Citation
The true story of U.S. Grant

Material Information

Title:
The true story of U.S. Grant the American soldier, told for boys and girls
Series Title:
Children's lives of great men
Creator:
Brooks, Elbridge Streeter, 1846-1902
Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Books ( Publisher )
Norwood Press ( Publisher )
Berwick & Smith ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Co.
Manufacturer:
Northwood Press ; Berwick & Smith
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
234, [2] p., [1] leaf of plates : ill., ports ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Pioneer children -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Frontier and pioneer life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Generals -- Biography -- Juvenile literature -- 19th century ( lcsh )
Presidents -- Biography -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Farm life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Success -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Determination (Personality trait) -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Leadership -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Humility -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile literature -- United States ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Juvenile literature -- United States -- 1869-1877 ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Biographies -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Biographies ( rbgenr )
Children's literature ( fast )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
individual biography ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note:
Pictorial front cover.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Elbridge S. Brooks ; illustrated.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026609531 ( ALEPH )
ALG3144 ( NOTIS )
02652706 ( OCLC )
04016999 ( LCCN )

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Full Text
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4
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‘

AT APPOMATTOX.
(When General Grant entered the McLean house at Appomattox to receive the surrender of General Lee’s army, his main wish was not
to play the conqueror. His desire was to spare the feelings of his opponent, and he pernitted no military
display nor did he wear his own sword or demand that of General Lee.) . [See page 228]





THE TRUE STORY OF >

TS. GRAN TL

THE AMERICAN SOLDIER

TOLD FOR BOYS AND GIRLS

BY

ELBRIDGE S. BROOKS

AUTHOR OF “THE STORY OF OUR WAR WITH SPAIN,” “THE AMERICAN SOLDIER,”
“THE AMERICAN SAILOR,” ‘‘THE TRUE STORY OF THE UNITED STATES,”

“THE TRUE STORY. OF COLUMBUS,” ‘“ WASHINGTON,” “ LINCOLN,”
“FRANKLIN,” “ LAFAYETTE,” AND MANY OTHERS
ILLUSTRATED
BOSTON

LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO.



COPYRIGHT, 1897,
BY
LoTrHrRop PUBLISHING COMPANY.

Norwood Press :
Berwick & Smith, Norwood, Mass., U.S.A.



PREFACE.

Tue life-story of every great American contains much that is startling,
much that is marvellous, and much that is inspiring, as, looking back, we
read it from its starting point.

The true story of America’s greatest soldier, Ulysses S. Grant, is not lack-
ing in the elements that give to the stories of Washington, Lincoln and Franklin
the flavor of moral and romance.

The son of a western tanner became the leader of the world’s mightiest
armies; the Ohio school boy became the ruler of the greatest of modern repub-
lics; the modest and retiring gentleman became the victorious general; the
broken and discouraged farmer and clerk became the foremost man of his day
in all the world.

As an example of persistence, of determination and of will, of a:clear head
in emergencies and a great heart in victory, of modesty, patience, simplicity,
strength and zeal, the record of the struggles and successes of U. S. Grant is a
lesson to young and old alike, and his story is one most fitting to be included
in this series of ‘‘Children’s Lives of Great Men.”

The words of the president of the republic, spoken above the brave general’s
last resting-place, in the grand mausoleum beside the Hudson, are eminently
appropriate in this connection. They serve as the best possible preface to this
life of the greatest American soldier.

“With Washington and Lincoln,” said President McKinley, ‘Grant had
an exalted place in history and the affections of the people. To-day his
memory is held in equal esteem by those whom he led to victory and by those
who accepted his generous terms of peace.”

To which may be added this portrait of our great general from the same
poet-patriot who said grand words of Washington and Lincoln —I mean James
Russell Lowell:

i “He came grim, silent; saw and did the deed
That was to do; in his master grip
Our sword flashed joy; no skill of words could breed
Such sure convictions as those close-clamped lips ;

He slew our dragon, nor, so seemed it, knew
He had done more than any simplest man might do.”

E. .§. B.



WHY

“CONTENTS

CHAPTER I.

A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX

‘CHAPTER IL

ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC

HOW

HOW

HOW

HOW

HOW

HOW

CHAPTER IIL

THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER

CHAPTER IV.

HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA

CHAPTER Y.

THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A ‘*HARD SCRABBLE”

CHAPTER VI.

HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY Ae aan :
CHAPTER VIL.
THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI

CHARTER VIII.

HE FOUGHT IT OUT

II

54

73

go

. 104

I20

136



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER IX.

HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT . . e

CHAPTER X.

HOW THE TANNER’S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME

CHAPTER XI.

HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD . : ° .

\

CHAPTER XII.

THE OLD GENERAL’S LAST FIGHT

CHAPTER XIIL

WHAT THE WORLD SAYS , . ° ° °

156

174

189

206

220



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

At Appomattox.

The house in which Grant was born . . . .
Grant’s first election-day . . . ° . .
The Birthplace of U. S. Grant . . . . .
Where the United States will make a park . .
The Birthplace as it looks to-day Sets . .
The Memorial Building in which the Birthplace stands
“Stumping” at the swimming hole . . oe
John Quincy Adams . 5 . . . .
Blindfolding the balky colt . : aA . .
“So he went along through a happy boyhood” . .

“That’s jest the very lowest I can sell the critter for, Lyss,” said the farmer _

The “country schoolmarm ” of Grant’s boyhood days

“ Might just as well send this little fellow of yours, Squire.”

Ulysses sees the sights ae ranean eau Ntee te

In camp at West Point . ; 7 . .
Cadet Grant’s famous horseback leap ° ° .
Cadet life out-of-doors . : A ° . .
Kosciusko’s monument at West Point . ° .

General Zachary Taylor. . . . : . .
Grant rides for ammunition at Monterey . .
Chepultepec — the “ West Point” of Mexico . .
Grant said, “ we’re coming in!” and they did . ai
The battery in the steeple . . . . oss
The Cathedral in the City of Mexico . i . .
Bull fight in Mexico . : . : . . .
The dangerous trip “ overland ” in “ the fifties.” 3

‘Target practice in U. S. A. barracks . ; : :

Frontis.
si 3
S is
: -
. .
3 ;
3
> °
2 a
s <
7 a
: 7
5 S
; .
. .
.
a 5
: .
* .
3 :
4 3
: .
. 2
%5 <
C5 <
G °

13
16
18
20
20
20
22
25
28
29
33
35
38
41
45
49
50
52
57
59
61

63
66
68
71
75
76



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

The march across the Isthmus . 3 : 3 : 7 ‘
He cared for the si€k and fought the plague. : 5 ° .

Grant in the plague camp at Panama . 5 s ; . . .
Cold weather sentry duty, in barracks . . eee ° .
A hard road to travel . SoA tine { 3 . . .
“ Captain Grant found out what work really was.” . . . .
Grant as a wood-peddler_. = : . : = . 7 .

With the Gray and the Bay : A : s 7 : .
“ Hardscrabble,” the cottage that Grant built for himself in Missouri

Grant’s home in Galena, in 1861. i A “ 3 s

A “new recruit,” in 1861. . ‘ ° 3 a é 5 5
The Court House at Galena < . 3 . ;: . .
“Men! go to your quarters,” said Colonel Grant : ° : .

“T prefer to do my first marching in.a friendly country,” he said S
Grant at Belmont . 3 . . ah fee : - : °
Grant at Shiloh So 'oe oe

Grant’s charge at Shiloh. : . . : : : . :
Major-General U. S. Grant . . : 7

Spot where Grant met Pemberton to arrange for the surrender of Vicksburg

A Confederate sharpshooter at Lookout Mountain .. . :
President Lincoln handing Grant his commission as Lieutenant-General
Grant and his Generals . : . 5 . . .

“T shall fight it out on this line if it takes allsummer.” . |.

The ninth of April, 1865. 7 is % . . ears

They saluted like gentlemen and soldiers . 5 : :

At the Grand Review in Washington . . . . . 3
“Grant was the hero of the hour”. : : . .

Grant and his family . 7 : : . ; . . ;

A boy’s first view of General Grant . . . : -

Grant and Johnson. 4 : i . . < a : .
At the inauguration . : : S 3 5 ; . .

The new Washington as Grant made it. : : 5 5 :
The city of Geneva in Switzerland where the Court of Arbitration met
Charles Sumner . ce : se SeNS ; 2
Horace Greeley . : . : : : . : ‘ .
President Grant delivering his second inaugural address . : é

William T. Sherman . . 3 . Z . y 5 °
“Let no guilty man escape” . . : 7 . . < ‘
Memorial Hall, Philadelphia. . . . . . 2

Lord Beaconsfield , é s : : . . Gi 5
‘William I. . : 3 . ‘ . . . : . % ‘

78
81
83
86
87
92
94

95
100

106
109
IIo

115

130
133
135
139
142

143

147
149
152
154
157
159
161

169
171
173
175
177
179
182
185
186
190
IOI



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Ex-President Grant . . ‘: *
The Norman Gate . 5 ;
Grant and Bismarck . ; s 3 5

. . . . . . .
. wae . . . . .

. . . . . .

Windsor Castle, the home of the Queen of England .
Grant addressing the workingmen at Newcastle, Eng.
General Grant landing at Nagasaki, in Japan. . °
The Gate at Lucknow, India. 3 5 3 ‘ Ky
The Golden Gate, San Francisco Harbor . 5 ¢ : ;: é ‘ i
Grant’s home in East Sixty-sixth Street, New York City . ; . ° .
The harbor of New York . . . . . . . . . . .
The old General's last fight ‘ . 7 3 . > . ° . .
The cottage on Mount McGregor, near Saratoga, in which General Grant died

The outlook at Mount McGregor A . . : 3 . . .
The temporary tomb of General Grant, Riverside Drive, New York City . >
The view across the river from Grant’s tomb at Riverside . . ¢ : .
Hancock and Grant . s sates @ ‘ 7 . . ° . ° .
At Spottsylvania . 5 . . ° . . en iete te 3 ‘ °
The Grant monument at Chicago ° 7 . . ° . . ° °
Where our hero sleeps at Riverside . . . . . ° ° ° .
The second funeral of Grant. ° aa a ° ° ° ° ° °

193
194
195
197

201
204
205
208
210
213
217
218
221
222
224
225
228
231
233



THE TRUE STORY OF

ULYSSES S. GRANT

CHAPTER I.
WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX.

HIS is a story for the boys and girls of America.
It isa true story. It is the story of an Ameri-
can. It is a story of adventure, of fighting
and of glory. It is the story of the greatest
soldier of the Republic—the story of Ulysses
S. Grant.

I do not wish to tell you the story of this remarkable
man simply because he fought and won great battles, nor
because, for fully twenty years, he was the foremost man
and the chief citizen of the United States of America, nor
because I delight to write of war and bloodshed and victory.
I donot. I abominate war. I hate bloodshed. I know
that there are two sides to every victory. But the story of
General Grant seems to me one that all the boys and girls of

It





12 WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INIO A BOX.

America can take to heart. It is one that should help and
strengthen and inspire them. For as they read in these
pages, how, out of obscurity came honor, out of failure
fame, out of hindrances perseverance, out of indifference
patriotism, out of dullness genius, out of silence success,
and, out of all these combined, a glorious renown, they may
See, in this man’s advance into greatness, a reason for their
own doing their best — patiently, unhesitatingly, persistently.
‘For it was thus that Grant rose to honor and renown; it

‘was thus that the tanner’s son of Georgetown became the
general of the armies of the Republic, that the horse-boy
of the Ohio farm became the President of the United States.
Let me tell you his story.

In the year 1821 there stood on the banks of the Ohio
river, in Clermont County in southwestern Ohio, twenty-five
miles to the east of Cincinnati, a small frame house, with
one story and an ell. It was the home of Jesse Root Grant
and Hannah, his wife. Jesse Grant was a smart and indus-
trious young tanner who had settled at this spot on the
Ohio River. It was known as Point Pleasant. Here he
had gone into the business of tanning hides into leather,
«being backed up with money by a man who wished to have
his son learn the tanner’s trade.

Point Pleasant was a little settlement of some fifteen or
twenty families. It has not grown much in all these years ;
for, to-day it is a little village of but one hundred and





THE HOUSE IN WHICH GRANT WAS BORN.
At Point Pleasant, Ohio. From a photograph taken in 1880. The old gentleman at the gate was the doctor
who “ tended” Ulysses as a baby.









WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 1S

‘twenty-five people; but it is more famous than many larger
and more pushing places just because it was the birthplace
of a great American.

The house of Jesse Grant, the tanner, stood back from
the broad river some three hundred feet. A small creek
flowed past the door and tumbled into the Ohio river; back
of the house rose a little hill; close at hand was the tanyard
where the bark of trees, brought from the woodland near by,
was ground into the reddish bark-dust called tan — the stuff
that helps turn calf-skin and cowhide into leather.

Into this pleasant but simple little home beside the beau-
tiful Ohio, on the twénty-seventh day of April in the year
1822, a baby boy was born. He was a strong, promising-
looking little fellow and weighed just ten and three quarters .
pounds. .

The young tanner and his wife were very proud of their
first baby, of course, and did not think he should be named
without talking over such an important matter with their
folks. So, when the baby was about a month old, Jesse
‘Grant hitched up his horse and wagon and took his wife
and baby over to grandpa’s, ten miles away.

There they held a family council over the baby’s: name.
Everyone had a different name to propose, and it was finally
decided to vote for a name by ballot.

So the father and mother, the grandfather and grand-
mother and the two aunts wrote, each on a slip of paper, the
name he or she liked best; the slips were put into a hat,



16 WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX.

and then one of the aunts drew outa slip. The name on
the first slip drawn out was to be the baby’s name. And

the name drawn out was Ulysses.

Thus you see, almost the first thing that happened to this
little Ohio baby was a decision by ballot. Do you suppose
it was, what we call, prophetic? It may not have been, but
don’t you see, just forty-six years afterwards, almost to a
day, the representatives of the American people met in con-
vention and the
first ballot they
took declared that
Ulysses S. Grant
should be their
candidate for
i President of the
‘ United States.

So the baby
was called Ulys-



GRANT’S FIRST ELECTION-DAY.

ses —and Ulysses, you know, was a great soldier of the old,
old days. But this baby’s grandfather so much liked the
name he had written —it was Hiram —that the baby’s
father and mother said that should be a part of their boy’s
name, too. And Hiram, you know, was a very wise and
brave ruler in Bible times. There again, you see, the baby’s
name was just a bit prophetic, for they gave him the names
of a great soldier and a wise ruler; and as Hiram Ulysses
Grant the baby was christened.



WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 17

When this baby, however, grew to be a big boy and
went away to school he lost the name of Hiram by a very
funny mwtake, of which I will tell you later. By this mis-
take the boy’s name became Ulysses Simpson Grant, and
thus it came to pass that, as U. S. Grant, this Ohio boy
finally became great and famous.

The baby Ulysses did not live long in the little frame
cottage beside the Ohio; for, when he was but ten months
old, his father Jesse hada good chance to go into the tan-
ning and leather business in a much larger place, and so
the family moved away from the little village with its attrac
tive name of Point Pleasant.

But the birthplace of a great man is always a notable spot,
no matter how short a time it was his home. -So, of course,
that little frame house at Point Pleasant became quite a
show place when the little baby who had been born there in
1822 became, forty years after, a very famous man.

The cottage stood for along time on the banks of the
great river; but, at last, in the year 1888, a river boatman
named Captain Powers bought the old house and loaded it
on a flat-boat and floated it up the river to Cincinnati.
Then it was taken off the flat-boat and twenty-four horses
were hitched to it and dragged it to the corner of Elm
and Canal streets in the city of Cincinnati. There it was
exhibited to thousands of visitors, as one of the great sights

of the Ohio Centennial Exposition of 1888.
After a few months, the house was bought by a rich



18 WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT*INTO A BOX.

Ohio man named Chittenden, who carried it off to Columbus,
the capital of Ohio; he set it up on the State Fair Grounds
and there it staid until the year 1896, when Mr. Chittenden
presented the famous house to the State of Ohio and moved
it to another part of the Fair Grounds. And there a





































































































































































































































































THE BIRTHPLACE OF U. S. GRANT.

memorial building was built around it, to protect and pre-
serve the little cottage in which our greatest soldier first saw
the light.

So, to-day, if you go to the beautiful city of Columbus
in the State of Ohio, and ride out to the Fair Grounds you
can see the birthplace of General Grant packed carefully



WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 19

away for safe keeping in a great house-box of brick and
glass and iron. This is called the Grant Memorial Building.
_ When you have read his story you will understand w hy
the birthplace of General Grant is so interesting an object
‘to all the world, and why it has been put into a box for peo-
ple to look at;.though it does seem a pity that the little old
house could not have been kept on the very spot where it
stood when, on the twenty-seventh of April, 1822, Ulysses
Simpson Grant was ushered into the great world that was,
in after years, to so respect .and honor him.

But the site of that great little house is still a notable
spot even though the house itself has been carted away,
and, even as I write, the Congress of the United States is
considering a plan to buy all the land round about the spot
where Grant was born and to lay it out and beautify it into a
National Park, thus preserving for the people of the United
States the place where General Grant was born.

As I have told you, the baby Ulysses, when he was ten
months old, moved away from Point Pleasant. His father
set up a tannery at Georgetown in Brown County, ten miles
back from the Ohio River, twenty miles east of Point Pleas-
ant, and almost fifty miles from Cincinnati.

I think you will be able to find the town on any good
map of Ohio, for it is.quite a place now. It is a town of fif-
teen hundred people, quite a city you see in comparison to
the little hamlet of Point Pleasant where the great American
soldier was born.



a WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO’ A BOX.

Here, at Georgetown, Ulysses lived as a boy until he
was seventeen years old. His father made quite a suc-
cess of his tannery and leather









business and became very well-
known in his own neighbor-
hood. Jesse Grant, the father
Aun of Ulysses, was never what
jt we call a rich man, but he
re.
was a prosper-
ous one. He
was always, as
General Grant
himself tells us,
in what is called
“comfortable
circumstances.”
Indeed, soon
after he moved
to Georgetown he built aneat and
convenient, small brick house and,
in addition to his tannery, had a
. good-sized and productive farm.
ane ae eon eet =” hatebrick houseis stillestana:
Looks To-DaY. | j-—TiKE “MEMORIAL ing on one of Georgetown’s streets,
STANDS: and though it has been changed
a little in appearance, any boy or girl who visits the busy

little Ohio town can see the places that were familiar to



WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 21

young Ulysses in and about the house where his boyhood
was spent.

They will still show you the family sitting-room with its
big fire-place and its old-fashioned mantel, the front hall and
the odd-looking staircase — just the same to-day as when Ulys-
ses climbed sleepily up to bed —the little hall bedroom which
was “ Ulysses’ room,” the old building in which he learned,
much against his will, his father’s trade of a tanner, the
tumble-down building where he first went to school, and,
just back of the tanyard, the “Town Run,” a little brook
along which lay the favorite play-ground of the Grant boys.
A mile out of town you could find that deep still spot in White
Oak Creek familiar to generations of Georgetown boys as
their “swimming hole” —and where, no doubt, Ulysses often
“stumped” his companions with many a difficult or fancy
water-act, for the boy was an excellent swimmer.

Young Ulysses Grant never took kindly to the trade of
a tanner. He liked the farm best, especially the horses.
Before he was six years old he could ride horseback or hold
the reins as well as many an older boy, in town or country.
Before he was ten years old his father took him to a circus,
and let him ride a pony around the ring, and as he grew
_ through boyhood he became famous, in all the Georgetown
region, as the best horseman and _ horse-trainer thereabouts.
Indeed, he loved horses all his life, and he owned some very
fast and beautiful ones when he became a man.

It was because he liked horses and farm-life so much ~



22 ' WHY A HOUSE.WAS PUT INTO A BOX.

‘that his father did not make him do much work about the
tannery, but, instead, let him do about as he pleased on the
farm out of school hours. -

For Jesse Grant believed in boys going to school. He
himself, had not had many such advantages, but he deter-
mined that his boys should have just as good an education
as he could get for them in the farming section in which
they lived.

From all I can hear I don’t think the boy Ulysses really '



“STUMPING ” AT THE SWIMMING HOLE.

enjoyed going to school, much better than any healthy
active boy who is fond of out-door life. But all such boys
are very glad in later years that their fathers or mothers
insisted on their going to school regularly, and we are
assured by General Grant that from the time he was old
enough to go to school to the year that he left home he
never missed a quarter from school. This was quite differ-
ent from that other great American, Abraham Lincoln, was



WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 23

‘it not? For he, you know, never got more than a year’s
schooling in all his wonderful life.

EK boy who does go to school, however, isn’t much of a
boy if he cannot find some time to play. So you may be
sure that “ Lyss Grant,” as the Georgetown boys called him,
made the most of his spare time. _

. He tells us himself, in his sketch of his boyhood, that he
had as many privileges as any boy in the village and prob-
ably more than most of them.

Chief among these privileges was: permission to go any-
where or do anything allowable in a boy, after his “chores”
were done. And this meant all sorts of boyish sports —
fishing, hunting, swimming, skating, horseback riding, doing
“stunts ” at jumping and wrestling in the tanyard along the
Town Run and in the “Swimming Hole,” and all the other
jolly out-door and in-door good times that belong to the vil:
lage boy even more than to the country or city boy.

But it was by no means a case of all play and no work
to this moderate, easy-going but fun-loving village boy. He |
tells us that when he was a boy everyone worked in his
region — “except the very poor;” and Jesse Grant, while
allowing his boys all possible liberty, gave them also plenty of

work to do.

Ulysses, as we know, hated the tannery work. But he
loved farm-life; so his father set him at work, after school
hours or in vacation time, “doing chores” on the farm.

While yet a little fellow the boy would drive the horses



24 WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX.

hauling cord-wood or logs from the wood-lot to the farm.
At eleven, he could hold a plough and turn a furrow almost
as well as a man, and until he was seventeen he did all the
“horse-work ” on the farm — breaking up the lgnd, furrow-
ing, ploughing, bringing in the loads of hay and grain, haul-
ing the wood and taking care of the live stock.
He confesses to us, in the story of his life, that he did
not like to work; but he says that, like it or not, he did do
as much work when he was a boy, as any hired man will do



to-day — and attended school besides.

And yet, as I have told you, he managed to find time to
play. The home rule was never severe. He was never
punished, and rarely scolded by his parents; so he must
have been a pretty.good boy, mustn't he? He tells us that
they never objected to his enjoying himself when he could,
for they let him go fishing, or swimming, or skating; they ~
even allowed him to take the horses and go away on a visit
with one of his boy friends.

Once, he went off in this way to Cincinnati, fifty miles
away; another time, he took a carriage trip to Louisville,
with his father——a big journey for a boy in those. days.
Once he went, with a two-horse carriage, a seventy-mile ride
to Chillicothe, and again, with a boy of his own age, on the
same kind of a seventy-mile ride to Flat Rock in Kentucky,
to visit a friend. What a good time those two fifteen-year-
- old boys must have had. on that trip! And you may be
sure, Ulysses did the driving. ,



JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.
President of the United States when Grant was a boy.





a







WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 27

But he had a tussle driving home. Let me tell you about
it. He saw a horse he liked, and he “swapped off” one of
his carriage horses for it, getting ten dollars to boot. But
the new horse had never been driven in harness, and the
two boys had a fearful time getting an unbroken, balky,
kicking, nervous horse to go in a span. In fact, the boy
who was with Ulysses got frightened and after one very
risky runaway adventure with the new horse, he deserted
and went home in a freight wagon. But Ulysses was bound
to get that new horse home and would not give in to its
pranks. At one time it really looked as if he would have to
give up the job; but, asa last resort, he got out of the car-
riage, blindfolded the balky colt with his big red bandanna
handkerchief, and so drove the funny-looking team to an
uncle’s, not far from his home.

It was such things as this in the boy that worked out
into equally pronounced qualities in the man. Ulysses S.
Grant had, as boy and man, determination, grit, tenacity —
_ what you boys call “ stick-to-it-iveness ” or “sand.” When
he really set out todo a thing he did it — whether it were
to drive home a skittish colt or fight a great war to the
finish.

Would you like to know what sort of looking boy
“Lyss Grant” was in his early teens? He was a short,
sturdy little fellow, with a careless way of walking, and
inclined to be round-shouldered. He was a freckle-faced,
*sober-sided” lad, with straight sandy hair and blue eyes, who



28 WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX.

got out of things when he could, but did them uncomplainingly
if he felt it to be his duty. He was quiet, no bragger, just a
bit shy, but when roused to action he was quick and deter-
mined. He was generally the successful leader in the snow-
ball fights, no one in the county could outride him, and
though never quarrelsome he was no coward. Above all
else, like Washington and Lincoln, he hated a lie, and his
word could always be
depended upon.

One other trait he
had that helped make
his success later in
life. I have told you
that he was persistent
and stuck to anything



he had made up his

“ mind to do. He was

BLINDFOLDING THE EALKY COLT. Bee e planner. If he

had a hard piece of work in hand, he did not just go at it
thoughtlessly ; he sat down and planned it out. ,

They still tell the story in Georgetown of the “cute”
way in which the twelve-year-old Ulysses beat the men of
the town on a peculiar job of stone-lifting. It seems that
while a new building was going up in the town, the boy
“ Lyss,” as everyone called him, drove the ox-team that
hauled the stone for the foundation from White Oak Creek.
One big stone was ‘selected for the doorstep, but after the



WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 29

men had tugged away at it for hours they concluded it was
too big to lift and that they must give it up.
“Here, let me try it,’ said Ulysses; “if you'll help me,
I'll load it.” . .
They all laughed at him, but promised to give him a lift.
Then the boy asked the men to prop up one end of the
stone. They did so, and “chocked” it. Then Ulysses backed



















“so UK WENT ALONG THROUGH A HAPPY BOYHOOD.”

the wagon over the stone, slung it underneath the wagon by
chains, hoisted up the other end of the stone the same way
and then hauled it in triumph into town.

And to-day, if you are in Georgetown, they will show you
in front of that same building, now an engine house, the
very stone, picked out as a doorstep and now set in the side-

v



30 WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX.

walk, which the twelve-year-old Ulysses engineered out of
White Oak Creek and hauled into town.

They tell much the same story of the boy and his big black
horse, Dave, and how he loaded up and hauled off a load of
great logs, cut out for building beams. This time, he was
quite alone in the woods; but with a fallen tree-trunk as a
lever and slide, and with the help of Dave and a strong rope,
he lifted the heavy logs to the truck and brought them home
in triumph, much to the surprise of his father.

This, you see, was planning to some advantage; but it
was this same'patience and invention that helped him to win
victories later, and that men then called strategy.

So he went along, through a pleasant, happy boyhood,
full of its trials and its crosses, no doubt — even the best-
reared boy has these, and they help to make a man of him
— but learning gradually those lessons of integrity, honesty,
patience, self-dependance and self-help, which served him so
well in the worries and disappointments, the failures and
disasters, the endeavors and successes that made up the his-
tory of this later leader of men. ;



ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. 31

CHAPTER II.
ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

Les was nothing really remarkable about the boy-

hood of Grant. That you have found out already.
But then, not many boys do have remarkable boyhoods or
do great things at a time when their chief business should be
growing and learning. The world’s historic boys are few
and far between; but it is from the sturdy, active, healthy,
hearty, wide-awake, honest, honorable and commonplace boys
that the world’s best men have been made.

Young Ulysses Grant was just one of these healthy,
commonplace boys. He did well whatever he deliberately
set out to do, and he could ride and drive a horse better
than any other boy in all that country round.

In fact, the most of his own business enterprises while’
he was a boy —all boys do have certain business enterprises
in which they engage, you know, with more or less success
— were connected with horses. He did not like to be called
a horse-jockey, for horse-jockies in those days were not con-
sidered altogether respectable; but he did dearly love a
horse-trade, and he was generally. so bright and shrewd at
this business as to get the best of the bargain.

To be sure, one of his earliest attempts at horse-trading



32 ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

was not a brilliant success — though he did get the horse he
wanted! It seems, when he was about ten years old he fell
quite in love with a certain colt that belonged to a farmer
near by. He begged his father to buy the colt, and at last
Jesse Grant commissioned the boy to see the farmer and
make the bargain.

“ Offer him twenty dollars for the colt, Ulysses,” he said ;
“if he won’t take that, try him with twenty-two and a half,
and if he won’t ‘take that, offer him twenty-five. But you
mustn’t go over twenty-five dollars. It’s all the colt’s
worth.”

So Ulysses, proud of his mission, went to the farmer.

«What did your father say you might pay ?” asked ‘the
farmer, and Ulysses, truthful always, and recalling his fath-
er’s instructions replied, “ He told me to offer you twenty
dollars, and if that wouldn’t do, twenty-two fifty, and if that
wasn’t enough, twenty-five; but not a cent more.”

“Well, now, that’s jest the very lowest I can sell the crit-
ter for, Lyss,” the farmer declared. “You can have the colt
for twenty five dollars, but not a cent less.”

Ulysses drove the colt home, delighted with his business
ability. But, as his father questioned him, the truth came
out, and it was very long before the poor boy heard the last
of the “good joke on Lyss Grant,” as the boys called it.

But that first attempt at a horse trade, as the saying is,
“cut the boy’s eye-teeth.” That is, he learned wisdom by
experience, and after that he became one of the best judges



OLYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. 33

of horses and prices in the neighborhood, so that his father
let him do about as he pleased in horse trades, for he knew
he could rely on the boy’s judgment..

In this business, and by doing “odd jobs” of hauling
and trucking, Ulysses made quite a bit of money for a boy



“THAT’S JEST THE VERY LOWEST I CAN SELL THE CRITTER FOR, LYSS,” SAID THE FARMER.

of those days, and, in all this, he won no little reputation ,
as a business boy. ©

_ I don’t imagine he had a very clear idea as to what he
wished to do when he became a man. Not many boys
really do know what they desire or are fitted for, until they
learn by experience, in what direction their tastes lie. One
thing, however, Ulysses did feel certain about. He did not



34 @GLYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

mean to bea tanner, if he could help it. He was like many
another boy, you see, who, though he does not exactly know
what he wishes to do, is quite sure that he doesn’t intend
following his father’s line of business. And that decision
has led to many a mistake and many a failure in the career
of men — though not always.

I have told you that Ulysses was kept pretty steadily at
schoo! from the day when he was old enough to learn his
ABC’s. That old Georgetown schoolhouse, as I have said, is
standing to-day, though itis quite dilapidated. But there the
boy went from his primer to the three R’s—“ readin’, ‘ritin’
and ’rithmetic,” for so folks used to call them. Sometimes a
man was his teacher, sometimes a woman, and while as he
says they could none of them teach much nor very well, still
that country “school marm’” of his boyhood days, laid the
foundation of an education that led finally to the production
of one of the world’s remarkable books. :

Twice, during his boyhood at Georgetown, Ulysses was
sent away to school in the hope of getting a better education
than the village school of Georgetown afforded. Once he
went to Maysville in Kentucky, and, after that, to a private
school at Ripley in Ohio. But he was never much of a stu-
‘dent ; indeed, as he assures us, he did not take kindly to any of
his books or studies, except his arithmetic. And I shouldn't
be surprised if he helped wear out the bunches of switches
that were gathered very often, from a beech-wood near the
schoolhouse, for the teacher’s use and the children’s correc-



THE “COUNTRY SCHOOLMARM” OF GRANT’S BOYHOOD








ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC, 37

tion. Those were the days of hard whippings at school,
you know — when Grant was a boy. ,

It was while at home for his Christmas vacation, from
his school at Ripley, that Ulysses had a great surprise.

“ Ulysses,” said his father, one day, as he finished read-
ing a letter he had just received, “I believe you're going to
get that appointment.”

“What appointment?” the boy inquired in surprise.

“Why, to West Point,” replied his father.“ I applied to
Senator Morris for one, and I reckon you'll get it.”

“To West Point,” repeated Ulysses, still a bit dazed we
the news, “why, I don’t want to go there.”

“But I want you to,” his father said. “I reckon you'll
go if I say so.”

“Well, if you say so, I suppose I’ll have to go,” said the
boy slowly. “But I don’t want to —I know that.”

The appointment did come in good time, through Mr.
Hamer, the congressman from that section, and much to the
surprise of the neighbors. For to their minds, young Ulys-
ses Grant seemed the last boy in the world to go to West
Point. Four boys had already gone to the famous Military

Academy from that village of Georgetown, but then “they
_ were smart,” folks said, and only a smart boy could pass the.
examination for entrance. “Slow little chap, Lyss is,” said
one of the townsfolk, “ might just as well send this little
fellow of yours, squire, as that boy of Jesse Grant’s.” The
Georgetown people all supposed that going to West Point



38 ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

depended on influence or ability, and they never imagined
that Jesse Grant had enough of the first, or Ulysses enough
of the second. You know the old Bible saying, don’t you:





















“MIGHT JUST AS WELL SEND THIS LITTLE FELLOW OF YOURS, SQUIRE.”

A prophet is not without honor save in his own country
and among his own kin.

To tell the truth, Ulysses rather shared the opinion of
the Georgetown gossips; but when the documents came, he
knew he must “face the music,” as he declared, and try to
pass those dreaded examinations — the bane and bugbear of
every boy and girl who goes to school.



ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. ° 39

But Jesse Grant was determined that his boy should go
to West Point, and when the appointment did come he put
Ulysses in charge of a special tutor who “coached” the
slow scholar so well that his teacher felt that the boy would
pass the examination, if he did not get “rattled,” as the say-
ing is to-day.

As the day of departure approached, Ulysses found him-
self looking forward to this journey to the East, even though
he knew that the dreaded examination came at the end of
the trip. This western boy, of course, longed to see the
world, as all boys do, and a trip to New York was some
thing to talk about in those days.

Ulysses thought he was quite a traveller. He had been
_ east as far as Wheeling in Virginia; he had been into
northern Ohio; he had, as you know, visited Cincinnati and

Louisville and esteemed himself, as he says “the best trav-
elled boy in Georgetown.” But this trip to West Point was
indeed a journey. It was almost as much to the Ohio boy
of sixty years ago as a trip to Europe or around the world
is to the American boy of to-day. It meant to him, the
chance of seeing and inspecting the two great eastern cities,
Philadelphia and New York. That was enough. To have
‘that chance he would willingly risk the examinations that
were sure to come; but he tells us frankly in his “Memoirs ”
that he was in no hurry to reach West Point and, boy-like,
would not have minded a steamboat explosion or a rail-
road collision or any other accident of travel, if it would



40 ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

only hurt him just enough to keep him from going into West
Point. Boysare all alike, aren't they ? I remember when I
used to wish I could have some pleasant little happening on
examination days —a stroke of harmless paralysis, or a tem-
porary loss of speech, just long enough to excuse me from
that most dreaded school ordeal. But to Ulysses Grant, as
to all other boys and girls in a similar situation, “nothing of
the kind,” he tells us, “occurred, and I had to face the music.”

At last the time came, and on the fifteenth of May, 1830,
with a new outfit of clothes and over a hundred ‘dollars
in his pocket, the seventeen-year-old Ulysses bade “his
folks” good-bye and started for Ripley, the river town ten
miles away, where he was to take the steamer for Pitts-
burg.

Of course he enjoyed the journey. Every boy likes to
see the sights, even if he must face the music at the end of
the journey. But you may be sure he was in no hurry to
get to the music. He took things leisurely. Railroads in
that day were few and far between, and, to reach West Point,
Ulysses “changed off,” on steamboat, canal boat and rail-
road. .He was fifteen days making the trip. To-day it can
be made in almost as many hours.

The canal boat on which he journeyed from Pittsburg to
Harrisburg had to be hauled over the Alleghany mountains;
this was interesting, but the boy thought the railway ride
from Harrisburg to Philadelphia about the finest, smoothest,
fastest going he had ever made.















































































ULYSSES SEES THE SIGHTS.









OLYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. 43

“Why,” he wrote home, “at full speed our train made as
much as eighteen miles an hour! Think of that!”

And to-day the Empire State Express easily makes, at
full speed, sixty miles an hour!

Ulysses paid a five days’ visit to his relations in Phila-
delphia —and was called to account by letters from home
for dallying so long by the way, when he should be at West
Point. But ke “did” Philadelphia pretty thoroughly and
managed to see a good deal of New York — though there
was not as much of that great city to see then as there is
to-day.

At last he sailed up the river to West Point. On the
thirty-first of May he saw the quaint old buildings on the
heights, climbed the long road from the steamboat dock,
known to so many visitors, reported at the barracks as an
applicant for admission and then — faced the music and took
the examinations for entrance.

This was the time when his name was changed. You
see, when his application was put in, the Congressman who
filled out the papers forgot Ulysses Grant’s full name. He
mixed him up with his younger brother, Simpson, and
thinking that Simpson was Ulysses’s middle name, he filled
in the application for Ulysses Simpson Grant instead of
Hiram Ulysses Grant.

Now, when a thing gets down in black and white on the
books of the government, it takes almost an Act of Congress
to get it off. Ulysses was very much “put out” when his



44 ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC

papers came to him with the wrong name, for no one likes
to have a mistake made in his name, you know; although
“they do say” that young Ulysses always did object to his.
initials, H-U--G. The boys used to make fun of them, you
see. Nevertheless, as soon as he reported at West Point,
he tried to convince the authorities that he was not U. S.
Grant, but H. U. Grant.

It was no use, however. The boy’s name was down on
the appointment as Ulysses Simpson Grant; it was so on
- the books of the Academy. It would make a great fuss to
get it changed and rather than bother about it he let it go.
So it came to pass that he was U.S. Grant forever.

The “U.S.” made so suggestive a pair of initials that,
at once, the West Point boys caught them up as the George-
town boys had his other initials. They nicknamed the new
boy “ Uncle Sam ;” and as “Sam Grant” he was known all |
through his cadet days.

Very much to his surprise, so he assures us, Ulysses
passed his examination — and, “ without difficulty!” He was
now a West Point cadet.

That sounds all very fine to you, I suppose. There has
always been something attractive to American boys and
girls about West Point cadets. But young Ulysses did not
think it fine, although of course he was glad to get through
his “exams” all right.

You see, he did not like the idea of being a soldier. He
did not like the discipline nor the hard work. And as he









































Hy A,
(AB
i



t IN CAMP AT WEST POINT









ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. 47

had not, at that time, the least idea that he would ever be in
the army, he did not like anything about the place, at first
—not even the camping out, which he thought very tire-
some and stupid.

Indeed, during that first winter at West Point, Saanich
Congress met, Ulysses used to run for the newspaper and
read the debates in Congress, eagerly. The reason was this.
There were in those days, many people who did not believe
at all in a school for the training of soldiers, like West Point,
even though George Washington had founded it. They
wished to do away with the Academy altogether and that
very year of 1830, a bill was really introduced into Congress
propesing to “ abolish the Military Academy at West Point.”
It was the talk, or debate, on this matter that so interested
Ulysses Grant, for, so he tells us, he hoped to hear that the
school had been abolished, so that he could go home again.
But, fortunately, the bill did not pass. West Point remained
and Grant was trained into a soldier.

So far as his lessons were concerned, I am afraid this
training did not occupy any more of his time than just
enough to let him squeeze through the school. This was
not because he was a slow or stupid scholar. He was not.
He hardly ever needed to read a lesson through the second
time, but trusted to luck to come off without a failure. His
son tells us that his low standing at school was due to the
West Point library. There was a good one there and this
boy had come from a place where books were scarce. So



48 ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

he used the library at the Academy for story books and not
for works on tactics or his other studies. They were pretty
good story books however; for he read, while there, Scott and
Irving and Marryatt and Cooper and Lever— authors dear
to the boys of sixty years ago. He often told his son that
that library at West Point was like a new world to him.

But, you see, at West Point, mathematics were the great

thing, and Ulysses Grant had a good head for figures. So,
as he got along easily with that tough study, it did not
make so much difference about the others.

He did not tell us in his Memoirs just where he stood in
his class, but he does say that if the class had been turned
the other end foremost he should have been near the head.
So it is not so hard to tell just about where he stood, is it?

His lowest marks seem to have been in French; his
highest were in cavalry tactics. That is where his boyish
training as a horseman came in, you see. His fame asa splen-
did horseman even yet exists at West Point. There was
nothing he could not ride, and his famous high jump on
the big sorrel “York” over a bar six feet from the ground, is
still marked and shown at West Point as “Grant’s upon
York.”

Would you like to know what sort of a looking boy was
Cadet Grant? He was a plump, fair-faced, almost under-
sized little fellow — in fact, he came just within the West
Point entrance limit of five feet; he was quiet in manner,
careless in dress, able to take care of himself, giving and tak-



ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. 49

ing jokes good-naturedly; determined, if he undertook any-
thing that he really wished to do; a bit lazy, perhaps; never
fond of study, but never stupid; slow to take offense, but
ready to fight back when cornered or imposed upon.

“It is a long time ago,” writes one of his West Point
associates, “but when I recall old scenes, I can still see
- ‘Sam’ Grant, with his over-
alls strapped down to his
boots, standing in front of
his quarters. It seems but
yesterday since I saw the
little fellow going ‘to the
riding-hall, with his spurs
' clanking on the ground and
his great cavalry sword
dangling by his side.”

There was nothing about
his West Point life out of
the common. He was just
an ordinary, every-day cadet,
going through the training



that taught him obedience,

CADET GRANT’S FAMOUS HORSEBACK LEAP.

attention, order, health,

good manners and simple living. It is a hard life for some
boys, with its routine work, its strict rules, its absolute
obedience to orders, and all the worries and trials that
make school-life by rule hard to bear; but Ulysses got



50 ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

over -his first dislike to it, and, after awhile, was glad that
Congress had not “abolished” West Point. He thought
that by the time he got through there he might teach mathe-
_ matics in some school
or college. The one
thing he was certain
about was that he
would not be a sol-
dier!

So his four years
at West Point went
on—broken only by
one vacation, when he



had been two years at













































the school. Except































































for his famous horse-

CADET LIFE OUT-OF-DOORS.

; back leap of six feet,
three inches —that was on his last examination day, by the
way, and in the presence of the high dignitaries called the
“Board of Directors” —he left no reputation at the Acad-
emy, either for high scholarship or great pranks — nothing,
in fact, to make a boy remember him after he had left the
school, or to put him at the head of his mates.

Certainly he was not at the head of his class. -He
graduated on the thirteenth of June, 1843, number twenty-
one in a class of thirty-nine—just about half way, you
see.



ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. 5!

He left West Point thinking pretty well of himself, as
most cadets— in fact as most college boys do. But there
is no harm in that, you know. I wouldn’t give much fora
boy who didn’t have a pretty fair opinion of himself. It
helps a fellow on, in a way. So Ulysses thought himself
“the observed of all observers,” as he went on his homeward
journey.

He considered that the two greatest men in America
were General Scott, the head of the army, and Captain ©
Smith, the commandant of cadets at West Point. And
though he did not intend to be an army officer, still he did
have a dream of some day reviewing the cadets just as Gen-
eral Scott had done —to his mind, at that time, the highest
honor in the world. But, as he tells us, he remembered that
horse-trade of his when he was a boy, and so for fear the
boys would make fun of him, he kept quiet about his ever
- being like General Scott.

While Ulysses was at West Point, his father had
removed his tannery and leather business to a little place
called Bethel, about twelve miles away, in Clarmont County.
Here the Grant family lived; here Ulysses had spent the one
vacation granted him when at West Point, and here he went
after graduation — brevet second lieutenant Ulysses Simp-
son Grant, Fourth U. S. Infantry.

“The “brevet” meant that he wasn’t really a second
lieutenant yet, but he would be soon—if he was a good
boy and joined his regiment.



52. ULYSSES FACES, THE MUSIC.

_When his new uniform came out to him he felt very big.
This was natural enough. We all feel fine in new clothes,
and there is always a fascination to boys about “soldier
clothes ” — especially if they have been fairly earned, as his
had been. |
- But you know the old saying that “pride goeth before a
a fall.” Our young
brevet second lieuten-
ant soon had proof of
this.

When his fine “ sol-
dier clothes” came
home he put them on
and rode away on
horseback to Cincin-
nati, to “show off.”
He was riding along



one a ‘the city streets,
thinking, he says, that
everyone was looking at him aid feeling himself to be quite
as big a man as General Scott, whén a ragged, dirty, bare-
footed little street boy —what we call a “mucker” here-
abouts — called out shrilly:

“Yah, soldier! Will you work? You bet he won't. He’d
sell his shirt first.”

Then everybody laughed. Well! You can imagine what
a terrible shock this was to the spruce and dignified brevet

KOSCIUSKO’S MONUMENT AT WEST POINT.



ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. ; 53

second lieutenant. But when, soon after, he was home
again at Bethel, he had just such another shock.

At the old stage tavern across the way, from Grant’s
home worked a drunken wag of a stableman. When the
trim-looking soldier boy had been home a few days, what
should this stableman do but come into the street rigged
out in a pair of sky-blue nankeen pantaloons with a white
stripe along the seams. This was just the color of Ulysses's
fine military trousers. Barefooted and bareheaded, but
making the most of the sky-blue pantaloons, the stableman
paraded up and down the street before the Grant house,
with an absurdly dignified military walk, imitating the
brevet second lieutenant of infantry.

Of course it set every one to laughing, and of course it
annoyed Ulysses dreadfully. Indeed, as he says, it quite
“knocked the conceit” out of him, and it gave him a dislike
for military bluster and military uniforms that he never got
over in all his life.

Thus the schooling at West Point came to an end. It
had done much for this homespun, awkward country boy
from the Ohio valley. It had developed his qualities of
manliness, persistence and endurance ; it had disciplined and
trained him into habits of obedience and had securely laid
the foundation of that military knowledge and leadership
which, thirty years later, was to do such mighty service to
the republic which had educated and developed him.



54 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

CHAPTER III.
HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED. OVER THE BORDER.

WE look at things quite differently when we are boys or
girls and when we are men or women. Sometimes,

however, opinions do not change. This seems to have been

Grant’s case as to the justice of the war with Mexico.

Forty years after that war, General Grant wrote in his
“Memoirs” that he regarded it as one of the most unjust
ever waged by a stronger against a weaker nation.

He tells us, in the same sentence, that as a young soldier
he was bitterly opposed to it; but, you know, the first duty
asoldier must learn is obedience; and, being a soldier in the
United States army, owing to the republic his education and
his training, Lieutenant Grant felt that obedience to orders
was his supreme duty and, even against his will, he marched
to the southeast with the troops that were first known as the
Army of Occupation and, later, as the Army of Invasion.

I do not propose to tell you here the story of the Mexi-
can War, which was fought in the years 1846 to 1848.
That story you can read in history, and I hope in time that
you will read enough about-it to decide for yourself that it
was an unjust and a tyrannicak war— just the same kind of
a fight as when a big bully of a boy doesn’t “take one of his



HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 55

size,” but “ pitches into” a little fellow who couldn’t possibly
Stand up against him.

From one side, the war with Mexico is nothing to be
proud of; but from another it is full of spirit and interest.
I shall simply tell you here of Grant’s connection with it,
and how it helped to make him and other officers brave sol-
diers, fitting them for the great and terrible war that came
thirteen years later, largely because of this war against
Mexico.

When Ulysses Grant graduated from the Military
Academy at West Point in 1843, the regular army of the
United States was a small affair. It had only 7500 men in
all, and there were more than enough officers to go around.

But the young lieutenant was given a place in the
Fourth regiment of the United States Infantry and, after
ninety days furlough or vacation, was ordered to report at
an army post at the Mississippi river six or seven miles
below St. Louis. |

This army post was called Jefferson Barracks and was
then one of the largest in the country, being garrisoned by
sixteen companies of infantry, or foot soldiers.

Grant had wished to belong to a cavalry regiment, as
was natural in so fine a horseman; but when his turn to
choose came, there were no places left in either an artillery
or a cavalry regiment. So it was, for him, what we call
“ Hobson’s choice,’ and he became a lieutenant of infantry.

Jefferson Barracks is a very pleasant place. It is still a



*

56 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

military post, you know, finely situated at the great river.
Lieutenant Grant had a good deal of spare time there and
he spent a part of this in visiting the home of one of his
West Point classmates not far off. This farm was called
Whitehaven, and was about five miles from Jefferson Bar-
racks. There he fell in love with the girl who afterwards
became his devoted wife. She was the sister of his class-
mate and her name was Julia Dent.

At that time young Lieutenant Grant had some idea of
becoming a teacher of mathematics either at West Point or
some other good school. He even wrote to his former pro-
fessor at West Point to look out for some such chance: for
him. But, before the opening could be found, the United
States and Mexico got into trouble; the little regular army
was ordered into Texas; the President declared war against
the republic of Mexico; volunteers were called for, because
there were not enough regular troops; the Mexicans at
Matamoras were angry because the Ameriéans were build-
ing a fort opposite their town; they fired the first shot; that
opened the war; and so it came to pass that, with his little
American army of three thousand men, General Zachary
Taylor, whom people called “Old Rough and Ready,”
invaded Mexico, and young Second Lieutenant Ulysses S.
Grant marched over the border and engaged in actual war.

The first taste of real war that he had, was in the little
skirmish known as the Battle of Palo Soe seat is, the
battle of the high trees — or woods.



HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 57

When, a little before the battle, the young lieutenant
heard the first guns of conflict, he did not like the prospect
before him. He wrote about this years afterwards, that he
didn’t know how General Taylor felt, aut as for himself, a
young second lieu-
tenant who had
never * heard: the
boom of a hostile
gun, he felt sorry
he had enlisted.

However he may
have felt at first,
he certainly did not
let his feelings in-
terfere with his ac-
tions, for he did his
duty when really in
the fight. His com-
pany protected the
'American artillery



which the Mexicans

i : GENERAL ZACHARY TAYLOR.
tried to captu EG) he Afterwards President of the United States.

helped to drive back the Mexican lancers, who came charg:
ing against them; and the stars and stripes went forward.

Then they marched on, and the next day fought another
little battle at “the palm grove,” or as the Mexicans call it,
“ Resaca dela Palma.”



58 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

Here Grant was again one of the fighters in a sharp,
short battle; but he seems to have recalled it when she
became a famous man, only for the fact that, his captain
being sent off somewhere on a special mission, the young
lieutenant was for a time in actual command of his com-
pany —and felt correspondingly elated, of course. He
also mentions that he led his men in a fiery charge across a
piece of ground that had already been charged over and cap-
tured by the Americans, so that, he says, he had come to the
conclusion that, so far as he was concerned, the Battle of
Resaca de la Palma would have been won just:as it was,
even if he had not been there.

But this, I imagine, was what you boys call “only fun-
ning,’ as it was just the modesty of the man —for General
Grant was never a man to put himself forward or brag
about what he had done. It is certain that, through those
two years of war, he made quite a record for himself as a
brave and valiant young soldier; his namé was mentioned
in reports and despatches; he was promoted several times
and he did a great deal of hard work as the quartermaster
and adjutant of his regiment. The quartermaster, you know, |
is the officer whose duty it is to look after the food and
comfort of the men of his regiment; the adjutant is the
colonel’s chief helper. So you see both these positions are
busy and responsible parts.

The quartermaster need not go into battle if he does not
wish to. His chief duty is in and about the ‘camp. But



HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 59

Lieutenant Grant was never one to shirk. He felt that his
duty was in the field quite as much as in the camp and he

was always ready to take his part in battle and on bivouac.
So, as I have told you, he made a record for bravery and






| ; I fe
=

il

|
3 tne) A es

GRANT RIDES FOR AMMUNITION AT MONTEREY.

daring that would have been remembered even if his future
had not been so great and glorious.

It was Lieutenant Grant who, when the fight was raging
hotly in the streets of Monterey, volunteered to ride back to
General Taylor’s headquarters and order up fresh ammu-
nition for the American soldiers who were holding the town.
He did so. Flinging himself, Indian fashion, or rather in



60 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

circus style, upon his horse, with one heel in the cantle of
his saddle and one hand grasping the horse’s mane, the
' young lieutenant rushed his horse toward the gate of the
town, and swinging against the horse’s side, rode the gaunt-
let of fire and shot that blazed out from house-top and street
corner, helping some wounded men on the way, leaping a
four-foot wall so as to gain a short cut, and kept on until
he gained the general’s tent with his message. Yet all he
finds to say in his “ Memoirs” of that daring gallop was, “my 3
ride was an exposed one.”

It was Lieutenant Grant who, when his regiment was
detached from General Taylor's command and joined to the
little army of General Scott, marched and fought under that
victorious leader from the sea-fortress of Vera Cruz to the
capital city of Mexico, never missing a battle and yet always
faithful to his duty as care-taker for his regiment.

He chased the flying Mexicans out of the bewildering
ditches of the farm of San Antonio; he was in the rush that
stormed and carried the church-fortress of Cherubusco; he
left his commissary-wagons to take part in the fierce fight at
Chepultepec, the “West Point” of Mexico, so gallantly de- |
fended by the Mexican cadets; he was one of the leaders of
the gallant band that burst into the long low stone building
of Molino del Rey —“ the king’s mill” —and won his pro-
motion to a first lieutenant’s commission, first by brevet for
bravery and, later, to full rank, by the death of his senior.

Then came the final attack on the capital and the cap-



HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 61

ture of the city of Mexico. In this struggle Lieutenant
Grant bore an active part; for it was largely due to his
good judgment and coolness that a speedy entrance into the
city was gained by the Americans.

It seems that while he was marching with one part of

General Scott's army to attack the northern entrance to the
+ 4





































































































































































































































































































5 ===SARGEUTSG==—





CHEPULTEPEC — THE “‘ WEST POINT” OF MEXICO.

city, called the San Cosme Gate, he thought he saw a way
by which he could get behind—or, as it is called, flank,
the Mexican soldiers who were drawn up to oppose the
Americans.

Leaving the ranks — by permission, of course — he
jumped behind a stone wall, and going cautiously, got to a



62 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

point where he could see just how the land lay and just how
the enemy was placed. Then he ran back again without
being seen, called for volunteers, and leading a dozen plucky
soldiers. who were ready to risk the danger, he and his
men trailed arms under cover of the wall and thus getting
behind the Mexicans drove them away from their battery
and the house-tops from which they were me at the
Americans.

Soon after this success, Lieutenant Grant, while looking
for another chance to get the best of the Mexicans came
upon a little church standing by itself back from the road.
This church, he noticed, stood not far from the city walls ;
its belfry, he believed, was just in line with the space behind
the city gate. “If I could only get a cannon into that bel-
fry,” he said, “I could send some shot in among the Mexican
soldiers behind the gate and scatter them.”

It was a bright idea. “TI’ll try it,” he said to himself.

No sooner said than done. Hurrying back to the
American ranks, Lieutenant Grant got hold of a small light
cannon, called a mountain howitzer, and some men who
knew how to work it. They dodged the enemy, cut across
a field and made a bee-line for the little church.

There were several wide and deep ditches in this field:
but the men took the howitzer apart, and each one carrying a
piece of it they waded the ditches until, at last, they reached
the church without being seen by the enemy. The priest who
was in charge of the church was not going to let the Ameri-



eres



GRANT SAID “ WE’RE COMING IN!” AND THEY DID.






HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 65

can soldiers come in, but young Grant told him, “I think
you will. We're coming in.” And they did.

Piece by piece the cannon was carried up into the belfry,
put together again, loaded and aimed directly at the Mexi-
cans who were guarding the San Cosme gate, less than a
thousand feet away.

Bang! went the howitzer Bang! bang! it went again.
You may well believe that those Mexicans were a surprised
lot, when the cannon balls began dropping down among
them. At first, they could not imagine where the shots
came from, and when they did they were so confused. that
instead of sending soldiers to surround and capture this
battery in a belfry, they simply made haste to get out
of the way of those orePeils cannon-balls as quickly as
possible. :

Of course, the Americans noticed this “ embattled church-
steeple,” too. ;

“That’s a bright. idea,” said General Worth, and he sent
a young lieutenant named Pemberton — who had something
special to do with General Grant later in life — to bring the
man with the bright idea before him.

So Lieutenant Grant reported what he had done to Gen-
eral Worth and the general told him to keep at it and take
another gun up into the steeple, too. But as there was only
room for one gun in that steeple, Grant could not use
another; even if he wished to. But, as he explained, years
after, he couldn’t tell General Worth that, because it wasn’t



66 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

proper for a young lieutenant to contradict the commanding

general when he said “ put two guns in the steeple.”

Well, it was a very bright idea—that battery in a steeple,

was it not? And, as it helped open the way for the capture

THE BATTERY IN THE STEEPLE,



of the Mexican capital, it
also brought to the young
lieutenant fame and promo-
tion.

He really did not care
very much about the first;
for, as you know, Ulysses
Grant was a quiet and mod-
est young fellow who did
not care a rap for show, and
was never one to push him-
self forward. But his good
work in that church steeple

‘had been “noticed by his

superior officers, and in three
different reports of the cap-
ture of Mexico, Lieutenant

Grant’s share received honorable mention.

This, in due time, brought him promotion — something
that everyone likes—boy or girl, scholar, clerk or soldier.
But things always went a bit slow with this slow-going
young man, and while he had plenty of work to do as com-
missary and adjutant of his regiment, the war did not push



HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 67

him rapidly on towards General Scott’s position — about
which, you remember, he had a presentiment or dream when
he was a West Point cadet. He went into the battle of
Palo Alto, which opened the war, a second lieutenant; six-
teen months later when he marched into the city of Mexico
as one of the victorious Americans, he was still a second
lieutenant, although he had been in almost every battle and
belonged to a regiment that lost many officers. Somehow,
success was always slow in coming, or missed altogether in
Grant’s early days. But this, you know, teaches a boy
patience, especially if a young fellow is determined, conscien-
tious and persistent. U.S. Grant was all of these, even as
a boy, you know; so delay schooled him and brought him
experience, cautiousness, firmness and that other quality
which some folks call stubbornness, but which we know
was, in his case, persistence.

Promotion did come however, soon after the American
soldiers were in possession of the city of Mexico. His gal-
antry in the church steeple and the way in which he always
did his duty were not forgotten, and when a vacancy was
made by the death of one of his superior officers, Grant went
up astep and was made first lieutenant of his regiment —
the Fourth U. S. Infantry.

There was not much more fighting after that, but the
American soldiers held possession of the city of Mexico sev-
eral months longer, remaining in the land until the treaty of
peace between Mexico and the United States was signed,



68 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

on the second of February, 1848. This is known as the
“Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo,” from the name of the place
where the treaty was drawn up. By it, the United States
obtained complete possession of Texas, New Mexico and
California. :

Lieutenant Grant had nothing to do with this treaty —



















































































































































































































































































































































































THE CATHEDRAL IN THE CITY OF MEXICu.

his day for being the central figure in great events and ina
greater treaty had not yet come — but he found plenty to
do as care-taker of his regiment. He was still quartermaster
and he had his hands full. It is no small thing to look after
the food and clothes of several hundred men, as the young
lieutenant had long since discovered.

This question of clothes was a serious one. The soldiers



HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 69

were getting ragged after their months of service. No
clothing was sent them by the government and something
had to be done. So cloth was purchased of the Mexican
merchants, and Mexican tailors were employed to make it
up into “Yankee uniforms.” Lieutenant Grant had to see
to getting these new suits for all the men of his regiment,
and as there were always more soldiers needing clothes than
there were clothes ready for the soldiers, you can see that he
was kept pretty busy “tailoring.”

Then the money gave out which was needed for the pay-
ment of the military band. Now music is almost as neces-
sary for keeping up the spirits and discipline of the soldiers
as food and clothing. The musicians in the United States
army at the time of the Mexican war, were paid but a little
by the government; the rest of their pay came from a sort
of soldiers’ savings bank known as the regimental fund.
This fund had got pretty low down; it needed to be in-
creased if the soldiers were to have good music, so Grant set
himself to thinking things over.

As a result he went to work bread-making.

You see a hundred pounds of flour will make one hun-
dred and forty pounds of bread. Grant was allowed to draw
flour for his men and this left quite an amount on his hands
—forty pounds out of every one hundred and forty. He
rented a bakery, hired Mexican bakers, bought fuel and
other bake-shop needs and ran a bread-bakery to supply the
army with bread. He did this so well that, out of the



90 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

profits of that extra forty pounds in every one hundred and
forty, he paid the musicians of the Fourth Infantry and
increased the slender regimental fund— which meant com-
forts and even luxuries for his soldiers.

All this of course kept him pretty busy. But he found
time to climb up the volcano of Popocatapetl, that is “the
smoking mountain.”

You can find this in your geography, on the map of
Mexico. It is a great volcano, you know, nearly eighteen
thousand feet high, and the party of climbers were almost
lost in a dreadful storm of wind and snow that came down
on them. One of that party of volcano-climbers was to
bring fame to Grant later in life— Captain Buckner, who in
the Civil War commanded Fort Donelson and brought from
Grant the famous words “ unconditional surrender.” Later
- still, Buckner was one of the pall-bearers at the funeral of
the great soldier whom he helped to fame and who was his

companion in that fearful climb up the smoking mountain.

: So the time passed pleasantly enough in Mexico with
this young lieutenant, because he was kept busy. To do
nothing, you know, is the hardest kind of work, and U.S.
Grant was never a do-nothing.

He looked after all his regimental duties, and aioved
his spare time in “ poking about” seeing sights. Twice on
these sight-seeing trips he was made prisoner by the Mexi-
cans, but was allowed to go free because there was then no
fighting — or what is called a truce between the two republics.



HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 71

‘Besides climbing Popocatapetl, he explored tombs and
ruins of the old Aztecs, the Mexicans whom Cortez the Span-
iard conquered, you remember, in the days after Columbus;
he visited the wonderful “ great caves” of Mexico, and went



BULL FIGHT IN MEXICO.

to see a bull fight. This, you know, is the favorite national
sport of Mexico, just as baseball and football are with us.
But Grant didn’t like it. He only went to one—and one -



y2 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

was enough. It made him sick, he said. For Grant, I
must tell you, although the greatest of American soldiers,
could not bear the sight of blood, and hated anything like
brutality. Other great soldiers have been like him in this.
So the bull-fighting disgusted him, and he said he could not.
see how human beings could enjoy the sufferings of beasts
and often of men, as they seemed to do on these occasions.

But more than in sight-seeing, fighting and care-taking,
the Mexican war was for Ulysses S. Grant a splendid
school and a most helpful experience. In it, he learned to
be a soldier, to endure privation, to have patience, to know
men and, especially, to become acquainted with those who, a
few years after, were to play a prominent part upon a stage
on which he was to be chief actor.

Grant never failed to acknowledge the great advantage
that his experience in the Mexican war brought him. He
learned to know by name or in person almost all the officers
who rose to positions of leadership, on one side or the other,
in the great Civil War. He was an observing man, he
studied people and saw their good points and their weak ones
and he knew just what sort of men were his old comrades
of the Mexican war, when, in after years, he was either
associated with them as commander or opposed to them as
conqueror.

There is no better school, boys and girls, than the school
of experience; and in that school Ulysses S. Grant was an
apt, if a slow and often a worried pupil.



HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA. 293
#

CHAPTER IV.
HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA.

HE first thing that Lieutenant Grant did when he went
marching home from the war with Mexico was to get
a four months’ leave of absence, or vacation, hurry to St.
Louis and be married. This important date in his life —
his wedding day — was the twenty-second of August, 1848.
He married Julia Dent, the St. Louis girl of whom I
have already spoken, and a splendid wife she made him.

The wedding took place at the farmhouse, in which lived
the parents of Julia Dent. It was'ten miles below St. Louis
and was a big, roomy, hospitable old Southern mansion with
great rooms, ample fireplaces, broad verandas and pleasant
grounds, and as it stood then it stands to-day, only slightly
altered.

The young couple did not go to housekeeping in St.
Louis, nor could they make their home in the big and breezy
Dent mansion. Julia Dent was a “soldier's bride,” and a
soldier is never his own master. His home is “in barracks”
or “quarters” at whatever point or place he is ordered to
go. So his wife, too, had to live with him in barracks —
that is, you know, in the soldier’s quarters at some fort or
garrison, or military post.



74 HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA.

So, after the honeymoon had been spent in visiting the
Grant family or the Grant relatives in Ohio, the young
lieutenant and his wife, when his vacation days were over,
went back to duty. He joined his regiment, and his wife
went with him.

At the close of the Mexican war, Grant’s regiment — the
Fourth U. S. Infantry, you know — went into camp at Pas-
cagoula in Mississippi. There the lieutenant left it when
he went off to St. Louis to be married; but, before his four
months’ vacation was over, the Fourth U. S. Infantry was
ordered to the military post of Sackett’s Harbor on the
shores of Lake Ontario. Quite a change from the Gulf e
Mexico, was it not?

There, in the Madison Barracks at Sackett’s Harbor,
Lieutenant Grant and his wife began their married life. In
their rooms in the officers’ quarters they spent their first
Christmas.

In the spring of the next year, however, 1849, orders
came to move. The regiment was transferred to Detroit in
Michigan. In this beautiful northern city —not as attractive
then as it is to-day, I imagine—they lived for nearly two
years, when again came the order to move. |

This time, in the spring of 1851, they went back once
more to their first home, the Madison Barracks at Sackett’s
Harbor, following their regiment.,

You see, by this, that a soldier and his wife can never
hope to make their home long in one place. A small army,



HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA. 75

like that of the United States, is shuffled and shifted about
almost as much as you shuffle the cards when playing your
game of “ Authors.” Uncle Sam’s blue-coats of the regular
army never know how long they are going to “stay fixed.”

So it came about that, before the Fourth United States
Infantry had been in the Madison Barracks at Sackett’s Har-
bor a year, orders again came to the soldier to move.

This time it fairly took their breath away; the regiment
was ordered to Cal-
ifornia. That would
not sound so very

































































































































































































remarkable in these a SSeaS =





























































































































































days when we can
rush across the con-
tinent from the At-

lantic to the Pacific THE DANGEROUS TRIP “OVERLAND” IN “THE FIFTIES.”



in six days. But in 1851 very few people went. by land
across the continent. There were no railroads; people had
to ride in slow, lumbering wagons, or on horseback — or
walk! and the journey of three thousand miles took weeks
and months, that were slow, tiresome and dangerous. There
were mountains to climb, deserts to cross, rivers to wade,
Indians to face and-wild beasts to fight. Hunger and thirst,
heat and cold, rain and snow and all the discomforts of life
were a part of the daily experience of the traveller and the
emigrant. It was a terrible journey to go overland to the
Pacific in the days before the railroads. |



a

76 HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA.

So, people preferred going by water. This was not always
agreeable, either; but, you see, it was a case of the longest
way round being the shortest way home. Travellers to Cali-
fornia went by steamboat from New York to Aspinwall on
the Isthmus of Panama; then they crossed the Isthmus by
boat and mule, went on board another steamer at Panama
and sailed up the Pacific to San Francisco. It was a long,



TARGET PRACTICE IN U. S. A. BARRACKS,

hard, tedious and often dangerous journey; but it was not
nearly so difficult nor dangerous as the way overland.

But when the orders to go to California came to the sol-
diers at Sackett’s Harbor, Lieutenant Grant decided that he
would not take his young wife on such a,long, hard and
uncertain journey. He did not intend to live in California,
and who could tell how long the regiment would be quar-
tered there? Orders might come sending him somewhere



HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA. 77

else, even before he and his wife had really “got settled,”
and the long journey would be all for nothing. |

So he arranged to have his wife visit his people in Ohio
and her people in St. Louis, promising that when he had been
in California long enough to see how he liked it, he would
arrange either to send for her or get leave of absence and
come east for her.

So it was arranged; the good-byes were said; and on the
fifth of July, 1851, the Fourth Infantry, with such of the
soldiers’ wives and children as could not or would not stay
behind, sailed out of the harbor of New York and steamed
southward for their first port on the Isthmus of Panama.
In eight days they sailed into the harbor of Aspinwall on
the Atlantic side of the Isthmus and prepared to go ashore.

July on the Isthmus of Panama is wet, hot and sickly.
The passengers from the north felt the changes from drench-
ing rain to burning sun and suffered from them greatly.
They were very anxious to be on their way north again toa
healthier climate.

But the Isthmus had to be crossed. It looks small and
narrow enough on the map, does it not? In one part it is
only thirty miles from ocean ‘to ocean. But it is altogether
too wide if one feels sick and has no way to get across except
to ride horseback or walk.

To-day, a railroad, forty-eight miles long, runs across the
Isthmus from Aspinwall on the Atlantic to Panama on the
Pacific. But, when Lieutenant Grant and his infantrymen



78 HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA,

crossed the Isthmus in 1851, this railroad had but just been
commenced and only ran a few miles, to the banks of the.
Chagres river. This is the stream, you know, which engi-
neers for more than three hundred years have been trying
to turn into a ship canal that should join the Atlantic and
the Pacific—the famous ditch known as the Panama canal.
When Lieutenant Grant and his seven hundred compan-
ions of the Fourth Infantry started to cross the Isthmus they
had a fearful time.
Grant was quarter-
master or “care-taker”
of his regiment, you
know, and had to look
out for the comfort
and transportation of
the men. This Isth-
mus journey put his
ability to the test.
First, he saw them all on board the cars for the thirty
mile ride by railway. When the road ended, at the Chagres
river, they “changed for Gorgona” and went on board cer-
tain flat-bottomed boats that would carry between thirty and
forty passengers apiece. These boats were poled along the



THE MARCH ACROSS THE ISTHMUS.

river, against the current — six polemen to a boat—at the
rapid rate of a mile an hour!

In this way, they pushed on to a place called Gor-
gona where they had to get out again for a ride on mule-



HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA, . 79

back to Panama on the Pacific, some twenty-five miles
distant.

Did you ever hear of a harder fifty-mile trip? To-day,
in the comfortable cars of the Panama railroad, you can
make the trip across the Isthmus in three hours. It took
Lieutenant Grant and his company nearly two weeks to do
that fifty miles. I will tell you why. -

The United States government had arranged with the
steamship cempany for the connected and comfortable trans-
portation of the Fourth Infantry and its baggage from
New York to San Francisco, including the trip across the
Isthmus.

The officers and soldiers, with the families of a few of
the latter, made up a company of seven hundred people.
But, in 1851, crowds of adventurers were going to California -
to dig for gold. So the seven hundred, instead of having
comfortable quarters, were crowded upon a steamer already
fully occupied. And when Aspinwall was reached everyone
was in a hurry to get across the Isthmus to Panama and
the Pacific. The passengers on the steamer had first chance
and the soldiers simply had to wait for “ second turn.”

A part of the regiment did, after a few days’ delay, get
across to Panama; but Grant, as regimental quartermaster,
was left at a place called Cruces on the banks of the sickly
Chagres river with all the baggage and camp equipage, one -
company of soldiers and those men of the regiment who
had brought their wives and children with them.



80 HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA,

There at Cruces they waited. The transportation prom-
ised by the steamship company did not come; a man with
whom a new contract had been made by the agents of the
steamship company kept promising mules and horses, but:
after a day or two Grant discovered that this man had been
supplying them to passengers who could pay higher than the
contract price, and the young quartermaster found out that
if he were ever to get his people and baggage to Panama, he
would have to: find the means himself.

Then came the climax. The dreadful cholera — that

plague of hot countries —broke out in the camp. Lieutenant
Grant had sickness and death to struggle with, in addition to
his other worries. For cholera in July, in the Isthmus of
Panama, with sultry, rainy weather and insufficient shelter
for the sick, means death.
- Did you ever read Dickens’s story of “ Martin Chuzzle-
wit?” Do you remember Mark Tapley who always “ came
out strong” when things were at their worst ? There was a
good deal of this spirit in the quartermaster of the Fourth
U. S. Infantry.

With a company of plague-stricken men and women to
care for, with no means of removing them to a place of
safety, with insufficient accommodation for either the sick or
the well, with disappointment as to unkept promises delaying
and worrying him, with half-hostile Indians all about his
camp, and with food growing scarce and distress staring
him in the face, Quartermaster Grant had certainly a hard



HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA. 81

4

problem to solve. But he coolly looked at all the chances,
set his teeth togethéf, and made-up his mind to work the
thing out himself.

He sent his last company of soldiers and the doctors on,
by foot, to Panama. Then he took entire charge of the
cholera camp and, for over a week, he fought the plague des-
perately and un- |
flinchingly. He
cared for the sick,
buried the dead,
kept one eye on
the half-hostile
Indians, tried in
every way to
arrange for some



kind of transpor-

HE CARED FOR THE SICK AND FOUGHT THE PLAGUE.

tation to Pana-
ma, and kept things going as briskly and as cheerfully
as he could, stubbornly resolved not to give in. He was
busy all the time.’ For a week he did not take off his clothes
and scarcely allowed himself any rest — working, nursing,
striving, in the midst of the plague that brought weakness
and death from the forest and the swamp.

Of one hundred and fifty men, women and children in
that cholera-stricken camp on the Chagres river, fully one
third died before that week of terror came to an end. But
Grant never gave up.



82 HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA.

Finding that the agents and promises of the steamship
.company were not to be relied upon, and that if his sick and
his baggage were ever to get to the Pacific he must get
them there himself, he took all the responsibility and set to
work on his own hook. He hired mules and litters at twice
the price offered by the steamship company, engaged Indians
to bury the dead and pack on the mules the camp belong-
ings, and at last took up his march to the Pacific, bringing
everything with him, excepting alas! the victims whom the
cholera had claimed as its own in that plague-spot in the
Panama forests.

I have lingered over this brief happening in the life of
U.S. Grant because it has always seemed to me a key to
his character; it prepares us to see in this quiet, determined,
self-reliant young quartermaster, sending all his available
help away and grimly remaining to fight the plague and
care for the people and property under his charge, the pre-
face to that soldier and ruler of later years, whom the poet
Lowell described as,

“ One of those still, plain men that do the world’s rough work.”

There is no doubt, is there, about that work in the
Panama cholera-camp being rough indeed ?

Early in September the Fourth Infantry sailed through
the Golden Gate and entered upon its garrison life in
California.

Those were exciting days in the great Western state.
It was only a territory then —a vast track of land, stretch-





THE PLAGUE CAMP AT PANAMA,

GRANT IN
“ He took all the responsib

work on his own hook.”

and set to

lity









HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA. 85

ing along the Pacific and recently acquired from Mexico.
But it was fast filling up. The word had gone abroad that
gold was to be had just for the digging or the washing in
the land and streams of California. People from all parts
of the world, in a hurry to get rich, rushed to California to
become gold-miners. ,

There were all sorts and conditions of men among them,
and while most of them did not get rich, they did make
things lively for a while on that far Pacific coast. For men
who failed to find gold had to find work or starve. They
had to do something. It was “hard lines” for many a
stout-hearted young fellow, and that mining life in Cali-
fornia was full of temptation, danger, risk and struggle.
But these are the things which, bravely faced, help to make
men. Only the plucky and strong ones did win the fight;
but their labors and exertions, their defeats and successes
helped to | build mighty states in that far western land and
to lay the foundations upon which the republic rose to
greatness.

It was in such a school as this that U. S. Grant learned
anew the lessons of foresight, determination and watchful-
ness that guided him so well in later times of need. Those
were days, he himself tells us, “ that brought out character,”
and, in his case, each new experience strengthened a charac-
ter that was to mean great things for his native land.

He lived in barracks with his regiment—at Benicia,
not far from San Francisco; at Fort Vancouver on the



86 HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA,

Columbia river, in the southern part of what is now the
state of Washington; and at Humboldt Bay, near to
the town of. Eureka, in northern California. ie
He found a soldier’s. life in times of peace, even in that
new and unsettled land of gold, lazy, unprofitable and
unpromising. He never really did like a soldier's life, you
know. “I never liked service in the army— not as a young .
officer,’ he said, years
after ; he always declared
that he was more a farm-
er than a fighter. So,
when he came to look
carefully at his chances he
could not see any future
or prosperity for him if
he remained in the army.



And yet, as you all know,
it was the army that was

COLD WEATHER SENTRY DUTY, IN BARRACKS.

: to make him great!

But, as he thought it all over, there in California, he
longed to see the wife and children he had left in “the
states,” as folks then called the East; he knew that his pay
as a soldier was too small to support a family, and he dared
not take the risk of bringing them so far from home. So
he concluded to resign, leave the army. and go into some
good business in which he could hope to make money and
win success. |



A HARD ROAD TO TRAVEL.
the mountains.in gold-mining days in California.





eS

atehe







HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA. 89

He liked California, and, for many years after he left it,
he hoped some day to go back and make that splendid state
his home. But he felt that he must first get a good start in
life; so, in March, 1854, he resigned from the army and
went home again. |

Ever since the day when, in the belfry of the Mexican
church, he had bombarded the city of Mexico with his bat-
tery of one gun, he had been a captain by brevet, but not in
rank or pay. In July, 1853, the death of an officer left a
vacant place, and as the other officers moved up towards the
head the lieutenant became a captain. So, when he resigned
from the army and went home, he was Captain Grant. You
see how slowly things went in times of peace. He had to
wait six years for the promised promotion to captain.

For eleven years had U.S. Grant been a soldier of the
republic. Slow in speech and action, except when action
was absolutely necessary, more brave.than brilliant, and a
worker rather than a “show” soldier,-he was always to be
depended upon if anything needed to be done. He never
shirked his duty because it was not a pleasant one, and if he
saw that a thing must be done he stuck to it until it was
done. ;

The same strategy that, as a boy, he displayed in lifting
and loading the great stone in Georgetown, he exhibited as
a lieutenant in the church tower in Mexico; the same pluck
and grit that helped the boy drive home the balky horse he
had purchased, served the man in his daring ride for ammu-



90 HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE.”

nition through the streets of Monterey and in the grim grap-
ple with the plague in the forests of Panama. These, and
such experiences as these, were the foundation of that stern,
silent, determined, unyielding effort that made this quiet
soldier the great captain — the future hero and victor in the
' republic’s desperate struggle for life.



CHAPTER V.

HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE.”

O Ulysses gave up fighting for farming. It was not
altogether a successful exchange, so far as results
went. Captain Grant had never been able to save much
out of his pay as a soldier—never very large; and eleven
years of soldiering are not a very good preparation for farm-
ing. He would have to get his living out of the ground
now, and he knew that, like Adam the first farmer, “in the
_ sweat of his face he must eat bread.”

That means hard work, of course; and hard work indeed
our ex-soldier found it to make both ends meet. He was
never afraid of hard work either as boy or man, and what he
set his hand to do, he did “with his might,” as the Bible



HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE.” 91

says. But even the hardest worker does not always make a
success of things, and this was to be the experience of the
soldier from the Pacific.

When he landed in New York, on his homeward trip
from San Francisco by the way of Panama, he had little or
no money, and a man whom he had once helped and upon
whom he depended for a return not only refused to pay him
but ran off altogether. So the poor captain had to write to
his father in Ohio for help to get home.

His people were of course delighted to see him again;
but when, at last, late in the summer of 1854, he was once
more with his wife and children at St. Louis, he found that
he must face the world sturdily if he were'to get his own
living and that, at thirty-two, he had actually to begin life
over again; “a new struggle for our support,” he calls it,
and a struggle indeed it was.

Mrs. Grant’s father had given her part of his Whitehaven
acres asa farm. On this, Captain Grant decided to build a
house and go to farming.

He had no house to live in and no money with which to
stock the farm; but he set about building the house and
hoped to raise enough on his farm to gradually pay for live-
stock and farm-tools.

He did most of the house-building himself. All he could
do was to put up a log cabin, and he carted the stones for
the cellar, hauled the logs for the walls and split the shingles
for the roof. He had a few negroes to help him, but he was



92 HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE”

his own mason and carpenter, except when it came to the
“raising,” and at this the neighbors helped.
It was not very much of a house, I imagine; but then
nobody expects all the conveniences in a log cabin and,
humble as it was, his home-made log house was home — and



4
“CAPTAIN GRANT FOUND OUT WHAT WORK REALLY WAS.”

you know, as John Howard Payne's beautiful song tells us,
“ Be it ever so humble, there’s no place like home.”

But long before he and his family were settled in their
log-built home, Captain Grant had found out what work
really was. He had learned how hard it was to squeeze a
living out of the ground. He discovered that raising pota-



HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE.” 93

toes and corn and wheat and cutting cord-wood on a sixty-
acre farm always meant hard work, but does not always
mean money enough to live on as one would like.

As I told you, however, in my story of how Grant fought
the plague at Panama, he had a good deal of the Mark Tap-
ley spirit about him, and so, even while he saw what a hard
row he had to hoe on his little farm, he saw the funny side
of it too, and named his little place “ Hardscrabble,” because,
he said, he was certain to find life there “a hard scrabble.”

His sixty acres, as I have said, were good ground for corn
and wheat and potatoes, and in its forest land he could cut a
good many cords of wood. The log house at “ Hardscrabble”’
was set on a rise of ground and shaded by a grove of young
oaks. It was a pleasant spot, and Grant would have been
very happy there with his wife and children if he had not
been worried over money matters and often been sick with
the fever and ague. That will make anyone feel mean and
out-of-sorts, you know, and Grant had been a sufferer from
that hot and shivery complaint ever since he had been a boy
in Ohio.

There was one thing he always managed to have at
“ Hardscrabble” and that was good horses. To have had poor
ones would not have been like Grant; for he, you know,
was always a horse-lover. And, at “Hardscrabble,” he used
to declare that, with his pet team of a gray and a bay, he
could plough a deeper furrow and haul a heavier load of
wheat or cord-wood than any other farmer around.



94 HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE.”

For, you see, he was his own teamster. And when
times were especially hard and money was slow in coming,
he would load up his wood team and driving into town:
would peddle his fire-wood from door to door.

From this, you can be certain that there was about Cap-
tain Grant no such thing as false pride. He was ready to



GRANT AS A WOOD-PEDDLER.

do anything that was honest work, no matter how humble.
But not the most tempting opportunity could ever induce
him to do a dishonorable action. He hated meanness as he
did lying and swearing; and it is a splendid record for a
man who has gone through as much and had as many ups
and downs as he that, in all his eventful life, he never did a
mean action, never swore and never lied. Yet that is the

record of U. S. Grant.
He himself has said in no spirit of boasting — for Grant





WITH THE GRAY AND THE BAY.



eat
Feria
Pa







HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A“ HARD SCRABBLE.” 97

was never a boaster— but just to illustrate a point he was
making, “I am not aware of ever having used a profane
expletive in all my life.” He told his boys so, too, and his
eldest son declares that his father did not even use the sim-
plest kind of boyish “swear words.” When his father was
a young man, so this eldest son tells us, he did hear him say
once on a time “ thunder and lightning!” But he says that
is about the only strong expression his father ever did use,
and the fact that the soldier’s son remembered it shows how
unusual a thing it was.

His record for honesty and truthfulness is known to all
men and is dwelt upon by all persons who had anything to
do with him in business or pleasure.

“O, Sam Grant said it, did he?” they would say at
West Point. “Well, that settles it. If he said so, it’s so.”

And meanness, which is very close to ungentlemanliness,
is also pretty near to coarseness in talk or act. Not one of
these found place in the character of U. S. Grant. He
never said anything that approached coarseness, his son
tells us. He never used vulgar words nor would he tell or
listen to bad stories. He would get up and leave the room
rather than hear them. And to do that, let me tell you,
takes real courage.

Do you wonder that, through all his life, men trusted him ©
and respected him, even when things went hardest with
him? Do you wonder that, when the son from whom I
‘have quoted grew to be a man, he said his father was his



7

98 HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE.”

ideal of all that is true and good? Do you wonder that he
says to his own boy that the best he can wish for him is to
be as good a man as his grandfather ?

“My father’s character,” he says, “was what I believe a

good Christian teacher would consider the ideal one. He
"was pure in thought and deed. He was careful of the feel-
ings of others —so much so, in fact, that when he had to
do anything to hurt them, I believe he felt more pained
than the people whom he hurt.”

This is an excellent reputation to have, is it not? And
in the case of Ulysses Grant it is one that all men acknowl-
edge’ as truly merited. It began with him even as a boy in
the Ohio tanyard; under the hard experience of life at Hard-
scrabble and the years that followed it was tested by adver-
sity and became at last the calm, self-controlled, fearless, yet
at the same time tender and sympathetic nature that won,
by unbending will and by equally determined clemency, in
the terrible warfare that closed at Appomattox.

There is no “fire of adversity,” as we call it, that is so
trying and tormenting as not being able to “get along.”
Failure is a terrible blow to a man’s good opinion of him-
self — indeed, it is so to a boy’s, too.

Captain Grant had a severe schooling in failure after he
left the army. Somehow, as we say, things did not seem to
go his way.

He could not make farmine pay; few men can, when
along comes sickness to take all the strength and ambition



HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A“ HARD SCRABBLE.” 99

out of them—as did the fever and ague with Captain Grant.
Hauling fire-wood ten miles to town and peddling it from
door to door at four dollars a cord will not put much money
in a man’s pocket, especially when he has a growing family
to support.

So, after three year’s trial at farming, when he saw that
he was running behind each year, when he found himself
weakened by continuous fever and ague, two thousand dol-
lars in debt to his father, and, though steadily industrious,
still as steadily unsuccessful, he came to the conclusion that
he was not cut out for a farmer and. must try his hand at
something else.

Although he called “ Hardscrabble” his home he had
not lived there all the time. Once he left the cabin to take
charge of the house of his brother-in-law on the Gravois
road. It was a neat Gothic cottage and was: called “ Wish-
ton-wish.’”—I wonder if that name was given it because of a
certain tale by a great American story-teller? Do you know
which one?

In 1856 the Grants moved into Whitehaven — the man-
sion belonging to Mrs. Grant’s father. Captain Grant was
to look after the place; but he still called “ Hardscrabble ” his
home, and when at last the fever and ague would not let
him continue as a farmer and he determined to make a
change, he was obliged to sell “Hardscrabble” and its
belongings so as to raise a little money.

Life had been a struggle there, certainly. But even up-



Full Text
i}

iLL

Bie

;
ty 4
tnd





4
'
&
%
‘

AT APPOMATTOX.
(When General Grant entered the McLean house at Appomattox to receive the surrender of General Lee’s army, his main wish was not
to play the conqueror. His desire was to spare the feelings of his opponent, and he pernitted no military
display nor did he wear his own sword or demand that of General Lee.) . [See page 228]


THE TRUE STORY OF >

TS. GRAN TL

THE AMERICAN SOLDIER

TOLD FOR BOYS AND GIRLS

BY

ELBRIDGE S. BROOKS

AUTHOR OF “THE STORY OF OUR WAR WITH SPAIN,” “THE AMERICAN SOLDIER,”
“THE AMERICAN SAILOR,” ‘‘THE TRUE STORY OF THE UNITED STATES,”

“THE TRUE STORY. OF COLUMBUS,” ‘“ WASHINGTON,” “ LINCOLN,”
“FRANKLIN,” “ LAFAYETTE,” AND MANY OTHERS
ILLUSTRATED
BOSTON

LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO.
COPYRIGHT, 1897,
BY
LoTrHrRop PUBLISHING COMPANY.

Norwood Press :
Berwick & Smith, Norwood, Mass., U.S.A.
PREFACE.

Tue life-story of every great American contains much that is startling,
much that is marvellous, and much that is inspiring, as, looking back, we
read it from its starting point.

The true story of America’s greatest soldier, Ulysses S. Grant, is not lack-
ing in the elements that give to the stories of Washington, Lincoln and Franklin
the flavor of moral and romance.

The son of a western tanner became the leader of the world’s mightiest
armies; the Ohio school boy became the ruler of the greatest of modern repub-
lics; the modest and retiring gentleman became the victorious general; the
broken and discouraged farmer and clerk became the foremost man of his day
in all the world.

As an example of persistence, of determination and of will, of a:clear head
in emergencies and a great heart in victory, of modesty, patience, simplicity,
strength and zeal, the record of the struggles and successes of U. S. Grant is a
lesson to young and old alike, and his story is one most fitting to be included
in this series of ‘‘Children’s Lives of Great Men.”

The words of the president of the republic, spoken above the brave general’s
last resting-place, in the grand mausoleum beside the Hudson, are eminently
appropriate in this connection. They serve as the best possible preface to this
life of the greatest American soldier.

“With Washington and Lincoln,” said President McKinley, ‘Grant had
an exalted place in history and the affections of the people. To-day his
memory is held in equal esteem by those whom he led to victory and by those
who accepted his generous terms of peace.”

To which may be added this portrait of our great general from the same
poet-patriot who said grand words of Washington and Lincoln —I mean James
Russell Lowell:

i “He came grim, silent; saw and did the deed
That was to do; in his master grip
Our sword flashed joy; no skill of words could breed
Such sure convictions as those close-clamped lips ;

He slew our dragon, nor, so seemed it, knew
He had done more than any simplest man might do.”

E. .§. B.
WHY

“CONTENTS

CHAPTER I.

A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX

‘CHAPTER IL

ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC

HOW

HOW

HOW

HOW

HOW

HOW

CHAPTER IIL

THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER

CHAPTER IV.

HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA

CHAPTER Y.

THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A ‘*HARD SCRABBLE”

CHAPTER VI.

HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY Ae aan :
CHAPTER VIL.
THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI

CHARTER VIII.

HE FOUGHT IT OUT

II

54

73

go

. 104

I20

136
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER IX.

HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT . . e

CHAPTER X.

HOW THE TANNER’S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME

CHAPTER XI.

HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD . : ° .

\

CHAPTER XII.

THE OLD GENERAL’S LAST FIGHT

CHAPTER XIIL

WHAT THE WORLD SAYS , . ° ° °

156

174

189

206

220
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

At Appomattox.

The house in which Grant was born . . . .
Grant’s first election-day . . . ° . .
The Birthplace of U. S. Grant . . . . .
Where the United States will make a park . .
The Birthplace as it looks to-day Sets . .
The Memorial Building in which the Birthplace stands
“Stumping” at the swimming hole . . oe
John Quincy Adams . 5 . . . .
Blindfolding the balky colt . : aA . .
“So he went along through a happy boyhood” . .

“That’s jest the very lowest I can sell the critter for, Lyss,” said the farmer _

The “country schoolmarm ” of Grant’s boyhood days

“ Might just as well send this little fellow of yours, Squire.”

Ulysses sees the sights ae ranean eau Ntee te

In camp at West Point . ; 7 . .
Cadet Grant’s famous horseback leap ° ° .
Cadet life out-of-doors . : A ° . .
Kosciusko’s monument at West Point . ° .

General Zachary Taylor. . . . : . .
Grant rides for ammunition at Monterey . .
Chepultepec — the “ West Point” of Mexico . .
Grant said, “ we’re coming in!” and they did . ai
The battery in the steeple . . . . oss
The Cathedral in the City of Mexico . i . .
Bull fight in Mexico . : . : . . .
The dangerous trip “ overland ” in “ the fifties.” 3

‘Target practice in U. S. A. barracks . ; : :

Frontis.
si 3
S is
: -
. .
3 ;
3
> °
2 a
s <
7 a
: 7
5 S
; .
. .
.
a 5
: .
* .
3 :
4 3
: .
. 2
%5 <
C5 <
G °

13
16
18
20
20
20
22
25
28
29
33
35
38
41
45
49
50
52
57
59
61

63
66
68
71
75
76
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

The march across the Isthmus . 3 : 3 : 7 ‘
He cared for the si€k and fought the plague. : 5 ° .

Grant in the plague camp at Panama . 5 s ; . . .
Cold weather sentry duty, in barracks . . eee ° .
A hard road to travel . SoA tine { 3 . . .
“ Captain Grant found out what work really was.” . . . .
Grant as a wood-peddler_. = : . : = . 7 .

With the Gray and the Bay : A : s 7 : .
“ Hardscrabble,” the cottage that Grant built for himself in Missouri

Grant’s home in Galena, in 1861. i A “ 3 s

A “new recruit,” in 1861. . ‘ ° 3 a é 5 5
The Court House at Galena < . 3 . ;: . .
“Men! go to your quarters,” said Colonel Grant : ° : .

“T prefer to do my first marching in.a friendly country,” he said S
Grant at Belmont . 3 . . ah fee : - : °
Grant at Shiloh So 'oe oe

Grant’s charge at Shiloh. : . . : : : . :
Major-General U. S. Grant . . : 7

Spot where Grant met Pemberton to arrange for the surrender of Vicksburg

A Confederate sharpshooter at Lookout Mountain .. . :
President Lincoln handing Grant his commission as Lieutenant-General
Grant and his Generals . : . 5 . . .

“T shall fight it out on this line if it takes allsummer.” . |.

The ninth of April, 1865. 7 is % . . ears

They saluted like gentlemen and soldiers . 5 : :

At the Grand Review in Washington . . . . . 3
“Grant was the hero of the hour”. : : . .

Grant and his family . 7 : : . ; . . ;

A boy’s first view of General Grant . . . : -

Grant and Johnson. 4 : i . . < a : .
At the inauguration . : : S 3 5 ; . .

The new Washington as Grant made it. : : 5 5 :
The city of Geneva in Switzerland where the Court of Arbitration met
Charles Sumner . ce : se SeNS ; 2
Horace Greeley . : . : : : . : ‘ .
President Grant delivering his second inaugural address . : é

William T. Sherman . . 3 . Z . y 5 °
“Let no guilty man escape” . . : 7 . . < ‘
Memorial Hall, Philadelphia. . . . . . 2

Lord Beaconsfield , é s : : . . Gi 5
‘William I. . : 3 . ‘ . . . : . % ‘

78
81
83
86
87
92
94

95
100

106
109
IIo

115

130
133
135
139
142

143

147
149
152
154
157
159
161

169
171
173
175
177
179
182
185
186
190
IOI
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Ex-President Grant . . ‘: *
The Norman Gate . 5 ;
Grant and Bismarck . ; s 3 5

. . . . . . .
. wae . . . . .

. . . . . .

Windsor Castle, the home of the Queen of England .
Grant addressing the workingmen at Newcastle, Eng.
General Grant landing at Nagasaki, in Japan. . °
The Gate at Lucknow, India. 3 5 3 ‘ Ky
The Golden Gate, San Francisco Harbor . 5 ¢ : ;: é ‘ i
Grant’s home in East Sixty-sixth Street, New York City . ; . ° .
The harbor of New York . . . . . . . . . . .
The old General's last fight ‘ . 7 3 . > . ° . .
The cottage on Mount McGregor, near Saratoga, in which General Grant died

The outlook at Mount McGregor A . . : 3 . . .
The temporary tomb of General Grant, Riverside Drive, New York City . >
The view across the river from Grant’s tomb at Riverside . . ¢ : .
Hancock and Grant . s sates @ ‘ 7 . . ° . ° .
At Spottsylvania . 5 . . ° . . en iete te 3 ‘ °
The Grant monument at Chicago ° 7 . . ° . . ° °
Where our hero sleeps at Riverside . . . . . ° ° ° .
The second funeral of Grant. ° aa a ° ° ° ° ° °

193
194
195
197

201
204
205
208
210
213
217
218
221
222
224
225
228
231
233
THE TRUE STORY OF

ULYSSES S. GRANT

CHAPTER I.
WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX.

HIS is a story for the boys and girls of America.
It isa true story. It is the story of an Ameri-
can. It is a story of adventure, of fighting
and of glory. It is the story of the greatest
soldier of the Republic—the story of Ulysses
S. Grant.

I do not wish to tell you the story of this remarkable
man simply because he fought and won great battles, nor
because, for fully twenty years, he was the foremost man
and the chief citizen of the United States of America, nor
because I delight to write of war and bloodshed and victory.
I donot. I abominate war. I hate bloodshed. I know
that there are two sides to every victory. But the story of
General Grant seems to me one that all the boys and girls of

It


12 WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INIO A BOX.

America can take to heart. It is one that should help and
strengthen and inspire them. For as they read in these
pages, how, out of obscurity came honor, out of failure
fame, out of hindrances perseverance, out of indifference
patriotism, out of dullness genius, out of silence success,
and, out of all these combined, a glorious renown, they may
See, in this man’s advance into greatness, a reason for their
own doing their best — patiently, unhesitatingly, persistently.
‘For it was thus that Grant rose to honor and renown; it

‘was thus that the tanner’s son of Georgetown became the
general of the armies of the Republic, that the horse-boy
of the Ohio farm became the President of the United States.
Let me tell you his story.

In the year 1821 there stood on the banks of the Ohio
river, in Clermont County in southwestern Ohio, twenty-five
miles to the east of Cincinnati, a small frame house, with
one story and an ell. It was the home of Jesse Root Grant
and Hannah, his wife. Jesse Grant was a smart and indus-
trious young tanner who had settled at this spot on the
Ohio River. It was known as Point Pleasant. Here he
had gone into the business of tanning hides into leather,
«being backed up with money by a man who wished to have
his son learn the tanner’s trade.

Point Pleasant was a little settlement of some fifteen or
twenty families. It has not grown much in all these years ;
for, to-day it is a little village of but one hundred and


THE HOUSE IN WHICH GRANT WAS BORN.
At Point Pleasant, Ohio. From a photograph taken in 1880. The old gentleman at the gate was the doctor
who “ tended” Ulysses as a baby.



WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 1S

‘twenty-five people; but it is more famous than many larger
and more pushing places just because it was the birthplace
of a great American.

The house of Jesse Grant, the tanner, stood back from
the broad river some three hundred feet. A small creek
flowed past the door and tumbled into the Ohio river; back
of the house rose a little hill; close at hand was the tanyard
where the bark of trees, brought from the woodland near by,
was ground into the reddish bark-dust called tan — the stuff
that helps turn calf-skin and cowhide into leather.

Into this pleasant but simple little home beside the beau-
tiful Ohio, on the twénty-seventh day of April in the year
1822, a baby boy was born. He was a strong, promising-
looking little fellow and weighed just ten and three quarters .
pounds. .

The young tanner and his wife were very proud of their
first baby, of course, and did not think he should be named
without talking over such an important matter with their
folks. So, when the baby was about a month old, Jesse
‘Grant hitched up his horse and wagon and took his wife
and baby over to grandpa’s, ten miles away.

There they held a family council over the baby’s: name.
Everyone had a different name to propose, and it was finally
decided to vote for a name by ballot.

So the father and mother, the grandfather and grand-
mother and the two aunts wrote, each on a slip of paper, the
name he or she liked best; the slips were put into a hat,
16 WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX.

and then one of the aunts drew outa slip. The name on
the first slip drawn out was to be the baby’s name. And

the name drawn out was Ulysses.

Thus you see, almost the first thing that happened to this
little Ohio baby was a decision by ballot. Do you suppose
it was, what we call, prophetic? It may not have been, but
don’t you see, just forty-six years afterwards, almost to a
day, the representatives of the American people met in con-
vention and the
first ballot they
took declared that
Ulysses S. Grant
should be their
candidate for
i President of the
‘ United States.

So the baby
was called Ulys-



GRANT’S FIRST ELECTION-DAY.

ses —and Ulysses, you know, was a great soldier of the old,
old days. But this baby’s grandfather so much liked the
name he had written —it was Hiram —that the baby’s
father and mother said that should be a part of their boy’s
name, too. And Hiram, you know, was a very wise and
brave ruler in Bible times. There again, you see, the baby’s
name was just a bit prophetic, for they gave him the names
of a great soldier and a wise ruler; and as Hiram Ulysses
Grant the baby was christened.
WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 17

When this baby, however, grew to be a big boy and
went away to school he lost the name of Hiram by a very
funny mwtake, of which I will tell you later. By this mis-
take the boy’s name became Ulysses Simpson Grant, and
thus it came to pass that, as U. S. Grant, this Ohio boy
finally became great and famous.

The baby Ulysses did not live long in the little frame
cottage beside the Ohio; for, when he was but ten months
old, his father Jesse hada good chance to go into the tan-
ning and leather business in a much larger place, and so
the family moved away from the little village with its attrac
tive name of Point Pleasant.

But the birthplace of a great man is always a notable spot,
no matter how short a time it was his home. -So, of course,
that little frame house at Point Pleasant became quite a
show place when the little baby who had been born there in
1822 became, forty years after, a very famous man.

The cottage stood for along time on the banks of the
great river; but, at last, in the year 1888, a river boatman
named Captain Powers bought the old house and loaded it
on a flat-boat and floated it up the river to Cincinnati.
Then it was taken off the flat-boat and twenty-four horses
were hitched to it and dragged it to the corner of Elm
and Canal streets in the city of Cincinnati. There it was
exhibited to thousands of visitors, as one of the great sights

of the Ohio Centennial Exposition of 1888.
After a few months, the house was bought by a rich
18 WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT*INTO A BOX.

Ohio man named Chittenden, who carried it off to Columbus,
the capital of Ohio; he set it up on the State Fair Grounds
and there it staid until the year 1896, when Mr. Chittenden
presented the famous house to the State of Ohio and moved
it to another part of the Fair Grounds. And there a





































































































































































































































































THE BIRTHPLACE OF U. S. GRANT.

memorial building was built around it, to protect and pre-
serve the little cottage in which our greatest soldier first saw
the light.

So, to-day, if you go to the beautiful city of Columbus
in the State of Ohio, and ride out to the Fair Grounds you
can see the birthplace of General Grant packed carefully
WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 19

away for safe keeping in a great house-box of brick and
glass and iron. This is called the Grant Memorial Building.
_ When you have read his story you will understand w hy
the birthplace of General Grant is so interesting an object
‘to all the world, and why it has been put into a box for peo-
ple to look at;.though it does seem a pity that the little old
house could not have been kept on the very spot where it
stood when, on the twenty-seventh of April, 1822, Ulysses
Simpson Grant was ushered into the great world that was,
in after years, to so respect .and honor him.

But the site of that great little house is still a notable
spot even though the house itself has been carted away,
and, even as I write, the Congress of the United States is
considering a plan to buy all the land round about the spot
where Grant was born and to lay it out and beautify it into a
National Park, thus preserving for the people of the United
States the place where General Grant was born.

As I have told you, the baby Ulysses, when he was ten
months old, moved away from Point Pleasant. His father
set up a tannery at Georgetown in Brown County, ten miles
back from the Ohio River, twenty miles east of Point Pleas-
ant, and almost fifty miles from Cincinnati.

I think you will be able to find the town on any good
map of Ohio, for it is.quite a place now. It is a town of fif-
teen hundred people, quite a city you see in comparison to
the little hamlet of Point Pleasant where the great American
soldier was born.
a WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO’ A BOX.

Here, at Georgetown, Ulysses lived as a boy until he
was seventeen years old. His father made quite a suc-
cess of his tannery and leather









business and became very well-
known in his own neighbor-
hood. Jesse Grant, the father
Aun of Ulysses, was never what
jt we call a rich man, but he
re.
was a prosper-
ous one. He
was always, as
General Grant
himself tells us,
in what is called
“comfortable
circumstances.”
Indeed, soon
after he moved
to Georgetown he built aneat and
convenient, small brick house and,
in addition to his tannery, had a
. good-sized and productive farm.
ane ae eon eet =” hatebrick houseis stillestana:
Looks To-DaY. | j-—TiKE “MEMORIAL ing on one of Georgetown’s streets,
STANDS: and though it has been changed
a little in appearance, any boy or girl who visits the busy

little Ohio town can see the places that were familiar to
WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 21

young Ulysses in and about the house where his boyhood
was spent.

They will still show you the family sitting-room with its
big fire-place and its old-fashioned mantel, the front hall and
the odd-looking staircase — just the same to-day as when Ulys-
ses climbed sleepily up to bed —the little hall bedroom which
was “ Ulysses’ room,” the old building in which he learned,
much against his will, his father’s trade of a tanner, the
tumble-down building where he first went to school, and,
just back of the tanyard, the “Town Run,” a little brook
along which lay the favorite play-ground of the Grant boys.
A mile out of town you could find that deep still spot in White
Oak Creek familiar to generations of Georgetown boys as
their “swimming hole” —and where, no doubt, Ulysses often
“stumped” his companions with many a difficult or fancy
water-act, for the boy was an excellent swimmer.

Young Ulysses Grant never took kindly to the trade of
a tanner. He liked the farm best, especially the horses.
Before he was six years old he could ride horseback or hold
the reins as well as many an older boy, in town or country.
Before he was ten years old his father took him to a circus,
and let him ride a pony around the ring, and as he grew
_ through boyhood he became famous, in all the Georgetown
region, as the best horseman and _ horse-trainer thereabouts.
Indeed, he loved horses all his life, and he owned some very
fast and beautiful ones when he became a man.

It was because he liked horses and farm-life so much ~
22 ' WHY A HOUSE.WAS PUT INTO A BOX.

‘that his father did not make him do much work about the
tannery, but, instead, let him do about as he pleased on the
farm out of school hours. -

For Jesse Grant believed in boys going to school. He
himself, had not had many such advantages, but he deter-
mined that his boys should have just as good an education
as he could get for them in the farming section in which
they lived.

From all I can hear I don’t think the boy Ulysses really '



“STUMPING ” AT THE SWIMMING HOLE.

enjoyed going to school, much better than any healthy
active boy who is fond of out-door life. But all such boys
are very glad in later years that their fathers or mothers
insisted on their going to school regularly, and we are
assured by General Grant that from the time he was old
enough to go to school to the year that he left home he
never missed a quarter from school. This was quite differ-
ent from that other great American, Abraham Lincoln, was
WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 23

‘it not? For he, you know, never got more than a year’s
schooling in all his wonderful life.

EK boy who does go to school, however, isn’t much of a
boy if he cannot find some time to play. So you may be
sure that “ Lyss Grant,” as the Georgetown boys called him,
made the most of his spare time. _

. He tells us himself, in his sketch of his boyhood, that he
had as many privileges as any boy in the village and prob-
ably more than most of them.

Chief among these privileges was: permission to go any-
where or do anything allowable in a boy, after his “chores”
were done. And this meant all sorts of boyish sports —
fishing, hunting, swimming, skating, horseback riding, doing
“stunts ” at jumping and wrestling in the tanyard along the
Town Run and in the “Swimming Hole,” and all the other
jolly out-door and in-door good times that belong to the vil:
lage boy even more than to the country or city boy.

But it was by no means a case of all play and no work
to this moderate, easy-going but fun-loving village boy. He |
tells us that when he was a boy everyone worked in his
region — “except the very poor;” and Jesse Grant, while
allowing his boys all possible liberty, gave them also plenty of

work to do.

Ulysses, as we know, hated the tannery work. But he
loved farm-life; so his father set him at work, after school
hours or in vacation time, “doing chores” on the farm.

While yet a little fellow the boy would drive the horses
24 WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX.

hauling cord-wood or logs from the wood-lot to the farm.
At eleven, he could hold a plough and turn a furrow almost
as well as a man, and until he was seventeen he did all the
“horse-work ” on the farm — breaking up the lgnd, furrow-
ing, ploughing, bringing in the loads of hay and grain, haul-
ing the wood and taking care of the live stock.
He confesses to us, in the story of his life, that he did
not like to work; but he says that, like it or not, he did do
as much work when he was a boy, as any hired man will do



to-day — and attended school besides.

And yet, as I have told you, he managed to find time to
play. The home rule was never severe. He was never
punished, and rarely scolded by his parents; so he must
have been a pretty.good boy, mustn't he? He tells us that
they never objected to his enjoying himself when he could,
for they let him go fishing, or swimming, or skating; they ~
even allowed him to take the horses and go away on a visit
with one of his boy friends.

Once, he went off in this way to Cincinnati, fifty miles
away; another time, he took a carriage trip to Louisville,
with his father——a big journey for a boy in those. days.
Once he went, with a two-horse carriage, a seventy-mile ride
to Chillicothe, and again, with a boy of his own age, on the
same kind of a seventy-mile ride to Flat Rock in Kentucky,
to visit a friend. What a good time those two fifteen-year-
- old boys must have had. on that trip! And you may be
sure, Ulysses did the driving. ,
JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.
President of the United States when Grant was a boy.


a




WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 27

But he had a tussle driving home. Let me tell you about
it. He saw a horse he liked, and he “swapped off” one of
his carriage horses for it, getting ten dollars to boot. But
the new horse had never been driven in harness, and the
two boys had a fearful time getting an unbroken, balky,
kicking, nervous horse to go in a span. In fact, the boy
who was with Ulysses got frightened and after one very
risky runaway adventure with the new horse, he deserted
and went home in a freight wagon. But Ulysses was bound
to get that new horse home and would not give in to its
pranks. At one time it really looked as if he would have to
give up the job; but, asa last resort, he got out of the car-
riage, blindfolded the balky colt with his big red bandanna
handkerchief, and so drove the funny-looking team to an
uncle’s, not far from his home.

It was such things as this in the boy that worked out
into equally pronounced qualities in the man. Ulysses S.
Grant had, as boy and man, determination, grit, tenacity —
_ what you boys call “ stick-to-it-iveness ” or “sand.” When
he really set out todo a thing he did it — whether it were
to drive home a skittish colt or fight a great war to the
finish.

Would you like to know what sort of looking boy
“Lyss Grant” was in his early teens? He was a short,
sturdy little fellow, with a careless way of walking, and
inclined to be round-shouldered. He was a freckle-faced,
*sober-sided” lad, with straight sandy hair and blue eyes, who
28 WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX.

got out of things when he could, but did them uncomplainingly
if he felt it to be his duty. He was quiet, no bragger, just a
bit shy, but when roused to action he was quick and deter-
mined. He was generally the successful leader in the snow-
ball fights, no one in the county could outride him, and
though never quarrelsome he was no coward. Above all
else, like Washington and Lincoln, he hated a lie, and his
word could always be
depended upon.

One other trait he
had that helped make
his success later in
life. I have told you
that he was persistent
and stuck to anything



he had made up his

“ mind to do. He was

BLINDFOLDING THE EALKY COLT. Bee e planner. If he

had a hard piece of work in hand, he did not just go at it
thoughtlessly ; he sat down and planned it out. ,

They still tell the story in Georgetown of the “cute”
way in which the twelve-year-old Ulysses beat the men of
the town on a peculiar job of stone-lifting. It seems that
while a new building was going up in the town, the boy
“ Lyss,” as everyone called him, drove the ox-team that
hauled the stone for the foundation from White Oak Creek.
One big stone was ‘selected for the doorstep, but after the
WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX. 29

men had tugged away at it for hours they concluded it was
too big to lift and that they must give it up.
“Here, let me try it,’ said Ulysses; “if you'll help me,
I'll load it.” . .
They all laughed at him, but promised to give him a lift.
Then the boy asked the men to prop up one end of the
stone. They did so, and “chocked” it. Then Ulysses backed



















“so UK WENT ALONG THROUGH A HAPPY BOYHOOD.”

the wagon over the stone, slung it underneath the wagon by
chains, hoisted up the other end of the stone the same way
and then hauled it in triumph into town.

And to-day, if you are in Georgetown, they will show you
in front of that same building, now an engine house, the
very stone, picked out as a doorstep and now set in the side-

v
30 WHY A HOUSE WAS PUT INTO A BOX.

walk, which the twelve-year-old Ulysses engineered out of
White Oak Creek and hauled into town.

They tell much the same story of the boy and his big black
horse, Dave, and how he loaded up and hauled off a load of
great logs, cut out for building beams. This time, he was
quite alone in the woods; but with a fallen tree-trunk as a
lever and slide, and with the help of Dave and a strong rope,
he lifted the heavy logs to the truck and brought them home
in triumph, much to the surprise of his father.

This, you see, was planning to some advantage; but it
was this same'patience and invention that helped him to win
victories later, and that men then called strategy.

So he went along, through a pleasant, happy boyhood,
full of its trials and its crosses, no doubt — even the best-
reared boy has these, and they help to make a man of him
— but learning gradually those lessons of integrity, honesty,
patience, self-dependance and self-help, which served him so
well in the worries and disappointments, the failures and
disasters, the endeavors and successes that made up the his-
tory of this later leader of men. ;
ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. 31

CHAPTER II.
ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

Les was nothing really remarkable about the boy-

hood of Grant. That you have found out already.
But then, not many boys do have remarkable boyhoods or
do great things at a time when their chief business should be
growing and learning. The world’s historic boys are few
and far between; but it is from the sturdy, active, healthy,
hearty, wide-awake, honest, honorable and commonplace boys
that the world’s best men have been made.

Young Ulysses Grant was just one of these healthy,
commonplace boys. He did well whatever he deliberately
set out to do, and he could ride and drive a horse better
than any other boy in all that country round.

In fact, the most of his own business enterprises while’
he was a boy —all boys do have certain business enterprises
in which they engage, you know, with more or less success
— were connected with horses. He did not like to be called
a horse-jockey, for horse-jockies in those days were not con-
sidered altogether respectable; but he did dearly love a
horse-trade, and he was generally. so bright and shrewd at
this business as to get the best of the bargain.

To be sure, one of his earliest attempts at horse-trading
32 ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

was not a brilliant success — though he did get the horse he
wanted! It seems, when he was about ten years old he fell
quite in love with a certain colt that belonged to a farmer
near by. He begged his father to buy the colt, and at last
Jesse Grant commissioned the boy to see the farmer and
make the bargain.

“ Offer him twenty dollars for the colt, Ulysses,” he said ;
“if he won’t take that, try him with twenty-two and a half,
and if he won’t ‘take that, offer him twenty-five. But you
mustn’t go over twenty-five dollars. It’s all the colt’s
worth.”

So Ulysses, proud of his mission, went to the farmer.

«What did your father say you might pay ?” asked ‘the
farmer, and Ulysses, truthful always, and recalling his fath-
er’s instructions replied, “ He told me to offer you twenty
dollars, and if that wouldn’t do, twenty-two fifty, and if that
wasn’t enough, twenty-five; but not a cent more.”

“Well, now, that’s jest the very lowest I can sell the crit-
ter for, Lyss,” the farmer declared. “You can have the colt
for twenty five dollars, but not a cent less.”

Ulysses drove the colt home, delighted with his business
ability. But, as his father questioned him, the truth came
out, and it was very long before the poor boy heard the last
of the “good joke on Lyss Grant,” as the boys called it.

But that first attempt at a horse trade, as the saying is,
“cut the boy’s eye-teeth.” That is, he learned wisdom by
experience, and after that he became one of the best judges
OLYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. 33

of horses and prices in the neighborhood, so that his father
let him do about as he pleased in horse trades, for he knew
he could rely on the boy’s judgment..

In this business, and by doing “odd jobs” of hauling
and trucking, Ulysses made quite a bit of money for a boy



“THAT’S JEST THE VERY LOWEST I CAN SELL THE CRITTER FOR, LYSS,” SAID THE FARMER.

of those days, and, in all this, he won no little reputation ,
as a business boy. ©

_ I don’t imagine he had a very clear idea as to what he
wished to do when he became a man. Not many boys
really do know what they desire or are fitted for, until they
learn by experience, in what direction their tastes lie. One
thing, however, Ulysses did feel certain about. He did not
34 @GLYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

mean to bea tanner, if he could help it. He was like many
another boy, you see, who, though he does not exactly know
what he wishes to do, is quite sure that he doesn’t intend
following his father’s line of business. And that decision
has led to many a mistake and many a failure in the career
of men — though not always.

I have told you that Ulysses was kept pretty steadily at
schoo! from the day when he was old enough to learn his
ABC’s. That old Georgetown schoolhouse, as I have said, is
standing to-day, though itis quite dilapidated. But there the
boy went from his primer to the three R’s—“ readin’, ‘ritin’
and ’rithmetic,” for so folks used to call them. Sometimes a
man was his teacher, sometimes a woman, and while as he
says they could none of them teach much nor very well, still
that country “school marm’” of his boyhood days, laid the
foundation of an education that led finally to the production
of one of the world’s remarkable books. :

Twice, during his boyhood at Georgetown, Ulysses was
sent away to school in the hope of getting a better education
than the village school of Georgetown afforded. Once he
went to Maysville in Kentucky, and, after that, to a private
school at Ripley in Ohio. But he was never much of a stu-
‘dent ; indeed, as he assures us, he did not take kindly to any of
his books or studies, except his arithmetic. And I shouldn't
be surprised if he helped wear out the bunches of switches
that were gathered very often, from a beech-wood near the
schoolhouse, for the teacher’s use and the children’s correc-
THE “COUNTRY SCHOOLMARM” OF GRANT’S BOYHOOD


ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC, 37

tion. Those were the days of hard whippings at school,
you know — when Grant was a boy. ,

It was while at home for his Christmas vacation, from
his school at Ripley, that Ulysses had a great surprise.

“ Ulysses,” said his father, one day, as he finished read-
ing a letter he had just received, “I believe you're going to
get that appointment.”

“What appointment?” the boy inquired in surprise.

“Why, to West Point,” replied his father.“ I applied to
Senator Morris for one, and I reckon you'll get it.”

“To West Point,” repeated Ulysses, still a bit dazed we
the news, “why, I don’t want to go there.”

“But I want you to,” his father said. “I reckon you'll
go if I say so.”

“Well, if you say so, I suppose I’ll have to go,” said the
boy slowly. “But I don’t want to —I know that.”

The appointment did come in good time, through Mr.
Hamer, the congressman from that section, and much to the
surprise of the neighbors. For to their minds, young Ulys-
ses Grant seemed the last boy in the world to go to West
Point. Four boys had already gone to the famous Military

Academy from that village of Georgetown, but then “they
_ were smart,” folks said, and only a smart boy could pass the.
examination for entrance. “Slow little chap, Lyss is,” said
one of the townsfolk, “ might just as well send this little
fellow of yours, squire, as that boy of Jesse Grant’s.” The
Georgetown people all supposed that going to West Point
38 ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

depended on influence or ability, and they never imagined
that Jesse Grant had enough of the first, or Ulysses enough
of the second. You know the old Bible saying, don’t you:





















“MIGHT JUST AS WELL SEND THIS LITTLE FELLOW OF YOURS, SQUIRE.”

A prophet is not without honor save in his own country
and among his own kin.

To tell the truth, Ulysses rather shared the opinion of
the Georgetown gossips; but when the documents came, he
knew he must “face the music,” as he declared, and try to
pass those dreaded examinations — the bane and bugbear of
every boy and girl who goes to school.
ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. ° 39

But Jesse Grant was determined that his boy should go
to West Point, and when the appointment did come he put
Ulysses in charge of a special tutor who “coached” the
slow scholar so well that his teacher felt that the boy would
pass the examination, if he did not get “rattled,” as the say-
ing is to-day.

As the day of departure approached, Ulysses found him-
self looking forward to this journey to the East, even though
he knew that the dreaded examination came at the end of
the trip. This western boy, of course, longed to see the
world, as all boys do, and a trip to New York was some
thing to talk about in those days.

Ulysses thought he was quite a traveller. He had been
_ east as far as Wheeling in Virginia; he had been into
northern Ohio; he had, as you know, visited Cincinnati and

Louisville and esteemed himself, as he says “the best trav-
elled boy in Georgetown.” But this trip to West Point was
indeed a journey. It was almost as much to the Ohio boy
of sixty years ago as a trip to Europe or around the world
is to the American boy of to-day. It meant to him, the
chance of seeing and inspecting the two great eastern cities,
Philadelphia and New York. That was enough. To have
‘that chance he would willingly risk the examinations that
were sure to come; but he tells us frankly in his “Memoirs ”
that he was in no hurry to reach West Point and, boy-like,
would not have minded a steamboat explosion or a rail-
road collision or any other accident of travel, if it would
40 ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

only hurt him just enough to keep him from going into West
Point. Boysare all alike, aren't they ? I remember when I
used to wish I could have some pleasant little happening on
examination days —a stroke of harmless paralysis, or a tem-
porary loss of speech, just long enough to excuse me from
that most dreaded school ordeal. But to Ulysses Grant, as
to all other boys and girls in a similar situation, “nothing of
the kind,” he tells us, “occurred, and I had to face the music.”

At last the time came, and on the fifteenth of May, 1830,
with a new outfit of clothes and over a hundred ‘dollars
in his pocket, the seventeen-year-old Ulysses bade “his
folks” good-bye and started for Ripley, the river town ten
miles away, where he was to take the steamer for Pitts-
burg.

Of course he enjoyed the journey. Every boy likes to
see the sights, even if he must face the music at the end of
the journey. But you may be sure he was in no hurry to
get to the music. He took things leisurely. Railroads in
that day were few and far between, and, to reach West Point,
Ulysses “changed off,” on steamboat, canal boat and rail-
road. .He was fifteen days making the trip. To-day it can
be made in almost as many hours.

The canal boat on which he journeyed from Pittsburg to
Harrisburg had to be hauled over the Alleghany mountains;
this was interesting, but the boy thought the railway ride
from Harrisburg to Philadelphia about the finest, smoothest,
fastest going he had ever made.












































































ULYSSES SEES THE SIGHTS.



OLYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. 43

“Why,” he wrote home, “at full speed our train made as
much as eighteen miles an hour! Think of that!”

And to-day the Empire State Express easily makes, at
full speed, sixty miles an hour!

Ulysses paid a five days’ visit to his relations in Phila-
delphia —and was called to account by letters from home
for dallying so long by the way, when he should be at West
Point. But ke “did” Philadelphia pretty thoroughly and
managed to see a good deal of New York — though there
was not as much of that great city to see then as there is
to-day.

At last he sailed up the river to West Point. On the
thirty-first of May he saw the quaint old buildings on the
heights, climbed the long road from the steamboat dock,
known to so many visitors, reported at the barracks as an
applicant for admission and then — faced the music and took
the examinations for entrance.

This was the time when his name was changed. You
see, when his application was put in, the Congressman who
filled out the papers forgot Ulysses Grant’s full name. He
mixed him up with his younger brother, Simpson, and
thinking that Simpson was Ulysses’s middle name, he filled
in the application for Ulysses Simpson Grant instead of
Hiram Ulysses Grant.

Now, when a thing gets down in black and white on the
books of the government, it takes almost an Act of Congress
to get it off. Ulysses was very much “put out” when his
44 ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC

papers came to him with the wrong name, for no one likes
to have a mistake made in his name, you know; although
“they do say” that young Ulysses always did object to his.
initials, H-U--G. The boys used to make fun of them, you
see. Nevertheless, as soon as he reported at West Point,
he tried to convince the authorities that he was not U. S.
Grant, but H. U. Grant.

It was no use, however. The boy’s name was down on
the appointment as Ulysses Simpson Grant; it was so on
- the books of the Academy. It would make a great fuss to
get it changed and rather than bother about it he let it go.
So it came to pass that he was U.S. Grant forever.

The “U.S.” made so suggestive a pair of initials that,
at once, the West Point boys caught them up as the George-
town boys had his other initials. They nicknamed the new
boy “ Uncle Sam ;” and as “Sam Grant” he was known all |
through his cadet days.

Very much to his surprise, so he assures us, Ulysses
passed his examination — and, “ without difficulty!” He was
now a West Point cadet.

That sounds all very fine to you, I suppose. There has
always been something attractive to American boys and
girls about West Point cadets. But young Ulysses did not
think it fine, although of course he was glad to get through
his “exams” all right.

You see, he did not like the idea of being a soldier. He
did not like the discipline nor the hard work. And as he






































Hy A,
(AB
i



t IN CAMP AT WEST POINT



ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. 47

had not, at that time, the least idea that he would ever be in
the army, he did not like anything about the place, at first
—not even the camping out, which he thought very tire-
some and stupid.

Indeed, during that first winter at West Point, Saanich
Congress met, Ulysses used to run for the newspaper and
read the debates in Congress, eagerly. The reason was this.
There were in those days, many people who did not believe
at all in a school for the training of soldiers, like West Point,
even though George Washington had founded it. They
wished to do away with the Academy altogether and that
very year of 1830, a bill was really introduced into Congress
propesing to “ abolish the Military Academy at West Point.”
It was the talk, or debate, on this matter that so interested
Ulysses Grant, for, so he tells us, he hoped to hear that the
school had been abolished, so that he could go home again.
But, fortunately, the bill did not pass. West Point remained
and Grant was trained into a soldier.

So far as his lessons were concerned, I am afraid this
training did not occupy any more of his time than just
enough to let him squeeze through the school. This was
not because he was a slow or stupid scholar. He was not.
He hardly ever needed to read a lesson through the second
time, but trusted to luck to come off without a failure. His
son tells us that his low standing at school was due to the
West Point library. There was a good one there and this
boy had come from a place where books were scarce. So
48 ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

he used the library at the Academy for story books and not
for works on tactics or his other studies. They were pretty
good story books however; for he read, while there, Scott and
Irving and Marryatt and Cooper and Lever— authors dear
to the boys of sixty years ago. He often told his son that
that library at West Point was like a new world to him.

But, you see, at West Point, mathematics were the great

thing, and Ulysses Grant had a good head for figures. So,
as he got along easily with that tough study, it did not
make so much difference about the others.

He did not tell us in his Memoirs just where he stood in
his class, but he does say that if the class had been turned
the other end foremost he should have been near the head.
So it is not so hard to tell just about where he stood, is it?

His lowest marks seem to have been in French; his
highest were in cavalry tactics. That is where his boyish
training as a horseman came in, you see. His fame asa splen-
did horseman even yet exists at West Point. There was
nothing he could not ride, and his famous high jump on
the big sorrel “York” over a bar six feet from the ground, is
still marked and shown at West Point as “Grant’s upon
York.”

Would you like to know what sort of a looking boy was
Cadet Grant? He was a plump, fair-faced, almost under-
sized little fellow — in fact, he came just within the West
Point entrance limit of five feet; he was quiet in manner,
careless in dress, able to take care of himself, giving and tak-
ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. 49

ing jokes good-naturedly; determined, if he undertook any-
thing that he really wished to do; a bit lazy, perhaps; never
fond of study, but never stupid; slow to take offense, but
ready to fight back when cornered or imposed upon.

“It is a long time ago,” writes one of his West Point
associates, “but when I recall old scenes, I can still see
- ‘Sam’ Grant, with his over-
alls strapped down to his
boots, standing in front of
his quarters. It seems but
yesterday since I saw the
little fellow going ‘to the
riding-hall, with his spurs
' clanking on the ground and
his great cavalry sword
dangling by his side.”

There was nothing about
his West Point life out of
the common. He was just
an ordinary, every-day cadet,
going through the training



that taught him obedience,

CADET GRANT’S FAMOUS HORSEBACK LEAP.

attention, order, health,

good manners and simple living. It is a hard life for some
boys, with its routine work, its strict rules, its absolute
obedience to orders, and all the worries and trials that
make school-life by rule hard to bear; but Ulysses got
50 ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC.

over -his first dislike to it, and, after awhile, was glad that
Congress had not “abolished” West Point. He thought
that by the time he got through there he might teach mathe-
_ matics in some school
or college. The one
thing he was certain
about was that he
would not be a sol-
dier!

So his four years
at West Point went
on—broken only by
one vacation, when he



had been two years at













































the school. Except































































for his famous horse-

CADET LIFE OUT-OF-DOORS.

; back leap of six feet,
three inches —that was on his last examination day, by the
way, and in the presence of the high dignitaries called the
“Board of Directors” —he left no reputation at the Acad-
emy, either for high scholarship or great pranks — nothing,
in fact, to make a boy remember him after he had left the
school, or to put him at the head of his mates.

Certainly he was not at the head of his class. -He
graduated on the thirteenth of June, 1843, number twenty-
one in a class of thirty-nine—just about half way, you
see.
ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. 5!

He left West Point thinking pretty well of himself, as
most cadets— in fact as most college boys do. But there
is no harm in that, you know. I wouldn’t give much fora
boy who didn’t have a pretty fair opinion of himself. It
helps a fellow on, in a way. So Ulysses thought himself
“the observed of all observers,” as he went on his homeward
journey.

He considered that the two greatest men in America
were General Scott, the head of the army, and Captain ©
Smith, the commandant of cadets at West Point. And
though he did not intend to be an army officer, still he did
have a dream of some day reviewing the cadets just as Gen-
eral Scott had done —to his mind, at that time, the highest
honor in the world. But, as he tells us, he remembered that
horse-trade of his when he was a boy, and so for fear the
boys would make fun of him, he kept quiet about his ever
- being like General Scott.

While Ulysses was at West Point, his father had
removed his tannery and leather business to a little place
called Bethel, about twelve miles away, in Clarmont County.
Here the Grant family lived; here Ulysses had spent the one
vacation granted him when at West Point, and here he went
after graduation — brevet second lieutenant Ulysses Simp-
son Grant, Fourth U. S. Infantry.

“The “brevet” meant that he wasn’t really a second
lieutenant yet, but he would be soon—if he was a good
boy and joined his regiment.
52. ULYSSES FACES, THE MUSIC.

_When his new uniform came out to him he felt very big.
This was natural enough. We all feel fine in new clothes,
and there is always a fascination to boys about “soldier
clothes ” — especially if they have been fairly earned, as his
had been. |
- But you know the old saying that “pride goeth before a
a fall.” Our young
brevet second lieuten-
ant soon had proof of
this.

When his fine “ sol-
dier clothes” came
home he put them on
and rode away on
horseback to Cincin-
nati, to “show off.”
He was riding along



one a ‘the city streets,
thinking, he says, that
everyone was looking at him aid feeling himself to be quite
as big a man as General Scott, whén a ragged, dirty, bare-
footed little street boy —what we call a “mucker” here-
abouts — called out shrilly:

“Yah, soldier! Will you work? You bet he won't. He’d
sell his shirt first.”

Then everybody laughed. Well! You can imagine what
a terrible shock this was to the spruce and dignified brevet

KOSCIUSKO’S MONUMENT AT WEST POINT.
ULYSSES FACES THE MUSIC. ; 53

second lieutenant. But when, soon after, he was home
again at Bethel, he had just such another shock.

At the old stage tavern across the way, from Grant’s
home worked a drunken wag of a stableman. When the
trim-looking soldier boy had been home a few days, what
should this stableman do but come into the street rigged
out in a pair of sky-blue nankeen pantaloons with a white
stripe along the seams. This was just the color of Ulysses's
fine military trousers. Barefooted and bareheaded, but
making the most of the sky-blue pantaloons, the stableman
paraded up and down the street before the Grant house,
with an absurdly dignified military walk, imitating the
brevet second lieutenant of infantry.

Of course it set every one to laughing, and of course it
annoyed Ulysses dreadfully. Indeed, as he says, it quite
“knocked the conceit” out of him, and it gave him a dislike
for military bluster and military uniforms that he never got
over in all his life.

Thus the schooling at West Point came to an end. It
had done much for this homespun, awkward country boy
from the Ohio valley. It had developed his qualities of
manliness, persistence and endurance ; it had disciplined and
trained him into habits of obedience and had securely laid
the foundation of that military knowledge and leadership
which, thirty years later, was to do such mighty service to
the republic which had educated and developed him.
54 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

CHAPTER III.
HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED. OVER THE BORDER.

WE look at things quite differently when we are boys or
girls and when we are men or women. Sometimes,

however, opinions do not change. This seems to have been

Grant’s case as to the justice of the war with Mexico.

Forty years after that war, General Grant wrote in his
“Memoirs” that he regarded it as one of the most unjust
ever waged by a stronger against a weaker nation.

He tells us, in the same sentence, that as a young soldier
he was bitterly opposed to it; but, you know, the first duty
asoldier must learn is obedience; and, being a soldier in the
United States army, owing to the republic his education and
his training, Lieutenant Grant felt that obedience to orders
was his supreme duty and, even against his will, he marched
to the southeast with the troops that were first known as the
Army of Occupation and, later, as the Army of Invasion.

I do not propose to tell you here the story of the Mexi-
can War, which was fought in the years 1846 to 1848.
That story you can read in history, and I hope in time that
you will read enough about-it to decide for yourself that it
was an unjust and a tyrannicak war— just the same kind of
a fight as when a big bully of a boy doesn’t “take one of his
HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 55

size,” but “ pitches into” a little fellow who couldn’t possibly
Stand up against him.

From one side, the war with Mexico is nothing to be
proud of; but from another it is full of spirit and interest.
I shall simply tell you here of Grant’s connection with it,
and how it helped to make him and other officers brave sol-
diers, fitting them for the great and terrible war that came
thirteen years later, largely because of this war against
Mexico.

When Ulysses Grant graduated from the Military
Academy at West Point in 1843, the regular army of the
United States was a small affair. It had only 7500 men in
all, and there were more than enough officers to go around.

But the young lieutenant was given a place in the
Fourth regiment of the United States Infantry and, after
ninety days furlough or vacation, was ordered to report at
an army post at the Mississippi river six or seven miles
below St. Louis. |

This army post was called Jefferson Barracks and was
then one of the largest in the country, being garrisoned by
sixteen companies of infantry, or foot soldiers.

Grant had wished to belong to a cavalry regiment, as
was natural in so fine a horseman; but when his turn to
choose came, there were no places left in either an artillery
or a cavalry regiment. So it was, for him, what we call
“ Hobson’s choice,’ and he became a lieutenant of infantry.

Jefferson Barracks is a very pleasant place. It is still a
*

56 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

military post, you know, finely situated at the great river.
Lieutenant Grant had a good deal of spare time there and
he spent a part of this in visiting the home of one of his
West Point classmates not far off. This farm was called
Whitehaven, and was about five miles from Jefferson Bar-
racks. There he fell in love with the girl who afterwards
became his devoted wife. She was the sister of his class-
mate and her name was Julia Dent.

At that time young Lieutenant Grant had some idea of
becoming a teacher of mathematics either at West Point or
some other good school. He even wrote to his former pro-
fessor at West Point to look out for some such chance: for
him. But, before the opening could be found, the United
States and Mexico got into trouble; the little regular army
was ordered into Texas; the President declared war against
the republic of Mexico; volunteers were called for, because
there were not enough regular troops; the Mexicans at
Matamoras were angry because the Ameriéans were build-
ing a fort opposite their town; they fired the first shot; that
opened the war; and so it came to pass that, with his little
American army of three thousand men, General Zachary
Taylor, whom people called “Old Rough and Ready,”
invaded Mexico, and young Second Lieutenant Ulysses S.
Grant marched over the border and engaged in actual war.

The first taste of real war that he had, was in the little
skirmish known as the Battle of Palo Soe seat is, the
battle of the high trees — or woods.
HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 57

When, a little before the battle, the young lieutenant
heard the first guns of conflict, he did not like the prospect
before him. He wrote about this years afterwards, that he
didn’t know how General Taylor felt, aut as for himself, a
young second lieu-
tenant who had
never * heard: the
boom of a hostile
gun, he felt sorry
he had enlisted.

However he may
have felt at first,
he certainly did not
let his feelings in-
terfere with his ac-
tions, for he did his
duty when really in
the fight. His com-
pany protected the
'American artillery



which the Mexicans

i : GENERAL ZACHARY TAYLOR.
tried to captu EG) he Afterwards President of the United States.

helped to drive back the Mexican lancers, who came charg:
ing against them; and the stars and stripes went forward.

Then they marched on, and the next day fought another
little battle at “the palm grove,” or as the Mexicans call it,
“ Resaca dela Palma.”
58 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

Here Grant was again one of the fighters in a sharp,
short battle; but he seems to have recalled it when she
became a famous man, only for the fact that, his captain
being sent off somewhere on a special mission, the young
lieutenant was for a time in actual command of his com-
pany —and felt correspondingly elated, of course. He
also mentions that he led his men in a fiery charge across a
piece of ground that had already been charged over and cap-
tured by the Americans, so that, he says, he had come to the
conclusion that, so far as he was concerned, the Battle of
Resaca de la Palma would have been won just:as it was,
even if he had not been there.

But this, I imagine, was what you boys call “only fun-
ning,’ as it was just the modesty of the man —for General
Grant was never a man to put himself forward or brag
about what he had done. It is certain that, through those
two years of war, he made quite a record for himself as a
brave and valiant young soldier; his namé was mentioned
in reports and despatches; he was promoted several times
and he did a great deal of hard work as the quartermaster
and adjutant of his regiment. The quartermaster, you know, |
is the officer whose duty it is to look after the food and
comfort of the men of his regiment; the adjutant is the
colonel’s chief helper. So you see both these positions are
busy and responsible parts.

The quartermaster need not go into battle if he does not
wish to. His chief duty is in and about the ‘camp. But
HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 59

Lieutenant Grant was never one to shirk. He felt that his
duty was in the field quite as much as in the camp and he

was always ready to take his part in battle and on bivouac.
So, as I have told you, he made a record for bravery and






| ; I fe
=

il

|
3 tne) A es

GRANT RIDES FOR AMMUNITION AT MONTEREY.

daring that would have been remembered even if his future
had not been so great and glorious.

It was Lieutenant Grant who, when the fight was raging
hotly in the streets of Monterey, volunteered to ride back to
General Taylor’s headquarters and order up fresh ammu-
nition for the American soldiers who were holding the town.
He did so. Flinging himself, Indian fashion, or rather in
60 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

circus style, upon his horse, with one heel in the cantle of
his saddle and one hand grasping the horse’s mane, the
' young lieutenant rushed his horse toward the gate of the
town, and swinging against the horse’s side, rode the gaunt-
let of fire and shot that blazed out from house-top and street
corner, helping some wounded men on the way, leaping a
four-foot wall so as to gain a short cut, and kept on until
he gained the general’s tent with his message. Yet all he
finds to say in his “ Memoirs” of that daring gallop was, “my 3
ride was an exposed one.”

It was Lieutenant Grant who, when his regiment was
detached from General Taylor's command and joined to the
little army of General Scott, marched and fought under that
victorious leader from the sea-fortress of Vera Cruz to the
capital city of Mexico, never missing a battle and yet always
faithful to his duty as care-taker for his regiment.

He chased the flying Mexicans out of the bewildering
ditches of the farm of San Antonio; he was in the rush that
stormed and carried the church-fortress of Cherubusco; he
left his commissary-wagons to take part in the fierce fight at
Chepultepec, the “West Point” of Mexico, so gallantly de- |
fended by the Mexican cadets; he was one of the leaders of
the gallant band that burst into the long low stone building
of Molino del Rey —“ the king’s mill” —and won his pro-
motion to a first lieutenant’s commission, first by brevet for
bravery and, later, to full rank, by the death of his senior.

Then came the final attack on the capital and the cap-
HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 61

ture of the city of Mexico. In this struggle Lieutenant
Grant bore an active part; for it was largely due to his
good judgment and coolness that a speedy entrance into the
city was gained by the Americans.

It seems that while he was marching with one part of

General Scott's army to attack the northern entrance to the
+ 4





































































































































































































































































































5 ===SARGEUTSG==—





CHEPULTEPEC — THE “‘ WEST POINT” OF MEXICO.

city, called the San Cosme Gate, he thought he saw a way
by which he could get behind—or, as it is called, flank,
the Mexican soldiers who were drawn up to oppose the
Americans.

Leaving the ranks — by permission, of course — he
jumped behind a stone wall, and going cautiously, got to a
62 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

point where he could see just how the land lay and just how
the enemy was placed. Then he ran back again without
being seen, called for volunteers, and leading a dozen plucky
soldiers. who were ready to risk the danger, he and his
men trailed arms under cover of the wall and thus getting
behind the Mexicans drove them away from their battery
and the house-tops from which they were me at the
Americans.

Soon after this success, Lieutenant Grant, while looking
for another chance to get the best of the Mexicans came
upon a little church standing by itself back from the road.
This church, he noticed, stood not far from the city walls ;
its belfry, he believed, was just in line with the space behind
the city gate. “If I could only get a cannon into that bel-
fry,” he said, “I could send some shot in among the Mexican
soldiers behind the gate and scatter them.”

It was a bright idea. “TI’ll try it,” he said to himself.

No sooner said than done. Hurrying back to the
American ranks, Lieutenant Grant got hold of a small light
cannon, called a mountain howitzer, and some men who
knew how to work it. They dodged the enemy, cut across
a field and made a bee-line for the little church.

There were several wide and deep ditches in this field:
but the men took the howitzer apart, and each one carrying a
piece of it they waded the ditches until, at last, they reached
the church without being seen by the enemy. The priest who
was in charge of the church was not going to let the Ameri-
eres



GRANT SAID “ WE’RE COMING IN!” AND THEY DID.
HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 65

can soldiers come in, but young Grant told him, “I think
you will. We're coming in.” And they did.

Piece by piece the cannon was carried up into the belfry,
put together again, loaded and aimed directly at the Mexi-
cans who were guarding the San Cosme gate, less than a
thousand feet away.

Bang! went the howitzer Bang! bang! it went again.
You may well believe that those Mexicans were a surprised
lot, when the cannon balls began dropping down among
them. At first, they could not imagine where the shots
came from, and when they did they were so confused. that
instead of sending soldiers to surround and capture this
battery in a belfry, they simply made haste to get out
of the way of those orePeils cannon-balls as quickly as
possible. :

Of course, the Americans noticed this “ embattled church-
steeple,” too. ;

“That’s a bright. idea,” said General Worth, and he sent
a young lieutenant named Pemberton — who had something
special to do with General Grant later in life — to bring the
man with the bright idea before him.

So Lieutenant Grant reported what he had done to Gen-
eral Worth and the general told him to keep at it and take
another gun up into the steeple, too. But as there was only
room for one gun in that steeple, Grant could not use
another; even if he wished to. But, as he explained, years
after, he couldn’t tell General Worth that, because it wasn’t
66 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

proper for a young lieutenant to contradict the commanding

general when he said “ put two guns in the steeple.”

Well, it was a very bright idea—that battery in a steeple,

was it not? And, as it helped open the way for the capture

THE BATTERY IN THE STEEPLE,



of the Mexican capital, it
also brought to the young
lieutenant fame and promo-
tion.

He really did not care
very much about the first;
for, as you know, Ulysses
Grant was a quiet and mod-
est young fellow who did
not care a rap for show, and
was never one to push him-
self forward. But his good
work in that church steeple

‘had been “noticed by his

superior officers, and in three
different reports of the cap-
ture of Mexico, Lieutenant

Grant’s share received honorable mention.

This, in due time, brought him promotion — something
that everyone likes—boy or girl, scholar, clerk or soldier.
But things always went a bit slow with this slow-going
young man, and while he had plenty of work to do as com-
missary and adjutant of his regiment, the war did not push
HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 67

him rapidly on towards General Scott’s position — about
which, you remember, he had a presentiment or dream when
he was a West Point cadet. He went into the battle of
Palo Alto, which opened the war, a second lieutenant; six-
teen months later when he marched into the city of Mexico
as one of the victorious Americans, he was still a second
lieutenant, although he had been in almost every battle and
belonged to a regiment that lost many officers. Somehow,
success was always slow in coming, or missed altogether in
Grant’s early days. But this, you know, teaches a boy
patience, especially if a young fellow is determined, conscien-
tious and persistent. U.S. Grant was all of these, even as
a boy, you know; so delay schooled him and brought him
experience, cautiousness, firmness and that other quality
which some folks call stubbornness, but which we know
was, in his case, persistence.

Promotion did come however, soon after the American
soldiers were in possession of the city of Mexico. His gal-
antry in the church steeple and the way in which he always
did his duty were not forgotten, and when a vacancy was
made by the death of one of his superior officers, Grant went
up astep and was made first lieutenant of his regiment —
the Fourth U. S. Infantry.

There was not much more fighting after that, but the
American soldiers held possession of the city of Mexico sev-
eral months longer, remaining in the land until the treaty of
peace between Mexico and the United States was signed,
68 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

on the second of February, 1848. This is known as the
“Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo,” from the name of the place
where the treaty was drawn up. By it, the United States
obtained complete possession of Texas, New Mexico and
California. :

Lieutenant Grant had nothing to do with this treaty —



















































































































































































































































































































































































THE CATHEDRAL IN THE CITY OF MEXICu.

his day for being the central figure in great events and ina
greater treaty had not yet come — but he found plenty to
do as care-taker of his regiment. He was still quartermaster
and he had his hands full. It is no small thing to look after
the food and clothes of several hundred men, as the young
lieutenant had long since discovered.

This question of clothes was a serious one. The soldiers
HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 69

were getting ragged after their months of service. No
clothing was sent them by the government and something
had to be done. So cloth was purchased of the Mexican
merchants, and Mexican tailors were employed to make it
up into “Yankee uniforms.” Lieutenant Grant had to see
to getting these new suits for all the men of his regiment,
and as there were always more soldiers needing clothes than
there were clothes ready for the soldiers, you can see that he
was kept pretty busy “tailoring.”

Then the money gave out which was needed for the pay-
ment of the military band. Now music is almost as neces-
sary for keeping up the spirits and discipline of the soldiers
as food and clothing. The musicians in the United States
army at the time of the Mexican war, were paid but a little
by the government; the rest of their pay came from a sort
of soldiers’ savings bank known as the regimental fund.
This fund had got pretty low down; it needed to be in-
creased if the soldiers were to have good music, so Grant set
himself to thinking things over.

As a result he went to work bread-making.

You see a hundred pounds of flour will make one hun-
dred and forty pounds of bread. Grant was allowed to draw
flour for his men and this left quite an amount on his hands
—forty pounds out of every one hundred and forty. He
rented a bakery, hired Mexican bakers, bought fuel and
other bake-shop needs and ran a bread-bakery to supply the
army with bread. He did this so well that, out of the
90 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

profits of that extra forty pounds in every one hundred and
forty, he paid the musicians of the Fourth Infantry and
increased the slender regimental fund— which meant com-
forts and even luxuries for his soldiers.

All this of course kept him pretty busy. But he found
time to climb up the volcano of Popocatapetl, that is “the
smoking mountain.”

You can find this in your geography, on the map of
Mexico. It is a great volcano, you know, nearly eighteen
thousand feet high, and the party of climbers were almost
lost in a dreadful storm of wind and snow that came down
on them. One of that party of volcano-climbers was to
bring fame to Grant later in life— Captain Buckner, who in
the Civil War commanded Fort Donelson and brought from
Grant the famous words “ unconditional surrender.” Later
- still, Buckner was one of the pall-bearers at the funeral of
the great soldier whom he helped to fame and who was his

companion in that fearful climb up the smoking mountain.

: So the time passed pleasantly enough in Mexico with
this young lieutenant, because he was kept busy. To do
nothing, you know, is the hardest kind of work, and U.S.
Grant was never a do-nothing.

He looked after all his regimental duties, and aioved
his spare time in “ poking about” seeing sights. Twice on
these sight-seeing trips he was made prisoner by the Mexi-
cans, but was allowed to go free because there was then no
fighting — or what is called a truce between the two republics.
HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER. 71

‘Besides climbing Popocatapetl, he explored tombs and
ruins of the old Aztecs, the Mexicans whom Cortez the Span-
iard conquered, you remember, in the days after Columbus;
he visited the wonderful “ great caves” of Mexico, and went



BULL FIGHT IN MEXICO.

to see a bull fight. This, you know, is the favorite national
sport of Mexico, just as baseball and football are with us.
But Grant didn’t like it. He only went to one—and one -
y2 HOW THE LIEUTENANT MARCHED OVER THE BORDER.

was enough. It made him sick, he said. For Grant, I
must tell you, although the greatest of American soldiers,
could not bear the sight of blood, and hated anything like
brutality. Other great soldiers have been like him in this.
So the bull-fighting disgusted him, and he said he could not.
see how human beings could enjoy the sufferings of beasts
and often of men, as they seemed to do on these occasions.

But more than in sight-seeing, fighting and care-taking,
the Mexican war was for Ulysses S. Grant a splendid
school and a most helpful experience. In it, he learned to
be a soldier, to endure privation, to have patience, to know
men and, especially, to become acquainted with those who, a
few years after, were to play a prominent part upon a stage
on which he was to be chief actor.

Grant never failed to acknowledge the great advantage
that his experience in the Mexican war brought him. He
learned to know by name or in person almost all the officers
who rose to positions of leadership, on one side or the other,
in the great Civil War. He was an observing man, he
studied people and saw their good points and their weak ones
and he knew just what sort of men were his old comrades
of the Mexican war, when, in after years, he was either
associated with them as commander or opposed to them as
conqueror.

There is no better school, boys and girls, than the school
of experience; and in that school Ulysses S. Grant was an
apt, if a slow and often a worried pupil.
HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA. 293
#

CHAPTER IV.
HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA.

HE first thing that Lieutenant Grant did when he went
marching home from the war with Mexico was to get
a four months’ leave of absence, or vacation, hurry to St.
Louis and be married. This important date in his life —
his wedding day — was the twenty-second of August, 1848.
He married Julia Dent, the St. Louis girl of whom I
have already spoken, and a splendid wife she made him.

The wedding took place at the farmhouse, in which lived
the parents of Julia Dent. It was'ten miles below St. Louis
and was a big, roomy, hospitable old Southern mansion with
great rooms, ample fireplaces, broad verandas and pleasant
grounds, and as it stood then it stands to-day, only slightly
altered.

The young couple did not go to housekeeping in St.
Louis, nor could they make their home in the big and breezy
Dent mansion. Julia Dent was a “soldier's bride,” and a
soldier is never his own master. His home is “in barracks”
or “quarters” at whatever point or place he is ordered to
go. So his wife, too, had to live with him in barracks —
that is, you know, in the soldier’s quarters at some fort or
garrison, or military post.
74 HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA.

So, after the honeymoon had been spent in visiting the
Grant family or the Grant relatives in Ohio, the young
lieutenant and his wife, when his vacation days were over,
went back to duty. He joined his regiment, and his wife
went with him.

At the close of the Mexican war, Grant’s regiment — the
Fourth U. S. Infantry, you know — went into camp at Pas-
cagoula in Mississippi. There the lieutenant left it when
he went off to St. Louis to be married; but, before his four
months’ vacation was over, the Fourth U. S. Infantry was
ordered to the military post of Sackett’s Harbor on the
shores of Lake Ontario. Quite a change from the Gulf e
Mexico, was it not?

There, in the Madison Barracks at Sackett’s Harbor,
Lieutenant Grant and his wife began their married life. In
their rooms in the officers’ quarters they spent their first
Christmas.

In the spring of the next year, however, 1849, orders
came to move. The regiment was transferred to Detroit in
Michigan. In this beautiful northern city —not as attractive
then as it is to-day, I imagine—they lived for nearly two
years, when again came the order to move. |

This time, in the spring of 1851, they went back once
more to their first home, the Madison Barracks at Sackett’s
Harbor, following their regiment.,

You see, by this, that a soldier and his wife can never
hope to make their home long in one place. A small army,
HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA. 75

like that of the United States, is shuffled and shifted about
almost as much as you shuffle the cards when playing your
game of “ Authors.” Uncle Sam’s blue-coats of the regular
army never know how long they are going to “stay fixed.”

So it came about that, before the Fourth United States
Infantry had been in the Madison Barracks at Sackett’s Har-
bor a year, orders again came to the soldier to move.

This time it fairly took their breath away; the regiment
was ordered to Cal-
ifornia. That would
not sound so very

































































































































































































remarkable in these a SSeaS =





























































































































































days when we can
rush across the con-
tinent from the At-

lantic to the Pacific THE DANGEROUS TRIP “OVERLAND” IN “THE FIFTIES.”



in six days. But in 1851 very few people went. by land
across the continent. There were no railroads; people had
to ride in slow, lumbering wagons, or on horseback — or
walk! and the journey of three thousand miles took weeks
and months, that were slow, tiresome and dangerous. There
were mountains to climb, deserts to cross, rivers to wade,
Indians to face and-wild beasts to fight. Hunger and thirst,
heat and cold, rain and snow and all the discomforts of life
were a part of the daily experience of the traveller and the
emigrant. It was a terrible journey to go overland to the
Pacific in the days before the railroads. |
a

76 HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA.

So, people preferred going by water. This was not always
agreeable, either; but, you see, it was a case of the longest
way round being the shortest way home. Travellers to Cali-
fornia went by steamboat from New York to Aspinwall on
the Isthmus of Panama; then they crossed the Isthmus by
boat and mule, went on board another steamer at Panama
and sailed up the Pacific to San Francisco. It was a long,



TARGET PRACTICE IN U. S. A. BARRACKS,

hard, tedious and often dangerous journey; but it was not
nearly so difficult nor dangerous as the way overland.

But when the orders to go to California came to the sol-
diers at Sackett’s Harbor, Lieutenant Grant decided that he
would not take his young wife on such a,long, hard and
uncertain journey. He did not intend to live in California,
and who could tell how long the regiment would be quar-
tered there? Orders might come sending him somewhere
HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA. 77

else, even before he and his wife had really “got settled,”
and the long journey would be all for nothing. |

So he arranged to have his wife visit his people in Ohio
and her people in St. Louis, promising that when he had been
in California long enough to see how he liked it, he would
arrange either to send for her or get leave of absence and
come east for her.

So it was arranged; the good-byes were said; and on the
fifth of July, 1851, the Fourth Infantry, with such of the
soldiers’ wives and children as could not or would not stay
behind, sailed out of the harbor of New York and steamed
southward for their first port on the Isthmus of Panama.
In eight days they sailed into the harbor of Aspinwall on
the Atlantic side of the Isthmus and prepared to go ashore.

July on the Isthmus of Panama is wet, hot and sickly.
The passengers from the north felt the changes from drench-
ing rain to burning sun and suffered from them greatly.
They were very anxious to be on their way north again toa
healthier climate.

But the Isthmus had to be crossed. It looks small and
narrow enough on the map, does it not? In one part it is
only thirty miles from ocean ‘to ocean. But it is altogether
too wide if one feels sick and has no way to get across except
to ride horseback or walk.

To-day, a railroad, forty-eight miles long, runs across the
Isthmus from Aspinwall on the Atlantic to Panama on the
Pacific. But, when Lieutenant Grant and his infantrymen
78 HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA,

crossed the Isthmus in 1851, this railroad had but just been
commenced and only ran a few miles, to the banks of the.
Chagres river. This is the stream, you know, which engi-
neers for more than three hundred years have been trying
to turn into a ship canal that should join the Atlantic and
the Pacific—the famous ditch known as the Panama canal.
When Lieutenant Grant and his seven hundred compan-
ions of the Fourth Infantry started to cross the Isthmus they
had a fearful time.
Grant was quarter-
master or “care-taker”
of his regiment, you
know, and had to look
out for the comfort
and transportation of
the men. This Isth-
mus journey put his
ability to the test.
First, he saw them all on board the cars for the thirty
mile ride by railway. When the road ended, at the Chagres
river, they “changed for Gorgona” and went on board cer-
tain flat-bottomed boats that would carry between thirty and
forty passengers apiece. These boats were poled along the



THE MARCH ACROSS THE ISTHMUS.

river, against the current — six polemen to a boat—at the
rapid rate of a mile an hour!

In this way, they pushed on to a place called Gor-
gona where they had to get out again for a ride on mule-
HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA, . 79

back to Panama on the Pacific, some twenty-five miles
distant.

Did you ever hear of a harder fifty-mile trip? To-day,
in the comfortable cars of the Panama railroad, you can
make the trip across the Isthmus in three hours. It took
Lieutenant Grant and his company nearly two weeks to do
that fifty miles. I will tell you why. -

The United States government had arranged with the
steamship cempany for the connected and comfortable trans-
portation of the Fourth Infantry and its baggage from
New York to San Francisco, including the trip across the
Isthmus.

The officers and soldiers, with the families of a few of
the latter, made up a company of seven hundred people.
But, in 1851, crowds of adventurers were going to California -
to dig for gold. So the seven hundred, instead of having
comfortable quarters, were crowded upon a steamer already
fully occupied. And when Aspinwall was reached everyone
was in a hurry to get across the Isthmus to Panama and
the Pacific. The passengers on the steamer had first chance
and the soldiers simply had to wait for “ second turn.”

A part of the regiment did, after a few days’ delay, get
across to Panama; but Grant, as regimental quartermaster,
was left at a place called Cruces on the banks of the sickly
Chagres river with all the baggage and camp equipage, one -
company of soldiers and those men of the regiment who
had brought their wives and children with them.
80 HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA,

There at Cruces they waited. The transportation prom-
ised by the steamship company did not come; a man with
whom a new contract had been made by the agents of the
steamship company kept promising mules and horses, but:
after a day or two Grant discovered that this man had been
supplying them to passengers who could pay higher than the
contract price, and the young quartermaster found out that
if he were ever to get his people and baggage to Panama, he
would have to: find the means himself.

Then came the climax. The dreadful cholera — that

plague of hot countries —broke out in the camp. Lieutenant
Grant had sickness and death to struggle with, in addition to
his other worries. For cholera in July, in the Isthmus of
Panama, with sultry, rainy weather and insufficient shelter
for the sick, means death.
- Did you ever read Dickens’s story of “ Martin Chuzzle-
wit?” Do you remember Mark Tapley who always “ came
out strong” when things were at their worst ? There was a
good deal of this spirit in the quartermaster of the Fourth
U. S. Infantry.

With a company of plague-stricken men and women to
care for, with no means of removing them to a place of
safety, with insufficient accommodation for either the sick or
the well, with disappointment as to unkept promises delaying
and worrying him, with half-hostile Indians all about his
camp, and with food growing scarce and distress staring
him in the face, Quartermaster Grant had certainly a hard
HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA. 81

4

problem to solve. But he coolly looked at all the chances,
set his teeth togethéf, and made-up his mind to work the
thing out himself.

He sent his last company of soldiers and the doctors on,
by foot, to Panama. Then he took entire charge of the
cholera camp and, for over a week, he fought the plague des-
perately and un- |
flinchingly. He
cared for the sick,
buried the dead,
kept one eye on
the half-hostile
Indians, tried in
every way to
arrange for some



kind of transpor-

HE CARED FOR THE SICK AND FOUGHT THE PLAGUE.

tation to Pana-
ma, and kept things going as briskly and as cheerfully
as he could, stubbornly resolved not to give in. He was
busy all the time.’ For a week he did not take off his clothes
and scarcely allowed himself any rest — working, nursing,
striving, in the midst of the plague that brought weakness
and death from the forest and the swamp.

Of one hundred and fifty men, women and children in
that cholera-stricken camp on the Chagres river, fully one
third died before that week of terror came to an end. But
Grant never gave up.
82 HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA.

Finding that the agents and promises of the steamship
.company were not to be relied upon, and that if his sick and
his baggage were ever to get to the Pacific he must get
them there himself, he took all the responsibility and set to
work on his own hook. He hired mules and litters at twice
the price offered by the steamship company, engaged Indians
to bury the dead and pack on the mules the camp belong-
ings, and at last took up his march to the Pacific, bringing
everything with him, excepting alas! the victims whom the
cholera had claimed as its own in that plague-spot in the
Panama forests.

I have lingered over this brief happening in the life of
U.S. Grant because it has always seemed to me a key to
his character; it prepares us to see in this quiet, determined,
self-reliant young quartermaster, sending all his available
help away and grimly remaining to fight the plague and
care for the people and property under his charge, the pre-
face to that soldier and ruler of later years, whom the poet
Lowell described as,

“ One of those still, plain men that do the world’s rough work.”

There is no doubt, is there, about that work in the
Panama cholera-camp being rough indeed ?

Early in September the Fourth Infantry sailed through
the Golden Gate and entered upon its garrison life in
California.

Those were exciting days in the great Western state.
It was only a territory then —a vast track of land, stretch-


THE PLAGUE CAMP AT PANAMA,

GRANT IN
“ He took all the responsib

work on his own hook.”

and set to

lity



HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA. 85

ing along the Pacific and recently acquired from Mexico.
But it was fast filling up. The word had gone abroad that
gold was to be had just for the digging or the washing in
the land and streams of California. People from all parts
of the world, in a hurry to get rich, rushed to California to
become gold-miners. ,

There were all sorts and conditions of men among them,
and while most of them did not get rich, they did make
things lively for a while on that far Pacific coast. For men
who failed to find gold had to find work or starve. They
had to do something. It was “hard lines” for many a
stout-hearted young fellow, and that mining life in Cali-
fornia was full of temptation, danger, risk and struggle.
But these are the things which, bravely faced, help to make
men. Only the plucky and strong ones did win the fight;
but their labors and exertions, their defeats and successes
helped to | build mighty states in that far western land and
to lay the foundations upon which the republic rose to
greatness.

It was in such a school as this that U. S. Grant learned
anew the lessons of foresight, determination and watchful-
ness that guided him so well in later times of need. Those
were days, he himself tells us, “ that brought out character,”
and, in his case, each new experience strengthened a charac-
ter that was to mean great things for his native land.

He lived in barracks with his regiment—at Benicia,
not far from San Francisco; at Fort Vancouver on the
86 HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA,

Columbia river, in the southern part of what is now the
state of Washington; and at Humboldt Bay, near to
the town of. Eureka, in northern California. ie
He found a soldier’s. life in times of peace, even in that
new and unsettled land of gold, lazy, unprofitable and
unpromising. He never really did like a soldier's life, you
know. “I never liked service in the army— not as a young .
officer,’ he said, years
after ; he always declared
that he was more a farm-
er than a fighter. So,
when he came to look
carefully at his chances he
could not see any future
or prosperity for him if
he remained in the army.



And yet, as you all know,
it was the army that was

COLD WEATHER SENTRY DUTY, IN BARRACKS.

: to make him great!

But, as he thought it all over, there in California, he
longed to see the wife and children he had left in “the
states,” as folks then called the East; he knew that his pay
as a soldier was too small to support a family, and he dared
not take the risk of bringing them so far from home. So
he concluded to resign, leave the army. and go into some
good business in which he could hope to make money and
win success. |
A HARD ROAD TO TRAVEL.
the mountains.in gold-mining days in California.


eS

atehe




HOW HE FOUGHT THE PLAGUE AT PANAMA. 89

He liked California, and, for many years after he left it,
he hoped some day to go back and make that splendid state
his home. But he felt that he must first get a good start in
life; so, in March, 1854, he resigned from the army and
went home again. |

Ever since the day when, in the belfry of the Mexican
church, he had bombarded the city of Mexico with his bat-
tery of one gun, he had been a captain by brevet, but not in
rank or pay. In July, 1853, the death of an officer left a
vacant place, and as the other officers moved up towards the
head the lieutenant became a captain. So, when he resigned
from the army and went home, he was Captain Grant. You
see how slowly things went in times of peace. He had to
wait six years for the promised promotion to captain.

For eleven years had U.S. Grant been a soldier of the
republic. Slow in speech and action, except when action
was absolutely necessary, more brave.than brilliant, and a
worker rather than a “show” soldier,-he was always to be
depended upon if anything needed to be done. He never
shirked his duty because it was not a pleasant one, and if he
saw that a thing must be done he stuck to it until it was
done. ;

The same strategy that, as a boy, he displayed in lifting
and loading the great stone in Georgetown, he exhibited as
a lieutenant in the church tower in Mexico; the same pluck
and grit that helped the boy drive home the balky horse he
had purchased, served the man in his daring ride for ammu-
90 HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE.”

nition through the streets of Monterey and in the grim grap-
ple with the plague in the forests of Panama. These, and
such experiences as these, were the foundation of that stern,
silent, determined, unyielding effort that made this quiet
soldier the great captain — the future hero and victor in the
' republic’s desperate struggle for life.



CHAPTER V.

HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE.”

O Ulysses gave up fighting for farming. It was not
altogether a successful exchange, so far as results
went. Captain Grant had never been able to save much
out of his pay as a soldier—never very large; and eleven
years of soldiering are not a very good preparation for farm-
ing. He would have to get his living out of the ground
now, and he knew that, like Adam the first farmer, “in the
_ sweat of his face he must eat bread.”

That means hard work, of course; and hard work indeed
our ex-soldier found it to make both ends meet. He was
never afraid of hard work either as boy or man, and what he
set his hand to do, he did “with his might,” as the Bible
HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE.” 91

says. But even the hardest worker does not always make a
success of things, and this was to be the experience of the
soldier from the Pacific.

When he landed in New York, on his homeward trip
from San Francisco by the way of Panama, he had little or
no money, and a man whom he had once helped and upon
whom he depended for a return not only refused to pay him
but ran off altogether. So the poor captain had to write to
his father in Ohio for help to get home.

His people were of course delighted to see him again;
but when, at last, late in the summer of 1854, he was once
more with his wife and children at St. Louis, he found that
he must face the world sturdily if he were'to get his own
living and that, at thirty-two, he had actually to begin life
over again; “a new struggle for our support,” he calls it,
and a struggle indeed it was.

Mrs. Grant’s father had given her part of his Whitehaven
acres asa farm. On this, Captain Grant decided to build a
house and go to farming.

He had no house to live in and no money with which to
stock the farm; but he set about building the house and
hoped to raise enough on his farm to gradually pay for live-
stock and farm-tools.

He did most of the house-building himself. All he could
do was to put up a log cabin, and he carted the stones for
the cellar, hauled the logs for the walls and split the shingles
for the roof. He had a few negroes to help him, but he was
92 HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE”

his own mason and carpenter, except when it came to the
“raising,” and at this the neighbors helped.
It was not very much of a house, I imagine; but then
nobody expects all the conveniences in a log cabin and,
humble as it was, his home-made log house was home — and



4
“CAPTAIN GRANT FOUND OUT WHAT WORK REALLY WAS.”

you know, as John Howard Payne's beautiful song tells us,
“ Be it ever so humble, there’s no place like home.”

But long before he and his family were settled in their
log-built home, Captain Grant had found out what work
really was. He had learned how hard it was to squeeze a
living out of the ground. He discovered that raising pota-
HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE.” 93

toes and corn and wheat and cutting cord-wood on a sixty-
acre farm always meant hard work, but does not always
mean money enough to live on as one would like.

As I told you, however, in my story of how Grant fought
the plague at Panama, he had a good deal of the Mark Tap-
ley spirit about him, and so, even while he saw what a hard
row he had to hoe on his little farm, he saw the funny side
of it too, and named his little place “ Hardscrabble,” because,
he said, he was certain to find life there “a hard scrabble.”

His sixty acres, as I have said, were good ground for corn
and wheat and potatoes, and in its forest land he could cut a
good many cords of wood. The log house at “ Hardscrabble”’
was set on a rise of ground and shaded by a grove of young
oaks. It was a pleasant spot, and Grant would have been
very happy there with his wife and children if he had not
been worried over money matters and often been sick with
the fever and ague. That will make anyone feel mean and
out-of-sorts, you know, and Grant had been a sufferer from
that hot and shivery complaint ever since he had been a boy
in Ohio.

There was one thing he always managed to have at
“ Hardscrabble” and that was good horses. To have had poor
ones would not have been like Grant; for he, you know,
was always a horse-lover. And, at “Hardscrabble,” he used
to declare that, with his pet team of a gray and a bay, he
could plough a deeper furrow and haul a heavier load of
wheat or cord-wood than any other farmer around.
94 HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE.”

For, you see, he was his own teamster. And when
times were especially hard and money was slow in coming,
he would load up his wood team and driving into town:
would peddle his fire-wood from door to door.

From this, you can be certain that there was about Cap-
tain Grant no such thing as false pride. He was ready to



GRANT AS A WOOD-PEDDLER.

do anything that was honest work, no matter how humble.
But not the most tempting opportunity could ever induce
him to do a dishonorable action. He hated meanness as he
did lying and swearing; and it is a splendid record for a
man who has gone through as much and had as many ups
and downs as he that, in all his eventful life, he never did a
mean action, never swore and never lied. Yet that is the

record of U. S. Grant.
He himself has said in no spirit of boasting — for Grant


WITH THE GRAY AND THE BAY.
eat
Feria
Pa




HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A“ HARD SCRABBLE.” 97

was never a boaster— but just to illustrate a point he was
making, “I am not aware of ever having used a profane
expletive in all my life.” He told his boys so, too, and his
eldest son declares that his father did not even use the sim-
plest kind of boyish “swear words.” When his father was
a young man, so this eldest son tells us, he did hear him say
once on a time “ thunder and lightning!” But he says that
is about the only strong expression his father ever did use,
and the fact that the soldier’s son remembered it shows how
unusual a thing it was.

His record for honesty and truthfulness is known to all
men and is dwelt upon by all persons who had anything to
do with him in business or pleasure.

“O, Sam Grant said it, did he?” they would say at
West Point. “Well, that settles it. If he said so, it’s so.”

And meanness, which is very close to ungentlemanliness,
is also pretty near to coarseness in talk or act. Not one of
these found place in the character of U. S. Grant. He
never said anything that approached coarseness, his son
tells us. He never used vulgar words nor would he tell or
listen to bad stories. He would get up and leave the room
rather than hear them. And to do that, let me tell you,
takes real courage.

Do you wonder that, through all his life, men trusted him ©
and respected him, even when things went hardest with
him? Do you wonder that, when the son from whom I
‘have quoted grew to be a man, he said his father was his
7

98 HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE.”

ideal of all that is true and good? Do you wonder that he
says to his own boy that the best he can wish for him is to
be as good a man as his grandfather ?

“My father’s character,” he says, “was what I believe a

good Christian teacher would consider the ideal one. He
"was pure in thought and deed. He was careful of the feel-
ings of others —so much so, in fact, that when he had to
do anything to hurt them, I believe he felt more pained
than the people whom he hurt.”

This is an excellent reputation to have, is it not? And
in the case of Ulysses Grant it is one that all men acknowl-
edge’ as truly merited. It began with him even as a boy in
the Ohio tanyard; under the hard experience of life at Hard-
scrabble and the years that followed it was tested by adver-
sity and became at last the calm, self-controlled, fearless, yet
at the same time tender and sympathetic nature that won,
by unbending will and by equally determined clemency, in
the terrible warfare that closed at Appomattox.

There is no “fire of adversity,” as we call it, that is so
trying and tormenting as not being able to “get along.”
Failure is a terrible blow to a man’s good opinion of him-
self — indeed, it is so to a boy’s, too.

Captain Grant had a severe schooling in failure after he
left the army. Somehow, as we say, things did not seem to
go his way.

He could not make farmine pay; few men can, when
along comes sickness to take all the strength and ambition
HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A“ HARD SCRABBLE.” 99

out of them—as did the fever and ague with Captain Grant.
Hauling fire-wood ten miles to town and peddling it from
door to door at four dollars a cord will not put much money
in a man’s pocket, especially when he has a growing family
to support.

So, after three year’s trial at farming, when he saw that
he was running behind each year, when he found himself
weakened by continuous fever and ague, two thousand dol-
lars in debt to his father, and, though steadily industrious,
still as steadily unsuccessful, he came to the conclusion that
he was not cut out for a farmer and. must try his hand at
something else.

Although he called “ Hardscrabble” his home he had
not lived there all the time. Once he left the cabin to take
charge of the house of his brother-in-law on the Gravois
road. It was a neat Gothic cottage and was: called “ Wish-
ton-wish.’”—I wonder if that name was given it because of a
certain tale by a great American story-teller? Do you know
which one?

In 1856 the Grants moved into Whitehaven — the man-
sion belonging to Mrs. Grant’s father. Captain Grant was
to look after the place; but he still called “ Hardscrabble ” his
home, and when at last the fever and ague would not let
him continue as a farmer and he determined to make a
change, he was obliged to sell “Hardscrabble” and its
belongings so as to raise a little money.

Life had been a struggle there, certainly. But even up-
too HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A * HARD SCRABBLE.”

hill work may have its pleasures. Years after, walking over
the old place one day, General Grant pointed out some
stumps sticking up in the farmland and said, “I moistened
the ground around those stumps with many a drop of sweat.
But they were happy days, afterall,” he added.

When the persistent fever and ague had so weakened

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be





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nd

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ea mre



“ HARDSCRABBLE,” THE COTTAGE THAT GRANT BUILT FOR HIMSELF IN MISSOURI.

him that he felt obliged to change his way of life, his wife’s
family, the Dents, found an opening for him in the real
estate business in St. Louis. |

He formed a partnership with a real estate dealer, a man
who buys and sells houses and lands, you know, or lends
money to land-owners. This new firm was called Boggs &
a

HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “HARD SCRABBLE.” 101

Grant, and all the office they had was a desk in an old house
on Pine Street in St. Louis.

Captain Grant did the writing and figuring, but he was
not areal good hand at “drumming up” business. A suc
cessful real estate agent must be what some folks in these
busy days call a “hustler,” and U.-S. Grant was not cut out
for work that called for a fast and ready talker. You know
they called him, later on, “ the silent man.”

So he did not succeed as a real estate agent. The firm of
Boggs & Grant lasted only about a year. Then hard times
came on, money was not easy to get, there was not business
enough for two in the Pine Street office and Captain Grant
gave it up.

Although he had failed as a real estate agent he came
out of the business with a spotless reputation. He might
not be a business success, but he was a success as a man.

“He was always a gentleman and everybody loved him,

he was so gentle and considerate to every one,” the wife of

his partner said of him. “But really we did not see what
he could do in the world.”

That is the way too many people look at what they call
failure, isn’t it? But failure is not always not being able to
do a thing in our way, you know. This lady lived to learn
what Grant could do when his great opportunity came.

“Grant did not seem to be just calculated for business,”
says one man who. knew him in those hard days, “But a
more honest, generous man never lived. I don’t believe he
102 HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A “ HARD SCRABBLE.”

knew what dishonor was.” That is even a finer record to
have than to be set down as a “booming real estate specu-
lator,” is it not? :

After Captain Grant gave up the real estate business, he
tried hard to get the appointment as County Engineer. This
is the man who looks after laying out roads and highways,
and sees that boundaries and buildings are right. He should
be a man who knows a good deal about mathematics and
surveying.

Captain Grant was just the man for such a position.
But, too often, one who is trying to get such a place must
have lots of friends to back him up, and he must have what
is known as political influence. This is not right, of course.
The best man should always get the place, and a man’s best
recommendation for a position should be that he knows how
to do the work. It is getting to be more this way in public
life now-a-days, but when Captain Grant was trying to get
the place as County Engineer, political influence was the
principal thing an applicant must have.

So he did not get the appointment. He did get a small
place in the Custom House at St. Louis; but the next
month the head man, or “ Collector,” died and the new Col-
lector put one of his own friends in Grant’s place.

Did not the poor captain have a hard time of it? It did
seem as if there really was nothing for him to do, anywhere.

Day after day he walked the streets of the city trying to
find work. Day after day he went home disappointed. He
HOW THE CAPTAIN FOUND LIFE A“ HARD SCRABBLE,” 103

had to move into humbler and cheaper quarters; he had to
borrow money to live on; he had no end of trouble, and at
last he made up his mind to give up trying to get a foothold
in a city where everything seemed to be against him, and go
back to his father and the leather business.

It was in the spring of the year 1860 that he came to this
conclusion. Of course, it was a hard thing to do. It is
never easy for a man of spirit to ask favors or to depend
upon others.

But Grant was never a man to sit down and do nothing.
He would never give up trying, and effort is half the battle.
That was one secret of his success, as it is of any boy or
man who will never admit defeat. Lack of success is one
thing; but loss of pluck is quite another; and this loss
Grant never admitted.

He did feel pretty blue over things, though. He had
made a brave fight against ill-fortune, and the battle seemed
going against him because the opportunities, the strife and
the surroundings in Missouri seemed more than he could
master. In all that big Western city oe seemed to be no
place for poor Captain Grant.

But to-day, where two great streets cross each other, in
the busiest part of St. Louis, there stands a statue of the
man who, so the world said, was a failure in St. Louis; and
the great city in which he could not make a living honors
and reveres him to-day not only as a great American, but as
one of the great citizens of St. Louis.
104 HOW HE HEARD. THE CALL TO DUTY.

But he could have no idea of that: in 1860, when there
~seemed no possible way for him to get along there.

“T can’t make a go of it here,” he said; “I must leave.”

His wife was ready to share his fortunes, be they good or
bad, and she agreed that his plan was the wisest. So, early
in 1860, Captain U. S. Grant, with his affairs at their worst
and his fortunes at their lowest, turned his back on the part
of the world where he had found life a very “ hard scrabble”
indeed, and moved his family to Galena in the State of.
Illinois.

For, in Galena, his two younger brothers were in the
leather business and Jesse Grant, his father, had arranged
with them to give Ulysses a chance to do something as
clerk in their leather store.

Wa”
CHAPTER VI.

HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY.

Cre GRANT'S father was “well off,” as riches
were reckoned in those days, and was perfectly able to

help his eldest son out of his difficulties.
But Jesse Grant had always been proud of this boy of
his and it hurt his pride to have Ulysses so unsuccessful in

#
$

HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY. 105

business. He was considerably disturbed when Ulysses
came to Covington to talk things over with him; but when
the father saw that he really must give the son another lift
over the hard places, he “ took hold of Ulysses’s affairs,” as
he said, and straightened them out by making a place for
the ex-soldier, ex-farmer, ex-real estate agent in the leather
store at Galena, of which he himself was chief owner.

Besides his tanneries in Ohio, Jesse Grant for several
years had a prosperous leather store in Covington, Ken-
tucky. He had also opened a large “leather and findings ” -
store in Galena, which he had put in charge of two of his
sons — both younger than Ulysses. The Galena store, in
1860, was one of the best buildings in that bluff-top town
on the Galena river, just back from the Mississippi, and in
it was carried on the largest leather and harness business
northwest: of Chicago.

It. was not into the tannery business, as is generally
stated, that U. S. Grant went when he moved to Galena.
Indeed, it is not really correct to call him a tanner. You
will remember that, when he was a boy, he did but little
work in his father’s tanyard, and his work at Galena was
really selling leather and harnesses in a fine large store.

His home was with one of his brothers in a modest,
two-story brick house away up on one of the terrace-like
bluffs on which Galena is built, to the north of the principal
street of the town, and in what was then considered a most
desirable neighborhood.
106 HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY.

Captain Grant was fond of his home, fond of his wife,
fond of his children and, of course, fond of his horses, two
of them being used in the leather business and cared for
and driven by the captain.

He was a quiet, retiring sort of citizen and neighbor —



GRAN1’S HOME IN GALENA, IN 1861.
(From a recent photograph.)

“a very commonplace man,” people said. He was never a
stern or strict father, but he was a loving and a just one.
He liked his boys to be boys — manly, honest, fearless, self-
reliant and true. His eldest boy, then about twelve years
HOW HE HEARD ,.THE CALL TO DUTY. 107

old, he taught to swim simply by tossing him into deep
water where he just had to swim ashore. But the watchful
father was close at hand to help and direct the boy.

. His removal to Galena and business connection there was
an excellent change for Captain Grant. For, although only
a clerk on a six-hundred dollar salary in his brother’s store,
he was really given a position in a good business in which,
by his father’s direction, he would, in time, become a part-
ner. This he hoped would come around in a year or so.
But when that « ee or so” was over, he, as he tells us in
his “ Memoirs,” “was engaged ,in an employment which
required all my attention elsewhere.” And, indeed, it did.

Captain Grant lived for eleven months in Galena— from
May, 1860 to April, 1861. He was a quiet, square-shoul-
dered, spare-built man of thirty-eight, stooping slightly,
because of farm-work and fever and ague. He walked to
and from the leather store, or drove the horses about in the
business wagon. He was salesman, bill-clerk and collector
for the leather store. He was a great “home-body.” He
visited but a few neighbors, and was, even after ten months’
residence, as he says, almost a comparative stranger in Galena.
No one paid very much attention to him or expected that he
would ever amount to much, except as the success of his
father and brothers in business might push him into a fairly
comfortable living.

Suddenly, to the quiet, unobtrusive, ordinary-appearing
man came the call to duty that proved his call indeed.
108 HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY.

Political troubles ended in actual conflict. Americans were
in arms against Americans. Fort Sumter was fired upon.
The president of the United States called for volunteers
to defend the Union. There was war in the land.

Ulysses S. Grant was no politician. He had neither the
wish nor the will to be one. But he had thought a great
deal about the questions that were putting the Union in
peril. Being a soldier by education and experience, he knew
well what war meant, and he hoped very much that so terri-
ble a thing would not be forced upon his native land.

He talked this way; he voted this way; he helped, as
far as his voice and vote could help, to put off the day that
would divide the people of the United States and set the
North against the South. Many other good and true men
did so, too; but the dreadful day could not be put off. It
had to come. It was what was called the “Inevitable Con-
flict” — that is, the trouble that can not be put off.

When it did come, in the firing upon Fort Sumter by
the Southern batteries encircling that little fortress-covered
island in Charleston harbor, it aroused to action the very
men who had tried hardest to keep it off. “The Union,”
they said, “must be preserved. The flag shall be defended.”

How well I remember, as a boy, the coming of the tid-
ings of that terrible twelfth of April, 1861. How excited
was every one. How people talked and talked,when Presi-
dent Lincoln said, “ I must have seventy-five thousand men
to help me put down this rebellion.” And how they did

*
HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY. 109

things! For the soldiers sprang to arms at once and the
whole broad land became one mighty camp.

There were mass meetings held all over the northern
country; business almost stopped; schools could hardly
“keep ;” men who had thought and voted differently now
clasped hands forthe Union
and from the enthusiastic
mass meetings went men
pledged to march “on to
to obey the
call of the president, to de-
fend the National Capital
and uphold the nation’s

”

Washington

honor.

Just such a meeting as
this was held in the court
house in Galena, where
Grant lived. It roused the
citizens to enthusiasm and



when, two days later, an-

A “NEW RECRUIT,” IN 1861.

other meeting was held to |
encourage enlistments, the country court house was crowded.
Some one must preside. This was to be a military meet-
ing, not a talking one, and some one suggested Captain U.
S. Grant for chairman.
Not a’hundred people in Galeria knew who this Captain
Grant was, and when a medium-sized, stoop-necked, serious
110 HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY.

looking man in a blue army overcoat rose in his place, the
crowded court room looked at him curiously. 7

He did not know just what to do. It ne a new
position for him.

“Get up on the platform! go up; go up, Cap'n!” men
shouted. But the captain did not like such prominence.
He simply smiled,
shook his head and
leaning both hands
on a desk looked
over the throng.

eWith much
embarrassment and
some prompting,”
he says in his “ Me-
moirs,”’ “ I made out



THE COURT HOUSE AT GALENA. to announce the ob-
Where Grant made his first speech. ; ‘
ject of the meeting.”

“Fellow Citizens,” he said, “ This meeting is called to
organize a company of volunteers to serve the State of IIli-
nois” (in defence of the Union, he meant, of course). “ Be-
fore calling upon you to become volunteers I wish to state
just what will be required of you. First of all, unquestion-

ing obedience to your superior officers. The army is not a
picnicing party, nor is it an excursion. You will have hard
fare. You may be obliged to sleep on the ground after long
marches in the rain and snow. Many of the orders of your
HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY. IIl

superiors will seem to you unjust, and yet they must be
borne. If an injustice is really done you, however, there are
courts-martial where your wrongs can be investigated and
offenders punished. If you put your name down here it
shall be in full understanding what the act means. In con-
clusion, let me say, that, so far as I can, I will aid the com-
pany, and I intend to re-enlist in the service myself.”

That was Grant’s first speech. It was like him — plain,
honest, convincing and right to the point. It did not mean
fun for those who enlisted. It meant business. To men
who were as determined and as interested as himself it told
more than sounding words and bursts of eloquence. Asa
result, the Galena company of volunteers was speedily made
up. More than enough enlisted. Indeed, over an hundred
had to be rejected because the ranks were full.

At once, Grant was offered the captaincy of the com-
pany. But he had other plans. He knew that, in the
nation’s stress, men of experience would be needed to serve
as officers. “I can’t afford to re-enter service as a captain
of volunteers,” he said. “I have served nine years in the
regular army and I| am fitted to command a regiment.”

So he declined to take the post of captain of the com-
pany he had helped to raise, although he promised to do
everything in his power to help them get into service.

This may seem to you, at first, as not just the modest
way that Grant usually acted; but it was really wise and
just. Do you remember, in the story of George Washing:
112 HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY.

ton’s life, the trouble that he had because he would not take
a place offered him as captain in the American militia when
he knew he ought to be colonel? His reasons for this action
were honorable and right, and Captain Grant’s were the
same. He knew that the United States had educated him
and that, to his country, his best service was due; this ser-
vice called him really to higher duties than that of a cap-
tainofacompany. Regiments would be formed that needed
reliable heads; and even patriotism doesn’t always know
how to lead armies to victory. So he waited; but, while he
waited, he gave all his time to working for the Union,
drilling the new recruits, telling the leaders what to do; he
even helped the ladies get up the proper kind of uniforms
for the volunteers. After that meeting at which he spoke
he never, so he tells us, went into the leather store again
to put up a package or do any other business.

Determined to serve, but equally determined to accept
service only as he felt it to be his duty —in a position
suited to his experience and rank — he followed the Galena
company to Springfield, the capital of Illinois and the home
of Abraham Lincoln. Here, in the midst of all the war
fever and excitement, Captain Grant sought, for days, to get
his ‘just deserts. But he was too modest to insist upon
what he knew to be his rights and at last became discour-
aged and declared that he should try somewhere else. The
politicians and fancy soldiers were too much for him and
his chance for service was but small.
HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY. 113

“ I came down here,” he said to a friend, “ because I felt it
my duty. The government educated me.and I felt I ought
to offer my services again. I have applied, to no result. I
can't afford to stay here longer and I’m going home.”

He did accept a post in the adjutant-general’s office— that
is the place in which most of the army business is trans-
acted; but he felt it to be little more than “a clerk’s job.”

“ Any boy could do this,” he said. “I’m going home.” -

Do you remember how nearly Spain lost the glory and
honor of placing Columbus on his feet, when he wished to
make that wonderful voyage to the West? You have read
of it in the story of Columbus, of course. In the same way,
the State of Illinois came very near to losing the honor and
glory of Grant's services. As Columbus thought of offering
his services to France because Spain rejected him, so Grant
was on the point of offering his services to Ohio because
Illinois refused them.

In fact, a commission as colonel of the Twelfth Ohio
regiment was already on its way to him—though he did
not know it— when there came a telegram from the gov-
ernor of Illinois asking if he would accept the command of .
the Twenty-first Illinois regiment. Before the Ohio ‘offer
reached him, Grant had already telegraphed his acceptance.

The Twenty-first Illinois had rather a hard name. Its
colonel and its men did not get along well, and so many
complaints against the regiment reached the governor that

changed its colonel. So U.S. Grant became Colonel Grant.
114 HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY.

The Twenty-first Illinois was awaiting orders for service
at Camp Yates, just outside of Springfield, and here Grant
went to take command. ; .

“Colonel,” said Congressman Logan who accompanied
him to the camp, “ this regiment of yours is said to be a lit-
tle unruly. Do you think you can manage them?”

“JT think I can,” the colonel answered; and from the way
he said it, Congressman Logan thought so, too.

Arrived at Camp Yates, he was introduced to his new
command by Congressman Logan, whom the county knew
later as general and senator. He was a brilliant, popular’
and inspiring orator, and opened his address with words
that stirred his soldier-audience to enthusiasm. The new
colonel was quietly in the rear, but now Logan led him for-
ward and, as a fitting close to his thrilling speech said,
“Tllinoisans! allow me now to present to you -your new

colonel, U. S. Grant.”
Of course the soldiers cheered. It was a great day for

them. They had got rid of one objectionable colonel and
had now been given another who did not look particularly
stern or masterful. No doubt they thought they could do
about as they pleased with Colonel Grant. :

“ Speech! speech!” they demanded.

Everybody made speeches to the soldiers in those days
— speeches full of patriotism, love for the flag, loyalty to the
Union and all that. Of course the soldiers expected just
such a speech from Colonel Grant.
HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY. 115

He hesitated a moment. Then in a clear, calm, every-
day voice, that all could hear and all could understand, he
said : !

“Men! go to your quarters.”

That was all his speech. There was not much to it, was

”



“MEN! GO TO YOUR QUARTERS,” SAID COLONEL GRANT.

there? But it gave his soldiers an altogether new idea of
their colonel.

They speedily discovered that their new idea meant
“business.” That very night at dress parade, the colonel
said to his officers. “A soldier’s first duty is to obey his
commander. I shall expect my orders sto be obeyed as
exactly and instantly as if we were on the field of battle.”
116 HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY.

They were so obeyed, for both officers and men saw at
once, that, as one of the sergeants said, “ he’s the colonel of
this regiment.”

From an unruly, careless and disobedient set of men,
the Twenty-first Illinois developed into an orderly, well-
drilled soldierly regiment.

In all this their colonel was quiet, self-controlled, direct
and just. He always knew what he wanted and how to get
it. He was strict, but never ugly; firm, yet always friendly;
determined, yet never tyrannical. His superiors were de-
lighted with his orders and reports, which were short, clear
and right to the point. He attended to everything himself,
where attention was necessary, and as a result his command
was always well looked after and supplied. He trained his
men into soldiers and, therefore, they respected and obeyed
him.

“We knew we had a real soldier over us,” said one of
his lieutenants. “We knew, too, that we had the best com-
mander and the best regiment in the state.”

In less than a month after he had taken command of his
regiment, the Twenty-first Illinois was ordered into Mis-
souri, where General Frémont was in command and where

an invasion of the state by southern troops was daily
expected.

Grant thought this a fine opportunity to train his men
to long marching. So, instead of going across the state by
railroad, he marched his regiment across.
HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY, . 117

“T prefer to do my first marching in a friendly country
and not in the enemy’s country,” he said, and the result
proved the wisdom of his decision.

The knowledge of his able discipline and care of his men
became known, and before the Illinois river was reached his



“T PREFER TO DO MY FIRST MARCHING IN A FRIENDLY COUNTRY,” HE SAID.

command was ordered to a threatened point near the town
of Palmyra in Missouri.

It did not prove a field of battle, however, for the enemy
retired before Grant reached Palmyra. The colonel’s sensa-
tions however are worth recording, as he has put them
down. For, he tells us in his “ Memoirs,” that as he
118 HOW HE HEARD THE CALL TO DUTY,

approached Palmyra he was anxious, rather than fearless or
frightened. It was because of his responsibility as the
leader of men; not because of any lack.of.courage. He had
never before been in a position of command and, he says:
“If some one else had been colonel and I jhad been lieu-
tenant-colonel I do not think I would have felt any
trepidation.”

You see how slowly he developed into a real leader.
The best soldier is not always the boasting, reckless leader ;
he mingles caution with courage, and his anxiety is often
greater than his ambition.

But Colonel Grant’s men never knew his feelings. They
knew him to be a leader they could trust and follow, and he
handled them well. They marched cn to a village called
Florida; but the confederates had fled before them, and
finally Colonel Grant was ordered to join General Pope who
was stationed in the town of Mexico, in Missouri.

When he reached there he was given command of the
district, with three regiments and a section of artillery. He
found the men of his new command lacking in discipline
and the people complaining of their actions. Colonel Grant
changed all this at once. His own regiment was what 18
called an “object-lesson” in soldiering. He made soldiers
out of the men; he protected the people; he kept the dis-
trict over which he had been placed in command, orderly,
quiet and peaceful. | |

One day the news came to him that he had been made a
HOW HE HEARD THE CALL 10 DUTY. 11g

brigadier-general. This was a great surprise for him. But -
it shows that quiet, careful and determined work pays.

You see, the president had asked the Illinois Congress-
men to recommend a few good Illinois officers for promotion
to the post of brigadier-general. Colonel Grant scarcely
knew the Congressmen from his state, but they had heard
good reports of his ability and discipline and what he had .
done with the men over whom he was placed in command.

So, on the list of seven names proposed by them to the
president as brigadiers, the name of Ulysses S. Grant led all
the rest, and at once he was ordered to take command of an
important district in Missouri, with headquarters at the
town of Ironton.

The day of return for patient waiting had dawned for
him; and his readiness to respond to the call of duty and to
do his best in whatever position he was placed, but to say
what that position should be, had already found its result
in his call to go up higher, even before he had been tried in
the heat and fire of battle.
120 HOW THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI.

CHAPTER VII.
HOW THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI.

S brigadier-general, Grant was sent to take charge of a
4 large district covering all the country south of St.
Louis and all of southern Illinois. .

This was on the border-land between the North and the
South. It was full of rebels and half-rebels — and those
who were half-rebels were much harder to deal with than
the out-and-out rebels. It is always so, you know; an open
enemy is better than a secret foe.

General Grant made his headquarters at Cairo, at the.
extreme southern tip end of Illinois. One of the first things
he determined to do was to give the “half-rebels ” a lesson,
by seizing the city of Paducah on the Kentucky side of the
Ohio river, forty miles or so east of Cairo. ©

Kentucky had not yet joined the Confederacy, but was
trying to remain neutral, as it is called—that is, favoring
neither the one side nor the other.

This is not an easy thing to do when opposing armies
are marching from either side. As the Confederate troops
already occupied two towns in the state, General Grant
believed that the Union forces should have a good footing
there, also.

,
HOW THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI: 121

So he sailed down the river to Paducah with his soldiers
and occupied the town, and though the “neutrals” were
very indignant, the Union forces had secured a footing in
Kentucky.

By this time he had a well drilled army in camp at
Cairo. These soldiers had enlisted to fight and they were
tired of being idle. So was Grant; and, at last, taking
three thousand men with him, he started to break up a camp
of Confederates at a place called Belmont, on the Mississippi
river, twenty or thirty miles south of Cairo.

Directly opposite Belmont in the town of Columbus a
large Confederate force was stationed, and when Grant had
surprised the camp at Belmont these troops began coming
across the river to help their comrades.

A fierce fight followed. The Confederates were driven
into their camp, Grant had his horse shot under him, but he
kept his men moving, and at last the Confederates. turned
and hastily fled from their camp to the river.

It was a Union victory. It was Grant’s first battle in
the Civil War and the first that his soldiers had fought.
When the boys in blue found they had really won a battle
they were so overjoyed that, as the saying is, they com-
pletely lost their heads. They rushed about the captured
‘camps firing guns, making speeches and “carrying on” until
Grant, to bring them to their senses, set the camp on fire.

While this was going on, the Confederates on the river
bank had been reinforced by more troops from across the
122 HOW THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI.

river. They turned, spread out their lines and swooping

down on the Union troops fairly surrounded them.
At this, Grant's officers and soldiers were greatly alarmed.

They supposed, of course, that they were captured.

ry



GRANT AT BELMONT.
“We cut our way in; we've got to cut our way out.”

‘What shall we do?” they said to him. “We are
surrounded.”

“Well,” said Grant coolly, “We cut our way in, we've
got to cut our way out.”

And. they did. Under their general’s lead they pushed
down to the river conveying all their wounded men with
them and, under a heavy fire got on board the steamers and
were soon on their way back to Cairo, victors in their first
HOW THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI. 123

battle, though by a very narrow chance. But that chance,
you see, was because they had a cool-headed leader.

The battle of Belmont destroyed the rebel plans, broke
up their camp, saved the Union posts from attack and, above
all, so inspired the men engaged in the fight that, as Gen-
eral Grant himself declares, “ they acquired a confidence in
themselves that did not desert them through the war.”

The battle of Belmont was fought on November 7th,
1861. It was the first step toward breaking into the Con-
federate lines. At once, General Grant decided to make a
still greater step and clear the Confederates away from the
two forts they had built on the Tennessee and Cumberland
Rivers, in Stewart County, northern Tennessee, just where
the jog comes that you can find on your map of Tennessee.

If he could capture those two forts he could keep the
Confederates from the control of a fertile section of country
from which they drew their supplies. It was some time be-
fore he could get permission from his superior officers to
make the attack. They thought it too risky.

But when, at last, they told him he might try to take
Fort Henry, he did not waste a moment. With seventeen
thousand men, and seven gunboats to help him, he moved at
once on Fort Henry on the Tennessee. On the fifth of Feb-
ruary he was before it. But the officer in charge felt that he
could not resist an attack and, leaving but a small garrison, he
sent his other men, almost without a fight, across country to
Fort Donelson, eleven miles away. Then he surrendered
124 HOW THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI.

Fort Henry, and Grant, taking command, sent word to his
superior officer that he had captured Fort Henry and would
take Fort Donelson in,a very few days.

This almost took his commanding officer's breath away.
The authorities were not used to such quick work. Fort
Donelson was a large and strongly-built circle of earth-
works, perched a hundred feet above the Cumberland river
and protecting all that region. Its capture was considered
impossible.

So General Halleck, who was Grant’s superior, sent word
to him to “hold Fort Henry at all hazards,” and sent him
also pickaxes and shovels so that he could strengthen the
fortifications. But Grant had other plans, and as he was not
ordered wot to take Fort Donelson, he set out to do it.

He knew both the Confederate generals in command at
Fort Donelson. He had served with one of them in the
Mexican war; he knew all about the other, too, and he
felt certain that he knew what they would do—or would
not do.

So, at once, with fifteen thousand men, he marched
against Fort Donelson and confronted an army of twenty-one
thousand men, protected by strong fortifications.

With the gunboats on the river helping him, he set about
his work... At first, the gunboats made an attack from the
river; but the guns of the fort answered gallantly and the
vessels were crippled and driven back.

The Confederates were delighted at this victory, and next
HOW THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI. 125

day came pouring out of the fort and began a sharp attack
on the Union lines. But General Lew Wallace, who, years
after, wrote “Ben Hur,” held back the Confederate attack
on the right, and, as Grant came hurrying up, the enemy fell
back again to their fortifications.

At once he followed up their retreat by ordering his men
to charge the Confederate outworks. They did this gallantly.
They captured them; and that night the Union soldiers slept
within the outer works of Fort Donelson.

That very night the two commanding generals at Fort
Donelson, fearing for their lives if they were caught, stole
out of the fort by the back way and slipped off with about
‘three thousand men. Next day, General Buckner, whom
they left in command, saw that he could not hold Fort Don-
elson against attack without more help, and sent a note to
General Grant asking what terms he would give the Confed-
erates if they gave up the fort.

You remember General Buckner, do you not? He was
the officer who climbed the volcano of Popocatapetl with
Grant, when they were both young soldiers in Mexico. »

Grant knew him, too; but he sent back a note in reply
that-has become famous:

“No terms,’ it said, “ except uaceaditional and immediate
surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately
upon your works.”

That settled it. -General Buckner knew that Grant meant
just what he said and would keep his word; and, on the six.
126 HOW THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI.

teenth day of February, 1862, Fort Donelson with seventeen
thousand men surrendered to General Grant.

“General,” said Buckner to Grant, after the surrender,
“if I had been in command, you would not have got up to
Donelson as easily as you did.”

“ General,” said Grant to Buckner, “if you had been in
command, I should not have tried the way I did.”

Which shows, does it not, what an advantage it was for
Grant to have served in the Mexican war? He knew the
characters of the men he was marching against.

The whole North was delighted at the fall of Fort Don-
elson. “Who is this man Grant?” they began to ask, and
catching sight of his initialh—U. S.—they called him,
from his famous letter to Buckner, “ Unconditional Sur-
render Grant.’ :

As for him, he at once advocated another advance. He
had broken into the rebel lines at Belmont. He had cleared
the rivers by the capture of Forts Henry and Donelson.
Now he wished to go a step further and attack the Confed-
erate base of railroad communication at Corinth in north-
ern Mississippi.. If he succeeded in this, he would break
through their second line of defense.

His army was to be reinforced, and were to gather at
Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River, twenty-two miles
from Corinth. Here he was encamped when Albert Sidney
Johnston, the Confederate general and a gallant leader, deter.
mined, like Grant, not to wait to be attacked, but to attack.




GRANT AT SHILOH.
Bere Grant first felt himself destined for a real leadership.



HOW THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI. 129

So, on the sixth of April, with an army of forty thousand
men he fell upon Grant’s force of twenty-five thousand, strik-
ing it at Shiloh church three miles from Pittsburg Land-
ing. There a terrible battle was fought. It was as Grant
says “a case of southern dash against northern endurance.”

The battle lasted through two days and its story proves
the truth of Grant’s words. The first day’s fight was favor-
able to the Confederates. Again and again they threw
themselves upon the Union lines, which being made up in
many cases of new men—“raw recruits” — staggered,
broke and gave away. But they reformed again speedily, for
their leaders were such fine soldiers as Generals Sherman,
McClernand, Wallace and McCook. Through the entire
day, from eight o'clock until sunset the Union troops of
25,000 men held at bay the Confederate army of 40,000, well
generaled and determined to win.

Before night came General Buell with nearly 20,000 more
men. To him the situation looked desperate and he said
to Grant, “General, what preparation have you made for
retreating 2?” |

And Grant replied confidently, “Why, I haven’t given
up the hope of whipping them, yet.”

It was almost like the answer of the famous John Paul
Jones, the plucky sea captain in the American Revolution,
who, when called upon to surrender, shouted back, “I haven’ t
yet begun to fight.”

As Grant looked over the field at night, rain-soaked,
130 HOW THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISS/PP1.

blood-sprinkled, disadvantageous, with an enemy sleeping in
his captured tents, confident of victory, when all but he
expected defeat on the morrow, he studied over the situation
and said, “We shall win to-morrow. Begin the fight as
soon as you can see, and we shall report a victory.”



GRANT’S CHARGE AT SHILOH.
From an old war-time print.
j

It was as he said. The second day’s fight was favorable
from the start. All day the Confederates were driven back,
back, back, fighting for every inch of ground. At three in
the afternoon Grant himself led two regiments in a charge ;
the Confederates broke and ran and the battle of Shiloh

ended in a victory for the Union.
It was a victory only because of General Grant's tenacity
é
HOW THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI 131

—that is, his determination to stick to a thing until he had
succeeded — never to acknowledge defeat until he was actu-
ally whipped off the field. The victory, as Grant very
properly says, “was not to either party until the battle was
over.’ And when it was over the Union soldiers were the
victors. The leader of the Confederates, General Albert
Sidney Johnston, was killed; the rebels, though daring and
enthusiastic fighters, were worn out; “it is possible,” says
General Grant in his account of the battle, “that the south-
ern man started in with a little more dash than his northern
brother; but he was correspondingly less enduring.” Shiloh
was the victory of endurance and the Union soldiers learned
a lesson in this line from their determined and silent general.

So the second line of the Confederate defence was broken
and Grant pushed onward for a third move. This was
nothing less than to divide the Confederacy east and west
by starting at its main centre of communication, the city of
Vicksburg on the Mississippi. If that were captured the

Mississippi would be freed and the Confederacy cut off from
- 1ts western base.
It was not set about at once. It was over a year before

Grant accomplished his purpose. In spite of his successes
thus far in the war, jealousy, calumny and lack of appreci-
ation barred his way. Grant was of slow development, as
his story shows, but he had wonderful patience, wonderful
persistence and wonderful push—three p’s that help to
make a great commander.
132 HOW THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI.

Because of his victory at Fort Donelson he was made
major general of volunteers — and then he was set aside. for
another officer, only to be speedily reinstated in his command;
after Shiloh he was found fault with and almost arrested,
only to be given full command again, entrusted with a larger
territory and made general in command of the department
of the Tennessee. Step by step he worked toward his objec-
tive point. Battles were fought, advances made, territory
occupied, and, finally, with twenty-five thousand men under
his command and a clear field before him he moved.against
Vicksburg, called from its importance and its strength “ the
Gibraltar of the Mississippi.”

The Confederacy awoke to its danger and tried to stop
him. But it was of no use. Grant could not be stopped. -

His risk was great.- On one side, behind its entrench-
ments, garrisoning the town, was Pemberton’s army, fully as

large a force as his own; on the other side, marching toward
him with the hope to reinforce or relieve Vicksburg, was

Joseph E. Johnston’s army, many thousands strong. But
Grant never faltered. With Sherman and McPherson s his
trusted assistants, he swung round upon the advancing enemy
and, at the same time, kept a bold front toward the entrenched
foe. He swept around with a resistless rush. Pemberton
was driven back into the Vicksburg trenches; Johnston
was defeated in three desperate battles. Within twenty
days Grant, in five separate battles, beat two armies (who
united, might have destroyed him,) seized Jackson, the capi-


: MAJOR-GENERAL U. S. GRANT.
From an old-time war-print published after the fall of Vicksburg.
HOW THE GENERAL UNLOOSED THE MISSISSIPPI. 135

tal of Mississippi, took thousands of prisoners and captured
stores of artillery. Having thus separated the two armies
of his foemen beyond hope of union, he sat down before
Vicksburg to starve it into surrender.

This was on the nineteenth of May, 1863. The end



SPOT WHERE GRANT MET PEMBERTON TO ARRANGE FOR THE SURRENDER OF VICKSBURG.

came speedily. By the first of July the besiegers had
reached the outer works, and orders were issued for an
assault on the sixth. On the third a white flag appeared on
the works and General Grant received a letter from Pember-
ton, the Confederate commander of Vicksburg, asking for
terms of surrender.
6 HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT.

To this request Grant returned his customary answer:
“ The unconditional surrender of the city and garrison.

I have no terms other than these.”
There were no other terms, and on the Fourth of July,

1863, the very day on which in the North occurred the great
victory at Gettysburg, Vicksburg surrendered to Grant.
The Mississippi river was free from the lakes of Minnesota
to the Gulf of Mexico. The tanner’s son had become a great

and successful general.



Â¥

CHAPTER VIII.
HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT.

HEN Vicksburg fell all the North rejoiced. Well

might the South have done so, too, could her people

have seen,.as they do to-day, that in their case failure was

success. By that I mean that the South gained, and will

gain, more because of the way the Civil War ended than
had she won the victories and obtained independence.

“God moves in a mysterious way
His wonders to perform,”

the old hymn tells us, and in the making of the New
America through strife and blood, one of His wonders was
HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT. 137

certainly worked out in a mysterious way for the side that
did not win.

When the report of the fall of Vicksburg was sent north
by the successful general, the land rang with hurrahs. Hal-
leck, the commander-in-chief, who had not always believed in
Grant's plans, or always helped them on, telegraphed to him,
“Your narration of the campaign, like the operations them-
selves, is brief, soldierly, and in every respect creditable and
satisfactory. In boldness of plan, rapidity of execution, and
brilliancy of routes, these operations will compare most fav-
orably with those of Napoleon about Ulm. You and your
army have well deserved the gratitude of your country; and
it will be the boast of your children that their fathers were
of the heroic army which re-opened the Mississippi River.”

But even more than this acknowledgment of his ability,

Grant prized the congratulations that came from that other
great American whose name and fame are so dear to us all
to-day, the president —/¢he president — Abraham Lincoln.
Read his words carefully and see how like that grand and
noble man was this letter of thanks sent by him to his suc-

cessful general.
‘“ My dear General,” wrote the president, “I do not re-

member that you and I ever met personally. I write this
now as a grateful acknowledgment for the almost inestima-
ble service you have done the country. I wish to say a word
further. When you first reached the vicinity of Vicksburg,
I thought you should do what you finally did,— march the
138 HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT.

troops across the neck, run the batteries with the transports,
and thus go below; and I never had any faith, except a gen-
eral hope that you knew better than IJ, that the Yazoo Pass
expedition and the like could succeed. When you got below
and took Port Gibson, Grand Gulf and vicinity, I thought
you should go down the river and join General Banks; and
when you turned northward, east of the Big Black, I feared
it was a mistake. I now wish to make a personal acknowl-
edgment that you were right and I was wrong. Yours very
truly, A. LINCoLN.” |

Congress, too, sent a vote of thanks to this modest victor,
and the legislatures of some of the northern states followed
suit. He was made major-general in the regular army, and
both the nation and the government awoke to the fact that
when, as Lincoln wrote, “the Father of Waters again goes
unvexed to the sea,” the tide of war had turned indeed, and
America had discovered her greatest soldier.

Soon his new plans developed. He was given the com-
mand of a great section called the “ Military Division of the
Mississippi.’ He wished to strike at another point and
relieve the division of the Union army which was almost
shut up in Chattanooga, at bay before the Confederates in
southern Tennessee. A victory here would relieve the great
stretch of fine country between the Alleghany Mountains
and the Mississippi River and this was the next campaign
that Grant desired to lead.

He acted quickly as soon as his plans were laid and per-
HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT. i 139

mission obtained from the War Department at Washington.
He first arranged aline of supply to get food to the hun-
gry and beleaguered soldiers in Chattanooga — the “ cracker
line,” so the soldier boys called it; then, he drew in some of
his men at one point, hurried on reinforcements to another,
sent some of the soldiers charging against Mission Ridge,
fought a great battle ona hilltop “above the clouds” on
Lookout Mountain,

hurled his army like







a thunder-bolt against



the Confederate center Z
y-

at Chattanooga, and iy |
: y/ a =A
LZLZEU wh

BELGE y

so surprised, and &
dazed the enemy that | a
the Confederate armies
who had gathered all
about Chattanooga to
crush and capture the
Union troops, were
sent racing for dear
life through the moun- 4 conreperare sHARPSHOOTER AT LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN.
tain gaps into Georgia.

The battle of Chattanooga is said by military critics to have
been one of the most remarkable battles in history. It
brought to a brilliant ending Grant’s well-planned endeavor
to secure the great mountain plateau he had aimed for;
it made him lieutenant-general and commander-in-chief of
140° HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT.

the armies of the United States; it brought him, at once,
to the direction of affairs in Virginia, where for three years
the genius of Lee had held the northern armies at bay and
had overwhelmed in defeat the four generals who had led
the Union soldiers to battle.

But now see the modesty, the generosity, the kind-hearted-
ness and appreciation of this remarkable man. He had done
it all; his brain had thought out, his hand had worked out
all this plan of victory, from Shiloh to Chattanooga. Yet,
when he was leaving the West for the East to take his great
command he wrote to his best and most beloved assistant,
the brave General Sherman, who was to make that remark-
able “march to the sea,” a letter in which he gave him
thanks and credit for the help he had been to him in his
western campaign. “No one feels more than I,” he said,
“how much of this success is due to the energy, skill, and the
harmonious putting forth of. that energy and skill, of those
whom it has been my good fortune to have occupying sub-
ordinate positions under me. There are many officers to
whom these remarks are applicable to a greater or less
degree, proportionate to their ability as soldiers; but what I
want is to express my thanks to you and McPherson, as the
men to whom, above all others, I feel indebted for whatever
I have had of success. How far your advice and assistance
have been of help to me, you know. How far your execu-
tion of whatever has been given to you to do entitles you
to the reward I am receiving, you cannot know as well as I.
HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT: Iq

I feel all the gratitude this letter would express, giving it
the most flattering construction.”

Do you wonder that the men who helped him were will-
ing to do their very best when such words as these came to
them? In this world, boys and girls, too many men are
willing to take to themselves all the credit for what they
have a share in. It isa sign of goodness as well as great-
ness to say to another, “ Without your help, I should not
have succeeded.”

For the first time since his cadet days Grant was in the
city of Washington. For the first time in his life he met
Abraham Lincoln. The men whose names will ever be joined
together as the two greatest Americans of the Nineteenth
Century, met quietly and cordially; and, in the president's
room at the White House, on the ninth of March, 1864,
President Lincoln handed to General Grant the paper which,
by act of Congress, made him lieutenant-general of the
armies of the United States.

The two men faced’each other— the one, tall, angular,
ungainly, almost awkward in appearance, but with a face
that was full of earnestness and an eye that looked straight
into.a man’s heart; the other, slim, slightly stooping, almost
a foot shorter than the president, with a quiet face that
showed but little of his great power, and an eye, gray, like
Lincoln’s, and, like Lincoln’s, his most expressive feature.

And it is just an indication of the real pride Grant felt in |
this ceremony that he took with him, not a display of pomp
142 HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT.

and circumstance, but simply his boy, his eldest son, whom

he wished to have share in his honor and glory. .
“General Grant,” said the President, handing the soldier
his commission, “ the nation’s appreciation of what you have
done, and its reliance upon you for what still remains to be
accomplished in the existing great struggle, are now pre- °
sented with this commission, constituting you lieutenant-
general in the army of the United States. With this high
honor, devolves upon

a




you, also, a correspond-
ing responsibility. As
the country herein
trusts you, so, under
God,it will sustain you.
,,, I scarcely need to add
7 that, with what I here
speak for the nation,






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vee IG “Mr. President,”
PRESIDENT LincoLw MawniNe GxaNt wis coMmIs!ON General Grant replied,
reading the words from

a paper in his hand, “I accept the commission with grati-
tude for the high honor conferred. With the aid of the
noble armies that have fought on so many fields for our
common country, it will be my earnest endeavor not to dis-

appoint your expectations. I feel the full weight of the


GRANT AND HIS GENERALS.

SHERIDAN. GRANT. SHERMAN.
MEADE. THOMAS.



HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT. 145

responsibilities now devolving on me, and I know that if
they are met, it will be due to those armies, and above all,
to the favor of that Providence which leads both nations
and men.”

Short, you see, and modest as were all his utterances,
was this speech of acceptance in reply to an order that
placed him in command and leadership of a mighty army of
seven hundred thousand men.

To use this great army to advantage was what General
Grant now desired — to make each part of it do something, ©
but especially to make all the parts work together to one
end — victory.

“We have worked so much apart, up to this time,” said
Grant, “that we've been like a balky team, no two ever pull-
ing together’”—he just knew how that was, too; Grant was

a horseman, you know. So to make all parts of the army,
- East and West, work together, his plan was to hurl his armies
against the Confederate armies; to keep hurling them; to
give the enemy no rest; to give him no chance to draw
away troops from one part to reinforce another, and, as he
declared, “to take no backward step.” That was one thing
Grant never did — go backward.

In May, 1864, this forward movement was begun. Grant,
though directing the movements of all the armies, from
the Atlantic to the Mississippi, made his headquarters with
the army of the Potomac, and that force, though commanded
by General Meade, was controlled and directed by Grant.
146 - HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT.

It took a year for Grant to carry out his plans, but he
kept steadily at work. He had quite another piece of work
on hand than he had yet attempted — the conquest of Gen-
eral Lee, the greatest general of the Confederacy.

In the way in which he set about this task we can see
the greatness of U. S. Grant asa soldier. He always knew
and studied the men he was opposed to; each one he met in
a different way. And, in Lee, he knew that he was matched
against a leader who was bold as well as cautious, determined
as well as patient, masterly as well as wily, and, in every
way as the old saying has it, “a foeman worthy of his steel.”

I shall not describe the terrible fights which made the last
year of the Civil War so wonderful a year of battle. 5

You will read the description for yourselves as you grow
older; you can read them with even better understanding
than could those who were boys at the time they were
fought, or even those who read of them a dozen years after
they were fought. For you will read them as a connected
story, explained by the light of what we now know as to
plan and method, and you will see that Grant’s whole plan
of campaign was as simple as it was great: “ Give the
enemy no rest; strike him and keep striking him. The war’
must be ended and we must end it now.”

Directing every great movement; watching every action;
at the front oftener than at the rear; minglirig with the
men in their camp and on the march; sleeping with them on
the bare ground; eating with them their humble rations;
HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT. 147

advancing always, inch by inch perhaps, but always going
toward something, if defeated in one attempt trying it again
next day; making the enemy defend himself and not defend-
ing himself from the enemy; fearless, though a hater of
blood; confident of victory even in the darkest hour; picking





“I SHALL FIGHT IT OUT ON THIS LINE IF IT TAKES ALL SUMMER.”
(From an old war-time picture.)

the best men as his helpers and sticking to them until they
achieved success — this was Grant in Virginia. “ Direct as
a thunderbolt, tenacious as a bull-dog,” as someone said of
him, he fought straight on, never halting in his Opinion nor
wavering in his actions.

“I shall fight it out on this line if it takes all summer,”
148 ‘ HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT.

he wrote in a letter to the government from the terrible bat-
tlefield of Spottsylvania. That announcement thrilled the
North; it gave soldiers and people confidence; and the
weary president at Washington with a great sigh of relief
knew that at last he had a general at the head of his armies
upon whom he could rely to the end.

In just thirteen months after the president had handed
to General Grant at the White House his commission as
head of the army the end came. Sherman had made a path
for his army through Georgia and marching to the sea had
cut the Confederacy in two; Sheridan, at the head of a won-
derful body of cavalry had ridden around Lee's entire army
and kept it from running away and from getting any more
supplies of food or ammunition; Thomas, at Nashville, held
back the western armies of the Confederacy and defeated
them so that they could not go to the aid of Lee; Meade,
the hero of Gettysburg, marching as Grant’s right hand man
at the head of the army of the Potomac, executed all the
orders of his chief with determination, precision and despatch,
and, at the centre of all stood Grant—firm, unyielding,
aggressive, imperative; saying a thing and doing it, too;
striking, striking, striking — until, at last, in the apple
orchard at Appomattox the last stand was made, the last
gun fired, the white flag fluttered out and Lee, serene even
in defeat, in the little McLean farmhouse met the triumphant
general of the Union and surrendered himself and his entire
army prisoners of war.
By permission of Frank Leslie's Publishing House.
THE NINTH OF APRIL, 1865.
The meeting of Lee and Grant.





HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT. 151

General Grant tells us that he had a dreadful sick head-
ache when Lee’s note was handed him asking for an inter.
view to discuss terms of surrender.

“The instant I saw the contents of that note I was cured,”
he said; and no wonder, was it ?

Dressed simply, in a soldier’s blouse, without a sword,
his general’s shoulder straps the only mark of his rank,
General Grant met General Lee in McLean’s farmhouse and
arranged the terms of surrender.

Do you know what those terms were? Before Grant's
day a surrender meant a disgrace, a punishment or a terror.
Leaders in rebellion were imprisoned, hung or shot; sol-
diers were penned up like criminals, homes a
laid waste. Surrender meant savagery.

Now it meant release, relief, friendship. Read what
Grant wrote to General Lee at Appomattox Court-House,
Virginia, on the ninth of April, 1865.

“In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of
the 8th instant, I propose to receive the surrender of the
Army of Northern Virginia, on the following terms, to wit:

“Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate,
one copy to be given to an officer designated by me, the
other to be detained by such officers as you may designate.

“The officers to give their individual paroles not to take
arms against the United States until properly exchanged,
and each company or regimental commander to sign a like
parole for the men of their commands.
152 HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT.

“The arms, artillery, and public property to be parked
and stacked, and turned over to the officers appointed by
me to receive them. This.will not embrace the side-arms
of the officers, nor their private horses or baggage.

“This done, each officer and man will be allowed to return
to their homes, not to be disturbed by United States

authority so long as they observe











‘their parole and the laws in force
where they may reside.”

Was not that generous, mag-
nanimous, great? But,
as if to add emphasis to
his goodness, Grant said
to Lee, when the south- |
ern leader told him that
some of his men
owned their horses,
-“T will instruct my
paroling officers that
all the enlisted men

THEY SALUTED LIKE GENTLEMEN AND SOLDIERS.

of your cavalry and
artillery who own horses are to retain them, just as the
officers do theirs. They will need them for their spring
ploughing and farm work.”

“General,” said Lee earnestly, “there is nothing you
could have done to accomplish more good either for them
or for the government.”
b
HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT. 153

So you see that one of Grant’s kindliest deeds was in
connection with horses, of which he was so fond, and farm-
ing, at which he had tried his hand.

Then General Lee mounted his horse; he and Grant
saluted each other like gentlemen and soldiers; the Confed-
erate chieftain rode back to his army, and the long conflict
was over.

As for Grant, he sent to the authorities at Washington
this short telegram:

HEADQUARTERS, ApPomaTTox C. H., Va.
: April gth, 1865, 4.30 P. M.
Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War,
WASHINGTON.
General Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia this afternoon upon

terms proposed by myself. The accompanying additional correspondence will show
conditions fully. _ U.S. Grant, Lieut.-General.

“ Lee has surrendered!”

The North was jubilant. Bells rang, salutes thundered,
bonfires blazed, there was joy and glorification everywhere,
and Grant‘was the hero of the hour.

In the midst of it all a heavy blow fell on the land. The
good president was killed. There is reason to believe that
the. great general who had led the armies of the Union to
victory was also marked for the assassin’s bullet ; but, fortu-
nately, he escaped by a change of plans, and our greatest
martyr, Lincoln the. good, was the only victim of the mad-
ness of hate. It was a mighty sacrifice.

So peace came. The last hostile shot was fired in
154 HOW HE FOUGHT IT OUT. :

Texas, the last armed rebel to the national authority had
surrendered, the grand review of the armies marched for two
days before the new president and the general of the army,
in Washington, and then as the armies were disbanded and
the soldiers were sent to their homes, General Grant, on the
second of June, 1865, issued to.them his final order.
“Soldiers of the Army of the United States,” he said to



AT THE GRAND REVIEW IN WASHINGTON.

them; “by your patriotic devotion to your country in the
hour of danger and alarm, your magnificent fighting, bravery,

and endurance, you have maintained the supremacy of the
Union and the Constitution, overthrown all armed opposition
to the enforcement of the laws, and of the proclamations
forever abolishing slavery (the cause and pretext of the re-
bellion), and opened the way to the rightful authorities to’
HOW HE FOUGHT IT OVT. 185

restore order, and inaugurate peace on a permanent and en-
during basis on every foot of American soil.

“Your marches, sieges, and battles, in distance, duration,
resolution and brilliancy of results, dim the lustre of the
world’s past military achievements, and will be the patriot’s
precedent in defence of liberty and right in all time to come.

“In obedience to your country’s call, you left your homes
and families, and volunteered in its defence. Victory has
crowned your valor and secured the purpose of your patriotic
hearts; and with the gratitude of your countrymen, and the
highest honors a great and free nation can accord, you will
soon be permitted to return to your homes and families, con-
scious of having discharged the highest duty of American
citizens.

“To achieve the glorious triumphs, and secure to your-
selves, your fellow-countrymen and posterity the blessings
of free institutions, tens of thousands of your gallant com-
rades have fallen and sealed the priceless legacy with their
lives: The graves of these a grateful nation bedews with
tears, honors their memories, and will ever cherish and sup-
port their stricken families.”

And thus ended the long and terrible war that had made
the tanner’s son the greatest soldier of the century.
156 HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE lTS VERDICT.

CHAPTER IX.
HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT.

HE war was over, and U. S. Grant was the hero of the
hour. How well I remember the popular enthusiasm

that greeted the hero of Donelson and Vicksburg and Appo-
mattox when he came North. I was a boy then and a hero-
worshipper — all boys and girls are, if they have any heart
and life and love inthem. I raced all the way up Broadway
beside his carriage, to the old building of the Union League
Club where the general was to have a reception, and only
my lack of assurance and a sufficient number of years kept
me out of the club-house, itself. And when the short, stoop-
ing, brown-bearded, quiet-faced man came out on the balcony
and bowed to the crowd, oh! how we did cheer. Those
were great days for boys in New York.

The victorious general bore his honors modestly. You
do not need to be told that. He was never a man to seek |
publicity or notoriety.

“T don't like this show business,” he used to say, when
dragged forward to be “ exhibited.”

After the surrender of Lee, Grant’s first thought was to
hasten the disbandment of the great armies of the Union;
his second was to help the republic of Mexico.
HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT. 157

Our former foemen, the Mexicans, against whom Grant
had first marched across the border, were in a bad way. The
French emperor, Napoleon II1., had, by force of arms and










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contrary to the will of the people, established an empire in
Mexico.

The United States, years before, had pledged itself not to
let Europe interfere in the affairs of America. This is called
158 HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT.

the “Monroe Doctrine,” because it was given to the world
by President James Monroe — the man who was president
of the United States when Grant was born. 7

This interference in the affairs of Mexico by the Em-
peror of the French was done in an unfriendly spirit to the
United States and at a time when, in the midst of a great
civil war, it was especially mean and cowardly.

But that was just like Napoleon III., Emperor of. the
French.

As soon as our war was over and his hands were free,
General Grant induced the United States government to
show the French Emperor that a sister republic was not to
be thus overawed or enslaved without a protest. So, at his
suggestion, General Phil Sheridan, the greatest cavalry gen-
eral of the: United States, was sent to the southwest and,
with sixty thousand troops was placed upon the Texan
border as a strong hint to Napoleon that the French soldiers
were apt to get themselves into trouble if they staid much.
longer in Mexico.

Napoleon had made one of his tools, the Austrian prince,
Maximilian, Emperor of Mexfco. But when the Emperor
of the French saw how the United States felt in the matter
and knew that his soldiers might have to face in fight sucha
general as Grant and such troops as Sheridan’s sixty thou-
sand veterans, he, as the old saying has it, “deemed dis-
cretion the better part of valor.” So he called home to
France all his soldiers, and left poor Maximilian to fight his
HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT. 159

own battles—which he was, of course, not able to do,
because the people of Mexico were opposed to him.

So Maximilian’s grand “ Empire of Mexico” fell; the
poor prince was shot and Mexico, once again, was a free re-
public — and largely because of Grant's determined actions.



GRANT AND HIS FAMILY.
From aun old photograph, issued at the close of the war.

The sad death of Abraham Lincoln made Andrew John
son, president of the United States.
He was in every respect the exact opposite of the es

and good Lincoln.
The result was that President Johnson was soon in hot
160 HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT.

water with everyone and his whole term was a constant and
unlovely squabble with Congress. |

Into this fight he tried hard to drag General Grant.
But it was of no use. Grant knew that the president was
commander-in-chief of the armies of the United States, and
that it was his part as general to yield to his superior
officer, a soldier’s first duty — obedience.

So he obeyed the president's commands until they
touched his honor; then he refused.

This was when President Johnson tried to have General
Lee, the Confederate general, arrested for treason, impris-
oned and punished.

This was the last thing in the world Lincoln would have
done. It was absolutely against Grant’s ideas. Besides, he
had promised to General Lee and his soldiers, in the name
of the American people, freedom from punishment, so long
as they obeyed, the laws of the land. They were prisoners
under parole —that is, they had given their word of honor to
do nothing against the United States. To punish them as
traitors would be breaking his word, and Grant fought
sturdily for kindness toward them and especially for am-
nesty or pardon to General Lee. Was not that grand?

The nation said it was, and the president had to yield.
But he did not like Grant after that.

President Johnson had his first quarrel with Lincoln’s
stern old war secretary, Stanton. Contrary to the law, he
forced Stanton out of office, in August, 1867, and appointed




A BOY’S FIRST VIEW OF GENERAL GRANT.



HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT. 163

General Grant, Secretary of War ad interim —that is, until
a new secretary should be regularly nominated by the presi-
dent and approved by Congress.

General Grant therefore served as Secretary of War, and
during the months in which he occupied that high and
important office he performed its duties acceptably and well.

But when Congress met again, in January, 1868, the Sen-
ate refused to agree to the president’s turning Stanton out
of office and he became Secretary of War once more.

Grant had filled the office of Secretary of War, not
because he wished to but because the president had ordered
him to; and he recognized the president, as I have told you,
as his superior officer.

But when President Johnson told General Grant not to
obey Stanton, after the great secretary’s return to the war
office, Grant told the president that he could only obey his
orders when put in writing.

“You said you would,” said the president. “You prom-
ised to do what I asked you.”

“I did not,” Grant replied, “I simply said I would obey
your orders as my commanding officer.”

The president began to say spiteful things about Grant,
but the great soldier would not be drawn into a quarrel.

“Mr. President,” he said “I will do only my duty. I
regard this whole matter, from beginning to end, as an
attempt to involve me in the resistence of law for which
you hesitate to assume the responsibility in orders.”
164 HOW THE REPUBLIC.GAVE ITS VERDICT.

The president could say no more after this bold and
blunt declaration. Indeed, he only got deeper into. hot water
and, soon after, came within a very few votes of being turned
out of his high office by Congress—that is, by what is
called “impeachment.”
Soon after this most unpleasant state of affairs in the
government, the time came to elect a new president.

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, GRANT AND JOHNSON.
“ Mr. President, I will do only my duty.”

With one voice the National Republican Convention —
the same body that had nominated and renominated Abra-
ham Lincoln —selected Ulysses S. Grant as its choice, and
the vote in the Convention stood six hundred and fifty for
Grant, and not one against him!

General Grant did not wish to be president. He enjoyed
HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT. 165

his position as General of the Army. To this position, cre-
‘ ated especially for him and held by. no other man. since
George Washington’s day, he had been advanced by Con-
gress on July 25, 1866. It was a life position and gave him
a salary of twenty-two thousand dollars a year. Was not
that a great change from the days— not seven years before
— when he had waiked the streets of St. Louis, poor, unrec-
ognized, almost unknown, hunting for work ?

He knew what the presidency meant —criticism, worries,
troubles, hard work, misunderstandings, enemies, for four
years; and then, perhaps, nothing to do.

But Grant was a soldier; he was accustomed to obey
orders; in a republic the people rule; they’ are the masters ;:
to their will obedience is due, and it was because he felt in
this way, because he was true and loyal and grand and great
that U. S. Grant put aside his own desires, sunk his own
preferences and said, “If the people select me as president I
must serve.” As one writer has said of this decision, “ It
was the final sacrifice of a patriot.” ;

So, when they came to tell him that he was nominated
for the presidency he did not say he could not accept the
nomination, that he was not a fit man for it, that he was
afraid to assume the responsibilities of the position. He
met the ‘order like a soldier; and, like a soldier, accepted it.

“Gentlemen,” he said, in the short speech replying to
the announcement of his nomination, “being entirely unac-
customed to public speaking, and without the desire to cul-
166 HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT.

tivate the power, it is impossible for me to find appropriate
‘ language to thank you for this demonstration. All that I
can say is, that to whatever position I may be called by your
will, I shall endeavor to discharge its duties with fidelity
and honesty of purpose. Of my rectitude in the perform-
ance of public duties you will have to judge for yourselves
by the record before you.”

Then he sat down and wrote to the committee of the
convention who notified him of his nomination a letter of
acceptance which is now one of the famous letters of the
world, for in it occurred these words.

“Tf elected to the office of President of the United
States,” he wrote, “ it will be my endeavor to administer all
‘ the laws in good faith, with economy, and with the view of
giving peace, quiet and protection everywhere. In times
like the present, it is impossible, or at least eminently
improper, to lay down a policy to be adhered to, right or
wrong, through an administration of four years. New
political issues, not foreseen, are constantly arising; the
views of the public on old ones are constantly changing,
and a purely administrative officer should be left free to
execute the will of the people. I always have respected that
will, and always shall. Peace, and universal prosperity — |
its sequence— with economy of administration, will lighten
the burden of taxation, while it constantly reduces the
national debt. Let us have peace.”

“Let us have peace” —those were great words. They
HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT. 167

fitted the needs and spirit of the time better than a volume
of explanations or a flood of eloquence. And the people
applauded them and adopted them as their sentiment and
desire.

As General Grant had made no exertion to secure his
nomination, so, too, he made no move toward helping for-
ward his election to the presidency.

This was not a war campaign. In that he always led;
that moved according to his directions. In the presidential
campaign the people were to lead. He was in their hands.
If the nation wished him for its chief ruler, the nation must
elect him. He would give no help, All of which shows, as
I told you in an earlier chapter, that Grant was no politician.
He was a soldier, calmly awaiting the call to duty.

It came. The National election, in November, 1868,
resulted in the republic’s verdict to its greatest soldier: Go
up higher! And by an electoral vote of two hundred and
fourteen out of three hundred and seventeen— twenty-six
states out of thirty-four, Ulysses S. Grant was elected Presi-
‘dent of the United States.

Standing upon a platform built for the occasion against
the splendid east front of the great white capitol at Wash-.
ington, on Thursday, the fourth of March, 1869, with a great
cheering throng before him, with senators and generals and
high officials about him and, beside him, those who were
dearest to him—his wife and children — General Grant took
the oath of office to faithfully administer the duties of his
168 HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT.

office during his term as president. Then the guns boomed
a salute; the steam whistles shrilled out their applause; the
the bands played; the people cheered; and that all meant the
old-time hail: “Long live Ulysses S. Grant, President of
the United States!”

Then, when things became quiet, President Grant read
his inaugural address. It was short—only about a thou-
sand words. But it expressed a firm determination to do
his duty and serve the nation, as president, as loyally as he
had served it as general.

“T have,” he said, “in conformity with the Constitution
cf our country, taken the oath of office prescribed therein.
I have taken this oath without mental reservation, and with
a determination to do, to the best of my ability, all that it
requires of me.

“The responsibilities of the position I feel, but accept
them without fear. The office has come to me unsought; I
commence its duties untrammelled. I bring to it a con-
scious desire and determination to fill it, to the best of my
ability, to the satisfaction of the people. On all leading
questions agitating the public mind I will always express
my views to Congrcss, and urge them according to my judg-
ment, and when I think it advisable, will exercise the consti-
tutional privilege of interposing a veto to defeat measures
which I oppose. - But all laws will be faithfully executed,
whether they meet my approval or not.

“T shall, on all subjects, have a policy to recommend;
HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT. 169

none to enforce against the will of the people. Laws are to
govern all alike— those opposed to as well as those in favor
of them. I know no method to secure the repeal of bad
or obnoxious laws so effectual as their strict execution.”

As he read, his little daughter Nellie, then just in her
“teens,” stood beside her
father, holding his hand,
until someone placed a
chair for her, so that
she might sit near “her
papa the president.”

And after it was
over, surrounded by a
great and cheering
crowd, the new presi-
dent drove to his new
home in thc nation’s
capital —the splendid
White House.

His work there as



president was quite dif- eta eh ee
ferent from what he Nellie Grant and her father.
had ever been used to as a soldier; and yet, very naturally,
he brought into it, the same traits that had made him a
great and successful soldier.

As he chose his own lieutenants and helpers in the army,

s he wished to select them as president. He asked no
170 HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT.

one’s advice, took no one into his confidence, but went his
way as would a leader of an army planning a campaign of
which he alone was the director and head.

People began to talk —that is, the politicians did. They
had always been accustomed to having their advice asked, or
to having the opportunity to suggest some one they knew
for office or appointment.

But Grant went on his solitary way. He made up his
first cabinet — his circle of advisers and helpers, you know —
to suit himself and not to please the politicians. Then they
—the politicians — began to grumble. They called Grant
hard names — the dictator, the man on horseback and other
things. |

But the soldier-president paid no attention to their
criticism. He thought he knew what was wanted. He
selected his cabinet almost without consultation; every one
was surprised at his selections; even those selected had to
be argued with to accept, and when one or two were found
“not eligible” —that is, not permitted by the laws of the
land, to fill the position offered them — no one was more sur-
prised or disappointed than President Grant. Then he
understood that a president and a general were quite differ-
ent. But, all the same, it was a good cabinet, and his
administration was a success, notwithstanding all he had to
learn and unlearn.

It was during his first administration that the city of
Washington was remade. From a mud-hole it became a
HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT. 17L

metropolis ; from a shabby country village it became a city
of groves and bowers, of boulevards and palaces, of beauty
and importance, so that it is, to-day, the most attractive of
capitals, the finest winter city in the world, the show town of



THE NEW WASHINGTON AS GRANT MADE IT.

America. And this was largely due to the foresight and
planning of U. S. Grant.

But greater than material growth — than the picturesque
development of granite and tar and sewer and drain pipes
and brick and morter, was the great stride toward peace
made by the Republic’s greatest soldier.
172 HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT.

There was serious trouble with Great Britain. England
had not used us well during the great civil war. From her
ports had sailed rebel war-ships to destroy our merchant
vessels and drive our commerce from the sea.

Of course our government objected and said England
had hurt us. And, after the war was over, the United States
government demanded satisfaction from Great Britain.
This was refused. There was grumbling and quarrelling

on both sides of the sea; there was even talk of war.
President Johnson had sadly bungled; President Grant

took things in hand. He clearly saw the right and wrong
of the whole matter; he refused to acknowledge the justice
of England’s position; he formed his plan for settlement as
wisely and as directly as he did his plans for battle.

He made the United States responsible for all demands
upon Great Britain so that private claims might be counted
out and the trouble brought down simply between the two
governments. Then he demanded from Great Britain jus-—
tice — that was all.

Our mother-country and old-time enemy objected; she
twisted and turned; but she did not wish war. Finally
Great Britain yielded a point in the dispute. Then Grant
pushed on another—just as he had “inched on” towards
Vicksburg and Richmond.

At last, a.commission of five Americans and five En-
glishmen was appointed to talk over the matter. That was
Grant’s first great victory. It decided that the United
HOW THE REPUBLIC GAVE ITS VERDICT. . 173

States was right in making its complaints, and a treaty was
signed the eighth of May 1871, called the treaty of Wash-
ington which gave satisfaction to the United States.

Then the main question of whether Great Britain was
responsible for the.damage done by rebel warships fitted out
in English ports was submitted for decision — we call it







































































THE CITY OF GENEVA IN SWITZERLAND WHERE THE COURT OF ARBITRATION MET.

arbitration, now — to a court made up of five picked men
from the United States, Great Britain, Italy, Switzerland
and Brazil.

This court of arbitration met at Geneva in Switzerland
and in September 1872, after long discussions, decided that
Great Britain was in the wrong and must pay to the United
174 HOW THE TANNER’S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME.

States over fifteen millions of dollars to make good the
damage she had done.

This was Grant’s second great victory. It was peace
instead of war; honorable settlement instead of blood and
blows as in the old days.

“T shall never fire another gun in anger,” said U. S.
Grant, and to his unchanging desire and invincible will came
this great and notable victory of peace with honor — to
both sides.



CHAPTER: -X:

HOW THE TANNER’S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME.

AS there ever a girl or boy who did not say to his or

her playmate “I am mad at you” or “I won't play

with you?” Very few, I suspect. It is not a good state of

mind to be in, or a nice thing to say —but it’s the way of

the world, and, as some old poet has said, “the child is
father to the man.”

That means, of course, that what children do, grown
folks sometimes do, as well. They get “mad” and call
names just as they did when they were boys. And some-
times it is old friends who do this.

Though the people liked and honored Grant, the politi-
HOW THE TANNER’S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME. 175

cians did not. Even some statesmen, who ought to have

been broader-minded and clearer-sighted than politicians, did

not like “Grant's way.”

They said he was running the office to suit himself; that

he wanted to have all
the say and become a
tyrant or a dictator;
that he was not re-un-
iting the North and
South in the right
way; that he was only
‘looking out for his
own friends in the
government; that he
was trying to make
the party in power like
_a great machine in
which he held the
lever. They said —
well, in fact they said
about everything that
was disagreeable,
either because they



CHARLES SUMNER.
A statesman who did not like “ Grant's way.”

were “mad,” like foolish boys and girls, or because they
thought they knew better themselves how to do things, or
because they were on the other side in politics and felt
bound to find fault with the side in power, or because they

%
176 HOW THE TANNER'S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME.

honestly felt that the way things were being done was not
for the good of the country. It takes all kinds to make up
the world, you know.

But Grant went on in his own direct way. He felt that
he was doing the best for the country, and, when he believed
that, nothing could move him.

He had certain simple views about “running the gov-
ernment.” He wished to put into office men who were
friendly to him and who would carry out his ideas; he
wished to make the republic strong at home and abroad;
he wished it to be honest in money matters and to keep all
the promises it had made when it had to borrow great sums
of money to pay for carrying on the war. As a result, he

had done many excellent things as president. He had made
mistakes, perhaps; every one makes some mistakes, you

know; but see what he had accomplished as president of the
United States during the four years he had held the office.
He ‘had paid a great slice of the public debt—that was
the money borrowed by the republic to carry on the war; he
had lowered the taxes— the money that each man has to
pay towards carrying on the government; he had tried to
put only honest and good men ‘into office and to cut down
the running expenses — that is what we call “honesty and
economy in the public service;” he had been so strong and
sure a captain, with his hand on the rudder of the ship of
state, that business had improved and the people, at home
and abroad, had confidence that the great American Republic
HOW THE TANNER’S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME. 177

would keep all its promises, pay all its debts, recover from
all the harm done by those terrible years of war and become
greater, stronger, richer and more powerful than ever.

So, you see, the people believed in Grant; and when his
first four years as
president were nearly
over, even though the
other party wished a
change — just because
it was the other party,
you know, and though
the discontented ones
in his own party
growled and grumbled
and wished a change,
also, the people of the
republic in great num-
bers - said, “Let. us
have Grant again for
President =< ble gis isa



safe man and the best

”

man HORACE GREELEY.
: Grant’s chief critic in,his second campaign and his opponent for
So, at the National the presidency.

Republican Convention which met at Philadelphia on the
fifth of June 1872, U. S. Grant was unanimously nomi-

nated as the candidate of the party for president of the
United States for a second term.
178 HOW THE TANNER'S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME.

Of course he was re-elected. Although the “mad,” the |
discontented, the dissatisfied, the jealous, the angrily-critical
and the honestly-critical men in his own party joined with
the hostile men in the other party, their efforts failed and »
Grant was re-elected president by a vote of two hundred and

eighty-six out of three hundred and forty-nine electoral votes
and by a popular majority of nearly eight hundred thousand.

It was a cold, bleak, raw and wintry day when he stood
up to deliver his second inaugural. But he stood before the
people stalwart, determined, but modest and unassuming, as
if to show the people that he knew his duty to be the repub-
lic’s need, and to do it however the wind of opposition might
plow or the cold of criticism cut and sting.

He knew that he was right; and, standing there, he said,
sorrowfully but feelingly: “From my candidacy for my
present office in 1868, to the close of the last presidential
campaign, I have been the subject of abuse and slander,
scarcely ever equalled in political history. This, to-day, I
feel I can afford to disregard, in view of your verdict, which
I gratefully accept as my vindication.”

So he took the oath of office the second time; again the
drums beat, the guns boomed and the people cheered; and
again Ulysses S. Grant, the tanner’s son, entered the White
House, president of the United States for the second time.

Once more he entered upon that high office not because
he liked it or wished for it, but because he felt it to be his
duty; once more, so he believed, the people had selected


PRESIDENT GRANT DELIVERING HIS SECOND INAUGURAL ADDRESS.



HOW THE TANNER S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME. 181

him to act for them and to look after their affairs and he
intended to serve them honestly and well ; once more he
found things that must be done and he set about doing
them.

Two of these were, what was called, the reconstruction
of the South and the money question. To both of these he
gave much thought and care, and the time will come when

the work of President Grant on both these difficult matters ~

will be set down as the work of a statesman and a great
ruler.

Very few boys think alike; very few men think alike.
It is because people differ that the world goes on.

So, when men in office or in power or in politics or in
business have a question to settle, they are apt to differ
about it and discuss it, until some decision is reached.

There never was a harder question to settle than how to
make the southern States which had been in rebellion good

Union States again. Probably if Lincoln had lived there’

would not have been so much trouble; but, for some good
reason, God thought it best to have us work out the problem
without that kindly, kingly soul.

So President Johnson muddled it up, and so stirred up
things that the southern people, who had been ready to
grasp the hand of peace that Grant stretched out at Appo-
mattox, were changed by Johnson’s mistakes and demanded
where they should have asked.

This made it hard to settle things, for though none who

*
182 HOW THE TANNER’S SON SERVED

THE SECOND TIME.

had been rebels against the national authority had been
punished, all had seen that justice must be done.
For nearly eight years Grant had to face the question

what to do in the South.

When the people of the South tried to make things go the



WILLIAM T. SHERMAN.

Hero of the “March to the Sea” ; successor to Grant as General of
the army of the United States.

way they wished them
and were unjust,
harsh and cruel to
the black men whom
the nation had set
free, and the white
men who differed from
them, Grant, who tried
to see the matter from
their side as well as
from his own, said
that he did not wish
to do anything that
should distress or
hurt them, but, he
added, in much the
same way that he had
said “ unconditional
surrender” at Donel-

son “T will not hesitate to exhaust the powers vested in the
executive, whenever and wherever it shall become necessary

to do so, for the purpose of securing to the citizens of the
HOW THE TANNER’S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME. 183

United States the peaceful enjoyments of the rights guaran-
teed to them by the Constitution and the laws.”

That was stern talk. It was the word of a soldier, and
it was kept like a soldier. |

There were terrible times in the South. It was years
before matters were smoothed out, and the hatred and anger
and wickedness that.were a part of the story of Southern
progress died down. For, you must know this, boys and
girls —no good thing is ever done for the world, no great
result ever reached, nothing really worth having is ever
obtained without worry, trouble, suffering and loss. But
the end came in time. And the new America, the real
union of states, the true and mighty republic, will, when
you are men and women, be found to have come to grandeur
at last largely because of the determined, unyielding and
noble stand of the soldier-president Ulysses S. Grant who,
with his firm hand, taught the people the value of obedience
to law and the greatness of a patriotism that knew neither
North nor South — nothing but the Republic.

In the same way he settled the money troubles. The
public debt was great; the needs of the country were great ;
the year 1873 was a dark and trying one. Some of the
leaders thought they saw a way out by-making more money,
even if it cheapened our dollar and broke the nation’s solemn
promise to pay its debts in honest money. This was what
was called the “inflation of the currency ”—that is, swel-
ling it in amount but not in real value.
184 HOW THE TANNER’S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME.

Grant saw how this would, in a way, help the country
out of its difficulties, but the more he studied it the more he
felt certain that it would not be just or right. And when,
in 1874, the Congress passed a bill of this sort, which
should make paper money or “currency” as good as gold, he
vetoed it —that is, he refused to sign it, and sent it back to
Congress with these words: “I am not a believer in any
artificial method of making paper money equal to coin when
the coin is not owned or held ready to redeem the promise
to pay; for paper money is nothing more than promises
to pay.”

That sounds like Ulysses S. Grant does it not? He was
the soul of honor and of truth.

Arbitration — the settlement of disputes by peaceful dis-
cussion instead of by the terrible clash of war, was the vic-
tory of Grant’s first administration.

The veto of the inflation bill— honesty in money mat-
ters —was the victory of Grant’s second administration.

And when men whom he had trusted, men whom he had
placed in high position and honored with his confidence and
his faith, proved themselves weak and unable to resist
temptation; when they joined with others to do the nation
harm by using their high position for selfish and base ends
—jin other words, to put money in their pockets by using
their position as the means, without care or thought as to
their duty to the republic— then the president, like the soldier
he was, put justice before friendship, and duty above regard
HOW THE TANNER’S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME. 185

and, though he knew those he had held as friends might be
brought to justice, said simply: “ Let no guilty man escape.”

In his second administration came the close of the first
one hundred years of the life of the republic — the Centen-
nial anniversary of the founding of the United States of
America. .

‘The nation celebrated the event grandly. In every town
and village in the land the Fourth
of July, 1876, was observed with
especial honor. In the city of
Philadelphia, in which, one hun- &
dred years before, the Declaration | Nah
of Independence had been signed,
and America proclaimed free, a
sixmonth’s exhibition of the |
world’s progress and the world’s
work was displayed. And this

great Exposition was opened and



set going by the man whose head

“LET NO GUILTY MAN ESCAPE.”

and hand had done so much
toward preserving independence and keeping whole the union
of the states —its defender and ruler, President Grant.

The second administration of Grant drew toward its
close. And when people began to talk about who should be
president after that, there were those all through the nation
who said: “No one can succeed him. Let us have Grant
for a third term.”
186 HOW THE TANNER’S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME,

They had said the same thing about Washington, you
know.

But Washington, you remember, would not serve a third
time. He told the people that they were able to make a
wise choice and that they must get a new president. It was
not wise or right to keep putting the same man in the presi-



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































MEMORIAL HALL, PHILADELPHIA.
_ Erected as a memorial of the Centennial Exposition and anniversary year of 1876.

dent’s chair. It was not good for him or for the nation.
And then, you know, he issued his grand Farewell Address.

President Grant did not issue a farewell address. He
was a much younger man than was Washington when his
second term closed, and he did not feel that the occasion
called for any such action. —

But he did see that it was not a wise thing to listen to
the voice of those who cried “once more.” ~ He did feel that
*

HOW THE TANNER’S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME. 187

if he should allow his name to be used again as a candidate,
it would, in a way, force the party to nominate him, and this ©
he believed to be a very bad thing for the country. For, if
one man is able to say to the people “you must keep me as
a president,’ in time the republic would be no better than a
tyranny and freedom would be in danger.

So, though it meant loss and sacrifice to himself, he put

aside all personal wishes or desires and said very firmly: “I
will not serve as president for the third time. Choose
someone else, and let me be a plain citizen of the United
States once more.” |

It turned out when he would not let his name be used,
that it. was not so easy to choose a new man.

There was great difference of opinion;, and when the
time came for a change there were many who wished to see
the other party succeed. Two good and wise men were
selected as candidates — one by the Republican and one by
the Democratic party.

But, so close was the election, that when election day was
over, the votes were so nearly even and there were so many
disputes about the voting that it was impossible to say
which candidate was elected.

' . The matter had to go to Congress for settlement. They
appointed fifteen men to go over the whole matter and
decide. This was called the Electoral Commission and they
went carefully over all the facts and figures trying to decide.
But even then they differed about the matter— seven of
188 - HOW THE TANNER’S SON SERVED THE SECOND TIME.

them saying that the Democratic candidate was elected and
eight of them that the Republican candidate was elected. |

The majority decided it. The Republican candidate was
declared elected. But even then those on the other side
were not satisfied. They said that the Democratic candi-
date had really won and that the decision of the eight men
should not be accepted.

For a few days things looked threatening. Men talked
wildly. But, in the president’s chair at Washington, sat a
man who could not be moved by talk and bluster. What-
ever was the law that would Grant enforce.

If the fifteen men had said that Mr. Tilden, the Demo-
cratic candidate, had been elected, President Grant would have
seen to it that Tilden was inaugurated president. A mayjor-
ity of the fifteen men had said that Mr. Hayes, the Repub-
lican candidate, was the rightful president. It was the duty
of President Grant to enforce the will of the majority, and
he took every step necessary to secure the inauguration of
Hayes.

“Let us have peace” his action meant again. “ But we ™
will have justice.” |

— To the everlasting honor of Mr. Tilden let it be said that
he sided with President Grant in working to still the loud
talkers and act for peace. He would do nothing to help on
the disturbing element, and, with Ulysses S. Grant in the
White House, the disturbers dare not disturb.

His firmness and determination to carry out the will of
HOW OLYSSES SAW THE WORLD, 189

the people as decided by the majority of the fifteen let the
country know that it would be carried out. The growls of
disappointment grew weak; the threats of the disobedient

ones died away, and Ulysses S. Grant, soldier-president to
the last, handed over his great office to his successor, Presi-

dent Hayes, and became a plain citizen — Mr. Grant, once
more.



(CHAPTER HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD.

S there any boy or girl who does not like a vacation?
Perhaps such a curiosity does exist somewhere, but I
have never seen one; have you?

No matter how much we enjoy our work or our study,
no matter what may be our occupation in life, a rest is
always welcome, a change is always pleasant.

It. is so with boys and girls; it is so with men and

women ; you know the old rhyme..

“All work and no play
Makes Jack a dull boy.”

It had been lots of hard work and very, very little play
for U.S. Grant all through his life. And from 1860 to 1876
190 HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD.

he had been so busy as soldier, as general, as conqueror,
as secretary, as president, that life had been as crowded with
work as it had been filled with honor. Bs

So, when the quiet of private life came, after the rush
and worry of public station, the general looked about for
some way in which he could get change of scene and
occupation.
' You remember, do you not, the reason, why Ulysses the
boy was willing to go to West
Point? Because of the journey
there. It would give hima chance
to see the world, he said, and he
was even ready to accept the risk
and work of West Point at the



LORD BEACONSFIELD, ae
‘Prime minister of England at the time end, for the sake of the jou mM cy
Of CRT SURE: East and all the sights and scenes

he would see on his way to the Military Academy on the
banks of the Hudson.

This desire to travel and to see new places was with him
all his life. So when his presidential terms were ended and
he had time and leisure for the first time in all his busy life,

‘he declared that he meant to see the world.

When the government which he had served so well knew
his desire and intention, it would have sent him across the
sea in a special ship, setting apart one of our men-of-war
for this purpose.

But show and circumstance were just shat General
HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD. IgI

_ Grant wished to avoid. Always the most modest and retir-
ing of men in private life, he wished to go abroad simply
as an American citizen on a visit to his daughter.

For you must know that this dearly-loved daughter
Nellie—the girl who had stood beside him when he was
first inaugurated president — had been married in the White
House. She had married a young Englishman and had
gone to England to live. One
of the general’s chief reasons for
his‘ trip abroad was to visit
Nellie. .

So, on the seventeenth of
May, 1877, General Grant with
his wife and his son Jesse sailed



WILLIAM I.
Emperor of Germany at the time of

from Philadelphia on the steamer ES

“Indiana” of the American line, en route for England and
the Continent.

I speak of him here as-General Grant. It is natural.
With all his high record as a just and wise president, it is as
General of the Armies of the Republic that he is most
famous; it is as general that the world speaks of him, to-day.

It is still, with us, as it was with General Sherman, his
loved and splendid assistant, when, in Philadelphia, he made
the farewell speech to his old chief as a large company
assembled to bid Grant good-bye and God speed.

“While you, his fellow-citizens,” said General Sherman,
“speak of him and regard him as ex-President Grant, I can-
192 - HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD.

not but think of the times of the war, of General Grant —
President of the United’States for eight years—yet I cannot
but think of him as the General Grant of Fort Donelson. I
think of him as the man who, when the country was in
the hour of its peril, restored its hopes when he marched
triumphant into Fort Donelson. After that, none of us felt
the least doubt as to the future of our country, and there-
fore, if the name of Washington is allied with the birth of ©
our country, that of Grant is forever identified with its
preservation, its perpetuation. It is not here alone, on the
shores of the Delaware, that the people love and respect
you, but in Chicago and St. Paul, and in far-off San Fran-
cisco, the prayers go up to-day that your voyage may be
prosperous and pleasant. God bless you, and grant youa
pleasant journey and a safe return to your native land.”

That was a pleasant and friendly “send-off” from an old.
comrade, was it not? And General Sherman meant it all, for
he loved and honored General Grant.

But if the. United States government could not prevail
upon General Grant to go to Europe in a war-ship, specially
set apart for his use, it did intend that the people across the
Atlantic should have the opportunity to make the general's
journey an enjoyable one. To do this, word was sent to all
the men abroad who were the agents or representatives of
the United States in Europe—our ministers and consuls,
they are called —in a note from the Secretary of State at
Washington. It read as follows:
HOW ULYSSES SAW 1HE WORLD. 193

“ GENTLEMEN, — Ulysses S. Grant, the late President of
the United States, sailed from Philadelphia on the 17th inst.
for Liverpool.

“The route and extent of his travels, as well as the dura-
tion of his sojourn
abroad, were alike un-
determmined slatw the
timeof his departure,
the object of his jour-
ney being to secure a
‘few months of rest
and recreation after
sixteen years of un-
remitting and devoted
labor in the military
and civil service of

his country.
“The enthusiastic

manifestations of pop-
ular regard and es-
fecMl= fOr General



Grant’ shown by the EX-PRESIDENT GRANT.
z from a photograph taken at Galena, /ll., after his return from
people in all parts of his trip around the world.

the country that he has visited since his retirement from
official life, and attending his every appearance in public
from the day of that retirement up to the moment of
his departure for Europe, indicate beyond question the
194 HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD.

high place he holds in the grateful affections of his
countrymen.

« Sharing in the largest measure this general public senti-
ment, and at the same time expressing the wishes of the
President, I desire to invite the aid of the diplomatic and
consular officers of the Government to make his journey a
pleasant one should he visit their posts. I feel already
assured that you will find patriotic pleasure in anticipating
the wishes of the department by.showing him that attention
and consideration which are
due from every officer of the
Government to a citizen of the
Republic so signally distin-
guished both in official service
and personal renown.”

This note put every one on



the lookout for the great Ameri-

fHE NORMAN GATE.

At Windsor Castle. can general. It is very likely

that, if General Grant had been asked, he would have pre-
ferred to go about without any one knowing it, just “on
his own hook,” you know. But, certainly, this preparing
the way for his coming must have made his visit and his
journeying all the more enjoyable.

He travelled everywhere that he cared to; he saw every-
thing there was to see; and the best of it was he did not
have any one to find fault with him because he lingered
here or loitered there, as when he first saw the world as a
HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD. 195

boy, on his way to school at West Point. Then, you remem-
ber, he stopped so long in Philadelphia and New York
“seeing the sights” that his folks at home scolded him for
loitering. Now, there was no one to scold him; he was
the head of his class. ;

He found all the doors open and every one ready to wel-
come him. He visited the Queen of England at splendid
iti Windsor castle; he
called on the Em-
peror of Germany
at Berlin, he met




I !

sl AULA
lH LA fh

fn eeneeeoe \
= He a




the soldier president
of France, General
MacMahon) -at
Paris, he was the








WK

ANS
\






nad

fC

GRANT AND BISMARCK.



guest of the boy-
king of Spain at
Vitofiay-vand= the
king of Portugal
at Lisbon. He talked with:the Pope at Rome and with the
king of Italy, too. The king of Denmark at Copenhagen,
the king of Sweden at Stockholm, the Emperor of Austria
at Vienna, all said, “how do you do,” in their most royal
style, and the Czar of Russia at St. Petersburg welcomed
him as a “ great and good friend,” as the letters between
kings and presidents always say.

In all of these interviews Grant bore himself modestly
196 HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD.

but manfully. His hosts respected and honored him, and
felt that it was quite as great a privilege to see and talk
with the foremost American soldier as it was for him to see
and talk with them.

For, of course, it was a privilege, and as such General
Grant regarded it. To dine with the Queen of England, to
discuss military matters and affairs of state with Bismarck,
to exchange greetings and opinions with the Pope—these
opportunities were most welcome to so keen a student of
men as General Grant; but I am certain that, quite as much
as royal interviews and princely festivities, did this sturdy
American citizen appreciate and enjoy his chances to see
and talk with the common people. For the people, whatever
is their condition and whoever are their rulers, make up the
- nation, and their life and talk show what the spirit of that
nation really is. .

So when Grant was in England, no occasion so gratified
him as the greeting he received from hundreds of thousands
of British workingmen. For it was the workingmen of
England, you must know, who in the darkest days of our
Civil War held firmly to the side of liberty and union, even
though their living depended on the trade in American cotton
and though the Confederacy made all sorts of brilliant prom-
ises if England would only recognize and befriend it. It was
the workingmen of England who kept off this recognition
until the cause of free labor triumphed over slave labor, and
the spirit of union over that of disunion.
HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD. 197

You can therefore easily understand why Grant was so
delighted with his greeting by the workers of England. He
was a worker himself. He knew what it was to toil and
sweat over his day’s “job” and he spoke from his heart





WINDSOR CASTLE, THE HOME OF ‘THE QUEEN OF ENGLAND.

when he replied to the address of welcome from the work-
ingmen of England.

“There is no reception Iam prouder of,” he said, “than
this one to-day. I recognize the fact that whatever there is
of greatness in the United States, or indeed in any other
198 HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD.

country, is due to the labor performed. The laborer is the
author of all greatness and wealth. Without labor there
would be no government, no leading class, nothing to pre-
serve. With us, labor is regarded as highly respectable.
When it is not so
regarded, it is that
man dishonors labor.





“We recognize
that labor dishonors
no man; and no mat-
ter what a man’s
occupation, he is elig-
ible to fill any post
in the gift of the peo-
ple. His occupation
is not considered in
the selection of him,
whether as a_ law-
maker, or an executor
of the- law. Now,



gentlemen, in con-



By permission of eS Dadizs ore Journal,”
GRANT ADDRESSING THE WORKINGMEN AT NEWCASTLE, ENG. clusion, all I can do



is to renew my thanks to you for the address, and to repeat
what I have said before, that I have received nothing from
any class since my arrival on this soil which has given me
more pleasure.”

So when he came to Newcastle, in the great coal and
HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD. 199

iron district of England, the city had a holiday. English
workers greeted an American worker; to his victorious arm
they felt that much of their own prosperity might be due.
They hailed him with banners and with cheers as “the
Hero of Freedom;” and Grant, standing on a platform in
the midst of these shouting thousands spoke the message of
peace from America to England—the great and happy hope
that was ever in his mind. For our greatest soldier was
also our greatest peace-lover.

From May, 1877, to November, 1878, General Grant
was in Europe. Besides his trip to the Continent he spent
much of the time visiting his dear daughter Nellie at her
_ English home.

Then he began to think of America. But the president
of the United States saw how much good this visit of Gen-
eral Grant was doing for America, in what he did, what he
said, and in his being seen and heard as the foremost Ameri-
can of his day; so the president expressed a wish that Gen-
eral Grant would keep on his travels and would visit those
far eastern lands where an American was scarcely known or
understood by the millions of people so different from
Americans in speech, customs, religion and life.

This changed General Grant’s plans. He decided to
come home by the way of Asia and make his journey a trip
around the world.

With United States government vessels ‘placed at his
service whenever he desired, with kings and consuls wait-
200 HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD.

ing to receive him, and with eyes open to all that was
curious, all that was notable and all that. was interesting in =
those old lands that were new to him, General Grant, with
his wife and eldest son,‘sailed from Marseilles in Southern
France on the twenty-fourth of January, 1879, for what is
known to us as the Far East —though really if you live in
California or on the Pacific coast it is the Nearest West!

It was a most extraordinary trip. It did not exactly
reach up to Greenland’s Icy Mountains (although the gen-
eral, you know, had been to the Land of the Midnight Sun)
but it did touch India’s Coral Strand, and others of those
far away regions which the old hymn writer had in mind.
when he said of them:

“Where all the prospect pleases
And only man is vile.”

The men who met and welcomed General Grant on his
Oriental tour however were not at all vile; they were courte-
ous, interested and full of big-worded compliments.

In India, in Siam, in China and in Japan, Grant met a
quick and friendly welcome, even though the princes and
people he saw were as opposite to him as possible in nature
and in looks, and though, with the inability of people who
live under a tyranny to understand the people who live
under a republic, they persisted in looking upon him and
referring to him as the “King of America.” Imagine
Grant, the most democratic of men, being hailed as king!




By permission of the ‘Ladies Home Journal.”

GENERAL GRANT LANDING AT NAGASAKI, IN JAPAN.



HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD. 203

Welcomed like a king, housed like a king, treated like a
king, Grant went from one strange land to another, studying
men and manners, customs and laws, more interested in the
viceroy of China than in the ruins of Rome, more impressed
by the people of Siam than by all the famous paintings in
the galleries of Europe. For General Grant was always a
student of men rather than of books, and a lover of the
people of the world rather than the beauties of nature.
Bismarck was more interesting to him than Niagara, the
Mikado of Japan than Mount Blanc.

From Marseilles to Bombay, from Bombay to Calcutta,
from Rangoon to Hong Kong, from Hong Kong to Canton,
from Canton to Shanghai, from Shanghai to Peking, from
Peking to Tokyo and from Tokyo home. This, with stops
at many important and intermediate places, was the jour-
ney of Grant in the East. He saw the Parsee sun worship-
pers of the Towers of Silence; he rode on elephant-back to
the sacred Ganges; he saw the places made famous by the
terrible Sepoy rebellion in India; he saw the gate at Luck-
now through which Jessie Brown heard the slogan that
brought the pipers and relief to that beleagured city ; he
toasted, in the British colony of Hong Kong “ the friendship
of the two great English-speaking nations of the world —
England and America;” he swung through the curious
streets of Canton in a latticed bamboo chair; he saw his
name coupled with those of Washington and Lincoln on the.
street-mottoes of Shanghai; he talked long and pleasantly
204 HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORTLT.

with the great Viceroy of China, Li Hung Chang, and, leav-
ing the United States war-ship in the beautiful harbor of
Nagasaki, he rode over the green hills of Japan and visited
‘in his own palace of Enriokwan, the young Mikado of Japan
—that hidden mystery of Eastern royalty, who, for the



THE GATE AT LUCKNOW, INDIA,
Through which relief came in the great Sepoy Rebellion. As General Grant saw it.

first time in the history of the world now talked with a
“foreigner.” 7

Then, at last, he turned his face homeward. He bade
good-bye to hospitable Japan and to that great Asiatic con-
tinent that had been to him, from boyhood, alike mysterious
and fascinating; he said good-bye to the foreign lands he
HOW ULYSSES SAW THE WORLD. 205

*

had visited and the strange sights he had seen, and, steam-
ing across the wide Pacific, set foot again upon his native
land, entering it through that splendid Golden Gate which,
as a young officer in California, he had seen years before,

»



‘ THE GOLDEN GATE, SAN FRANCISCO HARBOR.
Through which General Grant came home to America on his return from his trip around the world.

but never dreamed that he should enter in this fashion, as
the great American, homeward bound from his round of
visits to the kings and queens and princes and people of the

world.
206 THE OLD GENERALS LAST FIGHT.

But he returned as he departed, untouched by lionizing,
unspoiled by fame, the simple, modest, clear-headed, practi-
cal American citizen and gentleman — just U. S. Grant, the
same as ever.

CO gocognooOal pcan pa oD
CHAPTER XII.

THE OLD GENERAL'S LAST FIGHT.

LTHOUGH vacations are welcome and. rest or change
is delightful, there are but few men who like to have
nothing to do.

General Grant. was not one of these. He liked to be
occupied. His trip around the world was over, he was no
longer in office or in the army, he was worth just. about a
hundred thousand dollars. If he could use this money
wisely, he thought, he could make a good deal out of it and
perhaps be worth a fortune — which would be a good thing
for his family.

As you know, the general’s tastes were simple. He did
love fine horses, he did enjoy a good cigar; but these were
his only luxuries.

He was very, very fond of his children. He wished to
help them on in the world, and, after his return to America,
he was anxious to do something that would occupy his
mind and benefit his family.
THE OLD GENERAL'S LAST FIGHT. 207

He had been given many presents by his fellow-country-.
men. ‘They insisted on showing him how much they thought
of what he had done for them and the republic. He was
given a fine house in Galena, one in Philadelphia, one in
Washington, and one in New York. The men who had
money made him a gift of two hundred and fifty thousand
dollars, the interest of which —that is, the money it earns
each year——- was to come to him, while the whole amount
was to be kept untouched for his wife and children if he
should die.

He had one hundred thousand dollars of his own
besides this, and the brownstone house in East Sixty-sixth
street, near the Central Park, in New York, was full of pres-
ents and trophies and mementoes that had been given him
by the princes and people he had visited in his journey
around the world.

In 1880 the National Republican Convention met at
Chicago to nominate a new president of the United States.
Many of the men in that convention wished to nominate
General Grant. But there was a strong opposition, not to
Grant, but to allowing any man to be president of the
United States more than twice.

No president had ever had a third term. Washington
had stood out against it when he was asked to serve and
his example has always been followed. Probably Grant
would not have accepted the nomination, although he never
did say anything until it was time to speak.
208 THE OLD GENERAL'S LAST FIGHi.

So the fear that the people would not like it carried the
day, and another man was nominated for president. But
three hundred and six of the delegates to the convention
held firmly together, voting every time for General Grant.

If he had been nominated, and if he had accepted, there is no
doubt that he would have been elected, for he was the great-

Wb ley) em est living American and the people
hy | were true tothe man who had made
almost their very existence possible.



He did not wish the office again;
he would not have accepted it or
served had he not felt that it was
the will of the people. To that he
always bowed obedience. It is
probable, had he been elected, that
he would have made a better presi-



@ dent than ever, for his trip around
-. the world had given him a new |
knowledge of men and of nations,

GRANT’S HOME IN EAST SIXTY-SIXTH

Gna NaWOn ERCE: and that experience would have

BEE fe CEE HEE Meme) a ideduhimâ„¢oreathvrein conducting the
affairs of the republic and keeping it up to the mark along-
side the rest of the world.
_ But, instead of a political campaign, he had another fight
before him—the fiercest, most unrelenting and most desper-
ate of any that it had ever fallen to the lot of the great
soldier to face and wage. |
THE OLD GENERAL'S LAST FIGHT. 209

He was sixty years old; he was healthy, wealthy and
wise. The world was going well with him. His fame was
at its highest. His name was honored throughout all the
world. It seemed as though nothing could disturb or mo-
lest him, and yet, at one blow, the old general was struck
down — wounded in the tenderest of all places—his honor
— his reputation — his word.

It was this way. In 1880 he had gone into business,
investing the hundred thousand dollars, of which I have
told you, in the banking business in which one of his sons
+was a partner.

The banking business, you know, is one that deals with
money, lending, using or investing it so as to get large
returns and good profits. It is a very fine and high-toned
business when honorably conducted. But it gives oppor-
tunity to a dishonest or bad man to harm and hurt other
people, by what is called speculation.

General Grant was not an active partner in the busi-
ness. .He put in all his money and was to have part of the
profits. He had perfect confidence in his son and his son’s
partner.

At first the firm made lots of money. General Grant’s
name, of course, gave people confidence and one of the part-
ners was such a sharp and shrewd business man that people
called him the “ Napoleon of finance” — which means that
he was such a good hand to manage money matters that he
could conquer everything opposed to him in business, just
)

210 THE OLD GENERAL'S LAST FIGHT.

as Napoleon did in war. But Napoleon, you know, was
defeated and utterly overthrown at Waterloo!

It was the night before Christmas in the year 1883,
when General Grant, as I have told you, was feeling that
everything was going finely with him, that he was well and
strong and, that he was very nearly a millionaire on the
profits of his banking business, that he slipped on the ice in











































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE HARBOR OF NEW YORK.

front of his house and hurt one of his muscles so badly that
he had to go to bed and was kept indoors for weeks. You
would not think a little fall like that would be so bad, but
when a man gets to be over sixty he does not get over the
shock of such an accident as easily as he did when he was
sixteen. From that Christmas day of 1883 General Grant
was never again a well man.

Still he felt comfortable in his mind, for his affairs were
prosperous, and for the first time in his life he was able to buy
THE OLD GENERAL'S LAST FIGHT. 211

what he pleased and to spend as he liked, with a good big
sum in the bank.

On the morning of Tuesday, the sixth of May, 1884,
General Grant was, as he thought, a millionaire. Before
sunset that same day he knew that he was ruined.

The bank had failed. The “Napoleon of finance’
whom everyone thought so smart a business man, had been
too smart. He had speculated and lost everything.

Worse than this he had lied and stolen. He had used
the name and fame of General Grant to back up wicked
schemes and dishonorable transactions; he had used up all
the money put into the business by General Grant and Mrs.
Grant and the others who had gladly put in the money
because of General Grant’s name, and he had so turned and
twisted and handled things that not a dollar was left in the
business. «General Grant and his sons were ruined; their
good names apparently, were disgraced by being mixed up
with the affairs and wickednesses of their bad and bold part-
ner, who, as soon as he saw the truth was out ran away, like
the thief and coward he was.

Every one was surprised. More than this, they were so
Startled that, for a time, even the great name of Grant
seemed beclouded, and thoughtless people, cruel people, the
folks who like to talk and to say things without thinking of
the consequences, said mean and hateful and wicked and
untruthful things about this great and noble soldier who.
never in his life had done a dishonorable act, or said a mean
212 THLE OLD GENERAL'S LAST FIGHT,

or unkind thing, or knowingly injured a single person. It
was hard, was it not?

It was especially hard on such a man as General Grant.
He never complained, he never spoke of the treatment to
his friends; but it hurt terribly.

It made him sick. It weakened a constitution already
undermined by the shock of that fall on the ice, and it
developed a terrible trouble in his throat that brought him
months of suffering, of torture and of agony.

Before this developed however, he had set to work to do
something to earn money. For, to make.a bad’ matter
worse, something was wrong with the way the trust fund of
$250,000, of which I have told you, was invested and no
money could come from that for months. A great maga-
zine wished him to tell for its readers the story of one of his
battles, and, although General Grant had never trted or even
thought of such a thing, he did set to work, and wrote the
story of how he fought the battle of Shiloh; then he wrote
another one telling how he captured Vicksburg.

‘It was while he was at work on these articles that the
trouble in his throat developed. It grew worse and worse.
The doctors could not cure it; they could hardly give him
relief from the pain that came; and the first struggle with
the dreadful disease was harder to stand than any battle-grip
he had ever wrestled with. :

At first he was discouraged. For, as he looked at the
wreck of his fortune made by the dreadful. business failure,
THE OLD GENERAL’S LAST FIGHT.
(Sick, almost dying, but yet determined to win, he wrote the story of his life.)


see




THE OLD GENERAL'S LAST FIGHT, 215

and knew that he was a sick mar, no longer able to work or
make his own living, the future looked very dark and he
could not see how he could make things better for his wife
or the boys he so dearly loved.

Then it was that he determined to write, as did Julius
Czesar, the story of his life, his battles and his campaigns.
Publishers in different parts of the country, when they saw
how interesting were the two articles he had published and
how interested the people were in reading them, knew that
his story of the war would bea very successful book and
made him all sorts of offers and promises, if he would
write it. —-

He saw a way out of his difficulties; he determined to
try. Then the world saw one of the most remarkable things
in all its long history—a sick man, without experience or
training, deliberately sitting down to write the story of his
life, fighting off death with all the might and strength of
his giant will, in order to save his name from dishonor and
leave something for his wife and children after the death
that he knew was not far away.

In his room in the second story of that vine-covered
brownstone house in Sixty-sixth street the fight went on.
Now up, now down; sometimes so improved that every one,
save the doctor, was full of hope; now down so low that the
faltering breath nearly stopped, and only by stimulants was
life bought back and death held at bay, thus he lived; and still
the pencil kept going busily, whenever there was a pause in
216 THE OLD GENERALS LAST FIGHT.

the weakness or the pain. Writing or dictating, sometimes
four, sometimes six, sometimes eight hours a day, so the
months went on, until, at last, on the oth of June, 1885, he
was removed to Mount McGregor near Saratoga, in New
York; and there, almost within sight of a famous field of battle
and surrender in which his forefathers had joined, the fight
for life and for strength to finish his work went on.

It was a tremendous effort. He had barely two months
to live; but, in the eight weeks that followed the first of May,
he did more work, in writing his book, than in any .other
eight weeks of his life. As an army in battle sometimes
gathers up all its strength for a final charge or for a last
stand against the foe, so the old general, weakened by dis-
ease, worried by anxiety, but determined to win, actually
held death at bay until the work he had set himself to do
was accomplished.

Think of it, boys and girls, for it is one of the most
remarkable things that ever happened, the most heroic act
in all this great soldier’s wonderful career.

And the book that he wrote and completed under those
fearful conditions is one of the world’s notable books; while
its success more than met the desires of the writer and
placed his family again in comfort and security.

It was a wonderful victory.

As he lay there sick, dying, but working Stay and
well, the sympathy of all the world went out to him.
Friend and foe, Northerner and Southerner, American and
\

THE OLD GENERALS LAST FIGHT. 217

alien, prince and king, workingman and laborer, the high and
the humble, men and women, old and young — from all these,
all over the land and across the seas in the countries he
had visited,’came words of sympathy, of inquiry and of



THE COTTAGE ON MOUNT MCGREGOR, NEAR SARATOGA, IN ‘WHICH GENERAL GRANT DIED.

affection which showed how all the world loves and honors
and reveres a real hero.
From his sick room went out this message to the world,
whispered with stammering tones.
“Tam very much touched and grateful for the sympathy

and interest manifested in me by my friends and by those
218 THE OLD GENERALS LAST FIGHT.

who have not hitherto been regarded as my friends. I de-
sire the good-will of all, whether heretofore friends or not.”
At last, the work was done. The book was finished.
On the first day of July, 1885, his preface was dated and
signed. On the next day, silently thinking over what he
had done, what he had suffered and what might still be
before him, he
wrote a_ remark-
able letter to his
doctors which
closed in this
way: “If it is
within God’s
providence,” he
wrote, “that I
should go now, I








Ue:
am ready to obey wine
his call without if"

a murmur— I

should refer O- THE OUTLOOK AT MOUNT MCGREGOR.
P gS (Where General Grant would be wheeled in his invalid chair to get the view

ing now to endu r- he liked, over the valley.)

ing my present suffering for a single day without hope of
recovery. As I have stated, I am thankful for the Provi-
dential extension of my time to enable me to continue my
work. I am further thankful, andin a much greater degree
thankful, because it has enabled me to see for myself the
happy harmony which so suddenly sprung up between those
THE OLD GENERAL'S LAST FIGHT. 219

engaged but a few years ago in deadly conflict. It has been
an inestimable blessing to me to hear the kind expressions
toward me in person from all parts of the country, from peo-
ple of all nationalities, of all religions and of no religion, of
Confederates and National troops alike. . . They have
brought joy to my heart, if they have not affected a cure.
So to you and your colleagues I acknowledge my indebted-
ness for having brought me through the valley of the
shadow of death to enable me to witness these things.”

You see, to the last, the great soldier’s thoughts were all
for peace. He had seen battles. He knew the horrors of
war. He knew the beauty of peace.

With his work finished, his desire for life was gone. He
knew what life meant — suffering. He wished release and
peace. A few days longer*he lingered on, then, quietly,
calmly, in the cottage on the mountain top came the end.
The last fight was over; the last victory had been won.

On the morning of the twenty-third of July, 1885, the
tired hand dropped limply within that of the patient, faithful
wife. Then the telegraph clicked; a brief message went
abroad over all the earth; the flag on the White House at
Washington dropped to half-mast. General Grant was dead.
229 WHAT THE WORLD SAYS.

CHAPTER? XIII.
WHAT THE WORLD SAYS.

VV flags at half-mast, amid tolling bells and draped

houses and silent throngs of watchers, the dead
general was brought from his cottage on the mountain-top
to the great state capitol at Albany and then down the
river to the city which had been his home. !

There were processions and parades, a city hung with
black, a nation dotted with half-masted flags as, with the
slow and measured step of many troops, the great soldier
was carried to his grave on the heights above the Hudson.

_ There, in the temporary tomb of brick and iron, curved
into a temple-like dome, the worn body was left, covered
with flowers and garlanded with the memories of a grateful
nation.

The president and ex-presidents of-the United States,
cabinet secretaries, senators, governors, generals and admirals,
soldiers who wore the blue, soldiers who wore the gray, men,
women and children, a vast and notable throng, escorted the
dead soldier through the city streets and stood about his
modest resting place on beautiful Riverside Drive.

The bugle-call sounded “ taps”; again it sounded “rest ”;
then, from the war ship in the river below, boomed out the
WHAT THE WORLD SAYS. 221

farewell gun; the door of the little tomb swung shut; the
great crowd melted away, and only the silent soldier and
his guard of honor were left on the bluffs above the river,
so green and beautiful that fair midsummer day — August
the eighth, 1885.










' Og
yp Yj i
Hy

Ty Uf i, i

YY
Mf
LAT) ft =
cll



THE TEMPORARY TOMB OF GENERAL GRANT, RIVERSIDE
DRIVE, NEW YORK CITY.

And a poet wrote:

“The stars look down upon thy calm repose
As once on tented field, on battle eve,
No clash of arms, sad heralder of woes
Now rudely breaks the sleep God’s peace enfolds, —
Good night.

“Thy silence speaks and tells of honor, truth,
Of faithful service, — generous victory, —
- A nation saved. For thee a nation weeps, —

Clasp hands again, through tears! Our leader sleeps !

Good night.”
And from that day to this how that great leader’s fame
has gone on increasing, until, to-day, the three names that all
America links together as those of its greatest, noblest, wor-

thiest sons are Washington, Lincoln, Grant —the founder.
222 WHAT THE WORLD SAYS.

the liberator and the savior of the Union. So, already they
have been joined together on a portrait medal; so, as the
years go on, will they be joined in the hearts of the Ameri-
can people reverencing those who served the republic.



THE VIEW ACROSS THE RIVER FROM GRANT’S TOMB AT RIVERSIDE.

We all like to know what sort of a man a really great
man is.

Very much like other men you will find him to be;
until some great opportunity comes to test: and try him;
then he rises above all his fellows — grand, impressive,
monumental.
WHAT THE WORLD SAYS, 223

Some one has said that General Grant’s greatness was
made by opportunity. And this is about right.

You have read his life as here written. You know how
little there was to mark him as great, in his life, from 1822,
when he was born in the little Ohio village, to 1861, when he
was called to duty from the ree per Senne counter in the
Illinois city of Galena.

Simple, modest, unambitious, caring only for his wife and
family and thinking only of their welfare, finding life a hard
battle, but never complaining or dreaming of surrender —
so he lived for forty years ; so he would have lived on to the
end had not the occasion for action roused him, formed
him, developed him, until he became the leader, the genius,
the conqueror, the deliverer, the ruler, the hero, the man.

As a leader you have seen how he was brave as a soldier,
great as a general, greater as a conqueror.

His coolness in battle was wonderful, nothing disturbed
or excited him; nothing drew off his attention from the plan
he was. working out. His voice was seldom raised in the
fierce, hoarse shout of war, and never in anger.

When a shell burst almost at his feet, in the dreadful
battle of Spottsylvania, he kept on writing, never rising
from the stump which he called his “headquarters,” hardly
looking up to see what the fuss was about, and a wounded
soldier who was being carried by and saw it all said, admir-
ingly, “ Well, Ulysses don’t scare a bit, does he?” There is
nothing soldiers admire so much as bravery.
224 WHAT THE WORLD SAYS.

Once, at a lull in the great battle called the Wilderness,
the wounded General Hancock sprang from the ground at
the sound of distant firing and buckling on his sword called
for his horse so as to ride out into battle. But Grant sat
calm and unconcerned, and kept on whittling.

“Don't worry, general,” he said, “It takes firing on both
sides to make a battle. That's all on one side.”

Asa genius — you know what that is: a man to whom

» is given a natural
eift for creating and
doing things impos-
sible to most people
— Grant stands out
as, beyond all others,

aw

Ses the man.of the cen-
=< tury with a genius

for success in war.



Barly in; tive

the war should be
fought. After Donelson, so he tells us, he began to see how
important was the work that Providence had marked out for .
him. He saw what that work was and how to do it, as did
no othér leader. The power was in him. It only needed
the opportunity to develop it, and when that opportunity
came he rose to the occasion as few other men have done in
history—as no soldier has done since Napoleon. The same


SPOTTSYLVANIA.

AT
Ulysses don

a”

it, does he

t scare a bi.

“ Well,



WHAT THE WORLD SAYS. 227

ingenuity that led him to haul a gun into the steeple of the
little church in Mexico and flank the defenders of the gate,
led him to circumvent the Confederate plans and Confeder-
ate defenders at Vicksburg, to carry the day at Chattanooga
and to finally make victory at the Wilderness.

When the sortie was made by the enemy at Fort Donel-
son and his men feared a general attack, Grant mused over
agroupof dead Confederates. “Their haversacks are filled,”
he said. “ That means that they don’t intend to stay here and
fight us; they intend to fight their own way out. They are
desperate. Now then, whichever side attacks first is certain
of victory. They'll have to be pretty quick if they are going
to beat me.” He acted at once, and, before night, Donelson
fell.

It was in emergencies like this that Grant came out
strongest and in which his genius shone bright. To many
he seemed slow, silent, indifferent ; instead, when the supreme
moment came, he was alert, prompt, decided.

But genius is displayed quite as much in persistence as
in pluck. It was Grant’s one great purpose to keep at it and
never to give in, to fight it out on the line upon which he
had resolved, to take no backward step, that brought him
success and triumph. General Grant was a great soldier
because he could see just what to do and just how to do it,
when other leaders hesitated and experimented. He won by
energy and tenacity; he saved the nation by patience, push
and endurance; he attained fame by absolute persistence,
228 : WHAT THE WORLD SAYS.

audacity, determination, unconquerable will—these were the
proofs of his genius.

As a conqueror he was one of the greatest and most
magnanimous that the world has known. What his sword
had achieved, his generosity consummated. He conquered
the enemies of the Union in war; he conquered them again
in his generous terms at surrender; he conquered them yet
again when he stood as their champion against persecution.

In no pride of pomp or vain glory did he receive Buck-
ners surrender at Donelson, Pemberton’s at Vicksburg or
Lee’s at Appomattox. The instant these ofd comrades of
other days were overpowered they were no -longer his
enemies; they were his fellow-countrymen — his friends.
He thought more of his muddy boots than of his triumph
as he went toward the McLean farmhouse at Appomattox
to receive the surrender of Lee. He did not even wear his
sword, nor did he demand that of his captive, as laid down
in the laws of war. No troops paraded, no banners streamed,
no triumph music sounded as the brave men in gray yielded
to the men in blue. Grant had not conquered his foes; he
had convinced his fellow citizens.

As a man he was the kind that the world loves to
remember and talk about — loyal to his friends, forgiving to
his foes, calm in the face of danger, firm in the hour of
decision, modest and unassuming in his daily life, loving
and tender in his home, a leader when he led, a hero when
called upon to face either danger, disaster or death.
WHAT THE WORLD SAYS. 229

He loved children. For his own children he was ready
to lay down his life. For them and for his dearly loved
wife he struggled with death, writing a book ‘that was to
become famous and to make them comfortable for the future.
One of the most charming pictures of Grant the man and





THE GRANT MONUMENT AT CHICAGO.
Ln Lincoln Park, not far from St. Gaudens’ statue of Lincoln.

the father, is that given by his son, who says that when the

children were young, his father was seldom away from
home; he found his greatest pleasure there, and delighted in
reading aloud for the benefit of his children. “I remem-
ber,” says his son, “that, in this way, he read to us all of Dick-
230 WHAT THE WORLD SAYS,

ens’ works, many of Scott’s novels and other standard works
of fiction. I recall the evenings when we all sat around in
the family circle and enjoyed listening to these stories which
pleased my father quite as much as they did the children.
This reading always took place in the early part of the even-
ing because we were sent to bed at a reasonable hour.”

This is interesting, is it not; but more touching is it to
know that through all the years of his duty and fame as
general and president and as our greatest citizen, he wore
about his neck an intertwined braid made of the hair of his
wife and child, sent to him after that plucky fight with the
plague in the early days at Panama, of which I have told
you, and when far away from his dear ones on the Pacific
coast. And when, at Mount McGregor, he gave up the
long, bitter fight with pain and death, about his neck was
found the same braid of twisted hair, worn there as a
precious keepsake for over thirty years.

No man is perfect; all of us make mistakes and have
our imperfections. No man has been more maligned or
criticised or talked against than General Grant. As we look
back over the years we see, now, that most of this harsh
language was wrong and uncalled for. This simple, silent,
honest, straightforward man was trying to do his duty, as
he saw it, and in his own simple and manly fashion. If
he did not do it in the way that suited every one, may not
that have been the fault of his critics quite as much as of
himself? There are two sides to every shield, you know.
By permission of ‘‘ Leslie's Weekly.”

WHERE OUR HERO SLEEPS AT RIVERSIDE.
Birds eye view of the Grant mausoleum and surroundings as they will look.


ibe

ate
Sad




WHAT THE WORLD SAYS. 233

The years pass on; twenty-two in all had. gone since
that solemn midsummer funeral procession; then, in the
spring of 1897, on the ‘April day that would have been his
















































=




birthday on earth i wig
had he lived so long, ! , W
the cherished _ re- i} | : uM)
mains, which had ff | Ih

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—
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been taken from the
little temporary
tomb in which they |



SS
==

——S=

———














had lain for nearly | an

twelve years and | z

deposited in a grand fs 7 i

and glorious mauso- am

leum, were honored “ui a ane

with a splendid me- a a eer Ne
morial ovation. TUT rote

On the heights
of Riverside, over
looking the beauti-



LULU



ful Hudson and well
the great and pros-
re x THE SECOND FUNERAL OF GRANT.
perous city which The transfer from the temporary tomb to the great mausoleunt.

so reveres and honors him, the splendid monument stands
a landmark for miles around. The modest, unassuming
soldier who disliked show and parade, and, hated especially,
to have “a fuss” made over him, received on the 22d of
234 WHAT THE WORLD SAYS.

April, 1897, one of the grandest ovations ever given to
man.

‘Soldiers marched, orators spoke, the people in great and
marvelous throngs assembled to pay to the dead leader new
and impressive honors. But, in doing so they honored them-
selves. For it was because of what he did and of what he
was that the world thus publicly honored him ; and, as time
goes on, longer than that great gray monument shall stand
above his silent dust, while the words honor, duty, courage,

faith, simplicity, worth, will and loyalty mean anything, so
long will the world reverence and uplift the name and fame
of U. S. Grant, the greatest American soldier.
Books for Young Americans
By ELBRIDGE S. BROOKS
The Popular “True Story” Series



Seven gto volumes of from 200 to 250 pages each, profusely illustrated and
attractively bound in cloth, each $1.50.
«* A series which contains the lives of Columbus, Washington, Lincoln, Grant, and Franklin,
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This series contains:

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«¢« With its thorough historical research and its novelty of treatment it is the Columbus book
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«<« Although many excellent biographies of our first President have been prepared for the
young, we think that Mr. Brooks has presented the best, and has sustained well if not added
to his reputation gained\by his previous efforts in historical fields for young readers.’? —S. S.
Library Bulletin.

The True Story of Abraham Lincoln, the American.

«¢ His life reads like a romance, the best romance that ever was printed, and Mr. Brooks
has done an admirable work. . . . The story of Lincoln was never more ably told.’? —
Evening Post, Chicago.

The True Story of U. S. Grant, the American soldier.

«« Carefully written in that style which makes Mr. Brooks so popular a writer with his young
readers.’? — The Pilgrim Teacher.

The True Story of Benjamin Franklin, the American statesman.
The only popular life of the great Franklin written from a human standpoint for the boys and
girls of America. ;

The True Story of Lafayette, the friend of America.

This volume, the sixth in the series of «* Children’s Lives of Great Men,’’ will appeal to all
young Americans. It is an absorbing, simply told, and stirring story of a remarkable character
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the close of his long, dramatic, and romantic career.

The True Story of the United States of America. From 1492 to 1900.

This is in every sense a companion volume to the series of ‘« Children’s Lives of Great
Men.’’ It tells the true story of the beginnings, rise, and development of the republic of the
United States. Its object is to tell the story of the people of America. It is largely used for
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States yet told for young people.

?

At all bookstores, or sent postpaid on receipt of price,

LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO. . . ©. = «© = + ~~ # BOSTON
Elbridge S. Brooks’s Books for Boys and Girls

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It is no wonder that Mr. Brooks’s books are being put into so many schools, and if many such
books are included in school courses in the near future it is to be expected that truancy will be
at a discount.’’ — T’he Interior, Chicago.
The American Soldier. New and revised edition. Cloth, 4to, illustrated, $1.50.

A stirring and graphic record of the American fighting man, — from Bunker Hill to Santiago,

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The American Indian, Profusely illustrated, cloth, 4to, $1.50.

The first and only complete and consecutive story of the redmen of America.

The Boy Life of Napoleon, afterwards Emperor of the French. Adapted for
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trated, $1.25.

An absorbing and attractive volume, and the only story life of the boy Napoleon extant.

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In Blue and White: A Story of the American Revolution. 8vo, illustrated, $1.50.
This stirring story of the Revolution details the adventures of one of Washington’s famous

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to Yorktown. ;

In No Man’s Land: A Wonder Story. Cloth, 12mo, illustrated, $1.00.

«¢ Sparkles all over with glee. . . . There is not a duil line in it.”? — The Dial.

In Leisler’s Times: A Story of Knickerbocker New York, told for boys and girls,
Cloth, 12mo, illustrated by W. T. Smedley, $1.50.

«¢ A good boy’s book ; manly, patriotic, and readable.”” — The Independent.

The Story of New York. Cloth, 8vo, illustrated, $1.50.

This initial volume of the ««Story of the States Series,?? of which Mr. Brooks is editor.

*« More like a charming fireside legend, told by a grandfather to eager children, than the
dry and pompous chronicles commonly labelled history.” — Critic, New York.



The Story of our War with Spain. Told for young Americans. One vob,
8vo, profusely illustrated, $1.50.
An authentic, complete, and reliable account of the war for Cuban liberation in 1898.
<< Written in Mr. Brooks’s most graphic style in simple, straightforward, stirring chronicle,
without deviation for discussion or undue detail.’? — The Interior.
Storied Holidays. Cloth, 12mo, illustrated by Howard Pyle, $1.50.
A unique collection of historical stories about the world’s holidays, :
«* A book for buying and keeping that the children as they grow up, and the parents, too,
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. At all bookstores, or sent postpaid on receipt of price.’

LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO, ° lle . BOSTON






Bish
set
Be eae





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'1191' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPVR' 'sip-files00036.txt'
0c6badd93310d337b48b65d1f1ad2392
a6825591efa02af4025d1fbe1dd11f9797639ba9
'2011-12-21T07:35:32-05:00'
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPVS' 'sip-files00037.txt'
82ae0ffb48dc1818a27b1b4569e35c2d
ba03fe599c037d6c4bd785af1ec1a0c2539e99a8
'2011-12-21T07:34:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPVT' 'sip-files00038.txt'
c6b9175bca3b8237754afac251f3dbc8
9e672f760755894601e13a67ceab9b3f5d628fa0
'2011-12-21T07:37:57-05:00'
describe
'820' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPVU' 'sip-files00039.txt'
a757798ff246c5bae458e7f2d5492a58
f0d5e2d184ee3474d56aa56d2fc956cc8ef65e11
'2011-12-21T07:33:29-05:00'
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPVV' 'sip-files00040.txt'
b88c17d699bedc15dde03828d035c76f
61d5d9bf09f17f7394460b94e6ec2365f4b32aaa
describe
'201' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPVW' 'sip-files00041.txt'
edfe4fce1454c94ee870429f902b464f
45adcd3f8aad4ff470bf40a6a67f9ad53e46749f
'2011-12-21T07:38:32-05:00'
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPVX' 'sip-files00043.txt'
b19ffca4999af45168ec13a7beca962b
5f634482119212f0b3d730ef475972e4e8f7b434
describe
'661' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPVY' 'sip-files00044.txt'
5958f3154214ac5d13e9c08fcd5162e4
d0228515bd5ca716532aa22c671a854d0a94a086
'2011-12-21T07:37:44-05:00'
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPVZ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
fb425289a19f3bdb427a9975492cb521
55e5b1e3de1b60be22b90e07eccca9b1f24b717a
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWA' 'sip-files00046.txt'
14f02a51266b64648347262d7f13fb7c
eb1ebc1b024ee2d9d2805f6a250b15901ebfc9cb
'2011-12-21T07:38:52-05:00'
describe
'191' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWB' 'sip-files00047.txt'
44f9a316cf748ee3f453991444c26a7d
0141de769260df29226ffe08351dd339d9fcedf2
'2011-12-21T07:35:06-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1467' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
9901954d5aefda61b7bc9e7a5f65d97a
cd34d95eabeca7fe7b02b4d6d5eb81925df552fd
'2011-12-21T07:37:03-05:00'
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWD' 'sip-files00050.txt'
b064493c9b0984dd43a6c1e7e3d9178b
6720d7b04349dabebc16018020b808cb30c21d01
'2011-12-21T07:37:25-05:00'
describe
'355' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWE' 'sip-files00051.txt'
9e207d91e592b4846eed132911518ba7
890e4ca08dccb03f20913cda9b94c1dae11b9995
'2011-12-21T07:37:16-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1586' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWF' 'sip-files00053.txt'
9f73e779c1487ec9f4dcc8d2b6b71e41
02f4bf4267b082cf1c94009965f521709df735be
'2011-12-21T07:32:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWG' 'sip-files00054.txt'
e32bf75be920093d418e076909e7ebd9
a6ddb5a435708fe378da583199e23eb9e7ce27cb
'2011-12-21T07:37:56-05:00'
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWH' 'sip-files00055.txt'
6c892e7d44eaad7e57a39695033b319f
24f3667a155995dbd0e8ba159949577500070c1d
'2011-12-21T07:34:02-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1559' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWI' 'sip-files00056.txt'
d9920b73452782f486ee5576a7582508
17623f92fd3cee46d8619137d933a36359fd1b51
'2011-12-21T07:32:49-05:00'
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWJ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
a72930e532fe668482c81312c58131fe
dde6d615e502781cae993957b7f9eeda6aa1c816
'2011-12-21T07:37:30-05:00'
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWK' 'sip-files00058.txt'
86d2cdad1f504fb9a8ac8572b3001544
2b32d613113ae80b3ba02a1af6c058fb2ef89267
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWL' 'sip-files00059.txt'
f538abd14c439d7c22dbbf300651d47b
52d7b6f27c164d74bb777fcfaabf3cd47c338681
'2011-12-21T07:35:52-05:00'
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWM' 'sip-files00060.txt'
205dcbe35f78572da1a4728fb4957f3f
4c09609a4b784f389e48c84884a7561346222914
'2011-12-21T07:34:54-05:00'
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWN' 'sip-files00061.txt'
8b90d68a009c8190442b14977de88359
e82a91af214b82d0bb4a0a79a2712bb0d903a0f1
'2011-12-21T07:36:40-05:00'
describe
'1604' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWO' 'sip-files00062.txt'
8ce850a91c254a73dc39210967254a21
02e26bad8f792ba394704480940c7d410b440411
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWP' 'sip-files00063.txt'
7fb489efcd61094cb414cc46f5424057
a190cbb7e1c2dc54dac3180c90bd1b5c70b065d8
'2011-12-21T07:38:54-05:00'
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWQ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
2f1175b3a54112b21a6f4ab5ae2465b9
99c1943403750fb2b3d5201c36e7a3c307fa5441
'2011-12-21T07:35:00-05:00'
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWR' 'sip-files00065.txt'
8791fa1f884f7d8a3d0040168d8f9f2c
1205c30b66ddeb4a989d71e5118f1b7778630498
'2011-12-21T07:37:19-05:00'
describe
'1647' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWS' 'sip-files00066.txt'
e325db5223e14dfa42110bdff055dc94
bc386a2f3a688a1f0b98c0940a068c097271907d
'2011-12-21T07:33:51-05:00'
describe
'769' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWT' 'sip-files00067.txt'
320f4371b0056b718c34baa3560c61f5
a5ca47d4f744f226489018bd72374c7b32ef99c6
'2011-12-21T07:37:38-05:00'
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWU' 'sip-files00068.txt'
b3115b36cb5bb717c54f9bc78fd0be23
4f325772249b1c374c467aeb34257fc62adca080
'2011-12-21T07:38:31-05:00'
describe
'264' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWV' 'sip-files00069.txt'
ba4526c91363ca5214726e7ae88968b6
8866cb1396cc9167079dd2ae2ac5c69ea174cffc
'2011-12-21T07:33:08-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1495' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWW' 'sip-files00071.txt'
a3dd8551bb10e5a3f4f67a06a57f1f01
2cb7ff410a0eae3b6956b51a4b4cc2b607c6d0a5
'2011-12-21T07:32:47-05:00'
describe
'1628' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWX' 'sip-files00072.txt'
b5dc3905e49322a3b47d0200b4633903
bc130f7236861330407131359f41c4a54da57a1d
'2011-12-21T07:33:32-05:00'
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWY' 'sip-files00073.txt'
602d1de19ff6aa85b681fcc1cf21971f
8c4d8a1c9a17029e4c96d5e4c87937d55f019a02
'2011-12-21T07:36:18-05:00'
describe
'810' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPWZ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
ff7ee6d009b4e2b664cbdeddf3258f79
1ba1efece568843d3c7f0b3e651231e0c77db5d4
'2011-12-21T07:36:16-05:00'
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXA' 'sip-files00075.txt'
1076232b4b7bcf1e7467f39ba4f304ad
b49fe2215f4bb87ff7ed46333d1a4953f6cc73a1
'2011-12-21T07:38:12-05:00'
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXB' 'sip-files00076.txt'
b1a84d144854ed96647c9116cd1dd7bd
e63cf189679b022cc14d507604b93be8d3d2f805
'2011-12-21T07:32:06-05:00'
describe
'512' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXC' 'sip-files00077.txt'
47f8024ce0091bb2e4148dd275efaa9e
24ffe370f3c4781addfe300b119f9fcdd85270a8
'2011-12-21T07:34:23-05:00'
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXD' 'sip-files00078.txt'
e18c9fbbd92de943ea7f4097b24b4983
13842f0d298972a74328a038890fc137a2ddbeff
'2011-12-21T07:33:31-05:00'
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXE' 'sip-files00079.txt'
56629c4f6ed5a82a2bb46b6cea24912c
d42b1e2150e6e1f0f3e22481ac367e5f42a59363
'2011-12-21T07:33:22-05:00'
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXF' 'sip-files00082.txt'
be346d7e3a5af7814343c644246d7c94
858f04597589225813a7f26b41ce72c4cb476f1d
'2011-12-21T07:33:21-05:00'
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXG' 'sip-files00083.txt'
63337a8bebfe6264d7fd5cf441735629
1e3a055a73706ee577c35af680940149ac45e50b
'2011-12-21T07:36:39-05:00'
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXH' 'sip-files00084.txt'
5d933f605fdc91e959e56d4e29a9d85b
7ad5fcb105bd8d30ba674c5d4a6427da98a29608
'2011-12-21T07:36:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXI' 'sip-files00085.txt'
9392b7a94197f6de5f1852d5cec13369
d5e6676e512e88d5b43b059e8381aed999c37741
'2011-12-21T07:34:59-05:00'
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXJ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
ec0a55049423af77e4e71ad370e541bc
465bfef3349bdda13dc13256d3fbd551a37630f9
'2011-12-21T07:34:28-05:00'
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXK' 'sip-files00087.txt'
c48c1a961e541cdcaa158248d6c212b2
2f81d0bd059edcea6a124b879cc0b990cf4d5201
'2011-12-21T07:36:17-05:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXL' 'sip-files00088.txt'
fa9af54bc7f1645fcd2c51770c4e2253
a1826c291a0741c134962c59908cde2d3e65fdc4
'2011-12-21T07:33:18-05:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXM' 'sip-files00089.txt'
6b37717ea996cceac57a06dab474f650
51faaffd04def2a9e1ddd7dfaaae8bf64d2efbe0
'2011-12-21T07:37:00-05:00'
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXN' 'sip-files00090.txt'
89c10a1da705a0a65cd4c134d422a8d2
a6def6e6e8eb5604401f601de5976ec4a6023400
'2011-12-21T07:38:07-05:00'
describe
'285' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXO' 'sip-files00091.txt'
ef0c7ed4ee35a456c09a9f59f4a13a22
2e0e7581ddcd0a9f279879dac3a54fb2e62a3424
'2011-12-21T07:38:51-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1556' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXP' 'sip-files00093.txt'
2303ddc0f2b1cbbe185fc137c3f5ea72
03ef7502ae8d97a9db9c56ae65c4d6af83e03d4b
'2011-12-21T07:36:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXQ' 'sip-files00094.txt'
327923977a55a80ebbb7f6ea9dcf7ed3
c10699453837008781f299f5c2679064ede4c6de
'2011-12-21T07:35:25-05:00'
describe
'241' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXR' 'sip-files00095.txt'
28fa224ea3aca72cbdabe34c316237f3
186a6b493c88e1df4bcf9406218a4a76d8d30fee
'2011-12-21T07:31:57-05:00'
describe
'1563' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXS' 'sip-files00097.txt'
928c1744f4105666672353d7f601c948
66f34373783a8376f65e62090a8083804ec88479
'2011-12-21T07:37:59-05:00'
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXT' 'sip-files00098.txt'
88efb553cbbfc823d7d5bfd1ca590917
a9965649f83346778323cf2133109c1bbab4fe6e
'2011-12-21T07:38:00-05:00'
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXU' 'sip-files00099.txt'
a103bc211a51190a0e0c76d18b0b1bb6
ae319364af93306e402bcdabd7c7bd7961b1b877
'2011-12-21T07:33:33-05:00'
describe
'763' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXV' 'sip-files00100.txt'
6182bcba918345094c8a56d7353fd7d9
7645311aa6327fa3f4b2dde66eef64b89bb90c8f
'2011-12-21T07:35:23-05:00'
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXW' 'sip-files00101.txt'
d49913c46a7b608c87621592a7269808
f937eebe8ecbd962f619e9ee5936542ad1394889
'2011-12-21T07:36:57-05:00'
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXX' 'sip-files00102.txt'
c027f9bf7e28e83def252f6fb5d7f0e0
d1e1b9cd9728a0cecfc28870ef71e346c10f2f9c
'2011-12-21T07:33:41-05:00'
describe
'187' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXY' 'sip-files00103.txt'
37ab70da62fe166508cc40608518a8e5
7a440579b8d23ca868881e9bcc33c367754c997a
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPXZ' 'sip-files00105.txt'
934f3733f71bb58e41f5fafa19a00306
f2323879b6aabbcf65927c1e2914468c3d52e844
'2011-12-21T07:36:48-05:00'
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYA' 'sip-files00106.txt'
825636d37529fa60183a7a1b1a538ee4
4deb2ba57b231e5fe7698b8aed2f2f92d7027e1e
'2011-12-21T07:33:42-05:00'
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYB' 'sip-files00107.txt'
e7f99d7a234473e81efe758663a8d106
97d3a6e2b3c583c38853aca1ea8596c09f89ec83
'2011-12-21T07:33:58-05:00'
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYC' 'sip-files00108.txt'
208686a1643c592ff3e33f88c3e70dd6
5ad6700932550127bcd927e4c0e02e4a76257676
'2011-12-21T07:37:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYD' 'sip-files00109.txt'
5197ef38616c85e4714a6c2a5091448a
444160d623fe2f8c37c7ad21a5e4ddb54962ca77
'2011-12-21T07:32:04-05:00'
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYE' 'sip-files00110.txt'
0c58a230f87cebb8150b31d3f4590458
43afa2dbd5a848f5a81feef195e314e095d3af35
'2011-12-21T07:36:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYF' 'sip-files00111.txt'
b38ad7b99e1f2e797b0dc95351efafed
47c88349e56e013a746fdb2b4342dc67010caa29
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYG' 'sip-files00112.txt'
251f473fb72354f54bc5a23fc82d88ce
29c31d8d288d531e0c8762094ccc0eed7317b973
'2011-12-21T07:38:53-05:00'
describe
'1576' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYH' 'sip-files00113.txt'
31b4d249ffabf510341974131b8fbe2c
8ac361613dec8755140e535426a4cc915d511254
'2011-12-21T07:33:05-05:00'
describe
'622' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYI' 'sip-files00114.txt'
54765e8cfb2b74496dda746a9f290a27
d8766c51796d8c1c2851640929303a3995d10cab
'2011-12-21T07:36:28-05:00'
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYJ' 'sip-files00115.txt'
eb9766f42887da57079289ebfa055ac5
4951e683e19dbaeca637e1e5ae7b9ac1ff3296a8
'2011-12-21T07:34:16-05:00'
describe
'1614' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYK' 'sip-files00116.txt'
1365cdc3cdd174f7916553dbcb02f891
af9f8de994516f609cfc648d2fef930c6217e96e
'2011-12-21T07:31:59-05:00'
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYL' 'sip-files00117.txt'
35a7e88a5c0c738a356a3d678aa02d3a
44afa9cd771421ee7acbb4f14ccfb17b5a9d8213
'2011-12-21T07:36:59-05:00'
describe
'1598' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYM' 'sip-files00118.txt'
ff280e0660fe56872c5bf46195bb1668
676377f188b5102205d8fc5c57cfc3b10abfc1e3
'2011-12-21T07:34:06-05:00'
describe
'1638' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYN' 'sip-files00119.txt'
d1814044d073d1ac21f17c5900f2b108
10ea1bd3748972b01af51f3a8d8387639e705680
'2011-12-21T07:35:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYO' 'sip-files00120.txt'
69c38f0efb99ad97e46e908399986d91
77d16a889c2349a474bbd326eef290615564ed4b
'2011-12-21T07:38:50-05:00'
describe
'1640' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYP' 'sip-files00121.txt'
9d4eba909fa03a76a9fdb9dd9032eebe
40b54a5232d0f650ec16a004a0e2e7c34195456a
'2011-12-21T07:36:43-05:00'
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYQ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
22bd9d33d15677a2f452fe0083c3b0ca
2051058a4d53690cb0d76f4cdecdbfa5841655e8
'2011-12-21T07:36:41-05:00'
describe
'756' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYR' 'sip-files00123.txt'
a1b3f4e7212cba1b0cf392a1b0906a34
70e719cae40c8b21b4fbb4e0176e75f9208727c3
'2011-12-21T07:35:19-05:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYS' 'sip-files00124.txt'
ccee03afbaa7033206049ab4d0b2c190
48c51c4672839fc4778f44f2b7be74cf25aed52e
'2011-12-21T07:33:46-05:00'
describe
'715' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYT' 'sip-files00125.txt'
c78cb115b8755e45923240d08ae5a35b
6bb576476c22ba64eabca6d1dc9ed4cf51835e8f
'2011-12-21T07:34:47-05:00'
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYU' 'sip-files00126.txt'
755e424fa814d22537fe3bab18072530
f717effcdc970da1a37e675494432ab0f1d63cb4
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYV' 'sip-files00127.txt'
e2e22bb64bd8604c3cbd72e6e6b67fcd
7b130fea5ed1835f02c4a3bc7bee090426aeeae9
'2011-12-21T07:37:20-05:00'
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYW' 'sip-files00128.txt'
4926ccbf133988f8de4202acf2867ed0
b2708f5ce9458331bad782a67369d6dd03aa3ad7
'2011-12-21T07:33:40-05:00'
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYX' 'sip-files00129.txt'
a00216d140d093f4ece7103703a205fc
840e3e2da0f0ee5c437ae72cb7126930cd06b5f2
'2011-12-21T07:32:20-05:00'
describe
'757' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYY' 'sip-files00130.txt'
5ddbfff2172c1f21e9cae69c826b0b94
f5ab64cef7ca3ca91ac699a0691b58d006713f01
'2011-12-21T07:38:28-05:00'
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPYZ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
aaddb5251640db760ff93bdc6f869b6e
7c2dacda81e09ca087146101ad13f8f40438039b
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZA' 'sip-files00132.txt'
782ccac1cfc1f80092e69e93e3d841ae
571d30ca5d1ee3d025efb801f7277f5982b85252
describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZB' 'sip-files00133.txt'
63cfd4ab76cc60f0b5e06d0f8cd08de9
b03665bde37a5c146745ada47bcba5b59ae2eee5
'2011-12-21T07:34:22-05:00'
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZC' 'sip-files00134.txt'
3baa31fbd02f205ffc268d826e81729a
df87841bc682173fcf67c1dce443263d45f963db
describe
'417' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZD' 'sip-files00135.txt'
f7b57325433b3b6431e1a88540499ee0
95986efa0ea4a98191f5c7e20a87970a1e60c529
'2011-12-21T07:38:35-05:00'
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZE' 'sip-files00137.txt'
09050498a9b9894598fcc594f50afdd2
8bab7b9450351d759557da96c255b696022f15f9
'2011-12-21T07:35:33-05:00'
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZF' 'sip-files00138.txt'
422a8d2910086c9bd63a5c30c0a0a6ed
8d2e94722488ed163f32ed2399748c2dd0f38239
'2011-12-21T07:38:46-05:00'
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZG' 'sip-files00139.txt'
8159e328007a87c96724427d67005a29
82269f28a55f7eb037cab80c7e6909e8e99a5e3a
'2011-12-21T07:33:28-05:00'
describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZH' 'sip-files00140.txt'
a88ef0635fad54f9a571b9485a38a4f4
db4eb7239bd5194fe34aaa2c3f10efd5c1d1e206
'2011-12-21T07:35:57-05:00'
describe
'229' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZI' 'sip-files00141.txt'
3fd8d6d45d1d461297ee5dc88ad1cf24
81b3d9f9b7bf5884d7ce99f397bcffda408db100
'2011-12-21T07:38:43-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'733' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZJ' 'sip-files00143.txt'
1ff1e0bf93a36d39a94d9b9f52d42a81
ce2ee4332272e27ec681b1daafdb5010cc4d0095
'2011-12-21T07:32:25-05:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZK' 'sip-files00144.txt'
984ae835109c07a4e9d6b51dad636452
5d31771467a39a40767ef517c41021e94490bdb4
'2011-12-21T07:32:30-05:00'
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZL' 'sip-files00145.txt'
4a7363d629bc16d1a01eba31a904bd52
f277cfa69a0951cd915721d4274dc643b046abba
'2011-12-21T07:35:28-05:00'
describe
'1560' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZM' 'sip-files00146.txt'
1d43beb05891c732df51837ff63fb266
75b3a43c574caf37f216b510bc56da5c808358aa
'2011-12-21T07:36:32-05:00'
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZN' 'sip-files00147.txt'
205e12e43e390850625d1e22da0ba813
d222b985e39ecefa5fe37b7906dd249f2c82745e
'2011-12-21T07:37:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZO' 'sip-files00148.txt'
c69c0a9e9ac0b2deb026b9822d76508c
54e246538e74a61f7349b53b0a3dd9f240d193d4
'2011-12-21T07:33:53-05:00'
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZP' 'sip-files00149.txt'
94d22fd58ecccbfb1a6b48fcbc162080
c1a93be512918a735c475272f55ed477ba966f12
describe
'1687' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZQ' 'sip-files00150.txt'
a14b087d75f82b90470ebe37e48a623d
845afc0691d9b3964336ade0679564ab3a16db0a
describe
'347' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZR' 'sip-files00151.txt'
840704d7dd5d3c54d3dce23a812ddc07
773857846a8684743aa96f1ac18e4dd785c81e58
'2011-12-21T07:38:22-05:00'
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZS' 'sip-files00153.txt'
6628bc0c816e8d6212962573c3d43535
02626d38663bbbda109898550d7f496de31f5767
'2011-12-21T07:34:51-05:00'
describe
'1606' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZT' 'sip-files00154.txt'
f4d0244d7a0671781b337a41e5707b25
487104ba12c95c1d3f5689e9e49e18c3376614d1
describe
'786' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZU' 'sip-files00155.txt'
81258442e2b7d3effc6c9829b1961cb5
2a108e220aeaa2b826f4a74d7b22519a5702855e
'2011-12-21T07:32:33-05:00'
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZV' 'sip-files00156.txt'
1bd3e24720560db221ee03da3776ded4
bca7f06fbb33341add5a1ff231ee601f1255112c
'2011-12-21T07:33:07-05:00'
describe
'197' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZW' 'sip-files00157.txt'
03b5ccf4c110cc9355afcdb761d3eeea
ce8b4eac94ce55b909663051bf661eaf30b3b27a
'2011-12-21T07:35:58-05:00'
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZX' 'sip-files00159.txt'
0cd5bb3401d83cb3a7040133fa2f74aa
8c784892cd870edf4493659c61246cd33589ed2f
'2011-12-21T07:33:06-05:00'
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZY' 'sip-files00160.txt'
5b5f01c3af09a9b3e7240c43f09a2909
a01f47faa99a1b59d083210b8b5aaabf67b869d1
'2011-12-21T07:34:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAPZZ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
b8ac9a48b2e5ef9267e1a9548593938b
e4d85528844962796af77666d8770d34d3636bd3
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAA' 'sip-files00162.txt'
38b6d48905f7f3607f458a5d6e7a4b57
cdb0ad64ed84fbac061ee6ab02df52a993d42a5c
'2011-12-21T07:36:05-05:00'
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAB' 'sip-files00163.txt'
b2070bcf90843c0397bc657ae0585474
319708635dda5f64cebe2a488293404dcedcf2ad
'2011-12-21T07:37:21-05:00'
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAC' 'sip-files00164.txt'
0a9845580ac8d021328997ee64ec5e52
4f174e8c773352172fd8da14edf9e1a85cc8ace9
'2011-12-21T07:34:24-05:00'
describe
'501' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAD' 'sip-files00165.txt'
ab2144f4b3d622d81028b2b43a9f4165
c8b04ffa41dcb27663e314255fd6a98297dade2e
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAE' 'sip-files00166.txt'
c93bd5b0a0b7455e93c20183b82ac271
eea018029b804563ccfa3c6c89fbabd0c0d97426
'2011-12-21T07:32:41-05:00'
describe
'682' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAF' 'sip-files00167.txt'
76ec584933e75510c5b6a0f853ef7527
fee8e43b808557e240be8489474eb1513ee51d4d
'2011-12-21T07:32:16-05:00'
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAG' 'sip-files00168.txt'
88d23649b4adee9094959058fee86a05
22de32be369be6a1f66347320f1596d9d0ab015f
'2011-12-21T07:32:44-05:00'
describe
'308' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAH' 'sip-files00169.txt'
c96c9f6074192b526f9576bf48bce6e3
4725a37cfad21073d9f820b09e93dd08356f1d7b
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAI' 'sip-files00171.txt'
39f84fec8e64edb56e3e14a304ae26f5
fafdcbd3a97f408a21fe0b9d163314e81108c736
'2011-12-21T07:33:20-05:00'
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAJ' 'sip-files00172.txt'
b1c32a64d8ed6e977bc0b4c1e63f2d86
78cb29c55d9cb4b98718ae6800a53900568adafb
'2011-12-21T07:37:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAK' 'sip-files00173.txt'
0649e3102d0428afcc85bbd441bd6262
367891afd7778c6268d2c2d9e4dcbf81444d184a
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAL' 'sip-files00174.txt'
a70c68ed994143d8b1053e18755ded12
3addf70094bebfd19c39f9e57f6849db66855797
'2011-12-21T07:37:37-05:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAM' 'sip-files00175.txt'
20b974f8f4b1cd42c081637ace63a684
f5d3f28ea4d18af01b01a8f48f00ed6ea5aa1de6
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAN' 'sip-files00176.txt'
d9ba37800e0847d19d37f63d7c46ea0f
9858dc12cffd2dcd7d14154a45975fbe1b6020a4
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAO' 'sip-files00177.txt'
1e295fdb949689697e1d6f59989c6e52
5fd40e36038ed7b2ff77e5e5ba377eae1894a884
'2011-12-21T07:33:04-05:00'
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAP' 'sip-files00178.txt'
b06fd8ab914aa3d46637f0e2903eb512
cfadb3c74e99f596bcb0ada96dbe49c269586294
describe
'691' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAQ' 'sip-files00179.txt'
2d60044e2553f3d0938aad3b5b621be7
b31f86e6909669d8e61f7ee5b53507efac685ee4
'2011-12-21T07:37:08-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1521' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAR' 'sip-files00180.txt'
171a7c7a933f2aa8e0919d54004f3b6c
55c0a36e1e820029580f1a00c8a8ebe34a3c287f
'2011-12-21T07:32:42-05:00'
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAS' 'sip-files00181.txt'
8f098971fbbc1c235c3be30deead1f67
69effd59b5891a8b4a28f19ca81ac3e9c847f261
'2011-12-21T07:37:54-05:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAT' 'sip-files00182.txt'
e17e6c17fa153ba8821fc17a33e291a0
1174acb736c67fe755269345eb5ec4de2bbe6e0c
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAU' 'sip-files00183.txt'
e4564f42a9fb212d09709583ec7bb501
871d51875403efc7fdf8ecc61a70b2597c7eb393
'2011-12-21T07:36:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAV' 'sip-files00184.txt'
4d8f497f9090eccbc3ae35e6af32272b
295a8131aaf4527bb8e631ba327d7a7925a7f2ba
'2011-12-21T07:36:20-05:00'
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAW' 'sip-files00185.txt'
b4e0c51ab521a42ea08eef0008f24158
1f7b36f64a4368b125ee1b5fb2f3115cc9017800
'2011-12-21T07:33:38-05:00'
describe
'1680' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAX' 'sip-files00186.txt'
ac2d51bf05905328742505ca19f98310
359473323e2b5619737d88cca9cfcd0bbb3e38bd
'2011-12-21T07:37:12-05:00'
describe
'207' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAY' 'sip-files00187.txt'
2ed127e23c90c0ba90dc4772a8fe84f8
49a4631e6314c67e4eba764763431aeaf5ad1825
describe
Invalid character
'1489' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQAZ' 'sip-files00189.txt'
e370fa3d891e59c472d0ad71e0dbfb25
e6ee31a17f0283517efa098f9b284bbd1878d2cb
'2011-12-21T07:37:52-05:00'
describe
'1705' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBA' 'sip-files00190.txt'
33eb5ee4d07552ea8214ae02b0bf0dae
528b9730045ea9c49ae9c0edceee8293866e88ab
'2011-12-21T07:36:52-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBB' 'sip-files00191.txt'
c589b1c73f022ee116d402f60a17cd67
7cfb3f2ac42545c52aef3a7a55300ce98a90ab6a
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBC' 'sip-files00192.txt'
d47e7c60496e4f5d4bff93f59ddbf109
7276712e44b7b5e84466de6f3d0de2337cfb12fd
'2011-12-21T07:34:13-05:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBD' 'sip-files00193.txt'
728b5dd1a6e8859d06a851cc407b29d1
b66572611d9b916210ac3fcb80219258c065a156
'2011-12-21T07:32:21-05:00'
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBE' 'sip-files00194.txt'
317406924c73e768df2a77743ed91c31
ce3cf772c4088c5b82bd40722fa3ea824701fa6c
'2011-12-21T07:35:59-05:00'
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBF' 'sip-files00195.txt'
faf387246f2deb4779c5937302e17138
56301a35fac2c5730b335dd3d2fb78011a12fc84
'2011-12-21T07:33:49-05:00'
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBG' 'sip-files00196.txt'
337fbf493ecf31e23d919189fe5d4b58
4a62d9744c4d89aff933c32ba6d61cee010368ba
'2011-12-21T07:36:51-05:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBH' 'sip-files00197.txt'
f1a3f71eb480de5ff867300f2eba78f5
e795584bf4d7e670d658a6e454ce724f0d8a34f1
'2011-12-21T07:33:34-05:00'
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBI' 'sip-files00198.txt'
8d7fe0bc9eb4939290e402359866ef9e
762a0e0f2a0e6565b67abcc819d70e62f7d397dd
'2011-12-21T07:32:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBJ' 'sip-files00199.txt'
5e53398e80ecaa55ced02ef9ac5c91ce
530070621c8b5f0c8e45cf3c715994cf2b8b87cb
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBK' 'sip-files00200.txt'
0f7f62d1ca4e2ce4ac76e8aeb072baeb
cfbee71213672a8432b2d3f9be35dbea35019395
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBL' 'sip-files00201.txt'
3dc774188112b6f8e74128727db70c70
eee72052f8a320c5b2a2631e358c092fd60ec6d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBM' 'sip-files00202.txt'
5e0ff0097ec0c8340a048d0b175052ab
ccfe4291d32bbecc695af68900326ab9c6a0d9d8
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBN' 'sip-files00203.txt'
c0c13458352c9c0ce08531b0c02ab84b
35e9ea4035f6a3d58de387760768af52349d9a40
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBO' 'sip-files00204.txt'
1b8824308621880f7a23e67bd80e9185
2d833f9dc4fafc2a98c5dc033b54bf9f7536e0bf
'2011-12-21T07:35:21-05:00'
describe
'593' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBP' 'sip-files00205.txt'
6c9b322a74bac36e17422904df5eb908
e4e446c885896c9bff3540f2f96186fba834da13
'2011-12-21T07:34:07-05:00'
describe
'1630' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBQ' 'sip-files00206.txt'
fbbc8629b36f3117445fd1bb4e28e0cc
84d3480637a21979946ecea9b87e13aaadf5dc0d
'2011-12-21T07:32:23-05:00'
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBR' 'sip-files00207.txt'
c3f04fdad05153fac1da67609b472f50
58d1e4ff2e685756b0377b2d6d36dee84642048d
'2011-12-21T07:34:19-05:00'
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBS' 'sip-files00208.txt'
88f68a6bd33c97d658502fdb04ab2577
df4ce9243fb3249149a89671942b538671b0d8cb
describe
'221' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBT' 'sip-files00209.txt'
ec88bc254dbd9117336d3daf5076eba9
963f13c76523644d26cd28a2e20ed0885e4dc8ea
'2011-12-21T07:36:33-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBU' 'sip-files00211.txt'
1506c9209129ac4687e522363ccd37b7
cb0b65b267f7a7bb5384e17bbe1aad42a09235f1
'2011-12-21T07:36:58-05:00'
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBV' 'sip-files00212.txt'
e4e01b1921cb58e72c5bc638787b18ed
afb83c7ac10a164cea999661cb50aa7c61b8db8e
'2011-12-21T07:32:09-05:00'
describe
'641' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBW' 'sip-files00213.txt'
3830c84c82cb4ca6128cb93e47028b73
741a2bac3c54c1ad3d9326e605f2505c5c1ae28b
'2011-12-21T07:38:11-05:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBX' 'sip-files00214.txt'
d8b817eb50f775751b11fd6b5ca40052
d8ce84008b7192beb1cf31042bbb6152e464965a
'2011-12-21T07:35:41-05:00'
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBY' 'sip-files00215.txt'
ac8405bbcc03adde85bc89b5b0102337
bd099811501e83c47989f937e18824429d3cb1ca
'2011-12-21T07:35:29-05:00'
describe
'1673' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQBZ' 'sip-files00216.txt'
83fe77fd32d85f2019f100530a71cf9a
721ee37db213c482b48a534e3b20187c430f02fa
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCA' 'sip-files00217.txt'
430700628f521619540c90da2084ea83
0bbc32e5a55f7fd20afc076c537b7c1c14878b50
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCB' 'sip-files00218.txt'
910d1f853ac4c5e1df6a9a7a2e344863
72ed101b432c2c9320dacd1d2fd3c50c8a982ceb
'2011-12-21T07:34:26-05:00'
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCC' 'sip-files00219.txt'
fa854f4e4c82632f1ae8ab6945dd5de5
3707f059c9361e8a3da88c95ee58544e54d8f717
'2011-12-21T07:33:15-05:00'
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCD' 'sip-files00220.txt'
a9de81f7a818bda63eb82f2b88046ca9
f17e196d5a2763c6c3338a1f71854d3743b2137f
'2011-12-21T07:34:36-05:00'
describe
'274' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCE' 'sip-files00221.txt'
ae0b7302bc6257a75d20baf7daf8e79e
c2a06573e5aa88a0642ee9a1d5e253fb68ae19da
'2011-12-21T07:36:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCF' 'sip-files00223.txt'
e67d6c040de0c3e9875f03deedf89ded
7af3fa91bd4f17776d23a0b46f228624d168c1ea
describe
'1573' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCG' 'sip-files00224.txt'
d0ca360643bbe56910c9a564834c0f88
59070d9ae2e77060211d1d1703560acdd964271b
describe
'730' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCH' 'sip-files00225.txt'
a4665e41e80284d6aab9c6f05ce28f86
d6e0fdcb0148c4aded366fd6027b2b9e290b943c
'2011-12-21T07:35:04-05:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCI' 'sip-files00226.txt'
a39f6ed04c8e5ecb7d5d2b1752305585
8950a50cabca23d7288b2b681e511ba54cc9081b
'2011-12-21T07:38:03-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1325' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCJ' 'sip-files00227.txt'
798b98d27a398ecf2386e7f19f1345f3
017d1df43efa28e659998eec7d62bde341ae7d83
'2011-12-21T07:36:50-05:00'
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCK' 'sip-files00228.txt'
a9230b8bf6c3d4eb43c34b98b30bf470
25ed43e0eb86064a414d0fa738df51cf33066465
'2011-12-21T07:37:47-05:00'
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCL' 'sip-files00229.txt'
c6ad52bd1b02b2a6c4578735674d4343
4c9ed5e91f20ae595bd9048105b51c6bae6db68f
'2011-12-21T07:35:38-05:00'
describe
'702' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCM' 'sip-files00230.txt'
43c5cc28137d8485344ed40bf3849360
fcaa5a85bd21e5d0539c7e1fd60695d14d950de3
'2011-12-21T07:37:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCN' 'sip-files00231.txt'
78afe9e1831bd5219f1afce668baeda1
bc23b3002730073a3db837c9dca19c31a93bd7f1
describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCO' 'sip-files00232.txt'
d19c0ceb019e9da142340ccf3115ec31
d9e4beaf36d7b951bdb8b9a60a45e2f02415f8d7
describe
'108' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCP' 'sip-files00233.txt'
60a4cf3b9950372e1f4c60d45695db29
b720043b9606ab0b06ce3cfc525225120b70c0af
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCQ' 'sip-files00235.txt'
a7ff14ee914fd0b7902db02dee13f981
dff68741fcbca1dd849e4dd2def5378659971021
'2011-12-21T07:34:37-05:00'
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCR' 'sip-files00236.txt'
8a202e6086b3ffe6dd0032c5941c29de
65230ed2c47296870791cda78980fa3bcbb72ec7
'2011-12-21T07:34:04-05:00'
describe
'868' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCS' 'sip-files00237.txt'
7492a7c8805b806075c972ffc72092cd
adb183df659d41fbcf70891d9270718cbc2f784b
'2011-12-21T07:34:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCT' 'sip-files00238.txt'
03d52b4462a2cb889dc0bc92a14d3ff5
51a2227be71fad1b250f5b3ff039133fdda82e89
describe
'321' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCU' 'sip-files00239.txt'
70253bef7fa4b41c44389bccafea4419
798fab8560eafb3145dfd9018376151f987d8197
'2011-12-21T07:36:35-05:00'
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCV' 'sip-files00241.txt'
3ee1e48d46db334b381623ee10b24029
4d72eb21cdc9e0a8adc9d51ace641b9562360241
'2011-12-21T07:34:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCW' 'sip-files00242.txt'
edd758b6c93cd0967113a5d54d8f2168
8f75250ced0b72316c830023d0bd44d9520482ba
describe
'2830' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCX' 'sip-files00243.txt'
ab2d3582e6230df6917a907ea16b28fa
801be1b9ad90de333a05e938d3461f0241a8139b
'2011-12-21T07:32:28-05:00'
describe
'3134' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCY' 'sip-files00244.txt'
41d424a9a27bb20fda187961adfc7096
4fb6f20dc0415964fc87937ac05e0a7791f31e6f
'2011-12-21T07:35:34-05:00'
describe
'235' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQCZ' 'sip-files00251.txt'
2eac8b0ec38591aba9bd504d43510b25
1255ca300fcd775419f7c1ee04c9087cb54b67b5
describe
'1364442' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDA' 'sip-files00001.pro'
38ebf05ee233e5f066efd929052a30be
28baf97cc14d09e00aa5506f18f9bcfe37ef1d94
'2011-12-21T07:36:44-05:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDB' 'sip-files00002.pro'
374136c8ef70d8d2da44b8657ae25f6c
a07abac54a4994d76666bc30c71176ec94cde3dc
describe
'8910' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDC' 'sip-files00006.pro'
0d2df7e594957038197142faf420d1f0
3c6c20611207414598f63a3f152f565b8a6e30e2
'2011-12-21T07:35:27-05:00'
describe
'10236' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDD' 'sip-files00007.pro'
7dab3dd69ac9434e293850777ae31325
93c58feaa1b9dcfe816270086b4d781a21e1607b
describe
'2966' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDE' 'sip-files00008.pro'
564851065f3046268102881f22535aef
e66f703653428ecf8106f14d9ff3713025ed5ab8
describe
'53518' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDF' 'sip-files00009.pro'
a079ac825c5b7fd5bf8adcb11974b43b
977bf688add9a5c35ebf8daee89a91183e61156f
'2011-12-21T07:34:21-05:00'
describe
'11902' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDG' 'sip-files00011.pro'
a8b6d2c41ff13d86d98df06ced6094b3
cfd935a8a311f50cb9678221c854c14f2b88a1c0
'2011-12-21T07:35:42-05:00'
describe
'8492' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDH' 'sip-files00012.pro'
132e6d3d817064fc7270a5675a3a0e7f
82dd9efc9a506b31eaceceabc0f6c380be9e369e
describe
'40943' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDI' 'sip-files00013.pro'
089f9834ddae11805f2d9489d2992d4d
6a8ab9d25af34d147b5b807b4d6b76f2e4acb163
'2011-12-21T07:35:02-05:00'
describe
'53851' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDJ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
50cf687fcc929f17e9a1de700f5bb15b
0ce0454ae1dabb8b4e9fe751bacb23be5fcf7f39
'2011-12-21T07:34:34-05:00'
describe
'30089' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDK' 'sip-files00015.pro'
f1ccaa668823ffd47c061d7e125d0742
e0fbc6071990ce104a5ed6399184a4fbd017ca6f
'2011-12-21T07:38:47-05:00'
describe
'20898' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDL' 'sip-files00017.pro'
0b7d4509c44e6b604297b5d4979a21f5
30c376ec096b55e930860e040cff2e83f5929115
'2011-12-21T07:33:26-05:00'
describe
'38922' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDM' 'sip-files00018.pro'
fe74d8f1feea71563a1fd430ed6610db
d2caaf991d8742f8e7ee9ec986ff68a92efe8e08
describe
'4591' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDN' 'sip-files00019.pro'
b91fda8541ef53334e890af49c6c4807
1afada51160d0a74e6e1fbd55569b2f5700a8a78
describe
'38736' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDO' 'sip-files00021.pro'
6dbbcca8f4d4739e5f14306d1ebab1b0
75feda4e9b0c51e70d3c99d69d74e9f0ed8f240d
describe
'31346' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDP' 'sip-files00022.pro'
caedeeac8ae6b7adcaf33c6c6b2af2de
75912844e7626ce8cf60c6d281c4b0cfac338ae0
describe
'39723' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDQ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
bac0beb7024a19df531dc2d7f58c68e9
8dbee160aad2a58297bbccc3083e8efd404f57bc
'2011-12-21T07:34:17-05:00'
describe
'17613' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDR' 'sip-files00024.pro'
1eca689aab521fae0f20a7dfc6762431
8387c08c15ba171c8b8597ad8b9e40b6d999faa2
describe
'40915' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDS' 'sip-files00025.pro'
819a1174408af20ba89eb499260dedf0
a9060d4ec1b58ac300f6852fbadac441c878dc20
describe
'25861' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDT' 'sip-files00026.pro'
fc4315582653495b42a46f75a60d4fe7
801824c27120ebc00f7610a6bc4d3b98541c6e91
describe
'40658' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDU' 'sip-files00027.pro'
22c2846513c9f9426fbd7ed8463d45df
c79e760105f772ac9b7c1dc99d1d530b4d7e05a5
'2011-12-21T07:32:14-05:00'
describe
'25845' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDV' 'sip-files00028.pro'
e464808bc9dc5561e620e28ad6d99792
fd4967e5d2e08f5227052718ea0fe198b9615589
describe
'38498' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDW' 'sip-files00029.pro'
f5bb5bb15b6001871d12243467e8cb19
144d2cc4f9d75774365802aef22dea797cbc1a9b
'2011-12-21T07:35:24-05:00'
describe
'40091' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDX' 'sip-files00030.pro'
bdbda20c5589f6cd6e1a36272f9cc9f2
7be367ede381c00efe68f842e09e0348435d238c
'2011-12-21T07:35:40-05:00'
describe
'2058' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDY' 'sip-files00031.pro'
b215e8441cbbc3ca34170c83d04f4b25
bfa173bf5c9663a9a1708c8363ecd182b1968e67
describe
'39555' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQDZ' 'sip-files00033.pro'
71b076c537530ee72f299b26a3fe211b
9f8f2be31a1029119479abd75e1af17e41f16756
'2011-12-21T07:36:11-05:00'
describe
'31874' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEA' 'sip-files00034.pro'
91ae683aba6c078dee365bd042e10c8b
4956a567fe5ee049507d6858ae6c526102642d12
describe
'20207' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEB' 'sip-files00035.pro'
fdc50360dc54382c1154ce381e043338
eea3045aebc8d198f60a89cc864ec9933fea951c
'2011-12-21T07:35:26-05:00'
describe
'30241' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEC' 'sip-files00036.pro'
ae27597df78dfc62cbc8cdced9576cac
8ff3f988431962f684bdb9b5fbcf249b10e43b66
'2011-12-21T07:32:57-05:00'
describe
'32446' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQED' 'sip-files00037.pro'
bc7760e2c55aefebbccb57731a918432
48e5dc4f975cbc0a911dfac84899ace227cfecd8
'2011-12-21T07:38:45-05:00'
describe
'39656' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEE' 'sip-files00038.pro'
336cf47019bf8d61032d779a808515d0
6d0597bfbc442a58805e0e65681b6054c56d656a
describe
'19644' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEF' 'sip-files00039.pro'
80b3e9f3b95d48c736e0d1eb616bcd92
dd84e373b23a72488828a8d0269a5a9d238163c6
'2011-12-21T07:33:55-05:00'
describe
'41618' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEG' 'sip-files00040.pro'
1c22f85e1644180cd26098f47c71db10
672b392eda75b46702db937f85fb6fa4b550f3df
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEH' 'sip-files00041.pro'
c0229fe6e48be81cffb295800818435c
d9c4df97df9510c42acdfa62dac4ddc1a0e24dc0
describe
'38540' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEI' 'sip-files00043.pro'
37f78d0417820ccddef33f43d19447f6
52a722fe5eddd1f4b2222938659aaa6b084229b5
'2011-12-21T07:36:31-05:00'
describe
'16410' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEJ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
35111d78198929da5e8ad28780302be9
d6a884875a8f8364488594bc699e3e4b7fd84385
describe
'39964' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEK' 'sip-files00045.pro'
1d969c8cb4fb1648ef195a6a1fd3ed41
f5e16df05d887f2c6f1d106dd567ce0dd0401e31
'2011-12-21T07:37:14-05:00'
describe
'39603' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEL' 'sip-files00046.pro'
e454b1c461e5b1938b55d285cb41ed15
60594881d8e582cde369aea42a3c2b54f9de49fc
'2011-12-21T07:34:41-05:00'
describe
'1689' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEM' 'sip-files00047.pro'
0effb288cecc58f8dff189c8fe505a32
90a10e0838c3cd60bf4ed43337d63ad105cd60d1
'2011-12-21T07:33:56-05:00'
describe
'37048' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEN' 'sip-files00049.pro'
b8d6a699f75b5285c48f22996f2f9492
359d2d356fde9a0735b2c9d9308e142832b61746
'2011-12-21T07:36:13-05:00'
describe
'37704' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEO' 'sip-files00050.pro'
c2338e32c14c7200dc01e90551f6638c
0bfe45722bed2f1eaa4efd1b02fc4f28ee223fb3
describe
'3039' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEP' 'sip-files00051.pro'
547877451acfa904308372adb642d47c
2065c8d2c683416c365b80d72fe57ea96967e40b
describe
'40458' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEQ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
058a250c217a888b07b516c550149d72
dcae1b38f750aa1c72652672d3fdcf3b06d4d910
'2011-12-21T07:34:50-05:00'
describe
'40166' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQER' 'sip-files00054.pro'
c2838ddf2a3dc24749972ddc4a46d4ff
aa1ee0560c96fa4d471e3194ae73416a5aee3b9a
describe
'29554' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQES' 'sip-files00055.pro'
ac6eef0916eb67d7c86b13bbd7c7f679
86f3d133779ca919f7159ed2396db006ef3cd3e8
'2011-12-21T07:38:40-05:00'
describe
'27253' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQET' 'sip-files00056.pro'
9a3f1fbca00429726f4fe47ccf6bbba0
c18f49ccaa7cdb2ef034b33977656f589d964c47
'2011-12-21T07:38:41-05:00'
describe
'37642' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEU' 'sip-files00057.pro'
872147336c4368246448ca718c3de902
696ad920ff8c1b2cbf21a5d56d53152038f344cd
'2011-12-21T07:32:52-05:00'
describe
'26951' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEV' 'sip-files00058.pro'
a6b2668fa1bff926810aed71a8c0509f
8b33ade8073fbd0e477ce8ddc0673dfb6af77260
describe
'37753' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEW' 'sip-files00059.pro'
28a5181168fe77f85ac2763c2d2ede9d
8f4084331454ad79d8b05f3a89e7f884b593378a
describe
'34789' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEX' 'sip-files00060.pro'
dfc7444b77532f63d82b1dd57c1d6e72
81e8a7e823a9109a31cb84bc58df0218c158dbd4
'2011-12-21T07:36:03-05:00'
describe
'38612' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEY' 'sip-files00061.pro'
9ac972376fba2d79b7dbd9bf77ca6733
282d6539726570ce1f317c8d85363962e54e5a81
describe
'40729' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQEZ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
a911b0404dbaa8781fb96c3c63d24470
edd27717395190527bb0d3eb7077f14f29e10b28
'2011-12-21T07:37:34-05:00'
describe
'25213' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFA' 'sip-files00063.pro'
2c385ca11c842da184fbcda93097e35c
25eb074782a06288270abf293d5e9570ececc105
describe
'40233' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFB' 'sip-files00064.pro'
77e9cd324ae3f12d07ba6164d36a5632
08a8984e202c772d09a6eb6fab92d14b0111c403
describe
'18736' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFC' 'sip-files00065.pro'
f7c90c0788c76e2acd116c7d0ee436d3
1b0d874631e2714a102cd743893c54df52553434
describe
'41976' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFD' 'sip-files00066.pro'
77afccbf08625cd58b64558b9cabadc6
0260841bb5489071c587d5059f0c8c4729705d92
describe
'18835' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFE' 'sip-files00067.pro'
6dee03024803cabb9563245c0da54746
e22f22ac3f01e2bcad23e4dd5af7caabdc1b902f
'2011-12-21T07:37:26-05:00'
describe
'40569' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFF' 'sip-files00068.pro'
863657ff5563a3ab6cacab854f7eb38d
2fbbe55d507c2cdd9e41d44358253ce69e03281c
'2011-12-21T07:35:31-05:00'
describe
'3242' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFG' 'sip-files00069.pro'
830801d9d60ea68bc31f2ba185e69b59
50d528cf3ab0fbd1e92b9010c97e792d6d51752e
'2011-12-21T07:32:54-05:00'
describe
'37502' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFH' 'sip-files00071.pro'
45f979c2cc5c22f2255a08bcb5e42d30
af59e5cfd01d851e55fba5bfee07adbbcfbea258
'2011-12-21T07:32:03-05:00'
describe
'30274' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFI' 'sip-files00072.pro'
d81e7cba23e031eba9bce791555a55b9
14853d49ff94767e0ec35729bd283d36b07b2b8a
'2011-12-21T07:37:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFJ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
6912629e3b3d8a9440894efbcc924512
e733289d33d741e0e7e3f058c356095ce1ea95d1
'2011-12-21T07:32:32-05:00'
describe
'20331' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFK' 'sip-files00074.pro'
ae93012adcdf6cc6f1db3051d74e38b7
308afd90e8eba48c069df7cd2394fb68377c8c2c
describe
'40189' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFL' 'sip-files00075.pro'
e96ede9ad3f01bd5bcdc491d4fd8fe47
8738fb79eebedebdf18e68912b403d19a9ae88ac
'2011-12-21T07:36:42-05:00'
describe
'39551' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFM' 'sip-files00076.pro'
0ce9700936846325db07a85d46ab3998
855162a215205527cf7763a5f5071afd7eb2050c
describe
'12759' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFN' 'sip-files00077.pro'
07893714920647f7ec556426b6bf86fc
0661aba2b08683280540a302a0f5ae1fe3d4d58d
describe
'40016' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFO' 'sip-files00078.pro'
9a3904d661f0db42dc1f9a966c922729
82863d640200e8cf032121fcb46ec94211a8ee26
describe
'31916' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFP' 'sip-files00079.pro'
a02951ca8bd4a504f2df5228d605997b
ef0b07bd2f66d7ca6af829923b607d154c791f86
describe
'37321' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFQ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
a983f4a3b9c3ec0dcca38e2e5b5a619f
843a580bfbd42b44697c47e0d6d22a4cec8aad60
describe
'34936' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFR' 'sip-files00083.pro'
498e3bba0b3c23f1d4f7d5a839b38b5f
d2eaf80ccb5ea6a8c05decb37d50d09db177f263
'2011-12-21T07:34:44-05:00'
describe
'24741' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFS' 'sip-files00084.pro'
977edcbf91a90395bbd6cdcb6ddd93ce
6c07442b3aaa732bf4e03bceaf37d6418c138f19
'2011-12-21T07:35:45-05:00'
describe
'39142' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFT' 'sip-files00085.pro'
e7340242d7fb7a7841c8d64d61a6c71a
333e328b47cb86aeaa2a62111840a26064f0e2c5
'2011-12-21T07:37:35-05:00'
describe
'32922' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFU' 'sip-files00086.pro'
5b3c67adf80e24392023978359167921
4ce9140a4b5a746d83b64b4e0ebe1719c4b9bdc2
'2011-12-21T07:34:45-05:00'
describe
'38237' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFV' 'sip-files00087.pro'
31074324d8eeae530e323ab03f7701bf
54ecb56766ef2d195e52a48aba7b5a034d695be3
describe
'39422' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFW' 'sip-files00088.pro'
8ecf56e0f997352ba2b3b3cd5e962584
3f381cfd7cf96bd5cd2fa94caad0fe26d1519e17
describe
'29508' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFX' 'sip-files00089.pro'
11aeb2ebac76226dc4b9a7f4c3eee105
2a3b0eff2b4367de3afbf565577193d304401ce1
'2011-12-21T07:36:07-05:00'
describe
'38535' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFY' 'sip-files00090.pro'
9e0d2aa1733f79e1440d411824e6460e
b2a2bbe5e8ddb6a16ad50824fc26b22e29990d72
describe
'4668' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQFZ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
f098ebe0aac11d2ca8be6906a24e6608
2aa998da177ad84de0511aa96a93410773858ebd
'2011-12-21T07:35:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGA' 'sip-files00093.pro'
1eed685e3dc6da4af99ffdb229bb604a
29c7ad78b7c6b08806c7e51b91daf249a53c5064
describe
'31005' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGB' 'sip-files00094.pro'
fb5ca00d787745f301d488a0f28c8c24
71c592fa1797b16c5b772cb6dbfe46974f8c922b
'2011-12-21T07:37:09-05:00'
describe
'2210' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGC' 'sip-files00095.pro'
74eebefcf0c60a44e1f2a8a394b27d86
0c8837f32248c42e586997dfae782259b5344d97
describe
'39610' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGD' 'sip-files00097.pro'
74b79e79decabd1f284ef13ea88f1a09
11bbe8d231cdfa198fda0f695dfeafce1fc42d60
'2011-12-21T07:37:48-05:00'
describe
'28924' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGE' 'sip-files00098.pro'
999ec035bdd8124778482ead8ed21b41
22de3ca6fc72175bc6c561c333f076326b995384
'2011-12-21T07:38:42-05:00'
describe
'38522' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGF' 'sip-files00099.pro'
f200f1906bc4834d1081305c99a35054
382b42a032f3c826fb4d8592f5860674a69ff473
describe
'19036' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGG' 'sip-files00100.pro'
ec7bc4b72f32b761a9cc457c71a2dc40
8c2f4ef397d7e4fc64d7f8397a67dcfe35ae4e3d
'2011-12-21T07:38:17-05:00'
describe
'40643' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGH' 'sip-files00101.pro'
c0a2099e3a5cd1de0d9a75d19150715e
4a9b50408e7ae6546fa9891603d0367ed902dfec
'2011-12-21T07:36:24-05:00'
describe
'22990' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGI' 'sip-files00102.pro'
6eb80ed68f3be61913467eff8376d654
910857274df4e1341ec23c7838fab4ebada5d0ec
'2011-12-21T07:33:00-05:00'
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGJ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
42788a88e6fe4229db5ef2e31e4cd0b8
620a86f3cfef3011e0115e82b0f7e7e0eb7873e8
'2011-12-21T07:34:58-05:00'
describe
'39496' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGK' 'sip-files00105.pro'
2c8382149e7d1f91000bbb93d159295e
1d089c2650df47bdb952426ce3647538fc56dfc7
describe
'39370' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGL' 'sip-files00106.pro'
c6ed78f8fc703962cb0f8d073d1f11e3
9b98b20003dd734295a2cf84efa9764b0ab1fb16
describe
'38375' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGM' 'sip-files00107.pro'
9489ae08fcff2c9ca7094ffd462c5982
ca7c5555b33671abe68f65360eda2725b6df7345
'2011-12-21T07:37:39-05:00'
describe
'20211' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGN' 'sip-files00108.pro'
3b949355e5f28d49b8818f14f690e6d5
8a970e6f8674210a155ca145929eebcf8b841dc4
'2011-12-21T07:38:37-05:00'
describe
'39004' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGO' 'sip-files00109.pro'
5fb98301b6ed22b0d2d8b8d0e4a8a29c
3ec47255d0a0ddf9d0d790a0a94277d79bedf32a
'2011-12-21T07:33:47-05:00'
describe
'39238' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGP' 'sip-files00110.pro'
bc24cdbf53d152204c1f5c8d32520f4f
47cf2d6e50cad53e61698ea9b3644c223cf93cc2
'2011-12-21T07:34:48-05:00'
describe
'38760' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGQ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
9b55a60ec4ae671588a2a13829a199a1
30ebe0ec0f41c092aecda50d107e3728e10ea176
describe
'28195' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGR' 'sip-files00112.pro'
6c44282be124f547e577facdf1640908
02ada8ca06e38584c22689e09b747c405b8697c1
describe
'39959' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGS' 'sip-files00113.pro'
b672e02b40f9e0aac73617e26112e17e
29e7287e00a95367fa73f845b74a2e836218c722
describe
'15477' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGT' 'sip-files00114.pro'
9cb1e6acefbd3d76b377f2194f88a29c
3e04845e9abe187ce30915f19eb41a5193b38a3c
'2011-12-21T07:36:23-05:00'
describe
'40775' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGU' 'sip-files00115.pro'
dec5d48bdb6236313f9492e090b070a6
53b183f300174f793d811efe5ef86b91289601e1
describe
'41045' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGV' 'sip-files00116.pro'
364bfe22fffb4b1e8ddd324e2aa5bc11
4fc1b2029181d12279cafedbee076a62e8480221
'2011-12-21T07:33:19-05:00'
describe
'27214' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGW' 'sip-files00117.pro'
ef5c74cad02a63735bdeb2d490def828
88a8497d7f18d97710417a90267db4343306f8e7
'2011-12-21T07:34:32-05:00'
describe
'29889' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGX' 'sip-files00118.pro'
e05308f27c3799186c58834a6eea0f51
7ec8ed10bfb8eea2bb4a34db2bb885f9a7f38532
describe
'41125' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGY' 'sip-files00119.pro'
c742a116745212b0dbd4a824a156eb43
094ed02d7e696ccfb2a21861675e43f859285149
'2011-12-21T07:38:19-05:00'
describe
'41246' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQGZ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
d42e6b261ab90f581c3a258e09404a1b
78f04eb9a0a0676a90e82a2e51618011894310b3
describe
'40811' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHA' 'sip-files00121.pro'
f3d8fd2953b32dbad06a23898fb73c6b
97761cfbee78d2f41c3c34e6270faf68c78bc86a
'2011-12-21T07:36:34-05:00'
describe
'37507' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHB' 'sip-files00122.pro'
b8dc5ada5606a9152065d19ba7147c8d
fd9b1634447d2ccbbe119705e3a533385f68f3ef
'2011-12-21T07:32:48-05:00'
describe
'17054' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHC' 'sip-files00123.pro'
97abb146d37cb40f8c73f6f67abdf415
6f4a58b481bc5d461113c68d068362f420992865
'2011-12-21T07:38:55-05:00'
describe
'36510' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHD' 'sip-files00124.pro'
2c07e8e3693c78ca110592fc2934fea4
7be389e5812d7c2482a962324a8d85257111ef21
'2011-12-21T07:32:00-05:00'
describe
'17797' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHE' 'sip-files00125.pro'
38e8b274f0f58ffbb3a8aadc20da487d
85fd77c397a2e744c58014b54a56fbde4b8aac80
describe
'38088' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHF' 'sip-files00126.pro'
d12d986badb1d000f9d30ffce94607a0
4b0c38a90cac82d2c47c575d3a4f3bf30d6830ec
'2011-12-21T07:38:04-05:00'
describe
'28155' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHG' 'sip-files00127.pro'
618ca9c28aa4471aa7797b0418fc4cbc
776a85e9c2426a4b25e5f0a5c92c5b798456734d
describe
'31110' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHH' 'sip-files00128.pro'
90836e9986cecf4c83dbed3104e257db
272548e0e05662aec0e98c3d0e30d0405007b06a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHI' 'sip-files00129.pro'
86d6d866d5aa7795edfd8e7dc2fdd73c
c6701b7e6b051db371fdbf4aa3fc4d52a94ea7b1
'2011-12-21T07:35:18-05:00'
describe
'18586' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHJ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
d145b3963f9f7936124b715779bcedeb
167a4a355114e49766736b05d7106860afa4a6ed
describe
'41757' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHK' 'sip-files00131.pro'
f376c2375250445772ffb624638fc252
0944f4fe10b8cf8f690396c198ba4b11cd2a6b10
describe
'37750' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHL' 'sip-files00132.pro'
7135ee6a7836b86819bd2bd233c9f601
6971a2b25f4926d037c32b4961832bd3fe33aa36
'2011-12-21T07:37:02-05:00'
describe
'38180' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHM' 'sip-files00133.pro'
126bde0b9d82ce19d632340fdda06b47
8fcc8eddaacad3bc88cfc6d65be7844fc978e877
describe
'38413' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHN' 'sip-files00134.pro'
21d8aef2f6748c1f93ba11285068933c
b51fd0bac2a6195ab357b91649ce311b41e511c7
'2011-12-21T07:32:36-05:00'
describe
'4644' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHO' 'sip-files00135.pro'
86e9959d5c67b75d7696891110da287e
45cfddf7226c3b9912c94bea7275898feff40fe5
'2011-12-21T07:33:16-05:00'
describe
'38312' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHP' 'sip-files00137.pro'
0258416a0218823708a0ae3479cae940
e2e9f7483b00e2efda9c1de3decdbc600a9cf287
'2011-12-21T07:33:27-05:00'
describe
'20213' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHQ' 'sip-files00138.pro'
1522e896f8965505792b33cc5470d4d2
604a69284f8be4d8f06c1fbb6cfa84e57ff67376
'2011-12-21T07:33:36-05:00'
describe
'40818' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHR' 'sip-files00139.pro'
b870730f50e0b25c4a4c7b6661012616
309f628424d0747b92a43a436a635cb577d4a8d3
describe
'41686' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHS' 'sip-files00140.pro'
4d003ca2986ef00321c301c397255557
556def4467fc3006409233a59504babf0ec1a173
'2011-12-21T07:34:43-05:00'
describe
'3959' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHT' 'sip-files00141.pro'
bb28fd69501fbb758f14b4e412fad132
9e13b16919ae0e97dbd04374585c83fae4e4d75b
describe
'18140' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHU' 'sip-files00143.pro'
80512cb3f4f52330a82ea7ff4c5f0628
d6492e30a8f3a7f264e07e95532b5b43f962bb4a
describe
'26770' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHV' 'sip-files00144.pro'
b2ed9a2f4763b1519988e1035cf2f36a
67759d134d55204c90b02bd884056f1ca2267234
describe
'40051' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHW' 'sip-files00145.pro'
8c59c914ecd4dc8071222b46a3d2e189
3f7cb9446636263e8e1e50aaba88dafae8c3e2cf
'2011-12-21T07:32:15-05:00'
describe
'39715' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHX' 'sip-files00146.pro'
5b9fc6a81f4cd0cda8f064f1398e51dd
59657d9e91b46c15bd4f4d71a0cbca41a901b22b
describe
'26049' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHY' 'sip-files00147.pro'
816939bedc60572cfa87ff6012451f93
7e58b7fadba306da0dcc621ddd6bf3755564838f
describe
'41485' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQHZ' 'sip-files00148.pro'
d904adc71165bd3d99a45548ad7b3ebc
56a70ab3933372117b9e2bc6adf86354c61ba792
describe
'39503' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIA' 'sip-files00149.pro'
103b9112b3efb9f9dc6d1c395d5424d4
2a85f09d2f8c99d9d27fa211cab1e34c9ce8c420
'2011-12-21T07:36:06-05:00'
describe
'30924' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIB' 'sip-files00150.pro'
f71d8c7acbe84b7c14c91a3b29529fb2
70b23a5770c0b6bbfb8a8d6f8518062f4593b406
describe
'2999' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIC' 'sip-files00151.pro'
68564c43bec6a0da85d141548cc5986c
f37ec925367555266ba212c49fd9c6c4b14eebf2
describe
'37448' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQID' 'sip-files00153.pro'
48c7d0adf4ada329d09938d33d479ce8
04cc58e4bf1dbfd8153931382cf392cd9b28d5c2
'2011-12-21T07:33:59-05:00'
describe
'40704' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIE' 'sip-files00154.pro'
c51886cad5aebf94731815a1f42b7d00
946567ff83fb9179f6644810b65e86e072a44d30
describe
'19519' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIF' 'sip-files00155.pro'
0489a6bc3c7f0934e5e6a64cce0412ee
e6a0d14349db937cfa3d85140da584dcdef9e886
describe
'40482' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIG' 'sip-files00156.pro'
3c83dee1c8650d2362eb5281b63230ed
185c5d29f46a0a7265e4014223515e4877b141a0
'2011-12-21T07:35:39-05:00'
describe
'1658' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIH' 'sip-files00157.pro'
85cc3ab35e3d5d9dcd7843b99976f951
3f17310f2cd1d96d568ab9087f979edcbf434ff5
describe
'38007' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQII' 'sip-files00159.pro'
ee057147c6094574ce21e56fcbe70bb0
1f6cc266f6ce5815dd2382fea4dc06edf97a8431
describe
'27814' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIJ' 'sip-files00160.pro'
abfcb717eb6d35e980333309ac2a0f14
c4c834d15f8a2654676d8a0a3fdc6134b3376a73
'2011-12-21T07:37:04-05:00'
describe
'36362' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIK' 'sip-files00161.pro'
24b0622258600481a1be575438019999
c461ae3f94dfdf4b05c613f8cec47552401080a9
describe
'23310' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIL' 'sip-files00162.pro'
960677647fb3e7c4f98f20ba7d7b37c3
4931cb516bc17b75e84e059cd42161c6f64574d5
describe
'34013' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIM' 'sip-files00163.pro'
4bc9339a411586ce4b7e8ab51401d800
5748a210e96f8d008b10fede0e8ba6e317c5c4a6
'2011-12-21T07:33:02-05:00'
describe
'31468' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIN' 'sip-files00164.pro'
9db64575a6a31dc3ed01b4e14345b29c
850689f068c2a701d7162cf0b022fc74a5261e47
describe
'11654' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIO' 'sip-files00165.pro'
354f234da38ba32596f16da63c551be8
e3a674abfc0b1f081fac99cb5af87d67eac9cfea
'2011-12-21T07:34:08-05:00'
describe
'38750' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIP' 'sip-files00166.pro'
71c08a454858ac4db2f85bbc82eced89
782e86ae005e7e26a306741865024d07528c7ddb
'2011-12-21T07:34:09-05:00'
describe
'16270' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIQ' 'sip-files00167.pro'
3ba1e2d12a4e959420134f05232a799a
707652528ecdde3a4e3585131a8739a21f71e4b0
describe
'38210' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIR' 'sip-files00168.pro'
14db000d73c0eb53a8f7e2e8096beedd
75c26e6a9ecc86bd8e1a47224f9a01e841a533b7
'2011-12-21T07:38:26-05:00'
describe
'4959' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIS' 'sip-files00169.pro'
e7989594c51a47e8c99f36409fd19916
de26272250813863f57e42110648ac63d249f6d9
describe
'37952' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIT' 'sip-files00171.pro'
4d51920a167d0c6ed11409fd242430e2
14024c6b51637ea43c185ecdf1c21694ab6278a1
'2011-12-21T07:33:03-05:00'
describe
'20388' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIU' 'sip-files00172.pro'
96d6e7b10ca08c45115e8bafdd485a17
2fabe014ba9928db85536f09a4614af2dc72f79e
describe
'40761' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIV' 'sip-files00173.pro'
c7f86f84bd834291853be4e8b0b027f3
da9ece5be11e714fbb9c3d707cb7c56cd43dd4d0
describe
'40063' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIW' 'sip-files00174.pro'
43dceae38cb66e9d729d7a76a31e1006
3fca244070ddf86e863fc93112dcd1cf86df7e35
describe
'39228' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIX' 'sip-files00175.pro'
a509ab3223bdb2d92e328079411c8415
0860c3b94dafa76a8ef572310a30e515484f64f3
describe
'39074' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIY' 'sip-files00176.pro'
c2e387775930b5163e234379153ccbf4
15fefaa71296e34c6fdb6c8c5501b03b1de628f0
describe
'26708' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQIZ' 'sip-files00177.pro'
9207930f6b3d4b5ffd56331099aa1402
889095f48e8e876b5bfb6d1b1d690210add72e72
describe
'38186' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJA' 'sip-files00178.pro'
febb0d9d12389fb9e6cfdfe9cbce1103
599e30ad991ca2c09c61e56f845dacc85b63acc8
'2011-12-21T07:32:19-05:00'
describe
'17017' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJB' 'sip-files00179.pro'
efbfc6c0eb53e6a977e4089494faa9d5
6300d1795d93b15b7f39f523a87a8bc878f0a8d3
'2011-12-21T07:32:22-05:00'
describe
'38410' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJC' 'sip-files00180.pro'
bd3d0d122bf5123b23148df2081b42ec
20ecb24065fa85c357066fca41f7aef3780a6a1b
describe
'20846' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJD' 'sip-files00181.pro'
b7eecff6ec5f530f5d11503b375024d9
49fedea0c861902d15c5622363975fd22605a8f9
describe
'28055' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJE' 'sip-files00182.pro'
c6696814b2117f76a0da62122a60360d
fd3830238ee8a1690f90f03293be5af853a02ed6
describe
'24737' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJF' 'sip-files00183.pro'
f9724b6431b6596b510bee2983c4256e
5be14351e698254ccb3a91c9f6d74ba5c3c29b71
describe
'40214' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJG' 'sip-files00184.pro'
73dfaa0a8af7cc891451833448613c51
7189d1201ce5ca065e9f5b4efa53f109a1e762c7
describe
'25963' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJH' 'sip-files00185.pro'
1777637a17c9c21682a4b94980fc588f
6e36b9895c529ac3a3a0f4728f133ebba9db5129
'2011-12-21T07:36:22-05:00'
describe
'42491' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJI' 'sip-files00186.pro'
d8fb453ff5f0675946b1630e1c5d4db9
7abcded3d0f94f578013e33c5f367499e2e068af
'2011-12-21T07:35:16-05:00'
describe
'2909' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJJ' 'sip-files00187.pro'
9bc1c028889f0286c173a5410b79204d
8765c92fd087d3b5796a7ed7109b5c5deff5b1f3
describe
'37375' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJK' 'sip-files00189.pro'
aa8192df671688da3da5e408e8cf69c6
691c1a00ce2baf5c312eed3fe660377fff250895
describe
'26739' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJL' 'sip-files00190.pro'
1de2f9ea1bf0f13416d3ddb1eca1a50e
90846d1413c370a1424ad3530bb274a50316dd17
describe
'39990' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJM' 'sip-files00191.pro'
fdaafe926c56e8a2fe612c40f7d88aca
5e380f9dad21238feb5e0d4e488ca49aa8a6ff8a
describe
'39954' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJN' 'sip-files00192.pro'
c1948cafd80097e1302651d7b3376aec
f1750ea10e94954f9e5d44d88ca2e9b2689d0903
'2011-12-21T07:34:52-05:00'
describe
'31804' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJO' 'sip-files00193.pro'
b7456c33429ae554104273654e91cdd3
d7aa62f9cb95cd9b157d2f0ef4677a627197d138
'2011-12-21T07:32:24-05:00'
describe
'22880' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJP' 'sip-files00194.pro'
e99424f45bc6729a42d707f89f6e0be8
f948126eb3cc395a42a8cab81b9794870f2efd6a
describe
'38582' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJQ' 'sip-files00195.pro'
2476e69cd51e306c165876ce802c9ce1
229448e75c50d21c1d4b4d7f36cb92817d2be438
describe
'38329' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJR' 'sip-files00196.pro'
ca91505f3111684eccc1e5aaa41736e1
17b8db4465dba8aff3a82770ef65e959eb4c5bd6
describe
'25586' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJS' 'sip-files00197.pro'
7a2872702c6a66112b53de396a7803e4
ce9fac3d35909649bb2d2025f3dc23b4c20d8f73
'2011-12-21T07:37:53-05:00'
describe
'35089' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJT' 'sip-files00198.pro'
cff5046def2a1f5a9496377ecd24825d
8c1c89b8a9c2aa5e28f3061ed0ddc48dae0923f9
describe
'35407' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJU' 'sip-files00199.pro'
8961532479729e36c72e4b4b0915c57f
8c0c49a024cf168ed26c518ee4864eabeb6ca15d
describe
'41009' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJV' 'sip-files00200.pro'
1d577cd0a7f6c96eef8da8be7c191f6e
509f489deac448faa201205dbb994012db5f8b2e
describe
'26537' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJW' 'sip-files00201.pro'
b93f63a5d935bdd545fd821ab470d5ef
95ee8c35cb29e5219de5c838b9f2f04c39e25788
describe
'34567' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJX' 'sip-files00202.pro'
6b58e220d2518672ad10649063581bbb
9d2a74400abd9db4655761d4c6669efa2cf2e1e4
describe
'28440' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJY' 'sip-files00203.pro'
bea625181a51902b493a7bd3100089f6
258995472a62211958d216de315703e4cf62782e
describe
'39830' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQJZ' 'sip-files00204.pro'
5c467a22c980526a13f30c04c3d0591f
d28e0a015a15563eabe7efcd1932979f5fcfe9e3
describe
'14768' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKA' 'sip-files00205.pro'
53013d5ff98d9d565c53c1808ab8a307
94abb23f25e3c6f33634a189c823d93eef215e46
'2011-12-21T07:37:49-05:00'
describe
'26234' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKB' 'sip-files00206.pro'
38dc4189c9a22b805912bccc95cd92ae
48b826d621a7bec0d53a4f66203bb8b0d0abc5e4
describe
'37935' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKC' 'sip-files00207.pro'
d1ce127bb1d1249a9757beabc980a8e5
8ed4e290ca74faad9c9d33c9d2e1cede9a61df3a
'2011-12-21T07:32:40-05:00'
describe
'37175' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKD' 'sip-files00208.pro'
c3e65ef6641de1fd06cf9fb316104c9c
4030d5af664959b99864447055e5c42f9d40a641
describe
'2821' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKE' 'sip-files00209.pro'
8b56bf55ef25492fa789257bafdbb7fe
24f219941188f0f5129e3e2478575220b099641b
describe
'40471' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKF' 'sip-files00211.pro'
6205e6a243808ecad271a877c0d4a0a2
1e56b107700a20968d672eaec2ddf2e28f4fc7cb
'2011-12-21T07:34:27-05:00'
describe
'19220' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKG' 'sip-files00212.pro'
e67400b5f32db48689f2c6e60b1239d7
aa369e2f269fd00f80521f57d76736936003ae61
describe
'15552' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKH' 'sip-files00213.pro'
122430d46f1cc919885f893809a2bfb7
9f3ba2045cc1d62a28e21a04f52705222802542b
'2011-12-21T07:35:49-05:00'
describe
'28313' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKI' 'sip-files00214.pro'
f2b2c331bd82cbd2e938b3f31bf5994d
4b42386cd29d2d0fb409815501eb305f8bab34e3
describe
'37089' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKJ' 'sip-files00215.pro'
b27246de5b9498b130573edeacca2623
2c62f84fd41a3f55fc53dfca9e2e00985e276a4e
describe
'34371' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKK' 'sip-files00216.pro'
e99267aeb8e2dde4cb05e33e5b1414bc
0c0043141e862053240f35aad62a63557d9ec2ad
describe
'37619' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKL' 'sip-files00217.pro'
93d9c296ea944028a76e6933ab8d4eef
495db1a465205091f51b91e2e39be6d575fef399
'2011-12-21T07:34:53-05:00'
describe
'25016' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKM' 'sip-files00218.pro'
371c46884d0944c5786709f3e9dd7147
8ca6bbbaa9aa4839aedfcda3e44424a48be88777
describe
'39149' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKN' 'sip-files00219.pro'
47f4ac4fda72273621d1c0b61aa42db5
882f30e8444c68f85f9b17c79747f55000e5d5f3
describe
'39015' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKO' 'sip-files00220.pro'
7350d68e90815fd5495633838cfecd50
675fd6deeb5558fddfd76f85e8cf70dad61675c1
'2011-12-21T07:38:16-05:00'
describe
'3094' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKP' 'sip-files00221.pro'
6bcc1c54f41e423645dcbcb5f4d0384c
da827a34ca384212a053fb3f235413ef2434b1ec
'2011-12-21T07:33:43-05:00'
describe
'39632' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKQ' 'sip-files00223.pro'
314405217285b16940d96df476de59cb
da8a99a9fe08e5b83b0b6c0250ff37d0378fe67e
'2011-12-21T07:32:37-05:00'
describe
'39494' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKR' 'sip-files00224.pro'
10bbefda1471a074bf9befad8e6b28c2
84bca811de2ae3a4a5ba89fb37f93b56e763152d
describe
'16472' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKS' 'sip-files00225.pro'
18251c3df426ccbe31f82553d217d106
a744dc8a022ca34878e5d9e71ae73afcde95defa
'2011-12-21T07:38:02-05:00'
describe
'29286' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKT' 'sip-files00226.pro'
74c9bee51539896a130ba01473ffae4d
460b90b49c1aab2a0127117fbfb6f68ff83932f5
describe
'33544' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKU' 'sip-files00227.pro'
96f1fe6ca23a04be96396a6007421f9d
018863026b440aca76818aa34ff6164060679311
describe
'31540' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKV' 'sip-files00228.pro'
f107b288c2b2149257c54e25b7882562
5ff97b4977e3e4820ebdade193de4b0b8fe9a0b9
describe
'26134' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKW' 'sip-files00229.pro'
37e14318c8236f85179a93ef3e4e60d2
f9e624e02f5765b4619ded9336d48e9eba8199ee
describe
'15078' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKX' 'sip-files00230.pro'
1c2e7b5cb2a2ecca095cc72422ccc256
92bd0b6653c91f8ff557e691c925ae4542f57fb4
'2011-12-21T07:35:47-05:00'
describe
'39803' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKY' 'sip-files00231.pro'
39edb4ecceeac3d2983f588ece174528
752be69bad2b091a0c931e46eaee6bc8a658f26d
'2011-12-21T07:34:35-05:00'
describe
'31794' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQKZ' 'sip-files00232.pro'
be8ccb26a03b97ac3718b7e88d87fa18
46a76faa79224beda8a5d886f0e995f164b85665
describe
'2132' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLA' 'sip-files00233.pro'
4715be797bb6eaec7c315da6657699a9
fbfc9620453fe076da10363d06dfe51ec57bb495
describe
'40126' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLB' 'sip-files00235.pro'
63c06dc31c85cf1e759c3d86563c0071
9f5794ea6c79d3d4c0cd294baf272791169ca4b8
describe
'39116' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLC' 'sip-files00236.pro'
e8d08d59aaea6462d6bb88fffb1c067b
9627170333c5202bc030cb33ee4ef3cf3bcca78c
describe
'18791' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLD' 'sip-files00237.pro'
4ab93c4cf436975bd2678aaf33e5a215
129b3dadaecbfbac13376b93444ce881e16fade9
describe
'41107' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLE' 'sip-files00238.pro'
7f8b5625adea4e3b2c0757916b704905
d7680b2d15d0d02239594e251cfb2d288e065fd5
'2011-12-21T07:34:55-05:00'
describe
'3912' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLF' 'sip-files00239.pro'
4374212d543c5092c789d3d50fd407bd
01df78b57da6698155e9be79b0bad773ad0ea947
describe
'24287' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLG' 'sip-files00241.pro'
7f052bfa4ff430c7e09e0e6999020900
13e591b9a61efcb64ce0144407a05ac1f10a8aaa
'2011-12-21T07:38:48-05:00'
describe
'17717' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLH' 'sip-files00242.pro'
98cdc7d0a3261e6220cc544930be86de
db603eaae5da4f6abc03147670c5f9b6ad571e4c
describe
'67142' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLI' 'sip-files00243.pro'
22415671f310444df7f8dc2647245b95
bc44aacb4c92e7e41eacd1b3784296349e066e6c
describe
'74918' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLJ' 'sip-files00244.pro'
3c4efe1b3ccdbe76cf6dd2e45c8c1f87
e02d11a1e08e0bfef47817ef5181490f0780ba56
describe
'773' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLK' 'sip-files00251.pro'
93cbeb09dd8f991fcf8f1c06969e5765
8c7d8504758a021d1bd8187120cc65c400275f13
describe
'748389' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLL' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
87d30c830461a957ebaf6621b3261131
a34bc1c1e9a60bc70d2affeaa1739cb6df5d027d
describe
'760999' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLM' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
641452607925474aeadd01309a08679b
b2024c0df0680fba2d972e44ffc373f35fe81c49
describe
'617540' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLN' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
ae00dafd6c6244289469ff871fce20b1
27e2ffaf949287d420d7796e52bad94545d42676
describe
'617553' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLO' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
ea47aefdd80c666327a1d0f68c72c7f5
c1e40cd24e080d0fb571a6677bd4ec2640cf5c2f
describe
'617440' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLP' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
15b8e01ee617628cfa7928f47cd2a91c
f032a935c60b64fade0bb78ed2db206a8ada5970
describe
'617488' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLQ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
4fe408001f10e50507bf0c16664e134a
90560e0280586546801db34ef209b05b933f5d8e
describe
'617314' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLR' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
f1c8ac85fc0cf4543dc77682ac5c3712
2f8aa235eb9bdb5ef4aa6f5690dc86be41d1cb50
describe
'617517' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLS' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
b768840a99889fce70962b76b045af22
19dd120ef00cf1f9d16ffc3474c89bf25da6dfde
'2011-12-21T07:36:14-05:00'
describe
'617531' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLT' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
d60fe96ab872cb08947383af19dad392
9212a92e89bcd4a2d5aec406ac9f3d5da59bb5ce
'2011-12-21T07:37:45-05:00'
describe
'617548' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLU' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
a6bf185c45c77c7612de6e1ac6aaad1c
4a476baa0ddc20ca779c767fbb0031d2402f99c2
describe
'617515' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLV' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
b92a8f91163ae1c46a9345d7f7cfecf2
d61fe361a39dc7988003f3cac1b681abd7bbeea2
describe
'617464' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLW' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
abcb1a10f4acd14f406ac37fb8a80fc7
bbbc94e548389948d349448e1204a40bbb692daa
'2011-12-21T07:38:25-05:00'
describe
'617550' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLX' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
f13c9ab065db0a2c7749aa571ec6e691
a68dbffbaaec5fb9ee1401a16dcfdec09373e6be
'2011-12-21T07:37:17-05:00'
describe
'617207' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLY' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
9bed90ffa8f45e6cfc27a614577f470b
b7fd50e83fc19988a33846e3f8eb074893658294
'2011-12-21T07:38:27-05:00'
describe
'617493' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQLZ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
8da565af0061c1c8247fdf33f4195e1e
a65e7099f6b05616e95e983a58ba5b2d1334df85
describe
'617475' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMA' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
9e373bedb3ba89854830cb9278a8bd21
d19d2b6cd647665f2e57b7fa6bf38924ca6a4759
describe
'617555' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMB' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
938d8abe9b12e6683838075d52aecb10
d1ba2d7306683102cc152d9c62af08c1576e7601
'2011-12-21T07:38:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMC' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
1a8cd29b7cdb0c132fc575c7b9186a22
1a2164f817bdd7e52c5645ca8cf93c2519b62e84
describe
'617528' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMD' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
116c991176584e95756d8a50ea31e308
e6b0efcbebed0c27b87d00da2313d7cb73887ead
'2011-12-21T07:34:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQME' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
77eb75b80c95de54fa914c332ff91b91
3f0321099a9106d5cdae1723b5ef98adaacacbb3
describe
'617487' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMF' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d2efa9ed83e7874c918dcb8480fe439d
29f5d52f79d61613d71af9bfb0000e27f4bd1cb7
describe
'617523' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMG' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
44557c6413dd847fd1fcaae2d0975355
1c6eee29f49ad3a17ae716689ba8ea2d5063be33
'2011-12-21T07:37:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMH' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
4f960c00c6d51f759d9559c3c1e01bdc
448505f1c458e66bfb07bb588d4dee1766b04d7c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMI' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
44bf1e6a23e7f84fe05ee341b8d2cb1b
683c7249a14de4e434c18f3a93812af63e0eb450
describe
'617543' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMJ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
7a1ce66a7f5296142320b4257aaf822b
9aedc688566184d6bdae03ec6352bfd5bceaa83e
'2011-12-21T07:36:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMK' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
7c33e821b3b945da47284afa7a755406
18d5ce5a9a8d2933cd61e5de6d630f5256a9547b
describe
'617465' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQML' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
a1e8116e7601669327d951807a10e5eb
fe11d726517332e25d415d334e2cc4dd041513b4
describe
'617539' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMM' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
077436af8907144e1ff715709e609701
da9a13d7e07cc47cbb2e4080819c378a3b3bf4a7
'2011-12-21T07:34:14-05:00'
describe
'617546' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMN' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
f919b55ba581f04f5fe3586a436fb2b7
dc31905ca697af55693c1ed119e8be3bd035d2b0
'2011-12-21T07:34:31-05:00'
describe
'617537' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMO' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
58a2c71f4a7db4c5b342c1fca1c4bc18
7f297afa186e611f340d324d8bb9097acc1414bf
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMP' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
c3e8b341836e198d7f471961ff1d58cb
bed3000652086f7efceeeb088beac9c0cd3afc93
'2011-12-21T07:33:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMQ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
725d0336ebe77d8df8c2c08f30019ee5
fd5a1c1e0bc417a8b2ef50bd4e6c613f41c74f19
describe
'617511' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMR' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
63e4917184f72792a41089971e3a0669
554a1dccf6044b520e1d2c7a5fb70812949fd35e
'2011-12-21T07:34:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMS' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
e6685da928e9de10a93b10413c568b46
0cd2ecce8af1caf1b9aead5c5bebb9987576731b
'2011-12-21T07:36:08-05:00'
describe
'617400' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMT' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
8a304bae4ed5c78a12f60a2c334ebf71
fe035fbd0154c932eba040eb1f75c1584263b8b4
describe
'617362' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMU' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
1eef1ee71fea967fee6408b964433d60
c461b07f7974c1d80e474a7568110f2e645e20e0
'2011-12-21T07:35:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMV' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
f304789f67a4e07f3549a4773615fe18
55aff961dda38d79f084c6c522731f16a8e02d7b
describe
'617467' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMW' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
7446c0b7acb7100a40924ea58a8679de
26ec175aca9dc54546422f43fae2d9ac5d8c9f71
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMX' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
890718814884fa9769f03e81db8606f1
22c980c3ec290b48b44cd92cc08905fa658e7412
describe
'617547' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMY' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
1ab8189e2e92e6769a1dac6b0f7406e7
f43b621934a79a20cfd81503b969bddccff55bed
'2011-12-21T07:32:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQMZ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
f5c931be6a5447ac05e1ed32c13f0a81
14201cfd0ca10d98baf8bfbe981e4a30986f1266
describe
'617520' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNA' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
b1810df58cbcecc512761966e81b6ac4
1ff8ac3caacb7a65fc9a76b7a1466eaf577d567c
'2011-12-21T07:37:06-05:00'
describe
'617518' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNB' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
d8bc3e09a701be2711eee6459aaa159b
fc1ce6ff9dcaa51a6b91fe51a068e92804b37ccb
'2011-12-21T07:38:34-05:00'
describe
'617489' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNC' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
50c8c931920cdf692cc6f229b45d7c6b
42c0d417125c7407903cb5116941001b2eea72b0
describe
'617476' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQND' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
3303cf616f2180c023fd232f758797f3
0c1c050a87ce9f2f4e5af55e6738030a79af53cf
'2011-12-21T07:33:09-05:00'
describe
'391436' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNE' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
19eb3c365e557421172b374ab6b76a27
1ebcb56154d1348e70ae4384c8d4a5ddca23cf3d
describe
'617527' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNF' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
20724bbfd97c29ee274c57b8fda83c0c
a15b15d19d9042c6d5d4c304d90e70dcc7498d75
'2011-12-21T07:36:38-05:00'
describe
'617504' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNG' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
662ccfc90d2db8488a6020c16fa1046d
ac48cc5bf2a44f070c71a48cc1d418d94b1bdd08
'2011-12-21T07:35:01-05:00'
describe
'617551' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNH' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
690b37d7d8a6ebaf874fb764d6273a02
ecc1e5d79f3b077c4d19823fd44efb774fd5d2a8
'2011-12-21T07:34:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNI' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
81c981037cbad6c4add768e1eb03ed4b
adec196b702fcf0ba80e0430a3d65d8b78e9b207
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNJ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
1d92d3e6fd3f31c6ce0f3fce9d8f071e
ca7d46548ccbc01a93439aedc43446006d73a951
'2011-12-21T07:34:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNK' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
483d832bb27e5fbfc5e05c22d65b1a5b
56ae5fabd2c166d4b5e105b5c76fa436d62afb09
'2011-12-21T07:36:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNL' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
9d5f11cc80f83e977721416fbf800b43
e4107ba7bbf67b9d4d7d39157360cfb35f8f0e9f
describe
'617545' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNM' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
f4c208ccd9a604973f58161e506e2f9b
542564f2f21d536728272924be35fcd55c6c7e51
describe
'617535' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNN' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
061e64a0e686c05f965dfa1520c9a29f
e0145b1e5969ec3cd60cfb5cba7a0ea8a0a8f42b
'2011-12-21T07:33:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNO' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
d441109ce0a19db17a94029288f11676
c0cdaa206953c00dad8323c6e0afae351fc0fca0
describe
'617530' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNP' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
10fac4f3b96548d4dfb0eeac721eb6e8
39a119f8cb8c2acc76247668236b0e29900d6d27
describe
'617554' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNQ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
63cd8b871840237e46fdf24f8f1d0a38
a2f127fcaf2a150eecefdf04665ae90c1c33c518
'2011-12-21T07:38:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNR' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
af9071a512c942b1c2f8f45848b39bfe
23c7ca026906b1783c1d87a589a4e941e80645b7
describe
'617519' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNS' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
aac17dc7432dd5965e9c0b8afa7f281d
0617ba50dc1e32c490182fff1a8b0ff3a7e71ab0
'2011-12-21T07:32:26-05:00'
describe
'617466' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNT' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
cca13a60138ab3f65fcf71cf391662cf
6e9e0566e51b45cd4570992ed6825c709793c21e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNU' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
f5c1a82692177e18883ab5b81482953e
f401607c38bd42aedf0db78f7ee9fb291f73fa29
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNV' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
be58b33bcef5cf40592985f28ea9ec28
db0ade1088997d25639d92c9b2da8c6d2e915ff8
describe
'477896' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNW' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ee63cb76d2faf702903582228f075b01
754db36c16bb0face79741aa7f59b1d73f425371
describe
'617549' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNX' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
345e6bfd9c6fb28dcb8b83384ee0d90f
ac330fa2fb887e0b2f66e162f3b451e5fecce26e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNY' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
443df50cf683c087ddabd729b50407c1
130ed4a7360e1ebf11a0447e17800c1213402dcb
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQNZ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
9e5e483e856ad163f8681113278f38cc
d4e50c6aa2e4065fbc7ca7af3c43a2b1065f6548
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOA' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
9b936ee1c5333f252d44331414ca10da
500bd54e13549a61b502d2bddd4b51c9419483e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOB' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
392a1d42b8af566685df4887d3728caf
4712d5a8bae85f25fc4d223e0a94a399e2cfec3a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOC' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
19efa7c4962787f0330b69a7a41fdad5
fbb705fc381900568f70750148edefe8a1e91979
'2011-12-21T07:38:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOD' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
b5bfce639b25c060f39e463caaccba22
19e9b7bc78ec37aebf89f1bf77facf0db85d9c06
describe
'617505' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOE' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
74fda306d2bbd202a61835b3d0e6468d
7b7a0f47de5da931d305139327d651b6abffc54a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOF' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
55ec5ae1c20cad66da0dd7ab8e700c92
75b2f065fd8b9bb1ae9d08957b3756450c63af1c
describe
'617536' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOG' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
d59f108039edd98e693aa2aea52ff29c
203683231b894e4b5540081303d5672e13056b1c
describe
'617512' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOH' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
f77a95fd7af6c627b77048e148dc9181
827a5ac50adbf339f7c3b907462179d81e557bbb
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOI' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
a9defb12c46e1d92d6b8c69f4ca88a5e
5df6c79056f2010bc9c0bbba94d2056e247d18e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOJ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
65d0cec283ceb92e65ce3e7c2000d8da
0b0075fa878add28438482daa1de5f60db9181f6
describe
'617552' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOK' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
8451677acb6f1de039953b8e87141eeb
1abd43673778645d76bc4bf1dcc2538885778930
describe
'617510' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOL' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
0a8364064577a637448999716e75e9d7
87a6fc90da59bd2f73788fa578f6ad620d671f8a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOM' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
635b9a85f02aca831e8ca435cfd8cda8
29b15dc79cfe963afcad248490dee9ffc6ee7f76
'2011-12-21T07:37:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQON' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
1b6d1dcb4acdfddfd5292b07d126aff8
fdc868ff80ca7e9c56ed9a892089c4cae91ae923
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOO' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
d354a577a9b9f4f0816e754657e8edb7
1cfa297aa6488c3ddb8d69d65495427e9422da22
describe
'617503' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOP' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
a42aa94a734aa6b255ccccb11f054747
c06ccc2ce44be4df07e2b6ff1504cacf7d055c38
describe
'617532' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOQ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
969fc5f388735377f9bf2907a52a4c76
9fac4bc3b362b5a489c2ed00d8492978f53d3205
describe
'617501' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOR' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
e7a25098e9cf717fc09535b3f2d0a9a6
002e3f9201013b3aa1b58ab616e4d77d0f115a04
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOS' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
179caaf2f2fa14599b1f5359bb9a47de
889e36df09fff184018ac8b450951bb089d7c9d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOT' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
9fcbd541e5eb7703666e18ab2d1e8bd9
bd04b1566976e1e67c8f9545fbd11131a97b34c2
'2011-12-21T07:33:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOU' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
95cc256be9e6fea2c0c9bc9b72973cab
55f000d99f7a5470f06c0e0b519d58efea285846
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOV' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
7e3f6def124d4a81698af223632e0ab4
00287816645c530f763a60de6c7c28cd45134cd8
describe
'617450' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOW' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
fdbf1635832c6df49c8884874015d909
c54ea5c6f7a6d22d5f09911f210c993cd47067aa
describe
'617534' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOX' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
fc38ba19713eef0d6092966002e44a49
e8a4b7a43becd9805678aa5feacb4ef7d3b8ff89
'2011-12-21T07:34:03-05:00'
describe
'617525' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOY' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
89f4e85700837f2de2efb6695d48fc77
be82b86aea94a646bb6d5fed5eb61062472de290
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQOZ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
ff9bf4e2cb1640243ee3a8145aec666a
4f33ffa181296decdad2567d618deeda7a3fdece
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPA' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
7a184f176c98834ddaf61c1a3487393b
17bef9950eaab6ae14e1cfebcc3e22ef3dc33fa9
describe
'617398' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPB' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
cc23d1c66b72b45b006d7cca6d9961a3
6d15d79fc015eb4ae546a29340db71db47615921
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPC' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
20d5cd47dd95aa6a2d664fb411868afc
d666a1bd2c35eb9c7d0fc715830d0904647cbdaa
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPD' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
a3c381447de181b83abf7be08857e200
048a3d42b0fc305ddb50517b106e6e0b3fb60ad4
'2011-12-21T07:32:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPE' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
7a4607c7354828050d758da7a79c0c49
9607d57b35e3101a2ea69b2299dd42e683b93a35
'2011-12-21T07:35:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPF' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
5fa4b0a17d06e98f8fc914e2f668b052
8c2251c84930bd591cee98aa32970e4443514f7b
'2011-12-21T07:33:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPG' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
76f28f441ce70f035dc98f12c4e6bafc
41bdbde048d7ba0afcdbffb39e96a465b801ab1c
'2011-12-21T07:36:09-05:00'
describe
'617507' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPH' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
d0d619fb6077e5e9721d7b183f7f357b
91e15f7c3eea8b9032cfda9acd91e2bbb72286d0
'2011-12-21T07:35:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPI' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
5571b21d24e5414bc7d6539553cb846c
9c4f8a4b96c97604b4c7e16e274159984752f18b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPJ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
1670eae0cb8a3130bbb0da3475585b39
0b2e73333471166bf5b77013bdbd1c021d76c869
'2011-12-21T07:32:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPK' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
adf264fd7b333431f3b10244eefa1a88
5925a2d4c1ff43ec068dcfef04493085ec4743fd
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPL' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
b48f644b1ef4e0fd2b6e433fcaf83d29
d6adda1c15ae40dccecf5d787b49108b0facc62c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPM' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
6678448339290b3e288177a9f1e8004a
1e96fa1f25dc0fb32d551a35e104dcc5775c14ea
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPN' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
05b3c29527673b9cb7cb36474444edfb
8a4914954516246d831777fa690a1725e1c4409c
describe
'617538' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPO' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
226cb916bc95e6a7be233fbf1a898948
49fff1151fffab6641d69b2e4b6e828353b1b74c
'2011-12-21T07:36:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPP' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
84c8bbf1e617cdb21c3b381b98742df5
b0015ab099373b860622f742fafa35b693a3419a
'2011-12-21T07:34:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPQ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
2741e9b46222c6f8432acae21fd3526a
a907ad8fa24566348ddf9193f3c94c055bfacf5f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPR' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
bacfcd2fa444e3ab7f5449bf3ccc4d67
5b755d989376c9caa35b0463c90763c3ae4ca256
describe
'617499' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPS' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
3691b2a5064965d749a0fefb192a5b66
ed9f9ceebc81605d52f1e4301d91cad29348fbc4
'2011-12-21T07:38:39-05:00'
describe
'617469' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPT' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
d247ea58208cca7d7911ebd13119871c
99b6e3e2470bae283004d07fb5e2bf2816f5fac1
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPU' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
375311dbbfd14e9a7b6c588222441dd5
687b2fc8722d696384455aab0962e16f221a15c7
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPV' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
4a0c0bb4fb538d6efd448202c9081f89
f9750dbac9619138833fadc2cf388278fbc9691a
describe
'617372' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPW' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
6b91aa6e4111d1aa7fbed80fdfe79eef
beaf6ab56b36e623ed28a187e4a024e43af5bea6
describe
'617485' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPX' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
d1d7bcbb4341e705db0a2e6d92888c6a
c621aadddd0a842062a9dbbc99c16906a5a735f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPY' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
a5ca76098ead52e46e6277d4f0d1a64b
9345f259d77efb39a6e190d7d0264d321c967e70
'2011-12-21T07:38:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQPZ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
8a1614fcc3ad2a7ec76022cd527b7662
5348a6a0959946105204a6992bc1ddcbe2471625
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQA' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
e79ce4651b79abd204458418290a6e38
7c7631654802b30d2e1eabc043ce81ef3e0330a6
describe
'617480' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQB' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
871d640aaffda366c72acd75d85fe89a
7b492b2374b86c942e326979cb129636bc4e2fc1
'2011-12-21T07:35:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQC' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
dcd370ec58c8e12adf4278b9bc3b5ac5
9b1bbcaac57a8ef7eee8bcfc45ab4cdcc393859f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQD' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
b18db8307b48b92d7c7377e31d5a3380
2c93f1d6c5f7cefe7fef42be006f68b2f17c3eff
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQE' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
77e6273c7ada2801f2c08dad83d24ba7
ec3bc82f1e29e0440f260a84245361904bb5d52d
'2011-12-21T07:35:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQF' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
296a69497892d154aba9988d3856ef11
bc3e282b0cdd0958bbf42b01193ffe6c8a49c3d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQG' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
d0e41bdf3a41c788677117368dff0433
4153888a3d61105e6d44baefe803c97a079d3028
'2011-12-21T07:35:53-05:00'
describe
'430126' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQH' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
1c279da4efe1552c55ca1562374d6dd3
4a0529c2cfc1ab2320644577edc9df68d1338b09
describe
'617495' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQI' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
0a7c2a20b3ee1be8e2900b72e99ed5a8
855a0ead4a3974cc6107bea4a50f6511a845d35d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQJ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
d26f3725f3f378596e9c7d152d3c98c4
9698275865a838446cb7cde504eb02e7a75c6b5a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQK' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
5e6927bfb7c944666b7f99e1f420cf3e
d54e22d3cbb17041fb8f8e448fc2207afe8f09a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQL' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
5bbe447d92b2ca674de8af0e4dca5103
8f7682af6c80f538b3cf0edfbf805a1383cf420c
describe
'617541' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQM' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
253083549793f0351b0adde8dad49a39
cadd118ca3c029025311c3c47cc8527e4047dfe2
describe
'617492' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQN' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
6f5ec12431950f5d937dd863203afa85
be9061d314818763f150bc36399899f825db1936
describe
'617482' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQO' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
8e27b779ebfe5362e825fadb1a2abf92
9509afea8e3bf8a4cb317f186d999d5a0936b730
'2011-12-21T07:37:23-05:00'
describe
'617522' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQP' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
bbfb11b798b8d28be5d1c4db281bb2c7
d93b40ef3183b32e11c3b6dc2f91ddd4b586c857
'2011-12-21T07:36:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQQ' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
d5b13beb585d95de248035c05fb3b05c
20b08c932491c4fc708db2572181e43a58ef9a89
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQR' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
4ba6ea2591f2559c9f2406b78f9ed99e
45bffd807ddd913b9b1085cdc39af0cade7799dd
'2011-12-21T07:35:30-05:00'
describe
'617526' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQS' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
b2dfef0007c00db0834fb4367f5675b1
6a7d432987002605d028e0e2081bd2046f220fcd
'2011-12-21T07:36:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQT' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
d1faf260d3e4838b056674263fa28b90
f4bbe7148e1145318ae6d655ccde7c15dd61bf10
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQU' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
44ff17beee679f0c0cedade1cbcaffb0
b5d4e5bae4c0afa966b198157434ed0dd3403db0
describe
'617385' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQV' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
beea2e6aa232d57a37c3a286fa897b08
a5370171a5cf3c8a6436b471c3dd6f407840a686
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQW' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
02b366cad6e80b2c2a64b68e198ef25a
c2d2aafbaf44fa1c143f001cce0d80f26daeb634
describe
'617289' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQX' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
0bfe2072aff508b6f56878e7490210d9
dbb80cee22bd7efe139fbe3874135ddd86164f97
'2011-12-21T07:35:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQY' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
5d0f34390769881e5b29374cf252908b
c75647f0d86d30c97dd350bf316e15cc38ee7e28
'2011-12-21T07:35:17-05:00'
describe
'617521' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQQZ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
66eb3ca1d0a246c7716861cdd40dd33e
073ce7d7e273556c6573dc849cf13eaf612a25ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRA' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
55fb1cd568c371fd44258e1c2b22350e
0f61aee292ac3ee39dcc967d0cd679ceb7e72529
'2011-12-21T07:35:05-05:00'
describe
'617542' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRB' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
682d443802871238b6320bc46bd977fb
a2c7242c44aee40225c6bc45209f720692b7e909
'2011-12-21T07:33:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRC' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
e1f27a97644adf48c46a8f80af60cb0e
7b58e7bf8842ed98cb15e1e335f9264252bf36f7
describe
'617413' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRD' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
b0462432d17e3287ee80eb93990b176f
f8384fed223ce76a53b33368b3154fba3397eb8f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRE' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
f19f0593382ec34fa150ec03396be76a
bfb1f7b6de53e3560bcbd7c30744a84df88d71f2
describe
'617544' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRF' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
f0861192000f09199958096cfaa44910
0e4e37ec712606425dd53418523f3fb73563d5e6
'2011-12-21T07:36:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRG' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
fa4cbc7ebfd3c7c794c76b0750515c54
25166b8104bdeae990f55923972a6f772ffb9bd7
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRH' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
5fc0c4f893b0fa300d8559fd5112b1e9
1b6b1d8d41048d2db537d350cd7591174b8de909
describe
'617391' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRI' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
f43a6294663df4010d61e2c5f2e70115
0c0e829373ca7e670dbd82b3d3431512384ca94f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRJ' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
489b57e7a5fe567915219f1549bd4d79
0f14ffc8eaff6cc86de2e9ae1c4681dafe808f50
'2011-12-21T07:32:11-05:00'
describe
'617445' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRK' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
a459b5b1bbca5bbefae0ced7353021fe
27e8b869030d4fb70545977aba592d348f873f77
describe
'617506' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRL' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
27591d6eeb7c00fef5686e9aa1a2fae0
cdc7ad311e7a83a2b50625924d3793c2e76929d3
'2011-12-21T07:32:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRM' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
722319b8a6a23a5b923462145fd5a770
741f17a878569933a576a166ee6122d5bc596612
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRN' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
a0bd4b9162cbc2ffb8cc9fec5b31542c
33da199b119878b2e5aee04105456bad77a2f333
describe
'617446' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRO' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
65d9bd47e1f41ca3fe3351bbdc5ee371
5d354d5c2a194bb481d65b78536276356b49362f
describe
'617430' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRP' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
b96ea86cf51cc5b0aeff17b973e3baf9
6441be0045c3180e60e7df1008b457dbf999380b
describe
'617496' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRQ' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
fce02109edb5fa7d5e13ef69f2792412
7f9615d1b2866610fc3116c276cc9647bcbddf7b
describe
'617317' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRR' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
57ced6d04a84e3dd0c99edf2a9e8b0e3
545e373d5a7882960cca3299f08fb377b966f08f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRS' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
c936dc5cd8d363e70376133088c3412a
01e56f4e833b1155a37ffb5214f5699e39731b7e
'2011-12-21T07:32:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRT' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
05e01edee1607c6b31663cddbc3ddc4b
9cc4325f99718f0c44224ecdcb8d8b7e55982712
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRU' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
31258a718d96ecc77edb8b430b6dd446
e7ac8c9aa4e359e3c3d8b8ca96d22dfd8c1ea6ad
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRV' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
80d66a5c197e75dc660ed9c70c4b07b3
3c84627ebaf5d464d779fe33489404dda116b419
'2011-12-21T07:35:46-05:00'
describe
'617410' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRW' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
f4f9ffc8b601f6fbe63890b9b1e936e0
2cf0eb1f406a264665347f61dd6450951751e362
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRX' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
c352ffafca06b9511319213770738ec0
0d86354a4759eaf14149f3b7395393dc63f80803
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRY' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
b97e1df6d2b9ab50c7fc3e41a1c4ef1f
ec05e56a20c4815772e606710b3dc114aea5c796
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQRZ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
97dec7cf1cf2b654999b2d73cf5cacb4
61f3daea16dd8c5f1fc775fe51a5c4b97b759f37
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSA' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
c1aa33bcd14e6e9f8f326cf5d67014dc
6449098e02838224b62664690c06cd47b7d2716e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSB' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
a0543a368e387fcbe5bb3d529ff4f366
741ea55709390195d398c2eeb660a69f5fa5aac4
describe
'617458' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSC' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
1c3d2503f60f8c49b23d0b2de4c53188
3d9e630cd6acc80c445971f396fba79c8a86c60b
'2011-12-21T07:35:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSD' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
7cebf89ad575404f425563c62ba633ce
291a3348bbc125cb4fa098b6de6a7d142930e97e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSE' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
aeb1a38fa753d748c8824911132202f8
2d7a579906b49c8f2b5a971bfddd8e832fe490f7
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSF' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
dd8414d404e8174bbd3e1c78d2112037
ed2c197b653804c05671aa6043801bd95b88e1c8
describe
'617238' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSG' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
ac250ab614dbc3015e03e1e68ae7bcde
8198688012cd6b0caf0ea77d511f13e1ede93b15
describe
'617373' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSH' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
62922a0fbbb5434e7888c0e06446784b
0be159af7813692fd91ca36b5a6dc8263b316771
'2011-12-21T07:32:07-05:00'
describe
'617354' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSI' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
d2e1985d9e6bad5a40cc60208d43c1cc
0c4bdd8b417c0e69fb03b55f132b349bd64d131c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSJ' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
3a71689456e42b9a41808a2bddd8f6bd
94bd92560cc6c70542b22a65bb9e8a367359f4f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSK' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
72bfc0c116654b4a097883fe7586e1de
54a2aede4a83bdcbd40a364090e2d12c5cabf2b9
'2011-12-21T07:35:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSL' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
f90c7ff5637411e4946eef5e9713dc75
5cee0f12d886ee88e62fd9f1b964d1a13d2c454d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSM' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
ca7214ce4b91daaf5136c17673cd7d1b
242e5ec1c8edd47cc6012eedb7dfb93566e66d14
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSN' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
1e70d35532b046a02761a4a9e332e528
b61d320a5187b7ec746da7d9ac6641d8a5758f78
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSO' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
e48b6ff3035be9179a1c01b77bc6845f
e797120121decfd7c58f7cb5fed67cd73cdc3bb6
'2011-12-21T07:32:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSP' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
c4abf7aeae1834b80f3b3135dd8a9949
261834e6d2a070f180cdf7fecd4097de08e6825b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSQ' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
6bfcbc912559d49a0cb2ed7ef28f288f
4240c508f92d8d338a756eda334f4785b89400c3
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSR' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
fd7bc923b72f3daac6705fb2132b3424
1d336a7db547fea28ddc3d8ff11a5cecc0386296
'2011-12-21T07:37:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSS' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
0a45c1d26dd33bb60f4d00bcbdc7fc65
4aca78228bcf265704b68c7af23a54af1072a519
'2011-12-21T07:32:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQST' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
a97441ccc3e97eda9ec4913a96803a30
37331f8b49fd7e28b616267cfe7a0bce200a0c38
'2011-12-21T07:38:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSU' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
bb3c92aacb429113e69dbe392cca9e2c
125e1b9647f4cb6f491d116397409f56e58aa32b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSV' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
253083861d7d847b2bad496073e40961
aaa0bf7ee50398fc5ac0f32bfeb40732cf41b84b
describe
'617529' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSW' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
c45c4112b87614a23e2ac780731467e6
97ee38fe9ce399ea94488fe1f4711d0e7e1708cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSX' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
2038bde0faf334430c8ee7f3b39252a2
7deffe6d954fcaad8ccd4857485341c1d3f3fd60
describe
'617146' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSY' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
56f31d669e76305f18244b2b95a27cfe
8492ff281ce9f56ed6ed9e462692c257b478f9ea
describe
'617321' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQSZ' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
b0b71707805f52fe245a4ef4cae9fd69
27556557af0a4fad74eae8ba74da699f33717630
'2011-12-21T07:37:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTA' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
bf2b56f408028396408f57d375ea4194
3388d3974846ed6bcb9afea17ff83db90861be0e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTB' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
2783ac1b020e45cc82862bae3d8bad36
302d18ea262df2b54fdf9a537819150569083987
describe
'405343' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTC' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
6d56cec960ab2736be4feb990c111f9e
d85da1a01630814c171d56ffcd1e5a289a3ed248
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTD' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
7df39d5a288acb2732539a7549bc0474
171053b90d9d40bd65519f4dd117d3290df10a0c
'2011-12-21T07:35:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTE' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
34be0f78efd34b0ee93c65d0f310fd63
a6d1fa7d7d1a0f67a91f2e981b07b2b783d8bc9b
'2011-12-21T07:34:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTF' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
7f9bc0bde97fda2f2893e04c5d6a4bd3
d52c16857e863101ac62e2af37f6b3075ba976b8
describe
'617262' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTG' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
fce25a744850e4772fe3e0fa07918d73
5c7c84fa220df7dc255450154f6f3afdb618ebba
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTH' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
9da8ee1b1b76a83c303f69b02ed6e7a8
56a7ddff329a7bebc8fb38b112f638f12ac047d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTI' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
e610a68bc116e555291b50aa4cb0b70c
0916dc7a74ace1d4a279e8c033cf367881b434b2
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTJ' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
ed91abd78e2bb9aa662928ebb9d855f3
e021d9d16411846e73ad8a9cdb028eb2f481363c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTK' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
f5bb79fec452be0b1c3384bf3a09059e
18fd718d4a233adf14c40dce6cccb566f2ad55ff
'2011-12-21T07:38:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTL' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
10a3bac1980d0f6f58086653d7b4c30b
89654fd94de2ed29b29fcf331ebdb69a5b1ccd0a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTM' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
35fef81856dacfc144c76699fd05b990
2f4e9e04ada2b927e245654439ce701568c52365
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTN' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
d182ec152a1b0af6bc605cdaf0736910
a8a3abbf4126dcd9077f186aa60d1365e509b63e
describe
'617302' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTO' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
087af28917bc78bc1497b126d52bc1ad
9c223539842b0fb4433bc4ceb7482ac95d325e85
'2011-12-21T07:34:11-05:00'
describe
'617524' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTP' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
08f8a5b5162371e2fbb74f421e2d306d
a4c7a584bb1b7bf8a23e78761fb710fee1f7967f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTQ' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
39c408a165dc19d49618a35a71fdc814
a5c9088c25d3c1d31aaf77d791f4915397024f66
'2011-12-21T07:36:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTR' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
4749ed73911ee6f4d58575842c3ea8bd
ca14c40472928b7f5cb6ea4d5bd9e66a6049f4ae
describe
'617343' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTS' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
ccbd05f0f639ad62ac4f74d707f66c67
06ba13b40a574458abc78dec22287a842f967588
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTT' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
4a68f0d341313116aff5cddf9f202a42
ed4795ce67679b8c4fa3f52aa4c885a13668d5fa
'2011-12-21T07:33:13-05:00'
describe
'617453' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTU' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
8de578881537eac7cf0fd6d138900e6f
3e65116a8a62f8af259e6413ac58d3977fa5075a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTV' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
c185a0d645b76586b68d17254b54a8d4
cc611d8c79293aae06080d8d8eb8958a7805319f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTW' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
e1f08277cbae4619da26bb490abb879c
c862f2a36eb1bbfe11f587a65343017a85765a11
'2011-12-21T07:34:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTX' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
4f59a297603806c0e2b76301395a4b87
4b32ebe6e93b2a066cd1a97ab69e4e7b7d300a3b
'2011-12-21T07:37:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTY' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
6750d5b273be11f0afc9786a02c4562d
ea99d108a54a1b50b5c58eed391fe267bb42a54f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQTZ' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
c8e83408046cd3d4a4e2bd7fd2e1b4b5
c6ea7d7953cb044cfda1a53035c3c7895655fedd
'2011-12-21T07:35:37-05:00'
describe
'617242' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUA' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
f4ecd6978eb45efee087e382e37bfadc
0fdafa6cba2953c67697496f21f66925ed439cb2
'2011-12-21T07:37:22-05:00'
describe
'617411' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUB' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
8fe988f9373a4672b1c463eca46ffe55
7b253cd919777e9cb7d81f457a59906108074b7d
'2011-12-21T07:31:58-05:00'
describe
'617509' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUC' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
21ba6adbcf8c145c6a88527b68004203
8858762637141c6f98e5e0deb39b1f0cd7f40b6e
'2011-12-21T07:33:48-05:00'
describe
'617360' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUD' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
3516af4df627c841f8402d6f7c51c4f3
bda8171850c80002b3fb18f96ebb0f2f8f277dda
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUE' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
ee69c32f0b511f0a30bdefcc854f49f7
ed5deb116bd6bfbd2162800723e1bb6df74cdb73
'2011-12-21T07:37:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUF' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
b2ee972f2d9b377c79a4565701a8453d
c8a780dc0cbd647417c0058181b87cda3710d57e
describe
'511524' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUG' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
93d2d1d0a3f9f3475790e35d0ca7e8bf
6b8883aa329c3f53a60a0c2ee4aea79529137e89
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUH' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
1ca580ee4cfc73cc91411d39fd777f98
da5b747390cb22c20397a63c1e5697f1a911a25b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUI' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
9562f8598c6eea483e0c1c7c91d29ae3
36359da375ea93a933229e018e9699ea16ad92cf
describe
'617353' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUJ' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
352b82a66cea264ab06f08763dd67d26
557b24f289c25d4353bf20144d5b71088820ad81
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUK' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
2cc2854c0f93fb98cb1d2ffe69827723
aed44428ac8fa7580161a87c5cd4e771ee594007
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUL' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
a05010f89d5a0db357a5985f6e502a16
cd53da80ef74bf7322d931a9878aff0dcc3ad417
describe
'766938' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUM' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
f820668b299bf5c115f0634939cccf27
da720a388129886462b442630055d61f052677ba
describe
'753163' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUN' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
020a844e3f586f4b6652b1ea92a542e2
9fd11920bc56750a4939711baaf88423f9c0a758
'2011-12-21T07:36:53-05:00'
describe
'180428' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUO' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
59e3cea37b82ee3831963a52fec687e4
ce788be1e41bc91d1615501a8a9373424d86a62e
describe
'17974668' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUP' 'sip-files00001.tif'
4c738d13bacde24455937d2b17923e0a
54a68665ccde27e40ae125b4c0c7545ad81884ab
describe
'18271444' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUQ' 'sip-files00002.tif'
b9487adf4fb88a02a763b15489bd4e39
39bc052e21fee0f3acf41083cce38930a30e10b0
describe
'4952944' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUR' 'sip-files00006.tif'
976321c28054471a3ebdf8374f036b70
cb6ffe57403d529dec4b12036ed9a63f4ec8f095
describe
'4950756' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUS' 'sip-files00007.tif'
ac9029046c7223ab588aaaa46778501f
64acb4f2db64ad3ea414be2a9a2efe207a794719
'2011-12-21T07:38:44-05:00'
describe
'4948624' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUT' 'sip-files00008.tif'
b957f2e35a53b5288c45d2fe150b6fe0
24f90a351370e361234185d1534471dcdb13d221
describe
'4952596' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUU' 'sip-files00009.tif'
044952611bd98820a6bb4e82e7f26c01
f774dd88f5cc85532af99672c2f83e30104c729f
describe
'4950316' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUV' 'sip-files00011.tif'
33a6c3f892ae3617593d82712e8fdc1a
f046d68e3794a85675ae8b413aea4657f724c42d
describe
'4949792' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUW' 'sip-files00012.tif'
7c07bbb9f9ff7d9601feda4dc07c47b6
4cfed8873c8ead400e65e0c62b7b5b4b7deae8f3
describe
'4951284' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUX' 'sip-files00013.tif'
2956c7be719d72addba6b32979cf31c6
c274dbb05b4b0674ad523e45636b8b0795fbbc49
describe
'4952080' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUY' 'sip-files00014.tif'
baaef81a5b21beea5743a993c19794d3
4edf0d52ae9692db4562231c35d79ccdecf03072
describe
'4950384' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQUZ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
fad514f258d44fdfa2231337fa15531b
1d5caddf0eb1298d53ba25013204ad506c4fd0bb
describe
'4951768' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVA' 'sip-files00017.tif'
c5dc0e4e7cfc8d32506353fce107ce26
6af1064cb14b6e4fcd3cb0ed18679397771a347b
'2011-12-21T07:34:25-05:00'
describe
'4952972' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVB' 'sip-files00018.tif'
6092895fd1cf86dff46f9f7ece81d27c
a1ef110d9d2553b516f13965b85b61c9797f5640
describe
'4953512' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVC' 'sip-files00019.tif'
f0463b70e7a3b55871afebb253a2c594
f5f98d0574f5803d1bcb5d97879b8072bc5de44f
describe
'4948312' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVD' 'sip-files00020.tif'
de361bf00b868cb8926d3fef24ff7b5d
716f20d0c059b0f321720529bd7d0574481b9be6
describe
'4953640' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVE' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7407bb7d6a0894b6ec1add6f6cfab22a
5dd73407bdc7afcb2c633d36a60edfe3e49f8e38
describe
'4953312' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVF' 'sip-files00022.tif'
a6052bdb4f47f1ec1492ee8f7ddda244
3b5d495abdcde8edf63635c4d6950fa527dbeb4b
describe
'4953240' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVG' 'sip-files00023.tif'
76b11eb28dd5c738585ce44095b3f74a
54ae6162ebcd4ab3fa8c9fe0e9a00dec5ea5a528
'2011-12-21T07:32:01-05:00'
describe
'4953392' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVH' 'sip-files00024.tif'
4ffe0d852d597948659cd9f0628b8187
118c405826e13827402624761753bd51e1a268d1
describe
'4953244' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVI' 'sip-files00025.tif'
40e5ea89d3ccb4e316e372c71a2acf8b
5ab353ca4fa1738bc5846419df71607efa98746c
describe
'4953432' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVJ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
8d42325bde973f3de7a934dd6cc86245
5a05888e82ea428922632512e6e3bb6f270b19f9
'2011-12-21T07:35:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVK' 'sip-files00027.tif'
1c304909d03c5133d18914949bc35427
40e6ffc0d91add795e0516bef86284d26bac4c0a
describe
'4953424' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVL' 'sip-files00028.tif'
e6b655d9fe1b183d6165855f3cc14f2e
547afe4fc1b8ce058fef22d842fd2223cc83c740
describe
'4953412' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVM' 'sip-files00029.tif'
d138189c0064d33f1a17cb2955c3fc93
1bab71d8522916e83835d2e7778a6716de825115
describe
'4953548' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVN' 'sip-files00030.tif'
b4a7e815f9dc4a1f383ae275325c9ea5
5594d8e9fe93b8f3c73d2ccbe1492171fc4a628a
'2011-12-21T07:37:01-05:00'
describe
'4950732' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVO' 'sip-files00031.tif'
d147b383c8e09767914c9f20cd7d8b36
75c4daff0ee564d07717b7aa3766c634fc83ae20
describe
'4948392' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVP' 'sip-files00032.tif'
96694750ee6f761740e2277e011b467e
7ced3e52ab24cd714ea937143b289796452eec3e
describe
'4953460' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVQ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
f56c9c94e811502e3926f33370f853de
c48128ffc62dbf201aa18aa0bd70427c318d64cf
describe
'4953896' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVR' 'sip-files00034.tif'
fa6bffbc2267f71d3f3cbb5265d057c1
77ff2a9f0fc54caaa5807b2e83ef85367aedfaf4
'2011-12-21T07:38:01-05:00'
describe
'4953360' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVS' 'sip-files00035.tif'
4f3ff83e8267304947a4c1be28169f4b
2ca49659c590a793381dfda786080113ffc5f9fe
'2011-12-21T07:38:10-05:00'
describe
'4952516' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVT' 'sip-files00036.tif'
1bb963347676c36d33994028ee2910e6
b9104e19cf1bfbac180755f1d8df9a36ea1b0068
describe
'4952812' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVU' 'sip-files00037.tif'
c8203649bd95c84287e0db2f40eac68b
d5b2711557e4a900dfc4095f0ce81b272120585c
describe
'4953408' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVV' 'sip-files00038.tif'
fa203c3855e08811274035169ce85bc7
7054893abb6f422179e832b4e6a131fefb565546
describe
'4953472' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVW' 'sip-files00039.tif'
5dc12962ad652837fbd88318cb40ea16
d8cdef894ec4236c29c467dc74878fe9fcb84eed
describe
'4953796' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVX' 'sip-files00040.tif'
9157452ab493ff9cfbc70fc3d35a3416
740e14b22a06a0133901120b822b9754258000a3
describe
'4951576' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVY' 'sip-files00041.tif'
b21be04f14e4738abd8d342a499b7115
73f6b5702bc8d634ec59da7821585c7e7bc8aa82
describe
'4948140' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQVZ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
d6f040dd856b43955372a890509b6123
1fd2938682d2aaf8157d2f222737f0003a6c51eb
describe
'4953484' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWA' 'sip-files00043.tif'
6dd8dba2510eb4ef32c4bfacd8d0d6ea
7d14e632baad8bcb9c601024a548d1dffa15c250
describe
'4953988' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWB' 'sip-files00044.tif'
5a688bbc7e11099597236caf1455aace
8ce0cc85566a47120c18d71f55c3434ae2fd4b6f
'2011-12-21T07:32:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWC' 'sip-files00045.tif'
ee42e527d9f0ea9f84c1c8e3e86f7bff
bb9884286bf388c9b545443081966df769816048
describe
'4953496' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWD' 'sip-files00046.tif'
7160f1cfcde1835a7f34e81f719b2b43
98c9938684ff611831c970a06ee29867e0a837dd
describe
'4950852' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWE' 'sip-files00047.tif'
52ab93456eab008d291a0b7aec8c66eb
89361f124d224cd772c9f8a0361ca6a740b1cb7d
describe
'4948256' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWF' 'sip-files00048.tif'
56a8345e26183029d192860da560941d
7af78d506a64cc43e4b995b1639b289118c7787a
describe
'4953300' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWG' 'sip-files00049.tif'
aa1fd9ec8dae87090abe8bb26a862274
da8a841629a54b7bff971948f1777e029718f92c
describe
'4953444' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWH' 'sip-files00050.tif'
5c4a9f6e95d8edda7c9bc8157c264b4d
fbeaeca6c932e16f28123c9a27a9489ee91bbad1
'2011-12-21T07:33:52-05:00'
describe
'3145892' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWI' 'sip-files00051.tif'
3c1d244d7a47165be31aff18efea793c
2d3884c28cf6a5ddaa0fbc5c9e28f754f3bc60f3
describe
'4948216' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWJ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
486e14ad33fa6ddf07c149e4722cf374
6cf763b24b0669a21d37d3d85db88125c29ca04d
describe
'4953676' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWK' 'sip-files00053.tif'
8cc057ba4eae993578b177f7168e597b
7711ae3c54a4062583a67718f5e366032f4e0fef
describe
'4953624' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWL' 'sip-files00054.tif'
9001eb1bfe073a73b2a91c700b63ea34
c7c17b79e33b7ad912efbda419b37e21e4b7026b
describe
'4953120' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWM' 'sip-files00055.tif'
da71ccf97e08714b2298b0d51c06514f
6cface546eeef136088a56576c619841b2e90a46
describe
'4953808' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWN' 'sip-files00056.tif'
98f27fdf8b8ae5b58ce4ad44f45cdfd1
2f18342435ecb90f1e988cd7e5bc8f76f7e680c2
describe
'4953304' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWO' 'sip-files00057.tif'
5eff8b62824c7cda8a5050a89ced6b3d
47376fd6b7d8539f662e7bd64e82de407403ac45
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWP' 'sip-files00058.tif'
a5ca12ca2226f692a258778cfd892f90
0876a85a134f872b2d2c2874fb8c732f95c9c4ee
describe
'4953452' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWQ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
c220c7aa3a939726afefec4d211a224a
e07e56ea74db8595edabbb390f7879b92baf84fe
describe
'4952928' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWR' 'sip-files00060.tif'
f0a5863efcc93eb5b643cc1f4cc7e022
4c83c559dd77fd149b22c7d9889123da5eb15c6f
describe
'4953660' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWS' 'sip-files00061.tif'
3d6f99e002bbd9c554e9895014cb223c
d6cc728950f0ac904ae07f75097ad725d26b2771
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWT' 'sip-files00062.tif'
2b3d3c0af4fdd0ec3c7583aec102e65c
9fec9c653d238b7c5d2d7ed4ff410a4dce702523
describe
'4952980' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWU' 'sip-files00063.tif'
efc38c5e47c0967d903659671897f7be
7937f00516414bfd109fbce9d0bfc63d5468119f
describe
'4953500' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWV' 'sip-files00064.tif'
04c104b6687d2b49d6df8de1e23f2b40
8079d1eaac25bfdcb9b917e9d129b820ca1e1635
describe
'4953280' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWW' 'sip-files00065.tif'
281240406ad0ad70bccfa6b6ab909f0e
1a921803b115dba57af8a4366cf27a6d82180716
'2011-12-21T07:38:38-05:00'
describe
'4953824' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWX' 'sip-files00066.tif'
65dec124a8aed808fda1f508d0fac904
3ee4463adbd62faa830eecfb853b001a89de1412
'2011-12-21T07:36:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWY' 'sip-files00067.tif'
2cd1272d971328b45515fd674c523edd
259e59659d2cdbca58b457cf4ee2a8b36e4096e4
describe
'4953644' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQWZ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
91c5f3790d30dfd312fbe9051b0977e5
e32c02f3a42dd5637833c07ae1b80f7b3d354cb3
describe
'3836768' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXA' 'sip-files00069.tif'
76bed93afd96c16f7ad120f4822c6c1f
aaa4da30b9de718491c35baa4d5333ffe80d506d
'2011-12-21T07:35:10-05:00'
describe
'4948136' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXB' 'sip-files00070.tif'
682288245fcc411acc2177d0c392ab2b
2bc7eb423cb8d8cdcefa3850057591b01ebed1a7
describe
'4953652' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXC' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b66a7b3329be8b6ad5f3ca8bb10ad89d
2ed530039d593029abd6713f1e283f9a4a5d7681
describe
'4953332' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXD' 'sip-files00072.tif'
22c5f1bbff03031c7a1baaaa62640b1a
223e6282618dd2d1613149ad9a2dcc091e2ee513
'2011-12-21T07:35:03-05:00'
describe
'4953584' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXE' 'sip-files00073.tif'
063faa86e4299d1fae00beb5e9a078bf
51115cf12d2f5a947c79944b02f3e8611abad059
describe
'4952576' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXF' 'sip-files00074.tif'
8c61f71e02b9f2bb1a4b275ed94d97ba
b718ad43449a32365f773672431a763b351ef12e
describe
'4953544' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXG' 'sip-files00075.tif'
490abf1349c599e0b725936c37e4643e
e36bdf70d4e938807bbd04e0b00ce0d9fe6752d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXH' 'sip-files00076.tif'
b58f75bc4d97d04f4c7b5024bc78ba57
1f329992fd518cfb36038710833f3d66624cb7ed
'2011-12-21T07:36:46-05:00'
describe
'4953000' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXI' 'sip-files00077.tif'
f40de9035c7f215229dae67ee069100d
4a5b7ef7a4601e5d427fb8e96866f20248474acc
describe
'4953516' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXJ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
591be40a413e000220bddc3f82e2ca7e
8b05f7ce6b867bc87462dc5bdaa21f3e85b5d68f
'2011-12-21T07:38:08-05:00'
describe
'4952728' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXK' 'sip-files00079.tif'
8401343fe01875ed90100498e30e2c00
d8fbfbecf49814b5e41562e64112ff54c6035460
'2011-12-21T07:34:10-05:00'
describe
'4953524' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXL' 'sip-files00082.tif'
209e24993fa78a1a1814afa543b50ffd
f390de182b9c48beffbc43359b843cd6d22bcb06
'2011-12-21T07:32:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXM' 'sip-files00083.tif'
1cece723e2945de7f462224e41f4192e
07643cbf055db2f28941c01740bb935169c17620
describe
'4954068' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXN' 'sip-files00084.tif'
a167456c59d8c4f79aa94a31e3af3f54
dcbe483dc0141defb29e0547f474312a14986536
describe
'4953672' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXO' 'sip-files00085.tif'
4461a9e8a8df21b4f9bcd527640186e4
d3ee2c968e8111af71c3d24991b9ffc341f3c8a7
'2011-12-21T07:34:46-05:00'
describe
'4953776' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXP' 'sip-files00086.tif'
638340b907741a1edcc9e883b8fbdfcb
cfe298e94908102b9b804f2786a45500dd4814fd
describe
'4953388' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXQ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
4978905f3aac92094598b9ce18da6760
54ed146393ba3209b22bfa9d2ffc9ceeb5e3a69f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXR' 'sip-files00088.tif'
ece7df700878ab744899fe810f189a5c
98540a62a20fd89db39d3db9d0c6b73524a4bf78
describe
'4953084' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXS' 'sip-files00089.tif'
09ceb58fa2e92243b6d9f6cd1ddc3491
c9d3522cb02a690fb59390aed4a09a3b86ba19df
describe
'4953320' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXT' 'sip-files00090.tif'
455a665ba976028e24de539882e4c64a
5add86190d83f5964601a63a6b77a0e03c299384
describe
'4952480' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXU' 'sip-files00091.tif'
c853d31c1e8d258daf37faee37088c66
8d6a0a95ce0908b6696326a22eb62ef84e4a02df
'2011-12-21T07:35:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXV' 'sip-files00092.tif'
876a9f8766c58a30e4b30e6a3bd1c4bb
a76794741d4f4deaaca8d7467a6f5dbe88489cc2
describe
'4953504' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXW' 'sip-files00093.tif'
d6f9875c6bbc6ca1bafdb1568e39fb1a
d913ec93ddd470b0b7888a4c2356aaaec02538b1
'2011-12-21T07:37:58-05:00'
describe
'4953476' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXX' 'sip-files00094.tif'
55128491b2e81aa38e0466042bc1e5b6
30f1f8ede3d5fca45a8da0630ee5b6590a495f05
describe
'4954244' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXY' 'sip-files00095.tif'
fcefc233543ca635f9af698db0a8b41c
ceaa6b1851d5e04695508e46f3cd1a70a6979d5b
'2011-12-21T07:37:41-05:00'
describe
'4948232' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQXZ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
b1129b916c0b05a6030cefa5db3de8c6
8992a8721237dab2ae8fbecb9252a0ba747f0120
describe
'4953488' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYA' 'sip-files00097.tif'
b804fbdb944b61cefb4f6e1d3afe93f4
8357c53a944e4e113d9b8b56acc03973797e5947
'2011-12-21T07:37:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYB' 'sip-files00098.tif'
d0f19d4d45a52cbc071ae06b19b8a469
f65f44973f6aef7e080ac3f55146d2599e386756
describe
'4953900' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYC' 'sip-files00099.tif'
d0d1c071d8cb319fdcb9a08462d036da
b38784a07aba4756f13255c2ffba4eac71b7073c
describe
'4953848' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYD' 'sip-files00100.tif'
f0b4d0efc29ef6421b822f92c470b9de
143171c203f5200e32ea9b73074858644cb21e11
describe
'4953728' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYE' 'sip-files00101.tif'
702d68fe1e600e91af83dac606ffcd40
5647834b3fbd5cd34be42443f41185b2bd1c355c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYF' 'sip-files00102.tif'
0f9d476ae2f1a4d0c8c6e1ccff6e54ae
2c538ef11e3df6e5a5cbc2cf22383310dc1aada2
describe
'4951552' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYG' 'sip-files00103.tif'
394ed1e34bcfb37daa910f198d7f02f6
0e3db5504fc564d7710b95ac3d3378bd8098ef0e
'2011-12-21T07:38:20-05:00'
describe
'4948300' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYH' 'sip-files00104.tif'
5905ebfbfa66bced55286358a1e76126
dc200645f56a85a07c387e438a1fe1326ad92461
'2011-12-21T07:35:20-05:00'
describe
'4953268' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYI' 'sip-files00105.tif'
6bbb1384c71c852975cc12ef83f18aad
d7962b5412082eb2af53b2eaf9eaac7f8c1bcb13
describe
'4953752' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYJ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
585459879c478af3e62cbc38ffd7c7fc
f833dbcd4881a13d2892f8b3212a1418c7a95397
describe
'4953632' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYK' 'sip-files00107.tif'
f729f34ce7bf57980fe95b933c01c36d
4f97431e63284e8b7e7bbc5557f6b09b12ccc6af
describe
'4953748' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYL' 'sip-files00108.tif'
318a4a2b779538c8c25fe346af48de0a
c7b5127dccd048b12ead6e2aed0e27b302ee2087
describe
'4953628' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYM' 'sip-files00109.tif'
113d7b3646e90a1c8206d154c0981c07
e632c673d03e0a1c78602ce62fb6090cf6dd4f50
'2011-12-21T07:33:17-05:00'
describe
'4953656' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYN' 'sip-files00110.tif'
470b0cc60154b2628e7b1bbdf168aeb4
2a33ac433ddf3bd5eaccc2f1a4b8847dad0434fd
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYO' 'sip-files00111.tif'
930e120813bfd569d0f99e46029cf52e
40ceb9dfb7aed8c0266ba34897364e511b03ebdb
describe
'4952496' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYP' 'sip-files00112.tif'
b5621c78d06025325c508a16ec75805b
92c6e44f8565d391c2e466705b2743176978087e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYQ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
d65b1490cc87babc723ad223418b11ab
dc092c8a048c70c297fbdb7b301a903784673513
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYR' 'sip-files00114.tif'
0cab326e26d15c9f7951f42d224c31da
98f6b6da94ef25cd4c247004d753cda3f03076ff
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYS' 'sip-files00115.tif'
adf209b3a789c094d3db64ee314d1a38
588e2d3a6de16cfd0a5bf77f17e9152e06736188
describe
'4953604' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYT' 'sip-files00116.tif'
3380b17f77a5e6b3b67157255b5d9ffa
96cac90a66a028aa998c39a58378e7e3b8887c02
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYU' 'sip-files00117.tif'
617f9987ebc764c5e0b2e553f8c5bf96
90462d85adbb1eeffd2c2a19b9d7f4d9c1c7caa2
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYV' 'sip-files00118.tif'
db0824c577be3a44d9d0a567f1ea2c6a
bf45cb4cbd8085f553422bdb9e24ef5ef07fcf92
describe
'4953648' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYW' 'sip-files00119.tif'
aa5fbcdc9f0372bba804c7c815b4267b
1b901fea7fe739df051e053f590a498996040864
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYX' 'sip-files00120.tif'
d7e8ac26801ecc85e4c67e69952ade7f
b3f23cf24cd3ff4d1147520367634311c55af14d
describe
'4953448' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYY' 'sip-files00121.tif'
a747c0e2ba85c4e70e8de5daf7628c35
9013aaa5f1433b6d38494415e35440fb968111ae
describe
'4953164' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQYZ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
cfd5a0788bf333085e3561fcfb430789
c921703943325dd8bfda07ff28224c1b75232453
describe
'4952476' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZA' 'sip-files00123.tif'
a7fc839c741ab8aa163bc6b5c5623f26
f7e0fcc23ccf503f23657e0deebf311d61d3a257
describe
'4953200' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZB' 'sip-files00124.tif'
b52aa3473f9dc5d194adb27ad364b48e
f4517021d3877a6984a2545c8b20e8360d5d98a1
describe
'4953404' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZC' 'sip-files00125.tif'
03f706b7755c5d52fcab16a3ccabaff7
ff645ede767266a04ae09da4ab297a27fc640cc5
describe
'4953416' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZD' 'sip-files00126.tif'
4b9c5535b193308e769261f8b81fc985
439b506eb342bf3faf242644a861ba5110537a01
describe
'4951992' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZE' 'sip-files00127.tif'
0a90fc8ee8f43ef65748f4f931c8212d
da81811e7447f023302c10b00d3280b0ceb7d126
'2011-12-21T07:32:31-05:00'
describe
'4952820' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZF' 'sip-files00128.tif'
7fc4aeb85875151154d7add813c91429
2d2b70f99ec549c081621e7034d221ab8a93b992
'2011-12-21T07:34:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZG' 'sip-files00129.tif'
e05460e6b67ba067eb6235801eaf479f
2644d57e2d9c8a73835afbb650e0acc74ae32e58
'2011-12-21T07:32:39-05:00'
describe
'4953592' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZH' 'sip-files00130.tif'
3b4d277d4a2c0c2b2767d24ba088cf64
9923aa2d0df0f09453c4da327dbeecbe2d65f8d9
'2011-12-21T07:37:10-05:00'
describe
'4953736' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZI' 'sip-files00131.tif'
5c3d514b9970d3b94cfccde3121b8a02
84bd74b537d8f86e6119980b124de4276d3f380f
describe
'4953692' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZJ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
832e4dc86f58fde8ec2feb11b5f49441
b43b4fc41bfb824077757e9116d71779cbf87f41
describe
'4953840' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZK' 'sip-files00133.tif'
a1d683ef820973dfed4f164c6aaf57f9
7830e7b8673075905f19be70a6d54bcc15813f64
'2011-12-21T07:35:15-05:00'
describe
'4953812' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZL' 'sip-files00134.tif'
63e007161d00b8c26314ab5a591fc499
1a9edfbaa534cc3fdef67919cc74058ca39c28ac
describe
'3456020' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZM' 'sip-files00135.tif'
6f05c93634fdd58f05cda5cf1865d6d7
8073f4294d2e419e5ac4fc0514753db601c4d1d2
describe
'4948260' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZN' 'sip-files00136.tif'
2aa9a6d8bb7e93351e55d2560766ff83
6125ef5e61abc618d343f5a6c5412af8f572eee7
describe
'4953932' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZO' 'sip-files00137.tif'
bfd439b4ffc28d02fcc9debfcbe62bdf
36b1d2daab187ca47b160a73891d68618b7f6234
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZP' 'sip-files00138.tif'
f412ce3cc3e8f45821658564e7afb2ef
397f6000a500ec0570c6b6827da9d7801c32710f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZQ' 'sip-files00139.tif'
98cd6f9331c47dd0b092d3d8ddadc3ed
fc0761c762608db1eb96ed3966cb2922c6c292ae
'2011-12-21T07:38:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZR' 'sip-files00140.tif'
2fa90a867276ae6dac7770e21742e152
3343ee6a0d984389c13c0fcc102a3bcb62795266
describe
'4953060' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZS' 'sip-files00141.tif'
b12f8a36ffc82b661a525b6328be7660
216acaf714ca11e2b1fb4c5ebf93e6049efcfb99
describe
'4948152' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZT' 'sip-files00142.tif'
ac0b78bfa48200c587feae93d28dac9e
e2a6323faaada91b9886ddd0796efff99b1cbd37
describe
'4953104' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZU' 'sip-files00143.tif'
15a86c0189a713698ccf35c9cc8cc3b6
6cee0476958625fa5dce5254e2deddb3630128c5
describe
'4952316' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZV' 'sip-files00144.tif'
03595d8efd3fbc021415b28ca3395203
ed6b55ee5e79490a7d38d10a7b61168206a102ba
describe
'4953348' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZW' 'sip-files00145.tif'
7acc5aac3f5c84cd17d7f827bbefebfc
c7fcbdd57c959c7d0b8c2fa3e905b54291834f5b
'2011-12-21T07:33:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZX' 'sip-files00146.tif'
6ed8b24184a16b3f180b2cde6c307646
80286131db539643557934130f4cb2595fda92ff
'2011-12-21T07:32:08-05:00'
describe
'4953732' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZY' 'sip-files00147.tif'
1d468639f4a57fe7b7246676bf858a3d
c4b8660acc1a86f2a3b67418e9ae1af4606aaffc
describe
'4953596' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAQZZ' 'sip-files00148.tif'
e73555a3378486061e27e12297bbc584
ee2f31eebd1ad3ddbfeb4911e03199319b83f1c6
'2011-12-21T07:38:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAA' 'sip-files00149.tif'
6cefa8c21cad16828add0f129f43bbe4
62275252aaa87731d1b7593b859f4f8b8b4480bc
'2011-12-21T07:34:20-05:00'
describe
'4953428' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAB' 'sip-files00150.tif'
0b59ba6c55175aa79f5491437a45b549
a2807c89bccd0c96a86288226fe0d623e44cea79
describe
'4953464' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAC' 'sip-files00151.tif'
39ba8d844de655da396cbc0d5e089268
1a126fc28db8be1bf65e536064e21b140f6c4cb2
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAD' 'sip-files00152.tif'
c8b5557d99b261b1af5534c20083b7d1
b2ec858b0052226d4b8d0dca25fcd9708b470cc8
describe
'4953536' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAE' 'sip-files00153.tif'
b2880df7a3a62a9ca149c9955f819921
4d8e9a9242b7fb17f6407e695ff1908d834d18bd
describe
'4953908' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAF' 'sip-files00154.tif'
fd3ea20298569d9f2dbbac126fb79c60
48cf71c66130efd5ac510a108d4de96ae7f928a8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAG' 'sip-files00155.tif'
fbef1717092ee6c611ae4983370a6e4c
cf4b85a0f651b338caa569e42dcf62355ee7cfa2
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAH' 'sip-files00156.tif'
8a17a0f247dc4a7db243c62351cb7c9e
fc9b772d1ed419498b3d62e71ee453db28fd6fdf
describe
'4952912' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAI' 'sip-files00157.tif'
43af02dc003ddc43dcdb6a05190ab51b
fa90befda0bd884cfee56fe4b392107d8efd96e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAJ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
3335349376740146407c842483e04d2b
3b0d2767b4484cd88be97d88640d0a86d4c963cf
describe
'4953308' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAK' 'sip-files00159.tif'
8b63e93122366664ad72287be18d7781
b6ac64fbb49bd3fb29e85f25850449dad2b0a026
'2011-12-21T07:36:15-05:00'
describe
'4953168' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAL' 'sip-files00160.tif'
f251bccc72962b2ec47c48e35957d58d
1aff858eff0474c17fe254ce0a9b09af6d8bb8c8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAM' 'sip-files00161.tif'
cab0f2c9c0e8e0256d2f1abbc366bc0c
bc3187efeb05774a095d5aebbb544275db15814a
'2011-12-21T07:35:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAN' 'sip-files00162.tif'
2ece1917239798636016c5e984f64f96
fdcc2ed72e2850cb409f3585780664768dc187e1
'2011-12-21T07:32:18-05:00'
describe
'4952636' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAO' 'sip-files00163.tif'
f2ef17353f013dc4735230ac9a3e6819
572eb7b3f4a969f55308eff0fb35ec59bf6a306c
describe
'4952828' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAP' 'sip-files00164.tif'
3412b946160613595e7462ead2d1cb6c
17779a5a60c1eb46f37a997332fb5b913fd76895
describe
'4953708' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAQ' 'sip-files00165.tif'
a1c33379bac59cdb6c7df9439b5f9fb7
c0be9263eed084e7e8d18c349daabbf22d4057f3
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAR' 'sip-files00166.tif'
861bb31bc07245578bef0c2c53669cf3
2391039c3d4f1e5324f17b94c9fdce44570c5915
describe
'4953092' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAS' 'sip-files00167.tif'
8cea7627abe1087ecfcac9dc4ccc1ce0
71e915f7b7fa4ec9a0eb3f467bf967172e025c17
'2011-12-21T07:37:07-05:00'
describe
'4953288' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAT' 'sip-files00168.tif'
f080f2dae2500746ba36fd21d050569d
2f53bd7f8e3f72e25cb47ba1543271b955e6d5bf
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAU' 'sip-files00169.tif'
1a716fe1a1cf67ea6d87844417dc2b51
794d55d5d856cf5f1899c6d742f446edc9b48f67
describe
'4948188' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAV' 'sip-files00170.tif'
efb55e83894108edc55484f68605a73c
06ba2012462e7e115920740d43d880b9ad85294a
describe
'4953684' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAW' 'sip-files00171.tif'
9e34baee6666b6a2dedc9b8ecd420ba4
453a9231f8b4a21548a06e20c9d5345b6b9bae71
describe
'4952976' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAX' 'sip-files00172.tif'
5bd3d5a804ba6104c17ed90ed79a2fb5
8dc2ec45eac18c556e86d516d21cafa6c746aa6e
describe
'4953612' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAY' 'sip-files00173.tif'
c48a2c05c6be0d6bc721181003714bc4
96aa34a3a15b236aecaca6235f18ca61e49d1b70
'2011-12-21T07:33:44-05:00'
describe
'4953608' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARAZ' 'sip-files00174.tif'
d7118af46a6d64d205ad37f88832d42f
87dd3ba8727baf269963c62a63b24b0a831222d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBA' 'sip-files00175.tif'
420e6dd0e049b389b811d2f10927259b
f52d85818130e648dae96aaf34f219c278e7e39d
'2011-12-21T07:38:14-05:00'
describe
'4953568' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBB' 'sip-files00176.tif'
5134486aee1603b02d7b5f35544d19d3
1f4ddf476b9fedc47276a64842ac863a20b3f73f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBC' 'sip-files00177.tif'
5bf7e0a134cb1097ccb991590289d9b3
b5be6b8e2b312ca2bcd6649c1db6f4b69ac97df5
'2011-12-21T07:34:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBD' 'sip-files00178.tif'
3072d1457b7da66afde2002f79fe2db5
697c97813a0c15dfbe96a26bd8e462b239ed2a08
describe
'4953788' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBE' 'sip-files00179.tif'
e1deba80ab4d10333da6e763fcec15fb
7a4e28cca6d7d16c744b2ee7b9be4505dccb7cc8
describe
'4953292' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBF' 'sip-files00180.tif'
ba416cbb2503e0f254b138755d166842
86efda92d773fedbfdf0542108215013f9415881
describe
'4953172' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBG' 'sip-files00181.tif'
3a64894252e15a89552851063c6e02f4
4e05508a4576b8451e625a3577189fe3fe82efcc
describe
'4952528' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBH' 'sip-files00182.tif'
3600b3a713284e7a2a3682051d4484e5
4125471ef74535db4e5eb2b35949fd8935ee2cc2
describe
'4952424' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBI' 'sip-files00183.tif'
c51922df45b4dd0f27d40ce026a1dcf1
90e1c2eedabb7c9d610443ca397c56edaae30779
describe
'4953580' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBJ' 'sip-files00184.tif'
dbc418fcbd52a30b32fccad12fadf4b0
6fec9c18b05df74898d598d5b5fcf479a212b392
describe
'4952420' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBK' 'sip-files00185.tif'
8ac862e71178d07dc7b0a2612408df88
efe8d23557f91ead1383b022a4da2bd9d87134d1
'2011-12-21T07:33:12-05:00'
describe
'4953532' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBL' 'sip-files00186.tif'
a2758893b59a3a34b93c2f5ed11c84f9
f022c8f3c5c7982d8c70d3efde17381890cd9f46
'2011-12-21T07:33:57-05:00'
describe
'4951708' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBM' 'sip-files00187.tif'
8f3a9653de466aaedc84b0c585184746
3980fc0113ef579c83233105b36e2b2688eb7579
describe
'4948324' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBN' 'sip-files00188.tif'
9bcb5c5503d96f3c1ccfae89ac2d1b2c
9eb9ce9e884ffa9c0ce9ba03efcd7c9e6d4649c8
describe
'4953820' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBO' 'sip-files00189.tif'
d21a01b48149bbf2a9d9b09fa55fab5f
cd9ecb3ad5ca50a9ea3e6de074bcfc9b42c7b411
describe
'4953004' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBP' 'sip-files00190.tif'
f46cfa2bdb297d779a0ddbb3e36aeb6b
d8fc5d51cfbe9add59bc441d5debe0d22c53e9c9
describe
'4953396' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBQ' 'sip-files00191.tif'
8d8272e769f79f03f9877070ad57bdcf
2654ed525be0365de9142605cdaeaa33c9f3150e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBR' 'sip-files00192.tif'
81c4569461e758df415ec0af1b64c9a7
944fcbe0bcafd469642454d538838bb368088515
describe
'4953088' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBS' 'sip-files00193.tif'
71872121eff5f902f5796d183b49b02f
ade634f8ff4642abd77820caf308450f15cd1c0a
describe
'4953284' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBT' 'sip-files00194.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBU' 'sip-files00195.tif'
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'2011-12-21T07:37:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBV' 'sip-files00196.tif'
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describe
'4952276' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBW' 'sip-files00197.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBX' 'sip-files00198.tif'
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'2011-12-21T07:35:50-05:00'
describe
'4953688' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBY' 'sip-files00199.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARBZ' 'sip-files00200.tif'
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describe
'4953024' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCA' 'sip-files00201.tif'
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describe
'4952996' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCB' 'sip-files00202.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCC' 'sip-files00203.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCD' 'sip-files00204.tif'
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describe
'4953136' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCE' 'sip-files00205.tif'
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describe
'4953468' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCF' 'sip-files00206.tif'
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describe
'4953936' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCG' 'sip-files00207.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCH' 'sip-files00208.tif'
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describe
'3256784' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCI' 'sip-files00209.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCJ' 'sip-files00210.tif'
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describe
'4953636' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCK' 'sip-files00211.tif'
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'2011-12-21T07:34:40-05:00'
describe
'4953996' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCL' 'sip-files00212.tif'
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'2011-12-21T07:32:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCM' 'sip-files00213.tif'
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describe
'4953012' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCN' 'sip-files00214.tif'
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describe
'4953556' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCO' 'sip-files00215.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCP' 'sip-files00216.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCQ' 'sip-files00217.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCR' 'sip-files00218.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCS' 'sip-files00219.tif'
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describe
'4953816' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCT' 'sip-files00220.tif'
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describe
'4952252' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCU' 'sip-files00221.tif'
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describe
'4948276' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCV' 'sip-files00222.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCW' 'sip-files00223.tif'
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describe
'4953800' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCX' 'sip-files00224.tif'
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describe
'4953256' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCY' 'sip-files00225.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARCZ' 'sip-files00226.tif'
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describe
'4952628' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDA' 'sip-files00227.tif'
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describe
'4952740' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDB' 'sip-files00228.tif'
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'2011-12-21T07:33:11-05:00'
describe
'4952340' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDC' 'sip-files00229.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDD' 'sip-files00230.tif'
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describe
'4953020' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDE' 'sip-files00231.tif'
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describe
'4953156' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDF' 'sip-files00232.tif'
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describe
'4952720' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDG' 'sip-files00233.tif'
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describe
'4948432' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDH' 'sip-files00234.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDI' 'sip-files00235.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDJ' 'sip-files00236.tif'
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describe
'4952100' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDK' 'sip-files00237.tif'
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describe
'4953712' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDL' 'sip-files00238.tif'
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describe
'4104412' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDM' 'sip-files00239.tif'
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describe
'4948460' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDN' 'sip-files00240.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDO' 'sip-files00241.tif'
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describe
'4950600' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDP' 'sip-files00242.tif'
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'2011-12-21T07:33:24-05:00'
describe
'4954464' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDQ' 'sip-files00243.tif'
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describe
'4954512' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDR' 'sip-files00244.tif'
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describe
'18413704' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDS' 'sip-files00249.tif'
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describe
'18085028' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDT' 'sip-files00250.tif'
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describe
'4337676' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDU' 'sip-files00251.tif'
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describe
'189850' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDV' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
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describe
'46482' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDW' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
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describe
'93806' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDX' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
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describe
'101423' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDY' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
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describe
'71061' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARDZ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
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describe
'172542' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREA' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
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describe
'88753' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREB' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
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describe
'80108' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREC' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
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describe
'132160' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARED' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
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describe
'148247' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREE' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
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describe
'106523' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREF' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
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describe
'117977' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREG' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
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describe
'151037' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREH' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
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describe
'97884' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREI' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
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describe
'42465' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREJ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
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describe
'147070' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREK' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
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describe
'149626' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREL' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
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describe
'154505' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREM' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
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describe
'170294' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREN' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
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describe
'163267' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREO' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
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describe
'188251' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREP' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
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describe
'176694' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREQ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
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describe
'169413' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARER' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
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describe
'174497' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARES' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
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describe
'176710' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARET' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
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describe
'142680' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREU' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
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describe
'72029' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREV' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
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describe
'177158' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREW' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
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describe
'179973' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREX' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
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describe
'163412' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREY' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
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describe
'154025' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAREZ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
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describe
'151486' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARFA' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
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describe
'166830' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARFB' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
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describe
'160540' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARFC' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
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describe
'185052' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARFD' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
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describe
'152614' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARFE' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-12-21T07:32:51-05:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-12-21T07:37:13-05:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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37acad0f676b60e11bf9740c32f4d7ab
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describe
'174618' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMD' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
ba25ee17ab5364c739da134910fdf1cc
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describe
'187205' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARME' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
a905e6c49571e2604abc76b66612640b
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describe
'155874' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMF' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
709b4c5de45bed7235c7c78e752a5fed
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describe
'133788' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMG' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
de3d8f32b31b5a6fc8d14eddb71574dd
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describe
'164128' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMH' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
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describe
'159426' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMI' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
4ffb38c7842cff818350381ef0ea5df4
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describe
'153514' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMJ' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
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describe
'153060' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMK' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
8b2f219d2054c1a22e323c17ccd4430d
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describe
'151454' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARML' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
f48a654abf75ff652034e5ac6f8616f6
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describe
'162001' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMM' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
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describe
'74595' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMN' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
73d097058b3f2c2957ad3aa220dfc8f6
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describe
'187989' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMO' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
f08474aa439d0d25e957a86d13e3e25e
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describe
'183198' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMP' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
05e87754ff5b2669248cfa2b4c11659d
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describe
'160618' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMQ' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
22d8f4764f5042c89456d841f91abb5e
c27067d64e0ccf868fa9c041b6021ccd76b89ed9
'2011-12-21T07:37:36-05:00'
describe
'186734' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMR' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
31f88cd6cdea92f0944c74dc9569616e
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describe
'90975' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMS' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
2e1e82a90767087fa3ce54fa0297dc12
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describe
'69961' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMT' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
ad9d41c6235f3a6eeafaaf9ea55bedfd
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describe
'171663' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMU' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
3b2fd47f0494c8f7e22b0a37101dd42b
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describe
'101277' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMV' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
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describe
'177161' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMW' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
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describe
'197920' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMX' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
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describe
'55315' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMY' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
c289a9fb0627acbd4ae3aa22ec0fdc80
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describe
'125688' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARMZ' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
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describe
'73586' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNA' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
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describe
'26403' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNB' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
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describe
'56337' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNC' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'32465' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNF' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'31544' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNH' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
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describe
'15650' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNI' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
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describe
'19610' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNJ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
4b97d0f2fce5b36518e8082a609c365a
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'2011-12-21T07:32:45-05:00'
describe
'10596' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNK' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
0f499caaa5cccfff5c15a2cd75db5eb6
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describe
'50986' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNL' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
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describe
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309087b4b3f3221c099e1843c3248b1c
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'2011-12-21T07:32:17-05:00'
describe
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describe
'15164' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNO' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'13464' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNQ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'17825' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNS' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
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'2011-12-21T07:31:56-05:00'
describe
'50951' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNT' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'42686' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNX' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'56210' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARNZ' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'34353' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROB' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
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describe
'18635' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROC' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
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describe
'13964' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROD' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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c5ff4e52f58ca0646ce1e83f856a4e7d
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describe
'22568' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROI' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
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describe
'57419' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROJ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'54364' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROL' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'58569' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARON' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
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describe
'22575' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROO' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
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describe
'57245' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROP' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'60118' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROR' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
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describe
'23017' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROS' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'59756' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROV' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
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describe
'23127' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROW' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
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describe
'60977' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROX' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'36610' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAAROZ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
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describe
'16237' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPA' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
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describe
'18825' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPB' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'61204' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPD' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'23892' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPG' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
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describe
'53441' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPH' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
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describe
'22502' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPI' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
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describe
'51000' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPJ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'52650' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPL' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'57649' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPN' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
ba5a545c8433763215e4a07ad01a1adc
c19a19764b47943130cacecece1a2362d3864b7f
describe
'22953' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPO' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
35b24e20bf304f6d6d97c699c58c36a5
c08058ab988a766509f6811851292e259bb1b20e
describe
'53554' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPP' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
7ba379522138509552c6d15eacd7d6e1
1f9c8f688a6dc10e1385f56ad93f09a41543e808
describe
'22716' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPQ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
67c4aac6def0bd69dcb4ff574e7b7cb8
6e366f5a24fcea9e8c88f8bbfc244ac11d77d317
describe
'63684' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPR' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
fb0f59f3308bb60db54e9549adda60c2
f987435ca1512dd9aa6c9264a9098cfc9aefa60e
describe
'23813' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPS' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
93f64cb25bc4ff9de891a1a5feb0822f
45148a8b91c26e96a41ecbbb72ccf2093988c34c
describe
'41151' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPT' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
81a5b55c8408620961c963064148e340
75da3586af09cb1685454e7514b7ca37448b0114
describe
'18337' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPU' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
322fb589dc3aae426ba8aa6765fb1849
f12d1efd57177b202bad30705f695c81cd0bf31c
describe
'8927' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPV' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
3299cba95a191f11c49f1400d89615fd
c3e5ee05242e891e766dfb704444e6971313c864
describe
'8500' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPW' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
4295b6e2ae052f4d0b8f3788b730f971
10d9228b2f7783466ee8316f0a7c5fcbd64972da
describe
'57488' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPX' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
2044f24ad56724b78fc9c4779aba96f5
2468813c456dd6b2ac67edf14ba29b166b9c0917
describe
'23141' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPY' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
45fef986eacfe5aba78aa0eab72da58b
8512c637df321aa4bcc5a0e33f2f118167b86c3f
describe
'59084' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARPZ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
389f03f3b18d3bf3e5c92a340127893d
add0c53ee1340f4880deeda4647bf73912fc8874
describe
'23934' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQA' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
9734d68a5a422a5fe5b8cf6b291b7e28
00826c36665529a35b77978476a3a5bb69c73475
describe
'59356' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQB' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
ef145db7d2aeb592287741bb0933c178
c69eb58868e2afa9ed62890c07a5bf62ddff4fad
describe
'22849' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQC' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
b9ba79224d68c3b192ec1e17fa834b0c
66bedd1044d94e6d9f90f54e3e597e7a9472880d
describe
'60539' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQD' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
ef47b9c02726915df958671aa2f82c80
f723acbe728a17057b415e7ade974fa3192ef536
describe
'22861' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQE' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
ba1f549c031aa5217012d296ee870e8f
295e31b971a15b09192eba5f8a6ef49d1ed8c84d
describe
'33765' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQF' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
8444c95ddedd119384881f199c888ae4
92c597141196eeee3c98dd0ed457064909b40ba4
describe
'16168' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQG' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
826b5fcbd6c65fccc2a5f9b5ce98518e
48b9fa00cf322753b937d7fc09b6d37b561e07da
describe
'14041' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQH' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
615febf3926797b446e7f27f919cd79e
33b2920e707946b99cd61388421abc21ed257161
describe
'9288' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQI' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
5147b6330ea6fe41274986b1ac350286
b38776c002ffded2033f3283c8a281166f05a5d4
describe
'58209' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQJ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
fc0109cd2fdf0825aea5cfb52077cff3
c7f97b1309a3dc00d4c4bc072cd0aa058e1e7c9c
describe
'22834' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQK' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
37aeeda6ba284171705b567a21697113
c724c68eb874f309ca308584a6fd84ea67604102
describe
'57903' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQL' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
305e74a4f4a8224bb8adfde1a511fdd6
a07203175b183bfce3be65f1317f1621d26668aa
describe
'22866' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQM' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
390c0faec109e85ac4af4738045faff2
87b359f8eb96db7a23d8a78b4c41377798c3fd86
describe
'39294' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQN' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
b51ef546fc3ecf6f08ddc3b6bb02e2b1
c7f823bd402054db39d5c548718640c95b766975
describe
'20626' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQO' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
59d0eff95c7159d08dbdb6abf6387a13
82f9669fdd100dd208fff4b661770dc66b124721
describe
'11031' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQP' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
7b7033265fd9bfd3fb90f563940d44e4
5dfe32f5e00ef2a64635ea0e68b9a3b7809c25a3
describe
'8919' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQQ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
4446cccd1aba9493a1855eea0e2e5ed0
c332c9ba148e101b197379e1cb235cc326d75e09
describe
'59835' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQR' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
dcd34c3c9e4ca203c81f1f396abb9743
f24bd3a53a1e66aec4fbadf09e65e7de221f9bcf
describe
'23553' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQS' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
60c14716c2be3fed7af0bc716dbced3f
d4f527164247edc73a9a2e6bfe5600219b3c9c7a
describe
'59459' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQT' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
1ecd0862b5a484e2aa9f38c52280a49a
5887df6e913b527902694d748e606b3c2ffeffa9
describe
'23366' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQU' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
d8f7f51d0a47568e7d378d51fcf76422
f24f115fc0ed8dbb3d11afd1798de47dfa262e50
describe
'52532' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQV' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
1d8c0330715e8c01769b4f4ead181796
655e18dcf2e21e515f59f847982733904f546470
describe
'21835' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQW' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
a9422954f6fe794b7019647841b14431
232d1dc8244757e322d9d41b94800a249ca1f61a
describe
'57592' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQX' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
7b711bb57628e8f3fb720a1a722e6031
5e8357bf16ff90fb8ffc043b9031139053c2a954
describe
'23471' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQY' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
bdd38dfbd12ef7d3a1c2a539163754ce
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describe
'59451' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARQZ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
500a9864686498824696f88436f5a83f
26eac30642708c46783cdfdfe93b553b7285857b
describe
'23015' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRA' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
108a7fb6311a8b1b69feeedc236cd7a8
41216374cadf82708131ec3b2a0a90aaaca1ea2b
describe
'54747' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRB' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
211312da6e95bf62f61c3c9bcd72edd0
92879ce35f34845dc71f6e4964eed214f2fce56b
describe
'22753' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRC' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
f69b7ab75654fee74babb22cd5212119
d8afbb87db9ecd02d0ec057180332460c225c010
describe
'60621' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRD' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
223a5b8f20fce474a5cbf72cb289080c
11be33044fa732c139df03037969e64dc11ce51c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRE' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
37974ac6721ef9c7d4362e4cced912f7
c05112c49b24b6d687870fb04df015245d75e282
describe
'53799' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRF' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
5d1cf10a31d980cf5d3e4afede57cbd7
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describe
'21626' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRG' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
7facfbe7cae5ecf70ddd05747aff8f9c
7d0dbb96a1534b0a09ea1554e6c0b0582bd63d03
describe
'59538' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRH' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
d5b21d8c7f9823188b9e9cc3bd9e294c
1b9b861f83e88fe363b34285073a24997e80584d
describe
'23104' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRI' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
9868250810dd6b0cde5e9ef6d1520c8c
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describe
'60694' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRJ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
2d5c8b818acdd42873af23c6d70bcf37
4d86901e78df3eee048bd0f9519a68c96f741e5b
describe
'23337' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRK' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
be2c1dac2ff0c34549ec58b607f9467b
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describe
'52414' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRL' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
8069c3874ff48c7cf41f4d034b57c68f
1c7408de224f2ab58c80130ba97803583a955d47
describe
'21776' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRM' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
5b0b611bdcecd1877d964a81fa02a225
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describe
'60044' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRN' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
c1e15cb94fbbe6ae9e1f734146923f25
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describe
'23315' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRO' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
9804341a8db8ec4506d2d14fb73bd63a
3e16cae9619ab3666815ae7e023e0b0140ae1b58
describe
'51075' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRP' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
4b99d0505036b8cf4c444abdfb566d85
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describe
'22317' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRQ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
5990382090e25f3d026ffc9109ab081e
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describe
'62372' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRR' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
7a8dadbe4bc33e5bf185420665da5af2
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describe
'23624' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRS' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
5370ec971a7a58fc258f3688a13211e0
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describe
'55728' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRT' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
d86b592518cbd669e1d21eabaaae7544
3365610aa8d639090ef5a5e06701d0cd48af6480
describe
'22741' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRU' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
3ad5fec9a42e0fc55c9fc2053c20cfca
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describe
'60517' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRV' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
5ca32623c568be59518a6573e7c172ff
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describe
'23456' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRW' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
aee813feb2ab088e3efaae8207c6a5d4
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describe
'35261' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRX' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
7beb86a461b7438be0a7b6df8f0675e0
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describe
'19510' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRY' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
d9d9e63eeed0a6070e23c13cd6902811
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describe
'8923' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARRZ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
c0370f86b1c8abe5e747d2f594fc7993
abc7b405e4631197222654f77800b6f453cbbf0e
'2011-12-21T07:38:18-05:00'
describe
'8496' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSA' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
868bae98aa2aa612555885a5e197a79a
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describe
'60607' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSB' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
fb07804b9c407a1fa33e8978bc322e82
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describe
'23431' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSC' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
3450c591dee22d2ef840ed728170f10d
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describe
'54386' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSD' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
30ce82b8cff5aea9b4e8575d9a216ce2
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describe
'22609' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSE' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
30dd3206964a638e88b2cc823e576cac
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describe
'61083' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSF' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
cee0dc67b816274d6e480382a9184f84
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describe
'23373' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSG' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
f47d884033285b1b10f60f5d8fc582ee
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describe
'49345' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSH' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
844d73adf5020e5052e0bfb4fe5fd32e
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describe
'20664' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSI' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
b6a8f393e8ee222ef05981dee65d90c7
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describe
'58712' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSJ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
50ef4c81b702d7c11ca62bfc231b3c5c
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describe
'22839' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSK' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
9810cacce51dca073565dbf58d17715a
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describe
'59644' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSL' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
8cfc54456bc59faa0a127e74e2356b26
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describe
'23007' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSM' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
5f08d46967ea48d485413009c491ce72
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describe
'49197' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSN' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
760f09f4b6f380f802e951b0cc2cf3a9
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describe
'21538' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSO' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
d68fe8a7c2464b944ca45ae9424aa82c
2f0817d4528ab9399a2980783baea30509956038
describe
'59577' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSP' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
cb0cab0b1fe06fd9692af5aa20563e12
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describe
'22983' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSQ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
d9b4c7c64729ac3a9df8d13cc1b26b68
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describe
'52724' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSR' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
2333bf9383a2518814fba44d6c5b3c1c
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describe
'21419' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSS' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
a2079461ba428751928f606148486350
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describe
'57148' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARST' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
864bb1a0227d897d136160f4ae35d68b
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describe
'22929' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSU' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
8800c8252314a351c7faa63cae4ddf6d
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describe
'57357' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSV' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
bb836bee0eabb95db00624b89d86265d
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describe
'22930' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSW' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
27d99b75b770a32fd17c90f3716ada16
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSX' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
10b60ddba341cb3ee14eb87291cd2c1b
43a483366516276c4b3f16f1e813ba4a52421c19
describe
'24261' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSY' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
6334deafff5022b98be5089bb0f1c145
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describe
'59806' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARSZ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
16072176d01f806df3b5c701f9599dd9
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describe
'23773' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTA' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
79fa111680f76a8d262504f619e457f8
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describe
'59194' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTB' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
1d98add5e406503fc444e359e5ef9d80
87833200171cb44216c7cced4b461f5d7adff163
describe
'23585' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTC' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
9331d94ffec756199c8f6be3c01ce79d
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describe
'59923' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTD' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
5e839779b9351d8192bce95cf33e0cd8
8602063355be1539c058cb6e9f8099db322881a1
describe
'22958' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTE' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
21da7a5982bc984cb3cdc41b803949de
fe2adc4709b75475793503b168a8e64b7b203862
describe
'59009' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTF' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
5160becac72534de0992d68756c90d43
d9054b3452d037b3893e86446a8b791042361e42
describe
'22977' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTG' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
4dcd4368480c91f276de15a3f62267f5
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describe
'54267' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTH' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
e8ddd528d83889165168d8a80594dcf6
3d935bb5d7ee72c0cbda5881f59aa5f2dfb353f0
describe
'21971' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTI' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
b30c44a0e9e1cecf7f133f5fc5c78d91
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describe
'57963' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTJ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
31080b455af4684492e4ea1efc41e66f
64fc12253d68cf2d0224a13a7aa2a4700c3574f9
describe
'22693' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTK' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
f1603741fb7ac55372feb980af2b1f63
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describe
'29853' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
b98f0293965ea8b94ddd5993da1c5511
06938fbac59d6fd5ab5e8e92ac579440ffe64b91
describe
'16968' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTM' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
01969c1253c5956f0b7dde43a51c9728
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describe
'13281' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTN' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
2489342d92fcd81b43112aa77f4c4d29
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describe
'9137' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTO' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
e72a95c1d9b908577b406318664d5aac
3622b436228f523c4d9e1caa64f84cb4eab8917a
describe
'59802' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTP' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
42b30921994da771570190da99b8371c
03d209c290fd0edfb5cd251813e3a1714762caf9
describe
'23466' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTQ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
43262733238ae442fd51e3b86e3fd167
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describe
'59379' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTR' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
c7e1469d68d2e3d999e3f7bb81b30508
925fe04c78e2f136a7aff49ef3406b95e44b58a8
describe
'23193' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTS' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
00fe25a77962006771c4acfd576b1b8f
442f32d5fe9cfab8f09732492aa66ef03b5b4aa5
describe
'61840' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTT' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
25344e946ddd3d5c393ba2d919480b59
8aa67cdc065af64eb366a0ca5d132296216d66ac
describe
'24301' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTU' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
b18978435f93abfdda0dacf3ac275930
182ddd61e5ef59844edf472ae48e35595fe74888
describe
'13915' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTV' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
b70df3b32ccaffa62deef472c519865e
e91f056003e352cc2d07213bbb37d50c75ddd83a
describe
'9219' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTW' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
579cff7b6c3870bfce87ac2a1b9e0540
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describe
'59527' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTX' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
b8f75a049d29aeaefe03d2fdd7cb35cf
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describe
'22962' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTY' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
56ebafa89bd0e931359bdcad7e3eb785
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describe
'50559' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARTZ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
a05475d8d6c5cb5f216887d54dd50854
c57dfe357c36a3253c83c390cff96cca8e0d51e9
describe
'20814' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUA' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
0c155dce3948c21e7d86220fc4c21676
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describe
'62067' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUB' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
168aa96c4f5fd1ea08300a98113dcd37
f6bc0d2b3769107be51094da0d72c429a7a4579c
describe
'24107' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUC' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
5de77fba1a2462c3236a77ebe050500c
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describe
'56500' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUD' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
b34d321391f64f94b4e245fae1f079f5
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describe
'23676' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUE' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
b279b92ea4e0fdaaa0c0d5f5053da9ff
a70ac0489908d8f293b325f78a7535d52bc4cb56
describe
'61436' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUF' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
c4977e2cf89d934e317d878b7a9fcb5c
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describe
'23752' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUG' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
3e3fb242f57db33f7225c9aa0fc4a9ec
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describe
'53896' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUH' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
3c1c27ff09d0dcf38d0f7322bdce5350
1e937390bb0ccd348432f386d33b8e2c7f928dd5
describe
'22904' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUI' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
24f67bf954a88239b33785a35efe941e
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describe
'39838' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUJ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
03fa37d9cf5c89035a68d0ae54dc6514
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describe
'17968' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUK' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
9f4176b6b0a5e90371d0c456eb33dda8
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describe
'14483' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUL' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
a4bf6939aaa21c9fe14ffa7f2e399046
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describe
'9441' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUM' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
4b5cd48ef9053e5853587cbc2061187f
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describe
'58503' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUN' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
b1094fabbc77e652b41ec67725367bac
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describe
'23166' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUO' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
83b36f898c725618540e568bca9b59e5
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describe
'60998' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUP' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
788b9a4b0cf8c7a8f7361a42a3ef238e
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describe
'23548' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUQ' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
20880cd360762d593853cf3adbdb12fe
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describe
'61247' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUR' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
8b23c4bba6ca0b1993e390226c4cda70
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describe
'23574' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUS' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
62839b05bac87a4feecbfc6163d80a93
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describe
'55313' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUT' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
041c5c8a90a523c2335cdfff14fe4341
cdad636e5ebe4dd3d78de92abff350bdbecf8a93
describe
'23262' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUU' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
68eee469a7b517616f281ac591435b52
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describe
'58768' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUV' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
7902e13d466f09872f18fbcfd84df20b
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describe
'23336' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUW' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
b516e794c60e7afd51eee71c55c18dc3
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describe
'59414' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUX' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
4f1a1f46cc67dbc3233103f7c099c207
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describe
'23449' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUY' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
3762b3f49fb7fa32ba1c3b15c04746ea
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describe
'58828' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARUZ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
d2efd36ac7832a8942a0727c3c550f09
45da0f4dd71cc521b331e53681f29192eae60fc8
describe
'22964' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVA' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
da65ac08964974fc56c4ed43e6aedb3d
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describe
'47030' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVB' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
c6d80b69dde27cb688adfcd03b8e1bba
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describe
'20516' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVC' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
8d2c35d4d0e0cecc0239490c5da6be31
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describe
'59454' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVD' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
0d330d8d6042afc41f961b030236b3a3
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describe
'22909' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVE' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
7c45b830658d2dc9d1888d48eab5b73d
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describe
'51254' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVF' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
66aba3af34179087abb9442c3ebba411
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describe
'21036' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVG' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
d4009d113060d0ec58c4f540e870fded
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describe
'61481' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVH' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
2ce9b982a30078446497b7c2e72a4a7f
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describe
'23297' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVI' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
e29c03a66873898fa250a8fd3df17856
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describe
'60129' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVJ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
9c017ea4d0d9862cadb055ac6d442f6d
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describe
'23272' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVK' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
4afe8a654bf8cdc5335ab1507bedd427
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describe
'55246' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVL' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
7aed58d7892cb957d388c126e3764588
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describe
'22923' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVM' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
716042908555bec3567d8380793f3d70
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describe
'54543' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVN' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
8b68f75fa4401eb7d1e70810767c447d
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describe
'22678' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVO' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
0c684c27d64af83f076eb6c0c56af531
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describe
'61325' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVP' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
a9484d78a6c645266fda818c69275890
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describe
'23384' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVQ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
65131e681fac9bc6d3ed173753737a06
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describe
'61455' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVR' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
a1252c5bfea4a402117867c6de711bbc
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describe
'23205' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVS' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
b7a322b65d961dc99c6b1a3f0acd70eb
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describe
'59978' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVT' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
ed4144d6133011f63fd68313883482a2
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describe
'23280' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVU' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
bb14bdcc67c5992ef2ba7b27e05f0f38
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describe
'57760' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVV' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
b55a105eec1452382f3c39f95433287f
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describe
'22432' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVW' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
3b4765bc23e9320c864a937c75eaebbf
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describe
'45181' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVX' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
ddcb15db7babbc2075bf64faeac727ee
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describe
'20320' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVY' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
b757d00eae6bc9c8499dc9bac313c0ff
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describe
'55444' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARVZ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
e596b879023a4a2bf7c46953126453df
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describe
'22385' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWA' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
7e2aadc1ddf79011d08c01ea6513aa3c
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describe
'54879' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWB' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
7fe4d74304e10f082c1893f0940ee396
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describe
'23119' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWC' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
a8c3bc9b2d5c7659eb6f942c61528585
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describe
'57673' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWD' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
064c57c4239187a46fe7a27f04ff0c05
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describe
'22908' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWE' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
9228eab8fed20d604212acd957f2dfc2
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describe
'47457' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWF' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
c4c48d4453fd676a367f8790176bcf43
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describe
'19221' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWG' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
5870760703d8a69858526564f7b56129
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describe
'52182' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWH' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
778e324a75fe0991224a02e5241da8fd
b05fed1cad1a2628d55b8bfbc10732b01cff6770
'2011-12-21T07:32:59-05:00'
describe
'21202' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWI' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
1646a4627085084fa3e94545cb7faa41
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describe
'59207' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWJ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
addf7ebecee522ef7388fb488387652d
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describe
'23419' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWK' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
be196ece6eb7e355612694dbb5ab6538
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describe
'51855' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWL' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
2764ccd40d5ce0343b71940b3fa5889f
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describe
'22875' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWM' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
acdd7ee630f66c2b076759b9123c9073
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describe
'62003' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWN' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
85ea73c6a98ba033bf236356d39cd74d
20fd917544e520546f91d8a705032758edef42b3
describe
'23725' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWO' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
abc9eeb60511c08699f5757b1eaa44ba
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describe
'59822' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWP' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
0617b1dee65bafcead5deec7c0f808ca
3c53f24ff873539bcd8475272fc039a014660565
describe
'23498' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWQ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
e252d04fae3a2dbb671b04eb862266cb
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describe
'60986' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWR' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
871996b7e1b33797275347e30625d67b
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describe
'23782' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWS' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
b49c5b6e0431d5c4c13b304bba35522d
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describe
'60805' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWT' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
6aa03d4c23a83309435060f93344c619
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWU' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
0687de352e2935462bd976fe0d1c8bce
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describe
'41319' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWV' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
5ff1d172b3e707c7e145a983fd23579a
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describe
'21653' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWW' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
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describe
'14805' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWX' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
e273e11def47cf5f8899180cd8eb45dd
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describe
'9345' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWY' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
ae277749ce45795b3795aa9e3e592ae8
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describe
'61434' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARWZ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
6e92feeddaf060f5cef54b4a9e3131c0
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describe
'24104' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXA' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
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describe
'55511' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXB' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
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describe
'23132' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXC' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
f7ffd3349834cbe6dea52c54eedd2fea
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describe
'61528' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXD' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
e1f518c9073e1ef9c5f49a528642e81c
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describe
'23420' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXE' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
e59f6f74abcfc409cd182031f68a23d2
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describe
'62154' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXF' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
c9704c585a254f0c4885a7c3e56a66b0
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describe
'23623' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXG' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
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describe
'50699' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXH' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
2936f2a9daae47c3fa2d1947440dc8f1
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describe
'21706' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXI' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
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describe
'8937' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXJ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
5a698b9b306a38f984ecf995794d8540
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describe
'8510' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXK' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
ee044adc5c2547b87b45e00131d416dd
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describe
'51934' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXL' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
1781031bc7d2937c58dcb690750d1c17
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describe
'21748' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXM' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
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describe
'47028' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXN' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
14d2f39e98187b8dc614214b084d86c4
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describe
'20114' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXO' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
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describe
'60253' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXP' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
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describe
'22878' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXQ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
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describe
'60567' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXR' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
b9689e32845491c30e7ff99619409d1e
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describe
'23322' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXS' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
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describe
'58225' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXT' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
0bee5d11769984a4ce65ff82ad79ad83
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describe
'23377' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXU' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
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describe
'61375' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXV' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
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describe
'23225' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXW' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
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describe
'59444' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXX' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXY' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
e80196e35a3e0cc1fd50dc4a6a570383
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describe
'54812' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARXZ' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
7eca377e62b227ff081267bd15d4b500
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describe
'22676' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYA' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
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describe
'49928' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYB' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
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describe
'22498' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYC' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
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describe
'15511' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYD' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
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describe
'9559' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYE' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
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describe
'58392' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYF' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
a9cd1fc5dc9554c0504b7b12a818ec7b
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describe
'23105' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYG' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
a84d154e0c459f2dd9c34b0cdf06da0a
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describe
'62616' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYH' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
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describe
'23878' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYI' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
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describe
'52034' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYJ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
afe0156f9769b30fe353a63945a38c3b
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describe
'21718' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYK' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
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describe
'60813' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYL' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
1ccac44b702ab03a207c8141af643a8e
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describe
'22732' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYM' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
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describe
'46836' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYN' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
9a1c8c3169a47bdad6e3445a212f5c98
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describe
'21146' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYO' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
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describe
'15419' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYP' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
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describe
'9374' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYQ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
cd20926cce9e10d2c298fff42be1c5c4
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describe
'58892' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYR' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
49cbf5e1e83d2ad492ff70b9cca8dd59
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describe
'22659' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYS' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
1b32c394a1f02d63cb7aac52b58d7e81
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describe
'53935' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYT' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
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describe
'22313' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYU' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
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describe
'50923' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYV' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
e741ea2516c265bb14334cded71d4ebb
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describe
'21833' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYW' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
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describe
'56274' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYX' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
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describe
'22947' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYY' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
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describe
'54796' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARYZ' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
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describe
'21017' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZA' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
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describe
'52206' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZB' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
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describe
'21089' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZC' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
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describe
'51924' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZD' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
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describe
'22701' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZE' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
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describe
'59335' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZF' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
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describe
'23428' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZG' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
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describe
'50002' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZH' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
e1921b50596aa537fb29ee0c151d0fbb
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describe
'21922' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZI' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
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describe
'57850' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZJ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
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describe
'22658' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZK' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
1f06aa5cce2238423d07fdda6ea42e6a
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describe
'33113' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZL' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
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describe
'18568' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZM' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
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describe
'12337' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZN' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8972' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZO' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
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describe
'58436' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZP' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
46c1e9d9c2c6583772e887a1eac4c076
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describe
'23392' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZQ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
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describe
'51150' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZR' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
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describe
'21515' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZS' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
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describe
'61280' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZT' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
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describe
'23497' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZU' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
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describe
'62024' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZV' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
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describe
'23529' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZW' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
244c6525c45c61e0cb346c9a929f58c7
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describe
'60688' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZX' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
f9ea09fd0de421aa38f0d403a8e6962e
dd2a6f9843bc2281c46490e4cf4739db5e488d9d
describe
'23154' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZY' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
4e89bd351873869e7443f81cc6024604
56f0a568cf3ca6e4703724e9da5a35c77a538289
describe
'60396' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAARZZ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
7044e002ded47d72bdfee729a2e04896
98396a2343812d0a2be7913d428cbc949ba207ff
describe
'23224' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAA' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
df26caa9d14ba25653a481ac03396233
75c1d6e621d4808627cfba4285ffdb1998665e28
describe
'55104' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAB' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
b311895c2fc14e068ca204c5309e7f25
d810fbf35b1b1cc3ef47462a5c4cd6ecbd5ffc13
describe
'22711' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAC' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
90216b92a38614f1ecc3f9f8f4fb379c
3fd24d3d21ab682cf76cab6d6dd008031f16a40d
describe
'56178' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAD' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
4a39af6bd12b2d8f8e0f4981ecb56b5a
706016d8a7682cf3d44b74c2d1274382abf913a2
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAE' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
2536db58c12a7a951d62f1dd5091e0a4
3b5ce79034316a2c3529e478cf3552558cb08384
describe
'58542' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAF' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
1807e69942ddf7776e2c0d2452329214
c0274a3c5b6dcd626982be95f00d5d69d0f23e6d
describe
'23517' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAG' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
60e689ed81b5b8219f04d94dc092f412
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describe
'56744' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAH' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
05956df26c87ab65b2d8ede42cccf58d
2aafef374eca4cf6031c5a4edc1fabee9c56b05e
describe
'22685' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAI' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
a57bcadb4166b15d193547a55b5404b6
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describe
'52104' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAJ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
a58a874b9d7fc160e017ecbf8206b5b4
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describe
'22015' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAK' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
e1d36e9b2bcb861299ff7b65dfe158b9
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describe
'46375' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAL' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
0a5f4a28903bac75371a7093fc3e19d9
222d485aea4b493949860bde9c816b564b6297f5
describe
'20710' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAM' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
863f6c13cecc884d22765246e732dd20
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describe
'50673' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAN' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
b8c55da9072032046760440e9fcbc522
4d613195d30ce54b6fe7f294c0dc2fe98cea5731
describe
'20782' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAO' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
228ff0637fb4842949c12fa896f20278
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describe
'61171' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAP' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
21335b19b4475d61a5cbe4aeb863c394
bbd09ed5fbfdb85c793c417c83bfb406d609bd74
describe
'23309' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAQ' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
69c09a217d4514f1080a86b8aff771c4
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describe
'51237' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAR' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
9244627601fe9ba227793e201984f47a
12968d972e57aa2479918a2754ccd350ae82abc2
describe
'20574' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAS' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
ab687ebe2de3e94a581dedb18545c1a5
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describe
'61827' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAT' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
20a6f0c6a964bc10d44f15997c8e4fc2
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describe
'23332' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAU' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
58e4f79a7d908b76ba78ede035ccd3c1
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describe
'40612' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAV' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
e8a36af8a74e8ffecf3d63dedfb61312
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describe
'18414' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAW' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
e9da34d540214a2bc835e273470a3224
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describe
'15105' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAX' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
fcb84e11cd96c75c0889cbb23849d8f3
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describe
'9506' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAY' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
556d7c80899a354f160cfcf16e6fc104
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describe
'60038' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASAZ' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
606e232b1ec1df360fc20898b430ad0c
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describe
'23855' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBA' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
d8c8ce84f816281fdbd55134ec269bbd
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describe
'52535' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBB' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
8e9e4c4856df7a27ea3c55e19d7a9b84
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describe
'21523' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBC' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
e965a88cc599a13e02b6f8e55a0336f6
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describe
'61934' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBD' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
4edb86918a482385c1b67a1f8ba5fd43
5597bb3b56093fe3d1c03b71ccab91b73d7076d4
describe
'23270' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBE' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
04734e55fc461e258928e0af8989947a
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describe
'61104' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBF' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
4ae3e97d9bf2f038af4757721ae4d686
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describe
'23360' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBG' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
a2efdb0880707cf9b731160aefb330d3
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describe
'56521' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBH' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
83632d5e4592a97c2cfe632d93511f30
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describe
'22734' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBI' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
094739bcba2b931ae320afa61b160dc1
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describe
'54625' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBJ' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
98161f6487bcbd4e6c0e33821511d90c
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describe
'22384' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBK' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
bf3621f5a627b070918debdab71408ce
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describe
'58622' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBL' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
222bed9cf674edd278aef4b261bc7dd1
2a1e88480c1b400475671cf9f813240e0a3d3df8
describe
'22835' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBM' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
77b5decedf68d95efd62c8f036b8f3ea
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describe
'57803' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBN' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
02d84dad22a07a613f8276bb684decff
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describe
'23291' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBO' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
fc576d367ba27967258e673790545c80
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describe
'47328' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBP' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
b29f4e6695c919cd901cfecc196f06ce
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describe
'19867' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBQ' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
16bd212d427f582dffeac4cba05a990b
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describe
'58267' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBR' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
1f24f2f919ef737cfb93ab7d75b8f447
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describe
'23621' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBS' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
667575b1297082a2e14d16bdba72f3bf
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describe
'60054' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBT' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
bdf5a34ecab8803bae1ed0df6d818ec1
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describe
'23601' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBU' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
d995598117ca16873563b01fadb365c8
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describe
'61855' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBV' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
751cc70fd9b035f6e7659b6d29b8dc43
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describe
'23197' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBW' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
82e771b0a5261c63af5230e3e0894b55
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describe
'53028' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBX' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
b79c9505a6f76b866211fa272d0d49ed
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describe
'21670' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBY' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
0a720aac6e1eb4aaaf25c209e75d3452
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describe
'56496' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASBZ' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
7018a097ba1810e1f5af5e1c6e16f8d8
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describe
'21613' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCA' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
d191070cca86733ee7d73bad61eec683
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describe
'58727' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCB' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
d17614b75f9211a6dda6d97636edd064
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describe
'23158' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCC' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
7e67df001db830a371f7ebea3abd80c6
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describe
'61386' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCD' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
48502b2abf3e43dbfafc43012cc0a48c
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describe
'23213' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCE' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
0fac63d26b4843c33af45d2b64299118
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describe
'52907' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCF' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
52698c2ee7453f81e29cf327211e59dc
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describe
'21911' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCG' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
ce95c090516cda4b4eb0d06537a2c25b
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describe
'56468' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCH' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
2ec2497952d42199eb4226a7e6d53afa
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describe
'22694' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCI' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
ee90674e61b95d0e91b79feeb164d104
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describe
'61946' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCJ' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
caea8b612a4ee440c967b6399b055138
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describe
'24102' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCK' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
855170c95cd8e447877d66558e296c38
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describe
'59631' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCL' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
87718ff8f0ddf280f0d50f33e5843ab5
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describe
'23035' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCM' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
4377ea5464593594a81533d9141b5fe6
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describe
'36249' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCN' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
df8337f03319d6f0141e20de28a86628
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describe
'19596' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCO' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
b00d8caa1321df4814e0c7142f17eeff
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describe
'16023' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCP' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
21e8297457e6ce391ba014e052c0031e
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describe
'9583' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCQ' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
1b3c84225ea0314273a8bd9db9e7e0b1
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describe
'63372' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCR' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
f9828844b88e3619bc16d2bfe8b8c978
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describe
'23649' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCS' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
cac3a56640dfce29b2ee8a41a480c32b
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describe
'59354' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCT' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
1b0d18794f8ebcb6cdf5b409c90c016a
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describe
'23901' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCU' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
c9c9cdfae9fec36b5ba0030c9f00bece
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describe
'53046' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCV' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
3acc06aa33e8b85fd104541171e02778
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describe
'21710' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCW' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
5907e6a50df69d61d6ff3ba95a41d453
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describe
'52405' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCX' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
b54f69cfaa59d830530dc311d45414a1
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describe
'21739' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCY' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
7c5721e9930be92316f6faa43cf1c7ca
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describe
'60761' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASCZ' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
567ce3a884053e53ebd8ce65361c77f5
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describe
'23380' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDA' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
eaf3d68981ff8f496b3f586b8980ac59
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describe
'58097' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDB' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
8320a215aaf76a9e45c80a78d726464b
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describe
'23258' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDC' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
74f8a2db61ea6c37a2d3f358899eab29
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describe
'59215' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDD' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
1a65e33f094b0c5ad3bc8793dc77e025
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describe
'23155' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDE' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
344ea15026d6e3eeafd03f1c98ad3e04
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describe
'54147' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDF' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
2739674bcb8ce344c41f2611da54e809
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describe
'21878' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDG' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
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describe
'61473' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDH' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
c63fe7d82798421f9749f1d80065073a
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDI' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
ce2e361747c264c8d768b1fb03702a3c
175bd02502adbf801e6eb9420e6edc9170516c8f
describe
'62059' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDJ' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
c91daa26ac0815486b8a60fbbca7fc5e
06b3aa0ffa190f8262b766a4b4198b77dcaf2001
describe
'23644' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDK' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
87baffd08a428b0a538cc937c5fa5ab7
b772743796b402d5cfcb57d8812373b228fe4815
describe
'45248' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDL' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
fe118f59935dbd2db75f28efea1057ff
be0e645bd91f499249024577b2ddbd06238ec6c3
describe
'19831' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDM' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
9aeef704cc8922c1c1d4ed43d00858f5
5d1f43952869c6176da251ed3e3a54f5e8ab11f5
describe
'15344' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDN' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
fc25e03f645460962603fd67712a35ce
f3c0a7be47ae41894fc0aba6adb25852c1029011
describe
'9482' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDO' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
b97a0a493d7eb58f754cd25eca1d4dfe
2017cd1fb0f3ccb9cf8e87a7d0fa2dd902bd21cf
describe
'60662' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDP' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
d64f413235f465d4cd84d0a1e0fe393f
81833a5c75919ea47b772fe67492eeeff1fbd286
describe
'23632' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDQ' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
d7dcfc5e696b6c38649f161f4fa3f2f5
d8047061b300e4e6f899332ed3222ef39ab0e3bc
describe
'61851' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDR' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
3515cf7e3c1dec4c5fa76aa54bc91c69
4ddbd2e6f770741a12bfdd26a9f28085f9ab7179
describe
'23735' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDS' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
a30ed06c65e6d1eea76576781f3aefa0
6543f16ee2ae0276c94a366eb3cb4dfbcbaa3e73
describe
'56390' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDT' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
82242d1fbd272ecfe8377abcfb7bebed
1951a6c9c95c06abebf5de2dfdc45aafa5b4da59
describe
'22467' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDU' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
c462c08d9ee078a772c9b0fab3951809
18ee1a1be50da7afaf8107ebe91abe70e9871f8c
describe
'56908' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDV' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
f798ca4de275dd9bfced7b5ce7ce4f67
12b8cf926e369d2c03f62595c83436037fc2bc36
describe
'23578' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDW' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
2aa284f07422a2103a3de3a8389d6204
8c49883d259db7a626fb83a835be641d5af346a1
describe
'51618' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDX' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
63f32d3e7bc6e3f2ad6601cb2c9bd251
26863caddf67f2f8a928c05b324ade5d7aee083f
describe
'21079' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDY' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
571b5919880469ff8118d76fff8f5906
ca9b2ae11ffad461c6dcf5dc8fe21ce4357fd387
describe
'53715' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASDZ' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
bf26b05923f15ebe79ad4d9fea01a113
9f92a67fc9fe0994b971959685be4e75a5fcc870
describe
'20971' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEA' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
2847232009c01daea714c61f3e0d3bd7
bade9045de32d9b134dfde21ffdee9e5df8388ba
describe
'49322' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEB' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
3e2e095f7d57c74d2c367e0389629873
4291b83f896917cb3908ef8689ce11eafd65836e
describe
'20009' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEC' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
442a4c0b8ea9e8c91c4d4d77886e8474
0a1e41190b6084d7a5d4b1e4c9165dbe8f0cb829
describe
'51701' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASED' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
f03f87278595e93f25b0351af2178c0e
38911951b0f9be141244c27aab6b9e79b248b9c6
describe
'22285' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEE' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
96f66390e1a85b43dd73fb0307abc1c2
5128b47952ce16aeb1acb28281ea75d6b99bf53a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEF' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
58f21f7d748dc4a29b1def830d840b3e
c6ad3469844d9b581b1f85064b27fdcf34c5ecaa
describe
'22183' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEG' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
da842ac071ae19a12c9d5a656ecf6fa9
3b985508f632abd1045050dc46cc77e31d78721e
describe
'54569' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEH' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
53eb0f1bc04f94ab23b6e2e4c5b2ef58
931a03b9e4cc9a663db35ac57129ca358ef2fa81
describe
'22324' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEI' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
a396f443d3a77c1b1012abc81399e5fb
b3441d57fd511a6220ec57491df0765667688aa4
describe
'46671' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEJ' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
7dbe0b0612c345908eff1b712fbb75c3
b5eb6e25cf0c517f0d4b9aec67c903f18f0860a7
describe
'20750' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEK' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
9cdb7ec8d380fd3c34ccd09de7d4b1db
d317e1903eb3b61ce8e23374ee796c30af6be953
describe
'19576' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEL' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
84b760dc78f2a86beae4cff5e756fd99
30c287f7f5caa5f97c283a0ea55607e0e2bd964d
describe
'10204' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEM' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
cefe67d2efeabf60a8604cfd6d28e9f7
8c1f419c0c47c29f612d677683a3174e5e8f8fdf
describe
'62536' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEN' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
c4da48dd84555c102d748bc2f07b48cc
f66e47e841a03f84e11cba3f7226fcfc627bfd68
describe
'23402' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEO' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
8818249da61b03ced0386132dd9c7d6d
cdc7e7d2bfeb784e423784827b3f7cd8dc39e47d
describe
'61686' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEP' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
be5067c7381e3e2f78ad5419cec9666d
86e1cf0ca4775f9054f65408d1c2e7961f07ad89
describe
'23231' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEQ' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
c32f05c981e9bcde1933f00206fa0215
f8b128b68addf6bf443e073a8c91ea3186e72fa5
describe
'47628' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASER' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
ee8dc6fd411da0abd37db9e39fdc9182
303c448e2a7c8ba192d6dbd3d8ed9d1670573035
describe
'19790' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASES' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
d438a66409477ebe517b83a224dfb7f9
35e084940331a538cec017406543e37a93b85440
describe
'63145' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASET' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
b752696c3a049bef8a377608ccc7f972
c5ed6358fd61eb7a477074613d200b146fd81755
describe
'23707' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEU' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
fb5f401903462e33e116686127960fae
8abffa9f8dc591ef612a8cb5de583b0406c3d692
describe
'29973' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEV' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
22812b6fc34dcb456d53790232838b08
2dc92274b7e12bb3f379107fb7141f318d825f64
describe
'16951' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEW' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
071a7b1b57c798abe8353bcb8988f3d7
52dfac3bd523db5123c9f199a2cb17e570e80840
describe
'19091' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEX' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
8d2ca1b3b6a7fa055d02b9bccaaaa36c
513ab8e2b98e80d4aac87d47c483d8eb58a310b4
describe
'10267' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEY' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
9231db1bcc9662fc0cb284b8b9caebe6
30248d5068438a7ef89766c09d6465b8b858221e
describe
'53049' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASEZ' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
3611883e5fb8e75ab361c5f90c7441f4
c04f9ce4f65862bcdfbeb7013cd3af00e8a32725
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFA' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
22bdfb81b408cb966873b3cbf3c0468d
0555c58039b233f0c7428066dd5acb5667911902
describe
'35574' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFB' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
82c1a5cfd04417d94662a051331c18e2
197888b5077c9efacce15560e7df262b31e74dbe
describe
'15580' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFC' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
2bfff15c0cd6fb53f62b5833e7e8534c
dec436e3f635d38e241faf9bd155e35ef9677e81
describe
'58454' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFD' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
85b109391521bc4db937d6ab04218678
4802499c618fcee414f786df710fb28dbf8af450
describe
'24494' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFE' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
7c8091047cb1babfd96cfd3b58587030
17fefc5bf43e0e372e0e48076fa95f13735d6233
describe
'63557' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFF' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
be59a970a4c4074fa32daed0e87f15a8
bfef853b3d987644c68048f3735123486d6a31ce
describe
'25156' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFG' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
3709374048198220c1371af36122e625
73cd47211765b225e6c924f3722faf9233246fa3
describe
'18439' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFH' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
72439169b9b45db9ee97c7641082bd83
bd5b92c0fd9261e3bbef45a3db6e1cbf1e8a81e5
describe
'11689' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFI' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
1fbece9250eabbec8da4e7a1e07e5d43
d0e3f2e556faca810e4c65f53f7f195458b7e901
describe
'24439' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFJ' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
72354ea31baf0c4cb37a0b08a9b7b961
8a26a845c07aa14d8f01453ad9ec1ecedb94d0e3
describe
'12694' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFK' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
6e3c37b6e84827c69bf6864e44e196e2
9297597ed84a85456260b0ef544124c3ac7f9f2b
describe
'20451' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFL' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
737d39c8951e82843b8d354aef3a005b
ce903e989b52e6e102e55cc7ee0e8142178ec570
describe
'12754' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFM' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
504bdd6b8fee2c0e26809921a78b9b5c
1a57d999ab3c3ae0125f1b64e81b71547b99c532
describe
'168' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFN' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
2745f041c7b597d1c032d8cd7929ca75
bba7c8d360a16f02fb1a3280c6beb797324f259e
describe
'385377' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACFfileF20081201_AAASFO' 'sip-filesUF00086588_00001.mets'
da154df1a640b87e745f7ea3e95ebf63
37f29113a2ec1eb01d4451075afb6f793e03a0a7
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T10:53:33-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.