Citation
Frolic and fun for daughter and son

Material Information

Title:
Frolic and fun for daughter and son containing captivating stories of adventure: Chritmas tales ; little heroes ; peeps at many countries ; lessons from animal life and nature ; each containing a good moral, including glowing scenes in fairyland ; outdoor and indoor sports ; fireside poems, etc. ; the whole affording many happy hours to the young
Creator:
Allardyce, Isabel
Russell, B. B ( Benjamin B )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
B. B. Russell
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
256 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Picture books for children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Wit and humor, Juvenile ( lcsh )
Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fatherhood -- Religious aspects -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Daughters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sons -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Recreation -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sports -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sea stories -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1897 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1897 ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Family stories -- 1897 ( local )
Juvenile literature -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Fantasy literature ( rbgenr )
Family stories ( local )
Children's literature ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Text in prose and verse and in double columns.
General Note:
Pictorial cover and illustrated endpapers.
General Note:
"Juvenile publishers"--t.p.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Isabel Allardyce ; superbly embellished with many choice illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026584349 ( ALEPH )
ALG2123 ( NOTIS )
08489586 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




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FROLIC AND FUN

DAUGHTER AND SON

CONTAINING

CAPTIVATING STORIES OF ADVENTURE; CHRISTMAS TALES;
LITTLE HEROES; PEEPS AT MANY COUNTRIES; LESSONS
FROM ANIMAL LIFE AND NATURE; EACH
CONTAINING A GOOD MORAL

INCLUDING

GLOWING SCENES IN FAIRYLAND; OUTDOOR AND INDOOR
SPORTS: FIRESIDE POEMS, ETC.; THE WHOLE AFFORDING
MANY HAPPY HOURS TO THE YOUNG

BY

ISABEL ALLARDYCE

THE WELL-KNOWN JUVENILE STORY WRITER

Superbly Embellished with Many Choice Iliustrations

JUVENILE PUBLISHERS.

BOSTON,
B. B. RUSSELL,
57 CORNHILL.



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1897. by
HORACE C. FRY,
In the Office of .he Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.



CO Wise NES:

PAGE } PAGE

CHRISTMAS JOYS.......... 17 | Twe Farmer’s DauaHTrrR. .... 74
An Unpleasant Encounter. ... 18] Tue New Purir.......... 76
RECREATION... .... 2.0.4. 20| A Practica, Joxy . ....... = 78
Tue Firsr Prize. ........ 22) A Grear Evenr .......... 80
In roe Buacx Forest... .... 24) Ay vue Sea-Suorre........ 84
Tue Rivais............ 26 | UnwreLcome Visrrors....... 86
Tur Kine’s Cuinpren...... . 28 | Furure Sotprerns. . .. 2... = 88
MIGHT Shien op eee eae Pa, Bie 30) A Fiacur wirn A Srorm. ..... . 90
THE Vautur or Money ...... 82 | Tue Frrenp or THE Famity.... 92
An UncoMForTaBLE Posrtion ... 384] Ovutrwarp Bounp....... ie phon)
A VisIT TO THE Zoo........ 86 | THe Express. ........2.2. «96
Tue Jack In THE Box ...... 88] Aticr’s CHaRGE...... speedo
Tur HippoporAmMus......,.. 40 | A Cottecr Epucation .... . . 100
A Famous Fur Traper...... 48) Tue Proressor......... . 102
EAS LEARD MGT ee | cette ar 2 orc eh 445). SAVED dee) eo ue Pa ee ae 104
A Brave Deep. ......... 46 | Bey’s Luck... ......:... 106
Tue Hisrory or A Brar-Sxin. .. 48] A Wonperrut Curistmas-Box. . . 108
Frienps AGAIN. ......... . 62] Tae Cricket Marco ..,.... 110
Sxkate-Sartine In Denmark... . 54]In Scuoor....... ee ae
A YouTHruL GEentIus ....... 56 | DECEMBER®. 50.4.0). Se 4:
Aw Amateur Boat-Burnprr. ... 58| Jack O’Lanrrrn. ........ 115
In toe Twinichot....... .. 60] An Apr Pupm.......... 116
A KitcHen QuEEN...... . . 62] Wso Lavens Lasr Laucus Brsr.. 118
| A FormipasBLte Enemy... .... 64{| THE Inventor .......... 120
A Nopie Action. ........ 66| THe Youne Musician. ...... 122
A Lirrte Boox-Worm.. .... . 68{|CnEvER Hunrers........ . 124
A Lazy Day. .......... 70| Tae New Scoorar........ 126
CocK-A-DOODLE-DO .... . . .. 72) For tHe Honor or toe Town... 128





CONTENTS.



PAGE PAGE
A New YEAR’s PARABLE .... . 129 | Tue Satny Ann .. 2... . 190
GRANDFATHER'S DARLING .... . 130 KEPT MLN Ae ere me ae ne A 192
For tHe EXHIBITION ....... 132 | On PLeasurRE Bent. ... . soya 194
Davy’s Horses. ......... 134 | Jonn WESLEY... ....... . 198
A Reau Home QuEEN. ..... 1386 | Tae Lanp or THE PHarsaons ... 199
Anna’s ORDEAL... .......- 1388 | A Prep at Mapras........ 205
THE O_tp YEAR AND THE New. .. 140; A Nopue AnrmaL........ . 207
Tur Steering Beauty... .... 142 | New Sours Wars. ....... 208
Waere’s MorueR? ........ 144 | QuEENSLAND .........2.%. 210
A Pueasure TRIP......... 146 | Tae Moors. ........2... 213
Aut ABOARD! ... 2... .. . . . 148 | Scenes Amonest THE Somaris. . . 214
An AwkKWARD Fix ........ 150 | Mongouta.. . . 2... Sea eee 1S
Tur New Baby. ......... TDs BM exe CO Ae dee se tat eye ne ees oe 220:
A SurprisE FoR Morarre..... 154 | A Treacnerous For ....... 223.
Hien anp Low Lire ....... 156 | A Perr ar some CuInEsE Provinces 224
Pumpr’s Per. ...... Bytes) LD OnE GAMIBESTA Myre pater er ae ha fn eee eRe 7:
Ont Goop Turn Deserves AnorHer 160|JEnny Linp ..... er ao:
ALL oN A SummER’s Day ..... 162 | Jocko anpDI...... eee aoe
THe Onr-Man Banpd ....... 164| Pur ro tHe Tesr........ . 233
Tue Lirrte Artist. ....... 166 | A Vistr ro SrpeRIA. ..... . 234
Tue FisHerman’s Son... .. . . 168) Samuren Corr... ... pk; ereeer ay
THe IMAGE VENDOR........ 170 | A Purasanr Trip... .. 2... 238
PASUN Tae U CET Fe tee @ eee wars eee 172 | Wuere tar Sarp Went Down... 240:
URRY) GETSta7 ee her ane ety es 174 | Tae Rocxinec-Hors—E........ 242.
A Goop Fainy.......... 176 | A Practican JokKE........ 244
A STRANGE EXPERIENCE. .... . 179| A Story or TrHE Sea ....... 246
Tue Nicur ScHoor........ POOR RONIO tetas eee eee a ee .. . 248
WSERUL) SCORM et hee eo te 182 | A ProriraBLE AMUSEMENT... . . 250:
JOLLY WINTER... .....5-: 184) A Test or Sxmnp......... 252
Our Curistmas TREE. ..... . 186) THe SrgcE or Paris... ..... 2564
A UsEruL EXPERIENCE ...... 188 | On Mount Sr. Bernarp..... . 256.






"Sina.
[Come Frotic anp Fun ||

= Ab

Ms zh. Soin the platter,







CHRISTMAS JOYS.



AN UNPLEASANT ENCOUNTER.

le is not very nice to be always
hearing one’s self called a cow-
ard, and Lucy, who declared that she
was afraid of nothing but cows, re-
sented her brother Tom’s remarks as
to her courage. She would not pass
through the field where a few harm-
less old cows were grazing for any-
thing in the world, but always went
round by: the lane, much to Tom’s
disgust, for he did not know what it
was to feel frightened of a cow, and
made all sorts of fun of her. Their
mother sent them both into the town
one afternoon to do some shopping,
and as Lucy would not go through
the field, and Tom would not go by
the lane, they separated, Tom saying
he would meet her inthe town. He
knew that she would not arrive for
at least fifteen minutes after him,
and chatted with some friends he
met until he thought it was time for
her to make her appearance, when
he went into a store where they had
to buy several things, and decided to
wait there until she should come.
As he was sitting lazily, his elbows
on the counter, he suddenly heard a
great noise in the street. He rushed
out, and saw the people flying in all
directions.
“What is the matter?” he asked.
But no one stopped to answer him,

and as the crowd parted, he saw
18



Farmer Hayseed’s big black bull,
with lowered head and angry lashing
tail, tearing madly down the street
after a terrified little girl, who was
shrieking loudly as she flew along.
He saw at once that it was Lucy, and
although he knew there was great
danger of his being caught and gored,
perhaps to death, by the infuriated
animal, he darted forward, and seiz-
ing her in his arms, ran back into
the store. The bull continued wildly,
and after putting the whole town in
& panic, was secured with a rope, and
led to the meadow from which he
had escaped.

Lucy did not get over this adven-
ture for some time, and is more afraid
of cows than ever, but Tom does not
teaze her about her lack of bravery
as he used to do, for he remembers how
nearly being frightened he felt him-
self when he saw those terrible
horns so close to him on the day of
Lucy’s unpleasant encounter with
the bull.

Instead of allowing her to go down
the lane by herself while he strolls
through the fields, he always goes
with her, in case something might
happen again, for although Tom, like
most boys, is a great teaze, he is very
fond of his sister, and would be sadly
grieved if she were to meet with any
harm.



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































AN UNPLEASANT ENCOUNTER.



RECREATION.

HESE boys are enjoying their
recreation by testing their
prowess in throwing a ball into their
caps, but they are not playing for
money. The winner will not get
anything more than those who lose,
but will simply have the satisfaction
of having won the game. Joe Har-
per has a good and steady aim, and
the others are watching him intently,
for they feel sure that he will beat
them all; but he is older than they
and is in a higher class, so they feel
highly flattered that he should con-
descend to play with them. Joe is
very kind-hearted, and likes to help
the younger boys; he is strong, too,
and knows how to box, and spar, and
wrestle ; but he never shows off his
strength on boys smaller or weaker
than himself. Shortly after the com-
mencement of the term he had a good
opportunity of showing off his cour-
age and cleverness as a boxer. A
very big fellow called Ben Bunce,
much taller and stronger than Joe,
although he was in a lower class, beat
one of the young ones, and Joe found
the little fellow in tears; when he
heard what it was about he deter-
mined to give Master Ben a lesson,
so after school, while the boys were
all assembled, he told him that he
was a coward to beat a small boy,
and that if he wanted to fight now
2U



was the time. With that he took his
coat off, and Ben did the same, think-
ing he would settle Joe in a few sec-
onds. The boys formed a ring, and
Ben soon found that he was no match
for his adversary, who hit every time
and then dodged away, and ducked
so cleverly that Ben could hit noth-
ing but the air, and lost both his
breath and his courage. He thought
Joe must surely have a dozen hands,
for they seemed to strike him every-
where at once, and at last he was
forced to cry for mercy. He was
very glad to put his coat on and get
away, and took good care not to beat
any more little boys after that.

Since then all the small boys have
a great respect and admiration for
Joe, whom they look upon as their
special champion, for they know
that he is good and brave, and are
always proud when he joins in their
games.

This is how big strong boys should
always behave to little ones; there is
nothing so hateful as a bully, who
takes pleasure in tormenting and
frightening boys who are half his size.
They are always cowards at heart,
and do not dare to fight one who is as
strong as themselves, but vent their
temper on small children and helpless
dumb animals, because they know
that they cannot hit them back.
























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RECREATION,

21



THE FIRST PRIZE.

Wess of my industrious little
readers know what it is, I
am sure, to work hard for a prize,
and many of them, no doubt, also
know what it is to fail in their am-
bitions, while others, the greater
number, I hope, have tasted the de-
lights of sweet success at some time
or another. Only one can win the
first prize; therefore, there must al-
ways be some disappointed ones, who,
if they are wise and brave, will put
their shoulder to the wheel, and try
again. This is what Harold Daly
did; he had worked all one year as
hard as he could, only to see the
prize carried off by another boy. He
certainly did feel a twinge of the
most bitter disappointment when he
heard the name of Edwin Grey
called out instead of his own, and it
was some minutes before he could
compose himself sufficiently to go and
congratulate his happy rival. He
did so though, with a brave face, and
shook hands so warmly that Edwin
did not suspect what he was suftfer-
ing, although he knew that he had
been very anxious to win.

Instead of giving up and _ losing
heart, Harold started right in again
the following year. As he was now
in a higher class, the work was
harder, but he applied himself dili-
gently, and when some boys would

22



have been out playing, he was study-
ing his lessons and reading up books
that would be of use to him at the
examination. You must not think
from this that Harold did not care
to play, for he was just like other
boys in that respect, and after he
had finished his work, was always
ready for a game, but he took good
care to get through his lessons first,
for he knew that after romping and
playing he would be too tired to study.

When at last the long-looked-for
day came, he had the happiness of
carrying off the much-coveted prize.
It was only a book of poems, but did
not the Greeks value the . laurel
wreaths won at the Olympian games
as much as a king prizes his crown?
Harold ran all the way home, and as
he neared the cottage he saw his
mother standing at the door. He
waved the book above his head, call-
ing out, “The First Prize, Mother,”
and that day there was not a hap-
pier boy alive than he.

Now you see what may be gained
by persevering, and I hope that the
next time any of my young friends
may fail to win a prize or pass an
examination, they will remember
Harold, and bear in mind the words
of the old song,

“Tf at first you don’t succeed,
Try, try, try again.”





emt I ee a

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE FIRST PRIZE,

23







IN THE BLACK FOREST.

HE name of the Black Forest
will probably make you think
of goblins and witches and all sorts of
uncanny weird things, it sounds so
gloomy and mysterious, but there is
not a lovelier spot in all Germany,
and although in parts it may appear
fearful and lonesome, there is no
pleasanter place in the world in which
to spend a long summer afternoon
than the lovely green meadows with
the fringe of elms, and birches, and
willows along the banks of the stream,
as I am sure you will think after tak-
ing a look at Haunchen, Luise and
Ida, who have been enjoying them-
selves all the afternoon in the old
forest glades, playing hide and seek
among the trees, where elves and gob-
lins are supposed to reside, and rest-
ing on the daisy-covered sward, which
is popularly believed to be the nightly
dancing ground of the fairies.

As they sat under a tree Haunchen
told them how once upon a time a
beautiful princess was walking there
and plucked a flower, when an ugly
little elf appeared and told her that
for taking a flower that belonged to
him she would be imprisoned in the
earth until some brave knight rescued
her. Her disappearance caused great
distress at the court, and her father
issued a proclamation that whoever

should find her should wed her, so
24



all the noble young knights in the
kingdom set out to look for the miss-
ing maiden, for she was very lovely,
and each one wished ‘to win her for
his bride.

In the Black Forest there lived a
shepherd, who, when he heard of the
King’s proclamation, determined to
find the princess, so he began to search
and never left off night or day. One
night as he was walking in a lonely
part of the forest, he heard cries of
distress, and running to see what
might be the matter, he saw a very
ugly little elf with his foot caught
fast in a trap; the youth set him free,
and the elf told him to follow him
and he would lead him to the prin-
cess. They entered a hollow in a
tree and went down, down a long
way until they reached a cavern
where the princess was sitting weep-
ing, surrounded by a number of ugly
little elves, but she dried her tears at
sight of her rescuer and gladly ac-
companied him. |

When the nobles saw that a com-
mon shepherd had succeeded where
they had failed, they were indignant
and the King at first refused to give
his daughter to a youth of low birth,
but he would take nootherreward, and
as the princess was willing, the King
made him a nobleman and they were
married and lived happy ever after.



















THE BLACK FOREST,









THE RIVALS.

ISS2TEAPOT
regret to say,
Is somewhat of
a, flirt,

And never pauses

to reflect
Whose feelings
she may hurt,
But showers all
her favors free





On any who may come to tea.

She mildly fusses with the cups,
And chats with Sugar Bowl,
She’s more than nice with Buttered
Toast,
And charming with a Roll;
And, just to keep her hand in, makes
Sweet eyes at Crackers, Jam and
Cakes.

The Kettle is a suitor bold,
Of temper quick and hot,
He fairly bubbles o’er with rage,

Whenever the Coffee Pot
26



Throws glances at his lady fair,
And ogles her with loving air.



But Teapot smiles on all around
And does not seem to know
That Kettles warm and glowing
heart

Is boiling o’er with woe;
For while he sings his sweetest tunes
She’s softly whispering with the
Spoons.

He squandered every cent he had,
A bouquet fine to buy,





THE RIVALS. 27

And with one finer still, he saw At last, with ratile, clash, and din,
His rival standing by; They tumbled head o’er heels,
And so, with many a spluttering sniff, | And loudly clattered down the stairs,
He strutted off in angry tiff. With hisses, groans and squeals,
Where John, the footman, saw their
plight,
Picked both swains up and stopped
the fight.

ead









Next day the Coffee Pot appeared
: Much meeker than before;
“Take her, and bless you
a... A both,” he said ;
They’d pass each otheron the stairs, “s “My courtin’ daysare o'er;
With frown, and scowl, and glare, If looks could only kill, ’'m sure And thus in peace we'll all abide.”

They'd both have died right there.

His rival thus, each afternoon, Teapot was beaming bright, .
Put Kettle sadly out of tune. As, smilingly, she gave her hand
One day, a little more than he’d stand, Unto her gallant knight,
The Coffee Pot, with sneer,
Had said, “A pretty Kettle, you,”
And laughed, with such ajeer
That Kettle gave an angry
scream,
And, then and there, let off his
steam.

And then they had it hot and
strong,
The blows so thickly fell
That which was Kettle,which was Pot,
You really could not tell,
While in a thick and murky stream | While Coffee Pot in best array,
The coffee mingled with the steam. | Was pleased to give the bride away.

The bridal morn dawned fair and clear,



THE KING’S CHILDREN.

HERE once lived a young prince
and princess who had never

been out of the magnificent parks
and ¢ .rdens which surrounded their
father’s palaces and who did not know
that there were people in the world
who suffered from poverty and misery.
They saw nothing but well-dressed
ladies and gentlemen at the court,
and thought that the whole world was
made up of such. One morning they
wandered away from their attendants
and came to a large hedge that they
did not remember having seen before.
“J wonder what is on the other
side of that hedge ?” said the Princess.
‘“‘ Let us goand see,” said the Prince,
and he parted the bushes so that they
could creep through; but instead of
flowers, and fountains, and beautiful
avenues of trees such as they had
left behind, they found themselves in
an uncultivated place, where the trees
were stunted, the ground all uneven,
_ and the grass only in poor dry little
patches, here and there. They walked
some distance and presently met a
friar dressed in a loose habit, and with
a staff in his hand. He recognized
the children of the King, but did not
tell them soand when they approached
they asked him where he was going.
He said “to visit a poor little child.”
“We will go with you,” said both

children at once, and they walked
28





along with the friar. Presently they
reached a humble little cottage, by
the dusty road-side, and the friar said
it was here that the poor child lived,
and they went in with him. Lying
on a bed, in one corner of a small
room, was a boy about the same age
as the Prince, whose sunken cheeks
and hollow eyes were a great contrast
to those of his visitor. A poorly clad
woman was sewing at the bedside,
and as they entered the sick boy
raised himself and said, feebly, but
joyfully :

“The Prince and Princess !”

They were surprised that he should
know them; but he said that he had
often watched them play in the pal-
ace gardens, and the friar told them
that the child was ill because his
mother was too poor to buy the good
food he needed, and his. father was
dead. They said they would send
him nice things, and a lot.of toys
from the palace, and come to see him
again, then the friar took them back
to the garden, where they found their
attendants in a terrible fright at their
absence. This visit taught them a
great deal, and they never forgot af-
terwards to visit and help the poor.

The little boy, through the kind-
ness of the Prince and Princess soon
regained his lost health and he and
his mother were lifted above want.



Z

Me. bD pr nal

Ni

1 , Wg Soy 4i
ii, - Ey
|

: AVA
cyl
ll
oS v
fe : ( feet
° eye!
er Ne a ai
alee

y
ANY Th i \
zi ‘ tle OP MINOT
WR Ally i |

yh
Nh
Ny

Be



THE PRINCE AND PRINCESS MEETING THE FRIAR.

29



MICHI.

F you were to find yourself dressed

in Japanese costume, you would
probably feel as though you were
about to perform a part in a play, and
the sight of people dressed in this
artistic manner generally carries our
thoughts to the theatre, and screens,
and papier mache trays. We do not
usually imagine Japanese girls as be-
ing particularly pretty, either, for
those we see in this country are mostly
of the lower orders and. working
classes, and naturally lack the refine-
ment that accompanies good breeding,
but if you were to visit Japan, you
would be surprised at the beauty or
the children and young girls of the
higher classes. Their dress, probably, '
has something to do with the agree-



able impression they make, as the soft
silken fabrics, with their pretty colors
and handsome embroideries are cer-
tainly very becoming, and while they
enhance the charm of a pretty face,
cannot fail to improve a plain one.
Little Michi Komara had a brother
who was studying at a college in this



country; he wrote her long and amus-
ing letters, describing his mode of life,
and related many incidents of his
companions, mentioning some of their
names so often that she got to feel
quite well acquainted with them.
Michi and her parents lived in Tokio

and there she attended the school for
30

noble girls, known as the Peeresses’
School, where she learned English,
and her correspondence with her
brother was always in that language.
She wasa pretty, demure littlemaiden,
fond of study and very industrious;
when not at school she was often to
be found seated on the floor embroid-
ering a kimono, or making some grace-
ful and dainty garment, using a paper
thimble, and a long needle, upon
which the material is run, the thread
being cut from the reel only when the
seam is finished. You would think
it strange to see people sewing like
that, but every country has its own
ways and customs.

Her parents always accorded a
hearty welcome to foreign visitors,
especially when they came from
America, for they felt that they had
been near the absent son and could
tell them something of the ways of
the country he was in, even if they
had never been near the town of his
college. On sunny days they used to.
sit in the garden, bright with cherry
and plum trees, and exchange ideas,
or tell stories, which is a great amuse-
ment with all Japanese, while the
ladies’ busy fingers would deftly ply
the needle, for they never remained
idle.

One warm afternoon, while they
were thus engaged, a young boy



_ MICHI. oe 31

named Haru, the son of an intimate | they might never see, but whose heart
friend, called to see them, and told | felt very warm toward them on ac-
them that he was

going to their son’s
college. This was
indeed news and was

heard with joy by all

the family. Haru Peace oS A § y) i,
said he would come 2 PN ee Bilis
tosay good-bye before

starting, and would
willingly take any-
thing they might like
to send. Michi made
a collection of Japan-
ese coins and medals
which she knew for-
eigners to be interest-
ed in, and placing
them in a little box,
with the names of
her brother’s favorite *
companionsattached,
she confided it with
many admonitions to
Haru, who promised
faithfully that they
would be delivered
safely into the hands
of her brother. A
long letter accompan- : ; aig Ce
ied the box, in which “SHE GAVE IT WITH MANY ADMONITIONS TO HARU.”
Michi said that she was sending to | count of the many kindnesses they
each of her brother’s friends a souve- | had shown towards the stranger, far
nir of a little Japanese maiden whom | from country and friends.





THE VALUE

HEN a boy has to work for
his money before he can
spend it, he soon learns to be careful
with it, but as long as he has only to
say, “Father, I want to buy so and
so,’ and the amount is handed over
to him, he is under the impression
that money is easy to get, and it does
not matter how much he may spend.
Sam. Greely was of this opinion, until
his father at last thought it time to
make him understand that money
was not to be got for the asking, so
one day when he calmly said that he
had broken his bicycle lamp and
wanted to buy another, he met with
rather an unexpected reply.

“You bought that lamp only two
months ago, Sam; how much did it
cost?”

“ Only a dollar and a half, father,
but they have beauties at two and a
half, and I should like to have one of
those.”

“Where do you suppose I am to
get two dollars and a half from,
boy?”

“Why, father, from the bank, I
suppose.” |

“ And don’t Ihave to earn it before
it goes to the bank? Don’t I work
hard every day ?”

“Yes, father, and so will I when
I’m a man.”

“Tf you don’t do any work until
32



OF MONEY.

you're aman, Sam, you won’t want to
do it then, so if you wish to have a
new lamp, you must earn the money
with which to buy it. You weed and
water the garden every day, and keep
it in good order, and I'll give you ten
cents a day, and as soon as you have
the necessary amount you can buy
any lamp you like.”

Sam would have liked to have his
lamp at once, as he could not go out
after dark without a light and he was
fond of taking a spin in the cool of
the evening, but the next day he
started to his work with a good will,
and for the first time in his life knew
what it was to work and wait for a
thing before getting it. He found,
too, that there were several other little
articles that he needed, and when he
mentioned them to his father he sim-
ply said, “ You can buy them all with
your earnings when you’ve enough.”
Sam decided that a dollar and a half
was quite enough to pay for a lamp
after all, and if you had seen how
careful he was with it, you would
surely have thought that it cost ten
dollars at the very least; in fact,
everything he had to pay for out of
his hard-earned money lasted so much
longer than formerly, that his father
congratulated himself on the good
idea he had had to make him learn
the value of money.









































































































“HE STARTED TO HIS WORK WITH A GOOD WILL.”

33



AN UNCOMFORTABLE POSITION.

O find oneself all alone and face

to face with a big black bear,
cannot be a particularly pleasant sen-
sation, and this meeting of a bear and
aman in a tree may give you an idea
as to how you would feel if you were
similarly situated. The man, a na-

tive servant, was traveling with his |

master and a party of hunters in

South America, and was quite as_
brave as any of them, but being sepa- |
| @ very narrow escape, and at sight

rated from the others he suddenly
saw a bear trotting towards him; he
fired at him but missed, and before
he could shoot again the animal was
so near him that he took refuge in a
tree. He knew that his enemy would,
in all probability, come up after him,
but expected to have time to prepare
himself and shoot him as he was in
the act of climbing; he did not reckon
upon any accidents, and when his
gun got caught in the branches and
was wrenched from his hand, you

may imagine his dismay; he went as |

far up the tree as he could, but that
dreadful form came nimbly up after
him; then he dodged about from
branch to branch until he found him-
self on the end of one that was not
very strong, and which he expected
every moment would break under his
weight; he felt sure that when the
bear reached him they would both

fall to the ground together, and rais-
34



ing his voice he made the woods echo
with his screams. Bruin followed
calmly, seeming rather surprised at
this unexpected noise. The two
stared at each other for a few seconds
and then the man had the happiness
of hearing the whiz of a bullet, then
another, and another, and the heavy
beast tumbled out of the tree with
a crash, just,as the hunting party
came running to the spot. It was

of the monster that lay stretched
upon the ground, they shuddered

| to think from what a dreadful fate

their faithful attendant had been
saved.
Although such a ferocious animal,

| the bear is easily tamed, and shows

great docility to its master. It is
capable of very strong affections, too,
and will sometimes grieve itself to
death when removed from a favorite
keeper. A large brown bear that had
been in captivity for ten years, hav-
ing the same keeper during the whole
of that time, was surprised one day
when its food was brought by a
stranger. It showed the greatest un-
easiness and refused to eat. Some of
the men who were accustomed to enter
his cage, at different times tried to
coax him by offering him dainties, but
he would take no notice of them, and
when they became too assiduous in



AN UNCOMFORTABLE POSITION. : 35

their attentions a low growl warned | strative in its affection, and he was
them that it would be safer to retire. | quite unaware that it was so fond of
At the end of a week his keeper, who | him. He was received with great joy

















‘ Nay
(ts e Sr
AN UNCOMFORTABLE POSITION.



Bae

pees Tel

ee
had gone to superintend the disem- | by his savage friend, who afterward
barking of a South African lion, re- | attacked its food with voracity, and
turned with his new charge and was | quickly made up for the time he had
surprised when he heard of the bear’s | lost in foolish grieving during the
conduct, for it had not been demon- | keeper’s absence.



A VISIT TO THE ZOO.

HE ape family is very numerous
and ranges from the mighty
gorilla of Africa, called by the natives
the “Wild Man of the Woods,” to
the little pet monkey we are all
familiar with. The gorilla, although

re-discovered in modern times, was |

certainly known to the ancients, be-
cause Hanno, a Carthaginian admiral
who lived about five or six hundred
years B.c., once sailed from Carthage
with a fleet of sixty vessels and
thirty thousand persons, under in-
structions to proceed past the Pillars
of Hercules (the Straits of Gibraltar),
and found colonies on the Western
coast of Africa, discovered several
islands inhabited by wild creatures
with hairy bodies. They pursued
them, but the males were so fleet of
foot, throwing stones at their pursu-
ers as they ran, that they could not
succeed in capturing a single one, but
they took three females who defended
themselves so violently that they
were obliged to kill them, but they
stuffed their skins with straw and
took them to Carthage, where no
doubt they excited a great deal of
curiosity and wonderment.

The male gorilla is literally the
king of the equatorial regions, being
feared by the natives much more than
the lion, and a hunter gives us a thril-

ling accountof his first encounter with
36



one of these formidable creatures.
As he and his party were pushing
through the most dense and impene-
trable part of the forest they heard
a noise as of some one breaking
branches, and suddenly, as they were
creeping along noislessly the woods
were filled with the tremendous bark-
ing roar of the gorilla; the under-.
brush swayed rapidly, and presently
an immense male gorilla stood before
them; he had been walking on all
fours, but on seeing the party stood
erect and looked them boldly in the
face; he was not afraid and beat his
breast until it resounded like a drum,
which is his mode of showing de-
fiance, giving vent to roar after roar.
His eyes flashed fire, and the crest of
short hair on his forehead twitched
rapidly, while his powerful fangs were
shown at every thunderous roar he
emitted. When at a distance of about
six yards he stopped, and as he be-
gan another roar was fired upon and
instantly killed.

The monkeys which Amy and Joe
are feeding in the Zoo are very differ-
ent to their savage relative, and are
very funny as they chatter, and play,
and quarrel with each other for the
dainties which the children pass to
them through the bars of their cage.
They make very lovable pets when
properly treated.



Yy

a

LL

Zs

Yo

ELA ep oa OLLI eceeeode

SS













A VISIT TO THE ZOO.



THE JACK-IN-THE-BOX.

alee done it! See here! What a
beauty ve made!

Here’s the box and the Jack, too;
though you were afraid

‘That try as I would, I should never
succeed—

You’re mistaken, you see, Miss! mis-
taken indeed.

Just look at his face, that Ive col-
ored with red!

Here’s a triumph for me, after all
that you said.

Such a nose as he has, and such
white, wooly locks—

I really am proud of my Jack-in-the-
box.

He’s a wonder, he is!
him in tight.
Now, Jack, double up; down you go
out of sight

So—I’ve got him all safe, till I open
the lid.

There, it opens again.
do as you're bid!

See, PI shut

Now, Jack,

What’s this? He won’t jump; what’s
the matter with him?
There’s his great wooly head only up

to the rim—
- 38



Just the rim of the box; yes, there
he has stopp’d,

When up with a jerk, you know, he
should have popp’d.

Can you guess what’s the matter,
Fan? What's that you say?

I’ve forgotten the spring? Nay then,
try as I may

I have failed after all, and this stupid
old thing

Is worth nothing—and just for the
want of a spring!

Little readers, how much that we
make and we do

Seems perfect at first, both to me
and to you.

We think we have done nicely, when
lo!

Some spring is forgotten; our Jack
will not go.

As the spring to the toy, so, children,
be sure

Is the strength of good motive, kind,
loving and pure,

To the deeds that you do.
spring does its part,

God blesses your work, and brings
joy to your heart.

If the



Ot an

MN TT i H mA A ll IW Het I AA



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A = sr

THE JACK-IN-THE-DOX.









































39











































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ae enormous quadruped is a

native of the various parts of |

Africa, and is always found in the
water, or in its near vicinity. Its
absolute height is not very remark-





‘THE HIPPOPOTAMUS.

is also dappled with a number of
sooty black spots, which cannot be
seen except on a close inspection.
A vast number of pores penetrate
the skin, and exude a thick oily li-

able, as its legs are extremely short; | quid, which effectually seems to

but the actual bulk of its body is
very great indeed. The average
height of a full-grown Hippopotamus
is about five feet. Its naked skin is
of a dark-brown, curiously marked
with innumerable lines like those on

“crackle ” china or oil paintings, and
40



protect the animal from the in-
jurious effects of the water in which
it is so constantly immersed. The
mouth is enormous, and its size
is greatly increased by the odd man-
ner in which the jaw is set in the
head.



1



THE HIPPOPOTAMUS. 41

Within the mouth is an array of | or otherwise irritated. The incisor
teeth of the lower jaw lie almost
horizontally, with their points di-

white, gleaming tusks, which have a
terrific appearance, but are solely in-





HIPPOPOTAMUS HUNT.
tended for cutting grass and other | rected forwards, and are said to be
vegetable substances, and are seldom | employed as crow-bars in tearing up-
employed as weapons of offence, ex- | the various aquatic plants on which
cept when the animal is wounded | the animal feeds. The canines are



42

very large and curved, and are worn
obliquely in a manner very similar
to the rodent type of teeth. Their
shape is a bold curve, forming nearly
the half of a circle, and their surface
is deeply channeled and ridged on
the outer line of the curve, and
smoother on the face.

The young Hippopotamus is not



WwW

NV



THE HIPPOPOTAMUS.

able to bear submersion so long as
its parent, and is, therefore, carefully
brought to the surface at short inter-
vals for the purpose of breathing.
During the first few months of the lit-
tle animal’s life it takes its stand on its
mother’s back, and is borne by her
above or through the water, as experi-
ence may dictate, or necessity require.

oS

















A FAMOUS FUR TRADER.

ieee trading of furs has been for | entirely to the fur trade. He made

many years a source of profit
not only to the men who engage in
it, but also to the countries where
the furs are produced. One of the



musical instruments with his brother
in London, and when quite a young
man came to Baltimore to dispose of
some of his instruments, which he













































































































































































































































JOHN JACOB ASTOR TRADING WITH THE INDIANS.

most successful fur traders the world
has ever known was John Jacob
Astor, who was born in humble cir-
cumstances in Germany, in the his-
toric village of Heidelberg. His first
experience was purely accidental,
and led to his devoting himself

exchanged for furs in New York, and
returning to London with his stock,
disposed of it to such advantage that
he speedily made another trip.

He invested largely in real estate
in New York, where he made his

home until his death, in 1848.
43



A HARD LOT.

HE unhappy condition of the
Eskimo dogs has been remarked

with wonder by travellers to these
uncongenial regions. They are left
always in the open air, and receive
nothing in the slightest degree ap-
proaching a caress or a kind word.
Their chief use is to draw sledges
which are the only possible convey-
ances in that frozen land, and they
could not be replaced, for horses and
cattle are quite useless in journeys

over ice and snow, while a pack of |

light, active dogs, make their way
over all difficulties with the most
wonderful ease and safety.

No reins are used in driving them,
the voice and a long whip which has
a lash eighteen or twenty feet long
while the handle measures only one
foot answers all purposes. By throw-
ing this whip on one side or the other
of the leader, and repeating certain
words, the animals are guided or
stopped, and can be made to turn a
corner as cleverly as horses; when
the sledge is stopped the whip is
thrown gently over their backs when
' they immediately lie down, and will
remain quietly in this position until
their master returns to them.

Their powers of endurance are
great, and the cold seems to have

little or no effect upon them, for they
44



will pass the night without shelter in
the most severe weather with as little
concern as if it were mild. Three of
these dogs can draw a man and a
sledge at the rate of one mile in six
minutes, while a larger team will draw
very heavy loads at a correspondingly
quick rate. They bark and fight all
the time, and the instant one of them
feels the lash on his back, he relieves.
his feelings by wreaking hisvengeance
on his nearest companion, whose ears
he will snap at savagely. Their
drivers make a most unmelodious
noise too, shrieking and vociferating
as they dexterously manipulate the
long whip, so that to meet one of these
strange teams on a dark night, with
the driver running and gesticulating
alongside would give one the idea of
some uncanny being from the other
world, driving a pack of ghostly
wolves.

Their savage natures are not to be
wondered at when their surroundings
are considered, for they are half
starved by their masters during the
long winter, and left to shift for
themselves in summer when their
services are not required, and it is to
be regretted that animals who ren-
der such valuable assistance to their
owners should be so little appre-
ciated.





. A HARD LOT.



A BRAVE DEED.

ae hardly seems possible that a girl

of sixteen should save nearly
fifty people from a terrible death, and
yét that is what Grace Bussell did.
She is often called the Grace Darl-
ing of Australia, and when you have
heard her story, I am sure you will
say she deserves the name. Grace
lived with her parents in Western
Australia, and her father was one of
the first settlers near the Swan River.
She used to help in many ways. She
would ride twenty miles a day with
the cattle, and was as much at home
in the saddle as she was in the
kitchen.

Before you can quite understand
what a wonderful work this girl did
one day, you must remember that,
twenty years ago the towns in new
settlements in Australia were very
far apart, and people had often to
ride for miles to call on their next-
door neighbor.

Now it happened one day in De-
cember, 1876, that a vessel was
wrecked off the coast about eight
miles from the Bussells’ home. The
steamboat sprang a-leak, and not
being far from land, the captain tried
to steer her in. But it was of no
avail; she ran aground, and there
she stayed, with the water gradually
flowing into her. The lifeboat which

was on board the steamer was low-
46



ered, but it leaked, too, and was so
difficult to manage, that eight people
who had ventured in it were drowned.
So the rest of the crew clung to the
steamer and wondered whether they
could ever be saved. The surf ran
so wildly that no one could dare to
swim through it, and there was not
a house or a person in sight. But
help was near, though they knew it
not. The girl of sixteen was riding
along with a native servant. She
caught sight of the vessel in distress,
and turning her horse’s head towards
the coast, she started at a quick gal-
lop. When she reached the sea, she
urged her horse into the angry surf.
She rode boldly on till she reached
the vessel. With much difficulty
she took some of the children in her
arms, and put them before her on
the saddle; then, with women and
bigger children clinging to her dress,
she started for the shore, gave those
she had rescued to the care of the na-
tives, and returned once more to the
wreck. So she went backwards and
forwards for four hours, till all were
safe on land, the servant having rid-
den to bring out the last man. Tired
and wet as the girl was, she had still
something more to do. Those forty-
eight people whom she had rescued
must have food and protection of
some sort before night came on. So



A BRAVE DEED.

47

Grace rode home for help;.but by ; Humane Society, which was pre-

the time she had gone the eight | sented to her.

After this wherever

miles, she was so worn out herself, she went the story of her heroism



GRACE BUSSELL’S HEROIC DEED.

that she fainted, and was some time
before she could tell what had hap-
pened. Her married sister started
off at once with food and wraps for
the shipwrecked people, and the next
day they were all taken to Mr. Bus-
sell’s house.

You will agree with me that Grace
well deserved the medal of the Royal

went with her, and people never
tired of tellmg it; but she found the
greatest satisfaction in the thought
that she had rescued so many people.
You may not be so fortunate as to
win a medal and have your name
talked about far and near, but to do
what you can for others and be a
help to them will make you happy.









































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE

Ji the handsomely-furnished study

of a gentleman who is the father
of two inquisitive lads, a beautiful
bear-skin of a yellowish white color
is spread upon the floor. This rug

was sent by a friend who bought it

while traveling in Lapland. Seme
weeks after its arrival the traveler
himself came on a visit, and almost as
soon as he entered the house he was
assailed with questions from our two
young friends, who were under the
impression that he had killed the
bear himself, and that the skin was a
trophy of his own courage and dar-
ing. While modestly disclaiming
any right to this honor he told the
boys that he had bought it from the
man who had killed the bear, and
would tell them its history if they

would like to hearit. They immedi-
48

HISTORY OF A BEAR-SKIN.











ately begged him to do so, and he
began :

“You must know, my little friends,
that the natives of Lapland have to
work harder, and expose themselves
to more dangers than any other peo-
ple in the world, to earn their daily
bread. They are obliged to move
constantly from place to place, taking
their families with them, and travel-
ing in rude sledges drawn by rein-
deer. They keep near the sea coast,
and go on hunting and fishing ex-
peditions, realizing large sums from
the sale of furs and the oil from the
cod. The flesh of these animals they
eat, and great is the joy that reigns
in the camp when a hunting party
returns well laden.

“The man who killed that bear was
traveling with others, and had taken



THE HISTORY OF A BEAR-SKIN.

his two little boys with him. One
day as they were returning from a
fishing excursion they saw two im-
mense polar bears on a floe of ice.
They had left the boys in a safe place
on another large floe that
had frozen to the shore

49:

lowed by a horrible death. Our
friends could, therefore, do nothing
until within close range of the bear,
and in the meantime they trembled
for the safety of the children, whom





























































































































































and seemed a part of the











































































land, telling them to









































cook some fish by their

































































































return. On seeing the















































































































































































two animals they deter-





























































































































mined not to let such a































































































































chance slip, and instead =



























































of returning straight to
camp they got on to the
floe and killed them.
It snowed for a little
while as they rowed =
back with their treasure, ~
and as it cleared away,
what was their horror,
while yet at some dis-
tance, to see a huge white
bear in the act of scrambling out of
the water within a few feet of the
defenceless children !

“Thenativesdo notshoot the bears,
but kill them with a short pole, which
has an iron spike at one end. They
have to get very close to the animal
to use this weapon, which they
plunge into its heart; it is most des-
perate and dangerous work, as the
slightest mistake is likely to be fol-

4























they could see crouched against the
rocky ice in terror. As they drew
near the unwelcome visitor noticed
the approach of his natural enemy,
and diving quickly under the water,
disappeared. The men felt too glad
to see him depart to care about fol-
lowing, and after a warm greeting
between them and the boys, all sat
down to ahearty meal. The next
day they started out to hunt for the



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































==
S=

=

ee s>

eS:

5 =
==

it

NWELCOME VISITOR.

AN U



THE HISTORY OF A BEAR-SKIN. 51

intruder, and seeing him on a floe
near by, went afterhim. The father
of the boys soon succeeded in killing
him, and after depositing him in the
boat, which they had made fast, they
started off again to continue the
hunt. As they were walking along,
to their consternation, the floe sud-
denly parted, and they found them-
selves on a small portion of it float-
ing out to sea, their boat firmly se-
cured to the larger piece, which was
stationary. They floated thus for
two days without a particle of food,
and on the third day, just as they
had abandoned themselves to the
most bitter despair, a sailing vessel
hove in sight, which they hailed joy-
fully. They were taken on board,



and soon returned to their camp.
The boat had been found by their
companions, who, although accus-
tomed to these adventures, were be-
ginning to fear for their safety,

“T came across them some months
later, and seeing that this particular
skin was an exceptionally fine one,
offered to buy it, when the man told
me how nearly it had cost the lives
of five brave men, and introduced me
to the little lads who had had such
a narrow escape from its claws.”

The boys thanked their father’s
kind friend for telling them all these
things, and said that they would
think much more of the bear-skin
now that they knew how many lives
had been risked in obtaining it.





FRIENDS AGAIN.

LL boys—and girls, too, for that
matter—know what it is to
have a sweet tooth, and I am sure

that most of my young readers would |

have done exactly as Jack Jones did
when his father gave him a nickel
for weeding the garden. He made a
straight line for Mr. Smith’s candy
store around the corner, and invested
his newly-acquired and hard-earned
coin in butter-scotch. He met his
school-chum Dick as he was leaving
the store, and as they always went
shares with each other, they stood near
the window and munched the candy.
While they were thus pleasantly
employed, Joe Blake, who had quar-

relled with Jack the day before, came —

strolling by, his hands in-his pockets.

Now Joe had said some very un-_
pleasant things to Jack during this |
quarrel, which was over a game of |
They had both lost their |

base-ball.
tempers, but Jack knew that he was
in the right, and when Joe called him
a sneak and a cheat, it was as much
as he could do to keep from hitting
him. He had to walk right away
and leave him, or there would surely

have been some blows exchanged, |

and he wished to avoid this, for he

was very fond of Joe, who was|
y 9

really a nice boy, but apt to lose his
temper rather quickly. He was al-

ready sorry for what he had said, and
52

| wanted to say so, but was afraid that
Jack would not speak to him, so
walked past without taking any no-
tice. He was presently much sur-
prised to hear Jack call after him,

“T say, Joe, come here.”

He turned round, and Jack con-
tinued :

“Open your mouth and shut your
eyes.”

Joe did quickly as he was told, and
a big lump of delicious butterscotch
was thrust into his open mouth, and
so warmed. his heart towards Jack,
that he shook hands with him; and
begged his forgiveness for having
called himasneak. Jack forgave him
very readily, and the three boys went
down the street together, the best of
friends once more, and quite forgot all
their little quarrels and angry words
over that five cents’ worth of butter-
scotch. When they parted, Joe said
that the next time his father gave him
any money, he would come and tell
them both, and they would all go to
| Mr. Smith’s together, and buy what-
_ ever Jack should choose.
| It was very much better to make

up a foolish quarrel in this agreeable

manner than to pass each other by
without speaking, and I am sure you
will agree that as Jack’s butterscotch
had such a good effect, the nickel
could not have been better invested.











“OPEN YOUR MOUTH AND SHUT YOUR EYES.”

53



SKATE SAILING IN DENMARK.

HERE is no people more devoted
to out-door sports than the
Danes, those brave and hardy de-
scendants of the Vikings of old, who
boast that they have never been sub-
jugated by any other nation, and
whose sons still rank amongst the
best and most fearless sailors who
brave the perils of the stormy deep.
The Danish children, and especi-
ally the boys, learn to skate almost
as soon as they can walk, and in
their agility on the ice resemble their
Dutch cousins. It is acommon sight
in winter to see quite a little boy rac-
ing on skates, both with sails, as in
the picture, and without. Their dex-
terity is simply marvelous; they cut
the most graceful figures, dance quad-
rilles, and whirl about, making the
most difficult curves with the ease of
a bird on the wing, and these sturdy
little fellows, with their innocent,
rosy faces and forget-me-not blue eyes,
handle their canvas with the skill
and assurance of old salts, steering
themselves with the neatest accuracy,
and winding through the throngs of
skaters as cleverly as a driver guides
his horses through a crowded city.

I am sure you would enjoy sceing |

a skate-sailing contest, and would feel
at once that you would like to join
the skaters.

in a row together on the ice; their
54



All the boys are placed |

sails are fastened to their backs by
straps which cross over the chest, and
each one has his own little pennant
flying at the top. The starter drops
the national flag which he has held
aloft in his hands, and off they go.

| The crowds who line the banks shout

and cheer as they pass. Some fall
down, some fail to work their sails
properly, while the others rush past
with such speed that it is hard to say
which will come in first. As they near
the winning post, flying along like
huge birds with their wings outspread,
the cheers and shouts become deafen-
ing, and the happy boy who is declared
the winner, receives a grand ovation.
Sometimes ae King and Queen wit-
ness these sports, and give the prizes
to the victorious young heroes, who
for the rest of the day are objects of
the most intense admiration, espe-
cially to the very small boys, whose
highest ambition itis to do likewise.

If ever you go to Denmark you
may make the acquaintance of some
of these young skaters, and you will
then see with what delight they will
show you the trophies they have won
on the ice. No old soldier, displaying
the medals which he has earned at
the risk of his life in deadly battle, is

-more proud of his honors than these

hardy children of the North are of
their skating victories,



































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































SKATE SAILING IN DENMARK,

55



A YOUTHFUL GENIUS.

LL boys like to see a heavy fall
of snow, because then they
know that there is fun of all kinds
in store for them—sliding, skating,
sleighing and snow-balling. Sam
Ford, although only a little country
lad, was the recognized artist of the vil-
lage school. No one could draw such
funny pictures as he, his dogs, and
horses, and cows, being the most won-
derful things you ever saw, while his
portraits of the schoolmistress never
failed to make all the children roar.
Of course, when the snow came,
it was only natural that Sam should
be called upon to turn his talents to
account in modeling a snow man,
and this he did so cleverly, making
such an exact portrait of Mr. Smith,
the candy man, that that gentleman,
after seeing it, presented him with a
box of chocolate as a reward for his
artistic abilities. Thus encouraged,
Sam set to work diligently, and soon
had a complete gallery of snow men,
representing the different dignitaries
of the village, from the parson to
the policeman. They stood in ghostly
solemnity. in front of the school-
house, where their originals came to
look at them and pass opinions on
Sam’s extraordinary cleverness. Af-
ter a time, however, the thaw set in,
and the hot sun soon began to melt

the snow men; first, the corners of
56



their hats disappeared, then their
noses dropped off, until at last there
remained nothing but shapeless heaps
of dirty sloppy snow.

Sam was so grieved at seeing all
his fine creations melt away in this
manner, that he, too, was on the
point of melting—into tears. Ils
fame, however, had spread, and a
gentleman who had seen and ad-
mired the gallery in its first beauty,
was so struck by the talent shown in
the modeling that he made inquiries
about Sam, and when he heard that
he was an orphan living with an
aunt, who was very poor, and had
several children of her own, he
placed him in the studio of a clever
sculptor, who took a great interest.
in him, and finding him a very apt.
pupil, treated him as though he were
his own son, sending him to school,
and teaching him in his studio, where
he is making such progress that his.
friends hope some day that he will be
known to the world as a famous artist.

Many great men whose names will
live forever have begun life in a much
more humble condition than Sam,
because genius and industry are not
confined to any one rank, and never
fail to make a mark in the world, no .
matter how lowly and poor the person ‘
may be who is fortunate enough to
possess such gifts.







































































































































































































































FINISHING TOUCHES.



AN AMATEUR BOAT-BUILDER.

OST boys like playing with
boats, so that no notice as a

rule is taken of their indulging in this
pastime, even when they prefer it to
all others. It is generally supposed
that on growing older the passion for
ships and all things pertaining to a
sailor’s life will be gradually forgotten
and the fascinating employment of
boat-building be looked upon by the
big boy as something much too child-
ish for him to indulge in; the vessels
that occupied so many long summer
days in constructing, and cost their

youthful designers so many anxious |

moments, find new owners or are care-
less!y cast aside as so much rubbish,
and new schemes, and studies, and
amusements fill up the time once
given to the rounding of masts and
shaping of sails.

This is not the case with every boy,
however, as Howard Watson proved.
He never saw the sea until he was nine
years old, and his only ideas of boats
were gathered from pictures, but he
no sooner had his first peep at the
boundless, briny ocean, with its myr-
iads of craft of all kinds, sailing, row-
ing and steaming about, than all the
games he had loved so much until
then were forgotten, and boat-sailing
and boat-building became his one oc-
cupation. He made friends with an

old boatman, who used to take him
58



out, and gave him his first lessons in
shaping the hull of a vessel, and the

first time that he completed one en-

tirely, he invited his father and mother
to come and assist at the launching.
He went before and arranged with the
boatman to take them on the water,
so that they could watch his little
yacht better, then he waited on the
pier until his father and mother ar-
rived. The yacht was declared a
great success, and was named the
Alice Mary, after his mother.

Years after, when he was a grown
man and his name was known all
over the world as famous boat-builder
and designer, that same little yacht
occupied a prominent place in the
drawing-room of his proud and happy
mother, who showed it to everyone
as her son’s first effort, and she would
tell them how she thought it was
only a new pastime that would be
abandoned for another as soon as
they returned home, but little did
his parents imagine when the doctor
advised them to take him to the sea-
shore for a few weeks that they
were planning the boy’s whole fu-
ture life for him, and that this short
stay near sailors and shipping was
to be the means of bringing out his
true genius and cause him to be-
come one of the most successful men
of the day.









































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































‘eN

\ \\\ \\\
\ AK

YS

\

iN

\\ \\

A
XY



AN AMATEUR BOAT-BUILDER.



IN THE TWILIGHT.

HE children always have a plea- | there?” and was answered by a weak

sant hour with mother before
the curtains are drawn and the lamps
lit up for the evening. This is the
time she usually chooses for telling

them a story, and sometimes they |

will sit and watch the coals in the
fire and tell each other what they see
there.



|

voice, that said, “ For pity’s sake take
me in,” and a poor old man tottered
into the doorway. He was so weak
he could hardly stand, and his long
white beard was covered with snow.
They took him in, and placing him
in father’s chair by the parlor fire,
gave him a hot cup of tea and some-

One night it was snowing very hard | thing to eat.

and grew dark early, so mother gath-

When he had warmed himself he

ered her little ones round the fire | told them that he had started out to
and they began looking for“ pictures,” | visit his son, who had met with an
as they calledthem. The baby could | accident while driving a wagon, hav-
not understand this, so Ralph had to ing been knocked off his seat by a

keep her amused with some toys.
Katie saw a big house in the fire,
with pillars, and gates, and trees;
then Ralph looked at it and presently
an army of little soldiers came and

pressed up against the pillars, and
the lovely edifice tumbled down,
| came home he was surprised to see

burying the soldiers in its ruins.

They were expressing their regret
at this catastrophe when their mother
put up her finger and said, “ Hush!
What is that strange sound?”

They listened attentively, and a
distressed moan came faintly from the
window, which Ralph immediately
opened; but such a cloud of snow
came drifting in that he had to shut
it again quickly, and their mother,
giving Ralph the baby, went to the

door. She called out, “Who is
60

runaway horse.

|



The old man lost
his way in the storm, and said he was
guided to the house by the firelight
dancing on the window-panes, and
the children told him howthey always
sat like that every evening before
closing the shutters. When father

his chair occupied, and said that he
knew the old man’s son, and had been
to see him before coming home. He
was getting on nicely, and the owner
of the runaway horse was going to
compensate him for his injuries and
loss of work. This was good news
for the old man, whom they kept all
night, and the next morning being
bright and clear, he was able to pro-
ceed safely, expressing his deepest
gratitude for their kindness to him.





















































IN THE TWILIGHT. 61



A KITCHEN QUEEN.

asked todoany-
thing about the
I, house, or assist
in the kitchen,







GyA t |
Z|
=|
SZ \

consider them-
selves much in-
gas jured persons.
They seem to
think that such
things should be
attended to by
their mother and the servant, and if
they learn their lessons nothing else
should be expected of them, and the
rest of their time should be devoted
to amusing themselves, calling upon
their friends, curling their hair, and

so forth, anything in the way of |

housework being looked upon as far
beneath them. They do not mind
seeing their mothers work, though,
and instead of offering to help her, if
they have the slightest suspicion that

she means to ask them to do any- |

thing for her, they contrive to sneak
quietly out of the way, taking good
care not to be visible until they are
sure the disagreeable work is done.
Lucy Morse was not like this, al-
though I am sure she was smarter at
her lessons, and cleyerer, and much
prettier, than most of the vain, idle
62

seem always to.



eirls, who loll about looking at their
mothers working forthem. She was
very fond of music, for which she had
great talent, and was learning to play
the violin. I will not say that she
liked housework, because she did not,
very few people do, but it was to be
done, and it is not fair that one per-
son should be a slave while another
sits around in a rocker, enjoying the
fruits of another’s labor.

Lucy’s parents were not rich, they
could not afford to keep even one
servant, and deprived themselves of
many comforts to pay for the music
lessons which were such a source of
pleasure to them all, and the little
girl did all in her power to help them.

“T will be your servant, mother,
until you can afford to keep one,”
she used to say, and she would do
all the running up and down stairs,
and save her mother hundreds of
steps every day, besides doing so
many other useful things, that her
father called her the Kitchen Queen.

Her great ambition was to have a
nice good violin, as the one she had
was a cheap one that her father had
given her, but it was the best he

could afford, and she was very thank-

ful for it; but she was taken once to
hear the great Sarasate, and since
then her instrument did not seem the
same to her. At Christmas it was



A KITCHEN QUEEN.

announced that a musical contest was
to be held, and among other prizes
some mysterious donor had given a
FZ beautiful old violin to be
awarded to the best play-
er under fifteen years of
This news was
hailed with
2 delight by
=/<= all the young
“““ musicians of
the townand
our Lucy, of
course, en-
tered the lists
with quite a
large number
of other girls
of about her own age, and started to
practice hard for the event.

The day before the contest her
mother fell ill and could not leave
her bed, so, instead of being at her
music, Lucy had to attend to the
duties of the house and wait upon
her sick mother. The next day she
was no better, and although Lucy
knew that the fact of not practising
for two whole days would injure her
prospects for winning the prize, she
set to work and cleaned the house,
then she took some eggs and milk
and made a nice custard for her
' mother, after which she peeled the
potatoes and prepared everything for
dinner. Then she found time to









age.



63

practise for a couple of hours before
starting.

When she went to say good-bye to
her mother she did not tell her that
she was afraid she had not gone over
her music enough, because she knew
that it would upset her to think that
her illness had prevented her from
winning the prize; but she said, cheer-
fully: “I am g-ing to do my best,
and if anyone else does better they
will deserve the violin, and I shall
try and not feel very disappointed if
I fail to win it.”

The hall was crowded, and many
people who knew Lucy wished for
her success.
She felt ner-
vous, and¢
some of the \
contestants
who played
before her:
did so well
that she al-
most gave fi Sa
up hope, but fA —
as soon asf
she began to~
play she forgot her nervousness, and
the applause that followed her per-
formance told her that she had done




| well; but she did not dream that she

had won until a solemn-iooking gen-
tleman placed the much-coveted vio-
lin in her hand.



A FORMIDABLE ENEMY.

T]HE leopard is much distinguished | hunters shot at and wounded the leo-

by the beauty of his rich fawn-
colored coat, which is thickly dotted
with spots of a darker shade.
does not, as a rule, show any special
hostility to man unless he is attacked,
but is the terror of all defenceless
animals, such as horses, asses and
goats. He is such an agile climber,
too, that it is useless to seek refuge
from him in a tree, and like all mem-
bers of the cat family, he taxes a

great deal of killing, seeming to pos-.

sess the usual nine lives with which
we credit the whole tribes of felines.

Some travelers in South Africa
‘were returning one evening from a
hunting expedition, when a succession
of strange sounds caused them to
turn their horses in the direction of a
mountain ravine. There they saw a
beautifully marked leopard clinging
to the back of an equally beautiful
zebra that galloped about furiously,
braying loudly, and evidently beside
himself with pain and terror. He
passed the hunters like a flash of
lightning, bearing his ferocious enemy
on his back, in which the cruel fangs
had made a deep wound, while the
strong sharp claws were buried deep
in his flesh. Streams of blood were
pouring from the frightened animal,
leaving a long trail behind as he

bounded over the ground. One of the
64

He |

|



_pard, when with frantic ferocity it

left its victim, and springing upon its
assailant, tore him from his horse,
tearing his face and arms with its
claws. The other hunter, seeing the
danger of his friend, sprang from his
horse and shot at the beast, but the
bullet seemed to have no effect. The
infuriated animal immediately left
the prostrate man, and attacking his
second enemy, shook him as a dog
would shake a rat. The shock stupe-
fied him, and he lay unable to move
hand or foot, although dimly conscious
of what was going on around him. His
companion sprang up and fired again,
when the leopard returned and re-
newed the attack upon him, but at
this moment the bullets fortunately
took effect, and the brute fell down
dead.

They found the zebra in an ex-
hausted condition from loss of blood,
and securing it, took it home with
them and dressed its wounds, but, as
it is impossible to tame this animal,
as soon as it had recovered, they al-
lowed it to return to its beloved
mountains, where it is to be hoped it
was allowed to roam about freely and
lead a pleasant, peaceful existence
without being again attacked by any .
of its savage and formidable com-
panions.





LEOPARD ATTACKING A ZEBRA.

65



A NOBLE ACTION.

OU would not think to look at

little Edith Scott that she was
very brave. She is so small, and
slender, and delicate-looking, that she
appears even younger than her eight
years. No one knew what a noble
heart she possessed until the house
caught fire. It was one bitter cold
night in winter; they had all gone to
bed, and were sleeping peacefully,
when all at once the cry of “ Fire”
rang out, waking them in a fright.
The engines, with their galloping

horses, were quickly on the scene,’

and it was thought that all were got
out safely, when, at a top window,
from which flames were darting, Edith
appeared, holding her baby brother,
Eustace, in her arms. A cry of horror
went up from the crowd below; the
frantic parents, who thought the chil-
dren were safe, they themselves
having been carried out nearly suffo-
cated by the dense smoke, implored
some one to save them. A ladder
was placed against the wall, and a
brave, strong man went up to fetch
the little ones. When he reached
them, Edith thrust her brother into
his arms saying, “Take Eustace first.”

The man grasped the child, and
whispering some words of encourage-
ment to Edith, ran half way down
the ladder, and dropped his light

burden, which was caught by the
66



many willing hands outstretched to
receive it. He re-ascended the ladder
with all possible speed to rescue the
brave little sister, standly calmly at
her post. He was only just in time,
for as he placed her on the ground
the blazing roof fell in, and had she
stayed there another minute, she
would have met a horrible death in
the burning pile.

How thankful they were to be to-
gether once more, and with what joy
the happy parents embraced the chil-
dren whom they feared they were
about to lose in such a terrible man-
ner! When they looked at the black-
ened ruins of their pretty home they
could not help feeling a pang of regret,
but the sight of the children, safe and
unhurt, gave them much more happi-
ness than the most beautiful home in
the world could have done had they
lost them. Kustace is too little now
to understand all that his sister did
for him, but when he is older, and
they tell him of her noble action, he
will love her all the more for having
risked her life to save his.

Edith does not seem to think that
she has done anything at all wonder-
ful, and is surprised that people should
look upon her as a heroine, for she
considers that she only did what was
right in saving her brother before
thinking of herself.































TAKE EUSTACE FIRST.

67



A LITTLE BOOK-WORM.

UBY NORTH was much more
fond of reading than of play,
. and at school, when her companions
were enjoying their recreation by
running and playing games, she was
generally to be seen sitting in a cor-
ner of the play ground with a book
in her hand. This habit earned for
her the title of “the Book-worm,”
but that was a nick-name she did
not mind in the least, and as long as
the girls left her alone, and did not
force her from her beloved books to
join in their play she did not care
what they called her. She was not
naturally selfish, and would have
been surprised had anyone told her
that when she refused to play with
them, she was acting selfishly in
seeking only to please herself.

One afternoon they had a half
holiday, and Ruby settled herself
down in the drawing room, with a
new book that had lately been given
her, promising herself a nice, long,
uninterrupted read until supper time.
She had not got through many
pages when the door bell rang,
and the maid came in to tell her
that Florrie Miller wanted to see
her.

“ How tiresome,” muttered Ruby,
but she received the little girl po-
litely, although not as affectionately

as she might have done.
68



“Oh Ruby,” began Florrie, “Netta
feels ill this afternoon, and has sent
me to ask you if you would come
and stay with her a little while.”

Now Netta was Florrie’s lame sis-
ter, and she had to sit in a wheel
chair all day, and could not play
with the others; Ruby felt very
sorry for the poor little sufferer, but
she did not like leaving her book,
and was just framing an excuse,
when Florrie, after a pause, spoke
again.

“She has that bad pain in her
back, and she says you make her
forget it, because you tell her such
nice stories.”

On hearing this, Ruby’s sympathy
for the little cripple gained the day.
She looked regretfully at her book,
but only for a second.

“T will take my new book, and
show it her,” she said, “it is full of
lovely stories and pictures, and I am
sure she will enjoy it.” Then she
put on her hat and went with Florrie.
The joy with which Netta welcomed
her quite rewarded her for the little
sacrifice she had made, and she
thanked her so sweetly for giving
up her reading to come and sit with
her, that Ruby felt ashamed to think
she had hesitated a moment, and re-
solved that she would never be so
selfish again.



ne i HEC i

ia



A LITTLE BOOK-WORM, 69



A LAZY DAY.

OW happy and contented Bert
looks as he lies on the soft,
cool grass near the edge of the stream,
lazily angling for fish. Old Cesar is
enjoying himself too, and looks as if
he would like to put his paw in the
jar and take those little fellows out,
but he knows if he did that his mas-
ter would be angry with him, and as
he loves him better than anyone else
in the world, he does not wish to of-
fend him. Bert and Cesar have been
friends and companions for a long
time, ever since they were both wee,
toddling things, when Bert used to
try to carry the fat, heavy puppy,
and pull his ears and tail, which
Cesar got used to in a way, but he
never liked it. He grew so fast that
he was a big, strong dog while his
master was still a tottering little baby,
falling down at almost every step he
took.

When they were both about three
years old, Bert was playing in that
very meadow where you see him now,
which is quite close to the house.
Cesar was with him, of course, and
the two were running after a daz-
zling butterfly that seemed to take
as much pleasure in the chase as its
pursuers, almost letting them touch
its beautiful wings, then soaring above
their heads or fluttering away among

the tall grass. Bert got excited over
70





the race, the butterfly flew towards
the river, boy and dog. followed
blindly, when splash! Bert went
right into the water. Cassar imme-
diately abandoned all pursuit of the
butterfly, and had dashed after him
before he had time to sink. He soon
brought him safely to land and
dropped him on to the grass; he was
very much frightened, but otherwise
none the worse for his bath, and as
soon as he recovered his breath, set

up such a terrific screaming that the

fields and woods rang and echoed
with the sound. His mother, hear-
ing the noise, ran quickly to the
meadow, and nearly fainted on see-
ing her darling son streaming with
water, while Cesar’s coat was pour-
ing off cataracts. She carried him
home tenderly, while Cesar followed,
barking and dancing joyously. Of
course she knew what had happened,
and since then Cesar is considered
quite as one of the family and treated
accordingly by all who have the
honor of his acquaintance.

He seems to be quite aware of his
importance, too, and whenever he
sees Bert prepare to go out he imme-
diately follows, and looks as if he
would say,

“Tt would never do for you to go
without me, for if you did, something
dreadful would certainly happen.”

























































A LAZY DAY. >



COCK-A-DOODLE-DO.

caret OCK-A-DOODLE-DO,
: cock-a-doodle-do,”
sang Rooster
Bob, as he
perched upon
the dust bin,
while the



at him admir-
ingly and the
other roosters
tossed their
combs with
envy. Hewas
certainly
very fine bird, big and strong, and
handsome, and it was not surprising
that the hens admired him, or that
his companions envied and hated him,
although I do not think they would
have shown their dislike so openly
had he been more modest, but he
strutted about in such a conceited
fashion, looking at them so disdain-
fully, and even the lusty “cock-a-
doodle-do” seemed to say scornfully,
“T am superior to you all, and you
know it,” and they did know it, that
was where the bitterness came in, for
although. they tried to imitate his
lordly strut, and nearly broke a blood-
yessel every time they made an effort
to send forth a cock-a-doodle-do like
his they only succeeded in making
themselves ridiculous. The hens
72

a

hens gazed |



made fun of them, and when their
voices crackled as they were crowing,
a loud and derisive cackle would
cover them with confusion, and make
them wish they had never been born.

They were always shut up safely
at night in a warm shed because
foxes used sometimes to prowl around,
and not very far off was a small
colored settlement, the younger mem-
bers of which were just as dangerous
where poultry was concerned as the
the trickiest fox. Just before Christ-

mas the farm boys made a wondrous

snow man at the back of the shed,
putting a snow-ball on his head for a
hat, and sticking an old broom into
his arms for a gun, and so he stood
like a sentry keeping guard.

George Washington Johnson was
one of the most promising youths of
the afore-mentioned colored settle-
ment, and although he did not imitate
his great namesake as closely as he
might have done in trifles like the
cherry tree incident, he was looked
upon by his companions generally
as a “great boy.” Now George
Washington had unfortunately a
greater affection for poultry than his
means would allow him to indulge in,
and as he was walking home one
evening a particularly musical cock-
a-doodle-do brought before his mind’s
eye visions of roast chicken that



COCK.A-DOODLE-DO. 73

made his mouth water. He spotted George Washington put his fat.
the shed, and mentally resolved to | young chickens into his bag and noise-
return later with a bag and kindly | lessly departed. He went round an-
relieve the owner of the trouble and | other way, when there suddenly















































































































































































EBIENe
expense of feeding so many chickens, | appeared before him a silent ghostly
by helping himself to what his | apparition that caused him to drop his:
stomach craved for. bag with a yell and take to his heels.

It was an admirable night for the George Washington Johnson has.
deed ; the moon was hidden by thick | modified his appetite for poultry since
clouds; the ground was covered with | that night, and Rooster !Bob still

snow, which deadened all noise. reigns supreme.



THE FARMER’S DAUGHTER.

LSA lives in a lonely part of the
country, as her father is a
farmer, so she makes friends amongst
the animals of the farm, who all
love her. She feeds the pigeons, the
chickens, and the geese, and the lat-
ter show her especial affection. I
dare say you have heard that the
gratitude of geese towards those who
befriend them is very great, and the
supposition that the goose is a silly
animal is erroneous, for it is one of

the most intelligent of the feathered |

tribe, and forms lasting friendships
with those who show it kindness,
whether people or animals, and is
most faithful in its affections.

A gentleman living in the country
kept a large watch-dog, which was
always chained up during the day,
and it was noticed that one of the
geese paid him a great deal of atten-
tion. He had always manifested a
great dislike to poultry, never allow-
ing them to come within reach of his
chain, so that the fact of his letting
this one even enter his kennel was
remarked with no little surprise by
his master. One day he saw the
goose and her new friend sleeping in
the kennel side by side, and on in-
vestigation found that she had made
her nest in the straw and deposited
five eggs in it. The dog strongly ob-

jected to his premises being exam-
74



ined, and evidently considered him-
self bound to protect what had been
so confidingly entrusted to him. He
stepped in the kennel with the great-
est care for fear of injuring the eggs,
and was so distressed when his mas-
ter touched them that it was de-
cided to leave them there and see
what would be the outcome of this
peculiar friendship. When the gos-
lings were hatched he showed as
much solicitude as their mother in
looking after them, and would allow
them to hop about on him and peck
at his long woolly coat as they liked.
It was very funny to watch them,
and they caused a good deal of
amusement to all who saw them.
One Sunday morning as Elsa was
sitting quietly in church listening to
the sermon, she was horrified to hear
a mild “quack, quack,” and on look-
ing around there was one of her
geese waddling up the aisle towards
her seat; she had to take the in-
truder out and shut the door, and
after church she found it waiting for
her. It followed her home, and the
next Sunday she took care to see
that they were all safely locked in
the yard before she left, for although
she was very fond of her geese, she
thought they had plenty of time at
home to show their affection for her
without following her to church.















































































































































































































































































































































































































‘ |



:

’

v







THE FARMER’S DAUGHTER.



THE NEW PUPIL.

HEN Ethel Grant first came

to Miss Whackles’ boarding-

school, she declared that she would

make herself so disagreeable that

they would be glad to send her back
home.

On arriving she was introduced to
her companions, and although she
would have liked to play with them,
she remembered her resolution, and
scowled at everybody, hardly answer-
ing when she was spoken to.

The next day was a half holiday
in honor of the birthday of one of

the girls, Agnes Stanley, who re- |
_her eyes, and taking her new friend

ceived a large hamper full of good
things, and invited all her fellow-pu-
pils to partake of them at tea, which
was to be served in the garden.
Ethel declined the invitation sulkily,
thinking that she would be pressed
to accept, but Miss Whackles over-
heard her, and said:

“You will take your tea in the
school-room alone, and will, besides,
learn a page of geography for being
so rude.”

She bore herself proudly for some
time, but as she sat in the empty
school-room, the sound of her com-
panions’ merry voices reached her
through the open windows, and

throwing her book on the floor, she
76





burst into tears. As she was sob-
bing, a loving arm was passed round
her neck, and a soft voice said:

“Dear Ethel, I have brought you
some strawberries, and Miss Whack-
les says you may come and play with
us if you will beg her pardon.”

“T don’t want your strawberries,
and [I will not beg any one’s pardon,”
cried Ethel; but Agnes pleaded so
gently with her, and said that all the

‘girls felt unhappy because she was

shut up there alone, while they were
having such a good time, that, after
a great deal of coaxing, she wiped

by the hand, went into the garden.

They found Miss Whackles seated
under a tree chatting with some visi-
tors. Kthel went to her shyly, and
asked her to forgive her, which that.
lady did very graciously, telling her
to run away and make up for lost.
time. This time she obeyed very
quickly, and the afternoon passed so
pleasantly with the girls, who were
so friendly, that she forgot all about.
being disagreeable, and enjoyed her-
self as much as any of them. A few
days later she wrote home and told
her parents that she liked being at
school, because she had so many nice
girls to play with.



ge





























































































































































































a



























































































































































































































































MA

THE NEW PUPIL.



mn

77























A PRACTICAL JOKE.

REDA and Charlie were both
very fond of their young Aunt
Alicia, but they did not understand
that practical jokes are not only in
extremely bad taste, but cause those
that perpetrate them to be disliked
and avoided by sensible people, and
they thought it would be fine fun to
put a moustache and beard upon the
pretty face of the portrait she was
painting, so when a visitor came and
Aunt Alicia went to the drawing-
room, leaving them alone in her

studio, Freda suggested that they add’

a few improvements to the picture to
which their Aunt was just putting
the finishing touches. The lovely
painting was soon disfigured, and they
viewed it with some satisfaction until
Charlie, who began to feel remorse,
said, ‘Supposing Aunt Alicia can’t get
those things off, I am afraid she will
be very angry with us, so we had
better get away before she comes
back.”

Then they stole up to the school-
room as quiet as mice, for they knew
they had done wrong, and were fear-
ful of the consequences. Their Aunt
was rather quick-tempered, and they
quite expected to hear her come up
the stairs with a whip in her hand
ready to chastise them. They heard
her leave the drawing-room and go to

her studio, and waited anxiously for
78



the scene which they felt sure would
follow, but as all remained silent, they
crept softly down the stairs after a
while and peeped through the curtain
that hung before the studio door.
Their Aunt was standing before the
disfigured picture white and speech-
less, and after remaining in this atti-
tude for some time she dropped on her
knees, and laying her head on the
chair, burst into a passionate flood of
tears. The children had never seen
her cry before, and it touched them
as no amount of scolding could ever
have done. They ran into the room,
and throwing their arms around her
neck, mingled their tears with hers,
and implored her to forgive them.

She was too much upset to scold
them, but after awhile she grew calmer
and told them that she had intended
the picture to be shown at an exhibi-
tion and hoped to get a prize for it,
but was afraid they had ruined her
chances. They were very penitent
for having been so thoughtless, and
saw that what they had considered a
good joke was a very cruel act. By
working patiently, Aunt Alicia suc-
ceeded in restoring her picture to its
former beauty, and not even she her-
self was as pleased as were Freda and
Charlie when it was known that she
had been awarded the prize she had
striven so hard to gain.





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NTING WAS SOON DISFIGURED.”

Al

THE LOVELY P

“



A GREAT EVENT.

HE boys of Dr. Derwent’s college
had sent out invitations to

all their friends, and their friends’
friends, to attend a grand athletic
‘meeting to celebrate the twenty-fifth
anniversary of the Doctor’s master-
‘ship. Many of the old boys, some of
‘them now almost old men, were to
honor the occasion with their pres-
-ence, and as the college eleven boast-

ed an enviable reputation, some good |

games of cricket were expected. All
‘the boys at Dr. Derwent’s aimed at
being good cricketers, each one hop-
ing that the time would come when
he would be placed in the chosen
band of eleven elected to preserve
‘the honor of the college against rival
teams. Even the little boys were to
have a show on this occasion, and
‘very anxious they were to appear to
advantage before their sisters and
cousins and aunts, who were coming

in dozens, to say nothing of their |

fathers and mothers, who were look-
ing forward to this event with almost
.as much pleasure as the boys.
Arthur Sydney, captain of the col-
lege eleven, came to put the young-
-sters through their work, and as he
would stand no nonsense, they had a
pretty rough time of it, but when
they did well he encouraged and
praised them just as heartily as he

:8colded when they failed to please
80



him, so that they really enjoyed it,
and felt that they were to be an item
of no small importance.

“Tf you youngsters don’t make a
good showing I'll lick every one of
you,” said Arthur as he wiped his
hot, red face, but there was a twinkle
in his eye which he vainly tried to
suppress as they all assured him earn-
estly that they were quite certain he
would be proud of them.

The auspicious day was as fair and
bright and warm as even the com-
mittee could desire. Tents were
erected in which refreshments were
to be served, and the grand-stand,
gaily decorated with bunting, which
seemed to be principally composed of
the college: colors, soon began to
fill. Affectionate greetings were ex-
changed between audience and per-
formers, and the Doctor was simply
overwhelmed with congratulations.
How glad and proud he was to shake
hands with his old boys, some of
whose sons were running about in
white flannels, bat in hand, as their
fathers had done years before! Every-
body wore the bit of ribbon dear to
the eyes of the students, and as all
the guests had at least one relation,
and half-a-dozen friends in the field,
you may depend that demonstrations
of appreciatiation were not likely to
be lacking.



























































































































































































































COACHING FOR THE GAME,























;



CONSPIRATORS.



A GREAT EVENT.

The cricket match of the younger
classes against each other was one of
the first games, and they certainly
did great credit to their coach, who
looked on approvingly at the plucky
little fellows. Although this was not
the most important of the games, it
certainly made the most sensation
among the ladies, particularly the
mammas, who applauded their young
hopefuls without ceasing, much to
the delight of the latter, who were
spurred to greater efforts by the admi-
ration they excited, and looked upon
themselves as the heroes of the hour.

The great event of the day, how-
ever, and one which all had been
eagerly looking forward to was the
presentation to Dr. Derwent of a
handsome case of valuable books, to
which every boy in the school had
subscribed. The good man had no
idea of what was in store for him,
and had been considerably puzzled
during the day at coming upon boys
in twos and threes, in odd corners



83

and behind the tents, whispering
earnestly and mysteriously, like so
many conspirators; on seeing him
approach they would separate, only
to be caught five minutes later
in deeper conversation than ever.
When, at the close of the games, a
large wagon drove up to the grand-
stand, entirely filled by an immense
book-case, and the senior boy stood
on the box seat and presented it in
the name of the whole college, the
Doctor understood it all. And what
cheers rang upon the air as he rose
to acknowledge the gift! He told
them that he had received many
valuable presents that day from his
numerous friends, but there was none
amongst them that gave him such
pleasure as this one.

The wagon was driven round to

‘the library and the boys led the way

to the tents. Every one felt hungry,
and you may be sure that they all
did good justice to the dainties pro-
vided for them.





AT THE SEA-SHORE.

ON’T you think that Ronald
looks rather frightened as he
sits perched up there on the donkey?
The fact is, he has never been on a
real, live donkey before in his life,
and the only rides he has ever taken
have been on his rocking horse. He
says he likes it very much, but I
think he feels just a little bit uncer-
tain. A short way down the road,
they passed another little boy, who
was riding a donkey, which stood
quite still, and refused to budge
an inch. A big boy was pulling at
the bridle as hard as he could,
while another was pushing behind,
and several others were shouting
to try and make him move, but
he planted his feet on the ground,
and looked at them as much as
to say, “You may shout at me
until to-morrow, and yet I will not
move.”

Just as our little party passed, the
naughty donkey kicked up his heels,
and the rider was pitched out of the
saddle. He was not hurt, however,
and “everyone laughed very much;
but Ronald does not feel quite sure
whether his donkey may not take it
into his head to do the same, and he
has no desire:to be thrown. He felt
somewhat nervous as the donkey
trotted along, and, when he saw a

big mound in the middle of the path-
84



way, he tugged at the bridle to make
him go round to one side, but Master
Donkey kept straight ahead, and set
his ears back as though he would
say:

“]T know all about this sort of thing
better than you,” and he walked
right over the mound, making Ronald
bump on the saddle as he came down
on the other side. He said, “Oh,”
and clutched the bridie so tightly
that his sister Minnie, who was
running by his side, called out to
him:

“ Don’t you like it?”

“ Yes,” answered Ronald, “I like
it very much indeed, but I hope that
that this fellow does not mean to
run away with me.”

The donkey did not run away, but
trotted along pleasantly, and_be-
haved beautifully, only he would
always go his own way, instead of
the one Ronald wanted him to go.
When the ride was over, they asked
the man to tell them the name of
the good little animal, so that they
might hire him again, and he said
that he called him Solomon, which
they all thought a very funny name
for a donkey, but the man said he
called him that because he was so
wise, and if you look well at his face,
Iam sure you will say that the name
suits him.











































































“DONT YOU LIKE 17?”



UNWELCOME VISITORS.

HE wolf as a beast of prey is in-
vested with a terror peculiarly
its own; it is not to be greatly
dreaded when alone, as it is naturally
a coward, and shrinks from man, but
when united by hunger into large
packs they are feared by the bravest,
for made bold by numbers they spare
neither man nor beast.

This animal bears a great resem-
blarce to the dog, but is very much
stronger, and instead of the hand-
some, kindly eye of our canine friend,

2, glaring, fiery, green eyeball gives

his visage a fierce and formidable as-
pect. Many stories are told of the
depredations caused by packs of
wolves, especially in Russia, and of
the terrible experiences of travelers
who have been attacked by them.
During the warm periods of the year
each one as a rule hunts by himself
and prowls about alone, but in win-
ter they unite and form large packs,
pursuing their prey over the snow at
a rapid pace and with the greatest
perseverance. Even the horse, with
all his swiftness, cannot escape them
unless he reaches a village before his
strength begins to flag. On ap-
proaching near human habitations,
the wolves. give up the attack and
return to their solitary abodes, so
that the only safety is in flight.

They usually remain hidden during
86





the day-time, and issue forth at dusk
in search of prey. Hunger and
thirst are apparently the principal
causes of their ferocity, as they only
make an attack for the purpose of ac-
quiring food, and not for the mere
pleasure of aimless cruelty; the
struggle for existence makes them
rapacious.

A Russian lady was taken sud-
denly ill while her husband was
visiting some friends a few miles
distant, and the physician, fearing

serious results, sent one of the
trusted serving men to fetch his
master. It was in the middle of

winter, and by skating over the
frozen river a short cut could be
made which would lessen the time
for the journey by at least one-half,
so the man decided to go this way,
taking a gun with him in case of
emergency. He had covered con-
siderably more than half the dis-
tance, when, at a sudden bend in the
river, about twenty hungry, howling
wolves came running out of the
thick woods that lined the banks on
either side. He doubled his speed
and kept ahead of them for some
time, but they finally overtook him,
when he fired at one and killed it;
the noise had the effect of causing
them to pause for a time, during
which he skated for dear life, and



UNWELCOME VISITORS.

when they again reached him, he
fired a second time. He kept this
up until to his joy he saw the resi-
dence of his master’s friend, when





87

adventure the gentleman was not al-
lowed to proceed alone, but a number
of friends and servants attended
him; they traveled in sleighs, and









UNWELCOME VISITORS.

his pursuers, finding it would be the
better part of valor to retire dis-
creetly, took themselves off to the
woods, while the poor fellow, almost
dead with exhaustion, contrived to
reach his master’s presence and de-
liver his message. On hearing of his

arrived unmolested, the wolves evi-
dently being of the opinion that they
were not a large enough pack to at-
tack such a force. The lady recov-
ered from her illness, and the servant
was generously rewarded for his de-
votion and bravery.



FUTURE SOLDIERS.

AS is commonly said that the true
soldier, like the poet, is born,
not made, and many a man whose
name has become famous in military
annals first showed his ability in de-
fending or capturing cities or strong-
holds, while yet a boy at school, by
engaging in mimic battles and skir-
mishes with snow-balls, or forming
miniature armies, drilling and com-
manding them with a skill of a vet-
eran.

The famous Bertrand Duguesclin,

who drove the English out of nearly |

every point they occupied in France,
is a fine illustration of a boy’s nat-
ural abilities asserting themselves at
a very early age. He was the despair
of his parents, the idol of one-half
of the boys of his village, and the
terror of the other half, whom he
gradually conquered, however, and
ranged under his tattered banner.
When there was no longer a rival
force at home for his army to fight,
he would lead them into the next
village, where they would often ar-
rive with their bare feet bleeding
from the long march, and, armed with
sticks and stones, would soon put to
flight those who were brave enough
to oppose them. Bertrand’s parents
tried to make a lawyer of him, but
he organized an army in his new

quarters, and caused such frequent
88



disturbances that he was sent home
in disgrace, and his mother, when
asked what she meant to do with
him, exclaimed in tears: ‘Alas! he
is good for nothing, he can only fight.”

When, at last, he entered the army,
it was generally agreed that the vil-
lage was rid of a nuisance, but when,
in later years, news of his great vic-
tories came, and he was made a gen-
eral, then Constable of France, for
the many services he had rendered
his country, the men of his native
place were proud to show their scars,
and say, “ Duguesclin did that to me
when I was a boy,” and those who,
with bare and bleeding feet, had
bravely followed his ragged flag wher-
ever he chose to lead them, would
amuse their children by the hour tell-
ing thrilling tales of their adventures
under their youthful leader.

Tom and Joe are defending their
fort against Will and Dick, who have
been trying hard for a long time to get
possession, but Tom keeps close to his
flag, and hits with such unerring aim
that I fear they will have to give up
the attempt. They tried to steal round
and surprise him from behind, but
he was ready for them, and drove
them back, although Dick had nearly .
wrenched the flag from its place; a
storm of snow-balls soon made him
relinquish it, though.





































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































FUTURE SOLDIERS.



A FIGHT WITH A STORM.

HEN Jimmie saw the rain com-
mence to fall just as they

were about to leave school, he pressed
his nose against the window-pane and
gazed dolefully into the street, re-
peating, “ Rain, rain, go away, come
again another day,” in the hope that
it would be considerate enough for
him and his little sister to stop at
least long enough for them to get
home, but no, the more he repeated
the magic words the harder and faster
it fell, and at last, thinking he might

wait there all night and then have to’

start out in it, he summoned up his
courage, and taking his sister by the
hand, said,

“Come along, Cissie, or it will be
dark before we get home.”

They called Fido, Cissie’s dog, who
had followed her in the morning and
stayed at the school-house all day,
and ventured into the street, but the
wind was now blowing with such
force that Jimmie could hardly hold
up the umbrella, and when the silk
split and some of its ribs were laid
bare, his distress was great. Cissie
clung to him, and bending their faces
to the driving rain, they struggled
bravely along, but a sudden gust
carried away Jim’s hat and almost
lifted Cissie off her feet ; she dropped
her slate, and if Jim had not held

her very tightly, she would surely
90



have been blown away. They could
not help laughing in spite of their

/uncomfortable situation, and were

pleased to see that Fido quite en-
joyed it.

As they were nearing home they
met a little boy who was crying bit-
terly, and when Jim asked him what
was the matter, he said he had lost
his hat, that it had blown over a gar-
den wall, and he was afraid his
mother would scold him if he went
home without it. It happened to be
in their garden that it had fallen and
when they opened the gate there it
was stuck fast on a gooseberry bush.

“ What sort of fruit do you call
that?” said Jim to the little boy,
who quickly dried his tears at sight
of the lost hat, and was going to put
it on his head, but Jim stopped him
saying, “ No, no, you must not wear
it like that, it is too wet; just come
inside and wait until the storm is
over, then your hat will be dry and
you can wear it home.”

The invitation was gladly accepted
and they all had tea and played
together until the rain stopped ; then
the sun shone out again brighter
than ever, and the little boy, thank-
ing them for their kindness, said
good-bye, promising to come and see
his new friends again some other

day.





LS
vil mi |
nea a | if
4 MMA |
Ne I iy i) |

























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































“THEY STRUGGLED BRAVELY ALONG.”



THE FRIEND OF THE FAMILY.

OU have only to look at Prince’s
beautiful, intelligent face to
understand his character, for nobility,
bravery, honesty, and faithfulness
shine out of his big brown eyes, and
although he is so large and strong
that one stroke from his powerful
paw would knock you down, he is
as sweet tempered as a lamb, and
when he plays with little children or
dogs smaller than himself he is
always careful not to rush at them,
and is much more gentle than little
Daddles the terrier whom he could
swallow like a pill ifhe felt soinclined.
If a thief or a suspicious-looking man
were to enter the yard Prince would
change very quickly, and his eye
would have anything but a kindly
beam as he glared at the stranger,
that is why he is kept chained up
during the day, but at night when
every one is asleep, and no one is

there to look after the house, the |

chain is taken off, and Prince is
allowed to roam wherever he likes,

and as no one but a thief would try to |

enter a house when all its inmates
are in bed, if he were to attack any
one it would only be what he deserved.

His little mistress Helena, the
daughter of the house, on coming
home from school always gives him
a lump of sugar, and one day when
she came and shook hands with him,

92



saying, “howdy Prince?” he wagged
his tail and gave a bark, which meant
to express his joy at seeing her; he
knew the sugar would follow this
little demonstration, for although
Prince was anything but a greedy
dog, he had his little weaknesses as
we all have, and an extreme fondness
for sugar was one of them, which I
am sure you will say is not such a
very dreadful vice after all.

When Helena was a very little girl
aman came to the house pretending

to mend old kettles and tin ware,

and when Prince growled at him his
master gave him a reproving pat on
the head and told him to He still, for
he thought the man was a poor honest
fellow trying to earn his living, but
Prince would not keep still and
nearly broke his chain in his efforts
to get at the man. After he had
gone the child was missed, and while
they were hunting for her in every
possible place, Prince tugged and
pulled at his chain so that her mother
had the happy idea of unfastening
it, when he immediately bounded
out of the yard and down the road
in the direction the man had taken.
Helena’s father and the workmen
followed and found the dog standing
over the man, while Helena was safe
and unhurt. The wicked man meant
to steal her for a reward.





“TOWDY, PRINCE?”



OUTWARD BOUND.

F you have ever left your native
country in a ship bound for a
foreign port, you will understand the
feelings of Brian Doyle and his sister
Nora, as they sat on the deck of the
steamer that was bearing them away
from the land of their birth. Nora
was several years older than Brian,
and as their mother had died when
he was quite a baby, she had brought
him up, and taught him his letters,
and been so like a real little mother
to him, that he loved her very dearly.
Then their father died, and the only
relation they knew of was an uncle,
whom they had never seen, who
lived in Texas, which seemed to the
orphans too far away for them ever
to meet, and, although they wrote to
tell him of their father’s death, they
never expected to hear from him.
Judge, then, of their surprise when,
after some weeks, a letter came, con-
taining two hundred dollars, and say-
ing that he would like them to go
and make their home with him, and
that although he and his wife did not
know them, they would be as glad to
receive them as though they were
their own children.

They felt very sorry to leave all
the friends of their childhood, and
when they went to take a last look
at their parents’ graves, they could

not speak for emotion, for they knew
94



that they would never return to their
dear old Ireland. As the ship steamed
out of the docks Nora put her hand
to her eyes, for she could not bear to
look at the friends who were waving
their handkerchiefs and weeping to
see them go away, but Brian kept his
eyes fixed sadly on the receding
shore until it faded from sight.

Their uncle met them at New
York, and after showing them some
of the sights of that busy city, took
them to his farm in Texas, where
their newly-found aunt gave them
such a warm welcome that they could
not feel as though they were amongst
strangers, and soon made themselves
athome. Brian helps his uncle on the
farm, and their aunt says that she does
not know how she ever managed with-
out Nora. They love their adopted
country, but do not forget.the land
they were born in, or the two graves
which they will never see again.

Some time ago a man whom they
knew well came from Ireland to work
on their uncle’s farm. He brought
with him some roots of shamrock as a
present for Nora, which he said he had
taken from their old garden. Nora
planted them in a box and took the
greatest care of them, and as the man
had been careful to bring enough Irish
soil to cover them, they grew well and
were a great pleasure to everybody.



































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































OUTWARD BOUND.

95



THE EXPRESS.

AVE you anything you wish to_
send by the expressman? If
so, you have only to leave a message
with Cassie, and she will order her
wagon, and attend to your business
at once. Cassie is a clever little
woman, and drives her team herself,
although her horse, Charlie, is rather |
troublesome sometimes, and thinks
nothing of leaving the cart to go and |
have a drink of water, or eat a piece
of bread and jam, and Cassie has to |
be very strict with him. She is now |
sending her doll, the Princess Leo-
nora, on a visit to the city, and, al-
though they started several hours |
ago, they have not nearly arrived |
yet, and all because that horse
is in one of his troublesome moods.
Now he says that his shoe is loose,
and he can really travel no fur-
ther to-day, but Cassie calls big
brother Hugh, and tells him to bring
his hammer and nails to shoe the
horse, which he does, the horse and
Cassie chatting together while he
works.

I am afraid the poor princess will
grow tired of lying in the wagon so
long, and at this rate it will take her
many hours to reach her destination,
for the horse is no sooner shod, than |
he declares that he is very hungry, |

and must have something to eat at |
96





once, or he will drop by the road-
side. The sly fellow knows that
Cassie has a piece of cake stowed
away in a corner of the wagon, which
she gets out, as he knew she would,
and they sit down together and eat
it, after which he gallops furiously
round the yard several times, and

_ then, stopping at the steps, they hand

the princess out, telling her that she

| has arrived at her friend’s house in

the city.
Cassie and Charlie live in a part of

/the country where houses are few

and far between, so that they are
naturally thrown a great deal upon
their own resources, as they seldom
have other children to play with.
They amuse themselves by the hour
in the yard with their toys, and they

| have besides a little garden, where

they dig, and hoe, and water the
flowers, and in which they take great
pride. Their neighbors lie very far
off, and it is quite an event when a
visitor comes to see them, particu-
larly when they bring their children,
and remain for several days, as they
generally do. On these occasions,
they go for drives in the wagonette,
and take turns in driving the horse,
who is a quiet, good, old fellow, and
knows just what he has to do with-
out being told.







































"







































































































































































































THE EXPRESS.
7 97



ALICE’S CHARGE.

LICE was often left in charge
of her little sister Ellie, and
was always admonished by their mo-
ther to be kind and considerate both
to her and their brother, Ned, be-
cause, Alice being the eldest, was of
course the one to set a good example
to the others and keep peace among
them. Ellie was inclined to be diso-
bedient, and tried Alice’s patience
sorely at times, and Ned would make
such a noise over everything he did,
that she often felt quite tired of re-
peating “be quiet.”

Their mother was once called away
to see a sick sister, and Alice was left
in sole charge for several days; the
first day there was no trouble, as
they played in the garden most of
the time, but the second day it
rained, and towards afternoon Ned
began to show signs that he was get-
ting tired of being good, and insisted
upon going out, rain or no rain. This
made Alice angry, and she retired to
her room, leaving little Ellie all alone.

As the child had no one to talk to,
she set about looking for some occu-
pation, and finding a pretty piece of
blue silk in a drawer, began to make
adress for her doll out of it. Now
this silk belonged to Alice, who was
guarding it most preciously to make

a cushion for her mother’s dressing-
98



table on her next birthday, and when
she returned and found it all cut and
hacked to pieces, she gave Ellie a
sharp slap, and said she would not
speak to her again, and although the
little culprit begged her with tears to
kiss and forgive her, and Ned said he
did not see the use of making such a
fuss over a bit of old silk that was
only a rag any way, she steadily re-
fused, and no amount of pleading
could move her.

Then Ellie in her distress decided
to go and find mamma, and started
out in the heavy rain, which was
pouring in torrents. She wore no
coat or hat, and her little thin slip-
pers were soon soaking wet. Pre-
sently it began to thunder and light-
ning, and Alice, knowing that Ellie
would be frightened, went to keep
her company and tell her that she
forgave her. When she found that
she was not in the house, she was
filled with dismay, and the maid
went in search of her. She found
her under a hedge wet to the skin,
and nearly dead with fright. When
Alice saw her, and heard that she
had gone to find her mother because
she wouldn’t speak to her, she was
smitten with remorse for her harsh-
ness, and determined never to be so
strict again.



: yy i

C7);

Ys
Li
y



ALICE’S CHARGE.



r

A COLLEGE

EGGIE VIVIAN was looked
upon as one of the best all-
round athletes of his college; there
was nothing in the sporting line that
he could not do; rowing, foot-ball,
tennis, cricket or base-ball, he was
clever at them all, and helped the
college to win many agame. In fact,
his father used to say that he would
only find his college education of use
to him if he went to live in some
place where he would have to assert
his rights by force, as in that case he
would be sure to get on, but Reggie
would laugh and say,
“We manage to learn a few other
things as well, father, as you will see
some day.”

His home was in a beautiful part
of the country, and as the river
passed close to their house, it was a
common sight, during the summer
vacation, to see Keggie in his cool
white boating flannels taking a row,
and his vigorous stroke was the ad-
miration of all who saw him.

One Christmas time he went with
his parents to spend the holidays,
with some friends who lived a little
distance away. A large party was
assembled, and on Christmas eve the
festivities were kept up until a late
hour. It began to rain heavily in
the early part of the evening, but as

all the guests were staying in the
100



EDUCATION.

house, this did not trouble them; |
windows and doors were fastened
securely, and the sound of merry
music and dancing feet prevented
anyone from noticing the patter and
splash of the rain. They were about
to retire for the night, when a loud
shout from the outside attracted their
attention, and on opening a window,
a man was seen in a boat, and to
their consternation as far as they
could see the ground was covered
with water.

“What has happened?” they all
asked at once.

“The river has overflown,” an-
swered the man, “and we must get
boats at once, or the people in the
cottages on the banks will all be
drowned; have you anyone there
that can row ?”

Now was Reggie’s opportunity ; he
jumped into the boat with the man
and rowed quickly to the boat-house,

where they took as many boats in

tow as they could; others helped, of
course, but it was the first start that
saved the people’s lives, for in some
of the cottages the water had al-
ready reached the attics. No one
was drowned, and as Reggie’s father
looked proudly at his son, he said :

“ Your college education is of some
use, after all, I see.” It proved to be
of use in other ways, too.



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































SWS

YS

























































“HIS VIGOROUS STROKE WAS THE ADMIRATION OF ALL WHO SAW HIM.”
101



THE PROFESSOR.

EF OW solemn Fritz looks, as he

sits on the bank with his dog
Rags in his arms; you would almost
think he was having his photograph
taken, and making a painful effort to
look “pleasant,” according to instruc-
tions, but he is simply waiting for a
very learned professor who has prom-
ised to take him on a geological ex-
pedition, and his serious look is there-
fore befitting the occasion, for it is no
small condescension on the part of
the Professor even to speak to such
a little boy, much less take him out
and explain the mysteries of stones,
and earth, and rock to him. Rags is
going, too, and looks as if he under-
stood all the importance of his posi-
tion.

When the learned man first came
to live in this neighborhood it was
known, of course, what a very im-
portant personage they had amongst
them, and people felt curious to see
the famous man whose name was
known throughout the civilized world
as one of the greatest scientists of
modern times; so when a few days
after his arrival Fritz came in one
afternoon and said, “I met the Pro-
fessor on the cliffs a little while ago,”
he was immediately assailed with
questions.

“What is he like?”

mother.
102

asked his



“O just a tall, thin old man with
blue spectacles,” answered Fritz.

“And what was he doing when
you met him?” asked his sister Irene,
who was a grown-up young lady and
of course very curious.

“He was breaking stones,” said
Fritz.

“Breaking stones! who ever heard
of a gentleman doing such a thing?”
exclaimed Irene horrified.

“Well, he had a little hammer in
his hand and was breaking bits off
the rocks, and if that isn’t breaking
stones what is it?”

“You horrid boy, to pervert the
truth in that way,” said Irene, adding
after a pause, “I am sorry he is an
old man; he will be so very sedate
and solemn.”

To Fritz’ astonishment, when Irene
saw the Professor, she again called
him a horrid boy for daring to say
that he was old.

But here comes the Professor with
Irene by his side; she has taken such
an interest in geology lately that this
does not surprise Fritz. The expedi-
tion was not as interesting as he ex-
pected, as nearly all the Professor’s
explanations were given to Irene in
an undertone, while Fritz was told to
run ahead with the dog.

The Professor is now Fritz’ brother-
in-law, and teaches him much geology.





“YOU WOULD ALMOST THINK HE WAS HAVING HIS PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN.”
103



SAVED.

WO boys, Percy and Ernest
Smith, were taken to visit some
friends on the north coast of Scotland,
and, while playing near some high
cliffs one afternoon, found a small
cave in one of them, which they en-
tered, delighted to have made such a
discovery. They were not acquainted
with the treacherous tides or this part
of the country, which come in like
wild horses at a gallop, and, seeing a
~ long stretch of sand and rocks before

them, and the sea forming just a slight,

line across the horizon, thought they
were safe for hours, and soon became
absorbed in their play. They pre-
tended they were smugglers, and were
so engrossed that they did not hear
the rumbling of the rapidly-rising
tide, as it rolled in huge foam-crested
waves towards the cave.

“Hello!” at last exclaimed Ernest,
“the tide must be rising, there is
water coming in here,” and then for
the first time they noticed that little
puddles were splashing gently over
their boots.

“We had better be going, or we
may have to wade out,” said Percy,
so they went to the entrance of the
cave, and, to their horror, saw noth-
ing but a vast sheet of rolling, foam-
ing water; the in-coming waves
dashed against the cliffs with an omi-

nous sound, and the boys’ hearts sank
104



as they saw that all communication
with the land was completely cut off.
They were at the bottom of a steep
cliff, hundreds of feet high, inacces-
sible to all but the sea-gull, and, rea-
lizing the dreadful fate that awaited
them, they clasped each other tightly,
and prayed for courage to meet their
death bravely. As the waves rose
higher, they clambered on to a small
ledge, and watched the water as it.
crept surely and swiftly towards them.
Suddenly they saw a rope dangle be-
fore the entrance, and, hardly believ-
ing their senses, waded towards it;
to their joy they saw a man, to whom
they shouted, and, when he perceived
them, he called back, “Al right boys,
we're coming for you,” then another
man, fastened to another rope, came
dangling from somewhere above, and

| the two boys were soon secured and

taken out of danger.

They heard afterwards that their
parents, becoming alarmed at their
long absence, had made inquiries all
over the place, and a fisherman said
he had seen them enter the cave early
in the afternoon. Then two brave
men, who were always saving lives
on that dangerous spot, immediately
volunteered to go for them. They
have never forgotten this adventure,
and have ever since shown a great
dislike to exploring strange caves.





SAVED.



BEN’S

OOR Ben Wilby never had any
luck although his mother used
to say that it would come in good
time. “There is no such thing as
luck, Ben,” she would say when he
was despondent over a fresh fail-
ure, “perhaps the boy who got the
place needed it just as much as
you, and your turn will come some
day.”

Ben’s father was dead, and his
mother was not strong enough to do
hard work and only managed to earn
a scanty living by doing fine sewing,
but Ben, who had attended a good
school until his father died, was
strong and healthy, and his great de-
sire was to get a situation, so that
his mother need not be kept so closely
to her sewing. He searched the ad-
vertisements every day for the “ boys
wanted,” and presented himself at
each address, but there was always
something to prevent his being en-
gaged.

One morning he went early to a
large business house, where a “smart
boy, well up in figures” was adver-
tised for; a crowd of others were
waiting, and when he entered the pri-
vate office a gentleman seated there
just said, “too young,” and Ben,
muttering to himself, “just my luck

again,” withdrew with a heavy heart.
106



LUCK.

He went to several more places, but
they were already filled, and he was
returning home about noon when he
saw, a few yards ahead of him, the
gentleman who had uttered that
chilling “too young” earlier in the
day. A pretty little girl was run-
ning by his side, and Ben lingered
behind, watching her admiringly.
Her father, for such he supposed him
to be, paused for a moment to look
into a shop window and the child
ran into the middle of the road just

as a hansom cab came along at a

rapid rate. She fell right in front
of it, but Ben, dashing forward like
a flash, picked her up, or she would
certainly have been trampled under
the horse’s feet. He carried her to
the sidewalk, where her father had
only just perceived what had hap-
pened, and as he took the frightened
child in his arms he looked at Ben
and said, “ You were in my office
this morning?” “Yes sir,” replied
Ben. “Come again to-morrow. I
will find a good place for you,” and
Ben hurried home to tell his mother
how his luck had come to him. The
next day he was installed in the
office he had left so sorrowfully the
day before, and in time became a
junior partner, marrying the little
girl whose life he had saved.



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LITTLE HEROES; PEEPS AT MANY COUNTRIES; LESSONS
FROM ANIMAL LIFE AND NATURE; EACH
CONTAINING A GOOD MORAL

INCLUDING

GLOWING SCENES IN FAIRYLAND; OUTDOOR AND INDOOR
SPORTS: FIRESIDE POEMS, ETC.; THE WHOLE AFFORDING
MANY HAPPY HOURS TO THE YOUNG

BY

ISABEL ALLARDYCE

THE WELL-KNOWN JUVENILE STORY WRITER

Superbly Embellished with Many Choice Iliustrations

JUVENILE PUBLISHERS.

BOSTON,
B. B. RUSSELL,
57 CORNHILL.
Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1897. by
HORACE C. FRY,
In the Office of .he Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.
CO Wise NES:

PAGE } PAGE

CHRISTMAS JOYS.......... 17 | Twe Farmer’s DauaHTrrR. .... 74
An Unpleasant Encounter. ... 18] Tue New Purir.......... 76
RECREATION... .... 2.0.4. 20| A Practica, Joxy . ....... = 78
Tue Firsr Prize. ........ 22) A Grear Evenr .......... 80
In roe Buacx Forest... .... 24) Ay vue Sea-Suorre........ 84
Tue Rivais............ 26 | UnwreLcome Visrrors....... 86
Tur Kine’s Cuinpren...... . 28 | Furure Sotprerns. . .. 2... = 88
MIGHT Shien op eee eae Pa, Bie 30) A Fiacur wirn A Srorm. ..... . 90
THE Vautur or Money ...... 82 | Tue Frrenp or THE Famity.... 92
An UncoMForTaBLE Posrtion ... 384] Ovutrwarp Bounp....... ie phon)
A VisIT TO THE Zoo........ 86 | THe Express. ........2.2. «96
Tue Jack In THE Box ...... 88] Aticr’s CHaRGE...... speedo
Tur HippoporAmMus......,.. 40 | A Cottecr Epucation .... . . 100
A Famous Fur Traper...... 48) Tue Proressor......... . 102
EAS LEARD MGT ee | cette ar 2 orc eh 445). SAVED dee) eo ue Pa ee ae 104
A Brave Deep. ......... 46 | Bey’s Luck... ......:... 106
Tue Hisrory or A Brar-Sxin. .. 48] A Wonperrut Curistmas-Box. . . 108
Frienps AGAIN. ......... . 62] Tae Cricket Marco ..,.... 110
Sxkate-Sartine In Denmark... . 54]In Scuoor....... ee ae
A YouTHruL GEentIus ....... 56 | DECEMBER®. 50.4.0). Se 4:
Aw Amateur Boat-Burnprr. ... 58| Jack O’Lanrrrn. ........ 115
In toe Twinichot....... .. 60] An Apr Pupm.......... 116
A KitcHen QuEEN...... . . 62] Wso Lavens Lasr Laucus Brsr.. 118
| A FormipasBLte Enemy... .... 64{| THE Inventor .......... 120
A Nopie Action. ........ 66| THe Youne Musician. ...... 122
A Lirrte Boox-Worm.. .... . 68{|CnEvER Hunrers........ . 124
A Lazy Day. .......... 70| Tae New Scoorar........ 126
CocK-A-DOODLE-DO .... . . .. 72) For tHe Honor or toe Town... 128


CONTENTS.



PAGE PAGE
A New YEAR’s PARABLE .... . 129 | Tue Satny Ann .. 2... . 190
GRANDFATHER'S DARLING .... . 130 KEPT MLN Ae ere me ae ne A 192
For tHe EXHIBITION ....... 132 | On PLeasurRE Bent. ... . soya 194
Davy’s Horses. ......... 134 | Jonn WESLEY... ....... . 198
A Reau Home QuEEN. ..... 1386 | Tae Lanp or THE PHarsaons ... 199
Anna’s ORDEAL... .......- 1388 | A Prep at Mapras........ 205
THE O_tp YEAR AND THE New. .. 140; A Nopue AnrmaL........ . 207
Tur Steering Beauty... .... 142 | New Sours Wars. ....... 208
Waere’s MorueR? ........ 144 | QuEENSLAND .........2.%. 210
A Pueasure TRIP......... 146 | Tae Moors. ........2... 213
Aut ABOARD! ... 2... .. . . . 148 | Scenes Amonest THE Somaris. . . 214
An AwkKWARD Fix ........ 150 | Mongouta.. . . 2... Sea eee 1S
Tur New Baby. ......... TDs BM exe CO Ae dee se tat eye ne ees oe 220:
A SurprisE FoR Morarre..... 154 | A Treacnerous For ....... 223.
Hien anp Low Lire ....... 156 | A Perr ar some CuInEsE Provinces 224
Pumpr’s Per. ...... Bytes) LD OnE GAMIBESTA Myre pater er ae ha fn eee eRe 7:
Ont Goop Turn Deserves AnorHer 160|JEnny Linp ..... er ao:
ALL oN A SummER’s Day ..... 162 | Jocko anpDI...... eee aoe
THe Onr-Man Banpd ....... 164| Pur ro tHe Tesr........ . 233
Tue Lirrte Artist. ....... 166 | A Vistr ro SrpeRIA. ..... . 234
Tue FisHerman’s Son... .. . . 168) Samuren Corr... ... pk; ereeer ay
THe IMAGE VENDOR........ 170 | A Purasanr Trip... .. 2... 238
PASUN Tae U CET Fe tee @ eee wars eee 172 | Wuere tar Sarp Went Down... 240:
URRY) GETSta7 ee her ane ety es 174 | Tae Rocxinec-Hors—E........ 242.
A Goop Fainy.......... 176 | A Practican JokKE........ 244
A STRANGE EXPERIENCE. .... . 179| A Story or TrHE Sea ....... 246
Tue Nicur ScHoor........ POOR RONIO tetas eee eee a ee .. . 248
WSERUL) SCORM et hee eo te 182 | A ProriraBLE AMUSEMENT... . . 250:
JOLLY WINTER... .....5-: 184) A Test or Sxmnp......... 252
Our Curistmas TREE. ..... . 186) THe SrgcE or Paris... ..... 2564
A UsEruL EXPERIENCE ...... 188 | On Mount Sr. Bernarp..... . 256.



"Sina.
[Come Frotic anp Fun ||

= Ab

Ms zh. Soin the platter,







CHRISTMAS JOYS.
AN UNPLEASANT ENCOUNTER.

le is not very nice to be always
hearing one’s self called a cow-
ard, and Lucy, who declared that she
was afraid of nothing but cows, re-
sented her brother Tom’s remarks as
to her courage. She would not pass
through the field where a few harm-
less old cows were grazing for any-
thing in the world, but always went
round by: the lane, much to Tom’s
disgust, for he did not know what it
was to feel frightened of a cow, and
made all sorts of fun of her. Their
mother sent them both into the town
one afternoon to do some shopping,
and as Lucy would not go through
the field, and Tom would not go by
the lane, they separated, Tom saying
he would meet her inthe town. He
knew that she would not arrive for
at least fifteen minutes after him,
and chatted with some friends he
met until he thought it was time for
her to make her appearance, when
he went into a store where they had
to buy several things, and decided to
wait there until she should come.
As he was sitting lazily, his elbows
on the counter, he suddenly heard a
great noise in the street. He rushed
out, and saw the people flying in all
directions.
“What is the matter?” he asked.
But no one stopped to answer him,

and as the crowd parted, he saw
18



Farmer Hayseed’s big black bull,
with lowered head and angry lashing
tail, tearing madly down the street
after a terrified little girl, who was
shrieking loudly as she flew along.
He saw at once that it was Lucy, and
although he knew there was great
danger of his being caught and gored,
perhaps to death, by the infuriated
animal, he darted forward, and seiz-
ing her in his arms, ran back into
the store. The bull continued wildly,
and after putting the whole town in
& panic, was secured with a rope, and
led to the meadow from which he
had escaped.

Lucy did not get over this adven-
ture for some time, and is more afraid
of cows than ever, but Tom does not
teaze her about her lack of bravery
as he used to do, for he remembers how
nearly being frightened he felt him-
self when he saw those terrible
horns so close to him on the day of
Lucy’s unpleasant encounter with
the bull.

Instead of allowing her to go down
the lane by herself while he strolls
through the fields, he always goes
with her, in case something might
happen again, for although Tom, like
most boys, is a great teaze, he is very
fond of his sister, and would be sadly
grieved if she were to meet with any
harm.
















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































AN UNPLEASANT ENCOUNTER.
RECREATION.

HESE boys are enjoying their
recreation by testing their
prowess in throwing a ball into their
caps, but they are not playing for
money. The winner will not get
anything more than those who lose,
but will simply have the satisfaction
of having won the game. Joe Har-
per has a good and steady aim, and
the others are watching him intently,
for they feel sure that he will beat
them all; but he is older than they
and is in a higher class, so they feel
highly flattered that he should con-
descend to play with them. Joe is
very kind-hearted, and likes to help
the younger boys; he is strong, too,
and knows how to box, and spar, and
wrestle ; but he never shows off his
strength on boys smaller or weaker
than himself. Shortly after the com-
mencement of the term he had a good
opportunity of showing off his cour-
age and cleverness as a boxer. A
very big fellow called Ben Bunce,
much taller and stronger than Joe,
although he was in a lower class, beat
one of the young ones, and Joe found
the little fellow in tears; when he
heard what it was about he deter-
mined to give Master Ben a lesson,
so after school, while the boys were
all assembled, he told him that he
was a coward to beat a small boy,
and that if he wanted to fight now
2U



was the time. With that he took his
coat off, and Ben did the same, think-
ing he would settle Joe in a few sec-
onds. The boys formed a ring, and
Ben soon found that he was no match
for his adversary, who hit every time
and then dodged away, and ducked
so cleverly that Ben could hit noth-
ing but the air, and lost both his
breath and his courage. He thought
Joe must surely have a dozen hands,
for they seemed to strike him every-
where at once, and at last he was
forced to cry for mercy. He was
very glad to put his coat on and get
away, and took good care not to beat
any more little boys after that.

Since then all the small boys have
a great respect and admiration for
Joe, whom they look upon as their
special champion, for they know
that he is good and brave, and are
always proud when he joins in their
games.

This is how big strong boys should
always behave to little ones; there is
nothing so hateful as a bully, who
takes pleasure in tormenting and
frightening boys who are half his size.
They are always cowards at heart,
and do not dare to fight one who is as
strong as themselves, but vent their
temper on small children and helpless
dumb animals, because they know
that they cannot hit them back.





















eae
a

- ata HHH
:
i

; Nae Pa ;





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AC























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































RECREATION,

21
THE FIRST PRIZE.

Wess of my industrious little
readers know what it is, I
am sure, to work hard for a prize,
and many of them, no doubt, also
know what it is to fail in their am-
bitions, while others, the greater
number, I hope, have tasted the de-
lights of sweet success at some time
or another. Only one can win the
first prize; therefore, there must al-
ways be some disappointed ones, who,
if they are wise and brave, will put
their shoulder to the wheel, and try
again. This is what Harold Daly
did; he had worked all one year as
hard as he could, only to see the
prize carried off by another boy. He
certainly did feel a twinge of the
most bitter disappointment when he
heard the name of Edwin Grey
called out instead of his own, and it
was some minutes before he could
compose himself sufficiently to go and
congratulate his happy rival. He
did so though, with a brave face, and
shook hands so warmly that Edwin
did not suspect what he was suftfer-
ing, although he knew that he had
been very anxious to win.

Instead of giving up and _ losing
heart, Harold started right in again
the following year. As he was now
in a higher class, the work was
harder, but he applied himself dili-
gently, and when some boys would

22



have been out playing, he was study-
ing his lessons and reading up books
that would be of use to him at the
examination. You must not think
from this that Harold did not care
to play, for he was just like other
boys in that respect, and after he
had finished his work, was always
ready for a game, but he took good
care to get through his lessons first,
for he knew that after romping and
playing he would be too tired to study.

When at last the long-looked-for
day came, he had the happiness of
carrying off the much-coveted prize.
It was only a book of poems, but did
not the Greeks value the . laurel
wreaths won at the Olympian games
as much as a king prizes his crown?
Harold ran all the way home, and as
he neared the cottage he saw his
mother standing at the door. He
waved the book above his head, call-
ing out, “The First Prize, Mother,”
and that day there was not a hap-
pier boy alive than he.

Now you see what may be gained
by persevering, and I hope that the
next time any of my young friends
may fail to win a prize or pass an
examination, they will remember
Harold, and bear in mind the words
of the old song,

“Tf at first you don’t succeed,
Try, try, try again.”


emt I ee a

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE FIRST PRIZE,

23




IN THE BLACK FOREST.

HE name of the Black Forest
will probably make you think
of goblins and witches and all sorts of
uncanny weird things, it sounds so
gloomy and mysterious, but there is
not a lovelier spot in all Germany,
and although in parts it may appear
fearful and lonesome, there is no
pleasanter place in the world in which
to spend a long summer afternoon
than the lovely green meadows with
the fringe of elms, and birches, and
willows along the banks of the stream,
as I am sure you will think after tak-
ing a look at Haunchen, Luise and
Ida, who have been enjoying them-
selves all the afternoon in the old
forest glades, playing hide and seek
among the trees, where elves and gob-
lins are supposed to reside, and rest-
ing on the daisy-covered sward, which
is popularly believed to be the nightly
dancing ground of the fairies.

As they sat under a tree Haunchen
told them how once upon a time a
beautiful princess was walking there
and plucked a flower, when an ugly
little elf appeared and told her that
for taking a flower that belonged to
him she would be imprisoned in the
earth until some brave knight rescued
her. Her disappearance caused great
distress at the court, and her father
issued a proclamation that whoever

should find her should wed her, so
24



all the noble young knights in the
kingdom set out to look for the miss-
ing maiden, for she was very lovely,
and each one wished ‘to win her for
his bride.

In the Black Forest there lived a
shepherd, who, when he heard of the
King’s proclamation, determined to
find the princess, so he began to search
and never left off night or day. One
night as he was walking in a lonely
part of the forest, he heard cries of
distress, and running to see what
might be the matter, he saw a very
ugly little elf with his foot caught
fast in a trap; the youth set him free,
and the elf told him to follow him
and he would lead him to the prin-
cess. They entered a hollow in a
tree and went down, down a long
way until they reached a cavern
where the princess was sitting weep-
ing, surrounded by a number of ugly
little elves, but she dried her tears at
sight of her rescuer and gladly ac-
companied him. |

When the nobles saw that a com-
mon shepherd had succeeded where
they had failed, they were indignant
and the King at first refused to give
his daughter to a youth of low birth,
but he would take nootherreward, and
as the princess was willing, the King
made him a nobleman and they were
married and lived happy ever after.
















THE BLACK FOREST,






THE RIVALS.

ISS2TEAPOT
regret to say,
Is somewhat of
a, flirt,

And never pauses

to reflect
Whose feelings
she may hurt,
But showers all
her favors free





On any who may come to tea.

She mildly fusses with the cups,
And chats with Sugar Bowl,
She’s more than nice with Buttered
Toast,
And charming with a Roll;
And, just to keep her hand in, makes
Sweet eyes at Crackers, Jam and
Cakes.

The Kettle is a suitor bold,
Of temper quick and hot,
He fairly bubbles o’er with rage,

Whenever the Coffee Pot
26



Throws glances at his lady fair,
And ogles her with loving air.



But Teapot smiles on all around
And does not seem to know
That Kettles warm and glowing
heart

Is boiling o’er with woe;
For while he sings his sweetest tunes
She’s softly whispering with the
Spoons.

He squandered every cent he had,
A bouquet fine to buy,


THE RIVALS. 27

And with one finer still, he saw At last, with ratile, clash, and din,
His rival standing by; They tumbled head o’er heels,
And so, with many a spluttering sniff, | And loudly clattered down the stairs,
He strutted off in angry tiff. With hisses, groans and squeals,
Where John, the footman, saw their
plight,
Picked both swains up and stopped
the fight.

ead









Next day the Coffee Pot appeared
: Much meeker than before;
“Take her, and bless you
a... A both,” he said ;
They’d pass each otheron the stairs, “s “My courtin’ daysare o'er;
With frown, and scowl, and glare, If looks could only kill, ’'m sure And thus in peace we'll all abide.”

They'd both have died right there.

His rival thus, each afternoon, Teapot was beaming bright, .
Put Kettle sadly out of tune. As, smilingly, she gave her hand
One day, a little more than he’d stand, Unto her gallant knight,
The Coffee Pot, with sneer,
Had said, “A pretty Kettle, you,”
And laughed, with such ajeer
That Kettle gave an angry
scream,
And, then and there, let off his
steam.

And then they had it hot and
strong,
The blows so thickly fell
That which was Kettle,which was Pot,
You really could not tell,
While in a thick and murky stream | While Coffee Pot in best array,
The coffee mingled with the steam. | Was pleased to give the bride away.

The bridal morn dawned fair and clear,
THE KING’S CHILDREN.

HERE once lived a young prince
and princess who had never

been out of the magnificent parks
and ¢ .rdens which surrounded their
father’s palaces and who did not know
that there were people in the world
who suffered from poverty and misery.
They saw nothing but well-dressed
ladies and gentlemen at the court,
and thought that the whole world was
made up of such. One morning they
wandered away from their attendants
and came to a large hedge that they
did not remember having seen before.
“J wonder what is on the other
side of that hedge ?” said the Princess.
‘“‘ Let us goand see,” said the Prince,
and he parted the bushes so that they
could creep through; but instead of
flowers, and fountains, and beautiful
avenues of trees such as they had
left behind, they found themselves in
an uncultivated place, where the trees
were stunted, the ground all uneven,
_ and the grass only in poor dry little
patches, here and there. They walked
some distance and presently met a
friar dressed in a loose habit, and with
a staff in his hand. He recognized
the children of the King, but did not
tell them soand when they approached
they asked him where he was going.
He said “to visit a poor little child.”
“We will go with you,” said both

children at once, and they walked
28





along with the friar. Presently they
reached a humble little cottage, by
the dusty road-side, and the friar said
it was here that the poor child lived,
and they went in with him. Lying
on a bed, in one corner of a small
room, was a boy about the same age
as the Prince, whose sunken cheeks
and hollow eyes were a great contrast
to those of his visitor. A poorly clad
woman was sewing at the bedside,
and as they entered the sick boy
raised himself and said, feebly, but
joyfully :

“The Prince and Princess !”

They were surprised that he should
know them; but he said that he had
often watched them play in the pal-
ace gardens, and the friar told them
that the child was ill because his
mother was too poor to buy the good
food he needed, and his. father was
dead. They said they would send
him nice things, and a lot.of toys
from the palace, and come to see him
again, then the friar took them back
to the garden, where they found their
attendants in a terrible fright at their
absence. This visit taught them a
great deal, and they never forgot af-
terwards to visit and help the poor.

The little boy, through the kind-
ness of the Prince and Princess soon
regained his lost health and he and
his mother were lifted above want.
Z

Me. bD pr nal

Ni

1 , Wg Soy 4i
ii, - Ey
|

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cyl
ll
oS v
fe : ( feet
° eye!
er Ne a ai
alee

y
ANY Th i \
zi ‘ tle OP MINOT
WR Ally i |

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Be



THE PRINCE AND PRINCESS MEETING THE FRIAR.

29
MICHI.

F you were to find yourself dressed

in Japanese costume, you would
probably feel as though you were
about to perform a part in a play, and
the sight of people dressed in this
artistic manner generally carries our
thoughts to the theatre, and screens,
and papier mache trays. We do not
usually imagine Japanese girls as be-
ing particularly pretty, either, for
those we see in this country are mostly
of the lower orders and. working
classes, and naturally lack the refine-
ment that accompanies good breeding,
but if you were to visit Japan, you
would be surprised at the beauty or
the children and young girls of the
higher classes. Their dress, probably, '
has something to do with the agree-



able impression they make, as the soft
silken fabrics, with their pretty colors
and handsome embroideries are cer-
tainly very becoming, and while they
enhance the charm of a pretty face,
cannot fail to improve a plain one.
Little Michi Komara had a brother
who was studying at a college in this



country; he wrote her long and amus-
ing letters, describing his mode of life,
and related many incidents of his
companions, mentioning some of their
names so often that she got to feel
quite well acquainted with them.
Michi and her parents lived in Tokio

and there she attended the school for
30

noble girls, known as the Peeresses’
School, where she learned English,
and her correspondence with her
brother was always in that language.
She wasa pretty, demure littlemaiden,
fond of study and very industrious;
when not at school she was often to
be found seated on the floor embroid-
ering a kimono, or making some grace-
ful and dainty garment, using a paper
thimble, and a long needle, upon
which the material is run, the thread
being cut from the reel only when the
seam is finished. You would think
it strange to see people sewing like
that, but every country has its own
ways and customs.

Her parents always accorded a
hearty welcome to foreign visitors,
especially when they came from
America, for they felt that they had
been near the absent son and could
tell them something of the ways of
the country he was in, even if they
had never been near the town of his
college. On sunny days they used to.
sit in the garden, bright with cherry
and plum trees, and exchange ideas,
or tell stories, which is a great amuse-
ment with all Japanese, while the
ladies’ busy fingers would deftly ply
the needle, for they never remained
idle.

One warm afternoon, while they
were thus engaged, a young boy
_ MICHI. oe 31

named Haru, the son of an intimate | they might never see, but whose heart
friend, called to see them, and told | felt very warm toward them on ac-
them that he was

going to their son’s
college. This was
indeed news and was

heard with joy by all

the family. Haru Peace oS A § y) i,
said he would come 2 PN ee Bilis
tosay good-bye before

starting, and would
willingly take any-
thing they might like
to send. Michi made
a collection of Japan-
ese coins and medals
which she knew for-
eigners to be interest-
ed in, and placing
them in a little box,
with the names of
her brother’s favorite *
companionsattached,
she confided it with
many admonitions to
Haru, who promised
faithfully that they
would be delivered
safely into the hands
of her brother. A
long letter accompan- : ; aig Ce
ied the box, in which “SHE GAVE IT WITH MANY ADMONITIONS TO HARU.”
Michi said that she was sending to | count of the many kindnesses they
each of her brother’s friends a souve- | had shown towards the stranger, far
nir of a little Japanese maiden whom | from country and friends.


THE VALUE

HEN a boy has to work for
his money before he can
spend it, he soon learns to be careful
with it, but as long as he has only to
say, “Father, I want to buy so and
so,’ and the amount is handed over
to him, he is under the impression
that money is easy to get, and it does
not matter how much he may spend.
Sam. Greely was of this opinion, until
his father at last thought it time to
make him understand that money
was not to be got for the asking, so
one day when he calmly said that he
had broken his bicycle lamp and
wanted to buy another, he met with
rather an unexpected reply.

“You bought that lamp only two
months ago, Sam; how much did it
cost?”

“ Only a dollar and a half, father,
but they have beauties at two and a
half, and I should like to have one of
those.”

“Where do you suppose I am to
get two dollars and a half from,
boy?”

“Why, father, from the bank, I
suppose.” |

“ And don’t Ihave to earn it before
it goes to the bank? Don’t I work
hard every day ?”

“Yes, father, and so will I when
I’m a man.”

“Tf you don’t do any work until
32



OF MONEY.

you're aman, Sam, you won’t want to
do it then, so if you wish to have a
new lamp, you must earn the money
with which to buy it. You weed and
water the garden every day, and keep
it in good order, and I'll give you ten
cents a day, and as soon as you have
the necessary amount you can buy
any lamp you like.”

Sam would have liked to have his
lamp at once, as he could not go out
after dark without a light and he was
fond of taking a spin in the cool of
the evening, but the next day he
started to his work with a good will,
and for the first time in his life knew
what it was to work and wait for a
thing before getting it. He found,
too, that there were several other little
articles that he needed, and when he
mentioned them to his father he sim-
ply said, “ You can buy them all with
your earnings when you’ve enough.”
Sam decided that a dollar and a half
was quite enough to pay for a lamp
after all, and if you had seen how
careful he was with it, you would
surely have thought that it cost ten
dollars at the very least; in fact,
everything he had to pay for out of
his hard-earned money lasted so much
longer than formerly, that his father
congratulated himself on the good
idea he had had to make him learn
the value of money.






































































































“HE STARTED TO HIS WORK WITH A GOOD WILL.”

33
AN UNCOMFORTABLE POSITION.

O find oneself all alone and face

to face with a big black bear,
cannot be a particularly pleasant sen-
sation, and this meeting of a bear and
aman in a tree may give you an idea
as to how you would feel if you were
similarly situated. The man, a na-

tive servant, was traveling with his |

master and a party of hunters in

South America, and was quite as_
brave as any of them, but being sepa- |
| @ very narrow escape, and at sight

rated from the others he suddenly
saw a bear trotting towards him; he
fired at him but missed, and before
he could shoot again the animal was
so near him that he took refuge in a
tree. He knew that his enemy would,
in all probability, come up after him,
but expected to have time to prepare
himself and shoot him as he was in
the act of climbing; he did not reckon
upon any accidents, and when his
gun got caught in the branches and
was wrenched from his hand, you

may imagine his dismay; he went as |

far up the tree as he could, but that
dreadful form came nimbly up after
him; then he dodged about from
branch to branch until he found him-
self on the end of one that was not
very strong, and which he expected
every moment would break under his
weight; he felt sure that when the
bear reached him they would both

fall to the ground together, and rais-
34



ing his voice he made the woods echo
with his screams. Bruin followed
calmly, seeming rather surprised at
this unexpected noise. The two
stared at each other for a few seconds
and then the man had the happiness
of hearing the whiz of a bullet, then
another, and another, and the heavy
beast tumbled out of the tree with
a crash, just,as the hunting party
came running to the spot. It was

of the monster that lay stretched
upon the ground, they shuddered

| to think from what a dreadful fate

their faithful attendant had been
saved.
Although such a ferocious animal,

| the bear is easily tamed, and shows

great docility to its master. It is
capable of very strong affections, too,
and will sometimes grieve itself to
death when removed from a favorite
keeper. A large brown bear that had
been in captivity for ten years, hav-
ing the same keeper during the whole
of that time, was surprised one day
when its food was brought by a
stranger. It showed the greatest un-
easiness and refused to eat. Some of
the men who were accustomed to enter
his cage, at different times tried to
coax him by offering him dainties, but
he would take no notice of them, and
when they became too assiduous in
AN UNCOMFORTABLE POSITION. : 35

their attentions a low growl warned | strative in its affection, and he was
them that it would be safer to retire. | quite unaware that it was so fond of
At the end of a week his keeper, who | him. He was received with great joy

















‘ Nay
(ts e Sr
AN UNCOMFORTABLE POSITION.



Bae

pees Tel

ee
had gone to superintend the disem- | by his savage friend, who afterward
barking of a South African lion, re- | attacked its food with voracity, and
turned with his new charge and was | quickly made up for the time he had
surprised when he heard of the bear’s | lost in foolish grieving during the
conduct, for it had not been demon- | keeper’s absence.
A VISIT TO THE ZOO.

HE ape family is very numerous
and ranges from the mighty
gorilla of Africa, called by the natives
the “Wild Man of the Woods,” to
the little pet monkey we are all
familiar with. The gorilla, although

re-discovered in modern times, was |

certainly known to the ancients, be-
cause Hanno, a Carthaginian admiral
who lived about five or six hundred
years B.c., once sailed from Carthage
with a fleet of sixty vessels and
thirty thousand persons, under in-
structions to proceed past the Pillars
of Hercules (the Straits of Gibraltar),
and found colonies on the Western
coast of Africa, discovered several
islands inhabited by wild creatures
with hairy bodies. They pursued
them, but the males were so fleet of
foot, throwing stones at their pursu-
ers as they ran, that they could not
succeed in capturing a single one, but
they took three females who defended
themselves so violently that they
were obliged to kill them, but they
stuffed their skins with straw and
took them to Carthage, where no
doubt they excited a great deal of
curiosity and wonderment.

The male gorilla is literally the
king of the equatorial regions, being
feared by the natives much more than
the lion, and a hunter gives us a thril-

ling accountof his first encounter with
36



one of these formidable creatures.
As he and his party were pushing
through the most dense and impene-
trable part of the forest they heard
a noise as of some one breaking
branches, and suddenly, as they were
creeping along noislessly the woods
were filled with the tremendous bark-
ing roar of the gorilla; the under-.
brush swayed rapidly, and presently
an immense male gorilla stood before
them; he had been walking on all
fours, but on seeing the party stood
erect and looked them boldly in the
face; he was not afraid and beat his
breast until it resounded like a drum,
which is his mode of showing de-
fiance, giving vent to roar after roar.
His eyes flashed fire, and the crest of
short hair on his forehead twitched
rapidly, while his powerful fangs were
shown at every thunderous roar he
emitted. When at a distance of about
six yards he stopped, and as he be-
gan another roar was fired upon and
instantly killed.

The monkeys which Amy and Joe
are feeding in the Zoo are very differ-
ent to their savage relative, and are
very funny as they chatter, and play,
and quarrel with each other for the
dainties which the children pass to
them through the bars of their cage.
They make very lovable pets when
properly treated.
Yy

a

LL

Zs

Yo

ELA ep oa OLLI eceeeode

SS













A VISIT TO THE ZOO.
THE JACK-IN-THE-BOX.

alee done it! See here! What a
beauty ve made!

Here’s the box and the Jack, too;
though you were afraid

‘That try as I would, I should never
succeed—

You’re mistaken, you see, Miss! mis-
taken indeed.

Just look at his face, that Ive col-
ored with red!

Here’s a triumph for me, after all
that you said.

Such a nose as he has, and such
white, wooly locks—

I really am proud of my Jack-in-the-
box.

He’s a wonder, he is!
him in tight.
Now, Jack, double up; down you go
out of sight

So—I’ve got him all safe, till I open
the lid.

There, it opens again.
do as you're bid!

See, PI shut

Now, Jack,

What’s this? He won’t jump; what’s
the matter with him?
There’s his great wooly head only up

to the rim—
- 38



Just the rim of the box; yes, there
he has stopp’d,

When up with a jerk, you know, he
should have popp’d.

Can you guess what’s the matter,
Fan? What's that you say?

I’ve forgotten the spring? Nay then,
try as I may

I have failed after all, and this stupid
old thing

Is worth nothing—and just for the
want of a spring!

Little readers, how much that we
make and we do

Seems perfect at first, both to me
and to you.

We think we have done nicely, when
lo!

Some spring is forgotten; our Jack
will not go.

As the spring to the toy, so, children,
be sure

Is the strength of good motive, kind,
loving and pure,

To the deeds that you do.
spring does its part,

God blesses your work, and brings
joy to your heart.

If the
Ot an

MN TT i H mA A ll IW Het I AA



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A = sr

THE JACK-IN-THE-DOX.









































39








































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ae enormous quadruped is a

native of the various parts of |

Africa, and is always found in the
water, or in its near vicinity. Its
absolute height is not very remark-





‘THE HIPPOPOTAMUS.

is also dappled with a number of
sooty black spots, which cannot be
seen except on a close inspection.
A vast number of pores penetrate
the skin, and exude a thick oily li-

able, as its legs are extremely short; | quid, which effectually seems to

but the actual bulk of its body is
very great indeed. The average
height of a full-grown Hippopotamus
is about five feet. Its naked skin is
of a dark-brown, curiously marked
with innumerable lines like those on

“crackle ” china or oil paintings, and
40



protect the animal from the in-
jurious effects of the water in which
it is so constantly immersed. The
mouth is enormous, and its size
is greatly increased by the odd man-
ner in which the jaw is set in the
head.
1



THE HIPPOPOTAMUS. 41

Within the mouth is an array of | or otherwise irritated. The incisor
teeth of the lower jaw lie almost
horizontally, with their points di-

white, gleaming tusks, which have a
terrific appearance, but are solely in-





HIPPOPOTAMUS HUNT.
tended for cutting grass and other | rected forwards, and are said to be
vegetable substances, and are seldom | employed as crow-bars in tearing up-
employed as weapons of offence, ex- | the various aquatic plants on which
cept when the animal is wounded | the animal feeds. The canines are
42

very large and curved, and are worn
obliquely in a manner very similar
to the rodent type of teeth. Their
shape is a bold curve, forming nearly
the half of a circle, and their surface
is deeply channeled and ridged on
the outer line of the curve, and
smoother on the face.

The young Hippopotamus is not



WwW

NV



THE HIPPOPOTAMUS.

able to bear submersion so long as
its parent, and is, therefore, carefully
brought to the surface at short inter-
vals for the purpose of breathing.
During the first few months of the lit-
tle animal’s life it takes its stand on its
mother’s back, and is borne by her
above or through the water, as experi-
ence may dictate, or necessity require.

oS














A FAMOUS FUR TRADER.

ieee trading of furs has been for | entirely to the fur trade. He made

many years a source of profit
not only to the men who engage in
it, but also to the countries where
the furs are produced. One of the



musical instruments with his brother
in London, and when quite a young
man came to Baltimore to dispose of
some of his instruments, which he













































































































































































































































JOHN JACOB ASTOR TRADING WITH THE INDIANS.

most successful fur traders the world
has ever known was John Jacob
Astor, who was born in humble cir-
cumstances in Germany, in the his-
toric village of Heidelberg. His first
experience was purely accidental,
and led to his devoting himself

exchanged for furs in New York, and
returning to London with his stock,
disposed of it to such advantage that
he speedily made another trip.

He invested largely in real estate
in New York, where he made his

home until his death, in 1848.
43
A HARD LOT.

HE unhappy condition of the
Eskimo dogs has been remarked

with wonder by travellers to these
uncongenial regions. They are left
always in the open air, and receive
nothing in the slightest degree ap-
proaching a caress or a kind word.
Their chief use is to draw sledges
which are the only possible convey-
ances in that frozen land, and they
could not be replaced, for horses and
cattle are quite useless in journeys

over ice and snow, while a pack of |

light, active dogs, make their way
over all difficulties with the most
wonderful ease and safety.

No reins are used in driving them,
the voice and a long whip which has
a lash eighteen or twenty feet long
while the handle measures only one
foot answers all purposes. By throw-
ing this whip on one side or the other
of the leader, and repeating certain
words, the animals are guided or
stopped, and can be made to turn a
corner as cleverly as horses; when
the sledge is stopped the whip is
thrown gently over their backs when
' they immediately lie down, and will
remain quietly in this position until
their master returns to them.

Their powers of endurance are
great, and the cold seems to have

little or no effect upon them, for they
44



will pass the night without shelter in
the most severe weather with as little
concern as if it were mild. Three of
these dogs can draw a man and a
sledge at the rate of one mile in six
minutes, while a larger team will draw
very heavy loads at a correspondingly
quick rate. They bark and fight all
the time, and the instant one of them
feels the lash on his back, he relieves.
his feelings by wreaking hisvengeance
on his nearest companion, whose ears
he will snap at savagely. Their
drivers make a most unmelodious
noise too, shrieking and vociferating
as they dexterously manipulate the
long whip, so that to meet one of these
strange teams on a dark night, with
the driver running and gesticulating
alongside would give one the idea of
some uncanny being from the other
world, driving a pack of ghostly
wolves.

Their savage natures are not to be
wondered at when their surroundings
are considered, for they are half
starved by their masters during the
long winter, and left to shift for
themselves in summer when their
services are not required, and it is to
be regretted that animals who ren-
der such valuable assistance to their
owners should be so little appre-
ciated.


. A HARD LOT.
A BRAVE DEED.

ae hardly seems possible that a girl

of sixteen should save nearly
fifty people from a terrible death, and
yét that is what Grace Bussell did.
She is often called the Grace Darl-
ing of Australia, and when you have
heard her story, I am sure you will
say she deserves the name. Grace
lived with her parents in Western
Australia, and her father was one of
the first settlers near the Swan River.
She used to help in many ways. She
would ride twenty miles a day with
the cattle, and was as much at home
in the saddle as she was in the
kitchen.

Before you can quite understand
what a wonderful work this girl did
one day, you must remember that,
twenty years ago the towns in new
settlements in Australia were very
far apart, and people had often to
ride for miles to call on their next-
door neighbor.

Now it happened one day in De-
cember, 1876, that a vessel was
wrecked off the coast about eight
miles from the Bussells’ home. The
steamboat sprang a-leak, and not
being far from land, the captain tried
to steer her in. But it was of no
avail; she ran aground, and there
she stayed, with the water gradually
flowing into her. The lifeboat which

was on board the steamer was low-
46



ered, but it leaked, too, and was so
difficult to manage, that eight people
who had ventured in it were drowned.
So the rest of the crew clung to the
steamer and wondered whether they
could ever be saved. The surf ran
so wildly that no one could dare to
swim through it, and there was not
a house or a person in sight. But
help was near, though they knew it
not. The girl of sixteen was riding
along with a native servant. She
caught sight of the vessel in distress,
and turning her horse’s head towards
the coast, she started at a quick gal-
lop. When she reached the sea, she
urged her horse into the angry surf.
She rode boldly on till she reached
the vessel. With much difficulty
she took some of the children in her
arms, and put them before her on
the saddle; then, with women and
bigger children clinging to her dress,
she started for the shore, gave those
she had rescued to the care of the na-
tives, and returned once more to the
wreck. So she went backwards and
forwards for four hours, till all were
safe on land, the servant having rid-
den to bring out the last man. Tired
and wet as the girl was, she had still
something more to do. Those forty-
eight people whom she had rescued
must have food and protection of
some sort before night came on. So
A BRAVE DEED.

47

Grace rode home for help;.but by ; Humane Society, which was pre-

the time she had gone the eight | sented to her.

After this wherever

miles, she was so worn out herself, she went the story of her heroism



GRACE BUSSELL’S HEROIC DEED.

that she fainted, and was some time
before she could tell what had hap-
pened. Her married sister started
off at once with food and wraps for
the shipwrecked people, and the next
day they were all taken to Mr. Bus-
sell’s house.

You will agree with me that Grace
well deserved the medal of the Royal

went with her, and people never
tired of tellmg it; but she found the
greatest satisfaction in the thought
that she had rescued so many people.
You may not be so fortunate as to
win a medal and have your name
talked about far and near, but to do
what you can for others and be a
help to them will make you happy.






































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE

Ji the handsomely-furnished study

of a gentleman who is the father
of two inquisitive lads, a beautiful
bear-skin of a yellowish white color
is spread upon the floor. This rug

was sent by a friend who bought it

while traveling in Lapland. Seme
weeks after its arrival the traveler
himself came on a visit, and almost as
soon as he entered the house he was
assailed with questions from our two
young friends, who were under the
impression that he had killed the
bear himself, and that the skin was a
trophy of his own courage and dar-
ing. While modestly disclaiming
any right to this honor he told the
boys that he had bought it from the
man who had killed the bear, and
would tell them its history if they

would like to hearit. They immedi-
48

HISTORY OF A BEAR-SKIN.











ately begged him to do so, and he
began :

“You must know, my little friends,
that the natives of Lapland have to
work harder, and expose themselves
to more dangers than any other peo-
ple in the world, to earn their daily
bread. They are obliged to move
constantly from place to place, taking
their families with them, and travel-
ing in rude sledges drawn by rein-
deer. They keep near the sea coast,
and go on hunting and fishing ex-
peditions, realizing large sums from
the sale of furs and the oil from the
cod. The flesh of these animals they
eat, and great is the joy that reigns
in the camp when a hunting party
returns well laden.

“The man who killed that bear was
traveling with others, and had taken
THE HISTORY OF A BEAR-SKIN.

his two little boys with him. One
day as they were returning from a
fishing excursion they saw two im-
mense polar bears on a floe of ice.
They had left the boys in a safe place
on another large floe that
had frozen to the shore

49:

lowed by a horrible death. Our
friends could, therefore, do nothing
until within close range of the bear,
and in the meantime they trembled
for the safety of the children, whom





























































































































































and seemed a part of the











































































land, telling them to









































cook some fish by their

































































































return. On seeing the















































































































































































two animals they deter-





























































































































mined not to let such a































































































































chance slip, and instead =



























































of returning straight to
camp they got on to the
floe and killed them.
It snowed for a little
while as they rowed =
back with their treasure, ~
and as it cleared away,
what was their horror,
while yet at some dis-
tance, to see a huge white
bear in the act of scrambling out of
the water within a few feet of the
defenceless children !

“Thenativesdo notshoot the bears,
but kill them with a short pole, which
has an iron spike at one end. They
have to get very close to the animal
to use this weapon, which they
plunge into its heart; it is most des-
perate and dangerous work, as the
slightest mistake is likely to be fol-

4























they could see crouched against the
rocky ice in terror. As they drew
near the unwelcome visitor noticed
the approach of his natural enemy,
and diving quickly under the water,
disappeared. The men felt too glad
to see him depart to care about fol-
lowing, and after a warm greeting
between them and the boys, all sat
down to ahearty meal. The next
day they started out to hunt for the
























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































==
S=

=

ee s>

eS:

5 =
==

it

NWELCOME VISITOR.

AN U
THE HISTORY OF A BEAR-SKIN. 51

intruder, and seeing him on a floe
near by, went afterhim. The father
of the boys soon succeeded in killing
him, and after depositing him in the
boat, which they had made fast, they
started off again to continue the
hunt. As they were walking along,
to their consternation, the floe sud-
denly parted, and they found them-
selves on a small portion of it float-
ing out to sea, their boat firmly se-
cured to the larger piece, which was
stationary. They floated thus for
two days without a particle of food,
and on the third day, just as they
had abandoned themselves to the
most bitter despair, a sailing vessel
hove in sight, which they hailed joy-
fully. They were taken on board,



and soon returned to their camp.
The boat had been found by their
companions, who, although accus-
tomed to these adventures, were be-
ginning to fear for their safety,

“T came across them some months
later, and seeing that this particular
skin was an exceptionally fine one,
offered to buy it, when the man told
me how nearly it had cost the lives
of five brave men, and introduced me
to the little lads who had had such
a narrow escape from its claws.”

The boys thanked their father’s
kind friend for telling them all these
things, and said that they would
think much more of the bear-skin
now that they knew how many lives
had been risked in obtaining it.


FRIENDS AGAIN.

LL boys—and girls, too, for that
matter—know what it is to
have a sweet tooth, and I am sure

that most of my young readers would |

have done exactly as Jack Jones did
when his father gave him a nickel
for weeding the garden. He made a
straight line for Mr. Smith’s candy
store around the corner, and invested
his newly-acquired and hard-earned
coin in butter-scotch. He met his
school-chum Dick as he was leaving
the store, and as they always went
shares with each other, they stood near
the window and munched the candy.
While they were thus pleasantly
employed, Joe Blake, who had quar-

relled with Jack the day before, came —

strolling by, his hands in-his pockets.

Now Joe had said some very un-_
pleasant things to Jack during this |
quarrel, which was over a game of |
They had both lost their |

base-ball.
tempers, but Jack knew that he was
in the right, and when Joe called him
a sneak and a cheat, it was as much
as he could do to keep from hitting
him. He had to walk right away
and leave him, or there would surely

have been some blows exchanged, |

and he wished to avoid this, for he

was very fond of Joe, who was|
y 9

really a nice boy, but apt to lose his
temper rather quickly. He was al-

ready sorry for what he had said, and
52

| wanted to say so, but was afraid that
Jack would not speak to him, so
walked past without taking any no-
tice. He was presently much sur-
prised to hear Jack call after him,

“T say, Joe, come here.”

He turned round, and Jack con-
tinued :

“Open your mouth and shut your
eyes.”

Joe did quickly as he was told, and
a big lump of delicious butterscotch
was thrust into his open mouth, and
so warmed. his heart towards Jack,
that he shook hands with him; and
begged his forgiveness for having
called himasneak. Jack forgave him
very readily, and the three boys went
down the street together, the best of
friends once more, and quite forgot all
their little quarrels and angry words
over that five cents’ worth of butter-
scotch. When they parted, Joe said
that the next time his father gave him
any money, he would come and tell
them both, and they would all go to
| Mr. Smith’s together, and buy what-
_ ever Jack should choose.
| It was very much better to make

up a foolish quarrel in this agreeable

manner than to pass each other by
without speaking, and I am sure you
will agree that as Jack’s butterscotch
had such a good effect, the nickel
could not have been better invested.








“OPEN YOUR MOUTH AND SHUT YOUR EYES.”

53
SKATE SAILING IN DENMARK.

HERE is no people more devoted
to out-door sports than the
Danes, those brave and hardy de-
scendants of the Vikings of old, who
boast that they have never been sub-
jugated by any other nation, and
whose sons still rank amongst the
best and most fearless sailors who
brave the perils of the stormy deep.
The Danish children, and especi-
ally the boys, learn to skate almost
as soon as they can walk, and in
their agility on the ice resemble their
Dutch cousins. It is acommon sight
in winter to see quite a little boy rac-
ing on skates, both with sails, as in
the picture, and without. Their dex-
terity is simply marvelous; they cut
the most graceful figures, dance quad-
rilles, and whirl about, making the
most difficult curves with the ease of
a bird on the wing, and these sturdy
little fellows, with their innocent,
rosy faces and forget-me-not blue eyes,
handle their canvas with the skill
and assurance of old salts, steering
themselves with the neatest accuracy,
and winding through the throngs of
skaters as cleverly as a driver guides
his horses through a crowded city.

I am sure you would enjoy sceing |

a skate-sailing contest, and would feel
at once that you would like to join
the skaters.

in a row together on the ice; their
54



All the boys are placed |

sails are fastened to their backs by
straps which cross over the chest, and
each one has his own little pennant
flying at the top. The starter drops
the national flag which he has held
aloft in his hands, and off they go.

| The crowds who line the banks shout

and cheer as they pass. Some fall
down, some fail to work their sails
properly, while the others rush past
with such speed that it is hard to say
which will come in first. As they near
the winning post, flying along like
huge birds with their wings outspread,
the cheers and shouts become deafen-
ing, and the happy boy who is declared
the winner, receives a grand ovation.
Sometimes ae King and Queen wit-
ness these sports, and give the prizes
to the victorious young heroes, who
for the rest of the day are objects of
the most intense admiration, espe-
cially to the very small boys, whose
highest ambition itis to do likewise.

If ever you go to Denmark you
may make the acquaintance of some
of these young skaters, and you will
then see with what delight they will
show you the trophies they have won
on the ice. No old soldier, displaying
the medals which he has earned at
the risk of his life in deadly battle, is

-more proud of his honors than these

hardy children of the North are of
their skating victories,
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































SKATE SAILING IN DENMARK,

55
A YOUTHFUL GENIUS.

LL boys like to see a heavy fall
of snow, because then they
know that there is fun of all kinds
in store for them—sliding, skating,
sleighing and snow-balling. Sam
Ford, although only a little country
lad, was the recognized artist of the vil-
lage school. No one could draw such
funny pictures as he, his dogs, and
horses, and cows, being the most won-
derful things you ever saw, while his
portraits of the schoolmistress never
failed to make all the children roar.
Of course, when the snow came,
it was only natural that Sam should
be called upon to turn his talents to
account in modeling a snow man,
and this he did so cleverly, making
such an exact portrait of Mr. Smith,
the candy man, that that gentleman,
after seeing it, presented him with a
box of chocolate as a reward for his
artistic abilities. Thus encouraged,
Sam set to work diligently, and soon
had a complete gallery of snow men,
representing the different dignitaries
of the village, from the parson to
the policeman. They stood in ghostly
solemnity. in front of the school-
house, where their originals came to
look at them and pass opinions on
Sam’s extraordinary cleverness. Af-
ter a time, however, the thaw set in,
and the hot sun soon began to melt

the snow men; first, the corners of
56



their hats disappeared, then their
noses dropped off, until at last there
remained nothing but shapeless heaps
of dirty sloppy snow.

Sam was so grieved at seeing all
his fine creations melt away in this
manner, that he, too, was on the
point of melting—into tears. Ils
fame, however, had spread, and a
gentleman who had seen and ad-
mired the gallery in its first beauty,
was so struck by the talent shown in
the modeling that he made inquiries
about Sam, and when he heard that
he was an orphan living with an
aunt, who was very poor, and had
several children of her own, he
placed him in the studio of a clever
sculptor, who took a great interest.
in him, and finding him a very apt.
pupil, treated him as though he were
his own son, sending him to school,
and teaching him in his studio, where
he is making such progress that his.
friends hope some day that he will be
known to the world as a famous artist.

Many great men whose names will
live forever have begun life in a much
more humble condition than Sam,
because genius and industry are not
confined to any one rank, and never
fail to make a mark in the world, no .
matter how lowly and poor the person ‘
may be who is fortunate enough to
possess such gifts.




































































































































































































































FINISHING TOUCHES.
AN AMATEUR BOAT-BUILDER.

OST boys like playing with
boats, so that no notice as a

rule is taken of their indulging in this
pastime, even when they prefer it to
all others. It is generally supposed
that on growing older the passion for
ships and all things pertaining to a
sailor’s life will be gradually forgotten
and the fascinating employment of
boat-building be looked upon by the
big boy as something much too child-
ish for him to indulge in; the vessels
that occupied so many long summer
days in constructing, and cost their

youthful designers so many anxious |

moments, find new owners or are care-
less!y cast aside as so much rubbish,
and new schemes, and studies, and
amusements fill up the time once
given to the rounding of masts and
shaping of sails.

This is not the case with every boy,
however, as Howard Watson proved.
He never saw the sea until he was nine
years old, and his only ideas of boats
were gathered from pictures, but he
no sooner had his first peep at the
boundless, briny ocean, with its myr-
iads of craft of all kinds, sailing, row-
ing and steaming about, than all the
games he had loved so much until
then were forgotten, and boat-sailing
and boat-building became his one oc-
cupation. He made friends with an

old boatman, who used to take him
58



out, and gave him his first lessons in
shaping the hull of a vessel, and the

first time that he completed one en-

tirely, he invited his father and mother
to come and assist at the launching.
He went before and arranged with the
boatman to take them on the water,
so that they could watch his little
yacht better, then he waited on the
pier until his father and mother ar-
rived. The yacht was declared a
great success, and was named the
Alice Mary, after his mother.

Years after, when he was a grown
man and his name was known all
over the world as famous boat-builder
and designer, that same little yacht
occupied a prominent place in the
drawing-room of his proud and happy
mother, who showed it to everyone
as her son’s first effort, and she would
tell them how she thought it was
only a new pastime that would be
abandoned for another as soon as
they returned home, but little did
his parents imagine when the doctor
advised them to take him to the sea-
shore for a few weeks that they
were planning the boy’s whole fu-
ture life for him, and that this short
stay near sailors and shipping was
to be the means of bringing out his
true genius and cause him to be-
come one of the most successful men
of the day.






































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































‘eN

\ \\\ \\\
\ AK

YS

\

iN

\\ \\

A
XY



AN AMATEUR BOAT-BUILDER.
IN THE TWILIGHT.

HE children always have a plea- | there?” and was answered by a weak

sant hour with mother before
the curtains are drawn and the lamps
lit up for the evening. This is the
time she usually chooses for telling

them a story, and sometimes they |

will sit and watch the coals in the
fire and tell each other what they see
there.



|

voice, that said, “ For pity’s sake take
me in,” and a poor old man tottered
into the doorway. He was so weak
he could hardly stand, and his long
white beard was covered with snow.
They took him in, and placing him
in father’s chair by the parlor fire,
gave him a hot cup of tea and some-

One night it was snowing very hard | thing to eat.

and grew dark early, so mother gath-

When he had warmed himself he

ered her little ones round the fire | told them that he had started out to
and they began looking for“ pictures,” | visit his son, who had met with an
as they calledthem. The baby could | accident while driving a wagon, hav-
not understand this, so Ralph had to ing been knocked off his seat by a

keep her amused with some toys.
Katie saw a big house in the fire,
with pillars, and gates, and trees;
then Ralph looked at it and presently
an army of little soldiers came and

pressed up against the pillars, and
the lovely edifice tumbled down,
| came home he was surprised to see

burying the soldiers in its ruins.

They were expressing their regret
at this catastrophe when their mother
put up her finger and said, “ Hush!
What is that strange sound?”

They listened attentively, and a
distressed moan came faintly from the
window, which Ralph immediately
opened; but such a cloud of snow
came drifting in that he had to shut
it again quickly, and their mother,
giving Ralph the baby, went to the

door. She called out, “Who is
60

runaway horse.

|



The old man lost
his way in the storm, and said he was
guided to the house by the firelight
dancing on the window-panes, and
the children told him howthey always
sat like that every evening before
closing the shutters. When father

his chair occupied, and said that he
knew the old man’s son, and had been
to see him before coming home. He
was getting on nicely, and the owner
of the runaway horse was going to
compensate him for his injuries and
loss of work. This was good news
for the old man, whom they kept all
night, and the next morning being
bright and clear, he was able to pro-
ceed safely, expressing his deepest
gratitude for their kindness to him.


















































IN THE TWILIGHT. 61
A KITCHEN QUEEN.

asked todoany-
thing about the
I, house, or assist
in the kitchen,







GyA t |
Z|
=|
SZ \

consider them-
selves much in-
gas jured persons.
They seem to
think that such
things should be
attended to by
their mother and the servant, and if
they learn their lessons nothing else
should be expected of them, and the
rest of their time should be devoted
to amusing themselves, calling upon
their friends, curling their hair, and

so forth, anything in the way of |

housework being looked upon as far
beneath them. They do not mind
seeing their mothers work, though,
and instead of offering to help her, if
they have the slightest suspicion that

she means to ask them to do any- |

thing for her, they contrive to sneak
quietly out of the way, taking good
care not to be visible until they are
sure the disagreeable work is done.
Lucy Morse was not like this, al-
though I am sure she was smarter at
her lessons, and cleyerer, and much
prettier, than most of the vain, idle
62

seem always to.



eirls, who loll about looking at their
mothers working forthem. She was
very fond of music, for which she had
great talent, and was learning to play
the violin. I will not say that she
liked housework, because she did not,
very few people do, but it was to be
done, and it is not fair that one per-
son should be a slave while another
sits around in a rocker, enjoying the
fruits of another’s labor.

Lucy’s parents were not rich, they
could not afford to keep even one
servant, and deprived themselves of
many comforts to pay for the music
lessons which were such a source of
pleasure to them all, and the little
girl did all in her power to help them.

“T will be your servant, mother,
until you can afford to keep one,”
she used to say, and she would do
all the running up and down stairs,
and save her mother hundreds of
steps every day, besides doing so
many other useful things, that her
father called her the Kitchen Queen.

Her great ambition was to have a
nice good violin, as the one she had
was a cheap one that her father had
given her, but it was the best he

could afford, and she was very thank-

ful for it; but she was taken once to
hear the great Sarasate, and since
then her instrument did not seem the
same to her. At Christmas it was
A KITCHEN QUEEN.

announced that a musical contest was
to be held, and among other prizes
some mysterious donor had given a
FZ beautiful old violin to be
awarded to the best play-
er under fifteen years of
This news was
hailed with
2 delight by
=/<= all the young
“““ musicians of
the townand
our Lucy, of
course, en-
tered the lists
with quite a
large number
of other girls
of about her own age, and started to
practice hard for the event.

The day before the contest her
mother fell ill and could not leave
her bed, so, instead of being at her
music, Lucy had to attend to the
duties of the house and wait upon
her sick mother. The next day she
was no better, and although Lucy
knew that the fact of not practising
for two whole days would injure her
prospects for winning the prize, she
set to work and cleaned the house,
then she took some eggs and milk
and made a nice custard for her
' mother, after which she peeled the
potatoes and prepared everything for
dinner. Then she found time to









age.



63

practise for a couple of hours before
starting.

When she went to say good-bye to
her mother she did not tell her that
she was afraid she had not gone over
her music enough, because she knew
that it would upset her to think that
her illness had prevented her from
winning the prize; but she said, cheer-
fully: “I am g-ing to do my best,
and if anyone else does better they
will deserve the violin, and I shall
try and not feel very disappointed if
I fail to win it.”

The hall was crowded, and many
people who knew Lucy wished for
her success.
She felt ner-
vous, and¢
some of the \
contestants
who played
before her:
did so well
that she al-
most gave fi Sa
up hope, but fA —
as soon asf
she began to~
play she forgot her nervousness, and
the applause that followed her per-
formance told her that she had done




| well; but she did not dream that she

had won until a solemn-iooking gen-
tleman placed the much-coveted vio-
lin in her hand.
A FORMIDABLE ENEMY.

T]HE leopard is much distinguished | hunters shot at and wounded the leo-

by the beauty of his rich fawn-
colored coat, which is thickly dotted
with spots of a darker shade.
does not, as a rule, show any special
hostility to man unless he is attacked,
but is the terror of all defenceless
animals, such as horses, asses and
goats. He is such an agile climber,
too, that it is useless to seek refuge
from him in a tree, and like all mem-
bers of the cat family, he taxes a

great deal of killing, seeming to pos-.

sess the usual nine lives with which
we credit the whole tribes of felines.

Some travelers in South Africa
‘were returning one evening from a
hunting expedition, when a succession
of strange sounds caused them to
turn their horses in the direction of a
mountain ravine. There they saw a
beautifully marked leopard clinging
to the back of an equally beautiful
zebra that galloped about furiously,
braying loudly, and evidently beside
himself with pain and terror. He
passed the hunters like a flash of
lightning, bearing his ferocious enemy
on his back, in which the cruel fangs
had made a deep wound, while the
strong sharp claws were buried deep
in his flesh. Streams of blood were
pouring from the frightened animal,
leaving a long trail behind as he

bounded over the ground. One of the
64

He |

|



_pard, when with frantic ferocity it

left its victim, and springing upon its
assailant, tore him from his horse,
tearing his face and arms with its
claws. The other hunter, seeing the
danger of his friend, sprang from his
horse and shot at the beast, but the
bullet seemed to have no effect. The
infuriated animal immediately left
the prostrate man, and attacking his
second enemy, shook him as a dog
would shake a rat. The shock stupe-
fied him, and he lay unable to move
hand or foot, although dimly conscious
of what was going on around him. His
companion sprang up and fired again,
when the leopard returned and re-
newed the attack upon him, but at
this moment the bullets fortunately
took effect, and the brute fell down
dead.

They found the zebra in an ex-
hausted condition from loss of blood,
and securing it, took it home with
them and dressed its wounds, but, as
it is impossible to tame this animal,
as soon as it had recovered, they al-
lowed it to return to its beloved
mountains, where it is to be hoped it
was allowed to roam about freely and
lead a pleasant, peaceful existence
without being again attacked by any .
of its savage and formidable com-
panions.


LEOPARD ATTACKING A ZEBRA.

65
A NOBLE ACTION.

OU would not think to look at

little Edith Scott that she was
very brave. She is so small, and
slender, and delicate-looking, that she
appears even younger than her eight
years. No one knew what a noble
heart she possessed until the house
caught fire. It was one bitter cold
night in winter; they had all gone to
bed, and were sleeping peacefully,
when all at once the cry of “ Fire”
rang out, waking them in a fright.
The engines, with their galloping

horses, were quickly on the scene,’

and it was thought that all were got
out safely, when, at a top window,
from which flames were darting, Edith
appeared, holding her baby brother,
Eustace, in her arms. A cry of horror
went up from the crowd below; the
frantic parents, who thought the chil-
dren were safe, they themselves
having been carried out nearly suffo-
cated by the dense smoke, implored
some one to save them. A ladder
was placed against the wall, and a
brave, strong man went up to fetch
the little ones. When he reached
them, Edith thrust her brother into
his arms saying, “Take Eustace first.”

The man grasped the child, and
whispering some words of encourage-
ment to Edith, ran half way down
the ladder, and dropped his light

burden, which was caught by the
66



many willing hands outstretched to
receive it. He re-ascended the ladder
with all possible speed to rescue the
brave little sister, standly calmly at
her post. He was only just in time,
for as he placed her on the ground
the blazing roof fell in, and had she
stayed there another minute, she
would have met a horrible death in
the burning pile.

How thankful they were to be to-
gether once more, and with what joy
the happy parents embraced the chil-
dren whom they feared they were
about to lose in such a terrible man-
ner! When they looked at the black-
ened ruins of their pretty home they
could not help feeling a pang of regret,
but the sight of the children, safe and
unhurt, gave them much more happi-
ness than the most beautiful home in
the world could have done had they
lost them. Kustace is too little now
to understand all that his sister did
for him, but when he is older, and
they tell him of her noble action, he
will love her all the more for having
risked her life to save his.

Edith does not seem to think that
she has done anything at all wonder-
ful, and is surprised that people should
look upon her as a heroine, for she
considers that she only did what was
right in saving her brother before
thinking of herself.




























TAKE EUSTACE FIRST.

67
A LITTLE BOOK-WORM.

UBY NORTH was much more
fond of reading than of play,
. and at school, when her companions
were enjoying their recreation by
running and playing games, she was
generally to be seen sitting in a cor-
ner of the play ground with a book
in her hand. This habit earned for
her the title of “the Book-worm,”
but that was a nick-name she did
not mind in the least, and as long as
the girls left her alone, and did not
force her from her beloved books to
join in their play she did not care
what they called her. She was not
naturally selfish, and would have
been surprised had anyone told her
that when she refused to play with
them, she was acting selfishly in
seeking only to please herself.

One afternoon they had a half
holiday, and Ruby settled herself
down in the drawing room, with a
new book that had lately been given
her, promising herself a nice, long,
uninterrupted read until supper time.
She had not got through many
pages when the door bell rang,
and the maid came in to tell her
that Florrie Miller wanted to see
her.

“ How tiresome,” muttered Ruby,
but she received the little girl po-
litely, although not as affectionately

as she might have done.
68



“Oh Ruby,” began Florrie, “Netta
feels ill this afternoon, and has sent
me to ask you if you would come
and stay with her a little while.”

Now Netta was Florrie’s lame sis-
ter, and she had to sit in a wheel
chair all day, and could not play
with the others; Ruby felt very
sorry for the poor little sufferer, but
she did not like leaving her book,
and was just framing an excuse,
when Florrie, after a pause, spoke
again.

“She has that bad pain in her
back, and she says you make her
forget it, because you tell her such
nice stories.”

On hearing this, Ruby’s sympathy
for the little cripple gained the day.
She looked regretfully at her book,
but only for a second.

“T will take my new book, and
show it her,” she said, “it is full of
lovely stories and pictures, and I am
sure she will enjoy it.” Then she
put on her hat and went with Florrie.
The joy with which Netta welcomed
her quite rewarded her for the little
sacrifice she had made, and she
thanked her so sweetly for giving
up her reading to come and sit with
her, that Ruby felt ashamed to think
she had hesitated a moment, and re-
solved that she would never be so
selfish again.
ne i HEC i

ia



A LITTLE BOOK-WORM, 69
A LAZY DAY.

OW happy and contented Bert
looks as he lies on the soft,
cool grass near the edge of the stream,
lazily angling for fish. Old Cesar is
enjoying himself too, and looks as if
he would like to put his paw in the
jar and take those little fellows out,
but he knows if he did that his mas-
ter would be angry with him, and as
he loves him better than anyone else
in the world, he does not wish to of-
fend him. Bert and Cesar have been
friends and companions for a long
time, ever since they were both wee,
toddling things, when Bert used to
try to carry the fat, heavy puppy,
and pull his ears and tail, which
Cesar got used to in a way, but he
never liked it. He grew so fast that
he was a big, strong dog while his
master was still a tottering little baby,
falling down at almost every step he
took.

When they were both about three
years old, Bert was playing in that
very meadow where you see him now,
which is quite close to the house.
Cesar was with him, of course, and
the two were running after a daz-
zling butterfly that seemed to take
as much pleasure in the chase as its
pursuers, almost letting them touch
its beautiful wings, then soaring above
their heads or fluttering away among

the tall grass. Bert got excited over
70





the race, the butterfly flew towards
the river, boy and dog. followed
blindly, when splash! Bert went
right into the water. Cassar imme-
diately abandoned all pursuit of the
butterfly, and had dashed after him
before he had time to sink. He soon
brought him safely to land and
dropped him on to the grass; he was
very much frightened, but otherwise
none the worse for his bath, and as
soon as he recovered his breath, set

up such a terrific screaming that the

fields and woods rang and echoed
with the sound. His mother, hear-
ing the noise, ran quickly to the
meadow, and nearly fainted on see-
ing her darling son streaming with
water, while Cesar’s coat was pour-
ing off cataracts. She carried him
home tenderly, while Cesar followed,
barking and dancing joyously. Of
course she knew what had happened,
and since then Cesar is considered
quite as one of the family and treated
accordingly by all who have the
honor of his acquaintance.

He seems to be quite aware of his
importance, too, and whenever he
sees Bert prepare to go out he imme-
diately follows, and looks as if he
would say,

“Tt would never do for you to go
without me, for if you did, something
dreadful would certainly happen.”






















































A LAZY DAY. >
COCK-A-DOODLE-DO.

caret OCK-A-DOODLE-DO,
: cock-a-doodle-do,”
sang Rooster
Bob, as he
perched upon
the dust bin,
while the



at him admir-
ingly and the
other roosters
tossed their
combs with
envy. Hewas
certainly
very fine bird, big and strong, and
handsome, and it was not surprising
that the hens admired him, or that
his companions envied and hated him,
although I do not think they would
have shown their dislike so openly
had he been more modest, but he
strutted about in such a conceited
fashion, looking at them so disdain-
fully, and even the lusty “cock-a-
doodle-do” seemed to say scornfully,
“T am superior to you all, and you
know it,” and they did know it, that
was where the bitterness came in, for
although. they tried to imitate his
lordly strut, and nearly broke a blood-
yessel every time they made an effort
to send forth a cock-a-doodle-do like
his they only succeeded in making
themselves ridiculous. The hens
72

a

hens gazed |



made fun of them, and when their
voices crackled as they were crowing,
a loud and derisive cackle would
cover them with confusion, and make
them wish they had never been born.

They were always shut up safely
at night in a warm shed because
foxes used sometimes to prowl around,
and not very far off was a small
colored settlement, the younger mem-
bers of which were just as dangerous
where poultry was concerned as the
the trickiest fox. Just before Christ-

mas the farm boys made a wondrous

snow man at the back of the shed,
putting a snow-ball on his head for a
hat, and sticking an old broom into
his arms for a gun, and so he stood
like a sentry keeping guard.

George Washington Johnson was
one of the most promising youths of
the afore-mentioned colored settle-
ment, and although he did not imitate
his great namesake as closely as he
might have done in trifles like the
cherry tree incident, he was looked
upon by his companions generally
as a “great boy.” Now George
Washington had unfortunately a
greater affection for poultry than his
means would allow him to indulge in,
and as he was walking home one
evening a particularly musical cock-
a-doodle-do brought before his mind’s
eye visions of roast chicken that
COCK.A-DOODLE-DO. 73

made his mouth water. He spotted George Washington put his fat.
the shed, and mentally resolved to | young chickens into his bag and noise-
return later with a bag and kindly | lessly departed. He went round an-
relieve the owner of the trouble and | other way, when there suddenly















































































































































































EBIENe
expense of feeding so many chickens, | appeared before him a silent ghostly
by helping himself to what his | apparition that caused him to drop his:
stomach craved for. bag with a yell and take to his heels.

It was an admirable night for the George Washington Johnson has.
deed ; the moon was hidden by thick | modified his appetite for poultry since
clouds; the ground was covered with | that night, and Rooster !Bob still

snow, which deadened all noise. reigns supreme.
THE FARMER’S DAUGHTER.

LSA lives in a lonely part of the
country, as her father is a
farmer, so she makes friends amongst
the animals of the farm, who all
love her. She feeds the pigeons, the
chickens, and the geese, and the lat-
ter show her especial affection. I
dare say you have heard that the
gratitude of geese towards those who
befriend them is very great, and the
supposition that the goose is a silly
animal is erroneous, for it is one of

the most intelligent of the feathered |

tribe, and forms lasting friendships
with those who show it kindness,
whether people or animals, and is
most faithful in its affections.

A gentleman living in the country
kept a large watch-dog, which was
always chained up during the day,
and it was noticed that one of the
geese paid him a great deal of atten-
tion. He had always manifested a
great dislike to poultry, never allow-
ing them to come within reach of his
chain, so that the fact of his letting
this one even enter his kennel was
remarked with no little surprise by
his master. One day he saw the
goose and her new friend sleeping in
the kennel side by side, and on in-
vestigation found that she had made
her nest in the straw and deposited
five eggs in it. The dog strongly ob-

jected to his premises being exam-
74



ined, and evidently considered him-
self bound to protect what had been
so confidingly entrusted to him. He
stepped in the kennel with the great-
est care for fear of injuring the eggs,
and was so distressed when his mas-
ter touched them that it was de-
cided to leave them there and see
what would be the outcome of this
peculiar friendship. When the gos-
lings were hatched he showed as
much solicitude as their mother in
looking after them, and would allow
them to hop about on him and peck
at his long woolly coat as they liked.
It was very funny to watch them,
and they caused a good deal of
amusement to all who saw them.
One Sunday morning as Elsa was
sitting quietly in church listening to
the sermon, she was horrified to hear
a mild “quack, quack,” and on look-
ing around there was one of her
geese waddling up the aisle towards
her seat; she had to take the in-
truder out and shut the door, and
after church she found it waiting for
her. It followed her home, and the
next Sunday she took care to see
that they were all safely locked in
the yard before she left, for although
she was very fond of her geese, she
thought they had plenty of time at
home to show their affection for her
without following her to church.












































































































































































































































































































































































































‘ |



:

’

v







THE FARMER’S DAUGHTER.
THE NEW PUPIL.

HEN Ethel Grant first came

to Miss Whackles’ boarding-

school, she declared that she would

make herself so disagreeable that

they would be glad to send her back
home.

On arriving she was introduced to
her companions, and although she
would have liked to play with them,
she remembered her resolution, and
scowled at everybody, hardly answer-
ing when she was spoken to.

The next day was a half holiday
in honor of the birthday of one of

the girls, Agnes Stanley, who re- |
_her eyes, and taking her new friend

ceived a large hamper full of good
things, and invited all her fellow-pu-
pils to partake of them at tea, which
was to be served in the garden.
Ethel declined the invitation sulkily,
thinking that she would be pressed
to accept, but Miss Whackles over-
heard her, and said:

“You will take your tea in the
school-room alone, and will, besides,
learn a page of geography for being
so rude.”

She bore herself proudly for some
time, but as she sat in the empty
school-room, the sound of her com-
panions’ merry voices reached her
through the open windows, and

throwing her book on the floor, she
76





burst into tears. As she was sob-
bing, a loving arm was passed round
her neck, and a soft voice said:

“Dear Ethel, I have brought you
some strawberries, and Miss Whack-
les says you may come and play with
us if you will beg her pardon.”

“T don’t want your strawberries,
and [I will not beg any one’s pardon,”
cried Ethel; but Agnes pleaded so
gently with her, and said that all the

‘girls felt unhappy because she was

shut up there alone, while they were
having such a good time, that, after
a great deal of coaxing, she wiped

by the hand, went into the garden.

They found Miss Whackles seated
under a tree chatting with some visi-
tors. Kthel went to her shyly, and
asked her to forgive her, which that.
lady did very graciously, telling her
to run away and make up for lost.
time. This time she obeyed very
quickly, and the afternoon passed so
pleasantly with the girls, who were
so friendly, that she forgot all about.
being disagreeable, and enjoyed her-
self as much as any of them. A few
days later she wrote home and told
her parents that she liked being at
school, because she had so many nice
girls to play with.
ge





























































































































































































a



























































































































































































































































MA

THE NEW PUPIL.



mn

77




















A PRACTICAL JOKE.

REDA and Charlie were both
very fond of their young Aunt
Alicia, but they did not understand
that practical jokes are not only in
extremely bad taste, but cause those
that perpetrate them to be disliked
and avoided by sensible people, and
they thought it would be fine fun to
put a moustache and beard upon the
pretty face of the portrait she was
painting, so when a visitor came and
Aunt Alicia went to the drawing-
room, leaving them alone in her

studio, Freda suggested that they add’

a few improvements to the picture to
which their Aunt was just putting
the finishing touches. The lovely
painting was soon disfigured, and they
viewed it with some satisfaction until
Charlie, who began to feel remorse,
said, ‘Supposing Aunt Alicia can’t get
those things off, I am afraid she will
be very angry with us, so we had
better get away before she comes
back.”

Then they stole up to the school-
room as quiet as mice, for they knew
they had done wrong, and were fear-
ful of the consequences. Their Aunt
was rather quick-tempered, and they
quite expected to hear her come up
the stairs with a whip in her hand
ready to chastise them. They heard
her leave the drawing-room and go to

her studio, and waited anxiously for
78



the scene which they felt sure would
follow, but as all remained silent, they
crept softly down the stairs after a
while and peeped through the curtain
that hung before the studio door.
Their Aunt was standing before the
disfigured picture white and speech-
less, and after remaining in this atti-
tude for some time she dropped on her
knees, and laying her head on the
chair, burst into a passionate flood of
tears. The children had never seen
her cry before, and it touched them
as no amount of scolding could ever
have done. They ran into the room,
and throwing their arms around her
neck, mingled their tears with hers,
and implored her to forgive them.

She was too much upset to scold
them, but after awhile she grew calmer
and told them that she had intended
the picture to be shown at an exhibi-
tion and hoped to get a prize for it,
but was afraid they had ruined her
chances. They were very penitent
for having been so thoughtless, and
saw that what they had considered a
good joke was a very cruel act. By
working patiently, Aunt Alicia suc-
ceeded in restoring her picture to its
former beauty, and not even she her-
self was as pleased as were Freda and
Charlie when it was known that she
had been awarded the prize she had
striven so hard to gain.


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NTING WAS SOON DISFIGURED.”

Al

THE LOVELY P

“
A GREAT EVENT.

HE boys of Dr. Derwent’s college
had sent out invitations to

all their friends, and their friends’
friends, to attend a grand athletic
‘meeting to celebrate the twenty-fifth
anniversary of the Doctor’s master-
‘ship. Many of the old boys, some of
‘them now almost old men, were to
honor the occasion with their pres-
-ence, and as the college eleven boast-

ed an enviable reputation, some good |

games of cricket were expected. All
‘the boys at Dr. Derwent’s aimed at
being good cricketers, each one hop-
ing that the time would come when
he would be placed in the chosen
band of eleven elected to preserve
‘the honor of the college against rival
teams. Even the little boys were to
have a show on this occasion, and
‘very anxious they were to appear to
advantage before their sisters and
cousins and aunts, who were coming

in dozens, to say nothing of their |

fathers and mothers, who were look-
ing forward to this event with almost
.as much pleasure as the boys.
Arthur Sydney, captain of the col-
lege eleven, came to put the young-
-sters through their work, and as he
would stand no nonsense, they had a
pretty rough time of it, but when
they did well he encouraged and
praised them just as heartily as he

:8colded when they failed to please
80



him, so that they really enjoyed it,
and felt that they were to be an item
of no small importance.

“Tf you youngsters don’t make a
good showing I'll lick every one of
you,” said Arthur as he wiped his
hot, red face, but there was a twinkle
in his eye which he vainly tried to
suppress as they all assured him earn-
estly that they were quite certain he
would be proud of them.

The auspicious day was as fair and
bright and warm as even the com-
mittee could desire. Tents were
erected in which refreshments were
to be served, and the grand-stand,
gaily decorated with bunting, which
seemed to be principally composed of
the college: colors, soon began to
fill. Affectionate greetings were ex-
changed between audience and per-
formers, and the Doctor was simply
overwhelmed with congratulations.
How glad and proud he was to shake
hands with his old boys, some of
whose sons were running about in
white flannels, bat in hand, as their
fathers had done years before! Every-
body wore the bit of ribbon dear to
the eyes of the students, and as all
the guests had at least one relation,
and half-a-dozen friends in the field,
you may depend that demonstrations
of appreciatiation were not likely to
be lacking.
























































































































































































































COACHING FOR THE GAME,




















;



CONSPIRATORS.
A GREAT EVENT.

The cricket match of the younger
classes against each other was one of
the first games, and they certainly
did great credit to their coach, who
looked on approvingly at the plucky
little fellows. Although this was not
the most important of the games, it
certainly made the most sensation
among the ladies, particularly the
mammas, who applauded their young
hopefuls without ceasing, much to
the delight of the latter, who were
spurred to greater efforts by the admi-
ration they excited, and looked upon
themselves as the heroes of the hour.

The great event of the day, how-
ever, and one which all had been
eagerly looking forward to was the
presentation to Dr. Derwent of a
handsome case of valuable books, to
which every boy in the school had
subscribed. The good man had no
idea of what was in store for him,
and had been considerably puzzled
during the day at coming upon boys
in twos and threes, in odd corners



83

and behind the tents, whispering
earnestly and mysteriously, like so
many conspirators; on seeing him
approach they would separate, only
to be caught five minutes later
in deeper conversation than ever.
When, at the close of the games, a
large wagon drove up to the grand-
stand, entirely filled by an immense
book-case, and the senior boy stood
on the box seat and presented it in
the name of the whole college, the
Doctor understood it all. And what
cheers rang upon the air as he rose
to acknowledge the gift! He told
them that he had received many
valuable presents that day from his
numerous friends, but there was none
amongst them that gave him such
pleasure as this one.

The wagon was driven round to

‘the library and the boys led the way

to the tents. Every one felt hungry,
and you may be sure that they all
did good justice to the dainties pro-
vided for them.


AT THE SEA-SHORE.

ON’T you think that Ronald
looks rather frightened as he
sits perched up there on the donkey?
The fact is, he has never been on a
real, live donkey before in his life,
and the only rides he has ever taken
have been on his rocking horse. He
says he likes it very much, but I
think he feels just a little bit uncer-
tain. A short way down the road,
they passed another little boy, who
was riding a donkey, which stood
quite still, and refused to budge
an inch. A big boy was pulling at
the bridle as hard as he could,
while another was pushing behind,
and several others were shouting
to try and make him move, but
he planted his feet on the ground,
and looked at them as much as
to say, “You may shout at me
until to-morrow, and yet I will not
move.”

Just as our little party passed, the
naughty donkey kicked up his heels,
and the rider was pitched out of the
saddle. He was not hurt, however,
and “everyone laughed very much;
but Ronald does not feel quite sure
whether his donkey may not take it
into his head to do the same, and he
has no desire:to be thrown. He felt
somewhat nervous as the donkey
trotted along, and, when he saw a

big mound in the middle of the path-
84



way, he tugged at the bridle to make
him go round to one side, but Master
Donkey kept straight ahead, and set
his ears back as though he would
say:

“]T know all about this sort of thing
better than you,” and he walked
right over the mound, making Ronald
bump on the saddle as he came down
on the other side. He said, “Oh,”
and clutched the bridie so tightly
that his sister Minnie, who was
running by his side, called out to
him:

“ Don’t you like it?”

“ Yes,” answered Ronald, “I like
it very much indeed, but I hope that
that this fellow does not mean to
run away with me.”

The donkey did not run away, but
trotted along pleasantly, and_be-
haved beautifully, only he would
always go his own way, instead of
the one Ronald wanted him to go.
When the ride was over, they asked
the man to tell them the name of
the good little animal, so that they
might hire him again, and he said
that he called him Solomon, which
they all thought a very funny name
for a donkey, but the man said he
called him that because he was so
wise, and if you look well at his face,
Iam sure you will say that the name
suits him.








































































“DONT YOU LIKE 17?”
UNWELCOME VISITORS.

HE wolf as a beast of prey is in-
vested with a terror peculiarly
its own; it is not to be greatly
dreaded when alone, as it is naturally
a coward, and shrinks from man, but
when united by hunger into large
packs they are feared by the bravest,
for made bold by numbers they spare
neither man nor beast.

This animal bears a great resem-
blarce to the dog, but is very much
stronger, and instead of the hand-
some, kindly eye of our canine friend,

2, glaring, fiery, green eyeball gives

his visage a fierce and formidable as-
pect. Many stories are told of the
depredations caused by packs of
wolves, especially in Russia, and of
the terrible experiences of travelers
who have been attacked by them.
During the warm periods of the year
each one as a rule hunts by himself
and prowls about alone, but in win-
ter they unite and form large packs,
pursuing their prey over the snow at
a rapid pace and with the greatest
perseverance. Even the horse, with
all his swiftness, cannot escape them
unless he reaches a village before his
strength begins to flag. On ap-
proaching near human habitations,
the wolves. give up the attack and
return to their solitary abodes, so
that the only safety is in flight.

They usually remain hidden during
86





the day-time, and issue forth at dusk
in search of prey. Hunger and
thirst are apparently the principal
causes of their ferocity, as they only
make an attack for the purpose of ac-
quiring food, and not for the mere
pleasure of aimless cruelty; the
struggle for existence makes them
rapacious.

A Russian lady was taken sud-
denly ill while her husband was
visiting some friends a few miles
distant, and the physician, fearing

serious results, sent one of the
trusted serving men to fetch his
master. It was in the middle of

winter, and by skating over the
frozen river a short cut could be
made which would lessen the time
for the journey by at least one-half,
so the man decided to go this way,
taking a gun with him in case of
emergency. He had covered con-
siderably more than half the dis-
tance, when, at a sudden bend in the
river, about twenty hungry, howling
wolves came running out of the
thick woods that lined the banks on
either side. He doubled his speed
and kept ahead of them for some
time, but they finally overtook him,
when he fired at one and killed it;
the noise had the effect of causing
them to pause for a time, during
which he skated for dear life, and
UNWELCOME VISITORS.

when they again reached him, he
fired a second time. He kept this
up until to his joy he saw the resi-
dence of his master’s friend, when





87

adventure the gentleman was not al-
lowed to proceed alone, but a number
of friends and servants attended
him; they traveled in sleighs, and









UNWELCOME VISITORS.

his pursuers, finding it would be the
better part of valor to retire dis-
creetly, took themselves off to the
woods, while the poor fellow, almost
dead with exhaustion, contrived to
reach his master’s presence and de-
liver his message. On hearing of his

arrived unmolested, the wolves evi-
dently being of the opinion that they
were not a large enough pack to at-
tack such a force. The lady recov-
ered from her illness, and the servant
was generously rewarded for his de-
votion and bravery.
FUTURE SOLDIERS.

AS is commonly said that the true
soldier, like the poet, is born,
not made, and many a man whose
name has become famous in military
annals first showed his ability in de-
fending or capturing cities or strong-
holds, while yet a boy at school, by
engaging in mimic battles and skir-
mishes with snow-balls, or forming
miniature armies, drilling and com-
manding them with a skill of a vet-
eran.

The famous Bertrand Duguesclin,

who drove the English out of nearly |

every point they occupied in France,
is a fine illustration of a boy’s nat-
ural abilities asserting themselves at
a very early age. He was the despair
of his parents, the idol of one-half
of the boys of his village, and the
terror of the other half, whom he
gradually conquered, however, and
ranged under his tattered banner.
When there was no longer a rival
force at home for his army to fight,
he would lead them into the next
village, where they would often ar-
rive with their bare feet bleeding
from the long march, and, armed with
sticks and stones, would soon put to
flight those who were brave enough
to oppose them. Bertrand’s parents
tried to make a lawyer of him, but
he organized an army in his new

quarters, and caused such frequent
88



disturbances that he was sent home
in disgrace, and his mother, when
asked what she meant to do with
him, exclaimed in tears: ‘Alas! he
is good for nothing, he can only fight.”

When, at last, he entered the army,
it was generally agreed that the vil-
lage was rid of a nuisance, but when,
in later years, news of his great vic-
tories came, and he was made a gen-
eral, then Constable of France, for
the many services he had rendered
his country, the men of his native
place were proud to show their scars,
and say, “ Duguesclin did that to me
when I was a boy,” and those who,
with bare and bleeding feet, had
bravely followed his ragged flag wher-
ever he chose to lead them, would
amuse their children by the hour tell-
ing thrilling tales of their adventures
under their youthful leader.

Tom and Joe are defending their
fort against Will and Dick, who have
been trying hard for a long time to get
possession, but Tom keeps close to his
flag, and hits with such unerring aim
that I fear they will have to give up
the attempt. They tried to steal round
and surprise him from behind, but
he was ready for them, and drove
them back, although Dick had nearly .
wrenched the flag from its place; a
storm of snow-balls soon made him
relinquish it, though.


































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































FUTURE SOLDIERS.
A FIGHT WITH A STORM.

HEN Jimmie saw the rain com-
mence to fall just as they

were about to leave school, he pressed
his nose against the window-pane and
gazed dolefully into the street, re-
peating, “ Rain, rain, go away, come
again another day,” in the hope that
it would be considerate enough for
him and his little sister to stop at
least long enough for them to get
home, but no, the more he repeated
the magic words the harder and faster
it fell, and at last, thinking he might

wait there all night and then have to’

start out in it, he summoned up his
courage, and taking his sister by the
hand, said,

“Come along, Cissie, or it will be
dark before we get home.”

They called Fido, Cissie’s dog, who
had followed her in the morning and
stayed at the school-house all day,
and ventured into the street, but the
wind was now blowing with such
force that Jimmie could hardly hold
up the umbrella, and when the silk
split and some of its ribs were laid
bare, his distress was great. Cissie
clung to him, and bending their faces
to the driving rain, they struggled
bravely along, but a sudden gust
carried away Jim’s hat and almost
lifted Cissie off her feet ; she dropped
her slate, and if Jim had not held

her very tightly, she would surely
90



have been blown away. They could
not help laughing in spite of their

/uncomfortable situation, and were

pleased to see that Fido quite en-
joyed it.

As they were nearing home they
met a little boy who was crying bit-
terly, and when Jim asked him what
was the matter, he said he had lost
his hat, that it had blown over a gar-
den wall, and he was afraid his
mother would scold him if he went
home without it. It happened to be
in their garden that it had fallen and
when they opened the gate there it
was stuck fast on a gooseberry bush.

“ What sort of fruit do you call
that?” said Jim to the little boy,
who quickly dried his tears at sight
of the lost hat, and was going to put
it on his head, but Jim stopped him
saying, “ No, no, you must not wear
it like that, it is too wet; just come
inside and wait until the storm is
over, then your hat will be dry and
you can wear it home.”

The invitation was gladly accepted
and they all had tea and played
together until the rain stopped ; then
the sun shone out again brighter
than ever, and the little boy, thank-
ing them for their kindness, said
good-bye, promising to come and see
his new friends again some other

day.


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“THEY STRUGGLED BRAVELY ALONG.”
THE FRIEND OF THE FAMILY.

OU have only to look at Prince’s
beautiful, intelligent face to
understand his character, for nobility,
bravery, honesty, and faithfulness
shine out of his big brown eyes, and
although he is so large and strong
that one stroke from his powerful
paw would knock you down, he is
as sweet tempered as a lamb, and
when he plays with little children or
dogs smaller than himself he is
always careful not to rush at them,
and is much more gentle than little
Daddles the terrier whom he could
swallow like a pill ifhe felt soinclined.
If a thief or a suspicious-looking man
were to enter the yard Prince would
change very quickly, and his eye
would have anything but a kindly
beam as he glared at the stranger,
that is why he is kept chained up
during the day, but at night when
every one is asleep, and no one is

there to look after the house, the |

chain is taken off, and Prince is
allowed to roam wherever he likes,

and as no one but a thief would try to |

enter a house when all its inmates
are in bed, if he were to attack any
one it would only be what he deserved.

His little mistress Helena, the
daughter of the house, on coming
home from school always gives him
a lump of sugar, and one day when
she came and shook hands with him,

92



saying, “howdy Prince?” he wagged
his tail and gave a bark, which meant
to express his joy at seeing her; he
knew the sugar would follow this
little demonstration, for although
Prince was anything but a greedy
dog, he had his little weaknesses as
we all have, and an extreme fondness
for sugar was one of them, which I
am sure you will say is not such a
very dreadful vice after all.

When Helena was a very little girl
aman came to the house pretending

to mend old kettles and tin ware,

and when Prince growled at him his
master gave him a reproving pat on
the head and told him to He still, for
he thought the man was a poor honest
fellow trying to earn his living, but
Prince would not keep still and
nearly broke his chain in his efforts
to get at the man. After he had
gone the child was missed, and while
they were hunting for her in every
possible place, Prince tugged and
pulled at his chain so that her mother
had the happy idea of unfastening
it, when he immediately bounded
out of the yard and down the road
in the direction the man had taken.
Helena’s father and the workmen
followed and found the dog standing
over the man, while Helena was safe
and unhurt. The wicked man meant
to steal her for a reward.


“TOWDY, PRINCE?”
OUTWARD BOUND.

F you have ever left your native
country in a ship bound for a
foreign port, you will understand the
feelings of Brian Doyle and his sister
Nora, as they sat on the deck of the
steamer that was bearing them away
from the land of their birth. Nora
was several years older than Brian,
and as their mother had died when
he was quite a baby, she had brought
him up, and taught him his letters,
and been so like a real little mother
to him, that he loved her very dearly.
Then their father died, and the only
relation they knew of was an uncle,
whom they had never seen, who
lived in Texas, which seemed to the
orphans too far away for them ever
to meet, and, although they wrote to
tell him of their father’s death, they
never expected to hear from him.
Judge, then, of their surprise when,
after some weeks, a letter came, con-
taining two hundred dollars, and say-
ing that he would like them to go
and make their home with him, and
that although he and his wife did not
know them, they would be as glad to
receive them as though they were
their own children.

They felt very sorry to leave all
the friends of their childhood, and
when they went to take a last look
at their parents’ graves, they could

not speak for emotion, for they knew
94



that they would never return to their
dear old Ireland. As the ship steamed
out of the docks Nora put her hand
to her eyes, for she could not bear to
look at the friends who were waving
their handkerchiefs and weeping to
see them go away, but Brian kept his
eyes fixed sadly on the receding
shore until it faded from sight.

Their uncle met them at New
York, and after showing them some
of the sights of that busy city, took
them to his farm in Texas, where
their newly-found aunt gave them
such a warm welcome that they could
not feel as though they were amongst
strangers, and soon made themselves
athome. Brian helps his uncle on the
farm, and their aunt says that she does
not know how she ever managed with-
out Nora. They love their adopted
country, but do not forget.the land
they were born in, or the two graves
which they will never see again.

Some time ago a man whom they
knew well came from Ireland to work
on their uncle’s farm. He brought
with him some roots of shamrock as a
present for Nora, which he said he had
taken from their old garden. Nora
planted them in a box and took the
greatest care of them, and as the man
had been careful to bring enough Irish
soil to cover them, they grew well and
were a great pleasure to everybody.
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































OUTWARD BOUND.

95
THE EXPRESS.

AVE you anything you wish to_
send by the expressman? If
so, you have only to leave a message
with Cassie, and she will order her
wagon, and attend to your business
at once. Cassie is a clever little
woman, and drives her team herself,
although her horse, Charlie, is rather |
troublesome sometimes, and thinks
nothing of leaving the cart to go and |
have a drink of water, or eat a piece
of bread and jam, and Cassie has to |
be very strict with him. She is now |
sending her doll, the Princess Leo-
nora, on a visit to the city, and, al-
though they started several hours |
ago, they have not nearly arrived |
yet, and all because that horse
is in one of his troublesome moods.
Now he says that his shoe is loose,
and he can really travel no fur-
ther to-day, but Cassie calls big
brother Hugh, and tells him to bring
his hammer and nails to shoe the
horse, which he does, the horse and
Cassie chatting together while he
works.

I am afraid the poor princess will
grow tired of lying in the wagon so
long, and at this rate it will take her
many hours to reach her destination,
for the horse is no sooner shod, than |
he declares that he is very hungry, |

and must have something to eat at |
96





once, or he will drop by the road-
side. The sly fellow knows that
Cassie has a piece of cake stowed
away in a corner of the wagon, which
she gets out, as he knew she would,
and they sit down together and eat
it, after which he gallops furiously
round the yard several times, and

_ then, stopping at the steps, they hand

the princess out, telling her that she

| has arrived at her friend’s house in

the city.
Cassie and Charlie live in a part of

/the country where houses are few

and far between, so that they are
naturally thrown a great deal upon
their own resources, as they seldom
have other children to play with.
They amuse themselves by the hour
in the yard with their toys, and they

| have besides a little garden, where

they dig, and hoe, and water the
flowers, and in which they take great
pride. Their neighbors lie very far
off, and it is quite an event when a
visitor comes to see them, particu-
larly when they bring their children,
and remain for several days, as they
generally do. On these occasions,
they go for drives in the wagonette,
and take turns in driving the horse,
who is a quiet, good, old fellow, and
knows just what he has to do with-
out being told.




































"







































































































































































































THE EXPRESS.
7 97
ALICE’S CHARGE.

LICE was often left in charge
of her little sister Ellie, and
was always admonished by their mo-
ther to be kind and considerate both
to her and their brother, Ned, be-
cause, Alice being the eldest, was of
course the one to set a good example
to the others and keep peace among
them. Ellie was inclined to be diso-
bedient, and tried Alice’s patience
sorely at times, and Ned would make
such a noise over everything he did,
that she often felt quite tired of re-
peating “be quiet.”

Their mother was once called away
to see a sick sister, and Alice was left
in sole charge for several days; the
first day there was no trouble, as
they played in the garden most of
the time, but the second day it
rained, and towards afternoon Ned
began to show signs that he was get-
ting tired of being good, and insisted
upon going out, rain or no rain. This
made Alice angry, and she retired to
her room, leaving little Ellie all alone.

As the child had no one to talk to,
she set about looking for some occu-
pation, and finding a pretty piece of
blue silk in a drawer, began to make
adress for her doll out of it. Now
this silk belonged to Alice, who was
guarding it most preciously to make

a cushion for her mother’s dressing-
98



table on her next birthday, and when
she returned and found it all cut and
hacked to pieces, she gave Ellie a
sharp slap, and said she would not
speak to her again, and although the
little culprit begged her with tears to
kiss and forgive her, and Ned said he
did not see the use of making such a
fuss over a bit of old silk that was
only a rag any way, she steadily re-
fused, and no amount of pleading
could move her.

Then Ellie in her distress decided
to go and find mamma, and started
out in the heavy rain, which was
pouring in torrents. She wore no
coat or hat, and her little thin slip-
pers were soon soaking wet. Pre-
sently it began to thunder and light-
ning, and Alice, knowing that Ellie
would be frightened, went to keep
her company and tell her that she
forgave her. When she found that
she was not in the house, she was
filled with dismay, and the maid
went in search of her. She found
her under a hedge wet to the skin,
and nearly dead with fright. When
Alice saw her, and heard that she
had gone to find her mother because
she wouldn’t speak to her, she was
smitten with remorse for her harsh-
ness, and determined never to be so
strict again.
: yy i

C7);

Ys
Li
y



ALICE’S CHARGE.
r

A COLLEGE

EGGIE VIVIAN was looked
upon as one of the best all-
round athletes of his college; there
was nothing in the sporting line that
he could not do; rowing, foot-ball,
tennis, cricket or base-ball, he was
clever at them all, and helped the
college to win many agame. In fact,
his father used to say that he would
only find his college education of use
to him if he went to live in some
place where he would have to assert
his rights by force, as in that case he
would be sure to get on, but Reggie
would laugh and say,
“We manage to learn a few other
things as well, father, as you will see
some day.”

His home was in a beautiful part
of the country, and as the river
passed close to their house, it was a
common sight, during the summer
vacation, to see Keggie in his cool
white boating flannels taking a row,
and his vigorous stroke was the ad-
miration of all who saw him.

One Christmas time he went with
his parents to spend the holidays,
with some friends who lived a little
distance away. A large party was
assembled, and on Christmas eve the
festivities were kept up until a late
hour. It began to rain heavily in
the early part of the evening, but as

all the guests were staying in the
100



EDUCATION.

house, this did not trouble them; |
windows and doors were fastened
securely, and the sound of merry
music and dancing feet prevented
anyone from noticing the patter and
splash of the rain. They were about
to retire for the night, when a loud
shout from the outside attracted their
attention, and on opening a window,
a man was seen in a boat, and to
their consternation as far as they
could see the ground was covered
with water.

“What has happened?” they all
asked at once.

“The river has overflown,” an-
swered the man, “and we must get
boats at once, or the people in the
cottages on the banks will all be
drowned; have you anyone there
that can row ?”

Now was Reggie’s opportunity ; he
jumped into the boat with the man
and rowed quickly to the boat-house,

where they took as many boats in

tow as they could; others helped, of
course, but it was the first start that
saved the people’s lives, for in some
of the cottages the water had al-
ready reached the attics. No one
was drowned, and as Reggie’s father
looked proudly at his son, he said :

“ Your college education is of some
use, after all, I see.” It proved to be
of use in other ways, too.
























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































SWS

YS

























































“HIS VIGOROUS STROKE WAS THE ADMIRATION OF ALL WHO SAW HIM.”
101
THE PROFESSOR.

EF OW solemn Fritz looks, as he

sits on the bank with his dog
Rags in his arms; you would almost
think he was having his photograph
taken, and making a painful effort to
look “pleasant,” according to instruc-
tions, but he is simply waiting for a
very learned professor who has prom-
ised to take him on a geological ex-
pedition, and his serious look is there-
fore befitting the occasion, for it is no
small condescension on the part of
the Professor even to speak to such
a little boy, much less take him out
and explain the mysteries of stones,
and earth, and rock to him. Rags is
going, too, and looks as if he under-
stood all the importance of his posi-
tion.

When the learned man first came
to live in this neighborhood it was
known, of course, what a very im-
portant personage they had amongst
them, and people felt curious to see
the famous man whose name was
known throughout the civilized world
as one of the greatest scientists of
modern times; so when a few days
after his arrival Fritz came in one
afternoon and said, “I met the Pro-
fessor on the cliffs a little while ago,”
he was immediately assailed with
questions.

“What is he like?”

mother.
102

asked his



“O just a tall, thin old man with
blue spectacles,” answered Fritz.

“And what was he doing when
you met him?” asked his sister Irene,
who was a grown-up young lady and
of course very curious.

“He was breaking stones,” said
Fritz.

“Breaking stones! who ever heard
of a gentleman doing such a thing?”
exclaimed Irene horrified.

“Well, he had a little hammer in
his hand and was breaking bits off
the rocks, and if that isn’t breaking
stones what is it?”

“You horrid boy, to pervert the
truth in that way,” said Irene, adding
after a pause, “I am sorry he is an
old man; he will be so very sedate
and solemn.”

To Fritz’ astonishment, when Irene
saw the Professor, she again called
him a horrid boy for daring to say
that he was old.

But here comes the Professor with
Irene by his side; she has taken such
an interest in geology lately that this
does not surprise Fritz. The expedi-
tion was not as interesting as he ex-
pected, as nearly all the Professor’s
explanations were given to Irene in
an undertone, while Fritz was told to
run ahead with the dog.

The Professor is now Fritz’ brother-
in-law, and teaches him much geology.


“YOU WOULD ALMOST THINK HE WAS HAVING HIS PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN.”
103
SAVED.

WO boys, Percy and Ernest
Smith, were taken to visit some
friends on the north coast of Scotland,
and, while playing near some high
cliffs one afternoon, found a small
cave in one of them, which they en-
tered, delighted to have made such a
discovery. They were not acquainted
with the treacherous tides or this part
of the country, which come in like
wild horses at a gallop, and, seeing a
~ long stretch of sand and rocks before

them, and the sea forming just a slight,

line across the horizon, thought they
were safe for hours, and soon became
absorbed in their play. They pre-
tended they were smugglers, and were
so engrossed that they did not hear
the rumbling of the rapidly-rising
tide, as it rolled in huge foam-crested
waves towards the cave.

“Hello!” at last exclaimed Ernest,
“the tide must be rising, there is
water coming in here,” and then for
the first time they noticed that little
puddles were splashing gently over
their boots.

“We had better be going, or we
may have to wade out,” said Percy,
so they went to the entrance of the
cave, and, to their horror, saw noth-
ing but a vast sheet of rolling, foam-
ing water; the in-coming waves
dashed against the cliffs with an omi-

nous sound, and the boys’ hearts sank
104



as they saw that all communication
with the land was completely cut off.
They were at the bottom of a steep
cliff, hundreds of feet high, inacces-
sible to all but the sea-gull, and, rea-
lizing the dreadful fate that awaited
them, they clasped each other tightly,
and prayed for courage to meet their
death bravely. As the waves rose
higher, they clambered on to a small
ledge, and watched the water as it.
crept surely and swiftly towards them.
Suddenly they saw a rope dangle be-
fore the entrance, and, hardly believ-
ing their senses, waded towards it;
to their joy they saw a man, to whom
they shouted, and, when he perceived
them, he called back, “Al right boys,
we're coming for you,” then another
man, fastened to another rope, came
dangling from somewhere above, and

| the two boys were soon secured and

taken out of danger.

They heard afterwards that their
parents, becoming alarmed at their
long absence, had made inquiries all
over the place, and a fisherman said
he had seen them enter the cave early
in the afternoon. Then two brave
men, who were always saving lives
on that dangerous spot, immediately
volunteered to go for them. They
have never forgotten this adventure,
and have ever since shown a great
dislike to exploring strange caves.


SAVED.
BEN’S

OOR Ben Wilby never had any
luck although his mother used
to say that it would come in good
time. “There is no such thing as
luck, Ben,” she would say when he
was despondent over a fresh fail-
ure, “perhaps the boy who got the
place needed it just as much as
you, and your turn will come some
day.”

Ben’s father was dead, and his
mother was not strong enough to do
hard work and only managed to earn
a scanty living by doing fine sewing,
but Ben, who had attended a good
school until his father died, was
strong and healthy, and his great de-
sire was to get a situation, so that
his mother need not be kept so closely
to her sewing. He searched the ad-
vertisements every day for the “ boys
wanted,” and presented himself at
each address, but there was always
something to prevent his being en-
gaged.

One morning he went early to a
large business house, where a “smart
boy, well up in figures” was adver-
tised for; a crowd of others were
waiting, and when he entered the pri-
vate office a gentleman seated there
just said, “too young,” and Ben,
muttering to himself, “just my luck

again,” withdrew with a heavy heart.
106



LUCK.

He went to several more places, but
they were already filled, and he was
returning home about noon when he
saw, a few yards ahead of him, the
gentleman who had uttered that
chilling “too young” earlier in the
day. A pretty little girl was run-
ning by his side, and Ben lingered
behind, watching her admiringly.
Her father, for such he supposed him
to be, paused for a moment to look
into a shop window and the child
ran into the middle of the road just

as a hansom cab came along at a

rapid rate. She fell right in front
of it, but Ben, dashing forward like
a flash, picked her up, or she would
certainly have been trampled under
the horse’s feet. He carried her to
the sidewalk, where her father had
only just perceived what had hap-
pened, and as he took the frightened
child in his arms he looked at Ben
and said, “ You were in my office
this morning?” “Yes sir,” replied
Ben. “Come again to-morrow. I
will find a good place for you,” and
Ben hurried home to tell his mother
how his luck had come to him. The
next day he was installed in the
office he had left so sorrowfully the
day before, and in time became a
junior partner, marrying the little
girl whose life he had saved.
ail

ru

























































































































































































































































































“BEN DASHED FORWARD AND PICKED HER UP.”
107
A WONDERFUL CHRISTMAS BOX.

HERE was great excitement
among the children, for, be-
sides being the joyous season that
we all love, Christmas Day was Baby
Jean’s birthday; she had come as a
Christmas box for the whole family
just one year before, and they were
naturally very proud of her; and if
you could see her you would say that
they were not proud without reason,
for she has the loveliest brown eyes
and auburn hair, and the prettiest
little dimpled face you ever saw.

Old Uncle Joe has lived at their
house much longer than any of the
children can remember, even their
mother does not recollect when he
first came, for he was there when she
was born. He is getting old now,
but he still potters about among the
flowers and shrubs, and always helps
in decorating the house for Christ-
mas. He took the children with him
to get some holly, and on coming
home they insisted on his taking a
seat in the mail cart. He smiles as
they pull him quickly over the snow,
and looks as happy as though he was
a king sitting in a luxurious chariot
behind a team of handsome, high-
stepping horses; in fact, I doubt if
any king ever looked so happy.

Last Christmas, when Baby Jean
was born, the secret was imparted to

him, and he was commissioned to
108





tell the children the good news, so he
came into the nursery and told them
mysteriously that the most wonder-
ful Christmas box in the world had
been sent tothem. They all jumped
out of bed and made guesses as to
what it might be; Jim said a rocking
horse, for he loved horses, while
Bertie, who wanted to be a soldier,
suggested a box of cavalrymen; but.
Uncle Joe shook his head and said
“Cold, cold,” at everything they
guessed, until Lilian, struck with a
happy thought, said, “A doll that
can open and shut its eyes;” the
boys snorted contemptuously at such
an idea; but Uncle Joe looked very
wise and said, “ Warmer,” with such
a knowing smile that they were all
puzzled and agreed unanimously to
“ ive it up.”

Then he told them to keep very
quiet until he came back, and left
the room; it seemed to them that he
took a long time to fetch it, but at
last he appeared with a white bundle
in his arms, and when he stooped to
show them what it was they saw a
little round pink face surrounded
with frills of snowy lace, and cried
out joyously all together, “‘ A baby.”
This is how Baby Jean made her first.
appearance in the nursery, and the
children say‘that she was the best
Christmas box they ever received.


“JT DOUBT IF ANY KING EVER LOOKED SO HAPPY.”

109
THE CRICKET MATCH.

HE boys had been practicing
steadily for a match with the

team of another school. They had
never played against them before,
but had heard such great accounts of
their doings, that they put all their
energies to work so as to be in readi-
ness to meet them, and if possible
beat them. A few days before the
match it began to rain; the first day
this did not vex them at all, because
they thought it would be sure to
clear up shortly, but when it kept
on without ceasing all through the
night and the next day, and again
the next, and still showed no signs of
abating, they began to feel uneasy,
their only consolation being that it
would be just as bad for the other
fellows as for them. George and
Harry Ford, with their friend, Will
Jenks, who was staying with them
till after the match, stationed them-
selves near a window and gloomily
watched the rain, their conversation
passing from cricket to the weather,
and from the weather back to cricket
again. The sky was dark, and the
air so thick with heavy vapors, that
it looked as though there might be
enough water there to keep on rain-
ing for a month. George, who was
captain of the team, looked very glum,
and said that if it did not clear up

soon, they would not be able to play.
110





“We have only two more days,”
he said, thrusting his hands deep in
his pockets with an air of mingled
determination and despair, “and I
am afraid to think what the ground
will be like if it keeps on raining.
We shall either have to play on
stilts or declare the match off, and
that goes against me, for I want those
fellows to see what we can do.”

“Tt certainly is tantalizing,” said
Will Jenks, as he nursed his bat dis-
consolately; “we can only wait and
see what it will be like to-morrow.”

To their unbounded delight no rain
fell the next morning, although the
clouds looked threatening, but to-
wards noon the sun struggled through
the mist, and at last shone warm and
bright, drying the ground so that on
the great day it was in perfect con-
dition, neither too hard nor too soft.
The stands were filled with specta-
tors, amongst whom were many ad-
miring friends of both teams come to
applaud both winners and _ losers.
The rivals were finally beaten, but.
not without hard work, for their
team was a very strong one, and
their defeat was almost as good as a.
victory. All were invited to supper
at the home of George and Harry,
where they had a good time, and
promised to meet again the following:
year.


































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































= = S === ===

“THE CAPTAIN OF THE TEAM LOOKS VERY GLUM.”





lll
IN SCHOOL.

TT \HERE was a new arrival at Miss

Peat’s school, a delicate-looking
little girl, with a pretty, pale face,
and lovely yellow hair, tied up with
a blue ribbon. Her name was Susie
Brown, and the first day she came
she excited great curiosity, because

none of the girls knew her, or re-

membered ever having seen her be-
fore.
play-ground, and asked her a thou-
sand questions about herself; she told
them that she had only just come to
live in that part of the country, and
that she had never heen to a school
before, but had been taught at home
by her mother. Then they ques-
tioned her as to what she knew,
and were surprised to find that in
‘some things she was far ahead of
any of them, although there were
other things that she knew nothing
about, and what seemed to them
very funny, was that she had never
played any games with other chil-
dren, so they said they would teach
her, and Alice Wilson, who was very
much bigger than Susie, said she

‘would be her friend, and put her |

up to all the little ways of the
school.

While they were at class in the
afternoon, Miss Peat asked a question
an geography that no one could an-

They all surrounded her in the |



“I know the answer to that,” so Alice
held up her hand, and told Miss Peat
that Susie knew what it was. All
the children looked at her, of course,
and she felt very bashful, but she
stood up and answered so well, that
Miss Peat praised her before the
whole school. After that she got
used to being in school, and soon
learned to put her hand up herself
when she knew anything.

She became a great favorite, both
with the school-mistress and her

_young companions, for she was gentle

and well behaved in class, and very
quick at her lessons, and, although
she did not know as many games as
the other children did, she never re-
fused to join them at play, and seemed
to have an endless stock of stories of
all kinds stored away in her head,
which she was always willing to tell
when asked to do so. On wet days,
when they had to stay in the school-
room for their recreation, they found
this very entertaining, and would
gather around her, and listen eagerly
to the wonderful tales she told them.
At these times, the ringing of the
bell to resume lessons was always
greeted with exclamations of regret,
because Susie’s stories were so inter-
esting, and she told them so well,
that +hey could have listened to her

sswer, and Susie whispered to Alice, | all day.
































































































































































































































8 IN SCHOOL.




































































DECEMBER.

HE flakes are falling thick and fast,
The hill is long and steep,
The load is very heavy, and
Zr The snow has drifted deep.

The mules are striving very hard,
And so is driver John,
Who cracks and twirls his strong big whip,

And shouts to urge them on.

They know his voice, and harder try,
For John knows how to treat them,

And though he shouts and cracks his whip,
He does not have to beat them.

When safe within the stable warm,
No happier mules than they,

And driver John gives every one
An extra wisp of hay.

And praises each one in its turn,
For working with good will,
And bringing home their heavy load,

So bravely up the hill.
114


X7HO prowls about the woods at
night,
And fills us all with deadly fright,
Whene’er we see his flashing light?
Jack o’ Lantern.

Who with his dog, deceiving gnome,

By darkling ghostly ways doth roam,

Leading the traveller far from home?
Jack o’ Lantern.

Who when the moon shines through
the trees,
And branches quiver in the breeze,
Casts frightful shadows o’er the leas ?
Jack o’ Lantern.

Who loves to hide in corners queer,

And lurk in places dark and drear,

Laughiag to see us quake with fear?
Jack o’ Lantern.



Who scares us with his lantern’sglare,
Making theflamenow bright now dim,
Gliding through flickering shadows
grim?
Jack o’ Lantern.

When Bobby’s safely tucked in bed,
And ’neath the blankets hides his
head,
Who frightens him with stealthy
tread?
Jack o Lantern.

Who nimbly o’er the roof doth creep,
And slyly through the window peep,
To see if he has gone to sleep?

Jack o’ Lantern.

Then fasten doors and windows tight,
In case he'll pass this way to-night,
For we don’t want to see the light

Of Jack o’ Lantern.
115
AN APT PUPIL.

IMAGINE that many of you
have had birds of different kinds,
which you have regarded as great
pets, and probably you have shed
genuine tears when they died or es-
caped from their cages to return no
more, for birds that are talked to and
made much of get as companionable
as a dog or any other four-footed ani-
mal, as their intelligence is much
greater than people generally sup-
pose. Nothing is prettier than to see
these little creatures hop out of their
cages and perch, with a caressing lit-
tle flutter, on their owner’s fingers,
where they will chirp exactly as
though they were talking and under-
stood every word said to them.
Patty’s goldfinch was not only a
beautiful bird to look at, but was so
clever and entertaining and had such
an affectionate disposition that every-
one loved it. Its cheery song always
reminded Patty that it was time to
rise in the morning, and when the
sun shone in at the window and it
had had its morning bath, it would
warble as though its little heart
would burst for very joy and glad-
ness. Patty calls it Goldie and cher-
ishes it more than anything she has,
for he was brought to her across the
ocean from England, so that he is
somewhat of a traveler. She has a

cat, too, but she never allows it to
116



stay in the room when Goldie is out
of the cage, because on one occasion
when she thought Puss safe in the
kitchen, she darted out from under-
the sofa towards poor Goldie, who
was very frightened and took refuge
on top of a curtain pole, from where
they had hard work to induce him
to come down. Since then Patty
takes care to see for herself that the
cat is safely installed in some other
part of the house before opening the
cage, as she would not have her fa-
vorite meet such a dreadful fate as to
make a meal for the cat.

She is teaching Goldie a little tune
and he almost knows it, although he
has been practicing it only a few
days. He whistles each note after
his mistress, who is very patient
with him, and when I tell you that
the tune is “ Yankee Doodle,” you
will see that he is becoming quite a
patriotic American, although he is a
British born bird, and if he had re-
mained in his own country would
probably have been learning to sing
“God Save the Queen” from some
loyal little English boy or girl, but
he is quite happy where he is, and is
content to learn the song his little
mistress teaches him. Let us hope
that he will live a very long time to
be a pleasure to her, for if she were to
lose him she would be very unhappy.








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AN APT PUPIL.






WHO LAUGHS LAST LAUGHS BEST.

OYS are naturally more fond of
running into danger than girls,
and usually look upon their sisters
. with contempt for their lack of cour-
age in exposing themselves to the
risk of breaking their necks or limbs.
Nat thought himself very clever be-
cause he could run on the top rail of
the stile and keep his balance, and
he made fun of Clara because she
could only take a few steps, when
she wobbled and had to jump off.
Mandy excited even greater ridicule
from the brave boy because she
would not attempt it at all.

“T knew I should fall,’ said Man-
dy, “and I am not going to hurt my-
self and make mamma angry just
because you choose to make fun of
me. You may be a little too clever
some day, then it will be my turn to
laugh at you.”

“ Well, never mind, retorted Nat,
“you are only a girl, and all girls are
born duffers.”

Mandy did not understand what a
duffer was, but she knew it meant
something mean, or Nat would not
have applied it to her under the cir-
cumstances, so she deigned no reply,
and, taking Clara’s arm, the two
walked home together.

Some days after this they went
with their mother and some friends

to spend the afternoon in a large
118





park; they had a nice lunch and
made tea in true gipsy fashion, after
which they were told that they could
go and play about for a time, while
their elders sat on the grass and
talked. As they roamed about they
came to a pond, and, placed right
across the middle of it, was a narrow
plank, which Nat had no sooner
caught sight of than he ran on it,
calling from the other side for his
sisters to do the same, but they were
frightened and would not go, then he
laughed at them, saying they were»-
“duffers,” and ran back across the
plank to show them how easy it was;
he did this several times, and, not
content with this easy work; began
to hop on one foot, when all at once,
just as he reached the side where they
were standing, he missed his footing
and fell in with such a splash that he
frightened the frogs almost into fits.
He had not the faintest idea how to
swim, and you should have seen him
splutter and beat the water with his
fists in his efforts to get ashore; if
his sisters had not been there he
would certainly have been drowned,
but they grabbed him by the hair
and pulled him out just as he was
sinking. Mandy did not make fun,
as she might have done, but as they
led him to his mother they said,
“Who laughs last laughs best.”




























































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N
THE INVENTOR.

ION MILES was always invent-
; ing toys for the children, and
different little things of utility for
all the members of the household.
He was studying at a medical col-
lege, and his father hoped that some
day he would become a clever doc-
tor, but so far Dion had not shown
any very special talent or liking for
cutting off limbs, or any other kind
of medical work, although he was
always called “Sawbones” at home,
and when he brought out some new

toy, or button-hook, or corkscrew, his |

father always said he was wasting
his time over silly nonsense and
would never do much good in the
world. One day he told the children
that he had a wonderful surprise in
store for them, which he would show
them in the dining-room after lunch,
and when they saw him take some-
thing out of a box and screw it to
the table they were full of curiosity.
The toy consisted of two figures, a
knight on horseback and another on
foot; they fought desperately and
performed such queer antics that
eyen father and mother, who were
called to see the show, could not help
laughing, although father said with a
twinkle in his eye, “Wasting your
time again Sawbones.”

“Surely not when I make the

children so happy father,” answered
120



Sawbones, knowing that this argu-
ment could not fail to touch a tender
chord, while the children clapped
their hands and declared that he was
the nicest brother in the world.

As time went on Sawbones began
by degrees to take more interest in
his work at the college, and one
morning at the breakfast-table he
said to his father:

“Dad, I want to show you a new
invention; do you mind coming to
my room for a minute?”

“T wonder if you will ever give
those things up and attend seriously
to your work,” answered his father,
but he followed him upstairs, and as
all the chairs were piled with some-
thing or other, sat upon the bed and
said, ‘“‘Let me see this wonderful
thing quick, for I must be going;”
then Sawbones showed him a tiny
little instrument for performing the
most delicate operations, and his
father, who was himself a doctor
of some reputation, saw that he
had really invented an article that
would be invaluable to surgeons; he
slapped him on the back heartily
and said :

“My boy, I congratulate you;
that is the best thing of its kind
I have ever seen,’ and when the
doctors at the college saw it they
were of the same opinion. After
THE INVENTOR.

See
ee oP

Lol f a

A
i
ih



“THEY PERFORMED SUCH QUEER ANTICS.”

that Dion invented many instru- | of sufferers, end became a very cele-
ments and other things for the relief | brated “Sawbones”’ after all.
121
THE YOUNG MUSICIAN.

ARL was a little German boy
whose parents were very poor
country people, and the only music
they ever heard was in church on
Sundays; this was not of the best,
for the organist was schoolmaster,
and sexton, with half a dozen other
occupations besides, so that little time
was left for perfecting himself in
music, while the whole congregation
did the singing, which was certainly
more hearty than sweet. When Karl
was about six years old he heard a
boy of the village playing tunes on
an old comb with a piece of paper
wrapped round it, and that night
when his parents supposed him to be
asleep, they heard sounds of sweet
music issuing from the children’s
room. At first they were frightened
because they thought it must be
something supernatural, but sum-
moning their courage, they went to
find out what it could be, and saw
- Karl sitting up in bed, blowing upon
a comb wrapped in paper. They
were amazed that he could make
such lovely music with such an in-
strument, and asked him who taught
him.

“Nobody taught me; it is easy;
you just do this,” and putting the
comb to his lips, he played some of
the well-known melodies that were
sung by the village people.

122



One of the neighbors, after hearing
ing him play, said to him, “Karl,
you will be a great musician some
day,” and made him a present of an
old dulcimer that had lain by for
years. Karl soon manipulated the
sticks with the dexterity of an ac-
complished player; then he taught
his sister, but she did not make the
progress that he did, and his clever-
ness surprised everyone. Some one
mentioned him to the organist, who,
convinced that the boy was a genius,
began at once to give him lessons.

' The boy made such wonderful prog-
ress that at the end of two years the
organist had taught him all he knew
himself, and wrote to the Emperor
about him, who interested himself in
the young musician and took him
under his special protection, so that
he received instruction from the best
masters. The violin was his chosen
instrument, and his name soon _be-
came famous all over Europe. He
did not forget his first teacher and
kind friend, the organist, and when
he came to take his parents and sis-
ters to the beautiful home he had
prepared for them in the city, he
made him and his family many hand-
some presents, and delighted them all
by playing for them as willingly as
though he were playing for the Em-
peror and court.






































































































































































































































































































































































“HIS CLEVERNESS SURPRISED EVERYONE.”

123
CLEVER HUNTERS.

HE cat is a remarkable climber,
as we all know, and her fond-
ness for trees is very great, particu-
larly if she thinks there is a chance
of catching a bird, when she will
stretch herself on a branch and lie
motionless for hours, showing such
extraordinary patience that we are
inclined to think it is a pity to waste
it in such a cause; but the cat is
such a persevering hunter that when
once she has tasted the sweets of
game, fresh from the woods, she will
disdain such common things as mice
and rats, and trespass on the pre-
serves of neighbors until she is re-
garded as a nuisance.

When Matty and Sophie first saw
their little white kitten up in a tree,
they thought she would surely fall
and break her neck, and were so
frightened that they asked the hired
boy to get a ladder and fetch her
down. When he laughed at their
fears they considered him a cruel,
heartless boy, and told him so, but
when they saw their pet leap from
branch to branch, and finally run
down the trunk to the ground, they
understood that kitty was a born
climber, and never felt any fear for
her safety afterwards, even when
they saw her on the topmost branch
of the highest tree, for they knew

she was hunting for birds and that
124





her sharp little claws could stick into
the bark and prevent her from slip-
ping. When kitty grew into a big
cat, she developed a great passion for
hunting, and would take herself off
into the woods for several days at a
time, and when she came back would
turn her nose up contemptuously at
the food that was offered her, conde-
scending only to lap some milk, after
which she would hide away and
sleep off the effects of her long vigils
for she did not catch her game with-
out having to watch and wait for it.

A lady once owned a large tabby
cat, which acquired the habit of
going out regularly at night and
poaching in the preserves of a neigh-
boring resident, who was particularly
jealous of his game. She would
often return witha nice fat part-
ridge or young hare in her mouth,
which she would present to her mis-
tress, having evidently eaten as
much as she desired. Everything
was done to try and cure her of these
marauding propensities, but in vain;
her misdeeds brought their own pun-
ishment, however; for one night,
while in the act of seizing a leveret,
she found herself caught in a trap,
and had to suffer the loss of one of
her hind legs; but this misfortune
did not kill her enthusiasm for
hunting, although the loss of her
CLEVER HUNTERS.







“THEY THOUGHT SHE WOULD SURELY FALL AND BREAK HER NECK.”
leg prevented her chasing hares and | afterwards confined herself to catch -
other fleet-footed animals, so she | ing rats and mice for her mistress.
125


THE NEW SCHOLAR.

LONG time ago, before public
schools were as numerous as
they are now, and in small towns did
not exist at all, Doctor Bartram, a
clever, scholarly man, kept a school
for boys of all ages. The older ones
he initiated into the mysteries of
Latin and Greek, and drilled the ru-
diments of a good education into the
younger ones. The doctor, being a
learned man himself, hated a stupid
boy as much as he loved a clever
one. He used to say that God made
all boys clever; that such a thing as
a real’ stupid boy had never been
born; that disease or accident some-
times caused dullness, but that no
boy in the full enjoyment of all his
faculties, mental and physical, could
be stupid.

“What people call stupidity is
simply laziness,” he would say; “if
a boy wants to learn he can do 50;
if he doesn’t want to learn, of course
he cannot, and then he is called
stupid.”

A little boy who was generally
known as Barney used to run about
near Doctor Bartram’s school, and
would sometimes do errands for the
boys. He was a ragged, barefooted
urchin, and none of them knew
where he lived or anything about

him, except that he seemed very
126



fond of the school-house, and always
brought back the right change when
sent to buy anything. One of the
younger boys one day gave him a
small story-book with pictures in it.
Barney accepted it with grateful
thanks, being ashamed to say that it
was of no use to him, as he could
not read. He amused himself by
looking at the pictures, and was
soon seized with a desire to know
what they were all about, and
haunted the school-house more than
ever, as though this would help him
to read.

One morning as the doctor was
giving a lesson to the small boys, a
strange noise was heard in one of
the cupboards. Thinking the cat
must be shut in there he sent a boy
to open it, when who should walk
out but Barney. It was thought
naturally that he was hiding there
to steal something, but the doctor
spoke kindly to him and asked him
what he wanted. Poor Barney hung
his head and mumbled under his
breath that he wanted to learn to
read. The doctor took him by the
hand and patting him on the back,
said: ‘And so you shall, my boy,”
and so he did, and much more be-
side, and became ‘a greater scholar
even than his kind master.









































FOR THE HONOR OF THE TOWN.

TJN\HERE was great excitement in

Riversville, because a sailing-
match was to be held to decide the
supremacy of Riversville or Mea-
dowville, its rival of long standing, in
sailing matters generally. Both towns

A meeting of the Riversville Nau-
tical Club was held to decide what
should be done to redeem the lost
honor of the town, and Joe Hender-
son, the leader in all things athletic,
rose amid loud cheers, and addressed
the assembly, as follows:



















“Gentlemen, some-









thing must be done to





















































stop the bragging and



boasting of those Mea-
dowville fellows, and to
make them understand
that we are the sole
champions of this river.
We have never lost a
boating contest of any
kind whatsoever, except















by the purest accident,
as youall know. (Cheers,













































~ and cries of “ that’s so.”)













































‘stood on the same river at no great dis-
tance from each other, and frequently
entered into friendly contests in all
sorts of sports. The Riversville boys
usually carried everything beforethem
on the water, and were justly proud
of their victories, but latterly their
luck seemed to have left them, and
the tide had turned in favor of the
Meadowvilleites, who did not fail to
crow loudly over their successes, much

to the disgust of the defeated ones.
128



What I propose is this:
let the best sailing boat,

and the best boys of Riversville meet

the best boat and best boys of Mea-

dowsville, and the side that wins will

hold the championship for all time.”
| This proposal was agreed to, and
the terms accepted by the Meadow-
villeites. On the great day thousands
,lined the river banks, and when
Riversville won by a short length, the
crew received such a flattering ova-
tion that they determined never to let
Meadowyille get ahead of them again.


FOR-OLD-AND «YOUNG

Fear not therefore, ye ave of more value

| than many Sparrows. Matt. x: 31.

2 ANY little sparrows
Y In the world abound,
But their Father know-
eth
When one falls to the

ground.

Many waving leaflets,
Cluster on a tree,
Yet not one can tremble,

But its God doth see.

Far more than the leaflets
Or the birds that fly,

Is the Father’s image
To the Father’s eye.

Doubt not, then, O wan-
d’rer !
Wherever thou may-
est be;
He that heeds the spar-
rows
Will remember thee.


GRANDFATHER'S DARLING.

ITTLE Dorothy Dene was dearer

to her grandfather than any-

thing or anybody in the world. She
was all that was left to him of his
family, and was the child of his
youngest daughter, who died in a
foreign land and left this little girl,
then only three years old, to take her
place in her father’s heart. She had
the same soft yellow hair and bright
blue eyes, and the sweet, winning
little ways that had endeared her
mother to every one, and which now

did the same for her. Any child less’

gentle and loving would have been
quite spoiled by the care and atten-
tion shown in gratifying her every
wish, but as her grandfather used to
say, you could not spoil Dorothy.

At the close of the day, when it
was too dark to see to read, and not
dark enough to light the lamp, the
two would sit together in the twi-
light, and Dorothy, comfortably
seated in her grandfather’s arms,
would listen to the tales that he
never tired of telling her. Some-
times she would drop off to sleep,
when he would sit quite still, hardly
daring to breathe until she awoke.

One day she was walking out with
her governess, when they saw a little
girl about Dorothy’s age seated on a
fallen tree, crying bitterly. She was

very poorly dressed, and dirty, and
130





looked like a little beggar, but that
did not prevent gentle Dorothy from
asking her what she was crying for.

““A boy threw a stone at me,”
sobbed the child, and she showed a
bare brown foot from which blood
was flowing.

“What a cruel, bad boy,” said
Dorothy, full of sympathy at once,
and taking out her handkerchief,
she bound it tenderly round the
dirty little foot, saying as she did so:

“ What is your name, and where
do you live?”

“ My name is Molly,” answered the
wounded one, “and I live with my
Aunt Sarah when I’m. home, which
ain't often, cause she beats me aw-
ful, so I stay out in the fields most
of the time.”

“Poor Molly,” said Dorothy, “come
and see me to-morrow morning. I
live in that big house, and my name
is Dorothy.”

The next morning the servant who
opened the door in answer to a timid
ring, was surprised to see a ragged
little girl standing there, and almost.
frightened the life out of her by
telling her in a loud voice to go
away and not dare to ring that bell
again. She was turning away sor-
rowfully, when she heard a sweet
voice say :

“Molly, Molly, come here,” and
GRANDFATHER'S DARLING. 131



“SOMETIMES SHE WOULD DROP OFF TO SLEEP.”
dainty Dorothy came tripping down | When her grandfather heard how
the marble steps, and taking her by | badly she was treated, he took her
the hand, led her into the house. | away from her aunt.
FOR THE EXHIBITION.

T was a wet stormy night, and

Mr. and Mrs. Lindsay were sit-
, ting with their children in their
comfortable parlor, where big logs of
wood crackled and glowed in the
fireplace. Their daughter Alice was
sewing, while the boys, Dick and
Cecil, were engaged in the strange
game of making snails run races
through little tunnels which they
made of dominoes. This was a
favorite amusement of theirs, and
they would worry all the family into
making bets on the results. Each
boy had his own tunnel and snails,
the latter being regarded with as
much interest as though they were
thoroughbred race horses, and after
the bets were made—which usually
consisted of all sorts of odds and
ends, from a bit of candy to an iron
nail—the racers were shaken up to
make them quite awake, and placed
just inside of each tunnel, receiving
a parting flip from their owners’
fingers to remind them of their duty.
If they showed no sign of appearing
at the other end within a given time,
a marble was shot in after them to
make them more lively. Half a
dozen of these gentle reminders
usually had the desired effect, and a
pair of horns protruding from the far
end of the tunnel would be greeted

with loud acclamations, followed by
132



a demand from the owner for the
immediate payment of all bets.

The boys were deeply engrossed
in their game, ’as the contestants had
disappeared for some time, and their
re-appearance might be expected at
any moment. Alice was chatting
merrily with her parents, when sud-
denly she dropped her work saying:

“Hark! what was that noise IL
heard?”

They all listened attentively, when
a weak little mew sounded above the
splash of the rain, so faint that it
could hardly be distinguished from
the moaning of the wind. Alice ran
to the door, and the boys tore them-
selves away from their beloved snails
to follow her. Crouching on the
door step they found a tiny tabby
kitten, shivering with cold, and as
wet as though it had been ducked in
a pond. Alice picked it up, and
taking it to the kitchen gave it a dish
of warm milk which it swallowed
eagerly. She then wrapped it in a
piece of old flannel, and it soon forgot
all its troubles in a sound sleep.

When Alice was sitting for her
portrait which was painted by a fam-
ous artist for an Exhibition of Fine
Arts, it one day jumped on her lap,
and went to sleep right on the book
she held. It looked so pretty that
the artist decided to leave it there,
FOR THE EXHIBITION. — 133

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FOR THE EXHIBITION.
exhibition. What is your opinion
of it?

and every one said that the portrait
was the most charming in the whole


DAVY’S HORSES.

AVY was so fond of playing at
horses that he turned every-
thing and everybody he could into
carriages and teams. Even his poor
grandpapa did not escape him for, as
he dozed in his rocker on the porch
in the afternoon, Davy would tie a
string to each arm of the chair, and
standing behind would pretend that
-he was driving a chariot. Sometimes
he would forget himself, and pull his
reins so hard that grandpapa would
almost be jerked out on to the floor,
and a good scolding would naturally
follow. He used to say that car-
drivers, and cabmen, and wagoners
must be the happiest men in the
world, and his one idea of human
felicity was to sit behind a horse and
crack a whip.

Once when he was playing in the
garden, galoping around and whip-
ping up an imaginary horse, a mag-
nificent coach passed down the road.
There were servants in splendid liy-
eries sitting behind with their arms
folded, looking so majestic that Davy
thought they must be foreign princes
in court dress, and the coachman, a
very grave-looking personage, with a
long whip in his hand, inspired him
with an awe amounting to reverence
as he gently flicked the sides of the
four spanking bays, who with tossing

heads and clanking harness trotted
134



proudly by, their knees almost touch-
ing their chins at every step they
took ; some beautifully-dressed ladies
and gentlemen were on top of the
coach, while another brilliantly-clad
person, who excited Davy’s highest
admiration, was a youth who blew
along funny-looking trumpet, the
sound of which he could hear long
after the coach had disappeared in
the clouds of dust it had created as it
whirled down the road.

Of course, Davy had to have a
trumpet after this, and if you look at
the picture you will see how he con-
trived to secure a mail-coach, too,
with which he spent many happy
hours in the garden; his team was
very well behaved, and they never
had an accident. Towards the end
of the summer his grandpapa, who
thought there was no other boy in
the world like Davy, in spite of his
horsey propensities, told him one
morning with a very wide smile, that
he had bought him a present which
he hoped would keep him from pull-
ing his rocker about, and taking him
by the hand, he led him to the stable
and there was a real little pony no
bigger than a good-sized mastiff. I
could not describe Davy’s joy if I
tried, so must leave it to your imagi-
nation. Everybody in the house was
glad, too.
































“HIS TEAM WAS VERY WELL-BEHAVED.”
A REAL HOME QUEEN.

HERE was not a happier home

anywhere than that of the
. Craigs. Mrs. Craig was a big, rosy-
cheeked woman, who had a smile
for everybody, and whose children
adored her. They were not what
the world would call rich, but had
quite enough to make them happy
and to help their poorer friends, al-
though not sufficient to excite envy
or jealousy. Elsie was the eldest
daughter, and was as bright and
happy as her mother, always ready
for amusement of any kind, and
dearly loving a new dress or hat.
Some of the neighbors used to say
that she would never have any com-
mon sense, and would grow up a
vain and giddy woman, but her mo-
ther always answered :

“Let her enjoy herself while she
may, trouble will always come soon
enough.”

Her words were more near the
truth than she imagined, for when
Elsie was twelve years old, her fa-
ther lost all his money through the
failure of a bank, and had te close
his business. They were now re-
duced to the bitterest poverty, and
poor Mrs. Craig, who had never
known what it was not to have
everything she wanted, lost her
health completely. It was then that

Elsie showed herself in a new char-
136





acter; she looked after her young
brothers and sisters, washing and
dressing them and taking them to
school, after which she would do all
the housework and cook the meals,
for they could not now afford to keep
a maid.

About a year later Mrs, Craig
died, and Elsie took her place in
everything, and proved to-be a real
little home queen, indeed. When she
now indulged in a bright ribbon or a
new hat, you may be sure it was for
one of her little sisters, and not for
herself, for she always thought of
them first, and mended and patched
her own clothes so as to buy new
ones for them.

In a few years her father’s busi-
ness prospered again, and she could
once more have nice dresses and
pretty ribbons, but she had shown
that she did not give the first im-
portance to these things. It is not
always the girls who care nothing
for dress that are the best ; every girl
should try to look as nice and dainty
as possible, and those who do not
possess at least a little share of the
vanity that is natural to us all very
often develop into careless, untidy
women, who have to rush and make
themselves presentable every time
an unexpected visitor comes to the
house.
ie x SS,
Ire siting





“THEY TOLD HER ALL THEIR SECRETS.”
137
ANNA’S

HEN Anna Doyle was quite a
little girl she could romp and
play like other children, and did not
know what it was to pass a sleepless
night, but when she was about seven
years old she had scarlet fever, and
lay hovering between life and death
for weeks. She recovered, but only to
be a helpless little invalid, obliged to
lie still and watch her healthy brothers
and sisters and playmates as they ran
about at their games.

She was nearly fourteen years old
when her parents heard of a very
famous foreign doctor, who had
wrought some marvellous cures in
cases similar to Anna’s, so they left
their other children with an aunt,
and took the little sick girl over the
sea, in the hope that the great man
would be able to cure her. Anna
felt quite frightened when he came
to see her, for she thought that such
a very famous man must be a terrible
person, but he was not at all what
she imagined, and spoke to her so
gently and kindly that her fears
vanished, and she told her mother
afterwards that he did not seem a
bit like a clever man, which she
meant as a compliment, for most of
the clever people she had met were
very disagreeable, as though they
thought it beneath their condescen-

sion to be amiable.
138





ORDEAL.

The doctor told her anxious parents
that it would be necessary to perform
a very difficult operation, which if
successful and followed by careful
treatment, would cure her so that she
would soon be able to walk, but that
it was attended with great danger
and might cost the little sufferer her
life. Her mother told her the exact
truth, and asked her if she felt brave
enough to undergo it, and Anna
knowing how happy her parents
would be if they could see her well,
said “yes” at once. Her mother sat
up with her all through the night
before she was to go through the
terrible ordeal, and holding her on
her lap she cheered her with kind
words until she fell asleep. arly
in the morning the doctor came, and
when he had done his delicate work
Anna was placed in bed where she
remained for several weeks. When
she was allowed to get up, she could
walk a little with a crutch, but she
gained strength rapidly, and by the
time they reached home again, she —
could walk without any support, and
only needed her crutch when she
felt tired. Imagine the joy of her
brothers and sisters when they saw
Anna run to meet them! they could
hardly believe their own eyes, and
made her tell them over and over
again about the wonderful doctor.
TR

t
nt
i } a
Le
Rt
ee

tht
PRATT ta a
a



ANNA’S ORDEAL.
139
THE OLD YEAR AND THE NEW.’

E stands, his brow with holly | Will no one say they would recall
wreathed, The dear Old Year?
And drops a silent tear,
For soon he knows he'll hear the cry,
“Good bye, Old Year.” |

Though sorrow he has brought to
some,
Many have memories dear,

nee : ake tl ish that th Id
His wistful gaze rests on the child SOE a pec ee anatnabveeyacet

Whom all will shortly cheer, ee AOldEVene
And hail with voices gay and strong, ;
“Good day, New Year.” And yet he passes from their lives,
Midst jest, and laugh, and jeer,
And do they then feel no regret, While bells ring out and rere shout,
To know his end so near? | “Good day, New Year.’
Se kee







She- Zrandame. ‘said - ta-her- tiny: dear:
~ Whey “you - come agai,
bingy. yot - be - here.

“Why: where -are “you - geiqg?”

| lispecd- ihe - child,

| "To-Feaxen : I-hope,
and-she-meckiy- smiled
| “Oh: yes " cried. the. desing. aebona

“Are you 2. Why; Fe -just - comes Troy Theres ven nee

140



—_——

THEM eneges.


EAR AND THE NEW.

Y

THE OLD

141
THE SLEEPING BEAUTY.

OUNG Dick, although only a | was not worth his salt. Every cent
country lad, was so fond of | he got he spent on books, his favor-
reading stories about good fairies and | ites being old romances about knights
brave knights, and enchantments, | errant and wicked giants, and dread-
that he began at last to believe that | ful battles with dragons, whose ad-

the days of magic were not gone for-
ever, as people supposed, and he

would not have been in the least
surprised if a bird had said “ Howdy
Dick?” to him, or if a big stone had
suddenly taken the form of a man,
and quietly walked from the spot
where it had been stuck fast for
years. He worked on a farm, for he
had no parents or any one to keep
him, and was obliged to earn his own
living. He liked reading much bet-
ter than farm work though, and in

consequence was always being told.

by the farmer who hired him, that he
142





Qe, FUEL



versaries turned into stone if one
drop of their terrible enemies’ blood
touched them, so that to under-
take to fight these monsters was
such a tremendous task, that
few knights had the courage to
attempt it. He read so many
of these romances that although
he had never heard of the
famous Knight of the Sorrow-
ful Visage, he was in danger
of becoming a second Don
Quixote, and setting out one
fine morning to fight wind-mills.

He was sent one afternoon in
summer to attend to some work
and was sauntering along lazily,
admiring the beauties of the day, and
thinking of his beloved knights, when
he came across a sight that almost
took his breath away. Lying among
the long grass, her head resting on a
pillow of soft green moss, over which
her golden hair shimmered like thou-
sands of sunbeams, was a beautiful lit-
tle girl fast asleep. She was dressed
like a shepherdess, and held a crook
in her hand with a pink ribbon bow
on it.

“ An enchanted Princess,” thought
THE SLEEPING BEAUTY.

143

Dick, immediately, “some wicked | was just saying, “For this kindness

giant has put her to sleep.”

He approached on the tips of his
toes, and as he bent over to have a good
look at her, the Princess awoke, and
sitting bolt upright, stared very hard
at Dick, then asked if he had come
to take her home. He replied, that
he would be pleased to do so, and as
they walked along, shetold him ggg
that the reason she was dressed
like a shepherdess was because
she had given a fancy dress ball
to her little friends that after-
noon, and as she was little
Bo-Peep, she had gone to look
for some real sheep and lost
herself, and was so tired that
she fell asleep. After walking
quite a long way, they came to
a big house that Dick had often
admired, and the young lady,
thanking him very sweetly,
asked him to come in and
see her mother and father, but he
felt too shy, and saying good bye,
quickly ran back to the farm. That
night he dreamed that he had dis-
covered the Sleeping Beauty; she
was lying on a couch in a sort of
cave, and when he looked at her he
saw that she had the same face and
the same golden hair as the shep-
herdess of his morning’s adventure.
He awakened her with a kiss, and she





I will marry you,” when he awoke.
The next day, a gentleman called
to reward the little boy who had
brought home his daughter, and
learning from the farmer that he was
no good on the farm, being always
buried in a book, he offered to take

him away and send him to school, if





the boy would like it. Dick jumped
for joy when he heard this, and was
soon installed in one of the best
schools in the country, where he
applied himself so diligently that he
became a fine scholar, although he
never lost his taste for old romances
and legends. When he grew up he
took to writing stories himself, and if
I was to tell you his name, you would
recognize it at once.
# prsting in from school or ply 4 ti
8 Theat the children say. This q

he 6 Withee com ins
. rom the boy, wr > Shar, inn é
On if eb one teaion home his eg rlie st yes,
e threshold,
Joining in theconstant cry,
ver as the days goby — 5


ys pe f iy

{ Graened with alone yy task, ] ] Petes ll unltring 4 :

Hn neday we may vainly ask DE post of duly sp ind
For the comfort of her face, Patient, seeking not} Ss,

ortherest of ber embrace; bxteus fork © J00d a)" Oy,

et ustove her while we may OF tbe children'ag pone te

Well for ws that Everias the days go 42”,

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Vii BA Roe reece Legs ol eae
WV CS Wie SING YINY 2 ale she
EE SEAN NUCH

rh as

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Wess,
oe


A PLEASURE TRIP.

HEN Maurice and Janet heard
their father say that he was
going to take them with him to see
the great Yellowstone Park, they
could hardly believe it was. really
true that such an unexpected treat
was in store for them. They had
read about this wonderful place, of
course, and to think that they were
going toseethemany marvels they h ad
read about was quite enough to keep
them in a state of excitement until
the time came for them to leave home.
They rested the day after their
arrival and the next morning started
early with a number of other tourists
to pay their first visit to the park.
When they saw the high mountains,
of which they had heard and read so
much, the sight of the stupendous
chasms fairly frightened them. In
some parts jets of hot vapor issued
from the rocky heights, which caused
Janet to ask her father if there was
not fire inside.

What amused them most of all
was the gigantic geysers, and when
they saw the air filled with steam
they could not understand what it
was or where it came from until their
father explained to them that this was
the region of the famous hot springs
and geysers. The sun was shining
brightly, and as its rays fell upon the

wonderful spouts of water, which rose
146





to immense heights, they were re-
flected in a thousand different hues,
sparkling and dancing, and mingling
with the crystal water until the whole
seemed like a scene from fairyland.

It took them several weeks to see
the many wonders of the park, and
even then they did not see every-
thing, for to do that would require
months, but they were out every day,
and the pleasure of this trip will not
be forgotten as long as they live.
The lofty mountains, with their inac-
cessible regions and snow-clad peaks,
filled them with awe, while the dash-
ing, roaring waterfalls tumbling over
the rocks, had such a fascination for
them that they could stay for hours
watching them rushing and plunging
over the precipices, the foaming water
looking like soft, fleecy wool.

I could not attempt to tell you a
hundredth part of what they saw,
but some day I hope you will go
there and see for yourselves what
marvellous beauties Nature has en-
dowed our country with. Maurice
and Janet say they are going to write
an account of their trip and embel-
lish it with the many photographs
they procured there, for their father
took his camera with him, so they
will be able to go over it all again, and
recall to mind the delightful incidents
of their interesting pleasure trip.












































































































































































































A PLEASURE TRIP

147
ALL ABOARD!

66 WET sheet and a flowing
sea,” sang Jack, as he puffed
and blew at the sails to make them
bulge out, and all the children cried,
“Yeo ho, my boys, heave ho!” Then
they puffed and blew harder than
ever, while Bob rowed vigorously
with a tennis racket, and the sails
looked so natural that they did not
find it at all a difficult matter to im-
agine that they were really at sea.
I don’t know what Mamma will say
when she finds that some of her best.
table napkins have been borrowed to
fit up the ship, or if Papa would be
pleased if he could see his favor-
ite gold-headed walking-stick crossed
over the broom handle, but I think
they have managed it very cleverly,
and they seem to be enjoying their
tripso much, that if Mamma and Papa
were to peep in just at this moment,
TI really don’t think they would be
able to scold them. Even the kitten
looks happy as it dozes in Vera’s lap.
Jack and Bob say that they are
going to be sailors as soon as they
are old enough, and will travel to far-
off countries, and bring home par-
rots and monkeys and all sorts of
wonderful things for the others.
They have an uncle who is captain
of a fine big ship called the Viking,
which goes to China and India, and

when he comes home from his long
148



voyages he tells the boys all the ad-
ventures he and his crew have met
with since they left home. Once
they were so long away that it was
feared the ship had gone down, as
there had been a dreadful storm.
They all waited very anxiously for
tidings of the absent ones and were
greatly rejoiced when their uncle
walked in one morning. He told
them that their rudder had got
broken and they were tossed about
at the mercy of the waves for a long
time, but after meeting with many
hardships, had finally succeeded in
reaching port safely.

Jack and Bob hope to go to sea
some day with their uncle, whom they
both look upon as the bravest man in
the world, and they are always read-
ing stories of adventure and travel,
and talking of the things they will do
when they start off on their voyages.

Now Jack starts singing asong about
a sailor’s life, and they all join in the
chorus, Bob keeping time with his oar,
and singing so heartily that I believe
they almost imagine themselves to
be really in the middle of the ocean
instead of on the school-room floor.
“Sailing, sailing, over the boundless

main,
There’s many a stormy wind must
blow,
Ere Jack comes home again.”
































































































































ALL ABOARD!

149
AN AWKWARD FIX.

YRIL and Jim had taken their
big new kite to the top of the
hill, and had invited Gus and his sis-
ter Ruth to come and see it fly. It
was a great success and went higher
than any kite they had ever had be-
fore. The wind rose after a while,
and it was fine sport to watch it, and
run after it, but in hauling it down
it got entangled in the topmost
branches of a very high tree, and
tug and pull at the strings as they
might, they could not dislodge it.
They all stood on the grass at the
foot of the tree and looked up at it
helplessly. Jim tried to climb up,
but when he had gone half way he
found that the tree was very straight,
with no places to-hold his feet, and
he did not much like the idea of get-
ting a fall.

“Mother would be very angry if I
were to fall,” he said, “and I know
would much rather give me another
kite than have me risk breaking my
neck, so I shall just leave it where
it is,’ and so he came down.

They stood around for a long time
watching it anxiously, hoping that
something would happen to free it
from the boughs, and making all
kinds of impossible suggestions for

its rescue.
150



“T am afraid it is getting late,”
said Ruth at last, “and Mother will
be wondering what has become of
us, so I think we had better go
home.”

“Let us have just one more try,”
said Jim, so they got some stones and
threw them at the kite, and a lot of
other children who were passing,
stopped and helped them. One little
boy wanted to climb up the tree, say-
ing he was sure he could get it down,
but the boys would not let him risk
it, and finally decided that they
would have to leave it, as it was now
almost dark, and they knew that
they ought to be at home.

They did not like leaving it there
though, and lingered about a little
longer, but at last they walked away
slowly and regretfully, when Jim,
who had looked round to take a last
look at the beloved kite, gave a
loud exclamation of joy, for the
wind had done what they could
not, and had lifted it out of the
branches. It was fluttering about
in the air, and if they had not run
back quickly and caught hold of the
long, dangling string, it would surely
have soared far away into space,
and they would never have seen it
again.








mn



AN AWKWARD FIX.

161
THE NEW BABY.

ee was great joy in the Simp- | the difference, unless it were by their

son house when Blanche and
Ted were told one morning that they
had a new little sister. This was
just the very thing that Blanche had
been wanting, she couldn’t say for
how long. She was tired of playing
with dolls, and used to say that if
she could only have a real live little
baby to nurse, that she would be
quite happy, and now that her wish
is at last granted, I leave you to
judge by her looks whether you think
she is satisfied or not. She will not
let Ted have it in his arms, because
she says—and I think she is about
right—that boys do not know how to
hold babies, and she is sure that he
would let the precious bundle fall,
and she would not risk such a dread-
ful thing for the world, so Ted has to
content himself with looking on. To
teaze Blanche for not letting him
nurse it, he says it is a funny-looking
little thing, and has a turned-up nose
and goggle eyes. Blanche is very in-
dignant at this, and covers it with
kisses, declaring that it is the sweet-
est, and prettiest, and dearest little
baby that ever was born, then Ted
says that it is just like all the other
babies he sees, and if they were all
mixed up together he would not know

152



clothes, but Blanche tells him that is
because he is only a stupid boy, and
does not understand anything about
babies, or else he would see that their
new sister is quite different to any
other baby in the world. She knows
that Ted loves her just as much as
they all do, and only says those
things to tease her, so she does not
get angry with him. ©

On fine days their mother dresses
her in pretty white clothes with blue
or pink ribbons, and sends her out
for an airing with the maid in a
lovely little carriage that was bought
expressly for the newcomer. Blanche
goes with them, of course, and you
should see how proud she looks when
the maid lets her push the carriage,
and how anxious and fussy she is for
fear the sun should get into Baby’s
eyes, or the wind be too cold for her.
Sometimes she meets some of her
little friends carrying their dolls or
pushing toy carriages, then she in-
vites them to come and look at her
new doll, and they all stand around
and agree with her that it certainly
is a most wonderful baby, and asa
great favor the maid allows each one
to push the carriage a little way, :
which pleases them all very much.
=









THE NEW BABY.



153
A SURPRISE FOR MOTHER.

T is Mother’s birthday to-day, and
Gertie and Laura wish to cele-
brate it in right royal fashion, so
they have been up since six o'clock,
and started off before breakfast to get
some flowers with which to adorn
the table, so as to give her a bright
welcome when she comes down.
They have been to the house of an
old lady, in whose garden grow the
biggest sunflowers they have ever
seen, and who promised to give them
some of the very finest if they would
come and fetch them; she kept her
word well, as you will see by looking
at the picture, for not only did she
give the promised sunflowers, but
filled a basket and Gertie’s apron
with lovely roses and other flowers,
so that they feel very happy indeed
as they return home with their treas-
ures.

They have some nice presents for
Mother, too, which they are sure will
surprise her very much, and over the
making of which there have been so
many mysterious whisperings, and
such scuffles to hide things and look
perfectly innocent whenever she
came into the room unexpectedly,
that she must have wondered some-
times what dreadful treason her little
daughters could be planning. She
always pretended not to notice any-

thing unusual in their behavior, how-
154



ever, and the mystery will be made
quite clear at breakfast-time, when
she finds beside her plate a beautiful
little book-marker made by Laura,
and a dainty needle-case put together
by Gertie’s clever fingers, with a card
on which is written in a big round
hand, “ Wishing dear Mother a very
Happy Birthday.” You may be
sure that she will value these pres-
ents as much as anything she will
receive, and they are longing for the
time to come to see what she will say.
' Later in the day there is to be a
party, to which all their friends, both
little and big, have been invited.
The little ones are to have their feast
on the lawn all to themselves under
the trees, where long tables will be
placed for them; then there will be
music and dancing and games, and
when the tired children are safely
tucked away in bed, the grown-up
people will have their party. Gertie
and Laura always look forward to
Mother’s birthday as the great event
of the year, greater even than Christ-

'mas, and they say it is the day they

enjoy better than any other. The
first time they could make her a pres-
ent by themselves they felt so proud
that they could hardly eat or sleep un-
til the time came to give it, and even
now they are always greatly excited
over this part of the celebration.
| \ .

Ht

A SURPRISE FOR MOTHER.


HIGH AND

O doubt you wonder what a
shabby-looking dog like Tow-

ser is doing in this handsome man-
sion. Flossie looks quite at home,
and anyone can see that she is used
to these grand surroundings, but poor
Towser crouches against the marble
pillar as though he would like to hide
himself, and feels very much out of
place. His master, a rough little
village boy, who runs about without
shoes or stockings, was playing with
him by the side of the canal a few
days ago, when they met a beauti-
fully dressed little girl, walking with
her nurse and the spaniel Flossie,
whom you now see eating so greedily,
and snarling at Towser for fear he
might take one of her bones. Flos-
sie began to snap at Towser the in-

stant they met, and the child, run- |

ning forward to scold her, lost her
balance and fell into the dirty, deep
canal. Did Flossie jump in after her
mistress? No, indeed; she just stood
still and barked louder than before,
while the little girl struggled in the
muddy water. But Towser, who is
strong and brave, dashed in after her
followed by Tom, who did not
even stop to throw off his ragged
jacket, so while the nurse ran about
screaming and wringing her hands,
and Flossie barked noisily, brave,

shaggy Towser seized Violet's dress
156

‘where



LOW LIFE.

in his teeth and swam with her
to the shore, while his little mas-
ter held her carefully above the
water.

Her golden hair was full of

/mud and her dainty velvet dress

was spoiled, but she was safe and
sound, and on reaching home told
her mother of the brave boy and
dog who had saved her. They have
both been sent for, and Tom is
in the drawing-room, while Towser
has been told to wait in the hall,
silly little Flossie snarls
and bites at him as if he were a
thief.

Violet’s mother has asked Tom to
sell Towser and has offered a large
sum for him, but Tom says he would
not part with him for a fortune, as
he is the best friend he has. So
they ask him if he would not like to
come and live with them and wear a
smart livery instead of his old rag- -
eed clothes,.and be Miss Violet’s
page-boy. Tom says he would like
it very much if he can have Towser
with him, and they gladly consent
to this, so it is settled that they are
both to come at once. If Flossie
knew how much her mistress thinks
of Towser, perhaps she would be
more polite to him, for he would not
touch her food, because noble dogs
are never greedy.
















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































HIGH AND LOW LIFE,
PHCEBE’S PET.

iG is very difficult to tame deer, as

they are such timid creatures,
and so distrustful of people generally,
but, if taken very young, they can
sometimes be made pets of. A young
deer that had lost its mother was
given to Phoebe, who nursed it care-
fully and fed it with milk from a
spoon; it grew very fond of her, and
used to follow her wherever she went,
running up to her to be caressed, and
Phoebe used to say that it thought
she was its mother. When it was

quite big, though, they had to keep:

it fastened up, because it would butt
at people it did not know, and one
day nearly killed a little boy who
amused himself by teasing it; after
this they did not allow it to roam
about by itself, but kept it in a field
tied to a tree during the day, where
Phoebe used to go and talk to it,
and at night they shut it up in the
stable; it never showed any bad
temper to those it knew, but seemed
to look upon all strangers as its per-
sonal enemies.

The hunting of the stag has been
a royal sport for centuries, and many
of the beautiful forests of the Old
World were planted for this purpose.
William the Conqueror, who reigned
in England from 1066 to 1087, was
so fond of this sport that he laid

waste sixty villages in the county
158



of New Hampshire to clear a space
on which his famous new forest was
planted. The poor people who were
thus turned out of their homes that
the whim of a selfish monarch
might be gratified, did not feel very
loyal towards their sovereign, and
it is not surprising that he made
them extinguish their lights at eight
o'clock, for fear they might conspire
against him, for he must have
known that they did not love him
very much.

The new forest still retains its
name, although it is anything but
new now; it is one of the loveliest
spots in England, and, instead of
the sound of the horn and the bay-
ing of the hounds, the merry laugh-
ter of picnic parties is now heard
everywhere. It was here that the
Conqueror’s son, William Rufus, was
killed by his favorite, Walter Tyrell,
who aimed at a deer, but the arrow
struck a tree, and, turning aside,
entered the king’s heart. The tree
still stands underneath which his
body was found by the charcoal-
burners, and hundreds of deer now
roam peacefully about; they are
very carefully preserved, and, as one
watches the graceful creatures gam-
bolling together, one cannot help
thinking that the hunting of these
sensitive and timid animals is cruel.






PHEBE’S PET.

159
ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER.

(Nig was very fond of

animals, and as he could not
have a pet of his own, he made friends
with the birds, and a number of little
Sparrows were well acquainted with
him, for they knew that he would
keep them from starvation during
the winter. Often, when he had
nothing but a slice of bread for his
dinner, he divided it with his hungry
little friends, and whenever he saw
a worm he picked it up and popped
it in ajar that he kept for the pur-

pose, and which sometimes would be |

half full of them; then calling the
sparrows by making a peculiar sound,
which they understood, he would di-
vide the dainty morsels equally be-
tween them.

He was occupied in this manner
one day when a little old gentleman,
dressed in very old-fashioned clothes,
stopped to watch the curious sight.
The sparrows were hopping around
their benefactor,’ perching on _ his
bare feet, and some of the more
greedy ones even jumped on to the
jar and tried to help themselves; but
this Maurice would not allow, and
made them stand in arow before him
and wait for their turn. The old-
fashioned old gentleman seemed much
amused, and asked the boy a lot of
questions—where his home was, if

he had any parents, and how he
160



made his living; and when Maurice
told him that he swept crossings
and cleaned away the snow from
people’s doors, and had no home, at
all, but slept in sheds, or stables, or
any place where he could find a
skelter, he asked him if he would
not like to have a comfortable home,
and earn his living.

“JT should like it very much,” re-
plied Maurice; “but who would take
me? I don’t l.now how todo anything,
and my clothes are so old and dirty.”

“T will take you,” said the old-
fashioned old gentleman. “I like
you, because I see you are fond of
animals, and I have a number of
very beautiful birds, and also several
dogs and other pets, and you shall
take care of them for me. I will
give you new clothes, and will have
you taught a business so that you
may get on in the world.”

Then they went together to a
large handsome house, and Maurice
was surprised that a man who wore
such extremely old-fashioned clothes,
should live in such a beautiful place ;
but his new friend was very rich,
although he was so old-fashioned that
no one would have thought so from
his appearance.

He is giving Maurice a good educa-
tion, and is pleased to see that the
boy is very grateful for his kindness.




“HE WOULD DIVIDE THE DAINTY MORSELS BETWEEN THEM.”
11 161
ALL ON A SUMMER’S DAY.

F these boys had been told to weed
the garden or to help with the
day’s work, symptoms of a tired feel-
ing would have developed early in
the day, but they played leap-frog
the whole afternoon in the hot sun,

and, although the perspiration poured |

down their faces, if you had asked
them if that kind of play were not
very tiring, they would have looked
surprised, and answered,

“Tiring? O, no, not in the least.
What makes you think so?” and
would most probably have given you
a polite invitation to join them in the
game, and try for yourself.

Lew Willis, who is jumping over

Tom Hardy’s back so neatly, was |

asked by his father in the morning

to help around the farm, as one ot
looked rather ashamed, and would

the men was ill, and the work had to
be done by somebody. When it was
near lunch time Lew complained ot
pains in his back, and said he was
really afraid that if he kept on he
would be overcome by the heat, so
his father told him to go into the
house and rest; when he told his
mother, she said,

“ Father shouldn’t put you to farm
work, it is much too hard for you. I
must speak to him about it.”

This sympathy made Lew’s pains
redouble, although his appetite was

not affected in the least, and after
162



eating a hearty lunch, he said he
thought he had better go and rest in
the field; he had not been there
three minutes when Tom Hardy ar-
rived with his brother Fred and
another boy, and seeing Lew lying
in the grass, proposed a game of leap-
frog. Lew’s spine, that had been so

| weak in the morning, seemed to gain

wonderful strength all at once, for
three hours later they were still at it,
and not one of them showed the
slightest signs of fatigue.

When Lew came in to supper, his
father, with a very serious face, but
with a peculiar twinkle in his eye,
asked him anxiously if he still had
pains in his back.

“Pains?” echoed Lew, in sur-
prise; then, recollecting himself, he

have colored, only his face was al-
ready so red with his exertions that
it couldn’t get any redder. “Oh,”
he stammered, “no, father, thank
you, they are all gone.”

“Ah,” said his father, “I'm glad
to hear that. I didn’t know before
that leap-frog was a cure for pains
in the back; I shall have to try it
myself.”

Then Lew knew that his father
had seen them, so he excused him-
self by saying, “But, you know,
father, farm work is so horrid.”


































































































































































ES SS=
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“THEY PLAYED LEAP-FROG THE WHOLE AFTERNOON.”































































































































































































163
THE ONE-MAN BAND.

HEN Don was a little boy he

once saw aman in the street
with musical instruments all over
his body, with which he played what
seemed to Don the most lovely
music; he had adrum, and cymbals,
and a cornet, and bells on his wrists
and ankles, and looked so funny that
Don called to a man who was lean-
ing against their railing and asked
him what it was, and he called back,
“that is a one-man band.” Don
thought that a man who was a
whole band in himself must be a
very wonderful person, and he
watched him with the greatest inter-
est, throwing him anickel his uncle
Tom had given him when he finished
playing.

After the man had gone Don went
to his play-room and began to hunt
for his drum and trumpet. As he
had not a lot of musical instruments
like the man, he decided to be a
soldier as well, so he shouldered his
gun, and put on a sword, and
marched about blowing his trumpet
and beating his drum until the whole
house was filled with the noise. His
mother came to see what was the
matter, for she thought the ceiling
would come down upon her head,
and when she entered the room she
had to put her fingers in her ears, for

the racket Don made was deafening.
164 Zi



“ What is this?” asked his mother.
“You have found a new game I per-
ceive!”

“Yes,” answered Don, taking the
trumpet from his mouth. “Iam a
one-man band and a soldier, and the
regiment is out on the march now;”
then the noise began again, and as
his mother saw he was having con-
siderable enjoyment to himself, she
left him.

Some years have passed since then,
and Don is a now at a military col-
lege preparing to be a real soldier ;
when he went away his mother put
his gun and sword and drum in a
cupboard, where they lay for a long
time, but one day a little brother
arrived, who is now as fond of play-
ing soldiers as Don used to be, and
who thinks his big brother in his
gold-trimmed uniform much more
important than a general. He felt
very proud when his mother gave
him the gun and sword that this
greatly admired personage used to
play with when he was a little boy
like him and says that when he is
big he will be a soldier too, but his
mother thinks that one is quite
enough in the family, and tells him
that he must stay at home to look
after her while his brother is away
fighting the enemy and defending
his country.
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65

AN BAND.

E ONE M

TH
THE LITTLE ARTIST.

O one who does not know how
to draw can understand what
a very great pleasure it is; many
hours that might otherwise be wasted
can be pleasantly passed at this de-
lightful occupation, and those who
are fortunate enough to be clever
with their pencil or brush need never
know what it means to feel dull or
lonesome, for whenever they are left
to themselves they can settle down
to their drawing. This is anything
but a selfish amusement, for, besides
keeping them employed, it often gives
great pleasure to others. If your
friends have pet animals, you could
not give them anything that would
please them more than a portrait,
done by yourself, of one of these
little favorites, and a picture of any
kind is always more highly valued
by the one who receives it, when
they know that it is the work of the
donor, than when it has been bought
at a store.

Whenever it is wet, and Mary can-
not go for her walk, she gets her box
of colors, and begins to copy some-
thing. She can already draw very
nicely, and is now doing something
for her Aunt Julia’s birthday. She
is anxious to do this particularly
well, because Aunt Julia is an artist

herself, and paints portraits and all
166





sorts of beautiful things, but she has
had to work very hard to know so
much, and Mary means to do the
same.

It was her aunt who gave her her
first lessons in drawing, and made
her a present of a box of colors and
brushes, and a nice little china pa-
lette. As yet she can only do flowers,
and jugs, and little things like that,
but in time she will learn to paint
people and animals. She says she is
going to try to be an animal painter,
like Rosa Bonheur, whose beautiful
pictures of lions, and tigers, and
horses, she never tires of looking at,
but it will be a long time before she
can do this, and she has many years
of study and hard work before her,
although, as she is fond of it, I have
no doubt she will succeed.

I hope Aunt Julia will be pleased
with her birthday present, and will
pass a good opinion upon it, as that
will encourage Mary, who says that
as soon as she can paint living things
she will do the portrait of her little
fluffy dog Tatters, who often sits
watching her when she is working,
and looks at her drawing, as though
he understands all about it. When
it is done we will ask her to let us
put it in a book, so that you may all
see it.




































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE LITTLE ARTIST.

167
THE FISHERMAN’S SON.

HESE little girls and boys live
in France, and you probably
think they look very funny in their
caps, and blouses, and wooden
shoes, which they call sabots, but all
the peasant children dress like that
in the French provinces, and when
they get tired of walking in their
sabots, they carry them in their
hands and go barefoot. Pierre’s fa-
ther is a fisherman, and goes to sea
in a small boat to catch fish, which
he sells to keep his family. Pierre
says that when he is big he will be a
fisherman too, and he is already
quite clever at making boats. You
see that he has now one of his fa-
ther’s sabots on, to which he has
hoisted a sail, and launches his funny
little craft, while the other children
look on admiringly, and tell him
that he is the cleverest boat-maker
they have ever known.

He thinks it a very grand thing to
be a fisherman, but his mother does
not think so, for her father went out
to sea one day in his little fishing-
smack, and never returned. A
dreadful storm arose suddenly, and
the next morning they found his boat
on the beach turned upside down,
and the sails all torn to pieces.
Every time her husband goes to sea,
she fears that he may never come

back, and she hopes that as Pierre
168





erows older, he may give up all
thought of being a fisherman. We
also hope that he will do as his
mother wishes, but for the pres-
ent he can make boats, and pad-
dle in the water as much as he
likes.

Presently the sails of the fisher-
men’s smacks will appear in the bay,
and the children will run down to
the beach to meet them, and as soon
as they get near enough, will wade
out to kiss their fathers and welcome
them home.

Have you ever stood on the beach
and watched a fleet of these strong,
tough little boats return after a day’s
fishing? It is a very pretty sight to
see the small white sails skim over
the water making straight for the
shore, and keeping all together like
soldiers on the march. A big crowd
is always waiting to see them come
in, and they never fail to get a hearty
welcome from their wives, and chil-
dren, and friends, who cluster around
the boats, and lend a hand in pulling
them upon the beach, where the men
unload the fish they have caught,
and sometimes sell it at once to
dealers who are waiting to buy it.
The perils they have undergone are
forgotten in the joy of meeting their
friends again, and all go home with
happy faces and glad hearts.


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ian MAN TT TTT TTT



THE FISHERMAN'S SON.
169
THE IMAGE VENDOR.

ae little boy has to wander
about the streets all day,
standing at corners trying to entice
the busy passers-by to stop and buy
something from him. When the
weather is warm and sunny, as in
his native country, he does not mind
it at all, but when it is cold or wet,
he is very unhappy. He has only
cheap little plaster images, and some
days he hardly sells any, which
makes him feel very discouraged, be-
cause his father and mother are very

poor, and he knows that they need

the money.

His father used to be a very good
workman, and was employed by
house-builders, and then Beppo did
not have to go out selling images, for
his father earned enough to keep
them all comfortably, but some time

ago he met with a dreadful accident, |
ito buy of him.

and is now acripple. He was stand-
ing on a scaffold near the top of a
high building cutting stone, as no
doubt you have often seen men do;
the scaffold had not been fastened
properly, and the ropes slipped from
their places, causing him and two
other men who were on it to fall to
the ground.

With a cry of horror their fellow-
workmen rushed to the spot and

raised them tenderly. One man was
170



killed in the fall, and the other died
a few days later, while Beppo’s fa-
ther was so injured that he will
never be able to walk again as long
as he lives, so he sits by the window
in his little room at home, and makes
the statues for Beppo to sell. It is
very fortunate that he knows how to
do this, which is a trade that many
Italians learn in their own country,
for in this way both he and his
son can earn a living, although
only a poor one, but it is very much
better than begging or living on
charity.

Now you will not wonder that
Beppo looks anxious and presses the
passers-by to purchase his wares;
every image that he sells means food
and clothing for himself and his
parents, so it is only natural that he
should do his best to persuade people
A kind lady has
just bought two statues for her chil-
dren, and he has done well to-day,
for when he started his little tray
was quite crowded, and now he has
only a few left, so he will go home
early and perhaps will have time to
play a little with the other Italian
boys who live near him, for although
he looks so serious, he is just as fond
of play as you or any of your young
friends.






















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































a
Hi

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THE IMAGE VENDOR

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































171
AUNT JULIET.

6¢ (NHILDREN,” said Mrs. For-

rest one morning, “ Your
Aunt Juliet is coming to stay with
us on a long visit.”

“Then all our fun is over,” ex-
claimed Richie, while Nellie made a
face and mumbled, “I hate aunts.”

“That is very naughty, Nellie,”
said her mother; “ What makes you
say such an absurd thing?”

“T suppose she will be like Rose
Finch’s aunt, who wears blue specta-
cles and scolds and nags at them all
day,” continued Nellie, not heeding
her mother’s question.

“Tf I whistle or sing she’ll have a
headache,” chimed in Richie, “and
we shall have to creep about on tip-
toe. Well, I don’t care, Tl run
away to seaif she bothers me much.”

This was Richie’s standing: threat,
so no one took any notice of it, but
a smile lurked round the corners of
Mrs. Forrest's mouth as she folded
Aunt Julia’s letter and observed :

“T think you had better wait until
you see your aunt before you say
such rash things.”

Nothing more was said on the sub-
ject until about a’ week later, when
Mrs. Forrest told the children that
they would probably find their Aunt
Juliet in the house on their return
from school. The announcement

was received with’ exclamations of
172



distress, and they went away declar-
ing they would come home late so as
to ward off meeting the “ogress,” as
they had named her, as long as _pos-
sible. On returning in the afternoon
they crept quietly into the house,
and hearing voices in the drawing-
room, knew that the dreadful aunt

must be there, and slipped noiselessly

upstairs, where they were discovered
later by their father.

“Come children,” he called, “ your
aunt wishes to make your acquaint-
ance.”

They descended the stairs slowly
and unwillingly, and entered. the
drawing-room with wry faces and
downcast eyes, but no elderly, blue-
spectacled apparition was glaring
fiercely at them; their mother was
chatting with a charming young
lady in a pink lawn dress, who came
forward with outstretched hands, as
Mrs. Forrest said with a laugh:

“Kiss your Aunt Juliet, children,
and bid her welcome.”

How surprised they were, and how
Aunt Juliet laughed when she heard
what they had said about her. The
next day Nellie invited Rose Finch,
and they went into the woods, where
Aunt Juliet made daisy chains for
them, and they have such fun with
her that they would not be without
her again for the world.
pitt. or,
DP Li A “ee

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! ery

AUNT JULIET,



173
FURRY PETS.

ARES and rabbits are familiar

to us all, and many of us at

some time have had them as pets.
Although they are naturally timid,
they are very easily tamed, and will
live in the house like a cat if al-
lowed to do so. Frank had two
beautiful rabbits given to him, which
he kept in a hutch in the yard, and
every day before going to school, he
used to take them a nice fresh carrot
or lettuce. On his return he would

let them out, and they were so |

tame that even the baby could play
with them and pull their long
ears without frightening them in the
least.

A few weeks ago his father brought
home a young watch-dog, which he
said he was going to train to stay in
the yard and take care of the house.
Frank was afraid to let the rabbits
out of their hutch while the dog was
loose, for fear he would bite them, so
when he wanted them to have a run
he used to chain the dog up first.
One day he let them out and went
in to his dinner, and when he came
back was surprised to see them frisk-
ing with the dog, who was lying at
the door of his kennel; the three
played together like old friends, so
Frank unfastened the chain, for he
saw that the dog would not hurt

them. They ran about, and jumped,
_ 174



and played for hours, and at last all
three went into the kennel and went
to sleep.

The hare is very intelligent and
very swift of foot; it is well that it
is so, for its only safety is in flight
and the sagacity it shows in eluding
its pursuers; it has no other means
of defence, so that it never shows
fight, but follows the old adage, that
“discretion is the better part of
valor,” and as soon as it scents an
enemy, it hides and runs. It shows
a wonderful amount of cunning in
avoiding the dogs, generally running
in a straight line while they are
in sight, but doubling over and
over again, and with great rapid-
ity, as soon as it gains the slightest
cover.

On one occasion, a hare that was
closely pursued by the dogs, passed
through a high hedge, over which
the dogs jumped; noticing this, it
doubled, returning through the
hedge, the dogs following again by
jumping over, as there was no open-
ing large enough for them to get
through. This trick was repeated
until the hounds were completely
worn out, when the intelligent little
victim, seeing her advantage, darted
swiftly away and escaped, her pur-
suers being too tired to continue the
chase.










































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































FURRY PETS.
A GOOD FAIRY.

ALLY was invited one Christmas
to go to a pantomime, and as
she had never been to one before,

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she was highly delighted at the pros-
pect. She sat quite still and kept
her eyes fixed upon the curtain,
wishing she could penetrate its thick-
ness and have a peep at the mys-
teries it concealed. When at last it
rose, the scene that met her gaze al-
most took her breath away; it was a

about Sally’s size came whirling in;
she had a glittering wand in her
hand, with which she touched the
big pansies, when they slowly opened,
and out of each one came a lovely
fairy; they were soon all whirling
and twirling in the mazes of a dance
which almost made Sally’s head
swim, they went round so quickly.
She was particularly attracted by the



magic cave, adorned with precious | first one, whom she thought more
stones and rows of monster pansies. | beautiful than all the others, and
Presently a beautiful little fairy | wished with all her heart that she

176
A GOOD FAIRY.

could be like her. When the first
scene was over and the fairies disap-
peared, Sally could see her little
favorite at the side of the stage seated
among some foliage, and some gen-
tlemen who were standing near gave
her some candy, which she munched
in a most unfairylike manner.



~~ Soon

ib i}

—

Y

She flitted in and out during the
whole of the performance, and when
it was over, Sally’s mind was full of
her; she talked about her all the
way home and dreamed about her all

night.
' The next morning she rose very
early and went to the pansy bed and
12



177

looked at all the funny little faces in
the pansies; they seemed to nod at
her until she felt convinced that they
must be all fairies. As she was ex-
amining them intently, who should
come tripping down the path but the
sweet little fairy of her dreams;
she had the same wand in her hand,
but it did not sparkle as it had done
when the bright lights of the stage
flashed upon it. Sally ran to meet
her, but stumbling against a stone
she fell down, and on opening her
eyes found that she was still in bed,
and felt very much disappointed to
know that it was only a part of her
dream, and that the pansies were all
hidden under the snow.

At breakfast she said that she

would be quite happy if she could

only see the little fairy and speak
with her; so her mother told her to
put on her hat, and she would take
her at once to the fairy’s own house.
Sally did not require to be told a
second time, but was ready and wait-
ing long before her mother came
down. She ram along chatting mer-
rily, wondering what the fairy would
say to her, and asking her mother a
thousand questions. After walking
some distance they turned into a nar-
row dirty street, when Sally exclaimed:

“O mother, a fairy would not live
here!”
178

“Fairies live in very strange
places sometimes,” answered her mo-
ther; “just wait, and you will
see.”

They climbed a steep, dark stair-
case, and entered a small, poorly-
furnished room, where a woman was
washing clothes in a cloud of steam,
and a little girl was holding a baby
almost as big as herself.

“Here is your fairy, Sally,” said
her mother, but Sally could find
nothing to say; she stared hard at
the little girl for some time, and at
last whispered : .

‘“‘She has the same face and hair,



A GOOD FAIRY.

but she does not look like a fairy
now.”

Then the woman at the wash-tub
turned to her and said:

“She is even more of a fairy now
than when she is at the theatre, for
she minds the baby, and helps me
with my work, and gives me. the
money she earns, and if that is not
being a good fairy, I should like to
know what is.”

Then Sally kissed the “ good fairy,”
and told her how she had dreamed
about her, and asked her to come and
see her, and they have been friends
ever since.

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Destt Thows UBLE, iano EVERY pete GIRL
UST EAT UP HER oe

oa Nes aig Wor G @R


A STRANGE EXPERIENCE.

OME time ago a British schooner
stopped at a small island in the

New Zealand group to get fresh
water; two men were sent on shore
to look for springs, which they dis-
covered after a short search, and were

returning to report their success, when
some natives who had evidently
been slyly watching them, darted
from behind some trees, and seizing
them dragged them to a small clear
space in the wood, where a number
of their tribe were seated. They
were received with demonstrative
yells, and having heard that these

savages, although partly civilized,
still indulged occasionally in cannibal-
istic feasts, they were terribly fright-
ened and felt sure their end was near.

They were stripped to the waist
and cut with a fine instrument over

CRTELS ER. Se



their backs and shoulders, their cries
seeming to cause great amusement to
their tormentors. When it was over
they escorted them to the boat, and
one of the sailors who had been there
before, told them that they had re-
ceived a great honor, as it was a
custom amongst some of these semi-

savages to treat visitors in this way.
179
THE NIGHT-SCHOOL.

IKE’S appearance was certain-
ly not very prepossessing ;
his trousers looked as though rats,
had been gnawing them, his ragged |
coat was several sizes too small, and
it was with difficulty that his boots
were kept on his feet. For some
time he had noticed boys, some of
them almost as ragged as himself,
enter a comfortable, well-lighted
building in the evening, and as the
doors opened he caught glimpses of a}
bright fire, at which he wished he
could have warmed his half-frozen
fingers. His mother was dead, and
as he and his father were sitting in
their miserable little room one night
he spoke of this bright, cosy-looking
place, and added:

“Tf we could take Ned there and
place him in front of that big fire
Tm sure he’d get well.”

Ned was his younger brother, and
had caught a cold through want of
warmth and proper clothing, and as
they had been unable to provide any
comforts for him he grew gradually
worse. His father went hungry
many times to procure some delicacy
for the little invalid, but he could
get no work, and was only one of
many hundreds who were suffering
in the same way. When Mike de-
scribed the comfortable house with



its glowing fire, he said :
180

“Tf they knew Ned was so sick
perhaps they would let us take him
in a while; we will go and ask
them.” So he wrapped the boy up
as well as he could and they went
into the street; as they neared the
building Mike ran on before, and was
peeping in at the door when a gentle-
man came out and laid his hand
kindly on his shoulder, saying :

“Come inside, little boy, there is
plenty of room for you.”

“Please sir, it is for Ned,” said —
Mike, gaining courage from these
words, “he is very ill and we have
no fire at home.”

At this moment his father appeared
with Ned in his arms, and after a
few words of explanation they were
made welcome, and soon found them-
selves, for the first time that winter,
seated before a bright fire. The boys
were taught to read and write here,
and Mike was put into a class with
others of his own age; when his
father’s story was heard the kind
people who conducted the school told
him they would try and find work
for him, and in the meantime would
see that his sick boy wanted for
nothing. They were true to their
word, for they gave them a good
supper and made them stay there all
night, and Ned soon recovered, and
went to night-school with Mike.






























“PLEASE, SIR, IT IS FOR NED.”
USEFUL SCOT.

a Nees good dog he is, and a use-

ful dog, too; does his work
just likea man! Hearing this about
a dog excited my curiosity, and being
desirous of knowing more the speaker
kindly gave me the history of “ Use-
ful Scot.” His master, living some
miles away from a railway station,
often wondered how he could obtain
his daily paper early in the morning.
No carriers came near the house, and
to make a special journey on horse-
back would interfere too much with
the daily work of the farm. He re-
membered that at one part of the
railway the train passed within a
mile and a half of the house. Could
he use Scot to go and fetch the paper
if the baggage man threw it out just
at that spot? Scot was only a young
dog, but he determined to give him
a trial; so he arranged with the
bookseller at the station to have the
paper ready each morning, and with
the baggage man to throw it out at
the proper place.

Scot seemed to wonder next morn-
ing—after going for a walk with his
master and enjoying himself, running
from side to side and all sorts of
ways, as collie dogs do—why he
should be standing still by his
master’s side on a railway embank-
ment. The train, with a shrill whis-

tle, ran around the c¢ ‘ve. Scot!
182



started and was about to dash away,
when his master gave the word
“steady!” On came the train with
a great rush, and just as it was pass-
ing them the baggage man threw out
the paper. Scot soon knew what to
do, and with a little encouragement
he picked it up, and off they went for
home. For three mornings foltowing
he had a lesson, and the next he was
sent alone. At ten minutes to eight
by the old clock his master showed
him a newspaper, saying at the same
time, “ Off you go, Scot!’ After one
inquiring look, as much as to say,
“Are younotcoming, sir?” he bounded
off, and frisked happily away on his
errand. He was at his post in good
time, waiting patiently, and when the
baggage-man saw him alone he looked
anxiously back to see how the dog
would behave. Hegsoon had the paper,
and was runuing back home with all
his might, and when he reached there
what a fine reception he had!

His master can now read the paper
before starting out to work, instead of
waiting until he could send one of the
farm hands to fetch it, as he used to do
after the day’s work was over. Scot
is as regular as the mail, and true to
his Scotch descent, for rain and snow
have no terrors for him, and no matter
what the weather may be, he always
brings the paper before breakfast.




























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































a

Al













































































































































183
JOLLY WINTER.

LOVE the joyous spring-time, when all nature wears a smile,
And the scent of new-blown flowers fills the air,
When the birds are chirping gladly on the blossom-laden bough,
And all the world seems new, and bright, and fair.

T love the restful summer, with its sunny, sleepy days,
The hammock, and the lazy hours of ease ;

The visit to the ocean, and the dip into the surf,
The welcome shade, and hum of busy bees.

The glories of the autumn always fill me with delight,
As I roam through wood and dale at close of day,
Where the many tinted foliage and the softly-falling leaves,
Remind me that the summer's gone away.

But oh! when comes the winter with its mantle of white snow,
_ The frozen lake where fly the happy hours,
As skimming o’er the surface smooth we race with merry glee,
Then all forgot are birds, and bees, and flowers.

And when on frosty moonlight nights the bon-fires brightly blaze,
And cast strange flickering shadows on the scene,

Till the swiftly gliding figures take such queer fantastic shapes,
They look like flying phantoms of a dream ;

And when the stars gleam brightly and the pale moon softly shines,
Her vigil keeping o’er the scenes below,

And sleigh-bells sweetly tinkle while the wind is fast asleep,
And the earth has donned her robe of glistening snow.

O then begins the glorious time, the gladdest of the year,
That banishes all thought of summer days,

For who regrets the sunshine when the snow is hard and white,
And the ting-a-ling is heard of passing sleighs?

Though I dearly love the spring-time and the lazy summer hours,
And autumn when the leaves begin to fall,
My pulses beat more gladly when I see the fleecy snow,
And I love the jolly winter best of all.
184




















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































JOLLY WINTER.

185
186

OUR CHRISTMAS TREE.

H how I wish you could have come,
To see our Christmas Tree,
Such lovely things were growing there,
For Bob, and Sis and me.
A present on the hig tree grew,
For all our little cousins, too.

A rocking horse for Cousin Sam,
For Cousin Dick a gun,
With which he tried to shoot us all,
And thought it jolly fun,
To see us scamper all about
And jump on chairs, and scream, and shout,

A doll as big as Baby Sis,
With clothes as white as snow,
And bright blue eyes and golden hair,
Was fastened to a bough,
And stared so very hard at me,
I knew my dolly she must be.

A flat box full of shiny things,
For Cousin Joe was found,
Who opened it and just said “Oh!”
And then danced round and round,
And, waving it above his head,
“Just what I wanted,” gladly said.

And when he opened wide the box,
Some instruments I saw,
For Joe is very clever, and
Is learning how to draw.
But if that box had come to me,
How disappointed I should be!

T hugged my dolly very tight,
And pitied Cousin Joe,
Because he is a_boy, you see,
And so can never know
The pleasure that to little girls
Are lovely dolls with golden curls.






































































































THE CHRISTMAS TREE.

187
188

A USEFUL EXPERIENCE.

HIS naughty little pussy cat,
One morning while at play,
Peeped through the fence and thought that she
Would like to run away.

So creeping slyly through a hole,
She reached the other side,

And as she frisked and ran about,
A froggie she espied.

In all her life she’d never seen
A thing like this before,

And as he took his wondrous jumps
He puzzled her still more.

She followed him across the field,
And then adown the lane,

But when he jumped into a ditch,
She watched for him in vain.

At last she started home to go,
But ran about forlorn,

And wondered where the fence could be,
Through which she crept that morn.

All night she traveled far and wide,

And searched for it in vain ;
Next day while on his way to school
Tom found her in the lane.

He took her gently by the neck
With reassuring pat,

And running to the fence called out,
“ Mis’ Smith, is this your cat?”

Then Mrs. Smith was overjoyed

_ To find the wanderer,

And gave her milk and stroked her back,
And dried her fluffy fur.




































































































































































































































































































“MIS’ SMITH, IS THIS YOUR CAT?”

189
THE SALLY ANN.

OB TEMPEST and Oscar Vane
were two English boys who

lived at Dover and played on the
famous cliffs or in the water below
the whole day long. Strangers who |
saw them wading about when the
sea was rough, or when the wash of
a passing steamer would almost |
knock them off their feet, used some-
times to call to them and beg them |
to come out, fearing they might be
drowned, but the boys did not share |
their sentiments, and were as sure-
footed as goats, both in the water and
out of it. They were careful not to |
venture out too far, and never ran |
into danger, but they felt quite at |
home in the sea, and their mothers |
used to say that they believed they |
must be half fish, for they did not |
seem to be able to live out of the |
water. |
Rob had a boat that a sailor had |
given him, which was the nicest one
he had ever had, and was a model, so |
the man said, of a real sailing vessel. |
He called it the “Sally Ann,” and
it was a source of constant pleasure
to the two youngsters, who sailed it
about the bay and took the greatest
pride in its speed and beauty, but
one day as they watched it scudding
along, the wind suddenly veered
round, and almost before they were

|





aware of the fact, the “Sally Ann”
190

was rapidly making for the open sea
with all sail set; they knew it was
no use to attempt to go after her, for
they would only be drowned for their
foolishness, so they went home sor-

_rowfully, and when Rob told the
sailor who had given them the trea-

sure, he said:

“ She’s a good strong boat, so keep
a look out for her, she may come
back again with the tide.”

But the boys thought he only said
this to comfort them, and although
they did keep a look out they never
expected to see her again, but about
three days later, as they were play-
ing at the foot of the cliffs, they saw
something bobbing up and down on
the waves, and, feeling curious to
find out what it was, they quickly
slipped off their shoes and stockings
and waded toward the object; im-
agine their astonishment and delight
on discovering it to be their beloved
“Sally Ann.” She was lying on her
side and was somewhat dilapidated,
as though she had had a very rough
voyage; her sails were gone, too, but
it was impossible to mistake her iden-
tity, for there was her name in red
letters, rather faded now, but as
plain as could be, “Santy Any.”
They soon repaired her, and took
good care not to let her take any
more lonely voyages.
























































































“THEY WADED TOWARDS THE OBJECT.”
KEPT IN.

O be kept in and see all the
other boys go merrily off to
their play is not pleasant at any time,
but when it happens on the day that
a base bali game is to be played to
which you have been looking for-
ward for weeks, and school closes an
hour earlier so that the boys may go,
it is much harder to bear than on an
ordinary occasion. Besides which
Sam was not guilty of what he was
accused, and was being kept in for
the fault of another boy who was
too mean to confess it because he
wanted to go to the game.

This game had caused a good deal
of excitement for some days, and as
the time drew nearer the excitement
of course increased; there was such
chattering and whispering in class
that at last the professor said the next
one that spoke should be kept in and
so would not see the game at all;
this made them keep quiet at once,
and they worked busily, only show-
ing their anxiety by frequent glances
at the clock. The ink in Sam’s bot-
tle ran low, and he turned round to
dip his pen in that of the boy behind
him, when a voice said in a whisper,
“only fifteen minutes more ;” the pro-
fessor turned his head and seeing Sam,
as he thought, turning round from
speaking to some one, called out:

“Sam Brown, you are kept in.”
192 .





“YT didn’t speak, sir,” said Sam
quickly. “I was only ’’—
“Don’t add an untruth to your

‘fault! said the professor sternly,

“if you didn’t speak who did ?”
No one replied to this query, and

‘in spite of Sam’s protestations of in-

nocence he had to stay in and learn
some lines of Virgil; as the boys
trooped out he could not look at them
so he tried to hide the bitter disap-
pointment he felt, and stared hard
out of the window. His books lay
unheeded on the floor, and the boys
cast regretful glances at him as they
passed out; at last the door closed
upon the last one, and he sat in the
deserted school-room, dejected and
unhappy; the professor was writing
at his desk, and after a while, proba-
bly feeling sorry for the lonely look-
ing boy, he called him to his side
and said : ,

“Sam, I will forgive you this once,
on account of the base ball; if you
hurry you will still be in time.”

Sam thanked him and assured him
again that it was not he who had
spoken, and just then little Georgie
Green came into the school-roem and
confessed that he was the culprit.
The professor forgave him because
Sam pleaded hard for him, and the
two arrived at the grounds just as
the game was about to begin.












193

:

















Te:















































































—SSSSS =: —— ———
SSS
Se =
= =: —— = ————
ee
Ager
\
SS



=== =\ & a

SSSA

a It “
med yy

/,

“HE STARED HARD OUT OF THE WINDOW.”



4
: v7
LT MM :
ON PLEASURE BENT.

N hearing that Farmer Blake's
pond was frozen, and open for
skating, Tony and Fred immediately
bent their steps in that direction.
Their mother told them to be very
careful, and to be sure and not go
near the parts where the ice was not
quite strong. As they went down
the garden path, she and their sister
Chrissie watched them from the win-
dow, and again called to them to be
careful, and not get into any danger.
They called out,

“All right, mother, don’t you be
afraid,” and went off merrily. Al
though plenty of snow had fallen,
and the winter was well advanced,
this was the first skating of the season,
the weather having been unusually

mild, so they were determined to |

make the most of their time, in case
a thaw should set in and shorten
their pleasure. They had some dis-
tance to go to get to the pond, but a
lot of other boys were going the same
way, and they amused themselves
along the road by pelting each other
with snowballs, and running races, so
that when they arrived they were
quite warm and ready for fun. A

number of their friends and school- |

mates were already there, and the
pond presented a very lively and ani-
mated scene. Many ladies and little



were coming, so it seemed as though
they were going so have a very pleas-
ant time. Being the first skating of
the season, they were all pretty frisky,
but although there were a few tum-
bles, no one was seriously hurt.

During the afternoon Farmer Blake
came down in his buggy to see what
was going on, and told the boys that
he had brought some prizes to be raced
for. When this was announced a
loud cheer went up, and Sam Jones,
one of the biggest boys in the school
—in fact, he did not call himself a
boy any more, but a young man, for
he was nearly seventeen—called them
all out, and said that he was going to
be master of ceremonies and starter.
Then he picked out all those that
were about the same age, so that the
little boys should not race with the
big ones; both Tony and Fred won
arace each, and what do you think
Farmer Blake gave the winners?) A
bag full of hot roasted chestnuts, and
when all the races were run he
divided what was left over among
the losers.

They were very near ending the
day with a tragedy though, for in one
part of the pond the ice was not very
thick; no one noticed it, however,
and the skaters went several times
into that spot, but at last it broke

girls had come too. and a lot more | just asa little boy was skimming over

194
































4

|
:

a

i







































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ON PLEASURE BENT.


































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE RACES.

196
ON PLEASURE BENT.

it, and he disappeared into the cold
water beneath. Every one was dread-
fully frightened, thinking he must
surely be drowned, but Sam Jones
skated quickly to the spot, and in a
few seconds had him out, spluttering,
and choking, and shivering, but not
nearly drowned by any means. His

mother was there, and had seen the |
/ about the accident, and said what a

accident; she was beside herself with
grief and fear, and almost went on her
knees to thank Sam Jones for saving
her son, who was taken into a house
near by to have his clothes dried, and
then went home with his mother.
The other skaters stayed till quite

late, lighting bonfires all round the |

pond, and having a fine time of it.
Farmer Blake ordered a placard to be

put near the place where the little boy :

had fallen in, marked DANGER, in
big letters on each side, so that every-
one could see it, and you may be quite



|

197

spot, as none of them felt inclined to
take a plunge.

When Tony and Fred reached
home they were quite ready for the
good hot supper that was put before
them, and had many stories to relate
to their mother and sister, as they sat
around the bright fire. They felt
greatly alarmed when they heard

dreadful thing it would have been had
Sam Jones not got him out so quickly;
but there were no more mishaps that
winter, for the thin parts soon froze
as hard as the rest, and there was no
longer any danger. But all things
have an end, and at last, to every-
one’s regret, the thaw set in, when
Farmer Blake immediately forbade
any more skating, but the hard frost
had lasted several weeks, and during
that time the pond was crowded with

| skaters every day, who all declared

sure that they were all very careful | that it was one of the best seasons
to keep away from that particular | they had ever known.
















JOHN WESLEY.

HIS famous man, the chief | with the necessity of crossing the
founder of the religious body | fens in this unpleasant fashion, so
now known as the Wesleyan Metho- | that the modern traveler can sit at

dists, had often
to travel many
miles in great
discomfort. On
one occasion he
had promised
to attend a
meeting in a
small town in
Norfolk, Eng-
land, and al-
though heavy
rains had fallen
for some weeks,
and he knew
that the marsh-
es, or fens, as
they are called
in this part of
the country,
would be en-
tirely flooded,
he would not
disappoint the
thousands who
were looking
forward to his
visit, and was



WESLEY JOURNEYING THROUGH THE FEN COUNTRY.

several days reaching his destination, | his ease and admire the scene made

the driver being most of the time | famous by the great man’s ride, from

obliged to lead his horse. the window of a comfortable railway
The railroad has quite done away | carriage,

198
THE LAND OF THE PHARAOHS.

Bee unvarying banks of the Nile | vals along the banks, but in small,

have nothing picturesque about | poorly-populated villages, men and
them to attract the admiration of the | boys are still employed in carry
traveler, and yet a sojourn at j
Cairo is often sacrificed to a
voyage down the magical river,
from which the white-washed
minarets of the mosques are
seen through the palm groves,
where birds, known before only
by books, abound, and where
the sportsman may find as much
amusement as he
can possibly de-
sire,

Small mud-built
villages are seen at
every fresh wind-
ing of the river,
and the Arab wo-
men in their blue
robes, fetching
water from the
Nile in urns, which *
they carry grace-
fully upon their
heads, form a most
attractive spec-
tacle, which re-
minds one strongly
of biblical scenes.
Modern science
has introduced ma- WATERING IN EGYPT.
chines here for irrigating the land,|ing water from the river to the

and these are seen placed at inter- | fields, as was the ancient custom.
199















































“=, . oe Cay oe res

A WOMAN OF EGYPT.

200
IN THE LAND OF THE PHARAOGHS.

All Egyptian women keep their |

faces covered out of doors with a veil
fastened underneath the eyes, while
a band of the same material is placed
across the forehead. The veils of
the rich ladies are of thin, white
muslin, and do not hide the features

- much more than the tulle and lace

veils worn by Europeans. The
women of the working classes are
usually clad in a long gown of dark
blue cotton, and wear a thick, black
veil, which is kept in its place below
- the eyes by gilt or silver ornaments.
Their beautifully-formed, slender feet
are generally bare, but even the very
poorest are decked with anklets,
necklaces and bracelets of beads, or
imitation silver and gold.

When ladies drive out in their
' carriages, they are attended by a
sais, or running footman, who pre-
cedes the carriage; he is always
richly dressed in a short velvet jacket
embroidered with gold, a red cap
with a long silken tassel, full white
trousers, which end at the knee, leav-
ing the feet and legs bare, and a
bright-colored scarf round his waist.
No matter how rapid the pace of the
horses may be, he is always in ad-
vance, a long lance-like wand in his
hand, which he holds high in the
air, and his large white | sleeves,
caught lightly together behind, float-



201

ing out on each side as he runs, like
the snowy wings of a swan.

The antiquities of Egypt and its.
associations with all that is most.
sacred to every Christian, are its
chief attractions to us. Important.
discoveries are made every year of
hidden treasures, and it is impossible
even to imagine how many more rich
stores still remain to be unearthed.
One of the most interesting of the
recent discoveries was the finding of
the bodies of the Pharaohs in 1881.
It had been suspected for some time
that a hitherto unopened tomb had
been found at Thebes, because funeral
statuettes and other important objects.
had been offered for sale there, so a.
strict watch was kept, and finally a.
family of brothers confessed, and led
the way to a place not far from a
temple called Deir-el-Bahari, near
Thebes. Here the opening of a tun-
nel was found, covered over with
sand, and this tunnel led into the
heart of a hill where, in a chamber
twenty feet high, were piled more
than thirty mummy cases, most of
them decorated with that insignia of
Egyptian royalty, the asp. The
mummies were those of sovereigns
and members of their families,
amongst them being those of Ram-.
eses the Great, the Pharaoh who
opposed the Israelites, Sethi the Sec-












































































































































































































































































































































































BRASS BAZAAR.
IN THE LAND OF THE PHARAOGHS.

ond, the Pharaoh of the Exodus, and
other princes well-known in sacred
history. These mummies had been
removed at some unknown period
from their magnificent rock tombs in
the Valley of the Kings, not far dis-
tant, and hidden in this rude cham-
ber; no record of why this was done
has yet been discovered. The bodies
were all transported across the burn-
ing desert and down the Nile to Cairo,
where they now repose in state in a
richly-decorated apartment, on enter-
ing which onesees the Pharaohsranged
in a majestic circle, their dark faces
perfectly preserved, and showing the
dignity, power and resolution which
characterized them while living.

One of the most delightful places
in which to spend one’s spare time in
Cairo is that enchanting spot near
the end of the street called Mouski,
where all the bazaars are grouped
together, and where the scene is one
of continued animation. It does not
matter which one you enter, each
has its own particular charm, whether
it be the slipper bazaar, the Turkish
carpet bazaar, the perfume bazaar,
the flag bazaar, or the brass, or gold
and silver bazaar. They are all de-
lightful, and as you sit upon a divan,
sipping a cup of black coffee, which
the obliging merchant offers you,
watching the sewing, embroidering,
weaving, carving, busy groups, a de-



203

sire to buy a little of everything
comes over you, and your money
quickly passes from your pocket to
the hands of the long-skirted mer-
chant, and when at last you tear
yourself away, you are loaded with
relics of all kinds for your friends at
home. A great charm about these
wares is that they are not simply sold
here, but are made one by one on the
spot. You can see the brass-workers
incising the intricate arabesques of
their trays, the ivory carvers bending
over their delicate task, and the swift
fingers of the carpetmakers weaving
the brilliantly-colored textures.

A very interesting sight, too, in
the streets, is that of a funeral. The
blind are considered sacred in Cairo,
and no person so afflicted is. ever

‘allowed to want, so that blind beg-

gars abound here, perhaps, more than
in any city in the world. When a
rich person is buried, all the poor
blind people are summoned, and
placed at the head of the procession,
accompanying it to the cemetery,
preceded by a leader who is not
blind. After the ceremony each one
is given a present in money, and
most of those who watch the funeral
drop a coin into their palm as they
pass, so that the blind beggars of
Cairo hail the decease of a rich citi-
zen as a blessing sent by Allah for
their own particular benefit.
































BLIND MEN LEADING A FUNERAL PROCESSION,

204
A PEEP AT MADRAS.

ADRAS is the third great Pres-
idency of British India, and
consists of the whole triangle of coun-
try south of the river Krishna, to-
gether with the long strip of the Cor-
omandel coast on the Bay of Bengal,
covering some 130,000 square miles.
It is a land of tropical heat and
scenery. Dense forests, trackless
jungles, with here and there a range
of cliffs and ghauts, veiled in the
fierce midday by heated steamy
mists. Ancient temples, crumbling
palaces, fortresses of old Rajahs, and
ranges of lake-like tanks for irriga-
tion tell the story of a long past
greatness. On the Madras coast a
narrow strip of land six miles long
by one mile broad, was the first soil
held by the English in India. The
city of Madras marks the spot where
Fort St. George was built by the first
arrivals in 1639. We give a view of
the fort as it is to-day.

There is no harbor at Madras;
ships have to lie off the coast in
what is called the “Roadstead,” a
dangerous station, because of the
rapid currents and the violent storms
during the monsoons. The surf on
Madras beach is terrific. The great
waves, rollers from the Southern
Ocean, break in thunder and blinding
spray. Goods and passengers are
landed in surf-boats. They are es-



pecially high, strong and elastic;
sewn together with fibre in the seams
to bear the shock of the toss upon
the shingle.

Sometimes even these cannot go
out, and only fishermen on their cat-
amarans venture. These are three
logs of timber, ten feet long, lashed
together, and managed by a paddle.
Even these poor men sometimes lose
their lives, either by drowning, or by
being attacked and eaten by ferocious
sharks, which abound there. On
festive evenings hundreds of these
catamarans put out to sea with col-
ored lights, which dance and sparkle
in the darkness.

Madras is about 1,000 miles from
Calcutta, and 780 from Bombay. It
is not so large or prosperous as either,
but it is in a far more beautiful coun-
try. The teak trees are invaluable
for timber, the mango for fruit, the
banyan for shelter. Up the hillsides
are noble plantations of cinchona or
quinine trees, the famous medicine
that banishes fever and ague; and of
ipecacuanha, which cures dysentery.
Here grows the valuable gutta-percha
tree, and in gardens, the pepper, and
the clove, and other condiments, rice
for the daily food for the Hindoos,
and cotton for their clothing. As in
other parts of India, cotton-spinning

and weaving are fine arts.
205











































































































































































A PEEP AT MADRAS.

Amongst wild animals, the tiger
ranks first in interest. It abounds in
the jungles of Mysore, and is a con-
stant terror in the country parts.
One old tigress has been known to
empty thirteen villages, and throw
out of cultivation 230 square miles.
In.the marshes and jungles are found
the Indian rhinoceros, immensely
strong and dangerous, the tapir,
monkeys of many species, deer, and
small creatures, such as the mon-
goose or inchneumon, and the little
fruit-eating loris. Reptiles abound,
from boas and pythons to the slender
little green tree-snake. Amongst
birds we show the adjutant stork and
the weaver bird’s nest.

A NOBLE

ARRY, a French Newfoundland
dog, who in the course of twelve
years had saved more than twenty
lives, lived in the stormy times of
the First Empire, when bands of
French soldiers were daily crossing
the mountains to join the regiments
in Italy.

One day a soldier had strayed from
his company and lost his way in a
defile of the mountains. Exhausted
with fatigue, in endeavoring to retrace
his steps, he fell fainting in the snow,
would certainly have perished had
not the dog Barry, who, with won-

| was slain.

i relic of this monarch.





207

There are many races of men in
the Deccan. We show some lead-
ing types of Madrassees and a Brah-
In 1799 Tippoo Sahib’s capital
of Seringapatam was taken, and he
In the Indian Museum
at Kensington may be seen a curious
A wooden
tiger stands over an image of a Brit-
ish soldier. When a handle is turned,
the jaws of the toy animal open, and
the soldier groans. We are told the
Sultan Tippoo used to listen to this
ugly toy with grim pleasure.

Our other subjects are the great
templeat Tritchencore, the ruined sea-
side temple of Malabalipoor, and the
famous stud of elephants at Tanjore.

ANIMAL.

derful sagacity was searching for
stragglers, found him. . The soldier,
roused from his stupor by contact
with the warm breath and caresses
of the dog, slowly opened his eyes,
and seeing, confusedly, what he im-
agined to be a ferocious animal in a
crouching attitude, as if about to
devour him, drew his sword in self-
defense and thrust at the animal,
seriously wounding him. He was
about to strike again, when, now
thoroughly roused, he perceived that
it was the devoted Barry, the noble
animal who had saved his life.

min.
NEW SOUTH WALES.

EW SOUTH WALES joins
Queensland on the northeast,
and Victoria on the west. It is far
more of a pastoral and agricultural
colony than the latter. Very early in
her history her colonists introduced
the true merino breed of sheep, and
even these have been improved, so
that now they take the first place in
all the world for their wool.
estimated there are some 60,000,000
sheep and nearly 2,000,000 head of
cattle in New South Wales.
The squatter or sheep-farmer is a
great personage, with his sons and

daughters, shepherds and stockmen. |

Steadily, however, the plough en-
eroaches upon the sheep-walk round
about the towns.
_ More wheat, maize and barley are
grown than will feed the colony.
Fruits of all kinds, and the sugar-
cane flourish.
has more gold, but New South Wales
has coal, copper, silver and tin mines,
as well as a rich kerosene district,
whilst diamonds, rubies, opals and
sapphires may be found by eyes
that are opened wide enough to
discern them. The greatest trouble
of the colonist in the past has arisen

from England’s grave error in send-_

ing her convicts for so many years to

Botany Bay. The terrible bushrang- |
ing stories show the social dangers of |

208

It is |

For minerals, Victoria |

this system. But New South Wales
meets the evil by her care for the
education of the young, so that it
is estimated nearly one-third of the
population of the colony, attend
schools some time each day! In
conclusion we point out in our pic-
ture page some of the less-known
animals of the colony, such as the
sooty phalanger, a timid, night-hunt-
ing tree-climber, living on eggs of
small birds; the dasyure, an insect-
feeder. Among the birds, the emew,
or Australian ostrich, whose large,
dark-green eggs are often mounted in
silver as drinking-cups, and the
bower-bird, which makes “ bowers”
or “runs” out of branches and
flowers, decorating them with shells
or shreds of gay-colored trifles, as a
lady would her drawing-room. There
is also the mudfish, which burrows
in the damp clay all the dry weather,

| which hasa tiny wing as well as gills.



The little picture of the native dog-
dance is taken from Captain Cook’s
voyages, and was witnessed by him.
Notice also the ox-team, strong but
slow; andthe cutting and carrying

of sugar-cane.

The other scenes are up the coun-
try—a grand water-fall, a wonderful
sparry cave, and “Evan’s crown,” a
blue range of precipitous cliffs in the
mountains.








































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































NATIVE DOG
DANCE










QUEENSLAND.

HIRTEEN hundred miles from
north to south, and eight hun-
dred from east to west; such is
Queensland, the youngest, most prom-
ising, most romantic of all the sister
colonies of Australasia.
To begin with the coast, headland
succeeds headland in splendid per-

spective, with sunniest bays and har- |
bors between, fringed by a perfect.

maze of beautiful islands. On the
mainland, never out of sight, long
ranges of mountains, often 6,000 feet
high, stretch down to the coast.
These keep the townships and sea-
ports cool and healthy. Many are
the rivers that flow down valleys of
tropical beauty to the sea, and as
nearly all of them are navigable for
varying distances, they will one day
be busy highways of East Australian

commerce. Most of the longest and

finest rivers in Australia take their

rise in Queensland.
_ All along the east coast, at about
300 miles from the

stretches the Great Barrier Reef, |
. . |
connecting numberless coral islets,

and breaking the force of the thun-
dering “rollers” of the South Pacific :
on the one side of this coral wall all
is noise and foam, on the sheltered
side all is peaceful beauty. Here
the white and purple corals grow;

here the famous béche-de-mer-trepang,
210

mainland, |

|



when dried the dainty of Chinese
epicures, is fished for. In the more
northerly seas are great turtles,
caught by the fishers by turning
them on their backs. Mother of
pearl and tortoise-shell are also sought
for there.

One of the rare marine mammals
of the Pacific, the dugong, makes its
home in the silent, rocky shores of
the warm north. It is a timid vege-
table feeder, with a snout like a great
pig, and, indeed, is very pig-like in-
ternally. Itis sad to hear that these
interesting, harmless creatures flee
and perish wherever man intrudes.
Perhaps they may be protected in
some corner of the “ Reef,” as the
seals are at San Francisco.

The Queensland natives are more
numerous and fierce than those in
other parts of the continent. (See
our picture, portrait of native woman
and encampment.) Near the towns
they have been half-civilized, and
will do a little work, but they soon
get tired and escape to the bush for
a long spell of idleness. Some two
hundred of the cleverest have been
trained by the police as trackers and
patrols.

The natives in the interior are
skillful hunters and fishers. Their
language and customs have been care-
fully studied. It is only by so doing
COCOA-NUT TREES

= ————————
———— =

N_ ISLAND



hod
roa
—
212

we can realize how inestimable are
the benefits of Christian society, and
how increasingly are the living in-
debted to the noble dead. ‘The trees
of Queensland are interesting; the
banana and the cocoanut flourish ;
so does the health-breathing eucalyp-
tus. Notice also in one of our pic-
- tures the curious bottle-tree. The
trees in Queensland never entirely
shed their leaves. There are no bare
twigs even in winter.

From time to time Queensland suf
fers from terrible storms and cyclones,
which tear great trees up by the
roots, drive earth and stones, and kill
animals and men. In North Queens-
land the sugar-cane grows well; this

brings us to the one black spot in/

this beautiful colony’s record. The
climate is too hot for white labor, at

least in sugar plantations, so ships |

go around the South Pacific, hiring
“ Kanakas,” or black islanders, for a
term of -years to serve in North
Queensland. There is little doubt
that great crime and cruelty have
been wrought in this traffic. It is
called “ black-birding,” and the Eng-
lish people fear it is a form of slave-
trade over again. North and South
Queenslanders take different sides, as
the Northern and Southern States



QUEENSLAND.

did before the war; only here it is
the Northerners who import black
labor.

Sugar, coffee, tobacco, rice, maize
and arrowroot are grown. Fruits
are abundant—peaches, oranges, ba-
nanas and pineapples. Eucalyptus
oil, the great medicine for fever and
influenza, is extracted. No part of
Australia is so rich in minerals as
Queensland. There is more gold,
more copper, silver, lead, tin and
manganese than elsewhere. But the
glory of the land is in its flocks
and herds, with ten millions of sheep
and four and a half millions of
cattle.

In our picture we show the Parlia-
ment house of the former, and the
noble bridge at the latter town.
Mount Wyneck and Lion Island are
curiously shaped mountains. The
ereat ant-hills are from the tropical
Gulf of Carpentaria. Notice also
stock driving, pearl fishing and sugar-
cane crushing, industries characteris-
tic of Queensland. Altogether the
colony is a very interesting one. May
righteousness and peace be its por-
tion! May war never invade its
borders! Above all, may no slave
curse descend upon this loveliest land
of the southern seas,
THE MOORS.

7 HEN the Moors were driven | ships could hide in a creek, or be-

from their beloved Granada,
they settled in various parts of Af-
rica, and were no sooner established

A MOOR OF TUNIS.

in their new home than they sought
vengeance on their oppressors. Not
being strong enough to meet the
Spaniards in the open field, they lay
in wait for them at sea, and up to
the early part of this century, were
the terror of all comers. Their little



hind a rock until the enemy appeared,
then after a scramble on board, and
a desperate hand-to-hand scufile, the
prize would usually
be taken.

Many Spaniards
and other Kuro-
peans were captured
by these galleys
and kept in slavery.
Sometimes they
were very badly
treated, being put

_to the hardest labor,
but that which was
most galling to their
pride was being
compelled to row in
the galleys, and
thus aid their cap-
tors in pursuing and
seizing European
ships. The great
Cervantes, author of
Don Quixote, was
taken with some
other Spaniards and
kept in slavery by the Moors for five
years. Although he was not harshly
treated, being looked upon as a pris-
oner of value for whom a heavy ran-
som would be paid, he was in daily
expectation of death, many of his
comrades having suffered this penalty.
213
SCENES AMONGST THE SOMALIS.

APTAIN VITTORIA BAT-
TEGO, of the Italian army

in Africa, published in L’[Ulustrazione
ftaliana, an account of the city of
Lugh in Somaliland. The city was
known previously by name only to
the civilized world. The name sig-
nifies a place that may be entered
from only one direction. It lies on
the left bank of the Ganuna, or
Giuba, Europeans call that river in
Somaliland, and occupies a long
tongue of land, and is surrounded
by a wall, and that is closed and bar-
ricaded at night. The houses are
made of pickets, and thatched with
palm leaves. There are frequent fires
in the principal street of the city.
The inhabitants, save part of the
slaves, are all Mohammedans. The
climate is excellent. The octoge-
narian Sultan, Ali Hassan Nun, is
good, first, and much beloved of his
subjects. He is rich, and has at-
tracted to Lugh the commerce of the
Red Sea coast, and of the interior.
The people of Lugh wear a single
sheet-like garment fastened at the
loins with bands of white or colored
linen. The young women decorate
themselves with fluttering ribbons.
The married women completely mask
the head and face. The men wear
few ornaments. Some permit their

hair to grow long, and stick in it
214



spines of carved wood, single, double
and treble, which serve in place of
combs. Each has a rosary about his
neck, from which hangs a pair of
tweezers for extracting the spines
from the hair. A Somali is a grown
man at fifteen, and girls marry at ten.

The trade of Lugh is well regu-
lated, and has, as it were, all the
forms of commerce in civilized coun-
tries. Silver money is used, the In-
dian rupee being one of the coins.
There are various units of measure,
among them the English pound.

Although the caravans are subject

to tax, the poor Bedouins are ex-
cepted. They come from the in-
terior, and help maintain the trade
of Lugh.

The people of Lugh know but two
surgical operations; cauterization
and, oddly enough, the Ceesarian op-
eration. The dead are buried with
the knees bent. The people are tem-
perate in the use of alcohol. They
live on rice, coffee and milk, and
rarely eat meat. They smoke the
naighila and their tobacco. Justice
is administered in part according to
the Koran, and in part according to
laws of oral tradition. Few and
poor are the local industries. Rough
len is woven, and goldsmiths make
handsome ornaments, using various
other metals also, especially silver.
aoe
Ss























































SCENES AMONGST THE SOMALIS, 915
THE TREASURE OF GWALIOR.

A FEW years before the Indian | work was finished, the Rajah gave
mutiny of 1856, the Rajah of | them several bottles of wine to drink
Gwalior, being suspected of treason | his health. The wine was poisoned,
to the British Government, was de- | and all the soldiers died in a short
throned, and became one of the bit- time except this one, who, seeing
terest foes the English had to deal what had happened, feigned death
with. His treasure, which had been to escape his master’s dagger.
stored in a secret chamber of his pal- He conducted a party to the ruins,
ace for three generations, was valued but the treasure had vanished.
at nearly twenty million dollars, and Search parties have been close on its
two weeks before the mutiny broke | track several times, and it was last
out, he left his palace with a trusty heard of through a native who of
servant and ten soldiers, carrying fered gems for salein Bombay. When
this treasure on horses. He returned | arrested he confessed that he was the
with only the servant, who was leader of a gang of robbers, who had
locked in a dungeon, and never seen found the treasure and taken it on a
again, no one daring to ask what | boat, which had sprung a-leak. All
had become of him or the soldiers. | except this one man, who had about
Two months later the Rajah was | fifty thousand dollars’ worth of unset
killed in battle, but when his palace gems upon him, went to the bottom.
was searched, the treasure-room was | He refused to tell the locality of the
found to be empty. It was thought accident, and soon after dicd.
that he might have hidden his valu-. Since then the wreck has been con-
ables in one of the massive stone | tinually sought for, and the British
temples for which this city is so | government has offered an immense
famous, the many secret chambers | reward to any one who shall find it, or
and solid stone masonry of which | be instrumental in putting one of the
make them safe hiding-places, and | numerous government search parties
these were all searched, but in vain. | on its track. This has caused many
Some time afterwards a native told | adventurous spirits to embark in pur-
an English officer that he was one of | suitof the hidden wealth, but although
the soldiers who had assisted the Ra-| large sums have been spent all at- -
jah in removing the treasure, which | tempts so far have been unsuccessful,
they had carefully hidden in the | and the vast treasure still lies at the

ruins outside the city, and when the bottom of the Ganges.
216






a

In"
{ i el

Ny ir ty



A TEMPLE OF GWALIOR, INDIA.
MONGOLIA.

HEN we look at the maps of
Asia and Africa, we still see
a few large white spaces without
rivers, mountains or towns marked
there. Some of these are simply un-
explored countries, which when they
come to be visited are found to be
pleasant, fertile and fully inhabited
lands. Others are desolate, barren
wastes, where only a few wandering
tribes find a scanty living. Mongolia
has both of these characters.
The vast rainless tract that is called

the desert of Gobi, is more than 1200 |

miles in length. It is a high table-
land, 3500 feet above the sea; in
winter intensely cold, and in summer
a furnace.

Here are neither trees, streams, nor
inhabitants. An English missionary,
Mr. Gilmour, describes it as a rough,
milky-white desert, with bright-col-
ored stones of red, green and blue,
with black boulders and a few wiry
blades of dried grass. Here are seen
the most wonderful mirages. In the
morning the traveler is delighted to
see what he thinks to be tents, flocks
and camels moving about; or it may
be lakes, islands, trees reflected in the
water; or minarets and sails of ships.
It is all a cheat. Toiling to the spot
he only finds rocks, drought and heat.

There are, however, other parts of
Mongolia which are richly wooded
and very fertile. The valleys, through

218



which flow the tributaries of the great
rivers Amoor and Singari, are de-
scribed by travelers as some of the
loveliest on earth. . Snowy moun-
tains, cleft by ravines, rocks of many-
colored marbles, waterfalls, forests,
foaming rivers, unite to form a land
of fantastic and surpassing beauty.

In this district called -Mantchuria
there are limitless prairies or steppes,
nearly treeless, but carpeted in spring
and autumn with brilliant flowers and
soft verdure, a nursery of insect and
bird life. In the summer the dried
herbage sometimes takes fire and
burns with frightful fury; animals,
birds, fly before it in terror. We
have drawn the scene from a sketch
by one who saw it. After the fire
the young grass and sweet plant life
recover the blackened plains with
tender green.

The wealth of the Mongols consists
of flocks of sheep, herds of small, tough
horses, cattle, camels and goats. Asa
rule the people are hospitable, though
indifferent to personal comfort, ad-
dicted to cattle-stealing and to drink,
but when sober, good-hearted and
friendly ; on the whole, life being easy
and their wants few and simple, they
display a lack of foresight, and are lazy
and dirty. They dwell in tents, which
are their only protection against the
violent sand-storms of summer, and
the snow-hurricanes of winter.
AARON Phew ——— ie:
»| MONGOLIAN WRI atic 9 iu










































































































MEXICO.

HERE are few great countries of
which so little is heard, but
whose history is so full of romance
as Mexico. When that soldier of
fortune, Cortez, landed on the shores
of the “Mexique Bay” in A. D.
1519, he found existing there a great
empire, with a high degree of civili-
zation. Itis an exciting but tragic
story how Montezuma, the Aztec
king, was overthrown, his palaces
plundered, and his subjects slain
by a mere handful of European
adventurers. In a very few years
this ancient order was set aside for
ever.

The subjects of Montezuma were
mighty builders. Vast ruins of tem-
ple-palaces, raised on high terraces
and earth pyramids remain to this
day, often overgrown by dense forests
and canebrakes.

Mexico is named after Mexitli, the
Aztec god of war. The worship by
the natives of their deities, with long
unspeakable names, was cruel in the
extreme. In the galleries of South
Kensington Museum, England, you
may see casts of their great altars on
which hosts of human sacrifices were
offered; whilst in the British Mu-
seum are the sacrificial knife and
mask used for their hateful rites.
After the Spanish conquest, the

Aztecs became Christians, but to this
220

| herds of cattle.



day they still retain a strong trace of
cruel and repulsive superstition.
To-day the government is a Fed-
eral Republic—a United States in
little. There is a President, a Sen-
ate and a House of Commons, all in
due form, but the climate and the
national character incline to ease,
and much of the law is never put in

force. The Indians form one-third
of the population. Still there is
progress.

The port of Mexico on the Atlan-
tic coast is Vera Cruz (see illustra-
tion), a busy town and very charm-
ing when seen from the sea; but it
lies low, and is often a pest-house of
the dreaded vomito or yellow fever.

From Vera Cruz to Mexico is 260
miles, and the train makes but slow
progress, as there is one steep ascent
all the way. The lower slopes are
hot and tropical, but higher up it is
splendid. Naciendas, or high-walled
farms, are scattered about, with large
These farms are lit-
tle castles of defence against brigands.
At Cholula is a vast rained pyramid
1300 feet square and 170 feet high.
The city of Mexico is 7500 feet above
the sea, but is situated in a marshy
basin, surrounded by volcanic peaks.
Always seen above the city is the
great towering cone of the volcano
Popocatapetl, 18,000 feet high (see
DES


































































































































































































































222

illustration). Close at hand (see bot-
tom of illustration) is the large shal-
low lake of Tezcuco. There are
many others, salt and sulphureous.
In one of these are the famous float-
ing islands, called chinampas, which
are luxuriantly cultivated, producing
abundant fruits and flowers for the
city’s use.

Mexico is supplied with water by
aqueducts many miles in length,
whilst tunnels and canals through
the mountains carry off floods from
the great lakes. The Rio Grande is
the greatest river in Mexico.

The cathedral of the capital (see
illustration) is stately and_ richly
carved, but earthquakes and earth
tremors have shaken its columns and
walls. Within it is splendid with
altar railings and large lamps of pure
silver. From Mexico a famous ave-
nue and park lead to Chapultepec,
where once stood Montezuma’s pal-
ace. We illustrate a fine statue to
Columbus on this road.

The Mexican character, like the
Spanish, is serious and proud, but
also hospitable and generous. The
women have often great beauty.
The young men wear gold-embroid-
ered clothes and large sombero hats.
In wet weather they have a garment



MEXICO.

called a poncho, a thick, gaily-striped
blanket with a slit in the centre,
through which the head protrudes.

Silver ore seems inexhaustible.
The San Luis Potosi mine has a
world-wide fame. We show a gal-
lery in a silver mine and miners at
work, and a convoy of soldiers guard-
ing the precious metal on the way to
the Government mint.

The vegetable world is richly rep-
resented. Amongst forest trees, ma-

_hogany, logwood, rosewood and ebony

are frequent ; amongst shrubs, cotton
and indigo; whilst amongst fruits
the banana, cocoanut, coffee, sugar-
cane, vanilla and pepper abound.

Birds and insects are notable and
numerous. We give illustrations of
the gay trogons, and the lovely gem-
like humming birds, smaller than
many butterflies, and even more bril-
liantly colored. Amongst reptiles
we show two, the horned toad and
the great nerot called the axolotl,
found in warm volcanic lakes. Ugly
as they are both are harmless. The
Mexicans are great cattle-raisers and
splendid riders. Horses are innumer-
able and run wild. Even beggars
ride! Large and sure-footed mules
in pack trains climb the mountain
passes.
A TREACHEROUS FOE.

ANY stories are told of the; through a lonely mountain pass, to

treachery of the African na-| their dismay they came upon the

tives, who do not understand fair bat- dead bodies of the comrades who
tle on an open plain, but are experts had been sent before with the falits..

in entrapping their unconscious en- | They were horribly mutilated, and not

emy when unprepared. Some months one was left alive. As they were gaz-











ago a party of British troops was sent ing on the dreadful scene, a party of
from Benin with presents to a chief, natives bore down upon them, and
between whom and the British au- | out of the whole expedition only
thorities there had been some slight | two escaped. As soon as the news
dispute. Several officers with an es-| reached England an army was sent
cort followed to pay their respects to | to avenge the wrong, and the natives

the chief. As they were marching | had to pay dearly for their treachery.
223
A PEEP AT SOFIE CHINESE PROVINCES.

THE Chinese emperor, “the son
of Heaven,” as he is called,
used to rule in awful state at Pekin.
From north, west and south ‘there
came every year stately processions
humbly bringing tribute and splendid
presents to his celestial majesty.
Embassies from the hot, sunny
coasts and tropical forests of Annam
and Cochin-China were always on
the march with gifts. Annam sent
elephant tusks, rhinoceros horns,
nuts, spices, sandal wood and one
hundred pieces of satin, and one hun-
dred rolls of white silk. A letter
written in gold from the King of the
South said: “As is my duty as your
vassal, gazing from afar at the ‘ heav-
enly abode,’ I have sent my envoy
bearing these presents; I humbly
wait your acceptance of them.” Ton-
quin and Cambodia did the same.

But all is changed now, for France
has annexed the whole great S-shaped
coast, reaching back to the great river
Mekong. Driving back the yellow
troops of Cochin-China, she has made
herself a splendid empire in Southern
Asia; so no more tribute will reach
Pekin from the south.

Tonquin means the “astern
land.” It is the most northerly of
the three provinces we are consider-
ing, and the nearest to China. In-
land it is very mountainous, but with

224



fertile coasts and valleys. The coast
south of the gulf of Tonquin is An-
nam proper, and the great flat region
tending to the southwest is called
Cambodia; all three provinces are
now really France in Asia. The
country is extremely lovely. Palms,
bamboos and giant flowering trees
erow faster than man can destroy
them. Teak and gum-trees yield
splendid timber. Gutta-percha trees,
dye-woods, vanilla plants and spices
grow wild. The great staple crop is
rice, vast quantities being raised.
The indigo plant, the sugar-cane,

| coffee, tea, pepper, cloves and excel-

lent cotton are grown.

From Cambodia comes the yellow
pigment, thence called gamboge. Oils
and resins are made into brilliant
lacquer, and the glossy coral-red and
gilded wares seen in some museums
are the work of these artistic peoples
of “further India.”

In the forests roam the elephant,
rhinoceros, tiger, leopard and apes of
Among the birds are
peaforol, gold and silver pheasants,
and bright-plumaged macaws. In
the marshy deltas of the great rivers
Mekong and Saigon are crocodiles
and serpents, boas and venemous rep-
tiles.

Cambodia is a net-work of river
channels opening out into the great

many species.
Pra aaa







































































































































































































































FUNERAL PROCESSION=
Te

n\j

LANQUIN. —

CHINES
PHEASAN'

=| roMB “OFC BONZES



A PEEP AT SOME CHINESE PROVINCES.
15 225
226

inland lake of Touli-sap. Here are
the haunts of fever, ague and cholera.
It is death for a European to sleep in
these beautiful but deadly glades.
Still, people do live there, for where
is the spot which is not “home”’ to
some human beings? The French
port of Saigon is fast becoming a rich
and busy trade centre.

The religion of the richer inhabi-
tants of Cochin-China is Buddhism,
founded by Buddha, who is repre-
sented in temples by an image sitting
cross-legged in deep contemplation ;
but the poor worship good and evil
spirits, which they call Nats. There
are many Jesuit missionaries follow-
ing the French conquerors, but few
converts are made. By race the peo-
ple are a mixture of Malays and
Chinese, and are brave, lively and
peaceable. They live very hardly
and extremely coarsely, eating rice,
snakes, locusts and rats, and drink-
ing only tea, but chewing betel-nut
till their teeth are worn down to
their gums. As workers they make
and embroider some excellent silk
and cotton fabrics, while their houses
are mainly of wood and bamboos
gaily colored.

Turning to our illustrations, you
may see a scene in Nam-dinh, a
strongly fortified town Cope by
the French.

“ceremony.



A PEEP AT SOME CHINESE PROVINCES.

Next comes a Tonquinese manda-
rin’s banquet, which is a very cere-
monious affair. Endless are the
dishes—live fish, birds’-nest soup,
sea-slugs (tripong), roasted puppy,
half-decayed eggs—which to a west-
ern palate are hardly inviting. The
cooks are said to be very skillful, and
delight in surprising the guests.
With everything is served snowy-
white rice.

In the centre of the page is a wed-
ding, which also is a long, costly
The poor bride bends
low before her husband, confessing
herself his slave. Lower down we
show a native forge. With a stone
for an anvil, and a few simple tools,
a little charcoal, and goatskin bel-
lows, the men do really very fine
smith’s work.

Below is a floating village on the
Mekong river, and a fisherman with
a great square net, which he raises
up and down with a kind of a crane.

Other pictures to be mentioned are
the altar of ancestors, whose worship
is held sacred; a palanquin, showing
the mode of traveling; a tomb of the
bonzes—that is, the burial-place of
the Buddhist priests; and an elabo-
rate funeral procession.

You can alsosee how the womenspin
silk, and the way in which the peo-
ple amuse themselves in the open air.
ZAMBESIA.

HAT was a bright moment in
the life of the noble Living-
stone when first of any European he
looked upon the mighty waterfalls of
the African Zambesi. He had heard of
them at the court of the Makolo chief
Sekeletu—the natives talked with
awe of “ Mosi-oa-tunya” (“smoke
sounds there’’); and Livingstone de-
scribes how, while approaching the
river, he heard miles off the thunder
of the waters, and saw the five great
columns of snowy vapor rising some
hundreds of feet into the sky.

He says, “Creeping to the verge
with awe, I peered down into a large
fissure of rock where the river, a
mile in width, leapt into a chasm 300
feet deep.” The walls of this gigan-
tic cleft are perpendicular, and wind
on for thirty or forty miles. At the
bottom the vast white torrent boils
along its basalt bed. Bright rain-
bows gleam amongst the diamond
spray. Livingstone named them the
Victoria Falls. (We give a view of
the falls and also of the rapids below
them in our illustration.)

The river's banks are thronged
with game—zebras, antelopes, ele-
phants, buffaloes; and in the desert
plains, gnu, eland and deer of all
kinds with guttural names ending
in “bok.” Besides these are lions,
wolves, leopards and wild boars; and



in the marshes and river basins herds
of unwieldy hippopotami bask and
play. What a paradise for a natur-
alist !

In the tangled reeds and giant
sedges, vast flocks of water-fowl,
pelicans and flamingoes, wade or fly.
Further afield pheasants and part-
ridges, and in the veldt the ostrich
and secretary bird abound. So plen-
tiful was the game, says Livingstone,
that our party had frequently to
shout to the elephants and buffaloes
which blocked our way.

The centre of Africa is a great
table-land, five to six thousand feet
above the sea, high enough to keep
the atmosphere cool and fever-free.
There are two ways into Zambesia.
You may land on the low, swampy,
fever-haunted east coast, and proceed
up one of the shallow branches of
the Zambesi. The dense, deadly,
tropical jungle must be quickly
passed ; no white man can stay there
and live. Only two of these mouths
of the Zambesi can be ascended by
steamers, and the Portuguese claim
both of these.

But lately England has demanded
that the Zambesi, like the Congo,
shall be open to the commerce of the
world; and it seems to be likely so
settled after all. The rapids on the
upper Zambesi are a more serious

227
EGAN

a
Vedi
Ss
mie
sm oie
es

















MUSICAL
INSTRU MENTS,


ZAMBESIA, .

matter. In the far future locks may
be dug or light railways laid past the
falls; but at present there is nothing
to be done but land and load a mule
or donkey train. But on land the
mysterious tsetse fly hinders travel.
It is a common-looking insect not un-
like a large house-fly (see illustration),
perfectly harmless to men, goats or
donkeys, but to oxen or horses its
bite means death. The only plan is
to avoid the tsetse districts altogether.
But the road most followed is that
through Bechuanaland. The emi-
grant lands at the Cape of Good
Hope and starts northward by the
railway through the winding valleys
of Hottentot land, past wonderful
vineyards, through the waste Karoo.
North again past Kimberley and the
dusty diamond country to Vryburg,
where the iron horse stops. Here he
changes into a strong dusty coach,
drawn by eight sinewy mules, and is
jolted, shaken and hurried on through
Bechuanaland some 500 miles. Then
he mounts a large, roomy laager
wagon, yoked with numerous oxen.
The driver carries a mighty whip
with a lash forty feet long, which he
cracks like a gun. Roads there are
none. Great boulders strew the way.
Sometimes the wagon sinks up to the
axles in a muddy pit or torrent. At
night the drivers form laager; that



229

is, make a circle or camp of the drays
and allow the oxen to graze.

And now comes the strangest part
of our story. In ancient times, so
long ago that dates are wanting, a
foreign race held the country. They
built great round towers of granite,
and long circular walls and forts of
fantastic zigzag masonry. They also
came for gold, and have left furnaces,
clay crucibles and smelting works
scattered over the rough hillside.

Turning again to our picture, notice
a portrait of the Hon. Cecil Rhodes,
late premier of Cape Colony. Loben-
gula was until recently the warlike
chief of the Matabele. He is shown
administrating justice at his kraal at
Buhuvayo. The other chief below is
Khama, chief of the Bamangwato.
He is ten years younger than Loben-
gula, and has a noble character. He
is said to be the best example in
Africa of what a black ruler of good
instincts, early trained in Christian-
ity, may become. He was trained
by Moffat. He is a total abstainer,
and will allow no strong drink to be
sold or stored in his country. We
show also some very characteristic
heads of native men and women.
There is a steamer on Lake Tangan-
yika; an ox team crossing a river;
musical instruments; and Bechuana
weapons.
JENNY LIND.

there was no such bird in the hotel.
She returned to hisroom disappointed,
and as she was talking with him, and
consoling him, the same beautiful

T is said of the once famous singer,
Jenny Lind, that on one occa-

sion while traveling, she lodged at
an hotel where a young boy was



staying who was very ill. Her room
was near his, and one morning, after
hearing her practice, he begged his
mother to get him that beautiful bird,
as he knew that its sweet singing
would help him to get well. His
mother, being anxious to please him,

made inquiries, but was told that
230

melody was heard again.
This time she went straight
tothe apartment from whence
the delicious sounds _pro-
ceeded, and knocking at the
door, timidly asked the lady
who opened it if she would
be so good as to lend her bird
for a little while to a boy who
was very ill, and who was so
charmed with its singing that
he longed to hear it in his
She promised to take
every care of it, and return
it safely to its owner. The
lady replied that she had no
bird, but had been practicing
an operatic air that she was
to sing that evening at a con-
cert, and probably the boy had
mistaken her trills for the
warbling of a bird. She
added pleasantly,

“Tf you think it will do him any
good for me to sing to him, I will do
so with pleasure.”

So she went to the invalid’s room
and sang her sweetest songs for him,
and you may imagine his surprise
when he learned that the beautiful
bird was Miss Jenny Lind.

room.






























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































231
JOCKO AND I.

Byend boys and girls do not know | my best friend, because I have no
what it is to go about the | father, or mother, or sister, or brother,
Ea and I am a stranger
in this big country.
I brought him with
me from Italy, and
we are always to-
gether, rain or shine,
cold or warm. I share
my dinner with him,
and would much
rather go hungry my-
self than not give
Jocko his full share.
He dances to my mu-
sic, and I play the old
tunes that he used to
hear in Italy, be-
cause I know he likes
them. Then he takes
the pennies that kind
people give to me, and
salutes them so nicely
that they all say what
a cute little fellow he
is. Neither Jocko nor
I could get along very
well without each
other; I am the only
master he has ever
known, and he would
streets and earn your dinner before | not go through his funny little tricks
you eat it, but Jocko and I have had | for any one else as he does for me; he
to do this for a long time, although | knows my voice and always obeys me,
we are ut yet very old. Jocko is | and I never fail to praise him.


PUT TO THE TEST.

DVERSITY often bringsto light
traits of character that in pros-

perity might lie dormant forever.
Jim Lucas was generally considered
a lazy, careless boy, with no ambi-



tion beyond a game of base ball or
cricket. When he was thirteen his
father was thrown from his buggy
and killed, and it was then found
that his business affairs had been in
a bad state for some time, and Jim
and his mother were almost penni-
less. Then it was that Jim showed

what he was made of. He went toa
ship broker and told him he wished
to work. He was taken on simply
for his mother’s sake, for no one
thought he would ever be of much

use, but he turned out so steady and’
hard-working that in time he rose to
be a partner in the firm, and perhaps
if he had not met with misfortune,
he would have gone through life
without being of much good to him-
self or any one else. He did nobly

when he was put to the test.
233
A VISIT TO SIBERIA.

IBERIA is no less than 4,142
miles from east to west, and at

its widest 2,170 from north to south.
Traveling in a country where all the
great rivers flow north, where there
are only a few miles of railways and
no canals, is slow and difficult. In
the summer you hire a tarantass (see
our picture), a boat-like carriage
drawn by three horses abreast. But
traveling is easier in winter, when the
snow has fallen and the intense cold,
some 40 degrees of frost, has made the

surface like glass. When the traveler

comes to the end of the railway at Tin-
min, he buys a sledge with skates and
outriggers. This he lines with furs,
wraps himself up in a huge ball of
clothes, lays in a store of food and small
comforts, and travels day and night.

His food is all frozen hard-soups,
fish and black bread. These he
thaws when he reaches a post-house,
where horses and driver are changed.
Pursuits by packs of famished wolves,
or attacks by robbers, who are often

escaped convicts, are incidents of.

travel. The post-houses are fifteen
to twenty miles apart, and are all
under government control. The fresh
air, the brilliant blue sky and the
healthy exercise make traveling not
only endurable, but delightful. At
all times of the day and night, at the

post station, where horsesare changed,
234



the good wife brings the samovar for
a cup or two of boiling tea. :

The frost is terrible. Your ink
freezes into a little black bullet as
you write. The driver has frequently
to dismount to break away the icicles
from the noses of the poor horses,
who would else be stifled. When you
awake after a doze, you often find your
eyelids frozen together or your cheeks
and beard glued with ice to your shuba
(great-coat) by your frozen breath.

The Siberians are very hospitable.
They give frequent feasts and parties.
In the summer midnight picnics are
common, and in the winter dances
and surprise parties. Every house
has its icon, or holy picture (see our
illustration). On entering, each vis-
itor salutes it before he wishes his
host good-day. He will then be
offered either vodka or tea. Vodka
is a fiery spirit, the curse of Russia.
The samovar, or tea-urn, is always
ready ; the tea is brought from China
on camel-back (see camel caravan in
our picture), and is very good, but
dear. The moojiks and the poor use
buck tea, made in square cakes as
hard and dark as ebony. These
bricks are first used as money, till
they begin to crumble ; they are then
cut into chips and made into tea
broth.

The religion of the country is




























































































235
236

Eastern, or Orthodox Church. The
clergy are called popes, or papas. It
is painful to hear that drink is their
- great failing. The service is very
musical, but very long, and the peo-
ple stand through the whole of it.
The Siberians sing in a sweet but
sad minor key, chants which seem to
last for hours. The convicts sing in
their chains; the post-driver sings to
his horses; the timber-cutter sings at
work in the forest.

The gold mines of the Lena are

the wealthiest in the world (see our.

picture). Siberia is a land of gold;
only the richest mines are as yet
worked. The government buys all
the gold and platinum that is found.
Most of the trade of Siberia is in the
hands of a few merchant princes,
whose wealth is fabulous. The ani-
mal life of the country is very varied.
In the north are reindeer, polar bears
and white foxes; in the central for-
ests, packs of fierce wolves, brown
bears, with elks and other deer. Of
the furs, the silver or blue fox is
the rarest; of these, all the best
are reserved for the Czar. Sables,
black and red, ermine and lynx
abound. Great flocks of geese and
swans come south in winter, and in
summer the steppes abound with
game. The rivers are full of fish,
and from the roe of the sturgeon



A VISIT TO SIBERIA.

the great national dainty of caviare
is made.

At the top of our engraving we
give some striking pictures. A Si-
berian pope, an old wandering pil-
grim and a moojik’s wife; while on
the other side are Tartars of the
steppes and a group of Samoyedes
from the arctic north. In the centre
is the great city of Krasnoiarsk, on
the mighty river Yenesei, which is
2,500 miles long and 60 miles wide
at the mouth. Below this we show
the breaking up of the ice on the
Yenesei in the spring, when ships
and embankments are often crushed
to splinters, and the noise of the
grinding ice is alarming.

Notice next a picture of a mam-
moth. In ancient times these deso-
late northern waters were inhabited
by great hairy elephants of a differ-
ent species from those living to-day
in Africa and Asia. They existed
in such numbers that mines of their
ivory tusks are dug up, and this ivory
brings a great price to-day.

We show below a Siberian baim,
or nobleman. On the right is a gov-
ernor’s office, where all public busi-
ness is done. The great frame on
the table is the symbol of the Czar.
When that is uncovered the emperor
is supposed to be present, and all
matters are transacted in his name.
SAMUEL COLT.

Gees the many poor boys
who have made their names
famous, that of Samuel Colt occupies
a very prominent position, and will
never be forgotten as long as fire-
arms are in use, for Colt’s revolver
has a world-wide fame and holds its
own with all those
of more recent in- |
vention.
At the age of :
fifteen the future
inventor went to
sea as a sailor-boy,
and when he was
only twenty took
out a patent fora jg
pistol invented by |
himself which he |
called a revolver. ©
Ten years later he
started to manu-

cibly, and he began to consider how
they could be improved upon. He
was often surprised by his companions
sitting alone in a secluded corner of
the ship, gazing at a rusty pistol with
a look of the deepest thought upon
his face. They used to laugh at him





facture this weapon

on a large scale

and met with such success that he
built one of the largest armories in
the world in his native town of Hart-
ford, Connecticut, where his memory
is greatly honored, and to which he
became one of the most generous of
benefactors.

It is said that when he was at sea
he had occasion to clean some old
pistols and other fire-arms, the clum-
siness of which struck him very for-

SAMUEL COLT,
Inventor of Colt’s Revolver.

and tell him he was going crazy, but
this did not trouble the youthful
Samuel, who was working out his
problems for a revolver that would
astonish the world. His career shows
that perseverance will in the end over-
come all difficulties. No doubt inany
of his old companions who visited his
vast armories recalled to mind the
solitary figure, with its thoughtful

face, bent over an old pistol.
237
A PLEASANT TRIP.

RANK WOOD and Will Somers
borrowed the boat of their
friend Jack Branscom, with whom
they were staying, and went for a
row down the river, promising them-
selves a very pleasant trip. They
had rowed here before, but were not
very well acquainted with the river,
and when they had gone some miles
were surprised to hear a grating
sound underneath the boat as though
she had touched ground; they tried

to push off quickly into mid-stream, .

but to their great vexation found
that this was not possible; the boat
was stuck upon a bed of thick mud,
and the only way to move her would
be to get into the water and push
her; so after some deliberation, they
took off their shoes and stockings
and proceeded to do this. Jack’s dog,
Collie, was with them, and watched
them with some suspicion, evidently
thinking that they had evil designs
on his master’s boat; he kept very
still, though, and offered no opposi-
tion, and as the boys pushed and
pulled with might and main without
moving the boat much, he thought
perhaps that his weight had some-
thing to do with it, for he got out
and stood by them.

Their feet sank into the mud, and
the task was by no means an agree-

able one, but by degrees they got
238



into deeper water, and at last, giving
an extra hard push, there was a
splash and the boat was floating right
out into the stream, so they scram-
bled quickly after it and, in their
eagerness to seize it, succeeded in
capsizing it. Their shoes and stock-
ings and caps went into the water,
and, to crown their discomfiture,
Master Collie jumped on to the boat
and positively refused to allow them
to right it. They were up to their
necks in water, and it looked as if
they would have to stay there all
day, when Frank said,

“JT am going to get that dog off
somehow,” and tipped the boat so
that Collie got a nice bath; before he
could climb back, they were both in
their seats, but he soon jumped in
beside them and then they went fish-
ing for the floating articles.

When they landed a crowd of small
boys gathered round them, their curi-
osity excited by the dilapidated ap-
pearance of the trio, and an escort
that they fain would have dispensed
with, accompanied them to the house,
where their tale of woe instead of
arousing sympathy, provoked the
laughter of all their friends.

“Tf I had known you were going
that way, I would have warned you
about the mud bank,” said Jack,
laughing, “but I never thought of it.”




















































































































































































































































































































































A PLEASANT TRIP.
WHERE THE SHIP WENT DOWN.

ee golden sunbeams are playing
idly on the sparkling waters
of the bay, while a few fishing smacks,
their sails gleaming white in the warm
light, like the wings of strange sea-
birds, are wandering about as though
their occupants had no other object
than to enjoy the exquisite beauty
of the day and the freshness of the
breeze, which, too slight to fill the
drooping canvas, pleasantly fans their
cheeks. The purple hills blend with
the blue of the sky, softened and
toned here and there by flecks of
feathery white clouds, and every-
thing is so calm, and happy, and)
peaceful, that to the observer it seems
impossible to realize that but two
days before, those same rippling,
dancing waves were rollimg moun-
tains high, while from the blackened
sky tongues of lightning shot forth
every now and then, disclosing to the |
horrified gaze of the multitudes on
the shore a vessel, rocked and tossed
by the furious waters, damaged and
shattered beyond all control, and en-
tirely at the relentless mercy of the
angry elements. At last, after re
peated but fruitless efforts to launch
a, life-boat, a terrible cry arose above
the deafening roar of the troubled |
waters, and mingling with the moan-
ing of the wind and the hollow boom |
of the breakers, as they dashed over |
240























| of the vessel.

the cruel rocks, melted into one
mighty voice with the raging tempest.
The next flash of lightning showed
nothing but a vast waste of dark,
swirling water; theship had vanished!

The day following was clear and
bright, and only a few broken spars
and floating pieces of timber re-
minded the spectator of the tragedy
of the preceding night. Something
else, too, was found, saved as by a
miracle from the stormy deep. This
was a blue-eyed baby boy, discovered
fast asleep in a basket on the rocks.
He was unhurt, and is now safe in
the house of a fisherman, whose wife
will take care of him until his friends
are communicated with by the owners
The fisherman’s chil-
dren are rowing across the bay in
their father’s boat to look at the
scene of the disaster. The bright
sky and the calm loveliness of the
day cannot banish the sorrow they
feel as they gaze sadly at the spot
where the good ship went down, and
the thought of the many homes that

are now shadowed casts a gloom over

them, as though a dark cloud had

come between them and the sun.
The only thing that consoles them

is the thought of the dear little baby

| that has been saved, and who is now

at home with their mother, laughing
and playing.






















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































WHERE THE SHIP WENT DOWN.

16



241


THE ROCKING-HORSE.

OW many long journeys the
children have taken on the
old rocking-horse, and what tales of
travel and adventure and _hair-
breadth escapes he would tell if he
could only speak. And what won-
derful speed he has; all the fastest
trains in the world put together
could not cover the distance that he
does in the same time; he has beaten
every record that ever was made, or
that ever will be made, and carries
his little band of travelers into all
parts of the world in perfect safety.
He can perform more lightning
changes, too, than the cleverest fairy,
and is turned into a boat, or an ele-
phant, or a camel, by a word, accord-
ing to the land to which the adven-
turers desire to go.

“Where are we going to-day?”
asks Will, who is coachman, engi-
neer, captain, or anything else that
the emergencies of the situation may
require.

“To India,” says Jenny; “I am
going to visit an Indian Prince, and
ask him to give me some rubies.”

They all agree that this will be a
very nice yisit to pay, and amidst
much shouting, and waving of scarfs,
and clapping of hands, they start
on this perilous journey. The no-
ble steed rocks vigorously, but not

one of them moves until India is
242



reached; it is not even necessary for
them to change cars at any point of
the journey. They know when they
are on the ocean, for Will calls out,
“Ship ahoy!” every now and then.
When. they arrive at the Prince’s
palace they dismount to pay their
respects, and are treated as such dis-
tinguished visitors should be. Once
in possession of the rubies they take
their seats again, and make the re-
turn journey as swiftly as the first,
arriving home with many new ad-
ventures to talk about.

As they grew older these trips be-
came less frequent, and at last the
time came when the old rocking-
horse was consigned to the store-
room, where he remained for many
years undisturbed and covered with
dust. He was as strong as ever, and
although his mane and tail showed
signs of Baby Roy’s rough handling,
he was still in a condition to take
many more flying trips over moun-
tain and sea.

And the travelers, where were
they? Baby Roy was sleeping under
the daisies; Will was meeting with
real experiences as an engineer in the
hot, unhealthy country to which the
rocking-horse had so often borne him;
Brian passed his life on the ocean;
and Jenny lived in a foreign land for
many years






































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE ROCKING-HORSE.
A PRACTICAL JOKE.

HEN Alfred Sutton was twelve
years old he was sent away
to school and for his particular chum
chose Nat Goodwin, who was in the
same class as himself. Nat was a
nice boy, but much given to that most
dangerous of all forms of amusement,
practical joking. He was always
playing some prank upon his com-
panions, and Alfred tried in vain to
persuade him to abandon the prac-
tice.

There was a nervous delicate boy
at the school named Ted Watts who
was frightened at thunderstorms, he
made no secret of his fears and said
that he could not help trembling
when the thunder rolled, and that
the firing of cannon had almost as
bad an effect on him. Nat one day
confided to Alfred that he had con-
ceived the brilliant idea of putting a
big fire-cracker under Ted’s bed, and
would light it after the boy was
asleep to have the fun of seeing the
fright it would be sure to give him.

“T don’t see any fun in frightening
a poor little chap,” said Alfred, “I
think it is cruel, and you don’t know
what harm it might do him.”

But Nat thought his idea too good
to be abandoned, and a few nights
after, when they were all in bed he
told Alfred that there would be an

explosion presently in the little boys’
|



dormitory and to expect something
funny. Alfred got up quietly with-
out saying a word, and creeping
softly to the next room, made his
way to Ted’s bed; the younger ones
went to bed earlier than they did
and were all fast asleep; he felt
under the bed for the cracker, there
it was sure enough, and taking it in
his hand he ran back quickly to his
own room, when just as he reached
the door the cracker exploded. When
Nat heard it he thought naturally
that the scream that ‘followed came
from poor frightened Ted, but it had
such a ring of pain in it that he felt
rather startled, and ran with the
others to see what had happened.
They found Alfred with his hands
tightly pressed over his eyes moan-
ing, and the cracker that had done
the mischief smouldering at his feet.
He was sent home the next day, and
the feelings of his parents may be
imagined when they are told that he
would perhaps be blind for life. He
was very tenderly nursed, and when
he was able to go out his sister Claire
used to lead him by the hand. _ He
could not use his eyes for three long
years, during which time his studies
were of course neglected; he recov-
ered at last, but his eyes were always
weak, and this lesson completely
cured Nat of practical joking.


Fy



Wife. =

A PRACTICAL JOKE.
245 a
A STORY OF THE SEA.

T was in the treacherous Indian
Ocean where the storm had been
raging for two days, and on the third,
at three o’clock in the morning, the
vessel struck on a reef; complete
darkness followed, for the shock ex-
tinguished the lights, and when the
long looked-for daylight arrived, it
brought no relief, but simply made
those on board more fully aware of
the awfulness of their situation. The
captain ordered a life-boat to be low-

ered, and it no sooner touched the |.

heaving waters than it was swept,
away; those who were in it battled
for a time with the waves until one
by one they disappeared. In the
meantime three men were dispatched
in another boat to attempt a rescue,
but to the utter despair of the anxious
observers, it met the same fate as the
first, the brave volunteers meeting
death before their eyes. Only one
boat now remained, and the lowering
of this last hope was watched with
the most intense emotion. A cry of
anguish burst from all lips when this
boat was. half capsized, but the men
righted it; several ladies and chil-
dren were placed in it, under the care
of three sailors and an officer, and it
drifted rapidly out of sight.

As the day advanced the storm in-
creased, and the angry waters swept

over the vessel, the force of the waves
246



dashing many persons against the
sides, and leaving others almost pros-
trate on the deck. Several women,
grown too weak to withstand the re-
peated buffetings of the mighty seas,
were washed overboard in sight of
those who were every moment ex-
pecting to meet a similar fate. The
sea raged all day and showed no signs
of abating, and yet no answer had
been received to the distress signals,
and no ship hove in sight.

At last, after three days of starv-
ing, exposure and torturing suspense,
a steamer appeared on the horizon;
she was hailed frantically, and to the
joy of the weary survivors, their sig-
nals were answered, and she came
rapidly towards them. The water
was still rough, but a boat could now
be lowered without much danger, and
the sufferers were conveyed a few at
atime to the steamer. As the boat
arrived on its last trip the wreck sud-
denly parted and the few who re-
mained were hurled into the sea, but
their rescuers were strong and saved
them all, although not without some
difficulty, for they were so weak that
they could not help themselves. They
were all tenderly cared for, but to
many of them this wreck will be a
life-long sorrow, for the boat that
left with their loved ones has never
been heard of since.
al

\
L



7}
16a

He

A STORY OF THE SEA.
TONIO.

HERE is something particularly
pleasant and attractive about
Tonio, although his face is not al-
ways as clean as it might be, and his
brown feet are usually bare, but
when he smiles, which he is doing
nearly all the time, his white, even
teeth look like two rows of pearls,
and his large black eyes have a way
of screwing up that makes those
who look at him feel that they want
to smile too; and then his laugh!

it is impossible to hear it without |

joining in, even when you are quite
ignorant of the joke that has caused
it, and it has saved Tonio from many
a scolding that he richly deserved,
for he is sadly forgetful of his work,
but he is so young and so full of
play that we must not think too
hardly of him for that.

His father sold coal and wood in
the winter, and fruit in the summer,
his store being in a basement in the
back part of which the family lived.
If you could have seen the dark
kitchen, with the twin babies sitting
on the floor playing with lumps of
coal, which they stuffed into their
mouths and smeared all over their
faces, you would have wondered per-
haps how Tonio could be so light-
hearted and merry. He did his
father’s errands, not too quickly very

often, sometimes carrying loads that
248



were much too heavy for him, and
although his father declared that he
was the slowest boy alive, he would
have been very badly off without
him.

He was sent one morning with a
basket of coal to a customer, and
having delivered it went towards
home with the empty basket, but
when about half way he stopped and
began to play with a top that he

took from his pocket, spinning it.

cleverly on his hand. In the mean-
time his mother was preparing the
dinner, the babies were crying and
his father was muttering that some
day he would do something dreadful
to Tonio if he did not mend his
dawdling ways. Everybody seemed
ina bad temper, but when the boy
came in and beamed on them all
with his cheery smile, and kissed the
babies who put their little fat arms.
out to him, and laughed, and crowed,
and pulled his thick black hair, sun-
shine seemed to come with him into
the dingy kitchen, and the sly little
kiss which he left on his mother’s
cheek as she turned round from the
stove, drove the frown from her face
in an instant. His father’s threats
ceased suddenly, and such is the .
power of a bright smile and a sunny
disposition, that none of them knew
the way to look cross.




















































































LITTLE TONIO.
A PROBITABLE AMUSEMENT.

HE boys are in the full enjoy-
ment of their midsummer holi-

days, and pass most of their time
fishing and catching other small ani-
mals, with which they amuse them-
selves and terrify their sisters. Phil
and Gerald have just returned froma
fishing expedition and are showing
their sticklebacks to Harry, who re-
grets that he was not with them.
The greedy little things have already
swallowed all the worms in the jar,
and are now fighting among them-
selves because there are no more.
The three boys have taken posses-
sion of an old shed which nobody
uses, and have fitted it up as a
museum. They are going there now
to place the jars containing the
sticklebacks on a shelf with others,
in which small fishes, of almost every
species that can be found in fresh
water, are swimming about. The

jars have been borrowed from the |

store-room, and when the time for
making preserves arrives, I expect
there will be some inquiries as to
their disappearance.

They have some frogs, too, which
are quite tame, and come to be fed
when the boys whistle for them; they
have dug a hole in the ground and
filled it with water, into which the
little fellows can jump when they

want to swim, and, altogether, the
250



strange pets are very happy. The
boys think so much of them that
they have made a compact with the
gardener, who has promised to look
after them when their owners go
back to school, and send them news
every now and then of their doings.
It is very amusing to watch stickle-
backs, which are well known to
most youthful anglers, as they are
generally among the first captures
they make ; they are extremely vora-
cious, and it is very fortunate for a
large number of other things being in
the water, that they are no bigger
than they are; for they will swallow
fishes whole that are almost as big
as themselves, and will fight in such
a determined manner that they ex-
haust their victim, and when they
see it is tired out, will place its head
in a proper position for swallowing—
give a few gulps and it disappears.
Sometimes they will fight among

| themselves until they kill each other,

but, as a rule, they attack fishes of a
smaller species with a view to eating
them, and their own differences usu-
ally arise over a disputed morsel.
The boys find that their museum
affords a great deal of instruction, as
well as amusement; for whenever
they find a fish or insect that they
do not recognize, they immediately
set to work to find out all about it.






















Dy

Y
fh










A TEST OF SKILL.

ERHAPS you think it is very
easy to walk on stilts, if so
you had better try it the first oppor-
tunity you get, and if you can man-
age to go very far without falling off
you will be very fortunate indeed,
and may pride yourself on your skill.
It is not entirely for fun that the
boys are going about in this curious
and uncomfortable manner; some
sports are being arranged for a
charity, and a race on stilts is to be
one of the features, so the contestants
are practising as hard as they can;
none of them have ever been in a race
of this kind before, and all are anxious
to show off to the best advantage.
Bert Ross nearly fell off, and the
bovs who were watching his efforts
had a good laugh at him as he wob-
bled about; he had to steady himself
against the wall before he could go
on again, and if you look at his face
you will notice that his expression is
not altogether one of the greatest
enjoyment.

Stilts are sometimes very useful
articles, and many lives have been
saved by their use. In marshy
countries it is quite a common sight
to see the letter carrier and messen-
gers going from place to place perched
on these funny-looking things, and in
the distance they might easily be

mistaken for some peculiar member
252



of the stork family. In North Wales
the shepherds sometimes use high
stilts when the snow is deep, and are
wonderfully expert with them; they
are very different things to those the
boys are struggling with, and if you
were to see them you would wonder
how ever they managed to get on and
off their high perches.

A gentlemen who lived in these
regions went out one afternoon to
take a long ramble among the hills,
and was overtaken by a heavy snow-
storm, which was accompanied by
such high winds that the snow was
soon piled in drifts, and when his
friends went out to look for him they
found that they could not make any
headway, as they continually sank
up to their necks in snow, but a man
who tended sheep got out his stilts,
and, fastening a second pair to his
back, started off in search of the
lost rambler, whom he found ex-
hausted with the fatigue of strug-
gling through the deep snow, but
when he was mounted on a pair
of strong stilts he found that he
could get along quite well, and they
soon reached home in safety, so you

-will understand now that stilts are

very useful things, and were not in-
tended solely for little boys to
amuse themselves with, as many
seem to think.
















































































































A TEST OF SKILL.

253
THE SIEGE

HE winter of 1871 was the coldest |
that had been known in France
for twenty years. Fuel and warm
clothing were distributed by the rich
in Paris to their poor brethren until
there was none left to buy, and the
suffering in every home was intense;
many of the soldiers were brought in
from the ramparts frozen, and yet
Count Bismark continued to keep
Paris shut up within her gates, wait-
ing for famine and disease to do their
work and compel the suffering citi-
zens to capitulate.

The contrast between the German
soldiers outside the fortifications and
the French soldiers on the city side
was striking, and the latter light-
hearted even in the midst of starvation
would draw comparisons between their
own emaciated appearance and the
plump round faces of their enemies.
There was a little German bugler who
seemed to be a great favorite among
his own countrymen, and who for a
time was made the object of many
jokes from the Frenchmen on account
of his chubby red face, but finally, as_
he could speak a little of their lan-
guage, friendly greetings were ex-
changed, and it was a common sight
to see a group of French soldiers on
the ramparts trying to keep up a
conversation with the young German.

Christmas Day of that sad year
254



OF PARIS.

arrived at last, and food was so scarce
that instead of the little present usu-
ally given at this time, parcels con-
taining potatoes, coffee and flour were
amongst the most acceptable gifts of
the season. Our little German friend,
whose name was Fritz, was walking
along eating an enormous piece of
pudding, when he saw a French boy
about his own age looking at him with
longing, hungry eyes; Fritz glanced
about him and finding that he was
unobserved threw the pudding over

the high wall where it was caught

and divided among half a dozen
hungry ones, but if Fritz had been
seen doing this, it might have cost
him his life.

Two days later the bombardment
began, and the sound of Fritz’s bugle
rose shrill and clear above the boom
of cannon and the exploding of shells.
When at last through utter starva-
tion the Parisians were obliged to
capitulate, and the German army
marched triumphantly through the
city, it was noticed that while the
victorious soldiers were hooted and

hissed by the populace, there was

one little bugler whose hand was
frequently grasped, and who seemed
to have suddenly come amongst old
friends, instead of enemies whose
hatred of his countrymen was pro-
verbial.
LEILA FFP
Reiners Z SLL Y
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OF PARIS.

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255
ON MOUNT ST. BERNARD.

HE Hospice of St. Bernard, so
renowned for its famous dogs,

was founded as far back as the year
962, and from that time to this the

of mercy, each one is provided with
warm rugs, a rope and a flask of
brandy. Sometimes they find people
unconscious, when they lick their



convent, which stands more than
8,000 feet above the level of the sea,
has been a place of refuge to tray-
elers passing from France to Italy.
The beautiful dogs are so trained by
the monks that it is almost impos-
sible for a wayfarer to get lost.

When they start out on their errand
256

hands and faces, and lie on their
bodies to restore warmth. The trav-
eler, after partaking of the brandy,
is generally strong enough to walk,
and taking hold of the rope, is led
by his intelligent rescuer to the Hos-
pice, where he is tenderly cared for
until able to proceed on his journey.
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describe
'182' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBA' 'sip-files00016.txt'
b39f5fc1269e800cfc578fde30d8041b
588def1258eac82e595527431d792c1eca0a84cd
'2011-12-29T07:57:24-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2570' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBB' 'sip-files00017.txt'
7f060e4ac0ff1aae13cff84403fc69d2
47f750da9451135ddba8b6e175a487d84558d597
'2011-12-29T08:04:40-05:00'
describe
'155' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBC' 'sip-files00018.txt'
94bb7ecf8fff0c1e61cfc180c9c8fa0c
accf4326d1cd80a29725aec71227149c8c40667a
'2011-12-29T07:59:06-05:00'
describe
'2632' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBD' 'sip-files00019.txt'
ffe58bd19d0b1e4b303f97dd7a5ead5e
237580a9840103cc90d4a99664ad7409b699f12d
'2011-12-29T08:01:46-05:00'
describe
'275' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBE' 'sip-files00020.txt'
b892e87e4a790d2be699a64a3a30dca1
e8e0da77e951bd1a5821fb09863aefea6b9603e5
'2011-12-29T08:02:10-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2545' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBF' 'sip-files00021.txt'
4658020c1f5aecb3f77fe20f8d077aed
069690003a597fb5edab7ce45de384e5ffa6638a
'2011-12-29T08:00:32-05:00'
describe
'147' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBG' 'sip-files00022.txt'
4970a78ad08554ad7125f42a3946a07e
f13843a7a88319fc4db908c86e47befc1494fc6c
'2011-12-29T08:00:31-05:00'
describe
'2630' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBH' 'sip-files00023.txt'
b770d0ec3b81440034f54ffead1bea4a
598817ce183fda17e1c2b0010dbf1120e81ea45b
'2011-12-29T08:02:30-05:00'
describe
'283' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBI' 'sip-files00024.txt'
b37275129f2cbfe8f2412a0883df6442
f48739161b02d70af0b5beb8d779a2a4b9382362
'2011-12-29T08:00:12-05:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBJ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
f694734da5e54459c076121db0b0f89a
7bf64506ac47af58170f1ac0b2013512723eebff
'2011-12-29T07:58:32-05:00'
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBK' 'sip-files00026.txt'
994faea2f8b26d6038a5862210c90ce9
66c24d610bb44a8bbfebb7b88152defd91dbf669
'2011-12-29T08:03:51-05:00'
describe
'2628' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBL' 'sip-files00027.txt'
b10c7cdb2f002711ce16df2a0705bef6
19dad3feb9901f9daac4515ec3e4bbed87a0bae2
'2011-12-29T08:02:18-05:00'
describe
'173' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBM' 'sip-files00028.txt'
58c2f8ed910b2fd888e97337ce836fff
1ae1b3287b35ca7d9b8f825b65ad7892da38afcd
'2011-12-29T08:03:58-05:00'
describe
'2600' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBN' 'sip-files00029.txt'
291f95c13d23d4e6f45c4b200f71df99
26f09bd50366445c5b7129785066b140c9b450ae
'2011-12-29T07:58:06-05:00'
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBO' 'sip-files00030.txt'
8e31f5e0366f2cd4edca7dc3675a4237
f265cc2149f680edb7002c374a8c4b6879072a5d
'2011-12-29T08:01:57-05:00'
describe
'2489' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBP' 'sip-files00031.txt'
f02750c41382ef8843592fa5aa7c8446
848dea339ef7bd6a1a25d418367e19c2e40ceb1a
'2011-12-29T08:02:55-05:00'
describe
'218' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBQ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
8ad803e76352d95ff050700904637bd8
3d1601fd66840e26f5fb4066908c1e9ea6066895
'2011-12-29T08:02:50-05:00'
describe
'2609' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBR' 'sip-files00033.txt'
6309fd7bfb92172cf0fda4ef1e442766
15d985f2b314411a92fea4588334684b5dd49922
'2011-12-29T08:02:23-05:00'
describe
'659' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBS' 'sip-files00034.txt'
6c8360ff6f58f2fdb13328140c71a45b
b3e357c66202876c3df4bc3c81c29d7ff9463800
'2011-12-29T08:03:19-05:00'
describe
'2639' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBT' 'sip-files00035.txt'
c5be4adbdd81086e2a467af9580f6c84
07b9b0af8f1b0a730db0d14c0ad3cb7f9721fdab
'2011-12-29T08:05:19-05:00'
describe
'187' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBU' 'sip-files00036.txt'
091e93b3594eaf0d4528fed67f2cb65f
1573fce3d8c2c0606583da0c14dd6fd44a516e2c
'2011-12-29T08:02:00-05:00'
describe
'1650' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBV' 'sip-files00037.txt'
36a768ad531af181d9804c1fa2d10f90
9a6a4c57e1c1f186c95e6ac4c0e8817b08ada5ec
'2011-12-29T08:03:52-05:00'
describe
'214' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBW' 'sip-files00038.txt'
d6a58c81fa11cd42aa056d871987494e
188ad7807fc5bb2292cc2f209b8396bae50b0154
'2011-12-29T08:01:27-05:00'
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBX' 'sip-files00039.txt'
cc6f2abcd1d1c5f320bf7cbcb453983b
194215a37348f95f9cf13c3dbb85af091cd6c8f7
'2011-12-29T07:59:51-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'602' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBY' 'sip-files00040.txt'
34c28e20d3cc96d2edbeb583aca2a847
3d7d3e46cccac647a65c07a4c8685894005d708b
'2011-12-29T07:57:32-05:00'
describe
'799' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPBZ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
c13f9a9466e2d1b6cd56f287e8024289
3375013db16a3d8c3f04d98f84411b2ac0a3427b
'2011-12-29T08:00:09-05:00'
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCA' 'sip-files00042.txt'
d973240cc3ef9c5f755ed74464212b62
18354a098e52ce453b7cc426e4d342af0976a830
'2011-12-29T08:01:33-05:00'
describe
'2501' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCB' 'sip-files00043.txt'
f5458c02d8efde207f179da48a6c7e2a
b5151827973dca55f2ca61f541a4c2f034cd787a
'2011-12-29T08:03:17-05:00'
describe
'146' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCC' 'sip-files00044.txt'
49f67db0e41627f306f777cdfe5942d6
aadc972b05d498d079333fcb00be005ea8cc7fd2
'2011-12-29T08:00:06-05:00'
describe
'2565' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCD' 'sip-files00045.txt'
f2a5230c878b048c31cb41a24d5acec0
737528ffde9363903fedd92c48d0e48b9b23a27e
'2011-12-29T08:02:59-05:00'
describe
'920' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCE' 'sip-files00046.txt'
2901b3cd81794ef07587630eef2df609
57db99dbb31bef6f2479fde7697af37d0ce35365
'2011-12-29T08:03:01-05:00'
describe
'1601' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCF' 'sip-files00047.txt'
d5cd97e4b1b71f3cf9615dbcd5761c44
853ba0f00d3cad934590401044f6f1d074a0d273
'2011-12-29T08:03:22-05:00'
describe
'1767' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCG' 'sip-files00048.txt'
8b9f99b53be8e5c6bc14d36579722895
5136f9610623174bd1d0ad70a23ad3909dacba7e
'2011-12-29T08:05:50-05:00'
describe
'313' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCH' 'sip-files00049.txt'
89b87dc908a71f955a81145c9b98670d
67870714cb47f2cf70a0918f33cdfe00123dbecc
'2011-12-29T08:04:06-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1482' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCI' 'sip-files00050.txt'
9e9ba40befedc23720da8f62ab7ca6d0
4acf0ac70cd43654035f6331c19077b0cf0320a5
'2011-12-29T07:57:16-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2541' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCJ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
8d4ab016c4ab9a2d880d8c714ee2fba6
03fbe3dfadfc049bba570fd1ea6ec7e5ccf9ff15
describe
'219' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCK' 'sip-files00052.txt'
8fddf003ec4d6b1d1332734f3fb53006
68b4255bafe13031aa67dfe529209900fd86bdc6
'2011-12-29T08:02:34-05:00'
describe
'2716' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCL' 'sip-files00055.txt'
68421519050d9655564297c072e76b21
1756c34d71158c2008cc696a8b38e9ce4d3cd0e7
'2011-12-29T07:59:00-05:00'
describe
'796' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCM' 'sip-files00056.txt'
7efbf13c554966fdaf7a96f49ada3e38
24b2f1562ee6aa31fb0417e8ed368b3f60129604
'2011-12-29T08:04:28-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2622' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCN' 'sip-files00057.txt'
acf153e3d9ca12f035dc7a3daab88384
b3aa8fe4aaf00cd2ccd8992e9e33cabb9fe6afe5
'2011-12-29T08:05:29-05:00'
describe
'433' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCO' 'sip-files00058.txt'
aa4fbb6634f6008082b369503a370a99
e7adb821a5c6fa7b3c8889afb74edc7506902fd3
'2011-12-29T08:04:48-05:00'
describe
'2606' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCP' 'sip-files00059.txt'
68b9d1571d27521632655690fe7b652c
edbfaaf1bd19d52ec5294cb976a185291466feed
'2011-12-29T07:56:46-05:00'
describe
'159' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCQ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
218b0d4c9908cbb8aa3acfce6d2a656a
47f5a114aa70e121984b4126db228d2307c52946
'2011-12-29T08:04:27-05:00'
describe
'2566' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCR' 'sip-files00061.txt'
2c27caf0be2bf70f013395d6f7710d05
e0d19820eb0143a1279cc8acb0a6ca393fe3d17d
describe
'165' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCS' 'sip-files00062.txt'
dab89ff05fb03dc37f292f98b8ad547f
accd3a5adaaa47ec42db0377fba8108caba4a9ca
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCT' 'sip-files00063.txt'
56c005f28bd343a5fb02fe9cb2bfd54f
83f4354a1ea114c5df4e5ff7a05683eef5e3438e
'2011-12-29T08:01:10-05:00'
describe
'2301' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCU' 'sip-files00064.txt'
331069fe14aee13d71767a9d756cf3e8
72e6370c2dec6ddf1daf6b0f98ae356f5db76e37
describe
Invalid character
'2618' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCV' 'sip-files00065.txt'
2bc5f1fac1477c118dcf46fd486d6495
3e74c02234365c75a1e0d6f463f6aab17dcecd18
'2011-12-29T08:00:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCW' 'sip-files00066.txt'
51c4946326ea235daefe883af765c0d6
3fac216d1d2f2f5c0a997e0db03c908b49ce1e81
'2011-12-29T08:00:51-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2605' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCX' 'sip-files00067.txt'
73836478150c209971f150eabd1617ae
cc5519dc7cc72ad14d56b7d46509891f9239b2ff
'2011-12-29T08:00:24-05:00'
describe
'125' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCY' 'sip-files00068.txt'
64582083281e486b90f57b3298f0260f
11471af44ba41d87719ea862992a0c5b82f2faf6
'2011-12-29T08:02:06-05:00'
describe
'2447' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPCZ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
26f325b353156be07b9e95f560cdfda8
3595989341c03c11509d3a13bc2ff2334e726ef2
'2011-12-29T08:05:32-05:00'
describe
'150' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDA' 'sip-files00070.txt'
ba68fb131b83ebc2f583cb1825fa4698
1d3b088f04c503e4dfae2856a67063a649272081
'2011-12-29T08:04:04-05:00'
describe
'2567' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDB' 'sip-files00071.txt'
0f5bf04c3412f54ff74de1aa26957ad3
dbda6f4fb128fb771e395e4efeae2f79bf58ce50
'2011-12-29T07:57:25-05:00'
describe
'110' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDC' 'sip-files00072.txt'
c3de23916c6b7ecb01307cb9c6050eea
3965278b6a5f45ea85773c1fcd8f2a9de99bc0dc
'2011-12-29T07:57:38-05:00'
describe
'2593' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDD' 'sip-files00073.txt'
6dca4ede2a85dadf175f33d749db2269
7c79d12eee2d2bfe7fe0cee8f6a1568a0add7d33
'2011-12-29T08:02:32-05:00'
describe
'864' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDE' 'sip-files00074.txt'
bd6ab52838f23f3954ba73bb9398d33f
93c7ff901cbdc3401aea56ad39189d425b1c152c
'2011-12-29T07:59:32-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2650' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDF' 'sip-files00075.txt'
df639f4e4a3291db7048976cb8241ea3
da126ff34936ca1aac343da2351c4072cb0ad841
'2011-12-29T07:59:44-05:00'
describe
'304' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDG' 'sip-files00076.txt'
b69b708c5436764c8ddd1cf9c44fe2e6
b8b841d21af493af0f353cfafd489c4d19689aa3
'2011-12-29T08:05:48-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2412' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDH' 'sip-files00077.txt'
ffcd7e1dafab3346742296ef615cba73
995d3de92c7b1dacdba0072cfe979fdcb1e7acf8
'2011-12-29T08:03:23-05:00'
describe
'220' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDI' 'sip-files00078.txt'
b95a269a607610d843a6d8b17c884199
5b60ab0cd8d0d39578d32cbde9f15ad1c61efe8d
'2011-12-29T08:05:10-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2614' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDJ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
b909c19f4980ee8c054b9c56a261ed5b
0cac125f80cc8c859d7a405635fac353a6dcb794
'2011-12-29T08:01:40-05:00'
describe
'177' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDK' 'sip-files00080.txt'
17da02daff6272aefa4b32e8eba8d4d7
7fcb377c0a61f6868d486c78898417210ea15e29
'2011-12-29T08:00:11-05:00'
describe
'2665' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDL' 'sip-files00081.txt'
c881d257ed5468d74bfb554e6b8b098e
632c2061f42333ed21a2fff5378c74442d98c399
'2011-12-29T07:59:10-05:00'
describe
'208' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDM' 'sip-files00082.txt'
9cf39a3c8ab627f106add67865ef2015
5cf1be38c673260affb999512679600433049053
'2011-12-29T08:02:22-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'170' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDN' 'sip-files00083.txt'
5e2a4cb91886dec4469f195abbd8c01a
98d55e185294b772c4c79f8fb2fc432a6305892a
'2011-12-29T07:59:40-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1930' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDO' 'sip-files00084.txt'
cdbc36d515be862a3d4288536072dc0e
7858cef28a3714a098753bb4a96509983d68da50
'2011-12-29T07:58:26-05:00'
describe
'2415' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDP' 'sip-files00085.txt'
df7e3661bccea6b1096a34666c8d9430
d61439d6234a36653449201d02ac4314743d769a
'2011-12-29T08:02:36-05:00'
describe
'267' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDQ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
849f0e56d9e6d224b50000e56e72fc23
a655fe875e067031c434bffa952862d26ccaf9b1
'2011-12-29T08:02:24-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDR' 'sip-files00087.txt'
75cde2c953c3b03f80bee7f20bb47e98
dc89df1674e133e35d1a91b4ee11f33b78311f24
'2011-12-29T08:03:42-05:00'
describe
'875' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDS' 'sip-files00088.txt'
3f3bba14724e6377fbdf6191eb0403a3
f5a454436c52391a5e8be73b6fba8e79859970c1
'2011-12-29T08:03:02-05:00'
describe
'2592' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDT' 'sip-files00089.txt'
b28690c4118238e8d96dacccedeaf698
7fd0d12213093e51c357672e33133f7977f31e8c
'2011-12-29T08:04:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDU' 'sip-files00090.txt'
31e49b201aaa11ef9fd34952592975e7
0c64d50ff4da4d2f91d209426fba1819f28484db
describe
'2549' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDV' 'sip-files00091.txt'
7515144f94463c17caaa6cadc195f7d4
fa559b762a96b63763f9d1ee96cd4ecbb06c66c8
describe
'97' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDW' 'sip-files00092.txt'
61ad6f1ab1c28ddc38e9b8a5589ee506
09e7a8af50a2efd35972302176b4b4b82d5cf608
'2011-12-29T08:03:59-05:00'
describe
'2595' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDX' 'sip-files00093.txt'
3a888459e5538212a68f8560e72720e0
5659f7326476ae7096136e0569786865931c5e42
'2011-12-29T08:05:34-05:00'
describe
'101' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDY' 'sip-files00094.txt'
82f088653b5a280ae537287252f18e91
ef442ea81c966fa98be46e2d3deb9bf6de1bf212
'2011-12-29T08:05:22-05:00'
describe
'2616' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPDZ' 'sip-files00095.txt'
318f0f72926d39fc5935c686ed4bc561
fec4ce5a19a4388457fcd46bce2dd3c7b6427d9e
'2011-12-29T08:04:00-05:00'
describe
'133' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPEA' 'sip-files00096.txt'
25d71db5d29ebecb5bdc931690fbceab
21bba131437fcf1dba9adf27f4a690ef1955cafb
'2011-12-29T07:59:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPEB' 'sip-files00097.txt'
86b8f77b75cb4945771f1568e2999d0d
4a24ed8c6b968827362c883aceb7b4264ee0e331
'2011-12-29T08:02:15-05:00'
describe
'227' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPEC' 'sip-files00098.txt'
fa6d6073ea27da90694a37414bc2f8e8
1bfd93db88cd85d7dcd270b239f8f0bd1edc8233
'2011-12-29T07:58:52-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2510' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPED' 'sip-files00099.txt'
8a184cb0aa40da1bfe56a9014cf8aa3c
17b45f6b97c1f2dd3c7eeac7c6f68e3124f2e2f9
'2011-12-29T08:03:38-05:00'
describe
'190' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPEE' 'sip-files00100.txt'
44e74fd3b051b5df947044f0508ff8ea
7064bbb684cbd7d436b2c6f40050758d581c2d44
'2011-12-29T08:00:34-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2499' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPEF' 'sip-files00101.txt'
a35ba4befdff3991047aa1bf1a9d4f58
9208eb3900e54a7c711ef7863951210235e88faf
'2011-12-29T07:59:35-05:00'
describe
'200' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPEG' 'sip-files00102.txt'
6d195127c035c27ea38135eb48774145
07dd6606499cebb5f4b0cb53499f206c3b48abe1
'2011-12-29T08:05:24-05:00'
describe
'2495' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPEH' 'sip-files00103.txt'
ca660cc5da2be56b07cddc2a3949ec68
9aaa6204e4ca948ae78a2fd605d1b94a4bea43b7
'2011-12-29T08:04:55-05:00'
describe
'292' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPEI' 'sip-files00104.txt'
6714136ba4284731cd45630cd7f42534
505de470b07c139ffeaf15b9b2efbea94e38bba5
'2011-12-29T08:05:38-05:00'
describe
'2617' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPEJ' 'sip-files00105.txt'
ff50100a7016165f5884565484a424a8
d5db591d77203a2b3c5290e4a9c1f92ee2ca036f
describe
'247' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPEK' 'sip-files00106.txt'
2a1ddb937fc4e1a17e6366ff24fbca8b
2afd0773d2674ca87792b737a616f856b44de0c3
'2011-12-29T08:04:53-05:00'
describe
'2441' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF20081201_AABPEL' 'sip-files00107.txt'
49aefd0d5b1c5ef584b0b315d081efe7
091d829e4967ea21d554a8cbe9203cec8bc1afe5
'2011-12-29T08:00:54-05:00'
describe
'272' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAACPfileF