Citation
The giant scissors

Material Information

Title:
The giant scissors
Series Title:
Cosy corner series
Caption title:
Gate of the giant scissors
Creator:
Johnston, Annie F ( Annie Fellows ), 1863-1931
Barry, Etheldred B ( Etheldred Breeze ), b. 1870 ( Illustrator )
Page Company ( Publisher )
Colonial Press ( Printer )
C.H. Simonds & Co
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
L.C. Page and Co.
Manufacturer:
Colonial Press ; Electrotyped and Printed by C.H. Simonds & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
187, 4 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Homesickness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Scissors and shears -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Storytelling -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prisoners -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sick children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Tours (France) ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Fantasy literature ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's catalogue precedes and follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Annie Fellows Johnston ; illustrated by Etheldred B. Barry.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
020116944 ( ALEPH )
ALH2671 ( NOTIS )
01952454 ( OCLC )

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Full Text






E





Ah tad



THE GIANT SCISSORS



Works of

Annie Fellows Johnston

THE LITTLE COLONEL SERIES
(Trade Mark)

oe
The Little Colonel . .
(Trade Mark)
The Giant Scissors .
Two Little Knights of Kentucky

‘The Little Colonel Stories .
(Trade Mark)
(Containing in one volume the three stories, ‘‘ The
Little Colonel,” “The Giant Scissors,” and ‘Two
Little Knights of Kentucky.”)
The Little Colonel’s House Party. 4.50
(Trade Mark)
The Little Colonel’s Holidays - 3.50
(Trade Mark)
The Little Colonel’s Hero . - 53.50
(Trade Mark)
The Little Colonel at Boarding-School 5.50
(Trade Mark)

The Little Colonel in Arizona
(Trade Mark)

PJ
OTHER BOOKS
Joel: A Boy of Galilee.
Big Brother .
Ole Mammy’s ‘Torment.
The Story of Dago .
Cicely. r .
Aunt ’Liza’s Hero ,
The Quilt That Jack Built
Asa Holmes . S
Flip’s “ Islands of Providence ”
Songs Ysame (Poems, with Albion
Fellows Bacon) . A . A

MS Sec toee ue ae ao 01°

L. C. PAGE & COMPANY
200 Summer Street Boston, Mass.







JULES.



ii: GIANT S€lssOks

BY
ANNIE FELLOWS JOHNSTON

AUTHOR OF “ THE LITTLE COLONEL,”
“ BIG BROTHER,” “ OLE MAMMY’S
TORMENT,” ETC..

Ellustrated by
ETHELDRED.B. BARRY



BOSTON
L. C. PAGE AND COMPANY

(INCORPORATED)



Copyright, 1898
By L. C. PAGE AND COMPANY
(INCORPORATED)

All rights reserved

Colonial WBress :
Electrotyped and Printed by C. H. Simonds & Co.
Boston, U.S. A.





CHAPTER
Te
Il.
III.
IV.
Vv.
Vi.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.

IN THE PEAR-TREE 5 : 5

A New Farry TALE
BEHIND THE GREAT GATE

A LETTER AND A MEETING .
A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE.
Joyce PLays GHOST

OLD “NUMBER THIRTY-ONE”

CHRISTMAS PLANS AND AN ACCIDENT .

A GREAT DISCOVERY . 5
CHRISTMAS . ; : . .

PAGE

II
26
47
65
80

100

120

139

155

174





PAGE

JULES. : : > 7 . : 7 Frontispiece
WHERE JOYCE LIVED . 6 7 7 7 6 + SIZ
“HE IS STOPPING AT THE GATE’” . ; : . 2i
THE KING’s SONS : : : 7 . : en 27
“HE CUT IT LOOSE AND CARRIED IT HOME” . » 39
THE PRINCESS. : : : , : é - 41
“HE LAID HIS HEAD ON THE SILL” . : : 23850
“JT FELL TO THE FLOOR WITH A CRASH” : . 61
OuT WITH MARIE : 5 : 5 : : . 67

“HE CAME TOWARDS HER WITH A DAZED EXPRES-

SION ON HIS FACE . . : ; . ney]
INITIAL LETTER . : : : . . . . 80
A LESSON IN PATRIOTISM . : : . . . 89
TRYING TO READ . ; . . : ; : - 95

“¢Qu, IF JACK COULD ONLY SEE IT!’” . . » 108

ix



x : ILLUSTRATIONS.

“¢BROSSARD, BEWARE! BEWARE!’” . : :
“THE CHILD CREPT CLOSE TO THE CHEERFUL FIRE”
-JOYCE AND SISTER DENISA : . : : .
NUMBER THIRTY-ONE . : ‘ : : 2 .
“ JULES CAME OVER, AWKWARD AND SHY” : 7
“SITTING UP IN BED WITH THE QUILTS WRAPPED
AROUND HIM” . : : A ; : :
“¢THAT’s NUMBER THIRTY-ONE’” . Saas
“ WALKING UP AND DOWN THE PATHS” . F .
“KEEPING TIME TO THE MUSIC” :
“ HE TOOK THE LITTLE FELLOW’S HAND IN HIS” .

IIS
121

127
134
141

149
161
166
180
185



THE GATE OF THE GIANT
SCISSORS.



CHAPTER I.
IN THE PEAR - TREE.

Joyce was crying, up in old Monsieur Gré-
ville’s tallest pear-tree. She had gone down
to the farthest corner of the garden, out of
sight of the house, for she did not want any
one to know that she was miserable enough
to cry.

She was tired of the garden with the high
stone wall around it, that made her feel like a
prisoner; she was tired of French verbs and
foreign faces ; she was tired of France, and so
homesick for her mother and Jack and Holland
and the baby, that she couldn’t help crying.

II



12 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

No wonder, for she was only twelve years old,
and she had never been out of the little West-
ern village where she was born, until the day
she started abroad with her Cousin Kate.

Now she sat perched up on a limb in a dis-
mal bunch, her chin in her hands and her
elbows on her knees. It was a gray afternoon
in November; the air was frosty, although the
laurel-bushes in the garden were all in bloom.

“T s’pect there is snow on the ground at
home,” thought Joyce, “and there’s a big,
cheerful fire in the sitting-room grate.

«Folland and the baby are shelling corn, and
Mary is popping it. Dear me! I can smell it
just as plain! Jack will be coming in from the
post-office pretty soon, and maybe he’ll have
one of my letters. Mother will read it out
loud, and there they'll all be, thinking that I
am having such a fine time; that it is such a
grand thing for me to be abroad studying, and
having dinner served at night in so many
courses, and all that sort of thing. They
don’t know that I am sitting up here in this
pear-tree, lonesome enough to die. Oh, if I
could only go back home and see them for
even five minutes,” she sobbed, “but I can’t!



IN THE PEAR- TREE. 13

I can’t! There’s a whole wide ocean between
list

She shut her eyes, and leaned back against
the tree as that desolate feeling of homesick-
ness settled over her like a great miserable
ache. Then she found that shutting her eyes,
and thinking very hard about the little brown
house at home, seemed to bring it into plain
sight. It was like opening a book, and seeing
picture after picture as she turned the pages.

There they were in the kitchen, washing
dishes, she and Mary; and Mary was stand-
ing on a soap-box to make her tall enough to
handle the dishes easily. How her funny little
braid of yellow hair bobbed up and down as she
worked, and how her dear little freckled face
beamed, as they told stories to each other to
make the work seem easier.

Mary’s stories all began the same way: “If
IT had a witch with a wand, this is what we
would do.” The witch with a wand had come
to Joyce in the shape of Cousin Kate Ware,
and that coming was one of the pictures that
Joyce could see now, as she thought about it
with her eyes closed.

There was Holland swinging on the gate,



I4 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

waiting for her to come home from school, and
trying to tell her by excited gestures, long
before she was within speaking distance, that
some one was in the parlor. The baby had on
his best plaid kilt and new tie, and the tired
little mother was sitting talking in the parlor,
an unusual thing for her. Joyce could see her-
self going up the path, swinging her sun-bonnet
by the strings and taking hurried little bites of
a big June apple in order to finish it before
going into the house. Now she was sitting on
the sofa beside Cousin Kate, feeling very awk-
ward and shy with her little brown fingers
clasped in this stranger’s soft white hand.
She had heard that Cousin Kate was a very
rich old maid, who had spent years abroad,
studying music and languages, and she had
expected to see a stout, homely woman with
bushy eyebrows, like Miss Teckla Schaum,
who played the church organ, and taught
German in the High School.

But Cousin Kate was altogether unlike Miss
Teckla. She was tall and slender, she was
young-looking and pretty, and there was a
stylish air about her, from the waves of her
soft golden brown hair to the bottom of her





IN THE PEAR- TREE, 15

tailor-made gown, that was not often seen in
this little Western village.

Joyce saw herself glancing admiringly at
Cousin Kate, and then pulling down her dress
as far as possible, painfully conscious that her
shoes were untied, and white with dust. The
next picture was several days later. She and
Jack were playing mumble-peg outside under
the window by the lilac-bushes, and the little
mother was just inside the door, bending over
a pile of photographs that Cousin Kate had
dropped in her lap. Cousin Kate was saying,
“This beautiful old French villa is where I
expect to spend the winter, Aunt Emily.
These are views of Tours, the town that lies
across the river Loire from it, and these are
some of the chateaux near by that I intend to
visit. They say the purest French in the
world is spoken there. I have prevailed on
one of the dearest old ladies that ever lived to
give me rooms with her. She and her husband:
live all alone in this big country place, so I
shall have to provide against loneliness by tak-
ing my company with me. Will you let me
have Joyce for a year?”

Jack and she stopped playing in sheer aston-



16 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

ishment, while Cousin Kate went on to explain
how many advantages she could give the little
girl to whom she had taken such a strong fancy.

Looking through the lilac-bushes, Joyce
could see her mother wipe her eyes and say,
«Tt seems like pure providence, Kate, and I
cant stand in the child’s way. She'll have to
support herself soon, and ought to be prepared
for it; but she’s the oldest of the five, you
know, and she has been like my right hand
ever since her father died. There'll not be a
minute while she is gone, that I shall not miss
her and wish her back. She’s the life and sun-
shine of the whole home.”

Then Joyce could see the little brown house
turned all topsy-turvy in the whirl of prepa-
ration that followed, and the next thing, she
was standing on the platform at the station,
with her new steamer trunk beside her. Half
the town was there to bid her good-by. In
the excitement of finding herself a person of
such importance she forgot how much she was
leaving behind her, until looking up, she saw a
tender, wistful smile on her mother’s face, sad-
der than any tears.

Luckily the locomotive whistled just then,



teenie



WHERE JOYCE LIVED.






IN THE PEAR -TREE. Ig

and the novelty of getting aboard a train for
the first time, helped her to be brave at the
‘ parting. She stood on the rear platform of
the last car, waving her handkerchief to the
group at the station as long as it was in sight,
so that the last glimpse her mother shoulda
have of her, was with her bright little face all
ashine. .

All these pictures passed so rapidly through |
Joyce’s mind, that she had retraced the experi-
ences of the last three months in as many min-
utes. Then, somehow, she felt better. The
tears had washed away the ache in her throat.
She wiped her eyes and climbed liked a squirrel
to the highest limb that could bear her weight.

This was not the first time that the old pear-
tree had been shaken by Joyce’s grief, and it
knew that her spells of homesickness always
ended in this way. There she sat, swinging her .
plump legs back and forth, her long light hair
blowing over the shoulders of her blue jacket,
and her saucy little mouth puckered into a soft
whistle. - She could see over the high wall now.
The sun was going down behind the tall Lom-
bardy poplars that lined the road, and in a dis-
tant field two peasants still at work reminded



20 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

her of the picture of “The Angelus.” They
seemed like acquaintances on account of the re-
semblance, for there was a copy of the picture
in her little bedroom at home.

All around her stretched quiet fields, sloping
down to the ancient village of St. Symphorien
and the river Loire. Just across the river, so
near that she could hear the ringing of the
cathedral bell, lay the famous old town of Tours.
There was something in these country sights
and sounds that soothed her with their homely
cheerfulness. The crowing of a rooster and the
barking of a dog fell on her ear like familiar
music.

“Tt’s a comfort to hear something speak
English,” she sighed, “even if it’s nothing but
a chicken. I do wish that Cousin Kate
wouldn’t be so particular about my using
French all day long. The one little half-
hour at bedtime when she allows me to speak
English isn’t a drop in the bucket. It’s a
mercy that I had studied French some before
I came, or I would have a lonesome time. I
wouldn’t be able to ever talk at all.”

It was getting cold up in the pear-tree.
Joyce shivered and stepped: down to the limb



IN THE PEAR - TREE. 21

below, but paused in her descent to watch a
peddler going down the road with a pack on
his back.

“Oh, he is stopping
at the gate with the
big scissors!’ she
cried, so interested
that she spoke aloud.
“JT must wait to see
if it opens.”

There was some-
thing mysterious
about that gate across
the road. Like Mon-
sieur Gréville’s, it
was plain and solid,
reaching as high as LL
the wall. Only the me SS
lime-trees and the Se
second story win-
dows of the house could be seen above it.
On the top it bore an iron medallion, on which
was fastened a huge pair of scissors. There
was a smaller pair on each gable of the house,
also.

During the three months that Joyce had





- =



22 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

been in Monsieur Gréville’s home, she had
watched every day to see it open; but if any
one ever entered or left the place, it was cer-
tainly by some other way than this queer gate.

What lay beyond it, no one could tell. She
had questioned Gabriel the coachman, and
Berthe the maid, in vain. Madame Gréville
said that she remembered having heard, when
a child, that the man who built it was named
Ciseaux, and that was why the symbol of this
name was hung over the gate and on the gables.
He had been regarded as half crazy by his neigh-
bors. The place was still owned by a descend-
ant of his, who had gone to Algiers, and left it
in charge of two servants.

The peddler rang the bell of the gate several
times, but failing to arouse any one, shouldered
his pack and went off grumbling. Then Joyce
climbed down and walked slowly up the grav-
elled path to the house. Cousin Kate had
just come back from Tours in the pony cart,
and was waiting in the door to see if Gabriel
had all the bundles that she had brought out
with her.

Joyce followed her admiringly into the house.
She wished that she could grow up to look



IN THE PEAR- TREE. 23

exactly like Cousin Kate, and wondered if she
would ever wear such stylish silk-lined skirts,
and catch them up in such an airy, graceful
way when she ran up-stairs; and if she would
ever have a Paris hat with long black feathers,
and always wear a bunch of sweet violets on
her coat.

She looked at herself in Cousin Kate’s mir-
ror as she passed it, and sighed. “Well, I am
better-looking than when I left home,” she
thought. “That’s one comfort. My face isn’t
freckled now, and my hair is more becoming
this way than in tight little pigtails, the way
I used to wear it.”

Cousin Kate, coming up behind her, looked
over her head and smiled at the attractive re-
flection of Joyce’s rosy cheeks and straightfor-
ward gray eyes. Then she stopped suddenly
and put her arms around her, saying, ‘“ What’s
the matter, dear? You have been crying.”

“Nothing,” answered Joyce, but there was
a quaver in her voice, and she turned her head
aside. Cousin Kate put her hand under the
resolute little chin, and tilted it until she could
look into the eyes that dropped under her gaze.
You have been crying,” she said again, this



24 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

time in English, “crying because you are home-
sick. I wonder if it would not be a good occu-
pation for you to open all the bundles that I
got this afternoon. There is a saucepan in one,
and a big spoon in the other, and all sorts of
good things in the others, so that we can make
some molasses candy here in my room, over the
open fire. While it cooks you can curl up in
the big armchair and listen to a fairy tale in
the firelight. Would you like that, little one?”

“Qh, yes!” cried Joyce, ecstatically. “That’s
what they are doing at home this minute, I am
sure. We always make candy every afternoon
in the winter time.”

Presently the saucepan was sitting on the
coals, and Joyce’s little pug nose was raptur-
ously sniffing the odor of bubbling molasses.
“T know what Id like the story to be about,”
she said, as she stirred the delicious mixture
with the new spoon. “Make up something
about the big gate across the road, with the
scissors on it.” /

Cousin Kate crossed the room, and sat down
by the window, where she could look out and
see the top of it.

“Let me think for a few minutes,” she said.



IN THE PEAR- TREE. 25

“JT have been very much interested in that old
gate myself.”

She thought so long that the candy was done
before she was ready to tell the story; but
while it cooled in plates outside on the win-
dow-sill, she drew Joyce to a seat beside
her in the chimney-corner. With her feet on
the fender, and the child’s head on her shoulder,
she began this story, and the firelight dancing
on the walls, showed a smile on Joyce’s con:
tented little face.



CHAPTER II.
A NEW FAIRY TALE.

ONcE upon a time, on a far island of the sea,
there lived a King with seven sons. The three
eldest were tall and dark, with eyes like eagles,
and hair like a crow’s wing for blackness, and
no princes in all the land were so strong and
fearless as they. The three youngest sons
were tall and fair, with eyes as blue as corn-
flowers, and locks like the summer sun for
brightness, and no princes in all the land were
so brave and beautiful as they.

But the middle son was little and lorn; he
was neither dark nor fair ; he was neither hand-
some nor strong. So when the King saw that
he never won in the tournaments nor led in
the boar hunts, nor sang to his lute among
the ladies of the court, he drew his royal
robes around him, and henceforth frowned on
Ethelried.

26



Ten Nn ee a eo RRL SR iE



A NEW FAIRY TALE. 27

To each of his other sons he gave a portion
of his kingdom, armor and plumes, a prancing
charger, and a trusty sword ; but to Ethelried he
gave nothing. When
the poor Prince saw
his brothers riding
out into the world to
win their fortunes, he
fain would have fol-
lowed. Throwing
himself on his
knees before the “%
King, he cried, “Oh,
royal Sire, bestow
upon me also a sword
and a steed, that I
may up and away to
follow my brethren.”

But the King
laughed him to scorn.
« Thou a sword!” he
quoth. ‘Thou who hast never done a deed of
valor in all thy life! In sooth thou shalt have
one, but it shall be one befitting thy maiden
size and courage, if so small a weapon can be
found in all my kingdom!”



MwA Sy



28 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Now just at that moment it happened that
the Court Tailor came into the room to measure
the King for a new mantle of ermine. Forth-
with the grinning Jester began shrieking with
laughter, so that the bells upon his motley cap
were all set a-jangling.

“What now, Fool?” demanded the King.

“T did but laugh to think the sword of Ethel-
ried had been so quickly found,” responded the
Jester, and he pointed to the scissors hanging
from the Tailor’s girdle.

«By my troth,’ exclaimed the King, “it
shall be even as thou sayest!’’ and he com-
manded that the scissors be taken from the
Tailor, and buckled to the belt of Ethelried.

“ Not until thou hast proved thyself a prince
with these, shalt thou come into thy kingdom,”
he swore with a mighty oath. “Until that far
day, now get thee gone!”

So Ethelried left the palace, and wandered
away over mountain and moor with a heavy
heart. No one knew that he was a prince;
no fireside offered him welcome; no lips gave
him a friendly greeting. The scissors hung
useless and rusting by his side.

One night as he lay in a deep forest, too



A NEW FAIRY TALE. 29

unhappy to sleep, he heard a noise near at
hand in the bushes. By the light of the
moon he saw that a ferocious wild beast had
been caught in a hunter’s snare, and was
struggling to free itself from the heavy net.
His first thought was to slay the animal, for
he had had no meat for many days. Then he
bethought himself that he had no weapon large
enough.

While he stood gazing at the struggling
beast, it turned to him with such a beseeching
look in its wild eyes, that he was moved to pity.

“Thou shalt have thy liberty,” he cried,
“even though thou shouldst rend me in
pieces the moment thou art free. Better
dead than this craven life to which my father
hath doomed me!”

So he set to work with the little scissors to
cut the great ropes of the net in twain. At
first each strand seemed as hard as steel, and
the blades of the scissors were so rusty and
dull that he could scarcely move them. Great
beads of sweat stood out on his brow as he
bent himself to the task.

Presently, as he worked, the blades began to
grow sharper and sharper, and brighter and



30 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

brighter, and longer and longer. By the time
that the last rope was cut the scissors were as
sharp as a broadsword, and half as long as his
body.

At last he raised the net to let the beast go
free. Then he sank on his knees in astonish-
ment. It had suddenly disappeared, and in its
place stood a beautiful Fairy with filmy wings,
which shone like rainbows in the moonlight.

“Prince Ethelried,”’ she said in a voice that
was like a crystal bell’s for sweetness, “dost
thou not know that thou art in the domain of a
frightful Ogre? It was he who changed me
into the form of a wild beast, and set the snare
to capture me. But for thy fearlessness and
faithful perseverance in the task which thou
~ didst in pity undertake, I must have perished
at dawn.”

At this moment there was a distant rum-
bling as of thunder. “’Tis the Ogre!” cried
the Fairy. “We must hasten.” Seizing the
scissors that lay on the ground where Ethelried
had dropped them, she opened and shut them
several times, exclaiming :

“ Scissors, grow a giant’s height
And save us from the Ogre’s might!”



A NEW FAIRY TALE. 31

Immediately they grew to an enormous size,
and, with blades extended, shot through the
tangled thicket ahead of them, cutting down
everything that stood in their way, — bushes,
stumps, trees, vines ; nothing could stand before
the fierce onslaught of those mighty blades.

The Fairy darted down the path thus opened
up, and Ethelried followed as fast as he could,
for the horrible roaring was rapidly coming
nearer. At last they reached a wide chasm
that bounded the Ogre’s domain. Once
across that, they would be out of his power,
but it seemed impossible to cross. Again the
Fairy touched the scissors, saying :

“ Giant scissors, bridge the path,
And save us from the Ogre’s wrath.”

Again the scissors grew longer and longer,
until they lay across the chasm like a shining
bridge. Ethelried hurried across after the
Fairy, trembling and dizzy, for the Ogre was
now almost upon them. As soon as they were
safe on the other side, the Fairy blew upon the
scissors, and, presto, they became shorter and
shorter until they were only the length of an
ordinary sword.



32 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

“Here,” she said, giving them into his hands;
“because thou wast persevering and fearless in
setting me free, these shall win for thee thy
heart’s desire. But remember that thou canst
not keep them sharp and shining, unless they
are used at least once each day in some unself-
ish service.”

Before he could thank her she had vanished,
and he was left in the forest alone. He could
see the Ogre standing powerless to hurt him,
on the other side of the chasm, and gnashing
his teeth, each one of which was as big as a
millstone.

The sight was so terrible, that he turned on
his heel, and fled away as fast as his feet could
carry him. By the time he reached the edge
of the forest he was very tired, and ready to
faint from hunger. His heart’s greatest desire
being for food, he wondered if the scissors
could obtain it for him as the Fairy had
promised. He had spent his last coin and
knew not where to go for another.

Just then he spied a tree, hanging full of
great, yellow apples. By standing on tiptoe
he could barely reach the lowest one with his
scissors. He cut off an apple, and was about





A NEW FAIRY TALE. a3

to take a bite, when an old Witch sprang out
of a hollow tree across the road.

.“So you are the thief who has been steal-
ing my gold apples all this last fortnight!” she
exclaimed. “Well, you shall never steal again,
that I promise you. Ho, Frog-eye Fearsome,
seize on him and drag him into your darkest
dungeon !”’

At that, a hideous-looking fellow, with eyes
like a frog’s, green hair, and horrid clammy
webbed fingers, clutched him before he could
turn to defend himself. He was thrust into
the dungeon and left there all day.

At sunset, Frog-eye Fearsome opened the
door to slide in a crust and a cup of water,
saying in a croaking voice, “You shall be
hanged in the morning, hanged by the neck
until you are quite dead.” Then he stopped
to run his webbed fingers through his damp
green hair, and grin at the poor captive Prince,
as if he enjoyed his suffering. But the next
morning no one came to take him to the
gallows, and he sat all day in total darkness.
At sunset Frog-eye Fearsome opened the door
again to thrust in another crust and some water
and say, “In the morning you shall be drowned ;



34 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

drowned in the Witch’s mill-pond with a great
stone tied to your heels.”

Again the croaking creature stood and
gloated over his victim, then left him to the
silence of another long day in the dungeon.
The third day he opened the door and hopped
in, rubbing his webbed hands together with
fiendish pleasure, saying, “You are to have
no food and drink to-night, for the Witch has
thought of a far more horrible punishment for
you. In the morning I shall surely come
again, and then — beware!”’

Now as he stopped to grin once more at the
poor Prince, a Fly darted in, and, blinded by the
darkness of the dungeon, flew straight into a
spider’s web, above the head of Ethelried.

«Poor creature!” thought Ethelried. “Thou
shalt not be left a prisoner in this dismal spot
while I have the power to help thee.’”’ He lifted
the scissors and with one stroke destroyed the
web, and gave the Fly its freedom.

As soon as the dungeon had ceased to echo
with the noise that Frog-eye Fearsome made in
banging shut the heavy door, Ethelried heard a
low buzzing near his ear. It was the Fly, which
had alighted on his shoulder.



A NEW FAIRY TALE. 35

“Let an insect in its gratitude teach you
this,” buzzed the Fly. “‘{o-morrow, if you
remain here, you must certainly meet your
doom, for the Witch never keeps a prisoner
. past the third night. But escape is pos-
sible. Your prison door is of iron, but the
shutter which bars the window is only of
wood. Cut your way out at midnight, and I
will have a friend in waiting to guide you to a
place of safety. A faint glimmer of light on
the opposite wall shows me the keyhole. I
shall make my escape thereat and go to repay
thy unselfish service to me. But know that
the scissors move only when bidden in rhyme.
Farewell.”

The Prince spent all the following time until
midnight, trying to think of a suitable verse to
say to the scissors. The art of rhyming had
been neglected in his early education, and it
was not until the first cock-crowing began that
he succeeded in making this one:

“ Giant scissors, serve me well,
And save me from the Witch’s spell!”

As he uttered the words the scissors leaped
out of his hand, and began to cut through the



36 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

wooden shutters as easily as through a cheese
In a very short time the Prince had crawled
through the opening. There he stood, outside
the dungeon, but it was a dark night and he
knew not which way to turn.

He could hear Frog-eye Fearsome snoring
like a tempest up in the watch-tower, and the
old Witch was talking in her sleep in seven
languages. While he stood looking around
him in bewilderment, a Firefly alighted on
his arm. Flashing its little lantern in the
Prince’s face, it cried, “This way! My friend,
the Fly, sent me to guide you to a place of
safety. Follow me and trust entirely to my
guidance.”

The Prince flung his mantle over his shoul-
der, and followed on with all possible speed.
They stopped first in the Witch’s orchard, and
the Firefly held its lantern up while the Prince
filled his pockets with the fruit. The apples
were gold with emerald leaves, and the cherries
were rubies, and the grapes were great bunches
of amethyst. When the Prince had filled his
pockets he had enough wealth to provide for all
his wants for at least a twelvemonth.

The Firefly led him on until they came to a



A NEW FAIRY TALE. 37

town where was a fine inn. There he left
him, and flew off to report the Prince’s safety
to the Fly and receive the promised reward.

Here Ethelried stayed for many weeks, living
like a king on the money that the fruit jewels
brought him. All this time the scissors were
becoming little and rusty, because he never
once used them, as the Fairy bade him, in
unselfish service for others. But one day he
bethought himself of her command, and started
out to seek some opportunity to help some-
body.

Soon he came to a tiny hut where a sick man
lay moaning, while his wife and children wept
beside him. ‘What is to become of me?”
cried the poor peasant. “ My grain must fall
and rot in the field from overripeness because
I have not the strength to rise and harvest it;
then indeed must we all starve.”

Ethelried heard him, and that night, when the
moon rose, he stole into the field to cut it down
with the giant scissors. They were so rusty
from long idleness that he could scarcely move
them. He tried to think of some rhyme with
which to command them; but it had been so
long since he had done any thinking, except for



38 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

his own selfish pleasure, that his brain refused
to work.

However, he toiled on all night, slowly cutting
down the grain stalk by stalk. Towards morn-
ing the scissors became brighter and sharper,
until they finally began to open and shut of
their own accord. The whole field was cut by
sunrise. Now the peasant’s wife had risen very
early to go down to the spring and dip up some
cool water for her husband to drink. She came
upon Ethelried as he was cutting the last row of
the grain, and fell on her knees to thank him.
From that day the peasant and all his family
were firm friends of Ethelried’s, and would have
gone through fire and water to serve him.

After that he had many adventures, and he
was very busy, for he never again forgot what
the Fairy had said, that only unselfish service
each day could keep the scissors sharp and
shining. When the shepherd lost a little lamb
one day on the mountain, it was Ethelried who
found it caught by the fleece in a tangle of
cruel thorns. When he had cut it loose and
carried it home, the shepherd also became his
firm friend, and would have gone through fire
and water to serve him.



A NEW FAIRY TALE. 39

The grandame whom he supplied with fagots,
the merchant whom he rescued from robbers,
the King’s councillor to whom he gave aid,
all became his friends. Up and down the
land, to beggar or lord, homeless wanderer or
high-born dame, he gladly
gave unselfish service all
unsought, and such as he
helped straightway became
his friends.

Day by day the scissors
grew sharper and sharper
and ever more quick to spring
forward at his bidding.

One day a herald dashed
down the highway, shouting
through his silver trumpet
that a beautiful Princess had
been carried away by the
Ogre. She was the only
child of the King of this country, and the
knights and nobles of all other realms and all
the royal potentates were prayed to come to
her rescue. To him who could bring her back
to her father’s castle should be given the throne
and kingdom, as well as the Princess herself,





40 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

So from far and ‘near, indeed from almost
every country under the sun, came knights
and princes to fight the Ogre. One by one
their brave heads were cut off and stuck on
poles along the moat that surrounded the
castle.

Still the beautiful Princess languished in her
prison. Every night at sunset she was taken up
to the roof for a glimpse of the sky, and told to
bid good-by to the sun, for the next morning
would surely be her last. Then she would
wring her lily-white hands and wave a sad
farewell to her home, lying far to the west-
ward. When the knights saw this they would
rush down to the chasm and sound a challenge
to the Ogre.

They were brave men, and they would not
have feared to meet the fiercest wild beasts, but
many shrunk back when the Ogre came rush-
ing out. They dared not meet in single combat,
this monster with the gnashing teeth, each one
of which was as big as a millstone.

Among those who drew back were Ethel-
ried’s brothers (the three that were dark and
the three that were fair), They would not
acknowledge their fear. They said, “We are





THE PRINCESS.








A NEW FAIRY TALE. 43

only waiting to lay some wily plan to capture
the Ogre.”

After several days Ethelried reached the
place on foot. “See him,” laughed one of the
brothers that was dark to one that was fair.
«He comes afoot ; no prancing steed, no wav-
ing plumes, no trusty sword; little and lorn, he
is not fit to be called a brother to princes.”’

But Ethelried heeded not their taunts. He
dashed across the drawbridge, and, opening his
scissors, cried:

« Giant scissors, rise in power!
Grant me my heart’s desire this hour!”

The crowds on the other side held their
breath as the Ogre rushed out, brandishing a
club as big as a church steeple. Then Whack!
Bang! The blows of the scissors, warding off
the blows of the mighty club, could be heard
for miles around.

At last Ethelried became so exhausted that
he could scarcely raise his hand, and it ‘was
plain to be seen that the scissors could not do
battle much longer. By this time a great many
people, attracted by the terrific noise, had come
running up to the moat. The news had spread



44 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS,

far and wide that Ethelried was in danger ; so
every one whom he had ever served dropped
whatever he was doing, and ran to the scene of
the battle. The peasant was there, and the
shepherd, and the lords and beggars and high-
born dames, all those whom Ethelried had ever
befriended.

As they saw that the poor Prince was about
to be vanquished, they all began a great lamen-
tation, and cried out bitterly.

“Tle saved my harvest,” cried one. “He
found my lamb,” cried another. “He showed
me a greater kindness still,’ shouted a third.
And so they went on, each telling of some
unselfish service that the Prince had rendered
him. Their voices all joined at last into such a
roar of gratitude that the scissors were given
fresh strength on account of it. They grew
longer and longer, and stronger and stronger,
until with one great swoop they sprang forward
and cut the ugly old Ogre’s head from his
shoulders.

Every cap was thrown up, and such cheering
rent the air as has never been heard since.
They did not know his name, they did not
know that he was Prince Ethelried, but they



A NEW FAIRY TALE. 45

knew by his valor that there was royal blood
in his veins. So they all cried out long and
loud : “ Long live the Prince ! Prince Ciseaux !”

Then the King stepped down from his throne
and took off his crown to give to the conqueror,
but Ethelried put it aside.

“Nay,” he said. “The only kingdom that I
crave is the kingdom of a loving heart and a
happy fireside. Keep all but the Princess.”

So the Ogre was killed, and the Prince came
into his kingdom that was his heart’s desire.
He married the Princess, and there was feasting
and merrymaking for seventy days and seventy
nights, and they all lived happily ever after.

When the feasting was over, and the guests
had all gone to their homes, the Prince pulled
down the house of the Ogre and built a new
one. On every gable he fastened a pair of
shining scissors to remind himself that only
through unselfish service to others comes the
happiness that is highest and best.

Over the great entrance gate he hung the
ones that had served him so valiantly, saying,
“Only those who belong to the kingdom of
loving hearts and happy homes can ever enter
ene.



46 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

One day the old King, with the brothers of
Ethelried (the three that were dark and the
three that were fair), came riding up to the
portal. They thought to share in Ethelried’s
fame and splendor. But the scissors leaped
from their place and snapped so angrily in their
faces that they turned their horses and fled.

Then the scissors sprang back to their place
again to guard the portal of Ethelried, and, to
this day, only those who belong to the kingdom
of loving hearts may enter the Gate of the
Giant Scissors.



CHAPTER III.
BEHIND THE GREAT GATE,

Tuat was the tale of the giant scissors as it
was told to Joyce in the pleasant fire-lighted
room; but behind the great gates the true
story went on in a far different way.

Back of the Ciseaux house was a dreary field,
growing drearier and browner every moment as
the twilight deepened; and across its rough
furrows a tired boy was stumbling wearily
homeward. He was not more than nine years
old, but the careworn expression of his thin
white face might have belonged to a little old
man of ninety. He was driving two unruly
goats towards the house. The chase they led him
would have been a laughable sight, had he not
looked so small and forlorn plodding along in
his clumsy wooden shoes, and a peasart’s blouse
of blue cotton, several sizes too large for his
thin little body.

47



48 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

The anxious look in his eyes changed to one
of fear as he drew nearer the house. At the
sound of a gruff voice bellowing at him from
the end of the lane, he winced as if he had
been struck.

“Ha, there, Jules! Thou lazy vagabond!
Late again! Canst thou never learn that I
am not to be kept waiting?”

“But, Brossard,” quavered the boy in his
shrill, anxious voice, “it was not my fault,
indeed it was not. The goats were so stub-
born to-night. They broke through the hedge,
and I had to chase them over three fields.”

“Have done with thy lying excuses,” was
the rough answer. ‘Thou shalt have no sup-
per to-night. Maybe an empty stomach will
teach thee when my commands fail. Hasten
and drive the goats into the pen.”

There was a scowl on Brossard’s burly red
face that made Jules’s heart bump up in his
throat. Brossard was only the caretaker of the
Ciseaux place, but he had been there for twenty
years, — so long that he felt himself the master.
The real master was in Algiers nearly all the
time. During his absence the great house was
closed, excepting the kitchen and two rooms



BEHIND THE GREAT GATE. 49

above it. Of these Brossard had one and
Henri the other. Henri was the cook; a slow,
stupid old man, not to be jogged out of either
his good-nature or his slow gait by anything
that Brossard might say.

Henri cooked and washed and mended, and
hoed in the garden. Brossard worked in the
fields and shaved down the expenses of their
living closer and closer. All that was thus
saved fell to his share, or he might not have
watched the expenses so carefully.

Much saving had made him miserly. Old
Therese, the woman with the fish-cart, used to
say that he was the stingiest man in all Tour-
raine. She ought to know, for she had sold
him a fish every Friday during all those twenty
years, and he had never once failed to quarrel
about the price. Five years had gone by since
the master’s last visit. Brossard and Henri
were not likely to forget that time, for they
had been awakened in the dead of night by a
loud knocking at the side gate. When they
opened it the sight that greeted them made
them rub their sleepy eyes to be sure that they
saw aright.

There stood the master, old Martin Ciseaux.



50 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

His hair and fiercely bristling mustache had
turned entirely white since they had last seen
him. In his arms he carried a child.

Brossard almost dropped his candle in his
first surprise, and his wonder grew until he
could hardly contain it, when the curly head
raised itself from monsieur’s shoulder, and the
sleepy baby voice lisped something in a foreign
tongue,

« By all the saints!” muttered Brossard, as
he stood aside for his master to pass.

“Jt’s my brother Jules’s grandson,” was the
curt explanation that monsieur offered. “Jules
is dead, and so is his son and all the family, —
died in America. This is his son’s son, Jules,
the last of the name. If I choose to take him
from a foreign poorhouse and give him shelter,
it’s nobody’s business, Louis Brossard, but my
own.”

With.that he strode on up the stairs to his
room, the boy still in his arms. This sudden
coming of a four-year-old child into their daily
life made as little difference to Brossard and
Henri as the presence of the four-months-old
puppy. They spread a cot for him in Henri’s
room when the master went back to Algiers.



BEHIND THE GREAT GATE. 51

They gave him something to eat three times a
day when they stopped for their own meals,
and then went on with their work as usual.

It made no difference to them that he sobbed
in the dark for his mother to come and sing
him to sleep,—the happy young mother who
had petted and humored him in her own fond
American fashion. They could not under-
stand his speech; more than that, they could
not understand him. Why should he mope
alone in the garden with that beseeching look
of a lost dog in his big, mournful eyes? Why
should he not play and be happy, like the neigh-
bor’s children or the kittens or any other young
thing that had life and sunshine?

Brossard snapped his fingers at him some.
times at first, as he would have done to a
playful animal; but when Jules drew back,
frightened by his foreign speech and rough
voice, he began to dislike the timid child.
After awhile he never noticed him except to
push him aside or to find fault.

It was from Henri that Jules picked up
whatever French he learned, and it was from
Henri also that he had received the one awk-
ward caress, and the only one, that his desolate



52 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

little heart had known in all the five loveless
years that he had been with them.

A few months ago Brossard had put him
out in the field to keep the goats from straying
away from their pasture, two stubborn crea-
tures, whose self-willed wanderings had brought
many a scolding down on poor Jules’s head.
To-night he was unusually unfortunate, for
added to the weary chase they had led him was
this stern command that he should go to bed
‘without his supper.

He was about to pass into the house, shiver-
ing and hungry, when Henri put his head out
at the window. “Brossard,” he called, “there
isn’t enough bread for supper ; there’s just this
dry end of a loaf. You should have bought as
I told you, when the baker’s cart stopped here
this morning.”

Brossard slowly measured the bit of hard,
black bread with his eye, and, secing that there
was not half enough to satisfy the appetites of
two hungry men, he grudgingly drew a franc
from his pocket.

«Here, Jules,” he called. “Go down to the
bakery, and see to it that thou art back by
the time that I have milked the goats, or thou



BEHIND THE GREAT GATE. 53

shalt go to bed with a beating, as well as
supperless. Stay!” he added, as Jules turned
to go. “I have a mind to eat white bread to-
night instead of black. It will cost an extra
sou, so be careful to count the change. It is
only once or so in a twelvemonth,” he muttered
to himself as an excuse for his extravagance.

It was half a mile to the village, but down
hill all the way, so that Jules reached the
bakery in a very short time.

Several customers were ahead of him, how-
ever, and he awaited his turn nervously. When
he left the shop an old lamplighter was going
down the street with torch and ladder, leaving
a double line of twinkling lights in his wake, as
he disappeared down the wide “Paris road.”
Jules watched him a moment, and then ran
rapidly on. For many centuries the old village
of St. Symphorien had echoed with the clatter
of wooden shoes on its ancient cobblestones ;
but never had foot-falls in its narrow, crooked
streets kept time to the beating of a lonelier
little heart.

The officer of Customs, at his window beside
the gate that shuts in the old town at night,
nodded in a surly way as the boy hurried



54 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

past. Once outside the gate, Jules walked
more slowly, for the road began to wind up-hill.
Now he was out again in the open country,
where a faint light lying over the frosty fields
showed that the moon was rising.

Here and there lamps shone from the win-
dows of houses along the road; across the
field came the bark of a dog, welcoming his
master ; two old peasant women passed him in
a creaking cart on their glad way home.

At the top of the hill Jules stopped to take
breath, leaning for a moment against the stone
wall. He was faint from hunger, for he had
been in the fields since early morning, with »
nothing for his midday lunch but a handful
of boiled chestnuts. The smell of the fresh
bread tantalized him beyond ‘endurance. Oh,_
to be able to take a mouthful, —just one little
mouthful of that brown, sweet crust!

He put his face down close, and shut his
eyes, drawing in the delicious odor with long,
deep breaths. What bliss it would be to have
that whole loaf for his own, —he, little Jules,
who was to have no supper that night! He
held it up in the moonlight, hungrily looking
at it on every side. There was not a broken



BEHIND THE GREAT GATE. 55

place to be found anywhere on its surface; not
one crack in all that-hard, brown glaze of crust,
from which he might pinch the tiniest crumb.

For a moment a mad impulse seized him to
tear it in pieces, and eat every scrap, regardless
of the reckoning with Brossard afterwards. But
it was only fora moment. The memory of his
last beating stayed his hand. Then, fearing to
dally with temptation, lest it should master him,
he thrust the bread under his arm, and ran
every remaining step of the way home.

Brossard took the loaf from him, and pointed
with it to the stairway, —a mute command for
Jules to go to bed at once. Tingling with a
sense of injustice, the little fellow wanted to
shriek out in all his hunger and misery, defying
this monster of a man; but a struggling spar-
row might as well have tried to turn on the
hawk that held it. He clenched his hands to
keep from snatching something from the table,
set out so temptingly in the kitchen, but he
dared not linger even to look at it. With a
feeling of utter helplessness he passed it in
silence, his face white and set.

Dragging his'tired feet slowly up the stairs,
he went over to the casement window, and



56 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

swung it open; then, kneeling down, he laid
his head on the sill, in the moonlight. Was it
his dream that came back to him then, or only
a memory? He could never be sure, for if it
were a memory, it was certainly as strange
as any dream, unlike
anything he had ever
known in his life with
Henri and_ Brossard.
Night after night he
had comforted himself
with the picture that it
brought before him.

He could see a little
white house in the
middle of a big lawn.
There were vines on the
porches, and it must
have been early in the
evening, for the fireflies
were beginning to twinkle over the lawn. And
the grass had just been cut, for the air was
sweet with the smell of it. A woman, standing
on the steps under the vines, was calling “Jules,
Jules, it is time to come in, little son!”

But Jules, in his white dress and shoulder-





BEHIND THE GREAT GATE. 57

knots of blue ribbon, was toddling across the
lawn after a firefly.

Then she began to call him another way.
Jules had a vague idea that it was a part of
some game that they sometimes played together.
It sounded like a song, and the words were not
like any that he had ever heard since he came to
live with Henri and Brossard. He could not
forget them, though, for had they not sung
themselves through that beautiful dream every
time he had it ?

“ Little Boy Blue, oh, where are you?
O, where are you-u-u-u?”

He only laughed in the dream picture and
ran‘ on after the firefly. Then a man came
running after him, and, catching him, tossed
him up laughingly, and carried him to the
house on his shoulder.

Somebody held a glass of cool, creamy milk
for him to drink, and by and by he was in a
little white night-gown in the woman’s lap.
His head was nestled against her shoulder,
and he could feel her soft lips touching him
on cheeks and eyelids and mouth, before she
began to sing:



58 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

“Oh, little Boy Blue, lay by your horn,
And mother will sing of the cows and the corn,
Till the stars and the angels come to keep
Their watch, where my baby lies fast asleep.”

Now all of a sudden Jules knew that there
was another kind of hunger worse than the
longing for bread. He wanted the soft touch
of those lips again on his mouth and eyelids,
the loving pressure of those restful arms, a
thousand times more than he had wished for
the loaf that he had just brought home. Two
hot tears, that made his eyes ache in their slow
gathering, splashed down on the window-sill.

Down below Henri opened the kitchen door
and snapped his fingers to call the dog. Look-
ing out, Jules saw him set a plate of bones on
the step. For a moment he listened to the
animal’s contented crunching, and then crept
across the room to his cot, with a little moan.
“Q-o-oh —o-oh!” he sobbed. <“ Even the dog
has more than I have, and I’m so hungry!”
He hid his head awhile in the old quilt ; then
he raised it again, and, with the tears streaming
down his thin little face, sobbed in a heart-
broken whisper: ‘Mother! Mother! Do you
know how hungry I am?”



BEHIND THE GREAT GATE, 59

A clatter of knives and forks from the kitchen
below was the only answer, and he dropped
despairingly down again. ;

«She’s so far away she can’t even hear me!”’
‘ he moaned. “Oh, if I could only be dead, too!”

He lay there, crying, till Henri had finished
washing the supper dishes and had put them
clumsily away. The rark odor of tobacco,
stealing up the stairs, told him that Brossard
had settled down to enjoy his evening pipe.
Through the casement window that was still
ajar came the faint notes of an accordeon from
Monsieur Gréville’s garden, across the way.
Gabriel, the coachman, was walking up and
down in the moonlight, playing a wheezy
accompaniment to the only song he knew.
Jules did not notice it at first, but after
awhile, when he had cried himself quiet, the
faint melody began to steal soothingly into his
consciousness. His eyelids closed drowsily,
and then the accordeon seemed to be singing
something to him. He could not understand
at first, but just as he was dropping off to
sleep he heard it quite clearly:

« Till the stars and the angels come to keep
Their watch, where my baby lies fast asleep.”



60 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Late in the night Jules awoke with a start,
and sat up, wondering what had aroused him.
He knew that it must be after midnight, for the
moon was nearly down. Henri was snoring.
Suddenly such a strong feeling of hunger came
over him, that he could think of nothing else.
It was like a gnawing pain. As if he were
being led by some power outside of his own
will, he slipped to the door of the room. The
little bare feet made no noise on the carpetless
floor. No mouse could have stolen down the
stairs more silently than timid little Jules. The
latch of the kitchen door gave a loud click
that made him draw back with a shiver of
alarm; but that was all. After waiting one
breathless minute, his heart beating like a
trip-hammer, he went on into the pantry.

The moon was so far down now, that only a
white glimmer of light showed him the faint
outline of things; but his keen little nose
guided him. There was half a cheese on the
swinging shelf, with all the bread that had been
left from supper. He broke off great pieces
of each in eager haste. Then he found a crock
of goat’s milk. Lifting it to his mouth, he
drank with big, quick gulps until he had te











































”

A CRASH.

“1T FELL TO THE FLOOR WITH






BEHIND THE GREAT GATE. 63

stop for breath. Just as he was about to raise
it to his lips again, some instinct of danger
made him look up. There in the doorway
stood Brossard, bigger and darker and more
threatening than he had ever seemed before.

A frightened little gasp was all that the
child had strength to give. He turned so sick
and faint that his nerveless fingers could no
longer hold the crock. It fell to the floor with
a crash, and the milk spattered all over the
pantry. Jules was too terrified to utter a
sound. It was Brossard who made the out-
cry. Jules could only shut his eyes and crouch
down trembling, under the shelf. The next
instant he was dragged out, and Brossard’s
merciless strap fell again and again on the
poor shrinking little body, that writhed under
the cruel blows.

Once more Jules dragged himself up-stairs
to his cot, this time bruised and sore, too ex-
hausted for tears, too hopeless to think of
possible to-morrows.

Poor little prince in the clutches of the ogre!
If only fairy tales might be true! If only
some gracious spirit of elfin lore might really
come at such a time with its magic wand of



64 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

healing! Then there would be no more little
desolate hearts, no more grieved little faces
with undried tears upon them in all the earth.
Over every threshold where a child’s wee
feet had pattered in and found a home, it
would hang its guardian Scissors of Avenging,
so that only those who belong to the kingdom
of loving hearts and gentle hands would ever
dare to enter.



CHAPTE Ra LY:
A LETTER AND A MEETING.

Nearty a week later Joyce sat at her desk,
hurrying to finish a letter before the postman’s
arrival.

“ Dear Jack,” it began.

«You and Mary will each get a letter this week.
Hers is the fairy tale that Cousin Kate told me, about
an old gate near here. I wrote it down as well as I
could remember. I wish you could see that gate. It
gets more interesting every day, and I’d give most
anything to see what lies on the other side. Maybe I
shall soon, for Marie has a way of finding out anything
she wants to know. Marie is my new maid. Cousin
Kate went to Paris last week, to be gone until nearly
Christmas, so she got Marie to take care of me.

«It seems so odd to have somebody button my boots
and brush my hair, and take me out to walk as if I
were a big doll. I have to be very dignified and act
as if I had always been used to such things. I believe

65



66 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Marie would be shocked to death if she knew that I
had ever washed dishes, or pulled weeds out of the
pavement, or romped with you in the barn.

“Yesterday when we were out walking I got so tired
of acting as if I were a hundred years old, that I felt as
if I should scream. ‘Marie,’ I said, ‘I’ve a mind to
throw my muff in the fence-corner and run and hang
on behind that wagon that’s going dowr-hill.’ She had
no idea that I was in earnest. She just smiled very
politely and said, ‘Oh, mademoiselle, impossible! How
you Americans do love to jest.’ But it was no joke.
You can’t imagine how stupid it is to be with nobody
but grown people all the time. I’m fairly aching for a
good old game of hi spy or prisoner’s base with you.
There is nothing at all to do, but to take poky walks.

“Yesterday afternoon we walked down to the river.
There’s a double row of trees along it on this side, and .
several benches where people can wait for the tram-
cars that pass down this street and then across the
bridge into Tours. Marie found an old friend of hers
sitting on one of the benches, — such a big fat woman,
and oh, such a gossip! Marie said she was tired,
so we sat there a long time. Her friend’s name is
Clotilde Robard. They talked about everybody in St.
Symphorien.

“Then I gossiped, too. I asked Clotilde Robard if
she knew why the gate with the big scissors was never
opened any more. She told me that she used to be one
of the maids there, before she married the spice-monger
and was Madame Robard. Years before she went to
live there, when the old Monsieur Ciseaux died, there








TS SH
are

OUT WITH MARIE.









A LETTER AND A MEETING. 69

was a dreadful quarrel about some money. The son
that got the property told his brother and sister never
to darken his doors again.

“They went off to America, and that big front gate
has never been opened since they passed out of it.
Clotilde says that some people say that they put a curse
on it, and something awful will happen to the first one
who dares to go through. Isn’t that interesting?

“The oldest son, Mr. Martin Ciseaux, kept up the
place for a long time, just as his father had done, but
he never married. All of a sudden he shut up the
house, sent away all the servants but the two who take
care of it, and went off to Algiers to live. Five years ago
he came back to bring his little grand-nephew, but
nobody has seen him since that time.

“Clotilde says that an orphan asylum would have
been a far better home for Jules (that is the boy’s name),
for Brossard, the caretaker, is so mean to him. Doesn’t
that make you think of Prince Ethelried in the fairy
tale? ‘Little and lorn; no fireside welcomed him and
no lips gave him a friendly greeting.’

“ Marie says that she has often seen Jules down in
the field, back of his uncle’s house, tending the goats.
I hope that I may see him sometime.

“Oh, dear, the postman has come sooner than I
expected. He is talking down in the hall now, and if
I do not post this letter now it will miss the evening
train and be too late for the next mail steamer. Tell
mamma that I will answer all her questions about my
lessons and clothes next week. Oceans of love to
everybody in the dear little brown house.”



7O THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Hastily scrawling her name, Joyce ran out
into the hall with her letter. «Anything for
‘me?” she asked, anxiously, leaning over the
banister to drop the letter into Marie’s hand.
“One, mademoiselle,” was the answer. “But
it has not a foreign stamp.”

«“ Oh, from Cousin Kate!” exclaimed Joyce,
tearing it open as she went back to her room.
At the door she stooped to pick up a piece of
paper that had dropped from the envelope. It
crackled stiffly as she unfolded it.

“Money!” she exclaimed in surprise. “A
whole twenty franc note. What could Cousin
Kate have sent it for?” The last page of the
letter explained.

«I have just remembered that December is not very
far off, and that whatever little Christmas gifts we send
home should soon be started on their way. Enclosed
you will find twenty francs for your Christmas shopping.
It is not much, but we are too far away to send any-
thing but the simplest little remembrances, things that
will not be spoiled in the mail, and on which little or no
duty need be paid. You might buy one article each
day, so that there will be some purpose in your walks
into Tours.

«Jam sorry that I can not be with you on Thanks-
giving Day. We will have to drop it from our calendar

t



A LETTER AND A MEETING. 71

this year; not the thanksgiving itself, but the turkey
and mince pie part. Suppose you take a few francs to
give yourself some little treat to mark the day. I hope
my dear little girl will not be homesick all by herself.
I never should have left just at this time if it had not
been very necessary.”

Joyce smoothed out the bank-note and looked
at it with sparkling eyes. Twenty whole
francs! The same as four dollars! All the
money that she had ever had in her whole life
put together would not have amounted to that
much. Dimes were scarce in the little brown
house, and even pennies seldom found their
way into the children’s hands when five pairs
of little feet were always needing shoes, and
five healthy appetites must be satisfied daily.

All the time that Joyce was pinning her
treasure securely in her pocket and putting on
her hat and jacket, all the time that she was
walking demurely down the road with Marie,
she was planning different ways in which to
spend her fortune.

“Mademoiselle is very quiet,” ventured
Marie, remembering that one of her duties was
to keep up an improving conversation with her
little mistress.



72 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

“Yes,” answered Joyce, half impatiently ;
“T’ve got something so lovely to think about,
that I’d like to go back and sit down in the
garden and just think and think until dark,
without being interrupted by anybody.”

This was Marie’s opportunity. “Then
mademoiselle might not object to stopping in
the garden of the villa which we are now ap-
proaching,” she said. “My friend, Clotilde
Robard, is housekeeper there, and I have a
very important message to deliver to her.”

Joyce had no objection. “But, Marie,” she
said, as she paused at the gate, “I think I’ll not
go in. It is so lovely and warm out here in
the sun that I’ll just sit here on the steps and
wait for you.”

Five minutes went by and then ten. By
that time Joyce had decided how to spend
every centime in the whole twenty francs, and
Marie had not returned. Another five minutes
went by. It was dull, sitting there facing the
lonely highway, down which no one ever seemed
to pass. Joyce stood up, looked all around, and
then slowly sauntered down the road a short
distance.

Here and there in the crevices of the wall



A LETTER AND A MEETING. 73

blossomed a few hardy wild flowers, which
Joyce began to gather as she walked. “I'll go
around this bend in the road and see what’s
there,’ she said to herself. “By that time
Marie will surely be done with her messages.”

No one was in sight in any direction, and
feeling that no one could be in hearing distance,
either, in such a deserted place, she began to
sing. It was an old Mother Goose rhyme that
she hummed over and over, in a low voice at
first, but louder as she walked on.

Around the bend in the road there was
nothing to be seen but a lonely field where
two goats were grazing. On one side of it
was a stone wall, on two others a tall hedge,
but the side next her sloped down to the road,
unfenced.

Joyce, with her hands filled with the yellow
wild flowers, stood looking around her, sing-
ing the old rhyme, the song that she had
taught the baby to sing before he could talk
plainly :

“Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn,
The sheep’s in the meadow, the cow’s in the corn.
Little Blue Blue, oh, where are you?
Oh, where are you-u-u-u?”



74. THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

The gay little voice that had been rising
higher and higher, sweet as any bird’s, stopped
suddenly in mid-air ; for, as if in answer to her
call, there was a rustling just ahead of her, and
a boy who had been lying on his back, looking
at the sky, slowly raised himself out of the
grass.

For an instant Joyce was startled; then see-
ing by his wooden shoes and old blue cotton
blouse that he was only a little peasant watch-
ing the goats, she smiled at him with a pleasant
good morning.

He did not answer, but came towards her
with a dazed expression on his face, as if he
were groping his way through some strange
dream. “It is time to go in!” he exclaimed,
as if repeating some lesson learned long ago,
and half forgotten.

Joyce stared at him in open-mouthed aston-
ishment. The little fellow had spoken in Eng-
lish. “Oh, you must be Jules,” she cried.
«Aren't you? I’ve been wanting to find you
for ever so long.”

The boy seemed frightened, and did not
auswer, only looked at her with big, troubled
eyes. Thinking that she had made a mistake,













“HE CAME TOWARDS HER WITH A DAZED EXPRESSION
ON HIS FACE.”






A LETTER AND A MEETING. 7

that she had not heard aright, Joyce spoke in
French. He answered her timidly. She had
not been mistaken; he was Jules; he had been
asleep, he told her, and when he heard her
singing, he thought it was his mother calling
him as she used to do, and had started up ex-
pecting to see her at last. Where was she?
Did mademoiselle know her? Surely she must
if she knew the song.

It was on the tip of Joyce’s tongue to tell
him that everybody knew that song; that it
was as familiar to the children at home as the
chirping of crickets on the hearth or the sight
of dandelions in the spring-time. But some
instinct warned her not to say it. She was
glad afterwards, when she found that it was
sacred to him, woven in as it was with his one
beautiful memory of a home. It was all he
had, and the few words that Joyce’s singing
had startled from him were all that he remem-
bered of his mother’s speech.

If Joyce had happened upon him in any other
way, it is doubtful if their acquaintance would
have grown very rapidly. He was afraid of
strangers; but coming as she did with the
familiar song that was like an old friend, he



78 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

felt that he must have known her sometime, ~
that other time when there was always a sweet
voice calling, and fireflies twinkled across a
dusky lawn.

Joyce was not in a hurry for Marie to come
now. She had a hundred questions to ask, and
made the most of her time by talking very fast.
“Marie will be frightened,” she told Jules,
“if she does not find me at the gate, and will
think that the gypsies have stolen me. Then
she will begin to hunt up and down the road,
and I don’t know what she would say if she
came and found me talking to a strange child
out in the fields, so I must hurry back. I
am glad that I found you. I have been wish-
ing so long for somebody to play with, and
you seem like an old friend because you were
born in America. I’m going to ask ma-
dame to ask Brossard to let you come over
sometime.”

Jules watched her as she hurried away, run-
ning lightly down the road, her fair hair flying
over her shoulders and her short blue skirt
fluttering. Once she looked back to wave her
hand. Long after she was out of sight he still
stood looking after her, as one might gaze long-



A LETTER AND A MEETING. 79

ingly after some visitant from another world.
Nothing like her had ever dropped into his life
before, and he wondered if he should ever see
her again,



CHA PA Rave

A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE.

66 qe

i
i



‘HIS doesn’t seem a
bit like Thanksgiving
Day, Marie,” said
Joyce, plaintively, as
she sat up in bed to

take the early breakfast that

her maid brought in, —a cup
of chocolate and a roll.

“Tn our country the very
minute you wake up you can feel that it is a
holiday. Outdoors it’s nearly always cold and
gray, with everything covered with snow. In-
side you can smell turkey and pies and all
sorts of good spicy things. Here it is so warm
that the windows are open and flowers bloom-
ing in the garden, and there isn’t a thing to
make it seem different from any other old
day.”






80



A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 8I

Here her grumbling was interrupted by a
knock at the door, and Madame Gréville’s
maid, Berthé, came in with a message.

“Madame and monsieur intend spending the
day in Tours, and since Mademoiselle Ware has
written that Mademoiselle Joyce is to have no
lessons on this American holiday, they will be
pleased to have her accompany them in the
carriage. She can spend the morning with
them there or return immediately with Ga-
briel.” i

“Of course I want to go,” cried Joyce. “I
love to drive. But I’d rather come back here
to lunch and have it by myself in the garden.
Berthé, ask madame if I can’t have it served
in the little kiosk at the end of the arbor.”

As soon as she had received a most gracious
permission, Joyce began to make a little plan.
It troubled her conscience somewhat, for she
felt that she ought to ‘mention it to madame,
but she was almost certain that madame would
object, and she had set her heart on carrying
it out.

«IT won’t speak about it now,” she said to
herself, “because I am not suve that I am
going to do it. Mamma would think it was

d

’



$2 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS,

all right, but foreigners are so queer about
some things.”

Uncertain as Joyce may have been about
her future actions, as they drove towards town,
no sooner had madame and monsieur stepped
from the carriage, on the Rue Nationale, than
she was perfectly sure.

“Stop at the baker’s, Gabriel,’ she ordered
as they turned homeward, then at the big
grocery on the corner. ‘Cousin Kate told
me to treat™ myself to something nice,” she
said apologetically to her conscience, as she
gave up the twenty francs to the clerk to be
changed.

If Gabriel wondered what was in the little
parcels which she brought back to the car-
riage, he made no sign. He only touched his
hat respectfully, as she gave the next order:
“Stop where the road turns by the cemetery,
Gabriel ; at the house with the steps going up
to an iron-barred gate. I'l be back in two or
three minutes,” she said, when she had reached

it, and climbed from the carriage.

To his surprise, instead of entering the gate,
she hurried on past it, around the bend in the
road. Ina little while she came running back,



A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 83

her shoes covered with damp earth, as if she
had been walking in a freshly ploughed field.

If Gabriel’s eyes could have followed her’
around that bend in the road, he would have
seen a sight past his understanding : Mademoi-
selle Joyce running at the top of her speed to
meet a little goatherd in wooden shoes and
blue cotton blouse, —a common little peasant
goatherd.

“It’s Thanksgiving Day, Jules,” she an-
nounced, gasping, as she sank down on the
ground beside him. “We're the only Ameri-
cans here, and everybotly has gone off; and
Cousin Kate said to celebrate in some way.
I’m going to have a dinner in the garden.
I’ve bought a rabbit, and we'll dig a hole,
and make a fire, and barbecue it the way Jack
and I used to do at home. And we'll roast
eggs in the ashes, and have a fine time. I’ve
got a lemon tart and a little iced fruit-cake,
too.”

All this was poured out in such breathless
haste, and in such a confusion of tongues, first a
- sentence of English and then a word of French,
that it is no wonder that Jules grew bewildered
in trying to follow her. She had to begin

>.



84 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

again at the beginning, and speak very slowly,
in order to make him understand that it was a
feast day of some kind, and that he, Jules, was
invited to some sort of a strange, wonderful
entertainment in Monsieur Gréville’s garden.
«“ But Brossard is away from home,” said Jules,
“and there is no one to watch the goats, and
keep them from straying down the road. Still
it would be just the same if he were home,” he
added, sadly. “He would not let me go, I am
sure. I have never been out of sight of that
roof since I first came here, except on errands
to the village, when I had to run all the way
back.” He pointed to the peaked gables,
adorned by the scissors of his crazy old
ancestor,

“Brossard isn’t your father,” cried Joyce,
indignantly, “nor your uncle, nor your cousin,
nor anything else that has a right to shut you
up that way. Isn’t there a field with a fence
all around it, that you could drive the goats
into for a few hours?”

Jules shook his head.

“Well, I can’t have my Thanksgiving spoiled -
for just a couple of old goats,” exclaimed Joyce.
“You'll have to bring them along, and we'll



A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 85

shut them up in the carriage-house. You
come over in about an hour, and I'll be at
the side gate waiting for you.”

Joyce had always been a general in her small
way. She made her plans and issued her orders
both at home and at school, and the children
accepted her leadership as a matter of course.
Even if Jules had not been willing and anxious
to go, it is doubtful if he could have mustered
courage to oppose the arrangements that she
made in such a masterful way; but Jules had
not the slightest wish to object to anything
whatsoever that Joyce might propose.

It is safe to say that the old garden had
never before even dreamed of such a celebra-
tion as the one that took place that afternoon
behind its moss-coated walls. The time-stained
statue of Eve, which stood on one side of the
fountain, looked across at the weather-beaten
figure of Adam, on the other side, in stony-
eyed surprise. The little marble satyr in the
middle of the fountain, which had been grin-
ning ever since its endless shower-bath began,
seemed to grin wider than ever, as it watched
the children’s strange sport.

Jules dug the little trench according to



86 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Joyce’s directions, and laid the iron grating
which she had borrowed from the cook across
it, and built the fire underneath. “We ought to
have something especially patriotic and Thanks-
givingey,” said Joyce, standing on one foot to
consider. ‘Oh, now I know,” she cried, after
a moment’s thought. “Cousin Kate has a
lovely big silk flag in the top of her trunk.
T’ll run and get that, and then Pll recite the
‘Landing of the Pilgrims’ to you while the
rabbit cooks.”

Presently a savory odor began to steal along
the winding paths of the garden, between the
laurel-bushes, —a smell of barbecued meat sput-
tering over the fire. Above the door of the
little kiosk, with many a soft swish of silken
stirrings, hung the beautiful old flag. Then
a clear little voice floated up through the pine-

trees :
“ My country, ’tis of thee,
Sweet land of liberty,
Of thee I sing!”

All the time that Joyce sang, she was mov-
ing around the table, setting out the plates and
rattling cups and saucers. She could not keep
a little quaver out of her voice, for, as she went



A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE, 87

on, all the scenes of all the times that she had
sung that song before came crowding up in her
memory. There were the Thanksgiving days
in the church at home, and the Washington’s
birthdays at school, and two Decoration days,
when, as a granddaughter of a veteran, she had

helped scatter flowers over the soldiers’ graves.

Somehow it made her feel so hopelessly far
away from all that made life dear to be singing
of that “sweet land of liberty” in a foreign
country, with only poor little alien Jules for
company.

Maybe that is why the boy’s first lesson in
patriotism was given so earnestly by his home-
sick little teacher. Something that could not be
put into words stirred within him, as, looking up
at the soft silken flutterings of the old flag, he
listened for the first time to the story of the
Pilgrim Fathers.

The rabbit cooked slowly, so slowly that there
was time for Jules to learn how to play mumble-
peg while they waited. At last it was done, and
Joyce proudly plumped it into the platter that
had been waiting for it. Marie had already
brought out a bountiful lunch, cold meats and
salad and a dainty pudding. By the time that



88 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Joyce had added her contribution to the feast,
there was scarcely an inch of the table left
uncovered. Jules did not know the names of
half the dishes.

Not many miles away from that old garden,
scattered up and down the Loire throughout
“all the region of fair Tourraine, rise the turrets
of many an old chateau. Great banquet halls,
where kings and queens once feasted, still stand
as silent witnesses of a gay bygone court life;
but never in any chateau or palace among them
all was feast more thoroughly enjoyed than
this impromptu dinner in the garden, where a
little goatherd was the only guest.

It was an enchanted spot to Jules, made so
by the magic of Joyce’s wonderful gift of story-
telling. For the first time in his life that he
could remember, he heard of Santa Claus and
Christmas trees, of Bluebeard and Aladdin’s
lamp, and all the dear old fairy tales that were
so entrancing he almost forgot to eat.

Then they played that he was the prince,
Prince Ethelried, and that the goats in the
carriage-house were his royal steeds, and that
Joyce was a queen whom he had come to visit.

But it came to an end, as all beautiful things









A LESSON IN PATRIOTISM.






A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. gi

must do. The bells in the village rang four,
and Prince Ethelried started up as Cinderella
must have done when the pumpkin coach dis-
appeared. He was no longer a king’s son; he
was only Jules, the little goatherd, who must
hurry back to the field before the coming of
Brossard. /

Joyce went with him to the carriage-house.
Together they swung open the great door.
Then an exclamation of dismay fell from
Joyce’s lips. All over the floor were scattered
scraps of leather and cloth and hair, the kind
used in upholstering. The goats had whiled
away the hours of their imprisonment by chew-
ing up the cushions of the pony cart.

Jules turned pale with fright. Knowing so
little of the world, he judged all grown people
by his knowledge of Henri and Brossard.
«Oh, what will they do to us?” he gasped.

“Nothing at all,” answered Joyce, bravely,
although her heart beat twice as fast as usual
as monsieur’s accusing face rose up before
her.

“It was all my fault,” said Jules, ready to
cry. “What must I do?” Joyce saw his
distress, and with quick womanly tact recog:



92 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

_nized her duty as hostess. It would never do to

let this, his first Thanksgiving Day, be clouded
by a single unhappy remembrance. She would
pretend that it was a part of their last game;
so she waved her hand, and said, in a theatrical
voice, “You forget, Prince Ethelried, that in
the castle of Irmingarde she rules supreme.
If it is the pleasure of your royal steeds to
feed upon cushions they shall not be denied,
even though they choose my own coach
pillows, of gold-cloth and velour.”

«« But what if Gabriel should tell Brossard ?”
questioned Jules, his teeth almost chattering at
the mere thought.

«Oh, never mind, Jules,” she answered, laugh-
ingly. ‘Don’t worry about a little thing like
that. I'll make it all right with madame as
soon as she gets home.”

Jules, with utmost faith in Joyce’s power to
do anything that she might undertake, drew
a long breath of relief. Half a dozen times
between the gate and the lane that led into
the Ciseaux field, he turned around to wave his
old cap in answer to the hopeful flutter of her
little white handkerchief; but when he was
out of sight she went back to the carriage-



A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 93

house and looked at the wreck of the cushions
with a sinking heart. After that second look,
she was not so sure of making it all right with
madame,

Going slowly up to her room, she curled up
in the window-seat to wait for the sound of the
carriage wheels. The blue parrots on the wall-
paper sat in their blue hoops in straight rows
from floor to ceiling, and hung all their dismal
heads. It seemed to Joyce as if there were
thousands of them, and that each one was more
unhappy than any of the others. The blue roses
on the bed-curtains, that had been in such gay
blossom a few hours before, looked ugly and
unnatural now.

Over the mantel hung a picture that had
been a pleasure to Joyce ever since she had
taken up her abode in this quaint blue room.
It was called “A Message from Noél,” and
showed an angel flying down with gifts to fill
a pair of little wooden shoes that some child
had put out on a window-sill below. When
madame had explained that the little French
children put out their shoes for Saint Noél
to fill, instead of hanging stockings for Santa
Claus, Joyce had been so charmed with the



94 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

picture that she declared that she intended to
follow the French custom herself, this year.

Now, even the picture looked different, since
she had lost her joyful anticipations of Christ-
mas. ‘It is all No-el to me now,” she sobbed.
“No tree, no Santa Claus, and now, since the
money must go to pay for the goats’ mischief, no
presents for anybody in the dear little brown
~ house at home,—not even mamma and the
baby!”

A big salty tear trickled down the side of
Joyce’s nose and splashed on her hand; then
another one. It was such a gloomy ending for
her happy Thanksgiving Day. One consoling
thought came to her in time to stop the deluge
that threatened. “Anyway, Jules has had a
good time for once in his life.” Fhe thought
cheered her so much that, when Marie came in
to light the lamps, Joyce was walking up and
down the room with her hands behind her back,
singing.

As soon as she was dressed for dinner she
went down-stairs, but found no one in the
drawing-room. A small fire burned cozily on
the hearth, for the November nights were grow-
ing chilly. Joyce picked up a book and tried





A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 95

to read, but found herself looking towards the
door fully as often as at the page before her.
Presently she set her teeth together and swal-
lowed hard, for there was a rustling in the hall.
The portiére was pushed aside and madame
swept into the room
in a dinner-gown of
dark red velvet.

To Joyce’s waiting
eyes she seemed more
imposing, more ele-
gant, and more unap-
proachable than she
had ever been before.
At madame’s_ en-
trance Joyce rose as
usual, but when the
red velvet train had
swept on to a seat
beside the fire, she still remained standing.
Her lips seemed glued together after those
first words of greeting.

“Be seated, mademoiselle,” said the lady,
with a graceful motion of her hand towards a
chair. “How have you enjoyed your holiday?”

Joyce gave a final swallow of the choking





90 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

lump in her throat, and began her humble con-
fession that she had framed up-stairs among
the rows of dismal blue wall-paper parrots. She
started with Clotilde Robard’s story of Jules,
told of her accidental meeting with him, of all
that she knew of his hard life with Brossard,
and of her longing for some one to play with.
Then she acknowledged that she had planned
the barbecue secretly, fearing that madame
would not allow her to invite the little goat-
herd. At the conclusion, she opened the hand-
kerchief which she had been holding tightly
clenched in her hand, and poured its contents
in the red velvet lap.

“There’s all that is left of my Christmas
money,” she said, sadly, “seventeen francs
and two sous. If it isn’t enough to pay for the
cushions, I'll write to Cousin Kate, and maybe
she will lend me the rest.”

Madame gathered up the handful of coin,
and slowly rose. ‘It is only a step to the car-
riage-house,” she said. “If you will kindly
ring for Berthé to bring a lamp we will look to
see how much damage has been done.”

It was an unusual procession that filed down
the garden walk a few minutes later. First



:
|
|
|



A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 97

came Berthé, in her black dress and white cap,
holding a lamp high above her head, and screw-
ing her forehead into a mass of wrinkles as she
peered out into the surrounding darkness.
After her came madame, holding up her dress
and stepping daintily along in her high-heeled
little slippers. Joyce brought up the rear,
stumbling along in the darkness of madame’s
large shadow, so absorbed in her troubles that
she did not see the amused expression on the
face of the grinning satyr in the fountain.
_ Eve, looking across at Adam, seemed to wink
one of her stony eyes, as much as to say,
«Humph! Somebody else has been getting
into trouble. There’s more kinds of forbidden
fruit than one; pony-cart cushions, for in-
stance.’ +

Berthé opened the door, and madame stepped
inside the carriage-house. With her skirts
held high in both hands, she moved around
among the wreck of the cushions, turning over
a bit with the toe of her slipper now and then.

Madame wore velvet dinner-gowns, it is true,
and her house was elegant in its fine old fur-
nishings bought generations ago ; but only her
dressmaker and herself knew how many times



98 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

those gowns had been ripped and cleaned and
remodelled. It was only constant housewifely
skill that kept the antique furniture repaired
and the ancient brocade hangings from falling
into holes. None but a French woman, trained
in petty economies, could have guessed how
little money and how much thought was spent
in keeping her table up to its high standard of
excellence.

Now as she looked and estimated, counting
the fingers of one hand with the thumb of the
other, a wish stirred in her kind old heart that
she need not take the child’s money; but new
cushions must be bought, and she must be just
to herself before she could be generous to
others. So she went on with her estimating
and counting, and then called Gabriel to con-
sult with him.

“ Much of the same hair can be used again,”
she said, finally, “and the cushions were partly
worn, so that it would not be right for you to
have to bear the whole expense of new ones.
I shall keep sixteen, — no, I shall keep only
fifteen francs of your money, mademoiselle. I
am sorry to take any of it, since you have been
so frank with me; but you must see that it



A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 99

would not be justice for me to have to suffer in
consequence of your fault. In France, children
do nothing without the permission of their
elders, and it would be well for you to adopt
the same rule, my dear mademoiselle.”

Here she dropped two francs and two sous
into Joyce’s hand. It was more than she had
dared to hope for. Now there would be at
least a little picture-book apiece for the chil-
dren at home.

This time Joyce saw the grin on the satyr’s
face when they passed the fountain. She was
smiling herself when they entered the house,
where monsieur was waiting to escort them
politely in to dinner.



Full Text





E


Ah tad
THE GIANT SCISSORS
Works of

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Joel: A Boy of Galilee.
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Asa Holmes . S
Flip’s “ Islands of Providence ”
Songs Ysame (Poems, with Albion
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MS Sec toee ue ae ao 01°

L. C. PAGE & COMPANY
200 Summer Street Boston, Mass.




JULES.
ii: GIANT S€lssOks

BY
ANNIE FELLOWS JOHNSTON

AUTHOR OF “ THE LITTLE COLONEL,”
“ BIG BROTHER,” “ OLE MAMMY’S
TORMENT,” ETC..

Ellustrated by
ETHELDRED.B. BARRY



BOSTON
L. C. PAGE AND COMPANY

(INCORPORATED)
Copyright, 1898
By L. C. PAGE AND COMPANY
(INCORPORATED)

All rights reserved

Colonial WBress :
Electrotyped and Printed by C. H. Simonds & Co.
Boston, U.S. A.


CHAPTER
Te
Il.
III.
IV.
Vv.
Vi.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.

IN THE PEAR-TREE 5 : 5

A New Farry TALE
BEHIND THE GREAT GATE

A LETTER AND A MEETING .
A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE.
Joyce PLays GHOST

OLD “NUMBER THIRTY-ONE”

CHRISTMAS PLANS AND AN ACCIDENT .

A GREAT DISCOVERY . 5
CHRISTMAS . ; : . .

PAGE

II
26
47
65
80

100

120

139

155

174


PAGE

JULES. : : > 7 . : 7 Frontispiece
WHERE JOYCE LIVED . 6 7 7 7 6 + SIZ
“HE IS STOPPING AT THE GATE’” . ; : . 2i
THE KING’s SONS : : : 7 . : en 27
“HE CUT IT LOOSE AND CARRIED IT HOME” . » 39
THE PRINCESS. : : : , : é - 41
“HE LAID HIS HEAD ON THE SILL” . : : 23850
“JT FELL TO THE FLOOR WITH A CRASH” : . 61
OuT WITH MARIE : 5 : 5 : : . 67

“HE CAME TOWARDS HER WITH A DAZED EXPRES-

SION ON HIS FACE . . : ; . ney]
INITIAL LETTER . : : : . . . . 80
A LESSON IN PATRIOTISM . : : . . . 89
TRYING TO READ . ; . . : ; : - 95

“¢Qu, IF JACK COULD ONLY SEE IT!’” . . » 108

ix
x : ILLUSTRATIONS.

“¢BROSSARD, BEWARE! BEWARE!’” . : :
“THE CHILD CREPT CLOSE TO THE CHEERFUL FIRE”
-JOYCE AND SISTER DENISA : . : : .
NUMBER THIRTY-ONE . : ‘ : : 2 .
“ JULES CAME OVER, AWKWARD AND SHY” : 7
“SITTING UP IN BED WITH THE QUILTS WRAPPED
AROUND HIM” . : : A ; : :
“¢THAT’s NUMBER THIRTY-ONE’” . Saas
“ WALKING UP AND DOWN THE PATHS” . F .
“KEEPING TIME TO THE MUSIC” :
“ HE TOOK THE LITTLE FELLOW’S HAND IN HIS” .

IIS
121

127
134
141

149
161
166
180
185
THE GATE OF THE GIANT
SCISSORS.



CHAPTER I.
IN THE PEAR - TREE.

Joyce was crying, up in old Monsieur Gré-
ville’s tallest pear-tree. She had gone down
to the farthest corner of the garden, out of
sight of the house, for she did not want any
one to know that she was miserable enough
to cry.

She was tired of the garden with the high
stone wall around it, that made her feel like a
prisoner; she was tired of French verbs and
foreign faces ; she was tired of France, and so
homesick for her mother and Jack and Holland
and the baby, that she couldn’t help crying.

II
12 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

No wonder, for she was only twelve years old,
and she had never been out of the little West-
ern village where she was born, until the day
she started abroad with her Cousin Kate.

Now she sat perched up on a limb in a dis-
mal bunch, her chin in her hands and her
elbows on her knees. It was a gray afternoon
in November; the air was frosty, although the
laurel-bushes in the garden were all in bloom.

“T s’pect there is snow on the ground at
home,” thought Joyce, “and there’s a big,
cheerful fire in the sitting-room grate.

«Folland and the baby are shelling corn, and
Mary is popping it. Dear me! I can smell it
just as plain! Jack will be coming in from the
post-office pretty soon, and maybe he’ll have
one of my letters. Mother will read it out
loud, and there they'll all be, thinking that I
am having such a fine time; that it is such a
grand thing for me to be abroad studying, and
having dinner served at night in so many
courses, and all that sort of thing. They
don’t know that I am sitting up here in this
pear-tree, lonesome enough to die. Oh, if I
could only go back home and see them for
even five minutes,” she sobbed, “but I can’t!
IN THE PEAR- TREE. 13

I can’t! There’s a whole wide ocean between
list

She shut her eyes, and leaned back against
the tree as that desolate feeling of homesick-
ness settled over her like a great miserable
ache. Then she found that shutting her eyes,
and thinking very hard about the little brown
house at home, seemed to bring it into plain
sight. It was like opening a book, and seeing
picture after picture as she turned the pages.

There they were in the kitchen, washing
dishes, she and Mary; and Mary was stand-
ing on a soap-box to make her tall enough to
handle the dishes easily. How her funny little
braid of yellow hair bobbed up and down as she
worked, and how her dear little freckled face
beamed, as they told stories to each other to
make the work seem easier.

Mary’s stories all began the same way: “If
IT had a witch with a wand, this is what we
would do.” The witch with a wand had come
to Joyce in the shape of Cousin Kate Ware,
and that coming was one of the pictures that
Joyce could see now, as she thought about it
with her eyes closed.

There was Holland swinging on the gate,
I4 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

waiting for her to come home from school, and
trying to tell her by excited gestures, long
before she was within speaking distance, that
some one was in the parlor. The baby had on
his best plaid kilt and new tie, and the tired
little mother was sitting talking in the parlor,
an unusual thing for her. Joyce could see her-
self going up the path, swinging her sun-bonnet
by the strings and taking hurried little bites of
a big June apple in order to finish it before
going into the house. Now she was sitting on
the sofa beside Cousin Kate, feeling very awk-
ward and shy with her little brown fingers
clasped in this stranger’s soft white hand.
She had heard that Cousin Kate was a very
rich old maid, who had spent years abroad,
studying music and languages, and she had
expected to see a stout, homely woman with
bushy eyebrows, like Miss Teckla Schaum,
who played the church organ, and taught
German in the High School.

But Cousin Kate was altogether unlike Miss
Teckla. She was tall and slender, she was
young-looking and pretty, and there was a
stylish air about her, from the waves of her
soft golden brown hair to the bottom of her


IN THE PEAR- TREE, 15

tailor-made gown, that was not often seen in
this little Western village.

Joyce saw herself glancing admiringly at
Cousin Kate, and then pulling down her dress
as far as possible, painfully conscious that her
shoes were untied, and white with dust. The
next picture was several days later. She and
Jack were playing mumble-peg outside under
the window by the lilac-bushes, and the little
mother was just inside the door, bending over
a pile of photographs that Cousin Kate had
dropped in her lap. Cousin Kate was saying,
“This beautiful old French villa is where I
expect to spend the winter, Aunt Emily.
These are views of Tours, the town that lies
across the river Loire from it, and these are
some of the chateaux near by that I intend to
visit. They say the purest French in the
world is spoken there. I have prevailed on
one of the dearest old ladies that ever lived to
give me rooms with her. She and her husband:
live all alone in this big country place, so I
shall have to provide against loneliness by tak-
ing my company with me. Will you let me
have Joyce for a year?”

Jack and she stopped playing in sheer aston-
16 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

ishment, while Cousin Kate went on to explain
how many advantages she could give the little
girl to whom she had taken such a strong fancy.

Looking through the lilac-bushes, Joyce
could see her mother wipe her eyes and say,
«Tt seems like pure providence, Kate, and I
cant stand in the child’s way. She'll have to
support herself soon, and ought to be prepared
for it; but she’s the oldest of the five, you
know, and she has been like my right hand
ever since her father died. There'll not be a
minute while she is gone, that I shall not miss
her and wish her back. She’s the life and sun-
shine of the whole home.”

Then Joyce could see the little brown house
turned all topsy-turvy in the whirl of prepa-
ration that followed, and the next thing, she
was standing on the platform at the station,
with her new steamer trunk beside her. Half
the town was there to bid her good-by. In
the excitement of finding herself a person of
such importance she forgot how much she was
leaving behind her, until looking up, she saw a
tender, wistful smile on her mother’s face, sad-
der than any tears.

Luckily the locomotive whistled just then,
teenie



WHERE JOYCE LIVED.
IN THE PEAR -TREE. Ig

and the novelty of getting aboard a train for
the first time, helped her to be brave at the
‘ parting. She stood on the rear platform of
the last car, waving her handkerchief to the
group at the station as long as it was in sight,
so that the last glimpse her mother shoulda
have of her, was with her bright little face all
ashine. .

All these pictures passed so rapidly through |
Joyce’s mind, that she had retraced the experi-
ences of the last three months in as many min-
utes. Then, somehow, she felt better. The
tears had washed away the ache in her throat.
She wiped her eyes and climbed liked a squirrel
to the highest limb that could bear her weight.

This was not the first time that the old pear-
tree had been shaken by Joyce’s grief, and it
knew that her spells of homesickness always
ended in this way. There she sat, swinging her .
plump legs back and forth, her long light hair
blowing over the shoulders of her blue jacket,
and her saucy little mouth puckered into a soft
whistle. - She could see over the high wall now.
The sun was going down behind the tall Lom-
bardy poplars that lined the road, and in a dis-
tant field two peasants still at work reminded
20 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

her of the picture of “The Angelus.” They
seemed like acquaintances on account of the re-
semblance, for there was a copy of the picture
in her little bedroom at home.

All around her stretched quiet fields, sloping
down to the ancient village of St. Symphorien
and the river Loire. Just across the river, so
near that she could hear the ringing of the
cathedral bell, lay the famous old town of Tours.
There was something in these country sights
and sounds that soothed her with their homely
cheerfulness. The crowing of a rooster and the
barking of a dog fell on her ear like familiar
music.

“Tt’s a comfort to hear something speak
English,” she sighed, “even if it’s nothing but
a chicken. I do wish that Cousin Kate
wouldn’t be so particular about my using
French all day long. The one little half-
hour at bedtime when she allows me to speak
English isn’t a drop in the bucket. It’s a
mercy that I had studied French some before
I came, or I would have a lonesome time. I
wouldn’t be able to ever talk at all.”

It was getting cold up in the pear-tree.
Joyce shivered and stepped: down to the limb
IN THE PEAR - TREE. 21

below, but paused in her descent to watch a
peddler going down the road with a pack on
his back.

“Oh, he is stopping
at the gate with the
big scissors!’ she
cried, so interested
that she spoke aloud.
“JT must wait to see
if it opens.”

There was some-
thing mysterious
about that gate across
the road. Like Mon-
sieur Gréville’s, it
was plain and solid,
reaching as high as LL
the wall. Only the me SS
lime-trees and the Se
second story win-
dows of the house could be seen above it.
On the top it bore an iron medallion, on which
was fastened a huge pair of scissors. There
was a smaller pair on each gable of the house,
also.

During the three months that Joyce had





- =
22 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

been in Monsieur Gréville’s home, she had
watched every day to see it open; but if any
one ever entered or left the place, it was cer-
tainly by some other way than this queer gate.

What lay beyond it, no one could tell. She
had questioned Gabriel the coachman, and
Berthe the maid, in vain. Madame Gréville
said that she remembered having heard, when
a child, that the man who built it was named
Ciseaux, and that was why the symbol of this
name was hung over the gate and on the gables.
He had been regarded as half crazy by his neigh-
bors. The place was still owned by a descend-
ant of his, who had gone to Algiers, and left it
in charge of two servants.

The peddler rang the bell of the gate several
times, but failing to arouse any one, shouldered
his pack and went off grumbling. Then Joyce
climbed down and walked slowly up the grav-
elled path to the house. Cousin Kate had
just come back from Tours in the pony cart,
and was waiting in the door to see if Gabriel
had all the bundles that she had brought out
with her.

Joyce followed her admiringly into the house.
She wished that she could grow up to look
IN THE PEAR- TREE. 23

exactly like Cousin Kate, and wondered if she
would ever wear such stylish silk-lined skirts,
and catch them up in such an airy, graceful
way when she ran up-stairs; and if she would
ever have a Paris hat with long black feathers,
and always wear a bunch of sweet violets on
her coat.

She looked at herself in Cousin Kate’s mir-
ror as she passed it, and sighed. “Well, I am
better-looking than when I left home,” she
thought. “That’s one comfort. My face isn’t
freckled now, and my hair is more becoming
this way than in tight little pigtails, the way
I used to wear it.”

Cousin Kate, coming up behind her, looked
over her head and smiled at the attractive re-
flection of Joyce’s rosy cheeks and straightfor-
ward gray eyes. Then she stopped suddenly
and put her arms around her, saying, ‘“ What’s
the matter, dear? You have been crying.”

“Nothing,” answered Joyce, but there was
a quaver in her voice, and she turned her head
aside. Cousin Kate put her hand under the
resolute little chin, and tilted it until she could
look into the eyes that dropped under her gaze.
You have been crying,” she said again, this
24 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

time in English, “crying because you are home-
sick. I wonder if it would not be a good occu-
pation for you to open all the bundles that I
got this afternoon. There is a saucepan in one,
and a big spoon in the other, and all sorts of
good things in the others, so that we can make
some molasses candy here in my room, over the
open fire. While it cooks you can curl up in
the big armchair and listen to a fairy tale in
the firelight. Would you like that, little one?”

“Qh, yes!” cried Joyce, ecstatically. “That’s
what they are doing at home this minute, I am
sure. We always make candy every afternoon
in the winter time.”

Presently the saucepan was sitting on the
coals, and Joyce’s little pug nose was raptur-
ously sniffing the odor of bubbling molasses.
“T know what Id like the story to be about,”
she said, as she stirred the delicious mixture
with the new spoon. “Make up something
about the big gate across the road, with the
scissors on it.” /

Cousin Kate crossed the room, and sat down
by the window, where she could look out and
see the top of it.

“Let me think for a few minutes,” she said.
IN THE PEAR- TREE. 25

“JT have been very much interested in that old
gate myself.”

She thought so long that the candy was done
before she was ready to tell the story; but
while it cooled in plates outside on the win-
dow-sill, she drew Joyce to a seat beside
her in the chimney-corner. With her feet on
the fender, and the child’s head on her shoulder,
she began this story, and the firelight dancing
on the walls, showed a smile on Joyce’s con:
tented little face.
CHAPTER II.
A NEW FAIRY TALE.

ONcE upon a time, on a far island of the sea,
there lived a King with seven sons. The three
eldest were tall and dark, with eyes like eagles,
and hair like a crow’s wing for blackness, and
no princes in all the land were so strong and
fearless as they. The three youngest sons
were tall and fair, with eyes as blue as corn-
flowers, and locks like the summer sun for
brightness, and no princes in all the land were
so brave and beautiful as they.

But the middle son was little and lorn; he
was neither dark nor fair ; he was neither hand-
some nor strong. So when the King saw that
he never won in the tournaments nor led in
the boar hunts, nor sang to his lute among
the ladies of the court, he drew his royal
robes around him, and henceforth frowned on
Ethelried.

26
Ten Nn ee a eo RRL SR iE



A NEW FAIRY TALE. 27

To each of his other sons he gave a portion
of his kingdom, armor and plumes, a prancing
charger, and a trusty sword ; but to Ethelried he
gave nothing. When
the poor Prince saw
his brothers riding
out into the world to
win their fortunes, he
fain would have fol-
lowed. Throwing
himself on his
knees before the “%
King, he cried, “Oh,
royal Sire, bestow
upon me also a sword
and a steed, that I
may up and away to
follow my brethren.”

But the King
laughed him to scorn.
« Thou a sword!” he
quoth. ‘Thou who hast never done a deed of
valor in all thy life! In sooth thou shalt have
one, but it shall be one befitting thy maiden
size and courage, if so small a weapon can be
found in all my kingdom!”



MwA Sy
28 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Now just at that moment it happened that
the Court Tailor came into the room to measure
the King for a new mantle of ermine. Forth-
with the grinning Jester began shrieking with
laughter, so that the bells upon his motley cap
were all set a-jangling.

“What now, Fool?” demanded the King.

“T did but laugh to think the sword of Ethel-
ried had been so quickly found,” responded the
Jester, and he pointed to the scissors hanging
from the Tailor’s girdle.

«By my troth,’ exclaimed the King, “it
shall be even as thou sayest!’’ and he com-
manded that the scissors be taken from the
Tailor, and buckled to the belt of Ethelried.

“ Not until thou hast proved thyself a prince
with these, shalt thou come into thy kingdom,”
he swore with a mighty oath. “Until that far
day, now get thee gone!”

So Ethelried left the palace, and wandered
away over mountain and moor with a heavy
heart. No one knew that he was a prince;
no fireside offered him welcome; no lips gave
him a friendly greeting. The scissors hung
useless and rusting by his side.

One night as he lay in a deep forest, too
A NEW FAIRY TALE. 29

unhappy to sleep, he heard a noise near at
hand in the bushes. By the light of the
moon he saw that a ferocious wild beast had
been caught in a hunter’s snare, and was
struggling to free itself from the heavy net.
His first thought was to slay the animal, for
he had had no meat for many days. Then he
bethought himself that he had no weapon large
enough.

While he stood gazing at the struggling
beast, it turned to him with such a beseeching
look in its wild eyes, that he was moved to pity.

“Thou shalt have thy liberty,” he cried,
“even though thou shouldst rend me in
pieces the moment thou art free. Better
dead than this craven life to which my father
hath doomed me!”

So he set to work with the little scissors to
cut the great ropes of the net in twain. At
first each strand seemed as hard as steel, and
the blades of the scissors were so rusty and
dull that he could scarcely move them. Great
beads of sweat stood out on his brow as he
bent himself to the task.

Presently, as he worked, the blades began to
grow sharper and sharper, and brighter and
30 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

brighter, and longer and longer. By the time
that the last rope was cut the scissors were as
sharp as a broadsword, and half as long as his
body.

At last he raised the net to let the beast go
free. Then he sank on his knees in astonish-
ment. It had suddenly disappeared, and in its
place stood a beautiful Fairy with filmy wings,
which shone like rainbows in the moonlight.

“Prince Ethelried,”’ she said in a voice that
was like a crystal bell’s for sweetness, “dost
thou not know that thou art in the domain of a
frightful Ogre? It was he who changed me
into the form of a wild beast, and set the snare
to capture me. But for thy fearlessness and
faithful perseverance in the task which thou
~ didst in pity undertake, I must have perished
at dawn.”

At this moment there was a distant rum-
bling as of thunder. “’Tis the Ogre!” cried
the Fairy. “We must hasten.” Seizing the
scissors that lay on the ground where Ethelried
had dropped them, she opened and shut them
several times, exclaiming :

“ Scissors, grow a giant’s height
And save us from the Ogre’s might!”
A NEW FAIRY TALE. 31

Immediately they grew to an enormous size,
and, with blades extended, shot through the
tangled thicket ahead of them, cutting down
everything that stood in their way, — bushes,
stumps, trees, vines ; nothing could stand before
the fierce onslaught of those mighty blades.

The Fairy darted down the path thus opened
up, and Ethelried followed as fast as he could,
for the horrible roaring was rapidly coming
nearer. At last they reached a wide chasm
that bounded the Ogre’s domain. Once
across that, they would be out of his power,
but it seemed impossible to cross. Again the
Fairy touched the scissors, saying :

“ Giant scissors, bridge the path,
And save us from the Ogre’s wrath.”

Again the scissors grew longer and longer,
until they lay across the chasm like a shining
bridge. Ethelried hurried across after the
Fairy, trembling and dizzy, for the Ogre was
now almost upon them. As soon as they were
safe on the other side, the Fairy blew upon the
scissors, and, presto, they became shorter and
shorter until they were only the length of an
ordinary sword.
32 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

“Here,” she said, giving them into his hands;
“because thou wast persevering and fearless in
setting me free, these shall win for thee thy
heart’s desire. But remember that thou canst
not keep them sharp and shining, unless they
are used at least once each day in some unself-
ish service.”

Before he could thank her she had vanished,
and he was left in the forest alone. He could
see the Ogre standing powerless to hurt him,
on the other side of the chasm, and gnashing
his teeth, each one of which was as big as a
millstone.

The sight was so terrible, that he turned on
his heel, and fled away as fast as his feet could
carry him. By the time he reached the edge
of the forest he was very tired, and ready to
faint from hunger. His heart’s greatest desire
being for food, he wondered if the scissors
could obtain it for him as the Fairy had
promised. He had spent his last coin and
knew not where to go for another.

Just then he spied a tree, hanging full of
great, yellow apples. By standing on tiptoe
he could barely reach the lowest one with his
scissors. He cut off an apple, and was about


A NEW FAIRY TALE. a3

to take a bite, when an old Witch sprang out
of a hollow tree across the road.

.“So you are the thief who has been steal-
ing my gold apples all this last fortnight!” she
exclaimed. “Well, you shall never steal again,
that I promise you. Ho, Frog-eye Fearsome,
seize on him and drag him into your darkest
dungeon !”’

At that, a hideous-looking fellow, with eyes
like a frog’s, green hair, and horrid clammy
webbed fingers, clutched him before he could
turn to defend himself. He was thrust into
the dungeon and left there all day.

At sunset, Frog-eye Fearsome opened the
door to slide in a crust and a cup of water,
saying in a croaking voice, “You shall be
hanged in the morning, hanged by the neck
until you are quite dead.” Then he stopped
to run his webbed fingers through his damp
green hair, and grin at the poor captive Prince,
as if he enjoyed his suffering. But the next
morning no one came to take him to the
gallows, and he sat all day in total darkness.
At sunset Frog-eye Fearsome opened the door
again to thrust in another crust and some water
and say, “In the morning you shall be drowned ;
34 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

drowned in the Witch’s mill-pond with a great
stone tied to your heels.”

Again the croaking creature stood and
gloated over his victim, then left him to the
silence of another long day in the dungeon.
The third day he opened the door and hopped
in, rubbing his webbed hands together with
fiendish pleasure, saying, “You are to have
no food and drink to-night, for the Witch has
thought of a far more horrible punishment for
you. In the morning I shall surely come
again, and then — beware!”’

Now as he stopped to grin once more at the
poor Prince, a Fly darted in, and, blinded by the
darkness of the dungeon, flew straight into a
spider’s web, above the head of Ethelried.

«Poor creature!” thought Ethelried. “Thou
shalt not be left a prisoner in this dismal spot
while I have the power to help thee.’”’ He lifted
the scissors and with one stroke destroyed the
web, and gave the Fly its freedom.

As soon as the dungeon had ceased to echo
with the noise that Frog-eye Fearsome made in
banging shut the heavy door, Ethelried heard a
low buzzing near his ear. It was the Fly, which
had alighted on his shoulder.
A NEW FAIRY TALE. 35

“Let an insect in its gratitude teach you
this,” buzzed the Fly. “‘{o-morrow, if you
remain here, you must certainly meet your
doom, for the Witch never keeps a prisoner
. past the third night. But escape is pos-
sible. Your prison door is of iron, but the
shutter which bars the window is only of
wood. Cut your way out at midnight, and I
will have a friend in waiting to guide you to a
place of safety. A faint glimmer of light on
the opposite wall shows me the keyhole. I
shall make my escape thereat and go to repay
thy unselfish service to me. But know that
the scissors move only when bidden in rhyme.
Farewell.”

The Prince spent all the following time until
midnight, trying to think of a suitable verse to
say to the scissors. The art of rhyming had
been neglected in his early education, and it
was not until the first cock-crowing began that
he succeeded in making this one:

“ Giant scissors, serve me well,
And save me from the Witch’s spell!”

As he uttered the words the scissors leaped
out of his hand, and began to cut through the
36 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

wooden shutters as easily as through a cheese
In a very short time the Prince had crawled
through the opening. There he stood, outside
the dungeon, but it was a dark night and he
knew not which way to turn.

He could hear Frog-eye Fearsome snoring
like a tempest up in the watch-tower, and the
old Witch was talking in her sleep in seven
languages. While he stood looking around
him in bewilderment, a Firefly alighted on
his arm. Flashing its little lantern in the
Prince’s face, it cried, “This way! My friend,
the Fly, sent me to guide you to a place of
safety. Follow me and trust entirely to my
guidance.”

The Prince flung his mantle over his shoul-
der, and followed on with all possible speed.
They stopped first in the Witch’s orchard, and
the Firefly held its lantern up while the Prince
filled his pockets with the fruit. The apples
were gold with emerald leaves, and the cherries
were rubies, and the grapes were great bunches
of amethyst. When the Prince had filled his
pockets he had enough wealth to provide for all
his wants for at least a twelvemonth.

The Firefly led him on until they came to a
A NEW FAIRY TALE. 37

town where was a fine inn. There he left
him, and flew off to report the Prince’s safety
to the Fly and receive the promised reward.

Here Ethelried stayed for many weeks, living
like a king on the money that the fruit jewels
brought him. All this time the scissors were
becoming little and rusty, because he never
once used them, as the Fairy bade him, in
unselfish service for others. But one day he
bethought himself of her command, and started
out to seek some opportunity to help some-
body.

Soon he came to a tiny hut where a sick man
lay moaning, while his wife and children wept
beside him. ‘What is to become of me?”
cried the poor peasant. “ My grain must fall
and rot in the field from overripeness because
I have not the strength to rise and harvest it;
then indeed must we all starve.”

Ethelried heard him, and that night, when the
moon rose, he stole into the field to cut it down
with the giant scissors. They were so rusty
from long idleness that he could scarcely move
them. He tried to think of some rhyme with
which to command them; but it had been so
long since he had done any thinking, except for
38 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

his own selfish pleasure, that his brain refused
to work.

However, he toiled on all night, slowly cutting
down the grain stalk by stalk. Towards morn-
ing the scissors became brighter and sharper,
until they finally began to open and shut of
their own accord. The whole field was cut by
sunrise. Now the peasant’s wife had risen very
early to go down to the spring and dip up some
cool water for her husband to drink. She came
upon Ethelried as he was cutting the last row of
the grain, and fell on her knees to thank him.
From that day the peasant and all his family
were firm friends of Ethelried’s, and would have
gone through fire and water to serve him.

After that he had many adventures, and he
was very busy, for he never again forgot what
the Fairy had said, that only unselfish service
each day could keep the scissors sharp and
shining. When the shepherd lost a little lamb
one day on the mountain, it was Ethelried who
found it caught by the fleece in a tangle of
cruel thorns. When he had cut it loose and
carried it home, the shepherd also became his
firm friend, and would have gone through fire
and water to serve him.
A NEW FAIRY TALE. 39

The grandame whom he supplied with fagots,
the merchant whom he rescued from robbers,
the King’s councillor to whom he gave aid,
all became his friends. Up and down the
land, to beggar or lord, homeless wanderer or
high-born dame, he gladly
gave unselfish service all
unsought, and such as he
helped straightway became
his friends.

Day by day the scissors
grew sharper and sharper
and ever more quick to spring
forward at his bidding.

One day a herald dashed
down the highway, shouting
through his silver trumpet
that a beautiful Princess had
been carried away by the
Ogre. She was the only
child of the King of this country, and the
knights and nobles of all other realms and all
the royal potentates were prayed to come to
her rescue. To him who could bring her back
to her father’s castle should be given the throne
and kingdom, as well as the Princess herself,


40 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

So from far and ‘near, indeed from almost
every country under the sun, came knights
and princes to fight the Ogre. One by one
their brave heads were cut off and stuck on
poles along the moat that surrounded the
castle.

Still the beautiful Princess languished in her
prison. Every night at sunset she was taken up
to the roof for a glimpse of the sky, and told to
bid good-by to the sun, for the next morning
would surely be her last. Then she would
wring her lily-white hands and wave a sad
farewell to her home, lying far to the west-
ward. When the knights saw this they would
rush down to the chasm and sound a challenge
to the Ogre.

They were brave men, and they would not
have feared to meet the fiercest wild beasts, but
many shrunk back when the Ogre came rush-
ing out. They dared not meet in single combat,
this monster with the gnashing teeth, each one
of which was as big as a millstone.

Among those who drew back were Ethel-
ried’s brothers (the three that were dark and
the three that were fair), They would not
acknowledge their fear. They said, “We are


THE PRINCESS.


A NEW FAIRY TALE. 43

only waiting to lay some wily plan to capture
the Ogre.”

After several days Ethelried reached the
place on foot. “See him,” laughed one of the
brothers that was dark to one that was fair.
«He comes afoot ; no prancing steed, no wav-
ing plumes, no trusty sword; little and lorn, he
is not fit to be called a brother to princes.”’

But Ethelried heeded not their taunts. He
dashed across the drawbridge, and, opening his
scissors, cried:

« Giant scissors, rise in power!
Grant me my heart’s desire this hour!”

The crowds on the other side held their
breath as the Ogre rushed out, brandishing a
club as big as a church steeple. Then Whack!
Bang! The blows of the scissors, warding off
the blows of the mighty club, could be heard
for miles around.

At last Ethelried became so exhausted that
he could scarcely raise his hand, and it ‘was
plain to be seen that the scissors could not do
battle much longer. By this time a great many
people, attracted by the terrific noise, had come
running up to the moat. The news had spread
44 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS,

far and wide that Ethelried was in danger ; so
every one whom he had ever served dropped
whatever he was doing, and ran to the scene of
the battle. The peasant was there, and the
shepherd, and the lords and beggars and high-
born dames, all those whom Ethelried had ever
befriended.

As they saw that the poor Prince was about
to be vanquished, they all began a great lamen-
tation, and cried out bitterly.

“Tle saved my harvest,” cried one. “He
found my lamb,” cried another. “He showed
me a greater kindness still,’ shouted a third.
And so they went on, each telling of some
unselfish service that the Prince had rendered
him. Their voices all joined at last into such a
roar of gratitude that the scissors were given
fresh strength on account of it. They grew
longer and longer, and stronger and stronger,
until with one great swoop they sprang forward
and cut the ugly old Ogre’s head from his
shoulders.

Every cap was thrown up, and such cheering
rent the air as has never been heard since.
They did not know his name, they did not
know that he was Prince Ethelried, but they
A NEW FAIRY TALE. 45

knew by his valor that there was royal blood
in his veins. So they all cried out long and
loud : “ Long live the Prince ! Prince Ciseaux !”

Then the King stepped down from his throne
and took off his crown to give to the conqueror,
but Ethelried put it aside.

“Nay,” he said. “The only kingdom that I
crave is the kingdom of a loving heart and a
happy fireside. Keep all but the Princess.”

So the Ogre was killed, and the Prince came
into his kingdom that was his heart’s desire.
He married the Princess, and there was feasting
and merrymaking for seventy days and seventy
nights, and they all lived happily ever after.

When the feasting was over, and the guests
had all gone to their homes, the Prince pulled
down the house of the Ogre and built a new
one. On every gable he fastened a pair of
shining scissors to remind himself that only
through unselfish service to others comes the
happiness that is highest and best.

Over the great entrance gate he hung the
ones that had served him so valiantly, saying,
“Only those who belong to the kingdom of
loving hearts and happy homes can ever enter
ene.
46 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

One day the old King, with the brothers of
Ethelried (the three that were dark and the
three that were fair), came riding up to the
portal. They thought to share in Ethelried’s
fame and splendor. But the scissors leaped
from their place and snapped so angrily in their
faces that they turned their horses and fled.

Then the scissors sprang back to their place
again to guard the portal of Ethelried, and, to
this day, only those who belong to the kingdom
of loving hearts may enter the Gate of the
Giant Scissors.
CHAPTER III.
BEHIND THE GREAT GATE,

Tuat was the tale of the giant scissors as it
was told to Joyce in the pleasant fire-lighted
room; but behind the great gates the true
story went on in a far different way.

Back of the Ciseaux house was a dreary field,
growing drearier and browner every moment as
the twilight deepened; and across its rough
furrows a tired boy was stumbling wearily
homeward. He was not more than nine years
old, but the careworn expression of his thin
white face might have belonged to a little old
man of ninety. He was driving two unruly
goats towards the house. The chase they led him
would have been a laughable sight, had he not
looked so small and forlorn plodding along in
his clumsy wooden shoes, and a peasart’s blouse
of blue cotton, several sizes too large for his
thin little body.

47
48 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

The anxious look in his eyes changed to one
of fear as he drew nearer the house. At the
sound of a gruff voice bellowing at him from
the end of the lane, he winced as if he had
been struck.

“Ha, there, Jules! Thou lazy vagabond!
Late again! Canst thou never learn that I
am not to be kept waiting?”

“But, Brossard,” quavered the boy in his
shrill, anxious voice, “it was not my fault,
indeed it was not. The goats were so stub-
born to-night. They broke through the hedge,
and I had to chase them over three fields.”

“Have done with thy lying excuses,” was
the rough answer. ‘Thou shalt have no sup-
per to-night. Maybe an empty stomach will
teach thee when my commands fail. Hasten
and drive the goats into the pen.”

There was a scowl on Brossard’s burly red
face that made Jules’s heart bump up in his
throat. Brossard was only the caretaker of the
Ciseaux place, but he had been there for twenty
years, — so long that he felt himself the master.
The real master was in Algiers nearly all the
time. During his absence the great house was
closed, excepting the kitchen and two rooms
BEHIND THE GREAT GATE. 49

above it. Of these Brossard had one and
Henri the other. Henri was the cook; a slow,
stupid old man, not to be jogged out of either
his good-nature or his slow gait by anything
that Brossard might say.

Henri cooked and washed and mended, and
hoed in the garden. Brossard worked in the
fields and shaved down the expenses of their
living closer and closer. All that was thus
saved fell to his share, or he might not have
watched the expenses so carefully.

Much saving had made him miserly. Old
Therese, the woman with the fish-cart, used to
say that he was the stingiest man in all Tour-
raine. She ought to know, for she had sold
him a fish every Friday during all those twenty
years, and he had never once failed to quarrel
about the price. Five years had gone by since
the master’s last visit. Brossard and Henri
were not likely to forget that time, for they
had been awakened in the dead of night by a
loud knocking at the side gate. When they
opened it the sight that greeted them made
them rub their sleepy eyes to be sure that they
saw aright.

There stood the master, old Martin Ciseaux.
50 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

His hair and fiercely bristling mustache had
turned entirely white since they had last seen
him. In his arms he carried a child.

Brossard almost dropped his candle in his
first surprise, and his wonder grew until he
could hardly contain it, when the curly head
raised itself from monsieur’s shoulder, and the
sleepy baby voice lisped something in a foreign
tongue,

« By all the saints!” muttered Brossard, as
he stood aside for his master to pass.

“Jt’s my brother Jules’s grandson,” was the
curt explanation that monsieur offered. “Jules
is dead, and so is his son and all the family, —
died in America. This is his son’s son, Jules,
the last of the name. If I choose to take him
from a foreign poorhouse and give him shelter,
it’s nobody’s business, Louis Brossard, but my
own.”

With.that he strode on up the stairs to his
room, the boy still in his arms. This sudden
coming of a four-year-old child into their daily
life made as little difference to Brossard and
Henri as the presence of the four-months-old
puppy. They spread a cot for him in Henri’s
room when the master went back to Algiers.
BEHIND THE GREAT GATE. 51

They gave him something to eat three times a
day when they stopped for their own meals,
and then went on with their work as usual.

It made no difference to them that he sobbed
in the dark for his mother to come and sing
him to sleep,—the happy young mother who
had petted and humored him in her own fond
American fashion. They could not under-
stand his speech; more than that, they could
not understand him. Why should he mope
alone in the garden with that beseeching look
of a lost dog in his big, mournful eyes? Why
should he not play and be happy, like the neigh-
bor’s children or the kittens or any other young
thing that had life and sunshine?

Brossard snapped his fingers at him some.
times at first, as he would have done to a
playful animal; but when Jules drew back,
frightened by his foreign speech and rough
voice, he began to dislike the timid child.
After awhile he never noticed him except to
push him aside or to find fault.

It was from Henri that Jules picked up
whatever French he learned, and it was from
Henri also that he had received the one awk-
ward caress, and the only one, that his desolate
52 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

little heart had known in all the five loveless
years that he had been with them.

A few months ago Brossard had put him
out in the field to keep the goats from straying
away from their pasture, two stubborn crea-
tures, whose self-willed wanderings had brought
many a scolding down on poor Jules’s head.
To-night he was unusually unfortunate, for
added to the weary chase they had led him was
this stern command that he should go to bed
‘without his supper.

He was about to pass into the house, shiver-
ing and hungry, when Henri put his head out
at the window. “Brossard,” he called, “there
isn’t enough bread for supper ; there’s just this
dry end of a loaf. You should have bought as
I told you, when the baker’s cart stopped here
this morning.”

Brossard slowly measured the bit of hard,
black bread with his eye, and, secing that there
was not half enough to satisfy the appetites of
two hungry men, he grudgingly drew a franc
from his pocket.

«Here, Jules,” he called. “Go down to the
bakery, and see to it that thou art back by
the time that I have milked the goats, or thou
BEHIND THE GREAT GATE. 53

shalt go to bed with a beating, as well as
supperless. Stay!” he added, as Jules turned
to go. “I have a mind to eat white bread to-
night instead of black. It will cost an extra
sou, so be careful to count the change. It is
only once or so in a twelvemonth,” he muttered
to himself as an excuse for his extravagance.

It was half a mile to the village, but down
hill all the way, so that Jules reached the
bakery in a very short time.

Several customers were ahead of him, how-
ever, and he awaited his turn nervously. When
he left the shop an old lamplighter was going
down the street with torch and ladder, leaving
a double line of twinkling lights in his wake, as
he disappeared down the wide “Paris road.”
Jules watched him a moment, and then ran
rapidly on. For many centuries the old village
of St. Symphorien had echoed with the clatter
of wooden shoes on its ancient cobblestones ;
but never had foot-falls in its narrow, crooked
streets kept time to the beating of a lonelier
little heart.

The officer of Customs, at his window beside
the gate that shuts in the old town at night,
nodded in a surly way as the boy hurried
54 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

past. Once outside the gate, Jules walked
more slowly, for the road began to wind up-hill.
Now he was out again in the open country,
where a faint light lying over the frosty fields
showed that the moon was rising.

Here and there lamps shone from the win-
dows of houses along the road; across the
field came the bark of a dog, welcoming his
master ; two old peasant women passed him in
a creaking cart on their glad way home.

At the top of the hill Jules stopped to take
breath, leaning for a moment against the stone
wall. He was faint from hunger, for he had
been in the fields since early morning, with »
nothing for his midday lunch but a handful
of boiled chestnuts. The smell of the fresh
bread tantalized him beyond ‘endurance. Oh,_
to be able to take a mouthful, —just one little
mouthful of that brown, sweet crust!

He put his face down close, and shut his
eyes, drawing in the delicious odor with long,
deep breaths. What bliss it would be to have
that whole loaf for his own, —he, little Jules,
who was to have no supper that night! He
held it up in the moonlight, hungrily looking
at it on every side. There was not a broken
BEHIND THE GREAT GATE. 55

place to be found anywhere on its surface; not
one crack in all that-hard, brown glaze of crust,
from which he might pinch the tiniest crumb.

For a moment a mad impulse seized him to
tear it in pieces, and eat every scrap, regardless
of the reckoning with Brossard afterwards. But
it was only fora moment. The memory of his
last beating stayed his hand. Then, fearing to
dally with temptation, lest it should master him,
he thrust the bread under his arm, and ran
every remaining step of the way home.

Brossard took the loaf from him, and pointed
with it to the stairway, —a mute command for
Jules to go to bed at once. Tingling with a
sense of injustice, the little fellow wanted to
shriek out in all his hunger and misery, defying
this monster of a man; but a struggling spar-
row might as well have tried to turn on the
hawk that held it. He clenched his hands to
keep from snatching something from the table,
set out so temptingly in the kitchen, but he
dared not linger even to look at it. With a
feeling of utter helplessness he passed it in
silence, his face white and set.

Dragging his'tired feet slowly up the stairs,
he went over to the casement window, and
56 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

swung it open; then, kneeling down, he laid
his head on the sill, in the moonlight. Was it
his dream that came back to him then, or only
a memory? He could never be sure, for if it
were a memory, it was certainly as strange
as any dream, unlike
anything he had ever
known in his life with
Henri and_ Brossard.
Night after night he
had comforted himself
with the picture that it
brought before him.

He could see a little
white house in the
middle of a big lawn.
There were vines on the
porches, and it must
have been early in the
evening, for the fireflies
were beginning to twinkle over the lawn. And
the grass had just been cut, for the air was
sweet with the smell of it. A woman, standing
on the steps under the vines, was calling “Jules,
Jules, it is time to come in, little son!”

But Jules, in his white dress and shoulder-


BEHIND THE GREAT GATE. 57

knots of blue ribbon, was toddling across the
lawn after a firefly.

Then she began to call him another way.
Jules had a vague idea that it was a part of
some game that they sometimes played together.
It sounded like a song, and the words were not
like any that he had ever heard since he came to
live with Henri and Brossard. He could not
forget them, though, for had they not sung
themselves through that beautiful dream every
time he had it ?

“ Little Boy Blue, oh, where are you?
O, where are you-u-u-u?”

He only laughed in the dream picture and
ran‘ on after the firefly. Then a man came
running after him, and, catching him, tossed
him up laughingly, and carried him to the
house on his shoulder.

Somebody held a glass of cool, creamy milk
for him to drink, and by and by he was in a
little white night-gown in the woman’s lap.
His head was nestled against her shoulder,
and he could feel her soft lips touching him
on cheeks and eyelids and mouth, before she
began to sing:
58 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

“Oh, little Boy Blue, lay by your horn,
And mother will sing of the cows and the corn,
Till the stars and the angels come to keep
Their watch, where my baby lies fast asleep.”

Now all of a sudden Jules knew that there
was another kind of hunger worse than the
longing for bread. He wanted the soft touch
of those lips again on his mouth and eyelids,
the loving pressure of those restful arms, a
thousand times more than he had wished for
the loaf that he had just brought home. Two
hot tears, that made his eyes ache in their slow
gathering, splashed down on the window-sill.

Down below Henri opened the kitchen door
and snapped his fingers to call the dog. Look-
ing out, Jules saw him set a plate of bones on
the step. For a moment he listened to the
animal’s contented crunching, and then crept
across the room to his cot, with a little moan.
“Q-o-oh —o-oh!” he sobbed. <“ Even the dog
has more than I have, and I’m so hungry!”
He hid his head awhile in the old quilt ; then
he raised it again, and, with the tears streaming
down his thin little face, sobbed in a heart-
broken whisper: ‘Mother! Mother! Do you
know how hungry I am?”
BEHIND THE GREAT GATE, 59

A clatter of knives and forks from the kitchen
below was the only answer, and he dropped
despairingly down again. ;

«She’s so far away she can’t even hear me!”’
‘ he moaned. “Oh, if I could only be dead, too!”

He lay there, crying, till Henri had finished
washing the supper dishes and had put them
clumsily away. The rark odor of tobacco,
stealing up the stairs, told him that Brossard
had settled down to enjoy his evening pipe.
Through the casement window that was still
ajar came the faint notes of an accordeon from
Monsieur Gréville’s garden, across the way.
Gabriel, the coachman, was walking up and
down in the moonlight, playing a wheezy
accompaniment to the only song he knew.
Jules did not notice it at first, but after
awhile, when he had cried himself quiet, the
faint melody began to steal soothingly into his
consciousness. His eyelids closed drowsily,
and then the accordeon seemed to be singing
something to him. He could not understand
at first, but just as he was dropping off to
sleep he heard it quite clearly:

« Till the stars and the angels come to keep
Their watch, where my baby lies fast asleep.”
60 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Late in the night Jules awoke with a start,
and sat up, wondering what had aroused him.
He knew that it must be after midnight, for the
moon was nearly down. Henri was snoring.
Suddenly such a strong feeling of hunger came
over him, that he could think of nothing else.
It was like a gnawing pain. As if he were
being led by some power outside of his own
will, he slipped to the door of the room. The
little bare feet made no noise on the carpetless
floor. No mouse could have stolen down the
stairs more silently than timid little Jules. The
latch of the kitchen door gave a loud click
that made him draw back with a shiver of
alarm; but that was all. After waiting one
breathless minute, his heart beating like a
trip-hammer, he went on into the pantry.

The moon was so far down now, that only a
white glimmer of light showed him the faint
outline of things; but his keen little nose
guided him. There was half a cheese on the
swinging shelf, with all the bread that had been
left from supper. He broke off great pieces
of each in eager haste. Then he found a crock
of goat’s milk. Lifting it to his mouth, he
drank with big, quick gulps until he had te








































”

A CRASH.

“1T FELL TO THE FLOOR WITH
BEHIND THE GREAT GATE. 63

stop for breath. Just as he was about to raise
it to his lips again, some instinct of danger
made him look up. There in the doorway
stood Brossard, bigger and darker and more
threatening than he had ever seemed before.

A frightened little gasp was all that the
child had strength to give. He turned so sick
and faint that his nerveless fingers could no
longer hold the crock. It fell to the floor with
a crash, and the milk spattered all over the
pantry. Jules was too terrified to utter a
sound. It was Brossard who made the out-
cry. Jules could only shut his eyes and crouch
down trembling, under the shelf. The next
instant he was dragged out, and Brossard’s
merciless strap fell again and again on the
poor shrinking little body, that writhed under
the cruel blows.

Once more Jules dragged himself up-stairs
to his cot, this time bruised and sore, too ex-
hausted for tears, too hopeless to think of
possible to-morrows.

Poor little prince in the clutches of the ogre!
If only fairy tales might be true! If only
some gracious spirit of elfin lore might really
come at such a time with its magic wand of
64 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

healing! Then there would be no more little
desolate hearts, no more grieved little faces
with undried tears upon them in all the earth.
Over every threshold where a child’s wee
feet had pattered in and found a home, it
would hang its guardian Scissors of Avenging,
so that only those who belong to the kingdom
of loving hearts and gentle hands would ever
dare to enter.
CHAPTE Ra LY:
A LETTER AND A MEETING.

Nearty a week later Joyce sat at her desk,
hurrying to finish a letter before the postman’s
arrival.

“ Dear Jack,” it began.

«You and Mary will each get a letter this week.
Hers is the fairy tale that Cousin Kate told me, about
an old gate near here. I wrote it down as well as I
could remember. I wish you could see that gate. It
gets more interesting every day, and I’d give most
anything to see what lies on the other side. Maybe I
shall soon, for Marie has a way of finding out anything
she wants to know. Marie is my new maid. Cousin
Kate went to Paris last week, to be gone until nearly
Christmas, so she got Marie to take care of me.

«It seems so odd to have somebody button my boots
and brush my hair, and take me out to walk as if I
were a big doll. I have to be very dignified and act
as if I had always been used to such things. I believe

65
66 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Marie would be shocked to death if she knew that I
had ever washed dishes, or pulled weeds out of the
pavement, or romped with you in the barn.

“Yesterday when we were out walking I got so tired
of acting as if I were a hundred years old, that I felt as
if I should scream. ‘Marie,’ I said, ‘I’ve a mind to
throw my muff in the fence-corner and run and hang
on behind that wagon that’s going dowr-hill.’ She had
no idea that I was in earnest. She just smiled very
politely and said, ‘Oh, mademoiselle, impossible! How
you Americans do love to jest.’ But it was no joke.
You can’t imagine how stupid it is to be with nobody
but grown people all the time. I’m fairly aching for a
good old game of hi spy or prisoner’s base with you.
There is nothing at all to do, but to take poky walks.

“Yesterday afternoon we walked down to the river.
There’s a double row of trees along it on this side, and .
several benches where people can wait for the tram-
cars that pass down this street and then across the
bridge into Tours. Marie found an old friend of hers
sitting on one of the benches, — such a big fat woman,
and oh, such a gossip! Marie said she was tired,
so we sat there a long time. Her friend’s name is
Clotilde Robard. They talked about everybody in St.
Symphorien.

“Then I gossiped, too. I asked Clotilde Robard if
she knew why the gate with the big scissors was never
opened any more. She told me that she used to be one
of the maids there, before she married the spice-monger
and was Madame Robard. Years before she went to
live there, when the old Monsieur Ciseaux died, there





TS SH
are

OUT WITH MARIE.



A LETTER AND A MEETING. 69

was a dreadful quarrel about some money. The son
that got the property told his brother and sister never
to darken his doors again.

“They went off to America, and that big front gate
has never been opened since they passed out of it.
Clotilde says that some people say that they put a curse
on it, and something awful will happen to the first one
who dares to go through. Isn’t that interesting?

“The oldest son, Mr. Martin Ciseaux, kept up the
place for a long time, just as his father had done, but
he never married. All of a sudden he shut up the
house, sent away all the servants but the two who take
care of it, and went off to Algiers to live. Five years ago
he came back to bring his little grand-nephew, but
nobody has seen him since that time.

“Clotilde says that an orphan asylum would have
been a far better home for Jules (that is the boy’s name),
for Brossard, the caretaker, is so mean to him. Doesn’t
that make you think of Prince Ethelried in the fairy
tale? ‘Little and lorn; no fireside welcomed him and
no lips gave him a friendly greeting.’

“ Marie says that she has often seen Jules down in
the field, back of his uncle’s house, tending the goats.
I hope that I may see him sometime.

“Oh, dear, the postman has come sooner than I
expected. He is talking down in the hall now, and if
I do not post this letter now it will miss the evening
train and be too late for the next mail steamer. Tell
mamma that I will answer all her questions about my
lessons and clothes next week. Oceans of love to
everybody in the dear little brown house.”
7O THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Hastily scrawling her name, Joyce ran out
into the hall with her letter. «Anything for
‘me?” she asked, anxiously, leaning over the
banister to drop the letter into Marie’s hand.
“One, mademoiselle,” was the answer. “But
it has not a foreign stamp.”

«“ Oh, from Cousin Kate!” exclaimed Joyce,
tearing it open as she went back to her room.
At the door she stooped to pick up a piece of
paper that had dropped from the envelope. It
crackled stiffly as she unfolded it.

“Money!” she exclaimed in surprise. “A
whole twenty franc note. What could Cousin
Kate have sent it for?” The last page of the
letter explained.

«I have just remembered that December is not very
far off, and that whatever little Christmas gifts we send
home should soon be started on their way. Enclosed
you will find twenty francs for your Christmas shopping.
It is not much, but we are too far away to send any-
thing but the simplest little remembrances, things that
will not be spoiled in the mail, and on which little or no
duty need be paid. You might buy one article each
day, so that there will be some purpose in your walks
into Tours.

«Jam sorry that I can not be with you on Thanks-
giving Day. We will have to drop it from our calendar

t
A LETTER AND A MEETING. 71

this year; not the thanksgiving itself, but the turkey
and mince pie part. Suppose you take a few francs to
give yourself some little treat to mark the day. I hope
my dear little girl will not be homesick all by herself.
I never should have left just at this time if it had not
been very necessary.”

Joyce smoothed out the bank-note and looked
at it with sparkling eyes. Twenty whole
francs! The same as four dollars! All the
money that she had ever had in her whole life
put together would not have amounted to that
much. Dimes were scarce in the little brown
house, and even pennies seldom found their
way into the children’s hands when five pairs
of little feet were always needing shoes, and
five healthy appetites must be satisfied daily.

All the time that Joyce was pinning her
treasure securely in her pocket and putting on
her hat and jacket, all the time that she was
walking demurely down the road with Marie,
she was planning different ways in which to
spend her fortune.

“Mademoiselle is very quiet,” ventured
Marie, remembering that one of her duties was
to keep up an improving conversation with her
little mistress.
72 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

“Yes,” answered Joyce, half impatiently ;
“T’ve got something so lovely to think about,
that I’d like to go back and sit down in the
garden and just think and think until dark,
without being interrupted by anybody.”

This was Marie’s opportunity. “Then
mademoiselle might not object to stopping in
the garden of the villa which we are now ap-
proaching,” she said. “My friend, Clotilde
Robard, is housekeeper there, and I have a
very important message to deliver to her.”

Joyce had no objection. “But, Marie,” she
said, as she paused at the gate, “I think I’ll not
go in. It is so lovely and warm out here in
the sun that I’ll just sit here on the steps and
wait for you.”

Five minutes went by and then ten. By
that time Joyce had decided how to spend
every centime in the whole twenty francs, and
Marie had not returned. Another five minutes
went by. It was dull, sitting there facing the
lonely highway, down which no one ever seemed
to pass. Joyce stood up, looked all around, and
then slowly sauntered down the road a short
distance.

Here and there in the crevices of the wall
A LETTER AND A MEETING. 73

blossomed a few hardy wild flowers, which
Joyce began to gather as she walked. “I'll go
around this bend in the road and see what’s
there,’ she said to herself. “By that time
Marie will surely be done with her messages.”

No one was in sight in any direction, and
feeling that no one could be in hearing distance,
either, in such a deserted place, she began to
sing. It was an old Mother Goose rhyme that
she hummed over and over, in a low voice at
first, but louder as she walked on.

Around the bend in the road there was
nothing to be seen but a lonely field where
two goats were grazing. On one side of it
was a stone wall, on two others a tall hedge,
but the side next her sloped down to the road,
unfenced.

Joyce, with her hands filled with the yellow
wild flowers, stood looking around her, sing-
ing the old rhyme, the song that she had
taught the baby to sing before he could talk
plainly :

“Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn,
The sheep’s in the meadow, the cow’s in the corn.
Little Blue Blue, oh, where are you?
Oh, where are you-u-u-u?”
74. THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

The gay little voice that had been rising
higher and higher, sweet as any bird’s, stopped
suddenly in mid-air ; for, as if in answer to her
call, there was a rustling just ahead of her, and
a boy who had been lying on his back, looking
at the sky, slowly raised himself out of the
grass.

For an instant Joyce was startled; then see-
ing by his wooden shoes and old blue cotton
blouse that he was only a little peasant watch-
ing the goats, she smiled at him with a pleasant
good morning.

He did not answer, but came towards her
with a dazed expression on his face, as if he
were groping his way through some strange
dream. “It is time to go in!” he exclaimed,
as if repeating some lesson learned long ago,
and half forgotten.

Joyce stared at him in open-mouthed aston-
ishment. The little fellow had spoken in Eng-
lish. “Oh, you must be Jules,” she cried.
«Aren't you? I’ve been wanting to find you
for ever so long.”

The boy seemed frightened, and did not
auswer, only looked at her with big, troubled
eyes. Thinking that she had made a mistake,










“HE CAME TOWARDS HER WITH A DAZED EXPRESSION
ON HIS FACE.”
A LETTER AND A MEETING. 7

that she had not heard aright, Joyce spoke in
French. He answered her timidly. She had
not been mistaken; he was Jules; he had been
asleep, he told her, and when he heard her
singing, he thought it was his mother calling
him as she used to do, and had started up ex-
pecting to see her at last. Where was she?
Did mademoiselle know her? Surely she must
if she knew the song.

It was on the tip of Joyce’s tongue to tell
him that everybody knew that song; that it
was as familiar to the children at home as the
chirping of crickets on the hearth or the sight
of dandelions in the spring-time. But some
instinct warned her not to say it. She was
glad afterwards, when she found that it was
sacred to him, woven in as it was with his one
beautiful memory of a home. It was all he
had, and the few words that Joyce’s singing
had startled from him were all that he remem-
bered of his mother’s speech.

If Joyce had happened upon him in any other
way, it is doubtful if their acquaintance would
have grown very rapidly. He was afraid of
strangers; but coming as she did with the
familiar song that was like an old friend, he
78 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

felt that he must have known her sometime, ~
that other time when there was always a sweet
voice calling, and fireflies twinkled across a
dusky lawn.

Joyce was not in a hurry for Marie to come
now. She had a hundred questions to ask, and
made the most of her time by talking very fast.
“Marie will be frightened,” she told Jules,
“if she does not find me at the gate, and will
think that the gypsies have stolen me. Then
she will begin to hunt up and down the road,
and I don’t know what she would say if she
came and found me talking to a strange child
out in the fields, so I must hurry back. I
am glad that I found you. I have been wish-
ing so long for somebody to play with, and
you seem like an old friend because you were
born in America. I’m going to ask ma-
dame to ask Brossard to let you come over
sometime.”

Jules watched her as she hurried away, run-
ning lightly down the road, her fair hair flying
over her shoulders and her short blue skirt
fluttering. Once she looked back to wave her
hand. Long after she was out of sight he still
stood looking after her, as one might gaze long-
A LETTER AND A MEETING. 79

ingly after some visitant from another world.
Nothing like her had ever dropped into his life
before, and he wondered if he should ever see
her again,
CHA PA Rave

A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE.

66 qe

i
i



‘HIS doesn’t seem a
bit like Thanksgiving
Day, Marie,” said
Joyce, plaintively, as
she sat up in bed to

take the early breakfast that

her maid brought in, —a cup
of chocolate and a roll.

“Tn our country the very
minute you wake up you can feel that it is a
holiday. Outdoors it’s nearly always cold and
gray, with everything covered with snow. In-
side you can smell turkey and pies and all
sorts of good spicy things. Here it is so warm
that the windows are open and flowers bloom-
ing in the garden, and there isn’t a thing to
make it seem different from any other old
day.”






80
A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 8I

Here her grumbling was interrupted by a
knock at the door, and Madame Gréville’s
maid, Berthé, came in with a message.

“Madame and monsieur intend spending the
day in Tours, and since Mademoiselle Ware has
written that Mademoiselle Joyce is to have no
lessons on this American holiday, they will be
pleased to have her accompany them in the
carriage. She can spend the morning with
them there or return immediately with Ga-
briel.” i

“Of course I want to go,” cried Joyce. “I
love to drive. But I’d rather come back here
to lunch and have it by myself in the garden.
Berthé, ask madame if I can’t have it served
in the little kiosk at the end of the arbor.”

As soon as she had received a most gracious
permission, Joyce began to make a little plan.
It troubled her conscience somewhat, for she
felt that she ought to ‘mention it to madame,
but she was almost certain that madame would
object, and she had set her heart on carrying
it out.

«IT won’t speak about it now,” she said to
herself, “because I am not suve that I am
going to do it. Mamma would think it was

d

’
$2 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS,

all right, but foreigners are so queer about
some things.”

Uncertain as Joyce may have been about
her future actions, as they drove towards town,
no sooner had madame and monsieur stepped
from the carriage, on the Rue Nationale, than
she was perfectly sure.

“Stop at the baker’s, Gabriel,’ she ordered
as they turned homeward, then at the big
grocery on the corner. ‘Cousin Kate told
me to treat™ myself to something nice,” she
said apologetically to her conscience, as she
gave up the twenty francs to the clerk to be
changed.

If Gabriel wondered what was in the little
parcels which she brought back to the car-
riage, he made no sign. He only touched his
hat respectfully, as she gave the next order:
“Stop where the road turns by the cemetery,
Gabriel ; at the house with the steps going up
to an iron-barred gate. I'l be back in two or
three minutes,” she said, when she had reached

it, and climbed from the carriage.

To his surprise, instead of entering the gate,
she hurried on past it, around the bend in the
road. Ina little while she came running back,
A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 83

her shoes covered with damp earth, as if she
had been walking in a freshly ploughed field.

If Gabriel’s eyes could have followed her’
around that bend in the road, he would have
seen a sight past his understanding : Mademoi-
selle Joyce running at the top of her speed to
meet a little goatherd in wooden shoes and
blue cotton blouse, —a common little peasant
goatherd.

“It’s Thanksgiving Day, Jules,” she an-
nounced, gasping, as she sank down on the
ground beside him. “We're the only Ameri-
cans here, and everybotly has gone off; and
Cousin Kate said to celebrate in some way.
I’m going to have a dinner in the garden.
I’ve bought a rabbit, and we'll dig a hole,
and make a fire, and barbecue it the way Jack
and I used to do at home. And we'll roast
eggs in the ashes, and have a fine time. I’ve
got a lemon tart and a little iced fruit-cake,
too.”

All this was poured out in such breathless
haste, and in such a confusion of tongues, first a
- sentence of English and then a word of French,
that it is no wonder that Jules grew bewildered
in trying to follow her. She had to begin

>.
84 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

again at the beginning, and speak very slowly,
in order to make him understand that it was a
feast day of some kind, and that he, Jules, was
invited to some sort of a strange, wonderful
entertainment in Monsieur Gréville’s garden.
«“ But Brossard is away from home,” said Jules,
“and there is no one to watch the goats, and
keep them from straying down the road. Still
it would be just the same if he were home,” he
added, sadly. “He would not let me go, I am
sure. I have never been out of sight of that
roof since I first came here, except on errands
to the village, when I had to run all the way
back.” He pointed to the peaked gables,
adorned by the scissors of his crazy old
ancestor,

“Brossard isn’t your father,” cried Joyce,
indignantly, “nor your uncle, nor your cousin,
nor anything else that has a right to shut you
up that way. Isn’t there a field with a fence
all around it, that you could drive the goats
into for a few hours?”

Jules shook his head.

“Well, I can’t have my Thanksgiving spoiled -
for just a couple of old goats,” exclaimed Joyce.
“You'll have to bring them along, and we'll
A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 85

shut them up in the carriage-house. You
come over in about an hour, and I'll be at
the side gate waiting for you.”

Joyce had always been a general in her small
way. She made her plans and issued her orders
both at home and at school, and the children
accepted her leadership as a matter of course.
Even if Jules had not been willing and anxious
to go, it is doubtful if he could have mustered
courage to oppose the arrangements that she
made in such a masterful way; but Jules had
not the slightest wish to object to anything
whatsoever that Joyce might propose.

It is safe to say that the old garden had
never before even dreamed of such a celebra-
tion as the one that took place that afternoon
behind its moss-coated walls. The time-stained
statue of Eve, which stood on one side of the
fountain, looked across at the weather-beaten
figure of Adam, on the other side, in stony-
eyed surprise. The little marble satyr in the
middle of the fountain, which had been grin-
ning ever since its endless shower-bath began,
seemed to grin wider than ever, as it watched
the children’s strange sport.

Jules dug the little trench according to
86 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Joyce’s directions, and laid the iron grating
which she had borrowed from the cook across
it, and built the fire underneath. “We ought to
have something especially patriotic and Thanks-
givingey,” said Joyce, standing on one foot to
consider. ‘Oh, now I know,” she cried, after
a moment’s thought. “Cousin Kate has a
lovely big silk flag in the top of her trunk.
T’ll run and get that, and then Pll recite the
‘Landing of the Pilgrims’ to you while the
rabbit cooks.”

Presently a savory odor began to steal along
the winding paths of the garden, between the
laurel-bushes, —a smell of barbecued meat sput-
tering over the fire. Above the door of the
little kiosk, with many a soft swish of silken
stirrings, hung the beautiful old flag. Then
a clear little voice floated up through the pine-

trees :
“ My country, ’tis of thee,
Sweet land of liberty,
Of thee I sing!”

All the time that Joyce sang, she was mov-
ing around the table, setting out the plates and
rattling cups and saucers. She could not keep
a little quaver out of her voice, for, as she went
A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE, 87

on, all the scenes of all the times that she had
sung that song before came crowding up in her
memory. There were the Thanksgiving days
in the church at home, and the Washington’s
birthdays at school, and two Decoration days,
when, as a granddaughter of a veteran, she had

helped scatter flowers over the soldiers’ graves.

Somehow it made her feel so hopelessly far
away from all that made life dear to be singing
of that “sweet land of liberty” in a foreign
country, with only poor little alien Jules for
company.

Maybe that is why the boy’s first lesson in
patriotism was given so earnestly by his home-
sick little teacher. Something that could not be
put into words stirred within him, as, looking up
at the soft silken flutterings of the old flag, he
listened for the first time to the story of the
Pilgrim Fathers.

The rabbit cooked slowly, so slowly that there
was time for Jules to learn how to play mumble-
peg while they waited. At last it was done, and
Joyce proudly plumped it into the platter that
had been waiting for it. Marie had already
brought out a bountiful lunch, cold meats and
salad and a dainty pudding. By the time that
88 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Joyce had added her contribution to the feast,
there was scarcely an inch of the table left
uncovered. Jules did not know the names of
half the dishes.

Not many miles away from that old garden,
scattered up and down the Loire throughout
“all the region of fair Tourraine, rise the turrets
of many an old chateau. Great banquet halls,
where kings and queens once feasted, still stand
as silent witnesses of a gay bygone court life;
but never in any chateau or palace among them
all was feast more thoroughly enjoyed than
this impromptu dinner in the garden, where a
little goatherd was the only guest.

It was an enchanted spot to Jules, made so
by the magic of Joyce’s wonderful gift of story-
telling. For the first time in his life that he
could remember, he heard of Santa Claus and
Christmas trees, of Bluebeard and Aladdin’s
lamp, and all the dear old fairy tales that were
so entrancing he almost forgot to eat.

Then they played that he was the prince,
Prince Ethelried, and that the goats in the
carriage-house were his royal steeds, and that
Joyce was a queen whom he had come to visit.

But it came to an end, as all beautiful things






A LESSON IN PATRIOTISM.
A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. gi

must do. The bells in the village rang four,
and Prince Ethelried started up as Cinderella
must have done when the pumpkin coach dis-
appeared. He was no longer a king’s son; he
was only Jules, the little goatherd, who must
hurry back to the field before the coming of
Brossard. /

Joyce went with him to the carriage-house.
Together they swung open the great door.
Then an exclamation of dismay fell from
Joyce’s lips. All over the floor were scattered
scraps of leather and cloth and hair, the kind
used in upholstering. The goats had whiled
away the hours of their imprisonment by chew-
ing up the cushions of the pony cart.

Jules turned pale with fright. Knowing so
little of the world, he judged all grown people
by his knowledge of Henri and Brossard.
«Oh, what will they do to us?” he gasped.

“Nothing at all,” answered Joyce, bravely,
although her heart beat twice as fast as usual
as monsieur’s accusing face rose up before
her.

“It was all my fault,” said Jules, ready to
cry. “What must I do?” Joyce saw his
distress, and with quick womanly tact recog:
92 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

_nized her duty as hostess. It would never do to

let this, his first Thanksgiving Day, be clouded
by a single unhappy remembrance. She would
pretend that it was a part of their last game;
so she waved her hand, and said, in a theatrical
voice, “You forget, Prince Ethelried, that in
the castle of Irmingarde she rules supreme.
If it is the pleasure of your royal steeds to
feed upon cushions they shall not be denied,
even though they choose my own coach
pillows, of gold-cloth and velour.”

«« But what if Gabriel should tell Brossard ?”
questioned Jules, his teeth almost chattering at
the mere thought.

«Oh, never mind, Jules,” she answered, laugh-
ingly. ‘Don’t worry about a little thing like
that. I'll make it all right with madame as
soon as she gets home.”

Jules, with utmost faith in Joyce’s power to
do anything that she might undertake, drew
a long breath of relief. Half a dozen times
between the gate and the lane that led into
the Ciseaux field, he turned around to wave his
old cap in answer to the hopeful flutter of her
little white handkerchief; but when he was
out of sight she went back to the carriage-
A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 93

house and looked at the wreck of the cushions
with a sinking heart. After that second look,
she was not so sure of making it all right with
madame,

Going slowly up to her room, she curled up
in the window-seat to wait for the sound of the
carriage wheels. The blue parrots on the wall-
paper sat in their blue hoops in straight rows
from floor to ceiling, and hung all their dismal
heads. It seemed to Joyce as if there were
thousands of them, and that each one was more
unhappy than any of the others. The blue roses
on the bed-curtains, that had been in such gay
blossom a few hours before, looked ugly and
unnatural now.

Over the mantel hung a picture that had
been a pleasure to Joyce ever since she had
taken up her abode in this quaint blue room.
It was called “A Message from Noél,” and
showed an angel flying down with gifts to fill
a pair of little wooden shoes that some child
had put out on a window-sill below. When
madame had explained that the little French
children put out their shoes for Saint Noél
to fill, instead of hanging stockings for Santa
Claus, Joyce had been so charmed with the
94 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

picture that she declared that she intended to
follow the French custom herself, this year.

Now, even the picture looked different, since
she had lost her joyful anticipations of Christ-
mas. ‘It is all No-el to me now,” she sobbed.
“No tree, no Santa Claus, and now, since the
money must go to pay for the goats’ mischief, no
presents for anybody in the dear little brown
~ house at home,—not even mamma and the
baby!”

A big salty tear trickled down the side of
Joyce’s nose and splashed on her hand; then
another one. It was such a gloomy ending for
her happy Thanksgiving Day. One consoling
thought came to her in time to stop the deluge
that threatened. “Anyway, Jules has had a
good time for once in his life.” Fhe thought
cheered her so much that, when Marie came in
to light the lamps, Joyce was walking up and
down the room with her hands behind her back,
singing.

As soon as she was dressed for dinner she
went down-stairs, but found no one in the
drawing-room. A small fire burned cozily on
the hearth, for the November nights were grow-
ing chilly. Joyce picked up a book and tried


A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 95

to read, but found herself looking towards the
door fully as often as at the page before her.
Presently she set her teeth together and swal-
lowed hard, for there was a rustling in the hall.
The portiére was pushed aside and madame
swept into the room
in a dinner-gown of
dark red velvet.

To Joyce’s waiting
eyes she seemed more
imposing, more ele-
gant, and more unap-
proachable than she
had ever been before.
At madame’s_ en-
trance Joyce rose as
usual, but when the
red velvet train had
swept on to a seat
beside the fire, she still remained standing.
Her lips seemed glued together after those
first words of greeting.

“Be seated, mademoiselle,” said the lady,
with a graceful motion of her hand towards a
chair. “How have you enjoyed your holiday?”

Joyce gave a final swallow of the choking


90 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

lump in her throat, and began her humble con-
fession that she had framed up-stairs among
the rows of dismal blue wall-paper parrots. She
started with Clotilde Robard’s story of Jules,
told of her accidental meeting with him, of all
that she knew of his hard life with Brossard,
and of her longing for some one to play with.
Then she acknowledged that she had planned
the barbecue secretly, fearing that madame
would not allow her to invite the little goat-
herd. At the conclusion, she opened the hand-
kerchief which she had been holding tightly
clenched in her hand, and poured its contents
in the red velvet lap.

“There’s all that is left of my Christmas
money,” she said, sadly, “seventeen francs
and two sous. If it isn’t enough to pay for the
cushions, I'll write to Cousin Kate, and maybe
she will lend me the rest.”

Madame gathered up the handful of coin,
and slowly rose. ‘It is only a step to the car-
riage-house,” she said. “If you will kindly
ring for Berthé to bring a lamp we will look to
see how much damage has been done.”

It was an unusual procession that filed down
the garden walk a few minutes later. First
:
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A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 97

came Berthé, in her black dress and white cap,
holding a lamp high above her head, and screw-
ing her forehead into a mass of wrinkles as she
peered out into the surrounding darkness.
After her came madame, holding up her dress
and stepping daintily along in her high-heeled
little slippers. Joyce brought up the rear,
stumbling along in the darkness of madame’s
large shadow, so absorbed in her troubles that
she did not see the amused expression on the
face of the grinning satyr in the fountain.
_ Eve, looking across at Adam, seemed to wink
one of her stony eyes, as much as to say,
«Humph! Somebody else has been getting
into trouble. There’s more kinds of forbidden
fruit than one; pony-cart cushions, for in-
stance.’ +

Berthé opened the door, and madame stepped
inside the carriage-house. With her skirts
held high in both hands, she moved around
among the wreck of the cushions, turning over
a bit with the toe of her slipper now and then.

Madame wore velvet dinner-gowns, it is true,
and her house was elegant in its fine old fur-
nishings bought generations ago ; but only her
dressmaker and herself knew how many times
98 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

those gowns had been ripped and cleaned and
remodelled. It was only constant housewifely
skill that kept the antique furniture repaired
and the ancient brocade hangings from falling
into holes. None but a French woman, trained
in petty economies, could have guessed how
little money and how much thought was spent
in keeping her table up to its high standard of
excellence.

Now as she looked and estimated, counting
the fingers of one hand with the thumb of the
other, a wish stirred in her kind old heart that
she need not take the child’s money; but new
cushions must be bought, and she must be just
to herself before she could be generous to
others. So she went on with her estimating
and counting, and then called Gabriel to con-
sult with him.

“ Much of the same hair can be used again,”
she said, finally, “and the cushions were partly
worn, so that it would not be right for you to
have to bear the whole expense of new ones.
I shall keep sixteen, — no, I shall keep only
fifteen francs of your money, mademoiselle. I
am sorry to take any of it, since you have been
so frank with me; but you must see that it
A THANKSGIVING BARBECUE. 99

would not be justice for me to have to suffer in
consequence of your fault. In France, children
do nothing without the permission of their
elders, and it would be well for you to adopt
the same rule, my dear mademoiselle.”

Here she dropped two francs and two sous
into Joyce’s hand. It was more than she had
dared to hope for. Now there would be at
least a little picture-book apiece for the chil-
dren at home.

This time Joyce saw the grin on the satyr’s
face when they passed the fountain. She was
smiling herself when they entered the house,
where monsieur was waiting to escort them
politely in to dinner.
CHAPTER VI.
JOYCE PLAYS GHOST.

Monsieur CisEaux was coming home to live.
Gabriel brought the news when he came back
from market. He had met Henri on the road
and heard it from him. Monsieur was coming
home. That was all they knew; as to the day
or the hour, no one could guess. That was the
way with monsieur, Henri said. He was so
peculiar one never knew what to expect.

Although the work of opening the great
house was begun immediately, and a thorough
cleaning was in progress from garret to cellar,
Brossard did not believe that his master would
really be at home before the end of the week.
He made his own plans accordingly, although
he hurried Henri relentlessly with the cleaning.

As soon as Joyce heard the news she made
an excuse to slip away, and ran down to the
field to Jules. She found him paler than

100
JOYCE PLAYS GHOST. IOI

usual, and there was a swollen look about his
eyes that made her think that maybe he had
been crying.

« What’s the matter?” she asked. “Aren't
you glad that your uncle is coming home ?”

Jules gave a cautious glance over his shoulder
towards the house, and then looked up at Joyce.
Heretofore, some inward monitor of pride had
closed his lips about himself whenever he had
been with her, but, since the Thanksgiving Day
that had made them such firm friends, he had
wished every hour that he could tell her of his
troubles. He felt that she was the only person
in the world who took any interest in him.
Although she was only three years older than
himself, she had that motherly little way with
her that eldest daughters are apt to acquire
when there is a whole brood of little brothers
and sisters constantly claiming attention.

So when Joyce asked again, “What's the
matter, Jules?” with so much anxious sym-
pathy in her face and voice, the child found
himself blurting out the truth.

“Brossard beat me again last night,” he
exclaimed. Then, in response to her indignant
exclamation, he poured out the whole story of
I02 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

his ill-treatment. “See here!” he cried, in
conclusion, unbuttoning his blouse and baring
his thin little shoulders. Great red welts lay
across them, and one arm was blue with a big
mottled bruise.

Joyce shivered and closed her eyes an instant
to shut out the sight that brought the quick
tears of sympathy.

“Oh, you poor little thing!” she cried. “I’m
going to tell madame.”

“No, don’t!” begged Jules. “If Brossard
ever found out that I had told anybody, I
believe that he would half kill me. He pun-
ishes me for the least thing. I had no break-
fast this morning because I dropped an old
plate and broke it.”

“Do you mean to say,” cried Joyce, “that
you have been out here in the field since sun-
rise without a bite to eat?”

Jules nodded. me

«Then I’m going straight home to get you
something.” Before he could answer she was
darting over the fields like a little flying squirrel.

«Oh, what if it were Jack!” she kept repeat-
ing as she ran. “Dear old Jack, beaten and
starved, without anybody to love him or say a
JOYCE PLAYS GHOST. 103

kind word to him.” The mere thought of such
misfortune brought a sob.

In a very few minutes Jules saw her coming
across the field again, more slowly this time,
for both hands were full, and without their aid
she had no way to steady the big hat that
flapped forward into her eyes at every step.
Jules eyed the food ravenously. He had not
known how weak and hungry he was until
then.

“Tt will not be like this when your uncle
comes home,” said Joyce, as she watched the
big mouthfuls disappear down the grateful
little throat. Jules shrugged his shoulders,
answering tremulously, “Oh, yes, it will be lots
worse. Brossard says that my Uncle Martin
has a terrible temper, and that he turned his
poor sister and my grandfather out of the
house one stormy might. Brossard says he
shall tell him how troublesome I am, and
likely he will turn me out, too. Or, if he
doesn’t do that, they will both whip me every
day.”

Joyce stamped her foot. “I don’t believe
it,” she cried, indignantly. “Brossard is only
trying to scare you. Your uncle is an old man
104 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

now, so old that he must be sorry for the way
he acted when he was young. Why, of course
he must be,” she repeated, “or he never would
have brought you here when you were left a
homeless baby. More than that, I believe he
will be angry when he finds how you have been
treated. Maybe he will send Brossard away
when you tell him.”

“J would not dare to tell him,’ said Jules,
shrinking back at the bare suggestion.

“Then J dare,’ cried Joyce with flashing
eyes. “Iam not afraid of Brossard or Henri
or your uncle, or any man that I ever knew.
What’s more, I intend to march over here
just as soon as your uncle comes home, and tell
him right before Brossard how you have been
treated.”

Jules gasped in admiration of such reckless
courage. “Seems to me Brossard himself
would be afraid of you if you looked at him
that way.” Then his voice sank to a whisper.
« Brossard is afraid of one thing, I’ve heard
him tell Henri so, and that is ghosts. They
talk about them every night when the wind
blows hard and makes queer noises in the
chimney. Sometimes they are afraid to put

d
JOYCE PLAYS GHOST. 105

out their candles for fear some evil spirit
might be in the room.”

“T’m glad he is afraid of something, the
mean old thing!” exclaimed Joyce. For a
few moments nothing more was said, but
Jules felt comforted now that he had unbur-
dened his long pent up little heart. He
reached out for several blades of grass and
began idly twisting them around his finger.

Joyce sat with her hands clasped over her
knees, and a wicked little gleam in her eyes
that boded mischief. Presently she giggled
as if some amusing thought had occurred to
her, and when Jules looked up inquiringly she
began noiselessly clapping her hands together.

“T’ve thought of the best thing,” she said.
“T’'ll fix old Brossard now. Jack and I have
played ghost many a time, and have even
scared each other while we were doing it,
because we were so frightful-looking. We
put long sheets all over us and went about
with pumpkin jack-o’-lanterns on our heads.
Oh, we looked awful, all in white, with fire
shining out of those hideous eyes and mouths.
If I knew when Brossard was likely to whip
you again, I’d suddenly appear on the scene
106 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

and shriek out like a banshee and make him
stop. Wouldn’t it be lovely?” she cried,
more carried away with the idea the longer
she thought of it. “Why, it would be like
acting our fairy story. You are the Prince,
and I will be the giant scissors and rescue
you from the Ogre. Now let me see if I
can think of a rhyme for you to say when-
ever you need me.”

Joyce put her hands over her ears and began
to mumble something that had no meaning
whatever for Jules: ‘ Ghost — post — roast —
toast, — no that will never do; need — speed
deed, — no! Help — yelp (I wish I could make
him yelp),— friend — spend — lend, — that’s it.
I shall try that.”

There was a long silence, during which Joyce
whispered to herself with closed eyes. “Now
I’ve got it,” she announced, triumphantly, “and
it’s every bit as good as Cousin Kate’s:

« Giant scissors, fearless friend,
Hasten, pray, thy aid to lend.

“Tf you could just say that loud enough for
me to hear I’d come rushing in and save you.”
Jules repeated the rhyme several times, until
JOYCE PLAYS GHOST. 107

he was sure that he could remember it, and
then Joyce stood up to go.

“ Good-by, fearless friend,” said Jules. “I
wish I were brave like you.” Joyce smiled
in a superior sort of way, much flattered by
the new title. Going home across the field
she held her head a trifle higher than usual,
and carried on an imaginary conversation with
Brossard, in which she made him quail before
her scathing rebukes.

Joyce did not take her usual walk that after-
noon. She spent the time behind locked doors
busy with paste, scissors, and a big muff-box,
the best foundation she could find for a jack-
o’-lantern. First she covered the box with
white paper and cut a hideous face in one
side, — great staring eyes, and a frightful
grinning mouth. With a bit of wire she
fastened a candle inside and shut down the
lid.

“Looks too much like a box yet,” she said,
after a critical examination. “It needs some
hair and a beard. Wonder what I can make
it of.” She glanced all around the room for a
suggestion, and then closed her eyes to think.
Finally she went over to her bed, and, turning




108 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

the covers back from one corner, began ripping
a seam in the mattress. When the opening
was wide enough she put in her thumb and
finger and pulled out a handful of the curled
hair. “I can easily put it back when I have
used it, and sew up the hole
in the mattress,” she said to
her conscience. “My! This
is exactly what I needed.”

The hair was mixed,

white and black,

coarse and curly as
a negro’s wool.

She covered the top
of the pasteboard head
with it, and was so
pleased that she added
long beard and fierce
mustache to the al-
ready hideous mouth. When that was all
done she took it into a dark closet and
lighted the candle. The monster's head
glared at her from the depth of the closet,
and she skipped back and forth in front of it,
wringing her hands in delight.

«Oh, if Jack could only see it! If he could
—————————

JOYCE PLAYS GHOST. 109

only see it!” she kept exclaiming. “It is
better than any pumpkin head we ever made,
and scary enough to throw old Brossard into a
fit. I can hardly wait until it is dark enough
to go over.”

Meanwhile the short winter day drew on
towards the close. Jules, out in the field with
the goats, walked back and forth, back and for trying to keep warm. Brossard, who had gone
five miles down the Paris road to bargain about
some grain, sat comfortably in a little tobacco
shop, with a pipe in his mouth and a glass and
bottle on the table at his elbow. Henri was
at home, still scrubbing and cleaning. The
front of the great house was in order, with
even the fires laid on all the hearths ready
for lighting. Now he was scrubbing the back
stairs. His brush bumped noisily against the
steps, and the sound of its scouring was nearly
drowned by the jerky tune which the old fellow
sung through his nose as he worked.

A carriage drove slowly down the road and
stopped at the gate with the scissors; then, in
obedience to some command from within, the
vehicle drove on to the smaller gate beyond.
An old man with white hair and_ bristling
110 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

mustache slowly alighted. The master had
come home. He put out his hand as if to
ring the bell, then on second thought drew
a key from his pocket and fitted it in the
lock. The gate swung back and he passed
inside. The old house looked gray and for-
bidding in the dull light of the late afternoon.
He frowned up at it, and it frowned down on
him, standing there as cold and grim as itself.
That was his only welcome.

The doors and windows were all shut, so
that he caught only a faint sound of the
bump, thump of the scrubbing-brush as it
accompanied Henri’s high-pitched tune down
the back stairs.

Without giving any warning of his arrival, he
motioned the man beside the coachman to fol-
low with his trunk, and silently led the way
up-stairs. When the trunk had been unstrapped
and the man had departed, monsieur gave one
slow glance’ all around the room. It was in
perfect readiness for him. He set a match to
the kindling laid in the grate, and then closed
the door into the hall. The master had come
home again, more silent, more mysterious in
his movements than before.
JOYCE PLAYS GHOST. III

Henri finished his scrubbing and his song,
and, going down into the kitchen, began prep-
arations for supper. A long time after, Jules
came up from the field, put the goats in
their place, and crept in behind the kitchen
stove.

Then it was that Joyce, from her watch-tower
of her window, saw Brossard driving home in
the market-cart. ‘Maybe I’ll have a chance
to scare him while he is putting the horse up
and feeding it,’ she thought. It was in the
dim gloaming when she could easily slip along
by the hedges without attracting attention.
Bareheaded, and in breathless haste to reach
the barn before Brossard, she ran down the
road, keeping close to the hedge, along which
the wind raced also, blowing the dead leaves
almost as high as her head.

Slipping through a hole in the hedge, just
as Brossard drove in at the gate, she ran into
the barn and crouched down behind the door.
There she wrapped herself in the sheet that she
had brought with her for the purpose, and pro-
ceeded to strike a match to light the lantern.
The first one flickered and went out. The
second did the same. Brossard was calling
II2 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

angrily for Jules now, and she struck another
match in nervous haste, this time touching the
wick with it before the wind could interfere.
Then she drew her dress over the lantern to
hide the light.

“Wouldn't Jack enjoy this,” she thought,
with a daring little giggle that almost betrayed
her hiding-place.

“T tell thee it is thy fault,” cried Brossard’s
angry voice, drawing nearer the barn.

« But I tried,” began Jules, timidly.

His trembling excuse was interrupted by
Brossard, who had seized him by the arm.
They were now on the threshold of the barn,
which was as dark as a pocket inside.

Joyce, peeping through the crack of the door,
saw the man’s arm raised in the dim twilight
outside. ‘Oh, he is really going to beat him,”
she thought, turning faint at the prospect. Then
her indignation overcame every other feeling as
she heard a heavy halter-strap whiz through the
air and fall with a sickening blow across Jules’s
shoulders. She had planned a scene something
like this while she worked away at the lantern
that afternoon. Now she felt as if she were
acting a part in some private theatrical perform-
JOYCE PLAYS GHOST. 113

ance. Jules’s cry gave her the cue, and the
courage to appear.

As the second blow fell across Jules’s smart-
ing shoulders, a low, blood-curdling wail came
from the dark depths of the barn. Joyce had
not practised that dismal moan of a banshee to
no purpose in her ghost dances at home with
Jack. It rose and fell and quivered and rose
again in cadences of horror. There was some-
thing awful, something inhuman, in that fiendish,
long-drawn shriek.

Brossard’s arm fell to his side paralyzed with
fear, as that same hoarse voice cried, solemnly :
« Brossard, beware! Beware!” But worse than
that voice of sepulchral warning was the white-
sheeted figure, coming towards him with a wav-
ering, ghostly motion, fire shooting from the
demon-like eyes, and flaming from the hideous
mouth,

Brossard sank on his knees in a shivering
heap, and began crossing himself. His hair
was upright with horror, and his tongue stiff.
Jules knew who it was that danced around
them in such giddy circles, first darting towards
them with threatening gestures, and then glid-
ing back to utter one of those awful, sickening
II4 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

wails. He knew that under that fiery head and
wrapped in that spectral dress was his “ feariess
friend,” who, according to promise, had hastened
her aid to lend; nevertheless, he was afraid of
her himself. He had never imagined that
anything could look so terrifying.

The wail reached Henri’s ears and aroused
his curiosity. Cautiously opening the kitchen
door, he thrust out his head, and then nearly
fell backward in his haste to draw it in again
and slam the door. One glimpse of the
ghost in the barnyard was quite enough for
Henri.

Altogether the performance probably did not
last longer than a minute, but each of the sixty
seconds seemed endless to Brossard. With a
final die-away moan Joyce glided towards the
gate, delighted beyond measure with her suc-
cess ; but her delight did not last long. Just
as she turned the corner of the house, some
one standing in the shadow of it clutched her.
A strong arm was thrown around her, and 2
firm hand snatched the lantern, and tore the
sheet away from her face.

It was Joyce’s turn to be terrified. “Let me
go!’ she shrieked, in English. With one des-
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“6 BROSSARD, BEWARE! BEWARE1’”
JOYCE PLAYS GHOST. II7

perate wrench she broke away, and by the light
of the grinning jack-o’-lantern saw who was her
captor. She was face to face with Monsieur
Ciseaux.

«What does this mean ?’’ he asked, severely.
“Why do you come masquerading here to
frighten my servants in this manner?”

For an instant Joyce stood speechless. Her
boasted courage had forsaken her. It was only
for an instant, however, for the rhyme that
she had made seemed to sound in her ears as
distinctly as if Jules were calling to her:

“Giant scissors, fearless friend,
Hasten, pray, thy aid to lend.”

“T will be a fearless friend,’ she thought.
Looking defiantly up into the angry face she
demanded: “ Then why do you keep such ser-
vants? I came because they needed to be
frightened, and I’m glad you caught me, for I
told Jules that I should tell you about them as
soon as you got home. Brossard has starved
and beaten him like a dog ever since he has
been here. I just hope that you will look at
the stripes and bruises on his poor little back.
He begged me not to tell, for Brossard said you
I18 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

would likely drive him away, as you did your
brother and sister. But even if you do, the
neighbors say that an orphan asylum would be
a far better home for Jules than this has been.
I hope you'll excuse me, monsieur, I truly do,
but I’m an American, and I can’t stand by and
keep still when I see anybody being abused,
even if I am a girl, and it isn’t polite for me to
talk so to older people.”

Joyce fired out the words as if they had been
bullets, and so rapidly that monsieur could
scarcely follow her meaning. Then, having
relieved her mind, and fearing that maybe she
had been rude in speaking so forcibly to such
an old gentleman, she very humbly begged his
pardon. Before he could recover from her
rapid change in manner and her torrent of
words, she reached out her hand, saying, in the
meekest of little voices, “ And will you please
give me back those things, monsieur? The
sheet is Madame Gréville’s, and I’ve got to
stuff that hair back in the mattress to-night.”

Monsieur gave them to her, still too aston-
ished for words. He had never before heard
any child speak in such a way. This one
seemed more like a wild, uncanny little sprite
JOYCE PLAYS GHOST. 119

than like any of the little girls he had known
heretofore. Before he could recover from his
bewilderment, Joyce had gone. “Good night,
monsieur,” she called, as the gate clanged
behind her.
CHAPTER VII.
OLD “NUMBER THIRTY - ONE.”

No sooner had the gate closed upon the
subdued little ghost, shorn now of its terrors,
than the old man strode forward to the place
where Brossard crouched in the straw, still
crossing himself, This sudden appearance of
his master at such a time only added to Bros-
sard’s fright. As for Jules, his knees shook
until he could scarcely stand.

Henri, his curiosity lending him courage,
cautiously opened the kitchen door to peer out
again. Emboldened by the silence, he flung
the door wide open, sending a broad stream of
lamplight across the little group in the barnyard.
Without a word of greeting monsieur laid hold
of the trembling Jules and drew him nearer
the door. Throwing open the child’s blouse,
he examined the thin little shoulders, which

120
OLD “NUMBER THIRTY - ONE.” 121

shrank away as if to dodge some expected
blow.

“Go to my room,” was all the old man said
to him. Then he turned fiercely towards Bros-



sard. His angry tones reached Jules even after
he had mounted the stairs and closed the door.
The child crept close to the cheerful fire, and,
crouching down on the rug, waited in a shiver
of nervousness for his uncle’s step on the
stair.
I22 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Meanwhile, Joyce, hurrying home all a-tingle
with the excitement of her adventure, wondered
anxiously what would be the result of it. Under
cover of the dusk she slipped into the house un-
observed. There was barely time to dress for
dinner.. When she made her appearance mon-
sieur complimented her unusually red cheeks.

“Doubtless mademoiselle has had a fine
promenade,” he said.

“No,” answered Joyce, with a blush that
made them redder still, and that caused ma.-
dame to look at her so keenly that she felt
those sharp eyes must be reading her inmost
thoughts. It disturbed her so that she upset
the salt, spilled a glass of water, and started to
eat her soup with a fork. She glanced in an
embarrassed way from madame to monsieur,
and gave a nervous little laugh.

“The little mademoiselle has been in mis-
chief again,” remarked monsieur, with a smile.
«What is it this time?”

The smile was so encouraging that Joyce’s
determination not to tell melted away, and she
began a laughable account of the afternoon’s
adventure. At first both the old people looked
shocked. Monsieur shrugged his shoulders and
OLD “NUMBER THIRTY - ONE.” 123

pulled his gray beard thoughtfully. Madame
threw up her hands at the end of each sen-
tence like horrified little exclamation points.
But when Joyce had told the entire story
neither of them had a word of blame, because
their sympathies were so thoroughly aroused
for Jules.

“J shall ask Monsieur Ciseaux to allow the
child to visit here sometimes,” said madame, —
her kind old heart full of pity for the mother-
less little fellow; ‘and TI shall also explain that
it was only your desire to save Jules from
ill treatment that caused you to do such an
unusual thing. Otherwise he might think you
too bold and too—well, peculiar, to be a fit
playmate for his little nephew.”

“Oh, was it really so improper and horrid of
me, madame?” asked Joyce, anxiously.

Madame hesitated. “The circumstances were
some excuse,” she finally admitted. “But I
certainly should not want a little daughter of
mine to be out after dark by herself on such
a wild errand. In this country a little girl
would not think it possible to do such a thing.”

Joyce’s face was very sober as she arose to
leave the room. “I do wish that I could be
124. THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

proper like little French girls,’’ she said, with
a sigh.

Madame drew her towards her, kissing her
on both cheeks. It was such an unusual thing
for madame to do that Joyce could scarcely
help showing some surprise. Feeling that the
caress was an assurance that she was not in
disgrace, as she had feared, she ran up-stairs,
so light-hearted that she sang on the way.

As the door closed behind her, monsieur
reached for his pipe, saying, as he did so, “She
has a heart of gold, the little mademoiselle.”

“Yes,” assented madame; “but she is a
strange little body, so untamed and original.
I am glad that her cousin returns soon, for the
responsibility is too great for my old shoulders.
One never knows what she will do next.”

Perhaps it was for this reason that madame
took Joyce with her when she went to Tours
next day. She felt safer when the child was
in her sight.

“It is so much nicer going around with you
than Marie,” said Joyce, giving madame an
affectionate little pat, as they stood before the
entrance of a great square building, awaiting
admission. ‘You take me to places that I
OLD “NUMBER THIRTY - ONE.” 125

have never seen before. What place is this?”
She stooped to read the inscription on the
door-plate :

“LITTLE SISTERS OF THE POOR.”

Before her question could be answered, the
door was opened by a wrinkled old woman, in a
nodding white cap, who led them into a recep-
tion-room at the end of the hall.

« Ask for Sister Denisa,” said madame, “and
give her my name.”

The old woman shuffled out of the room,
and madame, taking a small memorandum book
from her pocket, began to study it. Joyce sat
looking about her with sharp, curious glances.
She wondered if these little sisters of the poor
were barefoot beggar girls, who went about the
streets with ragged shawls over their heads,
and with baskets in their hands. In her lively
imagination she pictured row after row of such
unfortunate children, marching out in the morn-
ing, empty-handed, and creeping back at night
with the results of the day’s begging. She did
not like to ask about them, however, and, in a
few minutes, her curiosity was satisfied without
the use of questions.
126 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Sister Denisa entered the room. She was a
beautiful woman, in the plain black habit and
white head-dress of a sister of charity.

“Qh, they’re nuns!” exclaimed Joyce, in a
disappointed whisper. She had been hoping to
see the beggar girls. She had often passed the
convent in St. Symphorien, and caught glimpses
of the nuns, through the high barred gate. She
had wondered how it must feel to be shut away
from the world; to see only the patient white
faces of the other sisters,.and to walk with
meekly folded hands and downcast eyes always
in the same old paths.

But Sister Denisa was different from the
nuns that she had seen before. Some inward
joy seemed to shine through her beautiful face
and make it radiant. She laughed often, and
there was a happy twinkle in her clear, gray
eyes. When she came into the room, she
seemed to bring the outdoors with her, there
was such sunshine and fresh air in the cheeri-
ness of her greeting.

Madame had come to visit an old pensioner
of hers who was in the home. After a short
conversation, Sister Denisa rose to lead the
way to her. ‘“ Would the little mademoiselle






































JOYCE AND SISTER DENISA.



pe | ee ee ey

ee



sea


OLD “NUMBER THIRTY - ONE.” 129

like to go through the house while madame
is engaged?” asked the nun.

“Oh, yes, thank you,” answered Joyce, who
had found by this time that this home was not
for little beggar girls, but for old men and
women. Joyce had known very few old people
in her short life, except her Grandmother Ware;
and this grandmother was one of those dear,
sunny old souls, whom everybody loves to
claim, whether they are in the family or not.
Some of Joyce’s happiest days had been spent
in her grandmother’s country home, and the
host of happy memories that she had stored
up during those visits served to sweeten all
her after life.

Old age, to Joyce, was associated with the
most beautiful things that she had ever known :
the warmest hospitality, the tenderest love, the -
cheeriest home-life. Strangers were in the old
place now, and Grandmother Ware was no
longer living, but, for her sake, Joyce held
sacred every wrinkled face. set round with.
snow-white hair, just as she looked tenderly
on all old-fashioned flowers, because she had
seen them first in her grandmother’s garden.

Sister Denisa led the way into a large, sunny
130 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

room, and Joyce looked around eagerly. It
was crowded with old men. Some were sit-
ting idly on the benches around the walls, or
dozing in chairs near the stove. Some smoked,
some gathered around the tables where games
of checkers and chess were going on; some
gazed listlessly out of the windows. It was
good to see how dull faces brightened, as
Sister Denisa passed by with a smile for this
group, a cheery word for the next. She
stopped to brush the hair back from the fore-
head of an old paralytic, and pushed another
man gently aside, when he blocked the way,
with such a sweet-voiced “ Pardon, little father,”
that it was like a caress. One white-haired old
fellow, in his second childhood, reached out and
caught at her dress, as she passed by.

Crossing a porch where were more old men
sitting sadly alone, or walking sociably up and
down in the sunshine, Sister Denisa passed
along a court and held the door open for Joyce
to enter another large room.

“Here is the rest of our family,” she said.
“A large one, is it not? Two hundred poor
old people that nobody wants, and nobody
cares what becomes of.”
OLD “NUMBER THIRTY - ONE,” 131

Joyce looked around the room and saw on
every hand old age that had nothing beautiful,
nothing attractive. ‘Were they beggars when
they were little?” she asked.

«No, indeed,” answered the nun. “That is
the saddest part of it to me. Nearly all these
poor creatures you see here once had happy
homes of their own. That pitiful old body
over by the stove, shaking with palsy, was
once a gay, rich countess; the invalid whom
madame visits was a marquise. It would break
your heart, mademoiselle, to hear the stories of
some of these people, especially those who have
been cast aside by ungrateful children, to whom
their support has become a burden. Several of
these women have prosperous grandchildren, to
whom we have appealed in vain. There is no
cruelty that hurts me like such cruelty to old
age.”

Just then another nun came into the room, said
something to Sister Denisa in a low voice, and
glided out like a silent shadow, her rosary sway-
ing back and forth with every movement of her -
clinging black skirts. “I am needed up-stairs,”
said Sister Denisa, turning to Joyce. «“ Will
you come up and see the sleeping-rooms ?”
132 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

They went up the freshly scrubbed steps to
a great dormitory, where, against the bare walls,
stood long rows of narrow cots. They were all
empty, except one at the farthest end, where
an old woman lay with her handkerchief across
her eyes.

“Poor old Number Thirty-one!” said Sister
Denisa. “She seems to feel her unhappy
position more than any one in the house.
The most of them are thankful for mere
bodily comfort, — satisfied with food and shel-
ter and warmth ; but she is continually pining
for her old home surroundings. Will you not
come and speak to her in English? She mar-
ried a countryman of yours, and lived over
thirty years in America. She speaks of that
time as the happiest in her life. I am sure
that you can give her a great deal of pleasure.”

“Ts she ill?” said Joyce, timidly drawing
back as the nun started across the room.

«No, I think not,” was the answer. ‘She
says she can’t bear to be herded in one room
with all those poor creatures, like a flock of
sheep, with nothing to do but wait for death.
She has always been accustomed to having a
room of her own, so that her greatest trial is
:

OLD “NUMBER THIRTY - ONE.” 133

in having no privacy. She must eat, sleep, and
live with a hundred other old women always
around her. She comes up here to bed when-
ever she can find the slightest ache for an
excuse, just to be by herself. I wish that
we could give her a little spot that she could
call her own, and shut the door on, and feel
alone. But it cannot be,” she added, with a
sigh. “It taxes our strength to the utmost to
give them all even a bare home.”

By this time they had reached the cot, over
the head of which hung a card, bearing the
number “ Thirty-one.”

“Here is a little friend to see you, grand-
mother,” said Sister Denisa, placing a chair by
the bedside, and stooping to smooth back the
locks of silvery hair that had strayed out from
‘under the coarse white night-cap. Then she
passed quickly on to her other duties, leaving
Joyce to begin the conversation as best she
could. The old woman looked at her sharply .
with piercing dark eyes, which must have been
beautiful in their youth. The intense gaze
embarrassed Joyce, and to break the silence
she hurriedly stammered out the first thing
that came to her mind.
»
134 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.
« Are you ill, to-day ?”

The simple question had a startling effect on
the old woman. She raised herself on one



elbow, and reached out for Joyce’s hand, draw-
ing her eagerly nearer. “Ah,” she cried, “you
speak the language that my husband taught
"me to love, and the tongue my little children
OLD “NUMBER THIRTY - ONE.” 135

lisped ; but they are all dead now, and I’ve
come back to my native land to find no home
but the one that charity provides.”

Her words ended in a wail, and she sank
back on her pillow. ‘And this is my birth-

day,” she went on. “Seventy-three years
old, and a pauper, cast out to the care of
strangers.”

The tears ran down her wrinkled cheeks, and
her mouth trembled pitifully. Joyce was dis-
tressed; she looked around for Sister Denisa,
but saw that they were alone, they two, in the
great bare dormitory, with its long rows of
narrow white cots. The child felt utterly help-
less to speak a word of comfort, although she
was so sorry for the poor lonely old creature
that she began to cry softly to herself. She
leaned over, and taking one of the thin, blue-
veined hands in hers, patted it tenderly with
her plump little fingers.

«] ought not to complain,” said the tremb-
ling voice, still broken by sobs. “We have food
and shelter and sunshine and the sisters. Ah,
that little Sister Denisa, she is indeed a smile
of God to us all. But at seventy-three one
wants more than a cup of coffee and a clean
136 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

handkerchief. One wants something besides a
bed and being just Number Thirty-one among
two hundred other paupers.”’

“Tam so sorry!” exclaimed Joyce, with such
heartfelt earnestness that the sobbing woman
felt the warmth of her sympathy, and looked
up with a brighter face.

“Talk to me,” she exclaimed. ‘It has been
so long since I have heard your language.”

While she obeyed Joyce kept thinking of her
Grandmother Ware. She could see her out,
doors among her flowers, the dahlias and touch-
me-nots, the four-o’clocks and the cinnamon
roses, taking such pride and pleasure in her
sweet posy beds. She could see her beside the
little table on the shady porch, making tea for
some old neighbor who had dropped in to
spend the afternoon with her. Or she was
asleep in her armchair by the western window,
her Bible in her lap and a smile on her
sweet, kindly face. How dreary and empty the
days must seem to poor old Number Thirty-
one, with none of these things to brighten
them.

Joyce could scarcely keep the tears out of
her voice while she talked. Later, when Sister
OLD “NUMBER THIRTY - ONE.” 137

Denisa came back, Joyce was softly humming a
lullaby, and Number Thirty-one, with a smile
on her pitiful old face, was sleeping like a little
child.

“You will come again, dear mademoiselle,”’
said Sister Denisa, as she kissed the child
good-by at the door. “You have brought a
blessing, may you carry one away as well!”

Joyce looked inquiringly at madame. “You
may come whenever you like,” was the answer.
“Marie can bring you whenever you are in
town.”

Joyce was so quiet on the way home that
madame feared the day had been too fatiguing
for her. “No,” said Joyce, soberly. “I was only
thinking about poor old Number Thirty-one.
I am sorrier for her than I was for Jules. I
used to think that there was nothing so sad
as being a little child without any father or
mother, and having to live in an asylum. I’ve
often thought how lovely it would be to go
around and find. a beautiful home for every
little orphan in the world. But I believe, now,
that it is worse to be old that way. Old peo-
ple can’t play together, and they haven’t any-
thing to look forward to, and it makes them so
138 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

miserable to remember all the things they have
had and lost. If I had enough money to adopt
anybody, I would adopt some poor old grand-
father or grandmother and make’m happy all
the rest of their days.”
CHAPTER. Vil:
CHRISTMAS PLANS AND AN ACCIDENT.

Tuat night, when Marie came in to light the
lamps and brush Joyce’s hair before dinner, she
had some news to tell.

«Brossard has been sent away.from the Ci-
seaux place,” she said. “A new man is com-
ing to-morrow, and my friend, Clotilde Robard,
‘ has already taken the position of housekeeper.
She says that a very different life has begun
for little Monsieur Jules, and that in his fine
new clothes one could never recognize the
little goatherd. He looks now like what he
- is, a gentleman’s son. He has the room next
to monsieur’s, all freshly furnished, and after
New Year a tutor is coming from Paris.

«But they say that it is pitiful to see how
greatly the child fears his uncle. He does not
understand the old man’s cold, forbidding man-
ner, and it provokes monsieur to have the

139
140 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

little one tremble and grow pale whenever he
speaks. Clotilde says that Madame Grévill¢
told monsieur that the boy needed games an¢
young companions to make him more like
other children, and he promised her that Mon ~
sieur Jules should come over here to-morrow
afternoon to play with you.”

“Oh, good!” criéd Joyce. “We'll have
another barbecue if the day is fine. I am so
glad that we do not have to be bothered any
more by those tiresome old goats.”

By the time the next afternoon arrived, how-
ever, Joyce was far too much interested in some-
thing else to think of a barbecue. Cousin Kate
had come back from Paris with a trunk full of
pretty things, and a plan for the coming Christ-
mas. At first she thought of taking only ma-
dame into her confidence, and preparing a small
Christmas tree for Joyce; but afterwards she
concluded that it would give the child more
pleasure if she were allowed to take part in the
preparations. It would keep her from being
homesick by giving her something else to think
about.

Then madame proposed inviting a few of
the little peasant children who had never seen
2
CHRISTMAS PLANS AND AN ACCIDENT. I4I

a Christmas tree. The more they discussed
the plan the larger it grew, like a rolling
snowball. By lunch-time madame had a list
of thirty children, who were to
be bidden to the Noél féte, and
Cousin Kate had decided to order
a tree tall enough to touch the
ceiling.

When Jules came over, awkward
and shy with the consciousness of
his new clothes, he found Joyce
sitting in the midst of yards of
gaily colored tarletan. It was
heaped up around her in bright
masses of purple and orange
and scarlet and green, and she
was making it into candy-bags
for the tree. -

In a few minutes Jules had
_ forgotten all about himself, and
was as busy as she, pinning the
little stocking-shaped patterns
in place, and carefully cutting out those fasci-
nating bags.

« You would be lots of help,” said Joyce, “if
you could come over every day, for there’s all


142 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

the ornaments to unpack, and the corn to shell,
and pop, and string. It will take most of my
time to dress the dolls, and there’s such a
short time to do everything in.”

«You never saw any pop-corn, did you,
Jules?” asked Cousin Kate. “When I was
here last time,-I couldn’t find it anywhere
in France; but the other day a friend told
me of a grocer in Paris, who imports it for
his American customers every winter. So
I went there. Joyce, suppose you get the
popper and show Jules what the corn is
like.”

Madame was interested also, as she watched
the little brown kernels shaken back and forth
in their wire cage over the glowing coals.
When they began popping open, the little
seeds suddenly turning into big white blossoms,
she sent Rosalie running to bring monsieur to
see the novel sight.

“We can eat and work at the same time,”
said Joyce, as she filled a dish with the corn,
and called Jules back to the table, where he
had been cutting tarletan. “There’s no time to
lose. See what a funny grain this is!” she
cried, picking up one that lay on the top of the
CHRISTMAS PLANS AND AN ACCIDENT. 143

dish. ‘It looks like Therese, the fishwoman,
in her white cap.”

«And here is a goat’s head,” said Jules,
picking up another grain. “And this one
looks like a fat pigeon.”

He had forgotten his shyness entirely now,
and was laughing and talking as easily as Jack
could have done.

“Jules,” said Joyce, suddenly, looking around
to see that the older people were too busy with
their own conversation to notice hers. “Jules,
why don’t you talk to your Uncle Martin the
way you do to me? He would like you lots
better if you would. Robard says that you get
pale and frightened every time he speaks to
you, and it provokes him for you to be so
timid.”

Jules dropped his eyes. “I cannot help it,”
he exclaimed. ‘He looks so grim and cross
that my voice just won’t come out of my throat
when I open my mouth.”

Joyce studied him critically, with her head
tipped a little to one side. ‘Well, I must
say,” she exclaimed, finally, “that, for a boy
born in America, you have the least dare about
you of anybody I ever saw. Your Uncle Mar-
144 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

tin isn’t any grimmer or crosser than a man I
know at home. There’s Judge Ward, so big
and solemn and dignified that everybody is
half way afraid of him. Even grown people
have always been particular about what they
said to him.

“Last summer his little nephew, Charley
Ward, came to visit him. Charley’s just a
little thing, still in dresses, and he calls his
uncle, Bill, Think of anybody daring to call
Judge Ward, Bil/! No matter what the judge
‘was doing, or how glum he looked, if Charley
took a notion, he would go up and stand in
front of him, and say, ‘Laugh, Bill, laugh!’ If
the judge happened to be reading, he’d have to
put down his book, and no matter whether he
felt funny or not, or whether there was any-
thing to laugh at or ‘not, he would have to
throw his head back and just roar. Charley
liked to see his fat sides shake, and his white
teeth shine. I’ve heard people say that the
judge likes Charley better than anybody else
in the world, because he’s the only person who
acts as if he wasn’t afraid of him.”

Jules sat still a minute, considering, and then
asked, anxiously, “ But what do you suppose
CHRISTMAS PLANS AND AN ACCIDENT. 145

would happen if I should say ‘Laugh, Martin,
laugh,’ to my uncle?”

Joyce shrugged her shoulders impatiently.
“Mercy, Jules, I did not mean that you should
act like a three-year-old baby. I meant that
you ought to talk up to your uncle some. Now
this is the way you are.’ She picked up a
kernel of the unpopped corn, and held it out
for.him to see. “You shut yourself up in a
little hard ball like this, so that your uncle
can’t get acquainted with you. How can he
know what is inside of your head if you always
shut up like a clam whenever he comes near
you? This is the way that you ought to be.”
She shot one of the great white grains towards
him with a deft flip of her thumb and finger.
« Be free and open with him.”

Jules put the tender morsel in his mouth
and ate it thoughtfully. “Tl try,” he prom-
ised, “if you really think that it would please
him, and I can think of anything to say. You
don’t know how I dread going to the table
when everything is always so still that we can
hear the clock tick.”

“Well, you take my advice,” said Joyce.
“Talk about anything. Tell him about our
146 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Thanksgiving feast and the Christmas tree, and
ask him if you can’t come over every day to
help. I wouldn’t let anybody think that I was
a coward.”

Joyce’s little lecture had a good effect, and
monsieur saw the wisdom of Madame Gréville’s
advice when Jules came to the table that night.
He had brought a handful of the wonderful
corn to show his uncle, and in the conversation
that it brought about he unconsciously showed
something else, —something of his sensitive
inner self that aroused his uncle’s interest.

Every afternoon of the week that followed
found Jules hurrying over to Madame Greéville’s
to help with the Christmas preparations. He
strung yards of corn, and measured out the
nuts and candy for each of the gay bags.
Twice he went in the carriage to Tours with
Cousin Kate and Joyce, to help buy presents
for the thirty little guests. He was jostled by
the holiday shoppers in crowded aisles. He
stood enraptured in front of wonderful show
windows, and he had the joy of choosing fifteen
things from piles of bright tin trumpets, drums,
jumping-jacks, and picture-books. Joyce chose
the presents for the girls.
CHRISTMAS PLANS AND AN ACCIDENT. 147

The tree was bought and set up in a large
unused room back of the library, and as soon
as each article was in readiness it was carried
in and laid on a table beside it. Jules used to
steal in sometimes and look at the tapers, the
beautiful colored glass balls, the gilt stars and
glittering tinsel, and wonder how the stately
cedar would look in all that array of loveliness.
Everything belonging to it seemed sacred,
even the unused scraps of bright tarletan and
the bits of broken candles. He would not let
Marie sweep them up to be burned, but gath-
ered them carefully into a box and carried
them home. There were several things that
he had rescued from her broom, — one of those
beautiful red balls, cracked on one side it is
true, but gleaming like a mammoth red cherry
on the other. There were scraps of tinsel and
odds and ends of ornaments that had been
broken or damaged by careless handling.
These he hid away in a chest in his room, as
carefully as a miser would have hoarded a bag
of gold.

Clotilde Robard, the housekeeper, wondered
why she found his candle burned so low several
mornings. She would have wondered still more
148 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

if she had gone into his room a while before
daybreak. He had awakened early, and, sitting
up in bed with the quilts wrapped around him,
spread the scraps of tarletan on his knees.
He was piecing together with his awkward
little fingers enough to make several tiny
bags.

Henri missed his spade one morning, and
hunted for it until he was out of patience. It
was nowhere to be seen. Half an hour later,
coming back to the house, he found it hanging
in its usual place, where he had looked for it a
dozen times at least. Jules had taken it down to
the woods to dig up a little cedar-tree, so little
that it was not over a foot high when it was
planted in a box.

Clotilde had to be taken into the secret, for
he could not hide it from her. “It is for my
Uncle Martin,” he said, timidly. “Do you
think he will like it?”

The motherly housekeeper looked at the
poor little tree, decked out in its scraps of
cast-off finery, and felt a sob rising in her
throat, but she held up her hands with many
admiring exclamations that made Jules glow
with pride.
iii =

UG







































“SITTING UP IN BED WITH THE QUILTS WRAPPED



















AROUND HIM,”
CHRISTMAS PLANS AND AN ACCIDENT. 151

“T have no beautiful white strings of pop-
corn to hang over it like wreaths of snow,” he
said, “so I am going down the lane for some
mistletoe that grows in one of the highest
trees. The berries are like lovely white wax
beads.”

“You are a good little lad,” said the house-
keeper, kindly, as she gave his head an affec-
tionate pat. “I shall have to make something
to hang on that tree myself; some gingerbread
figures, maybe. I used to know how to cut
out men and horses: and pigs, —nearly all
the animals. I must try it again some day
soon.”

A happy smile spread all over Jules’s face as
he thanked her. The words, “You are a good
little lad,” sent a warm glow of pleasure through
him, and rang like music in his ears all the way
down the lane. How bright the world looked
this frosty December morning! What cheeri-
ness there was in the ring of Henri’s axe as he
chopped away at the stove-wood! What friend-
liness in the baker’s whistle, as he rattled by in
his big cart! Jules found himself whistling, too,
for sheer gladness, and all because of no more
kindness than might have been thrown to a
152 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

dog; a pat on the head and the words, “ You
are a good little lad.”

Sometime after, it may have been two hours
or more, Madame Gréville was startled by a
wild, continuous ringing of the bell at her front
gate. Somebody was sending peal after peal
echoing through the garden, with quick, impa-
tient jerks of the bell-wire. She hurried out
herself to answer the summons.

Berthé had already shot back the bolt and
showed Clotilde leaning against the stone
post, holding her fat sides and completely ex-
hausted by her short run from the Ciseaux
house.

«Will madame send Gabriel for the doctor?”
she cried, gasping for breath at every word.
«The little Monsieur Jules has fallen from a
tree and is badly hurt. We do not know how
much, for he is still unconscious and his uncle
is away from home. Henri found him lying
under a tree with a big bunch of mistletoe in
his arms. He carried him up-stairs while I ran
over to ask you to send Gabriel quickly on a
horse for the doctor.”

“Gabriel shall go immediately,” said Madame
CHRISTMAS PLANS AND AN ACCIDENT. 153

Gréville, “and I shall follow you as soon as I
have given the order.”

Clotilde started back in as great haste as her
weight would allow, puffing and blowing and
wiping her eyes on her apron at every step.
Madame overtook her before she had gone
many rods. Always calm and self-possessed
in every emergency, madame took command
now; sent the weeping Clotilde to look for
old linen, Henri to the village for Monsieur
Ciseaux, and then turned her attention to Jules.

“To think,” said Clotilde, coming into the
room, “that the last thing the poor little lamb
did was to show me his Christmas tree that he
was making ready for his uncle!” She pointed
to the corner where it stood, decked by awk-
ward boyish hands in its pitiful collection of
scraps.

“Poor little fellow!’ said madame, with
tears in her own eyes. “He has done the
best he could. Put it in the closet, Clotilde.
Jules would not want it to be seen before
Christmas.”

Madame stayed until the doctor had made
his visit ; then the report that she carried home
was that Jules had regained consciousness, and
I54 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

that, as far as could be discovered, his only
injury was a broken leg.

Joyce took refuge in the pear-tree. It was
not alone because Jules was hurt that she
wanted to cry, but because they must have
the Noél féte without him. She knew how
bitterly he would be disappointed.
CHAPTER IX.
A GREAT DISCOVERY.

“ONLY two more nights till Christmas eve,
two more nights, two more nights,” sang Joyce
to Jules in a sort of chant. She was sitting
beside his bed with a box in her lap, full of
little dolls, which she was dressing. Every day
since his accident she had been allowed to make
him two visits, —one in the morning, and one
in the afternoon. They helped wonderfully in
shortening the long, tedious days for Jules.
True, Madame Gréville came often with
broths and jellies, Cousin Kate made flying
visits to leave rare hothouse grapes and big
bunches of violets; Clotilde hung over him
with motherly tenderness, and his uncle looked
into the room many times a day to see that he
wanted nothing.

Jules’s famished little heart drank in all this
unusual kindness and attention as greedily as

155
156 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

the parched earth drinks in the rain. Still, he
would have passed many a long, restless hour,
had it not been for Joyce’s visits.

She brought over a photograph of the house
at home, with the family seated in a group on
the front porch. Jules held it close while she
introduced each one of them. By the time he
had heard all about Holland’s getting lost the
day the circus came to town, and Jack’s taking
the prize in a skating contest, and Mary’s set-
ting her apron on fire, and the baby’s sweet
little ways when he said his prayers, or played
peek-a-boo, he felt very well acquainted with
the entire Ware family. Afterward, when
Joyce had gone, he felt his loneliness more
than ever. He lay there, trying to imagine how
it must feel to have a mother and sisters and
brothers all as fond of each other as Joyce’s
were, and to live in the midst of such good
times as always went on in the little brown
house.

Monsieur Ciseaux, sitting by his fire with the
door open between the two rooms, listened to
Joyce’s merry chatter with almost as much
interest as Jules. He would have been ashamed
to admit how eagerly he listened for her step on
A GREAT DISCOVERY. 157

the stairs every day, or what longings wakened
in his lonely old heart, when he sat by his love-
less fireside after she had gone home, and there
was no more sound of children’s voices in the
next room.

There had been good times in the old
Ciseaux house also, once, and two little
brothers and a sister had played in that very
room ; but they had grown up long ago, and
the ogre of selfishness and misunderstanding
had stolen in and killed all their happiness.
Ah, well, there was much that the world
would never know about that misunderstand-
ing. There was much to forgive and forget
on both sides.

Joyce had a different story for each visit.
To-day she had just finished telling Jules the
fairy tale of which he never tired, the tale of
the giant scissors.

«JT never look at those scissors over the
gate without thinking of you,” said Jules,
‘and the night when you played that I was
the Prince, and you came to rescue me.”

«“T wish I could play scissors again, and
rescue somebody else that I know,’ answered
Joyce. ~“ Td take poor old Number Thirty-one
158 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

away from the home of the Little Sisters of
the Poor.”

««What’s Number Thirty-one?” asked Jules.
«You never told me about that.”

‘Didn’t I?” asked Joyce, in surprise. “She
is a lonely old woman that the sisters take
-care of. I have talked about her so often,
and written home so much, that I thought I
had told everybody. I can hardly keep from
crying whenever I think of her. Marie and I
stop every day we go into town and take her
flowers. I have been there four times since _
my first visit with madame. Sometimes she
tells me things that happened when she was
a little girl here in France, but she talks to me
oftenest in English about the time when she
lived in America. I can hardly imagine that
she was ever as young as I am, and that she
romped with her brothers as I did with Jack.”

“Tell some of the things that she told
you,” urged Jules; so Joyce began repeating
all that she knew about Number Thirty-one.

It was a pathetic little tale that brought
tears to Jules’s eyes, and a dull pain to the
heart of the old man who listened in the
next room. “I wish I were rich,” exclaimed
A GREAT DISCOVERY. 159

Joyce, impulsively, as she finished. “I wish I
had a beautiful big home, and I would adopt

her for my grandmother. She should have
a great lovely room, where the sun shines in
all day long, and it should be furnished in rose-
color like the one that she had when she was a
girl. Id dress her in gray satin and soft white
lace. She has the prettiest silvery hair, and
beautiful dark eyes. She would make a lovely
grandmother. And I would have a maid to
wait on her, and there’d be mignonette always _
growing in boxes on the window-sill. Every
time I came back from town, I'd bring her a
present just for a nice little surprise; and I'd
read to her, and sing to her, and make her feel
that she belonged to somebody, so that she’d be
happy all the rest of her days.

“Yesterday while I was there she was holding
a little cut glass vinaigrette. It had a big D

engraved on the silver top. She said that it
was the only thing that she had left except her
wedding ring, and that it was to be Sister
Denisa’s when she was gone. The D stands
for both their names. Hers is Désiré. She
said the vinaigrette was too precious to part
with as long as she lives, because her oldest
I00 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

brother gave it to her on her twelfth birthday,
when she was exactly as old as I am. Isn't
Désiré a pretty name?”

«“ Mademoiselle,” called Monsieur Ciseaux
from the next room, “mademoiselle, will you
come — will you tell me — what name was that ?
Désiré, did you say?”

There was something so strange in the way
he called that name Désiré, almost like a cry,
that Joyce sprang up, startled, and ran into the
next room. She had never ventured inside
before.

«Tell me again what you were telling Jules,”
said the old man. “Seventy-three years, did
you say? And how long has she been back in
France?”

Joyce began to answer his rapid questions,
but stopped with a frightened cry as her glance
fell on a large portrait hanging over the mantel.
“ There she is!” she cried, excitedly dancing
up and down as she pointed to the portrait.
“There she is! That’s Number Thirty-one,
her very own self.”

« You are mistaken!” cried the old man,
attempting to rise from his chair, but trembling
so that he could scarcely pull himself up on his
) Ww \
9

ih be

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“¢THAT’S NUMBER THIRTY-ONE.’”
A GREAT DISCOVERY. 164

feet. “That is a picture of my mother, and
Désiré is dead; long dead.”

“ But it is evactly like Number Thirty-one, —
I mean Madame Désiré,” persisted Joyce.

Monsieur looked at her wildly from under
his shaggy brows, and then, turning away,
began to pace up and down the room. ‘JI had
a sister once,” he began. “She would have
been seventy-three this month, and her name
was Désiré.”

Joyce stood motionless in the middle of the
room, wondering what was coming next. Sud-
denly turning with a violence that made her
start, he cried, ‘No, I never can forgive! She
has been dead to me nearly a lifetime. Why
did you tell me this, child? Out of my sight!
What is it to me if she is homeless and alone?
Goltr. Gol.

He waved his hands so wildly in motioning
her away, that Joyce ran out of the room and
banged the door behind her.

“What do you suppose is the matter with
him?” asked Jules, in a frightened whisper, as
they listened to his heavy tread, back and forth,
back and forth, in the next room.

Joyce shook her head. “I don’t know for
164 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

sure,” she answered, hesitatingly, “but I be.
lieve that he is going crazy.”

Jules’s eyes opened so wide that Joyce wished
she had not frightened him. “Oh, you know
that I didn’t mean it,’”’ she said, reassuringly.
The heavy tread stopped, and the children
looked at each other.

« What can he be doing now?” Jules asked,
anxiously.

Joyce tiptoed across the room, and peeped
through the keyhole. “He is sitting down
now, by.the table, with his head on his arms.
He looks as if he might be crying about some.
thing.”

«I wish he didn’t feel bad,” said Jules, with
a swift rush of pity. “He has been so good
to me ever since he sent Brossard away. Some-
times I think that he must feel as much alone
in the world as I do, because all his family are
dead, too. Before I broke my leg I was making
him a little Christmas tree, so that he need not
feel left out when we had the big one. I was
getting mistletoe for it when I fell. I can’t
finish it now, but there’s five pieces of candle on
it, and I'll get Clotilde to light them while the
féte is going on, so that I’ll not miss the big
A GREAT DISCOVERY. 165

tree so much. Oh, nobody knows how much I
want to go to that féte! Sometimes it seems
more than I can bear to have to stay away.”

“Where is your tree?” asked Joyce. “ May
I see it?”

Jules pointed to the closet. “It’s in there,”
he said, proudly. “I trimmed it with pieces
that Marie swept up to burn. Oh, shut the
door! Quick!” he cried, excitedly, as a step
was heard in the hall. “I don’t want anybody
to see it before the time comes.”

The step was Henri’s. He had come to say
that Marie was waiting to take mademoiselle
home. Joyce was glad of the interruption.
She could not say anything in praise of the
poor little tree, and she knew that Jules ex-
pected her to. She felt relieved that Henri’s
presence made it impossible for her to express
any opinion.

She bade Jules good-by gaily, but went home
with such a sober little face that Cousin Kate
began to question her about her visit. Madame,
sitting by the window with her embroidery-
frame, heard the account also. Several times
she looked significantly across at Cousin Kate,
over the child’s head.
166 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

“Joyce,” said Cousin Kate, “you have had so
little outdoor exercise since Jules’s accident that
it would be a good thing for you to run around
in the garden awhile before dark.”

Joyce had not seen madame’s
glances, but she felt vaguely that
Cousin Kate was making an ex-
cuse to get rid of her. She was
disappointed, for she thought that
her account of monsieur’s queer
actions and Jules’s little tree would
have made a greater impression
on her audience. She went out
obediently, walking up and down
the paths with her hands in her
jacket pockets, and
her red tam-o’shanter
pulled down over her
eyes. The big white
cat followed her, ran
on ahead, and then
stopped, arching its
back as if waiting for her to stroke it. Taking
no notice of it, Joyce turned aside to the
pear-tree and climbed up among the highest
branches.












A GREAT DISCOVERY. 1607

The cat rubbed against the tree, mewing and
purring by turns, then sprang up in the tree
after her. She took the warm, furry creature
in her arms and began talking to it.

“Oh, Solomon,” she said, “what do you
suppose is the matter over there? My poor
old lady must be monsieur’s sister, or she
couldn’t have looked exactly like that picture,
and he would not have acted so queerly. What
do you suppose it is that he can never forgive ?
Why did he call me in there and then drive me
out in such a crazy way, and tramp around the
room, and put his head down on his arms as if
he were crying?”

Solomon purred louder and closed his eyes.

“Oh, you dear, comfortable old thing,”
exclaimed Joyce, giving the cat a shake.
«Wake up and take some interest in what I
am saying. I wish you were as smart as Puss
in Boots; then maybe you could find out what
is the matter. How I wish fairy tales could be
true! I'd say ‘Giant scissors, right the wrong
and open the gate that’s been shut so long.’
There! Did you hear that, Solomon Gréville?
{ said a rhyme right off without waiting to
make it up. Then the scissors would leap
168 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

down and cut the misunderstanding or trouble
or whatever it is, and the gate would fly open,
and there the brother and sister would meet
each other. All the unhappy years would be
forgotten, and they’d take each other by the
hand, just as they did when they were little
children, Martin and Désiré, and go into the
old home together,—on Christmas Day, in
the morning.”

Joyce was half singing her words now, as
she rocked the cat back and forth in her arms.
“ And then the scissors would bring Jules a
magnificent big tree, and he’d never be afraid
of his uncle any more. Oh, they’d all have
such a happy time on Christmas Day, in the
morning !”

Joyce had fully expected to be homesick
all during the holidays; but now she was so
absorbed in other people’s troubles, and her
day-dreams to make everybody happy, that
she forgot all about herself. She fairly bub-
bled over with the peace and good-will of the
approaching Christmas-tide, and rocked the cat
back and forth in the pear-tree to the tune of a
happy old-time carol.

A star or two twinkled out through the
“A GREAT DISCOVERY. 169

gloaming, and, looking up beyond them through
the infinite stretches of space, Joyce thought
of a verse that she and Jack had once learned
together, one rainy Sunday at her Grandmother
Ware’s, sitting on a little stool at the old lady’s
feet :

«Behold thou hast made the heaven and the
earth by thy great power and outstretched
arm, and ‘there is nothing too hard for thee.’
Her heart gave a bound at the thought. Why
should she be sitting there longing for fairy
tales to be true, when the great Hand that had
set the stars to swinging could bring anything
to pass; could even open that long-closed gate
and bring the brother and sister together again,
and send happiness to little Jules ?

Joyce lifted her eyes again and looked up,
out past the stars. “Oh, if you please, God,”
she whispered, “for the little Christ-child’s
sake.”

When Joyce went back to the house, Cousin
Kate sat in the drawing-room alone. Madame
had gone over to see Jules, and did not return
until long after dark. Berthé had been in
three times to ask monsieur if dinner should
be served, before they heard her ring at the
170 ‘FHE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

gate. When she finally came, there was such
an air of mystery about her that Joyce was
puzzled. All that next morning, too, the day
before Christmas, it seemed to Joyce as if
something unusual were afloat. Everybody in
the house was acting strangely.

Madame and Cousin Kate did not come
home to lunch. She had been told that she
must not go to see Jules until afternoon, and
the doors of the room where the Christmas
tree was kept had all been carefully locked.
She thought that the morning never would
pass. It was nearly three o’clock when she
started over to see Jules. To her great sur-
prise, as she ran lightly up the stairs to his
room, she saw her Cousin Kate hurrying across
the upper hall, with a pile of rose-colored silk
curtains in her arms.

Jules tried to raise himself up in bed as
Joyce entered, forgetting all about his broken
leg in his eagerness to tell the news. “Oh,
what do you think!” he cried. “They said
that I might be the one to tell you. She zs
Uncle Martin’s sister, the old woman you told
about yesterday, and he is going to bring her
home to-morrow.”
A GREAT DISCOVERY. 171

Joyce sank into a chair with a little gasp at
the suddenness of his news. She had not ex-
pected this beautiful ending of her day-dreams
to be brought about so soon, although she had
hoped that it would be sometime.

“ How did it all happen?” she cried, with a
beaming face. “Tell me about it! Quick!”

«Yesterday afternoon madame came over
soon after you left. She gave me my wine
jelly, and then went into Uncle Martin’s room,
and talked and talked for the longest time.
After she had gone he did not eat any dinner,
and I think that he must have sat up all night,
for I heard him walking around every time that
I waked up. Very early this morning, madame
came back again, and M. Gréville was with her.
They drove with Uncle Martin to the Little
Sisters of the Poor. I don’t know what hap-
pened out there, only that Aunt Désiré is to
be brought home to-morrow.

“Your Cousin Kate was with them when
they came back, and they had brought all sorts
of things with them from Tours. She is in
there now, making Aunt Désiré’s room look
like it did when she was a girl.”

“Oh, isn’t it lovely!” exclaimed Joyce. “It
172 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

is better than all the fairy tales that I have ever
read or heard, — almost too good to be true!”
Just then Cousin Kate called her, and she ran
across the hall. Standing in the doorway, she
looked all around the freshly furnished room,
that glowed with the same soft, warm pink
that colors the heart of a shell.

“ How beautiful!” cried Joyce, glancing from
the rose on the dressing-table to the soft cur-
tains of the windows, which all opened towards

the morning sun. “What a change it will be
from that big bare dormitory with its rows of
narrow little cots.” She tiptoed around the

room, admiring everything, and smiling over
the happiness in store for poor old Number
Thirty-one, when she should find herself in
the midst of such loveliness.

Joyce’s cup of pleasure was so full, that it
brimmed over when they turned to leave the
room. Cousin Kate slipped an arm around
her, and kissed her softly on the forehead.

“You dear little fairy tale lover,” she said.
“Do you know that it is because of you that
this desert has blossomed? If you had never
made all those visits to the Little Sisters of the
Poor, and had never won old Madame Désiré’s
A GREAT DISCOVERY. 173

love and confidence by your sympathy, if you
had never told Jules the story of the giant
scissors, and wished so loud that you could fly
to her rescue, old monsieur would never have
known that his sister is living. Even then, I
doubt if he would have taken this step, and
brought her back home to live, if your stories
of your mother and the children had not
brought his own childhood back to him. He
said that he used to sit there hour after hour,
and hear you talk of your life at home, until
some of its warmth and love crept into his own
frozen old heart, and thawed out its selfishness
and pride.”

Joyce lifted her radiant face, and looked to-
wards the half opened window, as she caught
the sound of chimes. Across the Loire came
the deep-toned voice of a cathedral bell, ringing
for vespers.

«“ Listen!’ she cried. ‘Peace on earth, —
good-will—oh, Cousin Kate! It really does
seem to say it! My Christmas has begun the
day before.”
CHAPTER X.
CHRISTMAS.

Lone before the Christmas dawn was bright’
enough to bring the blue parrots into plain
view on the walls of Joyce’s room, she had
climbed out of bed to look for her “messages
from Noél.” The night before, following the
old French custom, she had set her little
slippers just outside the threshold. Now, can-
dle in hand, she softly slipped to the door and
peeped out into the hall. Her first eager glance
showed that they were full.

Climbing back into her warm bed, she put
the candle on the table beside it, and began
emptying the slippers. They were filled with
bonbons and all sorts of little trifles, such as
she and Jules had admired in the gay shop
windows. On the top of one madame had laid
a slender silver pencil, and monsieur a pretty
purse. In the other was a pair of little wooden
shoes, fashioned like the ones that Jules had

174
CHRISTMAS. 175

worn when she first knew him. They were
only half as long as her thumb, and wrapped in
a paper on which was written that Jules him-
self had whittled them out for her, with Henri’s
help and instructions.

«What little darlings!” exclaimed Joyce.
«J hope he will think as much of the scrap-
book that I made for him as I do of these. I
know that he will be pleased with the big micro-
scope that Cousin Kate bought for him.”

She spread all the things out on the table,
and gave the slippers a final shake. A red
morocco case, no larger than half a dollar, fell
out of the toe of one of them. Inside the case
was a tiny buttonhole watch, with its wee
hands pointing to six o’clock. It was the
smallest watch that Joyce had ever seen,
Cousin Kate’s gift. Joyce could hardly keep
back a little squeal of delight. She wanted to
wake up everybody on the place and show it.
Then she wished that she could be back in the
brown house, showing it to her mother and the
children. For a moment, as she thought of
them, sharing the pleasure of their Christmas
stockings without her, a great wave of home-
sickness swept over her, and she lay back on
176 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

the pillow with that miserable, far-away feeling
that, of all things, makes one most desolate.

Then she heard the rapid “tick, tick, tick,

tick,” of the little watch, and was comforted.
She had not realized before that time could go
so fast. Now thirty seconds were gone; then
sixty. At this rate it could not be such a very
long time before they would be packing their
trunks to start home; so Joyce concluded not
to make herself unhappy by longing for the
family, but to get as much pleasure as possible
out of this strange Christmas abroad.
That little watch seemed to make the morn-
ing fly. She looked at it at least twenty times
an hour. She had shown it to every one in
the house, and was wishing that she could take
it over to Jules for him to see, when Monsieur
Ciseaux’s carriage stopped at the gate. He
was on his way to the Little Sisters of the
Poor, and had come to ask Joyce to drive with
him to bring his sister home.

He handed her into the carriage as if she
had been a duchess, and then seemed to forget
that she was beside him; for nothing was said
all the way. As the horses spun along the
road in the keen morning air, the old man was
CHRISTMAS. 177

busy with his memories, his head dropped for-
ward on his breast. The child watched him,
entering into this little drama as sympatheti-
cally as if she herself were the forlorn old
woman, and this silent, white-haired man at
her side were Jack.

Sister Denisa came running out to meet
them, her face shining and her eyes glisten-
ing with tears. “It is for joy that I weep,”
she exclaimed, “ that poor madame should have
come to her own again. See the change that
has already been made in her by the blessed
news.”

Joyce looked down the corridor as monsieur
hurried forward to meet the old lady coming
towards them, and to offer his arm. Hope had
straightened the bowed figure; joy had put
lustre into her dark eyes and strength into her
weak frame. She walked with such proud
stateliness that the other inmates of the home
looked up at her in surprise as she passed.
She was no more like the tearful, broken-
spirited woman who had lived among them so
long, than her threadbare dress was like the
elegant mantle which monsieur had brought to
fold around her.
178 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Joyce had brought a handful of roses to
Sister Denisa, who caught them up with a cry
of pleasure, and held them against her face as
if they carried with them some sweetness of
another world.

Madame came up then, and, taking the nun in
her arms, tried to thank her for all that she had
done, but could find no words for a gratitude so
deep, and turned away, sobbing.

They said good-by to Sister Denisa, — brave
Little Sister of the Poor, whose only joy was
the pleasure of unselfish service; who had no
time to even stand at the gate and be a glad
witness of other people’s Christmas happiness,
but must hurry back to her morning task of
dealing out coffee and clean handkerchiefs to
two hundred old paupers. No, there were only
a hundred and ninety-nine now. Down the
streets, across the Loire, into the old village
and out again, along the wide Paris road, one
of them was going home.

The carriage turned and went for a little
space between brown fields and closely clipped
hedgerows, and then madame saw the windows
of her old home flashing back the morning
sunlight over the high stone wall. Again the
CHRISTMAS. 179

carriage turned, into the lane this time, and
now the sunlight was caught up by the scissors
over the gate, and thrown dazzlingly down into
their faces.

Monsieur smiled as he looked at Joyce, a
tender, gentle smile that one would have sup-
posed never could have been seen on those
harsh lips. She was almost standing up in
the carriage, in her excitement.

«Oh, it has come true!” she cried, clasping
her hands together. “The gates are really
opening at last!”

Yes, the Ogre, whatever may have been its
name, no longer lived. Its spell was broken,
for now the giant scissors no longer barred
the way. Slowly the great gate swung open,
and the carriage passed through. Joyce sprang
out and ran on ahead to open the door. Hand
in hand, just as when they were little children,
Martin and Désiré, this white-haired brother
and sister went back to the old home together ;
and it was Christmas Day, in the morning.

At five o'clock that evening the sound of
Gabriel’s accordeon went echoing up and
down the garden, and thirty little children
180 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.



were marching to its music along the paths,
between the rows of blooming laurel. Joyce
understood, now, why the room where the
Christmas tree stood had been kept so care-
fully locked. For two days that room had
been empty and the tree had been standing
in Monsieur Ciseaux’s parlor. Cousin Kate
and madame and Berthé and Marie and
Gabriel had all been over there, busily at
work, and neither she nor Jules had suspected
what was going on down-stairs.

Now she marched with the others, out of
the garden and across the road, keeping time
to the music of the wheezy old accordeon that
Gabriel played so proudly. Surely every soul,
in all that long procession filing through the
gate of the giant scissors, belonged to the
CHRISTMAS. 181



kingdom of loving hearts and gentle hands ;
for they were all children who passed through,
or else mothers who carried in their arms the
little ones who, but for these faithful arms,
must have missed this Neél féte.

Jules had been carried down-stairs and laid
on a couch in the corner of the room where he
could see the tree to its best advantage. Beside
him sat his great-aunt, Désiré, dressed in a
satin gown of silvery gray that had been her
mother’s, and looking as if she had just stepped
out from the frame of the portrait up-stairs.
She held Jules’s hand in hers, as if with it she
grasped the other Jules, the little brother of
the olden days for whom this child had been
named. And she told him stories of his grand-
father and his father. Then Jules found that
182 THE GATE OF THE GJANT SCISSORS.

this Aunt Désiré had known his mother; had
once sat on the vine-covered porch while he
ran after fireflies on the lawn in his little white
dress; had heard the song the voice still sang
to him in his dreams:

“ Till the stars and the angels come to keep
Their watch where my baby lies fast asleep.”

When she told him this, with her hand
stroking his and folding it tight with many
tender little claspings, he felt that he -had
found a part of his old home, too, as well as
Aunt Désiré.

One by one the tapers began to glow on the
great tree, and when it was all ablaze the doors
were opened for the children to flock in. They
stood about the room, bewildered at first, for
not one of them had ever seen such a sight
before; a tree that glittered and sparkled and
shone, that bore stars and rainbows and snow
wreaths and gay toys. At first they only drew
deep, wondering breaths, and looked at each
other with shining eyes. It was all so beau-
tiful and so strange.

Joyce flew here and there, helping to dis-
tribute the gifts, feeling her heart grow warmer
CHRISTMAS. 183

and warmer as she watched the happy children.
“My little daughter never had anything like
that in all her life,” said one grateful mother
as Joyce laid a doll in the child’s outstretched
arms. “ She’ll never forget this to her dying day,
nor will any of us, dear mademoiselle! We knew
not what it was to have so beautiful a Noél!”

When the last toy had been stripped from
the branches, it was Cousin Kate’s turr tc be
surprised. At a signal from madame, the chil-
dren began circling around the tree, singing a
song that the sisters at the village school had
taught them for the occasion. It was a happy
little song about the green pine-tree, king of all
trees and monarch of the woods, because of
the crown he yearly wears at Noél. At the
close every child came up to madame and
Cousin Kate and Joyce, to say “Thank you,
madame,” and “Good night,” in the politest
way possible.

Gabriel’s accordeon led them out again, and
the music, growing fainter and fainter, died
away in the distance; but in every heart that
heard it had been born a memory whose music
could never be lost, —the memory of one happy
Christmas,
184 THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS.

Joyce drew a long breath when it was
all over, and, with her arm around Madame
Désiré’s shoulder, smiled down at Jules.

“How beautifully it has all ended!” she
exclaimed. “I am sorry that we have come
to the place to say ‘and they all lived happily
ever after,’ for that means that it is time to
shut the book.”

“Dear heart,’ murmured Madame Désiré,
drawing the child closer to her, “it means
that a far sweeter story is just beginning,
and it is you who have opened the book
for me.”

Joyce flushed with pleasure, saying, “I
thought this Christmas would be so lonely;
but it has been the happiest of my life.”

«And mine, too,” said Monsieur Ciseaux
from the other side of Jules’s couch. He
took the little fellows hand in his. “They
told me about the tree that you prepared for
me. -I have been up to look at it, and now I
have come to thank you.” To the surprise of
every one in the room, monsieur bent over and
kissed the flushed little face on the pillow.
Jules reached up, and, putting his arms around
his uncle’s neck, laid his cheek a moment
















SO SS reer,

“HE TOOK THE LITTLE FELLOW’S HAND IN HIS.”
CHRISTMAS. 187

against the face of his stern old kinsman.
Not a word was said, but in that silent
caress every barrier of coldness and reserve
was forever broken down between them. So
the little Prince came into his kingdom, — the
kingdom of love and real home happiness.

It is summer now, and far away in the little
brown house across the seas Joyce thinks of
her happy winter in France and the friends
that she found through the gate of the giant
scissors. And still those scissors hang over
the gate, and may be seen to this day, by any
one who takes the trouble to walk up the hill
from the little village that lies just across the
river Loire, from the old town of Tours.

THE END.
COSY CORNER SERIES

It is the intention of the publishers that this series shall
contain only the very highest and purest literature, —
stories that shall not only appeal to the children them.
selves, but be appreciated by all those who feel with
them in their joys and sorrows.

The numerous illustrations in each book are by well-
known artists, and each volume has a separate attract-
ive cover design.

Each, 1 vol., 16mo, cloth . a : 3 . $0.50
Ly ANNIE FELLOWS JOHNSTON

The Little Colonel. (trade Mark.

The scene of this story is laid in Kentucky. Its
heroine is a small girl, who is known as the Little
Colonel, on account of her fancied resemblance to an
old-school Southern gentleman, whose fine estate and
old family are famous in the region, This old Colonel
proves to be tke grandfather of the child.

The Giant Scissors,

This is the story of Joyce and of her adventures in
France, —the wonderful house with the gate of The
Giant Scissors, Jules, her little playmate, Sister Denisa,
the cruel Brossard, and her dear Aunt Kate. Joyce is
a great friend of the Little Colonel, and in later volumes
shares with her the delightful experiences of the « House
Party” and the “ Holidays.”

Two Little Knights of Kentucky,

Wuo WERE THE LitrLE COLONEL’s NEIGHBORS.

In this volume the Little Colonel returns to us like an
old friend, but with added grace and charm. She is
not, however, the central figure of the story, that place
being taken by the “ two little knights.”
2 L. C. PAGE AND COMPANY'S



By ANNIE FELLOWS JOHNSTON (Continued)

Cicely and Other Stories for Girls.

The readers of Mrs. Johnston’s charming juveniles
will be glad to learn of the issue of this volume for
young people, written in the author’s sympathetic and
entertaining manner.

Aunt ’Liza’s Hero and Other Stories.

A collection of six bright little stories, which will
appeal to all boys and most girls.

Big Brother.

A story of two boys. The devotion and care of
Steven, himself a small boy, for his baby brother, is the
theme of the simple tale, the pathos and beauty of which
has appealed to so many thousands.

Ole Mammy’s Torment.

“Ole Mammy’s Torment” has been fitly called “a
classic of Southern life.” It relates the haps and mis-
haps of a small negro lad, and tells how he was led by
love and kindness to a knowledge of the right.

The Story of Dago.

In this story Mrs. Johnston relates the story of Dago,
a pet monkey, owned jointly by two brothers. Dago
tells his own story, and the account of his haps and mis-
haps is both interesting and amusing.

The Quilt That Jack Built.

A pleasant little story of a boy’s labor of love, and
how it changed the course of his life many years after
it was accomplished. Told in Mrs. Johnston’s usual
vein of quaint charm and genuine sincerity.
COSY CORNER SERIES 3



By EDITH ROBINSON
A Little Puritan’s First Christmas.

A story of Colonial times in Boston, telling hoy
Christmas was invented by Betty Sewall, a typical child
of the Puritans, aided by her brother Sam.

A Little Daughter of Liberty.

The author’s motive for this story is well indicated by
a quotation from her introduction, as follows :

“One ride is memorable in the early history of the
American Revolution, the well-known ride of Paul
Revere. Equally deserving of commendation is another
ride, — untold in verse or story, its records preserved
only in family papers or shadowy legend, the ride of
Anthony Severn was no less historic in its action or
memorable in its consequences.”

A Loyal Little Maid.

A delightful and interesting story of Revolutionary
days, in which the child heroine, Betsey Schuyler,
renders important services to George Washington.

A Little Puritan Rebel.

Like Miss Robinson’s successful story of “A Loyal
Little Maid,” this is another historical tale of a real girl,
during the time when the gallant Sir Harry Vane was
governor of Massachusetts.

A Little Puritan Pioneer.

The scene of this story is laid in the Puritan settle-
ment at Charlestown. The little girl heroine adds
another to the list of favorites so well known to the
young people.

A Little Puritan Bound Girl.

A story of Boston in Puritan days, which is of great
interest to youthful readers.
4 L. C. PAGE AND COMPANY'S
By OUIDA (Louise de la Ramée)

A Dog of Flanders: A Curistmas Story.
Too well and favorably known to require description.

The Niirnberg Stove.
This beautiful story has never before been published
at a popular price.

A Provence Rose.
A story perfect in sweetness and in grace.

Findelkind.

A charming story about a little Swiss herdsman.

By MISS MULOCK
‘The Little Lame Prince.

A delightful story of a little boy who has many adven-
tures by means of the magic gifts of his fairy godmother.

Adventures of a Brownie.

The story of a household elf who torments the cook
and gardener, but is a constant joy and delight to the
children who love and trust him.

His Little Mother.

Miss Mulock’s short stories for children are a constant
source of delight to them, and “ His Little Mother,” in
this new and attractive dress, will be welcomed by hosts
of youthful readers.

Little Sunshine’s Holiday.

An attractive story of a summer outing. ‘ Little Sun-
shine” is another of those beautiful child-characters for
which Miss Mulock is so justly famous.
ic
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'2011-12-21T08:45:34-05:00'
describe
'134' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNQU' 'sip-files00045.txt'
e4c80a785fbd734487ea739c6c3c1265
25918feb0fa94c26ae74f61aba35070ebb357f21
'2011-12-21T08:50:22-05:00'
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNQV' 'sip-files00047.txt'
c09e96e0368f97bd12b0d166f2cfbc0e
fa1377846e2ff05b06ab5d1a6bc2c503e6c668eb
'2011-12-21T08:45:39-05:00'
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNQW' 'sip-files00048.txt'
b34741a212f80a3270a35c29be0079a6
29158f712bcd5ad4dfd6b46eb510e69323d9aa47
'2011-12-21T08:47:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNQX' 'sip-files00049.txt'
fd2e734277a7f70ddbe482c2d549b1aa
773f629fb9fce344bb8a251af7a002ea49b7cfc4
'2011-12-21T08:46:30-05:00'
describe
'587' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNQY' 'sip-files00050.txt'
9bd6c9c604dfeb84c5662416d3b5ced5
1013f9b9b1d77ea9b75216a0e137135f95315883
'2011-12-21T08:45:57-05:00'
describe
'884' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNQZ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
b4ab330dac3572ecf77f2f5451566c55
fe536b5d4b877da5119b03bcd6b66ff1a1159542
'2011-12-21T08:51:05-05:00'
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRA' 'sip-files00052.txt'
cb31bf008c3b9a1e00167bd338cc9879
c0d6785efa4614d560281ac12e9654c9a49f1eb9
'2011-12-21T08:52:08-05:00'
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRB' 'sip-files00053.txt'
9dfcf269f1eb78465914e52506ca1b63
faaa8b9a18c9f65e5c231905dfc09f2e85217e71
'2011-12-21T08:50:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRC' 'sip-files00054.txt'
dd58174b863ce50b597c5a5df9149da0
22c3c3842259fc1eeca0b420eb62bd30a1efc8c7
'2011-12-21T08:51:47-05:00'
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRD' 'sip-files00055.txt'
2bc06c3f800e78de4700f51c1fc44ff0
679eb53f110ff2918c4b20cdf87f19e69681610e
'2011-12-21T08:48:29-05:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRE' 'sip-files00056.txt'
db99ae1565bbea6093d82dc52834b984
6911ec971ded9bc773c0670a5500c6e8cd579f0a
'2011-12-21T08:46:28-05:00'
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRF' 'sip-files00057.txt'
d047c11a4460ef01f6d9e77a1185e94c
90aaba5ac6a30def567805be0499895622b7abad
'2011-12-21T08:45:40-05:00'
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRG' 'sip-files00058.txt'
5e14a650878e43e9183457de51525546
959521d03c67cc568ca5454aeaa4745698db57e1
'2011-12-21T08:51:52-05:00'
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRH' 'sip-files00059.txt'
b0697b88d2887e2e9879ddbb9e9b86d2
0eec491e0397be227c7a017d3d86e625d4120e3f
'2011-12-21T08:46:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRI' 'sip-files00060.txt'
1af3fc8f48a42667267c41deafcbb089
b3c6ccdc357dd299af1cd42bbcf4b29f0090c8a9
'2011-12-21T08:49:37-05:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRJ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
413711e51b34ec8f0c6c9780d772989a
89c687fd0fc160d3808a166e95091d0bd3772b2e
'2011-12-21T08:46:46-05:00'
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRK' 'sip-files00062.txt'
af5df0ae708c3f62755f05e76a54c427
7eec9d27ddb4ec80d6faaf48aa7f10deb2ce47f0
'2011-12-21T08:49:10-05:00'
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRL' 'sip-files00063.txt'
4128b6159415de2abd4f6f4c4deb54aa
b7601e21fc67508e50e27fa552ed5475abe28061
'2011-12-21T08:48:59-05:00'
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRM' 'sip-files00064.txt'
aec0086f2664117fe7d4887d7f55721a
cf31bb3dddc218130c147465d532ff567cd77114
'2011-12-21T08:45:51-05:00'
describe
'366' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRN' 'sip-files00065.txt'
a86ac71d5333d6bfa94eb81cbe6d7a90
803a7c788441890b2c756ba5237257672d1ee712
'2011-12-21T08:47:59-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1191' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRO' 'sip-files00067.txt'
b959b7317b94ff5038cb199a5d5ff60b
0fd41cd2544b7e1c7b4104c9288fabdc478d7f68
'2011-12-21T08:52:21-05:00'
describe
'432' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRP' 'sip-files00068.txt'
ff32dfccd239d070772ac9e1111a546b
7986860e952d78adaf06d6959079807db6f69ce0
'2011-12-21T08:48:13-05:00'
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRQ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
eac594b6a11e1c396412d3a95a2f3d77
3bc70268b9f3fdc87a0e760285ccc4c30418e2fd
'2011-12-21T08:46:52-05:00'
describe
'1687' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRR' 'sip-files00070.txt'
97ca8e871cbdc25b984cefd0b7a249d5
81a012eedf507fd6fd38ee585558b2b380b372e7
'2011-12-21T08:47:40-05:00'
describe
'146' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRS' 'sip-files00071.txt'
faf58e13cfac1f4277d6469a1f8daae8
fe28a110cc650fc9b2f29c3f99810be891b61e93
'2011-12-21T08:52:09-05:00'
describe
'1676' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRT' 'sip-files00073.txt'
ab40afb75a0b9ed492317c71533aba2d
9b3f999b901c2322b123e4d686286a8f0513cd00
'2011-12-21T08:51:55-05:00'
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRU' 'sip-files00074.txt'
80dbc22a6e21a5702671ab0d9637e422
c71b1d95151de6515ae8af7410ad09d992ac415c
'2011-12-21T08:46:05-05:00'
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRV' 'sip-files00075.txt'
694563901010b62559253e7a71e22c05
98056d7322edd80b1520a0322d4898943f462137
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRW' 'sip-files00076.txt'
395f0fc9ca93b27200a7c22c3a318821
81f9d1ba494bccdea64eb730427195c3d74592df
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRX' 'sip-files00077.txt'
504193d9b2644e7e83cc940628a47c53
0889b198d1233dd2db2cf05b58b27c8177bcded5
'2011-12-21T08:48:40-05:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRY' 'sip-files00078.txt'
2b0ae2a0501e704df5af0b2740663302
4bd7ed592e8c4555d244fee0621a7e3b14ae6172
'2011-12-21T08:48:41-05:00'
describe
'194' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNRZ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
f2e2ac77f07374675b0ccdd01933d192
df18082226c1c471d74acbb4e9087d7cb5b7149b
'2011-12-21T08:48:22-05:00'
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSA' 'sip-files00081.txt'
f028fbc9f3deb8e5b431ef230f4684ea
d67f0c04d29c6de250311f859a82c8c7cf0ffe56
'2011-12-21T08:45:46-05:00'
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSB' 'sip-files00082.txt'
4a7b3adf442f3ff7d7dc4a085ae2f541
a4dd8d3697a4b28a97920e792233912f983a2178
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSC' 'sip-files00083.txt'
191c5bb450108a800b1701d49972612f
1f407439c2f5c3d5d1bc22ea47a68846987862d8
'2011-12-21T08:51:51-05:00'
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSD' 'sip-files00084.txt'
8fe91de40fddd75d2e71c5bd0afd2fce
29b7d684bfcd5ae41bb178fb47c3974f92269b06
'2011-12-21T08:46:18-05:00'
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSE' 'sip-files00085.txt'
608bc631ef8df99eb7d3fd302cd066c2
4f2a5339f8cb1fef26c17f501fc4d54243f2efb3
'2011-12-21T08:48:15-05:00'
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSF' 'sip-files00086.txt'
083952e1dfc22137e8caeb60cd990dec
df63f48ea656edcf684d2f6fa3bb6e307ae4cd23
'2011-12-21T08:47:07-05:00'
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSG' 'sip-files00087.txt'
62cfd6e25108346c89d8044e288fa6b4
4c46fd2b199bb80208493c494e4e0520ff765140
'2011-12-21T08:48:30-05:00'
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSH' 'sip-files00088.txt'
cdbd1426bfd7cf329ff8a59b63452dbe
7a5d889dad7d1417c3022ca1bb268d07f6d7fecc
'2011-12-21T08:47:16-05:00'
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSI' 'sip-files00089.txt'
48e8d59785b577ffe1ccc8b3c2638e22
b711bcd01f04fd61841a858f48839454d8cacd21
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSJ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
b381b437569d8d193ded3e727bc72577
ec4e2b386d874261921239f4cfb4e0af1f03f309
'2011-12-21T08:46:26-05:00'
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSK' 'sip-files00091.txt'
8a5b552104a6b0e13ffe2c5cefdf2c29
589a0a61e97d27d74398ee73064928231fed81bb
'2011-12-21T08:51:13-05:00'
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSL' 'sip-files00092.txt'
128d4899d124e3e6c2a4375ad56e84d6
186ffcba4a0c80be4d71c54bbdc3683a9d47a851
'2011-12-21T08:51:14-05:00'
describe
'191' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSM' 'sip-files00093.txt'
6cc47c18167cf912059e895b0853dadb
701201c3d505166e893f6c93a6a83085063e9719
'2011-12-21T08:49:04-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1160' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSN' 'sip-files00095.txt'
26668108c8026a756a890925994b559f
6d385a40e0bf7d9f628bcb6eb10b58e2aa268ed4
'2011-12-21T08:49:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSO' 'sip-files00096.txt'
6dbb64b196be542aa86203759bc6ca15
aef6bac22231ad44e2f301ca4f3f483d54493433
'2011-12-21T08:47:29-05:00'
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSP' 'sip-files00097.txt'
41b65eae48f236bceb8ae70a73162283
33a78a21e0edb4d6aa9e594cb79d7f15b7aa7fe4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSQ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
79045ed022cbaa572d5af48d70bf7d43
962ff87b02a10620bb31f8e631ebc2b029651d13
'2011-12-21T08:49:31-05:00'
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSR' 'sip-files00099.txt'
1e779867baad5f34c29d06e39d76b099
76a3102cbc2f67bdd45810fb20227529d44c1c10
'2011-12-21T08:48:12-05:00'
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSS' 'sip-files00100.txt'
230aa91390a6fae145fe6e3f90953456
e634071a7831a3e7116c8b0da7535ec0f42c3053
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNST' 'sip-files00101.txt'
d7a0642ca7bc5acb75bf2737b8b63684
f2808d705072e39485e89cb0dffb2bc845cac8dc
'2011-12-21T08:46:15-05:00'
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
0d3a3a50fbc40b764393f6a3999e5819
6adc8b9b8c6c25da3b60ae8e98b19492008cd1de
'2011-12-21T08:49:45-05:00'
describe
'690' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSV' 'sip-files00103.txt'
db3e318744ff9817dd78653cfe2498be
7fc32bcbe0e140c397b6c6a19548c13a8f87da22
'2011-12-21T08:50:15-05:00'
describe
'917' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSW' 'sip-files00104.txt'
41d2c576c74a1f5d641e3ae18a83d549
67ec723b4b7b01d386eb4d36299efacaf223bd43
'2011-12-21T08:49:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSX' 'sip-files00105.txt'
ca78e43fa309117bcfa6dbaa9b7a1d5c
57c9c0b7c21bf85da2f3f2086e19774d4d24559a
'2011-12-21T08:46:33-05:00'
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSY' 'sip-files00106.txt'
9316b51e2119ef59fe3b5dc090ae9879
e082bd3444cfc04175933189d78897a371df9f09
'2011-12-21T08:45:54-05:00'
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNSZ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
e2025db23bcf4b4f82f6da3f628f4dc5
7c31ba9aa9631ada1b523151ca777a237043450c
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTA' 'sip-files00108.txt'
632ac587f05b399dfb710694d7b459e9
78d2e88d3af3b1e990f668cf9e27569a9fc32a05
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTB' 'sip-files00109.txt'
434a50a8ab2e0ba44821fd6048e89073
f158f1fa8da0a0ed41bf10e83e95298d93ca0976
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTC' 'sip-files00110.txt'
914416b0a8c3ac9dacfb4423567146b6
b9a0f61fd03643a5beecc55ff35e3d551fc840b2
'2011-12-21T08:47:09-05:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTD' 'sip-files00111.txt'
e179ccc5239550836650cffe93d94130
13d5dbef8f14ecbe72d2097512a11b8cf9999ecf
'2011-12-21T08:50:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTE' 'sip-files00112.txt'
b9be26c5c0fc497927d58d954b2b369f
d858d646a7390f30c76fc85499a4b496da244125
'2011-12-21T08:48:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTF' 'sip-files00113.txt'
114f2eb06d9ee296a9212e2db87cd9c3
0b15060a903622ed8da07167b1ea410e106c808e
'2011-12-21T08:48:54-05:00'
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTG' 'sip-files00114.txt'
b4540f91a271edda7455bb721ced2694
2297d69f088605257ad8c5b286a6c8395ccbcf8d
'2011-12-21T08:49:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTH' 'sip-files00115.txt'
886f0f75d81533106e4a7abc914d8711
7861e550ee239a2a43d9163552896f883cc2d458
'2011-12-21T08:45:48-05:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTI' 'sip-files00116.txt'
eaa5fa4f2e45799ed3fffa00fc96ff2d
c502e469f6e139a928de662225cb05433cc1029b
'2011-12-21T08:49:11-05:00'
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTJ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
ae939704ceb7269cbd82b0290e27a48e
1aa3cfccbf656254ea3e0c158d81080d784e9dd1
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTK' 'sip-files00118.txt'
38df8a96b3e0b939e18bc8d8afca6c57
0d3027e4527182bc4034b57fca1775ce72cc6b89
describe
'336' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTL' 'sip-files00119.txt'
92dc325faab26195de32b638a4304646
0317afefaa0a78d1041194ef6252626ef966b4a1
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTM' 'sip-files00121.txt'
e82901d9f44aadaa399c4affd5ca703a
6d2066bec9c060da67a2b501c3b4128ca07bbba8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTN' 'sip-files00122.txt'
42871bd88762c7ee00183e1f1d6146b7
0d203c9c92058cf94079a08a1416d5ecb0f28bf2
'2011-12-21T08:45:41-05:00'
describe
'254' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTO' 'sip-files00123.txt'
a84c5ea1032a62b9fb04990c8c615b45
ee6d0abdc218cd2e3802d922a148d738baea3440
'2011-12-21T08:50:54-05:00'
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTP' 'sip-files00124.txt'
971c8380e7792e715edf64c8e94bf805
ec820ead1e6edd2474734c6d2276d7697765ae54
'2011-12-21T08:51:23-05:00'
describe
'470' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTQ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
c8faa82eaa1a069a4c2e9792078ca7f4
f897d22b03d6ea6803082fd9e36e34a7a4060eb1
'2011-12-21T08:50:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTR' 'sip-files00126.txt'
fa9807d56a0640e641fb479d64d7ab49
6078110cae4b998f93dceadecb32de8a242b2200
'2011-12-21T08:48:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTS' 'sip-files00127.txt'
47026dc2b3c6404d4079ebb329046201
c2c5521c50033b2d8d35d9510d5acf1eda8e701a
'2011-12-21T08:47:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTT' 'sip-files00128.txt'
361219c5114ca0dadaf93b887bbd6926
e783009c17e330900263f8460e83ef0071adc767
'2011-12-21T08:48:57-05:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTU' 'sip-files00129.txt'
34eed5c6fbf3aea930f76fedbcc6deba
6567e70c17e25b3631ac151f9fddd5faf1ba70f4
'2011-12-21T08:48:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTV' 'sip-files00130.txt'
1b756a3cdfee2c0a0c1b153a675ccdca
dfe398cafa062427a6caf38db211e533483cfd34
'2011-12-21T08:49:23-05:00'
describe
'103' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTW' 'sip-files00131.txt'
43fd66680f2a5ee452f215aa5252c070
94c92912d48c2e973a4560be234bde89dbbd56be
'2011-12-21T08:46:14-05:00'
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTX' 'sip-files00133.txt'
c9730bb169322f6f9324c11788b0a29c
815665f76c5f780ca22d904215c352653e75418a
'2011-12-21T08:49:43-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTY' 'sip-files00134.txt'
748bdb8f3bc8778fe480a72dab71d804
17df0b1bc07d6ea20234bcefdd5061b3ddaa26fe
'2011-12-21T08:50:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNTZ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
4e3236d2739c771d350727dd7f2d5138
b5d7f69cda6d987d6c9151aa5c91175cf4ed1383
'2011-12-21T08:50:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUA' 'sip-files00136.txt'
4b6c42d3890f7ff35d8cb77394d884d7
3e7e1076532084643f45ceee0ca2be6c792a4d56
'2011-12-21T08:47:46-05:00'
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUB' 'sip-files00137.txt'
1564afad0a107b2228760e9462448bfa
137db54828abec4ca50c8025b035ec22a9ec00b7
'2011-12-21T08:50:53-05:00'
describe
'362' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUC' 'sip-files00138.txt'
a8be83b9f65c87b7f20e141d3da126a3
65dcbad106cf21513c3675dfaad996f9017ef21c
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUD' 'sip-files00139.txt'
487caa4fe7f82cf5469b8eda66af92f2
465469229a9f913379ad1dd2d5c2d393da239525
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUE' 'sip-files00140.txt'
cf60c10578ccdd972c1a3cfdd6867418
659b532a23ec2b11abf6de0ccccc9279a111073d
'2011-12-21T08:47:12-05:00'
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUF' 'sip-files00141.txt'
a1b6a29dfad19ff080964e22c5b92a73
a38a18275a815d73921ad7a2352d344d2f5c088b
'2011-12-21T08:52:26-05:00'
describe
'259' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUG' 'sip-files00142.txt'
fe404116ec6902896d20ec84ad5954c6
d0ec11e61c0aee36f4537770cfc7ab557c0522a3
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUH' 'sip-files00143.txt'
75f94dddb0b6f1bb9bc7fc93597865e3
3eead588caee2f701ec5d06f56dcc655ab2daeaa
'2011-12-21T08:50:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUI' 'sip-files00144.txt'
ae7303d191ed7f47d22a4e1f19473644
818f3b9f13172b7537ee4e1e40cb53afc6038adb
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUJ' 'sip-files00145.txt'
95522534576d3a53f6e761e0070589b9
0ca649e538d89ccb8a915ba10d359d90ac07d21a
'2011-12-21T08:47:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUK' 'sip-files00146.txt'
f0c0fc67b98ebe8576b492a51f962852
08823476e5c4b66af4ad54ed3e8bdcff01a91ce1
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUL' 'sip-files00147.txt'
d0fd115aefeae816c5dccc84a11b4f14
cc8b981638188b0f44f01283eec809b82ba79490
'2011-12-21T08:50:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUM' 'sip-files00148.txt'
0bfdeab8a6ffcc611b0a2a3c54044d61
9df62c7be43700877ea7ca76e2cc7456aa941025
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUN' 'sip-files00149.txt'
fe8734665b13eff693eae6bddb4a42b2
d3c8e4a7e68fa32cf8f28313750bf744b9db8fbd
'2011-12-21T08:50:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUO' 'sip-files00150.txt'
8a4ee69f2dacd42ac69534984c3c6e31
86bec3edf0e5da504b2ff9485d1bcc8eba28deeb
'2011-12-21T08:45:53-05:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUP' 'sip-files00151.txt'
6ea62d29a5fdf03251d04fa6939fc6d8
14f9eaa02f2ca29171b4cfec6dcbe008df692575
'2011-12-21T08:49:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUQ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
55d5579f2ad92641f3259e15822d31a5
ab65b2b50a54d741b957a3df7c8a3e8b7188ba3d
'2011-12-21T08:49:01-05:00'
describe
'186' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUR' 'sip-files00153.txt'
75a277abb6423ad035f7ef783ec83c85
a889532ddaf7a2c1b388350d80fb0bcd99502def
'2011-12-21T08:46:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUS' 'sip-files00155.txt'
1b19a9ef7bd4cae4b9a49c217a42ac3a
ec1e1791c5f977d517225b7a4a4b6df51c30e149
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUT' 'sip-files00156.txt'
6d8970386d67d8f23ab1258f8958672a
14ee7c0fe7a999bac2c71059ecd4ed562a57177a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUU' 'sip-files00157.txt'
015a09917acb60e60b2a2b79397293d0
e85ccb237756e9a4475fdc17f8efb71fb79fb552
'2011-12-21T08:46:07-05:00'
describe
'332' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUV' 'sip-files00158.txt'
f8d50767995a012af5ed21e42f6b7482
fa3662dc4cf03d14ed660d4d85a7af3545e19acd
'2011-12-21T08:52:01-05:00'
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUW' 'sip-files00159.txt'
62c9b2d869f9246c133ba17c6f0111ec
99ce5bb7e39ca0fc36a6022e15d08c7530cd007d
'2011-12-21T08:47:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUX' 'sip-files00160.txt'
8f866ceadaba0acebd7403dfe77fafea
7ff15ae7b3c7b99a2f64606187fc02bcc33c279a
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUY' 'sip-files00161.txt'
68690be7aa62dd48ba12424778932703
2a1b84276aec451fb4f49c19c35d6d7d6666030f
'2011-12-21T08:51:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNUZ' 'sip-files00162.txt'
d1217c0e845beffe39be9be240d4187d
68e92397b8cebe8ddfe1a7600fb4aea011d20f16
'2011-12-21T08:48:45-05:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVA' 'sip-files00163.txt'
a32517dad12e60ea640d99bf8f1725dc
a67ce953a61488a87c759cff0e05656bdd10946f
'2011-12-21T08:49:20-05:00'
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVB' 'sip-files00164.txt'
d9b8456719548db81cd37e3df0d92122
3abdbd241e79b990afb2682f7c6a4bcb8680d1ab
describe
'142' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVC' 'sip-files00165.txt'
a608ea1ef4e35baa94469284c1d65c4c
52c8202735ac18f9ceb1a738dd49b6d9f5ad9cba
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVD' 'sip-files00167.txt'
8c5295e9a4b0e379cf02b82a22fcc7ef
5274cf053a9c8ad5e51bad34ec263b39fd89ad23
'2011-12-21T08:51:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVE' 'sip-files00168.txt'
6815ce21dda66a0eecba95c9452733b1
71b31aebc691dffcd605481cfc9a49fb2b25893c
'2011-12-21T08:46:58-05:00'
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVF' 'sip-files00169.txt'
3ce9e3cb0dd800706dee100515e87ff1
0d47fa8a60a8611bc9e54262654ac2cda8cd34cf
'2011-12-21T08:47:25-05:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVG' 'sip-files00170.txt'
c4ddb4e3494772b9b308849ef9df33c1
653f93de3e201d380c934527757468e899934067
'2011-12-21T08:49:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVH' 'sip-files00171.txt'
3b9dab04fcc07b6d7c702b04a251dbcd
8a4e10799a1aacf7e763b7ad4472c5212ba0bcc1
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVI' 'sip-files00172.txt'
c6ae25d1346b5b42633445e22fff38b1
2b75b0fa4b375b362601ec3f123fc9e24fabd574
'2011-12-21T08:45:37-05:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVJ' 'sip-files00173.txt'
68944c81fd271045e66dc1608825f35d
62ec180817c93334ff68aaa717010ad821c72dd9
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVK' 'sip-files00174.txt'
793a7452c21c5ed5589007215bbc3573
5cfc1706bcca95d884085e86d63cb20f07b98af5
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVL' 'sip-files00175.txt'
e6fc9112409f529d654a1218eaba81e8
07a43973112c9fd9157cbb67e32b4ac7f889b272
'2011-12-21T08:51:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVM' 'sip-files00176.txt'
293405364b7a81091014457817c6387b
44787560b469be101f2f80d4192ddfb8ae13a6f4
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVN' 'sip-files00177.txt'
df32a349be8e5914fab6ff811eba86a9
57a3b1890683ea486399eb76e1691644adab81d5
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVO' 'sip-files00178.txt'
ece979df1f904aeb3c045d4d77522b17
6b1811aeb7a332c47c7c31afaaf9ffebc35ae575
'2011-12-21T08:52:25-05:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVP' 'sip-files00179.txt'
827610d3f782134eba6c02248cb743d3
1c52ae222ac6924cf14bb9398370b34c03645137
'2011-12-21T08:50:08-05:00'
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVQ' 'sip-files00180.txt'
0844c99e18cbe573e5678c36dcf8323e
53495366d6b1a41c83341304f63f6a3fc13d2601
'2011-12-21T08:47:02-05:00'
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVR' 'sip-files00181.txt'
2cc30f77edff66a9d2cfb37a3e13cd62
d556dd9b0aee9de0ac1b96a0aace765cb3a6c661
'2011-12-21T08:49:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVS' 'sip-files00182.txt'
996dc1ab601429518afffb407a692134
f180b8c59d1ca3affd615385217bca3dd139ae9f
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVT' 'sip-files00183.txt'
27ce860bcec357c7b755f0bceabf4a0c
38384f89d32371b816a4503f35aa63d800ebe3f3
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVU' 'sip-files00184.txt'
f0c90729d2a480539e1a5c68f48b16b6
3fecf53b3ee4ae02593ad85865d1a7207b408ca9
'2011-12-21T08:49:14-05:00'
describe
'815' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVV' 'sip-files00185.txt'
fe63b09fa4606e2f6103ec28dd6aadc0
95e20723f7b87802d9528c398e11adbb22771c7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVW' 'sip-files00186.txt'
6e4c252b2c02261ddb47476119580e09
c5071c105f8f99b759e1d20b97a2f9a8ccc028e9
'2011-12-21T08:46:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVX' 'sip-files00187.txt'
da5cc88a40d7bfee25c7f87f3429e218
c5126db80b4e13afe008bb32652686b61c24477c
'2011-12-21T08:50:33-05:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVY' 'sip-files00188.txt'
893655568fc9c759eada5285cd5c6fe8
84481c53c35b64e3f689ba827238d4ce2224fec2
'2011-12-21T08:47:10-05:00'
describe
'82' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNVZ' 'sip-files00189.txt'
3605f8cc1f2d4fd666604511450bc00d
6f62230ddb489801d9d85d017b5be6ed528a7f6c
'2011-12-21T08:50:46-05:00'
describe
'723' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWA' 'sip-files00191.txt'
41a366aec29b60ed2238b26476464fe9
d16d3bdaac86b7a5e2e274ff858fc3f892e17105
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWB' 'sip-files00193.txt'
d5bfb81d4d629a4e3815fe24eee7cbb4
efa299490c06287b6c093917fbf50ab091fdafc3
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWC' 'sip-files00194.txt'
d5eab2178e585579475d5a827fb91700
47eba3694d5d76d1055044e2833d25340672c7be
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWD' 'sip-files00195.txt'
1e485cb5a97812cb90bb932a3d394ba4
3033699be67424d376c912d993880912deccfb8e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWE' 'sip-files00196.txt'
6fab30bd23f9399574cc27e2b0ccfbeb
1be766bbf6b831f7a2371053f0a2c8cbbb5555bd
'2011-12-21T08:50:03-05:00'
describe
'88' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWF' 'sip-files00201.txt'
64b96221247a6e5e3c902806da988716
d2de252d4c7cc3caf39c092073a4833b8efa7c61
'2011-12-21T08:46:02-05:00'
describe
'2588' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWG' 'sip-files00001.pro'
d9fab094956c8d8aa2c15f0fbab30777
f031ad8cb1da9811905bca01f2967c0b2815d057
'2011-12-21T08:47:50-05:00'
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWH' 'sip-files00002.pro'
86007974b695e1750506f7ff6a68a6b9
c2139eeaacf391171b0d0056dc2ed91818ae3954
describe
'458' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWI' 'sip-files00003.pro'
4015637aae8816e71ba63a41c839733a
2b23e6a6c5584f38e6d323b6d605cc5a72357356
'2011-12-21T08:50:39-05:00'
describe
'733' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWJ' 'sip-files00005.pro'
3d2dfdfe74f09c12b1568fb19d9b7cc0
4ffcf984976550b0469371550fa721d93a7e1d19
describe
'28883' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWK' 'sip-files00006.pro'
26f4026bac66db88b57c122e3cb2ec44
ff3d317ae6e11b9d3d7209c6728b28c859ae1918
describe
'417' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWL' 'sip-files00008.pro'
444fa7c2ad37e45a01d3dcbeba0e8200
c3878ae06fe565326f8d1ce07287adddf609a7eb
'2011-12-21T08:46:34-05:00'
describe
'5579' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWM' 'sip-files00009.pro'
33b42e0a12bf2e9cde7baada6ec1a64d
0e95c86f6f0f7ff51a6ef6c9926843ec998815d8
describe
'4284' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWN' 'sip-files00010.pro'
9574916e8b63328506889b2b9f7309f5
eeff8ca0157a54f175b947ad48c00d0fb661c481
'2011-12-21T08:46:41-05:00'
describe
'10757' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWO' 'sip-files00011.pro'
85bce0fde2323d1ccc99908e31624100
f75401122f18d4acbdeea667bbb827f1ae1eb76f
describe
'13493' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWP' 'sip-files00013.pro'
be32387ad0d9b42f7eedba1b97f2cbed
7831b5ad625de88fd27eb9e78e43cd486137e9d7
'2011-12-21T08:50:57-05:00'
describe
'12691' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWQ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
e9b114da19b54b569c784c751ff26320
6888fcb07246b8a89a0a1b3562de484e7ca16c2b
'2011-12-21T08:52:23-05:00'
describe
'14999' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWR' 'sip-files00015.pro'
986b5a554b7c313644d412471b045b57
7781cf08546744320723558d3b5d5565c37b1480
'2011-12-21T08:49:24-05:00'
describe
'31496' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWS' 'sip-files00016.pro'
634f7d76ae2cd1ebf1c30a866f468fc2
23ee544c23cd9d8b05c33a1fcfadc444c6622f52
'2011-12-21T08:52:05-05:00'
describe
'28811' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWT' 'sip-files00017.pro'
e4de81c299c4fc8f9c00800ae393d869
ce1355d95eff677608a906589a52dc6ec4b2a303
'2011-12-21T08:51:01-05:00'
describe
'31144' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWU' 'sip-files00018.pro'
545c3c81b57377fe2b33641838190af1
ab1dc31df6fc6f3a7bfe8ade3b003ff099db8fe8
'2011-12-21T08:46:27-05:00'
describe
'30278' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWV' 'sip-files00019.pro'
bdd6e2be888407e5c5ba1b7890b349eb
99f408df4da662e4c009517e3379e377000b5f91
'2011-12-21T08:45:33-05:00'
describe
'30989' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWW' 'sip-files00020.pro'
cc59be7f826b4392938ca6ebe9a99c1f
9f56718ae68884e1ad6e96b20a55a86ec7421da8
'2011-12-21T08:48:43-05:00'
describe
'717' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWX' 'sip-files00021.pro'
d3ad5361d0e799e89a6b4f78a318d96c
ced6fc787cd33b6e67a2da7168de5c423860c88b
'2011-12-21T08:48:16-05:00'
describe
'31307' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWY' 'sip-files00023.pro'
f8321372fbb03fc628d34ed6d56ed05c
f218e31e5fe68116256e41a50326de06217750a4
'2011-12-21T08:50:14-05:00'
describe
'30100' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNWZ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
5839612824e648599c599a895c2ec10d
e0790532c5fc9757057ed7ebaa87c5f4e424d98c
'2011-12-21T08:46:49-05:00'
describe
'17933' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXA' 'sip-files00025.pro'
f196bf5f8514745f9f57cb5a91b9c95b
81a0e57041cea36904e7533673e68b093ff1f11c
'2011-12-21T08:49:39-05:00'
describe
'30490' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXB' 'sip-files00026.pro'
c10141581d2ad5a8152a2a7b2595c89c
0760b044838c34f6378383dfc07e20e27b2364a6
'2011-12-21T08:48:01-05:00'
describe
'29806' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXC' 'sip-files00027.pro'
a47c21b4ab467648e0394a6ceb132642
6619ee591521825c9a4a7f40f6c3493257abb2ff
'2011-12-21T08:52:18-05:00'
describe
'30228' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXD' 'sip-files00028.pro'
a285969e2bd8b922ee85638adf506044
e95a5710d66d9731d6a2a529cbd78fa4cefdbec6
'2011-12-21T08:47:53-05:00'
describe
'11987' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXE' 'sip-files00029.pro'
417bb23a78fd83fafe7e43838fa7299a
47d0a17c459717e6a9802db44609d61e7980cecd
describe
'21252' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXF' 'sip-files00030.pro'
77f323683cd4f4c5ccc5a1dd1bb472ea
156987623ef4666eece615c5dc588e9dbabd04e6
'2011-12-21T08:49:53-05:00'
describe
'18774' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXG' 'sip-files00031.pro'
a13cd497b7e60683b6ff6538f5d4f13f
54716a2d593d0c9816afb395cda5a5124a07de2a
'2011-12-21T08:46:20-05:00'
describe
'29633' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXH' 'sip-files00032.pro'
dd0a962b0ad77eb3ac63d2ac3f0367a9
2ebc97d808e9e27fecaec9e414958ddb5648cb12
'2011-12-21T08:49:35-05:00'
describe
'28433' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXI' 'sip-files00033.pro'
2815f97ea91758a0db81ffefb8997b60
464e957ace657da61988eae0e4e204e06b81152c
'2011-12-21T08:45:45-05:00'
describe
'29136' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXJ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
9a6777fed3e4e6527d95a4190ace66cf
f147c2c8e088fa3c612897888d13df1b57690ae3
'2011-12-21T08:46:17-05:00'
describe
'28680' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXK' 'sip-files00035.pro'
108cf110a2efa5b21be4ea9e40650c09
da2a64ccd53d62dc427fa393719a4025b5d6aab7
'2011-12-21T08:47:24-05:00'
describe
'29973' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXL' 'sip-files00036.pro'
17c6f2c164fdb7aaace33d32decd9b7d
2b9680687b4e27b6ce6ff51dbe62c28fb3ef4bc0
describe
'29736' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXM' 'sip-files00037.pro'
2054581521d2e898d866aaff71854efc
e0234cacc82fdf4cf065f8c18ccc3ee5520229c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXN' 'sip-files00038.pro'
85a774651ebce813071b0201c57d9f55
48935f855a56bbcc96b04d4e8bd698a5d123716b
'2011-12-21T08:48:02-05:00'
describe
'27203' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXO' 'sip-files00039.pro'
51ffd91018a9a9c5addf78f3bd26edfd
09dd363da8ee42dcbfed87e1facd9914e2857087
'2011-12-21T08:47:57-05:00'
describe
'30434' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXP' 'sip-files00040.pro'
525419959b30d523bcbf1d2d1c04ad46
dcfbc773a2cf94b521a9f0e4e845c76c8a8d2e02
describe
'29967' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXQ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
1db00f7c841849b0a973ca280c82f753
511a5423ba9dcf6e8c5efec5d6defd9dcfe2a0d4
describe
'30937' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXR' 'sip-files00042.pro'
feabf0abc0131e43050848a83fc3d5a3
7f887a30d2ce821224e1efbc976d24742786d112
'2011-12-21T08:49:16-05:00'
describe
'23392' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXS' 'sip-files00043.pro'
8e55c688ccb7b325679b9a1b01d7bfa9
1ca83e4d6780159900639cae4bb3e07b87d01526
'2011-12-21T08:46:24-05:00'
describe
'28266' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXT' 'sip-files00044.pro'
5f2d5054fe39d530a97654eb53621ba3
42074be568a0cb5d026de68244ba6ac6116a7a50
'2011-12-21T08:47:20-05:00'
describe
'592' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXU' 'sip-files00045.pro'
8829f62cd3138c8d89975e5aca89fd11
1521e7b20f340a3ab1d4a8bf8e3d908dd5f1444d
'2011-12-21T08:48:34-05:00'
describe
'27309' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXV' 'sip-files00047.pro'
ebae6b959aebabc6f25f7780f5f3b6fc
02aa681299de090d1bf5163acc967a73a5cb9ec7
describe
'29187' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXW' 'sip-files00048.pro'
df932707d59ec7589c47aef1774be143
be6db3be92c89a73ad3643bc1e75d31b299f62d5
describe
'29589' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXX' 'sip-files00049.pro'
ab933b504c4b6d11350d53c5d7f361ae
b561c74568d2a088097582952137c1d14a27bafe
describe
'14649' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXY' 'sip-files00050.pro'
e6241c20957da806e48cee9c2da2d414
737be7f5969284d67de15d7b7463f993de7848e9
'2011-12-21T08:48:47-05:00'
describe
'21688' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNXZ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
69b204a49f987687019a1ef3c4fbe14a
1b990d686537e4d27bb3234be6f3748a6c8b7fd9
describe
'29291' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYA' 'sip-files00052.pro'
063f7e49fef696fdaea1dd0a43e8ca06
d1ee8895a27761772e6f734d1dc7e75b5781690d
describe
'29482' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYB' 'sip-files00053.pro'
a1b58547a14511d9d31195b5467783a1
d077e6709e45192458f773a74516301abaf4f844
'2011-12-21T08:52:13-05:00'
describe
'29974' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYC' 'sip-files00054.pro'
cf196989b96862d2d44668af8b1d4205
97338e16dafe39b65295c22fd37f9c77c68356ec
describe
'30217' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYD' 'sip-files00055.pro'
7ab377e94f33a816486521f6a191979b
291b501225b2d789543d58ceb41c9e55e1a9edd5
'2011-12-21T08:52:14-05:00'
describe
'29460' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYE' 'sip-files00056.pro'
029f416d177e7b3b316fe2bac651dead
4d566e5f4a9074699ad4e37308e771f82736a73c
describe
'30412' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYF' 'sip-files00057.pro'
4ae70b36454b3031aeb71e7ad042b282
0da75850caf6f03c355f95b4b4ae652c9ff0d570
'2011-12-21T08:48:36-05:00'
describe
'30943' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYG' 'sip-files00058.pro'
aaf5f91de4fd422c5db1dcf29072720f
98a33cd75115447ac5d6c8bc1341a62f5e8901c0
'2011-12-21T08:46:54-05:00'
describe
'31462' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYH' 'sip-files00059.pro'
b50e8883a58316408a4522d7911ee09b
612a45b922c7cade3776cf0025dfeaf8ccdd789f
describe
'23286' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYI' 'sip-files00060.pro'
056ba80400cf37b2675c719195f49ace
a04a9d339c0e9c40508315952475d4e024424b46
'2011-12-21T08:47:13-05:00'
describe
'26529' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYJ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
4894be192ecb26367b6a2b4b78c6ff4b
cbe9cd96720c6e322420e4883fe34abc0e799cb9
'2011-12-21T08:51:20-05:00'
describe
'30792' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYK' 'sip-files00062.pro'
85eff3aeacc16b468b0fad826a90cb4f
a18dee3d6f28eecb6c70fedb3eb25718b58969bf
'2011-12-21T08:51:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYL' 'sip-files00063.pro'
88814e7ecf2e421ca7847855f7095c64
8d71e0aee2ad209b26e9578bbbaac36df36f6e42
'2011-12-21T08:49:02-05:00'
describe
'31480' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYM' 'sip-files00064.pro'
3a13c857009ed4f34122e484e4cd9f4e
e8f6a608d04db503c8407abd8177c79209e82757
'2011-12-21T08:46:47-05:00'
describe
'2400' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYN' 'sip-files00065.pro'
e064b15af79a41bf69cd3efc1787f0da
1505e180d525562a406a409ff639cf81398b0e94
'2011-12-21T08:48:04-05:00'
describe
'29857' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYO' 'sip-files00067.pro'
eea3a93269bae1ee897bc6e8f9ebf038
34af1ebd6ad831e91c740da661660ed4094c5000
describe
'10845' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYP' 'sip-files00068.pro'
a1345d6ca0a5525d7ca9812d4c5fea95
f7db8da159a86316ac203d5d26814dd658569801
'2011-12-21T08:45:42-05:00'
describe
'22699' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYQ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
5b76e0fdfdbabfa08bd6c2c48f448ca1
3276ac48fdaaa072a54ede7df063c208a631638c
describe
'41223' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYR' 'sip-files00070.pro'
79a21fead3a1eec7c0b916bf6789115e
686d29ee8b9eea1d20582995e4a4f95738623c3d
'2011-12-21T08:51:26-05:00'
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYS' 'sip-files00071.pro'
0303f91f99ef554ec42d55e8e1d4a9da
093ce193f1c67a478999e4a8340adc9497ce24a1
describe
'40315' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYT' 'sip-files00073.pro'
419b816b0ddacf15997ffcc748f2d2e5
9838bc12b9d67d02008e3d51728a431e1de641c3
describe
'32644' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYU' 'sip-files00074.pro'
afb21331584ad59b0ecb1d9ea45d4732
61e14cee066f419cae838aefa3bc026054336bbb
describe
'30322' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYV' 'sip-files00075.pro'
9aa12c2cce040fbe188efa006f2510b8
f5650e09a9e6d72246603ec5484e2707c20f30ef
'2011-12-21T08:47:35-05:00'
describe
'29512' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYW' 'sip-files00076.pro'
905dec5e2504d52bbb0652c9d7525992
c895935aafec3cbe2ee2fd2b0e329bf0205dbba3
describe
'28189' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYX' 'sip-files00077.pro'
7965fde35d5a86114e63b884f22855c7
65b8798e0cd1a6b21c86e1efeb5d6e34376f2d78
'2011-12-21T08:48:28-05:00'
describe
'28637' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYY' 'sip-files00078.pro'
81867e7683d90b10e983b0d4935c1168
08402dc74b695d47c14ebf8dad92fab011c25c2a
describe
'1728' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNYZ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
a60d7ff0e8c39d630cec8099bb210ff5
51e02c2a4ce606516fb551d5906cff0443045afa
describe
'30167' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZA' 'sip-files00081.pro'
bf4721eb5e958d39bfce5fc113314060
628f89710a45820bc2fd7b58f007fdf833808fc2
'2011-12-21T08:48:19-05:00'
describe
'29982' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZB' 'sip-files00082.pro'
0f1a1c1621750551fdeb06aabc4f99b5
e1a55a77dc001bd381f914b6ed6de55d7daea36d
describe
'4909' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZC' 'sip-files00083.pro'
200711f266e128af008f19a6d5017a6e
8c92be9306ae88e7824b9a88bdcd9793a156ea7f
'2011-12-21T08:46:08-05:00'
describe
'17293' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZD' 'sip-files00084.pro'
0000b913bb3bf0106dd6a73e34d7c0fc
238f556920d0e5dcadd9657abc2186dafab25435
describe
'28729' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZE' 'sip-files00085.pro'
5ef9d95affd1314a6a6ea9b701e8e6ce
29bd03b28c657f62b1a6971edca214567dd18b9c
'2011-12-21T08:46:44-05:00'
describe
'29155' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZF' 'sip-files00086.pro'
c93d7bbdc8d57c2b73e762b046971c5a
071b088cb84cc1677bb1bbf853fd5cdb368c5339
describe
'29264' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZG' 'sip-files00087.pro'
4c126257a91ca1a199f1a863276ef469
a7c4ebd29e656eed5ffea258277c566be014567e
'2011-12-21T08:46:01-05:00'
describe
'30034' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZH' 'sip-files00088.pro'
1f1e96f57acd1b7f1b9a5c6e87ef803d
6d36eba34242b1d48bd5065423be49610a73490b
describe
'30694' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZI' 'sip-files00089.pro'
0eef761cda2a7811bd301652de7fafbc
0ca75a82fbffc8a9e9dd2cda3b40ac35c610c494
describe
'28802' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZJ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
828d2963cd018f9bac0c5457f3172fad
d0759ce1f35de049ce7f65e9fa7133e1c1d9c0e4
'2011-12-21T08:46:43-05:00'
describe
'30891' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZK' 'sip-files00091.pro'
ca052531a18a79d936beb1e5ecaa28d2
9443912b51da19daa97fb1997ae85a2e73e8c8b2
describe
'31044' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZL' 'sip-files00092.pro'
fdbefaf9cbf7df880047138bb12bdbc9
acc1ebf09760dca2417a6e781e052b3c3fa46a59
describe
'2429' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZM' 'sip-files00093.pro'
4290174a25f75c0ac16c7e3418a5167c
e3ef305eb7d57d49afadf44e206956ac42e100b4
describe
'28853' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZN' 'sip-files00095.pro'
9384d12a116bfceb81ab9e31d71bf5ac
15feb5db48d6ac346f5ccd9a5846d1b14afe5b3e
'2011-12-21T08:49:26-05:00'
describe
'30816' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZO' 'sip-files00096.pro'
d01422d020e78d9e08275a4a6bffcd24
e721b472a686d6f57f59f0de267d2df05d8b04e3
describe
'29779' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZP' 'sip-files00097.pro'
a83e7cdb0004df102c0a07a98fa13414
ab087e176ad7438c26d3b36fb87a8a3e988de992
describe
'29871' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZQ' 'sip-files00098.pro'
d21252bfa2fd360973fa8287363bf3df
8873e6572f45db4fc0fcd61b4ac598d7856e4fd3
'2011-12-21T08:48:07-05:00'
describe
'23853' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZR' 'sip-files00099.pro'
736281004e25c802dc266abd03584794
6956d49169b359aeb1764830d5f0be7c152addd4
describe
'30796' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZS' 'sip-files00100.pro'
2b0a2b4850cd5af0f15a90d857bfdebe
ca9155def77a5db48abb4da64b77e16ad577cb79
describe
'30477' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZT' 'sip-files00101.pro'
fcf8e6818afd226f18eb39ee2899df1e
e851e43b18413558386cb1f022826eb40f5caba9
describe
'30426' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZU' 'sip-files00102.pro'
5263bb6307b5f7cb9844f50dc9d05cbf
5f51616e0673ea8e7187134eba60b57019351a9e
'2011-12-21T08:50:27-05:00'
describe
'16951' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZV' 'sip-files00103.pro'
2103f71a10971a148a60caf269d1c9ea
cc7a658d9c30d7e20c4a38728235687e43d372a3
describe
'21919' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZW' 'sip-files00104.pro'
5b9ba08e1947787f56e28483d4e23312
5743ce7baaf088f29b46fa73ba36599be20fb1f9
'2011-12-21T08:48:11-05:00'
describe
'30182' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZX' 'sip-files00105.pro'
88f5663e58f08465e3dd1f782b6cbce7
621e67a776bedb0e7c10800f1977e1676db3c247
describe
'28055' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZY' 'sip-files00106.pro'
f9f7ac3fa2c47968e69a80c4ae4217ad
9171b994799bc39ea3c1aabcda3bc44a6b790f22
'2011-12-21T08:46:48-05:00'
describe
'28275' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACNZZ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
f4e027ef086976a8c074c44ebbac8bd9
417844d0277e6283e2ac5c6c29e948ea9a241eeb
describe
'29355' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAA' 'sip-files00108.pro'
e13531277d1a61a961924650edcc598e
f3fc33be6bbab801265657d2977620256abd8705
'2011-12-21T08:50:12-05:00'
describe
'29730' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAB' 'sip-files00109.pro'
442bf1c15d162b2ae4333074780d8a30
21da0586f70cdec2a471fd91b98f4a2a423092f2
'2011-12-21T08:47:14-05:00'
describe
'28049' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAC' 'sip-files00110.pro'
ede74ac408452c063e149cdec8ad2424
aecd035cff2d677578af2fd14b506a5387393af8
'2011-12-21T08:47:51-05:00'
describe
'28866' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAD' 'sip-files00111.pro'
7a5e7da331fe97ff400130d10b851349
0f2e38683a4bce834d2dbc74096a8fbf3d1b7835
'2011-12-21T08:48:48-05:00'
describe
'23408' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAE' 'sip-files00112.pro'
eb19e20373e5e4fe90c53c999cdaffca
144bfdaa0a7452140a7a79e75f9989b66433e501
describe
'30356' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAF' 'sip-files00113.pro'
503f5efe7cfbe1b9c331ba896ef37bd6
380c5c0414ce0fd7f995c087ab79384f60fc4325
describe
'29508' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAG' 'sip-files00114.pro'
ffb292a87a088ac9c8cf9085bad601f4
144561effd1cf53dcec18ce6597a7c2876c113be
'2011-12-21T08:51:08-05:00'
describe
'29600' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAH' 'sip-files00115.pro'
d04d9dd398a8b558d6bc3693b8f25c00
58c595cc8d4b3621a19a20a4c20ba0814f033b53
describe
'30468' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAI' 'sip-files00116.pro'
4c0dffe6bbc35e421a5dbe72f9762538
2bfe271f44dbbe3a510b24e1bb0fd70af98a96c1
describe
'29686' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAJ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
ad006ead628d0163b4dbfbf11ff3231a
eb4763114e80893e8d98461a64d1b798d70026a1
describe
'30259' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAK' 'sip-files00118.pro'
d0881665868a24874c6ccaeee0cd6141
7d406c9579ce7da61374c321d33290eeb9916cb2
describe
'2830' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAL' 'sip-files00119.pro'
e3768c44c321754a805ff2ea9b46673e
9f62e8ecef1ed73340210407d852468a05506893
'2011-12-21T08:48:35-05:00'
describe
'28334' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAM' 'sip-files00121.pro'
321525ebdae083f951aa84627fed7cbf
1df0dd30cce2b109c5ac1f4f62dd050a764788bd
describe
'31295' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAN' 'sip-files00122.pro'
445fae2db0c41b7ee4641740b175d763
6a783f1d4b04abcba3c404be384a7083d78c2126
'2011-12-21T08:50:30-05:00'
describe
'5862' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAO' 'sip-files00123.pro'
2678c11470a22e99b181d2044894fc8c
2e1bc25b40f9c22684035c945411462bb3a85416
'2011-12-21T08:50:36-05:00'
describe
'21171' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAP' 'sip-files00124.pro'
49272fee46de396c0239a7ace7e7b418
de21b91d799f6a3826e7826309df9d15b0caad64
'2011-12-21T08:50:00-05:00'
describe
'11345' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAQ' 'sip-files00125.pro'
af26de06f0892a1ee49fa9c5f04b5485
48bf8544e55d7be196a3516eb5a7c9f9ecaa9ca5
describe
'30181' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAR' 'sip-files00126.pro'
345a5fd1b88cfb4f73e93f32974e860f
87d2ad6e1eb2ed4dd47e1d97dfd2b57d60f8a2e0
describe
'30144' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAS' 'sip-files00127.pro'
ec3e6fe5f975b47fb561cc596fd0310a
26b4cfbbc3842d882fdcc28a1d855aa5929f06b2
describe
'29819' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAT' 'sip-files00128.pro'
309525f671e4ed72fc81c8f07b8ce64b
dc224d51ec4548f8939778faaa19dd98e81be245
'2011-12-21T08:49:32-05:00'
describe
'28010' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAU' 'sip-files00129.pro'
c749d6f9303b3d0867ecef7029bc0b4f
1bd8153347451976b2966fc2c81818593d016850
describe
'30261' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAV' 'sip-files00130.pro'
16d9ce32fce42f07c96c2b8a7aa0fbc1
a0b06620d59fdcf0a7f9c8364ee23dcd4b1b536b
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAW' 'sip-files00131.pro'
6d71d4e67bf49b52961476d462e09bde
97194298f36ad637ebaefad60b73ca91b72245a1
'2011-12-21T08:49:03-05:00'
describe
'28951' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAX' 'sip-files00133.pro'
e37909666987161a220d2b6562cb6973
c58dc19e9e2cea5b32da817d82a3991d081b229e
'2011-12-21T08:52:30-05:00'
describe
'30499' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAY' 'sip-files00134.pro'
50192893b50058f31116536bad8b086c
b66f718f91f5f7b22802d65696d60520f55bdea5
describe
'30485' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOAZ' 'sip-files00135.pro'
04d755870c14cf9918d060c6825bbe2f
94ea421f6a5b127cfd2a856b4d78b994fbdab4cd
describe
'30403' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBA' 'sip-files00136.pro'
84d49744a4c61b451d4527ec209a02c8
1fb37160af95ebd4fff8c1c272ac1f312878fde0
'2011-12-21T08:46:31-05:00'
describe
'30019' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBB' 'sip-files00137.pro'
4b887d14dddb831a834f1371c60189a8
4cd44186246f10a7a71a231e75719513706ac630
'2011-12-21T08:48:08-05:00'
describe
'8890' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBC' 'sip-files00138.pro'
f86259f1141cd1a1ef0f6d8e044633c2
85167c2a657364ab8ae1d04204f84d827c4cf144
describe
'30032' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBD' 'sip-files00139.pro'
d744c7162f0585077382b3566eaf719b
83b4d4c2f737362658da2ec8a60280e494411c77
describe
'29228' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBE' 'sip-files00140.pro'
22804a15751302320be039a9dd01db50
eee72cc2a9ee5bb130e0a92f1f5fed01aa6138c0
'2011-12-21T08:50:37-05:00'
describe
'29425' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBF' 'sip-files00141.pro'
8215cb67d3eba8d391cc683b5e5abc6b
eab14b14842fe09d9c0b5e40add40a8416d34df3
'2011-12-21T08:45:49-05:00'
describe
'6410' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBG' 'sip-files00142.pro'
ecdbdd997eab22ce2aa78c29ab57fc21
8906a22d5651eda38522c4b189a5d554e95b8cdc
describe
'22227' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBH' 'sip-files00143.pro'
49938dbadb097281281240b24368ebff
eb32bf73c61b0a9bd7ece4b8513b653debf5b05e
describe
'30116' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBI' 'sip-files00144.pro'
89cef4548f9bf79233c8b9d0eae9744d
7eda696b353a69bf10d6f8c78ca9c5271a32ca17
describe
'23168' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBJ' 'sip-files00145.pro'
a3dfab84d0be09477d6c36de6c825874
b3ec048e9eae949d21c9f919da7e8ab8a9d0a3a4
'2011-12-21T08:51:44-05:00'
describe
'29420' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBK' 'sip-files00146.pro'
3c2995ba3a2ced6905881912f1bc5c5a
30e24e53e07f9471caf382e0c3b85e5e8449788c
'2011-12-21T08:47:45-05:00'
describe
'28118' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBL' 'sip-files00147.pro'
4ba92c77602c89e726e575e87098c8b3
310d5383c98a8c405d21e9cc2675942d43c0934c
describe
'30596' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBM' 'sip-files00148.pro'
c8c668d4d77bdd72e52aedfc5d5e729a
32b5c35574235709a9460dcce52e48245052e2ba
'2011-12-21T08:46:56-05:00'
describe
'29843' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBN' 'sip-files00149.pro'
3b619719011ba352dc21f666bf06ed9d
7fcf5ddd13d6caab0b4f6a4f4452d1b4846b5c03
'2011-12-21T08:52:10-05:00'
describe
'30658' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBO' 'sip-files00150.pro'
226c4bf26d2951de504e83df028f655e
d1de3b6f4879356d89ad5dc9b22f14ee1083d5f4
'2011-12-21T08:47:52-05:00'
describe
'30932' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBP' 'sip-files00151.pro'
23924a4dcb09190e7947c4d1999f2a30
96a381728a09756db8423a2ad2c72a4b5fa2f4a2
'2011-12-21T08:51:59-05:00'
describe
'28668' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBQ' 'sip-files00152.pro'
76243d5c6960d629949f7d9aeb679723
47662086e578e8bfd202a7636df1f961342fa328
describe
'1657' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBR' 'sip-files00153.pro'
169aaa0478e1d70b850c18a0d7568da4
58c4feef8a0de6d324f4377a25683ead22b47963
'2011-12-21T08:50:20-05:00'
describe
'30101' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBS' 'sip-files00155.pro'
60075bf3b249f8f3d9537e2dd2302cdf
a5862c31b6a707d931e9d2421d3a5998ef8e4757
'2011-12-21T08:45:59-05:00'
describe
'27906' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBT' 'sip-files00156.pro'
5f07bc93fe4c2fa53b71e083c4e89997
3d8b0665cc057fe8d519ed824e9cb4a9a35a1aa7
'2011-12-21T08:47:11-05:00'
describe
'29053' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBU' 'sip-files00157.pro'
b32448f6f06223a8598fec37b69e29d7
458ffad68c264ab2071355b0710b4091f66863b2
describe
'8248' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBV' 'sip-files00158.pro'
06d08a4ce35c8f995e0515f29934f5bb
8424cea3545f3fcb77b73747a2f72c86487bca33
describe
'21734' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBW' 'sip-files00159.pro'
f2d262d2cc33b57d58737461c6eb979f
69b1658ccb454bb3c1e5a2d472ddda5784e7ca05
'2011-12-21T08:47:36-05:00'
describe
'30959' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBX' 'sip-files00160.pro'
6a5b7f06cb0e5d696a29ed87fb3c7666
05d49a37f68bb207b519419a6b2e32c20f0ce435
describe
'28417' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBY' 'sip-files00161.pro'
62bdfa2f8f3c0cf0a003c4d61eeb7377
f221e1c9d62b8670a464d59875a10d3a5bd431b1
'2011-12-21T08:47:26-05:00'
describe
'28887' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOBZ' 'sip-files00162.pro'
6657459b61da8e03202f46567ddbbb19
3c3b8345e0150d7ce5df716323d4a1a4e5dbea47
'2011-12-21T08:46:42-05:00'
describe
'31198' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCA' 'sip-files00163.pro'
99b539a88e67975eccf899689da7188b
fa8f0366477085fac91d69bfd1dc35a46fdf38b7
'2011-12-21T08:49:29-05:00'
describe
'28318' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCB' 'sip-files00164.pro'
1cd5347b22e2639cd31f32b038f834e0
da9d4883439eab7a96eda2148be54b482e4b727f
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCC' 'sip-files00165.pro'
dd0674d3a30251a17c6bd3560b0e1ed2
49e43b933f71c9c00d1bd34b29c29208c5ee70b9
describe
'27945' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCD' 'sip-files00167.pro'
a75c86b13ad011735b17b656243d494e
d4e98bd3f70f469f869af0fb17165694cd318531
'2011-12-21T08:48:09-05:00'
describe
'28563' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCE' 'sip-files00168.pro'
0f28139df3a8a86aa22a8493dd2d3a92
ad771b8940d66b21caab92fba5540fab343159b2
'2011-12-21T08:46:16-05:00'
describe
'28593' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCF' 'sip-files00169.pro'
a93fd61c85f9db37cb5c27bcf82cbf65
78371aecfe00f3c05140f68e70d66f88b6dd5d8b
describe
'22987' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCG' 'sip-files00170.pro'
cce6afd313f1f8a5986611cffe2faaa7
f04d9ceafafa48136e73f827b99ccef6817ebd77
describe
'30010' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCH' 'sip-files00171.pro'
062e5ae4d0e276fb6b38edd029c5e51f
e6fcb976276958f8342bb5337a14da74e252192d
describe
'27959' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCI' 'sip-files00172.pro'
9648c0771b2084d4f73df922e22693ed
f9ed409f697432366e1f780abf10b923fd8ed97c
describe
'29565' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCJ' 'sip-files00173.pro'
a3fd9cf7d0bc8833d2eba7bd93aa6164
f8bac46adfec53f88576c5a165cf93bdcd734e37
describe
'29607' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCK' 'sip-files00174.pro'
1ede8257d271982eb73cb319653bf476
8e583cb8a6d411b9e985d5bea59c996014cc056e
describe
'29941' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCL' 'sip-files00175.pro'
1a5921528a5251a5ee4236a05c420aa9
42dcf175679bba6e98ebc82a29b7f48a2dff054a
'2011-12-21T08:49:00-05:00'
describe
'31426' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCM' 'sip-files00176.pro'
3ae32972319e3d6e23a9125e20f49899
092252165e6272e3b8020493ad3ae1d228beb177
describe
'25319' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCN' 'sip-files00177.pro'
a32ebdca09b1e2b0db713dfd3217426b
8f4024c95326328b9da3e785176bb202bd1f9cc2
describe
'23091' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCO' 'sip-files00178.pro'
38a7a1519516285fd2c0d4d2e0c5ec23
73e3b319778384a53cd4d2b5e22540330296de2a
describe
'30310' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCP' 'sip-files00179.pro'
cfcdf877c9310909d4507636e4c4d4ef
8457e08e84fe062304401cf6609e0ae77ee23a84
describe
'31506' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCQ' 'sip-files00180.pro'
9146631dd3634e2d3ac6d3ec174efb3d
068edb13040f977dd855639bbf95ef847b6f4fb3
describe
'27124' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCR' 'sip-files00181.pro'
17846394d56a2a972d7ba0e1ab6a5e60
5c6e7dce31f54730975485a1b1f6a4e450d0d9ce
'2011-12-21T08:52:17-05:00'
describe
'29011' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCS' 'sip-files00182.pro'
3c3c712df1766dc7585347c40a889bfa
00a646eca2cac26420fea56ec4a40880ed6dbcb8
'2011-12-21T08:50:42-05:00'
describe
'27414' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCT' 'sip-files00183.pro'
369beaa1bd95c2fa9af918f4f0a59fe5
f1da9e31ef9ea0ccdd3760d1bb2e6b50be36a5fe
'2011-12-21T08:47:27-05:00'
describe
'20083' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCU' 'sip-files00184.pro'
a037bcb2535b92c82cb342b9fb438940
31b0c8fbcfcf21fd9be6e9984542dbb43248e51d
describe
'20740' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCV' 'sip-files00185.pro'
de69152069cca81ed034fecb214a5d76
4387ca0041443cf57eb889cc12fe10407956e7a0
'2011-12-21T08:47:49-05:00'
describe
'28681' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCW' 'sip-files00186.pro'
fdf6630b8d7b853f19f6fab7ace0cc16
a51ab05b7756f9f0bd18a59ee6b2b761ae15f40e
'2011-12-21T08:47:21-05:00'
describe
'30021' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCX' 'sip-files00187.pro'
8ad4003ad843031512e753da9c607b49
bad85fce5dc6c569c223efe44b59dacd00fb8622
describe
'28662' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCY' 'sip-files00188.pro'
1f85a5824c59b81565b099f7b48e7d8b
ffb38226c36b4408a9d4f0a194e423d35b50aeb7
describe
'1745' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOCZ' 'sip-files00189.pro'
962116251ebda8c7491bbeb10dabbd5f
432f60cdb99dee90558c4bbd45c71325c99749ea
describe
'18229' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODA' 'sip-files00191.pro'
4e8f56276367acd03c44db45a19d4944
874021105f9aa830c14c7664b459b551e183645c
'2011-12-21T08:49:12-05:00'
describe
'37438' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODB' 'sip-files00193.pro'
c68a2b472585ec1dd43892498d4b35f6
b18bce8ae8975e7ef60903ca3d6cc58f65442c1e
describe
'33296' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODC' 'sip-files00194.pro'
a3b798980f061fa27d46a1fa1cc57d8b
c738e9a9006d2cbabf25d2414bf90a4faed41f2f
describe
'35995' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODD' 'sip-files00195.pro'
c2c01f3fb0d3f86b6aed194a8b4ce3fb
f2f0ad4e7b474132713bbb4456555804ac859d8a
describe
'27501' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODE' 'sip-files00196.pro'
0a54846791fb524949b2326227c175fc
0aa03f49905860ceae3a40ffe11c776d063a87b2
describe
'429' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODF' 'sip-files00201.pro'
d16ec48740121e026dbae3560291cafa
ab0386280b9a4ed668443db8dcb1b126e9e58164
'2011-12-21T08:51:32-05:00'
describe
'398569' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODG' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
dd4eb6d9e852bd5dacde856db4a2304b
921921f826fd2c8bfacae0200a99f2750104e68f
describe
'412526' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODH' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
b45a7f42c76f0de33cdcbf43c65022e1
ef513bf42c8142f4854f225510bd9744bfdf646e
'2011-12-21T08:52:32-05:00'
describe
'344328' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODI' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
1c6b86b8fe5e41e8e0cb6924d1fcaa5b
500a1e54218a2cbcb2b82ba9b8ebe60765e447b5
'2011-12-21T08:48:44-05:00'
describe
'186636' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODJ' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
d5e81db0ad42a18dd22fa02d218e2121
f6bc259cfd74510f8bd02e4852be6e93b154e9a5
describe
'344415' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODK' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
905805d7e0bcd12a251a471a76083169
1523f03b2cce7723b0a1a76884c1f65e9a286b4b
describe
'344534' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODL' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
decbdbcaeed41b0e37795a48ee35d6e9
507481dd70c1bd6836f1855c81c358a89e09ecbe
'2011-12-21T08:52:20-05:00'
describe
'315460' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODM' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
ce66c59bd8c64680e1e3fba264029312
6d105281f39d997b51645ec12097e3848fd7a9dc
'2011-12-21T08:47:01-05:00'
describe
'195826' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODN' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
1347b73c87ed476e76fde046a65506de
c78d4e7b1935ae2ce2a2caf4cee0a666a34c44e0
'2011-12-21T08:48:49-05:00'
describe
'344517' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODO' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
f70b484686ff4c862acde0c2a032d4b9
530450a1e6a4c825a609e0343615d84e20eb370c
describe
'344285' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODP' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
b44f940337a0891969bbd9c915b42495
d5b76c6c6b759cf2f3ffb6b587c5961f6946feba
'2011-12-21T08:51:02-05:00'
describe
'297817' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODQ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
d5edc1b90601f2973d1a191005f9544e
a513c4aac1714c0034f8cc34c775e3b708f7061a
describe
'344513' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODR' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
1b2147651ca09480b82d1c11243aa47d
300112b0097efe7353f3634b623aed65a82176d8
describe
'344457' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODS' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
2661ee13281f8814891f34a7cb482f37
860a9f740bc20b94b31faa68b55c20749e390d91
'2011-12-21T08:50:19-05:00'
describe
'344456' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODT' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
f4752c01e9e0b4b72a16e98cb6806aa9
f20d9b453425e54bcbffdfe5c9e36730483c2e2e
describe
'344500' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODU' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
cb90750cdc2bcc3f12e4b9ccad783f6b
7f3f864db7dafc60577175e7847e1f940300b258
'2011-12-21T08:48:23-05:00'
describe
'344518' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODV' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
033f33beb80bce1ed946857357311e9c
2cc6feb2fc4ce7795c3090f99186c03414233670
describe
'344508' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODW' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
901a3e5781280f64b618a9a4277e425e
4f1d8754d1540d74bac4ff72a31e6f5f2cdb7808
'2011-12-21T08:47:32-05:00'
describe
'344313' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODX' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
578688317db56797d7cbbbb59209e291
b192594698a66c7db5e38400708f0e7ad88bdfc1
describe
'191583' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODY' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
6937a10c613a049f471148c5c5edc76b
b1ffe4dc560703ecee3aafd15d94cb4e8d9a7a21
'2011-12-21T08:46:45-05:00'
describe
'344525' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACODZ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
3412f7ba947f59814a054776c5865e77
9bf0651564ce74a0ab033fc0cfd2f5420a35e415
'2011-12-21T08:52:07-05:00'
describe
'344516' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
860a957f6813771c1cc59f036e9d25a3
34d4c2b72b9bbb794523c47c0af0d8209969437c
describe
'344521' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEB' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
66aa23e9f77cbf22d97641ceeaa1c114
1a8228aecde354007d3558e8b6fb27c796254dc6
describe
'344527' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEC' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
b1d2a1556c4d8382637a4810a30c2d76
db128ff89a7477a75b24678280c95ac30274ab10
describe
'344530' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOED' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
6fe7a87409cfd2e2d4fa58999e707687
eebde6b1b32cccf49a1222f881f3ca225e6aedeb
'2011-12-21T08:51:57-05:00'
describe
'344469' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
27594883524da0494640cd4c7963cfb8
a7c8d346091c75ba9f647dc079f17bc183e61ccd
'2011-12-21T08:49:50-05:00'
describe
'344486' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEF' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
420ad0cd14e397db7037341993e88709
99cdd12a79f63c43bace4370f6c2dff0c0eb6721
'2011-12-21T08:48:39-05:00'
describe
'344455' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEG' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
6bd6162d9bbe23a09aa44be404b4010c
6caabd47560f9bdccf3e89c31bd1908d899ab5c2
'2011-12-21T08:47:44-05:00'
describe
'344541' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEH' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
38ce0ce22bb6cbc6b59c58122b4d000a
89ab970e0569a6ade6b70af1ccc44df4c146561f
describe
'344533' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEI' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
383f5c839ca4281dd73943abd3746493
1060a84c89cd456a101f649946e7272894e2aea4
'2011-12-21T08:46:11-05:00'
describe
'344488' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEJ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
9378134f2f17b8f6ac22c39daa1f132f
e6698f3bc6d2da27a4903238d111432202068187
'2011-12-21T08:49:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEK' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
87559c11e203b4b7639d99b211b86191
07a372629f3a146c82ea02f2f08f1663aff3269e
'2011-12-21T08:51:37-05:00'
describe
'344510' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEL' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
c2e28e9fcd90dd7b97a2fddbc29372ab
77b7758fca371257b01f8b10c0bb8d2e85131a82
describe
'344524' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEM' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
0129cb62b8ffc393d4595bbd658aebce
4f0e1ed4908bcdb8065f14955b1136ddc42aec06
describe
'344535' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
c82718865bc1191957600c72c0f48868
e317e300a0b051b993f8695117752070e9b2042c
describe
'344476' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEO' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
190aa0ca383ec56348c29c2a4118943c
36d23bedf4c38fae151a1e812d98acf9dac55e97
'2011-12-21T08:49:08-05:00'
describe
'344522' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
cbdd3c12bb284e52d27ed710d7c38819
5b3b0de9f54a65e1e82dc3665c944ddb2bd3a5ce
'2011-12-21T08:48:03-05:00'
describe
'344536' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEQ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
81409c7d0628730d2b48b944a22f8911
8fcef687caaecb4febadcb2e5c819a81dc4c3f60
describe
'344528' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOER' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
11640d77d0784a0c9a17a1fd8ec8487c
1a5c70a47c3962a053d1c081e7ced9601b87703b
describe
'344495' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOES' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
4bc42758311f5f80afa5af69690b6628
8e7d423623faca48ac0beaf1e1033273953cb7e3
describe
'344496' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOET' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
b4e458294eb5321a28439c1466e57ecc
cda0c5b31113e9bb6a21ce0137a53b216d70a9ad
'2011-12-21T08:46:04-05:00'
describe
'344485' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEU' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
6c7f343d0f8e9c81d36371d5a274c7a8
360f3189aadae49ffc7d0e8f458c87799a002179
describe
'344538' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
4f4ad9310c773797645577ce956d77a0
adbd369aa554b0984c6230070f1f7ad430501edd
describe
'220721' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEW' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
2aeeb579b3436377e748c7c79375308e
33c37e14a3520e696dc4af5a4c42a72493171f4a
describe
'344540' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEX' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
767527b6cf3d4cbdc88d832365141a35
f6bd86f4a8111d5e52e64e78bc53d7945b14be17
describe
'344472' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEY' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
9ce705268cb74b3d313f451fb22252a9
f83f32b912f1cddee46ca8f00097e771e4fd8c22
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOEZ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
c41f29578245804186e7aaff4e1b7036
3d00d6ea6d7bc115287ce2331467b7fbd7a2b462
'2011-12-21T08:45:47-05:00'
describe
'344453' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
8ea443bf9275246e0fdee68d3944a00a
788e93a2ffbc861067b5d9cf619eac7c8e3ba9dd
'2011-12-21T08:49:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFB' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
95ae1f256f5cbbab92064bf421ad2eee
751e2b3f3966455e1d9dba5d1ec2c344ecf65c71
'2011-12-21T08:47:03-05:00'
describe
'344523' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFC' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
d7a1a49edb961c789bc5db89a4e35c7e
6b2661cc3cc404875cc8bd5a7016c201217c7062
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFD' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
0b28ee913b08f56268bb566cf1ee23d0
c554f80b6d6ad136f8c9995ee7ae97df9df3d7cd
'2011-12-21T08:50:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
06a9056de613609dd69480e04af39c7c
8438afdbaa8893017e20de5847027916137e9dcb
'2011-12-21T08:48:51-05:00'
describe
'344529' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFF' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
e2e0084c3ef96cea56632514e8e815bc
9f06de831241b652e8e23d5fdb5effded57f4659
describe
'344484' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFG' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
887dd1b08d7ab9d2fef36427a383c007
b9643e1f364849219a0ac9228e24ea8edbad5913
describe
'344464' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFH' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
c1360c68384c0e9c094c993ae16befca
ecb14125007328048af67c0ca04c557f8b2a6037
'2011-12-21T08:45:56-05:00'
describe
'344531' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFI' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
be6afe9287c5385deea7f0d3fabf19eb
7408df4519ac808e5c24b9526b8b10bc90e8f86e
describe
'344511' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFJ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
d84de31fd321b0a409e8792e8e6ab060
eda7579a1f5dc3b3f4978d5b726c07a5e6ce090d
'2011-12-21T08:50:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFK' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
8ab2dec99f5aa78915543bf024e1265c
64420b890566f507c1c7160000970a2da06b79c8
'2011-12-21T08:48:56-05:00'
describe
'344477' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFL' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
b4465f8666c69f6b56bb9d4bf7fb532d
b4668d62e73bf4940d5843fc3b6a978f519d490f
describe
'344497' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFM' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
ed5f2377ed3425f664358b6984171eb5
a13c709422f74a3c5cce59fa04c1fb0ba21e1554
describe
'344475' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
da0c603aeb01bc3dab3e65931f7e7484
9e6008cf66c16e7b4cfe727dd81fd04008d81ae5
describe
'344466' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFO' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
1539ace857af486ef6b18937edcb5853
e6f54ebda46abb699a9601bbdaeca5c39b5c745a
describe
'344499' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFP' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
3f62aacc2e9b52912cfe34ff55b00b3d
04840029ea87bdde38015d303f245667ba5a4524
describe
'188519' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFQ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
57948627c7603ee232a1da7352a955e2
47ad4ecb5dac8ea3d8b40c8535fc87b32de38b5f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFR' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
08a486db160578cba5fd773ecde6f756
962e9c44bd92003cc7065a60ca71010a838aa12c
describe
'344470' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFS' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
b30a3a49a11e8886a292bbd75872e618
488fc0e067b74bd44cf8acefa623d45913c5110d
'2011-12-21T08:51:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFT' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
3a216dbe2b87d3e704be334476df4a13
3c448af0067f1269e10f2e2a216e96da01bb2b39
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFU' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
644f7ea4b141762d1c7995c54e73da66
fdd11bc1741aa6841ebe0fd3178a093b7f7d9eba
describe
'344474' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFV' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
ec1f08b8bb009b885eb37c09385da8cf
09efeee210ed9999c8a9a148c368cf68b5c1ec39
describe
'153236' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFW' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
17ba8ab5fe258f66da25ccdd76a838b3
a61ee8669bcdc5c88c8f5935d4857036e98f6b5c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFX' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
9ec1bbba1535984942f7808aeca76d4d
86837a4bffa0fa22155291d1a9c2e9fb8e945b2e
'2011-12-21T08:49:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFY' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
5aa7f8ab2c1022b7d10cfecc7967252f
55279c9c0e03a1db68b4f21eca89ba6b9eddc77d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOFZ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
24a9cdd30156e9027896331d471b2536
30b318cdffdecbd290b981b32d088e3e5ef95ab5
describe
'344491' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGA' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
77cebf7f785d1365db099f13c50db600
e2850db4d4044313b1be544c609873bd0a06fab3
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGB' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
8c459378ebd0ef2895621b55b6852812
1c655140272a75c1f893d0030a7dfc0608a0ad47
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGC' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
d81b874aa80741f828fc17558516390a
8d4099bef8a8ef354da351f41352823cac3acd15
'2011-12-21T08:46:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGD' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
8f39cf58022b012872554fad4ef895ab
f2a8ddc2ee0939b39ce8c1c7dc53a7a5d0219256
describe
'147982' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGE' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
d46985dfbad9fb4c6de2c0dce5aec1be
cb17287433d929b4e99bfaeb848ac6df91191705
describe
'344512' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGF' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
2dce8e88edcc72f4f834759768a051c8
f389d9b89eb634513e5db85cd8d8a506ff97bc3e
'2011-12-21T08:48:24-05:00'
describe
'344461' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGG' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
78cc74e6b27e0bf8b3da1be95eee07f6
c042230e61c9f17797c4e36ffd3613859a9c338a
describe
'260953' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGH' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
b09052f792ae75b29c2a66a0517d6e1e
5045e7f71be29cc50eabda5bc54fe68ffc52db17
'2011-12-21T08:51:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGI' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
fea6d6bf5f9afb97233721079fd7ae1b
73ca03deb8716f7fffbfed2deaafba7338c367b6
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGJ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
8d01cbd8f12333b480ae60f35143ab2d
223c8a0dc45b017b228c89c607f706bceffdfe32
'2011-12-21T08:49:17-05:00'
describe
'344463' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGK' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
f64bb3a22b6f3a04f9fc6e4bbba13021
2e13a0076bd28c2bf09ea05dff41115b3d8bdd1a
'2011-12-21T08:49:59-05:00'
describe
'344519' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGL' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
1acc53c6224a0a987c6f2edf97f03bc8
964f6b019576ca22f00e612803c69a74b85a0f1d
'2011-12-21T08:48:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGM' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
d029cb7a60426213bbfc709e2c31c683
d8870a559f21fb3d1947d898928ac2c2f5eebc0a
'2011-12-21T08:48:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGN' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
7010974381e64be43e6f5e7b2e9a19da
9c905d95c87ebc497d469f4d8c5305b357d48ac8
describe
'344388' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGO' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
03a6cca50385933f7ac470ba3c356798
a4c0e8f063086df301f6ca87c079c1424e4e4d83
'2011-12-21T08:51:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGP' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
56a8c5d38b759f182479c2ea51760da3
d563bad1b857c010a6e0bc0feae44d79677d0977
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGQ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
a0ad75334ad8584dec7778240966b228
26e9ac56a5f0db228ad2cbb60bd24aaa145f6c20
'2011-12-21T08:48:38-05:00'
describe
'344430' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGR' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
75af7e00ecc3f7a6ae9b476b919aff93
4a57a781eead6f6c18f9de68dee83f92790fffc2
describe
'211669' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGS' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
55244c8654653c0099981ae0d3105705
1d72ebf9498a6fb277a12ce3c45a2ef2c24c86e8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGT' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
1c6c623f2a46e92e749c46b07675689e
bfb2185f258bedc5d83e7804257cbe190fe6720c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGU' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
0559d4a9565740bb91be7dbbe5626365
d639195e69ca14a96c4869e62e112f66f08f1951
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGV' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
16da3d1db696db6cf47fc6111858e17b
5d0c5fc65074ee4d06ea8f0a24a0ad9cd28087d4
describe
'344504' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGW' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
4340bb43aa1726af42334311817f9df0
b5251d0d81b53004db1cde59c8a02668b6fa371a
'2011-12-21T08:45:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGX' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
d32380b4f0a1440fd3663ff5ed3281a7
01782405890dd51b989ef39578a6cf9af8d2193a
'2011-12-21T08:45:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGY' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
913c6acf9c022ff92b3cf623d5a8dee0
fd57a97407a58a6020083f16050006b4e6f50c90
describe
'344507' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOGZ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
f7b450340fd55209b44c9c5e6ef28d5d
281083f6e3fcc2f0e627d396b9bca24ec6b86b6b
'2011-12-21T08:51:28-05:00'
describe
'344498' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHA' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
ab4293f454a550cd3d6c107473fe2e13
49d05ff558162b8a6edf14192302d40f26d30f73
describe
'344271' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHB' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
937593dbe3e75e631ae11f36e7647d1b
284207a23acce387bb9f3c66ceafdad6e76f8420
'2011-12-21T08:52:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHC' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
8ecb692296c76e7e0de5ac65c6802b0b
9b42639cefb7e883e626ded6f27893221b648031
'2011-12-21T08:49:49-05:00'
describe
'344489' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHD' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
b99542d0fc51dafe8da93c1211453088
2a8ec2275eb745d355cb0b93dd1d1b1726a6ca21
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHE' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
fffaaeac192b2a14f3f5e1dbcee87248
b5db3c78bd4ece99b1f10a65d096598e0f00e162
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHF' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
4c5c77a8a41785e871d6181e9472c5e8
5fb88320104be6ba9aa2b7b9d16d86e018e86fd0
'2011-12-21T08:51:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHG' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
4f2bab1624801cb65199ca41fb2a233d
f311aa54bbe08925cfc65933bffc2f54c2abf609
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHH' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
bff7529179c37e1fead5fdd7c99cc9bb
a2999c45ac99cabe2c5b9b2cd83350b3da6e07ef
describe
'344447' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHI' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
14381a666a630bce34864c965b098f85
75e6a5e359b32cbcff3090f3908ecaae6f0127ab
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHJ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
91bd8281e4bbf7c3c924257d0a5611ac
330393c2808ded1b3db2f76531f87fbfbaf90d17
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHK' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
9de7182a3d468025bb33601a6365a015
556eee8d87e1a98ce4b1011c10772c1cfc96ad7a
describe
'344428' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHL' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
cd7c7695bac1c37e0dc0c0a99a0d17dc
23730f7b1c1845a5d8b4f7aee5b06301c186001f
describe
'344483' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHM' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
d5dd9bf6fe9b3dd58f7e12ec2a3f53aa
4a2fe8e698e8ff3ec3cb671893c8e5b7529aacd9
'2011-12-21T08:46:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHN' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
28518d68f4273af4dad3b69da3251592
b95ba2d102ca81e5bf1f6375b2feba44bea96718
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHO' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
4d4e97ca13129c58e09eb638e4d38934
3020522cf4b2f41de66c66560e1bf9e273d9df22
'2011-12-21T08:51:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHP' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
62c7000eb28591258460e0b831f13d65
afca147de7cb7d980e239bb70958de8d66949359
'2011-12-21T08:50:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHQ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
acd1dbb2ffb1dce8dc33d51c52e9018d
efc1060048a2afcce9174e31056d4d25e7bc8a2e
'2011-12-21T08:47:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHR' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
ff2424fc5634df1ffe2ab9378311ddb1
2d3692b22a3d2548e6d5c0de98cc5a66017e17ae
describe
'197417' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHS' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
0c0e83d06ac901ac132b6fb62290752a
0a1b5ec35a097b5e1cdb55984dba81db2c0464ea
'2011-12-21T08:47:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHT' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
41a1e80162f42bbc8513c25bb5b4eda9
3f167b3c0efde1d4c79544bae70aa81547203507
'2011-12-21T08:49:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHU' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
fad5e48a9e642312ef034550a2c33ad3
66b64b78cb752408cdb1b6aec96785a8755c3cae
describe
'334844' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHV' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
e0c8c348fb6843e5fff40a20262c2332
84d06664d885a5273c48118f83d959af68f085ac
'2011-12-21T08:49:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHW' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
4bc38badf85858597b7f25a78cf01c1a
302ea774e5e95fee28d2fbadd47de6386cae0f6a
describe
'344400' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHX' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
1ac5aa1bb3808d31576e55b9749b1cf6
2655bec1dd08c87aa653724f315d6de8a5694c7d
'2011-12-21T08:47:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHY' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
575693ad41b6098e3d1cb3ed19625501
e3b190a502d2d9703441cc4d0917990d688ea528
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOHZ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
6854b0efc39ce6ff764694dd6944e53c
d8a287af871376a3ef5ef0fdccbb958e1049cd41
'2011-12-21T08:51:45-05:00'
describe
'344435' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIA' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
402c84e94c61038b56c93272ea15bef4
7b2d94d10d4f1c1bad2fdaaafda2e93e265c7c8e
describe
'344532' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIB' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
7869d7847e6384b389418afdfab404f2
6f522fffe526400b81f07015dd3a334bfcab7abd
'2011-12-21T08:51:38-05:00'
describe
'344490' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIC' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
7acfe54e2b61fb1cf1d0ac005ddc6df9
f1cf3db27f7ff7534be1e3bb526bd83dc0d3e6d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOID' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
5a6840fc1afc29c6a3ea53bffc26fda7
a6cede306313955dcb6883eeb52370e410edacdc
describe
'169450' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIE' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
0467467cbf0a5da810e10926463ce6a4
f4164dad54e5e6b630e176f12190ebaf3e88a08e
describe
'344509' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIF' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
196958126d8951e52263273e6b57c58e
6df435c78a163e57117456f767a4a030ed0998da
describe
'344506' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIG' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
b2259b73b241f8f45e9f10473bdb81c8
dc5d7e13541c1c47b88a3769a50b8902d2907776
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIH' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
1bd833ed89a650293a1330b5ce77871c
7b73133cc0c8d2e098d378331b6170b1bf5f8356
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOII' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
537f6792dc8807c0f0f4e6a3a84b31a2
b03b4d8c320396e218cb8b9aa8aa6befa34458f1
describe
'344467' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIJ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
f2ef3de99629fd88511f5b6ec99cb429
931a987cf4f8573b721f6b1ee7947a98aa37eb7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIK' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
d5cd7206d97af8eb1c5a693cbdeb8274
82584d6e41f89fadce40756c764386cce5edc3f5
describe
'344465' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIL' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
058cd4f2ca143b848ec53a837f26a20a
8b529e463e8e831d1d5831ea2116371a79f848d9
'2011-12-21T08:48:37-05:00'
describe
'344444' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIM' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
4c9d98d91015da1fbc194b9742044953
14bf8d3b6595ce2b5b7636e69bd1a11ee66de976
'2011-12-21T08:48:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIN' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
40892f75b6c62d853388079cee859c37
1452835571ff06afc98f402bf4b82907f0608c5d
describe
'319103' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIO' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
8ae1aff43a52c26b7a2aaa92653846e9
89fce2b5f2a022e482d2034ef7636d6abb80918f
'2011-12-21T08:49:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIP' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
7484c458b2a6eaa08175fce591fb2e83
cc875ee0545e97175e9e81efb399683d2a59eb27
describe
'344494' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIQ' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
1009b5c9c9d67ed8bcb88018dc57c946
1d464e9bc9bacacb1fc4c6397e3c89f6aaca2e0e
describe
'344539' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIR' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
33dc0980704f5c52f1eaada364397ce0
59e852a2768cdbcbe9234873e537f1efdc8fa989
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIS' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
7c93d4eed97f20e1490b963e3301e644
9fa87a730aae17a5d30bca3998aa8f08eacadabd
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIT' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
ebc54ab0a7b0ee51b3c98c0e43655c16
f92543f66c6aeef7eef9a88184fb7ea3f9fa00f2
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIU' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
c70573b3fc88ddb61469394e32ba98e7
251d267f178f9eeb91220cf72f8e624e52c536a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIV' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
f364a399f97624316ed1e7dd1e63fc18
8921cd8f4f5c957e5e78986ce8f8e5b06c2e1651
'2011-12-21T08:49:33-05:00'
describe
'344478' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIW' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
84e110544b399a8b7e6020dd037e423e
91ef562b28e79776eaeb9b99bafd5f5a7a56c982
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIX' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
9ea5b0bc110dbe7e2c3dc86e3e884531
0e43fdf83b6390d1532b92d6b58fcab60ad74c24
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIY' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
1adb3281129558659ed7f80ac51f7636
2812d620512b706b66a1e1e8b56cbbfe057cb3ed
'2011-12-21T08:51:53-05:00'
describe
'344492' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOIZ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
39e42a8882a8a96a38d7dee53926b183
b62692649b91d47f985e0d9518736e0c3496c01e
describe
'142882' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJA' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
951ff4d20f5b1079cda58903d4e8e559
3ffda35c2a69ec432241327273640210e88f6e44
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJB' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
8ce8a690d9dc644d67f97b7a11c01d00
1b7046ceb9c1c7de42b7529ecfd38c756dd9b60a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJC' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
65df386716ffec54a7ecc828e9fd6638
d6acf0876c09bf3a1078b95dc070003bf9324f0a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJD' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
4b420d02ca05c0e87afd4dfa1f88a036
8f3a55218190fb1bcb48959a927f3776654e64c0
'2011-12-21T08:46:35-05:00'
describe
'281943' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJE' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
7d565239bfe7dc35ad42794a0905e75e
87740299c789e7416524b26a5614b147605a2916
'2011-12-21T08:49:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJF' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
a0472a5e4d2533ed830d21ceb5ab0762
68c3c9e66cc12477d7380670da6b444883bbeb34
describe
'344501' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJG' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
beb2eeceb0f09909388cb8755a00327f
cd2af2770b34501f96c86ddcec2c8e32ec6b1c12
'2011-12-21T08:50:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJH' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
3a6efe75a0027de2f638066d5ced8108
b18690ddca4816dc14323a4f633e711817bca567
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJI' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
7bfcf979d2a447b9ab4615bbe3482915
cdf45a20a3a1f2d461293e474855e2165782e54f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJJ' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
74bf79e7718c3166f8aa9ee58d04af78
e76c1e390cb439bc73804c2b5cdd180ee3a14b33
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJK' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
319cada6562d6d90aeb7986c5f824d3b
a57acd15f0cf1c497b4ab3de50d53a2db59ae67e
describe
'344514' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJL' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
eeba4c7965af920f7e1b23b94d12b5bf
07969e85f31d7668eb73bfb19f292a236d09f724
'2011-12-21T08:51:09-05:00'
describe
'162547' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJM' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
55105c1f8929cc8657d595c6aa1bed39
9760e9a79978b75989117c8f6085fc3b7a25e7f0
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJN' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
b0c8b1ab7d7c8652d205ef682a7efb01
68fd46eef4a9782512e189181e49b80057961a09
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJO' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
4942583af75d16a35eea281724968022
007945b0369d0f1b835b38348eeafbcb7b817374
'2011-12-21T08:47:39-05:00'
describe
'344436' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJP' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
9dcb0cb1c1a82f853ee8fc394b742bb6
713eab8cd01b8437e2626c451a5f573e937ba9b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJQ' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
3d1efa43aa14a81f430455900e32be53
a5fd92c409ae501fa755d9c61e40d95119897cc4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJR' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
626ad5d0667f920903cb157f1d57022a
a8dbb643cbea3a489f5920d3a786c16619e4a691
'2011-12-21T08:48:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJS' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
9f2c628bbd5e401d3c540c361bea8dbd
431385ecb5b8d4cbeedba6aeeff0778c1965b93f
'2011-12-21T08:50:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJT' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
fec21841ec2e85c63df2a2908f22222d
22b21eda1f83e69ffc463e6729306ce2545cf6b4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJU' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
779ab3ca3d2fc7570fadba19af006659
54f32f5c3245c8111cff1774ccac6bc2a59cf4c1
'2011-12-21T08:49:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJV' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
fe4444a6b13cc3d8a2e9b091d3ee0756
c2a25b46077b7624fc0e2d8da77874994cabee05
'2011-12-21T08:47:58-05:00'
describe
'344432' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJW' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
44320789d9bcdccd20899b57c06a8868
5422e12288d22fb684acb10a03cbf11d30e0278c
describe
'344520' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJX' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
67271b49af53d9fe5d383945113b15d9
83770b58d2be27d9c4632fe49ddac88dec5c6955
'2011-12-21T08:51:06-05:00'
describe
'344419' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJY' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
f68cc0882690598cf2fdacf017e44573
94f7de501941b44ddddbd2d2333482321d6931af
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOJZ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
c984d227849dd100811e2aca86d59380
8bbe88d91b044093fb0cab376321420a5aaaacba
'2011-12-21T08:51:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKA' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
5d329b52cfd80662578a287260d8bd5b
555a1710a442c95486b636fb324f2288e687aab1
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKB' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
23f1d1e0b2538469163816b5bb71c5f9
fdbf8c32d8aad084751653fa99e77a96ea4e9f24
'2011-12-21T08:46:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKC' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
f625634902edc95090e4886c95ca92f2
40def5586e1ece18ff65899ad382cad3475213d7
describe
'344515' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKD' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
0272807bc30a11826e5041978669ced4
3452606237c9964ae9a42c002edc745054c5ac64
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKE' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
8b652dc61046711d6b5b96ab6106a24c
a2f812ce14369be222ea6b2f6757c2e868c4287e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKF' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
44db4ccea74596488f81c9f8bb099723
651e51810d8ece3b47ae049ebb08b347e61543cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKG' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
a14e0f4be02d81011f68bcb8d233ddb4
94ddc136807e0839ba96288aced3f8d141edded3
'2011-12-21T08:45:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKH' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
08734d7b8be57e4ddea86a85ae61e0c6
afa52864eb4ae12b38e577d271bf6d29d0f76e70
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKI' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
bd0e60d20679192767231345c2d0fab1
c3ab3971ed19e1200c10533b07c434b5d358db1a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKJ' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
5160371361c344455b8ec4a1523120c1
78edf5fb0e62cdcbcb55674721b11562ebeadb77
describe
'137737' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKK' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
3eefc1ba7d26f6df29a4febea2605004
3bcb2157cfe3bd01ce67baaf96d9bef167d57bff
describe
'344274' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKL' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
5b388ce772a9a36b8d4b64e71d7fbefb
7dc73d7c262da9064696c420dc82286f6f38812f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKM' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
26c8a8b70747ceec226bf29700cbdd2c
545e3bd750fe73eccf621fb52c592397fdb94c57
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKN' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
3a0aaf5d61d69e459822f515c657b5eb
a79468bddea9f455455d80650d3f3411376be49b
'2011-12-21T08:46:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKO' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
8245873a8fcd869c2ba61cc5c25291d2
a53638232094a02efad96f5e1a247cf82250af22
describe
'344773' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKP' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
6b4bf9cec1b31328a1410616b213c2cd
d5ac1e762c92924873b6b264ecc10c9197c786db
describe
'412723' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKQ' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
e8fa45abdb9ba07581da2f2533744d51
75eed3f8bcabaeea7e7449747ac41e22b03c9fe7
describe
'390371' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKR' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
deadd3bfb18d1822f975fd91fe85208f
465baadb499de38436720415109c150bb45f1abe
describe
'64803' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKS' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
f4992bebd13e000a2820251d1eae6c94
3f031d972550ef1fd452a7f529d6ad2cb619af71
describe
'9587192' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKT' 'sip-files00001.tif'
44b62e2020258c289f8df6e7591ce75a
9949adbf8703254aeff88c69644ba3ffcd6e4332
'2011-12-21T08:51:54-05:00'
describe
'9919480' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKU' 'sip-files00002.tif'
9192992ba6dee42a7be12618eacc484d
b51afc942d6a684e6f299d1ec359ddf3f8967ec3
describe
'8283820' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKV' 'sip-files00003.tif'
431aa852f66f9e5ce004aa5b570ddaef
dd1c29a4f26782f96a2fe070fd1d0971c09af32e
describe
'2772572' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKW' 'sip-files00005.tif'
2e63adeb2185977ff23864585e2ff58b
ca0f8c27d37daa82624f698ea93beb5bbc3af2d1
'2011-12-21T08:49:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKX' 'sip-files00006.tif'
49ce53768d9c79c1d34c38990e92d028
de6df69148a216924bda762d94ce6c118bd0cbcd
'2011-12-21T08:50:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKY' 'sip-files00008.tif'
7cdaa45836065fa9bae4501eba3a1e09
ccd997d904bad1f36147235d6a3efc0d1853ffc7
'2011-12-21T08:51:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOKZ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
a4934f63c834dbd913691412d4e9f9aa
2ea7ef4248eb6384a20ffaa93f4e509e0f0bd80b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLA' 'sip-files00010.tif'
12ff6c5683bda248b7cdc24cee5f0aad
57219277f56e5e2c828cb8c704f55dd2560dbe98
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLB' 'sip-files00011.tif'
667bf7c4705a7ca5edb2e036b535cd06
52ee515e1286d434acdc7b0be896916c4e360e80
'2011-12-21T08:48:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLC' 'sip-files00013.tif'
194bb4f12a37945a9f731857108e2926
dea9ea816913c28f9477323b131b3e7783d0e2b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLD' 'sip-files00014.tif'
7de357438f37df79783f63b3eb1e29bb
0ddb9315ffe402a4b67767c417f79a4c9e334055
'2011-12-21T08:50:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLE' 'sip-files00015.tif'
61230045c9df09dffa6651bd51b205fa
ad3239e5cdab88eeec06bb72e91a4b1f83a136b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLF' 'sip-files00016.tif'
71ff77a1fcc936c903039ca22cc48de8
236a6883293dd2498a222e4d1bd9229c9b2b6639
'2011-12-21T08:49:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLG' 'sip-files00017.tif'
bb45e3b7480318fff82a26b2c474cb40
194aef8a26dc320f9bdc90e6714f3b3f1f87bf1a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLH' 'sip-files00018.tif'
6fceb52de381eceaedb162f94fad0a39
9f1469ddc3132bf0639f1e4455ed82187395e573
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLI' 'sip-files00019.tif'
5fb40c8c506d8fb51544aecc743fbc2f
1effaf3955ea3bb7626a4a9f56b613bb15c7d306
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLJ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
43b2c7381dfb91e1614ad1518873b303
b5004866a03eb763af5e06fb3d376698a9943357
'2011-12-21T08:47:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLK' 'sip-files00021.tif'
9afe00a578c4bbfeff38cde5c30a27f8
c0f2c926c074c94c2209c98b56d7b28a15e5a933
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLL' 'sip-files00022.tif'
5204d8d41dac756676e1e4f381dded47
4cadf92a35f3034e60063022736fb6820fcd59bb
'2011-12-21T08:50:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLM' 'sip-files00023.tif'
4b07c6b2875fe7e363de197f4e7355fe
eee4b284a961dc0c07c9a5d72e443b47ccbf3557
describe
'2772568' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLN' 'sip-files00024.tif'
e84546504e45dda05ad7910176d2e4b6
c785ea9053d352b4dbcba931982e1aef77accb32
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLO' 'sip-files00025.tif'
4a74d2c8d0062c1dbb3fcb358df73e77
73aa3fef09b7c1960ed1816cf9f0af40d2effd6d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLP' 'sip-files00026.tif'
a4dab3330ede736e2fc86f29a9910611
a9cf7a0ebae6b99f85970b527b9013fd158ecddd
'2011-12-21T08:50:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLQ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
7e75838f3fc7bab45b4f602ea02daa7c
2ba839a4bf92e3976a908bdb3d75dd789b48aadd
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLR' 'sip-files00028.tif'
2045b7e1dc19af81f1b71011177ae8c8
6c67506d8024fa0d5dba77af3bcc8bba65e86d23
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLS' 'sip-files00029.tif'
dc984016a1d25c4db6d5c95b2098da2e
ceca1bb92c334b22e653946e84cf3d29cab58d5c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLT' 'sip-files00030.tif'
e9315df3bd47bc78b28cc261e9c56429
9cc3ad37c601104cc2308ed5a145c0e8597c7fde
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLU' 'sip-files00031.tif'
0a79c169c99afdd189691d76d41ca1c6
3ec0ed8b16dbdcc01f1c2e3664615b5f0ecf3520
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLV' 'sip-files00032.tif'
c2f8a3c69d5232d8a94d1ec5d92532ad
e9ad6f9b058a56a09e454e9369cef78b9d48a19e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLW' 'sip-files00033.tif'
63596ae8f8c6315cd86bd2b298ea51d1
2dfcd3b0e647b57fd46620ea93f62f2c20126aa7
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLX' 'sip-files00034.tif'
a9b040be0ecfb50ef61d2ac35c6cb0df
5c8c4bcd1b1169e05d6b52adbf057c2e7e88f648
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLY' 'sip-files00035.tif'
66c1381a7c2f779f5a8967a168757273
dfc0cb9e17c871c402df6c2448cf521e4a2426cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOLZ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
f15b2c4fab8a41b7083a4740514a5bb6
708e6c13e66ab5c2bc82838ccec28ffd3a629f0e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMA' 'sip-files00037.tif'
2f887debfa62a067e06719006857e998
bfae67a99b82e0058bb2fbce91a1ae405b5af71d
'2011-12-21T08:46:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMB' 'sip-files00038.tif'
9a48367456b1d246b3ac837f390cab87
bbb52044e52202f2d2994f988b568cfcb76990b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMC' 'sip-files00039.tif'
75262ad7e798b15e0c67e7a553197d10
743030f2d44b808ea19a9e0230a97e05988d08a8
'2011-12-21T08:50:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMD' 'sip-files00040.tif'
38417b572790503b9b730d79f9ea7fb5
0cc04a4eefcc82ade6de30b374bfa42b6c19b359
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOME' 'sip-files00041.tif'
03d03c1c85848955190281dfb5b97a99
3a11cdb0ca628565521ffe096de14441fc7f795a
'2011-12-21T08:48:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMF' 'sip-files00042.tif'
99246030116dc52f7ba2c141aa87c3b2
cab79c4678af05b6da2158fe4857d4f7deb7c04b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMG' 'sip-files00043.tif'
d7ce31b5c9c9781fa41dd1ee232ca89e
bbb4632e2c2f1e96a58fdd148fa2672f5f91467a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMH' 'sip-files00044.tif'
778c9695b85c551a68cb5a6ba91b0061
3f8a002f93933f97974b0c0fb913148a19147333
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMI' 'sip-files00045.tif'
4999c441ff473299c55bf326ba51645a
404b503878215e30923abe5ccf3b9a8f7de7c747
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMJ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
b9fd3b4701190078c6f097c7b7a8d95f
13336a4806e8a2869715283cd6039e901817414a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMK' 'sip-files00047.tif'
be94ccdb83a78cc4d122cc01ab3c1d7e
ec4af3e86844ea33d6d4b75859554878eba05f1f
'2011-12-21T08:51:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOML' 'sip-files00048.tif'
286fc230ce3968db0ffcccd19ee038fe
624ffc7d16f1a27e493a6017180a453dcf6f7ad7
'2011-12-21T08:52:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMM' 'sip-files00049.tif'
dbcba7bfaf63a35c6a1fb5834da6706d
f4055fb78f2648124c4f9fd2c2c963d1efa7c5af
'2011-12-21T08:52:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMN' 'sip-files00050.tif'
bb3ea7ff0ebe1c4e83234ab8386d8dfe
fb0b1d4e0c53e6cae3d953a1d216ea3ffaf2589b
'2011-12-21T08:46:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMO' 'sip-files00051.tif'
8ab0602718f776baaa5595bcfeb168c8
31693366ec2d427cd9842fba8f7dfe6aff99c466
'2011-12-21T08:46:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMP' 'sip-files00052.tif'
57207897e1b37c7aaaf1d3c64a95f035
3eddcada0be8e6cd11d5b2facf91c3ff2c1463f0
'2011-12-21T08:51:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMQ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
9884992ba5a213649b7bfb2831302475
cf54419365a271909acb3d1630542021be2a1e8f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMR' 'sip-files00054.tif'
2e3cbd615a353853e68c1b132fff1555
16051aa5fc47546d7e8ff957260064a6caba2174
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMS' 'sip-files00055.tif'
44dbf61af4af1fa82bbd76cc29d4b401
7536a538757dd486db4f803aa5f861e137c5c0de
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMT' 'sip-files00056.tif'
61d0d6d31442949dc40214037cd1d22f
9e03dc8144560c0af9a63e21d91d049a4d84ed5d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMU' 'sip-files00057.tif'
78f8376561a828f35bf6c2320da1ad1c
d33155aa4cab85da2f507e54a63655a4ac45baf8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMV' 'sip-files00058.tif'
96c3715b4ce0bf4a0814a7b552897e75
9556a4dbef57c29ddd229f6bc13e7c90035e1c7b
'2011-12-21T08:50:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMW' 'sip-files00059.tif'
276ea5ac67d4e7dc03539ac5988fe632
86826f7dac01b8cae374c907bc075a6c2612b5a5
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMX' 'sip-files00060.tif'
7dff26fd83917530d0553744f0642ea5
67ba22b31907e0cde010313fe6c07fe8d3720bae
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMY' 'sip-files00061.tif'
51e9a72f6384ab721da8eb9f8f552582
b8913f5b41db076fd9a0e99413d06e91bd796d47
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOMZ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
93204f8829ae87f32891442c2514c83b
83cf2692a4278e13aadd2bcd27163f89ef5460c6
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONA' 'sip-files00063.tif'
a5d33f7561eb341ea82acf7bd85e1127
d6abbbe3fc8b44a4dfc293de5f96f3efb3651c3b
'2011-12-21T08:48:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONB' 'sip-files00064.tif'
dcb0335c9c2a915ca686a26fa19e837a
61abddf505aa791f01b190f0b0a5723fb1f3011a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONC' 'sip-files00065.tif'
e9667f7665193ffc4f1a5255eb72d38b
639b852c4c17c09467234758b3cb411de641520c
'2011-12-21T08:52:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOND' 'sip-files00066.tif'
629fb9694358535bd8fa461ee8737297
25bd5895738380e88ee18b73674f481ea909aac5
'2011-12-21T08:45:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONE' 'sip-files00067.tif'
a6b152686e9a9326896b7d4c67293a91
90c4f11490c69bbf294772e4feb169f8c98b5ddb
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
f08e7dc398000d10d78a6e0c8cfd1292
d3dba0ae6e9f6423061d95ef30e6e6614b35e4e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONG' 'sip-files00069.tif'
c352fa35d507382993ef893e9a7d1d88
7cb28928573e2017d1d483c4d665f50e0a6886d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONH' 'sip-files00070.tif'
8a5f4dc0ca17c612da8f5f2d55eba284
0218e614d3f0acdce4f2c96f56defd3941b1f1d0
'2011-12-21T08:49:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONI' 'sip-files00071.tif'
46d7ae062940072711adc56933d519e6
515d6ad34319ae83e25457845fdebe9d0ad5a918
'2011-12-21T08:52:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONJ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
48555fa73032347ee2f6949bb81c5aef
502d3fa905568692201361e25f4022fa6382c4d7
'2011-12-21T08:50:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONK' 'sip-files00073.tif'
4c37566eaeff18a318537c19780e91e9
d6b0be73871202a9a08af4a7d3103342383372d5
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONL' 'sip-files00074.tif'
87a30fc444965c469f6a4430e1c77d52
3ac0a4f51a9ca482b253ac02040ec5da45643a56
'2011-12-21T08:49:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONM' 'sip-files00075.tif'
e8444fab2f5ac29937cfd89ec231795d
e3f450605b6a83017f5b2e093330f9448bc14e88
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONN' 'sip-files00076.tif'
d5494d979bb022b8dd98e96acbb42ce5
ae24de66f52bbb4bbe8a0212345584f7a59121bf
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONO' 'sip-files00077.tif'
54a5b4d8a6c24d8387e8653447b99d10
fc13f4ffcd99c2405519709ccd88dae773193169
'2011-12-21T08:49:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONP' 'sip-files00078.tif'
cda1e0889b58eff939f5f133b30fcc1e
c4a62d3e8578efe4fb5f5633ea422a317586611e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONQ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
aa8d6fdf06d357c6089cebcaf2e3d348
cfec0ad583d0e33d8ce81bf1b205811518ffdcbc
'2011-12-21T08:47:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONR' 'sip-files00080.tif'
22afd8073eb4a7bec4c2c75ff612ab6e
a9802d3a54deda00f414e7211aae886b64dcb609
'2011-12-21T08:51:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONS' 'sip-files00081.tif'
bcc2c0bd682535bc99f09120c102f76f
331e24c104e5fcd18a8ab813f8007cd9ddf842b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONT' 'sip-files00082.tif'
dc500c5ab5770c98c47379ed73be74fb
7c180e2687d15baa9e22154c96b274e58387e291
'2011-12-21T08:49:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONU' 'sip-files00083.tif'
ae5103e0afcaed2925ae8e2355a06090
5d78bb8a13e036fb52c41663c799ec2c63a1c0a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONV' 'sip-files00084.tif'
3ee65fcd7ff4900ded1b355d3948ecc4
7babdcbbc877ecd161934705a74ba25a5921743c
'2011-12-21T08:45:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONW' 'sip-files00085.tif'
cb124a024c951cf7153f1ff2938ce093
a76227d47ac384d4749b379e5d77f52a45d6aa48
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONX' 'sip-files00086.tif'
9b5cb53a961fe0d87591b93b8c5b1ed6
4f6649aac14edf15e9bc46b31ed6b73c5d2caa5e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONY' 'sip-files00087.tif'
b380c3dc7413ec247c9605a6d34a7b3b
f5ec60d5cebbae91116efecf17c1137fecd90435
'2011-12-21T08:48:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACONZ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
0dd980c121c694619e22996495cef19b
1d51be698307a2b3369686372e500e7367d2381b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOA' 'sip-files00089.tif'
fdad101a58afe1656408b314a2f6ceb7
7132008f1b2eb4d58f3d2ecb54f6d7837acabf21
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOB' 'sip-files00090.tif'
d8632feb4c59aad4af995876f345dc8f
b024843eed79a4e2fd2f5adc3a4329ede93c8686
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOC' 'sip-files00091.tif'
e51635908f494fe071210969b4014767
1467e594f345579de6013ba644756c09e72f0066
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOD' 'sip-files00092.tif'
a30dbdd538f890a545102779af437885
02b2de9d87eb3435ff6da4217ec087bedf94ed5b
'2011-12-21T08:47:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOE' 'sip-files00093.tif'
ef794d657afa77dcb31e6d6193fea3ae
39b54c0efbb71709cc674c64854edd52b697e003
'2011-12-21T08:47:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOF' 'sip-files00094.tif'
ab5e353d75ec38313d31d2f103d7dd81
c35eb27f0ed615111bd8bce6569e0b85f62938e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOG' 'sip-files00095.tif'
99dc95044c7d706579c7f6b405d232ae
8173183de6e7d35c6dea3f9920ed84dbd2d1f9d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOH' 'sip-files00096.tif'
2f5c7cfe459b55d6b3d9d2cd293aa6cb
c7a9e8731ed47814c7c87b7554476d1bb1157786
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOI' 'sip-files00097.tif'
96cd80d74f7eb942086a217542c97356
7807704fee1d22dfbf1a1835d764371d5a412a22
'2011-12-21T08:47:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOJ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
b90284fe559d7271222f36866a68381a
b9021fcf60ef7ad15a9f10bdbee51e87c7ad44a8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOK' 'sip-files00099.tif'
a08e7c76e83d015383213d3ab452aeca
453b5b0d67d955b30430dcdb67c1e8ac43503a12
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOL' 'sip-files00100.tif'
80a538870365d8f996e807d7ad3f2291
62f68828d3b9db7c543050b46e0058af3c4eb504
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOM' 'sip-files00101.tif'
d3426adbad67ec31a7ea7aec6dbf9362
e30181da3bf8fc559e4adb00599fbb7e1fcc174d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOON' 'sip-files00102.tif'
71c5b5a3dd91bbc5ee699a6a873b047f
17947d66f019b689e5fa6522529831fd84ac5d12
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOO' 'sip-files00103.tif'
e01b3c71198172b87b8b6f8c9e2e2621
a9bbb9915a183a1a053bc1fead9e7491c98b4a5e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOP' 'sip-files00104.tif'
7119d4be31acb3411aa070fdaeb0ccca
af76c387590b878f4c5ad1f0fc7349de447095d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOQ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
0ba6f5c14e2f31f8026427c67a8f2064
fc84fa01ddfa83ec3833bda5ed7994d15d1c6d1a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOR' 'sip-files00106.tif'
ec7e0a2d76c60241828d6605df8005ed
e0649549584574a5ca7de438fe046f233ea0c187
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOS' 'sip-files00107.tif'
73fdb92b70734b11af0a60aa2f5120ec
4ca56d12e8ff6f700a39a5d26dbead01e7284bc1
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOT' 'sip-files00108.tif'
0d001d8fe85f69e35d2d85c01f00ac11
774e2aa9ba1d1655e59ca479b1418bfd749e4fa3
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOU' 'sip-files00109.tif'
97a0fd3c923c7a4d88164bc0123140d8
f30334670648a427d5d9a8fc4797c02e8ac6a6eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOV' 'sip-files00110.tif'
203e39c180dd0d013cc6e24c2b1d6f6c
12cc4387de954410a8e0199fcaf9d8a98d953be8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOW' 'sip-files00111.tif'
1b23bd27c4c903a4376b00250ce18fe7
69672a3b1a02703249afcbed122d848ae5883f9b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOX' 'sip-files00112.tif'
7056dbd6d106560a2d870c048f55168e
74880c6f6420f05852693d8c7c1d9c6a92d71ab2
'2011-12-21T08:50:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOY' 'sip-files00113.tif'
84d636b07c604db22d3ee36515f97f9b
ee23bd3b98ea428d1101337c2dc76e22fc61f52b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOOZ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
0d15df7e7ff9246c9e44224d813d16a5
2b28f966a3a3f5cc9effdda914ec510708d660b2
'2011-12-21T08:47:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPA' 'sip-files00115.tif'
c0b68809dc465d3795e75616c38e1f6e
8aa6ddf6a6ca810e1412e646b0ef84883fc365d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPB' 'sip-files00116.tif'
a9698277817cb542be1b2bd725ef2f1a
fd557fc76799c45bdaa003c55deb95add86594b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPC' 'sip-files00117.tif'
bf9df0230d2d30b43e5b355eebfe5947
3275301e6cd7275468e24beea00382b53b68fecb
'2011-12-21T08:50:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPD' 'sip-files00118.tif'
cd30663d8323664e7580497cb94bff8c
8df14ed343777be57ff3f11b9864fe69cf80f172
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPE' 'sip-files00119.tif'
d2cc514437d1a592b56768c4bdece5fd
046fc4bcfabb2b606fbaa4d6682fc7fb7efa398d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPF' 'sip-files00120.tif'
9ca3b27876f1bb1a66f8aac8178cdc8c
b3fe57a6ac1522069f2de0597292c0a83431451d
'2011-12-21T08:51:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPG' 'sip-files00121.tif'
aac8fdc4d3ed059cbba930e94586f5b7
93c8d6a62c7cfebeb15f70f3d528fd34e8c621b6
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPH' 'sip-files00122.tif'
ce27557c738e7af94fe0009cd268d035
9f6c0410839d3416213f72ac5209e64e223eb135
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPI' 'sip-files00123.tif'
9eb132c709e59bf79ba9d00526373d90
a2273d563f5e694ed066c0c716a4f263d86cbab9
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPJ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
fd78367b2930bbd7ecb5c12402485cfb
897335b47382034ebd3f88e9a39a605ab3fa5d2e
'2011-12-21T08:51:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPK' 'sip-files00125.tif'
a4e4f757696985212bef9417cf351b8b
5de79f69c02d88df81dde07f9f37f98cd24bb406
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPL' 'sip-files00126.tif'
69c5dea8948f586790139acce2feec2d
09c15ec3b8ebed5b6c7d6781b899ddb078373b1f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPM' 'sip-files00127.tif'
758145748ff090fe6498521ed0ee0726
1911f4b38138e9bd54c3258642d7e6a5444b159d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPN' 'sip-files00128.tif'
1ad6b730862017d6f052af3a269c6e58
1c115d4f580b452f7ae35b2722ae7487e3cdd1a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPO' 'sip-files00129.tif'
b08039df990d01166e72ac4bf3746b94
68ea4ca083bf0aa71c9f18548d867b2834429fb1
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPP' 'sip-files00130.tif'
7000ecf7c3b4f84a31422ce8d841a595
d5773c8c39fed5fc3e39723fb76b4fff85a1402e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPQ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
a028de3958e266782a497349cd23b98d
faf9a8920853918afc44dd788a0f48e5cdfe614f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPR' 'sip-files00132.tif'
d1ecd35b9a783ab309dcf4be520f806f
7fb6a2c11e79bfde3e3d66d7ab94512d1824f7d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPS' 'sip-files00133.tif'
3d7d564b7b7d0af58f4dfc456e9c0781
353c411f53ccfae465637cb03a450e9c80863332
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPT' 'sip-files00134.tif'
9ec617440cc6f39db2829a95f649b4b7
87b1783ae280aee2d1247f16fe0b7cca95c86ed8
'2011-12-21T08:46:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPU' 'sip-files00135.tif'
3e6beaf85d5501f59927028d802cf8a9
6c7d9a8e7822896239b85a79cc33b9bacf65a1a7
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPV' 'sip-files00136.tif'
27efb4e061fd1f675e8642c2d984a746
46d65b1e2345c66a73294d8ec4e2809958145704
'2011-12-21T08:50:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPW' 'sip-files00137.tif'
8bd7cf71fc758625d1d3dc36938719bc
3259083510bea2d40df3702bcb5ea99be955e041
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPX' 'sip-files00138.tif'
9f78a43b6e29549211452bfcdf6d318f
01a56c247bc5772a659647ebafa35bfc75868806
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPY' 'sip-files00139.tif'
fcf43c9e29425140cb562e823c0a707f
eefd63b66730afdb6a6c41f5a55c3bce817673bd
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOPZ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
a8073ad7df98525573cfd300bbb0fef1
4df2aae06007fe969b714b0721addf32af815549
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQA' 'sip-files00141.tif'
93926e79e9ca4350bfc7bd9895c83601
a6cd8cc6a61ab26e9d166936e7f48b46a15ea345
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQB' 'sip-files00142.tif'
b79630637239c436b602030d97b6932b
c7448e012f90176eca961157ba64814d0ea5a703
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQC' 'sip-files00143.tif'
4d6eafcc343e94d3623ad54e0b9610dd
f57411e0ff78730f31476eeef397feb5695893df
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQD' 'sip-files00144.tif'
1e3e1bfe92b58d082d9a664af984791b
e5b84f2cd821519d279084fba7d804a2fd69ef99
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQE' 'sip-files00145.tif'
7ba9b8bb3a81c883928d60cca67cc650
cce9c7a47adbdf39cce43f63149368f4e7145572
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQF' 'sip-files00146.tif'
4abf5c8b30e86eebf647b8f34acabb54
0301275812fddec5bacfc356238558f67a535b6a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQG' 'sip-files00147.tif'
be122aade8d1531140ffdb2cd6317598
17a2b647dbacb9b9abeef359d79a8e8bbf167337
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQH' 'sip-files00148.tif'
bca12fd039fa6f230bce40fa2ce00891
f850b06127ab802e378daf1c6de5f8bc03564f13
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQI' 'sip-files00149.tif'
b4f7d8109119e7465e4b02e6652c48c0
1175cc46ce8f8a72c57f61d2c6ef015b54dc97ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQJ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
4b17eeea91548672deb87b0910cffb9d
1571b7729046833dcbcd7abfd4181c118b7d8b44
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQK' 'sip-files00151.tif'
a60aeddf646b25dd4bde0f335db593bf
03b449c985df860261433d7b000364b4737df83a
'2011-12-21T08:47:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQL' 'sip-files00152.tif'
47dbfbfcb6c7d699caa036cd781946e1
8fc1a9633adf6e70d9237852f0d1b1695670ea75
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQM' 'sip-files00153.tif'
6e2c245d697b61a34e1d0385ebeb13c4
725c0ae8d222c119598840e0a133d6cfbeafc3e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQN' 'sip-files00154.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQO' 'sip-files00155.tif'
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'2011-12-21T08:51:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQP' 'sip-files00156.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQQ' 'sip-files00157.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQR' 'sip-files00158.tif'
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'2011-12-21T08:51:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQS' 'sip-files00159.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQT' 'sip-files00160.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQU' 'sip-files00161.tif'
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'2011-12-21T08:50:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQV' 'sip-files00162.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQW' 'sip-files00163.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQX' 'sip-files00164.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQY' 'sip-files00165.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOQZ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORA' 'sip-files00167.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORB' 'sip-files00168.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORC' 'sip-files00169.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORD' 'sip-files00170.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORE' 'sip-files00171.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORF' 'sip-files00172.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORG' 'sip-files00173.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORH' 'sip-files00174.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORI' 'sip-files00175.tif'
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'2011-12-21T08:51:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORJ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORK' 'sip-files00177.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORL' 'sip-files00178.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORM' 'sip-files00179.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORN' 'sip-files00180.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORO' 'sip-files00181.tif'
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'2011-12-21T08:48:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORP' 'sip-files00182.tif'
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'2011-12-21T08:52:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORQ' 'sip-files00183.tif'
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'2011-12-21T08:50:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORR' 'sip-files00184.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORS' 'sip-files00185.tif'
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'2011-12-21T08:51:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORT' 'sip-files00186.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORU' 'sip-files00187.tif'
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'2011-12-21T08:51:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORV' 'sip-files00188.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORW' 'sip-files00189.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORX' 'sip-files00190.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORY' 'sip-files00191.tif'
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'2011-12-21T08:47:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACORZ' 'sip-files00193.tif'
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'2011-12-21T08:49:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSA' 'sip-files00194.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSB' 'sip-files00195.tif'
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describe
'2774636' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSC' 'sip-files00196.tif'
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describe
'9924016' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSD' 'sip-files00199.tif'
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'2011-12-21T08:45:32-05:00'
describe
'9386328' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSE' 'sip-files00200.tif'
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describe
'1573644' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSF' 'sip-files00201.tif'
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'2011-12-21T08:50:40-05:00'
describe
'191464' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSG' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
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describe
'70152' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSH' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
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describe
'69651' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSI' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
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describe
'12173' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSJ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
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describe
'72760' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSK' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
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describe
'110396' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSL' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
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describe
'32936' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSM' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
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describe
'16395' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSN' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
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describe
'52431' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSO' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
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describe
'54343' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSP' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
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describe
'35902' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSQ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
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describe
'55896' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSR' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
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describe
'98054' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSS' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
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describe
'93319' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOST' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
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describe
'100426' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSU' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
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'2011-12-21T08:48:27-05:00'
describe
'103490' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSV' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
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describe
'98238' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSW' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
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describe
'88147' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSX' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
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describe
'8972' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSY' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
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describe
'101828' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOSZ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
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describe
'96554' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTA' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
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describe
'86084' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTB' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
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describe
'98792' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTC' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
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describe
'98622' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTD' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
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describe
'96698' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTE' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
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describe
'45874' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTF' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
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describe
'71077' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTG' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
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describe
'99982' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTH' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
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describe
'97257' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTI' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
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describe
'95058' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTJ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
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describe
'92532' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTK' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
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describe
'93823' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
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describe
'95059' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTM' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
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describe
'99086' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTN' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
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describe
'99020' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTO' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
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describe
'93049' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTP' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
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describe
'96528' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTQ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
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describe
'98362' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTR' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
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describe
'99352' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTS' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
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describe
'93415' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTT' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
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describe
'94598' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTU' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
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describe
'81248' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTV' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
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describe
'9732' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
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describe
'93391' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTX' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
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describe
'95542' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOTY' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'95829' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUC' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
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describe
'97522' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUD' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
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describe
'95229' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUE' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
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describe
'100564' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUF' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
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describe
'92968' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUG' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
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describe
'96407' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUH' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
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describe
'99345' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUI' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
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describe
'101208' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
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describe
'100271' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUK' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
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describe
'86077' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUL' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
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describe
'97025' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUM' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
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describe
'96849' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUN' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
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describe
'99136' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUO' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
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describe
'135766' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUP' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
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describe
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43715fb28b4024e48322b7a81b3a86b0
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'2011-12-21T08:52:11-05:00'
describe
'96800' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUR' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
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describe
'40638' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUS' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
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describe
'67431' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUT' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
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'2011-12-21T08:47:19-05:00'
describe
'110407' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUU' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
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describe
'78313' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUV' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
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describe
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'2011-12-21T08:51:46-05:00'
describe
'106173' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUX' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
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'2011-12-21T08:51:15-05:00'
describe
'97531' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUY' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
c1620ceaedcad9d84a5dd7f7b576d0ee
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describe
'95355' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOUZ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
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describe
'95408' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVA' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
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describe
'90306' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVB' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
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'2011-12-21T08:51:49-05:00'
describe
'92036' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVC' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
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describe
'99828' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVD' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
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describe
'8399' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVE' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
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'2011-12-21T08:49:05-05:00'
describe
'98121' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVF' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'23052' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVH' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
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describe
'66176' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVI' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
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describe
'93894' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVJ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
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describe
'93523' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVK' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
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describe
'97301' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVL' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
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describe
'95545' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVM' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
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describe
'96793' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVN' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
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describe
'93783' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVO' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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'2011-12-21T08:48:26-05:00'
describe
'105188' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVR' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
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describe
'9256' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVS' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
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describe
'96017' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVT' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
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describe
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'2011-12-21T08:50:25-05:00'
describe
'96453' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVV' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
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describe
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'2011-12-21T08:52:31-05:00'
describe
'100520' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVX' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
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describe
'99453' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOVY' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'58808' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWB' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
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describe
'75470' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWC' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
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'2011-12-21T08:50:01-05:00'
describe
'99593' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWD' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
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describe
'90436' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWE' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'96270' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWG' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
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describe
'98757' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWH' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
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describe
'88934' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWI' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
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describe
'94207' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWJ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
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'2011-12-21T08:50:51-05:00'
describe
'90696' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWK' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
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describe
'97926' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWL' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
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describe
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'2011-12-21T08:50:55-05:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-12-21T08:47:41-05:00'
describe
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describe
'148386' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWR' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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'2011-12-21T08:50:07-05:00'
describe
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describe
'27234' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWV' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
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describe
'69802' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWW' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
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'2011-12-21T08:52:12-05:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
'98583' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOWZ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'93572' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXB' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'8508' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXE' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
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'2011-12-21T08:48:52-05:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'98031' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXI' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
d5ca6a357cae57c65720b6a5e5323ef1
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describe
'97243' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXJ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
c4bab00022c736260b1a6c9bcbc3931c
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describe
'76664' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXK' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
3dec627e988128000e029950b848ffb6
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describe
'97651' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXL' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
3b0766f195eb53f9da97ba9a4b4c6f45
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'2011-12-21T08:49:09-05:00'
describe
'95490' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXM' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
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describe
'96832' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXN' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
8ed9bcd542ffeeb09dff2e84e58bae98
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describe
'29440' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXO' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
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describe
'76085' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXP' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
f9e1a202bac5a3ca29e101a07e06bd4f
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'2011-12-21T08:49:19-05:00'
describe
'98400' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXQ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
699434db0556524ad068dbf1b2e84d32
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describe
'97952' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXR' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
2cfa8446f9221ae5e5dc8d15690418d4
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describe
'94908' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXS' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
978c3e5672dd90c40ac5651015aa9fd9
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describe
'92725' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXT' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
5847381c3ff623e6d722ef3956b58b92
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describe
'98803' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXU' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
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describe
'95176' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXV' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
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describe
'99064' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXW' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
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describe
'99374' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXX' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
65e8d7ccf3e2856974dc04b8ba1f2dcb
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describe
'89710' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXY' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
517f5254c56d09054af13334ad1bdefe
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describe
'93196' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOXZ' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
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describe
'8035' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYA' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
5600e3ca6b56f8bf9d70c6b0d8eb1c43
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'2011-12-21T08:45:55-05:00'
describe
'98046' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYB' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
e3ec53ddabb991c140f3c7dab9e24687
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'2011-12-21T08:48:46-05:00'
describe
'92157' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYC' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
f1ff861c148c25cf5c66a1f4f4e885ef
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describe
'94204' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYD' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
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describe
'31818' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYE' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
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describe
'75016' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYF' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
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describe
'97933' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYG' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
2e5550b3d0f396d782314e79d954a10f
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describe
'91406' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYH' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
2df2d5628aa2c0f5885a71f6ec98731c
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describe
'94707' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYI' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
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describe
'100145' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYJ' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
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describe
'90397' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYK' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
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describe
'89396' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYL' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
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describe
'8348' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYM' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
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describe
'92717' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYN' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
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describe
'93325' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYO' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
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describe
'93859' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYP' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
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describe
'94251' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYQ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
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describe
'97923' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYR' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
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describe
'92453' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYS' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
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describe
'95548' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYT' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
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describe
'94701' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYU' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
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describe
'98948' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYV' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
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describe
'99245' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYW' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
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describe
'83850' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYX' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
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describe
'75762' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYY' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
a02c41e178ee0b5d498d8d2bc0b4c4bf
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describe
'98538' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOYZ' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
a0021fb1ffd3047c38ff88f491b8cfa5
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describe
'101026' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZA' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
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describe
'92284' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZB' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
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'2011-12-21T08:50:58-05:00'
describe
'98077' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZC' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
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describe
'91562' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZD' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
cd1c685d7dde447cfa3cde1044b50e46
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'2011-12-21T08:51:35-05:00'
describe
'87912' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZE' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
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describe
'89926' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZF' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
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describe
'92633' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZG' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
176193cd5fe16150994534ea8791521d
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'2011-12-21T08:49:46-05:00'
describe
'97347' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZH' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
f529c4d0d8eca502e029d4d57d8e9fab
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describe
'91073' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZI' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
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describe
'38110' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZJ' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
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describe
'8063' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZK' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
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describe
'61121' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZL' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
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describe
'104053' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZM' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
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describe
'95213' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZN' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
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describe
'102811' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZO' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
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describe
'86754' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZP' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
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describe
'75810' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZQ' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
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describe
'186169' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZR' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
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describe
'36247' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZS' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
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describe
'10951' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZT' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
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'2011-12-21T08:51:34-05:00'
describe
'45634' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZU' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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'2011-12-21T08:47:17-05:00'
describe
'14168' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACOZX' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'28837' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAD' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
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describe
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'2011-12-21T08:52:33-05:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
'5126' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAH' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAI' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
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describe
'17535' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAJ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
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describe
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'2011-12-21T08:50:18-05:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'19304' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAP' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'32857' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAR' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
4e88aa2c46def844896b3a17c6bb7103
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describe
'8283' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAS' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
2866950379065609931845a92debd57a
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describe
'31481' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAT' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
f5026378a5b69d5ee047a41ef625cfdd
4e0f0048e6dabc102ee530ec69dcd8830fad24a7
describe
'8009' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAU' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
e39cd17ad55b4b56f72b1c6b0c9dd6d5
d3448380d5312651701398a2bfe9541b083663ba
describe
'34612' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAV' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
1f0f96a03d791a137271d66070100116
df542ea673c3f540621163b5cf8d8397a62116e0
describe
'8467' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAW' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
7594ffa22739a6f2915c4dada498e66c
9eafa4d5304dcb7beeff19701dde8ac6d0643dc0
describe
'34426' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAX' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
1f2ec59d23d65ef6e50e4b278998cb02
586b6bbdc70c54a4c9f869e3c9e09b3557aa6b21
'2011-12-21T08:46:57-05:00'
describe
'8724' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAY' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
faae322a736e9e3c8fcb7fabb47032fe
1572bebae8407fd821cb6852e6728426e82acd61
'2011-12-21T08:51:03-05:00'
describe
'32739' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPAZ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ebaae9379fa6f9bfce45a470207a4d30
1ea3d4f6b10a658a9f2efb42111d8882c83dad31
describe
'7933' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBA' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
87fb14c31dbff7316728247ad366b255
b39aed29aa2d775f30cb11a04a4d08fe19a66c25
describe
'23297' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBB' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
2f270720a5ff6f2b79f1a415994b00aa
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describe
'6349' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBC' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
6904c4619a7ac41533a07770aed8897a
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describe
'2632' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBD' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
67486d949be5bf849b4407716f651cc1
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describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBE' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
af7e99a1872c566c3fa260569e0a8d0a
0333b0c96bad90f7d8181c30778532fb80476d5c
'2011-12-21T08:48:18-05:00'
describe
'33979' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBF' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
a85231d4ef37a396f71e5999f5fdbde6
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describe
'8594' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBG' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
03b3b8dacee3444d9f42b4bb55ab3a7d
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describe
'32849' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBH' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
c4a556a7c4d17b0b867154faa71e8b93
4ecba5042a915d2f9479f71cf7a3651c1614348e
describe
'8033' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBI' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
0ada87fad4eff0247103b208c3b4ae26
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describe
'27546' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBJ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
5830bcbfc1323a7fa29b64dc18b37d62
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBK' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
2e3527d11cfd49eee222cfcf160ac9c0
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describe
'33154' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBL' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
e8642bf47c1a71c6b425d544dc5bb8f8
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describe
'8181' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBM' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
4071988857e79e4ca74ded07938becab
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describe
'34080' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBN' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
873500e8ddbd279ad5e44028c3dc3fd0
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describe
'8197' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBO' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
a5fce0bba046460631a52a9fbc73dfc1
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describe
'32195' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBP' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
662f57729d9df4e870c7eb6b6dbe88c1
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describe
'7955' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBQ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
ffb46d73d779952dddd59c7366d0b3a8
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describe
'15034' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBR' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
fab0ad39abdd5ba31f50d2d6298d651d
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describe
'3899' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBS' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
7038c6c3f9f08cba0ce07a1a9e47ee39
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describe
'23666' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBT' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
a953c42694108c5e2a1185d15aed1ee5
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describe
'5779' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBU' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
bdf5781258fac5b90266da639551c1af
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describe
'31869' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBV' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
e9c83eb246b7084eb19be3fd85505d6e
451000679bfff2574f0968a06747388cc6fbbf44
describe
'8483' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
bd063293dbb1759dc71f1bc157a59321
aea00c19f9ad0e29c5ae6d8eac23565324a504d1
'2011-12-21T08:50:06-05:00'
describe
'33084' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBX' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
bbb80ef43f4f95617d2abd085d720aec
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describe
'8386' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBY' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
8028e3dfd03a6a1b399330c4c1d979da
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describe
'32045' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPBZ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
27e0d59a7f208c7a0c19697c4403a052
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describe
'8376' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCA' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
5a4431fa9a526c29055112ac6dd69087
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describe
'31823' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCB' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a95fa23896e4bcdf2a2ea115405114e3
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describe
'7714' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCC' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
95510ff7deb7ce86d74e3a0a0f7f3217
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describe
'30678' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCD' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
fe87b8d5e18221ae76d170a53b117ba7
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describe
'7712' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCE' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
a2a49af39233c37a6a5e66c42572d65b
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describe
'31949' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCF' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
4ffc9d95bab645419adfaf4bfb1fae7d
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describe
'8285' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCG' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
c24d4acb9ab55352cab24c2fbb907fd0
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describe
'33913' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCH' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
bc135c3323c004ce9fa9b0403bd538e4
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCI' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
2b35e6085e55f3d96ab27334a04c0604
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describe
'33138' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCJ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
80844e47ab381e815a14f6fd3d450f4f
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describe
'8055' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCK' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
0030a2f35bd4b9c9adffeff4127efebf
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describe
'31130' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCL' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
825c250cf3eb2a4d1b4ddebdc671d6aa
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describe
'7688' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCM' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
f54f1769c4a4afb83fbe66e8264bc109
8a5ea2e320101665a15e6f67c97a0cb94d3dd502
'2011-12-21T08:47:04-05:00'
describe
'32448' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCN' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
7192e33d3bce28d6b0423f8e7dfd6211
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describe
'8028' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCO' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
8fe83c640a2f1b8cb464fb8c85f50674
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describe
'33732' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCP' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
de80de8b3a4230b87f509df5c7584842
4ddfaef0cbb83b75ee18389f1b917c9b8336524e
describe
'7975' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCQ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
fdf688139fe7d9b6aa2760d59dbc8e33
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describe
'33795' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCR' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
07551e79b65999dcf654e7df857cfae4
1a64bb08612848ef458eb5afd510281177c1e21f
describe
'8252' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCS' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
e91372551bda8222296ed18ddbce3dcf
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describe
'30755' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCT' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
2bca7cde8e6abd27c419b00734deeafa
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describe
'7902' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCU' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
0b05a5edcf467928fd5f02e3a83712fa
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describe
'31289' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCV' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
ca4b53d0bb5b88bdd4b9594989eb7a3a
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describe
'8120' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCW' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
9f909f23a38df5a1a14944c8207a0f52
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describe
'24067' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCX' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
339e40a6a5470e56ea8833e687eb847b
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describe
'6960' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCY' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
0125229cb0a16e14cf6baf60824e2333
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describe
'2945' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPCZ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
76b43beb9f33202eb7c8e754c5c0de7a
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describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDA' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
ca60d4f5fa26368f094870056a96bd34
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describe
'31497' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDB' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
9dec078e7751b89e20c874d25416322e
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describe
'8087' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDC' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
5d15b4d34e6e2cb2b23f958b87d4d7aa
fcee05ec226922042a31781f176ab7d1d2847f57
'2011-12-21T08:51:04-05:00'
describe
'31677' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDD' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
bf73866c6c22ca92510eb80f7e2f1f9e
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describe
'7836' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDE' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
6b047e9d719e7e300b8d3bd9748ad083
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describe
'32590' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDF' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
b13619124d09f6d828382b3d26673877
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describe
'7806' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDG' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
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describe
'17185' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDH' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
f0c6f71352a339a5b753529b5f0a5fb0
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describe
'4424' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDI' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
6de004b39db3258ebbb31b1c43672dda
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describe
'24407' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDJ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
3a955651d7780f38497bf26993f12816
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describe
'6223' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDK' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
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describe
'32342' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDL' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
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describe
'7925' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDM' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
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describe
'32659' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDN' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
21d646574d5cda962e43c6ba808932b6
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describe
'8500' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDO' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
1b77b014c121470381ed1bf6397d9e53
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describe
'31570' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDP' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
2d59e430d63c710cd242a960f71e9604
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describe
'7859' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDQ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
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describe
'33662' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDR' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
24f8895e2888426bad2ce29595a47e8e
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describe
'8274' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDS' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
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describe
'30946' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDT' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
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describe
'7739' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDU' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
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describe
'31820' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDV' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8163' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDW' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
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describe
'33502' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDX' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
efcbf4f1cd5ff59837fa51854b32dbd1
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describe
'8351' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDY' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
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describe
'33750' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPDZ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
00d21a8fe60b0725381b5b7b6d54e60f
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describe
'8324' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEA' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
32dff4d05a2016fb4cea4f71b5246df8
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describe
'32179' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEB' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
fe1769d5096de837414441611c14fdf0
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describe
'8043' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEC' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
00ea3682f28ff6923301c1b8ebafb9ab
9f36376c8616863063162f0650389edcabdcad1a
describe
'28523' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPED' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
3be7b0392e63420c6eb04c1efd6774c7
507598b5e58f988ad09dfd4bef9742c426554550
describe
'7513' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEE' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
249a0bec73f411b4e11b26420a1afaab
ab2fff19520c36bec308357a73cc95a76d52f43b
describe
'31895' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEF' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
afe90d7aa4c8d83ff51ecc24f1c3d594
9d90a4c71cccc216b79aae10f54a8625645a45be
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEG' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
77a61bdf6d5451e9a3402849484971d8
154eced9701827ae5c61bceeface080b06cd5e91
describe
'32441' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEH' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
8501d57d349046c9590dfd7fa267bd4c
c1f34f5cbdba7317ba49a7f5b30b3e15eb722490
describe
'8180' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEI' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
5797fee4547c2e101a95456d95f55de2
435231e1a100401923fb1dc5560b88ffc21937ce
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEJ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
60eb6db4f2458d1f136b42a53b9b21ef
5c725ab5df4c3a71a49ab33b281e3080df30c3f8
describe
'7886' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEK' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
b9ae00f49b42b57ecc1b4fcf71e77e93
1b44c602d0478644a3e80e57017efcb40ed74c38
describe
'33043' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEL' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
50440c041791dba52120b9de1c33b452
1f2d577eeba8366839e8ad1a9bef91645445c483
describe
'7831' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEM' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
75c67c775ce12969629fdb3bdc1bb9c6
3f79eead130e930fa8673150e4c8abbf6bbf0380
describe
'2619' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEN' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
1f6489e168d6581c317f3f84ae114983
45d8dc1e23a35562ab3b82169110a7fab173cc22
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEO' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
5d5ae11c0a3f4d509e3c5c201e485432
82cf3026d5692ebe0dcde8f248bd5b0a30947d88
'2011-12-21T08:52:28-05:00'
describe
'33211' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEP' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
3619b9d92ac51a96cc93973633b2cc68
94ed20d89a3ca2c3948b42b89a30d0daa1da6abb
'2011-12-21T08:52:24-05:00'
describe
'8113' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEQ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
1498c6afc009b8221bdf46f9cd40d7e8
2f2786d472d97bdefed5e3f7c4c1f387a15e4096
describe
'13359' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPER' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
b5d3e06b24a754bfb22729c1f7eae9a9
38f5bad1f205891b636aa3a663743dc918a9aefb
'2011-12-21T08:50:44-05:00'
describe
'3724' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPES' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
9835d6fa4e41a1696ed3fc73d60a301f
7ee9c4637a26e0fcb53292ba11731a192a0c5b2e
describe
'22554' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPET' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
b5889534d4514cbd2b661cdb02ee100e
2feb08ccf017467067711cdcebc5e7b1ea720f0a
describe
'5609' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEU' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
efb197c10f8dcf9f0bb0bd9251db5e90
5ccaa9c822891c2556d0dd4d6eeeb925f0a89637
describe
'34839' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEV' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
cfc2a6f9925612122a6dced89421b55b
eec1d79914a759b4c2b791e4225e7bbf434e3960
describe
'8392' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEW' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
14059daa0c624bd47296af0181ad80c4
0949134a8b07eec03d9c03e91161f5266b2162b8
describe
'21639' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEX' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
f169121494da29fb02d33ad066952193
e65ff7adc8f2f41680229937c20c65cf37aa0a8e
describe
'6050' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEY' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
c633cb961653f04ca544abb32197b196
0c7f22de9b556d643694735eb13c8368565bb4e3
describe
'2351' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPEZ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
a9128af0a1f843a37448d880e88a2255
3265dd935018f168ba676c18032c7d50d1605d84
describe
'868' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFA' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
9a4550621a171d157f314848fc3389ff
4e59a73d051af70b9b357cde777fcf7075311560
describe
'33652' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFB' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
4036148124d0cccad8c42c9a71a9d56d
850b23a016c05a1c40ee9c8e48f06e41e21c5fee
describe
'8114' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFC' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
2405c1e8df08c484a0f33d574f0f1dab
4c5b471c73090c869466b340ad81565da1a7884b
describe
'32506' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFD' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
51c8494e7c3e8e2442f54d3e1a124150
211b893c56a7cfa5b94ec65110c6b2193e20cbcc
describe
'7725' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFE' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
729c733e4b36c7f19cbfb2b358029e3c
751ca8e522b12b629d6c654992446ebdeebd141b
describe
'31552' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFF' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
80b04018a4bbddcea9edb30a6debecf4
4655f3918de77c80e0af7ec9857860ae23d66cd1
describe
'7518' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFG' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
0c6335c8d4f091ebad3209803c7920e5
884b00bdf1f2bfac76ceb6356873218cdf3c77d2
describe
'33274' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFH' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
beba90dfc8e2251b9a9437637e214b0f
b29b1cc7d737881b5ede5f1dc376415900b83789
describe
'7980' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFI' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
7c142c32f93980043507ed53bfc78a1a
4c89a1ef35bb74d4bd9c4928963b5a17dacd69af
describe
'30822' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFJ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
776953a6d995c093362883a4a189a587
a9d1295d1252ee053fdc4015fc7be7e894828eb6
describe
'7622' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFK' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
bffeb9d0902fa65ba5a39010e4c0a29d
39192326ef77ed8bc75ab67060aad7909a8f6ed9
describe
'31154' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFL' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
60584f101bd5e415b8c686178252914a
b737cc685584ac80300a0c8872e2a70e17aac747
describe
'8066' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFM' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
beb2244ef763642fdfae9241b5804eed
d3c806fb599480c1844604030b476649ecebad81
describe
'28005' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFN' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
b12c359c235f87a0d0ed82b91ebf9f72
6a0322ad7c00d3d815b8bff51b3949c08fee8828
describe
'7270' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFO' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
3efc78284575842ad5e8eadf8c9cf320
b9f4ffb3a2a78f9a4ba12df38887b15f6b4ef56a
describe
'2451' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFP' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
ff97ed62e5fd7f040f1bb6f30a616d73
20f7c3e5512e4bcd24eacb85cd515c7943b6f241
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFQ' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
5344a201c2db0761180676f294d7ce3e
6cb11c5de1d8321a53a222986cf57ca25e37d079
'2011-12-21T08:51:16-05:00'
describe
'32793' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFR' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
e83f03dbed482961bba468577e8a7246
2be8842ed25b4b12f7ecaca3b416a583bedb60a0
describe
'8382' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFS' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
d3618d4d690965ba6254079a9ebb5c07
7634973f25c196f51db6f4baff44c859bad06323
describe
'32672' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFT' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
701d64aef41091980dc4763ce9171f81
cceb453ee1ea0ff0ceb1e9bf8fc3219f799fd4c5
describe
'8222' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFU' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
1f8235e9cf9b07f5242c65a968b5e844
c84f9c45fc5fde82a999a4665c7cb2d807a1ba57
describe
'7877' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFV' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
4a607704d3fba7ebc15aab17c334bd6b
894df30f3438b28e356f5f7fb3fa7524b9d6106f
'2011-12-21T08:51:42-05:00'
describe
'2413' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFW' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
2e0de33987a4a2630fdd3061efc08e5c
26b18209fcabcf4dd0433d6718b56d0ad0b4f169
'2011-12-21T08:50:41-05:00'
describe
'22386' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFX' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
56792ae515deea8a5799db6a1b15862d
e41fe2d85d2aab7e2d29b774b252eb3397236d28
'2011-12-21T08:49:56-05:00'
describe
'5952' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFY' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
df606593eec5f225682bf0cef91385df
432fdc15d9f3b1b26584f01a205bbd1ddffe2a72
describe
'31769' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPFZ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
1e9f36e8eb2d945d68b58c044f665819
f76a7ac52c9f23a54a137b98a49a89c94ec2f733
describe
'8195' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGA' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
4acb27944280c001f9b04b942a9e0a96
7e26d206d0541522b3eb9ea931f9ff587b49d880
describe
'31927' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGB' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
2e7b77a7a9bcd036433b7a8e3e98fd1b
50e24e693be5a737aab8c9996950cda07b97d0e7
'2011-12-21T08:47:48-05:00'
describe
'8189' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGC' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
0ab7b36c6a6bc593250d1535fbcb2fa9
b70cf4a1ba1492016cbda5383600f6cbc94ca1a6
describe
'33282' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGD' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
00c017d93ef5f3c0e65ad8e3b6afc33d
5ebbae44c5263e78b21462a6d2396558c29f3d72
describe
'8450' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGE' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
9f292a4f8f3590dd3aca84cca822d3a9
8879a2c265a70f7ece25f3525b900fc67bf47f1c
describe
'32968' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGF' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
6e7395015f84624b5076de4a51e35287
03e76806ed79ff215eb8d4e5324d5f5c6322f24d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGG' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
22f55225f72bb9a39878b1762323e2f2
9216c44be4226a79a020cfbd78e1532c6bd3dc95
describe
'32574' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGH' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
e2c98c2a71fe7e5544072c9cdfc7e816
b4daf1fd92d2379b750ee1e244ede6caea9586e4
describe
'8042' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGI' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
97b647c7d404bc508eff3f96b73357fd
2a141a52a695464908264c733963d856acf0a1d6
describe
'31454' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGJ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
3b029a58c3a0adc6c1aa6877a1f5ae0d
a48ba57d15b2fb8f9866455b3b152012325ba7d4
describe
'7954' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGK' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
171da60c6806a1612fe3d29f50cb4b1e
a3530d01e82b661f916a2dc6f378e0c658e7b9a3
describe
'34476' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
5f22a9d8fee098a41c1334f16ca53fdb
7e9b707f80e285fddba6d7e6ff3ba517e0e38a31
describe
'8371' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGM' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
070f1b3befdebb84c67725488ecec9d3
a4a115cfe9546933ba74243be9dd559200c9b699
describe
'32419' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGN' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
4698de1f1895c377414b8bc8c6cc111a
6b8acc66558dd036edc585d3253a7e64d9dc8633
describe
'8211' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGO' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
4f7e4b2558c91a10f35a9472ebb6b31c
2a1dea4ae35d6c8ab5dc53556e6069310d4d1a80
describe
'26663' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGP' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
34623f520e3cdb6f82ea35ef6ca40e96
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describe
'6757' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGQ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
ad78093a67025ec5879e8267cff86f2b
c365b9f0f6fd0e6202458123295c7521d81eb771
describe
'2650' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGR' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
9a4eb823b22f1918d82838d01b69be36
34298279d769f97bed63ba9dafadb705629a34f5
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGS' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
4908856966aa153db9ad328ca749c97d
c9854df9ea6ed10d36f231c6c2547ec592191f2d
describe
'32668' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGT' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
0a6a37dc0872997a41e70417e36ee20f
e192a62b832ff4d64ced1c75b4df864c8e1573b9
describe
'8102' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGU' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
768bb6b899281bff5020c6c7311d7c92
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describe
'32271' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGV' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
caa472754282bae4f31e1c40a035dc1b
a5fd38340cd902f83cc4b541512f4ed987ad3bd7
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGW' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
c852e09a7c9cd658c31195ad429bb6b7
c5f0129305023b114a17a3a0045381e3a496f236
describe
'32465' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGX' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
197efd20db31c47b9c73011bdc687ddf
01fa9b6863ca934233a84196b11f41673efb6150
describe
'7786' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGY' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
4977176df9f1a2a7308711f79fc968aa
4343591aad5db7a591cc6fbaf7e453461b455083
describe
'32211' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPGZ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
02d1d34590ebf37754ebd1c39788a9cc
633d0eb97f8af89164e886bc310a8c67b1f8470f
describe
'8143' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHA' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
ec01b42ca75403c5619902d480c15f22
29feb12db96de07fce5d1ca92309bae6d378a8ad
describe
'31844' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHB' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
409742f8f88f5bc046a92e3bd9d92a1c
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describe
'7845' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHC' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
bb468a7c82c592e509c4622d8dbec98b
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describe
'33281' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHD' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
52d0cf4b3f20c9bfd0acaa9ef1a68051
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describe
'8388' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHE' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
5f5c4569a5eef9a6666af3355c8bd244
04c8ac2685841217e24252af758f4b9ad02b56c8
describe
'33964' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHF' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
8e931cc78e9ce7d817728b8ab05481b3
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describe
'8514' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHG' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
685349f1631991094a812f475fec4e28
655f3cffc848529967ddac4a50a914df0e1564b3
describe
'32326' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHH' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
587754fac631a26e5221b2a054a647c6
665b7c42db2b7bc4d4bd3fef29b21a81bd350c86
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHI' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
933975c0d2369b72eb816b12a2824d89
388b59d4d6f944b2af99deff40a774fd69604b2b
describe
'20030' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHJ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
2f9e440a20bc54a08a9c586a2fc86597
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describe
'5326' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHK' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
9bdec056b1a4ff0488e281ab85f491d8
ea28ce83d03c9fb8b3f4aff16662e04719bf3d73
describe
'25530' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHL' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
dceb1ecf8535862dcdad09fbc261d1bf
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describe
'6374' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHM' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
862913bc32c6ec6812a4dfa09570818a
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHN' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
fba786d7b27082b185d17c4a73e64fc5
471fc480cf73c443f4d43e1d82d38da2102b3536
describe
'7970' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHO' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
b128d66f446d344bd9f40f3f52abc0f5
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describe
'31431' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHP' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
d1a94ac24a0ab9fa17bdf73c5a4f05f9
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describe
'8056' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHQ' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
99df2254684cce17db813a865fe76a0f
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describe
'31894' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHR' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
f8f4f3d7cdb7933f49d219d1ba74c5be
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describe
'8486' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHS' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
d8626879c7de284a558050316541d2bf
ca256b421c8e418d5b111e4bb4627cb65d9a7482
'2011-12-21T08:50:47-05:00'
describe
'32537' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHT' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
62cd12f8925ea864299da7761b048b08
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describe
'8380' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHU' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
3ed68aa5d26b63a043135f28662ab6d6
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describe
'33267' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHV' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
5f77def5295244a57c4f986e7e2cb67c
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describe
'8400' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHW' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
bea9ddbc3bfdea8b44ca0971e23a8e32
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describe
'30176' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHX' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
03ea93c26d40a3cc29dcd910c5683ee5
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describe
'7643' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHY' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
5b55ca20d274f9d6134b1ab07a331d11
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describe
'31864' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPHZ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
9af967a152b4ea3500b00ec1863e40c3
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIA' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
422296866362d124f2514511e6b28d0e
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describe
'29938' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIB' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
9f11866d97364a70ba81822942ef95a9
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describe
'7867' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIC' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
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describe
'32820' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPID' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
428241c988076bc4840dd9536e9d1f04
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describe
'8232' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIE' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
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describe
'31794' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIF' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
e085c1efa661f7876950c22c55fb310b
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describe
'7889' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIG' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
dcb029c443785053c8ae3ea67ed281cb
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describe
'31649' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIH' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
5c751de23d9fde35fbcf8980c001eab0
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describe
'7962' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPII' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
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describe
'33111' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIJ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8345' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIK' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
cd4fdf7b60c74661c03e65ececddfdaa
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describe
'33284' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIL' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
d0a2b708dd83ee3e2d3da56aa2c7d5ac
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describe
'8314' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIM' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
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describe
'32979' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIN' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8230' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIO' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
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describe
'34383' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIP' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
0da92ad633d6368187512a7989aa5ec2
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describe
'8048' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIQ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
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describe
'2596' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIR' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
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describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIS' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
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describe
'30574' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIT' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8101' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIU' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
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describe
'34286' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIV' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8471' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIW' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
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describe
'8816' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIX' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2661' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIY' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
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describe
'22632' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPIZ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6096' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJA' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
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describe
'23757' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJB' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6341' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJC' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
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describe
'33633' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJD' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8312' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJE' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
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describe
'33090' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJF' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
61511b1a98b1f4f2bf4a9406b0e1d3ce
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describe
'8293' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJG' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
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describe
'32091' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJH' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8134' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJI' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
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describe
'31653' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJJ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
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describe
'7808' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJK' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
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describe
'32830' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJL' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8159' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJM' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
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describe
'23090' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJN' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6566' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJO' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
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describe
'2453' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJP' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJQ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
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describe
'33629' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJR' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8404' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJS' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
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describe
'33186' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJT' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJU' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
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describe
'33352' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJV' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8226' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJW' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
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describe
'33209' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJX' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8078' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJY' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
87b53dfb60241a3479eb2dcbe53cd534
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'2011-12-21T08:51:29-05:00'
describe
'33042' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPJZ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
f806db56c45d7069cdb18cf681c8ffc2
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describe
'7959' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKA' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
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describe
'23819' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKB' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6636' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKC' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
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describe
'33048' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKD' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8259' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKE' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
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describe
'32498' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKF' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8290' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKG' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
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describe
'33199' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKH' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8506' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKI' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
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describe
'9778' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKJ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'25323' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKL' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6492' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKM' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
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describe
'32811' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKN' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8201' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKO' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
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describe
'31453' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKP' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8402' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKQ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
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describe
'32269' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKR' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8426' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKS' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
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describe
'31195' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKT' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKU' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
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describe
'33508' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKV' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8574' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKW' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
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describe
'31819' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKX' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8212' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKY' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
0a84bbc3bd98ad5071aaf8d38e0b3e67
08e1d0bfbeae06a7d72b346563feafc16759efea
describe
'32882' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPKZ' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
c932620f6a5dad8bcc828b3506897e54
c2fb8e78bba42f50c4fb32fdd2056e0c3d2cac61
describe
'8147' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLA' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
cc54cffc4b1253617f6d45f8dd127bbc
68bda3e864aa57c06f50fab7a0c2b7e5700628e2
describe
'34298' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLB' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
66cefeb77573417872c3456adbade75f
f46eb2068a62ffb6e63fb0a7184a90b4cd360ae9
describe
'8481' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLC' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
785e27d4bfea2cfa1b6a6a5c251286ea
b8e3d6e3d1c28af430285fe29972343dbd519489
describe
'30008' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLD' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
65ff1cbb2efce53deeec8900066ed97c
62a2e4203e20427b7ab7efbf35e4110acf1e7fde
describe
'7586' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLE' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
d80ddc55634aa0a7ff30ef461d4e7ad1
135fdab877a2c43afc35fd79b7c33e584e6ef282
describe
'25382' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLF' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
440bffb34cf946e8a3881ae346a5dc9a
df5ba39c74a0ee9fafe02130347f3317beb7ce8d
describe
'6774' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLG' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
c8cbfc2fb3cec3bd64b2f6ef543d7edf
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describe
'2375' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLH' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
e9511482ad4cda82959616e89e2ae725
b6bcb08fdd15a420e1c09eaa648fb2f421c153cc
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLI' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
a0f24b52b22492faaec8bf7aa7be4cbe
1198339997eb791a78e8aaad73ae298414b4b11d
describe
'33506' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLJ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
392c0dab37482dc8c3de71ad6166140d
9c05d5e31bfec2c320aac99a8a193619478cb11c
describe
'8105' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLK' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
537ea2a887a74f55de9481a79b2d9ac0
8c976d7bb1b6cdd4f194d1cf0296a58a22584edb
describe
'31248' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLL' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
f64a7886cee6e7b0852278097ae52b45
e05d8c8e29b4347ca861b2a944eb7aa945e67e9e
describe
'7437' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLM' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
8ee0d04640faccc173bdd77f207978ef
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describe
'30683' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLN' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
8168268988600889ca50d0e8c1437cdf
c74e717a73e3b5d3dd46b3cd548a367319dce6b7
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLO' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
3f50b283ef64c5fb1fb281e9efb22a9d
da7aba140184cf3d0caeea1972c8d389046c60e5
describe
'11040' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLP' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
fa3c2f3aa8506a32f546c4e8437d52c1
4d4bbb16a1ba4ec7f30dcf7c0cb1f7ab08811d0f
describe
'3008' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLQ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
c3a44a2a0babff756d20fcd3784731fd
1ea6602949f088ee13d692fcfd71f74c2014d204
describe
'24905' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLR' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
b1a085f444fe7bb1ff370a42093e75a2
d47a03bd8c580bbb7d4a6a5f4e41921450efb512
describe
'6364' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLS' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
5dd39a407c9b1f74dec8fffd8fed4918
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describe
'31968' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLT' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
56213fab024481cadc4d4db20bdaa723
b7cd7f7fee6d7d8525c23f0ce2be3ee90369187b
describe
'7872' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLU' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
e4991062f297c5bd61e40ad227a6ddd3
29355dd5c9b84c5781f27b8f428a10f07d575c5f
describe
'30097' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLV' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
4ddc77e4e10fc3e739759803321ef430
9c8fd365e14ef79a00e843b15ca7a31956055b9d
describe
'7501' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLW' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
8d16c5fe73d7982166ca68a92dcb119e
3ef438ac02985cdf69de49f1656b071c34af12cc
describe
'32188' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLX' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
bd4a1b7208d512198486efc0ca10f429
cc3497c94c16b4ff7b5b209c262dd6bb48253449
describe
'8148' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLY' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
a84132e6c42b6d5ef2cdfad2be4456fb
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describe
'33937' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPLZ' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
5b6a161b25c9b1cdaeaf0ade99fb4906
f96bf8d5d57828acdf35d9423320afab8f97534f
describe
'7812' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMA' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
3bbd14a4e729eac607afcf1a13ad8f3d
b82814b486e60e175b7e74a1426ccc5dbd40087b
describe
'30440' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMB' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
011a0362de0b70aa164aaf5863d0a0c7
0f3a4df0068f578f5c967c01ec54429f938779c4
describe
'7406' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMC' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
c9722c55cc92fbcc396248ffc29cf28a
8a686af0a5e59fc4ae6f78d1a5049509eaf4136f
describe
'24714' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMD' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
4d08cfcfd78cb08edc1103fc632211f3
2e9f13724a9ff0399329e952c08f46cc64482bad
describe
'6550' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPME' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
e782295fb0e5afcec3e474c267e53a0d
1f0b8f993d96f1ff6288803f7769f5392d1cb431
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMF' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
dbad73d920fc886487e79296758bf225
27c6e84cc12aa692d000e3004760a151013957bd
describe
'848' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMG' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
7d054b8ef7ba15063852597ab979cb53
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describe
'29532' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMH' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
5f5680380908614e325f6a7665275a90
32d235b241e4aaf3f012f0e98c8e7d1f5ed86deb
describe
'7977' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMI' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
330c70610e705929c297ed232e933984
5f8aa57d22bf66f21d48d3b1236af3d5462d5e3c
describe
'31850' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMJ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
30c21e8841b995f75afe03a3f4bc2342
cea91fa8bd4ee3c20583c0df27435a86e469d80d
describe
'8235' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMK' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
b90f5c5f1a9e1b573bfa511333795363
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describe
'31465' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPML' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
97c33c2b89b624ea7151c7b3108f7f5c
146232a43cc84b83589247d20867ccb6ea29fb14
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMM' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
9a4af4c704663b78a39c122a2c425706
fa9f2d7cc696e594ffea03db426647736db68da0
describe
'32097' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMN' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
07bda415716081193f7a838c8ebff16b
c1ce0d7e993f502b7c2eee545bb102e6ca302eb9
describe
'8179' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMO' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
1f13913c6fd3faf78289b2870637cd65
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describe
'32853' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMP' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
1eb1a02509f92511fc5edda29e6c7885
be1b658bb38b7501af5ab3bdefe7fc9d49f65dda
describe
'8026' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMQ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
d8126c60fbbe2539bf7f670a61df5971
16700802a2633f8a57f00d35cb47691a9aa418cc
describe
'31123' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMR' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
dbbcdf5fad80058f2884e05e1714420c
a1fa8142801dbcf8dd42c64eb5e4c7c5b6ec2c81
describe
'7693' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMS' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
45be856bac4d154c0c544b03ba2eb783
ae8bb21af00177621ad8436385f451280feb411e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMT' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
b8ccee9be4299da576b9216970d329bf
051e9509484611bb429aa93089e7a9bbf41cb1ad
describe
'7689' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMU' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
3a3a0201cba9b060a46e8e94065e35aa
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describe
'31830' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMV' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
642a58ac18b88658db165c93bda68aef
fe7ad7aa5b7d66b40a013c232771a62f1f464b00
describe
'8234' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMW' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
f19311cad215e34cfc715f1286eb9730
0cb0000a3a1e4832bbfffe12b90b77017b86cc0a
describe
'33331' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMX' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
478a52b5ca4b20256bda73922fc73dce
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describe
'8350' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMY' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
65901259c6f03c2a745d1e86f9b6bcc9
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describe
'33566' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPMZ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
bd9422aa20e1dc308f6963153463973c
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describe
'8294' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNA' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
2a91e5299b103f54b7a168040bb6f909
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describe
'27403' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNB' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
a2abb4e4447aad4db55395f692d8f665
fb7ef658721c52023b2a88561d2b2fba7a64e17a
describe
'6695' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNC' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
fe79cebcf1044fbb646e3634eb962de0
1a641d82bb54191122727dfc395a9b00cfeb84b3
describe
'25325' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPND' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
49c9c35003df86042c6675cc4a6b427f
806696027b04411dd2f7c8d1a27f468a09b3e71d
describe
'6234' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNE' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
4d0132dff1a129d923967755f32e339f
3ab0a3b249fc25b52ca3469adef087eb989b1fed
describe
'33549' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNF' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
c00e2dd06f9f4bfea4e5e596d3648daa
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describe
'8359' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNG' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
6d95457f236a20c46f2a9c9cb43c977c
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describe
'34250' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNH' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
fa51030b3c580537d9a68aeaf8d6fa17
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describe
'8068' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNI' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
6c101b36a41d2ebaca0f8ac694a4ba6a
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNJ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
157b6bbbffb932ac4d36acaa7fc41b43
23004acaa0e91b40c815cde55db0557535e143da
describe
'7780' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNK' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
6234344610b0f5138b13eaa491609174
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describe
'32634' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNL' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
16bc62c766535ceebe7c8c5ca7d744d0
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describe
'8193' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNM' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
a9f87fca4755a81a5ee1a9291d6740ee
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describe
'30399' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNN' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
af794b28bac8d5e369f8af5fa3f3fdab
12135ffba0ebe15bbe362839127f09e9a5b3ce2e
describe
'7820' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNO' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
9f9e43571983b3787b13af4ac1c8ba32
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describe
'29446' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNP' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
6e3f753223196c90427374249c4852ed
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describe
'7405' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNQ' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
3340eca3f88c5feab7c3c39bf25a4467
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describe
'29887' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNR' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
d29e5506890cc852cbe7be64ee13b9af
3cf3feac05a572d154b3312ce02617cffbd6d84f
describe
'7386' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNS' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
808c0f0aeba953df7982bdc8de2bd2d9
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describe
'30754' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNT' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
963dea0c6d0531bb3337d3144ba6d69b
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describe
'8136' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNU' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
934626900271920d2664cf3adcfe9bf9
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describe
'31393' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNV' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
882461bf9bbc9992ae154e50b3032a64
d6728cc36b110e7a6492a9c923103bdb2d56d09e
describe
'7732' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNW' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
3711e90d847e020f8ab5b6f4109385e6
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describe
'30354' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNX' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
028f07d0204bda25a49647d2fe6b2597
e9706c6c720fbb060606e19ca9bd243733d3654e
describe
'7704' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNY' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
fbc69897dfb849cee117fb962a848036
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describe
'10104' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPNZ' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
bc12d9a41676cb82ca8244057e1ce999
10c91b1ce4b2a39a08b45c010a31d2eeb6b8a437
describe
'2791' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOA' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
0effc715346aa25b1fc06a62500b49b2
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describe
'2346' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOB' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
80ccf84a40631b626212aa27e98c13b9
0922dfa41246f201a35a18aec74368dddc9284fe
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOC' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
6b3cf338703652d4f4f45723f0c67ebf
1d96abb25afcfe97ff306a4603f5b334c17d2ac1
describe
'20903' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOD' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
e91318d64d40b811941c9509cd96b7f9
4d4b0e9f29b3afb88dc44935e031c90f53137a18
describe
'5185' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOE' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
06829a2d40f031123ec7f9c1d8d4971b
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describe
'31375' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOF' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
2cb8b799cfba9931503f06221bb02df8
0d60b31bd7d766e559b161b649c98167c1e3dbfe
describe
'7817' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOG' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
a0a2897beccd8c6bb5edcd0dde0af704
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describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOH' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
9059f6f1201c10f3b3dfda3b729c6d7c
81b53ee5c982dc8c2bebd52968efb1663ddeb806
describe
'7584' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOI' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
254765c73efc54b5c30e241e08de379a
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describe
'31292' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOJ' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
e19ddfd0279603bd40170cb3cabf0c6d
89988b399d68fb5bc972608d9e8e2fe69db1fa47
describe
'7853' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOK' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
ed7ec52c61d053f83749f93d6d77da61
7d6a972cd03b46e9d098e7ca99ffc84e20a89c10
describe
'27106' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOL' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
a16ac283f523e03fab0ecd61543036bc
9d848afdd19cb75caf1a287a9e6f8664ba552353
describe
'7234' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOM' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
43bc394effe17e0e28a9872553c631ac
35e6839fe68d5fd8eae0a0a61e68d3e0c29f7fb3
describe
'16201' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPON' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
5a3a992c57cd3089f85b4479fc333a91
513913d906a651fb4b042b0fa81e40464debd5dc
describe
'4147' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOO' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
77a909031f7502ef225907fcaca88248
f3960cb0ff0a9faf475e574d9cc068654d9c1945
describe
'37484' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOP' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
c5eeb4cca8c8c12afaf6024e2372e9ff
f148b8fe8ad472468bd3d2838690fdf9cdf9a52a
describe
'8262' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOQ' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
6646338ce302b6561a6983177ec91504
80257c32b0dbe701fbab48497f5d69b223d7ca4a
describe
'8799' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOR' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
3ab21bd08cdfe572aa358bce62bdd450
b58e1192644c4847ad898559783df81751be9ad9
describe
'3252' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOS' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
0d05c99dc7ed46907392572adadb6264
ec023423f33648ce642bf3b4202a25c685abddf4
describe
'104' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOT' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
0b63a4a95b210ba5e0f0be455e8a01ba
6f452437e2666461323d641ffe347b4e1cb8f3ab
'2011-12-21T08:51:11-05:00'
describe
'320106' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABPfileF20081130_AACPOU' 'sip-filesUF00086573_00001.mets'
e598d6c7273dc0ba47590b7491c705c4
08c96644bfa6c8043d593c8d89282e49ca474787
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T11:13:54-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.