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A boy I knew

Material Information

Title:
A boy I knew and, Four dogs
Uncontrolled:
Four dogs
Creator:
Hutton, Laurence, 1843-1904
Harper & Brothers ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York ;
London
Publisher:
Harper & Brothers
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
x, 87 p., [34] leaves of plates : ill., port. ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Dogs -- Anecdotes -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Grandfathers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
City and town life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1898 ( local )
Autobiographies -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Family stories ( local )
autobiography ( aat )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
autobiography ( marcgt )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title page printed in red and black.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisement precedes text.
General Note:
"The papers upon which this volume is founded ... appeared originally in the columns of St. Nicholas." -- Introductory note.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Laurence Hutton. ; profusely illustrated.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002231973 ( ALEPH )
ALH2361 ( NOTIS )
16260861 ( OCLC )

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THACKERAY AND THE BOY



A BOY I KNEW
AND FOUR DOGS
BY LAURENCE HUTTON
Profusely Illustrated



NEW YORK AND LONDON
_ HARPER & BROTHERS PUBLISHERS
1898 ©





By LAURENCE HUTTON.



LITERARY LANDMARKS OF ROME, Illustrated. Post 8vo,
Cloth, Ornamental, $1 00.

LITERARY LANDMARKS OF FLORENCE, Illustrated. Post
8vo, Cloth, Ornamental, $1 00.

LITERARY LANDMARKS OF VENICE, Illustrated. Post 8vo,
Cloth, Ornamental, $1 00.

LITERARY LANDMARKS OF JERUSALEM. Illustrated. Post
8vo, Cloth, Ornamental, 75 cents.

LITERARY LANDMARKS OF LONDON. Illustrated. Post 8vo,
Cloth, Ornamental, $1 75.

LITERARY LANDMARKS OF EDINBURGH. Illustrated. Post
8vo, Cloth, Ornamental, $1 00.

PORTRAITS IN PLASTER. Illustrated. Printed on Large Paper
with Wide Margins. 8vo, Cloth, Ornamental, Uncut Edges and
Gilt Top, $6 00.

CURIOSITIES OF THE AMERICAN STAGE. Illustrated. Crown
8vo, Cloth, Ornamental, Uncut Edges and Gilt Top, $2 50.

FROM THE BOOKS OF LAURENCE HUTTON, With Portrait.
16mo, Cloth, Ornamental, $100. (In ‘‘Harper’s American
Essayists.’’)

OTHER TIMES AND OTHER SEASONS. With Portrait. 16mo,
Cloth, Ornamental, $1 00. (In ‘¢ Harper’s American Essayists,”’)

EDWIN BOOTH. Illustrated. 32mo, Cloth, 50 cents.



NEW YORK AND LONDON:
HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS.



Copyright, 1898, by Harrzrk & Brovrurrs.



All rights reserved,



TO
MARK TWAIN
THE CREATOR OF
TOM SAWYER

ONE OF THE BEST BOYS
I EVER KNEW



May the light of some morning skies
In days when the sun knew how to rise,
Stay with my spirit until I go
To be the boy that I used to know.
H. C. Bunner, in ‘‘ Rowen.”



ILLUSTRATIONS

THACKERAY AND THE BOY ... .
THE BOYS MOTHER. .......

Frontispiece
. 2...) Facing p. 4

8T. JOHN’S CHAPEL AND PARK. ......

THE BOY’S UNCLE JOHN ........

THE BOY IN KILTS

THE BOY PROMOTED TO TROUSERS

‘‘CRIED, BECAUSE HE HAD BEEN KISSED”

‘“G@OOD-MORNING, BOYS” . . . . . 2...

PLAYING §* SCHOOL” oc oe a

THE BOY’S SCOTCH GRANDFATHER...

THE HOUSE OF THE BOY’S GRANDFATHER—CORNER
OF HUDSON AND NORTH MOORE STREETS .

SVALWAYS: IN THE WAY 3 5 5.003 a es

READY FOR A NEW-YEAR’S CALL . ....

A NEW-YEAR’S CALL . . . . 1. eee

TOM RILEY’S LIBERTY-POLE . .

THE BOY ALWAYS CLIMBED OVER. ..... .

THE CHIEF ENGINEER .

‘*MRS. ROBERTSON DESCENDED IN FORCE UPON THE
DEVOTED BAND”

THE BOY AS VIRGINIUS . .......

JOHNNY ROBERTSON ........~.

TANBEPURD WS tet ears cen Na TE EE eS

JOH (STUARTS oss ten oper ee ee aes

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8
10
12

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16
18
20

22
24.
26
28
30
382
34

36
38
40
42
44



viii

BOB HENDRICKS

MUSIC LESSONS

THE BOY’S FATHER .

WHISKIE .

PUNCH

MOP AND HIS MASTER .

ILLUSTRATIONS

ROY AND HIS MASTER .

ROY

‘““HE TRIES VERY HARD TO

ROY

THE WAITING THREE

MOP

LOOK

Facing p. 46

“cc

48
56
62
64
68
14
76
80
82
84
87



INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Tue papers upon which this volume is founded—
published here by the courtesy of The Century Com-
pany — appeared originally in the columns of Sz.
Nicholas. They have been reconstructed and rear-
ranged, and not a little new matter has been added.

The portraits are all from life. That of The Boy’s
Scottish grandfather, facing page 20, is from a photo-
graph by Sir David Brewster, taken in St. Andrews
in 1846 or 1847. The subject sat in his own garden,
blinking at the sun for many minutes, in front of
the camera, when tradition says that his patience
became exhausted and the artist permitted him to
move. The Boy distinctly remembers the great in-
terest the picture excited when it first reached this
country.

Behind the tree in the extreme left of the view of
The Boy’s Scottish-American grandfather’s house in
New York, facing page 22, may be seen a portion of
the home of Mr. Thomas Bailey Aldrich, in 1843 or
1844, some years earlier than the period of “The



Xi : INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Story of a Bad Boy.” Warm and constant friends
—as men—for upwards of a quarter of a century, it
is rather a curious coincidence that the boys—as
boys—should have been near neighbors, although
they did not know each other then, nor do they re-
member the fact.

The histories of “ A Boy I Knew” and the “Four |
Dogs” are absolutely true, from beginning to end;
nothing has been invented; no incident has been
palliated or elaborated. The author hopes that the
volume may interest the boys and.girls he does not
know as much as it has interested him. He has
read it more than once; he.has laughed over it, and
he has cried over it; it has appealed to him in a
peculiar way. But then, he knew The Dogs, and he
knew The Boy!

i.



A BOY I KNEW






A BOY I KNEW

E was not a very good boy, or a very bad boy,

or a very bright boy, or an unusual boy in any

way. He was just a boy; and very often he for-

gets that he is not a boy now. Whatever there may

be about The Boy that is commendable he owes to

his father and to his mother; and he feels that he
should not be held responsible for that.

His mother was the most generous and the most
unselfish of human beings. She was always thinking
of somebody else—always doing for others. To her
it was blesséd to give, and it was not very pleasant
to receive. When she bought anything, The Boy’s
stereotyped query was, “ Who isto have it?” When
anything was bought for her, her own invariable
remark was, “ What on earth shall I do with it?”
When The Boy came to her, one summer morn-
ing, she looked upon him as a gift from Heaven;
and when she was told that it was a boy, and
not a bad-looking or a bad-conditioned boy, her



4 ; A BOY I KNEW

first words were, “What on earth shall I do with
it?”

She found plenty “to do with it” before she got
through with it, more than forty years afterwards ;
and The Boy. has every reason to believe that she
never regretted the gift. Indeed, she once told him,
late in her life, that he had never made her cry!
What better benediction can a boy have than that?

The Boy’s father was a scholar, and a ripe and
good one. Self-made and self-taught, he began the
serious struggle of life when he was merely a boy
himself; and reading, and writing, and spelling, and
languages, and mathematics came to him by nature.
He acquired by slow degrees a fine library, and out
of ita vast amount of information. He never bought
a book that he did not read, and he never read a book
unless he considered it worth buying and worth keep-
ing. Languages and mathematics were his particular
delight. When he was tired he rested himself by the
solving of a geometrical problem. He studied his
Bible in Latin, in Greek, in Hebrew, and he had no
small smattering of Sanskrit. His chief recreation,
on a Sunday afternoon or on a long summer evening,
was a walk with The Boy among the Hudson River
docks, when the business of the day, or the week, was
over and the ship was left in charge of some old
quartermaster or third mate. To these sailors the
father would talk in each sailor’s own tongue, whether















THE BOY’S MOTHER



A BOY I KNEW 5

it were Dutch or Danish, Spanish or Swedish, Rus-
sian or Prussian, or a patois of something else, always
to the great wonderment of The Boy, who to this
day, after many years of foreign travel, knows little
more of French than “Combien ?” and little more of
Italian than “ Zroppo caro.” Why none of these
qualities of mind came to The Boy by direct descent
he does not know. He only knows that he did in-
herit from his parent, in an intellectual way, a sense
of humor, a love for books—as books—and a certain
respect for the men by whom books are written.

It seemed to The Boy that his father knew every-
thing. Any question upon any subject was sure to
bring a prompt, intelligent, and intelligible answer ;
and, usually, an answer followed by a question, on the
father’s part, which made The Boy think the matter
out for himself.

The Boy was always a little bit afraid of his
father, while he loved and respected him. He be-
lieved everything his father told him, because his
father never fooled him but once, and that was
about Santa Claus!

When his father said, “Do this,’ it was done.
When his father told him to go or to come, he went
or he came. And yet he never felt the weight of his
father’s hand, except in the way of kindness; and, as
he looks back upon his boyhood and his manhood, he
cannot recall an angry or a hasty word or a rebuke



6 A BOY I KNEW

that was not merited and kindly bestowed. His
father, like the true Scotchman he was, never praised
him; but he never blamed him—except for cause.

The Boy has no recollection of his first tooth, but
he remembers his first toothache as distinctly as he
remembers his latest; and he could not quite under-
stand then why, when The Boy cried over that raging
molar, the father walked the floor and seemed to
suffer from it even more than did The Boy; or why,
when The Boy had a sore throat, the father always
had symptoms of bronchitis or quinsy.

The father, alas! did not live long enough to find
out whether The Boy was to amount to much or not;
and while The Boy is proud of the fact that he is his
father’s son, he would be prouder still if he could
think that he had done something to make his father
proud of him.

From his father The Boy received many things
besides birth and education ; many things better than
pocket-money or a fixed sum per annum; but, best
of all, the father taught The Boy never to cut a
string. The Boy has pulled various cords during his
uneventful life, but he has untied them all. Some
of the knots have been difficult and perplexing, and |
the contents of the bundles, generally, have been of
little import when they have been revealed ; but he
saved the strings unbroken, and invariably he has
found those strings of great help to him in the proper





ST. JOHN’S CHAPEL AND PARK



A BOY I KNEW "

fastening of the next package he has had occasion
to send away.

The father had that strong sense of humor which
Dr. Johnson—who had no sense of humor what-
ever—denied to all Scotchmen. No surgical opera-
tion was necessary to put one of Sydney Smith’s
jokes into the father’s head, or to keep it there. His
own jokes were as original as they were harmless,
and they were as delightful as was his quick appre-
ciation of the jokes of other persons.

A long siege with a certain bicuspid had left The
Boy, one early spring day, with a broken spirit and
a swollen face. The father was going, that morning,
to attend the funeral of his old friend, Dr. McPher-
son, and, before he left the house, he asked The Boy
what should be brought back to him as a solace.
Without hesitation, a brick of maple sugar was de-
manded—a very strange request, certainly, from a
person in that peculiar condition of invalidism, and
one which appealed strongly to the father’s own
sense of the ridiculous.

When the father returned, at dinner-time, he carried
the brick, enveloped in many series of papers, begin-
ning with the coarsest kind and ending with the finest
kind; and each of the wrappers was fastened with
its own particular bit of cord or ribbon, all of them
tied in the hardest of hard knots. The process of
disentanglement was long and laborious, but it was



8 A BOY I KNEW

persistently performed; and when the brick was
revealed, lo! it was just a brick—not of maple sugar,
but a plain, ordinary, red-clay, building brick which
he had taken from some pile of similar bricks on his
way up town. The disappointment was not very
bitter, for The Boy knew that something else was
coming; and he realized that it was the First of
April and that he had been April-fooled! The some-
thing else, he remembers, was that most amusing
of all amusing books, Phenixiana, then just pub-
lished, and over it he forgot his toothache, but not
his maple sugar. All this happened when he was
about twelve years of age, and he has ever since
associated “Squibob” with the sweet sap of the
maple, never with raging teeth.

It was necessary, however, to get even with the
father, not an easy matter, as The Boy well knew;
and he consulted his uncle John, who advised patient
waiting. The father, he said, was absolutely de-
voted to Zhe Commercial Advertiser, which he read
every day from frontispiece to end, market reports,
book notices, obituary notices, advertisements, and
all; and if The Boy could hold himself in for a
whole year his uncle John thought it would be
worth it. Zhe Commercial Advertiser of that date
was put safely away for a twelvemonth, and on the
First of April next it was produced, carefully folded
and properly dampened, and was placed by the side









THE BOY'S UNCLE JOHN



A BOY I KNEW 9

of the father’s plate ; the mother and the son making
no remark, but eagerly awaiting the result. The
journal was vigorously scanned; no item of news or
of business import was missed until the reader came
to the funeral announcements on the third page.
Then he looked at the top of the paper, through his
spectacles, and then he looked, over his spectacles, at
The Boy; and he made but one observation. The
subject was never referred to afterwards between
them. But he looked at the date of the paper, and
he looked at The Boy; and he said: “ My son, I see
that old Dr. McPherson is dead again!”

The Boy was red-headed and long-nosed, even from
the beginning —a shy, introspective, self-conscious
little boy, made peculiarly familiar with his personal
defects by constant remarks that his hair was red and
that his nose was long. At school, for years, he was
known familiarly as “ Rufus,” “ Red-Head,” “ Carrot-
Top,” or “ Nosey,” and at home it was almost as bad.

His mother, married at nineteen, was the eldest of
a family of nine children, and many of The Boy’s
aunts and uncles were but a few years his senior, and
were his daily, familiar companions. He was the
only member of his own generation for a long time.
There was a constant fear, upon the part of the elders,
that he was likely to be spoiled, and consequently the
rod of verbal castigation was rarely spared. He was
never praised, nor petted, nor coddled; and he was



10 A BOY I KNEW

taught to look upon himself as a youth hairily and
nasally deformed and mentally of but little wit. He
was always falling down, or dropping things. He
was always getting into the way, and he could not
learn to spell correctly or to cipher at all. He was
never in his mother’s way, however, and he was
never made to feel so. But nobody except The Boy
knows of the agony which the rest of the family,
unconsciously, and with no thought of hurting his
feelings, caused him by the fun they poked at his
nose, at his. fiery locks, and at his unhandiness. He
fancied that passers-by pitied him as he walked or
played in the streets, and he sincerely pitied himself
as a youth destined to grow up into an awkward,
tactless, stupid man, at whom the world would laugh
so long as his life lasted.

An unusual and unfortunate accident to his nose
when he was eight or ten years old served to ac-
centuate his unhappiness. The young people were
making molasses candy one night in the kitchen of
his maternal grandfather’s house —the aunts and
the uncles, some of the neighbors’ children, and The
Boy—and the half of a lemon, used for flavoring
purposes, was dropped as it was squeezed by careless
hands—very likely The Boy’s own—into the boiling
syrup. It was fished out and put, still full of the
syrup, upon a convenient saucer, where it remained,
an exceedingly fragrant object. After the odor had





THE BOY IN KILTS



A BOY I KNEW 11

been inhaled by one or two of the party, The Boy
was tempted to “take a smell of it”; when an un-
cle, boylike, ducked the luckless nose into the still
simmering lemonful. The result was terrible. Red-
hot sealing-wax could not have done more damage
to the tender, sensitive feature.

The Boy carried his nose in a sling for many
weeks, and the bandage, naturally, twisted the nose
to one side. It did not recover its natural tint for a
long time, and the poor little heart was nearly broken
at the thought of the fresh disfigurement. The Boy
felt that he had not only an unusually long nose, but
a nose that was crooked and would always be as red
as his hair.

He does not remember what was done to his un-
cle. But the uncle was for half a century The Boy’s
best and most faithful of friends. And The Boy
forgave him long, long ago.

The Boy’s first act of self-reliance and of conscious
self-dependence was a very happy moment in his
young life; and it consisted in his being able to step
over the nursery fender, all alone, and to toast his
own shins thereby, without falling into the fire. His
first realization of “getting big” came to him about
the same time, and with a mingled shock of pain
and pleasure, when he discovered that he could not
walk under the high kitchen-table without bumping
his head. He tried it very often before he learned



12 A BOY I KNEW

to go around that article of furniture, on his way .
from the clothes-rack, which was his tent when he
camped out on rainy days, to the sink, which was
his oasis in the desert of the basement floor. This
kitchen was a favorite playground of The Boy, and
about that kitchen-table centre many of the happiest
of his early reminiscences. Ann Hughes, the cook, .
was very good to The Boy. She told him stories,
and taught him riddles, all about a certain “ Miss
Netticoat,” who wore a white petticoat, and who
had a red nose, and about whom there still lingers a
queer, contradictory legend to the effect that “the
longer she stands the shorter she grows.” The Boy
always felt that, on account of her nose, there was a
peculiar bond of sympathy between little Miss Net-
ticoat and himself.

As he was all boy in his games, he would never
cherish anything but a boy-doll, generally a. High-
lander, in kilts and with a glengarry, that came off!
And although he became foreman of a juvenile hook-
and-ladder company before he was five, and would
not play with girls at all, he had one peculiar femi-
nine weakness. His grand passion was washing and
ironing. And Ann Hughes used to let him do all
the laundry-work connected with the wash-rags and
his own pocket-handkerchiefs, into which, regularly,
every Wednesday, he burned little brown holes with
the toy flat-iron, which would get too hot. But



NOON MII























































































































































































































































































FET RR TE



THE BOY PROMOTED TO TROUSERS



A BOY I KNEW 13

Johnny Robertson and Joe Stuart and ‘the other
boys, and even the uncles and the aunts, never knew
anything about that —unless Ann Hughes gave it
away !

The Boy seems to have developed, very early in
life; a fondness for new clothes—a fondness which
his wife sometimes thinks he has quite outgrown. It
is recorded that almost his first plainly spoken words
were “Coat and hat,” uttered upon his promotion
into a more boyish apparel than the caps and frocks
of his infancy. And he remembers very distinctly
his first pair of long trousers, and the impression they
made upon him, in more ways than one. They were
a black-and-white check, and to them was attached
that especially manly article, the suspender. They
were originally worn in celebration of the birth
of the New Year, in 1848 or 1849, and The Boy
went to his father’s store in Hudson Street, New
York, to exhibit them on the next business -day
thereafter. Naturally they excited much comment,
and were the subject of sincere congratulation. And
two young clerks of his father, The Boy’s uncles,
amused themselves, and The Boy, by playing with
him a then popular game called “ Squails.” They
put The Boy, seated, on a long counter, and they slid
him, backward and forward between them, with.
great skill and no little force. But, before the
championship was decided, The Boy’s mother broke



14 A BOY I KNEW

up the game, boxed the ears of the players, and car-
ried the human disk home in disgrace ; pressing as
she went, and not very gently, the seat of The Boy’s
trousers with the palm of her hand!

He remembers nothing more about the trousers,
except the fact that for a time he was allowed to
appear in them on Sundays and holidays only, and
that he was deeply chagrined at having to go back
to knickerbockers at school and at play.

The Boy’s first boots were of about this same era.
They were what were then known as “ Welling-
tons,” and they had legs. The legs had red leather
tops, as was the fashion in those days, and the boots
were pulled on with straps. They were always
taken off with the aid of the boot-jack of The Boy’s
father, although they could have been removed much
more easily without the use of that instrument.
Great was the day when The Boy first wore his first
boots to school; and great his delight at the sensa-
tion he thought they created when they were ex-
hibited in the primary department.

The Boy’s first school was a dame’s school, kept
by a Miss or Mrs. Harrison, in Harrison Street, near
the Hudson Street house in which he was born. He
was the smallest child in the establishment, and
probably a pet of the larger girls, for he remembers
going home to his mother in tears, because one of
them had kissed him behind the class-room door.





EEN KISSED”

““CRIED, BECAUSE HE HAD B



A BOY I KNEW 15

He saw her often, in later years, but she never tried
to do it again!

At that school he met his first love, one Phoebe
Hawkins, a very sweet, pretty girl, as he recalls her,
and, of course, considerably his senior. How far he
had advanced in the spelling of proper names at that
period is shown by the well-authenticated fact that
he put himself on record, once as “loving his love
with an F, because she was Feeby !”

Poor Phoebe Hawkins died before she was out of
her teens. The family moved to Poughkeepsie when
The Boy was ten or twelve, and his mother and he
went there one day from Red Hook, which was
their summer home, to call upon his love. When
they asked, at the railroad-station, where the Haw-
kinses lived and how they could find the house, they
were told that the carriages for the funeral would
meet the next train. And, utterly unprepared for
such a greeting, for at latest accounts she had been
in perfect health, they stood, with her friends, by the
side of Phoebe’s open grave.

In his mind’s eye The Boy, at the end of forty
years, can see it all; and his childish grief is still
fresh in his memory. He had lost a bird and a cat
who were very dear to his heart, but death had
never before seemed so real to him; never before
had it come so near home. He never played “ fu-
neral” again.



162: _A BOY I KNEW

In 1851 or 1852 The Boy went to another dame’s
school. It was kept by Miss Kilpatrick, on Franklin
or North Moore Street. From this, as he grew in
years, he was sent to the Primary Department of the
North Moore Street Public School, at the corner of
West Broadway, where he remained three weeks,
and where he contracted a whooping-cough which
lasted him three months. The other boys used to
throw his hat upon an awning in the neighborhood,
and then throw their own hats up under the awning
in order to bounce The Boy’s hat off—an amuse-
ment for which he never much cared. They were
not very nice boys, anyway, especially when they
made fun of his maternal grandfather, who was a
trustee of the school, and who sometimes noticed
The Boy after the morning prayers were said. The
grandfather was very popular in the school. He
came in every day, stepped upon the raised platform
at the principal’s desk, and said in his broad Scotch,
“Good morning, boys!” to which the entire body of
pupils, at the top of their lungs, and with one voice,
replied, “G-o-0-d morning, Mr. Scott!” This was con-
sidered a great feature in the school; and strangers
used to come from all over the city to witness it.
Somehow it made The Boy a little bit ashamed ; he
does not know why. He would have liked it well
enough, and been touched by it, too, if it had been
some other boy’s grandfather. The Boy’s father





“‘G@OOD MORNING, BOYS”



A BOY I KNEW 1”

was present once—The Boy’s first day ; but when he
discovered that the President of the Board of Trus-
tees was going to call on him for a speech he ran
away; and The Boy would have given all his little
possessions to have run after him. The Boy knew
then, as well as he knows now, how his father felt ;
and he thinks of that occasion every time he runs
away from some after-dinner or occasional speech
which he, himself, is called upon to make.

After his North Moore Street experiences The Boy
was sent to study under men teachers in boys’
schools; and he considered then that he was grown
up.

' The Boy, as has been said, was born without the
sense of spell. The Rule of Three, it puzzled him,
and fractions were as bad; and the proper placing
of e and i, or i and e, the doubling of letters in the
middle of words, and how to treat the addition of a
suffix in “y” or “tion” “almost drove him mad,” -
from his childhood up. He hated to go to school,
but he loved to play school; and when Johnny
Robertson and he were not conducting a pompous,
public funeral—a certain oblong hat-brush, with a
rosewood back, studded with brass tacks, serving as
a coffin, in which lay the body of Henry Clay, Dan-
jel Webster, or the Duke of Wellington, all of whom
died when Johnny and The Boy were about eight
years old—they were teaching each other the three
2



18 A BOY I KNEW

immortal and exceedingly trying “R’s” — reading,
*riting, and ’rithmetic—in a play-school. Their favor-
ite spelling- book was a certain old cook -book, dis-
carded by the head of the kitchen, and considered
all that was necessary for their educational purpose.
From this, one afternoon, Johnnie gave out “ Dough-
nut,” with the following surprising result. Conscious
of the puzzling presence of certain silent consonants
and vowels, The Boy thus set it down: “D-O, dough,
N-O-U-G-H-T, nut—doughnut!” and he went up
head in a.class of one, neither teacher nor pupil per-
ceiving the marvellous transposition.

All The Boy’s religious training was received at
home, and almost his first text-book was “The
Shorter Catechism,” which, he confesses, he hated
with all his little might. He had to learn and recite
the answers to those awful questions as soon as he
could recite at all, and, for years, without the slight-
est comprehension as to what it was allabout. Even’
to this day he cannot tell just what “ Effectual Call-
ing,” or “Justification,” is; and I am sure that he
shed more tears over “ Effectual Calling” than would
blot out the record of any number of infantile sins.
He made up his youthful mind that if he could not
be saved without “Effectual Calling” — whatever
that was—he did not want to be saved at all. But
he has thought better of it since.

It is proper to affirm here that The Boy did not





PLAYING ‘‘ SCHOOL”



A BOY I KNEW 19

acquire his occasional swear- words from “The
Shorter Catechism.” They were born in him, as
a fragment of Original Sin; and they came out
of him innocently and unwittingly, and only for
purposes of proper emphasis, long before the days
of “Justification,” and even before he knew his
ASB,’ O's.

His earliest visit to Scotland was made when he
was but four or five years of age, and long before he
had assumed the dignity of trousers, or had been sent
to school. His father had gone to the old home at
St. Andrews hurriedly, upon the receipt of the news
of the serious illness of The Boy’s grandmother, who
died before they reached her. Naturally, The Boy
has little recollection of that sad month of December,
spent in his grandfather’s house, except that it was
sad. The weather was cold and wet; the house, even
under ordinary circumstances, could not have been
a very cheerful one for a youngster who had no
companions of his own age. It looked out upon the
German Ocean—which at that time of the year was
always in a rage, or in the sulks—and it was called
“Peep o’ Day,” because it received the very first
rays of the sun as he rose upon the British Isles.

The Boy’s chief amusement was the feeding of
“flour-scones” and oat-cakes to an old goat, who
lived in the neighborhood, and in daily walks with
his grandfather, who seemed to find some little com-



20 A BOY I KNEW

fort and entertainment in the lad’s childish prattle.
He was then almost the only grandchild; and the
old man was very proud of his manner and appear-
ance, and particularly amused at certain gigantic
efforts on The Boy’s part to adapt his own short legs
to the strides of his senior’s iong ones.

After they had interviewed the goat, and had
watched the wrecks with which the wild shore was
strewn, and had inspected the Castle in ruins, and
the ruins of the Cathedral, The Boy would be shown
his grandmother’s new-made grave, and his own name
in full—a common name in the family—upon the
family tomb in the old kirk-yard; all of which must
have been very cheering to The Boy; although he
could not read it for himself. And then, which was
better, they would stand, hand in hand, for a long
time in front of a certain candy-shop window, in
which was displayed a little regiment of lead soldiers,
marching in double file towards an imposing and im-
pregnable tin fortress on the heights of barley-sugar.
Of this spectacle they never tired; and they used to
discuss how The Boy would arrange them if they
belonged to him; with a sneaking hope on The Boy’s
part that, some day, they were to be his very own.

At the urgent request of the grandfather, the
American contingent remained in St. Andrews until
the end of the year; and The Boy still remembers
vividly, and he will never forget, the dismal failure





THE BOY’S SCOTCH GRANDFATHER



A BOY I KNEW 21

of “ Auld Lang Syne” as it was sung by the family,
with clasped hands, as the clock struck and the New
Year began. He sat up for the occasion—or, rather,
was waked up for the occasion ; and of all that fam-
ily group he has been, for a decade or more, the only
survivor. The mother of the house was but lately
dead; the eldest son, and his son, were going, the
next day, to the other side of the world; and every
voice broke before the familiar verse came to an end.

As The Boy went off to his bed he was told that
his grandfather had something for him, and he stood
at his knee to receive—a Bible! That it was to be
the lead soldiers and the tin citadel he never for a
moment doubted; and the surprise and disappoint-
ment were very great. He seems to have had pres-
ence of mind enough to conceal his feelings, and to
kiss and thank the dear old man for his gift. But
as he climbed slowly up the stairs, in front of his
mother, and with his Bible under his arm, she over-
heard him sob to himself, and murmur, in his great
disgust: “Well, he has given me a book! And I
wonder how in thunder he thinks I am going to read
his damned Scotch !”

This display of precocious profanity and of innate
patriotism, upon the part of a child who could not
read at all, gave unqualified pleasure to the old gen-
tleman, and he never tired of telling the story as long
as he lived.



22 A BOY I KNEW

The Boy never saw the grandfather again. He
had gone to the kirk-yard, to stay, before the next
visit to St. Andrews was made; and now that kirk-
yard holds every one of The Boy’s name and blood
who is left in the town.

The Boy was taught, from the earliest awakening
of his reasoning powers, that truth was to be told
and to be respected, and that nothing was more
wicked or more ungentlemanly than a broken prom-
ise. He learned very early to do as he was told, and
not to do, under any consideration, what he had said
he would not do. Upon this last point he was al-
most morbidly conscientious, although once, literally,
he “beat about the bush.” His aunt Margaret, al-
ways devoted to plants and to flowers, had, on the
back stoop of his grandfather’s house, a little grove of
orange and lemon trees, in pots. Some of these were
usually in fruit or in flower, and the fruit to The
Boy was a great temptation. He was very fond of
oranges, and it seemed to him that a “ home-made”
orange, which he had never tasted, must be much bet-
ter than a grocer’s orange; as home-made cake was
certainly preferable, even to the wonderful cakes made
by the professional Mrs. Milderberger. He watched
those little green oranges from day to day, as they
gradually grew big and yellow in the sun. He prom-
ised faithfully that he would not pick any of them,
but he had a notion that some of them might drop





TS

TREE

ES

ORTH MOOR.

ND N

HUDSON A

ORNER OF

ER—C

H

HOUSE OF THE BOY’S GRANDFAT

THE



A BOY I KNEW 23

off. He never shook the trees, because he said he
would not. But he shook the stoop! And he hung
about the bush, which he was too honest to beat.
One unusually tempting orange, which he had known
from its bud-hood, finally overcame him. He did
not pick it off, he did not shake it off; he compro-
mised with his conscience by lying flat on his back
and biting off a piece of it. It was not a very good
action, nor was it a very good orange, and for that
reason, perhaps, he went home immediately and told
on himself. He told his mother. He did not tell
his aunt Margaret. His mother did not seem to be
as much shocked at his conduct as he was. But, in
her own quiet way, she gave him to understand that
promises were not made to be cracked any more
than they were made to be broken—that he had
been false to himself in heart, if not in deed, and
that he must go back and make it “all right” with
his aunt Margaret. She did not seem to be very
much shocked, either; he could not tell why. But
they punished The Boy. They made him eat the
rest of the orange !

He lost all subsequent interest in that tropical
glade, and he has never cared much for domestic
oranges since.

Among the many bumps which are still conspicu-
ously absent in The Boy’s phrenological develop-
ment are the bumps of Music and Locality. He



24 A BOY I KNEW

whistled as soon as he acquired front teeth ; and he
has been singing “God Save the Queen” at the St.
Andrew’s Society dinners, on November the 30th,
ever since he came of age. But that is as far as his
sense of harmony goes. He took music-lessons for
three quarters, and then his mother gave it up in
despair. The instrument was a piano. The Boy
could not stretch an octave with his right hand, the
little finger of which had been broken by a shinny-
stick ; and he could not do anything whatever with
his left hand. He was constantly dropping his bass-
notes, which, he said, were “understood.” And
even Miss Ferguson—most patient of teachers—de-
clared that it was of no use.

The piano to The Boy has been the most offensive
of instruments ever since. And when his mother’s
old piano, graceful in form, and with curved legs
which are still greatly admired, lost its tone, and was
transformed into a sideboard, he felt, for the first
time, that music had charms.

He had to practise half an hour a day, by a thirty-
minute sand-glass that could not be set ahead; and
he shed tears enough over “ The Carnival of Venice”
to have raised the tide in the Grand Canal. They
blurred the sharps and the flats on the music-
books —those tears; they ran the crotchets and
the quavers together, and, rolling down his cheeks,
_ they even splashed upon his not very clean little





ALWAYS IN THE WAY”

“ae



A BOY I KNEW 25

hands; and, literally, they covered the keys with
mud.

Another serious trial to The Boy was dancing-
school. In the first place, he could not turn round
without becoming dizzy; in the second place, he
could not learn the steps to turn round with; and in
the third place, when he did dance he had to dance
with a girl! There was not a boy in all Charraud’s,
or in all Dodworth’s, who could escort a girl back to
her seat, after the dance was over, in better time, or
make his “thank-you bow” with less delay. His
only voluntary terpsichorean effort at a party was
the march to supper; and the only steps he ever
took with anything like success were during the
promenade in the lancers. In “hands-all-round”
he invariably started with the wrong hand; and if
in the set there were girls big enough to wear long
dresses, he never failed to tear such out at the gath-
ers. If anybody fell down in the polka it was al-
ways The Boy; and if anybody bumped into any-
body else, The Boy was always the bumper, unless
his partner could hold him up and steer him straight.

Games, at parties, he enjoyed more than dancing,
although he did not care very much for “ Pillows
and Keys,” until he became courageous enough to
kneel before somebody except his maiden aunts.
“Porter” was less embarrassing, because, when the
door was shut, nobody but the little girl who called



26 A BOY I KNEW

him but could tell whether he kissed her or not. All
this happened a long time ago!

-The only social function in which The Boy took
any interest whatever was the making of New-
Year’s calls. Not that he cared to make New-Year’s
calls in themselves, but because he wanted to make
more New-Year’s calls than were made by any other
boy. His “list,” based upon last year’s list, was
commenced about February 1; and it contained the
names of every person whom The Boy knew, or
thought he knew, whether that person knew The
Boy or not, from Mrs. Penrice, who boarded oppo-
site the Bowling Green, to the Leggats and the
Faures, who lived near Washington Parade Ground,
the extreme social limitsof his city in those days.
He usually began by making a formal call upon his
own mother, who allowed him to taste the pickled
oysters as early as ten in the morning; and he in-
variably wound up by calling upon Ann Hughes in
the kitchen, where he met the soap-fat man, who
was above his profession, and likewise the sexton of
Ann Hughes’s church, who generally came with
Billy, the barber on the corner of Franklin Street.
There were certain calls The Boy always made with
his father, during which he did not partake of pic-
kled oysters ; but he had pickled oysters everywhere
else ; and they never seemed to do him any serious
harm.



ENS SSS ST ee

FPL SANA LES SN EN





READY FOR A NEW-YEAR’S CALL



A BOY I KNEW 24

The Boy, if possible, kept his new overcoat until
New Year’s Day—and he never left it in the hall
when he called! He always wore new green kid
gloves—why green ?—fastened at the wrists with a
single hook and eye; and he never took off his kid
gloves when he called, except on that particular New
Year’s Day when his aunt Charlotte gave him the
bloodstone seal-ring, which, at first, was too big for
his little finger,—the only finger on which a seal-
ring could be worn—and had to be made tempo-
rarily smaller with a piece of string.

When he received, the next New Year, new studs
and a scarf-pin—all bloodstones, to match the ring
—he exhibited no little ingenuity of toilet in dis-
playing them both, because studs are hardly visible
when one wears a scarf, unless the scarf is kept out
of the perpendicular by stuffing one end of it into
the sleeve of a jacket; which requires constant at-
tention and a good deal of bodily contortion.

When The Boy met Johnny Robertson or Joe
Stuart making calls, they never recognized each
other, except when they were calling together, which
did not often occur. It was an important rule in
their social code to appear as strangers in-doors, al-
though they would wait for each other outside, and
compare lists. When they did present themselves
collectively in any drawing-room, one boy—usually -
The Boy’s cousin Lew—was detailed to whisper “T.



28 A BOY I KNEW

T.” when he considered that the proper limit of the
call was reached. “'T. T.” stood for “ Time to Trav-
el” ; and at the signal all conversation was abruptly
interrupted, and the party trooped out in single file.
The idea was not original with the boys. It was
borrowed from the hook-and-ladder company, which
made all zs calls in a body, and in two of Kipp and
Brown’s stages, hired for the entire day. The boys
always walked.

The great drawbacks to the custom of making
New-Year’s calls were the calls which had to be
made after the day’s hard work was supposed to be
over, and when The Boy and his father, returning
home very tired, were told that they must call upon
Mrs. Somebody, and upon Mrs. Somebody-else, whom
they had neglected to visit, because the husbands and
the sons of these ladies had called upon the mother
of The Boy. New Year’s Day was not the shortest
day of the year, by any means, but it was absolutely
necessary to return the Somebody’s call, no matter
how late the hour, or how tired the victims of the
social law. And it bored the ladies of the Some-
body household as much as it bored the father and
The Boy.

The Boy was always getting lost. The very first
time he went out alone he got lost! Told not to go
off the block, he walked as far as the corner of
Leonard Street, put his arm around the lamp-post,





A NEW-YEAR’S CALL



A BOY I KNEW 29

swung himself in a circle, had his head turned the
wrong way, and marched off, at a right angle, along
the side street, with no home visible anywhere, and
not a familiar sign in sight. A ship at sea without
a rudder, a solitary wanderer in the Great American
Desert without a compass, could not have been more
utterly astray. The Boy was so demoralized that
he forgot his name and address; and when a kindly
policeman picked him up, and carried him over the
way, to the Leonard Street station-house for identifi-
cation, he felt as if the end of everything had come.
It was bad enough to be arrested, but how was he
to satisfy his own conscience, and explain matters to
his mother, when it was discovered that he had
broken his solemn promise, and crossed the street ?
He had no pocket-handkerchief ; and he remembers
that he spoiled the long silk streamers of his Glen-
garry bonnet by wiping his eyes upon them. He was
recognized by his Forty-second-plaid gingham frock,
a familiar object in the neighborhood, and he was
carried back to his parents, who had not had time to
miss him, and who, consequently, were not distracted.
He lost nothing by the adventure but himself, his
. self-respect, a pint of tears—and one shoe.

He was afterwards lost in Greenwich Street, having
gone there on the back step of an ice-cart; and once
he was conveyed as far as the Hudson River Railroad
Depot, at Chambers Street, on his sled, which he had



30 A BOY I KNEW

hitched to the milkman’s wagon, and could not untie.
This was very serious, indeed; for The Boy realized
that he had not only lost himself but his sleigh, too.
Aunt Henrietta found The Boy sitting disconsolately
in front of Wall’s bake-shop; but the sleigh did not
turn up for several days. It was finally discovered,
badly scratched, in the possession of “The Head of
the Rovers.”

“The Hounds” and “The Rovers” were rival
bands of boys, not in The Boy’s set, who for many
years made out-door life miserable to The Boy and
to his friends. They threw stones and mud at each
other, and at everybody else; and The Boy was not
infrequently blamed for the windows they broke.
They punched all the little boys who were better
dressed than they were, and they were even depraved
enough, and mean enough, to tell the driver every
time The Boy or Johnny Robertson attempted to
“cut behind.”

There was also a band of unattached guerillas
who aspired to be, and often pretended to be, either
“Hounds” or “ Rovers”—they did not care which.
They always hunted in couples, and if they met The
Boy alone they asked him to which of the organi-
zations he himself belonged. If he said he was a
“Rover,” they claimed to be “ Hounds,” and pounded
him. If he declared himself in sympathy with the
_ “Hounds,” they hoisted the “Rovers’” colors, and





ri

AY
ANN
AX\
’











TOM RILEY’S LIBERTY POLE



A BOY I KNEW 31

punched him again. If he disclaimed both associa-
tions, they punched him anyway, on general princi-
ples. “The Head of the Rovers” was subsequently
killed, in front of Tom Riley’s liberty-pole in Frank-
lin Street, in a fireman’s riot, and “ The Chief of the
Hounds,” who had a club-foot, became a respectable
ege-merchant, with a stand in Washington Market,
near the Root-beer Woman’s place of business, on the
south side. The Boy met two of the gang near the
Desbrosses Street Ferry only the other day ; but they
did not recognize The Boy.

The only spot where The Boy felt really safe from
the interference of “ The Hounds” and “ The Rovers”
was in St. John’s Square, that delightful oasis in the
desert of brick and mortar and cobble-stones which
was known as the Fifth Ward. It was a private
enclosure, bounded on the north by Laight Street,
on the south by Beach Street, on the east by Varick
Street, and on the west by Hudson Street; and its
site is now occupied by the great freight-warehouses
of the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad
Company.

In the “ Fifties,” and long before, it was a private
park, to which only the property owners in its imme-
diate neighborhood had access. It possessed fine old
trees, winding gravel-walks, and meadows of grass.
In the centre was a fountain, whereupon, in the proper
season, the children were allowed to skate on both



32 A BOY I KNEW

feet, which was a great improvement over the one-
foot gutter-slides outside. The Park was surrounded
by a high iron railing, broken here and there by
massive gates, to which The Boy had a key. But he
always climbed over. It was a point of etiquette, in
The Boy’s set, to climb over on all occasions, whether
the gates were unlocked or not. And The Boy, many
a time, has been known to climb overa gate, although
it stood wide open! He not infrequently tore his
clothes on the sharp spikes by which the gates were
surmounted; but that made no difference to The
Boy—until he went home!

The Boy once had a fight in the Park, with Bill.

Rice, about a certain lignum-vite peg-top, of which
The Boy was very fond, and which Bill Rice kicked
into the fountain. The Boy got mad, which was
wrong and foolish of The Boy; and The Boy, also,
got licked. And The Boy never could make his
mother understand why he was silly and careless
enough to cut his under-lip by knocking it against
Bill Rice’s knuckles. Bill subsequently apologized
by saying that he did not mean to kick the top into
the fountain. He merely meant to kick the top.
And it was all made up.

The Boy did not fight much. His nose was too
long. It seemed that he could not reach the end of
it with his fists when he fought; and that the other
fellows could always reach it with theirs, no matter





ER

THE BOY ALWAYS CLIMBED OV.



A BOY I KNEW 33

how far out, or how scientifically, his left arm was
extended. It was “ One, two, three—and recover ”—
on The Boy’s nose! The Boy was a good runner.
His legs were the only part of his anatomy which
seemed to him as long as his nose. And his legs
saved his nose in many a fierce encounter.

The Boy first had daily admission to St. John’s
Park after the family moved to Hubert Street, when
The Boy was about ten years old; and for half a
decade or more it was his happy hunting-ground—
when he was not kept in school! It was a particu-
larly pleasant place in the autumn and winter months;
for he could then gather “smoking-beans” and horse-
chestnuts; and he could roam at will all over the
grounds without any hateful warning to “Keep Off
the Grass.”

The old gardener, generally a savage defender of
the place, who had no sense of humor as it was ex-
hibited in boy nature, sometimes let the boys rake
the dead leaves into great heaps and make bonfires
of them, if the wind happened to be in the right di-
rection. And then what larks! The bonfire was a
house on fire, and the great garden-roller, a very
heavy affair, was “ Engine No. 42,” with which the
boys ran to put the fire out. They all shouted as
loudly and as unnecessarily as real firemen did, in
those days; the foreman gave his orders through a

real trumpet, and one boy had a real fireman’s hat
8



34 A BOY I KNEW

with “Engine No. 42” on it. He was chief en-
gineer, but he did not run with the machine: not
because he was chief engineer, but because while in
active motion he could not keep his hat on. It was
his father’s hat, and its extraordinary weight was
considerably increased by the wads of newspaper
packed in the lining to make it fit. The chief en-
gineer held the position for life on the strength of
the hat, which he would not lend to anybody else.
The rest of the officers of the company were elected,
viva voce, every time there was a fire.

This entertaiment came to an end, like everything
else, when the gardener chained the roller to the
tool-house, after Bob Stuart fell under the machine
and was rolled so flat that he had to be carried home
on a stretcher, made of overcoats tied together by
the sleeves. That is the only recorded instance in
which the boys, particularly Bob, left the Park with-
out climbing over. And the bells sounded a “gen-
eral alarm.” The dent made in the path by Bob’s
body was on exhibition until the next snow-storm.

The favorite amusements in the Park were shinny,
baseball, one-old-cat, and fires. The Columbia Base-
ball Club was organized in 1853 or 1854. It had
nine members, and The Boy was secretary and treas-
urer. The uniform consisted chiefly of a black leath-
er belt with the initials 0 B € C in white letters,
hand-painted, and generally turned the wrong way.





THE CHIEF ENGINEER



A BOY I KNEW 35

The first base was an ailantus-tree ; the second base
was another ailantus-tree; the third base was a but-
ton-ball-tree ; the home base was a marble head-
stone, brought for that purpose from an old bury-
ing-eround not far away ; and “ over the fence” was
a home-run. A player was caught out on the second
bounce, and he was “out” if hit by a ball thrown
at him as he ran. The Boy was put out once by
a crack on the ear, which put The Boy out very
much.

“The Hounds” and “The Rovers” challenged
“The Columbias” repeatedly. But that was looked
upon simply as an excuse to get into the Park, and
the challenges were never accepted. The challeng-
ers were forced to content themselves with running
off with the balls which went over the fence; an ac-
tion on their part which made home-runs through
that medium very unpopular and very expensive.
In the whole history of “The Hounds” and “The
Rovers,” nothing that they pirated was ever returned
but The Boy’s sled.

Contemporary with the Columbia Baseball Club
was a so-called “ Mind-cultivating Society,’ organ-
ized by the undergraduates of McElligott’s School,
in Greene Street. The Boy, as usual, was secretary
when he was not treasurer. The object was “ De-
bates,” but all the debating was done at the business
meetings, and no mind ever became sufficiently cul-



36 A BOY f KNEW

_tivated to master the intricacies of parliamentary
law. The members called it a Secret Society, and
on their jackets they wore, as conspicuously as pos-
sible, a badge-pin consisting of a blue enamelled circlet
containing Greek letters in gold. In a very short
time the badge-pin was all that was left of the So-
ciety ; but to this day the secret of the Society has
never been disclosed. No one ever knew, or will
ever know, what the Greek letters stood for—not
even the members themselves.

The Boy was never a regular member of any fire-
company, but almost as long as the old Volunteer
Fire Department existed, he was what was known
as a “Runner.” He was attached, in a sort of bre-
vet way, to “ Pearl Hose No. 28,” and, later, to “11
Hook and Ladder.” He knew all the fire districts
into which the city was then divided; his ear was
always alert, even in the St. John’s Park days, for
the sound of the alarm-bell, and he ran to every fire
at any hour of the day or night, up to ten o’clock
P.M. He did not do much when he got to the fire
but, stand around and “holler.” But once—a proud
moment—he helped steer the hook-and-ladder truck
to a false alarm in Macdougal Street—and once—a
very proud moment, indeed—he went into a tene-
ment-house, near Dr. Thompson’s church, in Grand
Street, and carried two negro babies down-stairs in
his arms. There was no earthly reason why the





““MRS. ROBERTSON DESCENDED IN FORCE UPON THE
DEVOTED BAND”



A BOY I KNEW 39

babies should not have been left in their beds; and
the colored family did not like it, because the babies
caught cold! But The Boy, for once in his life,
tasted the delights of self-conscious heroism.

When The Boy, as a bigger boy, was not running
to fires he was going to theatres, the greater part of
his allowance being spent in the box-offices of Bur-
ton’s Chambers Street house, of Brougham’s Ly-
ceum, corner of Broome Street and Broadway, of
Niblo’s, and of Castle Garden. There were no after-
noon performances in those days, except now and
then when the Ravels were at Castle Garden; and
the admission to pit and galleries was usually two
shillings — otherwise, twenty-five cents. His first
play, so far as he remembers, was “ The Stranger,”
a play dismal enough to destroy any taste for the
drama, one would suppose, in any juvenile mind. He
never cared very much to see “ The’Stranger ” again,
but nothing that was a play was too deep or too
heavy for him. He never saw the end of any of the
more elaborate productions, unless his father took
him to the theatre (as once in a while he did), for it
was a strict rule of the house, until The Boy was
well up in his teens, that he must be in by ten
o’clock. His father did not ask him where he was
going, or where he had been ; but the curfew in Hu-
bert Street tolled at ten. The Boy calculated care-
fully and exactly how many minutes it took him to



38 A BOY I KNEW

run to Hubert Street from Brougham’s or from Bur-
ton’s ; and by the middle of the second act his watch
—a small silver affair with a hunting-case, in which
he could not keep an uncracked crystal—was always
in his hand. He never disobeyed his father, and for
years he never knew what became of Claude Mel-
notte after he went to the wars; or if Damon got
back in time to save Pythias before the curtain fell.
The Boy, naturally, had a most meagre notion as to
what all these plays were about, but he enjoyed his
fragments of them as he rarely enjoys plays now.
Sometimes, in these days, when the air is bad, and
plays are worse, and big hats are worse than either,
he wishes that he were forced to leave the modern
play-house at nine-forty-five, on pain of no supper
that night, or twenty lines of “ Virgil” the next
day.

On very stormy afternoons the boys played thea-
tre in the large garret of The Boy’s Hubert Street
house; a convenient closet, with a door and a win-
dow, serving for the Castle of Elsinore in “ Hamlet,”
for the gunroom of the ship in “ Black-eyed Susan,”
or for the studio of Phidias in “The Marble Heart,”
as the case might be. “The Brazilian Ape,” as re-
quiring more action than words, was a favorite en-
tertainment, only they all wanted to play Jocko the
Ape; and they would have made no little success
out of the “Lady of Lyons” if any of them had





THE BOY AS VIRGINIUS



A BOY I KNEW 39

been willing to play Pauline. Their costumes and
properties were slight and not always accurate, but
they could “launch the curse of Rome,” and describe
“two hearts beating as one,” in a manner rarely
equalled on the regular stage. The only thing they
really lacked was an audience, neither Lizzie Gustin
nor Ann Hughes ever being able to sit through more
than one act at atime. When The Boy, as Virgin-
ius, with his uncle Aleck’s sword-cane, stabbed all
the feathers out of the pillow which represented the
martyred Virginia; and when Joe Stuart, as Fal-
staff, broke the bottom out of Ann Hughes’s clothes-
basket, the license was revoked, and the season came
to an untimely end.

Until the beginning of the weekly, or the fort-
nightly, sailings of the Collins line of steamers from
the foot of Canal Street (a spectacle which they never
missed in any weather), Joe Stuart, Johnny Rob-
ertson, and The Boy played “The Deerslayer” every
Saturday in the back-yard of The Boy’s house. The
area-way was Glimmer-glass, in which they fished,
and on which they canoed ; the back-stoop was Musk-
rat Castle; the rabbits were all the wild beasts of the
Forest ; Johnny was Hawk-Eye, The Boy was Hurry
Harry, and Joe Stuart was Chingachgook. Their
only food was half-baked potatoes—sweet potatoes if
possible—which they cooked themselves and ate rav-
enously, with butter and salt, if Ann Hughes was



40 A BOY I KNEW

amiable, and entirely unseasoned if Ann was dis-
posed to be disobliging.

They talked what they fondly believed was the
dialect of the Delaware tribe, and they were con-
stantly on the lookout for the approaches of Riven-
oak, or the Panther, who were represented by any
member of the family who chanced to stray into the
enclosure. They carefully turned their toes in when
they walked, making so much effort in this matter
that it took a great deal of dancing-school to get
their fect back to the “first position” again; and
they even painted their faces when they were on the
war-path. The rabbits had the worst of it!

The campaign came to a sudden and disastrous
conclusion when the hostile tribes, headed by Mrs.
Robertson, descended in force upon the devoted
band, because Chingachgook broke one of Hawk-
Eye’s front teeth with an arrow, aimed at the biggest
of the rabbits, which was crouching by the side of
the roots of the grape-vine, and playing that he was
a panther of enormous size.

Johnny Robertson and The Boy had one great
superstition—to wit, Cracks! For some now inex-
plicable reason they thought it unlucky to step on
cracks; and they made daily and hourly spectacles
of themselves in the streets by the eccentric irregu-
larity of their gait. Now they would take long
strides, like a pair of ostriches, and now short, quick









JOHNNY ROBERTSON



A BOY I KNEW 41

steps, like a couple of robins; now they would hop
on both feet, like a brace of sparrows; now they
would walk on their heels, now on their toes; now
with their toes turned in, now with their toes turned
out—at right angles, in a splay-footed way; now
they would walk with their feet crossed, after the
manner of the hands of very fancy, old-fashioned
piano-players, skipping from base to treble — over
cracks. The whole performance would have driven
a sensitive drill-sergeant or ballet-master to distrac-
tion. And when they came to a brick sidewalk they
would go all around the block to avoid it. They
could cross Hudson Street on the cobblestones with
great effort, and in great danger of being run over;
but they could not possibly travel upon a brick pave-
ment, and avoid the cracks. What would have hap-
pened to them if they did step on a crack they did
not exactly know. But, for all that, they never
stepped on cracks—of their own free will!

The Boy’s earliest attempts at versification were
found, the other day, in an old desk, and at the end
of almost half a century. The copy is in his own
boyish, ill-spelled print; and it bears no date. The
present owner, his aunt Henrietta, well remembers
the circumstances and the occasion, however, having
been an active participant in the acts the poem de-
scribes, although she avers that she had no hand in
its composition. The original, it seems, was tran-



42 A BOY I KNEW

scribed by The Boy upon the cover of a soap-box,
which served as a head-stone to one of the graves in
his family burying-ground, situated in the back-yard
of the Hudson Street house, from which he was taken
before he was nine years of age. The monument
stood against the fence, and this is the legend it
bore—rhyme, rhythm, metre, and orthography being
carefully preserved :

“Three little kitens of our old cat

Were berrid this day in this
grassplat.

They came to there deth in
an old slop pale,

And after loosing their breth

They were pulled out by
the tale.

These three little kitens have
returned to their maker,

And were put in the grave by
The Boy, .
Undertaker.”

At about this period The Boy officiated at the
funeral of another cat, but in a somewhat more
exalted capacity. It was the Cranes’ cat, at Red
Hook—a, Maltese lady, who always had yellow kit-
tens. The Boy does not remember the cause of the
cat’s death, but he thinks that Uncle Andrew Knox
ran over her, with the “ dyspepsia-wagon ”—so called
because it had no springs. Anyway, the cat died,









E PURDY

JAN



A BOY I KNEW 43

and had to be buried. The grave was dug in the
garden of the tavern, near the swinging-gate to the
stable, and the whole family attended the services.
Jane Purdy, in a deep crape veil, was the chief
mourner; The Boy’s aunts were pall-bearers, in
white scarves; The Boy was the clergyman; while
the kittens—who did not look at all like their moth-
er—were on hand in a funeral basket, with black
shoestrings tied around their necks.

Jane was supposed to be the disconsolate widow.
She certainly looked the part to perfection; and it
never occurred to any of them that a cat, with kit-
tens, could not possibly have left a widow behind
her.

The ceremony was most impressive; the bereaved
kittens were loud in their grief; when, suddenly, the
village-bell tolled for the death of an old gentleman
whom everybody loved, and the comedy became a
tragedy. The older children were conscience-stricken
at the mummery, and they ran, demoralized and
shocked, into the house, leaving The Boy and the
kittens behind them. Jane Purdy tripped over her
veil, and one of the kittens was stepped on in the
crush. But The Boy proceeded with the funeral.

When The Boy got as far as a room of his own,
papered with scenes from circus-posters, and peopled
by tin soldiers, he used to play that his bed was the

barge Mayflower, running from Barrytown to the



does A BOY I KNEW

foot of Jay Street, North River, and that he was her
captain and crew. She made nightly trips between
the two ports; and by day, when she was not tied
up to the door-knob—which was Barrytown— she
was moored to the handle of the wash-stand drawer
—which was the dock at New York. She never
was wrecked, and she never ran aground ; but great
was the excitement of The Boy when, as not infre-
quently was the case, on occasions of sweeping, Han-
nah, the up-stairs girl, set her adrift.

The Mayflower was seriously damaged by fire
once, owing to the careless use, by a deck-hand, of a
piece of punk on the night before the Fourth of
July; this same deck-hand being nearly blown up
early the very next morning by a bunch of fire-
crackers which went off—by themselves—in his lap.
He did not know, for a second or two, whether the
barge had burst her boiler or had been struck by
lightning !

Barrytown is the river port of Red Hook —a
charming Dutchess County hamlet in which The Boy
spent the first summer of his life, and in which he
spent the better part of every succeeding summer for
a quarter of a century ; and he sometimes goes there
yet, although many of the names he knows were
carved, in the long-agoes, on the tomb. He always
went up and down, in those days, on the Mayflower,
the real boat of that name, which was hardly more





E STUART

JO



A BOY I KNEW 45

real to him than was the trundle-bed of his vivid,
nightly imagination. They sailed from New York
at five o’clock p.m., an hour looked for, and longed
for, by The Boy, as the very beginning of summer,
with all its delightful young charms; and they ar-
rived at their destination about five of the clock the
next morning, by which time The Boy was wide
awake, and on the lookout for Lasher’s Stage, in
which he was to travel the intervening three miles.
And eagerly he recognized, and loved, every land-
mark on the road. Barringer’s Corner; the half-
way tree; the road to the creek and to Madame
Knox’s; and, at last, the village itself, and the tav-
ern, and the tobacco-factory, and Massoneau’s store,
over the way; and then, when Jane Purdy had
shown him the new kittens and the little chickens,
and he had talked to “ Fido” and ‘“ Fanny,” or to
Fido alone after Fanny was stolen by gypsies—
Fanny was Fido’s wife, and a poodle—he rushed off
to see Bob Hendricks, who was just his own age,
barring a week, and who has been his warm friend
for more than half a century ; and then what good
times The Boy had!

Bob was possessed of a grandfather who could
make kites, and swings, and parallel-bars, and things
which The Boy liked; and Bob had a mother—and
he has her yet, happy Bob!—who made the most
wonderful of cookies, perfectly round, with sparkling



46 A BOY I KNEW

globules of sugar on them, and little round holes in
the middle; and Bob and The Boy for days, and
weeks, and months together hen’s-egged, and rode in
the hay-carts, and went for the mail every noon, and
boosted each other up into the best pound-sweet-tree
in the neighborhood ; and pelted each other with
little green apples, which weighed about a pound to
the peck; and gathered currants and chestnuts in
season ; and with long straws they sucked new cider
out of bung-holes; and learned to swim; and caught
their first fish; and did all the pleasant things that
all boys do.

At Red Hook they smoked their first cigar—
half a cigar, left by uncle Phil—and they wished
they hadn’t! And at Red Hook they disobeyed
their mothers once, and were found out. They were
told not to go wading in the creek upon pain of not
going to the creek at all; and for weeks they were
deprived of the delights of the society of the Faure
boys, through whose domain the creek ran, because,
when they went to bed on that disastrous night, it
was discovered that Bob had on The Boy’s stockings,
and that The Boy was wearing Bob’s socks ; a piece
of circumstantial evidence which convicted them
both. When the embargo was raised and they next
went to the creek, it is remembered that Bob tore
his trousers in climbing over a log, and that The
Boy fell in altogether.









BOB HENDRICKS



A BOY I KNEW 47

The Boy usually kept his promises, however, and
he was known even to keep a candy-cane—twenty-
eight inches long, red and white striped like a bar-
ber’s pole—for a fortnight, because his mother limit-
ed him to the consumption of two inches a day.
But he could not keep any knees to his trousers ;
and when The Boy’s mother threatened to sew but-
tons—brass buttons, with sharp and penetrating
eyes—on to that particular portion of the garment
in question, he wanted to know, in all innocence,
how they expected him to say his prayers!

One of Bob’s earliest recollections of The Boy is
connected with a toy expréss-wagon on four wheels,
which could almost turn around on its own axis.
The Boy imported this vehicle into Red Hook one
summer, and they used it for the transportation of
their chestnuts and their currants and their apples,
green and ripe, and the mail, and most of the dust of
the road ; and Bob thinks, to this day, that nothing in
all these after years has given him so much profound
satisfaction and enjoyment as did that little cart.

Bob remembers, too—what The Boy tries to for-
get—The Boy’s daily practice of half an hour on the
piano borrowed by The Boy’s mother from Mrs.
Bates for that dire purpose. Mrs. Bates’s piano is
almost the only unpleasant thing associated with
Red Hook in all The Boy’s experience of that happy
village. It was pretty hard on The Boy, because, in



48 A BOY I KNEW

The Boy’s mind, Red Hook should have been a
place of unbroken delights. But The Boy’s mother
wanted to make an all-round man of him, and when
his mother said so, of course it had to be done or
tried. Bob used to go with The Boy as far as Dr.
Bates’s house, and then hang about on the gate until
The Boy was released ; and he asserts that the music
which came out of the window in response to The
Boy’s inharmonic touch had no power whatever to
soothe his own savage young breast. He attributes
all his later disinclination to music to those dreary
thirty minutes of impatient waiting.

The piano and its effect upon The Boy’s uncertain
temper may have been the innocent cause of the
first, and only, approach to a quarrel which The
Boy and Bob ever had. The prime cause, however,
was, of course, a girl! They were playing, that af-
ternoon, at Cholwell Knox’s, when Cholwell said
something about Julia Booth which Bob resented,
and there was a fight, The Boy taking Cholwell’s
part; why, he cannot say, unless it was because of
his jealousy of Bob’s affection and admiration for
that charming young teacher, who won all hearts in
the village, The Boy’s among the number. Anyway,
Bob was driven from the field by the hard little
green apples of the Knox orchard; more hurt, he
declares, by the desertion of his ally than by all the
blows he received.





MUSIC LESSONS



A BOY I KNEW 49

It never happened again, dear Bob, and, please
God, it never will!

Another trouble The Boy had in Red Hook was
Dr. McNamee, a resident dentist, who operated upon
The Boy, nowand then. He wasa little more gentle
than was The Boy’s city dentist, Dr. Castle; but he
hurt, for all that. Dr. Castle lived in Fourth Street,

opposite Washington Parade Ground, and on the
same block with Clarke and Fanning’s school. And
to this day The Boy would go miles out of his way
rather than pass Dr. Castle’s house. . Personally Dr.
Castle was a delightful man, who told The Boy
amusing stories, which The Boy could not laugh at
while his mouth was wide open. But professionally
Dr. Castle was to The Boy an awful horror, of whom
he always dreamed when his dreams were particu-
larly bad. As he looks back upon his boyhood, with
its frequent toothache and its long hours in the den-
tists’ chairs, The Boy sometimes thinks that if he had
his life to live over again, and could not go through
it without teeth, he would prefer not to be born at
all!

It has rather amused The Boy, in his middle age,
to learn of the impressions he made upon Red Hook
in his extreme youth. Bob, as has been shown,
associates him with a little cart, and with a good
deal of the concord of sweet sounds. One old friend

remembers nothing but his phenomenal capacity for
4



50 A BOY I KNEW

the consumption of chicken pot-pie. Another old
friend can recall the scrupulously clean white duck
suits which he wore of afternoons, and also the blue-
checked long apron which he was forced to wear in
the mornings; both of them exceedingly distasteful
to The Boy, because the apron was a girl’s garment,
and because the duck suit meant “dress-up,” and only
the mildest of genteel play ; while Bob’s sister dwells
chiefly now upon the wonderful valentine The Boy
sent once to Zillah Crane. It was so large that it
had to have an especial envelope made to fit it; and
it was so magnificent, and so delicate, that, notwith-
standing the envelope, it came in a box of its own.
It had actual lace, and pinkish Cupids reclining on
light-blue clouds; and in the centre of all was a com-
pressible bird-cage, which, when it was pulled out,
like an accordion, displayed not a dove merely, but
a plain gold ring—a real ring, made of real gold.
Nothing like it had ever been seen before in all
Dutchess County; and it was seen and envied by
every girl of Zillah’s age between Rhinebeck and
Tivoli, between Barrytown and Pine Plains.

The Boy did an extensive business in the valentine
line, in the days when February Fourteenth meant
much more to boys than it does now. He sent
sentimental valentines to Phoebe Hawkins and comic
valentines to Ann Hughes, both of them written
anonymously, and both directed in a disguised hand.



A BOY I KNEW 51

But both recipients always knew from whom they
came; and, in all probability, neither of them was
much affected by the receipt. The Boy, as he has
put on record elsewhere, never really, in his inmost
heart, thought that comic valentines were so very
comic, because those that came to him usually re-
flected upon his nose, or were illuminated with por-
traits of gentlemen of all ages adorned with super-
naturally red hair.

In later years, when Bob and The Boy could swim—
a little—and had learned to take care of themselves
in water over their heads, the mill-pond at Red Hook
played an important part in their daily life there.
They sailed it, and fished it, and camped out on its
banks, with Ed Curtis— before Ed went to West
Point — and with Dick Hawley, Josie Briggs, and
Frank Rodgers, all first-rate fellows. But that is
another story.

The Boy was asked, a year or two ago, to write
a paper upon “The Books of his Boyhood.” And
when he came to think the matter over he discov-
ered, to his surprise, that the Books of his Boyhood
consisted of but one book! It was bound in two
twelvemo green cloth volumes; it bore the date of
1850, and it was filled with pictorial illustrations of
“The Personal History and Experiences of David
Copperfield, the Younger.” It was the first book
The Boy ever read, and he thought then, and some-



52 A BOY I KNEW

times he thinks now, that it was the greatest book
ever written. The traditional books of the childhood
of other children came later to The Boy: “ Robinson
Crusoe,” and the celebrated “Swiss Family” of the
same. name; “The Desert Home,” of Mayne Reid ;
Marryat’s “Peter Simple”; “The Leather Stocking
Tales” ; “Rob Roy”; and “The Three Guardsmen”
were well thumbed and well liked; but they were
not The Boy’s first love in fiction, and they never
usurped, in his affections, the place of the true ac-
count of David Copperfield. It was a queer book
to have absorbed the time and attention of a boy of
eight or nine, who had to skip the big words, who
did not understand it all, but who cried, as he has
cried but once since, whenever he came to that
dreadful chapter which tells the story of the taking
away of David’s mother, and of David’s utter, hope-
less desolation over his loss.

How the book came into The Boy’s possession he
cannot now remember, nor is he sure that his parents
realized how much, or how often, he was engrossed
in its contents. It cheered him in the measles, it
comforted him in the mumps. He took it to school
with him, and he took it to bed with him; and he
read it, over and over again, especially the early
chapters; for he did not care so much for David
after David became Trotwood, and fell in love.

When, in 1852, after his grandfather’s death, The



A BOY I KNEW 53

Boy first saw London, it was not the London of the
Romans, the Saxons, or the Normans, or the London
of the Plantagenets or the Tudors, but the London
of the Micawbers and the Traddleses, the London of
Murdstone and Grinby, the London of Dora’s Aunt
and of Jip. On his arrival at Euston Station the
first object upon which his eyes fell was a donkey-
cart, a large wooden tray on wheels, driven, at a
rapid pace, by a long-legged young man, and fol-
lowed, at a pace hardly so rapid, by a boy of about
his own age, who seemed in great mental distress.
This was the opening scene. And London, from
that moment, became to him, and still remains, a
great moving panorama of David Copperfield.

He saw the Orfling, that first evening, snorting
along Tottenham Court Road; he saw Mealy Pota-
toes, in a ragged apron and a paper cap, lounging
along Broad Street ; he saw Martha disappear swiftly
and silently into one of the dirty streets leading from

Seven Dials; he saw innumerable public-houses—the
Lion, or the Lion and something else—in any one of
which David might have consumed that memorable
glass of Genuine Stunning ale with a good head on
it. As they drove through St. Martin’s Lane, and
past a court at the back of the church, he even got
a glimpse of the exterior of the shop where was sold
a special pudding, made of currants, but dear; a two-
pennyworth being no larger than a pennyworth of



54 A BOY I KNEW

more ordinary pudding at any other establishment
in the neighborhood. And, to crown all, when he
looked out of his back bedroom window, at Morley’s
Hotel, he discovered that he was looking at the
actual bedroom windows of the Golden Cross on
the Strand, in which Steerforth and little Copper-
field had that disastrous meeting which indirectly
brought so much sorrow to so many innocent men
and women.

This was but the beginning of countless similar
experiences, and the beginning of a love for Land-
marks of a more important but hardly of a more de-
lightful character. Hungerford Market and Hunger-
ford Stairs, with the blacking- warehouse abutting
on the water when the tide was in, and on the mud
when the tide was out, still stood near Morley’s in
1852; and very close to them stood then, and still
stands to-day, the old house in Buckingham Street,
Adelphi, where, with Mrs. Crupp, Trotwood Copper-
field found his lodgings when he began his new life
with Spenlow and Jorkins. These chambers, once
the home of Clarkson Stanfield, and since of Mr.
William Black and of Dr. B. E. Martin, became, in
later days, very familiar to The Boy, and still are
haunted by the great crowd of the ghosts of the
past. The Boy has seen there, within a few years,
and with his eyes wide open, the spirits of Traddles,
of Micawher, of Steerforth, of Mr. Dick, of Clara



A BOY I KNEW 55

Peggotty and Daniel, of Uriah Heep—the last slept
one evening on the sofa pillows before the fire, you
may remember—and of Aunt Betsy herself. But in
1852 he could only look at the outside of the house,
and, now and then, when the door was open, get a
glimpse of the stairs down which some one fell and
rolled, one evening, when somebody else said it was
Copperfield !

The Boy never walked along the streets of Lon-
don by his father’s side during that memorable
summer without meeting, in fancy, some friend of
David’s, without passing some spot that David knew,
and loved, or hated. And he recognized St. Paul’s
Cathedral at the first glance, because it had figured
as an illustration on the cover of Peggotty’s work-
box!

Perhaps the event which gave him the greatest
pleasure was a casual meeting with little Miss
Moucher in a green omnibus coming from the top of
Baker Street to Trafalgar Square. It could not pos-
sibly have been anybody else. There were the same
large head and face, the same short arms. “ Throat
she had none; waist she had none; legs she had
none, worth mentioning.” The Boy can still hear the
pattering of the rain on the rattly windows of that
lumbering green omnibus; he can remember every
detail of the impressive drive ; and Miss Moucher, and
the fact of her existence in the flesh, and there present,



56 A BOY I KNEW

wiped from his mind every trace of Mme. Tussaud’s
famous gallery, and the waxworks it contained.

This was the Book of The Boy’s Boyhood. He.
does not recommend it as the exclusive literature of
their boyhood to other boys; but out of it The Boy
knows that he got nothing but what was healthful
and helping. It taught him to abominate selfish
brutality and sneaking falsehood, as they were ex-
hibited in the Murdstones and the Heeps; it taught
him to keep Charles I., and other fads, out of his
“ Memorials” ; it taught him to avoid rash expendi-
ture as it was practised by the Micawbers; it showed
him that a man like Steerforth might be the best of
good fellows and at the same time the worst and
most dangerous of companions; it showed, on the
other hand, that true friends like Traddles are worth
having and worth keeping; it introduced him to the
devoted, sisterly affection of a woman like Agnes;
and it proved to him that the rough pea-jacket of a
man like Ham Peggotty might cover the simple
heart of as honest a gentleman as ever lived.

The Boy, in his time, has been brought in contact
with many famous men and women ; but upon noth-
ing in his whole experience does he look back now
with greater satisfaction than upon his slight inter-
course with the first great man he ever knew. Quite
a little lad, he was staying at the Pulaski House in
Savannah, in 1853—perhaps it was in 1855—when







THE BOY’S FATHER



A BOY I KNEW BY

his father told him to observe particularly the old
gentleman with the spectacles, who occupied a seat
at their table in the public dining-room ; for, he said,
the time would come when The Boy would be very
proud to say that he had breakfasted, and dined, and
supped with Mr. Thackeray. He had no idea who,
or what, Mr. Thackeray was; but his father con-
sidered him a great man, and that was enough for
The Boy. He did pay particular attention to Mr.
Thackeray, with his eyes and his ears; and one
morning Mr. Thackeray paid a little attention to
him, of which he is proud, indeed. Mr. Thackeray
took The Boy between his knees, and asked his
name, and what he intended to be when he grew up.
He replied, “ A farmer, sir.” Why, he cannot im-
agine, for he never had the slightest inclination
towards a farmer’s life. And then Mr. Thackeray
put his gentle hand upon The Boy’s little red head,
and said: “Whatever you are, try to be a good one.”

To have been blessed by Thackeray is a distinction
The Boy would not exchange for any niche in the
Temple of Literary Fame ; no laurel crown he could
ever receive would be able to obliterate, or to equal,
the sense of Thackeray’s touch ; and if there be any
virtue in the laying on of hands The Boy can only
hope that a little of it has descended upon him.

And whatever The Boy is, he has tried, for Thack-
eray’s sake, “to be a good one!”









FOUR DOGS



WHISKIE
AN EAU DE VIE

In doggerel lines, Whiskie my dog I sing.

These lines are after Virgil, Pope, or some one,
His very voice has got a Whiskie Ring.

I call him Whiskie, ’cause he’s such a rum one,

His is a high-whine, and his nip has power,
Hot-Scotch his temper, but no Punch is merrier ;
Not Rye, not Schnappish, he’s no Whiskie-Sour.
I call him Whiskie—he’s a Whis-Skye terrier.



FOUR DOGS

T was Dr. John Brown, of Edinboro’, who once
spoke in sincere sympathy of the man who “led
a dog-less life.’ It was Mr. “Josh Billings” who
said that in the whole history of the world there is
but one thing that money cannot buy, to wit: the
wag of a dog’s tail. And it was Professor John C.
Van Dyke who declared the other day, in reviewing
the artistic career of Landseer, that he made his dogs
too human. It was the Great Creator himself who
made dogs too human—so human that sometimes
they put humanity to shame.

The Boy has been the friend and confidant of
Four Dogs who have helped to humanize him for a
quarter of a century and more, and who have souls
to be saved, he is sure. And when he crosses the
Stygian River he expects to find, on the other shore,
a trio of dogs wagging their tails almost off, in their
joy at his coming, and with honest tongues hanging
out to lick his hands and his feet. And then he is



62 FOUR DOGS

going, with these faithful, devoted dogs at his heels,
to talk about dogs with Dr. John Brown, Sir Edwin
Landseer, and Mr. “ Josh Billings.”

The first dog, Whiskie, was an alleged Skye ter-
rier, coming, alas! from a clouded, not a clear, sky.
He had the most beautiful and the most perfect head
ever seen on a dog, but his legs were altogether too
long; and the rest of him was—just dog. He came
into the family in 1867 or 1868. He was, at the be-
ginning, not popular with the seniors; but he was
so honest, so ingenuous, so “square,” that he made
himself irresistible, and he soon became even dearer
to the father and to the mother than he was to The
Boy. Whiskie was not an amiable character, except
to his own people. He hated everybody else, he
barked at everybody else, and sometimes he bit
everybody else—friends of the household as well as
the butcher-boys, the baker-boys, and the borrowers
of money who came to the door. He had no dis-
crimination in his likes and dislikes, and, naturally,
he was not popular, except among his own people.
He hated all cats but his own cat, by whom he was
bullied in a most outrageous way. Whiskie had the
sense of shame and the sense of humor.

One warm summer evening, the family was sitting
on the front steps, after a refreshing shower of rain,
when Whiskie saw a cat in the street, picking its
dainty way among the little puddles of water. With









WHISKIE



FOUR DOGS 63

a muttered curse he dashed after the cat without
discovering, until within a few feet of it, that it was
- the cat who belonged to him. He tried to stop him-
self in his impetuous career, he put on all his brakes,
literally skimming along the street railway-track as
if he were out simply for a slide, passing the cat, who
gave him a half-contemptuous, half-pitying look ; and
then, after inspecting the sky to see if the rain was
really over and how the wind was, he came back to
his place between the father and The Boy as if it
were all a matter of course and of every-day occur-
rence. But he knew they were laughing at him;
and if ever a dog felt sheepish, and looked sheepish
—if ever a dog said, “ What an idiot ve made of
myself!” Whiskie was that dog.

The cat was a martinet in her way, and she de-
manded all the privileges of her sex. Whiskie al-
ways gave her precedence, and once when he, for a
moment, forgot himself and started to go out of the
dining-room door before her, she deliberately slapped
him in the face; whereupon he drew back instantly,
like the gentleman he was, and waited for her to
pass. :

Whiskie was fourteen or fifteen years of age in
1882, when the mother went to join the father, and
The Boy was taken to Spain by a good aunt and
cousins. Whiskie was left at home to keep house
with the two old servants who had known him all his



Full Text


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EVENT '2011-12-21T04:39:27-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2013-12-14T12:16:23-05:00'
xml resolution
'35' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNB' 'sip-files00001.txt'
7f0f75011619c65bf819eadd9ceedd40
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'2011-12-21T04:36:22-05:00'
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882d15176fd89abe87e87cf282255185
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'2011-12-21T04:39:55-05:00'
describe
'152' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNE' 'sip-files00011.txt'
eccb32a29c1aa72fdc2a71d40565dad8
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describe
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933f0667d33be56081d474d3daeb27d4
ad199670aeb7e1f9587253b67a82d4fc6cbd28bd
'2011-12-21T04:38:38-05:00'
describe
'162' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNG' 'sip-files00013.txt'
e5b841144eef4e43086e67799f4d1f87
abca0045a464dc1478da5e8983ccbece135bda9e
'2011-12-21T04:36:30-05:00'
describe
'233' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNH' 'sip-files00015.txt'
951916e0d015777e76ad57caade1df58
6003b7640cf0f61cdc9ab0436247f6470ee2d67b
'2011-12-21T04:39:17-05:00'
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNI' 'sip-files00017.txt'
be6ca974fee9ed8384cf11d8311cbabf
8339e43a631d6b1af23466059b093e1e042ead6b
'2011-12-21T04:39:12-05:00'
describe
'650' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNJ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
9783ba9cf41260bf9398daa25b9e8366
109c53ac8b0a49725a6ab72a4dd073045b4bdcda
'2011-12-21T04:38:25-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'1039' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNK' 'sip-files00019.txt'
1becf36c919cf0acd96fe4ad2bb79b75
4a4bece51f71033cde2ff9220769b14e09b53b12
'2011-12-21T04:39:41-05:00'
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNL' 'sip-files00020.txt'
abc5cfaa9444d31c3465051d9d404d89
71647e46a56ca82c22f1f3eb22a87a13ccab53a8
'2011-12-21T04:36:53-05:00'
describe
'43' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNM' 'sip-files00021.txt'
6b2271c2ee52b8e6d8120c16891534d3
d197280d8804d7bba912f55a7a3f18a6de7069ac
'2011-12-21T04:37:55-05:00'
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNN' 'sip-files00023.txt'
4f17dcd85ab4c42b57cabd2cf7921c22
2295acf7f5bad98c209efa27939be75512de89f4
'2011-12-21T04:38:18-05:00'
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNO' 'sip-files00024.txt'
54b629186d52bad97b8f2728d536ac82
a86d7b1cf2892fcf71310558697de980bf034caa
'2011-12-21T04:39:38-05:00'
describe
'137' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNP' 'sip-files00025.txt'
b9c1120a281ac9ced60e24ae1d4fe6f2
48018543859f15302cfe3d31ed060210e891d6d2
'2011-12-21T04:38:33-05:00'
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNQ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
8c9214bce1cb88b88a5f7bfcb3d4f5af
26bac9cfd469071e66f04c7df46571c10cd1df01
'2011-12-21T04:38:45-05:00'
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNR' 'sip-files00028.txt'
db07bbf3826609b13469f2482cc9bf67
2116241c5c29bac9bb8556a0fb9a4b541fe25971
'2011-12-21T04:37:18-05:00'
describe
'143' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNS' 'sip-files00029.txt'
bf5e1a8895351532637f0eb900cea87a
41bc7cd941e3329af2d12a2ea47c178a72da8aca
'2011-12-21T04:35:57-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1411' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNT' 'sip-files00031.txt'
4fe839560b8abc2a1b205f96e2ea84fe
ba4c3aa344949d3ee0da6da67161b227b4fb264f
'2011-12-21T04:38:46-05:00'
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNU' 'sip-files00032.txt'
a7933495e7875ccf5b3d8f678758bca7
8c3601e8ab773e37cf73e55ff343bc59f65f63ff
'2011-12-21T04:39:15-05:00'
describe
'93' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNV' 'sip-files00033.txt'
bf8656e672ec4a7816ff9d488a68fac9
c565d7f51720b1296cce41953ff22bca5c97989e
'2011-12-21T04:37:59-05:00'
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNW' 'sip-files00035.txt'
6abbaf77e7a22715f346eab2bfaf1be3
5f793dd6125a8033dec5f7b1fb36a7b00bbb88c7
'2011-12-21T04:39:29-05:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNX' 'sip-files00036.txt'
cfd73dac468445ed099166b3d7eceab0
0be21c40ae619f02dc9962c0cc6a2ab00e147a1e
'2011-12-21T04:39:43-05:00'
describe
'133' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNY' 'sip-files00037.txt'
694594280d4e121a62dcbe2c7f32d9fa
ec139d364a257c7c3f3d0b5ee4234fe950f48522
'2011-12-21T04:37:50-05:00'
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACNZ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
b6ca1959c2c8ea757b897a706f21e2af
6e2d79b75d22e76e31402b140c9071570212a0cc
'2011-12-21T04:36:48-05:00'
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOA' 'sip-files00040.txt'
f6c2af549f2527b47f89810134b73cf3
a72611d0f14829e226b4b0e5ebc7f5b4c7e6fb2b
'2011-12-21T04:35:52-05:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOB' 'sip-files00041.txt'
fc203d078f4898f1b23eaf529759d517
d4781a972bcd6d51d0a1c200ebd88731577e38ef
'2011-12-21T04:38:04-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1403' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOC' 'sip-files00043.txt'
ce8a8432de5e07e42a92f0f3b3c0d403
9a6196a13780c4da14b9f9b6494d26d730aeaedc
'2011-12-21T04:38:24-05:00'
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOD' 'sip-files00044.txt'
d174ca9a4c35e7a63d42d4318e6f5751
b2c146f45f6b57718df4d792e7c9fdeaf007f19d
'2011-12-21T04:36:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOE' 'sip-files00045.txt'
a71dd0f057fbe86b8a1b0c780660c353
c68efec927d2f39f34ebe651517aa513f71df815
'2011-12-21T04:39:23-05:00'
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOF' 'sip-files00047.txt'
3fe216234be75425580852f510a6ba96
a0792c806484cadf1405e1afa21a6464ddb9e622
'2011-12-21T04:36:15-05:00'
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOG' 'sip-files00048.txt'
db1337272d6d23fcc179d5b1bcfdca48
e8e153cda5a44018c1031a1043ede739928e902a
'2011-12-21T04:37:16-05:00'
describe
'78' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOH' 'sip-files00049.txt'
f113fc3be3cbf8f9ab40eb86f1413a95
0384474cd9b2295f7b738e12b4ad397054394066
'2011-12-21T04:39:45-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOI' 'sip-files00051.txt'
c659ad628202f8b38d3fdde90d03ffbb
e366cbaa11910371d23f0122a1f749fddc492ef3
'2011-12-21T04:37:39-05:00'
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOJ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
b1ea886aa197004941a27ddf22b770f9
e48ba589ae75f4c03bfbd2b94da5834593e738ae
'2011-12-21T04:39:52-05:00'
describe
'129' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOK' 'sip-files00053.txt'
576927a0fc2429938468354c4a8a5f70
bbb11d490b4b258d8901c78cff50edf3895a0a6d
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOL' 'sip-files00055.txt'
92d22352d92662704a523c8311231fff
d01e0fb8cb221e7244d8250c68decbd7067c4807
'2011-12-21T04:36:52-05:00'
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOM' 'sip-files00056.txt'
6ba39ef94c23e4575552b7988f8f2f8a
f4e36a36ba23f7ae76a12210bbb5d76a41bb59c1
'2011-12-21T04:38:32-05:00'
describe
'161' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACON' 'sip-files00057.txt'
ada346b217cd65dd6356e640ea6fd8e0
800ca8e7317ea467e1eabc4254a538d13c54c179
'2011-12-21T04:38:51-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOO' 'sip-files00059.txt'
8db28b5f30acdde25624afa8340ce23f
be89d696bf4be507fb2564c8dd687522e06ed4d1
'2011-12-21T04:38:03-05:00'
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOP' 'sip-files00060.txt'
9d142c4d33285a21e0b6d6e0542d480e
819f8d3a9f227b4cf68d97f91b5dfcfaad8fc586
'2011-12-21T04:35:40-05:00'
describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOQ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
4522ec56174826869d01c89b71fd0f23
e4d8eecb52670d06177323921057b4269c0d434f
'2011-12-21T04:37:27-05:00'
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOR' 'sip-files00063.txt'
8dfda6f513d07bb59f533931d5902cb3
c5cf4c1291c9ff02c1091803de5408c6eafe613b
'2011-12-21T04:36:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOS' 'sip-files00064.txt'
bb8862d554efcd86890f97164e590c81
04e12000ab4fa1942f8bf25e92ab5c3b88d71506
'2011-12-21T04:36:00-05:00'
describe
'61' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOT' 'sip-files00065.txt'
8532960ecc7592e1049d310178d07cda
0a9e6b031bdd52c818d645cf4b208bddb5969434
'2011-12-21T04:39:18-05:00'
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOU' 'sip-files00067.txt'
6ec52c6d34b1fe0dd44f3c52f954adec
413dc4ed44404399cce8d0a963bdff7aa84eb3c5
'2011-12-21T04:35:43-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOV' 'sip-files00068.txt'
5d980f5629f04557b0fb89bfd5297273
35c2cb7a95f0898357c3cf226e5fd9f2f46aa674
'2011-12-21T04:37:43-05:00'
describe
'108' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOW' 'sip-files00069.txt'
c418eaadf24eb53bf385393e61eaac8a
09f7e5c07a88e73d23984b3a00cbd06acaec6828
'2011-12-21T04:37:20-05:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOX' 'sip-files00071.txt'
4c4e52ab35cb1b149357f0042dd9f340
f8cbfedd424ecf5a45f6e72e31218c1669ce8d94
'2011-12-21T04:35:42-05:00'
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOY' 'sip-files00072.txt'
379b58692a466818bb1d516c070201f1
90d78f4281f9204b41498f851fdb95ee6597d499
'2011-12-21T04:35:44-05:00'
describe
'80' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACOZ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
5968b928b32c2238ce5aaf9bafd7f32f
c919aa4f4133a32bce011abcb9e451bd171262e7
'2011-12-21T04:38:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPA' 'sip-files00075.txt'
983d7d90da55776f52f5844fd92f1ef5
ab51d3335b0b059f7a8ff8b540a1a863087f2540
'2011-12-21T04:39:59-05:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPB' 'sip-files00076.txt'
8c6f618f5d8e23a0a973386d56ccf260
5f452b75944c7731f9c16ea13c6743b3e9dbebca
'2011-12-21T04:36:09-05:00'
describe
'132' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPC' 'sip-files00077.txt'
29cd68f0681babc13012733960967f50
b12e22669214d69206ea80247ba9964cf8b43345
'2011-12-21T04:39:05-05:00'
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPD' 'sip-files00079.txt'
104c6a829e3e73f8ec41068c006cf9f1
3a4ba09586d96e31b75ee1d4a148bbe1ee414ee8
'2011-12-21T04:36:20-05:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPE' 'sip-files00080.txt'
a1b44cedb00125d154f0083f02c321c5
04eb04d615b09e0e1bdc536d19bb9d22bc63cef9
'2011-12-21T04:35:49-05:00'
describe
'130' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPF' 'sip-files00081.txt'
ccc9381791db581335d8e049bb44333c
e69ef4f13fc6b03f12ffa5d3398a608741d61925
'2011-12-21T04:37:58-05:00'
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPG' 'sip-files00083.txt'
dc93b20469fdc57ee3efcc2b8bbb32fe
679913b76d65034a009f7aa7ccdcc5952b6adb4f
'2011-12-21T04:39:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPH' 'sip-files00084.txt'
cfa1891ea80878e81e4dfd04192f9358
bb55a6522acabf80d82a360c550c17425d349374
'2011-12-21T04:38:37-05:00'
describe
'94' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPI' 'sip-files00085.txt'
ecfa8d53a3aa47176e64700bbc932ebd
6d0c6f3789ed4b0a9b515e38e9f4e536807ec1a4
'2011-12-21T04:35:54-05:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPJ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
290022c85b7be275ff3ee52b0bc0e5e7
bf365a5733d4c4d8b22a4e27fe7ba72ccae9dde6
'2011-12-21T04:35:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPK' 'sip-files00088.txt'
e9d660280b9959f1a7989ac1f04f3657
238076f060f5dde23645341e9ac87a9ac278ead9
'2011-12-21T04:39:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPL' 'sip-files00089.txt'
de1118abfef1ece057fc091f2e3be790
09352fb72f775d7752ea1e2fb3010094b2663af9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPM' 'sip-files00091.txt'
8733179370ab51edf586db24038e8959
706b25d4cb56070bcef537e15952874870ac38d0
'2011-12-21T04:39:06-05:00'
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPN' 'sip-files00092.txt'
7be1fc0f8db382aaf40f9bea5349d614
ba6b4292300428efa61bc05632c6f0ee515d20ef
'2011-12-21T04:37:01-05:00'
describe
'53' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPO' 'sip-files00093.txt'
7b235801e31d3ca82be95839c1009ca4
d78b9faa6d028ac4648ed4f6823ec42f461909e5
'2011-12-21T04:37:42-05:00'
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPP' 'sip-files00095.txt'
f854c62bfd83b6404890d98f313ce989
2e0664a30b5c75a076014f759f1fdf7fe86a1219
'2011-12-21T04:36:46-05:00'
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPQ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
4ffcc85d43a4a175f607239803a37477
8466265a634c138a7b04db82cadca429e1e302f7
'2011-12-21T04:36:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPR' 'sip-files00097.txt'
73a1848de72cc978dc04dcf7df188cf3
680281d468f25a0912c19e973a0de119386714aa
'2011-12-21T04:35:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPS' 'sip-files00099.txt'
dba7d2d8f454394590066063baedcbd2
eba3926f4808c4847d37d7490e7a6070809a2fb2
'2011-12-21T04:38:00-05:00'
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPT' 'sip-files00100.txt'
49b53713f3da65ad96ca97bcce43104c
0983be9a6ac4a7c22d6f229ac21a2b31d4765076
'2011-12-21T04:35:38-05:00'
describe
'117' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPU' 'sip-files00101.txt'
352f5d6b450f202f8629a820222a4c5c
67ba8c1f77f7315d5eaf5a9b9cbb62e7a65faf7c
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPV' 'sip-files00103.txt'
5e5fcc99e747e0a98fe240fcf6dfef85
b81de584e1cf7613ea615b9c5bda448b48df97f4
'2011-12-21T04:37:28-05:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPW' 'sip-files00104.txt'
345441d6850084febf9ab5d59942279d
317097b6486888cfb78887910ff7e1ab21cb8f5b
'2011-12-21T04:39:31-05:00'
describe
'101' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPX' 'sip-files00105.txt'
a115d875105f525b996a328ee90df72c
e686fe925b4c3fa3b09c32b6614b82179596dad2
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPY' 'sip-files00107.txt'
9f5c8be5e84aa4794845ca48000341bb
8319453d288116698dc352bc44c3ad2c0a459aca
'2011-12-21T04:35:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACPZ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
7d16a39388b3e8ff08b5890a06b35b8b
6d3efb7dcbffcd7b88baa7c9ac5b5949095b1bb4
'2011-12-21T04:38:14-05:00'
describe
'104' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQA' 'sip-files00109.txt'
2777a50fa8f04c04c31539afd7607222
f2658cff96d854346ab6a8b0991965308964d24d
'2011-12-21T04:38:39-05:00'
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQB' 'sip-files00111.txt'
2177eee20367ab71698bc8f4cd8d2c55
cd4779adcebf2d1daf497fa563ea8108feacb318
'2011-12-21T04:40:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQC' 'sip-files00112.txt'
f07c007caad714d8f2e553651a994207
d1bda26433071e6a67ffd81ac21e3724b6667b67
'2011-12-21T04:35:50-05:00'
describe
'168' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQD' 'sip-files00113.txt'
92f0899123160f19d12c738ee7848556
fb0e31a7d35b1c3cde51d8a199e1b4c406754b80
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQE' 'sip-files00115.txt'
88f454a6d7703d4a66e923ea5c0702de
e767af62cf83347feefc58e258047ac398770107
'2011-12-21T04:38:34-05:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQF' 'sip-files00116.txt'
4dbba75e4ae4e02a9f4faddf498b5688
e19928de51a06d5feb7513655fd9a11077b0e8be
'2011-12-21T04:39:58-05:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQG' 'sip-files00117.txt'
401486a82e368d04bdd91bda62cd8ca7
18248147e5a8cbd1b9b1375bcb1689066ccb5395
'2011-12-21T04:37:17-05:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQH' 'sip-files00118.txt'
56bcd99e5cd2282d8f8cf3780b854f3d
a8c8f6326a6e9e83389c223c51bfa9116f30ab35
'2011-12-21T04:36:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQI' 'sip-files00119.txt'
9d2c08b3faebb68cb9c2a2c114d2825a
f3cec0866e862c7ae65e9e47f52f46862c49b392
'2011-12-21T04:36:23-05:00'
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQJ' 'sip-files00120.txt'
1eae74e2e0b4a13d27a4d61b89bc6f15
c18e5b64e75c897b3dfd39f9a9571a9798750656
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQK' 'sip-files00121.txt'
abe8d64f7cf7cefb5be1703c5c210ff3
da76998f7f41c3d16ad7498aa4d79538fb6429ab
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQL' 'sip-files00122.txt'
0e7379f532492036a13ad2c78a8b9129
305f9047082995848a252e5e40f8ff0eca44f12c
'2011-12-21T04:36:50-05:00'
describe
'121' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQM' 'sip-files00123.txt'
c0042f68f1b6f1691e69718b0acd80c9
fe817b94550d4af2daa7ccbb8740513fb8497693
'2011-12-21T04:37:41-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1441' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQN' 'sip-files00125.txt'
2cfffabf7d33aa998fff4231086d73ab
1e2892f42175a8c32ab368918338b31fc9ac3343
'2011-12-21T04:37:07-05:00'
describe
'48' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQO' 'sip-files00127.txt'
1db7c512b00bed3223b204ef2130c9b3
580b4f087cd9f5787ed6a5d4aa3c254aa9f1dc79
describe
'480' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQP' 'sip-files00128.txt'
3ba6552617564b79e5aceec3f8d83d10
66b90b62fc85a2c50b2aaf16605e681c98e5a59f
'2011-12-21T04:37:52-05:00'
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQQ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
f1779e82cfdfa9e95afc228685473cd9
a0c6dcbf9f4b76c14bf2f5ece64706cec8e26698
'2011-12-21T04:38:07-05:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQR' 'sip-files00130.txt'
00378a5f9aec9a0840070cddd7251b88
c226fca4b17fd99c8ff6902dcdbc024b29b074d1
'2011-12-21T04:40:27-05:00'
describe
'148' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQS' 'sip-files00131.txt'
f606e58191746a99688b87528e1c40bf
ecc219fe19fe130423d03018fe99d48a6d73b20c
'2011-12-21T04:37:21-05:00'
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQT' 'sip-files00133.txt'
9f1b2040ab6a89191db5fd321886066a
e3a7cf8ba4ffdfc7194e3a1eb1aa5985cbba69c9
'2011-12-21T04:36:04-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQU' 'sip-files00134.txt'
11785d23553214661dc179b445f22262
4b7c57ddcea3f28df2c4955155db658288a8d4a6
'2011-12-21T04:40:01-05:00'
describe
'210' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQV' 'sip-files00135.txt'
b7b2825eca19a16c1291fc4642e65a67
bbbb4c5a9331422e0f80ea193eab91c40099c06e
'2011-12-21T04:38:47-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1430' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQW' 'sip-files00137.txt'
a62667f82743905158b4d1e8178ecb32
4500fd0f47e93c9181798b117aa79581d4ebc1b1
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQX' 'sip-files00138.txt'
6b2aa5d3095aebe4a0bc275ce7122ac6
dfbf1882bf211478b622d6d9195aaaed55c639fb
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQY' 'sip-files00139.txt'
a30d64177bdc7720468e96672b94c8c3
76a0e58568cadb1023c71356a10be28341934af7
'2011-12-21T04:39:44-05:00'
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACQZ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
90df284d5a3cd99e5c57f8bb454b3fcf
0fdeded4b018502f5b5ed4c06542e99243ff28ee
'2011-12-21T04:38:49-05:00'
describe
'231' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRA' 'sip-files00141.txt'
4bfba05e8bfa91db8e1aa98e40a993b7
e19ac46ed7bf683137edba146c2ae393de96afbf
describe
Invalid character
'1360' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRB' 'sip-files00143.txt'
a4100645b3f7a33ce3de7d649e33eeda
aaa977d434908dc24ccf9b89ef0c222d09eea1fc
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRC' 'sip-files00144.txt'
ea1b2d66b040819df54ace2e6f6aab1d
f8f5e18f3bc6bd65950742eeb9d7e912dc0fe3da
'2011-12-21T04:35:45-05:00'
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRD' 'sip-files00145.txt'
1a0c4dd3dfcf9ad0e02afc43d39c632d
5660ba9ad542c110f88b101fbb3b85880d0ab09c
'2011-12-21T04:36:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRE' 'sip-files00146.txt'
c44d81fd859e8df65a1fb7da4fbdc5d1
73636bda51bce6da1f221d78f09bed65b31df56f
'2011-12-21T04:40:08-05:00'
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRF' 'sip-files00147.txt'
2b726b12ee27e783cef3b1f57529a784
02c432b3e61a098afa9e259229a8c022316f9e8b
'2011-12-21T04:39:19-05:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRG' 'sip-files00148.txt'
1469ea4f4e191bfbb9c4c58b164f36a8
a1d67503dcfb886b2d7b9f4b74654b531e24e6c6
'2011-12-21T04:36:42-05:00'
describe
'186' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRH' 'sip-files00149.txt'
7cb45d0d9054465b3b50232c769b7987
c6d03c7eefac535bbf0f5867d4bcee76a28935e9
describe
Invalid character
'1434' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRI' 'sip-files00151.txt'
bb9cb25f8b384a35f5bdf8fb716b207e
ad255afd37b2e5372e0fb37a2cb5f17e71e201b7
'2011-12-21T04:37:37-05:00'
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRJ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
1f933f430e1070c17abcaff7a33c434a
5f3d1b9a010d3009f68ff03ad01df3f70fab2b36
describe
'98' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRK' 'sip-files00153.txt'
6327b8a27e166ea7ee118c94a7bf519b
7569dbddde7a8a8bece7973a3cbb70ce2c1416e6
'2011-12-21T04:37:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRL' 'sip-files00155.txt'
90aef55c54cb709c3ae0764c5924de18
8a59f6b0f46a9a98cf3ac7c02fccb70021e70b4c
'2011-12-21T04:35:51-05:00'
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRM' 'sip-files00156.txt'
375ee2a4fcda9aa0500c3b3744cbaf94
7e8fce823c9c4ba36d7bd77a75f8e04c7d1b2f81
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRN' 'sip-files00157.txt'
f35761a06247e95ee95c803db9b38562
a05635b46ab5e75c653c529b1e0f16944cc279ce
'2011-12-21T04:38:16-05:00'
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRO' 'sip-files00158.txt'
5cdb8fab5e8d61d75cf5dced2c430b0b
c17ae905ad6ba845e02a44711a8d1529280edc92
'2011-12-21T04:40:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRP' 'sip-files00159.txt'
13474da06c18a67d5e990ec0960d0053
511b02c995cdc5c29e721949865f396cd67cae08
'2011-12-21T04:36:36-05:00'
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRQ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
9245809478e54ccbfa995606dd0db975
607a37626b4ad9285e070ac519d7f1ee6fcfe81a
'2011-12-21T04:40:22-05:00'
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRR' 'sip-files00162.txt'
bd0f71243d023aaac6c86c96efb2a039
4830b11cb6bce9b4393a33d2c03cf7cc91e7ec42
describe
'287' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRS' 'sip-files00163.txt'
13011b94ef7cfe28f54d1c90ebc44599
bfbb21ac6b70c26d1b636f443189ca69409a1c7d
'2011-12-21T04:36:19-05:00'
describe
'767' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRT' 'sip-files00165.txt'
e2fb05b3708f5d4b0c1ffb739b0a36f6
fcfb3d361aebeff5cc876bee9a7add6fed94edcf
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRU' 'sip-files00166.txt'
55fc4a39861f601b94a4a9cb5f261e53
53d13981b9798efbda3fa5671a6ca810a74acec5
'2011-12-21T04:37:14-05:00'
describe
'82' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRV' 'sip-files00167.txt'
48bcd5f52eac383e2673100fe8bef224
a143d95c6051d0dc8cf92d05e1854a39a0ad0d5a
'2011-12-21T04:38:44-05:00'
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRW' 'sip-files00169.txt'
c85e540f04bce9c02589eb81d49ce3c6
528ee0549d4b99e81bbb1834085ad24522eab58c
'2011-12-21T04:38:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRX' 'sip-files00170.txt'
1ba3eba680498ef7aac1f607c0cf59c6
ef34829a8a4a73966b5087139d493a31dc39f641
'2011-12-21T04:39:39-05:00'
describe
'792' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRY' 'sip-files00171.txt'
1cb4f0df095627a5a0bbbf599ffdf719
4260eaa46515abc79d78ce09340edc1fa90384c0
'2011-12-21T04:39:26-05:00'
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACRZ' 'sip-files00177.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-12-21T04:35:59-05:00'
describe
'426' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSA' 'sip-files00001.pro'
1043d99f29b4a28a82457424bc545980
10d1ab99b6ff58dbf9a8945593bfe6d41429a3cd
'2011-12-21T04:39:47-05:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSB' 'sip-files00002.pro'
1a759a21c65abe8918af1a9ee6ca1986
632e69f57e108577e70301fcf669b1f43f8d8844
'2011-12-21T04:36:05-05:00'
describe
'1819' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSC' 'sip-files00008.pro'
78efa5ce1f65738f5016cf8f1c86d1de
1e48cc025bccefe285cdb2ac97da18f58a3c7558
'2011-12-21T04:35:53-05:00'
describe
'3537' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSD' 'sip-files00011.pro'
7585ade54c6dde9deb16ac72b6fb23e8
a78d4f916dc4e04df16a392e307cf079b83f97e0
'2011-12-21T04:36:07-05:00'
describe
'29273' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSE' 'sip-files00012.pro'
9bf8c22c7938a7122d72a7581027d347
d684f41d221fb3f5f68418baf500a44955e03957
'2011-12-21T04:36:08-05:00'
describe
'2158' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSF' 'sip-files00013.pro'
d14ba4e0d62facf36d46fcb53342d7d8
d1925be022d1d7f2178194c2a1ec2f247cf8d5e4
'2011-12-21T04:39:50-05:00'
describe
'4477' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSG' 'sip-files00015.pro'
7f76b7f9fc02f8dd9303cd9aeacc972f
7525d0e5a6d565488819b67ea0099e60cd76a00e
'2011-12-21T04:36:33-05:00'
describe
'30063' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSH' 'sip-files00017.pro'
d65adf780d28e04e6590f67797bc2977
9593f721e9722659359bd48ae3f1e787dd7b83aa
'2011-12-21T04:37:00-05:00'
describe
'12474' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSI' 'sip-files00018.pro'
d0b365ed3826e125559ca376f4db6043
0864e7fafd4e813b3be31b051b2a4ce84b85db64
describe
'25936' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSJ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
481ba9e13e4d5f357a0df706b0a7582f
3a164f89cd934f38b5e7999b58462380273258ac
describe
'19717' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSK' 'sip-files00020.pro'
7e87597718594b66f5a023d0e6f77922
558e6c19aca916ea77e9b65ee4968e099db8de70
describe
'580' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSL' 'sip-files00021.pro'
ecd5b2e526ea6cbc82dc8db3237a8760
5180b09c52ac64a3b4a5038a9028db4e1523c3c6
'2011-12-21T04:37:35-05:00'
describe
'24362' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSM' 'sip-files00023.pro'
11a6d8e8305c78faa6d0dceafd1c8a03
051b9893f24f21a57ef2017176e16d49ebf63a54
'2011-12-21T04:36:49-05:00'
describe
'36527' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSN' 'sip-files00024.pro'
79108b64719f1b81ae8a0d54ac9a565e
403ce74c863255d46a926cb927d9f892f9b7b5ba
describe
'667' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSO' 'sip-files00025.pro'
4bea5dcc99d5c6ff15e174952d0b679e
ae6494b3868af3df6b066905f89117c5d311d97d
'2011-12-21T04:40:15-05:00'
describe
'35629' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSP' 'sip-files00027.pro'
cce2e557705f6869d2e76f89c3d4fad7
684eb161dad712e9d40f94d89f01370f2a622fc1
describe
'36410' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSQ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
b6dfe2df77ac6f533826463d6be48f69
1a2860ee060649ece637691a1e93f00a0663198c
describe
'2709' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSR' 'sip-files00029.pro'
ee154f01e3642eb152e3f373bfea9e29
32d8b2cad1809a5f3458add0e16dc6ecbe6e7fe8
describe
'35725' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSS' 'sip-files00031.pro'
b9055ddd85674f1201d3b9728d943c79
5348e2e9c16a5ec9a0431926510a686611c2fff0
describe
'36470' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACST' 'sip-files00032.pro'
c6922b946f068d68cca997d6f2648d0e
8374c1572fc3d10bb522ddfd74e86224d45ab53f
'2011-12-21T04:38:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSU' 'sip-files00033.pro'
981787d4d02d36fd8c2b6e980e466888
45f138ad8aa4992186b2d04b1cb19cb8b9e36b7f
describe
'37800' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSV' 'sip-files00035.pro'
7797e171320bfe4a7109e852bfa4d360
1c293d15d329d7f5c20899ec68a6daa91ba25d35
'2011-12-21T04:39:03-05:00'
describe
'36693' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSW' 'sip-files00036.pro'
f9c65b652fd9d99c89fcf0b32167d603
2f2a0c366c66b4cff2c669862cb38fffbeb3ac88
'2011-12-21T04:38:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSX' 'sip-files00037.pro'
28406b3b2a09aeb5d81dd22181dbf215
aacf75fefecfddda59172660c5c418b3dc23d98b
'2011-12-21T04:36:41-05:00'
describe
'35649' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSY' 'sip-files00039.pro'
ad73c856b51c96bbfb6205926b3d9eca
2441738b4a54caad4e0c68c50544a4f44bdfff82
describe
'36667' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACSZ' 'sip-files00040.pro'
c7e71432b5e32a9c12f7de9825dc1557
f7f9c46e96842ea9b2e68321c966928662c38a27
describe
'2889' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTA' 'sip-files00041.pro'
389167f7e0f528f4422c46b9126cf155
ae350bca5f2e705091829acff46561a3e967163e
describe
'35611' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTB' 'sip-files00043.pro'
5288e388699e7a0ffe23f92887caf8cb
6e6518ea3e93169fa9db5403e3a849589eeb8694
'2011-12-21T04:40:34-05:00'
describe
'36085' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTC' 'sip-files00044.pro'
c3ec83b2d22dd40a666e2d0a8c0a7820
76201492e14438555c5e6e89e88491100febb962
'2011-12-21T04:38:54-05:00'
describe
'2029' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTD' 'sip-files00045.pro'
bc097555e842249754067ad3ef7a94a5
00a25f7105a995e3a3cc8b0fa5302306674cca47
'2011-12-21T04:36:16-05:00'
describe
'34605' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTE' 'sip-files00047.pro'
900b111fbe7b2eba8dd74d4f773e6fb7
078c77da275ea103a1e81ed013ad9be7a292432c
'2011-12-21T04:40:02-05:00'
describe
'37030' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTF' 'sip-files00048.pro'
deb704ecbb09dfba3aed31fc16dfa7ad
edf2fd5490b3e09aa8c1b46ea7a03a0bcfa03b92
'2011-12-21T04:37:48-05:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTG' 'sip-files00049.pro'
f468721296e0d3b3e0c920a884b3e549
fe7b7b610d1a774bcc5fa044f72484a64a8fd9bb
'2011-12-21T04:40:33-05:00'
describe
'35664' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTH' 'sip-files00051.pro'
63bb47c8540a658d4edef73ab567bc55
4ac703669e146eac3901350503354ac95abcf7be
'2011-12-21T04:37:38-05:00'
describe
'37390' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTI' 'sip-files00052.pro'
3460f4253dce4a1b8b7d9b5dee545bbc
cacfe0a247c500cdf1c9bb4d153c99eea980f677
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTJ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
ba356574a5d4c731d8544aba1fbbc633
b9410a3914fd6faf5f6bd15e6b3e9069655a4a06
'2011-12-21T04:37:57-05:00'
describe
'36067' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTK' 'sip-files00055.pro'
bf805bbdd2e4b73c33b749a686cd147c
0375dfc62cf94148f68374a286d1ac575ab4c023
describe
'37207' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTL' 'sip-files00056.pro'
8c79a321abb4e0aa2b9853e0af70a9ba
4df96fb48732d073a8dd921e3dac129aa54d5680
describe
'2255' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTM' 'sip-files00057.pro'
972d1668461c2e12027dd7959d2c07bf
b43fd49c67d93b4c6514ea34e956f54300e4dbdc
describe
'36177' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTN' 'sip-files00059.pro'
dfb950cc325c7eb5435b41f89e1c5e0e
083471bced75ab4b5b3f2752dbd994c17cc5a4d0
'2011-12-21T04:38:27-05:00'
describe
'37011' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTO' 'sip-files00060.pro'
9d14fe3ffd07b79033ef510f3b280175
18948dd16e54a2879a9a544d61591c2ffbd8ffc0
'2011-12-21T04:39:24-05:00'
describe
'3971' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTP' 'sip-files00061.pro'
8471fb4c242da08e00a0f1fa1e2c14bb
8e3c15c7a49ab607d7823e520e6145571cec9755
describe
'34763' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTQ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
ac4de15bdebf32a842c9316c90ffe752
67e2fcc81ef3ce01251ff61163852d28f775da35
'2011-12-21T04:37:04-05:00'
describe
'36278' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTR' 'sip-files00064.pro'
18858ecde2da4d50ad02140f92b528c7
e182468a012a07bcc169e28f35b21fac364e12da
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTS' 'sip-files00065.pro'
3f7aefc377f32cf6c429c3db2c3576f9
91c69f4f07f587ffae50f0a2e678b9c60bf6b6c1
describe
'35898' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTT' 'sip-files00067.pro'
f7b84bae5770806fb0569a84fe16b51c
371b469822d9b11e1a0d28a068f049f45468f324
describe
'35098' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTU' 'sip-files00068.pro'
6c5bd605938cb987b2e6606423017f77
2e992906cb4d8c623edeccd32ee4cf4a3210f6d8
'2011-12-21T04:35:36-05:00'
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTV' 'sip-files00069.pro'
fee668b1cade1bd824d17578e15a7bbc
2100cffe89326b564f7b9603a34e0a4c446c3125
'2011-12-21T04:39:02-05:00'
describe
'36631' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTW' 'sip-files00071.pro'
dbcd35c52173598a7e0081aa7bccb83e
48e6dcfa4f11fa33a958eceb3728217c3a7256df
describe
'35377' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTX' 'sip-files00072.pro'
f0199222d480de50373ee085c9e021e7
415fb74831ae5f6e5f3134fdd849be55bfc2c8b8
'2011-12-21T04:36:38-05:00'
describe
'848' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTY' 'sip-files00073.pro'
9ae4e0057c37cdecd802483a13c4d045
90e678899299416ea0517406dc8bb112b51451e3
'2011-12-21T04:40:18-05:00'
describe
'37807' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACTZ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
662e331905f83141974ac93976f91a4d
d5b0795b4f3f04de43ba052ac1283c3ee975ac8d
'2011-12-21T04:38:40-05:00'
describe
'35060' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUA' 'sip-files00076.pro'
a8fcf1e63c403858b6fcfda3cdeabd7c
fa0dddf2575aa1c0dc369d4553f4c049df602c06
'2011-12-21T04:40:19-05:00'
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUB' 'sip-files00077.pro'
cb27d365e300acd6b444e7a96f2e81d0
4a0a762d2ae04ef2a47138166be20cd673747880
'2011-12-21T04:39:32-05:00'
describe
'36335' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUC' 'sip-files00079.pro'
f3487fbb4dcaa0fa3a38507256073824
bb1745a654c8cd25fa852d7d401688a0c02efe4e
'2011-12-21T04:37:33-05:00'
describe
'35731' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUD' 'sip-files00080.pro'
31abc29cc678efa296633c924de733f4
28d14b6f1670db6b3d48b9e1eb19c6064992c1f2
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUE' 'sip-files00081.pro'
ef886cd03cd1ffeae464eea0587b89a5
27ff57f110bd6b1e3557ebfd420c9612e50c6281
'2011-12-21T04:36:25-05:00'
describe
'36071' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUF' 'sip-files00083.pro'
f19ab44c384a3b3b84e267c1a45c04de
75e09174e762c907ddd941bb9487e14bb9b9948b
'2011-12-21T04:37:31-05:00'
describe
'37319' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUG' 'sip-files00084.pro'
8f2713a123c18fe4b65510a75176ea53
7610f461a5d3c56fe392237f4a7d20be9e44da13
'2011-12-21T04:39:46-05:00'
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUH' 'sip-files00085.pro'
1ad269e4fad8b295c8f0c1f7662ea5b0
9584e1d18fad37138fa8579aeef310cd14a2f701
'2011-12-21T04:36:02-05:00'
describe
'34825' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUI' 'sip-files00087.pro'
bb8f826ffe0cec154f64f6446fc06962
4102abff509c3bddf04e212411ec945ebe49dda2
describe
'36578' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUJ' 'sip-files00088.pro'
eb4b7d00dd337d4bd1746ce35b219f62
26137e2ea246f412277f491b7d2ad34d624001e2
describe
'1925' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUK' 'sip-files00089.pro'
c2861549cccb0b3ef3024d08039a2c4b
93f50534293436da38b97bc9ed303289f9544b6a
describe
'37374' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUL' 'sip-files00091.pro'
5180dbc7e830df99b621545f75851ea7
449e0f5c56b806fe85d8ca47c1e08d9af90b9a52
describe
'36395' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUM' 'sip-files00092.pro'
d5049efa38f23edfa2d4db8af76c7b30
bc8cbaac8b92aaeefe28a3b4637f3c8540fc922b
'2011-12-21T04:38:20-05:00'
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUN' 'sip-files00093.pro'
6e995f3b660e20cd4dfa6e4e2749411d
38d8a725ce1ad2750d0efee45c5a2f231ad5a0af
'2011-12-21T04:37:23-05:00'
describe
'36882' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUO' 'sip-files00095.pro'
6b3a07d39196a371bfb831a4fe391eb3
af195127e375edbd04fe1a84590fb90f1e92a10e
describe
'35600' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUP' 'sip-files00096.pro'
440f065e39a4f4b31b9b5805d60b0165
c980929e69aac367b404cd75d21a0026b999991f
describe
'666' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUQ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
06de49c036e679ee64d9b0982dbaf8c9
f86eb610eed60882a0d4242c6dc4b2e1dedfc545
'2011-12-21T04:39:48-05:00'
describe
'37386' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUR' 'sip-files00099.pro'
f54b194890a00161db248deadc7d8c3c
09280b670ebb2cbc8e4a9079a24ccdf850f5c56f
'2011-12-21T04:40:36-05:00'
describe
'27977' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUS' 'sip-files00100.pro'
ec05b277abef3d96c9d19121091542bb
ac1f32e2d63342ed87b480b96be2d9472b7d6434
describe
'517' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUT' 'sip-files00101.pro'
373847bd10ec2a39630184c1f7bc72d3
bdfd6553609b990f7026767270c3572a20ca2150
describe
'35383' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUU' 'sip-files00103.pro'
ca6e3fc9cb6ce77811bc03bcb916e6bc
6531595b42b81d65d7762151ebeb011b24e598ee
describe
'35398' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUV' 'sip-files00104.pro'
dac69250fd4be9495f1a9de649d9fd43
3b9b50c95976fd05a04739769e5bec7ed24b7959
'2011-12-21T04:37:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUW' 'sip-files00105.pro'
c0471e1abe44bc4aaec8f2accb0abce0
c68302fa188faf373154ff81cfcd7ddfda77d11a
describe
'35961' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUX' 'sip-files00107.pro'
017faa688962bbe122e33714b56b6a85
62e0d6ede6518bfb57c6364b0b3dacc5efb8ba0f
'2011-12-21T04:38:15-05:00'
describe
'35512' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUY' 'sip-files00108.pro'
439ea40937d4542f759d45ce0793040f
5c6bbc33e9dc8742e8d3cc868ac7fb02496a8543
'2011-12-21T04:35:39-05:00'
describe
'592' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACUZ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
8257843689787554acec0d9f5dcd1af8
ce806372dc292155719496a0d2b5c86e54e52ad1
'2011-12-21T04:36:56-05:00'
describe
'37026' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVA' 'sip-files00111.pro'
0c3b21b7649ace9928a56d1df795ede9
58645c44367917093d1560b2b9e22de015848e0a
describe
'35767' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVB' 'sip-files00112.pro'
648e8724d6ed405cf365fb184d87e148
e35c2b02910b70224e4230a75ccc3c356374929d
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVC' 'sip-files00113.pro'
ce94caa5b93744e4cc3d132d3123699a
697b0dd97a83e0d3df5572c8e0ef028cec6b5073
'2011-12-21T04:37:13-05:00'
describe
'35280' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVD' 'sip-files00115.pro'
e9ab231918df80aeb656de40009c3e9a
d11eb03bfb1d954dd84b23d59091c98528744ca3
describe
'37591' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVE' 'sip-files00116.pro'
b6d92b3e06058cd089c2b6d2a8440bd3
e0d3582ef9ec27ad3a80b6162048fbb84adcbc06
'2011-12-21T04:40:24-05:00'
describe
'35503' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVF' 'sip-files00117.pro'
a875241c318dfb786e5205b623888126
14556a971b473046d5fcc7b90b0630d8eaf27ccf
describe
'36741' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVG' 'sip-files00118.pro'
b166fef5f5ae7a3bb2c6a2a925852f9e
2d053642e7ff91f2263e9dca64a3f51e4d9b494f
describe
'37069' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVH' 'sip-files00119.pro'
1a59d1403efa2ec7d84e1236d4a851af
1b2cb7296c77ce9317bcfc5435d89aad63766077
'2011-12-21T04:40:06-05:00'
describe
'36024' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVI' 'sip-files00120.pro'
025581d89c7a40e5c0c16427914bbbfa
3a0b6f5a8c97ebc7ea29773881b9e95e8f58631b
describe
'35304' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVJ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
b45afaa2a4cb13a026e8063fbab79c53
9cdf7004b70835797f5dbd874c273ea6a8e828fc
'2011-12-21T04:37:26-05:00'
describe
'36995' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVK' 'sip-files00122.pro'
9836bdae813feb3b7c46b318d7df530d
db3ff0964af22a30bc4f2457b4157a469e3852f0
'2011-12-21T04:37:34-05:00'
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVL' 'sip-files00123.pro'
e0bd03dfbb3224338f44074fc91565e0
c3fdee81d2cd56e143d36103edae9e9cf6cc9e63
'2011-12-21T04:39:00-05:00'
describe
'36611' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVM' 'sip-files00125.pro'
eeba238f610c6a7f8cd68bad8b0fb1ac
9b8ba05631a06fd0a4f25f41130a59a9ccfad0d6
'2011-12-21T04:37:36-05:00'
describe
'502' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVN' 'sip-files00127.pro'
d7b18236cdcbfd79f7ad98d71edd010c
b34086f94a7c7d7f951ccb1c43ffaff91d0d2b25
'2011-12-21T04:37:53-05:00'
describe
'9962' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVO' 'sip-files00128.pro'
9766f296fbb6f5bbc554b4984519902a
a39a78ec47559d00fc116eaed0471c4678fdac32
'2011-12-21T04:37:25-05:00'
describe
'24614' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVP' 'sip-files00129.pro'
2a9896a2aff4ec1f6b3c77f02779075f
43af1ed037acf9dce02c40ed109c95b8352e88ac
describe
'36756' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVQ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
fef1717a77a7c7ecc7b576ddf22b3999
8625191c3d35ba7d4b682fb1e78e89f0df471e5c
'2011-12-21T04:36:27-05:00'
describe
'441' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVR' 'sip-files00131.pro'
50238ec01be005044d0895cef59cd71b
e1be8a7d38603ff5a28b1214d0d25dad5d85f289
describe
'36004' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVS' 'sip-files00133.pro'
59e4878179a37806673d4c34a76bf96e
4d8049a612bee5248da4d37a78373538787a1007
describe
'37136' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVT' 'sip-files00134.pro'
16eb0f74fd1edd66dd8e76ce385f9ad9
899e33ff4935aa58fb2d4503d580a9ef6797128b
'2011-12-21T04:38:26-05:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVU' 'sip-files00135.pro'
1b67225fd9f77ab1fe78abe026f766ac
b3faf89338d9dce91807289dbfb944c283d5201a
describe
'36218' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVV' 'sip-files00137.pro'
b6490a8e8115833634c71d9621340df1
94581bebcf32a6c78a1dceac2c94f1392f9a9ee4
describe
'33638' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVW' 'sip-files00138.pro'
724764db97c2228fd7f0bc88a5922be8
7b0d9b0e92da444b1ca1dff14718fab7d7b01933
describe
'35428' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVX' 'sip-files00139.pro'
9a5a31b95001b104feccd6e5052cbe0d
4c2560ad3ebc81c760d9bd438ce81d8763586b0b
describe
'38058' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVY' 'sip-files00140.pro'
dae92e68be27f29dac3d3a6813a2a29d
33ed524ad08c3ed05a72f52b07ee02e376c47e73
'2011-12-21T04:37:47-05:00'
describe
'1970' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACVZ' 'sip-files00141.pro'
912007e8f9b0b49c539aedd0b59ee750
228ced6aa822696ba133077d3747611ebee00c20
describe
'34432' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWA' 'sip-files00143.pro'
06e87d0b2ab8ce85e230cd61c3457ab4
70d96350631f0bc24f820f5cdd87128348cdab57
describe
'36197' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWB' 'sip-files00144.pro'
44ebb39ce9a85b867e26508c95674402
c2e45885e4756cdaec7f0a459025af3209622579
describe
'37854' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWC' 'sip-files00145.pro'
5715196661edeb212c53f809a60a0a32
f84db47f4fa11b03987865136bd4688ffb062877
'2011-12-21T04:38:06-05:00'
describe
'35791' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWD' 'sip-files00146.pro'
89883650043998e72d16d5ba008c1a99
ef7b97d449660e1dcfe1d666dc29aaf94a320abc
describe
'35993' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWE' 'sip-files00147.pro'
3ef485c139f73e123716c0237cd55651
f4ad0816c69adf1159bf7bfac1cfbd8c0afee03b
'2011-12-21T04:38:36-05:00'
describe
'34016' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWF' 'sip-files00148.pro'
269ebfd8166394931055b392eb65f15f
c6ea771d2567f506cd970ac0ce4d2890cee8d86a
'2011-12-21T04:37:03-05:00'
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWG' 'sip-files00149.pro'
d6bd22232c19b9b25d0f5cbb8da7672e
68b02d5b64748c12eeb0b53d1a3eb6337c72a23e
describe
'36393' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWH' 'sip-files00151.pro'
1105f3c4497d8a7eb40d09b508b8530b
b028f6660a8fab9f964d85e2e29b2ec030d0bec3
describe
'38117' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWI' 'sip-files00152.pro'
9fe48da62822000c23bdd5c448ca874b
f2183a7b26742c2dcae91dbc7add25c68f325dd9
describe
'499' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWJ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
5e22ecf8be02b8ce7d0069562fa87995
dce633712528bf572daa2eff588f6f2921a0fc7f
'2011-12-21T04:36:12-05:00'
describe
'37057' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWK' 'sip-files00155.pro'
8a5446f555d772cf4a582297e528bfb6
bcc3497be980c0c7964cbb4ce89791f44a7f4055
'2011-12-21T04:36:14-05:00'
describe
'36970' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWL' 'sip-files00156.pro'
299443c934646a127a8a42bb893d7a39
f3911ec29c2e173d0fe5d66ba847eda9937a64df
describe
'37077' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWM' 'sip-files00157.pro'
598785e99f950f518d7a6dbc575eef12
85fb7e0b3722b058c4d98ad336cbe32dfc73904d
'2011-12-21T04:36:57-05:00'
describe
'37351' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWN' 'sip-files00158.pro'
5ed96f8fd9842b9c069d7d1fea6937e2
b97a6b1e26ec37ebafc7cbe994e17add5480f455
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWO' 'sip-files00159.pro'
ffc5bf24c719b2badf092a177646e1d2
3a752adea70b636b812851c5c1eb85cef71aa80c
describe
'36893' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWP' 'sip-files00161.pro'
bce4d04e714fe874e418de260ffe9d79
6b18946b0b15d7f6397fa7f8ea34b6601c0ab16b
describe
'36288' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWQ' 'sip-files00162.pro'
d6f44f63959cf8dbfa3a2c13d0c9deda
b91e0a1043bdd85c93e647f870dbed01f20ddb81
describe
'4683' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWR' 'sip-files00163.pro'
841aaf1fa51dad401b2707adba0354f1
3507b43e79dc0be395eeba1b9ae5e02ffa15d776
describe
'16124' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWS' 'sip-files00165.pro'
7494709d577be672509bc470af3c360c
2e688982fd0df578a4e8004d3e68cade8cd19c99
describe
'30663' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWT' 'sip-files00166.pro'
98df56720eda21158fad9a872a2a3f4c
0c3d7fb48559b3ba2f056b19f926680e11c6e7a0
describe
'692' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWU' 'sip-files00167.pro'
e002c1f6076444689bcb9e3a98d10fd0
33679d991de0742fcf9bbe0d12b5eaf210e07cf2
describe
'37363' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWV' 'sip-files00169.pro'
0704aa6c073805760e87995ca5847968
56644d4842d5e18bfc144046f3830f9896f4d19d
'2011-12-21T04:39:11-05:00'
describe
'37165' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWW' 'sip-files00170.pro'
0cff18b78a6b7d9708f2696c229b33ec
ba6a5743e72aa75551fb408b561cb583733d5d08
describe
'20019' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWX' 'sip-files00171.pro'
ea3b11579a842e3cc6ffe6f6f6a39ebd
e7ae3e80c7340b4d4b3c645f2e4102f937dc2706
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWY' 'sip-files00177.pro'
a4324d29a0aa1fa5a1a3992ea3b028ee
31c788a2c2dd4689264786c9cda4b854eeff928b
describe
'473499' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACWZ' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
b29677912e2cdf7d9c6e17f96635fa17
3dccc0146bab9ce4a7a2a0d86f7eee27b171fee1
describe
'479085' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXA' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
03958912e80da04c6fa368623454be62
1e6446d69bbee841386ffc7490ddd54826dea83e
describe
'401625' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXB' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
f39cd31823a62e0435f528d41492d385
17be3a699b372292ffeaa0033f4945cdf650ae8d
describe
'358197' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXC' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
d7aac5ebb59be9c6811688578764a543
01849480db57fb7027cb5e70f98d9697f082f819
'2011-12-21T04:40:05-05:00'
describe
'358220' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXD' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
2a443c7282845b895ec0e886d0e077d2
a048f9e3afb0266b5efe26fcf299cd5f9a14e831
'2011-12-21T04:39:25-05:00'
describe
'358495' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXE' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
ea4cc1e1d1e293d6d1f98125f9d95f76
f8364bc419568381a7b5aea37c6448d92cade90d
'2011-12-21T04:39:42-05:00'
describe
'358118' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXF' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
62326b20ca90a677bd145fbdc8d934d5
f49110277a0162f4d504d6546978ac52f04d975f
describe
'358181' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXG' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
112b039ad7fb67bd59b5e460ad4abd71
41a410f53aad812a2c5569aae902a3e799ffdaf9
'2011-12-21T04:39:14-05:00'
describe
'358229' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXH' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
e14b04d49edb8989c32365b5bef1e426
c9f101a7bb788bfabdb2f234a52c68145f6f97ca
'2011-12-21T04:40:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXI' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
af630302ca9adae2e2aeb9b69a2a9fe0
7072e814415db31812ead2fa28da7e15b9986617
'2011-12-21T04:39:07-05:00'
describe
'358123' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXJ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
bdc5d420c5e43183e44cbab410b57ecf
409d32e5fbf3f015f9d2af926da237b434082bd9
'2011-12-21T04:40:25-05:00'
describe
'358180' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXK' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
5f5360819b46e2dba1aed2a9db3b1600
978e3ced986d8d8ea94019ef4bab084beb23f39b
describe
'358058' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXL' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
0728fb18aed5201803be68c46f1072fa
7d07545fcaeca3ce21bd421985df301e77f4bba6
'2011-12-21T04:38:08-05:00'
describe
'249198' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXM' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
8d28ba15444ec86b048f2e70c766b89e
5bc028fecbeb3ce6986f9946d8436b330a82a945
describe
'2819' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXN' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
607207ca9eb4950c9d4e020079b4bee9
b4a36739ca83f328d48531992834144aea389e98
'2011-12-21T04:36:01-05:00'
describe
'358140' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXO' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
41157f555a9c62f9ece5c5fa63e64af5
bb3a1c20f783eae7b5ad90d3a6f93f96650b081d
describe
'358227' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXP' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
f669b5e92aae7d67a83f9c0748b0429c
f22d78f89e56d4875d0af53bbe3c70a6de5e064b
describe
'358030' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXQ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
e0a7ca713d9f57dfa0ab258b7d1268b9
a497a758dc2ded6d06ae64d7017ece3b72392789
'2011-12-21T04:38:29-05:00'
describe
'358130' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXR' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
45910428ee368e46ca87cecd1b9052cc
8d78bbad0a0cccc9f8a1730d86ba62735081e50a
'2011-12-21T04:37:11-05:00'
describe
'358215' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXS' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
de8857c502c2bf08669bb60d354d7a40
690d206d0598d47aeced9bc81b7f1faf1fdf0204
describe
'311175' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXT' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
255596157d9945dd0aad2d09566a3e6f
1004a4ad3e7e46d8121ff68d40720b277438d157
describe
'358199' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXU' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
a112d5f7bba543f54fb892a083028a63
43b0cdc2977457cd36723ea232aa872b1dd35fc3
describe
'358222' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXV' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
a2162e22227b6b80b3431921a2313318
1e14e75f567565a0cc322d9f8f7026c6df736c39
describe
'133083' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXW' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
21186ebec59bf4a28b22fbb280be4da4
fb2c185323a87d2f013124dbeadc6244be7d956e
'2011-12-21T04:36:21-05:00'
describe
'358224' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXX' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
1a6c24921cb5ec377e205fe2543abd29
68cd030bee9d9d54c703f40ae29c263be985ce71
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXY' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
9cb17116743c22e6022f7f1aa361e091
d0f7210e6f112b657abc67c3139ef8904b189134
'2011-12-21T04:39:36-05:00'
describe
'358052' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACXZ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
f2bc01ac8a0da76ca3b6311bcaf0185c
b3500097419a3dfeb385580931e96ad52b680d20
'2011-12-21T04:36:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYA' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
dec58fb740cecc59a36dd37c6d3ef261
789dcd8bc04441920994e1c3b2c0eb006526eb8d
'2011-12-21T04:40:13-05:00'
describe
'358121' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYB' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
5ca8817436d986e67f05be47a7b415b1
3e75cb2691dafec2e6d6cc00ed50cb39476e74e1
'2011-12-21T04:36:13-05:00'
describe
'357978' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYC' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
91dac32e119604dafae10a468312069b
1978ef5759b94a67cdf0ea09577fba031a0edb9d
'2011-12-21T04:39:16-05:00'
describe
'358191' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYD' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
6549ac8a4f4f79a90fb31678684fe736
ec542388ee3d0bee0669de16273d53a466e61632
describe
'358161' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYE' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
4ceed8d966ae47f705382b7d224afe14
907a2943dca94b3a64ef1a040760d2e00f8adb3d
describe
'358225' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYF' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
e9b7af25cb6d8bc0a6fc655bd0c1ecaa
18d008b010a6617971d6f00326a15516814a80ae
describe
'358228' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYG' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
2be2cab8b823d758c892f3ba5f3739b7
71ff2391d4b107f24986f062698a301dd6020329
'2011-12-21T04:36:44-05:00'
describe
'358223' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYH' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
bc876fabb622b29f9bcddcec3722dedd
5a53c84bc2065e6e80b72d55001e9ff69cf5bc72
'2011-12-21T04:39:21-05:00'
describe
'358189' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYI' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
13984af58bd1ed117064f679baff9337
5777da9eca9a0a936f2089014105e05da34029ef
describe
'357859' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYJ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
94b7c548c4d3217beb605a97dddcd847
07beee48b5dc2fd83a8ef2ecbb7bea35a8c285b1
describe
'358156' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYK' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
f964b8439043aa3afe4d25b91b4097ab
31f74789429e3b63fc8a1acf72df313a7d1a9fc5
describe
'358179' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYL' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
28129c5f17bcbf7fcaee6eed47bebc5a
c1718ee93b8e99b236a46e10bd666b8347be6706
'2011-12-21T04:40:23-05:00'
describe
'358183' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYM' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
cdde1d4f5be193c53a74d8533a8d6820
d8a1b293469cfa0cdd1574a6c985c2ceb96a8602
describe
'358212' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYN' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
eb59457c435e08f519b5be9184766d51
0ead88b2029c6332797e3fd8438057b9bb99f1ef
'2011-12-21T04:37:46-05:00'
describe
'358206' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYO' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
9acd559e777f213fb1ceb8ef33d0428c
b8e18aeaeaf3a26530c262c950883cdda9eede67
describe
'358176' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYP' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
d761a91638ed7d65426c3d3ee28124ea
1cb42c220b5e727ad57d3e8a37d9ad9de709ec36
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYQ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
241ee752ab6e939aa740da428251685e
d54af42c2fe0e5874ecd336f25b1b70b01d8b0be
describe
'324313' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYR' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
27ddf465826ea0f22ec284c0f83c626f
5cb35d90138664a325419b2963481332eb490288
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
458771dbd0f41bda0a743049821069e7
4c867964e39608ad84cbef4a8c8b1f9468dc431d
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYT' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
16651ece9a4a1acdbf3eb4f732c88c92
8f7075f41c9d21f497a39ffc364c88472b4d43c6
'2011-12-21T04:36:58-05:00'
describe
'358195' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYU' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
312d2c62106b05337cda54a8d48aa9ab
1b90e4ea6e9867e8eb5d1913f498af9202b8a2e7
describe
'358193' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYV' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
82fd207c37cfa55d0fb2899873a15cc9
ca47f24276052790ac756a9580d7ed131ab529bc
'2011-12-21T04:36:24-05:00'
describe
'358216' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYW' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
aa5fc44d347a513a27bae206f6c01015
c2118d2ddafbaf90f57650658e0aa892db80e89f
describe
'169799' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYX' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
8aaac7bb27a1059bf7f20249d3ee7e4a
08b189092389b2d1320325e4e5be9cf4a039e190
'2011-12-21T04:38:35-05:00'
describe
'358162' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYY' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
02e391bf90454ca5f89f93199fe33e9a
860b94ce3dffa03bb02af6b90dfd64655487057f
'2011-12-21T04:40:31-05:00'
describe
'358217' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACYZ' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
15a5d553db6c5b55c2ff1af21905c52f
06b186fcaba559657acadfa34b44be9da5f92c82
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZA' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
8fd9f6b73181261298650e0faa292256
f5591e2f0a847537fe776200fe120c5b4a772b09
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZB' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
b9811cb0b6f143035e15f37a455c4ef4
cd2f28d6ed68a0ba12ef60e862e314674c223e10
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZC' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
600499e5a88f46b6d6fb0a7d68c1f95b
a999dc8c424c3d5809d674b3eee199ca932a5872
describe
'277550' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZD' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
5a7743f078430f77c63251cc099f8f07
d750e6585ec9e363a6147005174c79dbb472fa26
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZE' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
22d7c69bb6a8ef7db58741458dbcea85
1ae3db4dd158f77b9e67b4907d5934cd3f536307
'2011-12-21T04:40:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZF' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
45987b31a51018cee882b2321fa00f1b
4d991800800562cbbdc834108e539593c18c9a9a
describe
'265234' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZG' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
bb9915ff3dfa9c9da48a741f05b336d9
0bde733626923bfd336fba1b3b0ad26b05b55eb9
'2011-12-21T04:38:42-05:00'
describe
'358230' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZH' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
beb1fa5a940268104fac15ac449a0d34
39ca3dcd19d801dae2613bbe7701e152f1d75e68
describe
'358151' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZI' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
00957d2e9c5dd66b287cc8a8b0f6b79f
4eeff3794f92e91faa7df583b1c0026989765e55
'2011-12-21T04:37:29-05:00'
describe
'358133' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZJ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
f373ec5edf4bfe97e6bf3cb40f28311e
f47d213c0fd6becbc17539ec4145459ccf48fc1e
'2011-12-21T04:40:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZK' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
f4d13ad3a20e7d93e064593f4ab2b216
f1846a6a6363ef1c351612885173c796c73ce1d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZL' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
3d954b15183b25f0bca4fbcb123cc07a
d1f91289c5d152cc6a8e57b9e65845cdb0067e4c
'2011-12-21T04:40:29-05:00'
describe
'292757' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZM' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
6fb61273c4e0e9bb98f18b60a6e89285
e57ac441100211c148da0e052f1bae208de9e6df
'2011-12-21T04:35:58-05:00'
describe
'358186' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZN' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
1d877e8ed809d261d3aed21e5bfd5b6c
9dd2050708c3d01101aa963e441ed10817ec8305
describe
'358210' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZO' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
15f6f2616eff14bffc0da6be7220c916
e32936c8d6e9387b36a62c9254fe72c3f61cb9c8
'2011-12-21T04:36:34-05:00'
describe
'234157' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZP' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
64707562631e22237bc389eca17058df
55c6836999816467855314d4b27cd45f7836baab
describe
'358221' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZQ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
d3759cda27d77e375442931fb5c4e8af
f3d41245555059b7f1b592e040bf3471e43cfa00
'2011-12-21T04:40:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZR' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
9024726aa35e5edd972b05cdbd586610
b3f9287e560c41d83111445f08c7c427a1f60eaa
describe
'119796' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZS' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
a70d5ce44de429d10bd3281fa3d935da
517cec28edfab7a1c2f8d5a33ff94c3479767166
describe
'358209' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZT' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
b0d256a98dba1119606220aa38694c26
ef4aaf79ef0f84259a368e4328668dc105ce92f0
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZU' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
45f3dfd5af76b63ff0135caa0c49b31d
a72958b97ed021bafb12d6c86f2c91c680d8ca98
describe
'243974' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZV' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
6f16c30a61eabbb7e50923fdafdf382f
fd394a69b63da2d017515762d52b9cbe33f7bc7f
'2011-12-21T04:38:53-05:00'
describe
'358171' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZW' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
019008d261cddfc1963eddf0a9921630
ed0553d80ddf59db6717762365fce2553108f57c
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZX' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
bcb3bab903a975515f4162d9fb67d6a5
19e56cffbedb06f4f849d7e28e278032b2662111
describe
'182186' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZY' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
99f6a974b4a6cb11dc37da49cef1f01d
025f816e9eb5ba3d6bb361e1f56ea0f8596f4325
describe
'358099' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAACZZ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
8468c85585dc730e0a734eb1c3b3482a
ec38c2f81395bff4b9dcc33cd8bf21aa25f3c29b
describe
'358137' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAA' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
bdff16174d6b85e1115088f47af2abca
d251095bb41d61805d954bbf65a8291a65569f5a
describe
'203645' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAB' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
bdb6434938991ee14dd580043240d05f
cf8801c3538ea63ea7a08047bf17e05e9e2e9c74
'2011-12-21T04:38:56-05:00'
describe
'358157' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAC' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
9552e003bbad3a9d069fe87aefe7e56c
b679d956c4af2534255551e96856eb036e40fd45
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAD' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
4dcd603dd4144113fc8b06ee5d73b5e5
ed13761b5fcf5ed511e6eb62e468bb89f55650db
'2011-12-21T04:38:12-05:00'
describe
'218685' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAE' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
a2b6f92dd9fbf99cfc1ef148925a5fc0
e7d6ca8dca7112b02f240e846225c61a8d167842
'2011-12-21T04:36:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAF' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
a3d4daaff368037113444b93263ee460
40dde08332dece6087de6626b8d14e3c785d8175
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAG' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
da24a4ae29d41a078f5c6ec765c70912
1198c63bb82bef0df5fc6b5189e38d1adf71feaa
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAH' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
ec73c47531112e2c8ff31c6b7cf59bee
c4b1d84d85736fb3094adaf9dc7a53782b66eafb
'2011-12-21T04:37:19-05:00'
describe
'358231' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAI' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
68e81636a5bd62dfab8d427b2a9530d8
9dde1f8ec91830d2ae76229ec6bcea370243b993
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAJ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
eea0a49651fa9372f71b0a364879b1ad
61b4bbaa32c589e3e27b0c89c29c705a09ee1fd9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAK' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
e780314072ccd239c7a23e5acc39996f
2a13ec6db0fcc360f8eb3a1e49c904cdd24acd5a
'2011-12-21T04:39:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAL' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
2257f247b6992a5e765a62d6b4e36bfd
aa17c5241f1d575a362a61b30c8cc3c8c490b85e
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAM' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
5f3224656f49b74e1e5ffa7804d96bc5
b7faca036f1a5450268890d6053036b60801169d
describe
'333203' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAN' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
061b6ea1c51cbae8a51b5ceaf8936c55
cc15f0a6b827c39376ed4056709d0458d6d228e2
describe
'358203' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAO' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
9eea64dd5fb19140d66321874cc76dfa
be9f60b97a3e2cb69cf3c4041cb2abaa397f75f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAP' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
3347df012edea6081b81cb24e202931e
634e787fad9c08fb7c8857d2020fd74ae7cecf70
'2011-12-21T04:37:12-05:00'
describe
'358205' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAQ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
074661a74c1eb2670e680a380762271b
c58b4403d3a783a01a1505987ae617addfd5a005
'2011-12-21T04:36:29-05:00'
describe
'358057' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAR' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
5a0e48964d5382c91e8b53461565e21b
c3e55a959230a87c91ed81f64ae3da68519d765b
'2011-12-21T04:39:35-05:00'
describe
'358214' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAS' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
23005d88db0615b2d14b7e96eee03fbf
ca515cd6b4f2999e4bee0def2e8b0e58ebc8b7e9
describe
'358001' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAT' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
4bcedb733f009e77a9ed54e930548e13
c360fe994e2b1a5595596325a2b3dec6c63e0a9d
describe
'358190' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAU' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
8c77ba64d6fae167e05d419fc31b22a2
1d457c6b5ef835ad3d74cb41d52cc5a807e77f54
'2011-12-21T04:36:28-05:00'
describe
'358165' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAV' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
7857224e59374a7706bf13b6c2b875bb
9d279964ebaa3d4e5844385fc896b2eeb1c7812a
describe
'130736' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAW' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
70bd1913335d1850db7a2346ea5222fa
81f54ef5fbb2e924a3cba6802140bdf8b84d72d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAX' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
db54a70780a9f5872ef62888fce674ef
cf3433dd91f07b4f6df2744c0c09525a94963262
'2011-12-21T04:38:21-05:00'
describe
'358213' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAY' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
7e8fc71c66b0e34eb31686820d071fa3
ce36daab86ece2ec26815e6c2efa7e558bd71d7f
'2011-12-21T04:36:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADAZ' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
fbbce2c9c74b9b10e7342423c8be1433
6e073ade4652183f63d10469af6d938fbe661257
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBA' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
daf9dd07c11a4e8e0f19c7067b29177f
394b7f3b773c84d8757f84f37cb7f5bef22052bf
'2011-12-21T04:37:22-05:00'
describe
'326857' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBB' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
66ca5a75c39c6c772f1abf4ea6c36ed8
ed41a1ee699234d706e8741d1274297c10236ed2
describe
'358219' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBC' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
6c27765585b8a2c4c9ea4eed7455fa7a
dc410e4575b07a2983521b500fc98406bd0d4eb2
describe
'358192' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBD' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
004d450af33a8f782de3732c18897ab6
aacad19a7827742e3399b23ebfce77662ce9ac3a
describe
'358204' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBE' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
cf201c2e6dc0df69c2b4b277a95bd9af
f8b2e8174952ae6576bafc9d065b44c9d4186cdd
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBF' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
04325740c17301b050855ff4a9e2bb0c
31352cf5bfa9dee3f28b53ad934baaa2d10616ba
'2011-12-21T04:36:31-05:00'
describe
'358145' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBG' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
f30b367f52a5f8f9fb43408aebcbcc30
bb4b2812f26a5dbcb71d25a09ac601490d1e0720
describe
'358101' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBH' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
0f093130030b18d0393cc2f2720019cc
3fd037d03b0151af053a1638d67e0e0625ee0862
describe
'324394' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBI' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
bcf30dcdf3d82cc01d76d87e41de1662
80618744abf93d31130c0dcb7bb43c8fc6e23630
'2011-12-21T04:38:23-05:00'
describe
'358218' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBJ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
8d070e7e0cf282b5a99aea29ac91388d
98ee8d7c7999f4401578cbbeee2cfde8238441b6
'2011-12-21T04:40:17-05:00'
describe
'358175' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBK' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
1e683e872d8f5eb4fe8eff3631bfb5e8
aea2eac040aff44060b2fa95769aae762a6e05bd
describe
'358117' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBL' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
6b8c30c08dea10648ef1407c0cd922d4
9de1c0a0dc4d61ecdc8668d9f2ce28fbb24222c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBM' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
4a9d243c5a868c6f2ad3be99a2a69bc3
8ef61f5ca5e8edd6108204c26ac336ae5e4e29f2
'2011-12-21T04:40:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBN' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
38a5bc9be92d953fcb7c6817728e9078
12736b5863ba437d98abda6e0ba836e5d1a85481
'2011-12-21T04:39:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBO' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
6dec2ba8c44185e63cb0722cd57b65c8
0f4e21c4b5d1134f96de7cd65e19c29e98a3e4f0
'2011-12-21T04:40:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBP' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
67dc39fe4dc82b67356f849a3a26727e
7d8b38ccb3d5f746cea83a254a1713f08311cb3d
'2011-12-21T04:38:55-05:00'
describe
'348150' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBQ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
489adc56a62f936c0f5dbf679746fd5d
f8c2395649dc4ffdd40f64b2ada27ca5e1e50272
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBR' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
4e7406e9c87b3302c36dee301bea213f
71b624ffa0bdb05d5bff48bb3e802d28da45adf7
'2011-12-21T04:39:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBS' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
beb244922ccf3112d7df1dbbe3293b9e
14b86561fc5b5543dd45c23afe462398bcb6e97a
'2011-12-21T04:40:21-05:00'
describe
'278659' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBT' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
8aa870f118874a4c6703daca65b2a535
b1617443ec023f945a090841733d464c28588c0c
'2011-12-21T04:37:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBU' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
7d623791779d8ca53b3c7b77b8d32c92
9c11bd3d2ab8cbaa8c9e2923bec20f644f858a55
describe
'358164' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBV' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
f943a1f4e84bb6c1d482812d7c9e4b36
726fc0f6a8198f34753f309d534d8e3b9443540a
describe
'296800' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBW' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
642386b8b83bb5154a75dd0567b260a5
9a4cb356f4d6d4c50123afaa4d0777542946f550
describe
'358202' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBX' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
95c4e8493daf96f4c8cace33ff1e90a0
b3dd9f47a25441449eebb66a347973f258d35e62
'2011-12-21T04:39:22-05:00'
describe
'358158' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBY' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
1647ca9aa2b5ddac1585d8fd9561383f
aeec537a37f823078899de3d0af2b6fb21f6d200
describe
'358211' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADBZ' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
a814c24e21eca5eabcc3c47b054e20b1
5efa1a76507eb1a5f5b482cdbe6ab1f5b26a3bee
'2011-12-21T04:38:09-05:00'
describe
'483984' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCA' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
f1c884f81064f6fae933548bb7039e0d
7e4113cbe124d4275a4e886791be6264dfc95424
describe
'482081' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCB' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
0b5567bbd4e74376c6bf0117e1105336
efc52e8ea034f9ab4337b2306217e06b9547480a
describe
'95977' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCC' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
c00cf7300e9fd2c6594006e1b7d55994
94116c686c0f184dd09f44c65f0a2176bbd27d03
'2011-12-21T04:38:10-05:00'
describe
'11376632' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCD' 'sip-files00001.tif'
106f5d8512bec2237586408640943f99
7d758e57657dcea9208c0986548eb65dd63620a2
'2011-12-21T04:35:46-05:00'
describe
'11506440' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCE' 'sip-files00002.tif'
e0e4d7b36605838a7c0ec860f2163d4c
d2086634b0dc29585faf1c884cb20e0e78fda3e1
describe
'9645708' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCF' 'sip-files00003.tif'
eca371c6e0c147a6d2c49aa1aa7a53f0
686174a570b94732a9d24c9ce3d71314e9833259
describe
'2883488' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCG' 'sip-files00126.tif'
31cc2aa12f2e7c0ccbcaa8fdf3e3ddc5
7588d9711adedfc2340dd3d3fa60c821cdc4cd8f
'2011-12-21T04:36:10-05:00'
describe
'2876664' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCH' 'sip-files00008.tif'
7a19f028f90798ba8ab72b4abe82e524
325e64cb546f5f6b69f7ca9b4b15d1e3fa32a487
'2011-12-21T04:36:51-05:00'
describe
'8618216' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCI' 'sip-files00011.tif'
a78dc2393ea4ce8f5210cd30f1ef9921
dd4e2ca5c1783652b5e1cf42ec855de5f22cd472
describe
'2875116' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCJ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
fd181a6c76a2b49f976737d59a02b81d
bf6576bdf3578bb60fb2be03df87afdd918cab0e
describe
'2874012' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCK' 'sip-files00013.tif'
c02c6e412f283b00545ae2b3ea873ad6
d0aa1da186cce779aa3cbd7e6ecaed55fb663eef
'2011-12-21T04:37:24-05:00'
describe
'2874052' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCL' 'sip-files00015.tif'
24aedce579c316f546c9a630c0caedc8
9298c68cb0bebea0145a81fd12f98354e552793e
'2011-12-21T04:38:48-05:00'
describe
'2876152' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCM' 'sip-files00017.tif'
f3e87bfaa0ab4bff3105e6b5fdcbd16a
64bd94bac4f039942a82f10df5ecd3ddc502de00
describe
'2874844' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
ccf5e292e1d8d62f5346cf821073b11f
171627f30942069e4e3455aa62da2645b2677d59
'2011-12-21T04:35:37-05:00'
describe
'2876980' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCO' 'sip-files00019.tif'
d5663a8c3516d6196d91397fc28ec947
5cac007fff6a15214ed4f945eb4d3e165c02a897
'2011-12-21T04:36:03-05:00'
describe
'2876080' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCP' 'sip-files00020.tif'
37fc57d42d4d99d402116c717c86af02
ef984c83f651f5ac591932c17f0e9fae5d84bdd7
describe
'2001952' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCQ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
57424782a4faede4d71085cdd96b9f9a
0dc91a9ee4b2e6262f77681b907ed636970f5ca5
'2011-12-21T04:38:31-05:00'
describe
'2873780' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCR' 'sip-files00022.tif'
1139e62de0dc49e94bed79437c645710
4738cd69b7a684ceb02faeb3354412478327c68a
'2011-12-21T04:36:47-05:00'
describe
'2876736' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCS' 'sip-files00023.tif'
7263ea08aca9755c61b307fcc182a47b
ea6bd815ad63f56b4d0c1401485be2553b04a017
describe
'2877716' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCT' 'sip-files00024.tif'
d30697904c498c2b03a193cd354ca287
3e301d88bcb131e9fc93a46bcaaa92c9ef4280a3
'2011-12-21T04:39:56-05:00'
describe
'2875232' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCU' 'sip-files00025.tif'
e0c6d256c749aa2826eb67b12e201842
95fbbaf1c60637519bdc1822424a184e6d4f775a
describe
'2877932' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCV' 'sip-files00027.tif'
b0cb1c641d949aa63083e1f7971a070b
d2bae379a8b25055313cb31ed703feff877522e2
'2011-12-21T04:35:47-05:00'
describe
'2877996' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCW' 'sip-files00028.tif'
3d4824f03314274e6065b0c39ec6ec7f
dff3392011de201e10a6f4c787f35f5dbcb45589
describe
'2503956' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCX' 'sip-files00029.tif'
885c5889c6cd900cc6f73251477e76b7
6b9fe1015a3cf0234d9815b820bf6d7854af4ae4
'2011-12-21T04:38:30-05:00'
describe
'2878088' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCY' 'sip-files00031.tif'
1b8ec9860d40828448dc0b0674d58aa4
5d0f2c0ad5536cf0a65b1330e4a8509562b3b938
describe
'2878164' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADCZ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
65434825be3b0be7a0ab9dc5e99827ef
60a5667df2722ce4d4398faee82f6818ba3e26cd
describe
'1075188' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDA' 'sip-files00033.tif'
21556d0283d6d31c5191e92d8acc5541
89493f50060dc70ec3ce16e3c9f016a0f8515aeb
describe
'2877964' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDB' 'sip-files00035.tif'
d299ca4004ab8ae4dfa8f2c484c3858d
ec92ceb0e05550b6efb208e2279d9f153353f816
'2011-12-21T04:37:45-05:00'
describe
'2877928' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDC' 'sip-files00036.tif'
416d973a912b0f57dc5808089f030cd0
a0ad4a28ca5deee41945a674349c6990ceaef098
'2011-12-21T04:38:17-05:00'
describe
'2875392' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDD' 'sip-files00037.tif'
44e0ca4f1af40c7b21312f5de6b4fd44
e738a80b6d782babf4b5870f533fe012cf602d1b
describe
'2877824' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDE' 'sip-files00039.tif'
86a731e92df5367e9a1eb02dde9703ec
b72b06baa15688b14d09d3b062f054bd81fd10c4
describe
'2877948' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDF' 'sip-files00040.tif'
53108a7ef7744ccff7a0a0ba9dbf6712
8d2845d7304b365d4170271145213dfac62d4b89
'2011-12-21T04:38:43-05:00'
describe
'2876496' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDG' 'sip-files00041.tif'
8c913634895b26d402939a9b9a24bfcc
b955c69f60b071dc7e83ce13f5aa204d14b6f59e
describe
'2878052' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDH' 'sip-files00043.tif'
8f31331f54ba597219ec7fa81af5a6d5
086abf10642871a88ee4cc50e8546349da20b9b5
describe
'2877984' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDI' 'sip-files00044.tif'
dcda7f5ac2002b2d8978e117bb189897
37b1169ed149e20b9616619794aabfad7c509e18
'2011-12-21T04:36:17-05:00'
describe
'2874612' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDJ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
25492dd0f2ae0ae243be3dec971526d2
da81b856c902e00215019a3d842d9d61fabbe085
describe
'2877868' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDK' 'sip-files00047.tif'
454ffb7d91111caa77e6accf57ebc269
914a5c97f9eb8661d1c31d22c76261d355a221f4
describe
'2878056' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDL' 'sip-files00048.tif'
45b1ea2ae296e0f52b176976a729f54c
7687189276d529e3971fc36ed41a5bb713f4093f
'2011-12-21T04:39:51-05:00'
describe
'2874884' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDM' 'sip-files00049.tif'
0f8bdb70a7fc83eb390d629d9ee0852c
100a72d03b00aa40aafc76d8d41e7cb5b6c7f69e
'2011-12-21T04:38:19-05:00'
describe
'2876044' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDN' 'sip-files00051.tif'
c17f8e3a883fc8cad6d7080309e1e3c9
ab1e179440aef7b13846a97ee30aee66e8fff08a
'2011-12-21T04:36:59-05:00'
describe
'2877916' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDO' 'sip-files00052.tif'
7304bda8a70f3660242d00e01f388c07
c29ec3b907bff8a31558fa16dacee15d6777c883
describe
'2874808' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDP' 'sip-files00053.tif'
baaedcc3b2c89e9e8d92e7d1b4b86df1
ad1a51a72fe072591a5a081e0f62b4394b8db878
'2011-12-21T04:37:02-05:00'
describe
'2877976' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDQ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
9438c6fc93e719d4758cc14bd996c213
d398878457a95b11e46504e15ed02650ff21e102
describe
'2877960' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDR' 'sip-files00056.tif'
2bd0149cd0c5e32ddfae2378a36df123
3b3d766a5a3c110e332f1a99178d604d1750adf8
describe
'2876712' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDS' 'sip-files00057.tif'
f1673257c5faac09778082e8add6072c
903f67722d0ebfb7208844163f2dbca0aadfe53c
describe
'2877816' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDT' 'sip-files00059.tif'
2bff8f98aa219307a069ef1b6ad4805b
17288082b2d88d1c5dcdfea81786e015edbd09a8
describe
'2877736' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDU' 'sip-files00060.tif'
d8d689f07f8e229eed6c1a092c7e3e5c
0f308253facd0baff887059f49c3b423e3217568
describe
'2608920' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDV' 'sip-files00061.tif'
03581b40217a8c22a73c21210a5e168a
016ff92cd3b5dd8dd878844deb97e253804e7a58
describe
'2877848' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDW' 'sip-files00063.tif'
457327435f08cdc563cd384d3a337db2
d7576dc855861938e41c5f2c1a5334e8cf38b56b
describe
'2878756' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDX' 'sip-files00064.tif'
538b393b7a58448cabf5f8243d64b917
8b1bde0bbe31525b7f3727ec87bce1770a5575dc
describe
'2875004' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDY' 'sip-files00065.tif'
ab74c70cdbb6bf45c21fb3117ef952c7
6af968f4a4684061c08dae37210c9c2884b85b9e
describe
'2877972' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADDZ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
50a11f46bbd702fa65cfb5fe70bfb8dc
f8a121962fa168d701abf2263da02289c5262203
describe
'2877872' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEA' 'sip-files00068.tif'
aba00776d9c9c5da27dc9f7dc8423cae
3f08472bea0b3fe423376ada0d5a87f6a00be701
describe
'1371408' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEB' 'sip-files00069.tif'
fa83b1c69b3a599ac2556ddfd6078f1d
5c87a3dca551a462b965b70e46d3b08e1c189c82
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEC' 'sip-files00071.tif'
29600a2b2cc9715ae1794d6b9199a0e4
6f9411903ea577f0ea7276ef8bf95a132a5151dd
describe
'2878012' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADED' 'sip-files00072.tif'
3a1b7f9d212ea0256495e7c6ad23729b
e6f4d21027daf8df7d7451a9d453aeed535430fe
describe
'2875060' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEE' 'sip-files00073.tif'
bb89191c143c4cac37955dfa20021be9
0755bfe497fc73ec4bb257701044043d181b7e17
describe
'2877908' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEF' 'sip-files00075.tif'
af90bd3b904fa39963b247f3c7cfb122
9e15c7d0be025d20a6fbbf7c6cda7c35f63584ef
'2011-12-21T04:39:10-05:00'
describe
'2878252' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEG' 'sip-files00076.tif'
b072223e16052d7a9a56ab7673b52db5
319d79c28148c301ef31b8846b780fa2b6af2253
describe
'2234296' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEH' 'sip-files00077.tif'
0eca8bc238f5c0fca5ad193ceb7967b9
f0707567b70848668216f5a4596a3a10f8624e5b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEI' 'sip-files00079.tif'
1919a2461121a219cd3ec6b627831e84
e5a58b68db8f308c57cdfb5fcc753c3540328c94
'2011-12-21T04:39:08-05:00'
describe
'2878064' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEJ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
8245eb076762cb850aeab5b5f18e5735
61739667d0304c3c86e7f901da5d0698bc13032f
'2011-12-21T04:38:22-05:00'
describe
'2132004' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEK' 'sip-files00081.tif'
1a1312811fceb60e1ab13072dbd4c20c
41014d5d72689346e3d494d87ca9a8f842008a26
'2011-12-21T04:35:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEL' 'sip-files00083.tif'
1dab2c18d6024d1b17a97e95f53e0377
5303071e1a9146d39de2e2ed880ea471b2d3126a
describe
'2878008' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEM' 'sip-files00084.tif'
36b4ce6de3b1f23dbb9c3c44b7027cc7
a28945a50f30e592c4ac724092e678c11dc8a609
'2011-12-21T04:36:35-05:00'
describe
'2874828' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEN' 'sip-files00085.tif'
32278304b4ca53b0c9404d7be41d2d77
4bbb749a663ab7c7cec0ab7a28527070485028d8
describe
'2877844' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEO' 'sip-files00087.tif'
08cfb8e7828418057471f6bdc423cf89
f0b97037e9c910141b431881fc121baffcb76972
'2011-12-21T04:40:35-05:00'
describe
'2877812' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEP' 'sip-files00088.tif'
812a116723a82e442c0133a83cb8ad7f
743a2cecde4b5a2fe71485f276ba85d9d969ef01
describe
'2352424' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEQ' 'sip-files00089.tif'
8cb517184dbb9dbcbbb074b4135f4c21
855fe4348bbfce47fe8b8e5da52d600e64ca8fdf
'2011-12-21T04:38:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADER' 'sip-files00091.tif'
a0150779f51f41b9c36a7a9cd2f97287
5a84d6e5f0fe001b511004029272c9d56c1e5189
describe
'2877980' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADES' 'sip-files00092.tif'
3be9ad30429bb189b891a8f12abf9601
44837d278e4bd0b21439ffa9d651f381761bccae
describe
'1883568' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADET' 'sip-files00093.tif'
cb740d48cf88f792e919567051dcac87
aa389e38af8bf615619a269d03fac68be5b8049c
describe
'2877936' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEU' 'sip-files00095.tif'
645d575fd9dc1a50000a21d541705dbb
b87bdc86a2c037ab19b53a1ec916d7b959d392f7
'2011-12-21T04:37:40-05:00'
describe
'2877788' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEV' 'sip-files00096.tif'
7d1307d4dfeeacc4b6fa493753f6a846
15e2b26b1fbee595e9725422d83954727f1365b0
'2011-12-21T04:39:01-05:00'
describe
'969092' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEW' 'sip-files00097.tif'
457f6ee4d55571ae9c7c50f3d7de099e
290ad1a29e51f513611adb0196a3096121247854
describe
'2877840' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEX' 'sip-files00099.tif'
f0b7af34635fc0f6aefff72f5e829caa
db194bf745f4556fa6dc6c5dcba3bb9f223b8afc
describe
'2877124' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEY' 'sip-files00100.tif'
5581ecbd83d237e00295e4cf6e1b107d
3d5dbec33c52186fb4b6e7e3fd0006b1200ab174
describe
'1964240' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADEZ' 'sip-files00101.tif'
6b7ac15769dea08730b5da2e4c4e8f3a
804ad99a95749afbc0b6ed7265f7eefce9aa529a
describe
'2877756' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFA' 'sip-files00103.tif'
8aec709ce9f92b60eedb2352d94e6ad6
2b2f18578c944dda5ed8ca18bae9bed15779c02b
describe
'2877864' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFB' 'sip-files00104.tif'
ccf30f703dfacd246332f2b7ff1c5d5d
465222a85deae317f1fb7c87d6ddcb9f9ab65e6e
describe
'1470904' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFC' 'sip-files00105.tif'
5c2b0038762c4c5ea9bd9ee4fab50999
c959d05a3a65335996f540894de8618f2dfc1405
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFD' 'sip-files00107.tif'
8201f37f02f54c13904fc32cfb4a8983
f2fd9996a11c6a7d725369ba7163ff9f5948f143
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFE' 'sip-files00108.tif'
f3c005ea1ba0cebe7610b9c476efc51b
e05a202faf52c31b05cd61f4540ebddd68cb052b
'2011-12-21T04:40:03-05:00'
describe
'1638200' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFF' 'sip-files00109.tif'
d4795758e86791d788a06481da6e9daa
70835c97e787b7d7e30fd90d7f894007deb0861a
describe
'2877940' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFG' 'sip-files00111.tif'
d0152f18d210985dd86f08dd01a4a028
4e4d1b77870b1c263df6a9237347651e9c6a4732
describe
'2878028' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFH' 'sip-files00112.tif'
3bdf91190560c13684e229c4f3d23493
c70b0977a3f5c30d85b976fd2febdbb0656b733f
describe
'1762428' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFI' 'sip-files00113.tif'
dcf322ea850f75b765b98db15d237ce1
1d84a7812976c88dfa9e3b5866d29a460560599b
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFJ' 'sip-files00115.tif'
8a25744d94718075baa5d68fabf77b9f
844bc933468f7f9dd441add7cbda1e4479ee48d5
describe
'2878268' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFK' 'sip-files00116.tif'
43be5030653b2dfb6e22d184df7bdf64
fc0bad4d997710b23f1c41be8fefdd4f08e72fad
'2011-12-21T04:40:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFL' 'sip-files00117.tif'
b76812740c2366831279785f132f8338
cec37bc414829cf2802c0158c8636f639d24d2d2
'2011-12-21T04:37:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFM' 'sip-files00118.tif'
f4be87c857628d033cf023aca4ef8d41
1986be582642c7d6eb578fe91fb29dde20be3919
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFN' 'sip-files00119.tif'
40a0eee2b939a664e2679af033649f97
aac0fb6d62c8efe2295278107ebe19e7b4af10a1
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFO' 'sip-files00120.tif'
ff78642e02aafa339388a6c834547cef
e53175dbf0f6586996dd0fa4be744c89151b3f90
'2011-12-21T04:40:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFP' 'sip-files00121.tif'
3fcd7e317a7e183b15c23c604a0ea2f6
ecc99f0c007c28f46dcf65faa52526c00d5bf201
describe
'2878024' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFQ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
85b519a774611b36a67c6927c198dd74
cc23ffe442f2fa6a133eab1d089044bee40ad815
describe
'2676916' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFR' 'sip-files00123.tif'
2c616dc79d47d02367db52d08ba8ff8a
85e513b5627efb381ad1a4adce2be715ede6aef9
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFS' 'sip-files00125.tif'
12f71229cebb98807ec0fbaaffb5c484
023ea11dd5c9937f075afa50c8935bf8933de7b0
'2011-12-21T04:36:06-05:00'
describe
'2873708' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFT' 'sip-files00127.tif'
8b3d686f88614ea9897e5876ebd419b8
7d1382c68cd547cc9469a772a728237568cace33
'2011-12-21T04:38:11-05:00'
describe
'2874584' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFU' 'sip-files00128.tif'
6832e55636cc5aa98183b31dd9ca8eed
838d9a32640effc606a2b6ddf8eab2571645b57c
'2011-12-21T04:37:08-05:00'
describe
'2876908' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFV' 'sip-files00129.tif'
c76f112391afd817e653d5f8d1ba3542
65a52d5ca6063653eae5d9cb2b90e48ca8152a34
describe
'2878196' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFW' 'sip-files00130.tif'
157ea3c456fca73ad13ff33635d032c8
330bd285da2fbed24aab461c22fc65ca443a0dd1
describe
'2876988' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFX' 'sip-files00131.tif'
2c2634e5bb255c7aa8c9403fac43189e
b824861ec1b47e3486c5b001c96ebc1f45daf3b8
describe
'2878100' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFY' 'sip-files00133.tif'
5d522a6db7cbda312dde59a3db296ff2
23d57fda217c7d86fa09105d0e0713b24cc906fb
describe
'2878168' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADFZ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
3aeb5510de4797e14d08da8062b77831
0dc6a7fcd9f2eda8bfef8b8aeae826c57d69caed
describe
'1058896' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGA' 'sip-files00135.tif'
a86fc3e6c733e39dd4715868fc169b42
8b2cee731ed697dc07647e9ba12f45ab7d8828c8
describe
'2877772' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGB' 'sip-files00137.tif'
1a3818265c1a389de801d4241aaf47a6
c7a12f170f1b94ba1dec918358cc4c1b33a0cfaa
describe
'2877492' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGC' 'sip-files00138.tif'
1ac44945592c4b5ba798f91ac0a97d97
f61a489893aca710f40d06b3cc2af4a2fff730a1
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGD' 'sip-files00139.tif'
fd187e4f0b849b837b3a6718cf9fd259
3431712e67cffd1dc56fecea1827d2b7295ea8be
'2011-12-21T04:39:34-05:00'
describe
'2878176' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGE' 'sip-files00140.tif'
ad3e83af8aa25eb3945552397313f47e
b57972316c61414cdc3886a8f228fd0d08f48dc7
describe
'2627988' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGF' 'sip-files00141.tif'
c7b603b5ac3719cdf3222656f334183f
b9bf08dc487497667d9a66dbebbc7ddbb580fab6
describe
'2877796' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGG' 'sip-files00143.tif'
f16f562d6e98aa880414538a02ba1293
52d47363e788ae16b489752e0d76f6e800e375fa
describe
'2877692' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGH' 'sip-files00144.tif'
0b2f78deddeaa1f743ce1c92eb173b6e
cd070ea231b15902c0bb472cbced424c1ed63794
describe
'2877668' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGI' 'sip-files00145.tif'
9642e61478cf5598ec95e6c38e552518
eeeb48100afe693b55556df66e3e63d6367a83c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGJ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
0b39c38e4ce4874658cfa1ead7878fab
84c6bb2613d87a8cb2525f2ec10ad14dbec6b30a
describe
'2877712' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGK' 'sip-files00147.tif'
96cb9f018e0a59f78ebb798e116720eb
43991fa017c9367ccd7a28a71064be7134198948
describe
'2877820' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGL' 'sip-files00148.tif'
685f717f633daf80b41c26ed595d5c6b
54f8b64ecf45e88f62078717d9d0de1ac64c3330
describe
'2607972' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGM' 'sip-files00149.tif'
50edf6a45f8be98cd384f6b7e9ff2f13
ae5a25bc74cbf99a57e73abfa8f6b8d3f931eaca
'2011-12-21T04:37:10-05:00'
describe
'2877528' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGN' 'sip-files00151.tif'
07b41e9bd08ff83edcc5c6d9772e395b
4815a98e7694b9f40d902931b9fa38b02fdf1c06
describe
'2877616' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGO' 'sip-files00152.tif'
d592d6430b8aa6d80dc3c04505b284ab
0ef034f138ca59774e9271406d8a1c95769ce325
describe
'2875040' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGP' 'sip-files00153.tif'
668fd919c99c38a86cc9a099d44eb3a2
7cc276f3e6e88045be149505fda0250ce509487d
'2011-12-21T04:36:37-05:00'
describe
'2877924' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGQ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
cb590e8a380756ed4b2f140119cfc697
0b87d25607455894a2ccba4604f59e76e6d1870d
describe
'2877588' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGR' 'sip-files00156.tif'
12e14e96c10c31becf57b3debc8b19ab
a44baa2e2c89b9c2e196cfede2c1aa4da476c7be
describe
'2877744' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGS' 'sip-files00157.tif'
dad0ff6461611df8af4493539fbc7ced
8a5365d1b23c8e3a3e42cf3100fda5a61754a629
describe
'2877892' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGT' 'sip-files00158.tif'
ea9d61b195f318cea17eff3018e07442
8d172bad5f6650cb33d4433d6d2caaeeb06b2554
describe
'2796040' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGU' 'sip-files00159.tif'
4669747f1fd3f5d55fe698dc9b73b68a
2e6eae1a5487355bb2bd3bc1a566e33219f0933c
describe
'2878256' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGV' 'sip-files00161.tif'
a86503210fb5163d8f6aa8979db7fa5a
ecf9b21b5a94b6d30d9d8a9b5c0453aef2ea95a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGW' 'sip-files00162.tif'
7a15cac4472dcafc6fc6aaf9d738c9dd
971e849d7a60edbe010540527e8029d8d6619300
describe
'2240680' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGX' 'sip-files00163.tif'
9be0b1095a80ed33cae02abdc43bbf71
f76b3dcbcc029ab3ba5678b0cc235cacf08faefe
describe
'2876680' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGY' 'sip-files00165.tif'
6898aa390b8a491cbadb1a619efaaebe
091c8f06429d1fa89f991bf070aecce28a3af038
describe
'2877184' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADGZ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
187d79b46e8f04e3cd71247be16365ad
93aed23defec1e7500433e2e44d8d712cd38cec1
describe
'2386412' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHA' 'sip-files00167.tif'
e61ff632087dd65a417cf65f44e3654c
7a7a7da41f4eb1f34ea4e1f6accf4b94ccb47436
describe
'2878036' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHB' 'sip-files00169.tif'
9ff5abe5e535ed4abe9d70ce8156eec9
2ee6e8a1624fd8883fafdee716fd7b5655ae1bda
describe
'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHC' 'sip-files00170.tif'
b67beb12c0de3e89ed3b08926066f063
f8ee7c08c7a174531bf99ce0f81daa286b663e56
describe
'2876500' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHD' 'sip-files00171.tif'
0aa4d62de12e836402140dbac0e604ad
75befdadf315c7856b0cf5b1a730765a08f98dac
describe
'11623044' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHE' 'sip-files00175.tif'
d7654951fa048218ecc80f1169a59f3d
b4cc7f5fe9bcf6a04c19136ebad9a5decde621fc
describe
'11584952' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHF' 'sip-files00176.tif'
7bf6308c3669a2313d7445a29f35f8bd
4e85fe5dc9c7e98dd33c29d759c9d478469bad71
describe
'2320120' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHG' 'sip-files00177.tif'
17bac847e8a4c293f47b7812b8340143
df0a0f8d5eec285ca85186d4b3384de2cee327b9
describe
'260780' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHH' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
250edee08d1a36402d39eaf7d18a099d
02f5dbc2c432fb4b03a6c1eb53de32ff4067452f
'2011-12-21T04:36:39-05:00'
describe
'70617' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHI' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
4c6ba28cb531918db70160ed5aae403b
3bc9601135b1a4c15fad79fe00e333321f4f3cb4
describe
'55824' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHJ' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
88364544c102b41e3de5b0dcb9e01b13
02c6ff668ac5667f80aa99cacc3a82476307d643
describe
'44807' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHK' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
7a99ecdad60daad51058eff5431df2a8
2531822470200430bfd9dd0b18dc024d0896aa1a
'2011-12-21T04:38:01-05:00'
describe
'149401' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHL' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
69583893ad79dfba919560e0a6844861
d92f7827bf8f541c1a5024fbaf92790c4d727ab7
describe
'95712' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHM' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
ea61fb24a2bf7d499bca09349cf0b8e1
9b4a9c7175a0a561d912053e6cddc5f949126689
describe
'87362' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHN' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
8b4990a96c73ce4c6dde384a5ed47a83
ab553dba7f3607d2875c637334cb854309601b42
describe
'40254' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHO' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
7886d94f3d88097b58c66398d6bf7d0b
84e095bd9eb4e1e3cb5b313c4bab0e080a14a3ed
describe
'79671' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHP' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
d8209c3bf1fb5eb116eb9aa87d560f73
8889d18bb5ddf4f442993cfdb0d0d6011e2add5b
describe
'117747' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHQ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
5b5eb842e18d8b9f25ff13e547603229
88e1a545b901d5a435a134e7cff47843f8d33492
describe
'53148' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHR' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
bcfc7f8900acae3c7b7e136b461f6db4
fe623e064e3e647341f40e5ec129fc3e19e076e9
describe
'128913' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHS' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
a20cedb2c48689b51223c779b65d1d9c
a04a0eae1bc72cc488e69bb7ac121171140d03d9
describe
'102166' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHT' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
090d3e3d0fa3f349015092dd524b21e1
ee52948086c6c5d9525aa17eee6f0d5eed3431b9
describe
'29312' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHU' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0a1658e7cd2149345f531d1bb8c30ef8
254821aa0b1b2b3ac0529f58539879f29bada747
describe
'11022' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHV' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
acb6119ea3a247fc9ca03cae335a3399
57a3902c478db2903d8be785913fb70f40cf38cc
'2011-12-21T04:38:52-05:00'
describe
'122078' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHW' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
7760758126275f4189cb8b136e74d8a4
25632425f3ddb30ae1b54dd77b106c685b8292fe
describe
'178678' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHX' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
91bd6e64a08d91ead78ccbb630f93e0b
34d1051f254fde58475ab7125115fa357a1f8992
describe
'84050' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHY' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
ced8b4e551138eae9cef610ab366615b
7aab8b5a7448e3ab4d381e9f2765b13b27be81a6
describe
'167372' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADHZ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
65c24593a47fdd25ea9acc610a966d13
2320f203cd993daddb22cb4848a77e5102a9c698
'2011-12-21T04:40:04-05:00'
describe
'178792' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIA' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
54825499fa661a8607cffd20937d0b5b
35fc27c42034aef8374ea10193ad064d7ca89ebf
describe
'97658' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIB' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
e7fe5c0d9dd8f1d93d1c12fd3ad7072b
dde179b760de981bffbf7b3e9257ab4e197d468c
describe
'177008' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIC' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
fa032cb9f0904901254b5b7730be17c2
0da578a79c0be63fe2f2927040de908298a3ee7d
describe
'185735' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADID' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
40c2fa3d8aaade702d8e16baa60d4467
bcb7ac15987f67b11070231ed8e424dc99b96ef9
describe
'104014' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIE' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
c3d246a4d75204faa3ae3f60ed7447b4
07a59f269541392e27bc195ba383d7612f8ae711
describe
'170370' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIF' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
595d84057e97f3fba370e1ff1f5c2001
e4db462feeb7a3a696c3b364d6d08a5a55e74831
describe
'174962' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIG' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
158c23adf3b1f95109f682335539a6b7
cfd8821df512985a24502f51926227f760b2c12f
describe
'96945' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIH' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
f61967de601784c7daf8d521a0ffe251
c8611ba18735f6d6aaa93a28adfe99f8859f378b
describe
'159696' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADII' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
efec4818ae5c07c48ec5826cf9e121b2
738e57e863ff6043a908ea352ad9833393bd3b90
describe
'192489' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIJ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
54bed1fbf8b65e03343d2edb60b9d7cd
6c77ab8423a7de9da4cb1da8917a415361313ba4
'2011-12-21T04:37:15-05:00'
describe
'158544' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIK' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
cac1daa55c62249de3fc388c2460d64c
a096832c80a8f3e974408031fa0fe8841513bb2b
describe
'199634' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIL' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
dfc50399130e0329994567fa68f4d74c
537f242b426cbc71f3c4c1f856733f3441ac3f4c
describe
'182461' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIM' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
74210afa60c00e08aa50cc798cbb0df5
716094f941a387d9d9ff54c4b33981b562de1353
'2011-12-21T04:39:54-05:00'
describe
'61411' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIN' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
aa4b4965ffc563227fc42a687aea41c8
044e6c79bbc7fa91848bc305df4b97f7a6da7cbf
describe
'164539' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIO' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
0e1f34cbbe80117484316d03fba0f9f0
6f3c2951bf358441566e1f836a659746e555aaa5
describe
'189792' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIP' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
6c7c90fdf49a2ab7433da58e42a4d342
c782e3970cf08868cf42b4c7dec1b9da71b53e2f
describe
'79756' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIQ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
fafadbc822973a30dd078c8c0e02343b
3262918cf426de834f712bfe28ae6fbcb979a007
describe
'189903' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIR' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
5895ab7e8d1ef91a76cb3d84848ca525
07f034b83b6f0267ce03a912b4979e86b693a7c9
describe
'184638' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIS' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
211988c2fbaa8cc63f8849b45d3883df
5bb5fbd2c483cb18d8f0e7990c62b5a99bf4d259
describe
'61643' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
6ed418874fdab67dcd6dbb2918baba7c
fc625817f7ac08118d4da5fcd0300f93824cd3a7
describe
'168128' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIU' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
8c6bd3e56ec698ce1447606b5716fd33
686756927f2f9b180def86cb8c3a84669744046c
describe
'186022' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIV' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
de9ae98a25701f232d5e00e9d1bfaf69
790e1111e568da376ee57706aa764f580fde72e8
describe
'147533' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIW' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
40b5487d414f6781119e2b47f8e9956e
8587403194f68e62dce82d7d7186813179a04258
describe
'171691' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIX' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
b6a0d43a3cf7c8d4ace8705226f48771
99e43f69c656d43650530c820fa1a03078f48c3f
describe
'167799' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIY' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
df1e6b2df2ceb0fd351363287a9b7b85
eee4c414c7d2b528a4bcf259f5ba8ac4f3214968
describe
'110261' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADIZ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
537227575f77c108fe98596dd030d725
7febd15049bee09cff77e7f034bde04a1fb6855c
describe
'153923' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJA' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
7d7e67e47fa5436f9a24934463f3456a
04fb3753d93e6d0f76f191c27efc5b9181ffe259
describe
'180810' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJB' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
2e6e67672b3d330f54f117d69053def3
4c25993f96872a5fb0f2ade5825ae327ae53ca72
describe
'51578' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJC' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
c4bb35a4b05f44f8c1f50ba3049db160
1144bb06e907708ad9792e9b920f818f9abadb69
describe
'172276' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJD' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
5d66b04c2f278183772dc20b9c75f4dd
bdf06030ae3538149ed1b18da6de6e3f15e0883e
describe
'170550' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJE' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
d2aa32de00275498f6320357d7582ad9
bfe42be3c4cc2410ef3c6f8fee28ae138c091581
describe
'111140' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJF' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
257ba552e31f0f269b20a4ee4e7f0f23
96726e0607a54b89217fa65f2b158b97e0ae8753
describe
'159609' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJG' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
2a606b01236ea51491700a799d7d8700
3c3af260caecaa19c9fefb234ac2f17a181188a9
describe
'176605' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJH' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
646b8b6af802257316aa689a6928031e
cb15641904de9415f19c5ebc1bfb1eb1eb1ddf9d
describe
'69640' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJI' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
75fd063fd55f4f2194e6ad5c80225a4b
19099458ee222be729dd343aa6e92dff620430aa
describe
'172654' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJJ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
b0d1343bb0e8b0475fc4fe5a03465088
9b21157f48daf192f326f6d9917acf79d178f207
'2011-12-21T04:37:49-05:00'
describe
'176500' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJK' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
e3f3bef08e77aeed71a796848fe7fa33
c6e87ad7736fc43b0f33dd35267e84f3f89c0e61
describe
'134939' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJL' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
da062ef75625a6a3d06091a7f55506b4
ed3c409e77c37ad122951cc18bdbf81fad52f3a1
describe
'164990' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJM' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
7866545e014a4679b20ea50ca1c0998b
7a4ce273195d95cf05b74e112b4866be01d0a098
describe
'183233' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJN' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
edfe756cb0711d68996f072b8bad9c16
a0b5836a1cb49d962080c99d5d476c0975e0cf76
describe
'86356' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJO' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
71835cb31acdf1d6b92435639f3d8479
a89dc40ca38bb232f1daae6689c6f464dccd12a3
describe
'190013' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJP' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
015e1fc74e6c9c91be0103fc54e8fefd
9bdb2d2de7799d806447f01d7f0ad6472ad3f7fa
'2011-12-21T04:40:30-05:00'
describe
'183553' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJQ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
f720d9f03b561317306e67a999860d6a
86a1d18e245fe9f0b07cee491130a50e3e8a713b
describe
'75617' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJR' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
8e944cfe2328516567c111b2f525f4c1
04be5704fe625b06efd2c68176c85eb3fda72dea
describe
'167540' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJS' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
c0a1879792e6ca6d677d6a557aafa642
ce8aa9b7b3fc61a4d9f14908c2384b2ad5b27db5
describe
'186164' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJT' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
4fa8e2ae7d2ec05efd56afb381f575d3
852c31e14803fa47ad0f8028258ec67bc3270606
describe
'118526' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJU' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
e12ff0ba337495ddafc27d5f58e18550
0a68f494e1ba1d70c4e122029461b231dce77eb2
describe
'183976' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJV' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
3b0530d63463d37da903af060328469e
f511eff8bee26b1d3d6c8b997626f65121938a8a
describe
'181977' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJW' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
4f614ef5e0841ddf5215c092a8223513
da6a3a45024fdac8fa4ee138b875b61256d0e2ee
describe
'113735' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJX' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
acfc6d5018aa87b5e38fa800ccbc4036
b851c5b937c53e74ac6dc5b288f346db5bb6ac6f
describe
'168356' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJY' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
cc519f108a44f93db3338007ba628bd2
2adb38d069d4b780fa38bd8651be70fb40b474ce
describe
'177391' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADJZ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
fa2bbe3cfa04dc742bb7cd3038496ad0
fe179127ac50a601b5cc71026d4ec8c68503542a
describe
'61009' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKA' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
aae9fc7713519168662d1bfbc0b22f49
91c589e2b5cd4f2c84ec305be68f963302705d5b
'2011-12-21T04:38:58-05:00'
describe
'170729' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKB' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
3293ffa0d1ab02064d5d04b896d8009a
370ab6af957df2f08dae78e4fad40ce8b171c5b2
describe
'147772' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKC' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
233428738efda21d47b7c01fe8d478c8
6ab87a1e01ae04a9049656d8946f3e8c58788049
describe
'167547' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKD' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
f4d1986725ce28397b245cf4b1f3b6b9
a8e24dd85e227a184e3daa2dd7938eca77d112f4
describe
'160118' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKE' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
8599b33ab5f0288e0151d945891f6aca
388190aa558ec6edabcf7680e89aa164a6e01c6e
describe
'176289' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKF' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
645a998611082462dde65641aed5a1c8
2ecbd5cfa01612e0670402a5765af39ccf9d2793
describe
'137659' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKG' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
f4b62d2fc6a6ec75088fffef83281057
a4b79b2c97519580378eb31d6b21b37f9861a09e
describe
'177664' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKH' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
4d534702f98e151488de8dcaf238d740
e210410bb54a383e6fd6c438f72524a0b0879d6a
describe
'174363' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKI' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
3ab6a299b6f2ab5548ea98d35b731dd7
340a1076ca89ba89a7dbc1c38899f2dee07d6969
'2011-12-21T04:38:02-05:00'
describe
'58065' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKJ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
aff27204b0488431df9e9ee244d2e15a
cabffdf0fd4341ed6c5943c373662beecab57dd5
describe
'192608' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKK' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
426d66effc3aa832f797d304b156e859
902065a99e9b4bbc9c85bedfe55f7108b2bc8d08
describe
'184879' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKL' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
7d1f8a11f999fe6e09b716003d9b8ddc
d7ef966f02e95fe8b904a636434a3cee8ae1dd5f
'2011-12-21T04:37:32-05:00'
describe
'107767' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKM' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
303a2d2cc85618568cb0bf02266a632e
10391ff49d94553c5ca32cbdfcbca8d4255947e1
describe
'168916' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKN' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
a023af0362d9709d650b4f7923a91d6f
80991fb8d6c2540777d59f93a3224577598e35ed
describe
'179978' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKO' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
f6f15f5220a3c0d7eed82906ebb4a0f2
e21b678dc4fcddfa9b41023e2284ddb44e5c4e87
describe
'177216' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKP' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
9cddd246e36a5c051830ba39c6be46b7
d0ed73356e85db728a9178cd92f4f6e38bd85fa5
describe
'171617' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKQ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
fa5dd94b8bcc63169ebe2e5de24e28bb
c2103cb7f4c27b461473837a02584eafcab86b43
describe
'176092' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKR' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
119b87264c2a24ce9faee21b0fd715bb
ad90731be17eb1879a55ae21a20f1b031a2e8270
describe
'169083' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKS' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
faffb71d154dfbfc67aa05698120056b
30a094bae7599433410c0cee307ebaec0039e305
describe
'169921' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKT' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
2e981e9de9dabe3306634b1731690b51
f79c85ae6d35a6ce0c0794bb86a798f9d616275b
describe
'182227' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKU' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
132a19d36581d55de7b664d321a9719b
9016bdb8a52018466445d56563f978726fe0b9da
describe
'164543' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKV' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
aa1b6745d5e07e4c9f4081f9c09112a5
0cb074295738d1465dc721ef10416004f7bcde86
'2011-12-21T04:39:20-05:00'
describe
'183201' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKW' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
6aab1159ac7b2bf4cd96ed9f0bbf70fb
74b7e01f5218279d4be2a86c249ee402119208c6
describe
'43308' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKX' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
b48c0ea1c8b24b9663237fe4c0c8547b
d6ad3d7d63ca39e577c3c2f6ec3114a00d14f61e
describe
'65880' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKY' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
2b227c4cd76ac02d1fd04756e48dbeb1
fcb9663a652f31cb6100d66321505a30254193ac
describe
'134892' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADKZ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
6ea28467cbeaf2f14a229d8baf2d86d9
6fea74dc0a195f970ac3b14060cfade1e3271ad4
describe
'174331' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLA' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
ace157c54cc2d8ef791b4013d62f69f7
5f81e3d2824e7df5c00be8a85c42a12366a93262
describe
'202771' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLB' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
dae35c8461a62daed701db1b5372295a
0a12aaa9f07cf35fcdfc4f8c901eb851a3927c51
describe
'169488' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLC' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
5e84b3618834a97d1dd61c2d37e51962
9c8d397ccbc122e0e715eb8c57e6656e190dc6f5
describe
'184261' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLD' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
cf5a92507036dea5b7be7cb68b6ef339
d181070e567afb502feb23394f9738eefabba13e
describe
'150002' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLE' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
f20466104525544a739f6943f6a02a90
767af59eb5553b8620d4674eabd5a968e1d70fc0
describe
'160200' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLF' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
1cc4517368e1130fd3a8976f9f60c48b
ddb5f8e32b09e3afbcf648ce78382e1e68b1f1c8
describe
'153816' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLG' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
b6d8fc9a2ca200f2a4329aaf1290ce52
109ffa2144718263e2a25e453e6c949ec02a0832
describe
'167442' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLH' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
fcff5861a4a497892e86574ac0a01326
977edf115ac9243803db3e93d059d2637484c023
describe
'186545' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLI' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
53ca1cc0e58fbc4b0831b70e016f7cd7
305b7f66e21591bbfed7a34d5606e7d904939c0c
describe
'160593' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLJ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
fd0402741156bbb1ce3837f538b3f39f
53c3b24c361577ab208c3a6be1c51d71ec3c8f80
describe
'170560' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLK' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
6e43c0cb76b0ea74fbded6783776c688
b1bf10af0d58642580190acfca94095d2ed79970
describe
'165420' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLL' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
522385f96c7e7d130d7dea9522dbc66c
a883a2ba5ea9e5d547b078ec47472c98a97aed76
describe
'171555' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLM' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
e747c420fb1e69fbbe89675fbe1b5a42
8849acbe40b97e4b536f7039eb64f95ea93539d4
describe
'170063' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLN' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
7a29bdbd2ce1314ed70b06853c96c34c
5284ad852df1bdd62967298a6ee267713e275d35
describe
'170794' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLO' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
7bac3dd1ca0997bcaccb7440ccac2501
d3b489265ac6926dbd627a625e40c2a71508492a
describe
'172989' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLP' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
cb39437d1f095d70396795a50efd1c13
43258cee23f3768d7c89921105074c06fc9d112c
describe
'185367' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLQ' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
9d9b07d19b56ce8bd0b4457e121896ed
c48f269f2ce742d5dd5a4ca013b704867c5d8555
describe
'159480' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLR' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
5d3ce236378266f5aef55e2356910f31
b13238cd3e74928e9586e33babd69252a60795e6
describe
'166415' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLS' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
2a06f75d07e3e3de2d994d49e0cc33af
b414f934aaba9a6d2ada0232bdfa4739d55d30b2
'2011-12-21T04:37:05-05:00'
describe
'83336' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLT' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
d026927a4c632219c5685c3b2dad21be
81002fda4490245b15d9b5182a87ca94c3386e3a
'2011-12-21T04:37:44-05:00'
describe
'172692' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLU' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
50af541af9bcfcaea0e645f54fc1b478
f5e009fc251c788e803e5f5228cb2ce300e53bcf
describe
'151552' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLV' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
1933ebe4711b21887c0d024b47a31733
bfbbe108efeb36b2ff32c5116d491df682de9131
describe
'155501' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLW' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
76436fe6765e83fe2a0f2262c8b58a8d
88d3abf6d1a8c626fd37676be756006ed0e5b86c
'2011-12-21T04:39:40-05:00'
describe
'187186' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLX' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
912b03420d2e4ca941dcd4e01449bfdf
5f7f3b03c2d28ed8e58275013ffb0cd1799e85d1
describe
'49583' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLY' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
181cac7a751648c7470d07aa9ee5dd6b
caaee80a0358a83d3e42c7674ef59c820b4fe9ac
describe
'164488' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADLZ' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
c8e8d639b925225bbae0e6fae78ce002
0cac0a0accaaacf88bf5c1757544da202f137abf
'2011-12-21T04:38:13-05:00'
describe
'178593' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMA' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
24ce4de868d33848c12a77617ea17e5f
03febd0ad55016dea68bbc20c919b96091b1b796
describe
'52257' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMB' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
080c60a2d285dd212f9086fa22ac1ee1
bb7c0ab7329b44e1981765e3c9db0bab376c7626
describe
'145062' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMC' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
649546f3dfbf1258ede737ca71c0b2f9
12f7bff3f9a846699febab3cb50d9c5f01e5b4cb
describe
'156485' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMD' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
937c72798fa8f52cbcb7dcb9668cf4e9
52794a0d0f1c877ece16f32092d2cbcfb21f08f2
describe
'47139' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADME' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
3fba6382e97607169b015ee5346ed22e
686f362473693cfe5f1f65b98e30358214fe9bc2
describe
'168863' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMF' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
35bc5073a69ef33962141430c6ca21c4
4fbb44fe2bebe76d4608924d2bb3799968ea2e3c
describe
'164349' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMG' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
42aa3d13f19b149aa4fd0f117d5f962a
3604887bb183304261357dc955d2b6534b34c265
describe
'122587' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMH' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
88c791f17ef2725ef98f6ea45133f5e4
2ce97d0307d5121b405fb6863b7997004a69972a
describe
'69234' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMI' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
3762d48bc631d27c0dd4a8705650bfe5
e17a6989dcd35b7e77b2d80d03956f9ec36312d7
describe
'220920' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMJ' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
bd054e714a6485ad804a6a09237e5c38
cb86c65a53ac0db3da9258bdfdaaba143297355a
describe
'61389' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMK' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
28bc29783f1530e0b6f81186a7167fef
21d602e910a267099841231ff707df7863065800
describe
'24641' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADML' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
e24a05fb87a7a49d7ee5ea1ca1b03d48
7848c7a8bea01e576d43ffb3c40a682910363b99
describe
'59426' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMM' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
d99be4f038fb2bfb160a85389cfe56ae
19efc15ad41253c60917c979952855df2e50ad19
describe
'21024' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMN' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
379906bcc4ca7c800ef5a50689907fd5
e37f60d345bb59393987e56f2512d9cbc1c6c56f
describe
'12449' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMO' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
f22605aae081b40802101a67893561ed
bd69f9cab4a93b0a5bd81956553629315c2371cb
describe
'15893' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMP' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
d75ff44369c4ced30d7625d8959ec6e9
9bb94da9ea0e26ed77e71611665ebdf1a801a8d7
describe
'10197' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMQ' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
db7f7ea9e518aad936d5494a881264dc
ba72df5aff8cc2603b61c17ca0d7721df862a7c4
describe
'42607' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMR' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
ab586a3d2653639e10f9f55c889002ed
871c418c6c5d99390b7ac07be1a4303fe8ba8804
describe
'19225' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMS' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
b9c200aee811484e78a9196a55ea6f02
10279fc04cf2353af89816972b3ca581f116696b
'2011-12-21T04:36:32-05:00'
describe
'32857' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMT' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
2904293696151a1282d6a7211d7c6aec
cbbbf85b38e0cbf4ca3009552f6cfe1d1e792b51
describe
'18236' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMU' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
f2cf25d37a469b5715d6e81178abd542
13c2bbe650888cc20fa3cffc17db97b0d015ca7d
describe
'29385' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMV' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
5b5c1b6b7d69706a55ccf592456176a0
eb33938d389976816420e7fb2f88630b7a6dbe2a
describe
'14769' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMW' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
4dfedf0d558d5a8bb6b711f86ac8b03d
f3ebb3efa7c79ed8940a8549097cf7aa27e22bf6
describe
'15764' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMX' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
9502cb7dd303a8d2b51ec572d4213bb2
cedc1db04c60de3ceba71b7ec85c458e08844eb9
describe
'10532' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMY' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
3c5fa60768a1184a38a9d3e054cd4975
97997058bc215dae34f92044ad69b3d88e6705b4
describe
'20194' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADMZ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
7b0552c0e612be2f74a59479a6662f9e
a16cc5ed1e138c72b9da2398c659d1ae2922bb2d
describe
'11275' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNA' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
512a8c8f1765eb8f601aa82dd802a0e1
e7f068f5ddad9772c61f00ce2a648a37e3e57c8f
describe
'42347' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNB' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
5fa2267f81be133291064dba624586b2
938c1f219d933ce4cce1805ded4d34441b539c0d
'2011-12-21T04:37:09-05:00'
describe
'18563' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNC' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
70382b6b0805e1f0ea8fffae7340d79d
063c41965b6e5794ec778c3164d9af64e37d9166
describe
'24752' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADND' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
a04328a40d6eb9a4fff94a12e6e3bc01
09c47273f8dbd03a2463c0edd9b3dca2d5d4271a
describe
'13723' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNE' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
c9b58e1f24652c2e5cf1e19e18152f46
a4e5867f92d509ed734c04967b2e4762a33906aa
describe
'49522' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNF' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
6b7eca4f3915653c9f20b32b42e0a02d
53d4a36ca604d9e5d55fe1c248f7e861d2f11ecd
describe
'21017' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNG' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
01c1ed0ede162dc4bb2578503ccfd6fe
6ea1a8140115129467d3b8cfe5d02e61f6c5176a
describe
'39304' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNH' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ff2f1f894aecd0e3355d66e1075f3af8
41a2fc4b0262db35c1638a187bb2bc20abc7713b
describe
'17896' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNI' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
3f5f06492d1776902b9805705f2a500a
dc76ca31821acfaf7eadcd23dd8abd294e9c5497
describe
'12644' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNJ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
3c844dd8dca2e2d0fddd969f1e9b60ae
363b910b609bef65553938daa79902eedabb06a4
describe
'9561' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNK' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
8ccbe85d988b02e571fe23e1c649e244
ac4341e4fc630c5266dec2e38116b2cbdf4e2d39
describe
'9229' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNL' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
a3c8e1ff3bd234c528511240511cde8d
69723c5ab209a2768a0d92a081f96cb4747ef91a
describe
'8772' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNM' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
e008de2f903aeae53015a0797222a563
97f15a832f0e176caa8e74ce7926d33a4f4ab985
describe
'46783' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNN' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
3c84bc41482905d500dc23590d11b9b5
f35fa5ce74819d2ffae6eccd918e5c5bb01456a2
describe
'19768' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNO' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
eaf8d6c7d3a7dd6f09c77783f8cc9176
a42b4253dde283e0a90935f38ff220723ff27774
describe
'61801' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNP' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
9673169cab7325226fb49e1666b4f039
849eda08a6e68eb8ca622416e845c786a78674f2
describe
'23897' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNQ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
470e699ac50489bb1d0050bdb06c2b8a
4e4284064e5e1f3e7f2c3fe90810becf7eec24c0
describe
'27153' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNR' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
9f18d58dea362fd2ae37ccfc02288d66
85a5f658f96bd108f7df6fc3614ff8149dfdc650
describe
'14535' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNS' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
fc1ef678bb5470f02172dc07600a5f7e
73cac6d80e9c646dcca1ae0ef70f6dd55173017f
describe
'60927' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNT' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
6fa23f7cafc74ccdba295663f21fe7a6
5fa4ac81ae64506ab7ff85bfd1d5d3565504ce0e
describe
'24079' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNU' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
08adfa3f6042adab1668ed9cb2e8a678
9c0286cdb352cb7df05c44bb77ac97777052dd6c
describe
'64103' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNV' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
795f4bacb5debd8d1a3e9cf9170bbd7b
3301668d11c2bd86e531e7415c21148c78d7b3cf
describe
'24838' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNW' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
907225979900d87ac427294077d46ceb
9cdcea2a9f7f1887db6510e085a09b3ecac1cb9c
describe
'35107' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
455156a89fcbeebac6018678e66e302d
e87c18919cc4a34fcaeb059beae71e217f1a20b9
describe
'18813' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNY' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
38faddd804cfd87fc37d714132eb3369
4b959fc0c0e0230190edcb9d44dc5dacdb82f12c
describe
'62714' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADNZ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
592679b4c86d70c315a377398c3c9388
00a232404b46170b4ba46717300196f79cf8e36c
describe
'24704' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOA' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
445f70ac86476221757f429e02898e51
0257cedf798781d99703d63d35fd5367b3c01f25
describe
'64487' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOB' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
b27d62b7c1cc2cf7fef6086d81e78486
88495096f0579ece1d5cfeb17e54afeb45cb75c1
describe
'24934' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOC' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
4b70bf5b77d1996ddc0f1c2085bc29b7
a8381b2bbba9ecf0b69687385de7a9d5e0773cb6
describe
'33629' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOD' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
527c957c1567463566c681c710d30099
fcfc49cf8a95743bb086e36e8ab8c6e308e38905
describe
'15853' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOE' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
d8fffa8939ee7fbd426181c14aac040e
82750335055657796d7a478c6cd2ca65f9415f12
describe
'63284' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOF' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
301da1bd768034d2d9378543ca8a31ac
fee3a52d5c8f0f01644e951222024aaa60ff28e5
describe
'24244' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOG' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
a126e67288c713e2d0a0eedef7044b50
5615622804e6352587fb9c57bb17d894380f9786
describe
'62437' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOH' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
5630637e9956c977239d5b9ea593bc00
3c387dc565d7adad66afc263f179ff2b16b66e14
describe
'24352' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOI' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
e787cd65890d0124d0a7e281bf7fb3bd
3ca30c17121e7ca3d2a65f882b265848d95bb61b
describe
'29640' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOJ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
97b2c60a906acb4680a7da36beb45d00
e78e42b818f481abe33b961e0deb07293fa447d5
describe
'14832' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOK' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
ce40ea9324d7fac223dad26e41e0644f
51854a4b871e75302c77b1717bd16992587bee03
describe
'60432' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOL' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
9bbfc56d84c5a5a1eb7d05fc2456ea9b
8122f577140ce17489d8f91c470177d4b7113a88
describe
'24184' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOM' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
8ca5c2045cc0ec229f6820a8e1b6d651
5c140ccf30802daee554d244a29a459e42b819a7
describe
'64630' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADON' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
ddc17f62ea33f8f58c8515c2ab3e56c1
79acf79de51f3c2df1ba8ed47262600b02717320
describe
'24857' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOO' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
6c63f327698ef439b4c31b5bdb59963f
375329e3d5b9a20b7125ae6970e3a5dc444dc32a
'2011-12-21T04:39:57-05:00'
describe
'43372' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOP' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
f75b44e29e3689c26e60bfc1f2a66605
13457e2578261759b5e1c7c5e18ff945158a53bd
describe
'18558' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOQ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
b4ac1181718b268672c261b13fc7cd99
aee21c8ca4592ed290890497e98a094d7ec09d01
describe
'65684' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOR' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
2dec175ef82a65755a27772db90944a4
553fcb616ca902f34c8541567d2968b8e2ca47b7
describe
'24543' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOS' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
ac6d839577df3334936cb24cf26d41d8
80202f787e3b107db62036f3bb427171aae32bfb
describe
'62706' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOT' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
fb44a25814272f07a2da12c8a95b9552
2833372adf4aee2aef6bdb4a9fa01495383581af
describe
'24549' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOU' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
55f6e35bd6f41a234d0acfe06744deba
2451782427cd00acf16a1ac388fe63ce4641a473
describe
'21788' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOV' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
4e8f953aa9b4d34b0b8d2909491ec667
ee6c40aa4e2d9ef9d179d1a7a91dcf9caf846204
describe
'12515' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOW' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
a8bd244b02a9f45220e90e3c985559b5
ab8ae4f5ddbfad981e4ef196df3b3f99e75f1796
describe
'59949' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOX' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
97f7de200c1770c812a8b5cebce9721b
f44798cfd7b8cf2e1cf4f15d4fdb3fc1659b0142
describe
'23580' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOY' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
a67084481d35b34533afde25c35e41c0
a4c917a2726684ba204083c5fcb594f64b3578c6
describe
'64990' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADOZ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
728009de1ba6f9101322cbae38e0a619
99b1f2b51ba5e96a3d8400f0c5fe6ffff443324d
describe
'24772' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPA' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
4f3dc15d65bce39b9069642fa3c2fa6a
197b22c96d8b833d32300736b9b4fbb267637322
describe
'24509' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPB' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
214fccbd63d3113cba3d2df032e7bc20
224bc9d10096167cca30cf6354b529bff02e38ba
describe
'13526' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPC' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
69540247c2ca9316edb48bfbd77ec3fe
885a5fb220a56b4a7ed391740bbbfb108692480e
describe
'66516' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPD' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
69dd8b3da4758a4f7dbc74c149589db8
df82c78ba794121dad704370f22781646d6c680b
describe
'25751' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPE' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
131e0264ea9bf379b46b87b67ab6b733
fb42bce75670a63246083d0a4b21763546421d1a
describe
'63791' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPF' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
12a65d3fb10bdb384badc9b2900dc2b6
a9fbf0b66a6dbc8effecd542f5d8f443f868e190
describe
'24259' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPG' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
9600579a17d5bcf72a05634e166344d3
d359796fe24f4774071004b5aaef9d97b3fa7a12
describe
'22059' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPH' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
d8f5b73821705cd3aafccc35edb54a25
f4a8b14f81b98008ecd3de2c13ec562a318aa474
describe
'13018' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPI' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
0031b183d27255733e5691ed157b88f9
8637d2eb3466b467f17933f029b52361e5fbb970
describe
'61926' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPJ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
a72adbf3b711ba43494ed355527a1b09
0c7df6b31ee13a4b5d35a06026c268d60ece2622
describe
'24189' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPK' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
6644312acba361f71a3c934dcea5f16e
5329542b0d6b32ff722989ef21353e43078550c9
describe
'64373' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPL' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
61ecd3e333f6ce9be555e28f45d92d15
c9d57e5901fc8aa311f332daa4bf5a67fcba3fbe
describe
'24366' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPM' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
5065f4f1b77bb042dd8893ed2ff1ab77
c5108f1a051b91add7927ef0241dd4cba02f25d6
describe
'42219' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPN' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
78fd42124f43dd8f53aafded8ac95975
3dcb3387eb473ad4afe552c1c559e517e8eeae43
'2011-12-21T04:38:41-05:00'
describe
'19262' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPO' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
40c003da4355ebd1486faca533542fc5
7162dcf71e5b7994753a2afd741e095b2413903a
'2011-12-21T04:39:30-05:00'
describe
'61457' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPP' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
62f93cbf83aff1740591922835e3081f
5913a705417875eb6737cdd4648c3163b480db66
describe
'23624' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPQ' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
20e9ed8b2da48934f766c67f8977d7d9
9b0d03684d57f1589054dc03f72afbb39f50f480
describe
'61719' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPR' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
242fae056ea8afc6197cb15a923bb2e4
aa1c6c73e8ff1310064760242c20302f46df7790
describe
'23831' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPS' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
ace945d6e90aebcbb8bb0a0e61cccdcf
34994e36a87cf7b7c9e7c704f800745a0ef84af6
describe
'38169' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPT' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
7443a56af4e1b00907de4fd6f35c25d8
64dd811d06768d08e8214da47b8f7795b67a20dd
describe
'20277' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPU' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
5284f7d8fb7a349534eaf1c79ff20630
f8dbbf62b310d02eb1d5e6bcd58ea00f5852481d
describe
'60064' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPV' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
e1e3623b40f98cd0ada72a40fbe0c358
b2bfbbe974c48bf04aa11cf878e1d075793cda9e
describe
'23646' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPW' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
3822e36c732426a3ec2b7eeee23feb28
71ae1c64b1f651c0f5c395bbb6e75f67270e11c9
describe
'65637' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPX' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
e0a508203612cd3d0fa4cdc73771ef76
2f633df5eac55914401e456dd09c3ef49f0b3a2a
describe
'25669' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPY' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
eb3c2853195eb6f82e911a3b744f5125
adaaf89e465bf9af8586d0af68dd3094188026f8
describe
'21432' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADPZ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
4e5652a3ec927224d7926b4459150ba2
b996a001c37d715b052ca3913ce940a790283061
describe
'13231' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQA' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
2b3f8552298403e95be2d9ad3b2f9b61
5a88c830fc6ea09079fffffc4f1f57a91781921e
describe
'62555' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQB' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
2409d8879c35b6842d015cf4cd739789
b60a882eecfe50947b3d2a0f68fd07f8de99e5d5
describe
'24675' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQC' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
dcacc65df3df21729009f6a08edc8f17
715bca10e2151a096760dfae197e4ba53ebde775
describe
'62184' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQD' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
0b6eb97a1927e422efaac0566b843ae6
76d4287c071904229ab879eb3ca7f3442e97f269
describe
'23849' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQE' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
15c14578a16e545b540bcb3865affa35
28fdf1fd08af44aee8bf817770c16114fc6a0867
describe
'38646' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQF' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
3ad2522a88c819b2190752c8c0a36cd1
80f6db4dc3cdc0a172ab3f492c4e75f07bbe91fd
describe
'17975' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQG' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
a973c5d9ef337d6d4240e1f6d6e07c2d
272ee343d468831dde2cf155e26b0d19b7a92ad2
describe
'60450' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQH' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
5f7c8aa6b063b096a0c13349e0c856d6
ec548f1e3036c356b62cad428dc01cfa0968dd41
describe
'23716' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQI' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
d8c48437e3a8d7ff5679ec3b16efcf37
131bdcc1769a05eec910ffd83e357abacd4441a4
describe
'62616' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQJ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
620a2597df0d35766b60898549f77fce
c53fe1d6d664760a709ac7b37eca80021a149a3a
describe
'24230' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQK' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
2fb67e347031eddb79c568d638d6298e
7a34445208393128b40b448f0f0282717f454748
describe
'24106' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQL' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
0495aa820c436578476ed5dee49a2d19
cb1691a3b501a1b4032c68ac9d8e0cea1254fc32
'2011-12-21T04:40:00-05:00'
describe
'13669' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQM' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
0a59ba4f2773bd9d8626afda67342bf9
75f7689e4c46c06f5b7383ce8178479ec87467a6
describe
'62950' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQN' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
bf4a8f20d8fb7dd6714cc2d96abcf27f
3f6a5ac1f16471ba74c36adef328778efd3fc1e4
describe
'24261' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQO' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
1bf7820d22c18de0aff62408a86ab64d
e5080e45dbb083c55bea42bf278b9864d503fb93
describe
'63233' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQP' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
252942618a92fa9a14337eb956e61f2c
a90d89d29a22609b8b0d38f88c276d72bd699c79
describe
'25318' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQQ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
c958c2df8978da25ca46a2b4160b704b
75b0d1c47c77b6cb3baf5b7d8dd2209fd6276ffa
describe
'43524' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQR' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
d0e8552ea2a80bcf77765f336f0a5ccd
eea14ae0925ee09c546af97a41f042afadf7d593
describe
'18950' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQS' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
8a55bb1a150f7f5ed3794cb5bd4b3220
1749db6d0e9aa7543c576d09de30b88ae7d1bb46
describe
'62181' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQT' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
d70c61510412e44d9a5a9a235ccc3f0c
f8e6a5b0ba1bd646cc790a39295c7ffff149fb00
'2011-12-21T04:40:10-05:00'
describe
'24057' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQU' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
1707feedd829423088a2d63a8ae52f0c
47c8fa13e2e244d1bf1270f038687d064a2f0c79
describe
'63614' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQV' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
528b503b46e7f55da5d8a71049d3bfa2
bec972746eb1c1f3c26c7cfe2dbba49e39226899
describe
'24605' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQW' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
00617b8e71513a14c791f84d53306554
79baccea9e7c4847014f2aa6c6fc3289d14fdc7e
describe
'30739' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQX' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
2b832c1e5a4b34ba5dc3c77e2af37c1e
7fa2ab9d47b9d657f8a0cc2d304a38e83f02d578
describe
'15589' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQY' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
40e1489cd5645bfd42b289b104561812
15bc843b94e3794343dd4b3a0b0415e022f5d065
describe
'62870' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADQZ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
b0f4b0ea0102ac902a89d1d9dcd77138
886e16f783b67897f400064d377c959a55a7c66b
describe
'24396' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRA' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
4da539e175b6ec1c94d7bcec2d578f7a
0476a2040d03edb7300af4dfc18c76fc27d2594e
describe
'63889' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRB' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
c0657c2e08e41432dbc024bfeaeb2ee7
e55cb922c33d3c7404488cc1b979423306208063
describe
'24341' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRC' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
5c8c7f2837870fa004dd1886b35e86d6
d748c9a18dac4daa3412595948459477ac11a01e
describe
'23918' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRD' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
5315d69fc05a2ee61fd86c8dd427987a
0b2e8bcd0765af67996192f574f67384985c295a
describe
'13362' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRE' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
b56c9ec70f6b08f7b84ab8dd9c2d36d0
2954639723cf031ce03f335290f947e747cc50db
describe
'60529' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRF' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
626127ef473d100608618bbb0f9108ea
904ce4c71ee95a9abb9e23ee2616ab8ea94ba4f8
describe
'24199' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRG' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
3c95af994104b8aa6c272d600c0fe430
9e7e70c09a5fc17621bbe085b1675a18620a2335
describe
'63648' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRH' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
1dd245505e7f4626efd7cb9f0d2b06c7
af07bea93d686f5204033e5085804d3aab620e5c
describe
'23948' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRI' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
091da94fa2879c042b178872476e4dd2
370b9da1f2d182c6b9f1201a9bde1a7545511eee
describe
'36619' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRJ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
9da47c519a93dc771faab1538c3e0ced
7b9bbc9d3153b26f329a00e58bb08bb90abb5080
describe
'16690' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRK' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
fe193285f1f5dba614e7787160fbcd47
92dff692df54f761dd7e90755e2c81d1940ccb56
describe
'64376' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
cdf4148c7b4a13e3885a32ce891803c1
894a9c0bf78fb6b235faa89d6f56be2e500d0128
describe
'24447' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRM' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
1acd53fb2974354f7108c26d3bfabdb0
8e562fb0b7b7561e84d646d715f93b6825ace31a
describe
'63553' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRN' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
02a3840a783783ad3058de2b273bea84
c160b476df5634628ca4fb21c190908cbec23012
describe
'24210' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRO' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
fa6c905bd391897c1570b252e0c373b3
ba74cbcbbc8c409fd839e0fb73ea740e4ffc6adb
describe
'36130' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRP' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
14ca0409426de0a1152f883e4b6e39a8
70103e05eb3613249a9f6451cfad4859f3128610
describe
'16761' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRQ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
27f2364c41c46c8bedecaf78de07d632
297e2b88f9eb3ee58182fccb42940178121c6f8f
describe
'62478' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRR' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
ad3d1aa9fd1512a4ffe3afe99d944cab
4e076b61ba6ff59e0f939584bb4f2c212edee1ae
describe
'24263' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRS' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
e1f76a4e1675ea9bb1c789de6e01bc03
4dd5fe0db182c634852eac6cc169ead07acac1d5
describe
'61930' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRT' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
25e1ae5b5d6167fd00289e0c07a957a3
8b6961f0c9e11dbdb53230ef8c9bb725437efc5c
describe
'24077' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRU' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
8ec55b8b65ede746fd05d6ae46fdefdb
d089c45f7266da6a2da27fcfd05315477efb4e7e
describe
'23309' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRV' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
18e477f730f0a2eb2e1f269923711ab5
fd4b88713dfba85c2d6ffe9eca4382f726f4e187
describe
'13925' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRW' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
85637c109b37ef48db1121b57995bfc5
25163fc93ae15c750f8e60bba254a2ec441a04c9
describe
'62429' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRX' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
65087982d1b0c2cd7e6741a7bb6b940e
9d1c09011a55e7dbc4004b4562d0692e6a2c2e2a
describe
'24074' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRY' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
069e0cdc03d2165f97754ddeb75a0a8b
938b7c5e1f12fe9cc93d740a81436944729a2614
describe
'50690' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADRZ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
395cdaa9fbe2cae9809975fe611ac61e
f56717156cf7841dc0187418c9179168342a1d5e
describe
'21277' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSA' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
3285c9f1804d980405e36ad24e420c0a
6469a9f1590167e23c396e44f9dac63cbb675a52
describe
'52054' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSB' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
9b5a40d890f8e1ff222e00bb582733e6
a30986f4be074fa869f7f59f02a9a4e9590abc33
describe
'20988' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSC' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
7b5030a70350b9b04f00f0e9ad0659b7
df2a2f776f4fa25cda1038076751964241e33d47
describe
'60594' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSD' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
a01a8aaeebe7ee92bbfa1535f736f979
854c5d9fddc83b2e96c694928248e0e4d9ee666d
describe
'23835' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSE' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
994fb8e6494780b3098c7efb3ad807de
ff6df9c78b19139eec426ebde757d9fe28033571
describe
'61330' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSF' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
a7904eba6c439b65e79b742057579c3e
731926550c094c73bd9762b2c425860716a89ec1
describe
'24036' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSG' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
6d4a798c90d48444fca5b857aee4c1ac
b4942b9e0ede28e38a6aca9d12ea85fc2f0e7a6d
describe
'41650' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSH' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
aa7868ee263e0a7c78f5b802f31f1975
632a5feb7b9992c6f4c4c64d8e355e1f2b1a08c0
describe
'17852' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSI' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
95c106bea9941f9416dff54109556fb0
e5ff8950a7fa2501f08ca8f87a3ecb9c4ebc610b
describe
'62018' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSJ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
18cced056aaf03f68d522224bec374e1
17e3a78c6643bf381fa457ee97c77c0b340caea3
describe
'23889' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSK' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
e3fbf52f9e6a3b1569573ceb3b08e888
f9b50aa13c0ab5c60e5c5c3e4abb5ac7649ade49
describe
'62188' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSL' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
0fae935e9a57dca8a0d7b7b752b053aa
b492bc97e33e8984a6caf4c80abeab90e1ee975b
describe
'23930' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSM' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
1d96d11bde88f3c377ae67b2aa62de70
ad9578b0af87c68c93f21add63bfb57db3868715
describe
'22010' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSN' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
68ca510dd3836e008d0aa0b115b52a0d
9cfd24708aa51feaf55f888bbefe29fa466c11f6
describe
'12529' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSO' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
e721c0ece3014723abd1271b351ff0ec
3755f7d4b05d1ce6e2fafdb5b77d984437d0d595
describe
'64483' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSP' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
fc0f7a6ad427b24c5909dc09710cf0e1
e74e6e3e17e7cf6fff27a54ad14ad7097ae76955
describe
'24532' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSQ' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
802933bb57df41e081657aa5bd21354e
61da93984fb56bfc9160501f50e9bb8a7d697d1d
describe
'62791' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSR' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
31a35e7bcc64b93209cef68a2caee582
9c3836b7c3083808aa86299d95ad4f8fd4aa8bda
describe
'24562' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSS' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
c3b1aed81e9b30811ed9f76bca1ea295
42c59fd86bdb2d3a8823f26c236f3609dd42bd9b
describe
'34043' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADST' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
fd72f8b24e3551afaf83790625158248
e7ae7970add792ba14bcdd6decbfd8262cf99c04
describe
'16393' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSU' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
491c7a6ac059d6188e765ed85182057b
0db17e43ba276994247b1921dd50187f0ff21002
describe
'62280' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSV' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
ebe52cdcb3618209df40bd39538398cd
abaca305c24d3b571d328ea748b8dca59d2e81bd
describe
'24233' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSW' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
387d7c6200c32aaf28710015290f7e00
132f0af8db17525ba58f289cd4b90321f4bf12e5
describe
'65262' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSX' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
17ec65e021dcff0c2e65f6d1a4730da8
3a2a80c0422fc259d997ad9e9e611a1147572dc1
describe
'25273' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSY' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
c5a3ec0b052af3bffa13f33b62b8c6cd
920a3ea6afc441339f87eb8a8f7695c81605a94d
describe
'63568' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADSZ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
4443f852d7f30fa07e0051bc6ca56b5e
27076fb6d3e32cadc1626d93fb329f2c64a1f295
describe
'24701' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTA' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
86805d91f45c828b59a176cdd0bd82e8
eaea74f95b3be76e58141e5f022f2bc406ace9e0
describe
'63662' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTB' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
33c5fa54b4108ff3268a8eb1b8d32f12
dbd7c4cc62ef83a0941656fa0f1d606731b0dcc3
describe
'24425' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTC' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
af989117f38476ea9147bacf6b62b764
a48e760e8679e8e9a181465f960f0c1fc73f98bf
describe
'63280' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTD' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
877a9f75e1f058b5c085190630cb2833
6221f75c6c6e48e49e39b3e63a9bfb2c6e4ed36d
describe
'24320' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTE' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
1b8582ba3ed47ae0ab16796a578da5c9
2e688e167d813ed34315191e11521dac23c4e648
describe
'63962' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTF' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
78bf4db7f4aaa4323d97a15a078cdb14
b9aa740599ae03ebd9e2c4365732d7ccb606ae95
describe
'24432' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTG' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
ac73986901842ef0781811b4fd13e158
88eb17d7ae4433de13328713d6a8cf83ff7045dc
describe
'63477' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTH' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
c2e6d8d1b3a145fac5106169be22b4ea
2def66a35f21d1218127750c16a956076f6e134a
describe
'24545' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTI' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
0d160a492cc4f38349b7278504c127a6
b0a7b104112180be1404087a15ce1342794d3eb6
describe
'64515' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTJ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
208435a9612390dc271bc8c64baeb763
056792a39978614597b7de715aa4a61df802d26f
describe
'24653' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTK' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
932a589317e8c7f7387df188a7c6a537
67c06fc3bb0242022eee51132dc63f77e5341ad3
describe
'43747' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTL' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
9759f5f8a2135c85d723a7e9718f059f
69f2e667586c75a7f204bed72f54080d6d54fa09
describe
'17870' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTM' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
51c7c8c1f1a9b7c79e1ba1bd7867673c
1cdb8ef08547b5341c8924885d05597d0ce453d0
describe
'64861' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTN' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
0e9469529c2bc29c15fbdc590296d8b0
6c18cb9864b2fa8f23f96716d2529bc405274cd1
describe
'24589' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTO' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
698f4fceca74ce5ba61538f92ec21570
b8e4679bed2ba7812a301041d1631622dddc4d93
describe
'21952' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTP' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
22db9b858ae6834c667ee442837611ce
722b72768e7990f245cbc01aeebacf66b513991c
describe
'19111' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTQ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
a5c3513a637aa09bc8ad0dbd9027ac87
e89481c0a3e27a2bde532b39eaec1a9d7f23bffc
describe
'14003' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTR' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
45e30cab8993d3aff6789c7ba5f8caa7
d9235413b9b2724fc040769f6a8be7ddb38181c8
describe
'9726' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTS' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
440829e8b60f0bf5aa15dc6a60bbf6e1
559c7a79f00b0ea7433178f1b93a763ab9c62ea4
describe
'22578' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTT' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
802073009172afe8d0d35a484182f22a
3b14a38b565e3744569d6127a7e740ab0507df76
describe
'12564' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTU' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
83fa5566df298a54b3f99d17cd514ab5
630e2006203e97087910753a3e0b3fd66881378f
describe
'48165' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTV' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
ce3828eb7b1af80899176cacfa3e93a6
432ffe9a53fbedb40c0b57f239d3e716f5cdf2dc
describe
'20979' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTW' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
0378ebe42eb35ff9a07151ce5c80489f
debfcf1f1cf56fa54f9734a131909612923fd424
describe
'63330' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTX' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
b57e3144da36a6dcc866fdc42457480b
e03b5bd54bd226252cc6de7d26f87a7eb1f273eb
'2011-12-21T04:39:33-05:00'
describe
'24565' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTY' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
7283ccf9728349d1a46bc73a26e736d4
9e89b42d5b220d7ec87bc0256338e959fc6f0cdc
describe
'52234' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADTZ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
1344646b8caff602e60d969df355555e
195c0da26aa0df79f7a525bab0478545c70b34d9
describe
'20752' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUA' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
33fbdbcb1b5ba58cd21d5a340f022e88
f45c198a37a1788ddb5916b7d4eff1256b92bd5e
describe
'62075' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUB' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
2e2de5adbb01c601f82dc4a4b30ff66f
057e8b9bfef3f94c5d086070e660c0239e91392a
describe
'25141' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUC' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
8b104ca5c5a9216bda3d19d8e8c7fe8c
ee556cca762e17023ae8208c86520929f591b869
describe
'64689' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUD' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
12a5e4fd68f8356edc4853029e8598a2
5332b403292fe7a5fae58b8a8c620573a2ebc5b9
describe
'25068' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUE' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
b8053e9f2e94c5a03e8d178e85dc7793
823df6468520701fad269bfcdf58543bd8055523
describe
'42847' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUF' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
7cebf9df2b743a5f2d2eb85b19dc7e6d
978837f05b91f00a7f5cbe0fe7f64227046b3100
describe
'18579' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUG' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
75f6c2f7f419caa65b3394e9d9915efd
3ffdb54c277e19d319c1eb48c54216673ed13cae
describe
'59542' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUH' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
838239126b65f4aac38cb6525c28b3a4
a873f4c7f36de56cbcdb52b9b66af85357506264
describe
'23813' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUI' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
aea131a94633809f74a4e2fd3bc9d369
4c999844ae139702f2cddd367858363d98c72aad
describe
'56938' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUJ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
eda0a0a48524eb07319684c594902cc0
f61b103b57147b24343693b23a1c6107602f417c
describe
'22814' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUK' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
b03137dab00a38a81153e0b340fdcce1
018fc01eec44b4e1dc6e65cd8f51497209da35f4
describe
'61379' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUL' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
ec8af70f33acbaed1d3d818035684d4f
db3b803f9d25ca67abdd0e5865d4b665d4657acf
describe
'23973' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUM' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
f2af756de7629cd550e760e463028e2a
569765638f3ab1e544cba88115f8918e58989887
describe
'65057' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUN' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
4ea524808e518d0ab1b80cb0e371ad29
2d9f53a62ea682136f5000fa1a359f734033ade1
describe
'24941' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUO' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
1be644d22e89bbc2e42bc8ed2e5a9723
477635e45da89772745bc6feabe83e1ac38c3c16
describe
'52284' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUP' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
8bf408f1702b0961a84b01afc1be5235
c688e35a0e6a76fcc724d62a865f355efdc6bba0
describe
'23314' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUQ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
97ba3d23de129911b759a99ea18a85d9
eca297acdf340d871e6d0045dfc172ef18f81fc6
describe
'60368' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUR' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
4bcd73e33ed9d57a66962b4f30d2e1f6
5acc1edb703a78a6667ef5715b0fdac337dc6ba1
describe
'24078' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUS' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
5643dabfc52387fa2f0b6aa2fd1175dc
05a45e352eb93b53fbad25bc8d439c7481362615
describe
'60463' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUT' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
65cf882fdeda325f808270381b423e2d
1c2ea311b9b666d389c9bc35aa6b61e902bce2c3
describe
'23666' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUU' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
e9c48f4b51136decbef650fb0b8a7eff
cfee0ebe7e968ef0374374d95c253cc8a06d6ffc
describe
'62235' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUV' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
7401436ceabbaec192ab94fccb17f06c
f5b9798bd520f8a6887d218b2b6b635233afa124
describe
'23621' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUW' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
fa29ec25a62cab019ba28d20f481d8c7
b02a64d4d91d2af0ad1016df705dc1a3ab395228
describe
'60035' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUX' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
3d171d9eb6ffbda8b26d73de8e0b6578
0dab1b4e284b37ac93634a74808ed7ff616104f9
describe
'23446' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUY' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
ae9964219edb1aff41a3244853468cdb
315dd4c0aedbbef46f186f5d0ee75ea6e5aac3d9
describe
'61314' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADUZ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
4858159e405e4bcda2c38f84d180cfba
c7a4bd4d030248cd331ad3466e51e0283aa007e9
describe
'23951' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVA' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
20385c0c970aebdd74f68647a229649d
858236d268d42864c36e4b029413abe81edf1289
describe
'60142' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVB' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
f191c14f3006c7cffe565bb2c044c496
c140b36798cf68f6a2a05f13f9c0e6b63347ed3f
describe
'23645' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVC' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
941c9e3089dc0bccbaa6c1029060019f
e0e3384d8e931b5d12241c2723c6ebd86b4a4dcc
describe
'54761' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVD' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
3f568f8ae2f194db39a27cc080910488
1a8f9d85b1789739395d64bcefe3b5ddfcb3a35c
describe
'23067' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVE' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
71c40d60e8b23566009494447c97e289
a1666b8502c82c8af898f08402b0ab5871b55940
describe
'58999' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVF' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
21ba8007324c83912d8c48ffbd72976a
7453a92a45a18af89831224a821b1774b8bb6ddc
describe
'23312' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVG' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
b3e447bc992e43a3c82f0263700877d0
28129be94864dab3e0b409b8a5a9d2030960ddc2
describe
'61203' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVH' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
2bb240d1ad1fb989875077ac4be16567
71c663f6800d02a265dbda4ccf7b55917d8d2c57
describe
'23807' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVI' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
66343a79731cf3722fd4b40a78e1841b
0863834ce1a120d9e7b8a19a844dfd6e38acce92
describe
'26971' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVJ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
a1ba1a258a7b78e9d5495405c9bc3309
329f94083b0c04013ae95bcbc7aa956761194947
describe
'14010' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVK' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
b8a70a0e08fda94065deccc5aea4efcd
0b372ea14290118dd98ef8c405fe2be8d73a11a1
describe
'61189' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVL' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
f202a0c18db6414d6f761a4de460eca8
307dcb83378df73c25c34abcf86b64f6c06b1066
describe
'24017' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVM' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
3195355896a907576824cd55bc5edb84
b3666155b91e37fd06a23fb58613863c18eed3ac
describe
'58355' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVN' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
2dd15918131aeb8cb292c57427e13cce
cd67107866c4ef7118dd3332f3d13a4ec4c75d1c
describe
'23198' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVO' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
cae8976451f594887a74a9919300fa7e
f5d69870fdec10040824e34aaa87c3a8e46b3d79
describe
'60088' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVP' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
62ced58b8d4b2ca7cabfd3426e59f660
d445fbbfe8eda663ff86b0d52f18c45e7bbb9199
describe
'23707' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVQ' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
201afe4c16eb7d2c4849b34cffc058fe
3c230c0907d481c126d28d0bfae44db035cdd1c2
describe
'64237' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVR' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
a8ba74e6626d66448a10a914cd0e0776
8dbff9a7b06f8ab29d97c36dd09ca751937bab16
describe
'24354' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVS' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
65dabd2b495b7d6095a8660684ca090e
6794961777d2d59d94add28459677361f5018042
describe
'19580' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVT' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
57dc7ebd9425f532ea5b1b5a19c1d767
5fb441528c33e34be2a742ae311a07ba9142a934
describe
'13119' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVU' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
03091492025ed6a6c5188e19e5990863
f414a5a90b923303affcc7a2946fae5b21cde7ab
describe
'64081' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVV' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
66bc540126b0c4c0d697e383f3337e3e
21c29377c25aa4674568454928fce27ce88f0801
describe
'24690' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVW' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
577bea092cccde1bb36770c1d70ca528
9870202cbd6bbf1f7daf45c28b0bdd5e8a0057fe
describe
'61587' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVX' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
919603c5f81a781acfa60867ba62c646
568b48e3076916367e01686b0d344b01a50c6dbd
describe
'23876' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVY' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
98f2347dd3a8686562270b1a4a75f831
aa93d41d5f33911c72e12c86214b7bd55d88ffe4
describe
'22897' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADVZ' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
277b93e13c47428685046351c33e5160
50f419fd062780f01ae31b70fee935a01c545df1
describe
'14929' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWA' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
875a45a6cb60636191ebaaf7ea8d1131
4830f536693edc9649e1732daab9c293385a818f
describe
'43072' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWB' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
e5a8e3b8b1a5e89ecac2205b12ddb4c1
58afd2c37fe0245a390c967a1d5ebbf9327699a6
describe
'19358' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWC' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
daa052ff1c47acfe0c172ebedabbb3c9
18024a8dba76518bf2cc297803f789df70718d9e
describe
'50273' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWD' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
1e31b7582e380c99a708ca208660e816
2a7d7cd93c254fac2095c6080196496699e073b9
describe
'21562' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWE' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
4d59a825efbaad2f171d80f82faddd91
5a98aac0e5cc8e8f6ade527fdff9b03c1df10bb9
describe
'19992' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWF' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
43f9d55732cff7f63e012f4601561f65
d420bcb748ee2633bc79c3b0bdfc8094f13fbaca
describe
'13398' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWG' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
16f8447e1c96bd2886bb074015e6d5ff
988c60aea127bc061149894907fad7b2d59e0939
describe
'63793' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWH' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
08da830c375e610fc17a39652f1dadd5
e97abd8fef6401ac095127d91016fab35f4cf823
describe
'24440' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWI' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
1419ca4c5e1cb9f874727aafd0e8bb35
f3a1351b26f11bbdb37b81189745bb00f8df904d
describe
'62386' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWJ' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
51fcf7cd8212ae451a2dda76bc36162c
cf69ed030ab480de376bb0bb03b8e859f2983eaa
describe
'24221' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWK' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
c52885b8275eeb7225b0e896025a4d38
699e1ed29505678e45523b7879697e0023f4f194
describe
'45224' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWL' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
d46e31a89d5cce6c7f3a833fdf812ea9
081b9574b4388da209b02b0df7810b16f02d4d60
describe
'19179' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWM' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
21dd8a02e9d2a2880bdfc4ee5b79402e
40c3cc236959493cd9839c46c828488e57ece5e1
describe
'20199' 'info:fdaE20081126_AAAAUAfileF20081129_AAADWN' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
0c9e08a7519a358b98254430bf0207c1
97165f76c81a31e55950ac5835f0fa65c9145637
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The Baldwin Library

RMB vice









THACKERAY AND THE BOY
A BOY I KNEW
AND FOUR DOGS
BY LAURENCE HUTTON
Profusely Illustrated



NEW YORK AND LONDON
_ HARPER & BROTHERS PUBLISHERS
1898 ©


By LAURENCE HUTTON.



LITERARY LANDMARKS OF ROME, Illustrated. Post 8vo,
Cloth, Ornamental, $1 00.

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Cloth, Ornamental, $1 75.

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8vo, Cloth, Ornamental, $1 00.

PORTRAITS IN PLASTER. Illustrated. Printed on Large Paper
with Wide Margins. 8vo, Cloth, Ornamental, Uncut Edges and
Gilt Top, $6 00.

CURIOSITIES OF THE AMERICAN STAGE. Illustrated. Crown
8vo, Cloth, Ornamental, Uncut Edges and Gilt Top, $2 50.

FROM THE BOOKS OF LAURENCE HUTTON, With Portrait.
16mo, Cloth, Ornamental, $100. (In ‘‘Harper’s American
Essayists.’’)

OTHER TIMES AND OTHER SEASONS. With Portrait. 16mo,
Cloth, Ornamental, $1 00. (In ‘¢ Harper’s American Essayists,”’)

EDWIN BOOTH. Illustrated. 32mo, Cloth, 50 cents.



NEW YORK AND LONDON:
HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS.



Copyright, 1898, by Harrzrk & Brovrurrs.



All rights reserved,
TO
MARK TWAIN
THE CREATOR OF
TOM SAWYER

ONE OF THE BEST BOYS
I EVER KNEW
May the light of some morning skies
In days when the sun knew how to rise,
Stay with my spirit until I go
To be the boy that I used to know.
H. C. Bunner, in ‘‘ Rowen.”
ILLUSTRATIONS

THACKERAY AND THE BOY ... .
THE BOYS MOTHER. .......

Frontispiece
. 2...) Facing p. 4

8T. JOHN’S CHAPEL AND PARK. ......

THE BOY’S UNCLE JOHN ........

THE BOY IN KILTS

THE BOY PROMOTED TO TROUSERS

‘‘CRIED, BECAUSE HE HAD BEEN KISSED”

‘“G@OOD-MORNING, BOYS” . . . . . 2...

PLAYING §* SCHOOL” oc oe a

THE BOY’S SCOTCH GRANDFATHER...

THE HOUSE OF THE BOY’S GRANDFATHER—CORNER
OF HUDSON AND NORTH MOORE STREETS .

SVALWAYS: IN THE WAY 3 5 5.003 a es

READY FOR A NEW-YEAR’S CALL . ....

A NEW-YEAR’S CALL . . . . 1. eee

TOM RILEY’S LIBERTY-POLE . .

THE BOY ALWAYS CLIMBED OVER. ..... .

THE CHIEF ENGINEER .

‘*MRS. ROBERTSON DESCENDED IN FORCE UPON THE
DEVOTED BAND”

THE BOY AS VIRGINIUS . .......

JOHNNY ROBERTSON ........~.

TANBEPURD WS tet ears cen Na TE EE eS

JOH (STUARTS oss ten oper ee ee aes

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6c

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6c

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6
8
10
12

_14

16
18
20

22
24.
26
28
30
382
34

36
38
40
42
44
viii

BOB HENDRICKS

MUSIC LESSONS

THE BOY’S FATHER .

WHISKIE .

PUNCH

MOP AND HIS MASTER .

ILLUSTRATIONS

ROY AND HIS MASTER .

ROY

‘““HE TRIES VERY HARD TO

ROY

THE WAITING THREE

MOP

LOOK

Facing p. 46

“cc

48
56
62
64
68
14
76
80
82
84
87
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Tue papers upon which this volume is founded—
published here by the courtesy of The Century Com-
pany — appeared originally in the columns of Sz.
Nicholas. They have been reconstructed and rear-
ranged, and not a little new matter has been added.

The portraits are all from life. That of The Boy’s
Scottish grandfather, facing page 20, is from a photo-
graph by Sir David Brewster, taken in St. Andrews
in 1846 or 1847. The subject sat in his own garden,
blinking at the sun for many minutes, in front of
the camera, when tradition says that his patience
became exhausted and the artist permitted him to
move. The Boy distinctly remembers the great in-
terest the picture excited when it first reached this
country.

Behind the tree in the extreme left of the view of
The Boy’s Scottish-American grandfather’s house in
New York, facing page 22, may be seen a portion of
the home of Mr. Thomas Bailey Aldrich, in 1843 or
1844, some years earlier than the period of “The
Xi : INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Story of a Bad Boy.” Warm and constant friends
—as men—for upwards of a quarter of a century, it
is rather a curious coincidence that the boys—as
boys—should have been near neighbors, although
they did not know each other then, nor do they re-
member the fact.

The histories of “ A Boy I Knew” and the “Four |
Dogs” are absolutely true, from beginning to end;
nothing has been invented; no incident has been
palliated or elaborated. The author hopes that the
volume may interest the boys and.girls he does not
know as much as it has interested him. He has
read it more than once; he.has laughed over it, and
he has cried over it; it has appealed to him in a
peculiar way. But then, he knew The Dogs, and he
knew The Boy!

i.
A BOY I KNEW
A BOY I KNEW

E was not a very good boy, or a very bad boy,

or a very bright boy, or an unusual boy in any

way. He was just a boy; and very often he for-

gets that he is not a boy now. Whatever there may

be about The Boy that is commendable he owes to

his father and to his mother; and he feels that he
should not be held responsible for that.

His mother was the most generous and the most
unselfish of human beings. She was always thinking
of somebody else—always doing for others. To her
it was blesséd to give, and it was not very pleasant
to receive. When she bought anything, The Boy’s
stereotyped query was, “ Who isto have it?” When
anything was bought for her, her own invariable
remark was, “ What on earth shall I do with it?”
When The Boy came to her, one summer morn-
ing, she looked upon him as a gift from Heaven;
and when she was told that it was a boy, and
not a bad-looking or a bad-conditioned boy, her
4 ; A BOY I KNEW

first words were, “What on earth shall I do with
it?”

She found plenty “to do with it” before she got
through with it, more than forty years afterwards ;
and The Boy. has every reason to believe that she
never regretted the gift. Indeed, she once told him,
late in her life, that he had never made her cry!
What better benediction can a boy have than that?

The Boy’s father was a scholar, and a ripe and
good one. Self-made and self-taught, he began the
serious struggle of life when he was merely a boy
himself; and reading, and writing, and spelling, and
languages, and mathematics came to him by nature.
He acquired by slow degrees a fine library, and out
of ita vast amount of information. He never bought
a book that he did not read, and he never read a book
unless he considered it worth buying and worth keep-
ing. Languages and mathematics were his particular
delight. When he was tired he rested himself by the
solving of a geometrical problem. He studied his
Bible in Latin, in Greek, in Hebrew, and he had no
small smattering of Sanskrit. His chief recreation,
on a Sunday afternoon or on a long summer evening,
was a walk with The Boy among the Hudson River
docks, when the business of the day, or the week, was
over and the ship was left in charge of some old
quartermaster or third mate. To these sailors the
father would talk in each sailor’s own tongue, whether












THE BOY’S MOTHER
A BOY I KNEW 5

it were Dutch or Danish, Spanish or Swedish, Rus-
sian or Prussian, or a patois of something else, always
to the great wonderment of The Boy, who to this
day, after many years of foreign travel, knows little
more of French than “Combien ?” and little more of
Italian than “ Zroppo caro.” Why none of these
qualities of mind came to The Boy by direct descent
he does not know. He only knows that he did in-
herit from his parent, in an intellectual way, a sense
of humor, a love for books—as books—and a certain
respect for the men by whom books are written.

It seemed to The Boy that his father knew every-
thing. Any question upon any subject was sure to
bring a prompt, intelligent, and intelligible answer ;
and, usually, an answer followed by a question, on the
father’s part, which made The Boy think the matter
out for himself.

The Boy was always a little bit afraid of his
father, while he loved and respected him. He be-
lieved everything his father told him, because his
father never fooled him but once, and that was
about Santa Claus!

When his father said, “Do this,’ it was done.
When his father told him to go or to come, he went
or he came. And yet he never felt the weight of his
father’s hand, except in the way of kindness; and, as
he looks back upon his boyhood and his manhood, he
cannot recall an angry or a hasty word or a rebuke
6 A BOY I KNEW

that was not merited and kindly bestowed. His
father, like the true Scotchman he was, never praised
him; but he never blamed him—except for cause.

The Boy has no recollection of his first tooth, but
he remembers his first toothache as distinctly as he
remembers his latest; and he could not quite under-
stand then why, when The Boy cried over that raging
molar, the father walked the floor and seemed to
suffer from it even more than did The Boy; or why,
when The Boy had a sore throat, the father always
had symptoms of bronchitis or quinsy.

The father, alas! did not live long enough to find
out whether The Boy was to amount to much or not;
and while The Boy is proud of the fact that he is his
father’s son, he would be prouder still if he could
think that he had done something to make his father
proud of him.

From his father The Boy received many things
besides birth and education ; many things better than
pocket-money or a fixed sum per annum; but, best
of all, the father taught The Boy never to cut a
string. The Boy has pulled various cords during his
uneventful life, but he has untied them all. Some
of the knots have been difficult and perplexing, and |
the contents of the bundles, generally, have been of
little import when they have been revealed ; but he
saved the strings unbroken, and invariably he has
found those strings of great help to him in the proper


ST. JOHN’S CHAPEL AND PARK
A BOY I KNEW "

fastening of the next package he has had occasion
to send away.

The father had that strong sense of humor which
Dr. Johnson—who had no sense of humor what-
ever—denied to all Scotchmen. No surgical opera-
tion was necessary to put one of Sydney Smith’s
jokes into the father’s head, or to keep it there. His
own jokes were as original as they were harmless,
and they were as delightful as was his quick appre-
ciation of the jokes of other persons.

A long siege with a certain bicuspid had left The
Boy, one early spring day, with a broken spirit and
a swollen face. The father was going, that morning,
to attend the funeral of his old friend, Dr. McPher-
son, and, before he left the house, he asked The Boy
what should be brought back to him as a solace.
Without hesitation, a brick of maple sugar was de-
manded—a very strange request, certainly, from a
person in that peculiar condition of invalidism, and
one which appealed strongly to the father’s own
sense of the ridiculous.

When the father returned, at dinner-time, he carried
the brick, enveloped in many series of papers, begin-
ning with the coarsest kind and ending with the finest
kind; and each of the wrappers was fastened with
its own particular bit of cord or ribbon, all of them
tied in the hardest of hard knots. The process of
disentanglement was long and laborious, but it was
8 A BOY I KNEW

persistently performed; and when the brick was
revealed, lo! it was just a brick—not of maple sugar,
but a plain, ordinary, red-clay, building brick which
he had taken from some pile of similar bricks on his
way up town. The disappointment was not very
bitter, for The Boy knew that something else was
coming; and he realized that it was the First of
April and that he had been April-fooled! The some-
thing else, he remembers, was that most amusing
of all amusing books, Phenixiana, then just pub-
lished, and over it he forgot his toothache, but not
his maple sugar. All this happened when he was
about twelve years of age, and he has ever since
associated “Squibob” with the sweet sap of the
maple, never with raging teeth.

It was necessary, however, to get even with the
father, not an easy matter, as The Boy well knew;
and he consulted his uncle John, who advised patient
waiting. The father, he said, was absolutely de-
voted to Zhe Commercial Advertiser, which he read
every day from frontispiece to end, market reports,
book notices, obituary notices, advertisements, and
all; and if The Boy could hold himself in for a
whole year his uncle John thought it would be
worth it. Zhe Commercial Advertiser of that date
was put safely away for a twelvemonth, and on the
First of April next it was produced, carefully folded
and properly dampened, and was placed by the side






THE BOY'S UNCLE JOHN
A BOY I KNEW 9

of the father’s plate ; the mother and the son making
no remark, but eagerly awaiting the result. The
journal was vigorously scanned; no item of news or
of business import was missed until the reader came
to the funeral announcements on the third page.
Then he looked at the top of the paper, through his
spectacles, and then he looked, over his spectacles, at
The Boy; and he made but one observation. The
subject was never referred to afterwards between
them. But he looked at the date of the paper, and
he looked at The Boy; and he said: “ My son, I see
that old Dr. McPherson is dead again!”

The Boy was red-headed and long-nosed, even from
the beginning —a shy, introspective, self-conscious
little boy, made peculiarly familiar with his personal
defects by constant remarks that his hair was red and
that his nose was long. At school, for years, he was
known familiarly as “ Rufus,” “ Red-Head,” “ Carrot-
Top,” or “ Nosey,” and at home it was almost as bad.

His mother, married at nineteen, was the eldest of
a family of nine children, and many of The Boy’s
aunts and uncles were but a few years his senior, and
were his daily, familiar companions. He was the
only member of his own generation for a long time.
There was a constant fear, upon the part of the elders,
that he was likely to be spoiled, and consequently the
rod of verbal castigation was rarely spared. He was
never praised, nor petted, nor coddled; and he was
10 A BOY I KNEW

taught to look upon himself as a youth hairily and
nasally deformed and mentally of but little wit. He
was always falling down, or dropping things. He
was always getting into the way, and he could not
learn to spell correctly or to cipher at all. He was
never in his mother’s way, however, and he was
never made to feel so. But nobody except The Boy
knows of the agony which the rest of the family,
unconsciously, and with no thought of hurting his
feelings, caused him by the fun they poked at his
nose, at his. fiery locks, and at his unhandiness. He
fancied that passers-by pitied him as he walked or
played in the streets, and he sincerely pitied himself
as a youth destined to grow up into an awkward,
tactless, stupid man, at whom the world would laugh
so long as his life lasted.

An unusual and unfortunate accident to his nose
when he was eight or ten years old served to ac-
centuate his unhappiness. The young people were
making molasses candy one night in the kitchen of
his maternal grandfather’s house —the aunts and
the uncles, some of the neighbors’ children, and The
Boy—and the half of a lemon, used for flavoring
purposes, was dropped as it was squeezed by careless
hands—very likely The Boy’s own—into the boiling
syrup. It was fished out and put, still full of the
syrup, upon a convenient saucer, where it remained,
an exceedingly fragrant object. After the odor had


THE BOY IN KILTS
A BOY I KNEW 11

been inhaled by one or two of the party, The Boy
was tempted to “take a smell of it”; when an un-
cle, boylike, ducked the luckless nose into the still
simmering lemonful. The result was terrible. Red-
hot sealing-wax could not have done more damage
to the tender, sensitive feature.

The Boy carried his nose in a sling for many
weeks, and the bandage, naturally, twisted the nose
to one side. It did not recover its natural tint for a
long time, and the poor little heart was nearly broken
at the thought of the fresh disfigurement. The Boy
felt that he had not only an unusually long nose, but
a nose that was crooked and would always be as red
as his hair.

He does not remember what was done to his un-
cle. But the uncle was for half a century The Boy’s
best and most faithful of friends. And The Boy
forgave him long, long ago.

The Boy’s first act of self-reliance and of conscious
self-dependence was a very happy moment in his
young life; and it consisted in his being able to step
over the nursery fender, all alone, and to toast his
own shins thereby, without falling into the fire. His
first realization of “getting big” came to him about
the same time, and with a mingled shock of pain
and pleasure, when he discovered that he could not
walk under the high kitchen-table without bumping
his head. He tried it very often before he learned
12 A BOY I KNEW

to go around that article of furniture, on his way .
from the clothes-rack, which was his tent when he
camped out on rainy days, to the sink, which was
his oasis in the desert of the basement floor. This
kitchen was a favorite playground of The Boy, and
about that kitchen-table centre many of the happiest
of his early reminiscences. Ann Hughes, the cook, .
was very good to The Boy. She told him stories,
and taught him riddles, all about a certain “ Miss
Netticoat,” who wore a white petticoat, and who
had a red nose, and about whom there still lingers a
queer, contradictory legend to the effect that “the
longer she stands the shorter she grows.” The Boy
always felt that, on account of her nose, there was a
peculiar bond of sympathy between little Miss Net-
ticoat and himself.

As he was all boy in his games, he would never
cherish anything but a boy-doll, generally a. High-
lander, in kilts and with a glengarry, that came off!
And although he became foreman of a juvenile hook-
and-ladder company before he was five, and would
not play with girls at all, he had one peculiar femi-
nine weakness. His grand passion was washing and
ironing. And Ann Hughes used to let him do all
the laundry-work connected with the wash-rags and
his own pocket-handkerchiefs, into which, regularly,
every Wednesday, he burned little brown holes with
the toy flat-iron, which would get too hot. But
NOON MII























































































































































































































































































FET RR TE



THE BOY PROMOTED TO TROUSERS
A BOY I KNEW 13

Johnny Robertson and Joe Stuart and ‘the other
boys, and even the uncles and the aunts, never knew
anything about that —unless Ann Hughes gave it
away !

The Boy seems to have developed, very early in
life; a fondness for new clothes—a fondness which
his wife sometimes thinks he has quite outgrown. It
is recorded that almost his first plainly spoken words
were “Coat and hat,” uttered upon his promotion
into a more boyish apparel than the caps and frocks
of his infancy. And he remembers very distinctly
his first pair of long trousers, and the impression they
made upon him, in more ways than one. They were
a black-and-white check, and to them was attached
that especially manly article, the suspender. They
were originally worn in celebration of the birth
of the New Year, in 1848 or 1849, and The Boy
went to his father’s store in Hudson Street, New
York, to exhibit them on the next business -day
thereafter. Naturally they excited much comment,
and were the subject of sincere congratulation. And
two young clerks of his father, The Boy’s uncles,
amused themselves, and The Boy, by playing with
him a then popular game called “ Squails.” They
put The Boy, seated, on a long counter, and they slid
him, backward and forward between them, with.
great skill and no little force. But, before the
championship was decided, The Boy’s mother broke
14 A BOY I KNEW

up the game, boxed the ears of the players, and car-
ried the human disk home in disgrace ; pressing as
she went, and not very gently, the seat of The Boy’s
trousers with the palm of her hand!

He remembers nothing more about the trousers,
except the fact that for a time he was allowed to
appear in them on Sundays and holidays only, and
that he was deeply chagrined at having to go back
to knickerbockers at school and at play.

The Boy’s first boots were of about this same era.
They were what were then known as “ Welling-
tons,” and they had legs. The legs had red leather
tops, as was the fashion in those days, and the boots
were pulled on with straps. They were always
taken off with the aid of the boot-jack of The Boy’s
father, although they could have been removed much
more easily without the use of that instrument.
Great was the day when The Boy first wore his first
boots to school; and great his delight at the sensa-
tion he thought they created when they were ex-
hibited in the primary department.

The Boy’s first school was a dame’s school, kept
by a Miss or Mrs. Harrison, in Harrison Street, near
the Hudson Street house in which he was born. He
was the smallest child in the establishment, and
probably a pet of the larger girls, for he remembers
going home to his mother in tears, because one of
them had kissed him behind the class-room door.


EEN KISSED”

““CRIED, BECAUSE HE HAD B
A BOY I KNEW 15

He saw her often, in later years, but she never tried
to do it again!

At that school he met his first love, one Phoebe
Hawkins, a very sweet, pretty girl, as he recalls her,
and, of course, considerably his senior. How far he
had advanced in the spelling of proper names at that
period is shown by the well-authenticated fact that
he put himself on record, once as “loving his love
with an F, because she was Feeby !”

Poor Phoebe Hawkins died before she was out of
her teens. The family moved to Poughkeepsie when
The Boy was ten or twelve, and his mother and he
went there one day from Red Hook, which was
their summer home, to call upon his love. When
they asked, at the railroad-station, where the Haw-
kinses lived and how they could find the house, they
were told that the carriages for the funeral would
meet the next train. And, utterly unprepared for
such a greeting, for at latest accounts she had been
in perfect health, they stood, with her friends, by the
side of Phoebe’s open grave.

In his mind’s eye The Boy, at the end of forty
years, can see it all; and his childish grief is still
fresh in his memory. He had lost a bird and a cat
who were very dear to his heart, but death had
never before seemed so real to him; never before
had it come so near home. He never played “ fu-
neral” again.
162: _A BOY I KNEW

In 1851 or 1852 The Boy went to another dame’s
school. It was kept by Miss Kilpatrick, on Franklin
or North Moore Street. From this, as he grew in
years, he was sent to the Primary Department of the
North Moore Street Public School, at the corner of
West Broadway, where he remained three weeks,
and where he contracted a whooping-cough which
lasted him three months. The other boys used to
throw his hat upon an awning in the neighborhood,
and then throw their own hats up under the awning
in order to bounce The Boy’s hat off—an amuse-
ment for which he never much cared. They were
not very nice boys, anyway, especially when they
made fun of his maternal grandfather, who was a
trustee of the school, and who sometimes noticed
The Boy after the morning prayers were said. The
grandfather was very popular in the school. He
came in every day, stepped upon the raised platform
at the principal’s desk, and said in his broad Scotch,
“Good morning, boys!” to which the entire body of
pupils, at the top of their lungs, and with one voice,
replied, “G-o-0-d morning, Mr. Scott!” This was con-
sidered a great feature in the school; and strangers
used to come from all over the city to witness it.
Somehow it made The Boy a little bit ashamed ; he
does not know why. He would have liked it well
enough, and been touched by it, too, if it had been
some other boy’s grandfather. The Boy’s father


“‘G@OOD MORNING, BOYS”
A BOY I KNEW 1”

was present once—The Boy’s first day ; but when he
discovered that the President of the Board of Trus-
tees was going to call on him for a speech he ran
away; and The Boy would have given all his little
possessions to have run after him. The Boy knew
then, as well as he knows now, how his father felt ;
and he thinks of that occasion every time he runs
away from some after-dinner or occasional speech
which he, himself, is called upon to make.

After his North Moore Street experiences The Boy
was sent to study under men teachers in boys’
schools; and he considered then that he was grown
up.

' The Boy, as has been said, was born without the
sense of spell. The Rule of Three, it puzzled him,
and fractions were as bad; and the proper placing
of e and i, or i and e, the doubling of letters in the
middle of words, and how to treat the addition of a
suffix in “y” or “tion” “almost drove him mad,” -
from his childhood up. He hated to go to school,
but he loved to play school; and when Johnny
Robertson and he were not conducting a pompous,
public funeral—a certain oblong hat-brush, with a
rosewood back, studded with brass tacks, serving as
a coffin, in which lay the body of Henry Clay, Dan-
jel Webster, or the Duke of Wellington, all of whom
died when Johnny and The Boy were about eight
years old—they were teaching each other the three
2
18 A BOY I KNEW

immortal and exceedingly trying “R’s” — reading,
*riting, and ’rithmetic—in a play-school. Their favor-
ite spelling- book was a certain old cook -book, dis-
carded by the head of the kitchen, and considered
all that was necessary for their educational purpose.
From this, one afternoon, Johnnie gave out “ Dough-
nut,” with the following surprising result. Conscious
of the puzzling presence of certain silent consonants
and vowels, The Boy thus set it down: “D-O, dough,
N-O-U-G-H-T, nut—doughnut!” and he went up
head in a.class of one, neither teacher nor pupil per-
ceiving the marvellous transposition.

All The Boy’s religious training was received at
home, and almost his first text-book was “The
Shorter Catechism,” which, he confesses, he hated
with all his little might. He had to learn and recite
the answers to those awful questions as soon as he
could recite at all, and, for years, without the slight-
est comprehension as to what it was allabout. Even’
to this day he cannot tell just what “ Effectual Call-
ing,” or “Justification,” is; and I am sure that he
shed more tears over “ Effectual Calling” than would
blot out the record of any number of infantile sins.
He made up his youthful mind that if he could not
be saved without “Effectual Calling” — whatever
that was—he did not want to be saved at all. But
he has thought better of it since.

It is proper to affirm here that The Boy did not


PLAYING ‘‘ SCHOOL”
A BOY I KNEW 19

acquire his occasional swear- words from “The
Shorter Catechism.” They were born in him, as
a fragment of Original Sin; and they came out
of him innocently and unwittingly, and only for
purposes of proper emphasis, long before the days
of “Justification,” and even before he knew his
ASB,’ O's.

His earliest visit to Scotland was made when he
was but four or five years of age, and long before he
had assumed the dignity of trousers, or had been sent
to school. His father had gone to the old home at
St. Andrews hurriedly, upon the receipt of the news
of the serious illness of The Boy’s grandmother, who
died before they reached her. Naturally, The Boy
has little recollection of that sad month of December,
spent in his grandfather’s house, except that it was
sad. The weather was cold and wet; the house, even
under ordinary circumstances, could not have been
a very cheerful one for a youngster who had no
companions of his own age. It looked out upon the
German Ocean—which at that time of the year was
always in a rage, or in the sulks—and it was called
“Peep o’ Day,” because it received the very first
rays of the sun as he rose upon the British Isles.

The Boy’s chief amusement was the feeding of
“flour-scones” and oat-cakes to an old goat, who
lived in the neighborhood, and in daily walks with
his grandfather, who seemed to find some little com-
20 A BOY I KNEW

fort and entertainment in the lad’s childish prattle.
He was then almost the only grandchild; and the
old man was very proud of his manner and appear-
ance, and particularly amused at certain gigantic
efforts on The Boy’s part to adapt his own short legs
to the strides of his senior’s iong ones.

After they had interviewed the goat, and had
watched the wrecks with which the wild shore was
strewn, and had inspected the Castle in ruins, and
the ruins of the Cathedral, The Boy would be shown
his grandmother’s new-made grave, and his own name
in full—a common name in the family—upon the
family tomb in the old kirk-yard; all of which must
have been very cheering to The Boy; although he
could not read it for himself. And then, which was
better, they would stand, hand in hand, for a long
time in front of a certain candy-shop window, in
which was displayed a little regiment of lead soldiers,
marching in double file towards an imposing and im-
pregnable tin fortress on the heights of barley-sugar.
Of this spectacle they never tired; and they used to
discuss how The Boy would arrange them if they
belonged to him; with a sneaking hope on The Boy’s
part that, some day, they were to be his very own.

At the urgent request of the grandfather, the
American contingent remained in St. Andrews until
the end of the year; and The Boy still remembers
vividly, and he will never forget, the dismal failure


THE BOY’S SCOTCH GRANDFATHER
A BOY I KNEW 21

of “ Auld Lang Syne” as it was sung by the family,
with clasped hands, as the clock struck and the New
Year began. He sat up for the occasion—or, rather,
was waked up for the occasion ; and of all that fam-
ily group he has been, for a decade or more, the only
survivor. The mother of the house was but lately
dead; the eldest son, and his son, were going, the
next day, to the other side of the world; and every
voice broke before the familiar verse came to an end.

As The Boy went off to his bed he was told that
his grandfather had something for him, and he stood
at his knee to receive—a Bible! That it was to be
the lead soldiers and the tin citadel he never for a
moment doubted; and the surprise and disappoint-
ment were very great. He seems to have had pres-
ence of mind enough to conceal his feelings, and to
kiss and thank the dear old man for his gift. But
as he climbed slowly up the stairs, in front of his
mother, and with his Bible under his arm, she over-
heard him sob to himself, and murmur, in his great
disgust: “Well, he has given me a book! And I
wonder how in thunder he thinks I am going to read
his damned Scotch !”

This display of precocious profanity and of innate
patriotism, upon the part of a child who could not
read at all, gave unqualified pleasure to the old gen-
tleman, and he never tired of telling the story as long
as he lived.
22 A BOY I KNEW

The Boy never saw the grandfather again. He
had gone to the kirk-yard, to stay, before the next
visit to St. Andrews was made; and now that kirk-
yard holds every one of The Boy’s name and blood
who is left in the town.

The Boy was taught, from the earliest awakening
of his reasoning powers, that truth was to be told
and to be respected, and that nothing was more
wicked or more ungentlemanly than a broken prom-
ise. He learned very early to do as he was told, and
not to do, under any consideration, what he had said
he would not do. Upon this last point he was al-
most morbidly conscientious, although once, literally,
he “beat about the bush.” His aunt Margaret, al-
ways devoted to plants and to flowers, had, on the
back stoop of his grandfather’s house, a little grove of
orange and lemon trees, in pots. Some of these were
usually in fruit or in flower, and the fruit to The
Boy was a great temptation. He was very fond of
oranges, and it seemed to him that a “ home-made”
orange, which he had never tasted, must be much bet-
ter than a grocer’s orange; as home-made cake was
certainly preferable, even to the wonderful cakes made
by the professional Mrs. Milderberger. He watched
those little green oranges from day to day, as they
gradually grew big and yellow in the sun. He prom-
ised faithfully that he would not pick any of them,
but he had a notion that some of them might drop


TS

TREE

ES

ORTH MOOR.

ND N

HUDSON A

ORNER OF

ER—C

H

HOUSE OF THE BOY’S GRANDFAT

THE
A BOY I KNEW 23

off. He never shook the trees, because he said he
would not. But he shook the stoop! And he hung
about the bush, which he was too honest to beat.
One unusually tempting orange, which he had known
from its bud-hood, finally overcame him. He did
not pick it off, he did not shake it off; he compro-
mised with his conscience by lying flat on his back
and biting off a piece of it. It was not a very good
action, nor was it a very good orange, and for that
reason, perhaps, he went home immediately and told
on himself. He told his mother. He did not tell
his aunt Margaret. His mother did not seem to be
as much shocked at his conduct as he was. But, in
her own quiet way, she gave him to understand that
promises were not made to be cracked any more
than they were made to be broken—that he had
been false to himself in heart, if not in deed, and
that he must go back and make it “all right” with
his aunt Margaret. She did not seem to be very
much shocked, either; he could not tell why. But
they punished The Boy. They made him eat the
rest of the orange !

He lost all subsequent interest in that tropical
glade, and he has never cared much for domestic
oranges since.

Among the many bumps which are still conspicu-
ously absent in The Boy’s phrenological develop-
ment are the bumps of Music and Locality. He
24 A BOY I KNEW

whistled as soon as he acquired front teeth ; and he
has been singing “God Save the Queen” at the St.
Andrew’s Society dinners, on November the 30th,
ever since he came of age. But that is as far as his
sense of harmony goes. He took music-lessons for
three quarters, and then his mother gave it up in
despair. The instrument was a piano. The Boy
could not stretch an octave with his right hand, the
little finger of which had been broken by a shinny-
stick ; and he could not do anything whatever with
his left hand. He was constantly dropping his bass-
notes, which, he said, were “understood.” And
even Miss Ferguson—most patient of teachers—de-
clared that it was of no use.

The piano to The Boy has been the most offensive
of instruments ever since. And when his mother’s
old piano, graceful in form, and with curved legs
which are still greatly admired, lost its tone, and was
transformed into a sideboard, he felt, for the first
time, that music had charms.

He had to practise half an hour a day, by a thirty-
minute sand-glass that could not be set ahead; and
he shed tears enough over “ The Carnival of Venice”
to have raised the tide in the Grand Canal. They
blurred the sharps and the flats on the music-
books —those tears; they ran the crotchets and
the quavers together, and, rolling down his cheeks,
_ they even splashed upon his not very clean little


ALWAYS IN THE WAY”

“ae
A BOY I KNEW 25

hands; and, literally, they covered the keys with
mud.

Another serious trial to The Boy was dancing-
school. In the first place, he could not turn round
without becoming dizzy; in the second place, he
could not learn the steps to turn round with; and in
the third place, when he did dance he had to dance
with a girl! There was not a boy in all Charraud’s,
or in all Dodworth’s, who could escort a girl back to
her seat, after the dance was over, in better time, or
make his “thank-you bow” with less delay. His
only voluntary terpsichorean effort at a party was
the march to supper; and the only steps he ever
took with anything like success were during the
promenade in the lancers. In “hands-all-round”
he invariably started with the wrong hand; and if
in the set there were girls big enough to wear long
dresses, he never failed to tear such out at the gath-
ers. If anybody fell down in the polka it was al-
ways The Boy; and if anybody bumped into any-
body else, The Boy was always the bumper, unless
his partner could hold him up and steer him straight.

Games, at parties, he enjoyed more than dancing,
although he did not care very much for “ Pillows
and Keys,” until he became courageous enough to
kneel before somebody except his maiden aunts.
“Porter” was less embarrassing, because, when the
door was shut, nobody but the little girl who called
26 A BOY I KNEW

him but could tell whether he kissed her or not. All
this happened a long time ago!

-The only social function in which The Boy took
any interest whatever was the making of New-
Year’s calls. Not that he cared to make New-Year’s
calls in themselves, but because he wanted to make
more New-Year’s calls than were made by any other
boy. His “list,” based upon last year’s list, was
commenced about February 1; and it contained the
names of every person whom The Boy knew, or
thought he knew, whether that person knew The
Boy or not, from Mrs. Penrice, who boarded oppo-
site the Bowling Green, to the Leggats and the
Faures, who lived near Washington Parade Ground,
the extreme social limitsof his city in those days.
He usually began by making a formal call upon his
own mother, who allowed him to taste the pickled
oysters as early as ten in the morning; and he in-
variably wound up by calling upon Ann Hughes in
the kitchen, where he met the soap-fat man, who
was above his profession, and likewise the sexton of
Ann Hughes’s church, who generally came with
Billy, the barber on the corner of Franklin Street.
There were certain calls The Boy always made with
his father, during which he did not partake of pic-
kled oysters ; but he had pickled oysters everywhere
else ; and they never seemed to do him any serious
harm.
ENS SSS ST ee

FPL SANA LES SN EN





READY FOR A NEW-YEAR’S CALL
A BOY I KNEW 24

The Boy, if possible, kept his new overcoat until
New Year’s Day—and he never left it in the hall
when he called! He always wore new green kid
gloves—why green ?—fastened at the wrists with a
single hook and eye; and he never took off his kid
gloves when he called, except on that particular New
Year’s Day when his aunt Charlotte gave him the
bloodstone seal-ring, which, at first, was too big for
his little finger,—the only finger on which a seal-
ring could be worn—and had to be made tempo-
rarily smaller with a piece of string.

When he received, the next New Year, new studs
and a scarf-pin—all bloodstones, to match the ring
—he exhibited no little ingenuity of toilet in dis-
playing them both, because studs are hardly visible
when one wears a scarf, unless the scarf is kept out
of the perpendicular by stuffing one end of it into
the sleeve of a jacket; which requires constant at-
tention and a good deal of bodily contortion.

When The Boy met Johnny Robertson or Joe
Stuart making calls, they never recognized each
other, except when they were calling together, which
did not often occur. It was an important rule in
their social code to appear as strangers in-doors, al-
though they would wait for each other outside, and
compare lists. When they did present themselves
collectively in any drawing-room, one boy—usually -
The Boy’s cousin Lew—was detailed to whisper “T.
28 A BOY I KNEW

T.” when he considered that the proper limit of the
call was reached. “'T. T.” stood for “ Time to Trav-
el” ; and at the signal all conversation was abruptly
interrupted, and the party trooped out in single file.
The idea was not original with the boys. It was
borrowed from the hook-and-ladder company, which
made all zs calls in a body, and in two of Kipp and
Brown’s stages, hired for the entire day. The boys
always walked.

The great drawbacks to the custom of making
New-Year’s calls were the calls which had to be
made after the day’s hard work was supposed to be
over, and when The Boy and his father, returning
home very tired, were told that they must call upon
Mrs. Somebody, and upon Mrs. Somebody-else, whom
they had neglected to visit, because the husbands and
the sons of these ladies had called upon the mother
of The Boy. New Year’s Day was not the shortest
day of the year, by any means, but it was absolutely
necessary to return the Somebody’s call, no matter
how late the hour, or how tired the victims of the
social law. And it bored the ladies of the Some-
body household as much as it bored the father and
The Boy.

The Boy was always getting lost. The very first
time he went out alone he got lost! Told not to go
off the block, he walked as far as the corner of
Leonard Street, put his arm around the lamp-post,


A NEW-YEAR’S CALL
A BOY I KNEW 29

swung himself in a circle, had his head turned the
wrong way, and marched off, at a right angle, along
the side street, with no home visible anywhere, and
not a familiar sign in sight. A ship at sea without
a rudder, a solitary wanderer in the Great American
Desert without a compass, could not have been more
utterly astray. The Boy was so demoralized that
he forgot his name and address; and when a kindly
policeman picked him up, and carried him over the
way, to the Leonard Street station-house for identifi-
cation, he felt as if the end of everything had come.
It was bad enough to be arrested, but how was he
to satisfy his own conscience, and explain matters to
his mother, when it was discovered that he had
broken his solemn promise, and crossed the street ?
He had no pocket-handkerchief ; and he remembers
that he spoiled the long silk streamers of his Glen-
garry bonnet by wiping his eyes upon them. He was
recognized by his Forty-second-plaid gingham frock,
a familiar object in the neighborhood, and he was
carried back to his parents, who had not had time to
miss him, and who, consequently, were not distracted.
He lost nothing by the adventure but himself, his
. self-respect, a pint of tears—and one shoe.

He was afterwards lost in Greenwich Street, having
gone there on the back step of an ice-cart; and once
he was conveyed as far as the Hudson River Railroad
Depot, at Chambers Street, on his sled, which he had
30 A BOY I KNEW

hitched to the milkman’s wagon, and could not untie.
This was very serious, indeed; for The Boy realized
that he had not only lost himself but his sleigh, too.
Aunt Henrietta found The Boy sitting disconsolately
in front of Wall’s bake-shop; but the sleigh did not
turn up for several days. It was finally discovered,
badly scratched, in the possession of “The Head of
the Rovers.”

“The Hounds” and “The Rovers” were rival
bands of boys, not in The Boy’s set, who for many
years made out-door life miserable to The Boy and
to his friends. They threw stones and mud at each
other, and at everybody else; and The Boy was not
infrequently blamed for the windows they broke.
They punched all the little boys who were better
dressed than they were, and they were even depraved
enough, and mean enough, to tell the driver every
time The Boy or Johnny Robertson attempted to
“cut behind.”

There was also a band of unattached guerillas
who aspired to be, and often pretended to be, either
“Hounds” or “ Rovers”—they did not care which.
They always hunted in couples, and if they met The
Boy alone they asked him to which of the organi-
zations he himself belonged. If he said he was a
“Rover,” they claimed to be “ Hounds,” and pounded
him. If he declared himself in sympathy with the
_ “Hounds,” they hoisted the “Rovers’” colors, and


ri

AY
ANN
AX\
’











TOM RILEY’S LIBERTY POLE
A BOY I KNEW 31

punched him again. If he disclaimed both associa-
tions, they punched him anyway, on general princi-
ples. “The Head of the Rovers” was subsequently
killed, in front of Tom Riley’s liberty-pole in Frank-
lin Street, in a fireman’s riot, and “ The Chief of the
Hounds,” who had a club-foot, became a respectable
ege-merchant, with a stand in Washington Market,
near the Root-beer Woman’s place of business, on the
south side. The Boy met two of the gang near the
Desbrosses Street Ferry only the other day ; but they
did not recognize The Boy.

The only spot where The Boy felt really safe from
the interference of “ The Hounds” and “ The Rovers”
was in St. John’s Square, that delightful oasis in the
desert of brick and mortar and cobble-stones which
was known as the Fifth Ward. It was a private
enclosure, bounded on the north by Laight Street,
on the south by Beach Street, on the east by Varick
Street, and on the west by Hudson Street; and its
site is now occupied by the great freight-warehouses
of the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad
Company.

In the “ Fifties,” and long before, it was a private
park, to which only the property owners in its imme-
diate neighborhood had access. It possessed fine old
trees, winding gravel-walks, and meadows of grass.
In the centre was a fountain, whereupon, in the proper
season, the children were allowed to skate on both
32 A BOY I KNEW

feet, which was a great improvement over the one-
foot gutter-slides outside. The Park was surrounded
by a high iron railing, broken here and there by
massive gates, to which The Boy had a key. But he
always climbed over. It was a point of etiquette, in
The Boy’s set, to climb over on all occasions, whether
the gates were unlocked or not. And The Boy, many
a time, has been known to climb overa gate, although
it stood wide open! He not infrequently tore his
clothes on the sharp spikes by which the gates were
surmounted; but that made no difference to The
Boy—until he went home!

The Boy once had a fight in the Park, with Bill.

Rice, about a certain lignum-vite peg-top, of which
The Boy was very fond, and which Bill Rice kicked
into the fountain. The Boy got mad, which was
wrong and foolish of The Boy; and The Boy, also,
got licked. And The Boy never could make his
mother understand why he was silly and careless
enough to cut his under-lip by knocking it against
Bill Rice’s knuckles. Bill subsequently apologized
by saying that he did not mean to kick the top into
the fountain. He merely meant to kick the top.
And it was all made up.

The Boy did not fight much. His nose was too
long. It seemed that he could not reach the end of
it with his fists when he fought; and that the other
fellows could always reach it with theirs, no matter


ER

THE BOY ALWAYS CLIMBED OV.
A BOY I KNEW 33

how far out, or how scientifically, his left arm was
extended. It was “ One, two, three—and recover ”—
on The Boy’s nose! The Boy was a good runner.
His legs were the only part of his anatomy which
seemed to him as long as his nose. And his legs
saved his nose in many a fierce encounter.

The Boy first had daily admission to St. John’s
Park after the family moved to Hubert Street, when
The Boy was about ten years old; and for half a
decade or more it was his happy hunting-ground—
when he was not kept in school! It was a particu-
larly pleasant place in the autumn and winter months;
for he could then gather “smoking-beans” and horse-
chestnuts; and he could roam at will all over the
grounds without any hateful warning to “Keep Off
the Grass.”

The old gardener, generally a savage defender of
the place, who had no sense of humor as it was ex-
hibited in boy nature, sometimes let the boys rake
the dead leaves into great heaps and make bonfires
of them, if the wind happened to be in the right di-
rection. And then what larks! The bonfire was a
house on fire, and the great garden-roller, a very
heavy affair, was “ Engine No. 42,” with which the
boys ran to put the fire out. They all shouted as
loudly and as unnecessarily as real firemen did, in
those days; the foreman gave his orders through a

real trumpet, and one boy had a real fireman’s hat
8
34 A BOY I KNEW

with “Engine No. 42” on it. He was chief en-
gineer, but he did not run with the machine: not
because he was chief engineer, but because while in
active motion he could not keep his hat on. It was
his father’s hat, and its extraordinary weight was
considerably increased by the wads of newspaper
packed in the lining to make it fit. The chief en-
gineer held the position for life on the strength of
the hat, which he would not lend to anybody else.
The rest of the officers of the company were elected,
viva voce, every time there was a fire.

This entertaiment came to an end, like everything
else, when the gardener chained the roller to the
tool-house, after Bob Stuart fell under the machine
and was rolled so flat that he had to be carried home
on a stretcher, made of overcoats tied together by
the sleeves. That is the only recorded instance in
which the boys, particularly Bob, left the Park with-
out climbing over. And the bells sounded a “gen-
eral alarm.” The dent made in the path by Bob’s
body was on exhibition until the next snow-storm.

The favorite amusements in the Park were shinny,
baseball, one-old-cat, and fires. The Columbia Base-
ball Club was organized in 1853 or 1854. It had
nine members, and The Boy was secretary and treas-
urer. The uniform consisted chiefly of a black leath-
er belt with the initials 0 B € C in white letters,
hand-painted, and generally turned the wrong way.


THE CHIEF ENGINEER
A BOY I KNEW 35

The first base was an ailantus-tree ; the second base
was another ailantus-tree; the third base was a but-
ton-ball-tree ; the home base was a marble head-
stone, brought for that purpose from an old bury-
ing-eround not far away ; and “ over the fence” was
a home-run. A player was caught out on the second
bounce, and he was “out” if hit by a ball thrown
at him as he ran. The Boy was put out once by
a crack on the ear, which put The Boy out very
much.

“The Hounds” and “The Rovers” challenged
“The Columbias” repeatedly. But that was looked
upon simply as an excuse to get into the Park, and
the challenges were never accepted. The challeng-
ers were forced to content themselves with running
off with the balls which went over the fence; an ac-
tion on their part which made home-runs through
that medium very unpopular and very expensive.
In the whole history of “The Hounds” and “The
Rovers,” nothing that they pirated was ever returned
but The Boy’s sled.

Contemporary with the Columbia Baseball Club
was a so-called “ Mind-cultivating Society,’ organ-
ized by the undergraduates of McElligott’s School,
in Greene Street. The Boy, as usual, was secretary
when he was not treasurer. The object was “ De-
bates,” but all the debating was done at the business
meetings, and no mind ever became sufficiently cul-
36 A BOY f KNEW

_tivated to master the intricacies of parliamentary
law. The members called it a Secret Society, and
on their jackets they wore, as conspicuously as pos-
sible, a badge-pin consisting of a blue enamelled circlet
containing Greek letters in gold. In a very short
time the badge-pin was all that was left of the So-
ciety ; but to this day the secret of the Society has
never been disclosed. No one ever knew, or will
ever know, what the Greek letters stood for—not
even the members themselves.

The Boy was never a regular member of any fire-
company, but almost as long as the old Volunteer
Fire Department existed, he was what was known
as a “Runner.” He was attached, in a sort of bre-
vet way, to “ Pearl Hose No. 28,” and, later, to “11
Hook and Ladder.” He knew all the fire districts
into which the city was then divided; his ear was
always alert, even in the St. John’s Park days, for
the sound of the alarm-bell, and he ran to every fire
at any hour of the day or night, up to ten o’clock
P.M. He did not do much when he got to the fire
but, stand around and “holler.” But once—a proud
moment—he helped steer the hook-and-ladder truck
to a false alarm in Macdougal Street—and once—a
very proud moment, indeed—he went into a tene-
ment-house, near Dr. Thompson’s church, in Grand
Street, and carried two negro babies down-stairs in
his arms. There was no earthly reason why the


““MRS. ROBERTSON DESCENDED IN FORCE UPON THE
DEVOTED BAND”
A BOY I KNEW 39

babies should not have been left in their beds; and
the colored family did not like it, because the babies
caught cold! But The Boy, for once in his life,
tasted the delights of self-conscious heroism.

When The Boy, as a bigger boy, was not running
to fires he was going to theatres, the greater part of
his allowance being spent in the box-offices of Bur-
ton’s Chambers Street house, of Brougham’s Ly-
ceum, corner of Broome Street and Broadway, of
Niblo’s, and of Castle Garden. There were no after-
noon performances in those days, except now and
then when the Ravels were at Castle Garden; and
the admission to pit and galleries was usually two
shillings — otherwise, twenty-five cents. His first
play, so far as he remembers, was “ The Stranger,”
a play dismal enough to destroy any taste for the
drama, one would suppose, in any juvenile mind. He
never cared very much to see “ The’Stranger ” again,
but nothing that was a play was too deep or too
heavy for him. He never saw the end of any of the
more elaborate productions, unless his father took
him to the theatre (as once in a while he did), for it
was a strict rule of the house, until The Boy was
well up in his teens, that he must be in by ten
o’clock. His father did not ask him where he was
going, or where he had been ; but the curfew in Hu-
bert Street tolled at ten. The Boy calculated care-
fully and exactly how many minutes it took him to
38 A BOY I KNEW

run to Hubert Street from Brougham’s or from Bur-
ton’s ; and by the middle of the second act his watch
—a small silver affair with a hunting-case, in which
he could not keep an uncracked crystal—was always
in his hand. He never disobeyed his father, and for
years he never knew what became of Claude Mel-
notte after he went to the wars; or if Damon got
back in time to save Pythias before the curtain fell.
The Boy, naturally, had a most meagre notion as to
what all these plays were about, but he enjoyed his
fragments of them as he rarely enjoys plays now.
Sometimes, in these days, when the air is bad, and
plays are worse, and big hats are worse than either,
he wishes that he were forced to leave the modern
play-house at nine-forty-five, on pain of no supper
that night, or twenty lines of “ Virgil” the next
day.

On very stormy afternoons the boys played thea-
tre in the large garret of The Boy’s Hubert Street
house; a convenient closet, with a door and a win-
dow, serving for the Castle of Elsinore in “ Hamlet,”
for the gunroom of the ship in “ Black-eyed Susan,”
or for the studio of Phidias in “The Marble Heart,”
as the case might be. “The Brazilian Ape,” as re-
quiring more action than words, was a favorite en-
tertainment, only they all wanted to play Jocko the
Ape; and they would have made no little success
out of the “Lady of Lyons” if any of them had


THE BOY AS VIRGINIUS
A BOY I KNEW 39

been willing to play Pauline. Their costumes and
properties were slight and not always accurate, but
they could “launch the curse of Rome,” and describe
“two hearts beating as one,” in a manner rarely
equalled on the regular stage. The only thing they
really lacked was an audience, neither Lizzie Gustin
nor Ann Hughes ever being able to sit through more
than one act at atime. When The Boy, as Virgin-
ius, with his uncle Aleck’s sword-cane, stabbed all
the feathers out of the pillow which represented the
martyred Virginia; and when Joe Stuart, as Fal-
staff, broke the bottom out of Ann Hughes’s clothes-
basket, the license was revoked, and the season came
to an untimely end.

Until the beginning of the weekly, or the fort-
nightly, sailings of the Collins line of steamers from
the foot of Canal Street (a spectacle which they never
missed in any weather), Joe Stuart, Johnny Rob-
ertson, and The Boy played “The Deerslayer” every
Saturday in the back-yard of The Boy’s house. The
area-way was Glimmer-glass, in which they fished,
and on which they canoed ; the back-stoop was Musk-
rat Castle; the rabbits were all the wild beasts of the
Forest ; Johnny was Hawk-Eye, The Boy was Hurry
Harry, and Joe Stuart was Chingachgook. Their
only food was half-baked potatoes—sweet potatoes if
possible—which they cooked themselves and ate rav-
enously, with butter and salt, if Ann Hughes was
40 A BOY I KNEW

amiable, and entirely unseasoned if Ann was dis-
posed to be disobliging.

They talked what they fondly believed was the
dialect of the Delaware tribe, and they were con-
stantly on the lookout for the approaches of Riven-
oak, or the Panther, who were represented by any
member of the family who chanced to stray into the
enclosure. They carefully turned their toes in when
they walked, making so much effort in this matter
that it took a great deal of dancing-school to get
their fect back to the “first position” again; and
they even painted their faces when they were on the
war-path. The rabbits had the worst of it!

The campaign came to a sudden and disastrous
conclusion when the hostile tribes, headed by Mrs.
Robertson, descended in force upon the devoted
band, because Chingachgook broke one of Hawk-
Eye’s front teeth with an arrow, aimed at the biggest
of the rabbits, which was crouching by the side of
the roots of the grape-vine, and playing that he was
a panther of enormous size.

Johnny Robertson and The Boy had one great
superstition—to wit, Cracks! For some now inex-
plicable reason they thought it unlucky to step on
cracks; and they made daily and hourly spectacles
of themselves in the streets by the eccentric irregu-
larity of their gait. Now they would take long
strides, like a pair of ostriches, and now short, quick






JOHNNY ROBERTSON
A BOY I KNEW 41

steps, like a couple of robins; now they would hop
on both feet, like a brace of sparrows; now they
would walk on their heels, now on their toes; now
with their toes turned in, now with their toes turned
out—at right angles, in a splay-footed way; now
they would walk with their feet crossed, after the
manner of the hands of very fancy, old-fashioned
piano-players, skipping from base to treble — over
cracks. The whole performance would have driven
a sensitive drill-sergeant or ballet-master to distrac-
tion. And when they came to a brick sidewalk they
would go all around the block to avoid it. They
could cross Hudson Street on the cobblestones with
great effort, and in great danger of being run over;
but they could not possibly travel upon a brick pave-
ment, and avoid the cracks. What would have hap-
pened to them if they did step on a crack they did
not exactly know. But, for all that, they never
stepped on cracks—of their own free will!

The Boy’s earliest attempts at versification were
found, the other day, in an old desk, and at the end
of almost half a century. The copy is in his own
boyish, ill-spelled print; and it bears no date. The
present owner, his aunt Henrietta, well remembers
the circumstances and the occasion, however, having
been an active participant in the acts the poem de-
scribes, although she avers that she had no hand in
its composition. The original, it seems, was tran-
42 A BOY I KNEW

scribed by The Boy upon the cover of a soap-box,
which served as a head-stone to one of the graves in
his family burying-ground, situated in the back-yard
of the Hudson Street house, from which he was taken
before he was nine years of age. The monument
stood against the fence, and this is the legend it
bore—rhyme, rhythm, metre, and orthography being
carefully preserved :

“Three little kitens of our old cat

Were berrid this day in this
grassplat.

They came to there deth in
an old slop pale,

And after loosing their breth

They were pulled out by
the tale.

These three little kitens have
returned to their maker,

And were put in the grave by
The Boy, .
Undertaker.”

At about this period The Boy officiated at the
funeral of another cat, but in a somewhat more
exalted capacity. It was the Cranes’ cat, at Red
Hook—a, Maltese lady, who always had yellow kit-
tens. The Boy does not remember the cause of the
cat’s death, but he thinks that Uncle Andrew Knox
ran over her, with the “ dyspepsia-wagon ”—so called
because it had no springs. Anyway, the cat died,






E PURDY

JAN
A BOY I KNEW 43

and had to be buried. The grave was dug in the
garden of the tavern, near the swinging-gate to the
stable, and the whole family attended the services.
Jane Purdy, in a deep crape veil, was the chief
mourner; The Boy’s aunts were pall-bearers, in
white scarves; The Boy was the clergyman; while
the kittens—who did not look at all like their moth-
er—were on hand in a funeral basket, with black
shoestrings tied around their necks.

Jane was supposed to be the disconsolate widow.
She certainly looked the part to perfection; and it
never occurred to any of them that a cat, with kit-
tens, could not possibly have left a widow behind
her.

The ceremony was most impressive; the bereaved
kittens were loud in their grief; when, suddenly, the
village-bell tolled for the death of an old gentleman
whom everybody loved, and the comedy became a
tragedy. The older children were conscience-stricken
at the mummery, and they ran, demoralized and
shocked, into the house, leaving The Boy and the
kittens behind them. Jane Purdy tripped over her
veil, and one of the kittens was stepped on in the
crush. But The Boy proceeded with the funeral.

When The Boy got as far as a room of his own,
papered with scenes from circus-posters, and peopled
by tin soldiers, he used to play that his bed was the

barge Mayflower, running from Barrytown to the
does A BOY I KNEW

foot of Jay Street, North River, and that he was her
captain and crew. She made nightly trips between
the two ports; and by day, when she was not tied
up to the door-knob—which was Barrytown— she
was moored to the handle of the wash-stand drawer
—which was the dock at New York. She never
was wrecked, and she never ran aground ; but great
was the excitement of The Boy when, as not infre-
quently was the case, on occasions of sweeping, Han-
nah, the up-stairs girl, set her adrift.

The Mayflower was seriously damaged by fire
once, owing to the careless use, by a deck-hand, of a
piece of punk on the night before the Fourth of
July; this same deck-hand being nearly blown up
early the very next morning by a bunch of fire-
crackers which went off—by themselves—in his lap.
He did not know, for a second or two, whether the
barge had burst her boiler or had been struck by
lightning !

Barrytown is the river port of Red Hook —a
charming Dutchess County hamlet in which The Boy
spent the first summer of his life, and in which he
spent the better part of every succeeding summer for
a quarter of a century ; and he sometimes goes there
yet, although many of the names he knows were
carved, in the long-agoes, on the tomb. He always
went up and down, in those days, on the Mayflower,
the real boat of that name, which was hardly more


E STUART

JO
A BOY I KNEW 45

real to him than was the trundle-bed of his vivid,
nightly imagination. They sailed from New York
at five o’clock p.m., an hour looked for, and longed
for, by The Boy, as the very beginning of summer,
with all its delightful young charms; and they ar-
rived at their destination about five of the clock the
next morning, by which time The Boy was wide
awake, and on the lookout for Lasher’s Stage, in
which he was to travel the intervening three miles.
And eagerly he recognized, and loved, every land-
mark on the road. Barringer’s Corner; the half-
way tree; the road to the creek and to Madame
Knox’s; and, at last, the village itself, and the tav-
ern, and the tobacco-factory, and Massoneau’s store,
over the way; and then, when Jane Purdy had
shown him the new kittens and the little chickens,
and he had talked to “ Fido” and ‘“ Fanny,” or to
Fido alone after Fanny was stolen by gypsies—
Fanny was Fido’s wife, and a poodle—he rushed off
to see Bob Hendricks, who was just his own age,
barring a week, and who has been his warm friend
for more than half a century ; and then what good
times The Boy had!

Bob was possessed of a grandfather who could
make kites, and swings, and parallel-bars, and things
which The Boy liked; and Bob had a mother—and
he has her yet, happy Bob!—who made the most
wonderful of cookies, perfectly round, with sparkling
46 A BOY I KNEW

globules of sugar on them, and little round holes in
the middle; and Bob and The Boy for days, and
weeks, and months together hen’s-egged, and rode in
the hay-carts, and went for the mail every noon, and
boosted each other up into the best pound-sweet-tree
in the neighborhood ; and pelted each other with
little green apples, which weighed about a pound to
the peck; and gathered currants and chestnuts in
season ; and with long straws they sucked new cider
out of bung-holes; and learned to swim; and caught
their first fish; and did all the pleasant things that
all boys do.

At Red Hook they smoked their first cigar—
half a cigar, left by uncle Phil—and they wished
they hadn’t! And at Red Hook they disobeyed
their mothers once, and were found out. They were
told not to go wading in the creek upon pain of not
going to the creek at all; and for weeks they were
deprived of the delights of the society of the Faure
boys, through whose domain the creek ran, because,
when they went to bed on that disastrous night, it
was discovered that Bob had on The Boy’s stockings,
and that The Boy was wearing Bob’s socks ; a piece
of circumstantial evidence which convicted them
both. When the embargo was raised and they next
went to the creek, it is remembered that Bob tore
his trousers in climbing over a log, and that The
Boy fell in altogether.






BOB HENDRICKS
A BOY I KNEW 47

The Boy usually kept his promises, however, and
he was known even to keep a candy-cane—twenty-
eight inches long, red and white striped like a bar-
ber’s pole—for a fortnight, because his mother limit-
ed him to the consumption of two inches a day.
But he could not keep any knees to his trousers ;
and when The Boy’s mother threatened to sew but-
tons—brass buttons, with sharp and penetrating
eyes—on to that particular portion of the garment
in question, he wanted to know, in all innocence,
how they expected him to say his prayers!

One of Bob’s earliest recollections of The Boy is
connected with a toy expréss-wagon on four wheels,
which could almost turn around on its own axis.
The Boy imported this vehicle into Red Hook one
summer, and they used it for the transportation of
their chestnuts and their currants and their apples,
green and ripe, and the mail, and most of the dust of
the road ; and Bob thinks, to this day, that nothing in
all these after years has given him so much profound
satisfaction and enjoyment as did that little cart.

Bob remembers, too—what The Boy tries to for-
get—The Boy’s daily practice of half an hour on the
piano borrowed by The Boy’s mother from Mrs.
Bates for that dire purpose. Mrs. Bates’s piano is
almost the only unpleasant thing associated with
Red Hook in all The Boy’s experience of that happy
village. It was pretty hard on The Boy, because, in
48 A BOY I KNEW

The Boy’s mind, Red Hook should have been a
place of unbroken delights. But The Boy’s mother
wanted to make an all-round man of him, and when
his mother said so, of course it had to be done or
tried. Bob used to go with The Boy as far as Dr.
Bates’s house, and then hang about on the gate until
The Boy was released ; and he asserts that the music
which came out of the window in response to The
Boy’s inharmonic touch had no power whatever to
soothe his own savage young breast. He attributes
all his later disinclination to music to those dreary
thirty minutes of impatient waiting.

The piano and its effect upon The Boy’s uncertain
temper may have been the innocent cause of the
first, and only, approach to a quarrel which The
Boy and Bob ever had. The prime cause, however,
was, of course, a girl! They were playing, that af-
ternoon, at Cholwell Knox’s, when Cholwell said
something about Julia Booth which Bob resented,
and there was a fight, The Boy taking Cholwell’s
part; why, he cannot say, unless it was because of
his jealousy of Bob’s affection and admiration for
that charming young teacher, who won all hearts in
the village, The Boy’s among the number. Anyway,
Bob was driven from the field by the hard little
green apples of the Knox orchard; more hurt, he
declares, by the desertion of his ally than by all the
blows he received.


MUSIC LESSONS
A BOY I KNEW 49

It never happened again, dear Bob, and, please
God, it never will!

Another trouble The Boy had in Red Hook was
Dr. McNamee, a resident dentist, who operated upon
The Boy, nowand then. He wasa little more gentle
than was The Boy’s city dentist, Dr. Castle; but he
hurt, for all that. Dr. Castle lived in Fourth Street,

opposite Washington Parade Ground, and on the
same block with Clarke and Fanning’s school. And
to this day The Boy would go miles out of his way
rather than pass Dr. Castle’s house. . Personally Dr.
Castle was a delightful man, who told The Boy
amusing stories, which The Boy could not laugh at
while his mouth was wide open. But professionally
Dr. Castle was to The Boy an awful horror, of whom
he always dreamed when his dreams were particu-
larly bad. As he looks back upon his boyhood, with
its frequent toothache and its long hours in the den-
tists’ chairs, The Boy sometimes thinks that if he had
his life to live over again, and could not go through
it without teeth, he would prefer not to be born at
all!

It has rather amused The Boy, in his middle age,
to learn of the impressions he made upon Red Hook
in his extreme youth. Bob, as has been shown,
associates him with a little cart, and with a good
deal of the concord of sweet sounds. One old friend

remembers nothing but his phenomenal capacity for
4
50 A BOY I KNEW

the consumption of chicken pot-pie. Another old
friend can recall the scrupulously clean white duck
suits which he wore of afternoons, and also the blue-
checked long apron which he was forced to wear in
the mornings; both of them exceedingly distasteful
to The Boy, because the apron was a girl’s garment,
and because the duck suit meant “dress-up,” and only
the mildest of genteel play ; while Bob’s sister dwells
chiefly now upon the wonderful valentine The Boy
sent once to Zillah Crane. It was so large that it
had to have an especial envelope made to fit it; and
it was so magnificent, and so delicate, that, notwith-
standing the envelope, it came in a box of its own.
It had actual lace, and pinkish Cupids reclining on
light-blue clouds; and in the centre of all was a com-
pressible bird-cage, which, when it was pulled out,
like an accordion, displayed not a dove merely, but
a plain gold ring—a real ring, made of real gold.
Nothing like it had ever been seen before in all
Dutchess County; and it was seen and envied by
every girl of Zillah’s age between Rhinebeck and
Tivoli, between Barrytown and Pine Plains.

The Boy did an extensive business in the valentine
line, in the days when February Fourteenth meant
much more to boys than it does now. He sent
sentimental valentines to Phoebe Hawkins and comic
valentines to Ann Hughes, both of them written
anonymously, and both directed in a disguised hand.
A BOY I KNEW 51

But both recipients always knew from whom they
came; and, in all probability, neither of them was
much affected by the receipt. The Boy, as he has
put on record elsewhere, never really, in his inmost
heart, thought that comic valentines were so very
comic, because those that came to him usually re-
flected upon his nose, or were illuminated with por-
traits of gentlemen of all ages adorned with super-
naturally red hair.

In later years, when Bob and The Boy could swim—
a little—and had learned to take care of themselves
in water over their heads, the mill-pond at Red Hook
played an important part in their daily life there.
They sailed it, and fished it, and camped out on its
banks, with Ed Curtis— before Ed went to West
Point — and with Dick Hawley, Josie Briggs, and
Frank Rodgers, all first-rate fellows. But that is
another story.

The Boy was asked, a year or two ago, to write
a paper upon “The Books of his Boyhood.” And
when he came to think the matter over he discov-
ered, to his surprise, that the Books of his Boyhood
consisted of but one book! It was bound in two
twelvemo green cloth volumes; it bore the date of
1850, and it was filled with pictorial illustrations of
“The Personal History and Experiences of David
Copperfield, the Younger.” It was the first book
The Boy ever read, and he thought then, and some-
52 A BOY I KNEW

times he thinks now, that it was the greatest book
ever written. The traditional books of the childhood
of other children came later to The Boy: “ Robinson
Crusoe,” and the celebrated “Swiss Family” of the
same. name; “The Desert Home,” of Mayne Reid ;
Marryat’s “Peter Simple”; “The Leather Stocking
Tales” ; “Rob Roy”; and “The Three Guardsmen”
were well thumbed and well liked; but they were
not The Boy’s first love in fiction, and they never
usurped, in his affections, the place of the true ac-
count of David Copperfield. It was a queer book
to have absorbed the time and attention of a boy of
eight or nine, who had to skip the big words, who
did not understand it all, but who cried, as he has
cried but once since, whenever he came to that
dreadful chapter which tells the story of the taking
away of David’s mother, and of David’s utter, hope-
less desolation over his loss.

How the book came into The Boy’s possession he
cannot now remember, nor is he sure that his parents
realized how much, or how often, he was engrossed
in its contents. It cheered him in the measles, it
comforted him in the mumps. He took it to school
with him, and he took it to bed with him; and he
read it, over and over again, especially the early
chapters; for he did not care so much for David
after David became Trotwood, and fell in love.

When, in 1852, after his grandfather’s death, The
A BOY I KNEW 53

Boy first saw London, it was not the London of the
Romans, the Saxons, or the Normans, or the London
of the Plantagenets or the Tudors, but the London
of the Micawbers and the Traddleses, the London of
Murdstone and Grinby, the London of Dora’s Aunt
and of Jip. On his arrival at Euston Station the
first object upon which his eyes fell was a donkey-
cart, a large wooden tray on wheels, driven, at a
rapid pace, by a long-legged young man, and fol-
lowed, at a pace hardly so rapid, by a boy of about
his own age, who seemed in great mental distress.
This was the opening scene. And London, from
that moment, became to him, and still remains, a
great moving panorama of David Copperfield.

He saw the Orfling, that first evening, snorting
along Tottenham Court Road; he saw Mealy Pota-
toes, in a ragged apron and a paper cap, lounging
along Broad Street ; he saw Martha disappear swiftly
and silently into one of the dirty streets leading from

Seven Dials; he saw innumerable public-houses—the
Lion, or the Lion and something else—in any one of
which David might have consumed that memorable
glass of Genuine Stunning ale with a good head on
it. As they drove through St. Martin’s Lane, and
past a court at the back of the church, he even got
a glimpse of the exterior of the shop where was sold
a special pudding, made of currants, but dear; a two-
pennyworth being no larger than a pennyworth of
54 A BOY I KNEW

more ordinary pudding at any other establishment
in the neighborhood. And, to crown all, when he
looked out of his back bedroom window, at Morley’s
Hotel, he discovered that he was looking at the
actual bedroom windows of the Golden Cross on
the Strand, in which Steerforth and little Copper-
field had that disastrous meeting which indirectly
brought so much sorrow to so many innocent men
and women.

This was but the beginning of countless similar
experiences, and the beginning of a love for Land-
marks of a more important but hardly of a more de-
lightful character. Hungerford Market and Hunger-
ford Stairs, with the blacking- warehouse abutting
on the water when the tide was in, and on the mud
when the tide was out, still stood near Morley’s in
1852; and very close to them stood then, and still
stands to-day, the old house in Buckingham Street,
Adelphi, where, with Mrs. Crupp, Trotwood Copper-
field found his lodgings when he began his new life
with Spenlow and Jorkins. These chambers, once
the home of Clarkson Stanfield, and since of Mr.
William Black and of Dr. B. E. Martin, became, in
later days, very familiar to The Boy, and still are
haunted by the great crowd of the ghosts of the
past. The Boy has seen there, within a few years,
and with his eyes wide open, the spirits of Traddles,
of Micawher, of Steerforth, of Mr. Dick, of Clara
A BOY I KNEW 55

Peggotty and Daniel, of Uriah Heep—the last slept
one evening on the sofa pillows before the fire, you
may remember—and of Aunt Betsy herself. But in
1852 he could only look at the outside of the house,
and, now and then, when the door was open, get a
glimpse of the stairs down which some one fell and
rolled, one evening, when somebody else said it was
Copperfield !

The Boy never walked along the streets of Lon-
don by his father’s side during that memorable
summer without meeting, in fancy, some friend of
David’s, without passing some spot that David knew,
and loved, or hated. And he recognized St. Paul’s
Cathedral at the first glance, because it had figured
as an illustration on the cover of Peggotty’s work-
box!

Perhaps the event which gave him the greatest
pleasure was a casual meeting with little Miss
Moucher in a green omnibus coming from the top of
Baker Street to Trafalgar Square. It could not pos-
sibly have been anybody else. There were the same
large head and face, the same short arms. “ Throat
she had none; waist she had none; legs she had
none, worth mentioning.” The Boy can still hear the
pattering of the rain on the rattly windows of that
lumbering green omnibus; he can remember every
detail of the impressive drive ; and Miss Moucher, and
the fact of her existence in the flesh, and there present,
56 A BOY I KNEW

wiped from his mind every trace of Mme. Tussaud’s
famous gallery, and the waxworks it contained.

This was the Book of The Boy’s Boyhood. He.
does not recommend it as the exclusive literature of
their boyhood to other boys; but out of it The Boy
knows that he got nothing but what was healthful
and helping. It taught him to abominate selfish
brutality and sneaking falsehood, as they were ex-
hibited in the Murdstones and the Heeps; it taught
him to keep Charles I., and other fads, out of his
“ Memorials” ; it taught him to avoid rash expendi-
ture as it was practised by the Micawbers; it showed
him that a man like Steerforth might be the best of
good fellows and at the same time the worst and
most dangerous of companions; it showed, on the
other hand, that true friends like Traddles are worth
having and worth keeping; it introduced him to the
devoted, sisterly affection of a woman like Agnes;
and it proved to him that the rough pea-jacket of a
man like Ham Peggotty might cover the simple
heart of as honest a gentleman as ever lived.

The Boy, in his time, has been brought in contact
with many famous men and women ; but upon noth-
ing in his whole experience does he look back now
with greater satisfaction than upon his slight inter-
course with the first great man he ever knew. Quite
a little lad, he was staying at the Pulaski House in
Savannah, in 1853—perhaps it was in 1855—when




THE BOY’S FATHER
A BOY I KNEW BY

his father told him to observe particularly the old
gentleman with the spectacles, who occupied a seat
at their table in the public dining-room ; for, he said,
the time would come when The Boy would be very
proud to say that he had breakfasted, and dined, and
supped with Mr. Thackeray. He had no idea who,
or what, Mr. Thackeray was; but his father con-
sidered him a great man, and that was enough for
The Boy. He did pay particular attention to Mr.
Thackeray, with his eyes and his ears; and one
morning Mr. Thackeray paid a little attention to
him, of which he is proud, indeed. Mr. Thackeray
took The Boy between his knees, and asked his
name, and what he intended to be when he grew up.
He replied, “ A farmer, sir.” Why, he cannot im-
agine, for he never had the slightest inclination
towards a farmer’s life. And then Mr. Thackeray
put his gentle hand upon The Boy’s little red head,
and said: “Whatever you are, try to be a good one.”

To have been blessed by Thackeray is a distinction
The Boy would not exchange for any niche in the
Temple of Literary Fame ; no laurel crown he could
ever receive would be able to obliterate, or to equal,
the sense of Thackeray’s touch ; and if there be any
virtue in the laying on of hands The Boy can only
hope that a little of it has descended upon him.

And whatever The Boy is, he has tried, for Thack-
eray’s sake, “to be a good one!”



FOUR DOGS
WHISKIE
AN EAU DE VIE

In doggerel lines, Whiskie my dog I sing.

These lines are after Virgil, Pope, or some one,
His very voice has got a Whiskie Ring.

I call him Whiskie, ’cause he’s such a rum one,

His is a high-whine, and his nip has power,
Hot-Scotch his temper, but no Punch is merrier ;
Not Rye, not Schnappish, he’s no Whiskie-Sour.
I call him Whiskie—he’s a Whis-Skye terrier.
FOUR DOGS

T was Dr. John Brown, of Edinboro’, who once
spoke in sincere sympathy of the man who “led
a dog-less life.’ It was Mr. “Josh Billings” who
said that in the whole history of the world there is
but one thing that money cannot buy, to wit: the
wag of a dog’s tail. And it was Professor John C.
Van Dyke who declared the other day, in reviewing
the artistic career of Landseer, that he made his dogs
too human. It was the Great Creator himself who
made dogs too human—so human that sometimes
they put humanity to shame.

The Boy has been the friend and confidant of
Four Dogs who have helped to humanize him for a
quarter of a century and more, and who have souls
to be saved, he is sure. And when he crosses the
Stygian River he expects to find, on the other shore,
a trio of dogs wagging their tails almost off, in their
joy at his coming, and with honest tongues hanging
out to lick his hands and his feet. And then he is
62 FOUR DOGS

going, with these faithful, devoted dogs at his heels,
to talk about dogs with Dr. John Brown, Sir Edwin
Landseer, and Mr. “ Josh Billings.”

The first dog, Whiskie, was an alleged Skye ter-
rier, coming, alas! from a clouded, not a clear, sky.
He had the most beautiful and the most perfect head
ever seen on a dog, but his legs were altogether too
long; and the rest of him was—just dog. He came
into the family in 1867 or 1868. He was, at the be-
ginning, not popular with the seniors; but he was
so honest, so ingenuous, so “square,” that he made
himself irresistible, and he soon became even dearer
to the father and to the mother than he was to The
Boy. Whiskie was not an amiable character, except
to his own people. He hated everybody else, he
barked at everybody else, and sometimes he bit
everybody else—friends of the household as well as
the butcher-boys, the baker-boys, and the borrowers
of money who came to the door. He had no dis-
crimination in his likes and dislikes, and, naturally,
he was not popular, except among his own people.
He hated all cats but his own cat, by whom he was
bullied in a most outrageous way. Whiskie had the
sense of shame and the sense of humor.

One warm summer evening, the family was sitting
on the front steps, after a refreshing shower of rain,
when Whiskie saw a cat in the street, picking its
dainty way among the little puddles of water. With






WHISKIE
FOUR DOGS 63

a muttered curse he dashed after the cat without
discovering, until within a few feet of it, that it was
- the cat who belonged to him. He tried to stop him-
self in his impetuous career, he put on all his brakes,
literally skimming along the street railway-track as
if he were out simply for a slide, passing the cat, who
gave him a half-contemptuous, half-pitying look ; and
then, after inspecting the sky to see if the rain was
really over and how the wind was, he came back to
his place between the father and The Boy as if it
were all a matter of course and of every-day occur-
rence. But he knew they were laughing at him;
and if ever a dog felt sheepish, and looked sheepish
—if ever a dog said, “ What an idiot ve made of
myself!” Whiskie was that dog.

The cat was a martinet in her way, and she de-
manded all the privileges of her sex. Whiskie al-
ways gave her precedence, and once when he, for a
moment, forgot himself and started to go out of the
dining-room door before her, she deliberately slapped
him in the face; whereupon he drew back instantly,
like the gentleman he was, and waited for her to
pass. :

Whiskie was fourteen or fifteen years of age in
1882, when the mother went to join the father, and
The Boy was taken to Spain by a good aunt and
cousins. Whiskie was left at home to keep house
with the two old servants who had known him all his
64 FOUR DOGS

life, and were in perfect sympathy with him. He had
often been left alone before during the family’s fre-
quent journeyings about the world, the entire estab-
lishment being kept running purely on his account.
Usually he did not mind the solitude; he was well
taken care of in their absence, and he felt that they
were coming back some day. This time he knew it
was different. He would not be consoled. He wan-
dered listlessly and uselessly about the house; into
the mother’s room, into his master’s room; and one
morning he was found in a dark closet, where he had
never gone before, dead—of a broken heart.

He had only a stump of a tail, but he will wag it—
when next his master sees him!

The second dog was Punch—a perfect, thorough-
bred Dandie Dinmont, and the most intelligent, if
not the most affectionate, of the lot. Punch and
The Boy kept house together for a year or two, and
alone. The first thing in the morning, the last thing
at night, Punch was in evidence. He went to the
door to see his master safely off; he was sniffing at
the inside of the door the moment the key was heard
- in the latch, no matter how late at night ; and so long
as there was light enough he watched for his master
out of the window. Punch, too, had a cat—a son,
or a grandson, of Whiskie’s cat. Punch’s favorite
seat was in a chair in the front basement. Here, for
hours, he would look out at the passers-by—indulg-
















































































PUNCH
FOUR DOGS 65

ing in the study of man, the proper study of his kind.
The chair was what is known as “cane-bottomed,”
and through its perforations the cat was fond of
tickling Punch, as he sat. When Punch felt that
the joke had been carried far enough, he would rise
in his wrath, chase the cat out into the kitchen,
around the back-yard, into the kitchen again, and
then, perhaps, have it out with the cat under the
sink—without the loss of a hair, the use of a claw,
or an angry spit or snarl. Punch and the cat slept
together, and dined together, in utter harmony; and
the master has often gone up to his own bed, after a
solitary cigar, and left them purring and snoring in
each other’s arms. They ‘assisted at each other’s
toilets, washed each other’s faces, and once, when
Mary Cook was asked what was the matter with
Punch’s eye, she said: “I think, Sur, that the cat
must have put her finger in it, when she combed his
bang!”

Punch loved everybody. He seldom barked, he
never bit. He cared nothing for clothes, or style, or
social position. He was as cordial to a beggar as he
would have been to a king; and if thieves had come
to break through and steal, Punch, in his unfailing,
hospitable amiability, would have escorted them
through the house, and shown them where the
treasures were kept. All the children were fond of
Punch, who accepted mauling as never did dog be-

5
66 FOUR DOGS

fore. His master could carry him up-stairs by the
tail, without a murmur of anything but satisfaction
on Punch’s part; and one favorite performance of
theirs was an amateur representation of “Daniel in
the Lion’s Den,” Punch being all the animals, his
master, of course, being the prophet himself. The
struggle for victory was something awful. Daniel
seemed to be torn limb from limb, Punch, all the
time, roaring like a thousand beasts of the forest,
and treating his victim as tenderly as if he were
wooing a sucking dove. The entertainment—when
there were young persons at the house — was of
nightly occurrence, and always repeatedly encored.
Punch, however, never cared to play Lion to the
Daniel of anybody else.

One of Punch’s expressions of poetic affection is
still preserved by a little girl who is now grown up,
and has little girls of herown. It was attached to a
Christmas-gift—a locket containing a scrap of blue-
gray wool. And here it is:

“Punch Hutton is ready to vow and declare
That his friend Milly Barrett’s a brick.
He begs she’ll accept of this lock of his hair ;
And he sends her his love—and a lick.”

Punch’s most memorable performance, perhaps,
was his appearance at a dinner-party of little ladies
and gentlemen. They were told that the chief dish
FOUR DOGS eats

of the entertainment was one which they all particu-
larly liked, and their curiosity, naturally, was greatly
excited. The table was cleared, the carving-knife was
sharpened in a most demonstrative manner, and half
a dozen pairs of very wide-open little eyes were fixed
upon the door through which the waitress entered,
bearing aloft an enormous platter, upon which noth-
ing was visible but a cover of equally enormous size—
both of them borrowed, by-the-way, for the important
occasion. When the cover was raised, with all cere-
mony, Punch was discovered, in a highly nervous
state, and apparently as much delighted and amused
at the situation as was anybody else. The guests,
with one voice, declared that he was “sweet enough
to eat.”

Punch died very suddenly; poisoned, it is sup-
posed, by somebody whom he never injured. He
never injured a living soul! And when Mary Cook
dug a hole, by the side of Whiskie’s grave, one raw
afternoon, and put Punch into it, his master is not
ashamed to confess that he shut himself up in his
room, threw himself onto the bed, and cried as he
has not cried since they took his mother away from
him.

Mop was the third of the quartet of dogs, and he
came into the household like the Quality of Mercy.
A night or two after the death of Punch, his mas-
ter chanced to be dining with the Coverleys, in
68 FOUR DOGS

Brooklyn. Mr. Coverley, noticing the trappings and
the suits of woe which his friend wore in his face,
naturally asked the cause. He had in his stable a
Dandie as fine as Punch, whom he had not seen, or
thought of, for a month. Would the bereaved one
like to see him? The mourner would like to look at
any dog who looked like the companion who had
been taken from him; and a call, through a speak-
ing-tube, brought into the room, head over heels,
with all the wild impetuosity of his race, Punch per-
sonified, his ghost embodied, his twin brother. The
same long, lithe body, the same short legs (the fore
legs shaped like a capital S), the same short tail, the
same hair dragging the ground, the same beautiful
head, the same wistful, expressive eye, the same cool,
insinuating nose. The new-comer raced around the
table, passing his owner unnoticed, and not a word
was spoken. Then this Dandie cut a sort of double
pigeon-wing, gave a short bark, put his crooked, dirty
little feet on the stranger’s knees, insinuated his cool
and expressive nose into an unresisting hand, and
wagged his stump of a tail with all his loving might.
It was the longed-for touch of a vanished paw, the
lick of a tongue that was still. He was unkempt,
uncombed, uncared for, but he was another Punch,
and he knew a friend when he saw one. “If that
were my dog he would not live forgotten in a stable:
he would take the place in the society to which his


MOP AND HIS MASTER
FOUR DOGS 69

birth and his evident breeding entitle him,” was the
friend’s remark, and Mop regretfully went back to
his stall.

The next morning, early, he came into the Thirty-
fourth Street study, combed, kempt, shining, cared
for to a superlative degree ; with a note in his mouth
signifying that his name was Mop and that he was
The Boy’s. He was The Boy’s, and The Boy was
his, so long as he lived, ten happy years for both of
them.

Without Punch’s phenomenal intelligence, Mop had
many of Punch’s ways, and all of Punch’s trust and
affection ; and, like Punch, he was never so superla-
tively happy as when he was roughly mauled and
pulled about by his tail. When by chance he was
shut out in the back-yard, he knocked, with his tail,
on the door; he squirmed his way into the heart of
Mary Cook in the first ten minutes, and in half an
hour he was on terms of the most affectionate friend-
ship with Punch’s cat.

Mop had absolutely no sense of fear or of animal
proportions. As a catter he was never equalled; a
Yale-man, by virtue of an honorary degree, he tack-
led everything he ever met in the feline way—with
the exception of the Princeton Tiger —and he has
been known to attack dogs seven times as big as
himself. He learned nothing by experience: he never
knew when he was thrashed. The butcher’s dog at
0 FOUR DOGS

Onteora whipped, and bit, and chewed him into semi-
helpless unconsciousness three times a week for four
months, one summer; and yet Mop, half paralyzed,
bandaged, soaked in Pond’s Extract, unable to hold
up his head to respond to the greetings of his own
family, speechless for hours, was up and about and
ready for another fray and another chewing, the
moment the butcher’s dog, unseen, unscented by the
rest of the household, appeared over the brow of the
hill.

The only creature by whom Mop was ever really
overcome was a black-and-white, common, every-day,
garden skunk. He treed this unexpected visitor on
the wood-pile one famous moonlight night in Onteo-
ra. And he acknowledged his defeat at once, and
likea man. He realized fully his own unsavory condi-
tion. He retired to a far corner of the small estate,
and for a week, prompted only by his own instinct,
he kept to the leeward of Onteora society.

He went out of Onteora, that summer, in a blaze
of pugnacious glory. It was the last day of the sea-
son; many households were being broken up, and
four or five families were leaving the colony to-
gether. All was confusion and hurry at the little
railway station at Tannersville. Scores of trunks
were being checked, scores of packages were being
labelled for expressage, every hand held a bag, or a
bundle, or both ; and Mop, a semi-invalid, his fore paw
FOUR DOGS 71

and his ear in slings, the result of recent encounters
with the butcher’s dog, was carried, for safety’s sake,
and for the sake of his own comfort, in a basket,
which served as an ambulance, and was carefully
placed in the lap of the cook. As the train finally
started, already ten minutes late, the cook, to give
her hero a last look at the Hill-of-the-Sky, opened the
basket, and the window, that he might wag a farewell
tail. When lo! the butcher’s dog appeared upon the
scene, and, in an instant, Mop was out of the win-
dow and under the car-wheels, in the grip of the
butcher’s dog. Intense was the excitement. The en-
gine was stopped, and brakemen, and firemen, and
conductors, and passengers, and on-lookers, and other
dogs, were shouting and barking and trying to sep-
arate the combatants. At the end of a second ten
minutes Mop—minus a piece of the other ear—was
back in his ambulance: conquered, but happy. He
never saw the butcher’s dog or Onteora again.

To go back a little. Mop was the first person who
was told of his master’s engagement, and he was the
first to greet the wife when she came home, a bride,
to his own house. He had been made to understand,
from the beginning, that she did not care for dogs—
in general. And he set himself out to please, and to
overcome the unspoken antagonism. He had a deli-
cate part to play, and he played it with a delicacy
and a tact which rarely have been equalled. He did
9, FOUR DOGS

not assert himself; he kept himself in the back-
ground; he said little; his approaches at first were
slight and almost imperceptible, but he was always
ready to do, or to help, in an unaggressive way. He
followed her about the house, up-stairs and down-
stairs, and he looked and waited. Then he began to
sit on the train of her gown ; to stand as close to her
as was fit and proper ; once in a while to jump upon
the sofa beside her, or into the easy-chair behind her,
winking at his master, from time to time, in his quiet
way. °

And at last he was successful. One dreary winter,
* when he suffered terribly from inflammatory rheu-
matism, he found his mistress making a bed for him
by the kitchen fire, getting up in the middle of the
night to go down to look after him, when he uttered,
in pain, the cries he could not help. And when a
bottle of very rare old brandy, kept for some ex-
traordinary occasion of festivity, was missing, the
master was informed that it had been used in rub-
bing Mop!

Mop’s early personal history was never known.
Told once that he was the purest Dandie in America,
and asked his pedigree, his master was moved to look
into the matter of his family tree. It seems that a
certain sea-captain was commissioned to bring back
to this country the best Dandie to be had in all Scot-
land. He sent his quartermaster to find him, and
FOUR DOGS "3

the quartermaster found Mop under a private car-
riage, in Argyle Street, Glasgow, and brought him
on board. That is Mop’s pedigree.

Mop died of old age and of a complication of dis-
eases, in the spring of 1892. He lost his hair, he lost
his teeth, he lost everything but his indomitable
spirit; and when almost on the brink of the grave,
he stood in the back-yard—literally, on the brink of
his own grave—for eight hours in a March snow-
storm, motionless, and watching a great black cat
on the fence, whom he hypnotized, and who final-
ly came down to be killed. The cat weighed more
than Mop did, and was very gamy. And the en-
counter nearly cost a lawsuit.

This was Mop’s last public appearance. He re-
tired to his bed before the kitchen range, and
gradually and slowly he faded away: amiable, un-
repining, devoted to the end. A consultation of doc-
tors showed that his case was hopeless, and Mop was
condemned to be carried off to be killed humanely
by the society founded by Mr. Bergh, where without
cruelty they end the sufferings of animals. Mop had
not left his couch for weeks. His master spoke to
him about it, with tears in his eyes, one night. He
said: “To-morrow must end it, old friend. °Tis
for your sake and your relief. It almost breaks my
heart, old friend. But there is another and a bet-
ter world—even for dogs, old friend. And for old
"4. FOUR DOGS

acquaintance’ sake, and for old friendship’s sake, I
must have you sent on ahead of me, old friend.”

The next morning, when he came down to break-
fast, there by the empty chair sat Mop. How he
got himself up the stairs nobody knows. But there
he was, and the society which a good man founded
saw not Mop that day.

The end came soon afterwards. And Mop has
gone on to join Whiskie and Punch in their waiting
for The Boy.

The family went abroad for a year’s stay, when
Mop died, and they rented the house to good people
and good tenants, who have never been forgiven for
one particular act. They buried a dog of their own
in the family plot in the back-yard, and under the
ailantus-tree which shades the graves of the cats and
the dogs; and The Boy feels that they have profaned
the spot!

It seemed to his master, after the passing of Mop,
that the master’s earthly account with dogs was
closed. The pain of parting was too great to be en-
dured. But another Dandie came to him, one Christ-
mas morning, to fill the aching void; and for a time
again his life is not a dogless one.

The present ruler of the household has a pedigree
much longer and much straighter than his own front
legs. Although he comes from a distinguished line of
prize-winning thoroughbreds, he never will be per-
MAS'

Ss

i
a
4

ROY


FOUR DOGS %5

mitted to compete for a medal on his own behalf.
The Dog Show should be suppressed by the Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Dogs. It has ruined
the dispositions and broken the hearts of very many
of the best friends humanity ever had. And the
man who would send his dog to the Dog Show,
would send his wife to a Wife Show, and permit his
baby to be exhibited, in public, for a blue ribbon or a
certificate—at an admission-fee of fifty cents a head!

Mop’s successor answers to the name of Roy—
when he answers to anything at all. He is young,
very wilful, and a little hard of hearing, of which
latter affliction he makes the most. He always un-
derstands when he is invited to go out. He is stone-
deaf, invariably, when he is told to come back. But
he is full of affection, and he has a keen sense of
humor. In the face he looks like Thomas Carlyle,
and Professor John Weir declares that his body is all
out of drawing!

At times his devotion to his mistress is beautiful
and touching. It is another case of “ Mary and the
Lamb, you know.” If his mistress is not visible, he
waits patiently about; and he is sure to go wherever
she goes. It makes the children of the neighborhood
laugh and play. But it is severe upon the master,
who does most of the training, while the mistress
gets most of the devotion. That is the way with
lambs, and with dogs, and with some folks!
6 FOUR DOGS

Roy is quite as much of a fighter as was any one
of the other dogs; but he is a little more dis-
criminating in his likes and his dislikes. He fights
all the dogs in Tannersville; he fights the Drislers’
Gyp almost every time he meets him; he fights the
Beckwiths’ Blennie only when either one of them
trespasses on the domestic porch of the other (Blen-
nie, who is very pretty, looks like old portraits of
Mrs. Browning, with the curls hanging on each side
of the face); and Roy never fights Laddie Pruyn nor
Jack Ropes at all. Jack Ropes is the hero whom he
worships, the beau ideal to him of everything a dog
should be. He follows Jack in all respects; and he
pays Jack the sincere flattery of imitation. Jack, an
Trish setter, is a thorough gentleman in form, in ac-
tion, and in thought. Some years Roy’s senior, he
submits patiently to the playful capers of the younger
dog; and he even accepts little nips at his legs or his
ears. It is pleasant to watch the two friends during
an afternoon walk. Whatever Jack does, that does
Roy; and Jack knows it, and he gives Roy hard
things to do. He leads Roy to the summit of high
rocks, and then he jumps down, realizing that Roy is
too small to take the leap. But he always waits un-
til Roy, yelping with mortification, comes back by the
way they both went. He wades through puddles up
to his own knees, but over Roy’s head; and then he
trots cheerfully away, far in advance, while Roy has


ROY
FOUR DOGS 04

to stop long enough to shake himself dry. But it was
Roy’s turn once! He traversed a long and not very
clean drain, which was just large enough to give free
passage to his own'small body ; and Jack went rush-
ing after. Jack got through; but he was a spectacle
to behold. And there are creditable eye-witnesses
who are ready to testify that Roy took Jack home,
and sat on the steps, and laughed, while Jack was
being washed.

Each laughed on the wrong side of his mouth,
however—Jack from agony, and Roy from sympa-
thy—when Jack, a little later, had his unfortunate
adventure with the loose-quilled, fretful, Onteora por-
cupine. It nearly cost Jack his life and his reason;
and for some time he was a helpless, suffering invalid.
Doctors were called in, chloroform was administered,
and many delicate surgical operations were performed
before Jack was on his feet again; and for the while
each tail drooped. Happily for Roy, he did not go
to the top of the Hill-of-the-Sky that unlucky day,
and so he escaped the porcupine. But Roy does not
care much for porcupines, anyway, and he never did.
Other dogs are porcupiney enough for him!

Roy’s association with Jack Ropes is a liberal edu-
cation to him in more ways than one. Jack is so big
and so strong and so brave, and so gentle withal, and
so refined in manners and intellectual in mind, that
Roy, even if he would, could not resist the healthful
~g FOUR DOGS

influence. Jack never quarrels except when Roy
quarrels ; and whether Roy is in the right or in the
wrong, the aggressor or the attacked (and generally
he begins it), Jack invariably interferes on Roy’s be-
half, in a good-natured, big-brother, what-a-bother
sort of way that will not permit Roy to be the under
dog in any fight. Part of Roy’s dislike of Blennie—
Blennie is short for Blenheim—consists in the fact
that while Blennie is nice enough in his way, it is not
Roy’s way. Blennie likes to sit on laps, to bark out
of windows—at a safe distance. He wears a little
sleigh - bell on his collar. Under no circumstances
does he play follow-my-leader, as Jack does. He does
not try to do stunts; and, above all, he does not care
to go in swimming.

The greatest event, perhaps, in Roy’s young life
was his first swim. He did not know he could swim.
He did not know what it was to swim. He had
never seen a sheet of water larger than a road-side
puddle or than the stationary wash-tubs of his own
laundry at home. He would have nothing to do
with the Pond, at first, except for drinking purposes ;
and he would not enter the water until Jack went in,
and then nothing would induce him to come out of
the water—until Jack was tired. His surprise and
his pride at being able to take care of himself in an
entirely unknown and unexplored element were very
great. But—there is always a But in Roy’s case—
FOUR DOGS 79

but when he swam ashore the trouble began. Jack,
in a truly Chesterfieldian manner, dried himself in
the long grass on the banks. Roy dried himself in
the deep yellow dust of the road—a medium which
“was quicker and more effective, no doubt, but not so
pleasant for those about him; for he was so enthu-
siastic over his performance that he jumped upon
everybody’s knickerbockers, or upon the skirts of
everybody’s gown, for the sake of a lick at some-
body’s hand and a pat of appreciation and applause.

Another startling and never -to-be-forgotten ex-
perience of Roy’s was his introduction to the par-
tridge. He met the partridge casually one afternoon
in the woods, and he paid no particular attention to
it. He looked upon it as a plain barn-yard chicken
a little out of place; but when the partridge whirled
and whizzed and boomed itself into the air, Roy put
all his feet together, and jumped, like a bucking
horse, at the lowest estimate four times as high as
his own head. He thought it was a porcupine! He
had heard a great deal about porcupines, although
he had never seen one; and he fancied that that was
the way porcupines always went off!

Roy likes and picks blackberries—the green as
well as the ripe; and he does not mind having his
portrait painted. “Mr. Beckwith considers Roy one
of the best models he ever had. Roy does not have
to be posed ; he poses himself, willingly and patient-
80 : FOUR DOGS

ly, so long as he can pose himself very close to his

_master; and he always places his front legs, which
he knows to be his strong point, in the immediate
foreground. He tries very hard to look pleasant, as
if he saw a chipmunk at the foot of a tree, or as if
he thought Mr. Beckwith was squeezing little worms
of white paint out of little tubes just for his amuse-
ment. And if he really does see a chipmunk on a
stump, he rushes off to bark at the chipmunk; and
then he comes back and resumes his original posi-
tion, and waits for Mr. Beckwith to go on painting
again. Once in a while, when he feels that Mr. Beck-
with has made a peculiarly happy remark, or an un-
usually happy stroke of the brush, Roy applauds
tumultuously and loudly with his tail, against the
seat of the bench or the side of the house. Roy has
two distinct wags—the perpendicular and the hori-
zontal; and in his many moments of enthusiasm he
never neglects to use that particular wag which is
likely to make the most noise.

Roy has many tastes and feelings which are in en-
tire sympathy with those of his master. He cannot
get out of a hammock unless he falls out; and he
is never so miserable as when Mrs. Butts comes over
from the Eastkill Valley to clean house. Mrs. Butts
piles all the sitting-room furniture on the front piaz-
za, and then she scrubs the sitting-room floor, and
neither Roy nor his master, so long as Mrs. Butts


“HE TRIES VERY HARD TO LOOK PLEASANT”
FOUR DOGS 81

has control, can enter the sitting-room for a bone or
a book. And they do not like it, although they like
Mrs. Butts.

Roy has his faults; but his evil, as a rule, is
wrought by want of thought rather than by want of
heart. He shows his affection for his friends by
walking under their feet and getting his own feet
stepped on, or by sitting so close to their chairs that
they rock on his tail. He has been known to hold
two persons literally spellbound for minutes, with his
tail under the rocker of one chair and both ears under
the rocker of another one. Roy’s greatest faults are
barking at horses’ heels and running away. This
last is very serious, and often it is annoying; but
there is always some excuse for it. He generally
runs away to the Williamsons’, which is the summer
home of his John and his Sarah; and where lodges
Miss Flossie Burns, of Tannersville, his summer-girl.
He knows that the Williamsons themselves do not
want too much of him, no matter how John and
Sarah and Miss Burns may feel on the subject ; and
he knows, too, that his own family wishes him to stay
more at home; but, for all that, he runs away. He
slips off at every opportunity. He pretends that
he is only going down to the road to see what time
it is, or that he is simply setting out for a blackberry
or the afternoon’s mail; and when he is brought re-

luctantly home, he makes believe that he has for-
6
82 “FOUR DOGS

gotten all about it; and he naps on the top step, or
in the door-way, in the most guileless and natural
manner; and then, when nobody is looking, he
dashes off, barking at any imaginary ox-cart, in wild,
unrestrainable impetuosity, generally in the direction
of the Williamsons’ cottage, and bringing up, almost
invariably, under the Williamsons’ kitchen stove.

He would rather be shut up, in the Williamsons’
_ kitchen, with John and Sarah, and with a chance of
seeing Flossie through the wire-screened door, than
roam in perfect freedom over all his own domain.

He will bark at horses’ heels until he is brought
home, some day, with broken ribs. Nothing but
hard experience teaches Roy. There is no use of
boxing his ears. That only hurts his feelings, and
gives him an extra craving for sympathy. He licks
the hand that licks him, until every one of the five
fingers is heartily ashamed of itself.

Several autograph letters of Roy’s, in verse, in
blank-verse, and in plain, hard prose, signed by his
own mark—a fore paw dipped in an ink-bottle and
stamped upon the paper—were sold by Mrs. Custer
at varying prices during a fair for the benefit of the
Onteora Chapel Fund, in 1896.

To one friend he wrote:

‘“My DEAR BLENNIE BEcKWITH,—You are a sneak; and a
snip; and a snide ; and a snob; and a snoozer; and a snarler;
and a snapper; andaskunk. AndI hate you; and I loathe you;


“He is stone-deaf when he is asked to
come back ”



“He poses willingly and steadily ” “He

waits patiently about”

ROY
FOUR DOGS 83

and I despise you; and I abominate you ; and I scorn you; andI
repudiate you; and abhor you; and I dislike you; and I eschew
you ; and I dash you; and I dare you.
‘Your affectionate friend,
«“P. §.—T’ve licked this spot.
“R. H.

Roy



mark.

‘‘Witness : Kate Lynch.”

Inspired by Miss Flossie Williamson Burns’s bright .
eyes, he dropped into poetry in addressing her:
“Say I'm barkey; say I’m bad ;

Say the Thurber pony kicked me ;
Say I run away—but add—

‘Flossie licked me.’ his
“Roy x Hurron.
‘* Witness: Sarah Johnson.” — mark.

In honor of “John Ropes, Esquire,’ he went to
Shakspere :
84 FOUR DOGS

‘‘But that I am forbid
To tell the secrets of thy mountain climb,
-I could a tail unfold, whose lightest wag

Would harrow up the roof of thy mouth, draw thy young blood,

Make thy two eyes, like a couple of safety-matches, start from
their spheres ;

Thy knotted and combinéd locks to part right straight down
the middle of thy back,

And each particular brick-red hair to stand on end

Full of quills, shot out by a fretful Onteora porcupine.

But this eternal blazon must not be

To ears that are quite as handsome as is the rest of thy beau-

tiful body.
(‘‘‘ Hamlet,’ altered to suit, by) bi
is
“Roy x Hurton.
‘‘ Witness: John Johnson.” mark.

His latest poetical effort was the result of his
affection for a Scottish collie, in his neighborhood,
and was indited

TO LADDIE PRUYN, ESQ.

Should Auld Acquaintance be forgot,
And the Dogs of Auld Lang Syne?
I'll wag a tail o’ kindness yet,
For the sake of Auld Ladd Pruyn.

Witnesses :
Marion Lyman,
Effie Waddington,
Katherine Lyman.

While Roy was visiting the Fitches and the Tel-
ford children, and little Agnes Ogden, at Wilton,
Conn., some time afterwards, he dictated a long let-
ter to his master, some portions of which, perhaps,




=.
aS
—

THE WAITING THREE
FOUR DOGS 85

are worth preserving. After the usual remarks upon
the weather and the general health of the family, he
touched upon serious, personal matters which had
evidently caused him some mental and physical un-
easiness. And he explained that while he was will-
ing to confess that he did chase the white cat into a
tree, and keep her away from her kittens for a couple
of hours, he did not kill the little chicken. The little
chicken, stepped upon by its own mother, was dead,
‘quite dead, when he picked it up, and brought it to
the house. And he made Dick Fitch, who was an
eye-witness to the whole transaction, add a post-
script testifying that the statement was true.
John says the letter sounds exactly like Roy! -
Roy’s is a complex character. There is little me-
dium about Roy. He is very good when he is good,
and he is very horrid indeed when he is bad. He is
a strange admixture of absolute devotion and of ut-
ter inconstancy. Nothing will entice him away
from John on one day, neither threats nor per-*
suasion. The next day he will cut John dead in the
road, with no sign of recognition. He sees John,
and he goes slowly and deliberately out of his way
to pass John by, without a look or a sniff. He comes
up-stairs every morning when his master’s shaving-
water is produced. He watches intently the entire
course of his master’s toilet ; he follows his master,
step by step, from bed to burean, from closet to
86 FOUR DOGS

chair; he lies across his master’s feet; he minds no
sprinkling from his master’s sponge, so anxious is he
that his master shall not slip away, and go to his
breakfast without him. And then, before his mas-
ter is ready to start, Roy goes off to breakfast, alone
—at the Williamsons’! He will torment his master
sometimes for hours to be taken out to walk; he will
interrupt his master’s work, disturb his master’s af-
‘ternoon nap, and refuse all invitations to run away
for a walk on his own account. And the moment
he and his master have started, he will join the first
absolute stranger he meets, and walk off with that
stranger in the opposite direction, and in the most
confidential manner possible !

There are days when he will do everything he
should do, everything he is told to do, everything he
is wanted to do. There are days and days together
when he does nothing that is right, when he is diso-
bedient, disrespectful, disobliging, disagreeable, even
disreputable. And ail this on purpose!

It is hard to know what to do with Roy: how to
treat him ; how to bring him up. He may improve
as he grows older. Perhaps to his unfortunate in-
firmity may be ascribed his uncertainty and his varia-
bility of femper and disposition. It is possible that
he cannot hear even when he wants to hear. It is
not impossible that he is making-believe all the time.
One great, good thing can be said for Roy: he is
FOUR DOGS gy

never really cross; he never snaps ; he never snarls;
he never bites his human friends, no matter how
great the provocation-may be. Roy is a canine
enigma, the most eccentric of characters. His fami-
ly cannot determine whether he is a gump or a gen-
ius. But they know he is nice; and they like him!
Long may Roy be spared to wag his earthly tail,
and to bay deep-mouthed welcome to his own particu-
lar people as they draw near home. How the three
dogs who have gone on ahead agree now with
each other, and how they will agree with Roy, no
man-can say. They did not agree with very many
dogs in this world. But that they are waiting to-
gether, all three of them, for Roy and for The Boy,
and in perfect harmony, The Boy is absolutely sure.


23hles0s


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