Citation
Little Miss Crosspatch

Material Information

Title:
Little Miss Crosspatch
Creator:
Kelly, Charles H ( Publisher )
Harmer and Harley
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Chas. H. Kelly
Manufacturer:
Harmer & Harley, Ltd..
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
62 p. : ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Motherless families -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Temper -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Maiden aunts -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Chronically ill children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Tuberculosis -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1898 ( local )
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Summary:
Anonymous story of an ill-tempered child and her reaction to the death of her older brother.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026850524 ( ALEPH )
ALH3590 ( NOTIS )
245529481 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




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LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.





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‘SISSIE WOULD NOT ANSWER HER FATHER.’— See f. 22,





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LITLE MISS CROSSPATCH,



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Londo:
CIIAS. E. KELLY, 2, CASTLE ST., CITY ROAD, E.C,,
AND 26, PATERNOSTER ROW, EC,

189°.



HARMER & HARLEY, LTD.,
PRINTERS,
89 TO 44, COWPER STREET, FINSBURY, ©.O.







the arbour? and I will tell you a nice




story, all about dollies and their mam-
WF mas; but you must leave that cross
face behind you, somewhere.’

‘Cross face, indeed! don’t you know I

feel very cross indeed? for I don’t want to
talk to any one, nor to listen to stories; I hate
hearing about dollies, or their mammas, or any-
thing.’

‘Hush, hush, my dear, you really must not

talk like this; but come down and be a good



8 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

girl, and I'll forgive you. I have already for-
given your brother,’

Now Sissie’s brother was two years older
than herself; his name was Bertie. A very deli-
cate, sensitive child, rather older than his years,
he loved his sister and auntie very dearly. Poor
boy, he had no mother to love ; she died at Sis-
sie’s birth, leaving her two little babes with their
father and Aunt Sally. Mr. Strange had spent
only three happy years of married life. His
blooming young wife had been the light of his
life; and now she was gone Aunt Sally had
offered her willing services at once to her be-
reaved brother, who willingly accepted them.

Sidney Strange was a man born for business ;
he could not rest out of his office long together.
His one great trouble was the visible progress
of consumption in hissonand heir. Fortunately
he did not know of the dreadful temper gaining
ground in his little daughter. He saw the great
advantage of having his sister Sally to live with
him instead of a stranger ; ‘for, he said, ‘I can

go to my work and know my dear children are



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 9

left under the care of an aunt who loves them
as her own.’

Aunt Sally was one of those pleasant-look-
ing people one sometimes meets with. Shewas
never without her smile, which became her some-
what troubled face, and seemed to make it
almost beautiful in spite of her forty years. At
the Sunday-school the children were always
pleased when they could do any little service
for Miss Strange; they loved her as their
teacher, and indeed she would sometimes spend
an hour with them at their day-school. Gene-
rally she gave them a lesson on Bible History,
which they got through easily, just because they
loved their teacher. If they chanced to see her
out walking with her two pupils, they would run
to carry anything, or to open gates, and would
chat to her as freely as though they had known
her all their lives. She had been three years at
Oaklands, and during that time had gained the
esteem of all the village children, as well as of
their parents.

We left Sissie sitting on a bough of an old



10 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

apple tree, in her sulks, on account of being kept
five minutes in the schoolroom. She refused to
play with her brother, or work in her little gar-
den, or do anything except sulk.

What a painful thing it is to see little girls or
boys in bad tempers. It was painful to Aunt
Sally to see her little niece growing up into a
woman with such an evil companion. She tried
to coax her down from her perch; but Sissie,
who was really in a bad temper, would not please
any one. She had a little business up in the
tree: what do you think it was? She had cer-
tainly something in her hat, and every now and
again she smiled down at Aunt Sally, who was
wondering what that smile meant.

Sissie was a very little girl, with rosy cheeks
and blue eyes. She liked to sit in her little perch
in the apple tree. There was just a nice little
seat ; and she looked like a bunch of apple blos-
som, with her pink frock and white pinafore, and
her fair hair floating in the breeze ; her tiny face
was almost like a rosy apple, but it had a few
puckers, which made Bertie afraid to ask many

questions.



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. ti

‘Do come down, Sissic, and have a nice game
on the lawn ; I will let you be first each time, if
you will?

‘Do not keep bothering me, Bertie ; I tell
you IT am not coming down for a long time. I
do not like you one bit ; you are a—’

‘Hush, hush, Sissie, or I must call you a
naughty girl. I will not allow you to talk to
your brother as you do. Bertie, come and mect
Daddy ; we will leave Sissie behind, if she does
not come down very quickly,’ says Aunt Sally.

‘Auntie, Auntie, come and lift me down, I
want to speak to you, it is a secret; Bertie must
go away.’

But Bertie-had gone, gone slowly down the
drive to meet his father, and the tears were
rising to his eyes, as he turned from his disagree-
able sister.

‘What is it you want to tell me, Sissie? Come
down first, and then I will listen’

‘No, no, Auntie, I am going to tell it, sitting
here ; but please pick up my hat.’

Aunt Sally obeys, and, picking up the



12 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.
crumpled hat, she tries to pull it out to its pro-
per shape, when out of it pop five or six little
grey mice. Poor Auntie shouts and runs about:
the poor little mice are frightened almost out of
their lives ; they run up Auntie’s legs, and down
again, and over her boots, while she is so fright-
ened that she nearly goes off in hysterics. Poor
Auntie! she does not dislike the innocent little
animals, but Sissie had heard her say how
fr-ghtened she was of mice, so ‘her little lady-
ship’ had captured those baby mice, while their
mother was gone to find some dinner for them.
Poor little mother mouse, when she went home
and found her little babies all gone, how sad
she would be! Why did that young lady rob
her of her treasures, just for one minute’s plea-
sure ?

Sissie did laugh while Aunt Sally was run-
ning about; she did not care about the poor
little mice having such a bump, not she, nor did
she care either for the sad trouble she had
brought upon poor Mrs. Mouse.

Auntic sees that coaxing will not bring Sis-



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 53

sie down from her perch, so she tries what she
can do by climbing to reach her. Sissie laughs
heartily as she watches Aunt Sally cauticusly
wending her way toward where she is sitting ;
but Auntie is not one of those sprightly ladies
we sometimes see ; she is rather fat, and being a
little bit nervous, she is of course slow in motion.
Presently she gets almost close enough to reach
Sissie, while that young lady quickly mounts a
little bit higher. Poor Auntie has to give up
the hope of reaching her, so she looks down on
the ground, and is terrified to see how far she is
above it.

‘However shall I get back? O, Sissie, I am
sure to tumble. Bertie, Bertie, she shouts with
all her might, ‘do come and help me down.’

He comes panting up to where Auntie is
clutching a bough of the tree ; he places her foot
and persuades her to give a jump. Down goes
Auntie on the green turf; Bertie is helping her
up ina moment ; she is only a little bit shaken,
But Sissie—do you know what she is doing?

She is actually laughing at poor Auntie, laugh-



ij LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

ing quietly to herself. What a naughty girl!
and, to make matters worse, she announces to
Auntie that she is about to jump. Standing
quite erect, she counts ‘One to start, two to
stay, three to make ready, and four away.’
Aunt Sally, who is not quite recovered from her
last shock, and knows what a venturous child
Sissie is, rushes to the place where her naughty
little niece, pleased to see Auntie with that scared
face, is standing in the attitude of some one just
about to give a jump. Poor Aunt Sally begs
her not to jump; but Sissie is enjoying her
Auntie’s coaxing and scolding and threatening,
all in succession.

‘T will not jump, if you will not tell Bertie
what I have done to his garden. I believe he
really will be cross with me, when he finds I did
it. I shall not say whether I did it, though.
Now, Auntie, I only made Bertie a few mud
pies.’

‘But, my dear, how did you gét the water?’

‘O, I carried lots of it from the pool. Some

I carried in my pinafore—not this one, though ;



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 15

Sarah is going to dry it again—and some in ink-
pots and my dollie’s silver mug, but I think
Bertic’s watering-can must have tumbled in some
day, for I saw it tumbling down close by the
pool, when I was using it; but I am sure you
will say the mud pies are splendid, because my
flour was so very good.’

Now do you not think that Sissie Strange
was a very mischievous child? She did not
care how much she grieved her brother ; she de-
lighted to see him vexed ; but she did not know
how much he prized his little garden, which he
always kept so neat, so different to his sister's.
She had little rocks built in hers, and flowers
stuck between the stones; but Bertie had real
flowers growing out of his garden.

Sissie is now walking gaily by the side of
Aunt Sally ; she is still boasting of her wonder-
ful pies; they are almost in sight of the garden.

‘Come now, Auntie, or Bertie will see us.
If he comes, I shall run away, because I’ve lost
his watering-can ; but if father comes, O—’

‘Why, dear me, Sissie, do you mean to say



16 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

you have done this? Surely it cannot be you.
What wd¢// Bertie say? Why did you do it,
Sissie? Sec, it is like a pool, poor Bertic’s
garden.’

‘But, Auntie dear, broke in the child, ‘Bertie
really does like good pies, I am quite sure he
does ; he will be so pleased when he sees them.
See, they are well moulded, quite like Mary’s
loaves. J think they are a good bit prettier,
don’t you, Auntie ?’

But Auntie does not answer ; she is gazing
on the picture before her. It is indeed an ugly
one; the little garden looks as though it had
been watered rather liberally for once; anyhow
it has served Sissie for a pool to float paper boats
on. That young lady did not tell Auntie that
she had coaxed Thomas, the gardener, to carry
her two big cans of water, and had made him
believe she was only going to play at boating.
There are a few tightly rolled lumps of soil, of dif-
ferent sizes and shapes ; these are the wonder-
ful pies. Sissie is about to pick one up in her
hands to show Auntie their excellent quality,



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 17

when epproaching footsteps make that young
lady look eagerly round about her.

But who are coming hand in hand towards
them? They are Mr. Strange and Bertie.
Poor Sissie, she does not know what to do in
her confusion, but she disengages her hand from
Aunt Sally’s, and, running towards her father,
she is transformed into a smiling little damsel,
looking as though she never wore a cross face.

‘Well my Sissie, daddy is come back; but
you promised to come and meet me, my dear.
Have you been too busy, eh? Your brother
has brought me to see his garden; would my
little daughter like her daddy to see hers too?’
*O no, thank you, father, mine is no garden
at all; but Bertie’s is not very nice, I think.’
With these words Sissie runs off in the direction
of her Auntie.

Bertie is indeed delighted to take his father
to his garden; it is seldom Mr. Strange has time
to see his children’s different sources of amuse-
ment. He walks on with Bertie, listening in-

tently to the little fellow’s sensible talk on garden

ae



18 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCRH.

work. | Bertie, who is a favourite of Thomas’s,
has stood and watched him at his work, chatting
about all sorts of things, while Thomas would
show him how to plant different things, and how
to attend to them while they were growing.
Not like Sissie; she would plant something
in her garden one day, and on the morrow she
would dig it up to look at it. She would go on
like this for a day or two, until at last her
patience had all gone. Then she would pull the
plant out of the soil and take it back to Thomas,
scolding and crying, and indeed sometimes
throwing it right at him. After these out-
bursts Thomas would not listen to Sissie’s
pleadings for something that would grow quick
‘Poor Sissie!’ the least thing that went wrong
with her would cause sometimes an hour’s sulk,
and she would put on her cross face—it was,
indeed, very cross-looking—that frightened her
brother away.

Bertie and his father at length reach the
garden. What a sight to meet Bertie’s eyes;

he stares around him, thinking he has come by



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 19

the wrong path; but no, it is really his garden,
or the place where it used to be. Poor Bertie,
he stares up in his father’s face, tears filling his
eyes.

‘My boy, how is this? You do not know
anything about it, do you, dear? Now I wonder
what or who has done it’

‘T expect it is Sissie, but perhaps she—she—’
but Bertie bursts out in tears. What a cruel
little sister he has, to be sure!

‘Where is Sissie? do you know, Bertie?
I want to speak to her.’

‘Oh, father, please don’t scold Sissie; she
must have made a mistake. I am sure I don’t
know who else could have done it, though,
but please, father, don’t tell Sissie anything
about it. I will work in it to-morrow, and
perhaps it will be nearly dry by then.’

‘You are a dear, forgiving little boy, Bertie ;
but even if you have forgiven your sister, I have
not ; I must talk it over with her, if only for her
own good. O no, I will not be vey cross with
her, my boy; but you must cease crying in the

B 2



20 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

first place, before we can come to any under-
standing whatever. Now we will go in search
of Sissie;’ and Mr. Strange and Bertie walk
hand in hand round the garden, calling first
‘Sissie’ and then ‘Auntie’ at the top of their
voices.

Presently they see Auntie Sally and ‘TJ.ittle
Miss Mischief’ sauntering lazily down the
meadow; they are quite too far off to hear
either Mr. Strange or Bertie calling them; so
father and son walk slowly up to the house, to
wait until the ladies shall have time to return.

Bertie and his father are seated comfortably
in the dining-room; they are watching Auntie
and Sissie drawing quietly near the house.

‘Don’t go in yet, Auntie, I don’t want to ; do
let us go back to the stile. I will help you up
the bank, Auntie ; do come.’

This is what Bertie can hear; he has his
head turned towards the window, and listens
anxiously for Aunt Sally’s response.

‘No indeed, Sissie; I am too tired already,

and if I had to climb the bank again, why, yout



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 21

poor old aunt would be quite broken-windcd ;
she would have to puff and blow like a steam-
engine.

At this Sissie tries to laugh; she can see it is
useless to try to persuade her Auntie to stay out
longer. So they enter the house together, Sissic
looking rather thoughtful ; they walk into the
dining-room, quite unconscious of its occupants.

‘Well, Sally, you have had a nice stroll; I
have been watching you for some minutes. You
will be pleased to hear I am going to stay at
home this afternoon, ch, Sally?’

‘Now, are you indeed, Sydney? I can
hardly believe you. Shall we go for a drive, if
you are not too tired, Sydney ??

“Yes, Sally, we will if you like. Would my
little boy like to go with daddy and Auntie?’
Bertie looked at Sissie ; she was looking at him ;
of course he had to drop his eyes ; poor Bertic
saw at that one glance that his sister was pad oud
about something.

‘No, thank you, father, not unless—

‘What, my boy, would you rather stay at







22 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

home instead of coming out with your aunt and
me?’

‘Yes, father, unless you will take Sissie too.’

‘ As to taking Sissie, I think if we left her at
home to work in the garden—for I think she
enjoyed it this morning—it would be just what
she deserves. Would it not, Sissie?’

But Sissie would not answer her father: she
could only hang her head down in shame; but
she could not be silent for long. She thought to
herself, ‘Now they are going for a nice drive
this afternoon, and I want to go too; what had
I better say to father? I want to go—and I
will go too,’ she bellows out, quite forgetting her
father’s presence. Sissie was now in a really
annoying temper, as any one might have seen
by her face.

“IT do almost hate Bertie, I do. He called
me Crosspatch this morning, and that made me
really very cross indeed—then he said I hada

very puckered face, and that it was not one bit



pretty—I am sure he meant all the time to say

it was ugly—and ever so many more horrid



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 23

things he said to me; and so I did his garden
up for him a bit. But perhaps I didn’t put that
pool on it, though; I think I forgot to finish
that, but I will do it if Bertie calls me Cross-
patch once more.’

‘Now, now, my little girl, you are running on
too fast, broke in Mr. Strange ; ‘we must have
a proper understanding about this ;’ and taking
one in each hand, he led them to the arbour,
where he seated them on his knees, to have the
proper understanding.

‘ Sissie, you say Bertie teased you, and called’
you Crossy.’

‘No, no, not that name, father ; it’s “ Cross-
patch” he calls me, and teases me ever such a
lot when he says my face is all in puckers anda
good bit ugly. That’s just what he says; only I
do really get rather cross. 1 am sure Sybil Dean
would not always be so very happy if she had a
Bertie to tease her, and call her horrid names
like Ihave. But I will go with you and Auntie
for a drive this afternoon, I know I will; so

there now, father,



24 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

‘Don’t make too sure, my dear; your father
wishes to have an understanding between Bertie
and you, so please don’t interrupt him again,
Sissie ; but first of all we will call Aunt Sally,

Presently Mr. Strange starts afresh on the
garden topic, making signs to his little girl to
keep silent. It is a very hard task for Sissie ;
however, she manages to keep her little tongue
still, but her feet every now and again are
giving an impatient stamp ; sometimes her head
is bent low, which tells her father more plainly
than words that she is the guilty little party.
He goes on to say that a little boy whom he
knew very well had a nice little garden, as had
also this little boy’s sister. ‘Now the little
boy, being the eldest, kept his garden very
neat, and would frequently offer to assist his
sister. But she would never accept his kind
offers—at least I have been told so, and I
expect it is quite true. Well, one day this very
little boy found his garden in a most untidy
state: he could not find out who had done the

mischief, for no animals were allowed to enter



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCE.. 2S

the garden. Now who could it have been? I
am afraid I can guess; and the little boy too,
poor little lad, how very grieved he must have
been when he found his beautiful flowers all up-
rooted and his plants spoilt, and his garden made
almost like the rush pool down in our orchard.
Now, Sissie, you may speak ; you have kept very
quiet. Your turn shall come next, Bertie’

But neither of them spoke, so Mr. Strange
continued :

‘I should indeed be very vexed if I thought
a little girl of mine had done such an unkind
action; indeed I think I should send her off to
school, right away from her kind Auntic, and
father and brother, and all her friends. Perhaps
a good little girl like Sybil Dean would be
pleased to fill her place.’

‘Indeed, Sybil Dean shall not live here; I
will not go to school, for I will be taught by
Aunt Sally always. Yes, father I will, won’t I,
because—

Here Sissie bursts into tears, and Auntie lifts

her on her lap, and there the little girl confesses







26 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

all her little secrets—no, not quite all—between
her sobs and tears. Poor Bertie is crying too ;
but why does he cry? Simply because he loves
his sister, and would rather be scolded himself
than see her crossed in the least. Now Sissie does
deserve scolding much oftener than she gets it ;
but if her Auntie corrects any of her little faults,
this little miss flies into a temper and says,
‘What a very cross Auntie you are! Why don’t
you scold Bertie too ?—he is older than I’

‘ Sybil Dean never had a horrid Bertie nor a
cross Aunt Sally; that’s why she doesn’t have
a cross face. But I will not live at this house
very long, for I am grown past the table already,
and when I am up to the mantelpiece I shall
be nearly grown up, and then I am going to live
at quite a fresh place ; J am invited already.’

* €Pooh, pooh, you silly child, Sissie, says
Aunt Sally, ‘you have been dreaming that some
time.’

‘No, I never did dream it, Auntie; really it
is quite a true, real, real true secret between him

and ine’



LITTLE MISS*CROSSPATCH. 27

‘O, I see,” says Auntie, ‘you think about
keeping house for Bertie when he goes to live at
the place where they find gold in the soil. I
understand you, young lady,’

‘Indeed you don’t, she chimes in, ‘I did not
mean Bertie at all, his name is a great deal nicer
than that ;’ and Sissie chuckles to herself at
having a secret quite to herself.

Now Sissie is quite amiable again, and Auntie
too, for Sissie has amused her greatly by her
funny little talk; yet she does not like to hear
her little niece talking about going away soon.
But Sissie does not mean it; at least, I don’t
think she does,

‘But, says Auntie, ‘suppose I should go
away from you first, Sissie, what then ?’

‘O, but I know you won't; father didn’t
mean it, I know that quite well ; he only said
that just for me to be a very good girl; but
perhaps I am not going to be altogether good,
though.’

‘Really, Sissie, I believe your father did

mean it, for I saw he was not laughing ; but I



28 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

expect he is going to talk with Bertie and you
another day.’

There was no time for a longer conversation ;
the luncheon bell rang, and they hurried indoors.
Sissie’s thoughts were occupied about the after-
noon drive, ‘Shall I go, or shan’t 1?’ was what
she was unconsciously saying aloud at the table.

“Go where, Sissie ?’ asks her father.

“O, about our drive, I mean, father; we are
all going of course ; at least, I am, I know, if
Bertie is.’

‘No, Sissie, you are not going, none of us
are; and even if we were, you would stay behind
this time, for certain little occurrences.’

‘Well, daddy dear, I should have gone if
Bertie had, I should; for I would, because I
meant to. I would have run behind like our
Fritzy all the way ; and if I had been lost, you
and Auntie would have come back for me, and
then I should have hidden myself somewhere.’

‘Sissie, Sissie, you naughty little girl, you
gricve yout “ather very much. Do not speak to

me again, tatil you say you are very sorrv,



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 29

Little Miss sits very silent for the remainder
of the luncheon hour, but on rising from the
table she runs to her father, and says she is a
wee bit sorry, but only because, suppose she
had hidden, and they could not have found her
anywhere, and she would have followed a long
way behind them, pretending she had really
been lost; ‘but if it had been quite the truth,
my feet would have been a good bit worn out,
I should think ; that’s just why I am sorry,’

Mr. Strange could only laugh at his funny
little girl, and taking her in his arms, he asks
her if she would like to go to school.

‘No, indeed, I would not live at that sort
of house, because they are always scolding
and worrying the people that go and live with
them:

‘Well, we shall have to see about it some day,
unless you are a very good girl, and try to be
more obedient to your aunt,’ says her father,
rather sternly.

‘Yes, but I do love Aunt Sally, very, very

much, and I do not want to go away to school.



30 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

I will be a good girl if I can; but Bertie must
not call me “Crosspatch,” and then I will not
damage places of his.’

‘QO, Sissie, did you really do it? I mean, in
‘Bertie’s garden. Ofcourse we all thought it must
have been you, as no one else would have been
so unkind,’ says Aunt Sally.

‘Indeed, Auntie, suppose I did happen to just
do a bit of a trick like that, never mind ; Bertie’s
garden did want a good watering; and beside,
there were the beautiful pies, and cakes, and
pieces of pastry, and ever so many pretty little
things made in mud—made in dough, I forgot.
And I know Bertie likes little things, for I will
go and fetch him here, and ask him.’

‘O yes, Sissie, I do like many little things ;
only I donot care much for mud pies, stammered
out poor Bertie. ‘One reason is because they
make my hands so grimy; but girls always like
baking much better than boys, don’t they,
Auntie?’

Poor Bertie was glad his aunt was near at

hand to speak a word for him; but presently



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 31

she left Sissie and him together, and walk-
ing away towards the garden, she thought to
herself :

‘What a very odd little niece ! have, to be
sure! Really her brother seems quite afraid of
her. At any rate I can only do my duty, and
try to make them grow up attached to each
other. If I could only get Sissie to be obe-
dient, and loving to her brother, I am sure all
would go well?

Poor Aunt Sally! she is in great trouble ;
she ponders over in her mind, again and again,
what would their own mother have done, to
have drawn them together? She at last comes
to the conclusion, ‘I will treat Sissie with all
kindness, and try and bear patiently with her
for a little while ; and as she grows older, she
will see her own folly. I love the dear children,
poor Mary’s children. Ah, she knew my heart
as she lay on her bed and entrusted her two wee
lambs to Sidney and me.’

Aunt Sally has had this little thinking time

nice and quiet, but now she sees Mr. Strange



32 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

slowly advancing toward her. She looks her
usual calm self in‘an instant, and, going to meet
him, she asks his consent for Sybil Dean and
her little brother to come and spend a week with
the children.

‘Certainly, Sally, if you can manage such a
tribe, says Mr. Strange,in his usual good humour ;
‘but Iam going up to town next week ; so if
you have them before I return, you will not
have me to help you amuse them.’

‘Thank you, Sydney, but it must be next
week on account of their holidays.’

We will now return to our little couple in
the arbour. Listen to what Sissie is just saying ;

‘IT should much rather live at Dean’s house
than Strange’s. You sce, Bertie, there is Jack,
and Regie, and Sybil, and all; and Jack is such
avery nice dear boy, he is a great deal nicer
than you, Bertie, at least, I think he is; he
swings me a great deal higher too, and talks
just like a big grown-up man. He doesn’t have
headaches either, like you; and even when he

has a bad cold he doesn’t put on a wrap and



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. - 33

woollen gloves and all sorts of things, like you
do, Bertie. It is only girls that do that, for
Jack said so when I told him.’

‘O, Sissie, what did you tell Jack Dean?
why did you talk about me? I hate Jack Dean ;
and besides he is not a man, not nearly, for he
is only one year older than I, and he does not
know half as much Latin as I do, because he is
such a blockhead.’

‘T tell you he is not anything of the kind, I
love Jack Dean ever so much, because he takes
such great care of me; and he said I was nicer
than Sybil ;’ and Sissie’s eyes begin to flash,
and her little mouth becomes stiff-looking, and
her forehead is puckered.

‘ All right, Sissie, now don’t get cross; only
don’t talk about the Deans, because Sybil is
really nicer than you; she doesn’t have puckers
in her forehead either.’

‘I tell you I am not Crosspatch ; do you
hear me, Bertie, you horrid boy? Bertie, do
you hear me? I don’t like Sybil Dean one bit,
nor you either very much, for you are just

Cc



34 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

like a girl and I am like a boy, because I
have rosy checks like Jack’s, and yours are pale
like Sybil’s. Come back, Bertie, I tell you; I
will give you a good scolding ; I am really cross
now, so you had better obey me.’

‘Never mind,’ says little Bertie, ‘I am going
in now; I want to do something’

‘And I will come too, so there, stop for me
at once. But Bertie had gone; he had entered
the house at the back door so as to escape his
ill-tempered sister.

‘Well, my little girl, what are you doing all
alone? Never reading all this time I hope,’ says
Auntie, coaxingly.

‘No, Iam not reading, of course not; Iam
following Bertie; he has run away; he is a
very worrying boy, Aunt Sally; but Iam going
to give him a good scolding, I am, for he almost
called me “Crosspatch,” and I am not cross.
Auntie Sally, look ; look, Aunt, I tell you, I am
not Cross.’

‘Well, well, my dear, I hope you are not, or
you would be like that little girl in the story



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH., 35

your father told us the other day. ‘Don’t you
remember about the garden? for I think she
must have been very cross, to have been so
unkind to her brother ; don’t you, Sissie ?’

‘Only a little bit unkind or cross, that is
what I think ; for, if that naughty boy worried
her, it quite served him right, especially if he
called her “Crosspatch.” Do you know if the
boy’s name was Bertie, Auntie, or what was the
girl’s name, I wonder? But it does not matter
for I am going to find out, I am going now,
Auntie, to find the book in father’s study ; then
I will read the book through, and tell you which
was in fault.

Away runs Sissie in search of the book ; she
climbs a chair, then a table, and then the ledge
of a book-shelf. She reads the titles very care-
fully, but they are all so very difficult, none of
them seem like children’s tales to Sissie.

*O, what shall Ido now? I have torn this
one! O, dear! what if father came; but there,
Ihave put it back safe; I daresay it will get
stuck together again. But I must find that

C2



36 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH

book somehow. O, bother, I am cross now,
says Sissie, as the books came tumbling down
all in a heap from the high shelf, ‘I will leave
the horrid things where they are; father may
think they tumbled down themselves. At any
rate he will not think it was me.’

‘Won't he, Sissie ?’ says Auntie, as she walks
into the room, ‘I guess he will if I tell him all I
have heard. But about that little journey you
are going to take, Sissie. Let me see; you told
me you are already invited, but who is going to
take care of you? It can’t be Bertie, for he is
just as puzzled as I am.’

“No, indeed, it isn’t Bertie, he is not strong
and big like Jack. Jack doesn’t care one bit even
if it rains very hard, because he is so brave and
strong.’

‘O, indeed, it’s Jack Dean, is it? Wellnow,
Sissie, I am surprised at you, and Aunt Sally
laughs heartily. ‘When I was a little girl, I
never was invited to go off with a young gentle-
man, nor indeed when I was a big girl either,’ |

‘No, I suppose not, or else you would have



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 37

had some one to take care of you now. I mean
you would have had a nice house and lots of
flowers and other things, and lived by the sea,
like Jack and I are going to do very soon, and
Sissie’s face brightens up at the bare idea of
living by the sea. ‘We shall go boating every
day in the summer ; Jack says we shall; and,
now and again, we shall get on board a big ship
that will bring us right straight to London.’

‘And pray, says Aunt Sally, ‘how have you
learnt all this? Why, Sissie, you wouldn’t
really like to leave me and your father and
brother and all your friends behind you, would
you?’

‘J shouldn't mind leaving Sybil Dean at
any rate. When I’m gone, she may come and-
live at this house if she likes, because father
thinks she is a great deal better than I am, and
you do, too, Aunt Sally. Besides, Bertie told
me that Sybil was a great deal prettier than I
was, and that made me feel very cross indeed.’

Auntie Sally does not seem to notice the

child’s prattle. She is fecling very sad; she



38 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

thinks that Bertie looks very ill. Poor boy, he
has grown so tall and thin, while his sister is so
fat and rosy, and yet so discontented with her
home.

~ Sissic and her brother had never been much
attached to each other, but instead of this little
girl treating her poor delicate brother with kind-
ness she was constantly grumbling and scolding ;
and, indecd, it once came to slapping, because
one day she wanted her brother to romp with
her, and he wanted to lie down on account of a
bad headache. So she walked up to the sofa,
and gave him several hard smacks on his face.
Poor Bertie tried to take no notice of her, but
after she had gone, he gave way to a good cry-
ing, partly on account of the headache, and
partly for the smarts on his face. How many
little boys would have slapped their sisters in re-
turn! but few little girls would dare to slap an
elder brother. Bertie felt a little afraid of his
sister, especially if she got into, ‘Queer Street,’
as he called it.

The following morning, after lessons, both



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 39

children drove to the station with father and
Auntie. Father was going a long journey, he
would be away a long time. Poor Bertie cried
at the station: he was so grieved at his father’s
having to go and leave him behind until he was
older. Bertie loved his father, he always liked
to be with him; he would sit for hours in his
father’s study, reading some favourite book,
while his father would be writing, hardly finding
time to speak a word to his little son. Mr.
Strange hoped that some day Bertie might be a
great help to him; but to look at his sunken
cheeks and thin white hands, no one would have
thought him well.

Miss Strange was very anxious about little
Bertie, and, feeling it her duty to tell his father
of his poor state of health, she resolved to pro-
pose a journey to the sea-side, and for Bertie to
stay there for a considerable time.

‘But who can go with him?’ she pondered.
‘I must not leave Sissie here; she would get
into all sorts of mischief, and if I take her with

me she would be continually arguing with-her



40 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

brother. I must talk to Mrs. Dean, perhaps
she may advise me wisely.’

Accordingly Aunt Sally makes a call on
Mrs. Dean, a kind, good-natured lady, who was
always ready to aid those who were in want of
good advice, or anything else. Aunt Sally has
made a fast friend of Mrs. Dean ; she tells her
the trouble she is in, and what she wants to do.

‘Don’t you see, Mrs. Dean? the dear boy’s
father is away from home, he won't be returning
for some weeks, and Bertie looks much worse
since he has gone. Perhaps a fortnight at the
sea would just put him all right, as our doctor
said this morning; and I do believe in change
of scene, don’t you; Mrs. Dean ?’

‘I do, indeed, Miss Strange, for I am sure if
my Sybil had not gone away when she did, I
should have lost her. It is now three years,
Miss Strange ; you were just come into our neigh-
bourhood ; she looked like some little shadow
eliding about. So I resolved to take her,
and see what sca air would do for the poor

child’



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. AI

‘But the object of my call, Mrs. Dean, was
to get your advice as to who could go with
Bertie. You see, I could not possibly go and
leave Sissie at home ; she would get into all
sorts of performances with the servants, and
most likely offend them,’

‘Well now,’ says Mrs. Dean, ‘I had thought
of going, too; I was about letting Sybil go with
Miss Shaw; but, poor girl, she has been very ill
since she went home. Sybil came crying to me
this morning with a letter she had received from
her, saying that the doctor crdered her to keep to
her room for a week, and not to travel for some
long time. Poor child, she said she should
never have such a dear governess again, and she
sobbed as though her heart would break.’

‘Poor little girl, she puts me in mind of Ber-
tie, so loving and gentle to every one.’

‘Here they come, rushing in full speed
Are they not real boys, Miss Strange? Look
at their grimy hands and faces. Now go
straight to the nursery, and get tidied, and

bring your sister down with you.



42 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

‘All right,” shout the boys, half way up the
stairs, ‘we will carry Miss Baby down in our
arms, won’t we, Regie,’ says Jack.

‘No, Jack, you will not carry me at all, for
{ will walk myself; and please, I am not Miss
Baby, and Sybil comes slowly downstairs, tot-
tering and holding fast by the balustrades. Jack
and Regie begin to laugh.

‘T should like to know what you are, if you
are not a Baby Bunting. You walk exactly
like one. I think we had better have a peram-
bulator for you, that’s what I think.’

‘And so do I, too, says young Regie, ‘ for
then we could have it in turns, Jack, for hauling
soil, or bricks, or anything to our garden, couldn’t
we, Sybil ?’ .

‘But I am not going to have one, so you will
not be able to use it, and Sybil was on the point
of crying, when she lost her balance, and over
she went, over and over, without any noise, until
she stopped at the bottom ; then a low moan,
and all was still.

The boys fly to the drawing-room.



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 43

*O,mamina, be quick, do come quick. O,do
come, Miss Strange; our Sybil has turned such
a somersault all down the stairs; no, not quite
all down ; and she never cried a bit, says Regie.

‘O, my dear child she is stunned ; Heaven
help me!’ and Mrs. Dean rushes for a restora-
tive, while Aunt Sally carefully undresses the
unconscious child. Her two brothers are seated
on the stairs. Jack is crying, while Regie is
wondering how it was she did not cry out loud
cnough to be heard in the garden at the remark-
able somersault,

Little Sybil soon comes round, and Aunt
Sally takes her leave, Mrs. Dean promising her
to call very shortly. Not the next day, but the
day after that, Mrs. Dean's carriage draws up at
Mr. Strange’s door, and a lady and a little girl
are shown into the drawing-room. Miss Strange
is sitting there, reading to Bertie. There he
lies, poor, white-faced little boy.. He brightens
up at sight of Mrs. Dean’s kind face, and asks
after Sybil and the boys.

Sybil runs up to his side, and kisses him.



44 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

At sight of her he sits quite upright, and talks
and laughs as merrily as usual ; but there is a
strange ring in his laugh, and a strange look
about his eyes.

‘I think the best plan would be to stay at
home, Miss Strange, the dear boy is in no fit
state to travel; but I should send for his father
to make haste home. You would like your
father to come home, wouldn’t you, Bertie?’
says Mrs. Dean.

“O, yes, I should very much ; but he will
come soon, I am sure, because of his writing be-
ing left undone in his study. O, Mrs. Dean,
who tumbled downstairs at your house? Was
it Jack or Regie?’

‘It was I) chirps in Sybil, ‘and the boys say
I never cricd one bit, not even when I came
bump on the hall floor.’

‘Well Iam sure I should have done,’ says
Bertie, ‘because I’m rather a baby, you know.
Sissie said I was, because she is stronger than I?

“No, indeed, you are not one bit like a baby,

because you are so tall, and I think you are al-



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCIH. 45

most grown aman. I told our Jack you were;
but he only laughed at me, and said Sissie was
a great deal nicer than you; and I believe he
and Sissie are going somewhere soon, for I heard
him say to Regie something about getting up
early some morning, even when it was dark, and
calling for your Sissie to go with him over the
sea. But of course our Jack won’t go for a long
time yet, and perhaps our Regie would wake
early, too, and run downstairs, and take the key
out of the door, that’s what I heard him say;
and I will persuade him to do it, wouldn’t you,
Bertie? because I don’t want dear Jackie to go
a long way from us.’

‘Do you love Jack very much, Sybil?’ asks
Bertie ; ‘because our Sissie don’t love me not
the least little bit ; she told me she didn’t. So
I know she doesn’t, because she scolds me so
much, and gets so cross with me.’

‘O,-yes; I love our Jack and Regie; although
they tease me and call me “Miss Baby,” I do
not mind. But does your Sissy get really cross,

and does she scold you, even though you are the



46 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

eldest? Our Jack and Regie expect me to
obey them always, because I am the youngest ;
but I don’t every time they ask me, and then
they call me “ Baby.”’

“Please lift my head up, Auntie, it aches so
dreadfully. O dear! I do feel very ill; I can
hardly see you, Auntie dear. I do wish he
would come home to see me just for one little
minute— The poor boy utters some inaudible
sounds, and seems to drop off to sleep.

‘What had I better do? O, Mrs. Dean, do
decide something for me. See, he has fainted
away. I will telegraph straight off to his father.’

‘No, don’t do that, my dear Miss Strange ; it
would be-useless. See, he is reviving already ; I
would put him straight to bed, and send for a
doctor ; you can do nothing more.’

Poor Auntie lifts the little boy up, and
attempts to carry him upstairs. He is hardly
any weight, but it is too much for her. Mrs,
Dean gently takes him in her strong arms and
carries him upstairs to his little bedroom. They

let the fresh air blow on his face, which seems



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 47

to bring him back to consciousness. Gazing
around the room, his eyes fall on Sissie, who is
looking at him, her eyes brimful of tears.

‘O, Aunt Sally, what have you done to him?
Why does he look like that? It frightens me,
his funny eyes, I mean. Why doesn’t he talk
to me when IJ speak to him?’ and Sissie bursts
into tears. ‘I was trying just then to love
Bertie, indeed 1 was, Auntie; but he always
begins our quarrels. Sometimes he talksa great
deal too much, and then I call him “ Chatter-
box,” and he calls me “Crosspatch,” and that is
how our quarrels begin.’

‘All right, my dear, you go downstairs to
Sybil, she is in the drawing-room ; Mrs. Dean is
so very kind; she will not leave me until the
doctor comes.’

‘Why is the doctor coming, Auntie? Whois
ill? for ’m not, indeed I’m not, Mrs. Dean, for
I feel quite well now. Whereis our Sissie gone?
I heard her talking to you just now, Auntie, and
it was all about me too.”

‘Now, now, my dear, lie down and keep still ;



48 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

we must not allow you to talk any more or you

?

will be worse ;’ and Mrs. Dean lays him down
and promises to come and see him again to-
morrow, if he will keep very still, and not get
talking too much.

Sybil and Sissie have been alone in the
drawing-room for almost an hour. When Mrs.
Dean and Aunt Sally come in they seem in great
confusion ; Sissie hides her face, which is dyed
crimson, behind a book that lies handy, while
Sybil gathers up courage to say :

‘O, mamma, Sissie says I am coming to stay
at this house with her and Bertie for a bit,
when can I come?’

‘But what a funny little girl Sissieis! She
does not mean it, Sybil, does she, Miss Strange ?
for you have enough to do already,’ and Mrs,
Dean arranges her bonnet and prepares to go,
Miss Strange accompanying her to the door.

‘Really, Mrs. Dean, that child is a marvel ;
she must have heard Mr. Strange and me talking
about it. We had intended inviting your little

ones here as Bertie is so fond of them, and



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 49

Sissie too, in her funny way. You will lct them
come, won’t you? as soon as my boy gets well,
or as soon as he gets better, for the poor child
has never been quite well, that’s my belief?

‘Thank you, Miss Strange ; but I could not
think of letting them come while Bertie is in
such a weakly state. I will call to-morrow to
know what Dr. Evans says about him. Come
Sybil, I shall leave you behind, dear, if you are
not quick. Good-bye, my dear Miss Strange,
Be sure not to worry yourself or Mr, Strange
either; there is no cause for it if he is well
attended to, as no doubt he will be. Good-bye,
Sissie dear, be sure and be a good girl, and not
make too much noise to awake your brother,’

‘O, Auntie, don’t let her ga; you said she
was going to stay here; do hold her tight,
Auntie dear. Ah, don’t go, Sybil, please ; do
stop with me, and the poor little girl utterly
breaks down. Mrs. Dean and Miss Strange try
to console her, but she will not hear of anything
unless Sybil can stop.

‘T heard you ask father the other day, Aunt

D



5: LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

Sally, and I listened for him to say, “ Yes,” and
he said it too; and so do Ict Sybil stay with me,
please, Mrs. Dean, will you?’

. ‘My dear, we are coming again to-morrow,
and I will think it over. Perhaps if I did allow
my Sybil to comeand stay with you poor Bertie
would get no sleep, and your poor Auntie would
be worried out of her life.’

‘No, mamma, I would not make a noise,
really I wouldn’t, if you will let me stay.’

‘Do let her stay, Mrs. Dean, for my sake,’
whispers Miss Strange ; ‘that child will not be
right again for a week if she gets disappointed ;
she has such a dreadful temper,’

‘Well, you may stay, if you like, Sybil; but
you must not be any trouble to Miss Strange,
I shall come for you to-morrow ;’ and Mrs.
Dean takes her departure amid shouts of delight
from the two little girls. They go straight up-
stairs with Aunt Sally, and peep in at Bertie,
who is quietly enjoying a nice sound sleep.
How pale he looks, as he lies there, with his

little hands clasped tight together, as though he



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 51

were holding something very precious! Miss
Strange goes on into the little bedroom.

‘This is to be your room, little girls, for to-
night ; I shall put you to bed at half-past eight.’

‘O, you are a good, kind Auntie ; isn’t she,
Sybil? O won’t we have some fun, though!’

‘But we must not make much noise, Sissie,
because of Bertie. Do you know I believe he
is really ill. Suppose he should die. O, Sissie
dear, it makes me cry. I love your Bertie very
much, don’t you?’

‘Not exactly, Sybil, because he used to worry
me so very much, and call me “ Crosspatch ;”
so of course I don’t feel very, very sorry
about him being a little bit ill; although I am
sure he is very ill, because he doesn’t tell stories
like Ido. He told me yesterday he was ill, and
that perhaps he should never get well. He said
he was quite sure he should remember mother’s
face when. she came to mect him at the big
gates,

‘O, Sissie dear, did he say that? I do hope
he will soon be better; but do you think he

D2



52 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

would really know his mother? because she has
been dead a long time; mother told me all
about it, and about Bertie and you.’

-‘What did she tell you about me, Sybil Dean?
Tell me at once, I used not to do things rather
unkind to Bertie, unless he teased me. Father
and Auntie always thought it was my fault, but
it wasn’t, really it wasn’t. Sybil, why do you
keep staring like that? You are just like our
Bertie ; that’s just what he does when I’m cross,

‘and when I do look just a little bit at him he
calls me “ Crosspatch.”’

‘O, what a pretty name, Sissie! I shouldn’t
mind it-at all. But shall we goand have a peep
at Bertie now? I wonder does he know Pm
living at this house? I don’t think he does,
because he hasn’t noticed me.’

‘O yes, he does; he heard father and Aunt

Sally talking about you, and so did I. Auntic
said something about perhaps it would make me
more kind to Bertie, and not so cross, if I had
another child companion just like you; I am

sure she meant you.’



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 53

‘Yes, I did mean you, Sybil dear, you are
such a kind, loving little girl ; I hope you may
be a pattern to our Sissie. Yes, little miss, I
have heard what you said to Sybil; but come,
both of you, and sce Bertie. The doctor has
been, and says he is in a very weakly state ; he
has: asked to see his little sister several times,
but I thought it best to keep him quiet.’

‘But, Miss Strange, how did he know I was
here, to-day? I am sure he didn’t know I was
going to stay.’

‘O, he knows you are here, Sybil, don’t you,
Bertie, boy? and pleased he is to see you, my
dear.’

‘O, Bertie dear, I do hope you will soon get
well; I am very sorry for you to be ill, and
Sissie is too.’

‘Is our Sissie sorry too, did you say, Sybil?
Why, she does not care anything about me, I
think,’

‘I am sorry too, really I am, Bertie dear.
O, do get well again quickly, and I will be ever

so kind to you; I will indeed. I'll never mess



54 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

up yeur garden again, nor do any unkind things
to you if you will get well quickly, because Sybil
is teaching me to be kind. Sybil loves you,
Bertie ; did you know? I shall soon love you
just-as much if you do not worry me at all.’
‘Sissie dear, I love you very much ; I always
did love you, even when you were unkind to me’
Auntie Sally left the three together for ten
minutes, and in that time there was a great deal
of talking done. Sissie made promises to love
Bertie always, even when he had got quite well ;
and Sybil promised to teach Sissie how to be kind.
Aunt Sally calls them down to tea, and
while ‘they are sitting round the table she talks
and laughs with the two little girls, and wonders
which of them will think of Bertie first. He is
sitting up in bed to-day; his head doesn’t ache
quite so much, but he hasn’t had his tea yet;
perhaps his aunt has forgotten about it. Miss
Strange continues talking, and the two little
girls seem to be enjoying their tea, when sud-
denly Sybil Dean jumps up.
“O. Miss Strange, have you forgotten Bertie?



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 55

or has he had his tea? Shall I take it to
him ?’

‘Don’t trouble, my dear, I am going up to
him now ; but when you have finished you may
come up to me and ask Bertie what he would
like. He doesn’t like tea, I know,’

‘And what can I do, Aunt Sally? Can’t I
come too?’

‘Yes, yes, my dear; and if Bertie says he
would like something milky, you two little girls
shall help to cook it.’

‘O how jolly, Sybil! I hope he will say
“something milky ;” he does like milky things,
I know.’

Sybil and Sissie, delighted at the thought of
cooking something for Bertie, finished their tea,
and ran upstairs.

‘O, Bertie, do say “something milky ;” we
are going to help to make it, Sybil and I; and
of course Auntie will see we do it right.’

‘But I don’t want anything except an orange,
thank you, dear ; I am not one bit hungry.’

*O, I wish you were; you ought to be on



56 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

purpose, because I’m not disagreeable with you,
and if—’

‘Sissie dear, do not speak like that to Bertie ;
perhaps he will have some to-morrow, before
Sybil goes home.’

‘When will Sybil come again, if she goes
home to-morrow, Auntie dear?’

“You will often come and see Bertie, won’t
you, Sybil? and bring Jack and Regie when
Bertie gets better, and stay with us for a week.
You would like that, wouldn’t you, Bertie? and
you, Sissie ?’

‘O,1 shall be glad when the day comes; it
will be jolly fun, won’t it, Bertie? If you are
not got guzte well, I shall take Jack and Regie
to see your garden, shall I, Bertie?’

‘You may if you like, Sissie. I don’t think
I shall be well for a long time yet; but show
Sybil my garden too, and be sure don’t tread on
my little parsley bed ; it is just in the corner,’

Sybil and Sissie go quictly toward the
garden ; neither of them is very talkative.

‘This is poor Bertie’s garden, Sybil ; isn’t it



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 59

a dear little one? It isa great deal nicer than
mine, for Bertie works in his a great deal longer
than I do ia mine. I generally get cross when
I am gardening, because I can’t get my things
to grow quick enough ; they take days and days
to grow, did you know, Sybil?’

‘O yes, answers Sybil, ‘it takes weeks and
weeks for some things to grow. My crocuses
were ever so long growing, and my tulips, really
I thought they were gone dead ; but Jack knew
better than I, for they grew up splendidly and
tall’

‘Has your Jack a garden, Sybil? Is it
better than Bertie’s ?’

‘It is just like Bertie’s, only not quite so tidy’

And thus the little girls went on talking.
They stayed out until eight o’clock, and Auntie
was standing on the steps calling tothem. When
they reached Auntie they were out of breath ;
they had been running a race together; Sybil
had won the race ; she was so much lighter than
Sissie, who was just as broad as long.

‘Why, Auntie dear, you have been crying;



a
*

58 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

now I will cry too, and Sissie begins to
whimper.

‘No, don’t cry, darling ; we cannot help it;
I think he is better now. He has had a bad
attack of coughing,’

‘Do, Auntie, let us go and see him; I won’t
cry, if you will let me go, just once, before we go
to bed.’

Aunt Sally is very downcast, she has sent for
Mrs. Dean, and that good lady is sitting by Ber-
tie’s bedside ; she is reading to him out of a big
book. Mrs. Dean thinks it best to send a tele-
gram to Mr. Strange, and have the doctor im-
mediately. The doctor calls, and Aunt Sally
and Mrs. Dean watch him as he shakes his
head and says:

‘He has taken a turn for the worse, Miss
Strange. Have you sent for his father? He
would like to see him alive, no doubt.’

‘O, Mr. Evans, can’t you give us a little hope?
Do you think the dear boy is so near death ?’

‘He may live through the night certainly,
but he cannot last long. ‘I am sorry I cannot do



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 59

anything to save him, but he is in the hands of
One Who is wiser than I ; trust to His judgment,
my dear Miss Strange, He knows best” The
kind doctor takes his departure, promising to
call again before long.

Both Mrs. Dean and Miss Strange seem
to know his end is near. Mrs. Dean asks him
if he should like Daddy to come home. The
dear boy brightens up and says:

‘Dear Daddy, do make haste and come home

to your little Bertie. He is going to live at the
happy place where mother is. You told me
how happy she was, and I shall be too.—Is he
come yet, Auntie dear?’ the child continues:
‘I wish he would, and Sissie too, and Sybil. I
heard them laughing just now, and I laughed
too.’
Sissie and Sybil were both in the room.
Sissie was laughing quietly at what Bertie had
just said ; while little Sybil sat on a footstool,
sobbing as though her heart would break.

Presently Bertie sits straight up in bed and
gazes round the room ; his eyes fall on Sissie



60 LITELE MISS CROSS PAL CH.

and Sybil ; he reaches out his little white hands
for them to come to his bedside, forgetting his
Auntie’s presence and Mrs. Dean’s.

‘ Sybil, dear, I hope you will love Sissie ; she
is my little sister, you know; I love her very
much. I used to tease her though,’ and Bertic’s
eyes filled with tears. He went on: ‘She loves
you, Sybil, and I do too. Will you try and love
her? perhaps she will love me when I am gone
to that happy place where mother lives. Jesus
keeps the door, you know, but He will open it
when He sees me coming. Will you come too,
Sybil? Auntie is coming some day, and your
mother is, too.’

Poor Sybil is unable to answer him; she
draws Sissie up to the bedside ; neither of them
speaks for a few moments.

‘Indeed I will come too, Bertie, to see my
mother. Dotake me with you}; I will be a good
girl. O, Bertie, don’t look like that, it makes
me cry,’

Bertie lay back on his pillow, and seemed to

fall asleep ; Aunt Sally rose softly, and went to



LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 61

the window. A gentleman was just coming up
the drive ; it was Mr. Strange. Aunt Sally run
down the stairs to hurry him. ‘O, Sydney, you
are only just in time!’ She could say no more.

Mr. Strange went to the bedside. Bertie
opened his eyes, and on secing his father he
smiled a satisfied smile, and closed his eyes—
this time never to open upon earthly forms
again. Then he held out his hand as a sign of
farewell, and his last words were: _

‘Will you all meet me in the happy home,
Sissie and all’

They all answered ‘ Yes, except Sissie ; she
was sobbing bitterly, and did not answer.

‘Will you, Sissie, dear? Do say “yes”

)

quickly ;’ and directly she uttered the word he
was soaring up to ‘the happy place,’

Mrs. Dean needed all her self-command to
cheer up Mr. Strange and his sister, as well as
the two little girls. Poor Sybil was. deeply
moved by Sissie’s pitiful face.

Mrs. Dean asked Miss Strange to let Sissie

come home with her and Sybil. They went

-



62 TEs MISS CROSSPATCH.

downstairs, and Mr. Strange saw them off, pro-
mising to cheer up Miss Strange, and to think
of his bereavement in the right light.

The great God knows what is best for us,
and Bertie was gone to his dear mother, whom
he thought so much of. Sissie was left to be a
comfort to her father and aunt. Her temper
was cured at Mrs. Dean’s by the example of
Sybil’s sweet disposition and ways; and, by
God’s grace, she learned to be like her. She
often paid visits to Mrs. Dean, whose children
often came and spent their holidays at Sissie’s
home.

Children, learn to govern your tempers ; you
can if you try. Don’t be like Sissie, always
grumbling about something or somebody. She
was never really happy until she made up her
mind to give up being cross. She is now one
of the most pleasant little girls, and no one
would ever think she had deserved the nicknanie
* CROSSPATCH.’



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LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.


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‘SISSIE WOULD NOT ANSWER HER FATHER.’— See f. 22,


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Londo:
CIIAS. E. KELLY, 2, CASTLE ST., CITY ROAD, E.C,,
AND 26, PATERNOSTER ROW, EC,

189°.
HARMER & HARLEY, LTD.,
PRINTERS,
89 TO 44, COWPER STREET, FINSBURY, ©.O.




the arbour? and I will tell you a nice




story, all about dollies and their mam-
WF mas; but you must leave that cross
face behind you, somewhere.’

‘Cross face, indeed! don’t you know I

feel very cross indeed? for I don’t want to
talk to any one, nor to listen to stories; I hate
hearing about dollies, or their mammas, or any-
thing.’

‘Hush, hush, my dear, you really must not

talk like this; but come down and be a good
8 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

girl, and I'll forgive you. I have already for-
given your brother,’

Now Sissie’s brother was two years older
than herself; his name was Bertie. A very deli-
cate, sensitive child, rather older than his years,
he loved his sister and auntie very dearly. Poor
boy, he had no mother to love ; she died at Sis-
sie’s birth, leaving her two little babes with their
father and Aunt Sally. Mr. Strange had spent
only three happy years of married life. His
blooming young wife had been the light of his
life; and now she was gone Aunt Sally had
offered her willing services at once to her be-
reaved brother, who willingly accepted them.

Sidney Strange was a man born for business ;
he could not rest out of his office long together.
His one great trouble was the visible progress
of consumption in hissonand heir. Fortunately
he did not know of the dreadful temper gaining
ground in his little daughter. He saw the great
advantage of having his sister Sally to live with
him instead of a stranger ; ‘for, he said, ‘I can

go to my work and know my dear children are
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 9

left under the care of an aunt who loves them
as her own.’

Aunt Sally was one of those pleasant-look-
ing people one sometimes meets with. Shewas
never without her smile, which became her some-
what troubled face, and seemed to make it
almost beautiful in spite of her forty years. At
the Sunday-school the children were always
pleased when they could do any little service
for Miss Strange; they loved her as their
teacher, and indeed she would sometimes spend
an hour with them at their day-school. Gene-
rally she gave them a lesson on Bible History,
which they got through easily, just because they
loved their teacher. If they chanced to see her
out walking with her two pupils, they would run
to carry anything, or to open gates, and would
chat to her as freely as though they had known
her all their lives. She had been three years at
Oaklands, and during that time had gained the
esteem of all the village children, as well as of
their parents.

We left Sissie sitting on a bough of an old
10 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

apple tree, in her sulks, on account of being kept
five minutes in the schoolroom. She refused to
play with her brother, or work in her little gar-
den, or do anything except sulk.

What a painful thing it is to see little girls or
boys in bad tempers. It was painful to Aunt
Sally to see her little niece growing up into a
woman with such an evil companion. She tried
to coax her down from her perch; but Sissie,
who was really in a bad temper, would not please
any one. She had a little business up in the
tree: what do you think it was? She had cer-
tainly something in her hat, and every now and
again she smiled down at Aunt Sally, who was
wondering what that smile meant.

Sissie was a very little girl, with rosy cheeks
and blue eyes. She liked to sit in her little perch
in the apple tree. There was just a nice little
seat ; and she looked like a bunch of apple blos-
som, with her pink frock and white pinafore, and
her fair hair floating in the breeze ; her tiny face
was almost like a rosy apple, but it had a few
puckers, which made Bertie afraid to ask many

questions.
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. ti

‘Do come down, Sissic, and have a nice game
on the lawn ; I will let you be first each time, if
you will?

‘Do not keep bothering me, Bertie ; I tell
you IT am not coming down for a long time. I
do not like you one bit ; you are a—’

‘Hush, hush, Sissie, or I must call you a
naughty girl. I will not allow you to talk to
your brother as you do. Bertie, come and mect
Daddy ; we will leave Sissie behind, if she does
not come down very quickly,’ says Aunt Sally.

‘Auntie, Auntie, come and lift me down, I
want to speak to you, it is a secret; Bertie must
go away.’

But Bertie-had gone, gone slowly down the
drive to meet his father, and the tears were
rising to his eyes, as he turned from his disagree-
able sister.

‘What is it you want to tell me, Sissie? Come
down first, and then I will listen’

‘No, no, Auntie, I am going to tell it, sitting
here ; but please pick up my hat.’

Aunt Sally obeys, and, picking up the
12 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.
crumpled hat, she tries to pull it out to its pro-
per shape, when out of it pop five or six little
grey mice. Poor Auntie shouts and runs about:
the poor little mice are frightened almost out of
their lives ; they run up Auntie’s legs, and down
again, and over her boots, while she is so fright-
ened that she nearly goes off in hysterics. Poor
Auntie! she does not dislike the innocent little
animals, but Sissie had heard her say how
fr-ghtened she was of mice, so ‘her little lady-
ship’ had captured those baby mice, while their
mother was gone to find some dinner for them.
Poor little mother mouse, when she went home
and found her little babies all gone, how sad
she would be! Why did that young lady rob
her of her treasures, just for one minute’s plea-
sure ?

Sissie did laugh while Aunt Sally was run-
ning about; she did not care about the poor
little mice having such a bump, not she, nor did
she care either for the sad trouble she had
brought upon poor Mrs. Mouse.

Auntic sees that coaxing will not bring Sis-
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 53

sie down from her perch, so she tries what she
can do by climbing to reach her. Sissie laughs
heartily as she watches Aunt Sally cauticusly
wending her way toward where she is sitting ;
but Auntie is not one of those sprightly ladies
we sometimes see ; she is rather fat, and being a
little bit nervous, she is of course slow in motion.
Presently she gets almost close enough to reach
Sissie, while that young lady quickly mounts a
little bit higher. Poor Auntie has to give up
the hope of reaching her, so she looks down on
the ground, and is terrified to see how far she is
above it.

‘However shall I get back? O, Sissie, I am
sure to tumble. Bertie, Bertie, she shouts with
all her might, ‘do come and help me down.’

He comes panting up to where Auntie is
clutching a bough of the tree ; he places her foot
and persuades her to give a jump. Down goes
Auntie on the green turf; Bertie is helping her
up ina moment ; she is only a little bit shaken,
But Sissie—do you know what she is doing?

She is actually laughing at poor Auntie, laugh-
ij LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

ing quietly to herself. What a naughty girl!
and, to make matters worse, she announces to
Auntie that she is about to jump. Standing
quite erect, she counts ‘One to start, two to
stay, three to make ready, and four away.’
Aunt Sally, who is not quite recovered from her
last shock, and knows what a venturous child
Sissie is, rushes to the place where her naughty
little niece, pleased to see Auntie with that scared
face, is standing in the attitude of some one just
about to give a jump. Poor Aunt Sally begs
her not to jump; but Sissie is enjoying her
Auntie’s coaxing and scolding and threatening,
all in succession.

‘T will not jump, if you will not tell Bertie
what I have done to his garden. I believe he
really will be cross with me, when he finds I did
it. I shall not say whether I did it, though.
Now, Auntie, I only made Bertie a few mud
pies.’

‘But, my dear, how did you gét the water?’

‘O, I carried lots of it from the pool. Some

I carried in my pinafore—not this one, though ;
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 15

Sarah is going to dry it again—and some in ink-
pots and my dollie’s silver mug, but I think
Bertic’s watering-can must have tumbled in some
day, for I saw it tumbling down close by the
pool, when I was using it; but I am sure you
will say the mud pies are splendid, because my
flour was so very good.’

Now do you not think that Sissie Strange
was a very mischievous child? She did not
care how much she grieved her brother ; she de-
lighted to see him vexed ; but she did not know
how much he prized his little garden, which he
always kept so neat, so different to his sister's.
She had little rocks built in hers, and flowers
stuck between the stones; but Bertie had real
flowers growing out of his garden.

Sissie is now walking gaily by the side of
Aunt Sally ; she is still boasting of her wonder-
ful pies; they are almost in sight of the garden.

‘Come now, Auntie, or Bertie will see us.
If he comes, I shall run away, because I’ve lost
his watering-can ; but if father comes, O—’

‘Why, dear me, Sissie, do you mean to say
16 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

you have done this? Surely it cannot be you.
What wd¢// Bertie say? Why did you do it,
Sissie? Sec, it is like a pool, poor Bertic’s
garden.’

‘But, Auntie dear, broke in the child, ‘Bertie
really does like good pies, I am quite sure he
does ; he will be so pleased when he sees them.
See, they are well moulded, quite like Mary’s
loaves. J think they are a good bit prettier,
don’t you, Auntie ?’

But Auntie does not answer ; she is gazing
on the picture before her. It is indeed an ugly
one; the little garden looks as though it had
been watered rather liberally for once; anyhow
it has served Sissie for a pool to float paper boats
on. That young lady did not tell Auntie that
she had coaxed Thomas, the gardener, to carry
her two big cans of water, and had made him
believe she was only going to play at boating.
There are a few tightly rolled lumps of soil, of dif-
ferent sizes and shapes ; these are the wonder-
ful pies. Sissie is about to pick one up in her
hands to show Auntie their excellent quality,
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 17

when epproaching footsteps make that young
lady look eagerly round about her.

But who are coming hand in hand towards
them? They are Mr. Strange and Bertie.
Poor Sissie, she does not know what to do in
her confusion, but she disengages her hand from
Aunt Sally’s, and, running towards her father,
she is transformed into a smiling little damsel,
looking as though she never wore a cross face.

‘Well my Sissie, daddy is come back; but
you promised to come and meet me, my dear.
Have you been too busy, eh? Your brother
has brought me to see his garden; would my
little daughter like her daddy to see hers too?’
*O no, thank you, father, mine is no garden
at all; but Bertie’s is not very nice, I think.’
With these words Sissie runs off in the direction
of her Auntie.

Bertie is indeed delighted to take his father
to his garden; it is seldom Mr. Strange has time
to see his children’s different sources of amuse-
ment. He walks on with Bertie, listening in-

tently to the little fellow’s sensible talk on garden

ae
18 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCRH.

work. | Bertie, who is a favourite of Thomas’s,
has stood and watched him at his work, chatting
about all sorts of things, while Thomas would
show him how to plant different things, and how
to attend to them while they were growing.
Not like Sissie; she would plant something
in her garden one day, and on the morrow she
would dig it up to look at it. She would go on
like this for a day or two, until at last her
patience had all gone. Then she would pull the
plant out of the soil and take it back to Thomas,
scolding and crying, and indeed sometimes
throwing it right at him. After these out-
bursts Thomas would not listen to Sissie’s
pleadings for something that would grow quick
‘Poor Sissie!’ the least thing that went wrong
with her would cause sometimes an hour’s sulk,
and she would put on her cross face—it was,
indeed, very cross-looking—that frightened her
brother away.

Bertie and his father at length reach the
garden. What a sight to meet Bertie’s eyes;

he stares around him, thinking he has come by
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 19

the wrong path; but no, it is really his garden,
or the place where it used to be. Poor Bertie,
he stares up in his father’s face, tears filling his
eyes.

‘My boy, how is this? You do not know
anything about it, do you, dear? Now I wonder
what or who has done it’

‘T expect it is Sissie, but perhaps she—she—’
but Bertie bursts out in tears. What a cruel
little sister he has, to be sure!

‘Where is Sissie? do you know, Bertie?
I want to speak to her.’

‘Oh, father, please don’t scold Sissie; she
must have made a mistake. I am sure I don’t
know who else could have done it, though,
but please, father, don’t tell Sissie anything
about it. I will work in it to-morrow, and
perhaps it will be nearly dry by then.’

‘You are a dear, forgiving little boy, Bertie ;
but even if you have forgiven your sister, I have
not ; I must talk it over with her, if only for her
own good. O no, I will not be vey cross with
her, my boy; but you must cease crying in the

B 2
20 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

first place, before we can come to any under-
standing whatever. Now we will go in search
of Sissie;’ and Mr. Strange and Bertie walk
hand in hand round the garden, calling first
‘Sissie’ and then ‘Auntie’ at the top of their
voices.

Presently they see Auntie Sally and ‘TJ.ittle
Miss Mischief’ sauntering lazily down the
meadow; they are quite too far off to hear
either Mr. Strange or Bertie calling them; so
father and son walk slowly up to the house, to
wait until the ladies shall have time to return.

Bertie and his father are seated comfortably
in the dining-room; they are watching Auntie
and Sissie drawing quietly near the house.

‘Don’t go in yet, Auntie, I don’t want to ; do
let us go back to the stile. I will help you up
the bank, Auntie ; do come.’

This is what Bertie can hear; he has his
head turned towards the window, and listens
anxiously for Aunt Sally’s response.

‘No indeed, Sissie; I am too tired already,

and if I had to climb the bank again, why, yout
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 21

poor old aunt would be quite broken-windcd ;
she would have to puff and blow like a steam-
engine.

At this Sissie tries to laugh; she can see it is
useless to try to persuade her Auntie to stay out
longer. So they enter the house together, Sissic
looking rather thoughtful ; they walk into the
dining-room, quite unconscious of its occupants.

‘Well, Sally, you have had a nice stroll; I
have been watching you for some minutes. You
will be pleased to hear I am going to stay at
home this afternoon, ch, Sally?’

‘Now, are you indeed, Sydney? I can
hardly believe you. Shall we go for a drive, if
you are not too tired, Sydney ??

“Yes, Sally, we will if you like. Would my
little boy like to go with daddy and Auntie?’
Bertie looked at Sissie ; she was looking at him ;
of course he had to drop his eyes ; poor Bertic
saw at that one glance that his sister was pad oud
about something.

‘No, thank you, father, not unless—

‘What, my boy, would you rather stay at




22 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

home instead of coming out with your aunt and
me?’

‘Yes, father, unless you will take Sissie too.’

‘ As to taking Sissie, I think if we left her at
home to work in the garden—for I think she
enjoyed it this morning—it would be just what
she deserves. Would it not, Sissie?’

But Sissie would not answer her father: she
could only hang her head down in shame; but
she could not be silent for long. She thought to
herself, ‘Now they are going for a nice drive
this afternoon, and I want to go too; what had
I better say to father? I want to go—and I
will go too,’ she bellows out, quite forgetting her
father’s presence. Sissie was now in a really
annoying temper, as any one might have seen
by her face.

“IT do almost hate Bertie, I do. He called
me Crosspatch this morning, and that made me
really very cross indeed—then he said I hada

very puckered face, and that it was not one bit



pretty—I am sure he meant all the time to say

it was ugly—and ever so many more horrid
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 23

things he said to me; and so I did his garden
up for him a bit. But perhaps I didn’t put that
pool on it, though; I think I forgot to finish
that, but I will do it if Bertie calls me Cross-
patch once more.’

‘Now, now, my little girl, you are running on
too fast, broke in Mr. Strange ; ‘we must have
a proper understanding about this ;’ and taking
one in each hand, he led them to the arbour,
where he seated them on his knees, to have the
proper understanding.

‘ Sissie, you say Bertie teased you, and called’
you Crossy.’

‘No, no, not that name, father ; it’s “ Cross-
patch” he calls me, and teases me ever such a
lot when he says my face is all in puckers anda
good bit ugly. That’s just what he says; only I
do really get rather cross. 1 am sure Sybil Dean
would not always be so very happy if she had a
Bertie to tease her, and call her horrid names
like Ihave. But I will go with you and Auntie
for a drive this afternoon, I know I will; so

there now, father,
24 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

‘Don’t make too sure, my dear; your father
wishes to have an understanding between Bertie
and you, so please don’t interrupt him again,
Sissie ; but first of all we will call Aunt Sally,

Presently Mr. Strange starts afresh on the
garden topic, making signs to his little girl to
keep silent. It is a very hard task for Sissie ;
however, she manages to keep her little tongue
still, but her feet every now and again are
giving an impatient stamp ; sometimes her head
is bent low, which tells her father more plainly
than words that she is the guilty little party.
He goes on to say that a little boy whom he
knew very well had a nice little garden, as had
also this little boy’s sister. ‘Now the little
boy, being the eldest, kept his garden very
neat, and would frequently offer to assist his
sister. But she would never accept his kind
offers—at least I have been told so, and I
expect it is quite true. Well, one day this very
little boy found his garden in a most untidy
state: he could not find out who had done the

mischief, for no animals were allowed to enter
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCE.. 2S

the garden. Now who could it have been? I
am afraid I can guess; and the little boy too,
poor little lad, how very grieved he must have
been when he found his beautiful flowers all up-
rooted and his plants spoilt, and his garden made
almost like the rush pool down in our orchard.
Now, Sissie, you may speak ; you have kept very
quiet. Your turn shall come next, Bertie’

But neither of them spoke, so Mr. Strange
continued :

‘I should indeed be very vexed if I thought
a little girl of mine had done such an unkind
action; indeed I think I should send her off to
school, right away from her kind Auntic, and
father and brother, and all her friends. Perhaps
a good little girl like Sybil Dean would be
pleased to fill her place.’

‘Indeed, Sybil Dean shall not live here; I
will not go to school, for I will be taught by
Aunt Sally always. Yes, father I will, won’t I,
because—

Here Sissie bursts into tears, and Auntie lifts

her on her lap, and there the little girl confesses




26 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

all her little secrets—no, not quite all—between
her sobs and tears. Poor Bertie is crying too ;
but why does he cry? Simply because he loves
his sister, and would rather be scolded himself
than see her crossed in the least. Now Sissie does
deserve scolding much oftener than she gets it ;
but if her Auntie corrects any of her little faults,
this little miss flies into a temper and says,
‘What a very cross Auntie you are! Why don’t
you scold Bertie too ?—he is older than I’

‘ Sybil Dean never had a horrid Bertie nor a
cross Aunt Sally; that’s why she doesn’t have
a cross face. But I will not live at this house
very long, for I am grown past the table already,
and when I am up to the mantelpiece I shall
be nearly grown up, and then I am going to live
at quite a fresh place ; J am invited already.’

* €Pooh, pooh, you silly child, Sissie, says
Aunt Sally, ‘you have been dreaming that some
time.’

‘No, I never did dream it, Auntie; really it
is quite a true, real, real true secret between him

and ine’
LITTLE MISS*CROSSPATCH. 27

‘O, I see,” says Auntie, ‘you think about
keeping house for Bertie when he goes to live at
the place where they find gold in the soil. I
understand you, young lady,’

‘Indeed you don’t, she chimes in, ‘I did not
mean Bertie at all, his name is a great deal nicer
than that ;’ and Sissie chuckles to herself at
having a secret quite to herself.

Now Sissie is quite amiable again, and Auntie
too, for Sissie has amused her greatly by her
funny little talk; yet she does not like to hear
her little niece talking about going away soon.
But Sissie does not mean it; at least, I don’t
think she does,

‘But, says Auntie, ‘suppose I should go
away from you first, Sissie, what then ?’

‘O, but I know you won't; father didn’t
mean it, I know that quite well ; he only said
that just for me to be a very good girl; but
perhaps I am not going to be altogether good,
though.’

‘Really, Sissie, I believe your father did

mean it, for I saw he was not laughing ; but I
28 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

expect he is going to talk with Bertie and you
another day.’

There was no time for a longer conversation ;
the luncheon bell rang, and they hurried indoors.
Sissie’s thoughts were occupied about the after-
noon drive, ‘Shall I go, or shan’t 1?’ was what
she was unconsciously saying aloud at the table.

“Go where, Sissie ?’ asks her father.

“O, about our drive, I mean, father; we are
all going of course ; at least, I am, I know, if
Bertie is.’

‘No, Sissie, you are not going, none of us
are; and even if we were, you would stay behind
this time, for certain little occurrences.’

‘Well, daddy dear, I should have gone if
Bertie had, I should; for I would, because I
meant to. I would have run behind like our
Fritzy all the way ; and if I had been lost, you
and Auntie would have come back for me, and
then I should have hidden myself somewhere.’

‘Sissie, Sissie, you naughty little girl, you
gricve yout “ather very much. Do not speak to

me again, tatil you say you are very sorrv,
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 29

Little Miss sits very silent for the remainder
of the luncheon hour, but on rising from the
table she runs to her father, and says she is a
wee bit sorry, but only because, suppose she
had hidden, and they could not have found her
anywhere, and she would have followed a long
way behind them, pretending she had really
been lost; ‘but if it had been quite the truth,
my feet would have been a good bit worn out,
I should think ; that’s just why I am sorry,’

Mr. Strange could only laugh at his funny
little girl, and taking her in his arms, he asks
her if she would like to go to school.

‘No, indeed, I would not live at that sort
of house, because they are always scolding
and worrying the people that go and live with
them:

‘Well, we shall have to see about it some day,
unless you are a very good girl, and try to be
more obedient to your aunt,’ says her father,
rather sternly.

‘Yes, but I do love Aunt Sally, very, very

much, and I do not want to go away to school.
30 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

I will be a good girl if I can; but Bertie must
not call me “Crosspatch,” and then I will not
damage places of his.’

‘QO, Sissie, did you really do it? I mean, in
‘Bertie’s garden. Ofcourse we all thought it must
have been you, as no one else would have been
so unkind,’ says Aunt Sally.

‘Indeed, Auntie, suppose I did happen to just
do a bit of a trick like that, never mind ; Bertie’s
garden did want a good watering; and beside,
there were the beautiful pies, and cakes, and
pieces of pastry, and ever so many pretty little
things made in mud—made in dough, I forgot.
And I know Bertie likes little things, for I will
go and fetch him here, and ask him.’

‘O yes, Sissie, I do like many little things ;
only I donot care much for mud pies, stammered
out poor Bertie. ‘One reason is because they
make my hands so grimy; but girls always like
baking much better than boys, don’t they,
Auntie?’

Poor Bertie was glad his aunt was near at

hand to speak a word for him; but presently
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 31

she left Sissie and him together, and walk-
ing away towards the garden, she thought to
herself :

‘What a very odd little niece ! have, to be
sure! Really her brother seems quite afraid of
her. At any rate I can only do my duty, and
try to make them grow up attached to each
other. If I could only get Sissie to be obe-
dient, and loving to her brother, I am sure all
would go well?

Poor Aunt Sally! she is in great trouble ;
she ponders over in her mind, again and again,
what would their own mother have done, to
have drawn them together? She at last comes
to the conclusion, ‘I will treat Sissie with all
kindness, and try and bear patiently with her
for a little while ; and as she grows older, she
will see her own folly. I love the dear children,
poor Mary’s children. Ah, she knew my heart
as she lay on her bed and entrusted her two wee
lambs to Sidney and me.’

Aunt Sally has had this little thinking time

nice and quiet, but now she sees Mr. Strange
32 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

slowly advancing toward her. She looks her
usual calm self in‘an instant, and, going to meet
him, she asks his consent for Sybil Dean and
her little brother to come and spend a week with
the children.

‘Certainly, Sally, if you can manage such a
tribe, says Mr. Strange,in his usual good humour ;
‘but Iam going up to town next week ; so if
you have them before I return, you will not
have me to help you amuse them.’

‘Thank you, Sydney, but it must be next
week on account of their holidays.’

We will now return to our little couple in
the arbour. Listen to what Sissie is just saying ;

‘IT should much rather live at Dean’s house
than Strange’s. You sce, Bertie, there is Jack,
and Regie, and Sybil, and all; and Jack is such
avery nice dear boy, he is a great deal nicer
than you, Bertie, at least, I think he is; he
swings me a great deal higher too, and talks
just like a big grown-up man. He doesn’t have
headaches either, like you; and even when he

has a bad cold he doesn’t put on a wrap and
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. - 33

woollen gloves and all sorts of things, like you
do, Bertie. It is only girls that do that, for
Jack said so when I told him.’

‘O, Sissie, what did you tell Jack Dean?
why did you talk about me? I hate Jack Dean ;
and besides he is not a man, not nearly, for he
is only one year older than I, and he does not
know half as much Latin as I do, because he is
such a blockhead.’

‘T tell you he is not anything of the kind, I
love Jack Dean ever so much, because he takes
such great care of me; and he said I was nicer
than Sybil ;’ and Sissie’s eyes begin to flash,
and her little mouth becomes stiff-looking, and
her forehead is puckered.

‘ All right, Sissie, now don’t get cross; only
don’t talk about the Deans, because Sybil is
really nicer than you; she doesn’t have puckers
in her forehead either.’

‘I tell you I am not Crosspatch ; do you
hear me, Bertie, you horrid boy? Bertie, do
you hear me? I don’t like Sybil Dean one bit,
nor you either very much, for you are just

Cc
34 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

like a girl and I am like a boy, because I
have rosy checks like Jack’s, and yours are pale
like Sybil’s. Come back, Bertie, I tell you; I
will give you a good scolding ; I am really cross
now, so you had better obey me.’

‘Never mind,’ says little Bertie, ‘I am going
in now; I want to do something’

‘And I will come too, so there, stop for me
at once. But Bertie had gone; he had entered
the house at the back door so as to escape his
ill-tempered sister.

‘Well, my little girl, what are you doing all
alone? Never reading all this time I hope,’ says
Auntie, coaxingly.

‘No, Iam not reading, of course not; Iam
following Bertie; he has run away; he is a
very worrying boy, Aunt Sally; but Iam going
to give him a good scolding, I am, for he almost
called me “Crosspatch,” and I am not cross.
Auntie Sally, look ; look, Aunt, I tell you, I am
not Cross.’

‘Well, well, my dear, I hope you are not, or
you would be like that little girl in the story
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH., 35

your father told us the other day. ‘Don’t you
remember about the garden? for I think she
must have been very cross, to have been so
unkind to her brother ; don’t you, Sissie ?’

‘Only a little bit unkind or cross, that is
what I think ; for, if that naughty boy worried
her, it quite served him right, especially if he
called her “Crosspatch.” Do you know if the
boy’s name was Bertie, Auntie, or what was the
girl’s name, I wonder? But it does not matter
for I am going to find out, I am going now,
Auntie, to find the book in father’s study ; then
I will read the book through, and tell you which
was in fault.

Away runs Sissie in search of the book ; she
climbs a chair, then a table, and then the ledge
of a book-shelf. She reads the titles very care-
fully, but they are all so very difficult, none of
them seem like children’s tales to Sissie.

*O, what shall Ido now? I have torn this
one! O, dear! what if father came; but there,
Ihave put it back safe; I daresay it will get
stuck together again. But I must find that

C2
36 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH

book somehow. O, bother, I am cross now,
says Sissie, as the books came tumbling down
all in a heap from the high shelf, ‘I will leave
the horrid things where they are; father may
think they tumbled down themselves. At any
rate he will not think it was me.’

‘Won't he, Sissie ?’ says Auntie, as she walks
into the room, ‘I guess he will if I tell him all I
have heard. But about that little journey you
are going to take, Sissie. Let me see; you told
me you are already invited, but who is going to
take care of you? It can’t be Bertie, for he is
just as puzzled as I am.’

“No, indeed, it isn’t Bertie, he is not strong
and big like Jack. Jack doesn’t care one bit even
if it rains very hard, because he is so brave and
strong.’

‘O, indeed, it’s Jack Dean, is it? Wellnow,
Sissie, I am surprised at you, and Aunt Sally
laughs heartily. ‘When I was a little girl, I
never was invited to go off with a young gentle-
man, nor indeed when I was a big girl either,’ |

‘No, I suppose not, or else you would have
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 37

had some one to take care of you now. I mean
you would have had a nice house and lots of
flowers and other things, and lived by the sea,
like Jack and I are going to do very soon, and
Sissie’s face brightens up at the bare idea of
living by the sea. ‘We shall go boating every
day in the summer ; Jack says we shall; and,
now and again, we shall get on board a big ship
that will bring us right straight to London.’

‘And pray, says Aunt Sally, ‘how have you
learnt all this? Why, Sissie, you wouldn’t
really like to leave me and your father and
brother and all your friends behind you, would
you?’

‘J shouldn't mind leaving Sybil Dean at
any rate. When I’m gone, she may come and-
live at this house if she likes, because father
thinks she is a great deal better than I am, and
you do, too, Aunt Sally. Besides, Bertie told
me that Sybil was a great deal prettier than I
was, and that made me feel very cross indeed.’

Auntie Sally does not seem to notice the

child’s prattle. She is fecling very sad; she
38 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

thinks that Bertie looks very ill. Poor boy, he
has grown so tall and thin, while his sister is so
fat and rosy, and yet so discontented with her
home.

~ Sissic and her brother had never been much
attached to each other, but instead of this little
girl treating her poor delicate brother with kind-
ness she was constantly grumbling and scolding ;
and, indecd, it once came to slapping, because
one day she wanted her brother to romp with
her, and he wanted to lie down on account of a
bad headache. So she walked up to the sofa,
and gave him several hard smacks on his face.
Poor Bertie tried to take no notice of her, but
after she had gone, he gave way to a good cry-
ing, partly on account of the headache, and
partly for the smarts on his face. How many
little boys would have slapped their sisters in re-
turn! but few little girls would dare to slap an
elder brother. Bertie felt a little afraid of his
sister, especially if she got into, ‘Queer Street,’
as he called it.

The following morning, after lessons, both
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 39

children drove to the station with father and
Auntie. Father was going a long journey, he
would be away a long time. Poor Bertie cried
at the station: he was so grieved at his father’s
having to go and leave him behind until he was
older. Bertie loved his father, he always liked
to be with him; he would sit for hours in his
father’s study, reading some favourite book,
while his father would be writing, hardly finding
time to speak a word to his little son. Mr.
Strange hoped that some day Bertie might be a
great help to him; but to look at his sunken
cheeks and thin white hands, no one would have
thought him well.

Miss Strange was very anxious about little
Bertie, and, feeling it her duty to tell his father
of his poor state of health, she resolved to pro-
pose a journey to the sea-side, and for Bertie to
stay there for a considerable time.

‘But who can go with him?’ she pondered.
‘I must not leave Sissie here; she would get
into all sorts of mischief, and if I take her with

me she would be continually arguing with-her
40 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

brother. I must talk to Mrs. Dean, perhaps
she may advise me wisely.’

Accordingly Aunt Sally makes a call on
Mrs. Dean, a kind, good-natured lady, who was
always ready to aid those who were in want of
good advice, or anything else. Aunt Sally has
made a fast friend of Mrs. Dean ; she tells her
the trouble she is in, and what she wants to do.

‘Don’t you see, Mrs. Dean? the dear boy’s
father is away from home, he won't be returning
for some weeks, and Bertie looks much worse
since he has gone. Perhaps a fortnight at the
sea would just put him all right, as our doctor
said this morning; and I do believe in change
of scene, don’t you; Mrs. Dean ?’

‘I do, indeed, Miss Strange, for I am sure if
my Sybil had not gone away when she did, I
should have lost her. It is now three years,
Miss Strange ; you were just come into our neigh-
bourhood ; she looked like some little shadow
eliding about. So I resolved to take her,
and see what sca air would do for the poor

child’
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. AI

‘But the object of my call, Mrs. Dean, was
to get your advice as to who could go with
Bertie. You see, I could not possibly go and
leave Sissie at home ; she would get into all
sorts of performances with the servants, and
most likely offend them,’

‘Well now,’ says Mrs. Dean, ‘I had thought
of going, too; I was about letting Sybil go with
Miss Shaw; but, poor girl, she has been very ill
since she went home. Sybil came crying to me
this morning with a letter she had received from
her, saying that the doctor crdered her to keep to
her room for a week, and not to travel for some
long time. Poor child, she said she should
never have such a dear governess again, and she
sobbed as though her heart would break.’

‘Poor little girl, she puts me in mind of Ber-
tie, so loving and gentle to every one.’

‘Here they come, rushing in full speed
Are they not real boys, Miss Strange? Look
at their grimy hands and faces. Now go
straight to the nursery, and get tidied, and

bring your sister down with you.
42 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

‘All right,” shout the boys, half way up the
stairs, ‘we will carry Miss Baby down in our
arms, won’t we, Regie,’ says Jack.

‘No, Jack, you will not carry me at all, for
{ will walk myself; and please, I am not Miss
Baby, and Sybil comes slowly downstairs, tot-
tering and holding fast by the balustrades. Jack
and Regie begin to laugh.

‘T should like to know what you are, if you
are not a Baby Bunting. You walk exactly
like one. I think we had better have a peram-
bulator for you, that’s what I think.’

‘And so do I, too, says young Regie, ‘ for
then we could have it in turns, Jack, for hauling
soil, or bricks, or anything to our garden, couldn’t
we, Sybil ?’ .

‘But I am not going to have one, so you will
not be able to use it, and Sybil was on the point
of crying, when she lost her balance, and over
she went, over and over, without any noise, until
she stopped at the bottom ; then a low moan,
and all was still.

The boys fly to the drawing-room.
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 43

*O,mamina, be quick, do come quick. O,do
come, Miss Strange; our Sybil has turned such
a somersault all down the stairs; no, not quite
all down ; and she never cried a bit, says Regie.

‘O, my dear child she is stunned ; Heaven
help me!’ and Mrs. Dean rushes for a restora-
tive, while Aunt Sally carefully undresses the
unconscious child. Her two brothers are seated
on the stairs. Jack is crying, while Regie is
wondering how it was she did not cry out loud
cnough to be heard in the garden at the remark-
able somersault,

Little Sybil soon comes round, and Aunt
Sally takes her leave, Mrs. Dean promising her
to call very shortly. Not the next day, but the
day after that, Mrs. Dean's carriage draws up at
Mr. Strange’s door, and a lady and a little girl
are shown into the drawing-room. Miss Strange
is sitting there, reading to Bertie. There he
lies, poor, white-faced little boy.. He brightens
up at sight of Mrs. Dean’s kind face, and asks
after Sybil and the boys.

Sybil runs up to his side, and kisses him.
44 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

At sight of her he sits quite upright, and talks
and laughs as merrily as usual ; but there is a
strange ring in his laugh, and a strange look
about his eyes.

‘I think the best plan would be to stay at
home, Miss Strange, the dear boy is in no fit
state to travel; but I should send for his father
to make haste home. You would like your
father to come home, wouldn’t you, Bertie?’
says Mrs. Dean.

“O, yes, I should very much ; but he will
come soon, I am sure, because of his writing be-
ing left undone in his study. O, Mrs. Dean,
who tumbled downstairs at your house? Was
it Jack or Regie?’

‘It was I) chirps in Sybil, ‘and the boys say
I never cricd one bit, not even when I came
bump on the hall floor.’

‘Well Iam sure I should have done,’ says
Bertie, ‘because I’m rather a baby, you know.
Sissie said I was, because she is stronger than I?

“No, indeed, you are not one bit like a baby,

because you are so tall, and I think you are al-
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCIH. 45

most grown aman. I told our Jack you were;
but he only laughed at me, and said Sissie was
a great deal nicer than you; and I believe he
and Sissie are going somewhere soon, for I heard
him say to Regie something about getting up
early some morning, even when it was dark, and
calling for your Sissie to go with him over the
sea. But of course our Jack won’t go for a long
time yet, and perhaps our Regie would wake
early, too, and run downstairs, and take the key
out of the door, that’s what I heard him say;
and I will persuade him to do it, wouldn’t you,
Bertie? because I don’t want dear Jackie to go
a long way from us.’

‘Do you love Jack very much, Sybil?’ asks
Bertie ; ‘because our Sissie don’t love me not
the least little bit ; she told me she didn’t. So
I know she doesn’t, because she scolds me so
much, and gets so cross with me.’

‘O,-yes; I love our Jack and Regie; although
they tease me and call me “Miss Baby,” I do
not mind. But does your Sissy get really cross,

and does she scold you, even though you are the
46 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

eldest? Our Jack and Regie expect me to
obey them always, because I am the youngest ;
but I don’t every time they ask me, and then
they call me “ Baby.”’

“Please lift my head up, Auntie, it aches so
dreadfully. O dear! I do feel very ill; I can
hardly see you, Auntie dear. I do wish he
would come home to see me just for one little
minute— The poor boy utters some inaudible
sounds, and seems to drop off to sleep.

‘What had I better do? O, Mrs. Dean, do
decide something for me. See, he has fainted
away. I will telegraph straight off to his father.’

‘No, don’t do that, my dear Miss Strange ; it
would be-useless. See, he is reviving already ; I
would put him straight to bed, and send for a
doctor ; you can do nothing more.’

Poor Auntie lifts the little boy up, and
attempts to carry him upstairs. He is hardly
any weight, but it is too much for her. Mrs,
Dean gently takes him in her strong arms and
carries him upstairs to his little bedroom. They

let the fresh air blow on his face, which seems
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 47

to bring him back to consciousness. Gazing
around the room, his eyes fall on Sissie, who is
looking at him, her eyes brimful of tears.

‘O, Aunt Sally, what have you done to him?
Why does he look like that? It frightens me,
his funny eyes, I mean. Why doesn’t he talk
to me when IJ speak to him?’ and Sissie bursts
into tears. ‘I was trying just then to love
Bertie, indeed 1 was, Auntie; but he always
begins our quarrels. Sometimes he talksa great
deal too much, and then I call him “ Chatter-
box,” and he calls me “Crosspatch,” and that is
how our quarrels begin.’

‘All right, my dear, you go downstairs to
Sybil, she is in the drawing-room ; Mrs. Dean is
so very kind; she will not leave me until the
doctor comes.’

‘Why is the doctor coming, Auntie? Whois
ill? for ’m not, indeed I’m not, Mrs. Dean, for
I feel quite well now. Whereis our Sissie gone?
I heard her talking to you just now, Auntie, and
it was all about me too.”

‘Now, now, my dear, lie down and keep still ;
48 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

we must not allow you to talk any more or you

?

will be worse ;’ and Mrs. Dean lays him down
and promises to come and see him again to-
morrow, if he will keep very still, and not get
talking too much.

Sybil and Sissie have been alone in the
drawing-room for almost an hour. When Mrs.
Dean and Aunt Sally come in they seem in great
confusion ; Sissie hides her face, which is dyed
crimson, behind a book that lies handy, while
Sybil gathers up courage to say :

‘O, mamma, Sissie says I am coming to stay
at this house with her and Bertie for a bit,
when can I come?’

‘But what a funny little girl Sissieis! She
does not mean it, Sybil, does she, Miss Strange ?
for you have enough to do already,’ and Mrs,
Dean arranges her bonnet and prepares to go,
Miss Strange accompanying her to the door.

‘Really, Mrs. Dean, that child is a marvel ;
she must have heard Mr. Strange and me talking
about it. We had intended inviting your little

ones here as Bertie is so fond of them, and
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 49

Sissie too, in her funny way. You will lct them
come, won’t you? as soon as my boy gets well,
or as soon as he gets better, for the poor child
has never been quite well, that’s my belief?

‘Thank you, Miss Strange ; but I could not
think of letting them come while Bertie is in
such a weakly state. I will call to-morrow to
know what Dr. Evans says about him. Come
Sybil, I shall leave you behind, dear, if you are
not quick. Good-bye, my dear Miss Strange,
Be sure not to worry yourself or Mr, Strange
either; there is no cause for it if he is well
attended to, as no doubt he will be. Good-bye,
Sissie dear, be sure and be a good girl, and not
make too much noise to awake your brother,’

‘O, Auntie, don’t let her ga; you said she
was going to stay here; do hold her tight,
Auntie dear. Ah, don’t go, Sybil, please ; do
stop with me, and the poor little girl utterly
breaks down. Mrs. Dean and Miss Strange try
to console her, but she will not hear of anything
unless Sybil can stop.

‘T heard you ask father the other day, Aunt

D
5: LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

Sally, and I listened for him to say, “ Yes,” and
he said it too; and so do Ict Sybil stay with me,
please, Mrs. Dean, will you?’

. ‘My dear, we are coming again to-morrow,
and I will think it over. Perhaps if I did allow
my Sybil to comeand stay with you poor Bertie
would get no sleep, and your poor Auntie would
be worried out of her life.’

‘No, mamma, I would not make a noise,
really I wouldn’t, if you will let me stay.’

‘Do let her stay, Mrs. Dean, for my sake,’
whispers Miss Strange ; ‘that child will not be
right again for a week if she gets disappointed ;
she has such a dreadful temper,’

‘Well, you may stay, if you like, Sybil; but
you must not be any trouble to Miss Strange,
I shall come for you to-morrow ;’ and Mrs.
Dean takes her departure amid shouts of delight
from the two little girls. They go straight up-
stairs with Aunt Sally, and peep in at Bertie,
who is quietly enjoying a nice sound sleep.
How pale he looks, as he lies there, with his

little hands clasped tight together, as though he
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 51

were holding something very precious! Miss
Strange goes on into the little bedroom.

‘This is to be your room, little girls, for to-
night ; I shall put you to bed at half-past eight.’

‘O, you are a good, kind Auntie ; isn’t she,
Sybil? O won’t we have some fun, though!’

‘But we must not make much noise, Sissie,
because of Bertie. Do you know I believe he
is really ill. Suppose he should die. O, Sissie
dear, it makes me cry. I love your Bertie very
much, don’t you?’

‘Not exactly, Sybil, because he used to worry
me so very much, and call me “ Crosspatch ;”
so of course I don’t feel very, very sorry
about him being a little bit ill; although I am
sure he is very ill, because he doesn’t tell stories
like Ido. He told me yesterday he was ill, and
that perhaps he should never get well. He said
he was quite sure he should remember mother’s
face when. she came to mect him at the big
gates,

‘O, Sissie dear, did he say that? I do hope
he will soon be better; but do you think he

D2
52 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

would really know his mother? because she has
been dead a long time; mother told me all
about it, and about Bertie and you.’

-‘What did she tell you about me, Sybil Dean?
Tell me at once, I used not to do things rather
unkind to Bertie, unless he teased me. Father
and Auntie always thought it was my fault, but
it wasn’t, really it wasn’t. Sybil, why do you
keep staring like that? You are just like our
Bertie ; that’s just what he does when I’m cross,

‘and when I do look just a little bit at him he
calls me “ Crosspatch.”’

‘O, what a pretty name, Sissie! I shouldn’t
mind it-at all. But shall we goand have a peep
at Bertie now? I wonder does he know Pm
living at this house? I don’t think he does,
because he hasn’t noticed me.’

‘O yes, he does; he heard father and Aunt

Sally talking about you, and so did I. Auntic
said something about perhaps it would make me
more kind to Bertie, and not so cross, if I had
another child companion just like you; I am

sure she meant you.’
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 53

‘Yes, I did mean you, Sybil dear, you are
such a kind, loving little girl ; I hope you may
be a pattern to our Sissie. Yes, little miss, I
have heard what you said to Sybil; but come,
both of you, and sce Bertie. The doctor has
been, and says he is in a very weakly state ; he
has: asked to see his little sister several times,
but I thought it best to keep him quiet.’

‘But, Miss Strange, how did he know I was
here, to-day? I am sure he didn’t know I was
going to stay.’

‘O, he knows you are here, Sybil, don’t you,
Bertie, boy? and pleased he is to see you, my
dear.’

‘O, Bertie dear, I do hope you will soon get
well; I am very sorry for you to be ill, and
Sissie is too.’

‘Is our Sissie sorry too, did you say, Sybil?
Why, she does not care anything about me, I
think,’

‘I am sorry too, really I am, Bertie dear.
O, do get well again quickly, and I will be ever

so kind to you; I will indeed. I'll never mess
54 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

up yeur garden again, nor do any unkind things
to you if you will get well quickly, because Sybil
is teaching me to be kind. Sybil loves you,
Bertie ; did you know? I shall soon love you
just-as much if you do not worry me at all.’
‘Sissie dear, I love you very much ; I always
did love you, even when you were unkind to me’
Auntie Sally left the three together for ten
minutes, and in that time there was a great deal
of talking done. Sissie made promises to love
Bertie always, even when he had got quite well ;
and Sybil promised to teach Sissie how to be kind.
Aunt Sally calls them down to tea, and
while ‘they are sitting round the table she talks
and laughs with the two little girls, and wonders
which of them will think of Bertie first. He is
sitting up in bed to-day; his head doesn’t ache
quite so much, but he hasn’t had his tea yet;
perhaps his aunt has forgotten about it. Miss
Strange continues talking, and the two little
girls seem to be enjoying their tea, when sud-
denly Sybil Dean jumps up.
“O. Miss Strange, have you forgotten Bertie?
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 55

or has he had his tea? Shall I take it to
him ?’

‘Don’t trouble, my dear, I am going up to
him now ; but when you have finished you may
come up to me and ask Bertie what he would
like. He doesn’t like tea, I know,’

‘And what can I do, Aunt Sally? Can’t I
come too?’

‘Yes, yes, my dear; and if Bertie says he
would like something milky, you two little girls
shall help to cook it.’

‘O how jolly, Sybil! I hope he will say
“something milky ;” he does like milky things,
I know.’

Sybil and Sissie, delighted at the thought of
cooking something for Bertie, finished their tea,
and ran upstairs.

‘O, Bertie, do say “something milky ;” we
are going to help to make it, Sybil and I; and
of course Auntie will see we do it right.’

‘But I don’t want anything except an orange,
thank you, dear ; I am not one bit hungry.’

*O, I wish you were; you ought to be on
56 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

purpose, because I’m not disagreeable with you,
and if—’

‘Sissie dear, do not speak like that to Bertie ;
perhaps he will have some to-morrow, before
Sybil goes home.’

‘When will Sybil come again, if she goes
home to-morrow, Auntie dear?’

“You will often come and see Bertie, won’t
you, Sybil? and bring Jack and Regie when
Bertie gets better, and stay with us for a week.
You would like that, wouldn’t you, Bertie? and
you, Sissie ?’

‘O,1 shall be glad when the day comes; it
will be jolly fun, won’t it, Bertie? If you are
not got guzte well, I shall take Jack and Regie
to see your garden, shall I, Bertie?’

‘You may if you like, Sissie. I don’t think
I shall be well for a long time yet; but show
Sybil my garden too, and be sure don’t tread on
my little parsley bed ; it is just in the corner,’

Sybil and Sissie go quictly toward the
garden ; neither of them is very talkative.

‘This is poor Bertie’s garden, Sybil ; isn’t it
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 59

a dear little one? It isa great deal nicer than
mine, for Bertie works in his a great deal longer
than I do ia mine. I generally get cross when
I am gardening, because I can’t get my things
to grow quick enough ; they take days and days
to grow, did you know, Sybil?’

‘O yes, answers Sybil, ‘it takes weeks and
weeks for some things to grow. My crocuses
were ever so long growing, and my tulips, really
I thought they were gone dead ; but Jack knew
better than I, for they grew up splendidly and
tall’

‘Has your Jack a garden, Sybil? Is it
better than Bertie’s ?’

‘It is just like Bertie’s, only not quite so tidy’

And thus the little girls went on talking.
They stayed out until eight o’clock, and Auntie
was standing on the steps calling tothem. When
they reached Auntie they were out of breath ;
they had been running a race together; Sybil
had won the race ; she was so much lighter than
Sissie, who was just as broad as long.

‘Why, Auntie dear, you have been crying;
a
*

58 LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH.

now I will cry too, and Sissie begins to
whimper.

‘No, don’t cry, darling ; we cannot help it;
I think he is better now. He has had a bad
attack of coughing,’

‘Do, Auntie, let us go and see him; I won’t
cry, if you will let me go, just once, before we go
to bed.’

Aunt Sally is very downcast, she has sent for
Mrs. Dean, and that good lady is sitting by Ber-
tie’s bedside ; she is reading to him out of a big
book. Mrs. Dean thinks it best to send a tele-
gram to Mr. Strange, and have the doctor im-
mediately. The doctor calls, and Aunt Sally
and Mrs. Dean watch him as he shakes his
head and says:

‘He has taken a turn for the worse, Miss
Strange. Have you sent for his father? He
would like to see him alive, no doubt.’

‘O, Mr. Evans, can’t you give us a little hope?
Do you think the dear boy is so near death ?’

‘He may live through the night certainly,
but he cannot last long. ‘I am sorry I cannot do
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 59

anything to save him, but he is in the hands of
One Who is wiser than I ; trust to His judgment,
my dear Miss Strange, He knows best” The
kind doctor takes his departure, promising to
call again before long.

Both Mrs. Dean and Miss Strange seem
to know his end is near. Mrs. Dean asks him
if he should like Daddy to come home. The
dear boy brightens up and says:

‘Dear Daddy, do make haste and come home

to your little Bertie. He is going to live at the
happy place where mother is. You told me
how happy she was, and I shall be too.—Is he
come yet, Auntie dear?’ the child continues:
‘I wish he would, and Sissie too, and Sybil. I
heard them laughing just now, and I laughed
too.’
Sissie and Sybil were both in the room.
Sissie was laughing quietly at what Bertie had
just said ; while little Sybil sat on a footstool,
sobbing as though her heart would break.

Presently Bertie sits straight up in bed and
gazes round the room ; his eyes fall on Sissie
60 LITELE MISS CROSS PAL CH.

and Sybil ; he reaches out his little white hands
for them to come to his bedside, forgetting his
Auntie’s presence and Mrs. Dean’s.

‘ Sybil, dear, I hope you will love Sissie ; she
is my little sister, you know; I love her very
much. I used to tease her though,’ and Bertic’s
eyes filled with tears. He went on: ‘She loves
you, Sybil, and I do too. Will you try and love
her? perhaps she will love me when I am gone
to that happy place where mother lives. Jesus
keeps the door, you know, but He will open it
when He sees me coming. Will you come too,
Sybil? Auntie is coming some day, and your
mother is, too.’

Poor Sybil is unable to answer him; she
draws Sissie up to the bedside ; neither of them
speaks for a few moments.

‘Indeed I will come too, Bertie, to see my
mother. Dotake me with you}; I will be a good
girl. O, Bertie, don’t look like that, it makes
me cry,’

Bertie lay back on his pillow, and seemed to

fall asleep ; Aunt Sally rose softly, and went to
LITTLE MISS CROSSPATCH. 61

the window. A gentleman was just coming up
the drive ; it was Mr. Strange. Aunt Sally run
down the stairs to hurry him. ‘O, Sydney, you
are only just in time!’ She could say no more.

Mr. Strange went to the bedside. Bertie
opened his eyes, and on secing his father he
smiled a satisfied smile, and closed his eyes—
this time never to open upon earthly forms
again. Then he held out his hand as a sign of
farewell, and his last words were: _

‘Will you all meet me in the happy home,
Sissie and all’

They all answered ‘ Yes, except Sissie ; she
was sobbing bitterly, and did not answer.

‘Will you, Sissie, dear? Do say “yes”

)

quickly ;’ and directly she uttered the word he
was soaring up to ‘the happy place,’

Mrs. Dean needed all her self-command to
cheer up Mr. Strange and his sister, as well as
the two little girls. Poor Sybil was. deeply
moved by Sissie’s pitiful face.

Mrs. Dean asked Miss Strange to let Sissie

come home with her and Sybil. They went

-
62 TEs MISS CROSSPATCH.

downstairs, and Mr. Strange saw them off, pro-
mising to cheer up Miss Strange, and to think
of his bereavement in the right light.

The great God knows what is best for us,
and Bertie was gone to his dear mother, whom
he thought so much of. Sissie was left to be a
comfort to her father and aunt. Her temper
was cured at Mrs. Dean’s by the example of
Sybil’s sweet disposition and ways; and, by
God’s grace, she learned to be like her. She
often paid visits to Mrs. Dean, whose children
often came and spent their holidays at Sissie’s
home.

Children, learn to govern your tempers ; you
can if you try. Don’t be like Sissie, always
grumbling about something or somebody. She
was never really happy until she made up her
mind to give up being cross. She is now one
of the most pleasant little girls, and no one
would ever think she had deserved the nicknanie
* CROSSPATCH.’
‘ZShiESS |







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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-10-25T12:20:59-04:00'
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTST' 'sip-files00041.txt'
adfd87e3adeb9ccdaf99de9aee323555
4fa7539fda7ce253f26e80fcdce135021fb5b6e4
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTSU' 'sip-files00042.txt'
b060b10f15630544333ef29d2bb6ddbe
5324b90f2755960ff6cfc9ec402fd1105a1faa7e
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTSV' 'sip-files00043.txt'
ff3e2b6294fd75b20cc6652f5ca72bfb
7519e5ad990bec74b66aa9915ff4c1f0bdb2354e
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTSW' 'sip-files00044.txt'
daba995c265aa2806e6455f77bc5f998
9a7743a9f7e8787a073cf7f210a95042ac7817a7
'2011-10-25T12:21:32-04:00'
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTSX' 'sip-files00045.txt'
a89d3cb8d761a7b5163d100ee2235813
0f8f5915c88fe19ee02e08fb53aa716295487af8
'2011-10-25T12:21:18-04:00'
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTSY' 'sip-files00046.txt'
71fca08e17d773ef8e3e754e150d80a1
a4adb8e696bf534441e36dbb2fabb10c8e09543b
'2011-10-25T12:21:06-04:00'
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTSZ' 'sip-files00047.txt'
5adfa5550048b98d46d70070190685ad
ebc8b8a0b3ba27514fc9fab5e163de8639462623
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTA' 'sip-files00048.txt'
4e5972871789481f14cba8327bfa5e9d
8153040c9150441e143f348085742b5dab362ac3
'2011-10-25T12:21:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTB' 'sip-files00049.txt'
0dfe59ac0938a8dd29f71902aa66ca30
fa0b3891a98ee2c35def08e92e39c489fdce707c
'2011-10-25T12:20:53-04:00'
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTC' 'sip-files00050.txt'
5f14c3a08fddc0369c6b11a94d72bd42
233a3547296831be0e1193079932d06fdac293d4
'2011-10-25T12:21:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTD' 'sip-files00051.txt'
4d3f7911ad70991276b8357030e7b043
ca911298b45c021ab1899ccf547d52b6f0cbb2aa
'2011-10-25T12:09:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTE' 'sip-files00052.txt'
2650e200cdde90391e716ff2bd5cd8f9
c66c5150303864d7d65d83059a98944569c1e393
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTF' 'sip-files00053.txt'
d89893b2d92e72f76bc455533bf01f38
3583b11db80a3be6945c4b7b3a97af5561c9f03a
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTG' 'sip-files00054.txt'
11cf840fe8a53032d4402f1c48518a7b
2e8b95d01db0d4c86df974545dfe2e52a391b704
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTH' 'sip-files00055.txt'
46fe4da63f9429c1f01c21d808566dc3
5ee2436fd49815bc41a3377bfa840c1da7c8f0b2
'2011-10-25T12:09:21-04:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTI' 'sip-files00056.txt'
d0e7f8efce93132435dae5c9cf81f458
cab10837706e142f2bf398bc05fce56e3444c450
'2011-10-25T12:20:46-04:00'
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTJ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
9beabab73a50054bef06808e9c4d59c6
fec8e6ce957d9e4f20130c2407836a61363d3ed6
'2011-10-25T12:21:36-04:00'
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTK' 'sip-files00058.txt'
a25eb8980a503b7340a91aaf9896a316
abe3af6f0c4da4029dfb30a9b84c6fdd44eed9dd
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTL' 'sip-files00059.txt'
17347c8a9c5c583e2c6c8973fd6e1800
c510d1dff0226bd50dba2f39d69cff6f565da3ba
'2011-10-25T12:21:04-04:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTM' 'sip-files00060.txt'
4f82c2b40b6b9e25a2486f375251fe21
9a48c79bcacb6877dafa16e0356af0560a843864
'2011-10-25T12:20:37-04:00'
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTN' 'sip-files00061.txt'
cd8008b49a7b136bd2b9a70b3bbc3333
436174b01c82af54594752606916cf8922ab3405
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTO' 'sip-files00062.txt'
2df74b83f3bf8acb7c56e8fc62e0e64f
a3de568da7a854c7cc7406e9684bf5653788f7d0
'2011-10-25T12:20:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTP' 'sip-files00063.txt'
a4d4b58f112d8ae9c2ea81bb94a8467b
96ec6b09bc0ac76e6a6efdda57e9b2ca647f27cb
'2011-10-25T12:21:22-04:00'
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTQ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
7597081604378b9fc10a627357818ae0
2fba301133d679599ecba223c00d3cb1099b069c
'2011-10-25T12:21:23-04:00'
describe
'71' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTR' 'sip-files00071.txt'
48480e1542878ccb7dbbe779b267c2d4
9977bd49f6318072f3e3130dc303cc4b6d597e7b
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTS' 'sip-files00001.pro'
aac4bf96b8ea2acd470f2f2edcec7a12
75f4a525c24f41eed61da31af434997584a4e296
describe
'489' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTT' 'sip-files00002.pro'
f46e843e3aacbff0c74e37ce45ab5f29
b48ced4e2d47e2da63ad1cf2292fa4928fb0912b
describe
'621' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTU' 'sip-files00003.pro'
00e1f5528527e6a6114e39a350020cef
65dfdb225c01c19c36c146173c1787d1d3c3513e
'2011-10-25T12:20:22-04:00'
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTV' 'sip-files00005.pro'
2259b7720873d664077f12d93039972f
6374ca2c34e479bceec403f7730c251b24fbfa98
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTW' 'sip-files00006.pro'
b7ba9ae4e14fc0251dac586effea8d07
dacb3e52eb854075aa2a829a0b5b9ec1dbce884e
describe
'3081' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTX' 'sip-files00007.pro'
3c77bed2fd634feb574bdfb5c9e4d7c2
1ade75808f1f297d52a84545f0944bfdc997c414
describe
'2209' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTY' 'sip-files00008.pro'
feb0c9a57806bd16e5093526b86a6eb6
5feeb77a1d4c3fae6fa51402cb5dea478666bec5
describe
'12830' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTTZ' 'sip-files00009.pro'
e596f3599e8aa253fc8ce6cbcbad3786
d8b4cab05a0cb300eb0d278106d23556783c273f
'2011-10-25T12:20:40-04:00'
describe
'28718' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUA' 'sip-files00010.pro'
e52b5b1721d3b4414b1b65f4b241c5e5
0f4e9996eef85e663d2f6fa1d20418b19c3a01cc
describe
'26761' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUB' 'sip-files00011.pro'
31c0450275388e96de993bdb7f8d3930
5ec7833118186cb2cce77fe8b6f0c11e3842eccb
'2011-10-25T12:20:27-04:00'
describe
'29086' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUC' 'sip-files00012.pro'
2d4885907fa72f682390e1d95d112d80
93065560a24c9091bfe79c3c054397bf3965dab8
'2011-10-25T12:21:33-04:00'
describe
'24707' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUD' 'sip-files00013.pro'
88c505eaac2b455a9717543917a61c9c
c4d12da364f89100a9c0fa37f3067aa33f88e2fb
'2011-10-25T12:20:28-04:00'
describe
'27777' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUE' 'sip-files00014.pro'
d0931e2795926a19e1bee3db15a63ac5
fe92f269242036ca355c36957cae6dbaa0eebf97
describe
'27826' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUF' 'sip-files00015.pro'
10f170f7fa73d76ec98bc8008d72fee1
033ac7a14d29950c9e9acb613a9efc29dc42ae86
describe
'27048' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUG' 'sip-files00016.pro'
5b5e304d17562a22764f78dd4fa4445d
52c13e0aed462507a149de7b6f2e737d21c1a6fe
describe
'27495' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUH' 'sip-files00017.pro'
691758d0a131269567b546a75dbe43b2
7540a9d75a2928693b99bd9e5368654efce0c318
describe
'27460' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUI' 'sip-files00018.pro'
cb452a972cbae1f0cc596d8b159653e7
5a4f89b2203feeb63586b2de1a8b872e21bc8a6b
describe
'27082' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUJ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
0cce7e54bd269ad2d02aee10f9bd0098
bb25d61bf6c1f090dbe41e4e75ff00defd63b472
describe
'27411' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUK' 'sip-files00020.pro'
4f250a1d5b47543d060ba01afb183a95
f2fe3aa0faeb21302e01f0bdc7ded4986bf91641
describe
'25789' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUL' 'sip-files00021.pro'
921dd4909a911434f0a312294f2a6848
bd38a3acaa5967571b21e71133ba5d80530d2f10
describe
'26465' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUM' 'sip-files00022.pro'
b05fd3490103bec5b9726df5ece02370
e53c58682cf4722bd95578c9985fe34bff198534
'2011-10-25T12:21:17-04:00'
describe
'25748' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUN' 'sip-files00023.pro'
1825f2cf4211e37f9d5e164360f4ec8f
b1fd94e887d24bb546e0b066e4eee8f4d9a071db
'2011-10-25T12:21:09-04:00'
describe
'25373' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUO' 'sip-files00024.pro'
de4aa15bac1d6fc383f43313b5e7cf8b
2495f172890198dada1a2b737b96986aea46aa24
describe
'25951' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUP' 'sip-files00025.pro'
a87372cd975b85e1c4d1f75dfafe00c7
eb3e776314215fc78c2240d89e4734959dfedd69
describe
'28841' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUQ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
805459c6c9871ca4ff72b5a7af3a1df8
0371c3f285755c6c39e83ee454d02f937e91b0bb
describe
'26212' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUR' 'sip-files00027.pro'
e0d520f10effa9cf8d2041d79722f0f0
42c73577d74e69be2287497e13a0df1df4c07a51
describe
'27334' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUS' 'sip-files00028.pro'
2acbc33003ff465a082dab1abc13f81f
1bebb431b72671b47412504a82b92175b21faad9
describe
'25666' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUT' 'sip-files00029.pro'
55e5c8c096dfc7b966d43d290d9b4749
4d3efd89b61ee1542e2edd47d190831416b90c1e
describe
'26677' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUU' 'sip-files00030.pro'
e8f2bcd2170ffe40f0ff30de9d78d669
3b9ae9e9e26334b6f6a3de9d21720c51863a13be
'2011-10-25T12:21:13-04:00'
describe
'26097' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUV' 'sip-files00031.pro'
f0a0c2b624bcd9b3f3eba05de0c4a0c7
b2a9cb136ccdddb2a1b2d62ddca9beda0f9d1b6e
describe
'26587' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUW' 'sip-files00032.pro'
eda77b06b5a087057cf9f6b946cc2a89
20854bdeb7bfd74798003c04ba856ec0b228efe9
describe
'25868' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUX' 'sip-files00033.pro'
b12430170fbcb0a38d15fbdae150091f
570ba7ec71f797fa2fda534736f0bd59852269a3
describe
'26997' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUY' 'sip-files00034.pro'
8b4f26d3aad692c5699abd7565d4b12a
972b5ba6d43d8ef429ceafbc8ab5f5cd008bc66b
describe
'26499' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTUZ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
818d919e81f14943521c396dab7ce88a
7bc4bc1a3825a467d8b94175af6a0f461bf1fb94
'2011-10-25T12:20:49-04:00'
describe
'25898' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVA' 'sip-files00036.pro'
8fa7b2f8c133998ffe44f925f5d0b3e9
2e3fea64097d093928ea2c9e299974f66592ec7d
'2011-10-25T12:20:38-04:00'
describe
'27618' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVB' 'sip-files00037.pro'
4837029275a78befe7534e915af3ca28
1739f583255aa7fc4ffb5d276a11498c1d12e741
'2011-10-25T12:20:41-04:00'
describe
'27440' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVC' 'sip-files00038.pro'
f74b010158939da8a94181db17b46204
d0af732da0c7548ae4a8aa4b43b4bcc45f687119
describe
'27034' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVD' 'sip-files00039.pro'
65251328fdfc6d5734b6a7e57223252c
33d5e31ede87c0c2bf75cb4f6ea525459fdb3fdc
describe
'27585' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVE' 'sip-files00040.pro'
a09fbc1a24226d8a3a2bd52eba417aa4
f09299de818acac9d861795ee611e4c084703315
describe
'27908' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVF' 'sip-files00041.pro'
d3095e23cb91c93c401177c6d5dc8b35
ac2a211310390feabfaf45f68c756b3c58bfa180
describe
'26428' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVG' 'sip-files00042.pro'
992fc62f97d65042e135a25e728ba9c2
2ede5fafd8eb4658fa4440215a6d2e065469d410
'2011-10-25T12:21:19-04:00'
describe
'26199' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVH' 'sip-files00043.pro'
9fc80eea20ad9abe20a96fb4832f7bf1
fc0af5a7724ef63e92bd6d0cbead0dabaac8d5ed
describe
'26124' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVI' 'sip-files00044.pro'
cd74e3779a1e08493806c4a125734fac
8ea7cd05faf32d30ffe4b30dd9d143f37ed24c07
'2011-10-25T12:21:12-04:00'
describe
'27338' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVJ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
2050f4f48234d430719c193137d903db
aaa43bfd0e594983683741b103f5e78a86247377
describe
'25744' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
4ca03581e59f8eef8fe43a3ced057d2c
1443790943da6f33d75b8a2b5755b1b7fe16b3ca
describe
'27657' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVL' 'sip-files00047.pro'
ce9d8371b90a69c96ce1931336140ef1
ba04d9b23d215409417eecadb558ef820828edb2
'2011-10-25T12:20:23-04:00'
describe
'27144' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVM' 'sip-files00048.pro'
d38d841d69820894b1a819721dbb817b
924051291547970188dab14105c351fe1dea38a4
'2011-10-25T12:20:36-04:00'
describe
'25406' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVN' 'sip-files00049.pro'
4a6286e08ab828ddc94db2fdde9c9a62
b7c6539ebbcaeedfc55a6f96d767c4c50623cb5e
describe
'26423' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVO' 'sip-files00050.pro'
be4acb468bb677994be6398d3b09374d
2ce8982a8e5fb05b583fd12544820b8b7f8c716b
'2011-10-25T12:20:34-04:00'
describe
'27696' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVP' 'sip-files00051.pro'
3b42c02a155906c5f3b3606d5b9eafd5
37f8f81296d4ac83325d8dfe1d88db41e137ac57
describe
'27691' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVQ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
372ccdccb55dfe27ee6b929dad6b901a
60ec4c3e1c7e88ef57d260bcd4a11161b16aabf5
describe
'26627' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVR' 'sip-files00053.pro'
51d7ee1e4a3f3c0901e33099eadeccf7
e6701ca19d2dd6fdfdb0e45514bc819be013dfb8
describe
'26792' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVS' 'sip-files00054.pro'
0b6120caa6b10cf09f1b4ff39cee5bea
3c88dbdc1411e236a71161dbd6f5c37729f25f9a
describe
'24619' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVT' 'sip-files00055.pro'
dea5690252f6b0d91745b8b831515675
5ae3362bb64e9cbd684c410fa131ea9d1b71b837
describe
'28350' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVU' 'sip-files00056.pro'
531bb124edc61316c9dea17334672dd6
ff3a8ec018fc184cb15c59e5c8b88f352deb36f3
describe
'22955' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVV' 'sip-files00057.pro'
b71ae2fe70941d3d6a33ddf189268f40
aa0ab34dda6f84924e39825af52d36b453171699
describe
'25336' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVW' 'sip-files00058.pro'
7e7febe760df91a022e4d19318b6bd91
55953a0ea7eb8fe9d8f31e7fb456e67e62a2d292
describe
'26289' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVX' 'sip-files00059.pro'
45287e39ead769efe1a32da731277060
01653032f1929c26cbca9d735ea1f3dc8693000e
describe
'24615' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVY' 'sip-files00060.pro'
e8d238de82b2c2f6c013c418b0b32adf
cc58c2695ee0eecbdde6a3a0f69de32a0e1b98f8
describe
'25669' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTVZ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
6f6f4d136cb0b8dce8e89acb94263d2f
0c4e539b1d930580c08f357b85abc01231f3d148
'2011-10-25T12:20:45-04:00'
describe
'26210' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWA' 'sip-files00062.pro'
85c9d17857f56ccf1451d79e70c82af3
dc580ac5a9ee851963e1d70eec985cafa85b8425
describe
'25846' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWB' 'sip-files00063.pro'
c142b6f0e77e4577a0e6e72117b20162
d05b0f7cb4c28c61ed402087577a4dae55dd8a6e
describe
'23725' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWC' 'sip-files00064.pro'
2dfb9fa5bd4515878e816f8b7e7a869c
a3f387fffa0243331cfc12ebf74b4ed2ff20d9d2
'2011-10-25T12:09:20-04:00'
describe
'301' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWD' 'sip-files00071.pro'
c7ba2c2719e565c2311d4fa418a99ad0
1609b35662faa3decc7f0bb3fce38239047e4afc
describe
'348983' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWE' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
4f4aac7f3b795e61e68058c89c29c9f7
ec3f11658316246634de75d50a462ada751549d3
describe
'332600' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWF' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
b1e62c6158ff724d19a5f6f145367faa
5cd73ab8cca8431b8cdbb290e359d04f8e60084a
describe
'272908' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWG' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
85702cc955c2864cee2b2acd490315a9
162c02dd3f74883640b433618360af24329dfb05
describe
'72982' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWH' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
81d1dddf19dbe2a580c017f70ebb4b37
e51a7f687955f981670e3ca368f92ea128f1480f
describe
'272813' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWI' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
c38d69dbd78e73d84f7c6d9f13359b61
23667ac0449f364f264a933a71aae70eefee95d4
describe
'272911' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWJ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
10061bb893da6f2b9feea113a86c9cf1
dd0bdcec5a6ff97a121bc0a6c390b4d681069295
describe
'160013' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWK' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
e39bcf8598d6a204f04b5ebc4f0d87ca
6c7327f9836a3de5424d95766c7614f97da0c4b9
describe
'256171' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWL' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
2cc8548abf0e400f1ab10a6881f3ea7d
e04de09ed969b97a1831ed67485f2cee1e64974d
describe
'272904' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWM' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
ed18ed7eeeb45a595bed083d19084d4a
33661fc3f4334e8a194906c61bea038cce1baf15
describe
'272875' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWN' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
a6e22506e05680ce306db37ad2ffbaaf
53b2b05e423c022812748735b1e42d6386bd0f24
describe
'263115' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWO' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
9f5fc3239d1aeba598f125cec85f5cb1
05033bfb8dd770bc5c057a4845d20a90944d59da
describe
'260415' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWP' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
89d4703cd326f9b1979bdd5f04fba137
af439e075f1422ac540c2dcca83928f415fe08a9
'2011-10-25T12:21:41-04:00'
describe
'261758' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWQ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
43b989c723139e62174d1c98d6e534a9
8d532ca4c1f573c36d769e65f818035ce490b04c
describe
'272926' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWR' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
5b01e8352b4f177b5a0eeaeb55b4e476
7e74226da0285926e6d7261c05e7548f54d9484a
'2011-10-25T12:20:52-04:00'
describe
'267342' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWS' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
11614286bf2a7889aefccc9bddf3ea5f
db34f35be6d27757efd456d602831618d0f8c27a
describe
'272932' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWT' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
1192e836cea218aa81d8b96c3513cb2c
9a456106eb9d6793f459bec320684a81ab9a2ee8
describe
'267327' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWU' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
363dff1d10f2d8d13c47e76fe758c071
d170006a692141bb6797d0facf754f8377ec37d6
describe
'272882' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWV' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
94675443fbd756b34f68c8e97ad6d19c
6c7360748296e2fd38a518d92448ca1f9cd32f93
describe
'265946' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWW' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
d5afb8f0c584d4b8c7042a257ec3b5b7
a07e09e50229b941f75daa3f939867ae5f4757ff
'2011-10-25T12:20:50-04:00'
describe
'272943' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWX' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
a2c0a65add68ad983cab2e4e7c9522df
df688310b0f38a7850348a6844b467953561f3b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWY' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
03d54958c04763c1eed9cad53976b7dd
8822d2b0f0f041eeb3e3c88e2e1b8b99d5e4206f
'2011-10-25T12:20:54-04:00'
describe
'272941' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTWZ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
144af663a88c8a121eb8c7544ed17eaf
0d8199a5878fa37a90af97fb8b93cd2649db52ff
describe
'272922' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
8da1017a266404f3398f461f677974e0
5ce1a82c02d744113307c43093ee9b14f391c88e
describe
'267321' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXB' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
5346142ea956762d6fd5709a36cd01eb
6190aa396ffe07d2b10f0518a65ef618f428fb40
describe
'267355' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXC' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
6f79aef8474f25dd43e9b4a786f1fbc7
0108e5096b04c6ade936d4d95dd116ac451664af
describe
'272935' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXD' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
bada7a5d0aa181e68cd62587ec1906a8
2c9fd6777c247dde93149fe823e9ac94d04b04e4
describe
'272888' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
8108d5ac7dca88e0a8bb14c2559892a6
84899466fd1a5ad1d1f3673d4162757948911d2c
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXF' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
dd23815a42eaddeda8c19298f45ea5e0
6da0a5683287b19ee5f31a37b030f3881c62c5d3
'2011-10-25T12:21:10-04:00'
describe
'272940' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXG' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
3d077947892af45d86b3f66f935c6d61
df806367d7e3226b958e44357f642d1637428944
describe
'272867' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXH' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
4b0f0d90f99cdf5e07af285e57b562d2
e62d872e76fd313bcf6aa80a0d3d846b767448ff
describe
'272933' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXI' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
88ad8df557abe53ae8741350793a74e2
d4e1e782a8d38583d0e04c55ab5fbde3b0a92a1f
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXJ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
8979208b99bc224d418e9efa396ca4b9
95ba9fa1ce7566edc650b5fce925dbbd983ff733
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXK' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
55149bc5c4255a7a5c57edd188171bcd
85e1fe4dc01975e70ee1dcbb0283858a14408ea2
describe
'285809' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXL' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
883824037d5344a881db4b3d61654c57
c17aac045db698b1c5f43fdd595eb969d93166a3
describe
'272919' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXM' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
7f790a09e04638bfbac39b53c75c17fc
32f0d6c48e023524b6b4e26e482a12b822d4dead
'2011-10-25T12:21:27-04:00'
describe
'272917' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
c05ad5979d04c0ce6cd7291794b047de
a44429c25d56393fbf6b160ed2a648fb8d5ec89c
describe
'272939' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXO' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
8591ef1156e819ae428a3ae7a4045491
d583139365a277d9a0c2eb1bad2301909d5d635f
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
8a0acebbb710ab71b5473a9baa651d42
8e6fdb1b050b046f08c7f6ca0375f55813c08e0f
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXQ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
8eb6ceb2b5318c76c57b89cbda534a70
39f11a9197ee255f18d93a06185fab26d38668b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXR' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
92ae1b8d1c70c132874b03679e4e49eb
ec5b982d184f8edd42feff789f377c1e27712055
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXS' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
fdc30eb43ffddd8ac3a120e557c85e68
e693027fdc9d856d7f856133d8d479f4cebd40e3
describe
'272927' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXT' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
be8e3c96561040f7144b6ca4b81da916
9deb62a7dce5527a787ad680a889dddee2f9f29b
describe
'272931' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXU' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
1d5daf577f84bd54a71dc041e58b9afc
a82b4f087ad09cd3686d6f702b186ccbdc8c8777
describe
'272893' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
fe03af50ed887b807aa778cc13de23c1
0aa53f253feab63ea4ad9bd358791edc9030c1c1
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXW' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
f48a7d893b066e010d98d021140cd665
1e43c5b933678e88d156d965d1a747322255c502
describe
'272843' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXX' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
87a472f5f410addc3536798e1fa6ea52
9d5ac7dff637dbc9e70170e41b65a89b55879103
describe
'272879' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXY' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
0266c275a262faeeaa0dc2b80c00e83b
6a5096e5d03f7dfbcd480e2903745bc7a946d786
describe
'272923' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTXZ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
3434774f4f3650fd559eb52e3769c7c4
54a3abf7d453cbbca46a5bab287be62a629782a9
'2011-10-25T12:21:34-04:00'
describe
'272924' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
1648280712ce17b9bec95f064ca801d3
37a9bb1e99e5f27cb57297ba324220b38c40ec7a
describe
'272869' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYB' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
619db2388cd1d6f44c19956f1c850e3c
7206361227a11577103844005fd452ec2ec57587
'2011-10-25T12:21:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYC' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
5362a119662717e43d3e98e955a4aed3
c3dadce776b5c13543ed5e906e67351c5e75bbe0
'2011-10-25T12:09:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYD' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d5b15cdb9bc685e3f8451188cdf07aaf
028b531ee215dc6cfa08b4d9878c72a859ed5f1d
describe
'272830' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
309df0197f64c67a872bc5af2da390ec
7f1adcdf693eaee09a89ad9da99955c41b32ad8d
describe
'272903' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYF' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
3c0cdc6c1d3616e698268b3fe9c49533
fd9cec90d59425523bd465dd3fad0ce48c33db23
describe
'272934' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYG' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
c66e7439b43e4d556bafa36f31e0050b
a70476f7b412abd9789658d6a5449d1702b18e5e
describe
'272860' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYH' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
f32fdda419383575ec9ac64a3a8e4183
eaf57f8c1c66e1c78a3e5afa36ad3094fdedaa3e
describe
'272928' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYI' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
6a1fe8f3619b197523999166c383ebf5
0b891e71d6bb8dc5af5f9b44190b5fe2c1bb4148
describe
'272886' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYJ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
4ee0e60089d7ad4e11f53fd235051c8a
5e3ba19054f39373eab8fe2147a1f321e348f456
describe
'272884' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYK' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
a69c2fd37ba1308979fc16fe1c6cc14a
c651311e90d3c18c7aa7c6265d84cacfe60ddbd3
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYL' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
9a4eab9e177eebc7c99ab01e20cafee0
7d9215a7b2100733afe4617519e1776c6da98d2a
describe
'272915' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYM' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
fe291292af2308ec2e41ed9ba9b33bcb
5aea82023e460a2008dd35fefa0a593f58f72d37
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
a605fdea6b542705206caa84eb8c25f3
fbd078c628893a2d70b251fbb99ab56760b9beca
'2011-10-25T12:21:14-04:00'
describe
'272849' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYO' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
1dcd75e7d06e15f8f6864545494878aa
6ec13a28d78b350c838cde7d2e03eab2e127fc66
describe
'337004' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYP' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
423e5c8bc118ed30c536171b9bff6f60
20b833a4563cfaee1815b8647d547469d62a66f3
describe
'356043' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYQ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
6908cdd1012d692643125dd5b7cef8c3
42f523bdfde2bf8669939f7e6fa310cef4d3e2ea
describe
'53241' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYR' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
471e772639a3cb13fb6a42391f7a1831
b71070c73b7229f58017f371238faed044093071
describe
'8383440' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYS' 'sip-files00001.tif'
5338fb3f3868f4c1efe771c8e1eb56cc
b86acd4edbf80a96601d62a3caaa20bfa7f99105
describe
'7988248' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYT' 'sip-files00002.tif'
1d151026029c9aa26eeab2a20b26a769
086ea630f6eac98feaec8acc6ba0ab72d0837d5c
describe
'6555800' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYU' 'sip-files00003.tif'
8a8b8957a6d7d954dac4cf4dad2cca29
360ca0a4a54662881be37f88e6e873dffa22f334
describe
'1981116' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYV' 'sip-files00005.tif'
a0101b72076ae122f882ceec2665f26f
60e6c0277139b8e205f9ad56a4cf0471ec15d49b
describe
'2200364' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYW' 'sip-files00006.tif'
96b7f95b72e607cfcfdb70429a5144d7
d9c68445d08c66693954bd45eaeeedc97ec39b7e
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYX' 'sip-files00007.tif'
5884948608c3b2686758eaed90886ec6
12ee1063965f3980d57757ebe8edee469e018738
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYY' 'sip-files00008.tif'
083a6e91f1bfbf640ac9fc9ace4886bd
b4d14a6d026867ea939cee824311143cccd2f45b
'2011-10-25T12:20:57-04:00'
describe
'2066480' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTYZ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
ce679e7537b35636bceae9ca82fa929d
6b6d9533c90fd0fdb642b64ed29ea1772478299e
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZA' 'sip-files00010.tif'
1999c1bbd637bae5f50d4428c4457081
0863581aff16bfe67b017a940a29181cd722c8a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZB' 'sip-files00011.tif'
768c82e395465ec0dfd4bc9188e8b39e
034be4ae3c1bee35228ccc3a82af432f523ee4a4
'2011-10-25T12:21:25-04:00'
describe
'2127096' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZC' 'sip-files00012.tif'
6e12f0c119f8f7fe9f2a239072911d1d
e8195d42d9ab86e6d8ed2ec385f83592c80555a6
describe
'2100140' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZD' 'sip-files00013.tif'
9c6e5c36087d07a1146d200eb2c9d888
d350cec7a9ee10c9ca8b0ae60edbddd0878de2ce
describe
'2111276' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZE' 'sip-files00014.tif'
075c8006e903d525246556322508cfaf
fb45b15a77a75613128b4f792adb5a823025daef
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZF' 'sip-files00015.tif'
cb7c2e54294524c21d9a68c5038f9b3f
2ece8df9549bcb62ffcb28d03bccb649aab40708
describe
'2155820' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZG' 'sip-files00016.tif'
eb025ef046cf4b7321b8a32b511e2319
d21ef3f744fc2ed575ab64ad0acdb1131ed37136
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZH' 'sip-files00017.tif'
8c4f85a207d15ab2344238d4c8a803b9
ae4e44f6d9001cd3c13ccd1f6d1f143c9fedee3e
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZI' 'sip-files00018.tif'
4241dbd65ce0306cbd8b1ccaf98b2b27
3fb26869b36d18983cd48ee56afc8b5f10d1e1e8
describe
'2200360' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
b11462f4b79e1f2b4f5b20267a9ac4c0
ad732d20137496850344883afd10e36eedb0606e
describe
'2144684' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZK' 'sip-files00020.tif'
bea0f5c27a4a854c3a2e27ef7040ebe3
f8ef3870f53ffe4012d59f73ddf17179814cd4d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZL' 'sip-files00021.tif'
776cc91a852f312ec9e349f0cdb17924
44318ac003488db6763e72af7915052651b3f16c
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZM' 'sip-files00022.tif'
9b2ac0fe39d758de97708d229ec57523
16217167f7bcd20647c0954a2b545c48820a68db
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZN' 'sip-files00023.tif'
392229abb28c8404df2ef462b49029cb
18cc05d3042c8cb6fb6373b4f823935fe4bd0701
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZO' 'sip-files00024.tif'
06225bcb9568ea532f81483d979f7dce
464493d277dfe93a59708552f0967a05256d1669
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZP' 'sip-files00025.tif'
12453a2c7127279a330403d3075a8494
aea4e5a18e341247143a07a3ef1ad0fc5d705dfa
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZQ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
fad90acffe814e48cb0c266b55308d7c
0edc571e1e04faf2ef24127a4414630a5dd6ef01
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZR' 'sip-files00027.tif'
1d4e97254b795df1f76ca87fff8595c7
2de95d2ce5fb03f5ef571b3c987a1424aa419dd8
'2011-10-25T12:21:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZS' 'sip-files00028.tif'
7b8bf54996b41bdf1c988187690ab22c
64052773f84b0f9b0bc433818b227111f1967fdb
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZT' 'sip-files00029.tif'
ea12e49350ad034bea5e4c3fa1ac9ce1
8e68a3c91797b3f4abff749d95b4157af76c8ac7
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZU' 'sip-files00030.tif'
ec15baa96f232f45cdb62c0de90db74d
a91e1c1d7471c58460f2157957a91bc995bb2297
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZV' 'sip-files00031.tif'
094a61dda3a7512e3ecd13fbb510cb0b
f49e1c4f728de94a261e7cabe294b0d9aa690be0
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZW' 'sip-files00032.tif'
16cb5df8f10f6a23f723f1cf9725cf10
a206392e874fc1ac6c253907d9190d4707c531aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZX' 'sip-files00033.tif'
3723a15e3fa7707123ccc0454d890a13
2804239bbc32e7866703a122b9aa6d555d7903e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZY' 'sip-files00034.tif'
b0eda10bf906e5a57598346f61c9e064
4a93847760301819b4c3bdbf28513a263319c157
describe
'2303420' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABTZZ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
8dbbe7f38fcdcd05d29ff52a64602b49
a1b85f3debab12ab402aaf1b520e0c2171942382
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAA' 'sip-files00036.tif'
26ff127d177b5ed8ab7203a81db959a1
3c8b414652a3f6abc0137048cccd2d7e53a35abb
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAB' 'sip-files00037.tif'
3f41fe518372520c5bd821253c34348b
7db357488f642a7047b6ffb5d275b81018192d33
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAC' 'sip-files00038.tif'
434e26e29f12ffdd6bbe4d24e3b81c6d
d603b21492682f1dfa7b68572a62d692b807f7cc
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAD' 'sip-files00039.tif'
90b45b8a09372413c9289726004f630c
25cb3f1e42de152ca74b124601888c7a9ecd0ee0
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAE' 'sip-files00040.tif'
459790b4da875166f7a1324cf47bc96a
1d5d51fff0a9475163dd133007782b7704de542a
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAF' 'sip-files00041.tif'
aa5b6d3bb2a30d14057fd27e0ee503b1
51a43bb6386b6b01023e938e0f40a937c6584ee8
'2011-10-25T12:21:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAG' 'sip-files00042.tif'
67e3eb201527752b3728f725eafbf621
64fb09d2dc2b71392b9cd06d6a275d5aef58e63f
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAH' 'sip-files00043.tif'
93a0ecb778ac1ce98aa98d88cd0edfcf
ade1546789162b109c4a478a1e0f27e7d62e614d
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAI' 'sip-files00044.tif'
66d02b4a613e80b87ef94bebcb43417f
6f6719ff3ac15a9ad9f457ec8a7d190c8f42f9e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAJ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
c016abe69535a203bd931407508bd13e
cc51ba906da3988586a5bb642a8ddb5fe00358c8
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAK' 'sip-files00046.tif'
1764f1a99ad4972d28f375cbf443c8ae
b493c8690e8e6cfc8c55f6b3adb9f40f763f0904
'2011-10-25T12:21:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAL' 'sip-files00047.tif'
c63b107b75234307310c12d1f8e9cf6d
493aba8e6242a8c58d8f2a4e283e9a1753b586b2
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAM' 'sip-files00048.tif'
8accd8a454139dfa902e08cca2fdb293
6ee9cdb54d6c65870ac9f7d1c25150980f676328
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAN' 'sip-files00049.tif'
a28a5028e19bc39fcf24b899b99d5e64
25f727f9d847b0fc9b1c22be9333053dd0ef9523
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAO' 'sip-files00050.tif'
d30f57d2e46f91bc11635e587c3936f1
73cce7760cb02d974f7592e6a6453b878562f43f
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAP' 'sip-files00051.tif'
e58f10d0d5e6322e82fe8a9d7940c76a
cfab8722e313c3888675f017776cf1733cd8c583
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAQ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ed5abe23ce893b75c6a7c49f3d52fdcd
ed28aa3fd62e0e0256a454d9155f77f21dfdf3bd
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAR' 'sip-files00053.tif'
056ea7cc0b51f473d1e968147e215503
55a0f85bf2178123823366c1b084be0baf51984a
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAS' 'sip-files00054.tif'
a8f42fa752cbcfb78672d8f70bcdab26
8ff0348423c455c54cd2e30421c7d6d531455694
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAT' 'sip-files00055.tif'
f566a5905ac4bcd5df9402af43b2f32e
1305d5150a02b69826264e29d696171b87f5b01d
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
dd020fc9f3a85449bbbf2d42ce38a189
c617f4829c7ae2ca0e0ee7a5e54f713823af29f0
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAV' 'sip-files00057.tif'
dbc502c6efdda26643de2da0cea9e731
cfab2185a1701adaa19ac6e0d79ed7b1c9e84e57
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAW' 'sip-files00058.tif'
a600c23d1ba46373a4f27a5676edebea
fd6acc5ff304648fe9612340e3ec6ea9ffe2a633
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAX' 'sip-files00059.tif'
8f4ae2c13f214c70769b144ebbdb34ce
8521e7abaed656263b5f66e902255d961d36f405
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAY' 'sip-files00060.tif'
7e30c650170ffd8a68b6518140cd39ae
ab3d6197d19b0c2f08590e7d808d90613009b250
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUAZ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
8d3aa90b6fd93c60c890788e4d5691c7
9491fef216b89a87542b810b2557687680f6fe27
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBA' 'sip-files00062.tif'
605c0575fa43dfc74a65d32a326f1bef
3d52776f980e288557c6d3fd52295551c90389a5
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBB' 'sip-files00063.tif'
ce85b049351411d0e633674654489dac
fefe85ca319f069a540d5ba223c7de4527740add
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBC' 'sip-files00064.tif'
ec4256c518e8adc1306d722916c07239
3d1dc6717244b12de1ce095eb5cb3de0719f5c36
describe
'8095428' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBD' 'sip-files00069.tif'
2eb92bf84671fb272e3533b184c24e80
fe9c93b5e5e5b0b37eecb863fc468da80b93cfc8
'2011-10-25T12:20:39-04:00'
describe
'8555432' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBE' 'sip-files00070.tif'
eca678a67a4b5d47798f1fb4ba105850
9f1551064f7cee0a9f894455e55b21a09f68717f
describe
'1282968' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBF' 'sip-files00071.tif'
8cdb6dc47d9f0041a93e9f4d1413e4c3
3bb231d2582387a4923b0c6c7895178ef2247826
describe
'158398' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBG' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
7b6dac5055165974b59c4437b855e661
7a70c59b9c1703e5387e698d484bd60102d08123
describe
'74340' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBH' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
175461c526edc842e4203fa7e046b250
f61dbf08f47d89fc49030b86e5d62ff8970275d7
describe
'74412' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBI' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
6fb9e44299d805a53c1ad5db62fe1e90
dcefdb98735788093dc455a1705d55ed7ab2ca24
describe
'29536' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBJ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
d900d908b200c7774b755be608975f58
2fd164b38b02202eeb8076c335331cd18f7f470d
describe
'195393' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBK' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
795bb7e5dc3d0d25438bb412850ea7d2
3a204cd49f9024b85048710fdd5dc5bdead6fff9
describe
'94554' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBL' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
daf17f33b36618a828911a754fce7d59
0032d18e0027e9653f7f7a4271f73b72ab24dacc
describe
'12852' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBM' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
1b6d67955f03225452edf8d3ee853160
5f3d34661c0b27c777f531cd77a8a0a706ccb8ca
describe
'109931' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBN' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
1cddeb6f2e46bc83f7bb539edaa00213
91b43371edbd0aa16db0b855ca83b473593d6014
describe
'105794' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBO' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
3df69d64940e4e6c9fa2424217693057
df37b001f13a66463b23cd4b21346b2b7e38d01d
'2011-10-25T12:20:24-04:00'
describe
'102072' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBP' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
dbaedec602f55780eab0d6acb151c474
6fe6307469e46efc16cf98dee8e2ee49660935ea
describe
'147654' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBQ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
9a2862e9588aa0361f868943bdb7e7c4
47b7beff8bc546e0dd68a3e046fb077561a51e5b
describe
'90097' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBR' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
a400e8569b152da84dca6de33459645c
90595c04a01fe75cc22c2bfbc40a2ddb05669226
describe
'101862' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBS' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
059a98316c63baeca536191959dd8056
ecf1476e05ba9338f668fa020b319ffcfdbb1671
describe
'106409' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBT' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
0778f4c41e5403d570ad8a7eca56cc7e
dd01028125af8c67de10ef22f556a323dd72b99b
describe
'99592' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBU' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
9ea804b47e31e4db1d3c3ac284cc329f
3789b69decc3f294b9c5fa098c69cd05d3957ea5
describe
'101668' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBV' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
fc34176ea070f8faf827953cdff4e950
a4ecc1b36550052c47eeaa82313d1ea31343a064
describe
'103186' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBW' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
a7d9f4ce33666ff3066480ffa153a255
7fc00efc7b8457671cf0b56c6a61cbc207155638
describe
'105224' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBX' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
25cd78e513eded8ee416d2f28208d0d9
2dc1837a28608e2e14164046dfa868c7d06756c2
describe
'104327' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBY' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
1f9c4c0c3b763533a88c7705dd9d48e7
97ee18d38f491ae7f09fd63e0c2e90d3049974b4
describe
'96462' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUBZ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0424b3cec5429945f6814742fe2cfe82
4c6c9351e73b507d32c5b19eccb347508ee73e7f
describe
'98529' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCA' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
86af9d0214e1cf46cd05eb25aa650304
53327b1c3081b0105125254a3f8569c2b1a39bf6
describe
'99646' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCB' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
e58d76f2ca2b8a3f76452ed5bdc773b7
e603a56cd978668cc380c9b3464180b3e793aa44
describe
'99484' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCC' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
6c3e0c5b74f2bd2d46d593cfa25de82e
b14f49011ca524bb228989564c1096f74b3edd9f
describe
'96897' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCD' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
877602dda7104213084b222ad5f9fd21
b65e9bc719b798d1db1232a7dad65d40ed64b858
describe
'105926' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCE' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
b750b2acff8a77fd1b12dd37ec1541d7
d9f273aff2c015d79e3c8000954343356e32f257
describe
'102117' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCF' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
67357f280d1e1bd3815c5e74c3265ed4
cff89dcf32386c1fb3d160e29a38f3a784a40645
describe
'97980' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCG' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
506d0caa22accd9579ec51d485526167
5ebd0b0652875d2d89db280400f4f3d39f36139d
describe
'93061' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCH' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
418917c5ad6576030eb47978008c843f
7c76ee1ea96c28873d19ddfd1d114abbb2629c55
describe
'97978' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCI' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
ff8d8a4b729f2182576b1fee1c63bd4f
dcd1a76e44a87dfcfa867f3693c78841fbd6d825
describe
'97621' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCJ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
4a58ab69ad4588ae810bc6f12a2641b7
6c62738d61d9063c48b6cf6147566e2dba728a37
describe
'97616' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCK' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
ae0b65d25aec06fc1a119c235aba3f7f
18d27feb2cebfd608f2c10b69b60c2851c9b2b70
describe
'96380' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCL' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
8d3b9dae58aba3e9c6524e75ab4c59f6
a7851b999d2e0911eca36af147c39a84f0bbd1ea
describe
'101880' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCM' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
ee0e3eef7a1f1058db0fdc097561fbcd
b0f07a74720239c0dd9033a9c2fab2026a712ea3
describe
'94612' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCN' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
fd4d672cff520bce7455bc260b1a3ed5
eea421c7b01b45379a6ee93fcad1b26e6bd216db
describe
'92035' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCO' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
312d000f34f6af11c8ba211c7871e1b5
0c13ace2b983bc32c5d68e68cc902230421d2cfb
describe
'98299' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCP' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
753c146aa6d5269bc699a05618b14c5a
58a87225777bfcef7e01e5d923802bfcf2739cef
describe
'98185' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCQ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
c75001a5f6d961330a200e389d7772a7
3da1df516156adba9b5ce668ee53ca508f50bc44
describe
'99089' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCR' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
d8d372525f506152c082918458665e38
f396e94806537de337edfa72919be2b71b1f1c29
describe
'99366' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCS' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
c25aa1788952cbaaf23ecad8d6003497
c374a6d087b93ed11bea51c09f391386575f0533
describe
'100122' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCT' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
5bf6f1aa658b0d34f5f9b8c54e74ab5c
972123ef7a369e096f76c93cf62f46ef21b0b81f
describe
'97716' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCU' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
248f029c728692b44f4bedc9a4a233da
5ccfb164f4941d10bb8aa21e8ffc1e08d3bd7c40
describe
'101366' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCV' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
0f39a26943edbf4bb88801aaabc2dc87
90e4efe531e738e400407e6b030293c4bf1cc460
describe
'91793' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCW' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
d167c83d9b6270468a24ca48ba8e23ac
275bb7ee19c7129b6341ef0947b08ef138c6c728
describe
'100909' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCX' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
e19f06d948512478c8914c509c25f40a
432e4dff3e6496ea49fe34cd495376de89248e47
describe
'92897' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCY' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
29e4837c6d886f48725d1c45b9f79b37
afebdb9387ade4cefb62aaa966e148bff61a95e4
describe
'101084' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUCZ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
48c081d0ea76b5c69b2223d186f692d7
01534bad0077de0770d0c8a86ad071faead63baa
describe
'97133' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDA' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
5ee1ba9abf31ea908ac406ea3a7c2d9c
2dea42f1c9545dc78432bc90a0376d5fb99dcc39
describe
'95881' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDB' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
8f8dd70095e5242d8c42f7555900b3f0
65ce02a5d6db6903eba2a10a36d4916c1a37037f
describe
'99411' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDC' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
4289852faecce4884247ad7ed2056e93
cbf57e92f7cc48053f822f33d0257e6a07a3e623
describe
'101904' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDD' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
2cf5de3ef24f4f921592f15b3f1f21b5
0531112c87edb56d2bf78f84b0bd02b6c80db514
describe
'101449' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDE' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
7a950535415c8f300420123cc83c8768
363a8d2fcc4cec3faf1d6bfdc64258df47175ee0
describe
'102141' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDF' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
465a43e76e318011e6e325563a7ab27d
7e2cb03bb556d5b09a65b3e40ce98c3726365625
describe
'98207' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDG' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
0699f19d67b948526962c85285b01cb2
40fa3bb22acd13ff103cadd6a40212b8d81b6375
describe
'91075' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDH' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
f297844aff173bec97c0cff1d1f25988
194141c955e8f567206b355cc5b9baf03527fbf6
describe
'107830' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDI' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
132a935b9d2dea276415620ddacad738
ffcbcdba31e321726e915b7d461c3115b8c1df5b
describe
'87012' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDJ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
8300cde2a1dcc580447af942448a9198
a9ace72d2c8d7df9839e4c78acc922275e362686
describe
'94005' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDK' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
939bf94293b9ea8d170ba7f42492195b
05c343ec1a66780211d619d77e52ff6275dcfa97
describe
'99190' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDL' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
1e1c2c75def0ec0ef9031b5263f86cbc
c1dcffaa80d21acd8ed3c133860bd24cdb7c49b8
describe
'91410' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDM' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
98312c799714612026c990a92bf47625
e7f138b3d47df80d10ed315111b700cc8e80a9c6
describe
'99700' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDN' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
d436d5f8f3fb415ad428504498f59be9
7ed11fe2286de37eb630789331751c732b1debce
describe
'97381' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDO' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
2cc847abc70ae4c4056fcc227152d617
297a3dcd17e6e224af9d682ac547070e2188e1ae
describe
'98943' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDP' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
e14518ce41dfdffd50a0a317fea427e9
f8d6e773fff8cc7e3469c1a7ca0ea8a871801235
describe
'96677' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDQ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
c649a1e9e31524779365d35ad3495af3
13bb7853a70e497102a0365beacb700ccf8edf55
describe
'71842' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDR' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
4151afcb2b4f11a8d1441c8efbc9302d
3c380273a71b4848eeed4280094774c8c112580a
describe
'133563' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDS' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
9b8e8b5218ed884a09631439934117b9
51d3300dcc0b246dc4dda0537e0fe4932b57698a
describe
'33550' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDT' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
7172a862a56bf46f00b7e9a9b5a729f5
dde413aaf7eeb60f9a63af5d21a94707e1203d3e
describe
'8658' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDU' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
796dfc2c39316a59e508b7d7fecb3bf8
8c02e7077c6fe772d55a95368a97cb5c1e6d26ce
describe
'37437' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDV' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
e2b376564f367d357d62721144d02912
81f052739295eae1e84fd358244dd5f741847899
describe
'17032' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDW' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
d1b141dd79ae9f86c6832dec7906edc7
c9fd2927039ff0de41ff63368b53401896bebcc8
describe
'4304' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDX' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
55dee352ae85e3e88cbcfac789c5b4c7
5f42191b8eba8f19f6ee94af1c533cf3466580eb
describe
'15048' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDY' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
bc3109f3fd1b1044dedb7a17faf80a2e
d6538ee889c9159f7ea9e3cb173f53af43ee2a04
describe
'3437' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUDZ' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
1cb3b6b06c9fb19086295ccc73932a99
f1fc119cb60596274777f67e6674aa87076c06ed
describe
'22828' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEA' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
eeca84e69447938b8b1422c402480f16
f8c4c02b2788de18c90c866c0b1573990c1252d9
describe
'20366' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEB' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
d515c496fac8bd90bffcdc755a50af11
fb4e71f637451ea9a82c50a74dc30efef763c418
describe
'49409' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEC' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
78611763cc4c12044d86affea91e355b
32676c5b09b4be10a26b1c82c98ab86cb1db218c
describe
'11556' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUED' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
1825f28bb3bf836ae5c3ae7bb51ee6ef
b7e9390f84f2b26de780ee7c2ce33a76b075c6d4
describe
'25001' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEE' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
12762122eddc9cc79ded7ce9ee1b0246
8e2d023080f90ba775852d96bab6f47a95b4d2e1
describe
'6547' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEF' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
337965d097bb7d3166c51c76b5999265
30fcd0e69ed91504502b0b28094129e4ec3a207f
describe
'3941' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEG' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
676135c1d6f90788e926f44b69d0d17c
7ba37ed0193c22792b5a53c44d785a79e6422500
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEH' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
61b30aec414883ca7726aac9586b0e03
0bbda81cb040d322091e47d79bac991f30ca1c43
describe
'34500' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEI' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
8ce06660a7cc21ec08609b551b716c76
d509644f5c50aab9d619bb11ac8fc61ec88bc49c
describe
'9440' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEJ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
6d639722c34880416849d05c18c573ff
903a0c440ce149ba8f312fa2d1da840700ae55f4
describe
'37299' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
a22c521ce221ea65f93dbb955fa854fa
990fea587987a798c9f34975df09d0472f271687
describe
'9939' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEL' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
0d49e9edfc42537f1800d9b1d24c564e
0722da62896661fd37bff9b2988262096b926839
describe
'36321' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
b65dbd4c6184e238b9947f581f4ce449
f855306f70d976844c339f574f777dcdc858cf57
describe
'10134' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
13ab55031d00f21ed99c7e8bf2c921d3
1dc74a7fbd4d04177157ffc4f8dbd8f08b17123f
describe
'66168' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEO' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
1d8e4b99df095ed62e0b4b290f54b1d8
fd1313de1be6c126b2ed293d2205d54b59d387a3
describe
'33430' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEP' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
8f3e6261ce88a7eea11c54ce7ff019b6
89440de8b04723ca170a7a03723a28068854eeb8
describe
'32715' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEQ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
848ddbcdb669929e2fbb6240489762fe
2c7318f3a8e186e5ef5e3050d852b3cc0f2e5bac
describe
'9493' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUER' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
e35b6eadcc9ee1e8884e04e441c80c7d
6baecbe8776a353958237d4076a903850e9143d0
describe
'35382' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUES' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
cf64da542f9be1539c54c5e0bb42713a
20fc8cc0bb896ad009896de8d3ae3d8915538bdd
describe
'10480' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUET' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
358fb40f5cbaa0817109388a128f0dac
0de0dd0c34cf0f1ffd4290115e70b2d79a0fe25b
describe
'37954' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEU' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
3817181fd3da885eac2c07f0403fd8dd
870b1584e517809847dbad55a1b59c9a41015baa
describe
'10424' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEV' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
0d1119f8f24b11e3b9da9b5b2f87451d
3651983b55b7a9debf7f2f5cfdbbd1b7d9594f93
describe
'35264' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEW' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
9248c2141f6c48766af89b4b57fa88d6
487d1fc3ecf18dc2e9115e85564faee2d9083112
describe
'9872' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEX' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
d659fdc887a92bb1958f1450d8e80b84
1337cf3eecb045cf3fe808eec464dce35572a66f
describe
'35677' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEY' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
cca4977350d24ae2654452233125edf1
2090748ad723a9a2e51fecb9f7219cf86f82bf0a
describe
'9634' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUEZ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
469853042e5ab23a8bd06d30a45d4744
61a55c15b002df85a15e806b5a32c50e9261390e
describe
'37925' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFA' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
16a621813cb2d4031595b5fce00a3565
5088d41bf104ffc99e224122e1e38820c35c4391
describe
'10175' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFB' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
ad617f468ffd245408d0679b26b6f7ef
108862fd8eec4be2f52c1e7aecb6169624e48639
describe
'37697' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFC' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
e057924684c14fdf6c995a9f653fa7f9
8ae8307841a51a626d96ed7706adc978c95ef096
describe
'10090' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFD' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
7eefd67a2df4aeaefc13d68f00e74b67
b7d09609ac2b4b423d7a058826338bd2fc3a5ca2
describe
'36315' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFE' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
6f9c36491168e3e755fc0680bbc693f1
ca5bb07ac97d189fc923fe56bf3b03d1ebdcc49e
describe
'10705' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFF' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
787e54bd9a128b48ff3ff9beca45d818
1965393c0b87b1b9e78ede16126ed4600d8c5e9e
describe
'35685' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFG' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
0f4aec0fa5d097a17879c87e89d92bf9
d3441b9871819c857b8fd590beba3f064ca7e598
describe
'9808' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFH' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
0cd2fd97885a9c8a53c83bf2fea02d45
563db6f8b32563820ea3aa54a93f91af1fe0a378
describe
'34154' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFI' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
bd31c6ed6a158c5b319b1534953f2cfd
927519c7ac9be2b0a08fd2d3e58d64f9eecfb6d8
describe
'9547' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFJ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
022e01c6724274897160054fa815607d
76d579fe6818ca0bd7a5b911dab171d68f571b71
describe
'34404' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
56c1546ab3e8adf8e23f9082f2ad1026
beca76e7cc63474be25872294a9ac9edd9755272
describe
'9580' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFL' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
b76bd0e8c4ec2af95e1ff8c4175133d8
85b33a5358a059ee3d1410cd87580f704c2a6291
describe
'35401' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFM' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
994827bf4f33c1fd5a552ee14c915a92
3858e0570067e150074f2721834724f8cdd05fdf
describe
'10524' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFN' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
c851d04c9c4ee85a664f737c3e2664b1
bd834177637578e4cbb6d33fcda487ef672877f0
describe
'34342' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFO' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
2ef8d5a19c10a1a69ad3170c55570b62
7d50b97cdce99614405a8f0f538e131292371c9f
describe
'9690' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
af58079edc2c9c75c5b8269346cc6230
314b8f35290974e4f5cd4b13b14ae416a2363847
describe
'37343' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFQ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
0fd12abfb74f6b006f79d0af88de7197
bfa8ff42c1369a6030a4506f07a1cf9ad1c51fc1
describe
'10726' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFR' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
3bebc5087b8624c2ad434a4fd0148352
0c2e61b06a9a28239337a703f60ba69ac622906d
describe
'35957' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFS' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
73fda7176086e811386950e44e901c9c
25742b3528010dc300b8baecca7b3a05780d51e2
describe
'10325' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFT' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
a2358859cfd9db59eac94529230480ce
676fe09ad3092d1ad64f994701bc064cca838348
describe
'34874' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFU' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
eb14238417e4352cae29dc046f65b8fa
7b94b421b72e4ec917835aa93e32a93529f7a2ce
describe
'9123' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFV' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
286d695e3fddf026ab326a76d820cbb4
864e1164e19c7d2ae86611510ec2bf890e7e1545
describe
'33072' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFW' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
2fa450ef1627c42518eae28a6f510555
28f02d9de55b2d550b1d51d79046c4f25af24162
describe
'8961' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFX' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
bcd25ab1f8f8732f1b867757167ced47
17a74fec0970769d8d0e0033548969b78362d837
describe
'34970' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFY' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
8cde7dc1f7a0d10e8cf3ca1c33dec76c
52ff2561b31b89970d57c69e21ae69ffa995429b
describe
'9689' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUFZ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
27de49776c1d13e0d9354b9b4573d9c4
fa8a3fb73b3028134e7084312d3ad69854f96328
describe
'34013' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGA' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
e4e3c60eb4bd2a17da095e795c5b5e07
2720d77c8785b35232f26f528358081ffc5fdb2d
describe
'9969' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGB' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
df066b970d0343ce4f011022962e92a3
24ab836c7eee0ac5e47b1c55708c03e1c1b94d7a
describe
'33736' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGC' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
5269e9995350e5ef257d3f7a0cfbc39a
fa1ef85948e6151c48b984e9d20ff57903ac9a40
describe
'9102' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGD' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
c5b6ec7ddca33770e03fb3f35875e9e0
b67c12c9a30a3507fd43c2e6c2850bf89870c46d
describe
'33829' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGE' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
556ea5220ff6564207de7ef2854d466c
5a3eaf175c8f21cc5f9e5103ba22f855fcc5c770
describe
'9731' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
52421e89fb8dec13a9129b22b9b24146
84d0159af8ae314552aef66ff27a25f7a548168c
describe
'35850' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
6b95e9fa69273435bbd7ae226127dda9
86cbf61b725e5c785d1a63c59bc80c3ed9304c2b
describe
'9724' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGH' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
70bf9e44747ddd7a0d40e6223d121d70
da97c5e26df815c781b429753faa3378334fdbf6
describe
'35179' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGI' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
fd58e2ee71c008481c02e0776b20149c
74529f99ce3a15fef80ba969b7547029169ff6e0
describe
'9195' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGJ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
630d39e64aaba5ef8343b80628366dea
dd97cadbd4cbe4381f4fbc34d4620e271c74e415
describe
'32363' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGK' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
c37de3fa7362ea2027b354c604f29ed1
29771ffbe66d27fb9c773f0a39b5635729ddd302
describe
'8971' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
be569d0226513056a8e0bc907425dd04
58662d438bfd7360f808cbff5e6da6937ff81d35
describe
'34990' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGM' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
50f65707de274594bb06d93debb20b9e
66a354c8fc6ca764a3e9986f5b8110d6dcc48179
describe
'9463' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGN' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
8ae25a619d3ea8f6e4046bdda8610e40
e7fd86c5d5b53ace79f65454d191813913cf2e43
describe
'35465' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGO' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
02a19c4224940328990e1c6672391dfc
44733e15cf66fb171a86d49e85285152a4f3f935
describe
'9691' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGP' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
447ae0458a84025632c0af04b091e795
dc0a7f54fc0d7b59311ce0edd7bdb6dfd06f9e4b
describe
'34697' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGQ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
22a68f17afa31adc9febb0400485a053
08d116fa4491d27f6faeb95f09c7d6ad2df595e1
describe
'9333' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGR' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
26fdc8627b5130f3b367963b53d4d42a
7e48727c70aa80f7dc6e24d23b68f23e920d64c5
describe
'34523' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
d8f9b8811a8457dcd23744eeeea6e34a
7e1392bf2ad0278a4ad6fb916c25bb5cbabe9c42
describe
'9725' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGT' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
9084ad2d3db7f7af1e2cacacc33ede8b
bba4bfafecd7ec883f518e58b201123074d336bd
describe
'35286' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGU' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
a194a7bc143fca699a81d058a36b6674
6f9b133271551327ce30dfb5a99833b0351f9f9e
describe
'9487' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGV' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
149b6c0f1188784e2eb1410e994712a0
10f350d45505a0f38cc826bb46c8a124ddd7f7d9
describe
'35009' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
ead638e78053f8d93a89b5450d08ee3d
d6874cc4e694c3b12cfcaae2c182ef851113c03b
describe
'9518' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGX' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
228245f8cfc025db236953f5b0b35fe5
dcd9877d014febf35b247d82425f21c7b412950a
describe
'36853' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGY' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
957a62e99d7cd053dd8cce4ea7a3df20
e48089d57d16a13f81fd32986f900ba8b6df3f28
describe
'9566' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUGZ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
33e9841a241dfbcbadfffc2bdb68e0c3
6d34870490391b4f25dc2fcaffad00da3798be63
describe
'32115' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHA' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
68bedb9fd6224bc1fc0ebc12723f8ab9
8c8474fbb8b1eecaac7d8093116e8d2247844b3e
describe
'8683' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHB' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
32d45472aedf3ca5ae581482370ef7b0
f37152e26df046f62e711afb67d1ff9208f405d0
describe
'35250' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHC' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
6f4cf878cf99c02bb578d4fbc946a324
1202bbbb26474f75febc98650a64be9c4886799e
describe
'9736' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHD' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
8b1700422291412e36b160db465ed381
d44c8f6928e80aa99448b55cda3bf5771211548b
describe
'33182' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHE' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
f0c575eab355ca823e7e69bf210258c8
45a123ead939ecf6f8b480026d9a3b37260edc81
describe
'9380' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHF' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
c0494c0cb00858b11e958bef93251c31
e4adb727b4bb5e8d0e107af3a3001ce89e112dc9
describe
'35138' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHG' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
6cc4469554aa3f74506c508c2ee64a61
91170801c0a5421f1a934c1c2d75fdda41a813a0
describe
'9388' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHH' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
20fc2bad0f2e43166df9ae3e94d305e2
eb1aeecfa59b35f9842a7afad02f96b01a7aa72c
describe
'35323' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHI' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
259516614b882177e3d2100ad8570c74
763f2ee6c4b4da17761dcfd7e11a2eebd5b5b558
describe
'9266' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHJ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
7bef021559390d56a7efac9032918e0e
96fa01d935d27709a38e0b7f16a1d63c161b8fca
describe
'33276' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHK' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
e451336fe8d387894db540dec788319a
3123bc187e608838a735cb183352f5f2ef2bb677
describe
'8847' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHL' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
c71aec731b2a87fef1313716cf5b7f1e
3e121378470c06f16a1acb3ff0247023ed144e39
describe
'35157' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHM' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
9d685069bcb48e527f46eaab7bb4393f
bc61e1b86804b54c71b28e6df82b3c448d70976c
describe
'9448' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHN' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
5a29576ea436bde98e2be16b9f5dd8fb
46bf1a7feacbfdedba2cfbfa7bdc9b88be5ec304
describe
'37020' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHO' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
b0a1074ed4072014e80f78d0b0e7af4d
2a538603729849c756d05a2d5d722e17d632deb4
describe
'9951' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHP' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
99ec5f277cbc518550f03eb2941cf55c
b122af348a8059102473a3d61f4dbfad56c313fe
describe
'34677' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHQ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
1455f4ef921b419d7b7ee013db8485e9
603f2876b24efac05647d14f6ad585ae7d8c5fca
describe
'9303' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHR' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
94a58e64baaa444a60719f732ee23739
e0eaa8c1561c8ad621592dfec979866537d08c78
describe
'35642' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHS' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
2f5550f6c447771693a3cdf5a0d66cd3
955072879378e4ab67714e7cc256965f70d11b9d
describe
'9996' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHT' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
f6eecc21dcf039f20f08b3fe0b201713
09921ce526f144131950601adc1c3442364d3df0
describe
'34653' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHU' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
762ba78da7d8d2f68c52607d479a671a
e6d55850d061afbea1ddd1f7bfd554b417bf1586
describe
'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHV' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
e9ae4e0d8297eb2f9d7f7a3aacca758b
907b5a2db9f2d103c472bf342eb93b69c87d532b
describe
'32288' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHW' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
6af2b2babfbd0c0f17bb51a18fa3fd54
890f79a1b5238bb70eadbadbc68c661f4d511c45
describe
'8937' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHX' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
9b1e565d08663f0f4eed3811cb678e5c
b40456fca6b1bae3a544cefd07a3c6bf44826a63
describe
'36616' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHY' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
7a9d9a55ce7e001bbe61025020e5a306
53ea390f4bcb386f8613cdb9a91509ef9d5d3f74
describe
'9862' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUHZ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
0bc8fb7a16a0335149144ad629e53373
50208a91f6484b33ede59f1007143ced17675a50
describe
'30020' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIA' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
c0c459abd5211f7021244e9516bb257f
dcbf5d013ce274916a46e3ba834857867c51130b
describe
'9329' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIB' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
32761480f343e5f5e72723c591baf3c5
035e7eb03986c8434addb3f5f3962a9acca7f54b
describe
'34333' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIC' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
a65783ce0b0e55d71fab7a3a1325bd81
d4502a6bf1607bb2f50b330c4b1f6933aff70e46
describe
'9320' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUID' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
aec7978ff732acfe7cecdd96279e2e6b
48fe7abda12d3bf83a9c85e52649e5ed77a9c886
describe
'35609' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIE' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
e08214a801c971af6afc643269da3921
13ae6dc664f3e0b50c56f108700a9dbd8a4e936b
describe
'9472' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIF' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
4408431c9363c4810c6e7728cac75a26
499425902b1089f07bc754ff54d0d690548f56f1
describe
'32498' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIG' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
816b86866eb992a6495540f42f491eac
41aaf03a4deae99de6465043f72849a594a0129d
describe
'8730' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIH' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
bb155bbf13d5926300b4688689033c60
bd4842612a0d6f3798ba7d1269fe76f34f1ec3e1
describe
'33940' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUII' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
ab91e3b62f1e1c464b89a5818a579731
8cfbc29f0c38224f5c1b709784e40d7e17d66a8d
describe
'10119' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIJ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
8a57e67619cf582561b0e337e62db0b5
fbda2fd2f26466c007644a1b2d4c4497ff725ba9
describe
'34331' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIK' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
8cbc69d2b989f58666979278bc447591
2431f35b5a496cb3b29be00918fb6d3fa0770f53
describe
'9671' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIL' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
62783ee84fee7bb5a62426ee648e214c
9fb4f7c23d85be2c50c694b47759f2409311a07d
describe
'34685' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIM' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
19ca32d51562c7302ca544d2f452b693
81142f6741530e617d2206223add3e50545be877
describe
'9847' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIN' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
21d09048d2669bfbdf7c21c868fdfad7
2847d112155eaff041b4569ea2ea1bee6d889fd3
describe
'33223' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIO' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
0360e2d682fa9929565848b47453e763
5e5359ce4b273cbbe240dcb95ef320bf05ec606b
describe
'8902' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIP' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
079ef68244d923a6be199ef8c865f55c
2f3fc2e60df07894dfe624dcfe780334a253cf84
describe
'15993' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIQ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
208bba4222128d51af01d4c1b81913d4
04a1ee5f2219f6f57b17301603bd6677e8926551
describe
'4243' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIR' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
198dd62f8b98a58309171e9bc9626ee2
4d4537059a3f9d6a22252d0d520a2d0e3c1e6b0b
describe
'28493' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIS' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
a4dc0796403a6dce84266b94b7c04f53
afc2989e0aa08276d87c4b6daa4254215f4b39d2
describe
'6074' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIT' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
edb41310698c107284268e41fcefdefb
63c09e49020a6c7918977e1418ac49f17b0b4e3f
describe
'8777' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIU' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
e8f4ac25e761fb4ce5d7de91b878bcd2
cb5adb7c79e6cd6ecda447dfb3e9436a317fbfef
describe
'3107' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIV' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
aa814b51c4df3b599a47e996b6602f2c
11a49aac532fd9579dd0a4b5e8a6ffb6de867aab
describe
'16' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIW' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
7f40c69a5d93fae7590ef0fac4aa30e8
98ecbc436247a5fa2738ac3e3c68ea1a68aeef40
describe
'113899' 'info:fdaE20081121_AAABBVfileF20081124_AABUIX' 'sip-filesUF00086583_00001.mets'
e8bb63931a27410e21706b0d98a54931
c1d11c312364bff44c8d6dced0e23cfd1f5294d5
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T15:06:01-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.