Citation
The century book of the American revolution

Material Information

Title:
The century book of the American revolution the story of the pilgrimage of a party of young people to the battlefields of the American revolution
Alternate title:
Story of the pilgrimage of a party of young people to the battlefields of the American Revolution
Creator:
Brooks, Elbridge Streeter, 1846-1902
Depew, Chauncey M ( Chauncey Mitchell ), 1834-1928 ( Author of introduction )
Century Company ( Publisher )
De Vinne Press ( Printer )
Sons of the American Revolution -- Empire State Society
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
The Century Co.
Manufacturer:
De Vinne Press
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vii-x, [2], 249 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
War -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
War stories -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Storytelling -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
History -- Campaigns -- Juvenile fiction -- United States -- Revolution, 1775-1783 ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Juvenile fiction -- United States ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Atlantic States ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Travelogue storybooks -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Travelogue storybooks ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Pictorial cover.
General Note:
At head of title: Issued under the auspices of the Empire State Society of the Sons of the American revolution.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Elbridge S. Brooks, with an introduction by Chauncey M. Depew ; illustrated.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026609675 ( ALEPH )
ALG3151 ( NOTIS )
228677902 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

E20081201_AAAABJ.xml

UF00086589_00001.pdf

UF00086589_00001.txt

00006.txt

00265.txt

00199.txt

00206.txt

00026.txt

00047.txt

00080.txt

00058.txt

00105.txt

00060.txt

00054.txt

00092.txt

00233.txt

00051.txt

00177.txt

00231.txt

00263.txt

00252.txt

00055.txt

00061.txt

00153.txt

00162.txt

00137.txt

00205.txt

00253.txt

00183.txt

00067.txt

00142.txt

00181.txt

00237.txt

00037.txt

00262.txt

00033.txt

00215.txt

00100.txt

00224.txt

E20081201_AAAABJ_xml.txt

00096.txt

00145.txt

00108.txt

00174.txt

00062.txt

00002.txt

00112.txt

00146.txt

00243.txt

00076.txt

00057.txt

00148.txt

00182.txt

00158.txt

00087.txt

00066.txt

00186.txt

00073.txt

00075.txt

00194.txt

00127.txt

00235.txt

00027.txt

00063.txt

00114.txt

00221.txt

00091.txt

00071.txt

00120.txt

00059.txt

00223.txt

00136.txt

00259.txt

00150.txt

00042.txt

00012.txt

00201.txt

00156.txt

00125.txt

00023.txt

00167.txt

00039.txt

00218.txt

00122.txt

00258.txt

00163.txt

00255.txt

00256.txt

00133.txt

00210.txt

00072.txt

00081.txt

00020.txt

00038.txt

00213.txt

00250.txt

00188.txt

00179.txt

00193.txt

00151.txt

00101.txt

00011.txt

00238.txt

00190.txt

00160.txt

00034.txt

00010.txt

00083.txt

00157.txt

00143.txt

00024.txt

00110.txt

00093.txt

00117.txt

00247.txt

00234.txt

00152.txt

00184.txt

00022.txt

00204.txt

00119.txt

00189.txt

00168.txt

00111.txt

00154.txt

00248.txt

00207.txt

00019.txt

00203.txt

00251.txt

00126.txt

00135.txt

00172.txt

00191.txt

00170.txt

00220.txt

00246.txt

00169.txt

00070.txt

00032.txt

00138.txt

00068.txt

00241.txt

00107.txt

00217.txt

00128.txt

00140.txt

00212.txt

00064.txt

00008.txt

00035.txt

00095.txt

00200.txt

00264.txt

00271.txt

00090.txt

00196.txt

00016.txt

UF00086589_00001_pdf.txt

00222.txt

00116.txt

00118.txt

00103.txt

00208.txt

00166.txt

00197.txt

00017.txt

00139.txt

00178.txt

00097.txt

00050.txt

00121.txt

00085.txt

00195.txt

00018.txt

00227.txt

00098.txt

00209.txt

00113.txt

00052.txt

00144.txt

00084.txt

00069.txt

00245.txt

00134.txt

00239.txt

00088.txt

00187.txt

00240.txt

00029.txt

00257.txt

00175.txt

00226.txt

00272.txt

00074.txt

00254.txt

00249.txt

00132.txt

00077.txt

00219.txt

00041.txt

00236.txt

00053.txt

00164.txt

00198.txt

00229.txt

00104.txt

00185.txt

00115.txt

00078.txt

00149.txt

00141.txt

00131.txt

00021.txt

00028.txt

00216.txt

00031.txt

00009.txt

00230.txt

00046.txt

00147.txt

00044.txt

00013.txt

00228.txt

00001.txt

00109.txt

00225.txt

00099.txt

00102.txt

00180.txt

00040.txt

00129.txt

00094.txt

00159.txt

00014.txt

00086.txt

00242.txt

00232.txt

00130.txt

00049.txt

00079.txt

00048.txt

00165.txt

00211.txt

00123.txt

00065.txt

00261.txt

00106.txt

00214.txt

00015.txt

00056.txt

00192.txt

00045.txt

00161.txt

00171.txt

00176.txt

00173.txt

00202.txt

00030.txt

00244.txt

00089.txt

00082.txt

00155.txt

00273.txt

00036.txt

00124.txt

00260.txt

00043.txt

00025.txt

00003.txt


Full Text
a8
UY if THEY MER











att
















Seog







f SUS Ee Se bg



Otber books in the same series and by
the same autbor.

THE CENTURY BOOK
FOR YOUNG AMERICANS.

The Story of the Government.

Issued under the auspices
of the National Society of
the Sons of the American Revolution.

With introduction by
GENERAL HORACE PORTER,

President-General of the Society.
THE CENTURY BOOK

OF FAMOUS AMERICANS.

The Story of a Young People’s
Pilgrimage to Historic Homes.







Issued under the auspices
of the National Society of the
Daughters of the American Revolution.
With introduction by
Mrs. ADLAI E. STEVENSON,

President-General of the Society.





Uniform with this book in size and style. Each
containing 250 pages and nearly as many illus-
trations. Price of each, $1.50.

TE See



22S

=
:
:
:
a
:
:
a
:
t
=



























a
a

b
+





THE BATTLE OF LEXINGTON.

APRIL 19, 1775, FROM THE PAINTING BY HENRY SANDHAM, NOW IN THE CARY MEMORIAL BUILDING, LEXINGTON,

”

FOUGHT ‘*PATRIOT’S DAY,



ISSUED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE EMPIRE STATE SOCIETY
OF THE SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Ww CENTURY BOOK @l
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

THE STORY OF THE PILGRIMAGE OF A
PARTY OF YOUNG PEOPLE TO THE BATTLE-
FIELDS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

BERRIDGE = BROOKS

HE CENTUR YOUN
“THE eae ue ioe OK OF FAMOUS A anit CANS,” ‘°A BOY OF THE Est ae
‘HISTORIC BOYS,’ HILDREN’S LIVES OF GREAT MEN” SERIES, ETC.

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW

ILLUSTRATED



TRHEZEEN TUR. COs eNE VW VORK





Copyright, 1897, by The Century Co.

THE DeVINNE PRESS.











INTRODUCTION

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE EMPIRE STATE SOCIETY,
SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. NEW YorK, May 11, 1897.

A FEW years ago the suggestion was made to The Century Company by Mr.
John Winfield Scott, a member of the Executive Committee of the National Society
of the Sons of the American Revolution, appointed a committee of one for the
Executive Committee, that The Century Company should issue a book in which
should be set forth in a manner attractive to young people “the principles contended
for in the American Revolution, and a description of the institutions of the Govern-
ment.” The result of this suggestion was embodied in “The Century Book for
Young Americans,” the story of the trip of a party of young people to the city of
Washington, written by Elbridge S. Brooks and richly illustrated from the great
store of material which the publishers possessed. The book was issued in the autumn
of 1894, indorsed by the National Society, and with an introduction by General
Horace Porter, President-General. Its success has been great, both as a book for
children at home and for supplemental reading in schools, and in 1896 it was followed
by “The Century Book of Famous Americans,” written also by Mr. Brooks, telling
of the adventures of the same young people and their well-posted uncle on a journey
to the homes of historic Americans, Washington, Hamilton, Webster, Clay, Jefferson,
Franklin, Lincoln, Grant, and others. It was issued under the auspices of the
National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

The same publishers purpose offering to the public a volume in which the story
of the American Revolution, from Lexington to Yorktown, shall be told in such a
way as will interest young readers, and, at the same time, possess valuable informa-
tion for old as well as young in its descriptions of the historic scenes made famous
during the struggle of our forefathers for their independence. The book will have
a living and personal interest because it takes the form of a journey to each of these
historic places by the same party of young people and their guide. The illustrations,
which include many photographs taken especially for this book, will add both to the
attractiveness and the value of the work.

The Empire State Society of the Sons of the American Revolution is not respon-
sible for the statements in the book and has no pecuniary interest in its publication.

Individually, I take pleasure in commending the volume both in its scope and
execution. CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW,

President,

vii









































II

III

IV

VI

PAB r ORC ONTENS

IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS.

A Visit to Cambridge— Uncle Tom's Enthusiasm— Three Great Poets and
Three Historic Houses —A City of Memorials— From the Vikings to the Boys

in Blue— Uncle Tom's Suggestion—An Object-Lesson in America’s Revolu-

ON

tionary Story.

LEXINGTON COMMON 5

On the Road to Lexington— Changed Condition re the eerie Stone
Cannon— Lexington Village and Its Famous Common— The Story of the Fight
— The Monument— The Memorials and the Old Houses— Uncle Tom's Sum-
ming-up.

AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS

ON

How They Came to Concord—Dr. Prescott’s Ride— Where the Congress Met—

_ At Concord Fight— The Old Monument — The Statue of the Minute-man— The

Story of the Retreat— Dr. Hale’s Poem — Sites and Scenes in a Famous Old
Town.

BUNKER HILL

Climbing the Monument— The View oe the Top— Tracing the Base
—The Redoubt— Colonel Prescott — Warren and Putnam— The Story of the

. Assault— Victory or Defeat 2 — Webster's Oration — T. ie Tablet on Dorchester

Heights— The First American Victory.

In GREATER NEW YORK

Along the Shore Line— Historic Towns— The British Plan— Ticonderoga and
Quebec— In Old New York — The Battle of Long Island — The Great Retreat
— Harlem Heights and White Plains — The Fall of Fort Washington.



ALONG THE DELAWARE

Where Washington Crossed — The Wintry March — The Dash on Trenton — A
Turning Point in the War — Princeton's Battle-ground — In “The Lair of the

Tiger !”
ix

PAGE

17

35

DD

73

95



VII

VIII

IX

XI

XII

XII

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ON THE SCHUYLKILL AND THEREABOUTS :
By Brandywine Creek — Old-time Obstacles — The Fight at the Ford and on the
Hill — Where Lafayette was Wounded — The Chew House — The Street Fight
at Germantown — A Baffling Fog—At Valley Forge —An Olject-lesson in
Self-sacrifice— At Monmouth Court-house — The Monument at Freehold — A
Gallant Foeman.

Up THE HUDSON : Boe 4%
The Hudson as a Historic ns Gr eat Beacon- rie The Neutral
Ground —The Cow-Chase —Dobbs Ferry —André’s Fate— Stony Point—
Newburgh and West Point— Washington’s Noblest Deed.

PROMENADING WITH BURGOYNE . :
At the Springs— Burgoyne’s Promenade— Or aes and Bennington — vee
and Gates— The “Lone Tree” of Walloomsac— The Bennington Monument—
Across Country to Schuylerville— Freeman's Farms and Bemis Heights— The
Saratoga Monument— The Vacant Niche— The Surrender Spot.

FROM THE SEA TO THE SAND-HILLS .
By Sea to Savannah— Where the British Landed — The ‘Siege of Sane
A City of Monuments — Fascinating Charleston— The Defense of Fort Moultrie
— The Battle of Eutaw Springs.

AMONG THE CAROLINA HIGHLANDS :
The Balny Breezes of Camden — An Old-time Hill-town— The Battle of Camien
— Gates the Blunderer— The Deserted Village—De Kalb’s Monument— The
Hogback of Hobkirk’s Hitl— King’s Mountain and its Hero-story —A Monument
on a Fiilttop.

IN A REGION OF RIVERS :
From King’s Mountain to Cowpens— Why Cee ?— Morgan vs. Teas
The Old Monument—The Statue in Spartanburg— The Hornets’ Nest—A
Land of Liberty—A Splendid Battle-park— The Field of Guilford—A Most
Important Battle. .

ON THE HEIGHTS ABOVE YORK

The Sun on the Monument— After Guilford— Marion's opie Cornwallis at
Bay— The French Alliance— The Last Assault— The Surrender— Old York-
town — Home Again.

115

139

159

175

193

229



ie CON RORY BOOK Ol:
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



nt



“THE BROAD STONE SEAT OF THE LONGFELLOW MEMORIAL.”

In the distance is seen Craigie House, which was Washington’s headquarters and Longfellow’s home.



MibeCEN TUR BROOK
OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

CEE AE Real
IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS

A Visit to Cambridge—Uncle Tom’s Enthusiasm— Three Great Poets
and Three Historic Houses—A City of Memorials—From the Vikings
to the Boys in Blue—Uncle Tom's Suggestion—An Object-Lesson in
America’s Revolutionary Story.

BS eS HAT a spot this is, boys and girls!” Uncle Tom Dunlap
\ exclaimed, with an impressive sweep of the hand. ‘The
(| atmosphere is fairly charged with patriotism; the air throbs
with memories. I know of no spot in the whole country
that is more absolutely a center of American interest than
this old town of Cambridge. I know of none better calcu-
lated to make you young people proud of America and of what America has
done.”

Uncle Tom spoke with more than his customary enthusiasm, It was
evident that he felt all that he said.

He sat with his young people on the broad stone seat of the Longfellow
Memorial in the old college town of Cambridge in Massachusetts. It was
the same group of boys and girls that had gathered about him, as, on their
personally conducted trip to Washington, he helped them study the gov-
ernment of the United States of America in its own house and home; it
was the same group of eager young people that had taken, with him, the
tour of inspection among the homes of great and famous Americans.

Once again they had all met in Boston—Jack and Marian Dunlap,
their cousin, Albert Upham, and Marian’s “best friend,” Christine Bacon.
Uncle Tom Dunlap, as usual, had taken charge of them, and that morn-

I Tt









2 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

ing they had welcomed, at their hotel, their boy friend of the a z
Roger Densmore.

Their first trip had been to Cambridge.

“We did n’t see half enough when we were there before,” Bert com-
plained.

“That ’s so,” Roger admitted. ‘We ought to give more time to it.
There ’s lots to see there, you know; and besides, it’s a good place to
start from if you want to see more things. Is n’t that so, Uncle Tom?”

Uncle Tom emphatically indorsed this statement, and they were speed-
ily flying in “the electrics” through that wonderful piece of modern engi-
neering, the big underground “Subway,” out through Boston’s stately
Back Bay, and across the graceful Harvard Bridge, to what Uncle Tom
called ‘“‘the classic shades” of Cambridge.

Roger, as a prospective Harvard boy, had been their guide through
the beautiful University town; and even Jack, who was preparing for Yale,
and Bert, whose educational future still lay unsettled between Princeton,
Yale, and Cornell, were forced to admit that Harvard and its surroundings
were, as Jack declared with characteristic emphasis, “ Just great!”



ONE OF THE NEW GATES AT HARVARD.

Under Roger’s guidance they had “done” the colleges from the beauti-
ful gates to the dormitories and the “gym,” from Memorial Hall to the
Agassiz Museum, and from the Fogg Art Museum and the Library to the
tennis-courts on Jarvis Field, the “tree” in the quadrangle where the class-
day scramble is held, and—what especially interested the girls—the
rounded walls of Radcliffe.

From here, after reading the tablet under the decrepit Washington elm,



EN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS 3

they had wandered up Brattle Street, and, entering the green little park
known as the Longfellow Memorial, they had dropped upon its broad
granite seat to rest and look about them.



LEIF ERICSON, THE NORSEMAN.

This statue, by Miss Whitney, is located on Commonwealth Avenue, in Boston, just above
where that boulevard is crossed by Massachusetts Avenue, which extends for
nearly twenty miles to Lexington and Concord.

Then it was that Uncle Tom uttered his exclamation. So suggestive
was the spot that the boys and girls unconsciously echoed his sentiments ;
though Bert, ever ready with his query of investigation, tacked to his
appreciative “that ’s so!” his inevitable “but why?”

“Tl tell you why, Mr. Bert,” his uncle replied. ‘Stand up, all of you,
while I box the patriotic compass. Before you, if certain over-confident
antiquarians are to be believed, lie the beginnings of historic America.”

_ «What! over there in the swamp?” asked Jack.

“The marsh, if you please, sir,” corrected Roger. ‘The idea of calling

Longfellow’s beloved marshes a swamp!”



4 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“Yes, there, through its marshes, winds the historic Charles River,
upon whose banks, almost against the Cambridge Hospital yonder, Pro-
fessor Horsford claimed to have discovered the cellar of Leif Ericson’s
fish-house—the first stone house, so he declared, built by Europeans in
America, almost five hundred years before the caravels of Columbus tacked
across the ‘herring-pond.’”

“Leif Ericson!” exclaimed Marian. ‘Was n’t his the beautiful statue
we saw on Commonwealth Avenue?”

“ Ves,” Uncle Tom assented.

“Oh, but he’s just a ‘fake,’” Jack declared. ‘‘ My teacher said so.”

“You don’t really believe that story, do you, Uncle Tom?” queried
Bert, with a tinge of skepticism.

“TJ “ll discuss that question with you later, boys—say at Norumbega
Tower?” Uncle Tom replied, with a non-committal shrug.

“Oh! what ’s Norumbega Tower?” Christine asked, attracted by the
rhythm of the name.

“It’s a stone tower on the Charles River, ten miles above here,” Roger ex-
7 : -seeeea plained. “Professor Horsford put it up,
onthe very rocks which, so he said, were
part of the fort and city of Norumbega,
built by Leif Ericson the Norseman in
the year one thousand and one. It’s
an awfully nice place for a picnic, girls.
And the canoeing !—well, you must
just see it before you go home.”

‘“Which—the town or the canoe-
ing?” laughed Marian.

“Both,” replied Roger, gallantly,
“one is historic and you ’ll make the
other so.”

“And there we ‘ll have our dis-
cussion over Leif Ericson,” said Uncle
Tom. “Just now’I wish to consider
other things with you. Only, permit
me to remark, ladies and gentlemen,
the singular coincidence that places
Leif Ericson’s stone house here, on

NORUMBEGA TOWER. the Charles, within sight of the house
Erected on a knoll above the river. The tablet set in its face of the great poet who wrote ‘The

tells the whole story. A flight of stone steps within i 5°97
leads to the outlook on the top. Skeleton in Armor.





IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS 5



LONGFELLOW’S HOME AT CAMBRIDGE.

The famous Craigie House, used by Washington for his headquarters in Cambridge. The room on the right of the front
door was Washington’s office and Longfellow’s study. The chamber over it was the General’s bedroom.

“That ’s so!” cried Jack. ‘Perhaps that sad old sea-dog stood right
here where we stand to-day, and shouted

‘I am a viking bold!

My deeds, though manifold,

No skald in song has told,
No saga taught thee!

Take heed that in thy verse

Thou dost the tale rehearse,

Else dread a dead man’s curse —
For this I sought thee!’

Look out! Marian; he may be right behind you now,” and Jack ended
his quotation with so shrill a viking’s “‘skoal!” that Marian jumped aside in
terror, and everybody else laughed.

“Let the viking rest, Jack,” said Uncle Tom. “True or not, here is
the beginning of the story, and, perhaps, though scholars scoff at the idea,
the beginnings of the white man in America. Let me get on with my com-
pass. Behind you, rising above its tall green hedge, is Longfellow’s house,

r*



6 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

—a Mecca for Cambridge pilgrims. There he wrote ‘The Skeleton in
Armor’; there he wrote ‘Paul Revere’s Ride’; there he wrote ‘The Build-
ing of the Ship’—that splendid poem that drew tears from President Lin-
coln in the dreary war-days, and which, with its stirring closing lines, has
thrilled countless Americans for over forty years. And in that very house,
long before Longfellow was born, George WVcshington lived, when, here in
Cambridge, he ae command of the American army.”



















































LONGFELLOW’S STUDY.

Occupied by Washington as his military office. Behind it is the poet’s library, which was used
as a staff-room by General Washington.

“Under that big elm, you EnOuGy put in Roger, “that you saw in front
of Radcliffe College. They say it’s over three hundred years old.”

‘“What—the college?” said Jack.

“The.collevel” chee Marian, scornfully ; “the elm, of course. What
a goose you are, Jack Dunlap! Don’t you know the girls’ college is some-
thing new?”

“ Oh, is it?” said Jack. ‘I did n’t suppose there was anything new in
Cambridge. I thought the flavor of antiquity covered everything here,—



IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS 7

Leif Ericson, Washington, Radcliffe, and Harvard’s last base-ball victory
over Yale.”

Uncle Tom paid no attention to Jack’s rather flippant remarks, but took
up the thread of his broken discourse.

“To your right,” he said, “there, beyond the trees of the Common,
stood, until a few years ago, next to what is now the fine Law School
building, the old-fashioned, roomy, gambrel-roofed house where lived the
boy Oliver Wendell Holmes, who afterward wrote ‘Old Ironsides’ there.”

“Nail to the mast that tattered flag,
Set every threadbare sail,
And give her to the god of storms,
The lightning and the gale,”

spouted Jack.

“Only they did n't, you know,” said Roger. ‘The frigate Constitution
—‘Old Ironsides,’ as she was called—was built here in Boston, and is
scheduled to drop anchor this year at the Navy Yard, at the mouth of this
very Charles River.”

“Just think of it,” said Chris- _
tine, “what lots of things of that —
sort there are around Boston!”

“Why not? It’s the Hub of
the Universe—eh, Roger?” Jack
said, in what the Boston boy de-
clared to be “the regular New
York tone.”

“Well, right here is where the
American Revolution commenced,
so why is n't it the hub?” de-
manded Bert.

‘Why not?” was Uncle Tom’s
comment ‘And in. the ~old
Holmes house near the Law
School, of which I told you, the
Committee of Safety held its



meetings when the American Rev- STAIRWAY IN THE OLD HOLMES MANSION.
1 . . 2 an To the right, at the foot of the stairs, was the room in which the
olution was beginning. nNere, occupation of Bunker Hill was planned.

too, at the opening of the fight,
were held the first councils of war, for that home was the headquarters of
the first American commander-in-chief, General Artemas Ward.”



8 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“What! Artemus Ward, the funny man?” cried Jack. ‘Was he a
general in the Revolution?”

‘No, no, Jack; how mixed up you do get!” said Roger. ‘“ Why, my fa-
ther heard Artemus Ward
lecture; so he could n't
have been a general in
the Revolution.”

“That’s only a make-
believe name—what you
call a xom de plume,”
Bert explained? “Your
Artemus Ward, Jack, was
America’s first funny



man; his real name was
Browne. Uncle Tom’s
Artemas Ward was
America’s first major-



general—the command-
| er-in-chief before Wash-

ELMWOOD, THE HOME OF JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL. ington took command.

Here Benedict Arnold and his Connecticut Volunteers were quartered just after the Is nt that so U n cle
battle of Lexington. The house was used as a hospital after Bunker Hill. T >» 2
om:

“That ’s about it, Bert,” his uncle replied, with his smile of approval.

“Tt’s just another coincidence, the same as Longfellow and the viking’s
house, I suppose,” said Marian. ‘Goon, Uncle Tom; Jack does break
in so.”



“Over here to your left, across the tree-tops,” Uncle Tom went on,
“stands Elmwood, the house in which James Russell Lowell lived, and
where he wrote what, I think, is America’s noblest poem — his splendid
‘Commemoration Ode.’”

“Oh, yes, is n’t that fine!” said Christine. ‘Don’t you remember how
it ends? I had to learn those lines at school.

‘O Beautiful! my Country! ours once more!
Smoothing thy gold of war-disheveled hair
O’er such sweet brows as never other wore,

And letting thy set lips,

Freed from wrath’s pale eclipse,
The rosy edges of their smile lay bare,
What words divine of lover or of poet
Could tell our love and make thee know it,



IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS 9

Among the nations bright beyond compare?
What were our lives without thee?
What all our lives to save thee?

We reck not what we gave thee;
We will not dare to doubt thee,
But ask whatever else, and we will dare.’”

“Grand, is it not, boys and girls?” Uncle Tom exclaimed, baring his
head to that magnificent sentiment of the poet.

«And that ’s where Lowell wrote it— over there at Elmwood, is it?”
said Jack. ‘Seems to me there must be something in the Cambridge air
that just sets poetry a-sprouting; who knows what might happen if I should
come here to Harvard, eh, Roger?”

Jack a poet! The idea was so funny that they all fell to laughing, much
to Jack’s disgust. When they had sobered down, Uncle Tom went to
boxing his compass again.

“The Elmwood house is very much like Longfellow’s home, and has,
like Longfellow’s, a Revolutionary history. It was the mansion of Andrew
Oliver, the Tory Lieuten-
ant-Governor of Massachu-
setts, and it was mobbed
by the angry patriots be-
cause Oliver took charge of
the hated British stamps
that brought about the row.
After Oliver left the country
the house became the home
of Elbridge Gerry, one of
the signers of the Declara-
tion of Independence.”

“Well, well; Cambridge
was ‘right in it,’ from the
stare. was. ot. 1°? said

Jack.

“T told you it was a













THE WADSWORTH HOUSE.
center of American inter- Bui in 1726 for the president of the college. A British shell just grazed it, and

ests,” said Uncle Tom. Washington, who had ees it, removed to safer quarters in the Craigie House.
‘Now, just keep still for a moment, will you, and let me try to give you the
steps in American history that we can lay our fingers on, right here in Cam-
bridge-town. There, on the Charles, the Norsemen, so it is said (let us
grant, for the sake of historic steps, that they did), built the first house in





IO THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

America. In those college buildings, in Harvard Square, or in the older
ones that these have replaced, have gone to school men who built them-



NEIGHBORS ON “TORY ROW,” IN CAMBRIDGE, TALKING OVER THE TROUBLES.

selves and their memories into the history of the republic. Here met the
Provincial Congress, the Committee of Safety, and the council of war in
the days that precipitated the American Revolution. Yonder is the old
church whose organ-pipes the rebel soldiers melted into bullets for Bunker
Hill. Wadsworth House in the College yard, and the Longfellow house,
upon which we are looking, were both occupied by Washington when he
came here to Cambridge to organize revolution. Along Brattle Street, in-
cluding the Longfellow house, stood the fine old loyalist mansions that gave
the street its nickname of “Tory Row.” Under that old elm by Radcliffe,
General George Washington took command of the American army, and
upon the Common, beyond it, that army was drawn up for review. On that
Common, Roger showed you the sturdy young elm grown from a shoot of the
old elm and planted there in the centennial year of 1875. Close by the young
elm rises the tall monument, topped by a splendid soldier-figure, in memory
of the men of Cambridge who rallied to the defense of the flag in the Civil



IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS Il



THE WASHINGTON ELM.

Under this tree Washington took command of the American Army, July 3, 1775. Radcliffe College is on the right in
the picture. Cambridge Common, with the growing shoot from the old elm, is at the left.

War. Across the trees, overlooking all Cambridge, rises the imposing tower
of Memorial Hall, an honor in stone paid by the great University to all her
brave sons who fell in defense of the Union; and, just across the river,



Te THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

stretches the wide meadow upon which the college boys meet in the glori-
ous tussle for mastery in base-ball and foot-ball. It is called Soldiers’ Field,
a gift to the college, and perpetuating by its name, as does Memorial Hall,
the brave boys in blue who marched to defend what Americans in Cam-
bridge, a century before, first strove for and attained. Was I not right
when I told you the atmosphere hereabouts was charged with patriotism,
that it just throbbed with memories? And, of these memories, two stand
out above all others — the two so singularly linked by that old square, yel-
low house across the way, in which these two
men lived and labored for America, though
in such different fashion—Washington the
soldier, and Longfellow the poet; the man
whose sword and the man whose pen have
inscribed imperishable names in the history of
the republic that so loves and honors them.”
‘Somehow, Uncle Tom,” said Christine, just
a bit dreamily, as she leaned against the stone
coping of the Longfellow Memorial and looked
across the street to what had so long been the
poet’s home, “I keep thinking of what Long-
fellow himself wrote after he had stood, one
p morning, before Lowell’s gate at Elmwood.
PAUL REVERE. Does n't it fit both the great men who have
lived over the way, and the others, too, who
have made Cambridge famous? I wonder if I can remember the last
lines:



‘Sing to him, say to him, here at his gate,

Where the boughs of the stately elms are meeting,
Some one hath lingered to meditate

And send him unseen this friendly greeting ;

‘That many another hath done the same,

Though not by a sound was the silence broken;
The surest pledge of a deathless name

Is the silent homage of thoughts unspoken.’”

“That’s awfully nice, Christine, of course,” said Jack, while all the others
nodded approval, ‘only I call it rather rough on Uncle Tom, after he ’s
been spouting away here for half an hour.”

Christine colored up at Jack’s bit of sarcasm. ‘‘ You don’t understand
what I mean, Jack,” she said. ‘But Uncle Tom does,” and, with a con-



IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS 13

fident smile, she slipped her hand into that of their “guide, philosopher, and
friend,” as Bert loved to call his uncle.

As for that young gentleman, he was trying to dovetail history and
poetry into a fixed fact. For Longfellow’s name and Revolutionary sur-



OLD NORTH CHURCH, SALEM STREET, BOSTON.
From which, on the night of April 18, 1775, Revere’s signal-lights were hung. It is now
known as Christ Church. The spire is a new one, built since 1804. A tablet on
the front gives the story of the lanterns.

roundings had recalled to Bert’s mind the poet's stirring ballad of a certain
famous gallop that had set the fires of liberty ablaze.

“Let’s see, Uncle Tom; Paul Revere did n't ride through Cambridge,
did he?” Bert inquired.

“No, his route lay through Charlestown and Medford. But Cambridge
had its ‘fate-of-a-nation’ rider in William Dawes. He was Paul Revere's
double, and he set out for Concord even before Paul Revere started. Of
course,” continued Uncle Tom, ‘you know the story, and why Revere rode



14 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

with news. The people were restless; they were angry with the King of

England for his tyranny, and were ready to protest in something more than

words. The King’s men in Boston were watchful and active; they knew

the spirit of the people, and hastened to possess themselves of the war-stores
the people were gathering at different
points about Boston. Their spies were
abroad; they knew where the muni-
tions of war were stored; they set out
to destroy them. One _ expedition
cleared them out at Salem; another
successfully raided the old powder-
house at Winter Hill.”

“That old powder-house is. still
standing, you know,” broke in Roger.
“The city of Somerville has made a
public park of the hill on which it

‘ stands. I want you to see it before



”
you go.

“We must, Roger,” said Uncle
m. “Itis one of the few really Rev-

OLD POWDER-HOUSE, SOMERVILLE. To : Es y
Formerly a mill. Here in September, 1774, British olutionary relics left us hereabouts.
soldiers seized and carried off the colony’s Well the Committee of Safety was

)

store of powder.

sitting in Cambridge; a watch -was set
to keep an eye on the King’s men, and when William Dawes rode through
the little college town with word that the regulars were to march to Con-
cord next day to destroy the stores collected there, the minute-men gath-
ered, and from Cambridge and all the near-by towns marched toward Con-
cord to help save the powder and stores upon which their success depended.
Some of the men belonging to this section gathered here for their work,
and, as they straggled past the Holmes house, where, years after, the poet
was born, the Cambridge minister stood in the doorway and bade his neigh-
bors Godspeed on their errand. Next day—the historic nineteenth of
April, 1775—-came that famous fight.”

“Oh, Uncle Tom, can’t we go to Lexington and see where the battle was
fought?” cried Marian, full of enthusiasm to find herself so near the scene
of that world-renowned conflict.

“Why not?” said Uncle Tom. “I think it would be an excellent plan
for us to ridé to Lexington and Concord, to-morrow, and recall the story of
the fight on the very spot. What do you say, Roger?”

“I say yes,” Roger replied, catching the spirit of the suggestion. “If



IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS 15

you say so, I ll get a wagonette and we ’ll start from here bright and
early.”

“A patriotic picnic, eh?” said Jack. ‘I vote for it with both hands.”

The plan was unanimously agreed to. And so it came to pass that,
next day, Uncle Tom and his tourists, coming out from Boston after an
early breakfast, rode from Cambridge along the very road over which, so
many years before, the British red-coats had marched on their hostile
errand. For, as Uncle Tom said, there is nothing like getting the lay of
the land if you really wish to understand things; and, just then, there was
nothing his young people wished more to understand than just how things
looked on the village green at Lexington and that famous North Bridge
at Concord, where once

“the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world.”

Thus it was that the tour of the Revolutionary battle-fields was begun by
Uncle Tom Dunlap and his young Americans.









































































































































































































































































































ACROSS THE MARSHES.

View from the piazza of the Craigie House, looking south.





LEXINGTON COMMON.

To the left the road runs on toward Concord. The real battle-ground is further to the right, and there the later memorials stand.

The old battle monument is in the foreground.



Ci Artest)
ON LEXINGTON COMMON

On the Road to Lexington—Changed Condition of the Country— The Stone
Cannon—Lexington Village and Its Famous Common— The Story of
the Fight— The Monument— The Memorials and the Old Houses—
Uncle Tom’s Summing-up.







[Sai HE wagonette, with its freight of battlefield students, left the
f° %| college quarter of Cambridge on a glorious morning.

“What a day for a ride, and what a ride to take!”

was the composite remark of the five happy ones, as, with

ie Uncle Tom in the corner, and a driver who, though Cam-

: bridge-born and bred, knew little beyond his horses, they

drove by Wadsworth House, and past the old First Church and the
ancient mile-stone.

In the shadow of the Washington elm,—which, by the way, a certain

learned professor of American history says is no Washington elm—but

who will agree with him?—the horses turned to the tight and were
soon chasing the electrics up the wide thoroughfare of North Avenue to



(eS
esl

CO)






CY

FE
ey

?








Arlington.

Through that pleasant old town they rode, and were speedily on the
Concord turnpike, following the track taken by Dawes, the messenger of
danger, and by Smith, with his files of destroying red-coats, on that starlit
April night so many years before.

“Do you suppose it was much built up here in the days of the Revolu-
tion, Uncle Tom?” Marian inquired.

“Scarcely at all, my dear,” her uncle replied. “The highway from
Cambridge to Lexington Common ran then through farmlands, with but
an occasional house beside it. One hundred and twenty years in this
growing country make quite a difference in the looks of things, you know.
When the Revolution broke out, Arlington, which we have just left behind

2 17





18 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

us, was known as Menotomy; this section through which we are now
riding was called Cambridge Farms, and Lexington village was a collection
of a few houses, grouped about the meeting-house on the green, and with
a population, in village and outlying farms, of scarcely more than five hun- .
dred. To-day the town has a population of five thousand. This is why
it is hard, in this country, for the antiquarian to locate historic events.
The march of improvement and the growth of population have been so great
that old landmarks have been swept away; roads have been widened and
graded, hills leveled, valleys filled, streams obliterated, villages merged into
towns, and towns into Cities, and the whole face of the land so changed and
‘adapted’ that one who seeks to point out the exact spot where some
famous man was born, or some notable event occurred, has to draw upon
his imagination, and give the atmosphere rather than the exact surround-
ings. Pray bear that in mind, boys and girls, when we are trying to dis-
cover or replace the relics of our historic past.”

“But can you really call the battle of Lexington a battle, Uncle Tom?”
inquired Bert.

“In the strict military sense,” Uncle Tom replied, ‘it was not a battle ;
it was scarcely even a skirmish. A battle conveys the idea of military
manceuvers, of strategy, charge and countercharge, the shock of squadrons,
or the duels of artillerists. There were none of these at Lexington. In
the sense that Saratoga and Gettysburg, Waterloo and Sedan were battles,
Lexington, of course, is, as Jack would say, ‘not in it.”

“Very kind of you, Uncle Tom,” said Jack, with an air of injured inno-
cence, “to charge up all your convenient slang against me. But go ahead;
I’m not objecting.”

“ Lexington,” Uncle Tom resumed, with a wave of recognition toward
Jack, ‘was simply an ‘affair.’ It was an organized resistance to what was
considered an unlawful violation of the rights of English subjects — for the
colonies were English still; they were not in open nor armed rebellion.
Indeed, the records on both sides, after the fight at Lexington, are filled
with affidavits made by American and British participants in the affair,
alleging that no hostile move was intended, and that no open resistance was
made. You see, neither side wished to take the responsibility of saying
‘We began the war.’ The action of the minute-men was an armed protest
rather than a real battle. But its results were unparalleled by any battle
of ancient or modern times; for from it sprang the American Revolution,
and the American Revolution was the corner-stone of American nationality
and of the world’s progress in liberty.”

“Yes, I know,” said Bert; “I have read somewhere that Samuel Adams,



ON LEXINGTON COMMON 1g

when he heard the firing at Lexington, exclaimed: ‘This is a glorious
morning for America.’”

“Samuel Adams was a prophet, Bert,” Uncle Tom replied. “He
looked beyond the present; he read the future correctly; he knew the



a : a
KING’S CHAPEL, BOSTON,

In front of which Lord Percy’s reinforcement of British soldiers formed for the march to relieve their comrades at Lexington. ‘The chapel
was built in 1749. Some of the Colonial governors and other people of note in colony days are buried in the old cemetery adjoining.
temper of the people and saw that out of that conflict would spring, through
all the colonies, the determination to be free. That is why the country
through which we are riding and the town we are approaching are as

famous as Thermopylae, or Waterloo, or Sedan.”



20 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

So, with talk and laughter, with eyes open to see the beauty of the
rural landscape, and ears attentive to all the details of the day that made
the region famous, they rode to Lexington. The highway ran on past

DESTRUCTION or rox TEA um BOSTON HARBOUR.



From an old print.

stretches of green fields, patches of woodland, trim market-gardens, and
suburban estates, with here a modern house, and close beside it a patri-
archal relic of colony days.’

They drove slowly by every tablet set in fence or wall or house front
telling them that here such an event occurred or that there lived such an
one who participated in the fight, until, at last, they climbed the slope
where, before the temple-like High School building, a mounted cannon,
carved in stone, pointed toward the clustering houses of Lexington just
beyond.

“What is it—a petrified British battery?” queried Jack.

“Well, you ’re not so far out of the way, Jack,” Uncle Tom replied.
“That stone cannon marks the site of the British battery with which Lord .
Percy hoped to petrify the fighting colonists.”

“And did he?” asked Marian.

“Well, hardly,” exclaimed Roger, with pardonable pride.

“Go slow, my dear Boston boy,” said Uncle Tom. “I am afraid the
truth of history scarcely bears out your enthusiasm. If to petrify means to
check, the field-piece of Lord Percy, planted where the stone tablet stands



<< JON LEXINGTON COMMON 21

and on that hill-top over there, on ‘Percy Road’ across the way, certainly
did check the advance of the pursuing colonists as they drove the tired red-
coats through the village we are now entering.”

They found Lexington to be, as they rode through its main street, a
large and pleasant New England village —‘ quite citified,” Marian declared,
as she noted its brick blocks, its spacious and attractive houses, its modern
school and church buildings, and its signs of trade and life. There were
trees everywhere, whose leafy boughs cast a grateful shade upon the broad
street and the triangular plot of green before which the driver reined up
his horses and Uncle Tom bade them all alight.

“This, boys and girls,” he said, “is one of the most famous bits of turf
in all America —the battlefield of Lexington Common!”

Then, standing beside the pulpit-shaped monument of red granite that
marks the site of the old meeting-house, Uncle Tom briefly rehearsed the
story of the Lexington fight.

“You know how it all came about,” he said. ‘The tea had been thrown
overboard at that wharf we saw in Boston. There was trouble brewing. The
British were on the hunt for hidden war-supplies. Gage, the English com-



THE “TEA-PARTY” TABLET.

On the entrance to what is now Long Wharf, Boston. There the tea-ships Dartmouth, Eleanor, and Beaver lay, when their
cargoes of tea were thrown into the harbor.

mander at Boston, had sent out soldiers to collect or destroy the powder
and stores said to be gathered for war purposes by the colonists. Follow-
ing out this plan, he had sent troops to Concord, eighteen miles from Bos-

2*



22 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



THE HANCOCK-CLARK HOUSE, LEXINGTON.

‘It belonged to relatives of John Hancock, and there he and Adams were sleeping when roused and warned by Paul Revere.” ”
It is within sight from the boulder tablet. It was built in 1695, enlarged in 1734.

ton, where, he had been told, war supplies were stored. They were also to
arrest, on their way, those two persistent rebels and ringleaders, John
Hancock and Samuel Adams. By some means (it is said through the wife
of Gage, a New Jersey woman) the secret leaked out, the signal lanterns
were displayed in the North Church of Boston, and Paul Revere and Wil-
liam Dawes rode, by different roads, toward Concord, spreading the alarm.
On that very night of the eighteenth of April, Gage sent Colonel Smith
with eight hundred British soldiers on the errand of destruction. Boston
had no bridges, so the troops were ferried across the Charles River from
what is now the Public Garden or Arlington street to East Cambridge, then
called Lechmere Point. They marched across the marshes, and, striking
the Concord highway, where now stretches Massachusetts Avenue, passed
through North Cambridge, Arlington, and Lexington. Here where we
stand, by this pulpit-like monument and that elm-tree back of us (planted
by President Grant on the nineteenth of April, 1875), stood the old meeting-
house —a square, boxlike building facing down the street, up which, just
as we have come, marched Major Pitcairn and his six companies of light



ON LEXINGTON COMMON 23

infantry and marines sent in advance by Colonel Smith to clear the way,
_and, if possible, to arrest Hancock and Adams.”

“Where were they?” inquired Roger.

“In that house which you can just see on the Bedford road across the
railroad track,” Uncle Tom replied, pointing out the old Hancock-Clark
House. ‘It belonged to relatives of John Hancock, and there he and
Adams were sleeping when roused and warned by Paul Revere. They es-
caped to the woods,
though against
Hancock’s desires,
for he wished to
stay and face the
British. With them,
too, escaped young
Dorothy Quincy,
who afterwards be-
came Mrs. John
Hancock.”

‘‘Oh, was n’t she
the delightful ‘ Dor-
othy Q.’ of Holmes’s
poem?” exclaimed
Christine. “I re-
member he says of
her portrait :

‘Hold up the canvas full

in view —

Look! there ’s a rent the
light shines through,

Dark with a century’s
fringe of dust:

That was a Red-Coat’s PORTRAIT OF DOROTHY QUINCY (“DOROTHY Q.”)
rapier thrust!’ ” Showing injuries received from British bayonets during the Revolution.

“Ah no,” replied Uncle Tom, ‘that charming young lady —she was
young, you know, Christine,—

‘Grandmother’s mother; her age I guess,
Thirteen summers, or something less,’—

was aunt to the Dorothy Q. who married Hancock. They were captivating





24 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

young ladies, both of them; but really we must tear ourselves away from
them, for here comes Major Pitcairn ready to pop into us.

‘Lexington, as you know, had been warned of the coming of the regu-
lars by Paul Revere, and, at two o’clock in the morning, the bell of the
church, which hung, not in the church steeple,— for the church had no stee-
ple,— but in an odd kind of belfry built on the ground very near the church,
rang out the summons. The Lexington farmers (who were called minute-
men, because they were pledged to rally in case of danger ‘at a minute’s
notice’) hurried to the meeting-house, but as there were no signs of the
British the minute-men were dismissed. At half-past four news came of the
advance; the drum beat to arms; out of the Buckman Tavern,—that old
house by the elm-tree, just over the way,—and from other houses near by,
the minute-men came hurrying to the Common. Their leader was Captain
John Parker, a big, brave man. He drew his men in line right here,” and
Uncle Tom led his tourists to the big granite boulder ten rods to the right
of the meeting-house memorial. ‘He sent such of his men as had no am-
munition into the meeting-house where the powder was stored, and then he
said—what did he say, Marian?
Read what is carved on the
boulder, just beneath the mus-
ket and powder-horn.”

Then Marian read from the
carved boulder Captain Parker’s
words to the minute-men:
“«Stand your ground. Don’t
fire unless fired upon; but if
they mean to have a war, let it



begin here.’”
: ‘Here, then, they stood,”
THE BUCKMAN TAVERN. continued Uncle Tom, “ seventy

Rallying-place of the minute-men on the night before the battle

of Lexington and directly opposite the battle-field. Lexington farmers, against they

knew not how many British
soldiers, trained in the art of killing. Through the dim light of the early
morning came the red-coats. They halted near the meeting-house, and
Major Pitcairn rode toward the Americans. “‘Disperse, ye villains; ye
rebels, disperse!’ he commanded. But they would not.”
“Well, I guess not,” cried Jack, who was growing excited over the story.
“That was n’t what they were there for.”
“Pitcairn flourished his sword before the Americans,” Uncle Tom went
on, ‘‘and, I am sorry to say, swore at them, and added, ‘Lay down your



ON LEXINGTON COMMON 25



i

THE STONE BOULDER ON LEXINGTON COMMON.

Jonathan Harrington’s house is the one on the left. To the front door, seen in the picture, he dragged himself to die at
his wife’s feet.

*

arms, I say. Why don’t you lay down your arms and disperse?’ Still they
did not obey, and what he would have done next or just how he would have
made them disperse I cannot say. For, as I told you, the British had no
wish to begin hostilities, and Pitcairn really did not desire to fire upon the
rebels. But just then one of the minute-men,— probably a ‘fresh’ young
fellow, Jack, who was excited, heedless, and ‘worked’ up,—in disregard of
Captain Parker’s order, raised his gun and snapped it at the British.”

“Good for him!” cried Jack.

“What, against orders, Jack?” said Bert.

“T don’t care; I would have done it too,” Jack declared.

“Yes, I’m afraid you would, Jack,” his uncle assented with a significant
nod, and then added, ‘The gun, you know, was one of the old-fashioned flint-
lock muskets,— perhaps it was n’t loaded, perhaps the minute-man snapped
it ‘just for a bluff,’ as you boys say. At any rate the gun did not go off; but
the flint struck the steel and the powder flashed in the pan. A British
soldier saw the flash; he saw his major turn to give an order of some sort,



26 ' THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

and, just as much ‘rattled’ as the minute-man, he aimed and fired. A few
other British soldiers followed suit. But no one was injured, and the
Americans supposed the guns were loaded with blank cartridges and that
the whole affair was just a scare. But the British blood was aroused, and
though Pitcairn struck his staff into the ground as an order to desist firing,

his soldiers disregarded or did not qace end his command. With a eva
huzza they fired a general discharge. The musket-
balls plowed into the ‘rebel’ ranks. Jonas Parker
dropped to his knees; Ebenezer Munroe’s arm fell
helpless at his side; now one and now another of that
heroic band sank beneath British bullets; up the street
came the tramp of the main body of grenadiers,
marching to the support of their comrades. Eight
hundred against seventy was unequal odds. The
minute-men had done what they were assembled to
do: they had made their protest; and with a few
scattering shots in reply, the minute-men dispersed.’
The British, wreathed in the smoke of the deadly
volley they had just fired, let fly another broadside,



THE MEETING-HOUSE

BELFRY. gave a cheer of victory, and, wheeling about, marched
Built in 1761. It formerly stood on to Concord ek
on the common, but it is now ‘
on Belfry Hill opposite the The young people drew a deep breath as Uncle

Hancock school-house.

Tom concluded, and looked about them.

“And here it happened,” said Marian. ‘My, my, it does n’t seem possible!”

“Tt is sometimes hard to re-make surroundings,” said Uncle Tom. “In
this case, although the town has been filled with houses, the roads leveled,
and the Common made into a beautiful lawn, we can still look upon some
of the very witnesses of that famous fight. Among the relics in the Cary
Library, down the street, is the tongue of the very bell that rang out the
summons in the meeting-house belfry. On that hill, just beside the fine
Hancock school-house, stands that same queer old belfry. Right across
from us, on Monument Street, that house marked with a tablet is the
Marrett-Munroe house, toward which young Caleb Harrington was running
with powder from the church when he was shot down by the British. Into
the Buckman Tavern, over the way, the colonists bore their wounded, and,
to the left there, on Elm Avenue, at the corner of the Common, that house
with the tablet is the one to which Jonathan Harrington, shot down by
British bullets, dragged himself, only to die on the doorstep at his wife’s
feet. There are, in fact, of the forty houses that made up this village of

t See frontispiece, reproducing Sandham’s painting of the battle.



ON LEXINGTON COMMON 27

Lexington at the time of the battle, eight yet standing which were witnesses
of that famous fight. And yonder, on the western edge of the Common,
that gray and ivy-draped monument covers the bones of our first martyrs,
and is said to be the oldest memorial of the American Revolution in the
land. Let us walk around and inspect it.”

They did so, and on the rounded knoll upon which stands the old monu-
ment, surrounded by an iron fence and clothed in its coat of ‘“ ivy-green,”
the visitors studied the quaint old shaft which, with neither grace of con-
struction nor beauty of ornamentation, yet means more to Americans, and



ia

THE MARRETT-MUNROE HOUSE.

A witness of the fight. Opposite the monument on Lexington Common, and to the left of the battle-ground. Built in 1729.

even more to the world, than any of the world-famous memorials that tell of
historic happenings in the old Europe over the sea.

“This monument was erected in 1799— the year in which Washington
died,” Uncle Tom announced. ‘The bones of the martyrs were removed
here from the old burying-ground in 1835 and placed in a stone vault just
behind the monument. The inscription here on the front was written by
the Rey. Jonas Clark, who was the minister of the old meeting-house on
the Common at the time of the battle. It is as inspiring as it is quaint. -
Can you make it out, Bert?”



28 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Bert settled his glasses firmly on his nose, and, shading his eyes from
the sun, slowly read out the inscription on this, the oldest Revolutionary
monument in the country:

Sacred to the Liberty and the Rights of Mankind!!!
The Freedom and Independence of America,
Sealed and defended with the Blood of her Sons,

This ‘Monument is erected
By the inhabitants .of Lexington
Under the patronage ‘and at ‘the Expense of
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts
To the memory of their Fellow Citizens,
Ensign Robert Munroe, and Messrs. Jonas Parker,
Samuel Hadley, Jonathan Harrington, junr.,
Isaac Muzzey, Caleb Harrington and John Brown,
of Lexington, and Asabel Porter of Woburn,
Who fell on the Field, the First Victims to the
Sword of British Tyranny and Oppression
On the morning of the ever memorable
' Nineteenth of April, An. Dom. 1775.
The Die was Cast!!!
The Blood of these Martyrs
In the cause of God and their Country
Was the Cement of the Union of these States, then
Colonies, and gave the spring to the Spirit, Firmness
and Resolution of their Fellow Citizens.

They rose as one Man to revenge their Brethren’s
Blood, and at the Point of the Sword, to assert and
Defend their*native Rights,

They nobly dar’d to be free!!

The contest was long, bloody and affecting.
Righteous Heaven approved the solemn appeal,
Victory crowned their arms, and
The Peace, Liberty, and Independence of the United
States of America was their Glorious Reward.

“Whew!” said Jack, as Bert concluded. “But that ’s a long one, is n’t
it? I guess old Brother Clark thought folks had lots of time when he
made that up.”

“Oh, Jack, how can you say so?” Christine protested ; and Marian said,
“Why, I think it’s just splendid. It reads just as folks talked and wrote
a hundred years ago —all capitals and exclamation points and dignity.”

“Seems to me Marian’s just struck it, has n’t she?” said Roger. “That
old monument is a sample of the way people worked and talked when it was
built—solid and stilted, and yet, after all, simple and strong. I can’t help



ON LEXINGTON COMMON ' 29

thinking, though, that we do things better nowadays. While Bert was
reading I could n’t help comparing this inscription with the short but splen-
did one on Milmore’s grand Sphinx on Chapel Hill in Mount Auburn
Cemetery at Cambridge. I want you all to see that before you go away.



THE SPHINX, MOUNT AUBURN CEMETERY.

And all it says (in English on one side, Latin on the other) is: ‘American
Liberty Preserved, African Slavery Destroyed, by the Uprising of a great
People, by the Blood of Fallen Heroes.’

“That is grand; and it tells the whole story,” was Jack’s comment.

“Well, but I think this is fine,” declared Bert, his eyes still fixed on the
old vine-curtained battle monument. ‘It does n’t say too much; it tells
the whole story, and it gives the names of those who fell—we should n’t
remember them in any other way.”

“JT honor your loyalty to the old shaft, Bert,” said Uncle Tom, as he
signaled to their driver to bring the wagonette alongside. ‘‘It sits par-
ticularly well on you, for, did you but know it, eleven of your kinsmen stood
in the line of the seventy minute-men yonder where the musket-boulder
stands, refusing to disperse, ‘not being afraid of the King’s commandment’;
and to three of the names on this old monument you are related by ties of
blood. Not many American boys can make such a claim.”

Jack took off his hat as the girls climbed into the wag One, and made
a low bow to his cousin. eA fer you, sir; after you,’ "he said. “Age be-
fore beauty. I’m not sure but’so much noble lineage may overweight the



30 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION









THE BOSTON MASSACRE.

British troops fired upon Americans on King street (now State street) in Boston, March 5, 1770, killing five men and wounding six,
two of them mortally. The picture is a reproduction of a cut engraved by Paul Revere. The grave of the victims is in the
old Granary Burying-ground on Tremont street. Their monument (see page 33) stands on Boston Common.
carriage and make it one-sided. Don’t you think you’d better ride in front
with the driver, my noble son of the Revolution?”

But, for all his fun, Jack was just as proud of Bert's “heraldry of honor”
as any of the party, and made the most of his reflected light when boasting
of his cousin’s claim.

As they headed up the Concord road they all gave a last look at the
historic green they were leaving behind, and Bert, with his customary de-
sire to get down to facts, said, ‘Then oe Uncle Tom, is really the spot
where the Revolution began?”

‘Broadly speaking, it ecraialy’ is,” Uncle Tom replied. “As to the actual
first shot and first act of open resistance, however, there are as many claims
as there were colonies. I have always felt that Golden Hill in New York
City has as much claim to the credit of ‘first blood’ as the Boston Massacre,
where Crispus Attucks and his comrades fell, and which is commemorated
by that slate-pencil sort of monument on Boston Common; a certain North



ON LEXINGTON COMMON 31

Carolina village has the same claim; and, no doubt, some day we shall be
talking of putting up a monument to Sukey Carroll.”

‘‘Who under the sun was Sukey Carroll?” Marian inquired.

“Why,” replied Uncle Tom, “she was the Marblehead girl who sang
out to the British soldier who pointed a musket at her, when the King’s men
were searching Salem for arms: ‘Do you think I was born in the woods to
be scared by you, you lobster-back?’ Which was spirited, if not polite.”

“Was that what they called the British soldiers, — lobster-backs ?”
laughed Jack. “Did n’t that fit their red coats well, though? Good for
Sukey!”

‘“buteatter all)’ said. Uncle. Lom, “right here in Massachusetts the
American Revolution began. For when James Otis — that ‘flame of fire,’
as some one has called him — gave up his office of Advocate-General and,
in February, 1761, in that room that we saw in the old State House in Bos-
ton, argued the case of the people against the King, ‘then and there,’ as
John Adams declared, ‘ American Independence was born.’”

‘Oh, yes, I remember about Otis,” said Jack. ‘“He’s the patriot that
was sandbagged by Tories, was n’t he ?”

“Yes, and was killed by sunstroke the very year the Revolution suc-
ceeded,” said Marian.

‘‘T must show you his statue. It is in the chapel at Mount Auburn,
you know,” Roger reminded them.

“That ’s the man,” said Uncle Tom. ‘Well, from him and such fore-
runners of revolution as he, came the historic conflict itself, begun under the
elms of Lexington Common where we, to-day, have been re-reading the
story.”

“But I thought you said both sides denied their intent to fight,” said
Jack, ‘and that our forefathers took their ‘Alfred Davids,’ as that chap in
‘Our Mutual Friend’ called them, that the other side began it.”

“That is so, in fact,” replied Uncle Tom. “ Neither side had any desire
for a conflict. The colonists had no thought but to obtain their rights, and
were never more loud in loyalty to King George than after Lexington. In-
deed, Mr. Dana argues that not until the Declaration of Independence was
America in revolution. He insists that King George and his parliament
were, in fact, the revolutionists.”

“Well! that’s a new idea!” exclaimed Jack.

“But why?” queried Bert.

“They were going contrary to law, he claims,” explained Uncle Tom,
‘while the colonists were standing in defense of the law. But, for all that,
Lexington did open the ball, and the minute-men from these very farmlands



32 THE CENTURY. BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

through which we are now riding gave to the world a lesson in resistance
to tyranny that has stood from that day to this as a beacon-light of freedom.
I wonder if I can recall Holmes’s poem on Lexington. It is peculiarly apt
just here, on the field it immortalizes and in the neighborhood of the site
of the Cambridge house in which it was written.”

“Let ’s have it,” urged the boys. Marian said, “ Do repeat it;” while
Christine, with the glance that compels, silently echoed Marian’s request.

So Uncle Tom put on his thinking-cap, and, with but few slips and
stumbles, repeated three or four of Holmes’s stirring stanzas:

“Slowly the mist o’er the meadow was creeping,
Bright on the dewy buds glistened the sun,
When from his couch, while his children were sleeping,
Rose the bold rebel and shouldered his gun.
Waving her golden veil
Over the silent dale,
Blithe looked the morning on cottage and spire;
Hushed was his parting sigh,
While from his noble eye
Flashed the last sparkle of liberty’s fire.

“On the smooth green where the fresh leaf is springing
Calmly the first-born of glory have met;
Hark! the death-volley around them is ringing!
Look! with their life-blood the young grass is wet!
Faint is the feeble breath,
Murmuring low in death
‘Tell to our sons how their fathers have died;’
Nerveless the iron hand,
Raised for its native land,
Lies by the weapon that gleams at its side.

“ Over the hillsides the wild knell is tolling,
From their far hamlets the yeomanry come;
As through the storm-clouds the thunder-burst rolling,
Circles the beat of the mustering drum.
Fast on the soldier’s path
Darken the waves of wrath
Long have they gathered and loud shall they fall;
Red glares the musket’s flash,
Sharp rings the rifle’s crash
Blazing and clanging from thicket and wall.

“Green be the graves where her martyrs are lying!
Shroudless and tombless they sunk to their rest,
While o’er their ashes the starry fold flying
Wraps the proud eagle they roused from his nest.



ON .LEXINGTON COMMON



MEMORIAL OF THE BOSTON MASSACRE.

Monument by Kraus, on Boston Common just to the right of the subway on West street.

Borne on her Northern pine,
Long o’er the foaming brine,
Spread her broad banner to storm and to sun;
Heaven keep her ever free,
Wide as o’er land and sea
Floats the fair emblem her heroes have won

{”

“That ’s fine, is n’t it?” said Roger.
«Sounds like Scott’s ‘ Hail to the Chief’ song,” declared Bert.
3

33



34 THE CENTURY BOOK OF -THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“Got a dash and go to it that make you just tingle, has n’t it?” said
Jack.

“And beautiful, too — that about the martyrs,” said Christine.

‘“T think so, my dear,” said Uncle Tom; ‘and it is pleasant to know
that our secon leader and greatest martyr considered it Holmes’s finest
poem.”

‘Meaning Lincoln?” queried Bert.

“Ves,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘Noah Brooks, who was one of his secre-
taries, tells us that Lincoln could not read it through without a tremble in
his voice when he came to the line

‘Green be the graves where her martyrs are lying.’

Perhaps he felt in those verses a prophecy of his own end—a death that
was to carry him on in history as our greatest martyr in all the long years
that followed Lexington.”

Thus talking and commenting, amid fields and farms and woodlands,
and bright stretches of hill and vale, the boys and girls rode on to Concord,
where the second chapter in that famous story of our first Nineteenth of
April was written in smoke and blood so many years ago.

en

As a
Yili wim, |

7
AY

Cl a ze
if Mpc. eee

ooh Lid
tH Ap +h







CHARA 2 Revit
AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS

How They Came to Concord —Dr. Prescott’s Ride—Where the Congress
Met— At Concord Fight—The Old Monument—The Statue of the
Minute-man—The Story of the Retreat—Dr. Hale's Poem— Sites and
Scenes in a Famous Old Town.

pcoccoc,

fetes ERE the Lexington highway joins the old Bedford road
7} and both are merged into Lexington Street in Concord
B| town, Marian, with an eye for everything, spied an old
house, a stone wall, and an inscription.

“Oh, Uncle Tom!” she cried, pointing; “there ’s a
tablet in that stone wall. Let ’s stop and read it.”

For reply, Uncle Tom bade the driver touch up his horses.

“T’m your young Lochinvar, just now, Marian,” he declared. “You
know how it was with him —




‘He staid not for brake and he stopped not for stone.’

Neither for carriage-brake nor tablet-stone have we any use just now. I
propose to tell you nothing out of chronological order.”

“Then I rise to a point of order, Mr. Chairman,” said Jack, leaning out
of the carriage to look back. ‘What’s the matter with the stone?”

“Tt marks the line of retreat, Jack, and not of advance,” Uncle Tom
replied. “I propose that, instead of a wagonette-load of volatile young
end-of-the-century Americans, we become one colonial patriot on a fleet
horse — Dr. Samuel Prescott, galloping post-haste from Lexington bearing
the news of the night-march of the British.”

‘Who was Dr. Prescott?” asked Roger.

“A Concord man,” replied Uncle Tom, “kin to a certain Colonel Pres-

cott, of whom you will hear later. Well, we—Dr. Samuel Prescott, you
35



36 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

know — have had a hard gallop. But our horse is a fast one, and, by cut-
ting across lots, jumping fences, walls, and ditches, we have narrowly es-
caped the British scouts, and are now
riding into this quaint peace-named
town of Concord which nestles at the
foot of its sand-ridge and along the
banks of its pretty river. And re-
member we are galloping along a
street which to-day is one of the
most famous in America.”

“Why? Because of the battle?”
inquired Bert.

“No; no battle was fought just
on this piece of road,” Uncle Tom
replied. ‘But because, as we ride,
we are passing the homes of a most
remarkable group of American
writers and thinkers — Hawthorne,
Emerson, Thoreau, and the Alcotts.”

“Oh! did Miss Alcott live here
—on this street?” came the quick
inquiry from every admirer of the
famous “ Little Women.”

“Why, certainly, she—but there!
I am breaking my own rule,” Uncle
Tom declared. ‘We were not to be led aside from our historical sequence.
Presto! vanish all modern things. Disappear, Jo, Amy, Meg, and Beth!
We are Dr. Prescott, the colonial newsbearer, riding on matters of life and
death.”

So, beneath the elms that border Lexington street, they rode into Con-
cord town. Uncle Tom resisted all queries and cajolements designed to
lead him from his main purpose, and at last they drew up in front of a large
white church, set well back from the street and topped by a gilded dome.

“Who went to church here?” asked Jack, ‘‘ Washington or the Little
Women?”

“Read the tablet, Bert, while Dr. Samuel Prescott gets his breath,”
Uncle Tom suggested. ‘“ Here we are at the beginning of things.”

Bert adjusted his glasses and read the tablet that stands on the curb in
front of the broad church lawn. The others helped, by reading with him
in a sort of undertone chorus.



“WE HAVE HAD A HARD GALLOP.”



AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS 37



























































































































































































































































































CONCORD, FROM LEE’S HILL.

Lee was a Tory, and his house at the foot of this hill was used as a target by the minute-men.

FIRST PROVINCIAL CONGRESS
OF DELEGATES FROM THE TOWNS OF
MASSACHUSETTS
WAS CALLED BY CONVENTIONS OF
THE PEOPLE TO MEET AT CONCORD ON THE
ELEVENTH DAY OF OCTOBER, 1774.
THE DELEGATES ASSEMBLED HERE
IN THE MEETING HOUSE ON THAT DAY,
AND ORGANIZED
WITH JOHN HANCOCK AS PRESIDENT
AND BENJAMIN LINCOLN AS SECRETARY.
CALLED TOGETHER TO MAINTAIN
THE RIGHTS OF THE PEOPLE,
THIS CONGRESS
ASSUMED THE GOVERNMENT OF THE PROVINCE
AND BY ITS MEASURES PREPARED THE WAY
FOR THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION.

“Here, you see,” said Uncle Tom, as the reading of the tablet ended,
“is where the real trouble began. This provincial congress appointed a
committee of safety, advised the people to pay their taxes not to the King’s
officer but to the appointed colonial treasurer, and directed the towns to
double their stock of ammunition and store it up for the use of the colony in
case of armed resistance to the demands of King George of England.”

“ But had they the right to do that,” queried Bert.

a



38 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“Why not?” demanded Roger. “It was their ammunition. Had n't
they paid for the stuff?”
“But they were colonists,” persisted Bert. ‘They were subjects of

King George, and had no right to gather supplies to make war on him.”

“No right!” exclaimed Jack. ‘Well! I guess yes. They took the
right, anyhow.”

“It was a question of liberty of action and of self-defense,” said Uncle
Tom. ‘Whether or not, they really had the right as subjects of the King,
at any rate, as Jack says, they took it. That is why General Gage, the
British governor, sent out expeditions to hunt up, confiscate, or destroy
these colonial war-stores, and why, as you know, the grenadiers and ma-
rines were marching from Boston to Concord, where supplies were said
to be stored.

“But come! While we have been arguing as to rights, here stands Dr.
Prescott with tidings of approaching trouble.”

“T’ll bet he has n’t been standing idle,” said Jack. ‘The whole town
knows his news by this time.”

“True enough, they do,” Uncle Tom assented. ‘Already lights are
flashing out and bells are set a-ringing; the townsmen are aroused; mes-
sengers are sent Lexington-way, post-haste, for further tidings; the minute-
men are summoned for duty. Soon after daybreak the messengers come
galloping back, along the very road that
we have traveled, with tidings of the sun-
rise skirmish on Lexington Common and
the news that eight hundred red-coats are
well on their way to Concord.

“By this time, the minute-men of Acton
and of Lincoln, Concord’s next-door neigh-
bors, have reported for action, here, in
the square. There is a hurried consul-
tation. Emerson, the minister, who lives
in the old manse on the next street, is out-
spoken. ‘Let us stand our ground,’ he
says... Li we die letusdic: here. Others,



HIDING eben ine. however, hesitate, remembering that open
resistance means treason to the King. ‘It

will not do for us to begin the war,’ they say. So, wishing to do everything
properly, they decide to take post up on that hill, just back of us, and await
developments. More minute-men join them there. Up comes Colonel
Barrett from his home, on that hill yonder across the river, where he has



AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS 39

‘
oe)
mG

ae

rise
fo



THE ROAD TO THE BATTLE-GROUND.

“‘ Looking down a vista of tall and murmuring pines, they saw a sight they never forgot." This avenue runs from Monument
street to the Minute-man and then stops.

been hiding supplies and burying powder and shot. Silent but determined
they stand and wait, but only for a brief time; for at seven o'clock there
is a gleam of color on the Lexington road, and here, into the square where
we are standing, come the eight hundred British soldiers on the double
quick.”

‘Hey, now there ’s going to be trouble,” cried Jack, deeply interested.

‘No, not yet, Jack,” said Uncle Tom. ‘Colonel Barrett saw that he was
outnumbered. He withdrew from this hill, and marched down to the river
where a country road crossed the bridge and stretched away between the
farms. Then he took position on the hill slope beyond the bridge, hoping
for more help, and waiting the moment to act.

“But the British at once proceeded to business. Their first move was
to take possession of the two bridges that spanned the river,—the north
and the south,—and prevent the farmers from interfering with them. So,
while Smith and Pitcairn with part of the troops held the center of the town
and proceeded to smash things, six companies of light infantry marched on
and, turning yonder to the right, into what is now Monument street, just

Â¥



AO THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

beyond the town hall, they pushed on to the North Bridge. My fellow min-
ute-men, the lobster-backs are too many for us. Let us get to the bridge
before them and join our comrades on the hill.”

“What!” cried Jack; “retreat? Never!”

‘“Let’s not call it retreating, Jack,” said Roger. ‘“ We'll say that we re
marching rapidly in advance of the enemy.”

“That ’s exactly what we ’re doing, boys,” laughed Uncle Tom, as the
wagonette turned to the right, into Monument street. “ We ’ve simply got
to get there before them.”

A ride of perhaps half a mile past very new and very old houses carried
them across the railroad track to a sharp turn to the left. A signboard on
a tree said “Battle Ground, 1775”; and, looking down a vista of tall and
murmuring pines, they saw a sight they never forgot. It was the battlefield
of Concord.



THE OLD MONUMENT.

This view is from a point just in front of the Minute-man. The bridge is a copy of the historic old North Bridge over
which the fight was waged.

“Formerly,” Uncle Tom explained, ‘“ the road to Carlisle turned off
here instead of going forward as it does to-day. This bit of the old road
has been preserved and set apart as a memorial of the battle.”



AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS 4!

They drew up beside the old monument while Uncle Tom gave them
the lay of the land. .

“Here, you see, the Carlisle road crossed the river. The minute-men,
falling back from the hill, crossed the bridge and took station on that slope
just beyond. Here others joined them
—minute-men from Bedford and West-
ford, and Littleton, and Carlisle, and
Chelmsford,—about four hundred in all.
The British came down this road and
halted just above where we stand.
Some soldiers were hurried to the South
Bridge, some were sent off on a search
for war-stores, and about a hundred
were left to guard the North Bridge.
Meantime the soldiers left in the village
were unearthing and destroying a few
things. The smoke from their fire led
the Americans to suppose that the whole
village was to be destroyed. ‘Shall we
let them burn the town?’ they asked
each other. ‘Let us march into the
town for its defense,’ they said. Then
brave Captain Davis, of Acton, drew his
sword. ‘I have not a man that is afraid
to go. March!’ he said, and, together,
in double file, the minute-men and militia
marched down the slope toward the





bridge. THE OLD NORTH BRIDGE.
“They struck the Carlisle road; the

British, seeing them coming, began to rip up the bridge planking; the
Americans broke into a run; the British formed in line of battle here where
the old monument stands; the Americans halted and drew up in line at
the other end of the bridge, where the statue stands. Let us cross over
and join our comrades.”

They left the carriage in the shade of the pines, crossed the bridge, and
gathered beneath the impressive statue of the Minute-man.

“Only for an instant did the farmers and red-coats face each other in
silence,” Uncle Tom continued. ‘Then—bang! went a British musket;
bang! bang! went another and yet another. Two minute-men fell wounded.
Crack—crack—crack! broke a volley from the British. Captain Davis



42 . THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



ame ses std Labatt Beene

FRENCH’S STATUE OF THE MINUTE-MAN.

Upon the other face of the granite pedestal is cut the verse from Emerson.

fell dead across a great stone; another and another are down here where
we stand. England has begun the war.

“Major Buttrick, the leader of the minute-men, fairly leaps from the
ground in excitement. ‘Fire, fellow-soldiers! For God’s sake, fire!’ he
cries, and, his own. musket leading the fusillade, the first war-guns of the
American Revolution speak out their sharp defiance to the King. Again
and again the shots fly across the bridge. Two British soldiers fall dead;
seven are wounded. Then the firing ceases. The British turn and run
back, down Monument street, toward the town, and the victorious farmers
hold the little bridge they have so manfully defended.”

“Hooray!” cried Jack, waving his hat in energetic emphasis, as if he
were Major Buttrick himself.

“How long did it take?” asked Roger.

“Just two minutes,” replied Uncle Tom.

«Short and sweet,” was Jack’s comment.

“Tt was n’t really much of a fight, was it?” said Bert. ‘Justa bit of a
skirmish.”



AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS 43

“It was the act more than the action, Bert,” Uncle Tom declared. “It
meant resistance; it meant war and not peace—independence, not submis-
sion. The minute-men at Lexington had stood in silent protest; they
dispersed when once they had asserted their rights even in the face of
death. The minute-men of Concord gave back blow for blow; their guns
were the first declaration of independence. A skirmish? Yes, Bert. But
a skirmish that was indeed a battle, more eventful in the history of the
world, so Bancroft asserts, than were Agincourt and Blenheim. Come,
cross the bridge with me and read what it says on that old monument, built
on the very site of the British line of battle and dedicated in 1836, in the
presence of sixty survivors of that memorable day.”

























THE HOME OF RALPH WALDO EMERSON.
On the Lexington road. Partly destroyed by fire in 1873. Here Emerson died in 1882.

Marian read aloud, with the usual half-tone chorus of accompaniment,
the inscription on the eastern face of the weather-stained pedestal :

Here
On the rgth of April, 1775,
was made the first forcible resistance to
British Aggression.
On the opposite bank stood the American militia
Here stood the invading army,
and on this spot the first of the enemy fell
in the War of the Revolution,
which gave Independence to these United States.
In gratitude to God, and in the love of Freedom,
This monument was erected,
A. D. 1836.



44 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“Now cross again,” said Uncle Tom, and at his direction Christine
read the verse carved on the granite pedestal which supports French’s
splendid bronze figure of the brave-eyed young Minute-man—one hand
on his plow, the other grasping the ready musket:

“By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled,
Here once the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world.”



THE OLD MANSE,

Made famous by Hawthorne. It was from this house in a room on the right that Ralph Waldo Emerson’s grandfather, the
Rev. William Emerson, watched the fight.

‘Who wrote that, boys and girls?” asked Uncle Tom, and, as with
one voice, the five made answer, ‘“ Ralph Waldo Emerson.”

“Who lived in a square white house on Lexington street, half a mile or
more from here,” Uncle Tom added, with a nod of approval; ‘‘and who
used to spend a good many of his boyish days in that old house to the
left of us, among the trees, where his grandfather lived before him—a.
famous old house now, known all over the world?”

“Why?” asked Christine, “is it—is it—?”



AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS

“Ves, it is,” Uncle Tom re-
plied, “the Old Manse, made fa-
mous by Hawthorne.”

‘Oh, let ’s go right over there
and gather some mosses,” said
Marian.

“You can’t,” grumbled Jack.
“Tt says, ‘Private Grounds. Tres-
passing strictly prohibited.’ ”

“How mean!” came the dis-
approving verdict.

“Yes; there Hawthorne wrote
his ‘Mosses from an Old Manse’;
there Emerson wrote his essay,
‘Nature,’ and many of his best
poems; and there, from that upper
window, now nearly covered from
sight by its curtain of pines, the
grandfather of the man who wrote
the famous lines on the monument
watched the fight with the greatest
anxiety, fearful that his parishion-
ers—who, it is said, locked him in
to keep him out of danger— would
not return the British fire.”

“But they did,” said Jack,
pointing at the statue.

“What a beautiful statue!”
said Marian, looking up at the fine
but determined face.

‘What a splendid verse!” said
Christine, studying the pedestal.

“What a great day!” said
Bert, thrilled by all the action of
the time.

“Right you are, boys and
girls,” Uncle Tom assented.
«Here, indeed, is a remarkable
combination. As some one has

said of it, standing here as we do, »

SSS = Zi eter aa

THE OLD MANSE FROM THE RIVER.

45





46 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

and looking upon this statue of the Minute-man, ‘There are few towns
in the world that can furnish a poet, a sculptor, and an occasion.’ I think
that ‘sso, don tyou?,”

They lingered long in that beautiful spot. At their feet flowed the
river; above them towered the spirited Minute-man; before them stretched
the beautiful avenue of pines that frames the historic field. The rusty gray
obelisk that tells the story of the fight; the suggestive slab set in the stone
wall to mark the grave of the British soldiers who fell beneath the fire of the
defiant farmers; the bit of old road preserved only because of its historic as-
sociations; the place, the day, the delightful surroundings—everything held
and impressed them, and as they strolled along the avenue of pines to
where their carriage waited for them on the highway, Marian declared, en-
thusiastically, “Splendid! is n't it? It’s worth coming miles to see.” And
every boy and girl echoed the declaration.

Then they took a last look down the green and piny vista to where,
beyond the bridge, that farmer-boy in bronze stands sentinel beside his
plow, the guardian spirit of that famous field.

“«Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled, ’” Bert quoted, musingly. ‘Is
that really true, Uncle Tom? Did the minute-men carry a flag?”

“Why not?” asked Jack. ‘ What good is a battle without a flag ey

“Bert is a born investigator,” laughed Uncle Tom. ‘1 ’m afraid it sa
case of poetic license. So far as I can discover, no flag was carried by the
minute-men or displayed either at Lexington or Concord. The Nineteenth
of April, 1775, was a protest and not a parade. There was no military or-
der among these farmer-folk. It was a case of every man being a fighter
on his own hook. It began here at Concord, and ended only when the last
harried red-coats found safety under the guns of the English fleet at
Charlestown, twenty miles away.”

«That was a great retreat, was n’t it?” said Roger.

“Sort of a twenty-mile go-as-you-please, I guess,” said Jack. ‘“ How
was the start, Uncle Tom?”

“ Handicapped, Jack,” replied his uncle, falling in with the boy’s athletic
simile. ‘The British officers knew they had roused the country-side, and
when they had called in their men and started on the homeward march,
they were so certain it would be a running fight that Smith, the commander,
did everything he could to ward it off. He put ‘flankers’ up on that sand-
ridge to protect his line from the provincials, who, after the fight at the
bridge, struck across country over the ‘ Great Fields,’ as that pasture land
to the left is called. But where the ridge stops at the Old Bedford road,
the flankers on the hill were no longer of avail, and when the retreating





ON THE ROAD TO CONCORD.

«From all the country round the farmers came hurrying to the relief of their neighbors,””



48 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

British struck that point where we saw the tablet at the junction of the Bed-
ford and Lexington roads, their terrible troubles began. We ’Il drive up
there now and see the fight.”

‘Which way?” asked Roger.

‘Well, you see we can’t drive across the Great Fields with the minute-
men,” Uncle Tom replied; “so we ’ll have to play that we are the British
for a little while. Here we are, in the square. It ’s no use, Jack, we ’ve
simply got to retreat with the rest of them until we get to the cross-roads.
Then we ll become minute-men once more. Here is where it went on. For
nearly an hour the red-coats were marching and counter-marching, because,
you see, Colonel Smith, the British leader, was uncertain what to do. Then
came the order ‘About face! for Boston.’

“By this time the news had spread. From all the country round the
farmers came hurrying to the relief of their neighbors. Too late Smith
saw that he would have to run the gantlet for home.”

“Began to see the box he was in, did n't he?” said Jack.

“It was a box sure enough,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘The highway
stretched through Lexington to Charlestown and the sea. All along, it was.
flanked by stone walls or ran between hills. Behind these the Americans
were posted as if behind breastworks. Here where the sand-ridge is.
stopped by the old Bedford road, was the first exposed place, and here, as
I told you, the trouble began. This is Merriam’s Corner. Now, Marian,
you can give us the tablet you wished to read as we came riding into town.”

Marian stepped from the carriage, and standing before the tablet set
in the low stone wall, read it aloud:

THE BRITISH TROOPS
RETREATING FROM THE
OLD NORTH BRIDGE
WERE HERE ATTACKED IN FLANK
BY THE MEN OF CONCORD
AND NEIGHBORING TOWNS
AND DRIVEN UNDER A HOT FIRE
TO CHARLESTOWN

“That ’s literally true,” Uncle Tom remarked. ‘They were really
‘driven’ to Charlestown.”

“Under a hot fire?” queried Bert,

“Never hotter,” replied his uncle. ‘Here the Medford and Reading
minute-men joined their Concord brethren and began the stone-wall fight
that lasted for nearly twenty miles. On the Lincoln ridges the Woburn
men took a hand and Pitcairn lost his horse; before Lexington was reached



AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS 49



THE WRIGHT TAVERN.

Where Major Pitcairn vowed vengeance on the “rebels.” This house has suffered less change than any other building in Concord.

the men who had faced the British on the green that morning ‘pitched into
them.’ At Fiske’s Hill, just this side of Lexington, a hot fight took place,
and the British began to run in disorder. At Lexington village, near where
we saw the stone cannon on the hill, the reinforcements sent from Boston
under command of Lord Percy were met—twelve hundred men, with two
cannon. But when, after a rest, the homeward march was taken again,
numbers only increased the opportunity for good shots, and the enraged
farmers hung on the skirts of the retreat and harried the red-coats, as
hounds do the game, all along the road.”

“Poor fellows!” said Christine.

“What do you say poor for?” asked Jack, indignantly. “It served
them right. They had no business to be there.”

“But they could n’t help it, Jack,” said Christine. ‘They were ordered
to march to Concord.”

“Soldiers have to obey orders, Jack,” said Uncle Tom, ‘‘and those poor
red-coats found the trip uncomfortable enough without your added con-
demnation. As they lagged along under the hot April sun, foemen sprang
out upon them at all points. The British would whirl around and drive
away one force, only to be peppered at by another. It seemed, as one
British soldier declared, to ‘rain rebels.’ The tablets all along the road

between here and Charlestown record the story of that fearful retreat. It
4



50 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

cost King George nearly three hundred men out, of a force of eighteen
hundred, and the news, spread by swift riding from Maine to Georgia,
aroused thirteen colonies to action, and opened a seven years’ fight for
independence.”

“How many Americans were killed?” asked Bert.

“About fifty,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘They knew how to fight, you see.
They were hunters and could stalk the game. There is a poem by Edward
Everett Hale that you must hunt up and read when you get home. You
will find it-in his ‘Story of Massachusetts,’ and it is one of the most striking
pictures of that Nineteenth of April man-hunt that I know of.. It ends
something like this”—and beneath a spreading elm that cast long shad-
ows across the Lexington highway, Uncle Tom reproduced the picture that

Dr. Hale drew:

“Well, all would not die. ‘There were men good as new —
From Rumford, from Saugus, from towns far away,—
Who filled up quick and well, for each soldier that -fell,
And we drove them and drove them and drove them all day.
We knew, every one, it was war that begun,
When that morning’s march was only half done.

“In the hazy twilight, at the coming of night,
I crowded three buckshot and one bullet down.
*T was my last charge of lead, and I aimed her and said,
“Good luck to you, Lobsters, in old Boston Town.”



BACK FROM THE MAN-HUNT.

“Good luck to you, Lobsters, in old Boston Town.”

“In a barn at Milk Row, Ephraim Bates and Munroe,
And Baker and Abram and I made a bed;
We had mighty sore feet, and we ’d nothing to eat,
But we ’d driven the Red-coats; and Amos, he said:



AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS 51



THE JONES HOUSE.
Now generally known as the ‘“‘ Keyes House.” It is opposite the battle-ground, and the white spot near a window in the ell,
between two doors, marks a bullet-hole. Here too is the stone across which Captain Davis fell dead.

“¢Tt ’s the first time,’ said he, ‘that it ’s happened to me
To march to the sea by this road where we ’ve come;
But confound this whole day but we ’d all of us say
We ’d rather have spent it this way than to home.’”

“The hunt had begun with the dawn of the sun,
And night saw the wolf driven back to his den.
And never since then, in the memory of men,
Has the Old Bay State seen such a hunting again.”

“Well! it was a hunting of men, was n't it?” exclaimed Jack as the
wagonette turned and drove back to Concord.

“Tt seems so dreadful, though,” said Christine. “Think how many
families it broke up.”

“War is always dreadful, my dear,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘To-day we
see only the heroic side of the American Revolution, but for a generation
and more after Concord and Lexington, so old people have told me who
were children then, the subject was never talked of at home; it was all so
dreadful, they said.”

Then, talking over the day and what it meant to America and the
world, for all its tragic and sorrowful phases, they came at last to the
little hotel where they were to spend the night in Concord.



52 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

They were well repaid for thus lengthening their stay. For what a day
Uncle Tom gave them on the morrow !

Guided by him they walked about this “town of tablets,” as Marian
called it, deeply interested in all they saw. The citizens of the quaint old
town have put up memorial stones to mark almost everything of note that







THE WAYSIDE, AT CONCORD.

On Lexington road, the line of the British retreat. Here Hawthorne lived when he wrote ‘‘ Tanglewood Tales,” and
Miss Alcott when she was in her early ‘‘ teens,” before she lived in ‘‘ Orchard House.”

ever occurred there, while the historic houses, the literary shrines, and the
beautiful surroundings of Concord made a lasting impression on these re-
ceptive young minds.

They visited the houses of historic interest; they saw the British bullet-
mark in the ell of the rambling old Jones house; they touched the very
stone across which brave Captain Davis fell dead; they stood within the
identical Wright Tavern, in which Pitcairn, fuming at the “obstinacy” of the
“rebels,” stirred his toddy with a bloody finger and vowed vengeance; they
lingered before the tall gate-posts at the entrance of the Old Manse made
famous by Hawthorne; they worshiped in clamorous admiration before the
house which had been the home of Hawthorne and, later, the scene of the



AMONG THE EMBATTLED: FARMERS : 53

early exploits of the “Little Women.” They saw the house in which that
charming story had been written; they looked upon the home of Emerson,
and followed the footsteps of Thoreau; they canoed up and down the beau-
tiful Concord River; they rode to Fairyland and to Walden Pond and added,
each, a stone to the memorial pile on the spot where once had stood Thor-
eau’s hermit hut; they visited the library and the antiquarian rooms, filled
with memorials of famous folks from the days of the Puritans to those of
John Brown.

And, last of all, they stood on that remarkable knoll in beautiful Sleepy
Hollow Cemetery and looked upon that little cluster of graves, almost within
touch of each other, where lie the remains of Emerson and Hawthorne
and Thoreau and the two Alcotts,—father and daughter,—as grand a
group of worthies as can be found thus brought together anywhere outside
of Westminster Abbey.

Then they rode back, along the historic highway, following the British
retreat quite to Charlestown neck, through Lexington and Arlington and
Somerville — a road fairly peppered, as Jack declared, with memorial tablets
and historic houses, eloquent reminders of that ever famous Nineteenth of
April, 1775.

At Sullivan Square they dismissed their carriage and took the electrics
into Boston — saturated, so Bert affirmed, with facts and sights of one of
the most famous episodes in the world’s story of liberty, and of that eventful
day that gave birth to American freedom.































































































































































































































































WALDEN POND.










Mm

rr Ise ee ee























7.
‘









































































\ Or II I CoOL Leno rir)

IT







a

Beg Be se
OO CES Tre

pede NSP ty



























FEES EES aS RES SR SS



i, wrth ft

ER’s HO

BUNK

On

K

TAC

AT

ney CHARLES TOWN

?



Vy:

mi



€

of

Br

G








I¢





¢





Ci AEE Realy.

ON BUNKER HILL

Climbing the Monument—The View from the Top— Tracing the Battle-
ground — The Redoubt— Colonel Prescott— Warren and Putnam—
The Story of the Assault — Victory or Defeat? — Webster's Oration —
The Tablet on Dorchester Heights — The First American Victory.

HOW many?” panted Marian, poised on the topmost step;
“JT lost count.”

“Two hundred and ninety-two, two hundred and ninety-
three, two hundred and ninety-four!” counted Bert, a good
second in the race.

“Dear me! are we at the top at last?” said Christine. ‘Where ’s
Uncle Tom?”

‘“Coming, coming, my dear,” a voice replied from the depths. ‘This
tells on flesh, and thirty-six does n’t spring up two hundred and twenty-one
feet as easily as nimble fifteen.”

“Are we really two hundred and twenty-one feet from the ground?”
said Marian. ‘“ My, what a view!”

They stood at last, together, within the little circular chamber, pierced
with four barred windows — the top of Bunker Hill Monument.

The day was clear and bright. Sea and shore alike stood free of haze
or mist, and far to the west, beyond the ridge of Monadnock, they traced
the filmy outline of Kearsarge, the high New Hampshire mountain, a good
ninety miles away.

Uncle Tom had put all other plans aside.

“Tt is an ideal day for the monument,” he said.

And indeed it was.

“Two hundred and twenty-one feet seems short, alongside of the Wash-

ington Monument’s five hundred,” said Jack. “And yet it seems as high.”
55



le
g
i
7
'
4
ye
e



56 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“That ’s because there ’s no elevator here,” said Marian, still breathing
hard from her race up the last turn.

“There was an elevator here once, many years ago,” Uncle Tom in-
formed them. “But it was a crude, cramped, unsafe affair, and after it had
fallen once, and nearly killed its passengers, it was given up, and now
visitors have to trust to ‘Shanks’s mare.’”

Christine and Roger were already at the east window, drinking in the
superb ocean view. Bert was studying out the inscription on the bursted
memorial cannon hung up on the wall, while Jack was wondering how
under the sun they could have rigged an elevator to slide up and down that
narrow central cavity.

Uncle Tom called them about him and slowly made the circuit from
window to window. .

‘No other place in all the world,” so he told them, “unless it be the
Acropolis at Athens, so clearly discloses the real panorama of a battle re-
gion. It is almost as if we were taking a bird’s-eye view from a balloon.
See! to the east is the sea!”

“Ts n't it glorious!” cried Marian, a great lover of salt water.

‘Over that stretch of blue, and here into Boston Harbor, came the British
fleet to discharge its cargo of red-coats for the subjugation of America.”

“Only they did n’t subjugate,” put in Jack.

‘In this narrower stretch of the Charles River, just below us, six Biitish
men-of-war were moored with guns trained on these rebel heights. South
of us is Boston-town, without bridges then, and small indeed compared with
its bulk to-day; but it was the very hotbed of rebellion; working toward
the west we see Dorchester and Cambridge, Arlington, Somerville, and
Medford, until we get around here to the Mystic, flowing down to join the
Charles. To the North, across the Mystic, lie Malden and Everett, Chelsea,
Revere, and Lynn. And that rocky cape-like piece running into the sea is
famous Nahant, where Longfellow and Agassiz and Sumner and other great
Bostonians made their summer home. Across that long ridge—bhere out
of the west window—lie Lexington and Concord. So, you see, we are
indeed at the very center of revolutionary beginnings.”

“Is n't it down there that Paul Revere stood waiting for the signal?”
asked Christine, pointing to the river's edge.

“Yes, we can see him if we look out here through the south window,”
said Uncle Tom. “See, that little clump of trees just across the river is
Copp’s Hill burying-ground—the site of a British battery, and the tall spire
beside it is the old North Church where the signal lanterns were hung.
There! they are flashing out the news, and at once, galloping past us up



ad

Main street, just at the
Charlestown and So-
and Arlington, Revere
tidings of the British
the west window, you
turns past East Cam-
called Lechmere’s Point.
under Smith and Pit-
march to Lexington.
Further up the river,
where the Roxbury
road ran across. the

ON

BUNKER HILL








oy:

foot of this hill, through
merville and Medford
spurs on, spreading the
march. Here, through
can see where the Charles
bridge —then it was
There the 800 British
cairn gathered for their



BUNKER HILL MONUMENT, CHARLESTOWN.

A hollow shaft, 30 feet square at the base and 221 feet high, built after designs by Horatio Green-
ough and Solomon Willard. The corner stone.was laid by Lafayette, June 17, 1825. The
monument was dedicated June 17, 1843, Daniel Webster being the orator.

narrow neck of land, marched Lord Percy and his 1200 reinforcements.
And through this western window you ‘can almost trace the line of retreat
which we followed the other day, along which, from Concord to Charles-

town, raced the British rout.”

‘Where ’s Sudbury, Uncle Tom?” Christine asked.

“Don’t you know

that ’s where the landlord lived, in the Wayside Inn?



58 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

‘And over there, no longer bright,
Though glimmering with a latent light,
Was hung the sword his grandsire bore
In the rebellious days of yore
Down there at Concord, in the fight.’”

‘“ Sudbury is over Concord way, across those hills, through the west win-
dow,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘The Wayside Inn is standing yet and in fine
condition; we ’ll try to get over there some day and visit it. Don’t you re-
member what the poet said about the landlord’s grandfather as he looked on
the sword?

‘Your ancestor who bore this sword
As Colonel of the Volunteers,
Mounted upon his old gray mare,
Seen here and theré and everywhere,
To me a grander shape appears
Than old Sir William, or what not,
Clanking about in foreign lands,
With iron gauntlets on his hands
And on his head an iron pot.’

That ’s my case exactly. I see more real heroism in these Minute-men
and Militia Volunteers of Lexington, and Concord, and Bunker Hill, and get
more real inspiration from them than from all the Battles of the Spears





















































































































































——
ALL ABOARD FOR AMERICA!

Troop-ships leaving Portsmouth Harbor, England, for the ‘‘ subjugation” of America.
e

and of the Standards and what not, in the days that Cervantes, in ‘Don
Quixote’, laughed to death.”

“Lexington, you say, was an ‘affair’; Concord was a ‘skirmish’; was
Bunker Hill really a battle?” asked Roger.

fy



ON BUNKER HILL 59

“Let ’s go down-stairs and see,” Uncle Tom replied. “We ’Il fight it
over again on its own ground.”

With a final look at the wonderful panorama of land and sea, caught
through the four windows of that tall gray shaft, the party clattered down
the two hundred and ninety-four stone steps and stood at last upon all that
is left of the little elevation first known as Russell’s Pasture (when it was
the scene of war), afterwards as Breed’s Hill and now forever famous under
its mistaken name of Bunker Hill.

Uncle Tom briefly reminded them of the causes that led to the fortifica-
tion of this height by the Americans; how the farmers of New England had
surrounded Boston-town, after Lexington and Concord had stirred them
to action, with a cordon of rude little forts and earthworks extending in
a wide semicircle from Dorchester Heights to Chelsea; how they had
thus shut up the British in Boston,—sixteen thousand Yankee farmers hold-
ing ten thousand disciplined British troops at bay; how the Committee of
Safety sitting at Cambridge decided that.a good fort on Bunker Hill would
keep the British ships from sailing up the Charles or the Mystic; how they
sent twelve hundred men to fortify it, and how, after looking over the
ground, the soldiers decided to first throw up a redoubt on the lower height,
nearer the river. He told them how the soldiers worked all night un-
noticed by the British, who, when they awoke on the morning of the seven-
teenth of June, and saw what the “rebels” had been at, proceeded to
attempt to dislodge them.

“Bunker Hill Monument,” said Uncle Tom, “stands just about in the
center of the little fort, or redoubt, as it is called, which inclosed in an
irregular rectangle something over seventeen thousand square feet of land.”

‘“ About how much is that, Uncle Tom?” Marian asked, with a rather
hazy idea of figures.

‘How much land is there in your house lot at home?” asked Uncle
‘Tom.

Marian looked at Jack.

“It’s twenty-five by one hundred,” he replied, answering her query.

“Then the fort on Bunker Hill occupied about as much land as seven

New York City house lots,” said Uncle Tom. ‘The ramparts were about
six feet high, with a narrow ditch at their base. See! here is a stone tablet
marking the southeast corner of the redoubt; here”— and he led them
along the asphalt walk an hundred feet or so—‘‘is the stone that marks

the northeast corner. Then it stretched back there toward Concord street,
and at the south end over a defended entrance or sally-port. Here, to the
north, as this tablet tells you, ran an outer or protecting breastwork three



60 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

oom
WLLL



STATUE OF COLONEL WILLIAM PRESCOTT.
He commanded the redoubt on Bunker Hill. The statue stands just
in front of Bunker Hill Monument.

hundred feet, until it ended in a muddy bog where no one could wade.
Across from this corner, as this tablet tells you”— and Uncle Tom led them
along the path to the northern corner —‘“ was to run another protecting
breastwork to guard the rear. There was no time to build one, so Knowl-
ton, of Connecticut, extended a rail-fence to the river, put up another
parallel to it, and filled in between with new-mown hay to within about
six hundred feet of this point. A similar fence ran out on the opposite



ON BUNKER HILL 61

side. It took a thousand men all night to finish this well-planned fortifica-
tion. At sunrise it was scarcely done. But the British then discovered it
and prepared to assault it.”

‘‘Who commanded the Americans?” inquired Bert.



STATUE OF GENERAL JOSEPH WARREN.

Now in the relic room of Bunker Hill Monument.

For answer, Uncle Tom led them to the southern front of the monument
where stands the bronze statue of Colonel William Prescott —a strong and
spirited figure.

“That was the hero of Bunker Hill,” he said, “the fearless commander
within the redoubt— related by blood to that Dr. Samuel Prescott who,
you remember, rode post-haste to Concord.”

“JT thought Warren was the leader,” said Bert.

‘‘ That was his statue inside the monument office, was n’t it?”

“Yes,” Uncle Tom replied; ‘‘but Warren was only a volunteer, acting
under orders at the battle, even though he was president of the provincial
congress and a major-general.”



62 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“ But he was a hero,” insisted Bert.

“Most assuredly,” his uncle replied. “When Elbridge Gerry, at Cam-
bridge, begged him not to go into the fight, he replied quietly, ‘Dulce e¢
decorum est pro patria mort’ ; which means — what, Bert?”

“It is sweet and becoming to die for one’s country,” replied the student
Bert.
“Ves,” replied Uncle Tom; ‘and when he reached Bunker Hill he
asked General Putnam, who directed there, to put him where he could be
most useful. Putnam suggested this fort here on Russell’s Pasture, and
Warren, although appointed a major-general that day by Congress, refused
to take the command offered him from Colonel Prescott, but said: ‘I come
as a volunteer with my musket to serve under you.’ A very brave, courte-
ous and lovable man was Doctor and General Joseph Warren.”

“Putnam was brave too, was n’t he?” asked Roger.

“As brave and impetuous as when he faced the wolf in its den,” Uncle
Tom answered. ‘Bunker Hill—the height beyond this, you know — was
his strong point. He held, and rightly, that the fortification on this slope
was of no benefit unless protected by a redoubt on Bunker Hill. He began,
in fact, to throw up earthworks there, but he had not men enough nor time
enough to complete them. For, before he could fairly get to work, the
battle was joined. You know the story of the fight, of course.”

“Ves; but tell it to us, Uncle Tom,” said Marian.

“That ’s so, right here where it was really fought,” Jack chimed in.

“A few words should tell it,” said Uncle Tom, ‘The British landed over
there, where you see the Navy Yard buildings. The sun shone brightly ;
the day was hot; Prescott, a magnificent figure, walked calmly among his
men, cautioning them to go slow and reserve their fire until the word came.
At the rail fence Putnam held command. He, too, encouraged his men, told
them that every shot must count, and ordered them not to fire until they
could see the whites of their enemies’ eyes.”

‘‘George! that was pretty close range, was n't it?” said Jack.

‘How horrible!” sighed Christine.

“Tt had to be, my dear. War is no child’s-play. It zs horrible,” said
Uncle Tom. “The British soldiers, marching as if on parade, came solidly
against the American entrenchments. The right wing, led by General
Howe, headed for the rail fence; the left wing, commanded by General
Pigott, advanced toward the redoubt. The Americans, standing on the
little platform that brought their guns to the level of the rampart, waited
quietly. The British fired as they marched; but they aimed too high.
The Americans covered each his man. Then, when their foemen were dan-



ON BUNKER HILL 63

gerously near,
came the word
of command:


















Fire | The
muskets held
by farmers

and marksmen
spoke with
deadly effect.
At the rail
fence Howe’s
red - coats «
staggered,
recover-
ed and
then



j
broke —
repulsed. Be-
fore the re-
doubt, here on
the hill, the British fell under the
‘murderous fire; their line broke,
swayed, turned and retreated down
the hill. Again the red ranks re-
form; again they march against rail
fence and redoubt, only again to be
met by that murderous fire, and to
stagger down the slope, where now
their dead and wounded lie strewn
in confusion. The farmers of New
England have stood like their own
PLAYING AT WAR. granite against the veteran troops
“ snow forts, boys.’ ‘It’s great sport.’” 5 . .
“Then it was a victory, Uncle

Tom,” cried Jack. ‘I always said it






64 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

was. I’ve played it lots of times on snow forts, boys. It’s great sport.
You can just send the British kiting back every time. I always said it was.
a victory for us.”

“Wait, wait, Jack; the end is not yet,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘It was a
victory thus far. But now Prescott’s men look troubled even in the midst







NN Wily . *
VS CaN
AYA




=
ae

2 Pa
5 I SY, Sai +
SS “remo a Py
5 h My HY)
Cad a WO

\

ON THE SLOPE OF BUNKER HILL.

“**Don’t waste a kernel,’ said Prescott, ‘make every shot tell.’”

of their hurrahs. Their ammunition has given out. Only a few artillery
cartridges for the almost useless cannon are on hand. Prescott has them
torn open and the powder distributed, almost grain by grain, among the
musket-men. ‘ Don’t waste a kernel,’ he says; ‘make every shot tell.’”

‘“And they did, I'll bet,” said Jack.

“They did, but to little avail,” his uncle replied. ‘Howe was angered
at his double repulse and put all his efforts into carrying the redoubt by
storm. His red-coats surged up the hill; once more came the farmers’



ON BUNKER HILL 6

Un

deadly fire, but not with the strength or volume of the earlier broadsides.
There came no second discharge. The British swarmed over the breast-
work; clubbed muskets, bare bayonets, paving-stones confronted them. It
was a bloody hand-to-hand conflict. Then, the Americans turned and re-
treated toward Bunker Hill, where Putnam, who had withdrawn his men
from the rail fence, hoped to rally them. Over there, in the middle of
Concord street, Warren fell—the American Revolution’s first notable vic-
tim. The British artillery swung around in flank, opened a galling fire on
the fugitives, and the retreat, turning into a rout, surged down the hillsides
and over toward the camp at Cambridge. Had reinforcements or ammu-
nition been forthcoming, the day might have been crowned with success.”

“Then it was a defeat,” sighed Bert.

“Really it was, because the British gained and held the hill,” Uncle
Tom replied. ‘But in moral effect, in its influence on the Americans who
now saw that they could stand their ground against British troops, and
equally in its influence on the English commanders, who never after at-
tempted to carry by storm an American earthwork, Bunker Hill was a vic-
tory, and is so held and celebrated by us. Gage lost eleven hundred out
of twenty-five hundred men, and lost besides his power and command; for
when the news of the battle reached England, the man who was so palpably
outgeneralled by ‘a parcel of Yankee farmers’ was recalled, and his com-
mand given into other hands.”

“ How many Americans were killed, Uncle Tom, ?” asked Roger.

“One hundred and forty,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘Their names all ap-
pear on those great bronze tablets yonder in Winthrop Park, where we will
go after we leave the hill.”

They went there shortly, but first they made one more circle of the his-
toric hill, following the lines of the redoubt. They stood on the spot where
the brave Warren fell, in front of what is now No. 32 Concord street.
They inspected all the pictures and relics in the little monument museum—
the statue of Warren—the timber from the wreck of the Somerset, the
British man-of-war whose marines set the town of Charlestown on fire —
General Putnam’s sword — Major Worthen’s gun and cartridge-box, and
the memorials of Daniel Webster, whose splendid orations at the begin-
ning and the completion of the monument on Bunker Hill are now a part of
the literature of America.

Then, with a last look at Prescott’s martial figure guarding the base of
the tall gray shaft, they went down from the hill, and, at the entrance to
Winthrop Park, read with deepest interest the names of the officers and

men who fell in this famous Battle of Bunker Hill.
5



66 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

y
4

Ft

TT tae



THE BUNKER HILL TABLETS.

At the entrance to Winthrop Park, Charlestown. Bunker Hill Monument in the distance. These bronze tablets, erected by
the city of Boston, give brief details of the battle and lists of the killed.

As he read the line from Daniel Webster that stands at the bottom of
one of the tall tablets (“The blood of our fathers—let it not have been
shed in vain”), Jack backed away toward the soldiers’ monument, and look-
ing up the vista between the twin tablets where the tall shaft topped the
green hill, he pointed at the monument, and broke out into those splendid
words of Webster that so many school-boys have learned and spoken.

“The powerful speaker stands motionless before us. It is a plain shaft. It bears no inscrip-
tions, fronting to the rising sun, from which the future antiquarians shall wipe the dust. Nor does
the rising sun cause tones of music to issue from its summit. But at the rising of the sun and
in the setting of the sun, in the blaze of noonday and beneath the milder effulgence of lunar light,
it looks, it speaks, it acts to the full comprehension of every American mind and the awakening
of glowing enthusiasm in every American heart. Its silent, but awful utterance ; its deep pathos,
as it brings to our contemplation the seventeenth of June, 1775, and the consequences which
have resulted to us, to our country, and to the world from the events of that day, and which we
know must rain influence on mankind to the end of time; the elevation with which it raises us
high above the ordinary feeling of life surpass all that the study of the closet or even the
inspiration of genius can produce,”

“Fine, fine indeed,” cried Uncle Tom, appreciatively, while the others
“gave the palm” to Jack’s oratorical powers. ‘‘ Now let us have the com-



ON BUNKER HILL 67

pletion of that same Webster oration, Jack, and then I think we can leave
the Bunker Hill Monument duly impressed and benefited. Begin with the
last paragraph, you know.”

And Jack, nothing loth,—he did dearly love to “spout” on occasion,—
gave the desired peroration:

“ And when we and our children shall all have been consigned to the house appointed for all
living, may love of country and pride of country glow with equal fervor among those to whom
our names and blood shall have descended. And then, when honored and decrepit age shall lean
against the base of this monument, and troops of ingenuous youth shall be gathered round it, and
when the one shall speak to the other of its objects, the purposes of its construction, and the great
and glorious events with which it is connected— there shall rise from every youthful breast the
ejaculation — ‘Thank God! —I also —am an American!’”

Then they left the monument and the tablets and rode into Boston.
That afternoon they boarded a City Point “electric” at Post-office Square
and swinging about past the rising walls of the great Southern Depot and
amid the railroad and shipping centers of the south side, they crossed the
Federal street bridge and whizzed through Broadway, the wide main street
of South Boston. As they rode along, Uncle Tom, who had informed his
young people that he was now about to take them to the closing scene in
the Revolutionary siege of Boston, told them that Bunker Hill was really
one of America’s turning-points.

“The battle settled things in one way especially,” he said. “It proved
to the world that America meant war, and that there was possible no peace-
able solution of the problem which England’s obstinacy had raised. Though
a defeat, it had given the colonies courage and backbone. As Webster said
of it, the fearful crisis was past. The appeal now lay to the sword; and the
only question was whether the spirit and resources of the people would hold
out till the object was accomplished. Washington, as he rode northward
from Philadelphia on his way to the old elm at Cambridge, met a messenger
carrying to Congress the news of Bunker Hill. To his inquiries the mes-
senger answered that the provincials retreated only because of lack of am-
munition. ‘Did they stand the fire of the regulars?’ Washington asked
anxiously. ‘That they did,’ said the messenger, ‘and held their own fire in
reserve until the enemy was within eight rods.’ Washington appeared re-
lieved. ‘Then,’ said he to his companions, ‘the liberties of the country are
safe.’ To him, the fearless stand of the New England militia meant material
for soldiers — just what he was at that time most anxious about.”

“Was he commander-in-chief then?” asked Roger.

“Yes, he was chosen on the fifteenth of June, 1775, just two days before



68 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

the battle of Bunker Hill,” Uncle Tom replied, ‘and at once he set out for
the camp at Cambridge. On the second of July he reached the town and
made his headquarters first in Wadsworth house, which I showed you
fronting Harvard Square on the college grounds, and shortly after in the
big square colonial house on Brattle street, now dear to all the world as



WASHINGTON AND THE MESSENGER FROM BUNKER HILL.

‘¢ «Did they stand the fire of the regulars?’ Washington asked anxiously.”

the home of Longfellow. On the next day —the,third of July —he took
-command of the army, standing beneath the old elm in whose broken
shadow you also stood, against Radcliffe College near to Cambridge Com-
mon. All summer and winter he was striving to put his motley army of
ten thousand constantly changing men into some sort of military shape.
He drew the line of siege closer and closer about the British in Boston.
But when spring came he knew that he must do something. He prepared
to attack the British inside their lines, and, as the first movement, occupied
and fortified the high land here in South Boston, then known as Dorches-
ter Heights. Let us go and see the exact spot.”

A ride of twenty-five minutes brought them to the corner of H street,
where, leaving the car, they passed down Broadway so that Uncle Tom



ON BUNKER HILL 69

might show them the broad and breezily elevated building made famous
by the marvelous life-stories of Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller—the
Perkins Institution for the Blind, the first “blind school” in America.

“It is almost on the slopes of Dorchester Heights, you see,” Uncle
Tom explained, ‘‘and is thus doubly a notable landmark. See, we turn
here from Broadway into G street. We are now assaulting another slope
quite as high and fully as historic as Bunker Hill.”

Where G street swept around a circular knoll of green, Uncle Tom
crossed the street and led his young people through the open gateway.

“This slope,” he said, “is a part of what was formerly known as Dor-
chester Heights. It is now Thomas Park, so named in memory of John
Thomas, one of the best and bravest of our early Revolutionary generals.”

“Never heard of him,” said Jack, sprinting up the asphalt slope. ‘ Did
you, Roger?”

And the Boston boy was forced to confess that the name was new to him.

‘‘Is n’t there something about John Thomas in Thackeray?” queried
Christine, who was just beginning to enjoy the great English humorist.



PERKINS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND.

Standing near to Dorchester Heights on Broadway and G streets in South Boston.

«Tut, tut! Christine,” Uncle Tom corrected. ‘You are almost as bad
as Jack —”
“Come; I like that!” cried Jack, breaking a stride in half, by way of

protest.
5



7O THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“IT mean that Artemus Ward query of yours in Cambridge,” Uncle
Tom explained. “To far too many of this generation Artemas Ward is
only, as Jack said, America’s funny man, and John Thomas means Thack-
eray’s English flunky. Instead, to Americans, those names should stand
for the two leading generals in the early American
army, before George Washington took command
here at Boston. To General John Thomas was due
the wonderfully rapid and effective fortifying, by
Washington’s order, of this rise of land called Dor-
chester Heights. There were several heights here-
abouts then, you know, and they commanded the
beleaguered city, as you can readily see.”

They did see this at once, as they stood on the

oe sere BUNKER crest of the hill, beside the fence that separates the

old reservoir basin from the green park. Before

them stretched the chain of treeless islands that dot the broad, blue

harbor; beyond them lay the town, within easy cannon-range, and Bert

declared that he really could n’t see what under the sun the British were
thinking of, to allow the Americans to get in ahead of them.

‘Why did n’t they seize and occupy this height?” he asked.

“Too slow in action, I imagine,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘Howe, who
succeeded Gage as British commander in Boston, did have the idea, but
he failed to carry it out. Washington saw the wisdom of it soon after he
got the lay of the land, and a part of his plan of assault was to have this
hill complete the circle of his fortifications. So he sent General Thomas
here with twelve hundred men one March night in 1776, and under cover of
a friendly fog the earthworks were well thrown up by daylight, just on a
line with where this tablet stands. Read what it says there, Marian.”

And Marian, standing before the squat, unlovely memorial stone, read:



Location of the
American Redoubts
on
Dorchester Heights
Which compelled the Evacuation
of Boston by the British Army
March 17, 1776

“T can just see how it did, can’t you?” said Roger. ‘Look here!
It’s in a direct line with the State-House dome on Beacon Hill.”

‘Howe appreciated the fact, too,” Uncle Tom told them. ‘He in-
stantly prepared to attack the new redoubt.”



ON BUNKER HILL 71





TABLET MARKING LINE OF REDOUBTS ON DORCHESTER HEIGHTS.
Now Thomas Park, South Boston.

“How? the same as he did Bunker Hill?” asked Jack.

“Perhaps,” Uncle Tom replied; “though I doubt if that style of assault
would have been tried again. Buta March storm came on and spoiled his
plans, and that night, upon due consideration, he and his officers deter-
mined to evacuate the town. Washington had outgeneraled him. General
Thomas pushed forward his work and made a strong fort here, but before it
was finished the British army, amounting to nearly nine thousand men,
accompanied by over a thousand Tory refugees, embarked with supplies and
luggage on seventy-eight vessels, and sailed away to Halifax. This was on
Sunday, the seventeenth of March, 1776. From that day Boston was free.”

‘Hurrah for us, and good riddance to them!” cried Jack. ‘Why don’t
we put up a decent-sized monument here?”

‘Probably something better than this crude stone-yard slab will some
day rise on this height,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘Indeed, certain public-
spirited folk are already agitating the matter of a suitable monument on
what they call the spot that marks the first American victory.”

‘Was it the first?” inquired Marian.

‘Why, yes, it must be so,” said Bert. ‘Don’t you see we really were
defeated on Bunker Hill. These fortifications drove the British off. Is n’t
that so, Uncle Tom?”



p2. THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“That ’s about it,” his uncle replied; ‘‘and no doubt the growing wave of
Revolutionary remembrance will some day land a shaft on this sightly spot.

“Of one thing you may be sure, boys and girls,” Uncle Tom told them,
as they descended the hill and took the cars back to the center of town:
“in this land of tablets, as this section of the old Bay State appears to be,
the memorial will not long be lacking that shall indicate the spot where the
guiding hand of Washington first showed its masterly grasp, and added to
the protest of exon and the defiance of Bunker Hill the stern and
compelling measures of Dorchester Heights.”



BOSTON FROM DORCHESTER HEIGHTS.

From an old drawing made by Governor Pownall.



CEA ik ay:
IN GREATER NEW YORK

Along the Shore Line— Historic Towns —The British Plan— Ticonderoga
and Quebec—In Old New York—The Battle of Long Island —The
Great Retreat— Harlem Heights and White Plains —The Fall of
fort Washington.

FEW days later, while on the way to New York, Uncle
Tom drew the attention of his young companions to the
fact that, along the way, were numerous towns that possessed
a stirring Revolutionary record.

“Newport, just off our route,” he said, ‘was for three
years occupied by the British, and, later, was the rendezvous for our French
allies; Stonington, through which we passed, was attacked by the British
early in the war; New London and Groton, its opposite neighbor, suffered
terribly, as that tall monument on the hill will tell you; New Haven, Fair-
field and Norwalk all showed marks of British invasions, in fire, shot, and
sword. In fact, not one of the thirteen colonies lacks its Revolutionary rec-
ord. From Maine to Georgia, from Portland to Savannah, you can study
the record and the relics of those dreadful days of war. For in every col-
ony the desire for independence followed fast upon the uprising of the
Massachusetts minute-men, and the British plan to divide the colonies by
distinct but related invasions laid the touch of war upon every section.” __

“How do you mean?” queried Bert. ‘Did they try to split them



apart?”

«That was their plan,” replied his uncle. ‘Orders went out from the
English councils to occupy, overrun, and terrorize each section separately,
cutting off the eastern from the middle and the middle from the southern
colonies. That was England’s intent; if her generals in America had
been spry enough it might have succeeded.”

“But we had Washington,” said Roger.
73



74 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

STATUE OF ETHAN ALLEN.

By Larkin G. Mead. Placed in Statuary Hall in the Capitol
at Washington, by the State of Vermont, in
honor of its heroic leader.



“Yes, and he was more than a
match for England’s lazy leaders — he
and Nathanael Greene,” Uncle Tom
assented. ‘ You see, in these days of
railroads, steamboats, and bridges, one
cannot imagine this land without those

* modern conveniences. But your great-

great-grandfathers had to get along
without them. So rivers and mountain
ridges kept people separate and at
home; and in war, the possession of
river fords and mountain passes was

_ the key to every military situation.”

“That ’s so,” said Jack. “If they
could n’t wade the rivers or cross the
mountains, they could n’t get any-
where or do anything.”

“Exactly; communication means
union, and this the British aimed to
prevent. See here’—and Uncle Tom,
with his blue pencil, hastily sketched
on his folded newspaper a rough out-
line map of the colonies.

“Here to the north,” he said, “is
the St. Lawrence; here, almost at
right angles to it, is the Hudson —
they bounded New England north and
west; further down, the Delaware and
its tributaries cut away up into middle
New York and its chain of lakes;
Chesapeake Bay and its feeders break
the Pennsylvania ridges; while, from
Virginia to Georgia, the rivers seam
the land from the sea beach to the
hills. It was the British plan to con-
trol these rivers. The St. Lawrence

they held by the occupation of Canada—a section which never shared the
sentiment of independence. Ethan Allen’s capture of Fort Ticonderoga —”
“In the name of the Great Jehovah and the Continental Congress!”

put in Jack.



IN GREATER NEW YORK 75

Uncle Tom smiled.

‘Do you know what he is said to have said, Jack?” he asked.

“Why, I have said what he is said to have said. What else is he said
to have said?” Jack demanded, in what Bert called “his reiterative protest.”

“Oh, Uncle Tom! Did n't Ethan Allen roll out those splendid words?”
cried Marian. .

“Perhaps,” her uncle answered. “But old Vermonters tell us that
when the impetuous Allen, at the head of his ninety followers, roused the
surprised commander at night, he called out to that gentleman roughly :
‘Here! come out of that, you old rascal, and give us the fort, quick, or
we ‘ll smoke you out like rats!’”

“Oh, I just won’t believe that,”
Marian declared. ‘It does n’t sound
half as nice.”

“T should n’t wonder, though,”
Jack decided, with a nod of approval.
“Those Green Mountain boys were
rough-and-ready fellows.”

“They got the fort, anyhow,” said
Roger.
: “Yes, and its capture brought into
prominence a brave man who after-
ward went wrong,” Uncle Tom added.

“| know,” said Christine. ‘“ Bene-
dict Arnold.”

“The traitor!” cried Jack, lunging
_at the supposed renegade a vindictive
dagger-thrust with his fountain-pen.

_ Qh, but was he brave?” asked
Marian. ‘I thought he was every-
thing bad.”

“His great crime must not blind
our eyes to his great courage,” Uncle
Tom replied. ‘Benedict Arnold is
one of the world’s terrible examples of OLD ST. JOHN’S GATE, QUEBEC.

a man of great possibilities wrecked Near here, Montgomery fell.
by his inability to conquer himself.”

“But, talking of conquest,” said Bert, ‘Quebec was n’t much in that
line, was it, Uncle Tom?”

‘No, it was a sad failure,” Uncle Tom answered, “although the march

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ao



WH

a

a







































































































































































































































DRAWN BY E. H. BLASHFIELD ENGRAVED BY J. H. E. WHITNEY.

“*CAN THE YANKEES GET QUEBEC?’”



IN GREATER NEW YORK 77.

of the Americans terrified the Canadians and set all the beleaguered town to
asking, ‘Can the Yankees get Quebec?’ As a matter of fact, Washington’s
plans were excellent, but the obstacles in the way were almost insurmount-
able. Arnold’s march through the Maine woods was a series of fearful
hardships; Ethan Allen, over-hasty as usual, ‘got rattled,’ as you boys say,
in an attempt to capture Montreal on his own hook, and, instead, was cap-
tured himself; Schuyler, an able general, was taken sick and had to give up
the lead, and only Montgomery and his thousand men safely crossed the
border and captured Montreal. Hurrying toward Quebec with but three
hundred men, he found Arnold and his remnant beneath the heights of
the city, and there a thousand bedraggled Americans attempted to storm the
strongest fortress in America garrisoned by two thousand British soldiers.
Leading a forlorn hope, Montgomery, in the teeth of a wintry Canadian
northeaster, stormed one of the barriers and fell dead. Arnold, leading
another forlorn hope against another barrier, had almost carried it when he
fell wounded. A sortie of the British streamed out of the gates, one half
of the Americans were captured, and the invasion of Canada ended in sorry
defeat before the walls of Quebec.”

“That was a shame!” cried Jack, pounding Bert’s knee emphatically.

‘Perhaps'not,” his uncle replied. “Through failure we learn the way to
success. Out of this Canadian defeat came the caution, the patience, and
the knowledge when and how to strike, that developed Washington into a
great commander, and led the way to the final act at Yorktown.”

“But all this has led us away from your map, Uncle Tom,” said Bert,
never forgetful of starting-points.

‘That ’s so,” said Roger; “what about the rivers?”

“The British held the St. Lawrence and were sure of Canada,” said
Uncle Tom, returning to his blue pencil and his outline map. ‘“ Thereafter,
the American Revolution became a series of struggles for the possession of
the Hudson, the Delaware, and the rivers of the South. We are all to be in
New York for a while; suppose we sandwich a little patriotism between your
days of pleasure, and take a look at the places made famous by this struggle
for the Hudson and for the Delaware ‘in the times. that tried men’s souls’
here in America, when George the Third was king. What say you?”

And Jack, beating time, led off the company in an “under-the-breath”

chorus of
“So say we all of us;

So say we all.”

The “ patriotic picnic,” as the children, adopting Jack’s convenient phrase,
persisted in calling their search for Revolutionary reminders, gave them



78 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

many pleasant outings in and about the metropolitan city. While Uncle,
Tom went at it systematically, he was too wise a cicerone to weary his
young comrades by too much sight-seeing along one particular line. A
day here, a day there, interspersed with other occupations, gradually covered
the ground, and gave his “picnickers” an excellent idea of the Revolutionary
operations in and around New York.

Taking an early Sunday-morning stroll, long before church hours, about
that section of lower Broadway so busily crowded at all other times in the
week, he brought the boys and girls to what he called the initial letter in
New York’s Revolutionary chapter. It was the tall building of red brick
known as Number One, Broadway.

Uncle Tom pointed out the bronze tablet set in the front wall by the
Society of the Sons of the Revolution. At once, as was their custom, the
young people read the inscription aloud, in moderated chorus:



















































Here stood Kennedy House,
Once Headquarters of
Generals Washington and Lee.
On the Bowling Green
Opposite, the Leaden Statue
of King George was
destroyed by the people
July 9, 1776, and later
made into bullets for the
American Army.



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































“Well, that does give us a
good starter, and that ’s a fact,”
said Jack.

“T did n’t suppose you had
any places marked like that
in New York,” said Roger.
i Paat sine:

“Oh, you must n't think
Boston does it all, Roger,”









Pn Marian retorted. ‘We know
NUMBER ONE, BROADWAY, IN 1776. what to do, too.”
The old Kennedy House (Washington’s Headquarters) and the Watts 6 Wish I ’d been there |

Mansion. Bowling Green opposite.

Would n’t I have held the
ropes, though, that pulled the statue over!” cried Jack. ‘Made into
bullets, eh? Well, that was giving old Georgy a Holland for a Gulliver,

was n't it?”



IN GREATER NEW YORK 79

“A what?” came the puzzled query, while even Uncle Tom seemed
at sea.

And Marian said, ‘There! I know that ’s just another of Jack Dun-
lap’s horrible misquotations. Where did you get it from?”



NUMBER ONE, BROADWAY, IN 1897.

“Out of my extensive reading, ma’am,” replied her brother. ‘“ Don’t
think that you monopolize all the education of the family, my dear.”

Then Uncle Tom saw a light. He laughed aloud.

“Poor Jack!” he said. ‘He does hit the bull’s-eye sometimes, though
more by luck than skill, I fear. I recognize his quotation, Marian. It’s a.
historic tit for tat; he means a Roland for an Oliver—those two famous
paladins of old Charlemagne, you know. And it does fit this case; for, in
melting George the Third into bullets for their own use, his American
rebels returned him, with thanks; really a tit for tat, you see.”

“Thanks, Uncle Tom,” said Jack, bowing deeply. ‘‘ You appreciate
me. Praise from —”

“There, there! pray don’t try another on us, Jack,” implored his uncle.
“Tt is really too brain-fatiguing to unravel them.”

Standing in that famous spot about which centered so many of the dra-
matic happenings of old New York, they pictured to themselves that excit-
ing day in Bowling Green, and the others that so quickly followed. In
fancy they saw again the flying post-rider speeding down Broadway with
his tidings of Lexington fight; they saw the volunteer companies parading
the streets, drilling for liberty; they watched the Sons of Liberty drive off



80 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



FROM THE PAINTING BY EDWIN A. ABBEY.

IN VERY OLD NEW YORK

the carts which bore the arms and ammunition of the British reinforcements
ordered to Boston, and Uncle Tom showed them where, at the corner of
Broadway and John Street, the ‘‘confiscated” arms were stored.

In Trinity churchyard they stood before the tall brown shaft that rises
“to the memory of those great and good men who died while imprisoned in
this city for their devotion to the cause of American Independence”; they
saw the one remaining building in City Hall Park which was one of
those dreadful British prisons; they stood before the tomb of the hero of
Quebec, the brave Montgomery, set in the wall of old St. Paul’s; they heard
again, before his touching statue in the shadow of the granite Post-office,
the moving story of the bravery and death of glorious Nathan Hale: they
looked from the broad Battery out upon the splendid harbor, while Uncle
Tom traced for them on the hazy horizon, off toward Sandy Hook, the track
of the king’s fleet which brought, in the summer days of 1776, a great Brit-
ish army, with its hated Hessian contingent, for the subjugation of New
York and the control of the valley of the Hudson.

‘And that brings us,” said he, ‘to our next notable conflict — the battle
of Long Island. To-morrow or the next day we will cross the bridge and
study that fight upon its own historic ground.”

On the heieered day, crossing the great web-like span of fhe: Brooklyn
Bridge, the party of investigators descended to the street on the Brooklyn
side, and were soon speeding in the Flatbush “trolley” to the main battle-
ground in Prospect Park.



IN GREATER NEW YORK 81





IN THE HOTEL IMPERIAL, NEW YORK.

PLAYING AT BOWLS ON BOWLING GREEN.

As they went, Uncle Tom endeavored to give them a brief outline of the
battle they were to study.

“The battle of Long Island,” he told them, “was something in the na-
ture of what the Western cattlemen would call a round-up. You know what
that is, boys.”

“Getting around the cattle and Soren driving them into a pen or
corral, is n’t it?” queried Bert.

“Yes; and in this case,” said Uncle Tom, “the pen was the Americans’
own line of fortifications, poorly constructed and barely half made and half
manned, stretching almost from the Narrows to Hell Gate. General Howe,
who had succeeded Gage at Boston —”

“And been driven out himself,” put in Roger.

“Yes,” commented Uncle Tom, ‘‘—had learned a lesson from his Ameri-
can foemen, and, when he came sailing in through the Narrows to the in-
vestment of New York, had a plan of action well thought out. He would
land his troops on Long Island, surround the rebels in their lines, force them
back by weight of numbers and discipline to Brooklyn Heights, and there
capture them. From Brooklyn Heights he could command or bombard
New York, precisely as the Americans did Boston from Dorchester Heights,
and thus end the war.”

“Only he did n't,” said Jack.

‘His game was well played,” Uncle Tom continued, disregarding Tack: s

parenthesis. ‘Twenty thousand British and Hessian troops were landed,
6



82 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

and marched by devious ways through the four, passes which cut the lines

of hills that stretched across the island.

Many of those hills to-day are

leveled, but you can see traces of what they then were, in Prospect Park,



THE MEMORIAL ARCH.

At the entrance of Prospect Park, Brooklyn. This arch, erected as a
memorial to the Soldiers and Sailors of the Civil War, overlooks
almost the entire range of the Battle of Long Island.

in Greenwood Cemetery, and
on toward Jamaica. To these
twenty thousand Washington
could oppose scarcely ten
thousand men, half of them
militiamen and fresh volun-
teers. _But some of the ten
thousand were fighters,— the
Marylanders especially,— and
to-day they are remembered as
the heroes of the fight.”

‘What did they do?” asked
Marian.

“T ’ll show you, my dear,
on the very spot,” replied
Uncle Tom. “The battle was
really more a series of skir-

mishes or small engagements than a single conflict, but some of these
were bloody and obstinate. General Howe’s plan worked well. By three



THE TABLET IN PROSPECT PARK.

In Battle Pass, showing the line of defense.

roads his three detachments advanced upon the Americans, while he, with
ten thousand troops, marching silently in the dead of night, and guided by



GREATER NEW YORK 83

a.Tory farmer, got into the rear of the Americans on the Jamaica road.
On the morning of the twenty-seventh of August, 1776, the Americans
found themselves surrounded and in the heat of a desperate battle, the
line of which stretched over ten miles or more of country. There could
be but one result. Washington, fearing for New York as well as for
the Brooklyn defenses, hurried over the river .with reinforcements.
Greene, who had studied and alone knew the ground, was too sick to
move. No other general officer was capable of filling his place. Wash-
ington saw at once that Howe had the advantage of position, discipline, and



BATTLE PASS.

From the Terrace and Arbor, Prospect Park. This gives a bird’s-eye view of the main battle-ground.

numbers; and as he watched the fight, helpless to check or concentrate it,
he wrung his hands in anguish and cried, ‘Good God! what brave fellows
I must lose this day !’” i

“Why did n’t he chip right in and lead them on?” asked Jack.

‘Washington never was backward about rushing in and leading on
when it would do any good, I assure you. But this was not a case where
individual leadership could avail anything,” Uncle Tom replied, as, leaving
the cars by the splendid memorial arch, they entered the Park through the
main gate, and hailing a Park carriage, rode to Sullivan Heights.

“Here,” said Uncle Tom, as they stood among the cages of the “ Zoo,”
“General Sullivan, who had command outside of the fortifications, was sta-
tioned; but down below us is the slope on which the fiercest fight occurred.”

They descended the hill, crossed the Vale of Cashmere, and came out



84 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION
*&

- upon a swelling lawn where, in the face of a broken, tree-shaded knoll,
Uncle Tom halted them before a bronze tablet.

“Line of defense, August 27, 1776, Battle of Long Island, 175 feet south.

Site of Valley Grove house, 150 feet north,” read Bert and the others.
, “This is Battle Pass,” explained Uncle
Tom, ‘where the Hessians, twice repulsed,
finally swarmed upon Sullivan’s men, and
drove or captured them, forced the redoubt,
and combining with the rest of the British
army, finally sent the defeated Americans
flying for safety within the weak security of
their Brooklyn defenses. So the round-up,
you see, was successful, although some of
the ‘cattle’ were obstinate.”

“But what about the Maryland men?”
asked Marian.

For answer, Uncle Tom led them back
across the lawn to where, above a broad drive-
way, upon a sightly slope, rose a graceful
shaft of granite and marble, topped with a
polished globe.

: “Read the inscription, Marian,” he said,
THE MONUMENT TO THE “while Jack gets his kodak ready. Is n't
MARYLAND MEN. it a fine location? The monument was
neat ree splaced aMere wings 1805 .thirougit thesehoreaor
the Maryland Society of the Sons of the
American Revolution, and is a beautiful shaft, well worthy a shot.”
And Marian read:



“In Honor of
Maryland’s Four Hundred
Who on this Battle-field,
August 27, 1776,
Saved the American Army.”

‘How did they save it?” queried Christine, as Jack shot his kodak.

‘‘ By facing about here, and, against terrible odds, holding off the swarm-
ing enemy until the bulk of the Americans could withdraw. Then,” said
Uncle Tom, “surrounded, flanked, decimated, but heroic to the last, they
surrendered, sacrificing themselves for their comrades and their cause.”

“Good for them!” cried Jack, who had taken what he considered a most
satisfactory picture. ‘‘ Now let’s get the battle-field from the arbor.”



IN GREATER NEW YORK 85

He did so, and added other pictures to his roll of films. For Uncle Tom
and his companions “did” Revolutionary Brooklyn thoroughly, traversing
the ground from the Cortelyou house, where the Marylanders almost
‘‘bagged” Cornwallis, to the
points now swallowed up
by the great and growing
city, where hot and deadly
fights occurred.

At last they stood beside
the tall flag-staff on what,
in 1776, was Fort Putnam,
and now is called Fort
Greene. At their feet
stretched away Greater
New York, the cities of
Brooklyn and New York so merged into a tall and broken sky-line that
the dividing river was obliterated and the great bridge seemed suspended
above the crowding roofs. Under their feet, on the lowest terrace of the
high redoubt, was the “tomb of the martyrs ”—the vault in which are laid
the bones of those brave but unfortunate patriots who died in the dreadful
prison-ship Jersey, then moored near by in the Wallabout. This and the
story of the battle seemed to tell of disaster, and Bert said soberly, “And it
was a defeat, Uncle Tom?”



















THE PRISON-SHIP “JERSEY.”



ET



OVER GREATER NEW YORK.
View from the Tomb of the Martyrs, Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn.

“Certainly a defeat, my boy,” Uncle Tom answered; “but the battle of
Long Island simply had to be fought. The defense of New York from
6* :



86 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION





THE RETREAT FROM LONG ISLAND.

Washington directing the passage of the American Army across the East River, at night. The location is near the Brooklyn
pier of the great bridge.

Brooklyn was certain to be a failure if once a strong and disciplined force
were concentrated on Long Island. Had General Howe followed up his
success, the army of Washington would practically have been wiped out.
But Howe was dilatory, as usual; and Washington, in a retreat that is one
of his greatest achievements, carried the American army across to New
York, and compelled his adversary to fight yet other battles before New
York was wrested from ‘the rebel grip,’ as they called it.”

‘A retreat an achievement?” cried Roger.

“Assuredly,” said Uncle Tom. ‘“ Two days after the battle of Long
Island, Washington skilfully laid his plans, and while the British were pre-
paring to gobble up the whole American army, in the teeth of a drenching



IN GREATER NEW YORK 87

storm and under cover of a friendly fog, in boats manned by Glover and
his hardy Marblehead fishermen-soldiers, the American army silently stole
away, with all their arms, guns, and military stores —”

‘And General Howe was left!” cried Jack, his spirit recovering from

the Long Island defeat. ‘Well,

“ |. . he who fights and runs away
May live to fight another day,

I suppose, and G. W. did certainly know how to do that.”

‘He did, certainly,” said Uncle Tom; “and military critics regard his
masterly retreat from Long Island as sufficient to rank him among the great
captains of the world.”

The day in Brooklyn thus proved most successful, and Uncle Tom, fol-
lowing it up soon after with a visit to the field of operations on Manhattan
Island, showed his young folks what he called “the sequel to Long Island.”

He explained to them that Washington, expecting that Howe would
bombard New York from Brooklyn Heights, advised the destruction of the
city, but was overruled by Congress.

« At last, however,” he said, ‘the British crossed the East River and
landed at Thirty-fourth street. Here the Americans posted to oppose
them became panic-stricken. They scattered like sheep, while Washington,
distracted by their lack of courage, stormed at them like a Trojan, and
would have sacrificed his life leading a forlorn hope in assault, had he not
been urged away.”

“Then G. W. could get mad, eh?” said Jack. “I thought nothing ever
ruffled him.” .
“Nothing ever did, except cowardice,” said Uncle Tom. ‘He could

forgive even stupidity, but he had no patience with a coward.”

‘I know I should have been one,” Marian declared.

“Oh, well, you ’re a girl,” said Jack apologetically. ‘That does n’t
count.”

“Does n’t it, though, Master Jack?” cried Uncle Tom. “It counts very
much sometimes, as history will tell you. And I’m pretty sure that if the
test ever should come, my girls here”—and he passed an arm lovingly
about his ‘gleams of sunshine,” as he called Marian and Christine—‘ would
prove as brave as did plucky Mistress Robert Murray, who at her comfort-
able house on Murray Hill (that’s just about at Park Avenue and Thirty-
seventh street, you know) detained the whole British advance by her
cleverness, and gave Washington time to escape.”

“How?” asked Christine. -



Full Text
xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20081201_AAAABJ' PACKAGE 'UF00086589_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-12-02T13:58:14-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:40:00-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299300; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-14T08:11:10-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '566727' DFID 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHI' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-filesUF00086589_00001.xml'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 16150bded7391bb99b25c97a8eb66327
'SHA-1' 29fc6675550ab1fb04506208011bcd8e6c846656
EVENT '2011-12-29T05:39:59-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2013-12-14T07:53:16-05:00'
xml resolution
'275' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHK' 'sip-files00001.txt'
5a31f97c3f7c5cbeda046ba260d9479b
897bd3bdeabc7741920c65b62b3e1ae743c55890
'2011-12-29T05:36:46-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'216' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHL' 'sip-files00002.txt'
879e9dd2c12f7eabd6f3c4f59e9c8450
b3bdaed0c2981e010c3a3e1ac3648c4475b92117
'2011-12-29T05:39:54-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'58' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHM' 'sip-files00003.txt'
49d51bcbf6b6f557e881a86747687438
94eef28f6cca975320bb05f9010fc5d7abdcb6f8
'2011-12-29T05:39:33-05:00'
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHN' 'sip-files00006.txt'
2ea97a6c5583e2e88b299a6d17c806c6
31b1ddf5b5ddd0e0afb72306686b9b2c47d53e9f
'2011-12-29T05:41:29-05:00'
describe
'291' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHO' 'sip-files00008.txt'
3212d246c3f1ad1f898ddf5a2fdba33a
47f5510f81ae7911213c69ea0b9ca70732e112c3
'2011-12-29T05:37:09-05:00'
describe
'692' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHP' 'sip-files00009.txt'
6bb14308b6dc061fa88ee19643c1cdd2
df694c55c092c32d78c196d4be9950fd546133be
'2011-12-29T05:36:23-05:00'
describe
'140' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHQ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
733a29b880b0198ce2a54c61be925d05
f58aa10600fb8947746802ad9c17f8489b5b56e4
'2011-12-29T05:39:14-05:00'
describe
'2784' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHR' 'sip-files00011.txt'
2a85a1db17ba3a2977bc095bf71a7fee
b2500ebc84685fa6b4960ea7f0b03e86b1fd536d
'2011-12-29T05:35:53-05:00'
describe
'2198' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHS' 'sip-files00013.txt'
bbaf36d63103fa1ec494617e1908776a
b00b1b6ebf440ede0e12770959f458550cd4df57
'2011-12-29T05:39:18-05:00'
describe
'2455' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHT' 'sip-files00014.txt'
513b705625693fd8f56cf738641933d6
b70e3467d32d30f4b82a3cd0def5ad7afe488ea8
'2011-12-29T05:37:52-05:00'
describe
'93' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHU' 'sip-files00015.txt'
2c54dde98fabe701881646831247e71f
18295eb816d5d57cbe4e0e9c377f4c8905a18bae
'2011-12-29T05:36:51-05:00'
describe
'274' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHV' 'sip-files00016.txt'
9764dc490e50d750939d0137773e32ac
b6511a3769bf5c597d10f09668c66932603298ea
'2011-12-29T05:36:54-05:00'
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHW' 'sip-files00017.txt'
5e8ddd58e21c2ab68cfbc9ac927cf00f
cda608b32f423a1f71f86012c861539b504d4ded
'2011-12-29T05:38:30-05:00'
describe
'1731' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHX' 'sip-files00018.txt'
f4d8adf6c328f7e470f67bb29d0e161e
99f3a9d0f4d7407c9477ae2f9de6bb3d0c087ef2
'2011-12-29T05:34:34-05:00'
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHY' 'sip-files00019.txt'
670faf820707af0814853b9646128848
f77f9f96245b6db267dca05d841f14906bc58079
'2011-12-29T05:35:18-05:00'
describe
'2822' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMHZ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
946fa54debd6d30e49fa78ce75cd9ce3
c077c4dfe5b623d552ccedf4f771f20f246d79ee
'2011-12-29T05:37:54-05:00'
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIA' 'sip-files00021.txt'
6f26e3cade34187f142e1d94dcbd3ad2
00b9e0d5f7fb7d95493b1f491def2629eb874208
'2011-12-29T05:35:11-05:00'
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIB' 'sip-files00022.txt'
6cdf254f7a6eafe70d5bdb4b1d5f88f3
689cadd664c07c5cdd549af68896a1dc728bfe0f
'2011-12-29T05:37:28-05:00'
describe
'2015' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIC' 'sip-files00023.txt'
541096dc13670b18e56759c1e7905a29
201363b08bd6bc69483d98d9c2b5751dd8d3a402
'2011-12-29T05:36:43-05:00'
describe
'2775' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMID' 'sip-files00024.txt'
97e6829932053c0e0b8b1e69b09b860a
0ff3f0012d521a91a38227606cc21ce68152459e
'2011-12-29T05:34:40-05:00'
describe
'2157' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIE' 'sip-files00025.txt'
9ea37bede6da0f3b6d1d22ffc62338c0
7484a1d678805dabcbdc9f4ae3cc4b2c48ee6d84
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIF' 'sip-files00026.txt'
695bcb010d8219ee451b37d411c0e340
d81e129239e744696f57250ed1467fb1a1436db5
'2011-12-29T05:34:39-05:00'
describe
'701' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIG' 'sip-files00027.txt'
02c383d4ad14d09576a83bf874ce0208
ec0ebd510980a67658a2900f1b68b7d7698e0663
'2011-12-29T05:41:26-05:00'
describe
'2738' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIH' 'sip-files00028.txt'
e5e1e90c2ee70efe5c174af93284cb62
3b308093bf682a3811f2633728d193068c1725a5
'2011-12-29T05:35:35-05:00'
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMII' 'sip-files00029.txt'
a57423c118963938adb95775ca1db087
968b72f40f87531157de811d350fffbdafb3defb
'2011-12-29T05:35:56-05:00'
describe
'2951' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIJ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
1f1e66c0d6ba3e0cc0bb4c13e303ed2f
db64ee68c3fb8088e3356d5a9ba9a509685c302e
'2011-12-29T05:36:32-05:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIK' 'sip-files00031.txt'
069b7b761b05afbc63a38b13eb85a779
486d74ab4258c0d6bd9b57b3a6b23f1632b7b7d1
'2011-12-29T05:35:16-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'391' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIL' 'sip-files00032.txt'
f54d9518f52222a6ea2f69d14a8ccb20
8f7b5fd25322bb1acad0d99d2aa4ef277929bfb5
'2011-12-29T05:35:31-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1870' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIM' 'sip-files00033.txt'
4f9a19d5cf831fb8fda4f7a15a343aa3
1a0a5f04bf769767cb16dadc354248e84ed1a9cb
'2011-12-29T05:38:29-05:00'
describe
'2871' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIN' 'sip-files00034.txt'
4118c9168da0a7efaa32d17c0414caa2
430019cb0088c33b1f2b059e3851b6bc5ec31f26
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIO' 'sip-files00035.txt'
999cc520b07f89261cb8a6938037836c
fbff128d84e5ba5949fd5342f3fd8e322af756ba
'2011-12-29T05:37:02-05:00'
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIP' 'sip-files00036.txt'
a36a5d9e13449ff558b792ba12c104e3
f6a3133ba0ae7e2136cf5bd9ee35171acc580954
'2011-12-29T05:39:38-05:00'
describe
'1854' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIQ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
140fe5aab95717766460aaf7500617df
4b945630d2fbbbfb8ef09d1c60d7ac1866be4267
'2011-12-29T05:35:44-05:00'
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIR' 'sip-files00038.txt'
40428fbf315f87f730d1eede83c00722
8bcf325e431e02077ce83426f69a9b690d6e2bee
'2011-12-29T05:39:17-05:00'
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIS' 'sip-files00039.txt'
a49ffee4f420f5c3ee78b3011c184cb9
b825df3d5c807fe283a1e828f9846f0bdc4908d9
'2011-12-29T05:38:08-05:00'
describe
'2986' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIT' 'sip-files00040.txt'
91a62e7838f4f52156c934eedfd43efc
0bf315cf93eb92ffadadc08eefdd015eedfaac94
'2011-12-29T05:41:09-05:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIU' 'sip-files00041.txt'
9b79a8322c1dd4dfb1050593f8116208
430510a37255773b1ece2ecd7bdb8c18b60072bc
'2011-12-29T05:37:36-05:00'
describe
'3014' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIV' 'sip-files00042.txt'
225772f3d389fa12b1e0e3f17cb9fadf
d46b6d894bd0bc9e792ecb128ea4d28acce2e8ee
'2011-12-29T05:38:01-05:00'
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIW' 'sip-files00043.txt'
2745cd82aefec21c24334feeb7bf1a3f
16caf7517c06d7a46e33c181b42c5aa001ce3b52
'2011-12-29T05:36:02-05:00'
describe
'2862' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIX' 'sip-files00044.txt'
ee106eafbfe0275da233538a9c8b6044
33c469de6c2ecee1c886b73c31fd7ec7d9a76610
'2011-12-29T05:37:53-05:00'
describe
'1677' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIY' 'sip-files00045.txt'
f58c1f80f5d83026cebb697c899b43f0
7d6c3cab5f4e38a0f4c700f2f6f44804a5f593cb
'2011-12-29T05:40:19-05:00'
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMIZ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
5f4d7adcd53dfc9000f608e2ae7c6b64
b94559c90506c30961f560f9a41df425c31a76c3
'2011-12-29T05:36:34-05:00'
describe
'2574' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJA' 'sip-files00047.txt'
f91582b777a686bb96b9fd2dbd30134b
623007522479cd0c0de6c041211d7d417e9839bb
'2011-12-29T05:40:04-05:00'
describe
'2870' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJB' 'sip-files00048.txt'
4eb074fef165501706cf30bf106f77a4
05ebdcc41080c7720b8cbf9d15d570bbf3ed6781
'2011-12-29T05:35:43-05:00'
describe
'645' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
2e6cc83390a171f99a28577f22cd0dde
966030fe9a94a5e7cb5651f7c9848327f3cb7429
'2011-12-29T05:37:40-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1434' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJD' 'sip-files00050.txt'
35934ba6897e4dfa660f1c04ae615efe
ce742cdd8e51e03d213c1246ba00a03dab05df07
'2011-12-29T05:36:56-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1801' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJE' 'sip-files00051.txt'
917f09dbd45ca1b03ad9f361b20701c6
20a755cc8dbd103d5abda28f56d83cca4033b527
'2011-12-29T05:38:05-05:00'
describe
'2701' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJF' 'sip-files00052.txt'
e02e50d54809c69bfa1606adf43e9e0a
b905bd1a862fea515a7a7570ac30c5ef8fe5b6e2
'2011-12-29T05:35:33-05:00'
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJG' 'sip-files00053.txt'
f39423d91ecfa172a84ac6563cc8c4a9
62f98538bda3c6a8b439d2ce25cb653ab30f4fd5
'2011-12-29T05:36:45-05:00'
describe
'2716' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJH' 'sip-files00054.txt'
1efcb6804b1b81ad882e3845aa79ab7d
d42b92c24d5f2e96a59d8d8c71e717708aeade2c
'2011-12-29T05:37:11-05:00'
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJI' 'sip-files00055.txt'
112541abfd735ce13ea85eec4a760025
7dc778d23f3d85dbd0731e700306becc94a095ff
'2011-12-29T05:39:39-05:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJJ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
23e03564b79f3690572a9bb9f5839744
f70b17bb3ac33dfe9667d6086536f8a3a99e4383
'2011-12-29T05:37:21-05:00'
describe
'2085' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJK' 'sip-files00057.txt'
39bb70b028451a64ca3538a7a3cce0d3
0a6e34bd5b0f81f68e085cbba35224cf05414c84
'2011-12-29T05:34:53-05:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJL' 'sip-files00058.txt'
498208586ab1a8f118cb91490066608f
069de36e75283e2d51e534ad5296b4d549e49a7f
'2011-12-29T05:40:34-05:00'
describe
'1903' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJM' 'sip-files00059.txt'
cdef53408004ee63cdad5ec04cd87e16
e7924a55edfe6a1828e8f64cf7e0cd32a32ced9c
'2011-12-29T05:41:01-05:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJN' 'sip-files00060.txt'
50d18d363fdb6732a0ab7c6889d94071
2b53f5a66f5e2ec97fd295a421f1b3e0457e8824
'2011-12-29T05:40:10-05:00'
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJO' 'sip-files00061.txt'
87113300e09306124deed1685f90e9dd
4f43a51a11f06484dfd3b9cb4d1a5c705bba2192
'2011-12-29T05:34:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJP' 'sip-files00062.txt'
728ca10b40dc10361bfc605e21966ed1
809172fd988dee7346bede40901ccea085acf89b
'2011-12-29T05:35:24-05:00'
describe
'334' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJQ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
010da294184fd9ab85a3e33932ff1fc1
9a9e3d9fa8fd6c981d62f158fc644f5d33dc684f
'2011-12-29T05:37:43-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2502' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJR' 'sip-files00064.txt'
b89f85b5c379453132061ce2bd258161
fa026e03f53833dd293562e2241538f63e32a760
'2011-12-29T05:34:33-05:00'
describe
'1614' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJS' 'sip-files00065.txt'
713b3a7721a6258accb028763bd95093
1d29e77043eb6e997b4399bc2a68fac56b0abcb2
'2011-12-29T05:36:01-05:00'
describe
'1965' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJT' 'sip-files00066.txt'
ab93a508b6aa58a30aa50511e713311b
5f47e5e7c6f67ebf2939a98bae86a09cbe939bd1
'2011-12-29T05:34:32-05:00'
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJU' 'sip-files00067.txt'
ed11b9a4a2ae0a83fe5e55c380854eb4
bc59e485fec757b36639abb4a9cf4ef01f72ff8f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJV' 'sip-files00068.txt'
7b0efa1930f64ff73f399aa6cb87e938
91016340ed188e6d99f9d584509d93f2b458bcb5
'2011-12-29T05:36:42-05:00'
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJW' 'sip-files00069.txt'
4907f6658cfb7c168feacba291b459ac
36ff0750d6963597e4e5cd84f0ac4d99c00f9afb
'2011-12-29T05:41:22-05:00'
describe
'134' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJX' 'sip-files00070.txt'
d4927c00b04ed9e252966bd6b1d543d7
029d9a997f071cd0387159364ca212b07dfc9840
'2011-12-29T05:39:30-05:00'
describe
'1642' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJY' 'sip-files00071.txt'
feba24e47150f8a11d166e0d18f7e610
cf839114c4b3fe4fa14b77e0f61995b69814ffad
'2011-12-29T05:34:50-05:00'
describe
'2741' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMJZ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
173653af098c203c287e8d53b2cdfd58
a60ee41fd65aec7ac35d4d0d71cf73292b8e4848
'2011-12-29T05:37:58-05:00'
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKA' 'sip-files00073.txt'
a1a5cb9a5d87fd87dc8e94807033e876
42703a8ce56bbbc0408303c90d95cd2495c0151f
'2011-12-29T05:36:50-05:00'
describe
'1827' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKB' 'sip-files00074.txt'
2e69c0afa75da8459f8ca22292f5b359
74174b6c6d32b2ba274db5a1a98d9bfdce22b372
'2011-12-29T05:36:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKC' 'sip-files00075.txt'
4d0917b862321f788ff613353bc599f8
8959dfcef498e1b5243ec0b3be1c9ad53784817c
'2011-12-29T05:34:29-05:00'
describe
'830' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKD' 'sip-files00076.txt'
4db6780eb3e3e8c7916ad8a744c4c552
c390e47907a687b520b08da6587a5469c93e3e0c
'2011-12-29T05:37:18-05:00'
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKE' 'sip-files00077.txt'
21df2736007c6a906a28cc967721b4b4
eb2a3ebf9df994768d6be0717106b7d2240bdcff
'2011-12-29T05:36:29-05:00'
describe
'2745' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKF' 'sip-files00078.txt'
33327a3f16f7760648e710bc3595af80
3baf9678daa5cf1da8ee238856b6c685eb7df787
'2011-12-29T05:34:41-05:00'
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKG' 'sip-files00079.txt'
bcae50498f9a40123a4158b650343111
26c1975428e3da0a1f6914340c752213be63060c
'2011-12-29T05:35:29-05:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKH' 'sip-files00080.txt'
100b3cfc56054e12c9a72e7827adf02d
deb5ce3bbbfc7c0e83c911a933b716a8fa8af320
'2011-12-29T05:37:30-05:00'
describe
'2777' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKI' 'sip-files00081.txt'
313c620f3a7cda781ea56ffbcb416230
65d502a8467032d36ce143fa5cbb4fb08fb0528f
'2011-12-29T05:35:45-05:00'
describe
'1987' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKJ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
d59ea099f1e4f54386515ab2b7030d57
968432c576d35b9906c4658d06d7e8cf7b515089
'2011-12-29T05:36:58-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2902' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKK' 'sip-files00083.txt'
017f805bb7e3099d95aae05710becff3
02ceeb89806837bf5e8009a344a959573221ab90
'2011-12-29T05:38:27-05:00'
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKL' 'sip-files00084.txt'
34e1a42dff51c6001ddd348c0e7598e1
c0489849059346dd34dd96ad99ead7a8813c8d74
'2011-12-29T05:39:41-05:00'
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKM' 'sip-files00085.txt'
67dda08105c15e6384bf9d1a00cc148b
2fa7cceeda77b72d69f772e10473e7a8312bb2c3
'2011-12-29T05:36:20-05:00'
describe
'2763' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKN' 'sip-files00086.txt'
8069f16cdc78a6ae86cb6c8833a6db15
c42119705445a9d573675477ef6b311d817dbb47
'2011-12-29T05:40:17-05:00'
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKO' 'sip-files00087.txt'
b9636141b9a8570949f7a73c0bf38cf9
f0794970222f56d2ef92e813682d020649163f08
'2011-12-29T05:40:00-05:00'
describe
'797' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKP' 'sip-files00088.txt'
1524bc7bf7e03a159a2d03a26fdd0376
443dddee1e57bad1ab27ba1edd5514916f7783e5
'2011-12-29T05:39:10-05:00'
describe
'1968' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKQ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
3fb561eb21446b8fc53be5a0d11c2991
32384036b47421849cc9937825676779df308aa1
'2011-12-29T05:41:20-05:00'
describe
'3007' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKR' 'sip-files00090.txt'
8d2dbc2b56758d80546b8a3f7a4cbd82
59ed4ed47cdd3a1ec20403dbeddcfe093569b40d
describe
'1897' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKS' 'sip-files00091.txt'
1d5b16f4191f411e827b8257c84bd138
7fc13021c57fd72f4e46dd81b81c182fd8b5935d
describe
'284' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKT' 'sip-files00092.txt'
a89b5cdc0508f2aa8150ef84d6902c86
b58d7d734dea21b65fab280cc1b2dfd5fa57fe9c
describe
'2802' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKU' 'sip-files00093.txt'
505f006261e0f62aa65ae444ee9f01fc
0b4606dd3353b8b9854729242f1fa2c12f859193
'2011-12-29T05:38:15-05:00'
describe
'2818' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKV' 'sip-files00094.txt'
2a48ba9811e2195e396d613dffce0ca0
71e13e95d4365be317e0ec61ea1f891ee5724a34
'2011-12-29T05:39:32-05:00'
describe
'1622' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKW' 'sip-files00095.txt'
cb24f0277c5c7df0f11946d04cd680a3
325233ac8bda7b4d63746a20b2945d7d1e83d8ce
'2011-12-29T05:36:18-05:00'
describe
'1744' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKX' 'sip-files00096.txt'
485fb90bae5fbd6d5e7f400ed6dfefc7
cc6c6759e41e396a249b66ec5ee969cdd9ac42ef
'2011-12-29T05:41:04-05:00'
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKY' 'sip-files00097.txt'
71d089491435ead10140c32d9e65a2a0
9e96d9ad44e19662eff94848b13ce785a04a7cc8
'2011-12-29T05:39:46-05:00'
describe
'2199' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMKZ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
3b909b5a7c9b51fbec84cb96d671e513
fb31f16d4548cd299e69c490d705eada5203b155
'2011-12-29T05:35:01-05:00'
describe
'1821' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLA' 'sip-files00099.txt'
253648f5312eeb12c7ffec16dd973301
0861d4a0a22704085f0112f95bd1a06bedc2089a
'2011-12-29T05:38:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLB' 'sip-files00100.txt'
98af51ac40112d897e488e18d6d5eb39
230aa1e87133a3897c13038dbdacb01220285222
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLC' 'sip-files00101.txt'
eb5dc8c14c2acada7142a6124419227a
f1ac17e388eedc2ffa78a16242225ea0f9dcb2c3
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLD' 'sip-files00102.txt'
e4496f66b0e7c82435e569f2292fb98b
33aadce81398dbba82e929fdd2aba0cdcd41e611
'2011-12-29T05:36:14-05:00'
describe
'2444' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLE' 'sip-files00103.txt'
dc077ddef60c24957a07ed265bbae4c4
6ce58be23afd7a80e782de01bea9ded0ea5ea196
'2011-12-29T05:34:57-05:00'
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLF' 'sip-files00104.txt'
a94a9960229bd94209f33f2bb102815a
d60b1f71276239c00430b0a5c1c476372a3d2926
'2011-12-29T05:36:41-05:00'
describe
'1988' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLG' 'sip-files00105.txt'
cce140d5366fd36ce6e89b1e3779ce6a
dd41bc8d403f8d0a002b23759941b868c2acb0e6
'2011-12-29T05:39:31-05:00'
describe
'2819' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLH' 'sip-files00106.txt'
74b6c1921874680c3677f39502c75420
7f94891bc875567d16f8dfd73f9d9ba45d439bb1
describe
'575' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLI' 'sip-files00107.txt'
6b69dbbedf172ea4da05f67bb0723c99
7ad8406ef30774329fe11640bed2d2694f699b73
describe
'2789' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLJ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
05e205c3d1e25aeec811eb5415dae83c
a4c9d288ea7aa3c061412b482dde77a542a5a50f
describe
'1851' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLK' 'sip-files00109.txt'
affb70ef04d0c5bae5933cd043812c3b
e27e745202035a7704ef836fed914c72e600aced
describe
'235' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLL' 'sip-files00110.txt'
655f86ef7857aaf4e7977bf9397f1e86
188814d2fca64cb35a4079c22cec254c9473b932
'2011-12-29T05:39:57-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1944' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLM' 'sip-files00111.txt'
3021b2ce3ab00b6df529693d2d6dc125
97d0d8bab60d85a8885c73e393388c25eeb3b52e
'2011-12-29T05:40:06-05:00'
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLN' 'sip-files00112.txt'
10441048f3b157193c78e72467a8718b
d2012d6b6113941bb86948d93e1f627ecd2e30fc
'2011-12-29T05:37:42-05:00'
describe
'2088' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLO' 'sip-files00113.txt'
ff594472a82b55be9882881a108af47e
1e5e3fae99be12cf1b40908cddad28eef0a7bbee
'2011-12-29T05:41:19-05:00'
describe
'2481' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLP' 'sip-files00114.txt'
3dcbf325f28c32ebdbd193d8bf9d7d1c
4a6b482a860cd25d824ef3a31feec10193110e7e
'2011-12-29T05:35:07-05:00'
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLQ' 'sip-files00115.txt'
a3bfb6a8bf2a6bd09c528a1528d1346a
9ade648afa76ae012c1793a45976109ef55cb269
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLR' 'sip-files00116.txt'
588ca110980811e4ff1b7d12fbbde683
93902ffb75ff2dbb49afdbe6e1ab914fd978dee6
'2011-12-29T05:35:38-05:00'
describe
'2265' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLS' 'sip-files00117.txt'
61f29816a10e03ac67fe784075b2419c
6513cce19c56b47c8702c2a1e32c56fde506a53b
describe
'2855' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLT' 'sip-files00118.txt'
e6c0ba345af90b4a6ea8330a23da132f
46971148c0f1ee43577e763fa8507c21fb48c726
'2011-12-29T05:38:07-05:00'
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLU' 'sip-files00119.txt'
f7527ed98ff91a6974ea403a0763ebbe
37e4f93fbb2fd9033f6b5d304933072c80249957
'2011-12-29T05:38:16-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'135' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLV' 'sip-files00120.txt'
06dfb4cdd3411dc0343e454eda836ff2
72bb8c8eaeaf4b17b8e9ed8cbf732dad87977f9f
'2011-12-29T05:40:58-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2757' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLW' 'sip-files00121.txt'
26d68b612a9db59c5c7356b9f25715de
ed13241cada5a88c7f817e813d12099fde59cd71
'2011-12-29T05:38:55-05:00'
describe
'2861' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLX' 'sip-files00122.txt'
458c0a493171a632d37d2eea587d53b7
f069fb13627470b6b4f1606fff5ed77785bd625d
'2011-12-29T05:36:16-05:00'
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLY' 'sip-files00123.txt'
a6f796f3351ac5c99d82a4db44fad419
b9f1993acc47ee9bce7347856e273d061593b34a
describe
'2842' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMLZ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
91ac02bf11745e1a593d91ec0a1bcda0
ebc7b43c352107fae6540db0cda080483614714e
describe
'1784' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMA' 'sip-files00125.txt'
ba7846da19ff6a83d47af2467d57ab47
bd4511dbdae98f885577d355cbda76b96ab0ce66
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMB' 'sip-files00126.txt'
db1c0a3e9f2f98ec2c77737b3c4bcd9f
aba1e4caf17466e16aa0b1b75edbc7d65aed419a
'2011-12-29T05:35:34-05:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMC' 'sip-files00127.txt'
05ba18427932c42fe0ccfd578f938b3b
ca2b68eaff4594d59f37aa3722945df3be52db36
'2011-12-29T05:38:39-05:00'
describe
'2746' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMD' 'sip-files00128.txt'
f6330d77337714c6c6650035d9f5814c
a11f775b263ed3d805ec8682cf1cc9abb7433ada
'2011-12-29T05:39:55-05:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMME' 'sip-files00129.txt'
6a2c68f72feeeb64601505a097f55f32
c5adedaa6d6c2e6b5700f6afcc322defce0ba50a
'2011-12-29T05:38:36-05:00'
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMF' 'sip-files00130.txt'
7ef33a3c74084500aab944fd564c6559
f86d573d96d8f563df9f00dcc4a1a14afc68dfcd
'2011-12-29T05:36:04-05:00'
describe
'1861' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMG' 'sip-files00131.txt'
ba2b65ba8fc705765b2049bc74b55168
3c8189a55a880d2a0284a5a645a6890189db7006
'2011-12-29T05:35:55-05:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMH' 'sip-files00132.txt'
b2359d2ebb7074b1b5278061f736a5d0
f8a0ef4d9d936f48085540ffedfa2474a76fa238
'2011-12-29T05:39:12-05:00'
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMI' 'sip-files00133.txt'
d60ef3d64d51f8b24402f087a6b1b3e6
541959e430d179e47edc2778cd975d4239f13045
'2011-12-29T05:39:27-05:00'
describe
'2838' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMJ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
fcccf1ddfa725b8c38b10d64178fdb04
2d028ab576248f8cb674fc92f75ce1e4bbb3a884
describe
'2542' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMK' 'sip-files00135.txt'
d47059ec8a30c6cce5c1b8b165541121
34ea5d439fedf84223c377cac46bc07087508809
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMML' 'sip-files00136.txt'
5bd3394fbcc851e11ccb7e2a6d06ac03
56aba4590a81a5582e65b327e0cd42d92f06d0f5
describe
'1976' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMM' 'sip-files00137.txt'
e8a73b87f3256146752ef723338a2047
c6cedb8c8d28141409650271a07a6bce73727941
'2011-12-29T05:39:34-05:00'
describe
'2005' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMN' 'sip-files00138.txt'
1186e8b8e1d66106d3210f01e70c454a
6bdbcffa4ec43b76a7ea7f5ff18676fe9c900484
'2011-12-29T05:37:10-05:00'
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMO' 'sip-files00139.txt'
879b42a3c51c3bc9975b5ca4aa0fd4ed
1d4b0b020f7b42776cb52aeed62861c162a2197e
'2011-12-29T05:39:25-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1301' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMP' 'sip-files00140.txt'
5e9ac6d4dc7cd4615bbefe549dee198b
2b3d9e680e4351e4d7e63ae1c3f926cc23d59559
'2011-12-29T05:39:02-05:00'
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMQ' 'sip-files00141.txt'
b90ee8a9d4c3695ac77bb4e7ddcf22a5
bd56114d9569ce2aaac989e06cd6c96d4b868fed
'2011-12-29T05:40:59-05:00'
describe
'2848' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMR' 'sip-files00142.txt'
bfea89addcd515e72e8e99f1ca7de019
641efc7957abd95ad8338318ecf2a857d174c187
describe
'1657' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMS' 'sip-files00143.txt'
de00745ccbdfe1bd8becf50faee92b19
a87bbdd63988f70f8d04bc34edbf68ccab534829
'2011-12-29T05:35:37-05:00'
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMT' 'sip-files00144.txt'
545ebbbda21e0d57ed9984da57a410fe
840aa08f5c2d114429266272455524fb81d89e70
describe
'1778' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMU' 'sip-files00145.txt'
08f53d69122c0d2106606ea79366311a
f0927e680b6cfcdc1ae3c3a8a1f97a56ece2d7c7
'2011-12-29T05:36:53-05:00'
describe
'1678' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMV' 'sip-files00146.txt'
6685e824b8ec0e44a90b6ba579f247ef
3fb448d2724524c77465a11095e238ae06a43d10
describe
'1881' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMW' 'sip-files00147.txt'
492e387583d52cd17c7636c48268be1e
adf29ba846b9a64ef170fb2550b26495b1fd3598
'2011-12-29T05:39:13-05:00'
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMX' 'sip-files00148.txt'
005e92cb7f26aff9df19f661c7c0e880
41e89c90cf956879582b54b96e457f8db0af66ac
'2011-12-29T05:40:20-05:00'
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMY' 'sip-files00149.txt'
9e61c13aedd265647f8f8d539be7efae
89ca2f5b933d743eba898da10406dafa2fb1b3e0
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMMZ' 'sip-files00150.txt'
011978629141c3a75740126c28f8dd08
b8f48da6eb83b898064e6c7d67a663823db14f1a
'2011-12-29T05:39:52-05:00'
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNA' 'sip-files00151.txt'
b81e1d2e3ab34381f800502ca0f0d650
dcb9d8ab2bb1d8c5e52fb79fcb1dc3c58dd661f7
'2011-12-29T05:36:27-05:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNB' 'sip-files00152.txt'
d4d4f7000c7005f9e9c8f79b94d7257c
ba2dfa7073d1ec3135dbb57d2aeac22a332080f2
describe
'425' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNC' 'sip-files00153.txt'
d85881c411eff54e797c69b32519f0bc
95377fa0af092a596d64758111f78c844423b3cc
'2011-12-29T05:38:59-05:00'
describe
'441' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMND' 'sip-files00154.txt'
ef0b3013bca3a80f20836bb93c72b489
29411403155122a1fd419d58a5d7323b4bff642a
'2011-12-29T05:37:05-05:00'
describe
'2011' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNE' 'sip-files00155.txt'
12ad2839c02cf86f99340ebd84853097
4c5013ac0ae75eb4e7cd2a817c590bb09e44b85f
'2011-12-29T05:34:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNF' 'sip-files00156.txt'
57c77a212ca644b31e82971686319e53
5b489c6bf2742f1d2887ee8a2747e7b6d4e483da
'2011-12-29T05:41:25-05:00'
describe
'220' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNG' 'sip-files00157.txt'
f178f7f5e0b37feb6721f455ee760c86
0e8d0594c3d88eac6b00bc882cc19277d79ad134
'2011-12-29T05:35:23-05:00'
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNH' 'sip-files00158.txt'
9396fa66bc59078281d164fdae0958f6
0cb949b346b05158ee20794ebc7b57512bd85910
'2011-12-29T05:34:48-05:00'
describe
'2086' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNI' 'sip-files00159.txt'
5061b32cbdc302b12413383c6f7fb453
4b20c6defe5ed275d0fb1602a0018002194e63e9
describe
'341' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNJ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
9ba3bb3ec6cee75744d31ff521e96bc0
f6c5a2a049d34ea86ef2da80ec2f3b7f4b91edd4
'2011-12-29T05:41:37-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2707' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNK' 'sip-files00161.txt'
1d4e14ab84bf01c3009a99603052b202
e98c2c7f1db987cd5638cc1b91f8af9f1b192b29
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNL' 'sip-files00162.txt'
5e69fff96cddd3418319bf706bde701a
e0350b346f6068a8cf457303d1a4538fc9894078
'2011-12-29T05:38:38-05:00'
describe
'332' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNM' 'sip-files00163.txt'
1af3571bf33011c437bd3ea429b2ab78
85e3ec70c9accea538e50ab040354307caa8b019
'2011-12-29T05:37:03-05:00'
describe
'3001' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNN' 'sip-files00164.txt'
f9079fec847c18226ef6171d766e0d32
fd55bd82925c001be6d24470af92cb05b43d0a31
describe
'2393' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNO' 'sip-files00165.txt'
0e6f523d18e53b471ce40e58e827ea42
0415cdbe665c65c44d342ee964f6cf9b2e531d19
'2011-12-29T05:37:06-05:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNP' 'sip-files00166.txt'
b58a5297341a9cd6d2e694fdd8a41cac
30bce8288e556f812c1fe6268adc28effe742375
'2011-12-29T05:40:01-05:00'
describe
'1907' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNQ' 'sip-files00167.txt'
d4cb812b2949d5a199284cd4536b0d2a
bd2166d60aad9cffc59303f006048b062ec8498b
'2011-12-29T05:34:42-05:00'
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNR' 'sip-files00168.txt'
8eb27e5b60b2cebb0c78692be259da44
012be0b2fb041be94bdec11d719941225f36f2be
describe
'2779' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNS' 'sip-files00169.txt'
1ff4dd25651698ecebecd9676570d525
e459ac082118d89ee841d4e25bf949bc9640e364
'2011-12-29T05:35:47-05:00'
describe
'3067' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNT' 'sip-files00170.txt'
d692d2c633cacda1d77f522d87c4e699
287a9d3168426fed1c559429a142659ecc981132
'2011-12-29T05:35:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNU' 'sip-files00171.txt'
a7126cc29d4fc9b9286a52e3d3b5f505
460b5d356062c3d41f25abe252c55474bb7a63ee
'2011-12-29T05:35:49-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNV' 'sip-files00172.txt'
b916902ee768a766984cfcef19de23b0
6a96ee2407d82fa20bc4b30e0704dd1023f7517f
'2011-12-29T05:38:43-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'304' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNW' 'sip-files00173.txt'
01b1e127be6fc39530ccf1d3c11d39ff
ce09095e6c914454b77044f44c4516e051245011
'2011-12-29T05:40:27-05:00'
describe
'2163' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNX' 'sip-files00174.txt'
ca728c11d455735c741ee6789002aa6c
efa52acf67379865a5194d6af61cab35057abe00
'2011-12-29T05:35:57-05:00'
describe
'1736' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNY' 'sip-files00175.txt'
4c12c25b66e813ca6adbe00663ce53f3
6744792e8ea1c48d2406d2c5dc0a2f7202b8ed39
'2011-12-29T05:40:03-05:00'
describe
'1922' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMNZ' 'sip-files00176.txt'
46a682ed2774c92908867f0637c0914a
4cddcb2c1d0a00532c6129d22549a74cf19c1d35
'2011-12-29T05:40:40-05:00'
describe
'2438' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOA' 'sip-files00177.txt'
9139decc9275529b0ef25adfbc645cea
8b29d723243912b2c50d45fe3e4de2727d382ed6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOB' 'sip-files00178.txt'
1a254d8836ff4bb6b38e447f9f3755bd
1d098a244bfddb9ef3ba4092e941949c468513a5
'2011-12-29T05:41:15-05:00'
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOC' 'sip-files00179.txt'
1ae9e58885715b617c075f02a11aed54
916bc45da4e5a1ecb0e1f1fa2f2ef0d99dc1261d
describe
Invalid character
'2913' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOD' 'sip-files00180.txt'
234f93dd4853afd9e34073f07087227a
2aa4a61da1a1645153cc415c6db18720467bd4f8
'2011-12-29T05:40:42-05:00'
describe
'2471' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOE' 'sip-files00181.txt'
2dc9bd9adfb030c7228d8320c59a3b77
e4066da5da1664d710933dacadd0586f0969a2f2
'2011-12-29T05:34:35-05:00'
describe
'3143' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOF' 'sip-files00182.txt'
af7a26642dc24a97a0561ae42cf7187e
4e282f44b7fbb425e65c0fa1565f55cfa18805c2
describe
'2358' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOG' 'sip-files00183.txt'
1813d4f976897c6574564cb37ddc82bd
6a144ed6b7335e021b798e8798b4b3ee7cb0a542
'2011-12-29T05:39:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOH' 'sip-files00184.txt'
0d1da9b5ae1be5be415f5297789f4af4
2975c28e5e876cd425e29a634522153f9eecfdb8
describe
'2268' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOI' 'sip-files00185.txt'
aa67dfd634b9983ccc389d2a33ea303e
44cb3daeea08faf6a45000fbf75cb4ea9e1bcfbb
describe
'2992' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOJ' 'sip-files00186.txt'
28d49abdc5c1a80526c0fc6294b87878
250961b75d7ba8e6ee97d997021116cef2568c1c
'2011-12-29T05:40:11-05:00'
describe
'1760' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOK' 'sip-files00187.txt'
17331c447b6d09e0a6a0f4aecdbadc57
94eb2b331dcb9e127048cbf2d85c6d3ad475b82c
'2011-12-29T05:38:54-05:00'
describe
'3043' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOL' 'sip-files00188.txt'
89e5386f07235c408cb0f55a3e9c40dd
72d88e5b740b1f31a67a0c2212be821e4fca7cd9
'2011-12-29T05:38:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOM' 'sip-files00189.txt'
34e09de2f1655108f5b9abb9b2d719fc
fb8003b3a2cae6ffb27698fe6eb04a542eced88b
'2011-12-29T05:39:48-05:00'
describe
'342' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMON' 'sip-files00190.txt'
7ef1e276b1696faa1e7a8c8384542829
19d003887c4079fd256a79082a3bb6b2adccc4fa
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOO' 'sip-files00191.txt'
5a29d10de6bfa88cbc04ca8f53310d7d
6ee9deac8a8ee94dca58ad182e983885e6756169
'2011-12-29T05:37:12-05:00'
describe
'2853' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOP' 'sip-files00192.txt'
768a285725a4e627984ae19f0bda5837
281bb8e85be07aa11dca10e6b87df64e284a7670
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOQ' 'sip-files00193.txt'
e54fc0e5e8b6b467de41f0ffcb7e727b
91269ed47a93a82f21ec1465bd27597298c0e371
'2011-12-29T05:38:50-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'489' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOR' 'sip-files00194.txt'
4c1bd410281717015a38854183c524cd
3fa2bce596bf890d390c038e66b4c4174c3bf7a2
'2011-12-29T05:40:21-05:00'
describe
'2639' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOS' 'sip-files00195.txt'
d2010d3861fd510a278d104fe23b99b2
e7df4a4e4be9437984a5da88b48b579bc6545d85
'2011-12-29T05:41:05-05:00'
describe
'2387' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOT' 'sip-files00196.txt'
6aae34a6cd256e44228eac04e2d2b158
6d63e61232de9a2c6b2a3de465cb586e0527e044
describe
'2196' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOU' 'sip-files00197.txt'
07c5376e450812df3d05e32a8dd08e65
08fe735f83dffc4ce08ce072e8021465e5f6e872
'2011-12-29T05:36:06-05:00'
describe
'2844' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOV' 'sip-files00198.txt'
1ede932b5c4a1ef71b5aba5d75913e92
8bf267302471da26d9852030ad18403fe2348eed
'2011-12-29T05:39:01-05:00'
describe
'2148' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOW' 'sip-files00199.txt'
c07feff5ac32f93dec39fca0522b3c64
de7d1201cd3e38d32e22295c3bffc8179267b8d9
'2011-12-29T05:35:32-05:00'
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOX' 'sip-files00200.txt'
a5c9378f5e8521289345a59b5a5d9258
89fde256218d2737ef206229448462a7319026d3
'2011-12-29T05:38:12-05:00'
describe
'2247' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOY' 'sip-files00201.txt'
e4ab0c6301bc329608289fcd3243071a
09dac56c161f5611f3482784bc21143894ae5a21
describe
'2841' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMOZ' 'sip-files00202.txt'
6c3ce42fb900b1530423e9e6c095a150
5e964e26eac1742c88c399853d05950c6ac73aa4
'2011-12-29T05:36:37-05:00'
describe
'1889' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPA' 'sip-files00203.txt'
f3ed9025a6b6a77d214b03219c27dd89
82da34b134e70a5d6027f4edf2f0712cd203c87f
'2011-12-29T05:35:19-05:00'
describe
'2758' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPB' 'sip-files00204.txt'
fcfe77d671cfa249b36cb7b8dc26cff4
4ef30f409161d26dae7f6e2c29c9cb59f604a587
'2011-12-29T05:35:02-05:00'
describe
'2386' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPC' 'sip-files00205.txt'
11aa53bad774e982f324207dd60f8531
54f07055709c6b94121814575315c033345a99b5
'2011-12-29T05:38:09-05:00'
describe
'2893' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPD' 'sip-files00206.txt'
4e69e84f2e74c1f155476137647522d1
1ef131f84c92c539cfba475c53d547ff5c40765a
describe
'1835' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPE' 'sip-files00207.txt'
49eff593d1f14ee009725660e66d4bcf
674e60fe086125103579641e05db9bf00f6ae486
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPF' 'sip-files00208.txt'
cf483ebf9ca0a04ebc0742edbc94a1f6
7273bcf8972bbeb73b342aba8d4fb90f75e98f2a
'2011-12-29T05:37:37-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2096' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPG' 'sip-files00209.txt'
a60d1d3deae1ec015c67c380e4d10870
394696457c1e7daa19178f0bc33e182611e8864d
'2011-12-29T05:38:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPH' 'sip-files00210.txt'
29a547b8db00e87f931c74d050d6e862
5e685881fe3497a6167b4d8d7a6ed448bcf6bdc6
'2011-12-29T05:38:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPI' 'sip-files00211.txt'
eb49579801b272f93b9ac4a1945e627c
4dada6fbd12b3020af670c2b2e1dbf6c60b5aa0c
'2011-12-29T05:38:18-05:00'
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPJ' 'sip-files00212.txt'
5c7c3d86731da120a709eee1507272ec
215d976253d2dd198a4b23e5e635d3f846179f2d
'2011-12-29T05:36:07-05:00'
describe
'2606' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPK' 'sip-files00213.txt'
8147458c906129184a7b9c7435ca6699
ee88787efe327075dea701626a2b819715605615
describe
'953' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPL' 'sip-files00214.txt'
38fb2fb2903ab93bd9f232e13ee272a8
8a3b3429ffc5f3462d5a84742f1f1f98ee51e55f
describe
'2158' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPM' 'sip-files00215.txt'
9dfdfa40b39eff0a8257cda954dc8c40
b04e41fc528e5e9fd94edef0ec02007b725225b1
describe
'2698' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPN' 'sip-files00216.txt'
67cc73478a945f3c48521697f18dc6a4
cedd57995b17a1c0ce0988e3ad15e4c969e08898
'2011-12-29T05:35:51-05:00'
describe
'2117' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPO' 'sip-files00217.txt'
7fb31453954a44c300b4be352bc036ad
74a9d0b9b78566fe12f2fd82d1221d39f400a632
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPP' 'sip-files00218.txt'
e251186a9d7ae6e0c4f6aa6bd97f68ea
739edebc80579c9272436954e8c219d68a5d22a7
'2011-12-29T05:37:08-05:00'
describe
'2576' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPQ' 'sip-files00219.txt'
17f352c8a43f2ca558a3857cce9b218e
aa6c5c8d476b598c7fb3a9504985650a7161413b
describe
'1696' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPR' 'sip-files00220.txt'
945710d8083264bd1f7b0f7a739fc5fa
2639fd4a214f3f13f887eb9fc75b8131397a576f
'2011-12-29T05:39:03-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'901' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPS' 'sip-files00221.txt'
6ff129c1491502f3a397ccb6b31791ea
8b9ddde91f067f00747d7a7085cd9d44237a4aa7
'2011-12-29T05:39:29-05:00'
describe
'2824' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPT' 'sip-files00222.txt'
dfbd851ece12a3878a8d499b0d4f2ddf
c15175676b8abefc78c001b9997bbb4e63c7c7ce
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPU' 'sip-files00223.txt'
7c3c66fa071158dd695ff197b1495f40
7a8c6963561efd0736345dd4ae63fe5d201936ff
'2011-12-29T05:34:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPV' 'sip-files00224.txt'
37a7ede1663e62e9619ee0a7f00013dd
153494894efa68360d309fc86c0bd55d01724998
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPW' 'sip-files00225.txt'
94e8e8f491ad3983e479d8362ef16194
844d044b27ff236692afadfe11b12cde06475f74
'2011-12-29T05:38:56-05:00'
describe
'318' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPX' 'sip-files00226.txt'
6341823fce964c3c83256efe8597fdc7
9c5b122c80179fc56a412a3aab4bd210b57fd762
'2011-12-29T05:35:09-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPY' 'sip-files00227.txt'
b336a2f504fb8dbd550730bca0c3bf5a
7b08fabf3efa41f2a24b40e4cac29481c1dfafe3
describe
'2706' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMPZ' 'sip-files00228.txt'
7140adcac28657fc7592086720ae8862
2e3ce10e58e0cc3d678a80e5092b177335eb8948
'2011-12-29T05:38:47-05:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQA' 'sip-files00229.txt'
4d531445eb3495ab826daa48284d66fe
607667c3d211356be9ac2528859efb414bde2d3c
describe
'2469' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQB' 'sip-files00230.txt'
363f092edbe52348cd18c5a561c43b73
6f79a56f48192d394f1cddd1e64c6a7b30ab3836
describe
'1754' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQC' 'sip-files00231.txt'
a6fd64fab0d5d984d6c606d91405544c
7ef71dc1955d223251aff47f767e03e1e3f8eadc
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQD' 'sip-files00232.txt'
2082f1780d86e62f4d06d76544f1239d
f8916a4dcb07baee97224c7171d10917e5b42932
describe
'2857' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQE' 'sip-files00233.txt'
abde87367e18f14788ba837d8a7a7549
aada1e51b41c28974dc72a5a027bab4081dfec72
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQF' 'sip-files00234.txt'
6ab39718d6f9820708759fd06916b97a
304dc0b2ba759aa4af860402e62b048acc167e93
'2011-12-29T05:41:11-05:00'
describe
'1790' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQG' 'sip-files00235.txt'
ee485db502b5636d6d45e70ca94a2a7e
149f114b78e291079ef5dc3af15fad5f07ef94a5
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQH' 'sip-files00236.txt'
0622cd5f887ad598176246d4a7e7cc30
ff4ee81dc33478b4596cfefd404db8891a9beeb9
describe
'1725' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQI' 'sip-files00237.txt'
7bbd0e450048f55854559a3eacbecd3a
4d655c319b0f92397bc3a81bd122a9bc32a9eb34
'2011-12-29T05:35:20-05:00'
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQJ' 'sip-files00238.txt'
e950a6bf8f9820c2a07b5777942bd258
1f22d9bc37a2637f44b66177cc873262f84a7330
'2011-12-29T05:39:47-05:00'
describe
'2865' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQK' 'sip-files00239.txt'
bef6206c7443d68a55d07ba5375e6b14
a636256da7ed59541ff6a8d630860fc128200a1c
'2011-12-29T05:36:33-05:00'
describe
'2949' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQL' 'sip-files00240.txt'
8812347e17e5846278084a28e8f1bf7e
a343d97d237770b06e7c6a2461ccf55804c43396
describe
'2143' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQM' 'sip-files00241.txt'
a9d46735ecf8ec7cc130c527a3da8337
5732ddc80841b71113aa6a5864634821230d2734
'2011-12-29T05:40:35-05:00'
describe
'2675' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQN' 'sip-files00242.txt'
44e2d92796947eaf293a3e5ff80c3d56
d33474092e0379870496b33e10ef09a65754ab00
'2011-12-29T05:35:13-05:00'
describe
'679' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQO' 'sip-files00243.txt'
ebe9f805641da673d0b7a67a75ae70c7
28888ea8ac4835caf0db10cac309c8879f78a752
'2011-12-29T05:36:10-05:00'
describe
'2740' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQP' 'sip-files00244.txt'
22bd96851d02b8a3a8f61b035713c85c
96436667166088b1c5356ca540ebefba6849a8ac
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQQ' 'sip-files00245.txt'
be523205367ef358a0e4b861dd2a4898
2213735899dce84c82edccc24314ea88f7e31211
describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQR' 'sip-files00246.txt'
064299fa560fdbab97726c5db883fd19
760602895f159457510f46ea73387c4c3c83fba6
'2011-12-29T05:41:10-05:00'
describe
'2292' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQS' 'sip-files00247.txt'
dfcdafd9fe5c60f0a204589500c656bf
149488e390267bb530560af9fdb4c3b4ccb19afc
'2011-12-29T05:40:02-05:00'
describe
'789' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQT' 'sip-files00248.txt'
dba44c9b0e0de4ddd128dd8e5a105b4f
e7be113275e9bca03808391ade56f77fb0dc2bbb
describe
'2414' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQU' 'sip-files00249.txt'
c978f0a38b758f70f28c17bdfd197232
936122de03c3f2b4f99ace7c137fee328fc29d50
'2011-12-29T05:34:55-05:00'
describe
'2725' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQV' 'sip-files00250.txt'
49825f73aebdb562f931780e3d63eebe
cb63992477e31b85135e11e978bfd738f4f60600
describe
'377' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQW' 'sip-files00251.txt'
3683e3d8aa50a580970fe80318525c73
c26c44ab990fa97bce88e642df133624b9099fb7
'2011-12-29T05:37:00-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'731' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQX' 'sip-files00252.txt'
648ca93547f3be031980587e2089c2f8
ea84f09e8c25b17fac6a86d6203d6c615fbd66c8
'2011-12-29T05:38:48-05:00'
describe
'2318' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQY' 'sip-files00253.txt'
6c9350f5c3ac567aeab8b856fc0612c6
80f5c073f863b315b2e0b1bf517a86864997acfa
'2011-12-29T05:39:50-05:00'
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMQZ' 'sip-files00254.txt'
012185f86b276a6315a1247ab8775a7f
e38c5407fa3ff3dec0ab1a545e2ccde690f64f90
'2011-12-29T05:37:55-05:00'
describe
'3048' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRA' 'sip-files00255.txt'
709d73e4ee1cae620e5c88150dc23a8a
e38c02ca7b74785427d534ab36141e8e90caf082
'2011-12-29T05:41:36-05:00'
describe
'2966' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRB' 'sip-files00256.txt'
0629fac023fe43174432dfd93bf63fd7
4cb4468391d4eaf91bda7834a3fa0ce5aa9d12ac
'2011-12-29T05:34:49-05:00'
describe
'258' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRC' 'sip-files00257.txt'
46e39c74454f6b301a4d44947cfec0d5
ce60a2c64c02605e59fd99ff2b0924c686ae01b3
'2011-12-29T05:40:22-05:00'
describe
'787' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRD' 'sip-files00258.txt'
ee4f7a12a07917e1e621315e8f04f803
c70796a81ca3fa1f9406949e43d389161317b5dd
'2011-12-29T05:35:05-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2243' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRE' 'sip-files00259.txt'
bfdadfe2375bb896627565ef09c793f8
7489a6b1ec66e64ba3242e6564c383e45faf75b8
'2011-12-29T05:40:33-05:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRF' 'sip-files00260.txt'
f2966b0c6021f9ebbca6bb28ea3df30b
0c8203238178d57f6e98d73b5e6ab42fac17ce79
'2011-12-29T05:40:29-05:00'
describe
'2230' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRG' 'sip-files00261.txt'
97cceebd4d26604837c5712fbf7de95c
2aad270b53bd4c5bb603432d9e9ce61a1d3c87f0
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRH' 'sip-files00262.txt'
c387c23232d801a2972aa20019a4481d
930763c5b2b3bc07aa6ce90d1d80a6a1f735e4f9
'2011-12-29T05:37:48-05:00'
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRI' 'sip-files00263.txt'
91fb1f3d8f01c8a143317d7b33f98b14
0ea75290c03975ef7ed61c64d5063e92ad55dd36
'2011-12-29T05:35:21-05:00'
describe
'806' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRJ' 'sip-files00264.txt'
12d39d52c90a8f353e59bff3068fe862
8a11ada56faa2519248a16aac9107d39df245709
'2011-12-29T05:38:40-05:00'
describe
'5998' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRK' 'sip-files00265.txt'
481c0d7bb074d44caa914128688a40e9
f6495b91287c0745047c63675a302f79ff062643
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRL' 'sip-files00273.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-12-29T05:37:07-05:00'
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRM' 'sip-files00001.pro'
ce274399cff28eb20d4bec726add73f9
21fcbb5c458cd2e81ee8952157e18d646053badb
'2011-12-29T05:37:41-05:00'
describe
'2227' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRN' 'sip-files00002.pro'
e1e4e64e0bba60213eb6022c082b8598
2143de5b2629dc15ac05b99ae3fb88496f011790
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRO' 'sip-files00003.pro'
92117b4ffd14e9de7ad808bd2d9326da
e163004695642ab8559b15c231cd311975a74c4d
describe
'20188' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRP' 'sip-files00006.pro'
5ab80ce1d42e7e492164eca85167f579
c06893413436feab86dc3547c9529a2423588838
'2011-12-29T05:35:58-05:00'
describe
'5092' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRQ' 'sip-files00008.pro'
1e9786d14190632c9895f66fbd2a0b50
07b90d54d622b5223a0a8843ac77215d1c64d086
'2011-12-29T05:35:48-05:00'
describe
'14104' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRR' 'sip-files00009.pro'
adaac053a6e68292899a273589a3af9c
1958eb23c9977e3f51907fff5fef85d1a057a309
describe
'1767' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRS' 'sip-files00010.pro'
7698d89355826c17fc428327ddd3c7ec
a01ac3aeeb4be07c37d9cf28e21f552d1676d1d6
'2011-12-29T05:38:00-05:00'
describe
'67336' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRT' 'sip-files00011.pro'
4cf37859736364aa0ead2991bba14107
714736717bfdea0c93499f2a5bb889df0eb88317
'2011-12-29T05:38:20-05:00'
describe
'44002' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRU' 'sip-files00013.pro'
83e13efcaff8efe2981542b8dba296e0
f34a900763ada9c6fec8721aae1c37ac2e4f8068
describe
'52801' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRV' 'sip-files00014.pro'
7f0ca176fe3c776b27ba11981cc41a7e
3f8013ea524239b401897f517dd1709de4d980f7
'2011-12-29T05:39:28-05:00'
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRW' 'sip-files00015.pro'
0fa0972a3ed9b989a4aea0cfe17c7837
53c0a255480d90c61d5b7d26b3ee271eedffcc1b
describe
'3983' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRX' 'sip-files00016.pro'
e8aaf1bdf394fed7891250334197b63a
62fca370ae1db98d44a02a4e6f4e63941fe47751
describe
'40639' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRY' 'sip-files00017.pro'
5083da82d50fd37fe83b2cc800fb996b
31df43ff562c8360a545b519f96161d6a0c983e2
'2011-12-29T05:41:00-05:00'
describe
'42762' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMRZ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
636fe946bc0f62f6ba8655d58c790957
3e2b7c4827fe912291b59026979a10674e4409be
describe
'28964' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSA' 'sip-files00019.pro'
e553a2c9d2009249c3278142a4cd1a97
8739ce5b396339003365f41adf8ec7d82f330e6a
describe
'52989' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSB' 'sip-files00020.pro'
d58c4954847d7da3bcab81ece8e00c26
83cd3c23a37afd16aa882966cb0f6467dc8149a3
'2011-12-29T05:38:02-05:00'
describe
'28438' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSC' 'sip-files00021.pro'
fd405f8c5b20e788b0232b92a4efe8b2
d415eb3e08da903b4d03bc457e34e8bf03951996
'2011-12-29T05:36:15-05:00'
describe
'30465' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSD' 'sip-files00022.pro'
b29bdab7c32ea1d33a01fc45e76cd5c0
1d21d3e1d75dee9f17527ba3eaab4b732108d363
'2011-12-29T05:37:45-05:00'
describe
'46759' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSE' 'sip-files00023.pro'
68b48c6bb490a516b2a71b1887ff49de
321c1c22e6b04d95a18d640ef1336c32366bf2e2
'2011-12-29T05:36:31-05:00'
describe
'46230' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSF' 'sip-files00024.pro'
57ce87c56c1dd7fb10686a8047d626fb
516b617262edff4ecaf3787c4e7a7d4477f74e2f
'2011-12-29T05:38:33-05:00'
describe
'50285' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSG' 'sip-files00025.pro'
cdc80d29b2a9beaff08dd87931eaeddb
5e35bf1a6b3e1e47c63a6de6f811197cae00fd9e
'2011-12-29T05:36:49-05:00'
describe
'35454' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSH' 'sip-files00026.pro'
65b7a6f3e285b794556f690ec6eca353
383e84871c554d41d7bd8266feed20fb7524fb30
'2011-12-29T05:35:12-05:00'
describe
'13271' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSI' 'sip-files00027.pro'
4e182c929550b77ad772411526b75866
7ab8af79ad67acdbfe6cee9e1469ae0cd0d35e17
'2011-12-29T05:41:12-05:00'
describe
'55879' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSJ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
ce9584f367261e7c168e430c28429bd0
3792ee1901730725ec448c0e5380f3b7cb7d2154
'2011-12-29T05:37:13-05:00'
describe
'27854' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSK' 'sip-files00029.pro'
ffbd726fe36591e782e62d5577940b80
1e5685c7e965f588c15d1962b22fcb8122c03523
'2011-12-29T05:35:25-05:00'
describe
'60200' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSL' 'sip-files00030.pro'
bb5fbaf311c088896c15ae52e1a5cf27
3f90c49995583eecdbaea73cd18bb853ab3373e4
'2011-12-29T05:38:11-05:00'
describe
'28473' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSM' 'sip-files00031.pro'
86ba71248428790c73347adb4d1b4446
9a8f43d911e5ca63e5210def1fb5b0b95502555a
'2011-12-29T05:40:08-05:00'
describe
'5562' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSN' 'sip-files00032.pro'
5ec04a3bee5525231513934264bf7202
b18ed791823e563a59aeb3f2d07543a4824151b4
'2011-12-29T05:40:44-05:00'
describe
'43724' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSO' 'sip-files00033.pro'
a18071d41238ee0ae6eb6d84c5fa94d6
a6f5fbc3e4c1d515c844ab2c59f004a6894ade02
describe
'73117' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSP' 'sip-files00034.pro'
907972dceac1e967c5404be9a1cf72a6
dc85ff597bbabc939b090719a460a85f6e94e30c
describe
'21412' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSQ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
fc388d34aa7c76492965bb80030f0dee
82e488dc3de88dce03b0e724647fa911a0454e88
'2011-12-29T05:37:16-05:00'
describe
'37399' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSR' 'sip-files00036.pro'
1612675a027f1d764cc9343f0549a374
0f204ad67172520ea815c5c82e5e73640abec0dd
describe
'43608' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSS' 'sip-files00037.pro'
4e94b055d020453ef6ec0e3eef7bca92
f569644d11155e81998e15e07d5f8ace113f7377
describe
'39731' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMST' 'sip-files00038.pro'
61376b2249e5287eb73d573cf32c9003
d28fab869ec94feaef1df49abbc9a4a068c0777d
'2011-12-29T05:38:14-05:00'
describe
'34209' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSU' 'sip-files00039.pro'
20b7487d44be39a7dca4f5ac957bc527
2736149f71b38c2e574a743c7a84a78f2454f277
'2011-12-29T05:39:16-05:00'
describe
'62848' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSV' 'sip-files00040.pro'
60699a1d6344d73db8a476eb2deab691
bdc9231d9995f128182b46dcc0315fa01b066693
'2011-12-29T05:39:00-05:00'
describe
'34121' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSW' 'sip-files00041.pro'
d68b06df73b6d9604e9e091470eeac45
5b0873bbc3244ab1b75289cc00af3709cdd708f3
describe
'70507' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSX' 'sip-files00042.pro'
e963b0ec74946c7a8ab2b2c03002b62b
56ded1493333d2dee48b2ba2e4bd988125949d98
'2011-12-29T05:40:49-05:00'
describe
'36072' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSY' 'sip-files00043.pro'
88af4e424ab3206511006450f8b2bf78
6e43716aeba0db76c6bbe88f153a32487cb6920f
describe
'54553' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMSZ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
38b54c46645b87b93f501cd6f14406a5
869b1cc828318ee60e8e3c86e007c2047badb5dc
describe
'41374' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTA' 'sip-files00045.pro'
0914bc50c620cc44f02cf62adf891830
0d48a5aea88e607a7dfc2a3382d8a2a22a91ec5f
describe
'37097' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTB' 'sip-files00046.pro'
c31b8a52b08a471c22e36a547df2a0d7
fbaffafb95605b98acae7ed97316579a7547c9cd
'2011-12-29T05:38:35-05:00'
describe
'65228' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTC' 'sip-files00047.pro'
30dba84383d780b65f5af04f59670940
ac62c1c2ec2c8bd9cb80b3e4e6c91cbf13f172c7
describe
'53941' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTD' 'sip-files00048.pro'
5fe5bae0466987f150fc6f8a970cfa28
24d930c58383d1ea8d6a526c1a6e26aaaa48cfad
describe
'12086' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTE' 'sip-files00049.pro'
40e060be8e9899361898f47c1c84a6e5
802b58c343eb7730b58c850f0a82b9f81726d7f1
describe
'33273' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTF' 'sip-files00050.pro'
11c716505a478f89a01f7c5f802b89f7
275d6a0a4ef5113f0b5bec35fbf25802a572ed6d
describe
'41151' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTG' 'sip-files00051.pro'
284f4ae84824fb059b764ac800ac084e
b237e89d43e3b94a438745b6994d949a745c7308
'2011-12-29T05:38:53-05:00'
describe
'49674' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTH' 'sip-files00052.pro'
59982d60f0f0eed21c9b2a7d2ebc9e39
ba4a29ab31baacd191c0bd5f3c80884747c7023f
'2011-12-29T05:39:23-05:00'
describe
'29586' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTI' 'sip-files00053.pro'
8f5758fadfee1b2067faa27e7bb5d8b0
ba535aa1f4cb327336fc8f1be592cc66384e7510
describe
'60263' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTJ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
2fdee3038cf4e92d76f466ae25d57750
ea467b232934c98a1b112c04c06d597d6a821ae1
describe
'35929' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTK' 'sip-files00055.pro'
6c01e65232ec1803aa77a6fd9da56667
74f55fde3a4e4111177e2828d212c1bd0f32adcc
'2011-12-29T05:36:22-05:00'
describe
'33094' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTL' 'sip-files00056.pro'
6991feaed565f9bf44a1a3aa2b53987e
0eea1475384e685c5e36c435d2738d07edec1107
describe
'51959' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTM' 'sip-files00057.pro'
c6f04dc28ce66131a86ad5fae82f97ef
8942ac3cd8a19faa5a613fced93071f26704b18a
describe
'29715' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTN' 'sip-files00058.pro'
a6f84101c44ec4aeb3886a6168099415
55e1139a8b70105666af419ffd99b3e918e3e7dc
describe
'37845' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTO' 'sip-files00059.pro'
b06833ade9a3636cf2133f9ab640edc1
968fc87bfe194a5b8599272cd3e792cf7fdc4fec
describe
'29514' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTP' 'sip-files00060.pro'
333180d8ff54049138a6ee217ec1805a
786c9f3480022f9a35fa86916ac24ada78ab9c7c
'2011-12-29T05:40:05-05:00'
describe
'33048' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTQ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
228e72c5e543aa5a5d467efd4fbcd1e3
a4c08ca1b6d8847639e7703a4b5476ccf299b0cb
'2011-12-29T05:38:46-05:00'
describe
'72791' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTR' 'sip-files00062.pro'
4a2e532bc47c3fe22088cd46bec83834
55fd48f789f2fcf4742df888855440f50cd4ec57
describe
'6522' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTS' 'sip-files00063.pro'
5e7d2ddd55c44a6f23611d2b60f05c7b
59e2cc076f00668f8a060b77a79d68b181da1da5
describe
'59192' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTT' 'sip-files00064.pro'
45f824cd81b531ac0e834a1741c1aa63
fba65a05519b4c1c768a1ea52f3fa9482dd8e7f2
describe
'40453' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTU' 'sip-files00065.pro'
fb953b5fdc87f9bfecfd7d12fcd817c2
a29f4d7d92e58a5ee9b470afe6997ca2e2315182
describe
'42171' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTV' 'sip-files00066.pro'
47ab45851109f50914a23fb9d9046302
4ae5f898f9abd19362b11a36808c8b6517d19b5a
describe
'36013' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTW' 'sip-files00067.pro'
bd1d8742e2a5fc4f1872b99f3740d467
3cb7c9d05ad69c78af3e7cbaf8345d4c31df5cbd
describe
'35436' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTX' 'sip-files00068.pro'
5c81d36b98be088eae6cbea27421b6eb
f7a4bc6763a589564a3a214967449d045f9649cd
'2011-12-29T05:36:11-05:00'
describe
'40060' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTY' 'sip-files00069.pro'
dcc91d3861b5fdff7f9362f3c6bfa20d
9efb559e59bd37a4abb6356520af9deda2cc5438
'2011-12-29T05:41:07-05:00'
describe
'2219' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMTZ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
2dba785a24e8dbe417b4c6574cfe6c84
cbedf3aca2d676a96c3f30b7d3f76afc4954d95c
describe
'38859' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUA' 'sip-files00071.pro'
3f97224d9ffdac69a3e45b13093eb891
942178fd624e3449796447b8da4e0fdce7619889
describe
'69669' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUB' 'sip-files00072.pro'
2f615755a7f34a1f2debf7ea2700ac1b
31f4a6bdb2018347101cf0d985db685e1b7bc30d
'2011-12-29T05:36:03-05:00'
describe
'33096' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUC' 'sip-files00073.pro'
5d9a39f7e29906c6805cb9ab893fef53
aadce0fe865995c0e5d6839e6261d6937be1f7dd
describe
'35790' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUD' 'sip-files00074.pro'
a3b8d1a5990078bc5b1c00c4cca1d10d
fb0b6bc1dddf907f338aadb930d07d3e2ee59dbc
describe
'68935' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUE' 'sip-files00075.pro'
8c131276040596f69aab2a52849810a4
519bbfd51e2730fb75d8a6e712a269434e1dc909
describe
'19509' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUF' 'sip-files00076.pro'
178cd033e5efd4757e011ad10e75b379
ee26dbb911acb153839c5bcce3ae8aaa52478f0e
'2011-12-29T05:40:25-05:00'
describe
'25567' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUG' 'sip-files00077.pro'
eb71caa51cbbf8c080c0e7b6b04be883
c178b81fd0a737e9237a321ba43bba9aa80576b1
describe
'69954' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUH' 'sip-files00078.pro'
b58412ae59190c0f6de61270f0eba39c
b312151281206985e7519d4d1d07992a5aa7e818
describe
'26181' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUI' 'sip-files00079.pro'
db8addb49e8e838b88fda4d1a020a1ae
b224d2e218ce0eb723da546cd3ef4142b3518571
describe
'26430' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUJ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
807ae817f2002a61c6bbb7ffe04a2459
e9c4ee961fa4d513f19b7eda6b96ca27d3d9ff1d
describe
'71216' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUK' 'sip-files00081.pro'
5d8b09351d05cd135b1b2edb838f6b80
839e616a655bb47e282659999db8166959a0ea69
describe
'47808' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUL' 'sip-files00082.pro'
41a61bf7eb1275a058649c0fc17f22a8
d2e069a27b6b5f51a470e5cc5c114d7397a6297b
'2011-12-29T05:40:45-05:00'
describe
'73726' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUM' 'sip-files00083.pro'
aee9decffad7670ba831e321f10a5694
0ec4b4b03ede18783aa8f2f28539d81571661a90
describe
'37736' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUN' 'sip-files00084.pro'
dda71de948009d7fabaee80aa43bccef
7ec683b4ee225fc623e80f39104a9623374c91ea
describe
'36181' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUO' 'sip-files00085.pro'
2bf8a4ccfd2d337c5e6cf341bd82aed8
ee0ace50eb211f398456db87b648516017d75b83
'2011-12-29T05:40:12-05:00'
describe
'58930' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUP' 'sip-files00086.pro'
2cf684e76e4842fd66706675221af8b0
c07a14d1e788979f4af1cecbd137c0aa16ececb5
describe
'37058' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUQ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
33aaa6c2c02794599c507f1397ecfc07
555a59020a4e13e5f539f1a9f64d12c8bcd581b4
'2011-12-29T05:36:13-05:00'
describe
'19954' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUR' 'sip-files00088.pro'
ff42b724c6e1c9b914134ea8f48b3eb5
c04acfe27affb76490a62607702233b82006767d
describe
'46275' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUS' 'sip-files00089.pro'
a354e8abb9a2fe2fcf9c804623f71dec
1a4d3f0ed5cd7107e48ed6fb6cfc0653b6f2fb67
describe
'45631' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUT' 'sip-files00090.pro'
021d98d2cdae271170818ca356d260a3
5568936e6d2b5e7cfdf397ae903db72d2557163a
'2011-12-29T05:38:10-05:00'
describe
'45973' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUU' 'sip-files00091.pro'
2d8deff8049d386f1e0bf992b5076a97
86fa61d8c6f5a3057c5a3803a27432823940c365
'2011-12-29T05:35:04-05:00'
describe
'1992' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUV' 'sip-files00092.pro'
1c39774d0f0b58ab6ef1f507e341d6d7
0ac2ae1b5cdc0eade340a4132aa3084d96a2967f
'2011-12-29T05:41:23-05:00'
describe
'69916' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUW' 'sip-files00093.pro'
c3f2da70782e02b31d7136e36a0bc750
2c00fec64447d664105e3280d28c3dee97f8ce36
'2011-12-29T05:39:56-05:00'
describe
'48876' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUX' 'sip-files00094.pro'
862b1c8b4506688737a50cdf3a7bc06d
cb42c9eaef34cdd1d2f2ea625a1e6f1f87f7f27b
describe
'39797' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUY' 'sip-files00095.pro'
a716cd57c0c21c69a141c49aa1454acb
fa1111661a2107b9096f6124a13a82c88d267bcd
describe
'44648' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMUZ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
a7bc3a83e1969929017f072809b7cf45
6b2166c13066503f8943344619942d7a59cd66f0
'2011-12-29T05:39:42-05:00'
describe
'38429' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVA' 'sip-files00097.pro'
857eb5638f836dd67d0bb8f58b92b699
db94415792ac353f4e2b694d181dc10d00eb6c36
describe
'36596' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVB' 'sip-files00098.pro'
ddab3e8bcf329f84ea1a42feee96e52a
989bc87ab34502ae83e8816e0629fa37e7798f0e
describe
'43497' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVC' 'sip-files00099.pro'
c488363e41cf57a4a8aa132242e19e79
5828293de172d7e49179671d8bc5f0ceffae9d41
'2011-12-29T05:36:30-05:00'
describe
'52620' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVD' 'sip-files00100.pro'
a5c35ee6e0a3dcb774eacd54b733dab5
6b1ba439f7b233a762a5a47c5b8feb4ed6b6a6e0
describe
'36392' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVE' 'sip-files00101.pro'
41ba6c86e125fd3d54b9c74865d801ae
0d5954d5ac414c8cb0e7efd1393f9648b55d35f3
describe
'25636' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVF' 'sip-files00102.pro'
fed22b31ce5cc4b638e9c13989195707
7b33c35afa008f16e0c6800d74eb15df822af496
describe
'60677' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVG' 'sip-files00103.pro'
1b057f6f8d59e0da1acabea725baa8d7
93b5e5786fac60ef6772f53ae2be78e73666366d
describe
'26259' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVH' 'sip-files00104.pro'
5c479d290fdd9f6da3f72152762c4c82
dd7e52a17d86d7034bf31ea101ad1730d24f0503
'2011-12-29T05:34:54-05:00'
describe
'48441' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVI' 'sip-files00105.pro'
414a6ffab867ced47f313ddbf51b718a
a2b3a6eca00dd6197e1e8d1c1952de185f30148e
'2011-12-29T05:41:13-05:00'
describe
'56314' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVJ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
4e14930588d822e97033ec0b24dea410
6cd98b24d78d0897d0da1430022418d5e1021c1a
'2011-12-29T05:41:31-05:00'
describe
'13808' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVK' 'sip-files00107.pro'
2a6dde05a13fa1ce4724ef6dc52b566f
8fed210f1de2326a8a20b86c2c17e5c2b4a6d304
describe
'70721' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVL' 'sip-files00108.pro'
5274f17c8a757af894e11ee4b0fb5114
18291f5bf62d3a9cf7b660a616a6f8ae3a8dfe5f
'2011-12-29T05:39:43-05:00'
describe
'46277' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVM' 'sip-files00109.pro'
69c8c81456ee734cb863f0bb366c14c0
1b44713abb259b0595297a9c9bd0f0c2079d3a44
describe
'4003' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVN' 'sip-files00110.pro'
1e5c5fc96d3e4df168584be0128617ec
61c1b899f5fb126035e39c37b0745cd83a16ba5a
'2011-12-29T05:39:04-05:00'
describe
'46591' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVO' 'sip-files00111.pro'
59fd20a16f9950a51d87cdb29dec0220
445a293b099caa651b2972a28c57d867502d2cb7
'2011-12-29T05:34:38-05:00'
describe
'36527' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVP' 'sip-files00112.pro'
8957905fad2b27e150a54e3312714881
da6a22fe1448360d9518fe27a054df11eb47e8c5
'2011-12-29T05:34:44-05:00'
describe
'50161' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVQ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
c03a9719ac7057d0c652f9845ddacafd
7a8e98c93c9893ce2dee1bd6aa9abd436ae225d8
describe
'54082' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVR' 'sip-files00114.pro'
d2afb855be638f1c743a2b294e81bb92
825ef38e8c2bc4459d534911fe5dc267df9ef26a
'2011-12-29T05:39:58-05:00'
describe
'21175' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVS' 'sip-files00115.pro'
70ec552bbf312e2feb22bdb15d6a2917
8a39c0fa01162e0499712179477c0e4492dc8eab
describe
'35706' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVT' 'sip-files00116.pro'
7427be659e3e041d3ecd11db13028d7f
e0bf1c29068dbf06b818fbc15a6fa4c7e222d9c5
'2011-12-29T05:34:56-05:00'
describe
'54589' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVU' 'sip-files00117.pro'
6066fbf16d26431c8a323f8f6249df34
ccc2c5114b0b0fd58a665741496fafe047179e99
'2011-12-29T05:40:13-05:00'
describe
'72907' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVV' 'sip-files00118.pro'
cd3e30e7ca794b1600be1a891061273b
cd824887fa6625663d63337b58c92a021e75c49d
'2011-12-29T05:41:35-05:00'
describe
'22602' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVW' 'sip-files00119.pro'
208200a842b3480ef684407a32dabe2c
725a0446e5d6e355fdcbfba38bf6a2e22273f906
'2011-12-29T05:38:45-05:00'
describe
'2968' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVX' 'sip-files00120.pro'
b30b3ec25d3fcddbf49565f7132b1106
cbb35ae28c9710017a05088940702faa8140cd4c
describe
'64580' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVY' 'sip-files00121.pro'
b99f4da8290945e74c3ba09831706a14
ae62429ea40f7336805c67ee5af606046730feb7
'2011-12-29T05:37:19-05:00'
describe
'62612' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMVZ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
a04709b038ddb5ecbd1aeaa42d74ff05
51a46ae435d357ea3e5c620b2fba93e10f8c9bf5
describe
'31680' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWA' 'sip-files00123.pro'
bc2465c11a41cf29da9cf41001cdb41e
91a7d02d8aa950a368e8f0e1f7ee4d5685d7068b
'2011-12-29T05:38:17-05:00'
describe
'36113' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWB' 'sip-files00124.pro'
7e210641546361d866afa6c972453d1f
9670eaf7d8fdda91de4a51cbedf91b1bbcaf7b18
describe
'43578' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWC' 'sip-files00125.pro'
6341c469e95573098aeb3f4151a2e64a
56a6c81600a4998e0092af0eae136f637d8e05dc
describe
'37083' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWD' 'sip-files00126.pro'
55dede0edad94f913fcb0212ebc80e36
e471ca6a69a8bebcb3d740c50b6b5fcacd72a048
describe
'36317' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWE' 'sip-files00127.pro'
e5f49e3132bcca27e5174afb600fbce6
f67b63cbf7929f64367b6813c7af9a227a09442c
describe
'69843' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWF' 'sip-files00128.pro'
c417098a3cb14344a32b31638ee325e1
89928f91176be8a8bb5e498cd02297f6beb2b9ad
'2011-12-29T05:41:18-05:00'
describe
'35166' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWG' 'sip-files00129.pro'
cac8b7a1237e6623f6372a90b02cb411
099a21ba05c6448abb58f31d3732523a8fb7dc88
describe
'16836' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWH' 'sip-files00130.pro'
7d89becfafb42789b0e25d0b491b82df
b1b5b23dff8eeb231159c865549b53bd4b15d179
describe
'43000' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWI' 'sip-files00131.pro'
f43855524d7313645f773e8157918835
35e88c93a4e72594e43fae84acad7760e2284bbe
describe
'32427' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWJ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
66f6fd20c642eac2c33557ffeaa113e0
9eeecaa6eecfaf1836f981d687df9171b44924f7
describe
'35141' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWK' 'sip-files00133.pro'
49f21084f100eb722b2542b54b38849f
0682525496bf4d2325cfb19503906aa2ea7f8703
'2011-12-29T05:34:52-05:00'
describe
'57300' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWL' 'sip-files00134.pro'
5b1ba21da1d4198bd0f0508c5a09e90a
16122d704a89267f7016bf55a6cd1406a4295cf4
describe
'50411' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWM' 'sip-files00135.pro'
5e42f127bf34ecb33c24d48db42e2845
d732d8ed8b7fc8c9242674ad9a1b021350ce72f2
describe
'36983' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWN' 'sip-files00136.pro'
51b6b3d9d41c438a22f84069edc7648b
5bac1c783b1a85151a660506efec78fe0db6b461
'2011-12-29T05:37:17-05:00'
describe
'47998' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWO' 'sip-files00137.pro'
ae3d9f7950efac5b207ba1b9311b707d
9749783aa7ceb746ac65636f4042f6eef33aca90
'2011-12-29T05:36:08-05:00'
describe
'49524' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWP' 'sip-files00138.pro'
993349f84c36ad73e135739792a72a7c
c500f326f64cb318fdc954e08c4eaf0c5c3aee35
'2011-12-29T05:39:20-05:00'
describe
'33383' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWQ' 'sip-files00139.pro'
02962647389e41428fb20b79af80ece5
6ad06fe8d32b6ad7dd1cb1bd4676034a9b1fb1c2
describe
'32039' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWR' 'sip-files00140.pro'
1970ebf85fb804684bbbe42e4c44aa2f
cff30fda05cfd9e00b667fa251397ab679dab2d2
'2011-12-29T05:40:30-05:00'
describe
'31226' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWS' 'sip-files00141.pro'
83dd8504daf8af07e14b324d524426f2
0aac43843a1efe63f53bf6ac0bd364d4f345f55b
describe
'52387' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWT' 'sip-files00142.pro'
564bb63e4c1a978241118b162f88d069
efafa3bff259d05d50b939da142eb0eefe021a84
describe
'39743' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWU' 'sip-files00143.pro'
2bd25fe857c45f389ec76b11d56e1e7a
099cb11f7e70696c89aac50fdc9fe62f04ef645d
'2011-12-29T05:37:56-05:00'
describe
'28942' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWV' 'sip-files00144.pro'
aa0b0449975c3fd3d598db13754709c5
107ba29023da000bcaba7b604e1a5f602ce0ead1
'2011-12-29T05:39:35-05:00'
describe
'42979' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWW' 'sip-files00145.pro'
4dab3ceaa58957179a50d3b56462e031
74d84d7c2b268c5e7b22375dacdb2e90731f8671
describe
'42275' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWX' 'sip-files00146.pro'
0f7e02187c0274a4191e16449e29f985
0923c38f4a087cb5a3bb3ffc73a22f5edb8a6089
'2011-12-29T05:37:01-05:00'
describe
'47534' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWY' 'sip-files00147.pro'
c7a911360bb87dcc29f355c74ddca751
ccb8acd2de6b14d5bedf61d9710b15eb8504b9f5
describe
'35160' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMWZ' 'sip-files00148.pro'
9a198523d0e23efa8980f0f0e5793157
5157f42ad9be694ae80693ca19b19c24b770e30b
describe
'32086' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXA' 'sip-files00149.pro'
711e00b2e0e11541261b5181b0cb6dbd
6947419371698ca432fa4aca01619615c7e8c54d
describe
'41758' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXB' 'sip-files00150.pro'
abcc7b2c22602c02c7346c878657f855
9cb71a47b5fda445bc48e76d381745ee058f012a
'2011-12-29T05:36:38-05:00'
describe
'35885' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXC' 'sip-files00151.pro'
9efec9f7f7aab92d45d4bf8e6022de0b
f9ba4463f4fcc3195da2b721e8b3c5d327e447d1
describe
'25178' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXD' 'sip-files00152.pro'
197e5ed37d5457cfc04364966c99ba62
8785d0c2bfb478b9df5bd7baccc4dc4987f89990
describe
'6770' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXE' 'sip-files00153.pro'
cad65095b904b55e8d6cbaced8e952df
708a4bc9e205da231d786915230daafcab609786
describe
'6140' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXF' 'sip-files00154.pro'
16de99181e1de59d0f3932b54144e5a6
7c547e58073eb246e1c7b10c2a33b22f9c62e8aa
'2011-12-29T05:38:42-05:00'
describe
'47244' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXG' 'sip-files00155.pro'
390115a5d975a3b2f50d3ed4328d0b37
de3fc86b18c6505e4a7af6b21fa47d29ca296b07
describe
'72733' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXH' 'sip-files00156.pro'
5b130f3ff8462f536fdf5678cd9cfd6c
aad360fc1b608c420ccfbbd500be590416bd6755
describe
'5036' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXI' 'sip-files00157.pro'
9e560dc84c004ce44b72911e8c31dcb7
e44b007d93d87ad7b4ba8b69a5579c0b712425b6
'2011-12-29T05:37:22-05:00'
describe
'28983' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXJ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
dd769344b475bc050d69e07a98fa3160
6a49932c94a783f4d1c97e90e37a25c50c244ed9
'2011-12-29T05:35:54-05:00'
describe
'51726' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXK' 'sip-files00159.pro'
276a598bd9f12b3e84d909174c4d5e08
109c0dd13fd45ad1cbd68cd08e9ab531ac56d79d
describe
'6642' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXL' 'sip-files00160.pro'
03a3cdd7af34a082f9ca55fc0ad307c7
7ee84b0b0b32e2b42e3e11abeedd9f9ebf8178f2
describe
'68206' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXM' 'sip-files00161.pro'
257707cf002fbf2323fd54cb6e172cd4
68993bd2becbe9e43e43166001b9cc8190ca7871
'2011-12-29T05:38:26-05:00'
describe
'62033' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXN' 'sip-files00162.pro'
04ef004f342eb763a288521e78266c88
d5b5660843e347b9f2479857234991307e400152
describe
'4607' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXO' 'sip-files00163.pro'
db640e91bb8725329b0c9e30dab4bf1b
555a0565e14f96a07624bc07e7570c78a0bd6fe4
describe
'55157' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXP' 'sip-files00164.pro'
b0a87c0af65543bcca2073714f14ba27
94295b7cd92826a6383dbaf0eb5cb01efdeca110
describe
'51251' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXQ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
0ffb1042134569c159bb24f29563b8df
ea0ccb999ff34b3947716bbee581c59fb073e9a1
'2011-12-29T05:41:24-05:00'
describe
'32503' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXR' 'sip-files00166.pro'
e4896a567170dc5c1f7a6febf511a448
0938d09b3cf794a81aa02161ba6a79179c625aea
describe
'45655' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXS' 'sip-files00167.pro'
41cb2e323c3c0f3b42169941539a04a3
19ee45a4ebc909f065e86ac742c30649983a5b50
describe
'30559' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXT' 'sip-files00168.pro'
2ae063470e8fadab58bcd0bf9a855bc7
879f58154e7bacaf132a256a45e61ffb9938156b
describe
'70700' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXU' 'sip-files00169.pro'
88d42fcaac9305f5430090730c6f8612
552f7f1a47fbc96d88fdbd5369cede2d0de16f7d
describe
'53211' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXV' 'sip-files00170.pro'
0ea21e19b2e6707f74c662fcc31abfac
379b74485d79299c2df1e86d768001a5c803baef
describe
'30844' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXW' 'sip-files00171.pro'
e492e3879ce90bb2d27e48d81ca0cf70
8b2824c37b09a4d0b9606f8704006b7dd7a04a71
describe
'28779' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXX' 'sip-files00172.pro'
9bc899d627cfce3e82e609ecdb2e1ec7
0b304485e11f92f7f76348eb1faa56bb683d2dc4
'2011-12-29T05:40:51-05:00'
describe
'3907' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXY' 'sip-files00173.pro'
13f926919f1c060421e9750ac1768eca
470c564cddd7db085b66709d82b8eff7bd2bd700
describe
'33146' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMXZ' 'sip-files00174.pro'
7cc8e4f1b97b33d00509a7f19fc85b9d
9dd5f2982e3004225c87b5b0d95e59bcee93b9bc
'2011-12-29T05:40:38-05:00'
describe
'41149' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYA' 'sip-files00175.pro'
e034918d9ec873ae77fa57a0f965dced
4106659fd619cd80b8227b5625b0c1ee61a0b9c6
'2011-12-29T05:41:30-05:00'
describe
'44834' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYB' 'sip-files00176.pro'
09b97f90f6d36ad20ad1d3605a83119e
5201a7b2720e19a41337248676fe4ced3b822c74
describe
'58133' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYC' 'sip-files00177.pro'
aef58a5b800b0b2a10cf8c8df67bc5ea
c74fe0e8d14b26a26b27f76517e64baf247067af
'2011-12-29T05:36:24-05:00'
describe
'69451' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYD' 'sip-files00178.pro'
a7f208ace2ba6d5cea9cd7751785526e
b93b37dfa426ca1a88ebb15c6f2e85446413b630
'2011-12-29T05:35:14-05:00'
describe
'10608' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYE' 'sip-files00179.pro'
49d87fb1df796d7d99f52569798e035e
ae095e841a293a9fce4e739c8fcd248700b8cece
describe
'54960' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYF' 'sip-files00180.pro'
90a8445aefb4b36aa18aa2aca74f8545
b57dc103181c91662b4b6ddde1c6203d12b431dc
describe
'58551' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYG' 'sip-files00181.pro'
334a803023952cbab0404d96dbefc491
b6aaca1c0e09dc0e71a2be1df96dfa4d37ec3b34
describe
'50359' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYH' 'sip-files00182.pro'
713e17059ad2c94271ad3539656ddd76
176c4b0b6277dd3ad72beea42fe273980a951a54
describe
'57474' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYI' 'sip-files00183.pro'
a3fc3af5087a912553c639d2c028eebf
782cf10bde9f5d65ba81c732b25865844bce6447
describe
'52329' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYJ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
e168b34b02666891646e666f44200c84
213d3076f7eb848d83720701415b3c5ed1ca3793
describe
'56751' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYK' 'sip-files00185.pro'
872624ae668b2a0a08737c00df6f268a
e18f64a8c7ee900305d3fe71bc5a61daf081a409
describe
'38139' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYL' 'sip-files00186.pro'
5e9b8422faabfdc6e4506f2c4c51fb66
796d815527b3011ec884a2440b56a1acc5c0e6a5
describe
'42566' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYM' 'sip-files00187.pro'
477fe31019607ab65f0f4ad20443b14a
d14ab4e7d81272fe31d91cac8dc83a038db53400
describe
'56326' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYN' 'sip-files00188.pro'
25e2f8603606326d9e33b25c2175b8c2
0d8fcbe3a6d4fca0120d05fba34cf498dbb48fd5
describe
'27422' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYO' 'sip-files00189.pro'
377675072431f84e370fc4fe2d1a9185
e4a8faa99ae64eaa2d524324d913c80d3fb5f200
describe
'5502' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYP' 'sip-files00190.pro'
422a6764c01e9229c2d2ddc3bc531521
62df085eeadc245492e6d28aa1b41f5c6fb31112
describe
'46832' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYQ' 'sip-files00191.pro'
81b397100bd681d6d08feaab3edc37df
878fb97c811f9db5587bf08541688f5e8ec2abe8
describe
'52199' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYR' 'sip-files00192.pro'
5d8339810053e0f0c4d65af4ec91bf58
72aa442f1b533a13cd4adcbd4bf0bba7295c08c1
describe
'42635' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYS' 'sip-files00193.pro'
48da508bc46f0535d645300183549009
b2b4e4a6bd7904e3b5289c31036895f22a6f6df6
describe
'12276' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYT' 'sip-files00194.pro'
153f8aa5ca4b1257ab58a9457cbacdd9
5cbe02434a4027c2af75ef71e6b70b39c18d5390
describe
'66074' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYU' 'sip-files00195.pro'
4e3c9989c160d8266568d242c1b9db04
29364d3534a9675d8d528e1d67b0d5ae132df135
describe
'54572' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYV' 'sip-files00196.pro'
db0299ce39309203399ca6137f317660
20a7ca1f0c2a989053f9888b70647e821d831347
'2011-12-29T05:40:07-05:00'
describe
'52823' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYW' 'sip-files00197.pro'
0e1dd4ef327fe5a447c1c3894a2e83bb
12ec2dda417a8f91a821afd6b78859233bcf696d
'2011-12-29T05:40:32-05:00'
describe
'45036' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYX' 'sip-files00198.pro'
53e2289f7d9a96dcc335b120ec772086
51d718159112843a8f424bcc76308e5eeb10c448
'2011-12-29T05:36:19-05:00'
describe
'54477' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYY' 'sip-files00199.pro'
a71dc9bfdbc949e08e272eae50cbac4c
0c97b9afa569c12f78ce217ce28562d919c574dd
describe
'43270' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMYZ' 'sip-files00200.pro'
0998692599a6f6b09f31e304470256a1
e63299ea0fcb965ebcef087e3a58fa7bb5a2e6a7
describe
'55560' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZA' 'sip-files00201.pro'
a045789a9f7caca4d2de98115bc6c5f1
b029fad321858182376fddbe417423ea6527aba7
describe
'51298' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZB' 'sip-files00202.pro'
a68add7c40c74fa5b0d414a16ca52176
c51b35599b039480acb9cb044e4bf9c29c0d1f1c
describe
'46683' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZC' 'sip-files00203.pro'
d217166d796f5f25c5e384c423d38a75
75ac2b4d97fcd9384de0328c9e303787880f94f7
'2011-12-29T05:41:34-05:00'
describe
'49436' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZD' 'sip-files00204.pro'
20f0ebe79a6e553008bd3e512ca4ace6
21fc5c5e161902b7c023109a35de27e4e7373bf3
describe
'57500' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZE' 'sip-files00205.pro'
0a8536abd524e5936e225e7d6390b3ac
6b9461ab0d5d1ccb7fdcd188417e31d957bc840c
describe
'55000' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZF' 'sip-files00206.pro'
85f950ca677e009949e6901ed7ba481a
342293c75508ec01b8dfd1289fa3313f539ae0db
'2011-12-29T05:41:06-05:00'
describe
'45710' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZG' 'sip-files00207.pro'
34ea461005c649762b5e7468ce2dbce8
eefb3f4e3142b08f99e7e5add55b24d03123e422
describe
'16005' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZH' 'sip-files00208.pro'
cc4b877df484c476172d3e89e0d7a38f
036382275fa2aefa73d557adec2ca73ccc851ff9
describe
'50421' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZI' 'sip-files00209.pro'
d2888a4350bc7874cb854de87a7f9b6e
32576b5e0520765c19edc80bd7d27c003cab9b0a
'2011-12-29T05:35:27-05:00'
describe
'42077' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZJ' 'sip-files00210.pro'
4f7e7cfc209c2362acce76e6ecbaa1c1
4b4c5f71fe340d41e6ae648ba644d76227292bb1
describe
'31727' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZK' 'sip-files00211.pro'
68c40119b730c16b3aeea84f1f40b9e7
72364910d7fc65a212625b19fc9553df466a8d95
describe
'36672' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZL' 'sip-files00212.pro'
e4a15f7274bac9b6e50fc4e5dcf8bb10
5b30a42203218d8ba90581305800590d37f63ba3
describe
'64989' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZM' 'sip-files00213.pro'
225e6263c521fbee576b1725ce9dd593
9bc5d2cfaa9b0b14ab7b68c3dc9ee1cb326ad069
describe
'23645' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZN' 'sip-files00214.pro'
ad0a7c753ae3aa2f844cb0a0d6474270
1a9cf6708e527a90b95177ddf429ab83e44cdfa3
describe
'52906' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZO' 'sip-files00215.pro'
e5cb955834ac755ce2dbaa0158f0c26c
40e280bec20139a76ec1182237b1d29b819b91c7
'2011-12-29T05:37:25-05:00'
describe
'65892' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZP' 'sip-files00216.pro'
7a966456b24ccb875fd00a2363318d55
9b844bf176baea7359b9d589f533af84f7189a83
'2011-12-29T05:36:40-05:00'
describe
'47690' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZQ' 'sip-files00217.pro'
1d8253ef9657e68a84ed64a9210a7310
83737efdabbe69c5c2c4a3285479088a58daa481
describe
'29459' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZR' 'sip-files00218.pro'
985079ba796c59f7c88cc8e34dd197b7
b206d2433325a7b6706ef194ba2553492675916f
describe
'64594' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZS' 'sip-files00219.pro'
4c7af673d11eb282baa692ac00e7e6b9
8ba4b4f10257db21f4e57596b8d8102defb979d6
describe
'40519' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZT' 'sip-files00220.pro'
385b8cffb4d2a96a7985c876b72aa254
decbc0dd2e587b30ea44271908923698c8563dcd
'2011-12-29T05:40:53-05:00'
describe
'22620' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZU' 'sip-files00221.pro'
f5cbd39c6e23825ce6efa716ddeafb51
48bc6312a7867f8296aa846b1abac5f712aab281
describe
'72104' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZV' 'sip-files00222.pro'
5e308e49021c7b3c0e45f9383d6aad8d
8f60e5bb0fe8bd8634420ed4688b849425261587
'2011-12-29T05:39:19-05:00'
describe
'33915' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZW' 'sip-files00223.pro'
5584e24f800490171cd6f52d40b4a6d9
6afbeb2cd79fdae9e484376d9eb5efbe209f8b0f
describe
'46245' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZX' 'sip-files00224.pro'
37e07185b647bdbbddc4666639acbef3
c27c9c376b15555db671ca9b1e672cb0d33d0d50
describe
'44515' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZY' 'sip-files00225.pro'
de8b4f88ab7702eaf77ee6b4ae2fee2d
784113e05d35bcbe858a98836875e91b031e60df
describe
'4204' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABMZZ' 'sip-files00226.pro'
d1f35af4efd875f58165512ae8fc056a
0fd1ff83f408b3d201e7e5083f4db5ff2f8a85bb
describe
'47100' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAA' 'sip-files00227.pro'
5f6733faa27922faeb0a710d9a54f55b
e0bed28fe0451e3c0ecdf138815a040f004aad8c
describe
'68381' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAB' 'sip-files00228.pro'
37ae5c2f4554c841a3e56252b21fcefd
4c65b1ca3bba05be893d8cf5c24d627c27e02add
describe
'27240' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAC' 'sip-files00229.pro'
9a1cdfd928b81e934202a68f6e2401ac
dfa43562f7c82f6c168c1671249bb6b647249cd6
describe
'54161' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAD' 'sip-files00230.pro'
2e615f98ad6ee1461b47542ce5512d4e
344249629547ce2109a14e41bb6cc1ab5289a858
describe
'42706' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAE' 'sip-files00231.pro'
e6982e95230ab625299edd1029a8b144
71213c36c57cdfaef5b583d3e2f97c08925aa639
'2011-12-29T05:41:16-05:00'
describe
'28404' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAF' 'sip-files00232.pro'
de32b538abb37d3792dd5b05509abf2a
1a8fb5847a1c3ede82a7a93440515c4ce24ce9d3
'2011-12-29T05:39:22-05:00'
describe
'70228' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAG' 'sip-files00233.pro'
b0d0cbd24f0fc68296f11e1490ed3dea
6602c88c592c09e09b2e4058e80ac06dee907540
describe
'23396' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAH' 'sip-files00234.pro'
4f05c7bb12e1adb43f02f58042657564
606dd2efb4560a28f810184fd29ac99d9d422e1b
describe
'40407' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAI' 'sip-files00235.pro'
1733f5085e5dc14949703974e7e06573
09b75e1f39838594ac88429ad8096cdf6b475a17
describe
'35248' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAJ' 'sip-files00236.pro'
a3e2d74f729952f47bbc67abcddc1c1e
ab36397fbad90cb7fe6c951cfc811cd205ab2dd9
describe
'41786' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAK' 'sip-files00237.pro'
80e1b8eb36a589a9334a28cca2f4dcda
3776c53c294336a1b722d9acd6d7b966178b9168
describe
'22599' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAL' 'sip-files00238.pro'
dbd837c9fd3a056b026861e45162112b
f5bbd28e02338b4dd82875e4d63eaa3420a29d97
describe
'73077' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAM' 'sip-files00239.pro'
92a9440c4e004dd62cb6df8dcc020aa6
b0002035355b12dd28d3add3883d82ee8c10e705
describe
'56968' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAN' 'sip-files00240.pro'
645c3ff9fdfc612eeb6ad5a364d9a741
a8b3956fecea8856ae20ca211090020b814ddef4
describe
'53338' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAO' 'sip-files00241.pro'
56a492a4e78312985380d903c02d397f
39772d374201c46ef644ad6f19fcbae826ba6194
describe
'67100' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAP' 'sip-files00242.pro'
9786de37ade25142f616fc039daba118
a098ab980bc90fadaad0e13fc799d1e7cacbd3e2
describe
'17040' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAQ' 'sip-files00243.pro'
b40ccd2cc3b28fb06922baa4aa2f2476
a3aa80a2d4e698cf43f60dfb9f3fb5d37da06376
describe
'29042' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAR' 'sip-files00244.pro'
70e7e16f433dba6a1053151293c805af
65121ca99070e2208bcadc4701d0ac724184f39c
'2011-12-29T05:37:15-05:00'
describe
'48637' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAS' 'sip-files00245.pro'
398daf1f3a6d3a8242dcf9b11063fef6
10201ac0e059af5fc63cbd2f2bbabb8afd382c60
describe
'39240' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAT' 'sip-files00246.pro'
ab4c8bc4423975ba3febe1fdaacd3b52
c6b0db37efabd86b7a6130c211da395d441dc72d
describe
'57172' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAU' 'sip-files00247.pro'
7958e4ce61bf64b327b0338d402a53d7
b418c0be9e6fed9ffc717eba1321b1f04224cccb
'2011-12-29T05:36:05-05:00'
describe
'17290' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAV' 'sip-files00248.pro'
0e84c00c8ab1929c88c55b1870878d95
925d4c496951d8925fc0fdbce5cc50a667c475dc
describe
'47254' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAW' 'sip-files00249.pro'
8d8e7af96c70f5b8895c08cbdf760233
1d26f1d37573d2278fd4f0ec52f6aec37fb05889
describe
'68871' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAX' 'sip-files00250.pro'
2b190f900ddaa6300246beeed8a65651
86ed80a8edf897182dc873f2d19a3e41684d2dd1
'2011-12-29T05:35:17-05:00'
describe
'5719' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAY' 'sip-files00251.pro'
cf64ef0dfb3251abff0345d4bbf514d6
01cdb2f95d975fb5d1973e5354b5f766f8ec9852
describe
'18088' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNAZ' 'sip-files00252.pro'
98d9c3e2ee31ef38aeccd920f01a7165
0752b1ff0e716b2771aac2530e70023accbf6f36
'2011-12-29T05:38:04-05:00'
describe
'55441' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBA' 'sip-files00253.pro'
af6dab6ed0a1ecb6aa58cb9568493550
cc76bf073bc15841bf2cbfb4606a99f77324899e
'2011-12-29T05:40:31-05:00'
describe
'21189' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBB' 'sip-files00254.pro'
e8e5a80e390312ab1f36403ed92b89a1
dc5eafb6198d18867d76b27049c57d6e9f58f415
describe
'70275' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBC' 'sip-files00255.pro'
397bcb2e3eeb50637582ecd21a791c78
992363c4d38922fdcae03e07e5179394fb8e7b14
describe
'44345' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBD' 'sip-files00256.pro'
124973bdae39f0debf96a783b117b79b
938deee304fa5c2ef72aebfd5e09f113c366c419
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBE' 'sip-files00257.pro'
57596127f9664d665cbe9db6d4739235
1dc5dcb856e2c527b51e0f157a3c64d68993b56c
describe
'17514' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBF' 'sip-files00258.pro'
6ef096ad13a427c4afc01f502fc932ae
90fd38c6779742049430abe3d9806f92f3c7d22b
describe
'54487' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBG' 'sip-files00259.pro'
d194c311723563cbbe9cd1e166d90b19
14ee89ab2d0781cb4b8a0ccd14adf33d0da420b9
describe
'31811' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBH' 'sip-files00260.pro'
a627c8161caa2cf459d46dd63950891e
962eb8bda160461be68db9731e161337faf945dd
describe
'56140' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBI' 'sip-files00261.pro'
68e3b6cba439a02fcf8d9b035ff80e52
3e56edfe4564973d74c9a1d797849b7d3b17a3d7
describe
'26236' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBJ' 'sip-files00262.pro'
3b46b691bab047821505f4900d31aeb1
96773ad6cb333e69790d2ad0e089b95e1d955983
describe
'34605' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBK' 'sip-files00263.pro'
2e29a1b04614ad7ddfbb22d96b1e96ef
5584cf6bb68d6a699d35ecf6adf7e453f72dcb9e
'2011-12-29T05:37:35-05:00'
describe
'20343' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBL' 'sip-files00264.pro'
7d28c8507dd27d0b1de6d136a4027b69
ddc260ac01c11ad44d20c632fee89da8350ff66d
describe
'135033' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBM' 'sip-files00265.pro'
889dcf658d95d28825b3827323c358a8
5190df01e13d85147a619549fd237aab3ac5c88d
'2011-12-29T05:40:55-05:00'
describe
'217' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBN' 'sip-files00273.pro'
96dc97de2c2c14e651742c3202147b12
364087b5df6002d01260d40429aab5b21cb1c6c6
describe
'858941' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBO' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
d23c70cf3b6c414f63761129a01f1a78
531b0685197e3efbe393394ab364b34fbd58d8b8
'2011-12-29T05:38:41-05:00'
describe
'822250' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBP' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
715e7963fefaf479ddecc592cec2e337
cfd4227756e7133ee326c4385dd48cb99385f313
describe
'726208' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBQ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
741c833f4f2c2cf4069797b0096d3bb1
534bd4819193a17da1fb0abc52bd65a9d49b7bcc
describe
'726399' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBR' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
0d5fc88b18c06944424f1f4e81f99bae
d5b264e731191a51c972c162d441ca54b290d346
describe
'725770' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBS' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
cbb3df37c03703551d15409f6ad5701e
4cf6dc62c28b3c1f76827230f9753da833b648c4
describe
'726437' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBT' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
c9f30430abd7e44cae76f34206f49122
3e8e6ffaa377e09cd3055540f4e3f04ba8a86668
describe
'582112' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBU' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
8c65651aa8b98f2201b9ae28c3f41e82
97c75262c38020bea4edf9c362c0ae3c01f1c22b
describe
'726443' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBV' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
263c3f33fea267c96f177ee3cf9defcc
8eeaeda541f16c58e1d8a648474328e6467654c9
describe
'726288' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBW' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
9524720a17fe548990acba2f3febb433
4735b5b307aad041bd4c4d8951b8cf3df225f445
describe
'726451' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBX' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
713c61d204fd3187c0faab479cab791a
f5d5a1ee5de2903bb401aab14388247f0731841d
'2011-12-29T05:41:33-05:00'
describe
'726430' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBY' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
52c59c9ecf20a2ed63c1852ddbd7abad
50b821910b8e1a8ec977676d712a4032228ce6fd
'2011-12-29T05:38:49-05:00'
describe
'579925' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNBZ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
65a5b6da9bf9bf65601aac3fdc65e545
0a86f602fa0a3a3091e01ff9e0aff95ea56ba83d
describe
'726333' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCA' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
81e29fdb11c27485e469ce322d996701
3160151b6c9aed86d8c6005577206c0672be72b8
describe
'726420' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCB' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
2d3d05212604a7ed200b52c748e230d4
f169dc6cf7d90627122283ea341988bd9549dec0
describe
'726449' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCC' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
bd881fa52333eef9abb39251b6dc5df4
5bec6ee8534412c93b452a1eef87608d68158d22
describe
'726139' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCD' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
7b452602444b91c5dc8c9503d2a38463
a0a1ba49e463f3caf22c6bcaf4ecaddae4bcad30
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCE' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
b9ffe117934580a725af6bdb71c0b097
eb3b1702a11937b47741e99cb02496907cd11796
describe
'726249' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCF' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
1d795a7b43b56934048307c4f21f0ada
1a11b88bed88feeb43ba13dbf603564045adf121
describe
'724281' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCG' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
d3b21b67268e9b2727cf4e3116b6fda4
9c7c36b1ef7af65cad7d2e585adc1c2f2cfa6714
describe
'726439' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCH' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
4a4b9777542d39f797ea2b0624ba0d93
890ba6c6f14d2b48dc883ce4d9ad668666458f77
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCI' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
0646fcfd971e00d3f4423b56b860390b
562a4c2d98b5b6f2f64a7efa0ee0382c01387ce1
'2011-12-29T05:36:44-05:00'
describe
'726433' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCJ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
20ae58406e45a8bfe827ae3c1b1ba614
547a0ba3c7f63a3348f25540961e61c3a79bd8fb
'2011-12-29T05:35:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCK' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
48212425ad4f811d13b57dd36b016dc4
afc4c9df771dc1929b98c6d3daa0c95c541a105b
describe
'715601' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCL' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
48fabd8b7b49be071e26a7e8040ec264
0abf90b0e446a43ce3f4282392c0f8e59c615fba
'2011-12-29T05:40:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCM' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
4cc2c746bc88e011484af59a08a4ca19
1e6c4d15727a998c18fbaab4a0a6e661c4422957
describe
'726423' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCN' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
9183315c34c255012cda1ab851f51e77
0b1944040e5ec74707291372099db716055f9590
describe
'726417' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCO' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
ab34e6611b4845211edded0de14fbeea
d5c9c9bd60ea62c33127f9fc6aae09ce843a840b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCP' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
1543bc01b75cae920e22c0b17732e60d
e540120d8852a5375586e3fad5de7173c8823e59
'2011-12-29T05:37:04-05:00'
describe
'728248' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCQ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
3303d85a917df5454e8a299c60c7b163
20f3306b21c617f61fd37efe353edb35222d6303
'2011-12-29T05:37:47-05:00'
describe
'726434' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCR' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
1b9dc2bd975b52f50f40f057bb6c3b15
4157d5612c4fb65458948dfa00dff3d75d6e9f1f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCS' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
c7844dfb14e7a10b66c9e55175cba625
d8ec86376d8808c6d74473754b304e912aa5503f
describe
'726338' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCT' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
b930305fd969f35f7d31da000d965f4b
77c06bdbe4fb3c54d626b3690abe5d304f276745
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
aad9a5da64a8e035af5502670b89541f
ce583c8abe837d6ad5d8b215ba2fa92f9f63184b
'2011-12-29T05:35:22-05:00'
describe
'726195' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCV' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
3a374e2b44b427c6f2b70545ccc50e14
073deaec915bb43e697bf7bda8bf6e4325580c78
'2011-12-29T05:35:15-05:00'
describe
'726425' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCW' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
95b158968897153f30dbe0b0eb20c90c
7cf452ddec88871cdebf7327312b7f65afa5a0d4
describe
'726404' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCX' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
d36dadd99a82be6014783c78e1e36347
c0e098a84ddc13832f2b90e03bfa89ce8615dc7a
describe
'726446' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCY' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
1be7d573482f8f4175a1718a6426b4cc
11ccf97dc278612f6ed26ac2a02abd25c7bc95d2
describe
'726406' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNCZ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
18c727b69534a238a6cb52e5fd4f8661
69f6e5fa98bbaad2ce5d08f12006ac42ac90756d
'2011-12-29T05:36:35-05:00'
describe
'726405' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDA' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
71d4606e79a14435331f9d6a48da66cb
ed9cb8e834adc39f5ce7e361f470c2444a31992d
'2011-12-29T05:41:32-05:00'
describe
'726329' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDB' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
024a7e13f5a8477cafac46c17fba59c4
aa31b981f181f1453fb35341550da87c374e21b3
describe
'720138' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDC' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
dc29dc0cc77327989751f825738d1f8f
b0028787b49381b7834400a2d2e42887eb15ef04
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDD' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
1cce0027172a775f12d6a069ca9a516b
26f5bb54e4ce71a2bcb6e4076ccaea7de65ac81b
describe
'726392' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDE' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
c62dde5cff05a70cac81118e6fa54e46
1c5078668588a68b23e07c3556470cfdd36d8a55
'2011-12-29T05:40:16-05:00'
describe
'726450' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDF' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
1470e4a5e311108ef8aed43ddad2e28e
08dbd08500d63adf654554f46cc088c5e6f6598d
describe
'726424' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDG' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
d49a12a2775c84c7acbb52c3990d20ad
099f539f079877895af8831fda32aede7759a63a
'2011-12-29T05:39:15-05:00'
describe
'726230' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDH' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
1db53f0326b0d8e3d7248e9317ec9aae
c609298101a16f1c6f01377cd7ae435925cc67fe
describe
'726426' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDI' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
beeaaaf9a9f2d1d3fd7a6747b77ed89a
eaab96f3e21cc8ef43fd33c0394ce1096c95ffb6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDJ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
3b6cf9e646bfbff142c081cdf2c1bfea
69d8b9418fa8baa1fb8025ea724c480a59b962cb
'2011-12-29T05:40:36-05:00'
describe
'726448' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDK' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
904b82a05492b5f66b0468671dc3861b
eddb9bc1a5e05a12ae96ddc8ffc3ed65f0307c4a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDL' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
266c228385c9026e825d2e71236f4858
15254f72e950b8f64ccf5c8a2d3b0c3a981f18f8
'2011-12-29T05:37:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDM' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
1c3294e904df8eff1d4c290b3209521a
3a561a1199d6fb3b45b9f7c2ce3946025a4b6e5f
'2011-12-29T05:35:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDN' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
01660eef3ecbaf318f4d6e6b0c945d7a
87bcd727de01e3961ad5e843eff6553155d65412
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDO' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
16e3627aaadb46ee354a68d82b35ea61
71c9e11b4d76b547c1e03822edf32e36b7f02c37
describe
'726160' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDP' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
15108c432bdf249d823a96d5c2d61142
47a75e000a1d688efb7f366ff7a8ad179351ef8e
describe
'726436' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDQ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
eb2ddf25bf1b6169c89efb14c2fdccb4
6614caa9fc180285ca038ccfc1543b97219f2b1e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDR' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
806b9431db82975f236eb681e71841ff
44f9c22bd123ae1a34f778f3983688fa86e95e1f
describe
'726408' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDS' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
a73a29a5872d072332b2b379555cb326
1a7357a3f39841c6159c12ba631808347cf182fe
describe
'726390' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDT' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
8dc8914376cc74a9cf6f482c1be63037
5b71d194bad7d2d61419ec7555c7aa05a0f98c73
'2011-12-29T05:36:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDU' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
f4b4301e9bf9496b57377c2050d00423
795d9d6891c9bbc311fef91dcba223053862510a
'2011-12-29T05:40:14-05:00'
describe
'726416' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDV' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
8ee943747cff2b9eae14667bf7bdba0c
d3841829b9a0b421bca1e9c01ae10ce78d368ff8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDW' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
9f672ce41adaad0134f1a4c25212eb63
deadb7b95e4bb44da1b7177d28cd5fb30806ab43
describe
'726431' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDX' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
5438a16f44fd3bd04724c27545d82077
a8fced3009ac94ca61dbc78dbb6e319cb390a343
describe
'726395' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDY' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
437fe3648f8e0fb4023d6d23d3289a96
b888f4c8579284b9b5fe3aa1e5c1c900538fd5a8
describe
'726441' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNDZ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
e8345b500bb880213a3d4320483594cc
767b789397557a73f6795f14b110fb33163df64f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEA' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
ef30e540240d4ff92ffbb500ff5398f3
a5babab323547a5d9bdd982b11808c0da22760ac
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEB' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
a83823eea9397982222781962f46976b
983936aec29050373a7732fed9db8d6df1a388b7
'2011-12-29T05:38:19-05:00'
describe
'756314' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEC' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
e9b16b3478e01c03ad03de0861912c57
59b05cb6b2c8da7dcaebddf72b573bd3f26b9095
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNED' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
10c56e1b22a63ea0df1c57f3a928062f
01768d21bca4b97f7c2036fba6923944b7b93347
describe
'726400' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEE' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
faa5d19a12a35cc294e68d9fe27b0bed
20f3757e7a74e5262c135e33081992de19f79fb0
describe
'726402' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEF' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
01d44ab0f34b7389fba91fd57d1b399e
630a68c784d02f4379a32f693b79720384afeda4
describe
'726351' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEG' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
8bcdc581f363b5a9dd8d837824250db3
120e1fe1afa6162181efa619ebea285a2416a361
'2011-12-29T05:39:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEH' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
0af778c359ef5afe560bb5c17a344c40
64365f682ac97647d7553166136e89b82643cd99
'2011-12-29T05:39:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEI' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
16dbfe2511cb905082079818f1f87c3f
043ddc8cf84670f9e6a9139b31791c33a4feb83f
'2011-12-29T05:38:37-05:00'
describe
'726373' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEJ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
759766963af47eabccc4dba49b1a952c
f8b7f9b2aba1239c154b30f8b6ec6e7ecbcbbbb4
'2011-12-29T05:39:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEK' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
2e239efcde291b7095ebf4d1c79e3602
45c06279ad52d0a14e67157fc031054c251250eb
'2011-12-29T05:39:49-05:00'
describe
'726355' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEL' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
e5d4f5cccbb9949a0372cf540c0345a4
84f3d9d7bfcc830d50e10860d574cf1c898d356b
'2011-12-29T05:35:10-05:00'
describe
'726435' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEM' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
4e797e7e29176ac5fe7d57b47d0e8058
dd77269828f3325b68b330af7382e8637ec89740
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEN' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
7c92c058f50407e7fa8ead4116dcc76f
91d28db6fd456adf242f31970e996db3386285d4
'2011-12-29T05:36:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEO' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
ec96669576615a41bb5852f972a9d790
e6029af7e238c93c60bd965a7c40449f8dab7abc
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEP' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
88e42e21941013613cd90750784df79e
d6fb06cb31470e5d0cc119544562558ef62f929d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEQ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
d6c99aca077dfce706692b0a50bc357d
8bee69aacd654245000df955c77406cdf799d55f
'2011-12-29T05:40:46-05:00'
describe
'726366' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNER' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
03cb36dc69f53302b3c73526b3586aaa
4acc83803ff6d8f373c1291599c5fd94f2d53453
'2011-12-29T05:34:58-05:00'
describe
'726429' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNES' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
0f14959c3237fce4363419ebebbb2e32
412944ff3d5565af688b491aa89b5542eecc4bc0
describe
'726421' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNET' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
ccc16622d51de1c8ba7b39566a240064
30c3cf619ab0d9dbbf221e71f048bf6161925896
describe
'726264' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEU' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
b0c6bf20e8c8720a1bf62890e301010d
11d08e0fe702124716da462370be6d03c8be7a4d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEV' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
64b6deaeaac58e94a548e4b59bf8675f
c42187227e6ae5e9740e96267cd16223d47dd8f1
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEW' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
319d76b200a70bd7164a59c5da04036f
69fdc2abfd43ab33d6dad33ff0ac1f995b74abe8
'2011-12-29T05:34:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEX' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
70f8d997c35425121d909b7a1d676bb3
789deebb25d76c11ea892cc0f8af9cb8182bea6c
'2011-12-29T05:36:39-05:00'
describe
'726438' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEY' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
b1331654b7cdca14df5262d48391fad6
62aede27664cca4e583e5eaff42d246fd6fc9f26
describe
'726445' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNEZ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
c4feb15dfe6cc3342040c09fb36fc9a2
002a77417bd0a0e8229cb248b04c61f4e84c4dae
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFA' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
4c9b0d36d020e65cd53435fa20b942fc
625d1cb53ad9e513c28a6c9231f5091932007568
'2011-12-29T05:38:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFB' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
6f9543c4c4e7b5702134a9be377dbdd1
e473c5234b32533c0ff1ad0ec612df6ed988b7d3
describe
'726363' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFC' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
ae272f1a0f368baf3889cb04512abf43
136ca8c037e36a9ff7c16a08bbaa907963246022
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFD' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
d480b09a4b5ae9f2248fb5ba4b5a18e9
dc5a9f784c12ed66531d2fae199dead0ffbf2eda
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFE' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
50bcbd3492beaf233ac44f585a619570
824c71544d306843ba18966955b96710ca48e4e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFF' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
472562f22005d4a11e0cd0ce92942377
7906b4123e9a9ebe817d1a7c778b3b1bac785ce4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFG' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
7b6b533a96e2b5aa1382acc423ef74be
5efbf32ece31af7951adffc4b452d099003141c2
'2011-12-29T05:35:42-05:00'
describe
'726397' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFH' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
df8911dd88cb709a41e46c03c3d11951
4951399b03eab594db1eed49bc7cb2e0bc7ea71c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFI' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
fbbb3db31be93b581aad0b51ba7c1f27
31c22e97d7b64f783c25005e8657b2005f76ebfa
'2011-12-29T05:35:36-05:00'
describe
'726422' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFJ' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
4db8fbfc180ba490959a481064ec971b
b845d0ed1ef767d23744d6d7ecc232c9154f3242
'2011-12-29T05:36:25-05:00'
describe
'726322' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFK' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
8cf0f2d1122ad6400f562f35ff09ce2e
e3c11cb47727af8d99d632bd9f6bfca31dd5e133
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFL' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
9d6d4a1e30473926cabd338872c1193d
cdf74b6b8dc4b037e894f64fcf1e583fa93138a2
'2011-12-29T05:35:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFM' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
034894639d20fac5abc62eecb0420c9a
19ef5c2444daec708611afaf0c55d1f9d26e6949
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFN' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
1ead986cdf1b2e8a853b2f2483012c9c
54dd2018285b4fb7f125f0dd5b09b6709a26a028
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFO' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
11491219e7eb4eb73f05002647993d88
9db7b549a3b1454393afc95301d750feadf36151
'2011-12-29T05:41:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFP' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
a2558946b5114dba33a3c46ed7ff2cc3
3a2457303516e13d48846c6345e10ec46cb01288
describe
'748970' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFQ' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
6104a41d25fb4050393a1fed623264a5
2803550ab9018fdbd35af6f192c483df2f46d47f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFR' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
5bcacedc15323b4cebc98f941dea8f30
64d4f18766e9842bf949ae251f6abf137aa5dfea
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFS' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
dd63951846e5a8a03b441d3ccd1874e4
317135b0a4458d0f521c76873c480388a74543ba
'2011-12-29T05:38:06-05:00'
describe
'726339' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFT' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
40abe0e22849632133665ecc7970b12e
a31905b2df34295f57d783068fe1b99890c32404
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFU' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
9c76fef473c6d9a584840b2be5cf159e
23a4eedf6d025a2f6bc3b0f24cda366f1ea5a5a8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFV' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
5fbb3350ec0da440ace1197a0409fc9f
0aa62f0ee949bc1385b48940c0d4ddc6cf7cab7f
describe
'726444' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFW' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
ef294e03ea7a3dcee250905264743f65
8e5d31ecb858573341e8fe094a45ad2683c5e7b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFX' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
b69159f5caa2c2f35965d3e494609ab1
2b1d849a1af02436755761b2b10e0d4b2002f0b6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFY' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
0e153b85a2fd5b70c48e9e82033e92dc
e9198a9e2832ba282202cbc89d6b5a434e92eea6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNFZ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
31f9c7f2e4bb7427fd357b6defea4a8e
db9eb96c5938257d9681763fe590e4b1b34eb3b9
'2011-12-29T05:38:57-05:00'
describe
'726386' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGA' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
796b338e8f57962dd41a29a6efc9d1a0
6ffe04fb7e2bca43ec90e9f78e586b4392d4dbf6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGB' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
0b1d779c1d2de32501e0ea5cc19eac29
073fee047daa7d88d40803098f650790a97bc448
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGC' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
776c27a49c696c9fae3d4be2f6bd530b
206092137935da4b80c26b31a0a37b362c7ace6e
describe
'726232' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGD' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
6e1488eea7b46453f75f908e5db2eabf
98b2348816049fa48d782939802cbe53172449b3
describe
'726367' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGE' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
280646633b9f8ec50293840671716ff0
33e067370273657517a09e5f455ebbd1126dc271
'2011-12-29T05:40:50-05:00'
describe
'726364' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGF' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
e62d3b2c2691410375bf0291783d92e2
97f96911347ed402af1d09c2134cdc0357289405
'2011-12-29T05:37:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGG' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
2a7e7c8faba405379b805083f9b22170
33e88956c1479334cb4769b70bc1ac463437ebbe
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGH' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
e241aece2aaba6a6f382fd9450fdbb33
fbee417835cacedf370821ef9317ecaaa9c00376
'2011-12-29T05:34:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGI' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
a46f4d79b7fba36d0df061cf5d93ed31
f139ed0ecb07b44c3346c78d33f0865f5ef01984
'2011-12-29T05:37:20-05:00'
describe
'726321' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGJ' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
9cab4c02ae376cb9ae3823428d2bb455
f5fada82549e7c87cf0ae37a664a2fcf31209719
describe
'726216' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGK' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
c2d9ce32d1d0d45232dc2e9dd2155051
c977ffb4893a0856f839e3bae1fbd9c40c6450bb
describe
'726432' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGL' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
266530a1d9fbce40c382dfd6c3c513bf
c95d1856cec91b73db66a4680d64ea06a16fef5f
describe
'726282' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGM' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
c2362300800bd91a7a8ec87fb69654a5
3302654a276f8ea67b740bbc3c5fa9624e754fb5
describe
'726358' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGN' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
406e14f26644320bda144858f1a54597
3caffcf97a78b34c09b83db194bb2ae020945405
describe
'726412' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGO' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
b96095a6cd2bd31fc106baf0769b14a5
c61a4300c31ff222734e28502e940c901315b30f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGP' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
c12711faefa223814b73895318f3c2ab
e00a33b3d5bcfc81107095643a70e5ddd262fcea
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGQ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
6c59a3bda3cf3b60403cc718f162e8ea
ec1061e8f9c54d02f99ad82855b9d1e5c6dc76e5
'2011-12-29T05:36:48-05:00'
describe
'726326' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGR' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
f2c722ab38409ecdce1b1715385a07bc
497767c23fb40e046348bd4000b0e5fb6d9415bb
'2011-12-29T05:38:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGS' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
5687872ba6f72fc4cd895867304b3863
3ba28901bab9f246f674b602e28657dd4c8a69c7
'2011-12-29T05:41:02-05:00'
describe
'736839' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGT' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
a07665b9bc53974a3fbb13228780e8d6
7155e9ddc3fb7b02b4d92a8ef82ae7f6bb289efb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGU' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
e4a36df9b292487acd51d6ffbcb4b127
39737e9cc2c697d20411af1afc3cc7dd5c926cd5
'2011-12-29T05:36:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGV' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
91156599562ae3f780f41b9e4aac3fba
607c10328ed2b4edac8e31744b29b8421dafc179
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGW' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
979c1b7db2a98507e566ef006a31bf57
aa2f689b7767243d7c5bad3bec192c9d73712bec
describe
'726442' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGX' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
92f1de5c4316d05b5b80ad9e642e2c50
a588311d753cbc81a2f1eee0acb38ea3f052cbf3
describe
'726335' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGY' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
a5b22bcdc8453f061a04a5b0581f57dc
77d8d8591014c2f23fcfdbedb56254ebc3c5523f
describe
'726419' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNGZ' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
2d3f154e9a6e38d4b2a1fc55ab33e57a
503d24d0dfbe6795786be74ff9631da1bea0b645
'2011-12-29T05:37:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHA' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
0684927f059b41965f988fe5a6eb23d7
406baadce55aace9ebb003a1a90a848e29849bbb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHB' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
863ff1b85c215ba120068825513e9f70
c9821cb3fbb0847d477968d171fae74e4daf2b46
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHC' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
ad30cae77fce4a5d456e38ae40279bab
b222d3300f3a3b86a27895d76a51db1cdeca6bff
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHD' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
39b1df7be17cb8dda6d36431b90edb75
a9cb36a032da2967eae49216a1f48c5d4e912884
'2011-12-29T05:40:39-05:00'
describe
'726418' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHE' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
99ca8c1971ec3875c727c7bb86937a3c
305fe676fd3387dd1e0a88756e6cda66e955f243
describe
'726325' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHF' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
715677cf997163cd42e59bcc90bddd63
17841010435b67e8f12c696286423599974330bf
describe
'726274' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHG' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
7a358345ee2eb93deb0f5db5591f2ded
11ec9725d55896bd77ed43d91b6454676fe238bb
describe
'726278' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHH' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
0b515bf09b7717d6045d3a1b48637186
9feb1653acffba8fba786c9ed4d22c635f76b658
describe
'726281' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHI' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
c242b227ee0740f7b7844b6d1519b125
540614535ee3e45ae28e125e14ce2aaafda40f6c
'2011-12-29T05:40:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHJ' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
8bf67e190c3e7c50fc2b7d6dc3b2718b
b55595c5a5aa749915637d56b96ca2a78c2b4f79
'2011-12-29T05:37:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHK' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
9a1bd0d86074b0b7810291fdbfca3623
381fc717c5530a0e9d62ecdb15fac4b5c4f83f9d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHL' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
d25c4037c55c6a1675e7b0110750c4ff
a1287787caa37810244208e627bee0b9372f61d3
'2011-12-29T05:37:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHM' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
c48f4c826bff48b3f4f9ce891b101e6c
82f42e5aad8d761a4a3595d370b742c28e22a00b
describe
'726447' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHN' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
ace80db09c2ee2ab2a4837b2ac3f6f39
6e4011c8e35647704f970c065b3fa2a98cfac264
describe
'726297' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHO' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
10000fffacb21bd97b1dc10f8f76b36b
3c6e400cbd08ea6d3eab6981efa62a4ec30aa3ba
'2011-12-29T05:36:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHP' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
4260e93a482e8aa06cdaa82a8f7f275f
c519a901cddcfd714d4ec04cdca428cec646086b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHQ' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
f6c9fc2ac8b15d329ca6ede77e130022
dd322cf9da8a3e6ccd7400ec9d71b4dc432a55ec
'2011-12-29T05:38:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHR' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
1d422766c437f046e6f9d178f308344c
da4e6fe164694b74aa603e1825be2aca8394d265
describe
'726171' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHS' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
08e7fba01c2df3d84d1a95565ada512f
bfcd2fcce570975727ae991c4f394578ac5bb5c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHT' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
137badcb1fccc6a76bdbc3050242bcb1
a3f05f4cbf792633657d13ee16422fa7b3c0f504
describe
'726379' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHU' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
6b3e3457932881ace0ac1ac217a03e18
490bd72d2ab036385e72100eaacbbfe387d38d0c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHV' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
4c4fe4a0cea4358b60d0f41ed85b36a4
f50899f3cab090d586680ff220aacd150a1d7502
describe
'726293' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHW' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
3ec4b77c31e59118515bc7f38187faeb
8460aeb75c2b7bb25c4c45dd34b0b7952647948e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHX' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
29ef5ad19976053670eb54daa86535dc
b1696de0048912bece481b9f8669421ce428230b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHY' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
f602b19dab52fa4ce2797e7353c38014
53427f4018d18b5b6d74e79166a7e054055f0373
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNHZ' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
854860902ef90efb202df80c1d7cfab4
309ac8f1af37866e5143f69a8b9acafa18583816
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIA' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
79b594c71fe0b6f7410fe2aa73e91c47
353542e179fd93f3687023311eee20206bf62473
'2011-12-29T05:40:18-05:00'
describe
'726362' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIB' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
f65ed0a681ef98de0314c44233b9c0b9
3b04fbf02c013a2dcf77d3e43914aaf64b9b09f9
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIC' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
112e2c4bf1f10cf433c3e67033cdd22e
ea84789c3c6aa070346370cf8ca9aebf51feabde
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNID' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
d4b4a5a73abf75ae103a8f2e30ea612d
16a8f2894b47e0e950dc0ea3e34ba0c220baac31
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIE' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
f0014812c587764b8812d6f168bb0bbf
e766fdc17dbbacd29b05de9b44fffadc2c7a2437
'2011-12-29T05:40:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIF' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
45386ebc76df89e602aec30a3f9eaa33
6300b23d333d0e01c5457dfeacdde39834ccc705
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIG' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
d4ccc5bfaf23661a4551f2d12ca2c0b2
36a6d6ea82ded9f50249f82ed85ed6d810642ab8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIH' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
c67e977c5eb2bee5c93d70228fa10069
157c33bc26caf0bd4b651392f4e7fd045f386195
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNII' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
02f4b4d334da9765a0ff44ab9ce40c22
5089e9ca5c1c7211602af48e8d2256d24258cf2f
describe
'726440' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIJ' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
772a0075ef9c1d3854c4f7292c9b5caf
b12808e98bcb9f39e748577056f145c2661d849e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIK' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
5e3209255ac5a6b05930c0e2b62e68f7
e801fd5726d293fcb804fea4178bcaa8d6981a5c
'2011-12-29T05:35:00-05:00'
describe
'726262' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIL' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
8b01a9fe01842081f988c313b4c824c6
c0dff0f3dcf357099f0cb6a1852676bb88bba539
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIM' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
4b782f64bf66464052de7895a505704d
08cf694af1901105fe065df06ee3ee75833da2fb
'2011-12-29T05:35:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIN' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
fe6c2ab19ffb1449b3d852d4c6f6155f
677cfbd253dda24fa51f2b3d8840b507be608882
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIO' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
dcacdc0b7268e0ea97f69498f5e6dab4
c21e60fe0b65754716e6d65487081200ccb506e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIP' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
a824d474688f29037d0f66efeaf648d8
191d0f244909e06a2a03bc7183e791f4815e2f02
describe
'726375' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIQ' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
30435e87f7fa872fecaf6b128fa9bfbb
2dcba2ba368a00e6c5045c9c60dd8a698eb5c9d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIR' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
3d86b973f0f9c19b36e74f0b4fef8958
d9861241bc85fdac6526b7917e355edf2f0954fb
'2011-12-29T05:37:57-05:00'
describe
'727139' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIS' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
cdd7fb4783338e6c102c869ce4004c8d
d2c5a881330abc9b88a94ed3f25d0026ca1deb80
'2011-12-29T05:36:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIT' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
e0c4531aff8357861ba613e3514a34bb
7bacb0f91058e7a11cf1c135b16f11ee4d67d3f7
describe
'726427' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIU' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
85a7f0827346cf90385d93d11dc559cf
2eedea8aa7fabc39796bc4e17c6c9f1d3696eb20
'2011-12-29T05:40:43-05:00'
describe
'726163' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIV' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
57aaa7215968b295218978b48761641c
de02ceb08dcf80f4a374a0280c10600f2470f158
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIW' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
eea4a10132ba021a855865709f4d76a6
a0f25a8d71db1cdca8fb7aecb3aaca80acb4a193
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIX' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
86dd91634995d97c9916a1f7b17bbe20
83f91def82b0e1f15f3b00b0e5606688489f01eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIY' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
c8d316e49dde87462cc4ac24c42c9d86
e6f5cd634264aa590d714aadb5a9be4d36fc88d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNIZ' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
24c4ec94dd0844152d3d94faf1e67c8f
99e99601f57e98ebbcc0254b6d2e7eec4d1ab7a0
describe
'726376' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJA' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
371087c65581c428b851d3ca41bb881a
ae2eac7c5cfab05373e7322bf508eeeb44202ade
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJB' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
7d25ecf89242fdd15703a590248873bc
c211db63e6d684701ca7477ae21e136683f75e76
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJC' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
2ceb77f9f01dc7e3be2d26ac61241ba6
b70d9c1397ad763d5c687fae9c692d683a1f708d
describe
'726401' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJD' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
411c540c01d6d18d5780392dcb70689e
277258173f40571f12503565abcf0d79a737141c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJE' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
8c0df6f93dd7cfd23e9a72f39d36d117
14b5f41ac0a432b35556fc6242ec439f569966ca
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJF' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
a79bc441e066896bdbb88f7e9e79a667
5ebd9137ab28e915f7d5b40c1fbe2ad61fd1c6cd
'2011-12-29T05:34:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJG' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
15aaec26a0839b1e39f3a1c80083df09
a4a46e522d92642c14e41248c580602217cac105
describe
'726320' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJH' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
f9779a8eff0c1ba611816f655b78bf25
b8603e115c0c6bd53fe4093a38e881c2adbc804e
describe
'726353' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJI' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
3b9b74c79658d459a81fde61cf192a23
e9af8c5aa43f196c91ae3b20eb69558924e7b192
'2011-12-29T05:38:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJJ' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
b18f2d5e45bc6c51b9bbe0db0f5a6c83
1338bf9503ab9296ca0c26ab9bef58f8c9c83148
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJK' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
57a135ebfc37b89f6e84122d0565cb7b
478493f24966ba833db011dd76aff3cde51086c4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJL' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
0c965adbbf309a3a0622432446faf51b
5cb3e47ccbab2e56a6ef5cadaaa04be1595aa071
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJM' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
05bc82890d97d9a7e1a7c042b36e0546
8b8d9c2ed0a74aba01a1883402ce9ce56b2972e4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJN' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
779bd4ebec4f4784acd66a923968b210
919560536d204f47b7209c4aa4d3d0fb1f419e32
describe
'726242' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJO' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
b2633df4f943d36a423fdb3c67aed9f1
2adf4fa588c4a9a8af2d6423f3991051b9810241
'2011-12-29T05:40:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJP' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
0e4c7a7937ae2951562641797ad90273
1394f017f847c038ddb8f32d75cb3652e4756a06
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJQ' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
8b178c4d1fe1b0eb8bd954ec089904cb
740b699d33e81a0745a8648b6be14aadfebc5507
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJR' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
eea1d17bbbddeb43371ea8222e505af6
2d40b339fe9ab4ae722124930932beac111facdb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJS' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
d4d7be35e18e9bf995760d6a403ecefd
7c09459dc61ccc868b6f4774b08e97455927640d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJT' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
96d5edcb1d5fb504609164e5756155b6
1252941c1403cf51c5a7cc6b55e160c9cbac7832
describe
'726428' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJU' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
f8a80f1e7b2784f8d0db0d77849dae13
f89cd88f25ce67fd967381c91c4811c6b12970cf
'2011-12-29T05:40:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJV' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
dee15cd7fd24f18f50adfdbf377076d8
ddd0ca0c357b8037b15afffb0f9c9111e4744660
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJW' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
24f049b2cb08d111cb1b69d534d1e6c0
78a7574c0ebec89671026ebc9df76c4e552a6225
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJX' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
32eb44e2e5620051e3da80492b36e0b6
faa6dbab0749a99a1fe3a445799e3a561d602d4a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJY' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
db3d8707337221a4d4c89d865bf75312
ed77dd8683bba153f498d6f1576548e8e191d71a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNJZ' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
f4aa7189444164fed10b80a666c26a2f
31c0b47176544ac67bcedeaf1ab7f1c500961d7b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKA' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
462bc10fdfedc86373e49478bb9ad793
3e1701f67a8ba4a4cdd6e6a7ef7959eca9955d7e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKB' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
5a28719756fca63bdb2271fbfe31e2e0
ca442ac74532e5c3b23a623d4887f6dfc4591229
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKC' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
3d3d160217f61b022d65d2c77765076c
c1f55e2a7c6f54a47a8fbf966601f4b7af766f3c
describe
'726385' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKD' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
398b9fe7936a4ead07c2bb09842a92c2
553be92ea32cec2da2a067bae5136d2ab9da20d1
'2011-12-29T05:40:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKE' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
c9a075eb243bf578af1645eb338cf995
667d97b195c1e366547c363d17b8f7d96f444e19
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKF' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
cddc8cb50a8efe781ead93397079226d
519ffcdd3573be491f7c7803c559f7bc46ee2c84
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKG' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
262393850e15a3be515bd3a0855a815a
1c5d855b90a488e0e56933b8072b437081479ba1
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKH' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
f52f34497237851f103a678ecb0041df
93e9e5ae9a058d78fd39107823d76badd7d90de2
'2011-12-29T05:34:37-05:00'
describe
'726384' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKI' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
1f193630cd7c7daf5569d294aa2362ce
fc95ce5f8335539f1e73c5a82dc3a20ba80dd5b7
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKJ' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
01858374d05b082fb79566ef6e108550
a614d1e1f3513c09a2fa3fcd8e5a7420c46383b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKK' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
0c96740ab8216e2e386245ded7f8480e
0dad1a4ae3f435c857fb387c07a10cab2ae12c5e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKL' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
e13050a92ea6de51387f8467f4df7897
a9ab2f449f9e8bbafe088a39c168759c7e259af9
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKM' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
b1c937b8e246d318541030cdeebdb228
d08d2f590eb733116ca8fcb7c9d9636f1f84690e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKN' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
c346f7f09468ea0197984860ddd6b68f
7d1226985f29c6bb703bcf539e88a9c2f95ef3da
describe
'726341' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKO' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
740f556e53089fcd293491ae20ae4d6e
c21fde22ed0169e9c31e439e7fa8d07b79cfac59
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKP' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
24c300b249350d1c23316905fe612cd1
c74a856e253742189e956a97c2914eea0391d97b
'2011-12-29T05:38:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKQ' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
20a4646916a11687440ad46194c1109e
0be56ee17771c3320d64fe80251969d5c45af9c0
describe
'726314' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKR' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
365948c63f871aea89ca964117f1dcf5
a7a862d735e7b0befef574882c606fe9979243a4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKS' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
b27eff206e2e87b2eeffd79e1088a47d
e8c1cc4a79326de594736ffe2957fff6f993175d
describe
'726360' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKT' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
c0a84d3f786136d65c3a108ffee03da7
1e80c15510ef2dd3ac61edf76e865e1b29f204ad
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKU' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
27de9fe8a88616e3f10ded94b946754b
fa461721a628d368b9fda0aa71005bc0c76c4a6c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKV' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
0f090021a4e5a8db3a383e4fa9c07723
f5fd80e5ff11f64b7435c23149e9b62769322e01
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKW' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
dec40322067b37520516aec661e08258
9490d805c9c091b7bf30d0ec50fe26b67b444cc0
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKX' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
36aac3e26c6b28cafdc07f6b763486d1
97ff946618d2cc749fc24ce0d6396d089fa27a9a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKY' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
6048b6ac1dccd2cf99a2bd79c5ac3a25
f82a77004a1deb162f9310b0269cbc25ef528d64
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNKZ' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
5b9e357db3c440b7edcc3888d483e69e
28e819ba410f4e8fdf3ea58a6d7b3579dd58512f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLA' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
444da5b91ba78c66222ce124627766d5
7428e37c0ae5589f33ae564c2cb6928ad892937d
'2011-12-29T05:34:30-05:00'
describe
'726130' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLB' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
1bdc887ba9de35ed1c3a143ede6e51f4
065240c94890f80cb32500f060a46b608b01cf91
describe
'726260' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLC' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
7529545c02527eba19e149e4310778b5
72373e26faa29f4861197c42c9bccf456ad81e0c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLD' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
998b07aee7613df0ea6b78f3a0309c2e
11dd3822a53a009823e4a600b274e3a6e514af1b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLE' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
82ffa2ad43992dad623742a38f457660
1502386aa1d98ae96b44ad7f51741f86ded32c23
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLF' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
4cdfc0f709ee8a8001cdcca570c9f36e
8d0a5c1d0520cd8cc9cba2a69165acba475a1c41
'2011-12-29T05:35:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLG' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
c9ef124abd28dcec763902474020a289
028abf5f1e953d43a16b5ccd0c7a6137a517cbb0
describe
'726324' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLH' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
8701edd93354833cb6c28b9bed2db8aa
6c13f0d79aa1ebf2bde4d479ccf5fcb59b88f929
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLI' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
fc939e659a40e86cbe8c50847c489565
fa37d0c64d2207b4f036c997a04dbe9b49778fe4
describe
'726396' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLJ' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
971201dcf0f6061462390c452af9f554
2ea03c4f1875674d14438e9f13908d7bea622904
describe
'726224' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLK' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
1a4b1a86b931cc5b8188dbcba21068a6
6e73f099da12b70a66f214d2419ad98edf6acf0f
describe
'726415' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLL' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
c9af3caba04b4e88fd8f3d97bbb321fe
e6d3819b187924b4bf2cbb45d5edaef0dfac511e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLM' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
df3b890a4d98f2cbfbb5fed75d2c6790
94f1ab7b82f51619adc99d4ad955ab58b4b4629a
'2011-12-29T05:39:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLN' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
284d75615b495ca01a11ee9ccae53f44
f4dacaf0f58f76aa8b95400f3ae984d916c30f57
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLO' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
bc601c5a7a6d9d945de8b6f7fbcbee7a
2b79b8550cb8a81618958eb34c904ffc0c500fc6
'2011-12-29T05:39:24-05:00'
describe
'726394' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLP' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
f9dc0300426c85c7291f10234c37f58f
bf266c226334edae528670e4ec754da23993a836
describe
'833920' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLQ' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
2a8bfa9897d634fd1a51a2e69a28dd73
4a08b7d66c3c3e78e9c7c2144af8a62cfcb50342
describe
'850081' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLR' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
989a60e968c98e50641c31afffdcf725
656e8097edde77f69f4b2ef3203ea79ec582a847
describe
'141075' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLS' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
adfc58a8d438e8546a6f39404930f496
20bc89986bfff12089e77c3c1d5a98df1673f0c3
describe
'20625864' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLT' 'sip-files00001.tif'
f24c101a01206b09e83f6356cb2d0a42
25b8196942c109aff4ff6afc2c49b51d71b26748
describe
'19741644' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLU' 'sip-files00002.tif'
3077b8c9aa0b141e807340173961803a
b398290f1f840dafec884db14026b115e947b397
'2011-12-29T05:35:28-05:00'
describe
'17440336' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLV' 'sip-files00003.tif'
8916e368f0253eff912df09d5bba2d22
6781d454626cb86fd9f032b1231f2cac537dc123
describe
'5828432' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLW' 'sip-files00006.tif'
1dd3e39331c077bb91759fdd53ef3156
4e63ab4fabe4bce8735eb4156e2b0a202970abb8
describe
'5823084' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLX' 'sip-files00008.tif'
f950e43e3a761bc5e182e1104640884f
e230d5d77c6f0fd93d67d2897208f2d9d02be328
'2011-12-29T05:39:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLY' 'sip-files00009.tif'
3321c3992ca53fffb679bbe3b58e62a3
1872a693e7858e60c7e597298283d55e739bcaab
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNLZ' 'sip-files00010.tif'
6f4c3e1c59971a8a5185d0768cd96915
273a488e8c37612c3ae3fe4d189c3775a84b1473
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMA' 'sip-files00011.tif'
f2436821adc90f0bb6379c66323601a0
1a4b07e92dd4b8301671cdd50998ed78227bdb10
'2011-12-29T05:37:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMB' 'sip-files00012.tif'
e2ba921c8e11bdedeca8e1391862704d
510563bb35519f583347bef71009ccbb989278eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMC' 'sip-files00013.tif'
c13c5fc476211e156d4e1e7175af9fcb
4d2748d909c08a5163f9552d45300af74232ea2d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMD' 'sip-files00014.tif'
5eb8491898f1f8be5d3f3ff6a5a2ba4e
d0715b897accde28c4d8118888afc04e66ed43de
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNME' 'sip-files00015.tif'
2c9fc6c04a4574eed3a12c1ec9436296
4483ec76725ab47d6643d29529fc9d0b3e864997
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMF' 'sip-files00016.tif'
5a7ccb327226146dc23bb83e70fc59a4
fdba207a6a309d364d6e42e0f3653539421ed1f3
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMG' 'sip-files00017.tif'
9cbd86b8c5acac5ef349082bda56d5ac
4ef9bb962e52ef165b8b96859b938a7ad2ad4853
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMH' 'sip-files00018.tif'
c4d5ccb4b1f90fefb31a8c100e42cbda
85bbc79c141710fb01859ec2fc68e0c761461f4a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMI' 'sip-files00019.tif'
ba111dd26e7e7778769cafcd955c35b4
d236a3744c049160a28a788e21ac4314085a2838
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMJ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
c715a357910b07b0f5f8e34625f34ad3
0cebe9f15e24bbeb14021eb8577d9d780a04e104
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMK' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ad891f862c07f2971d48675a395356c5
0c76e194c92a8e29338979084ec3fab29acd8a2b
describe
'5811640' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNML' 'sip-files00022.tif'
6ae401d21a8078d50afb9e4f07df1d87
788856f5e8c24bc8d4effde894847e1f9b059070
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMM' 'sip-files00023.tif'
61fa22a8e855e469cca59f5a9fbe883f
9aebc7ee5c9edac0819aab2d5fef8f5408ab11e9
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMN' 'sip-files00024.tif'
c01ef15b7a19f756f6c50ec1a0b5faa6
61a5ff57f596a3e6e65c1e7eafd56fb905c619e3
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMO' 'sip-files00025.tif'
fc03c67d35b96fbc1b6574b032302336
2928aad81da40bffb1f5fbe42f5d989b76d7881e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMP' 'sip-files00026.tif'
710d6d898fe590960022e07c3c201901
245ef93cebb5f66c9b4c169e1a6d5f17befdb6b2
describe
'5744464' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMQ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
01033504f233e7bdd1531a769d1abdc1
376f77a4988fe5492ca8f8c42a2a43f33bea1cd2
'2011-12-29T05:37:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMR' 'sip-files00028.tif'
4dfeec65db9df621b6f70c4b16b4bcfc
9da208290c0a05889b076fe1733db9b6a4cab10d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMS' 'sip-files00029.tif'
398a36b26571e2443bdc4cf8ea8dcfd9
4d5cb1487e13f6f0482a5e3ef04b1ec08b77c119
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMT' 'sip-files00030.tif'
dba20a642ff1fbeab77872d6bf38d0e8
a5635666c1886438547d086308a3a4e052301ce5
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMU' 'sip-files00031.tif'
6cf4f932d074930399b9ad96816dfc97
377bb6caa3dc52c42640d8ce1f0fa91d6887211d
describe
'5843016' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMV' 'sip-files00032.tif'
6fe343292d384fc4cb0410df8406d9fe
d40fdaf805a8dff8d4c0f0c90b314ce1f9588985
'2011-12-29T05:37:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMW' 'sip-files00033.tif'
9c9288acb0e5fd7847ad9d13c0ac0138
6c59145af534c8acfba45b925d244dc0c498f0c3
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMX' 'sip-files00034.tif'
69ac00236a31f66e442a12e3b7df5baa
c6b3cffb32ad8bb169bd66ab0afadc267ee1c4bb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMY' 'sip-files00035.tif'
8834156c4b0a08a8d278098dbd931e89
0932feca98a681372993fed3cd565e7a10169258
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNMZ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
6fae7b25ac594e0449264379c47f8ca9
7ece66f41398caf56491baad5df124e1ddfa9f9c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNA' 'sip-files00037.tif'
d75378902281d586f9f277c6ec262f9f
d2dd14adef816d0e8e39326130d7cf837f31b8cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNB' 'sip-files00038.tif'
14c755f71e1b419320861353c936bcb3
6c963623abbb0a7584c9812bf7d46e3029ad668b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNC' 'sip-files00039.tif'
ee849d1167d6cca1cf250cb43d4722aa
d8c0eeac2f8e4f9b904a0ec3eac85a7b80940662
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNND' 'sip-files00040.tif'
5c5719c1831f85483aad4cfc25535c95
9f0f52add455ed52fc2acb6760c25f2943fd424b
describe
'5828428' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNE' 'sip-files00041.tif'
6ba53c91bf2b0c2783ae438452bd9374
84504ada947955098f9d937246a747e16223478c
'2011-12-29T05:36:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNF' 'sip-files00042.tif'
93f674c773479d91aa60c7e75c94ee0f
af35f6a793829a19adafea7ae72197d76b6255de
'2011-12-29T05:38:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNG' 'sip-files00043.tif'
bbd438092737670cfee332b2d31e081b
5d54d10664da50386bb414b7394ca69dd36df9cd
describe
'5778052' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNH' 'sip-files00044.tif'
0b9feba76242f36af2c9969d474b9509
e71f35db46de8226629fa279c8221f9996fd1e3e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNI' 'sip-files00045.tif'
4e12fb6a9b4b465a76ffa829b51b603d
075070470c331dfbdde03ab4ef121e1fb5b5be3c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNJ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
ecf7085c4a2d93d23fa3776e1b8d1594
b725d7350f187e094a967e8bdbf6ad4c3b63a3a9
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNK' 'sip-files00047.tif'
4dbf7f826cdcc097683eb25955a11fe9
90315c0b275432e7b469b35373aa2a3e76091df8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNL' 'sip-files00048.tif'
f7a620ffaf00994677cce7d219580764
70c621b429384222dc8957f800d361fbf9cd6b88
'2011-12-29T05:34:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNM' 'sip-files00049.tif'
8e325b96198da2e4e4cfa8160cadebc6
9e2cf7e1f015e308f5fb9af8f122fc620cd4942f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNN' 'sip-files00050.tif'
b2fd701fd02324f2fa94e6a1cddd2d2a
52ce5126113bb5bc419949efbac847dd4cf68ecc
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNO' 'sip-files00051.tif'
fb71aa5a39a65370d78be59f71ddc419
fd14ce5a95331e95a9d3bbb18bd67b59e24f8e97
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNP' 'sip-files00052.tif'
0afa07e1af163afc26ccd1ebee8087ff
fea26f6ccd7995ba52ec0784b3a5fb49b8b83413
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNQ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
2dc941165360c1b90bb43557a5b88558
f47439c80618b82f073556e49c90210fd12ecb19
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNR' 'sip-files00054.tif'
e1831b2f2dece9b468c8eeceb4de0602
5be5f16b1ead5df845a060469a8581c759514da1
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNS' 'sip-files00055.tif'
fe4e5b03cd5380fec597abd735bf1ec7
6f10d6bc91a8e34d9be51b16272a689eb1831f3d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNT' 'sip-files00056.tif'
41e8a79ae6c8330c6eb71bba5fc22331
1785cb1c6de661dec6f24c3d573f04087c63d95f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNU' 'sip-files00057.tif'
9f3b53d0901beaf1ab03692da17d35ec
155df9a0f7abc6281f7a6cb152d36ff6a5c10433
'2011-12-29T05:40:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNV' 'sip-files00058.tif'
82e9b6815681be004ac864b0aea16dec
88b95414fb918be639bd5b188407872127fe8dc6
'2011-12-29T05:34:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNW' 'sip-files00059.tif'
ef92e1bba795f40492002866504d4021
70a4a3442e3976519b8deebb340ff0a7a97aaff6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNX' 'sip-files00060.tif'
7311fe6e7e88ff2246190597e4585bb4
f666ee0215d8b53da4c8b945b782914518e97b27
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNY' 'sip-files00061.tif'
9a4c4b0e7bb63643f139d6bf913e399f
3aa41b36abc37231dcb25579e305f2634186f813
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNNZ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
3aa591216a9a1e3083093432c304f0ba
d9e5279b355b2cc1fb002f0af7e6a15e6e33b9b5
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOA' 'sip-files00063.tif'
041423b59d24889caed8add7758f5c75
1d5d0b0f2510fd7d5ae75e511a57c4fa2688e815
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOB' 'sip-files00064.tif'
2857b5d60a0fd8654ed2f3855033d435
db83284ce9d0cdf44cf7498e21d86ef19f743b2e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOC' 'sip-files00065.tif'
d5308f843bafb46947fc2e8987c297cd
2536d78828ece42f593bb8697ec258332e3e74f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOD' 'sip-files00066.tif'
9777fba74045613069bebd277a1ace89
7bd0b53daff960a127bc825018033dab427c8931
'2011-12-29T05:35:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOE' 'sip-files00067.tif'
a65f406ead1fa7c24c21672fc2bb57dd
362af756cd1939c61edadd070541594b708e71a3
'2011-12-29T05:37:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
ae10b38a6482322b70d3b01a33752ea6
a516bc3f76f052a33bcfe9f916eab7ce69215c61
'2011-12-29T05:41:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOG' 'sip-files00069.tif'
91c15e2b8a6fdd1131dfcd00dd866216
7c11abbdcf74f0f0a3a6fbf26e835c4e0b92cdbf
describe
'6068472' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOH' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b71bdaba1c39cbd8c53f7ed563f0bdb4
096dfe772e4959cb50ec2434e2221f62179a11d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOI' 'sip-files00071.tif'
992b198f3ab72eee99acee9e350c31d4
504fe160eafe77418dbe3a284f261f9b5492eaea
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOJ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
068f0f4c6f99358b3a4e51666506b8c6
fa276ac468528fccee228ba61706d95d1bf1b3f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOK' 'sip-files00073.tif'
6870191d92fe9f7af26ca8059174c3f3
30c50169be66fa426240d35ac7574f24758df970
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOL' 'sip-files00074.tif'
f4e262d9040b4092d8a621401dcc27cb
ce7a0a617245fa5f23a9002802314b2c57a49c99
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOM' 'sip-files00075.tif'
1d00c05d88d98997fdb4a99a8800130e
174f66c2f00311bd8bd36ffb020b8c937fe78e88
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNON' 'sip-files00076.tif'
0b21b75544cf910566d0ae9676c0de7f
ea09890e7ebb909816f59c6ed290fad9f2683503
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOO' 'sip-files00077.tif'
fabb059b8757e1a3d639f0e78d32cbd8
bd95d94e81caaa132b4d76570828ddbfdc1a8995
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOP' 'sip-files00078.tif'
62827f394ea71a972dc6854e572d28ea
c9ddcda97e3a886f51696b93804f807806c7e1be
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOQ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
a94d9301063afd3cd5fdd04702ea82e0
6503ee66678f25b7b0a60092542040b8f97a4875
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOR' 'sip-files00080.tif'
64f4f60c502d534e2b230716d9ac7f90
a8ba6654ca92d0988c708583a45611126441bef6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOS' 'sip-files00081.tif'
9a5a3e6ac2c0617ec5fa56d00ece02f3
4103a6aa378caf7006ef9bcb54538ffb13931e92
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOT' 'sip-files00082.tif'
1e92e67cf5eeeb56b0cd08350a5b5e9c
96730186e4fdc778de3b11f7f60a7e79cbc1010f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOU' 'sip-files00083.tif'
b1cf3fadfd74fa480889aa6ec628cf8c
2f99d6deed5d4b1db885275ffed41365988ea94a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOV' 'sip-files00084.tif'
064db19cd224572a85aad6a0497349c1
f76feccc725a71e66c6c56eb343b402360feeae1
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOW' 'sip-files00085.tif'
4fe2b248db749b88dfc650de18b2627c
8d199bd01c63336870064c9fd39d662362fc0982
'2011-12-29T05:35:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOX' 'sip-files00086.tif'
9870f776098693270a96a5648bab5bb2
822893a54aa2050ff61ba945b8ff725a4ea5caeb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOY' 'sip-files00087.tif'
74572ba65cb6e311473dc82cd6588222
4f7706a21674e48295a45862839117e9abce0844
'2011-12-29T05:41:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNOZ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
e0c59e48601f836342b5d729cdee6a30
d2024a9bdfa04d353a3d8ef6c36ec2b289560f4f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPA' 'sip-files00089.tif'
41eaaa18d07042d3e03fd7c301c27cae
db1ee0bd80bd45eb92685a7180b844fd11554263
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPB' 'sip-files00090.tif'
7e16080c795ead2ae9938dc78905937d
e09171b396101bc6bac38f9a10492872adfaa510
'2011-12-29T05:36:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPC' 'sip-files00091.tif'
e10f043addfbdc790bc910d6ae5fd297
59d80eebc03809f8407eacdda107643899af5388
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPD' 'sip-files00092.tif'
b3a752753a3d3e1fba676af4170f4e26
9e7c68f1e4e2905e68c226e3f93b26b2bb9771a9
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPE' 'sip-files00093.tif'
824391a84a4a30a5d2b81548211093ef
e19eec0195344391881429e5a054a4def458fc71
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPF' 'sip-files00094.tif'
3059f7bef10672a5e664bda8d2acb901
91ac2b395b4e39836be0f894ee36be2d8edb631b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPG' 'sip-files00095.tif'
0c88690d9e4525cc40c8a75411042160
b0b68d847f66dbc0ae640b2f1a75e6f61394ce0d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPH' 'sip-files00096.tif'
81b107259f2605b1195cd901978c3372
24de08aa12aed1676826a22dcbf80dde124be48d
'2011-12-29T05:34:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPI' 'sip-files00097.tif'
8be62deaf5f6f23a928a2e72e59ef965
f6bc10c0a2feecf45b6fd484b3eee265cfd43ed6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPJ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
f689e3b4abb37604dbd7f44b970042f7
f67e773aba4a4554bdc689ab62bac6e6f12c93eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPK' 'sip-files00099.tif'
f80676c5a3fdcc4c88c6bca8448ed11f
5d6c2c990fc4e7120da45cc89e1dfc2b7124d549
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPL' 'sip-files00100.tif'
882e814ddfc9994692a3c6ae53fcdfe7
9b39e0f7136bd431986c4daa99582101f76c12f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPM' 'sip-files00101.tif'
7bd8f5485eb265a3235af08ef6a869a9
5e23ed9275d5eb5c18261378ca674ff5444a1a9a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPN' 'sip-files00102.tif'
b80158889230664a44d68cb0dffa5e98
406656b91f796a9149e1820e629ca4d1e6a6d707
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPO' 'sip-files00103.tif'
99a3d117891473e053dcc3f53e0b1bb8
463b6c3f0089d3f23d79a6d9e423d7523c7333c6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPP' 'sip-files00104.tif'
eee430b4842be26a43c670ee7a7e077f
c68d0b58d993dcb2a3ea6a7509783ef9ba69fa8d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPQ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
ae45f0ff44a7e83c4ef223e962c64058
0f58e8ba5ce8809963ac62b021ca265c3cdb4361
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPR' 'sip-files00106.tif'
4f6d67333f5ec902de8de97cb2af9cd9
f3c4cacf236104f640f9c5d24652b44e6ec03e97
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPS' 'sip-files00107.tif'
726af6a28102391ca636b3c74cddeeea
92a84fd68646dea92d43df01ec3b1dac8fec6e03
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPT' 'sip-files00108.tif'
05518f36bbf2cd9722590eacf3a814ef
5d27dd7619409ec13cd5820e07d6f8dd54bb425a
'2011-12-29T05:41:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPU' 'sip-files00109.tif'
9d070d08b32ad0626772544b227a0bb5
d2f1e612aa1156c1b30ab8dadfff29f34ade821d
describe
'6009536' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPV' 'sip-files00110.tif'
bf8d6d7939051929058c3dcbea31672b
3a7413b108a626d2ff42a7dc9c1fc80ac69a8b3a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPW' 'sip-files00111.tif'
950d3e6bd4ebf39eb0bae40704775a21
c2105709711e40fb349c50018eef28f81f27fa9f
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPX' 'sip-files00112.tif'
1454c2581e5d8440144b403725fcd763
99b42039d812b2a4857e994b5620b462ece09a98
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPY' 'sip-files00113.tif'
09694359562f367cc0a81b63ad64b6bb
fd8ca16d7f462625ebdec2ce5b50410cbf126c09
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNPZ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
36e5a319cb66d594b141a9a06207e115
cbd9cb6fa564d938ad833353b5d22489a3794bcc
'2011-12-29T05:37:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQA' 'sip-files00115.tif'
5a448dcff849b845d1b29cbd42564664
49afd7ff67672b817b089c5670510a05c314973e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQB' 'sip-files00116.tif'
b385167be920643170e9cb708285d062
9d035dd65ceab1685af1ea48f29868efc8f45f13
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQC' 'sip-files00117.tif'
d2c092c2ba82d4a3617c7d1695b51d21
aa5c1777bb0f62ec7ccc7ab9d3bddf85e0f207e4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQD' 'sip-files00118.tif'
300cbcea3fb44bda21924a68ee6668c7
a951cb9d054b7083ea8e2a4c70eb1eb5117adeb6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQE' 'sip-files00119.tif'
96cf55a1498ae021482c33b61a393428
e3ff03d182381166d0ae62874968590cf32e4057
'2011-12-29T05:39:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQF' 'sip-files00120.tif'
6dbc58e3fd533deac418cc50a7628421
17231edef00e424983f228658f2f47f0d552dcd7
'2011-12-29T05:40:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQG' 'sip-files00121.tif'
e0a5064f233d84f2fba43c136cab2aa9
c31b48394986ceee4801c106d5439b8e16cc8318
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQH' 'sip-files00122.tif'
70ffe7ea24d03ed38983d996b0c4a62b
894d1b9b8f5809f1f4d57648e8eab67ad334ba6c
'2011-12-29T05:40:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQI' 'sip-files00123.tif'
2bc0cedacf59552976fad6a6be382fee
857ab9dab3f18e0cba8a458e9c56e4634f8dc528
'2011-12-29T05:40:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQJ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
fb322d9e598af3fda462cb75f5edebe0
c768fa21b3a73ddf6e0f8174c733e0844adecd05
'2011-12-29T05:40:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQK' 'sip-files00125.tif'
67499dc8af638c350f0878585fbd8641
466c1b13b5155fb6b34de9dcaa630263d54e5111
'2011-12-29T05:36:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQL' 'sip-files00126.tif'
6246ccf490cfc3db2ba4f9e590459c39
b7ab7736047ce3c0abe8c1c0e96c86b226fbf602
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQM' 'sip-files00127.tif'
1b806c006c156aa406eb635ac28953ee
950513f90925baaedbbdc982b18ea7ad5e3b1f8c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQN' 'sip-files00128.tif'
7adbaa89fca4eeeeb161b36793e665d0
9c0d3ca66e2b0b95aa1ec5b9193f2d79c828b5a6
'2011-12-29T05:35:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQO' 'sip-files00129.tif'
cc27e649c0669a7865d908bcfac15f6c
1f3a77909d10392e33f83c6d2b3ede07c59414d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQP' 'sip-files00130.tif'
295da9b7b83f721d4304316c8a49e6db
bb7408d26d992569ccbb2e6588f1e640b6ee38a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQQ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
544650ce8ac2cf734fe871514990027f
68c1d75fad4800ee0654b173fc92254487a9b927
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQR' 'sip-files00132.tif'
886d59d597d9de3091a587356cf10ec5
4cca49f5eb38b08eec00886144d82dc09bf12f5c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQS' 'sip-files00133.tif'
0c984199cfebde1584c737f1224d6f10
d1466c7984392097aa1be0d016cf29fb32bf5dda
'2011-12-29T05:37:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQT' 'sip-files00134.tif'
9c3c224eb8cd015fe9a3cc89f2784048
ee91233ef437b78c4e8b136fc650e73c9ea274ab
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQU' 'sip-files00135.tif'
7de4efa71a046cebaa3c553cba793cc4
549b809334dab76465e635b7d6dfbfc2c9431867
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQV' 'sip-files00136.tif'
c6ec21117bfbcd2ab26d3a2e5649d49b
592914fc87ac07633b656fa3c97f298dc4e1cddb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQW' 'sip-files00137.tif'
aba1c13d4254ee1e7232ebe5d8a52a90
d4d4069c87b78aa733f36ad75b88569f79c8d6c5
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQX' 'sip-files00138.tif'
d6ee0817e38b98c296bcd7cf9aa66f2e
1693bed7186177f640fdb874ed546409043c2e20
'2011-12-29T05:38:22-05:00'
describe
'5912404' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQY' 'sip-files00139.tif'
c8d364d98a80cc77469e7a7509c64393
6c170b04fddda27d062942f82d2638b3c5d3366e
'2011-12-29T05:37:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNQZ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
fad5994ea878e8ccd971a9be770e28d1
a1d6ba62c79febe13ea148988442c491a2d0aff9
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRA' 'sip-files00141.tif'
78442cd5fb5f52ae9621489f1dced08a
2ad813765cdbc03539ea7940ce10b9417d546484
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRB' 'sip-files00142.tif'
37632b2dd996e24703a0cb5d6eacc0af
8fce0c93622084618648d897cb0a54082e085da9
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRC' 'sip-files00143.tif'
93861f1f972292ebeb0c512baf1a19b3
f23199148426d009e2cf243f32168066309f4524
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRD' 'sip-files00144.tif'
32664cc591697d8520fbe1537fe83729
2a596068549b82ea771a1f843268282f387a9eaf
'2011-12-29T05:37:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRE' 'sip-files00145.tif'
43f1959e54b623da35a8949be01c610c
e9a7f4a4696c1cbb9ba8d091609f0fdea48840cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRF' 'sip-files00146.tif'
016542141ae984bf02a975cf285ba679
a3057cf94a955a26a11b597cef70757f352b5c73
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRG' 'sip-files00147.tif'
58af1c1978d1289414d90af53c1b2fe4
f1c89c9dc30da48ffe3bc7a8a94c3ddce1570b3b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRH' 'sip-files00148.tif'
16810d281674ebf309133bdf7657629f
d685636f16f54836b2673e3c2567a4a304d671a4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRI' 'sip-files00149.tif'
acf92bc3b414d2ac7cb93a22b3e93f33
f5afdb0a07d3f34ef4ec6b93822055a3e5548681
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRJ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
e1afeea331923441b1867778cdccc921
aff895c28dd32a8a71ae9a4975715312dc980a0b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRK' 'sip-files00151.tif'
eea51aa6bf78cd5f2461e57f6e5b55dc
721968feb730900d60dfd95e7a57067b7981a89e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRL' 'sip-files00152.tif'
c5804176c4c4e0b5d4e312fc81b931de
8115144e0fa22f51cdbf04b00832d4d752b78b65
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRM' 'sip-files00153.tif'
5b8a436483f6d7d4355fd7b1f4ab1c9e
9231a4bb9a49751eb582d11980381fe614f43643
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRN' 'sip-files00154.tif'
5c14c4af858dceea1690929f3f4b73e4
4bbd7839ffb2217c891253222c4d26fbee985dc2
'2011-12-29T05:36:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRO' 'sip-files00155.tif'
a78a9bcab90c4470f664178d5926f476
19e945e2d90f8d6902b053f692f8e06a5edd2809
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRP' 'sip-files00156.tif'
e9ced892e6810baa2e86885eaed68cee
1b7c2447110e1632e33ff712a7adbd4f17222b6d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRQ' 'sip-files00157.tif'
10c6f127e774e988671be81e5ced5aa6
2944be252ad7295023bd8a108cdb67d5d4c300b2
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRR' 'sip-files00158.tif'
488d9accae6491b4834de041a6c98f30
ca9de371f93107b693a2fe4fc0ee8febe9ae8edb
'2011-12-29T05:35:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRS' 'sip-files00159.tif'
5021629eea269e7a2985c8c6e025bd0a
e5f1a763803530f2e5e91486ee4c7daeaf43a38d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRT' 'sip-files00160.tif'
4032b86f5d0c459fbc42711846d83b0d
ccd69286b8975852e11942e103b1eee855a63552
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRU' 'sip-files00161.tif'
94c95395f8daae8cbad992b570e03245
38d4d184f5d6209e96d000a3089629c735a66039
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRV' 'sip-files00162.tif'
88d3878d7c941b9546647c74ffb32376
09d806680ea29ae99c5fb5d3db307e18717baae8
'2011-12-29T05:36:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRW' 'sip-files00163.tif'
fc7604fa9104d6cad2118efb63d66322
827397807bfe82da8d0ad362d64cc33297abdb94
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRX' 'sip-files00164.tif'
bf375d057c455372d67e564fe97eb48d
e9f9c831d4e5259663456ce597e311fce2d57fac
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRY' 'sip-files00165.tif'
63e78cbdec47f19e3bee724d449a4a87
ed2c3769818ddd757ed5cbf007cf10fc0d8c3f46
'2011-12-29T05:41:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNRZ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
eb4ca83c6470c9c6de159f2301ef67cf
3138be683499191085ae93f40953af6e28552674
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSA' 'sip-files00167.tif'
6fc4336d05a3d8dafcde786714fe29a0
30cbf1bee1480b949903735f5ee020ca88ce1c11
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSB' 'sip-files00168.tif'
e4c1f9e5c8ad1bf5cc449aff93fd075a
f82b4a1dd80300281e3cb63d6ec1096f8431e3bf
'2011-12-29T05:38:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSC' 'sip-files00169.tif'
1ed3c20e675ac11b8294642740eb93da
46b1a06238e40d7d4c9c914a0244563d5818b3f1
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSD' 'sip-files00170.tif'
da04cf398ebbd5f3fd327a9b6cb19e79
f0e591b9873a8f789aa9b93249e3769fc731d92e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSE' 'sip-files00171.tif'
5e92d2939820d5af87aac7e912583a7e
9c8001adc1dc263e1eeecbe4e5b4c6825b1b6279
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSF' 'sip-files00172.tif'
1b057db1d20dc17550c75ca9f934f786
9c580c65e48d96be95d0c0e7bc86d186616f104e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSG' 'sip-files00173.tif'
a276b0619ab455053f2b38e24b82d260
d0e3f4a263173c067d0de4703c41b89773aa2adf
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSH' 'sip-files00174.tif'
95d1305c053c6f3b0d6d63c6895c9d82
edf93ca99475bc173ee0170afb170e2038e9090e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSI' 'sip-files00175.tif'
0f3037955142dc8a38c3b2fce36c3cf4
ebbf82934726c40f34d967d04059296075e757e8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSJ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
9c1dc366ced2c9dbed1892a7fb98331b
a90a7938235ed3724b2a32b492d56defa26a592e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSK' 'sip-files00177.tif'
690755541f8a227baec9ba5c71dba823
dfeb82762a64e695719a82c5e5adf6e65b76c100
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSL' 'sip-files00178.tif'
01755569dbafc5ee614bbe5964ec22a9
509f0ca8a74c8df8430732626164e46e5d5abe6c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSM' 'sip-files00179.tif'
cc73766a08226480d48b987fe07b9eda
b747b03d8824f9466eac674d004ed497be966647
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSN' 'sip-files00180.tif'
967e718c082c898ddbf0f120bbe60f5a
bb8a3043779bf221bd670204ac6d738a69a819ab
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSO' 'sip-files00181.tif'
8c45dfbe5169305d70b97f1e0ed8c10c
934162fe92d3992c21f4b5e762ec8c85c9f372bb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSP' 'sip-files00182.tif'
fa62349829cbf9a434244e9718c2c6fa
e7e5333e1666d5acbfb4ed1848ff996cfd390119
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSQ' 'sip-files00183.tif'
01723747c57f4cecf84f47fbe91c7bb1
e3f4f7a6789b648a20d61f34b2a135ef5a41355c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSR' 'sip-files00184.tif'
547a7931de82c0904a64f5fc05bc1189
2a3e4ef38c9dfab8ae6438e8e9efeae4dacc87dc
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSS' 'sip-files00185.tif'
78de3765c91b2a6684a3faaca03e4e2e
96ab69c6790384b10d5bcf26a041f131188e4b58
'2011-12-29T05:35:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNST' 'sip-files00186.tif'
b855891fcbcc81ab6f90e60075a581cb
05878140260c3592202527424c048cb0998fb3eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSU' 'sip-files00187.tif'
e989ba2010f39a6c8db1c7a290a71ac2
f102725af307d82651800cd7d66b2870462c429c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSV' 'sip-files00188.tif'
dbd433d0f7acb78feb8d196b7a48152c
0aa1824d7dcd6108dba11de56e12a3f03bd57dc2
'2011-12-29T05:37:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSW' 'sip-files00189.tif'
0edc12f3944216521bd1a51cca01eb3f
751437f4d12bf2db444ccd0921caae4308c8bb59
describe
'5835416' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSX' 'sip-files00190.tif'
19186ad375bb41edbac33ed72c8a95de
d4b80ed6bb62640e2f66ef5ae851642cc6389d02
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSY' 'sip-files00191.tif'
b7c503ef36c4183ad47137253281ae93
483093e4e5c473db395f857330339969563dc81e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNSZ' 'sip-files00192.tif'
fb48cd94a199a360a01d511afc64fc61
29b11ebbcac6990ccc6b7ee6724fac7822652d42
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTA' 'sip-files00193.tif'
16f4040fd77a72b466b956e55ef141a4
8612d6394e7b91354c5d384b3fcff043c3b1da29
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTB' 'sip-files00194.tif'
613f557488c1f60f04636d5a82bffe6a
86dbcefb22a7d67c6432aa1ff081ea4dadbf66f1
'2011-12-29T05:39:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTC' 'sip-files00195.tif'
999cc0d3d4e8b65c07620e2b85b9481b
4a2744ce84b1629a7e7ad87f98a8049d9f81b127
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTD' 'sip-files00196.tif'
1fcd30047583a108f07b233cd58f4dfc
7be863f095216fca2cd94edb2c09dafe2df638c1
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTE' 'sip-files00197.tif'
d409860685ea3b79c7d605d4eaeac394
8a57709ecd8bfba250c827fed108cb180dcb3af7
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTF' 'sip-files00198.tif'
93c1a7251353d682cb07f00f1a287638
df10bfdb26edbc24c621ddcae5398ad685f42cf4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTG' 'sip-files00199.tif'
979099d9a762035c110c25a13a04df47
0191f7596a76def8caa2f692fc12ac2a2388e89c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTH' 'sip-files00200.tif'
1a3116549dad4601c06976b259bd05b7
03117da5f18db7c5153ab5c22b2a849d7e6af982
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTI' 'sip-files00201.tif'
808cd5750a14756ffa5bb99ae2aec2a5
542c678ee321079c49579817a971c392bbdcf0d2
'2011-12-29T05:38:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTJ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
c7aca37ae167459f8a2341dc51216828
a663e492c15464a136d965dcf011727d44023bd8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTK' 'sip-files00203.tif'
878b097c061da72c56ceace54818fedf
0f9ad6c4b7ad48509f7d7ded968f7d5f1f57a1d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTL' 'sip-files00204.tif'
67270bde689d90ae4d877bb31195ab39
d8aa11ff2648413adb84673be2ff1bc0c4e96f88
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTM' 'sip-files00205.tif'
e6a7cd959fcaf7c379e49c6fd7d6c16f
2a42895eee90e35b366076d678e52e381c16db1c
'2011-12-29T05:37:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTN' 'sip-files00206.tif'
9a1935efaf9b3324f0b5e739484a28f4
7601382c28823a18276b18ce0777e73d96e93e34
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTO' 'sip-files00207.tif'
dca3ec43caf751f61e6a090362605387
4a9a3203ed960e4d997b0ad91e823fc8e4dbdab4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTP' 'sip-files00208.tif'
ea271b948693a6894c8c98db6ba38cd1
f8f5f1ced326b9870561aa2a7bea9df62730194a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTQ' 'sip-files00209.tif'
d657010a3d1118007cd0deb1579af033
b0ab92b17cd0e384bb43453bb262559ae83a9c79
'2011-12-29T05:38:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTR' 'sip-files00210.tif'
5d16f88ae14827dc6f2455f46c670364
7dcc1fde9dc49fb6557d101533c6b1d904ee7925
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTS' 'sip-files00211.tif'
cc0cf1ca9b854ef2e0584f1de44c4388
deeb9f7d346418f7ceb7bd19536c19b91681e5b7
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTT' 'sip-files00212.tif'
6ac67cc04a8a9615b7425f3237ca1491
e702fd2e9fede74e67d15cc21e3c42319a4d3362
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTU' 'sip-files00213.tif'
957e866f4c98a2d01eeb4ab617b86567
fbfa85c5f52f20eadd94cae662f4785cdbbea70d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTV' 'sip-files00214.tif'
36a3d937a3d9f0858a3f37c751797214
70fe03411faaf8b61e611816dd86766f87c97b3a
'2011-12-29T05:39:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTW' 'sip-files00215.tif'
07e30d0a2261eb66db97327116c64358
dfa195b1e9b07fc0374ee2813e863b730d6ea18b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTX' 'sip-files00216.tif'
89a61b0bce9847692a88140108a2d668
4a82175a39edb1597b39a780bbd341d085090f4a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTY' 'sip-files00217.tif'
081e7dfc025c3d740ac31ec9d49cb889
34b04bcb7619399a34a349cd19e68e55ab15681b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNTZ' 'sip-files00218.tif'
f3e3f9afed7b12f91b20990843de215b
a39430818b8b07641fd0c55f5a5f52e1b35b7d65
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUA' 'sip-files00219.tif'
db19aa5dd8173930228a2895da7b2a5d
bc3398ade4a7f97e6cd70ceb04235b80b6cdf700
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUB' 'sip-files00220.tif'
7005ac49b07f156c6374bce3d6b1beaa
29aaf5c62f43f6b3a6ad5f07e7e6c924b7d41fa5
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUC' 'sip-files00221.tif'
28ea402a1a4812f74f708c7d948483c4
af42256284dcd6b7993d05e77c905903b0f048a9
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUD' 'sip-files00222.tif'
037976bcfaa404e7ab439f5c5e277732
ed7af4f2b6b36c95764643f739ae3e80a335eb4d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUE' 'sip-files00223.tif'
c8e024fd36a7405bdf44ad4b736e4c7b
b40957ad55a7c01a6d3662e749db456462a5b65b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUF' 'sip-files00224.tif'
de270c38b1a8e44ec852d8fe9d07d95f
8aaf16ba960a5d576d2eb3f6722df00ab847f9c4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUG' 'sip-files00225.tif'
f6f1d97e0341a0ae46f3dcb9d1a2f666
af4d621bfe91dbfbee839156386fb275483da813
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUH' 'sip-files00226.tif'
5539c338271b649e311dcdd99ad56a63
16d7e6aee0e6abd5f589c95342f6be5c66289ee0
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUI' 'sip-files00227.tif'
d4d1f697bbac318d7003c4cae2e51d8c
3a807682180ae4e23eb25792c2993d9114e98621
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUJ' 'sip-files00228.tif'
9a7ba9654e083e8e3c3458ea4bda9593
a0a32519678837f4cdb03bb8a6a7cdf5b5e4c03c
'2011-12-29T05:39:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUK' 'sip-files00229.tif'
db73ce0275c3d0d0dc201824ce77762b
5540ee4b1a62a1f972b7a7a43049bde5e7353a64
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUL' 'sip-files00230.tif'
1ce521dbf59ecc62e0f2b17468cf5750
4563da57f6037e70f57dbed0e7fb28cd0a37b46c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUM' 'sip-files00231.tif'
c8856f4e7d6ff30a1d064928a3bc3aa0
9a5d38e0d1b85cbd475a7a42dd4cf2bc128e1e19
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUN' 'sip-files00232.tif'
696240f8db937898a0dbc9cf692a7172
d7dd2cc1ea464ba8557811d9a7aad36dd4c0dbd6
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUO' 'sip-files00233.tif'
700efc2b23c850a87a0ac25f08ad4851
8d765eedd54a2444ec3c7b7d2cecd10cfc62f2c5
'2011-12-29T05:41:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUP' 'sip-files00234.tif'
dcaa1ca5741d053ba411cb979db05e31
bb04a0350e865e94cee710adf743e1d32b76888a
'2011-12-29T05:36:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUQ' 'sip-files00235.tif'
d867db6115ec7e0aba284bb977332074
46767afe191a7332c6d267c44459bebed8c31453
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUR' 'sip-files00236.tif'
4be47e9b9b0534ca8e04f8b6fe7c05e1
2ad41398330907cd4e6ddcddd752088eda6bb5fc
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUS' 'sip-files00237.tif'
05c3f93af3eb723229a85691d968c62c
2c114fc5a53e1e6782ed664a9a49c4b1bb08c4d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUT' 'sip-files00238.tif'
c5c439e4392286dd6088d4c277accdc2
e74899aad60e6c73f4aa5e0122f37712ce38fa87
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUU' 'sip-files00239.tif'
c9a2c21cee940651912b24bb1099e8d3
0836513ad733d8cd46d4c6fcb5df1325aa6c76b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUV' 'sip-files00240.tif'
6ae788eedcbb634076e26255243b89f8
ffbac91aad04d338b815746af2e575a2f0afddb9
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUW' 'sip-files00241.tif'
3d0893b34da153c136b38f3efccbced6
31be4057fddf415dbf5987a066a83df6895c9c17
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUX' 'sip-files00242.tif'
22d74703a461b35e6f79852291b7ec64
aea2cd266311b209621ef1c70f1af3c777eeba21
'2011-12-29T05:40:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUY' 'sip-files00243.tif'
f3bed8a2fbe3dcea9c0d4924b96912b9
f132dc0d2e14acde0441b9face049d5d19d8f1d3
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNUZ' 'sip-files00244.tif'
8852ff593d4c935b1c26157b96c70393
b94dc39eb3987264a18e648199626ca08b69d34a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVA' 'sip-files00245.tif'
746b5b9b398b8aa1318b918ec210b1ab
57e7e5594ede05ad874cc69413d48b4f18f9a389
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVB' 'sip-files00246.tif'
e6062beb9ac7ce62d7cb2b39db97fa80
ac4f012f8105819718a54fb9b8caba9c8b3cb634
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVC' 'sip-files00247.tif'
2ff7de975eb3785dbc13a25b4fb41cfd
8dcec4607d796a6a6a6f248476467e489ecd5110
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVD' 'sip-files00248.tif'
9aff9dc262652b98b5e3c29d5eaae13a
aafe99484fec2f923fe272a76d6dd02d4fb99042
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVE' 'sip-files00249.tif'
19233330ce332f67f7ce579850b7a9f6
ecd30bc2b1dbb4471b1674f1532448051ceb6d24
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVF' 'sip-files00250.tif'
fc96c7e1e64aab326f6622cfb0c261a4
4aac7294b1d7699a82aa2705be1d6956ada813d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVG' 'sip-files00251.tif'
178683cd6e59783b1b81d7eea490c12c
eee082061fbe950c45efe19fac3ef5226c7ed639
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVH' 'sip-files00252.tif'
a5e20699adef6edd1d0f7c7d64b2803b
bbe3945d4029c42d3420c58d921a652a92fea3eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVI' 'sip-files00253.tif'
94f88362c3776b3e5e592bcff58cea79
40781dc6270225d2855c0fe174a6436dd4c42afd
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVJ' 'sip-files00254.tif'
c5004bac6a4fa0d841ab108fcbce5cc3
65919636e7a1fd4adf260f6c4e0dcbda1b2be382
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVK' 'sip-files00255.tif'
319b10133f5dc00abe2c5e0616d9069e
d0a9c783c0e8a0e084fa83db200ff76473d2b188
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVL' 'sip-files00256.tif'
2fecfd9031f12c328e9cba8228a9a9c1
e490bbf73c4bf20207fc3d6384efea2eff9edff8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVM' 'sip-files00257.tif'
fecb35694cf1fc6d343fd0fb74cfb7c4
02f59ecd91819a4762ee8d96b6c5fcb37df3672a
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVN' 'sip-files00258.tif'
b5d085e8c26e3632fee4c80b5cfbccea
7668cff93e16947dc9434f6ec0eabbee2890837c
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVO' 'sip-files00259.tif'
94422969894f1e8772f775d6bff93d39
3759efc38b077f398a85818db6a7e4e596d91c6e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVP' 'sip-files00260.tif'
174ee377e9a211e89c8b6f7653717f29
dcd5517a26506a38aee161be1abe3f73d93ec09b
'2011-12-29T05:39:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVQ' 'sip-files00261.tif'
b797fcd0f3dbd7b389ec761ead1e6587
0600bfa5a3cfd43a1e29be2b4805ccfe714034f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVR' 'sip-files00262.tif'
725e190b13657146dc990af5a8551965
87bf3efdd603ecded37eefd4ef6adb885f74825d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVS' 'sip-files00263.tif'
633e1dd086d31fe91734714e60a10485
856068206fbe30c8c1e17d77922f77a16c508ed7
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVT' 'sip-files00264.tif'
8b7b45eb30fa49a28dabd548dab9d3e3
845c6c30da1afe190ed5595f34278097f98b63cf
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVU' 'sip-files00265.tif'
d031d11483870c7a75a8f390196a3af9
31d6452bf2c4cf42ecd9e854f361642223de1cf7
'2011-12-29T05:40:15-05:00'
describe
'20022428' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVV' 'sip-files00271.tif'
6ba05c98a2af2b05784f4f99b2877540
86ea705b05683e25620f1b6743211a885c36eddd
describe
'20410064' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVW' 'sip-files00272.tif'
b2c6a97f3078f2ab3b0eae3d0f2ef363
9ca21002053daa060dcbb1ce4a2ae42f3c296447
describe
'3391868' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVX' 'sip-files00273.tif'
14d518d5c1408979b29a87cec0a011ab
561a4d5f20156546726c0804a2a3bcbc6f0134c1
describe
'161044' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVY' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
85ad0be535158dab60c165d7d15fee00
cd3ed99e35945f8e0d6e7384aa15cd036be58aef
describe
'65369' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNVZ' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
9598698c04a08eec872bb365a6b8efc4
39d13943f56ce7def020cf6262ebb7046255a6e9
describe
'62578' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWA' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
07c6127e3f5ef2827e88dd8e715fcd3c
01fa54803355a0f6214bbb73b9b83ab9fb4f8fe9
describe
'49391' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWB' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
7419da1aef73767c1109bf6ca6293162
1b8bdea99eead3b25347c9809fb53227772e6c31
describe
'63594' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWC' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
5f71addf0c733dc4f555c4003cf40887
164f8a62c634d1561b401fcf5d9cf78909e168e2
describe
'54390' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWD' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
a436dc9df8e35a87b27c2d3805df44a5
926203cc490a55e3f70c0ea9a947135850dddaac
describe
'11237' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWE' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
820c6349a604e27150e58ef385a6f416
ece4356d43edb1e7f4a3b8eda4902e06e715cf07
describe
'134368' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWF' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
d66e67959ed38b36f1fec0bf344d54fe
de3568423a9d9833199e92887ec8e44479f3d365
describe
'39759' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWG' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
5d950a3502fec143678eecab4a9d9760
96c816930da1061e76f1c6e8899c10177c11b1ee
describe
'75134' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWH' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
eebe5c4f0db6e7292efbc192830d6238
ec89acc6c5b8995a03267959d2e266b338a950ca
describe
'85395' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWI' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
5579e5e4b223ad5347e3d73a52072666
8c122c0dd7b3d81da649dd58db7006bbc24d1bd3
describe
'14871' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWJ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
98b7258914a3a05f73113809dc822857
f0a8cc110505a2b4c3505b9a621143db2d6ae95c
describe
'56624' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWK' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
515d1a89b9b2298d9bf055af921d0075
f4dd91baa3038f6987bcdb6ed4c3823574cf8372
describe
'100712' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWL' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
f67b809ce3ae44a7e66c18ae7ebc7ec3
188f540f85e6b20bd6d79cf4dc7a270996f96e3a
describe
'138525' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWM' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
5b1376e74925a53ea43b34680dcafb42
e7c7f91858f106ed23a2192fcca4212357035238
describe
'112509' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWN' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
b48cca7739bdeb58201635127858c89f
f9166137202509004c621c08fa5f9f7d8007a93f
describe
'130949' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWO' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
36fbe6bdc9ddd24a60297ca6f175224b
eed189dde6471e652affd34e8177b67dc73b4446
describe
'116007' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWP' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
c34b38ad8ef8a048eda100d1aee52177
d3c8a6971d58397793bd9ba2c43a244753370db1
describe
'141350' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWQ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
74cd33fbd2186dc0893d707d4f51a5e3
ef3d56cdffbb30ec2b0aa8513fd1bec4a357da34
describe
'119860' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWR' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
0d554fdad0f0aa5601729f72c270a4f5
136d90edc2395c0931c3ab51b200910424b0596f
describe
'126854' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWS' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
70bef0b8bc750500e74022046d50da5c
9488818afbb2639a1307538bbdab236de36f4ed6
describe
'134845' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWT' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
721098675df7d7fde6b4b04f0eff8984
6effc9a66f92f158918e0705f387ae84f63ae4ef
describe
'146571' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWU' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
852239df7e78c1712f80db975bd3f7b1
784833704af89d6f7d959cf0e2aa880d15096ed2
describe
'108607' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWV' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
f3258588446ad4fdcb43a3f9f46cd4a3
717f25d0fd18ff23ba19fbaa71c25dd3866b6b51
describe
'121337' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWW' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
d8c756220ba6eb7c6ed32ee5da5ba45a
f6436ee27cbbd2e1ecbe2a1b92dae69c6548a028
describe
'93651' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWX' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
e655c2175de089f47acd115240f1f5a9
63deaec7db21cef9025ab454726c1d8347b195a0
describe
'136782' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWY' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
80ada63da989e3abd1c1fb03d91bba7b
d6f5ed5c2f03f488d7a2810e82956a012bd85af9
describe
'100030' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNWZ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
e38d0184e5b0893a8e0a359f2c8c090a
43bdb31ec486757a767b860ec449e692489e0464
'2011-12-29T05:37:34-05:00'
describe
'86693' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXA' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
e4e3a900791fa07fc9b0ab72eec84ea6
697cb208e8de8364b8d437f111e726e5532f4505
describe
'100955' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXB' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
942bce35bc1e223b1e668048ff11ae8a
9eb6bbe8846ba0450ea0efb737599de0f4948dce
describe
'148213' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXC' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
b32d38d1f9a746b7584a6c532fede545
c75bca55df013e41601a9ca366643ee137a8d07d
describe
'107827' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXD' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
d511d22c2e6ffccb508fd97d267e22be
373005bf2cf75c5fc5a04d53de54320cc0a3d2e9
describe
'133585' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXE' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
23b001a930f81af8ff5b8e8aa353805c
ff41e87b5f214513715bba3282c3269a52a5f86d
describe
'142560' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXF' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
1cd2fab9566f9747a23ea7d5d246a9b2
45042af2e4b10578b937b3229610aac714f6c533
describe
'137922' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXG' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
d854da9d32add502ea04d3faa84b3cab
9ee151ca068b05a80a8133fe35e113a876af14f9
describe
'137910' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXH' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
d69ffdb830f1df238e53911532d21af3
543055ee01924e5315dfd58a4616a9d4eac69e5e
describe
'144463' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXI' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
14a98ce2d8ef9b2e470435557ab6dbba
d95c9b9cd794a92012608eee8b48bce391e99aa0
describe
'137905' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXJ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
444632a9ebb347478c68e0da7534ebfa
32aaf1ed054c14e92c5e11de6aefc6fd6fa60711
describe
'149033' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXK' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
3e46d41a8ed29c1e90db71242808014b
ab598752c83aaa600dccc9a1ab8dd7fe01683b98
describe
'139389' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXL' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
94be6f2b40c16ce5115804b7da757791
1bf58a7f6478781f19586b068fc889979040ad84
describe
'101771' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXM' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
22ae886f0fe0012d3640dd99e47580f2
6342ec4cbd7c128637b99d9292144807739556ec
describe
'138297' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXN' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
7e9157eaec99557a0dabf519d29307d4
97b8d49bbf8831bdc193fbe9f0214452195a5a20
describe
'140816' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXO' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
220a0c5c667130ccc9813f02803800fb
bff3ee856492ee43e95eb9b597e256973db7b253
describe
'131110' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXP' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
ea4f859cca19b45bf466004a0fea9cc1
1bed3641373796ba8ffe36f56ef34ed805876527
describe
'96373' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXQ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
d0910c07117a754b5ab0a4f0a4733698
4c8c8f411485c29cb7be3488511be500c87d09ce
describe
'106591' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXR' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
508cbe3a603e8f467d9a18f48e0645b9
8a09a47e4cba5df85dbb712e34bac61840034ba4
describe
'107684' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXS' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
194d8f1ab3a900bb099add87eba37c61
531d89b99aa10424d4ecaf41b81c13c2c350739c
describe
'92675' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXT' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
ece4d2336057a8b43d733719ae2e33e4
f44bad86d666e3452dce515966d0206f8bb3bfaa
describe
'122856' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXU' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
e032f223531a5e4d594c73769026e3b0
493fd7022a1dc88900ffe4be362a5dd0e0a869bc
describe
'121130' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXV' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
3269195d4757efddbbe4d01258360f71
4d606e421a8c8b1160852c05bb80e6ded1901b8d
describe
'127682' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXW' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
521a08756b3d3e144791af430766efc4
59d5c614ccad17ae04584f63d86698575a407797
describe
'136733' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXX' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
0d4aaa866616a68b51327abd602856af
d9b151980442cdb932da7ebadf36de4892a482d6
describe
'132924' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
a18aa85c5a68d2c87d0cd8fa98aae288
c39777438e76e4f884d5dfcde4ba2039ee4dc11f
describe
'147202' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNXZ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
af7afa8bdf61ac83431008cf6f19971c
787f70c5472164364590557c8b9eaf5e65bdb3a9
describe
'124548' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYA' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
3dc2dd610faafefc68c94bbf7f418430
a26b916575e26dcb653468d39b0e9d0c61d3bb17
describe
'124400' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYB' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
abbf2445e577958a07e49e142cb9ff0a
fd8f1dce170467967e2620219f3360281892b0c4
describe
'139672' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYC' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
00bb45d8e812016e9ab498c51c1c953e
16d8f6f06bd7d83a80d96738dd20ee231b718e77
describe
'156824' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYD' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
450123f9835cfed740b63b4530c9e308
53ca1f5badb48c86b360d1b7627f037fc00b3fa2
describe
'146405' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
faa552f083b51f841c0349a3839ff35f
14cb9abf9509f283009025c87e32bcfd4873f2f5
describe
'154366' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYF' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
30f15cd54810704817b84abcbc855b32
8cc82f66e9967eed4090916eb888a782cc906207
describe
'119140' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYG' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
1091a539535d15e09353c0e6a70cff7f
534e69926bafc8ca67456a8b3e85fa159439d32d
describe
'132581' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYH' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
db024338240cb0a3465e047873082528
9458dfa16e568bfee8b6cc43cd804be098d204f9
describe
'104916' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYI' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
69832b9017f1dc4d67197b9a606d0483
235fe77ff3d37509c478cf883f80ce27b0bc52b3
describe
'103982' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYJ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
1d39845cf25dcf89bb1138a52738cc89
66043f15cd1f015172310a1d187f3d5f46267e1c
describe
'149730' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYK' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
6a1bb0a5017b6f7aea09aa7f10371a42
840bd4258108768f8f72741ece178dec33a534af
describe
'139270' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYL' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
58b9434281180b934b4c76ec89d46508
38a04f27d398103235777b47109b718ea7f1f71c
describe
'92121' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYM' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
c32b5f6ec2d28d7a40143c5b4e72b4db
10c944aba4e381f5b0f3a61521ef6629abf53641
describe
'85048' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYN' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
3df965d7813aac8d075b103d3bce542f
fbd7315dc23ffb3e946e53438623ff10a6edd8eb
describe
'137289' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYO' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
3ebb5d39edc9c66415a0cf0a5d881981
b58a515d1c505827506d7433fe443b15fddb93a8
describe
'90757' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYP' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
6c874e2c9f3a57e9e22a34a95d0f05f9
5d4a437cc08e1cb0ba0fdc4171cb216f2f36b0ac
describe
'108906' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYQ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
ff1b0a30c052afa6093c6d2d5d94cf2f
8a029b9a75a87e17180aa1c80f0ca28b0b0d115a
describe
'138033' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYR' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
f01cb4e7605cd28e1dd9ce3be59ffd4c
4a1162ff318837d2621539fe2adb0ee89517adb2
describe
'97179' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYS' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
b75b284c66186761b6fd0fb195619163
3cf4c44ed68f6669c8af10c3f887bd78246af177
'2011-12-29T05:39:36-05:00'
describe
'84879' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYT' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
bb0a8626335038e18af3ff29b12f7ab1
cf90bfbf835ab1758ee35263d9d75e3c53b926d9
describe
'142917' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYU' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
32e79797944e1b297d18b2a79c875428
22deb5640dd409ed9b2439197f7a5488b47a0dc9
describe
'116932' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYV' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
42dd071a052b7dbdab12211169c09ff3
61ecc66a4cc211be21cb89ab83a856dd1b9f9002
describe
'101175' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYW' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
e7e7c92c016d74fbecb9222f9223d62f
099123f6e04a4611c860d1122d08da43117c5a82
describe
'137410' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYX' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
a6e1a548c12e302463943e58e36a3975
b3bda7897e940d0357fe17f57ba19c2ff73d6e12
describe
'135882' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYY' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
b4fb233b8f6da9665e1a5add46b24519
b9d215d0b1d7c4f3c78d6e066e4b9ebe78b5a971
describe
'138428' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNYZ' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
958446ee986a950a8384d8e4619cd137
26f3c7479def60d636217f95def214aa65ec4608
describe
'138633' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZA' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
3d87ef5a21a315f92c6467424257fa95
c9f9052b6fd2401dd91db0048d9ebbb485838b3b
describe
'116574' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZB' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
ec7195416e26c9079883edc8b5802546
0a0231257625023bb55762ddc666af9f719ac480
describe
'123189' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZC' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
74a5aaf694a0aa2bd7744b9a3d57fa66
c8690fd14dd87c1c094815475d1e9a6cadf26ae3
describe
'128188' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZD' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
7486f5ffe95402a60c78b82337dca82b
3c26b361147f027dd1b906b85329653f1d6b7983
describe
'79481' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZE' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
a02c0a426ffc709b0f12358a0618e6fb
216901d664d82be3f64f9731f41760440ca7e86c
describe
'98419' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZF' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
4f1e8ea834e90810cf33a3f198e55cab
e3c27daec32d33e04590204f526ba48e97c8ca5c
describe
'139437' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZG' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
40218a325d5769d554b2b5b34ed98fe9
be449f933edb93bf81fb682b4ae413ae90bb3b1e
describe
'132764' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZH' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
5e290ce5daf695976dd4cc625563c8e5
d4bf22705715d1ec7ffc568814c495bf5de48350
describe
'142027' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZI' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
0f9fe43b07a37a42f32f81dfffc34211
a64eaff936663eab98abb5207887132efc38c9f4
describe
'142976' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZJ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
94588a24369d1ddd09db5c08c3171fe4
f159480b1cd57a1ae2ca7173635f58e99d79ba42
describe
'137759' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZK' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
e319acd7a153d49344d4fe6e0082def1
730b659a55509f4b5169a003dfc7c6a7fc5636d6
describe
'117636' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZL' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
6a75192724ce23ed69f6a50caf5f163c
06d98fdc9d1dc3ee18192ab16f156b67287c969b
describe
'137042' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZM' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
1bf3a91a28a4ca0d6de4c7cb3163e9f5
066f4df4a72e4b5be05eed2efbe71da3b20595cc
describe
'133666' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZN' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
08d228dc713bde456b862eea44d14fca
2b7c7ec497791e7c7672574cbb8b744507819c9b
describe
'112872' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZO' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
01c7c822f58fc63f026d15928515f314
edf3302313ac9b091cdda331c6af7e8fc4ab9bf1
describe
'117229' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZP' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
fc54447310b67555ae2f253b98c3fd7c
9558cabc068e4a8f1d8750c3894286a3c2e97ba7
describe
'118675' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZQ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
eac60b6966aec71df79efdce2e0ab636
21ddbe4b96397aaab1895713411fa0ed5610147b
describe
'120079' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZR' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
b4b11153d079925ebf78360e98ba025f
680cdec80171d8a94192ba415485af436645536a
describe
'134838' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZS' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
9ed6339f4aa5b7af4487c4c2fedefcba
ceeaff11cc6a75bd368d56867c9352012b659cf8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZT' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
d0285c124b69a3f575fb45d1f431a623
0aa24edf0e57f4de0a893a594756e9eb8bccc76c
describe
'150161' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZU' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
117e39c7ee32dc14d5b366e367ddf81a
bdc94a55a135c31415658cd7c2d210bb6e7318c4
describe
'115835' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZV' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
49664aa0ccbdefc1a555f4044b874ff8
db44ae3f40773f3e956dbde57e12574c9f9de50b
describe
'134440' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZW' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
66af6d30bfb225e066ac5e8a68b22401
337e41af10e6c2b445ad7ef4f9b074f8a087f40a
describe
'135138' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZX' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
e0df9ddbb9e14025eddc10cc5f4ec251
5227e2eb9577fa4f1541b1c366ac0b31f4d3fc5a
describe
'140497' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZY' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
c273a2bcea849cefc89badd18821a3be
78b80ca675dfa09064e0ac26ba4954903e02c0af
describe
'126964' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABNZZ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
f2871395b7da05e93226e16d19d89f4b
c2d5a09fcf45734806c338330561243f7fb76a4f
describe
'85633' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAA' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
a92c94564480ba2e57212a066a1a98f4
98a3ebdd1b593cb746a9a0cee845ad08149a2955
describe
'100680' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAB' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
a89e42107bfada20e29697c623a0d2d3
cb5ab198a1c5098b1ff5b653ec19a1b4476256f3
describe
'110790' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAC' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
de6bfdc9a30a0fc5f3ab85eeb4a98fc6
fc1d86cd4d4fa458840b6c80fe160f1a5ef96c25
describe
'137951' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAD' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
097766c7a3b8529568a2d569d418a233
60a839fb9ac229c98a95e3e12c36d5f04ed69686
'2011-12-29T05:37:33-05:00'
describe
'124781' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAE' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
ee50656cbc34629887a3a72fb5465981
e88cc89fe3cc76ca208a7611b5c00fe65b1f3610
describe
'101566' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAF' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
b737ab4e740abc7a7ce04e6b9fee5724
d506459053a7d733592e551b34ea83ada14ef3ed
describe
'148355' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAG' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
63bdf1eaa7a0ddcebf79f1f62bae9a88
e56c2d2edacea1c53cdf23be112cd2497eb167f1
describe
'130551' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAH' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
4ab5e5a604a4805b2b434c6f5d90d068
7eb28b2af06400b5304cee6eefe2b6b5ba4e1bb7
describe
'142661' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAI' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
54fb312327bafd24f1dbb0931a0c5c9b
b27254dd9bce90204957de6fb5528f6aed6d8e84
describe
'164651' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAJ' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
b21dcecf81bcb69d97ed5b73ef54ce26
507560ac353788cf5537eec790b0a0da88bb54ec
describe
'103588' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAK' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
c9fcee5cbfccf07629fb16a3eaf3de27
59e94f739251e93d202401d90ccf8f4457f6fd03
describe
'130721' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAL' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
f45df1ed61f8eff3a27f5652e07fb314
ce7a1591871895121bca7cc37f2a628d577ce01a
describe
'128744' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAM' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
3c1528f2d42724d9fa44bb9fc3651ee7
e53afae1c477bdb7d6f7b6210a5ff53c8ca47f68
describe
'119521' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAN' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
09b362201fd27ecf1fbefb1248cdd97a
7e23da624001bcadb1d4179eb30a406ea482aac0
describe
'118731' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAO' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
6c5a19ac10aef6b936c8038155aeaebd
baf2fa1eeff94762a7e1752ed6125039619f64f2
describe
'125284' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAP' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
1fa2c66f04c9ff6040881721a96e1a7d
88ce6b28f1cc999c61b4d29928c401de528b8006
describe
'110513' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAQ' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
80734a2635d2189d035f8a4d5efae2dd
caee452d2b352d44d97c0921fb2b3c9a8ded23d8
describe
'123240' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAR' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
4e8015173c083a585d3563459071d135
e5277682a13941544782ce8a81bcc10abbcac38f
describe
'138308' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAS' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
be92f797b928776081b69c3c84768622
de35e9eaca4ee25a71fa12c863972820b3e969f7
describe
'109779' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAT' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
8be6025ee127daf4f04b3977f085cd38
c9b8394c4c6ebbc66be52b806ef69013937d1835
describe
'101780' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAU' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
6250e6dac7b0743937ca5c0e1d41b1d2
a83a3a6c0d4541150dff2674f1ff2c0bd676b6aa
describe
'96709' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAV' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
256f6e4d0db534a038a08a953c70fc3b
a716aaeccf4278bddfd4c3b52cee61e3b55a48bb
describe
'112299' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAW' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
158180def791edb0337a8790a3178a7c
27d8f69f192789337cd7ccf4a461b728fdbc1d6c
describe
'116206' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAX' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
c3f92e6456b7b6ca0ecf56910526b019
c46a9de9e8418fe24ed032b1a19b3bf1598a5e62
'2011-12-29T05:38:13-05:00'
describe
'136019' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAY' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
24560eba59780adc21c28cbd3f826cf1
4d3e219ca3df7d7aaa62a02f4e100fecac7e2397
describe
'135799' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOAZ' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
6f3f2263a1d162256b222b9700bcbecf
4cfdf34e6f18f4df4d4db9284d541cc56296e571
describe
'117347' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBA' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
e776fa1a9e53d3a700aeedeb17ba1510
a97b6a886cfc00c372faf6c38e126ce8b8572055
describe
'115571' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBB' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
26fd08d8e4e9da7de6d6443e6b0b38d4
108cb6e499b5db0a6b7b87c6025caa82540ef573
describe
'141933' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBC' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
cd4cf5e485c36d15dc7321286fcb7790
36d0ca97ef8ecebe54a7c5afc2c861f5fbb95b91
describe
'125127' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBD' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
7b8682b641fcac2eda06ed2bb73c831c
88a1cd5edbb05b9de92c0cdb093cf6827708eed5
describe
'151566' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBE' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
a010f0bfdf50b6063381602e0982b859
69a5cfab70c83a27e5088878ebbd535973df20e7
describe
'135056' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBF' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
0ee1e99704c79c7b6fadcf63aca2626b
c74729897aa86c04cb44b5c3fb71a7dc94ae44e9
describe
'127819' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBG' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
1a441652e39ed15987ad943275a6e6e0
84b8769ad15610ad3f4c46a95a724223c43b5a31
describe
'115665' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBH' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
5966551c588832636f03ee6d5d92ee87
b5c924233968b0b7c0a44b3e44783dcda791d965
describe
'136101' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBI' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
2bf71d44bf8f2944789985b0a6c40ba8
c26089c6add95490d89fcb47e5f38c3f491715fc
describe
'131534' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBJ' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
7eb3079d9f3713c12b47d9d938ab41ae
0ff24794db3df6d2b91a596a00ec426ad97d5b12
describe
'140985' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBK' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
6d3e6a2f21cff87a6de9efa25d2bf852
1ae81ab9ae3ad1fff10d722fe836e6c9c147f2a1
describe
'120809' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBL' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
c8090cca21b54c93684d525129f06f7d
d62c4041454f6b85aeb6761805f136c918c6f952
describe
'145317' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBM' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
c240503aa54551aa1af940b9b2a0a76d
2b4dc42465f82a0e621c269e113cbb9cf4270d1e
describe
'134550' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBN' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
ea41bff522285bb62bba41aaf1322f10
1786e119236d5cb35c5ee904a68b4285042ddcdb
describe
'109739' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBO' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
27508cbde4480fea815e0cf420a14f32
00a9b7580f85bb0c2a395ced17951a290bd1a21c
describe
'102185' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBP' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
a51dd1b65049d21e4015f96fc24f1d57
2d5a6f2326165ac53db05963beeab2726e9a56d7
describe
'123343' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBQ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
56f67686ddb164815ef4eaf4ffb9df66
fea4b5b76e12a6c9a5e8268d9d401f4986574eaa
describe
'96264' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBR' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
8f6fb9edeeb980d42c79ce993b01c519
2446de067982d4cb9aafe5d69c7208450a5abc95
describe
'135727' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBS' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
8d4bd99e7d3cf6a69102c82154942706
3d2ca75b01375315473266759d0ee3f7310c0bef
describe
'99792' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBT' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
ab707309f6b98ff2b8c2db7a77b01598
a29c508e151e722a7135159dc81ca8715730988b
describe
'144557' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBU' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
8a8a3958ca7724740bf63657d7c9e1d1
c153fc2f1e1a3b8a9414d1630b6e63ec7c6aa00f
describe
'94690' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBV' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
242ba30d4f7852c5ff31bf35bd13c092
38c6b87b102ad84f4494ad97cc57e772f4e73be3
describe
'128594' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBW' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
217ed0de5d30ea26c6153df945316043
77994522e279bb830f60175abc367516ec8377fa
describe
'135502' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBX' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
d31ecf9233485cc432c98b3da08c665f
e03f3cbc178b892321fb4f787537c056d2ba41a5
describe
'155561' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBY' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
07b52e6a8dc0ba188449e5e1c5149e76
2a61493acb967881d89e99ab4fb2dd89a4f7ff1a
describe
'134936' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOBZ' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
b8a16e10cfd19d561c6565d2feee7584
902b3878b185d7423cfe04531e2589f85c739a8c
describe
'123134' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCA' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
45fa0035b87b802ca37c591b39801485
fe827327896a4b59ac22d5a4f486e2f7938fc825
describe
'151769' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCB' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
1bd799ae457f547de33ecb8d02bbee71
4514a1f147f7ead473058d08cfeb929c0cc97f8c
describe
'134098' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCC' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
c2c461b9eeafd78546f7868fefa73d4b
d5c181adeed5c120a866cdeb2ce059ebae899abe
describe
'119592' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCD' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
e9ba23c655478454bac6ebe42b983449
1c1acd60d59669d52535d87245751354a0ac3237
describe
'114547' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCE' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
b33cb8e3a1ff59d65d31ad666e8c0b43
872866eecdf1971aa7550310ee962022d44798ac
describe
'116964' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCF' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
bc423b8dbc490a610eac0a8b1551bf37
21f366b23c46e7be51592073363191af119e986a
describe
'150398' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCG' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
a15e79304f4fd6560adc4b3d989b5fb2
43009468be3dd20ffaca4e2d13ba40050a4bc052
describe
'140350' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCH' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
21bb3d4ae1eeeeefc535e052c62b9a7b
b187f94763c6ac4e55475522457557889ce2dea6
describe
'127293' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCI' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
c47ef3dbcf5bc35f2fd50953a59d7f79
f0b2fe57c07990af07b52e622e507e9dd7a7216b
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCJ' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
d847d33a64f01fc283db3d032088ad15
919f44ba0a3e1454456ce2664b8f767b630e4b22
describe
'103713' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCK' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
e3de6f196da6d75c053652d2f7155a1b
12268b4a391b2faad88748113c2ae9587e2407d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCL' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
61e9b46375570955f1cc663a5bc72072
8d5f92bce02294941c468b1418b43ee50cac352f
describe
'118545' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCM' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
5336ff6afbec3112f2bb084d2249ccdd
2ab78981d1188ad20c4438195d1240d8bfe3d024
describe
'91784' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCN' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
7e207beec61d184f94044a0655cc836b
8e7141344979eccc2fdf601e22fc237e5355d88d
describe
'115290' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCO' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
e49066bf98c0531f73d152797f3249cd
16907c65d7c4bcc2405dd27cdebd4cab1f4fc5c3
describe
'137520' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCP' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
c1037c7baf45a29152c45c2e60a88374
87fc98e32ff2e05c760538b7516b2391399a9543
describe
'140901' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCQ' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
16cb853aeaa01ef9df1ce0947cd734cc
d5c20a8d00670dfedf9dd1d258883468adf08d95
describe
'162820' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCR' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
f12f2e69cc889ab6faa94324d010de1b
9cfeb9759f8e48a9a87d9e328b68bae608254a91
describe
'140759' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCS' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
7b7701c867747eb9eab14a3a401dfe22
c8ac3871c5c41c8ff023f5b2654a6ec302abb1e0
describe
'133534' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCT' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
f301e4f97358a673f4ec504e65541266
511753aa19565bad03ab7ab53fb8f84b6a6a57e4
describe
'129651' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCU' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
7077ec363a76030d2bcb45f97a56993d
0868bc8cf09155bc5405b7518cbc437c8ae2e751
describe
'137730' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCV' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
5635cf145b91a662dc7514f96355c8a5
d4b7f7dc600b7330055101d6992b02e60d66bf79
describe
'132991' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCW' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
94488f699f8ac5e60f16fc9639295e55
3437576f02feed98ead337cc8a1a47469490815b
describe
'140601' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCX' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
8d5ab587656ce2aa68ece9d1c43068df
713e9be7db92e901739460a794acccafcaaeedd2
describe
'128124' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCY' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
58e97f803c8a99aa5a92098bc86cd6c7
e96177f7bd4569e71d2356f3ce1e9fd55eca713b
describe
'133445' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOCZ' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
cf7da74622eb9e4dd0a780faf6a2e030
1975fcdaec8ceaa1631c970cb2c271dadcdeeaf8
describe
'141512' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODA' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
3e73f9252e807466dfa1d6f1ab690fcd
7b18d0518b03298067f7e940cedf9d651907e575
describe
'81422' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODB' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
02ab3afa419e74c0b8bbacecc11fd9c4
1f40003ab6cb4dcd6120fa66ab043b444c218df7
describe
'77247' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODC' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
8e6f434b40d44a9101d37b4d55253557
0a36b86b78f94ac4cc74350d5e26bad614141556
describe
'101132' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODD' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
cb6ed073e82686b78e09db2f0f856e6b
ce602d1d5ce00aaba78dbc2c0418c4a79de3558d
describe
'135652' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODE' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
b25301f375aab413ee7d8cb14a0169a4
55d32f01979d714f19c8f0b473a2c3ebe2a00a14
describe
'127912' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODF' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
15c89af14d8d239cceca41aa05063465
7b3fbec03273300067c0c8cb5d3688d3d162f997
describe
'139625' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODG' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
85cb3f7583fa55f536359e85cfeb0de6
66c2f6b9c9672db6170ef02520e03c02e7292f8d
describe
'147335' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODH' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
e7be28f09804218cc144d707f09adf49
3c6677ba582deb0deab28884d7ac7aea495b161b
describe
'123733' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODI' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
998e8936a682d91f353617ecf5cbf30d
616fb267ca6c3695aeec4e1cc29f47b40d047bc8
describe
'139344' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODJ' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
40d6a1fcb6f9f6b8668dc96940ed64d1
192d9d2a22b13582c71a49b0c4f8433362cd0fa0
describe
'133226' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODK' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
742733ee47f7d7bfc8455002ad0e51a3
29e32eba2ccd1ed184863d6f6b76a5e24f08520b
describe
'126679' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODL' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
f4a6bc55c20bce58c16239fe06d6da9b
8f0aa6a101374fab2073f9c6b02f1e2e1f804067
describe
'147707' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODM' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
d8a6e609cf529e9968bd473743d2e976
45805567378b7c6f07045195b11988186911fcca
describe
'139404' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODN' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
01a411b93dfcc050274cc9842716323f
32e50811cfb07bcdebec56cf41a0915d85fc5930
describe
'137669' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODO' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
fea4753958c963c8321980a5f7386e96
424785c1adc0502382ec221d758c6e45000fdf22
describe
'124932' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODP' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
de2c2bd161aec7c1053217de125322cd
4911e5699c47f45535180459387eedd9ba7c2a9c
describe
'127443' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODQ' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
a0a80676b38a47ca434fb125e3b116c0
b4187c7c64ed3b19d40a8f7d2e498dc214166561
describe
'134480' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODR' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
80bba5594419320f713f4c51d405acd9
8406065aab5a9a6c424cbaeaa5df9da7e039d1bf
describe
'141868' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODS' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
af33f4d0939086acca9f0e3e2c54531f
df9a16cd034bf7aee5b3a2b498dd256420634633
describe
'126522' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODT' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
8a0c3e8521223f57b643b30f1e6d0f0d
c6155649b042559c61b5e1de7b9bd1f457cecc63
describe
'171195' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODU' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
3c3207f7a24026b3b054e96ed663dac3
aa88364d4acf49156df609f71286bfe75bdc4473
describe
'108217' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODV' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
a31fa209340d39abade0886a434861db
f483f0a415d07069d3a37cd68f5f5eea52cb6c4b
describe
'121164' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODW' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
d089135f846671b27e7058424df45d22
ebb01bedd9f5b76545ab3841c84e8b042d7aba16
describe
'143611' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODX' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
b4ef9b4c545204f90732ab6ace808eca
f7d8a1c7ccbefd019bfb977f178830f435dea39f
describe
'118417' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODY' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
fdf7e23da59bdd1bb33a7293b9a7e15b
e55a9b72b4122149daf0ebbc762903868b64d157
describe
'127571' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABODZ' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
ebf4ee456ee6a69379ce00f206430c7f
444ae6746a7921eddaec4ead248b53e2f2bdbacc
describe
'124129' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEA' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
86a2ab1df6d0d0959d07bec5fa69a1f5
fbbb85a22ccaeeac30439d5be400ede9cadf1640
describe
'136737' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEB' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
a37f19ef967b1572976688ec1f2f1e8a
96fd5ecefaa63c8e4a3651581bbfc06bbe731b14
describe
'128084' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEC' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
66e2ce153c88a3d724368ac938221174
86711250b8b1c7a1d1e66055f2449e33f1c1f75a
describe
'116416' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOED' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
45f991d85acb084f8a67b6aef2e4106b
34d2e15f3f32af436bcaa5a3b1623d49acf30cc4
describe
'140956' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEE' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
21e271124b5a728a32c6906c1d3c3f7d
8d12a4766be8c328292d748ddf120c8283072a59
'2011-12-29T05:36:12-05:00'
describe
'130055' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEF' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
babf546ec73577a6bc1d925caf6e6cf0
437cccab94e4c36960fbbbce5fa353398c6d9662
describe
'136429' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEG' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
982448ad90e735250a69502806db9d19
3141427eeae48b25900db894463078f53bc43aba
describe
'131488' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEH' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
e514ab69fb443438a5ad95f867de2a1b
281f76756ba37ec6c34c97b2a04a7be5426b6838
describe
'142683' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEI' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
c61d29a8309d8878049abe1ad402a04b
77240417676174f13df86cf8505136fa13ff4e36
describe
'145572' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEJ' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
6ac874b9071fd05f1b0940a0796d5b31
43858225db44bd11910029dc9bd8aa42e414e54d
describe
'140480' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEK' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
35a02a1fe27eccf7dba56a7e7caa9b88
02e9c16a7004b905c0e4a1c853e04894686b8561
describe
'102090' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEL' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
d45f2df9604ccaa43a4b3ea88b5b8e83
35f4b13e32f149efa3bd7492c5e2a08343535036
describe
'169476' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEM' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
2deb17a5929bc7fd6cbd1b479ceb0001
1914aa5509aefe8006623b19c29eade18bd28c7b
describe
'103657' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEN' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
4d5fc2ef458e4ad88e66663863ae1c71
02c59ea874c76a8f5aab9c27032767ad437b9aa0
describe
'144125' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEO' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
ecbb342f3dbde431d45c6eaa15366f51
d2a254f4163d7ca6e2ed01bbd62132f750da8f28
describe
'122912' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEP' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
03d2da22811602905e7f249893997c8d
453df869c1fe2b5b5577e94e508f1d24e25da459
describe
'118428' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEQ' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
9afded09f6aa6c451274e95ab8f58e91
1fcbad4e44c112ab47c0b6f930355a6cf8a83937
describe
'111694' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOER' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
f05b9365729352a9634ac4669c733d54
8105174b9956ed29e55c4fd571726c892aaf5f5d
describe
'103422' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOES' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
983676b0f11ee1d0660b310e4503058c
5bd88880b02b011537e48cee28cc324b59a2bd9e
describe
'133646' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOET' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
ece28955ed2d621b6a69678c577f5aea
dfd6a635f0774b3323122338f19cf65b40bd7da9
describe
'109355' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEU' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
f742c388d59f3f3b0e44fd1d55f156d4
02b23e340af0417271a091ee98aea0b8ac2b1fd9
describe
'115478' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEV' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
0628bec10a45e0beedbc6ca8f6400d82
3e30401ce0c585886bc70a5aec7bb21e8358dce4
describe
'122384' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEW' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
0ecdc913905a8ec3904a5a823cdf1021
808e7bb23fdd962d5a9d4384c144ec5d63d26d91
describe
'142639' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEX' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
b385cba2a6cc6cfb1cb7fd88eccb9e25
3bd2999f4dbefe4c7563472d5c954b2506a2bf72
describe
'115211' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEY' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
15b7513b0eb973c1b133bff8981c7c16
483f92437c51cbd76f16f13cb9ac871c0871e85a
describe
'144393' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOEZ' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
e21a477d39b911574d3804e59546ad83
26d3c2f50f55af52f2699cb653534275524e49be
describe
'143203' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFA' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
6a3ac7749b067583c5b641dce3b002df
0cb98de1bfa186476fb7d6a7e80efede5d70b779
describe
'154663' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFB' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
d250f5ddb0b01e8960963b6240d296ff
46f77bffc62e24c2015e7c80092adcfb7248eb2f
describe
'140298' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFC' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
dbdd1999777d17179381875e7741c578
50b5fbed2173529e130703578d25d287eefbe3e3
describe
'84114' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFD' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
8e9e8a1934f14b167ab4acced3f1a528
f264fa8d8d06447952d6e394a569dd0e132d9363
describe
'116689' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFE' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
6e951340953ce9a4ccd6ea05b95219b3
21c0308f75ede03c48c06888b02f260855a49887
describe
'104839' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFF' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
8d8d8eb125925dcb7bb2fba0b841745f
0c04f494a2288363b1dad8b1bec8471345895552
describe
'106551' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFG' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
ac013703b2994706a7dec6ae5b4b8078
38f2df1122b37b83e0342064f72dbb645da00b7c
describe
'125972' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFH' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
ccdfb1054f5ffa803610f7a149c3ad9e
0bb82d1219f979eaf58f5780163ea3cdc0869905
describe
'91473' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFI' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
bb614b0c2368fd2227900ddafb14c7eb
a1f0a2f11d64626feceaeaa52b205886cb306dd1
describe
'86533' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFJ' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
b8264cb6ddc0e007b8adb9c2c6833834
83ea97aabfdf7a72107c1db5f9e33e3ae43e15e5
describe
'140983' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFK' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
8b3a5c9f583727d532bbb1bb068611c9
ea0c5a72a6b3d0760c737db28f6e7a57e7b43e1e
describe
'139754' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFL' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
9992ff02eca7e3efd8ce4efb08cbab32
26baf378c269ca6081a477143efa83edbe8a9e8b
describe
'142688' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFM' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
0c575196e87f2dacf0f390732e8465e4
0a80ef0e036c0e7e79c84fdc2e0515c59f019cc2
describe
'128142' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFN' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
ac442b895efe9599c303b3ace5eafa87
12ba3953f42fdb21c8ff80024867cc05cb33b497
describe
'119686' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFO' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
3d872dbe1de375b8d2cae4d48d71c1b7
402caa323b4d19bfa08e62645fe39f563a34e716
describe
'123693' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFP' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
27685e84f9049958a6aa0841f4d0830d
7c2d3203095d53a1055439e8e0cffd62cbc40b6b
describe
'101458' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFQ' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
288a95fe13f6190bd97d7cacddb72db3
995e1c4d3e40ec796e64651ab5bd58ba948ddf7f
describe
'80328' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFR' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
367b30bbc561f7cc9000d92d5861db34
cdec1710b394f9632dee794ce4d9a20ea0053ba7
describe
'107118' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFS' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
7d474a126ea1388e980f1c5e2390c1da
da8549ad694ddb334ba4ebe066da2b4ddb1baf3f
describe
'125729' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFT' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
f8d566cd7b7a4328f4bbb3c145775d3f
89ad9853c967a81bc4d1d18199ff76d201028e1f
describe
'125391' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFU' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
ecca43c52a7a5770e111433074aaed0e
a3f8fb8f7eecab729c70dd5180eebec50b9849d8
describe
'135324' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFV' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
3bc535ca349bcea1319a91f83fd4f9b7
40b5fae27885f7c11a797750225011ac48e97165
describe
'148044' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFW' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
dfb3070dcc1d8467591c8e5769a1f114
93db31ddc7f6ff4d14ce821c6f475dbb66014078
describe
'128995' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFX' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
a7d7ff44fba40c117cc0cd0b1713ac46
c3622b9e44f03473d4f87d867229d9b38421d111
describe
'70381' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFY' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
25da716dcb19d831a72e998bb6c1528f
a11c4d28b35567e1000946f64f1db57a63f49f1b
describe
'132469' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOFZ' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
3ff8c9ae853c198c12158c929e1c6a2a
ed45f1429946acb8305d8998fce3a1900e6002e8
describe
'62954' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGA' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
4239a6a00cbbdaf1548477956d8e748a
59960b9359ed7e9865efe53378e9ebc9dd588cd7
describe
'156392' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGB' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
d1337cf4c5b1728d5175502334fb3121
7ede4b764ddc88740dab6083d4aa1aaaccf11517
describe
'38620' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGC' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
7664104f7b6b1d576e7053abb1e5be13
a10aa3b0f77569cda8b38e41a5858226031faaeb
describe
'8872' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGD' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
f82a031b083182b593b58fe61d534bde
c189b0ba13ed38f582856374f50c7397b1ced9df
'2011-12-29T05:40:54-05:00'
describe
'36427' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGE' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
dd75c03ec98422d0f71a30e0dd59d76b
0c807203ee5b15da39b0d0e4113c58849eff9688
describe
'15023' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGF' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
8a34ac308ed03db9f039d0400e818a19
57d35d5e3766097c601f24c09ba97021bec0988f
describe
'3718' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGG' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
b989702eb61e7c7a6703e43c657b051f
dbe48d305e6f7a585cf902d91b5fd3bcbc48380d
describe
'13746' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGH' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
9716f554c8e204656589d0625b7fb4c4
0d6446e85a05655d6955c729b9d00a769b3bb403
describe
'3461' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGI' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
5f2e40c3d221cf97b304c22ea71ba601
95df9d28c2c9267d347d1339103735a82dec2271
describe
'13834' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGJ' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
df603c52fe9537239f065d81896047cf
9acc0ad5b525fc58579e6e60f9ebfa4255b59d4f
describe
'3915' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGK' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
7735534c2a22d03a0fd6e151522d2460
9c7cc9117ec24056609cd81a9825f7bc796ea50d
describe
'14193' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGL' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
060af4ee5ad1fa53e3f73c897f2513ae
a8bde1525f4400548b23a983d57fa1f5a4441573
describe
'3602' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGM' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
d257bba129474dadfdaa34d09a1cd25f
6d86fcbec181827935832366f8191ad78bd7116e
describe
'16728' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGN' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
f9285159860e1bf4862d495d86c3ec00
00aa6dd4377da52cb78ef0720a299b19f336f940
describe
'4879' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGO' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
ff6ae8af9e542bd6a5499417a628db62
2cd5397daafd0a67749600a7dbd5554e1b0bbb4e
describe
'3165' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGP' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
ab2e8b39292e10899f5b0667fa06adb8
9ab2babde9f9060f60e23a054dc65e876dc19f8c
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGQ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
e1beda1a99bff6ecfc0e0b3c84711943
9e588468e2b4d03dc1a9af96bd12f80a54dd7d74
describe
'36663' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGR' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
5a9505886b51ada33111615768f32743
c78811774a0ac8e3d20bc53d5ca074f8b7184d01
describe
'8491' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGS' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
875482375b4cbbe7d47629568ac0f7e9
c6bfb6e661e149eab55c13c68e4d27627fa8d7f6
describe
'10324' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGT' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
06607a9b322ec2c8a9a90460a2246c5e
a09e6289f2a182e7a795cd5fa7036e22c0bba60f
describe
'3002' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGU' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
b03c31996f7801a7887dd1575197b225
0a68f1993bec1451ac3011f4fd9d955b7d772c11
describe
'21718' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGV' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
e6fd283e94c19276eab1261f3aacebe3
204525a478012e2dd9aaf3a3ccebb6f734f514db
describe
'5540' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGW' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
c62a64bbebe896f526939e37fa2b2a4e
09b594c088046a26d8f86abd9e05e0916f25df63
describe
'24104' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGX' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
aeee3d8d1c87ed86261d04870fc71560
e387cd2d840cc2891b81d0ba51ab900d90b70e3c
describe
'6115' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGY' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
b31377b03a646203f698a48c53176749
dc7de6a706985a507b109879ba8594c64caf279d
describe
'4626' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOGZ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
9c83fc8ddba3e3ccd6088c541a185c1b
6d61eed739ff58032a7d9838b2e4f4d939e30f15
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHA' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
95f1073e045450e5c9e33851e0d90c30
3af20e79bfc06246ed7cf5eb3b49030239f1a929
describe
'13626' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHB' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
401c7e37f84693b7f227b753c3abf97f
29fc63167e828e04304ac6afa45ee46e50eb0a23
describe
'3465' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHC' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
aa4b02e49b38f163aa0772e70e1384cb
815b8f4c4d73784ba0a8777fe4cf55c6c441477e
describe
'29381' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHD' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
7a51fb3d2ccecf52a62656803a66e8eb
5a7e2636c2e4b6cb829252f8a38cf21f454d8ed9
describe
'7444' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHE' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
58b43849802913737ba14657d1fbb479
b86af3e6466c04cf8fc81451874f21f00915225c
describe
'37239' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHF' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
ba815bec5c7b240d7c58f5ccfc66c14c
1a822bc125d0a0d30a72b868f0a6617a4c64a26f
describe
'8920' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHG' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
b7fec3ae4b6af1dca0f64e9641e649f9
776ce08fc31c12d83025d97e98d95aa5aae08590
describe
'28151' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHH' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
d543351dafedbd8a3c5b81bd94d8806a
67802b2774656893be970372642191c1d5d9f8e0
describe
'6800' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHI' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
971c7c1319e5671da58e4f52842fa403
94138dff969693b7d3b973ce385f60f962b62300
describe
'36355' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHJ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
8914c7a4f4154043c71706997df782eb
a795a5712f2ad3cfaa6ff709a28ae7aa4a870a96
describe
'8734' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHK' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
8b62a6287fb28dfeeac02255585ba6c0
f56dc5cc2bba321a0a934e672e3724c9f6db592e
describe
'29939' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHL' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
c122bea790ada4ed335b86f35b228240
6a1d27e5f78667107c0ffb6dec68b08f504b05a3
describe
'7623' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHM' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
37b5ce0994cd36d30079fb27e2f049ae
bcea58ddfed64fb31a48454033fc2c88e2c87503
describe
'36788' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHN' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
aa9509d29b6cc467a0690d23281a28bd
555c7bdc5ad85f440445101af662318b50a1bc73
describe
'8966' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHO' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
81e56e48708746cb8a958092ad0a9554
548e6f5012b5b4fc435b84fb446647623280bcb8
describe
'33987' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHP' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
f8bae84bab4b7b43ade6865a6df5c227
31d524f6b18ab4391999fd218fde5fbbea9038f3
describe
'8555' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHQ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
331ecdaf880a4f0aeeba6a09de26478a
9c3181c4f69011a19615ac8219cf6b0e3aa19240
describe
'33930' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHR' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
0d5ba990ba1e4a69384efe33ee83f12b
537d399bb491bd691cc4a3999e7ec59d3f5db1c8
describe
'8274' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHS' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
4c62159b9a17b549bb303327e2b7dce1
97160649364f0960ec2e791f47f921d1ed821663
describe
'36132' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHT' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
c89d8f09959c578ebb7260c64380f631
98d010d0fa5194778e4f064ab7c5cc08e347ea2f
describe
'8681' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHU' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
0e20a73fcc9b82f6ed164c59550f7594
35d83ea63e551393f887756b08d890ca280565e5
describe
'38131' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHV' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
208644a2cee241c72b78fb76ca58db5d
ba2cee8a27f7bbcb8263763ea33005d35f0b098f
describe
'8723' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHW' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
03af0fb48efebcf6c61d13270a8f44ab
550e6ad110a5828b053d43e265a0b4508d50141c
describe
'26945' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHX' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
729ce770574d8328834ba60e351a1865
141605ad75c18461b9814436979f8ecb5edea5ee
describe
'6621' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHY' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
c8b48ed3b8c18eba895f1d06c9c3c66a
80b540e9819a4e60893a755ee74a436e31174797
describe
'34535' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOHZ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
58838d0cedf88da5659aced5dab3a588
55acd7780de830943d77abc5dc16f45c6fd12ac7
describe
'7975' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIA' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
167d009461e890ba7ae8a58cbb0a32c2
e2fa565fd0a0634641aad8c65c37c5c17fee0128
describe
'24769' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIB' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
c46ff9d6ba444658752f7e070a79f62f
e26d01bc7ee259d725221b232073997ea8a1227e
describe
'6246' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIC' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
010f519ebd2ac33e0c8003079069d805
9dd1ecf765824459674f2f987244d0d6cfbcb6b1
describe
'38140' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOID' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
0499cefda1d0893192560f3f0e0eacbe
f7b725d3a82619bab2853a3d0b6c25b26ff68990
describe
'8653' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIE' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
8bf3d5a78417104e55ed705a1697c635
3436699977cb9e7b13152d8be1f61de212c0fb04
describe
'26058' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIF' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
602845a3a4c6bed7826bebba7b0061a4
90f07fc2235efa1965b1f4576c57fc792a489ca5
describe
'6325' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIG' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
b7adafeaa99d4c4fd6f636462c97d9a5
a9479448c09d743e2de225327dbe8e47396a2d6b
describe
'20615' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIH' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
26d833394071793a794a6d1e7f50e420
4cf5605e8cadd9b3d3add7d48c785afb18025406
describe
'5129' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOII' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
24dc61db95ad1c2a5a5dc02c4b38c51f
22e83126501b638621bdd78e6e25d2a32c6b83ec
describe
'29529' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIJ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
2ade87a6bf0960c3c51446288e56a3a6
8a54481a3703d4d344a6ceb3eda393261cd22283
describe
'7297' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIK' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
69574355ce15f0f366e18009dc9b16cd
ba7c32e196f7eb20fdbd0e54f22145d5775a5609
describe
'42135' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIL' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
0099cf76e9ffbf536372afaabf2eb5be
a683ea5a887c87495a0fd98eae3c5357ac10b7f1
describe
'9518' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIM' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
47d58657cbe4ae4f455b7541d883795e
e1c8b7d0572f9c29b69dfc8437e60c0fbc3f03d2
describe
'28468' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIN' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
d8522e4f97b1f1449e7cce9b21629a33
1a74620cf6dae5109e8f8a14bc02ea044340b74f
describe
'7255' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIO' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
09e17fae5a2d3485b660b078a7c1d842
d60b9e735f51b9546af7e1839a342f09144ff3e2
describe
'36400' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIP' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
5de82d3ecf67f1d3e5d56059ea7978db
32b2cc580b58272befb9300130f5dc746c42a73e
describe
'8477' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIQ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
29df3df6d84034cac4116098eb0ac11a
fb5e5600e65a45c177e664a2d1309a7ed0418af7
'2011-12-29T05:41:38-05:00'
describe
'37034' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIR' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
f5bb4eec24d267a6236a652cd8c8c805
b3804582fd0ad8abe6c758f8d3d8ec8d3c40d80a
describe
'8563' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIS' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1e271c25107093b41ceda48b0521ac1b
2e907f4bc9bf17abf103e3161a3dfeb5ca75abb3
describe
'36207' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIT' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
7f7c85593284537446533e744f9e9416
398abb5953de9ceba5b244d02d04a2f11d152de4
describe
'8514' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIU' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
98f0788889013aab660ae86ad39c59c7
5b897beea0a37ffb9f25b71a16feccdde8e52779
describe
'36635' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIV' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
928378ba49d5dcf37904e68ac31471c8
c5e7ebc7811e40d6c53d972ecaab18fc378629e3
describe
'8767' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIW' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
be372e8ac28dc68b164ecb2ac717fccb
badf7342ac2829f11634f5444ba8e3132f244214
describe
'39805' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIX' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
1b51a8d07a2ed6fee38cffc38c042402
3f69f60056ff4273be525ac9fa225094e2e3e94e
describe
'8964' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIY' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
e4f4aa3232fb848ef9b9f2bcd72621a7
81f52b5be2b0daca2a2d2f3e068d817835d105a5
describe
'35304' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOIZ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
be1ae3ac8075c024914e44abe6a1641b
b3cf445db1ddd8902ac2c4653864abfaacbb34c9
describe
'8481' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJA' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
dcf1e4c713806eabadb2c0f717448cfe
f9e2080f245573abde3cff8a386ada6c48331490
describe
'41019' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJB' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
a92a0ff20166ea21904cdcbfacd7ccc6
e35d09ad195d6389b5f145908829d73834f1ab96
describe
'9181' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJC' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
d3f39523ab58d08fffc416b181977fa9
2c4751949a3bb6477a154246c8377e23a3a6b44b
describe
'35420' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJD' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
a61635b7aad5e43a49e95f76e2366480
b53efe3f07e896950e636c833d04bf1574f484a4
describe
'8373' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJE' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
12d7e1efa12b8cc3fa9301c1e95551b8
1a551d5aaf730286509668ba0b4d693c1467a961
describe
'28018' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJF' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
2a0ab93c168903b806227ccac7c3d732
b20bef40d84008bbed40efb76adedbdc83cbed71
describe
'6551' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJG' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
8587638fa5142c8fd7a95c8b86e895c5
1eae93fdfae137ced352590ea8411dd6a269764a
describe
'36844' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJH' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
22bcc33c68fc01b01110788a6f1975f0
637a63e9e49a58f96b1266d4f7528af215f23023
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJI' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
90e8dc20a9588832121904d3867f0f5a
0c74d340bc2bdc3f345911b54e87238bc85e2795
describe
'37130' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJJ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
d7e52613024e5a0276072f20ecb520c2
867b64c1934ab0c57264fb43dd5527e687e3b661
describe
'9044' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJK' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8f2239338b2be69d37d72b26ed1260c0
e13552cee718cd44f9723fe9e85a4316441f3e7f
describe
'38481' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJL' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
75be5b1af2120b5b779fdabdd3fa656e
4baa4ecf914cbc2541410c94a4086192984698d3
describe
'8868' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJM' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e6ec1e7dab170a7cebba3ec444155798
febb593b5b7aec5fce723f54e77c20265727e02f
describe
'26660' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJN' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
c9dd6326080e6b22dbf99f33fee4b5ad
93d4ebd222ba75ad5e8dab162c84ae195d6b26c9
describe
'6429' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJO' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
234b96ef57b54685966a2d91b9bd2614
b00fb714d465f0ef52f2f88ec4fd3cb2c6ba0c12
describe
'24956' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJP' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
592bdb6b1601fb12c0c59815967d8971
7898e32604f4857c60b88b2de385467b5913a617
describe
'6048' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJQ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
209cbb1284de81f728a42159bd99b78d
d82f1fb347cf44711f68d1d9663d0afa97f41029
describe
'30276' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJR' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
13f3eba65ea387ca10f05597bd74888b
1e5a8d893d96c7cdb468911f0736e032aab5501e
describe
'7089' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJS' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
91d9098ec2a85570c19355e7cbf0673b
770e72bde6738ed522937b50b3e3cdea54bc9e09
describe
'27109' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJT' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
7ca3a4ad4a9c911c9fa77efafd758273
14eb2c45f2093c983bba146b0156d4318d3538ea
describe
'6674' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJU' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
8280a493ae013ec12ce4a8cbfe3ced75
f967e24d10706e5f87821bc9d9ce15d9691234ba
describe
'34397' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJV' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
f698ee9a26009bdbf540915e25f029e8
f02231d7bc285d1693b4dfe90569bcf0fe3066e6
describe
'8190' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJW' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
234cf9d5908ecdf5a8c33c03b1c9ffec
ab52d987a16a0c228f958c5fdc0c64422536aac3
describe
'30564' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJX' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
b55f950137e91a4cbc4695d3eeec4935
55460c3295252734bbd9fd760d0a1004ffd00161
describe
'7252' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJY' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
c16bb0d382dc3198c6098ead1a731c7d
90c34dc88d1541acca1b2b479e8d0c1d0f3c1365
describe
'36470' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOJZ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
298fa6250847f4331698f0fcf856c0c4
2e71bf9512e1876b4843c53992f0357e660b7bd1
describe
'8535' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKA' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
496f66fd1815f17b6276905183ce3143
1656f3d88ae03aaf01d7576b4d43e7513585771b
describe
'35778' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKB' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
750be59209ba0d6a9477bc7474df8807
70eff9405bdb37cbfd06fdeb9c3147501dd86042
describe
'8428' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKC' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
e5b556033616eddf71eb6fab84a07925
339aa8e9547b67876cd945b7b7a6a6b7475f4fe9
describe
'34981' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKD' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
9f7c625b8317433447a96f79e0b9ee4e
8d873a346435510e7760e2807605d07a174073d1
describe
'8214' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKE' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
c389d2802522aefd6848791ad3de20a0
8adfd9cf1ab87f94aeccdaef1bb06153965d2e50
describe
'39875' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKF' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
758fc72dcaf31ff019a50f65e05f05b3
dc145751744491bcd4764d38b292d127dab816c6
describe
'9258' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKG' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
a29e3246eb10d99112a03a71b16b871a
c818d9cb8bdcce82da3ed4a4e122d94ce7abd63e
describe
'31721' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKH' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
80222e269f914b057d8e97ce7aff5034
944c83d049ce395ba0391b35c966beeb5d27b19b
describe
'7605' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKI' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
781e1f60eaa01b843c86a9fdd0053425
4946f9878a2d71eb8530b8341ef1a4131176e0e4
describe
'32977' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKJ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
ad338d8b6d1e0d1f9e00ec2ea0cb295c
5b3dee118d02a84009140e65fe8b9deb7a760d91
describe
'7779' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKK' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
ef983e70d5566866ab73960d77cde4cb
b71de11f81edecb6fab6cd2eb6ed8f0416f67c80
describe
'35511' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKL' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
7c70447394f8854ea77e8df35ca56902
7c37ad4617850ed98562e898dcc3e69f09c243a1
describe
'8399' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKM' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
ad4fa6f9fd244c30b8d2771c680fe3b1
3aecc324c534e83ddec4a06d0230f6b93922cab9
describe
'40658' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKN' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
31fe549122c0eb4f523deb67adddd23a
59bcea8fec184c790e463f2c9ee49cea3440232c
describe
'9595' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKO' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
4ec13f1f2ee244eea642ed97672bd2ed
b23d936eadd76fbf4e585bcbc63d42a5651999fb
describe
'40917' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKP' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
4e85c39edf9440c68b702420abd0f33b
cf8b9960720135d41e9a58248ada7c237ee7d412
describe
'8886' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKQ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
8b1142c6803656f67a54e5d55e407fe4
a43eea2010096ad5731aaf229115f385ce16cbc0
describe
'37926' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKR' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
f6066464c0c78b2bfb85baece7e08443
ecd6b4dc83639af6a0e2713c091682e354bd506e
describe
'9620' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKS' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
7f20d877ca20e43ec466df7c72003c2a
35b1f1fc973c37dc99d7b29ec94b1c474b410f6a
describe
'33213' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKT' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
4489496c087704b9a959eb4829afce88
6fa5979f99e8898df5d4f4376dad0ec7eec49822
describe
'7596' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKU' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
ad42ef57265885a7deaa3ed2fd60f91d
9415ece9fb1edcf10b499bf2796a4bfcf81bc4e9
describe
'35361' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKV' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
74f59e39df73a2f0e274d937f5c6b64c
5110efc470ce6e18f677481e401ffe4b9153233a
describe
'8392' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKW' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
300ab22ad69bd25319909528e968f3da
1012b4dc92a4e4e56c84b2b1f7c6d088adc97831
'2011-12-29T05:37:26-05:00'
describe
'29013' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKX' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
5fb336b8c9011445662613515e1fba96
ef9105590c6faf20e00556817d7c7164ef2a4862
describe
'7129' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKY' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
073b133818cfc5490df0d592c2cb73a4
0fae2a3f89585f86da6747fa19e5ca76b6aceb2d
describe
'27643' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOKZ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
95a3f90016b143681bd5a51d4a6edbec
a3c78cb05b691e36add75089acfdc10193ca30be
describe
'6801' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLA' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
123fe8bc4d63310e2400e4c5b0cc8dc6
bdb9cf10f1d23976ffd67e6432d0319b58020c22
describe
'38480' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLB' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
b3016d8a9449a102d1453b248891b0bb
badd870d0022842bf1b9ff080f3734a66052d3d4
describe
'9222' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLC' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
413847e91f1ec379fcf813712c40f489
f8adbf503368b06479e5713f02f1fdeb77f00c96
describe
'37334' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLD' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
5f4cae853bdbf4bedbe5ab4650263abf
6f5b5afc805bbc78b2fb4b63425eca382f35bbe5
describe
'8557' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLE' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
b320f69766f9ce332be287e3ab2ea16a
51726534d6b17166cfb010f4e58c40b0a6c78185
describe
'21833' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLF' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
f182f78c2a9518a488d463bd7464f734
c2b8c4d86cca9272c6ddbc81fa233cd480902cf0
describe
'5283' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLG' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
197518cd3f1cbb5fc3a684674378fbda
4ba2c94b979a9d72f6f56cc70264043a879a2063
describe
'24335' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLH' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
3f95275f25418bbe81c2218e989d826f
f7826f0e0a321e0d89e0aceb2e1dc186f7842c6e
describe
'6156' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLI' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
c80a40cb66a08830bed9e8cb3b6128da
9a6054d061b2db3ecb121263838942ba49176ab0
describe
'38658' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLJ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
fec864939d9d5c365e30111ba6c82fa9
bfb2fcb16f064d56b93737f05d88c78dbd6b4b62
describe
'8430' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLK' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
40eb480aab20d4fcb2c31c858bda1da6
2ad72b09ac05debd7239d193e210356c0e4f5ab9
describe
'23560' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLL' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
f471a1fd41b6459e9786878adcef4fe0
bef45816f1305bbcc9cdd3655f543dad24e7e845
describe
'5886' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLM' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
1a6f2a4e925fb0c3666951824e8a33a4
42f601c12105483483dfa2b692db72da5f4b0817
describe
'29813' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLN' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
bd06490dc0fb4614711095bd66618217
edfba9d6540a2bf768ab2d3dae6b8866348755a1
describe
'7098' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLO' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
cf396903d2c7cc0b80e14f71eadb26c6
9f93868f271031bc8b692e338b17ae57ab30ebe7
describe
'38795' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLP' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
987b8da06fbb2c0f3238499b88596e04
8c81a97e055c50cc4212b3e7169b80d061337e2e
describe
'8673' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLQ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
a770389407c1985742aad08bebec0e97
88bf6149f73d62f89e9d88dd1c02ab9f3099d941
describe
'23944' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLR' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
09768ed9423a00293d8e1a3858c83d36
65bb7ffb594c7db785d9b5ecab5381b510f309b2
describe
'5537' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLS' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
71a63d93636ebbe4186712568641fd45
5e2fd1d9356c2865ec944f5b33cbad5c836ccaec
describe
'23609' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLT' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
23af46eadf4e7647e0ade2e011c6633d
f732612e6caa00012b4c546d49c94b341e8accf9
describe
'5866' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLU' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
e51687eb21ab03b2ee504690a9c8f67c
a0a41c1c4c44aa94d272f02ee9c6bf7298ba76a6
describe
'39799' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLV' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
1de1655da8bc1b92771adef9b48e23fe
e3151410eafd6ff7b43817e23068b430d58126a2
describe
'8797' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLW' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
8bd68037b11b3297f19583f93304270d
6a6bcb723c49cb0774a7dbfa18525e89f72b9937
describe
'31527' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLX' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
8325f1d65a5445d3251406d1209f51e6
93f6ac8f0d904b5200d5c6872d557cb95534e0f8
describe
'7953' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLY' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
981e162c1b06825a7b5498bbfe904420
d45f4671eb9327ebec55a003a2ea12d49ab8d480
describe
'27343' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOLZ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
8cc413c1ec8729ae16ae3ff5006dd5f7
5bdddd963c42ac930be33b4620e1a48cb254fd97
describe
'6735' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMA' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
7e90f4052127d186c0cb3d1e60e9e458
80f5b1e0b13b0f4bfe1fb626fa14173b2c83d109
describe
'38578' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMB' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
4881097e715a3abb0cb28db0aaffb784
fd3cf6f0d04db8bf4a5e19807c8c28c25d202568
describe
'8257' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMC' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
2000fcd39edce54ec7af31936913b08f
8af35ed01e99b1530ddd6b2825d95dfac78004a4
describe
'35212' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMD' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
10893aa7ed2185dcb84e6ec38125bc50
d7fd4e5b24246e3c699b9d71e158d8025e90ed73
describe
'8368' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOME' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
29cc029a9ea54d70b220bb66d788cfe5
383e95e209e5e9453c086a3c1596e6f8fc5bc9df
describe
'38056' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMF' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
5710c15a366dcad894a00ab6a790382f
11b5ecd7debe78691489b46a16a44ce0a0a74335
describe
'8665' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMG' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
fd0c91bb2bae6bf975cc75bd0e02490a
c3525e54033c815b4f144ff75528c18f8f460991
describe
'37826' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMH' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
5a8750329d377d4d86d36475829a993c
d90b3b2fd2d67bc572da4e0536813618d6fff0f6
describe
'8802' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMI' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
a8d4c3038ff6b86bc0cc2fbb51c843ea
337b70b40d5f1c50eb742affc94701ba1cd1c3fe
describe
'32417' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMJ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
ba5c6a81305f03f91dbb0dd2cd8d6e6f
44d2151fa45dd26592f453d667a83c4d9cf070a7
describe
'7518' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMK' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
3aaca322883c19592c68ade290daf547
e144d4a66c9e56b1222292e772ca70ca2fcaccf1
describe
'34707' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOML' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
f879008f27586480c1ef52a047b3467e
7c18976a82cf166341c7c1fb15c1ae0dd3d3a9fe
describe
'8034' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMM' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
e26e99d56a1cbe59b7a7db3595c9bf7f
851b937d16971f372bb8fff84b11a858d27b87d6
describe
'33823' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMN' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
b069995916fa0f732e93afa14798e518
353594075416e3cadd43c8df5550b43d1d5e8a81
describe
'7687' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMO' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
7c82a88d3248a2fb40e976a72130516e
104b64fa12453b2eada198a2c9f91f2893669346
describe
'20942' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMP' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
504073c79a4cf8a375c4f144655ceb5c
82081b2fb84360774109d6c1f098a5fe0603aabd
describe
'5016' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMQ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
216c55048faf29099b16a5b7fb8ccf4a
c23b945d0f3036d76d717b44416c96aef1b4545e
describe
'27934' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMR' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
56c1225aa8bef548af8c86a2c61e8684
02d57a3ebabc2f22595c0dd57ec7533dc791bf41
describe
'6593' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMS' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
5094450faf482c3f48fdb0feb3d8cfcc
686167f7f5a61fc10aef8c00e2f5bf9c5d6520d2
describe
'37206' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMT' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
348097782cd81b2b116229eea9174e35
3149282bc468f990627d508b20770e4417c7e06c
describe
'8788' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMU' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
5e44915a7bcfbe8d101cba79f9878599
2535fa2916e22c0cfc9cdc6b977491bce05bb167
describe
'36780' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMV' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
e2e04d3a2de6b957fdf9b7c5c5810f4f
5e30313e7d28485aa714995b55dda6db92af1add
describe
'8756' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMW' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
d24ab793275a48f71892cd5c9d3d45ba
86f98ea7e4a9ff9ffb5eefefb07e883db26b012b
describe
'33361' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMX' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
45940a271aa750fef5ec9c209feed97c
a334fe5e4b45123a2db2b2ac709c23a4a45b06e6
describe
'8037' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMY' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
978de0fe66aea63423635e06e415218b
a85287d2fa16cdcec8984a1279b877d92a8a2ce6
describe
'39888' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOMZ' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
4889e4fbbdd309cb57ae33cab1e49a98
7d3ea506592b039293c5b15645e2993cec458ab1
describe
'8933' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONA' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
dba7d1d4c4679f0b043321f1019bc3f5
3d05834db458cbefe57289ebeca617081dc58689
describe
'37725' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONB' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
1dd9ece894ecc5155f0e599123fec893
bf0b7030e7caa907c58813c052157da400603d58
describe
'8787' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONC' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
f9fff84554bee87d9b1276a819aafff0
436562e267cfd032e52bf968d8fec11116e22deb
describe
'32433' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOND' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
79864a9e0d67568abe6b5af7abf16077
dfa8e98e12863bf077c9bb8600085547e04a826f
describe
'7777' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONE' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
61b330a41688034af7fa989e6bab6198
31e3dc584ca4e19588609030c215024423f96e54
'2011-12-29T05:41:21-05:00'
describe
'36566' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONF' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
c7d5d16a071959989b4b038dff9182fc
d5849e1185e89e73722a35f283f8fdee121778a5
describe
'8374' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONG' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
ba312ff6bb973f2aae0609680ecc9ecf
66c9a7371397e2c221e2470edd4841ef9fdd74e5
describe
'35412' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONH' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
01162099959ee14865b6a4ee76c425d1
fa6946e11af48a6ba89278627631204fe830b682
describe
'8809' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONI' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
427ec1aa16246680f751d959d106273c
78588415216f6758f372e108d922cc02bbd4b9a8
describe
'30816' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONJ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
ffdf1c4773cf0f2476f9a262a795b39d
131a9e84f216b8625eabd0ea0119f027e5817078
describe
'7425' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONK' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
866b06acc6b7b74cbf6c9fae430454f0
7bd7dbb258fafd3c91e719ca73bce59c4b786542
describe
'31592' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONL' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
4d777ad970f3b3239bb6d6332fc14162
550f066bb340d40fd89edc5bf14d3a45fbb695dc
describe
'7397' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONM' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
3e8a624645f80848ddd8741c831c903d
b1c5dd298f16a778bbb7085ba64e63679ad72761
describe
'33473' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONN' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
6baee0e6a3caa021d9c10aaedf635187
e91f00cf8ec57cf2e4b4749eee6e18729e93586c
describe
'7976' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONO' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
07cf3a9657bd109bca9c3be926cba7de
031c33f7db8d43ef1da152f0185e76b9341ed0e1
describe
'32327' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONP' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
5a2577b8160b754a91a85656cf505e72
7df9734c7fbd45c17695318f1249ed8e755e7998
describe
'7814' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONQ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
41df4915ca67851bc4f124dc582061cc
3f0e6e5815a55b261459805604ffb31aaa892c6c
describe
'34066' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONR' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
83a0b6de9ea6c902c0a1e6ce0860def9
30f916893a057280226c01d2623ef2b17d8743fc
describe
'8150' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONS' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
14808b5f4bf239c2f70f17d1a5624c71
e6dda4d31b9493cefb9918e68c66faacfec18c46
describe
'35348' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONT' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
af730aad6c443a7e2c293184196f6e72
82fd98381a3688692e562a6150e24b64ae028f37
describe
'8078' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONU' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
d2d20d0f47b6e9df5828bcf8d6d741cc
3419a73fb5672a24fccce743ab606590b53a8478
describe
'38271' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONV' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
6d9f64d2e5e5d0988cf0fe10d258507c
57fbfcf2f89ed8968599533596fb209b437fc762
describe
'9084' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONW' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
8090f1b001d14fe729c3d1fafcdba461
ae01ffd3b39de000ae8d38f08d7903b8aaf757ac
describe
'31850' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONX' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
0bd201369612df3845733b0ee9ef952d
d0557f969b5bdf00943679422b07cc9721c59d36
describe
'7328' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONY' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
e5c20afd8ee72bdcad00af7d28b0dc99
668ad8813c5367fd64f0fbac9132aae9fb89dcf6
describe
'36818' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABONZ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
2e3ddd7e05b48fb224ca7578c7514eed
239303f671c1cd1dbf4c5e3b45235fb747851deb
describe
'8579' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOA' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
120778348bfb279f84b913065ed1726f
8c5f48e36a898c82a469c454e1e9b6cf729c3d40
describe
'36643' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOB' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
fb0a0d508e1415929c7d25dc0067aa5d
6ba7980aa81c9f61fbd9dd22b6e8aeb72e4d86bf
describe
'9221' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOC' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
bafc75c648a14c18276ccb9cdf7047bc
74833553756d37255090da7612db45162c1b0c53
describe
'39605' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOD' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
9a1b3b63a15e456a3452dc9317f16c53
78a7798dba8907317500d1935bb6cbb93c894b17
describe
'8721' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOE' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
d10c034c827eca3d9efd3a9a6d42e519
5a207908666caef116ccc2b0c0ac31a550762048
describe
'33893' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOF' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
3a018410d1bb33309d92a160b2528424
b2169e09c6d086276b1ed1aaa045fa4c78ae67bd
describe
'7743' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOG' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
b06bb08a3b68adb1b1ffc77e774d37d7
8942bbafedb6701f5889ceb3200a9d806324c3d9
describe
'20966' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOH' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
da14f3432017dad9534ea79c9e1d0499
a0bbc66f8711417cfedbd79c41eb4e95d6396c62
describe
'4859' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOI' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
fcaa7a0fae71c1725ac45cad3aa73b23
46ea18bb099dd08ffcdeb3a63de7f40f58927e6b
describe
'28411' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOJ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
2f76dd7d88b05bd2e635b158450ac36f
6fedffcca68ad2d5ed7495c394b76f4e685d6e1c
describe
'6645' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOK' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
70479c3fb9ca171018d9749f1fb0d466
9984916bda42cd2615e1fd86a43b7e50714e866d
describe
'28763' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOL' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
9f5a73183e5132c441a86973a27930ce
4d35c369c7914793000ade251c7a46b6f3097304
describe
'6926' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOM' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
c8dd370156ab5addbf4d25ac7676364c
7886b2f629d37526095ba9a841a7e348f00e2ec7
describe
'37085' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOON' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
b7a438be8641d685cc60bf5e8efeb439
17d9c429284242f585bcd169c746ade6feae3779
describe
'8798' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOO' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
b237656c914afcee2d7d8e7df1e63ed9
223a904319bb81aa3e223392b02cb9150e18bae9
describe
'35198' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOP' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
528e9fdd16f2301e029eb0ac83711d09
985a8786be508630de3a88c66373f090fa429119
describe
'8328' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOQ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
e91a8b4c192608aac53249cd56e2a09f
3dd640c27594a0ad635b33a925e58a6e351dc021
describe
'25830' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOR' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
6147be7f451a525a809db59343168ce3
6c911bff017d57bb816c5f7a62d6caa586f79ade
describe
'6554' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOS' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
c348b936eb246b7589d84432356758ff
f4d63235dc407d709243b2a1c2858a770e4ec829
describe
'39531' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOT' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
4e34c34d8175a5ca01ce71e300d28a41
b733d8ad100f97f1393b98276fe2689f2546c833
describe
'8905' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOU' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
4b26f91c897ee61656497b41596ef776
002c09bae6bb2ba488aff9bc733459525ecc9c9b
describe
'36544' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOV' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
cf02b0ad15b6ae54f942cdebda79998c
974e0b72cac6196ef24815fce00749cd5a08a08f
describe
'8480' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOW' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
92003ca979a2c77581c1f57ba8b08a9a
fcb266120d34dca1fbe9b18876abfcff4051a8d8
describe
'39608' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOX' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
3fdaa47a328eea633b768feb78920e76
df17c203a8b0af897e483f3881c577f54f54a423
describe
'8609' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOY' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
fc6343cabbe9c72264d822edea7dfa76
190001a4c41246263fb6d06e4536ca0ef8a2ac71
describe
'40563' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOOZ' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
ef7cf1a3435cb4798bc0c9cfbd626201
df3dae1fa18a61e4804373cabc58f8df51f2580c
describe
'9356' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPA' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
8fb10e7c74ad390d4f52d86988312d07
37ece91230d009955b58bf364dc83c2c64d3061a
describe
'23480' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPB' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
a378554d3901826d18428a9f6483cbf9
3450be7a99412db9d8a94cf3c62b79b52c6e8117
describe
'6228' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPC' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
6c819bbf7c9b2453b0cb0b12724b021b
d07d2d0293df9c46051282049a7af5df0cb00d26
describe
'36397' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPD' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
1b73757e01cabe35ea0317e5b20f362b
0fc01296dd225d25409dc9b94f6235953a245c3e
describe
'8604' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPE' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
a67275e77d3da12191768d45b709af19
948386dcda64b4d6137517fc958197701043aadc
describe
'35868' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPF' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
e6a412c282606cc911aadca2b9e324f6
2c617a26f6e337161b7a217621cf147688bdf275
describe
'8240' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPG' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
9822be502a183d62ff1b8014d85fca96
d2a8ef321063fc9d6c58748d85fa451ff93e3c3c
describe
'31207' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPH' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
5726afa226ae55fec0538bfeb768aa63
7a4f3197860c9a44303185a14e640e7dab8b1c62
describe
'8000' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPI' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
3f6b7b14f4e438e476e970c5b37dddf9
843479c5d13a1b17eab86c0a25126682718e1498
describe
'32381' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPJ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
f1c6f19fec3e86e0ea20580c050afa3f
0434a8d13db50e6bac2a48aeb7fc68861448c44a
describe
'7943' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPK' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
eaca8285ee986ef6b152056a530cfcea
e1d1acfa382f57c2de6a801ff7960eed9e855e52
describe
'33866' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPL' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
e78242d4fb9b30c92f17c8a659b7cd26
59df81c1eae1a0d10971230378c63f431372a2ed
describe
'7928' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPM' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
3312fc0e2bae447088eedda484c2bba6
6534f59c0fc7be6643a6f25dbb1805247a9d93aa
describe
'30429' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPN' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
710597838b5d72675709de2979c53598
5f47c4aa7442fef6e68d916042db3462fd3263c2
describe
'7301' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPO' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
cc8f78dbd3d90153fbd6d971edc43417
4197c516339ba117c567de2428cf3a908b940893
describe
'31868' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPP' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
9d952a2774a1017aac1a58a4cd64e7f1
5f653d57f9c67f9aed474c65137e5a82cde1b1e1
describe
'7558' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPQ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
721eb60e6f5c4bbdb74e3e151a2d5591
7cc8a034b11a88ef2a3c533525654b7b8c92871f
describe
'38724' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPR' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
4ae834ee619d40bc240c9303fbbf8a9c
ab3ac43047d488708668afde3cc481c3d27864fe
describe
'8975' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPS' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
b29798b5e84224e628bbb4751c5db113
a68f3a0cdff3477107f19259bcff55604046f835
describe
'28178' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPT' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
21033d8759751d6a0183f16232a90398
62bb10dd3a8cccbc3214b04b4e7c43c865b70748
describe
'6846' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPU' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
636b318091102e4a44c60ab8da975c45
085c4e0790a89df4cb6971ff67b8cb85b78dc27d
describe
'25259' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPV' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
d658a514c9d30e6849ac8576f8db4fd3
27034a660b8196c0d72cdc35728d296391c63957
describe
'6390' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPW' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
de666a79c412d15279ee7a9d7d3528b8
862acde188b9314738c46073901684f1d307da54
describe
'27900' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPX' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
284e14e690bace6cb479574806d5ac25
736416ef6fd5310388b79dc8f5266443935cb83b
describe
'6573' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPY' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
f7378d3e86b3c56a7438eb4592cbc5e6
fef4ece3fe203df9c7283e437c28290224c3f50c
describe
'29711' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOPZ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
f0d8d6fda30d77645a176fb2e0623d6d
12f22bfde10f86105fc3ce45bd6fdf80018f90f0
describe
'7152' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQA' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
70f31032147ce3619c7a238ca5d79633
6638d11fa576472899855eae160ac481a1f90e7e
describe
'29740' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQB' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
4706b27f450cde903dbd6ba80f6fefd1
42ed6fda27893b4d339ba6d76f871638f2fc60d0
describe
'7418' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQC' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
c8c88e84a2689ed563d100b474bbd557
9f32a0d91aeef5560e06c07734f8bd151dd8f288
describe
'37912' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQD' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
2f80c87346af53bf420827882a441240
975c83c4845ac4336c0cee5dd2d85e2c5b16aa79
describe
'8822' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQE' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
222dc0585f5d6f64be2deeed4c548262
1b6c9045576dbe97e7aba38d4a4eb3a7640d29e5
describe
'36722' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQF' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
1c2ce000b4875778516a419f1b1f4eaf
9258022c749e5ad2522db2f8ecf53632711fda3f
describe
'8690' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQG' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
5ce2de2d7807931bba6e71c92fede891
ac9388c92cdebbca4effffc1e4d4f6a712314412
describe
'30879' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQH' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
6698a59436e8da97462d9195a56eaf2d
813df09961dcdafff1d1f28dba1d854845f7b90f
describe
'7143' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQI' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
7e9eda300e17193a7d0e09f01531c2f6
6f9edb01158da2c927a2f1639966a0e1c9adabd5
describe
'31241' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQJ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
282e4656147269362f099d9de4a952a2
c9b46addf3c0afaea6602779231ae68a2b6c7f0d
describe
'7557' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQK' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
7936eec1a03d97d83e0751ecbe9d6c04
56babe764b81c3503550dd3431070285dc046346
describe
'38274' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQL' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
759e94ee6efc3c1c7b8a6820a8c23ca1
ad7a4fb2a58c6b6190fe7165e9794c84384f67f9
describe
'8847' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQM' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
86bfeded0a4e537ddc3fff69a84cb064
616a5fb26f602aed4cff4cbcb464901df7a00ef6
describe
'32501' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQN' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
5827eaae2f36fc7d43ad96d25b52c35a
5b731da52a72bda4ab81fe32676a6696a0b9b2fb
describe
'7848' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQO' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
940f733ada7e50928a950c09184990ba
0f95b210109c32a2def15ee5c1dfaae59237210c
describe
'39296' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQP' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
a9bf54ade7f4e399f3deb80d80bf4489
506f0cecc316bc4425df9d5635de23e44943e8b5
describe
'9096' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQQ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
6d9fbd03751266d676c410d2ce954ce0
b75ae30429883ac26dd6e6c8940e6574a9853bfe
describe
'35803' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQR' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
fc76c97c0678455285569494ec1a7b7d
ad75c6cdb5509b0ef7e8bcef0cc7e3b24be19999
describe
'8635' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQS' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
1ded97ca4ab30c10dfc8bf9896a59425
4dc67fb19c62540ca7fcc581380191d1ccf6946c
describe
'35932' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQT' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
2d600a62b29e74113e8d5a2317182476
74196947f86836d39afeeb30a348d280e0b215be
describe
'8432' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQU' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
aca3c479f213cd15b96e6ac3e0d39b81
f6bf4e9150e371899cc0f8f41b5b70b79c193f5d
describe
'30562' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQV' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
a50450f6df7cdb8ea06cd9bdce6cf646
ba3e105329f6c89d0922f84b4fd8e4d3656af090
describe
'7819' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQW' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
fb4ab98a12a9c37aefb772640e06e451
531f7547ec69693232dd16bfe330799b4e53f928
describe
'35501' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQX' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
73a4cba7337b56a01d70ed1e41f63b5e
ec23fa85c745d89bdc76d7a2e6de0a23f38a534b
describe
'8382' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQY' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
6e46cc3a48732a1bc2a771404be39bc6
8b05b33405e1b00893ab6117d66a7dfd57618c2c
describe
'35641' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOQZ' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
b9dbd7883c9790f5a84b71cd85f6d263
9a505776629df763e560e76b89fbe64513a1154d
describe
'8270' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORA' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
b9323749370df496fd4932e38e723fe0
05c81aa7f2c580be47805b52626079380c3dd1a6
describe
'35656' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORB' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
5293b3ba61fc0b0048c23fca47643f2c
579af228849bf3f396883549df7777f86982c200
describe
'8212' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORC' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
f053ac8e31ee03e4f083a3af64c7c4e7
a4c28abab5da01f1905c2c2a33d6c03e8445ff19
describe
'32845' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORD' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
adfd8dcf0ab543bef7e4726eb7cbb4af
871f55640c2b8c0d5825dd464e523aeccdac1a38
describe
'7775' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORE' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
246d4261a41f89a33d66f8e61612bae2
1df1cc14d75d78a31a3ff056d638ac2ee41f2b05
describe
'37785' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORF' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
79e14276b5ad1d50600d3ce6f763fccc
f52cf19562e2df3441724ff7b463973c04ea4e81
describe
'9035' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORG' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
37290b69f88822ee301ae6d91e279bc7
72f4025f22f7a9cdda123c10fe375357085d7a0d
describe
'35791' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORH' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
670daef91f9583c2f2960d30d3f7cd36
88394c018c03858f8d603c0d2898325623c2139c
describe
'8699' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORI' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
ced685e83c23ceefe2659b3868a7f677
d597980e8d2ec4cabcbd3b61a6208af10d75137d
describe
'29697' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORJ' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
b2032ae1f0fee9f3548ba372031d4577
f50dc7c6d4d66ac51a18098c2a443ecbfbd8ae1b
describe
'7512' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORK' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
790ff17dd6f26fd68cd496a79dbc4ea3
f234faa91df290adaddd6857398b97386bf1d675
describe
'28050' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORL' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
9cca2a0be2df3e086677dbe1e4e144ee
c5e0ccf4a191130ec4eabd46d7501c875c45e845
describe
'6879' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORM' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
32986d5af877744ec11ceb830ceab8ca
05ba35a269716c5fb4d399b5f56a06102f8be013
describe
'32236' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORN' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
43e9be70abe7a46b01da588fd9000a9c
31b18e5f9cb955a4878a23500bb7da99b15a7908
describe
'7839' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORO' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
2215f9fdefbec55735e35eb8d2cdc706
b85afc8988288ac9c30823db21fa3c8e4bada46d
describe
'24727' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORP' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
5747f855f647c7f7da2b8cd54efa4130
82ec5516b3ad2a99a6cf9964052aca80f691f0db
describe
'6323' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORQ' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
c235f3576c350764922a7e55f7d31e94
0e5fd089540a3bbceacce750002bbd0ef80395fc
describe
'29941' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORR' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
9e74b24efbb2813e36d68416c4cbe9e7
d2e7690446498cc4b235f5633979bb015c573788
describe
'6972' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORS' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
110b99c2a58ebd6b539dc9852ee2fe8f
f9d40cba1ec46552cd3e0cad7d2d1e78473a6a41
describe
'28655' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORT' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
2ad5ba94e8599feb78d694d6dd4eff2f
dfb9689b42b4d2db4bc690a2e1891c54292043a3
describe
'6713' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORU' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
72b058e79d6fe8a5890dc35fddd70df8
96026d361c7eba8debffca117e855e7e81646289
describe
'39881' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORV' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
7126f6746a47dcd56144d09a2d1f5f0a
33a831b96a3743ca7298a472e31614dee6f01cee
describe
'8729' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORW' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
06d68057d05f777bed95c8ed00d54820
28b9ea0d6fdf2a60886df3bf00e05bf7cd67e4d2
describe
'23426' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORX' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
c453b430131d6d08b88c0c3ce317ef54
a0d48a850f4180fcbfcfc7c344e71cb4b87bdbd3
describe
'6037' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORY' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
dfac5d59c78192c9501ccf4d8ab3dfd8
927f492abd0b0c139d4b3bc51bf3525799aa6f7b
describe
'32424' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABORZ' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
812d1ae2d28d3b07428516426941b2a1
59dc10e54b4e5880c36cb8514b6475d40bfb7ca5
describe
'7610' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSA' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
4cdbe690ffd876110ed864f92c89eb19
99d638e759894e7a236e2dcafe926bfb29595fb5
describe
'35878' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSB' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
244ba155bdfb34446162fbae8ba78771
1b408a61791dd19425f2abeb4c1473a371e74c19
describe
'8083' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSC' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
b7ae6f8df331f94d87fad048b43a08de
453692e0698f54aae14565502f45b4d500a7140b
describe
'36798' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSD' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
d377e2713b2c0a840875ba667158b5f5
fad26d586ae59f6a5b1742ee08c56e5a8ee61f0f
describe
'8641' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSE' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
ad3136a17f3104f1d2f0a7f5e3cf0f99
0d246a3c6c842feca73b0f446b3dbc6d7dfd5c35
describe
'37052' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSF' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
5d68b3dbfc5f1a89a4ef543b1ea18660
43982b00130c8199e879fa796e9be91dc1f9e68a
describe
'8441' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSG' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
c88d9607b0b02b51edfde6f4ead6f754
2d68561a510844910da174ad7762e68f8271ea2b
describe
'35009' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSH' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
53afd21b320a2eaca0c9dcbc85b85470
a9797743445b28936be67285d1190ccd16527846
describe
'8303' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSI' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
c069006c1c57dd2620aa83bd5d9f9276
c267c9d50ef840691323b98cde512a3bdc8c8f2f
describe
'32507' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSJ' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
baa4bbe50bca792f186d5578a1f50109
f771a16eb7ecc2c1fe2a74aa2751e81b9fbbc94f
describe
'7378' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSK' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
edf47285e8ce57790e1262f8bd1fa370
4e51067eb5c63f2025158bd000cefae012c83b5d
describe
'36442' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSL' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
0f871c2f1a7358bacd49ae2617598e0d
12ec95e8aa8aac62a6852ad733f5fa91ead378a5
describe
'8779' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSM' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
fe38a8246c2ab91f297827bdfb047bca
0f4cffb97080a3fda671f975a23fc6d6c9445e62
describe
'32331' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSN' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
8985a0cb83526da9cf12e59438f29104
dca977c7c0e7eb8de9abcb731e6abf8371027d5f
describe
'7570' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSO' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
fad5578c96b57b164db30434dad63a62
a714ed4b31664f87cb7fc5714db516b0c982df0f
describe
'29366' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSP' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
45b3114cc259cf7b1a49f0e5f59fbe25
cd8b55971b96bd58ae70fe7c11fe28e4fa5b02be
describe
'7130' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSQ' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
c8e9f8369602ae2c93903e7a588cfdce
df629b818cc4c39b43ca8723ec8285ddd71f43f1
describe
'30616' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSR' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
8e45746562b32f782d52d83c958518f7
92c0cec8e3f785b63ea7673a137380660f105e27
describe
'7096' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSS' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
38ed522d180f1a22531e206bfad8633d
6035b2900b036d2d521791f3837081651cda2978
describe
'35440' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOST' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
44dde9b19b47fadfc9e6146bffbc8ae0
e669dcd073b9c26ff97989e369a743a82f065497
describe
'8319' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSU' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
ecea2af7cc43a5d29d05fcb254cff509
257f7924c345335a63cee1c57a9041b18e9b4336
describe
'38912' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSV' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
f362422539765a3b663ece21df11c5d6
fdb2373a936c9090be045217389873a388de23c5
describe
'8834' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSW' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
40275e7a21da5670ea22cfe684456972
ff4a33f8a2231711524d2fb2407c63f33741ab04
describe
'34823' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSX' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
0eb9a9fc8a7b8dcccbb3ae4d0bc34a6f
2d50c71147b34fdfe19fa9204eeb0dca9394e7b9
describe
'8290' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSY' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
a41da37e6e3f2878d198c20f22d3cfbf
be7c0832a96b8b51e0894d333c2fa0c408cc0c7f
describe
'30500' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOSZ' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
bebea8fb67f1639eec0d37e7967654aa
38601c900c729fcbfc0fb132ef580f5b33bc2ea2
describe
'7420' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTA' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
67f918be47769ae0a5fa3393d7579de3
0e08ea1a1d69fb0d1ba72fe21eaa261146389c49
describe
'25834' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTB' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
99d29a76ba2f49107f0c1cac27e5b108
0cd609350ea3950c406115e719a7553b2d257beb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTC' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
3a0b04c3f28252c82465859aa12ffa25
4ac3a9cf8c6558cf692a9e543e401b1a84f3993b
describe
'24819' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTD' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
6ec1eba318b74d3167a83c00a1184318
47b33bb6c734d433624102538eb3cae9d23ea19f
describe
'6025' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTE' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
d455e73b56de6a1a431009bdd00937b7
0368b177ced21f8302649bb86679b75fa1a1b467
describe
'30934' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTF' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
82648bd692bbd94454ebba735ae69b3a
19ddb4cdb7a32a0631775a423647860ca8284aa2
describe
'7313' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTG' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
51f974ad22eb31c4e40453ac9f7c325a
35098eae19b019a4769c7830a4cb529f7315f553
describe
'25996' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTH' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
a28eeed9e9c1616dddee9291d349ca87
fd26569e09254a5b8fe9c7bfcb9e8d1bc6a31136
describe
'6613' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTI' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
853a4934cfb7a94d7f0470b6724f53dc
8192ed7629bef2c88fcc7660ef400b5cc01fc0bc
describe
'30395' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTJ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
1de2f04f626afa22df8e5b8b26874982
023d7e8d5b8aeeb64307d7334cba84db8f366d52
describe
'7249' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTK' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
2a953d937013ec53f1417275f0427f5e
d14bdaf0fa9f13b412f91b709e8493a5060b0c55
describe
'37737' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTL' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
d79f8861e88d3107b3810dc29e065fa7
2ce1a0c62ec2c63c66dbe2ccba050bc15b7df5dc
describe
'8754' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTM' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
e4e4a5569a5756072eb76deb2bf30195
4ea1c7331295daa528a0f83b3a3077fb2f390263
describe
'39483' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTN' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
6d58cd154121af9707e0a689e10fd20d
bd96eccd49520d60101af44bd7e734dfd9f727a0
describe
'8774' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTO' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
0753ec84426bd3bf9c56d779ee304d8b
1e2225711ac49a136acc80ba7ef78a056ea8838b
describe
'37532' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTP' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
e49dec01d206e0fb2b37d58ce29ce4b0
5e8ffbb0e0a06a4b2ddda7856a06b0f3b32423f5
describe
'8613' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTQ' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
ea5ba98331ffe500079a9c19439f33da
67ee0fb498727fb1948683c495611100dfcae830
describe
'38537' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTR' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
31ac7d54e258c3a76e7ca175fa1bbc29
10f39e84752659094400447c2da44dd7e2341774
describe
'9107' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTS' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
95319ccd6d3b658b403e66bf82490c6b
6094fc32001fb479e719c2ce12ae59c17f5eb80a
describe
'36712' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTT' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
00861ec96f969b0a0f897853158284fa
91080d72d880ec9189d47e497d56e4396ccd021d
describe
'8406' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTU' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
44e213c98f92fffe95ace58ba6d19f10
464c38daa811c45be3e3298459a26434f5557b70
describe
'33838' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTV' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
918b433bb6ec0f31a1ac2366c4422421
88ab25934e668169a12bc93b9e594d7c31aab143
describe
'7914' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTW' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
1af397b077a1ae4ed7992f0c90e2aec5
34d9918979efe6c6f1b486155dfac296a24973c1
describe
'36768' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTX' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
edcdb92be7b87ce292e2b6ede38eb5ae
07aa643cd467d1a253aa80c7539655df43b83b21
describe
'8597' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTY' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
dde5a9917466c325ca85afe3a1292ae1
ca3f165edea35f07f30c4ac2d13ddfb3c51236b0
describe
'36035' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOTZ' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
ffff1d1cba3df8e30ccfe35c81f36bf1
e58c9edcc7a6537d19a91e1ae9b76797e63ee45e
describe
'8064' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUA' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
600ab19e53af23a89f2c5b6fb8fd8d59
47bcbba165637afc78f0cb0a7414e9ca704f2aa4
describe
'38458' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUB' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
349a4d87279fc1b9d79cd97f028764be
928bdde797a53fa1bc096f47f9538da1ceba7475
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUC' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
21b8ca6620940875701fcc40bfac91b0
c8101b43f020e2cbc342a2aef7caa8ab4f3b6e82
describe
'33286' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUD' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
a2c6a7776edf3b364ebb22aa7b31de3d
35bca51c347c3a6b54f72dfcd936e8c862821e2b
describe
'7911' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUE' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
e5314513c972c613159d6f78ad8ca8a2
30532fcb6542c3a20895118f23de7a5778af7c5e
describe
'36114' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUF' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
58431913f5298c8c323d133f73ba150e
ed80227e038a6cebfa37ecbb4934b71dae6889c7
describe
'8863' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUG' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
c3dbda905366bd737cb0fe6c86d30c97
fe5189b01fe9e99a13677aa4be45b2900354ac5a
describe
'38720' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUH' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
405a0ee956d2b416423f7de70f754333
c3527eebf17c092889ed6396de713c4dfaae9548
describe
'8811' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUI' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
a53efc6eb9a4a1bf5df8ab648e4a11b6
b6448d75afa11091cbd969f94b5357df0b53a92c
describe
'21889' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUJ' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
536af2c6fd99b5418a853b38386aa2c1
f22a9aaf0890410d6b14abec6e0425514a1d1f96
describe
'5429' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUK' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
425f7a426fc07dbd86b591e94387536c
9b0bcfa8d0b4444305e78bd5bafda31f706429c8
describe
'17979' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUL' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
5cb09e8931dcc64d520d88d7a6b67cb8
e0f7df3affdb9dfcdeb1c61f177072a471e46ca1
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUM' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
be3ace7c4e8f53f1854c0d88f8c22506
f7c7fddfbdad7a1cb44262939b0e1b38e850a119
describe
'28328' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUN' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
88d44bb41ff4790f1b57af0018252b6f
734abba10d4afb526c0b73873d8fe84a41364f82
describe
'6793' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUO' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
4b73e63839e2d1ecfacd887e5f8defa1
b00a560899c1aedcd2ac40ca02ed34013f614911
describe
'36562' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUP' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
ba9e052e65bf9ca1074fba94e93400b4
b5d8b42227c9f0eb13cdf2554d33109be4493719
describe
'8713' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUQ' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
03ea919b7cbba270b7c6688fe97b659a
1e1b7c2b6df6f0063b32866b241391b12260e04d
describe
'33620' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUR' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
186479699a32a682610cd4491fe1c7b1
798c57f1159f3c946443cf5427c92d20b757938d
describe
'8112' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUS' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
260a4e2830016f8893743fda9a26fb96
e83592b4a73823391772bf2d946514434abf224c
describe
'34003' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUT' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
96909facd8a4d12d2bd69998c9c1a9a7
0cb99f2625239d1a79855f5cee0b675795b7719d
describe
'8231' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUU' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
447443948691919a541fb9e41e675f23
8617ef3ab8ba10816a2d5da559483f5dc6e07071
describe
'41036' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUV' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
1a5c1d9e6d654208fec64debf7f0ff47
e74ba420bf4264226b208c0366a13d912d9fcbf9
describe
'9520' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUW' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
dd918702d849d5749148e1059eecf6b7
6c2f64503fbd5e6b0a0f73aebbdb26996c79d8fa
describe
'34587' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUX' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
ef89f6f288849af314581b7d2cda1ba4
89261375e7d1089f76b3711e5a98c8ce13374bb1
describe
'8248' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUY' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
b4bb7733a1b01f67731ac763716809e4
0dc42c46da65cd0d7ebc2a7c0b56c008892ed581
describe
'37565' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOUZ' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
dda09fc70daa0c08a33695cd85cdd18d
08d421ffedebe7350e0515ea45e56438bcbcd653
describe
'8992' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVA' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
f4e18f7c95945b11727525dc84498a5f
e7a42c522bf07a4463d2b174223fa06066411cf2
describe
'36103' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVB' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
d97103d243fbf9a08f04c0760fa7b208
e7362567127a5ec2d0c2e59bb7a4a0db670a7179
describe
'8615' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVC' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
f3846938fbdbbe7a7ddc6ff65b54871a
aa35168f056e46e19ef3c7a3b2c65f20c534f15f
describe
'34152' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVD' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
ca587783d940da07534eb6cb99e82157
dd75b222be4e11e9102b3dfe8178656e6844da0e
describe
'8018' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVE' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
bb8b7bfc2952cee4a42eac2cc9ae73e6
d1b3de447b28a4f8116a4b03c8bfe1fcc529fec9
describe
'38677' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVF' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
78d3ffbb6757aab4e55a008b1618a751
53106ee324a67e4b46262eee103f7bdb250ae5c0
describe
'9057' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVG' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
3c51855d14ea927e2fbce7824d2ebda8
13a5208a91731b1a00f732c6c0029791f6a48c60
describe
'38573' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVH' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
62c9696a1903f4fde0f9e372e409bd81
c4ee266d4800bac5a0e70ac75902a23fcfcaf27b
describe
'8944' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVI' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
a6d42c8a6ec1a4bbfd46eb7c5e3a5c9f
b3d602fc5b19f4722489676f9f590615e6640cbb
describe
'38250' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVJ' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
9f166372f5751e78d3e7e44163982b00
f64fd2806ad14b0fc2ff859c506b5b9ea5fdf9c2
describe
'9008' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVK' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
a3eb2a08d2c4dbc131d6d9a10b778b5c
750f3e461b232b01a66857878891bdec858b9ab1
describe
'33175' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVL' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
82b0bf10d82791c5cc714a8e299740de
2c60a79433712f51c67842beabaceafbd4ad6b34
describe
'8061' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVM' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
824d4550336d446cefed8e485e85af9e
8bde1e9be963ddadbe7daacf2818027601f155fc
describe
'35536' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVN' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
9f2061da4c54c20e90f71811ed7607cb
4b9e51a668e594637474d86be05fc776e1f58f6d
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVO' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
215e19ef2b376c1dc2930671f80a5889
8621fbb50c32691dc176352be6f4b54e2790c91f
describe
'36876' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVP' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
0d6b594b226d714ef215bc975c473069
9b43eceec7b1d8ea19da7166864c24aa2ee4b6fb
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVQ' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
bd2f41cf0bb256644606b79b76fb602f
0fa055323808647b96df5907c8fe4ec4d238834a
describe
'39062' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVR' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
ba753e30b3f7e26b61944df57bcf6746
b0105be7490e079d77a9ddb2882f4ba5431397da
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVS' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
0b6b684a06325c51388ce5939a7342ae
7f54692f116b784afcf39a031fefa4889cccfc82
describe
'33872' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVT' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
e2a1080ccb015b9e640b7efcf90fd6e8
862cd754ff5b2425620496dbe500734c898663cc
describe
'8174' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVU' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
9a302a077b4ad8b3d5198bc9b4fa4dce
1d7926b6294805410f4e2e7e8228f0fd07a8e580
describe
'42695' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVV' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
4c2a398b0d6c98016e895b53accac66b
9a618d35af5b6524aa7b9afbb08306c527808de9
describe
'10112' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVW' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
aea4a3bc314a17f846a2ab06554ce1b6
916b9e7be60bcc7c3f2f3cbc1f106e1563b791b5
describe
'30420' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVX' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
c1be3bf9f82b5ba5224768eb9e555b6f
b4878e84f1a3134477ee49537b1699cf2a44a986
describe
'6950' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVY' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
c4d63817a51fa3eaa5ba916497801863
7d2575e758d6f6c9a0fb2002d975d787c3fe70ec
describe
'32865' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOVZ' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
d8ef75af57d40aad540189c34a1d2f90
de6961412445d31931e4e3e45f47c7e0a4fe8e39
describe
'7755' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWA' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
b12a72d5bcaeef3c766e9890658733bf
c2b97cb3fd9e6eed4543160793fb3c39a6c98f4d
describe
'36878' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWB' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
d585cf975b1cfd08e14bfc5eabb46106
22056cb14f80a61b2aa22692fe7fa296734fb711
describe
'8601' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWC' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
4bf435f403219c4f5ffab5be3b1377d6
69a0ddce17f92dcfc1a89ad889a96415e6f337c7
describe
'31751' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWD' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
f9ffd1642e5081e14dda8be7da87681b
4b0660ec0bc4491e0589ca407c0ec56b7ad10e4e
describe
'7577' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWE' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
1c1206d1a5e18b2b91962d1305ba8494
c6f764400d7a9074b0994c673105f8c6b353e0ce
describe
'34883' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWF' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
a80e50138f05581743947357132ecc33
883353d0ab2dbd13ac1560991c304f7ed346a315
describe
'8054' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWG' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
2879bab69ed2f8cc0e4c014335d836b3
92832bc906c6c3cc7bfb4b5e02aac38fddaae64b
describe
'31473' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWH' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
e0a7cc4351cf91aef1742ac40d15dc94
d9f5079f62f98846102c42b8b40eee8365fca7c9
describe
'7659' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWI' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
a5d25fa877e41ebf819acb1749c77a24
5e70e9a522492172102cbe2a5765cce5c95d3367
describe
'37804' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWJ' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
dfb9330ee2d005bff29194e622af9f0f
9223df8fbeef768918be6c7231fa4b9b23fc76e9
describe
'8898' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWK' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
a56d1c1b80118ea4f8b79a71bab487d8
8b610d0d2e456e07fe5ab89a0f7756d8549bd679
describe
'36486' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWL' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
f9935515d676f322871c52bb3338ffe3
3b3aed6d1761937c1e07d940c7f424ae49a8ccbd
describe
'8420' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWM' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
578d6fcced9dfc0af4df15fec4e95417
799810650f99ad5d528eadb4045555dc9a1e6f67
describe
'32337' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWN' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
07a88e08894732f301bc030e9ca4dce2
c116dc69b70fc027122624ae15cec4fa6ca7f7f6
describe
'8002' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWO' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
657f63d54f1676c6fde842fc16f766d3
a3fc377a67a66eb820fe3ab1d9ea58e8908d8d70
describe
'36871' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWP' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
ffb7a7503e4878bca9aafbade52df62c
7e40d4dae40d47c9e28c60fde58f9881866b66c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWQ' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
5e7a649725e46bdef1f58a83e798b7ee
7f2a81b290061428b1c00c1deb3f3091f7e38604
describe
'36407' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWR' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
6c98fa58d1293ff6088063f46727cc0c
723fe0ac979eee03ba4cae9e7c9a70117c6a1deb
describe
'8451' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWS' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
5c932c47bc3c0c9b1af94e98adfc86ef
8be0c73419ec9d63964d027e0db72405020d37b1
describe
'35740' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWT' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
c3b7660becd35d168bd053efd8baed12
f9db8b1ce92ffab157f7ccb96ac7f92656e3182b
describe
'8750' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWU' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
4dd900579275e69683a598004d812b47
f55af20f5f18f2577d9bbc8c185335c9f1607749
describe
'34004' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWV' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
96f015b83f7d0d06d90d58739c73bf0a
a4b31e21248620231bdbf3ef87383d8fb7fc0b43
describe
'8250' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWW' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
a9caf0af17f76a843c58015eb69e00c4
055508226d45a75aabe1aacba398f59b6e9ed419
describe
'39720' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWX' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
cca8b5cd6ed548ed4f00e72e42b4e99c
996795944311236743e2f6f537225f2a023ad3f0
describe
'8765' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWY' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
d6de83edcd10fb6616686dff43eb4472
2066c4c4be15b03b89502b24689c6f8ecb73fd23
describe
'37219' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOWZ' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
5bf9b3c3b56c06af0af87a0ae09cba98
067e494b25d5e2bf1fdc06b23330ff35466c1ba7
describe
'9076' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXA' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
435e1fd0e1910e77fdec72d7d22a6c54
4d87f83a31a790b5f468da9418d49aeb6756c3a3
describe
'37429' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXB' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
5da0777286aefd3d09af32660d6feb39
f90c4395efe26baa29b0c32b3889c2b52446842a
describe
'8637' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXC' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
ec900446bed257fb03ce2734ff2a137c
681d23d69dd5ea5802fbbff0fc87d1cbbc226cf4
describe
'27883' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXD' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
353703a6fe4cc80686ee0abd25e80b03
38eb9bdfcc537267c90f6409cfcced9022658dde
describe
'6891' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXE' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
db70bc80170cb18c6beea4097bc619a2
bb6de4bd4f8d3a6f9dc1baaac54d6c7e37c35573
describe
'40162' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXF' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
518f65507817aac4e3abb6f5d733bddb
a95f9b2aea0e97f1fe0f4e8e82b7c697e212033a
describe
'9400' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXG' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
a5fde1d81947bde397abcd56a10c9021
2f5c0bb91a534a731a367e738e169589a8397252
describe
'29907' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXH' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
406d9eeca36b08217d3759cb05f7c1fd
2ddae64ac223dc2a283861a26b69f8daf721172b
describe
'7365' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXI' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
9819bd337cf2c35bb5634aaf10a3727d
088929112f11cce7e1bf9875c4738b75a8ed22f0
describe
'40498' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXJ' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
f25d684989b3467c29e5935d1202eb2c
d43eafdd300149822ce537464f4c193d3155227a
describe
'9094' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXK' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
6714499551047ed51fab5e6d9f1f943a
75bc5502d2920c341a5f9511774d1a77413ed23c
describe
'32914' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXL' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
c26361fc3a8491695e573e06a182cd77
a1c51a5496c897187a6a2b74b58cc19ce60ee604
describe
'8036' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXM' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
ca961e6d0f709de752ae7cc0c39a64b1
784a080de43c5111c25e93eb2a9e599dd5e0ab8b
describe
'34621' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXN' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
b8c0ac7868b777519fdc2e18e3708cef
ec2cdc91c12be73bd7fa613527190639885f89fc
describe
'8261' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXO' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
ba2726bd7e09392b6653704745b54aa1
00f7e20c91efe955f2ae10cd4b4eb72e06db4443
describe
'30551' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXP' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
2fa802e5444aadc6a4c7b06ba5dbcecb
ebc2b0585bd89375fa40f370c5951e0a867a6dec
describe
'7254' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXQ' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
cfed767f67c5c1a9a6b4e51b47632932
681841912dd13595a062e523c242786c5869da81
describe
'27280' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXR' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
4cf17ff2dbe3be2a06e630073ddc7a70
7e1879c0182180c114a2947e755a23fde6f83efe
describe
'6753' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXS' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
654f168059e3bdb7d13c00e1a1c7e6f5
d66c672679abec2f088ac8a5b8abd7378460092b
describe
'36809' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXT' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
e9e4fc644a63ab6bf034a28fcf7f25bf
f35b4d5875ab2a7b7695eb0d9e743dba9c100d0e
describe
'8667' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXU' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
66caf19095a2a49c96332de811e23605
62207443f58c3c7ace1ca630697f1311ac566b47
describe
'30502' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXV' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
0976f16261a157dec1cb2895a91219f8
a18346c7933801bcc8510366b9926f773d55aa81
describe
'7578' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXW' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
287a15aa723278a9af35a5d258b5c508
a4b4484ee7c5dfaa7180faaf6b51641330f6ba6d
describe
'31145' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXX' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
7c596780a432e4a65a64ad5048467224
84b8da79d6852381a6407bb794a1aec05592c44f
describe
'7616' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXY' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
aaf6565b541ca7c6cac4ed026f95b693
141a3975f0591fd3d286b23701620b68b103043a
describe
'33271' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOXZ' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
f7ec947117886b9b3fba3680d086acd8
353bcf8e08141b143afbbafb042b564f7265112d
describe
'8220' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYA' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
ef4dbcce27cac28c19293992c611fc19
1372cb5d490df5b8a3e253aeb4db1e46e5acdb43
describe
'37672' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYB' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
6619c71bc718765b19e780553e279f9f
076042227f4a7566734ecdeaa68e8df94d37baba
describe
'8614' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYC' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
cc8d3bbaf13f9a594c3cbd5f215f50ad
972395cc79fc0a6c7bc79cfc42f537620a8b09a1
describe
'30425' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYD' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
e2fee6386ea804ad4112831e6883d001
b3d9b3c2f0e4270dd59952400de597aedfa92edd
describe
'7447' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYE' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
fbc94924e0556c2cb797cd8732d1e92d
4f5a1992bc85b59296636e7497a3b85de7d6a495
describe
'39551' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYF' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
ba897361058490b1911b1db58e00ac55
c91fc9e064f46c827677c583f1b8587a2e21875e
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYG' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
fde687a594f7e4d8209faec244bf0679
aae6fce9a21d2dff715fe8c1f6dec5d2746340a7
describe
'39149' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYH' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
f515af4dc1ffeb49544b9a2bc39c90a4
99505c66fc5ff5d732902c8fa5c0540ce20fbef3
describe
'9081' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYI' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
aff41faeb1825d3499cebc85e6cc246e
5d27eee30a839f9f5cdfd371dfffb383b705f727
describe
'41380' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYJ' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
db1059ad39f341da13544aed2cbb334a
08142ad82bcf8382b4d9def163107c831c2212b3
describe
'9607' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYK' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
f1d85e7eb173bf799a06e787d9a9f185
ba337914920557d465dea9598f2c570e0bddc135
describe
'39069' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYL' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
195d29b01b5c4e40815003b1ae685ffa
09ff8552679c5d9c9315b4e2a02f540f04646631
describe
'9074' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYM' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
edabc756256bfa2123f9fde263c5ea15
d5a1feeb8fc3c9d1254fb686993e66f60e5507f5
describe
'21259' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYN' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
0ee352675d12f520f4b246bfccb0d074
5050cb6c10d6903bdbb92dd64cc56f59a97873f3
describe
'5275' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYO' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
73e98d92f26c1a343e40572bb79a94a3
e76c0a64f01d45ce21d84e8802de060b7c4aa742
describe
'33610' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYP' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
9c38b3347466a80c36adecfe399ef6b6
90b8714786bfece09e32ef2e0043fad1733fd2ae
describe
'8792' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYQ' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
1787733c6b455ae23cf806d12b805fae
c47c7d32961198e63cc1cea63c703a9c4bc4741c
describe
'29560' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYR' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
89a0cb3f691baf5426fe6ebf96d7d8d7
3b36f1c6b6e30c0f8ef9dcd783f32eeee14f12d9
describe
'6515' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYS' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
72a2dbbcc7c969d5b58934d11224b790
b3ffef0a6bb2a5685ec159cbc9793cf8c568b061
describe
'28911' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYT' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
c054f84edcbabcb7ef4a775894e6faf4
8830fd75434bf612a270129f6385aa4f3c7ac847
describe
'7169' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYU' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
38b819151e7df50ab2e411d40ec5be29
d8b0608682ad6150333b21cc091d5439f6c69fa4
describe
'34979' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYV' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
b2bd35e67f3f3162b13300bf30c57130
2b332c885912959e510c81b9c9e238017334a050
describe
'8272' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYW' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
f8dccd07da4d2c3060d3edd8568e1c30
f73ea11dd9df5b7cc1905b42de9b3e5fdb4c0797
describe
'24593' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYX' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
fd5b50138d0920456aa426e412a4f3f8
895f30781be7c93ad98dc73901c358607b62bf2d
describe
'6211' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYY' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
09df9782cb2f80027925636bc99a265c
2451ac1d4cbd41ed66198197d18c25084452c12f
describe
'24130' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOYZ' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
abd5e6348b5c18ffec5cef2e4cf0012d
a12bf9041916903703a9bf016ba4e89f390072aa
describe
'6015' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZA' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
6a8df16a0742c466617c7cee728f661d
d76c3e7c114c0531da1cf7ed5e4645385981ea07
describe
'39499' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZB' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
cbb15c92e4ba9c3a40958640971c135f
c662642281f30b40e0c3ea2b956b4560b071265f
describe
'8995' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZC' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
ce1c118f8fa82ae4976cda70884baa86
f3fd9ef883f1978b6e6b7bed04d66fd2a81640d5
describe
'33145' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZD' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
bbf6b783c674b6802e36429eac7132ca
c97be3283a1f665d3a1ed335a3c32a32017b8350
describe
'7935' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZE' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
a8562e7b2f50b12851df773dcc317946
9a01b7a9cf71282ae820f89573cb59cb786edf2a
describe
'36795' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZF' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
001fcc858bb57493646e3ee96f8e945f
02295d275c694381999d37f3c44ea3a44a253550
describe
'8889' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZG' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
3624fce89045c43d22f3f704bdbff259
e5b48d8aae172de636424fda79676926649bfda0
describe
'35658' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZH' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
eee1b5e12dfc401fc2ff1554aa4d8d3b
27603c0c04fd0966fbc8dab5e2d84c2dac71f533
describe
'8578' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZI' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
1cc3f6e3f79ab1b60904b1a977d4ea3d
07727a3fe0bad990a9a8bda164697e40a9449f8a
describe
'32002' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZJ' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
05820b36fe95f0fe0fc6a05de01bb3af
f49214b151d250d6f573cc8822f6ef7095f0bbfc
describe
'7563' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZK' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
e673cdbef626505392ab04c0bbc92f70
98151ea9b1d74cd327078c2c688b281fbb198917
describe
'34190' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZL' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
9e7feb4fa3f05456a220f2cc951bbb7f
29b55ba2081177c05a172845a5b884550c05d8ed
describe
'7708' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZM' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
5c954bfe0c56d9fbca7ae7d2db6147a4
8f2a2785047851669fe7016e1254facb4ba58704
describe
'26979' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZN' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
a51130ddcd237bed22efade85c09e068
d7873b518023e57ca7a9d0e150675c04ead8d905
describe
'6740' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZO' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
2a56e94c612928bc04ae2510ea906e35
07deb1383160a2a0e0368736b58a72f99e8eb347
describe
'18228' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZP' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
02a152b6729a97f4510af7f4b3c8047b
c25990056649f7ee94f8461e03ff53033b30e884
describe
'4648' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZQ' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
7f588b54bf8eaa4ba6dd397c20b4fbc5
bee0f600ee1289026e817563461d6d5a2ae48eed
describe
'28999' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZR' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
e8cd6d87616ed88c6f56c2b042ac3adb
594b5537617fdd32ec560fb0f3ff45aafbbe560a
describe
'7172' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZS' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
ac838c0692e06c37bca4faeb978ed7a5
1c87d1cad305abacc73cd7414d581d8282e8829d
describe
'35739' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZT' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
2b8f86bde0574f70201715fc269ec4f1
57488523532c4137c985290f246f57741d6d9169
describe
'8639' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZU' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
d66229c751c04475add078705e613edf
d2c743c965f241b4f03f65701cf40ea7ae16f39e
describe
'32950' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZV' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
7b0a3e09403b09dd2eccd7aabcd2faa6
1b59f51c034d2166b3468bf6c4f22a1fbaf94cb1
describe
'8109' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZW' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
80082524de0f9c1ea3755c34fc9c381c
3eccd30bf170a64f6af386122367570e14b13462
describe
'38262' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZX' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
8df32c50755677376dbf15507f39c20d
66995562af7d0cab8637cb252d6f4a437e12c66b
describe
'8743' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZY' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
8db1bac784471133f7879168e47e9bc3
70acad2c3093df4f3bff5fec13cde3485db83ee9
describe
'39053' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABOZZ' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
282610a00a0cb8d1932c47813cd08e5f
eec7f19395770cf18f896c3f617cb37f5391ab39
describe
'9232' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAA' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
8042f04ef8736a065e9d6e63d67c62b1
fd79fb2223725be4034024d8389fca1b79645c04
describe
'33333' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAB' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
d6a3ebe6ea44895da9829fff776ed68c
d3bbe4f85aba34598745d8231e3a6e872fbd2554
describe
'7993' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAC' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
0cddbc3d1abd44efaae3a7a5882df3b8
d67cb50053edf4d3693d6db7be2b92b6dec14971
describe
'18912' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAD' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
49cb6ca5ffc8084fa19fe7a9d2f97ff1
1b9d870bbc16496b9e796f97c2ffc2a71adee9c1
describe
'4733' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAE' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
1532eb2a808751b0a456263137e29ef9
12815084173f007b3ac788190a204fb0b2eb15d4
describe
'33394' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAF' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
60cfc074724adfff1418ab16106a0868
af9f444419bdc09a339071e8e847fd4572d6d0f4
describe
'7974' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAG' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
f1dcc489a71d7584742cd64bff32b62b
76fb09d3ef1374f18fe305fa5326a7f307cac41d
describe
'14132' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAH' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
8cefc769394b19360c36f4223aa210d8
76f7413444e102778c61b28d1d1bd73e35b41c36
describe
'3570' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAI' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
d21d401c80d90a2c9eabf98fa7249dd8
aa399992e0e2b196c5beb6cf600bafb1e59c4fe1
describe
'31262' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAJ' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
873b7828c8b3ef2e1147b6d676312248
e8711fa9aabfaddc54e13403af09def0bc8fef21
describe
'6727' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAK' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
8e95c1aefa8b85e49d3bcf31365b28a9
e2fc14792f8bcf87aeb10a97100523d2bd1e7cef
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAL' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
666ea77e3741ccc58352588210bfd176
84ab7c9dc120c5649bf7c66ee60f2edff2177220
describe
'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAM' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
988fd8304ae49305830a39d6c2810e08
5f644e9442ff2eae0d6ab742a25476d40048f829
describe
'24' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAN' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
e925e08256b12aa27a372d9751b18332
b0e79314e5cecce89f50119c5fadd26733c87a87
describe
'437309' 'info:fdaE20081201_AAAABJfileF20081202_AABPAO' 'sip-filesUF00086589_00001.mets'
9ebf8e84c54c015d00064a0182f28fa5
6e83697de95242aebaaec4ebfd7f6719625b53ff
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T07:53:12-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.




a8
UY if THEY MER








att










Seog







f SUS Ee Se bg



Otber books in the same series and by
the same autbor.

THE CENTURY BOOK
FOR YOUNG AMERICANS.

The Story of the Government.

Issued under the auspices
of the National Society of
the Sons of the American Revolution.

With introduction by
GENERAL HORACE PORTER,

President-General of the Society.
THE CENTURY BOOK

OF FAMOUS AMERICANS.

The Story of a Young People’s
Pilgrimage to Historic Homes.







Issued under the auspices
of the National Society of the
Daughters of the American Revolution.
With introduction by
Mrs. ADLAI E. STEVENSON,

President-General of the Society.





Uniform with this book in size and style. Each
containing 250 pages and nearly as many illus-
trations. Price of each, $1.50.

TE See



22S

=
:
:
:
a
:
:
a
:
t
=



























a
a

b
+


THE BATTLE OF LEXINGTON.

APRIL 19, 1775, FROM THE PAINTING BY HENRY SANDHAM, NOW IN THE CARY MEMORIAL BUILDING, LEXINGTON,

”

FOUGHT ‘*PATRIOT’S DAY,
ISSUED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE EMPIRE STATE SOCIETY
OF THE SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Ww CENTURY BOOK @l
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

THE STORY OF THE PILGRIMAGE OF A
PARTY OF YOUNG PEOPLE TO THE BATTLE-
FIELDS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

BERRIDGE = BROOKS

HE CENTUR YOUN
“THE eae ue ioe OK OF FAMOUS A anit CANS,” ‘°A BOY OF THE Est ae
‘HISTORIC BOYS,’ HILDREN’S LIVES OF GREAT MEN” SERIES, ETC.

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW

ILLUSTRATED



TRHEZEEN TUR. COs eNE VW VORK


Copyright, 1897, by The Century Co.

THE DeVINNE PRESS.








INTRODUCTION

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE EMPIRE STATE SOCIETY,
SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. NEW YorK, May 11, 1897.

A FEW years ago the suggestion was made to The Century Company by Mr.
John Winfield Scott, a member of the Executive Committee of the National Society
of the Sons of the American Revolution, appointed a committee of one for the
Executive Committee, that The Century Company should issue a book in which
should be set forth in a manner attractive to young people “the principles contended
for in the American Revolution, and a description of the institutions of the Govern-
ment.” The result of this suggestion was embodied in “The Century Book for
Young Americans,” the story of the trip of a party of young people to the city of
Washington, written by Elbridge S. Brooks and richly illustrated from the great
store of material which the publishers possessed. The book was issued in the autumn
of 1894, indorsed by the National Society, and with an introduction by General
Horace Porter, President-General. Its success has been great, both as a book for
children at home and for supplemental reading in schools, and in 1896 it was followed
by “The Century Book of Famous Americans,” written also by Mr. Brooks, telling
of the adventures of the same young people and their well-posted uncle on a journey
to the homes of historic Americans, Washington, Hamilton, Webster, Clay, Jefferson,
Franklin, Lincoln, Grant, and others. It was issued under the auspices of the
National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

The same publishers purpose offering to the public a volume in which the story
of the American Revolution, from Lexington to Yorktown, shall be told in such a
way as will interest young readers, and, at the same time, possess valuable informa-
tion for old as well as young in its descriptions of the historic scenes made famous
during the struggle of our forefathers for their independence. The book will have
a living and personal interest because it takes the form of a journey to each of these
historic places by the same party of young people and their guide. The illustrations,
which include many photographs taken especially for this book, will add both to the
attractiveness and the value of the work.

The Empire State Society of the Sons of the American Revolution is not respon-
sible for the statements in the book and has no pecuniary interest in its publication.

Individually, I take pleasure in commending the volume both in its scope and
execution. CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW,

President,

vii



































II

III

IV

VI

PAB r ORC ONTENS

IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS.

A Visit to Cambridge— Uncle Tom's Enthusiasm— Three Great Poets and
Three Historic Houses —A City of Memorials— From the Vikings to the Boys

in Blue— Uncle Tom's Suggestion—An Object-Lesson in America’s Revolu-

ON

tionary Story.

LEXINGTON COMMON 5

On the Road to Lexington— Changed Condition re the eerie Stone
Cannon— Lexington Village and Its Famous Common— The Story of the Fight
— The Monument— The Memorials and the Old Houses— Uncle Tom's Sum-
ming-up.

AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS

ON

How They Came to Concord—Dr. Prescott’s Ride— Where the Congress Met—

_ At Concord Fight— The Old Monument — The Statue of the Minute-man— The

Story of the Retreat— Dr. Hale’s Poem — Sites and Scenes in a Famous Old
Town.

BUNKER HILL

Climbing the Monument— The View oe the Top— Tracing the Base
—The Redoubt— Colonel Prescott — Warren and Putnam— The Story of the

. Assault— Victory or Defeat 2 — Webster's Oration — T. ie Tablet on Dorchester

Heights— The First American Victory.

In GREATER NEW YORK

Along the Shore Line— Historic Towns— The British Plan— Ticonderoga and
Quebec— In Old New York — The Battle of Long Island — The Great Retreat
— Harlem Heights and White Plains — The Fall of Fort Washington.



ALONG THE DELAWARE

Where Washington Crossed — The Wintry March — The Dash on Trenton — A
Turning Point in the War — Princeton's Battle-ground — In “The Lair of the

Tiger !”
ix

PAGE

17

35

DD

73

95
VII

VIII

IX

XI

XII

XII

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ON THE SCHUYLKILL AND THEREABOUTS :
By Brandywine Creek — Old-time Obstacles — The Fight at the Ford and on the
Hill — Where Lafayette was Wounded — The Chew House — The Street Fight
at Germantown — A Baffling Fog—At Valley Forge —An Olject-lesson in
Self-sacrifice— At Monmouth Court-house — The Monument at Freehold — A
Gallant Foeman.

Up THE HUDSON : Boe 4%
The Hudson as a Historic ns Gr eat Beacon- rie The Neutral
Ground —The Cow-Chase —Dobbs Ferry —André’s Fate— Stony Point—
Newburgh and West Point— Washington’s Noblest Deed.

PROMENADING WITH BURGOYNE . :
At the Springs— Burgoyne’s Promenade— Or aes and Bennington — vee
and Gates— The “Lone Tree” of Walloomsac— The Bennington Monument—
Across Country to Schuylerville— Freeman's Farms and Bemis Heights— The
Saratoga Monument— The Vacant Niche— The Surrender Spot.

FROM THE SEA TO THE SAND-HILLS .
By Sea to Savannah— Where the British Landed — The ‘Siege of Sane
A City of Monuments — Fascinating Charleston— The Defense of Fort Moultrie
— The Battle of Eutaw Springs.

AMONG THE CAROLINA HIGHLANDS :
The Balny Breezes of Camden — An Old-time Hill-town— The Battle of Camien
— Gates the Blunderer— The Deserted Village—De Kalb’s Monument— The
Hogback of Hobkirk’s Hitl— King’s Mountain and its Hero-story —A Monument
on a Fiilttop.

IN A REGION OF RIVERS :
From King’s Mountain to Cowpens— Why Cee ?— Morgan vs. Teas
The Old Monument—The Statue in Spartanburg— The Hornets’ Nest—A
Land of Liberty—A Splendid Battle-park— The Field of Guilford—A Most
Important Battle. .

ON THE HEIGHTS ABOVE YORK

The Sun on the Monument— After Guilford— Marion's opie Cornwallis at
Bay— The French Alliance— The Last Assault— The Surrender— Old York-
town — Home Again.

115

139

159

175

193

229
ie CON RORY BOOK Ol:
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION
nt



“THE BROAD STONE SEAT OF THE LONGFELLOW MEMORIAL.”

In the distance is seen Craigie House, which was Washington’s headquarters and Longfellow’s home.
MibeCEN TUR BROOK
OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

CEE AE Real
IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS

A Visit to Cambridge—Uncle Tom’s Enthusiasm— Three Great Poets
and Three Historic Houses—A City of Memorials—From the Vikings
to the Boys in Blue—Uncle Tom's Suggestion—An Object-Lesson in
America’s Revolutionary Story.

BS eS HAT a spot this is, boys and girls!” Uncle Tom Dunlap
\ exclaimed, with an impressive sweep of the hand. ‘The
(| atmosphere is fairly charged with patriotism; the air throbs
with memories. I know of no spot in the whole country
that is more absolutely a center of American interest than
this old town of Cambridge. I know of none better calcu-
lated to make you young people proud of America and of what America has
done.”

Uncle Tom spoke with more than his customary enthusiasm, It was
evident that he felt all that he said.

He sat with his young people on the broad stone seat of the Longfellow
Memorial in the old college town of Cambridge in Massachusetts. It was
the same group of boys and girls that had gathered about him, as, on their
personally conducted trip to Washington, he helped them study the gov-
ernment of the United States of America in its own house and home; it
was the same group of eager young people that had taken, with him, the
tour of inspection among the homes of great and famous Americans.

Once again they had all met in Boston—Jack and Marian Dunlap,
their cousin, Albert Upham, and Marian’s “best friend,” Christine Bacon.
Uncle Tom Dunlap, as usual, had taken charge of them, and that morn-

I Tt






2 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

ing they had welcomed, at their hotel, their boy friend of the a z
Roger Densmore.

Their first trip had been to Cambridge.

“We did n’t see half enough when we were there before,” Bert com-
plained.

“That ’s so,” Roger admitted. ‘We ought to give more time to it.
There ’s lots to see there, you know; and besides, it’s a good place to
start from if you want to see more things. Is n’t that so, Uncle Tom?”

Uncle Tom emphatically indorsed this statement, and they were speed-
ily flying in “the electrics” through that wonderful piece of modern engi-
neering, the big underground “Subway,” out through Boston’s stately
Back Bay, and across the graceful Harvard Bridge, to what Uncle Tom
called ‘“‘the classic shades” of Cambridge.

Roger, as a prospective Harvard boy, had been their guide through
the beautiful University town; and even Jack, who was preparing for Yale,
and Bert, whose educational future still lay unsettled between Princeton,
Yale, and Cornell, were forced to admit that Harvard and its surroundings
were, as Jack declared with characteristic emphasis, “ Just great!”



ONE OF THE NEW GATES AT HARVARD.

Under Roger’s guidance they had “done” the colleges from the beauti-
ful gates to the dormitories and the “gym,” from Memorial Hall to the
Agassiz Museum, and from the Fogg Art Museum and the Library to the
tennis-courts on Jarvis Field, the “tree” in the quadrangle where the class-
day scramble is held, and—what especially interested the girls—the
rounded walls of Radcliffe.

From here, after reading the tablet under the decrepit Washington elm,
EN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS 3

they had wandered up Brattle Street, and, entering the green little park
known as the Longfellow Memorial, they had dropped upon its broad
granite seat to rest and look about them.



LEIF ERICSON, THE NORSEMAN.

This statue, by Miss Whitney, is located on Commonwealth Avenue, in Boston, just above
where that boulevard is crossed by Massachusetts Avenue, which extends for
nearly twenty miles to Lexington and Concord.

Then it was that Uncle Tom uttered his exclamation. So suggestive
was the spot that the boys and girls unconsciously echoed his sentiments ;
though Bert, ever ready with his query of investigation, tacked to his
appreciative “that ’s so!” his inevitable “but why?”

“Tl tell you why, Mr. Bert,” his uncle replied. ‘Stand up, all of you,
while I box the patriotic compass. Before you, if certain over-confident
antiquarians are to be believed, lie the beginnings of historic America.”

_ «What! over there in the swamp?” asked Jack.

“The marsh, if you please, sir,” corrected Roger. ‘The idea of calling

Longfellow’s beloved marshes a swamp!”
4 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“Yes, there, through its marshes, winds the historic Charles River,
upon whose banks, almost against the Cambridge Hospital yonder, Pro-
fessor Horsford claimed to have discovered the cellar of Leif Ericson’s
fish-house—the first stone house, so he declared, built by Europeans in
America, almost five hundred years before the caravels of Columbus tacked
across the ‘herring-pond.’”

“Leif Ericson!” exclaimed Marian. ‘Was n’t his the beautiful statue
we saw on Commonwealth Avenue?”

“ Ves,” Uncle Tom assented.

“Oh, but he’s just a ‘fake,’” Jack declared. ‘‘ My teacher said so.”

“You don’t really believe that story, do you, Uncle Tom?” queried
Bert, with a tinge of skepticism.

“TJ “ll discuss that question with you later, boys—say at Norumbega
Tower?” Uncle Tom replied, with a non-committal shrug.

“Oh! what ’s Norumbega Tower?” Christine asked, attracted by the
rhythm of the name.

“It’s a stone tower on the Charles River, ten miles above here,” Roger ex-
7 : -seeeea plained. “Professor Horsford put it up,
onthe very rocks which, so he said, were
part of the fort and city of Norumbega,
built by Leif Ericson the Norseman in
the year one thousand and one. It’s
an awfully nice place for a picnic, girls.
And the canoeing !—well, you must
just see it before you go home.”

‘“Which—the town or the canoe-
ing?” laughed Marian.

“Both,” replied Roger, gallantly,
“one is historic and you ’ll make the
other so.”

“And there we ‘ll have our dis-
cussion over Leif Ericson,” said Uncle
Tom. “Just now’I wish to consider
other things with you. Only, permit
me to remark, ladies and gentlemen,
the singular coincidence that places
Leif Ericson’s stone house here, on

NORUMBEGA TOWER. the Charles, within sight of the house
Erected on a knoll above the river. The tablet set in its face of the great poet who wrote ‘The

tells the whole story. A flight of stone steps within i 5°97
leads to the outlook on the top. Skeleton in Armor.


IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS 5



LONGFELLOW’S HOME AT CAMBRIDGE.

The famous Craigie House, used by Washington for his headquarters in Cambridge. The room on the right of the front
door was Washington’s office and Longfellow’s study. The chamber over it was the General’s bedroom.

“That ’s so!” cried Jack. ‘Perhaps that sad old sea-dog stood right
here where we stand to-day, and shouted

‘I am a viking bold!

My deeds, though manifold,

No skald in song has told,
No saga taught thee!

Take heed that in thy verse

Thou dost the tale rehearse,

Else dread a dead man’s curse —
For this I sought thee!’

Look out! Marian; he may be right behind you now,” and Jack ended
his quotation with so shrill a viking’s “‘skoal!” that Marian jumped aside in
terror, and everybody else laughed.

“Let the viking rest, Jack,” said Uncle Tom. “True or not, here is
the beginning of the story, and, perhaps, though scholars scoff at the idea,
the beginnings of the white man in America. Let me get on with my com-
pass. Behind you, rising above its tall green hedge, is Longfellow’s house,

r*
6 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

—a Mecca for Cambridge pilgrims. There he wrote ‘The Skeleton in
Armor’; there he wrote ‘Paul Revere’s Ride’; there he wrote ‘The Build-
ing of the Ship’—that splendid poem that drew tears from President Lin-
coln in the dreary war-days, and which, with its stirring closing lines, has
thrilled countless Americans for over forty years. And in that very house,
long before Longfellow was born, George WVcshington lived, when, here in
Cambridge, he ae command of the American army.”



















































LONGFELLOW’S STUDY.

Occupied by Washington as his military office. Behind it is the poet’s library, which was used
as a staff-room by General Washington.

“Under that big elm, you EnOuGy put in Roger, “that you saw in front
of Radcliffe College. They say it’s over three hundred years old.”

‘“What—the college?” said Jack.

“The.collevel” chee Marian, scornfully ; “the elm, of course. What
a goose you are, Jack Dunlap! Don’t you know the girls’ college is some-
thing new?”

“ Oh, is it?” said Jack. ‘I did n’t suppose there was anything new in
Cambridge. I thought the flavor of antiquity covered everything here,—
IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS 7

Leif Ericson, Washington, Radcliffe, and Harvard’s last base-ball victory
over Yale.”

Uncle Tom paid no attention to Jack’s rather flippant remarks, but took
up the thread of his broken discourse.

“To your right,” he said, “there, beyond the trees of the Common,
stood, until a few years ago, next to what is now the fine Law School
building, the old-fashioned, roomy, gambrel-roofed house where lived the
boy Oliver Wendell Holmes, who afterward wrote ‘Old Ironsides’ there.”

“Nail to the mast that tattered flag,
Set every threadbare sail,
And give her to the god of storms,
The lightning and the gale,”

spouted Jack.

“Only they did n't, you know,” said Roger. ‘The frigate Constitution
—‘Old Ironsides,’ as she was called—was built here in Boston, and is
scheduled to drop anchor this year at the Navy Yard, at the mouth of this
very Charles River.”

“Just think of it,” said Chris- _
tine, “what lots of things of that —
sort there are around Boston!”

“Why not? It’s the Hub of
the Universe—eh, Roger?” Jack
said, in what the Boston boy de-
clared to be “the regular New
York tone.”

“Well, right here is where the
American Revolution commenced,
so why is n't it the hub?” de-
manded Bert.

‘Why not?” was Uncle Tom’s
comment ‘And in. the ~old
Holmes house near the Law
School, of which I told you, the
Committee of Safety held its



meetings when the American Rev- STAIRWAY IN THE OLD HOLMES MANSION.
1 . . 2 an To the right, at the foot of the stairs, was the room in which the
olution was beginning. nNere, occupation of Bunker Hill was planned.

too, at the opening of the fight,
were held the first councils of war, for that home was the headquarters of
the first American commander-in-chief, General Artemas Ward.”
8 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“What! Artemus Ward, the funny man?” cried Jack. ‘Was he a
general in the Revolution?”

‘No, no, Jack; how mixed up you do get!” said Roger. ‘“ Why, my fa-
ther heard Artemus Ward
lecture; so he could n't
have been a general in
the Revolution.”

“That’s only a make-
believe name—what you
call a xom de plume,”
Bert explained? “Your
Artemus Ward, Jack, was
America’s first funny



man; his real name was
Browne. Uncle Tom’s
Artemas Ward was
America’s first major-



general—the command-
| er-in-chief before Wash-

ELMWOOD, THE HOME OF JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL. ington took command.

Here Benedict Arnold and his Connecticut Volunteers were quartered just after the Is nt that so U n cle
battle of Lexington. The house was used as a hospital after Bunker Hill. T >» 2
om:

“That ’s about it, Bert,” his uncle replied, with his smile of approval.

“Tt’s just another coincidence, the same as Longfellow and the viking’s
house, I suppose,” said Marian. ‘Goon, Uncle Tom; Jack does break
in so.”



“Over here to your left, across the tree-tops,” Uncle Tom went on,
“stands Elmwood, the house in which James Russell Lowell lived, and
where he wrote what, I think, is America’s noblest poem — his splendid
‘Commemoration Ode.’”

“Oh, yes, is n’t that fine!” said Christine. ‘Don’t you remember how
it ends? I had to learn those lines at school.

‘O Beautiful! my Country! ours once more!
Smoothing thy gold of war-disheveled hair
O’er such sweet brows as never other wore,

And letting thy set lips,

Freed from wrath’s pale eclipse,
The rosy edges of their smile lay bare,
What words divine of lover or of poet
Could tell our love and make thee know it,
IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS 9

Among the nations bright beyond compare?
What were our lives without thee?
What all our lives to save thee?

We reck not what we gave thee;
We will not dare to doubt thee,
But ask whatever else, and we will dare.’”

“Grand, is it not, boys and girls?” Uncle Tom exclaimed, baring his
head to that magnificent sentiment of the poet.

«And that ’s where Lowell wrote it— over there at Elmwood, is it?”
said Jack. ‘Seems to me there must be something in the Cambridge air
that just sets poetry a-sprouting; who knows what might happen if I should
come here to Harvard, eh, Roger?”

Jack a poet! The idea was so funny that they all fell to laughing, much
to Jack’s disgust. When they had sobered down, Uncle Tom went to
boxing his compass again.

“The Elmwood house is very much like Longfellow’s home, and has,
like Longfellow’s, a Revolutionary history. It was the mansion of Andrew
Oliver, the Tory Lieuten-
ant-Governor of Massachu-
setts, and it was mobbed
by the angry patriots be-
cause Oliver took charge of
the hated British stamps
that brought about the row.
After Oliver left the country
the house became the home
of Elbridge Gerry, one of
the signers of the Declara-
tion of Independence.”

“Well, well; Cambridge
was ‘right in it,’ from the
stare. was. ot. 1°? said

Jack.

“T told you it was a













THE WADSWORTH HOUSE.
center of American inter- Bui in 1726 for the president of the college. A British shell just grazed it, and

ests,” said Uncle Tom. Washington, who had ees it, removed to safer quarters in the Craigie House.
‘Now, just keep still for a moment, will you, and let me try to give you the
steps in American history that we can lay our fingers on, right here in Cam-
bridge-town. There, on the Charles, the Norsemen, so it is said (let us
grant, for the sake of historic steps, that they did), built the first house in


IO THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

America. In those college buildings, in Harvard Square, or in the older
ones that these have replaced, have gone to school men who built them-



NEIGHBORS ON “TORY ROW,” IN CAMBRIDGE, TALKING OVER THE TROUBLES.

selves and their memories into the history of the republic. Here met the
Provincial Congress, the Committee of Safety, and the council of war in
the days that precipitated the American Revolution. Yonder is the old
church whose organ-pipes the rebel soldiers melted into bullets for Bunker
Hill. Wadsworth House in the College yard, and the Longfellow house,
upon which we are looking, were both occupied by Washington when he
came here to Cambridge to organize revolution. Along Brattle Street, in-
cluding the Longfellow house, stood the fine old loyalist mansions that gave
the street its nickname of “Tory Row.” Under that old elm by Radcliffe,
General George Washington took command of the American army, and
upon the Common, beyond it, that army was drawn up for review. On that
Common, Roger showed you the sturdy young elm grown from a shoot of the
old elm and planted there in the centennial year of 1875. Close by the young
elm rises the tall monument, topped by a splendid soldier-figure, in memory
of the men of Cambridge who rallied to the defense of the flag in the Civil
IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS Il



THE WASHINGTON ELM.

Under this tree Washington took command of the American Army, July 3, 1775. Radcliffe College is on the right in
the picture. Cambridge Common, with the growing shoot from the old elm, is at the left.

War. Across the trees, overlooking all Cambridge, rises the imposing tower
of Memorial Hall, an honor in stone paid by the great University to all her
brave sons who fell in defense of the Union; and, just across the river,
Te THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

stretches the wide meadow upon which the college boys meet in the glori-
ous tussle for mastery in base-ball and foot-ball. It is called Soldiers’ Field,
a gift to the college, and perpetuating by its name, as does Memorial Hall,
the brave boys in blue who marched to defend what Americans in Cam-
bridge, a century before, first strove for and attained. Was I not right
when I told you the atmosphere hereabouts was charged with patriotism,
that it just throbbed with memories? And, of these memories, two stand
out above all others — the two so singularly linked by that old square, yel-
low house across the way, in which these two
men lived and labored for America, though
in such different fashion—Washington the
soldier, and Longfellow the poet; the man
whose sword and the man whose pen have
inscribed imperishable names in the history of
the republic that so loves and honors them.”
‘Somehow, Uncle Tom,” said Christine, just
a bit dreamily, as she leaned against the stone
coping of the Longfellow Memorial and looked
across the street to what had so long been the
poet’s home, “I keep thinking of what Long-
fellow himself wrote after he had stood, one
p morning, before Lowell’s gate at Elmwood.
PAUL REVERE. Does n't it fit both the great men who have
lived over the way, and the others, too, who
have made Cambridge famous? I wonder if I can remember the last
lines:



‘Sing to him, say to him, here at his gate,

Where the boughs of the stately elms are meeting,
Some one hath lingered to meditate

And send him unseen this friendly greeting ;

‘That many another hath done the same,

Though not by a sound was the silence broken;
The surest pledge of a deathless name

Is the silent homage of thoughts unspoken.’”

“That’s awfully nice, Christine, of course,” said Jack, while all the others
nodded approval, ‘only I call it rather rough on Uncle Tom, after he ’s
been spouting away here for half an hour.”

Christine colored up at Jack’s bit of sarcasm. ‘‘ You don’t understand
what I mean, Jack,” she said. ‘But Uncle Tom does,” and, with a con-
IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS 13

fident smile, she slipped her hand into that of their “guide, philosopher, and
friend,” as Bert loved to call his uncle.

As for that young gentleman, he was trying to dovetail history and
poetry into a fixed fact. For Longfellow’s name and Revolutionary sur-



OLD NORTH CHURCH, SALEM STREET, BOSTON.
From which, on the night of April 18, 1775, Revere’s signal-lights were hung. It is now
known as Christ Church. The spire is a new one, built since 1804. A tablet on
the front gives the story of the lanterns.

roundings had recalled to Bert’s mind the poet's stirring ballad of a certain
famous gallop that had set the fires of liberty ablaze.

“Let’s see, Uncle Tom; Paul Revere did n't ride through Cambridge,
did he?” Bert inquired.

“No, his route lay through Charlestown and Medford. But Cambridge
had its ‘fate-of-a-nation’ rider in William Dawes. He was Paul Revere's
double, and he set out for Concord even before Paul Revere started. Of
course,” continued Uncle Tom, ‘you know the story, and why Revere rode
14 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

with news. The people were restless; they were angry with the King of

England for his tyranny, and were ready to protest in something more than

words. The King’s men in Boston were watchful and active; they knew

the spirit of the people, and hastened to possess themselves of the war-stores
the people were gathering at different
points about Boston. Their spies were
abroad; they knew where the muni-
tions of war were stored; they set out
to destroy them. One _ expedition
cleared them out at Salem; another
successfully raided the old powder-
house at Winter Hill.”

“That old powder-house is. still
standing, you know,” broke in Roger.
“The city of Somerville has made a
public park of the hill on which it

‘ stands. I want you to see it before



”
you go.

“We must, Roger,” said Uncle
m. “Itis one of the few really Rev-

OLD POWDER-HOUSE, SOMERVILLE. To : Es y
Formerly a mill. Here in September, 1774, British olutionary relics left us hereabouts.
soldiers seized and carried off the colony’s Well the Committee of Safety was

)

store of powder.

sitting in Cambridge; a watch -was set
to keep an eye on the King’s men, and when William Dawes rode through
the little college town with word that the regulars were to march to Con-
cord next day to destroy the stores collected there, the minute-men gath-
ered, and from Cambridge and all the near-by towns marched toward Con-
cord to help save the powder and stores upon which their success depended.
Some of the men belonging to this section gathered here for their work,
and, as they straggled past the Holmes house, where, years after, the poet
was born, the Cambridge minister stood in the doorway and bade his neigh-
bors Godspeed on their errand. Next day—the historic nineteenth of
April, 1775—-came that famous fight.”

“Oh, Uncle Tom, can’t we go to Lexington and see where the battle was
fought?” cried Marian, full of enthusiasm to find herself so near the scene
of that world-renowned conflict.

“Why not?” said Uncle Tom. “I think it would be an excellent plan
for us to ridé to Lexington and Concord, to-morrow, and recall the story of
the fight on the very spot. What do you say, Roger?”

“I say yes,” Roger replied, catching the spirit of the suggestion. “If
IN CAMBRIDGE WITH PATRIOTS AND POETS 15

you say so, I ll get a wagonette and we ’ll start from here bright and
early.”

“A patriotic picnic, eh?” said Jack. ‘I vote for it with both hands.”

The plan was unanimously agreed to. And so it came to pass that,
next day, Uncle Tom and his tourists, coming out from Boston after an
early breakfast, rode from Cambridge along the very road over which, so
many years before, the British red-coats had marched on their hostile
errand. For, as Uncle Tom said, there is nothing like getting the lay of
the land if you really wish to understand things; and, just then, there was
nothing his young people wished more to understand than just how things
looked on the village green at Lexington and that famous North Bridge
at Concord, where once

“the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world.”

Thus it was that the tour of the Revolutionary battle-fields was begun by
Uncle Tom Dunlap and his young Americans.









































































































































































































































































































ACROSS THE MARSHES.

View from the piazza of the Craigie House, looking south.


LEXINGTON COMMON.

To the left the road runs on toward Concord. The real battle-ground is further to the right, and there the later memorials stand.

The old battle monument is in the foreground.
Ci Artest)
ON LEXINGTON COMMON

On the Road to Lexington—Changed Condition of the Country— The Stone
Cannon—Lexington Village and Its Famous Common— The Story of
the Fight— The Monument— The Memorials and the Old Houses—
Uncle Tom’s Summing-up.







[Sai HE wagonette, with its freight of battlefield students, left the
f° %| college quarter of Cambridge on a glorious morning.

“What a day for a ride, and what a ride to take!”

was the composite remark of the five happy ones, as, with

ie Uncle Tom in the corner, and a driver who, though Cam-

: bridge-born and bred, knew little beyond his horses, they

drove by Wadsworth House, and past the old First Church and the
ancient mile-stone.

In the shadow of the Washington elm,—which, by the way, a certain

learned professor of American history says is no Washington elm—but

who will agree with him?—the horses turned to the tight and were
soon chasing the electrics up the wide thoroughfare of North Avenue to



(eS
esl

CO)






CY

FE
ey

?








Arlington.

Through that pleasant old town they rode, and were speedily on the
Concord turnpike, following the track taken by Dawes, the messenger of
danger, and by Smith, with his files of destroying red-coats, on that starlit
April night so many years before.

“Do you suppose it was much built up here in the days of the Revolu-
tion, Uncle Tom?” Marian inquired.

“Scarcely at all, my dear,” her uncle replied. “The highway from
Cambridge to Lexington Common ran then through farmlands, with but
an occasional house beside it. One hundred and twenty years in this
growing country make quite a difference in the looks of things, you know.
When the Revolution broke out, Arlington, which we have just left behind

2 17


18 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

us, was known as Menotomy; this section through which we are now
riding was called Cambridge Farms, and Lexington village was a collection
of a few houses, grouped about the meeting-house on the green, and with
a population, in village and outlying farms, of scarcely more than five hun- .
dred. To-day the town has a population of five thousand. This is why
it is hard, in this country, for the antiquarian to locate historic events.
The march of improvement and the growth of population have been so great
that old landmarks have been swept away; roads have been widened and
graded, hills leveled, valleys filled, streams obliterated, villages merged into
towns, and towns into Cities, and the whole face of the land so changed and
‘adapted’ that one who seeks to point out the exact spot where some
famous man was born, or some notable event occurred, has to draw upon
his imagination, and give the atmosphere rather than the exact surround-
ings. Pray bear that in mind, boys and girls, when we are trying to dis-
cover or replace the relics of our historic past.”

“But can you really call the battle of Lexington a battle, Uncle Tom?”
inquired Bert.

“In the strict military sense,” Uncle Tom replied, ‘it was not a battle ;
it was scarcely even a skirmish. A battle conveys the idea of military
manceuvers, of strategy, charge and countercharge, the shock of squadrons,
or the duels of artillerists. There were none of these at Lexington. In
the sense that Saratoga and Gettysburg, Waterloo and Sedan were battles,
Lexington, of course, is, as Jack would say, ‘not in it.”

“Very kind of you, Uncle Tom,” said Jack, with an air of injured inno-
cence, “to charge up all your convenient slang against me. But go ahead;
I’m not objecting.”

“ Lexington,” Uncle Tom resumed, with a wave of recognition toward
Jack, ‘was simply an ‘affair.’ It was an organized resistance to what was
considered an unlawful violation of the rights of English subjects — for the
colonies were English still; they were not in open nor armed rebellion.
Indeed, the records on both sides, after the fight at Lexington, are filled
with affidavits made by American and British participants in the affair,
alleging that no hostile move was intended, and that no open resistance was
made. You see, neither side wished to take the responsibility of saying
‘We began the war.’ The action of the minute-men was an armed protest
rather than a real battle. But its results were unparalleled by any battle
of ancient or modern times; for from it sprang the American Revolution,
and the American Revolution was the corner-stone of American nationality
and of the world’s progress in liberty.”

“Yes, I know,” said Bert; “I have read somewhere that Samuel Adams,
ON LEXINGTON COMMON 1g

when he heard the firing at Lexington, exclaimed: ‘This is a glorious
morning for America.’”

“Samuel Adams was a prophet, Bert,” Uncle Tom replied. “He
looked beyond the present; he read the future correctly; he knew the



a : a
KING’S CHAPEL, BOSTON,

In front of which Lord Percy’s reinforcement of British soldiers formed for the march to relieve their comrades at Lexington. ‘The chapel
was built in 1749. Some of the Colonial governors and other people of note in colony days are buried in the old cemetery adjoining.
temper of the people and saw that out of that conflict would spring, through
all the colonies, the determination to be free. That is why the country
through which we are riding and the town we are approaching are as

famous as Thermopylae, or Waterloo, or Sedan.”
20 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

So, with talk and laughter, with eyes open to see the beauty of the
rural landscape, and ears attentive to all the details of the day that made
the region famous, they rode to Lexington. The highway ran on past

DESTRUCTION or rox TEA um BOSTON HARBOUR.



From an old print.

stretches of green fields, patches of woodland, trim market-gardens, and
suburban estates, with here a modern house, and close beside it a patri-
archal relic of colony days.’

They drove slowly by every tablet set in fence or wall or house front
telling them that here such an event occurred or that there lived such an
one who participated in the fight, until, at last, they climbed the slope
where, before the temple-like High School building, a mounted cannon,
carved in stone, pointed toward the clustering houses of Lexington just
beyond.

“What is it—a petrified British battery?” queried Jack.

“Well, you ’re not so far out of the way, Jack,” Uncle Tom replied.
“That stone cannon marks the site of the British battery with which Lord .
Percy hoped to petrify the fighting colonists.”

“And did he?” asked Marian.

“Well, hardly,” exclaimed Roger, with pardonable pride.

“Go slow, my dear Boston boy,” said Uncle Tom. “I am afraid the
truth of history scarcely bears out your enthusiasm. If to petrify means to
check, the field-piece of Lord Percy, planted where the stone tablet stands
<< JON LEXINGTON COMMON 21

and on that hill-top over there, on ‘Percy Road’ across the way, certainly
did check the advance of the pursuing colonists as they drove the tired red-
coats through the village we are now entering.”

They found Lexington to be, as they rode through its main street, a
large and pleasant New England village —‘ quite citified,” Marian declared,
as she noted its brick blocks, its spacious and attractive houses, its modern
school and church buildings, and its signs of trade and life. There were
trees everywhere, whose leafy boughs cast a grateful shade upon the broad
street and the triangular plot of green before which the driver reined up
his horses and Uncle Tom bade them all alight.

“This, boys and girls,” he said, “is one of the most famous bits of turf
in all America —the battlefield of Lexington Common!”

Then, standing beside the pulpit-shaped monument of red granite that
marks the site of the old meeting-house, Uncle Tom briefly rehearsed the
story of the Lexington fight.

“You know how it all came about,” he said. ‘The tea had been thrown
overboard at that wharf we saw in Boston. There was trouble brewing. The
British were on the hunt for hidden war-supplies. Gage, the English com-



THE “TEA-PARTY” TABLET.

On the entrance to what is now Long Wharf, Boston. There the tea-ships Dartmouth, Eleanor, and Beaver lay, when their
cargoes of tea were thrown into the harbor.

mander at Boston, had sent out soldiers to collect or destroy the powder
and stores said to be gathered for war purposes by the colonists. Follow-
ing out this plan, he had sent troops to Concord, eighteen miles from Bos-

2*
22 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



THE HANCOCK-CLARK HOUSE, LEXINGTON.

‘It belonged to relatives of John Hancock, and there he and Adams were sleeping when roused and warned by Paul Revere.” ”
It is within sight from the boulder tablet. It was built in 1695, enlarged in 1734.

ton, where, he had been told, war supplies were stored. They were also to
arrest, on their way, those two persistent rebels and ringleaders, John
Hancock and Samuel Adams. By some means (it is said through the wife
of Gage, a New Jersey woman) the secret leaked out, the signal lanterns
were displayed in the North Church of Boston, and Paul Revere and Wil-
liam Dawes rode, by different roads, toward Concord, spreading the alarm.
On that very night of the eighteenth of April, Gage sent Colonel Smith
with eight hundred British soldiers on the errand of destruction. Boston
had no bridges, so the troops were ferried across the Charles River from
what is now the Public Garden or Arlington street to East Cambridge, then
called Lechmere Point. They marched across the marshes, and, striking
the Concord highway, where now stretches Massachusetts Avenue, passed
through North Cambridge, Arlington, and Lexington. Here where we
stand, by this pulpit-like monument and that elm-tree back of us (planted
by President Grant on the nineteenth of April, 1875), stood the old meeting-
house —a square, boxlike building facing down the street, up which, just
as we have come, marched Major Pitcairn and his six companies of light
ON LEXINGTON COMMON 23

infantry and marines sent in advance by Colonel Smith to clear the way,
_and, if possible, to arrest Hancock and Adams.”

“Where were they?” inquired Roger.

“In that house which you can just see on the Bedford road across the
railroad track,” Uncle Tom replied, pointing out the old Hancock-Clark
House. ‘It belonged to relatives of John Hancock, and there he and
Adams were sleeping when roused and warned by Paul Revere. They es-
caped to the woods,
though against
Hancock’s desires,
for he wished to
stay and face the
British. With them,
too, escaped young
Dorothy Quincy,
who afterwards be-
came Mrs. John
Hancock.”

‘‘Oh, was n’t she
the delightful ‘ Dor-
othy Q.’ of Holmes’s
poem?” exclaimed
Christine. “I re-
member he says of
her portrait :

‘Hold up the canvas full

in view —

Look! there ’s a rent the
light shines through,

Dark with a century’s
fringe of dust:

That was a Red-Coat’s PORTRAIT OF DOROTHY QUINCY (“DOROTHY Q.”)
rapier thrust!’ ” Showing injuries received from British bayonets during the Revolution.

“Ah no,” replied Uncle Tom, ‘that charming young lady —she was
young, you know, Christine,—

‘Grandmother’s mother; her age I guess,
Thirteen summers, or something less,’—

was aunt to the Dorothy Q. who married Hancock. They were captivating


24 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

young ladies, both of them; but really we must tear ourselves away from
them, for here comes Major Pitcairn ready to pop into us.

‘Lexington, as you know, had been warned of the coming of the regu-
lars by Paul Revere, and, at two o’clock in the morning, the bell of the
church, which hung, not in the church steeple,— for the church had no stee-
ple,— but in an odd kind of belfry built on the ground very near the church,
rang out the summons. The Lexington farmers (who were called minute-
men, because they were pledged to rally in case of danger ‘at a minute’s
notice’) hurried to the meeting-house, but as there were no signs of the
British the minute-men were dismissed. At half-past four news came of the
advance; the drum beat to arms; out of the Buckman Tavern,—that old
house by the elm-tree, just over the way,—and from other houses near by,
the minute-men came hurrying to the Common. Their leader was Captain
John Parker, a big, brave man. He drew his men in line right here,” and
Uncle Tom led his tourists to the big granite boulder ten rods to the right
of the meeting-house memorial. ‘He sent such of his men as had no am-
munition into the meeting-house where the powder was stored, and then he
said—what did he say, Marian?
Read what is carved on the
boulder, just beneath the mus-
ket and powder-horn.”

Then Marian read from the
carved boulder Captain Parker’s
words to the minute-men:
“«Stand your ground. Don’t
fire unless fired upon; but if
they mean to have a war, let it



begin here.’”
: ‘Here, then, they stood,”
THE BUCKMAN TAVERN. continued Uncle Tom, “ seventy

Rallying-place of the minute-men on the night before the battle

of Lexington and directly opposite the battle-field. Lexington farmers, against they

knew not how many British
soldiers, trained in the art of killing. Through the dim light of the early
morning came the red-coats. They halted near the meeting-house, and
Major Pitcairn rode toward the Americans. “‘Disperse, ye villains; ye
rebels, disperse!’ he commanded. But they would not.”
“Well, I guess not,” cried Jack, who was growing excited over the story.
“That was n’t what they were there for.”
“Pitcairn flourished his sword before the Americans,” Uncle Tom went
on, ‘‘and, I am sorry to say, swore at them, and added, ‘Lay down your
ON LEXINGTON COMMON 25



i

THE STONE BOULDER ON LEXINGTON COMMON.

Jonathan Harrington’s house is the one on the left. To the front door, seen in the picture, he dragged himself to die at
his wife’s feet.

*

arms, I say. Why don’t you lay down your arms and disperse?’ Still they
did not obey, and what he would have done next or just how he would have
made them disperse I cannot say. For, as I told you, the British had no
wish to begin hostilities, and Pitcairn really did not desire to fire upon the
rebels. But just then one of the minute-men,— probably a ‘fresh’ young
fellow, Jack, who was excited, heedless, and ‘worked’ up,—in disregard of
Captain Parker’s order, raised his gun and snapped it at the British.”

“Good for him!” cried Jack.

“What, against orders, Jack?” said Bert.

“T don’t care; I would have done it too,” Jack declared.

“Yes, I’m afraid you would, Jack,” his uncle assented with a significant
nod, and then added, ‘The gun, you know, was one of the old-fashioned flint-
lock muskets,— perhaps it was n’t loaded, perhaps the minute-man snapped
it ‘just for a bluff,’ as you boys say. At any rate the gun did not go off; but
the flint struck the steel and the powder flashed in the pan. A British
soldier saw the flash; he saw his major turn to give an order of some sort,
26 ' THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

and, just as much ‘rattled’ as the minute-man, he aimed and fired. A few
other British soldiers followed suit. But no one was injured, and the
Americans supposed the guns were loaded with blank cartridges and that
the whole affair was just a scare. But the British blood was aroused, and
though Pitcairn struck his staff into the ground as an order to desist firing,

his soldiers disregarded or did not qace end his command. With a eva
huzza they fired a general discharge. The musket-
balls plowed into the ‘rebel’ ranks. Jonas Parker
dropped to his knees; Ebenezer Munroe’s arm fell
helpless at his side; now one and now another of that
heroic band sank beneath British bullets; up the street
came the tramp of the main body of grenadiers,
marching to the support of their comrades. Eight
hundred against seventy was unequal odds. The
minute-men had done what they were assembled to
do: they had made their protest; and with a few
scattering shots in reply, the minute-men dispersed.’
The British, wreathed in the smoke of the deadly
volley they had just fired, let fly another broadside,



THE MEETING-HOUSE

BELFRY. gave a cheer of victory, and, wheeling about, marched
Built in 1761. It formerly stood on to Concord ek
on the common, but it is now ‘
on Belfry Hill opposite the The young people drew a deep breath as Uncle

Hancock school-house.

Tom concluded, and looked about them.

“And here it happened,” said Marian. ‘My, my, it does n’t seem possible!”

“Tt is sometimes hard to re-make surroundings,” said Uncle Tom. “In
this case, although the town has been filled with houses, the roads leveled,
and the Common made into a beautiful lawn, we can still look upon some
of the very witnesses of that famous fight. Among the relics in the Cary
Library, down the street, is the tongue of the very bell that rang out the
summons in the meeting-house belfry. On that hill, just beside the fine
Hancock school-house, stands that same queer old belfry. Right across
from us, on Monument Street, that house marked with a tablet is the
Marrett-Munroe house, toward which young Caleb Harrington was running
with powder from the church when he was shot down by the British. Into
the Buckman Tavern, over the way, the colonists bore their wounded, and,
to the left there, on Elm Avenue, at the corner of the Common, that house
with the tablet is the one to which Jonathan Harrington, shot down by
British bullets, dragged himself, only to die on the doorstep at his wife’s
feet. There are, in fact, of the forty houses that made up this village of

t See frontispiece, reproducing Sandham’s painting of the battle.
ON LEXINGTON COMMON 27

Lexington at the time of the battle, eight yet standing which were witnesses
of that famous fight. And yonder, on the western edge of the Common,
that gray and ivy-draped monument covers the bones of our first martyrs,
and is said to be the oldest memorial of the American Revolution in the
land. Let us walk around and inspect it.”

They did so, and on the rounded knoll upon which stands the old monu-
ment, surrounded by an iron fence and clothed in its coat of ‘“ ivy-green,”
the visitors studied the quaint old shaft which, with neither grace of con-
struction nor beauty of ornamentation, yet means more to Americans, and



ia

THE MARRETT-MUNROE HOUSE.

A witness of the fight. Opposite the monument on Lexington Common, and to the left of the battle-ground. Built in 1729.

even more to the world, than any of the world-famous memorials that tell of
historic happenings in the old Europe over the sea.

“This monument was erected in 1799— the year in which Washington
died,” Uncle Tom announced. ‘The bones of the martyrs were removed
here from the old burying-ground in 1835 and placed in a stone vault just
behind the monument. The inscription here on the front was written by
the Rey. Jonas Clark, who was the minister of the old meeting-house on
the Common at the time of the battle. It is as inspiring as it is quaint. -
Can you make it out, Bert?”
28 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Bert settled his glasses firmly on his nose, and, shading his eyes from
the sun, slowly read out the inscription on this, the oldest Revolutionary
monument in the country:

Sacred to the Liberty and the Rights of Mankind!!!
The Freedom and Independence of America,
Sealed and defended with the Blood of her Sons,

This ‘Monument is erected
By the inhabitants .of Lexington
Under the patronage ‘and at ‘the Expense of
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts
To the memory of their Fellow Citizens,
Ensign Robert Munroe, and Messrs. Jonas Parker,
Samuel Hadley, Jonathan Harrington, junr.,
Isaac Muzzey, Caleb Harrington and John Brown,
of Lexington, and Asabel Porter of Woburn,
Who fell on the Field, the First Victims to the
Sword of British Tyranny and Oppression
On the morning of the ever memorable
' Nineteenth of April, An. Dom. 1775.
The Die was Cast!!!
The Blood of these Martyrs
In the cause of God and their Country
Was the Cement of the Union of these States, then
Colonies, and gave the spring to the Spirit, Firmness
and Resolution of their Fellow Citizens.

They rose as one Man to revenge their Brethren’s
Blood, and at the Point of the Sword, to assert and
Defend their*native Rights,

They nobly dar’d to be free!!

The contest was long, bloody and affecting.
Righteous Heaven approved the solemn appeal,
Victory crowned their arms, and
The Peace, Liberty, and Independence of the United
States of America was their Glorious Reward.

“Whew!” said Jack, as Bert concluded. “But that ’s a long one, is n’t
it? I guess old Brother Clark thought folks had lots of time when he
made that up.”

“Oh, Jack, how can you say so?” Christine protested ; and Marian said,
“Why, I think it’s just splendid. It reads just as folks talked and wrote
a hundred years ago —all capitals and exclamation points and dignity.”

“Seems to me Marian’s just struck it, has n’t she?” said Roger. “That
old monument is a sample of the way people worked and talked when it was
built—solid and stilted, and yet, after all, simple and strong. I can’t help
ON LEXINGTON COMMON ' 29

thinking, though, that we do things better nowadays. While Bert was
reading I could n’t help comparing this inscription with the short but splen-
did one on Milmore’s grand Sphinx on Chapel Hill in Mount Auburn
Cemetery at Cambridge. I want you all to see that before you go away.



THE SPHINX, MOUNT AUBURN CEMETERY.

And all it says (in English on one side, Latin on the other) is: ‘American
Liberty Preserved, African Slavery Destroyed, by the Uprising of a great
People, by the Blood of Fallen Heroes.’

“That is grand; and it tells the whole story,” was Jack’s comment.

“Well, but I think this is fine,” declared Bert, his eyes still fixed on the
old vine-curtained battle monument. ‘It does n’t say too much; it tells
the whole story, and it gives the names of those who fell—we should n’t
remember them in any other way.”

“JT honor your loyalty to the old shaft, Bert,” said Uncle Tom, as he
signaled to their driver to bring the wagonette alongside. ‘‘It sits par-
ticularly well on you, for, did you but know it, eleven of your kinsmen stood
in the line of the seventy minute-men yonder where the musket-boulder
stands, refusing to disperse, ‘not being afraid of the King’s commandment’;
and to three of the names on this old monument you are related by ties of
blood. Not many American boys can make such a claim.”

Jack took off his hat as the girls climbed into the wag One, and made
a low bow to his cousin. eA fer you, sir; after you,’ "he said. “Age be-
fore beauty. I’m not sure but’so much noble lineage may overweight the
30 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION









THE BOSTON MASSACRE.

British troops fired upon Americans on King street (now State street) in Boston, March 5, 1770, killing five men and wounding six,
two of them mortally. The picture is a reproduction of a cut engraved by Paul Revere. The grave of the victims is in the
old Granary Burying-ground on Tremont street. Their monument (see page 33) stands on Boston Common.
carriage and make it one-sided. Don’t you think you’d better ride in front
with the driver, my noble son of the Revolution?”

But, for all his fun, Jack was just as proud of Bert's “heraldry of honor”
as any of the party, and made the most of his reflected light when boasting
of his cousin’s claim.

As they headed up the Concord road they all gave a last look at the
historic green they were leaving behind, and Bert, with his customary de-
sire to get down to facts, said, ‘Then oe Uncle Tom, is really the spot
where the Revolution began?”

‘Broadly speaking, it ecraialy’ is,” Uncle Tom replied. “As to the actual
first shot and first act of open resistance, however, there are as many claims
as there were colonies. I have always felt that Golden Hill in New York
City has as much claim to the credit of ‘first blood’ as the Boston Massacre,
where Crispus Attucks and his comrades fell, and which is commemorated
by that slate-pencil sort of monument on Boston Common; a certain North
ON LEXINGTON COMMON 31

Carolina village has the same claim; and, no doubt, some day we shall be
talking of putting up a monument to Sukey Carroll.”

‘‘Who under the sun was Sukey Carroll?” Marian inquired.

“Why,” replied Uncle Tom, “she was the Marblehead girl who sang
out to the British soldier who pointed a musket at her, when the King’s men
were searching Salem for arms: ‘Do you think I was born in the woods to
be scared by you, you lobster-back?’ Which was spirited, if not polite.”

“Was that what they called the British soldiers, — lobster-backs ?”
laughed Jack. “Did n’t that fit their red coats well, though? Good for
Sukey!”

‘“buteatter all)’ said. Uncle. Lom, “right here in Massachusetts the
American Revolution began. For when James Otis — that ‘flame of fire,’
as some one has called him — gave up his office of Advocate-General and,
in February, 1761, in that room that we saw in the old State House in Bos-
ton, argued the case of the people against the King, ‘then and there,’ as
John Adams declared, ‘ American Independence was born.’”

‘Oh, yes, I remember about Otis,” said Jack. ‘“He’s the patriot that
was sandbagged by Tories, was n’t he ?”

“Yes, and was killed by sunstroke the very year the Revolution suc-
ceeded,” said Marian.

‘‘T must show you his statue. It is in the chapel at Mount Auburn,
you know,” Roger reminded them.

“That ’s the man,” said Uncle Tom. ‘Well, from him and such fore-
runners of revolution as he, came the historic conflict itself, begun under the
elms of Lexington Common where we, to-day, have been re-reading the
story.”

“But I thought you said both sides denied their intent to fight,” said
Jack, ‘and that our forefathers took their ‘Alfred Davids,’ as that chap in
‘Our Mutual Friend’ called them, that the other side began it.”

“That is so, in fact,” replied Uncle Tom. “ Neither side had any desire
for a conflict. The colonists had no thought but to obtain their rights, and
were never more loud in loyalty to King George than after Lexington. In-
deed, Mr. Dana argues that not until the Declaration of Independence was
America in revolution. He insists that King George and his parliament
were, in fact, the revolutionists.”

“Well! that’s a new idea!” exclaimed Jack.

“But why?” queried Bert.

“They were going contrary to law, he claims,” explained Uncle Tom,
‘while the colonists were standing in defense of the law. But, for all that,
Lexington did open the ball, and the minute-men from these very farmlands
32 THE CENTURY. BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

through which we are now riding gave to the world a lesson in resistance
to tyranny that has stood from that day to this as a beacon-light of freedom.
I wonder if I can recall Holmes’s poem on Lexington. It is peculiarly apt
just here, on the field it immortalizes and in the neighborhood of the site
of the Cambridge house in which it was written.”

“Let ’s have it,” urged the boys. Marian said, “ Do repeat it;” while
Christine, with the glance that compels, silently echoed Marian’s request.

So Uncle Tom put on his thinking-cap, and, with but few slips and
stumbles, repeated three or four of Holmes’s stirring stanzas:

“Slowly the mist o’er the meadow was creeping,
Bright on the dewy buds glistened the sun,
When from his couch, while his children were sleeping,
Rose the bold rebel and shouldered his gun.
Waving her golden veil
Over the silent dale,
Blithe looked the morning on cottage and spire;
Hushed was his parting sigh,
While from his noble eye
Flashed the last sparkle of liberty’s fire.

“On the smooth green where the fresh leaf is springing
Calmly the first-born of glory have met;
Hark! the death-volley around them is ringing!
Look! with their life-blood the young grass is wet!
Faint is the feeble breath,
Murmuring low in death
‘Tell to our sons how their fathers have died;’
Nerveless the iron hand,
Raised for its native land,
Lies by the weapon that gleams at its side.

“ Over the hillsides the wild knell is tolling,
From their far hamlets the yeomanry come;
As through the storm-clouds the thunder-burst rolling,
Circles the beat of the mustering drum.
Fast on the soldier’s path
Darken the waves of wrath
Long have they gathered and loud shall they fall;
Red glares the musket’s flash,
Sharp rings the rifle’s crash
Blazing and clanging from thicket and wall.

“Green be the graves where her martyrs are lying!
Shroudless and tombless they sunk to their rest,
While o’er their ashes the starry fold flying
Wraps the proud eagle they roused from his nest.
ON .LEXINGTON COMMON



MEMORIAL OF THE BOSTON MASSACRE.

Monument by Kraus, on Boston Common just to the right of the subway on West street.

Borne on her Northern pine,
Long o’er the foaming brine,
Spread her broad banner to storm and to sun;
Heaven keep her ever free,
Wide as o’er land and sea
Floats the fair emblem her heroes have won

{”

“That ’s fine, is n’t it?” said Roger.
«Sounds like Scott’s ‘ Hail to the Chief’ song,” declared Bert.
3

33
34 THE CENTURY BOOK OF -THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“Got a dash and go to it that make you just tingle, has n’t it?” said
Jack.

“And beautiful, too — that about the martyrs,” said Christine.

‘“T think so, my dear,” said Uncle Tom; ‘and it is pleasant to know
that our secon leader and greatest martyr considered it Holmes’s finest
poem.”

‘Meaning Lincoln?” queried Bert.

“Ves,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘Noah Brooks, who was one of his secre-
taries, tells us that Lincoln could not read it through without a tremble in
his voice when he came to the line

‘Green be the graves where her martyrs are lying.’

Perhaps he felt in those verses a prophecy of his own end—a death that
was to carry him on in history as our greatest martyr in all the long years
that followed Lexington.”

Thus talking and commenting, amid fields and farms and woodlands,
and bright stretches of hill and vale, the boys and girls rode on to Concord,
where the second chapter in that famous story of our first Nineteenth of
April was written in smoke and blood so many years ago.

en

As a
Yili wim, |

7
AY

Cl a ze
if Mpc. eee

ooh Lid
tH Ap +h




CHARA 2 Revit
AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS

How They Came to Concord —Dr. Prescott’s Ride—Where the Congress
Met— At Concord Fight—The Old Monument—The Statue of the
Minute-man—The Story of the Retreat—Dr. Hale's Poem— Sites and
Scenes in a Famous Old Town.

pcoccoc,

fetes ERE the Lexington highway joins the old Bedford road
7} and both are merged into Lexington Street in Concord
B| town, Marian, with an eye for everything, spied an old
house, a stone wall, and an inscription.

“Oh, Uncle Tom!” she cried, pointing; “there ’s a
tablet in that stone wall. Let ’s stop and read it.”

For reply, Uncle Tom bade the driver touch up his horses.

“T’m your young Lochinvar, just now, Marian,” he declared. “You
know how it was with him —




‘He staid not for brake and he stopped not for stone.’

Neither for carriage-brake nor tablet-stone have we any use just now. I
propose to tell you nothing out of chronological order.”

“Then I rise to a point of order, Mr. Chairman,” said Jack, leaning out
of the carriage to look back. ‘What’s the matter with the stone?”

“Tt marks the line of retreat, Jack, and not of advance,” Uncle Tom
replied. “I propose that, instead of a wagonette-load of volatile young
end-of-the-century Americans, we become one colonial patriot on a fleet
horse — Dr. Samuel Prescott, galloping post-haste from Lexington bearing
the news of the night-march of the British.”

‘Who was Dr. Prescott?” asked Roger.

“A Concord man,” replied Uncle Tom, “kin to a certain Colonel Pres-

cott, of whom you will hear later. Well, we—Dr. Samuel Prescott, you
35
36 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

know — have had a hard gallop. But our horse is a fast one, and, by cut-
ting across lots, jumping fences, walls, and ditches, we have narrowly es-
caped the British scouts, and are now
riding into this quaint peace-named
town of Concord which nestles at the
foot of its sand-ridge and along the
banks of its pretty river. And re-
member we are galloping along a
street which to-day is one of the
most famous in America.”

“Why? Because of the battle?”
inquired Bert.

“No; no battle was fought just
on this piece of road,” Uncle Tom
replied. ‘But because, as we ride,
we are passing the homes of a most
remarkable group of American
writers and thinkers — Hawthorne,
Emerson, Thoreau, and the Alcotts.”

“Oh! did Miss Alcott live here
—on this street?” came the quick
inquiry from every admirer of the
famous “ Little Women.”

“Why, certainly, she—but there!
I am breaking my own rule,” Uncle
Tom declared. ‘We were not to be led aside from our historical sequence.
Presto! vanish all modern things. Disappear, Jo, Amy, Meg, and Beth!
We are Dr. Prescott, the colonial newsbearer, riding on matters of life and
death.”

So, beneath the elms that border Lexington street, they rode into Con-
cord town. Uncle Tom resisted all queries and cajolements designed to
lead him from his main purpose, and at last they drew up in front of a large
white church, set well back from the street and topped by a gilded dome.

“Who went to church here?” asked Jack, ‘‘ Washington or the Little
Women?”

“Read the tablet, Bert, while Dr. Samuel Prescott gets his breath,”
Uncle Tom suggested. ‘“ Here we are at the beginning of things.”

Bert adjusted his glasses and read the tablet that stands on the curb in
front of the broad church lawn. The others helped, by reading with him
in a sort of undertone chorus.



“WE HAVE HAD A HARD GALLOP.”
AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS 37



























































































































































































































































































CONCORD, FROM LEE’S HILL.

Lee was a Tory, and his house at the foot of this hill was used as a target by the minute-men.

FIRST PROVINCIAL CONGRESS
OF DELEGATES FROM THE TOWNS OF
MASSACHUSETTS
WAS CALLED BY CONVENTIONS OF
THE PEOPLE TO MEET AT CONCORD ON THE
ELEVENTH DAY OF OCTOBER, 1774.
THE DELEGATES ASSEMBLED HERE
IN THE MEETING HOUSE ON THAT DAY,
AND ORGANIZED
WITH JOHN HANCOCK AS PRESIDENT
AND BENJAMIN LINCOLN AS SECRETARY.
CALLED TOGETHER TO MAINTAIN
THE RIGHTS OF THE PEOPLE,
THIS CONGRESS
ASSUMED THE GOVERNMENT OF THE PROVINCE
AND BY ITS MEASURES PREPARED THE WAY
FOR THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION.

“Here, you see,” said Uncle Tom, as the reading of the tablet ended,
“is where the real trouble began. This provincial congress appointed a
committee of safety, advised the people to pay their taxes not to the King’s
officer but to the appointed colonial treasurer, and directed the towns to
double their stock of ammunition and store it up for the use of the colony in
case of armed resistance to the demands of King George of England.”

“ But had they the right to do that,” queried Bert.

a
38 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“Why not?” demanded Roger. “It was their ammunition. Had n't
they paid for the stuff?”
“But they were colonists,” persisted Bert. ‘They were subjects of

King George, and had no right to gather supplies to make war on him.”

“No right!” exclaimed Jack. ‘Well! I guess yes. They took the
right, anyhow.”

“It was a question of liberty of action and of self-defense,” said Uncle
Tom. ‘Whether or not, they really had the right as subjects of the King,
at any rate, as Jack says, they took it. That is why General Gage, the
British governor, sent out expeditions to hunt up, confiscate, or destroy
these colonial war-stores, and why, as you know, the grenadiers and ma-
rines were marching from Boston to Concord, where supplies were said
to be stored.

“But come! While we have been arguing as to rights, here stands Dr.
Prescott with tidings of approaching trouble.”

“T’ll bet he has n’t been standing idle,” said Jack. ‘The whole town
knows his news by this time.”

“True enough, they do,” Uncle Tom assented. ‘Already lights are
flashing out and bells are set a-ringing; the townsmen are aroused; mes-
sengers are sent Lexington-way, post-haste, for further tidings; the minute-
men are summoned for duty. Soon after daybreak the messengers come
galloping back, along the very road that
we have traveled, with tidings of the sun-
rise skirmish on Lexington Common and
the news that eight hundred red-coats are
well on their way to Concord.

“By this time, the minute-men of Acton
and of Lincoln, Concord’s next-door neigh-
bors, have reported for action, here, in
the square. There is a hurried consul-
tation. Emerson, the minister, who lives
in the old manse on the next street, is out-
spoken. ‘Let us stand our ground,’ he
says... Li we die letusdic: here. Others,



HIDING eben ine. however, hesitate, remembering that open
resistance means treason to the King. ‘It

will not do for us to begin the war,’ they say. So, wishing to do everything
properly, they decide to take post up on that hill, just back of us, and await
developments. More minute-men join them there. Up comes Colonel
Barrett from his home, on that hill yonder across the river, where he has
AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS 39

‘
oe)
mG

ae

rise
fo



THE ROAD TO THE BATTLE-GROUND.

“‘ Looking down a vista of tall and murmuring pines, they saw a sight they never forgot." This avenue runs from Monument
street to the Minute-man and then stops.

been hiding supplies and burying powder and shot. Silent but determined
they stand and wait, but only for a brief time; for at seven o'clock there
is a gleam of color on the Lexington road, and here, into the square where
we are standing, come the eight hundred British soldiers on the double
quick.”

‘Hey, now there ’s going to be trouble,” cried Jack, deeply interested.

‘No, not yet, Jack,” said Uncle Tom. ‘Colonel Barrett saw that he was
outnumbered. He withdrew from this hill, and marched down to the river
where a country road crossed the bridge and stretched away between the
farms. Then he took position on the hill slope beyond the bridge, hoping
for more help, and waiting the moment to act.

“But the British at once proceeded to business. Their first move was
to take possession of the two bridges that spanned the river,—the north
and the south,—and prevent the farmers from interfering with them. So,
while Smith and Pitcairn with part of the troops held the center of the town
and proceeded to smash things, six companies of light infantry marched on
and, turning yonder to the right, into what is now Monument street, just

Â¥
AO THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

beyond the town hall, they pushed on to the North Bridge. My fellow min-
ute-men, the lobster-backs are too many for us. Let us get to the bridge
before them and join our comrades on the hill.”

“What!” cried Jack; “retreat? Never!”

‘“Let’s not call it retreating, Jack,” said Roger. ‘“ We'll say that we re
marching rapidly in advance of the enemy.”

“That ’s exactly what we ’re doing, boys,” laughed Uncle Tom, as the
wagonette turned to the right, into Monument street. “ We ’ve simply got
to get there before them.”

A ride of perhaps half a mile past very new and very old houses carried
them across the railroad track to a sharp turn to the left. A signboard on
a tree said “Battle Ground, 1775”; and, looking down a vista of tall and
murmuring pines, they saw a sight they never forgot. It was the battlefield
of Concord.



THE OLD MONUMENT.

This view is from a point just in front of the Minute-man. The bridge is a copy of the historic old North Bridge over
which the fight was waged.

“Formerly,” Uncle Tom explained, ‘“ the road to Carlisle turned off
here instead of going forward as it does to-day. This bit of the old road
has been preserved and set apart as a memorial of the battle.”
AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS 4!

They drew up beside the old monument while Uncle Tom gave them
the lay of the land. .

“Here, you see, the Carlisle road crossed the river. The minute-men,
falling back from the hill, crossed the bridge and took station on that slope
just beyond. Here others joined them
—minute-men from Bedford and West-
ford, and Littleton, and Carlisle, and
Chelmsford,—about four hundred in all.
The British came down this road and
halted just above where we stand.
Some soldiers were hurried to the South
Bridge, some were sent off on a search
for war-stores, and about a hundred
were left to guard the North Bridge.
Meantime the soldiers left in the village
were unearthing and destroying a few
things. The smoke from their fire led
the Americans to suppose that the whole
village was to be destroyed. ‘Shall we
let them burn the town?’ they asked
each other. ‘Let us march into the
town for its defense,’ they said. Then
brave Captain Davis, of Acton, drew his
sword. ‘I have not a man that is afraid
to go. March!’ he said, and, together,
in double file, the minute-men and militia
marched down the slope toward the





bridge. THE OLD NORTH BRIDGE.
“They struck the Carlisle road; the

British, seeing them coming, began to rip up the bridge planking; the
Americans broke into a run; the British formed in line of battle here where
the old monument stands; the Americans halted and drew up in line at
the other end of the bridge, where the statue stands. Let us cross over
and join our comrades.”

They left the carriage in the shade of the pines, crossed the bridge, and
gathered beneath the impressive statue of the Minute-man.

“Only for an instant did the farmers and red-coats face each other in
silence,” Uncle Tom continued. ‘Then—bang! went a British musket;
bang! bang! went another and yet another. Two minute-men fell wounded.
Crack—crack—crack! broke a volley from the British. Captain Davis
42 . THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



ame ses std Labatt Beene

FRENCH’S STATUE OF THE MINUTE-MAN.

Upon the other face of the granite pedestal is cut the verse from Emerson.

fell dead across a great stone; another and another are down here where
we stand. England has begun the war.

“Major Buttrick, the leader of the minute-men, fairly leaps from the
ground in excitement. ‘Fire, fellow-soldiers! For God’s sake, fire!’ he
cries, and, his own. musket leading the fusillade, the first war-guns of the
American Revolution speak out their sharp defiance to the King. Again
and again the shots fly across the bridge. Two British soldiers fall dead;
seven are wounded. Then the firing ceases. The British turn and run
back, down Monument street, toward the town, and the victorious farmers
hold the little bridge they have so manfully defended.”

“Hooray!” cried Jack, waving his hat in energetic emphasis, as if he
were Major Buttrick himself.

“How long did it take?” asked Roger.

“Just two minutes,” replied Uncle Tom.

«Short and sweet,” was Jack’s comment.

“Tt was n’t really much of a fight, was it?” said Bert. ‘Justa bit of a
skirmish.”
AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS 43

“It was the act more than the action, Bert,” Uncle Tom declared. “It
meant resistance; it meant war and not peace—independence, not submis-
sion. The minute-men at Lexington had stood in silent protest; they
dispersed when once they had asserted their rights even in the face of
death. The minute-men of Concord gave back blow for blow; their guns
were the first declaration of independence. A skirmish? Yes, Bert. But
a skirmish that was indeed a battle, more eventful in the history of the
world, so Bancroft asserts, than were Agincourt and Blenheim. Come,
cross the bridge with me and read what it says on that old monument, built
on the very site of the British line of battle and dedicated in 1836, in the
presence of sixty survivors of that memorable day.”

























THE HOME OF RALPH WALDO EMERSON.
On the Lexington road. Partly destroyed by fire in 1873. Here Emerson died in 1882.

Marian read aloud, with the usual half-tone chorus of accompaniment,
the inscription on the eastern face of the weather-stained pedestal :

Here
On the rgth of April, 1775,
was made the first forcible resistance to
British Aggression.
On the opposite bank stood the American militia
Here stood the invading army,
and on this spot the first of the enemy fell
in the War of the Revolution,
which gave Independence to these United States.
In gratitude to God, and in the love of Freedom,
This monument was erected,
A. D. 1836.
44 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“Now cross again,” said Uncle Tom, and at his direction Christine
read the verse carved on the granite pedestal which supports French’s
splendid bronze figure of the brave-eyed young Minute-man—one hand
on his plow, the other grasping the ready musket:

“By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled,
Here once the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world.”



THE OLD MANSE,

Made famous by Hawthorne. It was from this house in a room on the right that Ralph Waldo Emerson’s grandfather, the
Rev. William Emerson, watched the fight.

‘Who wrote that, boys and girls?” asked Uncle Tom, and, as with
one voice, the five made answer, ‘“ Ralph Waldo Emerson.”

“Who lived in a square white house on Lexington street, half a mile or
more from here,” Uncle Tom added, with a nod of approval; ‘‘and who
used to spend a good many of his boyish days in that old house to the
left of us, among the trees, where his grandfather lived before him—a.
famous old house now, known all over the world?”

“Why?” asked Christine, “is it—is it—?”
AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS

“Ves, it is,” Uncle Tom re-
plied, “the Old Manse, made fa-
mous by Hawthorne.”

‘Oh, let ’s go right over there
and gather some mosses,” said
Marian.

“You can’t,” grumbled Jack.
“Tt says, ‘Private Grounds. Tres-
passing strictly prohibited.’ ”

“How mean!” came the dis-
approving verdict.

“Yes; there Hawthorne wrote
his ‘Mosses from an Old Manse’;
there Emerson wrote his essay,
‘Nature,’ and many of his best
poems; and there, from that upper
window, now nearly covered from
sight by its curtain of pines, the
grandfather of the man who wrote
the famous lines on the monument
watched the fight with the greatest
anxiety, fearful that his parishion-
ers—who, it is said, locked him in
to keep him out of danger— would
not return the British fire.”

“But they did,” said Jack,
pointing at the statue.

“What a beautiful statue!”
said Marian, looking up at the fine
but determined face.

‘What a splendid verse!” said
Christine, studying the pedestal.

“What a great day!” said
Bert, thrilled by all the action of
the time.

“Right you are, boys and
girls,” Uncle Tom assented.
«Here, indeed, is a remarkable
combination. As some one has

said of it, standing here as we do, »

SSS = Zi eter aa

THE OLD MANSE FROM THE RIVER.

45


46 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

and looking upon this statue of the Minute-man, ‘There are few towns
in the world that can furnish a poet, a sculptor, and an occasion.’ I think
that ‘sso, don tyou?,”

They lingered long in that beautiful spot. At their feet flowed the
river; above them towered the spirited Minute-man; before them stretched
the beautiful avenue of pines that frames the historic field. The rusty gray
obelisk that tells the story of the fight; the suggestive slab set in the stone
wall to mark the grave of the British soldiers who fell beneath the fire of the
defiant farmers; the bit of old road preserved only because of its historic as-
sociations; the place, the day, the delightful surroundings—everything held
and impressed them, and as they strolled along the avenue of pines to
where their carriage waited for them on the highway, Marian declared, en-
thusiastically, “Splendid! is n't it? It’s worth coming miles to see.” And
every boy and girl echoed the declaration.

Then they took a last look down the green and piny vista to where,
beyond the bridge, that farmer-boy in bronze stands sentinel beside his
plow, the guardian spirit of that famous field.

“«Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled, ’” Bert quoted, musingly. ‘Is
that really true, Uncle Tom? Did the minute-men carry a flag?”

“Why not?” asked Jack. ‘ What good is a battle without a flag ey

“Bert is a born investigator,” laughed Uncle Tom. ‘1 ’m afraid it sa
case of poetic license. So far as I can discover, no flag was carried by the
minute-men or displayed either at Lexington or Concord. The Nineteenth
of April, 1775, was a protest and not a parade. There was no military or-
der among these farmer-folk. It was a case of every man being a fighter
on his own hook. It began here at Concord, and ended only when the last
harried red-coats found safety under the guns of the English fleet at
Charlestown, twenty miles away.”

«That was a great retreat, was n’t it?” said Roger.

“Sort of a twenty-mile go-as-you-please, I guess,” said Jack. ‘“ How
was the start, Uncle Tom?”

“ Handicapped, Jack,” replied his uncle, falling in with the boy’s athletic
simile. ‘The British officers knew they had roused the country-side, and
when they had called in their men and started on the homeward march,
they were so certain it would be a running fight that Smith, the commander,
did everything he could to ward it off. He put ‘flankers’ up on that sand-
ridge to protect his line from the provincials, who, after the fight at the
bridge, struck across country over the ‘ Great Fields,’ as that pasture land
to the left is called. But where the ridge stops at the Old Bedford road,
the flankers on the hill were no longer of avail, and when the retreating


ON THE ROAD TO CONCORD.

«From all the country round the farmers came hurrying to the relief of their neighbors,””
48 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

British struck that point where we saw the tablet at the junction of the Bed-
ford and Lexington roads, their terrible troubles began. We ’Il drive up
there now and see the fight.”

‘Which way?” asked Roger.

‘Well, you see we can’t drive across the Great Fields with the minute-
men,” Uncle Tom replied; “so we ’ll have to play that we are the British
for a little while. Here we are, in the square. It ’s no use, Jack, we ’ve
simply got to retreat with the rest of them until we get to the cross-roads.
Then we ll become minute-men once more. Here is where it went on. For
nearly an hour the red-coats were marching and counter-marching, because,
you see, Colonel Smith, the British leader, was uncertain what to do. Then
came the order ‘About face! for Boston.’

“By this time the news had spread. From all the country round the
farmers came hurrying to the relief of their neighbors. Too late Smith
saw that he would have to run the gantlet for home.”

“Began to see the box he was in, did n't he?” said Jack.

“It was a box sure enough,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘The highway
stretched through Lexington to Charlestown and the sea. All along, it was.
flanked by stone walls or ran between hills. Behind these the Americans
were posted as if behind breastworks. Here where the sand-ridge is.
stopped by the old Bedford road, was the first exposed place, and here, as
I told you, the trouble began. This is Merriam’s Corner. Now, Marian,
you can give us the tablet you wished to read as we came riding into town.”

Marian stepped from the carriage, and standing before the tablet set
in the low stone wall, read it aloud:

THE BRITISH TROOPS
RETREATING FROM THE
OLD NORTH BRIDGE
WERE HERE ATTACKED IN FLANK
BY THE MEN OF CONCORD
AND NEIGHBORING TOWNS
AND DRIVEN UNDER A HOT FIRE
TO CHARLESTOWN

“That ’s literally true,” Uncle Tom remarked. ‘They were really
‘driven’ to Charlestown.”

“Under a hot fire?” queried Bert,

“Never hotter,” replied his uncle. ‘Here the Medford and Reading
minute-men joined their Concord brethren and began the stone-wall fight
that lasted for nearly twenty miles. On the Lincoln ridges the Woburn
men took a hand and Pitcairn lost his horse; before Lexington was reached
AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS 49



THE WRIGHT TAVERN.

Where Major Pitcairn vowed vengeance on the “rebels.” This house has suffered less change than any other building in Concord.

the men who had faced the British on the green that morning ‘pitched into
them.’ At Fiske’s Hill, just this side of Lexington, a hot fight took place,
and the British began to run in disorder. At Lexington village, near where
we saw the stone cannon on the hill, the reinforcements sent from Boston
under command of Lord Percy were met—twelve hundred men, with two
cannon. But when, after a rest, the homeward march was taken again,
numbers only increased the opportunity for good shots, and the enraged
farmers hung on the skirts of the retreat and harried the red-coats, as
hounds do the game, all along the road.”

“Poor fellows!” said Christine.

“What do you say poor for?” asked Jack, indignantly. “It served
them right. They had no business to be there.”

“But they could n’t help it, Jack,” said Christine. ‘They were ordered
to march to Concord.”

“Soldiers have to obey orders, Jack,” said Uncle Tom, ‘‘and those poor
red-coats found the trip uncomfortable enough without your added con-
demnation. As they lagged along under the hot April sun, foemen sprang
out upon them at all points. The British would whirl around and drive
away one force, only to be peppered at by another. It seemed, as one
British soldier declared, to ‘rain rebels.’ The tablets all along the road

between here and Charlestown record the story of that fearful retreat. It
4
50 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

cost King George nearly three hundred men out, of a force of eighteen
hundred, and the news, spread by swift riding from Maine to Georgia,
aroused thirteen colonies to action, and opened a seven years’ fight for
independence.”

“How many Americans were killed?” asked Bert.

“About fifty,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘They knew how to fight, you see.
They were hunters and could stalk the game. There is a poem by Edward
Everett Hale that you must hunt up and read when you get home. You
will find it-in his ‘Story of Massachusetts,’ and it is one of the most striking
pictures of that Nineteenth of April man-hunt that I know of.. It ends
something like this”—and beneath a spreading elm that cast long shad-
ows across the Lexington highway, Uncle Tom reproduced the picture that

Dr. Hale drew:

“Well, all would not die. ‘There were men good as new —
From Rumford, from Saugus, from towns far away,—
Who filled up quick and well, for each soldier that -fell,
And we drove them and drove them and drove them all day.
We knew, every one, it was war that begun,
When that morning’s march was only half done.

“In the hazy twilight, at the coming of night,
I crowded three buckshot and one bullet down.
*T was my last charge of lead, and I aimed her and said,
“Good luck to you, Lobsters, in old Boston Town.”



BACK FROM THE MAN-HUNT.

“Good luck to you, Lobsters, in old Boston Town.”

“In a barn at Milk Row, Ephraim Bates and Munroe,
And Baker and Abram and I made a bed;
We had mighty sore feet, and we ’d nothing to eat,
But we ’d driven the Red-coats; and Amos, he said:
AMONG THE EMBATTLED FARMERS 51



THE JONES HOUSE.
Now generally known as the ‘“‘ Keyes House.” It is opposite the battle-ground, and the white spot near a window in the ell,
between two doors, marks a bullet-hole. Here too is the stone across which Captain Davis fell dead.

“¢Tt ’s the first time,’ said he, ‘that it ’s happened to me
To march to the sea by this road where we ’ve come;
But confound this whole day but we ’d all of us say
We ’d rather have spent it this way than to home.’”

“The hunt had begun with the dawn of the sun,
And night saw the wolf driven back to his den.
And never since then, in the memory of men,
Has the Old Bay State seen such a hunting again.”

“Well! it was a hunting of men, was n't it?” exclaimed Jack as the
wagonette turned and drove back to Concord.

“Tt seems so dreadful, though,” said Christine. “Think how many
families it broke up.”

“War is always dreadful, my dear,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘To-day we
see only the heroic side of the American Revolution, but for a generation
and more after Concord and Lexington, so old people have told me who
were children then, the subject was never talked of at home; it was all so
dreadful, they said.”

Then, talking over the day and what it meant to America and the
world, for all its tragic and sorrowful phases, they came at last to the
little hotel where they were to spend the night in Concord.
52 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

They were well repaid for thus lengthening their stay. For what a day
Uncle Tom gave them on the morrow !

Guided by him they walked about this “town of tablets,” as Marian
called it, deeply interested in all they saw. The citizens of the quaint old
town have put up memorial stones to mark almost everything of note that







THE WAYSIDE, AT CONCORD.

On Lexington road, the line of the British retreat. Here Hawthorne lived when he wrote ‘‘ Tanglewood Tales,” and
Miss Alcott when she was in her early ‘‘ teens,” before she lived in ‘‘ Orchard House.”

ever occurred there, while the historic houses, the literary shrines, and the
beautiful surroundings of Concord made a lasting impression on these re-
ceptive young minds.

They visited the houses of historic interest; they saw the British bullet-
mark in the ell of the rambling old Jones house; they touched the very
stone across which brave Captain Davis fell dead; they stood within the
identical Wright Tavern, in which Pitcairn, fuming at the “obstinacy” of the
“rebels,” stirred his toddy with a bloody finger and vowed vengeance; they
lingered before the tall gate-posts at the entrance of the Old Manse made
famous by Hawthorne; they worshiped in clamorous admiration before the
house which had been the home of Hawthorne and, later, the scene of the
AMONG THE EMBATTLED: FARMERS : 53

early exploits of the “Little Women.” They saw the house in which that
charming story had been written; they looked upon the home of Emerson,
and followed the footsteps of Thoreau; they canoed up and down the beau-
tiful Concord River; they rode to Fairyland and to Walden Pond and added,
each, a stone to the memorial pile on the spot where once had stood Thor-
eau’s hermit hut; they visited the library and the antiquarian rooms, filled
with memorials of famous folks from the days of the Puritans to those of
John Brown.

And, last of all, they stood on that remarkable knoll in beautiful Sleepy
Hollow Cemetery and looked upon that little cluster of graves, almost within
touch of each other, where lie the remains of Emerson and Hawthorne
and Thoreau and the two Alcotts,—father and daughter,—as grand a
group of worthies as can be found thus brought together anywhere outside
of Westminster Abbey.

Then they rode back, along the historic highway, following the British
retreat quite to Charlestown neck, through Lexington and Arlington and
Somerville — a road fairly peppered, as Jack declared, with memorial tablets
and historic houses, eloquent reminders of that ever famous Nineteenth of
April, 1775.

At Sullivan Square they dismissed their carriage and took the electrics
into Boston — saturated, so Bert affirmed, with facts and sights of one of
the most famous episodes in the world’s story of liberty, and of that eventful
day that gave birth to American freedom.































































































































































































































































WALDEN POND.







Mm

rr Ise ee ee























7.
‘









































































\ Or II I CoOL Leno rir)

IT







a

Beg Be se
OO CES Tre

pede NSP ty



























FEES EES aS RES SR SS



i, wrth ft

ER’s HO

BUNK

On

K

TAC

AT

ney CHARLES TOWN

?



Vy:

mi



€

of

Br

G








I¢





¢


Ci AEE Realy.

ON BUNKER HILL

Climbing the Monument—The View from the Top— Tracing the Battle-
ground — The Redoubt— Colonel Prescott— Warren and Putnam—
The Story of the Assault — Victory or Defeat? — Webster's Oration —
The Tablet on Dorchester Heights — The First American Victory.

HOW many?” panted Marian, poised on the topmost step;
“JT lost count.”

“Two hundred and ninety-two, two hundred and ninety-
three, two hundred and ninety-four!” counted Bert, a good
second in the race.

“Dear me! are we at the top at last?” said Christine. ‘Where ’s
Uncle Tom?”

‘“Coming, coming, my dear,” a voice replied from the depths. ‘This
tells on flesh, and thirty-six does n’t spring up two hundred and twenty-one
feet as easily as nimble fifteen.”

“Are we really two hundred and twenty-one feet from the ground?”
said Marian. ‘“ My, what a view!”

They stood at last, together, within the little circular chamber, pierced
with four barred windows — the top of Bunker Hill Monument.

The day was clear and bright. Sea and shore alike stood free of haze
or mist, and far to the west, beyond the ridge of Monadnock, they traced
the filmy outline of Kearsarge, the high New Hampshire mountain, a good
ninety miles away.

Uncle Tom had put all other plans aside.

“Tt is an ideal day for the monument,” he said.

And indeed it was.

“Two hundred and twenty-one feet seems short, alongside of the Wash-

ington Monument’s five hundred,” said Jack. “And yet it seems as high.”
55



le
g
i
7
'
4
ye
e
56 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“That ’s because there ’s no elevator here,” said Marian, still breathing
hard from her race up the last turn.

“There was an elevator here once, many years ago,” Uncle Tom in-
formed them. “But it was a crude, cramped, unsafe affair, and after it had
fallen once, and nearly killed its passengers, it was given up, and now
visitors have to trust to ‘Shanks’s mare.’”

Christine and Roger were already at the east window, drinking in the
superb ocean view. Bert was studying out the inscription on the bursted
memorial cannon hung up on the wall, while Jack was wondering how
under the sun they could have rigged an elevator to slide up and down that
narrow central cavity.

Uncle Tom called them about him and slowly made the circuit from
window to window. .

‘No other place in all the world,” so he told them, “unless it be the
Acropolis at Athens, so clearly discloses the real panorama of a battle re-
gion. It is almost as if we were taking a bird’s-eye view from a balloon.
See! to the east is the sea!”

“Ts n't it glorious!” cried Marian, a great lover of salt water.

‘Over that stretch of blue, and here into Boston Harbor, came the British
fleet to discharge its cargo of red-coats for the subjugation of America.”

“Only they did n’t subjugate,” put in Jack.

‘In this narrower stretch of the Charles River, just below us, six Biitish
men-of-war were moored with guns trained on these rebel heights. South
of us is Boston-town, without bridges then, and small indeed compared with
its bulk to-day; but it was the very hotbed of rebellion; working toward
the west we see Dorchester and Cambridge, Arlington, Somerville, and
Medford, until we get around here to the Mystic, flowing down to join the
Charles. To the North, across the Mystic, lie Malden and Everett, Chelsea,
Revere, and Lynn. And that rocky cape-like piece running into the sea is
famous Nahant, where Longfellow and Agassiz and Sumner and other great
Bostonians made their summer home. Across that long ridge—bhere out
of the west window—lie Lexington and Concord. So, you see, we are
indeed at the very center of revolutionary beginnings.”

“Is n't it down there that Paul Revere stood waiting for the signal?”
asked Christine, pointing to the river's edge.

“Yes, we can see him if we look out here through the south window,”
said Uncle Tom. “See, that little clump of trees just across the river is
Copp’s Hill burying-ground—the site of a British battery, and the tall spire
beside it is the old North Church where the signal lanterns were hung.
There! they are flashing out the news, and at once, galloping past us up
ad

Main street, just at the
Charlestown and So-
and Arlington, Revere
tidings of the British
the west window, you
turns past East Cam-
called Lechmere’s Point.
under Smith and Pit-
march to Lexington.
Further up the river,
where the Roxbury
road ran across. the

ON

BUNKER HILL








oy:

foot of this hill, through
merville and Medford
spurs on, spreading the
march. Here, through
can see where the Charles
bridge —then it was
There the 800 British
cairn gathered for their



BUNKER HILL MONUMENT, CHARLESTOWN.

A hollow shaft, 30 feet square at the base and 221 feet high, built after designs by Horatio Green-
ough and Solomon Willard. The corner stone.was laid by Lafayette, June 17, 1825. The
monument was dedicated June 17, 1843, Daniel Webster being the orator.

narrow neck of land, marched Lord Percy and his 1200 reinforcements.
And through this western window you ‘can almost trace the line of retreat
which we followed the other day, along which, from Concord to Charles-

town, raced the British rout.”

‘Where ’s Sudbury, Uncle Tom?” Christine asked.

“Don’t you know

that ’s where the landlord lived, in the Wayside Inn?
58 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

‘And over there, no longer bright,
Though glimmering with a latent light,
Was hung the sword his grandsire bore
In the rebellious days of yore
Down there at Concord, in the fight.’”

‘“ Sudbury is over Concord way, across those hills, through the west win-
dow,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘The Wayside Inn is standing yet and in fine
condition; we ’ll try to get over there some day and visit it. Don’t you re-
member what the poet said about the landlord’s grandfather as he looked on
the sword?

‘Your ancestor who bore this sword
As Colonel of the Volunteers,
Mounted upon his old gray mare,
Seen here and theré and everywhere,
To me a grander shape appears
Than old Sir William, or what not,
Clanking about in foreign lands,
With iron gauntlets on his hands
And on his head an iron pot.’

That ’s my case exactly. I see more real heroism in these Minute-men
and Militia Volunteers of Lexington, and Concord, and Bunker Hill, and get
more real inspiration from them than from all the Battles of the Spears





















































































































































——
ALL ABOARD FOR AMERICA!

Troop-ships leaving Portsmouth Harbor, England, for the ‘‘ subjugation” of America.
e

and of the Standards and what not, in the days that Cervantes, in ‘Don
Quixote’, laughed to death.”

“Lexington, you say, was an ‘affair’; Concord was a ‘skirmish’; was
Bunker Hill really a battle?” asked Roger.

fy
ON BUNKER HILL 59

“Let ’s go down-stairs and see,” Uncle Tom replied. “We ’Il fight it
over again on its own ground.”

With a final look at the wonderful panorama of land and sea, caught
through the four windows of that tall gray shaft, the party clattered down
the two hundred and ninety-four stone steps and stood at last upon all that
is left of the little elevation first known as Russell’s Pasture (when it was
the scene of war), afterwards as Breed’s Hill and now forever famous under
its mistaken name of Bunker Hill.

Uncle Tom briefly reminded them of the causes that led to the fortifica-
tion of this height by the Americans; how the farmers of New England had
surrounded Boston-town, after Lexington and Concord had stirred them
to action, with a cordon of rude little forts and earthworks extending in
a wide semicircle from Dorchester Heights to Chelsea; how they had
thus shut up the British in Boston,—sixteen thousand Yankee farmers hold-
ing ten thousand disciplined British troops at bay; how the Committee of
Safety sitting at Cambridge decided that.a good fort on Bunker Hill would
keep the British ships from sailing up the Charles or the Mystic; how they
sent twelve hundred men to fortify it, and how, after looking over the
ground, the soldiers decided to first throw up a redoubt on the lower height,
nearer the river. He told them how the soldiers worked all night un-
noticed by the British, who, when they awoke on the morning of the seven-
teenth of June, and saw what the “rebels” had been at, proceeded to
attempt to dislodge them.

“Bunker Hill Monument,” said Uncle Tom, “stands just about in the
center of the little fort, or redoubt, as it is called, which inclosed in an
irregular rectangle something over seventeen thousand square feet of land.”

‘“ About how much is that, Uncle Tom?” Marian asked, with a rather
hazy idea of figures.

‘How much land is there in your house lot at home?” asked Uncle
‘Tom.

Marian looked at Jack.

“It’s twenty-five by one hundred,” he replied, answering her query.

“Then the fort on Bunker Hill occupied about as much land as seven

New York City house lots,” said Uncle Tom. ‘The ramparts were about
six feet high, with a narrow ditch at their base. See! here is a stone tablet
marking the southeast corner of the redoubt; here”— and he led them
along the asphalt walk an hundred feet or so—‘‘is the stone that marks

the northeast corner. Then it stretched back there toward Concord street,
and at the south end over a defended entrance or sally-port. Here, to the
north, as this tablet tells you, ran an outer or protecting breastwork three
60 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

oom
WLLL



STATUE OF COLONEL WILLIAM PRESCOTT.
He commanded the redoubt on Bunker Hill. The statue stands just
in front of Bunker Hill Monument.

hundred feet, until it ended in a muddy bog where no one could wade.
Across from this corner, as this tablet tells you”— and Uncle Tom led them
along the path to the northern corner —‘“ was to run another protecting
breastwork to guard the rear. There was no time to build one, so Knowl-
ton, of Connecticut, extended a rail-fence to the river, put up another
parallel to it, and filled in between with new-mown hay to within about
six hundred feet of this point. A similar fence ran out on the opposite
ON BUNKER HILL 61

side. It took a thousand men all night to finish this well-planned fortifica-
tion. At sunrise it was scarcely done. But the British then discovered it
and prepared to assault it.”

‘‘Who commanded the Americans?” inquired Bert.



STATUE OF GENERAL JOSEPH WARREN.

Now in the relic room of Bunker Hill Monument.

For answer, Uncle Tom led them to the southern front of the monument
where stands the bronze statue of Colonel William Prescott —a strong and
spirited figure.

“That was the hero of Bunker Hill,” he said, “the fearless commander
within the redoubt— related by blood to that Dr. Samuel Prescott who,
you remember, rode post-haste to Concord.”

“JT thought Warren was the leader,” said Bert.

‘‘ That was his statue inside the monument office, was n’t it?”

“Yes,” Uncle Tom replied; ‘‘but Warren was only a volunteer, acting
under orders at the battle, even though he was president of the provincial
congress and a major-general.”
62 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“ But he was a hero,” insisted Bert.

“Most assuredly,” his uncle replied. “When Elbridge Gerry, at Cam-
bridge, begged him not to go into the fight, he replied quietly, ‘Dulce e¢
decorum est pro patria mort’ ; which means — what, Bert?”

“It is sweet and becoming to die for one’s country,” replied the student
Bert.
“Ves,” replied Uncle Tom; ‘and when he reached Bunker Hill he
asked General Putnam, who directed there, to put him where he could be
most useful. Putnam suggested this fort here on Russell’s Pasture, and
Warren, although appointed a major-general that day by Congress, refused
to take the command offered him from Colonel Prescott, but said: ‘I come
as a volunteer with my musket to serve under you.’ A very brave, courte-
ous and lovable man was Doctor and General Joseph Warren.”

“Putnam was brave too, was n’t he?” asked Roger.

“As brave and impetuous as when he faced the wolf in its den,” Uncle
Tom answered. ‘Bunker Hill—the height beyond this, you know — was
his strong point. He held, and rightly, that the fortification on this slope
was of no benefit unless protected by a redoubt on Bunker Hill. He began,
in fact, to throw up earthworks there, but he had not men enough nor time
enough to complete them. For, before he could fairly get to work, the
battle was joined. You know the story of the fight, of course.”

“Ves; but tell it to us, Uncle Tom,” said Marian.

“That ’s so, right here where it was really fought,” Jack chimed in.

“A few words should tell it,” said Uncle Tom, ‘The British landed over
there, where you see the Navy Yard buildings. The sun shone brightly ;
the day was hot; Prescott, a magnificent figure, walked calmly among his
men, cautioning them to go slow and reserve their fire until the word came.
At the rail fence Putnam held command. He, too, encouraged his men, told
them that every shot must count, and ordered them not to fire until they
could see the whites of their enemies’ eyes.”

‘‘George! that was pretty close range, was n't it?” said Jack.

‘How horrible!” sighed Christine.

“Tt had to be, my dear. War is no child’s-play. It zs horrible,” said
Uncle Tom. “The British soldiers, marching as if on parade, came solidly
against the American entrenchments. The right wing, led by General
Howe, headed for the rail fence; the left wing, commanded by General
Pigott, advanced toward the redoubt. The Americans, standing on the
little platform that brought their guns to the level of the rampart, waited
quietly. The British fired as they marched; but they aimed too high.
The Americans covered each his man. Then, when their foemen were dan-
ON BUNKER HILL 63

gerously near,
came the word
of command:


















Fire | The
muskets held
by farmers

and marksmen
spoke with
deadly effect.
At the rail
fence Howe’s
red - coats «
staggered,
recover-
ed and
then



j
broke —
repulsed. Be-
fore the re-
doubt, here on
the hill, the British fell under the
‘murderous fire; their line broke,
swayed, turned and retreated down
the hill. Again the red ranks re-
form; again they march against rail
fence and redoubt, only again to be
met by that murderous fire, and to
stagger down the slope, where now
their dead and wounded lie strewn
in confusion. The farmers of New
England have stood like their own
PLAYING AT WAR. granite against the veteran troops
“ snow forts, boys.’ ‘It’s great sport.’” 5 . .
“Then it was a victory, Uncle

Tom,” cried Jack. ‘I always said it



64 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

was. I’ve played it lots of times on snow forts, boys. It’s great sport.
You can just send the British kiting back every time. I always said it was.
a victory for us.”

“Wait, wait, Jack; the end is not yet,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘It was a
victory thus far. But now Prescott’s men look troubled even in the midst







NN Wily . *
VS CaN
AYA




=
ae

2 Pa
5 I SY, Sai +
SS “remo a Py
5 h My HY)
Cad a WO

\

ON THE SLOPE OF BUNKER HILL.

“**Don’t waste a kernel,’ said Prescott, ‘make every shot tell.’”

of their hurrahs. Their ammunition has given out. Only a few artillery
cartridges for the almost useless cannon are on hand. Prescott has them
torn open and the powder distributed, almost grain by grain, among the
musket-men. ‘ Don’t waste a kernel,’ he says; ‘make every shot tell.’”

‘“And they did, I'll bet,” said Jack.

“They did, but to little avail,” his uncle replied. ‘Howe was angered
at his double repulse and put all his efforts into carrying the redoubt by
storm. His red-coats surged up the hill; once more came the farmers’
ON BUNKER HILL 6

Un

deadly fire, but not with the strength or volume of the earlier broadsides.
There came no second discharge. The British swarmed over the breast-
work; clubbed muskets, bare bayonets, paving-stones confronted them. It
was a bloody hand-to-hand conflict. Then, the Americans turned and re-
treated toward Bunker Hill, where Putnam, who had withdrawn his men
from the rail fence, hoped to rally them. Over there, in the middle of
Concord street, Warren fell—the American Revolution’s first notable vic-
tim. The British artillery swung around in flank, opened a galling fire on
the fugitives, and the retreat, turning into a rout, surged down the hillsides
and over toward the camp at Cambridge. Had reinforcements or ammu-
nition been forthcoming, the day might have been crowned with success.”

“Then it was a defeat,” sighed Bert.

“Really it was, because the British gained and held the hill,” Uncle
Tom replied. ‘But in moral effect, in its influence on the Americans who
now saw that they could stand their ground against British troops, and
equally in its influence on the English commanders, who never after at-
tempted to carry by storm an American earthwork, Bunker Hill was a vic-
tory, and is so held and celebrated by us. Gage lost eleven hundred out
of twenty-five hundred men, and lost besides his power and command; for
when the news of the battle reached England, the man who was so palpably
outgeneralled by ‘a parcel of Yankee farmers’ was recalled, and his com-
mand given into other hands.”

“ How many Americans were killed, Uncle Tom, ?” asked Roger.

“One hundred and forty,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘Their names all ap-
pear on those great bronze tablets yonder in Winthrop Park, where we will
go after we leave the hill.”

They went there shortly, but first they made one more circle of the his-
toric hill, following the lines of the redoubt. They stood on the spot where
the brave Warren fell, in front of what is now No. 32 Concord street.
They inspected all the pictures and relics in the little monument museum—
the statue of Warren—the timber from the wreck of the Somerset, the
British man-of-war whose marines set the town of Charlestown on fire —
General Putnam’s sword — Major Worthen’s gun and cartridge-box, and
the memorials of Daniel Webster, whose splendid orations at the begin-
ning and the completion of the monument on Bunker Hill are now a part of
the literature of America.

Then, with a last look at Prescott’s martial figure guarding the base of
the tall gray shaft, they went down from the hill, and, at the entrance to
Winthrop Park, read with deepest interest the names of the officers and

men who fell in this famous Battle of Bunker Hill.
5
66 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

y
4

Ft

TT tae



THE BUNKER HILL TABLETS.

At the entrance to Winthrop Park, Charlestown. Bunker Hill Monument in the distance. These bronze tablets, erected by
the city of Boston, give brief details of the battle and lists of the killed.

As he read the line from Daniel Webster that stands at the bottom of
one of the tall tablets (“The blood of our fathers—let it not have been
shed in vain”), Jack backed away toward the soldiers’ monument, and look-
ing up the vista between the twin tablets where the tall shaft topped the
green hill, he pointed at the monument, and broke out into those splendid
words of Webster that so many school-boys have learned and spoken.

“The powerful speaker stands motionless before us. It is a plain shaft. It bears no inscrip-
tions, fronting to the rising sun, from which the future antiquarians shall wipe the dust. Nor does
the rising sun cause tones of music to issue from its summit. But at the rising of the sun and
in the setting of the sun, in the blaze of noonday and beneath the milder effulgence of lunar light,
it looks, it speaks, it acts to the full comprehension of every American mind and the awakening
of glowing enthusiasm in every American heart. Its silent, but awful utterance ; its deep pathos,
as it brings to our contemplation the seventeenth of June, 1775, and the consequences which
have resulted to us, to our country, and to the world from the events of that day, and which we
know must rain influence on mankind to the end of time; the elevation with which it raises us
high above the ordinary feeling of life surpass all that the study of the closet or even the
inspiration of genius can produce,”

“Fine, fine indeed,” cried Uncle Tom, appreciatively, while the others
“gave the palm” to Jack’s oratorical powers. ‘‘ Now let us have the com-
ON BUNKER HILL 67

pletion of that same Webster oration, Jack, and then I think we can leave
the Bunker Hill Monument duly impressed and benefited. Begin with the
last paragraph, you know.”

And Jack, nothing loth,—he did dearly love to “spout” on occasion,—
gave the desired peroration:

“ And when we and our children shall all have been consigned to the house appointed for all
living, may love of country and pride of country glow with equal fervor among those to whom
our names and blood shall have descended. And then, when honored and decrepit age shall lean
against the base of this monument, and troops of ingenuous youth shall be gathered round it, and
when the one shall speak to the other of its objects, the purposes of its construction, and the great
and glorious events with which it is connected— there shall rise from every youthful breast the
ejaculation — ‘Thank God! —I also —am an American!’”

Then they left the monument and the tablets and rode into Boston.
That afternoon they boarded a City Point “electric” at Post-office Square
and swinging about past the rising walls of the great Southern Depot and
amid the railroad and shipping centers of the south side, they crossed the
Federal street bridge and whizzed through Broadway, the wide main street
of South Boston. As they rode along, Uncle Tom, who had informed his
young people that he was now about to take them to the closing scene in
the Revolutionary siege of Boston, told them that Bunker Hill was really
one of America’s turning-points.

“The battle settled things in one way especially,” he said. “It proved
to the world that America meant war, and that there was possible no peace-
able solution of the problem which England’s obstinacy had raised. Though
a defeat, it had given the colonies courage and backbone. As Webster said
of it, the fearful crisis was past. The appeal now lay to the sword; and the
only question was whether the spirit and resources of the people would hold
out till the object was accomplished. Washington, as he rode northward
from Philadelphia on his way to the old elm at Cambridge, met a messenger
carrying to Congress the news of Bunker Hill. To his inquiries the mes-
senger answered that the provincials retreated only because of lack of am-
munition. ‘Did they stand the fire of the regulars?’ Washington asked
anxiously. ‘That they did,’ said the messenger, ‘and held their own fire in
reserve until the enemy was within eight rods.’ Washington appeared re-
lieved. ‘Then,’ said he to his companions, ‘the liberties of the country are
safe.’ To him, the fearless stand of the New England militia meant material
for soldiers — just what he was at that time most anxious about.”

“Was he commander-in-chief then?” asked Roger.

“Yes, he was chosen on the fifteenth of June, 1775, just two days before
68 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

the battle of Bunker Hill,” Uncle Tom replied, ‘and at once he set out for
the camp at Cambridge. On the second of July he reached the town and
made his headquarters first in Wadsworth house, which I showed you
fronting Harvard Square on the college grounds, and shortly after in the
big square colonial house on Brattle street, now dear to all the world as



WASHINGTON AND THE MESSENGER FROM BUNKER HILL.

‘¢ «Did they stand the fire of the regulars?’ Washington asked anxiously.”

the home of Longfellow. On the next day —the,third of July —he took
-command of the army, standing beneath the old elm in whose broken
shadow you also stood, against Radcliffe College near to Cambridge Com-
mon. All summer and winter he was striving to put his motley army of
ten thousand constantly changing men into some sort of military shape.
He drew the line of siege closer and closer about the British in Boston.
But when spring came he knew that he must do something. He prepared
to attack the British inside their lines, and, as the first movement, occupied
and fortified the high land here in South Boston, then known as Dorches-
ter Heights. Let us go and see the exact spot.”

A ride of twenty-five minutes brought them to the corner of H street,
where, leaving the car, they passed down Broadway so that Uncle Tom
ON BUNKER HILL 69

might show them the broad and breezily elevated building made famous
by the marvelous life-stories of Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller—the
Perkins Institution for the Blind, the first “blind school” in America.

“It is almost on the slopes of Dorchester Heights, you see,” Uncle
Tom explained, ‘‘and is thus doubly a notable landmark. See, we turn
here from Broadway into G street. We are now assaulting another slope
quite as high and fully as historic as Bunker Hill.”

Where G street swept around a circular knoll of green, Uncle Tom
crossed the street and led his young people through the open gateway.

“This slope,” he said, “is a part of what was formerly known as Dor-
chester Heights. It is now Thomas Park, so named in memory of John
Thomas, one of the best and bravest of our early Revolutionary generals.”

“Never heard of him,” said Jack, sprinting up the asphalt slope. ‘ Did
you, Roger?”

And the Boston boy was forced to confess that the name was new to him.

‘‘Is n’t there something about John Thomas in Thackeray?” queried
Christine, who was just beginning to enjoy the great English humorist.



PERKINS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND.

Standing near to Dorchester Heights on Broadway and G streets in South Boston.

«Tut, tut! Christine,” Uncle Tom corrected. ‘You are almost as bad
as Jack —”
“Come; I like that!” cried Jack, breaking a stride in half, by way of

protest.
5
7O THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“IT mean that Artemus Ward query of yours in Cambridge,” Uncle
Tom explained. “To far too many of this generation Artemas Ward is
only, as Jack said, America’s funny man, and John Thomas means Thack-
eray’s English flunky. Instead, to Americans, those names should stand
for the two leading generals in the early American
army, before George Washington took command
here at Boston. To General John Thomas was due
the wonderfully rapid and effective fortifying, by
Washington’s order, of this rise of land called Dor-
chester Heights. There were several heights here-
abouts then, you know, and they commanded the
beleaguered city, as you can readily see.”

They did see this at once, as they stood on the

oe sere BUNKER crest of the hill, beside the fence that separates the

old reservoir basin from the green park. Before

them stretched the chain of treeless islands that dot the broad, blue

harbor; beyond them lay the town, within easy cannon-range, and Bert

declared that he really could n’t see what under the sun the British were
thinking of, to allow the Americans to get in ahead of them.

‘Why did n’t they seize and occupy this height?” he asked.

“Too slow in action, I imagine,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘Howe, who
succeeded Gage as British commander in Boston, did have the idea, but
he failed to carry it out. Washington saw the wisdom of it soon after he
got the lay of the land, and a part of his plan of assault was to have this
hill complete the circle of his fortifications. So he sent General Thomas
here with twelve hundred men one March night in 1776, and under cover of
a friendly fog the earthworks were well thrown up by daylight, just on a
line with where this tablet stands. Read what it says there, Marian.”

And Marian, standing before the squat, unlovely memorial stone, read:



Location of the
American Redoubts
on
Dorchester Heights
Which compelled the Evacuation
of Boston by the British Army
March 17, 1776

“T can just see how it did, can’t you?” said Roger. ‘Look here!
It’s in a direct line with the State-House dome on Beacon Hill.”

‘Howe appreciated the fact, too,” Uncle Tom told them. ‘He in-
stantly prepared to attack the new redoubt.”
ON BUNKER HILL 71





TABLET MARKING LINE OF REDOUBTS ON DORCHESTER HEIGHTS.
Now Thomas Park, South Boston.

“How? the same as he did Bunker Hill?” asked Jack.

“Perhaps,” Uncle Tom replied; “though I doubt if that style of assault
would have been tried again. Buta March storm came on and spoiled his
plans, and that night, upon due consideration, he and his officers deter-
mined to evacuate the town. Washington had outgeneraled him. General
Thomas pushed forward his work and made a strong fort here, but before it
was finished the British army, amounting to nearly nine thousand men,
accompanied by over a thousand Tory refugees, embarked with supplies and
luggage on seventy-eight vessels, and sailed away to Halifax. This was on
Sunday, the seventeenth of March, 1776. From that day Boston was free.”

‘Hurrah for us, and good riddance to them!” cried Jack. ‘Why don’t
we put up a decent-sized monument here?”

‘Probably something better than this crude stone-yard slab will some
day rise on this height,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘Indeed, certain public-
spirited folk are already agitating the matter of a suitable monument on
what they call the spot that marks the first American victory.”

‘Was it the first?” inquired Marian.

‘Why, yes, it must be so,” said Bert. ‘Don’t you see we really were
defeated on Bunker Hill. These fortifications drove the British off. Is n’t
that so, Uncle Tom?”
p2. THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“That ’s about it,” his uncle replied; ‘‘and no doubt the growing wave of
Revolutionary remembrance will some day land a shaft on this sightly spot.

“Of one thing you may be sure, boys and girls,” Uncle Tom told them,
as they descended the hill and took the cars back to the center of town:
“in this land of tablets, as this section of the old Bay State appears to be,
the memorial will not long be lacking that shall indicate the spot where the
guiding hand of Washington first showed its masterly grasp, and added to
the protest of exon and the defiance of Bunker Hill the stern and
compelling measures of Dorchester Heights.”



BOSTON FROM DORCHESTER HEIGHTS.

From an old drawing made by Governor Pownall.
CEA ik ay:
IN GREATER NEW YORK

Along the Shore Line— Historic Towns —The British Plan— Ticonderoga
and Quebec—In Old New York—The Battle of Long Island —The
Great Retreat— Harlem Heights and White Plains —The Fall of
fort Washington.

FEW days later, while on the way to New York, Uncle
Tom drew the attention of his young companions to the
fact that, along the way, were numerous towns that possessed
a stirring Revolutionary record.

“Newport, just off our route,” he said, ‘was for three
years occupied by the British, and, later, was the rendezvous for our French
allies; Stonington, through which we passed, was attacked by the British
early in the war; New London and Groton, its opposite neighbor, suffered
terribly, as that tall monument on the hill will tell you; New Haven, Fair-
field and Norwalk all showed marks of British invasions, in fire, shot, and
sword. In fact, not one of the thirteen colonies lacks its Revolutionary rec-
ord. From Maine to Georgia, from Portland to Savannah, you can study
the record and the relics of those dreadful days of war. For in every col-
ony the desire for independence followed fast upon the uprising of the
Massachusetts minute-men, and the British plan to divide the colonies by
distinct but related invasions laid the touch of war upon every section.” __

“How do you mean?” queried Bert. ‘Did they try to split them



apart?”

«That was their plan,” replied his uncle. ‘Orders went out from the
English councils to occupy, overrun, and terrorize each section separately,
cutting off the eastern from the middle and the middle from the southern
colonies. That was England’s intent; if her generals in America had
been spry enough it might have succeeded.”

“But we had Washington,” said Roger.
73
74 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

STATUE OF ETHAN ALLEN.

By Larkin G. Mead. Placed in Statuary Hall in the Capitol
at Washington, by the State of Vermont, in
honor of its heroic leader.



“Yes, and he was more than a
match for England’s lazy leaders — he
and Nathanael Greene,” Uncle Tom
assented. ‘ You see, in these days of
railroads, steamboats, and bridges, one
cannot imagine this land without those

* modern conveniences. But your great-

great-grandfathers had to get along
without them. So rivers and mountain
ridges kept people separate and at
home; and in war, the possession of
river fords and mountain passes was

_ the key to every military situation.”

“That ’s so,” said Jack. “If they
could n’t wade the rivers or cross the
mountains, they could n’t get any-
where or do anything.”

“Exactly; communication means
union, and this the British aimed to
prevent. See here’—and Uncle Tom,
with his blue pencil, hastily sketched
on his folded newspaper a rough out-
line map of the colonies.

“Here to the north,” he said, “is
the St. Lawrence; here, almost at
right angles to it, is the Hudson —
they bounded New England north and
west; further down, the Delaware and
its tributaries cut away up into middle
New York and its chain of lakes;
Chesapeake Bay and its feeders break
the Pennsylvania ridges; while, from
Virginia to Georgia, the rivers seam
the land from the sea beach to the
hills. It was the British plan to con-
trol these rivers. The St. Lawrence

they held by the occupation of Canada—a section which never shared the
sentiment of independence. Ethan Allen’s capture of Fort Ticonderoga —”
“In the name of the Great Jehovah and the Continental Congress!”

put in Jack.
IN GREATER NEW YORK 75

Uncle Tom smiled.

‘Do you know what he is said to have said, Jack?” he asked.

“Why, I have said what he is said to have said. What else is he said
to have said?” Jack demanded, in what Bert called “his reiterative protest.”

“Oh, Uncle Tom! Did n't Ethan Allen roll out those splendid words?”
cried Marian. .

“Perhaps,” her uncle answered. “But old Vermonters tell us that
when the impetuous Allen, at the head of his ninety followers, roused the
surprised commander at night, he called out to that gentleman roughly :
‘Here! come out of that, you old rascal, and give us the fort, quick, or
we ‘ll smoke you out like rats!’”

“Oh, I just won’t believe that,”
Marian declared. ‘It does n’t sound
half as nice.”

“T should n’t wonder, though,”
Jack decided, with a nod of approval.
“Those Green Mountain boys were
rough-and-ready fellows.”

“They got the fort, anyhow,” said
Roger.
: “Yes, and its capture brought into
prominence a brave man who after-
ward went wrong,” Uncle Tom added.

“| know,” said Christine. ‘“ Bene-
dict Arnold.”

“The traitor!” cried Jack, lunging
_at the supposed renegade a vindictive
dagger-thrust with his fountain-pen.

_ Qh, but was he brave?” asked
Marian. ‘I thought he was every-
thing bad.”

“His great crime must not blind
our eyes to his great courage,” Uncle
Tom replied. ‘Benedict Arnold is
one of the world’s terrible examples of OLD ST. JOHN’S GATE, QUEBEC.

a man of great possibilities wrecked Near here, Montgomery fell.
by his inability to conquer himself.”

“But, talking of conquest,” said Bert, ‘Quebec was n’t much in that
line, was it, Uncle Tom?”

‘No, it was a sad failure,” Uncle Tom answered, “although the march

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ao
WH

a

a







































































































































































































































DRAWN BY E. H. BLASHFIELD ENGRAVED BY J. H. E. WHITNEY.

“*CAN THE YANKEES GET QUEBEC?’”
IN GREATER NEW YORK 77.

of the Americans terrified the Canadians and set all the beleaguered town to
asking, ‘Can the Yankees get Quebec?’ As a matter of fact, Washington’s
plans were excellent, but the obstacles in the way were almost insurmount-
able. Arnold’s march through the Maine woods was a series of fearful
hardships; Ethan Allen, over-hasty as usual, ‘got rattled,’ as you boys say,
in an attempt to capture Montreal on his own hook, and, instead, was cap-
tured himself; Schuyler, an able general, was taken sick and had to give up
the lead, and only Montgomery and his thousand men safely crossed the
border and captured Montreal. Hurrying toward Quebec with but three
hundred men, he found Arnold and his remnant beneath the heights of
the city, and there a thousand bedraggled Americans attempted to storm the
strongest fortress in America garrisoned by two thousand British soldiers.
Leading a forlorn hope, Montgomery, in the teeth of a wintry Canadian
northeaster, stormed one of the barriers and fell dead. Arnold, leading
another forlorn hope against another barrier, had almost carried it when he
fell wounded. A sortie of the British streamed out of the gates, one half
of the Americans were captured, and the invasion of Canada ended in sorry
defeat before the walls of Quebec.”

“That was a shame!” cried Jack, pounding Bert’s knee emphatically.

‘Perhaps'not,” his uncle replied. “Through failure we learn the way to
success. Out of this Canadian defeat came the caution, the patience, and
the knowledge when and how to strike, that developed Washington into a
great commander, and led the way to the final act at Yorktown.”

“But all this has led us away from your map, Uncle Tom,” said Bert,
never forgetful of starting-points.

‘That ’s so,” said Roger; “what about the rivers?”

“The British held the St. Lawrence and were sure of Canada,” said
Uncle Tom, returning to his blue pencil and his outline map. ‘“ Thereafter,
the American Revolution became a series of struggles for the possession of
the Hudson, the Delaware, and the rivers of the South. We are all to be in
New York for a while; suppose we sandwich a little patriotism between your
days of pleasure, and take a look at the places made famous by this struggle
for the Hudson and for the Delaware ‘in the times. that tried men’s souls’
here in America, when George the Third was king. What say you?”

And Jack, beating time, led off the company in an “under-the-breath”

chorus of
“So say we all of us;

So say we all.”

The “ patriotic picnic,” as the children, adopting Jack’s convenient phrase,
persisted in calling their search for Revolutionary reminders, gave them
78 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

many pleasant outings in and about the metropolitan city. While Uncle,
Tom went at it systematically, he was too wise a cicerone to weary his
young comrades by too much sight-seeing along one particular line. A
day here, a day there, interspersed with other occupations, gradually covered
the ground, and gave his “picnickers” an excellent idea of the Revolutionary
operations in and around New York.

Taking an early Sunday-morning stroll, long before church hours, about
that section of lower Broadway so busily crowded at all other times in the
week, he brought the boys and girls to what he called the initial letter in
New York’s Revolutionary chapter. It was the tall building of red brick
known as Number One, Broadway.

Uncle Tom pointed out the bronze tablet set in the front wall by the
Society of the Sons of the Revolution. At once, as was their custom, the
young people read the inscription aloud, in moderated chorus:



















































Here stood Kennedy House,
Once Headquarters of
Generals Washington and Lee.
On the Bowling Green
Opposite, the Leaden Statue
of King George was
destroyed by the people
July 9, 1776, and later
made into bullets for the
American Army.



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































“Well, that does give us a
good starter, and that ’s a fact,”
said Jack.

“T did n’t suppose you had
any places marked like that
in New York,” said Roger.
i Paat sine:

“Oh, you must n't think
Boston does it all, Roger,”









Pn Marian retorted. ‘We know
NUMBER ONE, BROADWAY, IN 1776. what to do, too.”
The old Kennedy House (Washington’s Headquarters) and the Watts 6 Wish I ’d been there |

Mansion. Bowling Green opposite.

Would n’t I have held the
ropes, though, that pulled the statue over!” cried Jack. ‘Made into
bullets, eh? Well, that was giving old Georgy a Holland for a Gulliver,

was n't it?”
IN GREATER NEW YORK 79

“A what?” came the puzzled query, while even Uncle Tom seemed
at sea.

And Marian said, ‘There! I know that ’s just another of Jack Dun-
lap’s horrible misquotations. Where did you get it from?”



NUMBER ONE, BROADWAY, IN 1897.

“Out of my extensive reading, ma’am,” replied her brother. ‘“ Don’t
think that you monopolize all the education of the family, my dear.”

Then Uncle Tom saw a light. He laughed aloud.

“Poor Jack!” he said. ‘He does hit the bull’s-eye sometimes, though
more by luck than skill, I fear. I recognize his quotation, Marian. It’s a.
historic tit for tat; he means a Roland for an Oliver—those two famous
paladins of old Charlemagne, you know. And it does fit this case; for, in
melting George the Third into bullets for their own use, his American
rebels returned him, with thanks; really a tit for tat, you see.”

“Thanks, Uncle Tom,” said Jack, bowing deeply. ‘‘ You appreciate
me. Praise from —”

“There, there! pray don’t try another on us, Jack,” implored his uncle.
“Tt is really too brain-fatiguing to unravel them.”

Standing in that famous spot about which centered so many of the dra-
matic happenings of old New York, they pictured to themselves that excit-
ing day in Bowling Green, and the others that so quickly followed. In
fancy they saw again the flying post-rider speeding down Broadway with
his tidings of Lexington fight; they saw the volunteer companies parading
the streets, drilling for liberty; they watched the Sons of Liberty drive off
80 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



FROM THE PAINTING BY EDWIN A. ABBEY.

IN VERY OLD NEW YORK

the carts which bore the arms and ammunition of the British reinforcements
ordered to Boston, and Uncle Tom showed them where, at the corner of
Broadway and John Street, the ‘‘confiscated” arms were stored.

In Trinity churchyard they stood before the tall brown shaft that rises
“to the memory of those great and good men who died while imprisoned in
this city for their devotion to the cause of American Independence”; they
saw the one remaining building in City Hall Park which was one of
those dreadful British prisons; they stood before the tomb of the hero of
Quebec, the brave Montgomery, set in the wall of old St. Paul’s; they heard
again, before his touching statue in the shadow of the granite Post-office,
the moving story of the bravery and death of glorious Nathan Hale: they
looked from the broad Battery out upon the splendid harbor, while Uncle
Tom traced for them on the hazy horizon, off toward Sandy Hook, the track
of the king’s fleet which brought, in the summer days of 1776, a great Brit-
ish army, with its hated Hessian contingent, for the subjugation of New
York and the control of the valley of the Hudson.

‘And that brings us,” said he, ‘to our next notable conflict — the battle
of Long Island. To-morrow or the next day we will cross the bridge and
study that fight upon its own historic ground.”

On the heieered day, crossing the great web-like span of fhe: Brooklyn
Bridge, the party of investigators descended to the street on the Brooklyn
side, and were soon speeding in the Flatbush “trolley” to the main battle-
ground in Prospect Park.
IN GREATER NEW YORK 81





IN THE HOTEL IMPERIAL, NEW YORK.

PLAYING AT BOWLS ON BOWLING GREEN.

As they went, Uncle Tom endeavored to give them a brief outline of the
battle they were to study.

“The battle of Long Island,” he told them, “was something in the na-
ture of what the Western cattlemen would call a round-up. You know what
that is, boys.”

“Getting around the cattle and Soren driving them into a pen or
corral, is n’t it?” queried Bert.

“Yes; and in this case,” said Uncle Tom, “the pen was the Americans’
own line of fortifications, poorly constructed and barely half made and half
manned, stretching almost from the Narrows to Hell Gate. General Howe,
who had succeeded Gage at Boston —”

“And been driven out himself,” put in Roger.

“Yes,” commented Uncle Tom, ‘‘—had learned a lesson from his Ameri-
can foemen, and, when he came sailing in through the Narrows to the in-
vestment of New York, had a plan of action well thought out. He would
land his troops on Long Island, surround the rebels in their lines, force them
back by weight of numbers and discipline to Brooklyn Heights, and there
capture them. From Brooklyn Heights he could command or bombard
New York, precisely as the Americans did Boston from Dorchester Heights,
and thus end the war.”

“Only he did n't,” said Jack.

‘His game was well played,” Uncle Tom continued, disregarding Tack: s

parenthesis. ‘Twenty thousand British and Hessian troops were landed,
6
82 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

and marched by devious ways through the four, passes which cut the lines

of hills that stretched across the island.

Many of those hills to-day are

leveled, but you can see traces of what they then were, in Prospect Park,



THE MEMORIAL ARCH.

At the entrance of Prospect Park, Brooklyn. This arch, erected as a
memorial to the Soldiers and Sailors of the Civil War, overlooks
almost the entire range of the Battle of Long Island.

in Greenwood Cemetery, and
on toward Jamaica. To these
twenty thousand Washington
could oppose scarcely ten
thousand men, half of them
militiamen and fresh volun-
teers. _But some of the ten
thousand were fighters,— the
Marylanders especially,— and
to-day they are remembered as
the heroes of the fight.”

‘What did they do?” asked
Marian.

“T ’ll show you, my dear,
on the very spot,” replied
Uncle Tom. “The battle was
really more a series of skir-

mishes or small engagements than a single conflict, but some of these
were bloody and obstinate. General Howe’s plan worked well. By three



THE TABLET IN PROSPECT PARK.

In Battle Pass, showing the line of defense.

roads his three detachments advanced upon the Americans, while he, with
ten thousand troops, marching silently in the dead of night, and guided by
GREATER NEW YORK 83

a.Tory farmer, got into the rear of the Americans on the Jamaica road.
On the morning of the twenty-seventh of August, 1776, the Americans
found themselves surrounded and in the heat of a desperate battle, the
line of which stretched over ten miles or more of country. There could
be but one result. Washington, fearing for New York as well as for
the Brooklyn defenses, hurried over the river .with reinforcements.
Greene, who had studied and alone knew the ground, was too sick to
move. No other general officer was capable of filling his place. Wash-
ington saw at once that Howe had the advantage of position, discipline, and



BATTLE PASS.

From the Terrace and Arbor, Prospect Park. This gives a bird’s-eye view of the main battle-ground.

numbers; and as he watched the fight, helpless to check or concentrate it,
he wrung his hands in anguish and cried, ‘Good God! what brave fellows
I must lose this day !’” i

“Why did n’t he chip right in and lead them on?” asked Jack.

‘Washington never was backward about rushing in and leading on
when it would do any good, I assure you. But this was not a case where
individual leadership could avail anything,” Uncle Tom replied, as, leaving
the cars by the splendid memorial arch, they entered the Park through the
main gate, and hailing a Park carriage, rode to Sullivan Heights.

“Here,” said Uncle Tom, as they stood among the cages of the “ Zoo,”
“General Sullivan, who had command outside of the fortifications, was sta-
tioned; but down below us is the slope on which the fiercest fight occurred.”

They descended the hill, crossed the Vale of Cashmere, and came out
84 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION
*&

- upon a swelling lawn where, in the face of a broken, tree-shaded knoll,
Uncle Tom halted them before a bronze tablet.

“Line of defense, August 27, 1776, Battle of Long Island, 175 feet south.

Site of Valley Grove house, 150 feet north,” read Bert and the others.
, “This is Battle Pass,” explained Uncle
Tom, ‘where the Hessians, twice repulsed,
finally swarmed upon Sullivan’s men, and
drove or captured them, forced the redoubt,
and combining with the rest of the British
army, finally sent the defeated Americans
flying for safety within the weak security of
their Brooklyn defenses. So the round-up,
you see, was successful, although some of
the ‘cattle’ were obstinate.”

“But what about the Maryland men?”
asked Marian.

For answer, Uncle Tom led them back
across the lawn to where, above a broad drive-
way, upon a sightly slope, rose a graceful
shaft of granite and marble, topped with a
polished globe.

: “Read the inscription, Marian,” he said,
THE MONUMENT TO THE “while Jack gets his kodak ready. Is n't
MARYLAND MEN. it a fine location? The monument was
neat ree splaced aMere wings 1805 .thirougit thesehoreaor
the Maryland Society of the Sons of the
American Revolution, and is a beautiful shaft, well worthy a shot.”
And Marian read:



“In Honor of
Maryland’s Four Hundred
Who on this Battle-field,
August 27, 1776,
Saved the American Army.”

‘How did they save it?” queried Christine, as Jack shot his kodak.

‘‘ By facing about here, and, against terrible odds, holding off the swarm-
ing enemy until the bulk of the Americans could withdraw. Then,” said
Uncle Tom, “surrounded, flanked, decimated, but heroic to the last, they
surrendered, sacrificing themselves for their comrades and their cause.”

“Good for them!” cried Jack, who had taken what he considered a most
satisfactory picture. ‘‘ Now let’s get the battle-field from the arbor.”
IN GREATER NEW YORK 85

He did so, and added other pictures to his roll of films. For Uncle Tom
and his companions “did” Revolutionary Brooklyn thoroughly, traversing
the ground from the Cortelyou house, where the Marylanders almost
‘‘bagged” Cornwallis, to the
points now swallowed up
by the great and growing
city, where hot and deadly
fights occurred.

At last they stood beside
the tall flag-staff on what,
in 1776, was Fort Putnam,
and now is called Fort
Greene. At their feet
stretched away Greater
New York, the cities of
Brooklyn and New York so merged into a tall and broken sky-line that
the dividing river was obliterated and the great bridge seemed suspended
above the crowding roofs. Under their feet, on the lowest terrace of the
high redoubt, was the “tomb of the martyrs ”—the vault in which are laid
the bones of those brave but unfortunate patriots who died in the dreadful
prison-ship Jersey, then moored near by in the Wallabout. This and the
story of the battle seemed to tell of disaster, and Bert said soberly, “And it
was a defeat, Uncle Tom?”



















THE PRISON-SHIP “JERSEY.”



ET



OVER GREATER NEW YORK.
View from the Tomb of the Martyrs, Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn.

“Certainly a defeat, my boy,” Uncle Tom answered; “but the battle of
Long Island simply had to be fought. The defense of New York from
6* :
86 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION





THE RETREAT FROM LONG ISLAND.

Washington directing the passage of the American Army across the East River, at night. The location is near the Brooklyn
pier of the great bridge.

Brooklyn was certain to be a failure if once a strong and disciplined force
were concentrated on Long Island. Had General Howe followed up his
success, the army of Washington would practically have been wiped out.
But Howe was dilatory, as usual; and Washington, in a retreat that is one
of his greatest achievements, carried the American army across to New
York, and compelled his adversary to fight yet other battles before New
York was wrested from ‘the rebel grip,’ as they called it.”

‘A retreat an achievement?” cried Roger.

“Assuredly,” said Uncle Tom. ‘“ Two days after the battle of Long
Island, Washington skilfully laid his plans, and while the British were pre-
paring to gobble up the whole American army, in the teeth of a drenching
IN GREATER NEW YORK 87

storm and under cover of a friendly fog, in boats manned by Glover and
his hardy Marblehead fishermen-soldiers, the American army silently stole
away, with all their arms, guns, and military stores —”

‘And General Howe was left!” cried Jack, his spirit recovering from

the Long Island defeat. ‘Well,

“ |. . he who fights and runs away
May live to fight another day,

I suppose, and G. W. did certainly know how to do that.”

‘He did, certainly,” said Uncle Tom; “and military critics regard his
masterly retreat from Long Island as sufficient to rank him among the great
captains of the world.”

The day in Brooklyn thus proved most successful, and Uncle Tom, fol-
lowing it up soon after with a visit to the field of operations on Manhattan
Island, showed his young folks what he called “the sequel to Long Island.”

He explained to them that Washington, expecting that Howe would
bombard New York from Brooklyn Heights, advised the destruction of the
city, but was overruled by Congress.

« At last, however,” he said, ‘the British crossed the East River and
landed at Thirty-fourth street. Here the Americans posted to oppose
them became panic-stricken. They scattered like sheep, while Washington,
distracted by their lack of courage, stormed at them like a Trojan, and
would have sacrificed his life leading a forlorn hope in assault, had he not
been urged away.”

“Then G. W. could get mad, eh?” said Jack. “I thought nothing ever
ruffled him.” .
“Nothing ever did, except cowardice,” said Uncle Tom. ‘He could

forgive even stupidity, but he had no patience with a coward.”

‘I know I should have been one,” Marian declared.

“Oh, well, you ’re a girl,” said Jack apologetically. ‘That does n’t
count.”

“Does n’t it, though, Master Jack?” cried Uncle Tom. “It counts very
much sometimes, as history will tell you. And I’m pretty sure that if the
test ever should come, my girls here”—and he passed an arm lovingly
about his ‘gleams of sunshine,” as he called Marian and Christine—‘ would
prove as brave as did plucky Mistress Robert Murray, who at her comfort-
able house on Murray Hill (that’s just about at Park Avenue and Thirty-
seventh street, you know) detained the whole British advance by her
cleverness, and gave Washington time to escape.”

“How?” asked Christine. -
88 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

‘“By forcing her hospitality upon General Howe and his officers, and
fixing up a fine dinner for them, just as they were in hot pursuit of Putnam
and the rear-guard of the retreating Americans.”

“Then they did retreat,” said Bert, while Marian clapped her hands.



MRS. ROBERT MURRAY ENTERTAINING BRITISH OFFICERS WHILE PUTNAM ESCAPES.

“They had to,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘“ Howe’s force was too strong to
resist, and Washington began another masterly retreat up the valley of the

Hudson.”

“But about Mrs. Murray?” said Christine.

‘Why, she made herself so agreeable at dinner,” Uncle Tom explained,
“that while Howe and his officers were enjoying themselves, and their ad-
vance was halted, the whole American army got safely beyond the site of
Central Park and behind their intrenchments here in Harlem.”

“Good for her!” said Marian, applauding again.

‘What was there so very brave about that?” Jack demanded. ‘“ Any-
body could give a dinner.”
IN GREATER NEW YORK 89

“Put yourself in her place, and you ’ll soon discover, my boy,” said Un-
cle Tom. ‘Courage does not only exist behind a bayonet or a sword:
courage is the ability to be heroic in any way that faces danger and con-
quers circumstances.”

“But there was a battle here in Harlem, was n’t there?” queried Bert.

‘Right where we now stand,” said Uncle Tom.

He had come with his party by the cable-cars to One Hundred and
Twentieth street and Manhattan
Avenue. Then he had led them in
the shadow of the walls of the new
Columbia College to the heights
at One Hundred and Nineteenth
street, at the end of Morningside
Park, and still surmounted by the
ruins of an old block-house.

“Here ran the fight,” he said.
“It was one of Washington’s plans
to inspirit his men by a rapid
attack on the advancing British.
Had his instructions been followed
out, and the British flanked, it
would have proved something more
than a skirmish; but the Americans
had not yet learned discipline or
obedience. They attacked in front
instead of in flank, and the battle
of Harlem proved but a temporary
check, though a brave and gallant
fight. There ran the line of battle
—all along the ridge where the new



college buildings stand, and up as THE OLD BLOCK-HOUSE.

far as Riverside Drive and Gran t’s At Tenth Avenue and One Hundred and Nineteenth Street,
a ” New York. From just above this spot Washington

splendid tomb. directed the Battle of Harlem.

”

Say,cthat's gtreatyis n't 16
Roger burst in, ‘‘to think that the tomb of our greatest soldier should be
right here on a real battle-ground!”

“Tt is a telling coincidence,” assented Uncle Tom; “and here where we
stand, on this rocky knoll at One Hundred and Nineteenth street, is a point
made glorious by a hero’s fall.”

“Who was that?” asked Marian.
go THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“Our old friend Colonel Knowlton, who fought so bravely at the rail-
fence on Bunker Hill,” Uncle Tom answered. ‘From down yonder at
One Hundred and Twelfth street and Twelfth Avenue, he fought the High-
landers, disputing the ground step by step, until forced back ‘to this high
bluff. Here, standing. at bay, he and his
comrade Major Leitch fell pierced with
wounds, while the ever-ready Marylanders,
charging in, routed the Highlanders and
brought off Knowlton’s command. Over
this very bluff on which we stand Knowlton
fell, fighting until death.”

Leaving. the heights of Harlem, the
party crossed to the “ Elevated,” and riding
as far north as One Hundred and Seventy-
fifth street, set off to discover the remains
of Fort Washington, considered when built,
so Uncle Tom informed them, an uncon-
querable redoubt.

It proved really a journey of discovery,
for even the polite policemen could not di-
rect them; but accosting a bevy of small
boys, they found their guide.











“T kin tek yer to the ol’ fort,” said the

PE HOME OR CENERSLP CRANE “leaderrot, the In Riverside Park. It stands upon the line of battle sorts ales
of the fight on Harlem Heights. nuthin’ there, unless yer dig.

Up hill and down dale, through fields,
over a deep railroad cut, and into a grove he led them; and there, shaded
by great trees, he pointed it out.

‘That ’s the ol’ fort,” he said.

Uncle Tom was delighted.

‘Right you are, my boy; here it is,” he said. “Just enough of it
remains to stand in proof. See, here are the sloping curtains, and here are
two of the five corners—for it was a five-sided bastioned earthwork, you
see. On this height it commanded the river, and with its outlying defenses
had a circuit of six miles: It was indeed the inner citadel of all the
northern defenses of the island, and was an excellent fortification. You
can see that, after all these years of change, it is still wonderfully preserved
in outline.

‘General Howe,” Uncle Tom explained, “sought to put into execution
here the same tactics that had gained him Long Island. He did not dare to
IN GREATER NEW YORK gl

For the Landon Magazine 3778,
4 40



mith the agacanthoks
aulotterrnimarkable
Lares of
= HEL L-GATEZ.
A a J

TPP wee

=

34 Barrwkhs AD ae eh
Quarters,and birt when theKinigs
Trew landed atBogs Pont:

fie 4 <
e Zs

5 fo

British StatuteMiles .
2









Kip’s Bay is where the British landed at Thirty-fourth street — McGowan’s Pass is just below Grant’s tomb — Inclenburg is where
Mrs. Murray lived — Snake Hill is just above Point of Rocks, where Knowlton fell— Fort Washington is where Magaw
surrendered — Fort Lee, across the river, is where Washington watched the disaster.

attempt an assault on the fortifications on these broken heights; but, instead,
would encircle the Americans, cut them off from the city on the south and


g2 . THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

the country on the north, and thus entrap them. Forced across the Har-
lem, the Americans intrenched themselves at White Plains, a few miles
above here, in Westchester County. On and around the slope of Chatter-
ton Hill, west of the little Bronx River, and near to the village, the two
armies, each thirteen thousand strong, again stood face to face.”

‘“Much of a battle?” asked Jack.

“Howe expected it to be the decisive and closing battle of the war,”
Uncle Tom replied. ‘‘ But the Americans fought with so much spirit that
they were able to retire with credit, and Howe, as usual, ‘waited for rein-
forcements.’”

“That means that he was whipped, then,” declared Roger.

“Tt was almost that,” said Uncle Tom; “for while he waited, Washing-
ton, by another of his masterly retreats, fell back to North Castle, five miles
away, a high ground from which the British army could not dislodge him.”

‘“Good generalship,” was Jack’s patronizing comment.

“Indeed it was,” his uncle agreed. ‘ Howe changed his plans and fell
back to the attack upon Fort Washington, here where we stand. It had
been held by the Americans after the retreat from New York, contrary to
Washington’s desire, and was garrisoned by twenty-five hundred men.

a Seca to me they ought to have held it, if it was so strong a work,”
said Bert critically.

“Tt was not well eee had no water, and. was not prepared to
withstand a siege,” Uncle Tom explained. ‘But worse than this, treason
was abroad. Dumont, the adjutant, one of our earliest traitors, deserted to
the British with a correct plan of the defenses. At once the fort was sur-
rounded by three storming-parties, who completely invested it, north, south,
and east, while a war-ship in the river bombarded it from the west. Piece
by piece the outer defenses were taken. The whole garrison was crowded
into this little space where we stand, and where heres is scarcely standing-
room, as you see, for a thousand.”

“It is pretty cramped quarters, and that’s a fact,” said Jack.

‘“Rescue was impossible; surrender was the only alternative. Magaw,
the brave commander, made a brief but spirited resistance, and finally sur-
rendered; while Washington, across the river yonder at Fort Lee, unable to
help in any way, could only stand anxiously watching, a spectator of the
defeat and capture of twenty-five hundred good fighting-men.”

“Say, I kin show yous the rock over at Fort Lee that Washington stood
on and cried,” announced the little guide, who seemed well “up” in local
history; and it would not have required much to send the whole party to
the Fort Lee ferry to cross over and ‘see that rock.”
IN GREATER NEW YORK 93

But Uncle Tom decided otherwise, and after picknicking awhile on the
green slopes of the old fort, they all went cityward again.

“This Fort Washington scrimmage about settled things for New York,
did n't it?” Jack inquired.

‘Yes; when Magaw surrendered the last American post fell, and New
York became British,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘Washington, crossing into
_ New Jersey, conducted another of his desperate but well-planned retreats
until he had put the Delaware River between him and his pursuers, who
finally gave up the chase, boasting that they would catch him and end the
war as soon as there was ice enough to cross the Delaware.”

“Ah ha! somebody else crossed, if I know my history,” said Bert.

“Right you are,” said Jack. ‘Tell us about that, Uncle Tom.”

‘No use telling without seeing, I imagine,” Uncle Tom replied. “Our
New York campaign has been a success, even if we did have to retreat.
What do you say to changing our base of operations, just as Washington
did, to Philadelphia, and follow up his Jersey campaigns?”

‘Cross the Delaware where he did?” asked Marian, delightedly.

“Surely,” replied her uncle. ‘This is to be an object-lesson, you know.”

‘All except the ice,” said Christine.

“We ’ll take that with our soda,” said Jack. “All in favor of campaign-
ing in New Jersey, hold up their hands. Twice five is ten. All up,
Uncle Tom. It’s a-unanimous vote. The army will now move across the
Hudson.” And three days later it did.



THE REMAINS OF FORT WASHINGTON.

The embankment is just to the west of the railroad cut, and is easily discernible when found. It is on the descending road from
One Hundred and Seventy-fifth street to Fort Washington station. This view is from the outside of the fort.






















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A BRITISH INVASION.
CrAR TER SV
ALONG THE DELAWARE

Where Washington Crossed — The Wintry March — The Dash on Tren-
ton— A Turning-potnt in the War— Princeton's Battle-ground —In
“the Latr of the Tiger” /

BROAD river, broken by a low island and spanned by a
long, covered bridge; a green bank sloping down to the
river's edge, cut by a railroad track and a quiet canal stretch-
ing along peacefully side by side, and parallel to the river
below; a plain wooden railway-station, and, across the ruddy
road, an old-fashioned house faced with yellow stucco; further up the canal-
side a little, low, gambrel-roofed house gray with age; across the river a
group of scattered houses fringed about with trees—this is what, with a
quick glance, the boys and girls took in as they descended from their brief
railway journey from Philadelphia, in answer to the brakeman’s announce-
ment: ‘“ Washington Crossing!”

“So this is the very spot where Washington crossed the Delaware, is
it?” queried Marian, balancing herself on the railroad track and surveying
the pleasant landscape. ‘Pretty place, is n’t it? Not at all as I imagined
it — all icy and snowy and horrid.”

“T don’t see why they make such a talk about it,” Jack remarked criti-
cally. ‘“ What did they go poking. through the ice for? What ’s the matter
with the bridge?”

“Oh, Jack!” came the chorus of protest; and Bert said, “ Why, what are
you talking about, old man? There was n’t any bridge here then — was



)

there, Uncle Tom?’
“Tt looks old enough to have been here then, anyhow,” retorted Jack.
“Just think of this river with its winter current running swollen with
)

ice,” said Roger, trying to picture the scene. ‘“Br-r-r! how cold it must

have been. Were n't they Marblehead fishermen who got the boats across?”
95
96 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“Yes, of Captain John Glover’s regiment,” Uncle Tom replied. “The
same brave fellows who piloted Washington across the East River in that
gloomy August retreat from Brooklyn manned the boats that brought their

fs eee



WHERE WASHINGTON CROSSED THE DELAWARE.

The view is from the east bank, New Jersey side, and it is taken from what is said to be the exact spot where Washington
and his army landed.

determined leader and his heroic men across this placid-looking stream on
that pitiless December night.”

“Not very placid then, I guess,” said Roger.

“Anything but placid, Roger,” replied Uncle Tom. ‘Choked with ice,
fringed with gathering snow, pelted with hail and sleet — that was the pic-
ture here as the dusk of Christmas fell in 1776. Come; let’s go over to the
Pennsylvania side and do this crossing systematically — without the boats.”

They paid their toll to the skeptical bridge-keeper, who gruffly doubted
even the existence of Washington, in reply to their eager query as to the
exact point of crossing, and walked briskly across the thousand-foot bridge
that unites the New Jersey and Pennsylvania sides of the Delaware.

To still their indignation at this startling official disbelief, Uncle Tom,
as they walked, catechized them as to the steps that led up to this Christmas
crossing of the Delaware ; for he had already outlined the tale.
ALONG THE DELAWARE 97

t

They answered well, for they had imbibed the whole story — the mas-
terly southward retreat of the little American army after the fall of Fort
Washington and the evacuation of Fort Lee—the chase through “the
Jerseys” by Howe and Cornwallis—the shrewd manner in which Wash-
ington “corralled” all the boats along the river for miles, and crossed the
Delaware at Trenton just as the British advance, led by Cornwallis, reached
the bank—the failure of the British leader to get any boats for the cross-
ing —his decision to occupy the New Jersey side of the river — Washine-
ton’s decision to make a desperate attack at some weak point in the British
line —the gathering of one section of his little army along the Pennsylvania
bank of the Delaware, above Trenton, and their rendezvous at this very
point upon which, so Un-
cle Tom told them, they
were now looking, as they
emerged from the cavern-
ous mouth of the covered
bridge and stood in the
bright sunshine on the
Pennsylvania shore.

“This was then called
McKonkey’s Ferry,” said
Uncle Tom. “It is now
Taylorsville. It is nine
miles above Trenton, and
the approach to that town,

SSN

SS
SS

ESS

ae
wh

on the New Jersey side,
was by two roads, along
which certain patriot far-
-mers of New Jersey had
volunteered to guide the
Continentals.”

Turning to the right,
as they emerged from the
bridge, Uncle Tom led oe

WASHINGTON GIVING DIRECTIONS FOR “CORRALLING
his party a short distance THE BOATS.
along a pleasant village
street, and then suddenly stopped before a roomy brown house which, so he
said, was the home of Doctor *Griffee.

And there, in Doctor Griffee’s front yard, they saw before them a plain

three-course, stunted monument of brown sandstone, upon the face of which
7


98 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Marian speedily read thig inscription, placed upon the tablet upon its erec-
tion in 1895, by the Bucks County Historical Society :



NEAR THIS SPOT
WASHINGTON
CROSSED THE DELAWARE
ON CHRISTMAS NIGHT, 1776.
THE EVE OF THE BATTLE OF
TRENTON,



“But I want to see the very,
real spot, Uncle Tom,” said Christine. ‘This
says ‘near’ it.”

In reply to Uncle Tom’s knock at the door, a friendly lady and her
pleasant-faced young daughter came from the house and cheerfully answered
all the questions of the visitors.

The lady showed where the old road had turned toward the river, run-
ning through what was now her vegetable-garden. She pointed out the
place where the boats gathered that cold Christmas day and where, later, a
small monument had been raised on the river brink to mark the spot of
embarkation,

“The stones of that old monument,” their hostess told them, ‘‘ are now
worked into the foundations of the new monument up there by our front







[CHRISTMAS

fence.

“And down here, just where we are standing, marched Washington's
men,” said Uncle Tom, “each soldier carrying three days’ rations and forty
rounds of ammunition. They were almost barefooted; the blood from their
wounded feet reddened the freshly fallen snow as they marched.”

“ Poor fellows!” said Christine the sympathetic.

“Perhaps they did n’t mind it so much as you think,” said Jack. “They ’d
got used to it by that time, I guess; and besides, they knew where they
were bound.”

‘So did some of the enemy,” added Uncle Tom. ‘A Tory farmer saw
what was up, and sent a note to the nearest British post — which happened
to be the Hessian camp at Trenton. But Colonel Rahl, the commander,
was having too good a time celebrating Christmas, and stuck the note in
his pocket without reading.”

“My! but that was a narrow escape,” said Marian.

“Tt was a pitiless night—dark, cold, aiid dismal; the air was full of
mingled snow and hail; the river was choked with floating cakes of ice.
But Glover’s Marblehead men were ready; and so was Washington, even
ALONG THE DELAWARE 99

though the two other divisions that he had ordered to codperate with him
failed to keep the appointment.”

{“Why was that?” asked Bert.

“They thought the night was so bad that the march would not be made,”
Uncle Tom explained.



MILMORE’S STATUE OF GENERAL GLOVER.

General John Glover, of Marblehead, was the hero of the retreat from Long Island and of the crossing of the Delaware.
His statue stands in the broad central walk on Commonwealth Avenue, Boston.

“H’m! guess they did n't know G. W. very well,” said Jack. “He
never went back on his word.”

“He did n’t this time, surely,” Uncle Tom remarked. ‘‘ The boats were
manned; rank upon rank the soldiers passed aboard, and Knox, the Boston
bookseller, with a big heart and a voice just as big, shouted out Washing-
£00 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION









































































































































































































































“ABOVE THE CROSSING-PLACE.”

On the canal parallel to the Delaware River.

ton’s orders as he stood by his chief, who, right here where we stand, sat on
an overturned and empty bee-hive anxiously watching the crossing of the
troops — twenty-four hundred men with eighteen pieces of artillery.”

“Did n't he go over in the last boat, striking an attitude and with the
Stars and Stripes wrapped around him, same as in the picture?” asked Jack.

“TI can’t say, Jack,” Uncle Tom replied, “the painters made it so, and
they ought to know, for both Peale and Trumbull were at Trenton. But,
however he crossed, it was hard lines. The jagged ice floating down the
river made progress slow and difficult; but the Marblehead men pulled and
poled through it; the New Jersey farmers piloted the fleet across, and by
three o'clock in the morning of December 26, the troops were all put across
and Washington was ready to set them on the forward march for Trenton.
Now we'll see just where they landed.”

Once more they crossed the covered bridge, conversing pleasantly with
the country doctor jogging along beside them in his travel-worn buggy, and
passing over the canal stood beside the six-foot sandstone monument, in the
face of which was set a bronze tablet stamped with the eagle and laurel
badge of the Cincinnati.
ALONG THE DELAWARE IOI

Roger read off the inscription in a voice that combined dignity and
esse ately:
THIS TABLET IS ERECTED BY THE
SOCIETY OF THE CINCINNATI IN THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY
TO COMMEMORATE THE CROSSING OF THE DELAWARE RIVER
BY GENERAL WASHINGTON AND THE CONTINENTAL ARMY
ON CHRISTMAS NIGHT OF
SEVENTEEN HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-SIX

But while the rest sentimentalized over the event and its historic record,
Jack hunted up a lady to whom the doctor on the bridge had referred him.
Her family, it seems, had lived for years in the yellow house by the railway
station, arid she at once dropped her gardening tools and took Jack to the
traditional ‘exact spot” where Washington had landed on the New Jersey
side.

Jack hailed his party, and they hastened over the canal bridge and the
railway track, and soon stood in the gentle dip where the old ferry road had
led up from the river in Revolutionary days. Thereupon, Jack put them all
aboard the little punt that lay moored to the bank, and, posing them in
proper attitudes, pushed the punt off at rope’s length and kodaked them all
with an enterprising snap-shot,—‘“ caught in the act of crossing,” he said.

Then they all accompanied Uncle Tom to the little old gambrel-roofed
house on the hill—the only witness of that famous crossing of the icy Dela-
ware. They stood within the
quaint, old-fashioned, heavily-
timbered rooms and tried to re-
construct the historic scene —
even to Washington taking a
hasty bite in that very room at
three o’clock in the morning,
and immortalizing it so long as
its frame shall last.

Standing beside the old
house, Uncle Tom showed them
about where the ferry road had
climbed the rise. ‘Along this,”
he said, i Washington's tattered In this house, which stands near the landing-place, Washington took
regiments slipped over the breakfast at three o’clock in the morning.
slushy. 8 ground to the Bear Tav-
ern, a mile beyond the river. Here, by Washington's command, the little
army divided into two sections—one taking the river road and one the

7*



WHERE WASHINGTON BREAKFASTED.
102 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Pennington highway. Then, with the password, ‘Victory or death,’ they
stole quietly on the unsuspecting Hessians at Trenton, nine miles away.”

The visitors said good-by to the hospitable folk they had met at this
pleasant riverside spot, and, taking the train to Trenton, dropped off at the
Warren street station, and made a bee-line for the tall battle monument that
overtops the roofs and spires of New Jersey’s famous capital.

In the center of the town, at the junction of Warren and Greene streets,
they came upon the tall white shaft that commemorates that day of surprise,
of terror and of blood, of victory and of death.

‘“What a splendid place to set up a monument!” said Marian.

‘And what a fine monument!” said Roger.

‘It stands upon the exact spot,” Uncle Tom explained, “on which
young Captain Alexander Hamilton, of the New York artillery, planted his
battery that winter morning and raked the startled Hessians. Just back of
the monument on that middle street, where Fountain and Princeton avenues
now cross, Washington stood to direct the fight.”

“Upon his big white horse,” put in Bert. ‘I’ve seen the picture,
have n’t you?— Washington at Trenton. It’s a fine one.”
“It may or may not be authentic,” Uncle Tom replied. “The portrait

painters had a way of labeling Washington’s pictures as at this or that battle.
The records say he stood over yonder— but whether on horseback or be-
side his horse, or whether he had a horse at all, just then, I am unable to
say. The statue on top of the monument, you see, represents him standing.
At any rate, he had plenty to occupy him. Trenton was one of the few
battles of the American Revolution that was a town fight. Up and down
the streets of this old city——then a wooden town of about one hundred
houses — ran the short, fierce conflict. Here down Warren street, where we
stand, Sullivan led his brigade in a resistless charge. His chief aides —
Captain William Washington and Lieutenant James Monroe — fell wounded
in the rush.”

‘Was that Monroe who was afterward President?” asked Bert.

“Yes, he won his spurs at Trenton, under Washington’s own eye,” said
Uncle Tom. ‘Though wounded, both those brave officers sprang to their
feet, and, manning two field-pieces, cleared the street of the Hessians, who
after the first rush tried to repel the charge. General Mercer’s men at
the same instant dashed in a fierce charge down Greene street. Rahl, the
Hessian leader, who had stumbled out of his house at the first assault, tried
to rally his men down there on Greene street. But even as he was shout-
ing, ‘All who are my grenadiers, forward!’ a bullet struck him down, and
he was carried off to die. The lines of retreat were all closed. Stark, the
ALONG THE DELAWARE 103












Vermonter, swung around into State
street with a resistless rush; Glover
of Marblehead held the bridge across
the creek; down yonder, on Han-
over street, Forrest’s six-gun_bat-

tery unlimbered for action; resis-

tance came to an end; the Hessians,

huddled in an apple-orchard close
beside what is now the new post-
office building on State street, lowered











*



4
My,

4
we



,

WASHINGTON CROSSING THE DELAWARE.—THE MARCH TO TRENTON.— WASHINGTON
DIRECTING THE ARTILLERY AT TRENTON.
THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

€
y
}

of



THE BATTLE-MONUMENT AT TRENTON.
ALONG THE DELAWARE I05

their standards, grounded their arms, and Colonel Baylor galloped back to
Washington with the joyful report: ‘Sir, the Hessians have surrendered !’”

‘Hooray for our side!” cried Jack, smiting the old six-pounder that
stands as a relic of the fight before the big bronze door of the battle monu-
ment. - “Must n’t Washington have felt glad?”

“He did, indeed,” said Uncle Tom. “He caught a boy-soldier — one
of St. Clair’s aides — by the hand and cried, ‘This is a glorious day for our
country.’

“And so it was. It turned the gloom of defeat into the sunlight of vic-
tory; it gave heart and courage to the soldiers, to Congress, and to the
people of the colonies ; it established the fame of Washington as a leader and
a soldier, and drew the attention and respect of Europe to the struggling
and defiant colonists. Trenton was the dawn of a new day for America.”

They passed the guardian sentinels at the portals, and stood within the
monument. To a height of one hundred and thirty-four feet it springs into
the air, topped by a heroic figure of Washington, his uplifted hand one
hundred and fifty feet above the street-level. Guarding the doorway in
the pedestal, on the right hand and the left, stand two bronze statues, typical
soldiers of that historic day —the one a private of Glover's fisherman regi-
ment from Marblehead, the other a gentleman private of the Philadelphia
light-horse troop. Upon the four sides of the pedestal are bronze memorial
tablets depicting, in relief, the crossing, the battle, the surrender, and the
historical inscription. This latter Bert, before
they entered, had read for the edification of the
company :

This monument is erected by
the Trenton Battle Monument Association
to commemorate the victory
gained by the American Army
over the forces of Great Britain

in this town on the 26th of December
Anno Domini 1776



Presented by
The Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New Jersey. GENERAL ARTHUR ST. CLAIR,

WHO WAS IN THE FIGHT AT TRENTON,

They rode in the electric elevator to the top of the shaft; they stood
upon the breezy outlook at the crown, and looked off upon the fair, broad
landscape, while at their feet stretched in every direction the roofs and spires
and smoking chimneys of the busy and growing city of Trenton.

“Tt means a good deal,” said Uncle Tom, ‘this monument, reared in
this city and above the streets through which the tide of battle surged that
106 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

brief wintry hour so many years ago. This bronze statue above us may
crumble into dust, but the man it represents will ever be one of the world’s
immortals. Read us here, Christine, the lines that Richard Watson Gilder
wrote in commemoration of the man and the day we are here considering.”
And Christine, taking from Uncle Tom’s hands the « Battle Monument”
pamphlet he had secured, read, on that bright and breezy height, Gilder’s
helpful and inspiring lines:
“Since ancient Time began,
Ever on some great soul God laid an infinite burden:

The weight of all this world, the hopes of man.
Conflict and pain, and fame immortal, are his guerdon!

“And this the unfaltering token
Of him the Deliverer— what though tempests beat,
Though all else fail, though bravest ranks be broken,
He stands unscared, alone, and never knows defeat.

“Such was that man of men;
And if are praised all virtues, every fame
Most noble, highest, purest, then, ah! then,
Upleaps in every heart the name none needs to name.”



GENERAL HENRY KNOX,

WASHINGTON’S RIGHT-HAND MAN AT TRENTON.

“ know him as the inspiration of all that is grand, all that is gracious, all that
is good in American life ; and here at Trenton his fame became glory. Now
let us see the town.”

They descended to earth, and then, walking slowly through the town,
they visited the points made famous by the famous fight: the spot where
Washington stood to direct the assault, the house in which Colonel Rahl
had too much Christmas, the place where he was shot, the house in which
he died, the apple-orchard where the Hessians surrendered, and the points
on the Pennington and the River road by which the Americans had entered
and surprised the town. They examined and noted down the exhibits in
the relic-room of the monument, and studying once again the graceful and
towering shaft that rises upon the street that led straight on from gloom to
glory, listened with real appreciation as Christine, at Uncle Tom’s request,
read the second part of Mr. Gilder’s memorial poem. “It is the moral of
the whole splendid story,” Uncle Tom declared. © And so it was:

“Ye who defeated, ’whelmed,
Betray the sacred cause, let go the trust;
Sleep, weary, while the vessel drifts unhelmed ;
Here see in triumph rise the hero from the dust!
ALONG THE DELAWARE 107

“ All ye who fight forlorn
’Gainst fate and failure; ye who proudly cope
With evil high enthroned; all ye who scorn
Life from Dishonor’s hand, here take new heart of hope.

“ Here know how Victory borrows
For the brave soul a front as of disaster,
And in the bannered East what glorious morrows
For all the blackness of the night speed surer, faster.

“Know by this pillared sign
For what brief while the powers of earth and hell
Can war against the spirit of truth divine,
Or can against the heroic heart of man prevail.”



GENERAL SAMUEL WEBB,
WHO FOUGHT AT TRENTON.

That evening, gathered about the ample hearth of the pleasant inn at
Princeton,—for the night was cool,— the boys and girls listened while Uncle
Tom again went over the story of the fight in the streets of Trenton, and
showed how it led directly to the battle, a week later, fought on Princeton’s
streets and fields, and about the walls of its quaint and central college
building.

“It is well for us to study the battles of Trenton and Princeton to-



THE WILLOWS NEAR PRINCETON.

gether,” he said. “They were but ten miles apart; one followed fast upon
the other—in fact, one was the companion enterprise to the other.”
108 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“Sort of a two-part Revolutionary story, eh?” put in Jack.

“Very much so,” Uncle Tom assented. ‘Cornwallis, angered at Wash-
ington’s victorious dash on Trenton, gave up his trip to England, and
marched against the American leader
with eight thousand men, vowing to
drive him across the Delaware or cap-
ture him and his army.”











“Those British generals were
always going to do such a lot,”
commented Marian.

“They planned well,” said
Uncle Tom; “but, as the
saying is, they reckoned
without their host.”

er hat: @S) “a: “fact:
Washington was a
host in himself,” added
Roger.

«Well, Cornwallis
left this very town of
Princeton on the morn- ~
ing of the second of
January, 1777," Uncle
Tom proceeded. ‘‘He
pushed the American
outposts before him as
he approached Trenton,

and, having cooped up

ee ey) Washington's army in

. arn the town, sat down to rest

and to wait for the morning and

for the reinforcements he had or-
dered to follow him.”

“Did n't the British generals do

a lot of sitting down and waiting?”

“CORNERED, BUT NOT CAGED.”

“The American commander thought things out in Trenton.” queried Marian. :
«“Far‘too much for their own
good,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘And so it proved in this case. Cornwallis

was certain that now he had Washington caged. But he had not.”
“Well, I guess not!” cried Jack.
ALONG THE DELAWARE IOQ

“Cornered, but not caged, the American commander thought things out
in Trenton,” said Uncle Tom. ‘His position was desperate, and he knew
he was no match for the superior force of the British. He had no means for
making a second crossing of the Delaware, still choked with floating ice.
The British sentries were within speaking and hearing distance. But some-
thing must be done, and at once. A brilliant plan came to him. It was
nothing else than to slip out of Trenton by the ‘side door,’ swing around to
Princeton, fall upon and capture Cornwallis’s garrison there, and then hurry
on and destroy the British war stores at New Brunswick before Cornwallis
could catch up with him.”

“That was a fine plan,” said Bert. “ Did it work?”

“The first part worked admirably,” Uncle Tom replied. “With his
usual skill in strategy, Washington threw Cornwallis completely off his



THE BRIDGE ACROSS STONY BROOK, PRINCETON.

Destroyed by the Americans to cut off British pursuit. After the battle of Princeton it was rebuilt as it now stands, in 1792.

guard. He doubled the sentries, piled up the camp-fires, set men to work
throwing up intrenchments, made everything appear as if he were preparing
to defend himself in Trenton to the bitter end, and then quietly withdrew
all his troops from Trenton, without arousing the suspicion of Cornwallis,
and by daylight was down here, just south of Princeton village.”

“Pretty good work, that,” exclaimed Jack.

“Was n’t it, though?” Christine assented.

“There were then in Princeton three British regiments and three com-
panies of cavalry,” Uncle Tom continued. ‘“ Two of these regiments and a
IIO THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

part of the cavalry started for Trenton just as the Americans came into the
town. As they crossed the bridge over Stony Brook,— which I will show
you to-morrow,—the British colonel saw General Mercer and his Americans
on the other side of the stream. He turned, recrossed the bridge, and then
both sides raced for the best standing-ground —the high land above the
stream. General Mercer got there first, and at once gave battle to the
British. But the Americans had no bayonets, and could not stand against
the British charge.”

“Oh exclaimed: ack:

“General Mercer fell, mortally wounded; but as his men fled through the
apple-orchard and past the Quaker church, Washington heard the firing and
marched across to their support. Heading his troops, and with drawn
sword, he dashed to the support of Mercer's men. The British wavered,
turned, and fled down the hill; and Washington, massing his forces, chased



THE OLD CLARK HOUSE, PRINCETON BATTLE-FIELD.

In which General Mercer died.

the fleeing British through the town and into the main college building,
where the other regiment had taken refuge. The Americans thundered at
the college doors, and the British, after a show of resistance, escaped from
the building and were soon in full retreat toward New Brunswick. That
was the battle of Princeton.”

“Pretty good for our side, too,” said Roger.
ALONG THE DELAWARE Ill



QUAKER MEETING-HOUSE, PRINCETON BATTLE-FIELD.

Richard Stockton, signer of the Declaration of Independence, is buried in the graveyard at the right of the picture.

“What did Brother Cornwallis say, I wonder?” queried Jack.

“There is no knowing just what he said, Jack,” laughed Uncle Tom.
“What he did, when he found out how he had been fooled, was to hurry a
detachment Princetonward. It came here to Stony Brook just as the Ameri-
can rear-guard was destroying the bridge by which the newcomers hoped
to cross. So Washington again escaped a fight with a superior force, and
while he retreated one way, toward Morristown, Cornwallis retreated in
another direction, to New Brunswick. He had been outmarched, outgen-
eraled, and outwitted, and the victory rested with Washington.”

“But why did n’t G. W. pitch right in and wipe Cornwallis out?” grum-
bled Jack.

“Good gracious! Jack, do be satisfied, can’t you!” cried Bert. ‘* Wash-
ington knew what he was about; and I guess he had done enough.”

“He certainly had done much — no man more,” said Uncle Tom. ‘‘ His
dash on Trenton and the affair at Princeton entirely changed the look of
things for America. They forced Cornwallis to act on the defensive, and
before spring set in not a red-coat was to be found in all New Jersey out-
side the regular quarters at New Brunswick and Amboy. Washington
112 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

worried and badgered them all winter, never fighting a battle, but keeping
the enemy continually on the anxious seat; and it is worth remember-
ing that, after the surrender at Yorktown, Cornwallis himself expressed to
Washington his admiration of his dash and strategy.”

“Ts that so?” said Bert. ‘What did he say?”

“«VYour Excellency’s achievements in New Jersey,’ said Cornwallis to
Washington, ‘were such that nothing could surpass them.’ ”

“Well! that was kind,” said Jack.

“Tt was recognition of real ability by an able man,” said Uncle Tom;
“for Lord Cornwallis was one of the best of England’s fighting-men.”

Bright and early next morning the visitors to Princeton were abroad;
and thoroughly did they enjoy that fine old university town.

From the vantage-ground of the broad lawn of one of the great country
houses on Stockton street, whose hospitable owner courteously did the
honors as host and topographer, they overlooked the Princeton battle-field
as it climbed the green slope from Stony Brook to the Quaker meeting-
house.

Then they drove over the whole course of the fight. They stood on the
graceful bridge which replaced the old one fought over and destroyed at the
crossing of Stony Brook; they lingered beside the white stone that marks
the spot where the brave Mercer fell; they stood within the very room in
which that heroic leader died, in the old Clark house on the hill; they in-
spected Drumthwacket lodge,— ‘“‘And well named it is, too, for a battle-
ground house,” they all declared,— into which the wounded British officers
were carried; they stood beside the quaint and plain old meeting-house
on the edge of the Quaker burying-ground, where Washington so gallantly
rallied his men, and among whose unmarked graves is that of Stockton, the
signer of the great Declaration.

Then, leaving the past, they walked into the living present, and “did”
the university,— “the lair of the tiger,” Jack called it, with rueful memories
of lost battles on well-contested ball-grounds,— from old Nassau to the
Brokaw memorial, and from Alexander Hall to the new and imposing library.

“Fine place to go to college, eh, Roger?” said Bert, as they all stood
around the big cannon in the center of the campus, and heard from one
of the black-and-yellow-capped students the story of the great college fight
over that highly prized relic. ‘How would you like it?”

“Tt is fine,” assented the prospective Harvard boy, dodging the direct
question.

‘‘An ideal place, I should think,” Marian declared; whereat the black-
and-yellow cap was gallantly doffed, and the whole party was escorted
ALONG THE DELAWARE TeIs3

again to Nassau Hall, to see the class ivies that drape its time-stained front’
and sides.

“Now,” said Uncle Tom, as in the exhibition-room of the old Hall they
halted before George Washington’s portrait in King George’s frame, ‘we
will go back to Philadelphia and follow this great man’s next move; for it
was close about that old Quaker city that the tide of war surged, as Howe
and Cornwallis made a last attempt to capture Philadelphia and control the
lands along the Delaware.”

So, with a warm good-by to beautiful Princeton, with its hospitable estate-
owners, its delightful inn, its Revolutionary sites, its college scenes, its tree-
embowered home of an ex-President of the United States, its broad streets
and its leafy ways, the battle-tourists fell back, as did Washington, upon
Philadelphia, prepared to intercept Howe and Cornwallis, and “have it out
with them,” so Jack declared, “even if we get the worst of it.”

‘““Never mind, dear boy,” said Roger; “we have the advantage of our
respected ancestors. We know just how the story turns out, you see.”

And soon they were speeding back to Philadelphia, filled with enthusi-
asm for fresh Revolutionary enterprises.



THE COLLEGE CAMPUS, PRINCETON.

The old cannon is the exact center of the campus, and is the rallying-ground of the students.
Duportail Steuben Lafayette Washington Scott (of Ky.) Wayne Woodford



Poor Knox Stirling Scammell Patterson Greene Lee (and his dogs)
FROM THE BAS-RELIEF ON THE MONUMENT.

THE COUNCIL OF WAR BEFORE MONMOUTH.

This is one of the bronze tablets encircling the monument at Freehold, N. J., commemorative of the battle of Monmouth. It represents
the Council of War, held previous to the battle, in which Lee openly dissented from the plan outlined by Washington, and,
because his advice was not taken, was sulky, mutinous, and almost treacherous on the battle-field.

J. &. KELLY, SCULPTOR.
GHA Ba Re Vi
ON THE SCHUYLKILL AND THEREABOUTS

By Brandywine Creek — Old-time Obstacles— The fight at the Ford and
on the [ill— Where Lafayette was Wounded — The Chew House— The
Street Light at Germantown— A Baffling Fog— At Valley Forge —
An Object-lesson tn Self-sacrifice— At Monmouth Court-house —The
Monument at Freehold —A Gallant Foeman.

eiELL, Uncle Tom, where to, and what ’s first on the pro-
gram?” Jack inquired, as he squinted a critical eye at
William Penn, perched five hundred feet and more above
the Broad-street asphalt, and wondered whether he could
throw a stone over that elevated guardian of Philadelphia’s
vast City Hall.

Uncle Tom sniffed the morning air. .

‘Breakfast, Jack, as soon as the girls are ready,” he replied. ‘Then,
it ’s such a fine day, I think we ’ll go over the hills to the Brandywine.”

‘That sounds bad, sir, very bad indeed, for a good temperance man,”
said Jack, shaking his head magisterially.

For answer, Uncle Tom clapped his nephew on the back, and literally
ran him in through the hotel entrance, where the others stood laughing at
these early-morning antics.

“Did you ever see two such children?” said Marian, loftily.

Then they all went in to breakfast.

This meal over, they walked leisurely around to the big Broad-street sta-
tion, and were soon speeding off toward Chadd’s Ford on the Brandywine, .



twenty-seven miles from town.

The railway ride was a charming one. It ran through beautiful suburbs,
between low hills and billowy rolling land, green as emerald, and clothed
with oak and chestnut.

Uncle Tom drew the attention of his young people to this broken land,
115
116 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



THE VILLAGE OF CHADD’S FORD.

Below Brandywine summit.

beautiful, indeed, under a bright spring sun, and developed almost to the
verge of landscape-gardening, he admitted, but “mighty hard,” he said,
‘on a leader of troops who is in a hurry to get somewhere.”

“Why, what ’s to hinder him?” asked Bert.

‘Nothing but the hills themselves, Bert,” his uncle replied. ‘“ But you
would find them obstacles enough if you were leading an army. To these
successions of hills may be set down the slowness and difficulty especially
of such a war as our Revolution. With none of our modern facilities for
getting about, a campaign was a continual climbing up and down, by wind-
ing roads, over hills covered with forests, with no telegraph wires for quick
communication, nor any search-lights to show the paths at night.”

“Just as bad for the other side, too, was n’t it?” queried Bert.

“Certainly; and in that fact lay some compensation,” Uncle Tom
admitted.

“What ’s sauce for the goose —” Jack began, but Marian laid a hand
upon her brother’s lips.

“Now don’t, Jack Dunlap!” she commanded; “you know you ’Il get
mixed up.”

“Take this very campaign we are on,” said Uncle Tom, with a side
ON THE SCHUYLKILL AND THEREABOUTS II7

smile at Jack’s discomfiture. ‘‘ Howe sailed from New York. Washington
was in the dark as to his destination. Howe could n't get up the Delaware
because of obstructions. For six weeks the British were literally at sea,
and Washington was held uncertain here in New Jersey before he could
decide just what to do. To-day, the telegraph, the telephone, the rail-
road, and the search-light would render such delays and ignorance im-
possible. Suddenly, Washington heard that Howe’s expedition was far up
Chesapeake Bay. Czesar Rodney A



“Big and burly and bold and bluff,
With his three-cornered hat and his suit of snuff,
A foe to King George and the English State,
Was Czesar Rodney, the delegate,”

quoted Marian, with a bow to her uncle.
«Was that the man, Uncle Tom?” asked Jack.



CHADD’S FORD ON THE BRANDYWINE.

‘¢ The ford called Chadd’s was a shallow part of the creek where the stream is broken by a few spots of island.”

“That ’s the man,” replied his uncle. ‘He galloped about, gathering
his Delaware militia, and sent the information post-haste to Washington.
The general hurried down from his camp above Philadelphia, and on the
eleventh of September, 1777, the two armies came together with a clash

here at the place we are approaching — Chadd’s Ford on the Brandywine.”
8* :
118 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

‘What funny names!” said Christine. ‘Why is it called the Brandy-
wine?”

And for a wonder, as they all agreed, Uncle Tom had to confess, “I
don’t know.” .

“T do!” Bert announced with a great show of satisfaction. “I looked
it up in Townsend’s ‘U. S.,’ that
book of curious facts about the
United States that is in your
father’s library, Jack.”

‘Well, where did the name
come from, Bert?” asked Uncle
Tom.

“Why, you see there was a
Dutch vessel came sailing up
the river once, down near Wil-
mington, you know, and it was
laden with brandy, only the
Dutch folks called it ‘brand-
win.’ The vessel ran aground
and was wrecked, and _ the
brand-win was all lost. But
the Dutchmen, who liked the liquor, were so sorry for its loss that they
spoke of the stream as the place where the brand-win was spilled, and from
that, folks got to calling it Brandywine. And that is its name to-day.”

‘So it was a spill instead of a spree,” said Jack. ‘That ’s better.”

“Good for you, Bert,” said Uncle Tom. “You investigate to some
advantage. I shall remember your explanation.”

They steamed down the slope from Brandywine summit (where the con-
ductor pointed out the battle-ground) and dismounted at the sunny little
wooden station labeled “Chadd’s Ford.” Then, crossing the road, they
waited on the “hotel” piazza until their conveyance was in readiness. A
bright boy who knew the landmarks accompanied them as guide. They
took the long circuit that passed all the headquarters, climbed the hill to the
inn where five roads meet at Dillworthtown, struck off to the left toward the
Lafayette monument and Birmingham church, then swung to the left again
past Chadd’s house, came down the hill by the creamery, crossed the bridge
at Chadd’s Ford, and thus returned to the village tavern from which they had
started. This completed the circuit, and gave them an excellent idea of the
‘lay of the land” whereon was fought the bloody battle of the Brandywine.

The Brandywine itself they found to be but a narrow stream, hardly



WASHINGTON’S HEADQUARTERS,
Above Chadd’s Ford, during the battle of the Brandywine.
ON THE SCHUYLKILL AND THEREABOUTS IIg

more than a creek, winding in
and out through the meadows,
and bordered by slanting wil-
lows. On the further side the
banks were steep, and in Rev-
olutionary days, so Uncle Tom
told them, these sharp, uneven
banks were bordered by forests,
and cut through only at ford-
ing-places for the rough road-
ways of old-time travel.

The- dord. ‘called’ -Chadd’s
they saw was a shallow part of
the creek below the breast of
the dam, where the stream is broken by a few spots of island. Since
1829 a covered bridge, a small pattern of the one across the Delaware at
Washington Crossing, has been the roadway over the creek; but in Rev-
olutionary times the old “Baltimore pike” wound down from the steep bank
above, plunged through the creek, and then rambled on through the meadows
to Chester and Philadelphia.

“From Kennett Square, seven miles above Chadd’s Ford,” said Uncle
Tom, “came Cornwallis.” Then he stopped. ‘Who else came from there?”
he asked. ‘Who once lived at Kennett Square ?”

‘Who did, Uncle Tom? Any one we know?” asked Marian.

“ Animal, vegetable, or min-
eral?” demanded Jack.

“Qh, I know,” said Christine
suddenly. ‘ Bayard Taylor.”

“Ves,” Uncle Tom nodded ;
“and the scene of his delightful
‘Story of Kennett’ is laid right
in this section. You ‘Il enjoy
reading it, now that you know
its environment. Well, from
Kennett Square came Corn-



LAFAYETTE’S HEADQUARTERS,
Above Chadd’s Ford, Brandywine battle-field.



DILLWORTHTOWN INN. : £
From here, Washington directed the retreat WwW allis and Howe with seven

to Chester. thousand British and _ seven

Near Brandywine summit.

thousand Hessians, marching by different routes so as to strike at Washing-
ton in front and rear. The Hessian advance came upon the American ad-
vance here at Chadd’s Ford and drove it across the Brandywine. Wash-
120 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

ington, starting to force the enemy back, heard that Cornwallis had led his

troops around and along the upper road that we took from Birmingham to

Dillworthtown. At once he sent a strong force to the hill just west of the

old meeting-house we stopped at, and there Cornwallis attacked them.”
“Where the monument to Lafayette stands ?” inquired Roger.



BIRMINGHAM MEETING-HOUSE,
Where the fight raged fiercest on the battle-field of Brandywine.

“Pretty near there,” said Uncle Tom; “for there Lafayette was
wounded. It was a sharp fight. The Hessians, who had forced the ford,
hastened to Cornwallis’s assistance, only to be held back by the left wing of
the Americans. But the right wing had a hard time. It was forced from
the field, and would have fled in a panic had not Washington galloped up
with General Greene and reinforcements, brought order back, and held the
field. Then the night came, both sides ceased fighting, and Washington,
seeing that he was outnumbered, fell back in good order to Chester, while
Howe made his headquarters in the big square house we saw on the hill.
It had been a sharp fight, but the British found the Americans not so easy
to handle, and they moved after them very cautiously. As Washington fell
back, Howe advanced, and a few days after the battle of Brandywine he
took possession of Philadelphia.”
ON THE SCHUYLKILL AND THEREABOUTS I2I

“Just what he was aiming for,” grumbled Jack. ‘ Why could n’t we
keep him out?”

‘Washington had not men enough successfully to resist Howe, although
he did not hesitate to attack him,” Uncle Tom explained. ‘ Philadelphia
had to go, but it proved only a hindrance and a drag to the British.”

«Well, it’s a pretty spot here, defeat or no defeat,” Marian commented,
looking all about her.

It was, indeed; and thoroughly did the young people enjoy the beautiful
country and the delightful drive, so punctuated with Revolutionary memo-
rials. Here stood Washington's head-
quarters, old-fashioned, maple-shaded;
there, near to it, Lafayette’s head-
quarters, among encompassing button-
woods — “though why,” Bert criti-
cized, ‘a volunteer aide-de-camp to
the commanding general should him-
self have headquarters is what I don’t
understand.”

“ The’sign says so, and so do the
people,” Marian explained; “and I
don’t see why you should doubt it.”

“T did n’t say I did, Miss Credu-
lous,” replied her cousin; “I merely
remarked that I did n’t understand
why.”

Among the maples they noted the
square house that served as the
American hospital.

“There ’s blood-stains on the
floor,” their young guide told them ;
“but I guess they ’re covered up by
the carpet.”

They lingered before the Birming-
ham meeting-house, about which .
raged the hottest fighting, and looked MONUMENT TO LAFAYETTE
Oye ticewalllinto the old burying. (Crit et a ban Pe eee
ground, now plain as a threshing-
floor, in which had been buried the British slain, their graves flattened by
the British cavalry so that there should no tale be told of decimated ranks.

Last, but by no means least, they gathered about the modest terra-cotta


I22 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

monument raised to the memory of Lafayette, so the inscription told them,
‘by the citizens and school-children of Chester County.” For, “on the
rising ground a short distance south of this spot,” so it informed the reader,
‘Lafayette was wounded at the Battle of Brandywine, September 11, 1777.”

As they saw at least three such spots,—for over this question a fierce
local feud exists,—the travelers were a little confused as to the facts. But,
as Marian said, ‘‘ We know Lafayette was wounded because he said so him-
self. Here ’s what it said on his monument; Uncle Tom copied it down
for me: ‘The honor to have mingled my blood with that of many other
American soldiers on the heights of the Brandywine has been to me a
source of pride and delight.’”

‘“That ’s what he said when he visited here in 1824,” Mr. Eli Harvey
told them, as they rested a while at his comfortable farm-house on the hill.
“T ’ve heard my grandfather say that while he sat swinging his legs on
that there fence —a little shaver, then, he was —he heard Lafayette say he
was wounded and carried under a tree over yonder. But, bless you, it’s
over half a mile from where that West Chester professor put up that there
monument.”

It was too deep a question to solve, so the children gave it up, and soon
after were speeding cityward.

The next day they went to Germantown and Valley Forge — additional
chapters, so Uncle Tom assured them, in the disastrous story of the Schuylkill
campaign, in which Washington so stubbornly contested the British advance.



WHEN LAFAYETTE RODE BY.

“« My grandfather sat swinging his legs on that fence — he was a little shaver then,” said Mr. Harvey.

The ever-present trolley carried them whizzing up the broad and long
highway known as Germantown Avenue, six miles from Philadelphia’s City
Hall, but now a part of the big Quaker city.
ON THE SCHUYLKILL AND THEREABOUTS 123



PHOTOGRAPHED BY W. H. RAU, PHILA.

THE JOHNSON HOUSE, GERMANTOWN,

Where Americans mistook Americans in the fog, and friend fired into friend ; losing by a blunder the battle of Germantown.

“In Revolutionary days,” said Uncle Tom, “this was a little village by
itself, built on both sides of this single street. The battle was a running
street-fight ;

“Like Trenton?” queried Bert.

“Something of the sort. Come, let ’s stop here. This is the central
point of the fight”; and Uncle Tom stopped the trolley before a fine old
stone mansion set far back among its great trees, and led the children
through the broad gateway. Battered statues decorated the velvety lawn ;
broad walks swung around to the stables and back buildings.

«What is it?” asked Roger.

«This was called Cliveden,” replied Uncle Tom, ‘better known, because
of the family which has owned and occupied the mansion for generations, as
the Chew House.”

“The Chew House!” cried Christine. “Why, Uncle Tom! that ’s
where Hugh Wynne and Jack were in the fight.”

«Excuse me, ma’am, I ’m not quite a Methuselah, thank you,” said
Jack, looking a bit puzzled. “What fight? what Jack? and who ’s the
other fellow? Friends of yours?”

Christine laughed merrily.


124 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



or te E SET es NS oat
DRAWN BY HARRY FENN, AFTER A PHOTOGRAPH BY GUTEKUNST.

ENGRAVED By C. SCHWARZBURGER.

THE CHEW HOUSE, GERMANTOWN,

In which the British barricaded themselves and withstood the American assault.

“No, no; I mean in Dr. Mitchell’s new story, ‘Hugh Wynne,’” she
explained. ‘Was n't this the house, Uncle Tom?”

‘This is the house, my dear,” Uncle Tom answered. ‘What an up-to-
date girl you are, Christine! Dr. Mitchell’s snap-shot at the fight is a
fine one.. I wish I had brought the book along. We could have read his
description right here on the spot.”

“Oh, we ’Il trust to you, Uncle Tom,” said Bert. ‘ You tell it.”

“Yes, spin us the yarn,” echoed Jack.

“Tll try to,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘“‘ Howe, you know, was in Philadel-
phia. Washington was in camp fifteen miles to the northwest. He deter-
mined to make a dash down here on the British camp at Germantown,
where the bulk of Howe’s army was stationed. You must imagine this fine
avenue a long, broken line of small gray-stone houses, as Dr. Mitchell tells
us, set in gardens on each side of the highway, with here and there a man-
sion like this home of the Chews. This was the upper end of the town.
ON THE SCHUYLKILL AND THEREABOUTS I25

Down the street, near the Wayne Junction railway station, was the lower
end, not far below the market-place. The British stretched all along here.
Just across from where we stand a British regiment was encamped. Wash-
ington planned his surprise and attack admirably, but things did n’t work
out just as he intended.”

“Somebody blundered, I ‘ll bet!” cried Jack.

“Yes, some one did blunder, and a dreadful blunder it was,” said Uncle
Tom. ‘Down this street, on the other side, Mad Anthony Wayne came



THE ATTACK ON THE CHEW HOUSE.

From an old print.

charging gallantly; down this side swept Sullivan and his men. Together
they routed the British, and sent them speeding for their lives down this
very street. A thick fog came drifting in from the east, and covered friend
and foe. Lord Howe was caught in the rout, and hurried off with the
rest, protesting and storming.”

“Hey! glad of that!” cried Jack the partizan.

‘Down this main street they came, with Wayne and Sullivan at their
heels. The British regiment across the way made a bee-line for this big
house, and barricaded themselves inside it. At once a part of Wayne’s
126 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

division laid siege to the Chew House, but the British could not be driven
out, and kept the American besiegers busy for an hour. Meantime, the
rest of the American advance pursued
the fleeing British; Greene’s men,
swinging around the town, were to
take the British in the rear at the
market-place; but the fog bothered
them, and they were just too late:
for, in the uncertain light, the Amer-
ican right and left, coming together,
mistook each other for enemies, and
fired into each other’s ranks, de-
moralizing the whole army.”
“How dreadful!” exclaimed
Marian.
‘How stupid!” commented Bert.
‘Not so stupid as you think,
my boy,” said his uncle. “A fight
in a fog is even worse than one in
ee the dark. Fog mystifies and mag-
FROM # PAINTING BY R. E. PINE. : nifies. Of course this blunder de-
PEGGY CHEW, layed things. Greene arrived just
The girl who lived in So eee at the time of the battle of too late. Cornwallis dashed up with
reinforcements, the British made a
desperate and successful stand, and Washington reluctantly ordered a retreat.”
“How mean!” cried Roger. ‘Just as the battle was won.”
“It was all the fog’s fault,” explained Bert.
“Yes, sir,” said Jack; “if it had only been a bright morning, we ’d have
had ’em.”



“Tt was a well-planned battle,” said Uncle Tom; “and had things
worked together as Washington intended, it would have been a surprise
and a defeat for the British. As»it was, it was one of those happenings in
war which show how easily a victory almost won may suddenly become a
defeat,”

“Then if Wayne’s men had n’t stopped to hammer against this Chew
house,” said Bert, ‘‘the battle might have been a victory for us.”

“Yes, that and the sad mistake of friend mistaking friend for foe,” said
Uncle Tom.

“T think that was the worst of all, was n’t it, Marian?” said Christine.
‘Where did it happen — near heré, Uncle Tom?”
ON THE SCHUYLKILL AND THEREABOUTS 127

‘‘ Down the street, in front of what is called the Johnson house; I'll show
it to you,” said Uncle Tom.

He did so, after they had first walked about the “broad grounds of the
fine old Chew mansion, which had so nobly stood a siege. They saw, too,
the Billmeyer house, upon the steps of which Washington stood to direct the
fight, and the half-dozen other survivors of that battle in the fog. Then
they went back to town, and after an early lunch took the train to Valley
Forge.

For of course they must go to Valley Forge. “It has more of pathos
-and sentiment for us,” said Uncle Tom, “than any other place in the whole
American Revolution.”

“ But it was n't a battle-field,” said Bert.

“It was a moral battle-field, my boy,” Uncle Tom replied; “and aytre-
mendous victory for Washington and the right. It was winter quarters, but
not rest. While Howe in Philadelphia was wasting valuable opportunities
for action, Washington, among the snow-covered huts of Valley Forge,
amid privation, suffering, and poverty, was making men and heroes out of
his barefooted, ragged tatterdemalions. He put his soldiers to the hardest

are



THE STATION AT VALLEY FORGE.

“Even the plain sign-board with the words ‘ Valley Forge’ gave them a thrill.”

of tests, and nobly did they stand the trial. Valley Forge was America’s
object-lesson in self-sacrifice.”

At the little wooden station by the Schuylkill, twenty-one miles from
Philadelphia, even the plain sign-board’ with the words “ Valley Forge”
128 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION





































WASHINGTON AT VALLEY FORGE.

«Tt was a moral battle-field, my boy. Washington made heroes out of his tatterdemalions.”

gave them a peculiar thrill, as they followed the station-agent’s directing
finger and crossed the tracks to the headquarters—the old Potts house,
which Washington occupied during that bitter winter at Valley Forge.

The house, which is now under the care of the Centennial and Memorial
Association of Valley Forge, they found to be in excellent preservation,
well stored with Revolutionary relics, and in charge of a preoccupied super-
intendent and his obliging daughter.

‘“Where are the huts?” asked Roger.

“Up the hill— what is left of them — only a faint mark of the founda-
tions —a mile and a half from here,” the girl explained.

They were all astonished at this.

“We always hear about the army as ‘huddled in the huts at Valley
Forge,” said, Bert. “I thought that meant they were just huddled about
the headquarters house, in a little space.”

They found it anything but a little space as they climbed the hill for a
ON THE SCHUYLKILL AND THEREABOUTS 129

visit to the different landmarks. Uncle Tom explained to them that Wash-
ington had ten thousand men in camp — quite a force to provide for. Then,
too, he told them, Valley Forge was an intrenched camp with redoubts and
‘ forts, for Washington expected an attack by the British at any moment.

“It did n’t come, though, did it?” queried Bert.

‘No; Howe was having too good a time in Philadelphia,” Uncle Tom
replied. ‘Valley Forge, you see, lies in a cup-like valley, defended by its
half-circle of hills and by*the Valley Creek and the Schuylkill. Half a mile
above the mouth of the creek, was the old forge that gave the village its
name.” ;

They drove up the hill to the spot, near Port Kennedy, where some of
the huts had stood, only a few faintly marked foundations remaining; they



THE OLD POTTS HOUSE.

Washington’s headquarters at Valley Forge; now a Revolutionary museum. Rear view

located the Star redoubt, and also Fort Huntingdon and Fort Washington.
They stood on the spot where Baron Steuben drilled the men into soldiers;
they saw the houses that served as headquarters for Knox and Lafayette
and De Kalb and Wayne; they drank from the Washington spring ; ex-
plored Washington’s cave; crossed the Sullivan bridge; photographed
themselves about the War Department cannon, and departed for Phila-
delphia, deeply impressed with all the interesting sights and all the throng-
ing memories of Valley Forge and its historic winter of 1777~78.

But Jack said: “Well, that’s two defeats and a freeze. That’s pretty

hard on us, Uncle Tom. Can't you throw in a victory to brace us up?”
9
130 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



PHOTOGRAPHED BY S. R. FISHER, NORRISTOWN, PA,

THE OLD REDOUBT AT VALLEY FORGE.

“That ’s just what I am going to do for you, Jack,” Uncle Tom replied.
“We ‘Il take in Monmouth on our way back to New York.”

They left Philadelphia the next morning, and changing cars at Mon-
mouth Junction, branched off for Freehold, ‘‘ where the battle was fought.”

‘Why is it called the battle of Monmouth, then?” asked Marian.

“Because above the present town of Freehold stood the old court-
house. It was the shire or county town of Monmouth County,” Uncle Tom
explained, ‘‘and as the battle was fought along the court-house road, it has
always been called the Battle of Monmouth.”

In a green, triangular park at the junction of Court and Monmouth
streets in the town of Freehold, they found the battle-monument — a grace-
ful and beautiful shaft of Concord granite on a Quincy base. The height
from the base to the crown of the “Liberty Triumphant” statue that tops
the monument is just one hundred feet, while the five bronze tablets by
the sculptor Kelly, descriptive of the battle and encircling the shaft, are
wonderfully graphic and artistic.

The children were all delighted with the monument and clamorous
for the story of the fight — “ Molly Pitcher and all,” they demanded.

So, after lunch, Uncle Tom found a conveyance, and they drove out to
the battle-field as far as the Old Tennent Church, three miles from the
town. As they went, Uncle Tom briefly told the story of the fight.

“Tt was really a pitched battle,” he explained, ‘and the methods em-
ON THE SCHUYLKILL AND THEREABOUTS I31

ployed by Washington were but another proof of his military skill. When
the news of the French alliance filled America with joy and set the frost-
bitten camp at Valley Forge to huzzaing, it set Sir Henry Clinton, who had
succeeded Howe as British commander,
to thinking deeply. As a result he de-
cided to give up Philadelphia; and with
all his troops and a baggage-train twelve
miles long, he set out on his march across
New Jersey, to unite with the British force
at New York.”

“There ’s your first break, Jack,” said

Roger. ‘How is that for a dona fide
retreat?”
Dhate s
on, Uncle Tom.”

‘“Washington wished to prevent his
doing this, and to keep him occupied until
the French allies arrived,’ Uncle Tom
continued.

“How about that baggage-train twelve
miles long,” said Jack. ‘“ Don’t you think
Washington would like a chance at that ?”

“No doubt. Anyway, he tried for one,”
Unele- \Lom-replied.. ‘che. hurried’ vhis
army away from Valley Forge and got
upon Clinton’s track as soon as possible.
In the council of war, shown on one of
the monument tablets, the course of
action was debated, showing a strong
difference of opinion between Generals
Washington and Lee. But Washington
determined to fight, and on June 28, 1777,
he came upon Clinton’s army here on the



PHOTOGRAPHED @y J. C. SCOTT, FREEHOLD N. ¥.

plains of Monmouth. He sent Lee ahead MONMOUTH BATTLE MONUMENT.

to begin the attack, but Lee was —” In the triangular park at Freehold.
Uncle Tom paused.
‘Was what?” asked Bert, as his uncle hesitated — “too slow?”

“Worse —if not a traitor, at least traitorous,” replied Uncle Tom.
“Charles Lee, adventurer, is one of the puzzles of the Revolution. At any
rate, he did not do as directed, and as Washington reached the old Tennent
132 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



FROM THE-BAS-RELIEF ON THE MONUMENT. J. E. KELLY, SCULPTOR.

WASHINGTON STOPS THE RETREAT.

The spot where Washington turned the tide is now the parsonage of the Old Tennent Church, and is marked with a sign-board.

Church, to which we are going, he met men running the wrong way, who
told him that Lee was retreating.”

“What did G. W. say to that?” asked Jack.

“He was thunderstruck. Spurring his horse ahead of all his staff, he
met the retreat in full flight,” Uncle Tom continued. “This is one of the
great historic scenes in which Washington, the self-contained, gave way to
anger. He burst upon the pompous and conceited Lee with such a storm of
wrath that for once the soldier of fortune was struck speechless. He with-
ered under the words of his chief, and then Washington turned his men
about, charged upon the enemy, and drove them back, checked and defeated.

“When night came, Clinton left his dead unburied on the field and stole
away so silently that the Americans, close at hand, did not discover the
flight until next morning. Then he pushed on to New York, and Mon-
mouth was the last real battle fought on Northern soil. Valley Forge had
made it possible.”

“What became of Lee?” asked Roger.

“Probably nothing more would have been said to him,” answered Uncle
ON THE SCHUYLKILL AND THEREABOUTS 133

Tom, “for Washington’s anger was as brief as it was hot, and speedily
changed to courtesy. But Lee sulked. He wrote an insulting letter to
Washington, was tried by a court-martial, and finally dismissed from the
service. Students of history to-day are inclined to charge him with treason,
and even to say —”

“Oh, see! what ’s that—up on the railroad track?” broke in Marian.

“Landmark number one,” said Uncle Tom. ‘Molly Pitcher’s Well.
Who knows her story?”

“She's the woman we saw on the monument tablet who served the gun
after her husband was killed,” said Marian. “But what is the well?”

“It is claimed by good Freeholders that Mistress Molly’s house stood
back there, and that this well, beside the railway track, was in front of the
house. She was drawing water from this well for the American soldiers, so



WASHINGTON REBUKING LEE, AT MONMOUTH.

it is said, when her husband was shot down, and she, dropping her pail,
sprang to the cannon and filled her dead husband’s place as gunner.”
“Good for her,” cried Roger.
Further along the road, beside a weather-stained house, they saw a

weather-stained sign-board. ‘Spot where Washington met Lee,”
9* i

it said.
134 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

‘Where he spotted him, I guess,” said Jack. ‘Did n’t he swear,
Uncle Tom?”

“Who? Washington? Never!” said Marian.

“Tradition says that he did,” Uncle Tom replied; ‘but at the trial of
Lee, no witness, in telling the story, put any profane word in Washington’s
mouth, nor does Lafayette, in his memoirs. All accounts, however, do say
that he was a spectacle of ‘sublime wrath.’”

«That ’s hot enough, I guess, without the swear words,” said Jack.

They passed the spot, marked by its sign-board, where Washington
first came upon the retreating troops and turned them back; they borrowed
the keys of the old Tennent meeting-house and entered and inspected the
quaint and ancient edifice; they strolled about the old churchyard and



WHERE WASHINGTON MET LEE.

On the road from Freehold to Tennent Church. The ‘‘ spot”’ is almost exactly where the cow stands.

paused to read the inscriptions above the patriot graves. Upon one that
marked the resting-place of the brave Monckton, one of the heroes of the
fight, a gallant British officer, they read this:

Hic Jacet Lt. Col. Henry Monckton, who, on the plains of Monmouth, June 28, 1777,
sealed with his life his duty and devotion to his king and his country. “Courage is, on all hands,
considered as an essential of character.” This memorial.,erected by Samuel Fryer, whose father,
a subject of Great Britain, sleeps in an unknown grave.

And even Jack the partizan said nothing. They paid toa gallant foeman
the tribute of silent respect.
Then, returning to town, they rode to New York. But the spirit of in-
ON THE SCHUYLKILL AND THEREABOUTS 135

vestigation had by no means cooled. There were other battle-fields to see,
other Revolutionary memorials to study.

‘“Monmouth was pretty good as a victory,” Jack commented, as they all
sat in his father’s library talking over the trip. ‘But I see that some his-



SPOT MARKED “MOLLIE PITCHER’S WELL.”

The railroad track almost follows the line of battle.

tories put it down as a drawn battle because both parties rested on the
field. See here, Uncle Tom, you promised us a real victory. Just trot it
out, please.”

‘With all my heart,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘If you ’ll take a trip up the
Hudson with me I'll show you a victory that was a victory — battle, defeat,
surrender — everything you could wish for. Shall we go?”

‘Shaan twe though cried) lacks = But-where -|

“Well, first, up the Hudson,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘We shall find
enough to see, on both sides of the river, to make the sail to Albany almost
a Revolutionary biograph.”

“Oh, that will be fine,” said Roger. “I’d like to go up the Hudson.
Is it better than the Charles?”

‘Better than the Charles! Just hear the Boston innocent, will you,”
laughed Jack. ‘Why, old fellow, the Charles is a trout-brook alongside of
the Hudson.”

‘Well, trout-brooks are good things,” declared Bert, courteously.

“Yes, for trout; but when you come to scenery —” began Jack.

»
136 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



FROM THE BAS-RELIEF ON THE MONUMENT. J. &. KELLY, SCULPTOR.

MOLL PITCHER AT MONMOUTH.

«We ’ve got it on the Charles,” added Roger quietly.

Jack simply shook his head helplessly. He had no words suited to the
requirements of this case.

But Uncle Tom said: “ Everything in its place, boys. The Charles is
delightful, historic, unique. It is the Charles. The Hudson is—the Hud-
son; and what that means, I ‘ll show you on the way up to the field of
victory that was a victory. What was it— where is it?”

“T know!” exclaimed Christine.

“T know,” cried Bert.

And both, with one voice, shouted “Saratoga!”

“Saratoga it is,” said Uncle Tom, nodding approval. ‘“ Day after to-
morrow, on the day line for Albany. Is it a vote?”

“Tt is, it is— unanimous,” came the answer. And the second day after
found them all on the Hudson River day steamer, ez route for Albany and
Saratoga.


FROM THE BAS-RELIEF ON THE MONUMENT. J. E. KELLY, SCULPTOR,

THE DEATH OF COL. MONCKTON.

From Kelly’s tablets at Freehold. Wayne, the American, is on horseback leading the charge — Monckton, the Englishman,
ies on the ground.


LOWER NEW YORK. TRINITY CHURCH AND THE HARBOR.

‘** Here are more riches than any fabled Cathay could boast,’ said Uncle Tom; ‘here is a free metropolis more powerful than
any Eastern tyrant’s capital.’ ””
CHAE RSV

UP THE HUDSON

The FHludson as a Historic Waterway—Tts Great Beacon-lights— The
Neutral Ground — The Cow-Chase — Dobbs Ferry — Andre's Fate —
Stony Point— Newburgh and West Point— Washington's Noblest
Deed.

Z-—2IOGER and Jack,” said Uncle Tom, “here comes in the point
=, I wished to make in your discussion yesterday. The Hud-

\f] son is—the Hudson; and, in its way, this picturesque and
Ye noble stream plays as important a part in the story of the

Ai} American Revolution as does that historic road from
Cambridge to Concord upon which we first set out on our battle-field
pilgrimage.”

They were grouped well forward on the Albany steamer, headed up the
Hudson, and just steaming away from the Twenty-third-street pier.

Roger was still disposed to question Uncle Tom's statement, and even
Christine seemed inclined to support the Boston boy in his criticism.

“Oh! Uncle Tom,” she said, ‘think of all the things we saw along
that lovely drive, from Leif Ericson to Longfellow !”

“Explorers, poets, patriots —all these I can show you along the Hud-
son,” Uncle Tom declared. ‘‘ This river is notable for its historic, quite as
much as its natural, picturesqueness. Verrazano the Florentine, Gomez
the Portuguese, Hudson the Englishman, Block the Dutchman—one after
the other, these explorers headed for Cathay over the very course we are
sailing, and labeled this broad river according to their own nationalities.”

“Cathay? That ’s Marco Polo’s country, that Noah Brooks wrote about
in “St. Nicholas,” is n’t it, Uncle Tom?” Marian inquired.

“But that ’s China,” said Jack. ‘ How under the sun did they expect
to get to China this way? Walk?”

‘Why, don’t you know,” said Bert, ‘they thought the Hudson was a

strait or something —a short cut to China; did n't they, Uncle Tom?”
139


I40 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

-“Ves—and see! it was a short cut to something better than China,”
Uncle Tom said, sweeping his hand toward the great city they were leav-
ing. ‘Here are more riches than any fabled Cathay could boast; here is
a free metropolis more powerful than any Eastern tyrant’s capital. And all
this because of the American Revolution, in whose stirring story this river
played its important part. It has seen massacre and merrymaking, battle
and pageant, State-building and wonder-working. In Albany met the first
Congress of the Colonies; in the shadow of the Palisades sailed the first
steamboat. It has helped to make both our history and our literature, and
the greatest victory and’ the greatest crime of the American Revolution
have, alike, forever linked its name to the republic’s struggle for freedom.”

‘I suppose you mean Saratoga and the treason of Arnold, Uncle Tom,”
said Roger.

“Ves, both of them were Hudson River incidents,” Uncle Tom replied.

“Well, you ’re making out quite a case for us, Uncle Tom,” said Bert.

“Let me give you details,” his uncle continued. ‘From source to
mouth, the river is fairly bordered with Revolutionary beacon-lights. Upon
its head waters was planned the earliest offensive movement of the Revolu-
tion, following close upon the heels of Lexington—I mean the capture of
Ticonderoga and Crown Point, in May, 1775. At its mouth was played the
last act in the long eight-years’ drama—the evacuation of New York by
the British in November, 1783, which closed hostilities and rid the land of
the red-coated troops of King George. Up this river went Montgomery
and his men to join the forces gathered for the invasion of Canada; and just
beyond where we now are sailing, Washington and Rochambeau met to plan
out the campaign that ended in triumph at Yorktown. Irving, the biographer
of Washington and the annalist of the Revolution; Bryant, who wrote ‘The
Song of Marion’s Men’; Cooper, the author of ‘The Spy '’—the noblest novel
of the Revolution; Willis and Poe and Morris and Drake, to say nothing
of later writers, dear to you as the favorites of to-day, have all celebrated
this noble river in song or in story, and made its Revolutionary sights
and scenes their theme. In fact, boys and girls, if Massachusetts Avenue
was the roadway to liberty, the Hudson River was its waterway.”

“Uncle Tom, you ve proved it! I’m proud of you, sir!” and Jack, who
was a loyal son of New York and an ardent admirer of the Hudson, ap-
plauded his uncle vigorously.

‘But think of all the Tories around here!” said Bert. “I’ve read ‘The
Spy’ too, you know.”
“Well, how about Tory Row?” cried Jack. ‘That was right along

there by Washington’s headquarters in Cambridge, I believe.”
UP THE HUDSON I4I



DRAWN BY 8. WEST CLINEDINST.

THE FIRST STEAMBOAT ON THE HUDSON.

yoy

“Tn the shadow of the Palisades sailed the first steamboat.

‘No use, boys,” said Uncle Tom. ‘You can’t advance one over the
other with success. There were patriots and traitors in every section.
That ’s what made the Revolution, you know. And speaking of headquar-




ters, this river abounds in them.
Washington ‘stopped’ all along
here, you see.”

“Stopped? I should say he
was kept a-going,” said Jack.
‘Seems to me the railway sign
we see in so many depots would
have about hit him: ‘No Loiter-

ing about this Station.’”

Bert was disposed to resent this as a reflec-
tion on Washington, but Uncle Tom said: “You
- must admit, though, that he moved on to good
Â¥ advantage. It was the Howes and the Clintons
who did the loitering. And almost all these
headquarters that are standing to-day are asso-
ciated with some marked event in Washington’s

career. Over yonder, to the west of us, among
the New Jersey hills, lies Morristown, — settled
by New-Englanders, Roger,—the center of
Washington’s aggressive operations after the
battle of Princeton. In 1777 Washington made





THE HUDSON AT CLAREMONT HEIGHTS.

The Hudson was the waterway to liberty.
UP THE HUDSON 143

his headquarters there. He was there, too, in the winters of 1779 and 1780.
The old house is still standing—a relic and a museum. A few miles above
us here, just to the east of the river, on Broadway in White Plains, is the
house he occupied at the time of that disastrous battle. Twenty miles up
the river, and a mile or so to the west of it, stands the old, old house in
Tappan which was his headquarters at the time of André’s capture and exe-
cution; while at Newburgh is the most famous and best-preserved of all his
headquarters in this region. At Dobbs Ferry, Peekskill, West Point, Fish-
kill, and New Windsor are houses or traces of houses occupied by the great
Continental chieftain at important periods of our Revolutionary history. In
fact, this noble river is associated with Washington’s time of stress in the
history of our land even more than is the Potomac with his days of peace.”



WASHINGTON’S HEADQUARTERS, TAPPAN.

Two miles west of Sneden’s Landing on the Hudson. ‘The house was built in r700 and was occupied by Washington at the time of
André’s execution. This is the rear of the house. The front has four windows and a Dutch half-door.

Without harping too much upon the one subject,— for there are other
things to see along the Hudson besides Revolutionary landmarks,—the boys
and girls found continuous occupation for eyes and ears, following Uncle
‘Tom’s index finger and keeping the run of his comments and identifications.

It was a beautiful morning. The sun glinted and sparkled on the ruffled
river and lighted the long, dark escarpment of the Palisades — nature’s own
earthworks, now threatened with overthrow by man. The young people
knew in a general way the value of the Hudson River to the American pa-
triots at the time of the great Revolution, and that its loss meant the abso-
lute separation of New England from the Southern colonies —an object
kept continually in view by the British. So, as they followed Uncle Tom’s


ON THE BANKS OF THE HUDSON.

*‘ With Grant’s massive mausoleum as a Jandmark.””
UP THE HUDSON 145

words, they recognized that the river, between whose banks they were sail-
ing northward, was really, as he said, liberty’s historic waterway, dotted
with stations where now success, now failure, met the boys of ’76.

“But we really did hold the river, did n’t we?” asked Bert.

‘North of West Point, we certainly did,” Uncle Tom replied; ‘and thus,
to a certain extent, carried out our desires. But the struggle for the lower
Hudson was long and often bloody, though no important battle was waged
on its banks.”

‘How about Stony Point?” queried Bert.

“That was an assault rather than a battle,” Uncle Tom explained; ‘and,
though a brilliant affair, it was only a sort of interlude. Well see the spot
up above here. It’s well worth noting.”

‘Tt ’s nearer to West Point, is n’t it?” Marian asked.

“Yes,” her uncle replied ; ‘“‘and within the line of the American defenses.
This part of the river over which we are sailing washed what was known as
the neutral ground— the section between the British outposts at Spuyten
Duyvil and the American outposts below Peekskill. Yonkers, just above us,
was in the heart of the neutral ground, overrun by the guerrillas of either
side — cowboys and skinners, of whom you have read in Cooper's ‘Spy.’”

‘Which was which?” asked Roger.

“The skinners were the American marauders; the cowboys were the
British,” Uncle Tom replied; “and it is a question whether they did not do
more harm than good to their respective sides. What they were after was
plunder, and, when it came to getting booty, friend suffered as well as foe.”

Mile by mile the steamer plowed her rapid way up the Hudson, now
with Grant's massive mausoleum as a landmark, now with the long line of
the Palisades as a side-wall. Upon the western or New Jersey side they
noted the spot where Hamilton fell beneath the deadly bullet of Burr,—
“Both of them Revolutionary heroes,” Uncle Tom reminded his young
companions.

“Can we see the place now?” asked Christine.

“T don’t think so,” said Uncle Tom. “It is over there, just south of the
West Shore ferry house; and above, on the hill, still stands the old King
house, which was Lafayette’s headquarters after Brandywine battle It’s a
summer resort now, I believe. Look further up the river. Those big oil
works are at Shadyside. It used to be called Bull’s Ferry, and that ridge
of rocks, between the river and the road, was Block House Point.” And
then Uncle Tom told them the story of Anthony Wayne's big cattle raid,
which came so near to being a battle, and gave to André a theme for a comic
poem — the ‘‘ Cow Chase.”

Le:
146 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“Tl know that,” said Bert; “does n’t it end this way?

«“ And now I ’ve closed my epic strain ;
I tremble as I show it,
Lest that same warrior-drover Wayne
Should ever catch the poet.”

«And he did catch him, did n’t he, Uncle Tom?” cried Jack, excitedly.

“Yes; the comedy had a tragic ending,” said Uncle Tom, “for the very
day it was printed André was captured as a spy by men belonging to
Wayne’s command; Wayne's name signed the young poet’s death-warrant ;
and Wayne's troops executed the spy, above here, at Tappan.”

‘Poor André!” said sympathetic Christine.

“Poor nothing!” responded Jack, bristling up. ‘He was a spy. It
served him right.”

But Uncle Tom interposed a restraining hand. ‘Not time for that dis-
cussion yet,” he said. ‘ The André region is further up the river. Look!
over there, just above Block House Point, is Fort Lee, seated high amid
her beer-gardens.”

“More dangerous than British bullets, Uncle Tom,” said Bert, who was
a strong temperance boy.

“Quite right, quite right, Bert,” replied Uncle Tom, bestowing a look
of approval on his nephew. ‘I have no doubt that from the present occu-
pation of the crags of Fort Lee, yonder, have come more trouble and misery
than were ever caused by Cornwallis and his army, when they swooped down
from Alpine Landing and sent Washington scurrying across country, flee-
ing, but unbeaten.”

They had already passed the heights of Fort Washington, on the New
York side, and crossed the mouth of Spuyten Duyvil, where Jack sought to
arouse the ghost of the luckless Anthony Van Corlear by sounding an
imitation bugle call above the watery grave of Peter Stuyvesant’s defiant
trumpeter. As they rounded the pier at Yonkers, Marian clamored for
Washington’s love-story, which Uncle Tom had linked to the old Phillipse
Manor House, now the City Hall of Yonkers, and he, nothing loath, gave
the story; but he felt forced to hurry its close, to tell his listeners that, “right
here, off Yonkers, occurred in 1777 a fierce naval fight between two Brit-
ish frigates and a fleet of patriotic whaleboats that had tried to force a fire-
ship against the British craft.”

“ How did it come out?” asked Jack.

‘Well, the Americans were very nearly successful,” said Uncle Tom;
“but the British tars were too wide-awake, and saved themselves from de-
“THE LONG, DARK ESCARPMENT OF THE PALISADES.”

At the lower end of these was Block House Point, the scene of Wayne’s famous Cow Chase, and André’s humorous poem.


148 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

struction after a sharp resistances But see,” he continued, “here we are off
Dobbs Ferry, one of the most important of the Revolutionary points here-
about.”

“Why?” asked Bert, as they looked toward the pretty village on the
New York side, stretching up from the river to the ridge, embowered in
green and dotted with splendid summer houses.

‘At that little village of ‘Dobbs his ferry,’” said Uncle Tom, “the
British gathered for the attack on Fort Washington, after the battle of
White Plains; here they embarked to cross the Hudson for the reduction
of Fort Lee and the pursuit of Washington; here, in the old Livingston
manor house, Washington made his headquarters in 1781, when he met the
Frenchman Rochambeau and planned the campaign of Yorktown; here the
preliminaries of the evacuation
of New York, which closed the
war, were arranged by the
American and British com-
manders; and here, on the
eighth of May, 1783, a British
fleet, which was anchored about
where we are now sailing, fired
England’s first salute to the
Stars and Stripes.”

“Well, well! pretty good
record for one village, is n't
it?” said Jack.

(es, .repiieds misccunche:
“The Sons of the American
Revolution have thought so,
too, for they’ have put up a
granite shaft, commemorating
these events in front of the old
manor house, and Mr. Depew



THE WASHINGTON-ROCHAMBEAU MONUMENT
AT DOBBS FERRY.

A granite shaft erected by the Sons of the American Revolution in front of

claims it as the most impor-
tant memorial spot of the

the Livingston Manor-house, to commemorate the council of 1 1 22
war between Washington and Rochambeau, on the American Revolution.
eve of the Yorktown campaign. Past noble mansions set in

frames of glorious green, where
stretches of hill and vale slope upward to the eastern ridge, the boat sped
on, until suddenly Uncle Tom shot out a directing finger toward a gabled,
ivy-covered cottage almost screened behind its fringe of trees.
UP THE HUDSON 149

“ Sunnyside,” he announced.

“The home of Washington Irving,” they cried in chorus, as they recog-

nized the name.

‘And this is the Sleepy Hollow country, Uncle Tom?” said Christine.

“Yes,” Uncle Tom replied.
‘Here walked Ichabod Crane
and the fair Katrina; here rode
the terrible headless horseman ;
here roamed cowboy and
skinner in perpetual feud; here
was the station of the fearless
water-guard while worrying
the British frigates; and here,
at a later day, lived Washing-
ton Irving, the man who gave
the master-touch to all this ro-
mantic region, and wrote in
that ivy-draped cottage his
great ‘Life of Washington.’”

“How interesting,” said
Marian.

“Would n't I like to have
known him,” exclaimed Bert.

“I know him too well — or
not enough,” grumbled Jack.
“We had ‘The Sketch Book’
at school last térm.”

“Irvington, Tarrytown,
Sleepy Hollow,’ went on



THE ANDRE CAPTURE MONUMENT.

On Broadway, near Wildey street, Tarrytown. Erected in 1853 by the people.
of Westchester County to mark the spot of André’s capture. The
bronze statue of the minute-man on the top, said to represent
John Paulding, was added in 1880, and also the bronze
panel in the pedestal which depicts the capture

of André. The little brook below the
monument is called André’s Brook.

Uncle Tom; ‘so they string along in close succession on the Hudson's
eastern bank, linked to the name of Irving forever.”

“But is n't this the André region, too?” asked Bert.

“Yes; here it may be said to begin,” his uncle answered. “Right
over there, half-way on the road between Tarrytown and Sleepy Hollow,
stands the obelisk, topped with a minute-man in bronze, which reads:

On this spot,

the 25th day of September, 1780, the spy
Major John André,
Adjutant-general of the British Army, was captured by
John Paulding, David Williams and Isaac Van Wart,
all natives of this County.
150 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



MAJOR JOHN ANDRE.

André’s pen portrait of himself made while at Tappan, the day before his execution. In possession of Yale University.

‘From here on to West Point the river is a continual reminder of that
story of treachery, disaster, and death.”

“Not disaster to our side, anyhow,” exclaimed Jack. ‘We were all
tight,”

“But André was n’t— poor fellow,” said Christine-

“No, that ’s just it,” laughed Jack. “André was n’t all right, from the
word go. He was a spy.”

“Well, but not a real, mean, ugly, nasty spy. Was he, Uncle Tom?”
persisted Christine.

Uncle Tom looked thoughtful.

“Tt was all a sad, bad business, children,” he said at last —‘ Arnold’s
noble possibilities wrecked by ignoble desires and ungovernable jealousies ;
André’s splendid career ruined by a false, mean act. Let us only remember
now that Washington saw clearly through it all, recognized his duty and did
it, in spite of everything. And, after all these years, looking back at that
black and sorry time, the world says to-day, ‘John André was a spy, and his
punishment was just.’ Let us not discuss it any more. Sympathy we can
always show; but think what would have happened had that vile plot
succeeded ! ”
UP THE HUDSON I51

Up the river so fraught with reminders of André’s story they sailed on,
Uncle Tom pointing out the spots of special note.

“Here, at Tarrytown, he was captured,” he said; ‘here, off Croton, was
anchored the British war-ship Vulture, which bore André on his fatal mis-
sion and carried Arnold away, disgraced forever; yonder, across the river,
just above Haverstraw, you can see, on what is still called Treason Hill,
the house of the Tory Smith, where Arnold met André and gave him the
plans of the American works at West Point, and all the treacherous infor-
mation desired; over the hills there, back of Nyack, lies Tappan, the old
Dutch village— not much changed even now —to which André was taken.
There he was tried, condemned, and executed. You can still see the house
in which he was imprisoned and the house which Washington occupied, its
windows looking off to the very hill-slope upon which André was hanged,
courageous to the end, his last request being that his captors should bear
witness to the world that he died like a brave man.”

And again the girls sighed over the splendid young officer's terrible fate,
while even the boys looked grave.



WHERE ANDRE WAS HANGED.

On the hillside at Tappan, N. Y., just above the old village. The overturned stone is the third monument erected to mark the spot,
but never allowed to stand because of the popular detestation of a spy and of Arnold’s treason. The spire in the
village tops the church which stands on the site of the old one in which André was tried.

‘Come, here is something much more pleasant,” Uncle Tom exclaimed.
‘Do you see that little lighthouse on the point jutting out from the western
shore?” ‘

They all saw it.

“That is Stony Point,” said Uncle Tom.






































































































































Se

“Hurrah for Mad Anthony Wayne!” cried [2
| Jack, glad to relieve his feelings. “Say, Uncle
Tom, that was a great affair— Stony Point —
/was n't it?” ;

“Not so great, Jack,” said Uncle Tom; “but
{certainly gallant. The Americans, you see, forti-
| fied that point of rock in 1777. The British took
it from Lafayette in 1779 and strengthened it so
much that they called it ‘Little Gibraltar” But;
fone July day, that same year, along came, |

lstealthily marching over the hills from West
Point, Mad Anthony Wayne and a thousand men.

‘| At midnight, the little band crept close to the fort 2
| at Stony Point, and divided so as to attack it in

| front and rear. Wayne and his men were on the
water side. The sentries heard them, the garrison
was aroused. They sprang to resist the attack,

















































































































































































































































ALONG THE RIVER.

Anthony’s Nose and the turn in the river, shown in the lower picture, is a few miles above Stony Point, where Anthony Wayne
stormed the fort. Here in 1777 a great chain was stretched across the river to keep back British vessels.
UP THE HUDSON 153

slope marched Wayne and his men. Wayne fell wounded, but was on his
feet in an instant. ‘Forward!’ he cried, and over the ramparts leaped the
Americans. Their comrades at the rear heard their shout of occupation,
and charged on their side; then, left and right wings uniting, they drove
the garrison to close quarters and surrender. It was a gallant affair, and it
made the reputation of fearless General Wayne.”

“Well, it ought to,” cried Jack. “Did we keep the fort?”

“We could n’t, and did n’t wish to, then,” said Uncle Tom. ‘The cap-
tured stores and ordnance were carted off, the fort was dismantled, and the
Americans withdrew with their prisoners. But, don’t you see!—greater than
the victorious rush was the confidence it inspired and the patriotism it re-
awakened. Stony Point, like Trenton, was one of those spur-of-the-moment
victories that have even wider results than the mere defeat of the foe. In-
spiration is a great thing, boys and girls; it wins.”

So they sailed up the storied river. They saw Verplanck’s Point, on the
opposite shore, where Washington, after Yorktown, bade his French allies
good-by; and they looked at the bluff-built town of Peekskill, whence Put-
nam sent to the British camp that famous “spy letter,” which said bluntly:
“Edward Palmer, an officer in the enemy’s service, was taken as a spy,
lurking within our lines. He has been tried as a spy, condemned as a spy,
and will be executed as a spy. P. Si—He is hanged.”

They found, suddenly, the lost curve of the river, which had seemed to
end here in a bay, and sailed through the southern river-gate into the heart
of the Highlands; they ran past the slight remnants of two famous Revolu-
tionary defenses— Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton, captured after much
manceuvering by the British Clinton from the two American Clintons — the
governor and the general; and so, at last, they came to West Point, the key
to the Highlands, the one impregnable spot which the British could not take,
—even through treachery, — the picturesque site of the Military Academy
which has given to the republic, north and south, so many brave and
famous soldiers.

“‘Oh, can’t we see the cadets?” asked Marian.

The others looked desire, and seemed to echo Marian’s request; but
Uncle Tom was unyielding.

“Too modern,” he said. ‘“ We are on a Revolutionary hunt, you know;
there were no cadets in 1776.”

Away from the government dock, on past Trophy Point, on under the
shadow of Cro’ Nest, which the girls knew best as the home of “that dear
culprit Fay,” of Drake’s beautiful poem; on, under Storm King and Butter
Hill and past Pollopel’s Island —the northern gateway of the Highlands —
154 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

they sailed, marveling at the beauty of it all, and at length came to the
dock above which, on its terraced hillside, sits Newburgh —a city of special
interest to our voyagers, because in it was still to be seen one of the most
famous and best-preserved of all the headquarters of Washington.

Uncle Tom pointed it out to them from the river and described it care-
fully, from the cannon on the lawn to the celebrated room with seven doors
and one window, even as it was in Washington’s day.

They saw the stately Tower of Victory on the hill, and Uncle Tom told
them why it was erected.

“In the east wall,” he said; “beside the Angel of Peace, is set a bronze
tablet that tells the story. It says—I’ve got the inscription among my
memoranda somewhere —
ah! here it is:

‘This monument was
erected under the authority of
the Congress of the United
States and of the State of New
York, in commemoration of
the disbandment, under procla-
mation of the Continental
Congress of October 18, 1783,
of the armies by whose patri-
otic and military virtue our

national independence and
sovereignty were established.’”

Uncle Tom recounted
the things that had made
famous the old Hasbrouck

THE TOWER OF VICTORY house, used as Washing-
Stands in the northeast corner of the headquarters ground. It is of stone, fifty- ton’s headquarters, but de-

Seen ries Gea ee es clared that he thought the
greatest and most moment-
ous event in Washington’s life occurred there, ‘when he resisted temptation.”
‘What temptation?” queried Bert.
“To be King of America,” replied Uncle Tom.
“TI guess not. He was n’t that kind,” exclaimed Jack. “ Who tempted
hiaies
“His own soldiers,” Uncle Tom replied. “Wearied by the delays of
Congress, uncertain as to the future, they thought that Washington’s seiz-

ing the power was the only way to settle things, and they were ready to
aid him.” .


UP THE HUDSON 155

=e



WASHINGTON’S HEADQUARTERS, NEWBURGH.
The old Hasbrouck House on Liberty street, Newburgh, occupied by Washington from April, 1782, to August, 1783.

“Caesar and Napoleon over again,” remarked Bert.

“But George Washington was neither of these,” said Uncle Tom.
‘George Washington was the noblest kind of a patriot.”

«First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen,’
cried Jack.

‘He was angry, indeed, at the bare thought,” said Uncle Tom. “He
turned on the proposer magnificently. ‘I am at a loss to conceive,’ he said,
‘what part of my conduct could have given encouragement to an address
which to me seems big with the greatest mischief that can befall any coun-
try. . . . Let me conjure you, if you have any regard for your country, con-
cern for yourself or posterity, or respect for me, to banish these thoughts
from your mind, and never communicate, as from yourself or any one else,
a sentiment of the like nature !’”

sréatl said Jacks. ~<* That-settledat, louess—

“Indeed it did,” Uncle Tom replied; ‘and to me, boys and girls, that
seems one of the noblest moments in the life of the great Washington.”

”
156 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



DRAWN BY B. WEST CLINEDINST

THE MASTER OF CLAREMONT.

Chancellor Robert R_ Livingston and his young relatives —also his great gilded coach. Chancellor Livingston helped draft the
Declaration of Independence and administered the oath of office to President George Washington.

And of course Uncle Tom’s auditors, being enthusiastic young republi-
cans, agreed with him vociferously.

Past Fishkill, where Baron Steuben drilled the recruits into soldiers; past
Kingston, with its old Senate House and its reminders of British invasion ;
past Clermont, the noble estate for which Fulton named his first steamboat,
where lived the Livingstons — soldiers, statesmen, and patriots; past the
long, splendid ridge of the Catskills, fringing the western sky, they sailed; _
and finally, at sunset, made fast to the pier at Albany, tired but enthusiastic at
the close of what they all claimed to be one of the most delightful of all their
delightful trips. ,

‘What lots and lots we ’ve seen!” they said.

«Such a sail!” cried Roger.




















































Ss

Mae tot
Pipa

a

“THE SPLENDID RIDGE OF THE CATSKILLS,”

As seen from the river above Kingston, which the British devastated in 1777.


158 THE CENTURY BOOK OF

THE PEACE MONUMENT ON TEMPLE
HILL, NEWBURGH.

Built of field stone and erected by the people of the surrounding
towns to mark the spot where peace was proclaimed in 1783.



THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

«“ Such a river,” exclaimed Marian.

“Such a panorama,” said Bert.

“Such a picnic,” declared Jack.

“Such an Uncle Tom,” - said
Christine.

-And thereupon all the five gave
a characteristic demonstration of ap-
proval, as they gathered up their
traps; and the next moment they
were threading the streets of ancient
Albany.

Of course they enjoyed the famous
old city. It is full of interesting spots
as it sits upon its hill-tops, looking off
toward the western Helderbergs and
the Berkshires across the great river.

They heard many stories of the old
Dutch days, and especially of the boy
baron —the last of the patroons of
Rensselaerswyck. Uncle Tom told
them, too, that the old town was one
of the chief depots of supply in the
Revolution and was always “ going to
be taken” by the British, but never
was. The travelers, however, had eyes

but for one thing —the splendid, stately new State capitol whose white walls
and towers rise above everything else.



































































































ALBANY, FROM THE HUDSON.

With the new State capitol rising above everything.
GEE TE bs
PROMENADING WITH BURGOYNE

At the Springs — Burgoyne's Promenade — Oriskany and Bennington —
Schuyler and Gates—The “Lone Tree” of Walloomsac—The Benning-
ton Monument—A cross Country to Schuylerville— Freeman's Farms and
Bemis Herghts—The Saratoga Monument—The Vacant Niche—The
Surrender Spot.

tHE morning concert in the great hotel was over; the well-
dressed throng wandered away on rest or pleasure bent;
Roger and Jack, who had tested and tasted of each and
a every spring in the whole gorgeous Spa, were quite in con-

SPE AEGES| dition to remain quiescent for a space, and Uncle Tom,
gathering the five chairs about him on the broad and shaded piazza, turned
the attention of his youthful group of comrades to the business in hand —
battle-fields.

“ There’s an odd thing about this fight we are now to consider, boys and
girls,” he said.

‘Which is—?” queried Bert.

“That it was not fought here at Saratoga, nor by the general who has
all the credit of the affair,” Uncle Tom replied.

“Sir,” said Jack senatorially, ‘you speak in riddles.”

“Ves, what do you mean?” cried Marian. “It’s called the battle of
Saratoga.”

“But that battle-ground is fully a dozen miles away,” Uncle Tom re-
plied; “and Schuyler, who planned the campaign, was the real victor of the
fight.”

‘But why is it called the battle of Saratoga?” asked Roger.

“And why is Gates called the victor of Saratoga?” queried Bert.

‘Because both are correct,” his uncle replied.

“But you just said it was n’t so,” said Marian. ‘‘ Uncle Tom, what is the



matter with you?”
159
160 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“Too bad, too bad,” said Jack. ‘“He’s taken one spring too many.”

“Do give us the facts, Uncle Tom,” said Bert.

“ The facts are these,” Uncle Tom remarked, smiling at their perplexity.
“ Burgoyne, a brave soldier and a gallant gentleman, though with an over-
supply of confidence and bluster, was placed in command of a picked English
army and sent south from Canada to clear the Hudson Valley of rebels and
join with Clinton in New York.”

“Nice little contract laid out for him,” remarked Roger.

“ He considered himself equal to it,” said Uncle Tom. ‘“ He had already
asserted that with ten thousand men he could promenade through America.
The British government took him at his word, gave him a fine army of ten
thousand men, and told him to promenade.”



BATTLE-FIELD OF ORISKANY.

The ravine where the Indian ambush was made is at the bottom of the slope on the left. Here 1500 men — Americans, British,
Tories, and Indians — fought hand-to-hand in the midst of a violent storm.

« And that’s what we ’re up here for, is it— to promenade with him?”
remarked Jack. “All right; fall in, boys! mark time— for'ud — hup!
Where do we promenade first, Uncle Tom?”

«Easy walking at first, Jack,” his uncle replied. “ From Quebec to Fort
Edward, Burgoyne found it really a promenade. Fort and post fell before
him; resistance was faint, and he was so confident of victory that he hurried
off a special messenger to King George, telling the king that everything was
going just as he wished it.”

«« Better not holler until you ’re out of the woods,’

“That ’s so, Roger; it’s a waste of breath; and so Burgoyne found it,”

”

said Roger.
PROMENADING WITH BURGOYNE 161

Uncle Tom replied. “For, while he was enjoy-
ing his promenade, and his Tories and Indians
were thinking of the pickings they were to have
when the army got into the rich Hudson Valley,
a determined and valiant man —a soldier and a
general indeed— was working against desperate
odds to stop the triumphal career of Burgoyne.”

Schuyler?”

“Yes. That able and masterly soldier had
been working like a beaver to head off Burgoyne.
Against almost insurmountable obstacles, in spite
of jealousy, misrepresentation, secret wire-pull-
ing, and Congressional stupidity, Schuyler had
labored on, upheld by his own sense of duty and
Washington’s support. Soon the fruits of his
work began to show. Two side-issues attempted
by Burgoyne were brought to naught by the up-
rising of the people, and crippled Burgoyne be-
yond repair.”

‘What were they, Uncle Tom?” asked Bert.

“One was the devastation of the beautiful
Mohawk Valley; the other, the seizure of sup-
plies and horses at Bennington, across the Ver-
mont line. Both were signal failures,” Uncle
Tom remarked. “At Oriskany, just beyond the © THE BATTLE MONUMENT

: : : AT ORISKANY.
present city of Utica, St. Leger and his Tories Ania ean oer e a
and Indians were checked and turned back by
the valiant old General Herkimer after one of the bloodiest engagements
of the war. At Bennington, on the slopes of the Green Mountains, brave
General Stark cut to pieces the invading Hessians of Baum.”

“Molly Stark’s husband, was n’t he?” cried Marian.

“Who ’s Molly Stark?” said Jack.

“I "ll tell you at Bennington,” replied Uncle Tom. “Just now we ’re
interested in Burgoyne. Checked at Oriskany, overwhelmed at Benning-
ton, rudely awakened by a few other experiences of the same sort, Bur-
goyne saw that his promenade was not to be such a success, after all.”

“Not a real sprinting-match for the championship, eh?” said Jack.

“Well, the sprinting-match was there,” Uncle Tom replied, “but the
championship was in dispute. Burgoyne began to feel alarm. Reinforce-
ments were not forthcoming, either from Sir Guy Carleton at Quebec, or

It


162 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

from Sir Henry Clinton at New York. Driven to extremities, surrounded
by an aroused and gathering people, disappointed in his hope of succor from
the Tories of the invaded section, Burgoyne’s only course was to force his
way through to the lower Hudson and unite with Clinton. ‘This army
must not retreat,’ was his order, as he crossed the Hudson on his bridge of
boats above Schuylerville, a dozen miles to the east of us, and marshaled
his forces for battle.”

“Here?” asked Roger.

“No; over by the Hudson,” replied Uncle Tom. ‘ We ’ll go over the
ground to-morrow or next day. Burgoyne had got himself into a bad box.
The Americans were as jubilant as the British were despondent. Suddenly,
a serious thing happened. On the very eve of the victory which he had
been organizing so splendidly, Schuyler was deprived of his command.”

“Why, how mean!” cried Marian.

‘What for?” asked Bert.

“Because Gates was a place-hunter, a wire-puller, a worker for him-
self and no one else,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘“ He was very jealous of Schuyler,
of whom Washington entertained a high opinion, and who had replaced
Gates in the northern command. So he just haunted Congress, working
secretly for Schuyler’s position. His influence was strong enough to com-
pass his ends, and Schuyler was set aside in favor of this intriguer and poli-
tician, who never showed ability or fitness for anything save setting sly
traps for successful rivals.”

«A little hard on him, are n’t you, Uncle Tom?” asked Bert.

“No, I think not,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘From the day he took the
command at Boston in Massachusetts, to the day he ruined himself at Cam-
den in South Carolina, the career of Horatio Gates was that of a self-seeker.
He played Washington false at the crossing of the Delaware, and was the
whole background of the infamous plot to ‘down’ that greatest patriot,
which is known as the ‘Conway Cabal.’ He aroused in Benedict Arnold
the spirit of discontent that drove that unbalanced partizan to treason. He
supplanted Schuyler by persistent and peculiar methods, robbed him of his
opportunity and his fame, and would joyfully have degraded him had not
the gallant Schuyler, unlike the hot-headed Arnold, been above resentment.
When relieved of his command, Schuyler only said, ‘The country before
everything,’ and set about helping Gates all he could by his influence and
position in the region about Saratoga. For he lived just beyond those
hills, toward the Hudson, you know.”

“Why did n’t he kick?” cried Jack indignantly. ‘1 would.”

“No, you would not, Master Jack,” his uncle replied, “not when you




































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE ARROWS OF THE ALLIES.

When the Indians came over the border with Burgoyne to ravage the valley of the Hudson,

it was on this raiding march that

Jane McCrea was murdered, and that such incidents as this occurred; for there were Indians on both sides.
164 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

saw how much depended on union of action and purity of purpose. Schuy-
ler saw this, and heaped upon his rival’s head those coals of fire that had
set the patriotism of these hills ablaze.”

“Good for him!” cried Jack.

“Was n't he fine?” said Christine.

“Just as he had things right where
he wanted them, too,” said Roger.

“Yes, folks do say,” Uncle Tom re-
marked, ‘‘that Stark’s victory at Benning-
ton decided the campaign, and that Bur-
goyne was really defeated then. This is
hardly the fact, for the nail had to be
clinched after it was driven; yet it is
certain that the defeat of Baum and his
Hessians did pave the way for Burgoyne’s
surrender at Saratoga.”

With Bennington in view as a starting-
point, they boarded the train the next day,
and running east to Hoosick Falls, took
the trolley through that pleasant hill-town,
vocal with its tumbling waters and the
whir of its busy industries, and whizzed
out to the hill at Walloomsac, where the
battle was fought.

«What, here?” cried Bert. «Why, I



eee thought it was fought at Bennington.”
GENERAL HORATIO GATES. “No, sir; right up along that ridge
Fok a ar ® yonder. beforecyou cross. the 7 Vor State
line,” said a communicative villager who
stood beside them on the piazza of the village hotel. ‘Of course, they
marched down from Bennington, and it was mostly Bennington folks who
did the fighting, so that lets ’em out; but when they tell you the battle of
Bennington was fought in Vermont, you tell ’em it was the battle of Wal-
loomsac in York State.”
« Another idol shattered,” said Bert, who did like to deal in facts.
Thats allright,” Uncle, om remarked, as they walked across the fields
toward. the “lone pine” that marks the battle-line on the ridge; “it’s an-
other case of local difference, you see. But, for all practical and historical
purposes, it was the battle of Bennington. In that town it was arranged ;
there the militia rendezvoused; from there they marched to the field; and it
PROMENADING WITH BURGOYNE 165

was really a running fight from the grist-mill by the falls to the bridge near
Bennington. It was a spirited action, too.”

They climbed the ridge of Battle Hill, once cut by Baum’s hasty intrench-
ments and marked now by the “lone tree of Walloomsac”; then, descending,
they passed the supposed burial-place of that brave but defeated Hessian,
and took the train for Bennington. At North Bennington, where Stark
spent the night before the fight, and through which runs the creek where the
battle began, they changed cars, and were soon at the beautiful city of
the hills, nestled in the wide green valley of the Walloomsac. They drove to
the pleasant hotel on Monument Avenue,
while ever before them, at the foot of the
verdant cone of Mount Anthony, rose the
big blue shaft of the battle monument,
the second tallest in the land.

‘‘T had no idea it was such a big thing,”
said Jack, while even Roger felt that
Bunker Hill was overtopped.

Set on the top of a green knoll over
seven hundred feet above the sea, the
obelisk of blue dolomite springs three hun-
dred feet in air, from the very spot where,
in Revolutionary days, stood the Conti-
nental store-house which was Burgoyne’s
objective point in the Bennington raid.
Four hundred iron steps lead to the out-
look chamber at the top.

Up these they groped their way, read
the inscriptions, and marveled at the un-
rivaled view. Descending, they stood be-
neath the great captured camp-kettle of
Burgoyne, suspended above their heads as
a relic of Saratoga’s fight; and then, cross-
ing the lawn, read upon a simple marble



slab, cracked and stained with long ex- GENERAL PHILIP SCHUYLER.
ay Bronze statue in the niche on the battle monument
posure, this G at Schuylerville.

On this site stood the Continental store-house, the rendezvous of the Green
Mountain Boys who fought the glorious battle of Bennington, the 16th of August,
1777-. This battle turned the scale of Victory in favour of American Independence.
To the memory of those patriots this humble monument is erected by one who had
a father and nine uncles in the battle, one of whom was killed.

ri*
166 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION



Rese h D7



COPYRIGHT, 1892, BY M. E. WATSON. USED BY PERMISSION.

THE BATTLE MONUMENT AT
BENNINGTON, VT.

‘The second highest monument in America, located at the foot of
Mount Anthony, 739 feet above tide-water. The shaft, 302
feet high, fronts the Green Mountains and is in a battle
park at the head of Monument Avenue. The
“‘Catamount”’ Monument is a quarter
of a mile down the avenue.

a widow!’



Then he ‘pitched in’ and won.

“The old and the new,” said
Christine, looking from the simple,
time-stained slab to the tall and
towering obelisk ; ‘‘and both tell the
story, too, don’t they?”

“Great boy, that Stark, was n’t
he?” exclaimed Jack as, a little later,
walking down Monument Avenue,
they stood before the bronze cata-
mount, high on its pedestal of Ver-
mont marble, and erected in 1897 to
mark the site of the Catamount
Tavern, which played a remarkable
part in the history of Vermont.
There Ethan Allen had planned the
attack on Ticonderoga; there Stark
had decided upon and directed the
fight above the Walloomsac; there
the Green Mountain boys and the
men of New Hampshire came hurry-
ing to the rendezvous, determined to
‘hobble the Hessians.”

‘You ’re right, Jack,” said Uncle
Tom; “John Stark was a valiant

fighter. He knew how to do his
duty. He made his mark at Bunker
Hill. He led the van at Trenton.

He fought in the ‘college rush’ at
Princeton; and here he disobeyed
the orders of Congress by staying
at Bennington to fight Baum and his
Hessians. ‘There they are, boys!’
he cried, waving his sword toward
the raiding Germans. “We ’Il get
em, or to-night Molly Stark ’Il be

For this he received pro-

motion and thanks from the very Congress whose words of censure for his
disobedience of orders had hardly had time to cool.”

“Tt all depends, does n’t it?” said Jack.

“How would it do to try on

that sort of tactics at school, I wonder?”
PROMENADING WITH BURGOYNE 1607

‘“ Not until you know more than your teachers, Jack,” was Uncle Tom’s
comment. ‘Stark did.”

They spent the night in beautiful Bennington so that the boys and girls
could get into their trip the trolley-ride up the mountain, and enjoy from the
hotel piazza that superb early-morning view of the broad and picturesque
Walloomsac Valley and the forest-
crested ramparts of the Green Moun-
tain heights.

. Then they rode back to Johnson-
ville on the main line, took a branch
road to pleasant Greenwich, and drove
across country to Schuylerville, where,
on the height above the town, rises
another mighty obelisk of blue granite,
commemorating the field of what has
been judged by historians to be one
of the decisive battles of the world —
Saratoga.

Standing beside that splendid shaft
reared by the exertions of patriotic
citizens and the aid of Congress, Uncle
Tom briefly sketched the story of the
victory it commemorates.

He told his boys and girls of
Schuyler’s untiring efforts and Bur-



GENERAL DANIEL MORGAN.

’ Who commanded the riflemen at Saratoga. From a portrait in

goyne’s growing perplexities, of the the possession of Mrs. V. N. Taylor, of Washington,
2 me o is D.C. Reproduced, by permission, from
British advance across these very hills « Battles of Saratoga, 1777.”

and by the river-road, while Gates,

following Schuyler’s lines, marched his constantly growing army of minute-
men and militia from the Mohawk to the Hudson, and threw up breast-
works and rude fortifications stretching from the river to the heights. He
told them that the region all about Schuylerville was known at that time
as Saratoga, though now divided up into various post-offices and settle-
ments, while the little town of Schuylerville, lying about the mouth of
Fish Creek, was really known for years as Old Saratoga. ‘Hence it is
really the battle of Saratoga, you see.”

“Perplexed and dispirited by the defeats at Oriskany and Bennington,”
said Uncle Tom, ‘“ Burgoyne moved down the river, while an American
colonel with a strong spy-glass, perched in the top of a tree on a hill across
the river, watched all the preparations for the start, and hurried across to re-
168 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

port the fact to Gates in his camp at Stillwater. The Americans prepared
to meet the enemy, and soon battle was joined. There were two engage-
ments — the first at Freeman’s Farms, about ten miles southwest of us, across
the hills, the other three weeks later, at Bemis Heights, near to the river.”

‘‘T know the dates,” said Bert; ‘‘ September 19 and October 7, 1777.”

Uncle Tom nodded. ‘“That’s right. One battle was the complement
of the other. Saratoga was, in fact, a sort of bivalve battle. One shell
was Freeman’s Farms on September 19; the other shell was Bemis Heights
on October 7.”

‘And Burgoyne the oyster shut in between,” said Roger.

“Exactly,” Uncle Tom assented. ‘The shells closed on him relentlessly
and locked him fast; then Arnold’s sword and Morgan’s rifle-barrel pried the
bivalve open.”

“And Gates ate the oyster,” said Jack. .

“Just so. It was all in logical order,” Uncle Tom declared. ‘The
country was roused. Burgoyne was desperate. He had to fight, and he
fought. He had veteran troops;
he had brave and competent gen-
erals, both English and Hessian:
Frazer and Reidesel, Phillips and
Breyman.”

“But Gates had their equals,
did n’t he?” said Bert.

“That he had,” Uncle Tom
replied; “Arnold and Morgan,
Kosciusko, Dearborn, Poor, and
Learned — valiant fighters all.
And how they did fight! While
Gates stayed in his tent, hesitat-
ing, Arnold led the battle at Free-
man’s Farms, hurling back the
British onset, and Morgan’s shrill
whistle directed his riflemen in
their impetuous rush. Phillips and



PS EEMAI SHAMS, Arnold, destined to fight on the
Where one of the Saratoga battles was fought, September 19, 1777. : )
From “‘ Battles of Saratoga, 1777,”’ by permission. same side later the more s the

pity!— fought up and down the
ravine I will show you, while the little stream that trickles through it
ran red with blood.”
“Oh, dear!” shuddered the girls.
PROMENADING WITH BURGOYNE 169

“Night alone closed the fight; but the British advance was checked.
Had Gates seconded Arnold promptly and properly, the battle would have
been a decisive victory. Instead, his jealousy swallowed up his justice; he
slighted and censured Arnold, and
finally deprived him of his command = + =
and gave him nothing to do or say.”

“That was mighty mean,” said
Jack indignantly.

“Yes; Arnold was furious, and
when the chance came he snapped his
fingers at Gates’s orders,” said Uncle
Tom. “That dilatory leader — really
a case of a man having greatness
thrust -upon him—stayed-in his en-
campment while, of their own accord,
the plans that Schuyler had so skilfully
laid combined for the closing struggle.
It came at last — off there, toward the
river, just beyond Freeman’s Farms,
on a ridge called Bemis Heights. Bur-
goyne led out his troops. ‘Order out
Morgan,’ said Gates, and Morgan op-
posed the British advance. The battle
raged hotly. Morgan swept down
upon Frazer, and the brave English- BRITISH LINE OF BATTLE.
man fell von the Geld. ‘The: Hessians Marking the battle-line of Bemis Heights, October 7, 1777.

From “ Battles of Saratoga, 1777,” by permission.

held their ground; victory hung in the

balance. Then, with a rush—he could simply stand it no longer, you
see — Arnold galloped from his tent, where he had been a restless spectator
of the battle, and, in open defiance of Gates, regardless of the aide who
came spurring after him to order his return, he was speedily in the thick
of it all. His coming was an inspiration. The regiments rallied; charg-
ing after their impetuous leader, they stormed the Hessians, who turned
in flight before the rush. Burgoyne tried in vain to rally his army; he
was driven into his camp. Then Arnold, turning, charged against the
Hessian camp on the hill, killed Breyman, the commander, and sent
everything scattering before him. Then he fell wounded; and then came
the night. Burgoyne retreated here to Schuylerville, and encamped on
this very hill, down which, ten days later, the red-coats and Hessians
marched to the flats by the river and surrendered to the American com-


170 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

mander. It was the end of the
‘promenade’; it was the beginning
of the Republic.”

“1777-1883,” read Bert, turn-
ing to the bronze plate set at the
entrance into the tall granite
obelisk :

‘“‘ This monument was erected under
the auspices of the Saratoga Monu-
ment Association, to commemorate the
surrender of General Burgoyne to Gen-
eral Gates, onthe 17th of October,1777.”

‘“Good enough!” cried Jack,
smiting the captured British 24-
pounder before the portal a sound-
ing smack. ‘Show us the very
spot, Uncle Tom.”

«All in good time; let ’s look
at this first,” his uncle replied.

They entered the neatly kept
memorial-room in the base; they
climbed the stairs and studied all
the fine and striking bas-reliefs in
bronze that picture the great
event; they admired the heroic
bronze statues of the great leaders
of the battle, each in a niche on
the outer faces of the obelisk.

There stood Schuyler, organ-
izer of victory; there Gates, who
plucked the fruits of that organi-
zation; there Morgan, hero of
Northern and Southern fields; and
there —

THE BATTLE MONUMENT AT SCHUYLERVILLE. “Why, hullo!” cried Jack,

Commemorating Burgoyne’s defeat and surrender in the battle
autumn of 1777.



“this one is vacant. Who goes
in heres”

They had come to the southern side of the monument expectantly, and now
stood gazing up perplexedly at the empty niche that yawned before them.
PROMENADING WITH BURGOYNE Evi

‘Don’t you know who should have gone there, boys and girls?” said

Uncle Tom. ‘Who was the real hero of the battle? Who led the charge
and really won both fights? Who?”

“Why — Arnold,” said Marian.

“And yet his niche stands vacant. Why?” asked Uncle Tom.
'“ Because he was a traitor!” said Bert.

“Oh, how dreadful that is!” said Christine.

‘OT is kind of rough, is n't it?” was Roger’s comment. But Jack said
stoutly, “No; it serves him right.”

“And how does it serve us?” demanded his uncle. ‘Is it not a lesson
and a reminder as well? That niche would have been filled with Arnold’s
statue had he not proved a traitor to his country. What he won he lost.
To me that empty niche is the most eloquent of all the reminders of this
famous field of strife and history.”

Impressed, all of them, by this sermon in stone, they descended the hill
and walked about the historic town of Schuylerville, known to far too few



THE OLD SCHUYLER HOUSE,
On the banks of Fish Creek, Schuylerville, the residence of General Philip Schuyler, the ‘ organizer of victory.””

Americans. Above them towered the monument; below them flowed the
Hudson, for whose possession all this blood had been shed; all about them
stretched greeii fields and crested heights, ever speaking of a great struggle
and a wonderful victory.

They saw the home of General Schuyler on the banks of the rushing,
tumbling Fish Creek; they saw the fine old Marshall house, in which
Madame Reidesel and her three little girls passed that dreadful day of bat-
tle, and in which the brave General Frazer died; they stood on the field
172 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

of surrender, now no field at all, but a busy business street, and read the
bronze tablet set in the dead wall of a brick block:

“Near this spot, October 16, 1777, American and British officers met and
consummated articles of capitulation of General Burgoyne to General Gates.
And on this ground the British army laid down their arms, thus securing Ameri-
can Independence.”

Next day they took carriages and drove slowly over the two battle-
fields, whose important spots are marked by granite tablets carefully in-
scribed —‘‘a good deal like Con-
cord and Lexington,” so Roger
declared.

Along the old highway, by
wide farms, far-reaching valleys,
and forest-covered ridges, they
drove—an intensely interesting
ride, that led them through Quaker
Spring and Freeman’s Farms and
Bemis Heights, not so rapidly but
that they had time to see all the
tablets and read all the inscrip-
tions.

Here General Frazer fell; here
lay the great ravine where Acland
was wounded, and the rivulet ran
blood-red; here was the old
battle well at Freeman’s Farms,



WHERE ARNOLD WAS WOUNDED. for which so desperate a fight was
Breyman’s Hill, last stronghold of the British, battle of Saratoga, Oc- d . I d ] 1 F N il
tober 7, 1777. From “‘ Battles of Saratoga, 1777,” by permission. wage » here stood olc ort ell-

son—a rude breastwork of logs
and earth; here were Gates’s headquarters, here Bemis’s tavern, here Kos-
ciusko’s water-battery. A tablet marked the British line of battle and the
American encampment; a tablet stood where Arnold was wounded at the
heroic assault of Breyman’s camp; a tablet showed where Morgan assailed
Frazer, and another stood where fell Lieutenant Hardin of Morgan’s rifle-
men, storming Balcarras’s redoubt. ci
And so, all along that historic road, the granite tablets dotted hill and
plain—an object-lesson in American valor and British pluck, displayed in a
field that speaks forever of patriotism, courage, the desperation of defeat,
the jubilation of victory, combined in one of the world’s most notable con-
flicts — the double battle of Saratoga.
PROMENADING WITH BURGOYNE 173

Then, full of what they had seen, they drove on to Stillwater, where
they dismissed their Schuylerville teams and “trolleyed” it to Mechanics-
ville, and so by rail to Saratoga again.

But as next day they went southward and homeward, Jack said: ‘It’s
no use, Uncle Tom; we’re in for it, and so are you. If we’ve seen the
Northern battle-fields, we must see the Southern ones. Must n’t we,
folkses?”

And all the “ folkses” replied with an enthusiastic and vociferous “ Yes.”

‘Ask father,” said Jack.

Uncle Tom yielded—willingly ; and so did “father” and all the other
powers.

As a result, maps were carefully studied, guide-books closely examined ;
and at the proper time the Southern campaign was duly and delightfully
opened by Uncle Tom and his battle-field brigade.



THE MARSHALL HOUSE, SCHUYLERVILLE,

Overlooking the Hudson. Here Madame Reidesel and her children lived during the battle, hiding the most of the time
in the cellar to escape the American bombardment; and here the British General Frazer died.
























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































“SENT SOUTH TO ‘PACIFY’ THE CAROLINAS.”
The British fleet lay off the entrance to the Savannah River, December the twenty-third, 1778.
CHAPTER OX
FROM THE SEA TO THE SAND-HILLS

By Sea to Savannah— Where the British Landed — The Szege of
Savannah — A City of Monuments — Fascinating Charleston — The
Defense of Fort Moultrie — The Battle of Eutaw Springs.

WHE young folks gathered about Uncle Tom, in the very nose
of the bow, as the stanch steamer sailed cautiously up the
_q| tiver. Coming south by sea, they had a most invigorating
SA voyage. Even Hatteras seemed to have calmed down for

E85) their especial benefit, and the hazy land-line of the Carolina
coast smiled at them in a balmy welcome.

It had been a delightful trip—dquite different, Uncle Tom declared, from
that of the British fleet, which, sailing from Sandy Hook to the attack of
Savannah and the subjugation of the southern colonies, was very nearly a
whole month in making the voyage—from November 27 to December 22%
1778.

“It was after Saratoga, then?” said Roger.

“Oh, yes,” Uncle Tom replied ; “over a year later. The British gov-
ernment determined upon the conquest of the southern colonies, which,
except for the unsuccessful attack on Fort Moultrie in Charleston harbor,
early in the war, had practically been unmolested. So this expedition of
which I speak was sent south by water to overawe and ‘ pacify’ the Carolinas.
It is the trail of the British sword that we are now following.”

They rounded the Martin’s Industry lightship, far out, off the bar; they
sailed under the lee of the striped tower of Tybee Light, and soon were
threading the narrow channel of the yellow Savannah River, where the new
jetties mark the tortuous passage.

“When you get home again,” said Uncle Tom, sweeping his hand toward
the long, low, sandy island on the left, “you must look up Whittier’s
Tybee poem. That is Tybee, you know.”

175



Qe
176 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

‘Oh, I remember that,” said Christine. ‘“ Does n’t it begin:

“¢ The tent-lights glimmer on the land,
The ship-lights on the sea;
The night winds smooth with drifting sand
Our track on lone Tybee.’”’

“That’s it,” Uncle Tom answered. ‘It comes tome again and again as
we coast these low, sandy shores. But things have changed greatly since
Whittier wrote that poem. The tent-lights on Tybee are now the ‘elec-
trics’ of the string of seaside hotels, and the ‘track on lone Tybee’ to-day
is the railway track over which run the comfortable cars that carry vis-
itors from Savannah to the splendid,
floor-like, five-mile beach of Tybee, for a
day’s or a week’s outing.”

“So here ’s where the British came
sailing along, is it?” said Jack. ‘There
were n't any light-houses or jetties then,
I suppose. I hope they ran aground.”

‘No, they did n’t, Jack,” Uncle Tom
replied. ‘They were wise enough not
to attempt this dangerous channel. The
fleet lay off the entrance to the river; the
British troops were landed over there on
Tybee Island. They advanced on the



city, were joined by reinforcements from
Florida, captured Savannah, overran
Georgia, and advanced on Charleston.
Then, fearful of an American rising, they
fell back to Savannah, and did nothing for
several months except make themselves
particularly disagreeable to the conquered
patriots.”

“They had a fondness for that, it
seems to me,” said Marian.

“Suddenly,” continued Uncle Tom,
“hope sprang up anew in the breasts of the dispirited Americans. In Sep-
tember, 1779, D’Estaing, with a splendid French fleet, King Louis’s first
open assistance to the new United States of America, came sailing up from
the West Indies, and anchored just where we have been sailing, off the
mouth of the Savannah River. Meantime, our old friend Lincoln, of Dor-

pl

te

B22 Janvier



THE FRIEND’ OF AMERICA. KING
LOUIS XVI OF FRANCE.

(From an old print.)
FROM THE SEA TO THE SAND-HILLS 177



PHOTOGRAPHED BY CLARKE, CHARLESTON, S. C.
ON THE BATTERY, CHARLESTON.

Looking off toward Forts Moultrie and Sumter.

chester Heights fame, came down from ‘Charleston with his Americans and
joined the French force; the allied armies then marched to the attack of
Savannah.”

“Ah, ha!” said Jack, growing interested; ‘now this begins to look like
business.”

“Yes, it begins to,” was Uncle Tom’s reply, ‘but it proved a bad busi-
ness. Do you see that bluff over there to the left, beyond the rice-fields ?”

They all saw it—a green, tree-fringed ridge, rising out of the fen-like
rice-lands.

“There the French and Americans joined forces and, marching along
that very road, advanced to within three hundred yards of the British de-
fenses. The British made a sortie, but were repulsed and driven within
their lines. Then the allied armies bombarded the city for a few days,
and at last determined to assault its defenses. It was well planned, but a
Charleston militia officer, named Curry, deserted to the British and gave
them the whole secret of the proposed attack, which therefore failed, and,
indeed, ended in disaster. In that onset, called the battle of the Spring
Hill redoubt, Pulaski and the brave Sergeant Jasper were killed. The
French admiral feared for the.safety of his fleet in case of an Atlantic gale,
and, sailing hurriedly away, he left Lincoln and the Americans in the lurch,
and the poor patriots of Georgia were in a worse plight than ever.”

12
178 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

ie

THE JASPER MONUMENT, SAVANNAH.



“Dreadful!” exclaimed Marian.

“Fine lot of help, he was!” cried Jack.

“What did Lincoln do?” Bert asked.

‘He retreated to Charleston. General Clinton came sailing down from
New York with more British, and the trouble grew worse, as you will see
when we get to Charleston,” Uncle Tom replied.

So, with Uncle Tom’s brief sketch of the siege of Savannah asa side-light,
FROM THE SEA TO THE SAND-HILLS ; : 179

they sailed on up the narrow river, across whose far-reaching bar Ogle-
thorpe had first sailed with his philanthropic plans of a great Protestant
province; where the Wesleys had come, aflame with missionary ardor,
and Whitefield, gentlest of religious enthusiasts; where the last outpost
against Spanish arrogance had been established and maintained ; where the
first naval capture by the revolted colonists had been made in the Amer-
ican Revolution; and where first the flag of the Southern Confederacy had
been raised in Georgia.

_ They threaded the narrow channel where the river wound through low
-and verdant marsh-lands, through humid rice-plantations, past the neat,
white houses of the light-tenders and the dotted fretwork of the new
jetties, past the cotton-lands, the martello tower and the forts; then the
long line of cotton- and resin-docks came in sight, with tramp steamers
labeled with outlandish North Sea names; and so at last they tied fast to
the dock, and were speedily rattling up the city streets to the fine hotel in
the region of parks and statues.

They were in Savannah. And the very first thing they came upon, as
they sallied forth for a walk after dinner, was a spirited and dramatic statue
directly in front of the hotel. '

«What isit? Is n't it fine?” cried Marian.

“Dat ’s de Jasper monument, miss,” said a small darky in reply.

“Jasper? Who was he?” asked Marian.

“1 dunno, miss; I reckon he was a gemman what fit endu’in’ de wah,”
the darky replied.

Bert, who meanwhile was at his usual occupation of deciphering in-
scriptions, now read aloud, with his eyes fixed on the pedestal of the beauti-
ful monument:

“To the heroic memory of Sergeant William Jasper, who, though mortally wounded, rescued
the colors of his regiment in the assault on the British lines about this city, October 9, 1779.

A century has not dimmed the glory of the Irish-American soldier whose last tribute to civil
liberty was his noble life. 1779-1879.”

« Sergeant Jasper?” said Christine. “Why, did n't he have something to
do at Fort Moultrie?”
‘Oh, yes, I know,” said Roger; ‘saved the colors, did n’t he?”
‘« But that ’s what this monument says he did here in Savannah,” said
Bert, still looking at the stirring figure.
“He did it at both places,” Uncle Tom explained.
“Why, he was a regular color-sergeant, was n’t he?” cried Jack.
“He was a brave and daring young fellow,” said Uncle Tom. ‘We
shall run across him again in Charleston. He was identified with numer-
180 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

ous Revolutionary happenings in this region. Two miles above here he,
with a single companion, rescued a company of American prisoners from
their guard of ten men and forced the ten to surrender. I believe they now
call the place Jasper Spring.”

‘Good for you, sir! You wereatrump!” said Jack, doffing his cap to the
spirited soldier in bronze, the gallant flag-bearer.

They walked along Bull street and its stretch of sandy parks until they
came to the point where, in Monterey Square, a tall shaft of Italian marble,
topped by a statue of Liberty, rose before them.

“The Pulaski monument,” said Uncle Tom.

And Marian, whose turn it was to be inscription-reader, gave the brief
memorial lines: eee

‘the heroic Pole
who fell mortally wounded
fighting for American liberty
at the siege of Savannah
g October 1779.”

‘He was the fellow from Poland, eh?” Jack remarked.

“Yes,” Uncle Tom replied, ‘“‘and a valuable supporter of the American
cause.”

‘““That’s so,” said Bert; ‘‘ we ’ve come across him before — at Brandywine,
wasn't it? and Valley Forge?”

‘Yes, he was at both places,” said Uncle Tom. ‘He joined the army
as a volunteer, but was soon made a brigadier-general. He was a dashing
cavalry leader, and organized and led a corps called ‘ Pulaski’s Legion.’.”

“He was n't the ‘Freedom-shrieked’ man, was he?” queried Jack.

“Oh, Jack!” cried Christine, “what a way to put it! That was Kosci-
usko, in Campbell’s poem, was n’t it, Uncle Tom:

‘Hope for a season bade the world farewell,
And Freedom shriek’d as Kosciusko fell!’”

“Yes; don’t you remember, we caught a glimpse of his monument on
the parapet of old Fort Clinton at West Point?” Uncle Tom replied.

“That ’s so,” Jack said, nodding his recollection. ‘But say, why were
those Polish boys so ready to chip in and help us?”

‘Because of two women and a man,” Uncle Tom replied.

“Another of Uncle Tom’s history puzzles. What do youmean?” asked
Marian.

«Wait a minute,” said Bert; and at once both he and Christine put
on their thinking-caps.
FROM THE SEA TO THE SAND-HILLS 181

“It’s something to do with the dismem- Pa
berment of Poland, is n’t it, Uncle Tom?” Bert F PR
said.

“Ves,” his uncle replied. ‘For genera- |
tions, you see, Poland was the small boy of
Europe. Now one and now another of the |
big-boy nations around would ‘pick on him,’
as you say, and the land was in a constant
struggle against outside and inside foes. At
last, just before our American Revolution, the
Empress Catherine of Russia, the Empress
Maria Theresa of Austria —”

‘“Two women,” said Jack, nodding —

«and Frederick the Great, king of
Prussia—”

«And aman,” put in Marian —

‘joined together to divide Poland among
themselves.”

“There ’s your dismemberment of Poland,”
remarked Bert.

“ The patriots sprang to arms, among them
Casimir Pulaski and Thaddeus Kosciusko,”




f

Uncle Tom went on. “Defeated in the
struggle,—for the great HEOIMDITIG A EW AS. LOOl >< sage nce sea eran
THE MONUMENT TO PULASKI.

much for them,—with others of their race
they fled from their native land to America,
and fought for our liberty more successfully than for their own.”

As they talked thus of Polish heroes, the tourists walked within the semi-
tropical borders of Forsythe Park, with its fountains, its sphinxes, and its
palms, and, turning at the Confederate monument, retraced their steps
toward the river and the business section of the town.

And there in the heart of the city, in Johnson Square, they came upon
another Revolutionary reminder — the old-fashioned, square-cut monument
to the ‘‘second soldier of the Revolution,” so Uncle Tom declared. It said:

In Monterey Square, Savannah.

“ Major-General Nathanael Greene. Born in Rhode Island, 1742. Died in Georgia, 1786.
Soldier, patriot, the friend of Washington. ‘This shaft has been reared by the people of Savan-
nah in honor of his great services to the American Revolution.”

«Why do you call him the ‘second soldier of the Revolution,’ Uncle
Tom?” queried Roger. “Did he really come next to Washington ne

. 12*
182 THE CENTURY BOOK OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

“ Unquestionably,” Uncle Tom
replied. ‘‘ Nathanael Greene was
a great man. Self-taught and self-
made, this Quaker boy, this black-
smith’s apprentice, at fourteen
taught himself geometry, and be-
fore he was of age had become a
careful student of military affairs.
From Bunker Hill to Yorktown he
was in the thick of the fight.
Washington admired and trusted
him; he rose to high command in
the patriot army, and it was his
head and hand that saved the South
after the signal failure of the bom-
bastic Gates. By his good work
at Guilford Court House and Eutaw
Springs he rendered Yorktown
possible and made American inde-
pendence a fact.”

“That ’s a good deal to say for
a man,” said Bert, studying the
stalwart bas-relief in Continental
uniform.

‘“Fine-looking man, eh?” re-
marked Jack, joining his cousin.

“A manly man in every way,”
Uncle Tom declared. ‘‘ Brown’s

‘ ; statue of him in the Capitol at
MAJOR-GENERAL NATHANAEL GREENE. T : : :
‘This statue was placed in Statuary Hall, in the Capitol at Washing- W ashington Is a fine-looking

ton, by the State of Rhode Island, in memory of ‘‘ her figu re. w
chosen son.”



“Why did they put up a statue
to him here?” asked Marian. ‘Did he have anything to do with the siege
of Savannah ?”

‘He saved it from a second siege, or rather, by his skill, he scared away
its British possessors,” Uncle Tom replied. ‘More than that, as I have
said, he saved the South, almost lost through the incompetency of Gates.
That is why the Southern people admired and appreciated this Northern
soldier. They gave him, after the war, a large estate near this town of
Savannah; when he died, in 1786, he was buried here, a few squares
FROM THE SEA TO THE SAND-HILLS 183

from where we. stand, in the quaint old Broad-street cemetery ; and in 1829
this monument was erected in his honor. I admire Nathanael Greene.”

“And so do we,” said Jack, saluting the bronze effigy on the tablet.

‘We shall meet him frequently,” Uncle Tom assured them, “as we fight
our way across the Carolinas to Yorktown.”

They found much to admire in Savannah. Who would not? Itis a
fine old Southern city, so mingling old and new that, as Uncle Tom de-
clared, its very street pavements marked its
three stages of development —the sand
age, the shell age, and the asphalt age.

The young folks did not know which to
admire most, the climate or the curiosities.
They marveled at the magnolias, the pal-
mettos, and the live-oaks; they were full of ec aoe
questions at the Hermitage, last vestige of |
an old-time slave plantation; they enjoyed
their drives to Thunderbolt and Beaulieu;
they wheeled to Jasper Spring, and over ae
the broad