Citation
The Miff-Miffs

Material Information

Title:
The Miff-Miffs
Creator:
Mackness, Mabel ( Author, Primary )
Blackie & Son ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Glasgow
Dublin
Publisher:
Blackie & Son
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
96, 8 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Twins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Governesses -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Play -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Intergenerational relations -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fire -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Revenge -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1898
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Ireland -- Dublin
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mabel Mackness ("Mona Neale")

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026859238 ( ALEPH )
ALH4004 ( NOTIS )
245101173 ( OCLC )

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THE MIFF-MIFFS

BY

MABEL MACKNESS

(‘Mona NEALE”)

LONDON
BLACKIE & SON, Liutrep, 50 OLD BAILEY, E.C.
GLASGOW AND DUBLIN





































———qx~———

HAVE made up my mind to
write a story. - When I told
= Barney what I meant to do, he
ried up his heels in a very rude way
and simply roared with laughter. He
wanted to know who I thought would read



- it, and who would make it into a proper

book with printing and pictures. He
also made a lot of nasty remarks about
the way to spell “cauliflower” (I spelt it
“kolliflour” in my dictation yesterday),
and how many “t’s” there were in “ cot-
tage”, and told me to be sure and spell
Barney with a capital “B”. But I don't
care one bit, I mean to write my story all
the same, however much the others laugh



4 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

at me, and I shall give it to Cousin Ellinor
to make into a book when I have written
it.

Cousin Ellinor writes lots of lovely.
story-books about children for other chil-
dren to read; and once she put me into a
book. It must have been a very long
time ago, when I was only a tiny girl and
did not know how to behave properly, for
the story-book Nelka was such a stupid
little thing and talked the silliest baby-
nonsense. ‘The grown-up people in the
book always laughed at everything she
said and did, and called her a “ little cure”.
I do not know what that means, but I
suppose they thought she was funny, or
they would not have laughed.

Cousin Ellinor gave me one of the
books for my own, and wrote init:

To the real little Nelka, from her affec-
tionate friend the authoress.

I read it once, but it was so silly I do
not see why she took the trouble to write
it. I am sure I could never have said



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 5

such very ridiculous things as the book-
Nelka said, and, even if I did, I do not
think it was very kind of Cousin Ellinor
to write them in a book for everyone to
read and know what a silly little girl I

~ was.

My name is really Nelly Kathleen, but
I am always called Nelka, a sort of be-
tween-the-two name for short, and our
other name is Vivian. There are three of
us altogether, Nelka (that is me), Barney,
‘who is my twin brother, and Eric. We
are nine years old, Barney and I, but
Barney is taller and bigger than I am
in every. way, and his eyes are brown like
mother’s, not blue as Eric’s and mine are.

Barney used to be a very nice boy, be-
fore Fraulein came, which was after we
came home from the sea-side in September.
Fraulein is our governess, and she came
to look after us when nurse went away to
be married, and mother thought we were
too big to have another nurse. We were
very sorry when nurse went away; she



6 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

had been our nurse ever since we could
remember, and she was such a dear kind
soul. She kept Barney in order too, and
as long as nurse was with us Barney was
a real nice boy, and just as much of a
nursery child as Eric and me. When
Fraulein came she treated Barney as
though he were much older than I was,
and it certainly did not improve him, for
he only got cocksy and thought himself.
much better than Eric and me, and tried
to “sit upon” us.

On the day that we were nine years
old Barney was allowed to leave off his
sailor suits, and to wear a Norfolk jacket
and knickerbockers just like father. He
had his curls cut quite short too, and Mr.
Evans the curate used to come every after-
noon and teach him Latin in the school-
room, while Fraulein was giving me my
music lesson in the drawing-room.

Barney got fearfully conceited with all
this promotion, and even Fraulein had to
confess sometimes that he was much nicer



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 7

when he was only a little boy with curls
and sailor suits. He took to calling Eric
“the kid”, which Eric hates more than

-. anything else; and talked very grandly

about what he would do when he went to
school next year. Eric is only a little boy
—not much more than four years old—
and he can’t talk quite properly yet; but
still I don’t think Barney need have made
fun of him, for he was just as small him-
self once upon a time, and did not like to
be made fun of and called “kid” any more
than Eric.

We live in a very beautiful old house
called the Grange, about a mile and a
half from the small town of Beeston,
where there are shops and a railway-
station. There is only one other house
near to us—of course not counting the
~ cottages where the poor people live—and
as my story will have a good deal to do
with this house I must tell something”
about it. It is called Holly Lodge, and it
is so near to the Grange that the two



~' 8 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

gardens are only separated by a little
stream, in which we sometimes fish for
tiny trout and give cook no peace until
she fries them for us, and sends them up
for tea.

Holly Lodge is quite a small house
compared with the Grange, and when
_ first Barney and I remember it, it was
occupied by a crotchety old man of whom
we stood rather in awe. He seemed to -
spend most of his time strolling up and
down the footpath above the river-bank.
He used to shake his stick at us and
shout in his great loud voice across the
stream directly he caught sight of us with
our fishing-rods. If we happened to hook
ever so small a fish he would get quite
purple with rage, and call us “cruel little
animals” and all kinds of ugly names.
Father told us we need not heed him as
he was a little wrong in his head, and
after that we never cared how much he
stormed at us, :

One day we missed old ‘““Grumps”, as



‘THE MIFF-MIFFS. 9

we used to call him, from his accustomed
place on the river-bank, and Gardener told
us afterwards that the old man was dead.
I cannot say that Barney and I felt very
sorry, for he really was a very cross old
man, but mother sent some beautiful
white roses to be put upon his grave, and
told us we must have sympathy for those
who were old and afflicted. Barney and
I felt sorry when mother said that, and
wished we had been more polite to poor
old Grumps, for most likely he had be-
come cross and disagreeable because he
had had no kind friends to cheer him, and
had always lived by himself.

After old Grumps died, Holly Lode
was empty for a long time, and we chil-
dren got hold of a long plank and placed
it across the stream, so that we could go
from our garden into the Lodge grounds
and explore the enemy’s country.

In time the garden became so over-
grown with weeds and untrimmed shrubs,
that it was a perfect jungle and magnifi- -



10 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

cently adapted for our childish games.
Sometimes we pretended we were fugitive
soldiers hiding in the forest, and pursued
by remorseless foes thirsting for our blood.
Sometimes we were “ Robinson Crusoes”
shipwrecked on a desert island, or rob-
bers in our secret caves, a terror to the
imaginary victims who chanced to fall into
our clutches. Our favourite game was
“wild Indians”, and the deserted garden
rang with the yells of the fierce tribe of
the “ Winkey-Wums”, as they danced
their war-dance round the heap of dead
leaves which represented their camp-fire,
waving their tomahawks and shouting
their war-cry preparatory to swooping
down upon their unsuspecting enemies.
We have lived a very long time at the
Grange, almost as long as Barney and I
can remember. Our house is a very large
one, and I think it must be very, very old,
because it is not like any other house I
have ever seen. It has a funny cork-
screw staircase all the way up from the



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 11

very bottom to the very top of the house.
When you are running upstairs very fast,
you often hear a pitter-patter of footsteps
above your head, as though someone else
were going upstairs in front of you and
was determined to reach the top first. It
makes you feel rather frightened if it is
about bed-time and the stairs are dark.
I often think it is Barney going up before
me, but immediately I stop and call out to
him the footsteps stop too, and then I
- know it is only the echo of my own steps
that I hear.

Mother says it is silly to be afraid when
you know the real cause of anything that
seems mysterious, but all the same I
always scamper up the corkscrew stairs
as fast as my legs will go, if it is getting
dusk and I hear that ghostly pitter-patter
above me. Every now and then as you
go upstairs you pass a door, and each of
these doors opens into a separate wing,
containing two or three rooms. We chil-
dren have one wing all to ourselves, and



12 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

nobody cares how much noise we make
in our own department, for no one in any
other part of the house can hear a sound,
if the staircase door is shut. There are
four rooms in our wing—our school-room,
and Fraulein’s room on one side of the
landing, and on the other my bedroom
and the little room where Barney sleeps.
Eric has a crib in Fraulein’s room.

Our school-room window opens down
the middle like a door, and you can step
out of it on to a sort of square balcony
which is really the roof of the drawing-
room. The drawing-room is not old like
the rest of the house, but was built by the
gentleman who owned the Grange before
father. This roof has a nice stone para-
pet round it high enough to prevent any
of us from falling over, and mother allows
us to make it a play-place. We kept a
lot of flower-pots and boxes out there,
which we used to plant with seeds and
bulbs at the different seasons. In the
hot weather we used to sit there, when



THE MIFF-MIFES. 13

the sun had gone round to the other side
of the house, and learn our lessons for
Fraulein, and sometimes if she was in a
very good humour Fraulein would tell
Jane to carry out the table and let us
have tea there.

It was very beautiful out on the roof in
the cool evening, when the sun was just
beginning to feel sleepy and to think
about going to bed. We could look
down upon the garden all scarlet and
gold with the gorgeous summer flowers,
and the soft green paths winding in and
out between the beds, looking so cool and
fresh as the dew gathered thick upon
them. We could see the park too, with
the evening shadows lying long and dark
across the mossy grass, and the little
stream creeping in and out among the
hollows like a thread of silver. We could

~ hear the cooing of the wood-pigeons and

the chattering of the restless starlings as
they sought their resting-place for the
coming night. Through a gap in the trees



14, THE MIFF-MIFES.

to the left of the school-room window we
could just see the chimneys of Holly
Lodge, and it is time that I was getting on
to tell about the funny adventure that
happened to us there.

It was the winter that father had the
influenza so badly, and the doctor said
that he must go away to the south of
France before he could get quite well
again. Mother of course had to go with
him, so we were left in Fraulein’s charge
while mother and father went away toa
place called Nice for four months. They
went away about the beginning of Decem-
ber, and we were much aggrieved at having
to spend Christmas by ourselves at the
Grange. Fraulein was a very kind old
thing, and used to tell us lovely German
fairy-tales in the twilight as we sat round
the school-room fire and cracked nuts after
tea; but we missed mother dreadfully. We
always enjoyed the hour we were down-
stairs in the evening the best of any time
in the day; mother used to read to us or





THE MIFF-MIFES. 15

sing and play, and father used to ask us
riddles and give us pennies when we
guessed them.

It seemed dull and lonely in the big
Grange with only ourselves and the
servants in it, and the drawing-room and
dining-room with shutters up, and the
furniture dressed in the holland pinafores
it wears when we are at the sea-side in
the summer. We hung up our stockings
as usual on Christmas-eve, and put our
shoes in the fireplace ready for Santa

Claus when he came down the chimney.
Both shoes and stockings were full of
lovely presents in the morning, and we
had our goose and plum-pudding and
crackers just as usual on Christmas-day,
as well as piles of letters and cards, but
somehow it did not seem half like Merry
Christmas without father and mother.

When mother and father went away
Holly Lodge was still without an occupant,
and a huge ugly board nailed on to one of
the tall fir-trees. which stand like sentinels



16 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

on either side of the gate, told anyone
who did not already know that Holly |
Lodge was “To sell or let”.

Fraulein did not allow us to run wild
over the park ‘and garden, as we were ac-
customed to do in summer, on account of
some faddy notion she had that we might
- catch cold. So instead of rushing about
like mad things, rending the air with our
shouts and laughter, she made us go with
her for a prim and proper walk twice a
day—thus all our wild Indian and robber
games were put a stop to for a time.
Barney especially rebelled against the
restriction, and sometimes he made him--
self so disagreeable when we were out
walking that he nearly drove poor Frau-
lein out of her mind. He used to lag
behind until we were almost out of sight
and then turn tail and bolt home, arriving
long before us, after we had waited ever
so long for him to overtake us. Some-
times he would hide behind a hedge and

then run home another way—poor Frau-
(21487)





EE Ee aL

SBP eS



THE MIFF-MIFFS, 17

lein thinking he was lost and ready to cry
with anxiety. I think it is a very silly
way of showing you are displeased, to go
on like that; and after all it was only
Fraulein’s being so anxious to take good
care of us that made her seem to be too
particular.

One day when we were passing the gate
of Holly Lodge, Barney said, “ Hullo, look,
Nelka, the board has been taken away
from the gate!”

“So it has,” I answered, stopping short,
and going up to the gate I stood on tiptoe
and peeped over the top into the garden.
“Someone must be coming to live there;
there is a gardener working in the garden,
and I am sure they have been painting the
front-door.”

By this time we were all three of us
clinging to the top bar of the heavy wooden
gate and eagerly surveying our old domain.

“What a shame!” said Barney indig-
nantly. ‘They are chopping down all
our jungle!”

(21487) B



18 THE MIFF-MIFES.

« And look,” I added regretfully, point-'
ing to the earwiggy little arbour formed
out of the heart of a decrepid old yew-
tree, “they are going to take away our
robber den. What a pity!”

« Sha’n’t have no dezzer t’island now to
play Crusoe on,” put in Eric mournfully,
as he surveyed the havoc made in our
beloved tangle of brier and bush, as the
gardener’s sickle flashed hither and thither
amongst the thorny undergrowth.

“Come, my children,” said Fraulein,
taking hold of Eric and dragging him
down from his perilous perch, “it is not
pretty manners to stare so; someone will
come to live now in the Lodge, and you
can no more play your sports there. So,
come now, and make no more regrets
about it. Ach, Eric, you naughtiest of boys,
see then the big hole in your stocking-
knee!”

Eric looked at the tear made by an
obtrusive splinter in his blue stocking
without much concern.



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 19

“°Tisn’t much matter,” he said calmly.
“My knee was too hot anyway, it’s much
comfabler Jike vis.”

Fraulein held up her hands in horror,
and tried in vain to make his short serge
knickerbockers cover the gaping hole.
“ Ach, what a child!” she cried in despair;
“will he nevair learn to take care of his
clothes?”

After a few days Holly Lodge began to
present quite an orderly appearance. The
front-door and shutters were painted a
vivid green, neat curtains and blinds con-
cealed the staring windows, and the trim
paths, cropped shrubs, and smooth-rolled
turf had but little resemblance to the old
wilderness of weeds and bushes in which
we had passed so many happy hours. A
few days more passed, and then we noticed
that the ivy-grown chimneys sent up a
film of blue-gray smoke, and in the bow-
window to the left of the front-door hung
a cage containing a large gray parrot,
while a fat tabby cat sunned herself upon



20 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

the window-sill. But curious as we were
to know who our new neighbours could
be, for at least a week after the appearance
of the parrot and the fat cat we saw no
signs of the occupants of Holly Lodge.

One morning as Barney and I were
learning our lessons in the school-room
Eric came in with a very mysterious face.

“T know who lives in ve Lodge,” he
announced with an air of much importance.

Barney was learning his Latin verbs for
Mr. Evans, and was far too grand to
appear to take the least interest in what
Eric said. Iam glad I am not a boy and
do not have to learn Latin—it does make
them so fearfully cocksy. I looked up as
Eric entered and made his interesting
declaration, and said eagerly: |

“Oh, do tell, Eric, there’s a dear!”

Eric put his head on one side, and looked
very important. “Sha’n’t tell unless I
choose,” he said tantalizingly, at which
Barney looked up with a mocking grin.

“Silly little kid,” he said scornfully.



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 21

“Just as if we couldn’t ask Fraulein if we

wanted to know.”

~ “Fraulein doesn’t know—so vere!” said

Eric triumphantly, not noticing the hated
epithet in his delight at having for once

- got the better of Barney. “ Nobody knows

"cept me.”

“Do tellus, Eric darling,” I said coax-
ingly. “Is it children?” Eric shook his
head, and I added, “If you will tell me I
will tell you where we buried the blackbird
Gardener shot yesterday.”

Eric’s eyes brightened. “Certain sure?”
he said doubtfully.

“Certain sure,” I replied solemnly.

“The Miff-Miffs.”

“Who?” I asked perplexedly.

“The Miff-Mi7fs,” answered Eric frown-
ing. “I runned into the post-office to
buy a stamp for Fraulein, and Mrs. Jupps
was giving some parcels to the boy, and I
heard her say, ‘Robert, take vose to ve Miff-
Miffs at Holly Lodge’. So ven I knowed
it was ve Miff-Miffs what lived vere.”





22 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

“He means the Miss Smiths,” said
Barney contemptuously, looking up from
his Principia. “Fancy a kid of four
years old not being able to talk yet!”

Poor Eric flushed scarlet. “I said so!”
he cried indignantly. “It was ve Aif-
Migs I said.”

Barney laughed provokingly, and I tried
to pacify the angry little boy.

“Never mind, darling,” I said, putting
my arm round his neck comfortingly,
«Barney is very rude to laugh at you.
The blackbird is buried in the west shrub-
bery just underneath the juniper-bush.”

Eric was mollified, and departed to seek
his spade that he might dig up the corpse
of the blackbird for the inspection which
had been denied him the day before.

It was not long before our curiosity re-
garding the new tenants of Holly Lodge
was satisfied, and we had seen for ourselves
the mysterious Miff-Miffs.

The Miff-Miffs were two little old maids
as alike in every way as two people could



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 23

possibly be. Their real name was, of
course, as Barney had said, the Miss
Smiths; but we always called them the
“ Miff-Miffs”, and it was a most suitable
name, for they were far too odd-looking
to have such a very ordinary name as the
Miss Smiths. We used to pass the two
old ladies every morning as we were
starting for our walk with Fraulein,
toddling along in the direction of the vil-
lage shop, which was also the post-office.
They were dressed exactly alike, in funny
old-fashioned mushroom hats, tied under
the chin with broad strings of brown
ribbon, and black shawls with coloured
borders and fringe of silk. Their shawls
were fastened just below their hat-strings
with enormous gold brooches, set with a
great many different kinds of stones.
They each carried a very big ermine muff,
and over their left arms dangled a little
velvet bag, which I think used to be called
a reticule.

In the long-ago days when mother was



24 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

a little girl, she carried her lunch to school
in one of these little bags, and it still _
hangs on the bell-handle in the boudoir,
with the red shoes mother wore at her
first party.

They were not very amiable-looking old
ladies, although the youngest one—Miss
Martha we found out afterwards she was
called—must have beenrather pretty before
she grew so wrinkled and lost her teeth.
She had pretty bright eyes, which reminded
me of a mouse, and her cheeks were red
and wrinkled like a winter apple—rather
a sour apple it looked.

Our speaking acquaintance with the
Miff-Miffs did not begin in a very friendly
way. As I said before, Barney was never
on his nicest behaviour when obliged to
go for a walk with Fraulein, Eric, and me.
Barney can be as polite and nice as pos-
sible when he likes, and people often say to
mother what a very well-behaved boy Bar-
neyis. Mother always takes one of us with
her in the carriage when she goes visiting: _



THE - MIFF-MIFFS. 25

for, as I said at the beginning of my story, —
we have no people near us to visit, and
-mother is nervous about going alone in
the carriage ever since one day when the
horses ran away, and there might have
been a very bad accident. When Barney
goes with her, he hands round cake at
afternoon tea and opens the door for the
ladies, and they all think what a very nice
polite boy he is. So I hope the people
who read this story will not think that
Barney is always as rude as he was on the
particular day about which I am now going
to tell.
We had met the Miff-Miffs several times
on the road, and, as we were always walk-
~ ing quietly along at Fraulein’s side nothing
had ever happened to draw their attention
to us. But one unlucky day we were
returning from our walk, Barney, in one of
his worst tempers, marching on ahead of
the rest of us, and kicking the mud about
in a most disagreeable way with his thick
boots. In vain Fraulein kept calling out



26 THE MIFF-MIFFS,

to him, imploring him to walk properly
and remember his manners. Barney took
no notice, but tramped along, his hands in
his coat pockets, his head held in the air,
flinging the mud about on either side of
him as he brought his heavy boots down
with a splash at every step neon the muddy
footpath.

Just as we were nearing the Lodge, out
of the gate came tripping side by side the
two Miff-Miffs, all dressed in their best
frilled skirts and Sunday shawls. From
the little reticules hanging at their sides
poked knitting-needles and lace caps,—
evidently the old ladies were on their way
to the Vicarage to take tea with the vicar’s
wife. Barney, keeping the very middle
of the path, plunged steadily on, just as
though he saw no one before him. Straight
up to the horrified ladies came Barney,
and without in the least making way for
them, pushed right in between them, scat-
tering mud as he went, so that one huge
splash landed on the shoulder of poor



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 27

Miss Martha, and a wet dab on the cheek
of Miff-Miff, which did not at all improve
her appearance. The two ladies stopped
short and for a moment barred the way,
so that Barney was not able to push past
them as he intended to do.

“Dear me!” said poor Miss Martha,
hurriedly fumbling amongst the frills of
her skirt for the opening which led to the
pocket in her petticoat in which was her
handkerchief, “My best cashmere shawl!
how very annoying! what a clumsy young
person!”

The elder Miff-Miff fixed her pale, gray
eyes on Barney, and in a very deep voice
said severely, “ When J was a little boy, it
was considered good manners to step off
the footpath and allow ladies to pass, not
to push them aside.”

I am very sorry to have to tell what
Barney did then, for it was really terribly
rude, and I am sure he would never have
done such a thing if it had not been that
he was in such a bad mood. He stared



28 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

straight into Miff-Miff’s face, which was
quite red with surprise and horror, and
burst into a loud laugh.

“T shouldn't have thought you ever
were a little boy,” he said rudely, and the
poor little lady’s wrinkled face grew pink
with confusion.

“Sister!” exclaimed Miss Martha faintly,
stopping her search for her handkerchief
and looking at her sister in horrified amaze-
ment. ‘My dear, what a very terrible
thing to say!”

“My dear, I meant—I am sure you
know what I meant to say,” said poor
Miff-Miff, looking so funny with her con-
cerned face and the little dab of wet mud
beginning to trickle down her cheek, that
I am sure I should have laughed too, if I
had not felt so ashamed of Barney.

By this time we had come up with them,
and Fraulein caught hold of Barney’s sleeve
so that he could not escape, and began to
make apologies to the excited little ladies.

“How can I make excuse, madam,”



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 29

she said in her funny English, “for this
careless and ill-mannered little pupil of
mine. Ach, but it makes me quite
ashamed that he should be of such a
rudeness guilty.” Barney was evidently
beginning to feel a little ashamed himself,
and at the sound of Fraulein’s shocked
voice he hung his head and no longer
giggled. Then Fraulein turned to Barney
and said reproachfully, “Does it not
shame you that your good dear mother
should know that so you behave when
she is absent? Ach, but you will now
make your apology to the ladies and beg
them to pardon your carelessness, nicht
mein Kind?”

Barney shuffled about uncomfortably,
and at last, with his eyes on the ground,
muttered reluctantly, “I beg your pardon,”
- then wriggled himself free of Fraulein’s

hold and bolted off home as hard as he
could tear.

We remained a few minutes trying to
restore the ruffled feelings of the little old



80 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

maids. Fraulein kindly pointed out the
spot of mud on Miff-Miff’s cheek, and
assisted her to remove it with her hand-
kerchief, while at Fraulein’s bidding I
used my own clean handkerchief to wipe
away the splash from poor Miss Martha’s
best cashmere shawl. - Fraulein all the
time was making every excuse she could
think of for Barney’s dreadful behaviour,
and expressing her regret that the ladies
should have been so put out.

Miff-Miff herself said primly, “It is of
no consequence, pray do not trouble to
apologize,” and Miss Martha added,

“We had better return to our abode,
sister, and make ourselves fit to appear at
the Vicarage.”

So saying the little ladies made a stiff
curtsy to Fraulein, and thanking us
primly for our assistance toddled off back
again in the direction of the Lodge.

That was our first encounter with the
Miff-Miffs, and I fear that from that
day, all on account of Barney’s rough be-



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 31

haviour, they put us down as dreadful
little savages.

One day we were playing “kick-ball”
in that part of the park which joins Holly
Lodge, when our ball bounced over the
fence, and fell right in the middle of the
centre flower-bed, in which the tulips and
hyacinths were beginning to lift their heads.

“Run and fetch it, Eric!” commanded
Barney. “It was your kick that sent it
over.”

Eric warmly denied the charge; but on
my adding, “I think it was my kick that
helped, but run and get it, Eric, there’s a
brick,” he consented to go, and disappeared
into the road, to return in a very few
minutes panting, with the big ball clasped
in his arms, and a most indignant flush
upon his cheeks.

“She’s just an old cat!” he exclaimed
fiercely, as he flung the ball at our feet
and Barney and I drew near him.

“Who, Eric?” I asked; “did you see
them?”



32 THE MIFF-MIFFS,

Eric nodded.

“Sha’n’t go to fetch balls any more,”
said the little boy indignantly. ‘She
called me a ‘fief’, ve horrid old story-
teller!”

“Who? Miff-Miff did?” queried Bar-
"ney.

“Yes,” said Eric hotly. “She foughted.
I'd comed to steal her silly old flowers,
‘cos I had to step into the tulip-bed to
get our ball. First she banged on the
window—bofe of ’em did, ve old pigs, and
veir knuckles must just have hurted awful.
I was as quick as ever I could be trying
to find ve ball, cos I just foughted she
was coming out after me. But ve stupid
fing was hiding itself in a corner under a
big leaf, and before I could see it Miff-Miff
came running out in an awful rage.

“You are a bad wicked boy,’ she said,
‘coming to steal our flowers, and if I
knowed where the policeman lived I
would make him come and take you to
prison, you fief.’”



THE MIFF-MIFFS, 33

“Oh, Eric,” I said breathlessly, “ what-
ever did you do then?”

“T saw ve ball roll out,” said Eric,
“and I just snatched it up, ’cos I was so
‘fraid she might take it away and keep it.
Ven I said, ‘I’m not a fief, and vis is our
ball what rolled into your garden by mis-
take. I’ve comed to fetch it, and I don’t
want none of your silly old flowers.’”

“Yes,” I said excitedly. “What did
she say then? wasn’t she very angry?”

“Very,” responded Eric solemnly. “She
made big eyes at me like a tiger, and said,
‘Don’t you ever come into my garden
again, little boy. I am very angry with
you, you have stamped on two of my best
tulips with your clumsy boots.’ So I
just stamped on two more,” concluded
_ Eric with a triumphant sparkle in his blue
eyes, “and afore she could catch me I
shouted, ‘ Who cares for you, old cat? and
runned as hard as ever I could out at the
gate and home.”

He looked round expecting Dine for
(21.487)



84 THE MIFF-MIFiS.

his valiant deed, and Barney clapped him
on the back delightedly: ‘“ Well done, old
chap!” he cried. “That’s the way to treat
crabby old maids. Just show them they
are not going to play hokum-pokum with
us.”

This was a very favourite expression of
Barney's. None of us quite knew what
it meant, but it sounded imposing, and
Barney thought a great deal of himself
for having invented it.

A day or two after Eric’s adventure we
were flying kites in the lane, and the
string of mine became entangled in the
branches of a laburnum tree in the Miff-
Miffs’ shrubbery. After vainly trying to
disentangle it from where I stood in the
lane, I was at last obliged to brave the
enemy's wrath and go into the Miff-Miffs’
garden in order to reclaim my kite. I
boldly marched up to the gate and at-
tempted to open it, only to find that it
was securely fastened from the inside. I
was far too proud and angry to ring the



HE MIFF-MIf?s, 35

bell, so I left my poor kite to its fate, and
what became of it I do not know, but I
never saw it again.

After this fresh offence we held a council
in the old washing-house—a mouldy, ivy-
grown building, given over to rats and
earwigs and other horrid creepy things.
Father always intended to pull the rickety
old place down and build a nice summer-
house in its place, but until that took
place we three made use of the old place
as a secret chamber, where we could talk
over our very private matters with no fear
of any one overhearing.

The council occupied half an hour or
so in the sitting, and at the close our Chief
rose and threw upon the floor an ancient
and moth-eaten glove, which had once
belonged to father and was used by the
Winkey-Wums on occasions like this, in
strict accordance with the old custom.
“JT declare WAR TO THE KNIFE,” an-
nounced the Chief solemnly. “ Whereas
we, the honourable tribe of Winkey-



36 THE MIFF-MIFFS, -

Wums, have been most horribly insulted
by the new and disagreeable tribe of Miff-
Miffs, we are only doing what is right
and just in taking revenge upon our
enemies.”

The old glove lay upon the floor where
the Chief had dropped it, and the fol-
lowers, imitating their Chief’s example,
rose, as he finished his speech, from their
inverted wash-tubs, and gravely placed
each one his right foot upon the glove,
repeating as he did so the awful declara-
tion, “WAR TO THE KNIFE!”

Thus was war declared against the Miff-
Miffs.

After the big council we had various ©
meetings in what we called the “ Hatching-
hole”, in order to determine in what way
we were to wreak vengeance upon our
enemies. ‘ Hatching-hole” was a certain
recess on the stairs formed by the back of
the old oak settle and a corner cupboard
—the space between them just being big
enough for the three of us to squeeze in.



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 87

We could draw a corner of the window-
curtain across the recess when we were
safely packed in, and no grown-up person
would ever have suspected our. hiding-
hole.

We called this place our “ Hatching-
hole”, because in it we hatched our plots
and planned our mischief, and I am afraid
“Hatching -hole” was answerable for
many of the scrapes we were continually
getting into.

One evening Barney came bounding
into the school-room just as we were
about to begin tea. Eric and I were on
our knees on the hearth-rug, busily en-
gaged in making toast. Fraulein stood at
the table wielding a big knife, and receiv-
ing each crisp, brown slice from our
‘hands, she spread it generously with
butter, and added it to the tempting-look-
ing pile, which was keeping hot upon a
large plate before the fire. I must say,
that whenever Fraulein did a thing she
did it properly. If she consented to



38 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

allow us, as a treat, to have hot-buttered
toast for tea, you may be sure that it was
hot-buttered toast, with the butter spread
thick upon it, until no more would soak
in, and as many slices as we liked to
make.

Barney had been kept in by Mr. Evans,
because he did not know his Latin, so
he came bursting into the school-room,
very hungry, and in boisterous spirits,
after his long imprisonment. “Hallo!
jolly hot toast for tea!” was his first ex-
clamation as he burst open the door, and
the delicious odour of toast-making reached
his nostrils.

“Ach, but you deserve it not, bad boy,
when you know not your lesson, and Mr.
Evans must keep you in,” said Fraulein,
reprovingly, looking up from the big slice
of toast she was buttering, her good-
humoured face trying .to assume a severe
look.

“JT couldn't help it, Fraulein,” said
Barney insinuatingly, patting her broad



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 39

shoulder as he passed; “and you've made
me an extra big share of toast, ’m sure,
to make up for my having been done out
of all the fun of making it.”

Fraulein shook her head, but an indul-
gent smile stole over her face,—she never
could resist Barney, when he put on his
coaxing manner.

“ Ach, then, what a child it is,” she
said. “You shall have tree big slice if
you promise to learn better next time.
The poor man, Mr. Evans, must walk so
far in all the cold dark before he can reach
home, and you detain him one whole half-
hour when you know not your lessons.”

“Oh, it’s all right, Fraulein,” retorted
Barney, easily; “I think he enjoys the
walk. I asked him to come upstairs and
have some tea before he went, but he said
he hadn’t time, as he must be back at
Beeston at six for the choir practice. I
guess he would have let the old choir
practice slide, though, if he’d known there
was buttered toast for tea,”



40 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

Jane’s entry with the tea-pot put a stop
to any more toast-making, which was just
as well, perhaps, as the delicious simmer-
ing pile in the fender had assumed a most
imposing height, while the contents of the
china butter-tub had almost dwindled into
nothingness.

As we drew in our chairs to the table
and proceeded to ‘help ourselves, after
handing the toast to Fraulein, Barney
whispered to me:

“There will be a meeting in ‘Hatch-
ing-hole’ after tea.”

“Have you thought of a plan?” I
whispered back eagerly,and Barney nodded
mysteriously.

We worked our way steadily through
the stack of toast, and, when only a few
crumbs and a buttery plate remained,
Fraulein said grace and gave us permission
to leave the table, followed by a strict
injunction to go and wash our hands
before attempting to do anything. We
pelted off to the bath-room and washed



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 41

our hands, and then sneaked one by one
into our hiding-hole on the stairs.

When all were assembled, with knees
touching and heads together—for the space
of “ Hatching-hole” would only permit of
very close intimacy—Barney propounded
his plan.

“T had a long talk with Gardener this
afternoon,” he said in a low whisper,
“when I was waiting for Mr. Evans in
the garden, and he told me ever so many
things about the Miff-Miffs. He told me
they are awfully clever for one thing, and
have travelled over almost the whole
world, and written lots of books and things,
and they had a brother who was ever
such a big man in some foreign place—I
think it was in China or somewhere—he
was almost like a king, he was so power-
fol

“Oh my!” said Eric and I, much im-
pressed; but Barney went on hastily:

“ But that’s no matter, it wasn’t that
that Gardener told me that was most



42, THE MIFF-MIFFS.

important, it was this—the Miff-Miffs
are most terribly frightened of bur-
glars!”

“What's burglars?” asked Eric.

‘““Robbers—people that come into the
house at night and steal things, and some-
times murder you, if you don’t give them
all the money and jewels and things in
the house.”

“Oh!” said Eric, looking rather scared,
“there aren’t any here, are there?”

“Of course not, silly,” said Barney, im-
patiently, “but there might be, don’t you
see? Gardener told me that the Miff-
Miffs have heaps of beautiful silver things
in the Lodge—dishes and tea-pots and
spoons—and they are so frightened that
burglars will come and steal them, that
they have been having new bolts and
locks put on to all the doors and windows,
for fear anybody might get in. Gardener
says they keep a candle burning in every
room all night long, and he says Miff-Miff
asked him the other day if he would sell



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 43

her Juno, that great retriever of his, to
be their watch-dog.”

“Yes,” said I, keenly interested, “and
did he?”

Barney shook his head and whispered
even lower, “ No, Gardener said he couldn’t
spare Juno, but he knows a man in
Beeston who has some very fierce bull-
dogs, and he is going to see about getting
one for the Miff-Miffs, to be chained up in
the yard at night. Now comes our revenge.”

Barney leant forward till our foreheads
touched, and my curls tickled his nose so

that he sneezed.
~ “Don’t do that, Nelka,” he said im-
patiently, just as though I could help it,
“and talk very low, or someone might
hear. We will be burglars!”

The audacity of the suggestion almost
took our breath away. .

“ Barney!” I said, gazing all eyes, “and
steal their things? That would be wicked,
wouldn’t it?” I said doubtfully.

“Not steal things,” said Barney irri-



44 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

tably, “of course not; we would hide their
spoons and forks and things in all sorts of
places, so that they would think burglars
had been in the house, but of course we
wouldn’t really take anything.”

“Supposing they heard us and we were
discovered, what would happen then?” I
queried, still doubtful.

“Of course they wouldn’t hear us,” said
Barney. “Even if they did, they would
be far too frightened to get up to see
what the noise was. Oh, it would be
grand!” and Barney chuckled hilariously
beneath his breath.

Eric and I joined in, a little timorously
certainly, but still rapidly catching Barney’s
wild delight at his project.

“How frightened the old cats will be
in the morning, when they find that some-
one has been in the house!” said Barney
exuberantly.

“ But what about Crabby Ann?” I asked,
“Crabby Ann” being the name we had
given the sour-faced old woman who acted



THE MIFF-MIFFS. - 45

as servant to the Miff-Miffs, for whom we
had conceived almost as great a dislike as
we had to the two old maids themselves.

“ She sleeps right away up in the gabled
room at the back,” replied Barney confi-
dently. ‘I know, because I saw one of
those hideous ‘mutches’ she always wears
hanging on to the knob of the looking-glass
which stands in the window. © It will be
quite easy. We can get in at the little
pantry window,—you know the one I
mean, Nelka,—at the back of the goose-
berry bushes, where I got inonce before and
hid when we were playing wild Indians.”

“Yes, I know,” I answered eagerly,
catching somewhat of Barney’s enthusiasm,
and excited at the daring of the plan.
“But are you sure there hasn’t been a
bolt put on it?”

Barney shook his head. “ Hush! talk
lower, Nelka, or Fraulein will hear us,
and then we are done for. No, there is
no bolt on the window yet. I expect they
don’t suppose that anybody could squeeze



46 THE MIFF-MIFES,

through such a very tiny window as that;
“anyway, it is never fastened, for I climbed |
up on the cucumber frame on purpose to
see, and it is still unlatched. We can get
into the pantry, and then crawl through
a big ventilator there is into the kitchen.
There is a shelf the other side of the ven-
tilator, and we can get on to that, and
then crawl along until we come to a table,
or something which will help us to get
down without making any noise. I know
all about the house inside, because I ex-
plored well that day I hid there, and you
couldn’t think where I had got to. How
lucky that I did, wasn’t it?”

We assented, and before we returned
to the school-room a dark and daring
plot had been formed in the secrecy of
“ Hatching-hole ”.

In view of the determination of the
Miff- Miffs to protect themselves from
night marauders, by calling in the services
of a fierce yard-dog, we agreed. that no
time must be lost in carrying our plan



THE MIFF-MIFFS. ; Al

into execution, and the following night
was fixed for our burgling expedition.

Much to Eric’s annoyance, we decided
that he could not be allowed to take part
in the adventure, as the risk of discovery
would be too great.

It was Fraulein’s habit to sit up late at
night reading, often until midnight, and it
was upon this custom of hers that we
were relying in order to enable us to carry
out our scheme of revenge against the
Miff-Miffs. The household at Holly Lodge
was wont to retire early—Barney had it
from Gardener that the precise hour at
which the Miff-Miffs closed up for the
night was nine o'clock. Allowing them
one hour in which to make their toilets
and compose themselves to sleep, we fixed
the hour for our burglary at ten o’clock.
That would give us plenty of time to carry
out our design, and return before there
could be any chance of Fraulein missing
us. We were sorry at being obliged to
leave Eric out of the fun, but he was really



48 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

too small to take part in such a daring
exploit; and besides, his sleeping in Frau-
lein’s room made it quite impossible for
him to join us without being missed.

Having completed our arrangements we
returned to the school-room, doing our
utmost to look innocent.

“Mein children,” said Fraulein, as we
entered the room one behind the other,
“where have you been? I was just coming
to look where you could be. It is time
for Eric to go to bed, and Barney and
Nelka must come and prepare their lessons
for to-morrow.”

“Yes, Fraulein,” said Barney, so meekly
that I was surprised that Fraulein did not
suspect something from this unusual obe-
dience, and preparing at once to collect his
lesson-books, and settle himself at: the
table. For half an hour we scribbled
away at exercises, and murmured spelling
and tables without once raising our eyes
from our books. At last Fraulein rose
and left the room fora moment. Barney



THE MIFF-MIFFS, 49

at once gave me a kick under the table,
and squirmed with suppressed delight.

“T say, Nelka, to-morrow!” he said in
a loud whisper, and I had just time to
return the kick before Fraulein returned.

“You are good attentive children to-
night,” she said, nodding her head approv-
ingly at sight of our bent heads and diligent
fingers. ‘Such good behaviour is an en-
couragement to me to reward with treats
good children.” This was in allusion to
the hot toast we had had for tea, and I
could see Barney’s white teeth gleam as
he pressed them into his lower lip, to keep
himself from letting out the whole thing
_ by bursting into a fit of laughter.

Next day our excitement, so strictly
repressed, became positively painful. We
could attend to nothing, and Fraulein was
in despair over our morning lessons. After
Barney had had his geography returned
for the fifth time, because he would repeat
in. a far-away, mechanical voice that

“London is the capital of America, a fine
(4487) D



50 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

city on the river Tyne, famous for its coal
manufactories,” he took the bull by the
horns. “

“T really can’t learn lessons to-day,
Fraulein,” he declared obstinately. “I’ve
got the fidgets, and when I have fidgets
it’s no use trying to make me learn things.
I shall have a headache next—I know I
shall,” he added, looking threateningly at
poor distracted Fraulein—“ and then you -
will be sorry, for mother never allows us
to have headaches.”

“Do you not feel well, my dear?” asked -
Fraulein anxiously. It was her one dread
that any of us should fall ill while under
her charge.

“ Not especially,” said Barney, stretching
himself languidly, and uttering a deep
sigh. “I think Td be all the better of
a run in the garden. I feel kind of hot.
Don’t you think we might put up lessons
for to-day, Fraulein, and Nelka and I go
and tidy up our gardens?”

“Oh, yes,” I put in coaxingly. “Do



THE MIFF-MIFFS, 51

say we may, Frauly, like a dear thing.
_ Our gardens are so untidy, and Gardener
says we ought soon to be sowing our
seeds.”

Fraulein fell into the trap. “Well, I
suppose so,” she said kindly. “I fear no
more lessons can be done to-day, you
children are so restless, and perhaps the
fresh air may do you good. Put a hand-
kerchief round your throat, Barney, in
case you are inclined to take a little cold.
Eric can come with me to Beeston, and I
can get some more of the silk I require to
finish the table-cloth I am working for
your mother’s birthday gift.”

In high glee Barney and I tore off to
don our old garden clothes, and were soon
at work upon our little flower-beds, while
discussing our plans for the evening.

“We mustn’t undress ourselves,” said
Barney, carefully removing a fat worm
from his flower-bed to a place of safety on
the lawn—that was one thing about Barney
very different from some boys, he never



52 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

hurt a living creature, however ugly or
loathsome it might be. “You must just
stick your night-dress on over your dress,
Nelka, and get into bed, and when Frau-
lein comes in to tuck us up, we must
pretend to be sound asleep, and then she
will not think any more about us.”

I assented, and then, struck by another
thought, asked Barney how we were to
get out of the house without being seen
by anyone. ‘The doors, as we knew, were
all carefully locked at sundown by Jack-
son, the butler. :

“We will get out of the staircase
window,” said Barney cheerfully. “TI see
Gardener has left a ladder leaning against
the wall by the boudoir window, where he
has been nailing up the ivy. I intend to
move the ladder by and by and put it
against the staircase window, so that we
can get out quite easily. Gardener will
never notice it, he is busy in the kitchen-
garden to-day and is not likely to be
wanting it.”



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 53

The day passed somehow, and promptly
at eight o’clock—nearly half an hour sooner
than usual—Barney began to put away
the book he was reading, and yawning
said:

“T feel inclined to go to bed, Fraulein,
and I don’t think I want any supper, I
had such a lot of tea.”

It was our custom to have a tray of
biscuits, oat-cake, and milk brought into
the school-room at half-past eight, and on
ordinary occasions Barney did ample
justice to this simple meal. His assertion,

_ therefore, that he was not hungry, after his
slackness at lessons in the morning, caused
Fraulein to fear that something was amiss.

“T am afraid you are not very well,
dear child,” she said anxiously, as Barney
closed the door. of the book-case and
came to bid her good-night, “I think
a little dose would be a good thing.”

“No, thank you, Fraulein,” said Barney
with sudden alacrity; “no ‘Gregory’ or
‘castor oil’ for me, thank you. I only



54 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

want a good sleep, and I shall be all right
in the morning.”

I really wondered at Barney’s cheek,
how he could tell such fibs and deceive
poor simple Fraulein! He said good-
night and went off, Fraulein remarking to
me in rather a troubled tone as he left the
room:

“T do hope the child is not going to be
ill; it is not like Barney to refuse his
meals.”

“Oh no, Frauly!” I said reassuringly,
“Barney is never ill I think this has
been a long day, somehow. As soon as
Jane brings the supper-tray I think I shall
go to bed too.”

“T am so anxious to get this table-cloth
finished by to-morrow,” said Fraulein,
resuming her needle-work. ‘Sunday is
your dear mother’s birthday, and it must
be posted to-morrow in order to arrive at
Nice by that day. I must work hard to-
night and finish it before I go to bed.”

I peeped out of the corner of my eyes



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 55

and saw that still half a corner of the
table-cloth remained unworked, and I cal-
culated that it would take at least three
hours to finish. Therefore we might safely
reckon that it would be twelve o'clock
before Fraulein would retire to her bed-
room. !

“You will have to sit up late if you
mean to finish all that to-night, Fraulein,”
I said with much innocence.

“ Ach, that I mind not,” said Fraulein
briskly. “In my country we must go early
to bed, because we rise so early; but
here in England, where you lie in bed until
past eight o’clock, I must not go so soon
to bed, or I should become jau/—that is,
as you say here, lazy.”

At this moment Jane entered with the
supper-tray, and after fortifying myself
for the coming excitement with a cup of
milk and two of my favourite brown
biscuits, I said good-night, and left Frau-
lein to enjoy the dainty little chicken pdzé
which cook had sent up especially for her.



56 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

Fraulein was a great favourite of cook’s,
and it was a pet grievance of ours that
she used to send up for supper all the
dishes she knew we liked best, although
she knew we children were not allowed
anything more substantial for supper than
biscuits and milk. .

“T will come and say good-night to
you as soon as I have finished my supper,”
said Fraulein, as I laid aside my work and
took my candle.

“Come soon, then, won’t you?” I re-
turned as I kissed her plump cheek, “ for
I expect we shall be asleep pretty soon.”
Oh how guilty I felt as I uttered those
untruthful words!

According to our agreement I merely
took the ribbon off my hair, and plaited it
as I was accustomed to do when I went
to bed, and then slipping off my shoes I
popped my night-dress over my frock, and
blowing out the candle crept into bed.
In a few minutes the door opened to
admit Fraulein, and as she approached



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 57

the bed I breathed hard and did my best
to feign sleep. It is a dreadful thing to
pretend to be asleep while a person bends
over you and smooths the bed-clothes,
with a lighted candle so placed on the
table at the bed-side that every little
twitch of your face can be seen. It seemed
hours to me that Fraulein stood there, and
I felt that I must giggle or scream or kick
or do something if she did not go away.
However, I managed to keep quiet, and
Fraulein went away all unsuspicious bear-
ing her candle, and I heard her enter
Barney’s room. as she opened the door, and I had to dive
under the bed-clothes and smother my
laughter at this barefaced deceit. As
soon as the closing of the school-room
door announced that Fraulein had re-
turned to her beloved fancy-work, and
that there was nothing more to fear from
her, my door was pushed cautiously open,
and Barney appeared—a comical object in
his pink flannel night-shirt, with his stock-



58 THE MIFF-MIFFS,

ings and knickerbockers appearing be-
low.
“ All serene?” he queried in a hoarse
whisper; and on my popping my head out
from my nest and answering “ All serene”,
he shut the door noiselessly and came and
sat-at the foot of my bed.

“T’ve just been in to see Eric,” he said.
“The wretched kid was awake, and he
was very much inclined to kick up a row
because we won't let him come with us.
I got him pacified by promising him my
big blue marble, and you are to make it
up to him to-morrow—he wants to sow
your mignonette seed that Gardener gave
you.”

“Vd rather you hadn’t promised that,
Barney,” I said reluctantly, “I always like
to sow my own seeds—Eric sows them
far too thick. Why did you promise him
that?”

“He would have that,” said Barney,
“he wouldn’t agree to anything else, and
I had to make him quiet at any price. I



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 59

knew you wouldn’t like it, but it cant be
helped. He’s promised to lie still and go
to sleep, and we are to tell him all about
it in the morning. I wonder what time
it is?”

“J heard the school-room clock strike
nine just when Fraulein came in,” I an-
swered, and Barney said excitedly:

“Then it’s time we were getting ready.
Get up and let us light the candle, Nelka.”

I slipped noiselessly out of bed, and
with a trembling hand I felt on the mantel-
piece for the matches, which I handed to
Barney, who struck one and lighted the
candle.

“Have you got your goloshes ready,
Nelka?” he asked.

“Under the bed,” I answered, produc-
ing them and proceeding to draw them on -
over my slippers. Then pulling off my
night-dress I stood up fully dressed, and
took down my garden hat and jacket from
the peg on the door. Then I turned to
Barney. “I am quite ready,’ I said,



60 THE MIFF-MIFFS,

trembling with excitement, now that the
time for action had really come.

“Are you? Wait a bit,” said Barney
cautiously, and taking the bolster from its
place beneath the pillow he laid it down
the centre of the bed, and carefully spread
over it my white night-dress. When he
had drawn up the bed-clothes and made
a dent in the pillow where my head should
have been, it really looked not unlike a
person in bed. “Just to make sure,” he
said complacently as he contemplated the
dummy, “in case Fraulein should take it
into her head to come in to fetch anything,
and notice an empty bed. Now, come on,
Nelka, we must do the same in my room.”

Bearing the candle we crept out, closing
the door behind us, and slipping across
the landing reached Barney’s room un-
heard and unseen by the unconscious
Fraulein, deeply engrossed in her needle-
work. Within the safety of his own room
Barney quickly divested himself of his
night-shirt, and being fully dressed under-



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 61

neath, he had only to take down his cap
and put on a pair of old tennis shoes,
which he had unearthed from the cup-
board in the vestibule where such things
were kept, and announced himself ready
to start. The candle was blown out, and
hand in hand we stole out on to the land-
ing, pausing a moment outside the school-
room door to make sure that Fraulein
‘had heard nothing. We lingered a minute
to peep through a crack in the door, and -
could see Fraulein sitting at the centre
table, her head bent to catch every ray of
light from the lamp. We passed on,
breathing freely as the baize door which
led on to the staircase swung noiselessly
to behind us, and we stood on the dark
stairs in comparative safety. I gripped
Barney’s arm nervously as we descended
the few steps necessary to reach the stair-
case window, by means of which we were
to make our escape.

“Hush! don’t be a goose,” whispered
Barney, beneath his breath, as we felt our



62 _ HE MIFF-MIFFS.

way carefully in the darkness. My heart
was thumping so hard against my jacket,
that I was sure it must be distinctly heard
in the ghostly stillness of the quiet house.
We reached the alcove in safety, and
drawing aside the heavy curtain, which
screened the window, Barney carefully
undid the catch and pushed up the sash.

“Tt’s all right,” he said in a tone of
relief, “the ladder is there, just where I
placed it. I'l go first.”

Nimble as a monkey Barney stooped
down and threw one leg over the low sill.
As soon as he felt his foot on the ladder,
the other leg followed, and in a moment
he had disappeared. I leant over the sill,
and watched until I saw him reach the
ground in safety, and heard the whistle we
had agreed upon as a signal that I should
descend. I was just as used to climbing
and scrambling as Barney, and with as little
difficulty I clambered over the sill, and
descended the shaky ladder backwards.
It was a long ladder, and I was not sorry



‘HE MIFF-MIFFS. 63

when I felt Barney clutch my arm, and
heard him say: “ You're all right now,
Nelka. Mind where you put your foot,
though, and don’t step on the tulips.” He
guided my dangling foot to a safe resting-
place, away from the flower-bed, and with
a thrill of wild excitement I stood by his
side on the gravel-path and realized that
we were in for a real adventure from which
there was no drawing back.

‘““No time to waste,” said Barney, “let’s
run!” and, seizing my hand, he drew me
out of the shadow of the house, and we
stepped across the gravel, making as little
noise as possible with our india-rubber
soles.

“We'll go through the shrubbery,” said
Barney, as we gained the lawn safely,
“so as not to run the risk of being seen
as we cross the lawn.” The shrubbery
bordered the tennis-lawn on one side, and
pushing our way through this, we emerged
into the portion of the park which was
divided from the kitchen-garden of the



64 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

Lodge by the little stream. Our plank
bridge was still in its old place, and by
means of it we crossed the stream, and
scrambled up the sloping bank opposite,
where the violets and yellow celandine
were beginning to perk up their heads.
At the top we paused awhile, to gain
breath, before opening the little rustic
gate in the low fence, which led into the
Lodge garden.

We could just see the top of the Grange
from where we stood, and I could not
help thinking how big, and black, and
eerie it looked, rising above the surround-
ing trees, like the picture of one of the
robbers’ castles in our fairy-books. It
was a very dark night, with neither moon
nor stars to be seen in the black vault of
sky above us. A low moany sort of wind
rustled in the dry bushes near us, and the
little brook, trickling over the pebbles at
our feet, made a mournful murmuring,
not at all like the cheery song it sang in
the sunshine of the morning. The eeri-



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 65

ness of finding ourselves all alone in the
strange stillness of night affected Barney,
as it did me, with a feeling of nervousness, °
and he did not stop long, but unlatched
the wicket-gate and admitted us both to
the little garden.

“There are the gooseberry-bushes, and
that is the window,” he whispered softly,
pointing to a wall just in front of us, in
which I dimly made out the outline of a
very small slit window at a little distance
from the ground. Just below the window
was a patch of something dark, which I
made out to be the group of gooseberry-
bushes. The knotted branches of a pear-
tree, growing against the wall, would
make an excellent ladder. Stealthily we
advanced up the narrow path, between
the cabbage-rows, and crept in among the
spiky bushes as carefully as we could.
One thorny branch caught in my skirt,
and before I could disengage myself, it
had torn a rent right through the hem of

my frock.
(38487) E



66 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

“ Stupid!” muttered Barney in an angry
whisper. “Now Fraulein will see that,
and ask how you did it!”

“T couldn’t help it,” I whispered back
again, “the thorns caught it. It is my
old frock, luckily.”

We were standing just below the win-
dow now, and Barney gave me a warning
grip to be silent, and laying hold of the
knotted branches of the old pear-tree, he
began to climb up it, as though it were a
ladder. The window was only a few feet
above the ground, and Barney easily
reached the sill, and was able to put his
knee upon it. With his free hand he
pressed against the sash, and the un-
fastened window yielded to the pressure
and opened inwards. His face in the dim
light glowing with excitement, he looked
down, and beckoned to me to follow. As
I seized the lowest branch of the tree, and
sought a secure foothold, by which to raise
myself, he disappeared within the narrow
aperture. I gained the window-sill as he



. fHE MIFF-MIFFS. 67

had done, and heard Barney’s voice from
within say hoarsely:

- “Mind where you drop—don’t smash
anything.”

I looked through the window and saw
that just below it was a shelf, set out
with dishes of eatables—evidently we had
made our entrance by way of the Miff-
Miffs’ larder. I steered my way safely
through a collection of dishes, and managed
to drop down on to the stone floor of the
pantry, without doing any damage.

“T say,” said Barney, pointing to the
tempting array of eatables arranged in
spotless order upon the shelf, “what do
you say to helping ourselves to some of
these jolly-looking things; burglars always
begin by helping themselves to supper?”

“Oh, Barney!” I said, rather shocked
—that was carrying the thing a little too
far—‘ that would be really stealing!”

“No it wouldn't,” said Barney, stoutly.
“Remember we have got a cause to re-
venge ourselves on the Miff-Miffs. If



68 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

you come to think of it, they stole your
kite.”

“Gardener said he thought most likely
it had blown away,” I objected hesita-
tingly. “I am sure mother would not
like us really to steal.”

But Barney did not agree with me, and
more for the bravado of the thing than
because he was greedy, he helped himself
to a delicious-looking pasty, and munched
it with much relish.

Crabby Ann had certainly been having
a pastry-baking the day before, for there
was an elaborately-decorated pigeon-pie
on the shelf below, and a glass dish of jelly
fingers which made my mouth water—
above all things I love jelly fingers. There
was also an uncut ham garnished with
parsley, and a paper ruffle round its leg
bone; and a pair of plump chickens all
trussed ready for the oven stood in a
baking-tin near the window. It looked
very much as though the Miff-Miffs were
expecting company.



THE MIFF-MIFFS. ' 69

“Don’t let us waste time,” said Barney,
cramming the last bit of flaky pastry into
his mouth. ‘Hide the pie under the
shelf there behind the potato basket, and
scatter those other things about a bit.
What shall we do with the ham?”

“Let us take it into the kitchen,” I
suggested, “and this loaf of bread too
—then they will think the burglars meant
to have supper, and were interrupted.”

Having disarranged the prim orderliness
of the larder in such a way as would make
~ Crabby Ann’s “ mutch” rise from her head
with horror when she discovered it in the
morning, we climbed up to the ventilator-
window above the door and squeezed our
way through into the kitchen. As Barney
had said, we found ourselves then on a
broad shelf running the whole length of
one wall of the kitchen. There was a
deal table in the middle of the room, and
in the centre of the table was a lighted
candle in a tin candlestick.

“Hold the ham,” whispered Barney,



70 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

“while I get down. I can drop on to the
floor quite easily, and Dll bring you a
chair.”

I supported the dish containing the
ham while Barney, clinging to the edge of
the shelf with both hands, dropped with a
muffled thud on to the floor. He brought
a chair and mounting on it relieved me
of the ham and the loaf. With the aid of
the chair I quietly followed his example,
and dropped to the floor without making
any noise.

“We will put the ham on the table, and
the bread,” whispered Barney. ‘“There’s-
nothing worth meddling here, we must go
to the dining-room and hide all the silver
things we can find.”

We blew out the candle, and, hand in
hand, holding our breath, we stole along
the narrow stone passage, at the end of
which was a baize door entirely shutting
off the kitchen premises from the rest of
the house.

The Lodge, as I have said, was an old-



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 71

fashioned house, and queerly built. On
pushing back the door and emerging from
the dark passage we found ourselves in a
square tiled hall. Facing us was the front-
door securely barred and bolted, and on our
left the glass door leading to the little
conservatory. On our right, three or four
steps led up to the baize door which shut
off the wing containing the dining-room
and library.

“T think you had better wait here,”
said Barney, as we tiptoed across the
empty hall, the only sound which broke
the silence the tick-tack of a wheezy old
grandfather’s clock which stood in one
corner. ‘I will walk along to the dining-
room and see what I can find there. If
there is nothing worth hiding, then we
will go along the other passage to the
drawing-room,” pointing to another baize
door on our right.

“But the Miff-Miffs,” I gasped, “surely
they will hear us! Where do they sleep?”

“Upstairs,” answered Barney. “Don't



72 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

be such a ninny, Nelka. If you're going
to funk it, you had better go home.”

I did “funk” it. But go home? No,
better face a whole army of irate Miff-
Miffs, with Barney for company, than
cross that dusky, eerie garden alone!
“Tm not going to funk it,” I whispered
back resolutely ; “ only, don’t be too daring,
Barney. I will wait here, if you won't be
very long.” The baize door swung back
on noiseless hinges, and fell to again, mak-
ing a sound like a faint sigh. A shiver of
dread ran through me, as I saw Barney’s
lithe form glide into the darkness beyond,
and I was left alone in the dim-lit hall.

A hanging lamp burned feebly, just
above the front-door, but it only added
terror to the darkness, by shedding a light
in the centre of the hall, and leaving the
corners in mysterious gloom. It seemed
hours to me that I stood there, my heart
palpitating, and every wheezy tick of the
old clock making me start with fear. I
do not know how long I really did stand



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 73

there, quaking like a jelly, before I heard
Barney’s voice. It was no longer subdued,
but raised almost to a shriek, and with a
strange ring of terror in it.

“ Nelka, Nelka, open the door!”

I stood a moment as though paralysed,
and my feet seemed glued to the ground
so that I could not move. Where was
Barney? What door? What did it all
mean? These thoughts flashed through
me, and then again, but with a gasping
strangling sound, came the cry, from some-
where behind the baize door, “Nelka,
Nelka, come quick, I can’t see anything!”
Then it flashed in upon me, and like the
sharp cut of a whip roused me to action,
Barney did not cry out like that unless
there was something wrong! He must be in
danger! I sprang forward and with all my
might threw myself against the door. It
flew open, and as it did so I was almost
suffocated by a blinding rush of smoke,
which burst forth as from a pent-up fur-
nace. I was staggered for a moment and



74 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

almost lost my breath; I kept my place,
however, and with my back pressed against
the door to keep it open, I waited until
the first volume of smoke had rolled past,
and then as my eyes became clearer I
looked for Barney. He was close to me, |
struggling throughthe dense smoketowards
the open door. I stretched out my hand
as he stumbled forward, and gripping his
arm I dragged him through the doorway,
letting the heavy door swing to behind us
so as to shut out the smothering cloud of
smoke. Barney reeled against the wall
and remained there as though stupefied,
grasping my hand and making a queer
gurgling sound in his throat. At last his
breath came back and he was able to gasp
out:

“The house is on fire—I got—to the
dining-room—and as soon as I opened the
door—the smoke rushed out. I was almost
choked—I couldn’t find my way back in
the dark. It was horrible!”

While we were standing there the smoke



THE MIFF-MIFFS. : 75

was already beginning to fill the hall, and
I could distinctly smell the smell of burning
wood. Then anawful thought struck me.

“ Barney, Barney,” I cried, “the Miff-
Miffs!| They will be burnt to death. Oh,
can’t we save them!”

Barney’s face, all smudged and blackened
with the smoke, grew white as mine. ‘“‘We
must, Nell!” he gasped, starting forward.
“They can’t burn in their beds. We must
try to save them. Come quickly, the stairs
may catch fire any moment!”

Still giddy and dazed from the effects
of the smothering smoke, he seized my
hand, and together we groped our way
up the staircase, which was rapidly becom-
ing enveloped in a dense curtain of smoke
creeping up from the hall below. The
stairs were shallow and wide, and as the
house consisted but of two stories we soon
reached the long narrow passage, at the
end of which, as we knew, was the Miff-
Miffs’ bedroom. We flew down the passage
and reached the door, |



76 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

“ Hammer on the door, Nelka, with all
your might and main,” panted Barney,
and we applied our knuckles, as though
‘we were bent on waking the dead, but
with no result. I tried the door, but it
was locked, and then we simply hurled
ourselves against it, beating it with our
fists and feet.

“¥Frre!” I shrieked at the pitch of my
voice, “Fire! Fire! Fire! Wake up, and
~ open the door!”

The door shook and creaked as we
thundered upon it, but we got no response
from within. “The house is on fire—
wake up, wake up! Fire! Fire! Fire!” we
both of us yelled together. At last from
the Miff-Miffs’ room came an answering
shriek, and the bolt of the door was with-
- drawn. It opened about a yard, and a
head was poked out.

“Who is there?” demanded the eldest
Miff-Miff’s voice sharply. “And what do
you want?”

“Your house is on fire!” I cried, gasping



“THE MIFF-MIFFS, 77

with fear and exertion. “Oh, make haste
and escape, or you will be burned to death!”
Another shrill shriek sounded from within
the room, and I heard the other Miff-Miff’s
voice say feebly, “What do they say,
sister? Oh, mercy me, what is to become
of us?”

We could contain ourselves no longer,
and as Miff-Miff turned away to say some-
thing to her sister, I pushed past her into
the room. Miff-Miff was standing in the
middle of the floor, her head crowned by
an enormous night-cap, beneath which ap-
peared rows of whitey-brown curl papers,
and. clothed in the funniest garments.
Amongst the pillows of the big bed I
caught sight of a scared white face, which
I recognized as belonging to little Miss
Martha. I was far too frightened and
excited to think of making any apology
for bursting so suddenly into the Miff-
Miffs’ bedroom, and I had just enough
breath left to stammer out:

“You must get up at once and escape



78 HE MIFF-MIFIS.

before the stairs catch fire. Oh, please
hurry!”

“Why, bless me, it is the child from
next door,” said Miff-Miff; and poor Miss
Martha sat up in bed and begged her
sister to hand her her “ peignoir”. “ How
can I leave the house like this, child?”
said poor Miff-Miff, looking helplessly at
her ludicrous garments. ‘Oh, do help
me! Jam all ofa flutter!”

“Tt doesn’t matter really,” I said en-
treatingly; “no one minds about dress.
If you will only come before it is too late.”

But still the two old ladies stood help-
lessly wringing their hands and piteously
lamenting their plight, until at last in
desperation I rushed to a wardrobe, and
opening it, seized the first thing my hand
touched. It happened to be a thick
wadded cloak, and with this in my hand
I flew to the bed-side.

“Get up, Miss Martha!” I implored.
“Here is your cloak; I will help you to
put it on.”



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 79

“But my hat, child,” said the old lady
fretfully, putting her hand to her head.
“T can’t go out like this—I should die of
shame.”

I looked round the room. A checked
shawl hung over the back of a chair near,
and a pair of bright-green bed-shoes with
yellow bows stood below it. I seized
them both, and rushing back to the bed I
threw the shawl over the old lady’s head,
so as to hide her comical night-cap, and
at last she consented to leave her bed.
Miff-Miff had sufficiently recovered her
wits to don a huge dressing-gown of
wonderful hue, and had tied her mush-
room hat over her night-cap, which only
made matters worse, so far as appearance
went. She turned tremblingly towards
us.

“JT am ready to accompany you, my
dear,” she said. “You will stay with us,
child, won’t you?”

At this moment Barney called to us
from outside to make haste. “The smoke



80 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

is coming upstairs,” he cried; “ make haste
if you are coming.” ~

‘We are coming,” I called, and taking
a hand of each of the old ladies I emerged
into the passage, with the two queer
mummy-like figures one on either side of
me. . I have never been able to make out
how it was that Barney managed to refrain
from giggling even at that trying moment—
the poor little ladies did look so very ridi-
culous. Not a shadow of a smile was on
his grimy face as he politely led the way
to the head of the stairs. Just as we
were beginning to descend Miff-Miff sud-
denly stopped short.

“Sister,” she exclaimed excitedly, “the
alarm-bell—we quite forgot it—our house
might yet be saved!”

“Where is the bell?” said Barney at
once, “I will ring it if you tell me where
it is; and you had better get quickly
downstairs, for it is getting precious hot
and smothery up here.”

“The bell-rope is hanging just inside



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 81

the linen-closet—the door next to our own
bedroom,” said Miff-Miff; “it will arouse
Ann.”

Poor old Crabby Ann! In our excite-
ment we had quite forgotten her, sleeping
all unconscious of danger in the little
gable-room at the top of the house.
Barney dashed upstairs again, and in a
moment the clanging of the alarm-bell,
which swung from one of the gables out-
side the Lodge, rang out in the clear night
air. I got the old ladies downstairs in
safety, and by the time we reached the
hall the smoke enveloped us like a thick
veil, and the air felt close and stuffy so that
we could hardly breathe. With the trem-
bling assistance of Miff-Miff I succeeded
in unbarring the front-door, and oh, the
relief it was to feel the rush of fresh, pure
air from outside.

We stepped out on to the lawn, and
found that the ringing of the bell had
already assembled a little crowd of vil-

lagers, and from one to another the cry of
(mt 487) F



82 HE MiFF-MIPFS.

“Fire!” was passing. The men began to
run for buckets and call for water to be
brought them. We could see volumes of
smoke pouring forth from the dining-room
wing, and could smell the odour of burn-
ing wood. The crowd increased rapidly,
and the men worked like slaves, passing
the pails of water from one to another
with lightning speed, and dashing them
upon the burning pile. I recognized
Jackson amongst the crowd busying about
in his shirt-sleeves, and Gardener was
there as well, and Thomas the groom—the
whole village seemed to have turned out,
and to be doing their utmost to save the
Miff-Miffs’ house.

Barney joined us after a few minutes,
closely followed by old Ann tottering
along, her mouth open to its widest, and
uttering piercing shrieks of terror and
exclamations of “ Mercy me! Sakes help
us!” Barney led the old creature up to
the spot where we were standing, and
then rushed off to join the busy throng of



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 83

helpers. The old ladies stood wringing
their hands in great distress, to see the
ruthless destruction going on before their
eyes of their trim little house and garden,
by fire and water. Crabby Ann added
her lamentations to theirs. “ Oh, mistress,”
she cried, “think of the beautiful dining-
room carpet with all that water thrown in
at the windows—dear, dear, what a clean-
ing up I'll need to have after all this!”

“The poor parrot!” moaned Miss Martha;
“will no one remember poor dear Joey
in the conservatory? He will be burnt to
a cinder!”

“ And Silvertail!” added Miff-Miff pit-
eously, “she is so frightened of fire, poor
darling—we should never find another cat
so sweet and amiable should we lose her!”

_I stood between the poor old souls, and
tried to assure them that someone would
be sure to think of the Polly and remove
him to a place of safety. As for Silvertail,
she would be certain to look after herself,
being a cat and possessing four legs. In



84 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

the midst of the hubbub of voices around
us suddenly I heard Fraulein’s voice at
my elbow.

“ Nelka! My good child, what make
you here?”

I was terribly taken aback, but there
was nothing for it but to put a bold face
upon it.

“Never mind, Fraulein,” I said promptly,
“we are all here to help. I am taking
care of the Miff-Miffs.”’ Fraulein was so
astonished she actually believed me, and
made no further remark at the moment,
but set herself to persuading the poor
Miff-Miffs to return with her and take
refuge in the Grange until the first excite-
ment was over. They consented at last, —
as they were shivering with the unaccus-
tomed exposure to the chill night air, and
were persuaded they could do no good by
remaining.

So we four—Barney was tearing about
as black as a sweep, in a state of wildest
excitement, and refused to leave the spot



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 85

—made our way back to the Grange. The
house was all astir and lighted up, for
nearly all the servants had gone to see the
fire at the Lodge. Eric in his red dress-
ing-gown was watching the scene from
the school-room window under Jane’s
charge. Fraulein sent Jane to get some
hot wine and water to restore the shiver-
ing bodies and shattered nerves of the old
ladies, and making up a big fire she made
them sit down in the two arm-chairs and
compose themselves.

“Do not so distress yourself, I beg you,
dear Miss Smith,” she said soothingly,
“it will, I am sure, be all right.”

_ “Qur poor Polly!” groaned Miss Martha,
thinking of her pet.

“Poor Ben’s foreign curios that he
thought so much of,” mourned Miff-Miff
dolefully. ‘I suppose we shall lose every-
thing and become beggars.”

“No, no, not so, dear ladies,” said
Fraulein cheerfully, “Jackson has told
me it is nothing of a fire—one room only



86 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

a little the worse, and in no time it will,
be all over.”

“Do you really think so?” said Miff-
Miff, a ray of hope lighting up her wrinkled
old face. “This could not have happened
at a worse time, for we are expecting a
guest to-morrow—” I thought of the
treacle pasty and the daintily-frilled ham,
and oh, how my conscience stabbed
me !—

“Our dear nephew from India, whom
we have not seen for ten years—our
brother Ben’s boy.”

At this moment Barney came rushing
_in, his hands and face quite black. “It’s
out at last,” he cried, throwing himself
down on the sofa quite exhausted, for he

had worked as hard as anyone. The two
- old ladies clasped their hands and uttered
an exclamation of joy.

“ Oh,thank Heaven, whatamercy! Then
we may yet have a roof to shelter poor
Gerald.”

“Dear boy!” ejaculated Miss Martha,



THE MIFF-MIFFS., 87

nodding her head. with its ridiculous
- covering. ‘ He is so nice too!”

Just then the door opened and Jane
entered, bearing a tray on which was the
wine decanter and a little jug of hot
water. When the two ladies had sipped
the potion Fraulein mixed for them, their
nerves had so far recovered that they
were able to talk, and they began to
thank Fraulein for her kindness, and then
turning to Barney and me:

“We owe our lives to these two dear
young people!” said Miff-Miff, quite drop-
ping her prim manner as she looked
gratefully at us.

“No you don’t,” stuttered Barney
bluntly. “You don’t know anything
about it, or you wouldn’t say that!”

I saw the amazement on the Miff-Miffs’
faces, and endeavoured to mend matters
a little.

“No really,” I put in hurriedly. ‘“ We
didn’t do anything—it was a mistake—we
never meant—”



88 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

To my relief at this moment there came
a tap at the door, and Jane entered to say
that Gardener was outside and wished to
speak to the Miff-Miffs. He came in
presently all smelling of fire and smoke,
and informed the ladies that the fire was
now quite out, and that very little real
damage had been done to the Lodge.
The ladies might safely return as soon as
they wished. The Miff-Miffs rose, and
having with old-fashioned courtesy thanked
us for having sheltered them in their
temporary distress, they departed under
Gardener’s escort.

I hardly know just what happened after
that—but I do know that before we went
to bed that eventful night we had made
a clean breast of everything to Fraulein.
We told of our share in the night’s pro-
ceedings, our purposed scheme of revenge
with its unexpected ending, and of our
wrongs. I must say that Fraulein was
very nice about it; and although she gave
us the scolding we expected, she made us



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 89

see how mean and unworthy of dear -
mother’s teaching our conduct was, and
in the end we felt heartily ashamed of
ourselves. We begged with tears that
she would allow the Miff-Miffs to remain
in ignorance of the real cause which had
brought us so opportunely upon the scene
at the time of the fire, and at last she
consented to do so.

“Only,” she said, looking gravely into
our downcast faces, ‘let this be a
lesson to you, children, to be more gentle
and forgiving, even although -you may
sometimes have cause to feel resentful at
little wrongs done you by others. In this
case you did good where you wilfully in-
tended to do evil, and you have cause to
feel very glad that so it turned out. In
future, my children, you must try by your
good behaviour and kind actions to right-
fully deserve the good opinion which our
neighbours at the Lodge have formed of
you.”

We slunk away to bed, silent and sub-



90. THE MIFF-MIFFS.

dued, and far more impressed by Frau-
lein’s grave words than we should have
been by the severest punishment. The
next day the chief of the Winkey-Wums
called a council in the washing-house.
When his followers were duly seated
round him on their inverted tubs, he
gravely produced from under his jacket a —
broken clay pipe, and a roughly-made
wooden. hatchet.

“Faithful followers,” began the chief of
the Winkey-Wums, holding out the pipe,
which was filled with a mixed tobacco of
Barney’s invention, consisting principally
of brown paper and cigar-ends, “I have
called this meeting in order that we may
smoke the pipe of peace and bury the
hatchet, in token that the war between
our tribe and the Miff-Miffs is now at an
end.” He struck a match and lighted the
pipe, and, after taking a puff himself,
handed it solemnly to me. The taste of
the home-made tobacco was horrible, but
I duly put it to my lips and took a draw



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 91

~ before passing it on to Eric, who did like-
wise. The pipe of peace was then form-
ally extinguished, and laid aside in the old
boiler where such treasures were kept.
Then the chief rose and waved the wooden
axe.

“Faithful followers,” he repeated ma-
jestically, “the pipe of peace is now
smoked, and it only remains for the
Winkey-Wums to bury the war-hatchet.”

He beckoned us to follow him, and we
trooped out of the washing-house, and
walked one behind the other in Indian
file to a patch of soft ground below a
drooping alder.

Here the chief stopped and solemnly
bending down scraped a hole in the damp
earth. We drew near to witness the
ceremony, and with reverent fingers the
chief laid the little axe in the hole, and
thus peace was declared between the
noble tribe of Winkey-Wums and the
Miff- Miffs.

While we were holding our council of



92 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

peace in the ratty old wash-house, Frau-
lein had stepped across to the Lodge to
inquire for the Miff-Miffs. She brought
back word that the old ladies were none
the worse for the fright they had had the
night before, and that the Lodge was very
slightly damaged by the fire, which had
fortunately been taken in time. The
cause of the catastrophe was the upsetting
of a night-lamp which was kept burning
all night in the dining-room; but how
this had been done no one ever knew,
though we all thought Miss Silvertail -
might have been able to throw some light
on the matter had nature endowed her
with the power of speech.

Some few days after the fire we were
playing rounders in the park, Fraulein
having gone to Beeston for the afternoon
and left us to our own devices, when a
man’s cheery voice called out to Barney,
who had just made a very good run:

“Well done, youngster, that’s the way
to run!”



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 93

We looked up and saw a jolly-faced
man, with a lot of curly brown hair stick-
ing out from beneath his cap, and a big
black moustache, leaning over the Miff-
Miffs’ fence, watching our game with a
merry twinkle in his dark eyes.

“ Miff-Miff’s nephew,” I said in a low
voice; but the young man’s sharp ears
caught what I said.

“Quite right,” he said, smiling and
nodding familiarly towards me. ‘Gerald
Bancock, at your service. May I come
and join your game?”

We liked the look of the bright, sun-
burnt face and friendly brown eyes.

“Yes, yes,” we called out in chorus,
and the young man leapt the fence as
easily as though it were a footstool, and
landed in our midst.

“Tve watched you playing from my
bedroom window ever so often,” he said,
looking round our circle cheerily, “and I
made up my mind I would come and join
you the first day I could get out.”



94, THE MIFF-MIFFS,

‘Have you been ill?” I asked, begin-
ning to understand how it was that we
had seen no sign of the Miff-Miffs’ beloved
nephew before now.

“Nothing much,” rejoined Mr. Gerald
cheerfully. “A touch of fever, Indian
fever—that’s what we Anglo-Indians have
to put up with—it bowled me over for a
day or two.”

Thus commenced our friendship with
Mr. Gerald Bancock, and after that he
became a constant visitor at the Grange,
and we all voted him the jolliest fellow
that ever was. He had come to pay a
long visit to his old aunts, and many were
the delightful tea-parties to which we were
invited at the Lodge during his visit.

Under Mr. Gerald’s gay influence the
Miff-Miffs forgot their primness and
dignity, and laughed as heartily as we
did at the merry stories with which he
used to entertain us on these occasions.
He even coaxed Miff-Miff into opening
the precious ebony cabinet stored with



THE MIFF-MIFFS. 95
quaint curios brought from foreign coun-
tries by Mr. Gerald’s father, the Miff-
Miffs’ only brother, who had died in India
many years ago from a snake bite. Many
and wonderful were the stories he told
us of the strange peoples and quaint
customs of the countries through which
he had travelled.

The days flew by like lightning after
Mr. Gerald’s coming, and before we realized
it the four months were over and we had
our dear father and mother again.

There came a sad day after that, when
our dear Mr. Gerald had to say good-bye
to the old ladies and to all of us and
set sail for India, there to remain another
spell of years before we could see him
again. We were indeed sorrowful to see
the last of his cheery face, and missed
him terribly at first. Barney went away
to boarding-school soon after his departure,
and now only Eric and I are left with
Fraulein. We often have long letters from
dear Mr. Gerald; and at Christmas he



96 THE MIFF-MIFFS,

never forgets to send us each a beautifu
present. 2

We sometimes go and have tea with the
two Miff-Miffs, and on acquaintance we find
them, in spite of their little peculiarities,
very sweet, simple-minded old ladies, and
their kindness is unbounded.

I have now reached the end of my story,
and Cousin Ellinor has promised to put it
into the very next book she writes. She
tells me it has got to have a title, and that
I must give it one out of my own head, as
it is my story; so I think, as it is all about
our little old-maid friends, I could not give
it a better title than the “ Mirr-Mirrs”.

THE END.



A SELECTION OF.
BLACKIE & SON’S
BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

SUITABLE FOR GIFTS, PRIZES, AND LIBRARIES,

BLACKIE’S HALF-CROWN SERIES.

Illustrated by eminent Artists. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

A Daughter of Erin. By Vioter G. Finny.
--Nell’s School-Days. By H. F. Gurney.
The Lueck of the Eardleys. By Suzma E. Brarns.
The Search for the Talisman. By Henry Friru.
Picked up at Sea. By Joun C. Hurcuxson.
Things will Take a Turn. By Beatrice Harrspen. Ilustratea.
The Whispering Winds and the Tales they Told. By
Mary H. DeBenHamM. With 25 Illustrations.
Marooned on Australia. By Ernest Faveno.
My Friend Kathleen. By Jennie Cuappe.t.
A Girl’s Kingdom. By M. Corszr-Srymour.
Reefer and Rifleman. By Col. Percy-Groves.
Laugh and Learn. By Jennerr Humpureys.
A Musieal Genius. By the author of “The Two Dorothys”.
For the Sake of a Friend, By Marcarnr Parker.
Under the Black Eagle. By Anprew Hiuuiarp.
Secret of the Australian Desert. By Ernest Favenc.
Hammond’s Hard Lines. By Sxerron Kuprorp.
Duleie King: A Story for Girls. By M. Corset-Seymour,
‘Hugh Herbert’s Inheritanee. By Caroinz Austin.
Nicola: The Career of a Girl Musician. By M. Corpet-Srymour.
A Little Handful. By Harrier J. Sorters.
A Golden Age: A Story of Four Merry Children. By Ismay THorn
A Cruise in Cloudland. By Henry Frirs.
A Rough Road. By Mrs. G. Linyaus Banks,
The Two Dorothys: A Tale for Girls. By Mrs. Herpert Martin.
Stimson’s Reef: A Tale of Adventure. By C. J. Curcumrs-Hyve,
Marian and Dorothy. By Annm E. Armsrronc.
[9] G26



Full Text




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Piha I abe


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FIEF

NOT A

“Pu
THE MIFF-MIFFS

BY

MABEL MACKNESS

(‘Mona NEALE”)

LONDON
BLACKIE & SON, Liutrep, 50 OLD BAILEY, E.C.
GLASGOW AND DUBLIN


































———qx~———

HAVE made up my mind to
write a story. - When I told
= Barney what I meant to do, he
ried up his heels in a very rude way
and simply roared with laughter. He
wanted to know who I thought would read



- it, and who would make it into a proper

book with printing and pictures. He
also made a lot of nasty remarks about
the way to spell “cauliflower” (I spelt it
“kolliflour” in my dictation yesterday),
and how many “t’s” there were in “ cot-
tage”, and told me to be sure and spell
Barney with a capital “B”. But I don't
care one bit, I mean to write my story all
the same, however much the others laugh
4 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

at me, and I shall give it to Cousin Ellinor
to make into a book when I have written
it.

Cousin Ellinor writes lots of lovely.
story-books about children for other chil-
dren to read; and once she put me into a
book. It must have been a very long
time ago, when I was only a tiny girl and
did not know how to behave properly, for
the story-book Nelka was such a stupid
little thing and talked the silliest baby-
nonsense. ‘The grown-up people in the
book always laughed at everything she
said and did, and called her a “ little cure”.
I do not know what that means, but I
suppose they thought she was funny, or
they would not have laughed.

Cousin Ellinor gave me one of the
books for my own, and wrote init:

To the real little Nelka, from her affec-
tionate friend the authoress.

I read it once, but it was so silly I do
not see why she took the trouble to write
it. I am sure I could never have said
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 5

such very ridiculous things as the book-
Nelka said, and, even if I did, I do not
think it was very kind of Cousin Ellinor
to write them in a book for everyone to
read and know what a silly little girl I

~ was.

My name is really Nelly Kathleen, but
I am always called Nelka, a sort of be-
tween-the-two name for short, and our
other name is Vivian. There are three of
us altogether, Nelka (that is me), Barney,
‘who is my twin brother, and Eric. We
are nine years old, Barney and I, but
Barney is taller and bigger than I am
in every. way, and his eyes are brown like
mother’s, not blue as Eric’s and mine are.

Barney used to be a very nice boy, be-
fore Fraulein came, which was after we
came home from the sea-side in September.
Fraulein is our governess, and she came
to look after us when nurse went away to
be married, and mother thought we were
too big to have another nurse. We were
very sorry when nurse went away; she
6 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

had been our nurse ever since we could
remember, and she was such a dear kind
soul. She kept Barney in order too, and
as long as nurse was with us Barney was
a real nice boy, and just as much of a
nursery child as Eric and me. When
Fraulein came she treated Barney as
though he were much older than I was,
and it certainly did not improve him, for
he only got cocksy and thought himself.
much better than Eric and me, and tried
to “sit upon” us.

On the day that we were nine years
old Barney was allowed to leave off his
sailor suits, and to wear a Norfolk jacket
and knickerbockers just like father. He
had his curls cut quite short too, and Mr.
Evans the curate used to come every after-
noon and teach him Latin in the school-
room, while Fraulein was giving me my
music lesson in the drawing-room.

Barney got fearfully conceited with all
this promotion, and even Fraulein had to
confess sometimes that he was much nicer
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 7

when he was only a little boy with curls
and sailor suits. He took to calling Eric
“the kid”, which Eric hates more than

-. anything else; and talked very grandly

about what he would do when he went to
school next year. Eric is only a little boy
—not much more than four years old—
and he can’t talk quite properly yet; but
still I don’t think Barney need have made
fun of him, for he was just as small him-
self once upon a time, and did not like to
be made fun of and called “kid” any more
than Eric.

We live in a very beautiful old house
called the Grange, about a mile and a
half from the small town of Beeston,
where there are shops and a railway-
station. There is only one other house
near to us—of course not counting the
~ cottages where the poor people live—and
as my story will have a good deal to do
with this house I must tell something”
about it. It is called Holly Lodge, and it
is so near to the Grange that the two
~' 8 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

gardens are only separated by a little
stream, in which we sometimes fish for
tiny trout and give cook no peace until
she fries them for us, and sends them up
for tea.

Holly Lodge is quite a small house
compared with the Grange, and when
_ first Barney and I remember it, it was
occupied by a crotchety old man of whom
we stood rather in awe. He seemed to -
spend most of his time strolling up and
down the footpath above the river-bank.
He used to shake his stick at us and
shout in his great loud voice across the
stream directly he caught sight of us with
our fishing-rods. If we happened to hook
ever so small a fish he would get quite
purple with rage, and call us “cruel little
animals” and all kinds of ugly names.
Father told us we need not heed him as
he was a little wrong in his head, and
after that we never cared how much he
stormed at us, :

One day we missed old ‘““Grumps”, as
‘THE MIFF-MIFFS. 9

we used to call him, from his accustomed
place on the river-bank, and Gardener told
us afterwards that the old man was dead.
I cannot say that Barney and I felt very
sorry, for he really was a very cross old
man, but mother sent some beautiful
white roses to be put upon his grave, and
told us we must have sympathy for those
who were old and afflicted. Barney and
I felt sorry when mother said that, and
wished we had been more polite to poor
old Grumps, for most likely he had be-
come cross and disagreeable because he
had had no kind friends to cheer him, and
had always lived by himself.

After old Grumps died, Holly Lode
was empty for a long time, and we chil-
dren got hold of a long plank and placed
it across the stream, so that we could go
from our garden into the Lodge grounds
and explore the enemy’s country.

In time the garden became so over-
grown with weeds and untrimmed shrubs,
that it was a perfect jungle and magnifi- -
10 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

cently adapted for our childish games.
Sometimes we pretended we were fugitive
soldiers hiding in the forest, and pursued
by remorseless foes thirsting for our blood.
Sometimes we were “ Robinson Crusoes”
shipwrecked on a desert island, or rob-
bers in our secret caves, a terror to the
imaginary victims who chanced to fall into
our clutches. Our favourite game was
“wild Indians”, and the deserted garden
rang with the yells of the fierce tribe of
the “ Winkey-Wums”, as they danced
their war-dance round the heap of dead
leaves which represented their camp-fire,
waving their tomahawks and shouting
their war-cry preparatory to swooping
down upon their unsuspecting enemies.
We have lived a very long time at the
Grange, almost as long as Barney and I
can remember. Our house is a very large
one, and I think it must be very, very old,
because it is not like any other house I
have ever seen. It has a funny cork-
screw staircase all the way up from the
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 11

very bottom to the very top of the house.
When you are running upstairs very fast,
you often hear a pitter-patter of footsteps
above your head, as though someone else
were going upstairs in front of you and
was determined to reach the top first. It
makes you feel rather frightened if it is
about bed-time and the stairs are dark.
I often think it is Barney going up before
me, but immediately I stop and call out to
him the footsteps stop too, and then I
- know it is only the echo of my own steps
that I hear.

Mother says it is silly to be afraid when
you know the real cause of anything that
seems mysterious, but all the same I
always scamper up the corkscrew stairs
as fast as my legs will go, if it is getting
dusk and I hear that ghostly pitter-patter
above me. Every now and then as you
go upstairs you pass a door, and each of
these doors opens into a separate wing,
containing two or three rooms. We chil-
dren have one wing all to ourselves, and
12 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

nobody cares how much noise we make
in our own department, for no one in any
other part of the house can hear a sound,
if the staircase door is shut. There are
four rooms in our wing—our school-room,
and Fraulein’s room on one side of the
landing, and on the other my bedroom
and the little room where Barney sleeps.
Eric has a crib in Fraulein’s room.

Our school-room window opens down
the middle like a door, and you can step
out of it on to a sort of square balcony
which is really the roof of the drawing-
room. The drawing-room is not old like
the rest of the house, but was built by the
gentleman who owned the Grange before
father. This roof has a nice stone para-
pet round it high enough to prevent any
of us from falling over, and mother allows
us to make it a play-place. We kept a
lot of flower-pots and boxes out there,
which we used to plant with seeds and
bulbs at the different seasons. In the
hot weather we used to sit there, when
THE MIFF-MIFES. 13

the sun had gone round to the other side
of the house, and learn our lessons for
Fraulein, and sometimes if she was in a
very good humour Fraulein would tell
Jane to carry out the table and let us
have tea there.

It was very beautiful out on the roof in
the cool evening, when the sun was just
beginning to feel sleepy and to think
about going to bed. We could look
down upon the garden all scarlet and
gold with the gorgeous summer flowers,
and the soft green paths winding in and
out between the beds, looking so cool and
fresh as the dew gathered thick upon
them. We could see the park too, with
the evening shadows lying long and dark
across the mossy grass, and the little
stream creeping in and out among the
hollows like a thread of silver. We could

~ hear the cooing of the wood-pigeons and

the chattering of the restless starlings as
they sought their resting-place for the
coming night. Through a gap in the trees
14, THE MIFF-MIFES.

to the left of the school-room window we
could just see the chimneys of Holly
Lodge, and it is time that I was getting on
to tell about the funny adventure that
happened to us there.

It was the winter that father had the
influenza so badly, and the doctor said
that he must go away to the south of
France before he could get quite well
again. Mother of course had to go with
him, so we were left in Fraulein’s charge
while mother and father went away toa
place called Nice for four months. They
went away about the beginning of Decem-
ber, and we were much aggrieved at having
to spend Christmas by ourselves at the
Grange. Fraulein was a very kind old
thing, and used to tell us lovely German
fairy-tales in the twilight as we sat round
the school-room fire and cracked nuts after
tea; but we missed mother dreadfully. We
always enjoyed the hour we were down-
stairs in the evening the best of any time
in the day; mother used to read to us or


THE MIFF-MIFES. 15

sing and play, and father used to ask us
riddles and give us pennies when we
guessed them.

It seemed dull and lonely in the big
Grange with only ourselves and the
servants in it, and the drawing-room and
dining-room with shutters up, and the
furniture dressed in the holland pinafores
it wears when we are at the sea-side in
the summer. We hung up our stockings
as usual on Christmas-eve, and put our
shoes in the fireplace ready for Santa

Claus when he came down the chimney.
Both shoes and stockings were full of
lovely presents in the morning, and we
had our goose and plum-pudding and
crackers just as usual on Christmas-day,
as well as piles of letters and cards, but
somehow it did not seem half like Merry
Christmas without father and mother.

When mother and father went away
Holly Lodge was still without an occupant,
and a huge ugly board nailed on to one of
the tall fir-trees. which stand like sentinels
16 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

on either side of the gate, told anyone
who did not already know that Holly |
Lodge was “To sell or let”.

Fraulein did not allow us to run wild
over the park ‘and garden, as we were ac-
customed to do in summer, on account of
some faddy notion she had that we might
- catch cold. So instead of rushing about
like mad things, rending the air with our
shouts and laughter, she made us go with
her for a prim and proper walk twice a
day—thus all our wild Indian and robber
games were put a stop to for a time.
Barney especially rebelled against the
restriction, and sometimes he made him--
self so disagreeable when we were out
walking that he nearly drove poor Frau-
lein out of her mind. He used to lag
behind until we were almost out of sight
and then turn tail and bolt home, arriving
long before us, after we had waited ever
so long for him to overtake us. Some-
times he would hide behind a hedge and

then run home another way—poor Frau-
(21487)


EE Ee aL

SBP eS



THE MIFF-MIFFS, 17

lein thinking he was lost and ready to cry
with anxiety. I think it is a very silly
way of showing you are displeased, to go
on like that; and after all it was only
Fraulein’s being so anxious to take good
care of us that made her seem to be too
particular.

One day when we were passing the gate
of Holly Lodge, Barney said, “ Hullo, look,
Nelka, the board has been taken away
from the gate!”

“So it has,” I answered, stopping short,
and going up to the gate I stood on tiptoe
and peeped over the top into the garden.
“Someone must be coming to live there;
there is a gardener working in the garden,
and I am sure they have been painting the
front-door.”

By this time we were all three of us
clinging to the top bar of the heavy wooden
gate and eagerly surveying our old domain.

“What a shame!” said Barney indig-
nantly. ‘They are chopping down all
our jungle!”

(21487) B
18 THE MIFF-MIFES.

« And look,” I added regretfully, point-'
ing to the earwiggy little arbour formed
out of the heart of a decrepid old yew-
tree, “they are going to take away our
robber den. What a pity!”

« Sha’n’t have no dezzer t’island now to
play Crusoe on,” put in Eric mournfully,
as he surveyed the havoc made in our
beloved tangle of brier and bush, as the
gardener’s sickle flashed hither and thither
amongst the thorny undergrowth.

“Come, my children,” said Fraulein,
taking hold of Eric and dragging him
down from his perilous perch, “it is not
pretty manners to stare so; someone will
come to live now in the Lodge, and you
can no more play your sports there. So,
come now, and make no more regrets
about it. Ach, Eric, you naughtiest of boys,
see then the big hole in your stocking-
knee!”

Eric looked at the tear made by an
obtrusive splinter in his blue stocking
without much concern.
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 19

“°Tisn’t much matter,” he said calmly.
“My knee was too hot anyway, it’s much
comfabler Jike vis.”

Fraulein held up her hands in horror,
and tried in vain to make his short serge
knickerbockers cover the gaping hole.
“ Ach, what a child!” she cried in despair;
“will he nevair learn to take care of his
clothes?”

After a few days Holly Lodge began to
present quite an orderly appearance. The
front-door and shutters were painted a
vivid green, neat curtains and blinds con-
cealed the staring windows, and the trim
paths, cropped shrubs, and smooth-rolled
turf had but little resemblance to the old
wilderness of weeds and bushes in which
we had passed so many happy hours. A
few days more passed, and then we noticed
that the ivy-grown chimneys sent up a
film of blue-gray smoke, and in the bow-
window to the left of the front-door hung
a cage containing a large gray parrot,
while a fat tabby cat sunned herself upon
20 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

the window-sill. But curious as we were
to know who our new neighbours could
be, for at least a week after the appearance
of the parrot and the fat cat we saw no
signs of the occupants of Holly Lodge.

One morning as Barney and I were
learning our lessons in the school-room
Eric came in with a very mysterious face.

“T know who lives in ve Lodge,” he
announced with an air of much importance.

Barney was learning his Latin verbs for
Mr. Evans, and was far too grand to
appear to take the least interest in what
Eric said. Iam glad I am not a boy and
do not have to learn Latin—it does make
them so fearfully cocksy. I looked up as
Eric entered and made his interesting
declaration, and said eagerly: |

“Oh, do tell, Eric, there’s a dear!”

Eric put his head on one side, and looked
very important. “Sha’n’t tell unless I
choose,” he said tantalizingly, at which
Barney looked up with a mocking grin.

“Silly little kid,” he said scornfully.
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 21

“Just as if we couldn’t ask Fraulein if we

wanted to know.”

~ “Fraulein doesn’t know—so vere!” said

Eric triumphantly, not noticing the hated
epithet in his delight at having for once

- got the better of Barney. “ Nobody knows

"cept me.”

“Do tellus, Eric darling,” I said coax-
ingly. “Is it children?” Eric shook his
head, and I added, “If you will tell me I
will tell you where we buried the blackbird
Gardener shot yesterday.”

Eric’s eyes brightened. “Certain sure?”
he said doubtfully.

“Certain sure,” I replied solemnly.

“The Miff-Miffs.”

“Who?” I asked perplexedly.

“The Miff-Mi7fs,” answered Eric frown-
ing. “I runned into the post-office to
buy a stamp for Fraulein, and Mrs. Jupps
was giving some parcels to the boy, and I
heard her say, ‘Robert, take vose to ve Miff-
Miffs at Holly Lodge’. So ven I knowed
it was ve Miff-Miffs what lived vere.”


22 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

“He means the Miss Smiths,” said
Barney contemptuously, looking up from
his Principia. “Fancy a kid of four
years old not being able to talk yet!”

Poor Eric flushed scarlet. “I said so!”
he cried indignantly. “It was ve Aif-
Migs I said.”

Barney laughed provokingly, and I tried
to pacify the angry little boy.

“Never mind, darling,” I said, putting
my arm round his neck comfortingly,
«Barney is very rude to laugh at you.
The blackbird is buried in the west shrub-
bery just underneath the juniper-bush.”

Eric was mollified, and departed to seek
his spade that he might dig up the corpse
of the blackbird for the inspection which
had been denied him the day before.

It was not long before our curiosity re-
garding the new tenants of Holly Lodge
was satisfied, and we had seen for ourselves
the mysterious Miff-Miffs.

The Miff-Miffs were two little old maids
as alike in every way as two people could
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 23

possibly be. Their real name was, of
course, as Barney had said, the Miss
Smiths; but we always called them the
“ Miff-Miffs”, and it was a most suitable
name, for they were far too odd-looking
to have such a very ordinary name as the
Miss Smiths. We used to pass the two
old ladies every morning as we were
starting for our walk with Fraulein,
toddling along in the direction of the vil-
lage shop, which was also the post-office.
They were dressed exactly alike, in funny
old-fashioned mushroom hats, tied under
the chin with broad strings of brown
ribbon, and black shawls with coloured
borders and fringe of silk. Their shawls
were fastened just below their hat-strings
with enormous gold brooches, set with a
great many different kinds of stones.
They each carried a very big ermine muff,
and over their left arms dangled a little
velvet bag, which I think used to be called
a reticule.

In the long-ago days when mother was
24 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

a little girl, she carried her lunch to school
in one of these little bags, and it still _
hangs on the bell-handle in the boudoir,
with the red shoes mother wore at her
first party.

They were not very amiable-looking old
ladies, although the youngest one—Miss
Martha we found out afterwards she was
called—must have beenrather pretty before
she grew so wrinkled and lost her teeth.
She had pretty bright eyes, which reminded
me of a mouse, and her cheeks were red
and wrinkled like a winter apple—rather
a sour apple it looked.

Our speaking acquaintance with the
Miff-Miffs did not begin in a very friendly
way. As I said before, Barney was never
on his nicest behaviour when obliged to
go for a walk with Fraulein, Eric, and me.
Barney can be as polite and nice as pos-
sible when he likes, and people often say to
mother what a very well-behaved boy Bar-
neyis. Mother always takes one of us with
her in the carriage when she goes visiting: _
THE - MIFF-MIFFS. 25

for, as I said at the beginning of my story, —
we have no people near us to visit, and
-mother is nervous about going alone in
the carriage ever since one day when the
horses ran away, and there might have
been a very bad accident. When Barney
goes with her, he hands round cake at
afternoon tea and opens the door for the
ladies, and they all think what a very nice
polite boy he is. So I hope the people
who read this story will not think that
Barney is always as rude as he was on the
particular day about which I am now going
to tell.
We had met the Miff-Miffs several times
on the road, and, as we were always walk-
~ ing quietly along at Fraulein’s side nothing
had ever happened to draw their attention
to us. But one unlucky day we were
returning from our walk, Barney, in one of
his worst tempers, marching on ahead of
the rest of us, and kicking the mud about
in a most disagreeable way with his thick
boots. In vain Fraulein kept calling out
26 THE MIFF-MIFFS,

to him, imploring him to walk properly
and remember his manners. Barney took
no notice, but tramped along, his hands in
his coat pockets, his head held in the air,
flinging the mud about on either side of
him as he brought his heavy boots down
with a splash at every step neon the muddy
footpath.

Just as we were nearing the Lodge, out
of the gate came tripping side by side the
two Miff-Miffs, all dressed in their best
frilled skirts and Sunday shawls. From
the little reticules hanging at their sides
poked knitting-needles and lace caps,—
evidently the old ladies were on their way
to the Vicarage to take tea with the vicar’s
wife. Barney, keeping the very middle
of the path, plunged steadily on, just as
though he saw no one before him. Straight
up to the horrified ladies came Barney,
and without in the least making way for
them, pushed right in between them, scat-
tering mud as he went, so that one huge
splash landed on the shoulder of poor
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 27

Miss Martha, and a wet dab on the cheek
of Miff-Miff, which did not at all improve
her appearance. The two ladies stopped
short and for a moment barred the way,
so that Barney was not able to push past
them as he intended to do.

“Dear me!” said poor Miss Martha,
hurriedly fumbling amongst the frills of
her skirt for the opening which led to the
pocket in her petticoat in which was her
handkerchief, “My best cashmere shawl!
how very annoying! what a clumsy young
person!”

The elder Miff-Miff fixed her pale, gray
eyes on Barney, and in a very deep voice
said severely, “ When J was a little boy, it
was considered good manners to step off
the footpath and allow ladies to pass, not
to push them aside.”

I am very sorry to have to tell what
Barney did then, for it was really terribly
rude, and I am sure he would never have
done such a thing if it had not been that
he was in such a bad mood. He stared
28 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

straight into Miff-Miff’s face, which was
quite red with surprise and horror, and
burst into a loud laugh.

“T shouldn't have thought you ever
were a little boy,” he said rudely, and the
poor little lady’s wrinkled face grew pink
with confusion.

“Sister!” exclaimed Miss Martha faintly,
stopping her search for her handkerchief
and looking at her sister in horrified amaze-
ment. ‘My dear, what a very terrible
thing to say!”

“My dear, I meant—I am sure you
know what I meant to say,” said poor
Miff-Miff, looking so funny with her con-
cerned face and the little dab of wet mud
beginning to trickle down her cheek, that
I am sure I should have laughed too, if I
had not felt so ashamed of Barney.

By this time we had come up with them,
and Fraulein caught hold of Barney’s sleeve
so that he could not escape, and began to
make apologies to the excited little ladies.

“How can I make excuse, madam,”
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 29

she said in her funny English, “for this
careless and ill-mannered little pupil of
mine. Ach, but it makes me quite
ashamed that he should be of such a
rudeness guilty.” Barney was evidently
beginning to feel a little ashamed himself,
and at the sound of Fraulein’s shocked
voice he hung his head and no longer
giggled. Then Fraulein turned to Barney
and said reproachfully, “Does it not
shame you that your good dear mother
should know that so you behave when
she is absent? Ach, but you will now
make your apology to the ladies and beg
them to pardon your carelessness, nicht
mein Kind?”

Barney shuffled about uncomfortably,
and at last, with his eyes on the ground,
muttered reluctantly, “I beg your pardon,”
- then wriggled himself free of Fraulein’s

hold and bolted off home as hard as he
could tear.

We remained a few minutes trying to
restore the ruffled feelings of the little old
80 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

maids. Fraulein kindly pointed out the
spot of mud on Miff-Miff’s cheek, and
assisted her to remove it with her hand-
kerchief, while at Fraulein’s bidding I
used my own clean handkerchief to wipe
away the splash from poor Miss Martha’s
best cashmere shawl. - Fraulein all the
time was making every excuse she could
think of for Barney’s dreadful behaviour,
and expressing her regret that the ladies
should have been so put out.

Miff-Miff herself said primly, “It is of
no consequence, pray do not trouble to
apologize,” and Miss Martha added,

“We had better return to our abode,
sister, and make ourselves fit to appear at
the Vicarage.”

So saying the little ladies made a stiff
curtsy to Fraulein, and thanking us
primly for our assistance toddled off back
again in the direction of the Lodge.

That was our first encounter with the
Miff-Miffs, and I fear that from that
day, all on account of Barney’s rough be-
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 31

haviour, they put us down as dreadful
little savages.

One day we were playing “kick-ball”
in that part of the park which joins Holly
Lodge, when our ball bounced over the
fence, and fell right in the middle of the
centre flower-bed, in which the tulips and
hyacinths were beginning to lift their heads.

“Run and fetch it, Eric!” commanded
Barney. “It was your kick that sent it
over.”

Eric warmly denied the charge; but on
my adding, “I think it was my kick that
helped, but run and get it, Eric, there’s a
brick,” he consented to go, and disappeared
into the road, to return in a very few
minutes panting, with the big ball clasped
in his arms, and a most indignant flush
upon his cheeks.

“She’s just an old cat!” he exclaimed
fiercely, as he flung the ball at our feet
and Barney and I drew near him.

“Who, Eric?” I asked; “did you see
them?”
32 THE MIFF-MIFFS,

Eric nodded.

“Sha’n’t go to fetch balls any more,”
said the little boy indignantly. ‘She
called me a ‘fief’, ve horrid old story-
teller!”

“Who? Miff-Miff did?” queried Bar-
"ney.

“Yes,” said Eric hotly. “She foughted.
I'd comed to steal her silly old flowers,
‘cos I had to step into the tulip-bed to
get our ball. First she banged on the
window—bofe of ’em did, ve old pigs, and
veir knuckles must just have hurted awful.
I was as quick as ever I could be trying
to find ve ball, cos I just foughted she
was coming out after me. But ve stupid
fing was hiding itself in a corner under a
big leaf, and before I could see it Miff-Miff
came running out in an awful rage.

“You are a bad wicked boy,’ she said,
‘coming to steal our flowers, and if I
knowed where the policeman lived I
would make him come and take you to
prison, you fief.’”
THE MIFF-MIFFS, 33

“Oh, Eric,” I said breathlessly, “ what-
ever did you do then?”

“T saw ve ball roll out,” said Eric,
“and I just snatched it up, ’cos I was so
‘fraid she might take it away and keep it.
Ven I said, ‘I’m not a fief, and vis is our
ball what rolled into your garden by mis-
take. I’ve comed to fetch it, and I don’t
want none of your silly old flowers.’”

“Yes,” I said excitedly. “What did
she say then? wasn’t she very angry?”

“Very,” responded Eric solemnly. “She
made big eyes at me like a tiger, and said,
‘Don’t you ever come into my garden
again, little boy. I am very angry with
you, you have stamped on two of my best
tulips with your clumsy boots.’ So I
just stamped on two more,” concluded
_ Eric with a triumphant sparkle in his blue
eyes, “and afore she could catch me I
shouted, ‘ Who cares for you, old cat? and
runned as hard as ever I could out at the
gate and home.”

He looked round expecting Dine for
(21.487)
84 THE MIFF-MIFiS.

his valiant deed, and Barney clapped him
on the back delightedly: ‘“ Well done, old
chap!” he cried. “That’s the way to treat
crabby old maids. Just show them they
are not going to play hokum-pokum with
us.”

This was a very favourite expression of
Barney's. None of us quite knew what
it meant, but it sounded imposing, and
Barney thought a great deal of himself
for having invented it.

A day or two after Eric’s adventure we
were flying kites in the lane, and the
string of mine became entangled in the
branches of a laburnum tree in the Miff-
Miffs’ shrubbery. After vainly trying to
disentangle it from where I stood in the
lane, I was at last obliged to brave the
enemy's wrath and go into the Miff-Miffs’
garden in order to reclaim my kite. I
boldly marched up to the gate and at-
tempted to open it, only to find that it
was securely fastened from the inside. I
was far too proud and angry to ring the
HE MIFF-MIf?s, 35

bell, so I left my poor kite to its fate, and
what became of it I do not know, but I
never saw it again.

After this fresh offence we held a council
in the old washing-house—a mouldy, ivy-
grown building, given over to rats and
earwigs and other horrid creepy things.
Father always intended to pull the rickety
old place down and build a nice summer-
house in its place, but until that took
place we three made use of the old place
as a secret chamber, where we could talk
over our very private matters with no fear
of any one overhearing.

The council occupied half an hour or
so in the sitting, and at the close our Chief
rose and threw upon the floor an ancient
and moth-eaten glove, which had once
belonged to father and was used by the
Winkey-Wums on occasions like this, in
strict accordance with the old custom.
“JT declare WAR TO THE KNIFE,” an-
nounced the Chief solemnly. “ Whereas
we, the honourable tribe of Winkey-
36 THE MIFF-MIFFS, -

Wums, have been most horribly insulted
by the new and disagreeable tribe of Miff-
Miffs, we are only doing what is right
and just in taking revenge upon our
enemies.”

The old glove lay upon the floor where
the Chief had dropped it, and the fol-
lowers, imitating their Chief’s example,
rose, as he finished his speech, from their
inverted wash-tubs, and gravely placed
each one his right foot upon the glove,
repeating as he did so the awful declara-
tion, “WAR TO THE KNIFE!”

Thus was war declared against the Miff-
Miffs.

After the big council we had various ©
meetings in what we called the “ Hatching-
hole”, in order to determine in what way
we were to wreak vengeance upon our
enemies. ‘ Hatching-hole” was a certain
recess on the stairs formed by the back of
the old oak settle and a corner cupboard
—the space between them just being big
enough for the three of us to squeeze in.
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 87

We could draw a corner of the window-
curtain across the recess when we were
safely packed in, and no grown-up person
would ever have suspected our. hiding-
hole.

We called this place our “ Hatching-
hole”, because in it we hatched our plots
and planned our mischief, and I am afraid
“Hatching -hole” was answerable for
many of the scrapes we were continually
getting into.

One evening Barney came bounding
into the school-room just as we were
about to begin tea. Eric and I were on
our knees on the hearth-rug, busily en-
gaged in making toast. Fraulein stood at
the table wielding a big knife, and receiv-
ing each crisp, brown slice from our
‘hands, she spread it generously with
butter, and added it to the tempting-look-
ing pile, which was keeping hot upon a
large plate before the fire. I must say,
that whenever Fraulein did a thing she
did it properly. If she consented to
38 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

allow us, as a treat, to have hot-buttered
toast for tea, you may be sure that it was
hot-buttered toast, with the butter spread
thick upon it, until no more would soak
in, and as many slices as we liked to
make.

Barney had been kept in by Mr. Evans,
because he did not know his Latin, so
he came bursting into the school-room,
very hungry, and in boisterous spirits,
after his long imprisonment. “Hallo!
jolly hot toast for tea!” was his first ex-
clamation as he burst open the door, and
the delicious odour of toast-making reached
his nostrils.

“Ach, but you deserve it not, bad boy,
when you know not your lesson, and Mr.
Evans must keep you in,” said Fraulein,
reprovingly, looking up from the big slice
of toast she was buttering, her good-
humoured face trying .to assume a severe
look.

“JT couldn't help it, Fraulein,” said
Barney insinuatingly, patting her broad
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 39

shoulder as he passed; “and you've made
me an extra big share of toast, ’m sure,
to make up for my having been done out
of all the fun of making it.”

Fraulein shook her head, but an indul-
gent smile stole over her face,—she never
could resist Barney, when he put on his
coaxing manner.

“ Ach, then, what a child it is,” she
said. “You shall have tree big slice if
you promise to learn better next time.
The poor man, Mr. Evans, must walk so
far in all the cold dark before he can reach
home, and you detain him one whole half-
hour when you know not your lessons.”

“Oh, it’s all right, Fraulein,” retorted
Barney, easily; “I think he enjoys the
walk. I asked him to come upstairs and
have some tea before he went, but he said
he hadn’t time, as he must be back at
Beeston at six for the choir practice. I
guess he would have let the old choir
practice slide, though, if he’d known there
was buttered toast for tea,”
40 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

Jane’s entry with the tea-pot put a stop
to any more toast-making, which was just
as well, perhaps, as the delicious simmer-
ing pile in the fender had assumed a most
imposing height, while the contents of the
china butter-tub had almost dwindled into
nothingness.

As we drew in our chairs to the table
and proceeded to ‘help ourselves, after
handing the toast to Fraulein, Barney
whispered to me:

“There will be a meeting in ‘Hatch-
ing-hole’ after tea.”

“Have you thought of a plan?” I
whispered back eagerly,and Barney nodded
mysteriously.

We worked our way steadily through
the stack of toast, and, when only a few
crumbs and a buttery plate remained,
Fraulein said grace and gave us permission
to leave the table, followed by a strict
injunction to go and wash our hands
before attempting to do anything. We
pelted off to the bath-room and washed
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 41

our hands, and then sneaked one by one
into our hiding-hole on the stairs.

When all were assembled, with knees
touching and heads together—for the space
of “ Hatching-hole” would only permit of
very close intimacy—Barney propounded
his plan.

“T had a long talk with Gardener this
afternoon,” he said in a low whisper,
“when I was waiting for Mr. Evans in
the garden, and he told me ever so many
things about the Miff-Miffs. He told me
they are awfully clever for one thing, and
have travelled over almost the whole
world, and written lots of books and things,
and they had a brother who was ever
such a big man in some foreign place—I
think it was in China or somewhere—he
was almost like a king, he was so power-
fol

“Oh my!” said Eric and I, much im-
pressed; but Barney went on hastily:

“ But that’s no matter, it wasn’t that
that Gardener told me that was most
42, THE MIFF-MIFFS.

important, it was this—the Miff-Miffs
are most terribly frightened of bur-
glars!”

“What's burglars?” asked Eric.

‘““Robbers—people that come into the
house at night and steal things, and some-
times murder you, if you don’t give them
all the money and jewels and things in
the house.”

“Oh!” said Eric, looking rather scared,
“there aren’t any here, are there?”

“Of course not, silly,” said Barney, im-
patiently, “but there might be, don’t you
see? Gardener told me that the Miff-
Miffs have heaps of beautiful silver things
in the Lodge—dishes and tea-pots and
spoons—and they are so frightened that
burglars will come and steal them, that
they have been having new bolts and
locks put on to all the doors and windows,
for fear anybody might get in. Gardener
says they keep a candle burning in every
room all night long, and he says Miff-Miff
asked him the other day if he would sell
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 43

her Juno, that great retriever of his, to
be their watch-dog.”

“Yes,” said I, keenly interested, “and
did he?”

Barney shook his head and whispered
even lower, “ No, Gardener said he couldn’t
spare Juno, but he knows a man in
Beeston who has some very fierce bull-
dogs, and he is going to see about getting
one for the Miff-Miffs, to be chained up in
the yard at night. Now comes our revenge.”

Barney leant forward till our foreheads
touched, and my curls tickled his nose so

that he sneezed.
~ “Don’t do that, Nelka,” he said im-
patiently, just as though I could help it,
“and talk very low, or someone might
hear. We will be burglars!”

The audacity of the suggestion almost
took our breath away. .

“ Barney!” I said, gazing all eyes, “and
steal their things? That would be wicked,
wouldn’t it?” I said doubtfully.

“Not steal things,” said Barney irri-
44 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

tably, “of course not; we would hide their
spoons and forks and things in all sorts of
places, so that they would think burglars
had been in the house, but of course we
wouldn’t really take anything.”

“Supposing they heard us and we were
discovered, what would happen then?” I
queried, still doubtful.

“Of course they wouldn’t hear us,” said
Barney. “Even if they did, they would
be far too frightened to get up to see
what the noise was. Oh, it would be
grand!” and Barney chuckled hilariously
beneath his breath.

Eric and I joined in, a little timorously
certainly, but still rapidly catching Barney’s
wild delight at his project.

“How frightened the old cats will be
in the morning, when they find that some-
one has been in the house!” said Barney
exuberantly.

“ But what about Crabby Ann?” I asked,
“Crabby Ann” being the name we had
given the sour-faced old woman who acted
THE MIFF-MIFFS. - 45

as servant to the Miff-Miffs, for whom we
had conceived almost as great a dislike as
we had to the two old maids themselves.

“ She sleeps right away up in the gabled
room at the back,” replied Barney confi-
dently. ‘I know, because I saw one of
those hideous ‘mutches’ she always wears
hanging on to the knob of the looking-glass
which stands in the window. © It will be
quite easy. We can get in at the little
pantry window,—you know the one I
mean, Nelka,—at the back of the goose-
berry bushes, where I got inonce before and
hid when we were playing wild Indians.”

“Yes, I know,” I answered eagerly,
catching somewhat of Barney’s enthusiasm,
and excited at the daring of the plan.
“But are you sure there hasn’t been a
bolt put on it?”

Barney shook his head. “ Hush! talk
lower, Nelka, or Fraulein will hear us,
and then we are done for. No, there is
no bolt on the window yet. I expect they
don’t suppose that anybody could squeeze
46 THE MIFF-MIFES,

through such a very tiny window as that;
“anyway, it is never fastened, for I climbed |
up on the cucumber frame on purpose to
see, and it is still unlatched. We can get
into the pantry, and then crawl through
a big ventilator there is into the kitchen.
There is a shelf the other side of the ven-
tilator, and we can get on to that, and
then crawl along until we come to a table,
or something which will help us to get
down without making any noise. I know
all about the house inside, because I ex-
plored well that day I hid there, and you
couldn’t think where I had got to. How
lucky that I did, wasn’t it?”

We assented, and before we returned
to the school-room a dark and daring
plot had been formed in the secrecy of
“ Hatching-hole ”.

In view of the determination of the
Miff- Miffs to protect themselves from
night marauders, by calling in the services
of a fierce yard-dog, we agreed. that no
time must be lost in carrying our plan
THE MIFF-MIFFS. ; Al

into execution, and the following night
was fixed for our burgling expedition.

Much to Eric’s annoyance, we decided
that he could not be allowed to take part
in the adventure, as the risk of discovery
would be too great.

It was Fraulein’s habit to sit up late at
night reading, often until midnight, and it
was upon this custom of hers that we
were relying in order to enable us to carry
out our scheme of revenge against the
Miff-Miffs. The household at Holly Lodge
was wont to retire early—Barney had it
from Gardener that the precise hour at
which the Miff-Miffs closed up for the
night was nine o'clock. Allowing them
one hour in which to make their toilets
and compose themselves to sleep, we fixed
the hour for our burglary at ten o’clock.
That would give us plenty of time to carry
out our design, and return before there
could be any chance of Fraulein missing
us. We were sorry at being obliged to
leave Eric out of the fun, but he was really
48 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

too small to take part in such a daring
exploit; and besides, his sleeping in Frau-
lein’s room made it quite impossible for
him to join us without being missed.

Having completed our arrangements we
returned to the school-room, doing our
utmost to look innocent.

“Mein children,” said Fraulein, as we
entered the room one behind the other,
“where have you been? I was just coming
to look where you could be. It is time
for Eric to go to bed, and Barney and
Nelka must come and prepare their lessons
for to-morrow.”

“Yes, Fraulein,” said Barney, so meekly
that I was surprised that Fraulein did not
suspect something from this unusual obe-
dience, and preparing at once to collect his
lesson-books, and settle himself at: the
table. For half an hour we scribbled
away at exercises, and murmured spelling
and tables without once raising our eyes
from our books. At last Fraulein rose
and left the room fora moment. Barney
THE MIFF-MIFFS, 49

at once gave me a kick under the table,
and squirmed with suppressed delight.

“T say, Nelka, to-morrow!” he said in
a loud whisper, and I had just time to
return the kick before Fraulein returned.

“You are good attentive children to-
night,” she said, nodding her head approv-
ingly at sight of our bent heads and diligent
fingers. ‘Such good behaviour is an en-
couragement to me to reward with treats
good children.” This was in allusion to
the hot toast we had had for tea, and I
could see Barney’s white teeth gleam as
he pressed them into his lower lip, to keep
himself from letting out the whole thing
_ by bursting into a fit of laughter.

Next day our excitement, so strictly
repressed, became positively painful. We
could attend to nothing, and Fraulein was
in despair over our morning lessons. After
Barney had had his geography returned
for the fifth time, because he would repeat
in. a far-away, mechanical voice that

“London is the capital of America, a fine
(4487) D
50 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

city on the river Tyne, famous for its coal
manufactories,” he took the bull by the
horns. “

“T really can’t learn lessons to-day,
Fraulein,” he declared obstinately. “I’ve
got the fidgets, and when I have fidgets
it’s no use trying to make me learn things.
I shall have a headache next—I know I
shall,” he added, looking threateningly at
poor distracted Fraulein—“ and then you -
will be sorry, for mother never allows us
to have headaches.”

“Do you not feel well, my dear?” asked -
Fraulein anxiously. It was her one dread
that any of us should fall ill while under
her charge.

“ Not especially,” said Barney, stretching
himself languidly, and uttering a deep
sigh. “I think Td be all the better of
a run in the garden. I feel kind of hot.
Don’t you think we might put up lessons
for to-day, Fraulein, and Nelka and I go
and tidy up our gardens?”

“Oh, yes,” I put in coaxingly. “Do
THE MIFF-MIFFS, 51

say we may, Frauly, like a dear thing.
_ Our gardens are so untidy, and Gardener
says we ought soon to be sowing our
seeds.”

Fraulein fell into the trap. “Well, I
suppose so,” she said kindly. “I fear no
more lessons can be done to-day, you
children are so restless, and perhaps the
fresh air may do you good. Put a hand-
kerchief round your throat, Barney, in
case you are inclined to take a little cold.
Eric can come with me to Beeston, and I
can get some more of the silk I require to
finish the table-cloth I am working for
your mother’s birthday gift.”

In high glee Barney and I tore off to
don our old garden clothes, and were soon
at work upon our little flower-beds, while
discussing our plans for the evening.

“We mustn’t undress ourselves,” said
Barney, carefully removing a fat worm
from his flower-bed to a place of safety on
the lawn—that was one thing about Barney
very different from some boys, he never
52 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

hurt a living creature, however ugly or
loathsome it might be. “You must just
stick your night-dress on over your dress,
Nelka, and get into bed, and when Frau-
lein comes in to tuck us up, we must
pretend to be sound asleep, and then she
will not think any more about us.”

I assented, and then, struck by another
thought, asked Barney how we were to
get out of the house without being seen
by anyone. ‘The doors, as we knew, were
all carefully locked at sundown by Jack-
son, the butler. :

“We will get out of the staircase
window,” said Barney cheerfully. “TI see
Gardener has left a ladder leaning against
the wall by the boudoir window, where he
has been nailing up the ivy. I intend to
move the ladder by and by and put it
against the staircase window, so that we
can get out quite easily. Gardener will
never notice it, he is busy in the kitchen-
garden to-day and is not likely to be
wanting it.”
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 53

The day passed somehow, and promptly
at eight o’clock—nearly half an hour sooner
than usual—Barney began to put away
the book he was reading, and yawning
said:

“T feel inclined to go to bed, Fraulein,
and I don’t think I want any supper, I
had such a lot of tea.”

It was our custom to have a tray of
biscuits, oat-cake, and milk brought into
the school-room at half-past eight, and on
ordinary occasions Barney did ample
justice to this simple meal. His assertion,

_ therefore, that he was not hungry, after his
slackness at lessons in the morning, caused
Fraulein to fear that something was amiss.

“T am afraid you are not very well,
dear child,” she said anxiously, as Barney
closed the door. of the book-case and
came to bid her good-night, “I think
a little dose would be a good thing.”

“No, thank you, Fraulein,” said Barney
with sudden alacrity; “no ‘Gregory’ or
‘castor oil’ for me, thank you. I only
54 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

want a good sleep, and I shall be all right
in the morning.”

I really wondered at Barney’s cheek,
how he could tell such fibs and deceive
poor simple Fraulein! He said good-
night and went off, Fraulein remarking to
me in rather a troubled tone as he left the
room:

“T do hope the child is not going to be
ill; it is not like Barney to refuse his
meals.”

“Oh no, Frauly!” I said reassuringly,
“Barney is never ill I think this has
been a long day, somehow. As soon as
Jane brings the supper-tray I think I shall
go to bed too.”

“T am so anxious to get this table-cloth
finished by to-morrow,” said Fraulein,
resuming her needle-work. ‘Sunday is
your dear mother’s birthday, and it must
be posted to-morrow in order to arrive at
Nice by that day. I must work hard to-
night and finish it before I go to bed.”

I peeped out of the corner of my eyes
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 55

and saw that still half a corner of the
table-cloth remained unworked, and I cal-
culated that it would take at least three
hours to finish. Therefore we might safely
reckon that it would be twelve o'clock
before Fraulein would retire to her bed-
room. !

“You will have to sit up late if you
mean to finish all that to-night, Fraulein,”
I said with much innocence.

“ Ach, that I mind not,” said Fraulein
briskly. “In my country we must go early
to bed, because we rise so early; but
here in England, where you lie in bed until
past eight o’clock, I must not go so soon
to bed, or I should become jau/—that is,
as you say here, lazy.”

At this moment Jane entered with the
supper-tray, and after fortifying myself
for the coming excitement with a cup of
milk and two of my favourite brown
biscuits, I said good-night, and left Frau-
lein to enjoy the dainty little chicken pdzé
which cook had sent up especially for her.
56 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

Fraulein was a great favourite of cook’s,
and it was a pet grievance of ours that
she used to send up for supper all the
dishes she knew we liked best, although
she knew we children were not allowed
anything more substantial for supper than
biscuits and milk. .

“T will come and say good-night to
you as soon as I have finished my supper,”
said Fraulein, as I laid aside my work and
took my candle.

“Come soon, then, won’t you?” I re-
turned as I kissed her plump cheek, “ for
I expect we shall be asleep pretty soon.”
Oh how guilty I felt as I uttered those
untruthful words!

According to our agreement I merely
took the ribbon off my hair, and plaited it
as I was accustomed to do when I went
to bed, and then slipping off my shoes I
popped my night-dress over my frock, and
blowing out the candle crept into bed.
In a few minutes the door opened to
admit Fraulein, and as she approached
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 57

the bed I breathed hard and did my best
to feign sleep. It is a dreadful thing to
pretend to be asleep while a person bends
over you and smooths the bed-clothes,
with a lighted candle so placed on the
table at the bed-side that every little
twitch of your face can be seen. It seemed
hours to me that Fraulein stood there, and
I felt that I must giggle or scream or kick
or do something if she did not go away.
However, I managed to keep quiet, and
Fraulein went away all unsuspicious bear-
ing her candle, and I heard her enter
Barney’s room. as she opened the door, and I had to dive
under the bed-clothes and smother my
laughter at this barefaced deceit. As
soon as the closing of the school-room
door announced that Fraulein had re-
turned to her beloved fancy-work, and
that there was nothing more to fear from
her, my door was pushed cautiously open,
and Barney appeared—a comical object in
his pink flannel night-shirt, with his stock-
58 THE MIFF-MIFFS,

ings and knickerbockers appearing be-
low.
“ All serene?” he queried in a hoarse
whisper; and on my popping my head out
from my nest and answering “ All serene”,
he shut the door noiselessly and came and
sat-at the foot of my bed.

“T’ve just been in to see Eric,” he said.
“The wretched kid was awake, and he
was very much inclined to kick up a row
because we won't let him come with us.
I got him pacified by promising him my
big blue marble, and you are to make it
up to him to-morrow—he wants to sow
your mignonette seed that Gardener gave
you.”

“Vd rather you hadn’t promised that,
Barney,” I said reluctantly, “I always like
to sow my own seeds—Eric sows them
far too thick. Why did you promise him
that?”

“He would have that,” said Barney,
“he wouldn’t agree to anything else, and
I had to make him quiet at any price. I
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 59

knew you wouldn’t like it, but it cant be
helped. He’s promised to lie still and go
to sleep, and we are to tell him all about
it in the morning. I wonder what time
it is?”

“J heard the school-room clock strike
nine just when Fraulein came in,” I an-
swered, and Barney said excitedly:

“Then it’s time we were getting ready.
Get up and let us light the candle, Nelka.”

I slipped noiselessly out of bed, and
with a trembling hand I felt on the mantel-
piece for the matches, which I handed to
Barney, who struck one and lighted the
candle.

“Have you got your goloshes ready,
Nelka?” he asked.

“Under the bed,” I answered, produc-
ing them and proceeding to draw them on -
over my slippers. Then pulling off my
night-dress I stood up fully dressed, and
took down my garden hat and jacket from
the peg on the door. Then I turned to
Barney. “I am quite ready,’ I said,
60 THE MIFF-MIFFS,

trembling with excitement, now that the
time for action had really come.

“Are you? Wait a bit,” said Barney
cautiously, and taking the bolster from its
place beneath the pillow he laid it down
the centre of the bed, and carefully spread
over it my white night-dress. When he
had drawn up the bed-clothes and made
a dent in the pillow where my head should
have been, it really looked not unlike a
person in bed. “Just to make sure,” he
said complacently as he contemplated the
dummy, “in case Fraulein should take it
into her head to come in to fetch anything,
and notice an empty bed. Now, come on,
Nelka, we must do the same in my room.”

Bearing the candle we crept out, closing
the door behind us, and slipping across
the landing reached Barney’s room un-
heard and unseen by the unconscious
Fraulein, deeply engrossed in her needle-
work. Within the safety of his own room
Barney quickly divested himself of his
night-shirt, and being fully dressed under-
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 61

neath, he had only to take down his cap
and put on a pair of old tennis shoes,
which he had unearthed from the cup-
board in the vestibule where such things
were kept, and announced himself ready
to start. The candle was blown out, and
hand in hand we stole out on to the land-
ing, pausing a moment outside the school-
room door to make sure that Fraulein
‘had heard nothing. We lingered a minute
to peep through a crack in the door, and -
could see Fraulein sitting at the centre
table, her head bent to catch every ray of
light from the lamp. We passed on,
breathing freely as the baize door which
led on to the staircase swung noiselessly
to behind us, and we stood on the dark
stairs in comparative safety. I gripped
Barney’s arm nervously as we descended
the few steps necessary to reach the stair-
case window, by means of which we were
to make our escape.

“Hush! don’t be a goose,” whispered
Barney, beneath his breath, as we felt our
62 _ HE MIFF-MIFFS.

way carefully in the darkness. My heart
was thumping so hard against my jacket,
that I was sure it must be distinctly heard
in the ghostly stillness of the quiet house.
We reached the alcove in safety, and
drawing aside the heavy curtain, which
screened the window, Barney carefully
undid the catch and pushed up the sash.

“Tt’s all right,” he said in a tone of
relief, “the ladder is there, just where I
placed it. I'l go first.”

Nimble as a monkey Barney stooped
down and threw one leg over the low sill.
As soon as he felt his foot on the ladder,
the other leg followed, and in a moment
he had disappeared. I leant over the sill,
and watched until I saw him reach the
ground in safety, and heard the whistle we
had agreed upon as a signal that I should
descend. I was just as used to climbing
and scrambling as Barney, and with as little
difficulty I clambered over the sill, and
descended the shaky ladder backwards.
It was a long ladder, and I was not sorry
‘HE MIFF-MIFFS. 63

when I felt Barney clutch my arm, and
heard him say: “ You're all right now,
Nelka. Mind where you put your foot,
though, and don’t step on the tulips.” He
guided my dangling foot to a safe resting-
place, away from the flower-bed, and with
a thrill of wild excitement I stood by his
side on the gravel-path and realized that
we were in for a real adventure from which
there was no drawing back.

‘““No time to waste,” said Barney, “let’s
run!” and, seizing my hand, he drew me
out of the shadow of the house, and we
stepped across the gravel, making as little
noise as possible with our india-rubber
soles.

“We'll go through the shrubbery,” said
Barney, as we gained the lawn safely,
“so as not to run the risk of being seen
as we cross the lawn.” The shrubbery
bordered the tennis-lawn on one side, and
pushing our way through this, we emerged
into the portion of the park which was
divided from the kitchen-garden of the
64 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

Lodge by the little stream. Our plank
bridge was still in its old place, and by
means of it we crossed the stream, and
scrambled up the sloping bank opposite,
where the violets and yellow celandine
were beginning to perk up their heads.
At the top we paused awhile, to gain
breath, before opening the little rustic
gate in the low fence, which led into the
Lodge garden.

We could just see the top of the Grange
from where we stood, and I could not
help thinking how big, and black, and
eerie it looked, rising above the surround-
ing trees, like the picture of one of the
robbers’ castles in our fairy-books. It
was a very dark night, with neither moon
nor stars to be seen in the black vault of
sky above us. A low moany sort of wind
rustled in the dry bushes near us, and the
little brook, trickling over the pebbles at
our feet, made a mournful murmuring,
not at all like the cheery song it sang in
the sunshine of the morning. The eeri-
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 65

ness of finding ourselves all alone in the
strange stillness of night affected Barney,
as it did me, with a feeling of nervousness, °
and he did not stop long, but unlatched
the wicket-gate and admitted us both to
the little garden.

“There are the gooseberry-bushes, and
that is the window,” he whispered softly,
pointing to a wall just in front of us, in
which I dimly made out the outline of a
very small slit window at a little distance
from the ground. Just below the window
was a patch of something dark, which I
made out to be the group of gooseberry-
bushes. The knotted branches of a pear-
tree, growing against the wall, would
make an excellent ladder. Stealthily we
advanced up the narrow path, between
the cabbage-rows, and crept in among the
spiky bushes as carefully as we could.
One thorny branch caught in my skirt,
and before I could disengage myself, it
had torn a rent right through the hem of

my frock.
(38487) E
66 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

“ Stupid!” muttered Barney in an angry
whisper. “Now Fraulein will see that,
and ask how you did it!”

“T couldn’t help it,” I whispered back
again, “the thorns caught it. It is my
old frock, luckily.”

We were standing just below the win-
dow now, and Barney gave me a warning
grip to be silent, and laying hold of the
knotted branches of the old pear-tree, he
began to climb up it, as though it were a
ladder. The window was only a few feet
above the ground, and Barney easily
reached the sill, and was able to put his
knee upon it. With his free hand he
pressed against the sash, and the un-
fastened window yielded to the pressure
and opened inwards. His face in the dim
light glowing with excitement, he looked
down, and beckoned to me to follow. As
I seized the lowest branch of the tree, and
sought a secure foothold, by which to raise
myself, he disappeared within the narrow
aperture. I gained the window-sill as he
. fHE MIFF-MIFFS. 67

had done, and heard Barney’s voice from
within say hoarsely:

- “Mind where you drop—don’t smash
anything.”

I looked through the window and saw
that just below it was a shelf, set out
with dishes of eatables—evidently we had
made our entrance by way of the Miff-
Miffs’ larder. I steered my way safely
through a collection of dishes, and managed
to drop down on to the stone floor of the
pantry, without doing any damage.

“T say,” said Barney, pointing to the
tempting array of eatables arranged in
spotless order upon the shelf, “what do
you say to helping ourselves to some of
these jolly-looking things; burglars always
begin by helping themselves to supper?”

“Oh, Barney!” I said, rather shocked
—that was carrying the thing a little too
far—‘ that would be really stealing!”

“No it wouldn't,” said Barney, stoutly.
“Remember we have got a cause to re-
venge ourselves on the Miff-Miffs. If
68 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

you come to think of it, they stole your
kite.”

“Gardener said he thought most likely
it had blown away,” I objected hesita-
tingly. “I am sure mother would not
like us really to steal.”

But Barney did not agree with me, and
more for the bravado of the thing than
because he was greedy, he helped himself
to a delicious-looking pasty, and munched
it with much relish.

Crabby Ann had certainly been having
a pastry-baking the day before, for there
was an elaborately-decorated pigeon-pie
on the shelf below, and a glass dish of jelly
fingers which made my mouth water—
above all things I love jelly fingers. There
was also an uncut ham garnished with
parsley, and a paper ruffle round its leg
bone; and a pair of plump chickens all
trussed ready for the oven stood in a
baking-tin near the window. It looked
very much as though the Miff-Miffs were
expecting company.
THE MIFF-MIFFS. ' 69

“Don’t let us waste time,” said Barney,
cramming the last bit of flaky pastry into
his mouth. ‘Hide the pie under the
shelf there behind the potato basket, and
scatter those other things about a bit.
What shall we do with the ham?”

“Let us take it into the kitchen,” I
suggested, “and this loaf of bread too
—then they will think the burglars meant
to have supper, and were interrupted.”

Having disarranged the prim orderliness
of the larder in such a way as would make
~ Crabby Ann’s “ mutch” rise from her head
with horror when she discovered it in the
morning, we climbed up to the ventilator-
window above the door and squeezed our
way through into the kitchen. As Barney
had said, we found ourselves then on a
broad shelf running the whole length of
one wall of the kitchen. There was a
deal table in the middle of the room, and
in the centre of the table was a lighted
candle in a tin candlestick.

“Hold the ham,” whispered Barney,
70 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

“while I get down. I can drop on to the
floor quite easily, and Dll bring you a
chair.”

I supported the dish containing the
ham while Barney, clinging to the edge of
the shelf with both hands, dropped with a
muffled thud on to the floor. He brought
a chair and mounting on it relieved me
of the ham and the loaf. With the aid of
the chair I quietly followed his example,
and dropped to the floor without making
any noise.

“We will put the ham on the table, and
the bread,” whispered Barney. ‘“There’s-
nothing worth meddling here, we must go
to the dining-room and hide all the silver
things we can find.”

We blew out the candle, and, hand in
hand, holding our breath, we stole along
the narrow stone passage, at the end of
which was a baize door entirely shutting
off the kitchen premises from the rest of
the house.

The Lodge, as I have said, was an old-
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 71

fashioned house, and queerly built. On
pushing back the door and emerging from
the dark passage we found ourselves in a
square tiled hall. Facing us was the front-
door securely barred and bolted, and on our
left the glass door leading to the little
conservatory. On our right, three or four
steps led up to the baize door which shut
off the wing containing the dining-room
and library.

“T think you had better wait here,”
said Barney, as we tiptoed across the
empty hall, the only sound which broke
the silence the tick-tack of a wheezy old
grandfather’s clock which stood in one
corner. ‘I will walk along to the dining-
room and see what I can find there. If
there is nothing worth hiding, then we
will go along the other passage to the
drawing-room,” pointing to another baize
door on our right.

“But the Miff-Miffs,” I gasped, “surely
they will hear us! Where do they sleep?”

“Upstairs,” answered Barney. “Don't
72 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

be such a ninny, Nelka. If you're going
to funk it, you had better go home.”

I did “funk” it. But go home? No,
better face a whole army of irate Miff-
Miffs, with Barney for company, than
cross that dusky, eerie garden alone!
“Tm not going to funk it,” I whispered
back resolutely ; “ only, don’t be too daring,
Barney. I will wait here, if you won't be
very long.” The baize door swung back
on noiseless hinges, and fell to again, mak-
ing a sound like a faint sigh. A shiver of
dread ran through me, as I saw Barney’s
lithe form glide into the darkness beyond,
and I was left alone in the dim-lit hall.

A hanging lamp burned feebly, just
above the front-door, but it only added
terror to the darkness, by shedding a light
in the centre of the hall, and leaving the
corners in mysterious gloom. It seemed
hours to me that I stood there, my heart
palpitating, and every wheezy tick of the
old clock making me start with fear. I
do not know how long I really did stand
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 73

there, quaking like a jelly, before I heard
Barney’s voice. It was no longer subdued,
but raised almost to a shriek, and with a
strange ring of terror in it.

“ Nelka, Nelka, open the door!”

I stood a moment as though paralysed,
and my feet seemed glued to the ground
so that I could not move. Where was
Barney? What door? What did it all
mean? These thoughts flashed through
me, and then again, but with a gasping
strangling sound, came the cry, from some-
where behind the baize door, “Nelka,
Nelka, come quick, I can’t see anything!”
Then it flashed in upon me, and like the
sharp cut of a whip roused me to action,
Barney did not cry out like that unless
there was something wrong! He must be in
danger! I sprang forward and with all my
might threw myself against the door. It
flew open, and as it did so I was almost
suffocated by a blinding rush of smoke,
which burst forth as from a pent-up fur-
nace. I was staggered for a moment and
74 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

almost lost my breath; I kept my place,
however, and with my back pressed against
the door to keep it open, I waited until
the first volume of smoke had rolled past,
and then as my eyes became clearer I
looked for Barney. He was close to me, |
struggling throughthe dense smoketowards
the open door. I stretched out my hand
as he stumbled forward, and gripping his
arm I dragged him through the doorway,
letting the heavy door swing to behind us
so as to shut out the smothering cloud of
smoke. Barney reeled against the wall
and remained there as though stupefied,
grasping my hand and making a queer
gurgling sound in his throat. At last his
breath came back and he was able to gasp
out:

“The house is on fire—I got—to the
dining-room—and as soon as I opened the
door—the smoke rushed out. I was almost
choked—I couldn’t find my way back in
the dark. It was horrible!”

While we were standing there the smoke
THE MIFF-MIFFS. : 75

was already beginning to fill the hall, and
I could distinctly smell the smell of burning
wood. Then anawful thought struck me.

“ Barney, Barney,” I cried, “the Miff-
Miffs!| They will be burnt to death. Oh,
can’t we save them!”

Barney’s face, all smudged and blackened
with the smoke, grew white as mine. ‘“‘We
must, Nell!” he gasped, starting forward.
“They can’t burn in their beds. We must
try to save them. Come quickly, the stairs
may catch fire any moment!”

Still giddy and dazed from the effects
of the smothering smoke, he seized my
hand, and together we groped our way
up the staircase, which was rapidly becom-
ing enveloped in a dense curtain of smoke
creeping up from the hall below. The
stairs were shallow and wide, and as the
house consisted but of two stories we soon
reached the long narrow passage, at the
end of which, as we knew, was the Miff-
Miffs’ bedroom. We flew down the passage
and reached the door, |
76 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

“ Hammer on the door, Nelka, with all
your might and main,” panted Barney,
and we applied our knuckles, as though
‘we were bent on waking the dead, but
with no result. I tried the door, but it
was locked, and then we simply hurled
ourselves against it, beating it with our
fists and feet.

“¥Frre!” I shrieked at the pitch of my
voice, “Fire! Fire! Fire! Wake up, and
~ open the door!”

The door shook and creaked as we
thundered upon it, but we got no response
from within. “The house is on fire—
wake up, wake up! Fire! Fire! Fire!” we
both of us yelled together. At last from
the Miff-Miffs’ room came an answering
shriek, and the bolt of the door was with-
- drawn. It opened about a yard, and a
head was poked out.

“Who is there?” demanded the eldest
Miff-Miff’s voice sharply. “And what do
you want?”

“Your house is on fire!” I cried, gasping
“THE MIFF-MIFFS, 77

with fear and exertion. “Oh, make haste
and escape, or you will be burned to death!”
Another shrill shriek sounded from within
the room, and I heard the other Miff-Miff’s
voice say feebly, “What do they say,
sister? Oh, mercy me, what is to become
of us?”

We could contain ourselves no longer,
and as Miff-Miff turned away to say some-
thing to her sister, I pushed past her into
the room. Miff-Miff was standing in the
middle of the floor, her head crowned by
an enormous night-cap, beneath which ap-
peared rows of whitey-brown curl papers,
and. clothed in the funniest garments.
Amongst the pillows of the big bed I
caught sight of a scared white face, which
I recognized as belonging to little Miss
Martha. I was far too frightened and
excited to think of making any apology
for bursting so suddenly into the Miff-
Miffs’ bedroom, and I had just enough
breath left to stammer out:

“You must get up at once and escape
78 HE MIFF-MIFIS.

before the stairs catch fire. Oh, please
hurry!”

“Why, bless me, it is the child from
next door,” said Miff-Miff; and poor Miss
Martha sat up in bed and begged her
sister to hand her her “ peignoir”. “ How
can I leave the house like this, child?”
said poor Miff-Miff, looking helplessly at
her ludicrous garments. ‘Oh, do help
me! Jam all ofa flutter!”

“Tt doesn’t matter really,” I said en-
treatingly; “no one minds about dress.
If you will only come before it is too late.”

But still the two old ladies stood help-
lessly wringing their hands and piteously
lamenting their plight, until at last in
desperation I rushed to a wardrobe, and
opening it, seized the first thing my hand
touched. It happened to be a thick
wadded cloak, and with this in my hand
I flew to the bed-side.

“Get up, Miss Martha!” I implored.
“Here is your cloak; I will help you to
put it on.”
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 79

“But my hat, child,” said the old lady
fretfully, putting her hand to her head.
“T can’t go out like this—I should die of
shame.”

I looked round the room. A checked
shawl hung over the back of a chair near,
and a pair of bright-green bed-shoes with
yellow bows stood below it. I seized
them both, and rushing back to the bed I
threw the shawl over the old lady’s head,
so as to hide her comical night-cap, and
at last she consented to leave her bed.
Miff-Miff had sufficiently recovered her
wits to don a huge dressing-gown of
wonderful hue, and had tied her mush-
room hat over her night-cap, which only
made matters worse, so far as appearance
went. She turned tremblingly towards
us.

“JT am ready to accompany you, my
dear,” she said. “You will stay with us,
child, won’t you?”

At this moment Barney called to us
from outside to make haste. “The smoke
80 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

is coming upstairs,” he cried; “ make haste
if you are coming.” ~

‘We are coming,” I called, and taking
a hand of each of the old ladies I emerged
into the passage, with the two queer
mummy-like figures one on either side of
me. . I have never been able to make out
how it was that Barney managed to refrain
from giggling even at that trying moment—
the poor little ladies did look so very ridi-
culous. Not a shadow of a smile was on
his grimy face as he politely led the way
to the head of the stairs. Just as we
were beginning to descend Miff-Miff sud-
denly stopped short.

“Sister,” she exclaimed excitedly, “the
alarm-bell—we quite forgot it—our house
might yet be saved!”

“Where is the bell?” said Barney at
once, “I will ring it if you tell me where
it is; and you had better get quickly
downstairs, for it is getting precious hot
and smothery up here.”

“The bell-rope is hanging just inside
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 81

the linen-closet—the door next to our own
bedroom,” said Miff-Miff; “it will arouse
Ann.”

Poor old Crabby Ann! In our excite-
ment we had quite forgotten her, sleeping
all unconscious of danger in the little
gable-room at the top of the house.
Barney dashed upstairs again, and in a
moment the clanging of the alarm-bell,
which swung from one of the gables out-
side the Lodge, rang out in the clear night
air. I got the old ladies downstairs in
safety, and by the time we reached the
hall the smoke enveloped us like a thick
veil, and the air felt close and stuffy so that
we could hardly breathe. With the trem-
bling assistance of Miff-Miff I succeeded
in unbarring the front-door, and oh, the
relief it was to feel the rush of fresh, pure
air from outside.

We stepped out on to the lawn, and
found that the ringing of the bell had
already assembled a little crowd of vil-

lagers, and from one to another the cry of
(mt 487) F
82 HE MiFF-MIPFS.

“Fire!” was passing. The men began to
run for buckets and call for water to be
brought them. We could see volumes of
smoke pouring forth from the dining-room
wing, and could smell the odour of burn-
ing wood. The crowd increased rapidly,
and the men worked like slaves, passing
the pails of water from one to another
with lightning speed, and dashing them
upon the burning pile. I recognized
Jackson amongst the crowd busying about
in his shirt-sleeves, and Gardener was
there as well, and Thomas the groom—the
whole village seemed to have turned out,
and to be doing their utmost to save the
Miff-Miffs’ house.

Barney joined us after a few minutes,
closely followed by old Ann tottering
along, her mouth open to its widest, and
uttering piercing shrieks of terror and
exclamations of “ Mercy me! Sakes help
us!” Barney led the old creature up to
the spot where we were standing, and
then rushed off to join the busy throng of
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 83

helpers. The old ladies stood wringing
their hands in great distress, to see the
ruthless destruction going on before their
eyes of their trim little house and garden,
by fire and water. Crabby Ann added
her lamentations to theirs. “ Oh, mistress,”
she cried, “think of the beautiful dining-
room carpet with all that water thrown in
at the windows—dear, dear, what a clean-
ing up I'll need to have after all this!”

“The poor parrot!” moaned Miss Martha;
“will no one remember poor dear Joey
in the conservatory? He will be burnt to
a cinder!”

“ And Silvertail!” added Miff-Miff pit-
eously, “she is so frightened of fire, poor
darling—we should never find another cat
so sweet and amiable should we lose her!”

_I stood between the poor old souls, and
tried to assure them that someone would
be sure to think of the Polly and remove
him to a place of safety. As for Silvertail,
she would be certain to look after herself,
being a cat and possessing four legs. In
84 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

the midst of the hubbub of voices around
us suddenly I heard Fraulein’s voice at
my elbow.

“ Nelka! My good child, what make
you here?”

I was terribly taken aback, but there
was nothing for it but to put a bold face
upon it.

“Never mind, Fraulein,” I said promptly,
“we are all here to help. I am taking
care of the Miff-Miffs.”’ Fraulein was so
astonished she actually believed me, and
made no further remark at the moment,
but set herself to persuading the poor
Miff-Miffs to return with her and take
refuge in the Grange until the first excite-
ment was over. They consented at last, —
as they were shivering with the unaccus-
tomed exposure to the chill night air, and
were persuaded they could do no good by
remaining.

So we four—Barney was tearing about
as black as a sweep, in a state of wildest
excitement, and refused to leave the spot
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 85

—made our way back to the Grange. The
house was all astir and lighted up, for
nearly all the servants had gone to see the
fire at the Lodge. Eric in his red dress-
ing-gown was watching the scene from
the school-room window under Jane’s
charge. Fraulein sent Jane to get some
hot wine and water to restore the shiver-
ing bodies and shattered nerves of the old
ladies, and making up a big fire she made
them sit down in the two arm-chairs and
compose themselves.

“Do not so distress yourself, I beg you,
dear Miss Smith,” she said soothingly,
“it will, I am sure, be all right.”

_ “Qur poor Polly!” groaned Miss Martha,
thinking of her pet.

“Poor Ben’s foreign curios that he
thought so much of,” mourned Miff-Miff
dolefully. ‘I suppose we shall lose every-
thing and become beggars.”

“No, no, not so, dear ladies,” said
Fraulein cheerfully, “Jackson has told
me it is nothing of a fire—one room only
86 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

a little the worse, and in no time it will,
be all over.”

“Do you really think so?” said Miff-
Miff, a ray of hope lighting up her wrinkled
old face. “This could not have happened
at a worse time, for we are expecting a
guest to-morrow—” I thought of the
treacle pasty and the daintily-frilled ham,
and oh, how my conscience stabbed
me !—

“Our dear nephew from India, whom
we have not seen for ten years—our
brother Ben’s boy.”

At this moment Barney came rushing
_in, his hands and face quite black. “It’s
out at last,” he cried, throwing himself
down on the sofa quite exhausted, for he

had worked as hard as anyone. The two
- old ladies clasped their hands and uttered
an exclamation of joy.

“ Oh,thank Heaven, whatamercy! Then
we may yet have a roof to shelter poor
Gerald.”

“Dear boy!” ejaculated Miss Martha,
THE MIFF-MIFFS., 87

nodding her head. with its ridiculous
- covering. ‘ He is so nice too!”

Just then the door opened and Jane
entered, bearing a tray on which was the
wine decanter and a little jug of hot
water. When the two ladies had sipped
the potion Fraulein mixed for them, their
nerves had so far recovered that they
were able to talk, and they began to
thank Fraulein for her kindness, and then
turning to Barney and me:

“We owe our lives to these two dear
young people!” said Miff-Miff, quite drop-
ping her prim manner as she looked
gratefully at us.

“No you don’t,” stuttered Barney
bluntly. “You don’t know anything
about it, or you wouldn’t say that!”

I saw the amazement on the Miff-Miffs’
faces, and endeavoured to mend matters
a little.

“No really,” I put in hurriedly. ‘“ We
didn’t do anything—it was a mistake—we
never meant—”
88 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

To my relief at this moment there came
a tap at the door, and Jane entered to say
that Gardener was outside and wished to
speak to the Miff-Miffs. He came in
presently all smelling of fire and smoke,
and informed the ladies that the fire was
now quite out, and that very little real
damage had been done to the Lodge.
The ladies might safely return as soon as
they wished. The Miff-Miffs rose, and
having with old-fashioned courtesy thanked
us for having sheltered them in their
temporary distress, they departed under
Gardener’s escort.

I hardly know just what happened after
that—but I do know that before we went
to bed that eventful night we had made
a clean breast of everything to Fraulein.
We told of our share in the night’s pro-
ceedings, our purposed scheme of revenge
with its unexpected ending, and of our
wrongs. I must say that Fraulein was
very nice about it; and although she gave
us the scolding we expected, she made us
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 89

see how mean and unworthy of dear -
mother’s teaching our conduct was, and
in the end we felt heartily ashamed of
ourselves. We begged with tears that
she would allow the Miff-Miffs to remain
in ignorance of the real cause which had
brought us so opportunely upon the scene
at the time of the fire, and at last she
consented to do so.

“Only,” she said, looking gravely into
our downcast faces, ‘let this be a
lesson to you, children, to be more gentle
and forgiving, even although -you may
sometimes have cause to feel resentful at
little wrongs done you by others. In this
case you did good where you wilfully in-
tended to do evil, and you have cause to
feel very glad that so it turned out. In
future, my children, you must try by your
good behaviour and kind actions to right-
fully deserve the good opinion which our
neighbours at the Lodge have formed of
you.”

We slunk away to bed, silent and sub-
90. THE MIFF-MIFFS.

dued, and far more impressed by Frau-
lein’s grave words than we should have
been by the severest punishment. The
next day the chief of the Winkey-Wums
called a council in the washing-house.
When his followers were duly seated
round him on their inverted tubs, he
gravely produced from under his jacket a —
broken clay pipe, and a roughly-made
wooden. hatchet.

“Faithful followers,” began the chief of
the Winkey-Wums, holding out the pipe,
which was filled with a mixed tobacco of
Barney’s invention, consisting principally
of brown paper and cigar-ends, “I have
called this meeting in order that we may
smoke the pipe of peace and bury the
hatchet, in token that the war between
our tribe and the Miff-Miffs is now at an
end.” He struck a match and lighted the
pipe, and, after taking a puff himself,
handed it solemnly to me. The taste of
the home-made tobacco was horrible, but
I duly put it to my lips and took a draw
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 91

~ before passing it on to Eric, who did like-
wise. The pipe of peace was then form-
ally extinguished, and laid aside in the old
boiler where such treasures were kept.
Then the chief rose and waved the wooden
axe.

“Faithful followers,” he repeated ma-
jestically, “the pipe of peace is now
smoked, and it only remains for the
Winkey-Wums to bury the war-hatchet.”

He beckoned us to follow him, and we
trooped out of the washing-house, and
walked one behind the other in Indian
file to a patch of soft ground below a
drooping alder.

Here the chief stopped and solemnly
bending down scraped a hole in the damp
earth. We drew near to witness the
ceremony, and with reverent fingers the
chief laid the little axe in the hole, and
thus peace was declared between the
noble tribe of Winkey-Wums and the
Miff- Miffs.

While we were holding our council of
92 THE MIFF-MIFFS.

peace in the ratty old wash-house, Frau-
lein had stepped across to the Lodge to
inquire for the Miff-Miffs. She brought
back word that the old ladies were none
the worse for the fright they had had the
night before, and that the Lodge was very
slightly damaged by the fire, which had
fortunately been taken in time. The
cause of the catastrophe was the upsetting
of a night-lamp which was kept burning
all night in the dining-room; but how
this had been done no one ever knew,
though we all thought Miss Silvertail -
might have been able to throw some light
on the matter had nature endowed her
with the power of speech.

Some few days after the fire we were
playing rounders in the park, Fraulein
having gone to Beeston for the afternoon
and left us to our own devices, when a
man’s cheery voice called out to Barney,
who had just made a very good run:

“Well done, youngster, that’s the way
to run!”
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 93

We looked up and saw a jolly-faced
man, with a lot of curly brown hair stick-
ing out from beneath his cap, and a big
black moustache, leaning over the Miff-
Miffs’ fence, watching our game with a
merry twinkle in his dark eyes.

“ Miff-Miff’s nephew,” I said in a low
voice; but the young man’s sharp ears
caught what I said.

“Quite right,” he said, smiling and
nodding familiarly towards me. ‘Gerald
Bancock, at your service. May I come
and join your game?”

We liked the look of the bright, sun-
burnt face and friendly brown eyes.

“Yes, yes,” we called out in chorus,
and the young man leapt the fence as
easily as though it were a footstool, and
landed in our midst.

“Tve watched you playing from my
bedroom window ever so often,” he said,
looking round our circle cheerily, “and I
made up my mind I would come and join
you the first day I could get out.”
94, THE MIFF-MIFFS,

‘Have you been ill?” I asked, begin-
ning to understand how it was that we
had seen no sign of the Miff-Miffs’ beloved
nephew before now.

“Nothing much,” rejoined Mr. Gerald
cheerfully. “A touch of fever, Indian
fever—that’s what we Anglo-Indians have
to put up with—it bowled me over for a
day or two.”

Thus commenced our friendship with
Mr. Gerald Bancock, and after that he
became a constant visitor at the Grange,
and we all voted him the jolliest fellow
that ever was. He had come to pay a
long visit to his old aunts, and many were
the delightful tea-parties to which we were
invited at the Lodge during his visit.

Under Mr. Gerald’s gay influence the
Miff-Miffs forgot their primness and
dignity, and laughed as heartily as we
did at the merry stories with which he
used to entertain us on these occasions.
He even coaxed Miff-Miff into opening
the precious ebony cabinet stored with
THE MIFF-MIFFS. 95
quaint curios brought from foreign coun-
tries by Mr. Gerald’s father, the Miff-
Miffs’ only brother, who had died in India
many years ago from a snake bite. Many
and wonderful were the stories he told
us of the strange peoples and quaint
customs of the countries through which
he had travelled.

The days flew by like lightning after
Mr. Gerald’s coming, and before we realized
it the four months were over and we had
our dear father and mother again.

There came a sad day after that, when
our dear Mr. Gerald had to say good-bye
to the old ladies and to all of us and
set sail for India, there to remain another
spell of years before we could see him
again. We were indeed sorrowful to see
the last of his cheery face, and missed
him terribly at first. Barney went away
to boarding-school soon after his departure,
and now only Eric and I are left with
Fraulein. We often have long letters from
dear Mr. Gerald; and at Christmas he
96 THE MIFF-MIFFS,

never forgets to send us each a beautifu
present. 2

We sometimes go and have tea with the
two Miff-Miffs, and on acquaintance we find
them, in spite of their little peculiarities,
very sweet, simple-minded old ladies, and
their kindness is unbounded.

I have now reached the end of my story,
and Cousin Ellinor has promised to put it
into the very next book she writes. She
tells me it has got to have a title, and that
I must give it one out of my own head, as
it is my story; so I think, as it is all about
our little old-maid friends, I could not give
it a better title than the “ Mirr-Mirrs”.

THE END.
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Linda and the Boys. By Crorrza Sznpy Lownpss.

Swiss Stories for Children. By Lucy WuEELock.

Aboard the ‘“‘ Atalanta”. By Henry Friru.

The Penang Pirate. By Joun C. Hurcuzson.

Teddy: The Story of a “Little Pickle”. By Joan C, Hurcueson.
New Light through Old Windows. By Grueson Gow.
4 BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE,



TWO SHILLING SERIES—Continued.

A Pair of Clogs, and other Stories.
By Amy Watton.
By Canoring AUSTIN.

The Hawthorns.
Dorothy’s Dilemma.

By Amy Watton.

Marie’s Home: or, A Glimpse of the Past. By CaroLine AUSTIN.

The Squire’s Grandson.

By J. M. Canwest.

Inseet Ways on Summer Days. By Jznnerr HusPureys.

Magna Charta Stories.
The Wings of Courage.

Edited by ArtHuUR GILMAN, A.M.
From the French of Gzorcz Sanp.
Bab: or, The Triumph of Unselfishness.
Adventures of Mrs. Wishing-to-be.
Our Dolly: Her Words and Ways.

By Ismay Tuorn.
By Auice CorKRAN.
By Mrs. R. H. Reap.

Fairy Faney: What She Heard and Saw. By Mrs. R. H. Reap.

Four Little Mischiefs.

By Rosa MULHOLLAND.
Little Tottie, and Two Other Stories.

By Tomas ARCHER.

Naughty Miss Bunny. By Cuara Murnonzanp.
Chirp and Chatter. With 54 Illustrations by Gorpon Brownz.

BLACKIE’S LIBRARY OF FAMOUS BOOKS FOR
BOYS AND GIRLS.

Illustrated. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, price 1s. 6d. each.

The Rifle Rangers. By Captain
MAYNE REID.

Macaulay’s Essays on English
History.

Northanger Abbey. By JANE Aus-
TEN.

Autobiographies of Boyhood.

Life and Adventures of William
Dampier.

Good Governess.

The Snowstorm. By Mrs. Gorz.

Holiday House. By C. SrNcLarr.

Log-book of a Midshipman.

Poor Jack. By Captain MARRYAT.

Martineau’s Feats on the Fiord.

Parry’s Third Voyage.

Passages in the Life of a Galley-
Slave.

The Downfall of Napoleon.

What Katy Did. By S. Coonmnas.

What Katy Did at School.



Wreck of the ‘‘ Wager”.
The Cruise of the Midge. By M.
Scorr.

Lives and Adventures of Drake
and Cavendish.

Moral Tales, By MARIA EDGEWORTH.

Marryat’s Settlers in Canada.

Tom Cringle’s Log. By M. Scorr,

The Vicar of Wakefield.

The Natural History of Selborne.

Cooper’s The Pathfinder.

The Lamplighter.

Plutarch’s Lives of Greek Heroes.

Deerslayer. By J. FENIMORE CooPER,

Tales of Romance and Fantasy.

Waterton’s Wanderings.

Anson’s Voyage Round the World.

Autobiography of Benjamin
Franklin.

Lamb’s Tales from Shakspeare.
BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 5



LIBRARY OF FAMOUS BOOKS—Continued.

Southey’s Life of Nelson.
Mitford’s Our Village.
Dana’s Two Years Before the Mast.

Marryat’s Children of the New
Forest.

Seott’s The Talisman.
The Basket of Flowers.
Little Women. By Miss ALOCorT.

Masterman Ready. By Captain
MARRYAT.

BLACKIE’S EIGHTEENPENNY SERIES.

Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations,

Holidays at Sandy Bay. By E. 8.

BUCHHEIA.

Best of Intentions. By GERALDINE
MOCKLER.

An Africander Trio. By JANE H.
SPETTIGUE.

A Chum Worth Having. By FLor-
ENCE COOMBE.

Penelope and the Others. By AMY
WALTON.

The Saucy May. By Henry FRITH.
The Little Girl from Next Door.

Uncle Jem’s Stella. By the author
of ‘‘ The ‘'wo Dorothys”.

_Olive and Robin. By the same.
The Ball of Fortune.

The Family Failing. By D. DALE.
Warner’s Chase. By A. S. SWAN.
Climbing the Hill. By A. 5. Swan.
Into the Haven. By A. S. SWAN.
Mona’s Trust. By PENELOPE LESLIE.
In a Stranger’s Garden.

Little Jimmy and his Strange
Adventures.

Pleasures and Pranks.
BELLA PEARSON.

ASoldier’s Son. By ANNETTE LYSTER.

Town Mice in the Country.

Mischief and Merry-making.

Phil and His Father. By Ismay
THORN.

By Isa-

Prim’s Story. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.
Littlebourne Lock. By F. BAYFoRD
HARRISON.

oud: Meg and Wee Dickie.
MARY E. RoPEs.

Grannie. By E. J. Lysaeur.

By



Tales of Daring and Danger. By
G. A. HENTY.

The Seed She Sowed.
Unlucky. By CAROLINE AUSTIN.

Eyerybouy's Business: or, A Friend
in Need. By IsMAY THORN.

The Seven Golden Keys.

The Story of a Queen. By MARY
C. ROWSELL.

Joan’s Adventures.

Yarns on the Beach. By G. A.
HENTY.

A Terrible Coward. By G. MAn-
VILLE FENN.

The Late Miss Hollingford. By
Rosa MULHOLLAND.

Our Frank. By AMY WALTON.

The Pedlar and his Dog. By MARY
C. ROWSELL.

Tom Finch’s Monkey. By J. ©
HUTCHESON.

Filled with Gold. By J. PERRETT.
Edwy. By ANNETTE LysTER.

The Battlefield Treasure.
BAYFORD HARRISON.

Our General: A Story for Girls.
Aunt Hesba’s Charge.

By Order of Queen Maude.
Miss Grantley’s Girls.

The Troubles and Trials of Little
Tim. By GREGSON Gow.

Down and Up Again. By G. Gow.
The Happy Lad. By B. BJORNSON.
The Patriot Martyr.

Madge’s Mistake.
ARMSTRONG.

Box of Stories.

By F.

By ANNIE E.-

By H. HAPPYMAN,
6 BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BLACKIE’S SHILLING SERIES.

Square f’cap 8vo, 128 pp., elegantly bound in cloth,
with Frontispiece.

The Blue Bead. By W. L. RooPER.
Mig and Her Friends. By E. Kine
HALL.

The Two Children in Black.
Our Little Nan. By EMMA LESLIE.

Mother’s Ship. By Hp B. LEaA-
THAM.

Ethelwynne. By ELLA K. SANDERS.
Here, There, and Everywhere.
Lost in Maine Woods.

The Red Umbrella.

Bogie and Fluff.

Cynthia’s Holiday.

Long Time. Ago. By M. CoRBET-
SEYM

Only a Shilling. By the same.
That Little Beggar.

Ronald and Chryssie.

Little Aunt Dorothy.

Fifteen Stamps. By S. KUPPORD.
Marjorie. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.
Sparkles. By Harriet J. SCRIPPS.
Daisy and her Friends.

dust Like a Girl. By P. LESLIE.

Brave Dorette. By JULIA GODDARD. ~

Piecrust Promises.
Summer Fun and Frolic.
The Lost Dog. By Ascorr R. HopE.

A Council of Courtiers.

A Parliament of Pickles.

The Rambles of Three Children.
Sharp Tommy. By E. J. LYsAGut.

Strange Adventures of Nell, Ed-
die, and Toby. By G. MOCKLER.

Freda’s Folly. By M. S. HAYORAFT.
Philip Danford. By JULIA GODDARD.
Mr. Lipscombe’s Apples. By Do.
The Youngest Princess.

A Change for the Worse.
Arthur’s Temptation.

How the Strike Began.

Our Two Starlings. By C. REDFORD.
A Gypsy against Her Will.

An Emigrant Boy’s Story.

The Castle on the Shore. .

John a’ Dale. By Mary C. ROWSELL,
Jock and his Friend.

Gladys. By E. O'BYRNE.

In the Summer Holidays.

Tales from the Russian of Madame
Kabalensky. By G. JENNER.

Cinderella’s Cousin. By PENELOPE.
Their New Home. By A. S. FENN.
The Children of Haycombe.
Janie’s Holiday. By C. REDFORD.
The Cruise of the ‘‘ Petrel ”.
The Wise Princess. By H. M.CAPEs.
A Boy Musician.

Hatto’s Tower. By M. C. RoWSELL.
Fairy Lovebairn’s Favourites.
Alf Jetsam. By Mrs. GEO. CUPPLES.
The Redfords. By Mrs. G. CUPPLES.
Missy. By F. BAYFORD HARRISON.
Hidden Seed. By Emma LESLIE.
Jack’s Two Sovereigns.

Ursula’s Aunt. By ANNIE S. FENN.
A Little Adventurer.

Olive Mount. By ANNIE 8. FENN.
Three Little Ones. By C. Lancron.
Tom Watkin’s Mistake.

Two Little Brothers.

The New Boy at Merriton.

The Blind Boy of Dresden.

Jon of Iceland: A True Story.
Stories from Shakespeare.
Every Man in his Place.
Fireside Fairies.

To the Sea in Ships.

Little Daniel; A Story of the Rhine.
Jack’s Victory: Stories about Dogs.
Story of a King.

Prince Alexis: or, Old Russia.
Sasha the Serf: Stories of Russia.
True Stories of Foreign History.
BLACKIE AND: SON’S BOOKS FOR CHILDREN. —- 7



BLACKIE’S NINEPENNY SERIES.
Neatly bound in cloth extra, Each 96 pp., with Illustration.

The Adventures of a Leather
Purse. By M. CoRBET-SEYMOUR.

A Bright Little Pair. By. L. E.
TIDDEMAN.

In the Gypsies’ Van. By E. LESLIE.
The Squire of the Parish.

Little Ladybird.

The Hollow Tree.

Merry Nights. By JEAN Gow.
Jocelyn Gower. By JANE DEAKIN.
Father’s Wife. By CIcELY FULCHER.
The Luck-penny. By C. A. MERCER.
Walter’s Feats. By A. R. Hopz.
Ella’s Brown Gown.

My Aunt Nan. By E. Kine HAL
Toby. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.

He, She, and It. By A. DEV. Dawson.
Darby and Joan. By PENROSE.
The Carved Box.

A Little English Gentleman.

The Doctor’s Lass.

Little Miss Masterful.

Spark and I. By ANNIE ARMSTRONG.
‘What Hilda Saw.

An Australian Childhood.

A Sprig of Honeysuckle.

Kitty Carroll. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.
A Joke for a Picnic.

Patty’s Ideas. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.
Daphne: A Story of Self-conquest.



Cross Purposes, and The Shadows.
By GEORGE MAC DONALD.

Lily and Rose in One.
Crowded Out. By M. B. MANWELL.
Tom in a Tangle. By T. SPARROW.

Things will Take a Turn. By
BEATRICE HARRADEN.

Max or Baby. By Ismay THORN.
The Lost Thimble: and other Stories.
Jack-a-Dandy. By E. J. Lysacut.
A Day of Adventures.

The Golden Plums: and other Stories.
The Queen of Squats.

Little Troublesome.

Shucks. By Emma LESLIE.

Sylvia Brooke. By H. M. Capgs.
The Little Cousin. By A. S. FENN.
In Cloudland. By Mrs. MUSGRAVE.
Jack and the Gypsies.

My Lady May.

A Little Hero. By Mrs. MUSGRAVE.
Prince Jon’s Pilgrimage.
Harold’s Ambition.

Sepperl the Drummer Boy.
Hans the Painter.

Fisherman Grim.

Aboard the ‘‘ Mersey ”.

A Blind Pupil. By ANNIE S. FENN.

Lost. ang neue: By Mrs. CARL
Rory



BLACKIE’S SIXPENNY SERIES.
Neatly bound in cloth extra. Each contains 64 pages and a Coloured Cut.

Her New Kitten. By GERALDINE

MOCKLER,

Sister Estella. By M. E. BRADSHAW-
ISHERWOOD.

A Tame Free Robin. By ANNIE
M. L. JARVIS.

A Long Chase. By G. MockKLER.

Big Brother Diek. By H. B. LEa-
THAN.

Flix and Flox.

Two is Company.

Top Brick off the Chimney.
Six in a Doll’s House.

A New Friend. By G. MocKLeEr.
- 8 BLACKIE AND SON’S BOOKS FOR CHILDREN.



SIXPENNY SERIES.—Continued,

The King’s Castle.

Nobody’s Pet. By A. DE V. Dawson.
By F. S. HoLurinas.

Lady Patience.
Verta and Jaunette.

Daisy’s Visit to Uncle Jack,
Mrs. Holland’s Peaches.
Marjory’s White Rat.
Grandmother’s Forget-me-nots.
From over the Sea.

The Kitchen Cat. By Amy WALTON.
The Royal Eagle. By L. THompson.
Two Little Mice. By Mrs. GARLIOK.

A Little Man of War.

Lady Daisy. By CAROLINE STEWART.

Dew. By H. Mary WILSON.

Chris’s Old Violin. By J. LockHart.
Mischievous Jack. By A. CoRKRAN.

The Twins. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.

Pet’s Project. By Cora LANGTON.
The Chosen Treat. By C. Wyatt.
Little Neighbours.
Jim. By CHRISTIAN BURKE.

Little Curiosity. By J. M. CALLWELL.

Sara the Wool-gatherer.
Fairy Stories: told by PENELOPE.

ANew Year’s Tale, By M. A. CURRIE.

By A. 8S. FENN.



Little Mop, By Mrs. CHARLES BRay.
The Tree Cake. By ‘W. L. ROOPER.
Nurse Peggy, and Little Dog Trip:
Fanny’s King. By Dar.Ey DALE.”
Wild Marsh Marigolds. By Do.
Kitty’s Cousin.

Cleared at Last.

Little Dolly Forbes.

A Year with Nellie. By A.S. F E NN.
The Little Brown Bird.

The Maid of Domremy.

Little Eric: A Story of Honesty.
Unele Ben the Whaler.

The Palace of Luxury.

The Charcoal Burner.

Willy Black: A Story of Doing Right.
The Horse and his Ways.

The Shoemaker’s Present.
Lights to Walk by.

The Little Merchant.

Nicholina: A Story about an Iceberg;



Tales Easy and Small.

Old Dick Grey.

Maud’s Doll and Her Walk.

In Holiday Time, F
Whisk and Buzz. :

NEW SERIES OF CHILDREN’S BOOKS.
BY WELL-KNOWN AUTHORS.

In prettily-designed cloth covers, Illustrated. Very suitable for suns
. School Rewards.

12 Books of 48 pages, 3d. each: the Packet of 12, 3s.
12 Books of 32 pages, 2d. each: the Packet of 12, 2s.
12 Books of 16 pages, 1d. each: the Packet of 12, 1s.

*,* A Complete List of Books for the Young, prices from 1d. to 7s.°6d., 26
with Synopsis of their Contents, will be supplied on Application.

LONDON: BLACKIE & SON, Lauren; GLASGOW AND DUBLIN.

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describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFWS' 'sip-files00033.txt'
7bd01ed45c4f8550896aae26621ef439
915dfaa54c14372092188de13cf28522ab05e5bd
'2011-12-21T00:33:36-05:00'
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFWT' 'sip-files00034.txt'
2c5299da818578ad79fe80b649533eb8
547c1ccba5cd9ce7327073d5ac9b25e199a88b28
'2011-12-21T00:31:48-05:00'
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFWU' 'sip-files00035.txt'
e60b7e4e762abc07ded00fdb5d05d618
83dd633774695bf3446347366e07d0608a5a064f
'2011-12-21T00:30:43-05:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFWV' 'sip-files00036.txt'
c599ddc1448a477e04932e14edb3f146
bc3f63227801ad78bae06a8cf1789c14aadf3e8b
'2011-12-21T00:32:16-05:00'
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFWW' 'sip-files00037.txt'
d8097b24846803399cec30142e386b37
35490085d60c6b296e30f66be9e687c55d8960f3
'2011-12-21T00:32:29-05:00'
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFWX' 'sip-files00038.txt'
a0ee14ded5f52778e01550d2c4424dfe
4fd396db7695dc00aeabdeaec21ae6b7adfa8d1f
'2011-12-21T00:31:50-05:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFWY' 'sip-files00039.txt'
453dfd222cde799817289871ce44639e
dd98981d9a333eec156fde2ae8a54e879ba55b80
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFWZ' 'sip-files00040.txt'
18271a3b0072ec945633b3785fdb2991
d03b7db7b7680b450dd68b0396d8184e6f10e209
'2011-12-21T00:31:56-05:00'
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXA' 'sip-files00041.txt'
ca718d4ce80b60e36838dafe079488a9
cd3b30ccefc00f9f452a0a7421bafd956c413c33
'2011-12-21T00:32:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXB' 'sip-files00042.txt'
675998196a54706140ab845fb0608479
b0455e0717629443104f1ac9afbe5c761086e85f
'2011-12-21T00:32:25-05:00'
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXC' 'sip-files00043.txt'
6783ea399578f4ffceea0bb6c4797047
a143b330d524ca4551f5ff6fd99dc480e00aaa79
'2011-12-21T00:33:15-05:00'
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXD' 'sip-files00044.txt'
8bb62b062bb624ae6271cf51e234ca03
26400e06480f8bd5324b20a528051bcbd528b804
'2011-12-21T00:30:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXE' 'sip-files00045.txt'
24bbf2529c582ca355d83036a5af71eb
5c643d3faeba1413d26892b657fb0b24bb60b4b0
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXF' 'sip-files00046.txt'
105b7f7126a5735a9b7d52de12109942
6720d25b19f4df60bd5e5ea445f6f386a1f69a59
'2011-12-21T00:31:51-05:00'
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXG' 'sip-files00047.txt'
703302bc899dc780dc8af19a17f2ff43
5ca44fd2daa97e4e74947fcfde99ce8d988748af
'2011-12-21T00:32:35-05:00'
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXH' 'sip-files00048.txt'
a1c972f99d28d7b50d12b7c5c88b5246
e1882aac023f1a66dca3e137ef18e5f2f607300c
'2011-12-21T00:32:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXI' 'sip-files00049.txt'
bbc485ae9905ef6a177589201813332c
3e54649950dcc9fcf30cfb3ecf5c0ef62e14f16f
'2011-12-21T00:30:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXJ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
254b721834532c015cf666ce6d9f14cb
78c0c17c05af913b216687f46ed0bf9416547a3f
'2011-12-21T00:33:33-05:00'
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXK' 'sip-files00051.txt'
d6bea2db735f3a8e1d2a7743598b738f
744bd59f77a7eebd84927673621c7b3632c8a815
'2011-12-21T00:32:31-05:00'
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXL' 'sip-files00052.txt'
e4316e1db9581dbc89749a914c10ee61
38879d58ceb5dcbf5d641d50772b60938b00d759
'2011-12-21T00:33:37-05:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXM' 'sip-files00053.txt'
9d6017fc6078c547b75985f9251db534
1d1ae718ea8df30b9b6db32c13bddfa9019cb43d
'2011-12-21T00:31:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXN' 'sip-files00054.txt'
490bc70296e8edac6cd71f20bbd8aed2
e93a3bfa3433245371a340c7590cf6baf202d797
'2011-12-21T00:32:26-05:00'
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXO' 'sip-files00055.txt'
1b9528ce3a5163b7c4c8753eedc3b786
54ad1e64235dd528dc4e2e9acb42d1c9a18e8818
'2011-12-21T00:31:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXP' 'sip-files00056.txt'
8e1f5c24ed41e25966f881f12a86987b
8c6b1965108ab5a593d1bdb44e5ba486652c41cb
'2011-12-21T00:32:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXQ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
d0b4b9a31a7c403dd67b82122becf7ed
01bb3168aa202eb71ae7518b8793560d6eb5bb38
'2011-12-21T00:32:02-05:00'
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXR' 'sip-files00058.txt'
179f65934f2f4a49b0676aa56c68c7e1
62e11596981e540e8383c1ec211dc1a6e4020025
'2011-12-21T00:33:03-05:00'
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXS' 'sip-files00059.txt'
605dd224fb07ec59f1472339c3b38bd8
e38773c698ce9d46ebf59e6c9b413edf8296df47
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXT' 'sip-files00060.txt'
39796bd7a56ebb5dbfce33435b718c90
9d948bf0768a9ee154c4e2c79946e46c1a3ed879
'2011-12-21T00:32:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXU' 'sip-files00061.txt'
9aab51aa4be3bc88497a1b62bc07ea01
9c208e12438bd4fe9b60b1030ecd422c5ac4bdec
'2011-12-21T00:32:07-05:00'
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXV' 'sip-files00062.txt'
f3ba310fb3882cc1a96d1b2cde7ac6e4
3cf6daac781de0d5c211b9323be5d9d608b9c128
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXW' 'sip-files00063.txt'
2759b620075da602860ce3578d7f707d
ef1dd94c0ffefc38d5fcada8e2a01cec047c234d
'2011-12-21T00:32:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXX' 'sip-files00064.txt'
13a29d3658d737e9d621efec20e2d4ea
cd6aa94b6bb8139f02218a3ab449651fbf418981
'2011-12-21T00:32:01-05:00'
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXY' 'sip-files00065.txt'
e4e25c718179428c45e615509ce5b729
f0d6df27d8f37ec30189b8bb1723b5a56540dd39
'2011-12-21T00:31:13-05:00'
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFXZ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
9e068c4d2b1b760243b4d5bce38c28b4
5afce6278aa197b9c4ae64e2d82be853c6dd7e09
'2011-12-21T00:32:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYA' 'sip-files00067.txt'
f3e4bc14481a3a6061df6aa96c204593
6ac7b08884d84456dc5bef1786466df97652f8c3
'2011-12-21T00:32:53-05:00'
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYB' 'sip-files00068.txt'
c3c29c08cc4ec7403e5c8129ef836622
420c49272982dd09833fc6c405bbbfecade31bdf
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYC' 'sip-files00069.txt'
57fa11924d92e10a7e87c32052758bb4
cec707e048cec86d0b811711fbf4fce260e2545c
'2011-12-21T00:31:02-05:00'
describe
'998' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYD' 'sip-files00070.txt'
3cef8136469d1baa3eefd4a5aead8a92
b76c382dfca2add1ad72ded5be49bd6630fe2916
'2011-12-21T00:33:02-05:00'
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYE' 'sip-files00071.txt'
08fee2bcf19fd5034c0ef0189f5f7ceb
4f40fd896020c82abd74198c6ecf1c1fd96e3684
'2011-12-21T00:33:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYF' 'sip-files00072.txt'
b9aa3348ed8732a83a1437abba13a676
38f5c0017661b6d7f63782c64c7fc7b10b4981d5
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYG' 'sip-files00073.txt'
e12b74ea1070eab95091154354ddbb9b
a864aeb992b9ebfb46ed0aff7fae0b40d27be76f
'2011-12-21T00:31:43-05:00'
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYH' 'sip-files00074.txt'
15094c98471caa9ff6cb72ce33e28646
7b50c04a52bc30fdfd2adfd3efa11ea6a2f9abd0
'2011-12-21T00:32:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYI' 'sip-files00075.txt'
f1ae63f3141019273782fea757886c5b
cd355258c03c13a7942963e231180b8db8fa2b9b
'2011-12-21T00:33:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYJ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
a939a107cb4f1641b4d166c8bdb2871b
7d81e35511c3c03e7897d04b10cbc2f6f9b70f4b
'2011-12-21T00:32:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYK' 'sip-files00077.txt'
38758191bd7f7dc34beeeb09bd85da5a
bcf562a1171d621555026ad7118bbe131039f4a9
'2011-12-21T00:31:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYL' 'sip-files00078.txt'
f609a4090436d3e56e85a3eb516bd9c3
ea74dd07f809e192db0952cacaa4c3b6fad134fd
'2011-12-21T00:33:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYM' 'sip-files00079.txt'
0827d23d696cb86f0118aa73047f450f
2fd7a539468ec5e83072400638eb92c9a6011f4d
'2011-12-21T00:31:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYN' 'sip-files00080.txt'
907e685a44819254a95d18b8bc473ea6
bc772a52104deb94b0ee323cb6b614f794935b09
'2011-12-21T00:33:28-05:00'
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYO' 'sip-files00081.txt'
2b1f953d9ac53fb7697af9a7d79637e2
b230305c4d0695f8ee2fbb06004f88118651395b
'2011-12-21T00:32:50-05:00'
describe
'909' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYP' 'sip-files00082.txt'
5acec7bc64a1811c5bd8fe980bf3d282
a9425bee394776967d129a722ce687bd526cddb6
'2011-12-21T00:31:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYQ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
36ba90601ddb70fdcf3d0b9babe09fde
aa09c71e4496bc32e97494706c2b4697969934af
'2011-12-21T00:31:06-05:00'
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYR' 'sip-files00084.txt'
d7d6fe5bd3a13d15b201ea595526b4ab
5ecac9a39831c17fd0de9f16b3be051d0db90af5
'2011-12-21T00:31:10-05:00'
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYS' 'sip-files00085.txt'
983516c1568ac2a609cb6e8c07aa075f
df876726f09de9fdefbbb7496d5e79607ff73de8
'2011-12-21T00:33:47-05:00'
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYT' 'sip-files00086.txt'
68d994ad6e300127b4fdb4e7268b7aac
7e2cb3e1440cd8b550468f473a43992b7b4dd756
'2011-12-21T00:33:38-05:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYU' 'sip-files00087.txt'
12d4faa47c12a8077aa37d9686cbc9ab
038b09f9c185fa68a8a7a456fc181c67523505d7
'2011-12-21T00:31:45-05:00'
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYV' 'sip-files00088.txt'
efe4abcf4a9c5561a2605373346fd3da
fe513016ed8c1124b46a3204233e124e1b01d5a0
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYW' 'sip-files00089.txt'
2458608458c65cb14e99a8262db24930
29ab89d36d7f7a0e00ad0a0483c795eee6eae178
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYX' 'sip-files00090.txt'
45873d9be7b46f9309a406e3ebfc3825
5268b505a1948e97da733c9221914c9ae1916683
'2011-12-21T00:32:54-05:00'
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYY' 'sip-files00091.txt'
91e3d2e8f478a3b1c4e55529033cd1a7
57282b9a0cfeae9c55ddb63f73e13d6b2f16584f
'2011-12-21T00:30:29-05:00'
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFYZ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
7357119a686847c2b2117a820638cf45
b84f6b949bd22e701397ea6e90eec4fc83a3aff1
'2011-12-21T00:32:28-05:00'
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZA' 'sip-files00093.txt'
2bb54b84bbf2035b9c66b903b89c8d95
efa4fcea4264d19c9d36591366834fe7e683d676
'2011-12-21T00:33:48-05:00'
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZB' 'sip-files00094.txt'
6770e3e63223d88479b3ed55c3b1eea8
34bfa3eebbbbdeb6077de821acb931558b140bbe
'2011-12-21T00:31:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZC' 'sip-files00095.txt'
8604d429c02a83577971a3013c926f65
91dde6e2626ddd2a74720cf527f006d939bb234e
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZD' 'sip-files00096.txt'
94f1d11e478ba97dc83ec7a329bb2081
3397af00390720756ea38363874bc4e79ce73894
'2011-12-21T00:30:51-05:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZE' 'sip-files00097.txt'
c40de8eed8b70f97ff5d2e81e1f66775
9593142c4ed6c659f9f1f4c47868c1ab47b1566e
'2011-12-21T00:31:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZF' 'sip-files00098.txt'
27eb0923d0f2a5aa3ee758ef92179607
fe368bc8d797571d8a4291d9e9c7869ed18d5181
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZG' 'sip-files00099.txt'
9d30d74fe9461d5955ed6e2bfe147198
7d45838bc9af985ea611b00840b0367158ea7721
'2011-12-21T00:30:46-05:00'
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZH' 'sip-files00100.txt'
2df5950bca48e1f80af12119467a24ab
79b3014663d9426a21bc69d495c7723adcea82ff
'2011-12-21T00:33:04-05:00'
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZI' 'sip-files00101.txt'
68f9feea4cf77afba2657ea959311882
64c9f67f8c8459cb35b07599acf4363033f192bf
describe
'660' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZJ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
0a624719397609630f0dd9c87129b0d6
85acb7138e2af47070ebc5f32dc72fffa342f1cf
'2011-12-21T00:32:08-05:00'
describe
'1662' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZK' 'sip-files00103.txt'
e468cebc823c30e9e9b5b843cddb88cf
b99f648434e26a6b10d3914d0a7dc5952f116551
'2011-12-21T00:31:23-05:00'
describe
'1737' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZL' 'sip-files00104.txt'
7f2696d7254aba13639bb6b7e7fafea0
a669f681dcaf876992de1b4c0d47593210644452
describe
'1777' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZM' 'sip-files00105.txt'
e696dd4e84c0ebf4d95218b9e32ed26b
2d02a060a680c86ab20cffea1230fcb59aeca2ef
'2011-12-21T00:31:47-05:00'
describe
'2189' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZN' 'sip-files00106.txt'
d895c0ab8fdffcf025627fd7f908b0c5
b5413b7fa5aad166a72378334a873fab0aad9ba4
'2011-12-21T00:31:17-05:00'
describe
'2405' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZO' 'sip-files00107.txt'
afb324bc2fff0c8bc08af8d743c4d15a
27369bf022828066685b0ef302aa61194b6f72f3
'2011-12-21T00:33:22-05:00'
describe
'2553' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZP' 'sip-files00108.txt'
66d4f5505d6f5a026c865cc26ed755b7
dec72fef763a55a52991402bc9119591d14d0c8b
'2011-12-21T00:32:45-05:00'
describe
'2290' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZQ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
7f750bd72ceaab24b4561b87891ef338
4aaca08339c8c289a74c448ef054f644245c4131
'2011-12-21T00:31:27-05:00'
describe
'2160' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZR' 'sip-files00110.txt'
18a58703f2aef461a42f361b2479e924
5087e315298177561932c77986649a9c954c9844
'2011-12-21T00:32:15-05:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZS' 'sip-files00001.pro'
46e6a4a1e3e9cce62b08f267a7960f3e
12fdddb36b950c50a8ed4d82825bd3c3b2474241
'2011-12-21T00:31:26-05:00'
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZT' 'sip-files00003.pro'
31c168b2e8bc287ecc138c3e2be50aec
e076b6a149b4480139c62005a340d63f1848fb7c
'2011-12-21T00:33:29-05:00'
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZU' 'sip-files00006.pro'
5905c784cfe426c7b6bb9fb8bd1ae0ae
917492f2f6ebfc82ea78bda785a49f23ca6eb394
'2011-12-21T00:33:43-05:00'
describe
'3289' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZV' 'sip-files00007.pro'
1face26accaaff80642deba477b30d13
9f527e3da728fd1fe475db6b99c4546d597e2d1a
describe
'16452' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZW' 'sip-files00009.pro'
809a2aed53e8b5f5df9a283f320a6de1
d49eab0abca701695bff088b0ce4bd28602af5d3
describe
'24222' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZX' 'sip-files00010.pro'
6c1b78a7a3d4951901edcd275e21bfb0
14fb017a263cf1f12aaad5be991b84be74ccfd12
'2011-12-21T00:32:03-05:00'
describe
'25157' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZY' 'sip-files00011.pro'
df008fe0d8f5b1da971c893c42d638ce
47ad57b89686eaf234de106b408f71e732622433
'2011-12-21T00:30:38-05:00'
describe
'24881' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABFZZ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
a7683fb2cf8dc5925bfea74a15e84e9f
2f05f20053ece620cbd2b91252f33596eda51e3a
'2011-12-21T00:31:25-05:00'
describe
'24796' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAA' 'sip-files00013.pro'
d34e80169948ce72bf55d990ffb6d466
7c6e31f4fd34b69c281e2afb654faed68cf87f4a
describe
'24169' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAB' 'sip-files00014.pro'
644c8666e43770f1a8e725e60e831e7c
3595a6831c9948f855e1f850d269ce2b2dbd646f
'2011-12-21T00:31:01-05:00'
describe
'25257' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAC' 'sip-files00015.pro'
d94a22f8c56cb29d13f78cdce85e8e35
8577dd53ea66e5f12456c7e0d999bdf83f60f2ce
'2011-12-21T00:31:34-05:00'
describe
'25725' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAD' 'sip-files00016.pro'
1dbd1bed600f92b1db7f813256e66cd4
a2d4127cc007e8203a9b2b60c1d9e6f7dc081057
describe
'25658' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAE' 'sip-files00017.pro'
9bf24bd74878c016b0a5e5d0c9f3c8f6
71a41219439362ab4467bf94adc3a1f5ee7667e3
describe
'25685' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAF' 'sip-files00018.pro'
14906799663f3e2744bf359e48f2d711
02fa264712018762442121ee6a09b133a4ec125d
'2011-12-21T00:33:06-05:00'
describe
'24922' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAG' 'sip-files00019.pro'
b78d48cc1dd9114b19ea9d717403d8b1
c4a35070183504345e020b2f81291fead221b570
'2011-12-21T00:32:21-05:00'
describe
'25448' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAH' 'sip-files00020.pro'
6208ed2063d0ab858f2fdf6ee21aaac3
8aae16a690bfcdfc4ae15269134335a02bba8092
'2011-12-21T00:32:37-05:00'
describe
'24591' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAI' 'sip-files00021.pro'
afb81ad8da30de857006ed0ae83b3973
a516241f8f2e70d7b070c94647caf9297e84fc46
describe
'25398' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAJ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
00e073641397f8315439d93c0d6ffee6
6ee05e7a84439d942c563a839b488cc99f2e1edc
'2011-12-21T00:33:27-05:00'
describe
'23775' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAK' 'sip-files00023.pro'
551495cb60e6fb1d34e7ddfab0734383
2c3fda086c90e9c0ba38ecab4b4080acba6537bd
'2011-12-21T00:33:23-05:00'
describe
'23764' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAL' 'sip-files00024.pro'
ca7c73e3bac8fc6219fad7ca3d53e77f
8d98ab976873a59b3cabfe258b78183b4de848c5
describe
'24777' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAM' 'sip-files00025.pro'
8e23b95fbcf76cfa7386c61993d4f666
4f005f827d841d0c13e38e48b6d5fb96261e3ad0
'2011-12-21T00:31:57-05:00'
describe
'25288' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAN' 'sip-files00026.pro'
57a2d4f6563d7d581f8f928daf547a40
f8700953464be8c242b776b3379f1330965b2b56
'2011-12-21T00:33:18-05:00'
describe
'23032' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAO' 'sip-files00027.pro'
bb9b864e6eea809a390a8e5de57fb48e
2712580d36363f89e3e8d80cf4bb2f09a090e53e
'2011-12-21T00:32:47-05:00'
describe
'24419' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAP' 'sip-files00028.pro'
976dc6c4220cf90be7ca831edff53422
8e2b10938d2cc7824eeacee805067178b3b83c71
describe
'24995' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAQ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
1a5625e8f89e662460f8042064cd24cd
9a191d15159b7dc6e4d5ae65f1c518d0e6f54559
describe
'25434' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAR' 'sip-files00030.pro'
f8773549826ccdf5f4dd5f5b41d01c10
a117f67b95c12f17ced6dbf2fdfdf00fd4533f3b
describe
'25459' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAS' 'sip-files00031.pro'
1b67c5fd76d5bfa717b63c40ca2b58c9
76f19277c13b25bb239c612a6332c87edd1ff5ec
'2011-12-21T00:30:42-05:00'
describe
'25594' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAT' 'sip-files00032.pro'
ecab982731b10826e8f6b878e1ca8301
1fb2811ea3e23f25583a72974508fb2edcd9ea59
'2011-12-21T00:33:30-05:00'
describe
'24362' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAU' 'sip-files00033.pro'
2f43b3dc8abe137b698291acc689d076
e5703e95ee0955a294e8b7ecbdc8771bfa951e6f
'2011-12-21T00:33:26-05:00'
describe
'24244' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAV' 'sip-files00034.pro'
9aac1ea867994fb0d4f33fba458699e8
cb1d2e867e8f200ddaebc7d47f526f612caa8e90
describe
'23889' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAW' 'sip-files00035.pro'
979ecc63a53f794d0e628292dda5afdb
6d3264a3d8689809e3e4e50110d5b12c931e41d9
describe
'24586' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAX' 'sip-files00036.pro'
f105eb60d783364ea167341a42df3e8d
55627b0a0231c6e24fe1282f7fedd9d2c34460f6
describe
'22888' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAY' 'sip-files00037.pro'
005d253eb6cb0b16e54f845acff0551c
5dfa890ed51f207dafeb74feed86b5d011b3b04a
describe
'22677' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGAZ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
ea0902e98672694510544fa992ff009a
be5ebb8abb9f048c40b6b77b907cf827889a060f
'2011-12-21T00:32:40-05:00'
describe
'25297' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBA' 'sip-files00039.pro'
d0c42610ba0cd410b1f72a4895bc4b84
c3a9e371188981137843e62ac8770bf01651a1c9
describe
'24393' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBB' 'sip-files00040.pro'
015e54ee430db53293170dc2c066034f
72d5c02571ec274e0121371d61c4f102e4cf038d
'2011-12-21T00:32:43-05:00'
describe
'24800' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBC' 'sip-files00041.pro'
222d18f218873f03fc853867ec4c9c52
0aee61363a00928880f215debd623a18a0e8c1a6
'2011-12-21T00:31:41-05:00'
describe
'23944' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBD' 'sip-files00042.pro'
c2cd5466da692e166b9ef51ea161e56e
e53efc85d53c5ad7ae0726badecb3eb2809e640c
describe
'23811' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBE' 'sip-files00043.pro'
f063120d80fc8dc35700537482f4e8fe
e5b41c40f5515f8edd52bcdbe9741d755abc3768
'2011-12-21T00:30:34-05:00'
describe
'23513' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBF' 'sip-files00044.pro'
f7b125fe7ed2ef50f8bad6a8829cddad
114b52adce632284754b0d67283f32046f8640f6
'2011-12-21T00:32:56-05:00'
describe
'24716' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBG' 'sip-files00045.pro'
f94bf3e77ea81dc942459a7a46d0ccea
78a215e176a8a3715266465e97f418fc01d77570
'2011-12-21T00:31:35-05:00'
describe
'22957' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBH' 'sip-files00046.pro'
bae8e566bed1044f257df032cb2a4488
338f9a3194b082645dc2167ad04e51fa8ec61c8d
describe
'23345' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBI' 'sip-files00047.pro'
40e6dc4581a64c2039f2ec94d125f024
78790be1f6d46d48134f273edc29d97a1857471f
'2011-12-21T00:31:19-05:00'
describe
'23857' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBJ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
6bb37a3c0588c09d0a868f3cf545f60c
8b64c7706231593f5f4c9e59505f8ff04ae34ea1
describe
'22925' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBK' 'sip-files00049.pro'
8f58f38643e522e892f0430dbf2e2e31
a2ba37cd8a531e7809afa8c05b8fe62deae4043e
'2011-12-21T00:30:48-05:00'
describe
'23874' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBL' 'sip-files00050.pro'
204eaba81d2d4eafc07a438f04e6d710
549627e090c990cc2e272c861deec2e271960615
'2011-12-21T00:33:08-05:00'
describe
'25101' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBM' 'sip-files00051.pro'
1fc95c738732985c42e07916e6b2e6e3
26faa3c227a60f6710252ff592234dbc7205c447
describe
'25330' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBN' 'sip-files00052.pro'
03eddc123527f41eead88a1f027b71a2
34383967f098274b58de10df6f531ce62dd23a38
describe
'25588' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBO' 'sip-files00053.pro'
b8491150dd56181392dfdfaa332defb3
511fe6d7b9d64d386837488dccd791a630c99b3c
describe
'24913' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBP' 'sip-files00054.pro'
da86f31ccdf588600228b0b596f1f364
4dcdac85541c06227c10d420306c16cab6b143f6
'2011-12-21T00:31:42-05:00'
describe
'26691' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBQ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
29e5eb8448d81e2d5cafcde0a37be9c3
30318a95f88fdebe327cd08d014d98f1845690a2
describe
'23734' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBR' 'sip-files00056.pro'
f4b6c84b538661fb783b786e9a4c4dde
6aba4e9eac33fdb9fe01e6bb933543b9cdde76f7
describe
'24759' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBS' 'sip-files00057.pro'
e22d84ed583a941177e747f8e504efed
d1bbf6fd373b5646c4278dc7a9f6967389826bac
describe
'24299' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBT' 'sip-files00058.pro'
74de79fa5c1d38201d726365ca3d9282
2dd719e98e49952faaea2a964bbed6d6e3694e22
describe
'24443' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBU' 'sip-files00059.pro'
56c7f614e9f0dc5243bc5c36ab4792ae
53dea4e1941e63aefd5f2831dcf6930fe4fcf985
describe
'22950' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBV' 'sip-files00060.pro'
83d9c742c07dd93ed152f133ed35ee29
1e5f90e27cc7641277b0abfdafff3ad144df9ac3
'2011-12-21T00:31:28-05:00'
describe
'24722' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBW' 'sip-files00061.pro'
d0ad892e2ab6066c941a9f10a6764974
323bab5b1db32e79987d814b4ee28c23dbcee5bc
describe
'23969' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBX' 'sip-files00062.pro'
fbcd6116b0ceffd7508e005466ab0871
774a679d0c17fb650ccfe5c6962c633b61e0e6d9
describe
'26108' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBY' 'sip-files00063.pro'
884f2a38764a6ee69a947120789cc5d8
a8404628a64f10e086c4938ee78aacad98d47a9c
describe
'22423' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGBZ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
b7e47789dbed9d87d581f4db8a345e2d
d82f9612ae057bcfc3d460fcb139a3c3031e3156
'2011-12-21T00:33:46-05:00'
describe
'23391' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCA' 'sip-files00065.pro'
c909775d89d2800d85771c7c5f84f816
4e6377aa5332a0a8014cd98d80ec42fbeeef8563
describe
'25821' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCB' 'sip-files00066.pro'
547c505a338557932dfaeb4d8f23c137
c52d8f3b17bb83426e5f68ec9e6059ef843734b5
describe
'25331' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCC' 'sip-files00067.pro'
613cd02489b1b4c1750e35e925067b0f
f34422a2b9a0d934ec94a62333524fb092788d24
describe
'25960' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCD' 'sip-files00068.pro'
d594416933032531bfd7f379efa57f56
523460036da829231657e6dfa449f6a9d6efad5f
'2011-12-21T00:32:57-05:00'
describe
'24718' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCE' 'sip-files00069.pro'
7869ad139bc6d0730ae096a1e9c1dbe6
60a091eb3abcb1b5a0bb95c2c47e79276bd87d0b
describe
'25404' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCF' 'sip-files00070.pro'
1424476affba9d684b63abfb93221bf9
bd035f5c986b9c8443fe4241ac04856570c29672
'2011-12-21T00:33:50-05:00'
describe
'25231' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCG' 'sip-files00071.pro'
0253f4d2a2b0397fa503ef433251a0a4
4d6f4bc528144120b2d37254c69d39dbc8a09a3c
describe
'24904' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCH' 'sip-files00072.pro'
702b1ad1e3f9b40597fd70538eabb9d9
e8975dd2bb1be9ba0ee6627e5fe9f2b12f5081a2
describe
'24201' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCI' 'sip-files00073.pro'
1734cd74367aeff6476c15802dbd4fca
6af637197bd2bec0e1f0d756a3e620bc5073e7c7
'2011-12-21T00:33:49-05:00'
describe
'23439' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCJ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
fc6f2e0336e3cae81eb1824e5843d1c6
37431460fd45f98232c65d68fcb75c4264a7e107
describe
'25212' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCK' 'sip-files00075.pro'
eb4d63ab6592f2c7ff89543d1a66d543
c8ceb1786ffaf3578f5f433588382edac0d56b56
describe
'23094' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCL' 'sip-files00076.pro'
68d562ad21f4b4083f88840f47a269ab
e4973753f4fc77a2e5205df9d60ea2bf1211248b
describe
'24680' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCM' 'sip-files00077.pro'
5c078c3b702b8383666df2c58a572b34
2c589f771d67cb8433a6ae6e5dfdcbcc4a053302
describe
'26000' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCN' 'sip-files00078.pro'
9815c373386d8e48b3b58239329707f9
74ba9a89a210846f8c43c624abc4d19840d05b9f
describe
'25258' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCO' 'sip-files00079.pro'
11dec1247a9e8c4335136249e9aa363f
a58417f4c9a2d1dde22870a8ff1cb7445096eed9
describe
'24455' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCP' 'sip-files00080.pro'
ea1bf7695ebf66430b4e1dddce65358b
27f014c31e419ea4860498e847a002e17d867088
describe
'24857' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCQ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
0d4cc504e76cd8d48ff90bc1fe776a1a
6fe5a4e4f3bd16a0bedbb991ad73e9683b2181bc
describe
'22750' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCR' 'sip-files00082.pro'
d3ae9ed80ddf83bc482af083cebd0408
b06f282dbec43ad96ea19b8ab6b1606bee0fdade
describe
'24806' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCS' 'sip-files00083.pro'
a3d385ba10d680a28bff41e704ceb1ef
a06271e39d6583382f8d1c28895dc7e98199cce3
'2011-12-21T00:32:09-05:00'
describe
'23495' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCT' 'sip-files00084.pro'
8587650ddcd21549300258ee069facc1
94ad3fa30baf45f62621f88196af3e29ef996863
describe
'23121' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCU' 'sip-files00085.pro'
898a8903f838e6c921265553e9b4b928
91d692c69acd9dbe249b4b938b8541e2f72bedfe
describe
'24133' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCV' 'sip-files00086.pro'
8b31f6e20fea3383a9bd0480b06fe111
badd5b1fa6b4893127f0f2283bfc4724fba66c0b
describe
'25388' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCW' 'sip-files00087.pro'
6464fbae7fef11e796e13cd81f47a54f
626a8b7193a0588a919e46f527ef5d9fab6d4abf
describe
'25138' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCX' 'sip-files00088.pro'
1929b2113ef09d5bc1ec9caee83b6de2
342a068c9c95c73d59c1edf7ad0dfb6bcb4ab7a8
'2011-12-21T00:31:31-05:00'
describe
'25827' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCY' 'sip-files00089.pro'
a65f553fddc74e832db352bf8afad3e5
a263df054a43de7c0171f5681e7eb066b39d7e11
describe
'22765' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGCZ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
71e3776420c5ce128fcacfd75abe5445
777ce755b8e22dafbd5a26fd0c89cb07a64004b3
describe
'24303' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDA' 'sip-files00091.pro'
fb1548aeebad359da84a5c6ce930ab7d
6feb47c56e84fc9234649812c5ada8058d39cab5
describe
'21974' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDB' 'sip-files00092.pro'
0c083b0752d1a4c50fdf720087b300d4
21ec59b15ba1187f1572335b010a12a22bfad1bc
describe
'22437' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDC' 'sip-files00093.pro'
b3ab9fb795854be2cf72f887c2dc26d0
5bde0e8a54990a1edb874c44cef4a01fca6598dc
'2011-12-21T00:32:22-05:00'
describe
'25429' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDD' 'sip-files00094.pro'
51cfcb57d06feb9085b47fd198eb37dd
7db5ed8d80471bf6e1b081ee1a11208854a0b958
describe
'24265' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDE' 'sip-files00095.pro'
471b1e0538cf8f41e8bd0c19f094e5c9
e1eb686580bafce5ecaea79bc573e207cfebeb88
describe
'24816' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDF' 'sip-files00096.pro'
630856ec5eab3a1fe55da28f86c216f5
c8542996abdaabc56f3fa5cb3186b4f582be082f
describe
'22729' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDG' 'sip-files00097.pro'
dc8e8704f516d1c81ca02191217cdad6
2400f89ec3805ac1c2667e61f87eff9e6c4c3282
describe
'24192' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDH' 'sip-files00098.pro'
2d5127d6cc379b57b459176db0d8ca0b
b6700bac6840fcb1981972d9d7f1cca1af213bb0
'2011-12-21T00:30:50-05:00'
describe
'23196' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDI' 'sip-files00099.pro'
282a3018b37dc08e511925a5ceef5b88
bd1d4e288baeb64890059aa1aa048553be5f46df
describe
'24017' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDJ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
fbdb2a21d3de0163083c27b438eb080d
681bae85ce45a1c8f50a6ed2d0fcb86b391b6a88
'2011-12-21T00:33:32-05:00'
describe
'25037' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDK' 'sip-files00101.pro'
25b7177d4d95df1a9c4bf78e4e4dbfea
fed1d37cf4ab51aebaeac0f64adeab55895c24bc
'2011-12-21T00:30:54-05:00'
describe
'16559' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDL' 'sip-files00102.pro'
789548dcc070c36c325c98cad541ee37
e97d0383376fc2ec9dcd113a3f5c503692d293e4
'2011-12-21T00:31:54-05:00'
describe
'38080' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDM' 'sip-files00103.pro'
191cec0655d93bf4f66fba231fc40764
232999e7ab0b310ea29655dd804616b88825bc50
describe
'41585' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDN' 'sip-files00104.pro'
8817bad4a0793b12ea2b2331b13325be
13e9c743df89d5c5acfed2cee6d04d726d405748
describe
'42949' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDO' 'sip-files00105.pro'
e43baa5f71be72065f262799c9aaeed7
36d56a8578eb5b945004e57c36455aa2c68ba6fc
describe
'50436' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDP' 'sip-files00106.pro'
32672bd06a69bdf0b60644a69e1bea91
aac0d3b6e8f289cf0f0252b2cc7cfd6643af2a02
'2011-12-21T00:32:11-05:00'
describe
'56090' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDQ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
450714f719529b167eb719ad9ac3f4e3
8374db2d51e18fe8e4e98a3efb65ad144059e1f5
describe
'60951' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDR' 'sip-files00108.pro'
d48d863beab12a06fae47480eb58b26f
499efe7d18722e6c821c28af84d723ef002a59cc
describe
'53394' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDS' 'sip-files00109.pro'
70a7bb46e7984810d7a7a79901d62b92
3f6e7d61b4593cb9d4d4cb4331d5759779853309
describe
'50241' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDT' 'sip-files00110.pro'
0d3df745c3c8854fee0e1f143ebf14ac
bf33fc20724241ef121cd548fd0cbfa240a68069
describe
'214' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDU' 'sip-files00115.pro'
75d828229695600111cb7d7e88064be3
f290f9a4c4a53689f711245da18dcb74a1c38e3f
describe
'353065' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDV' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
4dfad5aa27f0c3d0b00b520cd8551889
1c93216aa210b46e422a60168ac26a3675460a12
describe
'365309' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDW' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
15d484cb490b78a5888feb40fe920d24
2d1cefdf2c2f459c3338dc41273da9f6aab6881e
describe
'290574' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDX' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
e7b59e6588383900209f5b9808167c55
0cc03a1ce99c0435af7614e21c13b0c0a6ff203e
describe
'290482' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDY' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
fd416d0b13755c89704dba5e5ab771cb
0c10ca8a8f92d15ce4ff5924cfa87821eea9a591
describe
'290494' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGDZ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
dac8565717a9de56e2bfcdb5777e01db
64dc570f2fd0a7ba988aa7e04e061043d8b7d2fc
describe
'290622' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEA' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
438d0997f0a2447372c3f4d33394c73d
2e2cd1e373b245fd49c2ab7aacf8084f12215f53
'2011-12-21T00:31:12-05:00'
describe
'290528' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEB' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
dd6d2513dda61a141e69fe6cb73d9b93
316e2e1aa5daf03606e6217f6293c7e22147ce9a
'2011-12-21T00:31:33-05:00'
describe
'290506' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEC' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
5d9b1f37bbb72a3c349ffac9d3f8ee83
0094d49b4b514c2327a310ccec8529010e451333
'2011-12-21T00:30:56-05:00'
describe
'290616' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGED' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
2e38d7044d09f2a63855ce43e6847267
cbf4bebc91cada38e202c38d9b0b75673050af94
'2011-12-21T00:33:14-05:00'
describe
'290603' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEE' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
724effa4734a65f01320b9b6e07cdfc1
0cdedde7640eba5917ce280d534c5e60e64ec83b
describe
'290584' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEF' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
e8db44b99929b15473f9b7c02f8da5a7
7406c0739be4a3d228594b4d62c292fb2f4d93a4
'2011-12-21T00:30:32-05:00'
describe
'290509' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEG' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
40ace3ace96ecf8fc7ff9e64595974b7
943ecddb508cc351da049fe99afdd2bba659f2af
describe
'290546' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEH' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
29711c6d2552ba72a22c27d7a18555ac
d27b086b7620916d50b34b4fdcd4083dd95cddc9
'2011-12-21T00:33:40-05:00'
describe
'290570' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEI' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
de7f5efa80e5139fc9b5c02acc3c9479
12804fd47cc6bd82b0cd9c753d9278b486a38343
describe
'303880' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEJ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
a2c12b2a66bde06810ece485d9da1db2
007d5f8671a1e4b17cb341794caed33039f43e3a
'2011-12-21T00:33:19-05:00'
describe
'290610' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEK' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
b6a9581c59cdc5b40999c889b6b7c3fc
3217be1a2c2d821bc2cab9077310740d9d651416
'2011-12-21T00:32:58-05:00'
describe
'290605' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEL' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
98717561e5b8f995acc549791eb2a646
ddd701dbd0ed296fcdd6fe18a837000993e8fa4e
'2011-12-21T00:30:59-05:00'
describe
'290621' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEM' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
26b6560329d0294678b8d41406e040d0
272333537dfcddd5e1ba268ea502bf2134484a41
'2011-12-21T00:31:49-05:00'
describe
'290593' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEN' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
42b697c112cfe36266b8b36f676b8f53
20999a989ae329a5e489cb76a5a78916e1926600
'2011-12-21T00:31:29-05:00'
describe
'290613' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEO' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
9c7135bad1b2dff04253afb658eadf0c
251e1e42fbe6685b7e906d31bac6c797c587528b
describe
'290609' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEP' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
de2471b10c4f0c4e1b7379f8e71ed8cd
8120215e65d9ce0808701687402bf947cd9e6a3b
describe
'290618' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEQ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
24b1700e76cb4546952a451c9c992b84
4b1c679848b08335c7da2c375dbb6b4d823e21f3
describe
'290523' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGER' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
e728efb299f91ca9eac881e1ffacf00a
261e76ffc22956c1b379a7e37e07db5985dc8386
'2011-12-21T00:32:10-05:00'
describe
'290597' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGES' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
a51f93ab542dc72da834e8c88ecaa9f8
ca94dcb4f6263e49d3b73531df2beed30f1fe7b8
'2011-12-21T00:33:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGET' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
4edd65ac90b8682f6f632b8e0099390e
a8d9163b140c7937e900c66e625d1e31c6fdc536
'2011-12-21T00:30:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEU' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
8b280ebaca81629080c7ed0df0ddaa34
38b740c3debb3b2378fea3dc46d2267533566903
'2011-12-21T00:31:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEV' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
ce88fc02909362498c1d709daaef6f5d
01cce01014df18430389a3b5ebab703551aae6e3
describe
'290547' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEW' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
9609b3b8fee0e5973f0ca7a890c15481
4594b56c173e4ad51efc74b834eed5d77b682db4
'2011-12-21T00:30:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEX' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
8ac5932d755743e630517635939594c2
adf9ed10f2e77b2129048ea06848f884da49b092
'2011-12-21T00:30:37-05:00'
describe
'290604' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEY' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
d22fdda09405cf6383725e0be135c85b
92d818255836decbebb473be6fd58cfc78fcedf8
describe
'290527' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGEZ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
8877807d71a0f1f62d73865420238a46
b6da51370e0bd260a4a0d28972e409613bbfb96f
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFA' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
39527e9d4a851d783a06ba72b9d08446
cff10aa0eabc28893e785e7768987814932ce7dd
describe
'290615' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFB' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
ee0d2e0dd999bd97f04e4b33ea5ad984
bb990e0309613a6e9ee45d962ca198241c6b73d6
describe
'290542' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFC' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
ef22cfd09e334ad870541af945c40d3d
3a5ea94e1a4fee966eb22f61cc862195d0381fe1
'2011-12-21T00:32:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFD' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
762c32b4a7b6a35994775f5b02794067
c8a2796610bcdb48765e5a54d65c2e7b2dc47633
describe
'290590' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFE' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
4defc100ff6683885822659cf24e550c
efec3efac053bef3c9a9b4ad8398f27b7e8b779c
'2011-12-21T00:32:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFF' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
b87edaeaecb20e5622660fafa19ab7fa
9f44b23c67286010f7194fca87d869c52de8fcf8
'2011-12-21T00:32:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFG' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
f0732c01df747e4365c637f586c25e61
8f774fb021a8e8f03c3735299f16b3eddbe3e3e0
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFH' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
b836d18726e37bd70fff9d448b872304
8cc24da71f32ac99a677b8dbca579e09b9de2800
'2011-12-21T00:33:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFI' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
aa0fb23cfe9e8a027ef8def89c8f6265
0203a00e749c305e2a0624ae34a5ab08bfe959fb
describe
'290620' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFJ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
67ebcbf57f27d2d8fbaf7d01f108f32c
dafeadb4585f48221809b1ee5ccec92de8221821
describe
'290619' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFK' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
35efd2db35dd0a2a5736013ebb4d1687
4535664af9a856e3ca5a4e0974097156ee491906
describe
'290589' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFL' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
2295acf31f02991bf3ead3666a4d91a0
9202d299a4dec86c47091a08d0555a08f9c92d4a
describe
'290562' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFM' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
b7ae218578bb4ec004ec13d607c41a39
91c767a9c225e5e4afa5e936893e44bd8f154dc9
describe
'290545' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFN' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
cc945b6c4646c7e46a590de06a16266a
833024353eccd8ce02814c75e60c92acfa03451e
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFO' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
5694758dbc7042ef0393e515f1237fe2
85d21c501ddb9a80d368c8ce03b40649516b50d2
describe
'290612' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFP' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
62a471c43a2b6df8727ccbeade25a704
a7b0faf97d678cd790718eec9552a3d534dcd8f2
describe
'290594' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFQ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
8b7acb594d507c28866f54af0415ad5f
d2e13347c99e0b9615433b9db1e74bcb2e263d45
describe
'290599' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFR' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
f8268f19c5b83280c37505ec7d7cbfcd
7f86aac069fd76bae4767ceed9d6b1e6b4922a74
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFS' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
20009f3ebcd1dec85635e9ca592e7f68
3a889a4900fbdc2214a6d569d595e080969cfefa
describe
'290566' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFT' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
1ba37c612b9b3aaec2a232cf8fbb043d
22c561805a5629b26d3f9f8d2ae06e9daafad6bd
describe
'290617' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFU' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
9d5c0993f2c2147025ae5bcf21204661
c4304fd3a4475ed6f560b3d6b2eb45d467fef95a
describe
'290578' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFV' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
27763f14113152338d1c98772054999d
444114c5977c337b5c9cc285839dc1b9bba2aee1
describe
'290583' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFW' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
f60927e08f8a7ab1b8986f0c66935684
4bef57f8e53fc95003f51b839c89af88e1bb0ae8
describe
'290614' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFX' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
76bf612050d2d314dcba031c80e91ad6
65504dcbba855c41b8b130018913c85fcc626cde
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFY' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
ddc530add05ac7d7ea4579ad58a54b1b
3725b2d01a6a0f9044e4b35da12a253aed480032
describe
'290623' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGFZ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
8d7fa805e068190788d61ab58c646c83
2934d458346c5596a568ef596bc68e89b4f85161
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGA' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
0a149112955c4e378e03a38f43965ed0
0823fe0ec840b495ac0a7563974689d17fc2a0a8
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGB' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
fb7750e2b80b09af03998722a1157235
9d6debd19d1a616a00775d57e21ac4f1a4bb1f10
'2011-12-21T00:30:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGC' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
64d16ac340b298d1f21516a47ad9c0c1
95c09a9812e73f9a6c51d2121ce9bce9c6ccc4db
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGD' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
3dd29edc267f8e175308fe52d2c39434
9c18e64a5d57a3636f9d27474fc34d8ff7e13416
'2011-12-21T00:33:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGE' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
24cfad1d8dc3d9a191020f58e6bc6b38
6c030f0e415a377d4e14455a2603195308e669ff
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGF' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
4c135f408ea466c16efe3ffaa8deef14
0e816f5f8ff483dda43fb503211b77617b311495
describe
'290556' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGG' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
61fd2a6b125dd0869a45465701713ed2
5f2e270d92b07bbbd7ab9b9aba72d42ec42163c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGH' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
028af7fa0346294fa65270667b0b9e8f
bef4a574cb75d18625c9ca421f8b014e638bab52
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGI' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
a2b6346919497611f5a8a39ef246806f
d53d25a39059d436e1e89608c075c6abf4c938b3
'2011-12-21T00:31:52-05:00'
describe
'290552' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGJ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5ab134553952c37069f335c0a14272fa
15404f39e948db2fb77a5abad2167804f7fe85fc
'2011-12-21T00:30:57-05:00'
describe
'290601' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGK' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
8df9329e4a338fe270882d90b3681ac3
5d6ca4d5dafa876313526729716a629e72e3eda0
describe
'290611' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGL' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
1d36cff17e3ad644c6cd78796497ec3c
4b83c3ae14a34023e6f78cc602d2a6c87a9f205c
'2011-12-21T00:30:35-05:00'
describe
'290591' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGM' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
9969a4df5c4f99b761e642f730f6b2f1
69c78d8f8dd6cb8de44b64a1904f7b677fe285a7
'2011-12-21T00:31:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGN' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
15b60a1dc67e0480ba6a3f8d88b4331d
ae595c5fdf39199a840c48a203b60871acc48bde
describe
'290515' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGO' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
b00501ec56fd3f7ef0ada94e615aefd0
8ae6f8b9c08207373074ccd188713b403fa3df7c
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGP' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
3d7c51f37cc495f277571d30b473e7cc
e10ee98727bdf8a23fe72be5f9978d09d796081b
'2011-12-21T00:32:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGQ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
b8f4dfc5b3bdbcce3cd7065276fe9999
3e3fe3f8553649b39559bdf9f33cfde0a60ad5b2
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGR' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
071743f9b4d4096ca388b56caea88a2f
946eb5509a433ff81c6add7d2fd1920c3c6ae09a
describe
'290606' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGS' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
dba2ec51049a3e2d042baec9068e26a9
f7540804255f82818c0e2a6a5382bbcebabfa7d3
describe
'290607' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGT' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
c6065caf15d417e9421f9584d1939b86
2aae958e27fedf851318700949df52ae6167c4d4
'2011-12-21T00:30:58-05:00'
describe
'290567' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGU' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
b9c470603ef2b9a30be959a47c554578
9b024f96c39cc2b5caf4acda557e624a5906e934
describe
'290554' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGV' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
23a0354c4940e350f7ed299d3125a37c
0444b981ba9a4cd8c7d6e40f4c253e8b8906a789
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGW' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
38db52b2126b47c9c495f6d2c9bb7263
bfcb3a05266be5fb57419d816490b05cc7f55bd0
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGX' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
a1ddc80d950f8afcf534459637e3a515
6cf7e41048401a1db4e1dcf4d40269053fc78c60
'2011-12-21T00:33:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGY' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
773a220e2f067b002a28181d0704b64c
9fa0d70ddf7baf87ae927c1ac8ad3610f8b268d1
'2011-12-21T00:33:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGGZ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
39c8e3a2bb280f8a42b51cb456e9a30b
96ac41194229a715e4da5804207df9a8a34705d0
describe
'290406' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHA' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
d420c8b36ff4154a3e3cb63ac6fa7dba
0b774804a0a4bca8287894bd874382cf87a48033
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHB' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
0777c6f7cebadc20307a3eda26176495
3f10236dd610f3f711e2e4bff696220092bef424
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHC' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
5cdad1afae712b0a9613d8eb83215d04
6e88692d0fdce64a5d079021b806fd5b09a0a60e
describe
'290479' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHD' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
cbf7a3f06ce3444ff341689aa4e8d391
50caa8eb20bc5828a7cf1580c8dc5be4056e3973
describe
'290600' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHE' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
70b3024f8d0a19a41a672511dcf010d1
1f8c329cb4077d33c7b91d578b9a18740f39e162
describe
'290573' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHF' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
b9cf3366725c4e0b620df8511e6b3b53
7a96c17e8f5d6ed04a08bfd79f0c45b34162536a
'2011-12-21T00:31:03-05:00'
describe
'290538' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHG' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
ac69515de16200c8369eb1f076d5875d
af58d1c3a62bda026aeeb29294e60073ceb1c556
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHH' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
d4bee0fda2ccb2bc9e954fb7d326f870
e29db4023c70712f0bac8fe81481603b8c5138dd
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHI' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
0597aa3bb68f4425c2705a7250de73ba
85bd3c2b08fff785bc6b4c38cbe7a6ed1684518a
describe
'290595' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHJ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
60eb8dbc7d328494531a996c26789234
151453d91ff4f6211e906a043346bfe751ae5b9e
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHK' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
7e2abc5fd897afca6488e1587894e2d2
2d8023af4d0b45b84f93398d05122964a33f203d
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHL' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
5c75f3244b353d96b8cf7b1457f24d2c
9072e013206a910e191eacd78d8a5b07b3b8dc40
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHM' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
cb96b93afff26c9e90dcffcefed7031f
32c92af046278da412ad4d99436c24f0a6b7286f
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHN' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
2326c1fd70c6491492dbece0dc19df8a
62e23e97b43801190fbe30760ce74bc7a91b20ab
describe
'290588' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHO' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
d28a53d7e0b083c604c3dbd4ac9e5c9c
30214893e89741380372181b2b752be08dd3290d
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHP' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
7de4b18e86732204d61eea9c8b8f7ac6
b468f59312937716674768155176f73452e7a5fd
describe
'290517' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHQ' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
7392f031d24f46c01331bfdb3fd88855
43fd8c34b29fa85ec26d366563e70b9f2bb5e4cc
describe
'290608' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHR' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
9da6dc2cfe7d1f910acabcf1f38712a0
42ecb257eb504904e3db5e0d9b5496699560475c
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHS' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
a4816cfa87de5006010781e3673a50af
bc8a1a7c2ea962391aee880f5ff5dd3f5b8b7f24
'2011-12-21T00:30:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHT' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
b24d10274d471e8b03c5c428855f730f
50ae721398a7f23c85b6af9738717966f6dbcd63
'2011-12-21T00:32:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHU' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
b774eaf85ce19ee4fa83c79d02bbcd12
6b204a00d3152c1d8e51f85c300374de668c1e91
describe
'290581' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHV' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
474dce6eacc27e2bd85256fa4934e7ca
b730c98d83d6f2cd3f1b33ad5cf653c59dbbd0f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHW' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
23c51693912ce2731e08c68204cb75c0
53c51d1f8ec8a39bc2b3c620532a24d278bf0884
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHX' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
ebd046f2d9e1e9887c45e8c9c1a6167e
9a88843b43a80eeacd029ac81aab8041dfdb58c7
describe
'358599' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHY' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
ade762c80c8eb49b6ca1fc13cfec8f19
950add2e2cdaa8c3f7e4184c63ddc818919ed6b0
describe
'354771' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGHZ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
08f22a80eb4e151e19e2259103dc76d3
36fd4f9ba9a130bd8d8de950cca116c6591a21e0
'2011-12-21T00:32:24-05:00'
describe
'62777' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIA' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
220eea8acfc0738a29d1cb3cd87147a4
c96a0227058e33ac2648dfb922932a1a61b99c0c
describe
'8497652' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIB' 'sip-files00001.tif'
bbd3d7fdfd4107dddbb0d2c9335eaf57
c8fcf5f55c55fc2d9c49f2d64c9b43c58c175965
'2011-12-21T00:32:23-05:00'
describe
'8786984' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIC' 'sip-files00002.tif'
e842aa412da2ec5c8698b02e8d58ffea
e4a6e29d7161f2f3c72b2beb64a10c1dd89f64f5
'2011-12-21T00:31:44-05:00'
describe
'6989800' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGID' 'sip-files00003.tif'
2be2c87a23adb392f6e9c996fdadc86f
1dee0daee5f8de8d37e6ae8e1b25332d202920bf
describe
'2341232' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIE' 'sip-files00006.tif'
8f29aeca3e6caf2f47d8d08fb551bde8
8a5cf2f24d4d0e486aa7e2691e2da1137594160c
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIF' 'sip-files00007.tif'
8c1b1ece3d0b02fa70fdf7ca84101f22
aa5d792dea3894e4055257e62337b89bd5709355
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIG' 'sip-files00009.tif'
1820d87967b8a4c8e77e5471e2d19bab
a3801afc90547fc4fa1b73ab436359e40a116126
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIH' 'sip-files00010.tif'
195221ac97ded8cefec8ccb5be00b151
005149566f71800a5f9ce98dbd46fc0b76cc9a42
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGII' 'sip-files00011.tif'
b4c5a5574836d4bba0729ae815f69302
764a694243aaafbdf07f7ab487b1ac898e13a62b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIJ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
0af7e0efc512e49f02a4e5f0a8e4f491
837d7e59a6aa6293bfd82475fe0d6159b05f1541
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIK' 'sip-files00013.tif'
20bd615e5c561021a7665e6fee1b9f57
7d1e10778dff700c4be6b10944ea6e4840d2322b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIL' 'sip-files00014.tif'
5b3afd18c00f35a4e233d2ec5b66b9ff
3871e06a739925555b29a90d4480834c2a3e68e7
'2011-12-21T00:31:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIM' 'sip-files00015.tif'
ec4bd391ed1eb63cc1b68e9b2e4dd8bd
689a2392bfc9d6bfd0db4ecc1e04a1aa73084e5a
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIN' 'sip-files00016.tif'
735817aee2d12aae58ddc8db5e0dde09
a1267bc1791e7e31cc51ff202b8cae51b2aeab3c
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIO' 'sip-files00017.tif'
1767b1dd02ffb112f7052eafb8dc0b59
25cc005e9ae96fa8a59cbd856fcf325393351a07
describe
'2453852' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIP' 'sip-files00018.tif'
798593e1374eb4a104e5e4c44338bc72
b2bf62528ae0f6d9c4b2247f5e6a77cc76c89b34
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIQ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
2f5d7f06c25dd73ab0ca102e7f2a662e
6ba6f5a4796d818123e018660590811ada21a9eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIR' 'sip-files00020.tif'
ab6a32c2e7c46043882ed389749077c9
33b3cbefc029ff52ca7f821bbccd52629d0f31a8
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIS' 'sip-files00021.tif'
4b09cd7a517a1653e028cac6d0f6eb77
ac84bec438efde27d0cc8b9ef5b72587809f7645
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIT' 'sip-files00022.tif'
e22e6c6e4ef82fa850aad7e217417e8a
4d9bab3ac07c91f59de3ffe551c1b7b3d7a9d18f
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIU' 'sip-files00023.tif'
57256d78a9dba6caf4f734e64c35613d
902af574a5a19a690f87ae421906665d824f9f8a
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIV' 'sip-files00024.tif'
9dddb2d64a9c1d13867d350dc32181ff
b0f7b7a7c86e03816a7035d61c85a590d9a31c95
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIW' 'sip-files00025.tif'
d6f12353c92c3cfff2b94f08e7d1af9a
a362e2c573c7702e2f0cd3affb76312739ccf01c
'2011-12-21T00:30:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIX' 'sip-files00026.tif'
379b93268f9cebf0aa0c657a7066986d
0af2e83fdd0fa7da0e6d61e6ca4b46f001daa59f
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIY' 'sip-files00027.tif'
0780eb5d914c4226df60948d3547aea1
7eecf2fc16a4ce30ee87487e62c717351ffddf48
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGIZ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
6eadbeea94895bc8eed928213a6805f6
645d9dd129e88ec927949e06338910bd025c12ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJA' 'sip-files00029.tif'
2446579cd237ee22e4cacf2c8f5e07fb
85dbe9803319aeafb813e7e944ca249576a507ff
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJB' 'sip-files00030.tif'
4c88a08ced1f142d2180cef8b85ddcbc
e7b80858f22131cc68f670a499517d4d5626f50b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJC' 'sip-files00031.tif'
3a2f4a26b57925770d8b04bddaa8f2f8
517850cd16955d8e465669209ab88bc108ce1532
'2011-12-21T00:33:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJD' 'sip-files00032.tif'
1a79242970cc3b6c9adb5dbf6d6558ac
4be0e39a9b0f74f5d6d812651161cb27460bb013
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJE' 'sip-files00033.tif'
237c8e4f494cae11acdb366443933093
b92d706de4f2d702682117ebeadc0636a174af32
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJF' 'sip-files00034.tif'
0f49f268a2af42781666e11fdc154a9c
2f012f34fb24c9e2a6b19401fef40cc1ae0e07ec
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJG' 'sip-files00035.tif'
0a4cef52227f09dbe12241147a14f24e
c25696a8c272368a776f6e6fc817f67bd4153fbc
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJH' 'sip-files00036.tif'
b0ae288ea5c51a917399af563801d1e2
65324736df25dd72f082a3f684c9d95f74d43123
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJI' 'sip-files00037.tif'
3bfc8e209720108c28e2ab1f1a2192a1
06d8cdf432c9d6f8e5d79f0d30349e7a5ee8e7ae
describe
'2341228' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJJ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
a4eea119412235a295156bb69930b6ff
0dd85b501fcd5905fbba43290a6bfb7041cfe891
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJK' 'sip-files00039.tif'
3d116dcb89bb66d822b3ab23e46279d9
0205bbc71770be6428669a5a9bd69e9e1228ed47
'2011-12-21T00:31:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJL' 'sip-files00040.tif'
005eac29404ddb17ad42a0fa4d934218
b73032e04cd162543f527bc3b6e63e7fd5670dc3
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJM' 'sip-files00041.tif'
f72b72c9610976abc52d9b7c1e1287c0
4e584d4ef1d30820c8d54decd4912989b004ab8e
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJN' 'sip-files00042.tif'
6ff99511ffc3b17d3466b9da3f069fb8
dea23d3c17aa2be9805360ddcdc7bf7b95e02cb9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJO' 'sip-files00043.tif'
ec10ffd03cce71f702c9314d32cc1b1f
da11505fab2c66f3b991c046821eac0dd62ed61d
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJP' 'sip-files00044.tif'
1b4cc96475d6ea3a1a10d6a2764d37bf
1e8731940d633ff579cf2af277a156397890153b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJQ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
7e5da64441de0444e1c6e9a7996d4993
058c5ab34691146b39a6cf91d220e177576163bf
'2011-12-21T00:31:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJR' 'sip-files00046.tif'
2a7a77718013aaccaad2ad4ef5a8f763
418de7051901029ff007414289432bea4cfd47ec
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJS' 'sip-files00047.tif'
f140995f6728d73a9f89a4bb4a587fc2
0682411ae7c76d159bec58a3ed5af2da643a2601
'2011-12-21T00:32:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJT' 'sip-files00048.tif'
2dde3fcaa29ac33e4f74cd14d7bdb699
ca15c238a6ddbc5cdab239a66c557a91c150547a
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJU' 'sip-files00049.tif'
2be4e819b70ac7d9195f5c854a339485
6ff4ee27a037b65d4251bf52adfd92eb7e3a19f2
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJV' 'sip-files00050.tif'
14ab4e85ff384d147f2792d2122f542e
9ac84f608e55525acd8dbf9c4227cdb364a735f6
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJW' 'sip-files00051.tif'
4f7917f2177afccf3233cc6a0576e15e
1a46e2cd6e5be39b8aab10c6f32fe5fc06b1741a
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJX' 'sip-files00052.tif'
3d2583e58ab9a1f1f98e9cf4f523f29e
bc3825b6583cfcf582f0599c1654d7db4283532e
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJY' 'sip-files00053.tif'
546c67839dae6fe70c4cb2ea86d6c2f5
91b0bc1d4646c476d8fe476f86a638c3136c94ed
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGJZ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
ea3615573dea4768f625fac17973458a
4d6b5284cb0fa65a49939cb3624a40d84b0d2cde
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKA' 'sip-files00055.tif'
12026f2c2d21621c51cfb17f375cca60
6c8525f5910698380a188005fc11d0477b586abb
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKB' 'sip-files00056.tif'
b53d6a2b89489c41001b4f035b664eef
aac73535826a4431e5f9a3e571d3821d3cae5638
'2011-12-21T00:32:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKC' 'sip-files00057.tif'
6a736199e7301fb8896b49ee3b230a12
18e801db1cc3495c244065554dc630a3383f3b90
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKD' 'sip-files00058.tif'
aa1e6baacdc6ccfeca4d8e2360c42f1a
d35facccb01b40de485fad8e46f49ea17ea9a122
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKE' 'sip-files00059.tif'
a46ef383f237011b62fa7a09f892fda7
8ec67d2c3769024bdbec1e6360e0f3a7335dd6cf
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKF' 'sip-files00060.tif'
78867b603f4b0c99aa36afed63f93b08
38819675893550898cee83b79aaaa7a2e18d9863
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKG' 'sip-files00061.tif'
fc1a99456bcf213f4572f925f5f83330
958c5b25b3310d07b014b427c07b3615f0175f02
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
42b4907911bd2789846556c20e5550b1
7dfa2208cbc0bf0cdf132d2a0b4122e0a96cf04b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKI' 'sip-files00063.tif'
f3777481d0f76a48063907dd0506c55a
3ba528b8dcbd7f45a48310f84c4a07d960409d44
'2011-12-21T00:30:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKJ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
5d4547864fcc8fc9da4e1d4fd865c3d2
e403c0ce9335f60c0dcf2c464f09a0f2c47f18c6
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKK' 'sip-files00065.tif'
94ff6e9ea6f2bc0016e454c15f42d5f6
4f810783e87d3c9baf51bb6070575f45382501ca
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKL' 'sip-files00066.tif'
53e8c70f33f30a5a776844f46d48f60a
1bcb3fa5549cfbb005dc28d02e7fff88d1e7b679
'2011-12-21T00:33:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKM' 'sip-files00067.tif'
c72873fd7047e38771af515be391a4a5
02671180c99571905bc0f87bcf8c04a4a10a6996
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKN' 'sip-files00068.tif'
b7f958a391d69dd2d2bf1906c5220bae
126efc8460341d6a6148234f80d3757cee25d647
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKO' 'sip-files00069.tif'
b8153afff8b527360bcc6d4d873ce0ee
7cceeb869f6b0efd0efb94baa1ee37753fecd629
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKP' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b38fd967c6fb60a45bdff052b4a8ec03
d9dcbb83633b3add263c677ed0aa51d53c052f41
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKQ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
9b280ddb8bdc92f710270a50febc60ea
4552cca5b5ff148152870db684da39e0c1dd7c79
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKR' 'sip-files00072.tif'
fdd43bca8780b3a6887d57ab8b0ca1fe
1f1b8850f3822fbfb4639467e7aecba9576ca3d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKS' 'sip-files00073.tif'
150d942bc3d9b6644049e780a5948022
f1069b65e6a89527dac5afeb690b9331a10f240a
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKT' 'sip-files00074.tif'
7d42e90de647373dfb6cc06c30b68044
0548be527136280bbd06e14864f7df41d1f315d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKU' 'sip-files00075.tif'
d15f7dcd47c315826a4fc37f45b5cce1
bfcf4aff14ea5797fe51ac3f80ccf8f97016e5a8
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKV' 'sip-files00076.tif'
66ebf0726693031c9f001b90262832f7
ea912e3bb6a4c7f6234a3bd3e80c0a96ec8b69ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKW' 'sip-files00077.tif'
63cc2f8d4923262b253d965f51da61ad
c354eecda2f6d4f0c5248c7529bde27b56d24754
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKX' 'sip-files00078.tif'
142c488794d6fbd8f3569acab6a1a14d
d374c7e767c89a59b9f9ce5a3defef8ac6eca6c8
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKY' 'sip-files00079.tif'
70979747dc956608944e5a88596eb7c8
3a152f7f5b96be1b03d629ec248f6eac11f8ef2a
'2011-12-21T00:31:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGKZ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
0fc0bfddac8653fcd98f532c0e273194
56358638bd1113a469d12fa1b515c540beeffe58
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLA' 'sip-files00081.tif'
4f5b31b9a8470db040d99cd0155c914c
274a6d4412575409bf107f8ece37adf1954f05f3
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLB' 'sip-files00082.tif'
fff47cd29ffaf6debc3097fb98521768
96700e72a810c56a385614d3c8a4135fd0a47ab8
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLC' 'sip-files00083.tif'
750fbd7c429435f2dca3e5977ecf85df
0e96a0ef7872abe6b4a103137f1bd31fbfa0a270
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLD' 'sip-files00084.tif'
2e7bc92bb518ad2212465a132b845445
db50537ba54076fa35dfe09b4fab20ae2a00c9fd
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLE' 'sip-files00085.tif'
c2090a12a95a48e7f81ca0b1842a9b47
24278767bf5e773e2821702b12a22bc7375a554b
'2011-12-21T00:33:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLF' 'sip-files00086.tif'
8d3dbc11804111e4f785e9c0db5b2283
6b144dbc53ceaae256dbc48d5bdc760710d08a91
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLG' 'sip-files00087.tif'
86d7da214e63a462bbc3cc8d72bb0e8a
bc8deaa2883cb0c451d2613e1ae99e7cac9284ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
cc6f7d2e362957266b58b4ece2322fb0
578ea024c53721108beac5c1028a3490170df44c
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLI' 'sip-files00089.tif'
249690ef8ec1e75d93fea3039224dd92
88f248273ef374cbe3d08ff97bd41e38895e27d3
'2011-12-21T00:30:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLJ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
67d369d37d6aa418bba727a4e8f7070d
ab6e1479600ad4476db17d2605bde2a9449c1151
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLK' 'sip-files00091.tif'
b84b46d93f6c3924cbad4ba40abe4489
327f3febaed91db027af2aca6bdb4d53eac41f52
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLL' 'sip-files00092.tif'
84874550f0ac869c7de09f38a7af5b4e
8f65247c4a8ddd0cc793da5bf282fc66202900a1
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLM' 'sip-files00093.tif'
cda1230bb644048c72f4149a8a9736ab
cb9e9830a3491fc9b626c3cadf550f2076e65d1d
'2011-12-21T00:33:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLN' 'sip-files00094.tif'
29b1b210e474d0008ab6fb22c665858f
384a68eef060544ca059a769100d1b624537f8f6
'2011-12-21T00:31:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLO' 'sip-files00095.tif'
a1ddb173e17311ff893e79084d12c334
6f02fcbf2539c5858f4abd917289e9563ec78859
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLP' 'sip-files00096.tif'
fe79d582113260480acfa79c1f3153ca
1beac157309a5faa1d6a4798b9a86159135bceb9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLQ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
e7e45b770aeb9ffbf0989e6df11ab5ed
a580c8110222f0a4fa73e844adcdfa19cf5822a5
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLR' 'sip-files00098.tif'
60f50ae41bcb6aa4667667ec93b76c53
346c08d96ca2bd4f168ab8b3732d04da665a2b68
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLS' 'sip-files00099.tif'
2fe63ae57073aa8838461939ad91a771
99ebebef41def4dedbf4e4d0b73afa83d4176a77
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLT' 'sip-files00100.tif'
f4b560a5dd3b1c1e68856f7fe48e7fea
0e8cc91c4fcadf040af07ba585d16966093e4efe
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLU' 'sip-files00101.tif'
5be864901d8bfde94ac8886a400a76ca
f8e83133cebb5170e623e8c842dfe509caa5963c
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLV' 'sip-files00102.tif'
796c8b9b7b7dc51c4db3acb2bf6e58d8
d38180138cf1746a5f5e2b9ac35e201d1afc0224
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLW' 'sip-files00103.tif'
7c0349cab177dadd45e3d3c9dff2f04e
3a02d379d0de3b2f3ffd4e072341746a9f95fa22
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLX' 'sip-files00104.tif'
dd96c572fb520c375fd6f5e398f2755e
182533cee88580a1900e7d5e75ffd9e411f80469
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLY' 'sip-files00105.tif'
5eeace3890d6fb945d2dae14e8738281
1b538235c7566d8cea32866bffe199741d379f2b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGLZ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
7da52976ede266b84f290184a307b173
47581b794f7fb38abe6c823867ba211fcb69e971
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMA' 'sip-files00107.tif'
7647e77c2972f6587fddbb4c192e264d
42c7233855e39686228a7159a84aba1ffee75e01
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMB' 'sip-files00108.tif'
ff353011e48c3ff21c6285c17b4f6b08
b5f1c5632f41e8f65c3ff28240438d34e043a80c
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMC' 'sip-files00109.tif'
c998de740ebd4b7c8ee5485d5b222c1f
20833930543e9a679ba7feff358303b3fed68e22
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMD' 'sip-files00110.tif'
397cac72e94bcc1ad35fded0b190dee0
3ff3a58550e892b3896f2fe21a082d0a096105ea
describe
'8624412' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGME' 'sip-files00113.tif'
e23c2dbe9dc29e8e8ead12a2e6c5ded0
9c4ae159b83654c02e3070808f0cf934aa50a071
'2011-12-21T00:30:49-05:00'
describe
'8531852' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMF' 'sip-files00114.tif'
6a4f7d603bbd7f90fcede33030bdc8f7
3402e0987ca5c6ff1d0643296a45602f2511b657
describe
'1523176' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMG' 'sip-files00115.tif'
19b0f5c6ac2b884e4759b6de42458ab9
b37de0e1fc949a18237bc273befd1ef1b38e7b89
describe
'154290' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMH' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
4572ae414abb39001ccc511443a13eb2
71744b7364e6b81bf1e55bdfc8f2fc289774a856
describe
'86632' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMI' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
7a52caea0606a07e4635d22b9dcfe695
8186fd82007b3a4b923b27325728c5f4cc019f98
describe
'111598' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMJ' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
53e89a37402c5d87a49a4de990bba349
174710054b433d649962a26e468deacd459c8867
'2011-12-21T00:31:11-05:00'
describe
'143111' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMK' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
5758d658b3c6028b743c59badcd0739f
5caa6977dbaa831f8db87332a680752f9c77388f
describe
'44247' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGML' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
dd58421d6d4fc418cb533a921159456a
404f715284fbfefb074b9946303545a8af7eed88
describe
'122721' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMM' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
93cb0cb03c0fb78177a3db0149948440
fd79da6ea861abc8f0990d6db256cfb39e965c44
describe
'132681' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMN' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
d49ff97ecb3f8c00fe311586f9444cec
4844d1c753b95628aa87fb67de9b4c39d20e15da
describe
'134187' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMO' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
612b68fe31767875210265e55c8db8d7
0812ecb3b9fbc6ab19fe71b3e6e267c6036ecd19
describe
'123357' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMP' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
c66ee9586300a2008856d50a4881b525
bac6f4f34ddead5b4052251e0f0951cdc0e40260
describe
'122783' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMQ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
d9dbbe832c16291e8c0b81295443e964
84a41c577632d7f70b5582652829b70a34ffcf6e
'2011-12-21T00:32:27-05:00'
describe
'127768' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMR' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
06d27727764ace182495a432ba603941
5746c32167de84a3d2cdb125a46955dc30211c6f
describe
'134953' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMS' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
13a9bd7d6b043f015d9c0a2274b5c3ba
a60c81ae32b9eea7a4a265b11c3c89684fbfe22e
describe
'122362' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMT' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
5b526e47f148cedef3ef57e72126310c
6900e5707ec1e4f36aa7b3f6ca8fb24b2e57056b
describe
'123646' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMU' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
0ab05e21a00bd9486da209132ab191a3
0cb4f58471157d439980c82d6a63c58a1ba13df8
describe
'134641' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMV' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
6274b21030602256499e9ffa5d5c82d1
2f55f0831767e9f88b568dd57521cd9a44dc33a9
describe
'134991' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMW' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
9f56c33b12928427ae131b3e9d4b4974
cdfb5724dcf8394ac1307ed04d22a9c1d6e593a3
describe
'124705' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMX' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
09e2ad7a4d0726828f4d04538a7f9b4a
c4a0932d35a1ccfc9899a875f5548cfaba13ecac
describe
'125214' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMY' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
7a04d2a43165b6634c04247f4abcaef7
2d2e3dd1e0eddce7928442249494342ac455a09f
describe
'132153' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGMZ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
9a37306f430554959362cdbfd9bac618
88fee3a8f9127ecda0493c1ff33ada4c42a77997
describe
'125689' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNA' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
09ae5cd28f3061fe92865e59929cbaa9
f4591193c747a997bda61fcb56f39188708ab775
describe
'115412' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNB' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
0d836412c5e34b42656e4c1b4f1eae69
636851ea2eecdcb09538852b168146cd313583e1
describe
'121340' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNC' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
81083dcdd9a96a66b2e6b056eabc35d0
2547deb376240f51192b6d76c2b750b959d3d6af
describe
'130636' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGND' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
7fe0a441b04b6e79297cce2c2e47c593
ae2d5432d2c2178b223480cca2fdc32581e78ba2
describe
'121911' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNE' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
ce9d0109450684c95589839b0a9b2b76
31e548bc456d734ea67a4e0c4e5c3f976a3dda9b
describe
'119261' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNF' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
bc52eccc44f283dc7ee2167f48503546
cd236023e9fb77738dee35deb8689eabbf9ebcbd
describe
'117643' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNG' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
5e478c60e7fed7a687b61f2d3147cbb0
4db51c5327b52566b41623a345aaf7ad60af8370
describe
'130245' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNH' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
4450d39aba360c955c3bb63af680ea66
3c18d5c12e082d441e51ad514fb0c56eebd2fcd8
describe
'127942' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNI' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
6f4ede398c6867f634c7bb897b2a2044
d6b50aaa8f77dd6611103c56f3ae24b099cc5f78
describe
'121904' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNJ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
fc885d4e9d7d7c364f5e09c3f6e87e57
06aa66af6a95836aa8c82eae2778f20e3f46895d
describe
'116832' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNK' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
b45bcaa51573949311f9f3f3df2ff4b4
e82fbc863d124db99ea098d6751681de63655616
describe
'126476' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNL' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
67f7812ddca803d46a971fa51eedf3ba
531f02f66038cf9c4ced7301a6c010128818c413
describe
'123855' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNM' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
44da346722be9b57edcae0937dcdfd50
1355ef4df80325fb2da074ef5a25f90cc152aeaf
describe
'116708' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNN' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
861b50126b8a272f106fbae80dcd324f
dbfcea4416778505e89bbb1799fd9a40c4c9d87a
describe
'109133' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNO' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
e0b89df68ea6a8db2eaea3f30aef9bff
044b3eb0e7b6fd8b9ae1d8e8fe4350b5c7ff7820
describe
'117473' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNP' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
cc82ddd3e1b656138940972243560c39
70c069dd26c961a4d9899ef11aa30ace5b27df11
describe
'123368' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNQ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
e75c03452f4ba89f988434bcc6a1f630
8239fe748d6ac86d9fd65c43a406fbe4c7c9ae25
describe
'114882' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNR' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
9784732910dd227e972ce6c68224a689
3c4d44181d0c666aceb9445ab28f74c83854059a
describe
'115945' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNS' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
f267291474ff9bad222ed3d1d0b0e39e
7ac605f69f3b20f7cbfe5d2b33470826b247a2f6
describe
'122885' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNT' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
2f43e47de742cec44c0c4bd5f21d1c81
f7fd96e34dfecfcbefe365a4aa43206f4eb050f2
describe
'121040' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNU' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
25ac26e50112ea5484a5d14923eaddaa
3c0ba0637b44863206d5378c9c29f716e2b698fd
describe
'109800' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNV' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
cff68e2dd2c61803cc251db2f8e60f3a
1ca7aca23fd91cb57376cb72cd0dfce98b1e2213
describe
'113394' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNW' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
4a0b46391db8ce449bec0ea795eedb1a
ac0cf35bef48bc5fb4cd0b6e299628e108098c4a
describe
'116170' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNX' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
2800ec0ee771cb29e2500f0dd0568ae8
04fa472257b073c70e6e98c8d7369b23fd6003f8
describe
'118409' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNY' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
e63b494901ae18686b39ed336f0b5d20
3b03359b6a9b9219264235442dbbbe2e0b654990
describe
'114906' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGNZ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
b5920590b04c60959ad0239ba6a4a989
2e88a3fedc4c629780022910745dccc71fc68b47
describe
'110625' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOA' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
ff4eebea206a670e59b52ae64b403fed
e6112c9975ff9b44e5ca5d2d2a666088e7412997
describe
'119137' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOB' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
90489f5fa69211a20e99f11edadcb65f
093ae4e8f8dd4a8f7cf3d1e9bedd7fd9b00e2bda
describe
'124854' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOC' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
1023e67a4e6ba8502d76bb0d090c29dc
00a38e1184c6b729364a2a9409d5d521043f14f3
describe
'119841' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOD' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
5bda70e1b02c895756b3004e7a0463ea
dde7a212b18710548af17c503db96a1ec1b20765
describe
'120267' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOE' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
67dca3cbd0885b81a387ea288132e49a
c0379b53520383796a610a1826f5c0d4277b0de0
describe
'126679' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOF' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
e7d75b63541378a12aec318bb825d3f1
06fb264d921717252600f303167130aa38743070
describe
'132709' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOG' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
f9e76d6f50a7710208eba0304810be19
6424eb34c31c20cdf8b0fec189d72c59a8a1d9b7
describe
'112221' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOH' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
c0f6f23613db2b102bde3dad1fb7a5eb
9c6e75b6b7f0969deb1a52c0fca1c8f481c0fab8
describe
'116177' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOI' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
e84f8c46d302515529e1625404e627fd
02e0189f01c107b7097cdf53fd8547dc045744c5
describe
'121195' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOJ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
effe4e26764e8155fcd65166aa65a947
519a177e0cc3d6bc0192134ab17d282f08e66adb
describe
'121952' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOK' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
bc300ff8c0c405bbf58a48bb15186285
d4f7b337bb01c9db1e9b415f793af0be824d50c9
describe
'106401' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOL' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
09fb4763fffb1bca9974efe3c629afe7
d6554c0da05483f8ef59d5f59c2307f8b9b7748c
describe
'113746' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOM' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
c2353269db2de087b5c0088e1b2bf20a
55c14a5d5d40f8a2e5a7f5a1dc83030d96b03dda
describe
'123803' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGON' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
75183d18358f774990f61fbd4d766c12
2a427cd5952a1f5c175e61410b9e9606a043abf3
describe
'127874' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOO' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
c796c647ee747791cc60310a63ed4c41
b535e4b0c1d59c0bc9fb0481bec8a82a59a8c44c
describe
'109335' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOP' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
8c24ae464e04bbe1997552de6a7a0dc4
4e51828c4dfda5b7a5a36b4ca2707d177689fc88
describe
'109932' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOQ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
e6cbc405678691fe2d65ac22937e4cdf
82cff0905635172ac2def7fca320a21d54ebe971
'2011-12-21T00:32:18-05:00'
describe
'128943' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOR' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
9db6a3d62934d22cd36bd4148bf6398b
7e936d284beba5256183e5a3d46e0d345dc50493
describe
'124620' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOS' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
d30f005484f5950a095a14c6cc1ad7e9
265e4bb81741d40a44aac99589cf63a02430b502
describe
'120812' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOT' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
e92c5abdec41e3304482caacc51fbc0e
7f4e0e1793c5de6636c38e180b6d318e63de17b0
describe
'114477' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOU' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
cda2cbe5c2bdf857bf95f3b562e059b8
cc1fb53a3a6b49fee38b68666aaa012415315380
describe
'124851' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOV' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
422d642983943457d8e71060069d9f7a
1075902de55a85de261b304ace8786982dcb51db
describe
'122212' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOW' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
a4f1d13efc568bf3321c14d1912a1c14
a24c6fd0b84868707304defad09113aa514c3efe
describe
'118798' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOX' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
b5a61c789b9c1aa6fb69674df4bc0429
a978363d24e83528afc2bba756afd150e0d434a5
describe
'113329' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOY' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
e1776088f4c0d636ec126fefca3623b5
a844f9be9b77bf4b02381ea899dd969d377812f9
describe
'119687' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGOZ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
d0a111c58f24b84202ed3f90417825e7
1afa0f322bbd66740e60136b853d277f689c6149
'2011-12-21T00:33:44-05:00'
describe
'124821' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPA' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
8deabf74e503db78ff404d0f0c49e71e
01ce4f5a83c064a1217cdd607e11fad7cb67c47c
describe
'109268' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPB' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
4a92375cac8165244074423a01b4cd59
75e445a3e1fb2b199c7acb88c4fac90e95a89b68
describe
'115979' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPC' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
79f27598fd6715ba21ab1abd8d6fc39e
d55a640d2515e306956d88982cc4c507a021b42c
'2011-12-21T00:31:05-05:00'
describe
'128995' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPD' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
f5bf18d531e5c7342fa36c90452e056f
dcf35dd899007d6e96b87864f02ca81bdc87b34b
describe
'126345' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPE' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
9d0727aa9d651024751e7edac6d011fc
1c77967c1e4646b663a85a60ed03e066bb1d076b
describe
'118063' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPF' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
9d20afc113863b56a61e04b9138dfa03
188c2bf2a6f09752eb68725440633a073dbcb45d
describe
'117801' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPG' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
811abe0c15f400a0691887c7bc13d36b
c0be375a25a43f2857f4cec54c305cde803b9a46
'2011-12-21T00:31:40-05:00'
describe
'118593' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPH' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
2e34834d7ae0ccd5e97264d77fd5f420
0f8da8c62838bc76465259f7d9b8ae9865f83b49
describe
'125865' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPI' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
2971968a1019c95c7e988fdd91c7d91a
f5533748c2d4ee62636dc7349df40a39eb55cc74
describe
'109949' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPJ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
e93b961cc186d45518a656a2511b5314
ad3dc6e04068a8d8a569dd3de4cf5b52137ccc0e
describe
'108227' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPK' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
9f4dcff18fbee8413256ae765ee972b8
5c2284c03a1f65d0dc87ac34242ed9a5886afded
describe
'122866' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPL' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
54361c2f8472d52d57d55fa21ca3e87d
1aafaa66794e938b1008d7204aacb67fc37083cc
describe
'125292' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPM' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
82355cd24c7edd1ed8d9c3dc0a45b5e2
3576100e6a4007c6b5e87c4758d8b2b5780f20b6
describe
'121531' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPN' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
5c674158f6b2ba78411bc40ef8257ed0
65e5bb70daad60303503ffb38f0c306e20246ffc
'2011-12-21T00:30:39-05:00'
describe
'122149' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPO' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
53e96b65a654a46b9da7aaa133e53e1f
c45bdeb3aa3c36e7f6db19c2e0f07c34e2c6c667
describe
'118984' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPP' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
2b434be3c729aa9c960cb13062d710a3
667c67541aa3ea0d4ac9c2cf9175b16dae5e0b8b
describe
'121902' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPQ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
16d02648c4535a512d8ceb2e7b643b1c
e1f9a1b66930846d3eb32ddc6515c413935f6b7f
describe
'107217' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPR' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
e426c0e2ebd6ddc766b1fbcb82a81ea1
c291b8d08877550663ea6e7b6c61600b705f849d
describe
'107066' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPS' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
461bd0cf785100ab90271d1b8a96077b
8ccd46a382975d2ea4d2b084eada3c7910c2049b
describe
'128391' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPT' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
866fc8556b9f49dbd63e3d5539ad5592
ca8fb76bb71a835638fb396bf4cb9ff7a66d5972
describe
'121468' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPU' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
4fb0b284265ef1219c6062fe184751e9
9ddcab89de01172e428684cfcf5b4f267db1eb98
describe
'120980' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPV' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
6e01e1414b6c092dbfa98a51cb611977
934267a3a08c7ab1ff19b992170a7fd727d7388c
describe
'110565' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPW' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
467145804149e86d729d4fd38df2dab5
39d12f7b187aac31f8e76c6c1fe48fbfb91ee8c8
describe
'126511' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPX' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
46e1778648d439d5b9f48965b4608797
e4b238a1d5e7d8c59372ff36f148a09adc1c3d28
describe
'120061' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPY' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
29ce4993338b901aa763e14a1b27bd8b
711884eca2ee3864de8f9a00465c9ff527225813
describe
'115492' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGPZ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
815ba244900e3567d0d31fb79066bfeb
5ec534fd576bca3cb858bba4ffed3aa5429d6c13
describe
'117243' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQA' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
2f8ef04a6a1cd83569c645e964806cb9
9f5671129989718149901415f16de27a4193a9f1
describe
'90426' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQB' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
0719619cd2e99b61ddc7dc1a1a2630b8
9ea1e1249354a40b553f4c625e016e339b782444
describe
'137466' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQC' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
9c043acbd5a0b91b5de0ae89c45df191
d198e67fce2b06897bc74144d05b11a59f6b6993
'2011-12-21T00:33:41-05:00'
describe
'141530' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQD' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
5954a06eb5da61184e54a6e3ded4227b
047a8cb4c951762ddacc29ca26c9ad241959fee1
describe
'147302' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQE' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
4fc0256183fb957d07245776a1fd2d1f
0ccab96b3203cfd63d1c0a995471de88cbc735be
describe
'155127' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQF' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
049ed87d7f56d919a66a98e01eba8431
63757345edc7c37fa674a1ec1afcf7ef8efb08a7
describe
'155052' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQG' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
03dc361183629c462a03968070444657
60d6a0e4732dcd0ba193d425c10f78a95f114a4d
describe
'158522' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQH' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
b3db879e6d2c3a55a36429d088413b23
40c1b49afee7167e61c17cb288d595c89add2124
describe
'145179' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQI' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
cf3f1a1e0bb07b7748d2f9f541f8a70b
9a399e58a0461538ad9ed5262a05228f533c31a6
describe
'155240' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQJ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
0cad55daac32f92eee00e892ff91c979
42c00a2790ed0f7ece08c366f8276bd2da18b757
describe
'88462' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQK' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
42f729afdebd06ee498e2384818514e1
98565d6dc73e8e0ff2282bad73833d3422dbcd97
describe
'131681' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQL' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
d1e718bb73218ea1935c2bc48586ca64
49039282e8274e2a5dbb06ee00bec86b4eeb7e90
describe
'34975' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQM' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
0cd755655abdb3fe69df36f31c426bba
2b85823ef145e9ab6af333244603ae400153fd4a
describe
'9658' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQN' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
75abb9121c3148c1231bb907a47113a2
4f2d8b0e40cdc7de0fb76828a1f20e489500ed42
describe
'37291' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQO' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
e38c0d56fe9e46c470f5f1836c17f85c
ddd52ada3dd06906e3acb5ed4cec12c943ca9644
describe
'19222' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQP' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
7f4000ab149f3228aaa57fbd4c65ca5f
34e4f519c759661ecc3e000b1a724a4759cbd4d0
describe
'4816' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQQ' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
26e890ef76f8e4fb1a1e98ef4c439659
1fa3e6446e2c3bb1daae179acd82392ebc3c6c5e
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQR' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
d5574ca6f11de7e387b44c04844afc8f
3fb09bb1b02256077542a9851c85b6597470173b
describe
'5847' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQS' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
c56ed1ae0613c4ce67447317af6be862
1a8524a58444b55e1a9a8f501238f13e4bfcde75
'2011-12-21T00:33:20-05:00'
describe
'34741' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQT' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
5e296ebf48e09407d280490ff977ebe4
ee5d2de335f20e31b92366d1c5020d83acff0302
describe
'8797' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQU' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
e10631e527b9bb973f321de6112971ad
9573e26aed023400b922d21aa5f093d640bb7df5
describe
'12632' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQV' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
780117f8c812637ba50ecd7c8e115535
4f34f9f6d1708d6e6524bbb624122409005e3415
describe
'3297' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQW' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
0b6afd70a82fb776f6b25757aef1fc13
dbf493fed6aa12c5244d6b382c3b72ebd2676c40
describe
'37585' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQX' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
feb2ecf6ae62e40c00154a45dd6a4cfc
d5b542d07919618643d9feeed40d7b5da4c284ed
describe
'9237' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQY' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
df223e069d565701b2f614ab428c4aad
e9cea16e28cc3d10398a01469960ff0252e222cd
describe
'42910' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGQZ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
679f6355fb1264be1be40cecfb33f2c1
d228ad2983d29879a0041e40a8abd4e18f69b5aa
describe
'10364' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRA' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
0c82d0e7f6bdafe18cc7e87d6d7c3728
2417a73e3e7ebaca03141c784f18fa18d178dd49
describe
'43494' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRB' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
f1115f17046f03783372afc84bb2dc00
f96b46c932e419c161d2d59c5672b452e308fafe
describe
'10687' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRC' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
5064815886a25c4b1579c27b29cb4edd
fdc8919c032189a8b690cd03ac68b3376948060b
describe
'40963' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRD' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
55df802b67763b218e0e9d409acf0e63
8a63525a467d9aa95be0cbb01887122e3796f199
'2011-12-21T00:32:52-05:00'
describe
'9979' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRE' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
530ec387ee380c1242c84c286fdb67a8
abf76125b69a9851c01e8fb2dd58646cad6b32e6
describe
'40395' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRF' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
c283c0557eb8cff9a7edd8512f6ba144
91fc1da10e54fc6364e5d15901918aeaf07aa386
'2011-12-21T00:32:33-05:00'
describe
'9737' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRG' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
fccb7afcf6cfd30e1d58ea12236d518a
c3f0b8cf2ced468494c5b51aa79d499c29dcfa05
describe
'41511' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRH' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
66096a7c8716b297e034b2fce2577a35
1370a8c2e0e021c66dce67d02acc512bfecd2947
describe
'10399' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRI' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
d9d147b2fe4d8ceef48fe6cab2291c67
7088a2e3cec0292b227132e2893531cc08236770
'2011-12-21T00:31:04-05:00'
describe
'43292' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRJ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
59f7531db36ca401634e905eb46b81de
90943d1087bbe11df447b6125150d69f666eeead
describe
'10567' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRK' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
658fbd0f88ce7e123b6cb9b61a0040c4
f246671500c2de4107f98b12d6902a4f8105f35e
describe
'40521' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRL' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
a4d3df35a4be36da0558dd55388fbd20
7f48264cf0ba840c28de68fba27ec452afd13bb8
describe
'10102' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRM' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
7c30c991346b06f43d1eb61c5e8bbe33
b80cfad20579aea069d9be8675cc38b3cee64559
describe
'40885' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRN' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
d83b8d7528c6907e0778db1478cbc18a
38301332ced68db115fc6e57b2337a174034d3bb
'2011-12-21T00:30:41-05:00'
describe
'10100' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRO' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
865cd509465f15253b4a843e8161d698
96499389558a94575e6b083e8e1cb84814efd344
'2011-12-21T00:31:36-05:00'
describe
'42931' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRP' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
59522b642ae4aab1cc1a617cf3733b2f
e880b1cf674c8d5c879e5a8aeb532dd7d2488dce
describe
'10195' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRQ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
07c85648b7def07194d59c82037a7dc7
e8b28c5550d55039454e1568df85adcf494f3545
describe
'43671' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRR' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
eab9685935dc16e421836ee1738e2eda
5ed4c7333bdf50d0378bc90de639160940aada74
describe
'10655' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRS' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
4218405572058ff0898946e6109dc8b4
a2227ff164eb7b6d85bd575d3a70a86e5e28748e
describe
'41692' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRT' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
e6d5107309370b2835cfbf92d1cad4f3
2763d3684ced393e6f09e8db08a06be714afcd43
describe
'10496' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRU' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
74fce9669e8e55e509796a65e1119aed
0cdbc7330700431451f0005586cefcbad8f6ba50
describe
'41101' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRV' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
8db5823ec0f7a5806283c2e4546ce074
c48f8d118083fa97978bb12d4ec4e55e10e629d0
describe
'10291' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRW' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
405df8d73534a8d7b063a520b6e0d330
331ae08dc025f9af3acd293066c92bb3411e6ad6
describe
'43113' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRX' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
55f08118339ad18492a3ccbef42edbca
5539b547f47f26e406c22c4fbd48be66959a1a32
describe
'10345' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRY' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
f5411cf2fca66510bf0ce912d5105fbe
318b2b5982c5e21d2255aa07f8b0e33cc6aa7981
describe
'40235' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGRZ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
b52d22971940b34f11bd3886fd9fd7ff
198edb7f256c3d3464dd4085d24e3d5014612ed3
describe
'10104' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSA' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
350c9aff54fb10fe3469caaf8341f144
87535f8a5a9e32b6b532e65abcfe3f8fbe88beaf
describe
'38195' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSB' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
83bc3cce3e921c1b2747413462ee9cd0
f4a54899b29da97e055d0eaf82d1432a97b487fd
describe
'9568' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSC' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
a45c60020d10e481336caa8d8c7c4178
33efd226a9fbbae847dc793634328d34e3cb3857
describe
'39688' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSD' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
e981f8b992809e0f15b12387394cb70a
1cc508f023e34c16fbddc1dba433a644ae018eb4
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSE' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
6ac1ddf58398393d6be6a04fb291ed21
da7d5ea0c6d6f27fa0dfb57842c4769fd7052018
describe
'42326' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSF' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
56797426d44bbb5d023f4afb0a32f75f
993da3035c92867ba96f1fc5ff974577b47373ac
describe
'10475' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSG' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
941e8404b3a8acb570d7d3a63ef26ed8
3dcd3af91ee766797e45b6a77830865883725e86
describe
'38289' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSH' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
51c4b346e0daac7353c9394e8394b33c
f0194b2fb36db0b766b378dd16557ec8f281ba47
describe
'9846' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSI' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
4c0ef08ebc3cc6492115d0071950c9a7
7089a011223acf2737d3ba13b77ed0b1b5d53c0a
describe
'39007' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSJ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
a272bac5a2f66fdc744cdfd037977978
05402b47971dfa0a0b829508ccdb8adc464eae50
describe
'9724' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSK' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
c4e75c7c47995f87eebeb803a42ce388
9ea43d76c03ff7f4f916c743c1153d225924be1d
describe
'39145' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSL' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
d6f826cd96b5c2a3162ecc7ef9c2ce8f
6e459981c7b168e0b8668a9cdfd7ee54ed8ce13c
describe
'9640' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSM' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
ead71a70a6e42eb40d8f3b53c731d3ac
4e918cec5f53fde939d0d6f35140b9a6fe637707
describe
'41799' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSN' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
38c3ad27e3ed26117caea753e9d51f80
0b1f88091afcb47f1debc927682dd9ab87926bcd
describe
'10125' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSO' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
1dc686c101cf0d04e14f2d8ee5dda694
85d9eca7de02ce2cf8a3bdf3de62cf20a6a81318
describe
'41430' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSP' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
7e5fe4261292c4def3372b97e0adfe7c
ea7f3a9e577f2ffb23aa6fe558f7fea615bd3cc9
describe
'10182' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSQ' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
a8c7bcef9d9be2d01b30dfdeefede637
d4e0dafa4eb395a8b3a0ee4adad9f5cdea2dd8cc
describe
'40767' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSR' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
18bf4621b0d5a4041456926685d10ed6
5c38127049e3c12a3b1cdabce9fd8b47b1371ab5
describe
'9844' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSS' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
73f7acde4681beb1b5c4ae3bb5e6299a
0e07431b9c0edfc63f4e51c63eab3f27471c2712
describe
'38727' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGST' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
40e36546945822a865f698ea873364bc
c9e02a074f18f81baef1266ec3ccc857c2c0cdb0
describe
'9813' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSU' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
11de93cc241941a03a3b73c09ce5cac5
29fca517456b015c438b901a55bf1564aa94f264
describe
'40954' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSV' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
eba8cd4e317789df62645cb40fd5ef79
7bffc788acc329f5aa19fe370563598886ffb2f4
describe
'10389' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSW' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
6868809bd8454938088266ca63e6b2e1
01646e097b0049fdc1a889f156b73a24721cb9f6
describe
'40400' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSX' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
020d00d1ad7986dc49c78e7c4ebf66fc
ad783a7a95e3d049de5b920d144d2dcd1587a6a5
describe
'10149' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSY' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
f90d2a7daca62ad3689a2b594a3a658e
d45169e2725f24d7bfcc0ca1515fd771c3436290
describe
'38547' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGSZ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
ad006ff712f262347b3fa425e81660b8
3a53d5019fe8993b1c6a9ed9b80a75e8a39cfd06
describe
'9742' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTA' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
e7fb4f262b86fc6be152189162d4cfd7
bc60fba7004d6e6bc47c20f94a7c242325d86b17
describe
'36483' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTB' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
2e32e1c5591740cabd1b9f502570b652
4a9a05a32cc6572658c3ae7bdd4821eba222bece
describe
'9165' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTC' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1969fb8332be2d6ba801c8449d7dac0a
4083e7e6e5b04c4fdc7d78768f0792b5ac2301ed
describe
'38151' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTD' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
129ba3546bb4da0567542dd3482698d7
91e4f2915b9c3adab33c73ed1f0e79b0f2bddcb0
describe
'9589' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTE' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
b5cf88b1596a23e8e3b321a724a74d35
1215daf4ea51f14be1069e9bacc7aa5b9b1b2314
describe
'40517' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTF' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
8a4f75aef33bb2a9e1d0cd5e277176c0
d67c05715ee5ebcfed28241ebd665b3073c9ab2e
describe
'9956' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTG' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
4fecd23a752ff90d34539cf8399b1da9
d96c49ceeb4e9f4fcaac58072a54a081c964c679
describe
'38232' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTH' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
c35a7b34525c1f48f65640c124f5d852
e042216ccb67e2c8d9fcabbd0ee6f1529a2f800b
describe
'9586' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTI' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
8ea0fb4af528fabe0308e66a88e9df13
a173bf6512d39346137ed647089e06ed37fd4d66
describe
'39274' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTJ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
b93f9f49d6721c8b195743306564f57c
c0b4a5eed8051afd79a103e369a75d57988bba16
describe
'9550' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTK' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
eedbf2a17dba2f55ab09cb05cf8dc33f
a97163beb98fb2f203a52bd039ffa00571195ff6
describe
'39879' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTL' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
ac5da316e2a868be51f0deb141dcc5f8
f8a4aae3a76b9665ac493c5e62ae84fc63bad047
describe
'9953' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTM' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
37cf0b7f1585145b25045aff46d36494
adf7258af79475b4fa4e711c62df136d9b4dfd3a
describe
'39917' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTN' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
e57db99204ccdbb5fd82f09ef2aa78a0
fb9805d3f4d5b6869e9fd47bb26e45d3f1becec5
describe
'10215' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTO' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
b097128f4e73c3739e1822756b249657
83a987a4b89a30d651523d2856cc7a1d30154de1
describe
'37112' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTP' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
c468b99b1a32a3bf67b3b1ba31ff4fd5
1ea5ec40d5c9a49c7cf6ce5fc8b022ad8093281e
describe
'9622' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTQ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
b6991e7ed7941ce7542b50b9c0a10a8d
dfcfb994e1a02eeb1e4adbaf83b178cef542705a
describe
'37881' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTR' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
849ec3c5384c6780a44884ad23e342ae
31d1d46b893fe3dd3c09ae1a342fbd359c141631
describe
'9788' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTS' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
7c4304a925c38257aeac7b0755b9d8c4
1f01e3e76fe15de9a11b3286dbb74749854d40f3
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTT' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
623eca26c738706674b322ae6cbcd47e
ce4498b39d962c45c666fe91369737428e433acc
describe
'9481' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTU' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
cf13cfa9a35cfc9c467adfe55ca0ce6b
5e9879291f3c4c20e87e2a9f1ceec7a5e6a8142e
'2011-12-21T00:32:59-05:00'
describe
'38261' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTV' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
0a5867686a28c4a59c7b3c0252b9c905
cc6fa33b8431ad55ff57f693c5706fbb68442f06
describe
'9830' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTW' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
2d59600f455544fb00be039d7864299a
48339dc479a56a790bc43fd606569100c9964e07
describe
'38247' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTX' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
e946a1d3c9ca732f290dfc89f43b53ff
384f36cb7e596b9ec98da6cde8f29a2332da232b
describe
'9510' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTY' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
335d4db194ef37d6320a764a570ff274
ccc4e5a57520fa759f61d6f300e6abca0bcf5762
describe
'36790' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGTZ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
2e1c10be101356c282fe654b2f28078c
795d1ee313b512451a77bc29c027dbaff364febf
describe
'9250' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUA' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
02d7f9aae4d7f16b6f1a1f4a8a99c5a2
1ecd1c01223d9c38383dbc2372f8bb9c9178f37c
describe
'38406' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUB' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
6fe069a24a6542ca0d722db481e4cb8b
77ae3e4d3e88f9818071d171783b3134dfafbbc2
describe
'9487' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUC' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
72364829bd3088281399339fd1f96584
565cf91c93a0c9f51b39127502ce9561e2ad2ce1
describe
'41136' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUD' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
2df6103ad9ba3a3771fd37f2e9a345e6
592327131cd31ae1ef38aa9d6c9d4bb493e2aad7
describe
'10121' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUE' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
bfe512c9404246330eb0f8016bd8e97b
be5a5bbf6af4d7bbbf05a54f139ea77934753c01
describe
'39755' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUF' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
9b35acd276595782ee41e90c5f5a2071
a8456c13d3c25a6a30534e7746aa163d8da05c4e
describe
'10053' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUG' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
3ae04d03c497dd1d84575d626b32e200
37ff8fad3e1169add93ce863a4da2d80c594d06d
describe
'39453' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUH' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
d463be82ea6959f21cb57ecd31975511
340dbc1853f710742cda2c4902b2afe9330d5056
describe
'9904' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUI' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
0150cedb9ed63904b3c552c5b8a1420f
9319f8aae9166374ae3854c35ed24de3d789fc2b
describe
'41211' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUJ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
2ce2601cb07d69b0dfd932a59026fb16
afc0b1ee4f5a3310646bdf24364695a07c600c3c
describe
'10060' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUK' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
6a1699ae14aa58572eb971d50919dd99
a99476aadac7f7a66a46a9ac9be8c3781c73e506
describe
'43474' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUL' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
af805f7006e443e5f313883599a056e0
fb290c9b16f5cd2df651021908f492ac80bcfde8
describe
'10767' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUM' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
2cb42dec194b8f54b75f9090f72c5a24
a8c99024d248866513bd88f897c497c049e29557
describe
'38276' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUN' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
fb33759ff2669eef52dea023bfa15a77
74f5945ec557ea6d9abf400ddfb13a1558216618
describe
'9517' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUO' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
90e7545d9acba848a9c998f2d1a5985e
7108028fc23daf2d48f91e615476faa0efd893f6
describe
'38827' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUP' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
0824244fc1d5dd09be0b1aae3f6eb86f
592567004e4b91c0c170f89b6ec45f5cf98b97eb
describe
'9764' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUQ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
e088ae3a97ad97cedf737f6e49720faa
3aebff2603188d281577fcbc578ece1ac931a214
describe
'40027' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUR' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
5ccd6780faf85c0889bfaed65bd53f54
50df4df4620888f4e0f2f9f6a4cd87e4caf55c58
describe
'10118' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUS' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
78a51c03821b40962269bfef42e59b51
00de7f237de95f2c37930662f7b0ebd7bc41cc7d
describe
'40225' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUT' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
514e14bbd191f67bee1fe050f5eddc06
ffc91d7fd8bceea40292be1f0a49e7e1a4526ef1
describe
'10038' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUU' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
f951448cf54131ee274c4be6a2d7730a
06246d767ffb7f326f649981b5c466d3e644394f
describe
'35257' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUV' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
85c54e1dd142ef9b204daefc7599f8f3
f8b13f17db2ed68b384945f613bd2df6ecfb0374
describe
'9341' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUW' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
d658ac6ac0811723e8fde1e80f7fec36
33c6fd45b6448f449789d98b6745085913aca0cb
describe
'38344' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUX' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
8dde1a94b1c1e86548e50486bb2b49b0
987b8331633c45fad783238d611f1aa0f8037711
describe
'9850' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUY' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
e1a619f4dc9d33f29a75024243e8cb87
57f4a71eab3d77aa64b2f98f26376212281784f2
describe
'40824' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGUZ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
383f9d8a2cc3951e2ceb12d439fe6e3f
e3d708160fb77b6668218f2ebd6f02fa9549c268
describe
'10205' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVA' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
3b6c5c79db27705e3e91c8e8b203da19
03afe3e9ce7ade0666a49824143d0e4446a8dfb0
describe
'42427' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVB' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
86f8a24487684131590f5f1d6172817c
72143a52080e18e7b5b0c516257df8d8aebaad3f
describe
'10407' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVC' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
82093dbfd3be02d5cbfb1a089a4b05ca
6f2dc54806a02cecd963a900bcbfec1dbb9308bb
describe
'37026' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVD' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
383c6b59cf5168093775797c656935fa
db437c51fac9b0bd2321640c08c53613ae5c0f92
describe
'9053' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVE' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
87d0c7856f0bc2579753a0d8fa578bfe
e5b1f08d786b6cef15c3d0c8ec309930339b5551
describe
'37176' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVF' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
53b50584c6eb7a3f0dacbfe7a328fe90
b3316b67a64b01c873a587823a5d006ef99d8fb1
describe
'9688' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVG' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
4067950b8256a679777290b39d96ec26
f847f6e868e59b1f73bbca23098d523a60fe7878
describe
'41964' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVH' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
5e3b094dd6bed650d79bf3f558fc792b
13b60391f8d6c7a88fee78e5ceeef7460a840353
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVI' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
73809db753d8b6ec6e2cb40e9da00979
3d83f1d6da0fdc5d622add05ae3c33dea4bf2d74
describe
'41418' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVJ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
1bda7fd45e515dc775aadba5b8b35844
d9d202861ec609f3221b83979fded9c128a38cc2
'2011-12-21T00:33:31-05:00'
describe
'10265' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVK' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
2b08facbf3af3631d08d9db76d3153c2
bb31ded4affc941da2f47ebf4e99f1ca2158ebfb
describe
'39790' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVL' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
fc3df91648e8c653101ffa88fc4b516d
31ca091e5800ce10e3dca04bcbbf9d29e7cc034c
describe
'9888' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVM' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
9058f378721a287a9e23cd51a31f0461
b506921e3692369d18f81890187ef3d20895afe1
describe
'38450' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVN' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
6ba6c1f2ce7059f9f92e748ad509afdf
430bdda7637756db442b7f6326eb74c5a73621fc
describe
'9461' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVO' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
f78800860a967148eed83c9addd2bdb1
a85a3b71938a52d9e0ac2891fbc046e071e58148
describe
'41422' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVP' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
6a6228bd132e521f1ad1983de51de56f
7f7fcbcf0c41451baebbab48c0a3dfed549f5418
describe
'10156' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVQ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
b4ce519bf07271fafb5950d2f12254d8
e9cedacc0dd65ee024e369dedda6a98021793076
describe
'40768' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVR' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
ffd3e00323bfb3a24594275199856628
ca00b1a91fd898ab4903fc0a5445b22bb2e101cc
describe
'9965' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVS' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
b79f38ebbd24d055b2d8a33bacd71ae5
01ac133bf54e4eb04596ad8d76ca99b6f2d86c2a
describe
'39197' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVT' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
7829ce419289c23c36f813cbd258d996
e39a61ad6c3d97641f55ad6e1fbb44ee554ccb48
describe
'9822' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVU' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
57f3ac4a7fec8a95811f60fbe75dda34
e400912e087ceaaec6cad0ccebe819b8ee9d3158
describe
'37371' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVV' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
966477f91a76fddc256933b47c6405fa
48198ff78b9b1cf94a32ea5ee9c620722a3ad451
describe
'9505' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVW' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
58ff891ca3fb8b6cc92aa1ddc78a24a0
5f64b1a88f6bafc0eb3cd277199b438be6e9d9cf
describe
'39795' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVX' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
146a42b275cd9ef4647ba9560ee9a9c6
5c07dcd6273da40dcc5259d10de7198f8941b573
describe
'9720' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVY' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
6e7f6207e0e45e1540a71be88912d91c
1d5704007e7b559bfd2e6d4a0609d3c119e183e5
describe
'41138' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGVZ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
9e0bd55b1126cf089cbcd06de04d95ad
f8d810f65a21c21ba19bde138dfa399dff63d780
describe
'9969' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWA' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
0aa7275bc01979b901b796b0ec8beee1
c907c0bb720a16b5165821f47e61e733285a81f8
describe
'35405' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWB' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
ad16bc94fd3f179af93ea5686f34a794
733deba419e7988d99fffa8459080abcbdef8d09
describe
'9381' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWC' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
faed4c5b84ca17981d537ada4c40dde8
02375f1166571f9abd72cb1df5cb37eaa873e76c
describe
'37994' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWD' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
cccc7b1ebb4ef8c63235d22aaeddfa9c
a628f3a7d69cda43f26df13c94a5977973b41b73
describe
'9703' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWE' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
10f274f96a1c73c50ae739308297adc2
2733f4ca35bbb6fcba8c490afc68976f9eeef23c
describe
'42550' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWF' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
0f2352f2f96ba0a4e7788e14a96100ab
1af6fbd6ce22b88c1e14baa24164673814082333
describe
'10433' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWG' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
ec046aa776f2b439de4831e3ee8b1bf9
37252a9f714cda0cf854195aa0ca2bac634fb374
describe
'41224' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWH' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
fa42ce55542f524fd7a49c0d410e736c
e699913d25d511c7e694abdd1c4a450199d7f35f
describe
'10106' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWI' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
ca13fe155fcd1e1feb6016cd3a0eb7ae
f085876b623625cb6ea590d150b81df7ced8a467
describe
'38807' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWJ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
808113806302185baeaa22e98afbdd33
876cbdf8ca4f718de050bc4ddc114c80547d5a05
describe
'9802' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWK' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
75298ebe859871ff9fae632fc5f2e948
054e80a59b4741c068fa9a6277e4dbeb8c857f0f
describe
'38772' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWL' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
209c5f70f5d0e9958acd0e1f2e65f385
c163613a408af2078ccfad22ef58f13ec8b4a5e6
describe
'9373' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWM' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
ec4304374aefd8f8f79dea75b2d182cf
2504ad656b3a8ac47727a2b80940934dd2112666
describe
'38762' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWN' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
4f6a074090cad462c01ee0d7364c6ea9
90e7d3d535ccb2e9aade864e6295c3c7611d1d0d
describe
'9776' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWO' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
d3182ac0ff4929c914b1aad7f8ea777a
9b1bf082df24e511d53668400ecd83e4e5a47c33
describe
'41207' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWP' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
6b2293fcb1b4c9ae232e7fae7e70f9d3
43f5cf8707a7915128e81620ca9c6206ae00a5b0
describe
'10037' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWQ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
51d51202edaf9e816789d5824bd37f56
00e726171193935b9c89366161cc4a1b1993c6cf
describe
'36272' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWR' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
c8e890fb1abf74196fa78505edd78631
e5f41359a059ec013d3bbd18e5eda06200465970
describe
'9457' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWS' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
a224bac46ef8486c64643f3fe1372b21
f1712c3efc417e597116d9229d9ede5cdc74b015
describe
'36264' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWT' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
3f93a409416d401a1cb87329da29aee1
ae330a58bb7f16a431680960bb9a45de8810b2f6
describe
'9677' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWU' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
832ead2e96510be82460d584f8f3be42
f948eeb1f58f4c489954cdc281611e593e50e368
describe
'39819' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWV' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
a7674e4f367feaf44a7309d946ed4c7f
0e3371b7147d33326d8a7f1936952fa123ed06dd
describe
'9809' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWW' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
4b8e727b3a6b0769286eb14021638523
891dcaef52655f31528bf40c7778cd8e721426e5
describe
'40207' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWX' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
fedf5f6c61be3da92e8413a7f43f29d7
8e5684489402eabc7e3fb7257838e8c322a38723
describe
'10069' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWY' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
6722589c1a4187d596f1c3dc8162d152
7e17c047f916b39eb8adaf0c6c388bfc0a5029f5
describe
'40248' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGWZ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
756fc8a36d22fec9b7db4f53c5230f64
ba9a53d877bb8da8d20a04fc6e79fa044cfa9e52
describe
'9689' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXA' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
e3496eb0c8e1ee5297f8d8b56551e335
7b79d4656e4975fcf91996a9320a7e76561b8914
describe
'39931' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXB' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
2465af993c3669f0d8716d98f623d9c7
f0aaed8bb5a199f03a8c3ed6e383661457262f42
describe
'9831' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXC' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
db237841dcd57ce38f65ca9ef2623d51
1c7a44e67ad190efeb4b5f9e9892e596f0805bfe
describe
'38373' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXD' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
4bf38c88b8213eb754162c6d89db9eca
207d5e3a18c1dfc95b89545a1a632e9814745bf5
describe
'10001' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXE' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
981196819cb9266f19ab194a0715c7ae
2652364a5e0107d2dbee96c6c8c850eae21ea1f7
describe
'39047' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXF' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
8d77c4320990ede0dc668bc7c64dcd6b
7744666999a95ced4a8491b1a8cf903e090b279d
describe
'9734' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXG' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
86c7ccb3c2d5954800b604ae35dc7612
2a0e1500519d3e339c18abd41be91cc8a0df408f
describe
'36115' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXH' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
8e2983f22ce1a335a2a03dc4556835bf
22a1ba2babaf96779c3321295b41fd484e7c3c01
describe
'9371' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXI' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
8bc61ddfedb4368305832c5617a18942
4352b022604f795815bdfaf992382b3c591cb5e5
describe
'35068' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXJ' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
4516682f851a386334f595f8180a7f24
2ccd488505b78e86f693d9313cf4502907f178e4
describe
'9157' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXK' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
84dc41fc43ccef39a84088636825c4a7
f35816149bb6b5e35ad10f7b4662d7f1fd91863e
describe
'41064' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXL' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
725c90534d49e4701ed77e175224710b
96d24a92f329c116bddc4f97cc7c1dd5cca634ec
describe
'9970' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXM' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
96dd044573497b682921872a2de62efb
27cab75dbb26ac903a644aa54ebc8b7703b6084e
describe
'40058' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXN' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
81909d7315a8b215f8faa395d3257a75
d51d86d5ca0ca6c7b3b143fe0b018ec285133dbc
describe
'10077' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXO' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
4f178bee1f69f9d197e584cffd218b7a
e4d324f348c3b6951535481508dc44e82b2b4343
describe
'40147' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXP' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
4b7e4038c8ff0acadef6b219bd64fc08
04be8607f5dd0b1085889c14ead3f300ed972bd7
describe
'10186' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXQ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
c014173afaa6f9c61f90d0ae96e3c7b0
b8e4d34636fc623e8aa68158aad8ed2d58be7f72
describe
'36807' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXR' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
1036b3beaaacfe874a8caf245a27488b
4e0e3c6a6404c80ee484af71d1a07edab6f42c6a
describe
'9365' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXS' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
f3f6c1f51acc3f736f9fe79cb1ef7126
8d2b97f92910d9104bc83c3025f55b67cddb2dc6
describe
'41167' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXT' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
da0a02aa00c6e8f6cb125889e841ada9
6a37e5a27dc9fbdadbbf8ed5c2e53eacbc26aace
describe
'9898' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXU' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
6212f1ae5896c895bce259b53ffa61ed
c70ccd1e6ccd6045fbf6768032608b874b0b8333
describe
'39046' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXV' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
5a623781f372e7dd6af604902e57bb5c
370ed8fae367905023f237b9bcd7ad49d0b10f6c
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXW' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
bebdb3eb9ad57f98a0c9544ce06a02d8
9e4fb3dd910a359232a4aac33a1a690df7ed20b1
describe
'38187' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXX' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
e1ab90b31340e61ba54df9b57c62eb82
70a4324e3ccabc0fd3259988373f055a1e7576c7
describe
'9745' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXY' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
031cb918e46e866f3401d53e5af6ea6d
ea8af01555284b71d828df5d6f6134ebdc8b3fca
describe
'38532' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGXZ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
3a90f49ae0fb67f10738112edc288303
73e401449ed7cc292675a66ed1f52bdde45a9ef3
describe
'9598' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYA' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
edcae2b57d2ab0b5d37f22e140a71c21
bffcef363eb02b896edf8154b0bfe7759ef5e779
describe
'28370' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYB' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
b8e96dd8ac97643dabfb223dbe63c6fd
bd896bab9a241444ac1021ee5d2af096b12fdd8a
describe
'6952' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYC' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
c6a33e3678d750a3d119b79452f83d0e
5fec5220a0b93c0147f9c19965c43e86fd85f5c0
describe
'42767' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYD' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
b7022d6ff4b19e59d1a291d9bb37fbe2
871b9c0f3882468121c37513201ac881a0e6cf11
describe
'10359' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYE' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
3c8e77f4d67e4d837891ee382dd27171
300d8a1f9797f5b700cddb6ab7f113e0eef45d2b
describe
'43830' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYF' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
f24d51c5dbecf5d5eacc853adf206d33
5b5ed92deb6febc6e1a27cd90ecfdf71c7871478
describe
'10641' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYG' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
7d052532fbeb56010639e4cb0f3d69e7
e3585a5f269659d349dbe991a9b245962c4b388c
describe
'45881' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYH' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
33be9787ac59fefc38d8bf326dcbb9ec
6f1493f72d630cc2e83cd2c848e4313c7c0f8988
describe
'10889' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYI' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
d05ebdb66c44cbdde16b053e18938ca9
9c9d01b1dc7845da106bb4986317b5d605d3ae81
describe
'48196' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYJ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
139f435d41c7f0e153389d4536472af9
416f6c158e12b28303e12bf1c9eb46786994ddb4
describe
'11281' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYK' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
0a4a6d870ed38ea9c9a1d2db029645a4
08184dd1cf378c720d0ca2a9eed63e7556d711d5
describe
'48848' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYL' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
541dd0f299b11ef009892e1265d681fe
bcada880a7efa6b63aa1846d138dfcfa765d3a32
describe
'11311' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYM' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
1bf2d7b61442d3524fdb0d4c4ee97eea
1804cab5a822f7657ad06fbe08bb6dc5593f6132
describe
'46741' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYN' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
6f04dbe0a77a04d824b529e793bb2dc7
3ae406dc7fec290d0c12aefcaac2320b947e663a
describe
'11261' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYO' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
80e90157b2a6b49edc3f706f57650f72
f5a191fb9faf878548dbe7d66f239df62edd837a
describe
'42039' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYP' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
70560bb0e99d53b96aa66f960e4991ae
1fe86234008c7f95bb2c296553ff2f7b2cb777a1
describe
'10805' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYQ' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
5a8bc0e6bca656b5c12c1a79c5088554
b34ec9bd85a38427c5f205f98ada0d8b14697be5
describe
'45201' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYR' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
002d71b9972951c7bd31af513ddaaf19
a35a08420554b325be1cc6419a4e904bc0272cb5
describe
'11031' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYS' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
5e675ca70f85c17a216a703395a81e4c
3d685f98fee7080a71583a6bfa028c751b98a72d
describe
'19673' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYT' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
83f3ec027df3e668517aff636fa40bc0
90a154311528bc60ab6e29245abfd4e16140db69
describe
'4974' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYU' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
96014af2dbe6fd225ff736d12a8449e0
067a4094fe0844605f4e8216adffe9c204707587
describe
'24705' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYV' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
67a912498a51ad90cc1efe32c755558f
c8dc45179420f2fb0228887c8d699dac53d8629b
describe
'5376' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYW' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
f2c73cd5c0abf196a7ca3c9b04326979
0e3c7e4654fcf14fd6aef00735f5039747b86fd4
describe
'8982' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYX' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
06793671caf8b8296b497bc7713bd9d5
7cce73bff1f7104ab43910394962251c58b9032b
describe
'3606' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYY' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
370d68598b503f56c6424c3d934c3ac9
52b2c56aa4fc2fd04246df2d98eec6ea8b5b2045
describe
'24' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGYZ' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
e4471a72eb9c676a9a7df7a88fe74d10
454a6ba254adbda03e4c742fea25b91d3cd12b9d
describe
'184808' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASPfileF20081128_AABGZA' 'sip-filesUF00086579_00001.mets'
ec40c2539170f293fb2701bcff60a5f6
e5797af605155c225446861330a7850fea5f0749
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T12:34:18-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.