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Pansy Billings and Popsy

Material Information

Title:
Pansy Billings and Popsy two stories of girl life
Added title page title:
Pansy Billings
Added title page title:
Popsy
Creator:
Jackson, Helen Hunt, 1830-1885
Lothrop Publishing Company ( Publisher )
Colonial Press ( Printer )
C.H. Simonds & Co
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Lothrop Publishing Company
Manufacturer:
Colonial Press ; Electrotyped and printed by C.H. Simonds & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
107 p., [2] leaves of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Success -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1898 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Children's stories
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by "H.H." (Helen Hunt Jackson) ; illustrated.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026824453 ( ALEPH )
ALH2492 ( NOTIS )
01870442 ( OCLC )
07010806 ( LCCN )

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Full Text




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“WHAT A HALF-HOUR



Ir WAS FOR PANSY!”

See page 18.



PANSY BILLINGS AND POPSY

Two Stories of Girl Life

BY
Oia Ela
(HELEN HUNT JACKSON)

AUTHOR OF “RAMONA,” “NELLY’S SILVER MINE,”
“BITS OF TALK FOR YOUNG FOLKS,”
ETC., ETC.

ILLUSTRATED

BOSTON
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY



Copyright, 1898,
BY
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY.

Colonial IBress :
Electrotyped and Printed by C. H. Simonds & Co.
Boston, U.S.A.



CONTENTS:

PANSY BILLINGS.

CHAPTER PAGE
I. ArcHtE McCioup’s WoopEN Box . . . a
II. Pansy Gores InTO BUSINESS : . . a7 24
POPSY.

I. Popsy’s TABLE-CLOTHS 5 5 ° ° * 45

II. Popsy’s GRAND JOURNEY . . . ° - 79



RANSY. BILIEINGS AND EORSY



PaNoyY BIiLerNcs.

—_+—

CHAPTER at,
ARCHIE McCLOUD’S WOODEN BOX,

Pansy was not her real name. She was bap-
tized Mary Jane, after her mother’s oldest sister,
but, from the time she was eight years old, she
was never called anything but “ Pansy;” and
how that came about, and what it all meant,
both to Pansy herself and her family, it is the
purpose of this story to tell.

Pansy’s mother was a widow with three little
children, — Pansy, the oldest, Albert, the second,
and Alice, the youngest.

When Pansy’s father died, Alice was a little
baby, in the cradle, and Albert could but just
run alone. Pansy was seven, and felt herself

7



PaNoyY BIiLerNcs.

—_+—

CHAPTER at,
ARCHIE McCLOUD’S WOODEN BOX,

Pansy was not her real name. She was bap-
tized Mary Jane, after her mother’s oldest sister,
but, from the time she was eight years old, she
was never called anything but “ Pansy;” and
how that came about, and what it all meant,
both to Pansy herself and her family, it is the
purpose of this story to tell.

Pansy’s mother was a widow with three little
children, — Pansy, the oldest, Albert, the second,
and Alice, the youngest.

When Pansy’s father died, Alice was a little
baby, in the cradle, and Albert could but just
run alone. Pansy was seven, and felt herself

7



8 PANSY BILLINGS.

as old and as important as a grown woman,
because she took so much care of her little
brother and sister. It was droll about the
names of these two children. Before Alice
was born, Albert had always been called Ally.
When Mrs. Billings named the new baby
Alice, she did not think about the natural nick-
name for Alice being the same that they had
already used for Albert, and, the first thing they
knew, they had two “Allys” in the house.
That would never do. As the children grew
up, it would make no end of confusion, so they
fell into the way of calling Albert “ Ally-boy,”
to distinguish him from the “ Ally” that was a
girl, and before long that came to be supposed
to be his real name. All over the town he was
known as ‘ Ally-boy,” which was by no means
a bad name, any more than “ Pansy” was. But,
as Mrs, Billings used to say, anybody, to read
her children’s names as they were written in the

big family Bible, would wonder, and never think



;

PANSY BILLINGS. 9

that the children answering to the names of
Pansy, Ally-boy, and Ally were the same ones.

Mr. Billings was a teamster. He owned a
good wagon and pair of horses, and those, with
his own strong hands, a good temper, and an
upright character, were, as he often said, his only
“stock in trade.” But they proved a very good
stock. He had always plenty of work, — every-
body in the town who wanted work done would
go to Billings first, and not give the job to any-
body else, unless Billings was too busy. This
was what Billings had won for himself, simply
by being always pleasant, prompt, and faithful.
He was an ignorant man, and a stupid one:
knew enough to take care of horses, drive, and
do an errand as he was bid, — no more; but, little
as it was, that was enough to enable him to earn
a living, and be respected by everybody.

In which there is a lesson for all of us, if we

-will think about it a minute. It is the same

lesson which Jesus Christ once put into a par-



Io PANSY BILLINGS.

able; the parable of the lord who, going into a
far country, gave to his different servants differ-
ent sums of money, to one five silver talents,
to another three, to another only one. And
the man who had only one did not think it
worth while to try to do anything with it, it was
so small a sum. And that man, Jesus said,
“was slothful and wicked,” and deserved to be
punished. No such verdict as that would ever
be pronounced against Billings. His talent was
a very small one, but he used it faithfully, and
to the utmost; and no doubt when he died he
had his reward in the next world. Even in this
he was remembered and regretted far longer
than many a man who had been richer, cleverer,
and more prominent than he.

It was years before people left off saying,
“How we miss Billings!” ‘“There’s nobody
now that can be trusted as we used to trust
Billings!”

When Mrs. Billings found herself alone with



PANSY BILLINGS. II

her three little children, she did not know which
way to turn. She had always earned a little
money by washing, and by selling eggs; enough
‘for her own clothes, and the children’s, and now
and then to buy a piece of furniture for the
house; but to earn the entire support for the
family was quite another thing. Her heart
sank within her, as she looked into the three
little faces, now clouded and sorrowful as they
_ saw the sorrow and anxiety in hers. But she
did not sit idle a minute, or waste any of her
strength in useless fretting.

She went to all her husband’s old customers,
and asked them to ask their wives to give her
their fine washing. She also resolved to en-
large her poultry yard, and sell chickens, as well
as eggs. These were the only things she knew
of that she could do.

It went very hard with them for a time, work
was not plenty, and the chicken business very

uncertain; many a day -both mother and chil-



12 PANSY BILLINGS.

dren were hungry, and had not food enough in
the house to eat. Still, they pulled through,
month after month, and though their clothes
were shabby and their food scanty, they had
the comfort of a home together, and that was
everything.

Opposite their little house lived a florist, an
old Scotchman named Archie McCloud. He
was a queer, crotchety old man, but had most
wonderful success with flowers. People came
to him, from far and near, for roses, and carna-
tions, and heliotrope, but most of all for pansies.
Pansies were the old man’s delight. There was
not a variety of pansy known which could not
be found in his beds. |

“Tt’s the flower o’ a’ flowers,” he used to say.
“Tt’s the face o’ a sma’ cheeld in it; as the Lord
himsel’ gie us for a pattern. I’d spare a’ the
rest o’ them, an’ abide wi’ the parnsy.”

When old Archie first noticed the little Bil-

lings girl, with her baby sister in her arms, and



PANSY BILLINGS. 13

her baby brother toddling behind, standing close
to his fence and looking over at the flowers, he
was not pleased. He was. afraid of children.
For they sometimes opened his gate, ran in, and
stole flowers, when he was away. They reached
over the fence and broke off the tops of his
hedges. He hated to see them coming near
his place, much as he loved them for their own
sake. But there was something in this little
girl’s face which drew him to her greatly. He
observed that she was always pleasant and af-
fectionate to the baby; and once, when the
baby reached over the fence and made a clutch
at a lauristinus blossom, he saw her give a
gentle tap to the little hand, and say, “ No, no,
baby. You must not touch a leaf. They’re
only to look at.” Then his heart warmed to
the child, and he resolved to give her a bou-
quet some day. The very next day, a lady
stopped at the gate to buy some flowers. The

group of little Billingses were standing near.



14 PANSY BILLINGS.

As old Archie came out with the flowers in a
newspaper, and handed them to the lady in her
carriage, a beautiful purple pansy slipped out
and fell to the ground, almost under the horses’
feet. Quicker than a flash of lightning the
Billings baby was laid on the ground, and her
little nurse had sprung forward, close to the
horses’ heels, snatched the flower, and handed
it up, crying, “ Here is one that fell out!”

“Keep it, little girl,” said the lady, smiling
kindly.

“Oh! thank you!” said Pansy,—for so we
must begin to call Mary Jane now,— “thank
you!” and she looked at the flower with such
an ecstasy of delight in her face that the lady
thought to herself, “ This is no common child,
to love flowers like that.” The lady herself
loved flowers better than anything else in the
world; loved them so much that she could not
help instantly liking any one, even a stranger,

who loved them, too.



PANSY BILLINGS. 15

“Give her some more, Archie,” she said.
“The child evidently loves them.”

“Yes, mem, she do indeed. I’ve obsarved
her. She’s an excellent cheeld, Mrs. Scott,”
and he hastened back into the garden to cut
the flowers.

Pansy had not understood what was said, and
remained lost in admiration and delight, looking
down into the heart of her flower.

“Do you like the pansy?” said the lady.

Pansy looked up, bewildered at first.

“Ts that the name of it?” she asked.

“ Dear, dear,” thought the lady, “to think the
poor little thing never saw a pansy before!”

Vie stthates) 16S name,” said the lady. ‘It is
a lovely little flower.”

“It's got a face in it,” said Pansy, rapturously,
“just like it was laughing.”

Old Archie came up just in time to hear this
speech. His face glowed with pleasure.

“Eh, the bonnie bairn. Ye’re a_ parnsy



16 PANSY BILLINGS.

yersil’! Luik at the parceeption o’ the

”
!

bairn, mem!” and from that hour old Archie
was Pansy’s friend. So, also, was Mrs. Scott.
Though months went by before she and Pansy
were brought together again, she never forgot
the child’s face of delight, nor her quick recogni-
tion of the half-elfin laugh stamped on the pansy
petals, and she said to herself, many a time,
“Tll go and look up that child, and give her
some flowers;” but Mrs. Scott was like most
very rich ladies, so full of engagements and
amusements that weeks counted up into months,
without her realizing how fast they were speed-
ing by.

The next day, when old Archie saw Pansy at
the fence, with her babies, he went over to speak
to her. The first thing that caught his eye was
the purple pansy pinned on the front of her
apron.

“ An’ ye’re wearin’ the parnsy?” he said.

“Yes, sir,” said Pansy. “I didn’t like to leave



PANSY BILLINGS. 17

her in the house. I thought she would like to
come out and play with us,” and she looked
down into the blossom’s face with a glance as
loving as those she gave her little sister. The
old man chuckled.

“An’ wha tauld ye ’twas a lassie?” he said.
Pansy stared, perplexed. She was not used to
the Scotch brogue. Archie repeated his ques-
tion in plainer fashion. .

“ Oh, I don’t know,” said Pansy, “I just called
it so. It looks like Ally. Didn’t you ever see
the face in it?” she added, innocently, unpin-
ning the flower and holding it up to him. This
time old Archie shook his sides, laughing.

“Ay, ay, bairn,” he replied. “They've ’s
mony faces ’s they've blossoms; I ken ’em a’.
Come in, come in, an’ I'll show ye a bonny sight
o’ ’em,” and he opened the gate wide.

Pansy trembled with pleasure. How she had
longed and yearned to get inside that gate, and

see the gay flower beds nearer at hand!



18 PANSY BILLINGS.

“Oh, thank you, sir,” she cried; “might I just
take Ally-boy home and leave him? I can carry
the baby, but I’m afraid Ally-boy will step on
the beds,” at which Ally-boy began to cry, and
old Archie said, “No, you needn’t take him
home. Tl lead him, and keep him off the
beds.”

Such a sight was never seen before in that
garden, — three little children, one in arms, be-
ing piloted about by the old Scotchman himself.
And what a half-hour it was for Pansy! Her
cheeks grew crimson with excitement, and she
almost panted for breath, as she went from roses
to carnations, and from carnations to heliotrope,
and so on, till they came to the pansy beds,
which were on the farther side of the garden.
When she saw these, she did not speak a word,
only looked, and looked, and now and _ then
sighed. The queer old gardener liked her all
the better for this. He hated chatter. When
they got through, he said, “Now, my bairn,



PANSY BILLINGS. 19

there’s na cheeld kens what ye ken o’ this place.
An’ ye’re welcome whenever ye like.”

“Do you mean, sir, that I’m to come in when
I like?” asked Pansy.

“That's it, praceesely,” replied old Archie.
“Ye is to be trusted. I’ve watched ye mony a
time, when ye little thocht it. An’ ye’ve an eye
for the blossoms. Ye can come when ye like.”

“Oh, thank you very much,” said Pansy,
and her eyes thanked him far more than the
words.

She did not go into the garden, however, for
several days. Old Archie saw her standing, as
usual, at the fence, and looking over, but she
did not go near the gate. This pleased him,
too.

“ She’s na presoomin’, the little lassie. A fine
modesty she’s got in her wee soul,” he said to
himself; “it was a guid name I gave her, when
I ca’ed her for the parnsy. It’s the richt name

for her,” The next time he spoke to her he



20 PANSY BILLINGS.

said, “ Guid-day to ye, little Parnsy,” and after
that he never called her anything else. Soon
Ally-boy caught it, and, before long, the baby;
Mrs. Billings did not dislike the sound, and
Pansy herself delighted in it. She began to
have a strange feeling, which she was far too
young to have put in words, or to understand,
as if the pansies were her sisters. Whenever
old Archie asked her of a morning what flower
she would like, as he often did, she always said,
“A pansy, please,” and this pleased him more
and more. Sometimes he would try to tempt
her with some other flower, “ An’ winna ye like
a rose the day? or mebbe a pink?”

“No, sir, a pansy, please,” she would say, and
then he would often add to the pansy the rose,
or the carnation, saying, “ An’ if ye’ve na use for
this one ye can give it t’ the mither.”

So Pansy was seldom without one of her
namesake blossoms pinned on her apron. She

would wear it all day, put it in water at night,



PANSY BILLINGS. 2I

and, as if the blossom knew how the child loved
it, it would come out fresh the next morning,
ready to be worn again.

But old Archie was preparing a still greater
pleasure for his little friend. One day he ap-
peared at Mrs, Billings’s door, with a long
wooden box in his arms, almost heavier than he
could carry, filled with pansies; a dozen fine,
healthy plants, in full bloom. These were to
be Pansy’s own. He set the box in a sunny
corner of the yard. Pansy was not at home,
which grieved the old man. He wanted to see
the child’s face at the first sight of them. But
he did not lose much of its expression, for in
less than a minute after her mother had shown
her the box, and told her it was for her, she had
raced over to the garden, burst open the gate,
and, springing upon Archie, as he was stooping
over a geranium bed, picking off dead leaves,
she nearly threw him down with her impetuous

hug and kiss. She had never kissed him of her



22 PANSY BILLINGS.

own accord before, but now she hugged him and
kissed, and kissed and hugged, till he was almost
as out of breath as she.

This box was the beginning of a new life for
Pansy. She no longer spent so many hours
standing at the old florist’s fence. She liked
her own pansies better than all the gay-colored
flowers to be seen in his beds. The more she
looked at them, the more they seemed to her to
be alive, as she and her brother and sister were
alive. Often she would say to her mother,
“Can’t you see how they laugh? This yellow
one, she laughs the most, and the white one;
they are better-natured than the black ones.”

She took the best care of them. Not a weed
had a chance to more than show its head in the
box before it was pulled up; never a day passed
that they were not watered, and, if the sun were
too hot at noon, covered up with a thin paper;
old Archie had told her that this would make
the blossoms last longer. He told her, also,



PANSY BILLINGS. 23

about saving the seeds, to plant next year, so as
to get new varieties.

One morning, early in September, Pansy saw
Mrs. Scott’s carriage stopping again at the gar-
den gate. In a few moments old Archie came
out, and, seeing Pansy, beckoned to her to come

over.



X

CH APE Re ule

PANSY GOES INTO BUSINESS,

“Hev ye ony pansies in bloom in the box,
me bairn?” he asked.

“Oh, yes, lots,” said Pansy, wondering why
he asked.

“Weel, then, rin an’ cut all yell like to
spare,” said Archie. “Mrs. Scott, she’s wantin’
two hunderd, an’ I canna mak’ it oot for her.”

Pansy flew and cut every one in the box,
not without a pang at losing them, but very.
glad to be able to, as she supposed, help old
Archie.

What was her surprise when, counting the
pansies, carefully, he said, “ There’s fifty o ’em;
that ull be a dollar for ye, me bairn,” and he
put a silver dollar into her hand. She looked
at it and at him, so perplexedly that Mrs.
Scott laughed out.

24



PANSY BILLINGS. 25

“T did not know that you had an assistant
florist, Mr. McCloud,” she said. ‘This is the
little girl that liked pansies so much, isn’t it?
What is your name, dear?”

Pansy hesitated.

“They all call me Pansy, now,” she said;
“my real name’s Mary Jane. But I don’t
want the money for the pansies. They’re not
my pansies, anyhow. Mr. McCloud only gave
them to me to keep ina box. They’re all his,”
and she stretched out her hand towards old
Archie, to give him back the dollar,

“Na! na!” he said. “The siller’s yer ain;
haud fast to it. Siller dollars dinna grow on
bushes. It’s your ain.”

“Oh, yes, Pansy, it is my money, not Mr.
McCloud’s,” said Mrs. Scott, “and I like very
much to buy pansies of a little girl named
Pansy. Would you like to see what I am
going to do with all these pansies, my dear?”

she added, struck by a sudden fancy.



26 PANSY BILLINGS.

“Yes, ma’am,” said Pansy, timidly.

“Well, jump in on the front seat with the
driver,” replied Mrs. Scott, “and I'll take you
home with me and show you.”

“Tl have to ask my mother, first,” said Pansy.

“Jump in, Parnsy, jump in,” said old Archie.
“Tl gang ower an’ tell it t’ the mither.”

So Pansy, very happy, but a good deal
frightened, was rolled away in the fine carriage,
to Mrs. Scott’s beautiful house. It was the
most beautiful house in the town, and Mrs.
Scott was one of the richest women; as_ kind
and good, too, as she was rich. As Archie
watched her driving away with Pansy, he
thought to himself:

“It wad na’ be strange if it waur the mak-
kin’ o’ the lassie’s fortune, this ride she’s get-
tin’ noo!”

Old Archie did not know all that there was
of energy and character in his Pansy’s little
breast. She was not destined to be beholden



PANSY BILLINGS. 27

to any one for the making of her life. She
herself was to be the making of it.

When they reached the house, Mrs. Scott
led Pansy into the dining-room. Here a table
was beautifully set for a dinner-party. The
glass and silver and candlesticks shone so,
that it made Pansy blink her eyes.

In the centre of the table was a great bunch
of feathery white clematis; on each side of this
were dishes of fruit,— peaches and grapes and
plums.

“Do you think it is pretty, Pansy?” asked
Mrs. Scott.

Pansy could hardly speak.

“J think it must look like Aladdin’s palace,”
she said, at last.

“Oh, dear, no,” laughed Mrs. Scott, “not so
fine as that. I’m not going to have any flow-
ers but pansies, to-night,” she continued, “and
I'll arrange them now, so you can see how they

will look, and why I want so many.”



28 PANSY BILLINGS.

Then she took Pansy into another room,
where, on a table, were a dozen little narrow,
semicircular dishes, made of tin and _ painted
green; they were not quite an inch deep, and
less than an inch wide. They were filled with
wet sand. Into this sand Mrs. Scott stuck the
pansies, filling each little dish as full as it
would hold. Then she arranged them on the
table, in and out: among the dishes of fruit,
till it looked as if one long wreath of pansies
had been laid on the table-cloth. The tins
were so low they did not show at all. When
it was done, Pansy gave a little scream of
_ delight.

“JT don’t believe there was ever anything so
beautiful in the world before,” she said.

At this Mrs. Scott laughed again, but in a
moment more she looked sober. It always
made her sad to be reminded how little the
very poor people in this world can know about

the beautiful things which cost money.



PANSY BILLINGS. 29

“The pansies are the prettiest things of them
all, dear,” she replied, “and everybody can have
pansies.”

“Yes’m,” said Pansy; but in her heart she
thought, “ The pansies did not look so pretty in
my box.”

Poverty makes little children wise before their
time, in matters of money. Even while Pansy
was most absorbed in looking at the beautiful
house, and the dinner-table with the pansy
wreaths on it, she never forgot the silver
dollar in her hand. A dollar was a great
deal of money to Pansy. She had never be-
fore had more than five cents at a time. She
knew, too, how much a dollar seemed to her
mother.

“Two cents apiece for all my pansies,” she
thought. “I might have sold them before, if I
had enly known.” When she went home, she
gave her mother the dollar. Mrs. Billings was

as astonished as Pansy. She had never thought



30 PANSY BILLINGS.

before that a flower as common as a pansy could
be worth so much money.

“Why, you've had a dollar's worth of them
many a time before, haven’t you, Pansy?” said
she.

“Yes, indeed, lots of times,” said Pansy.
“But I’ve got the seed of all I didn’t cut. Mr.
McCloud told me to save it. Next summer we
can have a big bed.”

“T don’t know as Mr. McCloud would like us
to sell them,” said Mrs. Billings.

“Oh,” said Pansy, crestfallen, “perhaps he
wouldn’t. But sometimes he doesn’t have as
many as people want. Then he wouldn’t care.”

The upshot of this conversation, and of one
or two talks that Pansy had with old Archie,
was that next year there was not only a big
pansy bed in Mrs. Billings’s yard, but a bed
of carnations, and one of rose-geranium.* Old
Archie was only too glad to help Pansy to earn

a little money, and his own business was so



PANSY BILLINGS. 31

large he could well afford to help a poor
neighbor.

He taught Pansy, and also her mother, how
to take care of the plants, and make the most
of them. He showed Pansy how to tie up little
buttonhole bouquets with wire; a single carna-
tion and two pansies, with rose-geranium leaves,
made a pretty little bouquet, for which Pansy
got ten cents, and sometimes she sold ten in
one day. |

Before Pansy knew it, little girl as she was,
she had become a sort of florist in a small way.
Mrs. Scott’s friends had all heard about her, and
liked to patronize her. Her name, Pansy, also
helped her. It pleased everybody’s fancy; and
everybody was glad to give a lift to such an
industrious little creature. As the years went
on, and she had to spend many hours. each day
in school, it grew to be no small task for her to
keep her flower beds in order, and make all her

plants do their utmost. Each year old Archie



32 PANSY BILLINGS.

gave her new things, and her beds grew fuller
and fuller. She was always up by daylight, at
work in her garden; and she often worked there
after dark. All this outdoor work kept her
healthy, and by the time she was fifteen she was
as strong and large as most girls at eighteen.

Ally-boy, too, was a fine, hearty boy, and
helped her very much; but he did not love it
as Pansy did. He worked only for the money.
Pansy used to say, sometimes, she wished she
need not sell a single blossom; she loved every
one, and missed every one she cut and sent
away.

How proud old Archie was of her, and her
success, could hardly be told in words. She
did nothing without consulting him; and gradu-
ally it came about that he did few things without
consulting her. She read aloud to him all the
new books and pamphlets he got which related
to the florist business, and there was not a day
that she did not go with him through his hot-



PANSY BILLINGS. 33

houses and gardens. She called him “uncle
Archie” now, and nothing would have offended
the old man more than to have any one question
the relationship. He was not strong now. No-
body knew his age. It was a weakness of old
Archie’s never to tell it; but it must have been
much greater than any one supposed, for all of a
sudden he began to walk very feebly, and to look
like an aged man.

It cut Pansy to the heart to see that, when he
stooped to pick a flower, he could not straighten
up again without a groan, and that day after day
he would sit on the terrace, in the sun, and do
nothing, watching his workmen all day, and find-
ing fault with everything they did.

“Tm afraid uncle Archie is failing, mother,”
she said one day. “Do you see how bent he
walks? And he doesn’t lift his hand to a spade
or trowel now.”

“Yes,” replied Mrs. Billings, “he looks ninety,

if he’s a day. He can’t last long.”



34 PANSY BILLINGS.

The tears filled Pansy’s eyes. Putting on her
hat, she went over to the garden. Old Archie
was sitting, languid, in his chair, in the porch of -
the little two-roomed cottage where he had lived
all alone for forty years. A new Florist Cata-
logue lay on his knees.

“ Parnsy,” he said, as she came up the path,
“there’s a new parnsy we maun ha’! It’s a
big braw name they gie it,” and he pointed to
the name in the catalogue. “ An’ I’m a-thinkin’,
my bairn, o’ puttin’ up a sign ’t the place. It’s
not had ony name ’t it a’ these years. I thocht
I'd ca’ it the ‘Parnsy Gardens.’ Is’t na’ a guid
name? ’Twould luik well, I’m thinkin’, wi’ a
new gate, an’ maybe a parnsy or twa painted
abuve the warrds.”

“Why, that would be lovely, uncle Archie,”
cried Pansy, delighted with the idea. “ That’s
just what it ought to be called, but everybody
says there are no such pansies in the whole

country as yours, —”.



PANSY BILLINGS. 35

“Not so mony kinds in any ane mon’s place,”
interrupted old Archie.

“No, indeed,” said Pansy, “I was reading
that to you, you know, in that pamphlet, the
other day. Don’t you remember, it said that
the finest pansies, and the greatest variety, at
that Horticultural Show, were, as had_ been
the case for many years, exhibited by Mr. Mc-
Cloud?”

The old man nodded, with a look of tender
pride spreading over his face.

“Eh, eh, bairn,” he said, “fine warrds a’!
Fine warrds!” Then glancing up at her archly,
he said, “ An’ the bonniest parnsy o’ a’ winna
gae to the show!”

Pansy flushed and laughed, and, taking the
old man’s hand in hers, said, “ Don’t spoil me,
uncle Archie.”

“Na reesk o't,” he said, “na reesk. “Yer na’
the kind.”

While the new sign was being painted, old ©



36 PANSY BILLINGS.

Archie seemed more like himself than he had
done for months.

He haunted the painter’s shop, and nearly
drove the man crazy by his multiplicity of direc-
tions about the pansies which were to be painted
in the corners of the signboard,—a purple, a
yellow, a black, and a white, all on a green
ground.

They were painted over four times before he
would accept them, or allow that they bore the
least resemblance to pansies. At last, more in
despair than in satisfaction, he consented to
let them stand, contenting himself with saying:

“T daur say the maist o’ mankind ’ud ca’ ’em
parnsies,” and it was the utmost of commenda-
tion the wearied painter could extract from him.

The new gate and sign fronted Mrs. Billings’s
door, and the old man used to sit there by the
hour, contemplating it. It seemed to give him
great delight to read it aloud to Pansy.

“The ‘Parnsy Gardens, do you like the



PANSY BILLINGS. 37

name, my bairn? The ‘Parnsy Gardens.’
Does it na’ sound weel? Ay! Ay, it sounds
weel!” and he would gaze at Pansy with a long,
inquiring look of fond affection.

“He’s named it for you, Pansy, don’t you
think so?” said Mrs. Billings one day.

“No, indeed!” exclaimed Pansy, astonished.
“Why, it’s for the pansies! The garden’s
always been celebrated for its pansies. I won-
der he did not call it so before.”

Mrs. Billings was not convinced, however;
and she was by no means the only one who had
had the thought. It began to be said in the
town that old Archie had named his gardens
after his pet and favorite, Pansy Billings, and
one day somebody jokingly taxed the old man
with it.

“ An’ I might ha’ done waur,” he answered,
with a slow, shrewd smile. “I might ha’ done
waur. Ye wad aiblins tell me how a mon ’d do
- better?”



38 PANSY BILLINGS.

Very fast uncle Archie failed. Maple leaves
were turning red when the new signboard was
put up; and, before the trees were bare, the
old man had taken to his bed. Pansy or her
mother stayed with him all the time, one by
day, and the other by night. He seemed to
have dismissed from his mind all care about
his affairs, and lay there, like a little child,
peacefully going to sleep. When Pansy would
ask him some questions about the plants, he
would reply, ‘Weel, weel, bairn, ye ken what
to do; do as ye like! It’s a’ the same to me
noo.”

He suffered so little that Pansy could not
believe he was so near his end, and was greatly
surprised one night when her mother said to
her, “ Pansy, I don’t like to be left alone with
uncle Archie to-night. You'd better stay. You
can lie on the lounge in the kitchen, and if he’s
worse I'll call you.”

It was near morning when Pansy was



PANSY BILLINGS. 39

waked by her mother’s calling, “Come quick,
Pansy!”

It was not half a minute before Pansy was by
the bedside, just in time to hear the old man
say, half unconsciously, ‘Guid bairn! Parnsy
Gardens.” They were his last words. In a
moment more the loving, aged heart had ceased
to beat.

A great surprise was in store for Pansy. By
a will, drawn up only~a‘few months before his
death, old Archie had bequeathed to her his
whole property, — the Pansy Gardens, the little
house, and a few thousand dollars in the bank.
Pansy was overwhelmed. She could not accus-
tom herself to the idea of it. In her humility,
she at first doubted her ability to carry on the
business; and yet it was the very thing of all
others she had often thought she would choose
to do. .

As she looked back, she could see that the

plan had been in old Archie’s mind for two



40 PANSY BILLINGS.

years, and that he had been steadily educating
her for it.

It was not long before she found her heart
full of joy in the prospect. Every difficulty was
now smoothed away from her mother’s path.
Ally-boy could realize the dream of his life, and
go to college; Alice could go to a good school;
no more poverty for them. With ordinary good
luck, and industrious care, Pansy knew that
she could make the gardens yield a yearly in-
come more than sufficient for their comfort-
able living.

The man who had for many years been old
Archie’s head gardener begged to be kept on
in his place.

“Indeed, miss, an’ if ye'll keep me on, I'll
serve ye as well as ever I served the old man.”
And Pansy was thankful to keep him.

So here we leave her at seventeen, florist and
proprietor, in her own right, of a prosperous

business and a good home.





PANSY BILLINGS. 41

And all this had come about from —a
dropped pansy?

Not quite. It had come about, first, from the
dropped pansy, but after that from a little girl’s
affectionate good will, good cheer, honesty, and
industry, — qualities which never fail, in the

long run, to win.






POPS Y

THE STORY OF A TENNESSEE GIRL






raOponye

—~+>_—_.

ChyAR i Real.

POPSY’S TABLE-CLOTHS.

Porsy was a Tennessee girl. She lived on
a farm, which lay along the banks of a beau-
tiful little stream named Clifty Creek. The
people in that region always said “crik” for
creek.

Popsy’s father was a stone-mason, but there
was not much work for a stone-mason to do, in
that part of the country, except in the spring
and autumn, and if it had not been for the
farm, there would have been hard times often
in Popsy’s house. As it was, they did not
“have any luxuries, or any money to spare, and

45



46 POPSY.

they all had to work, but they were comfortable,
had plenty to eat, and had a very good time.
There were six of the children,— three boys
and three girls,—and Popsy was the youngest
but one. Her name was Mary, but she was
always called either Pop, or Popsy. I suppose
that must be Tennesseean for Polly, which is
everywhere a common nickname for Mary.

Their house was one story high, built of
sawed logs, —like a log cabin, only higher; and
the logs were covered inside and out by planks
of black walnut wood, all cut and sawed on
the farm.

This made the inside of the house very
pretty, rough as it was; the walls, floors, and
ceilings, being all of the black walnut boards,
were a beautiful brown color.

A straight stone walk was laid from the
front door down to the gate, and on each side
of this stone walk was a row of trees, — ever-

green trees, and a tree the country people



POPSY. 47

called the lily-of-the-valley tree, because it had
large, purple flowers, shaped like lilies. These
trees were arranged in regular alternation, first
an evergreen, then a lily-of-the-valley tree, and
so on, all the way down; they made a beau-
tiful shade in the summer, and the air was ~
sweet with the perfume of the great purple
blossoms.

This stone walk was the pride of Popsy’s
father’s heart. He was far more particular
about its being kept clean than he was about
the floors inside the house. On those, he had
a bad habit of spitting, to his wife’s great dis-
gust; but he was never known to spit on the
stone walk; and whenever he had been sitting
mn the porch whittling, which he always did
when he got into a brown study about things,
if any of the whittlings flew on the stone walk,
he would immediately go and get the broom
and sweep them off on to the ground. There

they might lie, year in and year out, and it



48 POPSY.

wouldn’t trouble him; but not on the precious
white stone walk. Not a single shaving must
be seen on that.

In each corner of the yard was a big cherry-
tree, and there were rows of peach-trees for a
' great distance along the road. Peaches were
as plenty in this part of Tennessee as apples
are in New England. When a traveller stopped
to rest his horse, or to give him water, any-
where along the road, he would generally find
a peach-tree at hand, from which he could pick
all the peaches he wanted.

The kitchen was in a separate house, joined
to the other by a long, covered porch; in a
room opening off the kitchen the negroes slept,
— there were usually three of these. They were
slaves, but they did not belong to Popsy’s
father. He was a German, and always said he
would never own a slave. It did not trouble
his conscience, however, to borrow them from

his brother-in-law, who lived about three miles



POPSY. 49

away, had more slaves than he knew what to
do with, and was always glad to have a few of
them working for their board in any family
where they would be well treated.

So Popsy grew up surrounded by faithful,
affectionate negro women. The whole family
worked together, — master, mistress, children,
slaves, all side by side, out-of-doors or indoors,
as it might be, in the tobacco field or sugar
grove, kitchen or dining-room. Except in the
one matter of eating, there were no distinctions
between black and white, employers and slaves,
in hard-working farmers’ families in Tennessee,
in those days.

One of the earliest things Popsy could rec-
ollect was working in the tobacco field, by the
side of old “aunt Carline,” who showed her
how to “sucker off,” as it was called.

To “sucker off” was to pick off from the
tobacco - plants all young shoots, or suckers,

which were growing out of the main stem, and



50 POPSY.

which eonld take the strength from the big
leaves. Even a little child only five years old
could do a pretty good day’s work at this, after
she had been shown how to do it. It was only
a sort of play.

“Aunt Carline” was a very old negro woman.
Her head was so white the children used to
say it looked like a woolly sheep’s head. She
had nursed and brought up all Popsy’s brothers
and sisters; and as for Popsy herself, she was
hardly out of “aunt Carline’s” sight till she
was twelve years old. They all loved the old
negro woman as if she had been their mother;
in fact, they never thought of going to ask their
mother for anything, if “aunt Carline” could be
found. It was strange they loved her so, for
she used to box their ears, right and left, when-
ever they displeased her, and give them many
a hard whipping, when they got into mischief,
or refused to eat the corn dumplings she had

made for their dinner.



POPSY. 51

There was a big sugar-maple grove two miles
from the house, and in this the children had
great good times every spring, when the sugar-
ing season came round. They had to work
pretty hard, carrying the sap from the trees to
the kettles in which it was to be boiled down
to sugar, but they did not mind the work if
they could have their pay in sugar. Three
times a day, they used to go over to the grove,
and “ tote sugar-water,” as they called it. They
had made out of bent hickory saplings a sort
of yoke, which fitted on the back of the neck;
a pad of sheepskin was put underneath it, where
it rested on the neck, so as to keep it from
chafing the skin, and from each end of this
yoke a bucket was swung; and it made a pretty
picture when the children, four or five of them
at once, came out of the maple wood, with their '
yokes on their shoulders, the buckets full of
sap, going carefully, for fear they should spill

adrop. There was another use to which the



52 ‘POPSY.

sweet sap was put, in farmers’ houses in that
country. They boiled in it the twigs of the
spicewood, and made a tea which they thought
tasted quite as good as real tea; and was a
great deal better, for one reason, — that it didn’t
cost anything, except the children’s time to
gather the bunches of the spicewood twigs,
and the sap. .

Popsy’s mother never allowed any one but
herself to superintend the final “stirring off”
of the sugar. She thought nobody else could
do it just right. This was a great occasion;
the children all gathered round the big kettles,
which were hung from crossed poles in a
cleared space on one side of the grove. In
their hands they held out pieces of bark as
long and wide as shingles; as the sugar slowly
thickened, their mother would dip out ladles
full of it and drop it on the pieces of bark.
Then the children danced around, blowing the

bubbling sugar, till it cooled enough for them



POPSY. 5

to dip their fingers in, and taste it. It was a
grand frolic, and a pretty sight, too, of a bright,
sunny, spring morning. —

This was the best of all the things which
came in spring-time.

In the autumn, came another grand frolic
time,—the chestnutting. There was a long,
ridgelike hill, about a mile from the house,
which they called Chestnut Ridge. It was like
a forest of chestnut-trees, — thirty acres, thick
grown with chestnuts, and nothing else; old,
gnarled trees, half-bare, and dead, they were so
old; and copses of young trees, all waving
green leaves, too young to bear nuts. Bushels
upon bushels of chestnuts the children gathered
here every autumn. The greater part of the
nuts had to be sold; but that did not spoil
the fun of gathering them, and eating all they
could, as they went along. At last, one year,
their father said, “ Well, children, you'll have

a new kind of chestnutting this year; you can



54 POPSY.

walk round among the top boughs and pick
off the nuts.”

What could he mean? The children thought
he was joking; but he was not.

“You'll see,” he said; and that was all he
would tell them. A few days later, he said,
“Go up to the chestnut wood this afternoon,
‘children, and see how many nuts you can get.”

After dinner, away they all raced; and sure
enough, when they reached the ridge, there
they saw a dozen great chestnut-trees cut
down, lying on the ground, and they could, as
their father had said, walk round among the
topmost boughs and pick the nuts out of all
the burs that the frost had opened.

At first they thought that this was better
fun than shaking the boughs with a long pole,
and knocking the nuts down; the nuts looked
so pretty, nestling by twos and threes in their
white satin cases, like jewels in a satin-lined

jewel-case, and it was droll work climbing in -



POPSY. Es

and out, among and over the tangled boughs
and branches of the fallen trees. But before
long they began to think that they would
never again gather nuts from these trees, and
that made them sad. They knew almost every
tree in the grove, and they did not want to
lose one. When they heard their father’s
plan, they felt still worse. He had made up
his mind to cut down the whole chestnut
grove, and turn the land into flax fields, which
would bring him much more money,— for
chestnuts were so plenty in Tennessee they
were worth very little in market. He promised
to leave a few trees standing, so that the chil-
dren could get some nuts every autumn, but
this did not console them; and it was, after
all, rather a sorrowful “nutting time” they had
that year. Every two or three days, their
father would cut down a new batch of trees,
and the children would go over and pick out

the nuts from the burs, and say good-by to



56 POPSY.

the trees. Then the trees were sawed and
chopped into firewood, brought over to the
house, and before spring all burned .up, and
that was the end of the chestnut grove.

But you will wonder what all this has to
do with Popsy’s table-cloths. Nothing at all;
only I wanted to give a little idea of the sort
of life Popsy led, how she had always had _ to
work herself, and had seen everybody around
her working. She did not know anything of
any other kind of life, except a working life.

Even the rare pleasures and recreations she
had, she generally paid for beforehand by some
extra piece of work. Once when she was a
little thing, not five years old, she, and the
brother and sister next older than herself, had
a very great treat, a two days’ holiday, and
visit to their uncle’s who lived three miles
away; and this they earned by a whole day’s
work in the tobacco field. One morning their
father said to them:



POPSY. 57.

“Tf you three youngsters’l sucker off that
whole tobacco patch clean and good, and pick
off every worm that’s in the patch, you can
go to your uncle’s and stay till Sunday night.”

Popsy was then not quite five, her sister
Liddy was seven, and her brother Jim nine.

To go to their uncle’s was like going to a
city! there was so much to be seen there: a
big plantation, dozens of negroes, old and
young, a large house with many rooms in it,
and furniture which to them seemed very fine;
and last, not least, a half dozen cousins, boys
-and girls, near their own age. The oldest
daughter was twenty, and she had gone into
the silk-worm business. She had a room
built on purpose for her worms, and big glass
windows in the side, through which you could
look in, and watch everything: worms eating
leaves, or spinning themselves up into cocoons,
moths flying about, laying eggs, little piles of

eggs just hatching out into worms not bigger



58 POPSY.

than pin-heads,—it was like fairyland to the
~children to watch it all. Their cousin had a
spinning-wheel, too, on which she wound off
the silk from the cocoons herself, and she had
made a good deal of money by selling the silk.
It was thought a wonderful thing by all the
people in the region, and Popsy was exceed-
ingly proud of her clever cousin.

How those children did work in that tobacco
patch! Long after Popsy was an old woman,
she remembered it just as vividly as if it had
been yesterday. When they thought it was
all done, they called their father to look at it;
and they stood by, anxiously watching to see
if he would find it all right. Liddy was so
afraid he would not be satisfied, and they would
not get their visit, that the tears rolled down
her cheek as she stood watching, while he
went from hill to hill, examining each plant,
and lifting up the leaves.

“ All right, children,” he said, “not a sucker



POPS Y. 59

nor a worm to be seen! Be off, now!” and
away they scampered to have their best home-
spun suits put on, —the two little girls, —clean
sunbonnets, also of homespun calico. They
went barefoot, carrying their shoes in their
hands, to put on when they reached their
uncle’s house. It would have been a great
extravagance to have walked the whole three
miles in them. And it was only a penance to
have to put them on at the end of the journey.
Shoes are torture to children that are in the
habit of running barefoot.

This was the sort of life that farmers’ chil-
dren lived in Tennessee, thirty years ago. I
dare say it will sound forlorn to most of the
children who read this story; but I can tell
them that they will be very lucky children if
they always enjoy the days in the kind of life
they lead now, as much as Popsy and _ her
brothers and sisters enjoyed theirs then.

There is one thing that Popsy learned to-



60 POPSY.

do, of which I have not yet told you; and now
I am coming to the table-cloths. She learned
to spin and weave. In those days, farmers’
wives and daughters used to make, with their
own hands, not only all the material for all the
clothes they wore, but all the cotton and linen
they needed for sheets, pillow-cases, towels, and
table-cloths. It is marvellous to read accounts
of the numbers of yards of cloth, woollen, cot-
ton, and linen, which a woman would make in
one year, besides doing all the work of the
house. It seems as if there must have been
more than twenty-four hours to a day, in that
period. Every good housewife prided herself
on having chests full of things she had spun
and woven. Two good woollen or linsey-
woolsey gowns, and two cotton gowns each
year, she made for herself, and for all her girls.
Coats and trousers, also, for the men and the
boys; and coverlets, blankets, sheets, table-

cloths, towels, by the dozen,



POPSY. 6I

Popsy had a maiden aunt, her father’s sister,
who lived with them, and seemed to Popsy
never to do anything but spin and weave.
“Aunt Linny” was famous all the country
round about for weaving the finest and most
beautiful patterns in both linen and cotton.
She it was who taught Popsy to sit at the
loom and weave, when she was such a little
thing she could not reach the treadies with her
feet, but had to jump, down off the stool each
time they were to be worked back and forth.
And so it came about that, as Popsy grew up,
her greatest ambition was to weave as fine
linen and cotton as her mother and her aunt
Linny wove. When she saw a flax field, with
its pretty blue flowers all nodding in the sun,
she didn’t think, as you or I would, “Oh! what
lovely blue flowers! How they smile, and they
are as blue as the sky!” She ran her eye
over the field to see how big it was, and how

much flax could be got out of it for spinning.



62 POPSY.

One summer, when Popsy was in her thir-
teenth year, as she was roaming over the farm, -
she saw in the distance a great stretch of beau-
tiful blue color; she knew at once it must be
a flax field in full flower.

“Oh, whose splendid flax field is that?”
thought Popsy. “I wish it was daddy’s!”
(The children in that part of Tennessee always
called their fathers “ daddy,” never “papa,” or
“father.”) “I wonder why daddy didn’t plant
any flax this year! I’m going over, anyhow, to
find out whose it is.” So Popsy trudged along,
till she came to the flax field, and it turned out
to belong to a man she knew very well, “uncle
Eli,” as she had always called him, though he
was not a relation of hers. But there are some
men and women who are always called uncle
and aunt, by the whole world; and Eli Hyer
was one of these. He was “uncle Eli Hyer”
to everybody within twenty miles of his farm.

As Popsy stood leaning over the rail fence,



POPSY. 63

looking with covetous eyes at the flax, uncle
Eli came along.

“Want some posies, Pop?” he said. “I’m
a-raisin’ it fur seed, but you kin hev a hand-
ful ef yer want ’em. They are pooty, an’ no
mistake.”

It never crossed his mind that the child
could be looking so longingly at the field for
any other reason than for the blossoms.

“O uncle Eli!” exclaimed Popsy. “Be ye
only raisin’ it for the seed? Ain’t your folks
goin’ to pull it to spin?”

“No,” replied the old man. “They ain’t
goin’ to do no flax spinnin’ this year, to my
house. Fur a wonder, the wimmin says they’ve
got all the linen they want.: I’m jest goin’ to
take the seed outer this field. It’s a payin’
crop for the seed.”

“Yes, I know ’tis,” said Popsy. “Daddy had
some for seed last year. But we hain’t got a

bit on the farm this year.”



64 POPSY.

“Vou hain’t?” exclaimed uncle Eli. “ Wall,
what was the reason o’ that? I never know’d
your folks not to hev flax afore!”

“We, always did, till this summer, but we
hain’t got a mite now,” answered Popsy; “that’s
why I was a-lookin’ at your’n, an’ wishin’ we
hed it.”

“What on airth do you want with flax, Pop?”
asked uncle Eli, thinking she was a queer little
girl, to care whether her father had one kind of
crop or another in his fields. “What do you
want with flax?”

“ Table-cloths,” answered Popsy, curtly, purs-
ing up her little mouth with an important
expression.

“ Table-cloths!” ejaculated uncle Eli Hyer.
“Wall, I declar’, Pop, you-don’t mean to say
yer a-gettin’ ready to be married, a’ready!”

Popsy turned scarlet. She was pretty angry
with uncle Eli, but she did not want to -vex

him, for she had already made up her mind



POPS Y. 65

to have some of his flax. So she answered,
pleasantly :

“Can't a girl make table-cloths without get-
ting married? Aunt Linny’s real old, an’ she
ain't married; an’ she’s got a trunk full; per-
fectly beautiful ones,—six o’ the three-leaved
Jean pattern; and I know how to weave that’s
well’s she does.”

Uncle Eli put one foot up on the lower rail
of the fence, to steady himself, while he threw
back his head and laughed.

“Well, Pop,” he said, “ you are a smart young
un, that’s a fact! You kin hev this whole field
of flax, to do what you're a mind to with, if
you'll shake out the seed for me fust!”

“Bargain!” said Popsy, briskly. “ Bargain,
uncle Eli. That's jest what I was gettin’ ready
to ask ye, if I couldn’t hev some on’t.”

“ How'll ye get it over to your place?” asked
uncle Eli, “It’s right smart o’ ways from

here.”



66 POPSY.

“ Tote it,” replied Popsy, confidently. “That’s
no great things.”

“It’s a good half mile,” said the old man.

“°Tain’t fur,” said Popsy, bounding off. “I'll
be here in time for the seed. Don’t yer go
back on me, now,” and she was off like a deer,
in her haste to run and tell her mother of her
good luck. |

“Reckon she'll forgit all about it,” said uncle.
Eli to himself, as he walked away. “She’s the
smartest young un Dave Meadows’s got in the
whole batch. But totin’ green flax a half mile
‘ud be hard on them thin shoulders o’ hern. I
allow her folks won’t thank me for the job, ef
she undertakes it.”

Popsy burst breathless into the kitchen where
her mother and old “aunt Carline” were busy
getting dinner.

“Mammy,” she cried, “Oh, mammy! uncle
Eli’s done given me all the flax in his field.”

Her mother turned a bewildered look upon



POPSY. 67

her. ‘“ Whatever does the child mean, now!”
she said. “Air ye crazy, Pop?”

“Guess not,” retorted Popsy. “I’ve got the
promise o’ the flax, though, sure; uncle Eli he
was a-raisin’ it jest for seed, he said, an’ if I’d
git off the seed for him, I might hev all the
flax I wanted. You see ef I don’t tote right
smart on’t over here, and make me some table-
cloths.” ;

“T expect yer'll about kill yerself, Pop,” said
her mother, languidly; but old “aunt Carline,”
shaking with laughter, said, “ Pop’s smart, she
is. I'll help ye, honey.”

“Don’t want any help,” cried Popsy. “I’m
goin’ to do it, every mite on’t, myself, from fust
to last, an’ then they'll be my table-cloths, won’t
they? It’s table-cloths I’m goin’ to make, jest
like aunt Linny’s.”

This was July. Early in August it would
be time to shake out the seed, and pull the

flax. Many a time, as uncle Eli passed the flax



68 POPSY.

field, he paused, and looked at it, wondered if
Popsy would hold to her bargain, and laughed
at the recollection of her excited face.

‘°Spect you thought I wa’n’t a-comin’, didn’t
yer, now?” sounded in his ears, in a merry,
roguish voice, one day, just as he had been .
thinking about Popsy and the flax field. “ Here
I am, yer see. Where’s yer cloths to shake out
them seeds? I’m goin’ to begin right now.”
He turned, and there stood Popsy, her face
laughing all over at his surprise.

“Wall, Pop, I didn’t reely think you’d do it,”
he replied. “Be yer folks willin’?”

“T guess so,” said Pop, carelessly. “I told
‘em. Mam. said I'd kill myself, she ’spected.
But Pll resk it. I kin stop when I’m beat out.”

In good earnest she set to work, shook and
beat out the tiny black seeds on to cloths spread
on the ground, then gathered them up carefully
and put them into wooden buckets.

Then she tugged away at the flax-plants, and





“*T WOULD RUN ALL THE WAY HOME WITH IT,’ SAID POPSY.”



POPSY. 69

pulled them up by the roots; threw them down
in big piles, tied them up into bundles, with
wisps of the flax itself. When she had eight
big bundles, she tied them all together with a
stout rope she had brought. The two ends of
the rope she knotted together, to hold in front
of her, to steady the load on her shoulders.
Then she sat down on the ground, close to the
big bundle of flax, slipped the noose of the rope
round her neck, pulled the bundle up on her
back, and staggered up to her feet. After she
once got upon her feet, the load did not feel
heavy. She thought to herself, “Pooh! this
is nothing! I could run all the way home with
it!” But, before she had gone many rods, she
changed her mind. Every bone and every
muscle in her body ached, and she was glad to
sit down and rest. “Got too much for one
time!” she said to herself. “Next time I'll
know better; but I’ll tote this, or die fur’'t!”
and she pulled along, with ‘the perSpiration



70 POPSY,

streaming down her forehead, and her cheeks
scarlet. It was a hot August day; and in
Tennessee, August heat is terrible. Every few
rods she had to stop, sit down on the ground,
slip the bundle off her back, and rest a long
time.

“The longest half mile I ever walked,” said
Popsy, as at last she threw down her bundle of
flax by the spring, in the rear of her house.
She wanted to have it near the spring, so as to
have plenty of water to put on the flax.

You see, Popsy’s work with the flax had only
‘just begun when she had, as she called it,
“toted” the plants home. There was nearly
a month’s work more to be done on it, before
it would be ready to spin.

It took her a week to “tote” home the quan-
tity of flax she wanted. Every day she carried
one big bundle; and the last day she carried
two. “Aunt Carline” begged to go and help
her bring it, but Popsy would not hear a word



POPSY, Ti

of any help from any one. These were to be
her own table-cloths, from the very ground up
to the last thread. .

Now I will try to tell you, as well as I can,
never having seen the process, only having
heard aunt Popsy describe it, what she did with
her flax next. The first thing was to spread it
all out on the ground, in a thin layer, and turn
water over it. Here it had to lie fourteen days,
to rot. If it rained in that time, or if heavy
dews fell at night, so much the better, — that
made less work to be done. . If it did not rain,
water must be turned over the flax carefully, as
often as every second or third day. The fine
threads in the stalks would not come out all
right for spinning, if it were not evenly and thor-
oughly wetted. Every morning and evening,
for fourteen days, Popsy went and examined her
flax, to see how it was getting on; and never
once did she forget to turn on the water when

it was needed. At the end of the fortnight it



We POPSY,

had all turned a dark color, and was a wet, sod-
den mass,

Then she took it up, and again tied it in
bundles; this time in small bundles, no larger
than she could easily hold in one hand. These
were put through a machine called the “break.”
This machine has six sharp wooden knives,
three above and three below, their edges com-
ing together. Between these sharp edges the
flax was put, and the knives worked up and
down, till the flax was all broken and bruised
into fine shreds.

Next, after the “break,” came the “ swingling-
board.” This was a big board, driven firmly
into the ground; the bundles of flax were held
in the left hand, firmly, laid across the top: of
this board, and’ beaten long and hard with a
huge wooden knife, a foot long; this knife was
called the swingling-knife. By this time, after
all this rotting, breaking, and swingling, the.

flax was pretty finely shredded, but not quite



POPSY. 73

fine enough. One more thing had to be done.
It must be hackled. This was done by drawing
it between two thin, square pieces of wood, set
thick with sharp nails. Popsy thought this the
prettiest work of all; as the flax was drawn back
and forth between these surfaces of sharp iron
points, it became almost as fine as hair, and a
great bunch of it, finely hackled, and ready to
spin, looked like nothing so much as a head of
brown hair, all tangled. When Popsy’s flax
was ready for the wheel it was just about the
color of her own hair, and looked, it must be
confessed, very much like it, tangles and all.
Next came the spinning. That was done on
a small wheel, made on purpose for spinning
flax. This also Popsy greatly enjoyed, and was
sorry when it was all-done. The weaving was
harder work; and for the use of the linen-loom
she had to wait, and take her chance when no-
body else wanted it. Sometimes she got almost

out of patience waiting. It seemed to her that



74 POPSY.

her mother and aunt Linny would never be
done their weaving. But she persevered. As
often as they took out a piece of finished linen
from the loom, there was Popsy, all ready, with
her “Please let me weave a piece, now,” so
pleadingly they could not resist her, even if
their own work did have to wait.

But Popsy’s pile of table-cloths grew very
slowly. It was early in October when she
began the first one, and it was the middle
of March when she finished the last,— eleven
big table-cloths, as strong as iron, and of the
prettiest patterns known in the whole country.
After the table-cloths were done, she wove four-
teen big towels, a yard long, with fringe at each
end, four inches long, and knotted, and of these
she was as proud as of the table-cloths.

“Uncle Eli” often dropped in, in the course
of the winter, to see her father and mother, and
whenever he found Popsy sitting at the loom he

would tell the story of how she looked the day



POPSY. 7S

he found her leaning over his fence, gazing long-
ingly at the flax field. He seemed never tired
of telling the story over and over, and he would
always add, when he thought Popsy could not
hear him:

“A smart young un, Mis’ Meadows, a power-
ful smart young un, that gal; I allow she'll git
on in life; no fear but what she’ll hev anything
she sets out to hev.”

All uncle Eli’s children were grown up, and
most of them gone away from home; and the
old man’s interest in Popsy carried him back
to the days when his own boys and girls were
growing up around him. When Popsy showed
him her store of table-cloths and towels, an idea
occurred to him. He said nothing, but he
chuckled inwardly to think what a pleasure
he could give the child. The next day he was
going to town with a big load of maple sugar,
and the thought that had struck him was this:

“Ef I make a good trade out er thet sugar,



70 POPSY.

I'll jest make the young un a present of a leetle
trunk o’ her own, to keep her linen in. It ought
to be hern, allus, an’ not go in with the rest.”

The sugar sold well, and uncle Eli, with a
smile on his kindly old face, went from shop to
shop, to find the prettiest trunk he could get for
| Popsy to keep her table-cloths in. He was very
hard to please, and had seen nearly every small
trunk in the town before he saw the one that
suited him.

It was narrow and long, with a high, rounding
' top, and was covered with —what do you think?
You have none of you ever seen such a trunk;
but thirty years ago they were thought to be
very fine. It was covered with goatskin, with
the hair left on; and this skin was nailed on
with rows of brass-headed nails. The goatskin
was white and brown in spots, more white than
brown, and there was a little scalloped strip of
bright red leather all around the edge of the
lid, that showed when the trunk was shut. On



POPSY. Ty,

one end, just below the handle, uncle Eli had
POP printed, in brass-headed nails, just like the
others on the trunk. You could read it as far
as you could see the trunk, — POP! in shining
brass letters. .

When he brought this fine trunk over, and
gave it to Popsy, she did not know what to
say, she was so astonished. It seemed to her
she had all she needed now to set off into the
world with, — eleven table-cloths, fourteen towels,
and such a splendid trunk as that. She could
not thank uncle Eli enough; and she made him
go into her bedroom, to see where she was going
to keep the trunk, standing end out into the
middle of the room, so that the brass-lettered
POP would be in plain sight all the time.

Old “aunt Carline”” was as pleased as Popsy.
“T tell yer, the gal airned it, she did,” she re-
marked, confidentially, to uncle Eli; “ yer ou’ter
seed her, a-totin’ thet flax, an’ the sweat jest

a-rollin’ off her like a crik; an’ she hain’t never



78 POPSY.

let up on it, from thet day to this. She’s the
smartest young un ever I nussed.”

Then fearing that Popsy had overheard her,
she turned quickly, and added:

“Now yer see, Pop, jest as yer mammy allers
telled yer; yer holp yerself an’ yer'll git holp.
The Lord he’s holp yer, a-puttin’ it inter uncle
Eli’s head to guv yer this yere box, but he
wouldn’t never hev gone done it, ef yer hadn’t

holp yerself fust.”



CHAPTER IL.

POPSYS GRAND JOURNEY.

Wuen Popsy first looked at her new trunk,
she little dreamed what a long journey it was
destined soon to take. She had heard her
father and mother sometimes talking about sell-
ing the farm, and moving away, but she did
not believe such a thing would really happen.
However, happen it did, and in only a few
months after Popsy got her trunk; and the
first thing she thought, when she found they
were really going, was: “Now my trunk will
be splendid to carry my clothes in.”

Uncle Eli Hyer had gone first. It was only
a few weeks after he gave Popsy the trunk
that he had suddenly sold’ his farm, and started
with his whole family for Missouri. Before he
went, he came over and had a long talk with

79



80 POPSY.

Popsy’s father, and tried to persuade him to
go, too. He said there was a better chance
for farming in Missouri than in Tennessee; a
great deal more room, and better land. Mis-
souri, he said, was the finest State in the West;
hogs grew twice as fat there as they did in
Tennessee.

~ When Popsy told me the story of her grand
journey she was an old woman between fifty
and sixty, but she laughed as she recalled this
reason uncle Eli had given for moving to Mis-
souri.

“J just wondered, then,” said she, “if hogs
could be any fatter than ours were; and if
they could, I thought I didn’t want to see ’em;
for ours were so fat they couldn’t but just turn
over. I never did like hogs; I don’t like ’em
now; though, I may say, I haven’t ever been
separated from ’em, not since I was a child.”

Two of Popsy’s brothers also had gone to

Missouri, to work on farms; and they had been



POPSY. vO

sending back letters, urging their father to sell
out, and come and join them.

“They didn’t give daddy any peace,” was
Popsy’s way of putting it, “ till he'd written ‘em
that he’d sell, the first chance he got.”

So it was finally settled; and before mid-
summer the last piece of Mr. Meadows’s farm
had been sold. They could not find any one
to take the whole of it; it went in lots; three
hundred acres to one man; three hundred to
another; the farming-fields to one, and the
pasture-lands and the timber to another.

There was a great excitement at the time,
throughout the whole region, about moving to
the West. Everybody seemed to have got
suddenly discontented with living in Tennessee.
The news spread from family to family. About
every day the news came that another had
decided to go. It seemed as if the people
were half crazy; some of them about gave

away their farms, to get money enough to go



82 POPSY.

with. One persuaded another; relatives and
friends did not want to be left behind, and
when the time finally came for starting, the
party, all told,— men, women, and children, —
counted up to fifty.

At Mr. Meadows’s house, the day before they
were to set off, there was a kind of farewell
feast. All the people who were going to emi-
grate were invited, and all the people who
wanted to bid them good-by; in short, every-
body for forty miles round. It was the biggest
entertainment ever seen in that region. Three
extra negro servants had been cooking night
and day for a week, to get ready for it; pies
and cakes and hams and chickens and turkeys
were literally piled up in stacks more than
could be counted. Some people arrived to
breakfast; some just rode up, alighted for a
few moments, took a cup of coffee and a bit
of cake, and drove away again; some stayed

to dinner; and the greater part stayed till



POPSY. 83

dark and had a dance,—the first time that
there had ever been dancing in the house.
“Just for once,” Popsy’s father and mother
said. “Just for once. There wouldn't ever
be such a time again.”

Nobody counted how many people came and
went in the course of the day. Nobody could.
Everybody was too busy. But reckoning as
well as they could, afterwards, they thought
there must have been at least six hundred,
and perhaps seven.

This was Tuesday. The next morning, at
ten o'clock, the party of “movers” gathered
in front of the Shiloh meeting-house to make
their start. That was the place agreed upon,
and the hour of starting was to be nine.
Before seven, the wagons began to appear;
but it was past ten before the last one arrived,
and nearly eleven before the cavalcade moved
off. There were fifty white- covered wagons,

mostly drawn by oxen; three comfortable car-



84 POPSY.

riages for invalids and old people, and a long
procession of horseback riders. Among these
last came Popsy, her sister Lyddy, and brother
Jim. Popsy was so excited and happy she
could hardly sit on her horse. It was a big
yellow horse, named Crusoe,—for Robinson
Crusoe, but the whole name proved too long, so
they had dropped the Robinson. Popsy and
her sister wore homespun cotton gowns, and big
sunbonnets made of the same cloth. Popsy’s
sunbonnet was generally flapping on her shoul-
ders behind, for if she kept it on her head she
could not see half she wanted to,— Popsy did
not mean to miss seeing a single thing on the
way.

In her pocket she carried a little book with
a pencil tied to it. She had resolved to write
down in this book the name of every town,
river, and mountain she saw. It seemed to
Popsy like seeing the whole world,—to go all

the way from Tennessee to Missouri. She



POPSY. 85

had never been more than four miles away
from her father’s house, and she had never
seen any other sort of life than the life her
own family, and the farmers’ families in that
region, led. How things looked in large towns,
and how things were done in what we should
now call comfortable and well-appointed houses,
Popsy had not the least idea. This journey
was going to teach her a great many things.
Mr. Meadows was the leader of the party.
He had the care of all the arrangements; pro-
viding the food for the animals, selecting the
place for camping at night, and determining
the routes they should take.

He must have had a good instinct about
roads, for he never but once, during the whole
six weeks’ journey, lost his way, though all he
had to go by was a little old map, which had
few of the roads marked on it. He walked
every step of the way; always a little in ad-

vance of the foremost wagon.



86 POPS Y.

Popsy, on her yellow horse, was here, there,
and everywhere, in the procession. She was
so full of fun and good spirits that she became
a sort of privileged character. Everybody liked
to have her come cantering up, and walk her
horse by the side of the wagons,

Her brother Jim rode a big bay horse. Pop-
sy wanted that horse, but it was not thought
safe for her; it was too high-spirited.

Old Crusoe was the fastest, if he could only
be got to do his best; but he was old, had
lost his ambition, and needed much whipping
before he would show his speed. One day,
however, Popsy had the satisfaction of making
him win in a race with the bay. She had
dared her brother to a mile run for a pound
of candy; and she had won fairly and squarely,
by dint of lashing Crusoe every other second
with a willow switch she had cut.

They were just entering a town, and Jim

made Popsy go into a shop to buy the candy.



POPSY. 87

He held her horse, outside. The first thing
she saw, when she crossed the threshold, was
a low iron stove with a fire burning in it. She
had never before seen a stove. She did not
know there was such a thing. The sight nearly
took her breath away.

“What’s that?” she exclaimed, pointing to it.
The man in the shop did not understand her.

“ What’s what?” he said.

“This thing where ye’ve got your fire!” said
Popsy, kicking it with her foot. “ Why don’t
you have your fire in a fireplace?”

Then the man laughed at her and told her he
“reckoned she was from Tennessee.” At which
Popsy was angry, and said no more.

But when she went out, she said to Jim and
Lyddy, “What do you think they’ve got in
there? A kind of a mud-turtle, with fire in it.”
Which I think was a very good phrase for a child
of thirteen to have hit upon to describe a stove.

This was in Kentucky. Kentucky seemed to



88 POPSY.

Popsy a-beautiful country; such lovely hills and
groves and sparkling streams. She saw many
a place where she wished that they could stop
and build a house and live always. —

In the town of Bowling Green, in Kentucky,
she had an adventure with a parrot, which pro-
duced a great impression on her mind.

They .had camped, for Sunday, in the out-
skirts of the town, on the edge of a little stream.
They always rested over Sunday, and when they
were not near enough to a town to go in to
church, they had some sort of religious services
in the camp.

On this Sunday, Popsy had strolled away by
herself, without permission, and walked into
town. She was sauntering from street to
street, gazing with eager and anxious eyes at
every thing and every person, when she spied a
huge green and red parrot, in a cage, hanging
in an open window of a room on the first floor

of a sort of restaurant, or eating-house.



POPSY. 89

The window was so low that the bird was but
little above Popsy’s head. She stood stock-still,
lost in admiration at the beautiful creature.
She had never seen any colored pictures of
birds. She had no idea that so gorgeous a bird
was to be seen on the face of the earth. It
almost frightened her, it shone so in the sun,
and its feathers were of so many splendid colors.
But how much more frightened was she when,
after looking at her for a second, the bird opened
its mouth, and, in distinct words, said, “ Good-
morning, madam! Go to hell,” and after this
a_volley of more awful oaths than Popsy had
ever heard in her life. It was a parrot be-
longing to some sailors, who had _ wickedly
taught it to swear at everybody in this way.

Poor Popsy took to her heels, and ran for dear
life, out of the town, back to the camp, and never
stopped nor took breath till she had reached
her mother’s wagon. She made no doubt that

a miracle had been wrought at that moment, to



90 POPSY.

punish her for having broken the Sabbath, and
run away from camp without leave; and that
she was in danger of experiencing all the curses
which the profane bird had hurled after her.
This lasted her brother Jim for fun till the end
of the journey. In fact, poor Popsy did not hear
the end of it for years; and I do not wonder,
for I think myself it was a very droll thing to
-have happened just as it did, on a Sunday,
when Popsy had run away.

The days flew by like a dream, to Popsy.
She thought she would like to spend all her
life journeying in that way. Everything was so
systematically arranged that there was no real
discomfort in the life. They had plenty of pro-
visions in the wagons; barrels of flour and of
salted meat, and kegs of cider. There were
three tents which were set up every night; two
for the women, and one for the men. Many
members of the party made up beds in their

wagons and slept on those. Popsy tried both,



POPS Y. gI

but liked the tents best. Every night there were

built four big fires of logs, and, after the suppers

had been cooked and eaten, everybody gathered

around these log fires, and sang, and told stories,
far into the night.

There were two fiddles in the party, and
several first-rate fiddlers, so they never lacked
for music.

Popsy never wanted to go to bed. When the
camp was in a grove she would sometimes select
a tree, whose branches were low enough to be
easily climbed, —she could climb like a wildcat,
—and once up and curled into a crotch, with
her head resting against the trunk, she would
sit by the hour, watching the men moving
about with lanterns, feeding the animals, throw-
ing logs on the fires, and singing, sometimes
negro songs, but oftener religious hymns; for
they were nearly all Methodists. Then, when
all the work was done, and the story-telling

began, it was like fairyland to Popsy. Not



92 POPSY.

a word escaped her ears, and her great blue
eyes looked black with excitement as she
listened.

Once she gave everybody a great scare. It
had grown very late, and, spite of all her inter-
est in the stories and talk, Popsy was sleepy.
Again and again she found herself nodding,
but she could not make up her mind to tear
herself away and go to bed. At last she was
really overpowered by sleep, and her head gave
so violent a nod that she lost her balance, let
go of the branch to which she was holding,
and came down, luckily feet foremost, into the
middle of the group of story-tellers.

They were more frightened even than she;
for they did not know, or had forgotten, that
she was up there, and their first thought was
that it must be some sort of wild animal that
was coming crawling through the branches.
But Popsy’s scream soon reassured them. She

alighted on her feet like a cat, jumping up and



POPSY. 93

down, to get her balance. “It’s only me,” she
said, “I missed my hold on the tree.”

“Ye was asleep, Pop, ye know ye was,” cried
her brother Jim. .

“No such thing,” exclaimed Popsy. “ How’d
I come down on my feet, if I’d been asleep, I’d
like to know! I wasn’t asleep any more’n you
are.”

“ Catch a weasel asleep,” said one of the men.

“Pop goes the weasel,” laughed Jim, at which
Popsy darted back, and, before Jim knew what
had happened to him, had got his head tight
under her right arm, and was giving it a good
sound pummelling, till he was glad to beg for
mercy.

“Don’t call me a weasel again, then,” she said,
as she marched off as dignifiedly as she knew
how. ;

Another sight Popsy saw on this journey,
which she never forgot. She was galloping

along on her horse, when she suddenly saw a



94 POPSY,

man sitting by the roadside, with a big pile of
sticks and old bones in front of him, building
them up into a sort of house, as children, build
houses out of corncobs. The man was laugh-
ing to himself, and pointing to the house, as he
laid each fresh stick on the pile. Popsy halted
her horse: ‘“ What be ye doin’ that for?”

The man looked up at her, and burst into a
loud laugh, still pointing to the sticks and bones,
but made no reply. While she sat.there on
her horse, looking bewilderedly at the man, her
father came up, and reproved her, sharply.

“ Ain't ye ashamed, Pop,” he said, “to stare
so at the poor creature! Come away. It’s an
idiot.”

Popsy had never before heard the word idiot;
and she did not in the least know what it
meant. ;

“T don't care,” she replied, “I’m goin’ to have
a good look at it,’ and she waited there till the

greater part of the procession of wagons had



POPSY. 95

passed her. Then she cantered on, and for half
a mile the fences on both sides of the road were
hung full of old bones and sticks, such as the
man had been playing with. That was the way
he spent all his time, gathering up old bones,
and bits of sticks, tying them on to the fences,
and building them up into towers, which he
knocked down and built over again a dozen
times a day. Even now Popsy did not under-
stand what: the word idiot meant, but she asked
no more questions; and, for years afterward, she
thought an idiot was simply a man who tied
bones on fences,

When they first started on this journey,
Popsy’s mother was so feeble that she had to
lie down all the time on a bed in the bottom of
one of the wagons; but, before they had been on
the road three weeks, she was so much _ better
that she could sit up all day, and walk a little.

There was one woman in the party who had

come very unwillingly. She did not want to



96 POPS Y.

leave Tennessee; and she was so angry at her
husband’s having decided, against her wishes, to
make the move, that she, too, lay on a bed in
the bottom of their wagon all the way. She
would not get up at all to help about anything.
She would not look out of the wagon, nor let
anybody see her face, if she could help it. She
slept most of the time; and when she was
awake she cried.

Popsy thought she must be crazy, not to
care anything about seeing the beautiful coun-
try they were travelling through, and all the
interesting people, and things that happened.
Even when the fiddles were playing at night,
and everybody in the whole camp having a good
time, she would not lift her head from her pil-
low, nor speak a word. Her husband, poor
fellow, had a sorry time with her. I think he
must have wished he had stayed at home.

When they got into the southern part of
Illinois, the party broke up, about half of them



POPSY. 97

deciding to settle there, instead of pushing on to
Missouri.

Both of the fiddles and the two best story-
tellers stayed behind, here, which was a loss
Popsy felt deeply. There was not so much fun
after that; and very often Popsy would be in
bed and sound asleep on a wagon-bottom, in
half an hour after they stopped for the night.
She was growing a little tired and sore from the
saddle, also, and sometimes, in the day-time, she
and her sister would tie their horses behind one
of the wagons, and climb in, on top of the piled
boxes and trunks, and ride there for part of a
day. It was from one of these perched-up seats
inside the wagon that Popsy made a famous
leap to the ground, which might have broken
her neck, but, by great good fortune, did not
huxteher at all:

It was in a farming town in the high lands
in Illinois. The wagon-train had stopped to let

the cattle drink, and Jim came galloping up to



Full Text

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“WHAT A HALF-HOUR



Ir WAS FOR PANSY!”

See page 18.
PANSY BILLINGS AND POPSY

Two Stories of Girl Life

BY
Oia Ela
(HELEN HUNT JACKSON)

AUTHOR OF “RAMONA,” “NELLY’S SILVER MINE,”
“BITS OF TALK FOR YOUNG FOLKS,”
ETC., ETC.

ILLUSTRATED

BOSTON
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY
Copyright, 1898,
BY
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY.

Colonial IBress :
Electrotyped and Printed by C. H. Simonds & Co.
Boston, U.S.A.
CONTENTS:

PANSY BILLINGS.

CHAPTER PAGE
I. ArcHtE McCioup’s WoopEN Box . . . a
II. Pansy Gores InTO BUSINESS : . . a7 24
POPSY.

I. Popsy’s TABLE-CLOTHS 5 5 ° ° * 45

II. Popsy’s GRAND JOURNEY . . . ° - 79
RANSY. BILIEINGS AND EORSY
PaNoyY BIiLerNcs.

—_+—

CHAPTER at,
ARCHIE McCLOUD’S WOODEN BOX,

Pansy was not her real name. She was bap-
tized Mary Jane, after her mother’s oldest sister,
but, from the time she was eight years old, she
was never called anything but “ Pansy;” and
how that came about, and what it all meant,
both to Pansy herself and her family, it is the
purpose of this story to tell.

Pansy’s mother was a widow with three little
children, — Pansy, the oldest, Albert, the second,
and Alice, the youngest.

When Pansy’s father died, Alice was a little
baby, in the cradle, and Albert could but just
run alone. Pansy was seven, and felt herself

7
8 PANSY BILLINGS.

as old and as important as a grown woman,
because she took so much care of her little
brother and sister. It was droll about the
names of these two children. Before Alice
was born, Albert had always been called Ally.
When Mrs. Billings named the new baby
Alice, she did not think about the natural nick-
name for Alice being the same that they had
already used for Albert, and, the first thing they
knew, they had two “Allys” in the house.
That would never do. As the children grew
up, it would make no end of confusion, so they
fell into the way of calling Albert “ Ally-boy,”
to distinguish him from the “ Ally” that was a
girl, and before long that came to be supposed
to be his real name. All over the town he was
known as ‘ Ally-boy,” which was by no means
a bad name, any more than “ Pansy” was. But,
as Mrs, Billings used to say, anybody, to read
her children’s names as they were written in the

big family Bible, would wonder, and never think
;

PANSY BILLINGS. 9

that the children answering to the names of
Pansy, Ally-boy, and Ally were the same ones.

Mr. Billings was a teamster. He owned a
good wagon and pair of horses, and those, with
his own strong hands, a good temper, and an
upright character, were, as he often said, his only
“stock in trade.” But they proved a very good
stock. He had always plenty of work, — every-
body in the town who wanted work done would
go to Billings first, and not give the job to any-
body else, unless Billings was too busy. This
was what Billings had won for himself, simply
by being always pleasant, prompt, and faithful.
He was an ignorant man, and a stupid one:
knew enough to take care of horses, drive, and
do an errand as he was bid, — no more; but, little
as it was, that was enough to enable him to earn
a living, and be respected by everybody.

In which there is a lesson for all of us, if we

-will think about it a minute. It is the same

lesson which Jesus Christ once put into a par-
Io PANSY BILLINGS.

able; the parable of the lord who, going into a
far country, gave to his different servants differ-
ent sums of money, to one five silver talents,
to another three, to another only one. And
the man who had only one did not think it
worth while to try to do anything with it, it was
so small a sum. And that man, Jesus said,
“was slothful and wicked,” and deserved to be
punished. No such verdict as that would ever
be pronounced against Billings. His talent was
a very small one, but he used it faithfully, and
to the utmost; and no doubt when he died he
had his reward in the next world. Even in this
he was remembered and regretted far longer
than many a man who had been richer, cleverer,
and more prominent than he.

It was years before people left off saying,
“How we miss Billings!” ‘“There’s nobody
now that can be trusted as we used to trust
Billings!”

When Mrs. Billings found herself alone with
PANSY BILLINGS. II

her three little children, she did not know which
way to turn. She had always earned a little
money by washing, and by selling eggs; enough
‘for her own clothes, and the children’s, and now
and then to buy a piece of furniture for the
house; but to earn the entire support for the
family was quite another thing. Her heart
sank within her, as she looked into the three
little faces, now clouded and sorrowful as they
_ saw the sorrow and anxiety in hers. But she
did not sit idle a minute, or waste any of her
strength in useless fretting.

She went to all her husband’s old customers,
and asked them to ask their wives to give her
their fine washing. She also resolved to en-
large her poultry yard, and sell chickens, as well
as eggs. These were the only things she knew
of that she could do.

It went very hard with them for a time, work
was not plenty, and the chicken business very

uncertain; many a day -both mother and chil-
12 PANSY BILLINGS.

dren were hungry, and had not food enough in
the house to eat. Still, they pulled through,
month after month, and though their clothes
were shabby and their food scanty, they had
the comfort of a home together, and that was
everything.

Opposite their little house lived a florist, an
old Scotchman named Archie McCloud. He
was a queer, crotchety old man, but had most
wonderful success with flowers. People came
to him, from far and near, for roses, and carna-
tions, and heliotrope, but most of all for pansies.
Pansies were the old man’s delight. There was
not a variety of pansy known which could not
be found in his beds. |

“Tt’s the flower o’ a’ flowers,” he used to say.
“Tt’s the face o’ a sma’ cheeld in it; as the Lord
himsel’ gie us for a pattern. I’d spare a’ the
rest o’ them, an’ abide wi’ the parnsy.”

When old Archie first noticed the little Bil-

lings girl, with her baby sister in her arms, and
PANSY BILLINGS. 13

her baby brother toddling behind, standing close
to his fence and looking over at the flowers, he
was not pleased. He was. afraid of children.
For they sometimes opened his gate, ran in, and
stole flowers, when he was away. They reached
over the fence and broke off the tops of his
hedges. He hated to see them coming near
his place, much as he loved them for their own
sake. But there was something in this little
girl’s face which drew him to her greatly. He
observed that she was always pleasant and af-
fectionate to the baby; and once, when the
baby reached over the fence and made a clutch
at a lauristinus blossom, he saw her give a
gentle tap to the little hand, and say, “ No, no,
baby. You must not touch a leaf. They’re
only to look at.” Then his heart warmed to
the child, and he resolved to give her a bou-
quet some day. The very next day, a lady
stopped at the gate to buy some flowers. The

group of little Billingses were standing near.
14 PANSY BILLINGS.

As old Archie came out with the flowers in a
newspaper, and handed them to the lady in her
carriage, a beautiful purple pansy slipped out
and fell to the ground, almost under the horses’
feet. Quicker than a flash of lightning the
Billings baby was laid on the ground, and her
little nurse had sprung forward, close to the
horses’ heels, snatched the flower, and handed
it up, crying, “ Here is one that fell out!”

“Keep it, little girl,” said the lady, smiling
kindly.

“Oh! thank you!” said Pansy,—for so we
must begin to call Mary Jane now,— “thank
you!” and she looked at the flower with such
an ecstasy of delight in her face that the lady
thought to herself, “ This is no common child,
to love flowers like that.” The lady herself
loved flowers better than anything else in the
world; loved them so much that she could not
help instantly liking any one, even a stranger,

who loved them, too.
PANSY BILLINGS. 15

“Give her some more, Archie,” she said.
“The child evidently loves them.”

“Yes, mem, she do indeed. I’ve obsarved
her. She’s an excellent cheeld, Mrs. Scott,”
and he hastened back into the garden to cut
the flowers.

Pansy had not understood what was said, and
remained lost in admiration and delight, looking
down into the heart of her flower.

“Do you like the pansy?” said the lady.

Pansy looked up, bewildered at first.

“Ts that the name of it?” she asked.

“ Dear, dear,” thought the lady, “to think the
poor little thing never saw a pansy before!”

Vie stthates) 16S name,” said the lady. ‘It is
a lovely little flower.”

“It's got a face in it,” said Pansy, rapturously,
“just like it was laughing.”

Old Archie came up just in time to hear this
speech. His face glowed with pleasure.

“Eh, the bonnie bairn. Ye’re a_ parnsy
16 PANSY BILLINGS.

yersil’! Luik at the parceeption o’ the

”
!

bairn, mem!” and from that hour old Archie
was Pansy’s friend. So, also, was Mrs. Scott.
Though months went by before she and Pansy
were brought together again, she never forgot
the child’s face of delight, nor her quick recogni-
tion of the half-elfin laugh stamped on the pansy
petals, and she said to herself, many a time,
“Tll go and look up that child, and give her
some flowers;” but Mrs. Scott was like most
very rich ladies, so full of engagements and
amusements that weeks counted up into months,
without her realizing how fast they were speed-
ing by.

The next day, when old Archie saw Pansy at
the fence, with her babies, he went over to speak
to her. The first thing that caught his eye was
the purple pansy pinned on the front of her
apron.

“ An’ ye’re wearin’ the parnsy?” he said.

“Yes, sir,” said Pansy. “I didn’t like to leave
PANSY BILLINGS. 17

her in the house. I thought she would like to
come out and play with us,” and she looked
down into the blossom’s face with a glance as
loving as those she gave her little sister. The
old man chuckled.

“An’ wha tauld ye ’twas a lassie?” he said.
Pansy stared, perplexed. She was not used to
the Scotch brogue. Archie repeated his ques-
tion in plainer fashion. .

“ Oh, I don’t know,” said Pansy, “I just called
it so. It looks like Ally. Didn’t you ever see
the face in it?” she added, innocently, unpin-
ning the flower and holding it up to him. This
time old Archie shook his sides, laughing.

“Ay, ay, bairn,” he replied. “They've ’s
mony faces ’s they've blossoms; I ken ’em a’.
Come in, come in, an’ I'll show ye a bonny sight
o’ ’em,” and he opened the gate wide.

Pansy trembled with pleasure. How she had
longed and yearned to get inside that gate, and

see the gay flower beds nearer at hand!
18 PANSY BILLINGS.

“Oh, thank you, sir,” she cried; “might I just
take Ally-boy home and leave him? I can carry
the baby, but I’m afraid Ally-boy will step on
the beds,” at which Ally-boy began to cry, and
old Archie said, “No, you needn’t take him
home. Tl lead him, and keep him off the
beds.”

Such a sight was never seen before in that
garden, — three little children, one in arms, be-
ing piloted about by the old Scotchman himself.
And what a half-hour it was for Pansy! Her
cheeks grew crimson with excitement, and she
almost panted for breath, as she went from roses
to carnations, and from carnations to heliotrope,
and so on, till they came to the pansy beds,
which were on the farther side of the garden.
When she saw these, she did not speak a word,
only looked, and looked, and now and _ then
sighed. The queer old gardener liked her all
the better for this. He hated chatter. When
they got through, he said, “Now, my bairn,
PANSY BILLINGS. 19

there’s na cheeld kens what ye ken o’ this place.
An’ ye’re welcome whenever ye like.”

“Do you mean, sir, that I’m to come in when
I like?” asked Pansy.

“That's it, praceesely,” replied old Archie.
“Ye is to be trusted. I’ve watched ye mony a
time, when ye little thocht it. An’ ye’ve an eye
for the blossoms. Ye can come when ye like.”

“Oh, thank you very much,” said Pansy,
and her eyes thanked him far more than the
words.

She did not go into the garden, however, for
several days. Old Archie saw her standing, as
usual, at the fence, and looking over, but she
did not go near the gate. This pleased him,
too.

“ She’s na presoomin’, the little lassie. A fine
modesty she’s got in her wee soul,” he said to
himself; “it was a guid name I gave her, when
I ca’ed her for the parnsy. It’s the richt name

for her,” The next time he spoke to her he
20 PANSY BILLINGS.

said, “ Guid-day to ye, little Parnsy,” and after
that he never called her anything else. Soon
Ally-boy caught it, and, before long, the baby;
Mrs. Billings did not dislike the sound, and
Pansy herself delighted in it. She began to
have a strange feeling, which she was far too
young to have put in words, or to understand,
as if the pansies were her sisters. Whenever
old Archie asked her of a morning what flower
she would like, as he often did, she always said,
“A pansy, please,” and this pleased him more
and more. Sometimes he would try to tempt
her with some other flower, “ An’ winna ye like
a rose the day? or mebbe a pink?”

“No, sir, a pansy, please,” she would say, and
then he would often add to the pansy the rose,
or the carnation, saying, “ An’ if ye’ve na use for
this one ye can give it t’ the mither.”

So Pansy was seldom without one of her
namesake blossoms pinned on her apron. She

would wear it all day, put it in water at night,
PANSY BILLINGS. 2I

and, as if the blossom knew how the child loved
it, it would come out fresh the next morning,
ready to be worn again.

But old Archie was preparing a still greater
pleasure for his little friend. One day he ap-
peared at Mrs, Billings’s door, with a long
wooden box in his arms, almost heavier than he
could carry, filled with pansies; a dozen fine,
healthy plants, in full bloom. These were to
be Pansy’s own. He set the box in a sunny
corner of the yard. Pansy was not at home,
which grieved the old man. He wanted to see
the child’s face at the first sight of them. But
he did not lose much of its expression, for in
less than a minute after her mother had shown
her the box, and told her it was for her, she had
raced over to the garden, burst open the gate,
and, springing upon Archie, as he was stooping
over a geranium bed, picking off dead leaves,
she nearly threw him down with her impetuous

hug and kiss. She had never kissed him of her
22 PANSY BILLINGS.

own accord before, but now she hugged him and
kissed, and kissed and hugged, till he was almost
as out of breath as she.

This box was the beginning of a new life for
Pansy. She no longer spent so many hours
standing at the old florist’s fence. She liked
her own pansies better than all the gay-colored
flowers to be seen in his beds. The more she
looked at them, the more they seemed to her to
be alive, as she and her brother and sister were
alive. Often she would say to her mother,
“Can’t you see how they laugh? This yellow
one, she laughs the most, and the white one;
they are better-natured than the black ones.”

She took the best care of them. Not a weed
had a chance to more than show its head in the
box before it was pulled up; never a day passed
that they were not watered, and, if the sun were
too hot at noon, covered up with a thin paper;
old Archie had told her that this would make
the blossoms last longer. He told her, also,
PANSY BILLINGS. 23

about saving the seeds, to plant next year, so as
to get new varieties.

One morning, early in September, Pansy saw
Mrs. Scott’s carriage stopping again at the gar-
den gate. In a few moments old Archie came
out, and, seeing Pansy, beckoned to her to come

over.
X

CH APE Re ule

PANSY GOES INTO BUSINESS,

“Hev ye ony pansies in bloom in the box,
me bairn?” he asked.

“Oh, yes, lots,” said Pansy, wondering why
he asked.

“Weel, then, rin an’ cut all yell like to
spare,” said Archie. “Mrs. Scott, she’s wantin’
two hunderd, an’ I canna mak’ it oot for her.”

Pansy flew and cut every one in the box,
not without a pang at losing them, but very.
glad to be able to, as she supposed, help old
Archie.

What was her surprise when, counting the
pansies, carefully, he said, “ There’s fifty o ’em;
that ull be a dollar for ye, me bairn,” and he
put a silver dollar into her hand. She looked
at it and at him, so perplexedly that Mrs.
Scott laughed out.

24
PANSY BILLINGS. 25

“T did not know that you had an assistant
florist, Mr. McCloud,” she said. ‘This is the
little girl that liked pansies so much, isn’t it?
What is your name, dear?”

Pansy hesitated.

“They all call me Pansy, now,” she said;
“my real name’s Mary Jane. But I don’t
want the money for the pansies. They’re not
my pansies, anyhow. Mr. McCloud only gave
them to me to keep ina box. They’re all his,”
and she stretched out her hand towards old
Archie, to give him back the dollar,

“Na! na!” he said. “The siller’s yer ain;
haud fast to it. Siller dollars dinna grow on
bushes. It’s your ain.”

“Oh, yes, Pansy, it is my money, not Mr.
McCloud’s,” said Mrs. Scott, “and I like very
much to buy pansies of a little girl named
Pansy. Would you like to see what I am
going to do with all these pansies, my dear?”

she added, struck by a sudden fancy.
26 PANSY BILLINGS.

“Yes, ma’am,” said Pansy, timidly.

“Well, jump in on the front seat with the
driver,” replied Mrs. Scott, “and I'll take you
home with me and show you.”

“Tl have to ask my mother, first,” said Pansy.

“Jump in, Parnsy, jump in,” said old Archie.
“Tl gang ower an’ tell it t’ the mither.”

So Pansy, very happy, but a good deal
frightened, was rolled away in the fine carriage,
to Mrs. Scott’s beautiful house. It was the
most beautiful house in the town, and Mrs.
Scott was one of the richest women; as_ kind
and good, too, as she was rich. As Archie
watched her driving away with Pansy, he
thought to himself:

“It wad na’ be strange if it waur the mak-
kin’ o’ the lassie’s fortune, this ride she’s get-
tin’ noo!”

Old Archie did not know all that there was
of energy and character in his Pansy’s little
breast. She was not destined to be beholden
PANSY BILLINGS. 27

to any one for the making of her life. She
herself was to be the making of it.

When they reached the house, Mrs. Scott
led Pansy into the dining-room. Here a table
was beautifully set for a dinner-party. The
glass and silver and candlesticks shone so,
that it made Pansy blink her eyes.

In the centre of the table was a great bunch
of feathery white clematis; on each side of this
were dishes of fruit,— peaches and grapes and
plums.

“Do you think it is pretty, Pansy?” asked
Mrs. Scott.

Pansy could hardly speak.

“J think it must look like Aladdin’s palace,”
she said, at last.

“Oh, dear, no,” laughed Mrs. Scott, “not so
fine as that. I’m not going to have any flow-
ers but pansies, to-night,” she continued, “and
I'll arrange them now, so you can see how they

will look, and why I want so many.”
28 PANSY BILLINGS.

Then she took Pansy into another room,
where, on a table, were a dozen little narrow,
semicircular dishes, made of tin and _ painted
green; they were not quite an inch deep, and
less than an inch wide. They were filled with
wet sand. Into this sand Mrs. Scott stuck the
pansies, filling each little dish as full as it
would hold. Then she arranged them on the
table, in and out: among the dishes of fruit,
till it looked as if one long wreath of pansies
had been laid on the table-cloth. The tins
were so low they did not show at all. When
it was done, Pansy gave a little scream of
_ delight.

“JT don’t believe there was ever anything so
beautiful in the world before,” she said.

At this Mrs. Scott laughed again, but in a
moment more she looked sober. It always
made her sad to be reminded how little the
very poor people in this world can know about

the beautiful things which cost money.
PANSY BILLINGS. 29

“The pansies are the prettiest things of them
all, dear,” she replied, “and everybody can have
pansies.”

“Yes’m,” said Pansy; but in her heart she
thought, “ The pansies did not look so pretty in
my box.”

Poverty makes little children wise before their
time, in matters of money. Even while Pansy
was most absorbed in looking at the beautiful
house, and the dinner-table with the pansy
wreaths on it, she never forgot the silver
dollar in her hand. A dollar was a great
deal of money to Pansy. She had never be-
fore had more than five cents at a time. She
knew, too, how much a dollar seemed to her
mother.

“Two cents apiece for all my pansies,” she
thought. “I might have sold them before, if I
had enly known.” When she went home, she
gave her mother the dollar. Mrs. Billings was

as astonished as Pansy. She had never thought
30 PANSY BILLINGS.

before that a flower as common as a pansy could
be worth so much money.

“Why, you've had a dollar's worth of them
many a time before, haven’t you, Pansy?” said
she.

“Yes, indeed, lots of times,” said Pansy.
“But I’ve got the seed of all I didn’t cut. Mr.
McCloud told me to save it. Next summer we
can have a big bed.”

“T don’t know as Mr. McCloud would like us
to sell them,” said Mrs. Billings.

“Oh,” said Pansy, crestfallen, “perhaps he
wouldn’t. But sometimes he doesn’t have as
many as people want. Then he wouldn’t care.”

The upshot of this conversation, and of one
or two talks that Pansy had with old Archie,
was that next year there was not only a big
pansy bed in Mrs. Billings’s yard, but a bed
of carnations, and one of rose-geranium.* Old
Archie was only too glad to help Pansy to earn

a little money, and his own business was so
PANSY BILLINGS. 31

large he could well afford to help a poor
neighbor.

He taught Pansy, and also her mother, how
to take care of the plants, and make the most
of them. He showed Pansy how to tie up little
buttonhole bouquets with wire; a single carna-
tion and two pansies, with rose-geranium leaves,
made a pretty little bouquet, for which Pansy
got ten cents, and sometimes she sold ten in
one day. |

Before Pansy knew it, little girl as she was,
she had become a sort of florist in a small way.
Mrs. Scott’s friends had all heard about her, and
liked to patronize her. Her name, Pansy, also
helped her. It pleased everybody’s fancy; and
everybody was glad to give a lift to such an
industrious little creature. As the years went
on, and she had to spend many hours. each day
in school, it grew to be no small task for her to
keep her flower beds in order, and make all her

plants do their utmost. Each year old Archie
32 PANSY BILLINGS.

gave her new things, and her beds grew fuller
and fuller. She was always up by daylight, at
work in her garden; and she often worked there
after dark. All this outdoor work kept her
healthy, and by the time she was fifteen she was
as strong and large as most girls at eighteen.

Ally-boy, too, was a fine, hearty boy, and
helped her very much; but he did not love it
as Pansy did. He worked only for the money.
Pansy used to say, sometimes, she wished she
need not sell a single blossom; she loved every
one, and missed every one she cut and sent
away.

How proud old Archie was of her, and her
success, could hardly be told in words. She
did nothing without consulting him; and gradu-
ally it came about that he did few things without
consulting her. She read aloud to him all the
new books and pamphlets he got which related
to the florist business, and there was not a day
that she did not go with him through his hot-
PANSY BILLINGS. 33

houses and gardens. She called him “uncle
Archie” now, and nothing would have offended
the old man more than to have any one question
the relationship. He was not strong now. No-
body knew his age. It was a weakness of old
Archie’s never to tell it; but it must have been
much greater than any one supposed, for all of a
sudden he began to walk very feebly, and to look
like an aged man.

It cut Pansy to the heart to see that, when he
stooped to pick a flower, he could not straighten
up again without a groan, and that day after day
he would sit on the terrace, in the sun, and do
nothing, watching his workmen all day, and find-
ing fault with everything they did.

“Tm afraid uncle Archie is failing, mother,”
she said one day. “Do you see how bent he
walks? And he doesn’t lift his hand to a spade
or trowel now.”

“Yes,” replied Mrs. Billings, “he looks ninety,

if he’s a day. He can’t last long.”
34 PANSY BILLINGS.

The tears filled Pansy’s eyes. Putting on her
hat, she went over to the garden. Old Archie
was sitting, languid, in his chair, in the porch of -
the little two-roomed cottage where he had lived
all alone for forty years. A new Florist Cata-
logue lay on his knees.

“ Parnsy,” he said, as she came up the path,
“there’s a new parnsy we maun ha’! It’s a
big braw name they gie it,” and he pointed to
the name in the catalogue. “ An’ I’m a-thinkin’,
my bairn, o’ puttin’ up a sign ’t the place. It’s
not had ony name ’t it a’ these years. I thocht
I'd ca’ it the ‘Parnsy Gardens.’ Is’t na’ a guid
name? ’Twould luik well, I’m thinkin’, wi’ a
new gate, an’ maybe a parnsy or twa painted
abuve the warrds.”

“Why, that would be lovely, uncle Archie,”
cried Pansy, delighted with the idea. “ That’s
just what it ought to be called, but everybody
says there are no such pansies in the whole

country as yours, —”.
PANSY BILLINGS. 35

“Not so mony kinds in any ane mon’s place,”
interrupted old Archie.

“No, indeed,” said Pansy, “I was reading
that to you, you know, in that pamphlet, the
other day. Don’t you remember, it said that
the finest pansies, and the greatest variety, at
that Horticultural Show, were, as had_ been
the case for many years, exhibited by Mr. Mc-
Cloud?”

The old man nodded, with a look of tender
pride spreading over his face.

“Eh, eh, bairn,” he said, “fine warrds a’!
Fine warrds!” Then glancing up at her archly,
he said, “ An’ the bonniest parnsy o’ a’ winna
gae to the show!”

Pansy flushed and laughed, and, taking the
old man’s hand in hers, said, “ Don’t spoil me,
uncle Archie.”

“Na reesk o't,” he said, “na reesk. “Yer na’
the kind.”

While the new sign was being painted, old ©
36 PANSY BILLINGS.

Archie seemed more like himself than he had
done for months.

He haunted the painter’s shop, and nearly
drove the man crazy by his multiplicity of direc-
tions about the pansies which were to be painted
in the corners of the signboard,—a purple, a
yellow, a black, and a white, all on a green
ground.

They were painted over four times before he
would accept them, or allow that they bore the
least resemblance to pansies. At last, more in
despair than in satisfaction, he consented to
let them stand, contenting himself with saying:

“T daur say the maist o’ mankind ’ud ca’ ’em
parnsies,” and it was the utmost of commenda-
tion the wearied painter could extract from him.

The new gate and sign fronted Mrs. Billings’s
door, and the old man used to sit there by the
hour, contemplating it. It seemed to give him
great delight to read it aloud to Pansy.

“The ‘Parnsy Gardens, do you like the
PANSY BILLINGS. 37

name, my bairn? The ‘Parnsy Gardens.’
Does it na’ sound weel? Ay! Ay, it sounds
weel!” and he would gaze at Pansy with a long,
inquiring look of fond affection.

“He’s named it for you, Pansy, don’t you
think so?” said Mrs. Billings one day.

“No, indeed!” exclaimed Pansy, astonished.
“Why, it’s for the pansies! The garden’s
always been celebrated for its pansies. I won-
der he did not call it so before.”

Mrs. Billings was not convinced, however;
and she was by no means the only one who had
had the thought. It began to be said in the
town that old Archie had named his gardens
after his pet and favorite, Pansy Billings, and
one day somebody jokingly taxed the old man
with it.

“ An’ I might ha’ done waur,” he answered,
with a slow, shrewd smile. “I might ha’ done
waur. Ye wad aiblins tell me how a mon ’d do
- better?”
38 PANSY BILLINGS.

Very fast uncle Archie failed. Maple leaves
were turning red when the new signboard was
put up; and, before the trees were bare, the
old man had taken to his bed. Pansy or her
mother stayed with him all the time, one by
day, and the other by night. He seemed to
have dismissed from his mind all care about
his affairs, and lay there, like a little child,
peacefully going to sleep. When Pansy would
ask him some questions about the plants, he
would reply, ‘Weel, weel, bairn, ye ken what
to do; do as ye like! It’s a’ the same to me
noo.”

He suffered so little that Pansy could not
believe he was so near his end, and was greatly
surprised one night when her mother said to
her, “ Pansy, I don’t like to be left alone with
uncle Archie to-night. You'd better stay. You
can lie on the lounge in the kitchen, and if he’s
worse I'll call you.”

It was near morning when Pansy was
PANSY BILLINGS. 39

waked by her mother’s calling, “Come quick,
Pansy!”

It was not half a minute before Pansy was by
the bedside, just in time to hear the old man
say, half unconsciously, ‘Guid bairn! Parnsy
Gardens.” They were his last words. In a
moment more the loving, aged heart had ceased
to beat.

A great surprise was in store for Pansy. By
a will, drawn up only~a‘few months before his
death, old Archie had bequeathed to her his
whole property, — the Pansy Gardens, the little
house, and a few thousand dollars in the bank.
Pansy was overwhelmed. She could not accus-
tom herself to the idea of it. In her humility,
she at first doubted her ability to carry on the
business; and yet it was the very thing of all
others she had often thought she would choose
to do. .

As she looked back, she could see that the

plan had been in old Archie’s mind for two
40 PANSY BILLINGS.

years, and that he had been steadily educating
her for it.

It was not long before she found her heart
full of joy in the prospect. Every difficulty was
now smoothed away from her mother’s path.
Ally-boy could realize the dream of his life, and
go to college; Alice could go to a good school;
no more poverty for them. With ordinary good
luck, and industrious care, Pansy knew that
she could make the gardens yield a yearly in-
come more than sufficient for their comfort-
able living.

The man who had for many years been old
Archie’s head gardener begged to be kept on
in his place.

“Indeed, miss, an’ if ye'll keep me on, I'll
serve ye as well as ever I served the old man.”
And Pansy was thankful to keep him.

So here we leave her at seventeen, florist and
proprietor, in her own right, of a prosperous

business and a good home.


PANSY BILLINGS. 41

And all this had come about from —a
dropped pansy?

Not quite. It had come about, first, from the
dropped pansy, but after that from a little girl’s
affectionate good will, good cheer, honesty, and
industry, — qualities which never fail, in the

long run, to win.
POPS Y

THE STORY OF A TENNESSEE GIRL
raOponye

—~+>_—_.

ChyAR i Real.

POPSY’S TABLE-CLOTHS.

Porsy was a Tennessee girl. She lived on
a farm, which lay along the banks of a beau-
tiful little stream named Clifty Creek. The
people in that region always said “crik” for
creek.

Popsy’s father was a stone-mason, but there
was not much work for a stone-mason to do, in
that part of the country, except in the spring
and autumn, and if it had not been for the
farm, there would have been hard times often
in Popsy’s house. As it was, they did not
“have any luxuries, or any money to spare, and

45
46 POPSY.

they all had to work, but they were comfortable,
had plenty to eat, and had a very good time.
There were six of the children,— three boys
and three girls,—and Popsy was the youngest
but one. Her name was Mary, but she was
always called either Pop, or Popsy. I suppose
that must be Tennesseean for Polly, which is
everywhere a common nickname for Mary.

Their house was one story high, built of
sawed logs, —like a log cabin, only higher; and
the logs were covered inside and out by planks
of black walnut wood, all cut and sawed on
the farm.

This made the inside of the house very
pretty, rough as it was; the walls, floors, and
ceilings, being all of the black walnut boards,
were a beautiful brown color.

A straight stone walk was laid from the
front door down to the gate, and on each side
of this stone walk was a row of trees, — ever-

green trees, and a tree the country people
POPSY. 47

called the lily-of-the-valley tree, because it had
large, purple flowers, shaped like lilies. These
trees were arranged in regular alternation, first
an evergreen, then a lily-of-the-valley tree, and
so on, all the way down; they made a beau-
tiful shade in the summer, and the air was ~
sweet with the perfume of the great purple
blossoms.

This stone walk was the pride of Popsy’s
father’s heart. He was far more particular
about its being kept clean than he was about
the floors inside the house. On those, he had
a bad habit of spitting, to his wife’s great dis-
gust; but he was never known to spit on the
stone walk; and whenever he had been sitting
mn the porch whittling, which he always did
when he got into a brown study about things,
if any of the whittlings flew on the stone walk,
he would immediately go and get the broom
and sweep them off on to the ground. There

they might lie, year in and year out, and it
48 POPSY.

wouldn’t trouble him; but not on the precious
white stone walk. Not a single shaving must
be seen on that.

In each corner of the yard was a big cherry-
tree, and there were rows of peach-trees for a
' great distance along the road. Peaches were
as plenty in this part of Tennessee as apples
are in New England. When a traveller stopped
to rest his horse, or to give him water, any-
where along the road, he would generally find
a peach-tree at hand, from which he could pick
all the peaches he wanted.

The kitchen was in a separate house, joined
to the other by a long, covered porch; in a
room opening off the kitchen the negroes slept,
— there were usually three of these. They were
slaves, but they did not belong to Popsy’s
father. He was a German, and always said he
would never own a slave. It did not trouble
his conscience, however, to borrow them from

his brother-in-law, who lived about three miles
POPSY. 49

away, had more slaves than he knew what to
do with, and was always glad to have a few of
them working for their board in any family
where they would be well treated.

So Popsy grew up surrounded by faithful,
affectionate negro women. The whole family
worked together, — master, mistress, children,
slaves, all side by side, out-of-doors or indoors,
as it might be, in the tobacco field or sugar
grove, kitchen or dining-room. Except in the
one matter of eating, there were no distinctions
between black and white, employers and slaves,
in hard-working farmers’ families in Tennessee,
in those days.

One of the earliest things Popsy could rec-
ollect was working in the tobacco field, by the
side of old “aunt Carline,” who showed her
how to “sucker off,” as it was called.

To “sucker off” was to pick off from the
tobacco - plants all young shoots, or suckers,

which were growing out of the main stem, and
50 POPSY.

which eonld take the strength from the big
leaves. Even a little child only five years old
could do a pretty good day’s work at this, after
she had been shown how to do it. It was only
a sort of play.

“Aunt Carline” was a very old negro woman.
Her head was so white the children used to
say it looked like a woolly sheep’s head. She
had nursed and brought up all Popsy’s brothers
and sisters; and as for Popsy herself, she was
hardly out of “aunt Carline’s” sight till she
was twelve years old. They all loved the old
negro woman as if she had been their mother;
in fact, they never thought of going to ask their
mother for anything, if “aunt Carline” could be
found. It was strange they loved her so, for
she used to box their ears, right and left, when-
ever they displeased her, and give them many
a hard whipping, when they got into mischief,
or refused to eat the corn dumplings she had

made for their dinner.
POPSY. 51

There was a big sugar-maple grove two miles
from the house, and in this the children had
great good times every spring, when the sugar-
ing season came round. They had to work
pretty hard, carrying the sap from the trees to
the kettles in which it was to be boiled down
to sugar, but they did not mind the work if
they could have their pay in sugar. Three
times a day, they used to go over to the grove,
and “ tote sugar-water,” as they called it. They
had made out of bent hickory saplings a sort
of yoke, which fitted on the back of the neck;
a pad of sheepskin was put underneath it, where
it rested on the neck, so as to keep it from
chafing the skin, and from each end of this
yoke a bucket was swung; and it made a pretty
picture when the children, four or five of them
at once, came out of the maple wood, with their '
yokes on their shoulders, the buckets full of
sap, going carefully, for fear they should spill

adrop. There was another use to which the
52 ‘POPSY.

sweet sap was put, in farmers’ houses in that
country. They boiled in it the twigs of the
spicewood, and made a tea which they thought
tasted quite as good as real tea; and was a
great deal better, for one reason, — that it didn’t
cost anything, except the children’s time to
gather the bunches of the spicewood twigs,
and the sap. .

Popsy’s mother never allowed any one but
herself to superintend the final “stirring off”
of the sugar. She thought nobody else could
do it just right. This was a great occasion;
the children all gathered round the big kettles,
which were hung from crossed poles in a
cleared space on one side of the grove. In
their hands they held out pieces of bark as
long and wide as shingles; as the sugar slowly
thickened, their mother would dip out ladles
full of it and drop it on the pieces of bark.
Then the children danced around, blowing the

bubbling sugar, till it cooled enough for them
POPSY. 5

to dip their fingers in, and taste it. It was a
grand frolic, and a pretty sight, too, of a bright,
sunny, spring morning. —

This was the best of all the things which
came in spring-time.

In the autumn, came another grand frolic
time,—the chestnutting. There was a long,
ridgelike hill, about a mile from the house,
which they called Chestnut Ridge. It was like
a forest of chestnut-trees, — thirty acres, thick
grown with chestnuts, and nothing else; old,
gnarled trees, half-bare, and dead, they were so
old; and copses of young trees, all waving
green leaves, too young to bear nuts. Bushels
upon bushels of chestnuts the children gathered
here every autumn. The greater part of the
nuts had to be sold; but that did not spoil
the fun of gathering them, and eating all they
could, as they went along. At last, one year,
their father said, “ Well, children, you'll have

a new kind of chestnutting this year; you can
54 POPSY.

walk round among the top boughs and pick
off the nuts.”

What could he mean? The children thought
he was joking; but he was not.

“You'll see,” he said; and that was all he
would tell them. A few days later, he said,
“Go up to the chestnut wood this afternoon,
‘children, and see how many nuts you can get.”

After dinner, away they all raced; and sure
enough, when they reached the ridge, there
they saw a dozen great chestnut-trees cut
down, lying on the ground, and they could, as
their father had said, walk round among the
topmost boughs and pick the nuts out of all
the burs that the frost had opened.

At first they thought that this was better
fun than shaking the boughs with a long pole,
and knocking the nuts down; the nuts looked
so pretty, nestling by twos and threes in their
white satin cases, like jewels in a satin-lined

jewel-case, and it was droll work climbing in -
POPSY. Es

and out, among and over the tangled boughs
and branches of the fallen trees. But before
long they began to think that they would
never again gather nuts from these trees, and
that made them sad. They knew almost every
tree in the grove, and they did not want to
lose one. When they heard their father’s
plan, they felt still worse. He had made up
his mind to cut down the whole chestnut
grove, and turn the land into flax fields, which
would bring him much more money,— for
chestnuts were so plenty in Tennessee they
were worth very little in market. He promised
to leave a few trees standing, so that the chil-
dren could get some nuts every autumn, but
this did not console them; and it was, after
all, rather a sorrowful “nutting time” they had
that year. Every two or three days, their
father would cut down a new batch of trees,
and the children would go over and pick out

the nuts from the burs, and say good-by to
56 POPSY.

the trees. Then the trees were sawed and
chopped into firewood, brought over to the
house, and before spring all burned .up, and
that was the end of the chestnut grove.

But you will wonder what all this has to
do with Popsy’s table-cloths. Nothing at all;
only I wanted to give a little idea of the sort
of life Popsy led, how she had always had _ to
work herself, and had seen everybody around
her working. She did not know anything of
any other kind of life, except a working life.

Even the rare pleasures and recreations she
had, she generally paid for beforehand by some
extra piece of work. Once when she was a
little thing, not five years old, she, and the
brother and sister next older than herself, had
a very great treat, a two days’ holiday, and
visit to their uncle’s who lived three miles
away; and this they earned by a whole day’s
work in the tobacco field. One morning their
father said to them:
POPSY. 57.

“Tf you three youngsters’l sucker off that
whole tobacco patch clean and good, and pick
off every worm that’s in the patch, you can
go to your uncle’s and stay till Sunday night.”

Popsy was then not quite five, her sister
Liddy was seven, and her brother Jim nine.

To go to their uncle’s was like going to a
city! there was so much to be seen there: a
big plantation, dozens of negroes, old and
young, a large house with many rooms in it,
and furniture which to them seemed very fine;
and last, not least, a half dozen cousins, boys
-and girls, near their own age. The oldest
daughter was twenty, and she had gone into
the silk-worm business. She had a room
built on purpose for her worms, and big glass
windows in the side, through which you could
look in, and watch everything: worms eating
leaves, or spinning themselves up into cocoons,
moths flying about, laying eggs, little piles of

eggs just hatching out into worms not bigger
58 POPSY.

than pin-heads,—it was like fairyland to the
~children to watch it all. Their cousin had a
spinning-wheel, too, on which she wound off
the silk from the cocoons herself, and she had
made a good deal of money by selling the silk.
It was thought a wonderful thing by all the
people in the region, and Popsy was exceed-
ingly proud of her clever cousin.

How those children did work in that tobacco
patch! Long after Popsy was an old woman,
she remembered it just as vividly as if it had
been yesterday. When they thought it was
all done, they called their father to look at it;
and they stood by, anxiously watching to see
if he would find it all right. Liddy was so
afraid he would not be satisfied, and they would
not get their visit, that the tears rolled down
her cheek as she stood watching, while he
went from hill to hill, examining each plant,
and lifting up the leaves.

“ All right, children,” he said, “not a sucker
POPS Y. 59

nor a worm to be seen! Be off, now!” and
away they scampered to have their best home-
spun suits put on, —the two little girls, —clean
sunbonnets, also of homespun calico. They
went barefoot, carrying their shoes in their
hands, to put on when they reached their
uncle’s house. It would have been a great
extravagance to have walked the whole three
miles in them. And it was only a penance to
have to put them on at the end of the journey.
Shoes are torture to children that are in the
habit of running barefoot.

This was the sort of life that farmers’ chil-
dren lived in Tennessee, thirty years ago. I
dare say it will sound forlorn to most of the
children who read this story; but I can tell
them that they will be very lucky children if
they always enjoy the days in the kind of life
they lead now, as much as Popsy and _ her
brothers and sisters enjoyed theirs then.

There is one thing that Popsy learned to-
60 POPSY.

do, of which I have not yet told you; and now
I am coming to the table-cloths. She learned
to spin and weave. In those days, farmers’
wives and daughters used to make, with their
own hands, not only all the material for all the
clothes they wore, but all the cotton and linen
they needed for sheets, pillow-cases, towels, and
table-cloths. It is marvellous to read accounts
of the numbers of yards of cloth, woollen, cot-
ton, and linen, which a woman would make in
one year, besides doing all the work of the
house. It seems as if there must have been
more than twenty-four hours to a day, in that
period. Every good housewife prided herself
on having chests full of things she had spun
and woven. Two good woollen or linsey-
woolsey gowns, and two cotton gowns each
year, she made for herself, and for all her girls.
Coats and trousers, also, for the men and the
boys; and coverlets, blankets, sheets, table-

cloths, towels, by the dozen,
POPSY. 6I

Popsy had a maiden aunt, her father’s sister,
who lived with them, and seemed to Popsy
never to do anything but spin and weave.
“Aunt Linny” was famous all the country
round about for weaving the finest and most
beautiful patterns in both linen and cotton.
She it was who taught Popsy to sit at the
loom and weave, when she was such a little
thing she could not reach the treadies with her
feet, but had to jump, down off the stool each
time they were to be worked back and forth.
And so it came about that, as Popsy grew up,
her greatest ambition was to weave as fine
linen and cotton as her mother and her aunt
Linny wove. When she saw a flax field, with
its pretty blue flowers all nodding in the sun,
she didn’t think, as you or I would, “Oh! what
lovely blue flowers! How they smile, and they
are as blue as the sky!” She ran her eye
over the field to see how big it was, and how

much flax could be got out of it for spinning.
62 POPSY.

One summer, when Popsy was in her thir-
teenth year, as she was roaming over the farm, -
she saw in the distance a great stretch of beau-
tiful blue color; she knew at once it must be
a flax field in full flower.

“Oh, whose splendid flax field is that?”
thought Popsy. “I wish it was daddy’s!”
(The children in that part of Tennessee always
called their fathers “ daddy,” never “papa,” or
“father.”) “I wonder why daddy didn’t plant
any flax this year! I’m going over, anyhow, to
find out whose it is.” So Popsy trudged along,
till she came to the flax field, and it turned out
to belong to a man she knew very well, “uncle
Eli,” as she had always called him, though he
was not a relation of hers. But there are some
men and women who are always called uncle
and aunt, by the whole world; and Eli Hyer
was one of these. He was “uncle Eli Hyer”
to everybody within twenty miles of his farm.

As Popsy stood leaning over the rail fence,
POPSY. 63

looking with covetous eyes at the flax, uncle
Eli came along.

“Want some posies, Pop?” he said. “I’m
a-raisin’ it fur seed, but you kin hev a hand-
ful ef yer want ’em. They are pooty, an’ no
mistake.”

It never crossed his mind that the child
could be looking so longingly at the field for
any other reason than for the blossoms.

“O uncle Eli!” exclaimed Popsy. “Be ye
only raisin’ it for the seed? Ain’t your folks
goin’ to pull it to spin?”

“No,” replied the old man. “They ain’t
goin’ to do no flax spinnin’ this year, to my
house. Fur a wonder, the wimmin says they’ve
got all the linen they want.: I’m jest goin’ to
take the seed outer this field. It’s a payin’
crop for the seed.”

“Yes, I know ’tis,” said Popsy. “Daddy had
some for seed last year. But we hain’t got a

bit on the farm this year.”
64 POPSY.

“Vou hain’t?” exclaimed uncle Eli. “ Wall,
what was the reason o’ that? I never know’d
your folks not to hev flax afore!”

“We, always did, till this summer, but we
hain’t got a mite now,” answered Popsy; “that’s
why I was a-lookin’ at your’n, an’ wishin’ we
hed it.”

“What on airth do you want with flax, Pop?”
asked uncle Eli, thinking she was a queer little
girl, to care whether her father had one kind of
crop or another in his fields. “What do you
want with flax?”

“ Table-cloths,” answered Popsy, curtly, purs-
ing up her little mouth with an important
expression.

“ Table-cloths!” ejaculated uncle Eli Hyer.
“Wall, I declar’, Pop, you-don’t mean to say
yer a-gettin’ ready to be married, a’ready!”

Popsy turned scarlet. She was pretty angry
with uncle Eli, but she did not want to -vex

him, for she had already made up her mind
POPS Y. 65

to have some of his flax. So she answered,
pleasantly :

“Can't a girl make table-cloths without get-
ting married? Aunt Linny’s real old, an’ she
ain't married; an’ she’s got a trunk full; per-
fectly beautiful ones,—six o’ the three-leaved
Jean pattern; and I know how to weave that’s
well’s she does.”

Uncle Eli put one foot up on the lower rail
of the fence, to steady himself, while he threw
back his head and laughed.

“Well, Pop,” he said, “ you are a smart young
un, that’s a fact! You kin hev this whole field
of flax, to do what you're a mind to with, if
you'll shake out the seed for me fust!”

“Bargain!” said Popsy, briskly. “ Bargain,
uncle Eli. That's jest what I was gettin’ ready
to ask ye, if I couldn’t hev some on’t.”

“ How'll ye get it over to your place?” asked
uncle Eli, “It’s right smart o’ ways from

here.”
66 POPSY.

“ Tote it,” replied Popsy, confidently. “That’s
no great things.”

“It’s a good half mile,” said the old man.

“°Tain’t fur,” said Popsy, bounding off. “I'll
be here in time for the seed. Don’t yer go
back on me, now,” and she was off like a deer,
in her haste to run and tell her mother of her
good luck. |

“Reckon she'll forgit all about it,” said uncle.
Eli to himself, as he walked away. “She’s the
smartest young un Dave Meadows’s got in the
whole batch. But totin’ green flax a half mile
‘ud be hard on them thin shoulders o’ hern. I
allow her folks won’t thank me for the job, ef
she undertakes it.”

Popsy burst breathless into the kitchen where
her mother and old “aunt Carline” were busy
getting dinner.

“Mammy,” she cried, “Oh, mammy! uncle
Eli’s done given me all the flax in his field.”

Her mother turned a bewildered look upon
POPSY. 67

her. ‘“ Whatever does the child mean, now!”
she said. “Air ye crazy, Pop?”

“Guess not,” retorted Popsy. “I’ve got the
promise o’ the flax, though, sure; uncle Eli he
was a-raisin’ it jest for seed, he said, an’ if I’d
git off the seed for him, I might hev all the
flax I wanted. You see ef I don’t tote right
smart on’t over here, and make me some table-
cloths.” ;

“T expect yer'll about kill yerself, Pop,” said
her mother, languidly; but old “aunt Carline,”
shaking with laughter, said, “ Pop’s smart, she
is. I'll help ye, honey.”

“Don’t want any help,” cried Popsy. “I’m
goin’ to do it, every mite on’t, myself, from fust
to last, an’ then they'll be my table-cloths, won’t
they? It’s table-cloths I’m goin’ to make, jest
like aunt Linny’s.”

This was July. Early in August it would
be time to shake out the seed, and pull the

flax. Many a time, as uncle Eli passed the flax
68 POPSY.

field, he paused, and looked at it, wondered if
Popsy would hold to her bargain, and laughed
at the recollection of her excited face.

‘°Spect you thought I wa’n’t a-comin’, didn’t
yer, now?” sounded in his ears, in a merry,
roguish voice, one day, just as he had been .
thinking about Popsy and the flax field. “ Here
I am, yer see. Where’s yer cloths to shake out
them seeds? I’m goin’ to begin right now.”
He turned, and there stood Popsy, her face
laughing all over at his surprise.

“Wall, Pop, I didn’t reely think you’d do it,”
he replied. “Be yer folks willin’?”

“T guess so,” said Pop, carelessly. “I told
‘em. Mam. said I'd kill myself, she ’spected.
But Pll resk it. I kin stop when I’m beat out.”

In good earnest she set to work, shook and
beat out the tiny black seeds on to cloths spread
on the ground, then gathered them up carefully
and put them into wooden buckets.

Then she tugged away at the flax-plants, and


“*T WOULD RUN ALL THE WAY HOME WITH IT,’ SAID POPSY.”
POPSY. 69

pulled them up by the roots; threw them down
in big piles, tied them up into bundles, with
wisps of the flax itself. When she had eight
big bundles, she tied them all together with a
stout rope she had brought. The two ends of
the rope she knotted together, to hold in front
of her, to steady the load on her shoulders.
Then she sat down on the ground, close to the
big bundle of flax, slipped the noose of the rope
round her neck, pulled the bundle up on her
back, and staggered up to her feet. After she
once got upon her feet, the load did not feel
heavy. She thought to herself, “Pooh! this
is nothing! I could run all the way home with
it!” But, before she had gone many rods, she
changed her mind. Every bone and every
muscle in her body ached, and she was glad to
sit down and rest. “Got too much for one
time!” she said to herself. “Next time I'll
know better; but I’ll tote this, or die fur’'t!”
and she pulled along, with ‘the perSpiration
70 POPSY,

streaming down her forehead, and her cheeks
scarlet. It was a hot August day; and in
Tennessee, August heat is terrible. Every few
rods she had to stop, sit down on the ground,
slip the bundle off her back, and rest a long
time.

“The longest half mile I ever walked,” said
Popsy, as at last she threw down her bundle of
flax by the spring, in the rear of her house.
She wanted to have it near the spring, so as to
have plenty of water to put on the flax.

You see, Popsy’s work with the flax had only
‘just begun when she had, as she called it,
“toted” the plants home. There was nearly
a month’s work more to be done on it, before
it would be ready to spin.

It took her a week to “tote” home the quan-
tity of flax she wanted. Every day she carried
one big bundle; and the last day she carried
two. “Aunt Carline” begged to go and help
her bring it, but Popsy would not hear a word
POPSY, Ti

of any help from any one. These were to be
her own table-cloths, from the very ground up
to the last thread. .

Now I will try to tell you, as well as I can,
never having seen the process, only having
heard aunt Popsy describe it, what she did with
her flax next. The first thing was to spread it
all out on the ground, in a thin layer, and turn
water over it. Here it had to lie fourteen days,
to rot. If it rained in that time, or if heavy
dews fell at night, so much the better, — that
made less work to be done. . If it did not rain,
water must be turned over the flax carefully, as
often as every second or third day. The fine
threads in the stalks would not come out all
right for spinning, if it were not evenly and thor-
oughly wetted. Every morning and evening,
for fourteen days, Popsy went and examined her
flax, to see how it was getting on; and never
once did she forget to turn on the water when

it was needed. At the end of the fortnight it
We POPSY,

had all turned a dark color, and was a wet, sod-
den mass,

Then she took it up, and again tied it in
bundles; this time in small bundles, no larger
than she could easily hold in one hand. These
were put through a machine called the “break.”
This machine has six sharp wooden knives,
three above and three below, their edges com-
ing together. Between these sharp edges the
flax was put, and the knives worked up and
down, till the flax was all broken and bruised
into fine shreds.

Next, after the “break,” came the “ swingling-
board.” This was a big board, driven firmly
into the ground; the bundles of flax were held
in the left hand, firmly, laid across the top: of
this board, and’ beaten long and hard with a
huge wooden knife, a foot long; this knife was
called the swingling-knife. By this time, after
all this rotting, breaking, and swingling, the.

flax was pretty finely shredded, but not quite
POPSY. 73

fine enough. One more thing had to be done.
It must be hackled. This was done by drawing
it between two thin, square pieces of wood, set
thick with sharp nails. Popsy thought this the
prettiest work of all; as the flax was drawn back
and forth between these surfaces of sharp iron
points, it became almost as fine as hair, and a
great bunch of it, finely hackled, and ready to
spin, looked like nothing so much as a head of
brown hair, all tangled. When Popsy’s flax
was ready for the wheel it was just about the
color of her own hair, and looked, it must be
confessed, very much like it, tangles and all.
Next came the spinning. That was done on
a small wheel, made on purpose for spinning
flax. This also Popsy greatly enjoyed, and was
sorry when it was all-done. The weaving was
harder work; and for the use of the linen-loom
she had to wait, and take her chance when no-
body else wanted it. Sometimes she got almost

out of patience waiting. It seemed to her that
74 POPSY.

her mother and aunt Linny would never be
done their weaving. But she persevered. As
often as they took out a piece of finished linen
from the loom, there was Popsy, all ready, with
her “Please let me weave a piece, now,” so
pleadingly they could not resist her, even if
their own work did have to wait.

But Popsy’s pile of table-cloths grew very
slowly. It was early in October when she
began the first one, and it was the middle
of March when she finished the last,— eleven
big table-cloths, as strong as iron, and of the
prettiest patterns known in the whole country.
After the table-cloths were done, she wove four-
teen big towels, a yard long, with fringe at each
end, four inches long, and knotted, and of these
she was as proud as of the table-cloths.

“Uncle Eli” often dropped in, in the course
of the winter, to see her father and mother, and
whenever he found Popsy sitting at the loom he

would tell the story of how she looked the day
POPSY. 7S

he found her leaning over his fence, gazing long-
ingly at the flax field. He seemed never tired
of telling the story over and over, and he would
always add, when he thought Popsy could not
hear him:

“A smart young un, Mis’ Meadows, a power-
ful smart young un, that gal; I allow she'll git
on in life; no fear but what she’ll hev anything
she sets out to hev.”

All uncle Eli’s children were grown up, and
most of them gone away from home; and the
old man’s interest in Popsy carried him back
to the days when his own boys and girls were
growing up around him. When Popsy showed
him her store of table-cloths and towels, an idea
occurred to him. He said nothing, but he
chuckled inwardly to think what a pleasure
he could give the child. The next day he was
going to town with a big load of maple sugar,
and the thought that had struck him was this:

“Ef I make a good trade out er thet sugar,
70 POPSY.

I'll jest make the young un a present of a leetle
trunk o’ her own, to keep her linen in. It ought
to be hern, allus, an’ not go in with the rest.”

The sugar sold well, and uncle Eli, with a
smile on his kindly old face, went from shop to
shop, to find the prettiest trunk he could get for
| Popsy to keep her table-cloths in. He was very
hard to please, and had seen nearly every small
trunk in the town before he saw the one that
suited him.

It was narrow and long, with a high, rounding
' top, and was covered with —what do you think?
You have none of you ever seen such a trunk;
but thirty years ago they were thought to be
very fine. It was covered with goatskin, with
the hair left on; and this skin was nailed on
with rows of brass-headed nails. The goatskin
was white and brown in spots, more white than
brown, and there was a little scalloped strip of
bright red leather all around the edge of the
lid, that showed when the trunk was shut. On
POPSY. Ty,

one end, just below the handle, uncle Eli had
POP printed, in brass-headed nails, just like the
others on the trunk. You could read it as far
as you could see the trunk, — POP! in shining
brass letters. .

When he brought this fine trunk over, and
gave it to Popsy, she did not know what to
say, she was so astonished. It seemed to her
she had all she needed now to set off into the
world with, — eleven table-cloths, fourteen towels,
and such a splendid trunk as that. She could
not thank uncle Eli enough; and she made him
go into her bedroom, to see where she was going
to keep the trunk, standing end out into the
middle of the room, so that the brass-lettered
POP would be in plain sight all the time.

Old “aunt Carline”” was as pleased as Popsy.
“T tell yer, the gal airned it, she did,” she re-
marked, confidentially, to uncle Eli; “ yer ou’ter
seed her, a-totin’ thet flax, an’ the sweat jest

a-rollin’ off her like a crik; an’ she hain’t never
78 POPSY.

let up on it, from thet day to this. She’s the
smartest young un ever I nussed.”

Then fearing that Popsy had overheard her,
she turned quickly, and added:

“Now yer see, Pop, jest as yer mammy allers
telled yer; yer holp yerself an’ yer'll git holp.
The Lord he’s holp yer, a-puttin’ it inter uncle
Eli’s head to guv yer this yere box, but he
wouldn’t never hev gone done it, ef yer hadn’t

holp yerself fust.”
CHAPTER IL.

POPSYS GRAND JOURNEY.

Wuen Popsy first looked at her new trunk,
she little dreamed what a long journey it was
destined soon to take. She had heard her
father and mother sometimes talking about sell-
ing the farm, and moving away, but she did
not believe such a thing would really happen.
However, happen it did, and in only a few
months after Popsy got her trunk; and the
first thing she thought, when she found they
were really going, was: “Now my trunk will
be splendid to carry my clothes in.”

Uncle Eli Hyer had gone first. It was only
a few weeks after he gave Popsy the trunk
that he had suddenly sold’ his farm, and started
with his whole family for Missouri. Before he
went, he came over and had a long talk with

79
80 POPSY.

Popsy’s father, and tried to persuade him to
go, too. He said there was a better chance
for farming in Missouri than in Tennessee; a
great deal more room, and better land. Mis-
souri, he said, was the finest State in the West;
hogs grew twice as fat there as they did in
Tennessee.

~ When Popsy told me the story of her grand
journey she was an old woman between fifty
and sixty, but she laughed as she recalled this
reason uncle Eli had given for moving to Mis-
souri.

“J just wondered, then,” said she, “if hogs
could be any fatter than ours were; and if
they could, I thought I didn’t want to see ’em;
for ours were so fat they couldn’t but just turn
over. I never did like hogs; I don’t like ’em
now; though, I may say, I haven’t ever been
separated from ’em, not since I was a child.”

Two of Popsy’s brothers also had gone to

Missouri, to work on farms; and they had been
POPSY. vO

sending back letters, urging their father to sell
out, and come and join them.

“They didn’t give daddy any peace,” was
Popsy’s way of putting it, “ till he'd written ‘em
that he’d sell, the first chance he got.”

So it was finally settled; and before mid-
summer the last piece of Mr. Meadows’s farm
had been sold. They could not find any one
to take the whole of it; it went in lots; three
hundred acres to one man; three hundred to
another; the farming-fields to one, and the
pasture-lands and the timber to another.

There was a great excitement at the time,
throughout the whole region, about moving to
the West. Everybody seemed to have got
suddenly discontented with living in Tennessee.
The news spread from family to family. About
every day the news came that another had
decided to go. It seemed as if the people
were half crazy; some of them about gave

away their farms, to get money enough to go
82 POPSY.

with. One persuaded another; relatives and
friends did not want to be left behind, and
when the time finally came for starting, the
party, all told,— men, women, and children, —
counted up to fifty.

At Mr. Meadows’s house, the day before they
were to set off, there was a kind of farewell
feast. All the people who were going to emi-
grate were invited, and all the people who
wanted to bid them good-by; in short, every-
body for forty miles round. It was the biggest
entertainment ever seen in that region. Three
extra negro servants had been cooking night
and day for a week, to get ready for it; pies
and cakes and hams and chickens and turkeys
were literally piled up in stacks more than
could be counted. Some people arrived to
breakfast; some just rode up, alighted for a
few moments, took a cup of coffee and a bit
of cake, and drove away again; some stayed

to dinner; and the greater part stayed till
POPSY. 83

dark and had a dance,—the first time that
there had ever been dancing in the house.
“Just for once,” Popsy’s father and mother
said. “Just for once. There wouldn't ever
be such a time again.”

Nobody counted how many people came and
went in the course of the day. Nobody could.
Everybody was too busy. But reckoning as
well as they could, afterwards, they thought
there must have been at least six hundred,
and perhaps seven.

This was Tuesday. The next morning, at
ten o'clock, the party of “movers” gathered
in front of the Shiloh meeting-house to make
their start. That was the place agreed upon,
and the hour of starting was to be nine.
Before seven, the wagons began to appear;
but it was past ten before the last one arrived,
and nearly eleven before the cavalcade moved
off. There were fifty white- covered wagons,

mostly drawn by oxen; three comfortable car-
84 POPSY.

riages for invalids and old people, and a long
procession of horseback riders. Among these
last came Popsy, her sister Lyddy, and brother
Jim. Popsy was so excited and happy she
could hardly sit on her horse. It was a big
yellow horse, named Crusoe,—for Robinson
Crusoe, but the whole name proved too long, so
they had dropped the Robinson. Popsy and
her sister wore homespun cotton gowns, and big
sunbonnets made of the same cloth. Popsy’s
sunbonnet was generally flapping on her shoul-
ders behind, for if she kept it on her head she
could not see half she wanted to,— Popsy did
not mean to miss seeing a single thing on the
way.

In her pocket she carried a little book with
a pencil tied to it. She had resolved to write
down in this book the name of every town,
river, and mountain she saw. It seemed to
Popsy like seeing the whole world,—to go all

the way from Tennessee to Missouri. She
POPSY. 85

had never been more than four miles away
from her father’s house, and she had never
seen any other sort of life than the life her
own family, and the farmers’ families in that
region, led. How things looked in large towns,
and how things were done in what we should
now call comfortable and well-appointed houses,
Popsy had not the least idea. This journey
was going to teach her a great many things.
Mr. Meadows was the leader of the party.
He had the care of all the arrangements; pro-
viding the food for the animals, selecting the
place for camping at night, and determining
the routes they should take.

He must have had a good instinct about
roads, for he never but once, during the whole
six weeks’ journey, lost his way, though all he
had to go by was a little old map, which had
few of the roads marked on it. He walked
every step of the way; always a little in ad-

vance of the foremost wagon.
86 POPS Y.

Popsy, on her yellow horse, was here, there,
and everywhere, in the procession. She was
so full of fun and good spirits that she became
a sort of privileged character. Everybody liked
to have her come cantering up, and walk her
horse by the side of the wagons,

Her brother Jim rode a big bay horse. Pop-
sy wanted that horse, but it was not thought
safe for her; it was too high-spirited.

Old Crusoe was the fastest, if he could only
be got to do his best; but he was old, had
lost his ambition, and needed much whipping
before he would show his speed. One day,
however, Popsy had the satisfaction of making
him win in a race with the bay. She had
dared her brother to a mile run for a pound
of candy; and she had won fairly and squarely,
by dint of lashing Crusoe every other second
with a willow switch she had cut.

They were just entering a town, and Jim

made Popsy go into a shop to buy the candy.
POPSY. 87

He held her horse, outside. The first thing
she saw, when she crossed the threshold, was
a low iron stove with a fire burning in it. She
had never before seen a stove. She did not
know there was such a thing. The sight nearly
took her breath away.

“What’s that?” she exclaimed, pointing to it.
The man in the shop did not understand her.

“ What’s what?” he said.

“This thing where ye’ve got your fire!” said
Popsy, kicking it with her foot. “ Why don’t
you have your fire in a fireplace?”

Then the man laughed at her and told her he
“reckoned she was from Tennessee.” At which
Popsy was angry, and said no more.

But when she went out, she said to Jim and
Lyddy, “What do you think they’ve got in
there? A kind of a mud-turtle, with fire in it.”
Which I think was a very good phrase for a child
of thirteen to have hit upon to describe a stove.

This was in Kentucky. Kentucky seemed to
88 POPSY.

Popsy a-beautiful country; such lovely hills and
groves and sparkling streams. She saw many
a place where she wished that they could stop
and build a house and live always. —

In the town of Bowling Green, in Kentucky,
she had an adventure with a parrot, which pro-
duced a great impression on her mind.

They .had camped, for Sunday, in the out-
skirts of the town, on the edge of a little stream.
They always rested over Sunday, and when they
were not near enough to a town to go in to
church, they had some sort of religious services
in the camp.

On this Sunday, Popsy had strolled away by
herself, without permission, and walked into
town. She was sauntering from street to
street, gazing with eager and anxious eyes at
every thing and every person, when she spied a
huge green and red parrot, in a cage, hanging
in an open window of a room on the first floor

of a sort of restaurant, or eating-house.
POPSY. 89

The window was so low that the bird was but
little above Popsy’s head. She stood stock-still,
lost in admiration at the beautiful creature.
She had never seen any colored pictures of
birds. She had no idea that so gorgeous a bird
was to be seen on the face of the earth. It
almost frightened her, it shone so in the sun,
and its feathers were of so many splendid colors.
But how much more frightened was she when,
after looking at her for a second, the bird opened
its mouth, and, in distinct words, said, “ Good-
morning, madam! Go to hell,” and after this
a_volley of more awful oaths than Popsy had
ever heard in her life. It was a parrot be-
longing to some sailors, who had _ wickedly
taught it to swear at everybody in this way.

Poor Popsy took to her heels, and ran for dear
life, out of the town, back to the camp, and never
stopped nor took breath till she had reached
her mother’s wagon. She made no doubt that

a miracle had been wrought at that moment, to
90 POPSY.

punish her for having broken the Sabbath, and
run away from camp without leave; and that
she was in danger of experiencing all the curses
which the profane bird had hurled after her.
This lasted her brother Jim for fun till the end
of the journey. In fact, poor Popsy did not hear
the end of it for years; and I do not wonder,
for I think myself it was a very droll thing to
-have happened just as it did, on a Sunday,
when Popsy had run away.

The days flew by like a dream, to Popsy.
She thought she would like to spend all her
life journeying in that way. Everything was so
systematically arranged that there was no real
discomfort in the life. They had plenty of pro-
visions in the wagons; barrels of flour and of
salted meat, and kegs of cider. There were
three tents which were set up every night; two
for the women, and one for the men. Many
members of the party made up beds in their

wagons and slept on those. Popsy tried both,
POPS Y. gI

but liked the tents best. Every night there were

built four big fires of logs, and, after the suppers

had been cooked and eaten, everybody gathered

around these log fires, and sang, and told stories,
far into the night.

There were two fiddles in the party, and
several first-rate fiddlers, so they never lacked
for music.

Popsy never wanted to go to bed. When the
camp was in a grove she would sometimes select
a tree, whose branches were low enough to be
easily climbed, —she could climb like a wildcat,
—and once up and curled into a crotch, with
her head resting against the trunk, she would
sit by the hour, watching the men moving
about with lanterns, feeding the animals, throw-
ing logs on the fires, and singing, sometimes
negro songs, but oftener religious hymns; for
they were nearly all Methodists. Then, when
all the work was done, and the story-telling

began, it was like fairyland to Popsy. Not
92 POPSY.

a word escaped her ears, and her great blue
eyes looked black with excitement as she
listened.

Once she gave everybody a great scare. It
had grown very late, and, spite of all her inter-
est in the stories and talk, Popsy was sleepy.
Again and again she found herself nodding,
but she could not make up her mind to tear
herself away and go to bed. At last she was
really overpowered by sleep, and her head gave
so violent a nod that she lost her balance, let
go of the branch to which she was holding,
and came down, luckily feet foremost, into the
middle of the group of story-tellers.

They were more frightened even than she;
for they did not know, or had forgotten, that
she was up there, and their first thought was
that it must be some sort of wild animal that
was coming crawling through the branches.
But Popsy’s scream soon reassured them. She

alighted on her feet like a cat, jumping up and
POPSY. 93

down, to get her balance. “It’s only me,” she
said, “I missed my hold on the tree.”

“Ye was asleep, Pop, ye know ye was,” cried
her brother Jim. .

“No such thing,” exclaimed Popsy. “ How’d
I come down on my feet, if I’d been asleep, I’d
like to know! I wasn’t asleep any more’n you
are.”

“ Catch a weasel asleep,” said one of the men.

“Pop goes the weasel,” laughed Jim, at which
Popsy darted back, and, before Jim knew what
had happened to him, had got his head tight
under her right arm, and was giving it a good
sound pummelling, till he was glad to beg for
mercy.

“Don’t call me a weasel again, then,” she said,
as she marched off as dignifiedly as she knew
how. ;

Another sight Popsy saw on this journey,
which she never forgot. She was galloping

along on her horse, when she suddenly saw a
94 POPSY,

man sitting by the roadside, with a big pile of
sticks and old bones in front of him, building
them up into a sort of house, as children, build
houses out of corncobs. The man was laugh-
ing to himself, and pointing to the house, as he
laid each fresh stick on the pile. Popsy halted
her horse: ‘“ What be ye doin’ that for?”

The man looked up at her, and burst into a
loud laugh, still pointing to the sticks and bones,
but made no reply. While she sat.there on
her horse, looking bewilderedly at the man, her
father came up, and reproved her, sharply.

“ Ain't ye ashamed, Pop,” he said, “to stare
so at the poor creature! Come away. It’s an
idiot.”

Popsy had never before heard the word idiot;
and she did not in the least know what it
meant. ;

“T don't care,” she replied, “I’m goin’ to have
a good look at it,’ and she waited there till the

greater part of the procession of wagons had
POPSY. 95

passed her. Then she cantered on, and for half
a mile the fences on both sides of the road were
hung full of old bones and sticks, such as the
man had been playing with. That was the way
he spent all his time, gathering up old bones,
and bits of sticks, tying them on to the fences,
and building them up into towers, which he
knocked down and built over again a dozen
times a day. Even now Popsy did not under-
stand what: the word idiot meant, but she asked
no more questions; and, for years afterward, she
thought an idiot was simply a man who tied
bones on fences,

When they first started on this journey,
Popsy’s mother was so feeble that she had to
lie down all the time on a bed in the bottom of
one of the wagons; but, before they had been on
the road three weeks, she was so much _ better
that she could sit up all day, and walk a little.

There was one woman in the party who had

come very unwillingly. She did not want to
96 POPS Y.

leave Tennessee; and she was so angry at her
husband’s having decided, against her wishes, to
make the move, that she, too, lay on a bed in
the bottom of their wagon all the way. She
would not get up at all to help about anything.
She would not look out of the wagon, nor let
anybody see her face, if she could help it. She
slept most of the time; and when she was
awake she cried.

Popsy thought she must be crazy, not to
care anything about seeing the beautiful coun-
try they were travelling through, and all the
interesting people, and things that happened.
Even when the fiddles were playing at night,
and everybody in the whole camp having a good
time, she would not lift her head from her pil-
low, nor speak a word. Her husband, poor
fellow, had a sorry time with her. I think he
must have wished he had stayed at home.

When they got into the southern part of
Illinois, the party broke up, about half of them
POPSY. 97

deciding to settle there, instead of pushing on to
Missouri.

Both of the fiddles and the two best story-
tellers stayed behind, here, which was a loss
Popsy felt deeply. There was not so much fun
after that; and very often Popsy would be in
bed and sound asleep on a wagon-bottom, in
half an hour after they stopped for the night.
She was growing a little tired and sore from the
saddle, also, and sometimes, in the day-time, she
and her sister would tie their horses behind one
of the wagons, and climb in, on top of the piled
boxes and trunks, and ride there for part of a
day. It was from one of these perched-up seats
inside the wagon that Popsy made a famous
leap to the ground, which might have broken
her neck, but, by great good fortune, did not
huxteher at all:

It was in a farming town in the high lands
in Illinois. The wagon-train had stopped to let

the cattle drink, and Jim came galloping up to
98 POPSY.—

the wagon in which Popsy was sitting. “ Oh,
Pop, Pop!” he cried, “get down quick. Here’s
an Irish woman making cider with her feet.”

The driver who had helped Popsy up to her
perch was, filling his bucket at the spring.
Popsy was too impatient to wait for his re-
turn. She eyed the distance between her perch
and the. near ox’s back, made a spring, and
alighted firm on the astonished creature's shoul-
ders, caught hold of the two horns, and swung:
herself to the ground, greeted by the cheers of
half a dozen men, who had sprung forward to
catch her, when they saw her come flying
through the air.

“Well done, Pop!” they shouted. But her
father was very angry, and told her if he caught
her doing such a thing again, he would give
her a whipping she would not forget in a day.
Popsy hardly heard either the praise or the
blame, she was in such a hurry to overtake

Jim, whose big bay horse she saw a few rods
POPSY. 99

ahead, standing in front of a shed. She was
on Crusoe’s back in a second, and by Jim’s
side before he thought she would have had
time to climb down from the wagon.

“ How'd ye get down so quick, Pop?” he said.

“ Jumped,” replied Pop, curtly. “ Daddy said
he’d lick me if I did it again. It didn’t hurt me.
I knew old Major wouldn’t budge. His back’s
broad as a barn door.”

“Ye didn’t light on Major’s back, though, did
ye, Pop?” exclaimed Jim.

“Course I did,” replied Pop. “I'll do it again
some day, when daddy’s on in front. It’s real fun.”

“ Pop, you'd ought ter ha’ bin a boy,” said Jim,
admiringly.

“TI expect so,” answered Pop. ‘Oh, the dirty
thing! Just look at her feet. They’re as black
as mud. Well! I don’t want any Illinois cider,
if this is the way they make it.”

There stood the Irish woman, in a great

wooden vat, half up to her knees in foaming
100 POPSY.

apples and cider, her bare feet, as she jumped
up and down, showing, as Popsy had said, black
as mud. It was not an appetizing sight for a
cider-drinker. In her two hands she held a big
wooden pestle; and with this she beat and
mashed the apples, all the while hopping and
whirling about in the vat, and stamping with
her feet,. till the juice flew in all directions, and
spattered her face and hair.

“Weell yees have some cider?” she called out,
tossing the hair back from her face, and resting
her pestle on the floor of the vat. She hoped
here would be a fine chance to sell some of her
cider to this big party of travellers. “I’ve a fine
barrel uv it, jist over beyant there,” pointing to
her house on the other side of the road; “a
fine barrel uv it, swate, an’ a plinty that’s sour,
for thim uz likes it sour.”

“Have ye got any that’s clean, mother?”
asked one of the men.

“Clane, is it, ye’re askin’??” she exclaimed,
POPSY. IOI

with great surprise; “sure, an’ why shouldn't
it be clane?”

At which everybody roared; and Popsy, with
her usual impetuosity, cried out, “ Why, your
feet are as dirty as anything.”

“ Indade, an’ they are as clane, thin, as a babe’s
in arrms; it’s the stain o’ the cider ye see on
thim, an’ it’s nothin’ else. It’s no worse for
the cider than for the wine ye drink, is it thin?
I’ve niver heard tell, ayther, as hands wuz made
afore feet,” and, seeing that she was not going to
make any trade for her cider, she fell to, more
vigorously than before, at her beating and stamp-
ing; and Jim and Popsy rode away, looking
back over their shoulders as long as they could
see her. Popsy was aghast.

“What did she mean about the wine, Jim?”
she said. “They don’t stamp it out that way,
with feet, do they?”

“Don no,” replied Jim, “shouldn’t wonder.

Nobody’s hurt by what he don’t see.”
102 POPSY.

“ Ugh!” said Popsy, shuddering. “It makes
me sick to think on’t. I mean to ask daddy.”

But before she had a chance to speak with her
father, new scenes and new incidents had put it
out of her mind. One thing followed another
on this journey "so fast that Popsy could not
remember half of them. Even where other
people did not see much to observe, or be
interested in, she was full of eager interest and
observation. Nothing escaped her quick eyes.

It was on the fourteenth of September that
they left home. And it was not until the thirty-
first of October that they reached the spot, in the
northeast corner of Missouri, which was destined
to be Popsy’s home for the next thirty years of
her life.

The precise place had not been determined on
before leaving home. Mr. Meadows preferred to
decide that for himself, on the spot. It was a
sort of accident which finally settled that impor-

tant question.
POPSY. 103

They camped, one night, in the edge of a fine
oak wood, on a little stream. In a clearing in
this forest stood a small, two-roomed log cabin.
On making the acquaintance of the people liv-
ing in it, Mr. Meadows found out that they
would like to sell the place. Nick Roberts was
the man’s name. This clearing and this cabin
were the thirteenth clearing and cabin he had
made in the wild regions in the West. He said
he believed it was his mission in life to go ahead
and cut down trees and build log cabins for
other people. At any rate, as soon as he had
got one made, somebody always came along, and
offered him a good sum of money for it, so he
would sell it, and push along again into some .
new wilderness.

When Popsy found that her father was going
to buy this place, she went off, alone, far, far into
the woods, and had.a good cry. It seemed to
her the loneliest, dreariest place she ever saw.

The land was rough and hilly, broken up into
104 , POPSY.

ravines and cliffs; the woods were dark, and full
of underbrush; it was five miles from a town,
and poor Popsy had hoped so much that their
new home would be near a village, so that she
could, as she would have said, “see folks.” Then
the little log cabin seemed to her only fit for a
barn. Altogether, Popsy was wretched enough.

“After all the lovely, beautiful country we’ve
come through,” she thought to herself, “hun-
dreds and hundreds of miles of it, what could
made daddy choose this horrid place?”

Many a good cry Popsy had, and Lyddy also,
in those first days at Nick Roberts’s. When
they found that the Robertses were not going
out of the cabin till spring, they felt worse than
ever,

“What! all live together in these two rooms!”
cried Popsy. “We can’t!” Popsy had yet to
learn what can be endured by settlers in a new
country. Their old house in Tennessee, though

it had not been a very good one, had still been
POPSY. 105

roomy and comfortable, in comparison with this.
“ll sleep in the wagon all winter then,” said
Popsy to her sister. “I won’t be in the room
with all these folks we don’t know.”

But before the winter was half over, it was far
too cold to sleep in the wagons, and Popsy and
Lyddy were glad enough to be tucked away
on the floor, in the corner of the room where
grandma _ Roberts, and Mrs. Roberts, and her
two children, and Popsy’s mother, all slept.
The men slept in the outside room, which was
also the kitchen. It had a big stove in it, and
two wooden settles, and the men slept, rolled up
in blankets, on these settles.

In the spring, when the Robertses went away,
Popsy cried as hard as she had cried in the
autumn, at the thought of having to live with
them. They seemed now just like her own
grandparents, and uncle, and aunt, and her
affectionate heart was nearly broken at the

thought of never seeing them again. But
106 POPSY.

there was not much time that summer for
crying over anything. How they did all have
to work! Popsy and Lyddy as hard as any-
body else,—clearing up fields, planting wheat,
getting ready to build the new house. They
had a terrible bit of bad luck with their first
orchard. In Tennessee it had always been the
custom to plant the wheat between the trees in
the’ orchards. So Mr. Meadows planted wheat
‘in his orchard here; but the Missouri soil was
different. The wheat killed out all the young
trees but one. And that was a terrible loss.
One of the biggest jobs Popsy did was setting
out wild gooseberries. The woods all about
were full of wild gooseberry bushes. As soon
as the bushes were transplanted and cultivated,
the fruit grew very large and delicious. Popsy
was so fond of gooseberries that she did not
mind working hard to make sure of having all
she wanted to eat; and the second summer after

they moved to Missouri she actually dug up
POPSY. ako?

with her own hands one hundred gooseberry
bushes, brought them from the woods in bundles
on her back, —just as she had brought flax, two
_ years before,—and set them out in rows on
two sides of the garden. On the opposite sides
were currant bushes, red, white, and black; and
a big raspberry patch; so they did not lack
for fruit.

Here Popsy lived till she grew up to bé a
woman, and was married to the son of one of
their near neighbors. Then she went to live
with him, on his father’s farm, only a few miles
away; and she never had another journey till
she was over forty years old. Through all those
years, this journey of which I have told you re-
mained in her mind as the most wonderful and
. interesting experience of her life. It was, indeed,

as I have called it, her “ Grand Journey.”
“22nleest Ff




=
=
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-12-21T00:33:40-05:00'
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJJW' 'sip-files00049.txt'
6162d2b11833c9696f7566e1bec18f31
8b9b7985bc007bb4bf89dc092e0b83d3b67969f9
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJJX' 'sip-files00050.txt'
421c9f820afab6e73c0d91e84021ad16
399c41be1a33fcab1a2e199e49bb1e0fc8f5ae83
describe
'333' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJJY' 'sip-files00051.txt'
cb19a5c27b589476d9c1bf09d9e68816
0a1c7859490952f87022453a46bef4c4cf17b52d
describe
'89' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJJZ' 'sip-files00053.txt'
c615524739286f95523d557f452b01cd
17d282a456f4f0f4d6b8e8a31cbb68c105285bb6
'2011-12-21T00:33:53-05:00'
describe
'657' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKA' 'sip-files00055.txt'
3290011cf88385bd3be39fa3d1ae9b6b
1210bc06e56f9793dcb7e063836451fcca7df25f
'2011-12-21T00:34:33-05:00'
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKB' 'sip-files00056.txt'
bbbe6fdede85eb191cf5b27da42a0480
c531a226ca5403a4c5f695a8462a8f8c2b5732a0
'2011-12-21T00:32:22-05:00'
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKC' 'sip-files00057.txt'
14fc736ecd4fbd6dd7267cb72c81c7bf
4b3ff88aa65fa6be9c0534e4c2bd16f35357ea45
'2011-12-21T00:34:53-05:00'
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKD' 'sip-files00058.txt'
5fee74cb94f77483fd1e4ed1ea3d99dd
206574bc4fa8ccd29e261053c37a54aa5bd36286
'2011-12-21T00:32:46-05:00'
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKE' 'sip-files00059.txt'
84868ee92a2a1a1526a2d01b9867f267
d5f6057b9df04845230a2ade859cd1a9e1c69763
'2011-12-21T00:32:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKF' 'sip-files00060.txt'
6f6d4ae717cf89167e0b25587975ceb0
a88a3394260537f60218a804b1f812feb61e3f85
'2011-12-21T00:33:50-05:00'
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKG' 'sip-files00061.txt'
a2e2622380f29d5f48cfb05e78c7e9da
0adcd45f575a026058b19023ce5ae5c3e9e1d665
'2011-12-21T00:32:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKH' 'sip-files00062.txt'
d72fc384a483b516866a4c923b4ca484
1b2f0626a00532f02459055b57d7f0c7d4418e46
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKI' 'sip-files00063.txt'
e3415403270c9a7270f11e1e9bc440e6
cc9bc62d31bd6c5f4c614bd432bd498f00171d0e
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKJ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
5472d1f6dcc025dd17501414d8cfeb90
daa02d48d5a88881c805272a289bd9c2fc9c0e56
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKK' 'sip-files00065.txt'
f9838a8fe9315406d67d33f345ecab63
1021a989a9276636e35b1ea3da43b8563cea2ba6
'2011-12-21T00:34:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKL' 'sip-files00066.txt'
18b9974f123bff8b413800e6fa7d3ab9
fca5e1d353279a9ea1362c1d74c1d07828bc81c7
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKM' 'sip-files00067.txt'
2aebe79ce749990807a7469ef21743e2
a202568bdfc30b126cc439e86aa8e4d0c1d96768
'2011-12-21T00:34:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKN' 'sip-files00068.txt'
d7957896facb1012b0a7f6b6023f1869
1df5c4b67312cc6684b400c14d6b11ab2e5dbc0b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKO' 'sip-files00069.txt'
e2062fe887c616a4954535f3965f6161
2942ad7312818a79c39ff197152964e51fee22c7
'2011-12-21T00:33:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKP' 'sip-files00070.txt'
8ae7ebd682f31a82027daa2d5ebd84d6
369a8644e823eb7cdfca36255b4e860a124d5031
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKQ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
2c2ecb98e43335d821f01d9dac88364e
b5954809b7254d7eb435e2dcb4bddce190e77726
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKR' 'sip-files00072.txt'
fb664b68d5049eba3bc3346fd69d02dd
198760183b4261a0f9cb38bd53da4fbbdc7a4704
'2011-12-21T00:32:37-05:00'
describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKS' 'sip-files00073.txt'
d1ee22241c858b696e8f4c815c59b504
26fdca97024d2f064152da9427e90bbbc2c22749
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKT' 'sip-files00074.txt'
1c9de5797b1f46b271498368fdbfee36
b10e923316f15235093edfc8d99eb8c50747c1c4
describe
Invalid character
'892' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKU' 'sip-files00075.txt'
e99ac6583625aea80622bdf0f3839dc7
6cc09a395b9e8758b3144caad77dffbcaf49a7e0
'2011-12-21T00:34:49-05:00'
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKV' 'sip-files00076.txt'
a368ecaa1d20899d3c7cbbbc79a42b8d
ff5b85816e48db49b81fca6364f618c4b8d5f8d9
'2011-12-21T00:34:23-05:00'
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKW' 'sip-files00077.txt'
1b5dd1a7714f6e84128d7588e954aa37
91c5571857e8fedaa553be4cf2c7fed52df1e9a0
'2011-12-21T00:34:45-05:00'
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKX' 'sip-files00078.txt'
2a2e9c924b973535b0628f2ceff5a220
c4b440f27e0d76e731100026239a47307196b97e
'2011-12-21T00:32:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKY' 'sip-files00079.txt'
ac21f42124c160e3d47260fdc8892260
921d1e68301e4d694e05208a405361e769533166
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJKZ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
0c7175a5dfaeb13e2c0b2fd8bb78e35b
97895a4fe2cc1f9653ffb9ec1ca1d87d5b4594e8
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLA' 'sip-files00082.txt'
276aac72c62372f8895ca5ebda01fd84
8d8b6a0182283bfed85b8634364ad10b68d3584f
'2011-12-21T00:33:26-05:00'
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLB' 'sip-files00083.txt'
45044d00d28d3191babf6dcc9f31b5b4
2dd41706a551fef4e3ccea8a277f7d8fe007bb0a
'2011-12-21T00:32:29-05:00'
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLC' 'sip-files00084.txt'
3cb30a29161856f64fe4fac1c8743fa8
f54feed2d84f90679e807a93133ac19932b4742d
'2011-12-21T00:33:41-05:00'
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLD' 'sip-files00085.txt'
4979c9fa7b32ea4bfca168218b012875
025f4b28c324208fcf16b4c77fd618fed4ba696e
'2011-12-21T00:33:44-05:00'
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLE' 'sip-files00086.txt'
62540a294d680708b92b78085cd39195
5cf414f2fd3fb126184efec451c7824cce6f580a
'2011-12-21T00:32:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLF' 'sip-files00087.txt'
87a517c141906413d1c3865d5a19fd81
03aeb7469bb91699e27b6a94c2f7ae1bb5fd43e8
'2011-12-21T00:34:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLG' 'sip-files00088.txt'
4a1cfc5019dfb03d5f54e01fb5e43a94
4750436733f6ec0e847e57d5797c62fd5a8b8c0e
'2011-12-21T00:34:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLH' 'sip-files00089.txt'
c5a50b6e73e450c0033fa4176eee084a
1e88a1a636ec0c360b04d0198ce4e9dd7ee1e518
'2011-12-21T00:33:35-05:00'
describe
'463' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLI' 'sip-files00090.txt'
ff1a403f7263a978daf75502dd5072c5
42fbc935f738f34f85e878820208365d31284e1c
'2011-12-21T00:35:05-05:00'
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLJ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
5f9835d19ec7cdf211567ded6b27cac3
abcee9b15632ed470ee96867ad9950f62cacd980
'2011-12-21T00:34:47-05:00'
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLK' 'sip-files00092.txt'
1b2852fee98e5f4b0f2305d86a68da0a
2d0aa28a1e25ab845f90782d8036571e2127ac77
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLL' 'sip-files00093.txt'
0cca29eeb1ff2ea1a8b08cf083906197
7472c2e7af16d1ba79ccf57be5edd95dfeb0898c
'2011-12-21T00:34:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLM' 'sip-files00094.txt'
1608402f1dc089db381070e54a3b8f3e
2abcfe63e74b6a641660fc90aaf355d645ba8cf2
'2011-12-21T00:32:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLN' 'sip-files00095.txt'
f0544538d14e609672eeea6d8d767089
b2843158b05803114365655e47379a6392b24a92
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLO' 'sip-files00096.txt'
a9b8ca717eca15a16f02f9b8a227b7e6
88b07642b1df5ef8955f3355eeba261f0e0a51ac
'2011-12-21T00:33:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLP' 'sip-files00097.txt'
169abf2f3e69e2b0d2577658b21d4b6e
fb7f1c473a9f5c3c0ad7f9b918e97cff8713ebfe
'2011-12-21T00:33:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLQ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
6d428ed654074e650bb91522d0df980c
2d83c8cfbe480185ff45ebee5e1e7b99572856fa
'2011-12-21T00:34:40-05:00'
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLR' 'sip-files00099.txt'
3d05f3e52c533f789b2d3b208842fa06
f16017c8b7e33537221ea4c391172b677258942a
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLS' 'sip-files00100.txt'
54c9cb614a8136131256e839b3ebc18f
a872b7350600ef03a186961acc055cb2f84ee128
'2011-12-21T00:33:09-05:00'
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLT' 'sip-files00101.txt'
083c3d550c18ca8e4c777e0fcb4a9da7
3f697561916913dd4d5f1d985e6b8151d51643c8
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
e68fae1e8552b9530a99ee52a095c7b5
18939a7ac2f09605ef2dafa795fda3763801f36f
'2011-12-21T00:32:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLV' 'sip-files00103.txt'
9c65d43cc11eee2ecc8e0334dec5e6e0
fc75f118f2596e6d7d70d4c4f60fd385d6c66ffc
'2011-12-21T00:33:00-05:00'
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLW' 'sip-files00104.txt'
64d33f5d96812e08d2e33ea413c47d84
e485378a8201345a1a25c8bf1656833317ae8aa9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLX' 'sip-files00105.txt'
14bf6972f785f3b1011617fd27c52e33
9e9c4bcaca8e0bc7a7172ea7b83d957580e7a2c4
'2011-12-21T00:32:16-05:00'
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLY' 'sip-files00106.txt'
eae3db71648657410029bb61ba9e93bf
6a76b9b21e503a23a90ac66ba03e96b61c62ff08
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJLZ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
6ed4a062e7b37f78b0f9036bf5b14c05
00e2027f33d19233bb930ec20dd2fcc2d9f804f8
'2011-12-21T00:32:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMA' 'sip-files00108.txt'
700a7e7ad497d9f66dac39f397e9db7c
4455b7705e125875ffc739795bd69a37f2b750af
'2011-12-21T00:32:25-05:00'
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMB' 'sip-files00109.txt'
dad2a0cf7acf08800b9c73f9e36e8ce5
2de1975d86c77c1088dcfdb8126baa7a47f2bfea
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMC' 'sip-files00110.txt'
0c030063d4904d1842dd2aa77492a679
f4d33609d3b7f257207bf961e660ca94959de034
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMD' 'sip-files00111.txt'
0058dc6e5e4a2104a05c8486d7f31577
74a0fcbb7a4b4c65daa7cad7544ec51c576f03ff
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJME' 'sip-files00112.txt'
96e677a99b1653e36f1848bbaa847ea5
eb0512bc8289152ebdd4620a4a38ddb6e89b299f
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMF' 'sip-files00113.txt'
fee8622de515137cee64df67acd3bc4a
b3e86474b6c92745089272cf9eaee2669c8d6c37
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMG' 'sip-files00114.txt'
87dba7033d7b1512e2ded5a64aca6126
46fef0626a90ef16619ee7068ef840cb0e99b471
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMH' 'sip-files00115.txt'
4e1ccba2da21f36082ff5151ddc1ab37
81908d03b584c2a1f2d864730032f5bcef7f666d
'2011-12-21T00:32:04-05:00'
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMI' 'sip-files00116.txt'
cf06e0a17fd280fcc7a61419120301bb
78128f30328b5f7b4d315554638f3bf2f8219ff0
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMJ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
425afcfbe0cc952fc50112fe9e990825
203f4d97c54475d8463d3347bbad49c223f53ac9
'2011-12-21T00:32:55-05:00'
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMK' 'sip-files00118.txt'
499079d297e9c7c935e9b4f26b9a1d50
5d07036ff008fd90792d72e38929c315d0ea955c
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJML' 'sip-files00119.txt'
36039ec07cc40407b7eb6fa9ab5ce0a1
602f58a527783e792d454514ffc69764a7848e3b
'2011-12-21T00:34:30-05:00'
describe
'96' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMM' 'sip-files00127.txt'
8dc9c6441cc65f49cc00431149ef1739
a9fe82f8d91a61d14d70edda56c71bb7ccb184d5
'2011-12-21T00:34:31-05:00'
describe
'31876' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMN' 'sip-files00001.pro'
41ef31157719a1b5f4017f4a3bc163ad
c5a8571020ae7d9c818525f15fe7af62da8eb7a5
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMO' 'sip-files00002.pro'
55bdfd0e9c62546810e8120b0a3027d8
95e2dba8fdcfb716faf0cc0598f7805af8d9dca4
describe
'2200' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMP' 'sip-files00008.pro'
d41e67e0deb9d393d860bb1a5b9a5b25
cbee963cbc0e9c2ac881d8394a74019702071e39
'2011-12-21T00:34:42-05:00'
describe
'5887' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMQ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
bf7e3854f5d0dbb0fa817343b31f1ffd
4b689f52f887f3d9c7878f6b2b8ba6ee058740cd
describe
'3581' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMR' 'sip-files00012.pro'
f8625e06a7c7b31fd0cac42a3e48b560
b5cd3a24ea019073e1da94b804bce05332b5f275
'2011-12-21T00:33:47-05:00'
describe
'5145' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMS' 'sip-files00013.pro'
49a0f338a12eb2976b47f3b04caf648e
78c3bef8dfeb2783fe01526f5e293f5dc3ebc01e
'2011-12-21T00:32:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMT' 'sip-files00015.pro'
a3748f4bf0a41d64d861284f0e4fc811
6eb7c7b78dcdb8647c7cb9aefe48cec2e186029b
'2011-12-21T00:33:56-05:00'
describe
'16622' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMU' 'sip-files00017.pro'
1269713bbd91aa55a61d81f3bb36dbbd
19563e9d88491ba8d56e0f5dd0a26bf5da8c4d86
'2011-12-21T00:34:08-05:00'
describe
'25717' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMV' 'sip-files00018.pro'
ccde9e2d4746f4d5ab8a31058d03aaf1
f3247b0b7d5102e0d8c1751c4bbd3a9168c63ccd
'2011-12-21T00:34:10-05:00'
describe
'26100' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMW' 'sip-files00019.pro'
11bcec0037335f85feb98fa29460c9f4
4fb800d5bdce71feca32f9c1492b7bbcc4172360
'2011-12-21T00:33:06-05:00'
describe
'24504' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
b2208caff64dc9a716f0f9af312ae62b
7c9bf4afd31e2a99619c46146a15ebca70808a2b
describe
'25062' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMY' 'sip-files00021.pro'
30180857e86ad3d144429c56431ffb82
48272580c7414828050d149671e0c6e619f409b7
describe
'24737' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJMZ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
4a7a2be0266df853c67e3c289a956e70
d5e3e6947fe7a9b05e782b0cd291dbd0ad9cfe01
'2011-12-21T00:34:29-05:00'
describe
'25703' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNA' 'sip-files00023.pro'
755f1a05a72c593d8adade758a5991c4
73366ad7cf1ad01fc5d7406b60e100f96403c141
'2011-12-21T00:34:57-05:00'
describe
'24427' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNB' 'sip-files00024.pro'
1ba56e1f5543ec2515701b0b966fcafc
aef8a36bd7366a0d1d4282495d0d481efa47f78c
describe
'22746' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNC' 'sip-files00025.pro'
dd8e102bb67c46156bf3a5d531fdd914
bc9c30365393ebe5ec4559ff46152af0d719b7a0
describe
'24182' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJND' 'sip-files00026.pro'
e5e7e54800186d7747e30b7244f4e427
d9d52e532386a301b021eb3a8a040cf7ecc47e97
'2011-12-21T00:32:30-05:00'
describe
'24288' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNE' 'sip-files00027.pro'
f1fed3eaab87b4db38b8a102fea2386f
8dbeb232b7adcd27b0c3a36deb2d0160c97a2159
'2011-12-21T00:34:22-05:00'
describe
'24883' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNF' 'sip-files00028.pro'
6f7be659b46d72f8a1f45df5d2b8d67e
25d6c41d6bc33eae58c6513ea8b9e37982026036
'2011-12-21T00:35:15-05:00'
describe
'23054' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNG' 'sip-files00029.pro'
4558927d06b66e264fd47a773e6809ef
b684001cbd0ed1760a9cdc113cdade5d6a10dfb7
'2011-12-21T00:35:11-05:00'
describe
'25765' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNH' 'sip-files00030.pro'
4e7d69ed793cf3ca5167ae9afe8e57b8
3ae0cce9ebc3a232d6863859f98b84197e58c8c2
'2011-12-21T00:33:16-05:00'
describe
'25540' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNI' 'sip-files00031.pro'
8998d2b58950a7da825e0e1d63dd16b6
2322f5fd41f4e86aa2d6aa5437a25290440a39cf
describe
'25559' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNJ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
d1843b74a1c0965a8d4da4b2aa9da45d
112fd9da0917b8fd1879f817c7142b4351f645d8
'2011-12-21T00:34:26-05:00'
describe
'7711' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNK' 'sip-files00033.pro'
ba391e84f15cdc36fa856eb04a959c6d
c3da20a2e2e107625f67e69ff8445608caf3eaaa
describe
'18256' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNL' 'sip-files00034.pro'
a94e5afbfcca8d04701a278a7571bc4c
166c35d37102461ee0b3fa492552fedeaef4410e
'2011-12-21T00:33:24-05:00'
describe
'22827' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNM' 'sip-files00035.pro'
2c5bc119f25b80fd2f4c88853a81f821
6e5834e836d3b4929263f47c47f76446cd364b87
'2011-12-21T00:33:27-05:00'
describe
'23209' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNN' 'sip-files00036.pro'
00c0346324540c51f8ecae889f224477
45cd339b89cce917af51208a7b468139e0534421
'2011-12-21T00:32:50-05:00'
describe
'21821' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNO' 'sip-files00037.pro'
c581ca24df11e1cd9f55b3df5317600a
d622b361a8f1c6b0357d867700fe93d50109693c
describe
'24134' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNP' 'sip-files00038.pro'
dfc5c304f1f30172ab98489f1559df7c
9324335184707c3b9eee48721ab7ddcff85c8ba6
'2011-12-21T00:32:10-05:00'
describe
'22680' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNQ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
fd0320900dde41791a019b986a708282
57b2908ac8e132d157cf64b1b776e33942f1f8a6
describe
'22956' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNR' 'sip-files00040.pro'
1392723e0f237f8669c066bc4f5273a0
3650bab1229248c2bcf2e3a2c0e88e984602b31b
describe
'24306' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNS' 'sip-files00041.pro'
1c389f2ed177aacde8695607f859b574
9b222e1cc04cd85303d676170ae72d250b7bb215
'2011-12-21T00:33:49-05:00'
describe
'24921' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNT' 'sip-files00042.pro'
f12e3786316dab5ad5b08751a7280450
9d32b259a78113b11fc426e23a0860b2849fea22
describe
'24438' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNU' 'sip-files00043.pro'
13643c440a9143fc47d0ad780ca4078a
1bb8c91a1e6f312e4c4c40fd4933bcf1439bdc30
'2011-12-21T00:33:46-05:00'
describe
'24491' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNV' 'sip-files00044.pro'
934cefbf42f00be7190cdedd224d02fd
b434ffdf770c41ddb81f81bac1b32a558335b834
'2011-12-21T00:34:41-05:00'
describe
'21231' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNW' 'sip-files00045.pro'
4c7bcb5110c2e3652f55e3768cfe00ba
3dd3b4034a9eb1a9b28f8258899ccf3b38678fba
'2011-12-21T00:32:54-05:00'
describe
'24205' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNX' 'sip-files00046.pro'
5a299e1740a6b59b7710ca2aa058fe40
9c0ce9e0410c1e04fe32f6106261564f02d48c56
'2011-12-21T00:33:31-05:00'
describe
'22523' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNY' 'sip-files00047.pro'
3285914994315f4b2ced4fad12c5548c
64559a5e274534e199875f4ad378b7ffe6696081
describe
'23807' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJNZ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
e842a9dff0ccb2c8f9be1c766c0e061f
0276baa9024f4352066c54bc410e38534e77cf50
describe
'22973' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOA' 'sip-files00049.pro'
e1fbf941979b006c33b280ce3bc8aff2
2c0fb85fd5b7660adae28197c2116aca240884a9
describe
'22558' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOB' 'sip-files00050.pro'
dfddb44dd528c8c670769a8cbcdb788b
22107511f378572621f332f1546e9da0c5182c51
'2011-12-21T00:34:21-05:00'
describe
'7757' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOC' 'sip-files00051.pro'
e1254761acc49b608c7a44f62f79897c
dc82878ca6b9986bd5f9479dd53e9991b4ba8ff9
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOD' 'sip-files00053.pro'
55bfc1996c8a8a4029cf7a158f50d3ec
85cd46a6ae4687734c3edc8ab3a26c604553ac36
describe
'14439' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOE' 'sip-files00055.pro'
6e18427ba094651ae9fe5b95c0a8afad
101eb184b27085d61cd34431b8562bfbcbf833ac
describe
'23740' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOF' 'sip-files00056.pro'
bb6d8cf7592093b00bf141e12d95f155
e23bcbf6b44f3de2bec23b02e0af8161617faeea
'2011-12-21T00:33:36-05:00'
describe
'24692' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOG' 'sip-files00057.pro'
44e633b76a6dae6d69d628981e621209
554f1167cd6a0c7d9fcd7466e05d281d82f79f1c
'2011-12-21T00:33:10-05:00'
describe
'24362' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOH' 'sip-files00058.pro'
276e491a831d20869dd4317fc974e8c2
4714948b57e4d46c5d233a57ae8add34509fae38
describe
'24289' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOI' 'sip-files00059.pro'
e2c8b4e8dbe44af180008445d65cafb2
a8f0b6442f5e89942d62aec7286e12d68b29df3b
describe
'24596' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOJ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
fb8404867c4cc2d52f1c84a86f8b9a7e
7804822e802857efb533138446f2b8f2e29f643a
'2011-12-21T00:35:00-05:00'
describe
'25751' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOK' 'sip-files00061.pro'
3adf31a3220486a96ee36c4aef74626d
aaf073cd1a36ef445d25f6f36cdfae144317b341
describe
'24614' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOL' 'sip-files00062.pro'
84251da77fc4a01d2fd72a9ef6f505f5
08d3a3f38709c54161dc5190aaa55603793ac4d8
describe
'24665' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOM' 'sip-files00063.pro'
a7b6aa410889af51160e956d366f61c5
28ba2d65d913c99fb4461762ee4ba5d64c69f884
describe
'23659' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJON' 'sip-files00064.pro'
afdac86a5fb8c6a2abc9365f779644fa
fffb61ee9b9d9d72e661b500ee56e387af360130
describe
'24713' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOO' 'sip-files00065.pro'
5b22b3ba8b56bf659cd93e77353cefe5
340d7d40559de06010f4a5acff514dbf1f97396c
describe
'24428' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOP' 'sip-files00066.pro'
b91bdd00276bf1314448a5bd20a0c79a
533ea77404b3e6de7a2a892bfd042536d5f4c7f4
'2011-12-21T00:35:06-05:00'
describe
'25123' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOQ' 'sip-files00067.pro'
2b21e433da02fe46ebdf28e92d5fb4c4
73f303613b380da7997c8206acb6bde9d4aeb489
'2011-12-21T00:34:09-05:00'
describe
'24752' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOR' 'sip-files00068.pro'
55e6a1ba7bdf08a41c82b92270ca131b
88c5a70f7029feaaa1d78870d16f4686207488b4
describe
'24548' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOS' 'sip-files00069.pro'
7d982f80cf12e4a700c284a5c24957a2
8feffc7f2178ed307088187d68b8841765fc340e
describe
'25326' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOT' 'sip-files00070.pro'
75b5bc217e89e5040d8de73ca2d541b1
e857389aea40839aaad8061b1479f698ccad23ba
describe
'25000' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOU' 'sip-files00071.pro'
2a2b353a5e0c197b4a84f6c11c83d10e
5b4d6fb68cf23a48a7d4dacc2aa6159e98278b30
describe
'25013' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOV' 'sip-files00072.pro'
41d8c02174614605eeab530597c747cb
a9cfd154f3fe03c4e27466763c6df855218ee157
'2011-12-21T00:34:25-05:00'
describe
'21760' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOW' 'sip-files00073.pro'
b957e3887d4aabc528d0d0814a1ebaab
ee5357b56829ef44ccf1f8c4af0aea5d27883055
'2011-12-21T00:34:44-05:00'
describe
'22635' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOX' 'sip-files00074.pro'
f22da1de4fd84a5a92984e87ca4bc6c6
a8309a57d0c63ffca76985b7440258edee20b4a3
describe
'22459' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOY' 'sip-files00075.pro'
8ad3958c031057f7f072155fc3f06a24
2cfd134460ef78525bba285933c761f9a4619115
'2011-12-21T00:35:09-05:00'
describe
'22599' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJOZ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
1b23d330669acd3d281176083564d252
e4c273bf0abd405da1f31dcfb88ab0b2e7c2a489
describe
'23702' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPA' 'sip-files00077.pro'
baadab23c5db37efedfd244c8f0b48e7
2c93418dda50ad39a58df8133a8557053d541d2a
describe
'24979' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPB' 'sip-files00078.pro'
2cf557c5c91bc7c54c72c172a9abee1d
b5cd3e9340ebc5c7f0c451fe35433132b1c9478b
describe
'1797' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPC' 'sip-files00079.pro'
a0d0232cf48943770fddeee6b4f1b153
d5c44c58f6cd4615e871915f92ba6657b33ba8d8
describe
'25397' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPD' 'sip-files00081.pro'
0dd448fa4d658f00a6c4ada235fbf1d4
67f92aa1fd6ccbe4f18ff9545115b561f3c30979
'2011-12-21T00:33:21-05:00'
describe
'23738' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPE' 'sip-files00082.pro'
af54b17a706abbd88221f194f46221e2
f03d1fd38db5e25c0b96170cd1eb00c94996d7a1
describe
'25448' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPF' 'sip-files00083.pro'
629c143ef6c8f704b1f526260e000245
68378ff2861874be93d2af14afca3fe072833191
'2011-12-21T00:32:56-05:00'
describe
'24207' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPG' 'sip-files00084.pro'
f1caa7df1616ab9bed7088a7d1365b1b
8fdd7743b0373c7da9fdd02aa72dea4973f3037b
describe
'25875' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPH' 'sip-files00085.pro'
6c4a2e07e8ed3c687a596cecb9d30873
4712bee634422868782d2cc2c8eb2c4a844371ca
'2011-12-21T00:32:21-05:00'
describe
'25419' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPI' 'sip-files00086.pro'
5f8369ae37762a3427e3d4a322085b13
dce3702307e256c318d75e795654b1653b758d3f
'2011-12-21T00:34:27-05:00'
describe
'23968' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPJ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
230f9eddf4df5eac802430dc1fd02392
3508b09351a25123076d1296e58b43fec0ceda5d
'2011-12-21T00:35:12-05:00'
describe
'25430' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPK' 'sip-files00088.pro'
2ef83dfd377fd054cc0c988a7d9a2fbc
1773c9ffa1c3c883cce20cf2df7a1043f79d497e
describe
'25454' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPL' 'sip-files00089.pro'
4091ff95aa959b559c5cda6eedf2d9f7
2b3e4042afbdf1de6d14b24aef5829d0e5938dcd
describe
'11516' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPM' 'sip-files00090.pro'
0a7d69491ef0305e8aa6cb7e64c54d3d
2f455334ef132eadb09dae2b692688230e4d1f05
'2011-12-21T00:33:12-05:00'
describe
'19666' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPN' 'sip-files00091.pro'
e3b658a149cc9102b4d25cb9bf26c236
9c115a561679bb75a8e43aa14360674c4240304c
'2011-12-21T00:34:28-05:00'
describe
'23593' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPO' 'sip-files00092.pro'
adcfe62da6e13261976c5bd36251f526
3c834e569be81fcf417018c3a572c08a3402cb01
describe
'24356' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPP' 'sip-files00093.pro'
0abee596ebe9eeaf4f56ac5a4825bb80
725ac3d0a09221c8fa9c8dbcab79fc3115a7c32f
'2011-12-21T00:34:24-05:00'
describe
'24466' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPQ' 'sip-files00094.pro'
4c65b75c3d7b5f4f38c3bf7aa158e96f
b14ad0a63582c6f564c2f0bf27e5be05545a5fed
'2011-12-21T00:32:34-05:00'
describe
'23386' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPR' 'sip-files00095.pro'
04f1aa33f0fd4341ec0b27691e4b0ebb
5f065e3e82548497d3de29936f61be3154811d5e
'2011-12-21T00:32:18-05:00'
describe
'24148' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPS' 'sip-files00096.pro'
03eb18b30ecb11fb302b4c0c0ceaff51
6fdf318171d34215e7a8758f3c402288b3a346aa
describe
'24198' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPT' 'sip-files00097.pro'
94581e0aaf8c427bf4e31d05df755683
e784c6488ca2531bdf283208b5d42caa69b2082e
describe
'24251' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPU' 'sip-files00098.pro'
0d1c54ac417506d8612321cf4766c866
c2af4bc5af98de7f9f2452e931b75c3ee9a9142e
'2011-12-21T00:35:02-05:00'
describe
'23830' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPV' 'sip-files00099.pro'
8f8980f086263877849d76a05c9b0df8
2641f0123b68dec77abefc2f701780ae1edfc209
describe
'24262' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPW' 'sip-files00100.pro'
c068fbab5d0a15ec305d51fdb9e53ced
fd2fd84a7cc9213cd1e5659426e9082325c90f25
'2011-12-21T00:33:22-05:00'
describe
'25835' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPX' 'sip-files00101.pro'
e80a69138f8ccb22989d908bdc9937ca
420541d5fa106827ad549b60d8492d0b243a7591
'2011-12-21T00:32:52-05:00'
describe
'25114' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPY' 'sip-files00102.pro'
e745c36cf1a3e68f2ed8a0d4b3a88cb8
76e9dc67e04f4074aeea0ca674c290a43e923d87
'2011-12-21T00:34:51-05:00'
describe
'24435' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJPZ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
3d10b15ec6f83022adcc9758ff0f689a
4e999bd32040839e063f5d5723610efe9cc1c691
'2011-12-21T00:32:27-05:00'
describe
'24226' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQA' 'sip-files00104.pro'
3fcad5e89d4e7a467cdc5d01e1e442d9
b5d438f257018521e1bceff567faff15e580a3d6
'2011-12-21T00:34:43-05:00'
describe
'21487' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQB' 'sip-files00105.pro'
847176542c1bd90f9d3297ce47f02e94
5cb29c7e0117e717d8a12e5f9644e502a12ccc6c
describe
'23952' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQC' 'sip-files00106.pro'
03b3fd0a48fe597b8810c2592e3675d1
2654de376602b93644c110141decba3d5924be9d
'2011-12-21T00:32:47-05:00'
describe
'24773' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQD' 'sip-files00107.pro'
2d6f602397cf62d83d3a85b8ca793b4b
a1aaea424c9cd028f93063fb83883864b1465888
describe
'24601' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQE' 'sip-files00108.pro'
b23cd4ce69c374b9518fbcd5ee8faf34
f5770e860f053510b23581e9815ae4bcb6b030e1
describe
'24389' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQF' 'sip-files00109.pro'
fc1f448cb276807eca4cc22bc041c6a5
279e136fb40316ffe2f1a862e2b7f68678156e39
describe
'24467' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQG' 'sip-files00110.pro'
1a05f2eae0def1aebdce3c2e6d95f8fd
a90d99277e5d789dc3b92dd04b53f5e9e1b5862f
describe
'23240' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQH' 'sip-files00111.pro'
e0fd5bae1fd790ace90ead2b07f9af90
25a23a6894069aaeb9d8d61af72742183df064f1
'2011-12-21T00:33:02-05:00'
describe
'24831' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQI' 'sip-files00112.pro'
a968b4af11645c78bc3f883a65a8d409
3bc9e45ae912b38975967e98e58d6abd640c4047
describe
'23867' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQJ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
65818e243d1bd0a94e14821b9c5d1801
f28946d6a605001041e4b3707772dcc086690491
describe
'24316' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQK' 'sip-files00114.pro'
dab26f24d3939ef2bf74166e59b544ac
4d61704acfe1cb72948fea1eb54d61bd0a762b65
'2011-12-21T00:34:48-05:00'
describe
'25270' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQL' 'sip-files00115.pro'
585a9adf8ac100e0ba50270b691ac857
822e5b2881f5bb11c085d0e49f534d3256a792bc
'2011-12-21T00:33:55-05:00'
describe
'24933' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQM' 'sip-files00116.pro'
2a03b1d48cc57ede0992f258cc1bcbc6
a56c5945cbf31678600ee6890ac78e59a1680351
'2011-12-21T00:34:12-05:00'
describe
'24869' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQN' 'sip-files00117.pro'
21ada664cd4adf7c237034b61b6ecd8b
c864410c7a9cf06cb05e448f3784d7ba86451ac8
'2011-12-21T00:35:07-05:00'
describe
'25440' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQO' 'sip-files00118.pro'
7a551a8b43008ac8be215b26615c15af
6246a62984cbd10f8a210334aab221210ed7c054
describe
'21299' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQP' 'sip-files00119.pro'
213c193f7ecd38932359821fcacb6302
ef673a3b91f673e51e44825255c5a1478dcd6062
describe
'396' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQQ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
ccaf926cf07f88cd19e8e43b422d375c
f6a8af97dc6b15232debdb727b1aa5666412eeb4
describe
'516641' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQR' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
06fd60f10058a043583f4637e937cb42
7a96a736f38653b365499e026513ceaebdde855f
describe
'519788' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQS' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
6e17a677a7cc83ef9121bdd834b564c6
420b8380b07e7b7383c43b766c7f101d9c5d0862
'2011-12-21T00:33:15-05:00'
describe
'437735' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQT' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
e18d7451861c67a30869719c160b110c
31b2060ea635615e6defd52b4a5d1009fa5a0634
'2011-12-21T00:33:54-05:00'
describe
'404132' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQU' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
d992172aef5b87cf22fb89092536226d
1a0fefd7443d3eede18013aeaca9e13afb06d903
describe
'237196' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQV' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
ecebd70d1882921d003f546e0b8303de
1d1f21bd75c207e9bd6b45855999399eff9223fb
describe
'324053' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQW' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
f0d99cf64760cde673d622e267a83c71
c4bd32f943a470099179c4a509fcbee051ac385c
describe
'257467' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQX' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
4ae49e80d4611ced18d68fbd1516e7b5
7710d3d05902c0627f90f8886c126bf5bdae3067
describe
'431099' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQY' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
52a7bf6ced081082104e1a72b348f6c5
02cd5946828c0e5032b389872d59870cf05ea160
describe
'437811' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJQZ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
e111d2f9aab1c6355e66b8565adc40d0
1a829472d6bc396f638b3ebae831512659f9dba4
describe
'437817' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRA' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
cdb705ec1849e2309615586330b66c1a
be71a99c8986f7ac13617d0a7cc49fd630b77ede
'2011-12-21T00:34:01-05:00'
describe
'426110' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRB' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
ba936f2178cffe1cbe095fc46f86e7a8
87df579d9906d4619e9030e50a10cd5e231e86fe
'2011-12-21T00:32:11-05:00'
describe
'437818' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRC' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
2c015ec2ebce45b24417da7e9fa822f2
b8c88d3e62d1823feb4068a2d085f30a25a483a6
describe
'437767' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRD' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
5a01c9bb9ce8a0f0d16e22375ad89f2c
635f7c576352da1ed0d9ba3c0b5e371956ed60a3
describe
'437758' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRE' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
f8b3b7941b8dd58d49294c82481c8fa1
7e9de2a5dd9c2d2b93f27797591a501336b5ade5
'2011-12-21T00:33:04-05:00'
describe
'412728' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRF' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
2a6ec018e18bb13af8593f11d4312266
f10a1421b8859ba707251705b2a7a8f29aa1a671
'2011-12-21T00:33:11-05:00'
describe
'437822' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
7a550567e8feffc18b8e558c93cad8e5
2eab50a1f17ef9a8ebc4a7be39e2d33273676920
describe
'437829' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRH' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
171f94a6912153a7b7126489d7c7fb60
4522019714ec22fa4af8f4b1012185cf94d831c8
'2011-12-21T00:32:12-05:00'
describe
'437827' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRI' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
1c7bdc6ae7188bc6d6a1749717bbf4c3
6a838ae0f0563cdf47eb379e06c42a8412fb14be
'2011-12-21T00:34:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRJ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
bf69f08d186ee45d5f396d4da6677b46
73db15b266751dffa74a6aec644ca6c9756c5fe2
describe
'437826' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRK' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
c821143d6ae94df789a722020c69f140
1d8a17300cd7bf945e2b9affaff0e744c4011b49
describe
'437762' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRL' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
41ddec64b62973d6e2372d01acf12b6f
e86e6b33449ffe5c2d74e573627b4555fa9b4eff
describe
'437776' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRM' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
7eef3f4209ba9608425605737b03bfa2
19fa45806a59f6ef43848e3733bbef95dfc23179
'2011-12-21T00:33:13-05:00'
describe
'437792' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRN' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
2862bfec267d0e9db99eeb4437763cbc
67f9be89f22ab190cc5c3937b3a4e880750db495
describe
'347487' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRO' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
61fb993c2bad00b38d6b986b15eec281
3653df3e50ff1d5b38c51966167050705079a786
'2011-12-21T00:33:08-05:00'
describe
'437700' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRP' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
2614e6c07df2ad5a41353b84fb8fc638
d122668cc9d3237bda92a7fcce0ca8bd51d9bf96
describe
'437825' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRQ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
c4cd86e50d689c528db73bb8935a81fc
e109ed6c5250d72d807592843583fb7dc73e2cbe
describe
'437791' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
3ebfceff2016f8b790097e7d9fb15691
27d06e3c44630e8d58c74e0e23a3aa706519d0ae
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRS' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
295cf561478a1a7d860a967afe17aee6
9d065852766de72898ae0686c650816980245bca
describe
'437773' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
23392cb50afb9c6468426dfb5a067d23
4b67aa0874d1cbeab6d1e851c25744f7090173d3
'2011-12-21T00:34:56-05:00'
describe
'437828' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRU' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
5d9d3c0c1f6e3d29a879f3a8d38ca8ce
cf405db0e32f5f891b4a85f42cda524512cc7fea
describe
'437823' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRV' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
906a04ab51558cba20c3c770ef8140ee
a56f8a195a8b182cf947c0b88f71efac9aafab10
describe
'437779' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
dc3f41a6dcffab8cee6418d1421d6c9d
4709474f76cd71ecd749eed61e2cdd697ae937dc
describe
'437802' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRX' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
28ee7737a1d08e19cfadcaa18a2a1cf7
413566dae79999134b736999d9e8213f0996d3e3
describe
'437736' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRY' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
580ff6aa291db4304745a42ea55ea5ce
f54db322fade82f39a3552effffe000831e5d935
describe
'437830' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJRZ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
f6e41ee4b33ba2ca42350aa43a913d82
085209cf76f44b5090c29e95ede50dbbbcd2e2d6
describe
'437726' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSA' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
0265c16c701190b917e2a79eefb89bb9
fc0323e7e340419321ce304c0dc05330a4949aca
describe
'437734' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSB' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
aa4d561900b43b7d9289f8735b5559c7
485908213fe6ebd13da04dcf65289ccfc6e5bb80
describe
'437797' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSC' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
4aed783e96210958e56044d9669a3ec1
37b1f572f45cf053b0054e1b69bdab94bb32a7ac
describe
'437769' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSD' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
a4b8d312207391db5aed9f596baa2ded
84d7a76e50232e0892e579a7c208210de307f081
describe
'437806' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSE' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
87eff7b85a65acc3df05400a87df98db
5bd145512b0fba147becfb89f36ccefaad583987
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSF' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
6f1b715ba5be629fc360aac02e4a92d6
9971d93a86a031b5f4dc00e3008f705cba737bea
'2011-12-21T00:34:39-05:00'
describe
'347007' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSG' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
26afd1a6f46dd19ef2a2604e35410d42
74088a42373665d06520c53c08a1d35ffa7c2483
describe
'213552' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSH' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
62fa7b30e208a67c650e809ac699789e
b973a48f9285ee8ec427f1d3bb6fadd2af989fe6
'2011-12-21T00:33:01-05:00'
describe
'236367' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSI' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
5f11f1c105a261c5f09db5772e432ad2
dae3b6f3ad9af483d9fe1594203d186a62de0c2b
describe
'207621' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSJ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
6961d594fd62053f10bf2f09cea48905
29072ff3d32bd52ce8048ce2c1d17ca670f734e0
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSK' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
7501001c588008bc61f638c3e5d1d731
17d76476046f83c87374b23bcfa2de0489891204
describe
'437728' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSL' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
6084c9e91380bf74a84f5d9cb0de7d8e
d6982b66be0a35020be83d6ff414e121df4d8cfe
describe
'437807' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSM' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
a477c539cd3ccd589b4d8719ce3b69ca
e6de950a2785ec0bb51911aeefe5a23fbe8a6e23
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSN' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
4096f1c0b6df55d132d3d1266583ae51
c599b94d5006ca3a513320c6a354c663702575cd
describe
'437803' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSO' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
52a19d6c321e6966bdb6ff3339b75b4f
f7648bd938261feb7fb2b34fceeacde1662a2c65
describe
'437782' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSP' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
2a4413ec0174a1c3f3bec6ed836599b4
9eaeeb6596daa716441e7e01c2c9aa75ab77bbe8
describe
'437756' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSQ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
6f6c353eb31d8ca29e53dce9ac3c4042
e53a4e0328c675d348bbb1cce73c1f0afd2723b0
'2011-12-21T00:33:34-05:00'
describe
'437658' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSR' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
94a4da246e9430517ba280ba6284a42c
fca1ceab8c854d4b39813f1b4a73632dd1002d63
'2011-12-21T00:32:17-05:00'
describe
'437771' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
645c26161dd2ca9a7cba8779074e6a15
755ac1c3dcdce76b30cdb1836c068657959c6a98
describe
'437798' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJST' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
cf1efc319640718566414c2a74ebb03d
dc9da4118d42aba50402110a49ade3639a4552b8
'2011-12-21T00:33:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSU' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
bfb367e51e8262318b770ab3e3f6478c
563570f4c16d9e84e7abb056aed48101300100fd
describe
'437824' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSV' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
ea8fa631e15857981b2e03ba943e3bb7
f58245824e99ac6318040f9be76800a182c26b9b
describe
'437765' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
cf63571a12a2dbe545c0196d002de276
2106d099a54f5d4d3c2a0b2d290faa11f614a077
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSX' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
e49a1a2eaa7ca43f1edac8aa00c5826b
eb34ea4609a32abef0654e68f190d15af58a1955
describe
'437768' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSY' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
49c10f7a78b7ef94e3a265d44751c605
e7a8b89d3951e2a893ee3b4c8502a141629bc97c
describe
'437813' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJSZ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5975aa4f672ae7e451633f5ac0839ebb
bb0807d150252a37b14a5a891a9d8b8551afacd7
describe
'437821' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTA' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
c475bac81c28b33293a53a6b79c54805
05fae390b66c98bfcd5141eca5d0adbe5553a356
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTB' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
507e14e54cfaf5f8e02ed5725308c825
bd7ab341d605969b81b63795a53de8ac89165769
describe
'437794' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTC' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
362cd3ec06ec4dcfb7b9e79b52b60a90
23d7af3a35b76bc71324f1c0b1abfe03ce2f2a5b
'2011-12-21T00:34:50-05:00'
describe
'437681' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTD' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
d53d739f683cb1260458d5870d7ddbfd
2835cd9855000af5fca19f7427ed0fbfb508e841
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTE' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
deef66b1fbd5f039148785d57a53a1db
d8be8b5131c4e729abc8b848b75e8fc7860e0b2e
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
fb29d63e8c4cef093eee2ce94ce8a4b1
fc45203683dcc01ca5f12f1bb4f4b3c5bb2a1aea
describe
'437672' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTG' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
922ad76c007bd6599d674a8978a87efa
62df728976d455fe03c326e50a9b52393327b42d
describe
'437809' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTH' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
28dd4fd1bea833e121280b1ff4824a3e
7f426fcea08a8115cc3f5195ceb50762ed23d480
describe
'437755' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTI' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
b5ef687897766a9af4b2145d8f322a71
17db1d4cd35cf856798c0056255c50e3ad56faee
describe
'437783' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTJ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
d3c58317dd4f1e67234a0d59e95fbd86
fffc21fb72e4aece6a4dfc1b6af2dacb36743164
describe
'437774' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTK' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
cca7f563030f573a5fd3a6b21511538f
f79eb233ba7ebce0945788ef2d5a96673f5fbc5d
'2011-12-21T00:32:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTL' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
c0b9f53207c8cc9a55d0c855b9abf177
51a5fff529ad4a488548d2ce89e1da9a04b2c788
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTM' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
12145a9d2bc92bcdd44930204cce9b5c
be10d6fe429920f419a14d7f42feb282e702c863
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTN' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
0dd691bde158b6c995c0bd63283ea171
b9fe6ba1d75ad4219ae001b645fc042eeed83925
'2011-12-21T00:32:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTO' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
0736e45dd31b13cb4fb85de5c1a43798
fe49b2ff4a62944aacbfc7ab7c2d978ca1ec8ccc
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTP' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
17d3fd02b9a22e6097bc10e1cf4fdd91
fba96dd321a22fbee90e449bff45678936bab461
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTQ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
c78055254eed84af9d761c8093d426e4
89e26ed438b34f4194f221e5813d15baf364253e
describe
'437754' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTR' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
5f86f225d6519ea780caf07e9627a374
9be8b4110bfc0b4eed2e72dbabdebfd3bea6a4a5
'2011-12-21T00:33:28-05:00'
describe
'398833' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTS' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
684abcd3af3dc1f7f98898c71810cac9
7407c81734bf471b42bdead3a6ec81cfaacfcf40
describe
'437640' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTT' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
439916f92e51de3ab03b3b76339f36df
d228f7ef7c5e65ff2fe009d7db863ef80eaee6fc
describe
'437819' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTU' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
1b8385c6c80c89110edabdd6db312fd3
0e8a6e88da3f4cc2c4431fb851ba995e28a11438
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTV' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
8b43fb95b455cd99e7430be87f7f7b25
74221cb5af8ec7175b2f9be0824c6b77bf8b0cf4
describe
'437820' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTW' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
597fd82311523839b5d24c2db5ed3314
c7dd7db93787c5ca46ee440d3ecd7c82aa1efb2f
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTX' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
a6090c3bf5682a5a7864ee09e374cdbd
d87511421fe8be700aed803f2888a17deda85ba0
describe
'437801' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTY' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
8e8bb0ecd215014cd8a0d362aaa99eab
d2d87fb0ac6324e3e74c9f50b452fd0870338eb5
describe
'423644' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJTZ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
bc61f4f91dce66cfdfef0b63bd4647f8
6ae04635b17523e70f0e08361ef65e45cf0973f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUA' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
1a264f6926e0958a6b741330b2f6ad91
4c0eb7d634973322c9fdc19efc2877ded06bf54b
'2011-12-21T00:34:14-05:00'
describe
'437816' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUB' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
af1797efbf5efa23c332e512a94bbbd8
bc1fc22b0da69a6b0e393a08bd119d1820628b07
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUC' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
5bfb05e20d33caf67179f13c07bfaf34
5012b1b5f1a5f0311ae3717f6c1630231da0dc9e
describe
'437753' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUD' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
974e792009b0e256bcbc407cf46c2637
031c36ffafbc85568df1aefb3555335c7f8c8356
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUE' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
0b776b82127d9b34743730bfcf3a95ff
58714697d38d0b28fa422cd3aa6a5062727e9958
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUF' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
2b4c26a2cb3cf72105ecc3f89a90633d
e6059c57b983f442e53a583621e6bbd3d29639ed
'2011-12-21T00:33:59-05:00'
describe
'437757' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUG' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
783b3008e845f536cfd74006653917cd
d154a80053396ef96b7d379fd823698a654f6418
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUH' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
d4de726ade1c2cce1ae77f78e794e84e
6b3a59c8bc904f254d7840877af455c39d87c34b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUI' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
f56831f0346b109f96e6fef564963d93
f7fcedcc7df6e9c2b277c0c90a18b2d433b6aa4c
describe
'416014' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUJ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
ad74fe990c228c0b186ba3a20b924a95
c1a7ffbfef874c559bb35f0a582f5709ae9a6a24
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUK' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
0f3d4d6babb2ad0056fda7f67799dd5e
04775a09469478270cc36d85ac685283f89aed4c
'2011-12-21T00:33:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUL' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
3a23b3481dc0c0e47b9eca8b088cebf4
cc011a5ebc6c654766b069f41183ad159c984bdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUM' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
d72cf60d8d24bba480431265db0f9888
42018a662127498c895a541e10014f716d4bfc3e
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUN' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
84a060c2c5721a1e9b2bf6242ac2ba86
94941a50ab00585466a560e5a4316278156dc5fe
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUO' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
f86ed7d6cacd9754400fec3c6fbe6888
4a0dd5742d63ceecbbecdfac5679da6a9c2ed84b
'2011-12-21T00:32:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUP' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
c1d8ffa4d09a75881c5675fab5bcbf51
8ef3ce628e9bff92fbce7cd995c6e94f5c2d7651
describe
'437808' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUQ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
6214b2c64ba91061e7f198ceef7f9da8
9de2974701d93d0a5c70157f797643cdad39e99b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUR' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
9c732725eb9dc1c518feb498c4311e17
d8a4cddaa2f8f07b956074a5b2a3e4af07f9f2e8
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUS' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
2ffd351662a7650ad4a51fecc584a083
8dc65a7b5b17b3b6deed92fffaeed97d7d7d263b
describe
'437799' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUT' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
a955701976f2123e0c87e8ae0105f596
5b0ead9b2bd9107825b5dd487fa63841d55417c4
describe
'437805' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUU' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
2095a6f5ac16e233818f0a2a3b891167
390a34e4bf5d8592c0c021ceee81d4c7504e1269
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUV' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
5e0e8d3e1d0cd94b8c60b6d4a706a198
057b1b9ca6fb874bbc27ceacbb0dea611a1f7261
describe
'499585' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUW' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
17e48557b66576af8b200525fe3a9d0e
8923daec5a8b63ce2d7f2d82369c4b21e6735b51
describe
'503231' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUX' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
039adc1a4d8acc203c26020269963362
4d3a5c24842f141614b194e809b2ae18eee7271a
describe
'81663' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUY' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
d3e6c67e3129e98312f782b2ab614337
6e40bdf526e85fdeb4679c25d9d6197b53d58a8b
describe
'12407448' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJUZ' 'sip-files00001.tif'
2addee5a93e5bb069b4f3cae1eb4a07c
9fa6d07790d490101549b6a49f5b19e112f21e13
'2011-12-21T00:32:15-05:00'
describe
'12482204' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVA' 'sip-files00002.tif'
1feb40a2fc1678cba820ec03461bc018
bf07596152fc95b08f98c8f1088b38fbc97cbb94
describe
'3519464' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVB' 'sip-files00008.tif'
251d88abb5b06803242fdc7145f238b0
31da16c264e6422c4bd3824178cb7094ecc39e6d
describe
'3519468' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVC' 'sip-files00011.tif'
3dcc2d72b1d7979a706aa818ec900985
4f86a2692edf1d345cf7762ad210cb47b34ecb5b
'2011-12-21T00:34:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVD' 'sip-files00012.tif'
798ed1c041d6ebd3d710726276810dfb
030cc6a76573e1bb0ccd03defa73b1b23ad00ca6
'2011-12-21T00:32:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVE' 'sip-files00013.tif'
a8edcaeb3fb4e5cae00d241ade5b3481
52fc85bcc30f02ca946b466abb37b101e67f1717
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVF' 'sip-files00015.tif'
56913c6f7ddea52376adfeb3962122d4
09c54138109a4206f56fed0a46dd1b44fc1cdb5a
describe
'3465972' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVG' 'sip-files00017.tif'
54b0dff5906c8253b04381c6048d94bb
63162662309f568646ae3b03ed6de3c25ab2ff0d
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVH' 'sip-files00018.tif'
ea9078239dff267a6c4953f3e25f0ed9
c87bb832d52beaba2a32e06b5527505418c22d5a
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVI' 'sip-files00019.tif'
928f0a612d6deb7e62bed4f19bf63b86
b5af302f04e8d85f2649fc21333bfa6c9f3b0097
describe
'3425852' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVJ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
ce585655c5e6e998bbdd633bba437bde
d94a16d4d87dccffb40f50f33fc4ec632f662cfd
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVK' 'sip-files00021.tif'
608c02ed6c96c923579c6de766fb28c4
466be75bc7de0e2ad6bec15a556afa31c3d048e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVL' 'sip-files00022.tif'
9760c56bcb69c58d2b01fb0c22a81284
03b294b61f5ea24a0d84a396ede06c87951f035c
'2011-12-21T00:33:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVM' 'sip-files00023.tif'
1bda9478085b20869a58afd84824a22d
bab63c3a0bbc7205b199bb7911741f126116040a
describe
'3318860' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVN' 'sip-files00024.tif'
905f9b4412a8c96c2f607655eef2da05
d47268b2918063f87a4bb3b1ad6202317ecc35fc
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVO' 'sip-files00025.tif'
767987d0481475f5ab7bddf182e3dc31
d1f6a927838aa45b06159b685e6e5a396e0ff492
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVP' 'sip-files00026.tif'
99cbd65fbf063d4285fcba257cba1fad
c846f538a7ecc1aa620638482b441960f4bab04a
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVQ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
4721adeefd2388ff617b0f66f896e914
35b0658d6313e9bf2e9d7cfe22b1420076e415af
'2011-12-21T00:33:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVR' 'sip-files00028.tif'
c31a7cfd73150cca8a66f06908beb59a
9e1dba48c1040999267969401be9041bc11076f0
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVS' 'sip-files00029.tif'
75ffea992a62836f6e7e030488155836
6fe8db38a4f5e93f5fcfabd9a8ab5540d71af5f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVT' 'sip-files00030.tif'
3347ffcab4405919b9a0ec9c20883b54
d3c6adf7d2f667ff6c182ebe6e1d03cd604cfb2f
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVU' 'sip-files00031.tif'
b0b2cb066d5a9d21dc1814cb037db637
b070dd04bc76794d55f73dca9334d1c22967e9f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVV' 'sip-files00032.tif'
95ec837a6b27096d4463e43eeea95af5
1b429e9719d056f922b1985c86255cfe7069b1e2
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVW' 'sip-files00033.tif'
1d7379850cacc518842e872e60e935df
b5957e4b39caf323201f4ba9ff29f454c4003830
'2011-12-21T00:32:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVX' 'sip-files00034.tif'
2aa01d08deaa5c23beb917de0434a641
7c6cd47cf3bf230bfcd6e82a72e66ef1c3a7c6f6
'2011-12-21T00:33:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVY' 'sip-files00035.tif'
8cfd867a0502b1c8f2decc6f9577b2ef
698cfb05451c5ea43393278936f958df3e995398
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJVZ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
b50e15b019089fcbf84c2f43bad8a339
9a56a9a4e612a7855bad7017ae906a4085adaaef
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWA' 'sip-files00037.tif'
eabc239884dec2b6dd59ec1325a519a5
6e70e20c24af9a471bbfc3e5ad67c0b880757f03
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWB' 'sip-files00038.tif'
aafbcd286072b12b66c99b4be8bad756
a15a294fa5a33fb067e65618fb23a99e6578e882
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWC' 'sip-files00039.tif'
a3698546c2d1f955e050443d8301f5d2
02d676a62154142ec18aa6ad4bad6a9f0c512000
'2011-12-21T00:35:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWD' 'sip-files00040.tif'
a3f2dce0d0568c03182d78e98fd4f4b6
1414b8820f1169963bc762506d7858e7a9ece536
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWE' 'sip-files00041.tif'
cfb00bab5aed9b6c585b5bd7785913c7
3475e32d265fc1aa32cfd5709edf9431f4fae358
'2011-12-21T00:34:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWF' 'sip-files00042.tif'
84dc02408118e509fc787744dace62af
cd2dd4aa7654df273ce2442f83ebd714c6011f67
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWG' 'sip-files00043.tif'
b341664a7c977bdc551a3a5fc24e1ff9
4d7fa8609583f8cd9ba472ed220e8e3eeffb7a58
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWH' 'sip-files00044.tif'
f089ea9e5e2f1cd581ae7adc57b54b8d
405911982c59e9c989737b62cb2d9225a3017ce3
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWI' 'sip-files00045.tif'
d90863fdcace399ce5b6fbb5ffb868a4
d9f83b05ee48d4e031691da7981107ae41b6b49e
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWJ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
a9b272f4f7bc450124a701fde570c316
4fe19d15042eb07b8a5fc5ac898fe8ac7d026513
'2011-12-21T00:34:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWK' 'sip-files00047.tif'
4f295fdc135680fbd75910bd591b9076
f383ac884370cc4449d48d16a90f337060a9570e
'2011-12-21T00:32:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWL' 'sip-files00048.tif'
8a2223d20636e4972b62142f748d3b77
f411e5bca15e24db75f82b298ac69a5d66fce4ba
'2011-12-21T00:34:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWM' 'sip-files00049.tif'
215b18cd9790b306d9b661867bbc7d06
c0683cc9402a42c0b4ff5edc2f1aafb3c4c1f0fc
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWN' 'sip-files00050.tif'
d2d6609e80ed3e1702e7da0e3f6c9984
14311ae48988586131e3aa70d3babf8774ee2ea3
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWO' 'sip-files00051.tif'
4dbdc6f980392538e5b33d367d4352b7
01f992c7680b11c76c957d89b278e08e96412642
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWP' 'sip-files00052.tif'
41e1238a582aaacc3be9a229dbcf70ee
80e41233df5bd8c2310fb9e8488a3ed3adb726ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWQ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
1e4654ffe1316a77334a9ce196a3f2cf
e830c110ca606992c83043a3312745f6413dc4e4
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWR' 'sip-files00054.tif'
b2469ef129bc65399ebc423ac581325f
cd645c7eb4fa63313e7422e4fd1799e971a679ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWS' 'sip-files00055.tif'
2ff7df215d7220402bf8ed621fd6e0a9
a94e59f0513f0d0f926891419f66e87bb13bcee7
'2011-12-21T00:35:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWT' 'sip-files00056.tif'
3a7dd05777eaf1334d8690ba53e57af5
5f5acbfb7cc59a3a2659c59777b5004c9c6d37d5
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWU' 'sip-files00057.tif'
e1424568b68c60e3f0fc044d8c0693c6
e92519637b1cf34b1788e70228209a141d26a0f1
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWV' 'sip-files00058.tif'
99152c14fbfec767e739c29e8d711b79
ba5908cec3774be654b5da83b0ff9e4f157d3284
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWW' 'sip-files00059.tif'
4dbd1c7b7a54b8aeed19add5ee60b14d
31d004be6b10629b5a0c63de4958670c5735569f
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWX' 'sip-files00060.tif'
67a8edf287ee07f2a05d509291fcda54
f58633bcb93786fb714f54f28ed1031db895a812
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWY' 'sip-files00061.tif'
7a3d883592fbf9d8c57021b0a5aca1d0
1b3539d2e61607a7e4bf09e7ce182620eba218a5
'2011-12-21T00:32:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJWZ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
eddc03d32133f095fec1c3118376e674
4cc7841e55299705e1df3d3717bb74293451dd29
'2011-12-21T00:33:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXA' 'sip-files00063.tif'
1c8cf3e40fe88bf1ce32a05708750bee
9bd0272d91d56395a4e59b6386351002f6810f4a
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXB' 'sip-files00064.tif'
5339450777c00e477bb43397acc20065
04e2d16607c55af9f47f90af1d4ea5a64919da38
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXC' 'sip-files00065.tif'
18bef9a56b0d344e5f303fff2325ca92
7a3fd97f061916808ddc200ac9d6cda177244855
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXD' 'sip-files00066.tif'
145e67e5191fb3a44b19e3b0ac83c974
a35d0d35a473556751420c278669a8581b7c38e4
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXE' 'sip-files00067.tif'
b640f743a9f05b6a0497436cd8bbd197
260392703765e928925e8fffdac9177b0bb65d23
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
749351579372a575bf7b3f3304a06fec
cdd087f13e019266f97798deb5ffd2e0b80ed916
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXG' 'sip-files00069.tif'
4073d981950fbd7de1f1b9bdc36c6db2
e2640c4a089b454c572efe5d981fbf16e134d542
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXH' 'sip-files00070.tif'
f67172485329e83207f85180c39b1bc2
7ae6fa00dc83a89b1fc281ab41b9e9c90ad88791
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXI' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b6009d6da38d26574b83c74dae8e9b79
4fd80fa61f41f8b3a94c3465158eb240bb263d9a
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXJ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
9bfd8fd25af6d8df7bd9cf1874c7d0ca
39d2492fbc0b0dc3be5db0d2051ab877a0021199
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXK' 'sip-files00073.tif'
36005a4f9087e2a976bd55d3f7ad1168
8bec9ac30277bc345cd623c58b53aa6821f95a69
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXL' 'sip-files00074.tif'
b064f1415e4be8c65a339611d95d4b12
9ca772e0893dd53c4a5ec7e4a7e3bd1e150f206f
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXM' 'sip-files00075.tif'
6ac951bd7048153e6a4225dfe8c95539
f8eea8e28bf44fe6d14ed5cd154e35f89689b219
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXN' 'sip-files00076.tif'
8007f10af7c7e1f63f814cf4f84915df
a735d6b71af7db06649fcb4815959a3dda797fee
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXO' 'sip-files00077.tif'
20b6a789b0edbe6906d0445c3ead6614
6cef35588fbbae27b631c757ef539f16fd866db6
'2011-12-21T00:32:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXP' 'sip-files00078.tif'
ee9bcd4220d030b0a4fda9cb4e9fc503
6be1ca99745b9cd502b2186866f8d86d10dea290
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXQ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
17eaa3fb177092bc343ae05565a173d4
f7259a2c9b0eed718b605ded3a11050cf21449f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXR' 'sip-files00081.tif'
aa4f4e18d07b1653b5bbd6e7291d5a7b
7d0f326e59f766d3107c44479a8a82cc8520601f
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXS' 'sip-files00082.tif'
9130825b5326f948798adaee871349df
0fc9b55a25641644978b06c7ef90ffaf0379d9d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXT' 'sip-files00083.tif'
385e0fa6523b11ffdf689505f82c5c20
1d9fe53f5d5c5a3af21f8b9a72774521a43489c5
'2011-12-21T00:32:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXU' 'sip-files00084.tif'
449598000f34e95f18836df2a873a4c3
5d0452d3be07e2acecbdecb4e0a88e1b0d97c75a
'2011-12-21T00:32:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXV' 'sip-files00085.tif'
00824ed28daca980fcde39a1012085d4
0ab31799106effaa71ac8a2aa8a20618e4e124c4
'2011-12-21T00:33:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXW' 'sip-files00086.tif'
7f3d3057caf2d29e72cb378d9288d849
5d03a1c9ed2de0999f505bfbd1d5258fcbee692b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXX' 'sip-files00087.tif'
2902c3062728e7e3f25b826a07f0ea96
89bc575a1a6c9d6928eccb84519ad72de12667fe
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXY' 'sip-files00088.tif'
a9bbf666c4b4d28e3245c2914a330c14
bee48f5944dcf20aea2c82371e0c0d26251381ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJXZ' 'sip-files00089.tif'
ec3b76d19dbbb23dc775516ea0af4b66
12550c24ac3816ff299fa0fbf9589a9b9fa494f0
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYA' 'sip-files00090.tif'
718e182a1a6b47772f30a9777054276b
b95c6348e80908fa0fcb62f252363aa374cd033f
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYB' 'sip-files00091.tif'
9064bd1e892fc63e3df5a18c2c5b0007
c991107cf75725b2fb993a44ba087a504bb50678
'2011-12-21T00:33:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYC' 'sip-files00092.tif'
dd86e465d2a31ad1c373b182a54717fb
be919de15f29b53b0e2a23c832bc7ee58bd3d2e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYD' 'sip-files00093.tif'
1be168fcf69e7e52045408ac87067da7
74e67b9626afaa52fa1e02e90035ea2c2412b562
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYE' 'sip-files00094.tif'
8a7303ff57bdaca28310ed5d5154af17
c56203252dfe07fba7cd18e653a0218047583547
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYF' 'sip-files00095.tif'
f4b8649e606a9ce899cb9197a15df583
99ecdfd9584585f118f81ab40487e0a249824686
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYG' 'sip-files00096.tif'
7e46b70bdd235ab231f2e763e066ebb9
b2269eea8e5f2079138704c628b225b9cc9ee18c
'2011-12-21T00:32:45-05:00'
describe
'3406368' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYH' 'sip-files00097.tif'
92fbd9776bddd378d5977bed8fef5b95
1a3a882c96433bd9f6ace6ce2cd7f5072e9aa8f9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYI' 'sip-files00098.tif'
ead63037e31d80f5e81135ec60b77498
66d5d7160c402464d3b2e854df745b7fca6aadc4
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYJ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
27fcafadb426ae58cc0f65bf95b599e3
52f9e7d219311f27f8928f5797f71d4882ec3f7d
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYK' 'sip-files00100.tif'
b17d2f2b1acc2fc2b17be6f89971e0a2
28cf250081f4336ebef96e1fe694e39911136bb8
'2011-12-21T00:32:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYL' 'sip-files00101.tif'
6837376d3ce1e6f9ca8c0edd0704c300
3498f2891edf0f7c72438dcdd5ef3dccd8b17994
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYM' 'sip-files00102.tif'
a2a8328ec00edbf642c65faf462b2eaa
181bd74bc1ac38101b98e8700ca394e7afe26279
'2011-12-21T00:33:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYN' 'sip-files00103.tif'
9c70b210cd04a0e5957afa0dbede7ac4
20e37063d373ffb14534df4533ad8d529888b74a
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYO' 'sip-files00104.tif'
ba182b130faa322d5ff571482978bcba
eaac5d31bf4e2f7760748a295ed4fce6bd32a30c
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYP' 'sip-files00105.tif'
a34bd752b9eb59ea54834366210696ff
46a54a3266b24597d93d9dfb9aaa7b29a8c944a2
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYQ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
fb724575849b480b7eb418d027d49d08
e8ad19d837325c577d7cd791abdf36ca09bc95c2
describe
'3345608' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYR' 'sip-files00107.tif'
62221abcec9e459d38737c8686dc6d2a
42b7f32664e2db5f0fe99689601a42791ce53e87
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYS' 'sip-files00108.tif'
de315ada38bc17abcd8758a702273a33
1b49ba9eda8b2569c640d58f04ab08d76d072883
'2011-12-21T00:33:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYT' 'sip-files00109.tif'
b58e0f6d42e3c3b3b7a523b1cc3bab8f
11513f37b007f89e90c837db03f0a53cd142bc0d
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYU' 'sip-files00110.tif'
e3f021f2f7e795f9d8916846cdc02748
fa47e87f1b87ce0ee3677f76bdca2b3ae4d48567
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYV' 'sip-files00111.tif'
1c88515fa857d7267473341a20a0f948
ec156e3ecc2deac2ba2cb2c03907fe9b8944e952
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYW' 'sip-files00112.tif'
77201def76ceb016a81353adb700dbb2
b291c0c6415efd09a2e462d326ac6cc0eec8012b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYX' 'sip-files00113.tif'
4d08724df9f6d5bd9854de6e1a5ab9c6
29ab698ff3e3cd7865e795a55d23b7f7157fe406
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYY' 'sip-files00114.tif'
36653ef7db5408014a665de9eac55dba
5da19113fcc835a59e03caab7ab1af8bfc6f96cc
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJYZ' 'sip-files00115.tif'
1cd7eb8f1bfd22df7f4c952c9e906980
6d1496e726ac04c57d3a4378bde4ebf6fffdab5c
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZA' 'sip-files00116.tif'
16ed3a60fcfea66a14dafd0248f881fb
a204aa29be297a924610fa37992502f606600147
'2011-12-21T00:34:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZB' 'sip-files00117.tif'
1296192f7c19cf602ea482cf87342e8e
a71eeafbe52fc2e4dbe4b1c9b1f88d02c49b44e1
'2011-12-21T00:32:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZC' 'sip-files00118.tif'
6f88634f1eaf6995c76dfd18eb5140d0
5e83a6b7c735abbc941a9c56c2b437703550280b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZD' 'sip-files00119.tif'
7a411d9e952442a27a9ca1441bd78caf
005f0890aa45ca8f5137d559e9812a51c54975f1
describe
'11997492' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZE' 'sip-files00125.tif'
d09dc065d8a078e36558c8ca4c73c661
01217624c421baeb3c60e35298f51c3d26c2fb8e
'2011-12-21T00:32:05-05:00'
describe
'12088840' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZF' 'sip-files00126.tif'
9efc70fe1595c118e13f104b445f0aaf
a0608e19b602bac9850aafbaef628dc5e8e1caf8
'2011-12-21T00:32:59-05:00'
describe
'1965304' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZG' 'sip-files00127.tif'
c8825a445e071422a9381be0dcbb032a
6ddf8d41b60b7a4f68f3ef13a8564f9bd52ed908
describe
'190994' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZH' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
67279d80ce4ffa6bf3ecf6a420d303ff
1bb19f86f9b92026b97d641c4e116eaf705611fb
describe
'93350' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZI' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
c85b74e73641bc3c5d1adc8bb28ad0db
f93b3ac25412414335f9892357b67c19ef9abd05
describe
'149756' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZJ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
2bd20c3572c2ab1054850b6cd11ad4fd
f94a5979d429a18d530e6065d0bf226a12f987d8
describe
'49707' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZK' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
e6073e5e6ad0807f41cce706ce3946d0
e58abfb94a007b110cb0dfa78eb1cb435e6542fc
describe
'29830' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZL' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
147a177d4c7d4160478034b2cfc27755
8267def4ebd80ac411fb0a7e3bc9bbad89d8fa4f
describe
'40246' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZM' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
1465bc43582a92e632283789f95e768f
0c304c682d82c296720e830a2951b00e221ec09f
describe
'27782' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZN' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
ab85e5959f949cc0704a6996bc2025e6
cc56d06d34313aea22138a77afce7026a594518f
describe
'80282' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZO' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b242a4e2996ed148046ac6a62ae11370
9e3748c32be65b91f0d41e0500e817d60b33ce1b
describe
'110042' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZP' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
dbb857cafefe7ab9fa99320a7c76aabb
100a12a51fffa58367985ab840e7fbd5b874ffb6
'2011-12-21T00:33:58-05:00'
describe
'112392' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZQ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
fab97ae9277589d6aabc049f8f8bde2d
63b4be16ca48686897b0dacee350cc34fe0bb2ad
describe
'108604' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZR' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
67832c1bbc397ec665d1d735dd3dfdeb
0befc12cc568f9de06367749d32964cc82544526
'2011-12-21T00:33:25-05:00'
describe
'110674' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZS' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
3a82fb2d61c016128f3c06ee2d54f246
a5f0ca1fba407c5a55e68e07fcbdfd43006452f1
describe
'104615' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZT' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
20554780b32141aa5cce25d9e6e3b473
bbcf175bf9c723aeabed00b4fb7cacc77fc8e83c
describe
'116194' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZU' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
f3013f83accb450744266dc0c183e5f7
1c71f918a5ab9d74f351bb593e634631f85c5573
describe
'108680' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZV' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
c4278e30f5f3846dc2a884e03df8b85b
e7a10e3d8e66c2a42205fe9eecb20a5baf86a6e0
describe
'101460' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZW' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
a188c22daabb36cef233bc5f4de8e56f
35ffaa32afeca050cc586ecc9eb45b629617e12b
describe
'104042' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZX' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
2b09ab6767a6497d9f348d7e4b2d0971
f9fa4947df3f161cc8d8534831bf3bf92d020eb4
describe
'103160' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZY' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
97499b3aaa1278211c8f619597cb4df2
d02c626b328c8f8c64b888775c7470e45581379b
describe
'105400' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABJZZ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
c1fe542375ae0e179451782070140e39
c1fae1fc6b9c26abba1d5d0bc296c75c899ddd5c
describe
'99204' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAA' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
950ac659e23cefd5d3f1b0db663af95b
d4d9f48adc014d95a81e80c322b75ba941129b9e
describe
'109510' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAB' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
ab09e5912fd8ddf65fbd313daa8447a8
f39f202858d6c70d89b9864eb2d30ecf0e98819e
describe
'109564' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAC' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
08c4bebb5ef53f950e5a855cfdd95f5f
cfd224d8d0b0bfcaba2531c8af7f4c2d38315689
describe
'107904' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAD' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
bb92d4117d191950915bc2c9c4c308d5
029873a4c7a9e46fa344f2cf6160c423b65326d7
describe
'48754' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAE' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
4e226cb6785e59b4d3cd1fc2b749b41a
4420e2208cda03c09f668b5ce82cec2f663fc39a
describe
'83965' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAF' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
bfc21f01fc3c1847881ecb8be68a9981
a3382a69d24d9fa15dad3787a49f719492937e11
describe
'100620' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAG' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
18d89a60827aa6a255508679707b192c
c50463a5e77068aacc630782a7ed506cd61b7bbb
describe
'100280' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAH' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
d762291ece4ececbbf854f8fd6ed4be7
a5f8f2e19c757e9ef638b345eeef50c892919706
describe
'95526' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAI' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
840a006c21abe078c1e96abf04d627cc
d29e7424e7c3f64a775698eaeeb0569a7f740c78
describe
'104416' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAJ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
90f5bf23f7dfccd8bf75599c25e3e88d
50591b58d1b3d5509e8a885d69a2dc20558a781b
describe
'98626' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAK' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
94321ba4012385be89dd14877f4edcb4
107b3cb52cc587daf676073cf830fe7fbcdff02a
describe
'98753' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAL' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
a221719af71387670fd33d212e83d307
6bec19b12524feeaf3de786179f2eb5d135593a3
describe
'105106' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAM' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
2db0613d47a86c67f983306cdfb1db2c
914a68c5db7dc17f05a5ba08f3458a69affa83de
describe
'107001' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAN' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
ead92b9afaab4ff1db6f6164f0f0ba66
7369bc764b85a180557c7b9074a18945073eea9e
describe
'105285' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAO' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
d3025f342056ba269b299451a1e25673
2b40169c47f1e32084968215b8647a0a850b0e65
describe
'102682' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAP' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
d4f368bb4cc882fe62555f68657c898f
0a7b72bba5b861c6712c82390663a939e45ab00f
'2011-12-21T00:32:08-05:00'
describe
'93548' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAQ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
3c861bd7915a00d1faafd6db212444fc
de32a30e4c15e95c915fa2771bacec3e0d95c09a
describe
'104081' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAR' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
eea976f244b82949b7bf551c0c828233
fe727d9876707316d56825b322c9f6f94683f9e9
describe
'98577' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAS' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
b156f2b672dc91e94f0e2d17e9a78b63
582b0f05800e4def87d7a888f72adb1391002649
describe
'101313' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAT' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
164ecff3415e53770c414a6116f84058
335f8c377dd8fbbaa53cb4461de557c8507b35c3
describe
'99913' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAU' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
c8da5e2ceaef2f6c31e538caad51263b
3d66c9b9169c3a56ec193638e0a5731137b93254
'2011-12-21T00:34:15-05:00'
describe
'98615' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAV' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
d10d6276c0e4d5bb55a62b928f699a1b
f9fe24e44b401411b1c310d381a767460dec8c30
describe
'47976' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAW' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
7885e29b45ea9606ea748fc5e6dca88a
795f031e578fce26efc554b21c35771a13c0dd50
describe
'22000' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAX' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
d2ef5d2bad371157beb95efac8940ab2
db034a301ff4b8604626291bdb0cf3da2aeee54a
describe
'26567' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAY' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
b7922231c55e0e4991a31306c7700339
e9d974f8a89ef430f5a322208d4b59a7b93127f9
describe
'21570' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKAZ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
32bc6084221865020566e9ab748b8961
82a833708de236791eb431f6b1704134fd77615f
describe
'73797' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBA' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
cbe9a0bbcd55347cb0c43ae7bae22de2
a38641f3d081f78a552900ed6fb01962f527da91
describe
'102558' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBB' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
5cc1fe9dd8dcbde85838be4f5187a688
9a18abcb934a3d8e0bd65ecfa11c836c6fc757f9
describe
'107098' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBC' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
b3a477ca392cd55f38107d2deabfcc2f
3e39b5ac321fbcc68e7cd19fdf4946e9d49eb180
describe
'102378' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBD' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
a622954133f00b855aeffaf33b3716da
1a0f57f3b8f1f4d05a09ef74b3acb4eeaba6be32
describe
'101708' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBE' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
29e5325446f64cde5e00fb7ef96815e5
5a06de07a2bdb91245619d237645eceab8b1b810
describe
'104061' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBF' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
64ff8de119ce64f57add981cf8676929
0fee026cad781cf3eda802bf730b973c25624488
describe
'108129' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBG' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
bc9a4cfa1a3c63664de0591cae024e93
53c5cd8a8c5ecc29b29c01c92e3067f999528ca7
'2011-12-21T00:35:14-05:00'
describe
'104007' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBH' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
5b07e43af33cdf1d0f569d9e141505f8
7953897b645ed853a3a35a4fc17d6c4eb2d061d0
describe
'104064' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBI' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
c41fb3ac39915493566b8ba218fa3855
5f21745ee2ce3959bec096883553b80766b398c6
describe
'103874' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBJ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
46244c34119bdebcc9878bbfc928ca61
f687f135e8d9d1ed7f0a3176aef65ab4f95dc4c5
describe
'105175' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBK' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
9dca91b7cec6289c5d4d7c0678f429d8
b21300bdec641690d397aff8703d8a64a9329759
describe
'102223' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBL' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
48f6b0ad5143d81c48bda936190d9465
aa09c7b08247f108bd18b88ba613cfc8d77828bd
describe
'104491' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBM' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
e411743703ea5c98cb8de5a9aac22566
3f00d63bc0773804105853ca4caec96a1416768d
describe
'104331' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBN' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
e5b620f36e392009046a2e918d172a26
608a12de42a6308ec1744b6263f79e359fb462bd
describe
'103225' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBO' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
5595ebe8e9ea091ae7e0bda3e5ebfd35
df40023f2ce59b57817c6ed136cf67fac2dc720d
describe
'104622' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBP' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
3b1160e79844905cc1ad73183d22b138
9a24c1f77bb292779304696deb86e0e8d3a58efe
describe
'105443' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBQ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
c6f910e681bbdb4d63d04d9e7b0c0cae
166664d739989a642d4c365f77ead4c242ccf4ec
describe
'105557' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBR' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
6fdd5a1f415a1ad6bb72c2cbd044e681
f0bac01309db06c6f8fe5bee9c8482dd9ce3ebe6
describe
'94314' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBS' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
16f03a60dbdc009228f7659763a2e277
85265e5db928e84bb52d7ac1328a861f8e03010a
describe
'96290' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBT' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
75c544dcfd643f3875518aeb9e5ac103
5f6e220eef03df7341910185a4de332f2fb91377
describe
'94541' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBU' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
aea484bff158be94476eeaec370a61cf
de9288c69bbf79b044be48af65ac3495c6c7a149
describe
'99835' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBV' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
0b0fd199ab8e4cf31d50722f02102d4e
9893d5858d085546aa2573960e194956e4472cef
describe
'100585' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBW' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
60fa522940a5fb45d2d063cfc5c13227
716c74a76e4a17804aa1ff37e535786a9c9b7499
describe
'108679' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBX' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
a1f28cf5c547d0f31eb5c39bda9ce804
b26659315a1fc132c9530595b322baaf39b3bd5b
describe
'150987' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBY' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
d5fd95c592da31aea6e402e36f085579
d9e1a89a0daa55a3c04c5702945bbd0b86d16462
describe
'111778' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKBZ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
f6841ff9842901b46850c48142cca86b
dd2a05c28835cecb881761149c77dcd02e0bff61
describe
'103137' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCA' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
5b1b381a61ab2c8a163474f7f3c1ecbf
2033daf7f82029bee4876dd88925eb42430c67ad
describe
'104975' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCB' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
2f56083b5a6fe7c2a4a5437426221c8c
5cb0b9fd5acc33ea68ebbf832e59511f3433794d
describe
'104371' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCC' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
e9407219d95a9248636c57e6eb1985fd
e1522458abcd12c80add536a78668a27f7ac4109
describe
'109208' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCD' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
0d1f1cc43a5d128563420ad9ea6688ba
6691a62f0c1d889225577bfc2525e379c86480ad
describe
'105536' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCE' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
e77c2eb375b8bce8c81e2d3c16daba73
567efc10a798d875571439b78769126a4f961cf9
describe
'103172' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCF' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
bfb9e44726e9939d13f8ab129ffd54a6
7b14d3328382e33a0b8e6b1c7844d635a5f297fd
describe
'106499' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCG' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
504f5a233ba6bc23924298382c5b4ed7
0983e81bebe5b1c3b3c4c1ceb46ac2927805134d
describe
'104976' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCH' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
5bbb8f16f82e35a5b8b133c05a543051
d8b603fecf8ade9f55148a0b189e07af29a24e49
describe
'59490' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCI' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
41133453d0f6769d258e57968b75effd
8e6246f7f7ee9c4be54e961cbe2589cef1b48395
describe
'90324' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCJ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
796d779ca0831906f0eaffbc0c91b705
e316f4673894d6bccbeff75e76d3b88f3587a6a8
describe
'98147' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCK' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
f6f7807ff48aab35b1e151208d0980b8
fb608d94c7c74a22c71e7e93bb1e0e0527fef3a3
describe
'103825' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCL' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
c9ac6c09b0d4bb9bdf9de970d0b5a1ce
805336c809e4af3ddc90a0297fdf2e36f17d488c
describe
'104274' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCM' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
97abfbaffdb24290878100651a6b8985
2fed63f39218fa53b8ad574d11a5651401130437
describe
'100367' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCN' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
bb18937c733cafacc817faeff73ea5e0
47b973ea06809e001892dbedf82a27da4966be4b
describe
'103368' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCO' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
62ad13229071a8a1874f5b8eba280a1b
b6c9208a0c765e44d7e886acbc9bb118f94d772f
describe
'104910' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCP' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
3ff4969766d7dd712cd179722f38bbcf
4fe3d502bfc60a5aeb8bd7a8e03e9f5211f7c225
describe
'101919' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCQ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
9b5bc40f53a76dc4eba4125c22e6ea31
2b8161e3f2157922a5008d539b540228856b5dba
describe
'99872' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCR' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
70ba0c55a9f953e20022efc51fa965a9
a0df738a508256c0bcd15d3d3484edcbfe426fda
describe
'104380' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCS' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
1d3fecb85e67ffc1e871806beb51b116
49402083269ce2fa014430b889e789d325c7e4ed
describe
'109338' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCT' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
3379811d0287405fc0cc607adc12ca61
aef4f9082996b402f71afebfc52380a6325768ad
describe
'103346' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCU' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
28fa7ebfabc9c9209f96618967de91cd
b9e740dd7b8abdf22dd00c9c458a5b3d56f9356f
describe
'102659' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCV' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
bc7609fd7f6583a3d22b3abaea8244b6
cc10bed41cb0afff79de8d3f84ac3a03fa3ef310
describe
'103460' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCW' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
43d11c813b8602c0f65a20305b1674f4
126b01437c4cfd88522bc9c629d13a364bfd002b
describe
'94961' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCX' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
ca281ce8eaee60d1325c297270666210
9ef211c68d8b55513219e1cb42f040e95f39498a
describe
'100535' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCY' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
c267ef9a5f842bfd0c0e4d33f6daca1c
38e741c19d14921ab38cc5d070eb3f936b081386
describe
'114351' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKCZ' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
0c52e791823ba1d660c75b863dc751e8
9c37bbc7efcb9c8b03d0177e5cd7ba21ac7671a8
describe
'107286' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDA' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
44e4d4c7a22e2943456584cd89ddebc2
b03bb7a725dd9b99b71a54846700c33584c727d5
describe
'103301' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDB' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
4ff86f4b72f98bac61ee5df50a8111b4
09ea7dab6d3cc52517ab05a02f5d68509549d3b8
describe
'105138' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDC' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
59e98cf77ec9eec5507e9db865190779
b9fe649af10f224c285d74e215d254fd2a0d9682
describe
'99954' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDD' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
e1f5f3955ff1b261677b31910ccc148c
a51db5abbc4804f550c77b6a03f0c51a648315e3
describe
'101820' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDE' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
d3ddf4b5f45cc2a46f258d9883a926f3
35921b59a68bb1bf75dde3c6da9f67e6e5d32213
describe
'99557' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDF' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
1223b7ebf70e5870029b78942541f98c
fddfc299858b2186ac8150d959300e4bfa107e5d
describe
'101321' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDG' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
390b8b843bcb6465573e2a260742b7e4
3b730d5d21512327cbd76b0885df2498df75d33b
describe
'105724' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDH' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
bf33be5659910fa036db35dc3d30f373
e19425d43f0ae55dd29b447736a559e372e5c26a
describe
'105391' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDI' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
53c9e9ab31916aaf7c9272d585a9ab56
e2fb741842caa47d212a6813dfa6099137ab776c
describe
'103831' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDJ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
915ae609d6dbd2830b1b036b97895e97
331c72bcea16a3309ce64f5f390bac4d14d66210
describe
'107948' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDK' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
b80fa64ba45c9321409caf02f3204e2c
eee97d3e78caa102f03d8a6c1acf1b8e5147c3fa
describe
'94187' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDL' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
448dd713b8ed8771d45c831c75f768a4
e415ea4e56730e6d3d5f5434213dc298f6c97bf7
describe
'99706' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDM' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
4698c018c2d3fac740ce6876cd0cac6f
4f27c97399d5625a1e939529a5f28dd02ad6cd9f
describe
'151666' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDN' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
6ecb68c364b4bed4c501d8d0a23b6394
06caf46c6c71ba9760fc5fcbd28a037e230a7930
describe
'45089' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDO' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
98d98069aea5b79c2b7db4f6fa798239
c9ee19a9ceeb69b1e83af588d02a14bdd17c32c9
describe
'18961' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDP' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
61d649ffea5cc46390eaa04a22797277
dee10080cca5fd106146d18e82bb656cf5f324b5
describe
'46380' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDQ' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
fcdead70b1ee55f2d067b18e838e8644
6f9d45ae0699b3c02e36bf5eb5894a619ddb511d
describe
'25450' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDR' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
2958690e46e7540225ef01ab57263b69
a691c1f665ff08962f676856798b02b4a41bff6b
describe
'11980' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDS' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
0be6f1e0645328a87e734544faedf44d
64099fe0ac3fabfd551809ca5a88017497cab474
describe
'51434' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDT' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
c993a427770b79572a7f3d6b9e34a0b8
cc2d0e5a5a869683eb7271efcc1c8189a542b365
describe
'26246' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDU' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
99b89079450fe7722384286e370193aa
8b93ce1019caf890cd12ce71feaac4ca02335c7a
describe
'27004' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDV' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
ef2afed5ae7c3c4a1cde9db465f3cdd9
1679ae75836fe126c369c81d81eacea4cdf73d01
describe
'20448' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDW' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
b1020b279e607fac48c3e8c3b7c8f878
0e5f50bd902c54b40fc0a2632214d83088fb7bc0
describe
'21545' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDX' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
60a2f7019ff54f44f36591ac25fb2f1e
44a0fe478a50c957456fcd5a1744cb90e7bfc2e6
describe
'18612' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDY' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
1fb4e4a9653c41cac625aebed375dd9b
e2e4d65224d9fddb0d81a24fd0463450e3ab5262
describe
'25082' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKDZ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
1ec078f28e41c1c26b5649611de05a9b
1f395bd97691a90d03e407b4183baedaaefe965b
describe
'19855' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEA' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
4f6b5103079ed5d97f5d0e42e5613859
2d1537116886d89b30f21685c3b1a7038eb5e4fe
describe
'20983' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEB' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
64774c4a490e1cbc5e680eddf619a818
8bc0d7d7baf8b50baa50815dfbb4cd32a96fd09a
describe
'18340' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEC' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
9218d40ab76c33248f7ca752727f5b27
9c1dda73b27d37d8b3335e639f7ef13b48ce5b2f
describe
'39506' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKED' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
6ba4d19ab22e414fa3646c752c557075
015a165ee2f090dd322356703d73211764d7c344
describe
'22648' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEE' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
f874a4542d627ab045bf8ba42b8838c0
507f40efe7e4af384b85c94a9b0bc330f7622afc
describe
'50386' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEF' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
ebbe8567a2558e1c0190656f538b1006
0fe579b33722aa940442b254e1145223d5def000
describe
'24925' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEG' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
043d2405b94562ab56fd097bc3aa37d6
b3aa84d1196854d5d8802d31334a2fa731b579b4
describe
'50941' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEH' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
2267273d4da93cfb1e95a6b4c1d968ea
104961915f42243ed854b57d8f781653d68b1bd0
describe
'25010' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEI' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
53de2e05e5b87b5ea8c6c80f529f1fa6
c1e0b698bd24b2aeb49f37061b20e6d7024b40bb
describe
'48718' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEJ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
91dfdf45e0c54a46fee57a768b26971e
f748c942d9fb716743db22175817a536c26d2ea2
describe
'24864' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEK' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
3121f562e4fbabfca292e70285827e43
fa3c1a16f5cd432c277470466b5e41d16d4c56a6
describe
'50824' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEL' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
d2bae2b3ac1c89092d061ec7b45e3438
442495afde57a4d794dafc25b1055e13d9a5e74f
describe
'25111' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEM' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
d6753246ead6b37a86d024f995ff2eb2
5da28d4923ef5fcd8acff61e0dbaf2b36d2532e3
describe
'47757' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEN' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
679d048b7eb090ce14236c45fbb44631
e7635a8862c0603ab176f208519444c540ebc027
describe
'24430' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEO' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
149c84448826ac8e751e919d5d58aec3
99d5b17595c7776e8c2ffec7637be51b52c902be
describe
'52357' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEP' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
3df6597fce97baf278f10a3aed9a41ab
9070bd41979175bad8608dac67d1c06b07c441af
describe
'24929' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEQ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
fd7dc35a1ab1651844ed7fcec567d4a4
e6a79c8dd13a93d82d1fa08ae38e37c4075c3e1f
describe
'51460' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKER' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
e93b528f691be54406f6f08f76cd896b
35f10dcb1a04beb5f9ae732283908a4024fd0f89
describe
'25202' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKES' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
00c32b9bab65e225ef6cff547528cc00
4121c3d35eddc0492b77d5bb56ee24ee395544e8
describe
'45734' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKET' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
5cde1f46f6c010e19f179f161a1756d8
03ee52850a8adc1de5c0875f5d09e81b02a65ab1
describe
'24325' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEU' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
afb8881a3576c7efc9a854d71eebf018
c659d4a6909750f646253b21adf3a2fc918c2240
describe
'47389' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEV' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
d6eb4ca7e7ccacdef6afc6c05132ed30
94b6ce48227374d99aa6da2d9c76f669aeed809f
describe
'24225' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEW' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
d90c408dba5f65e5feab4db7bf0f83ec
c4c23bb5dab8a9596323d35acc6e9566d1ec0356
describe
'48166' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEX' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
7a4d6785144d48460572863898988132
91256dfcd636bd6b8c20da6f8dfdcaf1c05654eb
describe
'24555' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEY' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
3829301e2454cba4974a4e587a16b718
cf8b9380d85cc06c3898500f920a3c4c89f10487
describe
'49174' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKEZ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
823a1663c9233c8d327bd97997f45854
c6940a87eb3fd658df4be45834ce749de5f78208
describe
'24310' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFA' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
5393d4a1c6555d27de1c16a69a43710d
087a89c076ddaf41a1b0e834927446350558675e
describe
'46607' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFB' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
5c03016e14441c2475c929010f390696
bac1653dc5ac6d9eeafeb5f5f90e4cdf3578c04a
describe
'24065' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFC' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
9f491e37425d501d8cebcf74a25e1419
8e8f70df9b244384784328ac4c64a93078524d9d
describe
'50177' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFD' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
d6022401796c353d960635608374a684
ee8d6229af4ac692b9274890b850b55766997595
describe
'24607' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFE' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
f1569c1ab840027d3a6457b81f069948
0ff2cd705fd7bce0d277d9578a5393e6e0c1fcd5
describe
'49992' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFF' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
6efab1fd583d9a56627bab43cd9f7ea8
c1985422dabd13256793fb089c8bfb8b1f981b1a
describe
'24783' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFG' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
4c00aaa7f248fbc577452096e23fb35f
a90155060a47478f80e050f03742fc228feb52d3
describe
'49271' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFH' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
50f4404c519846cd2f5c1c0333be59fa
3f2f14d3abc8c12e3fc09d9ace0d74265c5e2bb6
describe
'24612' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFI' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
091f6b7a0c47a10cf6bdecd1d3307874
69acfdae9f4c8deba8c5a0550979c2e6bb3d76c3
describe
'28841' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFJ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
5b5ee0f0f36444fa0dd7888b2d8b8829
0995fbdcb73846946378c546b22240eae558fd73
describe
'20021' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFK' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
b83f43f693a38d0e6495a944ad84f3fe
eb22c68aaf664de84e3fd003ba4ab3f6c9b4f74f
describe
'41685' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFL' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a821f984618e4770cf92c2efa5a19c02
e69f7d2b710bc3867a7168bfe4f3d737a53bee78
describe
'23257' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFM' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
f7648f99f782bdd116c287c804335825
45713eab4e659c54fe378bd5f8916b876162ca14
describe
'48731' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFN' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
d9e0bae635474554d7389dd521ddb9f6
c1264a5fb29a28f7860e56fbf3eb5872eeee5798
describe
'24705' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFO' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
ffacfefa8e7e09f824ed0f9b50b50c8a
65b084052ce57594f2a7efde3e844e08635b2784
describe
'46453' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFP' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
eea4a2231eab9ab8edf0a66e93125c3f
7e4a11bccf569d44c8b0a81aca718a3178752beb
describe
'24408' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFQ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
d49fccb02703e3d85f8bbba21baa7647
e714ed057b1db6697c68631969dc3e7747ec6966
describe
'45538' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFR' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
699c17c0878b523297b30dcc3d4767f2
3548fc851d5554e64a104014b18ad6ee75f89551
describe
'24049' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFS' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
d6c99cc12d24b4cd6a017ee274044831
ef20bf6cce5ff9ae290fe1eb6c869e90bce484c7
describe
'49053' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFT' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
fba314b69879d1d267dea0049e921739
b48b1eaf4e1abf5b392683f3b98fb29392a3d963
describe
'24381' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFU' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ddf30f63e2fa9c250a6749ac7b2db265
c2370b3577b84318bb5f1f1e413ad30f68b09702
describe
'45705' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFV' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
b3e6710d276bf59e033f2d6daa58afa2
d9fcb5a8b209c58e8ee884f55baf9beee5660d0f
describe
'24517' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFW' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
7fef6db23ddce419f04c098fd7e77b36
3d308680f8f0db064f2733e264bf2bb911827fbd
describe
'46789' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFX' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
2f38a60eb7e59615b3943b5176e020e7
698dc965153c161f6dec836add78fa03caa7f678
describe
'23972' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFY' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
5d55f0770bf3d8b10c075fa2cb45728b
b897839dbcf644ef5a51cb39b6b7b3228533b827
describe
'48811' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKFZ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
e637e90585a00c7c1a17376447b884ba
6a3706b95498d10f6a353737ae4109bc1d8fc3ed
describe
'24371' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGA' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
d58bfc489271a350297e7e39a6a7d48a
6c55f48e91d2747acef1f5733c6df38885216057
describe
'49688' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGB' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
c0c5ed5d33728e68e032c30065cfaf0e
7df754b4f475ea660801c8e5abb8aa9bb7e9f1e4
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGC' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
3048f2dc374359915f659a511563d9ea
f6384ba76dd5b26854d2c0f8e2434e89c1b7bdf6
describe
'48924' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGD' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
f7e68d4eba3e0462126153ecadb27ac9
24f747f83e9cde7832a56cd4e53f9d0eff0fa368
describe
'24410' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGE' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
b6315cd165e0852785fea916aec10298
9ca4af97a5cf5050baf89098af9b0edbfb69ca62
describe
'48255' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGF' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
c3b1d71f04a745e868027977c6c917e3
ecbc0e7ada6ece8ab6befaa5200e916dd645d412
describe
'24553' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGG' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
e96dd431cf3ca1817cb3eb5736f77af7
8f789f68e87a5cf7d8c6a9d0acef95a8c8a05778
describe
'45022' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGH' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
3afa221c92256986873569a50b7d3f2d
d47ebe17f440e93602b9094c9d852ce8a440fa7e
describe
'23975' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGI' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
0db63b9bdbd67f4e4ea59b88239b4689
83c2015580110f00c8223eae9e249e191ff60fd3
describe
'47558' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGJ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
1bf43a5860787b8b4454d3607c3a3a40
0328345f1794d8eba04c6f11c0fd6f195fb85394
describe
'24264' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGK' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
aa72d473f5d7f38a740ed301798aa26d
e9f289c95f488f11b5435a7f7fec0401f5571264
describe
'46787' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGL' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
ee0b05641081ed5e41bcb2c48abf83c4
023542127fb90924eba20de82666a1a4fb957c16
describe
'24274' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGM' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e025c54b5cc4cab023673120a672169e
5d3d6db03bb12d222e45d4c3f850cb6b43b9edfa
describe
'47758' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGN' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
4deab38d0270980e136c51ce5c68681c
c7cd94cb22442ee748374368b7407a1de70757f7
describe
'24131' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGO' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
6b0ab5dbe0fc3def4fc2a345a270addc
d893730f1bff3ea6c0b5554ee3d697778871e6a5
describe
'47156' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGP' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ccbd0a1754a6e5d20b5ce4f467acc62b
e3de754553baab98f5569ec31643fb7b5a426680
describe
'24312' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGQ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
f106ae568a0c9164f889cca9c963e6b8
6a330f032ebb33dea37a8e4a41ddabf06285abf2
describe
'46433' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGR' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
581a240b59b227217a630112e54fafd5
8e3e1073350aaa51881b0eb56eeb397d5ab35313
describe
'23993' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGS' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
58af56efb19dae33f5164db4fd87ae3e
5f17e7b0ac1a475cea289d2da88ed6ffdd754e71
describe
'27947' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGT' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
f00bebe18010a534ba8fccf2dad00b7c
6d4631ed2ed2cf15b20da5619244afd1f9f84e8f
describe
'20097' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGU' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
7a6e61080e446c32435a76b276abe17c
17e6d2949c37f134f86c0c4f6519425ec40b9db1
describe
'18796' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGV' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
551c25c132073b99b9ed7f87736e9302
7b1ec03ef649baa098bad142a80add2a3c2720ba
describe
'17807' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGW' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
e15c1febb60043b52c58439d9c3a220a
bcf18df3bbb98a83899e46bfdfe94bba92406d8a
describe
'20657' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGX' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
1f95f134aa45ab807a5362d54ebeaf0e
8a520944d6c5b5b676e18723737e93d52eddb7fa
describe
'18212' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGY' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
a68fdf5da0aca5cd5173ac0e09f93bee
b5c82ca8317400033facb27711498fed3cf96480
describe
'18597' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKGZ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
8c99706c038d294a6b5831994ec555b3
979ad8e83ab80c0adcf8c8274df0ec09b47813e6
describe
'17749' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHA' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
269767c80ed6a57f4648742b1c713a00
bb24cae9d94ad629884324bce926bc92dd16429f
describe
'37632' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHB' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
049b3a60ff86953485c8175cc0639c8c
133191ad2c9ad317abecfd7b38a6c8ded00bd6b6
describe
'22309' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHC' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
8caded77edd9aabf5694591e1230d18c
34f99414a95077cd9197ac85bebfcafff14b3173
describe
'47438' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHD' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
9d30d881b564b27f51fe66c9e136a6f8
689cf2c7bb6d346adc3e8faf8ee4b2f21d7c3e6d
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHE' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
3e0fcb122d0a8f5587a3510f91deccae
07a10dab026890c7b5b0db6dc87ff511b9e1703f
describe
'49149' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHF' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
16478d65ec4c605e5d49617ca7256aee
128d109ae9b895038af066dcaa823c6ffdb03a1d
describe
'24885' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHG' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
f239a0dba9d443ae00fc50baf21c9248
bc46184d7da3b3c61b1486bda25b88dc2e142c1a
describe
'46669' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHH' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
8de0f33d312f019cc7ede62c552614ab
b27e9cba2a490171093dbd5f5bc56d23729637c9
describe
'24101' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHI' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
f9826507c1929eb76e02a14e7e2770c0
a3eed704ac3b82f63f3be73778f324a10bfd7e13
'2011-12-21T00:32:23-05:00'
describe
'47437' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHJ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
5253bfdf19ec0e9d60fe504602b8c720
7cee5c5e4f69bd44143cbbb43fd2cc189e60c745
describe
'24085' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHK' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
e9a7a727154580b4c440ff9b35c21847
0cffafae9c21fed8d2afb89a8efa8b4f21db9d22
describe
'48187' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHL' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
a2922be0a41a22e71882a7859ec66240
89bb2c7b98e3047bd5da052341d89f35dff9b255
describe
'24303' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHM' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
a88b21b86a4f22324f99a6cd4e270a4a
cbceaa6c55412e1db7f2786e196dec303317a3c5
describe
'50110' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHN' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
8e380f88ff582509a1a1e8bd7d93c8b0
4d272f4dded90c7c5418cb5a3d88ee0346477d9c
describe
'24522' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHO' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
7b2483211e414f43e13f6cf0d7fc7756
eb60b2679569293ccab04a8c29fb23e1daafc090
describe
'47003' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHP' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
288c274b3a3d25b3a1bf6025da0ca513
e049c747f59023b1c31f1bf2fff56ddd81d2f5d4
describe
'24591' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHQ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
6f79e0690a8ecb1de4c64a375c1c8139
54efdd29012972a1aeee067ea14078537bbc0298
describe
'48722' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHR' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
64a258d04a43e78f8574232c8605273a
76f98c13e6d0c73584bc816d24f29abf40d93ca6
describe
'24187' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHS' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
39cd569cc76b88c149ad947c18a2c526
1d6dc797d428fc6a0369d14f1f90f94d4c5150e1
describe
'49466' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHT' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
a8b9769eb93633d8fee6e4ae8198b54c
a164f310ed620ee12e42650136b38533637fc172
describe
'24250' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHU' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
fb17a6ecac8c0aec60b26ee4445c5e6b
00e7cea711155dd6e9d8ce1f3c69b46e825c124e
describe
'47520' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHV' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
9910e2ce54d3df8272ac00e6296b7db2
a56e2a18926e1543d1c0b0563e934e2691559325
describe
'24844' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHW' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
210f1ab1c540dc34a4d682aab1ab4305
cc031d29b27e4a5a09d761f4a896e01cc6c58db7
describe
'46740' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHX' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
1126ce7be95924318e08232d1c1327ad
9ca36ead5aa4a9ac8798fbc93a409cc53f549d01
describe
'24260' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHY' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
cb483aa94f773a71490d7d7cf7c876bd
d9483ba2b8b302286e472d28fa764725e9970c92
describe
'48953' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKHZ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
bf05bc3df984a4c2c7b74a8f9fa52354
24329f69ce77114094ee05b2eae9d1934ccd5988
describe
'24374' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIA' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
7d9e1dc917574c07afd944bd41ca1631
ad9125463ea4a05df8289cef1fcf354f96faa9f9
describe
'48951' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIB' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
6444ce80097997974fe09b032b7c0096
c80551b4dc8ac5c89e86f9614ec2f35ae6915c29
describe
'24484' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIC' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
6e30e3f6d942997f02f4fdd58beeb0af
adfe6d397697837b92a7e383340999b840bd129a
describe
'47504' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKID' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
de9209a70b7257bbb6bca95d07eaa282
c0e18af99353d94c33f5b9006f711ff59717720a
describe
'24443' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIE' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
5dc31ade01b6fb566247a6da978568da
18f955b509c5146e44f88c161d463fa24b20a41e
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIF' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
bee5428539d061617586510313e728c4
5330bacb9f99795a2384abfd43df500cdb28173c
describe
'24463' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIG' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
b82baaf2018b96af47669ffee9920235
6899397217ad3e1e3355db5094e438cfd4e2f3a8
'2011-12-21T00:35:01-05:00'
describe
'48634' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIH' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
f4a2bf629f9243dd095656dac3aa6f86
ccce391e71dc44d9f90286545c5826cff3250cee
describe
'24460' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKII' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
9fd551ed6e88555000568893930cd603
d30ac9933b049d4432e5c6018b52fa28acc7e98f
describe
'48143' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIJ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
ac97ce954c90a94a905f8aed3be37fb9
3923eaec9536afab12442619a9e8f3a04a8318e1
describe
'24580' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIK' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
ba98a179e1567fa0f84c5e5b83a61a99
04369f45914328080cd9726e9ae8e3614f354fe6
describe
'44347' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIL' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
f0d7fb78809e162b9683efe414623815
db116a36b9025fa5008761766c0710e1ece8d890
describe
'24200' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIM' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
5af74608ead1928cb27ab7160d6328a7
35aef393aabc858b329d901e911d904592c16e61
describe
'44909' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIN' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
23e838605abe37030b8a7205dec1a7b1
714dbba57438522b576629bcdbbfe01ebff73810
describe
'24193' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIO' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
e133ea9b5bc8a0dd2ba32953983a36a3
9383ce213315cff083e649081faa84f17f0f3717
describe
'44919' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIP' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
7fc2c6cbe54dfab8a8da95f5b3b24f18
e8eee482d29dbd8ab1cd824928a236745a76b003
describe
'23736' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIQ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
0da6042ed829bd7702945dcbd796b3cf
9354da1d5e5e39ecb7d7566870ba98a03ae20554
describe
'46481' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIR' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
27d49e7624952a1206a07813472b0b0b
dd2abb1a6ea6b483270648ce99fe9588f10a5376
describe
'24244' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIS' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
b0824d4107254c3ef96a38fa5fdd3152
27d450baaadab226d090c582986ec658ea94309d
describe
'45984' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIT' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
31b67d38e3c16525366862f11e830474
db63d2a4d4c1d85ecd496c992a4a6356ab9f7255
describe
'24313' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIU' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
4caecbeb4ae564c925883bc6b06b58b4
ea1c563d6555fc78419ac887243138c1e2d0484b
describe
'48823' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIV' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
c51e561ae21376e6c3946f0665a7a06e
9832b688d015579e85e8651041efbdf7bfb674b4
describe
'24780' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIW' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
a2d0bc7d18ce505501666e47eb729578
f5dcb00cd9f4af920c39fa6aa600af57a95e5a19
describe
'49965' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIX' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
4cf2d3377e5d85cfcdec0bc2d02e60c8
5a5ddf506c5acf265538558f2b42d16017e0a814
describe
'25267' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIY' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
888adec7a8ba9448e94d3cba125c5e66
a853bc567faccd26151fd75b81a3b99b128fa62b
describe
'50103' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKIZ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
08cc18d19d76f578ec555c7ad8d3886e
cb30b1d03383568fca2c1d618cce3117e8aa3ba2
describe
'25209' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJA' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
e69b871db552d86259a88cbfc90effa1
52b006b7cffe1cd277b320e4e0d6243d41f71dd2
describe
'47342' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJB' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
ba6b537a0fabe31f63b8fd1f49c9923b
37999ac8272fd3c860191d9264d13a7ff3c8dbf8
describe
'24542' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJC' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
519cd9b4a9d33da5c5a0d2b576a1ecd3
e97f49504c41480abf9d580fba7e4ec150c0e8e7
describe
'47572' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJD' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
3b076b24860b39887365221579f1f9a4
353cd5ea67e338dbb91c9784b5033dee47915d5f
describe
'24485' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJE' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
a565d929592ac17116baaa2abd55cf2e
3c8ab881e706e327daa8c7c691c8c34192f46605
describe
'46986' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJF' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
045aa3b85b2bf864b32a8dadbd0cee29
32cb4d8558870384205127ef86f26b1de9cc24c5
describe
'24759' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJG' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
8c0326c30fd7671fa2869d4fee040b3e
ec6c3ef758c67ee768bbed9aa75c880c8291686a
describe
'49669' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJH' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
89c00ae76ce60684a981764085867212
eb10687b8b6ee17deb119e9eff7e921eb3f224b5
describe
'24877' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJI' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
66b70bdcd694793cecb60407bdf85619
584a92853955590db4fddb3abac695f5b5bd746a
describe
'49150' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJJ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
d590a264482757aa9b2927cf26ab7400
be40d2ba75cbaaddfc38b4e1194a667c64ebdbfd
describe
'24583' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJK' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
766c84fe86ed4fd9f433c91ddcc99715
fc8e8003d01539deed42edff6b2254c5fb926e58
describe
'47881' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJL' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
59442e7230ad7c159a594c2bdcfff9c0
42a819dad65f01b71f8435bc0dd7e305d9835c49
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJM' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
638cb1eae7f06b92482d38edccc3cea1
2ffd9d20ce64c94584be240dd3e7d39c566b8824
describe
'49385' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJN' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
5aa40b71396ecb817e5915cfaeaec1d5
922353ef5acd864ee1131bfdb4a9d8cd7abfe173
describe
'24331' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJO' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
2b7b2d97029484dad854544814379ab2
ec6b23b68b112eb37acf28ad7f4c48855fd09eef
describe
'48249' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJP' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
607ff919330416ab7d202971891cf518
ff77d2a87c6397241225e79b4e4112f8e472450d
describe
'24563' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJQ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
dda00a948d56933f8dc4b9b1c424f4de
ff6dad3f34c82d6799e53899ce932b9c45b309cb
describe
'31427' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJR' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
48a1f6bbdb4289142eed62c40475ee69
546a441fe20693373d3bfe1cfb7c42c71ab2690c
describe
'20866' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJS' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
57262b33c45aa56df97f35cbc3cf2193
495a011f96c549d24e2ee0525aeeec7eea641706
describe
'42969' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJT' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
f8fe7959eadbbf6a71c41712d6c5a54e
d7efb4cb7b0b33dab11157a6d94bf7f53c03d8c9
describe
'23437' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJU' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
c201251af2504ad5ef45bf3b59bc299c
b978a611a847c58c310b72cd0b04f0b9247ed9e1
describe
'46846' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJV' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
c304df4c3e1d5e4306855b0e34d9a0b7
b2f2982cf4188bc9816de638201d91ac3c75cdba
describe
'24005' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJW' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
1cf6810365acd394ae0bab5f61b3661d
be7fc211f4b028b115c35d398e0fe3f94b4c77d7
describe
'47849' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJX' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
9c9d1a3c3e546793ee7001922cf0d4ae
fc50f6701de58455d5ccea0bbafd3deea27fd3a9
describe
'24210' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJY' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
b92995b19c2343b9ddb13a3fe7673916
2f0628ecc2ae0b0e78671551ca779b4a36229b84
describe
'48380' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKJZ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
947425875a6723a67f5a2b35d7efb9a5
12d0f9d00a75f041763ba333cfffe61aabd7d7dc
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKA' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
0d870d9cf052928994ebacc79d59d93e
1f712723ca2af69eeea150be892c2c25d5b82675
describe
'47613' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKB' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
ea6c9307addb5a333a438fbeae96a53e
eaa74014088fbccdd96f714f1ca89eef248b96c2
describe
'24290' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKC' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
420e8e4dff5b0fcfa5e5c310893d2b75
db151b29cdcab0415f954e803c527db575098f2e
describe
'48254' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKD' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
0726ddc7e73becc963be3b5c699032d4
b9c8c9a2b810579cd1bc626df753028d2f9dd014
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKE' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
f9985e3d20c401e51084011666e94967
e46ef94a50c44dce162065e27ed042d1b74e7e16
describe
'48324' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKF' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
dc757cf209ad0cdd6aa5e7276206335b
9482ba51342a7840b9d3617cec4f1a682f1ff12d
describe
'24388' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKG' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
ff9828f8d15e06614d181eef088b822f
321db28fff64d081680289b4086922e85e399910
describe
'47762' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKH' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
194fa60bdc5c04d713ce7283ebb377ed
b0abf8625894fa653015d81a149d9122c743921b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKI' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
87921cc503d0074184f84992b95a8156
953a94ff8709cec816c186cc42fea3c00b966844
describe
'46786' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKJ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
fb578338ff937e8f465440fa5ff6157e
d8b621d7167bcf618602d9b776de78c2f4d2a1ef
describe
'24076' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKK' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
63954d61fbb83572ee6d44a6d794f4f2
b9e5cfc8b4105a26ce7df6f74214496c4426d638
describe
'47839' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKL' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
b86614ee6863920fd897bd2cb8f6c5d5
8de03437ce8cdea2378c448a372976da905da423
describe
'24237' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKM' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
16f24cf396119546093d1be94601a137
c707b7f9875f53dc548bfcb7b4ff117c14ea6493
describe
'50569' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKN' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
8439f0b8a0d2e417c4c13536b9e13481
c172f280e4fba10f3c65bdf73c9c7f0061856609
describe
'24401' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKO' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
c95842f3bb160e0474b5e16a0966af8b
4f74ff765cd3e8470d1405b6a0e3c80fc3763c3f
describe
'47024' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKP' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
4bd0825522dc64d80e137d8647a133b1
2092fd06e8fe7d0e60ef13b888e0e702fc3dd7b4
describe
'24068' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKQ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
b8dd8e9aceaccf54b26d013243d3ad80
c93a4759e635899c65d06603e80b38027b959674
describe
'47361' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKR' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
ee9c4db862b14d23099e89bb124db72a
01ff4292f8a4e497a048b3dd6264336bc4138976
describe
'24305' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKS' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
f1eb05309262ad71bb2b0ada1f261a18
ccea29415dc9fa241f2eaa667fe4eb3595ed16b4
describe
'47874' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKT' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
62f70fec9254c83dc57042d7422cbd48
d91b659abae281b1e4d64662563160ae54b74582
describe
'24477' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKU' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
bfd25049492731628c42a38fc61b2a36
4de0d996c52ec749f03872d5838c65e8e9115452
describe
'44855' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKV' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
a39ce60240f113964d2e66150d625382
7057267ce43a302d795a0f0b79e20342af8cb00a
describe
'24135' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKW' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
f2cc953403278b12176df81c10b53832
d6ea560ac99b1f49e5fce54e205a003e82333b6d
describe
'46798' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKX' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
1392cd9762ca646efc209bc610ad9c6f
761d0be07684a30d166be8b9198ed4f0383c6956
describe
'24185' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKY' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
84a21fc9a96b5debf714a3e92358582f
d3c3e224d0a7e6422ba39264710ebc1d19a2c1ee
describe
'51020' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKKZ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
1d3f22847f38f2cc6c89e9d9ea652ca2
ba352b0a99671e0220a760df08d8d5071ebe43d2
describe
'25630' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLA' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
7369f58b3f305276101146db13788bc1
01430902ab6b9baf863a23e300f6b09ae7cdfe12
describe
'48827' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLB' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
8089f1064d4c3a20e5110589161e82a6
5a4197ac44b9eae0baec7d382a216abce49ba6ec
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLC' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
af90ca534bddc954a208d9cdab9fa1ca
3400ab220dbcb7a0fc02fc8e709ad1387b24e1e8
describe
'47261' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLD' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
4e4c5b4788e878e613f4744a696a94df
49fc7187f16435882691eb0015b9afd125bf8772
describe
'24478' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLE' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
8e3095cce286a8ef9b07b0b352992692
374da2d77703342bee5192458c911ad7f8832c32
describe
'47890' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLF' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
96c793384833adb8ad8866ae6460925a
8966ab6d2061cbf55d3fdd2924a33ecfe187cdbe
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLG' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
6a27ab8e05723d48b5a9ccbfe1e412fe
13bd4382abe3c12d264953956262b05116d1419e
describe
'45989' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLH' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
8b9012da366f0183fdc01a84c6bc07a1
aa6801b047c935269aa9c3c4ab42f5fdb49990a7
describe
'24450' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLI' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
2989f7281e9a6e8454e3eb1bc981b282
a904a6e4cc0ec9d3b367fec354c8467e55469eeb
describe
'46763' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLJ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
2e50520a666f2ad5ea208b0a0e752dc4
779d2b925c7a1341878beb29e42fed9ab9ab3988
describe
'24394' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLK' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
ef122e98b5d1afaebe5c534b46b70717
dc019064c96523eb21de5334782e3c12ba0ce074
describe
'46066' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLL' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
ae50ed4bc1ebb477fe0adc7db529e792
62737ccd3e3b334a1b9319f0f02d60a837596b01
describe
'24028' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLM' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
9cb94373d5beb5e11d8ddc095cfe6018
22876bfa8f14ae36e98cd4bc2e5b8289cb966bdb
describe
'47162' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLN' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
4893d34d22cd752c7022177e527d8abb
d7226f66dcc33155d58bd7c329d7be6af7991b2e
describe
'23896' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLO' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
c33f50455e560ebc916f571e58d9de13
069c8264e6defb5f35ee1eb2854e37c51388d539
describe
'48085' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLP' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
3266189b1b37b58692bc596d7ca8cb00
3e87304f7c4127083b63adc007bcfebe76e6e737
describe
'24434' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLQ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
bf83a7c3c46ed896bca763df39bdb090
f3ddb3676567550878082e4245f84b61fb9dc7bb
describe
'47724' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLR' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
d5daac971d58a6353b7fbd7e0d3d1997
5809937612697bf7f2853e2a7f056af7bdc55e34
describe
'24351' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLS' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
91bb37d1f79c4cd139afa991bc4a3b95
854e6c5842745a6849d45c935baf26b36512fb96
describe
'48318' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLT' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
d0540c4fc5f9b8d65bd8ee6f8bea6e27
0abdfae4edb4436e2507b07dd2bdfed3177b1150
describe
'24328' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLU' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
2996b8eeb1d237001a3a294c16f2f7fe
b7a57bf2ce556016c105aec61f205eac0f12c6be
describe
'49076' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLV' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
b16bcb73ed74da0a6e42dcb025f1cbf9
8929b4b8c06ae49a0734e73b592e458ac1eb6ba4
describe
'24349' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLW' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
b8b0bda35b25608b738fefb5394ff2a1
ffee5df6e1e4c37dcaa7680df684da705d132d32
describe
'45437' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLX' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
c9e74d967c8fa8b1fba7746da882d170
29b1f207ebff3c81297eec8a007e196667d94ad6
describe
'23876' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLY' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
14af1d85c9f51ccec815e08459d8e1a7
025abf45f3983f2079fae6eefd55af66e0e55a9c
describe
'25616' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKLZ' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
7a28e5d379c4d40391b21608115d8246
4baf90489454ef7ebcd71b320356200eef5c80fc
describe
'11601' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKMA' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
00b686db274c0562258788487da046e5
f0d58ca1e2ca176a20d860c8f04ddbeb31c12de1
describe
'28572' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKMB' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
a9be0bfa6b562aef382488f261ac6a43
9e9a45d685c9365be429c70609f039d8bdd5523d
describe
'12490' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKMC' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
8cf1b1df3f5d60335315b92e52e5574c
f58655b311c610e3d9d68dde7eae641a1b3e4755
describe
'15422' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKMD' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
87a4d4e363b41af2c7ba5924e1456fc6
0fe032ad7738e9997c3575ed628d4038cce3220d
describe
'10734' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKME' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
98694498f809183304e283e2462aabc7
c4caf43291739e380e1b63df3c64774f88400958
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKMF' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
f36c3bfc1023fec5571e35a53cd3123a
4e579cf0978d751260c79db31bbe22d9dc4db2f7
describe
'191875' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAASSfileF20081128_AABKMG' 'sip-filesUF00086572_00001.mets'
e956e42175242d5c80a169c41c7e8bda
3539a628ae246a45197601c7a3c8d3c6017077fd
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T12:38:28-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.