Citation
Gwen

Material Information

Title:
Gwen
Creator:
Leslie, Penelope
Whittaker, Thomas ( Publisher )
Staniland, Charles Joseph, 1838-1916 ( Illustrator )
National Society's Depository ( Publisher )
William Clowes and Sons ( Printer )
Spottiswoode & Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
New York
Publisher:
National Society's Depository
Thomas Whittaker
Manufacturer:
William Clowes and Sons, Limited
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
111, 19, [1] p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Grandmothers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Farm life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Measles -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Family stories -- 1898 ( local )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1898 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Family stories ( local )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from prize inscription.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue, printed by Spottiswoode and Co., follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Penelope Leslie ; with frontispiece by C.J. Staniland.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026845488 ( ALEPH )
ALH3370 ( NOTIS )
245157630 ( OCLC )

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Full Text



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Bee,
ae) NSN









GWEN



LONDON:
PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, LIMITED,
STAMFORD STREET AND CHARING CROSS.





AN INCIDENT IN A DONKEY-RIDE. , Pp. 43



GWEN

BY

PENELOPE LESLIE

AUTHOR oF
“MISS BARTON’S BICYCLE,” ‘f TROUBLESOME COUSINS,” ETC.

WITH FRONTISPIECE BY C. J, STANILAND

LONDON
NATIONAL SOCIETY’S DEPOSITORY
BROAD SANCTUARY, WESTMINSTER
New. York: THOMAS WHITTAKER, 2 AND 3, BIBLE HousE

[All rights reserved]







BY THE SAME AUTHOR

Dorothy’s Stepmother. Price 1s.
Troublesome Cousins. Price 1s.

Miss Barton’s Bicyele. Price 1s.



NaTionaL Socirety’s DEeposiTory, SANCTUARY,
WEsTMINSTER. S.W.



















Srelslrelralralle



CONTENTS

Sue cig
CHAPTER PAGE

I, LEARNING TO MILK... vee ene ven 7
II, AN UNLAWFUL Donkey RIDE Sse eae ge
III. Gwen’s PRESENTIMENT cae oe vee «50
IV. AuNT MILLIE ae soe ie Fens OF
V. Dan’s IDEA... es fa re p72
VI. THE PLor THICKENS me eee Ser BS

: VII. GRANDMAMMA’s LECTURE... tee vee 103











GWEN

—

CHAPTER I

LEARNING TO MILK

Gwenie! We've played that
precious race-game every night
this week!” Daniel said irritably.

Gwendolyn had had measles since he
had, and had been just as ill; but it was
an understood thing that it was her busi-
ness to amuse him.

«Do think of something else!” he
repeated ; and Gwenie wrinkled up her
forehead and pondered deeply.





a LEARNING TO MILK

“There’s chess—we haven't played
chess for months,” she suggested doubt-
fully. |

But Daniel shook his head. A game
of skill which his sister generally won
was not to his liking at all.

“Draughts, then, or ‘Beggar my
Neighbour, or the spelling game.
Let's do ‘Constantinople.’ § There's
lots of paper in the Davenport, and I’ve
got two pencils.” And this time Daniel
seemed satisfied.

“Tt isn’t much fun with only two people
to play ; but we must do something. We'll
take two minutes for each letter, and
whoever thinks of most words altogether
shall choose what we're both to do till
bedtime,” he suggested, pulling out the
big Waterbury watch which grandmamma
had given him last birthday, and of which
he was intensely proud.

Gwendolyn got hold of two more
words than he did; but it was aclose



LEARNING TO MILK 9



tussle, and the game proved so interesting
that she elected to go on with it for the
rest of the evening—till Emma the house-
maid, whose business it was to look after
the two children, appeared with milk and
seed-cake for supper. :

“It’s going to be fine to-morrow, Miss
Gwendolyn, Tom says so,” remarked
Emma, encouragingly, as she left the room.
Tom was supposed to be the most weather-

. wise individual in the farm-yard.

“That's consoling. It’s poor fun having
measles and coming to the country to get
over them, when you never have a chance
of going out without getting wet through,
What shall we do to-morrow, if it really is
fine ?” demanded Daniel, with his mouth
full of seed-cake.

“Get up early and go out before break-
fast,” returned Gwenie, promptly.

_ “Well, of course. There wouldn’t be
much sense in staying indoors if it’s fine.
What shall we do when we ave out, I



10 LEARNING TO MILK



meant?” Dan said impatiently. Heliked-
his sister to make all the suggestions,
because having some one to blame if they
turned out badly was satisfactory.

“We needn’t do anything, just at first,
need we? It’s all new, and we don’t know
what the place is like. Couldn’t we walk
about and think of. something to do after
breakfast? There’s a pond somewhere,
with little fish in it.”

«“ Sticklebacks, I suppose. They aren't
fit to eat. But we might catch some
alive, and keep them in a finger-glass or
foot-bath or something. It'll be worth
while starting an aquarium, if there’s a
place here for us to catch things in,”

“How are we going to catch them,
though? Ina butterfly-net? They dart
about like wildfire,’ Gwenie said doubt-
fully.

“Then I don’t think your butterfly-net
would be much good—you wouldn’t be
quick enough with it, But they'll come



LEARNING TO MILE II



in a minute, if we get some proper fish-
hooks, and bits of raw meat. I know
a chap who used to catch hundreds,” Dan
remarked confidently.

“That must have been nice. Only we
haven't got any fish-hooks.”

“ Nor had the other chap, till he went
into a shop and bought some, which is
what I thought of proposing that we should
do,” suggested Daniel, sarcastically. Girls
were so stupid—there wasn’t an ounce of
go or enterprise in their composition.

‘But there.aren’t any proper shops in
the village—only a post-office, where they
sell sweets and writing-paper, and the
blacksmith’s. Besides, how much do fish-
hooks cost?” demanded Gwendolyn,
doubtfully.
“ About a farthing each, I think. They
needn’t be made of gold or silver either.
And the village shops aren't the only
ones we’ve got to depend on—there’s a
little town called Oxford, which it would



I2 LEARNING TO MILK

be just possible for us to get at,” returned
Daniel. He meant to be a great man
when he grew up, and prided himself on
being full of resources.

“We couldn't go there to-morrow,
though, could we? It’s six miles off; so
‘it would cost ever so much to go by train,
and it’s so horrid to wait,’ Gwenie said
disconsolately.

“We needn't go by train. You ought
to be able to walk six miles. Nobody is
likely to notice what we’re doing to-morrow,
so we can go directly after breakfast.
Grandpapa said we were to be out of
doors all day long.”

“But it isn’t only the six miles there—
it's six miles back, as well,” returned
Gwenie, doubtfully. ‘“ Not that I mind.
If they really mean to let us be out all
day, and aren’t going to look after us
much, and you don’t mind sitting down
to rest pretty often, I can do it quite
easily. We might ask if they'd let us



LEARNING TO MILK 13



have dinner out in the fields, and take it
with us. We could start quite early, and
not come back till teatime, if we did
that.”

“Yes ; but it wouldn’t do. They’d want
us to have plates and tumblers and all
sorts of things, if we asked to have dinner
out of doors. You can’t mention a picnic
without people wanting to pack you a
hamperful of crockery. They’d think we
only wanted it in the fields just for fun, so
they wouldn’t consider weight.”

“We might turn all the crockery out,
though, and just tie up enough to eat in
something. That’s what gipsies do; and
those big, red handkerchiefs of yours would
hold a lot,’ suggested Gwenie. “We
couldn’t be expected to carry a hamperful
of crockery twelve miles, just because
somebody packed it up for us.”

. Daniel wrinkled his brows, and thought
a little. Fellows like himself, who hadn’t
any brothers, had to make the best of their



14 LEARNING TO MILK



sisters; but Gwenie was so stupid and so
awkward to manage. If she once got it
into her head that the grown-up people
might disapprove of the expedition if they
knew all about it, she would most probably
decline to go altogether.

Aunt Millie was away, and Mrs. Wilton
herself was an invalid, so that her grand-
children scarcely ever saw her at all; but
Daniel was quite sharp enough to know
that for him and Gwenie to wander off
miles away by themselves, stopping when it
pleased them, to eat their dinner out of hand-
kerchiefs by the roadside, without forks, or
plates, or other civilized appliances, was
not a proceeding which was likely to meet
with her approval.

“You see, they mightn’t like it if they
saw we hadn't used the plates and
things,” he began doubtfully. “It isn’t
as if this was our own home and the
servants and. people knew all about us.”

“No; and we can’t smear the plates



LEARNING TO MILK 15



over and make them look as though they
had been used, because it would be deceit-
ful. I wish I didn’t always see how easy
it would be to manage everything if one
wasn't straight about it,’ Gwenie said
slowly.

“T wish you hadn’t such a priggish way
of giving out that you’re quite above doing
anything you oughtn’t to. Other people
can keep from doing mean things, like
making plates look as though they have .
been used when they haven't, without
boasting about it. You ought to be
ashamed of yourself for having such ideas!”
Dan said sharply.

“But we can’t help Satan putting bad
thoughts into our hearts. We don’t even
know exactly when he’s going to do it,
till it has happened. Mr. Bertram said so.
And as long as we get help to turn them
out again——”’

Gwenie stopped, with crimson cheeks;
Dan was looking so annoyed.



16 LEARNING TO MILK



‘Really, Gwen, I wish you'd curl up!”
he broke in angrily. “I know all that,
and you know I know it; and you aren't
good enough yourself to be always preach-
ing to other people. Who stole the pre-
served pears ?”

Gwendolyn’s eyes filled with tears, and
she hid her face, with a quick, impulsive
little movement which was natural to her.
It was so cruel of Dan. If he had ever
done anything very dreadful, like stealing
fruit, and had been found out and punished
and forgiven, she would never have been
mean enough to remind him of it; but
boys, somehow, were different. And it
was part of her punishment, she supposed,
that some people never would forget—
only it was so long ago. It was nearly
five years actually, since cook had left ever
so many preserved pears lying about at
home, and she had taken some when no
one was looking, and had nearly broken
her heart afterwards with all the shame



LEARNING. TO MILK 17



and disgrace and misery that her piece of
wickedness had brought her.

Dan’s conscience bristled up and began

to prick a little. Gwendolyn looked so
crushed and crestfallen, and she had been
so perky and bright and full of life two or
three minutes ago.
_ “Well, cheer up, old girl. We all do
things we shouldn’t occasionally; and I
believe I’m rather a brute to chuck stones
about in this fashion. Anyhow, we’ve
wandered rather far from the point. You
see, for one thing, if they packed an elabo-
rate hamper, it wouldn’t be’ quite polite of
us not to take the whole of it; and——”

“Perhaps it wouldn’t. But, Daniel,”
interposed Gwen, with a suspicious little
gurgle, which sounded as though she hadn’t
done crying, “why shouldn’t we tell Emma
plainly that we'd rather not have a hamper?
We might just say we only wanted some
food to tie up in a bundle, and then there
wouldn’t be any bother about it.”



18 LEARNING TO MILK

Dan shook his head. Gwen never could
take anything in. But she hadn't quite
done crying yet, and he wanted to make
up to her for that unkind reference to the
preserved pears, and didn’t mean to speak
sharply to her again just yet.

“T think we'd better give up the idea
of taking dinner with us. You ought to
manage if we start directly after having it
here to-morrow. Tea isn’t till six; and I
don’t suppose anybody would mind if we
were late,” he said presently.

“No, as we always have italone. Emma
only puts it on the table and goes away.
I shouldn’t think she'd notice if we weren’t
in quite at the right time; and I think I
can walk twelve miles. Only vou mustn’t
be too cross if I want to stop rather often
on the way home,” Gwen said doubtfully.

Dan woke up first next morning. The
sun was shining, the birds were singing,
and the little American clock, which his
sister had saved up money enough to give



LEARNING TO MILK 19

him last Christmas, assured him that it
was only half-past five o'clock.

Gwen was sleeping in a little room which
opened out of his. She had lain awake
for ever so long during the night, sobbing
softly to herself, and wondering whether
people ever were going to forget about
those horrid preserved pears; but the
regular breathing, which sounded quite dis-
tinctly through the closed door, made it very
evident that she was far from being awake
now. Dan sprang out of bed, opened the
door cautiously, and crept quietly up to
her. He didn’t want her to wake till he
woke her. The sun, which was shining
full upon her curly chestnut hair, turned-
up nose, and little freckled face, showed
the patchy redness which last night’s cry-
ing had left about her eyelids very plainly ;
and Daniel shook his head with an odd
mixture of regret and satisfaction.

“She isn’t a beauty, that’s one comfort.
Looking in the glass'll keep her from



20 LEARNING TO MILK

being conceited instead of making her
want to spend money on clothes and worry
about her complexion, like some girls do.
I wouldn’t swop her, though, for any other
fellow’s sister that I’m acquainted with.
Wake up, old girl!” And he shook the
shoulder that Gwendolyn wasn’t lying on
rather roughly. :

She opened her eyes, and started up
suddenly.

“Tt isn't: late? What is the matter?
Oh, I suppose you want to go out before
breakfast ?” she muttered sleepily.

“Yes, Ido. You know we arranged to
last night. Do wake up a bit! You've
been snoring loud enough to rouse the
neighbourhood,” Dan remarked encourag-:
ingly. .

Gwen pulled herself together at once,.
and sat straight up in bed.

“Snoring? Nonsense! I’m sure I.
haven't. You're only just awake your-
self!” she retorted angrily.



LEARNING TO MILK 21

Daniel’s superior smile was so aggra-
vating.

“ All right, old lady, we won’t dispute
the point. Somebody was snoring, and
they’ve stopped since you woke; but it.
may have been a ghost, of course. You
get your things on as quick as you can,
and we'll go and look for the stickleback
pond. I'll wait for you outside the hall-
door.” And Daniel disappeared, slamming
the door in a manner which startled Gwen
very considerably.

“Oh dear, just like aboy! He'll wake
everybody, and grannie won't like it.
Emma told us she objected to noise last
night ; I shall get dressed first, and go in
and warn him.” Accordingly, just as Dan
was in the act of pulling on his hobnail
boots Gwendolyn crept in on _ tip-toe,
carrying hers in her hand,

.“You haven't got your boots on yet.
Oh, that’s right! Don’t you think we'd
better put them on downstairs? Grannie



22 LEARNING TO MILK

doesn’t like a noise; and if we wake her
up, I’m so afraid she'll be angry.”

‘“Oh—hang it! Well, perhaps she will.
Though why grown-up people should
mind noise so much more than we do, I
never can understand—here goes!” And
carefully propping his door open with
a chair, Master Dan set an excellent
example of noiselessness by sliding silently
down the banisters, and waiting in a sort
of heap for his sister in the hall below.

“Don’t know exactly what we’re to do
when we ave out,” he remarked, when
Gwen arrived.

But the tinkling of a bell in the distance
apparently furnished her with an idea.

“That’s the cow-bell, I’m quite sure.
Mother said, when she was a little girl
the cow-bell always used to ring at six
o'clock. Let's go and see,” she sug-
gested.

“Go and see what—a bell ringing?
That doesn’t sound strictly exciting,”



LEARNING TO MILK 23

Dan said, tugging vigorously at his boot-
lace, which had been broken pretty often
and wasn’t quite longenough. But Gwen-
dolyn knew what she was talking about.

‘Of course not—the bell stops ringing
directly. But it means milking-time, and
by the time we get to the byre they'll
have collected all the cows ready to begin.
And, perhaps, if Tom’s in a good temper,
he'll let us have a try and milk one of
them; and then if I don’t learn enough to
be a governess, I can go out to the
colonies, and be a dairymaid when I’m
grown up,” she said eagerly.

«Oh, all right! Milking is girl’s work,
though; so I'll look on. Perhaps, when
you've succeeded in milking a tumblerful,
if you ever do, you'll offer your brother
some of it. Supper didn’t make a very
lasting impression on me last night, some-
how, and breakfast isn’t till eight,’ Dan
remarked rather gloomily.

“No—and I’m hungry too. But hot



24 LEARNING TO MILK

milk is nearly as satisfying as bread and
butter, so it will be all right,” Gwen said
encouragingly.

“Flot milk? There isn’t a fire out
there. You aren't going to bring it back
to the kitchen and boil it, are you?” Dan
inquired blankly. -

“Of course not. Dan, do you really
mean to say you didn’t know that milk is
hot—warm anyway—when it comes from
the cow? It’s thick and frothy too, and
just as good for one as a tonic. Mother
used to drink it every morning when she
lived here, and she thinks perhaps that’s
why she was so much stronger when she
was a little girl, than she’s ever been since,”
Gwen explained, in some astonishment.
It was so very seldom, she had always
been given to understand, that girls knew
anything which boys didn’t.

‘Oh, warm—of course! You spoke as
if it was going to be boiling,” Dan said
sheepishly. “You girls always are so



LEARNING TO MILK 25

casual and inaccurate, That’s how it is
you can’t make as much as we do when
you're grown up, and don’t do properly
for doctors, or newspaper reporters, or
anything interesting.”

‘We do do for doctors—some of us,
and lots of the things in newspapers are
written by women. Besides, I’d rather be
a woman than a man any day. It’s ever
so much nicer when you get old and can’t
work, and have to spend most of the time
indoors, particularly if you haven’t some-
body always about on purpose to amuse
you,” retorted Gwen, indignantly. “I
wouldn’t be a boy for anything !”

“Sour grapes! They'll get ripe later
on, when I go abroad, and begin to have
adventures. You've got the best of it
now, anyway, because you're going to
milk, and I’m going to look on,” Dan
said admirably. He didn’t want Gwen to
get into one of her agitated moods at this
hour of the day.



26 LEARNING TO MILK

The cows were standing ready in their
separate stalls, and Tom was talking to
two or three of the maids, and apparently
waiting to begin. He eyed the children
inquiringly.

“We—we've come to ask a favour.
Miss Gwendolyn wants to do some
milking,” Dan said boldly. He wanted
secretly to do some on his own account,
but was rather afraid of being clumsy,
and making himself ridiculous. Tom did
not look altogether best pleased.

“The cows don’t take kindly to new
hands. Has the young lady ever milked
before ?” he asked gruffly.

‘‘No, she hasn’t. She only wants to
try——”

“And if it’s a bother to you, I won’t
try at all. I only wanted to see if I could
do it—just once,” Gwen broke in eagerly;
“we thought you wouldn’t mind.”

“JT don’t, miss, if it’s only for a minute
or two. But there’s more in milking than



LEARNING TO MILK 27

people think, and those cows is easily put
out. I must choose you a quiet one.”
And Tom’s eyes ran down his stock
thoughtfully. ‘Jenny ‘Il do as well as
any of them. Youd better sit here,
missie!” and Gwen took her seat on a
three-cornered stool, alongside of the
nearest cow, obediently.

“You take the pail thusly—between
your knees, Miss Gwendolyn,” explained
Jane, the kitchen maid, advancing to
relieve Tom, who was beginning to look
rather put upon. ‘‘And then you turns
your attention to getting the milk into
it; not over your pinafore, as, just to
begin with, is what is most likely.”

“But I can’t make the milk come at
all,” complained Gwen presently, after one
or two utterly ineffectual attempts,

She was getting hot and uncomfortable,
and Dan was beginning to snigger con-
temptuously.

“ A good many can’t just at first. You



28 LEARNING TO MILK

want to persevere a bit. That’s better!”
as a thin stream of white fluid appeared
at last.

“Yes, but it’s only with one hand. - My
left isn’t doing anything at all. And I
can’t hold that pail between my knees—
it’s had to go down on the ground,” Gwen
panted breathlessly. :

“Well, the milk you have got has gone
into it. That’s more than them as tries
for the first time can say generally,” Jane
said admiringly. “You'd better stop now,
or we shall never get done, and to-morrow
it'll come first rate.”

Gwen didn’t want to stop—she felt
quite sure that she was going to improve
immensely immediately; but Jane was
looking a little impatient, so she got up
reluctantly,

“T think Pl just have one go. Your
performance wasn’t up to much,” Dan
said suddenly. And before Jane had
time to remonstrate he had popped down



LEARNING TO MILK 29

on the stool his sister had vacated, and
wedged the pail in between his knees,
with a professional air which was rather
annoying to the last performer.

“That's all very well, but you've no
skirts. I could have managed ever so
much better if I hadn’t had any,” she said
wistfully.

Dan was going to succeed at once, evi-
dently, and he was quite conceited enough
already. But the milk didn’t come, though
he worked away vigorously; and Gwen-
dolyn’s crestfallen air began to disappear.

“You haven’t got any at all, and I
believe youre hurting the cow. She
didn’t twitch about half as much as that
with me. She's going to kick — take
care!” as Dan sprang to his feet, just
too late, unfortunately, to circumvent
Jenny, who had managed to kick the
pail. of milk all over him, by way of
intimating that. she was thoroughly sick
of being experimented on.



30 LEARNING TO MILK

“Oh dear! Milk stains, and you’ve
only got two suits! What a pity it wasn’t
me. My frock would wash,” Gwen said
sorrowfully. “Those knickerbockers will
be in no end of a mess.”

“Tt won't show. We can sponge it
off. Commend me to girls for whining
over everything! Jenny’s an ill-tempered
brute, though, and I propose we don’t
have anything more to do with her,” Dan
returned, shaking himself ruefully.

“So do I propose it, nor with none of
the others neither. There'd be a fine row
about all that milk being spilt if Miss
Millie was to home,” observed Tom
gruffly. “You London young ladies and
gentlemen seem to me to do best out
of the farm-yard.”

“Which means that you'll be glad to
get rid of us. I think perhaps, Gwen, we
had better make ourselves scarce. You've
got to clean up these garments of mine,
and get them dried by the kitchen fire



LEARNING TO MILK 31



somehow before eight o'clock. I’m
awfully sorry I let that sulky beast
upset all your milk.” ©

And the two children proceeded to
make the best of their way back to the
house, without, as Tom remarked, so
much as “thank you” for all the precious
time he had spent on them.











CHAPTER II

An Untawrut Donxey RIDE

“Bin $6 OBODY would ever know that
Pw milk had been spilt all over
_ those knickerbockers of yours,
I’m quite proud of them. But I used
nearly all the ammonia mother gave me
taking out the stains, so we shall have to
try and not have any more accidents,”
observed Gwendolyn, thoughtfully.
“There won’t be a chance of having
any more learning to milk. Tom’s one
of the most disagreeable people I ever
met. He was quite rude to me in the
kitchen just now when I said that very





AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 33

likely we should go and have another shot
some other morning,” Dan said gruffly.

“Perhaps it was because he knew you
oughtn’t to be in the kitchen. Emma
told me grannie didn’t like it when she
saw me coming out with your knicker-
bockers. And we never remembered to
thank Tom for starting us this morning,
which we ought to have, because it wasn’t
his work, and we hindered him and Jane
too. I don’t think he'll be disagreeable
if we are civil.”

“Humph! Well, what’s that you're
writing ?” demanded Dan, suddenly.
Gwen didn’t generally write letters that

“he didn’t know about.

“It's a letter to a man in Oxford who
keeps fishing-tackle. Jane told me his
name ; and she said he’d send us six hooks
all ready to use if I sent him threepence
in stamps. I was going to ask you about
it,” Gwen said, reddening uncomfortably.

“What's the good of going to work in

Cc



34 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

that round-about fashion? I thought we
were going to fetch them this afternoon.”

“Yes ; only it’s a long way, and I wasn’t
sure if you'd asked grannie—it all seemed
rather a muddle when we were talking
about it yesterday.” Gwen faltered awk-
wardly. “I thought perhaps you'd be
rather glad to have them got this way—
it’s so much easier.” ‘

“That’s a matter of opinion—besides,
you ought to have asked me. I don’t
suppose you know how to write a business
letter in the very least. Let’s see.” And
Dan drew out the blotted sheet of note- _
paper which his sister was trying to hide
under her blotting-pad, and examined it
critically.

“DeEaR Mr. Roper,
“ My brother and I rekwire some
fish hooks. We rekwest you to send 6
and inclose threpence in stamps.
“Your affec*®* little friend,
“ GWENDOLYN.”



AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 35

“That won't do at all, Gwen. I knew
you wouldn’t know how to do it properly ;
but I really should have thought you
might have turned out something better
than that. The spelling isn’t right, and
your beginning and ending is ridiculous.
You don’t begin ‘Dear Mr. So-and-So’
to tradesmen, and you don’t want any
expressions of affection at the end either.
It’s extremely lucky that that letter wasn’t
posted before I saw it.”

“I’m very sorry, but I thought you put
‘your affectionate friend’ to everybody
who wasn’t a relation, And spelling is so
difficult. Do tell me exactly which words
aren't spelt right, and I'll try and re-
member,” murmured Gwendolyn, humbly.

“That’s precisely what you wouldn’t be
able to do, if you were shown what was
wrong without taking any trouble to find
out. You'd better look every single word
you've used up in the dictionary, and copy
out those you’ve spelt wrong about fifty



36 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

times. That'll do much better than getting
me to tell you,” Daniel returned evasively.

He felt privately almost certain that for
one thing there were four e’s in three-
pence, but was not quite sure enough to
commit himself.

“Oh, very well—when there’s time! I
wish we could get a grown-up person to
play spelling games with us,” Gwen said
wistfully.

“That wouldn’t be any good. J look
after you when we're doing that. And
now, if you'll allow anybody but yourself
to make suggestions, I'll tell you what
I’ve thought of. Do you remember those
donkey-rides we used to have on the sands
at Brighton ?”

“Rather! I should just think so!
Wouldn’t it be fun if we could have some
more?” ejaculated Gwendolyn, brighten-
ing up at the recollection.

“That's just what I’ve come to the con-
clusion that we can have, if you're sure



AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 37

that you really would like it,” returned
Daniel, mysteriously. ‘‘There’s a man in
the village who keeps three, and wants to
let them out to people for a shilling an
hour; it’s ninepence if you take them
for more than one hour. How would you
like to ride to Oxford and back on one of
them ?”

“ Awfully. Of course I should. But
how could we? Grannie mightn’t like it;
and it would cost such a lot!” objected
Gwendolyn the prudent.

“Tt would cost something, of course ; but
I’ve asked grandmamma, and she doesn’t
mind, and she’s given me four shillings to
pay foraride. I told her one hour wouldn’t
be worth getting stiff for. We ought to
do the whole business in three hours quite
easily,” explained Daniel, not, unfortu-
nately, thinking it necessary to mention
that he had not told grannie that he
wanted to ride to Oxford and back with
his sister, or that he had received strict



38 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

orders not to venture any distance without
the donkey-boy.

“That's nice. But if it’s going to take
. us three hours, four shillings isn’t enough.
That'll only pay for two hours if we're
going to have a donkey apiece,” re-
turned Gwendolyn, still looking rather
alarmed.

Pocket money with her and Daniel was
very far from being plentiful.

“T thought I told you they only charged
ninepence if you took the animals for more
than an hour. And I’m going to square
it with the man, and make him let us have
them the third hour for sixpence, which
will make it all right. If you want to
come, all you’ve got to do is to be ready
at two sharp, and leave business details
to me.” Which Gwendolyn, who loved
riding as indulged in for the only time in
her life on the Brighton sands, was very
glad to do.

“And what about the donkey-boy ?”



AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 39

inquired Dan, when his bargain was almost
concluded.

“The donkey-boy. Well, sir, any other
afternoon I wouldn’t let the donkeys out
without him. But he’s got business some-
where else to-day, and if you're accustomed
to ride, and will be responsible for the
animals, I don’t mind making an excep-
tion. It'll save you sixpence, which is
what I have to charge if he’s out for any
length of time.”

Dan hesitated. Grannie certainly had
said that they weren’t to go out without
the donkey-boy, and, therefore, as the
donkey-boy couldn’t come, he knew per-
fectly well that the expedition ought to be
given up. But it was such a lovely day,
and they really wanted the fishing-tackle.
Besides, when he had once made up his
mind to do anything really nice, he never
could bear to be disappointed. Broad
roads are such pleasant, easy places to walk
along, and Daniel wasn’t quite man enough



40 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

at present to realize ‘that it is generally
only the narrow, uphill, stony ones that
lead us on to places that are worth getting
to. So——

“Oh, I see! Then, as he can’t come,
I suppose we must. manage without him.
I'll bring the beasts safe back to you
myself.” And with that, Master Dan and
his guilty conscience and the donkeys set
off for the Manor House as fast as possible.

“Are you quite sure we can do it in
three hours? These donkeys don’t seem
inclined to go particularly fast,” Gwen
remarked presently.

“No; that one you're on is an obstinate
brute. I can see it by the way he holds
his ears. I only hope he won’t suddenly
take it into his head to stop altogether.
However, perhaps it’s better than having
an animal who insists on galloping all the
way as you aren’t used to riding. That
saddle is all right, isn’t it?”

“Ye-es, I suppose so. I’m not sure



AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE AI

that it’s altogether as tight as it might be;
but perhaps it’s only my imagination. It’s
such a long time since we had those rides
at Brighton,” returned Gwen, doubtfully.

“If you mean that there’s something
wrong, and you'd like me to get off and
see what it is, I wish you’d say so. The
saddle seemed right enough when we
started, and it’s just as it was then now,
as far as I can see,” grunted Dan.

Gwen was a fussy little thing, and
evidently half afraid of the animal she was
riding, but she would gain more courage
as they went on. .

“Oh, then of course it’s all right! I
shall get used to it presently. But I
wish you wouldn’t ride quite so fast. My
donkey won’t go.”

“So it appears. I really think you'll
have to beat hima bit. We shall be all
day on the road if he goes on like this,”
Dan returned discontentedly.

“T shouldn’t like to beat him, even if



(42 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

I'd got a stick, which I haven't. And
shaking the reins doesn’t seem to have
any effect. Don’t go on like that!” as
Daniel’s steed made a sudden spurt for-
ward. ‘I can’t possibly manage to keep
up with you!”

“So I see. This sort of thing won’t do.
If you aren’t going to beat him yourself,
I shall have to do it for you. What's the
matter now ?”

“I don’t know, only he won't go on.
Do come and help me, Dan; I can’t make
him move!” cried Gwen, in desperation.

Joseph, her donkey, had come to a full
stop, his fore feet planted firmly on the
ground in a slanting position, and his ears
laid back with a look of determination.

“He wants a good beating. I shall
have to get off and come to him,” said
Dan, slipping off his own donkey and
fastening it with a slipknot to the fence.
“It's lucky Pve got a riding whip, as you
haven't,”



AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 43°

“ Hadn’t I better get off? Suppose he
kicks ?” queried Gwen, eyeing her brother’s
implement nervously.

“He won't; the worst he'll do is to
start off rather suddenly. You stick on
tight, and don’t be a coward,” advised
Daniel. “ I’ll make him go somehow.”

But apparently this was easier said than
done. Joseph’s skin. must have been as
tough as his disposition was obstinate ;
for not one inch, either backwards or
forwards, could he be induced to move.

“T really don’t quite see what we are to
do if he’s going to glue himself to the
ground like this all the afternoon. You
can’t have been riding him properly, Gwen;
it’s too tiresome,” Daniel said at last, stop-
ping from want of breath. “Even if we
give the whole thing up, and don’t try to
get to Oxford, I don’t see how we're ever
to get the brute home, unless we tie a rope
round him and help my donkey to tug
him back to the village. They'd no



44. AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

business to let out such an aggravating
animal.”

“There’s somebody coming, isn’t there ?
It’s a man with a bath-chair. Perhaps he
understands donkeys,” suggested Gwen-
dolyn, looking over her shoulder anxiously.

“T’m not ‘going to ask anybody to help,
it would be all over the village in no time;
besides, what's the good? You can’t do
anything to a donkey but beat him, or
drag him along by main force, if he won’t
go. I wish that bath-chair would turn
round the corner,” muttered Daniel,
sulkily.

But the bath-chair evidently had no
idea of doing anything of the sort. It
and the man and the old lady in it came
straight on, and presently the old lady
pulled out a pair of opera-glasses and
proceeded to inspect Joseph and the
children pretty intently.

Daniel had turned his attention to
Joseph again, but suddenly Gwendolyn,



AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 45

who was still peering anxiously over her
shoulder, gave a cry of recognition—

“Its grandmamma! How funny! I
never knew she went out in a bath-chair.
Do let me get down and speak to her!”
she cried eagerly.

Daniel looked round awkwardly.

“Oh, well, we can’t get out of it! You
can get down, if you want to,” he said
slowly. The bath-chair had been advanc-
ing steadily, and was nearly upon them.

Mrs. Wilton put down her opera-glasses
and signed to the man to stop. |

“What is the meaning of this, Daniel ?”
she asked stiffly, taking no notice of
Gwendolyn, who had slipped thankfully
off Joseph, and run up to the bath-chair.

—“Tt's—you said we could go for a
_ donkey ride,” muttered that young man,
doggedly.

-«“ With the donkey-boy, I said. What
have you done with him?”

Daniel shuffled off the foot he was



46 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

standing on to the other, and got very
red. He felt so small and foolish and
generally ashamed of himself.

“We haven’t got a donkey-boy—they
couldn’t let us have one this afternoon,”
he said at last.

“Then, what did you mean by coming
out on donkeys at all? Didn’t you know
perfectly well that you ought to have let
your ride wait for another day ?” demanded
grandmamma indignantly. It had always
been an anxiety having children in the
house when Millie was away, but she
approved of putting young people on their
honour, and it had never occurred to her
that her own daughter’s children were not
to be trusted. Daniel hung his head and
looked nervously at Gwendolyn, who was
standing by with wide-open eyes.

“Yes, I believe I did. Only it was
such a lovely day, and we wanted to go
to Oxford for some fishing-tackle. Gwen
didn’t know anything about it,” Dan blurted



AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 47

out, wishing that the ground would open
and swallow him, or that, at any rate,
something would happen to take his
grandmother's attention off, and break
the awful silence which ensued when he
stopped speaking. He felt quite grateful,
when Joseph, who was still standing stock
still, suddenly stuck his tail. straight out
and brayed loudly.

“What is the matter with that animal ?”
inquired Mrs. Wilton.

“He’s only braying. That’s what
donkeys generally do when they think
it’s going to rain,” murmured Gwendolyn,
faintly.

“TI mean, why were you beating him,
and what was he standing still in the
middle of the road for?” went on Mrs.
Wilton, eyeing Daniel expectantly. That
young gentleman was still shuffling about
and looking extremely foolish.

“Gwen couldn't manage him. He
wouldn’t go,” he said sulkily.



48 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

“You didn’t seem able to manage him
either, from what I saw. Pray, what did
you intend to do if you couldn’t persuade
him to move ?”

“We hadn’t quite decided,” began
Daniel; but Mrs. Wilton broke in again
before he could finish his sentence.

“Oh, then I think I had better decide
for you! Will you kindly go back to the
village at once, and tell the man those
donkeys belong to that you can’t manage
them, and that I shall be much obliged if
he will either send or come for them
himself as soon as possible ? Gwendolyn
can stay here; there is plenty of room for
her in my bath-chair, and I mean to take
her back with me.”

Poor Daniel! This ignominious con-
fession of failure was not to his taste at
all, but grandmamma spoke decidedly,
and he didn’t see any way of getting out
of it.

“But it’s only Joseph who won't go.



AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 49



I can ride the other donkey back if Gwen
isn’t to come, can’t I ?” he said anxiously.

‘Certainly not. Go at once, and do as
I told you. You would probably get into
just the same predicament over again;
and, in any case, I don’t consider that you
are fit to be trusted alone with another
donkey,” returned grandmamma, severely ;
and, after that, Master Daniel felt that
there was nothing to be done but make
tracks on foot for the village as fast as
possible,







CHAPTER III

Gwen’s PRESENTIMENT

Son HY didn’t you tell me that we
weren't supposed to go with-
out a donkey-boy yesterday ?
Grandmamma made me so uncomfortable
on the way home. She seemed to think
the whole business perfectly awful,” Gwen-
dolyn was saying sadly.

““T’m afraid it was rather bad. I
oughtn’t to have done it. You're to be
depended on for jumping on a fellow when
he’s down, of course—you wouldn’t be a
girl if you weren't,” Dan returned dis-
consolately. He was feeling crushed and
cross and miserable.





GWEN’S PRESENTIMENT 5i

“You know I didn’t mean to jump upon
you. Oh, Dan, there’s a telegram!”
ejaculated Gwendolyn, suddenly.

_ “Very likely. But I don’t see why you
should be so excited about it. It can’t
have anything to do with you. I hate the
way you girls have got of flattening your
noses against the window and making
guesses at other people’s business,” growled
Daniel, angrily.

He felt thoroughly inclined for a quarrel
with somebody; but for this purpose
Gwendolyn had no intention of offering
her services. She had had a long lecture
anent the sisterly influence which ought
to be exercised over all brothers in the
bath-chair yesterday, and meant to begin
by trying to smooth hers down into an
amiable frame of mind again as soon as
possible.

The telegraph boy did not go away, but
remained dawdling about by the hall door
as though he were waiting for an answer.



52 GWEN’S PRESENTIMENT

Presently the door opened, and Emma
‘came in looking white and mysterious.

“Will Master Daniel go and speak to
the mistress, please, at once?” she said,
and then disappeared so promptly that
there wasn’t time to ask her a single
question.

“What’s that about? We can’t have
done anything else, can we?” queried
Daniel, uneasily.

“No, of course not—if we don’t know
it. But it might be something about that
telegram—do go and see! I wish grannie
had sent for me too!” Gwendolyn said
wistfully.

It was so horrid having to wait all by
herself in the schoolroom while Daniel was
being talked to about something exciting.

He came back presently, looking grave
and important.

“You were right for once, old lady—
that telegram did concern us. Father has
been sent for to India in a hurry, and he’s



GWEN'S PRESENTIMENT 53

got to sail next Thursday, so mother
wants us to go back at once, so as to see
him before he goes. Grandmamma is
dreadfully sorry we have to go so soon,
and she’s going to give us ten shillings
each to spend in amusing ourselves at
Wimbledon, where we shall have to stay
for the rest of the holidays, I. suppose.
Mother will be awfully cut up.” :

“T should think so! Next Thursday—
why, this is Saturday!” gasped Gwen,
with wide-open eyes. “And India is
such a long way off. I wish we could
all go!”

“We can’t, because there aren’t any
decent schools for me in India, and the
climate wouldn’t be good for you. If it
wasn’t for us mother would go—it’s only
for a year,” Daniel said thoughtfully.

“Oh, I’m glad she isn’t going! How
horrid it would be, particularly when you
were at school, with nobody but a gover-
ness and servants!”



54 GWEN’S PRESENTIMENT

“Yes; you wouldn't have much of a
time all by yourself; but girls have to put
up with being dull,” Dan remarked de-
cidedly. “We'd better go upstairs and
see about packing now. Grannie said we
were to start this afternoon,” .

So there was an end of Gwen and
Daniel’s visit to the country for the
present. Dan didn’t say much, but he
was very quiet and depressed and different
from his usual blustering little self.

Everything would have been different
if it hadn’t been for that wretched donkey
episode the day before. It was so horrid
to feel that he was going away in disgrace
and leaving a bad impression behind.
And being forgiven hadn’t done away
with the uncomfortable feeling he had
when anything reminded him of yester-
day’s escapade at all.

Gwen was very full of business, and
managed to get on with the packing with-
out assistance from Emma in a manner



GWEN'S PRESENTIMENT 55



which caused that good woman very con-
siderable astonishment.

“It’s plain you're not used to being
waited on, Miss Gwenie—the way you've
collected everything and forgotten nothing
is simply wonderful. There’s some good,
after all, comes from Master Daniel’s
domineering ways——”

But Emma never got a chance of
finishing her sentence, and the storm of
indignation which interrupted it, rather
altered her estimate of Miss Gwendolyn’s
disposition.

The house at Wimbledon was rather
in confusion when the children arrived
that night. Boxes and packing-cases were
everywhere, and Tosca, the family cat, was
wandering about with his tail in the air and
an expression of worry and dissatisfaction
about him which clearly indicated that he
‘strongly disapproved of the general dis-
turbance of household comforts.

Nobody was very communicative just at



56 GWEN'S PRESENTIMENT



first, but Gwendolyn caught sight of some-
thing in one of the passages which filled
her with a vague sense of uneasiness.

“That’s mother’s box; it’s got her
initials on it, What do they want to turn
that out for ?” she asked suddenly.

“Perhaps father’s going to take it, or
very likely some of the things he means to
leave behind are going to be packed away
in it. Or very possibly it’s been stuck out
in the landing simply because mother’s
room is being turned out. Housemaids
can’t sweep under beds when they’re all
stuffed up with band-boxes and _ things,”
returned Daniel. ‘You certainly have a
most extraordinary hankering after other
people’s business.”

So Gwen, who was one of those little
girls with fine, easily tumbled hair, who
are never very difficult to snub, said no
more just then.

But there was something different from
usual in her mother’s manner—something



GWEN’S PRESENTIMENT ed

which Gwendolyn could not have de-
scribed, but which made her restless and
uneasy. She kept looking at Daniel when
they were down in the drawing-room after
dinner, to see if he felt it too. But he
went on placidly teasing Tosca, and wan-
dering about from one part of the room to
another, just as he generally did when
nobody told him not to; asking questions
now and then about his father’s journey,
but apparently not having any idea of the
dreadful something else which might
possibly be kept behind.

At last, when bedtime came, and the
children got up to go, Gwendolyn could
not bear it any longer. It was naughty,
she knew perfectly well that it was
naughty, to guess and pry and try to find
out things that her parents did not wish
her to know, and if she hadn’t done it
perhaps she wouldn’t have been so miser-
able; but, as it was, her pent-up feelings
were too much for her and she suddenly



58 GWEN’S PRESENTIMENT



subsided into a burst of tears in the middle
of her “good-night” kiss, in a manner
which caused Daniel to fairly gasp with
amazement,

“What's the matter? What in all the
world is the matter now? She was all right
two minutes ago! Girls ave odd sorts of
people,” he ejaculated blankly.

But Mrs. Kregford seemed to under-
stand all about it.

“You go on upstairs, Daniel. I'll bring
Gwendolyn up presently,” was all she said ;
and in about half an hour a very pale, tear-
stained little person arrived in Daniel’s
room to explain her queer behaviour.

“Mother's coming up to say good night
to us both over again; but I’m to tell you
all about it first. We weren’t to have
known just for a day or two, only I
guessed,” she began timidly. 5

“Weren't to have known what? For
goodness’ sake do come to the point.. I’m
sick of mysteries,” Dan cried impatiently.



GWEN'S PRESENTIMENT 59

“That mother’s going too. She is
going, after all, because father wants her to.
But it’s only for a year,” Gwen explained,
in an awe-struck tone. Being left behind
in England without any parents at all,
seemed such a terrible thing that she
couldn’t speak about it above a whisper.

Dan, for once, was startled out of his
superiority. His eyes opened very wide
indeed.

“QOh-h! What's to become of us?” he
inquired faintly.

“We're to stay here—just for a little,
till the house is let.”

“By ourselves?” demanded Daniel,
. brightening visibly. What high old times
they might have!

But Gwenie shook her head.

“No, of course not. Aunt Millie’s
coming to look after us; and then, when
the house is let, she’s going to take us
back to grandmamma.”

Dan made a disrespectful little grimace.



60 GWEN'’S PRESENTIMENT



“ Aunt Millie—ugh ! She won't do any-
thing to amuse us unless she wants to;
and she won’t let us amuse ourselves if it
interferes with her, either. I only hope the
house’ll let soon.”
“Aunt Millie doesn’t, because she’s
going to be married, and her young man
can get at her here. Besides, she wants
to shop, and we’re so near London,” Gwen
returned discouragingly. ‘“ Mother said
she wouldn’t wonder if we were still here
when you had to go back to school.”

“Oh! Well, if you haven’t anything
more cheerful than that to tell one, I
think you’d better go back to bed. It’s
the only place you're fit for ; you look like
a sort of hybrid between a ghost and a
squeezed lemon as it is. Good night,”
Dan said so decidedly that, though Gwen
felt. lonely and inclined to stop and talk, .
she really thought that she had better do:
as he told her.





CHAPTER IV

Aunt Muir

“Ege HIS house feels lively, I must

say,” remarked Dan, resignedly.
They had just come back from
seeing the big steamer, with their father
‘and mother in it, off. Gwendolyn had
been more or less dissolved in tears since
an early hour in the morning, and his own
eyes were suffering from a prickly sensa-
tion, which necessitated a good deal of
blinking.

“That's my fault; but I’m going to
cheer up—mother .said we were to.
You're going to take me for a walk on
the common after dinner, aren’t you ?”





62 AUNT MILLIE



“Yes, Father said we were to spend
the rest of the holidays hunting for a bit
of white heather, and send it to him for
- luck, in a registered envelope, as soon as
we found it—only I don’t believe it grows
anywhere but in Scotland.”

“Ves, it does—in lots of places. But
I’m afraid there isn’t any on the common,
except what grows right under gorse
bushes, so that it can’t get any sun, and
that’s no good. But I know some girls
who found a whole lot of sundews eating
flies down by Cesar’s Camp, and if white
heather is hopeless it would be rather fun
to go and look for them.”

“Which side of Czsar's Camp?”
demanded Daniel, somewhat mystified.
Gwen always had had a way of prowl-
ing about with other girls when he was
away at school, and discovering all sorts
of odd things that he never bothered his
head about. :

“The side nearest to Robin Hood



AUNT MILLIE 63

&

church. You know where that little
stream with the brown rushes is. Ella
Monson said she thought it was the only
place near London that you could get
them,” explained Gwendolyn. “I meant
to have asked you to go there as soon as
you came home—if it hadn’t been for the
measles.”

“Then welll go this afternoon ; and, if
we find any, we'll start an aquarium in the
back garden. There’s a cracked foot-bath
upstairs that I could dig a hole for, and
there are heaps of flies about to feed them

”

on.

“Ves; but you don’t want an aquarium
for sundews,” interrupted Gwendolyn.
“They’re plants—the only kind of car-
nivorous plants that there are—in this
country, anyway—and they catch their
own flies. Their mouths are all sticky,
so that when a fly settles there it can’t
escape, and the sundew just sucks it down
as slowly as it wants to.” She wanted to



64 AUNT MILLIE





give as much information as she could,
without making it too evident that she
had found out that Daniel didn’t know
what the carnivorous plants in question
were. Botany wasn’t a boy’s science, no
doubt; but still he never liked her to
know more about anything than he did.
However, as usual, he rose to the occasion,
though rather lamely.

“T never suggested putting sundews zz
the aquarium, did 1? We can have frogs
and newts and such-like creatures inside,
and plant plants that like water round
the banks. The foot-bath is cracked, so”
water’ll always be oozing slowly out, and
keep the ground near like a marsh, The
worst of it is that when we've got the
whole thing to perfection it'll be just time
for me to go back to school.”

Gwendolyn wrinkled her brows thought-
fully. She wished Daniel wasn’t so fond
of trying to slip out of being in the wrong.
He always managed to make it sound as



AUNT MILLIE 65

though he had been right from the be-
ginning, and never seemed to suspect that
people couldn’t help seeing this and know-
ing that he hadn't. She felt pretty sure
that it was a habit which ought to be got
rid of, only just at present, when she was
continually doing something wrong herself,
home truths on the subject wouldn’t come
well from her.

“TI hope we sha’n’t forget to fill it up
with water pretty often. Because, if the
water is always oozing out it won’t last
very long,” she said presently.

“Is that what you were pondering
about so deeply ? Well, I hope we sha’n’t,
though, if we did, it wouldn’t matter much
if we hadn’t any fish. Frogs do all right
without water for a bit.”

“Yes; they don’t like being in water
always. We shall have to get some slips
of board to float about on the top for them
to rest on,” suggested Gwen.

“That's not a bad idea when the tank’s

E



66 AUNT MILLIE





half empty; but if we leave pieces of board
in when it’s full all the frogs will jump off
them and get lost. That would never do,
because they’d hop off into the house and
all sorts of places where there wasn’t any
water, and die for want of it. You never
saw such a miserable looking object as a
frog who’s lost his way and had to live in
dry places for a day or two,” returned
Daniel, with an air of wisdom.

“Yes. I found one of mine in the
housemaid’s cupboard like that. Its eyes
were so dull, and it was all limp and flabby,
with nothing shiny about it anywhere.
We put it on adamp sponge and sprinkled
it with water, and it got all right; but
mother said I was never to keep frogs
indoors any more. That one escaped out »
of my room.”

“T should have thought you'd have
known better than to keep such creatures
there any time. Were they big ones?”
inquired Daniel.



AUNT MILLIE 67



“Oh no, quite babies; the biggest of
them could have sat on a_half-crown.
There are always heaps of young ones on
the common early in the summer. I had
them in a bath with a little water and bits
of wood floating about just as we’re going
to do outside. They always seemed quite
happy, and I never kept the same ones
for more than a week ; but of course after
one of them had escaped, I shouldn’t have
cared to go on doing it any way. He was
nearly dead when we found him, but he
looked at me so reproachfully. And the
. worst of it was that until I actually put
him on the sponge and began sprinkling
him, I don’t believe he thought I was
going to be kind to him. He tried as
hard as ever he could to get away,” con-
fessed Gwendolyn, her face clouding over
at the recollection.

“No wonder; I call it beastly cruel to
keep frogs in bedrooms,” returned Daniel,
with more truth than elegance. “ You'd



68 AUNT MILLIE



better run upstairs and change your frock
now, or you'll keep me waiting for ever so
long after dinner.”

There wasn’t any white heather on
Wimbledon common, and apparently just
then not any sundews either, at least the
children couldn’t find any, and returned
home slightly depressed in consequence.

They did not notice that the gate was
open when they got there, or that there
were fresh carriage-wheel marks on the
drive; but there was a bundle of wraps and
a new Bradshaw on the hall-table which
attracted Daniel’s attention at once.

“Hallo, Aunt Millie must have come;
I thought she wasn’t due until to-morrow !”
he exclaimed, with more surprise than
pleasure. “Mother said to-morrow,
surely !”

“No; she wasn’t quite sure. We'd
better go to the drawing-room, hadn’t we ?
It’s so dull to arrive at a place and have
nobody but servants to greet you,” Gwen



AUNT MILLIE 69

said anxiously. She felt it was her business
to do the honours in her mother’s absence.

But the young lady seated in the
drawing-room with a tiny afternoon tea-
tray on the table beside her, did not seem
to be suffering from any lack of comfort.
She was dressed in a pretty pale mauve
cambric with a good deal of lace about it,
and a bunch of Neapolitan violets pinned
rather high up on the left side.

Gwendolyn felt unpleasantly conscious
of her own shabby serge frock and muddy
boots, and came forward looking rather
more awkward than usual. But Aunt
Millie did not seem to notice that any-
thing was wrong, and jumped up from her
seat at once as though she were pleased to
see them. ;

Presently she took up a little morocco
bag which lay beside the tea-tray, and
_ produced a small brown-paper parcel
from it.

“That is chocolate—chocolate creams, I



7O AUNT MILLIE

think they are. I thought they would
amuse you this evening as I have to go
out to dinner. You must eat them all up
between you,” she said, putting the package
into Gwendolyn’s hands.

-And somehow, after that, both children
came to the conclusion that Aunt Millie
would be just as well pleased if they went
upstairs.

“I knew she wanted us to go, by the
way she kept looking at that yellow book
with the picture on it,” whispered Gwen,
rather wistfully.

Daniel’s mouth was so full of chocolate
cream that he couldn't answer for a
minute.

“Well, that’s all right; I’m sure we
didn’t want to stop. She knows the right
place to go to for lolly-pops, anyway,” he
said at last approvingly. “ Besides, we've
got them all to ourselves, as it is, and if she
hadn’t been going out to dinner, she might
have wanted to eat some of them herself.



AUNT MILLIE 71
There’s a silver lining to every cloud,
according to your copy book, and this
one’s of a nature that it’s pretty easy to
appreciate.”
A sage conclusion which, as it was
intended to, put an end to Gwendolyn’s
grumbling for the present. |











CHAPTER V
Dan’s IpEA

DON’T think there’s anything
else we ought to get. You
have plenty of socks, Dan,



haven’t you?” Aunt Millie inquired rather
wearily.

Daniel was going back to school next
week, and they had been undergoing a
long afternoon’s shopping at the stores,
which wasn’t to her taste at all.

“Yes, I believe so; my hair wants
cutting,” he suggested gruffly. There was
another very different suggestion that he
wanted to make, only courage isn’t given
to everybody for everything.



DAN’S IDEA 78

“Your hair? Oh, nonsense! That can
be done at Wimbledon. You can go
round to that shop in the village by your-
self. We didn’t come up to London to do
things that can be done just as well down
there, and it’s quite time we thought of
going home. I don’t want to get back
later than five,” said Aunt Millie, who had
arranged to have tea in the drawing-room
waiting for her.

Outside the underground station that
they were making for, were a number of
gaily coloured placards. Daniel, who
knew the way, and had been walking on in
front a little, came to a full stop in front of
one of them. :

“ That’s at Dariel’s Theatre, and there’s
an afternoon performance next Saturday.
Mother said it was the only play going on
now that she'd like us to see, and father
meant to take us, only he hadn’t time,” he
remarked tentatively.

Miss Millie Wilton glanced up at the



7A DANS IDEA

pictorial advertisement doubtfully. A
crowd of oddly dressed people, with pistols,
were streaming out of a cave, and in the
distance a gentleman on an elephant was
rapidly disappearing. She liked going to
the theatre now and then well enough,
when she could choose her piece, but an
afternoon performance full of adventures
evidently intended for schoolboys, when
she wasn’t staying actually in London,
and the thermometer would probably be
about eighty degrees in the shade, was
another matter. However, the children
hadn’t given her much trouble, and there
was a beseeching look round the corners
of Daniel’s mouth, which made her rather
uncomfortable.

“That means you want me to take you,
I suppose ?” she said slowly.

“Oh no; I’m sure Daniel didn’t mean
to give a hint!” cried Gwendolyn, flushing
crimson; but the young man in question
did not do much to back her up.



DAN’S IDEA 75

~“No-o. Only somebody has always
taken us somewhere every other holi-
days,” he said, still gazing at the gorgeous
representations in front of him with longing
eyes.

“T see. Well, perhaps—I won’t abso-
lutely promise, but, perhaps, if I’m not
busy, [ll bring you both up to see it next
Saturday. Only you must be very good ;
and remember, I haven’t exactly promised,”
Aunt Millie said, as they turned into the
railway station.

* * * * *

“But she didn’t promise, Daniel. I’m
just as disappointed as you are; but it
isn’t fair to talk as though she had
promised when she didn’t,’ Gwendolyn
said reproachfully.

Daniel was standing at the other end
of the room, looking out of the window,
to hide the tears which would come, and
biting his lips with vexation.



76 DAN’S IDEA

“She could take us quite easily if she
chose—garden-parties don’t matter. Be-
sides, it’s a great deal worse for me than
it is for you. All the other chaps at
school will have heaps of things to talk
_ about, and I sha’n’t have been anywhere,
or seen anything,” he said bitterly.

“Ves, it’s too bad; but I don’t know
what we're to do. Are you quite sure
Aunt Millie wouldn't let us go together ?”
demanded Gwendolyn, brightening sud-
denly. “You're ever so much bigger
than you were last Christmas, when
mother wouldn’t let you take me.”

But Daniel shook his head.

“T’m afraid it’s no good; she wouldn’t
take the responsibility. Though what sort
of things grown-up people are so fond of
thinking I should allow to happen to you
I can’t imagine. She wants us to go to
that performance at the Drill Hall in-
stead,” he said moodily.

“That ought to be nice, oughtn’t it ?



DAN'S IDEA "7

There are pictures about it everywhere,”
Gwendolyn said hopefully.

But Dan was not to be comforted.

“It isn’t a London show—all the other
chaps will get taken to something in
London. Don’t you think if you went to
Aunt Millie and begged very hard, with
the water-taps turned on, like they gene-
rally are when things don’t please you, it
might have some effect ?”

But Gwendolyn didn’t think it would,
and wasn’t at all inclined to try.

“ Aunt Millie wants to go to that garden-
party so badly that I’m quite sure she
wouldn't give itup. She’s sent to London
for a wreath of forget-me-nots to put in
her best hat on purpose to wear with a
lovely dress she’s had made out of a lot
of pale blue silk that somebody sent her
from India, and Sir Thomas and Lady
Maxwell are going to call for her in a
carriage. She was quite cross after you
had been to her just now, and told me



78 DAN’S IDEA

that she forbade either of us to mention
the subject to her again,” she said
decidedly. o

Daniel was pacing up and down the
room by this time, stamping his foot with
. irritation.

“TI thought grown-up people—ladies
anyway—always gave up wanting to do
things just to please themselves, when
they grew up. Mother never seems to
think about herself!” he said impatiently.

“No; but then mother is mother! She’s
better than anybody else. I don’t think
people generally leave off trying to enjoy
themselves when they grow up. Any
way, Aunt Millie hasn’t. We shall just
have to make the best of the Drill Hall,”
Gwen said.

“Gwen—oh, you're awake! That’s
right. I’ve got an idea!” exclaimed
Daniel, putting in an early appearance in
his sister’s room on Saturday morning.



®

DAN'S IDEA 79



Gwendolyn had wakened early too, and
was curled up among her pillows, reading
fairy stories.

“That’s nice. Tell me all about it!”
she said eagerly.

But Daniel didn’t seem in a hurry to
begin. He hesitated, and shuffled about
in a manner which, to say the least of it,
was, for him, decidedly unusual.

“ After all, I'm not quite sure that it
will do to tell you. Girls always funk
everything so,” he said at last.

Gwendolyn’s colour rose. This was
really too bad.

“T don’t funk things! Don’t you re-
member how I learnt to swim in deep
water, with only a rope tied round——”
she began indignantly.

But Daniel wouldn’t let her finish.

“For goodness’ sake, don’t give us any
more of that bragging! You're so fat you
couldn't possibly help learning to swim
directly. I believe you could earn your



80 DANS IDEA

living perfectly well as a buoy, if other
trades failed!” he put in derisively.

“As a boy? Boys don’t find it any
easier to earn their living than girls do
—you're talking rubbish!” Gwen said in
‘some confusion. Of course she oughtn’t
to have advertised herself in that con-
ceited fashion, and it was mean to remind
Daniel that he had taken ever so much
longer learning to swim than she had.

“As a BU OY, stupid. Buoys are
great big pieces of wood on something
that float about on the top of water to
warn people when there are dangerous
rocks underneath. They have to be
fastened to the bottom with a rope, some-
how; but they’ve nothing else to do but
keep themselves afloat, which the laws of
gravity, or whatever it is looks after that
sort of thing, arranges for them. It ’ud
be rather a bother feeding you—that’s the
only thing. You'd have to have a bit
of board tied round your neck so that



DAN’S IDEA 81

it would float in front, and do to put
your meals on,” wound up Daniel, thought-
fully.

“ Aren’t you going to tell me what you
really came to talk about? It isn’t very
kind to talk as though you didn’t care any
more about me than you do for bits of
wood,” Gwen said reproachfully. Dan
didn’t mean, of course; but she used to
feel pretty sure sometimes that he wasn’t
as fond of her as she was of him, and she
never had quite learned to like being
made fun of.

“You shouldn’t jump to conclusions.
I never said I wouldn’t row out in a boat
to visit you occasionally, which is more
than one does for buoys of the usual
description. And we're just coming ‘to
the other thing—only you girls fly off into
high strikes so, if one tells you anything
without a little preparation.”

“Oh! Well, I’m quite prepared,” Gwen
said meekly. She only hoped secretly

F



82 DAN'S IDEA

that she wasn’t going to be asked to help
in anything naughty.

« Allright; then we'll begin. It’s about
that piece at Dariel’s. It seems to me
that there isn’t any reason why we shouldn't
_ go, after all.” And Dan stopped short,
eyeing his sister oddly.

“Isn't there? That’s nice. But who's
going to take us ?” she asked eagerly.

Dan’s eyes wandered over to the window,
and he went on looking out of it, instead
of at the person he was speaking to, which
wasn’t the way with him generally.

“TI don’t see that it’s necessary for
anybody to take me. J/’m going to take
you,” he said presently.

“That would be jolly; only, are you
guite sure Aunt Millie ‘ll let us ?” queried
Gwen, not very brightly.

“Aunt Millie? Well, I don’t see that
she need be asked. She’s never told-us
not to go; and it doesn’t make any differ-
ence to her.”



DAN’S IDEA 83

Gwen caught her breath in sheer
amazement.

‘But she came to look after us, instead
of mother. We can’t go without telling
her,” she said at last.

“That's all Tommy-rot. She’s given
me five shillings to pay for the Drill Hall,
and it can’t matter to her whether we go
there or to the other place—which would
be more fun. There’s no reason why we
should say anything about it. You always
make such a fuss about things,” Dan
returned discontentedly.

“T don’t think we ought to doit. I’m
sure it isn’t right,” Gwen said feebly.

It was dreadfully difficult to go against
her brother. He was so tall and strong
and decided about things; and, besides, he
had got her into the way of doing what
he wanted rather blindly.

“ Stuff and nonsense! Why shouldn't
it be right? We haven't been told not to
do it. Besides, how much do you suppose



84 DAN’S IDEA



Aunt Millie will care where we go so long
as we get back in decent time?”

Gwendolyn thought Aunt Millie might
care, and didn’t agree with him otherwise ;.
but, as often happened, let herself be talked
round at last.

“Only, for one thing, I don’t believe
we shall have enough money. There'll
be the train as well as the tickets, and
I’m sure five shillings isn’t enough,” she
said doubtfully.

“That'll be all right. We must pay
for the train out of our own money—we’ve
got enough. You manage to be ready
directly after dinner. Aunt Millie’s going
out to lunch, but she said we were to
have it early, because of the Drill Hall.
Meanwhile, we’d better prepare for break-
fast.” And Master Daniel walked off,
thoroughly satisfied with his morning’s
work,















CHAPTER VI
Tue Piotr THICKENS

WHIS train seems to take a tre-
mendous time getting to London.




I believe it stops at every sta-
tion,” Gwen remarked discontentedly,

“T’m quite sure it does. All the trains
on this line do. But the theatre’s close
to the station, and the doors aren’t open
till two, so it’s all right.”

“What are you going to do if five
shillings isn’t enough for the tickets? I’m
“quite sure mother generally pays more
than that,” Gwen said again presently.

Daniel looked rather blue for a minute.



86 THE PLOT THICKENS

‘Perhaps she does; but it isn’t so ex-
pensive if you don’t go to reserved seats.
We're going to be all right,’ he said
wisely. :

But he looked nearly as bewildered as
Gwen did when they actually got to the
theatre—there were such crowds of people
standing about outside, and nobody seemed
able to tell them exactly where to go.
Eventually they got into the box-office
by mistake, and there Daniel learnt that
his sister's original surmise had been
correct.

“T don’t think -we’d better bother about
tickets, as we’re in a hurry; and, anyway,
this isn’t the place for us to come to.
There’s another place called the pit which
you're supposed to go to if you only want
to pay half-a-crown—and there’s rather
a crowd there generally, so you'd better
come along,” he said, looking so crestfallen
that Gwendolyn felt certain the man in
the box-office had been rude to him.



THE PLOT THICKENS 87

She opened her eyes very wide when
they got to the long curved line of human
beings outside the pit entrance. Every-
body looked so dirty and common, and
altogether unlike the people that they were
accustomed to associate with. Dan's face
was rather white, but he had no idea of
turning back,

“You keep close up behind me, Gwen.
We sha’n’t have very long to wait,” he
said shortly; and Gwendolyn, who saw
that they were fairly in for the whole
business now, kept her opinion of their
surroundings to herself.

Presently a fat woman, who had been
eating peppermints steadily in front, offered
her some red and white bull’s-eyes in a
paper bag, and her somewhat indignant
refusal of these delicacies produced re-
marks which caused Daniel to grind his
‘teeth. Then a nigger with a banjo began
making a most unearthly noise, after which
he dodged about among the audience



88 THE PLOT THICKENS

collecting halfpence. Daniel pulled out
one of his half-crowns with some coppers
and dropped a penny into the outstretched
cap with a lordly air.

Presently there was a sudden move-
ment—a sort of upheaval in the crowd,
and the children felt themselves being
pushed rapidly onward.

“Stick fast on to me; don’t let the
people shove in front of you,” whispered
Daniel, shamefacedly.

He did not want Gwendolyn to know
it, but he was beginning to wish himself
at home. He never would have let her
in for this sort of thing if he had only
known exactly what it was. At last they
came to the little window where somebody
was giving out tickets.

“I want seats for two, please. And
my sister is under thirteen. Doesn't that
mean half price ?” he added suddenly.

The man shook his head as he pushed
the tickets forward.



THE PLOT THICKENS 89

“No ’arf price here. Five shillings,
please.”

So Daniel put his hand in his pocket
with a grimace. One and _ threepence
would very nearly have paid their railway
fare.

But what in the world had become of
those half-crowns? Surely he had put
them in the right-hand pocket. Dan’s
face grew very glum as he drew his hand
out empty. There was no hole in the
lining, so the coins could not have slipped
out that way—but they were nowhere to
be found in that pocket or in any other.

The man behind the window placed
his hand on the tickets and drew them
back. Daniel’s expression explained
itself.

“Tf you've had your pocket picked,
young man, you may as well go off at
once. We don’t give credit here; and
you're blocking up other people’s way,”
he said gruffly.



go THE PLOT THICKENS



Daniel turned a very scared grief-
stricken countenance round to Gwen.

“Have you any money?” he asked
despairingly. But of course she had none
at all. “Then I’m awfully sorry, but we
shall just have to go home. Unless ”—
and Daniel brightened up with a sudden
happy thought as he pulled out his Water-
bury watch and chain—‘“unless you will
give me the tickets in exchange for these ?”
But the man only laughed and shook his
head.

“ There’s no pawnshop here. You
clear out, young gent,” was all he said.

So Daniel took hold of his sister’s arm,
and began elbowing his way out into the
street. He kept his head turned away,
hoping she wouldn’t see that his cheeks
_were flaming and his eyes full of tears;

but, when they got out into the open,
another unpleasant discovery awaited him.

“The tickets—the railway tickets, I
mean—are gone too! Oh, Gwen, what



THE PLOT THICKENS 9!

a mess I’ve got you into!” he exclaimed
dismally.

Gwendolyn was sobbing quietly, too,
by this time; but she struggled hard to
recover herself and make the best of it.

“We—we might take a cab and pay
for it when we get home. Cook would
give us the money, if Aunt Millie wasn’t
in,” she suggested faintly.

But this did not fall in with Master
Daniel's views at all. He had not arrived
at being sorry for anything but the con-
sequences of his wrong-doing at present,
and still treasured faint hopes of being
able to conceal everything—hopes which,
fortunately for him, circumstances did not
lose much time in frustrating.

“That wouldn’t do at all. We might
as well write an account of our proceedings
for the newspaper, or tell the town-crier
all about them at once. But there’s no
reason why we shouldn’t walk home. It’s
only about eight miles; and, if we’re lucky



92 THE PLOT THICKENS

in finding the way and start at once, we
ought to get home just about the same
time as if we had gone to the Drill Hall.
Don’t you think that would be best?”
he asked, catching his breath a little,

But Gwendolyn’s head was turned
away. She had caught sight of somebody
she knew—somebody who had likewise
caught sight of her, and was coming
towards them with rapid strides. It was
Mr. Bertram, the vicar—their father’s
great friend.

“Daniel and Gwendolyn! The very
two young people I’ve been looking for!
How did you manage to get brought up
here?” he asked, in some amazement.

Daniel's face was a study. There was
evidently no chance of slipping safely out
of everything now.

“We weren’t brought up—we came.
That is, Dan brought me,’ Gwen ex-
plained confusedly,

Mr. Bertram’s face grew very grave.



THE PLOT THICKENS 93

“JT don’t understand that at all. I met
your Aunt Millie going out to lunch this
morning, and she told me that, as she was
unable to bring you up to town herself
this afternoon, she had arranged for you
to go to the performance at the Drill Hall
instead. So I, naturally, don’t understand
what you are both doing here.”

Mr. Bertram fixed his keen eyes on
Daniel; and that young man winced per-
ceptibly.

“T didn’t mean—Aunt Millie never
exactly said that we weren’t to come up to
London,” he stammered feebly.

“That means that she implied it—that
you understood perfectly well what she
meant, but that you nevertheless deliber-
ately chose to bring your sister up here in
her absence, thinking no doubt that you
were quite certain not to be found out.
Upon my word, you are a boy to be
proud of!” wound up Mr. Bertram, indig-
nantly.



94 THE PLOT THICKENS

Gwen had started crying afresh, while
Daniel hung his head and_ shuffled
awkwardly from one foot to the other.

“Aunt Millie ought to have taken us.
She was only going to a garden-party to
please herself,” he muttered sullenly at
last.

“Ought to have taken you, indeed!
As though aunts were bound to consider
their nephews’ and nieces’ amusements
before everything. I wonder what the
present generation of young people ave
coming to?” and Mr. Bertram’s eyes
wandered anxiously over to a small group
of his own offspring standing some yards
off, with a big cousin to look after them,
almost as though he thought Daniel’s
duplicity and impudence might be in-
fectious.

“And, as it happens, if you had been
good, and honourable, and obedient, you
would have got exactly what you wanted.
I had two tickets more than I need have



THE PLOT THICKENS 95

used for this entertainment, and was coming
up to see if you would like to go, when I
met your aunt. She told me all about
her plans for you, but you had gone when
we got to your house, and we could not
find you anywhere about the Drill Hall,
either,” he went on suddenly.

Gwen’s tears were falling fast.

“ And now we’ve lost the money, and
can't go at all,” she sobbed sorrowfully.
‘‘When this is once over, I don’t ever
mean to do anything naughty again!”

“Lost the money? How’s.that? Oh,
you've had your pockets picked, I sup-
pose,” remarked Mr. Bertram, taking no
notice of this last somewhat imprudent
statement. “Well, I must say if that’s
what's happened, it serves you both right.
Not that I would have allowed you to
go in, even if you had had the tickets and
everything ready. How do you propose
to get home ?”

Daniel hesitated. He felt pretty sure



96 THE PLOT THICKENS

that his proposition on the subject would
not meet with Mr. Bertram’s approval.
However, Gwendolyn, as usual, came
straight to the point at once.

“We're going to walk. That’s the
only way, as Dan’s lost the return tickets,
and we haven’t any more money. It isn’t
too far, and there are plenty of people to
ask about the way,” she said confidently.

Mr. Bertram gazed first at one culprit
and then at the other in blank amazement.

“Do you actually mean to say that you
intended to take your sister for a ten-mile
walk through the slums of London, just
on the chance of finding your way correctly,
and getting home in safety ? A very poor
chance, I should imagine, considering what
an incapable escort you have proved your-
self to be! I don’t know how to be thank-
ful enough that I happened to catch you
in the act. Would you just wait where
you are for a minute,” he exclaimed at last,
walking over to the corner where his



THE PLOT THICKENS 97



own children were clustered together, and
speaking a few hasty words to the big
cousin who was apparently in charge of
the party. Then he came back to Dan
and Gwendolyn.

You can come along with me, young
people—one on each side, if you please,”
he said decidedly. “I am going to take
you straight home, and don’t mean to lose
sight of you until your Aunt Millie returns
to take charge of you herself. And if she
takes my advice, she won't let either of
you out of her sight again, either, as long
as she has the misfortune to be considered
responsible for you. Children who can’t
be trusted never ought to be left alone.”

And with this crushing remark, Mr.
Bertram proceeded to walk off in the
direction of the station, with one of the
culprits hurrying along on each side of
him.

He put them both in front of him at
the booking-office, and took the tickets

cG



Full Text





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Bee,
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GWEN
LONDON:
PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, LIMITED,
STAMFORD STREET AND CHARING CROSS.


AN INCIDENT IN A DONKEY-RIDE. , Pp. 43
GWEN

BY

PENELOPE LESLIE

AUTHOR oF
“MISS BARTON’S BICYCLE,” ‘f TROUBLESOME COUSINS,” ETC.

WITH FRONTISPIECE BY C. J, STANILAND

LONDON
NATIONAL SOCIETY’S DEPOSITORY
BROAD SANCTUARY, WESTMINSTER
New. York: THOMAS WHITTAKER, 2 AND 3, BIBLE HousE

[All rights reserved]




BY THE SAME AUTHOR

Dorothy’s Stepmother. Price 1s.
Troublesome Cousins. Price 1s.

Miss Barton’s Bicyele. Price 1s.



NaTionaL Socirety’s DEeposiTory, SANCTUARY,
WEsTMINSTER. S.W.
















Srelslrelralralle



CONTENTS

Sue cig
CHAPTER PAGE

I, LEARNING TO MILK... vee ene ven 7
II, AN UNLAWFUL Donkey RIDE Sse eae ge
III. Gwen’s PRESENTIMENT cae oe vee «50
IV. AuNT MILLIE ae soe ie Fens OF
V. Dan’s IDEA... es fa re p72
VI. THE PLor THICKENS me eee Ser BS

: VII. GRANDMAMMA’s LECTURE... tee vee 103








GWEN

—

CHAPTER I

LEARNING TO MILK

Gwenie! We've played that
precious race-game every night
this week!” Daniel said irritably.

Gwendolyn had had measles since he
had, and had been just as ill; but it was
an understood thing that it was her busi-
ness to amuse him.

«Do think of something else!” he
repeated ; and Gwenie wrinkled up her
forehead and pondered deeply.


a LEARNING TO MILK

“There’s chess—we haven't played
chess for months,” she suggested doubt-
fully. |

But Daniel shook his head. A game
of skill which his sister generally won
was not to his liking at all.

“Draughts, then, or ‘Beggar my
Neighbour, or the spelling game.
Let's do ‘Constantinople.’ § There's
lots of paper in the Davenport, and I’ve
got two pencils.” And this time Daniel
seemed satisfied.

“Tt isn’t much fun with only two people
to play ; but we must do something. We'll
take two minutes for each letter, and
whoever thinks of most words altogether
shall choose what we're both to do till
bedtime,” he suggested, pulling out the
big Waterbury watch which grandmamma
had given him last birthday, and of which
he was intensely proud.

Gwendolyn got hold of two more
words than he did; but it was aclose
LEARNING TO MILK 9



tussle, and the game proved so interesting
that she elected to go on with it for the
rest of the evening—till Emma the house-
maid, whose business it was to look after
the two children, appeared with milk and
seed-cake for supper. :

“It’s going to be fine to-morrow, Miss
Gwendolyn, Tom says so,” remarked
Emma, encouragingly, as she left the room.
Tom was supposed to be the most weather-

. wise individual in the farm-yard.

“That's consoling. It’s poor fun having
measles and coming to the country to get
over them, when you never have a chance
of going out without getting wet through,
What shall we do to-morrow, if it really is
fine ?” demanded Daniel, with his mouth
full of seed-cake.

“Get up early and go out before break-
fast,” returned Gwenie, promptly.

_ “Well, of course. There wouldn’t be
much sense in staying indoors if it’s fine.
What shall we do when we ave out, I
10 LEARNING TO MILK



meant?” Dan said impatiently. Heliked-
his sister to make all the suggestions,
because having some one to blame if they
turned out badly was satisfactory.

“We needn’t do anything, just at first,
need we? It’s all new, and we don’t know
what the place is like. Couldn’t we walk
about and think of. something to do after
breakfast? There’s a pond somewhere,
with little fish in it.”

«“ Sticklebacks, I suppose. They aren't
fit to eat. But we might catch some
alive, and keep them in a finger-glass or
foot-bath or something. It'll be worth
while starting an aquarium, if there’s a
place here for us to catch things in,”

“How are we going to catch them,
though? Ina butterfly-net? They dart
about like wildfire,’ Gwenie said doubt-
fully.

“Then I don’t think your butterfly-net
would be much good—you wouldn’t be
quick enough with it, But they'll come
LEARNING TO MILE II



in a minute, if we get some proper fish-
hooks, and bits of raw meat. I know
a chap who used to catch hundreds,” Dan
remarked confidently.

“That must have been nice. Only we
haven't got any fish-hooks.”

“ Nor had the other chap, till he went
into a shop and bought some, which is
what I thought of proposing that we should
do,” suggested Daniel, sarcastically. Girls
were so stupid—there wasn’t an ounce of
go or enterprise in their composition.

‘But there.aren’t any proper shops in
the village—only a post-office, where they
sell sweets and writing-paper, and the
blacksmith’s. Besides, how much do fish-
hooks cost?” demanded Gwendolyn,
doubtfully.
“ About a farthing each, I think. They
needn’t be made of gold or silver either.
And the village shops aren't the only
ones we’ve got to depend on—there’s a
little town called Oxford, which it would
I2 LEARNING TO MILK

be just possible for us to get at,” returned
Daniel. He meant to be a great man
when he grew up, and prided himself on
being full of resources.

“We couldn't go there to-morrow,
though, could we? It’s six miles off; so
‘it would cost ever so much to go by train,
and it’s so horrid to wait,’ Gwenie said
disconsolately.

“We needn't go by train. You ought
to be able to walk six miles. Nobody is
likely to notice what we’re doing to-morrow,
so we can go directly after breakfast.
Grandpapa said we were to be out of
doors all day long.”

“But it isn’t only the six miles there—
it's six miles back, as well,” returned
Gwenie, doubtfully. ‘“ Not that I mind.
If they really mean to let us be out all
day, and aren’t going to look after us
much, and you don’t mind sitting down
to rest pretty often, I can do it quite
easily. We might ask if they'd let us
LEARNING TO MILK 13



have dinner out in the fields, and take it
with us. We could start quite early, and
not come back till teatime, if we did
that.”

“Yes ; but it wouldn’t do. They’d want
us to have plates and tumblers and all
sorts of things, if we asked to have dinner
out of doors. You can’t mention a picnic
without people wanting to pack you a
hamperful of crockery. They’d think we
only wanted it in the fields just for fun, so
they wouldn’t consider weight.”

“We might turn all the crockery out,
though, and just tie up enough to eat in
something. That’s what gipsies do; and
those big, red handkerchiefs of yours would
hold a lot,’ suggested Gwenie. “We
couldn’t be expected to carry a hamperful
of crockery twelve miles, just because
somebody packed it up for us.”

. Daniel wrinkled his brows, and thought
a little. Fellows like himself, who hadn’t
any brothers, had to make the best of their
14 LEARNING TO MILK



sisters; but Gwenie was so stupid and so
awkward to manage. If she once got it
into her head that the grown-up people
might disapprove of the expedition if they
knew all about it, she would most probably
decline to go altogether.

Aunt Millie was away, and Mrs. Wilton
herself was an invalid, so that her grand-
children scarcely ever saw her at all; but
Daniel was quite sharp enough to know
that for him and Gwenie to wander off
miles away by themselves, stopping when it
pleased them, to eat their dinner out of hand-
kerchiefs by the roadside, without forks, or
plates, or other civilized appliances, was
not a proceeding which was likely to meet
with her approval.

“You see, they mightn’t like it if they
saw we hadn't used the plates and
things,” he began doubtfully. “It isn’t
as if this was our own home and the
servants and. people knew all about us.”

“No; and we can’t smear the plates
LEARNING TO MILK 15



over and make them look as though they
had been used, because it would be deceit-
ful. I wish I didn’t always see how easy
it would be to manage everything if one
wasn't straight about it,’ Gwenie said
slowly.

“T wish you hadn’t such a priggish way
of giving out that you’re quite above doing
anything you oughtn’t to. Other people
can keep from doing mean things, like
making plates look as though they have .
been used when they haven't, without
boasting about it. You ought to be
ashamed of yourself for having such ideas!”
Dan said sharply.

“But we can’t help Satan putting bad
thoughts into our hearts. We don’t even
know exactly when he’s going to do it,
till it has happened. Mr. Bertram said so.
And as long as we get help to turn them
out again——”’

Gwenie stopped, with crimson cheeks;
Dan was looking so annoyed.
16 LEARNING TO MILK



‘Really, Gwen, I wish you'd curl up!”
he broke in angrily. “I know all that,
and you know I know it; and you aren't
good enough yourself to be always preach-
ing to other people. Who stole the pre-
served pears ?”

Gwendolyn’s eyes filled with tears, and
she hid her face, with a quick, impulsive
little movement which was natural to her.
It was so cruel of Dan. If he had ever
done anything very dreadful, like stealing
fruit, and had been found out and punished
and forgiven, she would never have been
mean enough to remind him of it; but
boys, somehow, were different. And it
was part of her punishment, she supposed,
that some people never would forget—
only it was so long ago. It was nearly
five years actually, since cook had left ever
so many preserved pears lying about at
home, and she had taken some when no
one was looking, and had nearly broken
her heart afterwards with all the shame
LEARNING. TO MILK 17



and disgrace and misery that her piece of
wickedness had brought her.

Dan’s conscience bristled up and began

to prick a little. Gwendolyn looked so
crushed and crestfallen, and she had been
so perky and bright and full of life two or
three minutes ago.
_ “Well, cheer up, old girl. We all do
things we shouldn’t occasionally; and I
believe I’m rather a brute to chuck stones
about in this fashion. Anyhow, we’ve
wandered rather far from the point. You
see, for one thing, if they packed an elabo-
rate hamper, it wouldn’t be’ quite polite of
us not to take the whole of it; and——”

“Perhaps it wouldn’t. But, Daniel,”
interposed Gwen, with a suspicious little
gurgle, which sounded as though she hadn’t
done crying, “why shouldn’t we tell Emma
plainly that we'd rather not have a hamper?
We might just say we only wanted some
food to tie up in a bundle, and then there
wouldn’t be any bother about it.”
18 LEARNING TO MILK

Dan shook his head. Gwen never could
take anything in. But she hadn't quite
done crying yet, and he wanted to make
up to her for that unkind reference to the
preserved pears, and didn’t mean to speak
sharply to her again just yet.

“T think we'd better give up the idea
of taking dinner with us. You ought to
manage if we start directly after having it
here to-morrow. Tea isn’t till six; and I
don’t suppose anybody would mind if we
were late,” he said presently.

“No, as we always have italone. Emma
only puts it on the table and goes away.
I shouldn’t think she'd notice if we weren’t
in quite at the right time; and I think I
can walk twelve miles. Only vou mustn’t
be too cross if I want to stop rather often
on the way home,” Gwen said doubtfully.

Dan woke up first next morning. The
sun was shining, the birds were singing,
and the little American clock, which his
sister had saved up money enough to give
LEARNING TO MILK 19

him last Christmas, assured him that it
was only half-past five o'clock.

Gwen was sleeping in a little room which
opened out of his. She had lain awake
for ever so long during the night, sobbing
softly to herself, and wondering whether
people ever were going to forget about
those horrid preserved pears; but the
regular breathing, which sounded quite dis-
tinctly through the closed door, made it very
evident that she was far from being awake
now. Dan sprang out of bed, opened the
door cautiously, and crept quietly up to
her. He didn’t want her to wake till he
woke her. The sun, which was shining
full upon her curly chestnut hair, turned-
up nose, and little freckled face, showed
the patchy redness which last night’s cry-
ing had left about her eyelids very plainly ;
and Daniel shook his head with an odd
mixture of regret and satisfaction.

“She isn’t a beauty, that’s one comfort.
Looking in the glass'll keep her from
20 LEARNING TO MILK

being conceited instead of making her
want to spend money on clothes and worry
about her complexion, like some girls do.
I wouldn’t swop her, though, for any other
fellow’s sister that I’m acquainted with.
Wake up, old girl!” And he shook the
shoulder that Gwendolyn wasn’t lying on
rather roughly. :

She opened her eyes, and started up
suddenly.

“Tt isn't: late? What is the matter?
Oh, I suppose you want to go out before
breakfast ?” she muttered sleepily.

“Yes, Ido. You know we arranged to
last night. Do wake up a bit! You've
been snoring loud enough to rouse the
neighbourhood,” Dan remarked encourag-:
ingly. .

Gwen pulled herself together at once,.
and sat straight up in bed.

“Snoring? Nonsense! I’m sure I.
haven't. You're only just awake your-
self!” she retorted angrily.
LEARNING TO MILK 21

Daniel’s superior smile was so aggra-
vating.

“ All right, old lady, we won’t dispute
the point. Somebody was snoring, and
they’ve stopped since you woke; but it.
may have been a ghost, of course. You
get your things on as quick as you can,
and we'll go and look for the stickleback
pond. I'll wait for you outside the hall-
door.” And Daniel disappeared, slamming
the door in a manner which startled Gwen
very considerably.

“Oh dear, just like aboy! He'll wake
everybody, and grannie won't like it.
Emma told us she objected to noise last
night ; I shall get dressed first, and go in
and warn him.” Accordingly, just as Dan
was in the act of pulling on his hobnail
boots Gwendolyn crept in on _ tip-toe,
carrying hers in her hand,

.“You haven't got your boots on yet.
Oh, that’s right! Don’t you think we'd
better put them on downstairs? Grannie
22 LEARNING TO MILK

doesn’t like a noise; and if we wake her
up, I’m so afraid she'll be angry.”

‘“Oh—hang it! Well, perhaps she will.
Though why grown-up people should
mind noise so much more than we do, I
never can understand—here goes!” And
carefully propping his door open with
a chair, Master Dan set an excellent
example of noiselessness by sliding silently
down the banisters, and waiting in a sort
of heap for his sister in the hall below.

“Don’t know exactly what we’re to do
when we ave out,” he remarked, when
Gwen arrived.

But the tinkling of a bell in the distance
apparently furnished her with an idea.

“That’s the cow-bell, I’m quite sure.
Mother said, when she was a little girl
the cow-bell always used to ring at six
o'clock. Let's go and see,” she sug-
gested.

“Go and see what—a bell ringing?
That doesn’t sound strictly exciting,”
LEARNING TO MILK 23

Dan said, tugging vigorously at his boot-
lace, which had been broken pretty often
and wasn’t quite longenough. But Gwen-
dolyn knew what she was talking about.

‘Of course not—the bell stops ringing
directly. But it means milking-time, and
by the time we get to the byre they'll
have collected all the cows ready to begin.
And, perhaps, if Tom’s in a good temper,
he'll let us have a try and milk one of
them; and then if I don’t learn enough to
be a governess, I can go out to the
colonies, and be a dairymaid when I’m
grown up,” she said eagerly.

«Oh, all right! Milking is girl’s work,
though; so I'll look on. Perhaps, when
you've succeeded in milking a tumblerful,
if you ever do, you'll offer your brother
some of it. Supper didn’t make a very
lasting impression on me last night, some-
how, and breakfast isn’t till eight,’ Dan
remarked rather gloomily.

“No—and I’m hungry too. But hot
24 LEARNING TO MILK

milk is nearly as satisfying as bread and
butter, so it will be all right,” Gwen said
encouragingly.

“Flot milk? There isn’t a fire out
there. You aren't going to bring it back
to the kitchen and boil it, are you?” Dan
inquired blankly. -

“Of course not. Dan, do you really
mean to say you didn’t know that milk is
hot—warm anyway—when it comes from
the cow? It’s thick and frothy too, and
just as good for one as a tonic. Mother
used to drink it every morning when she
lived here, and she thinks perhaps that’s
why she was so much stronger when she
was a little girl, than she’s ever been since,”
Gwen explained, in some astonishment.
It was so very seldom, she had always
been given to understand, that girls knew
anything which boys didn’t.

‘Oh, warm—of course! You spoke as
if it was going to be boiling,” Dan said
sheepishly. “You girls always are so
LEARNING TO MILK 25

casual and inaccurate, That’s how it is
you can’t make as much as we do when
you're grown up, and don’t do properly
for doctors, or newspaper reporters, or
anything interesting.”

‘We do do for doctors—some of us,
and lots of the things in newspapers are
written by women. Besides, I’d rather be
a woman than a man any day. It’s ever
so much nicer when you get old and can’t
work, and have to spend most of the time
indoors, particularly if you haven’t some-
body always about on purpose to amuse
you,” retorted Gwen, indignantly. “I
wouldn’t be a boy for anything !”

“Sour grapes! They'll get ripe later
on, when I go abroad, and begin to have
adventures. You've got the best of it
now, anyway, because you're going to
milk, and I’m going to look on,” Dan
said admirably. He didn’t want Gwen to
get into one of her agitated moods at this
hour of the day.
26 LEARNING TO MILK

The cows were standing ready in their
separate stalls, and Tom was talking to
two or three of the maids, and apparently
waiting to begin. He eyed the children
inquiringly.

“We—we've come to ask a favour.
Miss Gwendolyn wants to do some
milking,” Dan said boldly. He wanted
secretly to do some on his own account,
but was rather afraid of being clumsy,
and making himself ridiculous. Tom did
not look altogether best pleased.

“The cows don’t take kindly to new
hands. Has the young lady ever milked
before ?” he asked gruffly.

‘‘No, she hasn’t. She only wants to
try——”

“And if it’s a bother to you, I won’t
try at all. I only wanted to see if I could
do it—just once,” Gwen broke in eagerly;
“we thought you wouldn’t mind.”

“JT don’t, miss, if it’s only for a minute
or two. But there’s more in milking than
LEARNING TO MILK 27

people think, and those cows is easily put
out. I must choose you a quiet one.”
And Tom’s eyes ran down his stock
thoughtfully. ‘Jenny ‘Il do as well as
any of them. Youd better sit here,
missie!” and Gwen took her seat on a
three-cornered stool, alongside of the
nearest cow, obediently.

“You take the pail thusly—between
your knees, Miss Gwendolyn,” explained
Jane, the kitchen maid, advancing to
relieve Tom, who was beginning to look
rather put upon. ‘‘And then you turns
your attention to getting the milk into
it; not over your pinafore, as, just to
begin with, is what is most likely.”

“But I can’t make the milk come at
all,” complained Gwen presently, after one
or two utterly ineffectual attempts,

She was getting hot and uncomfortable,
and Dan was beginning to snigger con-
temptuously.

“ A good many can’t just at first. You
28 LEARNING TO MILK

want to persevere a bit. That’s better!”
as a thin stream of white fluid appeared
at last.

“Yes, but it’s only with one hand. - My
left isn’t doing anything at all. And I
can’t hold that pail between my knees—
it’s had to go down on the ground,” Gwen
panted breathlessly. :

“Well, the milk you have got has gone
into it. That’s more than them as tries
for the first time can say generally,” Jane
said admiringly. “You'd better stop now,
or we shall never get done, and to-morrow
it'll come first rate.”

Gwen didn’t want to stop—she felt
quite sure that she was going to improve
immensely immediately; but Jane was
looking a little impatient, so she got up
reluctantly,

“T think Pl just have one go. Your
performance wasn’t up to much,” Dan
said suddenly. And before Jane had
time to remonstrate he had popped down
LEARNING TO MILK 29

on the stool his sister had vacated, and
wedged the pail in between his knees,
with a professional air which was rather
annoying to the last performer.

“That's all very well, but you've no
skirts. I could have managed ever so
much better if I hadn’t had any,” she said
wistfully.

Dan was going to succeed at once, evi-
dently, and he was quite conceited enough
already. But the milk didn’t come, though
he worked away vigorously; and Gwen-
dolyn’s crestfallen air began to disappear.

“You haven’t got any at all, and I
believe youre hurting the cow. She
didn’t twitch about half as much as that
with me. She's going to kick — take
care!” as Dan sprang to his feet, just
too late, unfortunately, to circumvent
Jenny, who had managed to kick the
pail. of milk all over him, by way of
intimating that. she was thoroughly sick
of being experimented on.
30 LEARNING TO MILK

“Oh dear! Milk stains, and you’ve
only got two suits! What a pity it wasn’t
me. My frock would wash,” Gwen said
sorrowfully. “Those knickerbockers will
be in no end of a mess.”

“Tt won't show. We can sponge it
off. Commend me to girls for whining
over everything! Jenny’s an ill-tempered
brute, though, and I propose we don’t
have anything more to do with her,” Dan
returned, shaking himself ruefully.

“So do I propose it, nor with none of
the others neither. There'd be a fine row
about all that milk being spilt if Miss
Millie was to home,” observed Tom
gruffly. “You London young ladies and
gentlemen seem to me to do best out
of the farm-yard.”

“Which means that you'll be glad to
get rid of us. I think perhaps, Gwen, we
had better make ourselves scarce. You've
got to clean up these garments of mine,
and get them dried by the kitchen fire
LEARNING TO MILK 31



somehow before eight o'clock. I’m
awfully sorry I let that sulky beast
upset all your milk.” ©

And the two children proceeded to
make the best of their way back to the
house, without, as Tom remarked, so
much as “thank you” for all the precious
time he had spent on them.








CHAPTER II

An Untawrut Donxey RIDE

“Bin $6 OBODY would ever know that
Pw milk had been spilt all over
_ those knickerbockers of yours,
I’m quite proud of them. But I used
nearly all the ammonia mother gave me
taking out the stains, so we shall have to
try and not have any more accidents,”
observed Gwendolyn, thoughtfully.
“There won’t be a chance of having
any more learning to milk. Tom’s one
of the most disagreeable people I ever
met. He was quite rude to me in the
kitchen just now when I said that very


AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 33

likely we should go and have another shot
some other morning,” Dan said gruffly.

“Perhaps it was because he knew you
oughtn’t to be in the kitchen. Emma
told me grannie didn’t like it when she
saw me coming out with your knicker-
bockers. And we never remembered to
thank Tom for starting us this morning,
which we ought to have, because it wasn’t
his work, and we hindered him and Jane
too. I don’t think he'll be disagreeable
if we are civil.”

“Humph! Well, what’s that you're
writing ?” demanded Dan, suddenly.
Gwen didn’t generally write letters that

“he didn’t know about.

“It's a letter to a man in Oxford who
keeps fishing-tackle. Jane told me his
name ; and she said he’d send us six hooks
all ready to use if I sent him threepence
in stamps. I was going to ask you about
it,” Gwen said, reddening uncomfortably.

“What's the good of going to work in

Cc
34 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

that round-about fashion? I thought we
were going to fetch them this afternoon.”

“Yes ; only it’s a long way, and I wasn’t
sure if you'd asked grannie—it all seemed
rather a muddle when we were talking
about it yesterday.” Gwen faltered awk-
wardly. “I thought perhaps you'd be
rather glad to have them got this way—
it’s so much easier.” ‘

“That’s a matter of opinion—besides,
you ought to have asked me. I don’t
suppose you know how to write a business
letter in the very least. Let’s see.” And
Dan drew out the blotted sheet of note- _
paper which his sister was trying to hide
under her blotting-pad, and examined it
critically.

“DeEaR Mr. Roper,
“ My brother and I rekwire some
fish hooks. We rekwest you to send 6
and inclose threpence in stamps.
“Your affec*®* little friend,
“ GWENDOLYN.”
AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 35

“That won't do at all, Gwen. I knew
you wouldn’t know how to do it properly ;
but I really should have thought you
might have turned out something better
than that. The spelling isn’t right, and
your beginning and ending is ridiculous.
You don’t begin ‘Dear Mr. So-and-So’
to tradesmen, and you don’t want any
expressions of affection at the end either.
It’s extremely lucky that that letter wasn’t
posted before I saw it.”

“I’m very sorry, but I thought you put
‘your affectionate friend’ to everybody
who wasn’t a relation, And spelling is so
difficult. Do tell me exactly which words
aren't spelt right, and I'll try and re-
member,” murmured Gwendolyn, humbly.

“That’s precisely what you wouldn’t be
able to do, if you were shown what was
wrong without taking any trouble to find
out. You'd better look every single word
you've used up in the dictionary, and copy
out those you’ve spelt wrong about fifty
36 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

times. That'll do much better than getting
me to tell you,” Daniel returned evasively.

He felt privately almost certain that for
one thing there were four e’s in three-
pence, but was not quite sure enough to
commit himself.

“Oh, very well—when there’s time! I
wish we could get a grown-up person to
play spelling games with us,” Gwen said
wistfully.

“That wouldn’t be any good. J look
after you when we're doing that. And
now, if you'll allow anybody but yourself
to make suggestions, I'll tell you what
I’ve thought of. Do you remember those
donkey-rides we used to have on the sands
at Brighton ?”

“Rather! I should just think so!
Wouldn’t it be fun if we could have some
more?” ejaculated Gwendolyn, brighten-
ing up at the recollection.

“That's just what I’ve come to the con-
clusion that we can have, if you're sure
AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 37

that you really would like it,” returned
Daniel, mysteriously. ‘‘There’s a man in
the village who keeps three, and wants to
let them out to people for a shilling an
hour; it’s ninepence if you take them
for more than one hour. How would you
like to ride to Oxford and back on one of
them ?”

“ Awfully. Of course I should. But
how could we? Grannie mightn’t like it;
and it would cost such a lot!” objected
Gwendolyn the prudent.

“Tt would cost something, of course ; but
I’ve asked grandmamma, and she doesn’t
mind, and she’s given me four shillings to
pay foraride. I told her one hour wouldn’t
be worth getting stiff for. We ought to
do the whole business in three hours quite
easily,” explained Daniel, not, unfortu-
nately, thinking it necessary to mention
that he had not told grannie that he
wanted to ride to Oxford and back with
his sister, or that he had received strict
38 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

orders not to venture any distance without
the donkey-boy.

“That's nice. But if it’s going to take
. us three hours, four shillings isn’t enough.
That'll only pay for two hours if we're
going to have a donkey apiece,” re-
turned Gwendolyn, still looking rather
alarmed.

Pocket money with her and Daniel was
very far from being plentiful.

“T thought I told you they only charged
ninepence if you took the animals for more
than an hour. And I’m going to square
it with the man, and make him let us have
them the third hour for sixpence, which
will make it all right. If you want to
come, all you’ve got to do is to be ready
at two sharp, and leave business details
to me.” Which Gwendolyn, who loved
riding as indulged in for the only time in
her life on the Brighton sands, was very
glad to do.

“And what about the donkey-boy ?”
AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 39

inquired Dan, when his bargain was almost
concluded.

“The donkey-boy. Well, sir, any other
afternoon I wouldn’t let the donkeys out
without him. But he’s got business some-
where else to-day, and if you're accustomed
to ride, and will be responsible for the
animals, I don’t mind making an excep-
tion. It'll save you sixpence, which is
what I have to charge if he’s out for any
length of time.”

Dan hesitated. Grannie certainly had
said that they weren’t to go out without
the donkey-boy, and, therefore, as the
donkey-boy couldn’t come, he knew per-
fectly well that the expedition ought to be
given up. But it was such a lovely day,
and they really wanted the fishing-tackle.
Besides, when he had once made up his
mind to do anything really nice, he never
could bear to be disappointed. Broad
roads are such pleasant, easy places to walk
along, and Daniel wasn’t quite man enough
40 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

at present to realize ‘that it is generally
only the narrow, uphill, stony ones that
lead us on to places that are worth getting
to. So——

“Oh, I see! Then, as he can’t come,
I suppose we must. manage without him.
I'll bring the beasts safe back to you
myself.” And with that, Master Dan and
his guilty conscience and the donkeys set
off for the Manor House as fast as possible.

“Are you quite sure we can do it in
three hours? These donkeys don’t seem
inclined to go particularly fast,” Gwen
remarked presently.

“No; that one you're on is an obstinate
brute. I can see it by the way he holds
his ears. I only hope he won’t suddenly
take it into his head to stop altogether.
However, perhaps it’s better than having
an animal who insists on galloping all the
way as you aren’t used to riding. That
saddle is all right, isn’t it?”

“Ye-es, I suppose so. I’m not sure
AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE AI

that it’s altogether as tight as it might be;
but perhaps it’s only my imagination. It’s
such a long time since we had those rides
at Brighton,” returned Gwen, doubtfully.

“If you mean that there’s something
wrong, and you'd like me to get off and
see what it is, I wish you’d say so. The
saddle seemed right enough when we
started, and it’s just as it was then now,
as far as I can see,” grunted Dan.

Gwen was a fussy little thing, and
evidently half afraid of the animal she was
riding, but she would gain more courage
as they went on. .

“Oh, then of course it’s all right! I
shall get used to it presently. But I
wish you wouldn’t ride quite so fast. My
donkey won’t go.”

“So it appears. I really think you'll
have to beat hima bit. We shall be all
day on the road if he goes on like this,”
Dan returned discontentedly.

“T shouldn’t like to beat him, even if
(42 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

I'd got a stick, which I haven't. And
shaking the reins doesn’t seem to have
any effect. Don’t go on like that!” as
Daniel’s steed made a sudden spurt for-
ward. ‘I can’t possibly manage to keep
up with you!”

“So I see. This sort of thing won’t do.
If you aren’t going to beat him yourself,
I shall have to do it for you. What's the
matter now ?”

“I don’t know, only he won't go on.
Do come and help me, Dan; I can’t make
him move!” cried Gwen, in desperation.

Joseph, her donkey, had come to a full
stop, his fore feet planted firmly on the
ground in a slanting position, and his ears
laid back with a look of determination.

“He wants a good beating. I shall
have to get off and come to him,” said
Dan, slipping off his own donkey and
fastening it with a slipknot to the fence.
“It's lucky Pve got a riding whip, as you
haven't,”
AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 43°

“ Hadn’t I better get off? Suppose he
kicks ?” queried Gwen, eyeing her brother’s
implement nervously.

“He won't; the worst he'll do is to
start off rather suddenly. You stick on
tight, and don’t be a coward,” advised
Daniel. “ I’ll make him go somehow.”

But apparently this was easier said than
done. Joseph’s skin. must have been as
tough as his disposition was obstinate ;
for not one inch, either backwards or
forwards, could he be induced to move.

“T really don’t quite see what we are to
do if he’s going to glue himself to the
ground like this all the afternoon. You
can’t have been riding him properly, Gwen;
it’s too tiresome,” Daniel said at last, stop-
ping from want of breath. “Even if we
give the whole thing up, and don’t try to
get to Oxford, I don’t see how we're ever
to get the brute home, unless we tie a rope
round him and help my donkey to tug
him back to the village. They'd no
44. AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

business to let out such an aggravating
animal.”

“There’s somebody coming, isn’t there ?
It’s a man with a bath-chair. Perhaps he
understands donkeys,” suggested Gwen-
dolyn, looking over her shoulder anxiously.

“T’m not ‘going to ask anybody to help,
it would be all over the village in no time;
besides, what's the good? You can’t do
anything to a donkey but beat him, or
drag him along by main force, if he won’t
go. I wish that bath-chair would turn
round the corner,” muttered Daniel,
sulkily.

But the bath-chair evidently had no
idea of doing anything of the sort. It
and the man and the old lady in it came
straight on, and presently the old lady
pulled out a pair of opera-glasses and
proceeded to inspect Joseph and the
children pretty intently.

Daniel had turned his attention to
Joseph again, but suddenly Gwendolyn,
AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 45

who was still peering anxiously over her
shoulder, gave a cry of recognition—

“Its grandmamma! How funny! I
never knew she went out in a bath-chair.
Do let me get down and speak to her!”
she cried eagerly.

Daniel looked round awkwardly.

“Oh, well, we can’t get out of it! You
can get down, if you want to,” he said
slowly. The bath-chair had been advanc-
ing steadily, and was nearly upon them.

Mrs. Wilton put down her opera-glasses
and signed to the man to stop. |

“What is the meaning of this, Daniel ?”
she asked stiffly, taking no notice of
Gwendolyn, who had slipped thankfully
off Joseph, and run up to the bath-chair.

—“Tt's—you said we could go for a
_ donkey ride,” muttered that young man,
doggedly.

-«“ With the donkey-boy, I said. What
have you done with him?”

Daniel shuffled off the foot he was
46 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

standing on to the other, and got very
red. He felt so small and foolish and
generally ashamed of himself.

“We haven’t got a donkey-boy—they
couldn’t let us have one this afternoon,”
he said at last.

“Then, what did you mean by coming
out on donkeys at all? Didn’t you know
perfectly well that you ought to have let
your ride wait for another day ?” demanded
grandmamma indignantly. It had always
been an anxiety having children in the
house when Millie was away, but she
approved of putting young people on their
honour, and it had never occurred to her
that her own daughter’s children were not
to be trusted. Daniel hung his head and
looked nervously at Gwendolyn, who was
standing by with wide-open eyes.

“Yes, I believe I did. Only it was
such a lovely day, and we wanted to go
to Oxford for some fishing-tackle. Gwen
didn’t know anything about it,” Dan blurted
AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 47

out, wishing that the ground would open
and swallow him, or that, at any rate,
something would happen to take his
grandmother's attention off, and break
the awful silence which ensued when he
stopped speaking. He felt quite grateful,
when Joseph, who was still standing stock
still, suddenly stuck his tail. straight out
and brayed loudly.

“What is the matter with that animal ?”
inquired Mrs. Wilton.

“He’s only braying. That’s what
donkeys generally do when they think
it’s going to rain,” murmured Gwendolyn,
faintly.

“TI mean, why were you beating him,
and what was he standing still in the
middle of the road for?” went on Mrs.
Wilton, eyeing Daniel expectantly. That
young gentleman was still shuffling about
and looking extremely foolish.

“Gwen couldn't manage him. He
wouldn’t go,” he said sulkily.
48 AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE

“You didn’t seem able to manage him
either, from what I saw. Pray, what did
you intend to do if you couldn’t persuade
him to move ?”

“We hadn’t quite decided,” began
Daniel; but Mrs. Wilton broke in again
before he could finish his sentence.

“Oh, then I think I had better decide
for you! Will you kindly go back to the
village at once, and tell the man those
donkeys belong to that you can’t manage
them, and that I shall be much obliged if
he will either send or come for them
himself as soon as possible ? Gwendolyn
can stay here; there is plenty of room for
her in my bath-chair, and I mean to take
her back with me.”

Poor Daniel! This ignominious con-
fession of failure was not to his taste at
all, but grandmamma spoke decidedly,
and he didn’t see any way of getting out
of it.

“But it’s only Joseph who won't go.
AN UNLAWFUL DONKEY RIDE 49



I can ride the other donkey back if Gwen
isn’t to come, can’t I ?” he said anxiously.

‘Certainly not. Go at once, and do as
I told you. You would probably get into
just the same predicament over again;
and, in any case, I don’t consider that you
are fit to be trusted alone with another
donkey,” returned grandmamma, severely ;
and, after that, Master Daniel felt that
there was nothing to be done but make
tracks on foot for the village as fast as
possible,




CHAPTER III

Gwen’s PRESENTIMENT

Son HY didn’t you tell me that we
weren't supposed to go with-
out a donkey-boy yesterday ?
Grandmamma made me so uncomfortable
on the way home. She seemed to think
the whole business perfectly awful,” Gwen-
dolyn was saying sadly.

““T’m afraid it was rather bad. I
oughtn’t to have done it. You're to be
depended on for jumping on a fellow when
he’s down, of course—you wouldn’t be a
girl if you weren't,” Dan returned dis-
consolately. He was feeling crushed and
cross and miserable.


GWEN’S PRESENTIMENT 5i

“You know I didn’t mean to jump upon
you. Oh, Dan, there’s a telegram!”
ejaculated Gwendolyn, suddenly.

_ “Very likely. But I don’t see why you
should be so excited about it. It can’t
have anything to do with you. I hate the
way you girls have got of flattening your
noses against the window and making
guesses at other people’s business,” growled
Daniel, angrily.

He felt thoroughly inclined for a quarrel
with somebody; but for this purpose
Gwendolyn had no intention of offering
her services. She had had a long lecture
anent the sisterly influence which ought
to be exercised over all brothers in the
bath-chair yesterday, and meant to begin
by trying to smooth hers down into an
amiable frame of mind again as soon as
possible.

The telegraph boy did not go away, but
remained dawdling about by the hall door
as though he were waiting for an answer.
52 GWEN’S PRESENTIMENT

Presently the door opened, and Emma
‘came in looking white and mysterious.

“Will Master Daniel go and speak to
the mistress, please, at once?” she said,
and then disappeared so promptly that
there wasn’t time to ask her a single
question.

“What’s that about? We can’t have
done anything else, can we?” queried
Daniel, uneasily.

“No, of course not—if we don’t know
it. But it might be something about that
telegram—do go and see! I wish grannie
had sent for me too!” Gwendolyn said
wistfully.

It was so horrid having to wait all by
herself in the schoolroom while Daniel was
being talked to about something exciting.

He came back presently, looking grave
and important.

“You were right for once, old lady—
that telegram did concern us. Father has
been sent for to India in a hurry, and he’s
GWEN'S PRESENTIMENT 53

got to sail next Thursday, so mother
wants us to go back at once, so as to see
him before he goes. Grandmamma is
dreadfully sorry we have to go so soon,
and she’s going to give us ten shillings
each to spend in amusing ourselves at
Wimbledon, where we shall have to stay
for the rest of the holidays, I. suppose.
Mother will be awfully cut up.” :

“T should think so! Next Thursday—
why, this is Saturday!” gasped Gwen,
with wide-open eyes. “And India is
such a long way off. I wish we could
all go!”

“We can’t, because there aren’t any
decent schools for me in India, and the
climate wouldn’t be good for you. If it
wasn’t for us mother would go—it’s only
for a year,” Daniel said thoughtfully.

“Oh, I’m glad she isn’t going! How
horrid it would be, particularly when you
were at school, with nobody but a gover-
ness and servants!”
54 GWEN’S PRESENTIMENT

“Yes; you wouldn't have much of a
time all by yourself; but girls have to put
up with being dull,” Dan remarked de-
cidedly. “We'd better go upstairs and
see about packing now. Grannie said we
were to start this afternoon,” .

So there was an end of Gwen and
Daniel’s visit to the country for the
present. Dan didn’t say much, but he
was very quiet and depressed and different
from his usual blustering little self.

Everything would have been different
if it hadn’t been for that wretched donkey
episode the day before. It was so horrid
to feel that he was going away in disgrace
and leaving a bad impression behind.
And being forgiven hadn’t done away
with the uncomfortable feeling he had
when anything reminded him of yester-
day’s escapade at all.

Gwen was very full of business, and
managed to get on with the packing with-
out assistance from Emma in a manner
GWEN'S PRESENTIMENT 55



which caused that good woman very con-
siderable astonishment.

“It’s plain you're not used to being
waited on, Miss Gwenie—the way you've
collected everything and forgotten nothing
is simply wonderful. There’s some good,
after all, comes from Master Daniel’s
domineering ways——”

But Emma never got a chance of
finishing her sentence, and the storm of
indignation which interrupted it, rather
altered her estimate of Miss Gwendolyn’s
disposition.

The house at Wimbledon was rather
in confusion when the children arrived
that night. Boxes and packing-cases were
everywhere, and Tosca, the family cat, was
wandering about with his tail in the air and
an expression of worry and dissatisfaction
about him which clearly indicated that he
‘strongly disapproved of the general dis-
turbance of household comforts.

Nobody was very communicative just at
56 GWEN'S PRESENTIMENT



first, but Gwendolyn caught sight of some-
thing in one of the passages which filled
her with a vague sense of uneasiness.

“That’s mother’s box; it’s got her
initials on it, What do they want to turn
that out for ?” she asked suddenly.

“Perhaps father’s going to take it, or
very likely some of the things he means to
leave behind are going to be packed away
in it. Or very possibly it’s been stuck out
in the landing simply because mother’s
room is being turned out. Housemaids
can’t sweep under beds when they’re all
stuffed up with band-boxes and _ things,”
returned Daniel. ‘You certainly have a
most extraordinary hankering after other
people’s business.”

So Gwen, who was one of those little
girls with fine, easily tumbled hair, who
are never very difficult to snub, said no
more just then.

But there was something different from
usual in her mother’s manner—something
GWEN’S PRESENTIMENT ed

which Gwendolyn could not have de-
scribed, but which made her restless and
uneasy. She kept looking at Daniel when
they were down in the drawing-room after
dinner, to see if he felt it too. But he
went on placidly teasing Tosca, and wan-
dering about from one part of the room to
another, just as he generally did when
nobody told him not to; asking questions
now and then about his father’s journey,
but apparently not having any idea of the
dreadful something else which might
possibly be kept behind.

At last, when bedtime came, and the
children got up to go, Gwendolyn could
not bear it any longer. It was naughty,
she knew perfectly well that it was
naughty, to guess and pry and try to find
out things that her parents did not wish
her to know, and if she hadn’t done it
perhaps she wouldn’t have been so miser-
able; but, as it was, her pent-up feelings
were too much for her and she suddenly
58 GWEN’S PRESENTIMENT



subsided into a burst of tears in the middle
of her “good-night” kiss, in a manner
which caused Daniel to fairly gasp with
amazement,

“What's the matter? What in all the
world is the matter now? She was all right
two minutes ago! Girls ave odd sorts of
people,” he ejaculated blankly.

But Mrs. Kregford seemed to under-
stand all about it.

“You go on upstairs, Daniel. I'll bring
Gwendolyn up presently,” was all she said ;
and in about half an hour a very pale, tear-
stained little person arrived in Daniel’s
room to explain her queer behaviour.

“Mother's coming up to say good night
to us both over again; but I’m to tell you
all about it first. We weren’t to have
known just for a day or two, only I
guessed,” she began timidly. 5

“Weren't to have known what? For
goodness’ sake do come to the point.. I’m
sick of mysteries,” Dan cried impatiently.
GWEN'S PRESENTIMENT 59

“That mother’s going too. She is
going, after all, because father wants her to.
But it’s only for a year,” Gwen explained,
in an awe-struck tone. Being left behind
in England without any parents at all,
seemed such a terrible thing that she
couldn’t speak about it above a whisper.

Dan, for once, was startled out of his
superiority. His eyes opened very wide
indeed.

“QOh-h! What's to become of us?” he
inquired faintly.

“We're to stay here—just for a little,
till the house is let.”

“By ourselves?” demanded Daniel,
. brightening visibly. What high old times
they might have!

But Gwenie shook her head.

“No, of course not. Aunt Millie’s
coming to look after us; and then, when
the house is let, she’s going to take us
back to grandmamma.”

Dan made a disrespectful little grimace.
60 GWEN'’S PRESENTIMENT



“ Aunt Millie—ugh ! She won't do any-
thing to amuse us unless she wants to;
and she won’t let us amuse ourselves if it
interferes with her, either. I only hope the
house’ll let soon.”
“Aunt Millie doesn’t, because she’s
going to be married, and her young man
can get at her here. Besides, she wants
to shop, and we’re so near London,” Gwen
returned discouragingly. ‘“ Mother said
she wouldn’t wonder if we were still here
when you had to go back to school.”

“Oh! Well, if you haven’t anything
more cheerful than that to tell one, I
think you’d better go back to bed. It’s
the only place you're fit for ; you look like
a sort of hybrid between a ghost and a
squeezed lemon as it is. Good night,”
Dan said so decidedly that, though Gwen
felt. lonely and inclined to stop and talk, .
she really thought that she had better do:
as he told her.


CHAPTER IV

Aunt Muir

“Ege HIS house feels lively, I must

say,” remarked Dan, resignedly.
They had just come back from
seeing the big steamer, with their father
‘and mother in it, off. Gwendolyn had
been more or less dissolved in tears since
an early hour in the morning, and his own
eyes were suffering from a prickly sensa-
tion, which necessitated a good deal of
blinking.

“That's my fault; but I’m going to
cheer up—mother .said we were to.
You're going to take me for a walk on
the common after dinner, aren’t you ?”


62 AUNT MILLIE



“Yes, Father said we were to spend
the rest of the holidays hunting for a bit
of white heather, and send it to him for
- luck, in a registered envelope, as soon as
we found it—only I don’t believe it grows
anywhere but in Scotland.”

“Ves, it does—in lots of places. But
I’m afraid there isn’t any on the common,
except what grows right under gorse
bushes, so that it can’t get any sun, and
that’s no good. But I know some girls
who found a whole lot of sundews eating
flies down by Cesar’s Camp, and if white
heather is hopeless it would be rather fun
to go and look for them.”

“Which side of Czsar's Camp?”
demanded Daniel, somewhat mystified.
Gwen always had had a way of prowl-
ing about with other girls when he was
away at school, and discovering all sorts
of odd things that he never bothered his
head about. :

“The side nearest to Robin Hood
AUNT MILLIE 63

&

church. You know where that little
stream with the brown rushes is. Ella
Monson said she thought it was the only
place near London that you could get
them,” explained Gwendolyn. “I meant
to have asked you to go there as soon as
you came home—if it hadn’t been for the
measles.”

“Then welll go this afternoon ; and, if
we find any, we'll start an aquarium in the
back garden. There’s a cracked foot-bath
upstairs that I could dig a hole for, and
there are heaps of flies about to feed them

”

on.

“Ves; but you don’t want an aquarium
for sundews,” interrupted Gwendolyn.
“They’re plants—the only kind of car-
nivorous plants that there are—in this
country, anyway—and they catch their
own flies. Their mouths are all sticky,
so that when a fly settles there it can’t
escape, and the sundew just sucks it down
as slowly as it wants to.” She wanted to
64 AUNT MILLIE





give as much information as she could,
without making it too evident that she
had found out that Daniel didn’t know
what the carnivorous plants in question
were. Botany wasn’t a boy’s science, no
doubt; but still he never liked her to
know more about anything than he did.
However, as usual, he rose to the occasion,
though rather lamely.

“T never suggested putting sundews zz
the aquarium, did 1? We can have frogs
and newts and such-like creatures inside,
and plant plants that like water round
the banks. The foot-bath is cracked, so”
water’ll always be oozing slowly out, and
keep the ground near like a marsh, The
worst of it is that when we've got the
whole thing to perfection it'll be just time
for me to go back to school.”

Gwendolyn wrinkled her brows thought-
fully. She wished Daniel wasn’t so fond
of trying to slip out of being in the wrong.
He always managed to make it sound as
AUNT MILLIE 65

though he had been right from the be-
ginning, and never seemed to suspect that
people couldn’t help seeing this and know-
ing that he hadn't. She felt pretty sure
that it was a habit which ought to be got
rid of, only just at present, when she was
continually doing something wrong herself,
home truths on the subject wouldn’t come
well from her.

“TI hope we sha’n’t forget to fill it up
with water pretty often. Because, if the
water is always oozing out it won’t last
very long,” she said presently.

“Is that what you were pondering
about so deeply ? Well, I hope we sha’n’t,
though, if we did, it wouldn’t matter much
if we hadn’t any fish. Frogs do all right
without water for a bit.”

“Yes; they don’t like being in water
always. We shall have to get some slips
of board to float about on the top for them
to rest on,” suggested Gwen.

“That's not a bad idea when the tank’s

E
66 AUNT MILLIE





half empty; but if we leave pieces of board
in when it’s full all the frogs will jump off
them and get lost. That would never do,
because they’d hop off into the house and
all sorts of places where there wasn’t any
water, and die for want of it. You never
saw such a miserable looking object as a
frog who’s lost his way and had to live in
dry places for a day or two,” returned
Daniel, with an air of wisdom.

“Yes. I found one of mine in the
housemaid’s cupboard like that. Its eyes
were so dull, and it was all limp and flabby,
with nothing shiny about it anywhere.
We put it on adamp sponge and sprinkled
it with water, and it got all right; but
mother said I was never to keep frogs
indoors any more. That one escaped out »
of my room.”

“T should have thought you'd have
known better than to keep such creatures
there any time. Were they big ones?”
inquired Daniel.
AUNT MILLIE 67



“Oh no, quite babies; the biggest of
them could have sat on a_half-crown.
There are always heaps of young ones on
the common early in the summer. I had
them in a bath with a little water and bits
of wood floating about just as we’re going
to do outside. They always seemed quite
happy, and I never kept the same ones
for more than a week ; but of course after
one of them had escaped, I shouldn’t have
cared to go on doing it any way. He was
nearly dead when we found him, but he
looked at me so reproachfully. And the
. worst of it was that until I actually put
him on the sponge and began sprinkling
him, I don’t believe he thought I was
going to be kind to him. He tried as
hard as ever he could to get away,” con-
fessed Gwendolyn, her face clouding over
at the recollection.

“No wonder; I call it beastly cruel to
keep frogs in bedrooms,” returned Daniel,
with more truth than elegance. “ You'd
68 AUNT MILLIE



better run upstairs and change your frock
now, or you'll keep me waiting for ever so
long after dinner.”

There wasn’t any white heather on
Wimbledon common, and apparently just
then not any sundews either, at least the
children couldn’t find any, and returned
home slightly depressed in consequence.

They did not notice that the gate was
open when they got there, or that there
were fresh carriage-wheel marks on the
drive; but there was a bundle of wraps and
a new Bradshaw on the hall-table which
attracted Daniel’s attention at once.

“Hallo, Aunt Millie must have come;
I thought she wasn’t due until to-morrow !”
he exclaimed, with more surprise than
pleasure. “Mother said to-morrow,
surely !”

“No; she wasn’t quite sure. We'd
better go to the drawing-room, hadn’t we ?
It’s so dull to arrive at a place and have
nobody but servants to greet you,” Gwen
AUNT MILLIE 69

said anxiously. She felt it was her business
to do the honours in her mother’s absence.

But the young lady seated in the
drawing-room with a tiny afternoon tea-
tray on the table beside her, did not seem
to be suffering from any lack of comfort.
She was dressed in a pretty pale mauve
cambric with a good deal of lace about it,
and a bunch of Neapolitan violets pinned
rather high up on the left side.

Gwendolyn felt unpleasantly conscious
of her own shabby serge frock and muddy
boots, and came forward looking rather
more awkward than usual. But Aunt
Millie did not seem to notice that any-
thing was wrong, and jumped up from her
seat at once as though she were pleased to
see them. ;

Presently she took up a little morocco
bag which lay beside the tea-tray, and
_ produced a small brown-paper parcel
from it.

“That is chocolate—chocolate creams, I
7O AUNT MILLIE

think they are. I thought they would
amuse you this evening as I have to go
out to dinner. You must eat them all up
between you,” she said, putting the package
into Gwendolyn’s hands.

-And somehow, after that, both children
came to the conclusion that Aunt Millie
would be just as well pleased if they went
upstairs.

“I knew she wanted us to go, by the
way she kept looking at that yellow book
with the picture on it,” whispered Gwen,
rather wistfully.

Daniel’s mouth was so full of chocolate
cream that he couldn't answer for a
minute.

“Well, that’s all right; I’m sure we
didn’t want to stop. She knows the right
place to go to for lolly-pops, anyway,” he
said at last approvingly. “ Besides, we've
got them all to ourselves, as it is, and if she
hadn’t been going out to dinner, she might
have wanted to eat some of them herself.
AUNT MILLIE 71
There’s a silver lining to every cloud,
according to your copy book, and this
one’s of a nature that it’s pretty easy to
appreciate.”
A sage conclusion which, as it was
intended to, put an end to Gwendolyn’s
grumbling for the present. |








CHAPTER V
Dan’s IpEA

DON’T think there’s anything
else we ought to get. You
have plenty of socks, Dan,



haven’t you?” Aunt Millie inquired rather
wearily.

Daniel was going back to school next
week, and they had been undergoing a
long afternoon’s shopping at the stores,
which wasn’t to her taste at all.

“Yes, I believe so; my hair wants
cutting,” he suggested gruffly. There was
another very different suggestion that he
wanted to make, only courage isn’t given
to everybody for everything.
DAN’S IDEA 78

“Your hair? Oh, nonsense! That can
be done at Wimbledon. You can go
round to that shop in the village by your-
self. We didn’t come up to London to do
things that can be done just as well down
there, and it’s quite time we thought of
going home. I don’t want to get back
later than five,” said Aunt Millie, who had
arranged to have tea in the drawing-room
waiting for her.

Outside the underground station that
they were making for, were a number of
gaily coloured placards. Daniel, who
knew the way, and had been walking on in
front a little, came to a full stop in front of
one of them. :

“ That’s at Dariel’s Theatre, and there’s
an afternoon performance next Saturday.
Mother said it was the only play going on
now that she'd like us to see, and father
meant to take us, only he hadn’t time,” he
remarked tentatively.

Miss Millie Wilton glanced up at the
7A DANS IDEA

pictorial advertisement doubtfully. A
crowd of oddly dressed people, with pistols,
were streaming out of a cave, and in the
distance a gentleman on an elephant was
rapidly disappearing. She liked going to
the theatre now and then well enough,
when she could choose her piece, but an
afternoon performance full of adventures
evidently intended for schoolboys, when
she wasn’t staying actually in London,
and the thermometer would probably be
about eighty degrees in the shade, was
another matter. However, the children
hadn’t given her much trouble, and there
was a beseeching look round the corners
of Daniel’s mouth, which made her rather
uncomfortable.

“That means you want me to take you,
I suppose ?” she said slowly.

“Oh no; I’m sure Daniel didn’t mean
to give a hint!” cried Gwendolyn, flushing
crimson; but the young man in question
did not do much to back her up.
DAN’S IDEA 75

~“No-o. Only somebody has always
taken us somewhere every other holi-
days,” he said, still gazing at the gorgeous
representations in front of him with longing
eyes.

“T see. Well, perhaps—I won’t abso-
lutely promise, but, perhaps, if I’m not
busy, [ll bring you both up to see it next
Saturday. Only you must be very good ;
and remember, I haven’t exactly promised,”
Aunt Millie said, as they turned into the
railway station.

* * * * *

“But she didn’t promise, Daniel. I’m
just as disappointed as you are; but it
isn’t fair to talk as though she had
promised when she didn’t,’ Gwendolyn
said reproachfully.

Daniel was standing at the other end
of the room, looking out of the window,
to hide the tears which would come, and
biting his lips with vexation.
76 DAN’S IDEA

“She could take us quite easily if she
chose—garden-parties don’t matter. Be-
sides, it’s a great deal worse for me than
it is for you. All the other chaps at
school will have heaps of things to talk
_ about, and I sha’n’t have been anywhere,
or seen anything,” he said bitterly.

“Ves, it’s too bad; but I don’t know
what we're to do. Are you quite sure
Aunt Millie wouldn't let us go together ?”
demanded Gwendolyn, brightening sud-
denly. “You're ever so much bigger
than you were last Christmas, when
mother wouldn’t let you take me.”

But Daniel shook his head.

“T’m afraid it’s no good; she wouldn’t
take the responsibility. Though what sort
of things grown-up people are so fond of
thinking I should allow to happen to you
I can’t imagine. She wants us to go to
that performance at the Drill Hall in-
stead,” he said moodily.

“That ought to be nice, oughtn’t it ?
DAN'S IDEA "7

There are pictures about it everywhere,”
Gwendolyn said hopefully.

But Dan was not to be comforted.

“It isn’t a London show—all the other
chaps will get taken to something in
London. Don’t you think if you went to
Aunt Millie and begged very hard, with
the water-taps turned on, like they gene-
rally are when things don’t please you, it
might have some effect ?”

But Gwendolyn didn’t think it would,
and wasn’t at all inclined to try.

“ Aunt Millie wants to go to that garden-
party so badly that I’m quite sure she
wouldn't give itup. She’s sent to London
for a wreath of forget-me-nots to put in
her best hat on purpose to wear with a
lovely dress she’s had made out of a lot
of pale blue silk that somebody sent her
from India, and Sir Thomas and Lady
Maxwell are going to call for her in a
carriage. She was quite cross after you
had been to her just now, and told me
78 DAN’S IDEA

that she forbade either of us to mention
the subject to her again,” she said
decidedly. o

Daniel was pacing up and down the
room by this time, stamping his foot with
. irritation.

“TI thought grown-up people—ladies
anyway—always gave up wanting to do
things just to please themselves, when
they grew up. Mother never seems to
think about herself!” he said impatiently.

“No; but then mother is mother! She’s
better than anybody else. I don’t think
people generally leave off trying to enjoy
themselves when they grow up. Any
way, Aunt Millie hasn’t. We shall just
have to make the best of the Drill Hall,”
Gwen said.

“Gwen—oh, you're awake! That’s
right. I’ve got an idea!” exclaimed
Daniel, putting in an early appearance in
his sister’s room on Saturday morning.
®

DAN'S IDEA 79



Gwendolyn had wakened early too, and
was curled up among her pillows, reading
fairy stories.

“That’s nice. Tell me all about it!”
she said eagerly.

But Daniel didn’t seem in a hurry to
begin. He hesitated, and shuffled about
in a manner which, to say the least of it,
was, for him, decidedly unusual.

“ After all, I'm not quite sure that it
will do to tell you. Girls always funk
everything so,” he said at last.

Gwendolyn’s colour rose. This was
really too bad.

“T don’t funk things! Don’t you re-
member how I learnt to swim in deep
water, with only a rope tied round——”
she began indignantly.

But Daniel wouldn’t let her finish.

“For goodness’ sake, don’t give us any
more of that bragging! You're so fat you
couldn't possibly help learning to swim
directly. I believe you could earn your
80 DANS IDEA

living perfectly well as a buoy, if other
trades failed!” he put in derisively.

“As a boy? Boys don’t find it any
easier to earn their living than girls do
—you're talking rubbish!” Gwen said in
‘some confusion. Of course she oughtn’t
to have advertised herself in that con-
ceited fashion, and it was mean to remind
Daniel that he had taken ever so much
longer learning to swim than she had.

“As a BU OY, stupid. Buoys are
great big pieces of wood on something
that float about on the top of water to
warn people when there are dangerous
rocks underneath. They have to be
fastened to the bottom with a rope, some-
how; but they’ve nothing else to do but
keep themselves afloat, which the laws of
gravity, or whatever it is looks after that
sort of thing, arranges for them. It ’ud
be rather a bother feeding you—that’s the
only thing. You'd have to have a bit
of board tied round your neck so that
DAN’S IDEA 81

it would float in front, and do to put
your meals on,” wound up Daniel, thought-
fully.

“ Aren’t you going to tell me what you
really came to talk about? It isn’t very
kind to talk as though you didn’t care any
more about me than you do for bits of
wood,” Gwen said reproachfully. Dan
didn’t mean, of course; but she used to
feel pretty sure sometimes that he wasn’t
as fond of her as she was of him, and she
never had quite learned to like being
made fun of.

“You shouldn’t jump to conclusions.
I never said I wouldn’t row out in a boat
to visit you occasionally, which is more
than one does for buoys of the usual
description. And we're just coming ‘to
the other thing—only you girls fly off into
high strikes so, if one tells you anything
without a little preparation.”

“Oh! Well, I’m quite prepared,” Gwen
said meekly. She only hoped secretly

F
82 DAN'S IDEA

that she wasn’t going to be asked to help
in anything naughty.

« Allright; then we'll begin. It’s about
that piece at Dariel’s. It seems to me
that there isn’t any reason why we shouldn't
_ go, after all.” And Dan stopped short,
eyeing his sister oddly.

“Isn't there? That’s nice. But who's
going to take us ?” she asked eagerly.

Dan’s eyes wandered over to the window,
and he went on looking out of it, instead
of at the person he was speaking to, which
wasn’t the way with him generally.

“TI don’t see that it’s necessary for
anybody to take me. J/’m going to take
you,” he said presently.

“That would be jolly; only, are you
guite sure Aunt Millie ‘ll let us ?” queried
Gwen, not very brightly.

“Aunt Millie? Well, I don’t see that
she need be asked. She’s never told-us
not to go; and it doesn’t make any differ-
ence to her.”
DAN’S IDEA 83

Gwen caught her breath in sheer
amazement.

‘But she came to look after us, instead
of mother. We can’t go without telling
her,” she said at last.

“That's all Tommy-rot. She’s given
me five shillings to pay for the Drill Hall,
and it can’t matter to her whether we go
there or to the other place—which would
be more fun. There’s no reason why we
should say anything about it. You always
make such a fuss about things,” Dan
returned discontentedly.

“T don’t think we ought to doit. I’m
sure it isn’t right,” Gwen said feebly.

It was dreadfully difficult to go against
her brother. He was so tall and strong
and decided about things; and, besides, he
had got her into the way of doing what
he wanted rather blindly.

“ Stuff and nonsense! Why shouldn't
it be right? We haven't been told not to
do it. Besides, how much do you suppose
84 DAN’S IDEA



Aunt Millie will care where we go so long
as we get back in decent time?”

Gwendolyn thought Aunt Millie might
care, and didn’t agree with him otherwise ;.
but, as often happened, let herself be talked
round at last.

“Only, for one thing, I don’t believe
we shall have enough money. There'll
be the train as well as the tickets, and
I’m sure five shillings isn’t enough,” she
said doubtfully.

“That'll be all right. We must pay
for the train out of our own money—we’ve
got enough. You manage to be ready
directly after dinner. Aunt Millie’s going
out to lunch, but she said we were to
have it early, because of the Drill Hall.
Meanwhile, we’d better prepare for break-
fast.” And Master Daniel walked off,
thoroughly satisfied with his morning’s
work,












CHAPTER VI
Tue Piotr THICKENS

WHIS train seems to take a tre-
mendous time getting to London.




I believe it stops at every sta-
tion,” Gwen remarked discontentedly,

“T’m quite sure it does. All the trains
on this line do. But the theatre’s close
to the station, and the doors aren’t open
till two, so it’s all right.”

“What are you going to do if five
shillings isn’t enough for the tickets? I’m
“quite sure mother generally pays more
than that,” Gwen said again presently.

Daniel looked rather blue for a minute.
86 THE PLOT THICKENS

‘Perhaps she does; but it isn’t so ex-
pensive if you don’t go to reserved seats.
We're going to be all right,’ he said
wisely. :

But he looked nearly as bewildered as
Gwen did when they actually got to the
theatre—there were such crowds of people
standing about outside, and nobody seemed
able to tell them exactly where to go.
Eventually they got into the box-office
by mistake, and there Daniel learnt that
his sister's original surmise had been
correct.

“T don’t think -we’d better bother about
tickets, as we’re in a hurry; and, anyway,
this isn’t the place for us to come to.
There’s another place called the pit which
you're supposed to go to if you only want
to pay half-a-crown—and there’s rather
a crowd there generally, so you'd better
come along,” he said, looking so crestfallen
that Gwendolyn felt certain the man in
the box-office had been rude to him.
THE PLOT THICKENS 87

She opened her eyes very wide when
they got to the long curved line of human
beings outside the pit entrance. Every-
body looked so dirty and common, and
altogether unlike the people that they were
accustomed to associate with. Dan's face
was rather white, but he had no idea of
turning back,

“You keep close up behind me, Gwen.
We sha’n’t have very long to wait,” he
said shortly; and Gwendolyn, who saw
that they were fairly in for the whole
business now, kept her opinion of their
surroundings to herself.

Presently a fat woman, who had been
eating peppermints steadily in front, offered
her some red and white bull’s-eyes in a
paper bag, and her somewhat indignant
refusal of these delicacies produced re-
marks which caused Daniel to grind his
‘teeth. Then a nigger with a banjo began
making a most unearthly noise, after which
he dodged about among the audience
88 THE PLOT THICKENS

collecting halfpence. Daniel pulled out
one of his half-crowns with some coppers
and dropped a penny into the outstretched
cap with a lordly air.

Presently there was a sudden move-
ment—a sort of upheaval in the crowd,
and the children felt themselves being
pushed rapidly onward.

“Stick fast on to me; don’t let the
people shove in front of you,” whispered
Daniel, shamefacedly.

He did not want Gwendolyn to know
it, but he was beginning to wish himself
at home. He never would have let her
in for this sort of thing if he had only
known exactly what it was. At last they
came to the little window where somebody
was giving out tickets.

“I want seats for two, please. And
my sister is under thirteen. Doesn't that
mean half price ?” he added suddenly.

The man shook his head as he pushed
the tickets forward.
THE PLOT THICKENS 89

“No ’arf price here. Five shillings,
please.”

So Daniel put his hand in his pocket
with a grimace. One and _ threepence
would very nearly have paid their railway
fare.

But what in the world had become of
those half-crowns? Surely he had put
them in the right-hand pocket. Dan’s
face grew very glum as he drew his hand
out empty. There was no hole in the
lining, so the coins could not have slipped
out that way—but they were nowhere to
be found in that pocket or in any other.

The man behind the window placed
his hand on the tickets and drew them
back. Daniel’s expression explained
itself.

“Tf you've had your pocket picked,
young man, you may as well go off at
once. We don’t give credit here; and
you're blocking up other people’s way,”
he said gruffly.
go THE PLOT THICKENS



Daniel turned a very scared grief-
stricken countenance round to Gwen.

“Have you any money?” he asked
despairingly. But of course she had none
at all. “Then I’m awfully sorry, but we
shall just have to go home. Unless ”—
and Daniel brightened up with a sudden
happy thought as he pulled out his Water-
bury watch and chain—‘“unless you will
give me the tickets in exchange for these ?”
But the man only laughed and shook his
head.

“ There’s no pawnshop here. You
clear out, young gent,” was all he said.

So Daniel took hold of his sister’s arm,
and began elbowing his way out into the
street. He kept his head turned away,
hoping she wouldn’t see that his cheeks
_were flaming and his eyes full of tears;

but, when they got out into the open,
another unpleasant discovery awaited him.

“The tickets—the railway tickets, I
mean—are gone too! Oh, Gwen, what
THE PLOT THICKENS 9!

a mess I’ve got you into!” he exclaimed
dismally.

Gwendolyn was sobbing quietly, too,
by this time; but she struggled hard to
recover herself and make the best of it.

“We—we might take a cab and pay
for it when we get home. Cook would
give us the money, if Aunt Millie wasn’t
in,” she suggested faintly.

But this did not fall in with Master
Daniel's views at all. He had not arrived
at being sorry for anything but the con-
sequences of his wrong-doing at present,
and still treasured faint hopes of being
able to conceal everything—hopes which,
fortunately for him, circumstances did not
lose much time in frustrating.

“That wouldn’t do at all. We might
as well write an account of our proceedings
for the newspaper, or tell the town-crier
all about them at once. But there’s no
reason why we shouldn’t walk home. It’s
only about eight miles; and, if we’re lucky
92 THE PLOT THICKENS

in finding the way and start at once, we
ought to get home just about the same
time as if we had gone to the Drill Hall.
Don’t you think that would be best?”
he asked, catching his breath a little,

But Gwendolyn’s head was turned
away. She had caught sight of somebody
she knew—somebody who had likewise
caught sight of her, and was coming
towards them with rapid strides. It was
Mr. Bertram, the vicar—their father’s
great friend.

“Daniel and Gwendolyn! The very
two young people I’ve been looking for!
How did you manage to get brought up
here?” he asked, in some amazement.

Daniel's face was a study. There was
evidently no chance of slipping safely out
of everything now.

“We weren’t brought up—we came.
That is, Dan brought me,’ Gwen ex-
plained confusedly,

Mr. Bertram’s face grew very grave.
THE PLOT THICKENS 93

“JT don’t understand that at all. I met
your Aunt Millie going out to lunch this
morning, and she told me that, as she was
unable to bring you up to town herself
this afternoon, she had arranged for you
to go to the performance at the Drill Hall
instead. So I, naturally, don’t understand
what you are both doing here.”

Mr. Bertram fixed his keen eyes on
Daniel; and that young man winced per-
ceptibly.

“T didn’t mean—Aunt Millie never
exactly said that we weren’t to come up to
London,” he stammered feebly.

“That means that she implied it—that
you understood perfectly well what she
meant, but that you nevertheless deliber-
ately chose to bring your sister up here in
her absence, thinking no doubt that you
were quite certain not to be found out.
Upon my word, you are a boy to be
proud of!” wound up Mr. Bertram, indig-
nantly.
94 THE PLOT THICKENS

Gwen had started crying afresh, while
Daniel hung his head and_ shuffled
awkwardly from one foot to the other.

“Aunt Millie ought to have taken us.
She was only going to a garden-party to
please herself,” he muttered sullenly at
last.

“Ought to have taken you, indeed!
As though aunts were bound to consider
their nephews’ and nieces’ amusements
before everything. I wonder what the
present generation of young people ave
coming to?” and Mr. Bertram’s eyes
wandered anxiously over to a small group
of his own offspring standing some yards
off, with a big cousin to look after them,
almost as though he thought Daniel’s
duplicity and impudence might be in-
fectious.

“And, as it happens, if you had been
good, and honourable, and obedient, you
would have got exactly what you wanted.
I had two tickets more than I need have
THE PLOT THICKENS 95

used for this entertainment, and was coming
up to see if you would like to go, when I
met your aunt. She told me all about
her plans for you, but you had gone when
we got to your house, and we could not
find you anywhere about the Drill Hall,
either,” he went on suddenly.

Gwen’s tears were falling fast.

“ And now we’ve lost the money, and
can't go at all,” she sobbed sorrowfully.
‘‘When this is once over, I don’t ever
mean to do anything naughty again!”

“Lost the money? How’s.that? Oh,
you've had your pockets picked, I sup-
pose,” remarked Mr. Bertram, taking no
notice of this last somewhat imprudent
statement. “Well, I must say if that’s
what's happened, it serves you both right.
Not that I would have allowed you to
go in, even if you had had the tickets and
everything ready. How do you propose
to get home ?”

Daniel hesitated. He felt pretty sure
96 THE PLOT THICKENS

that his proposition on the subject would
not meet with Mr. Bertram’s approval.
However, Gwendolyn, as usual, came
straight to the point at once.

“We're going to walk. That’s the
only way, as Dan’s lost the return tickets,
and we haven’t any more money. It isn’t
too far, and there are plenty of people to
ask about the way,” she said confidently.

Mr. Bertram gazed first at one culprit
and then at the other in blank amazement.

“Do you actually mean to say that you
intended to take your sister for a ten-mile
walk through the slums of London, just
on the chance of finding your way correctly,
and getting home in safety ? A very poor
chance, I should imagine, considering what
an incapable escort you have proved your-
self to be! I don’t know how to be thank-
ful enough that I happened to catch you
in the act. Would you just wait where
you are for a minute,” he exclaimed at last,
walking over to the corner where his
THE PLOT THICKENS 97



own children were clustered together, and
speaking a few hasty words to the big
cousin who was apparently in charge of
the party. Then he came back to Dan
and Gwendolyn.

You can come along with me, young
people—one on each side, if you please,”
he said decidedly. “I am going to take
you straight home, and don’t mean to lose
sight of you until your Aunt Millie returns
to take charge of you herself. And if she
takes my advice, she won't let either of
you out of her sight again, either, as long
as she has the misfortune to be considered
responsible for you. Children who can’t
be trusted never ought to be left alone.”

And with this crushing remark, Mr.
Bertram proceeded to walk off in the
direction of the station, with one of the
culprits hurrying along on each side of
him.

He put them both in front of him at
the booking-office, and took the tickets

cG
98 THE PLOT THICKENS



almost without taking his eyes off them
at all.

Daniel was certain that the porters and
passengers would notice that they were
under unusually strict supervision, and felt
the indignity keenly. But he had sense
enough to know that it was richly merited,
and consequently went about hanging his
head in silence.

When they got home, the maid said that
Miss Wilton was not in; so Daniel hoped
that Mr. Bertram would go off and leave
them to themselves. But, instead of that,
he said he would wait for her in the draw-
ing-room, and marched both the children
in there to wait with him.

All their lives Daniel and Gwendolyn
remembered that long hour’s waiting.
Mr. Bertram gave them plenty of good
advice, and told them how their father had
gone round to the Vicarage the night
before he sailed and begged him to keep
an eye on the children, and send a letter
THE PLOT THICKENS 99



out to India, with something about them
in it, from time to time; so that it wasn’t
very pleasant to know that the first letter
would have to be a sad one, because, as
Mr. Bertram explained, he had promised
to put just exactly what he really did hear
and see with regard to Gwen and Daniel
in the letters, not merely to choose what
was most pleasing and satisfactory, an
arrangement which Mr. Kregford had
taken care to mention wasn’t one which
would be to his taste at all.

“Of course your Aunt Millie will be
writing too, to your mother, and, I suppose,
when you get down to the Manor House
your grandmother will write as well, so it
is to be hoped that you will try and pre-
vent anything but good news from finding
its way into other letters, as far as it is in
your power to prevent it, at any rate.
One dishonourable action does not ruin
one’s whole life at your age, luckily ; but
there will come a time later on when it
100 THE PLOT THICKENS

may—and I want you to try and be thank-
ful that you were stopped before you got
any amusement out of your expedition this
afternoon—and to try and make the best
use that you possibly can of the lesson which
it is to be hoped that it has taught you.”

And then, at last, Aunt Millie came in,
having heard that the children had returned
unexpectedly in the middle of the afternoon
with Mr. Bertram, and looking white and
scared and puzzled in consequence.

She was quite as angry as anybody had
expected just at first, but then everything
had ended well, there was no harm done,
and before the end of the interview, Mr.
Bertram was more than half afraid that the
culprits were going to be let off in a
manner that wouldn’t be wholesome. Dan,
at any rate, was beginning to recover him-
self a little, for he actually screwed up
courage to slip out into the hall when Mr.
Bertram was going away, with some
attempt at an apology.
THE PLOT THICKENS IOI



“I’m awfully sorry, sir; but, you know,
some chaps never have any ideas, and it's
ever so much easier for those sort of fellows
to keep straight,” he said awkwardly. “I
never can help seeing how to work things
out, and somehow it makes the temptation
so much bigger.”

“Very likely, my boy ; but you may be
very sure that, if you are cleverer than
other people, you have a corresponding
amount of strength given you to counter-
balance the temptations that your extra
supply of brains lets you in for, if you
only make your mind up to use it. Though,
to tell you the truth,” wound up the vicar,
turning away to hide a smile, “it has never
struck me that you were any sharper than
most other boys of your age. Your
escapade of this afternoon was extremely
naughty and rather daring ; but I certainly
didn’t consider that it was managed with
unusual cleverness.”

And with this unflattering conclusion,
102 THE PLOT THICKENS



Mr. Bertram disappeared; and that was
the end of the last piece of mischief that
there was an opportunity of getting into
before Daniel was packed off to school,
and Gwendolyn conveyed down into the
country to spend the rest of her parents’
absence at the Manor House with grand-

mamma.






CHAPTER VII

GRANDMAMMA’S LECTURE

ae a was dreadfully dull down there

| in the country without Daniel.
Gwendolyn learnt to milk quite
well, went for legitimate donkey rides
with the maids, and otherwise had every-
thing she could possibly have expected
done for her comfort and enjoyment.



But there was nobody to do things
with; nobody to bully her or order her
about, and somehow, although Dan’s
method of treating her when he was at
home certainly left a good deal to be
desired, life was inclined to fall very flat
without him.
104 GRANDMAMMA’S LECTURE

She counted the days which had to
elapse before the Christmas holidays, and
prepared a paper with a corresponding
number of black strokes upon it, which
she stuck up in her room so that she could
have the satisfaction of crossing one of
them off every night, but this was slow
work, the days wouldn’t go nearly as fast
as she wanted them to.

Daniel wasn’t much of a correspondent,
still he did write sometimes, and always
seemed happy at school ; but he never said —
anything about missing her, a circumstance
which prevented the letters, when they
did come, from being a source of unmixed
pleasure. Grandmamma found her reading
one of them for about the twentieth time
in the garden, one autumn day. Gwen
smuggled it away into her pocket, and
looked up smiling when she saw she was
observed; but there was a little sus-
picious redness and moisture round her
eyes, which hadn’t been unusual lately,
GRANDMAMMA’S LECTURE TO5



and Mrs, Wilton drew her own con-
clusions.

“That's a letter from Daniel, isn’t it ?
I didn’t know you had heard to-day,” she
remarked.

Gwen shook her head.

“T haven't; it’s an old one,” she said
shortly. ‘“ You've seen it.”

Grandmamma looked over at the banks
of tall sunflowers, with rows of straw bee-
hives in front of them in the distance, and
paused a minute. Then—

‘You're very fond of Daniel,” she said
presently. ,

Gwen looked up in blank amazement.

“Of course I am; he’s my brother.
Besides, we’ve always done things to-
gether,” she said slowly.

“That means that Daniel is fond of you
—that you ought to have a great deal of
influence over him,” grandmamma went on
thoughtfully.

Gwendolyn reddened slightly. Somehow
106 GRANDMAMMA’S LECTURE



she had an impression that she was in for
a lecture.

“Daniel has a great deal of influence
over me. He often makes me do things
when I don’t want to,’ she said awk-
wardly.

“That’s all very well, so long as they
are only good things. Still, it doesn’t do
to grow up too malleable, so that one is
always being moulded by other people
and never does any moulding one’s self in
return. It’s as bad as being only a mouth,
one of those things that Ruskin used to
object to—— ”

“ A mouth?” echoed Gwendolyn, look-
ing so puzzled that Mrs. Wilton began to
be afraid that she had been talking above
her grandchild’s head.

“T mean a human being whose mind is
always ready to swallow amusement and
information supplied by other minds, but
isn’t capable of supplying either in return.
That’s the kind of person which little girls
GRANDMAMMA'S LECTURE 107



who don’t take an interest in their lessons
are apt to become.”

“But I do take an interest in my
lessons,” protested Gwendolyn, looking
rather aggrieved.

“Yes, my dear, I know you do, There
aren’t any complaints to be made about
them. What I do wonder is whether you
have ever realized that you are going to
be a woman some day; and that one of
a woman’s missions is to fix her own code
of honour and sense of right-doing very
high indeed, and then try and help others
—brothers particularly-—without letting
them know she is doing it.”

“Oh well, no. I really don't think I
could manage that,” Gwen said doubtfully.

“But it is one of the things that an only
sister ought to manage. Otherwise the
one especial niche which Providence has
prepared for her is very likely to remain
empty, and that’s not a pleasant thing for
her to remember when old agé has come on.
108 GRANDMAMMA'’S LECTURE



Human beings aren’t put into the world
just to make it bright and pleasant like
flowers are; they have some particular
work to do either at home or abroad, every
one of them, and if we don’t each of us do
our own, there’s a risk of its staying undone
altogether. So, if you don’t feel clear
about your own niche yet, Gwendolyn,
you must try and fit yourself into it as
fast as possible,” wound up grandmamma
decidedly.

Gwendolyn’s state of mind was far from
clear.

“Where do you think my niche is,
then ?” she asked blankly.

‘Just at present, I should say it is
principally connected with Daniel. You
can do a great deal to make his holidays
happy, and a great deal to help him to be.
good too, if you only go to work the right
way.

“Ye-es; only—haven’t boys got niches,
too ?” demanded Gwendolyn, suddenly.
GRANDMAMMA’S LECTURE 109

Grandmamma smiled.

“Yes, of course; Daniel is going to
have just as many lectures inflicted on
him as you are, when the time comes. It
is his business to protect and take care of
you. But there, I’m wandering away from
the point, exactly as might be expected
of an old woman. Daniel’s niche is his
business, and for the present you may as
well devote all your own attention to
yours. There’s Aunt Millie standing out-
side the door with a basket, and I think
she is beckoning to you.”

“Yes; I expect she wants flowers for
the table. Hobson always lets me gather
them ;” and Gwendolyn walked off to the
house, with her forehead wrinkled, as it
generally was when she was thinking
deeply.

* * * * *

“Any news from home?” said Mr.
Kregford, inquiringly. It was one of the
hottest days of the Indian winter, about
IIO GRANDMAMMAS LECTURE



three weeks after the end of the Christmas
holidays, and he had come home to find
his wife buried deep in an English letter.

“Yes; this is from mother, and it’s all
about the children. Such a delightful
letter! She says the house is terribly
quiet now Daniel has gone back to school,
and they are all sorry, because neither he
nor Gwen did anything really naughty
that she felt anxious about, in spite of
their high spirits all through the holidays.
Isn’t it a comfort that we had her to leave
them with ?”

“Yes,” remarked Mr. Kregford, pick-
ing up the first sheet of the closely written
epistle; “as we couldn’t stay with them
ourselves, it most certainly is.”

“T knew you would feel that. We shall
have them with us, if all is well, next
Christmas ; but, in the mean time——”

“Tn the mean time, as you were evidently
about to remark, my dear,” put in Mr.
Kregford, laying down Mrs. Wilton’s
GRANDMAMMA’S LECTURE Ill



letter—which he could not make much of
without his spectacles—with a sigh; ‘in
the mean time, for children who cannot
have their own mother to look after them,
there’s nobody in the whole world like a
grandmamma.”

Gwendolyn and Daniel thought so too,
and went on trying to please her, and
struggling to occupy their respective
niches, to the very best of their im-
mature abilities.


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together one Christmas at the Downs House in Sussex. Milly, in emula-
tion of Aunt Hetty, writes a play. Difficulties intervene, but everything
comes right in the end, and the story concludes with an account of the
acting.



BY M. BRAMSTON

Author of ‘‘A Woman of Business,” ‘* Rosamond Ferrars,” &c.

TOLD BY TWO

With Three Full-page Illustrations by C. J. STaniLanp.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d.

The ‘‘two” are Hester Hazel, the old nurse, and her former charge,
Julian Chalfont, and the story turns upon the loss of some valuable
family jewels, and their ultimate recovery and the consequent clearing of
Hester’s character.

‘A story of engrossing interest, particularly to girls.” —REcorp.

THE STORY OF A CAT AND A CAKE

With Three Full-page Illustrations by W. S. Sracry, Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 2s. 62.
A story of Nuremberg in the time of the Thirty Years’ War, containing
adventures and perils in plenty and giving some effective pictures of
city and country life in Germany a couple of centuries ago.

‘This is a story of the siege of Nuremberg, told with the skill which Miss Bramston
always shows in her presentations of life whether past or present.”—SPEcTATOR.

THEIR FATHER’S WRONG

With Three Full-page Illustrations by C. J. Sraninanp.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d.

The story of the children of a man who had been gradually entangled

in a dynamite conspiracy, and of their successful endeavour to repair, as

far as possible, the wrong and suffering which their father’s action had
brought upon innocent people.

WINNING HIS FREEDOM

With Three Full-page Illustrations by W. S. Stacey. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 25. 6d.

The lesson taught by Miss Bramston’s story is that of honesty and
truth at all costs, as shown in the way in which young Piers Aylward freed
himself, after much pain and trouble, from the slavery imposed upon him
by his cowardly cousin Henderson.

‘*¢ Winning his Freedom’ is an admirable book for schoolboys,”—RECORD.



NATIONAL SOCIETY’S DEPOSITORY, SANCTUARY, WESTMINSTER.
NATIONAL, SOCIETY’S NEW STORY BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG 9

BY M. BRAMSTON—continued

LOTTIE LEVISON

. With Two Full-page Illustrations by W. 8. Stacey. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 25.
A South London story for young women and elder girls, describing
how Lottie Levison was filled with a longing to teach others the means of
‘getting the happiness which she had gained for herself.

THE ADVENTURES OF DENIS

With Three Full-page Illustrations by J. F. WEEpon. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d.

The adventures in question are closely connected with the rising of 1745
and the retreat of Prince Charles Edward from Derby to the north again.

‘©The Adventures of Denis’ isa charming tale of 1745, which would delight any one
to read.’ —Saturpay Review.

ABBY’S DISCOVERIES

With Three Full-page Illustrations by W. S. Sracry. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d.
The story of the successive discoveries, in very ordinary matters, that
little Abigail made in her earliest years, and the meaning and lessons
which they have for all those concerned in bringing up the young.

‘We have not seen a better book about the feelings and experiences of childhood
than this since we read the ‘My Childhood’ of Madame Michelet.”—SrectTaTor.

A VILLAGE GENIUS

A True Story of Oberammergau. With Two Full-page Illus-

trations by J. F. WEEDoN. Bevelled boards, cloth gilt,
price 2s.

A tale of Oberammergau and of the life of Rochus Dedler, the com-
poser of the music that is still used at the Passion Play there,

DANGEROUS JEWELS

With Four Full-page Illustrations by J. F. WEEpon. Bevelled
~ _ boards, cloth gilt, price 3s.

The opening scenes of this story are laid in Brittany at the time of the
great French Revolution, but the scene changes, and the later chapters

give some vivid descriptions of rough life in a lonely hut on the moorlands
of Devonshire,

A PAIR OF COUSINS

With Three Full-page Illustrations by C. J. STANILAND.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d.
The pair of cousins are Flower Callaway, who has a weakness for
appearing interesting and attractive in the eyes of others, and Avis
Goldenlea, a healthy-minded girl of real sterling worth.

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IO NATIONAL SOCIETY’S NEW STORY BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG

BY M. BRAMSTON—contznued

THE HEROINE OF A BASKET VAN
With Three Full-page Illustrations. Bevelled boards, cloth gilt,
price 2s. 6d.
The heroine is little Phenie, whom her father, Jonathan Redmoor,

takes with him to travel about the country in his basket van.

‘« There are plenty of incidents in the tale to interest the reader, and, as such a story
should end, Phenie finds her right place after all.” —ScHOOLMASTER.

UNCLE IVAN

With Three Full-page Illustrations. Bevelled boards, cloth
gilt, price 2s. 6d.
‘‘Uncle Ivan” gives a striking and eventful picture of lifein England
and Russia about forty years ago; together with some insight into the
methods of the Russian Government for dealing with political crime.

SILVER STAR VALLEY

With Four Full-page Illustrations by C. J. STANILAND.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 3s.
In this story Miss Bramston gives a striking and vivid picture of life
among a mining community in the Rocky Mountains.

BY .C. R. COLERIDGE
Author of An English Squire,” ‘*‘ The Girls of Flaxley,” &c.

A BAG OF FARTHINGS
With Two Full-page Illustrations by W. S. Stacry. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 2s.

The ‘‘bag of farthings’ contains the prizes for which certain boys and
girls run races, and some of the coins become mingled and interchanged
with three gold napoleons that are lost. The story tells how Bertie Brown
is wrongfully suspected of theft, and how at length he discovers the real

culprit and clears his own character.
“The delicate touch with which these pictures are handled is worthy of all praise.”

MAX, FRITZ, AND HOB

With Four Full-page Illustrations by W. S. Sracry. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 3s.
A tale of adventure four hundred years ago, the scene of which is laid
principally at the Castle of Lindenberg, in the Bavarian highlands,

FIFTY POUNDS
A Sequel to “The Green Girls of Greythorpe.” With Four
Full-page Illustrations by W. S. Staczy. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 3s.
A sequel to ‘‘ The Green Girls of Greythorpe,’’ showing what became
of the principal characters in that story after they had grown into young

men and young women. The interest of the present story, however, to
the reader is in no sense dependent on its predecessor. :



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NATIONAL SOCIETY’S NEW STORY BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG II



BY C. R. COLERIDGE—continued

THE GREEN GIRLS OF GREYTHORPE

With Four Full-page Illustrations by C. J. STANILAND.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 3s.

A story of an old endowed institution that has come under the notice
of the Charity Commissioners, who decide that a reorganisation and
extension of the school is necessary, and that the education it affords must
be brought into harmony with modern requirements.

‘The story is very prettily told, and, although quiet in tone, contains a full share
of incident and interest.” STANDARD.

MAUD FLORENCE NELLIE

Or, Don’t Care. With Four Full-page Illustrations by C. J.
STANILAND. Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 3s.

A story, showing how a veritable scapegrace of a boy, Harry Whittaker,

and his careless sister, Florrie, are gradually brought to see the costs

that may be entailed by the spirit which says ‘* Don’t care” to every
gentle correction of a fault.

REUBEN EVERETT

With Four Full-page Illustrations by C. J. STANILAND.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d.
Miss Coleridge’s ‘‘ Reuben Everett” is the story of ‘*a truant bird, that

thought his home a cage,” and describes the early days of training colleges
and railways in England.



BY MARY H. DEBENHAM
Author of “ The Princesses of Penruth,” &c.

ONE RED ROSE

With Five Full-page Illustrations by GERTRUDE D, HAMMOND.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 35. 6d.

Miss Debenham here gives us one of her tender character sketches in
the description of the bringing up of a genuine Irish girl, Rosaleen, at
Wold Lodge, under her Aunt Alicia, who holds her house and grounds
under the tenure of ‘‘ one red rose,” paid yearly to the lord of the manor.

“ & fascinating character-sketch of a genuinely erratic Irish girl.”
i St. James’s GAZETTE.

THE LAIRD’S LEGACY

With Three Full-page Illustrations by GerrtTrupE D.
Hammonp. Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 2s. 62.
Miss Debenham’s new story follows the fortunes of an exiled Scottish

laird, Sir Patrick Maxwell, in the early years of the eighteenth century,
and gives some account of the campaigning in the Low Countries.



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12 NATIONAL SOCIETY’S NEW STORY BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG

BY MARY H. DEBENHAM—
TWO MAIDEN AUNTS

With Two Full-page Illustrations by GERTRUDE D. HamMMonp.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 25.

The ‘*Maiden Aunts” are two girls, Angelica and Betty Wyndham,
upon whom (owing to a series of misfortunes) devolves the bringing up of
little Godfrey, the only child of their brother.

“¢ A charming story. . . . All the characters in the book are well delineated.
Miss Debenham may well be congratulated.”—St. James's GAZETTE.

THE MAVIS AND THE MERLIN

With Two Full-page Illustrations by W. S. Sraczy. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 2s.

In ‘*The Mavis and the Merlin” Miss Debenham gives some graphic
pictures of the storm that raged in the Low Countries during the latter
half of the sixteenth century, when William the Silent was making his
resolute attempt to found the Dutch Republic.

MY GOD-DAUGHTER

With Two Full-page Illustrations by W. S. Stacry. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 2s.

‘‘ My God-daughter” is little Theodosia (the motherless child of some
strolling players) named after the god-mother, Miss Theodosia Cartaret,
The story relates how the players’ children were lost and found again, in
London, at the time when the Gordon Riots were at their height.

MOOR, AND Moss

With Three Full-page Illustrations by W. S.Sracry. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 25. 6d.
A story of the Border in the first half of the sixteenth century, of the
struggles that were for ever taking place there and the raids that were
being made,

‘CA story of high courage and reckless daring... . For its historical interest and
literary charm, a book to be heartily commended.”—WESTERN ANTIQUARY.



{FOR KING AND HOME

With Three Full-page Illustrations by J. F. WEEDON.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 25. 6d.

Of the rising in La Vendée during the great French Revolution, and of

the adventures that subsequently befell a well-to-do family there, together

with an English cousin Dorothy, who was staying at the chateau at the

time,
I a

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BY MARY H. DEBENHAM- continued

MISTRESS PHIL

With Two Full-page Illustrations by C. O. Murray. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 2s.

‘6 Mistress Phil”? is Phillis Juliana Cheviot, and the story describes
her stay at Waltham Cross in the year 1760, and the results that followed
from it, giving also some lively pictures of mail-coaches and highwaymen,

‘* A book good enough for anybody to read, of whatever age.”
ScHoo. Boarp CHRONICLE,

FAIRMEADOWS FARM

With Two Full-page Illustrations by W. S. Stacey. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 2s.

The scene is laid in Hampshire about the time of Monmouth’s rebellion.
The story gives some vivid pictures of the opening at Winchester of Judge
Jeffreys’ harsh campaign against the rebels, and of the clouds that hung
over the neighbourhood for a time in consequence.

‘‘A simple yet capitally related story, and the pathetic features are very effectively
realised,” —LivzRPOOL CouRIER.

A LITTLE CANDLE

With Five Full-page Illustrations by W. S. Stacry. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 35. 6d.

Miss Debenham’s story is concerned with Scotland in the stormy
days of Claverhouse. The ‘* Little Candle” is Bride Galbraith, who,
by her tenderness and grace, softens the time of trial and affliction.

ST. HELEN’S WELL

With Two Full-page Illustrations by C. J. STANILAND,
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 2s.

‘© St. Helen’s Well” is a story of events that followed the rising in
1745 in favour of the Young Pretender,

BY FREDERICK C. BADRICK
Author of ‘‘ Starwood Hall,” ‘¢ The Spanish Galleon,” &c.

THE PUFF OF WIND

With Two Full-page Illustrations by C. J. STANILAND.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 15. 62.
A tale of harbour and heath in the west country a hundred years ago,
telling of the evil treatment of Oliver Mackworth and of the strange
happening by means of which justice was meted out to the guilty.

_‘!The writing shows a strong sense of ‘style’ and a quaintness which touches
originality."—SaTurpay REVIEW.

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BY FREDERICK GC. BADRICK—continued

THE GOLDEN BUCKLE

With Five Full-page Illustrations by W. S. Sracry. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 35. 6d.

A story of London in the year of the Great Plague, showing how one
John Garside, a hosier in Holborn, and his family took refuge on board
The Golden Buckle, then lying in the river,

KING’S FERRY

In the Days of the Press-gang. With Three Full-page Illus-
trations by W. S. Stacey. Bevelled boards, cloth gilt,
price 2s. 6d.

Concerning a certain ship’s doctor who came to Weymouth in press-
gang days, and, staying at King’s Ferry, tempted Simon Lydgate, the
ferryman, to do wrong ; of the punishment that fell on Lydgate, and of the
joy and peace that followed the home-coming of his boy, Wat.

JOAN’S VICTORY

With Two Full-page Illustrations by J. F. WEEDON. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 15. 6d,

Descriptive of a young woman of quick, passionate temper and stub-
born purpose, and of the means by which a young child unconsciously
brought her back to her better self and helped to soften her heart,

‘*Admirably detailed. Joan is really a very powerful psychological study.”
SPECTATOR.

PECKOVER’S MILL

A Story of the Great Frost of 1739. With Five Full-page
Illustrations by W. S. Sracry. Bevelled boards, cloth
gilt, price 35. 6d.

A story of a Jacobite conspiracy that was on foot in the time of the
great frost of 1739, showing how Silas Peckover came home from abroad
and took possession of the home of his forefathers, and how the sweet
womanliness and honesty of Mistress Ruth influenced him for good,

'* Silas Peckover is a character quite worthy of Ainsworth.”—AcapEmy.

CHRIS DERRICK

A Stormy Passage in a Boy’s Life. With Two Full-page
Illustrations by W. S. Sracry. Bevelled boards, cloth
gilt, price 25.
This story supplies some lively sketches of what a mutiny often led to at
the beginning of the present century, and of the narrow shifts that smugglers
ran in escaping from the revenue officers,



NATIONAL SOCIETY’S DEPOSITORY, SANCTUARY, WESTMINSTER.
NATIONAL SOCIETY’S NEW STORY BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG I5

BY FREDERICK C. BADRICK—continued

STARWOOD HALL

A Boy’s Adventure. With Two Full-page Illustrations by C.
J. STANILAND. Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 2s.

A stirring story of how an honest boy fell into the clutches of a band of

highwaymen, or ‘* gentlemen of fortune,” in the middle of the last century,

‘The pictures of rural manners .. . strike us as being extremely life-like.”—Times.

BY ESME STUART .
Author of ‘The Little Brown Girl,” ‘“‘ The Belfry of St. Jude’s,” &c,

THE KNIGHTS OF ROSEMULLION

With Three Full-page Illustrations by W. S. Stacey. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d.
A romantic picture of some chivalrous children in the present day,
showing how the mottoes and watchwords of King Arthur’s Knights may
still be adopted to good and earnest purpose.

“Will become popular with both boys and girls, and teach them the principles of
chivalry, and how they may be found in unexpected places, and applied in unexpected
ways.”—CuuRCH TIMES.

A SMALL LEGACY

With Two Full-page Illustrations by J. F. WEEpoN. Bevelled
boards, cloth gilt, price 2s.
A story for children, describing the life led by the coastguardsmen
and their families at St. Alban’s Head, and showing how it is possible for
boys and girls to be brave and honourable in all their actions,

“The picture of the quaint little American is most skilfully drawn, and his quaint
sayings are throughout very amusing.” —EDUCATIONAL TIMES,

A NEST OF ROYALISTS

With Two Full-page Illustrations by J. F. Weepon. Cloth
boards, gilt, price 15. 62.

A story of Blois in the year 1832, of an English family—the Merediths
—who went to live there, and of the circumstances under which they
became connected with a Royalist plot against the rule of Louis Philippe.

THE SILVER MINE

An Underground Story. With Four Full-page Illustrations by
W.S. Staczy. Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 3s.

An account of life on the rocky Devonshire coast, an unsuccessful
attempt to reopen a disused silver mine, and a long-standing family feud
between the Redwoods and the Pennants, with the incidents that served
to bring it to an end,

‘*A very bright, attractive story. The children are natural, and the style is fresh
and spirited.” JouRNAL oF EDUCATION.



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i6 NATIONAL SOCIETY’s NEW STORY BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG

BY ESME STUART—continued

THE VICAR’S TRIO

With Five Full-page Illustrations by C. J. StTanILanp.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 3s. 6d.
The story of how young Lord Faulconbridge, a peevish and irritable

. boy, is brought to see that the rank and wealth with which he has been

endowed bring with them equally great responsibilities,

CAST ASHORE

With Four Full-page Illustrations by C. J. STaNniLanp.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 3s.

It was little Mona who was cast ashore on the North Lancashire
coast, after the total wreck of the ship in which she was travelling under
the care of her father’s servant, Hanson. How Jephtha Toppin afterwards
lures her away, with a view to earning a reward, and how she is
eventually rescued—both are told with considerable power and vividness.

FOR HALF-A-CROWN

With Four Full-page Illustrations. Bevelled boards, cloth gilt,
price 3s.

Half-a-crown is the price that Mrs. Chemmo, a retired housekeeper
living in the cathedral city of Hedderstone on an annuity from her former
mistress, pays for a little waif, Natalia, to an Italian colony in a squalid
Portsmouth alley.

CARRIED OFF

A Story of Pirate Times. With Four Full-page Illustrations
by J. F. WEEpDon. Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 3s.

It is fearless Harry Fenn, the son of an Essex yeoman farmer, who
is ‘‘ carried off” by Captain Henry Morgan, the famous buccaneer, and
his men, to the West Indies, where the Spanish settlements are attacked,
and adventures in plenty follow.

‘Miss Stuart has gone with the times, and has given us a vigorous and well-told
story of the days of the buccaneers.” STANDARD.

BY M. E. PALGRAVE

Author of
6¢ Under the Blue Flag,” ** Miles Lambert’s Three Chances,” &c.

IN CHARGE

A Story of Rough Times. With Five Full-page Illustrations
by W. S. Stacry. Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 3s,

A stirring story of the days when smugglers were in plenty and free-
trading (as it was called) was in full swing.

“Full of incident and interest, very pleasantly told, and breathes an excellent spirit
throughout.”—WeEsTERN Morninc News.

NATIONAL SOCIETY’S DEPOSITORY, SANCTUARY, WESTMINSTER,
NATIONAL SOCIETY’S NEW STORY BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG 17

BY M. E. PALGRAVE—continued

A PROMISE KEPT

With Four Full-page Illustrations. Bevelled boards, cloth gilt,
price 2s. 6d.
A story with a lofty purpose, showing the amount of self-denial that
is necessary in those who leave their home and kindred to engage in
missionary work in far-off lands,

BY PENELOPE LESLIE
Author of ‘‘Marjory’s White Rat,” &c.

MISS BARTON’S BICYCLE

With Frontispiece by GERTRUDE D. Hammonp. Cloth
boards, gilt, price 15.

Timothy and Minna are keenly anxious to ride bicycles, and in a weak
moment borrow Miss Barton’s bicycle without having first obtained the
owner’s consent. Unfortunate results ensue, but a lesson is thereby learnt,
which is both wholesome and productive of good.

*€ Child life is portrayed with much force in this charming little book. Timothy and
Minna are delightful characters, who are much like brothers and sisters of to-day.”
TEACHERS AID,

DOROTHY’S STEPMOTHER

With Frontispiece by C. J. Stanizanp. Cloth boards, gilt,
price 1s.
Motherless little Dorothy went into the wood to look for fairies, and
found instead a very amiable young lady who eventually filled up the
vacant place in the home and brought sunshine into Dorothy’s life again.

‘¢ This is a simple and pleasant little story of how a little girl cherishes great hepes,
and finds them fulfilled in a quite unexpected way.”—SPECTATOR.

TROUBLESOME COUSINS
With Frontispiece by W. S. Stacey. Cloth boards, gilt, price rs.

‘*Troublesome Cousins” is a story specially suited for very young
children, and describes some of the scrapes in which Stella Weston and
her cousin Guy found themselves, partly through their restlessness and
partly through their desire to be independent.



BY AUDREY CURTIS
Author of ‘Little Miss Curlylocks,” &c.

PLAIN JEREMIAH

With Two Full-page Illustrations by GERTRUDE D, Hammonp.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 2s.

Jeremiah is only a lout of a boy in a south country village, but he has
sterling stuff in him, which is brought out both by his intimacy with the
old shepherd on the downs and by his acquaintance with the ‘* Awkward
Squad,” who are no other than the four young children of a retired
army officer.

‘°A most interesting story ... merits special praise, and will become a prime
favourite with the youngsters when known.”—TEACHERS’ AID.

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18 NATIONAL SOCIETY’S NEW STORY BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG

BY AUDREY CURTIS—continued

THE ARTIST OF CROOKED ALLEY

With Two Full-page Illustrations by GERTRUDE D. HAMMOND.
Cloth boards, gilt, price 1s. 64.
The artist was only nine years old and lived in Crooked Alley ; his
canvas was the pavement of a London street, his colours no more than a
motley collection of odds and ends of coloured chalks,

“A story of exceptional interest; one that attracts and retains the reader from
beginning to end.”—TEacuers’ AID.

LITTLE MISS CURLYLOCKS

With Two Full-page Illustrations by GERTRUDE D. HamMonp.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 2s.

This story relates how ‘Little Miss Curlylocks,” living with her
high-born grandparents at Montmorency Manor, becomes acquainted with
Alice Fogerty, her brother Tim, and the Fat Baby, and what happens in
consequence,



BY KATHERINE E. VERNHAM

THE TUCKERS’ TURKEY

And other Stories. With Two Full-page Illustrations by
C. J. Sranizanp. Cloth boards, gilt, price 15. 6d.

This is another volume of short stories, evidently drawn from actual
observation of some of the finer phases of character to be found among the
more indigent classes and even among the waifs and strays of London
and other cities and large towns,

‘‘ These stories are skilfully told . . . some are highly dramatic, and all are more or
less pathetic."—TEACHERS’ AID.

A WONDERFUL CHRISTMAS

And other Stories. With Two Full-page Illustrations by C. J.
STANILAND. Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 2s.

A collection of a dozen short stories, dealing for the most part with

the waifs and strays to be found in our great cities, and with some of the
more admirable points so often to be observed in their characters,

THE TWO ELLENS

By A. E. Deane, Author of ‘A Chance Acquaintance,” &c.
With Frontispiece by C.J. Stanizanp. Cloth boards,
gilt, price xs.

Miss Deane’s story will be found a simple and interesting piece of
reading for the very young ; moreover, it contains some sound warnings to
parents as to their responsibilities and the unwisdom of always letting
children have their own way.

“This is just the sort of book to give as a birthday present or Sunday School prize to
a little girl."—THE CuHuRCHWOMAN.



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NATIONAL SOCIETY’S NEW STORY BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG 19

THE KING’S RING

By Maup V. Hopcson. With Frontispiece by W. S. STacEy.
Cloth boards, gilt, price 15.
A short but effective story of Cavaliers and Roundheads, and of how
the Lady Grace Cross contrived to find food and shelter for King Charles I.
at a time when he was in great extremity of peril.

“A charming little story of the troublous days when families were divided between
Royalists and Roundheads.”—TuHz REcoRD.

BESSIE KITSON

By G. Norway, Author of “True Cornish Maid,” &c. With
Two Full-page Illustrations by GERTRUDE D, Hammonp.
Cloth boards, gilt, price 15. 6d.

Bessie Kitson, left an orphan at a very early age, is fortunately rescued
from the squalid home in which she has obtained shelter and taken to live
with honest, God-fearing people at Windsor. Ultimately the return of
Mr. George Kitson from Australia removes all fear of want alike from
Bessie and her faithful foster-mother.

TAKING FRENCH LEAVE

By L. E. Trppeman, Author of “Grannie’s Treasures,” &c,
With Two Full-page Illustrations by W. S. Stacey.
Bevelled boards, cloth gilt, price 15. 6d.

Madge and Will Torrance, the twin children of an artist living in the
country, weave a most perplexing web about themselves through playing
truant. from school on a very hot afternoon; and their story is likely to
prove a useful lesson to other young folks when tempted to be deceitful.



A FRIENDLY GIRL

By CATHERINE P. StaTER, Author of “A Goodly Child,” &c.
With Frontispiece by C. J. Stanitanp. Cloth boards,
gilt, price 15.

This story describes with much pathos and quiet humour how Jeanie
Scott, a member of the Girls’ Friendly Society, goes as a ‘‘ general”
servant to Miss Marget Melville, an old. maid living in the suburbs of
Edinburgh, and of certain things that happened while Jeanie was there,



LOST ON THE MOOR

By “Tarry.” With Frontispiece. Cloth boards, gilt, price rs,

The story of Little Jack, how he was lost on the moor in a thick fog
through his brother’s disobedience, and how he was found and finally
restored to his home.



NATIONAL SOCIETY’S DEPOSITORY, SANCTUARY, WESTMINSTER.

4/6

1/6
PRINTED BY
SPOTTISWOODE AND CO., NEW-STREET SQUARE
LONDON
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xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20081126_AAAAUF' PACKAGE 'UF00086577_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-11-29T08:22:03-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:38:39-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299272; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-14T12:01:10-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '3' DFID 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00145.txt'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2011-12-21T04:56:24-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-12-21T04:53:36-05:00'
redup
'301051' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJOP' 'sip-filesUF00086577_00001.xml'
38e91b52bf51522159ade81dc5c483af
3927d3fc552c925e34731470770b9c7761019f8c
'2011-12-21T04:54:52-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T11:55:19-05:00'
xml resolution
'33' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJOR' 'sip-files00001.txt'
1e025170107f642b923fc096ecd42d03
6024d6e28f635e38553e19ba1f8efe48bde506d8
'2011-12-21T04:54:21-05:00'
describe
'186' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJOS' 'sip-files00002.txt'
f3014f652484d440d89b00520a391089
3229cbdf20eb0f8179104cc1d34cd2e0b26d80e4
'2011-12-21T04:54:40-05:00'
describe
'96' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJOT' 'sip-files00003.txt'
3137cae4a659ccaa54214fbf3615e1b2
2516809c71a1027636c6e7eba27dd2753c8a0e7e
'2011-12-21T04:54:48-05:00'
describe
'82' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJOU' 'sip-files00005.txt'
bee53416913f13b3847055afc72f164c
d825ff80719e26da35b4f2a5b653e6782b2f3409
'2011-12-21T04:55:23-05:00'
describe
'197' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJOV' 'sip-files00006.txt'
4a3fd8129333e73ec5995a9cb7e3ced1
c4fef7d3aa62e36c087e40ccd41d259bf70c1277
'2011-12-21T04:56:00-05:00'
describe
'199' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJOW' 'sip-files00008.txt'
826361ac9be68e029563aca05b163633
8bb0a2857ad537d24f6cd75c986408c759643aa2
describe
'415' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJOX' 'sip-files00011.txt'
4c128002c6e96753de8181f051aace61
9a3677af58136b138610c66abe52d58e14ad3764
'2011-12-21T04:56:34-05:00'
describe
'246' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJOY' 'sip-files00012.txt'
4ae84e6060d654dc83341ff92f76d839
21c28047fabb37983c4ba575da80ad521d990eea
'2011-12-21T04:54:45-05:00'
describe
'417' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJOZ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
210d66ac547398ffc7eabdc2ae387cd4
4bfc3c78f9ab0ed4bcf709fa187b000a899b1f1d
'2011-12-21T04:56:28-05:00'
describe
'510' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPA' 'sip-files00015.txt'
69eebc8397e40118d17f852126acf1a8
d6bffabd220bab0b5e10336289ab36e7c4ac54f3
'2011-12-21T04:54:42-05:00'
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPB' 'sip-files00016.txt'
14870d61fe0da1b6a9b8cfd2296cf7bd
19b3f4d02a5c87e88b4c9b235c21ca75bd577e07
'2011-12-21T04:56:51-05:00'
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPC' 'sip-files00017.txt'
9120cdcc3ec88588dc7e266c77e66280
69c5fa98929a62929df4bdd9d9d811e6f560a4bb
'2011-12-21T04:56:47-05:00'
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPD' 'sip-files00018.txt'
e24102ab028f24d400957cad8f593eff
052f656ea6d5d94662b189361cf7b16592c9e8cd
'2011-12-21T04:55:20-05:00'
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPE' 'sip-files00019.txt'
022c805dcc4ff65db1b24048069e280c
5fd99175d5fa261a53d16bfac9a925c151ae2bf1
'2011-12-21T04:54:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPF' 'sip-files00020.txt'
a8f16133a5264c76a63de4c89ea4bd49
ecd789c29f72611d5b65dccdd4d5bd0b614aec61
'2011-12-21T04:55:32-05:00'
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPG' 'sip-files00021.txt'
188f5c6d37c5224a4584fd38df4693ca
402a23e62a97fa501fb9b3fac79b1ac44e4f920b
'2011-12-21T04:54:10-05:00'
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPH' 'sip-files00022.txt'
2bb7f730f9339c0df3ee715be7f32db4
255d50ab99631437bf074638fc48869675e3ad63
'2011-12-21T04:53:50-05:00'
describe
'884' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPI' 'sip-files00023.txt'
bd36d973f107d44f0a07a438d1554e57
ae1afc6de2515087455781e1e5bec31b5cabf4e8
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPJ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
57977577c153ed650bcc2564dbb40b72
bf6c610f467d6357f770d4355913b73b4c3dd1c0
'2011-12-21T04:56:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPK' 'sip-files00025.txt'
f1cabbe473c09d2c2bdd05715a65c19e
2ce845b5b084240445bc297e66dd29bf648301a8
'2011-12-21T04:55:29-05:00'
describe
'986' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPL' 'sip-files00026.txt'
51f3d6c6fc12be8cd22f54c942937c84
c03134e7a8a4553844c81716bffcee757009b68f
'2011-12-21T04:56:16-05:00'
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPM' 'sip-files00027.txt'
d26076acf0cbaa8a43b174be3e053c1d
e374dc982aad6cbcc308a2eace82d41876199a41
'2011-12-21T04:55:04-05:00'
describe
'861' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPN' 'sip-files00028.txt'
bd95c818b27901571f69ec0077f5c419
3c0a6ee0e5b0be941de93cea636ab00d2c298036
'2011-12-21T04:54:41-05:00'
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPO' 'sip-files00029.txt'
03c681bb498575bdd72c4174fc086a24
2667ef601a0e97839e046ca261e6d1a666bed2b6
'2011-12-21T04:55:52-05:00'
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPP' 'sip-files00030.txt'
d1ef454317d44db2d19ce3c2c9ce5146
1df9e0bbdb7c2d4dcca7161ad7838a47829ccb30
'2011-12-21T04:55:33-05:00'
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPQ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
c3201755949805dcd696e4e6a93ab6ce
fcc9022722b548e5a1705b3d97c311e4c1c3c291
'2011-12-21T04:56:03-05:00'
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPR' 'sip-files00032.txt'
0a72034fbab9302570945237008f532d
f0262328e17ab55088f6bd804ace8190e7c89f08
'2011-12-21T04:55:40-05:00'
describe
'936' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPS' 'sip-files00033.txt'
d64ac4e426f4866d48b7ad3e5b9224ce
d3140b5057f9e9cd5dbc59175d3882d757c339d8
'2011-12-21T04:56:08-05:00'
describe
'888' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPT' 'sip-files00034.txt'
18e2b1c05fb9b30d2b37e716e3eb16e1
25d5a4d8c096750f25a0de071eff0d435ef30301
'2011-12-21T04:54:34-05:00'
describe
'899' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPU' 'sip-files00035.txt'
6d8f8911768dc1489f0b1e25c400bdc8
5b7be568a8ff0998761fa2f518225cd7b6be2b5e
'2011-12-21T04:53:47-05:00'
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPV' 'sip-files00036.txt'
3657c130baa50cf3393070e2960722c5
d2db80d2aef9319334530c08098771073aec4dd3
'2011-12-21T04:55:53-05:00'
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPW' 'sip-files00037.txt'
f944109886832e2b4fd47fc06e4d2c5f
e5ad2a19c1ac3e5fd84fbbd686fe74e0a3b96ee6
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPX' 'sip-files00038.txt'
1054b292c3325b736726d9855469877c
46016d56e6011b653e7b8290ee0584d99161beb8
'2011-12-21T04:56:07-05:00'
describe
'322' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPY' 'sip-files00039.txt'
cffffc181cd907643af70df54ad6ddb2
ef0504ac75a6e8f862e90923a48f3f21bc3edd72
'2011-12-21T04:55:31-05:00'
describe
'590' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJPZ' 'sip-files00040.txt'
9c9a7fb0ed6f682cf6287e7f46936ea4
fe9e1fdc924fd0f0a52b84ce4970ade7f3200fff
'2011-12-21T04:55:47-05:00'
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQA' 'sip-files00041.txt'
f95bb99beafbc3df2590e987f09d2513
44d22b9c2f3ce6ae17c914794726f0ae5f10a037
'2011-12-21T04:55:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQB' 'sip-files00042.txt'
a3d27b50f134a346608f91bf9d6fa2dd
2fb3c57102c75b93a3f769d9d586e67ed5a668a0
'2011-12-21T04:55:36-05:00'
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQC' 'sip-files00043.txt'
94d8695e333f6ac898808e86c7c306ce
6d04f30caa3980bce17e65283d26b2b2dd631d35
'2011-12-21T04:54:57-05:00'
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQD' 'sip-files00044.txt'
2ae6fadd3e55f7c10c284396cf002376
c1b87419701ff049f6a456f0dc9ba08e3a2aa2f5
'2011-12-21T04:56:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQE' 'sip-files00045.txt'
9fe9ccd41cfcf713a26aa152b89a658d
8214a294423a38722fdc1ab516f9dbb67e5657f8
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQF' 'sip-files00046.txt'
5486f2a9f7d598ae6d93cc11997e4d55
25ca70d47d524841d5ff9d91fc104ffdacd11760
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQG' 'sip-files00047.txt'
66a2ab146cb5818d73cfc4db79858498
49f1c623d86a3cc574f9468abea37083e60c907c
'2011-12-21T04:56:09-05:00'
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQH' 'sip-files00048.txt'
1b640f757eb7776d84ccee3a96d49dbf
f5a59e97f05de99dfb0a23e60b7367c694040b2c
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQI' 'sip-files00049.txt'
63044483045b774716f82b919219416a
8a9bdfe4634ad37d3dad4a574c362d32427318e2
'2011-12-21T04:54:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQJ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
a3170a17e9611d40d4b0169cfdbb0d14
065c61663025e82a655a2e85401fd3abec30a060
'2011-12-21T04:56:57-05:00'
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQK' 'sip-files00051.txt'
7c04bb8f7fb3ff1223cbbbfb3f4b643a
3f00cf63c5ff268fc24bd6b6fc56cf269c0bc797
describe
'909' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQL' 'sip-files00052.txt'
caede6edc43ae4387ccc723bd0e23b72
10b111c2d7738f3942fab51934b8738e0f7b0dcf
'2011-12-21T04:56:58-05:00'
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQM' 'sip-files00053.txt'
bea802d7c6c25335dc165e015926231b
1dd69709c2b0b75bfbd922b7b98860673f033a1a
'2011-12-21T04:55:27-05:00'
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQN' 'sip-files00054.txt'
b4c929dfbae6c991d50eab79ca6ae39e
a37fe89ce6a0d9adf7a368119788988a87a58e2a
'2011-12-21T04:54:33-05:00'
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQO' 'sip-files00055.txt'
bc3f3d3d91cf501be6df0608d124d9fd
71af2edb4665e13c98e07f10ddd38ad5f4f7fba9
'2011-12-21T04:54:59-05:00'
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQP' 'sip-files00056.txt'
0d97ea849f96c130051f2e7d2654562a
b2f33d8522dfd5c5ef88886dcf60b74b53b25605
'2011-12-21T04:55:54-05:00'
describe
'525' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQQ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
3dccbc863ea1c9916db87ffec6ef9fea
b9996b978234a818cfffa98c8fff160c3165b65b
'2011-12-21T04:56:38-05:00'
describe
'610' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQR' 'sip-files00058.txt'
addb2522ec3da34ad65644d52fcab50f
0f93a9cd4200234d2302f1f57515f47915381b51
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQS' 'sip-files00059.txt'
48683e6ca72b9769a653b3f8c597d5ed
3dbcc0d365aed0559f7842b5dc1d10a8e09c0b56
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQT' 'sip-files00060.txt'
1283e8fcb04fd16fe52c3c3b10c1dd07
c8befb719b802a99e14d8532eb3429f3753a8b40
'2011-12-21T04:57:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQU' 'sip-files00061.txt'
aecd3cd2daed74ed1ea866afe75aab21
08fa83d91989f022215012fd720068ee7dc5d9e1
'2011-12-21T04:54:30-05:00'
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQV' 'sip-files00062.txt'
898e6191449ba8f10c41ecda37acfb29
7ddcd707810d72a22cdc15f30c7436265a7c9a52
'2011-12-21T04:53:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQW' 'sip-files00063.txt'
d73d6f6babfda1c16a7f7882f0115759
9d8dae39d0614257408616d50030809e844a6516
'2011-12-21T04:53:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQX' 'sip-files00064.txt'
a85be70ba492c125ba67907fcad7299c
deb8fac6d846c9d90b31a770613c0ce923f9ea0b
'2011-12-21T04:55:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQY' 'sip-files00065.txt'
91aa94448d87787082c1904f4e9088d2
0ad33a3ad442986ea273e5a1aa537ab9382097f3
'2011-12-21T04:54:04-05:00'
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJQZ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
1576a067528d838db22f2dcc93b8e330
d02d6b1f63b204bc105f4273138378587367a5d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRA' 'sip-files00067.txt'
ce152708d74fa372237343774fbae5a7
a95557d93d5e1b92ab55742a3b4b719d8ad1d58a
describe
'905' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRB' 'sip-files00068.txt'
cc9c304f7d8b32da3b43f3fab1c47b5f
f591e82b9ee7276eff7ff87ad50c7403409816af
describe
'627' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRC' 'sip-files00069.txt'
fb78a5b278f3ac05b347c12194a3f5ab
de2c4d677d33d0cc431d1a39b38903c934a1081d
'2011-12-21T04:56:40-05:00'
describe
'921' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRD' 'sip-files00070.txt'
362e4346f7096c39476831bd6d36efdc
0f242b163548ce08ae8bea6195f7a0e6e376abc2
'2011-12-21T04:56:43-05:00'
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRE' 'sip-files00071.txt'
ce4af37ffef973125e5cf7e2d32b36e2
555d91cce6a529e53e88ae826bbe541ff83c9dab
'2011-12-21T04:55:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRF' 'sip-files00072.txt'
38bf849a9905611421831e41aba46ab6
9071955ca2d7e375043e9acd3dba08da35d1317a
'2011-12-21T04:55:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRG' 'sip-files00073.txt'
708711f5514759f5521f7236c2003f9f
10a4a45dbf0ffbb9ee2d873162d2467df95abf98
'2011-12-21T04:53:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRH' 'sip-files00074.txt'
c3e24df70431a9f854d57228d75c362d
bb22c5c6c2971a896a5db12cf932ebab7603902a
'2011-12-21T04:54:49-05:00'
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRI' 'sip-files00075.txt'
f3a8cc8e3af650b5dbbc4579913504fd
8dfd76332c3e70967891a32dcab79fe4f26a9900
'2011-12-21T04:53:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRJ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
6fcb72b2940061d1ebaa7b9fc5b6dde3
b73b67c26373c529559ed99378f08660c6a92903
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRK' 'sip-files00077.txt'
32dc84bccccd4832bb7d9cb4d21a178c
e2ae2343aedf04d29c9f2696e26a385889da926f
'2011-12-21T04:53:40-05:00'
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRL' 'sip-files00078.txt'
99c3f9de8475d19574dbafeb86d90354
93b556094819cb952080afd8bcda05607d2a5627
'2011-12-21T04:54:18-05:00'
describe
'295' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRM' 'sip-files00079.txt'
e03d732d7b9de6cb96791af3e863e509
4a4989d7f76bd49b1a59fddf2f00fa8998e2cfce
'2011-12-21T04:56:44-05:00'
describe
'603' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRN' 'sip-files00080.txt'
3faa130bab11016a53620e11e70c800d
95015c4f9d88e5789e0299e9897ad75b55cb3971
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRO' 'sip-files00081.txt'
1e507c0650d70ab8506bdff08f624ae5
d36d7b244f467095e6d209e9e5c083b3b1f1f95b
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRP' 'sip-files00082.txt'
bbd9f13495a25f2223869636be4bde44
45d78e3435dcaad1627b68dc503a96bf854b3346
'2011-12-21T04:55:59-05:00'
describe
'810' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRQ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
bb877a08d88d5d63dafc176a30c5c0ec
4b0815ef33e718930a8c7f8c9faa4d87198ed42e
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRR' 'sip-files00084.txt'
5cf42f2f492041532b11fafe854c98f6
8d233e4ea17316d1ac747066c3d98b4598c60c9d
'2011-12-21T04:55:16-05:00'
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRS' 'sip-files00085.txt'
7a6d8d38e830564d01e2574a6c9e1325
7849588c814f63ba7507063380b85eebc2a11622
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRT' 'sip-files00086.txt'
fefe2a74f36a84658e7bb12fe7555d5d
c119e158ca0e0096ed099446bce2a285fc90899e
'2011-12-21T04:56:56-05:00'
describe
'874' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRU' 'sip-files00087.txt'
5d59f8842a4fbe84a41207eaa396c7e3
f5229dc06f340f356858dc650feb9be1930da984
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRV' 'sip-files00088.txt'
b0b12a52a5d620d98561a605c5912b90
a5c035fe35389c0211d6f38371646e5696df3a03
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRW' 'sip-files00089.txt'
4f9bf2e0ecef882c48d03078a45e1f55
fee4a2cb40722e3d7ee0aeaf5505761bc5f35c5b
'2011-12-21T04:54:05-05:00'
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRX' 'sip-files00090.txt'
e1a2c2f1dcbdd8223ec68249018246df
be1c94175ce34efb9ee39534194468f1187c1547
'2011-12-21T04:55:01-05:00'
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRY' 'sip-files00091.txt'
e757bb88e97c4a476aca84fc9780698a
81b9fda1e19704bbfb13d05e5bd99e1e11185d9e
describe
'804' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJRZ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
3344a74fb4b67241fda26f2daed100b0
2be1d6baad6f7cee5ce97b5760d52d4464619467
'2011-12-21T04:53:43-05:00'
describe
'620' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSA' 'sip-files00093.txt'
f99b835306f5008a4c663e074b974b63
8b8544cc8b988c881af18793c5c272bce1b89d27
'2011-12-21T04:54:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSB' 'sip-files00094.txt'
829121423a8e7c6effc270f3f3128058
a94b6c9611810776bac0c078e2ee99c5f816a694
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSC' 'sip-files00095.txt'
b057f618090d7789ad7b0fcde85d03c7
bb968bd0cc4f37b0c413dd63e0f653ade51d1432
'2011-12-21T04:56:13-05:00'
describe
'883' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSD' 'sip-files00096.txt'
83dab3c33cbd866fc614ec0ef92695a5
2f96f0b38c3ecefa020a79e24bf9f201e3e7c8a8
describe
'827' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSE' 'sip-files00097.txt'
c86faa91cf2e3d65c3e18b112527607f
416636fa6628371533138cb1add163df599193c8
'2011-12-21T04:54:50-05:00'
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSF' 'sip-files00098.txt'
2b31926eb261185a39dc20ff7faca2a5
ce7cf85249945f07df27956f792eb4bae9a421a2
'2011-12-21T04:54:32-05:00'
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSG' 'sip-files00099.txt'
c3999844a208843056639994e4c76025
653d8f53b8a571b792429def2c5f5160c449034a
'2011-12-21T04:54:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSH' 'sip-files00100.txt'
ed34c850d859c2574bf9cd490174210f
91392c021dc3a88aa083ba44dbe6811ff16fa59c
'2011-12-21T04:54:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSI' 'sip-files00101.txt'
5967dbdb658a7aa55c8f044c6f0e5130
7e364fd645263fbd02576421deab59072f8600a6
describe
'896' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSJ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
6ab27706b3a7b8cb5074b49da3ae690c
837baba6c361669869d65995b6e09f22e0e14b45
'2011-12-21T04:54:09-05:00'
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSK' 'sip-files00103.txt'
ff516122b04921a8bea30e7a8ff59ab3
71c7bbc4d69a7e10a1d0fba96c48f445d7139418
'2011-12-21T04:54:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSL' 'sip-files00104.txt'
c2d0854ecb66b0d801d15878f5f77367
b5fe1f99264a58cf398a54657fe2d6c4791678ab
'2011-12-21T04:55:08-05:00'
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSM' 'sip-files00105.txt'
b7b13eb9aca79e4f580a518791eb388f
c941f91f48b35bd084a183b054babf6c5e88fa80
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSN' 'sip-files00106.txt'
5365e5acbd206972a912e6c92d5da77d
9b671ad0940c1dd38b1ec0f7ea764f13526c59d0
'2011-12-21T04:54:26-05:00'
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSO' 'sip-files00107.txt'
1b8c9408ef66bbbb09d74102724f5c3c
7775ebd12b6c94e979ff05baaa2b4aef7c8259cd
'2011-12-21T04:55:44-05:00'
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSP' 'sip-files00108.txt'
1434e0d83f46b115863f513ee06527b2
ebb2a4bf50b934444ab1c98b39be371a8f06061c
'2011-12-21T04:54:24-05:00'
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSQ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
3a1a3f4b7a0674ee637c64dc8ce9ce36
173654efd73f2c2f5dee22394432771c55bb2884
'2011-12-21T04:54:56-05:00'
describe
'336' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSR' 'sip-files00110.txt'
0f8e96180a3c01264b5521a41778fa71
77f23767ce28166150408e9881231f4b3e7edd73
describe
'617' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSS' 'sip-files00111.txt'
ee8692c36c3ca0435caf7e11d74210a0
37f9029fe05c89274f037bca79d18f6c71f12bb6
'2011-12-21T04:56:18-05:00'
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJST' 'sip-files00112.txt'
c277e8203be7145039426f90570d9fa5
dbd0e4eb346d352b6bc90532847eefc4c1018866
'2011-12-21T04:56:45-05:00'
describe
'823' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSU' 'sip-files00113.txt'
b035763e76e6b2330ae760a9044405cf
059c61d07b3d4ab521405e413f1f8ec4ffcd3fed
'2011-12-21T04:53:41-05:00'
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSV' 'sip-files00114.txt'
3701f8d4ca65114f051ccbb8cfb1ac28
768a095661244a7319bda174ff2ac18fa843b2ea
'2011-12-21T04:56:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSW' 'sip-files00115.txt'
84a7ae3886e5378d6bc8dff3c6ec3ccd
2092bdd65f69eae2e25b52fd005734f25499d27e
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSX' 'sip-files00116.txt'
a3eee7cbfdefcf00df07fef039d8c782
2b2e1af64f1dc945bf9e8a18e67757bc1fbe46bb
'2011-12-21T04:54:13-05:00'
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSY' 'sip-files00117.txt'
e4cebf804cd7226f7f49c17102bfae9c
ada359a92427d531323d500d55f802fba0e7c735
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJSZ' 'sip-files00118.txt'
dd34992721c277d5fc94848a7793a078
34c439d4735f54e8a7263409e9ecd53fb617b49e
describe
'451' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTA' 'sip-files00119.txt'
182817638e1a8d748f83a2e5a7f3489c
6449dd1d99d6d48aa1b933104a868d24b2f09566
'2011-12-21T04:55:41-05:00'
describe
'1614' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTB' 'sip-files00121.txt'
ce3ed7e60372bb7fe1a6beaa939eae12
659798bc74e9eb6e473b3cfbf5d2906be1de384f
describe
'2443' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTC' 'sip-files00122.txt'
d288caf829304c690deafee2ad67b31c
42679c0374c45bd6458c58a7df3e739b076d2104
describe
'2352' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTD' 'sip-files00123.txt'
f7396fa8d1f5c301e6b3bd6ce04d11a4
6ef68df2e8ffe6a9ce86353236b05a9046761c8a
'2011-12-21T04:54:46-05:00'
describe
'2827' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTE' 'sip-files00124.txt'
9f8f0828bb03b98ea68fb8582bc44b8e
d7529d3bda561131ea543f564e99fe067ca75ae9
'2011-12-21T04:56:26-05:00'
describe
'2532' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTF' 'sip-files00125.txt'
8f3248b4f983a4a0a7cab5a74761bf77
6c3aaf62424fb61174bb4b90b54d0e4537417824
'2011-12-21T04:55:17-05:00'
describe
'2649' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTG' 'sip-files00126.txt'
002a6faf460a1bcbb7e4c4beb65c6233
c3d19e427f79653d4ba436981da8b88ba390916d
'2011-12-21T04:54:22-05:00'
describe
'2464' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTH' 'sip-files00127.txt'
9c7c70d7a9e404a0ee1c1c9c052b9d63
ef68d24151461fb8a31d32f4f8a8f077894b5b32
describe
'2932' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTI' 'sip-files00128.txt'
481e46a7ed2d0193fb935a3adeb5c672
e7a6b80e4b359596fe01f8862b6676fea30b5804
'2011-12-21T04:56:31-05:00'
describe
'2536' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTJ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
2f8eac69f66bb8e48e7dc62011d1a366
fa3e70b5e6b634be0dd343dd91a8c810fc57c281
'2011-12-21T04:56:14-05:00'
describe
'3107' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTK' 'sip-files00130.txt'
7e0e7bb115c4f6becc2e2126a31bb600
8d3696d538341a8f4d23cffdc029d2094f717497
'2011-12-21T04:54:58-05:00'
describe
'2522' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTL' 'sip-files00131.txt'
88cd8a7f9667db0f017a331f4de1e9c9
7c920b808b661d87ad4401f6d33033376de73463
describe
'2668' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTM' 'sip-files00132.txt'
96c8264a2f687bc86ec6d5fb318424e5
c1dcec7be4769848298a2b3731cfda6f565ef5d0
'2011-12-21T04:54:00-05:00'
describe
'2403' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTN' 'sip-files00133.txt'
d44bbd7158be5e3189b9e7a29b22c145
e6379ea96e157eb6c6b768e2a990d0a6ddba0f7f
'2011-12-21T04:55:57-05:00'
describe
'2711' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTO' 'sip-files00134.txt'
d051c25971acf51f40eeb405382b4fa2
40aa789345854fc82710276c0a0aa4494b00a933
'2011-12-21T04:55:30-05:00'
describe
'2618' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTP' 'sip-files00135.txt'
c4b4a9af00dac4e0b54cf6b2db65eec6
ad0955aba1b368ee6cd0d01caa3cadea33bca8d8
describe
'2847' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTQ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
1af87a434f947dd6cdbf52f5b4b8e86e
a4498b6e5c8e806f0b2c105349626c4ec9f6585a
describe
'2797' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTR' 'sip-files00137.txt'
821a291bcb7eab3401e24c3afed13549
1e05e852918b5caa8472c38a3ecba9274d51c07f
describe
'2878' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTS' 'sip-files00138.txt'
92e3fffd6863e41051f43af90f1241e8
0b6fe7660d72fe316d60dcef73a25f836b91abc9
describe
'2368' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTT' 'sip-files00139.txt'
0f0a3228ada3012e2f06c7fbe0595dbe
b31bbda5ce579c331f80fa68a561d9cafbbb7da6
describe
'174' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTU' 'sip-files00140.txt'
49f756b8ef70d44cb8cdd77d34879c54
73cc9db1078580c4de4cb7a94ee270a76eca70fc
'2011-12-21T04:56:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTV' 'sip-files00144.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-12-21T04:55:28-05:00'
describe
'497' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTW' 'sip-files00001.pro'
cc98ba4c3cc6ffb0f708b8084f47dc9c
68117dc3a4c95b74a5c3843c7c0c9cb1e3856750
'2011-12-21T04:55:00-05:00'
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTX' 'sip-files00002.pro'
811a8d300ada601874d17824ddc09f5e
00b4a1a244cc004dc21181121ad5b1be0dd1e30f
describe
'1805' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTY' 'sip-files00003.pro'
6b29efa51b193b2fd632f5bb3a37df6d
f1de66b827f7eadd64073e840bbdc907e5083813
'2011-12-21T04:54:17-05:00'
describe
'437' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJTZ' 'sip-files00005.pro'
eefdf507edd24463fdf918e498763eee
ec4aa9c4f6eb4f5c8868293557a9241f3412aa15
describe
'2472' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUA' 'sip-files00006.pro'
9ae0e4ac40f59aecbc581c1c1db60a70
600aa0c0c83e162f698f1533a29313e2cf47caf7
describe
'2167' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUB' 'sip-files00008.pro'
182d587313cc08e5e606aca13d0f3cbd
10d44cf21866396bf5171cfa5943d4ca97cb900b
'2011-12-21T04:53:53-05:00'
describe
'6974' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUC' 'sip-files00011.pro'
948ada9dc8bf045ad395c648e578fa8d
ae5fd5f3b0148123834525c982b433a5488ad9c5
'2011-12-21T04:54:36-05:00'
describe
'4695' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUD' 'sip-files00012.pro'
017c67a4c26b177c55878d38943f7ff3
79573dd15d60691a180a754d739ed0a59390d44f
describe
'7664' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUE' 'sip-files00013.pro'
6179a2b2b32519f57fed8c6302b49418
f74af0378a7067ed9f1969fb2ea8ce37454e9415
describe
'10769' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUF' 'sip-files00015.pro'
7f9c9e030d40aa09accee7ab369aa0e0
bedef29e3dcb676247e35c136774b1bfa88542e2
'2011-12-21T04:56:42-05:00'
describe
'21711' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUG' 'sip-files00016.pro'
a03182fb4a01091bd97524c4bc930f0f
7b10f3336988a2c7c2b59824f9e649558a13d9bc
describe
'23714' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUH' 'sip-files00017.pro'
d4e695d60f017dc9ab36c684136232b5
79621f1ee686595585004daf4b8cd0980aece919
'2011-12-21T04:56:06-05:00'
describe
'23032' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUI' 'sip-files00018.pro'
4b3f160150284f95e02924fdfb2bc0ba
d1fe08e8c4d8e6e06daf614900c61611d752f5bf
describe
'22975' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUJ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
1744bcf20ba6a68a1919d582aca92694
0fe8cf28cbb416ecdf3f50b26781cd69b9f4f60c
describe
'22929' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUK' 'sip-files00020.pro'
075798b1847594630b5b56be68691b29
e0093fe11ce058072461880acada56a13cf57026
'2011-12-21T04:55:12-05:00'
describe
'23811' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUL' 'sip-files00021.pro'
ea5c9d7256b3c17dfbce0df8bd342976
18f342b79b5c54bfcbd937dc81132288c7f9239b
describe
'24111' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUM' 'sip-files00022.pro'
619b34e1a33802df317e2fecbd66adff
aba9152e942b0bc2a7cceb2cce68035ed77900e4
describe
'22207' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUN' 'sip-files00023.pro'
5439bc1b69f6aff1e65492100f95f7c1
c8edf0422fce48661dfcaf983d8bab5119066ecf
describe
'24239' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUO' 'sip-files00024.pro'
d4aeba3be4b68fbfc69b678e5c7f5c1f
4eb0aa2c233977a049eb76846eb38baf95181707
'2011-12-21T04:56:48-05:00'
describe
'24260' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUP' 'sip-files00025.pro'
77f37416e8602c0d268a5ff299f2df73
dc5d3932e6aac0f600a3cf99983e2d01a28e8fe1
describe
'24556' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUQ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
67024d56fb31a1ba2238e74447476390
9f148dcaa683c8df07b9073541341befff1d4e4e
describe
'24980' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUR' 'sip-files00027.pro'
ab61967ffb0657250fb3771dd1302417
24f263ba97b56dffe514ab19c306b97ae2d814d3
'2011-12-21T04:56:15-05:00'
describe
'21412' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUS' 'sip-files00028.pro'
4335d3aad4980d0fa8a018c8331b3038
deb92f0b441d0f5d4ae2666f10c9c716f3be9de2
describe
'22826' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUT' 'sip-files00029.pro'
0e8e6ec84cad25aa99c1336d26b2c57d
50d9a884370d9bb69728e3d8bd30a5f4074df01d
describe
'22572' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUU' 'sip-files00030.pro'
15a98c394f5dba262b2e512124ff6d1d
9494a0d65266399196a3df214dd6bb7197c1934d
'2011-12-21T04:53:55-05:00'
describe
'24153' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUV' 'sip-files00031.pro'
3d597161b415d32e7cf16795d61f17c9
c3db12b87e010a2003922b29c70f18db6b47fc99
describe
'23276' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUW' 'sip-files00032.pro'
583f5640cca75ac4b4b13ff82c71a8fb
9343050bda518cde95ca5de09d6087f4f62afbde
'2011-12-21T04:53:56-05:00'
describe
'23199' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUX' 'sip-files00033.pro'
af81204afeb63dd5970f7bbf654ca313
eff8f5f60255eba80a6b7ace24b2d54ebc8050af
'2011-12-21T04:55:19-05:00'
describe
'21995' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUY' 'sip-files00034.pro'
63dd552d5f5f8cfbcbfdb8ed091d2e69
12a21232da6b4794130b2cc923634ca74d4a9345
describe
'22530' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJUZ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
9d73dec243faec87e8134b795aa98463
74206b423b8ad6fd63067d05dbcc7ea12d42cff9
describe
'21982' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVA' 'sip-files00036.pro'
56b7491a5c8fd9320c86ca036c3a6c10
7a13b3d4fe568329ff4fe876c996c567b1c28332
'2011-12-21T04:54:35-05:00'
describe
'22871' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVB' 'sip-files00037.pro'
4f48f83590c55b9bad109e872e66e268
10b73bdb8b8508a0875b102b28a87a874a0d16af
'2011-12-21T04:55:37-05:00'
describe
'22951' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVC' 'sip-files00038.pro'
ba61b70eeb55dae7972972f75550b7d8
cf8225f3e2c24c3a537ee58cfebad07d0b274dde
'2011-12-21T04:55:43-05:00'
describe
'7974' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVD' 'sip-files00039.pro'
71bea2fa8f8553688c40e147dd7be191
f4802a97510887025287d3f5d25329e07b643c40
'2011-12-21T04:53:51-05:00'
describe
'13367' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVE' 'sip-files00040.pro'
019b03de52be43bc67ed074686580898
7fb23bd462ce05cee79b75729c83465b741c3699
'2011-12-21T04:55:09-05:00'
describe
'23420' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVF' 'sip-files00041.pro'
95b6e0f71815a7678c61a01458c3a466
be65b4022e910642d384a49124bd0be261e790a6
'2011-12-21T04:56:39-05:00'
describe
'21668' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVG' 'sip-files00042.pro'
adcfbea842b24babf6500d93b5838588
041fc2a3a01fa2a12bdbf9a01d94046dc6121605
'2011-12-21T04:56:36-05:00'
describe
'24660' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVH' 'sip-files00043.pro'
99b76dd2e7cb9fc16fc7afa1731cb531
383fe12c1291d4b7d1b0aa59d8d0dfaece449905
'2011-12-21T04:54:27-05:00'
describe
'22521' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVI' 'sip-files00044.pro'
d478098e86b6b27fbf46bc982c0515fd
77e723b3ba04108c0da6504c0a1c92f07176554c
'2011-12-21T04:54:44-05:00'
describe
'23968' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVJ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
839a1a983e5270dd5feeb90de10f2bbf
0e0297b97e09d05e9cbb830ec0f562002f731d8d
'2011-12-21T04:54:31-05:00'
describe
'22593' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
f059dfc52ac4a20f0f44792eb24cc226
ffefa266eec861ea0026d5b9c793fb2e6d1cefa4
'2011-12-21T04:54:20-05:00'
describe
'24027' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVL' 'sip-files00047.pro'
73d67ad97c728251d03099ab53867ca5
13e79ec451ee2c66ffd915fbd00b4cac37f54619
describe
'23506' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVM' 'sip-files00048.pro'
92462bdd1362ddc1887241437a354154
f89ceace47375a65d79cc2130e7cdd8147584988
'2011-12-21T04:56:05-05:00'
describe
'23509' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVN' 'sip-files00049.pro'
dc796be9715994f4ce085d9ccafd1878
120d7c15fabef11d82a5895589f7fe64b85151c0
describe
'22783' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVO' 'sip-files00050.pro'
9b6ff99309696d7f444534bf3f91eeab
fbd8c8eabb1b127cb0de1db9aa2c444e418ed145
'2011-12-21T04:56:19-05:00'
describe
'24577' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVP' 'sip-files00051.pro'
b0b79d33961bf7a9f54d9de24bd9a667
c8154fd8e69a3cd651e343825eff7347340661d4
describe
'22613' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVQ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
2ecd1b50117155a57fa99467ede8777e
2f24c95deafd03196971c6bb85b3339fa71063ba
'2011-12-21T04:53:54-05:00'
describe
'22103' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVR' 'sip-files00053.pro'
3a429ce4b3a9e09ea6c4455f8d1ffdfc
391839f13b6cbf3d527bea69de90a3daf1961c21
describe
'23670' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVS' 'sip-files00054.pro'
a920a2e92b7fb5479b70b7d7f700da3a
377751be3f29e744e0935c010a2732bca7268134
'2011-12-21T04:56:27-05:00'
describe
'22107' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVT' 'sip-files00055.pro'
35c4aaed45fceb0b7682108b60876741
503e432502ce7569a3f3474352b2c0d17daa2fc5
'2011-12-21T04:56:49-05:00'
describe
'22358' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVU' 'sip-files00056.pro'
39d26a0504748820553cba5b060b31d1
653e25e459d4a8440a97eb08d480956aba5543b0
describe
'12951' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVV' 'sip-files00057.pro'
2ef415e1d5486600bae10918cc2488db
10319fa17935328730147597993e436a9970adfb
'2011-12-21T04:53:45-05:00'
describe
'13843' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVW' 'sip-files00058.pro'
38c4426ce78220a5dbc66c302f8757f9
aca0fc5286decaced29fb595e751714f83ede8bd
'2011-12-21T04:57:00-05:00'
describe
'23165' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVX' 'sip-files00059.pro'
9c7599a5519a99ce0319c183467302e9
e37f9f0a6e4bfe3ac8f241e62ce74fb2c907d2e8
describe
'21592' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVY' 'sip-files00060.pro'
0be3e6c37cbcf2fb5ddb9513ca1a32b1
a0e5db007734d279d6347e56115f44a354d27f6d
describe
'22544' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJVZ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
7e3e9aebe12f557c104d1d564286cade
f2ff9ccc38835044ab3af319a1c0e60701c7c46f
'2011-12-21T04:54:15-05:00'
describe
'23468' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWA' 'sip-files00062.pro'
ddd0e2224d163d2f3b2cf6abc180f154
b15d722ec5ae51480dac53de48149ceed86899e2
'2011-12-21T04:54:16-05:00'
describe
'22893' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWB' 'sip-files00063.pro'
987f4fbb089c5b93136143d495c878ed
7afb4b21f550e66c4b861a8f28760847de0fd5d1
'2011-12-21T04:55:34-05:00'
describe
'23652' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWC' 'sip-files00064.pro'
34ab7b0175d0bf30c3bed3f4c01bf73c
77ea29ef8fae9314acebed0e6a1fac7d321abae9
describe
'24346' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWD' 'sip-files00065.pro'
4190f8236f503b3da4ee41d05643e2b4
0b8c9fe153981f98eef9c3dcfe0346089cb23025
'2011-12-21T04:56:11-05:00'
describe
'23091' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWE' 'sip-files00066.pro'
e9709ec7043481ba731d4df56099b658
6c415d6f1a80e00120faf621a4f6b978fcec1e1b
describe
'21467' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWF' 'sip-files00067.pro'
3561b8afdba71d51385f6f94c75d5bab
17109b0a446e0f61438de1f8b103e37d41a7e8c6
'2011-12-21T04:55:02-05:00'
describe
'22766' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWG' 'sip-files00068.pro'
27ec30748e5ac30a640b9e0684df1c21
fbdb94a3da7cebcde8f7e3f054616888c26ba3bd
describe
'14029' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWH' 'sip-files00069.pro'
6290cc596ddf0b71462520154163e13d
a2320967633bfafb8e2c6ccf5ffab7d897386c52
describe
'22938' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWI' 'sip-files00070.pro'
6f38ee02c1c22f2828b20e5fffef0be5
347731c327e65f1ff6633cfcfcea1eb5351f320e
describe
'22894' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWJ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
f653f36f374ec47056c7627b2a47c025
c820bae5d05aea96fd9fadc089e7e4e48720d7d1
describe
'24147' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWK' 'sip-files00072.pro'
574be072e3e5fd86ced5bf2928fb2b35
a162ac278ece9a86bd9c64f5bd62bdcbc73295a2
describe
'23801' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWL' 'sip-files00073.pro'
51cf296d68b8c239912cfe312fea1adf
929c18fdbfd7624082e07bad649521b25e2cac6c
'2011-12-21T04:55:50-05:00'
describe
'23504' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWM' 'sip-files00074.pro'
b3a8083eded59dee6f97c59e1dda43f5
54c7e0c4a77ee980afdc4082142082af0518797a
describe
'24210' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWN' 'sip-files00075.pro'
995b9b60eddb4b1387ec1183f96ee9b9
584416f5999eef097c2ac528cefd4a32b65b7af1
describe
'23173' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWO' 'sip-files00076.pro'
5631627a617716f7cc94ef8f44019710
456d5dcdd88f36d8b4d1d507c11e2dffef90982e
describe
'22845' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWP' 'sip-files00077.pro'
e4829059f42c6efaf9e9e5257f15b5ee
4be489a60e467815fd5961d187253f341ba2b173
'2011-12-21T04:56:55-05:00'
describe
'22357' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWQ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
4fe048296f8a867b1ecbf2bead603e46
c55dc84eb485e55e90d096d4a2061903b52a2960
describe
'6856' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWR' 'sip-files00079.pro'
75542b17a8bc8fdd19a00f766e328957
ff1784cb16e220305f8946698d8233e7b3ad5ee9
'2011-12-21T04:56:02-05:00'
describe
'13273' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWS' 'sip-files00080.pro'
b703d365aad0bbb087fa328050234a26
6edbd5e6b4a417afd7752bd77c2e4e584edcd40e
'2011-12-21T04:54:54-05:00'
describe
'23008' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWT' 'sip-files00081.pro'
9621975e4f02006f80ecd68522217737
d24d50419944530fe2642da94db31ace8a446025
'2011-12-21T04:55:21-05:00'
describe
'23573' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWU' 'sip-files00082.pro'
f4a01bde32bb2a875f2c46e44fd9a23c
b03574cde42cc418c436071abd1826cbcb5f3b4a
describe
'20095' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWV' 'sip-files00083.pro'
32e5a147ebf0c9c92f9ef36ae8230c73
3e661734a8f9d463e3cec5603408e59349f6071c
describe
'23411' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWW' 'sip-files00084.pro'
34e82e528ed586d1605ee2f22a1accb4
4f5263a0866bccf548fab14c498a2bd4d7ae9496
describe
'23460' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWX' 'sip-files00085.pro'
3b8ceb88b4932e2cbb910fa58ff6f3b6
3bc1b5330053e4acdd7554f08d194422bdaec308
describe
'20655' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWY' 'sip-files00086.pro'
e04c22fd571026ca19c9b467c6d27ddf
6a3fa28622012aac90f0655ebd549c3dbb5c0078
describe
'21314' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJWZ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
be5cb6a9a1fa79f388132ae265c9f693
5de36df6ba3f133c25103d119cae74f58d053348
describe
'24289' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXA' 'sip-files00088.pro'
0a31cb9dd65f512eb8f4203a2aa2cf28
78be672ade9fe7ccbcf5d09a4261febc47ecb384
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXB' 'sip-files00089.pro'
7a08c90cb2533ca50672b36cf93779a4
5d4b314872a397d23d7640e6ef3b402e86d3d057
describe
'22345' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXC' 'sip-files00090.pro'
2af0bc8df869a6e95cb5352f92926186
4ec495f3d03992fc4b9a43129f9aea41f92b85ce
'2011-12-21T04:55:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXD' 'sip-files00091.pro'
a2a730195311da25b83ad78339c9eaaf
728298c2eefce28bbcd39531a65b2a3f53ae5500
'2011-12-21T04:56:37-05:00'
describe
'20212' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXE' 'sip-files00092.pro'
e73caa1e7c26c9b824e9a6488994d76e
24cfb7993dac603982b07da03dd84ca84ad2e989
describe
'13695' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXF' 'sip-files00093.pro'
b458d06e05e31e7b088923c6468ea40b
4186dc0f4a192cc30669a46240be0df7b11419e8
'2011-12-21T04:54:38-05:00'
describe
'23440' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXG' 'sip-files00094.pro'
48831d87e53e7510f33b876f176b946b
ac58b1308f03ccc0f6634d6096a27a46b88f70db
'2011-12-21T04:55:07-05:00'
describe
'23518' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXH' 'sip-files00095.pro'
d735024dc9eff8291d2e06d3a40baf85
66873a4d6d784c262abfdab22b544782adb6d01a
'2011-12-21T04:56:59-05:00'
describe
'21976' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXI' 'sip-files00096.pro'
65b9df74f11f49a8016de0c0c0607288
905a7f60fecedb81027e879def1435aa9c7e5846
describe
'20586' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXJ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
369fb751e7d4cb153352ad25c05d467f
1bc9ba2d975dfd1d483d6063289c31439bc6dae9
'2011-12-21T04:54:12-05:00'
describe
'23206' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXK' 'sip-files00098.pro'
3f371ecc45e8312470368200a6634397
6e094ae8ca00dfe5741c506f4ea8de496f92a603
'2011-12-21T04:55:49-05:00'
describe
'23441' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXL' 'sip-files00099.pro'
48a263f6c9ffbc8c6f4b001bb8897dc6
aa86e1616bccdd1f2286749508194c0f6e4c202e
'2011-12-21T04:56:53-05:00'
describe
'21848' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXM' 'sip-files00100.pro'
fe60c9236b2a2c5cecbae7e45bdf68f6
d7907c145ecb67febf02c57d472fb25667fdf9bd
describe
'22651' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXN' 'sip-files00101.pro'
c5d162661098fa1aeb010ebb41e30d5b
300561d124d372c3415c00b49123b91b23533f80
describe
'22260' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXO' 'sip-files00102.pro'
334399252336caf9adcb4bce544cbbfa
d627769fb82e2bd034ad456c2ce5a42357191605
describe
'23203' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXP' 'sip-files00103.pro'
161a3e025c5bba382e0793fbc7dae10b
35ee13a1046e2371cedee186b5227777df5bef9b
describe
'24884' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXQ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
9eb7965eab1da22c2b14ed55770fdab9
895d6fecfd7719aae755e335f9bb7bf2cbe3f7ed
describe
'23253' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXR' 'sip-files00105.pro'
96d08ff234135eb57563c863d620a3df
74b32247d207362f55484b0a9449ac2f24f35276
'2011-12-21T04:55:48-05:00'
describe
'23226' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXS' 'sip-files00106.pro'
c123255033883d2bc734d0167a5a37b7
0403e0308288ceee9239a69c2dbe5806acbd86e8
'2011-12-21T04:56:20-05:00'
describe
'25065' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXT' 'sip-files00107.pro'
b1a6e9790c6b9f02dfebd1511be84ddd
69efd98977ada1b826975862683e242b28f8313d
'2011-12-21T04:55:18-05:00'
describe
'25082' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXU' 'sip-files00108.pro'
5e95546d978f827c9d28a2a990345e49
160c2670df0f203f2715167bdfa754b5f071b666
describe
'24232' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXV' 'sip-files00109.pro'
640b1c2586fc9c398ad0beedae4f8dd6
407261ae9eae85bcd13c6ba334d8c5d793fb9461
describe
'8318' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXW' 'sip-files00110.pro'
2e9bd98ae441b8744347f389bc1d3663
aa1d6bf6ff3bf9509fdd06e9f12b286c385d7088
'2011-12-21T04:54:08-05:00'
describe
'14031' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXX' 'sip-files00111.pro'
40babfc3030d7953578f1f3923322c1e
bb9b7f478a74b093707a6260ec7a07bb064e977d
describe
'24347' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXY' 'sip-files00112.pro'
094ea7b9b8dac9684a15b900ac04885d
710d8457c23cfcf1fc36250e06780a92b4977dc1
describe
'19965' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJXZ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
cf839bcb93581f0d176a129eb6a95355
e95d3eab5d63edf3ee7d4b6e2050cccaca5857e4
describe
'22397' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYA' 'sip-files00114.pro'
59961220d85cda969a0a0787724e4c76
bb27a741b58486dcfc7b1d8d324583da4870c45e
describe
'23673' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYB' 'sip-files00115.pro'
04da94728114e048cfedb4c69382847f
721bb1dd896b4732085f3f4b819e5d7af9ef8e2b
describe
'21980' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYC' 'sip-files00116.pro'
485ec72d37824e52bce90607bf03aa23
7721dbdaaa601c59d5fa2d09424b3463d45cf975
describe
'22127' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYD' 'sip-files00117.pro'
aa02e5d7cc6f7ca291fa39bfaf5eb958
5123098a8b7f27f7cbc6d3c96a7a9c811b0bb2d0
'2011-12-21T04:54:28-05:00'
describe
'24285' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYE' 'sip-files00118.pro'
3338c0dc89df8e48ff5266d37ec620e5
c3123354ee8dc7ca2ee55f947d867f96ee272a74
describe
'10990' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYF' 'sip-files00119.pro'
98adbc68208fd5d69e540b0e58eb2a8b
ddff55b751584f4e48e27eceafadba8299fd57b8
describe
'35180' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYG' 'sip-files00121.pro'
10903b2ec2d84dbecbee4981fd696572
8272f0023396e34c6c714190f3a779ce0e255e63
describe
'46207' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYH' 'sip-files00122.pro'
3f8dc705138c5a46dc27d7bc7c06733d
cf8d23fb982bbf076bea9f8d7bd70e96e40fb309
describe
'52972' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYI' 'sip-files00123.pro'
4c0becf9815a437639f300e5831214c2
c675c8d35ead09f6d0fb35d43ead227128d2d996
'2011-12-21T04:56:23-05:00'
describe
'57359' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYJ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
ef6975a10a24e845028f9ea741dd0c96
e9aef8dcbab59878266b45ce254f213a12a4e245
describe
'55495' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYK' 'sip-files00125.pro'
7b57f25480cff00f602c5cde1f1f69b2
5ad58266467a0b11c78362d7a71c1eeedc37fdbf
describe
'53584' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYL' 'sip-files00126.pro'
9f7655b40ee66d11894db474d2973158
590ff7e6077a03191e32a28eec2a51f53d03721a
describe
'54186' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYM' 'sip-files00127.pro'
62aaf417c9eaea321e100221fd23b0aa
39805dc8daf3cf327933ffd0e81a2befb1444e91
'2011-12-21T04:53:48-05:00'
describe
'59177' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYN' 'sip-files00128.pro'
d4be47c9ca2313e4952956437546794f
ae9b5b5a2714481dbc77c0c7cb27f67c24345dc3
describe
'56632' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYO' 'sip-files00129.pro'
9093c7fbda837384157aba18066a78c4
bd86604bd6f3aee0fb22e4954abf91c568e52185
describe
'60391' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYP' 'sip-files00130.pro'
8720cf675594db4fc6d02dd8248955f2
65043969898b1d21899c995f9a2b3ca62b131e4d
describe
'55790' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYQ' 'sip-files00131.pro'
0f1d489337c422b677af0fb1da354fda
5a44267482f6dd4da5b84383372de49c08651823
describe
'53594' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYR' 'sip-files00132.pro'
e53f1b48ac3260547e474f2fcb5f8333
c191edbfd82ee69f8fcb06f16c19842487265ad4
describe
'52862' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYS' 'sip-files00133.pro'
51e3dcf74f02778386accc5ebc825446
a97fdcd2f0c57dcf96b123c642c3eb42e5608bae
describe
'53077' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYT' 'sip-files00134.pro'
167ac39da59cfa523e21124e155617f8
c644c0501f5c23559c2272cf83d8a69ced3c588c
describe
'59189' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYU' 'sip-files00135.pro'
1acdd6217353c6bdd5489c955dfb6d7e
903f7fdac74f44e39fc7e9402bba230e89e7500b
describe
'55794' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYV' 'sip-files00136.pro'
5c29a1451cc0bc49c7fc66e089b49dd6
806073b1ccb54f7b619b0606b1171eea09bb1448
describe
'60974' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYW' 'sip-files00137.pro'
cbc63ed7be3195b6054a2496d25eb6af
b2c2e69f2966d75ac787efef32b887ebdef6c296
'2011-12-21T04:55:24-05:00'
describe
'58360' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYX' 'sip-files00138.pro'
97f82e12c3fc992053f7fe7657092f1f
7ec9531eca48b621d134243da2dfb5209c1bd614
'2011-12-21T04:56:01-05:00'
describe
'53663' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYY' 'sip-files00139.pro'
d5621a1a6688fc4941fef573f3560a82
bac4b5e2eecb9cd09a09c80ef2e1090e86f7fafc
describe
'1722' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJYZ' 'sip-files00140.pro'
a8f4bdd14a13cd2ed8503de43b9ca86e
f7e1a16257e8b17323fb168868e5596d985df1e0
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZA' 'sip-files00144.pro'
9c81e33a730785ee2a300233df16d80b
6a7367d0a8194f56b279304519cc545698d576c5
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZB' 'sip-files00145.pro'
a210ed48ea47c834ad5d16be878fceac
9c47a9b623bd83551cf926a3c868b724324b0656
describe
'410879' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZC' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
c0fce465461261af77bb8c3e83dc1344
e2cab2b7c1eecdcc7dc154c6bd78f17c5bc90bca
'2011-12-21T04:55:56-05:00'
describe
'413977' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZD' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
559f11f7a00e3d503ef51a902ca7dc67
56cca01673dff4c4cc7d94137a220127bb370141
describe
'354390' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZE' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
d89c3a8af422691eb8d1f63eb775a324
b4e95afd4f629f9123dd2dcaba8e4866eda39372
describe
'102391' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZF' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
ed5455b58d5b3fcc41b948560a443976
b463308cf76cd6f279c72dcb4a79f93a3191fc2b
describe
'298132' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZG' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
a390b7fa72f619b2887edb86d112cea8
7ebab36afd46fd82e5f700059b000a7d7a236f8f
describe
'298223' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZH' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
7105e68e738f0c7d14b86393e237dd93
38414377373ff59040766b8be7f012045900a3f7
describe
'290497' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZI' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
617cf1179ab71d63d5a026bb2a7fbc0d
0accb84484e00c940c15abd290be60f5bf1a8cb3
describe
'298116' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZJ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
687e80e1f9824830c4a8260cb1c8268f
6cf5a9b9f3e286f61bc05c8c39711a68d7f46bd2
describe
'298424' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZK' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
29171ab1cbffa20a590cfd8ee98e8ba0
7805aa350b7ddd688c32b6aacc821bb8084b8b4e
'2011-12-21T04:56:12-05:00'
describe
'298327' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZL' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
d567ac59b672fff974b3ba2b9888d7e5
519090d7d93b5211e0afbab7116b2fd06002fb43
describe
'298379' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZM' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
70e46c6193d96b2db008085a9b907a43
4840215197e36940bde5ca8b2b8179c71da1ddb1
describe
'298350' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZN' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
bbea267424a8175e5237c4a7a6275839
18fc3f8ccefc97016edbfd1a99c405435d88a601
describe
'298358' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZO' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
edc15ba19c74085efadae0092f488b63
757194202ae22dabbcff1003131f2648c6af1958
describe
'298343' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZP' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
95c0a3c0166da09fd622a7598baf8b6a
ca46f49febe31759e4e133712942c522defb7d0a
describe
'298333' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZQ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
6e160f0727dddab7da8ed39a8a35d036
f47e4aec2dc81043442e9daf2a7841853a1b75fa
describe
'298360' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZR' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
aab30862e26ca0d3fcfa9c60af5248b4
7c524ea70c9ac5fb58e0e93436e8a889ba1ae0ad
describe
'298325' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZS' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
413bc4438ef4e5cc477722d59d77be54
82528a7924e635a1bda6f7ba8cd6a0f98a7a2d64
describe
'298523' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZT' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
23106d3ba2c48a8645040fdd47c04cd0
909d36822c58ca8e8ed38e1b1cc606f5f83123fc
'2011-12-21T04:54:29-05:00'
describe
'298344' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZU' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
bb34b8397b34083287a3e912e00bb2e0
ea556ff240bb80ed38f89bccb5a97d90fec8b644
describe
'298597' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZV' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
e74a9cbf21874ecb5993d6ad598bed52
b528a141de519760cb9b8bb4f7d153aed5feb218
'2011-12-21T04:54:55-05:00'
describe
'298368' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZW' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
5e41d022ca10cb46153e57596c89db10
382ae4130d949f33f194ae1c2979975176403ea7
describe
'298247' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZX' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
2d94213df134a11e93f33402aedeba5c
7d66fc14cd29bab132ff85d522d75317a0a65f5d
describe
'298324' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZY' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
7e565f8a59fd553890677b9e4777dea5
274099e5f48878512370c856b4303a61206ef618
'2011-12-21T04:55:11-05:00'
describe
'298510' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAJZZ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
89436b9b8fe037bc342bb843af6437bd
2e1d8299d5ff9d2629c8cf4afd3b76a117b8d603
'2011-12-21T04:53:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAA' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
59a39dde844bf9887a5b0edd6c6c7bd4
980bd534cff8c6583c3b048b548314b79d81727e
describe
'298356' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAB' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
d703bcab8abee0e8be95fcc732dc01bd
9a3dacb937bee3479eb4b094aec9971c287c8181
'2011-12-21T04:54:25-05:00'
describe
'298316' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAC' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
03c7bb46c7f6783299c1ae53fbbd0a1e
cfc62c3d35366e95016acd46c0c34073fcc97f4c
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAD' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
9b085ae28905a99bfb054cafbd0e62dc
ce35a4c35c15902ae9f21188848d77214296091a
describe
'298302' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAE' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
ad79e1a239093fab864cf808ed8ff8fd
7e7ef2d995d29b19acc6460e693d719d19fa3dc6
describe
'298589' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAF' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
faf71b0cde75342f982638032c2300b0
a48e5a635532f6d87601602f3e7f95c96a631c26
describe
'298357' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAG' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
24c153a629452236f4f38562a5bf8fe5
3bf6275bc6cca99836975da79f5ab260d8639331
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAH' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
e42965285f91a844ea119c6aea161429
e9642c2702fa7fadbf2e886b5a16f361303f67ba
describe
'298255' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAI' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
6453ed123cd547162157d34632e6efe2
8ccfbb3b39f59a1ed90b028899a924ec6739147e
describe
'298341' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAJ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
2fdb9032821fe7370cceea81f219c870
805c0a19f1fd08724d60c76f76a42801d359edbf
describe
'298353' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAK' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
2fb373aeaa441ac9eff859c01e485528
ec6bf11cf6a92c06d6af2d86c0163c5109ef1893
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAL' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
5cb7209df0bbb5e0d3a055f00c6919ed
10cf2b43ff23c9dede7392632eff386bd0b7ae5d
describe
'298338' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAM' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
1745afcfe6af7329e6fe47585c9c7c21
a66e225eeb3726aa130bb5a8bd67fa7e767580ab
describe
'298543' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAN' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
8557841d80282d51ec090ffcea7574aa
e77e9f4e4d4dfe50c03b24d3827e669ee202560e
'2011-12-21T04:55:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAO' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
0d814b7870be3841aee286ffbf308842
ad85f20c7e6aa7b901daf041056dd4dda3acf20f
describe
'298266' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAP' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
08101069746332bb4213ee7cd7ab7b12
7120a96809400541484af7481361699010ce042b
'2011-12-21T04:55:22-05:00'
describe
'298346' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAQ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
aab25c07f145f5e9aa142575f686ad4c
682f15baef318252cf19bbbc517a3b39ec37b2f1
describe
'298289' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAR' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
ef255d1f547da70ec2cd2c392c2a5134
05ecbf5577083b6b63773c43d11dfca6192f3d80
describe
'298565' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAS' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
df4c73515a5c8d8301722043971462bf
bba7895d532ac23e80a3e3ed877efe2a065ba9ff
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAT' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
f3593ff2d4cd148a7c1faa004eec3e83
084b3d1c12e01744bd76670fcbfda4f7592b545a
describe
'298128' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAU' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
6973b7a82b62bc91ce9d380a4ee9ed44
2d6d9a9e53420a7278695ba4d5438ecffc17a6b6
describe
'298258' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAV' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
f6322be2bb5f13678abb249ec197f97d
88015d5ac6779cc841d3c5262511f5034c80346f
describe
'298322' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAW' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
b41f7c73c92bd074d8ad982c7ec1b9ae
bb68f05a4fc6ce2b4d2c82ef9fa7a579a8b893cc
describe
'298530' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAX' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
ed587940f60ed93f06c99c654365aa33
920b6143a2a9e51edf033d41b02bb3d9e12eea95
describe
'298326' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAY' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d0016ede7321d9d87a8c325f8d98146d
1cea1e2fb19b7a89c548995f836138196fde9dd5
describe
'298274' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKAZ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
d8dd6bc267c8e4ef12ba4ceaaa260dc3
61f64e0073fbac28759ec26661b39487e9411f69
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBA' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
0c1b46c98ade5c9540546fbc2a5a3b53
12db0f56ab6f341b22f8b942bb320e042e715da5
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBB' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
36b14e9125346757dec1ff7593544270
42fd5d7fcb91ba506ef5aa523e45c0862b1eb8b3
describe
'298331' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBC' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
5bd8026fa9c87a70b1aa6868aa4c513e
57a821682137071b091fca94e12ee23266292637
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBD' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
0d2da795f1acf164b063f9b6584573bb
29ebcbdf2aab2e0bfb97b44c74f458007274b4a9
describe
'298482' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBE' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
d5857fe27944af9fbe48765543f3f5f2
fc314bcc01967fff1ebccb228bed153338a7d76a
describe
'298579' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBF' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
fb897db0ec07bfa277bfc28a3c4814c4
08cfbd93c3b1865df069947bdc348642c05c67c5
'2011-12-21T04:54:07-05:00'
describe
'298568' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBG' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
eddb12eb806e2903f7d8d7e4e667cde2
1b18499f403c97e68eb793875cb30c47559e9707
'2011-12-21T04:55:42-05:00'
describe
'298354' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBH' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
1d4f98c82dfa13e5073c8c57812536f5
9880947350130dad8d450d6e3d8981ebe2ec8067
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBI' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
ae21fb547a477079d620e4af72e9c417
8b1a9e74b696548b73b4aafd140ccdda9a178803
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBJ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
5f65dcfe74d524ce90f0b6af25146d92
3bf769d55b265c0c9617ca0f5150338ec13d8dff
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBK' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
c084e65f4556c95fcde7e7c5cbee4444
85efa7efa049233204b7caa80e56c54e213d52b2
describe
'298363' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBL' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
3283b65e9cc6b5e79ba51fb34673996f
4dc903d67dcedecfe183b09d6938c5c548f376c5
describe
'298474' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBM' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
0e8ac7748ca95357628bccd4367aaf9a
bc5ee9308ce64f9b2772c2c37c0d8b22b3ab8390
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBN' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
ad941afc749de7ce7dc0aacc92bfedc4
978d588d7d6aaae3e38134720681598115065ac8
describe
'298444' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBO' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
98f6979c8ee5512d814f9f34a58e8561
cacfa015f1c26d6960386b0ead76ca7e04f171b3
'2011-12-21T04:56:50-05:00'
describe
'298294' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBP' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
c6f00d90e7f6da4aca64bd7f0c2e4174
09b200ed38c78cab9d7be0197164aad8408ab942
'2011-12-21T04:56:17-05:00'
describe
'298183' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBQ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
591afb6eb41fedd3c5e77a9bf97b8dc6
414a3d6a1ad49ee7a34272bf33dc7298c7284dab
'2011-12-21T04:56:52-05:00'
describe
'298362' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBR' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
9c57ce1aa1436f6c832b4ee2587c09de
88ab5361d0c40ef9f7e1c2dc948002a96367dd1f
describe
'298141' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBS' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
236e9546b5e73c26c382d08bacfa81f3
18fe754ad3a239fd9f3cd1c2c577edfdb8ca54a0
describe
'298359' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBT' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
b40ed9633fb20ec7f64ed6bb17875761
d35f2f1bc99ae91be93453f452fdfe1560111062
'2011-12-21T04:54:06-05:00'
describe
'298168' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBU' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
4877875e1e39b3ecfc68560105dac5d2
bd3fc65d447898f184d44765d4f944cab55098c5
describe
'298342' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBV' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
ce72b51a6496dac0ed64f440d4fbe255
ec9c7365e1f7219c88c676412eca84131b7fc299
describe
'298257' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBW' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
8733ff5ce344798a239c9e8fa23f9abc
684be2d70750562d64bfd7612ac50b3849d631e5
'2011-12-21T04:56:25-05:00'
describe
'298181' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBX' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
9b647672c7dc0744836ee10f3997a93f
1ddedb68f5756e589d6118183f91c371feda2213
'2011-12-21T04:55:05-05:00'
describe
'298237' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBY' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
b50a2816b30d0b90bfb6ba39b9930f15
ce07fd5131b0b41b43fd29daa9240deffaf6f0c1
'2011-12-21T04:54:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKBZ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
795f6d5674cdedc7779ee76feee2bff0
3a2cc3ec852716675ed6e82527b0cabe0c12de52
describe
'298315' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCA' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
e91ff34ec46a1f99d6d261adb8e73b98
ebb39f0c8c4ab1980a46163421ed5b2961894a40
describe
'298366' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCB' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
f48f02697cfa08ace8b4b02d37c80d9b
1750d7809bd6f3b5d924122aa6e3bb4c003859a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCC' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
ce312a05c1e402b3fc25666deba1db36
651a169373c6b405089d8e3c502b3e069c586bbf
'2011-12-21T04:54:23-05:00'
describe
'298361' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCD' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
d4a69f990e905d525648843be4baace6
ff603a8dc2c9b0312ec7d29da93e0f38788c1e65
describe
'298207' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCE' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
e9fd8031c4d2204982203db23c802f87
107c659310f0e2b5fdca31f4752b0dc91d48951d
describe
'298301' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCF' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
76ac810aae1d0d6defe2a49b9e59e44d
2f85d7e2cea8b2acc6803457878118d64e715887
describe
'298461' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCG' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
9a67e1c80b0275288834cd4124f08733
28e77b2a9174de0023c42dbe5d1d03fc86f3228d
'2011-12-21T04:55:26-05:00'
describe
'298307' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCH' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
d3c2f9fba2478e227b1b13c1e102ffc3
a8c357cb508e9fb3aeba81af74210005d103adec
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCI' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
e18184d1a5e04448914a84a867131f9d
9a7dbce835f30d16c0051e7071363ceb6136735a
describe
'298583' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCJ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
ddb0725c144e0b98c0ae25c837073dba
b29575c2cdf775a9b3705145e0e76617820113ec
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCK' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
403727b077baf0a117037571236ad29d
5c80e2e6b40fd24b8e7230ae04a97ffe0b7c6e6a
describe
'298339' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCL' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
467ce0d285deede3775308c074f6479c
a4ac058dd02e92d37a32150a88b224e06735b3f8
describe
'298287' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCM' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
cd6aaf9805aa323cf53e559530a6f8fb
2ab338e96051641825ce7f38acf5c59bddf96f17
describe
'298608' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCN' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
71a382bad110a649ca5a7916212a2d1d
28fe20724e5fb4b71684247c2bf9620e97ac715b
'2011-12-21T04:55:15-05:00'
describe
'298347' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCO' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
4a738adf8e5c1f29fff5e6ade6d29436
7892dfe8b7cf703463d94cc1c7085b2dee9f500b
describe
'298304' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCP' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
5e815894750ff0a7d4cd47026670230e
fce1f8badb2587588d241cfb8474c20d769979a3
describe
'298285' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCQ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
ad7f5e453bd5a6750d3c86ffde5d9e6a
215e2258d59f27365fd30a06ffc81d8737a551a5
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCR' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
f254a7f4976831008d72628684ce3d07
99c3991676c762d17be568241b6042d193122e07
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCS' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
b6c8b1c308d1238b72224022248b3b1e
2c2ebf417b87272cc2b30aa69e438473a0b350bc
describe
'298334' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCT' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
f2fe3db1f8604e0d4b88cfe5b4d02db7
a0a86c0c6298c49f1fd0920afbbb5aadfa63d0dc
'2011-12-21T04:55:06-05:00'
describe
'298330' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCU' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
4dd71cec7a1844d6d5baf8e69d44de81
d34ebdd2a5ffa6a511ceb591e83cd15b1eb009d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCV' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
c03877959f1158cf50325a34a365e983
ab62615538f6e1a208e32ae67d12457eef157136
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCW' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
4cd66b8e5aef4086cdddc3b91cf152b4
60ee326d3fea321d7355bc157aada071b3c67bfb
describe
'298136' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCX' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
80c9abcb121d21de81db96293275442d
3b17d32b419d1f98a4d589c443c2ee9ad60f3916
describe
'298189' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCY' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
0d3e2f335950ad75ea395d8f7d71b79b
b14653afdfbb6c338829494e5d02dc48f84f74c0
describe
'298596' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKCZ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
6624c66172c5860f85c4e2c89cb7fc6e
de68749915c9edc7cd7b5ba37cf6b81b3ae64400
describe
'298355' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDA' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
e39f51142b2077fb95f2d36038cdcd9c
3abd1ca1c0fcbf2675f0b1ae6af37f081439774f
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDB' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
6c4308a7a1c840cc9c930edf89a5bb7c
0da4f67efe68086697446dfb41648a809247712b
'2011-12-21T04:55:51-05:00'
describe
'298297' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDC' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
8db0bc7b7b001a486d617e200a089f00
db7aae3aa34af46152d0a99e13489526c1b1d099
describe
'298407' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDD' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
03e8c74f4a538021c5fd202fb9f9567f
b7a035ffa77cdb16e7c5075ba49a42b3d7e18b33
describe
'298248' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDE' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
fc5b066436bfdf5d08c73f665aaf3718
4aee13be50b37c66548d374cd9daacf46de946b1
describe
'298303' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDF' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
48b91139e41c6457b400c802650de253
b0e197eafa60c2da60b2fa63632d0910c3a469b9
describe
'298365' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDG' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
b14b932ec66e1f0c88d0a9616e7452dd
587c758ef6451c4322b5af81817af8f4bb8bc2b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDH' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
065abc53cc8ac3144a4f1bd74e044aeb
b08fd8a68c0a7f66e601af6a7c6db85e99f1b7e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDI' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
94e6ff576bd9a285ba91a418f39922f7
7e0bf5cfd53cd4a31f9f25f0578a5342e58d553f
describe
'298292' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDJ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
c7640dd1329bb7e450bc6bdc52ed56c7
6780b1165e56f152b2cb8978caf0311e9b41e083
describe
'298588' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDK' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
7b01fc534554b919e4f7bbb632888eab
c467546783c2fbb38520f7763834e87cf3ed7a9f
'2011-12-21T04:56:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDL' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
acd578a99824b0787e378f14285d6bc2
59be0d20299dc524bd6d888d50cced43db2c2b2b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDM' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
0d30d51c0adea8862428678c0e932834
9264bcfcacd07f660ad61b978a12ecea0ea82bd0
describe
'352841' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDN' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
71b061bac2a41ec538752c13765457c7
337a55db225659d21b04c3267a95ca576725e845
describe
'375237' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDO' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
1b0e64578a577ddb0c2357a93cc15960
b5c1042ca6cce57dec23c7901f65ddce59b50bd2
describe
'366466' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDP' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
e5d945779e89b9f2bcec0eb4196b655d
53c091fd55797a0e88427df72caecde9fda00bc6
describe
'383501' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDQ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
b47d9acc4bd3a767fb4ec01112f4c7fa
bbb62fda5b8e07e94759dfdf70105af1ab9428c7
'2011-12-21T04:55:45-05:00'
describe
'360411' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDR' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
18e281531099d2ebb0ca57db71bda167
998b81191f82504941e7f5033e9a2e2afb8c7591
describe
'365000' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDS' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
f638803b5e1977b20e02435da279909e
86331b633f6c1ce69001a08440537811393fc1f4
describe
'345806' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDT' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
cab0ee1599d2ad2e054d8b9fab0a1d1d
18aa1e106b815860f913b12afa4b0ee64cda93a7
describe
'361733' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDU' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
632ec150f9411de79ff22afe1e803f72
b0580243354487f0fb5cc1d42bae16994e716426
describe
'364350' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDV' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
9f34920ead58eae1b468e4a7571362f8
559ed645204c2861801ce6070f29ffface6aae07
describe
'377432' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDW' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
b091814939a9fb8583d268f8f232ad72
d1cf2ea9d1b56308f7108508e5a3d877049f3ffd
'2011-12-21T04:56:41-05:00'
describe
'353691' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDX' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
e9c78d047326523bdd9b3f261e9734e3
1be20a292704738cf8393d279b39fcbb0b88df1c
'2011-12-21T04:56:46-05:00'
describe
'370663' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDY' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
3037279f0723b2ec178c37dba6dfcdad
03051946cb515c841b60cf0e6174a34a20b30d88
describe
'351490' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKDZ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
e28e53bedd800936962d3d40691ab199
a6f4778de49a0a732f468029062930a6f5fcbd9c
describe
'349474' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEA' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
671688a9cc45ea48da8e3f2c72e2ebaa
e212536793c9843f1208e97b970990653b8ef3e5
describe
'351336' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEB' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
b4cd6089ade25917f9b0d084da273c9d
cadf9e8b3a9b8001d6c7de45b8a4c95c92f40059
describe
'355420' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEC' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
4721bc3cb13f0aa839d808958e2af5b4
8839faac8a457caeeca1e4acfa3ad4627bb9d4df
describe
'345783' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKED' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
ff63b7fcf65e300e7b28ff6a3cc0da3f
9599f9914142dfcf77b9ee7b9855993a86c44139
describe
'344908' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEE' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
139d9e347ca4ee1eaef68eda5035c3c4
e85e73e78527e4b331ec7d044a86cde30ca13725
describe
'343535' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEF' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
30690d8791d41b67db0ae5bfa3e71b29
db50cf899a13bb27d6dc2b538f525a72fd1c0408
describe
'298298' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEG' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
1b6e2c8d1b045cf63ae87394d1f14a0d
77523ad018d00efa308d65b96307384fe735ecd4
'2011-12-21T04:54:14-05:00'
describe
'361644' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEH' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
f5c11185751c376b7e394a8036b91389
0861025675105dead03281e4fc8ab9b374f1d8bf
'2011-12-21T04:55:10-05:00'
describe
'406817' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEI' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
927cd1dc2f8f87274e2c855fdb690f3e
6fc89d509c82095eb8cf5461ccad4a94892f4753
describe
'405265' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEJ' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
1cb8bc91d99f9a81f171304714060271
dfe274359693e17ed2130667090c69b1dd00ebf4
describe
'82676' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEK' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
0fe9ca2ebd24ad3fc0ac214498381b78
5e2b5d3313d9ed91897f20110a614fc7701da4d3
describe
'9870532' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEL' 'sip-files00001.tif'
3c63b1c3b8977d15ce5017ce0963ee4b
1415a2c79f704992dba27a8f9f711e17e9fcff24
describe
'9948964' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEM' 'sip-files00002.tif'
0a0bed3fd3ee8ec7caa6d8f427631354
eae09c1f128a02af8808d9e0ed605291a3111baf
describe
'8518400' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEN' 'sip-files00003.tif'
71f3559d558f0bc7202e5a3582512fbb
ccbf75e1f933c984084c9636a27d68930cfa1a0b
'2011-12-21T04:56:22-05:00'
describe
'2497472' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEO' 'sip-files00141.tif'
27047b7801e1de6e622ccb5d7b79ffc3
eec390315989cdb7a5868c1bb78454d482697b2c
describe
'2393816' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEP' 'sip-files00005.tif'
d7ab0c7e91a02e3659fe8f061b7451b1
fab8169d35b1657fe7dc768a39b5bd94da741f76
describe
'2395164' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEQ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
c2e50a459b5eec796d9116555db23ee4
29a94fb15652411f3516f427d2db149580769d99
describe
'2339616' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKER' 'sip-files00008.tif'
2acc23f7d9ed30d967dd62dbb6a8fbe0
e7a0c3da33e50047516ca49614083bbc419c2d56
describe
'2394984' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKES' 'sip-files00011.tif'
c44b59e438bb53a6ffbd39556eb33695
ef48636e7ce6df69e14fe9e901b47a21642be77d
'2011-12-21T04:53:42-05:00'
describe
'2396540' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKET' 'sip-files00012.tif'
574fcf541d16ae96bfb2b464af788065
4ba78f106a4f467d2f048d59401b0251a8532bdb
describe
'2397940' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEU' 'sip-files00013.tif'
bdb5f3dcca7fa8d003b82213ec4dc24e
ea17975a7b7737fc375880ea16fdce730ed26ba8
describe
'2400656' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEV' 'sip-files00015.tif'
f96ef5f6b557837b6a3be8f70bec20da
93129ba68c66527b6659d9fa45018510e819fbc4
describe
'2400124' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEW' 'sip-files00016.tif'
d874f2ad853f21ecc276f5df3af306d7
4edcb7519f45e404e93449af128d107f06c1cfd9
describe
'2399640' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEX' 'sip-files00017.tif'
5bda879c41761aa2d12a17e35e7908d6
d2bb71926c6c1fcd3cdb5df5d09013c82fa19c82
describe
'2399760' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEY' 'sip-files00018.tif'
b7c4d00e8d065068fb9e8b8e76565d23
aa591973d2921d3a5df3acf6cf7ce2ef512c414f
describe
'2400040' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKEZ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
f02ffe6e4e84cd0a4375ba9347a26225
ce268fcb1662d76a7d0ff2faf9863e8e1ff80d32
describe
'2399684' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFA' 'sip-files00020.tif'
e48c716bda3fd0fa90e57ed92d64bcb0
71af8e7fb4448c7e051b74b25d9356494ea9e46f
describe
'2399676' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFB' 'sip-files00021.tif'
64d5853a12aa533ae1c4eea8d9b0a719
8a9f3b50b6e38fa9ec6ae174a4ee1099fb1af403
describe
'2401896' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFC' 'sip-files00022.tif'
e54ce208f112350a780cbaf38c37cdac
636f3fcc23ce4db6e4bd5791bfb353ce6b388c1b
describe
'2399604' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFD' 'sip-files00023.tif'
d5bad5e13b0d804c53586626c7b3f807
2337a59dd812f29ccc49a025e09e4bfc338b3746
describe
'2401880' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFE' 'sip-files00024.tif'
4029aa37466cda58b1bd9c9deaca75e5
55dcc723b37ef7f38e0cf3d5c7ad6a000e39ad79
'2011-12-21T04:56:54-05:00'
describe
'2400084' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFF' 'sip-files00025.tif'
e78e7c5b7643cde763f72f5c0e447256
4bdf3ba8503e1bec35684add6a65d9b1cdac47c8
describe
'2399800' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFG' 'sip-files00026.tif'
f0f043b3cf8f7b4d3b21f44806ccca92
fb764d8f8b6457852237bc03e285bdac3b6de6ff
'2011-12-21T04:56:10-05:00'
describe
'2399992' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFH' 'sip-files00027.tif'
2499ae158950325d52ede257ccbdb9d0
dacefbfc480fb53700a2f03397ecf61da2dee7c6
describe
'2401740' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFI' 'sip-files00028.tif'
b5835299119a3baf132cabc9a3fe6604
2695d50631a561276b6f93dea1b85aea24f2d67d
describe
'2399660' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFJ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
ad519d0043bfbf1a891c9cd7eceabcb7
518764f8da21e35f28d29393f0fe473a8e52d444
describe
'2399580' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFK' 'sip-files00030.tif'
650b429135e6c57d1286ab199e656ac8
d93f52735da6570341e616955a0af0938c05613f
describe
'2399816' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFL' 'sip-files00031.tif'
02ca40e76315dba6ea78f6240585fdaf
7f27a600478c78e8cfe0eabc58f68b33c877e956
describe
'2399532' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFM' 'sip-files00032.tif'
a5114f3db73e6c7f13a07be10bf8a0e0
8f66edeceec810066047e68c388e1362b79a67dc
describe
'2399568' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFN' 'sip-files00033.tif'
0ff63dbe2c9fe15fff781ca59aceb537
6d69c6ba39b2d376c4a8225118ed2177b0e1d821
describe
'2401536' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFO' 'sip-files00034.tif'
ba79afbe0d22e9ea5fcf9d9d3c2baf98
6b90850484620050b178c55583115034cd2dfef8
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFP' 'sip-files00035.tif'
1a7996a4d32d3f19f7825c1610d9e1f9
fe84e365bcf09ed39a6c05109f333800fe421ddd
describe
'2399728' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFQ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
5eb3c77a0b689133779887a4b05343cf
11b8d26cc70c177c9c462538ade799eca6fc84be
describe
'2399792' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFR' 'sip-files00037.tif'
35e7e3e19dbb0348017759b05b91d3a2
cebef9bfe4d250bc9c35d2200183a966064427bc
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFS' 'sip-files00038.tif'
32f700f06b2361ef65eacfc4db7efbd4
d915afc079b1d72da11bc69820aa9d9127fb2d96
describe
'2397488' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFT' 'sip-files00039.tif'
bf96c3699566e9b399689b47c8fbb213
d29bfa9ad74cfd58cc16597d4451584098161bfb
describe
'2399160' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFU' 'sip-files00040.tif'
6cfe08fce3cf7cbe589f05490b87a727
068bd30f6014fa03ba1c87f4faceec64f2cfd0d5
describe
'2399828' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFV' 'sip-files00041.tif'
e4e8b8f65df9b323d5191fc26062439b
13b8f9ed482a722d6d47b472b97f6c2660cebbbc
describe
'2401656' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFW' 'sip-files00042.tif'
8e6cd229c61ced58d6690e616f5900ef
7536acd54c3b4092f9552517bafc0d92938e9e88
describe
'2400096' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFX' 'sip-files00043.tif'
261fca5266a97d4686178d45dd0792e6
94e0b14e78dba60bc25137212475a07379371a43
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFY' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9d9cf6f07a3cef0a7573cf30ca6f614a
88914e1ddffba7f4165ff476fe0f8fcbafc11203
describe
'2399916' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKFZ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
8cc37e977b67edbd39b36526be031c9a
6b643d9ca7bef0e042d4c2fc1d373e470c29c1a7
describe
'2399808' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGA' 'sip-files00046.tif'
8d7c931472f7aca56adec1d0c1a95f4c
0cbf5a9b1ba5731779a50c0e557628bb6a169b6b
describe
'2401804' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGB' 'sip-files00047.tif'
983a619a8bada9c77dcbbe99825c043b
6bf781db0766977f2452e5e44ccf29558a9be564
describe
'2399812' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGC' 'sip-files00048.tif'
81d8fadc2c807e18d5dc2ae423dee381
b5543174fc2141bfd48d584793143bf41140cbf2
describe
'2398484' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGD' 'sip-files00049.tif'
c70fcd8fd7eface161ef76174415912e
e0744d9262250f75152defce9a60312ac3630291
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGE' 'sip-files00050.tif'
bde7f450512031d77c7c6b02099a031d
fab25349083e4cafd4c55ffc6fb68805cfe866f5
describe
'2399836' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGF' 'sip-files00051.tif'
25f8fb77c02d0c82134e1712595d83ce
55466f2a9c12a78d69df2b8f8a0c249b37078b15
describe
'2402004' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGG' 'sip-files00052.tif'
f1b9bbe12c7b2da1a2c2448806c76212
1066bb41f159f2887d5a0efd0d4142a3db87bf9a
describe
'2399772' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGH' 'sip-files00053.tif'
63dcde82f82c51599fceed4f93372939
5062566e964d3ea8b03f2d2a496bb85cde52bd20
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGI' 'sip-files00054.tif'
215c5f57f927268162eafd2ba028a1be
5df219b997416120a51f013c1cff2f905e95a721
describe
'2399536' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGJ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
e14f976ad25bfabc40fea4289afad6a8
67d8001ed2c246a70ebf0bfbc90a17d360684c31
describe
'2399564' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGK' 'sip-files00056.tif'
98e6bca7afba5eafec24d0b0a8b8c5ab
0f8dbcbf1f467c3978fa1d58b5aebab01cae2249
describe
'2398880' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGL' 'sip-files00057.tif'
3d39b65064834664e84ed6fefc9fc4e6
db625615a59bc9e3f4b77d826239e303b7f69980
describe
'2399144' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGM' 'sip-files00058.tif'
030a7e503399d35f13ba67557396c8e8
393b8a9275d8dac2ecdd94a6a06e3cce9f4f0bdd
describe
'2401860' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGN' 'sip-files00059.tif'
49927e6e580834d8e6eaae587c172afb
833645bda5bfdaaa4b7205953dc7c500bc738760
describe
'2402000' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGO' 'sip-files00060.tif'
57e6d72201014c27cfca277b6a8814bd
969f63de8ace98e9b346fa0db591d52114e2d107
describe
'2401852' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGP' 'sip-files00061.tif'
ca58e9504753db25569aa37e029f6a15
575e86302e3f59109820530da4e895bf16767091
describe
'2399708' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGQ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
62fb32bc6d5ee6d1b50157d9e2ec47a2
90b6652009167452881b92d18d4e05dbe25afc8e
describe
'2399388' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGR' 'sip-files00063.tif'
591807037ea970bf79f7a94fb8d64dcf
eef8cb0a4a2ca858595eeae9eb36573f40f0c794
describe
'2399888' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGS' 'sip-files00064.tif'
ced0c945c154663f26c2bb5535ef6490
74ab74a656db292b3c5f7e6a3701a62b7cc7ce26
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGT' 'sip-files00065.tif'
28590f5d0ceb49a4e2633e8dd78f90c5
d8a89496a6835861a8c87d6a8284112deb9ba1ce
describe
'2399876' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGU' 'sip-files00066.tif'
be86d1d07fb83197bf15b1afc59a8fd6
0e3a0fdc9f0c00e58a20979cd59e9cf1bd77753d
'2011-12-21T04:54:47-05:00'
describe
'2401600' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGV' 'sip-files00067.tif'
c3d95f86a630a0c222d98468cf51c7da
9cfa963cf258845f8a0ebb7770237b9b56e582eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGW' 'sip-files00068.tif'
969f8e5fc07d426115e8d572432134fc
45dc9f631dad0e7cf9337a3f29b6fcc28c3c0b3d
describe
'2401312' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGX' 'sip-files00069.tif'
c67b38037b1a2b73f18d9945b43ba562
17c416bc6b5b2e4ff6b11ebf8672f19fab852372
describe
'2399608' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGY' 'sip-files00070.tif'
f6607529cefa57e8035eaf1b3a7b07f9
ec41436351c589ccfa881391746c58cb0949accd
'2011-12-21T04:53:58-05:00'
describe
'2398776' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKGZ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
ab9b7fcc4e2d9c3bce79a5b1297d4250
b79ee007fb14c91df126399c648d9c665246a831
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHA' 'sip-files00072.tif'
72b1535589294a94432ed802a0699942
a0ef9caf3d4bdfb8a1d559456b6f603f4b7842eb
describe
'2398720' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHB' 'sip-files00073.tif'
2b9fc3621aae673ea66d2f1570dad439
f8f617036787b512bb7673629b2fe64cd0ba2a04
describe
'2399672' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHC' 'sip-files00074.tif'
425e2ce3b8d7f8a3a9c7d7cbd92b4cb5
a76678b3f4849ef63570db6f34c5533eebb588d0
describe
'2399764' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHD' 'sip-files00075.tif'
c16b828677f076d41acb95097fac8201
d4bbeb46f4140b3f58c8cb3183308216c097d264
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHE' 'sip-files00076.tif'
e20154ba76f1dfde2ea17d7904dcfa79
a3670d0fce16383e878c799cfb70cd3e537c3c92
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHF' 'sip-files00077.tif'
391d04e62bf10a02525e76c590cc7876
548ec8e12b9244868593796f8d26d7ca4955c921
describe
'2398708' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHG' 'sip-files00078.tif'
41da5ffd58d78a8166f4c001dc5fce74
640483b0bf1d2b294334414556d64229ddd53259
describe
'2396932' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHH' 'sip-files00079.tif'
fc8a6b348e5969fe81144b3bbd464f5f
6636a0eb47a2490957cec15afd4ddd6827a4f89d
describe
'2398964' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHI' 'sip-files00080.tif'
d42fadd749250bc153fc33602d33197e
ebe7a67206fdbd905ad6fc8259addae4b458c192
describe
'2399480' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHJ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
6faf209c0460420045cc813057c8da7d
1f08ed6fdfac2814cefdc81d227e38f57774da93
describe
'2399860' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHK' 'sip-files00082.tif'
720052aadb0e322a2b5a87bce765cdb3
5e382f7d3d8cb13aeb67b3986cf6928868af3ddc
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHL' 'sip-files00083.tif'
af4950560ec6d3d7379455c53ce6a3c7
7cd7c8de523a45f6ff612f26d7694f5f7f7d714c
'2011-12-21T04:56:35-05:00'
describe
'2399576' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHM' 'sip-files00084.tif'
0f57088d0c4e64d6f9e90934672d6824
32ee29c79904e84865964451f00aeb9ee57c01b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHN' 'sip-files00085.tif'
9581c0eb6bd9f3779744d3a20f727639
520942b42cd07b3024bf38c8e7739f3aaa9e786b
describe
'2399380' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHO' 'sip-files00086.tif'
f1dc24406fe852e43c401fd8abbd1474
2bd0049707ffa6d2df45aef32548e8237b0ef675
'2011-12-21T04:54:37-05:00'
describe
'2400260' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHP' 'sip-files00087.tif'
9803fbc0144f1d7d5f96b417790a7ea3
8c9a4837d3b33a3689ceb8ae404f8ccf29e6db4f
describe
'2399736' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHQ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
86ec3159b22e9b0f0cb828f3c273d54c
d5a88645e18c3062bb93af3093001df3908854ac
describe
'2399612' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHR' 'sip-files00089.tif'
798db38c7f2940a8cb34689c7b3a489b
2fca8f80e446994e283c630a8fb5d5161dd85e6e
describe
'2401468' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHS' 'sip-files00090.tif'
d7dcf0ce1a3ca2f385c71c2e24abc064
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describe
'2399528' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHT' 'sip-files00091.tif'
58d7b5e9ffe2b5fe74b72fb5ef9e98e8
46b74b25b39db2cc8416b1ca5af4bc14d1ae21f7
'2011-12-21T04:55:58-05:00'
describe
'2399004' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHU' 'sip-files00092.tif'
5c5c54f218bc7dac3cd5d22d293a9d92
81e670eff1f3fdbe07bdf1f516da66644ca2b96d
'2011-12-21T04:55:25-05:00'
describe
'2398832' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHV' 'sip-files00093.tif'
c3c0f845dba338d643eb19e545fe67ff
de0edb733bf4657035f97882542df39ecc2f8459
describe
'2401984' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHW' 'sip-files00094.tif'
b78509e845e75ee3b3f89c7d20cd366e
6cbb1cabebefd530878f79a6445b42bbffb3c654
describe
'2399912' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHX' 'sip-files00095.tif'
81461659dd0293896b416f99d8999500
94697f0a112c82c6c1d6b022523bcd1e1386dbb1
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHY' 'sip-files00096.tif'
05d214d47cc25e1e1b258c92116615be
d9bd59ea5b91bca2c93332e536abeaac51ddd982
describe
'2399456' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKHZ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
2f44b162105aac948dea0b26318ea2ed
bdc6fe93fdc16947d5536ae721a142daf99b9cb9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIA' 'sip-files00098.tif'
b81f464d6d10633dbbd4c5ab84e8a2cd
def3c46dbb888b44c64dc413deead79c5af0cabb
describe
'2399784' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIB' 'sip-files00099.tif'
44ee831b3dd01da978ccf58ced5566ff
fceab0cbba1216d1511e41ec7e964709cb60c51d
describe
'2399500' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIC' 'sip-files00100.tif'
2cc2c1cd571c4b2bf91941fa5d1f90c2
fabd903d805b2ded87f21b1647e30485b2e9001c
describe
'2399316' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKID' 'sip-files00101.tif'
f8b6bb56b66e9c9261fe14c16f40b036
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describe
'2399696' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIE' 'sip-files00102.tif'
3d2cad9d35bdf38cf1ddadced59f1a3c
88e0168b80f3a8f46a8c605ae1e7bcfee2c2b9a5
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIF' 'sip-files00103.tif'
38c69520d4df32e876be1ca0ae884eb5
c6509ff9fc7ac40233caf58c0513ec2335234789
describe
'2398772' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIG' 'sip-files00104.tif'
a222ee25b74e278d3b95bdb6f95a97a3
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describe
'2398416' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIH' 'sip-files00105.tif'
8a44019a125cedb94d282c2034d168fb
0e37f32260c8e5e3bcba28a67d7ea8c16c9cfa8c
describe
'2401688' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKII' 'sip-files00106.tif'
40dc53bfe4ea018d2c32058bb75554eb
a1b4a9d2519bfec59f3d544051c047ab1ec27b31
describe
'2399588' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIJ' 'sip-files00107.tif'
2a514af354a9fcaa9b5cc3003f32d402
95499835df7b72905ca9add26e46343da8acee63
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIK' 'sip-files00108.tif'
0de405a17085e1dfc5a9ec88ab6cb2b4
4cee06813663ad300da6ad9beda352d3ef2183a0
describe
'2399436' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIL' 'sip-files00109.tif'
95ca927cd922ee9594dd5b8d19240a96
e285f09ab7a7026aa797b3d3316632792cc6b19d
'2011-12-21T04:53:39-05:00'
describe
'2399228' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIM' 'sip-files00110.tif'
e94c45570579ef7f811e3d3c391a74bc
a7bb1bde39f7bd74b64e929a4c2e35cfa9b592bc
describe
'2399136' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIN' 'sip-files00111.tif'
c986d778768681d2324d9868999c800d
4b056c7c6ae3d7f9b78fdd9528c80df4e2dad92d
describe
'2399924' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIO' 'sip-files00112.tif'
71b40b61158dd60d15e15a156787f715
75a9e4fe0a876625c3da1b1ba5e62cf2a916cc93
describe
'2399216' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIP' 'sip-files00113.tif'
dd2d1d3eeb4e691b96749f2288c0c1b2
e352836eda52c34f25cd37437a0f3b32d82164e8
describe
'2399768' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIQ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
28acf6c0f0c2fce525070546b3733339
c3ef9069e73161bd9ca537cf0af66493e95a092c
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIR' 'sip-files00115.tif'
f2b120775883d24503cb7596addc06cc
822e579f8ac7335b6ce857e47592fe4b277f5135
describe
'2399652' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIS' 'sip-files00116.tif'
016c5d865f7ab4f3a29289ca74176ddb
ed459676f4e6486182f306f91e912f3bb379b4f6
describe
'2401624' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIT' 'sip-files00117.tif'
0b212c1365defc15100c4f5b7980ceda
e49a55cb099b6943add0eb6a2a9b4b5a9e072f6d
describe
'2399820' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIU' 'sip-files00118.tif'
b5247df46acda90a98ac76189135ef18
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describe
'2399936' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIV' 'sip-files00119.tif'
47986437633d378879ad436f41c3a3ae
c901554031bcb94f21bcad558cb2197c9d2479ac
'2011-12-21T04:55:35-05:00'
describe
'2835648' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIW' 'sip-files00121.tif'
7de7088b3120f354a7bad491a0327f28
d662db96df5b394875fb291eb4216119821c2924
'2011-12-21T04:54:51-05:00'
describe
'3016168' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIX' 'sip-files00122.tif'
7e4e8fc9563fb44d7c631abe348bf007
3b0344b0cfd8af9c4389b46da8c3b79a63e6d5c3
describe
'2946028' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIY' 'sip-files00123.tif'
fb8f409321ba1aff8444de15c0224112
a635950fead63fe6f9778d27082f7ed351e5a251
describe
'3082588' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKIZ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
440b5de561b50ad42def8a3de394dce6
71ef4c625753eb6532af8e1c14b4f91996c7177a
describe
'2897720' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJA' 'sip-files00125.tif'
e2ce3d1c60a25e4a9ca2064620132cb6
8d24712ae26859a1e2012fd13e346280d13a6f16
describe
'2934964' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJB' 'sip-files00126.tif'
0a50c0d67f4a335676a19641c85f825c
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describe
'2781072' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJC' 'sip-files00127.tif'
ec7782df7a8f6b62e3b1eaf95247d7f5
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describe
'2908264' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJD' 'sip-files00128.tif'
db647cb2c7226e77165ac5b5d0c9ef33
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describe
'2929280' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJE' 'sip-files00129.tif'
68f1ed070ca3d7293a160c46d945def7
382e934e3505d108d717cdabe34c52ea922966c6
describe
'3035228' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJF' 'sip-files00130.tif'
7a56e7db3fc9dd0eb7469af3a4ca515e
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describe
'2843916' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJG' 'sip-files00131.tif'
20184c08766ca0d9c7b848110457a393
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describe
'2979716' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJH' 'sip-files00132.tif'
1a635c45df118063262a94327b501723
c9956f5f58798fc0440b87ef21eb6e0d1eca2687
describe
'2826696' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJI' 'sip-files00133.tif'
e48af5a1a482e3a7d801929c9ef8d5b6
169f46eadda98af14a55796bd3cd593dc264da7a
describe
'2810376' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJJ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
43fe9f87c60908f17b2b8c0f8c43dbae
982f5b19132c455df4b39e333aca5be01844176c
'2011-12-21T04:55:03-05:00'
describe
'2825104' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJK' 'sip-files00135.tif'
e8d6d81d9c8b8fe3826acce8f6ff3e3a
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describe
'2857752' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJL' 'sip-files00136.tif'
251718ed9293b9476f0343a377574f2d
a993196ad99fde3a5ad442484717049344fef761
describe
'2780712' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJM' 'sip-files00137.tif'
da57f30e9cc50df4bed462fad950389e
a110e4850a269fa9efd9e1c09b50aea68a50a7c1
describe
'2773612' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJN' 'sip-files00138.tif'
199cf9d7b9cb34ca59603857100d2707
972c6d52caba636a6f4e2ec4bb3c7e2cf47c2461
describe
'2762720' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJO' 'sip-files00139.tif'
4e7e6b785b40d697b6167e861ae1c2eb
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describe
'2394832' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJP' 'sip-files00140.tif'
235364975329346c42109cdab89405f1
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describe
'8699612' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJQ' 'sip-files00142.tif'
e0485d4f38574885875eff48b9c3471b
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describe
'9776360' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJR' 'sip-files00143.tif'
20d1134e1f516daa44031df52782a54a
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describe
'9733460' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJS' 'sip-files00144.tif'
abcb4d2cbec6bedca142873653256c43
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describe
'1990840' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJT' 'sip-files00145.tif'
6e0ed57cb8b3088390f689a9b0206b6c
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describe
'197646' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJU' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
710dcaabef0e7a005015ff831ffa9a09
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describe
'344313' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJV' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
efa53a04b3189250a4af392c4dcd856a
09d15a377e06c8bd8ced5259556c0cad1e661838
describe
'317931' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJW' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
a1641650130b4e5a9f04ddb6d9842693
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describe
'25900' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJX' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
0ba6690b6b6af66f85c9f4dac44516fb
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describe
'88771' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJY' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
c442490125eb6cbd4532d1c2565404f6
91a8942f04df819b7259d8318b9f83cb13c9735f
describe
'134717' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKJZ' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
6e91c731c9f4e88da97fb4aa5819a5c8
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describe
'237537' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKA' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
bd74e0142317b30273b3bc68d2707cb0
e70352850fb1c00ef18e3ce164ba8dc23c7a87f0
describe
'138663' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKB' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
8e87bac910c6d2d2a94c92628caa9754
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describe
'72559' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKC' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
f74e85981cda7ac720efd1c20c377c03
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describe
'144441' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKD' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
bc0a9483f23a741d01f129245e97a8ff
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describe
'158399' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKE' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
de4f08cfdcf7035be0d948812c72feea
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describe
'138825' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKF' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
b441a26e7486278dcd0e2bac8237a968
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describe
'192107' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKG' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
c8d180569ae2a91ee19d6c31fc8bc785
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describe
'202008' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKH' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
f62483f67e129628674bfba6abfee4bf
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describe
'208832' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKI' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
b2785ad04f13e8ac8faaebbdda30e9d2
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describe
'177684' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKJ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
4b95619b9d881dc90bb34af4d2c75030
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describe
'184371' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKK' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
dfe8abfc3222f55982439536ca07f5f5
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describe
'200791' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKL' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
a2ade29406075ea4ee27baf504e32ca4
40f145dda90d006f9875a1069f160708c58bfcfe
describe
'192627' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKM' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
ea4561814a2a6c31dcc7e79f1af5a0a9
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describe
'195468' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKN' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
e5f56d9450b94779eed75b15fa37bd6e
728423e86851f7b1fef64e2136cc5628689fa328
describe
'203503' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKO' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
89702c3cac79596352288a489ba12a55
515ef9e31280ab0e688f5284692096023e6d4a90
'2011-12-21T04:56:33-05:00'
describe
'202261' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKP' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
d4a805d368d2e9af5462da3508cd5a82
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describe
'206746' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKQ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
4b7ab93b9c59eb193a5b1109d9234ec0
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describe
'176760' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKR' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
ecb412cb2631754847e03548a6a517f5
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describe
'185440' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKS' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
76eb5021acc2a0ea23199c4d72a309a5
68881abda463d4ee64dde5fa32372a5a87a25eb3
'2011-12-21T04:53:57-05:00'
describe
'192761' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKT' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
54f84b6f6b91090bdc97837e4594e019
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describe
'199016' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKU' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
895d6ee18852e99e59717c04e4d9122c
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describe
'184889' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKV' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
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describe
'183190' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKW' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
8d1aff664b140c45bc4e915108e40434
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describe
'165233' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKX' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
ae971f12500125d3442391919d3c6ad7
19d4db3b0c9f81c5d282b93c044b2b7688ec3184
'2011-12-21T04:54:43-05:00'
describe
'165890' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKY' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
c2df58b9ba06bd419b4f96d9f186bb11
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describe
'194574' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKKZ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
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describe
'198507' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKLA' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
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describe
'197092' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKLB' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
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'221859' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKON' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
96df19f2860349716ecb6e0fcec04731
8d05d9a280703c87802462ca97a55f034b1dfdd2
describe
'231461' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKOO' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
c5c2309879212ee9dcddfa18feef3dea
e449d2c241c0358bd7f0184a3f880982658f76b7
describe
'232742' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKOP' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
543fc0bf3a165508a86812f4e2228d4a
f7444efdc343ab85c40b9b7b7ef5aae11647f1ae
describe
'205087' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKOQ' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
5e3d5cb4afea46e57bcc3ae3c7176914
3ea23528140f21d818bd78d935a3c8de887d50b1
describe
'203565' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKOR' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
9bdf985de9acb39de77ec6e5c5490521
590cb6a2dec016865484050d1efe2b22e605ac3a
describe
'190153' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKOS' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
855f468a22bb48d66c90a75d16937f4e
3d30c6dd1f2ac24d3a3adc695f47fd99102bdc60
describe
'202855' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKOT' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
0b748605ed496b4668462b8d57fea605
ec0ca4f760c0abffe6b77d2b5741502e38b0383b
describe
'241508' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKOU' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
b37a4f3b4b60528d3c9c39bbe0ab24c1
ab36fd069f4a0ff4cc52b9d3f8b448e7b986bc77
describe
'253176' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKOV' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
119f4f9e5461e43c49493a1d813cdb3c
442f55073fc4c1b911935b5ebb8a742d6da984fe
describe
'217173' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKOW' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
557e4e975f9949a3debb23254cb552e8
6daa1ccfa0b60d5f5414503617f34420e6c9129f
describe
'217592' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKOX' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
eb15787fdc61dd9f9f03ed2e63269094
f90604f89e6a5050bf8fa1764752e9e117b718da
describe
'48156' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKOY' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
e4cf768b7590e443c9b27d961390054e
927867283b42a39e10f460bd03e48f1bce56fc1e
describe
'356351' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKOZ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
0caff5c0e25fb8c060d4c9eb6fbafccd
0ac60bcdc02bb1553586ee14ba71d82e6feffe62
describe
'342281' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPA' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
7220dfe70d9a96ec1edc6c80f7982cfa
9524e19145523bbe8e06c310c7bc5eaa4d514126
describe
'144933' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPB' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
2ffbf2d9556c451e5bdff8994d2bd757
1de4e3b621b49be3b0e4bc37e823fcbb3e50b9bd
describe
'56315' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPC' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
3b8edf422282233655329b75e3bb8e95
cf370358d54f438957f8625f1a26d5acba342790
describe
'18818' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPD' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
c5678d5a36c56b6f928fe6813f6d23cd
66582f037cdb80064dc9127b9a8c725b898124eb
describe
'47150' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPE' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
422741a02e413c5c5a42ce905ac20fab
861037b5a4f3872af833bca92bec20d80a5e582f
describe
'86196' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPF' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
af1d4044abc58e74dccbc72529117ce5
7e178188397d13d6b67ad5f12652266f041e3307
describe
'27040' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPG' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
53b9361b4dad7767c70790e030b8b4b2
3e833a76f79d14d3f2722ef727472abb4a3b7ea4
describe
'87303' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPH' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
e02526a1767f071b256dc347d1e7e352
31220e8e42d2f98b07c223c5f43d9a500e516356
describe
'28296' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPI' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
c0509c05508bff26247278930dd23921
6b3df77f8e5234d620c0d1086c3596f0ae62a255
describe
'22650' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPJ' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
e32795bf2bdd67d960a59d57d1b96c35
3ca351712ca57cfe36506907171d558d1aa590ed
describe
'11116' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPK' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
d73d48001e58cdd609333dd4edeb5460
a21acf47cdf5d2d470351c42aea15829db85a221
describe
'27535' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPL' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
3e9b4cc5f571f98936659e2e761ca990
53a3b35ddbaf09c0ff4540c4c7cf7ea9fc9d7306
describe
'11650' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPM' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
93cc712633e0b5f9fbd6d7d93a5ce9c5
aaa9bc3fdcababfa556b2e6eabe3f72969b360a9
describe
'70158' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPN' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
583edab220f5ef2c477e72e00396c380
c6c597be59dc95d4605c9923469e1e7296c739f8
describe
'28012' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPO' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
e821dddf80775e0dcf3046426c11b480
06e4dd15fb15604e0790645079a473a92ba8b6c1
describe
'34874' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPP' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
49fe280e293a4c99b06b2f30bb931448
bfe9acce42af2fda1e316f83d5f81ae898d48464
describe
'15021' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPQ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
60ddd8168194635d6c36bc734b516922
9c8275f44eca06be8d4ede673c53f2f6672c8fd9
describe
'23978' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPR' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
e66cbd5d401e10726602eae30f22b96d
3d4bccf6c7312771652a21c27ef7844c43c3dc65
describe
'12720' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPS' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
ded9d2418ccaa752e76173e914869914
618a6ed2afc9934b3b03746041434e36813290db
describe
'44493' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPT' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
31fc8c76cfa478f68747521765032c12
3c15f3655be0c2224fa579cbc2f557c5d8b28b26
describe
'19497' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPU' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
66417fe185ecf1b5a154c2d78c9fb065
a48bcf4127b3ebbce8120ac3b3ecf36d8f92fd10
describe
'51943' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPV' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
e80cca6de232d9ee7ebf9c4f0b367659
929094103692d342639d337baba0d73f6a71613b
describe
'21809' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPW' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
c53c17f8978a4e9f02328e4fefe8b5f6
8ea219b9ea80987e66d8663347e94d77ba280f6a
describe
'58993' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPX' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
d6ff1169b3854186ffbf622085b3a542
f1079dbaaeada595f968469f6447c16a4bbed6bb
describe
'25337' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPY' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
98ccba9b889cc0e4055605bc35681543
c6f6821416abd6d22817e053b58cf5ad9a9bd3fe
describe
'66285' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKPZ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
4fea0e8c5840677ff5429278b04c9db6
ba2953b73eb2cc45f6d8287346ddc816c59c59c7
describe
'25834' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQA' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
716a71ffb69e7c8a891ff85199f6713e
426e4aa29f9bac03d609720b3e2b16f2ab1462bf
describe
'66628' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQB' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
629e6abe51cc244d17eae5d1c467de7d
3da3aa23707fe74abf1edafba3ef00a9e48eacc9
describe
'25870' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQC' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
d096e2a79c47fabd8b436bf90bbffad6
b5366bd3e4be66cfb06a3d223e325c20cd101012
describe
'68301' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQD' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
990293613eb2a77edd63e717782ac6e3
c4600fb26ea5968ce3e9e18ea402cc7a7334859d
describe
'26509' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQE' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
65ced3b780a13d392921effd4c805c0f
ad7c04f84dbfae5a5a04a125901cd3c00aca7919
describe
'63545' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQF' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
e0cda08c415e6cf5c326ecf82c2ff812
8bcd2bd502e9c912acc4e4e4eaaa7d6d6456fd6b
describe
'25266' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQG' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
f26619d8921ed8629509c6650b9c736f
1656c5a310c0cab81b108c46c9084aaab4fa4fd9
describe
'64510' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQH' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
93d88010972dd3dfb0b7e89648a76e92
6901b3b40e893f3e9c02867cfa40c3929a599989
describe
'25501' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQI' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
22698207551516e4a9c4df2221050faf
2ea1805c2d06cc00f3b86a9420d8cda0322edce4
describe
'66759' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQJ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
d61620b861ecb4c3d7642ccd745624fa
ef45502f9a5e25d5ce362c06eb3f30a1ccc1f7d4
describe
'26228' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQK' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
dcfbfe3a7cc4d014b75590b35d7d6753
a9a1ac54533ff82c293ab9874b22b3668d239748
describe
'63577' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQL' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
0cf183f22aff7d81c5aaabeeb9f2c173
1e81ab44fb828069d18b4a25ac4687be730118a5
describe
'25443' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQM' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
17d8dc0ccbc1da8dca2f6777e33ac786
56c25ab5920af94e0d5eec3e2188b8b45ef6f27f
describe
'67651' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQN' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
a86050f9cd1f0228ec50bff740c770de
cf709872ecdaf6d56611423b17c0c8b00f113cc4
describe
'26282' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQO' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
369fee6478d6e09e977e775609baa4fd
9e7528be17e021d6c2a12e7073e3a0a556d7f7e5
describe
'68645' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQP' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
04ff15832694e8a643a9bfe4602f6e71
ac2ea6ddaff284ad63a4ce99314943f8ebea83f3
describe
'26236' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQQ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
32926b067e83b57ef3103124abd9e741
a1c425563c03991f9146724a98bf32724296a578
describe
'67460' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQR' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
507dbaf1dae880f00e93fef21e5b07a2
3d5a0ff373b9393b061f127f87503aed159c4f10
describe
'26167' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQS' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
a8e85db59b35c6a65819016dc3877cd1
bdb53dc07c3bb65ea319da56ccf6e97587156e72
describe
'68985' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQT' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
df3e44f150ed78695867a2bd76481e6d
2d9eb59925975fbf48b9cc8512d622438c971764
describe
'26561' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQU' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
b5f1173be686c848d73d9d6526a8d3da
30a76286f946f0ee79cdc54c34177c8556548c57
describe
'61145' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQV' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
4b0e0d379646416d31e9b79e02f8df14
cf80aeefb370fe687e2e43a93026cbdb0f05e124
describe
'24864' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQW' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
477a0fcaf045833683cdf0a312453b78
8962fcafc0d60530edbbf5c28596eac11822182c
describe
'64458' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
eda89ab7f4eede75e5ff08351b1fa2f6
d3e2acbd22b14c0ddc27ea0a81f0f86d53566d97
describe
'25558' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQY' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
8343016870bad892bc1fa4865e6aef06
7533cf2a8751dd50d245d3c2b14d49d3acbbda07
describe
'64123' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKQZ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
18208cb0ac9a9f934c04bb03718633c9
375f377bb9554edcb31994b27d5eeb76ade10665
describe
'25319' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRA' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
0fde322f832bc2659eaf90683240d09d
10c36d86e875d71665b32cbad8033364a02a6066
describe
'67703' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRB' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
e35c17e9643ec58304f860cf0a61887a
4778c2bd710478e44e204fe3ddc21eb9c127a2f3
describe
'26134' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRC' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
559c237266f403443d1a89f697320a15
5454dd2847e525c96ef38a675372ddde50eb2a6c
describe
'64454' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRD' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
d77059d2a193cb54fbf1027145c3afa1
7dbbacb5dc11da2facb31381a5f41d07dd4d1d16
describe
'24976' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRE' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
fba34dd0ebd68e44d76b124f7ee9ddcc
b6424e59a2ab6677401487437eb9ab79d0d8158b
describe
'64313' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRF' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
8e64ca3086aaddcff4daead522033b09
bca811622da925159f19b751c1f7a47ca8e5637e
describe
'25424' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRG' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
99932fc046ae216e185a5b394a1858f3
445dd98e4856656b15d02eea5e36edf102b72de7
describe
'60728' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRH' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
f8b7df3079362e9dced04a185bd53d92
ffdd86a94b54fb609c644bd85608c8dcea1409bc
describe
'25095' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRI' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
d3a623bc46ac463ee08663e5d8d69871
eccd4713429a62e6302326e57adc9e3e5de3fa8e
describe
'62098' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRJ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
90470864ade00af133472f15558a85f6
e43dcda631e9d47d30e69aafb67198e567dd9fa6
describe
'25512' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRK' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
4d230c22305d71855c142aabca9be4dd
a41997eafe16407dce6ad765c03290ca5a98b1fb
describe
'64259' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRL' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
c02c2923ae623cba8bf37b442b2e763b
c8460de7bd9a8262c9771754f8c0f511b90003bb
describe
'25349' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRM' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
ea356eb614101d79e1f31c8023af1de8
b35a5e2186d6714d41f29e4888fa9b6ecfaf1e41
describe
'66372' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRN' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
56c76b313c1848997160423a888a6a84
ee756a42703fa85ae0cd20323c23206a11c68777
describe
'25841' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRO' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
60fdd958be17a90cbcdda8410b064a20
f6f1703768091692f13baee9b160f28edd39e887
describe
'66023' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRP' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
0f35313dc4a7dec1046deafa791008a4
0eed90cb89a30f4062d66f1952f8efc609c93f35
describe
'26351' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRQ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
adce77905c20dd12e49cd83ee5455ee8
e0085b9907fa1a11c1f470f9f4c9f698e0988641
describe
'43764' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRR' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
64d71566533bbe700a1f4d111af9a14e
24b9a0c073333cb429fab5e89eb9e33df348902d
describe
'18615' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRS' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
ae642fb0cca4ab6b7b07f9d105c24726
f27bf9d3f285d1d0c2601d72383d60e7ec1ef48f
describe
'58274' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRT' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
17f750b986602bf14f5160f80d8da08f
3d5529e047228fb54b48539de9a940ecb0dbb829
describe
'23786' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRU' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
4902c7b397f080f1bb31e6b497bfb69a
96defd3d40a3e84a38d7aa51721ffa7fdbba66ce
describe
'65081' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRV' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
4ee77195ee3fa50eb5126a084409b409
7a3501b7240f6fac2596c2a914546447333870a9
describe
'25942' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRW' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
aec3bd110f1ff5855e4d7b7b89bacdcc
c7524e207587a8bcb6546cc4631aa5dfe9b43162
describe
'64598' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRX' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
4e5c1f7860b91612f1ad9f8411b38887
e83660acbeb36b0e19a675fb05b0b302e221f758
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRY' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
85f25683d9d6cfa5b64b8a2dcf4ae7bb
ce54c2e8fb8467fefc8b82095cad6c3c69d418d7
describe
'69025' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKRZ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
fc61ed72121e80ae4eb231a2b9562ac8
6ff7c2fc03901218c79ee9e6c00a6816c7cef4e5
describe
'26709' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSA' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
9fd9c7aeffa87b2769c674559a3603cf
28008d18ba35f7518406949c7c570f28c99b9fa6
describe
'62052' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSB' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
97310bf8485e67bb363d1beab8f00388
72df02ac82e918367146a924beb57e34a3e5ba3c
describe
'26111' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSC' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
0a4823128c397e359e27549adc358569
cd4bceb1fab136344ec43508dcb32ec6237507a2
describe
'67543' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSD' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
449ab3938574f8f41fe9e7b86407b82e
ede0d26bb32c8136c2fc09d3f13ac63605d1fb96
describe
'26196' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSE' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
60b872f0846e2830c0288dfb3f45087b
8edf1d0c0af084ab354472334489c189617784fd
describe
'63225' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSF' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
13f60f78f0f779ba5d95b1325530aafe
d93056c1e761950069396a67e2b6ab26c3c3b18b
describe
'25446' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSG' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
72b76fc5f50ffbcaea230695027de980
c3990262cb399ed1914b71f48bec1f08756bcd97
describe
'65581' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSH' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
145fd566a0bc8448a8d50e6751841b6a
3f96c46d707e16881d1f9b8e3cda59a7c1466a9a
describe
'26184' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSI' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e8290718bd17420ff55ccd3c6a6a8f89
220731bc29a64b1d57bd3fceb5e3f9a210790fd3
describe
'65533' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSJ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
2df35d6e0236c0ae536045821b840f3b
e7722d8264cac7638e5ed3fab4c279a552ea3bf3
describe
'25952' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSK' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
b5509c5dc560d640962c29f03f468046
3c4b7bdcf4f6a9d9dcebf970909422796bd21bad
describe
'63191' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSL' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
de3058769b98062628fd21451edf3020
efa56e2e4ca2497b0582a5637da68298bdf7a4c1
describe
'25647' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSM' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
773810ba5f33e79614754fbbd4815db9
13292d8aaf7dc4764beb376e63b064639b0c11d7
describe
'64803' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSN' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
3e28d752096f877ca7b79f144f874845
b4281c7e0b6991ca565bcd4f5d80867809f74724
describe
'25304' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSO' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
50923c340584ee495e859637c6710892
660ff1152c54091024537c0aa445528301f54a83
describe
'67780' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSP' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
2474e609ecfc015b93ed81000bafcc87
bad77c72e974ca5bedc31edde6263263cdcc3c61
describe
'26257' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSQ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
5bcb4fcf8443e8c4b9100a8ff92b9c81
d7bb32663c5c811884e0c3d293bbfd8e8bb0f1d8
describe
'62642' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSR' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
225003c904a7bddeb661b11813d8ba8b
e784a354dc5e00bab4797886b235300c8e33442b
describe
'25909' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSS' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
6c3534199cc349180a043a267b188552
b3cbee68503bb72d5f4739b7151f76c60c19e46d
describe
'63667' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKST' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
1b45a460bd2744318bbba42f7ef393cf
660148d7bedf0e004a480998cab316115ef71828
describe
'25462' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSU' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
60588ad1ade2a18abd08dd9e42e4875a
24c62712f6ad5fb692da9b3fe33dd68cc6929fe9
describe
'63491' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSV' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
939f524635b5b595f1f806a531294316
81aa3307e31e444c6981c87a7fec1e1489de4edb
describe
'25729' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSW' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
b8c0335b6669ddaafc5814d41e6babdb
3b59f5ff6d1e0a7eb1d8b0d2634026df80e1e85e
describe
'59671' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSX' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
a38fadfa12e89f3c3a07853b0b3523c2
efdfd96343aee6d9f44e327a4c8b69e9cda8da85
describe
'24765' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSY' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
2c44178c9f27ed789b21ea04d1b0e010
ce7e04fcf43d27b250c1af446530d5b8de92112f
describe
'62997' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKSZ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
255eff857960e53818e562f4aa5cab94
9bd5a3aec3c499d337dfc1191de37c9b8543d016
describe
'25388' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTA' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
fdedc358e0059e05938e4eec5737d9e8
70d226d50e5504ebf6b273a1bc67a630a16bc826
describe
'50989' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTB' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
318e22d58fe6884e8cfd98d1762af362
1808d82544c7654c01ba594aa47663e894b4ae67
describe
'20508' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTC' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
1752f14498a92c83a044ced6af9a4c91
bd0812cd2d79a449d31318eed95156a16cd4be0d
describe
'62120' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTD' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
d60f310c4f6b17a991180e54d4052dae
0a97c1a6a9cf147a1b20fead690dca440a002d8b
describe
'23674' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTE' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
5b207a57a13675152908955db860f0bd
bf56390e622a603217901bcda167388bab649792
describe
'67963' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTF' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
ba67d2660b80efd5556441ad508eedfd
1e690a52facd5f78ce7bb96ece3902f83a35cc43
describe
'25906' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTG' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
2d858e84a8641b1b042ceffd9936ee27
0c1859bf75c409df27c4e518a194b65dd5b686de
describe
'65116' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTH' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
af59a3e79556c22363c1e0904c7d046f
f20a116bb285927dc95907420ab87538c6016a46
describe
'26070' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTI' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
fa844f26e94a01df6de3c81388e66a97
2465f4a514bb2742408390a3aff0acd1954335d9
describe
'64397' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTJ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
d64ebe2a39b2efbb6c7dc2153e3d3c52
ae4255529ef78480b622aebb1a41d96ac0944665
describe
'25747' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTK' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
56d30dbf77c62b5d4c51cf133645541a
6dad99110f2e5b7ee6ba17bb4ea45a049f08da17
describe
'62562' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTL' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
41fc6fe2fd494d9b056d004ba7963803
0215964bf8f72ca479740de16499b593ffb12485
describe
'25541' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTM' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
dd03dc0a6e373f6859ad726bcb071dc8
42aae5e6772a5095504cc3b0bf50ac18a9d5efb7
describe
'61690' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTN' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
ad214ca780501dcc9e2b00543f3263c6
d1d5542e7c7ceefb251e46cbf880ca708d5a3ce4
describe
'24620' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTO' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
19c5b0fc5c0cc03fb46e3db2282d37d0
cd343e2000aba651408e7963d05d5ad5e02ddc81
describe
'61411' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTP' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
6fd2fabb748906a6cdbe7bb425bdf156
f9ece52850ccd40c0d3e4a10d2375923c66b6762
describe
'25526' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTQ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
2bef9450e23962aca73d7060b4a4db67
820677f185e0f907b4cd00b7d3c1a818a7ac7efd
describe
'63469' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTR' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
92d6b305fca41fbdf7e26a835ec53cb7
aced77ef653238ee2dd68455e419d0d5f7313734
describe
'26121' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTS' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
fba79f7ae6abf9bdea6bf1441cc8406e
39508983468b951e3187c1095dcd52c57ed20cd9
describe
'66014' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTT' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
3ed86ce93cfa366090e089ef8c62841f
8e0ce395e0bd3762ee6fa43aa1c407d29fa93688
describe
'26057' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTU' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
d21fccba268b2fa51f3e0a23c3130edc
ed0634cecbd3862775dcc3de1d69dc816877ced5
describe
'62532' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTV' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
a2320ba71a920fd721e3ff1749c6761b
deaa5ac82249a66f1b6b3e41835e9a504102cc72
describe
'24828' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTW' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
787add3b19c01a043b876c5b01185ae0
a30512c69551d046b51256b1ca322cbfc4938e9f
describe
'65974' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTX' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
fca97cec2279b9fa55b70388b3958d16
7bc48832a7672df5c932222aa03d4f09ee5bee21
describe
'25392' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTY' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
6d5ccd31cf70419f1d76a695e9337bd5
e186ab4fb953a533445c3c321182b03fe28ce44d
describe
'62405' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKTZ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
35838976f24814611043cf95b2821112
49df069b679e414230fdaa2a0c52b76fb776e74b
describe
'23939' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUA' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
94e86749eaaf78a0bb83efdf89d21918
c5d07e5b8bec2ef3fd1e0d76d876f722f1124f0f
describe
'62820' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUB' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
1f5c6baae0f2da9fa13010cea611c716
fdb2f9df25aa405fe4c7564f63fde769e71fdf8b
describe
'25374' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUC' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
6298844adfa39e459ef27096ca850f5b
54c18125102094d2f8acc66db9fc4c03ca1cfaeb
describe
'62008' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUD' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
d35a4619ab15c87fd51972b126cf7a83
9cf53f52f21dc044e0990fe195df077a6ba25712
describe
'26008' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUE' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
5b40874728d27287f0dcc10f03e4b2ed
4850d2be3978b9eaec3835a96caf04b4660a647d
describe
'67766' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUF' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
080264e778c2ce5b322b928a09350854
6ab92a7d0793fcadc7be3ca8639d7a9fc1c14914
describe
'26406' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUG' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
cc4a3d080c84434577c152eaaf011e14
4809bcb073772ab4d19dff08ee99bcb19b210180
describe
'65445' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUH' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
c097e48b27fe51d712b38d5c0e78daca
3b37fca47a7205bd5e774cdf36f8dddcfb0efcbc
describe
'26124' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUI' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
e379539f9dddd6d8bbf2cb7365e4426f
89e1c6e3753ddeb4014de2de74294aa8a35cca52
describe
'62448' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUJ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
b42cafb6782b3d9970ae8158a498d0e9
1c8fb6f96ccbad1c90ff51df7228dd8c7f2401f7
describe
'25282' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUK' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
063cfaab5d50dccfc9e4ce5a09cd7bca
66aba55f58db6bcb2499861e01e4a2b05b1f44bf
describe
'65025' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUL' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
5c5c069baa16e6759d3f15d3d3c5b79e
02ff33d1680af3b57d316e119351c7f36e065a07
describe
'26065' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUM' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
7cae48172cf18a096035c7053226f554
e265bfa7ce5d983c4f2e5a80a9b920debe25caef
describe
'64217' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUN' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
a0a6ace5c9a0d052eea44be5142c37b4
179d22dfd492e9765dde965ec350e26dac7a9e9e
describe
'25238' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUO' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
5da2dfd4ba1a564a16c2943749727196
9485a4ad0ecc390065aba81be73696cc6ddd1b62
describe
'63499' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
96850af488e96e4db7501906a3f11262
074f72be2582c09be5f6609cd1fd9a2991bddce0
describe
'25357' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUQ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
5df5d800c75f20601ef1def76832d905
0c9c53ed4b00b79830fa91c02c9decd9d8205ffc
describe
'61985' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUR' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
760836bc43bdb53e5603c2af7eed5a20
3434fbdfd62308461aa25555e4f70a5063f9c095
describe
'25726' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUS' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
f260f11277b38c60fda6f4a992293136
5d80cd8970dbec6b423083f69cc8c988d5288c01
describe
'36057' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUT' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
ac3563d2b1e8df50850eb0bda1ab81ba
4eb20fe369d3c733096283c4597de44b45c18254
describe
'16202' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUU' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
4069ec6ff92994a9515bb4c2411d6f1d
cdda4fae2ac05a1d4dfa14b75dc5a0e28baa28d7
describe
'57037' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUV' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
ff98d05ef11662b4e072dad356fe2bb8
19898bd2c9d4ababbc699a1acd3959ada1ff32de
describe
'22836' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUW' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
4b59ca0bea91b6802028c570609096bf
9543e6e96b986de152c0d9d2c53803b34a653313
describe
'63951' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUX' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
631985a0ad343e992bff2db3bcb39458
9643b262a95b28c01c9986716a423bb940b42bd7
describe
'25088' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUY' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
c7ae586ef918c6a9ed75e148920886de
c08c5a188ecd7146cbfff6624950e4ebd90a89c3
describe
'66479' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKUZ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
1a01d699a3c2475ce495f362b8289a7f
51ead3fc2a1292add266607944e7ffad8633cdab
describe
'25985' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVA' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
e1806f34b9b010c285b116da16147412
afdc0953efad8116b43873fb967eea4994776363
describe
'61383' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVB' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
3bc719afc27f9416800c25478a8e8b09
f5ce0d1b81129ff4b332bf79ebaefde9812eda17
describe
'24670' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVC' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
bfe6d6171370c43a657fdc829dda72b7
971a748e6583be38d55202d29d25ba7e87f1f92e
describe
'60911' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVD' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
1a96572f8e9bcdb85ae90799086f1742
ca6e1facca3eca0848bfbb8bf3bfa71909494419
describe
'24995' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVE' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
193370938887052c286670b40c235627
ab6f766f7d097598966b25fe297969cee6aad739
describe
'62580' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVF' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
920dcfd7ed4679cbb6a643e57db67991
9de8eeaa8dd2d4e6afc2071d82f0f450a20da172
describe
'25366' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVG' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
ab10489005340e8daa6c3aa09ba4c7b4
f87bb345eb00882615747aa453bee9ed3d1f52f8
describe
'56801' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVH' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
e5eedfd951d8af4e5b651d234cb56cea
687825c9b56662ccd09742f10a9a911604af6e1a
describe
'24151' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVI' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
7fad37c166a23f1422da8c4d8e08155b
ea0f7b109b35af4d2fed84d9a393ab695dc57cc2
describe
'56751' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVJ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
b041882e7c6fe277e160716a56def834
0add306e97a6b6f065d0477f46fbe8eead5e1cf7
describe
'24682' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVK' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
8be2e8756ac1a16565254759881f9040
c00c6705395edd446fdd774831bedb91c92b7443
describe
'67894' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVL' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
cc90e5feb893c1ff67b823c1753799e8
bf45407b8b07df2d7375aca20bd05a92e9fe22d7
describe
'26117' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVM' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
aaaabe67d7aa1b4556a30b778e4835f1
857bf4ffc373a1de77fb8440a751aa6037c85a6f
describe
'63582' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVN' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
0567487fd10c1e9d6367c6ef8fd6fb9a
6a68618e17bdbb1818ab4c618a2c456f01cc321e
describe
'25290' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVO' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
6e72132fd7154e7a0a49994d2acec63f
c0322736f3aa31d4425980906e3c2dad869528ce
describe
'57574' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVP' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
df14c91981e72fe8faa46d38ea06237d
f5f3ade54e2ed99198d91b15888387acaa2c60fa
describe
'24499' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVQ' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
31c7a999a95ad53d5efe9a4c7e13716c
f897da22e9d02ce1671a2a103cdbcffe7a9d9aaf
describe
'59607' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVR' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
687c498a9b01bc512f4c141337106719
f39d48aee28c4339d985eaf88c696eb0320eedd6
describe
'24802' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVS' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
b447f4265a55d250c406993eadd6e5b3
f653dccf25f4ec3a4cdd319ecb199b2fa7710037
describe
'52728' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVT' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
ecccee5e0230e823e0848c0434c052bc
271d7475ba9a097ea920c697475688b6ef7f8ab6
describe
'23094' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVU' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
c8a0bbf9fc502af724b814ae332ffac4
8735639c4762e4e310b0c472bdfe0e1af65a8c1c
describe
'51873' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVV' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
2cb2ddf910fd418324ecd8e2a862d1ec
2d029ce8d16f8e2ef282ec2d81453f9bd57f2fe1
describe
'22054' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVW' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
a78532d758de82fe4b1a7819f9a9a895
f88ad6de5e53224aa3c0e0f6a17b4b2f3b3e89fa
describe
'66114' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVX' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
b7c9ab84ac5a39b23a1fc55856768db4
29626b0c9006bdd0431272cbf5238de5d4cd5c22
describe
'26407' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVY' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
544c4c3efe5403e8ffbcbf4a64b675f5
6cbd073052dd9ec4faec3e2dd98ac252c4183bdd
describe
'66594' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKVZ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
c1caf6b9a5af11659baee6402a0d112d
4374775b98578ada1aa1b6176268460a560a82b3
describe
'25950' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWA' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
a3add9658c697f1a7e44c520a1eba37e
875059b278df8a157df1b184059c793d338bafbd
describe
'63099' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWB' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
7d0c99452b8618181822ff70da449cdb
e17a7a81d89bf469ee09792f47d85d8213bf0d66
describe
'25229' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWC' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
8802292e69ec8512edd0f92fa96d7fbe
2d0ae12dfcb7a549a3870169a2c3b92ade90d220
describe
'61799' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWD' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
57e9ba303a4c1bab4e174ec6d18fe116
55c99b7daa7975bf6a95a506f65957c327b0880f
describe
'24759' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWE' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
85a67a88c59b20a2afde428293080ee6
2e48811345ceb10e7ffe7879dab45ff39b6235ba
describe
'61123' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWF' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
19d946e33c3c4eba51a62ce44d2f3db1
642d32e31ff33bb06851b48b3d2c9110681b6105
describe
'25656' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWG' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
0ee8c4463d47c49c91928c746f8aab0b
de159dc73a92177725bca3f770fb98c3a3d86d66
describe
'60448' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWH' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
0440129bb4e8ad47647326d29ed82cd4
1b38397fc3207d5df554e8a5ed4fe5fee533cafe
describe
'25293' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWI' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
c95548879acafddc397fa3ccb02e549f
2a53ce84237eecd980228136046cf7e31b1b85fa
describe
'58961' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWJ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
3830dd8b8b4b97ff714f9d7b8a27ef46
a7c89893bdbbba434e09b0c84a65b30c5ffcf518
describe
'24825' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWK' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
c107f1c1b16cc2a15ec329a67c3df404
224a6cf8b263c295d24d299ef4b14215c178146d
describe
'59079' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWL' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
3a53e20418627739d152b46eb9fb2bab
5af21f825077c66616b2e5ad9b5e1b8570e35dd1
describe
'24219' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWM' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
e0e8cf4d269e6955e30ca96f92ec6045
547b16dc1f7f41629b48c7b84c566287b739346a
describe
'65324' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWN' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
136dd53b4bf36056287738890303825c
319215d9af7287cf0a05af6fa2d2281f8f01a849
describe
'25505' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWO' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
3a08e1c731412c371d5601af07d10285
3f2a2cf6f94e582b5573b8ea8b89a50cfe94cc04
describe
'66036' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWP' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
ef835501621156a728a3af9f626beeae
059a4a16d147b872959f9dd82ff2374135ed92d0
describe
'25655' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWQ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
f6f1fd44f554ed5a11cd5fc4540ddf9b
0df204ebefe22dbaa7aa035215508605eceb683a
describe
'61750' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWR' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
962e23f4ef2515d850d34ded0d80ea39
69f74265957267bd476f5bbda23c198decfaf9d8
describe
'25919' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWS' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
e81519a550ee29e43d9ff49222378347
2be5362c4435f81dac9799b47036554f0678c467
describe
'61951' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWT' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
880d649e24fa1bfde60877c8b8af5baa
c28b9bc64583ae094c1a0b43771355c13d892573
describe
'25286' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWU' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
8b955c34ee842f3d2527af35e6e8d1e6
b1a71f247f7f11fa9386a00d24539f2d6704ff08
describe
'60535' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWV' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
81d4e02b3ce46d6e8b7d339b0efe88d1
77dbb3c43508f323c21b9a4dcb8ab69408c8425e
describe
'25057' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWW' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
98c5e54c57d5ecafd12d182a401411f7
34e869c30cb27b89e3861296c603e9f8a6d79de5
describe
'62796' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWX' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
310250d59aee550e74a47c56e0e8c8dc
3525780e856f48134efc17b3a174e23520bbf28e
describe
'25300' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWY' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
541c83a4526065d85acde00eeb0e280c
2e5978fe3596ce9b3d7fb4b2a82fcce61c44183f
describe
'64315' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKWZ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
b6b4261d11c75290d86f34829ecb23c1
a8359872edacd977a29eddaa74b1c65c203c343c
describe
'25420' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXA' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
d31007ff9ab3149bf562cc2d45a46d46
275ffebc2ca4a8627ed98b2d861cf5783d8bb3fe
describe
'61833' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXB' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
b4a195bf753e9e8bb70bd273531c8a41
1d1cd7f006d4e3bb26f7c82e12db889450d946ab
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXC' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
58509e629459ea67d3ab80974342b0d8
553f9cb9b5062a9f68e686bc10de87262513345f
describe
'40685' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXD' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
9c870e9c85497a2b22fa23c2964305ce
e99136f71e8971043d10f40dd1f1adc86c1accb3
describe
'17587' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXE' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
0c5c7252628c4fdaf069a909dcdc8189
691fd74700d5e71165f8f404b898a8e6c6b54dc0
describe
'58694' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXF' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
1bb83a02efc07e468a5773512b29060b
9b7bb710cb5a01dfc6473e923d132bff17e5010b
describe
'23472' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXG' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
4d79c73103b8560991ea5f027f4500d2
b2fc2f699e4cea15397284d588a74279aae135f1
describe
'64258' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXH' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
2b389e9506854ee4b8a978633f4564e1
a38bc97fa72e464ec48b921a6034dd7ea3eb23f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXI' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
f5f92c24c1afae2eec596c6f42945666
5db933d376b5a69899a473c3dd1f4578bfb4f629
describe
'55424' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXJ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
2a7e5341b70aee077eb6ee5b17568af5
4671af679bd5b82eae9952ec45fec4f81c911306
describe
'23311' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXK' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
16f636ad32bc3200a263b6b33311d6e9
ac6ba3622397c19740c1bd8773f4813dd657adb4
describe
'57792' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXL' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
b1650fb4f9a8f1a3dc7d27f8af3aa016
99e4f324ded26684f0f699fe2ec1a935b05681e6
describe
'25346' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXM' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
50dbeae72eb206b4f31b57efe2f71dd9
2657c4c0d81954065ccc522b5244b2465b5fb394
describe
'59460' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXN' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
4cc50d057e71eefe232105e915ebd9d7
463d40364ebfeecb5e6e51c1262608bc3ec47194
describe
'25025' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXO' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
78cfae6c78cbf50e1cf57edaac41d978
39dba064b226cd0723dbe68c3ce7b4eeda8705f3
describe
'62738' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXP' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
65e7034c342a401e55dd3591d35047ef
5d5da18ec92404b4b9b3d92fd035e2552c6997ce
describe
'25432' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXQ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
30216331c90cbccd2916a0930fc949e5
95b0ad39e452a7c49d3f729be18f9db0a5d745e4
describe
'62655' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXR' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
19f04edcd8cf536f788a07eaa796a2e8
dccaa3ff1b0fe292c58c21da752490063d71fff4
describe
'25239' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXS' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
ee91da0205140ded01d75e44b54e71a6
178204d44f81a6004b3a7be53838652a453b9958
describe
'67107' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXT' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
458358291bbf5fcd48f4b4834e591fa9
227c70a0921eeb876c6b2b7214f00e8a0497252b
describe
'26014' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXU' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
2bfe92978df85781a884a553e974399c
69b890348e9d36bc94f34ef0a1829e1ce6bc146a
describe
'47940' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXV' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
bcacf51d342b013a49bf9f1a9cc312f0
e534b8e20be020e1b59e09a1fd52e946c71cf12e
describe
'19515' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXW' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
2c456796f55e989678d6a73086ef38de
6968b873a7d7205ae1bb1ab08a11c130578a754f
describe
'60488' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXX' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
01b4f6fc598f3562ddf1af812b3e9c5b
4fc966a5b7feeca25194c26f64de175b5694fef6
describe
'23996' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXY' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
d7c55dfa20c9a1a60cb20306217ed300
642ac40f86289ce622e8198f5b2927f67d0af471
describe
'66719' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKXZ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
27ff591cc25a4bbe1d2e316668d44ef5
2ce56f77a77cf36b2753d7f1e50d358d3e71ca98
describe
'26757' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYA' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
3bb1cf584258c3405476981a37250ee2
cdddb9e823816dd07c05f568aff3306bc3354102
describe
'72463' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYB' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
5f70f4f45c97b1243e061c844ee3567f
98db4b708b96dc3cf9e73ff36a3455409bde04c0
describe
'28041' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYC' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
537e01faa675adbabadd472b67634d60
ed472237bfb76206edab0916c1ad362ece976179
describe
'70026' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYD' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
c1fb2bac1ad9715dbfed342edb9aaabd
57bf07fef1d922e8ec3024d3084d4f922146bcf3
describe
'27579' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYE' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
6272a0e33fb6727310b7230724e04368
15e0c8be0b16e97a3bb3383cb5aa39fab9cabf9b
describe
'75810' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYF' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
c061f6b848499a9f35fcf26b869e27b5
fa61b8dcaec48aa1bd2c72823ab88fe72e9e73da
describe
'28919' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYG' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
7587e3a12274c3b721fc4d4496505e0f
dd450a8fd5fc8d8030cc84e19c2cae5e878c5c00
describe
'69261' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYH' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
fd6c5eee269f416ff99e0fa85f9591ef
99ca27947ffe39c20693be7f7f3977bdd048e42e
describe
'27445' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYI' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
96c44c6690506af308aeb92d2c676ad4
99dc19af97d407ec9a948bc6a047fbbac94f82c5
describe
'75094' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYJ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
c8b59dfee71bd69d9e88c5c4882e953a
1c7fb849b20e7b9a2f05b09d67626bcdd332abf0
describe
'29831' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYK' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
78d0068df9c28166a949c3fc5dd9a225
7e8705a1726a4118add06abf261f1ef6932d5466
describe
'70527' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYL' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
a2fe29f28b41690c91a0f2ab22278bfe
a11781a6678b05adebe331e73bd490b7f7fbb0f1
describe
'27908' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYM' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
ab39b217d9003bbddcddcbbf1944cdfa
4981724a059164fbe4057795215e656161eace41
describe
'73311' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYN' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
8349d94fe00814dfb9cf54061d0585eb
3edd896a09a9503bd3b2c05476032c0f6c8ae9ad
describe
'28250' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYO' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
a3c0311e5ceddc2fac3e8534525793e6
b7c4ba0705613c6288ffdf091ae07d68d053c06f
describe
'72633' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYP' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
52fd57b7a234ac000048b129d35f13a6
81a2e7b124490e1e48187fb7d67e2f25528d5dac
describe
'28487' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYQ' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
b16139f4c389ebbe4a326a5a5b456bcb
62638d42f3e7649808e830bdb15593fc4c9b7984
describe
'74796' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYR' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
ff26ef47d5afd563cd5a37bbf1f462f6
ea0bf48648b039f189a39ff917d311f0387cb379
describe
'28693' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYS' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
f70204a9967546a69bcdd1b3ba4d14c6
2977b0ddcc9e69dfd46f8de91cd0a38807359ce1
describe
'67469' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYT' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
48e5cec8660a52cb8ad0a2ff0c1f71d0
264daea1e1b36dadb9c229adc6f11460209f0b05
describe
'27420' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYU' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
1b0e8018e31ea2d911ffaaf268ea092d
4310956c5ed6db344a3f27fba743f153ce4a9f78
describe
'70337' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYV' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
cca34cbc812e82d6f596441d953e416e
37de820226d8f6d0eb243170440ba1bfd66a6e5f
describe
'28066' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYW' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
423916dfc3abf3ebc034875c4bd881c7
14817917e3d1d1c0619c08feb46b7106868315a3
describe
'67652' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYX' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
89ad4b24ead629eb2af468e3a80b9231
ac958a55531bfa6f79a9cfe37f9bdc224d604c63
describe
'27900' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYY' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
c8091814deb3da2603ab0086eb8848d8
f702af65b162f1d77ac44dc75df99bfb45c0027b
describe
'72781' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKYZ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
a4d28c6c3aa6fe251a3d2ef0a0ef3e21
db11f14bebcf4e3eb3f8717c65e3cc8cf02dbbf7
describe
'28795' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZA' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
0aa69d9a841a92f72af78b405778ed96
b1d551cd7508b4e3059de7a7536491b3a5af330e
describe
'74567' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZB' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
14ebb735a3a062fa9d2428b176974fae
7854a91f8fd5cccc10f397d7ecf834c32a350e54
describe
'28868' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZC' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
8981e5175400622aa92fc4c6c7940f14
51bbc17090b399ff96747048cdf0dcb72a7562be
describe
'76630' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZD' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
75d28659d2d222f6da3e76a31a1b9de0
8b8944663066a7502d93cd66a284dde2d8dae74a
describe
'28960' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZE' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
8fa96097d0f9976cc04014c9f1736850
c3d15c83e4393f5e5b80c4129b6e387f551abbe2
describe
'74273' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZF' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
3bd6da5c8f429721d44e3301bb74706f
2faef32a8dc95a080af7579abcef84d20010a8c3
describe
'28780' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZG' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
be0e54d217e0ecfd737941f842c6f9fb
e98c1759a6d8856c87fc0e1a4ac6404e99ee6784
describe
'74751' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZH' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
e27bd1535c7f565a7bffcd0df96f741e
052597d24df9f8ae52a2922b95b099be1ae1368c
describe
'28485' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZI' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
a96105c592cf691cb0089324ad0e74bf
f686d917820f559da98ae5af2cf7c7ed2123ab1b
describe
'15049' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZJ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
a83b4fd2811990844ad07c4c296d1b80
c341731a52686259aa131cdbcadbce25de572902
describe
'9697' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZK' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
3a89c44c0cbb8ecf1bba40cddce7f5f1
73759b632e70d59e604afebc56ed4de48b975699
describe
'19355' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZL' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
79e71a7a84ff5b71f5b7d1baf9b60ad4
8b8c3d9b77729b7b41f481b42c2f9c0441a07a29
describe
'89625' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZM' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
52a47f3afc142147bebb8f48ee91ee6a
fd44e523b1309f8eff159fa5afbf2a9ff394e8d0
describe
'27222' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZN' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
f2a4bdb611ffec8e202ba44098678a2b
664eb8f8e94a6d0aadea11d01c4c369fec9892b3
describe
'85292' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZO' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
639625c68c5805c59fc5534221bc4074
e724cbc3d9100719c122bfaa2ca7281ae125dfa5
describe
'26330' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZP' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
dc5dfac2d24cbd18635ea989410e1657
e5455eeec26731cc9d2d343cadca54312706dd16
describe
'30733' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZQ' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
939e1d5f2e2c03d0e31e8d1e2408c34a
1c8f9aae528d6b8c696f1c11aaa40d8a65a21086
describe
'13266' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZR' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
4ed7e5eb37c87f59f136afd3884d04d7
bfebab961e8ee3241e275bbd684e788274df5004
describe
'18198' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZS' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
b9ded74ef7b7bbdadf3498739b246eeb
52e0c3351cd7c84aac62589c71df0dd9196dd6cd
describe
'12045' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZT' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
f59c53948f834da12266259bf54f19a7
1ab71e45b3f8e335c6a39a5b7b4b715a836fbb4c
describe
'24' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZU' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
d4577f2f72a78515491536f6522f18cc
6c5c631ccb5315d55a2ac4588b48caa4a4abbf42
describe
'234112' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUFfileF20081129_AAAKZV' 'sip-filesUF00086577_00001.mets'
ca3b19b54562f527c22a0855d8fd18a5
86be75fed1d1d07054ac6fc853bbc52d18d6d592
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T11:55:16-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.