Citation
True stories of great Americans for young Americans

Material Information

Title:
True stories of great Americans for young Americans telling in simple language suited to boys and girls, the inspiring stories of the lives of George Washington, John Paul Jones, Benjamin Franklin, Patrick Henry, Robert E. Lee, George Peabody, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, Jas. A. Garfield, Robert Fulton, Cyrus W. Field, Thos. A. Edison
Creator:
Brooks, Elbridge Streeter, 1846-1902
Meek, Thomas Sheppard ( Author )
John C. Winston Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia ;
Chicago ;
Toronto
Publisher:
John C. Winston & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
11-14, 17-208 p., [6] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.), ports ; 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Statesmen -- Biography -- Juvenile literature -- United States ( lcsh )
Inventors -- Biography -- Juvenile literature -- United States ( lcsh )
Patriotism -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Determination (Personality trait) -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Loyalty -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
War -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
War stories -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile literature -- United States ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Juvenile literature -- United States ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Biographies -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Biographies ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
Ontario -- Toronto
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by the famous writer for young Americans and Thomas Sheppard Meek ; richly illustrated with six beautiful lithographs and original half tone drawings by eminent artists.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026661260 ( ALEPH )
ALG5316 ( NOTIS )
244482501 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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YOUNG WASHINGTON, SURVEYOR.



ae STORIES

GREAT AMERICANS

FOR YOUNG AMERICANS

TELLING IN SIMPLE LANGUAGE SUITED TO BOYS AND GIRLS, THE
INSPIRING STORIES OF THE LIVES OF

Gerorce WasHINGTON ABRAHAM LINCOLN
Joun Paut Jones | Uxyssres S. Grant
Benjamin FRANKLIN Jas. A. GarFIELD
Patrick Henry Rosert Futton
Rosert E. Lee Cyrus W. Fietp
GrorcE PEasopy Tuos. A. Epison

By tue Famous WRITER FOR YOUNG AMERICANS

AND THOMAS SHEPPARD MEEK

RICHLY ILLUSTRATED WITH

Six BEAUTIFUL LITHOGRAPHS AND ORIGINAL HALF TONE DRAWINGS

BY EMINENT ARTISTS

JOHN © WINS TON & COK.

PHILADELPHIA: CHICAGO: TORONTO



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1897, by
W. E. SCULL,
in the office 01 the Librarian of Congress, at Washington,

All rights reserved.

ALL PERSONS ARE WARNED NOT TO INFRINGE UPON OUR COPYRIGHT BY USING EITHER THE
MATTER OR THE PICTURES IN THIS VOLUME,



INTRODUCTION.

There is nothing which our boys and girls so much love to read or
have told to them as true stories of the lives of great and noble people.
This is what this book does. It deals especially with the early life of
each of twelve great men. It shows what were their natures and
their habits when they were boys. It tells about their mothers and
fathers and their homes; it tells of the circumstances which surrounded
them and relates scores of incidents of their boyhood days, their daily
doings, their jolly sports, their trials and difficulties and how they met
and overcame them. It shows us what books they read, what schooling
they had, how they came to be great and famous men and the wonderful
things they did in the world. This volume really composes twelve books
_ —each one a separate and complete child’s life of a great man.

Every boy and girl who reads this inspiring volume will want to get
out and do something in the world. It is as charming and entertaining
as a fairy tale, but every word of it is true history written in easy lan-

guage for the boys and girls of America.
11



CONTENTS.

GEORGE WASHINGTON—His BoyHoop Days anp How HE BECAME THE
FatuHer oF His Country

JOHN PAUL JONES—Tue Puvucky Litrire ScorcHMAN WHO REMOVED TO
AMERICA AND BECAME CAPTAIN OF OUR Navy

ABRAHAM LINCOLN—Tue Poor Boy, THE NoBteE Man, THE PRESERVER
OF THE UNION

ULYSSES S. GRANT—Tuer Farmer Boy Aanp THE HerRO OF THE GREATEST
oF MopERN Wars

ROBERT E. LEE—Tur Nosie Boy, Brave Sotprer AND Moprit Man. THE
IpoL oF THE SOUTH .

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN—TueEe CanpLeMAKeEr’s Son wuo, witH His KITE
DIscovVERED LIGHTNING TO BE THE SAME AS ELECTRICITY

PATRICK HENRY—Wuo From A Farmer Boy BECAME A LAWYER AND THE
- Famous ORATOR OF THE REVOLUTION

ROBERT FULTON—THE Turxkinge Boy. THe BumpER OF THE First
SuccESSFUL STEAMBOAT

GEORGE PEABODY—Tue Boy CLERK wHo, WHEN HE Diep, Lerr MILLIons
ro CHaAriry. AmeERIcA’s First PHILANTHROPIST

THOMAS A. EDISON—Tue GREATEST ELECTRICIAN OF THE WORLD

JAMES A. GARFIELD—Tue Boy on THE CANAL Boat. THE SEeconp MARTYR
PRESIDENT

CYRUS W. FIELD—TueE Perseverine Boy, THE Man woo Lai THE AT-
LANTIC CABLE : é
12

PAGE

sf

32

45

60

74

90

112

133

147

163

182

196



List of Illustrations.



George Washington’s Inaugural Procession.. ..
Young George Washington Riding a Colt.....
General Braddock’s Defeat........--. ..+--+--
George Washington Crossing the Delaware... -
General Washington at Valley Forge........-.
George Washington's Inauguration...........
George Washington’s Bedroom, Mount Vernon,

inkwhichwhe Diedueiiaseeee oceten crosses
John Paul Jones as a Sailor Boy.............-
John Paul Jones’ Men at Sea................
J. P. Jones Approaching Whitehaven........
J. P. Jones’ Men Ashore—Whitehaven......
British Captain Surrendering Sword..........
Abraham Lincoln’s First Home...............
The Boy Lincoln Studying...................
Abraham Lincoln the Wrestler...............
Abraham Lincoln, as Hired Man, Telling a Story
Abraham Lincoln Keeping Store.............
Abraham Lincoln on the Flatboat............
Abraham Lincoln Entering Richmond........
Ulysses S. Grant’s Childhood......-.........
Ulysses Grant after the Battle of Belmont....
Ulysses Grant at Shiloh
Ulysses Grant at Windsor Castle.............
Ulysses S. Grant in Japan.............2..00%
General Grant’s House, New York, 1885.....
President Grant’s Funeral Procession.........
Robert H. Thee’as Cadet... .22...3. 20.0.0
Young Lee Riding in Front of ‘‘ Stafford,’ Va.
‘Lee always to be found where the fighting was

thesfiercestaeme iri sceins Sagi e acne ars
Captain Lee at Cerro Gordo..........2..2065
General Lee Fortifying Richmond............
““He waved his sword above his head and

dashed to the front’? ...-......2...0000-
Franklin’s Kite Leads the Way to the Modern

Wser of Hlectricitycenerc sees e cist.
Ben Franklin Moulding Candles in his Father's

Franklin Slipping his Contributions to thePaper
under the Office Door,...



PAGE
17 ] Old-style Printing Press..........0-+e0--0--
19 | Independence Hall, Philadelphia...........-.
21 | Dr. Benjamin Franklin as Minister to Trance. .
24 | Franklin’s Grave, Corner Fifth and Arch Sts.,
26 ‘Philadelphiaeseycemtrmerrspsitesaeren tet
285 oi PatricksElennynvsisa)salerivertercnestelsanapecrsista creas
Patrick Henry Shooting a Deer..............
30 | ‘‘ Often at the country parties he played the
3 fiddle for many a jolly ‘Old Virginia
34 IRiee | iigaacerciphsetneete sane acictie) afer auetse mee y ements
36 | ‘‘Many a day you might have seen Patrick
38 plowing among the stumps in his ‘ New
43 GOT HORE SNARE a Seaman
45 | A Typical Virginia Courthouse in the Days of
48 Patrick: Henrys: .accseeees. a oS Cri eT
49 | An Old Virginia Mansion, common in the Time
51 ofp Patricksllenry eee on ee ee
53 | Development of Steam Navigation Following
56 Mul tonts)2Discovenyasiccs eect aeiie see
OM VObEeKemHaltone rien sere eee NN Te
61 | What You Would See To-day at a Steamboat
63 Landing on the Mississippi River........
65 | “Chicago,”’ one of the ‘‘ White Squadron”’
67 Warships of the United States...........
69 | Model of a Modern U. S. Man-of-War........
dia kGeorgesPeabodyaaqneeet cece eee eee
72 | The Bullock-Hoe Perfecting Press...........
74 | Memorial Hall, Harvard College........-....
T6s\e@hapelvofeValecCollezevscs.- seas cnins seeee
Thomas Alva Edison at Four Years of Age...
78 | The Birthplace of Thomas A. Edison, at Milan,
80 OURTO Rises see inte Neo Sua te banal an yaaa:
83 | Thomas A. Edison when Publisher of the
‘* Grand Trunk Herald,”’ Fifteen Years Old
86 | Shop in which the First Morse Instrument was
Constructed for Exhibition before Congress
90 | Listening to the Phonograph................
Thomas A. Hdison at Fifty Years of Age.....
93 | President James A. Garfield.................
Garfield’s Birthplace and the Home of his
96 Childhoodseauts-ceneucre nites

13

116

141

143
146
147
155
157
160
163

170

175
179
181
182



Full-page Color Plates.

Youne GEorGE Wasnineton, SuRvEyor.

Joun Paut Jones, First Caprain in rue U. S. Navy.

ApraHam Lincozn, Raru-spiirrer.

U. S. Grant on tue Fietp, Last Yrar ae THE War.

On tHe Eve or Gerryspurnc—GeneraL Len Directinc tHe Barrie.

Tomas A. Epison rx His Laporarory.

14





INAUGURAL PROCESSION.



The Inspiring History

OF



GEORGE WASHINGTON,

First President of the United States.

[)° you know what the twenty-second of February is? It is the
birthday of George Washington. Do you know who George
Washington was? He was the greatest and best man that ever

lived in this dear home-land of yours, which you call America.

He had no little boys or girls of his own, but he has always been
called ‘The Father of His Country.” Do you know why people call him
that? Let me tell you how he got this name.

Many years ago, on the twenty-second of February, in the year 1732,
a little baby was born in a comfortable-looking old farm-house down in
Virginia. This baby was named George Washington.

His father was a farmer, who planted and raised and sold large crops

2 (17)



18 GEORGE WASHINGTON.

of tobacco in the fields about his house. These fields were called planta-
tions, and George Washington’s father was what is called a planter.

The name of George’s father was Augustine Washington. His mother’s
name was Mary Washington. She was a very wise and good woman,
and George loved her dearly.

When George was a very small boy, his father died and he was brought
up by his mother in a nice, old farm-house on the banks of the Rappa-
hannock River, just opposite the town of Fredericksburg. Ask some
one to show you just where that is on the map.

George was a good boy. He was honest, truthful, obedient, bold and
strong. He could jump the farthest, run the fastest, climb the highest,
wrestle the best, ride the swiftest, swim the longest, and “stump” all
the other boys he played with. They all liked him, for he was gentle,
kind and brave; he never was mean, never got ‘‘mad,” and never told
a lie.

His mother had a sorrel colt that she thought very much of, because
it came of splendid stock, and, if once trained, would be a fine and fast
horse. But the colt was wild and vicious, and people said it could never
be trained. One summer morning, young George, with three or four
boys, were in the field looking at the colt, and, when the boys said again
that it could never be tamed, George said: ‘‘ You help me get on his back
and I’ll tame him.”

After hard work they got a bridle-bit in the colt’s mouth and put
young George on its back. Then began a fight. The colt reared and
kicked and plunged, and tried to throw George off. But George stuck
on and finally conquered the colt so that he drove it about the field.
But in a last mad plunge to free itself from this determined boy on its
back, the colt burst a blood-vessel and fell to the ground dead.

Then the boys felt’ worried, you may be sure. But while they were
wondering what George’s mother would say, the boy went straight to the
house determined to tell the truth.

“Mother,” he said, ‘your colt is dead.”

“Dead!” said his mother. ‘“ Who killed it?”

“T did,” said George, and then he told her the whole story.

His mother looked at him a moment, then she said: ‘It is well, my
son. I am sorry to lose the colt; it would have been a fine horse, but I



GHORGE WASHINGTON. 19

am proud to know that my son never tries to put the blame of his acts
upon others, and always speaks the truth.”

So you see, that early in his life, this boy was one to be depended upon.
This story, too, shows you that besides his being so truthful and honest,
young George Washington did not give up trying to do a thing until he



YOUNG WASHINGTON RIDING A COLT,

had succeeded. He was bound to tame that fierce sorrel colt, and he
stuck to it until he had conquered the animal, instead of letting it
conquer him.

He loved the woods, and he loved the water. He wanted to be a
sailor, but when he saw that his mother did not wish him to go away to
sea, he said: ‘All right, mother,” and he staid at home to help her on
her farm.



20 GEORGE WASHINGTON.

When he was sixteen years old he gave up going to school and became
a surveyor. A surveyor is one who goes around measuring land, so that
men can know just how much they own and just where the lines run
that divide it from other people’s land.

This work kept George out of doors most of the time, and made him
healthy and big and strong. He went off into the woods and over the
mountains, surveying land for the owners. He lived among Indians and
bears and hunters, and became a great hunter himself. He was a fine-
looking young fellow then. He was almost six feet tall. He was strong
and active, and could stand almost anything in the way of out-of-door
dangers and experiences. He had light brown hair, blue eyes and a
frank face, and he had such a nice, firm way about him, although he was
quiet and never talked much, that people always believed what he said,
and those who worked with him were always ready and willing to do
just as he told them.

When he was a boy it took a brave man to be a surveyor. He had to
live in the forests, in all sorts of dangers and risks; he had to meet all
kinds of people, and settle disputes about who owned the land, when
those who were quarreling about it would be very angry with the sur-
veyor. But young George Washington always won in the end, and his
work was so well done that some of his records and measurements have
not been changed from that day to this.

He liked the work, because he liked the free life of the woods and
mountains. He liked to hunt and swim and ride and row, and all these
things and all these rough experiences helped him greatly to be a bold,
healthy, active and courageous man, when the time came for him to be
a leader and a soldier.

People liked him so much that when there was trouble between the
two nations that owned almost all the land in America when he was a
boy, he was sent with a party to try and settle a quarrel as to which
nation owned the land west of Virginia, in what is now called Ohio.

These two nations were France and England. Their Kings were far
over the Atlantic Ocean. Virginia and all the country between the
mountains and the sea, from Maine to Georgia, belonged to the King of
England. There was no President then; there were no United States.

George Washington went off to the Ohio country and tried to settle





GEORGE WASHINGTON. 21

the quarrel, but the French soldiers would not settle it as the English
wished them to. They built forts in the country, and said they meant
to keep it all for the King of France.

So George Washington was sent out again. This time he had a lot
of soldiers with him, to drive the French away from their forts. The



BRADDOCK’S DEFEAT.

French soldiers would not give in, and Washington and his soldiers had
a fight with the French and whipped them.

Then the French King sent more soldiers and built more forts, and the
English King sent more soldiers, and there was war in the land.

War is a terrible thing, but sometimes it has to be made. The King
of Kngland was very angry with the French, and he sent over soldiers



22 GEORGE WASHINGTON.

from England to fight the French. They were led by a British general,
whose name was Braddock. He was a brave man, but he thought he
knew how to do everything, and he would not let anyone else tell him
how he ought to act. But he had never fought in such a land as Amer-
ica, where there were great forests and Indians, and other things very
different from what he was used to.

George Washington knew that if General Braddock and the British
soldiers wished to whip the French and the Indians, who were on the
French side, they must be very careful when they were marching through
the forests to battle. He tried to make General Braddock see this, too,
but the British General thought he knew best, and he told Washington
to mind his own business.

So the British soldiers marched through the forests just as if they were
parading down Broadway. They looked very tine, but they were not
careful of themselves, and one day, in the midst of the forest, the French
and Indians, who were hiding behind trees waiting for them, sprang out
upon them and surprised them, and surrounded them and fired guns at
them from the thick, dark woods.

The British were caught in a trap. They did not know what to do.
General Braddock was killed; so were many of his soldiers, and they
would all have been killed or taken prisoners if George Washington had
not been there. He knew just what to do. He fought bravely, and
when the British soldiers ran away, he and his Americans kept back the
French and Indians and saved the British army.

But it was a terrible defeat for the soldiers of the King of England.
He had to send more soldiers to America and to fight a long time. But
at last his soldiers were successful, and, thanks to Colonel Washington,
as he was now called, the English lands were saved and the French were
driven away.

After the war was over, George Washington married a wife. All .
American boys and girls know her name. It was Martha Washington.

They went to live in a beautiful house on the banks of the Potomac
River, in Virginia. It is called Mount Vernon. It was Washington's
home all the rest of his life. The house is still standing, and people
nowadays go to visit this beautiful place, just to see the spot that every-
one thinks so much of because it was the home of Washington, Perhaps,



GEORGE WASHINGTON. 23

some day, you will see it. You will think it is a beautiful place, 1 am
sure.

While Washington was looking after his great farm at Mount Vernon,
things were becoming very bad in America.

The King of England said the people in America must do as he told
them, and not as they wished. But the Americans said that the King
was acting very wrongly toward them, and that they would not stand it.

They did not. When the King’s soldiers tried to make them do as
the King ordered, they said they would die rather than yield, and in a
place called Lexington, in Massachusetts, some of the Americans took
their guns and tried to drive off the British soldiers.

This is what is called rebellion. It made the King of England very
angry, and he sent over ships full of soldiers to make the Americans
mind.

But the Americans would not. The men in the thirteen different parts
of the country—called the thirteen colonies—got together and said they
would fight the King’s soldiers, if the King tried to make them do as he
wished. Sothey got up an army and sent it to Massachusetts, and there
they had a famous battle with the King’s soldiers, called the Battle of
Bunker Hill.

After the battle, the leading men in the colonies saw that they must
put a brave man at the head of their army. There was but one man
they thought of for this. You know who—George Washington.

He rode all the way from Mount Vernon, in Virginia, to Cambridge,
in Massachusetts, on horseback, because, you know, they had no steam-
cars or steamboats in those days. As he was riding through Connecticut,
with a few soldiers as his guard, a man came galloping across the coun-
try, telling people how the Battle of Bunker Hill had been fought. The
British soldiers had driven the Americans from the fort, and said they
had won. But it had been hard work for the soldiers of the King.

Washington stopped the rider, and asked him why the Americans had
been driven out of the fort.

“ Because they had no powder and shot left,” replied the messenger.

“ And did they stand the fire of the British guns as long as they could
fire back?” asked Washington.



24 GEORGE WASHINGTON.

“That they did,” replied the horseman. ‘They waited, too, until the
British were close to the fort, before they fired.”

That was what Washington wished to know. He felt certain that if
the American ONE boys who stood out against the King’s soldiers did

pcs

not get frightened
or timid in the face
of the trained sol-
diers of the King,
that they would be
the kind of soldiers
he needed to win
with.

He turned to his
companions, “Then
the liberties of the

_ country are safe,”
he said, and rode
on to Cambridge to
take command of

' the army.

If ever you go to
Cambridge, in Mas-
sachusetts, you can
see the tree under
which Washington
sat on horseback,
when he took com-
mand of the Ameri-
can army.



WASHINGTON CROSSING THE DELAWARE. It is an old, old
tree now, but every-

body loves to look at it and to think of the splendid-looking soldier, in
his uniform of buff and blue, who, on a July day, long, long ago, sat his
horse so gallantly beneath that shady elm, and looked at the brave men
who were to be his soldiers, and by whose help he hoped to make his

native land a free and independent nation,



GEORGE WASHINGTON. 25

So, at his camp at Cambridge, he drilled his army of farmers and
fishermen, and when it was ready, he drove the British away from Bos-
ton without a battle, when all the American leaders met in the City of
Philadelphia and said they would obey the King of England no longer,
but would set up a nation of their own.

They called this new nation the United States of America, and they
signed a paper that told all the world that the men of America would no
longer obey the King of England, but would be free, even if they had to
fight for their freedom. You know what this great paper they signed is
called—the Declaration of Independence.

The day that they decided to do this is now the greatest day in all
America. You remember it every year, and celebrate it with fire-crackers
and fire-works and flags, and no school. It is the Fourth of July.

Well, the King of England was very angry at this. He sent more
ships and soldiers over the sea to America, and there was a long and
bloody war. It was called the American Revolution.

There was fighting for seven years, and, through it all, the chief man
in America, the man who led the soldiers and fought the British, and
never gave up, nor ever let himself or his soldiers grow afraid, even when
he was beaten, was General George Washington.

If the British drove him away from one place, he marched to another,
and he fought and marched, and kept his army brave and determined,
even when they were ragged and tired, and everything looked as if the
British would be successful.

When the British whipped him in the Battle of Long Island, at Brook-
lyn, and thought they had caught all the American army, Washington,
one stormy night, got all his soldiers safely across the river to New York,
and the British had to follow and fight. And, again, when it looked as
if the Americans must surely give in, Washington took his soldiers, one
terrible winter’s night, across the Delaware River and fell upon the
British, when they were not expecting him, and won the Battle of Trenton.

There were many hard and bitter days for George Washington through
these years of fighting. One winter, especially, was very bad. The
British soldiers seemed victorious everywhere. They held the chief cities
of New York and Philadelphia, and the weak American army was half-
starved, cold and shivering in a place in Pennsylvania called Valley



26

GEORGE WASHINGTON.

Forge. Washington was there, too, and it took all his strength and all
his heart to keep his soldiers together and make them believe that, if
they would only “stick to it,” they would beat the British at last. But

when their log huts
snow, and they had
to keep them warm,
from being hungry, it
soldiers to see victory
not been for Wash-
can army would have
to that dreadful win-

But he held it
spring came, marched
Forge. Part of his

the British at a place i

House,and was almost
back, when General
lopingup. Hestopped
running away; he
diers to help them, and

WASHINGTON AT VALLEY FORGE.






were all covered with
hardly clothes enough
or food to keep them
was not easy for the
ahead, and, if it had
ington, the Ameri-
melted away, owing
ter at Valley Forge.

together, and when
away from Valley
army were attacked by
called Monmouth Court
beaten and driven
Washington came gal-|

_» «. the soldiers who were

brought up other sol-
he fought so boldly

and bravely, and was so determined, that at last he drove off the
British, and won the important battle of Monmouth.
You see, Washington simply would not give in when people told him



GEORGE WASHINGTON. 27

he would have to, and that the British would get all the cities and towns.
He said that the country was large, and, that sooner than give in, he
would go with his soldiers into the mountains and keep up the war until
the British were so sick of it that they would finally go away.

So he kept on marching and fighting, and never giving in, even when
things looked worst, and, at last, on the 19th of October, in the year 1781,
he captured the whole British army, at a place called Yorktown, in Vir-
ginia, and the Revolution was ended.

So the United States won their freedom. They have been a great
nation ever since, and every American, from that day to this, knows that
they gained their freedom because they had such a great, brave, noble,
patriotic, strong and glorious leader as General George Washington.

After the Revolution was over, and Washington had said good-bye to
his soldiers and his generals, he went back to Mount Vernon and became
a farmer again. :

But the people of America would not let him stay a farmer. They got

together again in Philadelphia, and, after much thought and talk, they
drew up a paper that said just how the new nation should be gov ee
This is called the Constitution of the United States.

The Constitution said that, instead of a king, the people should pick
out—elect is what they called it—one man, who should be head man of
the nation for four years at a time. He was to preside over things, and
so he was called the President.

When the time came to elect the first President, there was just one
man in the United States that everybody said must be the President.
Of course you know who this man was—George Washington.

It was a great day for the new nation when he was declared President.
That is what we call being “inaugurated.” All along the way, as he
rode from Mount Vernon to New York, people came out to welcome him.
They fired cannon and rang bells, and made bon-fires and put up arches
and decorations; little girls scattered flowers in his path and sang songs
of greeting, and whenever he came to a town or city, every one turned
out and marched in procession, escorting Washington through their town.

When he came to New York, after he had crossed the bay in a big row
boat, he went in a fine procession to a building called “ Federal Hall,”
on Wall Street, and there he stood, on the front balcony of the building,



28 GEORGE WASHINGTON.

in face of all the people, and, with his hand on an open Bible, he said he
' would be a wise and good and faithful President. Then the Judge, who
had read to him the words he repeated, lifted his hand and cried out:

WASHINGTON’S INAUGURATION.



“Long live George Washington, President of the United States!” A flag.
run up to the cupola of the hall, cannon boomed, bells rang, and all the
people cheered and cheered their hero and general, whom they had now
made the head of the whole nation, :



GEORGE WASHINGTON. 29

So George Washington became President of the United States. He
worked just as hard to make the new nation strong and great and peace-
ful as he did when he led the army in the Revolution.

People had all sorts of things to suggest. Some of these things were
foolish, some were wrong and some would have been certain to have
broken up the United States, and lost all the things for which the coun-
try fought in the Revolution.

But Washington was at the head. He knew just what to do, and he
did it. From the day when, in the City of New York, he was made
President—that is what we call his inauguration—he gave all his thought
and all his time and all his strength to making the United States united
and prosperous and strong. And, when his four years as President were
over, the people would not let him give up, but elected him for their
President for another four years. When Washington was President, the
Capital of the United States was first at New York and afterward at
Philadelphia. Washington and his wife, whom we know of as Martha
Washington, lived in fine style, and made a very noble-looking couple.
They gave receptions every once in a while, to which the people would
come to be introduced and to see the man of whom all the world was
talking. Washington must have been a splendid-looking man then.
He was tall and well-built. He dressed in black velvet, with silver knee
and shoe buckles; his hair was powdered and tied up in what was called
a “queue.” He wore yellow gloves, and held his three-cornered hat in
his hand. A sword, in a polished white-leather sheath, hung at his side,
and he would bow to each one who was introduced to him. He had so
good a memory, that, if he heard a man’s name and saw his face at one
introduction, he could remember and call him by name when he met
him again. But though he was so grand and noble, he was very simple
in his tastes and his talk, and desired to have no title, like prince or
king or duke, but only this—the President of the United States.

His second term as President was just as successful as his first four
years had been. He kept the people from getting into trouble with other
countries; he kept them from war and danger, and quarrels and loss.

But it tired him all out, and made him an old man before his time.
He had given almost all his life to America.

When his second term was ended, the people wished him to be Presi-



30 GEORGE WASHINGTON.

dent for the third time. But he would not. He wrote a long letter to
the people of America. It is called “‘Washington’s Farewell Address.”
He told them they were growing stronger and better, but that he was
worn out and must have rest. He told them that if they would be wise
and peaceful and good, they would become a great nation; and that all
they had fought for and all they had gained would last, if they would
only act right, and they would become great, united and powerful.

So another man was made President, and Washington went back to
his farm at Mount Vernon. He was the greatest, the wisest and the most
famous man in all America. People said it was because of what he had
: done for them
that their country
was free and pow-
erful and strong.
They said that
George Washing-
ton was “The

Father of His
Country.” I think

he was; don’t
you? He was very
glad to get back
to Mount Vernon.
He loved. the
beautiful old place, and he had been away from it eight years. He
liked to be a farmer, with such a great farm to look after as there are
in Virginia. He found very much to do, and he mended and built and
enlarged things and rode over his broad plantations, or received in his
fine old house the visitors who came there to see the greatest man in
all America.

There came a time when he thought he would have to give up this
pleasant life and go to be a soldier once more. Jor there came very near
being a war between France and the United States, and Congress begged
Washington to take command of the army once more. He was made
lieutenant-general and commander-in-chief, and hurried to Philadelphia
to gather his army together. Fortunately the war did not occur, and the



WASHINGTON’S BEDROOM, MOUNT VERNON, IN WHICH HE DIED.



GEORGE WASHINGTON. 31

new nation was saved all that trouble and bloodshed. But Washington
was ready, if needed.

So he went back again to his beloved Mount Vernon. But he did not
long live to enjoy the peace and quiet that were his right. For, one
December day, as he was riding over his farm, he caught cold and had
the croup. He had not the strength that most boys and girls have to
carry him through such a sickness. He was worn out, and, though the
doctors tried hard to save his life, they could not, and in two days he died.
It was a sad day for America—the twelfth day of December, in the year
1799.

All the world was sorry, for all the world had come to look upon
George Washington as the greatest man of the time, Kings and nations
put on mourning for him, and, all over the world, bells tolled, drums
beat and flags were dropped to half-mast, when the news came that
Washington was dead.

When you grow up and go to Mount Vernon, as every American boy and
girl should do some day, you will see his tomb. It is a plain and simple
building, just as plain and simple as he was, and it stands close to his
house, on the green banks of the beautiful Potomac River he loved so much,

Then, sailing up the Potomac, or riding on the steam-cars, you will
come to the beautiful city that is named for this great man—Washing-
ton, the capital of the United States.

There you will see the great white dome of the splendid capitol, the
building in which the American people make laws for the nation that
Washington founded; there is the White House, where all the Presidents
since his day have lived; there is the tall, white monument—the highest
in the world—that the American people have built to honor his memory
and his name.

And in the cities and towns of America are statues and streets and
parks and schools and buildings named after him, and built because all
the world knows that this great American general and President was the
~ best, the noblest and the bravest man that ever lived in all America—
George Washington, “ first in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of his
countrymen.”

Love him, children. Never forget him. Try to be like him. Thus
may you grow to be good men and women, and, therefore, good Americans.



THE ENTERTAINING HISTORY OF

JOHN PauL JONES,

First Captain in the United States Navy.

NCE upon a time there lived in Scotland a poor gardener, who had

a little son. The gardener’s name was John Paul; that was his

son’s name, too. The rich man’s garden that big John took care

of was close by the sea, and little John Paul loved blue water so much
that he spent most of his time near it, and longed to be a sailor.

This blue water that little John Paul loved was the big bay that lies
between Scotland and England. It is called Solway Firth.

_ When little John Paul was born, on the sixth day of July, in the year
1747, both far-away Scotland, in which he lived, and this land of America,
in which you live, were ruled by the King of England.

The gardener’s little son lived in his father’s cottage near the sea until
he was twelve years old. Then he was put to work in a big town, on
the other side of the Solway Firth. This town was called Whitehaven.
It was a very busy place, and ships and sailors were there so much and
in such numbers that this small boy, who had been put into a store,
much preferred to go down to the docks and talk with the seamen, who
had been in so many different lands and seas, and who could tell him
all about the wonderful and curious ;:aces they had seen, and about
their adventures on the great oceans they had sailed over.

He determined to go to sea. He studied all about ships and how to
sail them. He studied and read all the books he could get, and, when

(32)



ee

ne

Sires

JOHN PAUL JONES, FIRST



CAPTAIN IN THE U.S. NAVY.





JOHN PAUL JONES. 33

other boys were asleep or in mischief, little John Paul was learning from
the books he read many things that helped him when he grew older.

At last he had his wish. When he was but thirteen years old, he went
as a sailor boy in a ship called the ‘ Friendship.”

The vessel was bound to Virginia, in America, for a cargo of tobacco,
and the little sailor boy greatly enjoyed the voyage, and was especially
delighted with the new country across the sea, to which he came. He
wished he could live in America, and hoped some day to go there again.



JOHN PAUL JONES AS A SAILOR BOY.

But when this first voyage was over, he returned to Whitehaven, and
to the store, where he worked. But, soon after, the merchant who owned
the store failed in business, and the boy was out of a place and had to
look after himself. So he became a real sailor, this time. For thirteen
years he was a sailor. He was such a good one that before he was twenty

years old he was a captain. This is how he became one. While the
3



34 JOHN PAUL JONES.

ship in which he was sailing was in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, a
terrible fever broke out. The captain died. The mate, who comes next
to the captain, died; all of the sailors were sick, and some of them died.
There was no one who knew about sailing such a big vessel, except
young John Paul. So he took command, and sailed the ship into port
without an accident, and the owners were so glad that they made the
young sailor a sea captain. |



PAUL JONES’ MEN AT SEA.

John Paul had a brother living in Virginia, on the banks of the Rap-
pahannock River. This was the same river beside which George Wash-
ington lived when he was a boy. John Paul visited his brother several
times while he was sailing on his voyages, and he liked the country so
much that, when his brother died, John Paul gave up being a sailor for
a while, and went to live on his brother’s farm.

When he became a farmer, he changed his name to Jones. And so



JOHN PAUL JONES. 35

little John Paul became known ever after, to all the world, as John Paul
Jones.

While he was a farmer in Virginia, the American Revolution broke
out. I have told you about this in the story of General George Wash-
ington, who led the armies of the United States to victory.

John Paul Jones was a sailor even more than he was a farmer. So,
when war came, he wished to fight the British on the sea. This was a
bold thing to do, for there was no nation so powerful on the sea as Eng-
land. The King had a splendid lot of ships of war—almost a thousand.
The United States had none. But John Paul Jones said we must have
one.

Pretty soon the Americans got together five little ships, and sent them
out as the beginning of the American navy, to fight the thousand ships
of England.

John Paul Jones was made first lieutenant of a ship called the Alfred.
The first thing he did was to hoist, for the first time on any ship, the
first American flag. This flag had thirteen red and white stripes, but,
instead of the stars that are now on the flag, it had a pine tree, with a
rattlesnake coiled around it, and underneath were the words: “Don’t
tread on me!”

The British sea captains who did try to tread on that rattlesnake flag
were terribly bitten, for John Paul Jones was a brave man and a bold
sailor. When he was given command of alittle war sloop, called the
Providence, he just kept those British captains so busy trying to catch
him that they could not get any rest. He darted up and down Long Is-
land Sound, carrying soldiers and guns and food to General Washington,
and, although one great British war ship, the Cerberus, tried for weeks
to catch him, it had to give up the chase, for John Paul Jones couldn’t be
caught. For all this good work, this bold sailor was made Captain Jones,
of the United States Navy, and it is said that he was the first captain
made by Congress.

He sailed up and down the coast, hunting for British vessels. He
hunted so well that in one cruise of six weeks he captured sixteen ves-
sels, or “prizes,” as they were called, and destroyed many others. Among
these was one large vessel, loaded with new warm clothing for the British
army. Captain Jones sent the vessel and its whole cargo safely into



36 JOHN PAUL JONES.

port, and the captured clothes were all sent to the American camp, and
were worn by Washington’s ragged soldiers.

The next year Captain Jones sailed away to France in a fine new ship
called the Ranger. Before he sailed out of Portsmouth Harbor, in New
Hampshire, he ‘ran up” to the mast head of the Ranger the first “Stars



JONES APPROACHING WHITEHAVEN, EARLY MORNING.

and Stripes” ever raised over a ship—Washington’s real American flag,
with its thirteen stripes and its thirteen stars.

He went to France and had a talk with Dr. Benjamin Franklin, the
great American who got France to help the United States in the Revo-
lution. Then, after he had sailed through the whole French fleet, and
made them all fire a salute to the American flag—it was the first salute
ever given it by a foreign nation—he steered away for the shores of Eng-
land, and so worried the captains and sailors and storekeepers and peo-



JOHN PAUL JONES. 37

ple of England that they would have given anything to catch him. But
they couldn’t.

The English King and people had not supposed the Americans would
fight. Especially, they did not believe they would dare to fight the
English on the sea, for England was the strongest country in the world
in ships and sailors. So they despised and made fun of “Yankee sailors,”
as they called the Americans. But when Captain John Paul Jones came
sailing in his fine ship, the Ranger, up and down the coasts of England,
eoing right into English harbors, capturing English villages and burning
English ships, the people begun to think differently.

They called Captain Jones a “pirate,” and all sorts of hard names.
But they were very much afraid of him and his stout ship. He was not
a pirate, either. For a pirate is a bold, bad sea robber, who burns ships
and kills sailors just to get the money himself. But John Paul Jones
attacked ships and captured sailors, not for selfish money-getting, but
to show how much Americans could do, and to break the power of the
English navy on the seas. So, this voyage of his, along the shores of
England, taught the Englishmen to respect and fear the American sailors.

After he had captured many British vessels, called “prizes,” almost
in sight of their homes, he boldly sailed to the north and into the very
port of Whitehaven, where he had “tended store,” as a boy, and from
which he had first gone to sea. He knew the place, of course. He
knew how many vessels were there, and what a splendid victory he
could win for the American navy, if he could sail into Whitehaven har-
bor and capture or destroy the two hundred vessels that were anchored
within sight of the town he remembered so well.

With two row-boats and thirty men he landed at Whitehaven, locked
up the soldiers in the forts, fixed the cannon so that they could not be
fired, set fire to the vessels that were in the harbor, and so frightened all
the people that, though the gardener’s son stood alone on the wharf,
waiting for a boat to take him off, not a man dared to lay a hand on
him.

Then he sailed across the bay to the house of the great lord for whom
his father had worked as a gardener. He meant to run away with this
ereat man, and keep him prisoner until the British promised to treat
better the Americans whom they had taken prisoners. But the great



38 JOHN PAUL JONES.

lord whom he went for found it best to be ‘not at home,” so all that
Captain Jones’ men could do was to carry off from the big house some
of the fine things that were in it. But Captain Jones did not like this;
so he got the things back and returned them to the rich lord’s wife, with
a nice letter, asking her to excuse his men.

But while he was carrying on so in Solway Firth, along came 2 great



JONES’ MEN ASHORE—WHITEHAVEN.

British warship, called the Drake, determined to gobble up poor Captain
Jones at a mouthful. But Captain Jones was not afraid. This was just
what he was looking for. ‘Come on!” he cried; ‘I’m waiting for you.”

The British ship dashed up to capture him, but the Ranger was all ready,
and in just one hour Captain Jones had beaten and captured the English
frigate, and then, with both vessels, sailed merrily away to the friendly
French shores.



JOHN PAUL JONES. 39

Soon after this, the French decided to help the Americans in their war
for independence. So, after some time, Captain Jones was put in com-
mand of five ships, and back he sailed to England, to fight the British
ships again.

The vessel in which Captain Jones sailed was the biggest of the five -
ships. It had forty guns and a crew of three hundred sailors. Captain ©
Jones thought so much of the great Dr. Benjamin Franklin, who wrote
a book of good advice, under the name of “Poor Richard,” that he
named his big ship for Dr. Franklin. He called it the “Bon Homme
Richard,” which is French for “good man Richard.’’ The Bon Homme
Richard was not a good boat, if it was a big one. It was old and rotten
and cranky, but Captain Jones made the best of it.

The little fleet sailed up and down the English coasts, capturing a
few prizes, and greatly frightening the people by saying that they had
come to burn some of the big English sea towns.

Then, just as they were about sailing back to France, they came—
near an English cape, called Flamborough Head—upon a great English
fleet of forty merchant vessels and two war ships.

One of the war ships was a great English frigate, called the Serapis,
finer and stronger every way than the Bon Homme Richard. But Cap-
tain Jones would not run away.

“What ship is that?’ called out the Englishman. ‘Come a little
nearer, and we’ll tell you,” answered plucky Captain Jones.

The British ships did come a little nearer. The forty merchant ves-
sels sailed as fast as they could to the nearest harbor, and then the war
ships had a terrible sea fight.

At seven o’clock in the evening the British frigate and the Bon
Homme Richard began to fight. They banged and hammered away for
hours, and then, when the British captain thought he must have beaten
and broken the Americans, and it was so dark and smoky that they ~
could only see each other by the fire flashes, the British captain, Pearson,
called out to the American captain: “Are you beaten? Have you
hauled down your flag?”

And back came the answer of Captain John Paul Jones: “I haven’t
begun to fight yet!”

So they went at it again. The two ships were now lashed together,



40 JOHN PAUL JONES.

and they tore each other like savage dogs in a terrible fight. O, it was
dreadful!

At last, when the poor old Richard was shot through and through, and
leaking and on fire, and seemed ready to sink, Captain Jones made one
last effort. It was successful. Down came the great mast of the Sera-
pis, crashing to the deck. Then her guns were quiet; her flag came
tumbling down, as a sign that she gave in.

At once, Captain Jones sent some of his sailors aboard the defeated
Serapis. The captured vessel was a splendid new frigate, quite a differ-
ent ship from the poor, old, worm-eaten and worn-out Richard.

One of the American sailors went up to Captain Pearson, the British
commander, and asked him if he surrendered. The Englishman replied
that he had, and then he and his chief officer went aboard the battered
Richard, which was sinking even in its hour of victory.

But Captain Jones stood on the deck of his sinking vessel, proud and
triumphant. He had shown what an American captain and American
sailors could do, even when everything was against them. The English
captain gave up his sword to the American, which is the way all sailors
and soldiers do when they surrender their ships or their armies.

The fight had been a brave one, and the English King knew that his
captain had made a bold and desperate resistance, even if he had been
whipped. So he rewarded Captain Pearson, when he at last returned to
England, by giving to him the title of “Sir,” and when Captain Jones
heard of it he laughed, and said: “ Well, if I can meet Captain Pearson
again in a sea fight, I’ll make a ‘lord’ of him.” For a “lord” is a
higher title than “sir.”

The poor Bon Homme Richard was shot through and through, and
soon sunk beneath the waves. But even as she went down, the stars
and stripes floated proudly from the masthead, in token of victory.

Captain Jones, after the surrender, put all his men aboard the cap-
tured Serapis, and then off he sailed to the nearest friendly port, with
his great prize and all his prisoners. This victory made him the great~
est sailor in the whole American war.

The Dutch port into which he sailed was not friendly to America, but
Captain Jones had made his name so famous as a sea fighter, that neither
the thirteen Dutch frigates inside the harbor, nor the twelve British



JOHN PAUL JONES. 41

ships outside, dared to touch him, and, after a while—when he got good
and ready—Captain Jones ran the stars and stripes to the masthead
and, while the wind was blowing a gale, sailed out of the harbor, right
through two big British fleets, and so sailed safely to France, with no
one bold enough to attack him.

He had made a great record as a sailor and sea fighter. France was
on America’s side in
the Revolution, you
know, and when Cap-
tain Jones went to
France after his great
victory, he was re-
ceived with great
honor.

Everybody wished
to see such a hero.
He went to the King’s
court, and the King
and Queen and French
lords and ladies made
much of him and gave
him fine receptions,
and said so many fine
things about him that,
if he had been at all
vain, it might have
“tured his head,”
as people say. But
John Paul Jones was
not vain. JONES’ FIGHT BETWEEN BON HOMME RICHARD AND SERAPIS.

He was a _ brave
sailor, and he was in France to get help and not compliments. He
wished a new ship to take the place of the old Richard, which had gone
to the bottom after its great victory.

So, though the King of France honored him and received him splen-
didly and made him presents, he kept on working to get another ship.

BSR -:





42 JOHN PAUL JONES.

At last he was made captain of a new ship, called the Ariel, and sailed
from France. He had a fierce battle with an English ship called the
Triumph, and defeated her. But she escaped before surrendering, and
Captain Jones sailed across the sea to America.

He was received with great honor and applause. Congress gave him
a vote of thanks “for the zeal, prudence and intrepidity with which he
had supported the honor of the American flag’’—that is what the vote
said.

People everywhere crowded to see him, and called him hero and con-
queror. Lafayette, the brave young Frenchman, you know, who came
over to fight for America, called him “my dear Paul Jones,” and Wash-
ington and the other leaders in America said, “Well done, Captain
Jones!”

The King of France sent him a splendid reward of merit called the
“ Cross of Honor,” and Congress set about building a fine ship for him
to command. But before it was finished, the war was over, and he was
sent back to France on some important business for the United States.

After he had done this, the Russians asked him to come and help
them fight the Turks.

This was often done in those days, when soldiers and sailors of one
country went to fight in the armies or navies of another.

Captain Jones said he would be willing to go, if the United States said
he could, for, he said: “I can never renounce the glorious title of a citi-
zen of the United States.”

The United States said he could go to Russia, but the British officers
who were fighting for Russia, refused to serve under Jones, because, as
they said, he was a rebel, a pirate and a traitor. You see, they had not
forgiven him for so beating and frightening the English ships and people
in the Revolution. And they called him these names because he, born
in Scotland, had fought for America.

They made it very unpleasant for Captain Jones, and he had so hard
a time in Russia that, after many wonderful adventures and much hard
fighting, at last he gave up, and went back to France.

He was taken sick soon after he returned to France, and, though he
tried to fight against it, he could not recover. He had gone through
so many hardships and adventures and changes that he was old before



JOHN PAUL JONES. 43

his time, and although his friends tried to help him and the Queen of
France sent her own doctor to attend him, it was no use.

He died on the eighteenth day of July, in the year 1792, when he was
but forty-five years old. He was buried in Paris, with great honor.

The French people gave him a great funeral, as their token of respect
and honor, and - oe
the French cler-
eyman who gave
the funeral ora-
tion said: ‘ May
hisexample teach
posterity the ef-
forts which noble
souls are capable
of making when
stimulated by
hatred to oppres-
sion.”

John Paul
Jones was a brave
and gallant man.
He fought des-
perately, and war =
isa dreadful |
thing, you know.
But, as I have
told you, some-
times it has to
be, and then it
must be bold
and determined. Captain Jones did much by his dash and courage to
make America free. He gave her strength and power on the seas.

He fought twenty-three naval battles, made seven attacks upon Ene-
lish ports and coasts, fought and captured four great war ships, larger
than his own, and took many valuable prizes—to the loss of England
and the glory of America. :

i: ae aN \



BRITISH CAPTAIN SURRENDERING SWORD.



44 JOHN PAUL JONES.

American boys and girls know too little about him. If you are to
learn about those who have fought for America on land and sea, you must
surely hear of him who was the first captain in the United States Navy
—and whose brave deeds and noble heroism is the heritage and example
of American sailors for all time.

‘“T have ever looked out for the honor of the American flag,” he said
and Americans are just beginning to see how much this first of American
sailors did for their liberty, their honor and their fame.

Some day they will know him still more, and in one of the great cities
of this land which he saved from destruction in those early days, a noble
statue will be built to do honor to Captain John Paul Jones—the man
who was one of the bravest and most successful sea fighters in the history
of the world.





LINCOLN, RAIL-SPLITTER.



THE NOTABLE HISTORY OF

ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

Sixteenth President of the United States.

eeppge oe ‘OID you ever read

= eco! a ’ the fairy stories
about the poor boy who
became a prince? Do
you wish to hear a true
story about just such a
boy? Let me tell it to
you. It is the story of
Abraham Lincoln, the
hero who saved his coun-
try. He was as poor a
boy as ever lived in
America; he rose to be
greater and grander and
more royal than any
prince, or king, or em-
peror who’ ever wore a
crown. Listen to his
story :

There was once a poor
carpenter, who lived in a
miserable little log cabin,

(45)





46 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

out West. It was on a stony, weedy little hill-side, at a place called
Nolin’s Creek, in the State of Kentucky.

In that log cabin, on the twelfth day of February, in the year 1809, a
little baby was born. He was named Abraham Lincoln.

I don’t believe you ever saw a much poorer or meaner place in which
to be born and brought up than that little log cabin. Abraham Lin-
coln’s father was poor and lazy. He could not read and he hated to
work. Abraham Lincoln’s mother was a hard-working young woman,
who dreamed about having nice things, but never did have them. Their
house had no windows, it had no floor, it had none of the things you
have in your pleasant homes. In all America no baby was ever born
with fewer comforts and poorer surroundings than little Abraham Lin-
coln. He grew from a baby to a homely little boy, and to a homelier-
looking young man. He was tall and thin and gawky. His clothes
never fitted him; he never, in all his life, went to school but a year; he
had to work hard, he could play but little, and, many a day, he knew
what it was to be cold and hungry and almost homeless.

His father kept moving about from place to place, living almost always
in the woods, in Kentucky and Indiana and Illinois. Sometimes their
home would be a log cabin, sometimes it was just a hut with only three
sides boarded up, and little Abraham Lincoln was a neglected and for-
lorn little fellow.

His mother died when he was only eight years old. Then Abraham
and his sister, Sarah, were worse off than ever. But pretty soon his
father married a second wife, and Abraham’s new mother was a good and
wise woman.

She washed him and gave him new clothes; she taught him how to
make the most and do the best with the few things he had and the
chances that came to him; she made him wish for better things; she
helped him fix himself up, and encouraged him to read and study.

This last was what Abraham liked most of all, and he was reading and
studying all the time. There were not many books where he lived, but
he borrowed all he could lay his hands on, and read them over and over.

He studied all the hard things he could find books on, from arithmetic
and grammar to surveying and law. He wrote on a shingle, when he
could not get paper, and by the light of a log fire, when he could not get



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 47

candles. He read and studied in the fields, when he was not working;
on wood-piles, where he was chopping wood, or in the kitchen, rocking
the cradle of any baby whose father or mother had a book to lend him.
His favorite position for studying was to lay, stretched out like the long
boy he was, flat on the floor, in front of an open fire. Here he would
read and write and cipher, after the day’s work was over, until, at last,
he grew to be as good a scholar as any boy round.

Once he borrowed a book of an old farmer. It was a ‘Life of Wash-
ington.” He read it and read it again, and when he was not reading it
he put it safely away between the logs that made the wall of his log-
cabin home. But one day there came a hard storm; it beat against the
cabin and soaked in between the logs and spoiled the book. Young
Abraham did not try to hide the book nor get out of the trouble. He
never did a mean thing of that sort. He took the soaked and ruined
book to the old farmer, told him how it happened, and asked how he
could pay for it.

“Wall,” said the old farmer, “‘’t’aint much account to me now. You
pull fodder for three days and the book is yours.”

So the boy set to work, and for three days “pulled fodder” to feed the
farmer’s cattle.

He dried and smoothed and pressed out the “Life of Washington,” for
it was his now. And that is the way he bought his first book.

He was the strongest boy in all the country ’round. He could mow
the most, plough the deepest, split wood the best, toss the farthest, run
the swiftest, jump the highest and wrestle the best of any boy or man in
the neighborhood. But, though he was so strong, he was always so kind,
so gentle, so obliging, so just and so helpful that everybody liked him,
few dared to stand up against him, and all came to him to get work done,
settle disputes, or find help in quarrels or trouble.

When he was fifteen years old he was over six feet tall and very strong.
No man or boy could throw him down in a wrestle. He was like Wash-
ington in this, for both men were remarkable wrestlers when they were
boys. But he always wrestled fair. Once, when he had gone to a new
place to live, the big boys got him to wrestle with their champion, and
when the champion found he was getting the worst of it he began to try
unfair ways to win. This was one thing that Lincoln never would



48 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

stand—unfairness or meanness. He caught the big fellow, lifted him in
the air, shook him as a dog shakes a rat, and then threw him down to
the ground. The big bully was conquered. He was a friend and fol-
lower of Lincoln as long as he lived, and you may be sure the “boys” all
about never tried any more mean tricks on Abraham Lincoln.

So he grew, amid the woods and farms, to be a bright, willing, oblig-
ing, active, good-natured, fun-loving boy. He had to work early and



THE BOY LINCOLN, STUDYING.

late, and when he was a big boy he went to work among the farmers,
where he hired as a “hired man.” He could do anything, from splitting
rails for fences to rocking the baby’s cradle; or from hoeing corn in the
field to telling stories in the kitchen.

And how he did like to tell funny stories. Not always funny, either.
For, you see, he had read so much and remembered things so well that
he could tell stories to make people laugh and stories to make people
think. He liked to recite poetry and “speak pieces,” and do all the



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 49

things that make a person good company for every one. He would sit in
front of the country store or on the counter inside and tell of all the funny
things he had seen, or heard, or knew. He would make up poetry about
the men and women of the neighborhood, or “reel off” a speech upon
things that the people were interested in, until all the boys and girls,
and the men and women, too, said “Abe Lincoln,” as they called
him, knew about everything, and was an “awful smart chap.”

peers en Sometimes
ee Rade ; : they thought

ee | yee hy te he knew too
much, for once,
when he tried
to explain to
one of the girls
that the earth
turned around
and the sun did
not move, she
would not be-
lieve him, and
said he was
fooling her.
But she lived
to learn that
“ Abe,’ as she
called him, was
not a fool,
but a bright,
thoughtful, studious boy, who understood what he read and did not
forget it.

He worked on farms, ran a ferry-boat across the river, split rails for
farm fences, worked an oar on a “flat-boat,” got up a machine for lifting
boats out of the mud, kept store, did all sorts of “odd jobs” for the farm-
ers and their wives, and was, in fact, what we call a regular “Jack of all
trades.” And all the time, though he was jolly and liked a good time,
he kept studying, studying, studying, until, as I have told you, the peo-

4



LINCOLN, THE WRESTLER.



50 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

ple where he lived said he knew more than anybody else. Some of them
even said that they knew he would be President of the United States
some day, he was so smart.

The work he did most of all out-of-doors, was splitting great logs into
rails for fences. He could do as much as three men at this work, he was
so strong. With one blow he could just bury the axe in the wood. Once
he split enough rails for a woman to pay for a suit of clothes she made
him, and all the farmers round liked to have “ ake Lincoln,” as they called
him, split their rails.

He could take the heavy axe by the end of the handle and hold it out
straight from his shoulder. That is something that only a very strong-
armed person can do. In fact, as I have told you, he was the champion
strong-boy of his neighborhood, and, though he was never quarrelsome
or a fighter, he did enjoy a friendly wrestle, and, we are told, that he
could strike the hardest blow with axe or maul, jump higher and farther
than any of his comrades, and there was no one, far or near, who
could put him on his back. He made two trips down the long Ohio
and the broad Mississippi rivers to the big city of New Orleans, in Louis-
iana. He sailed on a clumsy, square, flat-bottomed scow, called a flat-
boat. Lincoln worked the forward oar on the flat-boat, to guide the big
craft through the river currents and over snags.

On these trips he first saw negro men and women bought and sold the
same as horses, pigs and cattle, and from that day, all through his life, he
hated slavery. When he became a young man, a war broke out in the
Western country with the Indians. They were led by the famous Indian
chief called Black Hawk. Lincoln went with the soldiers to fight Black
Hawk. He was thought so much of by his companions that they made
him captain of their company.

Captain Lincoln’s soldiers all liked him, and they were just like boys
together. Sometimes they were pretty wild boys and gave him a good
deal of trouble, but he never got real angry at them but once. That
was when a poor, broken-down, old Indian came into camp for food and
shelter, and Loncoln’s ‘‘boys” were going to kill him just because he was
an Indian. But Lincoln said, ‘For shame!” He protected the old
Indian and, standing up in front of him, said he would knock down the
first man that dared to touch him. The soldiers knew that Lincoln



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 51

meant what he said, and thought even more of him after that. And
the old Indian’s life was saved.

When the soldiers’ time was up, and most of them went back home,
Lincoln would not go with them. He joined another regiment as a pri-
vate soldier and staid in the army until the Indians were beaten and
driven away, and Black Hawk was taken prisoner.

Then Lincoln started for home with another soldier boy. They had

Cr ara r I



a We eee

LINCOLN, AS HIRED MAN, TELLING A STORY,

great adventures. Their horse was stolen, and they had to walk; then
they found an old canoe and paddled down the rivers until the canoe was
upset and they were nearly drowned; then they walked again until they
“oot a lift” on a row-boat, and so, at last, walking and paddling, they
got back to their homes, poor and tired out, but strong and healthy
young men.

Then Lincoln tried store-keeping again. He had already been a clerk



52 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

in a country store; now he set up a store of his own. He was not very
successful. He loved to read and study better than to wait on custom-
ers, and he was so obliging and good-natured that he could not make
much money. ‘Then he had a partner who was lazy and good for noth-
ing, and who got him into trouble. But, through it all, Lincoln never
did a mean or dishonest thing. He paid all the debts, though it took
him years to do this, and he could be so completely trusted to do the
right thing for everyone that all the people round about learned to call
him ‘Honest Abe Lincoln.” That’s a good nick-name, is’nt it?

After Lincoln got through keeping store he was so much liked by the
people that they chose him to go to the capital of the State, as one of
the men who made laws for the State of Illinois, in what is called the
State Legislature.

He was sent to the Legislature again and again, and one of the first
things he did was to draw up a paper, saying what a wicked thing
Slavery was.

At that time, you know, almost everybody in the southern half of the
United States owned negro men and women and children, just as they
owned horses and dogs and cows. Lincoln did not believe in this. Once,
when he was in New Orleans, on one of his flat-boat trips, he went into
a dreadful place where they sold men and women at auction. It made
young Lincoln sick and angry, and he said if ever he got the chance he
would hit slavery a blow that would hurt it—though, of course, he did
not think he was ever to have the real chance to “hit it hard” that did
come to him.

But when he was a young man no one said much against slavery, and
the people thought Lincoln was foolish to act and talk as he did. But,
you see, one of the strongest things about Abraham Lincoln was that he
was sympathetic—that is, he felt sorry for anyone in trouble. He was
tender, even with animals—pigs and horses, cats and dogs, and birds.
If he found a little bird on the ground, he would take it up tenderly and
hunt around until he found its nest, and leave it there. He would get
down from his horse to pull a pig out of the mud, and, when he was a
boy, he went back across an icy and rushing river to help over a poor
little dog that was afraid to cross. So you will not wonder that, when



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 53

he grew to be a man, he hated slavery, for slavery was unkindness to
men and women.

After he came back from the Legislature, he became a lawyer—he had
always been studying law, you know. He was a bright, smart and suc-
cessful lawyer. What is better still, he was a good and honest one. He
never would take a case he did not believe in, and once when a man
came to engage him to help get some money from a poor widow, Lincoln
refused, and gave the man such a scolding that the man did not try it



LINCOLN KEEPING STORE.

again. So Mr. Lincoln grew to be one of the best lawyers in all that
Western country.

Because he was so wise and brave in speech and action, Lincoln rose
to be what is called a great politician. He and another famous
man, named Douglas, looked at things differently, and they had long
public talks or discussions about politics and slavery. These discussions
were held where all the people could hear them, in big halls or out of
doors, and crowds of people went to listen to these talks, so that very



54 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

soon everybody “out West” and people all over the country had heard
of Lincoln and Douglas.

At last, came a time when the people of the United States were to
choose a new President. And what do you think? ‘These two men
were picked out by the opposite parties to be voted for by the people—
Lincoln by the Republicans, and Douglas by the Democrats.

And on election day the Republicans won. The poor little backwoods
boy, the rail-splitter, the flat-boatman, the farm-hand, was raised to the
highest place over all the people. Abraham Lincoln was elected Presi-
dent of the United States.

Is not that as good as your fairy story of the poor boy who became a
prince? It is even better, for it is true.

It was a great honor, but it meant hard work and lots of worry for
Abraham Lincoln. Bad times were coming for America.

The men of the South, who believed in slavery and said that their
States had everything to say, stood up against the men of the North,
who did not believe in slavery, and said that the Government of the
United States had more to say than any one of the separate States.

Thus the men of the South said, ‘‘ You do as we say, or we will break
up the Union.”

And the men of the North said, ‘“‘ You cannot break itup. The union
of all the States shall be kept, and you must stay in it.”

The South said, ‘‘We won’t; we will secede’—that is, draw out of
the Union.

The North said, ‘“ You shall not secede. We will fight to keep you in
and preserve tho Union.”

The South said, ‘‘ We dare you!”

The North said, ‘‘ We'll take that dare!”

And then there was war.

Abraham Lincoln, when he was made President, spoke beautifully to -
the people, and begged them not to quarrel. But, at the same time, he
told them that whatever happened, he was there to save the Union, and
he should do so.

But his words then had little effect. War had to come, and it came.

For four dreadful years the men of the North and the men of the South
fought each other for the mastery on Southern battle-fields. Many des-



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 5d

perate and terrible battles were fought, for each side was bound to win.
Neither side would give in, and brave soldiers, under brave leaders, did
many gallant deeds under that terrible necessity that men call war.
This war was especially dreadful, because it was just like two brothers
fighting with each other, and you know how dreadful that must be.

During all those four years of war Abraham Lincoln lived in the Presi-
dent’s house at Washington—the White House, as it is called.

He had but one wish—to save the Union. He did not mean to let
war, nor trouble, nor wicked men destroy the nation that Washington
had founded. He was always ready to say, ‘‘ We forgive you,” if the men
of the South would only stop fighting and say, ‘We are sorry.” But
they would not do this, much as the great, kind, patient, loving Presi-
dent wished them to.

That he was kind and loving all through that terrible war we know
very well. War is a dreadful thing, and when it is going on some hard
and cruel things have to be done. The soldiers who are sick or wounded
have to be hurt to make them well. As they lay in their hospitals, after
some dreadful battle had torn and maimed them, the good President
would walk through the long lines of cot-beds, talking kindly with the
wounded soldiers, sending them nice things, doing everything he could
to relieve their sufferings and make them patient and comfortable.

In war, too, you know, even brave soldiers often get tired of the fight-
ing and the privations and the delay, and wish to go home to see their
wives and children. But they cannot, until it is time for them. So,
sometimes they get impatient and run away. This is called desertion,
and when a deserter is caught and brought back to the army, he
is shot.

Now President Lincoln was so loving and tender-hearted that he could
not bear to have any of his soldiers shot because they had tried to go
home. So, whenever he had a chance, he would write a paper saying
the soldier must not be shot. This is called a pardon, and whenever a
weak or timid soldier was arrested and sentenced to be shot as a deserter,
his friends would hurry to the good President and beg him to give the
man a pardon.

He almost always did it. ‘I don’t see how it will do the man any
good to shoot him,” he would say. ‘Give me the paper, I'll sign it,”



56 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

and so the deserter would go free, and perhaps make a better soldier
than ever, because the good President had saved him.

The question of slavery was always coming up in this wartime. But
when some of the men at the North asked Lincoln to set all the slaves
in the land free, he said: “The first thing to do is to save the Union;
after that we'll see about slavery.”

Some people did not like that. They said the President was too slow.



LINCOLN ON THE FLAT BOAT.

But he was not. He was the wisest man in all the world; the only one
who could do just the right thing, and he did it.

He waited patiently until just the right time came. He saw that the
South was not willing to give in, and that something must be done to
show them that the North was just as determined as they were. So,
after a great victory had been won by the soldiers of the Union, Abra-
ham Lincoln wrote a paper and sent it out to the world, saying that on
the first day of January, in the year 1868, all slaves in America should



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 57

be free men and women—what we call emancipated—and that, forever
after, there should be no such thing as slavery in free America.

It was a great thing to do. It wasa greater thing to do it just as
Lincoln did it, and, while the world lasts, no one will ever forget the
Emancipa-
tion Procla-
mation of
Abraham
Lincoln.

Still the
war went on.
But, little by
little, the
South was
growing wea-
ker, and, at
last, in the
month of
April, 1865,
the end came.
The Southern
soldiers gave
up the fight.
The North
was victori-
ous. The
Union was
saved.

You may

be sure that
the great and good President was glad. He did not think that he had
done so very much. It was the people who had done it all, he said.
But the people knew that Lincoln had been the leader and captain
who had led them safely through all their troubles, and they cheered
and blessed him accordingly.



LINCOLN ENTERING RICHMOND.



58 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

But do you think the poor black people whom he had set free blessed
him? They did, indeed.

When President Lincoln at last stood in the streets of Richmond,
which had been the capital of the Southern States, he was almost wor-
shipped by the colored people. They danced, they sang, they cried, they
prayed, they called down blessings on the head of their emancipator—
the man who had set them free. They knelt at his feet, while the good
President, greatly moved by what he saw, bowed pleasantly to the shout-
ing throng, while tears of joy and pity rolled down his care-wrinkled
face. Don’t you think it must have been a great and blessed moment
for this good and great and noble man. But it was the same all over
the land. There was cheering and shouting and thanksgiving every-
where for a re-united nation, and even the South, weary with four years
of unsuccessful war, welcomed peace and quiet once more.

Then, who in all the world was greater than Abraham Lincoln? He
had done it all, people said, by his wisdom, his patience and his determin-
ation, and the splendid way in which he had directed everything from his
home in the White House.

The year before, in the midst of the war, he had been elected Presi-
dent for the second time. “It is not safe to swap horses when you are
crossing a stream,” he said. So the people voted not to ‘“‘swap horses.”

Lincoln made a beautiful speech to the people when he was again
made President. He spoke only of love and kindness for the men of the
South, and, while he said the North must fight on to the end and save
the Union, they must do it not hating the South, but loving it.

And this is the way he ended that famous speech. Remember his
words, boys and girls, they-are glorious: ‘‘ With malice toward none, with
charity for all, with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the
right, let us finish the work we are in * * * and achieve and
cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all
nations.”

But, just when the war was ended, when peace came to the land
again; when all men saw what a grand and noble and loving and strong
man the great President was; when it looked as if, after four years of
worry, weariness and work, he could at last rest from his labors and be
happy, a wicked, foolish and miserable man shot the President, behind



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 59

his back. And, on the morning of the fifteenth of April, in the year
1865, Abraham Lincoln died. :

Then how all the land mourned! South, as well as North, wept for
the dead President. All the world sorrowed, and men and women began
to see what a great and noble man had been taken from them.

The world has not got over it yet. Every year and every day only
makes Abraham Lincoln greater, nobler, mightier. No boy ever, in all
the world, rose higher from poorer beginnings. No man who ever lived
did more for the world than Abraham Lincoln, the American.

He saw what was right, and he did it; he knew what was true, and he
said it; he felt what was just, and he stuck to it. So he stands to-day,
for justice, truth and right.

You do not understand all this now, as you listen to these words and
look at these pictures. But some day you will, and you will then know
that it was because Abraham Lincoln lived and did these things that
you have to-day a happy home in a great, free, rich and beautiful coun-
try— The land of the free and the home of the brave.”

So remember this, now, boys and girls: You are free and happy in
America to-day, because Abraham Lincoln saved for you to live in the
land that George Washington made free.



THE REMARKABLE HISTORY OF

ULysses S. GRANT,

General of the Armies of the United States.

HIS is the story of a great soldier and a good man. Everybody
likes to see soldiers marching, with their drums and guns and
flags and uniforms. They make a fine sight, and the boys and

girls all hurrah and clap their hands as the regiments march by. But
when these soldiers go marching to battle, it is quite another thing.
For war is terrible, and some of the best and bravest soldiers hate it
the most.

Sometimes, however, great questions and bitter quarrels can only be
settled by war and fighting, and then it is well for the people to have
_ their armies led to battle by such a great and gallant soldier as this
story tells about.

His name was Ulysses Simpson Grant. He was born in a little town,
out in Ohio, called Point Pleasant, on the twenty-seventh of April, in
the year 1822. The house in which he was born is still standing. Itis
on the banks of the Ohio River, and you can look across to Kentucky,
on the other side of the river.

When Ulysses was only a year old his father moved to a place: called
Georgetown, not far away, and there he spent his boyhood.

He was a strong, healthy, go-ahead little fellow, who did not like to go
to school very well. But, if he had anything to do, either in work or
play, he stuck to it, until it was done.

When he was seventeen years old, Ulysses was sent to the splendid
(60)





GRANT ON THE FIELD, LAST YEAR OF THE WAR.



ULYSSES 8. GRANT. 61

school among the beautiful highlands of the Hudson River, in New York,
where boys are taught to become soldiers of the United States Army.
This is called abe oes States Military ee at West Point.

ee eT Tne TN,





GRANT’S CHILDHOOD.



He stayed four years at this famous
school. He did not like the school part
of it any more at West Point than he did
at his Ohio school-house, but he loved horses, andl became a fine horse
back rider.

When he left West Point, he was made second lieutenant in’ the



62 ULYSSES 8S. GRANT.

United States Army. He went home, but in a year or two there was a
war between the United States and the country that joins us on the
south. It is called Mexico, and this war is called the Mexican War.

Young Ulysses Grant went to this war as first lieutenant, and fought
the Mexicans in many bloody battles. He was a daring young officer,
and his men followed willingly wherever he led. In one of the hardest
battles in this war with Mexico—the battle of Monterey—the American
soldiers charged into the town and then got out of ammunition—that is,
powder and shot. To get any more, some one would have to ride straight
through the fire of the Mexicans, who were in the houses of the town;
so the general did not think he could order any soldier to do this. But he
asked who would do it. That is what is meant by calling for volunteers.

Lieutenant Grant at once said he would go. He mounted his horse,
but slipped over on the side furthest from the houses in which the Mexi-
cans were hiding. Then he set his horse on a gallop, and so dashed
through the town and past all the hostile houses, and brought back the
ammunition in safety.

He did many other brave and soldierly things when he was a young
officer in this war with Mexico, but he was always such a modest man
that he never liked to tell of his courageous deeds. When he did, he
would generally say: “O, well; the battle would have been won, just as
it was, if I had not been there.” The brave men and the bravest boys,
you know, never boast.

In another of these battles in the Mexican war—it has a long, hard
name—Chepultepec, young Grant was so bold and brave that his name
was picked out as that of one of the bravest soldiers in the fight.

At another time, when a strong fort was in the path of the Americans,
Lieutenant Grant dragged a small cannon away up into a church steeple,
and pointing it at the fort, fired his cannon balls so swift and straight
and sure that the Mexican soldiers had to run out of the fort, and the
Americans marched into it and soon after took the city it had defended.
And when the news of this fight was sent home to the United States,
young Grant’s brave act was made a part of it, and he was promoted to
be a captain. The Mexicans were defeated in many battles, and, at last
the cruel war was ended. The Americans were victorious and marched
hack north to their homes.



ULYSSES S. GRANT. 63

Then Captain Grant married his wife; but, soon after, he had to go
without her to California and Oregon, where his regiment was sent. He
ae ReESaTiae peer: had a hard time

ee getting there, for
the dreadful cholera
broke out while
the soldiers were on
the way, and if it
had not been for
Captain Grant’s
bravery and devo-
tion most of the
soldiers and their
wives and chil-

dren would have
died.

You see, a man
can be just as
brave taking care
of sick people as
when fighting in
battle.

After he had been
in Oregon for a
while he got tired
of doing nothing,
so he gave up being
a soldier, and went
back to his little
farm near St. Louis,
in Missouri. He
lived in a log-
house on this farm
with bis wife and children, and at times was quite poor. He
tried farming, and buying and selling horses and collecting bills, '
and, at last, moved from St. Louis to the town of Galena, in Illb-















SSRIS TRI A AN oe

me ePRP TO

¢
t :

‘

ber cee..

GRANT AFTER THE BATTLE Of BELMONT.



64 ULYSSES 8. GRANT.

nois, where he was a tanner and made leather with his father and
brothers.

While Grant was an unknown tanner in Illinois a dreadful thing hap-
pened in America. The Northern and Southern States, which, joined
together, made these United States of America, became angry with each
other over things that, some day, you will learn all about in school.

The South said: ‘‘ We won’t stay in the Union any longer.”

The North said: ‘ You’ve got to stay. We won’t let you go.”

But the South determined to go, and, in the year 1861, they had gone
and had made a new nation of themselves. Then the North said the
South could not go and should not go, and tried to keep them in the
Union by force.

They began to fight with each other, and there was a terrible war in
the land. We call it now the War of the Rebellion, or the Civil War.

Captain Grant joined the army at once and marched away to the war
with some soldiers from his own town, and, after a while, he was given
command of a regiment and made a colonel. Soon after that he was
promoted to be a brigadier-general.

After the war had been going on for several months the men who were
at the head of things found out what a good soldier General Grant was,
and he was given command of a large number of men and marched
with them against the Confederates, as the Southern soldiers were
called.

There were some hard battles fought, among them that of Belmont, on
the Mississippi, at which village a severe engagement took place. But
Grant was victorious, and at last he got the Confederate soldiers cooped
up in a place called Fort Donelson.

When the general of the Confederate soldicre asked General Grant
how he could save his soldiers and get out of the fort alive, the General
said: ‘‘Unconditional surrender.” That means, give me your fort and
all your soldiers and guns and flags and swords. Then I will not
fight you. If you will not do this, I shall make you.

There was no other way, so the Comfederates surrendered Fort Donel-
son. It was a great victory for the Northern soldiers, and everybody
praised General Grant. Then he marched to another place. It was
called Shiloh. There was a terrible battle here. At first it was almost



ULYSSES S. GRANT. 65

a defeat for the Union soldiers, but General Grant stuck to it and fought
so bravely, that at last the Confederates were beaten and driven back.



Fame



GRANT AT SHILOH.

It was the first great battle of the war. It continued through two
April days—Saturday and Sunday. The Confederates were led by their

best and bravest general, Albert Sidney Johnston. Had it not been for
5



66 ULYSSES 8. GRANT.

General Grant’s bravery, determination, persistence and good leadership,
the Northern troops would surely have been beaten, and the Union cause
would have been sadly put back.

But he stuck to it. He must win, that was all. And he did win.
He rode up and down the line all that terrible Saturday and Sunday,
giving orders, directing and encouraging his men. For he knew that they
were mostly soldiers who had never seen a battle, and he knew that un-
less they were made braver by the courage and bravery of their leaders,
they would not make good soldiers.

So all through this dreadful battle of Shiloh, in which the dash and

bravery of the South first met the courage and endurance of the North,
General Grant was in the thick of it, inspiring his soldiers, bringing vic-
tory out of defeat, and showing the world what a great general he really
was.
So he kept driving the Confederate soldiers off whenever he fought
them. They were brave, too, for they also were Americans. But they
had not so great a general to lead them in battle. At last Grant got the
Southern army cooped up in a town called Vicksburg. He marched his
soldiers against it and built forts around it and banged away at it with
his great cannons until at last, when the Confederates in the town could
get no help and could not get away, they gave up the town and all its
forts and soldiers and guns to General Grant. That was the surrender
if Vicksburg. It was another splendid victory.

Then General Grant was promoted to be a major-general, and marched
off to fight more of the bold Southern soldiers. He fought them again at
a place called Chattanooga, among the mountains. This was so hard a
battle and so great a victory for General Grant that the United States
gave him a gold medal to remember it. Then he was given command of
all the armies of the United States. So far he had fought in the West.
Now he came East and took the lead of all the Northern soldiers in Vir-
ginia, which was called the Army of the Potomac. He fought the Con-
federates and their brave leader, General Lee, for a whole year in Virginia.
There were some dreadful battles. There never were harder ones in all
the world. But General Grant knew that if he wished to win, he must
fight hard and terribly. The hardest fighting of all that cruel war was
now to come, you see. It was in the region that separated the two capi-



ULYSSES S. GRANT. 67

tals—Washington, the capital of the United States, and Richmond, the
Southern capital.

Much of the fighting was in a section covered with thick woods and
underbrush, and called ‘The Wilderness.” For sixteen days the two
armies faced each other
in this wilderness, so
close together that they
could talk across, and
so, watching by night
and fighting by day, the
two generals, Lee, the
Confederate, and Grant,
the Union leader, fought
each other in the most
tremendous and des-
perate battles of modern
times.

They ended at last,
not by really defeating
Lee, but by forcing him
back, inch by inch, un-
til Grant and his sol-
diers got nearer to Rich-
mond. You _ see, the
men of the North and
the men of the South
had grown now to be
trained and courageous
soldiers, and they were
so equally matched in
numbers, bravery and
determination, and were so ably led by their commanding generals that
the conflict was a stubborn and desperate one.

But General Grant would not be defeated. He never gave up; and
when, in the hot weather, things seemed going badly and he was asked what
he meant to do, he said, “Fight it out on this line, if it takes all summer.”’



GRANT AT WINDSOR CASTLE.



68 ULYSSES 8. GRANT.

It did take all summer, and all the winter, too; but, at last, this great
soldier was successful. The Southerners were beaten, and their gallant
leader, General Lee, at a place called Appomattox, on the ninth of April,
1865, surrendered all his soldiers and flags and guns to General Grant.
It was the end to a long and bitter war. Probably no other soldier in
America could have defeated General Lee and his soldiers except General
Grant. The Southern soldiers were brave and determined; they were
desperate; for they knew if they did not beat Grant and capture Wash-
ington the cause of the South must be given up.

So they fought on, even after they began to get hungry and ragged, and
the South was poor and empty. Gradually, however, they grew weaker;
and still General Grant kept at it, forcing them back, back, until at last
they fled from Richmond. The Southern soldiers were beaten or cap-
tured, and, as I have told you, General Lee surrendered at last to General
Grant at Appomattox. The war was over. The North had won the great
fight that had lasted through four terrible years, and General U.S. Grant
was hailed as “the Conqueror.”

It is hard for the boys and girls who have quarreled and got the best
of it, not to clap their hands and talk big. It is even harder for men
and women. But General Grant, when he had won the victory, would
not “crow” over the defeated Southerners. ‘They are Americans,’’ he
said.

He gave them back their horses so that they could plough their farms
for planting; he gave them food and clothes, and sent them away friends;
he said to North and South alike: “The war is over. Let us have
peace.”

Of course his great success made him a hero. He was one. But he
hated to be so talked about; he never made a show of himself, nor said,
as a good many boys and men do when they have done something fine:
‘Look at me!” General Grant was quiet, modest and silent. Of course,
the world thought all the more of him because he did not try to put him-
self forward. His own land thought so much of him that they twice made
him President of the United States, just as they did Washington.
It was a pretty good rise for a little Western farmer boy and tanner, wasn’t
it? After he was through being President he left his country and trav-
eled around the world, and the world did him honor.



ULYSSES S. GRANT. 69

Kings and queens and princes invited him to their palaces and were
glad to see him. He visited the Queen of England in her palace of
Windsor Castle; he taiked with the soldiers and statesmen of the world,



GRANT IN JAPAN.

while emperors honored him as one of the world’s famous men, and cities
welcomed him as the foremost general of the day and the man who had
been President of the world’s mightiest Republic.



70 ULYSSES 8. GRANT.

Amid all these festivities, in all lands and in all scenes set to do him
honor, General Grant was still the same modest, quiet, silent man he had
been all his life. The brilliant carnival at Havana, which he saw and
which honored him, the curious and strange surroundings in far-off Japan,
where they were beginning to think and act for themselves; the court
of China, which few Americans had ever seen; the storied lands of the
Kast—Jerusalem, Damascus, Constantinople, Alexandria—all these he
visited, and in all he was welcomed and pointed out to the boys and
girls of every nation, tribe and land as the great American—the visitor
from the land beyond the sea. Great men, wherever he went, called
upon him and made friends with him, and, as I have said, the people
everywhere, in Japan and China, and Egypt and Turkey, and Russia and
Germany, and Italy and France and England ran after him just as their
kings and princes had done. They hurrahed for him and made much of
him—more than any man in all the world had ever before been so hon-
ored and entertained. .

For, you see, people everywhere knew that General Grant was a great
man, who, by his patience, his perseverance, his wisdom and his will had
carried a mighty nation through a terrible war, won it; had been made
the chief man of that nation, and shown all the world how a man can
be a great soldier and yet a quiet, simple, modest man. But they were
to see him fight one other battle—the hardest that any boy or girl, any man
or woman can fight—the battle against wrong and death. He came back
from his travels round the world, and as he did not like to be idle, he put
what money he had into business and began, so he thought, to grow rich.
He made his home in New York City, in a fine house which the people
who honored him had given him as a token of their respect and
affection and their pride in the man who had done so much for them in
four years of war, and who had governed his native land as President
through eight years of peace.

But his business ventures turned out badly. A wretched man worked
against him, using his honorable name to mislead the people, and taking
for himself both their money and that of General Grant.

All of a sudden the end came. The bad man ran away and General
Grant found himself without a cent. All his money was gone, and, —
worse than that, others who had trusted in him had lost their money,



ULYSSES 8S. GRANT. 71

too. It broke the great general down. It almost defeated the soldier
who had never known defeat. It made him weak and sick.

But, just as he had
marched to war courage-
ously, so, now, he faced
disaster just as bravely.
He set to work to make
his losses good, and, be-
cause all the world wished
to hear about him, he be-
gan to write the story of
his life and his battles.

He kept himself alive to
do this. For over a year
he fought ruin and a terri-
ble pain as stoutly as he
had ever battled with real
soldiers, while all the world
looked on in love and pity,
and kings and beggars sent
him words of sympathy.
He won the fight, for he did
not give up until his book
was finished. Then he died.

On the twenty-first of
July, in the year 1885, on
the mountain-top to which
he had been carried, near
Saratoga, in New York,
General Grant died, and
all the world mourned a

CENERAL GRANT’S HOUSE, NEW YORK; 1885. great man gone.
The world mourned;

men and women everywhere had learned to honor the great general as
much for his victories over disaster, disgrace and pain as for his con-
quests in war and his governing in peace. His funeral, on Saturday,





72 ULYSSES 8S. GRANT.

August 8, 1885, was one of the grandest public ceremonials ever seen in
America. The President of the United States, senators, governors, gen-
erals, judges and famous men came to New York to show their sorrow
and esteem, and the poor boy of the western prairies was buried amid
the solemn tolling of bells and firing of cannon, while all people and all
lands sent words of sorrow and of sympathy to the Republic which had
so honored him in death as it had honored him in life.

ant







Upon a beauti- ful knoll in a
beautiful park in , New York rises
a stately monu- * a ment above his
tomb. In the < City of Chicago,

in the State from
from poverty to
splendid monu-
his honor.

His is not an uncommon name, and yet in all America, in all the
world, there is but one Grant!

His story is one from which even the smallest boy and the tiniest
girl can learn something. For it teaches them to be persistent, yet

which he came
fame, another
ment towers in

GRANT’S FUNERAL PROCESSION.



ULYSSES 8. GRANT. 73

modest; strong, yet simple; magnanimous in victory; patient in distress
and defeat.

He was a great soldier, but he hated war; yet, when he had to fight,
he did fight, and nothing could put him aside from the end he had in
view.

Though he became the foremost man of the world, he was always a
quiet, modest and simple American gentleman, and, when he had to face
both pain and loss, he did so patiently, uncomplainingly and heroically,
never giving in until he had done what he had determined todo. ‘To
be a great soldier is a fine thing; to be a noble, truthful, simple man is
still finer. General Grant was both; and while the boys and girls of
America will never forget the battles and victories won for their sake,
let them also never forget that it was his simplicity, his loyalty, his
devotion, his persistence and his honor that made all the world respect
and love Ulysses Simpson Grant as a great American.

a



THE STIRRING STORY OF

RoBert E. Lee,

General of the Confederate Armies.

HIS is to tell you the story of Robert E. Lee.
Every boy and girl in America knows who
he was—a great American soldier.
But he was more than a great soldier, he was
a hero, and this is a hero story. Is there any
boy or girl who does not like to hear about a
hero? You know what a hero is, do you not?
It is one who does great deeds in a grand way.
Ever since the world began there have been
heroes. Some have been soldiers, some have
been kings, some have been just plain, poor men
& or boys. But the world has liked to hear their
. stories—from David, the boy who killed Go-
Ne the giant, to George Washington, who
\ delivered his land from tyranny.
In this dear America, which is our native
land, we “have had many heroes. They have
defended us in danger, fought for us in war, cared
for us in peace, and every boy and girl in Amer-
ica is told the story of their lives and taught to
love and respect and honor them.
It is the story of one of these brave and heroic

CADET LEE. men that I wish now to tell you—the story of
(74)





















ON THE EVE OF GETTYSBURG.—GENERAL LEE DIRECTING THE BATTLE.



ROBERT E. LEE. 75

Robert EH. Lee, who fought long and bravely for what he believed to be
the rights and the liberty of his fellow-men in the southern half of
the United States of America. Listen to his story.

Many years ago, when your grandfather’s grandfather was helping to
make the Fourth of July, a certain brave and gallant soldier fought in
almost all the battles of the American Revolution. People called him
‘ Light-horse’ Harry Lee. This was because he was the leader of a
number of dashing, fast-riding soldiers or cavalry called “light-horse,”
because the riders were dressed and armed as lightly as possible. In this
dress they could ride swiftly and act quickly. .

‘Light-horse” Harry Lee was a splendid horseback rider, and his swift
and daring dashes with his light-horse legion did a great deal toward
whipping the British and making the American Revolution a success.
General Washington thought very much of this brave Virginian horse-
man, and, when the war was over, wrote him a letter in which he sent
him his “love and thanks” for what he had done in the American Revo-
lution. And, when the great and good Washington died, at his beautiful
home at Mount Vernon, it was his friend the dashing cavalry soldier who
spoke those splendid words about the greatest American—words which,
I hope, you all know by heart: ‘‘ Washington! first in war, first in peace
and first in the hearts of his countrymen.”

Nearly twenty-five years after the American Revolution ended in suc-
cess, when “ Light-horse” Harry Lee had been Governor Lee of Virginia,
and was writing a book about the American Revolution, a little baby boy
was born into his pleasant Virginia home. This baby was named Robert
Hdward Lee, and he was to grow up to become an even greater and nobler
man than his famous father.

Robert E. Lee was born on the nineteenth of January, 1807—the very
year in which our great American poets, Longfellow and Whittier, were
born. His father’s house was at a beautiful country place in Virginia,
called Stafford. It was in Westmoreland County, on the Potomac River,
the very county in Virginia in which George Washington was born, and
on the banks of the same Potomac River.

He was a good boy in everything, good in his home, good in his school,
good in his looks, and good in his ways. His father was not very well



76 ROBERT E. LEE.

when Robert was a little boy and had to be away from home a great deal ~
hunting for good health; so Robert’s mother brought her boy up.

She brought him up well and made a man of him, because she made
him true and manly from the start. He was never what boys call a
“sissy” just because he was mild and good, but he was a manly, brave,





YOUNG LEE RIDING IN FRONT OF « STAFFORD,” VIRGINIA, THE MANSION OF
“LIGHT-HORSE” HARRY LEE.

true-hearted little fellow, kind to all about him, always in love with his
mother, always obeying her, attentive to his studies, doing his duty in
every way as a real boy should.

When Robert was four years old his father moved from his country
home at Stafford to the little city of Alexandria, quite near to Wash-
ington, the capital of the nation.

There Robert went to school in a queer, old-fashioned, yellow house



ROBERT E. LEE. 77

that is still standing in Alexandria, and is still used for a boy’s school.
Its right name was Hallowell’s School, from the master who kept it; but
the boys who went there called it, because of its yellow walls, ‘‘ Brimstone
Castle.”

When Robert was eleven years old his father, the famous “ Light-horse”
Harry Lee of the American Revolution, died in Georgia, where he had
gone for his health. The fatherless boy clung closer to his mother than
ever, and determined to do everything he could to help her; but he had
such a great respect for his father’s memory, and felt so much pride in
the deeds his famous father had done in the cause of liberty and his native
land, that when the time came for him to decide what he would do when
he became a man, he declared he would be a soldier just as his father
had been.

So he went to West Point, the famous Military Academy on the banks
of the Hudson River, where the United States trains boys to lead its
armies and fight its battles.

Robert EH. Lee stayed four years at West Point. He entered there asa
“nleb,”’ or new boy, in 1825, when he was eighteen years old, and leaving
it, or “graduating” as it is called, as Lieutenant Lee in 1829.

He did finely at that famous school. He was what they called a
model cadet—always spick and span in his gray and white soldier suit,
always at the head in his studies, always ready in his duties, in his
drill, and in all he had to do. He never received a demerit, or bad
mark, in all the four years that he was a cadet at West Point. Think
of that!

They said, there, that cadet Lee kept his gun so bright and clean that
the inspecting officer could fairly see his face in its gleaming barrel and
its polished stock.

He was such a fine scholar at West Point that when he got through
and graduated he stood second in his class—that is, next to head, you
know.

This gave him a chance to choose just where he would like to be in
the army when he came out of West Point.

He joined what is called the Engineer Corps, the pick of the whole
army.

The Engineer Corps is made up of men who look after building the forts



78 ROBERT E. LEE.

and defences of our harbors, set our river channels straight, and protect
the land from the sea as well as from the enemy.

It is a fine position for a young officer, and generally gives him
pleasant places to live in and agreeable things to do. Soldiers like it .

ee SS ETT “RT








Yd, SOP beh ae
“ALWAYS TO BE FOUND WHERE THE FIGHTING WAS THE FIERCEST.”

better than being sent off to lonely posts or to watching Indians, and it
gives them a fine training in how to do things about forts and fighting.

Lieutenant Lee was stationed at different places along the Atlantic
coast. He helped plan and build Fortress Monroe, on beautiful Hampton
Roads, in Virginia; he was stationed in Washington in one of the offices



ROBERT E. LEE. 79

of the big War Department; he helped lay out the boundary line between
the States of Ohio and Michigan; he looked after the improvement of the
harbor of St. Louis, and the changes that were made in the shifting
channel of the mighty Mississippi River; he superintended the building
of the forts in New York harbor, and, when he got back from a war,
which I will soon tell you about, he was made Superintendent of the very
place he had gone to school—the Military Academy at West Point; after
that he had command of all the United States troops in Texas. He was
Second Lieutenant in 1829, then First Lieutenant, then, in 1838, Captain
in the regular army—so, you see, he kept going right on in the world,
and was a great deal thought of in the army.

The United States did not have a very big army in those days, but
whenever there was a war it grew quickly. In the year 1846 there came
about a war between the United States and its next-door neighbor, the
republic of Mexico.

Never mind what it was all about, you will learn that when you study
the history of the United States. It was a cruel war, as all war is cruel;
but it was a great chance for Americans who wished to be real soldiers
to show what they were good for and what they could do.

They did well. They marched into Mexico, which is just the other
side of Texas, you know, and they fought so bravely that in less than
two years they had conquered Mexico and added to the United States all
the land from Texas to California and the Pacific Ocean.

In this war Robert E. Lee made a splendid soldier. He was so brave
and gallant, so ready and reliable, that he was always to be found where
the fighting was fiercest. And yet he was so gentle and kind that he
always struck at the point in the enemy's line where they could be
beaten the quickest, so as to finish the fight with the smallest loss of
men in killed and wounded.

There was one battle in Mexico in which the young engineer was
almost the leader and conqueror. This was the time when he got the
best of the Mexicans at a place called Cerro Gordo, high up in the moun-
tains. The Mexican soldiers held the zig-zag road up the mountains. It
ran between great cliffs and chasms, and had cannons all along so as to
keep the Americans from coming up. But Captain Lee, the engineer, said :

“Tf we can’t march against them, we must get behind them. T’Il



80 ROBERT E. LEE.

try.” He hunted all about for a good place, and at last saw a way by
which a sort of a path could be cut through the mountains and come out
behind the Mexicans. He did this so carefully, so swiftly and so silently

aaa anaanna cena Ir eae eae —



eae

CAPTAIN LEE AT CERRO GORDO.

that before the Mexicans knew what they were about he was right

upon them.
Captain Lee led the way, and showed the men just what to do. They

lowered the cannons by ropes down the steep cliff and hauled them up



ROBERT E. LEE. 81

on the opposite hill-side; they cut, and climbed, and jumped, and dug
until they got all the men, all the horses and all the cannons up behind
the Mexican line. ‘Then they turned their guns upon the enemy, and so
surprised and terrified them that almost without a blow all that part of
the Mexican Army surrendered to the American commander, General
Scott.

This was one of Captain Lee’s victories in Mexico. It was one of the
kind he liked, because he had to think it out. It was the best kind of
victory, too, for he won it without having to shoot down and kill very
many men.

For his courage and his soldiership he was again and again promoted
—Captain, Major, Lieutenant-Colonel, Colonel. He was on the staff of
the commander, Winfield Scott, the General of the American Army; and,
after the Mexican war was over, General Scott declared that his success
in Mexico was largely due “to the skill, valor and undaunted courage of
Robert E. Lee.” That is a good deal to say about one man, is it not,
and fine, too?

After the Mexican War was over and all the soldiers had come home
again, Colonel Lee was made Superintendent of the Military Academy at
West Point, as I have already told you.

For three years he was in charge there, directing the soldier boys in
their studies and their drilling at that splendid military school on the
banks of the Hudson. Then he was sent to join the army stationed in
Texas. He was Colonel of a cavalry regiment, the same position that
his famous father, ‘“ Light-horse Harry,” had held in the Army of the Re-
public. Later on he was placed in command of all the soldiers in what
was called the Department of Texas.

While he was home on a long vacation at his beautiful home in Vir-
ginia called Arlington, just opposite Washington, the Civil War broke out.

You know what that was, of course—the dreadful and terrible trouble
between two parts of our dear native land—the North and the South.

It could not be settled peaceably. Men thought so differently about
things that one side would not give in to the other, and so they just had
to. fight it out.

It was a long and bitter war. Many good and brave men were killed

on both sides, and there was sorrow and distress all over the land.
6



82 ROBERT E. LEE.

But when the war was over, the people of the United States became
better friends than they had ever been before, and there will never be
such a war again.

When the war broke out Colonel Robert E. Lee did not know just what
to do. But he thought the matter over long and deeply, and then he
said: ‘I cannot fight against my relatives, my children, my home. I
have been a soldier of the United States, but I am a son of Virginia, and
I must do as my State does.”

He resigned from the United States Army, giving up his position of
Colonel, and was made Major-General of the forces of the State of Virginia.

When Virginia went out of the Union—that is, when her people said,
“We will not belong to the United States any longer, we will join the
Confederate States,” Colonel Lee said, ‘Then I must go with you. ”

He was appointed military adviser to Jefferson Davis, the President of
the newly-formed Confederate States—tfor so the States that went out of
the Union called themselves.

A year later he was made Commanding General of the Army of
Northern Virginia, and for three years he led the brave Southern soldiers
who fought for the Confederacy against the brave Northern soldiers who
fought for the Union.

What a splendid leader of those gallant Southern soldiers General Lee
was! He knew just where to have them march, just when to have them
fight, just what to have them do.

Richmond, in Virginia, was the capital of the Confederate States, just
as Washington is the capital of the United States. General Lee sur-
rounded it with forts and defended it so skilfully that the Northern sol-
diers could not get into it, though they tried again and again, and when-
ever they tried to get through any of the approaches to the city, General
Lee would march his soldiers against them and fight long and desperately.

Boys, when they play at any good game, like a boy to be their leader.
You can do so much better if you have someone to follow, someone who
shows you what to do.

It is just so with men—especially with soldiers—and General Lee was
just such a leader.

His soldiers learned to love him and look up to him almost as you do
to your own father. They called him ‘“‘ Marse Bob” and “ Uncle Bobby ”



ROBERT E. LEE. 83

—not to his face, of course, but when they talked together about him.
He was so kind, and patient, and gentle; he was always trying to help
them, and cared for them so much that they knew he was their friend,



FORTIFYING RICHMOND.

even when he made them march the longest, and even when he made
. them fight the hardest.
But a soldier has to fight, you know. That is why he isa soldier, and,



84 ROBERT E. LEE.

although General Lee was always calm, and quiet, and gentle in speech
and manner, he was a great soldier and sometimes a fierce fighter.

One day, when there was a terrible battle raging, he saw his soldiers
beaten back by the Union troops from a place he wished them to keep.
“They must not lose it,” he said, and he waved his sword above his head
and dashed to the front to lead his soldiers into the battle again. But
his men knew that General Lee’s life was precious ; that if he were killed
there would be no one to lead them to victory.

‘No, no, General!” they cried; ‘‘Go back! Go back, Lee, to the
rear! We'll take it!”

And when he dropped back, he saluted his soldiers for their love and
care for him, and pointed at the Union line with his sword.

‘Forward,’ he said, and his men charging forward, thinking of their
brave and gallant leader, won back the place from which they had been
driven.

Once when his own son, who was also the commander of a large Con-
federate force of cavalry (as his father and grandfather had been, you
know), was in danger of being surrounded by a great force of the enemy,
his father, the General, cried out cheerfully, “‘Keep your men together,
General, ’ll get you out of this,” and he did.

“General,” a young officer shouted, dashing up to him, just as a great
battle was to begin, “The Federals are advancing.” General Lee looked
at him with a funny smile, enjoying the young officer’s excitement.
“Well,” he said, just as cool and calm as you please, ‘I did hear firing,
and I was just beginning to think it was time some of you lazy young
fellows were coming to tell me what it was all about.”

And I suppose that made the young officer laugh right on the edge of
that battle, and to get from his calm and cool General all the more
courage to do his best.

So, you see, while he was brave and serious, he could see the funny
side of things, too, and did all he could to make his soldiers bright as
well as brave, hopeful when things went wrong, calm in the midst of
danger. This is what makes a real soldier, you know.

The North had more men and more money than the South; they kept
on fighting, too, for neither side was willing to give in. But the North
for a long time could get no soldier who was as great a general as Lec.



ROBERT E. LEE. 85

On the third day of June, 1862, he was made General of the Army of
Northern Virginia. That post he held through the war, under that name
he led the Southern soldiers to battle and often to victory, while, by his
wise way of directing his men, he kept the Northern troops away from
Richmond for nearly three years.

He won the Battle of Malvern Hill, he won the Second Battle of Bull
Run, he won the Battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. Twice
he marched his soldiers into the Northern lines, and at Gettysburg, in
Pennsylvania, in 1863, he fought a terrible two-days’ battle which called
for all the strength and all the skill of General Meade, the Northern
leader, to turn it into a victory for the Union.

Four generals of the Union led the armies against him in four great
attempts to defeat and conquer him. But each time Lee was more than
a match, and they fell back from Richmond, defeated.

At last, in the beginning of the year 1864, General U. 8. Grant, who
had been a successful leader of the Union soldiers in the West, was called
to the Hast to take command of the armies of the United States. Then
there came a change.

General Grant knew all about General Lee. They had both been in the
Mexican War. He knew that to win he must do his very best. When
someone asked him how long it would take him to get to Richmond,
General Grant said, ‘ Well, about four days, if General Lee is willing ;
if he isn’t, well, it’s going to take a good deal longer.”

And it did. General Lee did object ; he objected with guns and swords
and men, and the soldiers of the North and the soldiers of the South
fought many terrible battles. The fighting grew fiercer and hotter.
Grant would never give up, but kept pressing on. Bit by bit the Union
soldiers drew about Richmond; bit by bit the Confederate soldiers gave
way, as their money, their strength and their numbers began to fail.
But they fought gallantly still. General Lee was watchful and deter-
mined. His eyes saw every weak spot in the Union line; he could
spread out his brave but tired and hungry soldiers so as to make the
best show, and his men loved him so well and followed him so willingly
that he was able to keep up the fight longer than any other general could
have done. Never before in all the world had so many men been brought
face to face in battle, and dreadful battles they were, there in the swamps



86 ROBERT E. LEE.

and woods and fields of Virginia, in the year 1864. It was because both
sides were brave men, and because brave and great generals led them,
that these battles were so fierce, for Grant was bound to win and Lee
was bound not to let him.

But when, at last, all hope of successfully defending Richmond was



“HE WAVED HIS SWORD ABOVE HIS HEAD AND DASHED TO THE FRONT,”

gone, when the brave chieftain had tried to break his way through the
lines of Union soldiers, who now surrounded his army, and had failed,
when he saw that to keep up the fight any longer was only a useless
killing of men, a thing he always hated and tried to stop, then General



ROBERT E. LEE. 87

Lee laid down his sword and surrendered himself and his army to his
great foeman, General Grant, a man as gentle, as honorable and as kindly
hearted as was he.

It was a sad day for General Lee, when he at last determined to give
up the battle.

At first, when one of his soldiers saw how useless it would be to ~
fight any longer, and told the General that he ought to surrender, the
_ grand old soldier straightened himself up and said:

“Surrender? No, sir. I have too many good fighting men for that.”

But General Grant had more, and so, as I told you, General Lee saw
this at last, and to stop the killing of any more brave men, he gave it
up—that is, he surrendered.

It all came to an end at last at a place called Appomattox Court
House, in Virginia. It was on the ninth day of April, 1865. The two
Generals met between the lines at a farm-house near an apple orchard,
and talked it all over. Both were glad to stop fighting; both were
proud of the heroism of their own men, and proud, also, of the courage
of the other side, for all were Americans.

General Grant said to General Lee, “If you will only promise for
yourself and your soldiers not to fight any more against the United
States, that is all I ask.’

General Lee promised, and so the greatest civil war that ever was
fought was ended in the kindest way just because both the leaders were
great as well as good, and when they made a promise would keep it.

Then General Lee rode back to his army and told his men what he
had done. ‘‘The war is over,” he said.

But when his soldiers heard it, although they were hungry and sick
and tired out and weary with so much fighting, they crowded about
their good General when he came back from arranging things with
General Grant, and cried like children.

‘General, take back that word,” cried one. ‘We'll die, but we won’t
surrender.”

General Lee looked on the brave men lovingly.

‘No, no,” he said. ‘We have done all brave men can do. If I let
another brave man be killed I should be a murderer. Go home to your



88 ROBERT E. LEE.

wives and children; whatever may be my fate, you will be safe. God
bless you all. Good-by!”

And then he turned and went into his tent.

After President Lincoln was killed, there was some fear that the new
President would do some harm to General Lee, because he had been the
leader of the Confederate soldiers. But General Grant stood up boldly
and said:

“You must not touch him. I gave him my solemn promise that he
should not be touched, and you must not let me break my word.”

So the great and terrible Civil War in the United States came to an
end. Peace was in the land, and as men looked back and thought it all
over, the one man who stood out before all the world as the greatest
soldier of the South in all that long and bloody war was Robert H. Lee,
the General of its Army, the son of brave ‘“Light-horse” Harry Lee.

When peace came and the soldiers had nothing to do in the way of
war, General Lee went home a poor man. He had lost almost all he
owned in those four dreadful years of war.

But the people of his own State loved and honored him so much that
they made him the head of one of the best schools in Virginia—Wash-
ington College. And as soon as it .was known that General Lee was to
be the President of the College, young men flocked to it so that they
might say they had General Lee for a teacher. He was as good a lesson
himself as anything they could learn from books. Do you know how?
He was so fine a man that they looked up to him and tried to be as good
and true and noble as he was.

For five years he lived as President of Washington College. Then, on
the twelfth day of October, 1870, he died, there among his students and
his books, a noble old man of sixty-three.

He was a great soldier and a great man. He was such a good man,
too. He loved little children dearly and always saluted every boy or
girl who-bowed or courtesied to him as he rode through the streets on
his splendid big horse, ‘“‘ Traveler.”

Once he came upon some boys he knew who were quarreling.
Indeed, they called each other names, and began to fight.

“Oh, General!” cried a little girl, running up to him, “ please don’t
let them fight.”



ROBERT E. LEE. 89

The General took the boys by the shoulder.

“Come, boys, boys!” he said, gently. ‘That isn’t nice. There is
some better way to settle your quarrels than with your fists.”

And how he did love little girls.

‘Where is my little Miss Mildred?” he would ask when he got home
from a ride or a walk, as the night was coming on. ‘She is my light-
bearer. The house is never dark if she is in it.”

Was not that a sweet and pretty way to speak about his little
daughter? Do you wonder that the children all loved him?

What made General Lee a great soldier was because he knew how to
lead a smaller number of soldiers against a larger number and defeat the
enemy by not letting them know what he was doing until he had done it.

This is what is called strategy. It was by this that General Wash-
ington won many battles in the Revolution, and in the same way
General Lee was victorious over and over again in the Civil War.

But he won quite as much by his great, gentle heart as by his flashing
sword. After the war was over people loved him dearly, and since his
death they have loved him even more, because, as they look back and
see how good and grand a man he was, they forget that he failed; they
only remember how hard he tried and how well he did. All through the
South he loved so well and which loved him so much, statues, to-day,
are being built to keep alive the memory of his life.

To-day, North as well as South, all America honors him, and as the
years go by the boys and girls, who, as they grow up, will hear his name
and know his story, will think of him not as Lee the Confederate General,
but as Robert E. Lee, the soldier, the gentleman, the American.



eine nteraccranegene cial




BENJASIUN
FRANKLIN,

The Candlemaker’s Son, who with
his Kite Discovered that Electricity
FRANKLIN’S KITE LEADS THE

Be HO da OD REN ae is the cause of Lightning.
OF ELECTRICITY.

ID any of my little readers ever look at a lightning rod putting up
from the roof of a house, and do you know what that lightning
rod is for? I will tell you. When you hear the thunder in the heavens,
there is a strange force which darts out in zigzag lines of fire, and if it
strikes anything like a tree or a house, it tears it to pieces, and perhaps
sets it on fire; but if it strikes a person or an animal, it does not break
even the skin, but passes through them in the twinkling of an eye and
kills them. This strange force most people call lightning, and the
lightning rod is put on the house to catch it and carry it down into the
earth before it strikes the building.
Two hundred years ago nobody knew how to catch the lightning, and
everybody stood in great dread of it. Now we know how to catch it

and carry it away from our houses, and we also know how to make it
(90)



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 91

run along wires and carry messages from one friend to another so fast
that, if you were a thousand miles away, your friend, if he were at the
end of the wire, would be receiving the message while you were at the
other end sending it.

We have also learned how to make it carry even the human voice for
a thousand miles, so that if you were in New York you might step up
to a little box, called the telephone, and talk into it, and your mother,
father, or friend could hear your words plainly in Chicago, nearly a
thousand miles away. It would pass so quickly that you and they could
talk back and forth almost as easy and quickly as if you were in the
game room. We also make this wonderful force pull our street-cars
through the great cities, thus setting free the horses that used to have
to do it. Wealso make it light our streets and houses, and we call it
electricity.

Is this not a very strange and a very wonderful power? And would
you not like to hear the story of the great man who first caught from the
skies this vivid, flashing lightning, and found out that he could harness
it, almost as easily as we can harness a horse, and make the very thing
which people had always dreaded as a terrible destroyer, the best friend
and servant of man? Did you say you would like to hear his story? 1
will tell it to you. His name was Benjamin Franklin.

A very long time ago, perhaps about four hundred years, there lived
in Northhamptonshire, England, a poor blacksmith whose name was
Franklin. In that country at that time, the oldest son always followed
the same trade or work which his father followed. So the oldest son in
the Franklin family always became a blacksmith, and he always got
the property which belonged to his father when the father died. The
other children had to get out and shift for themselves. The youngest
son in one of the large Franklin families was named Josiah. He couldn’t
bea blacksmith, as his older brother took up that business and inherited
his father’s shop. So Josiah went out and gave himself to a man who
made soap and tallow candles, and agreed to serve him, without any
pay except his board and clothes, until he was twenty-one years of age,

‘All this he did that he might learn the trade of a soap-boiler and candle-
maker. When he was twenty-one his employer gave him, as was the
custom, a new suit of clothes, a few dollars for his personal use, and a



92 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

letter saying that he had learned his trade well. With that letter to
show, young Josiah was able to go and hire himself to work where he
could get pay for his labor. The hired man nearly always lived in his
employer’s family, and received his board and a few dollars per month.

After a little while, Josiah was married and continued to live in England
and work at his trade until his wages were hardly sufficient to support
himself, his wife and three children on the coarsest kind of food. He
did, however, save up, in his earlier years, a little money, and the stories
of the New World—America—kept coming to his ears. He heard that
there were few candlemakers and soap-boilers in America, and that a
young man who understood his trade would have a much better chance
here than in England; so in the year 1682, a little more than two
hundred years ago, he took his wife and three children, and such
clothing, bedding and household things as they could bring, on board
a big sailing vessel and came to America. He landed in Boston, and
soon set himself up as a soap and candlemaker. He found it much
easier to support his family here than in the old country, and he became
very much in love with his new home.

In the year 1706, twenty-four years after Josiah Franklin and his wife
and three children came to America, a little baby boy was born. Like
his father, he proved to be the last child in the family, and his father
named him Benjamin. You remember Jacob’s youngest son was named
Benjamin. But Ben Franklin had sixteen brothers and sisters older
than himself. Don’t you think that was a big family ? Seventeen boys
and girls besides the mother and father! But you must remember they
were not all then in the house. The oldest of his brothers were nearly
thirty years of age when he was born, and they had gone into various
kinds of business for themselves.

Benjamin was a good boy and his father loved him very much;
you know how parents often love their youngest the best. The little
fellow learned to read when he was very young, but he was only sent to
school for two years, and then he was taken away, when he was only
ten years of age, to work in his father’s candle-shop. His business was

- to cut wicks for the candles, fill the moulds with the melted tallow, tend

the shop and run the errands. But ‘Ben,’ as he was called, did not
like this business. He would very much rather look in picture books



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 93

and read the easy, stories. He always loved to go down to the water’s

edge, and he
very quickly,
to save some
jump in a boat
the boys.

handle a boat
swimmer. He §

about far-away
countries, and
the strange peo-
ple and wonder-
ful sights, and he

thought it would be a splendid §
thing to be a sailor, and he told F
his father how much he would §

like to be one and go to sea.

But his father would not con-§

sent, and so Benjamin, like an
obedient son, gave it up, though
he often lay awake at nights










often did an errand
running all the way
time, that he might
or go swimming with

Thus he learned to
and to be an expert
heard the sailors talk

BEN FRANKLIN MOULDING CANDLES IN HIS
: FATHER’S SHOP.

and thought how grand it would be to



94 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

bound over the great billows and to visit all the countries of the world.
Sometimes he would dream he was away on the ocean, and would wake
up to find himself in his own little bed.

Franklin was also a great lover of fishing. Hvery chance he got, he
and his little boy companions would get their lines, and, rolling up their
pants, would wade into the marsh and fish in a mill-pond. Sometimes
the water was too cold, and besides he had heard it was not healthy to
stand in the water. So he said to the boys that it would be a good
thing to build a wharf to stand on as the men did for their work about
the water. They all thought so too.

There was a pile of stones not far away which were to be used to build
a new house. So they said the men could get more for themselves, or,
perhaps, they had more than they wanted; and in the evening, when
the men quit work, the boys slipped out—for they knew it was not just
right—and they carried enough of these stones away to make them a
good pier far out into the water.

Next day when the workmen came they wondered where their rocks
had gone. Upon searching around, they found what the mischievous
boys had done, and, as they had seen them there often fishing, they knew
just who had done it and went straight to their parents about it. Some
of the mothers and fathers only laughed, but Mr. Franklin took Ben aside
and began to lecture him. Ben tried to argue with his father that the
pier was very necessary as it kept the boys’ feet dry while they fished,
and he pretended to think it was a good thing they had done. But Mr.
Franklin told him that nothing was good or right that was not honest,
and, to impress the lesson on his mind, he gave Benjamin a sound
thrashing and forbade his fishing there any more. Ever after that, Ben
was an honest boy and an upright man.

But Ben did not get over his desire to go to sea. He did not dare to
ask permission, but he was always talking about what the sailors said,
and using words which showed he had learned the different sails and
much about ships. So his father grew afraid that his son would run
away and go to sea as one of his other sons had already done. One day
after Ben had been in the tallow-candle shop for two years—and was
now ten years old—his father began to talk with him about other trades.
He took him frequently to walk and they would stop to look at different



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 95

kinds of workmen, such as bricklayers, carpenters, iron-workers and
many others. He hoped the boy would like some of these better than
the life of a sailor, but Benjamin did not care for any of them.

By this time he had, however, grown very fond of reading. He
poured over his father’s dull books and sold little things of his own to
buy more. Often he would trade his old books at the second-hand book-
stores for others he had not read. So Mr. Franklin, seeing he was so
fond of reading books, thought it was best to make a printer of him.
His oldest son, James Franklin, already had a printing office and press.
Benjamin said he would like this trade, so he was apprenticed to his
brother to learn it.

When we say Ben was “apprenticed” we mean he was given to
his brother to have as his own until he should be twenty-one years
old. He was to work for his brother without any pay, except his
board and clothing. As Benjamin was about eleven years old now, he
would have to serve his brother for ten years to learn his trade. Ben-
jamin liked this trade very much. He got to see many new books and
could always borrow all he wanted, and used to sit up sometimes all night
to read a book so he could return it, unsoiled, to the store in the morning.

The boy took a great fancy to poetry and at odd moments wrote some
verses himself. When he had quite a lot, he showed it to his brother
James. Certainly it was, as Franklin afterwards called it, “wretched
stuff,” but James printed it and sent Ben around Boston to peddle it.
He was doing this with much pride when his father laughed at him and
made fun of his poetry, and told him he would always be a beggar if he
wrote verses for a living. He stopped short his writing and peddling
poetry. But he was bound to write, for he loved to do it, and I will
tell you how he played a nice trick off on his brother:

James Franklin published a little newspaper. It was Ben’s duty
after the paper was printed to carry loads of them around and deliver
them to the subscribers. The boy read this paper, and he thought he
could write as well as many whose articles were published in it. But he
would not dare to ask his brother James to let him write, nor would he
let anyone know what he wrote. His father would be sure to make fun,
as he did of his poetry, if he sawit. So he‘wrote almost every week and
slipped his pieces under the office door after it was closed. James



96 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

printed them and his father read them, but they did not dream that Ben
wrote them.

Now I will tell you of a way he saved money to buy books. Remem-
ber he got no wages for his work, but he always had money. A boy is
not of much account if he does not have money. When you see a boy

; always going around
without a cent, it is a
pretty good sign he
will never save any-
thing. Franklin had
got the notion that
it was wrong to eat
meat. Now, his
brother paid his
board, you know. So
the boy told his broth-
er if he would give
him half what his
board cost he would
board himself. As
that would save
James something, he
agreed. Benjamin
, quit eating meat and
lived on bread and
other cheap foods.
Thus, he saved money
to buy books, and by
eating only a bit of
bread and a tart for
dinner he had half an hour every day, while the others were eating
heavy dinners, to devote to reading; and this is the way he educated
himself.

Would you think it strange if I told you that Benjamin did not like
his brother James? It is a*fact, he did not. They often quarrelled, for



THE BOY FRANKLIN SLIPPING HIS CONTRIBUTION TO
THE PAPER UNDER THE OFFICE DOOR,



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 97

James did not treat his little brother right and sometimes gave him
beatings. I will tell you how he got free from hin.

One day James printed something in his paper which made the Goy-
ernor of the Colony mad. They arrested him and put him in jail for a whole
month. Benjamin published the paper while his brother was in prison,
and he said some very ugly things about the government, but was careful
not to say anything for which they could get him in prison. This pleased
James very much. But when they let him out of prison they forbade his
publishing the paper any longer. Nowwhat was Jamestodo? Hewasa
shrewd business man, so he said to Benjamin that he would set him free
and run the paper in his name. So they destroyed the papers that
bound the boy in law. Ben, however, said he would remain with his
brother until he was twenty-one years old. This agreement was made
and so it started, but soon James tried to impose on Ben as he had
done before; but as Ben was no longer bound to him, he left him. Ben
afterwards said that he did not do fairly in this, and he was sorry for it,
though it was, perhaps, nothing more than James deserved.

Benjamin now tried to hire himself to other printers; but none of
them would take him because he had broken his contract with his
brother. Besides they had all agreed together that when one of their
apprentices left, none of the others should hire him.

What was he to do? He was only seventeen years old, but he was
not to be discouraged. Gathering a few of his books, he went aboard a
sloop setting sail for New York. In that city he tried for days, but
could get no work. Someone told him to try Philadelphia. It was
a tedious and dangerous journey as it must be made by water. There
were no railroads then. He took a sail-boat to Amboy, New Jersey,
A storm came up and the boat was driven ashore, and the poor fright-
ened boy lay all night in the little hold of the boat with the waves
dashing over it, and the water, leaking through, soaked him to the skin.
It took him thirty-two hours to get to Amboy, and all that time he had
neither a drink of water nor a bite to eat.

Having very little money he set out on foot and walked to Burlington.
Here he was met by trouble he had not looked for. His ragged clothes,
wet and soiled, made him look like what we now call a tramp; but

there were no tramps in those days. They thought he was a runaway
7 .



98 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

and came very near putting him in jail, and he says he was then sorry
he had not remained in Boston with his brother James.

But it was now too late to: go back, so he found a man with a row-boat
at Burlington who was going to Philadelphia, and Franklin agreed to go
with him and help him row the boat to pay his passage. They arrived
at Philadelphia in the night, but as there were then no street lamps in
the city, they passed by without knowing it. At length they went
ashore and made a fire to dry themselves, and waited until morning
and rowed to the city.

Poor Benjamin Franklin, all soiled, tired and very hungry, started up
the street to find something to eat. He had no trunk or valise for his
extra clothing, so he stuffed his extra stockings and shirt in his pockets.
He soon found a baker shop and asked for biscuits as he used to buy in
Boston. The baker did not know what they were. They did not make
biscuits in Philadelphia. So Franklin asked him to give him threepenny
worth of bread of any kind, as he was very hungry. The baker gave
him three loaves, and, putting one under each arm, he chewed vigorously
on the other as he walked along. Don’t you suppose he looked very odd
and funny walking along the streets in his soiled clothes with his pockets
stuffed with socks and a shirt, a loaf of bread under each arm and eat-
ing another?

Well, so he did. And as he passed along a pretty girl, named De-
borah Read, looked out of the door, and he saw her laughing “‘ fit to kill,”
and making all manner of fun of him. His pride was stung, but he was
too hungry and helpless to do anything then. Many years afterwards he
married this very girl, and she was very fortunate and proud to get him.

Franklin soon found a place to work with a printer named Keimer,
and he very quickly showed that he was quite different from other work-
men and boys about the place. He knew all about printing, so he was
a valuable workman, and he had read and knew so much in books that
those who knew him liked to hear him talk, and they used to refer to
him to settle disputes on all sorts of questions. Instead of spending his
evenings at the tavern drinking or gossiping, as other young men did,
he went to his room and read good books or went in the company of
those of whom he could learn something. Such young men as these
always attract the attention of others.



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YOUNG WASHINGTON, SURVEYOR.
ae STORIES

GREAT AMERICANS

FOR YOUNG AMERICANS

TELLING IN SIMPLE LANGUAGE SUITED TO BOYS AND GIRLS, THE
INSPIRING STORIES OF THE LIVES OF

Gerorce WasHINGTON ABRAHAM LINCOLN
Joun Paut Jones | Uxyssres S. Grant
Benjamin FRANKLIN Jas. A. GarFIELD
Patrick Henry Rosert Futton
Rosert E. Lee Cyrus W. Fietp
GrorcE PEasopy Tuos. A. Epison

By tue Famous WRITER FOR YOUNG AMERICANS

AND THOMAS SHEPPARD MEEK

RICHLY ILLUSTRATED WITH

Six BEAUTIFUL LITHOGRAPHS AND ORIGINAL HALF TONE DRAWINGS

BY EMINENT ARTISTS

JOHN © WINS TON & COK.

PHILADELPHIA: CHICAGO: TORONTO
Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1897, by
W. E. SCULL,
in the office 01 the Librarian of Congress, at Washington,

All rights reserved.

ALL PERSONS ARE WARNED NOT TO INFRINGE UPON OUR COPYRIGHT BY USING EITHER THE
MATTER OR THE PICTURES IN THIS VOLUME,
INTRODUCTION.

There is nothing which our boys and girls so much love to read or
have told to them as true stories of the lives of great and noble people.
This is what this book does. It deals especially with the early life of
each of twelve great men. It shows what were their natures and
their habits when they were boys. It tells about their mothers and
fathers and their homes; it tells of the circumstances which surrounded
them and relates scores of incidents of their boyhood days, their daily
doings, their jolly sports, their trials and difficulties and how they met
and overcame them. It shows us what books they read, what schooling
they had, how they came to be great and famous men and the wonderful
things they did in the world. This volume really composes twelve books
_ —each one a separate and complete child’s life of a great man.

Every boy and girl who reads this inspiring volume will want to get
out and do something in the world. It is as charming and entertaining
as a fairy tale, but every word of it is true history written in easy lan-

guage for the boys and girls of America.
11
CONTENTS.

GEORGE WASHINGTON—His BoyHoop Days anp How HE BECAME THE
FatuHer oF His Country

JOHN PAUL JONES—Tue Puvucky Litrire ScorcHMAN WHO REMOVED TO
AMERICA AND BECAME CAPTAIN OF OUR Navy

ABRAHAM LINCOLN—Tue Poor Boy, THE NoBteE Man, THE PRESERVER
OF THE UNION

ULYSSES S. GRANT—Tuer Farmer Boy Aanp THE HerRO OF THE GREATEST
oF MopERN Wars

ROBERT E. LEE—Tur Nosie Boy, Brave Sotprer AND Moprit Man. THE
IpoL oF THE SOUTH .

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN—TueEe CanpLeMAKeEr’s Son wuo, witH His KITE
DIscovVERED LIGHTNING TO BE THE SAME AS ELECTRICITY

PATRICK HENRY—Wuo From A Farmer Boy BECAME A LAWYER AND THE
- Famous ORATOR OF THE REVOLUTION

ROBERT FULTON—THE Turxkinge Boy. THe BumpER OF THE First
SuccESSFUL STEAMBOAT

GEORGE PEABODY—Tue Boy CLERK wHo, WHEN HE Diep, Lerr MILLIons
ro CHaAriry. AmeERIcA’s First PHILANTHROPIST

THOMAS A. EDISON—Tue GREATEST ELECTRICIAN OF THE WORLD

JAMES A. GARFIELD—Tue Boy on THE CANAL Boat. THE SEeconp MARTYR
PRESIDENT

CYRUS W. FIELD—TueE Perseverine Boy, THE Man woo Lai THE AT-
LANTIC CABLE : é
12

PAGE

sf

32

45

60

74

90

112

133

147

163

182

196
List of Illustrations.



George Washington’s Inaugural Procession.. ..
Young George Washington Riding a Colt.....
General Braddock’s Defeat........--. ..+--+--
George Washington Crossing the Delaware... -
General Washington at Valley Forge........-.
George Washington's Inauguration...........
George Washington’s Bedroom, Mount Vernon,

inkwhichwhe Diedueiiaseeee oceten crosses
John Paul Jones as a Sailor Boy.............-
John Paul Jones’ Men at Sea................
J. P. Jones Approaching Whitehaven........
J. P. Jones’ Men Ashore—Whitehaven......
British Captain Surrendering Sword..........
Abraham Lincoln’s First Home...............
The Boy Lincoln Studying...................
Abraham Lincoln the Wrestler...............
Abraham Lincoln, as Hired Man, Telling a Story
Abraham Lincoln Keeping Store.............
Abraham Lincoln on the Flatboat............
Abraham Lincoln Entering Richmond........
Ulysses S. Grant’s Childhood......-.........
Ulysses Grant after the Battle of Belmont....
Ulysses Grant at Shiloh
Ulysses Grant at Windsor Castle.............
Ulysses S. Grant in Japan.............2..00%
General Grant’s House, New York, 1885.....
President Grant’s Funeral Procession.........
Robert H. Thee’as Cadet... .22...3. 20.0.0
Young Lee Riding in Front of ‘‘ Stafford,’ Va.
‘Lee always to be found where the fighting was

thesfiercestaeme iri sceins Sagi e acne ars
Captain Lee at Cerro Gordo..........2..2065
General Lee Fortifying Richmond............
““He waved his sword above his head and

dashed to the front’? ...-......2...0000-
Franklin’s Kite Leads the Way to the Modern

Wser of Hlectricitycenerc sees e cist.
Ben Franklin Moulding Candles in his Father's

Franklin Slipping his Contributions to thePaper
under the Office Door,...



PAGE
17 ] Old-style Printing Press..........0-+e0--0--
19 | Independence Hall, Philadelphia...........-.
21 | Dr. Benjamin Franklin as Minister to Trance. .
24 | Franklin’s Grave, Corner Fifth and Arch Sts.,
26 ‘Philadelphiaeseycemtrmerrspsitesaeren tet
285 oi PatricksElennynvsisa)salerivertercnestelsanapecrsista creas
Patrick Henry Shooting a Deer..............
30 | ‘‘ Often at the country parties he played the
3 fiddle for many a jolly ‘Old Virginia
34 IRiee | iigaacerciphsetneete sane acictie) afer auetse mee y ements
36 | ‘‘Many a day you might have seen Patrick
38 plowing among the stumps in his ‘ New
43 GOT HORE SNARE a Seaman
45 | A Typical Virginia Courthouse in the Days of
48 Patrick: Henrys: .accseeees. a oS Cri eT
49 | An Old Virginia Mansion, common in the Time
51 ofp Patricksllenry eee on ee ee
53 | Development of Steam Navigation Following
56 Mul tonts)2Discovenyasiccs eect aeiie see
OM VObEeKemHaltone rien sere eee NN Te
61 | What You Would See To-day at a Steamboat
63 Landing on the Mississippi River........
65 | “Chicago,”’ one of the ‘‘ White Squadron”’
67 Warships of the United States...........
69 | Model of a Modern U. S. Man-of-War........
dia kGeorgesPeabodyaaqneeet cece eee eee
72 | The Bullock-Hoe Perfecting Press...........
74 | Memorial Hall, Harvard College........-....
T6s\e@hapelvofeValecCollezevscs.- seas cnins seeee
Thomas Alva Edison at Four Years of Age...
78 | The Birthplace of Thomas A. Edison, at Milan,
80 OURTO Rises see inte Neo Sua te banal an yaaa:
83 | Thomas A. Edison when Publisher of the
‘* Grand Trunk Herald,”’ Fifteen Years Old
86 | Shop in which the First Morse Instrument was
Constructed for Exhibition before Congress
90 | Listening to the Phonograph................
Thomas A. Hdison at Fifty Years of Age.....
93 | President James A. Garfield.................
Garfield’s Birthplace and the Home of his
96 Childhoodseauts-ceneucre nites

13

116

141

143
146
147
155
157
160
163

170

175
179
181
182
Full-page Color Plates.

Youne GEorGE Wasnineton, SuRvEyor.

Joun Paut Jones, First Caprain in rue U. S. Navy.

ApraHam Lincozn, Raru-spiirrer.

U. S. Grant on tue Fietp, Last Yrar ae THE War.

On tHe Eve or Gerryspurnc—GeneraL Len Directinc tHe Barrie.

Tomas A. Epison rx His Laporarory.

14


INAUGURAL PROCESSION.



The Inspiring History

OF



GEORGE WASHINGTON,

First President of the United States.

[)° you know what the twenty-second of February is? It is the
birthday of George Washington. Do you know who George
Washington was? He was the greatest and best man that ever

lived in this dear home-land of yours, which you call America.

He had no little boys or girls of his own, but he has always been
called ‘The Father of His Country.” Do you know why people call him
that? Let me tell you how he got this name.

Many years ago, on the twenty-second of February, in the year 1732,
a little baby was born in a comfortable-looking old farm-house down in
Virginia. This baby was named George Washington.

His father was a farmer, who planted and raised and sold large crops

2 (17)
18 GEORGE WASHINGTON.

of tobacco in the fields about his house. These fields were called planta-
tions, and George Washington’s father was what is called a planter.

The name of George’s father was Augustine Washington. His mother’s
name was Mary Washington. She was a very wise and good woman,
and George loved her dearly.

When George was a very small boy, his father died and he was brought
up by his mother in a nice, old farm-house on the banks of the Rappa-
hannock River, just opposite the town of Fredericksburg. Ask some
one to show you just where that is on the map.

George was a good boy. He was honest, truthful, obedient, bold and
strong. He could jump the farthest, run the fastest, climb the highest,
wrestle the best, ride the swiftest, swim the longest, and “stump” all
the other boys he played with. They all liked him, for he was gentle,
kind and brave; he never was mean, never got ‘‘mad,” and never told
a lie.

His mother had a sorrel colt that she thought very much of, because
it came of splendid stock, and, if once trained, would be a fine and fast
horse. But the colt was wild and vicious, and people said it could never
be trained. One summer morning, young George, with three or four
boys, were in the field looking at the colt, and, when the boys said again
that it could never be tamed, George said: ‘‘ You help me get on his back
and I’ll tame him.”

After hard work they got a bridle-bit in the colt’s mouth and put
young George on its back. Then began a fight. The colt reared and
kicked and plunged, and tried to throw George off. But George stuck
on and finally conquered the colt so that he drove it about the field.
But in a last mad plunge to free itself from this determined boy on its
back, the colt burst a blood-vessel and fell to the ground dead.

Then the boys felt’ worried, you may be sure. But while they were
wondering what George’s mother would say, the boy went straight to the
house determined to tell the truth.

“Mother,” he said, ‘your colt is dead.”

“Dead!” said his mother. ‘“ Who killed it?”

“T did,” said George, and then he told her the whole story.

His mother looked at him a moment, then she said: ‘It is well, my
son. I am sorry to lose the colt; it would have been a fine horse, but I
GHORGE WASHINGTON. 19

am proud to know that my son never tries to put the blame of his acts
upon others, and always speaks the truth.”

So you see, that early in his life, this boy was one to be depended upon.
This story, too, shows you that besides his being so truthful and honest,
young George Washington did not give up trying to do a thing until he



YOUNG WASHINGTON RIDING A COLT,

had succeeded. He was bound to tame that fierce sorrel colt, and he
stuck to it until he had conquered the animal, instead of letting it
conquer him.

He loved the woods, and he loved the water. He wanted to be a
sailor, but when he saw that his mother did not wish him to go away to
sea, he said: ‘All right, mother,” and he staid at home to help her on
her farm.
20 GEORGE WASHINGTON.

When he was sixteen years old he gave up going to school and became
a surveyor. A surveyor is one who goes around measuring land, so that
men can know just how much they own and just where the lines run
that divide it from other people’s land.

This work kept George out of doors most of the time, and made him
healthy and big and strong. He went off into the woods and over the
mountains, surveying land for the owners. He lived among Indians and
bears and hunters, and became a great hunter himself. He was a fine-
looking young fellow then. He was almost six feet tall. He was strong
and active, and could stand almost anything in the way of out-of-door
dangers and experiences. He had light brown hair, blue eyes and a
frank face, and he had such a nice, firm way about him, although he was
quiet and never talked much, that people always believed what he said,
and those who worked with him were always ready and willing to do
just as he told them.

When he was a boy it took a brave man to be a surveyor. He had to
live in the forests, in all sorts of dangers and risks; he had to meet all
kinds of people, and settle disputes about who owned the land, when
those who were quarreling about it would be very angry with the sur-
veyor. But young George Washington always won in the end, and his
work was so well done that some of his records and measurements have
not been changed from that day to this.

He liked the work, because he liked the free life of the woods and
mountains. He liked to hunt and swim and ride and row, and all these
things and all these rough experiences helped him greatly to be a bold,
healthy, active and courageous man, when the time came for him to be
a leader and a soldier.

People liked him so much that when there was trouble between the
two nations that owned almost all the land in America when he was a
boy, he was sent with a party to try and settle a quarrel as to which
nation owned the land west of Virginia, in what is now called Ohio.

These two nations were France and England. Their Kings were far
over the Atlantic Ocean. Virginia and all the country between the
mountains and the sea, from Maine to Georgia, belonged to the King of
England. There was no President then; there were no United States.

George Washington went off to the Ohio country and tried to settle


GEORGE WASHINGTON. 21

the quarrel, but the French soldiers would not settle it as the English
wished them to. They built forts in the country, and said they meant
to keep it all for the King of France.

So George Washington was sent out again. This time he had a lot
of soldiers with him, to drive the French away from their forts. The



BRADDOCK’S DEFEAT.

French soldiers would not give in, and Washington and his soldiers had
a fight with the French and whipped them.

Then the French King sent more soldiers and built more forts, and the
English King sent more soldiers, and there was war in the land.

War is a terrible thing, but sometimes it has to be made. The King
of Kngland was very angry with the French, and he sent over soldiers
22 GEORGE WASHINGTON.

from England to fight the French. They were led by a British general,
whose name was Braddock. He was a brave man, but he thought he
knew how to do everything, and he would not let anyone else tell him
how he ought to act. But he had never fought in such a land as Amer-
ica, where there were great forests and Indians, and other things very
different from what he was used to.

George Washington knew that if General Braddock and the British
soldiers wished to whip the French and the Indians, who were on the
French side, they must be very careful when they were marching through
the forests to battle. He tried to make General Braddock see this, too,
but the British General thought he knew best, and he told Washington
to mind his own business.

So the British soldiers marched through the forests just as if they were
parading down Broadway. They looked very tine, but they were not
careful of themselves, and one day, in the midst of the forest, the French
and Indians, who were hiding behind trees waiting for them, sprang out
upon them and surprised them, and surrounded them and fired guns at
them from the thick, dark woods.

The British were caught in a trap. They did not know what to do.
General Braddock was killed; so were many of his soldiers, and they
would all have been killed or taken prisoners if George Washington had
not been there. He knew just what to do. He fought bravely, and
when the British soldiers ran away, he and his Americans kept back the
French and Indians and saved the British army.

But it was a terrible defeat for the soldiers of the King of England.
He had to send more soldiers to America and to fight a long time. But
at last his soldiers were successful, and, thanks to Colonel Washington,
as he was now called, the English lands were saved and the French were
driven away.

After the war was over, George Washington married a wife. All .
American boys and girls know her name. It was Martha Washington.

They went to live in a beautiful house on the banks of the Potomac
River, in Virginia. It is called Mount Vernon. It was Washington's
home all the rest of his life. The house is still standing, and people
nowadays go to visit this beautiful place, just to see the spot that every-
one thinks so much of because it was the home of Washington, Perhaps,
GEORGE WASHINGTON. 23

some day, you will see it. You will think it is a beautiful place, 1 am
sure.

While Washington was looking after his great farm at Mount Vernon,
things were becoming very bad in America.

The King of England said the people in America must do as he told
them, and not as they wished. But the Americans said that the King
was acting very wrongly toward them, and that they would not stand it.

They did not. When the King’s soldiers tried to make them do as
the King ordered, they said they would die rather than yield, and in a
place called Lexington, in Massachusetts, some of the Americans took
their guns and tried to drive off the British soldiers.

This is what is called rebellion. It made the King of England very
angry, and he sent over ships full of soldiers to make the Americans
mind.

But the Americans would not. The men in the thirteen different parts
of the country—called the thirteen colonies—got together and said they
would fight the King’s soldiers, if the King tried to make them do as he
wished. Sothey got up an army and sent it to Massachusetts, and there
they had a famous battle with the King’s soldiers, called the Battle of
Bunker Hill.

After the battle, the leading men in the colonies saw that they must
put a brave man at the head of their army. There was but one man
they thought of for this. You know who—George Washington.

He rode all the way from Mount Vernon, in Virginia, to Cambridge,
in Massachusetts, on horseback, because, you know, they had no steam-
cars or steamboats in those days. As he was riding through Connecticut,
with a few soldiers as his guard, a man came galloping across the coun-
try, telling people how the Battle of Bunker Hill had been fought. The
British soldiers had driven the Americans from the fort, and said they
had won. But it had been hard work for the soldiers of the King.

Washington stopped the rider, and asked him why the Americans had
been driven out of the fort.

“ Because they had no powder and shot left,” replied the messenger.

“ And did they stand the fire of the British guns as long as they could
fire back?” asked Washington.
24 GEORGE WASHINGTON.

“That they did,” replied the horseman. ‘They waited, too, until the
British were close to the fort, before they fired.”

That was what Washington wished to know. He felt certain that if
the American ONE boys who stood out against the King’s soldiers did

pcs

not get frightened
or timid in the face
of the trained sol-
diers of the King,
that they would be
the kind of soldiers
he needed to win
with.

He turned to his
companions, “Then
the liberties of the

_ country are safe,”
he said, and rode
on to Cambridge to
take command of

' the army.

If ever you go to
Cambridge, in Mas-
sachusetts, you can
see the tree under
which Washington
sat on horseback,
when he took com-
mand of the Ameri-
can army.



WASHINGTON CROSSING THE DELAWARE. It is an old, old
tree now, but every-

body loves to look at it and to think of the splendid-looking soldier, in
his uniform of buff and blue, who, on a July day, long, long ago, sat his
horse so gallantly beneath that shady elm, and looked at the brave men
who were to be his soldiers, and by whose help he hoped to make his

native land a free and independent nation,
GEORGE WASHINGTON. 25

So, at his camp at Cambridge, he drilled his army of farmers and
fishermen, and when it was ready, he drove the British away from Bos-
ton without a battle, when all the American leaders met in the City of
Philadelphia and said they would obey the King of England no longer,
but would set up a nation of their own.

They called this new nation the United States of America, and they
signed a paper that told all the world that the men of America would no
longer obey the King of England, but would be free, even if they had to
fight for their freedom. You know what this great paper they signed is
called—the Declaration of Independence.

The day that they decided to do this is now the greatest day in all
America. You remember it every year, and celebrate it with fire-crackers
and fire-works and flags, and no school. It is the Fourth of July.

Well, the King of England was very angry at this. He sent more
ships and soldiers over the sea to America, and there was a long and
bloody war. It was called the American Revolution.

There was fighting for seven years, and, through it all, the chief man
in America, the man who led the soldiers and fought the British, and
never gave up, nor ever let himself or his soldiers grow afraid, even when
he was beaten, was General George Washington.

If the British drove him away from one place, he marched to another,
and he fought and marched, and kept his army brave and determined,
even when they were ragged and tired, and everything looked as if the
British would be successful.

When the British whipped him in the Battle of Long Island, at Brook-
lyn, and thought they had caught all the American army, Washington,
one stormy night, got all his soldiers safely across the river to New York,
and the British had to follow and fight. And, again, when it looked as
if the Americans must surely give in, Washington took his soldiers, one
terrible winter’s night, across the Delaware River and fell upon the
British, when they were not expecting him, and won the Battle of Trenton.

There were many hard and bitter days for George Washington through
these years of fighting. One winter, especially, was very bad. The
British soldiers seemed victorious everywhere. They held the chief cities
of New York and Philadelphia, and the weak American army was half-
starved, cold and shivering in a place in Pennsylvania called Valley
26

GEORGE WASHINGTON.

Forge. Washington was there, too, and it took all his strength and all
his heart to keep his soldiers together and make them believe that, if
they would only “stick to it,” they would beat the British at last. But

when their log huts
snow, and they had
to keep them warm,
from being hungry, it
soldiers to see victory
not been for Wash-
can army would have
to that dreadful win-

But he held it
spring came, marched
Forge. Part of his

the British at a place i

House,and was almost
back, when General
lopingup. Hestopped
running away; he
diers to help them, and

WASHINGTON AT VALLEY FORGE.






were all covered with
hardly clothes enough
or food to keep them
was not easy for the
ahead, and, if it had
ington, the Ameri-
melted away, owing
ter at Valley Forge.

together, and when
away from Valley
army were attacked by
called Monmouth Court
beaten and driven
Washington came gal-|

_» «. the soldiers who were

brought up other sol-
he fought so boldly

and bravely, and was so determined, that at last he drove off the
British, and won the important battle of Monmouth.
You see, Washington simply would not give in when people told him
GEORGE WASHINGTON. 27

he would have to, and that the British would get all the cities and towns.
He said that the country was large, and, that sooner than give in, he
would go with his soldiers into the mountains and keep up the war until
the British were so sick of it that they would finally go away.

So he kept on marching and fighting, and never giving in, even when
things looked worst, and, at last, on the 19th of October, in the year 1781,
he captured the whole British army, at a place called Yorktown, in Vir-
ginia, and the Revolution was ended.

So the United States won their freedom. They have been a great
nation ever since, and every American, from that day to this, knows that
they gained their freedom because they had such a great, brave, noble,
patriotic, strong and glorious leader as General George Washington.

After the Revolution was over, and Washington had said good-bye to
his soldiers and his generals, he went back to Mount Vernon and became
a farmer again. :

But the people of America would not let him stay a farmer. They got

together again in Philadelphia, and, after much thought and talk, they
drew up a paper that said just how the new nation should be gov ee
This is called the Constitution of the United States.

The Constitution said that, instead of a king, the people should pick
out—elect is what they called it—one man, who should be head man of
the nation for four years at a time. He was to preside over things, and
so he was called the President.

When the time came to elect the first President, there was just one
man in the United States that everybody said must be the President.
Of course you know who this man was—George Washington.

It was a great day for the new nation when he was declared President.
That is what we call being “inaugurated.” All along the way, as he
rode from Mount Vernon to New York, people came out to welcome him.
They fired cannon and rang bells, and made bon-fires and put up arches
and decorations; little girls scattered flowers in his path and sang songs
of greeting, and whenever he came to a town or city, every one turned
out and marched in procession, escorting Washington through their town.

When he came to New York, after he had crossed the bay in a big row
boat, he went in a fine procession to a building called “ Federal Hall,”
on Wall Street, and there he stood, on the front balcony of the building,
28 GEORGE WASHINGTON.

in face of all the people, and, with his hand on an open Bible, he said he
' would be a wise and good and faithful President. Then the Judge, who
had read to him the words he repeated, lifted his hand and cried out:

WASHINGTON’S INAUGURATION.



“Long live George Washington, President of the United States!” A flag.
run up to the cupola of the hall, cannon boomed, bells rang, and all the
people cheered and cheered their hero and general, whom they had now
made the head of the whole nation, :
GEORGE WASHINGTON. 29

So George Washington became President of the United States. He
worked just as hard to make the new nation strong and great and peace-
ful as he did when he led the army in the Revolution.

People had all sorts of things to suggest. Some of these things were
foolish, some were wrong and some would have been certain to have
broken up the United States, and lost all the things for which the coun-
try fought in the Revolution.

But Washington was at the head. He knew just what to do, and he
did it. From the day when, in the City of New York, he was made
President—that is what we call his inauguration—he gave all his thought
and all his time and all his strength to making the United States united
and prosperous and strong. And, when his four years as President were
over, the people would not let him give up, but elected him for their
President for another four years. When Washington was President, the
Capital of the United States was first at New York and afterward at
Philadelphia. Washington and his wife, whom we know of as Martha
Washington, lived in fine style, and made a very noble-looking couple.
They gave receptions every once in a while, to which the people would
come to be introduced and to see the man of whom all the world was
talking. Washington must have been a splendid-looking man then.
He was tall and well-built. He dressed in black velvet, with silver knee
and shoe buckles; his hair was powdered and tied up in what was called
a “queue.” He wore yellow gloves, and held his three-cornered hat in
his hand. A sword, in a polished white-leather sheath, hung at his side,
and he would bow to each one who was introduced to him. He had so
good a memory, that, if he heard a man’s name and saw his face at one
introduction, he could remember and call him by name when he met
him again. But though he was so grand and noble, he was very simple
in his tastes and his talk, and desired to have no title, like prince or
king or duke, but only this—the President of the United States.

His second term as President was just as successful as his first four
years had been. He kept the people from getting into trouble with other
countries; he kept them from war and danger, and quarrels and loss.

But it tired him all out, and made him an old man before his time.
He had given almost all his life to America.

When his second term was ended, the people wished him to be Presi-
30 GEORGE WASHINGTON.

dent for the third time. But he would not. He wrote a long letter to
the people of America. It is called “‘Washington’s Farewell Address.”
He told them they were growing stronger and better, but that he was
worn out and must have rest. He told them that if they would be wise
and peaceful and good, they would become a great nation; and that all
they had fought for and all they had gained would last, if they would
only act right, and they would become great, united and powerful.

So another man was made President, and Washington went back to
his farm at Mount Vernon. He was the greatest, the wisest and the most
famous man in all America. People said it was because of what he had
: done for them
that their country
was free and pow-
erful and strong.
They said that
George Washing-
ton was “The

Father of His
Country.” I think

he was; don’t
you? He was very
glad to get back
to Mount Vernon.
He loved. the
beautiful old place, and he had been away from it eight years. He
liked to be a farmer, with such a great farm to look after as there are
in Virginia. He found very much to do, and he mended and built and
enlarged things and rode over his broad plantations, or received in his
fine old house the visitors who came there to see the greatest man in
all America.

There came a time when he thought he would have to give up this
pleasant life and go to be a soldier once more. Jor there came very near
being a war between France and the United States, and Congress begged
Washington to take command of the army once more. He was made
lieutenant-general and commander-in-chief, and hurried to Philadelphia
to gather his army together. Fortunately the war did not occur, and the



WASHINGTON’S BEDROOM, MOUNT VERNON, IN WHICH HE DIED.
GEORGE WASHINGTON. 31

new nation was saved all that trouble and bloodshed. But Washington
was ready, if needed.

So he went back again to his beloved Mount Vernon. But he did not
long live to enjoy the peace and quiet that were his right. For, one
December day, as he was riding over his farm, he caught cold and had
the croup. He had not the strength that most boys and girls have to
carry him through such a sickness. He was worn out, and, though the
doctors tried hard to save his life, they could not, and in two days he died.
It was a sad day for America—the twelfth day of December, in the year
1799.

All the world was sorry, for all the world had come to look upon
George Washington as the greatest man of the time, Kings and nations
put on mourning for him, and, all over the world, bells tolled, drums
beat and flags were dropped to half-mast, when the news came that
Washington was dead.

When you grow up and go to Mount Vernon, as every American boy and
girl should do some day, you will see his tomb. It is a plain and simple
building, just as plain and simple as he was, and it stands close to his
house, on the green banks of the beautiful Potomac River he loved so much,

Then, sailing up the Potomac, or riding on the steam-cars, you will
come to the beautiful city that is named for this great man—Washing-
ton, the capital of the United States.

There you will see the great white dome of the splendid capitol, the
building in which the American people make laws for the nation that
Washington founded; there is the White House, where all the Presidents
since his day have lived; there is the tall, white monument—the highest
in the world—that the American people have built to honor his memory
and his name.

And in the cities and towns of America are statues and streets and
parks and schools and buildings named after him, and built because all
the world knows that this great American general and President was the
~ best, the noblest and the bravest man that ever lived in all America—
George Washington, “ first in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of his
countrymen.”

Love him, children. Never forget him. Try to be like him. Thus
may you grow to be good men and women, and, therefore, good Americans.
THE ENTERTAINING HISTORY OF

JOHN PauL JONES,

First Captain in the United States Navy.

NCE upon a time there lived in Scotland a poor gardener, who had

a little son. The gardener’s name was John Paul; that was his

son’s name, too. The rich man’s garden that big John took care

of was close by the sea, and little John Paul loved blue water so much
that he spent most of his time near it, and longed to be a sailor.

This blue water that little John Paul loved was the big bay that lies
between Scotland and England. It is called Solway Firth.

_ When little John Paul was born, on the sixth day of July, in the year
1747, both far-away Scotland, in which he lived, and this land of America,
in which you live, were ruled by the King of England.

The gardener’s little son lived in his father’s cottage near the sea until
he was twelve years old. Then he was put to work in a big town, on
the other side of the Solway Firth. This town was called Whitehaven.
It was a very busy place, and ships and sailors were there so much and
in such numbers that this small boy, who had been put into a store,
much preferred to go down to the docks and talk with the seamen, who
had been in so many different lands and seas, and who could tell him
all about the wonderful and curious ;:aces they had seen, and about
their adventures on the great oceans they had sailed over.

He determined to go to sea. He studied all about ships and how to
sail them. He studied and read all the books he could get, and, when

(32)
ee

ne

Sires

JOHN PAUL JONES, FIRST



CAPTAIN IN THE U.S. NAVY.


JOHN PAUL JONES. 33

other boys were asleep or in mischief, little John Paul was learning from
the books he read many things that helped him when he grew older.

At last he had his wish. When he was but thirteen years old, he went
as a sailor boy in a ship called the ‘ Friendship.”

The vessel was bound to Virginia, in America, for a cargo of tobacco,
and the little sailor boy greatly enjoyed the voyage, and was especially
delighted with the new country across the sea, to which he came. He
wished he could live in America, and hoped some day to go there again.



JOHN PAUL JONES AS A SAILOR BOY.

But when this first voyage was over, he returned to Whitehaven, and
to the store, where he worked. But, soon after, the merchant who owned
the store failed in business, and the boy was out of a place and had to
look after himself. So he became a real sailor, this time. For thirteen
years he was a sailor. He was such a good one that before he was twenty

years old he was a captain. This is how he became one. While the
3
34 JOHN PAUL JONES.

ship in which he was sailing was in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, a
terrible fever broke out. The captain died. The mate, who comes next
to the captain, died; all of the sailors were sick, and some of them died.
There was no one who knew about sailing such a big vessel, except
young John Paul. So he took command, and sailed the ship into port
without an accident, and the owners were so glad that they made the
young sailor a sea captain. |



PAUL JONES’ MEN AT SEA.

John Paul had a brother living in Virginia, on the banks of the Rap-
pahannock River. This was the same river beside which George Wash-
ington lived when he was a boy. John Paul visited his brother several
times while he was sailing on his voyages, and he liked the country so
much that, when his brother died, John Paul gave up being a sailor for
a while, and went to live on his brother’s farm.

When he became a farmer, he changed his name to Jones. And so
JOHN PAUL JONES. 35

little John Paul became known ever after, to all the world, as John Paul
Jones.

While he was a farmer in Virginia, the American Revolution broke
out. I have told you about this in the story of General George Wash-
ington, who led the armies of the United States to victory.

John Paul Jones was a sailor even more than he was a farmer. So,
when war came, he wished to fight the British on the sea. This was a
bold thing to do, for there was no nation so powerful on the sea as Eng-
land. The King had a splendid lot of ships of war—almost a thousand.
The United States had none. But John Paul Jones said we must have
one.

Pretty soon the Americans got together five little ships, and sent them
out as the beginning of the American navy, to fight the thousand ships
of England.

John Paul Jones was made first lieutenant of a ship called the Alfred.
The first thing he did was to hoist, for the first time on any ship, the
first American flag. This flag had thirteen red and white stripes, but,
instead of the stars that are now on the flag, it had a pine tree, with a
rattlesnake coiled around it, and underneath were the words: “Don’t
tread on me!”

The British sea captains who did try to tread on that rattlesnake flag
were terribly bitten, for John Paul Jones was a brave man and a bold
sailor. When he was given command of alittle war sloop, called the
Providence, he just kept those British captains so busy trying to catch
him that they could not get any rest. He darted up and down Long Is-
land Sound, carrying soldiers and guns and food to General Washington,
and, although one great British war ship, the Cerberus, tried for weeks
to catch him, it had to give up the chase, for John Paul Jones couldn’t be
caught. For all this good work, this bold sailor was made Captain Jones,
of the United States Navy, and it is said that he was the first captain
made by Congress.

He sailed up and down the coast, hunting for British vessels. He
hunted so well that in one cruise of six weeks he captured sixteen ves-
sels, or “prizes,” as they were called, and destroyed many others. Among
these was one large vessel, loaded with new warm clothing for the British
army. Captain Jones sent the vessel and its whole cargo safely into
36 JOHN PAUL JONES.

port, and the captured clothes were all sent to the American camp, and
were worn by Washington’s ragged soldiers.

The next year Captain Jones sailed away to France in a fine new ship
called the Ranger. Before he sailed out of Portsmouth Harbor, in New
Hampshire, he ‘ran up” to the mast head of the Ranger the first “Stars



JONES APPROACHING WHITEHAVEN, EARLY MORNING.

and Stripes” ever raised over a ship—Washington’s real American flag,
with its thirteen stripes and its thirteen stars.

He went to France and had a talk with Dr. Benjamin Franklin, the
great American who got France to help the United States in the Revo-
lution. Then, after he had sailed through the whole French fleet, and
made them all fire a salute to the American flag—it was the first salute
ever given it by a foreign nation—he steered away for the shores of Eng-
land, and so worried the captains and sailors and storekeepers and peo-
JOHN PAUL JONES. 37

ple of England that they would have given anything to catch him. But
they couldn’t.

The English King and people had not supposed the Americans would
fight. Especially, they did not believe they would dare to fight the
English on the sea, for England was the strongest country in the world
in ships and sailors. So they despised and made fun of “Yankee sailors,”
as they called the Americans. But when Captain John Paul Jones came
sailing in his fine ship, the Ranger, up and down the coasts of England,
eoing right into English harbors, capturing English villages and burning
English ships, the people begun to think differently.

They called Captain Jones a “pirate,” and all sorts of hard names.
But they were very much afraid of him and his stout ship. He was not
a pirate, either. For a pirate is a bold, bad sea robber, who burns ships
and kills sailors just to get the money himself. But John Paul Jones
attacked ships and captured sailors, not for selfish money-getting, but
to show how much Americans could do, and to break the power of the
English navy on the seas. So, this voyage of his, along the shores of
England, taught the Englishmen to respect and fear the American sailors.

After he had captured many British vessels, called “prizes,” almost
in sight of their homes, he boldly sailed to the north and into the very
port of Whitehaven, where he had “tended store,” as a boy, and from
which he had first gone to sea. He knew the place, of course. He
knew how many vessels were there, and what a splendid victory he
could win for the American navy, if he could sail into Whitehaven har-
bor and capture or destroy the two hundred vessels that were anchored
within sight of the town he remembered so well.

With two row-boats and thirty men he landed at Whitehaven, locked
up the soldiers in the forts, fixed the cannon so that they could not be
fired, set fire to the vessels that were in the harbor, and so frightened all
the people that, though the gardener’s son stood alone on the wharf,
waiting for a boat to take him off, not a man dared to lay a hand on
him.

Then he sailed across the bay to the house of the great lord for whom
his father had worked as a gardener. He meant to run away with this
ereat man, and keep him prisoner until the British promised to treat
better the Americans whom they had taken prisoners. But the great
38 JOHN PAUL JONES.

lord whom he went for found it best to be ‘not at home,” so all that
Captain Jones’ men could do was to carry off from the big house some
of the fine things that were in it. But Captain Jones did not like this;
so he got the things back and returned them to the rich lord’s wife, with
a nice letter, asking her to excuse his men.

But while he was carrying on so in Solway Firth, along came 2 great



JONES’ MEN ASHORE—WHITEHAVEN.

British warship, called the Drake, determined to gobble up poor Captain
Jones at a mouthful. But Captain Jones was not afraid. This was just
what he was looking for. ‘Come on!” he cried; ‘I’m waiting for you.”

The British ship dashed up to capture him, but the Ranger was all ready,
and in just one hour Captain Jones had beaten and captured the English
frigate, and then, with both vessels, sailed merrily away to the friendly
French shores.
JOHN PAUL JONES. 39

Soon after this, the French decided to help the Americans in their war
for independence. So, after some time, Captain Jones was put in com-
mand of five ships, and back he sailed to England, to fight the British
ships again.

The vessel in which Captain Jones sailed was the biggest of the five -
ships. It had forty guns and a crew of three hundred sailors. Captain ©
Jones thought so much of the great Dr. Benjamin Franklin, who wrote
a book of good advice, under the name of “Poor Richard,” that he
named his big ship for Dr. Franklin. He called it the “Bon Homme
Richard,” which is French for “good man Richard.’’ The Bon Homme
Richard was not a good boat, if it was a big one. It was old and rotten
and cranky, but Captain Jones made the best of it.

The little fleet sailed up and down the English coasts, capturing a
few prizes, and greatly frightening the people by saying that they had
come to burn some of the big English sea towns.

Then, just as they were about sailing back to France, they came—
near an English cape, called Flamborough Head—upon a great English
fleet of forty merchant vessels and two war ships.

One of the war ships was a great English frigate, called the Serapis,
finer and stronger every way than the Bon Homme Richard. But Cap-
tain Jones would not run away.

“What ship is that?’ called out the Englishman. ‘Come a little
nearer, and we’ll tell you,” answered plucky Captain Jones.

The British ships did come a little nearer. The forty merchant ves-
sels sailed as fast as they could to the nearest harbor, and then the war
ships had a terrible sea fight.

At seven o’clock in the evening the British frigate and the Bon
Homme Richard began to fight. They banged and hammered away for
hours, and then, when the British captain thought he must have beaten
and broken the Americans, and it was so dark and smoky that they ~
could only see each other by the fire flashes, the British captain, Pearson,
called out to the American captain: “Are you beaten? Have you
hauled down your flag?”

And back came the answer of Captain John Paul Jones: “I haven’t
begun to fight yet!”

So they went at it again. The two ships were now lashed together,
40 JOHN PAUL JONES.

and they tore each other like savage dogs in a terrible fight. O, it was
dreadful!

At last, when the poor old Richard was shot through and through, and
leaking and on fire, and seemed ready to sink, Captain Jones made one
last effort. It was successful. Down came the great mast of the Sera-
pis, crashing to the deck. Then her guns were quiet; her flag came
tumbling down, as a sign that she gave in.

At once, Captain Jones sent some of his sailors aboard the defeated
Serapis. The captured vessel was a splendid new frigate, quite a differ-
ent ship from the poor, old, worm-eaten and worn-out Richard.

One of the American sailors went up to Captain Pearson, the British
commander, and asked him if he surrendered. The Englishman replied
that he had, and then he and his chief officer went aboard the battered
Richard, which was sinking even in its hour of victory.

But Captain Jones stood on the deck of his sinking vessel, proud and
triumphant. He had shown what an American captain and American
sailors could do, even when everything was against them. The English
captain gave up his sword to the American, which is the way all sailors
and soldiers do when they surrender their ships or their armies.

The fight had been a brave one, and the English King knew that his
captain had made a bold and desperate resistance, even if he had been
whipped. So he rewarded Captain Pearson, when he at last returned to
England, by giving to him the title of “Sir,” and when Captain Jones
heard of it he laughed, and said: “ Well, if I can meet Captain Pearson
again in a sea fight, I’ll make a ‘lord’ of him.” For a “lord” is a
higher title than “sir.”

The poor Bon Homme Richard was shot through and through, and
soon sunk beneath the waves. But even as she went down, the stars
and stripes floated proudly from the masthead, in token of victory.

Captain Jones, after the surrender, put all his men aboard the cap-
tured Serapis, and then off he sailed to the nearest friendly port, with
his great prize and all his prisoners. This victory made him the great~
est sailor in the whole American war.

The Dutch port into which he sailed was not friendly to America, but
Captain Jones had made his name so famous as a sea fighter, that neither
the thirteen Dutch frigates inside the harbor, nor the twelve British
JOHN PAUL JONES. 41

ships outside, dared to touch him, and, after a while—when he got good
and ready—Captain Jones ran the stars and stripes to the masthead
and, while the wind was blowing a gale, sailed out of the harbor, right
through two big British fleets, and so sailed safely to France, with no
one bold enough to attack him.

He had made a great record as a sailor and sea fighter. France was
on America’s side in
the Revolution, you
know, and when Cap-
tain Jones went to
France after his great
victory, he was re-
ceived with great
honor.

Everybody wished
to see such a hero.
He went to the King’s
court, and the King
and Queen and French
lords and ladies made
much of him and gave
him fine receptions,
and said so many fine
things about him that,
if he had been at all
vain, it might have
“tured his head,”
as people say. But
John Paul Jones was
not vain. JONES’ FIGHT BETWEEN BON HOMME RICHARD AND SERAPIS.

He was a _ brave
sailor, and he was in France to get help and not compliments. He
wished a new ship to take the place of the old Richard, which had gone
to the bottom after its great victory.

So, though the King of France honored him and received him splen-
didly and made him presents, he kept on working to get another ship.

BSR -:


42 JOHN PAUL JONES.

At last he was made captain of a new ship, called the Ariel, and sailed
from France. He had a fierce battle with an English ship called the
Triumph, and defeated her. But she escaped before surrendering, and
Captain Jones sailed across the sea to America.

He was received with great honor and applause. Congress gave him
a vote of thanks “for the zeal, prudence and intrepidity with which he
had supported the honor of the American flag’’—that is what the vote
said.

People everywhere crowded to see him, and called him hero and con-
queror. Lafayette, the brave young Frenchman, you know, who came
over to fight for America, called him “my dear Paul Jones,” and Wash-
ington and the other leaders in America said, “Well done, Captain
Jones!”

The King of France sent him a splendid reward of merit called the
“ Cross of Honor,” and Congress set about building a fine ship for him
to command. But before it was finished, the war was over, and he was
sent back to France on some important business for the United States.

After he had done this, the Russians asked him to come and help
them fight the Turks.

This was often done in those days, when soldiers and sailors of one
country went to fight in the armies or navies of another.

Captain Jones said he would be willing to go, if the United States said
he could, for, he said: “I can never renounce the glorious title of a citi-
zen of the United States.”

The United States said he could go to Russia, but the British officers
who were fighting for Russia, refused to serve under Jones, because, as
they said, he was a rebel, a pirate and a traitor. You see, they had not
forgiven him for so beating and frightening the English ships and people
in the Revolution. And they called him these names because he, born
in Scotland, had fought for America.

They made it very unpleasant for Captain Jones, and he had so hard
a time in Russia that, after many wonderful adventures and much hard
fighting, at last he gave up, and went back to France.

He was taken sick soon after he returned to France, and, though he
tried to fight against it, he could not recover. He had gone through
so many hardships and adventures and changes that he was old before
JOHN PAUL JONES. 43

his time, and although his friends tried to help him and the Queen of
France sent her own doctor to attend him, it was no use.

He died on the eighteenth day of July, in the year 1792, when he was
but forty-five years old. He was buried in Paris, with great honor.

The French people gave him a great funeral, as their token of respect
and honor, and - oe
the French cler-
eyman who gave
the funeral ora-
tion said: ‘ May
hisexample teach
posterity the ef-
forts which noble
souls are capable
of making when
stimulated by
hatred to oppres-
sion.”

John Paul
Jones was a brave
and gallant man.
He fought des-
perately, and war =
isa dreadful |
thing, you know.
But, as I have
told you, some-
times it has to
be, and then it
must be bold
and determined. Captain Jones did much by his dash and courage to
make America free. He gave her strength and power on the seas.

He fought twenty-three naval battles, made seven attacks upon Ene-
lish ports and coasts, fought and captured four great war ships, larger
than his own, and took many valuable prizes—to the loss of England
and the glory of America. :

i: ae aN \



BRITISH CAPTAIN SURRENDERING SWORD.
44 JOHN PAUL JONES.

American boys and girls know too little about him. If you are to
learn about those who have fought for America on land and sea, you must
surely hear of him who was the first captain in the United States Navy
—and whose brave deeds and noble heroism is the heritage and example
of American sailors for all time.

‘“T have ever looked out for the honor of the American flag,” he said
and Americans are just beginning to see how much this first of American
sailors did for their liberty, their honor and their fame.

Some day they will know him still more, and in one of the great cities
of this land which he saved from destruction in those early days, a noble
statue will be built to do honor to Captain John Paul Jones—the man
who was one of the bravest and most successful sea fighters in the history
of the world.


LINCOLN, RAIL-SPLITTER.
THE NOTABLE HISTORY OF

ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

Sixteenth President of the United States.

eeppge oe ‘OID you ever read

= eco! a ’ the fairy stories
about the poor boy who
became a prince? Do
you wish to hear a true
story about just such a
boy? Let me tell it to
you. It is the story of
Abraham Lincoln, the
hero who saved his coun-
try. He was as poor a
boy as ever lived in
America; he rose to be
greater and grander and
more royal than any
prince, or king, or em-
peror who’ ever wore a
crown. Listen to his
story :

There was once a poor
carpenter, who lived in a
miserable little log cabin,

(45)


46 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

out West. It was on a stony, weedy little hill-side, at a place called
Nolin’s Creek, in the State of Kentucky.

In that log cabin, on the twelfth day of February, in the year 1809, a
little baby was born. He was named Abraham Lincoln.

I don’t believe you ever saw a much poorer or meaner place in which
to be born and brought up than that little log cabin. Abraham Lin-
coln’s father was poor and lazy. He could not read and he hated to
work. Abraham Lincoln’s mother was a hard-working young woman,
who dreamed about having nice things, but never did have them. Their
house had no windows, it had no floor, it had none of the things you
have in your pleasant homes. In all America no baby was ever born
with fewer comforts and poorer surroundings than little Abraham Lin-
coln. He grew from a baby to a homely little boy, and to a homelier-
looking young man. He was tall and thin and gawky. His clothes
never fitted him; he never, in all his life, went to school but a year; he
had to work hard, he could play but little, and, many a day, he knew
what it was to be cold and hungry and almost homeless.

His father kept moving about from place to place, living almost always
in the woods, in Kentucky and Indiana and Illinois. Sometimes their
home would be a log cabin, sometimes it was just a hut with only three
sides boarded up, and little Abraham Lincoln was a neglected and for-
lorn little fellow.

His mother died when he was only eight years old. Then Abraham
and his sister, Sarah, were worse off than ever. But pretty soon his
father married a second wife, and Abraham’s new mother was a good and
wise woman.

She washed him and gave him new clothes; she taught him how to
make the most and do the best with the few things he had and the
chances that came to him; she made him wish for better things; she
helped him fix himself up, and encouraged him to read and study.

This last was what Abraham liked most of all, and he was reading and
studying all the time. There were not many books where he lived, but
he borrowed all he could lay his hands on, and read them over and over.

He studied all the hard things he could find books on, from arithmetic
and grammar to surveying and law. He wrote on a shingle, when he
could not get paper, and by the light of a log fire, when he could not get
ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 47

candles. He read and studied in the fields, when he was not working;
on wood-piles, where he was chopping wood, or in the kitchen, rocking
the cradle of any baby whose father or mother had a book to lend him.
His favorite position for studying was to lay, stretched out like the long
boy he was, flat on the floor, in front of an open fire. Here he would
read and write and cipher, after the day’s work was over, until, at last,
he grew to be as good a scholar as any boy round.

Once he borrowed a book of an old farmer. It was a ‘Life of Wash-
ington.” He read it and read it again, and when he was not reading it
he put it safely away between the logs that made the wall of his log-
cabin home. But one day there came a hard storm; it beat against the
cabin and soaked in between the logs and spoiled the book. Young
Abraham did not try to hide the book nor get out of the trouble. He
never did a mean thing of that sort. He took the soaked and ruined
book to the old farmer, told him how it happened, and asked how he
could pay for it.

“Wall,” said the old farmer, “‘’t’aint much account to me now. You
pull fodder for three days and the book is yours.”

So the boy set to work, and for three days “pulled fodder” to feed the
farmer’s cattle.

He dried and smoothed and pressed out the “Life of Washington,” for
it was his now. And that is the way he bought his first book.

He was the strongest boy in all the country ’round. He could mow
the most, plough the deepest, split wood the best, toss the farthest, run
the swiftest, jump the highest and wrestle the best of any boy or man in
the neighborhood. But, though he was so strong, he was always so kind,
so gentle, so obliging, so just and so helpful that everybody liked him,
few dared to stand up against him, and all came to him to get work done,
settle disputes, or find help in quarrels or trouble.

When he was fifteen years old he was over six feet tall and very strong.
No man or boy could throw him down in a wrestle. He was like Wash-
ington in this, for both men were remarkable wrestlers when they were
boys. But he always wrestled fair. Once, when he had gone to a new
place to live, the big boys got him to wrestle with their champion, and
when the champion found he was getting the worst of it he began to try
unfair ways to win. This was one thing that Lincoln never would
48 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

stand—unfairness or meanness. He caught the big fellow, lifted him in
the air, shook him as a dog shakes a rat, and then threw him down to
the ground. The big bully was conquered. He was a friend and fol-
lower of Lincoln as long as he lived, and you may be sure the “boys” all
about never tried any more mean tricks on Abraham Lincoln.

So he grew, amid the woods and farms, to be a bright, willing, oblig-
ing, active, good-natured, fun-loving boy. He had to work early and



THE BOY LINCOLN, STUDYING.

late, and when he was a big boy he went to work among the farmers,
where he hired as a “hired man.” He could do anything, from splitting
rails for fences to rocking the baby’s cradle; or from hoeing corn in the
field to telling stories in the kitchen.

And how he did like to tell funny stories. Not always funny, either.
For, you see, he had read so much and remembered things so well that
he could tell stories to make people laugh and stories to make people
think. He liked to recite poetry and “speak pieces,” and do all the
ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 49

things that make a person good company for every one. He would sit in
front of the country store or on the counter inside and tell of all the funny
things he had seen, or heard, or knew. He would make up poetry about
the men and women of the neighborhood, or “reel off” a speech upon
things that the people were interested in, until all the boys and girls,
and the men and women, too, said “Abe Lincoln,” as they called
him, knew about everything, and was an “awful smart chap.”

peers en Sometimes
ee Rade ; : they thought

ee | yee hy te he knew too
much, for once,
when he tried
to explain to
one of the girls
that the earth
turned around
and the sun did
not move, she
would not be-
lieve him, and
said he was
fooling her.
But she lived
to learn that
“ Abe,’ as she
called him, was
not a fool,
but a bright,
thoughtful, studious boy, who understood what he read and did not
forget it.

He worked on farms, ran a ferry-boat across the river, split rails for
farm fences, worked an oar on a “flat-boat,” got up a machine for lifting
boats out of the mud, kept store, did all sorts of “odd jobs” for the farm-
ers and their wives, and was, in fact, what we call a regular “Jack of all
trades.” And all the time, though he was jolly and liked a good time,
he kept studying, studying, studying, until, as I have told you, the peo-

4



LINCOLN, THE WRESTLER.
50 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

ple where he lived said he knew more than anybody else. Some of them
even said that they knew he would be President of the United States
some day, he was so smart.

The work he did most of all out-of-doors, was splitting great logs into
rails for fences. He could do as much as three men at this work, he was
so strong. With one blow he could just bury the axe in the wood. Once
he split enough rails for a woman to pay for a suit of clothes she made
him, and all the farmers round liked to have “ ake Lincoln,” as they called
him, split their rails.

He could take the heavy axe by the end of the handle and hold it out
straight from his shoulder. That is something that only a very strong-
armed person can do. In fact, as I have told you, he was the champion
strong-boy of his neighborhood, and, though he was never quarrelsome
or a fighter, he did enjoy a friendly wrestle, and, we are told, that he
could strike the hardest blow with axe or maul, jump higher and farther
than any of his comrades, and there was no one, far or near, who
could put him on his back. He made two trips down the long Ohio
and the broad Mississippi rivers to the big city of New Orleans, in Louis-
iana. He sailed on a clumsy, square, flat-bottomed scow, called a flat-
boat. Lincoln worked the forward oar on the flat-boat, to guide the big
craft through the river currents and over snags.

On these trips he first saw negro men and women bought and sold the
same as horses, pigs and cattle, and from that day, all through his life, he
hated slavery. When he became a young man, a war broke out in the
Western country with the Indians. They were led by the famous Indian
chief called Black Hawk. Lincoln went with the soldiers to fight Black
Hawk. He was thought so much of by his companions that they made
him captain of their company.

Captain Lincoln’s soldiers all liked him, and they were just like boys
together. Sometimes they were pretty wild boys and gave him a good
deal of trouble, but he never got real angry at them but once. That
was when a poor, broken-down, old Indian came into camp for food and
shelter, and Loncoln’s ‘‘boys” were going to kill him just because he was
an Indian. But Lincoln said, ‘For shame!” He protected the old
Indian and, standing up in front of him, said he would knock down the
first man that dared to touch him. The soldiers knew that Lincoln
ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 51

meant what he said, and thought even more of him after that. And
the old Indian’s life was saved.

When the soldiers’ time was up, and most of them went back home,
Lincoln would not go with them. He joined another regiment as a pri-
vate soldier and staid in the army until the Indians were beaten and
driven away, and Black Hawk was taken prisoner.

Then Lincoln started for home with another soldier boy. They had

Cr ara r I



a We eee

LINCOLN, AS HIRED MAN, TELLING A STORY,

great adventures. Their horse was stolen, and they had to walk; then
they found an old canoe and paddled down the rivers until the canoe was
upset and they were nearly drowned; then they walked again until they
“oot a lift” on a row-boat, and so, at last, walking and paddling, they
got back to their homes, poor and tired out, but strong and healthy
young men.

Then Lincoln tried store-keeping again. He had already been a clerk
52 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

in a country store; now he set up a store of his own. He was not very
successful. He loved to read and study better than to wait on custom-
ers, and he was so obliging and good-natured that he could not make
much money. ‘Then he had a partner who was lazy and good for noth-
ing, and who got him into trouble. But, through it all, Lincoln never
did a mean or dishonest thing. He paid all the debts, though it took
him years to do this, and he could be so completely trusted to do the
right thing for everyone that all the people round about learned to call
him ‘Honest Abe Lincoln.” That’s a good nick-name, is’nt it?

After Lincoln got through keeping store he was so much liked by the
people that they chose him to go to the capital of the State, as one of
the men who made laws for the State of Illinois, in what is called the
State Legislature.

He was sent to the Legislature again and again, and one of the first
things he did was to draw up a paper, saying what a wicked thing
Slavery was.

At that time, you know, almost everybody in the southern half of the
United States owned negro men and women and children, just as they
owned horses and dogs and cows. Lincoln did not believe in this. Once,
when he was in New Orleans, on one of his flat-boat trips, he went into
a dreadful place where they sold men and women at auction. It made
young Lincoln sick and angry, and he said if ever he got the chance he
would hit slavery a blow that would hurt it—though, of course, he did
not think he was ever to have the real chance to “hit it hard” that did
come to him.

But when he was a young man no one said much against slavery, and
the people thought Lincoln was foolish to act and talk as he did. But,
you see, one of the strongest things about Abraham Lincoln was that he
was sympathetic—that is, he felt sorry for anyone in trouble. He was
tender, even with animals—pigs and horses, cats and dogs, and birds.
If he found a little bird on the ground, he would take it up tenderly and
hunt around until he found its nest, and leave it there. He would get
down from his horse to pull a pig out of the mud, and, when he was a
boy, he went back across an icy and rushing river to help over a poor
little dog that was afraid to cross. So you will not wonder that, when
ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 53

he grew to be a man, he hated slavery, for slavery was unkindness to
men and women.

After he came back from the Legislature, he became a lawyer—he had
always been studying law, you know. He was a bright, smart and suc-
cessful lawyer. What is better still, he was a good and honest one. He
never would take a case he did not believe in, and once when a man
came to engage him to help get some money from a poor widow, Lincoln
refused, and gave the man such a scolding that the man did not try it



LINCOLN KEEPING STORE.

again. So Mr. Lincoln grew to be one of the best lawyers in all that
Western country.

Because he was so wise and brave in speech and action, Lincoln rose
to be what is called a great politician. He and another famous
man, named Douglas, looked at things differently, and they had long
public talks or discussions about politics and slavery. These discussions
were held where all the people could hear them, in big halls or out of
doors, and crowds of people went to listen to these talks, so that very
54 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

soon everybody “out West” and people all over the country had heard
of Lincoln and Douglas.

At last, came a time when the people of the United States were to
choose a new President. And what do you think? ‘These two men
were picked out by the opposite parties to be voted for by the people—
Lincoln by the Republicans, and Douglas by the Democrats.

And on election day the Republicans won. The poor little backwoods
boy, the rail-splitter, the flat-boatman, the farm-hand, was raised to the
highest place over all the people. Abraham Lincoln was elected Presi-
dent of the United States.

Is not that as good as your fairy story of the poor boy who became a
prince? It is even better, for it is true.

It was a great honor, but it meant hard work and lots of worry for
Abraham Lincoln. Bad times were coming for America.

The men of the South, who believed in slavery and said that their
States had everything to say, stood up against the men of the North,
who did not believe in slavery, and said that the Government of the
United States had more to say than any one of the separate States.

Thus the men of the South said, ‘‘ You do as we say, or we will break
up the Union.”

And the men of the North said, ‘“‘ You cannot break itup. The union
of all the States shall be kept, and you must stay in it.”

The South said, ‘‘We won’t; we will secede’—that is, draw out of
the Union.

The North said, ‘“ You shall not secede. We will fight to keep you in
and preserve tho Union.”

The South said, ‘‘ We dare you!”

The North said, ‘‘ We'll take that dare!”

And then there was war.

Abraham Lincoln, when he was made President, spoke beautifully to -
the people, and begged them not to quarrel. But, at the same time, he
told them that whatever happened, he was there to save the Union, and
he should do so.

But his words then had little effect. War had to come, and it came.

For four dreadful years the men of the North and the men of the South
fought each other for the mastery on Southern battle-fields. Many des-
ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 5d

perate and terrible battles were fought, for each side was bound to win.
Neither side would give in, and brave soldiers, under brave leaders, did
many gallant deeds under that terrible necessity that men call war.
This war was especially dreadful, because it was just like two brothers
fighting with each other, and you know how dreadful that must be.

During all those four years of war Abraham Lincoln lived in the Presi-
dent’s house at Washington—the White House, as it is called.

He had but one wish—to save the Union. He did not mean to let
war, nor trouble, nor wicked men destroy the nation that Washington
had founded. He was always ready to say, ‘‘ We forgive you,” if the men
of the South would only stop fighting and say, ‘We are sorry.” But
they would not do this, much as the great, kind, patient, loving Presi-
dent wished them to.

That he was kind and loving all through that terrible war we know
very well. War is a dreadful thing, and when it is going on some hard
and cruel things have to be done. The soldiers who are sick or wounded
have to be hurt to make them well. As they lay in their hospitals, after
some dreadful battle had torn and maimed them, the good President
would walk through the long lines of cot-beds, talking kindly with the
wounded soldiers, sending them nice things, doing everything he could
to relieve their sufferings and make them patient and comfortable.

In war, too, you know, even brave soldiers often get tired of the fight-
ing and the privations and the delay, and wish to go home to see their
wives and children. But they cannot, until it is time for them. So,
sometimes they get impatient and run away. This is called desertion,
and when a deserter is caught and brought back to the army, he
is shot.

Now President Lincoln was so loving and tender-hearted that he could
not bear to have any of his soldiers shot because they had tried to go
home. So, whenever he had a chance, he would write a paper saying
the soldier must not be shot. This is called a pardon, and whenever a
weak or timid soldier was arrested and sentenced to be shot as a deserter,
his friends would hurry to the good President and beg him to give the
man a pardon.

He almost always did it. ‘I don’t see how it will do the man any
good to shoot him,” he would say. ‘Give me the paper, I'll sign it,”
56 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

and so the deserter would go free, and perhaps make a better soldier
than ever, because the good President had saved him.

The question of slavery was always coming up in this wartime. But
when some of the men at the North asked Lincoln to set all the slaves
in the land free, he said: “The first thing to do is to save the Union;
after that we'll see about slavery.”

Some people did not like that. They said the President was too slow.



LINCOLN ON THE FLAT BOAT.

But he was not. He was the wisest man in all the world; the only one
who could do just the right thing, and he did it.

He waited patiently until just the right time came. He saw that the
South was not willing to give in, and that something must be done to
show them that the North was just as determined as they were. So,
after a great victory had been won by the soldiers of the Union, Abra-
ham Lincoln wrote a paper and sent it out to the world, saying that on
the first day of January, in the year 1868, all slaves in America should
ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 57

be free men and women—what we call emancipated—and that, forever
after, there should be no such thing as slavery in free America.

It was a great thing to do. It wasa greater thing to do it just as
Lincoln did it, and, while the world lasts, no one will ever forget the
Emancipa-
tion Procla-
mation of
Abraham
Lincoln.

Still the
war went on.
But, little by
little, the
South was
growing wea-
ker, and, at
last, in the
month of
April, 1865,
the end came.
The Southern
soldiers gave
up the fight.
The North
was victori-
ous. The
Union was
saved.

You may

be sure that
the great and good President was glad. He did not think that he had
done so very much. It was the people who had done it all, he said.
But the people knew that Lincoln had been the leader and captain
who had led them safely through all their troubles, and they cheered
and blessed him accordingly.



LINCOLN ENTERING RICHMOND.
58 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

But do you think the poor black people whom he had set free blessed
him? They did, indeed.

When President Lincoln at last stood in the streets of Richmond,
which had been the capital of the Southern States, he was almost wor-
shipped by the colored people. They danced, they sang, they cried, they
prayed, they called down blessings on the head of their emancipator—
the man who had set them free. They knelt at his feet, while the good
President, greatly moved by what he saw, bowed pleasantly to the shout-
ing throng, while tears of joy and pity rolled down his care-wrinkled
face. Don’t you think it must have been a great and blessed moment
for this good and great and noble man. But it was the same all over
the land. There was cheering and shouting and thanksgiving every-
where for a re-united nation, and even the South, weary with four years
of unsuccessful war, welcomed peace and quiet once more.

Then, who in all the world was greater than Abraham Lincoln? He
had done it all, people said, by his wisdom, his patience and his determin-
ation, and the splendid way in which he had directed everything from his
home in the White House.

The year before, in the midst of the war, he had been elected Presi-
dent for the second time. “It is not safe to swap horses when you are
crossing a stream,” he said. So the people voted not to ‘“‘swap horses.”

Lincoln made a beautiful speech to the people when he was again
made President. He spoke only of love and kindness for the men of the
South, and, while he said the North must fight on to the end and save
the Union, they must do it not hating the South, but loving it.

And this is the way he ended that famous speech. Remember his
words, boys and girls, they-are glorious: ‘‘ With malice toward none, with
charity for all, with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the
right, let us finish the work we are in * * * and achieve and
cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all
nations.”

But, just when the war was ended, when peace came to the land
again; when all men saw what a grand and noble and loving and strong
man the great President was; when it looked as if, after four years of
worry, weariness and work, he could at last rest from his labors and be
happy, a wicked, foolish and miserable man shot the President, behind
ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 59

his back. And, on the morning of the fifteenth of April, in the year
1865, Abraham Lincoln died. :

Then how all the land mourned! South, as well as North, wept for
the dead President. All the world sorrowed, and men and women began
to see what a great and noble man had been taken from them.

The world has not got over it yet. Every year and every day only
makes Abraham Lincoln greater, nobler, mightier. No boy ever, in all
the world, rose higher from poorer beginnings. No man who ever lived
did more for the world than Abraham Lincoln, the American.

He saw what was right, and he did it; he knew what was true, and he
said it; he felt what was just, and he stuck to it. So he stands to-day,
for justice, truth and right.

You do not understand all this now, as you listen to these words and
look at these pictures. But some day you will, and you will then know
that it was because Abraham Lincoln lived and did these things that
you have to-day a happy home in a great, free, rich and beautiful coun-
try— The land of the free and the home of the brave.”

So remember this, now, boys and girls: You are free and happy in
America to-day, because Abraham Lincoln saved for you to live in the
land that George Washington made free.
THE REMARKABLE HISTORY OF

ULysses S. GRANT,

General of the Armies of the United States.

HIS is the story of a great soldier and a good man. Everybody
likes to see soldiers marching, with their drums and guns and
flags and uniforms. They make a fine sight, and the boys and

girls all hurrah and clap their hands as the regiments march by. But
when these soldiers go marching to battle, it is quite another thing.
For war is terrible, and some of the best and bravest soldiers hate it
the most.

Sometimes, however, great questions and bitter quarrels can only be
settled by war and fighting, and then it is well for the people to have
_ their armies led to battle by such a great and gallant soldier as this
story tells about.

His name was Ulysses Simpson Grant. He was born in a little town,
out in Ohio, called Point Pleasant, on the twenty-seventh of April, in
the year 1822. The house in which he was born is still standing. Itis
on the banks of the Ohio River, and you can look across to Kentucky,
on the other side of the river.

When Ulysses was only a year old his father moved to a place: called
Georgetown, not far away, and there he spent his boyhood.

He was a strong, healthy, go-ahead little fellow, who did not like to go
to school very well. But, if he had anything to do, either in work or
play, he stuck to it, until it was done.

When he was seventeen years old, Ulysses was sent to the splendid
(60)


GRANT ON THE FIELD, LAST YEAR OF THE WAR.
ULYSSES 8. GRANT. 61

school among the beautiful highlands of the Hudson River, in New York,
where boys are taught to become soldiers of the United States Army.
This is called abe oes States Military ee at West Point.

ee eT Tne TN,





GRANT’S CHILDHOOD.



He stayed four years at this famous
school. He did not like the school part
of it any more at West Point than he did
at his Ohio school-house, but he loved horses, andl became a fine horse
back rider.

When he left West Point, he was made second lieutenant in’ the
62 ULYSSES 8S. GRANT.

United States Army. He went home, but in a year or two there was a
war between the United States and the country that joins us on the
south. It is called Mexico, and this war is called the Mexican War.

Young Ulysses Grant went to this war as first lieutenant, and fought
the Mexicans in many bloody battles. He was a daring young officer,
and his men followed willingly wherever he led. In one of the hardest
battles in this war with Mexico—the battle of Monterey—the American
soldiers charged into the town and then got out of ammunition—that is,
powder and shot. To get any more, some one would have to ride straight
through the fire of the Mexicans, who were in the houses of the town;
so the general did not think he could order any soldier to do this. But he
asked who would do it. That is what is meant by calling for volunteers.

Lieutenant Grant at once said he would go. He mounted his horse,
but slipped over on the side furthest from the houses in which the Mexi-
cans were hiding. Then he set his horse on a gallop, and so dashed
through the town and past all the hostile houses, and brought back the
ammunition in safety.

He did many other brave and soldierly things when he was a young
officer in this war with Mexico, but he was always such a modest man
that he never liked to tell of his courageous deeds. When he did, he
would generally say: “O, well; the battle would have been won, just as
it was, if I had not been there.” The brave men and the bravest boys,
you know, never boast.

In another of these battles in the Mexican war—it has a long, hard
name—Chepultepec, young Grant was so bold and brave that his name
was picked out as that of one of the bravest soldiers in the fight.

At another time, when a strong fort was in the path of the Americans,
Lieutenant Grant dragged a small cannon away up into a church steeple,
and pointing it at the fort, fired his cannon balls so swift and straight
and sure that the Mexican soldiers had to run out of the fort, and the
Americans marched into it and soon after took the city it had defended.
And when the news of this fight was sent home to the United States,
young Grant’s brave act was made a part of it, and he was promoted to
be a captain. The Mexicans were defeated in many battles, and, at last
the cruel war was ended. The Americans were victorious and marched
hack north to their homes.
ULYSSES S. GRANT. 63

Then Captain Grant married his wife; but, soon after, he had to go
without her to California and Oregon, where his regiment was sent. He
ae ReESaTiae peer: had a hard time

ee getting there, for
the dreadful cholera
broke out while
the soldiers were on
the way, and if it
had not been for
Captain Grant’s
bravery and devo-
tion most of the
soldiers and their
wives and chil-

dren would have
died.

You see, a man
can be just as
brave taking care
of sick people as
when fighting in
battle.

After he had been
in Oregon for a
while he got tired
of doing nothing,
so he gave up being
a soldier, and went
back to his little
farm near St. Louis,
in Missouri. He
lived in a log-
house on this farm
with bis wife and children, and at times was quite poor. He
tried farming, and buying and selling horses and collecting bills, '
and, at last, moved from St. Louis to the town of Galena, in Illb-















SSRIS TRI A AN oe

me ePRP TO

¢
t :

‘

ber cee..

GRANT AFTER THE BATTLE Of BELMONT.
64 ULYSSES 8. GRANT.

nois, where he was a tanner and made leather with his father and
brothers.

While Grant was an unknown tanner in Illinois a dreadful thing hap-
pened in America. The Northern and Southern States, which, joined
together, made these United States of America, became angry with each
other over things that, some day, you will learn all about in school.

The South said: ‘‘ We won’t stay in the Union any longer.”

The North said: ‘ You’ve got to stay. We won’t let you go.”

But the South determined to go, and, in the year 1861, they had gone
and had made a new nation of themselves. Then the North said the
South could not go and should not go, and tried to keep them in the
Union by force.

They began to fight with each other, and there was a terrible war in
the land. We call it now the War of the Rebellion, or the Civil War.

Captain Grant joined the army at once and marched away to the war
with some soldiers from his own town, and, after a while, he was given
command of a regiment and made a colonel. Soon after that he was
promoted to be a brigadier-general.

After the war had been going on for several months the men who were
at the head of things found out what a good soldier General Grant was,
and he was given command of a large number of men and marched
with them against the Confederates, as the Southern soldiers were
called.

There were some hard battles fought, among them that of Belmont, on
the Mississippi, at which village a severe engagement took place. But
Grant was victorious, and at last he got the Confederate soldiers cooped
up in a place called Fort Donelson.

When the general of the Confederate soldicre asked General Grant
how he could save his soldiers and get out of the fort alive, the General
said: ‘‘Unconditional surrender.” That means, give me your fort and
all your soldiers and guns and flags and swords. Then I will not
fight you. If you will not do this, I shall make you.

There was no other way, so the Comfederates surrendered Fort Donel-
son. It was a great victory for the Northern soldiers, and everybody
praised General Grant. Then he marched to another place. It was
called Shiloh. There was a terrible battle here. At first it was almost
ULYSSES S. GRANT. 65

a defeat for the Union soldiers, but General Grant stuck to it and fought
so bravely, that at last the Confederates were beaten and driven back.



Fame



GRANT AT SHILOH.

It was the first great battle of the war. It continued through two
April days—Saturday and Sunday. The Confederates were led by their

best and bravest general, Albert Sidney Johnston. Had it not been for
5
66 ULYSSES 8. GRANT.

General Grant’s bravery, determination, persistence and good leadership,
the Northern troops would surely have been beaten, and the Union cause
would have been sadly put back.

But he stuck to it. He must win, that was all. And he did win.
He rode up and down the line all that terrible Saturday and Sunday,
giving orders, directing and encouraging his men. For he knew that they
were mostly soldiers who had never seen a battle, and he knew that un-
less they were made braver by the courage and bravery of their leaders,
they would not make good soldiers.

So all through this dreadful battle of Shiloh, in which the dash and

bravery of the South first met the courage and endurance of the North,
General Grant was in the thick of it, inspiring his soldiers, bringing vic-
tory out of defeat, and showing the world what a great general he really
was.
So he kept driving the Confederate soldiers off whenever he fought
them. They were brave, too, for they also were Americans. But they
had not so great a general to lead them in battle. At last Grant got the
Southern army cooped up in a town called Vicksburg. He marched his
soldiers against it and built forts around it and banged away at it with
his great cannons until at last, when the Confederates in the town could
get no help and could not get away, they gave up the town and all its
forts and soldiers and guns to General Grant. That was the surrender
if Vicksburg. It was another splendid victory.

Then General Grant was promoted to be a major-general, and marched
off to fight more of the bold Southern soldiers. He fought them again at
a place called Chattanooga, among the mountains. This was so hard a
battle and so great a victory for General Grant that the United States
gave him a gold medal to remember it. Then he was given command of
all the armies of the United States. So far he had fought in the West.
Now he came East and took the lead of all the Northern soldiers in Vir-
ginia, which was called the Army of the Potomac. He fought the Con-
federates and their brave leader, General Lee, for a whole year in Virginia.
There were some dreadful battles. There never were harder ones in all
the world. But General Grant knew that if he wished to win, he must
fight hard and terribly. The hardest fighting of all that cruel war was
now to come, you see. It was in the region that separated the two capi-
ULYSSES S. GRANT. 67

tals—Washington, the capital of the United States, and Richmond, the
Southern capital.

Much of the fighting was in a section covered with thick woods and
underbrush, and called ‘The Wilderness.” For sixteen days the two
armies faced each other
in this wilderness, so
close together that they
could talk across, and
so, watching by night
and fighting by day, the
two generals, Lee, the
Confederate, and Grant,
the Union leader, fought
each other in the most
tremendous and des-
perate battles of modern
times.

They ended at last,
not by really defeating
Lee, but by forcing him
back, inch by inch, un-
til Grant and his sol-
diers got nearer to Rich-
mond. You _ see, the
men of the North and
the men of the South
had grown now to be
trained and courageous
soldiers, and they were
so equally matched in
numbers, bravery and
determination, and were so ably led by their commanding generals that
the conflict was a stubborn and desperate one.

But General Grant would not be defeated. He never gave up; and
when, in the hot weather, things seemed going badly and he was asked what
he meant to do, he said, “Fight it out on this line, if it takes all summer.”’



GRANT AT WINDSOR CASTLE.
68 ULYSSES 8. GRANT.

It did take all summer, and all the winter, too; but, at last, this great
soldier was successful. The Southerners were beaten, and their gallant
leader, General Lee, at a place called Appomattox, on the ninth of April,
1865, surrendered all his soldiers and flags and guns to General Grant.
It was the end to a long and bitter war. Probably no other soldier in
America could have defeated General Lee and his soldiers except General
Grant. The Southern soldiers were brave and determined; they were
desperate; for they knew if they did not beat Grant and capture Wash-
ington the cause of the South must be given up.

So they fought on, even after they began to get hungry and ragged, and
the South was poor and empty. Gradually, however, they grew weaker;
and still General Grant kept at it, forcing them back, back, until at last
they fled from Richmond. The Southern soldiers were beaten or cap-
tured, and, as I have told you, General Lee surrendered at last to General
Grant at Appomattox. The war was over. The North had won the great
fight that had lasted through four terrible years, and General U.S. Grant
was hailed as “the Conqueror.”

It is hard for the boys and girls who have quarreled and got the best
of it, not to clap their hands and talk big. It is even harder for men
and women. But General Grant, when he had won the victory, would
not “crow” over the defeated Southerners. ‘They are Americans,’’ he
said.

He gave them back their horses so that they could plough their farms
for planting; he gave them food and clothes, and sent them away friends;
he said to North and South alike: “The war is over. Let us have
peace.”

Of course his great success made him a hero. He was one. But he
hated to be so talked about; he never made a show of himself, nor said,
as a good many boys and men do when they have done something fine:
‘Look at me!” General Grant was quiet, modest and silent. Of course,
the world thought all the more of him because he did not try to put him-
self forward. His own land thought so much of him that they twice made
him President of the United States, just as they did Washington.
It was a pretty good rise for a little Western farmer boy and tanner, wasn’t
it? After he was through being President he left his country and trav-
eled around the world, and the world did him honor.
ULYSSES S. GRANT. 69

Kings and queens and princes invited him to their palaces and were
glad to see him. He visited the Queen of England in her palace of
Windsor Castle; he taiked with the soldiers and statesmen of the world,



GRANT IN JAPAN.

while emperors honored him as one of the world’s famous men, and cities
welcomed him as the foremost general of the day and the man who had
been President of the world’s mightiest Republic.
70 ULYSSES 8. GRANT.

Amid all these festivities, in all lands and in all scenes set to do him
honor, General Grant was still the same modest, quiet, silent man he had
been all his life. The brilliant carnival at Havana, which he saw and
which honored him, the curious and strange surroundings in far-off Japan,
where they were beginning to think and act for themselves; the court
of China, which few Americans had ever seen; the storied lands of the
Kast—Jerusalem, Damascus, Constantinople, Alexandria—all these he
visited, and in all he was welcomed and pointed out to the boys and
girls of every nation, tribe and land as the great American—the visitor
from the land beyond the sea. Great men, wherever he went, called
upon him and made friends with him, and, as I have said, the people
everywhere, in Japan and China, and Egypt and Turkey, and Russia and
Germany, and Italy and France and England ran after him just as their
kings and princes had done. They hurrahed for him and made much of
him—more than any man in all the world had ever before been so hon-
ored and entertained. .

For, you see, people everywhere knew that General Grant was a great
man, who, by his patience, his perseverance, his wisdom and his will had
carried a mighty nation through a terrible war, won it; had been made
the chief man of that nation, and shown all the world how a man can
be a great soldier and yet a quiet, simple, modest man. But they were
to see him fight one other battle—the hardest that any boy or girl, any man
or woman can fight—the battle against wrong and death. He came back
from his travels round the world, and as he did not like to be idle, he put
what money he had into business and began, so he thought, to grow rich.
He made his home in New York City, in a fine house which the people
who honored him had given him as a token of their respect and
affection and their pride in the man who had done so much for them in
four years of war, and who had governed his native land as President
through eight years of peace.

But his business ventures turned out badly. A wretched man worked
against him, using his honorable name to mislead the people, and taking
for himself both their money and that of General Grant.

All of a sudden the end came. The bad man ran away and General
Grant found himself without a cent. All his money was gone, and, —
worse than that, others who had trusted in him had lost their money,
ULYSSES 8S. GRANT. 71

too. It broke the great general down. It almost defeated the soldier
who had never known defeat. It made him weak and sick.

But, just as he had
marched to war courage-
ously, so, now, he faced
disaster just as bravely.
He set to work to make
his losses good, and, be-
cause all the world wished
to hear about him, he be-
gan to write the story of
his life and his battles.

He kept himself alive to
do this. For over a year
he fought ruin and a terri-
ble pain as stoutly as he
had ever battled with real
soldiers, while all the world
looked on in love and pity,
and kings and beggars sent
him words of sympathy.
He won the fight, for he did
not give up until his book
was finished. Then he died.

On the twenty-first of
July, in the year 1885, on
the mountain-top to which
he had been carried, near
Saratoga, in New York,
General Grant died, and
all the world mourned a

CENERAL GRANT’S HOUSE, NEW YORK; 1885. great man gone.
The world mourned;

men and women everywhere had learned to honor the great general as
much for his victories over disaster, disgrace and pain as for his con-
quests in war and his governing in peace. His funeral, on Saturday,


72 ULYSSES 8S. GRANT.

August 8, 1885, was one of the grandest public ceremonials ever seen in
America. The President of the United States, senators, governors, gen-
erals, judges and famous men came to New York to show their sorrow
and esteem, and the poor boy of the western prairies was buried amid
the solemn tolling of bells and firing of cannon, while all people and all
lands sent words of sorrow and of sympathy to the Republic which had
so honored him in death as it had honored him in life.

ant







Upon a beauti- ful knoll in a
beautiful park in , New York rises
a stately monu- * a ment above his
tomb. In the < City of Chicago,

in the State from
from poverty to
splendid monu-
his honor.

His is not an uncommon name, and yet in all America, in all the
world, there is but one Grant!

His story is one from which even the smallest boy and the tiniest
girl can learn something. For it teaches them to be persistent, yet

which he came
fame, another
ment towers in

GRANT’S FUNERAL PROCESSION.
ULYSSES 8. GRANT. 73

modest; strong, yet simple; magnanimous in victory; patient in distress
and defeat.

He was a great soldier, but he hated war; yet, when he had to fight,
he did fight, and nothing could put him aside from the end he had in
view.

Though he became the foremost man of the world, he was always a
quiet, modest and simple American gentleman, and, when he had to face
both pain and loss, he did so patiently, uncomplainingly and heroically,
never giving in until he had done what he had determined todo. ‘To
be a great soldier is a fine thing; to be a noble, truthful, simple man is
still finer. General Grant was both; and while the boys and girls of
America will never forget the battles and victories won for their sake,
let them also never forget that it was his simplicity, his loyalty, his
devotion, his persistence and his honor that made all the world respect
and love Ulysses Simpson Grant as a great American.

a
THE STIRRING STORY OF

RoBert E. Lee,

General of the Confederate Armies.

HIS is to tell you the story of Robert E. Lee.
Every boy and girl in America knows who
he was—a great American soldier.
But he was more than a great soldier, he was
a hero, and this is a hero story. Is there any
boy or girl who does not like to hear about a
hero? You know what a hero is, do you not?
It is one who does great deeds in a grand way.
Ever since the world began there have been
heroes. Some have been soldiers, some have
been kings, some have been just plain, poor men
& or boys. But the world has liked to hear their
. stories—from David, the boy who killed Go-
Ne the giant, to George Washington, who
\ delivered his land from tyranny.
In this dear America, which is our native
land, we “have had many heroes. They have
defended us in danger, fought for us in war, cared
for us in peace, and every boy and girl in Amer-
ica is told the story of their lives and taught to
love and respect and honor them.
It is the story of one of these brave and heroic

CADET LEE. men that I wish now to tell you—the story of
(74)


















ON THE EVE OF GETTYSBURG.—GENERAL LEE DIRECTING THE BATTLE.
ROBERT E. LEE. 75

Robert EH. Lee, who fought long and bravely for what he believed to be
the rights and the liberty of his fellow-men in the southern half of
the United States of America. Listen to his story.

Many years ago, when your grandfather’s grandfather was helping to
make the Fourth of July, a certain brave and gallant soldier fought in
almost all the battles of the American Revolution. People called him
‘ Light-horse’ Harry Lee. This was because he was the leader of a
number of dashing, fast-riding soldiers or cavalry called “light-horse,”
because the riders were dressed and armed as lightly as possible. In this
dress they could ride swiftly and act quickly. .

‘Light-horse” Harry Lee was a splendid horseback rider, and his swift
and daring dashes with his light-horse legion did a great deal toward
whipping the British and making the American Revolution a success.
General Washington thought very much of this brave Virginian horse-
man, and, when the war was over, wrote him a letter in which he sent
him his “love and thanks” for what he had done in the American Revo-
lution. And, when the great and good Washington died, at his beautiful
home at Mount Vernon, it was his friend the dashing cavalry soldier who
spoke those splendid words about the greatest American—words which,
I hope, you all know by heart: ‘‘ Washington! first in war, first in peace
and first in the hearts of his countrymen.”

Nearly twenty-five years after the American Revolution ended in suc-
cess, when “ Light-horse” Harry Lee had been Governor Lee of Virginia,
and was writing a book about the American Revolution, a little baby boy
was born into his pleasant Virginia home. This baby was named Robert
Hdward Lee, and he was to grow up to become an even greater and nobler
man than his famous father.

Robert E. Lee was born on the nineteenth of January, 1807—the very
year in which our great American poets, Longfellow and Whittier, were
born. His father’s house was at a beautiful country place in Virginia,
called Stafford. It was in Westmoreland County, on the Potomac River,
the very county in Virginia in which George Washington was born, and
on the banks of the same Potomac River.

He was a good boy in everything, good in his home, good in his school,
good in his looks, and good in his ways. His father was not very well
76 ROBERT E. LEE.

when Robert was a little boy and had to be away from home a great deal ~
hunting for good health; so Robert’s mother brought her boy up.

She brought him up well and made a man of him, because she made
him true and manly from the start. He was never what boys call a
“sissy” just because he was mild and good, but he was a manly, brave,





YOUNG LEE RIDING IN FRONT OF « STAFFORD,” VIRGINIA, THE MANSION OF
“LIGHT-HORSE” HARRY LEE.

true-hearted little fellow, kind to all about him, always in love with his
mother, always obeying her, attentive to his studies, doing his duty in
every way as a real boy should.

When Robert was four years old his father moved from his country
home at Stafford to the little city of Alexandria, quite near to Wash-
ington, the capital of the nation.

There Robert went to school in a queer, old-fashioned, yellow house
ROBERT E. LEE. 77

that is still standing in Alexandria, and is still used for a boy’s school.
Its right name was Hallowell’s School, from the master who kept it; but
the boys who went there called it, because of its yellow walls, ‘‘ Brimstone
Castle.”

When Robert was eleven years old his father, the famous “ Light-horse”
Harry Lee of the American Revolution, died in Georgia, where he had
gone for his health. The fatherless boy clung closer to his mother than
ever, and determined to do everything he could to help her; but he had
such a great respect for his father’s memory, and felt so much pride in
the deeds his famous father had done in the cause of liberty and his native
land, that when the time came for him to decide what he would do when
he became a man, he declared he would be a soldier just as his father
had been.

So he went to West Point, the famous Military Academy on the banks
of the Hudson River, where the United States trains boys to lead its
armies and fight its battles.

Robert EH. Lee stayed four years at West Point. He entered there asa
“nleb,”’ or new boy, in 1825, when he was eighteen years old, and leaving
it, or “graduating” as it is called, as Lieutenant Lee in 1829.

He did finely at that famous school. He was what they called a
model cadet—always spick and span in his gray and white soldier suit,
always at the head in his studies, always ready in his duties, in his
drill, and in all he had to do. He never received a demerit, or bad
mark, in all the four years that he was a cadet at West Point. Think
of that!

They said, there, that cadet Lee kept his gun so bright and clean that
the inspecting officer could fairly see his face in its gleaming barrel and
its polished stock.

He was such a fine scholar at West Point that when he got through
and graduated he stood second in his class—that is, next to head, you
know.

This gave him a chance to choose just where he would like to be in
the army when he came out of West Point.

He joined what is called the Engineer Corps, the pick of the whole
army.

The Engineer Corps is made up of men who look after building the forts
78 ROBERT E. LEE.

and defences of our harbors, set our river channels straight, and protect
the land from the sea as well as from the enemy.

It is a fine position for a young officer, and generally gives him
pleasant places to live in and agreeable things to do. Soldiers like it .

ee SS ETT “RT








Yd, SOP beh ae
“ALWAYS TO BE FOUND WHERE THE FIGHTING WAS THE FIERCEST.”

better than being sent off to lonely posts or to watching Indians, and it
gives them a fine training in how to do things about forts and fighting.

Lieutenant Lee was stationed at different places along the Atlantic
coast. He helped plan and build Fortress Monroe, on beautiful Hampton
Roads, in Virginia; he was stationed in Washington in one of the offices
ROBERT E. LEE. 79

of the big War Department; he helped lay out the boundary line between
the States of Ohio and Michigan; he looked after the improvement of the
harbor of St. Louis, and the changes that were made in the shifting
channel of the mighty Mississippi River; he superintended the building
of the forts in New York harbor, and, when he got back from a war,
which I will soon tell you about, he was made Superintendent of the very
place he had gone to school—the Military Academy at West Point; after
that he had command of all the United States troops in Texas. He was
Second Lieutenant in 1829, then First Lieutenant, then, in 1838, Captain
in the regular army—so, you see, he kept going right on in the world,
and was a great deal thought of in the army.

The United States did not have a very big army in those days, but
whenever there was a war it grew quickly. In the year 1846 there came
about a war between the United States and its next-door neighbor, the
republic of Mexico.

Never mind what it was all about, you will learn that when you study
the history of the United States. It was a cruel war, as all war is cruel;
but it was a great chance for Americans who wished to be real soldiers
to show what they were good for and what they could do.

They did well. They marched into Mexico, which is just the other
side of Texas, you know, and they fought so bravely that in less than
two years they had conquered Mexico and added to the United States all
the land from Texas to California and the Pacific Ocean.

In this war Robert E. Lee made a splendid soldier. He was so brave
and gallant, so ready and reliable, that he was always to be found where
the fighting was fiercest. And yet he was so gentle and kind that he
always struck at the point in the enemy's line where they could be
beaten the quickest, so as to finish the fight with the smallest loss of
men in killed and wounded.

There was one battle in Mexico in which the young engineer was
almost the leader and conqueror. This was the time when he got the
best of the Mexicans at a place called Cerro Gordo, high up in the moun-
tains. The Mexican soldiers held the zig-zag road up the mountains. It
ran between great cliffs and chasms, and had cannons all along so as to
keep the Americans from coming up. But Captain Lee, the engineer, said :

“Tf we can’t march against them, we must get behind them. T’Il
80 ROBERT E. LEE.

try.” He hunted all about for a good place, and at last saw a way by
which a sort of a path could be cut through the mountains and come out
behind the Mexicans. He did this so carefully, so swiftly and so silently

aaa anaanna cena Ir eae eae —



eae

CAPTAIN LEE AT CERRO GORDO.

that before the Mexicans knew what they were about he was right

upon them.
Captain Lee led the way, and showed the men just what to do. They

lowered the cannons by ropes down the steep cliff and hauled them up
ROBERT E. LEE. 81

on the opposite hill-side; they cut, and climbed, and jumped, and dug
until they got all the men, all the horses and all the cannons up behind
the Mexican line. ‘Then they turned their guns upon the enemy, and so
surprised and terrified them that almost without a blow all that part of
the Mexican Army surrendered to the American commander, General
Scott.

This was one of Captain Lee’s victories in Mexico. It was one of the
kind he liked, because he had to think it out. It was the best kind of
victory, too, for he won it without having to shoot down and kill very
many men.

For his courage and his soldiership he was again and again promoted
—Captain, Major, Lieutenant-Colonel, Colonel. He was on the staff of
the commander, Winfield Scott, the General of the American Army; and,
after the Mexican war was over, General Scott declared that his success
in Mexico was largely due “to the skill, valor and undaunted courage of
Robert E. Lee.” That is a good deal to say about one man, is it not,
and fine, too?

After the Mexican War was over and all the soldiers had come home
again, Colonel Lee was made Superintendent of the Military Academy at
West Point, as I have already told you.

For three years he was in charge there, directing the soldier boys in
their studies and their drilling at that splendid military school on the
banks of the Hudson. Then he was sent to join the army stationed in
Texas. He was Colonel of a cavalry regiment, the same position that
his famous father, ‘“ Light-horse Harry,” had held in the Army of the Re-
public. Later on he was placed in command of all the soldiers in what
was called the Department of Texas.

While he was home on a long vacation at his beautiful home in Vir-
ginia called Arlington, just opposite Washington, the Civil War broke out.

You know what that was, of course—the dreadful and terrible trouble
between two parts of our dear native land—the North and the South.

It could not be settled peaceably. Men thought so differently about
things that one side would not give in to the other, and so they just had
to. fight it out.

It was a long and bitter war. Many good and brave men were killed

on both sides, and there was sorrow and distress all over the land.
6
82 ROBERT E. LEE.

But when the war was over, the people of the United States became
better friends than they had ever been before, and there will never be
such a war again.

When the war broke out Colonel Robert E. Lee did not know just what
to do. But he thought the matter over long and deeply, and then he
said: ‘I cannot fight against my relatives, my children, my home. I
have been a soldier of the United States, but I am a son of Virginia, and
I must do as my State does.”

He resigned from the United States Army, giving up his position of
Colonel, and was made Major-General of the forces of the State of Virginia.

When Virginia went out of the Union—that is, when her people said,
“We will not belong to the United States any longer, we will join the
Confederate States,” Colonel Lee said, ‘Then I must go with you. ”

He was appointed military adviser to Jefferson Davis, the President of
the newly-formed Confederate States—tfor so the States that went out of
the Union called themselves.

A year later he was made Commanding General of the Army of
Northern Virginia, and for three years he led the brave Southern soldiers
who fought for the Confederacy against the brave Northern soldiers who
fought for the Union.

What a splendid leader of those gallant Southern soldiers General Lee
was! He knew just where to have them march, just when to have them
fight, just what to have them do.

Richmond, in Virginia, was the capital of the Confederate States, just
as Washington is the capital of the United States. General Lee sur-
rounded it with forts and defended it so skilfully that the Northern sol-
diers could not get into it, though they tried again and again, and when-
ever they tried to get through any of the approaches to the city, General
Lee would march his soldiers against them and fight long and desperately.

Boys, when they play at any good game, like a boy to be their leader.
You can do so much better if you have someone to follow, someone who
shows you what to do.

It is just so with men—especially with soldiers—and General Lee was
just such a leader.

His soldiers learned to love him and look up to him almost as you do
to your own father. They called him ‘“‘ Marse Bob” and “ Uncle Bobby ”
ROBERT E. LEE. 83

—not to his face, of course, but when they talked together about him.
He was so kind, and patient, and gentle; he was always trying to help
them, and cared for them so much that they knew he was their friend,



FORTIFYING RICHMOND.

even when he made them march the longest, and even when he made
. them fight the hardest.
But a soldier has to fight, you know. That is why he isa soldier, and,
84 ROBERT E. LEE.

although General Lee was always calm, and quiet, and gentle in speech
and manner, he was a great soldier and sometimes a fierce fighter.

One day, when there was a terrible battle raging, he saw his soldiers
beaten back by the Union troops from a place he wished them to keep.
“They must not lose it,” he said, and he waved his sword above his head
and dashed to the front to lead his soldiers into the battle again. But
his men knew that General Lee’s life was precious ; that if he were killed
there would be no one to lead them to victory.

‘No, no, General!” they cried; ‘‘Go back! Go back, Lee, to the
rear! We'll take it!”

And when he dropped back, he saluted his soldiers for their love and
care for him, and pointed at the Union line with his sword.

‘Forward,’ he said, and his men charging forward, thinking of their
brave and gallant leader, won back the place from which they had been
driven.

Once when his own son, who was also the commander of a large Con-
federate force of cavalry (as his father and grandfather had been, you
know), was in danger of being surrounded by a great force of the enemy,
his father, the General, cried out cheerfully, “‘Keep your men together,
General, ’ll get you out of this,” and he did.

“General,” a young officer shouted, dashing up to him, just as a great
battle was to begin, “The Federals are advancing.” General Lee looked
at him with a funny smile, enjoying the young officer’s excitement.
“Well,” he said, just as cool and calm as you please, ‘I did hear firing,
and I was just beginning to think it was time some of you lazy young
fellows were coming to tell me what it was all about.”

And I suppose that made the young officer laugh right on the edge of
that battle, and to get from his calm and cool General all the more
courage to do his best.

So, you see, while he was brave and serious, he could see the funny
side of things, too, and did all he could to make his soldiers bright as
well as brave, hopeful when things went wrong, calm in the midst of
danger. This is what makes a real soldier, you know.

The North had more men and more money than the South; they kept
on fighting, too, for neither side was willing to give in. But the North
for a long time could get no soldier who was as great a general as Lec.
ROBERT E. LEE. 85

On the third day of June, 1862, he was made General of the Army of
Northern Virginia. That post he held through the war, under that name
he led the Southern soldiers to battle and often to victory, while, by his
wise way of directing his men, he kept the Northern troops away from
Richmond for nearly three years.

He won the Battle of Malvern Hill, he won the Second Battle of Bull
Run, he won the Battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. Twice
he marched his soldiers into the Northern lines, and at Gettysburg, in
Pennsylvania, in 1863, he fought a terrible two-days’ battle which called
for all the strength and all the skill of General Meade, the Northern
leader, to turn it into a victory for the Union.

Four generals of the Union led the armies against him in four great
attempts to defeat and conquer him. But each time Lee was more than
a match, and they fell back from Richmond, defeated.

At last, in the beginning of the year 1864, General U. 8. Grant, who
had been a successful leader of the Union soldiers in the West, was called
to the Hast to take command of the armies of the United States. Then
there came a change.

General Grant knew all about General Lee. They had both been in the
Mexican War. He knew that to win he must do his very best. When
someone asked him how long it would take him to get to Richmond,
General Grant said, ‘ Well, about four days, if General Lee is willing ;
if he isn’t, well, it’s going to take a good deal longer.”

And it did. General Lee did object ; he objected with guns and swords
and men, and the soldiers of the North and the soldiers of the South
fought many terrible battles. The fighting grew fiercer and hotter.
Grant would never give up, but kept pressing on. Bit by bit the Union
soldiers drew about Richmond; bit by bit the Confederate soldiers gave
way, as their money, their strength and their numbers began to fail.
But they fought gallantly still. General Lee was watchful and deter-
mined. His eyes saw every weak spot in the Union line; he could
spread out his brave but tired and hungry soldiers so as to make the
best show, and his men loved him so well and followed him so willingly
that he was able to keep up the fight longer than any other general could
have done. Never before in all the world had so many men been brought
face to face in battle, and dreadful battles they were, there in the swamps
86 ROBERT E. LEE.

and woods and fields of Virginia, in the year 1864. It was because both
sides were brave men, and because brave and great generals led them,
that these battles were so fierce, for Grant was bound to win and Lee
was bound not to let him.

But when, at last, all hope of successfully defending Richmond was



“HE WAVED HIS SWORD ABOVE HIS HEAD AND DASHED TO THE FRONT,”

gone, when the brave chieftain had tried to break his way through the
lines of Union soldiers, who now surrounded his army, and had failed,
when he saw that to keep up the fight any longer was only a useless
killing of men, a thing he always hated and tried to stop, then General
ROBERT E. LEE. 87

Lee laid down his sword and surrendered himself and his army to his
great foeman, General Grant, a man as gentle, as honorable and as kindly
hearted as was he.

It was a sad day for General Lee, when he at last determined to give
up the battle.

At first, when one of his soldiers saw how useless it would be to ~
fight any longer, and told the General that he ought to surrender, the
_ grand old soldier straightened himself up and said:

“Surrender? No, sir. I have too many good fighting men for that.”

But General Grant had more, and so, as I told you, General Lee saw
this at last, and to stop the killing of any more brave men, he gave it
up—that is, he surrendered.

It all came to an end at last at a place called Appomattox Court
House, in Virginia. It was on the ninth day of April, 1865. The two
Generals met between the lines at a farm-house near an apple orchard,
and talked it all over. Both were glad to stop fighting; both were
proud of the heroism of their own men, and proud, also, of the courage
of the other side, for all were Americans.

General Grant said to General Lee, “If you will only promise for
yourself and your soldiers not to fight any more against the United
States, that is all I ask.’

General Lee promised, and so the greatest civil war that ever was
fought was ended in the kindest way just because both the leaders were
great as well as good, and when they made a promise would keep it.

Then General Lee rode back to his army and told his men what he
had done. ‘‘The war is over,” he said.

But when his soldiers heard it, although they were hungry and sick
and tired out and weary with so much fighting, they crowded about
their good General when he came back from arranging things with
General Grant, and cried like children.

‘General, take back that word,” cried one. ‘We'll die, but we won’t
surrender.”

General Lee looked on the brave men lovingly.

‘No, no,” he said. ‘We have done all brave men can do. If I let
another brave man be killed I should be a murderer. Go home to your
88 ROBERT E. LEE.

wives and children; whatever may be my fate, you will be safe. God
bless you all. Good-by!”

And then he turned and went into his tent.

After President Lincoln was killed, there was some fear that the new
President would do some harm to General Lee, because he had been the
leader of the Confederate soldiers. But General Grant stood up boldly
and said:

“You must not touch him. I gave him my solemn promise that he
should not be touched, and you must not let me break my word.”

So the great and terrible Civil War in the United States came to an
end. Peace was in the land, and as men looked back and thought it all
over, the one man who stood out before all the world as the greatest
soldier of the South in all that long and bloody war was Robert H. Lee,
the General of its Army, the son of brave ‘“Light-horse” Harry Lee.

When peace came and the soldiers had nothing to do in the way of
war, General Lee went home a poor man. He had lost almost all he
owned in those four dreadful years of war.

But the people of his own State loved and honored him so much that
they made him the head of one of the best schools in Virginia—Wash-
ington College. And as soon as it .was known that General Lee was to
be the President of the College, young men flocked to it so that they
might say they had General Lee for a teacher. He was as good a lesson
himself as anything they could learn from books. Do you know how?
He was so fine a man that they looked up to him and tried to be as good
and true and noble as he was.

For five years he lived as President of Washington College. Then, on
the twelfth day of October, 1870, he died, there among his students and
his books, a noble old man of sixty-three.

He was a great soldier and a great man. He was such a good man,
too. He loved little children dearly and always saluted every boy or
girl who-bowed or courtesied to him as he rode through the streets on
his splendid big horse, ‘“‘ Traveler.”

Once he came upon some boys he knew who were quarreling.
Indeed, they called each other names, and began to fight.

“Oh, General!” cried a little girl, running up to him, “ please don’t
let them fight.”
ROBERT E. LEE. 89

The General took the boys by the shoulder.

“Come, boys, boys!” he said, gently. ‘That isn’t nice. There is
some better way to settle your quarrels than with your fists.”

And how he did love little girls.

‘Where is my little Miss Mildred?” he would ask when he got home
from a ride or a walk, as the night was coming on. ‘She is my light-
bearer. The house is never dark if she is in it.”

Was not that a sweet and pretty way to speak about his little
daughter? Do you wonder that the children all loved him?

What made General Lee a great soldier was because he knew how to
lead a smaller number of soldiers against a larger number and defeat the
enemy by not letting them know what he was doing until he had done it.

This is what is called strategy. It was by this that General Wash-
ington won many battles in the Revolution, and in the same way
General Lee was victorious over and over again in the Civil War.

But he won quite as much by his great, gentle heart as by his flashing
sword. After the war was over people loved him dearly, and since his
death they have loved him even more, because, as they look back and
see how good and grand a man he was, they forget that he failed; they
only remember how hard he tried and how well he did. All through the
South he loved so well and which loved him so much, statues, to-day,
are being built to keep alive the memory of his life.

To-day, North as well as South, all America honors him, and as the
years go by the boys and girls, who, as they grow up, will hear his name
and know his story, will think of him not as Lee the Confederate General,
but as Robert E. Lee, the soldier, the gentleman, the American.
eine nteraccranegene cial




BENJASIUN
FRANKLIN,

The Candlemaker’s Son, who with
his Kite Discovered that Electricity
FRANKLIN’S KITE LEADS THE

Be HO da OD REN ae is the cause of Lightning.
OF ELECTRICITY.

ID any of my little readers ever look at a lightning rod putting up
from the roof of a house, and do you know what that lightning
rod is for? I will tell you. When you hear the thunder in the heavens,
there is a strange force which darts out in zigzag lines of fire, and if it
strikes anything like a tree or a house, it tears it to pieces, and perhaps
sets it on fire; but if it strikes a person or an animal, it does not break
even the skin, but passes through them in the twinkling of an eye and
kills them. This strange force most people call lightning, and the
lightning rod is put on the house to catch it and carry it down into the
earth before it strikes the building.
Two hundred years ago nobody knew how to catch the lightning, and
everybody stood in great dread of it. Now we know how to catch it

and carry it away from our houses, and we also know how to make it
(90)
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 91

run along wires and carry messages from one friend to another so fast
that, if you were a thousand miles away, your friend, if he were at the
end of the wire, would be receiving the message while you were at the
other end sending it.

We have also learned how to make it carry even the human voice for
a thousand miles, so that if you were in New York you might step up
to a little box, called the telephone, and talk into it, and your mother,
father, or friend could hear your words plainly in Chicago, nearly a
thousand miles away. It would pass so quickly that you and they could
talk back and forth almost as easy and quickly as if you were in the
game room. We also make this wonderful force pull our street-cars
through the great cities, thus setting free the horses that used to have
to do it. Wealso make it light our streets and houses, and we call it
electricity.

Is this not a very strange and a very wonderful power? And would
you not like to hear the story of the great man who first caught from the
skies this vivid, flashing lightning, and found out that he could harness
it, almost as easily as we can harness a horse, and make the very thing
which people had always dreaded as a terrible destroyer, the best friend
and servant of man? Did you say you would like to hear his story? 1
will tell it to you. His name was Benjamin Franklin.

A very long time ago, perhaps about four hundred years, there lived
in Northhamptonshire, England, a poor blacksmith whose name was
Franklin. In that country at that time, the oldest son always followed
the same trade or work which his father followed. So the oldest son in
the Franklin family always became a blacksmith, and he always got
the property which belonged to his father when the father died. The
other children had to get out and shift for themselves. The youngest
son in one of the large Franklin families was named Josiah. He couldn’t
bea blacksmith, as his older brother took up that business and inherited
his father’s shop. So Josiah went out and gave himself to a man who
made soap and tallow candles, and agreed to serve him, without any
pay except his board and clothes, until he was twenty-one years of age,

‘All this he did that he might learn the trade of a soap-boiler and candle-
maker. When he was twenty-one his employer gave him, as was the
custom, a new suit of clothes, a few dollars for his personal use, and a
92 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

letter saying that he had learned his trade well. With that letter to
show, young Josiah was able to go and hire himself to work where he
could get pay for his labor. The hired man nearly always lived in his
employer’s family, and received his board and a few dollars per month.

After a little while, Josiah was married and continued to live in England
and work at his trade until his wages were hardly sufficient to support
himself, his wife and three children on the coarsest kind of food. He
did, however, save up, in his earlier years, a little money, and the stories
of the New World—America—kept coming to his ears. He heard that
there were few candlemakers and soap-boilers in America, and that a
young man who understood his trade would have a much better chance
here than in England; so in the year 1682, a little more than two
hundred years ago, he took his wife and three children, and such
clothing, bedding and household things as they could bring, on board
a big sailing vessel and came to America. He landed in Boston, and
soon set himself up as a soap and candlemaker. He found it much
easier to support his family here than in the old country, and he became
very much in love with his new home.

In the year 1706, twenty-four years after Josiah Franklin and his wife
and three children came to America, a little baby boy was born. Like
his father, he proved to be the last child in the family, and his father
named him Benjamin. You remember Jacob’s youngest son was named
Benjamin. But Ben Franklin had sixteen brothers and sisters older
than himself. Don’t you think that was a big family ? Seventeen boys
and girls besides the mother and father! But you must remember they
were not all then in the house. The oldest of his brothers were nearly
thirty years of age when he was born, and they had gone into various
kinds of business for themselves.

Benjamin was a good boy and his father loved him very much;
you know how parents often love their youngest the best. The little
fellow learned to read when he was very young, but he was only sent to
school for two years, and then he was taken away, when he was only
ten years of age, to work in his father’s candle-shop. His business was

- to cut wicks for the candles, fill the moulds with the melted tallow, tend

the shop and run the errands. But ‘Ben,’ as he was called, did not
like this business. He would very much rather look in picture books
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 93

and read the easy, stories. He always loved to go down to the water’s

edge, and he
very quickly,
to save some
jump in a boat
the boys.

handle a boat
swimmer. He §

about far-away
countries, and
the strange peo-
ple and wonder-
ful sights, and he

thought it would be a splendid §
thing to be a sailor, and he told F
his father how much he would §

like to be one and go to sea.

But his father would not con-§

sent, and so Benjamin, like an
obedient son, gave it up, though
he often lay awake at nights










often did an errand
running all the way
time, that he might
or go swimming with

Thus he learned to
and to be an expert
heard the sailors talk

BEN FRANKLIN MOULDING CANDLES IN HIS
: FATHER’S SHOP.

and thought how grand it would be to
94 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

bound over the great billows and to visit all the countries of the world.
Sometimes he would dream he was away on the ocean, and would wake
up to find himself in his own little bed.

Franklin was also a great lover of fishing. Hvery chance he got, he
and his little boy companions would get their lines, and, rolling up their
pants, would wade into the marsh and fish in a mill-pond. Sometimes
the water was too cold, and besides he had heard it was not healthy to
stand in the water. So he said to the boys that it would be a good
thing to build a wharf to stand on as the men did for their work about
the water. They all thought so too.

There was a pile of stones not far away which were to be used to build
a new house. So they said the men could get more for themselves, or,
perhaps, they had more than they wanted; and in the evening, when
the men quit work, the boys slipped out—for they knew it was not just
right—and they carried enough of these stones away to make them a
good pier far out into the water.

Next day when the workmen came they wondered where their rocks
had gone. Upon searching around, they found what the mischievous
boys had done, and, as they had seen them there often fishing, they knew
just who had done it and went straight to their parents about it. Some
of the mothers and fathers only laughed, but Mr. Franklin took Ben aside
and began to lecture him. Ben tried to argue with his father that the
pier was very necessary as it kept the boys’ feet dry while they fished,
and he pretended to think it was a good thing they had done. But Mr.
Franklin told him that nothing was good or right that was not honest,
and, to impress the lesson on his mind, he gave Benjamin a sound
thrashing and forbade his fishing there any more. Ever after that, Ben
was an honest boy and an upright man.

But Ben did not get over his desire to go to sea. He did not dare to
ask permission, but he was always talking about what the sailors said,
and using words which showed he had learned the different sails and
much about ships. So his father grew afraid that his son would run
away and go to sea as one of his other sons had already done. One day
after Ben had been in the tallow-candle shop for two years—and was
now ten years old—his father began to talk with him about other trades.
He took him frequently to walk and they would stop to look at different
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 95

kinds of workmen, such as bricklayers, carpenters, iron-workers and
many others. He hoped the boy would like some of these better than
the life of a sailor, but Benjamin did not care for any of them.

By this time he had, however, grown very fond of reading. He
poured over his father’s dull books and sold little things of his own to
buy more. Often he would trade his old books at the second-hand book-
stores for others he had not read. So Mr. Franklin, seeing he was so
fond of reading books, thought it was best to make a printer of him.
His oldest son, James Franklin, already had a printing office and press.
Benjamin said he would like this trade, so he was apprenticed to his
brother to learn it.

When we say Ben was “apprenticed” we mean he was given to
his brother to have as his own until he should be twenty-one years
old. He was to work for his brother without any pay, except his
board and clothing. As Benjamin was about eleven years old now, he
would have to serve his brother for ten years to learn his trade. Ben-
jamin liked this trade very much. He got to see many new books and
could always borrow all he wanted, and used to sit up sometimes all night
to read a book so he could return it, unsoiled, to the store in the morning.

The boy took a great fancy to poetry and at odd moments wrote some
verses himself. When he had quite a lot, he showed it to his brother
James. Certainly it was, as Franklin afterwards called it, “wretched
stuff,” but James printed it and sent Ben around Boston to peddle it.
He was doing this with much pride when his father laughed at him and
made fun of his poetry, and told him he would always be a beggar if he
wrote verses for a living. He stopped short his writing and peddling
poetry. But he was bound to write, for he loved to do it, and I will
tell you how he played a nice trick off on his brother:

James Franklin published a little newspaper. It was Ben’s duty
after the paper was printed to carry loads of them around and deliver
them to the subscribers. The boy read this paper, and he thought he
could write as well as many whose articles were published in it. But he
would not dare to ask his brother James to let him write, nor would he
let anyone know what he wrote. His father would be sure to make fun,
as he did of his poetry, if he sawit. So he‘wrote almost every week and
slipped his pieces under the office door after it was closed. James
96 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

printed them and his father read them, but they did not dream that Ben
wrote them.

Now I will tell you of a way he saved money to buy books. Remem-
ber he got no wages for his work, but he always had money. A boy is
not of much account if he does not have money. When you see a boy

; always going around
without a cent, it is a
pretty good sign he
will never save any-
thing. Franklin had
got the notion that
it was wrong to eat
meat. Now, his
brother paid his
board, you know. So
the boy told his broth-
er if he would give
him half what his
board cost he would
board himself. As
that would save
James something, he
agreed. Benjamin
, quit eating meat and
lived on bread and
other cheap foods.
Thus, he saved money
to buy books, and by
eating only a bit of
bread and a tart for
dinner he had half an hour every day, while the others were eating
heavy dinners, to devote to reading; and this is the way he educated
himself.

Would you think it strange if I told you that Benjamin did not like
his brother James? It is a*fact, he did not. They often quarrelled, for



THE BOY FRANKLIN SLIPPING HIS CONTRIBUTION TO
THE PAPER UNDER THE OFFICE DOOR,
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 97

James did not treat his little brother right and sometimes gave him
beatings. I will tell you how he got free from hin.

One day James printed something in his paper which made the Goy-
ernor of the Colony mad. They arrested him and put him in jail for a whole
month. Benjamin published the paper while his brother was in prison,
and he said some very ugly things about the government, but was careful
not to say anything for which they could get him in prison. This pleased
James very much. But when they let him out of prison they forbade his
publishing the paper any longer. Nowwhat was Jamestodo? Hewasa
shrewd business man, so he said to Benjamin that he would set him free
and run the paper in his name. So they destroyed the papers that
bound the boy in law. Ben, however, said he would remain with his
brother until he was twenty-one years old. This agreement was made
and so it started, but soon James tried to impose on Ben as he had
done before; but as Ben was no longer bound to him, he left him. Ben
afterwards said that he did not do fairly in this, and he was sorry for it,
though it was, perhaps, nothing more than James deserved.

Benjamin now tried to hire himself to other printers; but none of
them would take him because he had broken his contract with his
brother. Besides they had all agreed together that when one of their
apprentices left, none of the others should hire him.

What was he to do? He was only seventeen years old, but he was
not to be discouraged. Gathering a few of his books, he went aboard a
sloop setting sail for New York. In that city he tried for days, but
could get no work. Someone told him to try Philadelphia. It was
a tedious and dangerous journey as it must be made by water. There
were no railroads then. He took a sail-boat to Amboy, New Jersey,
A storm came up and the boat was driven ashore, and the poor fright-
ened boy lay all night in the little hold of the boat with the waves
dashing over it, and the water, leaking through, soaked him to the skin.
It took him thirty-two hours to get to Amboy, and all that time he had
neither a drink of water nor a bite to eat.

Having very little money he set out on foot and walked to Burlington.
Here he was met by trouble he had not looked for. His ragged clothes,
wet and soiled, made him look like what we now call a tramp; but

there were no tramps in those days. They thought he was a runaway
7 .
98 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

and came very near putting him in jail, and he says he was then sorry
he had not remained in Boston with his brother James.

But it was now too late to: go back, so he found a man with a row-boat
at Burlington who was going to Philadelphia, and Franklin agreed to go
with him and help him row the boat to pay his passage. They arrived
at Philadelphia in the night, but as there were then no street lamps in
the city, they passed by without knowing it. At length they went
ashore and made a fire to dry themselves, and waited until morning
and rowed to the city.

Poor Benjamin Franklin, all soiled, tired and very hungry, started up
the street to find something to eat. He had no trunk or valise for his
extra clothing, so he stuffed his extra stockings and shirt in his pockets.
He soon found a baker shop and asked for biscuits as he used to buy in
Boston. The baker did not know what they were. They did not make
biscuits in Philadelphia. So Franklin asked him to give him threepenny
worth of bread of any kind, as he was very hungry. The baker gave
him three loaves, and, putting one under each arm, he chewed vigorously
on the other as he walked along. Don’t you suppose he looked very odd
and funny walking along the streets in his soiled clothes with his pockets
stuffed with socks and a shirt, a loaf of bread under each arm and eat-
ing another?

Well, so he did. And as he passed along a pretty girl, named De-
borah Read, looked out of the door, and he saw her laughing “‘ fit to kill,”
and making all manner of fun of him. His pride was stung, but he was
too hungry and helpless to do anything then. Many years afterwards he
married this very girl, and she was very fortunate and proud to get him.

Franklin soon found a place to work with a printer named Keimer,
and he very quickly showed that he was quite different from other work-
men and boys about the place. He knew all about printing, so he was
a valuable workman, and he had read and knew so much in books that
those who knew him liked to hear him talk, and they used to refer to
him to settle disputes on all sorts of questions. Instead of spending his
evenings at the tavern drinking or gossiping, as other young men did,
he went to his room and read good books or went in the company of
those of whom he could learn something. Such young men as these
always attract the attention of others.
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 99

One day Mr. Keimer, the printer, looked out and saw two finely dressed
gentlemen coming to his place. He went out to meet them and found
it was no other than Sir William Keith, the Governor of Pennsylvania,
and one of his friends. They had on silver knee-buckles and powdered
wigs and ruffled shirts and gay-colored coats and silk stockings. Such
fine people had never visited his shop before, and Keimer was much
pleased, thinking what an honor it was to him, and, perhaps, he thought
they might give him a big bill of printing to do. How great must
have been his disappointment when the Governor asked to see a young
man by the name of Benjamin Franklin.

Franklin came out with his sleeves rolled up and wearing leather
breeches—such as nearly all workmen wore in those days. He was
quite surprised that the Governor should visit him, but was not ashamed
to be an honest workman, and without ceremony he walked away
between the two fine gentlemen to the tavern. Now what do you sup-
pose the fine Governor wanted with this common young printer in his
leather breeches? He told him that he wanted him to start a printing
office of his own, as none of the other men of the city were first-class
workmen. Franklin was very proud of the Governor’s good opinion, but
told him that he could not think of starting for himself as he was too
poor to buy a press and types of his own and he did not think his father
would help him.

The Governor wrote a letter to Franklin’s father urging him to help
his son, and sent Franklin to Boston, dressed up nicely, wearing a watch,
and with money in his pocket, to carry the letter. His parents were
delighted to see him looking so large and strong and so much improved
in every way. But when he showed the Governor's letter, asking his
father’s aid in buying a press, he was told by the old gentleman that he
was too young to go in business for himself.

Franklin returned to Philadelphia with a heavy heart and reported to
the Governor what had happened. The Governor seemed very much
disappointed, and told Franklin that, if he would go to England to buy
the presses and types, he would start him in business for himself. Ben-
jamin agreed to do this, and at the appointed time called on the Goy-
ernor to get the letters of introduction and credit which the Governor
said he would give him so he could buy whatever he wanted. They
100 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

were not ready, but the Governor told him he would send them to the
ship with other mail and he would get them before landing in England.

So Franklin went aboard the vessel and for many days had a delight-
ful sail across the Atlantic Ocean. Just before they came to land, the
mail-bags were opened, but what was his amazement to find that there
was no letter from the Governor for him. They searched carefully all
through the letters sent by the Governor to make sure, but there was
not a word for or about Franklin or the printing press and types he was
to buy.

Here he was, a poor young man with no money and no friends, several
thousand miles from home. It would take about six weeks to write to
the Governor and hear from him. He thought it over and wondered if
the Governor had forgotten it or just treated him meanly. A man on the
ship told him that the Governor did many strange things, that he had
no credit abroad, and could not have bought a printing press for himself,
and that was the reason he had sent no letter of credit. Then Franklin ©
made one of his wise sayings, “Fine clothes do not make a fine gentle-
man,” which we still often hear repeated.

But Franklin had learned to depend on himself and knew his printer’s
trade well, and he at once got a position to set type in London, where he
learned many things that he did not know before. One was to engrave
pictures and handsome letters on metal. Another was to make printer’s
ink, and yet another how to cast type or letters. This was all very use-
ful to him in after years.

We have told you that Franklin would not eat meat. He also refused
to drink wine or any intoxicating drink. Now, all of the English
printers and laborers drank a great deal of beer, and when lunch-time
came, and Franklin sat down with his cup of milk or water,
they laughed at him, and told him that water would make him
weak and he would be of no account if he did not drink beer or whiskey
or something, and eat meat to make him strong.

Franklin told them that was a mistake, and, to prove it, he lifted heavy
weights and showed himself stronger than any man in the shop. One
holiday in the summer they went out for a swim in the River Thames,
and Franklin could swim farther and faster than any of them. They
also thought as he had come from the “ wild new world,” he did not
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 101

know much, but after they had talked to him a bit they found out he
had read more books than any of them, and instead of going out at
nights he spent his time reading. There was a man near by who kept
a second-hand bookstore, and Franklin used to oy him so much a week
to let him take out books and read them.

By and by he found he had saved enough money to return to America,

so he came back and got a position as a clerk in a store, but his em-
ployer died and he went back to work at the printer’s trade. He hired
himself to his old master, Keimer, and proved himself very useful in
engraving plates to print a new paper money which was then being used
in the Colony.

After a while Franklin bought a press and started a printing-house

of his own. He had to go greatly in debt for
it, but by very hard work he believed he could
pay the debt. He used to get up in the mornings
when other men were asleep and go to work,
and he was in his office at night after others
were in bed. If he had not been a very strong
and robust man, this would have made him
sick. Perhaps he stood it better because he
lived on nothing but milk and bread and drank a
mo) intoxicating, drinks. He did ‘everything | Cen ea ae
about his printing office. He made a wise
saying: “If you want a thing done well, do it yourself.” So when he
wanted paper, he took a wheelbarrow and went over to the paper house,
bought it and wheeled it home himself.
_ He soon started a little newspaper, and he had read so much that he
was able to write, for himself, almost everything he printed in it. He also
seta large portion of the type; and for a long time worked his printing press
with his own hands, for there were no steam presses in those days.
People saw how industrious he was, and, as he was the best printer in
Philadelphia, he soon had more work than he could do, working early
and late.

Now, I will tell you an interesting thing that happened. You remem-
ber I told you about the girl who laughed at him, when he walked up
the streets several years before, with his pockets stuffed full of socks and


102 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

a shirt, eating a loaf of bread and carrying two others under his arms.
Well, when Franklin was away in England, this pretty young lady,
whom he always liked very much, got married, and when he came home
he was sorry to hear it, for he had always hoped that he might become
able to take a wife himself, and, if he should, she was the one he meant
to ask to marry him. Some time after Franklin came home, the hus-
band of his old-time sweetheart died.

Franklin waited until she took off her mourning, and he had gotten
himself well started in his own shop, then he went over and told her
what he had always intended to do, and said if she was willing to marry
him now, he believed he could make a good living for the two in his own
business, but, of course, they would have to live poor at first. He also
told her that he was thinking of starting a little bookstore in front of his
printing office, and, if she would marry him, she could be his clerk in
the bookstore.

She readily consented, for she had always liked Franklin. So they
were married and the young couple set to work to pay off the debts for
the printing office. They had no servant and they lived on very plain
food. Franklin still ate for his breakfast only plain bread and milk out
of a plain earthen dish, with a pewter spoon. His wife attended the
store, sold books and stationery, and, long before they expected to be so,
they were out of debt and beginning to grow rich.

If you had gone into the house in those days you would have found
very few books, but in every home you would have found something
which people read very little now-a-days, namely, an almanac. It told
the people about the weather, the days of the month and the weeks, put
in a lot of recipes for cooking and all sorts of household remedies. In
addition to this, it had wise sayings and choice bits of reading. So you
see the almanac was a calendar, a cook book, a doctor book and a read-
ing book. Franklin concluded to print an almanac. He called it ‘‘ Poor
Richard’s Almanac,” and it is noted to-day for its wise sayings. Frank-.
lin signed the wise sayings, “ Richard Saunders,” and that is why it is
called “Poor Richard’s Almanac;” but everybody knew Benjamin
Franklin wrote it.

By this time Franklin was one of the most learned men in the Colony,
for, although he had never been to school since he was ten years old, he
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 103

had, by studying at odd times, learned to speak and write several lan-
guages. One of the great needs of the people, he said, was an oppor-
tunity to read good books. There were very few books in the country
and they were mostly in the libraries of rich people in their homes. So
Franklin started a public library in Philadelphia. It was the first one
started in this country, and he encouraged all the working people to
spend their evenings and holidays at the library reading.

About this time there was a great deal of talk about a strange in-
fluence called electricity and wise men of Europe wrote much about it.
Franklin read everything they wrote. Nobody knew what it was. Some
of the wise men from the Old World came over to Philadelphia and
lectured, and Franklin told them he believed that electricity was noth-
ing more than the same power which caused the lightning and the
thunder in the skies. They laughed at him of course, so he determined
to try and find out if it was not the same. How do you suppose he did
it? I will tell you.

Franklin noticed that the electricity in the batteries or machines
which these men used, if applied to a hemp string, would make the
short ends of the hemp stand up straight like the hair on a cat’s tail
when the cat is mad or excited. He also noticed when he touched the
battery, he felt a shock from the electricity. ‘Now,’ he said, “if the
lightning in the clouds is electricity, it will also make the ends of the
hemp string stand up, and if I could only get it to come to me, through
a piece of metal, I could feel the shock as I did from the electric bat-
tery.”

The serious question was how he could get the hemp string up to the
clouds. After a while he remembered that when he was a boy, he had
often made a kite fly up as high as the clouds. So he took a silk hand-
kerchief, made himself a kite and tied a long hemp string to it and put
a steel point at the end of the kite, for he had found out that steel would
attract electricity. On the other end of the hemp string, down close to
his hand, he tied a metal key, and then from the key he tied a silk string
which he held in his hand. They had found that electricity would not
go through a silk string, and he reasoned that, if there was electricity in
the clouds, it would be caught on the metal point of the kite and pass
104 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

down the hemp string to the metal key, but would not pass down the
silk string to his hand.

He was afraid if he should fly his kite in the daytime a great crowd
would gather around him, and, if his experiment should not prove
successful, they would laugh at him; so one night when there was a
wind and a thunderstorm, he went out all alone and sent his kite up.
When it was way up above the clouds, and the thunder was pealing and
the lightning was flashing, he saw the hemp on his string stand up on
ends. Then he reached his finger to the key and received a shock just
as he felt it in the electric battery. He had proved that lightning was
electricity, and he had learned how to catch %.

The learned men of the Old World were astonished that a man who
had never been to school since he was ten years of age had beaten them
all so far in this mysterious and strange discovery. They said he was a
philosopher, and called him “Doctor Franklin.” Many people, however,
only laughed at the discovery. Some of Franklin’s friends said to him:
“Now that you have discovered it, of what use is it?” Franklin
answered scornfully: “Of what use is achild? It may become a man.”
He meant to teach them that a discovery of any truth was a very impor-
tant matter, and that all knowledge may be turned to good use.

Franklin then set to work and invented the lightning rod, which is, as
we have said, a steel point on the house which catches the lightning and
runs it down a metal rod into the ground, saving the house from destruc-
tion, just as the steel point on Franklin’s kite caught the electricity from
the clouds and ran it down the hemp string.

Franklin was now a great man and the Americans were very proud
of him. So they sent him on a journey to London in the interest of the
people. Dr. Franklin was now reminded of a proverb of Solomon which
his father used to repeat when he was a boy: “Seest thou a man
diligent in his business? He shall stand before kings.” He was now
going to stand before the ‘“ Privy Council” of the King of England; and
what do you suppose he was going for? I will tell you.

When Pennsylvania was settled, William Penn was made the Governor,
and a large amount of land was given him by the King for his faithful
services. When William Penn died, his sons inherited this large amount
of land, and they claimed that they should not pay any taxes on it, and
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 105

refused to do so. The people thought they ought to pay like others, and
so did Franklin, hence he was sent to London to plead the cause of the
people against the sons of William Penn. The result was the King
made them pay taxes like everybody else, and Franklin came home
more honored than ever. He had stood before the King and gained a
great cause for the people.

Seven years after this the English people undertook a very great
injustice to the American Colonies. Always before this, when the King
wanted money from the colonists, he had asked for it by his Privy
Council and they had sent it freely. During the French and Indian
War against England, the colonists had given so freely that the King
said they had sent too much, and he made England pay back two
hundred thousand dollars a year for several years. Now in 1763 there
was a man by the name of George Grenville made Prime Minister of
England, and he was Lord of the Treasury. Without asking the King
he decided to tax the Colonies in America, and to do it he had stamps
made which he said should be put on all boxes of tea and everything
they bought, and the people who bought it would have to pay for these
stamps.

The people said they would give money when the King wanted it and
asked for it, as they had always done; but as they had no represen-
tative in Parliament to plead for them, and as Parliament never had
taxed them, they would not now submit to being taxed in this way.

So the colonists from all over the country sent Dr. Franklin to Eng-
land again, and he showed them how unjust it would be to make his
country buy these stamps. He told them that the people of America
would give money when the King asked for it. He showed them how
liberal they had always been in giving more than was required. He told
them the stamps on the goods would look like compulsion, and, while
they could persuade the American people to do anything, they were too
liberty-loving to be forced to do an unjust thing.

But Mr. Grenville persuaded Parliament to pass the law called the
“Stamp Act,” and the stamps were put on all the goods that came to
‘America. That meant the people of America had to pay England for
the privilege of buying goods. This made the Americans very angry and
they would not buy the goods. But a few people did buy them, and that
106 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

made the true patriots very angry. So one day when a ship loaded with
tea came into Boston harbor, with the hated stamps on the boxes, the
people went aboard and threw it into the sea.































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ATTN























































































































































































































































































































INDEPENDENCE HALL, PHILADELPHIA.

A few months later the mean Mr. Grenville was removed from the
office of Prime Minister, and, through Dr. Franklin’s influence, Parlia-
ment repealed the unjust “Stamp Act.” Dr. Franklin was very popular
in England. His learning and wisdom were so great that Oxford Uni-
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 107

versity gave him a degree LL.D., and other universities gave him degrees
of honor.

But, in spite of Dr. Franklin’s efforts and popularity, other unjust laws
were made and kept in force, and the quarrel already started grew worse
and worse. The people saw England had no love for them, and was only
holding them to help support the English King and rich people. This
made them hate the mother country. Patrick Henry, the fiery orator,
had made a great speech in Virginia, and urged the colonists to go to
war rather than submit. This speech had been printed and gone all
over the country, and fired the people against their oppressors. Mean-
time, England sent warships to America to frighten the people into sub-
mission. So Dr. Franklin after ten years’ hard work to keep peace left
England in April, 1775. When he landed on May 6th, he found that
the battle of Lexington had been fought, and the war was really begun.

As soon as he reached Philadelphia, he again tried to do what he could
to bring about peace, for he feared our small nation of about three millions
of people—not so many in all the country as there are now in the city
of greater New York—would be almost destroyed if they tried to fight
against the great kingdom of England with her many trained soldiers
and great warships.

But finding that England would not do right, he determined with
Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and other great men that
it was better to die as a freeman than to live in such slavery as England
wanted to put upon us. He was elected a delegate to the Continental
Congress, where the greatest men came from all the Colonies; and he
helped make, and signed, the Declaration of Independence.

He next went to work to get up soldiers—but he was a statesmen
instead of a soldier, and General Washington asked him to go to Canada
and see if the Colonies there would not join us in our war, and make
England set them free also. Franklin went and tried hard to induce
them, but finally had to give it up and come home. He was made Post-
master General of the United Colonies; that is, he had general charge
of all the mail.

When the war had been going on two years, everybody saw we must
have help, or we should be beaten, our country would be ruined, and all
our great men would be hung or shot as traitors to the English Govern-
108 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

ment. France had been secretly helping us for some time, for they
hated the English, but they would not come out boldly, for they were
afraid of getting into a great war with England themselves.

The colonists knowing that Dr. Franklin could speak French, having
learned it by studying at odd times while a young man, and also that
he was the wisest and most popular man in the country, decided to send
him to the court of France to beg them to help us.

Thus Franklin again stood before a king. He was now a venerable
man seventy years of age, but full of vigor and full of life and one of
the shrewdest men who ever went abroad for his country. The people
of Paris—the gayest city and the proudest court of the world—were
charmed with his wise sayings, his simple ways and his quaint manners,
for he pretended to be only a poor colonist, although he was famous all
over Kurope for his wise statesmanship, his learning in books, his dis-
coveries and inventions.

Franklin made himself very friendly, accommodating and pleasant;
for while his heart was almost bleeding for his suffering countrymen,
and he wanted France to send aid quickly, he knew he must go about it
in a very shrewd way and make them like him so much they could not:
refuse him. This teaches us a lesson. If we want people to help us, we
must make them like us. It also reminds us of another wise saying:
‘““Vinegar never catches flies.”

So Franklin went into their society. He talked with their learned
men about science and philosophy and everything they wanted to discuss.
One day he found a lot of scientific men talking very excitedly. He
listened, and found out they were trying to answer, by science, why it
was that a dead fish if dropped into a bucketful of water would cause
it to run over, but if a live fish of the same size were put into the bucket
it would not run over. Many reasons were given by the learned French
doctors, differmg so much that they got into quite a war of words.
Presently someone said, ‘Mr. Franklin, we have not heard your ex-
planation yet.”

With a smile Franklin asked them to bring in a bucket of water
and two fish the same size. This was done. “Kill one of the fish,”
said Franklin. This was done, and Franklin put it in the water and it
ran over just as the wise men had said. “ Now,” said Franklin, “ fill up
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 109

the bucket level full again.’’ This was done and he dropped in the live
fish. It ‘‘scooted” around and more water ran over than the dead fish
displaced. “There,” said Franklin, ‘‘before wasting time in argument, be
: sure of your facts.”

This is another
one of his wise say-
ings, and to this
day it is a maxim
in France, where
Franklin is almost
as popular as in his
native land.

Franklin soon
won over thie
French people to
the American side.
They wanted to
help us, but it was
very much then as
with our people who
want to help the
Cubans in their
struggle for freedom
from Spain’s tyr-
anny. ‘The govern-
ment did not want
to do anything for
their fear of HEng-
land.

But after about
a year of sleepless
nights and thoughtful days, Franklin won the government over too. It
was a glorious day for him, when the treaty was made and sixteen big
warships and four thousand French soldiers sailed out from France to
help us fight.

Besides this, Franklin could now buy more vessels, and as you read in





;
: SNe Se
-—_——- -— SOD RA Eon

DR. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN AS MINISTER TO FRANCE,
110 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

the life of Paul Jones, in this book, he fitted him out with ships after
the loss of his own vessel. Do you not remember the fearful fight between
the “Bon Homme Richard” and the “Serapis?” The ‘Bon Homme
Richard ” was Paul Jones’ ship, and it was gotten for him in France with
Franklin’s aid. ‘Bon Homme Richard” is French, and it means the
good man Richard. It was so named in honor of Franklin’s ‘ Poor
Richard’s Almanac,” which Jones read and found full of good advice. It
is believed that this treaty with France and the aid the French people
gave us are what saved our country from defeat. If so, is not Franklin
almost or quite as great as George Washington ?

Dr. Franklin remained in France during the whole of the war and
kept them sending us help, and when General Cornwallis surrendered to
General Washington he helped to make the treaty of peace with England,
signing them both—for there was first a treaty and afterwards a final
one—in Paris. He then made a treaty with Prussia which greatly
helped our country.

After all these great deeds and many smaller ones, which it would fill
a book to tell, he prepared to leave France, where he had been for more
than ten years, He was over eighty years of age and beginning to
suffer with gout. So the Queen of France had him carried to the sea in
her private easy chair, hung with silk curtains and lined with fine
cushions and borne by two mules, one walking in front and the other
behind.

When Doctor Franklin reached home, everybody, from the highest to
the lowest, joined in his praises and all those near enough went to see
him. He was, next to Washington, the most honored man in the coun-
try. But would you not think they would let the dear old man rest the
balance of his life? Certainly, if he so desired, but they thought he
ought to be the President of Pennsylvania for them, anyhow for a while,
and he served them in that office three years.

Then all the free Colonies sent their great men together to name the
new country and make a Constitution for it. Franklin was among them,
and he told them that God had given the victory and they must open the
meeting every day with prayer, because, he said: “If a sparrow cannot
fall to the ground without His notice, an empire cannot rise up without
His aid.” So they did as he advised. The new country was named the
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 111

United States of America, and its Constitution, declaring all men to be
born free and equal, was made and adopted.

George Washington was made President in 1789, and Franklin said
it was the proudest day of his life when he saw him in office and this
great country free, united, and under its own ruler.

He had now but a short time to live, and though eighty-three years
of age, he said he thought he ought to advise our people to free the negro
slaves. Our Constitution said all men were born free and equal, and if
that were true we should not keep our fellow-man in slavery. So he
became president of a society which undertook to persuade Congress to
free the negroes, and signed a long
letter called a memorial, begging
Congress to buy the slaves from their
owners and set all the black people
free.

On the seventeenth day of April,
1790, Benjamin Franklin died in
Philadelphia, at the ripe old age of
eighty-four years and three months.
All the nation went into mourning
for the good and great man. He
was buried beside his wife Deborah,
who had already been dead for
many years, in a graveyard on the
corner of Fifth and Arch Streets. If Sy
you should go to the great city of Corner Sat aaa Seeeente:
Philadelphia any time, you will, of
course, want to see Independence Hall and Carpenters’ Hall; and then
don’t fail to go and see Franklin’s grave. It is right in the corner, and
you can look through the iron fence and see his and his wife’s names on
the flat top of the marble slab that covers them. One of their children
and Mr. Read, Mrs. Franklin’s father, are buried by them.


Patrick HENRY,

The Poor Boy Who Became a Lawyer and the Famous Orator
of the Revolution.

LE boy and girl loves to hear a great

speaker, and almost everyone has
heard of the wonderful orator who stirred up
the people and made them resist the tyrant
King of England, who made our forefathers
pay unjust taxes and kept us from being a
free and independent people.

His name was Patrick Henry. Like al-
most all other great men, he has an interest-
ing life. He made himself what he was.
After failing in several other undertakings,
he finally entered the calling to which he
was exactly suited and became famous.

His life will teach my girl and boy readers not to despair if they fail
once or twice, but to keep on trying. There is some line of work or some
profession in which every boy and girl can succeed, if they will only do
as Patrick Henry did, find out just what they can do best; and, once
they have undertaken it, stick to it and work with all their might.

Like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson and many of the great
men in the early history of our country, Patrick Henry was born and
raised in Virginia. His father was named John Henry, and came to this
country, when a boy, from Scotland, about the year 1730, to seek his

fortune in the New World. He got acquainted with the Governor's
(112)



PATRICK HENRY.
PATRICK HENRY. 113

family, and the Governor introduced him to a Colonel Syme, who com-
manded the soldiers in Virginia. John Henry became a great friend of
Colonel Syme and his wife. Mr. Henry also had a good education, and he
was very useful to the Governor in the Colony. After a while he wrote
back to his brother Patrick, in Scotland, who was a minister of the
Church of England, and invited him to come to this country. Soon the
Rev. Patrick Henry arrived. He was a smart man and quite an orator,
and was made the preacher of St. Paul’s Parish in Hanover, Virginia.
It was for this good man that Patrick Henry, our great orator, was after-
wards named.

Colonel Syme, who commanded the Virginia soldiers, died, and his
good friend, John Henry, was made colonel in his stead. After a little
while he married Mrs. Syme, the widow of his former friend, and they
had two sons; the older one they named William, after the brother of
Mrs. Henry, and the younger boy was named Patrick, after his father’s
brother whom we have just told you about.

The two boys, William and Patrick, grew up together, and until Patrick
was ten years old, he and his brother William went to school in the
neighborhood, where they learned to read and write and studied arith-
metic. About this time their father opened a grammar school in his
own house, and the boys attended this school, where they studied Latin
and also a little Greek. Patrick was, however, more fond of arithmetic
and algebra and geometry. In fact, he disliked to study anything else,
and if we must tell you the plain truth—he was very lazy about studying
anything, and got out of all the lessons he could without telling stories
or being dishonorable. Like George Washington, he always told the
truth, and is said never to have done a dishonorable thing in his life.

But when it came to play, Patrick was different. He loved to play
ball, to go swimming and to go hunting. So fond was he of the woods
that sometimes when the school hour arrived Patrick was far away in
the forest with his gun and his dog, or along the banks of the brook with
his angle-rod, though it is said he seldom brought home any fish. When
school was out, as soon as he got his breakfast in the morning, he was
away to the woods, where he would spend whole days together, for weeks
at a time, seeming to grow more fond of the deep and lonely stillness

of the vast forest, which covered almost the entire country at that time.
8
114 PATRICK HENRY.

He preferred rather to go alone than with the other boys and join in
the jolly fox-chase or a rabbit hunt, as boys do now and as boys did
then. It is true that he often started off with them, but after a little
while they would find out that Patrick was not among them. Some-
times they would follow him, and they would nearly always find him
lying alone by some rippling brook, where he seemed to be delighted
with the music of the waters, or he would be flat on his back looking up
into the blue sky.

They naturally thought that he was too lazy to run about with them,
but often when they slipped up on him, they would hear words in
measured tones of oratory coming from his lips. He always seemed
much ashamed when they caught him ‘talking to himself,” as they
called it, and he was too modest to tell them what he really was doing.
It was found out in later life that he was thinking of the beauties of
nature, studying about the strange things in the woods and the streams
and the sky, and making to himself pretty speeches about them or about
people.

Thus we see, in early life, how his mind was inclined, and how he was
naturally training himself. There were at that time a great many deer
in Virginia, and it was sport to hunt them with dogs. One part of the
men and boys who went out to hunt would go on what they called the
“drive ;” that is, they would take the dogs and go into a part of the
forest and march straight through. If the dogs ‘jumped’ a deer, it
would run off in the other direction. The hunters followed, the dogs
barking and the men hallooing with all their might, and the poor
frightened deer would speed away in the other direction, as fast as its
nimble legs would carry it. The other part of the men were called the
‘“standers.” They would go a mile or two ahead of where they expected
to start the deer, and stand in the little forest paths along which the
animals passed to and fro in the forest. When the frightened deer came
bounding along the pathway, the ‘‘standers’’ would shoot it down.

When the deer was killed, the lucky hunter would blow his horn with
all his might, and all the hunters would come together, and they would
have a great jubilee. They had a fashion, when a young man first killed
a deer, to take the blood of the animal and literally smear him all over
with it, and it is said that Patrick, although he was a constant hunter,
PATRICK HENRY. 115

was a good deal larger and older boy when he got his first smearing than
a majority of his companions in the ¢
neighborhood.

Patrick Henry was very fond of
deer-hunting, but he never went on
the “drive.” He always took one
of the ‘stands,’ and was not at











all choice about which stand they
gave him, for it seems he would
much rather remain alone with
his thoughts than to be the heroic
hunter who should bring down
the deer. In fact, he frequently
failed to answer the call of the
lucky hunter who bagged the
game, and was absent at the
~ jollification around the slain
animal. This was a breach of
politeness on the part of the
hunter which his companions
were very slow to forgive.

We must not conclude, however, that Patrick did
_Parrick HENRY not like society. On the contrary, he was very
smoomn &eeeâ„¢ fond of it, but his enjoyments were of a peculiar

cast. He did not mix in the wild and mirthful scenes, but usually
116 PATRICK HENRY.

sat quiet, taking little part in the conversation, seldom, it is said, even
smiling or telling a joke. He seemed lost most of the time in his
thoughts. For this reason, people used to think he did not know
what was going on; but they found
out their mistake when they asked
him about it, for he was able to re-
peat every word of the conversation
better than any of the others could
do it.

Patrick was very _
fond of music and Fy f,
he learned to play g¥

2 PEN











¢

Se

“OFTEN AT THE COUNTRY PARTIES, HE PLAYED THE FIDDLE FOR MANY A JOLLY
‘OLD VIRGINIA REEL.”

on the flute and violin, and often, at the country parties, he played the
fiddle for many a jolly “old Virginia reel,” which was the most popular
dance in those days. He frequently joined in the dance, and, while
PATRICK HENRY. 117

he appeared to enjoy it immensely, it was said that he was very awkward
and danced all over rather than with his feet. It was funny to see his
long lanky arms and his big shoulders flying and shrugging about, while
his feet seemed so heavy that he could scarcely get them off the floor.

Patrick’s school-days ended when he was fifteen years of age. By that
time there were so many brothers and sisters in the family that the
father was scarcely able to support them; so he had to let the two older
boys leave school. Patrick was placed behind the counter of a country
store, where he stayed for one year as a clerk. His father then thought
Patrick and William ought to be able to run a store for themselves, so he
bought them a stock of goods, and in a country store “set them up in
trade,”’ as it was then called.

Patrick was the manager of the store, because he had a year’s experi-
ence, and William, though older, must be his clerk, at least until he could
learn all the mysteries of storekeeping from the younger brother. But
the boys thought that keeping store wasn’t work, but only play, and all
they needed to do was merely to wait on the customers and give them
what they called for. Furthermore, they thought everybody was per-
fectly honest, and so they were, generally, but often people who do not
have the money buy more things than they can pay for. So Patrick
and William trusted everybody and about one-half of the time forgot to
charge the things they sold on credit, and, at the end of the year when
their father came to see how much money they had made, lo! he was
surprised to behold that they had sold almost everything in their store, and
that they had very little money, and what they had charged up to the
neighbors, if all collected, would not leave one-half so much as he had
started the boys in business with at the beginning.

Thus Patrick Henry and his brother had proved great failures as
merchants, and they had to hunt work with the farmers, or get to be
clerks in other stores where they would have nothing to do with the
management. But while the money had been wasted, Patrick’s time
had not been wasted. His store was one of the most popular places in
the neighborhood. People used to go there to talk and gossip with the
“Henry boys,” as they called them. No other place was so entertaining,
or such a jolly good place to go. Every Saturday afternoon and almost
every night found quite a throng of men and boys seated before the store-
118 PATRICK HENRY.

door in the summertime, or on goods boxes around the store in the
winter, in animated conversation.

No matter where else they might go, they never talked like they did
in the “ Henry boys’ ”’ store; the reason of it wasthis: Patrick Henry,
while he did little talking himself, every time he could get a crowd
together began to ask somebody questions about some matter of history
or something of common interest. He would carry his questions from
one to another, around the company, until he would get them into a
lively debate which often ended in quarrels and sometimes in a fist-fight,

for they were great fighters in those days.
But no matter what they were doing, whether engaged in heated
discussion or pommeling each other with their fists, Patrick was watch-
ing them and studying human nature. You remember that he formerly
studied the woods, the birds, the brooks and the things he found in the
forest. He was now studying men, and how they might be moved to
good or bad deeds by speech. Perhaps he had no thought of ever
becoming a great orator. He studied human nature because he loved to
be doing it, and he thus gained a knowledge of men which afterwards
enabled him to control them so powerfully with his wonderful eloquence.

During this period at the store, Patrick also began to read books of
history. He particularly loved to study the lives of the grand old Greek
and Roman heroes. He read all the orations of that wonderful orator, De-
mosthenes, who lived in the city of Athens more than three hundred years
before Christ, and who used to make such fiery orations against Philip,
who was oppressing his countrymen, so that the people of Athens would
rise up and shout in their frenzy, ‘Let us march against Philip.” He
read also the beautiful speeches of Cicero, the silver-tongued orator of
the Romans, whose voice was so melodious, words so well chosen and
sentences so beautifully put together that it was like listening to sweet
enchanted music to hear him speak.

Frequently, when customers came into the store, they heard Patrick
in the back room, repeating some of these master orations, and they
used to pause in the doorway before asking for the goods they wanted,
and listen for a few moments to the beautiful expression he gave them.
Thus it will be seen how he prepared himself to speak as forcibly as
Demosthenes, yet as musically and beautifully as Cicero. Let not any of
PATRICK HENRY. 119

my young readers think this time was wasted. Not so; it was very
profitably spent. It is not what we learn in school so much as the
private training we give ourselves which makes us great in any cause.

We have spoken above of Patrick Henry’s playing the violin and
flute at the country parties. Like all true-hearted and manly boys, he
liked the girls, and was fonder of being with them than in the society: of
the men, for he was always pure-minded and never given to telling
vulgar stories, nor did he enjoy listening to them from others. At one
of the parties he attended, when he was about seventeen years of age,
he met and fell in love with a farmer’s daughter, and when he was only
eighteen years old did a very foolish thing which we would not advise
any of our young readers to imitate. What did he do, did you ask?
Why, at this early age he got married, without any money himself, and
his wife’s father was so poor he could not help her. What do you think
of an eighteen-year-old boy with a wife?

But before we blame Patrick Henry too much, we must remember that
in those days people got married earlier than they do now. In the
South many of the young men marry at the age of eighteen or nineteen
years, and the girls from fifteen to seventeen. If we go into some of the
far south countries, like Mexico, we find them marrying even younger.
So while Patrick Henry was, as we think, a very young groom, he was
not in that day entirely out of fashion.

One day soon after the wedding, Mr. John Henry and Mr. Shelton—
that was the name of Patrick’s wife’s father—met, and, between them,
gave the young people enough land to make them a small farm. They
built them a little house, and the young husband went to work with a
will digging in the earth to support himself and his new wife. Their
little cottage consisted of two rooms; one in which they cooked and ate, and
the other was their sleeping-room, their sitting-room, their parlor and
their spare-room, so that when any of their friends came to see them
and stayed all night, as they frequently did, Patrick and his wife gave
up the bed to the visitors and made for themselves a pallet in a corner.
This, you must remember, was not as poor a home as Abraham Lincoln
had when he was a boy; but a poorer one than he had when he started
his married life.

Many a day you might have seen Patrick, then a young husband not
120 PATRICK HENRY.

yet nineteen years of age, plowing among the stumps in his “new
eround,” as he called it, cleared up in front of his cabin, with his happy
eirl-wife busy inside the house, or feeding the chickens about the door.





It was too
bad that the
first year the crop on
gr: Patrick’s farm was a
a failure. He did not

“MANY A DAY YOU MIGHT HAVE SEEN PATRICK PLOW-
ING AMONG THE STUMPS IN HIS ‘NEW GROUND.” make enough to keep

them alive and in the
poorest kind of clothes. He proved himself to be as poor a farmer as he
had been a merchant, for at the end of the year he came out in debt.
He and his wife talked the matter over, and it was decided that they
should get out of debt by selling their little farm and all they had, and
he should take the remainder of the money and go again into business as
a merchant. He no doubt flattered himself that he would be able to
PATRICK HENRY. 121

profit by his past experience and make a success. The farm was sold,
and the store was opened.

His old friends came again. He had no trouble to get customers,
but he was too good-hearted to press anybody for money; and he occu-
pied so much time in playing his violin and flute for the pleasure of
those who came to his store to buy, and got up so many debates and his
customers had such a good time generally, that at the end of two years
he was worse off than before and had to give up his store. Thus, before
he was more than twenty-three years of age, he had failed twice as a
merchant, once as a farmer, and altogether in everything else he had
attempted to do except to make people like him and to learn more about
human nature and the way to control and influence men. In this he
was wiser than anyone else about him.

The little store being given up, he did such various jobs of work as he
could get and thus earned a poor support for his family. He had by
this time also become a great reader. During his idle hours, he studied
geography and history, learned all about the different countries, their
rulers, and their manners and customs. He was said by everybody to
be the best-read man in the community.

Often he had to go hungry or eat the very poorest and coarsest of food,
but he was always cheerful and never despondent. ‘No use of crossing
the bridge before we get to it,” he used to say to his wife. ‘“There’s a
good time coming bye and bye” was another of his favorite expressions,
though there was little prospect at this time for any good times for
Patrick Henry or his family. But it did come, as we shall see, and one
of the best lessons which young people can learn from his life is that of
cheerfulness and hopefulness. He was, also, always truthful and rigidly
honest, as we have said before. He was, also, a man of very firm
character. He could not be led into anything he thought was wrong,
and he was a believerin God and a true Christian. Thus he was able to
be cheerful and hopeful under troubles which would cause many men to
despair.

Up to this time he had never thought of becoming a lawyer, nor had
any of his friends suggested it to him. He had not made a public
speech, not even in a debating society, but he had read the history of
the nations of the world; he had studied oratory for his own
122 PATRICK HENRY.

pleasure, and it suddenly dawned upon him that he mzght make a
lawyer.

When Patrick ‘Henry was twenty-four years old, he set to work to read
law. For six weeks or two months he shut himself up with a few law
books and then he went before the board of examiners and asked them
to see if he did not know enough to practice law. He told them how
much he had read, and they laughed at him; but in talking with him
they found that he knew so much about history and other things that a
lawyer needed to know, that two of them gave him their consent to
practice.

The other one of the examiners, Mr. Randolph, who was not present when
the other two gave him their consent, was so shocked at Mr. Henry’s
personal appearance and poor clothes, when he came to see him, that
he told him he was not fit to be a lawyer—that no man who looked like
him could be a lawyer, and he would not examine him at all. This
made Patrick angry, and he answered the learned man in such a manner
and gave him such a lecture on his duty that Mr. Randolph was greatly
surprised, and he tried to punish Mr. Henry for it by getting him into
an argument in which he meant to show him how ignorant and unfit he
was; but here Patrick Henry was at home, and he talked so smart and
so well that the judge exclaimed: ‘Mr. Henry, I will never trust to ap-
pearances again. If your industry be only half equal to your genius,
you will become an honor to your profession;’’ and he signed Patrick
Henry’s license, though it is said young Henry was at this time so
ignorant of the forms of practice that he could not make out a case or
present it before the court.

Like most young lawyers, he had to wait a good while before
he had anything to do, and when it came it was rather by accident;
but it gave him an opportunity, and that opportunity made him
famous.

We will now tell you about his first law case and his first speech.
There was at that time in Virginia an established church like they
had in England. It was called the Episcopal Church, and the ministers
were hired by the Governor. Virginia was a great tobacco-raising coun-
try, and they had a law that the farmers might pay their debts in
tobacco. The sheriff and the judges of the court were paid so much a
PATRICK HENRY. 123

year in tobacco for their services, and the ministers also received a
certain number of pounds of tobacco each year.

That seems very funny to us now; but you know there was once a
time, in certain parts of the South, when they even used coon-skins for
money. ‘There are many cases where a man even paid for his license,
when he wanted to get married, in coon-skins, and when the preacher
‘tied the knot,” the young man, if he was generous and liberal, would
always load the preacher up with coon-skins as payment for his services.
This was not generally so, but it was often done in new countries where
coons were plentiful and money was scarce. So in Virginia the farmer
could pay his debts in tobacco at sixteen shillings a pound. But one
year tobacco went up to fifty shillings a pound, therefore the farmers,
who were in control, had a law made that they might pay their debts in
money if they wanted to, instead of tobacco.

This law was made to hold good for only ten months, and after that
time they again paid in tobacco, the price of which had gone down as
low or lower than it had been before. But a few years later there
came another short crop in tobacco, and the price went up to fifty shil-
lings again, so the farmers had another law made permitting them to
pay in money, but they very cautiously made this law so that it would
not run out; but the ministers seemed not to have noticed it was so
made and after the first year they wanted their pay in tobacco again,
because it would bring them nearly double what ney would get, if they
were paid in money.

This brought on quite a war between the nesple and the ministers,
and they had a big suit in court. The farmers were very mad with the
clergymen, and the clergymen were very mad with the farmers, each
accusing the other of wanting to cheat them. The clergymen sent word
to the King of England, and the King took their side, and said that the
farmer’s law should be ‘“ nll and void,” which means that it should not
be enforced, that the clergymen should be paid in tobacco. The King
was very wise in this, and, while it appeared that he only wanted to take
the ministers’ part, he was, in reality, planning to enrich himself;
because, if the clergy could collect their debts from the people in
tobacco, which was worth more than twice as much as the money
124 PATRICK HENRY.

they were entitled to, the King said he would also collect his taxes in
tobacco.

So you see how wise and yet how mean the King was in his decision.
The people had the law on their side, and the clergymen wanted to
collect twice what the people owed them, and the King said that they
should do it. The clergymen made a great noise that the people were
swindling them out of their just rights. They wanted tobacco, they did
not want money. They argued that it was a shame and a disgrace to
swindle the ministers in that way, and insisted that they were right,
because the King himself said so. The people, on the other hand, said
that the ministers and officers were employed for so much a year, and
that they had no right to demand their tobacco, which they could sell
for two or three times as many pounds of money as they had engaged to
work for.

This looks entirely reasonable, and the people were right; but the
clergymen and the officers and the King wanted the tobacco. You
would think that it would have been better if the sheriff and the King
and the judges had brought suit against the people to collect their
claims in tobacco; but you will see how cunning they were in having
the ministers to do it instead of doing it themselves. All the people
loved the ministers, and they would sympathize with their cause
perhaps, when they would not sympathize with the officers. Therefore,
it was decided that the ministers should bring suit, and if they could
make the people pay them in tobacco, then they would have to pay the
officers and the King also in tobacco.

A lawyer by the name of Lewis was to plead the cause of the people,
and a Mr. Lyons was to plead the cause of the clergymen; but when the
King decided that the clergymen were right and the people were wrong,
and that the law should not be obeyed, Mr. Lewis, the people’s lawyer,
told them they could not gain their cause against the King, and so he
gave it up.

There were very few lawyers then in the country, and they were nearly
all in the employ of the King, so the people could find no one to plead
their cause, and, as the last resort, they turned to Patrick Henry, a
young lawyer of twenty-four years, who had never made a speech in his
life. The place where the case was to be tried was at Hanover Court-
PATRICK HENRY. 125

house, and the judge who was to sit on the bench was Patrick Henry’s
own father, and among those who opposed the people was his own uncle
for whom he was named, the Rev. Patrick Henry. Was this not an
embarrassing situation for the young lawyer who had never made a
speech ?

The day came. It was one of those beautiful Indian summer days
which comes in November in the South. Patrick Henry was early at
the courthouse, and great throngs of people gathered in from all direc-
tions. Never before in Hanover had there been so many farmers present
on any court day. The decision of the case amounted to thousands of
dollars of loss or gain to them. The clergymen came from all over the
State, which was then, you know, only a Colony—though much larger
than it is now. There were twenty or more of the most learned clergy-
men of the nation present. They had come to frown upon the young
lawyer who was to plead against them and to scowl at the people, who,
they pretended, were trying to rob them.

Patrick Henry was nervous. It was his first case. He had never
spoken in court, and he walked restlessly about among the farmers,
speaking a word here and there to this or that one, with many of them
pulling at his elbows, offering him advice. He could plainly see that
they were afraid they had a very poor lawyer, and he felt, himself, that
they had. Presently, he saw his learned and eloquent uncle, Rey.
Patrick Henry, drive up in his carriage, and, before any of the clergymen
could get to him, the young lawyer dashed up, grasped his uncle by the
hand and pleaded with him to go away. The young lawyer said: ‘Sir,
I have never spoken in my life, and your presence here will add to my
embarrassment. My own father must sit on the bench, and that will be
bad enough. Besides, there will be twenty clergymen to criticise me.
All of this I can stand, but I am sure I could not have my own uncle,
whose name I bear, sitting among them frowning upon me. For my
sake I beg you to go away.”

The uncle replied in kindly but regretful tones: ‘Patrick, I am sur-
prised to find you arrayed against the ministry, you are doing yourself
creat injustice and ruining your future prospects for usefulness.”

“That may be,” said Patrick, ‘‘but I see no moral reason why I should
not accept the case for the people, besides, in my own heart, I am firmly


126 PATRICK HENRY.

convinced that they are right, and with all due respect, sir, that you
and the clergy are wrong. For my sake and the respect that I bear you,
will you not goaway? I shall have to say some hard words against the

clergy this day, and I would not speak them in your ears.”

There was a respectfulness in his tones that his uncle could but appre-
ciate and an earnestness in his manner which he could not resist, so
re-entering his carriage, he simply said: “ For your sake, Patrick, I will
be absent; though your cause is wrong, I have too much respect for your
feelings to allow my presence to embarrass you.” So saying, he drove
away.

The court was opened. The array before Patrick’s eyes was almost
fearful. The most learned men of the Colony, the severest critics in the
New World, were against him, and the courthouse was crowded. On
the outside, the windows were thronged with anxious faces looking in.

Mr. Lyons made a short speech, simply explaining to the jury the fact
that the King had decreed his side to be right. He pleaded that the
clergy were the greatest benefactors of the Colony, that it was a shame
to mistreat them, and that this law, if enforced, simply robbed them of
their just allowance. His closing was eloquent and beautiful, and the
ministers nodded their assent when he took his seat. He had presented
their cause well.

Now came the first trial of Patrick Henry’s strength. No one had
ever heard him speak, and everyone was curious. Hyen his opponents
seemed to feel sorry for him. He rose and stood fora moment in an
awkward mannet, and, when he began, faltered much in his speech. The
people hung their heads, and the ministers exchanged sly, smiling looks
of derision at each other. His father, it is said, almost sunk behind the
desk, he was so mortified and confused; but these circumstances only
lasted for a few moments.

Patrick Henry’s soul rose within him, his whole appearance changed,
the fire of his eloquence was kindled, and he seemed to forget him-
self; his figure stood erect, his bearing was lofty, and his face shone with
a grandeur which no one had ever seen upon it before. His awkward
actions became graceful to behold; his voice, no longer faltering, was
charming and beautiful. Words seemed to crowd for utterance; there
was lightning in his eyes as he turned upon the clergymen that seemed
PATRICK HENRY. 127

to rive them like a thunderbolt. He literally made their blood run cold
and their hair rise on ends. All eyes were now fastened upon him. Men
looked at each other with surprise, and then, held by the spell in his eyes,
the majesty of his attitude and the power of his words, they could look
away no more. The old father stood erect behind the desk, with tears of
delight streaming down his cheeks. The jury seemed bewildered.

No one can describe that speech, and it has never been printed. It







A TYPICAL VIRGINIA COURTHOUSE IN THE DAYS OF PATRICK HENRY.

was delivered under the impulse of the moment; but it was declared by
the clergymen themselves, against whom it was spoken, that no such
speech, as they believed, had ever fallen from the lips of man, and, to
this day, in Hanover, Virginia, the highest compliment that can be paid
to a speaker is to say: ‘‘He is almost equal to Patrick Henry when he
plead against the parsons.” The clergymen had sued for heavy damages,
but the jury, without scarcely leaving their seats, eranted them only one ©
penny. Mr. Lyons made a motion for a new trial; that is, he tried to
128 PATRICK HENRY.

get his case tried over, but the court refused to give them a new
hearing.

Was ever such a victory won by a new lawyer? It was the first
speech Patrick Henry ever made, and it was undoubtedly one of the
ereatest speeches ever delivered in the world before a court. At its
close the people, who had hung their heads in shame at the beginning,
rushed into the courthouse, seized the young lawyer in spite of the
sheriff’s cry for order, hoisted him on their shoulders, carried him out of
the house and over the town, with a wild multitude following and scream-
ing his praises at the top of their voices.

Patrick Henry had at last found the calling for which he was
intended, and to which he was suited. From this time forward he was
the greatest lawyer, not only in Hanover Courthouse, but of all Virginia.
He had all the cases he could attend to, and made plenty of money to
support his family, who had for many years been struggling with
poverty.

He lived for nearly forty years after this memorable day at Hanover
Courthouse. His life was full of honor and usefulness to his country,
and he has made several other speeches, parts of which almost every
schoolboy has at one time or another used as a declamation.

And now that we have told you of the hardships and troubles of
Patrick Henry’s early life, let us tell you of the great things he did
in the service of his country.

In January, 1765, the famous “Stamp Act” (which we explained in
the life of Benjamin Franklin) was passed by the British Parliament.
The colonists were to be oppressed, and no one dared to openly rebel
against it.

In May, Patrick Henry was elected to the House of Burgesses (that is
what the Virginia Legislature was called in those days), and he pledged
himself to his people to do all he could to oppose it. There were many
learned and eloquent speakers in the House and he was not expected to
take the lead.

The fine gentlemen in the assembly, who lived in fine old Virginia
mansions, and wore fine clothes, made fun of Patrick’s country way of
talking, his “homespun” clothes and his awkward manners; but when
he spoke they could not help admiring his wonderful command of
PATRICK HENRY. 129

language and his power over men. His first speech was against rich
men who wanted to lend the Colony’s money to themselves and their
friends. This made them his great enemies, but the other side—the
common people—admired him more than ever.

At last it came time to consider the hated “Stamp Act.” None of
the great men dared to speak against it openly. So Patrick Henry drew
up some resolutions declaring that the English Parliament had no right
to make this tax upon the people, and, furthermore, they had no right to
make any laws against the interest
of the Colonies. He said they were
responsible to the King alone, and
that the House of Burgesses and
the Governor alone had the right
to make the colonists pay taxes.

After the reading of his resolu-
tions, Patrick Henry was assailed
with a storm of words and much
ridicule by those who favored or
were afraid of England. There
were hot speeches from several
gentlemen, and a less heroic spirit
than Henry’s would have said not
a word more. Noone thought the fae ee
resolutions would pass. aN SDs ae Coa

At length when the storm had
subsided, Patrick Henry arose to speak. His face was deathly pale, his
thin lips quivered, but his eyes had a look of awful determination in them.
Stretching his long arms at full length toward the President (called the
Speaker) he began and delivered the greatest speech perhaps ever heard
in America. The walls rang with the mighty force of his words, and
everyone was overpowered with his wonderful eloquence, as they had
been in the famous “Parson Case.’”’ They shouted “treason” at him,
but he could not be frightened; but all the time grew bolder and more
eloquent. When he closed this great speech, every member but two
voted for his resolutions.

Patrick Henry had been the first one who dared oppose England. His

9


130 PATRICK HENRY.

wonderful speech was printed and sent all over the Colonies, north and
south, and it was even sent to England; and in a few months Parlia-
ment repealed (that is, removed) the hated “Stamp Act.”

But the spirit of liberty was now awake in the people, and they
demanded relief from other unjust laws which England tried to impose,
and in this effort Patrick Henry was one of the foremost men in the
country. He was greater than all other men in Virginia, and he, with
Thomas Jefferson and Richard Henry Lee, kept telling the people they
ought to be free.

In 1773—eight years after his great speech—Mr. Henry, Mr. Jefferson,
Mr. Lee and many others got the House of Burgesses to elect men to
write to the other Colonies about their grievances against Hngland.
This was a great benefit, for the different Colonies were thus brought
together in their efforts and protests against cruel laws. Through this
committee of correspondence, it was decided that the Colonies should
hold a congress at Philadelphia in 1774. Every Colony sent represent-
atives. Mr. Henry was one of those from Virginia.

Patrick Henry opened the Congress with a great speech, i in which he
said, “Zam not a Virginian, but an American.” Kvyerybody soon saw he
was the most powerful orator in Congress, and many said he was the
ereatest man in the nation, for he was as wise and just as he was
eloquent.

In March, 1775, Mr. Henry made another speech in the Virginia House
of Burgesses, which is said to have been the grandest effort in his life
up to this time. He wanted the Colony to raise soldiers and prepare for
war. Almost every schoolboy knows part of this speech.

Patrick Henry then went to work and got up a company and made
the Governor, who was but the servant of the King, give up the colonists’
gunpowder, which he had taken away to the English ships. This was
the first resistance, by arms, to England in Virginia. He also made the
Governor pay for the damage he did the people.

Patrick Henry now went back to the Continental Congress, as they
made him commander of all the Virginia soldiers; but he was too good
a statesman to spend his time in the war, and so his friends begged him
to stay in the Virginia Legislature and Continental Congress, which
he did.
PATRICK HENRY. 131

In May, 17 76, he got the Virginia Legislature to pass a vote request-
ing the Continental Congress to declare our country free from England
and to go to war with her, if she would not let us go. He then helped

make a new Constitution for Virginia, and they elected him Governor of
the Colony. Thus,

in sixteen years
after he began to
study law, he was
one of the most
famous men in
America and
Governor of Vir-
ginia. How do you
suppose those
proud people who
laughed at him felt
now ?

The Revolution-
ary War now be-
ean in earnest, and
it would take a big
book to tell how
he and John
Adams and others,
by their wise coun-
sel and eloquent
speeches, inspired
the soldiers and
helped General Bees
Washington tO WIN PATRICK HENRY MAKING HIS SPEECH BEFORE THE HOUSE
intheend. Through Lees
it all Patrick Henry was in his State Legislature, or the General Congress,
or serving as Governor. After the war was over, they made him
Governor twice, and tried again, in 1786, to get him to serve them, but
he declined, as he had already been Governor so much. He told them
he did not think they ought to get in the habit of letting one man


132 PATRICK HENRY.

hold office too long. In this he was like George Washington. You
know Washington would not let them make him President but twice.
But the people loved Patrick Henry so much that they tried to make
him Governor again ten years later, in 1796, but he told them no, he
had been honored enough.

President George Washington offered to make Mr. Henry his Secretary
of State in 1795. This is the very highest office in the nation, next to
the President and Vice-President. Patrick Henry said no, there were
better men for it. Mr. Washington then wanted to appoint him Chief
Justice of the United States, and President John Adams afterwards asked
him to be our special minister to France, where, you remember, Benjamin
Franklin was so long our representative, but he said no to both of these,
because he preferred to remain a private citizen and live with his family
—he now had many interesting children.

Finally, in 1799, the Virginia Legislature passed a very bad law,
which George Washington—who was now a private citizen again—
thought was very dangerous and might cause trouble to the whole
United States. So he begged Patrick Henry to offer himself as a candi-
date for the Legislature, for he knew, with his powerful eloquence, Mr.
Henry could overcome the bad law. Mr. Henry was elected, of course,
but before he took his seat he died, at Red Hill, Charlotte County, Vir-
ginia, June 6, 1799, when only sixty-three years and a few days old.

Patrick Henry was regarded by everyone as the greatest of American
orators. Thomas Jefferson and John Randolph declared he was the
greatest orator who ever lived, and he was often compared to Demos-
thenes and Cicero as the only speakers of ancient times worthy to be
ranked with him.

Patrick Henry’s wife, Sarah Shelton, died some years before her
noted husband, and he afterwards married the granddaughter of Gov-
ernor Spottswood, of Virginia. Mr. Henry throughout his life was a
devoted Christian, and left a spotless name for honesty and uprightness
of character.







NG PALACE
FROM NEW YORK TQ BOSTON ~

GREAT BATTLE. suanicgs

THE NAVY.









beat! a Sick ae eo Mee;
SR FINE STEAMBOAT ~
ONTHE MISSISSIPPI

ye : THE TRUE STORY OF
ae oye RSet : | 2 ROBERT
| FULTON,

The Builder of the First Success=
ful Steamboat.





FITGHS, STEAMBOAT : :
RAN BETWEEN PHILADELPHIA, AND, BURLINGTON, Nu. I78¢

au | O any of my young readers
ss De think, when they go to take a
: s boat-ride and are carried along, almost
as fast as a bird would fly over the
waters, in the great fast-moving
steamboats, that it is not yet one hun-
dred years since the first successful
steamboat was floated on the water?
Would you not like to know some-
thing about the man who made it?
ee eee ee eras I shall be very glad to tell you this
story, for he was one of our own coun-

trymen, and we feel proud of him as we do of Franklin, who invented
(133)

eucTON | THE Bo.

WITH Se 'SISEWHEE
134 ROBERT FULTON.

the lightning rod, and Morse, who invented the telegraph, and Bell,
who made the telephone, and Edison, who invented the phonograph,
and many other famous Americans who have discovered and made such
wonderful things for the benefit of the world. We like to tell the great
deeds they have done for the benefit of mankind.

I shall have to commence by telling you again of a very poor boy.
His name was Robert Fulton. He was born in the State of Pennsyl-
vyania in 1765. His father was an Irishman who had moved to the New
World, and he was a tailor; that is, he made clothes for other people. I
shall have to tell you the truth and say that Robert was not fond of
books when he was a boy, but he liked to be always making things.
He could make lead-pencils, and he could also make skyrockets for his
and his friends’ Fourth-of-July celebration. Everything that the boy
looked at in the way of a machine, he wondered if he could not make it
better.

He was given but very little education, first because he did not like to
study books, and second because his parents were so poor that he had
to go to work very young. They put him with a jeweler to learn the
trade of watch-making; but he soon began to use his extra time in
drawing pictures and painting. He also learned to make portraits of
people which looked very much like them (you know they could not
take photographs in those days), and he sold portraits and pictures of
landscapes to get money, which he carefully put away.

This boy also loved various kinds of sports. He was particularly fond
of fishing, and he used to go out with the boys on an old flat-boat which
they pushed along the river with a pole. This was very laborious work,
so Robert showed them how to make two paddle wheels, one on each
side of the boat, which they hung by cranks over the sides, and by
turning the cranks, as a boy would turn a grindstone, the paddles went
around in the water and pushed the boat along. This was great fun,
and it set Robert thinking and wondering why such wheels might not
be put on big boats, to push them when there was not wind enough for
the sails.

The one trouble about this was that such big wheels would be
required they could not get men enough around the cranks to turn them
in the water. Still Robert kept thinking about it, and after a while you
ROBERT FULTON. 135

will see how valuable this thought was to him. All this time Robert
Fulton kept painting pictures and selling them. He wanted very much
to be a great artist, like Benjamin West, who, he learned, had commenced
in America; but had now grown to be such a great artist that he was
living in London, getting lots of money for his pictures.

In the meantime, Robert’s father died, and he was left to support his
widowed mother. By the time he was twenty-one years of age he had
earned enough money to buy a little farm for his mother so she could
keep cows, have a garden, and raise chickens, turkeys and other fowls to
sell. Then, with his mother’s consent, he took the balance of his money
and sailed away to Kurope to study art. A large part of his time he
spent with the famous artist, Benjamin West, in London, and became a
good painter.

But all the time his mind kept running on inventions, and he made a
number of new machines. Among other things was a little boat which
he could make run under water. He intended it to blow up war vessels,
but somehow the people did not think it of any use. About this time
he began to be interested in the steam engine, which was invented by
James Watt, a young Scotchman, a good many years before.

These engines had been used to work pumps and to do all sorts of
things on the land, and one Englishman tried to make it run a boat.
This Englishman’s idea was to make the engine push a thing, like a
duck’s foot, through the water. Just like the inventor of the flying
machine now tries to use something like a bird’s wing to fly with, so
this inventor thought he must use something like the duck’s foot to
swim the boat along with. The engine worked the foot all right, but it
was not a success.

Fulton began to study how he could make a steam engine run a boat.
He heard of an American who tried to run a boat by forcing a stream
of water through it, pumping it in the bow and pushing it out the stern
with a steam engine. This was a pump-boat, and though it made the
boat go, something about it was wrong, and it failed. Another man by
the name of John Fitch had made a steamboat with paddles on the
sides of it like ordinary oars. The engine was made to run the oars
back and forth as the men did when they held them in their hands.
This man was also an American and ran his boat on the Delaware River
136 ROBERT FULTON.

in 1787. It made trips between Burlington, New Jersey, and Phila-
delphia, a distance of twenty miles, but it moved so awkwardly, though
it went pretty fast, that the people said it was no good, and poor John —
Fitch died broken-hearted. But before he died he told the people a
steamboat would yet be built to please them, and then they would be
ashamed for laughing at him.

‘Now,’ said Robert Fulton, after he had studied all about these other
boats, ‘why can I not take a steam engine and instead of making it work
a duck’s foot, or pump in and out a stream of water, or work oars like
men, all of which have been a failure, why can I not,” he said to a friend,
“make it run paddle wheels such as ‘we boys’ used to use on the old
flat-boat when we went fishing?”

So Fulton thought over it many days, and at last he got up two plans.
You know he was now a great artist. He had also studied engineering
while in Europe, and he had also studied navigation and written a book
on the subject of running boats on canals, which was then a matter of
very great interest in Europe.

In 1797, when Fulton was thirty-two years old, he met Mr. Joel
Barlow, the American Minister to the Court of France. Mr. Barlow found
Fulton was a very sensible young man and in every way a fine fellow, so
he invited him to go to Paris and live in his family as long as he wished.
Fulton accepted this kind invitation and went to Paris, which he made
his home for seven years. He continued to study and to make inven-
tions of various kinds, all the while keeping his plans for the steamboat
in mind. He also learned the French language, and, by reading good
books, tried to make up for his lack of education.

After a while his friend, Mr. Barlow, gave up the position of American
Minister to France, and a Mr. Livingston was appointed in his place.
Fulton soon made the acquaintance and gained the friendship of this
excellent man and showed him his plans for a steamboat. Mr. Living-
ston had already read much on the subject and was greatly interested in
Fulton and his plans. One of these plans was to use paddles in a new
way, and the other, as we have said, was to use the paddle wheels.
They concluded that wheels would be the best, so Fulton built a small
steamboat, which was tried on the River Seine in Paris. But the
machinery was too heavy, and the boat broke in two in the middle.
ROBERT FULTON. 137

This, of course, was a very great disappointment to Fulton and Mr.
Livingston, but it did not show their plan was a failure; but that they
had not built their boat strong enough. So Fulton went to work and
built another boat, and a great crowd of the gay people of Paris gathered
on the banks of the river to see it move. The trip was asuccess, and all
the people shouted as
it moved off in the
river; but it did not
go as fast as they ex-
pected, and in this re-
spect they were disap-
pointed. But Fulton
said he knew what the
trouble was, and the
next time he would
shape his boat differ-
ently, and he was sure
it would run fast
enough. Mr. Living-
ston was also satisfied
that this could be
done.

These men were both
Americans; and, now
that they were satis-
fied their boat would
be a success, they de-
termined toleave Paris,
come to America, and ARS ER a a
build another boat in
order that the first successful trip of a steamboat in the world might be
made in their own native land. This was great patriotism, and they are
entitled to our honor and respect for their loyalty to our country.

So Fulton and his friend started for America. In the meantime Ful-
ton had made designs for a new steam engine to be constructed differently
from any other, so it would exactly suit the purpose for which he desired


138 ROBERT FULTON.

it in running his steamboat. So he and Mr. Livingston sent their plans
to James Watt, the inventor of the steam engine, who was then in the
business of making steam engines for all sorts of purposes, and he built
them just the kind of a machine that Fulton wanted to furnish the
power for his new steamboat.

While the engine was being built in England, Fulton and Mr. Living-
ston were in New York building the boat. In this work Fulton looked
after every detail. He was particularly careful to see that the shape of
the boat was just right. In the first place, he wanted it strong in the
middle, so it would not be broken in two by the weight of the machinery
or the force of the waves. He built several little models, and, it is said,
floated them in a bathtub. He put little sails on them and would blow
his breath against the sails to see how the differently shaped boats
would move. He found that those with the very thin, narrow bow and
stern would get through the water much easier than those with a wide
bow and stern.

He therefore made his new boat with a narrow, sloping bow, so that
it would cut easily through the water. At last, when his boat was
almost complete, the engine came and was placed in the boat where it
could work the paddle wheels to the greatest advantage. He was also
very careful in making the paddle wheels to see that they were perfectly
true and correct. Then he placed a mast near the front and another
near the stern of his boat, and to these he had sails attached, so that
if the wind should blow in the direction his boat should run he could
hoist those sails and have the help of the wind in addition to the
steam power.

At last the boat was ready, the engine was in place, and Fulton looked
it over carefully and said it was all he could desire. He decided to make
a bold start by running from New York up to Albany, a trip which the
sail-boats had been making regularly every day or two. Albany, you
know, is the Capital of the State, while New York is the great business
city, where most of the large merchants live. Therefore, there was every
day or two a large number of passengers going back and forth between
New York and the beautiful city of Albany, which is about one hundred
and fifty miles north of New York on the Hudson River.

Mr. Livingston and Robert Fulton were very anxious to have as many
ROBERT FULTON. 139

well-known people as they possibly could get to go on their boat, so they
advertised in the papers several days before that the ‘‘ Clermont ’’—that
was the name of Fulton’s new boat—would make its trip from New
York to Albany on a certain day, and all those who wanted to go might
have a free ride.

The newspapers printed a great deal about the boat, but they did not
believe it would be a success. Many people ridiculed it so much that
the people talked about it, not as the steamer “Clermont,” but as
“Fulton's Folly.” Some of the wiser men said that it was all right to
run a steam engine on a solid place on the ground, but if anyone should
put it on a floating boat, which was continually swaying about, it would
cause the steam engine to explode, and it would blow everything to
pieces, and the people who were foolish enough to go on it would, most
likely, all be drowned.

This was as unwise and poor an argument as was made by some of
the philosophers in England when the first railroad train proposed to run
twenty miles an hour. They said if the railroad train should go as fast
as twenty miles an hour, the people could not get their breath, and they
all would be dead when they came to the end of their journey. Even
the doctors said this; so the people were very much afraid of the rail-
road trains, until after it had been found that those who traveled twenty
miles an hour were not dead or even sick from passing through the air
so fast.

The day for the boat to make its trial trip was Friday, August 11, 1807.
Now, you know, some people are superstitious about Friday. They say
that it is bad luck to move, or begin a new garment, or to start anything
new on Friday; but Fulton did not belong to this ignorant, stupid class.
He thought that Friday was just as good a day as any to make a trial.
Even if it had been the thirteenth day of the month, it would have made
no difference to him. He was not one of those silly people who would
not sit down to the table with thirteen present any more than he thought
Friday an unlucky day.

On the morning of August 11th, Fulton went down to his boat very
early. His engineer had been there all night, and had built a fire in the
engine, and, when morning came, from the foot of Cortland Street, New
York, the black smoke was seen pufling up from the large iron stack-pipe
140 ROBERT FULTON.

of the “Clermont.” The whistle blew loud, and Fulton and Mr. Living-
ston stood on the deck and smiled at the great crowd that gathered to
look at “the wonderful smoking monster,” as some of the people called it.
All the house-tops were filled with people, as they are now when a great
naval parade or something extraordinary happens on the river.

Mr. Fulton and Mr. Livingston hoped to see some of the distinguished
men of New York come down and get on their boat, but they were dis-
appointed. It was all they could do to induce twelve people to accept
their invitation, for everybody agreed that one could scarcely do a more
risky thing than trust his life on that great ‘‘new-fangled”’ boat, as they
called it, with a fire machine inside of it. No doubt there were young
men and boys who would have been willing to risk their lives for the
novelty of the trip, but their friends and parents would not let them.

We think very strange of this now, but we must remember it was new
then. Many people had never seen a steam engine of any kind and
’ did not know anything about it; and those wno had seen one, as we
told you, believed it would explode if put on a floating craft and
shaken up and down, as it would be by the waves.

At last, about one o’clock, long after the hour appointed for starting,
Fulton grew afraid the twelve people whom he had gotten on board
would become so frightened by the crowd on the bank that they would
get off the boat; so without waiting for more, he started off. The boat
moved beautifully, and all the people from the house-tops waved their
handkerchiefs and shouted as it glided out like a great duck on the
bosom of the North River. The tide was running slightly against them,
and the wind was also in the other direction; hence, as they could not
use their sails, they rolled them up tightly, and the people saw that the
boat was traveling entirely by steam. The crowd was struck with
wonder as they looked at the black smoke rushing from the pipes and
the great paddle wheels revolving, throwing the spray into the air, and
the boat speeding along without spreading her sails.

If you look at a steamboat now, you will see that the paddle wheels
on the side are covered by what they call the wheel-house; but Fulton
did not think of this, and he left his great paddle wheels out in the air
where everybody could see them.

As the boat went up the river, all the wharves, piers and house-tops,
ROBERT FULTON. 141

and almost the whole water-front of the city, and the banks through the
country, were thronged with the people. All along the route there was
great excitement. Hats and handkerchiefs were waved and shouts
and praises greeted the ears of the happy inventor, the captain, the crew
and the passengers. The “Clermont” was successful. Navigation by
steam was a reality. Robert Fulton became that day one of the greatest
men of his country.

Now, how long do you suppose it took them to get to Albany? If you



WHAT YOU WOULD SEE TO-DAY AT A STEAMBOAT LANDING ON THE
MISSISSIPPI RIVER.

were to go to New York now, and take one of the magnificent steamers
which are made entirely of steel, instead of wood, you would go to Albany
in about ten hours. Of course, you don’t expect that Fulton’s boat ran
as fast as one of these? He had no such powerful engines, and boat
building was not then so perfect as it is now, and it took Fulton just
three times as long as it takes one of our present great steamers to make
the trip. The “Clermont” reached Albany in thirty-two hours from the
time she left New York, but, as we said, she traveled against the wind
and tide. In coming back she made the trip in thirty hours. That was
142 ROBERT FULTON.

very much faster, however, than any other boat had ever traveled on the
Hudson River.

After this, regular trips were made two or three times a week by the
“ Glermont”’ between Albany and New York, and Fulton had no lack of
patronage. As soon as it was found out that there was no danger,
nearly all the fine people who traveled between the two cities paid a
higher price to go by the steamer “Clermont,” so Fulton and Mr. Liy-
ingston made money very fast.

They got so much patronage that the “Clermont” could not carry
one-fourth of the people who wanted to travel on her, and under Mr.
Fulton’s direction, in a short time, many other boats were built and
plying, not only between New York and Albany, but on all the great
American rivers. Mr. Fulton continued to labor to make more perfect
machinery and to have his boats built in a better shape for fast running.

I will tell you a story about the “Clermont’s” first trip up the Hud-
son. It is said that as she was plowing along in the night, she met
some sail-ships. The sailors had never heard of her or had not expected
to meet her, and when they saw this creature of fire and smoke coming
near them in the night, and heard her puffing and steaming, and her
machinery planking and her wheels splashing in the water, they were so
frightened that they were almost crazy. Some of them fell on their knees
and prayed; others took to small boats, and some even jumped overboard
on the other side and swam ashore. Others ran with all their might down
into the hold of their vessel and covered themselves up in the bunks in
the forecastle to escape the monster. This true story, perhaps, was read
by Mr. Samuel L. Clemens, our great American funny man, commonly
called “Mark Twain,” before he wrote the funny story of Uncle Dan’,
the old negro, who became so frightened when he saw a steamboat coming
up the Mississippi River, that he fell on his knees and prayed for deliver-
ance, thinking that the steamboat was either the Lord himself, or else it
was “old Satan” coming to destroy him.

Now that Fulton built and successfully ran steamboats, what do you
suppose happened to him? Why, the very same thing that happens to
every man or boy who shows that he knows something more than other
people, or can do things that are useful to mankind. He became famous
and got more work to do building steamboats than he possibly could
ROBERI FULTON. 143

do. The United States Government employed him to act as engineer
for them in the construction of steamboats, the building of canals and
helping along navigation, which, you know, means travel by water.

He also made for the Government torpedoes, or war instruments, for
blowing up vessels by exploding under the water. This, you know, he
had invented and shown in Europe, but he did not then have any fame,
and they did not think much of his invention. He was now able to
improve them and get the Government to adopt them. All the great

















































































































































































































“CHICAGO,” ONE OF THE “WHITE SQUADRON” WARSHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES.

war vessels in the world now carry torpedoes to use in this way, and for
the invention we are indebted to Robert Fulton.

Our Government thought so much of Fulton and had so much confi-
‘ dence in his ability that Congress voted three hundred and twenty
thousand (nearly one-half million) dollars to be used in building a
steam warship under Fulton’s direction. This act of the Government,
showing how much they esteemed the great inventor, gave Fulton more
pleasure, he said, than anything else that happened in his life. It took
144 ROBERT FULTON.

more than one year to build this great warship, and it was successfully
launched in the sight of a multitude of people, and what do you suppose
the Government named it? I have no doubt that you will guess aright,
for the great ship bore on its bow the name “ Fulton the First.”

This ship furnished the model for the great Swede, John Ericsson, who
afterwards came to America and improved on Fulton’s models, until we
have the wonderful floating forts and terrible cruisers which now make
up the war vessels of the great nations of the world.

But Fulton not only knew about steamboats and steamboat machinery,
he was a thorough mechanic and understood the most difficult inventions
of all kinds of machinery, and this knowledge helped him to expose a
rascally fellow who was once imposing a fraud upon the people. This is
how it was:

You have heard about perpetual motion, have you not? Well, that
means something which, when once set in motion, will move on forever
without any supply of power from without to keep it going. Many men
have spent the greater part of their lives trying to discover or invent
some new way of producing perpetual motion. Some have grown so
much interested in the subject that they have lost their minds. Others
have been so disappointed, after spending years in trying to discover
it, that they have killed themselves over their disappointment.

Well, in Fulton’s time, there came a man to New York by the name
of Redheffer, who said he had invented a perpetual motion machine.
Many people paid a dollar a piece to see the wonder; and even learned
men visited it and could not account for its continual motion. They
told Fulton about it. He said it must be a “humbug,” because he
knew that no machine could be made that would run of itself. However,
his friends kept coaxing him until he went with them to see it. After
looking at it in a careless way, as they had always done, Fulton sat
down and began to study its motion. He noticed that its running was
not regular. Sometimes it would go faster and sometimes slower. Then
he became more convinced that it was a “humbug,” and he put his ear
closer up to the machine to listen.

Presently he said: “This motion is made by some one turning a
crank,” for he had noticed, when he was a boy, in turning a grindstone,
that the stone, when pushing the crank down and when pulling it up,
ROBERT FULTON. 145

moved with a different rapidity. Hence, he concluded there must be
someone turning a crank somewhere, and he said: “If you people will
help me, I will prove to you that what I say is true.”

The people agreed, and, at once, they set to work to pull off some
strips of wood, when they saw a string running from the machine
back through the wall and passing up through the floor above.
They quickly ran upstairs and found an old man turning a crank,
which was connected with the machine by the string. This old fellow
had been there all the time turning this crank, while Redheffer pre-
tended his machine was running of itself. Fulton and his friends ran
back to the machine-room, but somebody had told the impostor, Red-
heffer, and he had run away and was never heard of after that.

Mr. Fulton was not only a machinist and a great inventor, but he was
also a wise statesman. While he was in France, he wrote letters to
Minister Carnot and tried to persuade him to adopt the principles of
“Free Trade” as the best means for increasing the trade of that nation.
When he came back to Philadelphia, he urged the people to buy pic-
tures painted by their own great artist, West, in London; and when they
refused to do it, he bought two of them himself, because he felt that
America ought to have some of the work of her greatest artist. These
pictures, when he died, he willed, with other fine works, to the Academy
of Art, in New York, where they may now be seen. He delighted to
encourage and aid young Americans who showed talent in any line.

One of Fulton’s greatest friends was the wise and ‘good Dr.
Franklin, of whom we have told you in a previous chapter in this
book, and many are the pleasant winter evenings Fulton spent
with Dr. Franklin in explaining his inventions and experiments; for
you must remember that besides the steamboat and the torpedoes,
which were his great inventions, he still found time for planning out
float-docks and many other improvements and inventions for the good of
trade and convenience in his native country. With it all, he was so
modest and quiet that, while he lived, very few people knew or thought
of what a great man he was until he was taken away by sudden
death, in the year 1815, when he was only fifty years of age. After his
death great steamers were built to cross the ocean, and locomotives were

made to pull railroad trains over the world.
10
146 ROBERT FULTON.

We cannot honor Robert Fulton’s memory too much. If he had not
lived, perhaps to-day we would travel by sailing vessels, taking weeks
of time instead of only a few days to cross the ocean. And but for
him, perhaps, even the railroads would not be in use; for, while he did
not invent the railway locomotive, he built the first successful steam-
boat and made all the world recognize that steam could be used to give
us faster modes of travel. Not only America, but every country in the









































































































U.S. MaN oF War
-Built- for: ExhiBit- AT: WoRLDS- FAIR
pe sabe eco



MODEL OF A MODERN U. S. MAN OF WAR.

world is indebted to Robert Fulton for teaching them this important
truth.

His life furnishes an interesting lesson to every ambitious and honest
boy, however poor. There are other things more wonderful than the steam-
boat yet to be invented; and as simple little things, as Robert Fulton’s
paddles on the old flat-boat, when he went fishing as a boy, will teach
the boys of to-day how to do them. Then keep your eyes open and
study the whys and wherefores of little things. Be a studious boy, as
Robert Fulton was, and you may also become a great and useful man to
your country and to mankind.
STORY OF THE BENEVOLENT LIFE OF
GEORGE PEABODY,

Our First Great Phi-lan-thro=-pist.







GEORGE PEABODY.

O my little friends under-
stand what a_philan-
thropist is? He is a man who
gives away his fortune, or a
large part of it, to help better
the condition of the poor and
give them a chance to live hap-
pier and more useful lives.
Would you like to know about
the first man who became a
great philanthropist in America,
and to know how he did so
much for the benefit of man-
kind? I will tell you, for his
story is avery interesting one,
and the reading of it. may be
the means of inducing other
boys to do likewise. Perhaps
you think that this great phi-
lanthropist, who gave away mil-

lions of dollars, was rich when he was born, and that he was raised by
kind and indulgent parents, who gave him everything he wanted and sent
him to school until he was a grown man, that he might train his mind
and heart for the great work which he did in life. This is, no doubt,
what George Peabody deserved to have had done for him; but perhaps

(147)
148 GEORGE PEABODY.

if it had been done, it would have made him selfish and spoiled him for
usefulness to his fellow-men. However this may be, we will tell you the
story just as it happened, and leave you to draw the lessons from his life.

In the year 1795, when George Washington was serving his second
term as President of the United States, and Robert Fulton, about whom
you have just read in the previous chapter, was living in France, thinking
about making the first steamboat, a little baby boy was born in Danvers,
Massachusetts, on the eighteenth day of February. They called his
name George. His father, Mr. Peabody, was a very poor man. George
was sent to school in Danvers, where he learned to read and write, and
began to study arithmetic. But when he was eleven years of age his
father became so poor that he had to tell George he could not go to
school any longer. So he was apprenticed to Mr. Sylvester Proctor, who
kept a country store at Danvers, and who agreed to teach George how to
be a merchant. In this way George earned his board and clothes, and
Mr. Proctor paid his father a few dollars a year for his services.

George stayed in Mr. Proctor’s store for five years, and by the end of
that time, though he was only about sixteen years old, he had learned
all that Mr. Proctor could teach him about the business. He knew very
much about goods, was so correct in keeping accounts, and so polite to
those who came to buy, that he was considered a real good merchant,
and everybody who came to the store was his friend. They all said when
they bought anything from George Peabody, they knew it was exactly
what he represented it to be. He was never known to cheat or to tell a
falsehood about anything he sold.

When George Peabody was sixteen years old, his older brother, David,
invited him to come to Newburyport and clerk in his store. David was
considerably older than George, and, by hard work, saved money enough
to start for himself a nice dry goods store in Newburyport; so George
went to clerk for his brother. Newburyport was a much larger town than
Danvers, and the new clerk thought he was quite fortunate in getting
the position.

Besides, he now knew so much about selling goods that his brother
could afford to pay him better wages, and his father permitted him to
keep it all for himself. All these things made George more attentive to
his duties than ever.
GEORGE PEABODY. 149

The other merchants soon noticed how smart he was, and they also
noticed that he did not spend his time around the taverns and had
none of the ugly habits common to other young men. In a little while
he was one of the best-known and best-liked young men in the neigh-
borhood.

George was beginning to think this was the place for him to settle
down and grow up as a merchant, and he was quite pleased with the
prospect before him. But there was a sad experience awaiting him,
which came very suddenly, as such things generally do. One morning
the people were awakened very early by the ringing of fire-bells. George
jumped out of bed and looked out of his window and saw the smoke
rising black and dense in the direction of his brother’s store.

He and his brother quickly hurried down to the place, where a great
crowd of people had already gathered before them, and they found, indeed,
that it was his brother’s store wrapped in flames. It was but a little while
until everything was burned up, and his poor brother was almost heart-
broken at the loss of his many years’ savings, for you know there were
very few people in those days, indeed, if there were any in this country,
who insured their goods and stores as they do now against loss by fire.

Several of the merchants in the town offered George employment in
their stores, for they knew him to be one of the best clerks in the town.
But, while he was waiting to decide the matter, he received a letter from
his uncle, John Peabody, who lived in Georgetown, District of Columbia,
which is now a suburb of our great capital city, Washington. This
uncle had a dry goods store, and, when he heard of the fire, he at once
wrote George to come down and clerk for him.

The thought of a trip to Washington City was quite an attraction to
the young man of seventeen years, who had never been in the far South,
as they then considered Washington; in fact, he had never traveled out
of the State of Massachusetts.

So after thanking the merchants for their kind offers to give him
employment, and bidding his many friends good-by, he took a ship and
sailed down the Atlantic Ocean to the mouth of the Potomac River, and
then up the Potomac River to the city of Washington.

This was a great trip, lasting several days, and George thought the
world was a great deal larger than he had ever imagined it to be; but
150 GEORGE PEABODY.

you must not suppose he was as ignorant at this time as when he left
school, a little boy of eleven years, for, besides learning so much about
business, he had also been reading good books and improving his mind
in every way he could.

George was gladly welcomed at his uncle’s house, and his uncle was
so pleased with him, after a short trial, that he turned over his business
entirely to him, and, furthermore, had it run in George’s name instead of
his own. Of course, the young man felt flattered at this, but he afterward
had much cause to regret it; for he learned that his uncle was not only
a very poor business man, but that he was far in debt.

George remained with him two years, when he saw that he could never
do any good in managing his uncle’s store. Try as hard as he might,
- and no matter how well he managed, his uncle was always doing some-
thing which would use up all the money they made and kept them
always in debt. He therefore determined to resign, that is, give up his
employment with his uncle, which he did.

Soon after George left his uncle’s store, a man by the name of Elisha
Riggs sent for him. Mr. Riggs had just opened a wholesale dry goods
house in Georgetown. He brought over silks and very fine goods from
England and also bought goods from Philadelphia and New York, which
he sold to merchants in Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Indiana and
other States, some of which were very little settled.

Mr. Riggs told George that he wanted an active, energetic young man
who knew about goods and would be able to buy and sell them, and,
furthermore, that he should perhaps want to send him occasionally into
the other States to dispose of his goods. George liked this idea very
much, for it would give him an opportunity to learn about other sections
of the country and other people, so he accepted Mr. Riggs’ offer and
entered, as he always did before, with all his heart and soul into the
work,

There were many things about the wholesale business which he had
never learned in a retail store; but it was only a little while until he
had mastered everything, and Mr. Riggs found him so bright and atten-
tive to his duties that he made him his manager, when he was a little
over nineteen years of age.

George succeeded so well that Mr. Riggs was not only satisfied, but,
{
\

GEORGE PEABODY. 151

after a few months’ trial, invited George to his home one day, and, after
they had eaten dinner together, astonished the young man by saying he
wanted to make him his partner in business.

George told him how much he was pleased at being thought worthy
of becoming a partner in the firm, but he said there were two things to
prevent his doing so: First, he had no money with which to buy an
interest, and, second, he was not yet twenty years of age, so he could not
become legally responsible with Mr. Riggs for the acts of the firm.

Mr. Riggs smilingly patted the young man on the shoulder and said
in a kind, fatherly way, ‘I know all that, George, but you see I am
taking the risk, so you need have no fears as to the money. Besides,”
continued Mr. Riggs, “if you manage the business well, your part of the
profits will soon pay for your interest, and by that time you will be old
enough to become a lawful partner.”

It is no wonder, that after such kind and generous treatment, George
Peabody worked both night and day to make the business a great success.
He said, in after-life, that he wasn’t half so anxious to make money for
himself as to keep Mr. Riggs from feeling he had made a mistake in
placing so much confidence in him and giving him so great an
opportunity.

Thus, before he was twenty years of age, George Peabody was going to
New York and Philadelphia, to buy the goods for the new firm. He also
traveled on horseback, going into the wild regions of other States to look
after the interests of the firm, which was now called by the name of
“Riggs & Peabody,” and was spreading its trade that was growing
very rapidly in the States where it had never gone before.

All of this, Mr. Riggs freely admitted, was due to the wise manage-
ment and watchful care of his young partner. In 1815 the business
was found to be so extensive that it was thought necessary to remove it
to Baltimore, where they would have better and quicker means of shipping
their goods.

By this time George had also noticed that very many of the country
merchants were in the habit of letting the firm keep all of the ready
money which they had and did not need in their business, and, in this
way, they had always on hand a large amount of money belonging to
the merchants who bought from them.
152 GEORGE PEABODY.

This was because the merchants felt that it was not safe to keep it in
their country stores, and there were no banks convenient for them to put
it in. Hence they let Riggs & Peabody keep their money. George,
whose eyes were always open for opportunities for making money, called
Mr. Riggs’ attention to this, and said they might just as well start a
banking business in connection with their business as merchants.

Mr. Riggs agreed, and that is how George Peabody commenced as a
banker, just before he was twenty-one years of age. He had never had
any experience in banking, but, as everybody now knows, he became
one of the greatest bankers in the world.

It was not long after Mr. Peabody went to Baltimore before he was,
as he had been everywhere else, noted for his good judgment, his
politeness and his kindness to everybody. His character was so good
that the Legislature of Maryland made his bank the financial agent
of the State; that is, Riggs & Peabody had charge of all of the State’s
money, and when the State wanted to borrow or lend money, it was done
through Mr. Peabody’s bank.

The firm of Riggs & Peabody grew so fast that, in 1822, they had to
establish branches in Philadelphia and New York, so that Mr. Peabody
divided his time between their headquarters in Baltimore and the branch
stores in the two other cities.

In a few years their business with England became so great that he
had to make trips across the ocean. He went for the first time in 1827,
and for the next ten years he crossed back and forth two or three times
almost every year.

In 1829, Mr. Riggs, being rather an old man, concluded to withdraw
from the firm and relieve himself from the business cares. He therefore
took out a very large sum of money, several times as great as the sum
he put in, and still left a considerable sum belonging to him in the
business. The name of the firm was then changed from “Riggs &
Peabody” to ‘“ Peabody, Riggs & Co.”

In 1836, Mr. Peabody found it was necessary for him to have a branch
house in London, as he was kept so much of his time on the ocean, going
back and forth, and he had to buy almost all the fine goods used in this
country in London, because we were not then, you know, a manufac-
turing people. The London house was opened in 1836, and the next
GEORGE PEABODY. : 153

year, Mr. Peabody, who was then forty-two years old, removed to
London, and remained there most of the time for the balance of his
life, though he was in America many times, and always claimed
America as his home.

It was lucky for the American people that Mr. Peabody did go to
London to live, because this same year, 1837, there came a great
financial panic: That means the merchants were broken up, the banks
were failing, and the people were unable to pay their debts; and the
English people who had sold to the merchants in this country became
very much alarmed, and got their money out of the country anyway they
could, no matter how many people it caused to fail.

Mr. Peabody by this time had made many acquaintances among the
leading business men and bankers in London, and they invited him into
the great London bank, known as the Bank of England, which is still
the largest banking-house in the world, and asked him a great many
questions about America. He explained everything to them in such a
manner that they had more confidence in our people, and hundreds of
merchants were saved from failure by Mr. Peabody’s influence.

In the meantime, the business of Peabody, Riggs & Co. grew larger
than ever. They now had many ships carrying their goods from England
to America, and bringing back such American goods as sold best in
England. George Peabody seemed to know just what and when to buy
for both countries, and the firm grew rich very fast. Any merchant can get
rich if he knows just what to buy and when to buy it, and when and
where to sell. Good judgment is worth more than money in business.

The merchants on both sides of the Atlantic began to leave large sums
of money in Mr. Peabody’s hands, just as the country merchants had
left it in his hands when he was in Baltimore. Finally, so much of this
money accumulated, and he had so much banking to do, that his time
was almost entirely taken up with this work.

So, in 1843, Mr. Peabody concluded to give his time to this branch
of the business, and he withdrew from the old firm and started a new
one under the name of “George Peabody & Co.,” which did a banking
and brokerage business, and his dealings were almost entirely with
Americans and in American securities.

Mr. Peabody was very proud of his country and never let a chance
154 GEORGE PEABODY.

pass to tell people that. he was an American. In his great banking-
house, his associates and many of his clerks were Americans. He
represented his house as an American banking-house in London, and
he had a reading-room in the building, and the tables contained all the
best American magazines and newspapers.

Kvery Fourth of July, Mr. Peabody gave a celebration at one of the
public houses, to which he invited all the prominent Americans in
London as well as many of his English friends, and they enjoyed their
Independence Day just as if they had been in their native country.

Another thing to show how patriotic Mr. Peabody was happened in
1851. That year England had a great exhibition, something like our
Centennial or World’s Fair, though not so large, to which all the nations
of the earth were invited to send specimens of their workmanship,
inventions, etc. For some reason, the Congress of the United States
failed to vote any money to make an exhibition for our country. This
grieved Mr. Peabody very much, and he gave fifteen thousand dollars
out of his own pocket to prepare and fit up a space in the exhibition
for Americans who wanted to show their inventions. Was not that
patriotic?

Among other things that were shown there was the great McCormick
reaper, which had never before been seen in England. Another was
the celebrated Colt’s revolver. Another was a lock which burglars could
not pick, made by an American by the name of Hobbs. Another was
Hoe’s wonderful printing press, the greatest then in the world, and the
greatest even now. He also showed Benjamin West’s fine paintings,
which, though they were done in London, he claimed belonged to us
because Mr. West was an American. Another thing which attracted
great attention was a celebrated piece of sculpture, known as Powers’
Greek Slave, also made by an American; and many other things which
beat the English people so far that they had much more respect for
America after that. The great newspapers of London praised Mr.
Peabody and his country, and said the English people got more benefit
from the things shown by the United States than from those from any
other country.

You say this was noble and patriotic in Mr. Peabody. So it was, but,
remember, all great men love their countries. It is only the mean and
GEORGE PEABODY. 165

cowardly man who does not love his native land. Whenever you see a
person who will not stand up for his own country, he is like a boy who
maltreats his mother, sure to be mean and cowardly.

Now, let me tell you some of the habits of this very great and rich
man—for he was now worth many millions of dollars. In personal
appearance he was very much like many other men. His face was
rather pale and thoughtful; but his body was strong, because he had
been used to simple living all his life. He was of about medium height
and very muscular, but not fat and chubby, like Doctor Franklin.





























THE BULLOCK-HOE PERFECTING PRESS,

He disliked all kinds of display, so he was simple in his dress, though
always neat as a pin. He wore no jewelry except a fine gold watch,
and that was fastened with a black silk cord. He thought it was
foppish to wear the big dangling chains that were common in those
days.

Mr. Peabody never married. We do not know why, but some of our
greatest and best men have lived all their lives as bachelors. Among
them were Washington Irving, the great American novelist, and John
156 GEORGE PEABODY.

Greenleaf Whittier, the noble Quaker poet, whom everybody loved. It
was natural for Mr. Peabody to be saving. When a poor boy, he had to
count his pennies very carefully before he spent them. ‘This habit clung
to him through life, and he never wasted anything. He was not given
to the extravagant use of tobacco or intoxicating liquors. Very many
men in London, who did not own one-tenth as much as he, spent ten
times as much on themselves. He was often seen making his dinner on
a mutton-chop and a cup of tea or a glass of milk, just because he knew
this was better for his health than more expensive diet.

I have already told you George Peabody was rigidly honest, and he
wanted everybody else to be honest too. On one occasion, when he rode
on an English railway, the conductor charged him a shilling 'too much
for his fare. He paid the shilling, looked very coldly at the man, and
asked him his name and address. The conductor pretended to be offended
at this, but that made no difference to Mr. Peabody. When he got off
the train, he went straight to the directors of the railroad and told them
what the conductor had done, and had him discharged.

Mr. Peabody said he did not mind paying the shilling himself, because
he could afford to do it; but the man was, no doubt, cheating many
travelers just as he had done him, and others could not afford to be
robbed of their money. Now, if any of my little readers think Mr.
Peabody did wrong in this, they are mistaken. He did exactly right.
Perhaps the conductor thought he was mean and spiteful for having him
discharged, but I will prove to you that he was, on the contrary, the
most liberal man in the world.

As far back as 1835, Mr. Peabody gave to the State of Maryland the
sum of two hundred thousand dollars, for which the Legislature sent him
a vote of thanks. This was his first large gift. In 1852, when Dr. Elisha
Kent Kane, the great Arctic explorer, of whom you have no doubt heard,
was sent into the cold regionsof the North to hunt for Sir John
Franklin, Mr. Peabody gave ten thousand dollars to help in this great
undertaking.

The same year he concluded to build a library and to stock it with
books in his old home down in Danvers, Massachusetts. So he gave thirty
thousand dollars to build this library, in order that the people and the
boys and girls of his old town might have better opportunities than he
GEORGE PEABODY. 157

had when a boy for studying and reading good books. Later on in his
life he gave one hundred and seventy thousand dollars more, making
two hundred thousand dollars in all to the Peabody Institute at Danvers.

Afterwards he gave fifty thousand dollars to build another such insti-
tution in North Danvers. You know the Bible tells us that charity begins
at home, so the first great gift that Mr. Peabody made was to the State
of Maryland, which had been his home when he began his career as



MEMORIAL HALL, HARVARD COLLEGE.
Harvard College received the gift of $150,000 from George Peabody.

a great merchant, and now he had given two hundred and fifty thousand
dollars in all to the little city of Danvers, where he was born.

In 1857 Mr. Peabody visited the United States again, and spent a
while in his home city, Baltimore, Maryland. This he loved next to
Danvers, the town where he was born. So he gave to Baltimore three
hundred thousand dollars to build a great library and institution of
learning. They named it the Peabody Institute, as had been done in
Danvers. Afterwards, Mr. Peabody saw that the great city of Baltimore
needed to have a larger institution than the one they had already built,
158 GEORGE PEABODY.

and he gave them seven hundred thousand dollars more to make it
large enough and fit it up in the very best manner. He then gave
twenty-five thousand dollars to Phillip’s Academy in Massachusetts and
twenty-five thousand dollars to Kenyon College.

_ Then Mr. Peabody went back to England, after having done what he
thought he ought to do for his native land at that time; he turned his
attention to the poor people in London. He went around among the tene-
ment-houses and saw how sometimes a large family lived in one miser-
able little hot room where the air could hardly get in. He noticed what
poor food they ate, and how pale and sickly the children looked, and his
great heart was moved with pity for them.

So he went out into different parts of the city where it was cool and
airy and he built great rows of comfortable houses and gave three
millions of dollars. You may understand how much this was if you
remember it takes ten hundred thousand dollars to make a million.
These houses that Mr. Peabody built for the poor people furnished com-
fortable homes to over twenty thousand persons; and the poor people
in London bless his name above all other good men who have helped them
in their distress. Many of them do not even know but that he was an
Englishman; but everyone knows the name of George Peabody, and they
love him as, perhaps, they love no other man.

Queen Victoria, the great Queen of England, was so thankful to Mr.
Peabody for his rich gift that she sent him a beautiful letter, and had her
portrait painted by the finest artist she could get and sent it to Mr.
Peabody as a gift. This portrait was so large and the frame so hand-
some that it cost the Queen forty thousand dollars. It was the most
expensive portrait she ever gave to anyone.

About this time the great Civil War in the United States was over,
and Mr. Peabody made another visit to this country. He was very sorry
that the Southern people and the Northern people had been at war with
each other, for he was born in the North, but he had lived and done
much of his business in the South. He therefore loved the people of
both sections of the country; and this great and bloody war, which
lasted four long years, had killed off thousands upon thousands of the
best men from both the North and the South.

The first thing Mr. Peabody did, when he came over, was to see how
GHORGE PEABODY. 159

the colleges were doing, and whether they were able to educate the
people. He gave one hundred and fifty thousand dollars to Harvard
College and one hundred and fifty thousand dollars to Yale College, the
two greatest colleges in the country. Then he gave two hundred
thousand dollars to hospitals and soldiers’ homes and other charitable
objects. For this generous liberality the United States Congress voted
that the thanks of the whole nation should be extended to him, and they
also had a medal made of pure gold and presented to him from the
United States Government.

Mr. Peabody now visited the South, and he saw how destitute the
people were. The rich farms had almost all their fences torn down, and
many of the houses had been burned. Churches and schoolhouses were
going to rack. This is not strange, for it was in that section of the
country that the fierce fighting was carried on, and the South had to
feed both the Southern and the Northern armies nearly all the time
during these four long years. The whole country looked desolate, and
the people were downhearted.

Besides this, there were three or four millions of black people who
were now made free, but not one in a hundred of them even knew their
A BOC’s. Mr. Peabody said that while they were slaves, it was perhaps
very well that they should not be educated ; but now they had become
free they must be educated, or the Government some day might be
destroyed through their ignorance. So he gave the great sum of three
million five hundred thousand dollars to help along the cause of edu-
cation in the Southern States.

This was his greatest and grandest gift, and did more good perhaps
than any other. Every Southern State received its portion of this money,
and the wise and noble Southern man, Doctor J. L. M. Curry, President
of a college in Richmond, Virginia, was made agent of this fund. It
was invested wisely so it would bring continual interest. After a while,
the great college, known as the Peabody Normal College, was established
out of this money in connection with the University of Nashville,
Tennessee.

Every Southern State was entitled to send as many of its young men
and young women as wanted to become teachers to this college to be
educated free. They not only had their tuition given them free, but
160 GEORGE PEABODY.

enough money was allowed every student to pay his board and
expenses until he could graduate as a teacher from this college. They
then went back home to their States, where they obligated themselves
to teach. Thousands of the best teachers now in the South at the head











































































































































































































































































































CHAPEL OF YALE COLLEGE.
$150,000 was given this College by Mr. Peabody.



of its colleges and
its public schools
were educated by
Mr. George Peabody
at this great Normal
College.

Besides this, in all
the States the “‘ Pea-
body Fund,” as it is
called, is used to
help along the cause
of education. There
are Peabody Insti-
tutes all over the
land, and thousands
upon thousands are
being educated at
the expense of this
ereat-hearted, rich
man, who was so
poor when he was a
boy that he had to
quit school and go
to work when only
eleven years old.

Mr. Peabody
thought at this time

of making his home in America, but the hard work he had done all his
life had injured his health, and he found he could not live as comforta-
bly in this climate as he could in England, where it does not become

so warm in the summer, so he returned to England.

The Queen, when she heard of the great things he had done for the
GEORGE PEABODY. 161

suffering of his own land, offered to make him a baron, but he declined,
saying he was only a simple citizen. She then offered to make him a
member of the Order of Bath and bestow upon him the grand cross,
which was the highest honor she could think of, but Mr. Peabody again
declined.

The Queen then asked him what gift he would accept from her, for
she wanted to express her regard in some way. Mr. Peabody said he
would like to have a simple letter from the Queen written with her own
hand, which he wanted to carry across the ocean to put in a frame and
hang up where the people would sometimes come and think of him. He
wanted them to see this letter that they might know he had the good-
will and friendship of the Queen.

It was in answer to this request that the Queen wrote him the letter
and sent him the fine portrait of herself, which we have already told you
about. If you ever go to the Peabody Institute at Danvers, you will see
the Queen’s letter and this forty-thousand-dollar portrait of the Queen
hanging side by side in the Institute. They were placed there by Mr.
Peabody the next time he came to America.

In 1868 Mr. Peabody endowed an art school in Rome, Italy, and in
1869 he made his last visit to his beloved America. On this visit he
gave one hundred and fifty thousand dollars to establish a public
museum at Salem, Massachusetts, and to other charitable objects one
hundred and sixty-five thousand dollars.

Then he went back to England, and what do you suppose he found
when he went out in London? Why, in one of the finest parts of the
city there stood a beautiful bronze statue of George Peabody. During
his absence in America, it had been made by his English friends; and
the Prince of Wales, the son of the Queen, had unveiled it in the
presence of the people, and made a speech calling George Peabody the
best man that ever lived.

A few weeks after this Mr. Peabody died in London, on the twelfth day
of November, 1869, when he was nearly seventy-five years of age. All
the world mourned the loss of this good man. The great people of
England turned out to his funeral. The Queen had him buried in West-
minster Abbey, the place where only the noted people of England lie

buried. This was the first time that a private citizen had ever been
1
162 GHORGE PEABODY.

buried in Westminster Abbey; and although the Queen and the
English people would have been pleased to keep him there, it was not
to be so.

Mr. Peabody told them before he died that he wanted to be buried by
the side of his old mother in America. So after his body had been kept
in Westminster Abbey for a while, the “Monarch,” the finest and fastest
warship in the British Navy, brought Mr. Peabody’s remains across the
Atlantic Ocean.

Before coming to land, Admiral Farragut, who commanded the Union
warships in the great war between the North and South, took the
American Squadron and went out to meet the “Monarch.” The casket
containing Mr. Peabody’s remains was transferred from the ‘“ Monarch”
to the Flagship of the American Squadron, and they took him back to
Danvers, which he left nearly fifty-nine years before when a poor boy
of sixteen, and laid him in a grave beside his dear old mother.

Then the people of the town got up a great petition, which almost
everybody signed, requesting the Legislature of Massachusetts to change
the name of the town from Danvers to Peabody, which was done. There-
fore, if you look on your map now, you will find the name Peabody
instead of Danvers. Peabody is now a thriving town; and one of the most
interesting spots seen by visitors to that place is the grave of George
Peabody, the poor boy who became one of the greatest merchants in the
world, and who has proved himself by far the most liberal benefactor of
mankind and the greatest philanthropist who ever lived.

Mr. Gladstone, the great and noble statesman of England, said: “It
was George Peabody who taught the world how a man might be the
master of his fortune, not its slave.” We point our young friends to the
life of George Peabody as a noble model for all those who expect to be
merchants and business men.

There have been many men in the world richer than he, but no man
ever gave one-tenth part so liberally as George Peabody. Of all the
rich men our country has produced, he did the most good with his
wealth; and he is by far the most honored rich man of the world.
: BPE

ae <



THOMAS A. EDISON IN HIS LABORATORY.
THE MARVELOUS GENIUS OF

THomas A. EpIson,

The Greatest Inventor of the World.

N looking at the face of this nice
little four-year-old boy, would you
think he would ever become a great
man? Yes, that is just what he has
done; and all great men grow out of
just such pretty innocent-looking boys
as this. Would you like to hear his
story ?

After Benjamin Franklin showed how
to catch the lightning in 1752, and run
it down a lightning rod into the ground,
another man by the name of Samuel F.
B. Morse found out how to make this
same electricity carry messages along
the wire, and he invented the telegraph
in 1835—nearly one hundred years
after Benjamin Franklin discovered

that lightning and electricity were the same.

Samuel Morse was a great man, but we are to tell you of one much
sreater than he, who so improved the telegraph that it would do ten
times as fast work as Morse’s machine. His name is Thomas Alva
Iidison, and he is called the Wizard of Menlo Park.

Do you know what a wizard is? It is one that can do very wonder-
(163)



THOMAS ALVA EDISON AT FOUR
YEARS OF AGE.
164 THOMAS A. EDISON.

ful things that people cannot understand. Did you ever hear of Alladin
in the fable, who is said to have possessed a wonderful lamp which he
could rub, and whatever he wished for would come? Well, that was
only a fable; but Thomas A. Edison has done things that have made
people wonder almost as much at as Alladin and his lamp. It is the
true story of his wonderful life that we are going to tell you.

Thomas A. Edison, besides his many wonderful discoveries in electri-
city, has made some of the most useful machines for the benefit of man-
kind, and he has made more inventions than any other man. He has
now more than two hundred and fifty patents. No other man has ever
secured half so many.

We can, of course, tell you of only a few of his wonderful inventions.
But, first, let us give you the story of his interesting boyhood.

Thomas Alva Edison was born February 11, 1847, in Milan, Erie
County, Ohio. In olden times his father’s people were Hollanders and
lived in Holland along the Zuyder Zee, which you know is an arm of the
North Sea, running into the land. Many of them were, by trade,
millers. His great-grandfather was born in Amsterdam, and when he
was a young man moved to America, and during the Revolutionary
War was a banker in the city of New York. He died at the great age
of one hundred and two years.

His mother’s maiden name was Nancy Elliot,. whose parents were
Scotch people. In her girlhood she lived in Canada and was educated
there for a teacher, and it was there that Samuel Edison, Thomas’ father,
met and married her. So you see Thomas Edison is part Dutchman and
part Scotchman, and this, perhaps, accounts for his wonderful ability to
work so long and so well and take so little rest.

The Hollanders are very strong people, and are able to do more work
than any other nation. It was from them that Thomas Edison received
his wonderful power of endurance. For, as you will see, he sometimes
worked days without sleep. The Scotch people, on the other hand, are
very determined. They are close students, and, as a rule, have quick
and keen minds, and want to look into and understand things.

Thomas Edison showed when he was a little boy that he was both a
Dutchman and a Scotchman in strength of body and his bright and
strong mind. His mother had been a teacher, and it was she who gave
THOMAS A. EDISON. 165

this promising boy his early instruction. It is said that only two
months of his life did Edison attend school.

Nevertheless, when ten years old, he was so bright that he could read
Gibbon’s ‘“ History of the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire,” Bur-
ton’s dry book called the ‘“ Anatomy of Melancholy,’ and David Hume’s
“History of England.” He was also at that age studying the “ Dictionary
of Sciences” and the “ Penny Enclyclopedia.’”’ When twelve years of







THE BIRTHPLACE OF THOMAS A. EDISON, AT MILAN, OHIO.

age, he even read one of the hardest books in the world, Newton’s
“Principia,” though he says he did not understand it.

You will not find one great man in a hundred who has had several
years of schooling, who has read the above learned but hard and dry books.
This shows you how anxious young Edison was to learn, and whenever
a boy wants to learn, he will learn, whether he goes to school or not.
Whenever a boy does not want to learn, no matter how much schooling
you give him, it is apt to do him very little good.

Mr. Samuel Edison, the father of Thomas, had a very cumfortable but
166 THOMAS A. EDISON.

plain home in Milan, where Thomas was born, which you will see in the
picture; but in 1854, when Thomas was only seven years old, his father
lost all his little savings and had to move out of this house and begin
living anew, in the town of Port Huron, Michigan. Hdison’s mother
taught him and the other children at home; but instead of having to
urge Tom on as most boys, she had to hold him back and take his books
away from him. He was ‘so anxious to learn that he would spend all
his time reading if she would let him. Often she read to the children,
after they had learned their lessons, much to Tom’s delight.

You will laugh when I tell you this funny thing that little Tom did
one day when about five years old. His sister tells it for the truth, but
it is said to plague Mr. Edison now if anyone speaks of it. There was
an old goose sitting on a nest full of eggs. Tom watched her day after day.
One morning he found the shells broken, and, toddling about the nest,
were several little goslings in a greenish-golden down. He wanted to
know how it happened, for he always wanted an explanation for every-
thing. His father told him that the warmth from the old goose’s body
hatched the goslings out of the eggs.

Next day they missed Tom, and, after hunting a long time, found him
curled up in a barn on a nest full of eggs, trying to hatch them out
with the warmth of his body.

When Thomas was twelve years of age he got a position on the rail-
road as a newsboy. That means one who sells books and papers, and
candy and pencils, etc., on the trains as they pass back and forth
through the country. He liked this position very much, because it gave
him a chance to see and read so many new books. As soon as he had
carried his books and papers through the train and sold what the people
wanted, he would settle himself down in the corner and spend every
spare moment in reading.

Strange to say, instead of reading the trashy books of wild tales, such
as spoil boys’ minds, he spent his time over magazines which described
new inventions, and in reading books that taught him something.
Among other books he always carried with him a book of chemistry,
and poured over it an hour or two almost every day, though he could
not pronounce many of the hard names and did not know what a large
part of it meant.
THOMAS A. EDISON. 167

By saving his money he was soon able to buy a lot of chemicals, and
he set up a little experimenting laboratory in the baggage-car, and when
he read about the strange things that would happen if you put two
different kinds of chemicals together, he would, according to the direc-
tions in his book, put them together and see what they would do. This
amused the baggageman, and he encouraged Tom to learn.

But the boy was not content with doing just what the book told him.
He was always putting chemicals together that the book did not say
anything about, to see what they would do; and about this he was
always cautioned to be careful.

One end of Hdison’s run as newsagent was at the city of Detroit,
Michigan. He had to lay over there sometimes for a day, and he spent
almost every other night in that city.

Very soon he began to go to the great Detroit Free Library. Now he
had an idea that all the smart men in the world had read all the books
that had been printed, and if he expected to be a well-read man he
should have to do likewise.

He looked at the great shelves of books, rising one above another and
running the whole length of the wall, and he thought it was a great
undertaking to read all these books, but he determined to do it. He
concluded that the way to read that library through was to begin at one
end of the shelf and read along to the other end of it; then take another
shelf and read to the end of it, and so on until he had read all the rows
of books.

Every day and every night when he was in Detroit, he spent at the
library, and, after several months, they noticed that he was going to the
same shelf and taking the books, one after another, just as he came to
them, no matter what they were about. One day the librarian questioned
him why he was doing that. He said he had started in to read the
library through; and by that time he had actually finished all the books
for about fifteen feet along one of the shelves.

This seems very funny, but it goes to show how determined the boy
was, and when he once set himself to do a task he was very apt to carry
it through. Of course, as soon as he was shown his mistake, he gave
up this way of reading and took the advice of those who knew how to
direct him.
168 THOMAS A. EDISON.

In the meantime, Edison had been so faithful in his duties as a news-
boy that he had made and saved quite a little sum of money, besides
what he gave his parents; and, when he was fourteen years old, he got
the news company to give him the exclusive right to sell papers over a
certain division of the railroad between Detroit and Port Huron, and he
hired four assistants to help him.

Let me now tell you a trick which Edison did in 1862, when he was
about fifteen years old. By a trick, 1 mean a shrewd and smart thing
which injured nobody, but which brought Edison lots of profit. At that
time the war between the North and South was raging, and the press
every day was full of the exciting accounts of the movements of the
soldiers.

When the great fight took place at Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee,
and nearly twenty-five thousand men were killed and wounded, Edison
made an agreement with the telegraph operators along the line which he
ran from Detroit, offering to give them a daily paper and two or three
monthly magazines, if they would put up notices on their bulletin boards
about the fight and say that a full account of it would be found in the
“Detroit Free Press.”

By his winning ways, he also got the news telegraphed all along the
lines (for by this time he had begun to study telegraphy himself by
watching the operators, and had made friends of most all of them). He
then went to the editor of the ‘Detroit Free Press,’ Mr. William F.
Story, and persuaded him to let him have a thousand extra copies of the
“Free Press,” to be paid for when he should return, for he did not have
enough money then to pay for them.

At the first station, Utica, Edison said he had been accustomed to sell
two papers at five cents each. This time a great crowd was waiting at
the station and he sold forty papers. At the next station he found a
still larger crowd waiting and clamoring for the news of the battle at
Pittsburg Landing, so he raised the price of the paper to ten cents and
sold one hundred and fifty, where he had before sold only one dozen
papers.

When he came to Port Huron, the town being a mile from the station,
he shouldered a bundle of papers and started for the town. About
half-way there he met a great crowd hurrying toward the station, and,
THOMAS A. EDISON. 169

knowing they were after his papers, he stopped in front of a church
where they were holding a prayer-meeting and raised the price of his
papers to twenty-five cents. In a few minutes the prayer-meeting was
adjourned, everybody was reading his paper, and he had his pockets
loaded with silver and not a paper left.

Kdison now had considerable money of his own, and he went back to
the city of Detroit and walked in with a smiling face to pay for his
papers at two and one-half cents each, which he had sold at an average
of twenty cents each. The good editor laughed, patted the boy on the
back and complimented him on his business tact and shrewdness.

In the meantime, Edison had often visited the type-setting rooms of
the “Free Press” and other papers, and at odd times had learned to set
type. It now occurred to him that he might, if he had the types, start a
little paper of his own. This idea he playfully announced to the editor
of the “Detroit Free Press.” The editor, to encourage him, took him
down into the type-room and showed him a lot of old type which they
had ceased to use, since they had bought new ones, and sold it to him
for a very small price.

Edison at once fitted up a printing office in the baggage-car, where he
had his chemical laboratory in the corner, and his friend, the baggage-
master, and his newsboy helpers with himself set the type, made up, and
printed the first edition of a small paper which they called the ‘‘ Grand
Trunk Herald.” It gave the news of the railroad men and little items
of general news. If a man was discharged, or a new man put to work,
or an accident occurred on the road, or the time of the running of the
trains was changed, or anything interesting to the railroad men happened,
it was sure to be in the “ Grand Trunk Herald,” and in a little while the
boy had several hundred regular subscribers.

But the ‘Grand Trunk Herald” came toa sad end, and with it Edison
came to grief. As we told you before, Edison was always experimenting
with dangerous chemicals. One day he dropped a bottle of acid, which
set the car on fire and came near burning up the train.

When the fire was at last put out, the baggageman was so angry that
he kicked Edison’s laboratory out of the door, and threw out all his types
and little printing press. Then he boxed Edison’s face so hard that he
made him deaf on one side, and he never could hear again on that side.
170 THOMAS A. EDISON.

Poor Edison was then put off the train, and the “ Grand Trunk Herald”
was published no more.

But you can’t keep a boy with pluck in him down. Edison was
determined to have a newspaper, and he soon arranged with a printer-
boy, known as the “devil,” in a Port Huron newspaper office to join him,
and they started a paper, which was called the “Paul Pry.” The boy
from the printing office knew how to print the paper, and he also knew

how to write better than Edison,
so the ‘Paul Pry” was a very
much better paper than the
“Grand Trunk Herald” had
| been.

It ran along nicely and had
a good many subscribers, but,
unfortunately, Edison and his
friend were so full of fun that
| they began to tell unpleasant
jokes about different prominent
people, and that is what brought
their paper toan end. One day
a subscriber, who had been made
| the butt of one of their jokes,
met Edison down by the river
St. Clair, and when Edison re-
ie 1 alge, fused to apologize for what he
THOMAS A. EDISON, WHEN PUBLISHER F THE had printed in the paper, he

“GRAND TRUNK HERALD,’ 15 YEARS OLD. orew so angry that he picked
the young editor up, boxed his ears and threw him into the river. After
this the “ Paul Pry” was not printed any more.

I omitted to tell you before that after Edison was thrown out of the
car by the baggageman, he took his chemical apparatus to the cellar of
his father’s house at Port Huron. Before this, Thomas had learned con-
siderably by watching the operators send telegrams, by asking them
questions, and by studying as much as he could during his short
stay in the office. I must tell you also that during EKdison’s four
years as newsagent, from the time he was twelve until he was sixteen


THOMAS A. EDISON 171

years old, he earned and gave his parents about five hundred dollars
every year. So by the time he was sixteen years old he had paid his
parents about two thousand dollars in cash, besides almost supporting
himself.

Now that he had set himself up permanently in his father’s cellar, he
concluded to add telegraphing to his chemical studies. So he bought a
book which proposed to teach him something about it, and he studied
diligently night and day until he had gone through it, and thought he
understood at least enough about it to make a trial.

Not far away there lived a boy near his own age, by the name of
James Ward, who was also of an inquiring mind, and the two boys con-
cluded to set up a telegraph line between their homes. At a hardware
store they found wire used to hold stovepipes in place. This, they said,
would do for the wire. They had observed that the wires of a telegraph
were run around glass to keep the electricity from escaping. They had
none of these glass pieces, so they took old bottles and wound the wire
around them. Next they secured some old magnets, and got a piece of
brass, which they finally fashioned into a key-board.

Now their line was ready, but they needed the electricity. What should
they do to make a current, so they could telegraph? The way they
undertook to do it was very funny. Edison had heard that if you rub
a cat’s back in the night, you could see sparks of electricity flying from
its fur.

So Edison secured two cats, attached the wire to their legs, and he and
his companion, seizing them by their necks, began vigorously to rub
their backs. Of course, the cats objected, and after much rubbing and
anxious watching the boys failed to get their lines to work.

No doubt, if the cats could talk, they would have told the boys
they were glad of it. This shows how original Mr. Hdison is, and, while
nothing came from rubbing the cats’ backs, many of his other efforts
made in just such an original way have turned out for the benefit of
the world.

About two months after this sad disappointment, there came a happy
day for Thomas Edison. His mind had now become given up to the
study of electricity, and he wanted to be a telegraph operator. One day
he was standing on the platform at the station thinking over many
172 THOMAS A. EDISON.

great things that telegraphing might do and how much he longed to
study it.

He looked up the railroad and saw the express locomotive coming
round the curve. Right in the middle of the track, between him and
the dashing engine, with its flashing headlight, he saw the little three-
year-old son of the stationmaster. At the peril of his own life, he
dashed in, and, seizing the little one in his arms, fairly threw himself off
the track, with the wheels of the great locomotive almost touching his
feet.

The stationmaster was overjoyed and offered to teach Edison to be a
telegraph operator. This kind offer Edison accepted, and in five months
he was so proficient that he got a position in a Port Huron telegraph
office at twenty-five dollars per month.

He was now sixteen years of age, and he learned so fast that he was
soon the best operator on the line. The newspapers were at that time
anxious to get some important news from Congress, correctly and quickly,
and they offered the man in charge of the office sixty dollars to get it
for them. The manager selected the boy Edison to do the work, and

promised him twenty dollars out of the sixty if he got it.

Edison did the work easily and well, and the sixty dollars was paid
over to the manager; but the mean man refused to give Edison the
twenty dollars he had promised him. This dishonorable act made the
boy so angry that he left that office and went to Canada, where he was
soon known as one of the most expert operators in the dominion.

While Edison was in Canada, he was required every half-hour to let
the superintendent know he was at his post by telegraphing the word
“six.” This he thought was unnecessary, so he invented alittle machine
that simply by a touch from the watchman would telegraph the little
word ‘six’ for him.

This gave him an opportunity to spend his time studying at his books,
but it also got him into very serious trouble; for once some orders came
to stop a train that was coming. Edison was at his books and did not
hear the order. When he did see the danger, he undertook to run on
ahead and give warning to stop the train, and he fell into a hole and
almost killed himself.

Fortunately, the engineers stopped the two trains before they came
THOMAS A. EDISON. 173

together. The manager called Edison to him and told him what a
serious thing he had done, and said he would have him sent to the peni-
tentiary for five years. This frightened the poor boy almost out of his
wits; but just at this moment two dandy Englishmen came in, and the
superintendent stopped to talk to them.

While he was thus engaged, Edison slipped out and ran to a train
which was just ready to start. He knew the conductor, and went aboard
and told him he was going to Sarnia, and would like him to let him
pass. The conductor consented, and when the superintendent looked
around for the boy, Edison was gone, he knew not where.

Now Sarnia is in Canada, just across the river from Port Huron,
Hdison’s home, and you may believe he was in a hurry when he got
there to cross over the line and get into the United States, where they
could not get him.

That winter he stayed at home in Port Huron. One day when they
could not telegraph to Sarnia across the river—the ice having broken
the wires—it was very important that a message should be sent over
very quickly. So Edison jumped on a locomotive and tooted the whistle
like he would tick the telegraph instrument, making the engine say, in
the language of the telegraph, ‘Hello, Sarnia! Sarnia, do you get what I
say?” After a little while, the telegraph operator on the other side, in
Sarnia, understood the language, and, jumping on an engine, talked back
to Edison with the whistle.

This cleverness on Edison’s part was much appreciated by the rail-
road and telegraph people, and they employed him at once and sent him to
several places, all of which he lost by experimenting. Finally he went
down to Cincinnati, where he got a salary of sixty dollars a month.

One day the operators from Cleveland came down to Cincinnati.
Hdison was on the day force and did not have to work at night, but that
night all of the Cincinnati office mates went out for what they called a
jolly good time with the Cleveland visitors. Edison never drank nor
wasted time, so he stayed at the office all night and sent in all the re-
ports for the fellows who were off on what they called a ‘‘jamboree.”

Next morning when it was found out that he had done the work of
several men in sending in the reports, his employers were so pleased
that they increased his salary to one hundred and five dollars a month.
174 THOMAS A. EDISON.

From Cincinnati, Edison went to Memphis, Tennessee, where the
operators received one hundred and twenty-five dollars a month. Here
his ability soon won the respect of some, but it made others very jealous
of him. Even the manager himself, who was trying to make some
invention known as the “Repeater,” was very jealous of Edison.
Finally Edison invented a repeater which saved the work of one man to
the company. This brought the young man considerable reputation;
but it made the manager so mad, that he made up a false charge
against Edison and had him dismissed.

Now, though Edison had been earning a large salary, he had been
sending most of it home to help his poor parents, and all the balance of
it he had spent for books and instruments for his experiments, so he had
no money left. But he was determined to get to Louisville.

So starting from Memphis, Tennessee, he walked one hundred miles
and then met a conductor he knew and got him to pass him the balance
of the way. When he arrived at Louisville, he was almost frozen. The
soles of his shoes were worn off, his feet were sore, he had an old straw
hat on, and a poor old linen duster was all he had for an overcoat. In this
poor plight, he presented himself at the telegraph office, where they:
received him with smiles of distrust. They thought surely he was a
tramp, but, as soon as they saw him at the key-board, they found he was
the most expert operator of them all. In a little while they had so
much respect for his ability, and he was so pleasant in his ways, that
they all learned to like him.

About this time there came reports from South America that made
Edison think that was the place for him, so with his little savings he
started and got as far as New Orleans, where he found the ship had sailed
away; and besides he met an old Spaniard who had traveled much
and who told him that the United States was the best country in the
world.

So Edison decided to stay in America, and without seeking another
position, he went home to Port Huron to visit his parents, and from
there he went back to Louisville, Kentucky, where he remained for quite
a long time, setting up his laboratory and also collecting around him all
sorts of curious machines. When the other operators went on what they
called a “jamboree,” Kdison remained at home and studied.
THOMAS A. EDISON. 175

I have told you that he was a great buyer of books. While in Louis-
ville he bought fifty volumes of the “North American Review” and
carried them home to his room and spent much of the day in reading
them. After working all night at the telegraph office, he went home
the next morning to find that some of his mean companions had carried
off the whole fifty volumes of books, put them in a pawnshop and were
lying about in his room drunk on the money. ‘Two of them had
actually gotten into his bed with their boots
on. He pulled them out of bed and left them
lying on the floor to sleep off their
re drunken stupor, while he
: £ went to bed
for his regu-
lar sleep.

Of course,
they never
paid him for
his books,
and _ besides,
as long as
he stayed
there in Lou-
isville, they
were contin-
ually borrow-

SHOP IN WHICH THE FIRST MORSE INSTRUMENT WAS CON- in g money
STRUCTED FOR EXHIBITION BEFORE CONGRESS.





from him,
which they never paid back. He was always too generous to refuse
anyone when they asked him. After a while they moved out of the old
office into a new office, and they made a rule that no one should take the
instruments from the office, nor should they use any of the chemicals.
Edison had been doing this in his experiments, and, as he always
returned them in good time, he thought it would make no difference, so
he concluded to take one of the instruments away in spite of the
rules. Then he concluded he would get some sulphuric acid. This acid
accidentally fell from his hands, ate through the floor, dripped through to
176 THOMAS A, EDISON.

the manager’s room below, ate up his desk and all the carpet. So the
next morning Edison was called before the manager and discharged.
Does it not look as if the poor young fellow was in what boys call “hard
luck?” :

He went home again to Port Huron, where he remained for about a
year and a half. By this time he was twenty-one years of age, and he
now discovered a means of making one wire do the work of two, thus
saving the people who owned the wire five thousand dollars, and so
pleased the Grand Trunk Company that they presented Edison with a
free pass to Boston, and gave him a position in the Franklin Telegraph
Office there.

But the poor fellow as usual had no money. He had spent every-
thing for books and experiments, so he had to leave home in his worn-
out clothes, and after spending four days on the road and getting very
little sleep, he appeared before the manager of the office at Boston, where
he was to work, and went to work that very same evening. But the
operators there were very finely dressed men, and they laughed at the
young fellow, whom they called ‘the jay from the wooly West.”

He started to work the first evening at six o’clock, and the operators
thought they would have some fun out of the new man, so they sent him
over to the table to take a special report from the “Boston Herald.”
Now, they had gotten the fastest telegraph operator in New York to send
the message, and had wired him they had a new man in the office, a
regular “jay from the wooly West,” they called him, and they wished
he would paralyze him by sending the message so fast he could not
take it.

Edison wrote a very plain and yet a very rapid hand. The men
stood around as he received the message with perfect ease, and looked
on with astonishment. After that they had the greatest respect for him,
and the ‘jay from the wooly West” became one of the best-liked men
in the office.

But he began his old tricks of experimenting again. We will tell you
one of them. In the office the roaches were very bad, and the operators
used to squirt sulphuric acid on them and stamp them with their feet,
but, in spite of everything they did, the roaches would run up over their
necks and through everything and gave them great annoyance.
THOMAS A. EDISON. 177

Now Edison soon tried an experiment which was very amusing to the
men, but I dare say was not enjoyed by the roaches. He put up some
tin strips along the wall, and smeared all over the tin strips such
things to eat as the roaches were very fond of. No sooner was this
done than the roaches came from all directions and in a minute the
strip was fairly black with them. Edison fastened a wire to the lower
end of the strip and another to the top, running both down to his table
and attached them to a strong battery. Instantly the roaches came
raining down dead; but the others kept coming. Every time one would
get on the strip, he would tumble off dead. For a long time the men
stood around roaring with laughter as the roaches came raining down.

They voted Edison to be the smartest man in the lot and called him
the e-lec-tro-cu-tor, and wanted to take him out and treat him; but as
he neither drank liquors nor smoked, they had to be content with giving
him their thanks.

We would like to tell you other amusing things of Mr. Edison, of which
there are very many, but we will have to say something now of his great
inventions. His hardships were now over, and prosperity smiled on him
ever atter.

In 1864, while in Boston, Edison conceived the idea of sending two
messages at once over the same wire. He kept experimenting on this
until he went to New York in 1871, and there he completed it. He
afterwards made this instrument so that it would send sixteen messages
over one wire, eight in each direction, and it has saved millions of dol-
lars to the telegraph companies.

He has also improved the telegraph system, so that instead of sending
fifty or sixty words a minute, as they had formerly done, he made it
possible to send several thousand words a minute. After Edison went
to New York, he also made a printing telegraph which is used in all the
large stock quotation houses. This brought him hundreds of thousands
of dollars profit, and a large factory was built in Newark, New Jersey,
of which he was made superintendent, and he began to grow rich very
fast. Many of these machines are found in every city of the Union.

About this time, a man by the name of Mr. Bell invented the tele-
phone. That is a little machine which you can walk up to and talk
to a friend several miles away, but it was not in a very perfect state

12
178 THOMAS A. EDISON.

until Mr. Edison invented what is known as his “transmitter,” an
important attachment which is used with the “Bell telephone” all over
the world.

Mr. Edison’s next invention is known as the “megaphone,” by the
use of which two persons may whisper to each other a quarter of a mile
away. With one of these to the ear, you can even hear cattle eating
grass four or five miles away, or you can speak to or hear the replies
from a ship far out at sea.

Next Mr. Edison invented the “phonograph,” which means a sound
writer—the most wonderful thing of all. A person may talk or sing or
whistle into this machine, and the sound of his voice will make little
marks upon a roll of gelatin inside, and when you start the machine to
moving, you can put in your ears little tubes which are attached to the
phone, and it will reply back to you just what was said or sung to it.

In 1889, at the great exposition in France, Mr. Edison had forty-seven
of these phonographs on exhibition. There were at that exhibition
people from all parts of the world. Buffalo Bill was there with his
company of Indians. They got the big Sioux Chief, Red Shirt, to talk
into the phonograph. He did so, never thinking that it would keep what
he said.

Then they let him put his ear to the phone, and he heard his own
voice speaking back to him out of the machine. He thought it was the
Great Spirit talking to him, and he ran away, much frightened, and could
not be induced to come near it again. Nor would any other of the
Indians go closer than twenty or thirty feet, nor would anyone of them
speak a word in its presence after Red Shirt had told them what it
had done. There was another man, De Brazza, who brought fifteen men
from fifteen different tribes in Africa, all speaking different languages,
and they got each one of them to talk into the phone.

All the great men of France, and others who visited there, among
them Mr. Gladstone and the Prince of Wales, from England, talked in
this wonderful phonograph, and thus Mr. Edison collected all the lan-:
guages of the world in his phonograph. Then he set them up and
charged the people a price to hear the voices of these strange men and
people, and it is said that an average of thirty thousand people a day
paid to listen to the phonograph.
THOMAS A. EDISON. 179

Such a machine as this has been better for Mr. Edison than one of the
famous Klondike gold mines, for now they are put all over the world
and are bringing him in royalties of immense sums every day.

He has collected the voices of all the prominent singers and the music
of the great bands of the world, and the speeches of the great orators,
and the voices of such notable people as the Queen of England, the
President of France and all the
other great rulers in the ~
world, so that you may
hear them in the —
phonograph.

When he once gets
a prominent person
to talk in his phono-
graph, or has some
great player like
Paderewski play
on a piano into it,
he can make this
phonograph talk or
play to another
phonograph, and so
he can make thous-
ands upon thousands
of reproductions and
send the voice of any
person anywhere he pleases. It would take more space than we can possi-
bly give to tell you of all the wonderful things the phonograph has done
or is doing, but it will, no doubt, do more wonderful things in the future.

A great phonograph factory was built in 1878 at Orange, New Jersey.
The people who are interested with Mr. Edison in this factory paid him
ten thousand dollars cash at the beginning and agreed to give him one-
fifth of all the money they received from sales. He made also a similar
arrangement in London, another in Russia, and another in France, and
so on, through all the European countries. His phonograph alone has
made him a millionaire. .


180 THOMAS A. EDISON.

Mr. Edison and Mr. Simms have also invented an electric torpedo, to
run in the water and blow up ships in battle. He has also made what
he calls a water telephone, and a chemical telephone, and a mercury tele-
phone and several other kinds of the same instrument. Then there is
the electric pen and the beautiful electric light—known as the incandes-
cent lamp—which is used all over the world; the mimeograph, and
many other things.

In 1873 Mr. Edison was married to Miss Mary E. Stillwell, a young
lady who had been helping him in his experiments. She was sitting at
a machine when Mr. Edison asked her to marry him, but she would not
promise right at once, and then when the wedding-day ‘came Mr. Edison
was so busy he forgot it. But she forgave him and married him the
next day.

In 1876 Mr. Edison removed his home from Newark, New Jersey, to
Menlo Park, New Jersey, and since that time has devoted his entire
attention to the invention of electrical machines. He has invented many
scientific instruments, which we cannot explain to our young friends, but
which have been a very great help to the world.

Mr. Edison’s home at Menlo Park is a beautiful place, and his library
contains a great many books on science and a great many of the best
books on literature. He also has a library in his workshop for the ben-
efit of his workmen. It is said that every scientific magazine in the
world comes to this library, and he encourages his men to read and study
as he does. Mrs. Edison, herself, is very much interested in the work,
and is very friendly and sociable with her old friends, many of whom
still remember when she was with them in the shop.

Mr. Edison, while very friendly and kind to his men, is, at the same
time, a very hard worker. Sometimes he works for two whole days,
when he becomes very much absorbed in anything, without stopping to
eat or sleep. On one occasion, he locked the door and made his impor-
tant workmen stay in the shop with him for two days and a half without
any sleep, in order that he might carry out some important work that
could not be delayed. At the end of that time, he sent all his men home
to stay for two days, and he himself slept for thirty-six hours.

But I must take time to tell you of one more of Mr. Edison’s inven-
tions, the kinetoscope—out of which have grown the vitascope and
THOMAS A. EDISON. 181

the biograph—which takes and shows pictures so you can see everything
in motion. If any of my little readers have not seen any of these
pictures, { advise you to do so the first opportunity you have. You
would hardly believe but that they were people or animals running
around before you—-every
motion, every expression, is
brought to you so plainly.

Now, you will see a great
express train come rushing by
you, with the smoke pouring
out of the engine; horses gallop
with their riders on their backs;
little girls and boys play in
their yards, and you see them
chasing each other, and all the
motions that they make are
shown to you in this wonderful
instrument. One of the funn-
iest things that the writer ever

_saw in a biograph was a pil-
low fight between two little
girls. .

I trust that this short ac-
count of the life and the many
things that Thomas A. Edison,
known as the “ Wizard of Menlo
Park,” has done, will induce
my little readers to learn more
of him and his wonderful in-
ventions. He is himself worth
many millions of dollars; but for every dollar he owns, his inventions
have, perhaps, saved hundreds of thousands of dollars for other people.

The great lesson which we want to learn from his life is, that industry
and perseverance are always rewarded.



THOMAS A. EDISON AT FIFTY YEARS OF AGE,
THE EVENTFUL LIFE OF
James A. GARFIELD,

The Boy on the Canal Boat; the Second Martyr President.

OULD you not like

to hear the story

of another boy who began
life almost if not quite as
poor as Abraham Lincoln,
and was a great and good
man, and was the second
martyr President of the
United States? Do you
know what a martyr is?
Martyrs are those noble men
and women who have been
put to death by wicked per-
sons because they were good
and noble and their right-
eous actions displeased those
who were wicked and selfish.
Abraham Lincoln was
the first President of the
United States who was a
martyr. Youremember read-
ing his interesting story.
We will now tell you the
life-story of another farmer

boy, who by hard work became one of the greatest men in the United
(182)



PRESIDENT JAMES A. GARFIELD.

‘
JAMES A. GARFIELD. 183

States, and who was, like Abraham Lincoln, finally elected President of
the United States, and like him became a martyr.

His name was James A. Garfield. Look at his picture and see if you
don’t think he has a strong, manly and noble face. The story of his
life will help every noble boy who wants to succeed and do good in the
world.

About seventy years ago, when the great State of Ohio was little more
than a wilderness, a man by the name of Abram Garfield moved from
the State of New York out into the wild country of Ohio and settled in
Cuyahoga County. The name Cuyahoga is an Indian word, and at that
time there were a great many Indians in the State. Abram Garfield
had married, before going to Ohio, a young woman by the name of Eliza
Ballou, whose ancestors had fled from persecution in France about one
hundred and fifty years before.

When Abram Garfield and his young wife moved to Ohio they settled
in what was known as “The Wilderness,” where quite a number of other
people from Connecticut had recently moved and built for themselves
houses. The whole country was covered with big forests, and the first
work to be done was to clear away a place in the woods and build them
a little log-cabin, such as you will see in the picture on opposite page.

It had but one room, with a door, three windows, and a chimney at
one end. Abram Garfield and his wife had three children when they
moved to this wilderness, and about a year after they got there their
youngest son was born. They named him James Abram—‘ Abram ”’
being for his father. There were now mother and father and four
children living in this little log-cabin out in the wilderness.

All day long the father cut trees in the forest, or worked in his new
fields among the stumps which were still left in the ground; but he
was very industrious and raised enough on his farm to support his
family, while Mrs. Garfield, with her spinning-wheel and loom, was all
day busy in spinning thread and weaving cloth to make them clothes.

They had no servant, but waited on themselves, not only growing the
cattle, hogs, and chickens on their little farm, and raising the corn and
wheat which they ate, but also spinning and weaving the cloth, which
Mrs. Garfield made into clothes for the children. Don’t you think this
was a very hard life? So it would be to most of our young people now.
184 JAMES A, GARFIELD.

But they owned their little farm and house; both together, perhaps,
worth two or three hundred dollars. Of course, they had to do their
cooking, eating, sleeping, receive their company, spin and weave and
make their clothes, all in their little one-room house.

Still they were honest and contented, and every morning when Mr.
Garfield went away, with his axe on his shoulder or following the plow,
you might have heard him whistling or singing a merry tune. As soon
as breakfast was over, the little fellows, in the summer, were out of



























































































































































































GARFIELD’S BIRTHPLACE AND THE HOME OF HIS CHILDHOOD.

doors, or away in the woods to pick berries, or to bring wood for their
mother to cook with, or to carry water from the spring, which was some
distance from the house.

At night, when they sat alone in their little cabin, their father or
mother would read, or they would tell them stories about the old times
in Connecticut or New York, or about the long and weary journey from
New York to Ohio, and the wonderful things that they saw on their way.
So, with all, as I have told you, it was a very happy and contented little
household.
JAMES A. GARFIELD. 185

Mr. Garfield was beginning to be prosperous as he thought, and
looked forward to having a big farm one of these days, and build them a
house which would, perhaps, have as many as three rooms, or maybe
four.

But suddenly, one day, Mr. Garfield came home very ill. There were
few doctors in that wild wilderness, and those who were there, as a rule,
knew very little about the practice of medicine; so, after a short illness,
the good man died when he was only thirty-three years of age.

Can you think of anything more sad than this little one-room log-
cabin, far out.in the forests of Ohio, with very few neighbors near
enough to visit them, the husband dead, and the poor woman with her
four little children, left alone so far, far away from her friends and rela-
tives in the East? Do you not think the first thing she would do would
be to try to sell her little farm, and with her children go back to New
York or Connecticut?

This, however, was not what Mrs. Garfield did. She determined to
remain in her little home, and, with her own hands, try to make a living
and raise her children. She was a good woman and had a fair educa-
tion, and she taught her little ones and read to them out of good books.

James was now a baby, and for several years it was a life of struggle
and privation. She was so poor that, if she had lived in one of the
ereat cities, the people would think they must go to her aid and send
her food and clothing to help her in her distress, and so they should,
but it was different far out in the wilderness.

Almost everybody was poor there, and lived on the plainest of food,
and dressed in the plainest clothes, and there were no rich people to
be seen.

When little James A. Garfield was only three years old, a neighboring
school was started in a little log-hut, and James was sent along with the
other children. Before he was four years of age he had learned to read;
and by the time he was ten, it is said, he had borrowed and read nearly
all the books in his neighborhood. From that time until the close of
his life, he was a great reader and student.

You will remember that Abraham Lincoln always carried a book with
him to his work, and you also remember Patrick Henry and George
Peabody and Thomas A. Edison, and other boys about whom we have
1 86 JAMES A. GARFIELD.

told you, educated themselves by reading. Now, we don’t mean by this
that our young friends do not need an education. Perhaps all of those
men would have been better off, if they had had opportunities of getting
a good education in school. Garfield believed inan education, as you
shall hereafter learn.

By the time James was ten years of age, he had learned to do almost
everything about the farm which could be done by so small a boy. He
not only helped the other children and his mother, but, when they had
done their own work, he frequently went to other farms and worked for
the neighbors that he might make a little money to help his mother
along.

He had very little time to play, so he made play out of his work by
doing it always cheerfully. His mother was a great worker herself, and,
besides, she was a very religious woman, and, it is said, her good advice
and happy hymns and songs always sent the children to their tasks with
a feeling that they were doing not only their duty, but it should be a
pleasure for them to do it.

All the spring and summer the children worked, but every winter
their mother sent them to the little neighborhood school. By the time
James was fourteen years old he had a fair knowledge of arithmetic
and grammar, and he had read his school “History of the United
States” so many times that he almost knew it by heart. Of all the
books he was familiar with, he, perhaps, knew most about the Bible.

It is said there was never a day in Mrs. Garfield’s home that she and
the children did not read certain parts of the Bible, and as the children
grew older, they often got into warm discussions, which they called
arguments, about what this or that passage meant. In this way Gar-
field came to manhood knowing a large portion of the Bible by heart
and very familiar with it all.

In after years, when he became a great man, James G. Blaine, the
famous orator and statesman in the United States Senate, said that Mr.
Garfield’s power lay largely in his earnest style of speaking and his
familiarity with the Bible, of which he was a constant student.

James Garfield also loved to read tales of the sea and tales of
adventure. His imagination was especially kindled by Cooper’s famous
“‘Leather-Stocking Tales,” and he used to regard ,‘‘N atty Bumpo,” the
JAMES A, GARFIELD. 187

hero of these five famous books, as the greatest character in American
history; for he could hardly believe that he was only a hero of a novel
and not a real man.

Perhaps he loved these tales so much because he himself lived in the
wilderness, and Mr. Cooper’s descriptions of the ‘Pioneer Indians” in
the “Leather-Stocking Tales” were very much like what Garfield himself
knew about.

He was also fond of reading Cooper’s “Sea Tales;” and the story of
“Long Tom” and his wonderful adventures on the ocean filled him with
delight, and made him want to go to sea himself so much that in 1848,
when he was seventeen years old, he left home and went to Cleveland,
Ohio, and offered to go on board of one of the great lake schooners as a
sailor.

It was a day or two before the ship was to go out, and during that
time Garfield found out that the sailors, as a rule, were very rough
men and that life on the sea was not so jolly and pleasant as he had
supposed. So he decided he would not go on the lake, and immediately
turned from the shore and started home; but he had not gone very far
before he began to feel ashamed of himself.

He was without money, and he disliked to go back home that way.
Besides, like many other ambitious boys, he thought he ought to do
something to tell the people about when he got home. So he went to
the Ohio and Pennsylvania Canal, on which they ran boats drawn by
horses on the bank, and he hired himself to drive the horses to one of
these boats. He was to receive twelve dollars a month for his work.

Now, James had been used to driving horses at home on the farm, and
during his trip on the towpath he pleased his employers so much that at
the end of the round trip they promoted him from the position of a
driver, by putting him on board the boat to steer the boat instead of
driving the horses. James thought this was quite an advance; but it
proved to be very much more dangerous than driving the horses, for he
had to stand on the edge of the boat and work the rudder.

He had lived inland all his life, and had had no experience at such
work. Every once in a while the rudder would slip, and overboard he
would go into the canal. It is said that on his first trip he actually fell
overboard fourteen times, and, as he could not swim, he had to be rescued
188 JAMES A. GARFIELD.

every time when the water was over his head. One dark, rainy night he
came very near being drowned, for no help was at hand when he fell into
the water; but by the very best of luck he got hold of a rope and drew
himself on deck.

Now, we have told you before that James was a very religious boy, so
he thought it must be through the power of God that he was saved from
drowning that dark night. He therefore determined to give up the canal































ao

























































































































































































































































































































































GARFIELD ON THE TOW-PATH.

boat, go home, try to get an education and be useful to his fellow-
man.

Garfield, when a boy, also read two other books which had much to
do with his career. One was the ‘“ Life of General Marion,” the dashing
hero of the Revolution, who, with his swamp-rangers in South Carolina,
had troubled and annoyed the British so much; the other was the “ Life
of Napoleon Bonaparte,” the noted French General and Emperor.

These two books, Garfield said, made him want to bea soldier. He
read them over several times, and they led him to read other books of
great warriors; but it was a good while before he had an opportunity to
gratify his ambition to be a soldier. In the meantime, let us tell you
what he did.
JAMES A. GARFIELD. 189

After leaving his work on the canals, he returned home in the winter
of 1849, and entered a high school, called a seminary, at Chester, Ohio,
about ten miles from his home. He had but very little money, and he
and three other young men boarded themselves. They rented a room
for a very small price, made their own beds, cooked their own food, and
ate in their room.

Garfield persuaded them that they could do without meat and other
expensive things. so they lived pretty largely on bread, rice, milk, and

potatoes, and it is said their
Hy, board did not cost them more
Oy than fifty cents each a week. At

A this small price of living, you can
see it required but very little
money to carry them through
their winter’s term at school.

By and by vacation came.
What do you suppose Gartield
did then? He was now a young
man of eighteen. There were
no rich uncles or aunts or other
friends for him to visit; and if
there had been, we dare say he
would not havedone it. Instead,
he went and hired himself to
work for a carpenter, and soon

GARFIELD AT THE AGE OF SEVENTEEN WHEN > a ,
HE ENTERED THE SEMINARY. lea ned to be a very good



workman.

He did carpenter work when he could get it to do, and at other times
he worked in the harvest-fields, and did anything and everything to get
money for his schooling. After his first term, he was able, in this way,
to take care of himself entirely, and did not ask his mother or anyone
else for their aid.

Garfield was always one of the best students in the school. He also
joined heartily in the sports with the other young men to keep up his
bodily strength. He was as good at all kinds of sports, and as ready for
them, as he was for his hard study. He played ball and practiced
190 JAMES A. GARFIELD.

boxing and other things that they did, and was always a manly and
brave fellow.

He was very peaceable too, but would not stand for people to
impose on him. One day, it is said, he thrashed the bully of the school
in a stand-up fight, because the fellow did some mean or unkind act.

Garfield attended this school for three winters, and in August, 1851,
he started to a new school known as Hiram College. From this moment
his zeal to get a good education grew stronger. He soon had an excellent
knowledge of Latin, algebra, natural philosophy, and botany. He
made all his expenses at this school by teaching in one of the oer
ments and working during his vacation.

After three years, he was not only prepared to go to one of the finest
colleges in the East, but had saved three hundred and fifty dollars toward
paying his expenses. Think of a young man going to school, paying
his own way, and actually making three hundred and fifty dollars
besides! That is the kind of boys that amount to something in this
world.

In the fall of 1853 he left his native State, Ohio, and journeyed east
and entered Williams College, Massachusetts. Two years later he
graduated from that fine school, and straightway was made the Professor
of Languages and Literature in Hiram College, which he had formerly
attended; and the very next year, when he was twenty-six years old, he
was made President of Hiram College.

One year later, he married Miss Lucretia Randolph, one of his old
schoolmates with whom he had fallen in love while at Chester Seminary.

Now, we have told you the interesting boyhood and schooldays of
James A. Garfield, let us tell you some of the great things that he did in
later life; for if he had stopped here, though he was a college president,
the world would never have known much of him, and his life would not
have been written in this book.

Mr. Garfield continued: to be President of Hiram College for five years,
and under his wise management the college took on new life. There
were very soon twice as many students as there had been before, and
everybody seemed to get some of Mr. Garfield’s zeal. He grew so pop-
ular that in 1858, when some of his friends were running for an office,
they begged him to make some speeches for them, which he did.
JAMES A. GARFIELD. 191

This made him even more popular, and in 1859 they elected him to
the State Senate of Ohio, where he was a very influential member. In
1861, when the war broke out, he persuaded the Ohio Senate to vote
twenty thousand soldiers and three millions of dollars to fight for the
Union.

This made Mr. Garfield so great a favorite that the Governor of
Ohio offered him the command of the Forty-second Regiment, which was
then being organized for the war. Many of the young men in the





































































































HIRAM COLLEGE, WHERE GARFIELD WENT TO SCHOOL AND OF
WHICH HE BECAME PRESIDENT.

AS



regiment were, or had been, students of Hiram College, of which Mr.
Garfield had been President; so he consented to command the regiment,
and in December, 1861, he took them down into Kentucky and West
Virginia to join in the fighting.

There were at this time two Confederate armies marching north from
the State of Kentucky. Mr. Garfield met one of them, led by General
Humphrey Marshall, on a little creek known as the Big Sandy, in the
Cumberland Mountains.

General Marshall had about five thousand soldiers with him and
Colonel Garfield had only about eleven hundred, but he surprised the
192 JAMES A. GARFIELD.

Confederate forces in such a way and protected his own men so well, by
getting in the best position where they could be sheltered from the fire of
the enemy, that General Marshall and his army were driven froin Kentucky.

This brilliant victory of Colonel Garfield’s was heralded all over the
North and he was praised by the greatest men in the army for his wise
management and brave fighting.

After this he was directed to join General Buell’s forces and go to the
aid of General Grant in Mississippi. They arrived just in time to fight
the second day in the great battle of Shiloh, where the Union army was
again victorious.

Garfield and his soldiers were next set to work in rebuilding the
railroads and bridges which had been destroyed by both armies; but
not being accustomed to that warm Southern climate, he took malarial
fever and was obliged to return home to get well, after which he was
sent to join the staff of General Rosecrans, who made him Commander-
in-Chief of his staff, and he kept this position as long as he remained in
the army.

One of the last brave things that Garfield did as a soldier was at the
ereat battle of Chickamauga, near Chattanooga, Tennessee. The fighting
had been very hard and for a time it looked as if the Confederates would
be victorious. General Rosecrans thought they would surely win the
day, so he with Colonel Garfield left the fighting ground and hastened to
Chattanooga to make arrangements for his army to retreat so they would
not be captured.

General Thomas was left to command the Union forces. As soon as
they reached Chattanooga, Garfield begged General Rosecrans to let him
go back to the battlefield and join General Thomas. This he did, and
with his help General Thomas made a fresh assault for one-half an hour
on the Confederates, and drove them back far enough to permit the
Union forces to retreat in perfect safety at night.

After this gallant service, Colonel Garfield was made Major-General,
and since that time has been called General Garfield.

Soon after the great battle of Chickamauga, General Garfield was
elected to Congress, and though his salary as Major-General was double
that of a Congressman, he felt that he could do more good at Washington,
so he gave up his position in the war and went to Congress.
JAMES A. GARFIELD. 193

Here he was as attentive to business and industrious as he had always
been as a boy at work, a student in school and as a president of a
college. He had many honors placed upon him in Congress, and in
1877, when Mr. Blaine became a Senator, Mr. Garfield was made leader
of his party, and three years later the State of Ohio elected him to the
Senate.

But the great honor came in June of that same year, when the
Republican National Convention in Chicago nominated him for President



THE WHITE HOUSE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

of the United States over and above all the other great statesmen and
warriors whom the nation wanted to honor.

General Hancock, who also fought in the war with General Garfield,
was nominated by the Democratic Party for the same office; but General
Garfield was elected. In a little while, he removed with his family from
Ohio to the White House at Washington. Was not this a great step-up
from his early home?

Some of Mr. Garfield’s very worst enemies were the ereatest men of
the nation. By that we do not mean the best men, but they were

brilliant and learned, and shrewd men, and great politicians, like Mr,
13
194 JAMES A. GARFIELD.

Conklingof New York. Mr. Conklingdid everything hecould tomake Pres-
ident Garfield unhappy, and to throw all the difficulties possible in his way.

But, finally, Mr. Conkling found out that he could not control the
Senators as he tried to do, so he and Mr. Platt, another Senator from
New York, resigned their places in the United States Senate and went
away. These things made a great commotion among the political men,
and perhaps was the cause of the tragedy which followed.

Mr. Garfield had been in office only a few months, and on July 2,
1881, he and his family rose early at the White House and went to the
railway station to take the train for Massachusetts. Mr. Garfield was go-
ing back to Williams College to attend the closing exercises of that school,
and several members of his cabinet and their friends were going with him.

James G. Blaine, the great Maine statesman and orator, was his
Secretary of State, and rode beside President Garfield to the depot.
Mrs. Garfield, who had been at Long Branch, New Jersey, where she had
gone to cure herself of malarial fever, was to join them at New York.
A fine private car was waiting for the President and his party.

Presently the carriage drove up to the door, and President Garfield
and Secretary Blaine came out smiling to the crowd that stood around,
looking very happy. They passed inside the door of the waiting-room.
A slender middle-aged man had for some time been walking nervously
up and down the room. As the President and Mr. Blaine came up, he
quickly drew a pistol from his pocket and, taking deliberate aim, shot
the President in the shoulder. Mr. Garfield turned quickly to see who had
shot him, when the assassin fired again, and the President sank to the
floor, the blood gushing from his side. Secretary Blaine sprang for
the murderer, but others caught him, and Mr. Blaine went back to
the President’s side.

They lowered Mr. Garfield on a mattress and carried him swiftly to the
White House, where he quickly gave orders that a message should be
sent to Mrs. Garfield and ask her to come home immediately. Mr. Gar-
field’s message was: “Tell her I am seriously hurt, but I am myself, and
hope she will come to me soon. I send her my love.”

That evening Mrs. Garfield was at her husband’s side. For almost
three months the brave, strong man struggled between life and death
through the hot summer days. At last he was removed to Elberon, on
JAMES A, GARFIELD. 195

the ocean shore near Long Branch, New Jersey, and placed in a cottage
where the cooling breezes of the sea brought him much relief, and it was
hoped would save his life; but it was not to be.

President Garfield died at night, September 19th, almost without a strug-
gle. ‘The news was flashed all over the world by telegraph wires, and nearly
every town and all the cities in the United States were draped in mourning.

The President’s remains were taken back to Washington, where great
crowds of people viewed them, and thousands of faces were wet with
tears as they passed his coffin. The sad funeral procession then moved
slowly to Cleveland, Ohio, where a splendid tomb was prepared on the
shores of Lake Erie, not far from his old home, and it was there they
laid him down to rest. All along the way, the moving train passed
through lines of sorrowful-faced people, who stood with uncovered heads
and with tearful eyes as the train moved by. In the House of Repre-
sentatives at Washington, a few months later, Secretary Blaine delivered
a great speech in praise of the dead President.

The vile man, Charles J. Guiteau, who killed the President, was one
of the displeased politicians, who pretended to think that Mr. Garfield
had done wrong in not giving him and certain other members of his
party appointments. He was tried before the court of the land and
hanged in January, 1882.

If you should go to Washington, D.C., you may see in the waiting-
room, at the depot where President Garfield was shot, a stone tablet, a
picture of which we show. It is worked in the floor right at the spot
where he stood when the fatal shot was fired.

SMEAM Cay, TY
PATSOURT “7,

S04,
ea anes
yy
'



TABLET IN WAITING-ROOM WHERE GARFIELD
WAS SHOT.
THE INTERESTING LIFE OF

Cyrus W. FIELp,

The Persevering Boy. The Man Who Laid the Atlantic Cable.



CYRUS W. FIELD.

UPPOSE you, my
young friend, were
in England and your
mother and father were
in America, and you
should become sudden-
ly very ill, or something
should happen to you
that you wanted them
to know about that very
same day; how do you
suppose you could get
word to them?

You know it is about
three thousand miles
across the Atlantic
Ocean, and the fastest
steamships in the world
require six or seven
days torun across. That
is the quickest time in
which anybody can get
from the shores of Eng-

land to the harbor and land in New York. But you would not have
to wait so long to make known to your parents the thing you want to

(196)
CYRUS W. FIELD. 197

tell them. With a few dollars, you could send down to the telegraph
office, and in less than one hour your message would be across the ocean.

Now would you not like to hear the story of the great man who made
it possible for news to travel so fast across the ocean? He not only
enabled friends who live over there to send messages quickly to friends
over here, but every day, in the papers, we get the news that happens
in England, France, Russia, China, and all over the world, all of which
has to come across the ocean in a very short time. It was the wonderful
brain and energy of one man who made this possible. His name was
Cyrus W. Field.

Cyrus was the son of a. minister who lived in Stockbridge, Massa-
chusetts, and was born on the thirtieth day of November, 1819. His
childhood was like that of other boys in the town. He loved to play,
but was always very studious. He attended school in his native
village until he was fifteen years of age. By that time he had gotten
a very good gencral education, and told his parents that he wished to
be a merchant.

They agreed for him to follow this calling, and they sent him to the
reat city of New York, where Alexander T. Stewart was keeping the
largest store in the country. Cyrus at once secured a place to clerk in
this great store, and from the first he became quite a favorite because of
his polite manners and diligence in attending to the business. His
employers advanced him rapidly, and before he was twenty-one years
of age he went into business for himself, and began to make and
sell paper.

In this business he worked hard and was so successful that in 18538,
when he was thirty-four years old, he was counted one of the very rich
men in New York; but by this time his health had become poor owing
to his hard work. So he concluded to take a long rest.

Mr. Field’s physician advised him to go to South America and spend
several months in the mountains of that country. He did so, and for
six months traveled over the great Andes and other mountains in
that far southern country. He learned a great deal, not only about the
people there, but he met foreigners from all parts of the globe with
whom he talked about other countries.

At the end of six months his health was restored and he returned to
198 CYRUS W. FIELD.

North America, but by this time he had concluded to give up his regular
business in New York and devote his attention to something else. So
he called the members of his firm together and told them of his inten-
tions and withdrew from the business, for he had now plenty of money
to live on the balance of his life, and, besides, he wanted to do something
that would be useful to his fellow-men.

Not very long after this, while he was thinking of what good thing -
he could do, Mr. Field’s brother, Matthew, came to him and
told him that there was a man by the name of Mr. Gisborne from New-
foundland who wanted to talk with him. Now, this man, Mr. Gis-
borne, had thought that by some plan they might get a telegraph wire
across the narrow strip of ocean lying between the American Coast and
Newfoundland, and, as he lived up in that country, he was anxious to
have it done.

He had heard that Mr. Field had lots of money, and he came to New
York to try to persuade him to undertake to build the telegraph line.
He had an idea, he said, that they could in some way lay the wire along
the bottom of the ocean if it were possible for them to send the telegrams
along the wire in the water. Then, he said, by starting fast steamers
from St. Johns, Newfoundland, they could get over to London in five or
six days, and so carry the news across in a very much shorter time
than it took the steamers to go from New York to England.

Mr. Field listened very attentively to Mr. Gisborne’s explanation. He
did not say much in reply because he was not himself acquainted with
the laws of electricity, and did not know whether it was possible to
send a telegram under water. He said he would have to think about it
and talk it over with those who understood it. With this, Mr. Gisborne
went away.

That night Mr. Field kept thinking of the plan. He thought to
himself, if it were possible to send a telegram from New York to St.
Johns, Newfoundland, in this way, why could a telegram not be sent
all the way across the Atlantic Ocean, and thus save the five or six
days necessary to carry it from St. Johns to Liverpool.

“This thought,” says Mr. Field, “came to me like a shock. of light-
ning itself. If that could be done, I thought, it would be one of the
greatest things ever done in the world. It would enable the world to
CYRUS W. FIELD. 199

know everything that happened in any other part of the world within a
very few minutes after it had occurred. Wonderful! wonderful!” said Mr.
Field to himself, “I wonder if it is possible?”

Thus he lay awake with these great thoughts in his mind most all the
night, and it was near morning when he fell asleep. The next day Mr.
Field went out and hunted up the most learned men in New York on
the subject of telegraphing. He told them what he had been thinking
about, and asked them if it were possible to telegraph under the Atlantic
Ocean to London, if the wires could be laid. All the experts, including
Mr. Morse, the inventor of the telegraph itself, said that it could be
done, if they could manage to get the wires across the ocean.

Mr. Field now thought that this was the great work he ought to do
for the world. But, rich as he was, his capital was too small to do it
all. He needed the help and advice of other wise men. So he went out
and sought the counsel and assistance of such great men as Peter
Cooper, who had been so successful as a business man and fee done so
much good in New York.

Mr. Cooper was pleased with the plan, and he interested Moses Taylor,
Marshall Roberts, and other prominent men in the enterprise. They
agreed to put in their money and help Mr. Field in the attempt, and so
they formed a company.

Peter Cooper was elected President, and Cyrus W. Field was elected
Business Manager to carry the enterprise through. A great deal of
money had to be subscribed and risked in the undertaking, and so they
vot the exclusive right for fifty years to place a telegraph line across the
Island of Newfoundland and connect it with one from America.

They soon found they would need more money than had been sub-
scribed in America, so Mr. Field at once went to England, and in
London, Liverpool, Birmingham, and other large cities, induced quite a
number of wealthy men to become members of his company. So much
encouragement did he get, that even the British Government agreed to
put in money; and they, furthermore, said they would help to furnish
the vessels necessary to carry and lay the cable across the ocean.

All the arrangements were now ready; but the cable must be made,
and they also must have machinery for laying it out from the sides of the
ship into the ocean. You can hardly imagine what a great task this
200 CYRUS W. FIELD.

was. You understand they must have a long wire which would reach
two thousand and five hundred miles, from the Coast of Ireland to the
Coast of Newfoundland—the narrowest place in the Atlantic Ocean—and
it must be laid down on the bottom of the ocean, where in some places
it would be two and three miles deep.

The wire would have to be made very large and strong, and consist,
not of one strand, but of many strands, in order to stand its own weight
in letting it down to the bottom in deep places. Then, you know, it
would be impossible to let it down with their hands or any known
machinery. They must have a special machine made to let the wire
down into the ocean.

Mr. Field remained in England to have this great cable wire made,
and he also superintended the making of the ‘‘paying-out” machinery,
as they called the machine which let the wire down. When he had
gotten all this work well under way, he thought it would be too
bad to let the British Government lay the cable without his own
government also helping; so he endeavored to get the United States
Government to help in the undertaking.

It was several years before they agreed to do so. In fact, it was not
until March 38, 1857, that our Congress passed a bill to help Mr. Field in
his great undertaking, and President Franklin Pierce signed the bill of
agreement the day before he went out of office to make room for President
Buchanan. In the meantime, Mr. Field had been crossing the ocean
back and forth. He visited England over forty times altogether while
engaged in this great work, and besides he had to subscribe more than
one-fourth of all the money that was used.

At length, on August 6, 1857, two great vessels, one named the
“Niagara,” furnished by the United States, and the other the ‘‘Agamem-
non,” furnished by England, each with one-half of the precious cable on
board, started from the small town of Valentia in Ireland. The
“Niagara”? was to lay its cable half-way across the ocean, and when
the ‘“Niagara’s cable gave out, they were to stop and fasten it to the
cable of the “Agamemnon,” which should lay it the balance of the way
across the ocean.

Mr. Field was on the ship ‘ Niagara,” and with him were Professor
Morse, the inventor of the telegraph, and a number of other men who
CYRUS W. FIELD. 201

were learned in electricity and telegraphing. Fora while the “ Niagara”
moved on beautifully and the ‘“paying-out” machine worked smoothly,
and fathom after fathom of the great cable passed over the ship’s side
and slipped down into the silent sea. Everybody was delighted.

The whole company felt that they were doing a great work for the
world. But all of a sudden the brake was put on to the ‘“paying-out”
machine too quickly, and the great cable snapped in two, and away it
went to the bottom of the ocean.

In vain they let down the grappling-irons and tried to pull it up. It
was gone and they could not find it. It looked as if years of work had
been thrown away, and many a one would have given it up, but not so
with Mr. Field. He ordered the ships to sail back to England.

They were now seven hundred miles from shore, and the only thing
that could be done was to make a new cable to take the place of that
which had been lost in the sea. By the time the new cable was finished,
it was too late to undertake the laying of it during that year. Mr. Field
all the while was exceedingly busy, frequently going twenty-four hours
without sleep. Many of the people who had joined with him were dis-
couraged and were abusing him, thinking they had lost their money.
These he had to be continually writing to and encouraging.

After a hard winter of this kind of work and making all things ready
again, they started on the tenth day of June the next year to relay the
cable. They carried a telegraph instrument on the ship and every little
while sent messages back to the land and received messages in reply.
Everything went along nicely until they were about two hundred miles
out at sea, when suddenly this cable broke as: the former one had done,
and it was necessary to go back to land again.

They found out later that the cable itself was poorly made, and, after
several attempts to repair it, they finally threw it away as of no account.
“This,” said Mr. Field, “was the reason it had broken. It was not strong
enough to carry its own weight.” So he was not discouraged, but at once
determined to make a new cable.

Do you wonder that the stockholders in the company were more dis-
couraged now than ever, and Mr. Field had to do more than he did
before to get them satisfied? So it was, and the worry he had was very
great; but in the meantime, he was making a new cable, and, on the
202 , CYRUS W. FIELD.

17th of July, the great ships “Agamemnon” and “ Niagara” sailed out to
sea again.

This time they decided to start work in the middle of the ocean, and
on the 28th day of that month their cables were spliced together half-
way between England and America, and the two great ships parted
company, the “Agamemnon” going toward Ireland with her end of the
cable, and the “ Niagara” headed for Newfoundland with hers. On the
fifth day of August, 1858, both great vessels reached their ports and the
great Atlantic cable was laid. In a little while the land connections
were made and the directors of the company met, and this is the message
they sent: ‘Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good-
will toward men!’’ You remember that is taken from the Bible, and it is
the song the angels sang to the shepherds when Christ was born in
Bethlehem.

Queen Victoria of England and President Buchanan of the United
States also exchanged messages over the cable. That day Mr. Field
became one of the greatest men of the world. He was given a great
reception in New York, and his fame was heralded and sent flying by the
electric wires-all over England and America. Every day the great news-
papers of England sent news to America, and America sent back news to
England.

Everybody said it was one of the most wonderful things ever thought
of; but there was another disappointment in store, for on the first day of
September the great cable refused to work, and then there were people
who came to believe that it never did work. Those who had invested
their money again bemoaned their loss. Even in the great Chamber of
Commerce, in New York, one of the men got up and said he believed the
whole thing was a “humbug,” and that it had never carried a message
over the ocean and all the messages claimed for it were only tricks of
Mr. Field and his friends.

Now Mr. Field himself was a member of the Chamber of Commerce,
and he wondered, if his own business associates thought this of him,
what would the outside world think? However, just after this man’s
fiery speech against it, Mr. Cunard of the British steamship line rose up
and made a speech saying he himself had sent messages and received
answers; therefore, he knew the cable was working perfectly, just as its
CYRUS W. FIELD. ; 208

owners claimed. Nevertheless, the great mass of the people thought it
was time to let it alone. They had already spent hundreds of thousands
of dollars, and only one or two others besides Mr. Field could be found
who believed that it would ever be possible to lay the ocean telegraph.

In the meantime, the great Civil War between the North and South
broke out in the United States, so he could get no help from home.

Yor five long years Mr. Field waited and worked, and it was not
until 1868 that he was able to begin the making of a new cable. It
was made stronger than the first one and was completed at the begin-
ning of 1865. By this time the war in the United States had closed.

Mr. Field concluded that he would not employ two vessels in carrying
the cable as they had done before; but instead, he employed a very
large ship which was able to carry it all. This enormous vessel—the
largest ever built in the world—was named the ‘‘Great Eastern.” It
had at one time carried two thousand soldiers across the ocean.

On the 23d of July, 1865, one end of the cable was laid fast to the
land on the Irish shore and the “Great Eastern” started with the other
two thousand miles of cable, weighing thousands of tons, on board.
Four other ships accompanied the “Great Eastern,’ loaded with coal.
The immense ship moved slowly and grandly out to sea. Day by day
the wheels turned round and round, and mile after mile of the new cable
was rolled out and laid along the bottom of the great Atlantic. Nearly
fifteen hundred miles had already been let out, and they were nearing
the coast of Newfoundland. Everybody was joyful.

At last, they thought they were about to succeed. The wheels were
turned very regularly and slowly, so that there should be no jars or
sudden jerks, as the cable went down into miles of the sea. But, oh,
horrors again! In spite of all their careful watching, their days of toil,
their high hopes, victory almost in sight, the cable snapped, and down it
sank into the deep, dark waves.

In sounding they found it was not so far to the bein and they hoped
that they might with their grappling-irons get hold of the end of it and
pull it up to the ship. They let down the grappling-irons, and finally
were successful in catching it. Slowly, and with almost breathless
excitement, they turned the lever of the ship, and fathom after fathom
they dragged it up nearer and nearer.
204 CYRUS W. FIELD.

With what eager eyes Mr. Field looked over the side of the great ship
and watched it pulling up closer and closer! But you must remember
that there were thousands of pounds to be lifted, and every foot they
raised it made it heavier. When nearly to the surface, and everybody’s
heart was in his mouth—snap!—it broke away from the grappling-irons
and sank again to the bottom. How disappointed were the men on the
ship! How Mr. Field almost felt like leaping in after it! For more
than twelve years he had been trying to lay this Atlantic cable. Must
he at last be disappointed ?

“Out with the grappling-irons again!” shouted Mr. Field. Again the
great irons went to the bottom of the sea. Again they got the cable,
and again they lifted it slowly almost to the surface, when again it
broke away and sunk to the bottom. Several times over and over this
was repeated; and when, at last, they found they could not get it, almost
every man on board was ready to die with disappointment. Tears ran
down many weather-beaten faces.

“No use trying to pull it up with these irons and this machine,” said
Mr. Field, ‘‘we shall have to have something better.” So they anchored
buoys to float on the water at the place that they might know it when
they should return; and, turning the bow of the “Great Eastern” back
toward the old country, they steamed away for the English shore.

The first work that Mr. Field did, after reaching London, was to raise
more money. It was no use to try in his native land, because they had
been made so poor by the war that they could not help much, and they
had never been hopeful of success as were the English people. He soon
raised enough money to pay for the making of a stronger cable and
changed the machine, so they could let it out with greater care.

A whole year was devoted to raising subscriptions and making this
new cable. On Friday, July 13, 1866, the ‘Great Eastern” again sailed
from the coast of Ireland, dropping the cable into the ocean.

They took with them on this trip again four other big ships to carry
along plenty of coal, so if the ‘“‘Great Eastern”’ needed more, they would
have it ready. They also had on board, as they had before, telegraph
instruments, and every few miles they telegraphed back to Valentia,
Ireland, and received messages from the shore.

The new cable and the new machinery worked beautifully for a time;
CYRUS W. FIELD. 205

but suddenly the electricity ceased to come. They quickly examined
the cable and found that by some means a piece of steel wire had been
put into the cable. They thought maybe some of the men who unwound
the cable down in the hold of the vessel had done it, but everybody
denied it. They took the piece of steel out, and the electricity came, as
did also the message from Ireland.

Then they put people to watch and see that the workmen did not do











































































































































































































































































































THE LANDING OF THE CABLE BY THE “GREAT EASTERN,” FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1866.

this any more. In spite of the watchers it was done again, and they could
not find out who did it. The cable this time broke, but they quickly
caught it and put it together. They found another little piece of steel
wire run into it. A long time after this, the man who put the little wire
in the cable confessed it, and said he had been hired to doit. You see
how the best men in the world, with the best intentions and doing the
grandest work, have their enemies. The man who hired the sailor to
206 CYRUS W. FIELD.

do this was not only injuring Mr. Field, but he was injuring the whole
world.

Early on the morning of the 27th of July, just fourteen days after she
left Valentia, Ireland—and on that same unlucky day, Friday—the people
from the shore of a place called Heart’s Content, in Newfoundland,
looked out and saw the “Great Eastern” and the ships that were with
her coming into port. The “Great Eastern” was yet miles out at sea.
As she drew nearer, every high place was crowded with people, and
everybody was wild with excitement. Small sail-boats and little
steamers went out to meet her.

From the telegraph station on the ship, a message was sent back to
England that they were landing the cable, and this message came back
over the wires: “It is a great work and glory to our age and nation, and
the men who have achieved it deserve to be honored among the bene-
factors of our race. Treaty of Peace has just been signed between
Prussia and Austria.” A few minutes later the cable was safely landed,
and from the telegraph office on the land, Mr. Field sent back this
message: ‘‘ Heart’s Content, July 27,1866. We arrived at nine o'clock —
this morning. All well. Thank God, the cable is laid and is in perfect
working order! Cyrus W. Field.”

Mr. Field found that the telegraph line across Newfoundland, which
had been neglected now for nearly six years, was in bad order, as was
also the cable from Newfoundland to New York, running across the
Gulf of St. Lawrence. Both of these he repaired in two days’ time, and
sent messages over to New York on July 29th.

As soon as the “Great Eastern” could take on coal from the four
ships that had accompanied her, she put out to sea with new grappling-
irons and machinery to find the place where she had left the buoys in
1865, to try to find the lost cable and bring it to the surface. For
several weeks they grappled in the bottom of the ocean before they
found the cable. At last they caught it and dragged it on board.

They quickly attached the telegraph instrument and sent a message
to Ireland. In a little while they had a reply from the Irish shore, and
Mr. Field was overjoyed to find that it was working perfectly. So they
spliced the new cable and started again for Newfoundland, and on the
seventh day of September landed it safely at Heart’s Content. Both of
these Atlantic cables, after thirty years’ use, are still working perfectly.
CYRUS W. FIELD. 207

When Mr. Field went over to New York a great banquet was given
in his honor, and many beautiful things were said about him. He was
called the greatest man in the world, and many other compliments were
paid him which made him blush, for he was a very modest man. He
said that they were paying him too much honor. At last they called
on him for a speech, which was simple and short, but it was very
beautiful. Furthermore, it showed that Mr. Field was a Christian man,





























































ELEVATED RAILROAD IN NEW YORK.

and felt he never could have done the great work without the help of
God. This is what he said:

“It has been a long, hard struggle—nearly thirteen years of anxious
watching and ceaseless toil. Often my heart has been ready to sink.
Many times when wandering in the forests of Newfoundland in the
pelting rain, or on the decks of ships on dark, stormy nights alone, far
from home, I have almost accused myself of madness and folly to sacrifice
the peace of my family and all the hopes of life for what might prove,
after all, a dream. I have seen my companions, one after another,
falling by my side, and feared that I might not live to see the end.
208 CYRUS W. FIELD.

And yet one hope has led me on, and I have prayed that I might not
taste of death till this work be accomplished. That prayer is answered;
and now, beyond all acknowledgments of men, is the feeling of gratitude
to Almighty God.”

Mr. Field’s great work was now ended. He certainly deserved to rest
the balance of his life; but there were many honors in store for him.
The Congress of the United States gave him a gold medal, with the thanks
of the nation. The great exposition at Paris, in 1867, voted to him its
highest honors and gave him also a grand medal. The New York
Chamber of Commerce sent him as their representative to the great Suez
Canal, which, you know, connects the Red Sea with the great Mediter-
ranean Sea.

Many years later, when they came to build the elevated railroad in
New York, Mr. Field was one of the great men who contributed his
money and gave good advice in the work. So, if you ever go to New
York, or anywhere else, and ride on the elevated railroads, such as we
show in the picture, you must remember that you are under some obli-
gation to Mr. Field for this privilege also.

In 1880 Mr. Field made a tour around the world, and among other
places he visited were the Sandwich Islands far out in the Pacific Ocean.
This country then was not-a republic, as it is now, but was ruled by a
king. Mr. Field made a treaty with them for the laying of a cable from
San Francisco, in the United States, to their country. This cable has
not yet been laid, but it will, no doubt, be done before very many years.

Mr. Field had spent nearly all his fortune in laying the Atlantic cable,
but it soon made him quite a rich man again. However, before his
death, I know my young friends will be sorry to hear that misfortunes
overtook him, and he lost most of his property, had serious trouble
in his home, and died unhappy in New York City, July 12, 1892, at the
age of seventy-three years.

The world owes to Cyrus W. Field a debt of gratitude which never can
be paid. But for him we should, no doubt, still be unable to get the
news from far-off countries for many days and in some cases weeks after
it happens; but since Mr. Field laid his great Atlantic cable, other
people have jaid them across other oceans, so that all the great countries
of the world are now connected and we know what happens in all parts
of the world within a few hours after it takes place.











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'2011-12-20T16:55:18-05:00'
describe
'1634' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCG' 'sip-files00012.txt'
aa52bc05e96b9f2ee9e3d96afd5df4a3
93498cd7ddb83e05252bcf1c47271cb797b70860
'2011-12-20T16:55:22-05:00'
describe
'3914' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCH' 'sip-files00013.txt'
e2633c1cbd7eb51b347522d5c0fadc63
8c6f2c0bd6024188ac8a0899a2977dbc8a014318
'2011-12-20T16:52:39-05:00'
describe
'388' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCI' 'sip-files00014.txt'
840f83da81dada185fc0825678e634f3
67e3d4903d444f543c30760662affb0d704e4ceb
'2011-12-20T16:56:56-05:00'
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCJ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
7e87e1ea98339da59adbd44db4e352f3
a81453470c12f1a51d32270cefc1f77632b4011c
'2011-12-20T16:54:44-05:00'
describe
'2324' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCK' 'sip-files00016.txt'
aaa207acc7f33deb9d1373e4d5f495fb
0a0cc8da6cb7ea4658472ffcdb80cc747ca6ef06
'2011-12-20T16:53:24-05:00'
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCL' 'sip-files00017.txt'
3f7b736ac6dac01f23812ec0ee08cdea
97ad28bc31cf1f7f20533707e873021509cc35fb
'2011-12-20T16:54:31-05:00'
describe
'2405' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCM' 'sip-files00018.txt'
07968a0ed53ee3bb4eb65a37149be59f
b5c8f3d657442e6f43456ad02ca3c9f01672b64a
'2011-12-20T16:57:32-05:00'
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCN' 'sip-files00019.txt'
5b30e612004c848c7e32e5c27cf46239
6c890e8fe94b54603d77005de476a703176640e0
'2011-12-20T16:50:35-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'2375' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCO' 'sip-files00020.txt'
7f558b3c3c94e7f4d33117f97b0da5e4
a550db1a4886f3b518c7221411f9233472e2b07c
'2011-12-20T16:54:24-05:00'
describe
'2192' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCP' 'sip-files00021.txt'
a4c72955b4b0233c42ba82be2114b287
7ae57d07f0d3691913d40fdc398f80b36c35f7d7
'2011-12-20T16:53:09-05:00'
describe
'2381' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCQ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
790ffb5cd0a60d5de7468bf4ee6995d0
821ac742171ba90488783be276be7a49c181607f
'2011-12-20T16:57:26-05:00'
describe
'2451' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCR' 'sip-files00023.txt'
d6b062d1e751d3292afe92b72c2e58d9
51e334a18ac233aa7252c01e0e28e505e3396a6b
'2011-12-20T16:54:12-05:00'
describe
'1693' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCS' 'sip-files00024.txt'
06c73688897bb52910e67ad50adb3ceb
1ff2b68d66df2ef338cfaf4d1f3bc427bfc8b69c
'2011-12-20T16:57:20-05:00'
describe
'2450' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCT' 'sip-files00025.txt'
351b544107b58026b63334106b0174b4
76e482fd596b36a7a973abd8d0665b043337ac1e
'2011-12-20T16:53:58-05:00'
describe
'538' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCU' 'sip-files00026.txt'
57a452e12ae56ff9c87173f006985277
0439997463bb70632b90e3af099cba8056e15e2b
'2011-12-20T16:57:44-05:00'
describe
'2476' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCV' 'sip-files00027.txt'
7cdee9ae65e832077f63d86a398e0ba6
f6063522f89cd707309f00c052e33301c9654bb2
'2011-12-20T16:52:10-05:00'
describe
'2408' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCW' 'sip-files00028.txt'
c1b120730fa6c800d4f1490283380504
b204871f3158f038d1cec2ac7c35f259007e5d33
'2011-12-20T16:57:48-05:00'
describe
'2320' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCX' 'sip-files00029.txt'
83669b379242f76eee9ff497f38e4ae3
0bc68785ca296ec0734777be21873c49a6d1365b
'2011-12-20T16:56:50-05:00'
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCY' 'sip-files00030.txt'
e0359cfbcab1acacfc3b0bc45e514183
d73f2506fed351d2132299278147a659ec99e889
'2011-12-20T16:54:42-05:00'
describe
'234' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHCZ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
b6f39ee7a6bbbd21a767efdc51df9deb
e88ff46f1a529a064706c03c31287ad8ef6d64de
'2011-12-20T16:57:36-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1079' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDA' 'sip-files00033.txt'
fb59a72c7395944ad8545c93c3c0bc71
cbf0de04f77539d0d0ae994ab23f70e3e2f0384b
'2011-12-20T16:58:13-05:00'
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDB' 'sip-files00034.txt'
7253e423ab536599d9bb57d8187d2257
27228b91388be9a434ed0008bf602392b86f1226
'2011-12-20T16:56:11-05:00'
describe
'2310' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDC' 'sip-files00035.txt'
62f6dabec46d83ce342139779f75ba21
a54dc7af9feb30679e70c413db80c34854d9333b
'2011-12-20T16:57:49-05:00'
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDD' 'sip-files00036.txt'
79ac4a551e7ae88aa9806d6a686e0300
9348f462fcd0c2ff8c702318c3e83ddebcb75ccb
'2011-12-20T16:55:43-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2447' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDE' 'sip-files00037.txt'
817ff98cf001b994b6e7e623d7343891
049e24a069ef0382cbbe30df8a00d2f8eeabdb1d
'2011-12-20T16:56:09-05:00'
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDF' 'sip-files00038.txt'
1627e742b6a688ae731c8196d0d14520
985aa044b47cee1ecfe3ae1c166c1f967aa14c94
'2011-12-20T16:56:08-05:00'
describe
'2248' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDG' 'sip-files00039.txt'
fe2770c4e398a7fd660f5f70d0b4acd7
ce5e7350b04e874a9ec0dee28691cc4012b49a75
'2011-12-20T16:53:55-05:00'
describe
'2388' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDH' 'sip-files00040.txt'
86a12659e3aba64ca2bc4621d8812596
ee28f738c0afc9f90eea882c718aebf5c9e051e9
'2011-12-20T16:54:29-05:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDI' 'sip-files00041.txt'
837cf08ddcda7f4c2803ac9661add458
d693ae4239dce7e44ae12d55e456c667789cb1b0
'2011-12-20T16:54:57-05:00'
describe
'2298' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDJ' 'sip-files00042.txt'
fdbacf0185339518352216b5045aa633
a473d07dabaa9f4c1d83ba7901d02f7ecec2c7dd
'2011-12-20T16:57:52-05:00'
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDK' 'sip-files00043.txt'
c2b1db638ac0e2fa6a14e28eeb6a759f
e0c6a08a0891beddfd87bdef3ac6c6cc9c8fb27f
'2011-12-20T16:56:38-05:00'
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDL' 'sip-files00044.txt'
7b781bf6873c04ace73f35f9b0f0721a
8c236c50ac8761751b25790762e902b4c37ec48b
'2011-12-20T16:53:25-05:00'
describe
'580' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDM' 'sip-files00046.txt'
3a435b4783c78c3c94a7e56f0c071172
70fc887611c256620603cf3ea805d33b0920a053
'2011-12-20T16:55:37-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1314' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDN' 'sip-files00047.txt'
af9b1be8834df99ffb12cbdfaa4e1f3c
efc67cefdaf9907e4dcc2120f967b6ab429e672c
describe
'2380' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDO' 'sip-files00048.txt'
d466ede1581e6b186d7ad8ad405b6b88
590adc88fe44dba27333a85f4b4695a23ce08db4
'2011-12-20T16:50:19-05:00'
describe
'2429' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDP' 'sip-files00049.txt'
df0606e5d571345a2853058be7b2a2fd
c81bd6d69a2b26295a05134f1634ee83b724febd
'2011-12-20T16:52:45-05:00'
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDQ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
266ccd84f729e7a06a05fcbd626c7f0c
ac9df8065acb12acf10e00b8e10c6d22eaee9685
'2011-12-20T16:51:41-05:00'
describe
'2257' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDR' 'sip-files00051.txt'
f8fa0ad8dc6c6bbe91e8fe5f7dad4706
d89a16aede3a0d188acb115b6dcbeb0fa1a7483b
'2011-12-20T16:57:37-05:00'
describe
'2440' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDS' 'sip-files00052.txt'
9b1c23fa98654a6f92ddb1948cfe1f4c
6b9605d617dfc09509ef82f898cba4dcfc02906e
'2011-12-20T16:50:29-05:00'
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDT' 'sip-files00053.txt'
2e1c38e7e5a085f0d0ee6fb6492d7448
91c8414c34d4cd3127eef907c0f19b436edbd416
'2011-12-20T16:51:44-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2348' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDU' 'sip-files00054.txt'
5b7c852f2a525c3969b63009f598b270
d8ed6023aaa6e8f256e0c0717558157bda69164d
'2011-12-20T16:58:07-05:00'
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDV' 'sip-files00055.txt'
da08940772c713370e33af6161fa3ef9
0e910dd6493739a89b98f6e443f3f353e7bec508
'2011-12-20T16:55:11-05:00'
describe
'2097' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDW' 'sip-files00056.txt'
6f84dc21ff1df0e2d7e35711f40e4aac
372cb77bf1156f25cf8dbd60119fb131cfce9b9b
'2011-12-20T16:51:19-05:00'
describe
'2400' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDX' 'sip-files00057.txt'
ef7b0cefa00c74e3acb233295e25606d
61a2fc5d78a4f2bee9012c6a418af0885c76d306
'2011-12-20T16:57:53-05:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDY' 'sip-files00058.txt'
69c1da78e962079aa15646e867a38c5c
e920adecf7d6f0cbf02c511dba73f876f8da961e
'2011-12-20T16:52:52-05:00'
describe
'2237' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHDZ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
f31fe8156d07fac514cc0d4925f5deab
61f3df375e587283a30f884b73c7b4b81d1e1611
'2011-12-20T16:51:20-05:00'
describe
'2396' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEA' 'sip-files00060.txt'
18faa65fb5f1115681f8dbf2f911271f
a01add16343dffd9d6d380bc7f5d84db3d5f9b0b
'2011-12-20T16:53:23-05:00'
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEB' 'sip-files00061.txt'
d67be357f70d19675101615837c5c3a1
48622f1307882931a9c1bb73976eb43ae7483b41
'2011-12-20T16:54:10-05:00'
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEC' 'sip-files00062.txt'
5c3eecea2394d7241c844bc9b0db10fa
d037cf9654ceaa0675e8580fe6a261f6fcc87a3e
'2011-12-20T16:50:55-05:00'
describe
'182' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHED' 'sip-files00063.txt'
9638d3fd1c94b03ce13222ee59e2fb1e
09507e6684aae04035b4c265127a7c1975bf2849
'2011-12-20T16:56:58-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'551' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEE' 'sip-files00065.txt'
3f91819cfc8366d8f45374b9a8d31057
d570cd0475a78482cde02518e6e7349c8e80bd9b
'2011-12-20T16:51:59-05:00'
describe
'2439' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEF' 'sip-files00066.txt'
6e4a09f783a37ec7d40aa1542179840d
190a11f604a8112231cd5cb0715de43bf21e7e78
'2011-12-20T16:53:33-05:00'
describe
'2418' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEG' 'sip-files00067.txt'
e6386152fd551dab326f003e800d545e
cfde91f5f7177ac6b9a05044e2e66c9685d796c7
'2011-12-20T16:53:08-05:00'
describe
'2267' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEH' 'sip-files00068.txt'
ca2f64b910541464116760b3259516d4
cffc7687a7df52c69dd1e3d3fc6caf621d6b16cb
describe
'549' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEI' 'sip-files00069.txt'
988c69027661cf5b0e278de3d03d0290
abcb5c4d06cf0d763eaa0fe9ae7f308a535a2d41
'2011-12-20T16:51:31-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2460' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEJ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
cbaab0038c2001c37a480bb10b12a7bc
b53590496c2b901186d9a6e6880b06d58057c5bd
'2011-12-20T16:55:33-05:00'
describe
'2296' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEK' 'sip-files00071.txt'
4e9a9b6c31587f871061ec5e5a7677eb
875b555ed2e58c3886ecb64133bae7b6a29e9697
'2011-12-20T16:54:20-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2403' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEL' 'sip-files00072.txt'
dc2851122a7706816595c59ab9a9a344
18e22eb6fff55cc4030de51d6cad097f87ffed9d
'2011-12-20T16:51:47-05:00'
describe
'460' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEM' 'sip-files00073.txt'
540c13ce5312e418a0ccfe40b0fecefb
f12576b74a0b99eed7e8dc55ca4f035bdb6c0d84
'2011-12-20T16:54:38-05:00'
describe
'2497' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEN' 'sip-files00074.txt'
701a99352404a182d7d19064c7b5ca3b
1c203337f2b0806647509c48726766802d8b5b74
'2011-12-20T16:56:27-05:00'
describe
'2477' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEO' 'sip-files00075.txt'
d915e03e595c23f511554449b6019729
d0a7d1cc64aac4e76b2c2997da9044b53630bbba
'2011-12-20T16:55:12-05:00'
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEP' 'sip-files00076.txt'
e6e56177a16da17cc3a70ace6858ca9c
45b48bef63627b0bb6bda225662b36f8ff2a9081
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEQ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
671adee91997a13325a6b4346ba01adb
66fe11393d3e83305a73a72ee79b03c1c688463a
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHER' 'sip-files00078.txt'
8ff1798b8dd467dddda407835258470f
7a00a4378bef83cd65c8e64feec431d3def8a4e4
'2011-12-20T16:55:04-05:00'
describe
'115' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHES' 'sip-files00079.txt'
bffd3114db83dba04bdc5fe0b38e89ac
d1eb222f6966c38ba273c1b8557ece4386b2f9d0
'2011-12-20T16:54:06-05:00'
describe
'2392' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHET' 'sip-files00081.txt'
3dd51e1e5fde3aa5f30f9334bb139a01
711a22456211c43877360cdf59f64ba9c1ccd82b
'2011-12-20T16:55:38-05:00'
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEU' 'sip-files00082.txt'
44aaa5c4ae03cfcf1a6bf36dcdf095db
9dbe6275820d7eda351f9657f38e823f42744d3d
'2011-12-20T16:51:53-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2181' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEV' 'sip-files00083.txt'
bda07205f9c559f30f0a690cd0663f1d
d397694cf164fbcd0a8e23836cb0315fb5edef9b
'2011-12-20T16:56:41-05:00'
describe
'812' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEW' 'sip-files00084.txt'
7c752f9aae426c0a04f0f2b8cccfe18c
a34101a35f0d029ed14a93c52650b49a6d210e70
'2011-12-20T16:55:20-05:00'
describe
'2442' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEX' 'sip-files00085.txt'
91f625df2d6254bbc14d3a9bb8124c8e
8c06b953bd10e13fc53acd95e1b03955270e58cc
describe
'681' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEY' 'sip-files00086.txt'
bb63f88845c7cc98348b0febf792cf84
85051173886ca621db03754a484850274cb63428
'2011-12-20T16:51:29-05:00'
describe
'2319' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHEZ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
efc69cd520d29efc0b1846a4c9a16582
031f32d43789609eed426e42d4d4ddf4c0d856bd
'2011-12-20T16:56:53-05:00'
describe
'2284' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFA' 'sip-files00088.txt'
c752e91b24df07f5bd9c81f3abcb3fa5
4b5bc35e496990f92e0e743c3b5f55642e2cf65a
'2011-12-20T16:56:12-05:00'
describe
'495' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFB' 'sip-files00089.txt'
005de8d88c43c719b87b58a4b8015856
4a6b14bc64cb40ed9320c1d6abcabd3ee439e6c6
'2011-12-20T16:57:43-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2354' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFC' 'sip-files00090.txt'
6e3d173b4c395f6277c1c9bf49507018
10023f20dc111669d54adf24d97f8eab74069f5b
'2011-12-20T16:51:33-05:00'
describe
'2452' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFD' 'sip-files00091.txt'
d6a6fdb501c2fe6dbb98ab9367a137a7
f02f6ad340231874c559ef3f53747e1aa63af7f8
'2011-12-20T16:56:29-05:00'
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFE' 'sip-files00092.txt'
4373294ab12a1e7d9dd5323eb95ba063
3b0dffd9cf1c9f3c03e707706ca16e7f4f819b7d
'2011-12-20T16:56:48-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2117' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFF' 'sip-files00093.txt'
7ae02d05af8efb0b215a3f0af27ad930
9fe432a57f1b88acf419d9a2e8e08e0a0d1fd321
'2011-12-20T16:52:35-05:00'
describe
'2220' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFG' 'sip-files00094.txt'
f96ee0fee108125a0086ce19f94d113f
b60fa6f3e1eec734bcfc3089a5020e62c88ed0be
describe
'1734' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFH' 'sip-files00095.txt'
8fd15fb2878cfa3a9cfb391cdce78663
c7a7619dd2b2f74534ec1cdb77c14fe60b99c543
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFI' 'sip-files00096.txt'
fbd9acc633bc64619cb4bde5fe7dac35
e3b8293243b010a514e627184cfaf6c5449929b4
'2011-12-20T16:50:46-05:00'
describe
'2498' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFJ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
0bacf444b878213ad2a0cc2bc30d45a5
f9d7c71a8512ebc6efa13b18a68510f67e9cc477
'2011-12-20T16:54:37-05:00'
describe
'2505' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFK' 'sip-files00098.txt'
1dc267b50a2939c61eeadded790a4aeb
f6eb2e715d7930a08fe49da1a7fdc96a1a4efd5d
'2011-12-20T16:56:04-05:00'
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFL' 'sip-files00099.txt'
79451b77b37ab05a1987fdc51c1b78a7
aa227b8633d1fbec4804a9c9c54635d16cfb1213
'2011-12-20T16:58:04-05:00'
describe
'2446' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFM' 'sip-files00100.txt'
217be7e0c45fda8cce8ab8582521e71a
21beb6e198811d462f9438b558bd559ce401e65b
'2011-12-20T16:57:05-05:00'
describe
'2489' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFN' 'sip-files00101.txt'
d472739a3e21f2d62607a77fccd7f558
7d9464daf17de1d550e6ac04cd03535445644a1e
'2011-12-20T16:56:07-05:00'
describe
'2351' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFO' 'sip-files00102.txt'
9d44d9fceef42c7559755ef41580b9a1
a9bb2ca2a6e48f0411cf7245b3b320bd1d6ff28d
'2011-12-20T16:52:47-05:00'
describe
'2494' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFP' 'sip-files00103.txt'
0016e72a038704b51abe9c81e1cdc79e
4fa4b2510636c0834e8150910f9c2a0e880286a9
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFQ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
2599dcd721da8981f51f29c520feef97
1e9e8f8d08651c306dab313cee94365526b60058
'2011-12-20T16:55:46-05:00'
describe
'2458' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFR' 'sip-files00105.txt'
404229ecac7aa4ceb061c7b647753ce2
68c526a520c08e034284232547fb3a43944bf396
'2011-12-20T16:51:34-05:00'
describe
'2407' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFS' 'sip-files00106.txt'
348a8f4bb676caea5da99bde4dab51d3
38cc959bcc29aeac48af92af71402969d909543e
'2011-12-20T16:56:14-05:00'
describe
'2243' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFT' 'sip-files00107.txt'
9dc47b5fc321091a4435e6c0b44227b9
0da665653f886c23292d522321bd9f052cb0c9e8
'2011-12-20T16:57:00-05:00'
describe
'2456' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFU' 'sip-files00108.txt'
d13799703f5e7d2bc18297edf4f2a3ca
00e6467027bda8c0c3485a90f2cfff8c9bbd62a3
describe
'2427' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFV' 'sip-files00109.txt'
484cdb9426998f9910826e3f2d7b9aa0
25d5df0c2ff2792cd7f6ca8d307853fe4e2e4d47
'2011-12-20T16:54:39-05:00'
describe
'2464' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFW' 'sip-files00110.txt'
8232334f45ee26c325bb06a61ab253c4
2cc2162046e536e145333d14190065ee37383fcb
'2011-12-20T16:53:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFX' 'sip-files00111.txt'
5ee4ed23c2cd898e4a9be11d66f13522
35bf1f7f07270559ef1ab933e5b1c19f14fa6290
'2011-12-20T16:51:22-05:00'
describe
'539' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFY' 'sip-files00112.txt'
a23075f70381b54e5f4267d8c56df1e3
2889f0d44bdbbc1b76d2fd516903bd1e27261a2e
describe
'2410' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHFZ' 'sip-files00113.txt'
5bcea8c2fbe22b91bb0b3ab40a4e5e89
4fa03cf9bcce65f5f984de4543317f6ef47724eb
'2011-12-20T16:52:54-05:00'
describe
'2397' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGA' 'sip-files00114.txt'
a23fab587690cb3bf5b977bbccb575f1
62f19645297210396d6d4067f732f9357e3f062c
'2011-12-20T16:52:22-05:00'
describe
'2499' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGB' 'sip-files00115.txt'
56b73565e7751bfdf567b3410a233d11
53e45b6290d4ebd0079c2307bd687067e18eb860
describe
Invalid character
'2411' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGC' 'sip-files00116.txt'
3e711cbf121c9eb19fc2cdd45f9c9ac5
91655bc8d11c8c717d25a7dc4037c2764c2d3cd4
'2011-12-20T16:55:42-05:00'
describe
'1852' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGD' 'sip-files00117.txt'
941551a419cb370c9a43d8062981bb9a
565dce1f871564182978d342726b5dc72cc6b866
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGE' 'sip-files00118.txt'
bf7b0e8366df7648cce82f353fd40c3b
2fd2ae153d2e71184b41456fa4b4c9425fb1eb96
'2011-12-20T16:55:54-05:00'
describe
'2518' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGF' 'sip-files00119.txt'
8bc547b88d9aac21311d172783122b32
3e1e22791b605122687b50f2a8c2700a4575db0e
'2011-12-20T16:51:00-05:00'
describe
'2455' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGG' 'sip-files00120.txt'
ff19aa58aaef5724610d39c23b84ef9e
302cb7cbcc701236dcf0cbaeaceda2518d991934
'2011-12-20T16:56:34-05:00'
describe
'1909' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGH' 'sip-files00121.txt'
008f5c419aa6d04a13c8bdcec09023e2
ce93f670b343ee08f55262c59e3f7c8bac3ec65a
'2011-12-20T16:51:28-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'884' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGI' 'sip-files00122.txt'
b52e77d424ff7be763679f0ae0f9483f
874e079ce7d5b0c8cf0b33d1e48568dc2d8bc89c
'2011-12-20T16:52:58-05:00'
describe
'2554' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGJ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
7cb9a1e8bed09200243ea4ab40837b5e
5056f11e254a3975a071961b4336590be426bbf7
'2011-12-20T16:52:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGK' 'sip-files00124.txt'
533ec59ef77dbeca5b70e1edb350f74d
595d18e14768fabecba59ddfeeb85248a82640fe
'2011-12-20T16:50:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGL' 'sip-files00125.txt'
302a8025f5e98ee0436a0ae1ceffc8aa
495bee104fb00d9401aba9af3813855ef2c5c5db
'2011-12-20T16:55:59-05:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGM' 'sip-files00126.txt'
c0851b4faaecc7b0073b786c4e9a6c10
02c6bad64d7b0e81fe7db016902e8cfe24c93baa
'2011-12-20T16:56:54-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2404' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGN' 'sip-files00127.txt'
027063bfb225a90b610532ddb14cbccf
05aa4469ffc807e5d4b53af1d362db875ead64a0
'2011-12-20T16:58:00-05:00'
describe
'2299' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGO' 'sip-files00128.txt'
e62afac8d37061fa8d69aca3036d924f
cb7de822cd13680d948dd37e5a38a820c5dfd609
'2011-12-20T16:55:06-05:00'
describe
'2393' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGP' 'sip-files00129.txt'
e44c3fdaf441852c7d664eba863dda2a
d35b3f6e2a15734cab749e277a1380042ac91cb9
'2011-12-20T16:55:00-05:00'
describe
'2352' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGQ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
630e5bac7814a87b43d2d4f6c1e9c051
daf950fd9d31e2262c3da323423f0c9d8833edde
'2011-12-20T16:56:20-05:00'
describe
'2412' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGR' 'sip-files00131.txt'
86e623f18678770e394deefa70f66fcb
eb74380b3341af8e815b3b350b4e1bd3c2a268ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGS' 'sip-files00132.txt'
2cc44f851e6b0b60229962b29c4e3c60
76d25ac2d8962482a6a5237f17173b19872307d5
'2011-12-20T16:56:30-05:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGT' 'sip-files00133.txt'
c5edd13c37dc9a3282b329f62cf519f5
b3b0cd8cf6562226a8a7664b555f2c1959209623
'2011-12-20T16:54:18-05:00'
describe
'2240' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGU' 'sip-files00134.txt'
159e853798d9ee82984b02e5a876c75e
58033f4fae85368bdaeefbf4e68846262c4ae7d5
describe
'2052' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGV' 'sip-files00135.txt'
227ac9e4dff7493b5fddd9ad7244e25c
318a394c3b7c2920bfcb2ab6a42e34444f037855
'2011-12-20T16:54:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGW' 'sip-files00136.txt'
f0ef19874024d8a0fa85a8ed0d263a92
c847c18fb30d490f6b46c0553915bc0b70b4030f
'2011-12-20T16:51:11-05:00'
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGX' 'sip-files00137.txt'
fa0e1fe7d3c451dcf4fd37b49127587d
a8676c2f535bb23a96fa716306d22d925a7fd12a
'2011-12-20T16:57:25-05:00'
describe
'2080' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGY' 'sip-files00138.txt'
277c0dffb8a96c7df1052b50654a67f9
fd8fd028201dbab92544d40cee9eacccb1b0b56d
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHGZ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
15997bf0ccc63588437befc3cf357fa9
62cc75b859672fc102049d9234cc6e8b4ee5c229
'2011-12-20T16:52:12-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHA' 'sip-files00140.txt'
5ff6a6739dc66f51a539a0910f1ec24a
97c31229202d5d2d5c993481efc9530d2c3b1c49
'2011-12-20T16:53:17-05:00'
describe
'2414' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHB' 'sip-files00141.txt'
aaf10e5eea959635235222bf46bacaf2
d25c33b16dc0e5066d921511f85fe5ceb4cb2e90
describe
'2441' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHC' 'sip-files00142.txt'
9095b7ed21bd79879e59dba61830800b
fc8f4f306f2a452ff5f6e1053b678a154d29ba4e
'2011-12-20T16:54:30-05:00'
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHD' 'sip-files00143.txt'
8a0a86b861f28de0e84a9e3bed327cc3
ad7516b5ff2cb866377806cd8962fa77966f73ac
'2011-12-20T16:58:05-05:00'
describe
'2417' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHE' 'sip-files00144.txt'
b8b9be4f65dd5b61bde00cb050edae57
f2e067d64b12e049c8bdad85c027ca579d46b60b
'2011-12-20T16:55:16-05:00'
describe
'2401' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHF' 'sip-files00145.txt'
7ab42d311cf9cf5fdce9839a2a5d5c01
9496f1e67fadd24c307ddea861be902cd47cbb4e
'2011-12-20T16:55:48-05:00'
describe
'2538' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHG' 'sip-files00146.txt'
aa3290243e0a8f831841735716fef800
ef0ac2740a842e781b6b1951b239313e0cb6a645
'2011-12-20T16:56:02-05:00'
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHH' 'sip-files00147.txt'
5b7186bb676ee6f8d3726848751c320e
65812a6032eb227494546b748bb64b899d16a637
'2011-12-20T16:57:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHI' 'sip-files00148.txt'
3bc26d2a81ccbbb3a2f1abacecbeb4bc
443f8c4f8e48a07289574dc86306c88c25680dba
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHJ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
b7973e20dd7225ff2b7756dab2e18458
d84eff0f6991856d6cb1725084263334ff115d26
describe
'2457' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHK' 'sip-files00150.txt'
750f0d62f07db5c0431c09a4623119c7
084c25e10ca3e1aa6d7551ecaa03c6df6a2eef0e
'2011-12-20T16:55:14-05:00'
describe
'2469' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHL' 'sip-files00151.txt'
0623d8f891e6685709ef75e80f836f5d
637584f014335ced0b7e06374e27b395a1335c81
'2011-12-20T16:57:04-05:00'
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHM' 'sip-files00152.txt'
e199d20319a811fd8ced83beaff3b70b
7301b3e3dce94c50a1368d90f1dc50fae37b7539
'2011-12-20T16:54:04-05:00'
describe
'1862' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHN' 'sip-files00153.txt'
fec5eb051d65030e7e594f4602f29f4f
59d9c6021157a8303d31aadc5f254f9e2d5d4f09
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHO' 'sip-files00154.txt'
1f41837d9403ba5ec280c3f60f736ed8
3dc12de28685f49cd726b95913e506954759ef62
'2011-12-20T16:57:31-05:00'
describe
'2437' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHP' 'sip-files00155.txt'
88e5c6b818db19ade7af0c63e8825ba0
f69c2d7e73bf1ef780ca3d998771beda91983a6d
'2011-12-20T16:56:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHQ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
7a751233b8abc6be99eff7c4040fb6dd
f17094122725377a00f49daaf60502f219d78c3b
'2011-12-20T16:54:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHR' 'sip-files00157.txt'
747a9cb065d28ef8af995cdb2a8e69d0
d266313c725a74b8080d6aa0a3d0a7c28aac7319
'2011-12-20T16:55:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHS' 'sip-files00158.txt'
7120f545ba0fcfdc63c493c9cbe2372f
805da8c9e7c321e3d6c39408272ded5d57e010eb
'2011-12-20T16:51:04-05:00'
describe
'2428' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHT' 'sip-files00159.txt'
a8471f806ead999f1d9affffa60f7ee4
09cb1d315c93c5194807101c25562a92411ab2d3
describe
'2371' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHU' 'sip-files00160.txt'
57be14c33c2860b24f50877406b2714c
4cc6d6f8c7696bc4eb6e22e55b600fa7c3bce224
'2011-12-20T16:53:42-05:00'
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHV' 'sip-files00161.txt'
4829183e9981e2eb5978325ccdef5e02
bcfbf1a18363b712a11d2b715dd8c8709c4ec5ac
'2011-12-20T16:52:40-05:00'
describe
'2454' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHW' 'sip-files00162.txt'
661d8ff935a6b041b15d2b27aaa24643
2887d809e81fa0225643670a550649ca509a0b63
'2011-12-20T16:55:29-05:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHX' 'sip-files00163.txt'
a64d3b06354805fa21340c7106c3d935
5345483d8f0305548e48c29ba7e159920b002599
'2011-12-20T16:52:21-05:00'
describe
'2434' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHY' 'sip-files00164.txt'
b43137f9b0e8a2229ca43ecc07088f42
1f726714a24101896489d0fd90216851aae0fad7
describe
'2365' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHHZ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
8535ff8e0918b9b25aef64257d846614
53dade59a23414ad31bff7a032a86ae73f0c96c0
'2011-12-20T16:55:47-05:00'
describe
'2526' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIA' 'sip-files00166.txt'
a4661c70a98268acd0209830d27f7af0
54873caefe13ab3be424613b633b2c97fb739765
describe
'2360' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIB' 'sip-files00167.txt'
a5d0b27518307201ceb50d23127aca37
34ae8e9899ba5558ac8e37abcd14481557ceb662
'2011-12-20T16:55:41-05:00'
describe
'2153' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIC' 'sip-files00168.txt'
580ad345303fbecdc203a900051974cc
0f036c8cf4329d9841d137573b2676c12c3a855e
'2011-12-20T16:52:46-05:00'
describe
'444' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHID' 'sip-files00170.txt'
24276cc76d3510cfd4d864076ac92380
0f8c3bd79935eff8dddcf1b50418ba7a78fa0761
describe
Invalid character
'1678' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIE' 'sip-files00171.txt'
e9bb0113548f25eff1ca2c28fdac1797
1b5c3ccabf7b7f8e8d4a003dce361ea32cdcb94f
'2011-12-20T16:56:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIF' 'sip-files00172.txt'
c2468fc37c3f422eac78ab68414f073e
fd456c718e3779570702dfe1ff715fb8df3ce589
'2011-12-20T16:57:39-05:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIG' 'sip-files00173.txt'
b9088a5baa433427f24386bee5dfebb2
f083924a8571394b7077bd591034e89d6b4a05a8
'2011-12-20T16:52:27-05:00'
describe
'2394' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIH' 'sip-files00174.txt'
3a561f17f2002006078ff04eef716e4e
6a8507c6a6aa803023cbe02ae14126eb28012ed0
'2011-12-20T16:57:27-05:00'
describe
'2314' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHII' 'sip-files00175.txt'
5f1ab71466cc148ce734e5bada5dcc8d
127cb19feb1ad6edc0660e3cfae5b9050565b156
'2011-12-20T16:56:24-05:00'
describe
'2356' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIJ' 'sip-files00176.txt'
4988497a14eef2216f69a6188f3095ef
b261a67309f2ae6c6d1125cdac224830c4c37b50
'2011-12-20T16:54:16-05:00'
describe
'2484' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIK' 'sip-files00177.txt'
899733779b93b48033fcec378ce4a492
0ec83b95ef9e250da1e9fddd3c83bf6d63d3b67e
'2011-12-20T16:57:28-05:00'
describe
'2387' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIL' 'sip-files00178.txt'
7a87e837a723b043d0fe2d0257a4f058
552676e0492a578c35df92a2ebfb0500b0787249
'2011-12-20T16:56:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIM' 'sip-files00179.txt'
ab0b27576d26bd1d914fcf38373d9942
f0b26d4f7c82981357921631232ad3604e15ce47
'2011-12-20T16:51:55-05:00'
describe
'2318' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIN' 'sip-files00180.txt'
50efa813bfff7667c46bf33b5018bbc5
958e9c4b0d3c9bc2d36ddd1fe90abff73951af7f
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIO' 'sip-files00181.txt'
e947dd3ca8ba6567c2723d8f3cb7072e
7eb62b06824b9224e7719dfba6a837aca9de64b6
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIP' 'sip-files00182.txt'
efa234907644e50fe69b3e6f9b8e166a
9ec10ced3b39aa3973245a84504347cabcabaf1d
'2011-12-20T16:57:29-05:00'
describe
'2558' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIQ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
e7070f1d3e41888dbf3a429cbb94873b
8f991fcc9663527d6bda82065ef331db956afa49
'2011-12-20T16:50:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIR' 'sip-files00184.txt'
123fe1056a966c0619e5ac04185b087d
1e5306b032a30e791c00fcfc3cbf7086e9ccf319
'2011-12-20T16:57:50-05:00'
describe
'2431' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIS' 'sip-files00185.txt'
bea928e0d0bc5c8211b935dc97953a5d
e41a7e3f6b726d3783657ae4792c85b0eef1dd58
describe
'2350' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIT' 'sip-files00186.txt'
762a73a694c4745ee01c13354674707e
7d6854be4e77147659e5a958f9c6e8645a5e5398
describe
'1642' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIU' 'sip-files00187.txt'
e5665489f89669c152335b0a226627c5
8243ea33af21c76870d9be52ecc7ee73ce65c716
describe
'2426' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIV' 'sip-files00188.txt'
6ef54d536f7b0d8723334c104a6d0530
38934f7005eb4510a11779df6f3205aeadbea63f
'2011-12-20T16:52:32-05:00'
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIW' 'sip-files00189.txt'
e3943591ff94b4edd1407c77349037fe
44d5eb4bd24d08fc9b0dabc5ce44055cee0ea1ee
'2011-12-20T16:55:31-05:00'
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIX' 'sip-files00190.txt'
1ffbc3f5e148e4a110b0af273f794e0d
f744fa844fbada0bc9647274289ef0e118c9d093
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIY' 'sip-files00191.txt'
779ed39e0e6ade2381970fc9d7b417fd
fd7554bced3dff337acc992ca437d0f7a470b148
'2011-12-20T16:57:56-05:00'
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHIZ' 'sip-files00192.txt'
98ae6315b3447acb02b01f96cf6f967a
492ed2d6c37e2530804eb00c8095e40e072a5db4
describe
'2383' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJA' 'sip-files00193.txt'
41b8f8e3589756bfb7d56df6f4eba1a2
2b8f852b21166308c308ba1063dbb99d05ba792c
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJB' 'sip-files00194.txt'
59db693af8e507c8c56988cd7998e213
1eaf76c3f2ef60f4b0c4545ab4b23521f4841773
'2011-12-20T16:54:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJC' 'sip-files00195.txt'
f73202ff611c057c0661159cebbb55db
8e4eb85c9d9386933387717af587d80ecd84f6a7
'2011-12-20T16:51:02-05:00'
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJD' 'sip-files00196.txt'
21fa2c0660e92747dd9803870c62f254
d3bac004e7ab8750359df7b672478df2dbae616c
'2011-12-20T16:55:26-05:00'
describe
'2483' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJE' 'sip-files00197.txt'
49966941afbc5b8d74e6988b7c5f3eb8
5b772c9fd51a51f74aabfeb7ef4952eb62d09125
'2011-12-20T16:57:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJF' 'sip-files00198.txt'
50cfee0827304781f4cce759d2fe2acf
3c34fe635aef2ff07444bc5f42096c7f799bd4ae
'2011-12-20T16:54:05-05:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJG' 'sip-files00199.txt'
60d5e2fb21f2cba78e7b3c77e317c3e8
68bbbff0a36b73feef1255acf15d441ebcd06658
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJH' 'sip-files00200.txt'
64cade9c11cd3278cb817b9356cb422c
bb7e1863fe39fdb99306b881794ebb1c12904894
'2011-12-20T16:54:22-05:00'
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJI' 'sip-files00201.txt'
6751af7db7669290c5c64b40ed0abd56
24099fd213e30d75aceddf81e5044f5e1ebb326d
'2011-12-20T16:52:08-05:00'
describe
'2509' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJJ' 'sip-files00202.txt'
31f47279a8bf6253abacaf384716a70e
7eb63f127d12c08581c09a9675efbfb3c8e2cb8d
'2011-12-20T16:55:05-05:00'
describe
'1770' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJK' 'sip-files00203.txt'
9eebfdc2c93f9ac06a94e197696f6f98
ca618a560a0603b91244057f9542af19144d0f61
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJL' 'sip-files00204.txt'
9523e640ab0a5c43452b544f2fc79e32
c67619cf2fe47d7362ddb055592db4ad42f65ad2
describe
'2366' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJM' 'sip-files00205.txt'
2839366a2d2cc527c0b7fdddce4f1201
164db0271b59deb6a06ff8f85de6a6eb9517e401
'2011-12-20T16:52:02-05:00'
describe
'2416' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJN' 'sip-files00206.txt'
1938b63df47b3a90d28a3b9632aa695d
2f8a5868cd40a0a1d707f3afc95c83643f0a9ad2
'2011-12-20T16:52:43-05:00'
describe
'2449' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJO' 'sip-files00207.txt'
e8d4678280e0ebd962b29100850019a4
d1949d364aeba3bb1f92002db5dcc2a44a3b8343
'2011-12-20T16:57:45-05:00'
describe
'2343' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJP' 'sip-files00208.txt'
e6aed9a5a419c7fea69216d770783e8c
eaeee7ad1ea3d7f64b3d70d161bf12fd79ad01da
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJQ' 'sip-files00209.txt'
c0c9909bd4cdaa757150e7f84706d6fb
b8f144971fbbc1152cf57c9739d27bd6bf0994da
'2011-12-20T16:52:51-05:00'
describe
'2340' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJR' 'sip-files00210.txt'
1bba2cd005c5fc4953d20443c0d465e8
2086655ff57ffc8e598c59aecb53eace590b2494
'2011-12-20T16:57:57-05:00'
describe
'2529' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJS' 'sip-files00211.txt'
156ac62fc7a1d60202b9fb153ef53ba1
31f0f5f32a8c9cd4be66a39c5d57974f7b6477f6
'2011-12-20T16:52:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJT' 'sip-files00212.txt'
ffbc60a5d3f24f1087c97efc29055217
1d90a6f0dbe1ac9c85f828ad7f360032253fddd2
'2011-12-20T16:53:34-05:00'
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJU' 'sip-files00213.txt'
404998f9f878eeda5c47e9ec8f2e698f
2fc56d6bc416b8bd6c3b0977d24de70bebb29482
describe
'2512' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJV' 'sip-files00214.txt'
4ec01980b45ceed0c30bc07ab7574368
6129c2abb4c19f72ace2dd6b99fe7ab31042842c
'2011-12-20T16:50:33-05:00'
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJW' 'sip-files00215.txt'
3e150e67574e1dce96915169e69e1999
c48d8fe6b97ec1687d301b3a6dcd4b9a6de966ac
'2011-12-20T16:53:26-05:00'
describe
'2462' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJX' 'sip-files00216.txt'
8156e6a524520a2a869ace0097d312a8
b5a3fd7d10828a601fd105eafac0389bc5b58ebb
'2011-12-20T16:54:32-05:00'
describe
'18' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJY' 'sip-files00222.txt'
22b0c56b867d09e8d9f2dd06e77b7381
b9726cd48aa1d237289aa4c4720c4d3686691e56
'2011-12-20T16:56:15-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'356' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHJZ' 'sip-files00001.pro'
06d35c244c3064c1c0730a8dda481b0d
7265626095add22207353661406d1bf1e5662c65
'2011-12-20T16:50:24-05:00'
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKA' 'sip-files00002.pro'
a2294dc9303111a5fd9b892e19e37b96
773c32f9f69324694da6cf0422cd786870831c68
'2011-12-20T16:50:42-05:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKB' 'sip-files00005.pro'
4885bb499d70adab4e4bfd204cbee7f3
dafe3927ecc37557207ea24fb4fa4213147fe3fe
'2011-12-20T16:56:49-05:00'
describe
'2368' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKC' 'sip-files00008.pro'
5a83473648cbad826c97cd5cee3b89b2
5f783b8e4b15cb7439b499ff2b8faf2743fb4af9
'2011-12-20T16:52:55-05:00'
describe
'15565' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKD' 'sip-files00009.pro'
e7ff2326b66d16d0ec83ccb826db30a9
dc37fa94bc34be9bc2e94319e11f2d9c5e1b3b70
describe
'7185' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKE' 'sip-files00010.pro'
2303747a33507e7275430b93fb055294
3aad6802cc6e5a85a669dc115fa4cfd637e72663
'2011-12-20T16:56:40-05:00'
describe
'29156' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKF' 'sip-files00011.pro'
b117d3b8e8c009142673c16b7f7b4244
085fcc56faa232666eeacfa785f0c2d015317b87
'2011-12-20T16:51:08-05:00'
describe
'33641' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKG' 'sip-files00012.pro'
50def6db4f8c7ab030fdd4f13bc85f7a
032a33455d7b185d4987cb3eb488f07f385d4f3e
'2011-12-20T16:51:35-05:00'
describe
'93250' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKH' 'sip-files00013.pro'
a62f4d0e3167a16ef0860eb7dbd6047d
60c3e365b20c52c6fb84f31b1bd122def4d2cd4d
'2011-12-20T16:51:18-05:00'
describe
'7599' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKI' 'sip-files00014.pro'
6da1721b17ae17f2e65151bc24756290
2085d6482a4392eafcc81fcc75c22ffc1d0e82c1
describe
'22915' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKJ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
cd5ccf5716e333a984ae986310468e74
e317d4a31803a122046825b40076351df790ca1c
'2011-12-20T16:52:01-05:00'
describe
'58974' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKK' 'sip-files00016.pro'
6d40eba76feb155e66b16ebff1895989
912f2de99e816767fddf5cdd12d473ac0fddda09
'2011-12-20T16:55:15-05:00'
describe
'19657' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKL' 'sip-files00017.pro'
9dd8cd041d38994b2333a7c346bdf332
b6086cabf2c79f8c07771fa86868a3ea3ccc1f76
'2011-12-20T16:55:09-05:00'
describe
'61187' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKM' 'sip-files00018.pro'
2cba2b0f4603a08414f5dfada51870fc
7bbd1fb7772663eeb5689a42d17c76424944fd8e
'2011-12-20T16:57:59-05:00'
describe
'20732' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKN' 'sip-files00019.pro'
ccee26a148b4adf4596eb528ca988ae6
1f0187526f82cff47fd4269e9755dd9185b679f7
describe
'60764' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKO' 'sip-files00020.pro'
9ed7ac066aebdfd781231d5e22a767b9
5d238294f8df8cb479b21ce4ce23b25eb412a58d
describe
'55598' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKP' 'sip-files00021.pro'
d2032e7b900e0b631289277eb3037544
e4840483c3e7ff12dc1e37ba53a8b5aa8875b941
'2011-12-20T16:52:16-05:00'
describe
'29898' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKQ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
ebfd1d9073a940d90fbff411846820ce
2dc23e6c662801d2240531cc889977d516f2483b
'2011-12-20T16:56:28-05:00'
describe
'62459' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKR' 'sip-files00023.pro'
3f5b9b41792b8e4b503190e852fec82b
9a0d02c463b62455288411cfc4b4163362c18631
'2011-12-20T16:50:14-05:00'
describe
'36614' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKS' 'sip-files00024.pro'
9be7620ae8f7d3cd1256df506514fa17
b6904cf50b696c27d34acb98075e15988b4e1c18
describe
'62642' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKT' 'sip-files00025.pro'
20b7a1007f4668629e650daf2fc50b51
5c2fe5816b319256e1516724271f993dbf739743
describe
'13855' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKU' 'sip-files00026.pro'
0a75785fa27c28e58a76725db0a43dea
a84f3e252d4ed4c88d87ec339a0451384a1d03c1
describe
'63391' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKV' 'sip-files00027.pro'
ad2be9219c066d163be2f8875a1d1d9a
eb702073392fa4633ddcd3ce1511924fea2e8b90
'2011-12-20T16:55:56-05:00'
describe
'47040' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKW' 'sip-files00028.pro'
3a7a06647d8dc8e6ef1d1ac413f35ccc
c9cd7a20969a0e4a1fe3c96d399c9058fcc61157
'2011-12-20T16:50:34-05:00'
describe
'58429' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKX' 'sip-files00029.pro'
9c4a77b12ebe0aefd6a05019e8f4a1a7
9ce1182523081b28b8c5b67e671fda9a74e9c931
describe
'39558' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKY' 'sip-files00030.pro'
9c202f0743ba437a997d15d665efb894
7e9611e519bcb2ae9bc0bb9130e3b7d36263ec3e
'2011-12-20T16:53:56-05:00'
describe
'3866' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHKZ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
8c75179b370dd2fdf16bb16750e6cde0
d2a2a6d5353f9d5a060f605dcca19c51263c0e55
describe
'26791' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLA' 'sip-files00033.pro'
cf63c57651fe497fc49f1d6a05357125
f7622d887f151e82c62ad9adc6fe780e9d939824
'2011-12-20T16:57:30-05:00'
describe
'25919' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLB' 'sip-files00034.pro'
50602b1b973f44267f31878a7fba9e17
74a67ffb3f2e2d96878f32b57c5e834a95df22ce
'2011-12-20T16:54:01-05:00'
describe
'59113' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLC' 'sip-files00035.pro'
40aa674d32066d69a2899fd275f99b68
609dfb9c4c344212ecee334bd39e9be55eac5eba
describe
'24873' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLD' 'sip-files00036.pro'
be36402df40bcb990f085964ce433c4f
7e5a91e8675693606a21785272815840b0d9788c
describe
'62259' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLE' 'sip-files00037.pro'
6516a01ecf933c3d1989d3881253b485
85dbde6b18e62ba06240418175a684cc33d43271
'2011-12-20T16:58:02-05:00'
describe
'23984' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLF' 'sip-files00038.pro'
11cf17a337a0d0fde296362a2434aa6e
205bfce5d0b9282312adc98f7936c876aec1f16e
'2011-12-20T16:55:08-05:00'
describe
'57215' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLG' 'sip-files00039.pro'
1602aaddf8072c681467931035684768
5d9cb9c34d094125ad147312365ebc3597410d57
'2011-12-20T16:51:24-05:00'
describe
'60917' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLH' 'sip-files00040.pro'
0c92efcedf3f491069098bf37723c129
6298f64a2cda831042aa193c98475a095d428494
'2011-12-20T16:53:15-05:00'
describe
'33734' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLI' 'sip-files00041.pro'
fcef8ca1123e27734d49d74aad6a0b91
80a42caf44cfe7f0017a8056fccb438692ef16da
'2011-12-20T16:52:20-05:00'
describe
'58195' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLJ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
56500eb618e7f47f39377a1bc93fb744
669721cd6b0cad4ee86171b4e7cc6ca5316bf4f2
'2011-12-20T16:56:03-05:00'
describe
'31694' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLK' 'sip-files00043.pro'
f846189df08d45f6f8014b12af2a595a
ed1ef231d235df8222ecdaa87278473dcf5ed78e
'2011-12-20T16:52:17-05:00'
describe
'22299' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLL' 'sip-files00044.pro'
824d64abd0dc4edb2fb92ba5ed5227d3
c8a273a22f894d67f4aa143da879953dbe5d33a9
'2011-12-20T16:56:31-05:00'
describe
'9011' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLM' 'sip-files00046.pro'
3da3cbfbeeac2b86977f07e620c55462
04ae03a1c989d7d76b7c92da0a31a4f1770109fe
'2011-12-20T16:53:51-05:00'
describe
'17047' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLN' 'sip-files00047.pro'
94048cbaab1fa4deb942c432e3791972
ec48d4474575ddb262c4873ed43f8f1193929db9
describe
'60924' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLO' 'sip-files00048.pro'
05d28fea28d58dd9cafd101a33123b92
b9903b51cde3e32db91672909d299d6161086887
'2011-12-20T16:54:23-05:00'
describe
'61844' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLP' 'sip-files00049.pro'
5b9ce0f0311a3ecfcff967b09fd66041
6bd4f0947ce4b9c5801bbd7827cefc040f2482a0
describe
'27902' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLQ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
4bf395e0c9d6914d9ab90476a22e91a6
1204ff63d126b607b5fd0a70bc79a1f2b2e785d9
'2011-12-20T16:57:41-05:00'
describe
'37341' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLR' 'sip-files00051.pro'
e565b22312234245ce282e317e024c6b
cfbc4a09015334f48cc9cc74ae3788c1c663e621
'2011-12-20T16:54:46-05:00'
describe
'62405' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLS' 'sip-files00052.pro'
cb3d87ca5ffee08c34ddb67ec9601005
9bdfe0a8e45e19d3224f110d79cd97b44b2a6878
'2011-12-20T16:50:12-05:00'
describe
'25459' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLT' 'sip-files00053.pro'
3ade785ece3138065e7c9dba2e4498c2
dde5f311286eacbecdd363a25002f428a7a7a29f
'2011-12-20T16:56:18-05:00'
describe
'60034' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLU' 'sip-files00054.pro'
3b12568be564ded719af02c17cdb98c5
2ff8f5d14da0a087bf3c9815d2491f2ced6476ad
'2011-12-20T16:54:55-05:00'
describe
'27890' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLV' 'sip-files00055.pro'
e68ef282b1f2f77919b400a15cfeed55
aed7ca20f4ab2b6ac7e197219c38b678e7825ecc
describe
'53181' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLW' 'sip-files00056.pro'
967f58e1de41d0bc7559223a94d8f809
f8bced30b265662bd38c6dc742b6f3f80547fd99
'2011-12-20T16:55:32-05:00'
describe
'61393' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLX' 'sip-files00057.pro'
a18ac4ffc2df328efd82921efabf6ff6
db1987c7fb61f1674acfd39f54eea39d4ab323e6
'2011-12-20T16:51:27-05:00'
describe
'27000' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLY' 'sip-files00058.pro'
7bb2bcb673b5563862e710ff1329b3e8
77ab04469187de65f4ed0ae547295a061d4b8f53
describe
'27771' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHLZ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
4d8ed63d89d3112cfd9a54b35a1965ab
1887c75c7dc4b9cab0e58b7cbb6ad6cadfbfb46a
describe
'61337' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMA' 'sip-files00060.pro'
b3335e8b4a34b579c1cd9418858ba562
2977b17cff7783f9c86004fb5c0099815379a069
describe
'32754' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMB' 'sip-files00061.pro'
68170db47f1f17cd1bc8e9e7be0463fa
326837aa0c050ca41b342a4358fb4a7ad0b27f05
describe
'37373' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMC' 'sip-files00062.pro'
6a89c5742a2a5eae7c8c26e9b9cc0a38
df7f8789237b55030080782f31f39cb23f8fa889
'2011-12-20T16:57:09-05:00'
describe
'3845' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMD' 'sip-files00063.pro'
92b13cf44518b3447bded081e5d3b504
e776c9fb8d15eb394ecd4697472e3c8838ff440b
'2011-12-20T16:54:34-05:00'
describe
'13921' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHME' 'sip-files00065.pro'
053f9d988c0c549903b92c7a8c3d7a64
be826cec6b59d1fac38755d81d4d44a0c58d651b
'2011-12-20T16:56:17-05:00'
describe
'62396' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMF' 'sip-files00066.pro'
98c7cf328554d0de7e3ff2b1e1e06b87
eade21ae0308514fcfb7d4a75cee89452b07f1af
describe
'27794' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMG' 'sip-files00067.pro'
8c39c660244e5899e09050c15d712c2a
5aa2012f2232152fd6e1b1f0933c00fd1a6f620d
describe
'57781' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMH' 'sip-files00068.pro'
c4968a6d30035be49ac4f8fd8cd86b9d
af362d9ae2c71e0230fd19499f62fa7995af05b7
describe
'12480' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMI' 'sip-files00069.pro'
b4c123d36e72f6ebce007496069cf960
e976d80a2e47c3b3e352bc4a5c24193cd1b85fc2
describe
'62733' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMJ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
24c06b042e6c3067f2f8e682e71d9c8e
90b1491bdbe7f65b49a251a8b80cd43260c12dcb
describe
'34433' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMK' 'sip-files00071.pro'
af3e668c0c67deb900eb8219f8da9368
d106b92c1f74769f910423a1590281959cf3384d
'2011-12-20T16:52:49-05:00'
describe
'61450' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHML' 'sip-files00072.pro'
b0dc9df1e1cc07457527b1e466c40459
e4ca7e6d1f97849b9c8b856405a92de3e71fd5ba
describe
'11739' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMM' 'sip-files00073.pro'
12b5e52f4de3ec00e7bc8e9478dfea98
5aa75fbaeed234166457bb64eb21c82400d48d3e
describe
'63474' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMN' 'sip-files00074.pro'
7b44c4c51fef087c571ecd6f6e2629dc
ef55928ea29db2b24b682345bff666eedcc91b1a
'2011-12-20T16:50:44-05:00'
describe
'32980' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMO' 'sip-files00075.pro'
260b7e269116678c7af40399928b604b
df7aa6fe3f97fe9ca422e7f5226e8262dfd4b29d
'2011-12-20T16:54:13-05:00'
describe
'29879' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMP' 'sip-files00076.pro'
bbcec162acf5c91d2496004eb67c7391
40388896726f6e094add1929758e00bf49542e50
describe
'24496' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMQ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
b480595ab910a14ab7ac7515351e3f65
f97c747be9e135933dbd52f615d1a82ed4fea836
'2011-12-20T16:51:56-05:00'
describe
'30127' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMR' 'sip-files00078.pro'
d52074b8282284239f874abf40ed5c81
4912f2cb4afd8d389b228c07ecc3909382e9c1ce
'2011-12-20T16:50:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMS' 'sip-files00079.pro'
7bb5581705a430978f33ab7aa2fba373
f2cf2c6dba4b9ef0f427f5046efdd96a35ad59ca
describe
'61029' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMT' 'sip-files00081.pro'
803552bbb28306f0b57bc999e65dc458
92e6aeac23a1755319e5a9e58f7545fa81248f3b
'2011-12-20T16:56:22-05:00'
describe
'23980' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMU' 'sip-files00082.pro'
79611a0adf48e6ec058e80a53f58dc0f
24bfde3d9b47828c0bc1562e79fa1d2676b9f3cc
describe
'55462' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMV' 'sip-files00083.pro'
f36de1a16c4d803b4a7608d5fc270966
c5c2dab2b360994fcb87c2669f3f0cf6b9454d8d
'2011-12-20T16:55:35-05:00'
describe
'18741' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMW' 'sip-files00084.pro'
d324014bd96430c440f74000471e7a0e
c3e9716d7e4566a48eb392748c6824e1119710a7
'2011-12-20T16:51:10-05:00'
describe
'62484' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMX' 'sip-files00085.pro'
f85ca8043071a13d3ed4c4341a2946b5
5133e3d309d5525b0035f19851c24a3bbba95c95
describe
'13890' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMY' 'sip-files00086.pro'
1a32ced97acd4d7f52d7c69c1c252663
c7b3ffe8b6e9921516eecb95aee68ebaa9c69a24
'2011-12-20T16:57:42-05:00'
describe
'58647' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHMZ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
11e21fd7a133473a56d1cf7294c4c6e8
fa4c32932804378a1cdb4fc96d0e56172d8cee9f
describe
'58128' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNA' 'sip-files00088.pro'
320031dd90478a5f0a99aadd58bf5d9a
9b441fcf430251699e1699a055feade739597c17
'2011-12-20T16:56:39-05:00'
describe
'11814' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNB' 'sip-files00089.pro'
225c2b8fefc98a9965774149e9db8e99
1db69942eab8ccbb09e0fd3618c27a7ec15092b1
describe
'60050' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNC' 'sip-files00090.pro'
27302667c0fdcc3a6dafbe9b0f6e8cc8
2c20b32a159aa488b8ea72b432eb3c9a41b33282
'2011-12-20T16:51:37-05:00'
describe
'62899' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHND' 'sip-files00091.pro'
9d03a86636cb16f0562a266ef1e04d7d
9222773b6b1eb1728b83054e51487582fba4bf1c
'2011-12-20T16:50:30-05:00'
describe
'21012' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNE' 'sip-files00092.pro'
ba11c2b7804e04d86716e2274ad389ba
0f6a63788ece3875397e423f57c4e6e44db24dc5
describe
'53223' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNF' 'sip-files00093.pro'
2ce7782c086f7ab412bab5d4fcbd9116
6f9ca6949f713ede45bb527d24cfb53ebfd41803
'2011-12-20T16:52:34-05:00'
describe
'56374' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNG' 'sip-files00094.pro'
891eddabf4021c6876df585b7475e6af
1ba4d4c39f2e9837bf83bb9bcd4f43e123eca511
'2011-12-20T16:54:25-05:00'
describe
'44054' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNH' 'sip-files00095.pro'
bedca183433ae9155d4df80518bbb6d8
ac7f0b16e0c4fa6c3685590ea329023b984b60b7
'2011-12-20T16:54:08-05:00'
describe
'29456' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNI' 'sip-files00096.pro'
530b06ce8727c2aba75ab6c07de64f79
ccdaa59d7dc868bbbddb2e3c7f857064d1e10d34
'2011-12-20T16:53:19-05:00'
describe
'63448' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNJ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
de5968f01851b653156cf52ea8a0b6af
374c388a8d890bb1e8bc84f0b091892fdece770d
describe
'63932' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNK' 'sip-files00098.pro'
e984d8da0fcbb9ccec2e1040b746bea6
74005932e93590a0676b5477a77afb1e110573c2
'2011-12-20T16:51:50-05:00'
describe
'23706' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNL' 'sip-files00099.pro'
3e7e8a83ab429387328e363576eb8ab1
9311f5171b956829b7e6d63a1cacbaa5899ff749
describe
'62752' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNM' 'sip-files00100.pro'
cc64117a4fd004109fb9272544fa433f
187969fb59cf20f1c18ae5db1df378be9c2fcd7c
'2011-12-20T16:54:52-05:00'
describe
'63722' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNN' 'sip-files00101.pro'
4d1fe43384cdd970c7b692898b89f64b
7f0aefae330a436401b15e4f95c18e6ce009eebd
describe
'31239' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNO' 'sip-files00102.pro'
f2d028710e0e762a8c81460d988a123e
0d6127fc3a182934a064e0330441b357fc5ea4c7
'2011-12-20T16:55:23-05:00'
describe
'63556' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNP' 'sip-files00103.pro'
84e30c25a7ef2cc1c8cacdce05f9cb7f
42523448c712e0f3c5f136fc848bcf9980299454
describe
'62486' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNQ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
91b4e61fe46ce06d24ef71df6ab1dc58
b619947f17fe1125f1cfbc87e4dc8435e7fe3c4f
describe
'62574' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNR' 'sip-files00105.pro'
cd2bb2b51e5a30044bb29efd48776083
fc430c4b23de4e758b0d7b2d071475b2d5323892
describe
'61489' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNS' 'sip-files00106.pro'
8c0403c3248d415f838244282a95a685
779c89b8dbee1116919010c6ccc83464686dcc50
'2011-12-20T16:55:03-05:00'
describe
'55646' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNT' 'sip-files00107.pro'
8ce8346a49fa0f0a1062ed7d32933745
7e0baad42b18c22220ca1e15201090ba48efc7cd
describe
'62741' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNU' 'sip-files00108.pro'
ced890d7bbea035a6264c837f02c55cd
3d020f104987eebfd40c2fcc4d792b778269a902
'2011-12-20T16:57:08-05:00'
describe
'61881' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNV' 'sip-files00109.pro'
44f605ca0c9f6771f1bc16151cc664cc
2703c80bd411abcabeabe11de0cf091e044416cc
'2011-12-20T16:51:52-05:00'
describe
'62983' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNW' 'sip-files00110.pro'
6a1575eb4484a7129716b9f5f4a047f2
bb36d788451c89af9e54aea6bb0a4a85bdc0764c
'2011-12-20T16:52:44-05:00'
describe
'61328' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNX' 'sip-files00111.pro'
e2a2f6be32b6cc77a55d90c996db4203
cc525de518701a7d29dd5d9cd614b6c1992d594a
'2011-12-20T16:55:53-05:00'
describe
'13704' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNY' 'sip-files00112.pro'
d3eb5f2fb3b2b33d661281faf6be8b85
573ee4685869d9741f39730e87368536d0102df9
describe
'61654' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHNZ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
6197026f26c8a6f5b612ba2c538ee0b2
16e7c35cf6190fbea938b80b44e8170d86f4596f
'2011-12-20T16:55:50-05:00'
describe
'61422' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOA' 'sip-files00114.pro'
01918a701557025225a2c7a4508fc8b8
e25f486cee4257b83afdf73311e1b0e99cfd9420
describe
'29160' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOB' 'sip-files00115.pro'
9f71fa01a8a5b39c9ebdd2bfd91ddd70
b2e833c055f476aa274fcb3d9532912e77c583bb
describe
'61757' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOC' 'sip-files00116.pro'
791bb3834a683c36453dd0a81ee08850
f9e12e764ff2c3dfcdb00eee0119e304aef633d0
describe
'44911' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOD' 'sip-files00117.pro'
6dc3c1be41d469c558b45ae37408365c
3b4bae1eaa7d453bb3c5faa272e63edf01b7664c
describe
'35392' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOE' 'sip-files00118.pro'
dbf1e16529d24a198c14e9698b31179f
eeb077577950cc556ba6b44d513e607a65c14b48
describe
'64218' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOF' 'sip-files00119.pro'
245a690bc99d3347f30817a360429238
cde3e8ecf311bbe68cc098844908887712113137
describe
'62846' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOG' 'sip-files00120.pro'
56aafac217ba00d9b676679da1097a16
1edddbde027fb39c31a1a10442c270126e3e24c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOH' 'sip-files00121.pro'
bb3bff03f562d02512548aa57f007ffa
01bacea09f6ed72a1b51649036bb7f8783b5e6e4
describe
'20601' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOI' 'sip-files00122.pro'
f2c02a2cf09ac310f618ae14f9e2bd7c
3da440384c83098921f813b8d782b740411785f4
'2011-12-20T16:54:28-05:00'
describe
'65339' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOJ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
78bcd37f6db0615be26b0b4610b1ee85
d44c9153bae2d34356e03df30a8e75e7f4f68c2e
describe
'63570' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOK' 'sip-files00124.pro'
cf67bfce5f51e0ce23f206c22eb00c8a
026c73015fce438f669bc237ae9430fa63bbca98
'2011-12-20T16:54:59-05:00'
describe
'62845' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOL' 'sip-files00125.pro'
4c73b84d87cb46730efe4d46aa2b7516
e5f0be41fa3fd4c2a2e577bb916631dcf3c4b6d4
describe
'25815' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOM' 'sip-files00126.pro'
1f6751fa55fb8f2a7f69f0b18acf9ad6
f38ad530b07b0d07caea894e47c465425a7bb0e7
'2011-12-20T16:56:55-05:00'
describe
'61626' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHON' 'sip-files00127.pro'
7509761fb23751302bdd7e8c7fafe82a
81cf9f8437e986ed9f2ca7933fdc8777b2ce1652
'2011-12-20T16:56:59-05:00'
describe
'58909' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOO' 'sip-files00128.pro'
d274fabe37c3c4011373651da5323da4
a3ca55bdc12fd6569afbbe1b6ac6054de752c3a1
'2011-12-20T16:53:54-05:00'
describe
'61259' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOP' 'sip-files00129.pro'
eb414fb8788af445161c1d4e0e9eaeb7
a01ebc36888b56e191dcef554c86618a9a98acb2
'2011-12-20T16:56:44-05:00'
describe
'60365' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOQ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
8d4287fc5fd8db1d2dea4e584e0dee3c
4be682e7640f3c2de96068e49d4e1a9c3af2a602
'2011-12-20T16:55:52-05:00'
describe
'61630' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOR' 'sip-files00131.pro'
25f3b65199ab4e0cfd6eceb9166207b9
5de3fa2db416788be33046100900856ded77d923
'2011-12-20T16:55:28-05:00'
describe
'61955' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOS' 'sip-files00132.pro'
9911ea37fd96fa347eacfa0589382ebe
2cd57cc6f50b291e8c6610fd5fe69aa3d6e2d382
describe
'29936' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOT' 'sip-files00133.pro'
2d94bf09a1d35316531fb654e712d998
399dbe1090a6e27370945e7dde140c5281d9f711
describe
'57082' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOU' 'sip-files00134.pro'
90554d5ff0b6a6f1a69a16a53c9f70b5
8f90435bd411d263dddcc15913cd7a187530ea08
describe
'50452' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOV' 'sip-files00135.pro'
251dbbdc02a71ef205e19924038933a7
562018584474a251bc014755af8d0ca9635b6590
'2011-12-20T16:54:43-05:00'
describe
'59242' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOW' 'sip-files00136.pro'
0ec8449ea59d63853e309569b1a88233
8d45030fb310923577db0edd49d3db5e315815d6
'2011-12-20T16:52:38-05:00'
describe
'30655' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOX' 'sip-files00137.pro'
fe712042a880701b323fc284dbabb4f8
e8020c7b0c55fd293caa897f08a226e59b1daa56
describe
'53107' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOY' 'sip-files00138.pro'
e2c3fa2ec247d9814644cd3c91cddc9c
c702f6cdd753a900b1e8bc8653ce6ee8465b3839
'2011-12-20T16:51:48-05:00'
describe
'27936' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHOZ' 'sip-files00139.pro'
ec568b99361abbdea71c5e0a02a19e15
0e87eab4b302fdf0099b6f36230b319a8e781a06
'2011-12-20T16:51:42-05:00'
describe
'61302' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPA' 'sip-files00140.pro'
d1a6ec51eca6e2c4939eacc1193d78f1
fbd0864b6099dfaa8b82ab2a341aff0a4f4d2d59
describe
'61860' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPB' 'sip-files00141.pro'
1aa823e576a470ca713de80ba115de27
61c80892c73fd48786f07d81bd1ca47b26d1b59d
describe
'62621' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPC' 'sip-files00142.pro'
bfaefc21874105c6b70b653bcbd567e9
3446a3980eededb1d743cb91c971efddc6de6eb7
describe
'35550' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPD' 'sip-files00143.pro'
13d4e03a6e5fc09be74f8c2cfe663761
bd62ceeb9c66e290512d1b04873bb4601682c5bd
'2011-12-20T16:54:33-05:00'
describe
'61854' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPE' 'sip-files00144.pro'
52a9c32350cb4aba78e9fd6b05f34aac
a8d1595cd55e5659dddb29ff46b8c5e3b83b7da4
describe
'61483' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPF' 'sip-files00145.pro'
fe8207b9bf934ee36e9dd3efd6e4c820
eb8b831f20c77ed487cb2d01337990cd70576641
describe
'64242' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPG' 'sip-files00146.pro'
8d238cae3ff0dd0e50ca798c8a8b1100
ebf96f99dad15835dd739be45c419ba8b2796e01
describe
'32468' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPH' 'sip-files00147.pro'
706c9d76f6716e9c37316332c0275988
6daa5e7cbd670b2f506ae3bbf40df08d34b1bf52
'2011-12-20T16:55:30-05:00'
describe
'62932' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPI' 'sip-files00148.pro'
016f76b253d796c5938dbf3635d27c3a
c1d0838408e01037081f4d015bed5dc8415c0175
'2011-12-20T16:56:35-05:00'
describe
'30550' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPJ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
bfa30024156759cf490a07c0814ba11a
004d767c36e1b00e87004d3358070c5186955214
'2011-12-20T16:50:21-05:00'
describe
'62341' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPK' 'sip-files00150.pro'
2df89e0272567e0a4ca94caea0820efa
aaf02077327377b5e25c6d0daa5f187bb8d7d0e8
describe
'63086' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPL' 'sip-files00151.pro'
e34dc76f26b45934b89570c28613aabb
3d7c90f1d4fdcc0b502671fa0d74d65f14a02e38
describe
'32409' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPM' 'sip-files00152.pro'
9d939f5a295cf246c2621ff65e8f7fdc
9ce7e99106df6ec31273cd2ed1fe50e37e75507b
describe
'28454' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPN' 'sip-files00153.pro'
eb226227a34dc1bbbd46a779b582e339
9623fcaeec75d556446f38b3079d85bd7f2b9080
'2011-12-20T16:50:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPO' 'sip-files00154.pro'
192882c531bc1cfde86d3b9f72d4d4e7
f8d3a4ff0ba476d471d2287a6ed78c53f690761d
'2011-12-20T16:51:15-05:00'
describe
'62144' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPP' 'sip-files00155.pro'
f1a1ebf2325489d53a57cc9cf6cc8b48
9aed70b73bc1e7ef5a768fc003a4053c7473a41a
'2011-12-20T16:57:03-05:00'
describe
'61080' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPQ' 'sip-files00156.pro'
089f6dd044c3200cb324b51158fea750
453abe963ae4d4d9e6da6fdc65d87581c0ffcd8d
describe
'60606' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPR' 'sip-files00157.pro'
438f9b12844425ba6aefea3e5c7b94bc
c484f382dc86a61f6d36f52040466a6677d8af85
'2011-12-20T16:53:03-05:00'
describe
'60799' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPS' 'sip-files00158.pro'
59c6330527d4c53164e3bd76ee4b13c4
a9340240d07e0eccde08b75697d057f793652c45
describe
'61234' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPT' 'sip-files00159.pro'
21369bd97439f17032c19bbf6a78bac2
c5fa81b43abc8aa9da5a1602d1b9a19d9b68cd63
'2011-12-20T16:51:51-05:00'
describe
'60653' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPU' 'sip-files00160.pro'
b84be2c381384c18300944083d77ab91
a5cbb1beddb4acf1063442ff0e6a64dfad818f62
describe
'29413' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPV' 'sip-files00161.pro'
21f941250b3925aa0eba35f636494013
a7fee86073add517cbd932f6ff95d3570cd6602f
describe
'62822' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPW' 'sip-files00162.pro'
303d7b4f63606c362c4987fc60066a09
5f97fc3931f706e03fa2b14ed1b5a42c7041c9ee
'2011-12-20T16:53:44-05:00'
describe
'32180' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPX' 'sip-files00163.pro'
fcc848ecda6656414c1d31d4ee4c05c5
d337117c63c1af5eb2d13262737bb88e012bb536
'2011-12-20T16:51:38-05:00'
describe
'62260' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPY' 'sip-files00164.pro'
e7f3556986e553e79ab3c56e0e6f3c42
d76bb6b6f657539907b0a4494a93a973618b6f65
describe
'60431' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHPZ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
57ba0351f42a0c5d0974d22179efc395
eaf50c8706e04935334bf9314a19aa906df49a55
describe
'31882' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQA' 'sip-files00166.pro'
7c992438d5dcfbde82689a1139ea7869
9c85fe6b5564db4b95357b6b8c0f21efc880307f
'2011-12-20T16:53:47-05:00'
describe
'60134' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQB' 'sip-files00167.pro'
ffcf90319d3d222486d99e8270740f5b
ef4ec2f1cf812061c0b8d3224270ca2cdac49de5
describe
'55040' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQC' 'sip-files00168.pro'
d132a4b61df41b02726a7af42d2751b1
3766aec61f3139516d0b0fb57f3d456d3cf0e806
'2011-12-20T16:53:37-05:00'
describe
'4152' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQD' 'sip-files00170.pro'
629bb367aec0da8044a9a7f92551ea14
813b7f868a8ca1a480a698c6bdbaae60a505af8a
describe
'28855' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQE' 'sip-files00171.pro'
13fa03c12692118b2121ab0b51d97eea
64c8adf451164349820975ea1ddbbb5a4732b3a6
'2011-12-20T16:55:36-05:00'
describe
'61423' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQF' 'sip-files00172.pro'
ea110e07b38837597847df87ed59f9fe
8560143d6b47aef70fa73a564c3711b693f5c9cc
'2011-12-20T16:54:00-05:00'
describe
'29430' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQG' 'sip-files00173.pro'
f48a22b8a49067aec80df89b11326fec
24916bfcadc584a176ffbe453ddecf9911c66eb5
describe
'61194' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQH' 'sip-files00174.pro'
8d282f9f9139282ed1cabb46be64cadf
519d4b72ed13a3b81ff607633fe2a31126cd4e9f
'2011-12-20T16:57:17-05:00'
describe
'59205' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQI' 'sip-files00175.pro'
2f00813359ba760b68c6beed6885d8c6
6ef19eee859d6744659e743a333f5c375d464277
'2011-12-20T16:52:11-05:00'
describe
'60155' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQJ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
89be405c90c679abdb2aa3228e21b82f
ae1e0acb0f0d7774eeb901bcbdb55d7cea7cc6b2
'2011-12-20T16:51:58-05:00'
describe
'63793' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQK' 'sip-files00177.pro'
4cbc292924f93cb9b05b10184634b445
cf500b2d94695035ee1482569d98de403604c852
describe
'45619' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQL' 'sip-files00178.pro'
6f9aa2a203126eef4b395062d49be3ab
a1d46c18519505d6cd4d0163fae9e070a39fff24
describe
'59997' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQM' 'sip-files00179.pro'
1bc0007c2ee299f42685c36fa353cf5b
654472386f6e4ebf27d485a53710ed5e06a9b3a9
describe
'59114' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQN' 'sip-files00180.pro'
b5bf9279d4de2f8b29602f69b7e051f6
55d2a102892cf827a15d5c435ff88dd3a68a364b
'2011-12-20T16:53:30-05:00'
describe
'62027' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQO' 'sip-files00181.pro'
fd8d8db2db223865bfe0c107ecc23f2a
302778c21b4626989f0f6a5b50141fc9738ea4a6
describe
'61325' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQP' 'sip-files00182.pro'
a89337201c451738f591f851f42d2b21
95a2a2d8a11f34a7ec43aa4b4e3795f64c1e8cdc
describe
'43082' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQQ' 'sip-files00183.pro'
e4d846e5294a3e151f8ce7998096d4ef
653021db342130a73a5664a2e78439c9038dde97
describe
'58927' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQR' 'sip-files00184.pro'
6060018a0d5ad1f859390d205af98ccf
8d1c70a56fce2e9f35586e3facdefdfc0ddbf1ec
describe
'61899' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQS' 'sip-files00185.pro'
14b4eab1f1b512ff1bacdd81bbf19d5c
18626a307dfc4f4364297ae27c1fec7c0e56c5ea
'2011-12-20T16:58:08-05:00'
describe
'60016' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQT' 'sip-files00186.pro'
f4c799595bcaa6cd1dd9d5b58acc04ce
884bf675650cf50ab84530b0bfaa2bf73f0c82a8
'2011-12-20T16:53:01-05:00'
describe
'40555' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQU' 'sip-files00187.pro'
9eb28c1bc8dfc74827093bcd2a006eee
b543d2ec46810f57466d218e7240b4c27c151cd7
describe
'61941' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQV' 'sip-files00188.pro'
f6eb9ab7f3d5f8bae558f9686f0081f3
a81e53ae0bb3b03001881b7a9a36f24c0bfd31de
describe
'35958' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQW' 'sip-files00189.pro'
33e68a82e40773a4aac249a63c761274
a168b0d549f3fd6ca051b33fe6e334fdfb4d2284
describe
'22337' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQX' 'sip-files00190.pro'
81953707a3f7c77d41eb8c1dbc1fa92a
080fc14b6c5f5fcab8dd08a13642ff5695681a2e
describe
'62208' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQY' 'sip-files00191.pro'
1d111e9b83e8d74f7ccf1bda87cf50ea
5230074da5576e81e40c37a0f130799b62a71d9e
describe
'30050' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHQZ' 'sip-files00192.pro'
ee2c7ecd0db35c0e5def321a5807a656
9439ef368843ec98f3a883571cf5f66b3c35b27c
describe
'60194' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRA' 'sip-files00193.pro'
d7870d052d84edbca71829c3239e9a2a
c3843ac178b68fdbf0d0df31e5d256771bc37568
describe
'60656' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRB' 'sip-files00194.pro'
8d79ede548a5a91ce111bf43459c1a22
229c686805180e01413f2cc76c020f086d4fc220
describe
'60627' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRC' 'sip-files00195.pro'
f56ab4acbc898e0b1df48b0cf139961d
46a926aeb032a1d08d498f712d257d75735a36b0
'2011-12-20T16:55:55-05:00'
describe
'31411' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRD' 'sip-files00196.pro'
4dca97de5c2decde2986c333d21ccfbd
97550d1ecdc42354c3150b5a54e3975518bf6cbd
'2011-12-20T16:52:53-05:00'
describe
'46342' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRE' 'sip-files00197.pro'
bfa217bdb8fe9a158144f73fe3025a02
ad9b583a28334f4fdbf60c3ddd1759bc606a81d2
describe
'60015' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRF' 'sip-files00198.pro'
75edab2787e7591cf5356525296bfea2
f62235e3c4bdd6aad7e2b0a0a2e3c528fc8fdf44
'2011-12-20T16:54:36-05:00'
describe
'30713' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRG' 'sip-files00199.pro'
48e7df0b21ff9ab73cebf1acc44cb142
d953e8f80bf08099064be3fc6b01df737d81eb90
describe
'60398' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRH' 'sip-files00200.pro'
4cd61f1ba0ca513d2b41f528e8b66529
fbc868d7b0d0a15ad87093e985b3a1b6430a3f0e
'2011-12-20T16:56:45-05:00'
describe
'30514' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRI' 'sip-files00201.pro'
0379ed6d6ce677867c0dfcf8401347b0
17f8f120f21ee0eab2e565eb096ee0af28bca245
'2011-12-20T16:52:59-05:00'
describe
'64120' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRJ' 'sip-files00202.pro'
76366aeed2f20a4a8284e3af156f4f48
345372f926696b8eae4c20a5afd1601306581566
'2011-12-20T16:58:12-05:00'
describe
'44897' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRK' 'sip-files00203.pro'
433e966bdc8caedec1cc4402c8e1252d
9676ac68285dbfc4dea39a4eeaa7242a4fe355b8
describe
'20517' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRL' 'sip-files00204.pro'
467625f7d183671a95f7bcfa6f461e2a
6d2e7fa13144d27621ce7c8902aa4eecdf10c956
describe
'59868' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRM' 'sip-files00205.pro'
a02fd7f31cd6b76813f950c4970625ab
21a36dff3bd79a9102a3bfe5067f5a9f09ea8261
'2011-12-20T16:50:23-05:00'
describe
'61451' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRN' 'sip-files00206.pro'
62c736ddac48f420d7520d5f1e7ca4f8
d5867bf2c212987b9e205565b812e4c003fc3f36
'2011-12-20T16:50:25-05:00'
describe
'61977' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRO' 'sip-files00207.pro'
42b0cdf008137385f845a9aefcdc7a96
93c47bc31ccd70296f5349fb8edd1ec7a4f9b003
describe
'59983' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRP' 'sip-files00208.pro'
297300f259664e7b3f04dadcaadb3fe5
56eeab610efb861d9df6790377d14dfe87799159
describe
'63041' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRQ' 'sip-files00209.pro'
a9b374d14211ad7a324b54d38b61bc69
34460b199deab2afb924ab92a2ef9ed154cf6eb0
describe
'60048' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRR' 'sip-files00210.pro'
8303f79ad31630712e03bdcc95d9866d
1ee835156c171d66aba84f6fffdb5b85ca50e01d
describe
'63751' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRS' 'sip-files00211.pro'
b9301d19f06c1ac415de483ece615e97
9ed1a98fe59dc4f09ad8bb9223e535f9a003e252
describe
'62800' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRT' 'sip-files00212.pro'
bea6ee57ee53ab3d6483befbc5dc7b41
cb29e6ed726a0a64360a77a536fc50d59c102324
'2011-12-20T16:53:10-05:00'
describe
'27300' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRU' 'sip-files00213.pro'
9a620107214416af6c4585d16ce2521e
448118b7abe7944fc1d030169625bac4fcaa780c
describe
'63579' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRV' 'sip-files00214.pro'
87a89ba64faaf5005b82b2b20da520f1
64de7600825ebfda40fc7a4e7d6bdb44a41c526d
describe
'33703' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRW' 'sip-files00215.pro'
cc4afb5e66cd7bde06d79ce6a279136a
67e202f5b2fcc0c7d14c979de94905a62dd97e46
describe
'63293' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRX' 'sip-files00216.pro'
f5babd5ef5430f53f7e93642963a985a
ce90f71c6077c2311d03f05ecbfe3980926382fd
describe
'464' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRY' 'sip-files00222.pro'
faa1063b68e32c38fe628699c9f4486a
34711cbc94bcd8a9c0fe7cfabd10deed079f6085
'2011-12-20T16:57:40-05:00'
describe
'806145' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHRZ' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
88886343a49bbc01d7c26aff8d8723ca
33c5d6ec2f9e97f29df0950362d51179db37f340
'2011-12-20T16:56:52-05:00'
describe
'804307' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSA' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
09227e98dde0cd178459b3b096469318
654c81fa1f7b98713fcde1a73f32c95b4a0da7f7
'2011-12-20T16:57:06-05:00'
describe
'697490' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSB' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
3f9dada31867f8bd795bf03f81330684
baf97c95674cd2fffd9e712e1546e2ba08b8b547
describe
'697992' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSC' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
9f68969faaf4763c33afc766e0535712
9644225dd6ce698652178d39592ffb66bf3a0684
describe
'697831' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSD' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
35527183884c94ff4f01070a87de0046
bfd624823bb1f8c8e6d4875931abd716b3ac4b44
'2011-12-20T16:51:39-05:00'
describe
'698068' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSE' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
e08208a174291cb9840947ca5b189a15
e392660c441ef8cebe0b43fba587596974541fb3
'2011-12-20T16:53:29-05:00'
describe
'697915' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSF' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
a9d633219a255332d87b2d9f5806ac3c
4f49d871793c3147ca6431db61045ca5fc3cbe24
describe
'697901' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSG' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
f37ad379fe242609921193483b2637b0
2c0e87a8c319760b4ce82d8cc50f76feb2f99853
'2011-12-20T16:51:12-05:00'
describe
'698200' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSH' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
d6ccd110ee941f284f3f5b3c15b2d0ad
467cc3cb0225bfe9dd76671b7c80a6897e0d8533
describe
'697932' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSI' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
a2a2b4fbb385d48de2042df403c5ad6d
84ec9520c12bf01a11eba3c70faa9463ef22af0c
'2011-12-20T16:53:27-05:00'
describe
'697952' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSJ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
cc7c0f1ab86ebc63c057138c01fe2134
31681542d1a2f33fc02fd9d50e9929558a110e71
describe
'698175' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSK' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
71797e55d4b9e7178846f5cc665353ce
884991a8ac5f1b56d3c788dce321674f104d8049
describe
'698216' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSL' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
d19ef5c84f1e73c5f46c081b6240102d
28020c1fe280919085df15e1c14a6853074d175f
describe
'697978' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSM' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
fc7ca0ba12cc3d8be7f85502114cfcae
db381c021f696fb0cf2e7b15dd4c4ddf747f96dd
describe
'698231' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSN' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
ae9cba357beed11b5416203e1172bc06
1e791c5647acb5c30391dbd8c5f7bb124f8a1dde
describe
'697985' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSO' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
db3c3085d8f71241d710d62139c44f51
d6488d989fc883c56f2153e97cdee4eea78d5ba1
describe
'697948' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSP' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
ccecf7130e5c4f684a76de8a317bbbe4
3267f34572aca8a5ad2bf4ea6dab1de833f7071c
describe
'698066' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSQ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
9788b86cbe7c108121ff7c29b8e638ba
bf3a8349604ea55d5fe3ea3bb2e9fb17d0a88a1d
describe
'698238' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSR' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
a303d25b743dc2e4197a081c3c959f43
77b61573e6031897eb2d1d812365abbd6e76962d
'2011-12-20T16:54:41-05:00'
describe
'698188' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSS' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
8bb3048d3b7361cd33d43b9bb92757fb
4f272046d012053632b17ebb34d3c8ff790a0893
describe
'698133' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHST' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
343799e44a79eff47f16950fd230abd3
adc8c0b0a22c219a2a31449a15a4165ef54ae851
'2011-12-20T16:51:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSU' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
d2d5aa198496a6e03cd5243fab7aac8b
548c631db71b7792ab8b5c85e47fbd23e8c6b38b
describe
'698144' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSV' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
3ac64f5ceb8b7f01078fef91121b062e
b4f96232a5170aca71417e0c4feb879de3f31ea4
'2011-12-20T16:50:39-05:00'
describe
'697840' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSW' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
843bfb25e29a7519e76e93d2ad515b70
847f6fd4794bb546030b6f4c4aaf7224a9eb4302
'2011-12-20T16:55:49-05:00'
describe
'697986' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSX' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
f33ae91fcea838867b2c4b02924a59ab
71448ef5854a9c302055d9ffac88b4bf7be86f78
'2011-12-20T16:51:25-05:00'
describe
'697808' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSY' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d15536cec8ba246960d74f295154a8be
b02217bc35abc29c29b25ca9c2a350b996481f52
'2011-12-20T16:57:33-05:00'
describe
'697873' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHSZ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
b9f4488e249899c0334b86a552ecb837
2a6a0650631a32f643ce47c873df2758450c3f66
'2011-12-20T16:50:53-05:00'
describe
'697937' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTA' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
8fc0d1a382f31ead43e3ead8d47817f3
ee1987db55cbdade2821f2ebb1746ea88a728aef
describe
'697806' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTB' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
7a7840af814de91cd2278aa1160a00e7
c8d0f0528b722dba7e8d0f3405780127170eecf7
'2011-12-20T16:54:07-05:00'
describe
'697856' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTC' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
675bf3f4e3e1a56284dcac74a90e55f4
db9d3d03b50e91941e6a08d26d5f7c3579bf0687
describe
'697979' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTD' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
8e36737ceba64428fb4284268b18406b
c850561878133971a056e487c1f6c94179cc0413
'2011-12-20T16:54:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTE' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
c2ea2e32a07658823f4121a8b0aedf23
ab63ff493d9d2b6f694645813f68d662e2a0b60f
'2011-12-20T16:50:50-05:00'
describe
'697669' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTF' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
08e0bd6f3ae0f02ff400cffc5c1d4750
87717f2be6eec043edb532bf40a1a0c485e356d9
describe
'697960' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTG' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
f52936c3366545f9fe519022b9fda5e6
8daf36bafe4400f7a08ce714e2a01df71042d2d8
describe
'698206' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTH' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
5b4bfe7d1ce07082e6fdc2993c3af2b7
72e5ad6cdaa78eadd2b6e3c20b0b4b9897f462cb
describe
'697849' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTI' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
cb9e4c24a1062957527246761378b63c
cfab350ee70380086f8ddec2a646975020cfa8a4
describe
'697884' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTJ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
297d0f65c1e55d0fcf46708deb2b3607
0fa9e6b3d459ebf2e6c392815aef38260e4dca4c
describe
'697953' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTK' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
3ad47118c950c1d9a12dd72c40c7c2e1
3c9cb8bea866283a7365db27bccebf783b509ab3
'2011-12-20T16:54:47-05:00'
describe
'698115' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTL' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
81af3b641b843e0d52ab6f0214edcd9c
f1ea2fde3f42d740a29ac914e2979fff4e6385b5
describe
'698193' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTM' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
a7b62496e5e4deca555fd55e568838b5
f167edc3e000d7b09ce82fe1201f211f5b99241d
describe
'698212' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTN' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
10dbfb8a7d6a387553b557600d904cdd
94659f4dae8667b931f82ab650f741c43f8aef01
'2011-12-20T16:51:26-05:00'
describe
'698189' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTO' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
637ce199fc5eac0eefbcaa7ece831a29
bd0483112918a33f672d679279e7d672a7618b24
describe
'698125' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTP' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
0a409722bee6b3f0840cdd46bcfd2346
a623420727d2ffabcb272f4b129d0589822e6a32
'2011-12-20T16:58:09-05:00'
describe
'697963' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTQ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
8b6e1758e1b23fcdb3d163f05efa624c
e558466d81486d3f680cfe412b92b0dd38f7da31
'2011-12-20T16:52:33-05:00'
describe
'698228' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTR' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
d617a0166dc16d14dd377ba72a274555
664868b3cca556bdd631a110c30f4a0d539d3dc9
describe
'698036' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTS' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
773a8b20f7a4ca9baee1b64db7a5a084
e417ef5fcf6c01ee2531d52a91c4bceb5aae6af2
describe
'697902' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTT' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
9ae1242bd55958926d74e2c4089dbc29
436bb217932e23abfa0527d53ff2170c0799fe3a
'2011-12-20T16:50:38-05:00'
describe
'698199' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTU' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
67d0f213b17ce384ab89ca5189e9211e
49cb70f76a4a0909366f718e42b5e12df36331ae
describe
'697777' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTV' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
5e0329c5592501379f4ef0804430c328
433b14fccb4eca30f71faabdb43b863bad72bbac
describe
'698218' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTW' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
66280dd2c3fabf584c326caf731ec205
ef4ffd7c82bc61c35f7f2a3813673e9788ac0509
describe
'697846' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTX' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
98a09b5778ead085d898c80e647feb66
64c04adf9ba9a05b6b86d4ddc5854e86f2597a2c
describe
'697781' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTY' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
8b5fea57ab97f3b9ee92a0fc49408297
cfd5047942847cb9a3bd9b5e02bcdd15ec777f69
describe
'697924' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHTZ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
e62cb8e9ed01297c123c73c0138d8a56
b6c042a9b3759e83702831875b190f5e6d9df62f
describe
'698227' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUA' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
82df8ccd77085ab62eb719165a1b6143
05dff9a29aba4012b6c0e80a5d9674e066bf1b21
'2011-12-20T16:55:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUB' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
891569a007cdb11b9cbaf4e0b6688b39
34d59bb1c3d76342e601d15bdec5a478e86922ea
'2011-12-20T16:55:58-05:00'
describe
'698027' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUC' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
4919ce49c4be98a50fa447206441656c
13c9608714333fd3457c5092526a4cd6c553bc94
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUD' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
378a8e0231f2b13368f7391e2d456172
a05e8adcb4ee4fd7e534397af0a05e1b9632ac09
'2011-12-20T16:56:51-05:00'
describe
'698177' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUE' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
5045052ececf57cf970c38b9e7102e68
532980d36fb822a9f3ae795b3e16f7a40dfd51a2
'2011-12-20T16:50:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUF' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
6364a16eac195610a2b9ff5c02ddf987
ab83f307c2d1a54b4868aa1334a3fbc952615e8a
describe
'697892' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUG' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
f99d0a0523729050232ccf3c52145f72
711f5ad0d32a0544d2f10691d0e21fcc3531c354
describe
'697897' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUH' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
4af76d5ac1a02f70b730305bfad6420f
3050bd2284da2105bdc0915d155828a35693a387
describe
'698166' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUI' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
8688569f5cb55e0cbeac4e10278be90d
dcd75c314891e7ed9085b0d2d3dbd63179c2106a
'2011-12-20T16:51:46-05:00'
describe
'698219' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUJ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
c885ecd7517ba33549d363161974b72f
f9f6decb1b7b2e4a56e073f58d985b578ed04628
'2011-12-20T16:56:23-05:00'
describe
'698184' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUK' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
2e3e886ab05df045662f388db3a94221
565a1cf5cf6b9c1aa78e86e5e72366315d94bc88
'2011-12-20T16:50:16-05:00'
describe
'697780' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUL' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
0d2b803fb40b56bb124de731f6ab9b68
f75e656661ee15263bc12e4d352661d678da6cf2
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUM' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
c6faea1450c231853dd451343655efeb
cc5e610410dd7db0d28d6bdbeae02872a5027cd8
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUN' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
21bb2ef2b769c21a11c247a7e935836b
befeee6a5fdc9b68bdf3b34a11b4daa5596ce669
'2011-12-20T16:51:01-05:00'
describe
'698236' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUO' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
36bef2317145f9e195c8445874212e96
f9212ae2f71d09a868f675febad4ae9ab7bcc0d8
'2011-12-20T16:53:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUP' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
7871ffab800a91e351bb4bdaca3f66ad
4bbceaf7f90b14eebb866a8d807103a9a9b5b224
'2011-12-20T16:58:06-05:00'
describe
'698213' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUQ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
7a004d272f1a351e3d5717715254d0a7
5b0b117413f074d90f7b9447ece3a6428eb4ba77
describe
'697945' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUR' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
2c8fe06a30edc47217d6a7e8b8826651
9d90eccb6eecff2a7ad56b5240a7d065a2ddf292
'2011-12-20T16:53:57-05:00'
describe
'698052' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUS' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
ead315527ba95c9825f00c3b403030ed
91b17878954a6743026d61f7fa2f33b79b7f423b
describe
'698198' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUT' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
46221462e2322abf3ffc050c8a0c28f2
d0daf11dc5c2f2ffc38bff7226a911a0b6566d82
describe
'698207' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUU' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
e8ae66bc4fa2adbdd5d21b2f74b5e93c
16e613e64e5d24dc192449c8be56daa3eb127952
describe
'698162' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUV' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
29511836b1139db4824acf0712b49bdf
3b7faaa9d560041e91bd3dddb29d4c9f6cf8c47c
describe
'698094' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUW' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
76644b0aa338d24314d3b4912ea0a995
0d97f98297e0c671c93c99a1948288071e5975c9
describe
'698155' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUX' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
6322e377bbd3ed641ada51a69b7229f4
045d7fe244d07c6bdaf68f4fa4c7e3791c26536b
'2011-12-20T16:50:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUY' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
9ebb84966950edf4695daf57be94e8c5
bcb68a6c04c5dc37d4cae10089237839e85d1aac
describe
'697984' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHUZ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
7a2618f49011b4f2495ed7014c396bb1
29ba9defe82eed4cb3631dd6a7e336e3cc7f737a
describe
'698201' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVA' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
0bd73d5d6f550e29da036150778a3815
7d16053d1e34db449aaa0ba89d9866ce522f8648
'2011-12-20T16:57:21-05:00'
describe
'698079' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVB' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
8c362fac1544296d0a99c911535a468b
6dc7bc5b591675dfdcead724526dad078ab42390
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVC' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
c4327793702be4a487aaf60ee546e38e
397c93dc48c90970772518e15e99e4b5f21c031d
describe
'697735' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVD' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
1a0b0c6b37be95a15e7d5f466638d250
3b8a05637203380394649cf84d80e478498d2591
'2011-12-20T16:55:34-05:00'
describe
'697980' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVE' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
ea377ec18d04202c354e53fe20561821
8cbf27d9e1873a8788c59a3aa231374a0a351348
'2011-12-20T16:58:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVF' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
589c49a0dcf558b289b84bda408dd92e
8e9c3f3ecdb8b8f0ef7b8cc36164863c384fe60e
'2011-12-20T16:55:13-05:00'
describe
'698215' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVG' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
5ee1979499c1f067079150940e633e87
43d7ff497a21cdf9437abd917ce71add69ab064c
describe
'697962' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVH' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
49b971c9d574da1dcb7f98d1ae741fc5
f7d328ea9110227392bd77bdb4fe4dc543ed7124
'2011-12-20T16:51:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVI' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
5be01db4d9f308df464805a9b7434d3b
6a892a52bfb58661dbf87497a9adb42ad2a075b4
'2011-12-20T16:55:27-05:00'
describe
'698222' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVJ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
bb82b0888be9acbb87eff47c5f59bcdf
abd1450e0e88e9329dbec127f07d4c61a3773431
describe
'697982' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVK' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
03a6c5a04522e4aea86a4e1bd3c1d4b6
88fef84e99ac4b449f608dfffb003018047076b5
describe
'697956' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVL' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
910e74c00d3c84af0408041672517ad1
eaf9496ce13a89d1de1a83b31509d1472514c648
describe
'697938' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVM' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
ffbf6ef418b3b1caf601e84e3b01ace5
10344207cc2ae6c442b068b430e81bfa05fad2ff
describe
'698069' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVN' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
d03a44d9acaa536abcbfd5b7928f87d3
bc62a98ae659b5362d6809eb38a3d199b86e950f
describe
'697850' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVO' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
231b8382851aa66a3da22a0bb956cf7f
12423a9abcb13af7c8cc2a460be4612b3e586172
describe
'697737' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVP' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
7ee2e8194c051c65ab0943cc5bb2c66b
c0345fcf2f803957821d6c88e06501c9cc8d8f48
describe
'697825' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVQ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
802fb9e4e91972d8106ca22101f6dde9
20c239c8823b9b0b29d75abec82696e170f7af5e
'2011-12-20T16:51:40-05:00'
describe
'698112' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVR' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
e777c77cc00c854934bf58109f9aa18c
0d6220f9f094bbf2bc2a838a1404e9d9b0eeae91
'2011-12-20T16:58:01-05:00'
describe
'697928' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVS' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
07bc4de3250e572c9e81a4e1cbf4ea38
449e6099e2fd46bc68826f00034b586f6ca69791
describe
'698234' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVT' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
8ed5377f33610e7b6f878e021b9be001
47d5dfc2899cfab18522d0ad000f20c8cb58fbe1
'2011-12-20T16:56:10-05:00'
describe
'698196' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVU' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
04e60a51cb8fc94e169ff8f791748f6a
aa7afd2c755c08ad739465a346fc21051996488d
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVV' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
627fcffcadffff1cc7d1137899e35deb
3a90b95af0c17c8f02c1714363b80bd1c0bb22f7
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVW' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
6e9c59c1bece8ce813db1cbf72d90c14
4a704b7918e8a64a9666b72e64106a70d01f57fc
describe
'697862' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVX' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
bdb107d98ae317ffb74d5a30089968ab
39d49fbfd767b184a37867609a4bfe944340b19e
'2011-12-20T16:56:47-05:00'
describe
'698041' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVY' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
2c0cede056ee90efec6086c86950cc33
99c3c3751311215f2088ba25af895d0061e7d439
describe
'698223' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHVZ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
d27b1b68f59a4d99b6097ff7948d6464
e46a48e213b3fcbdebd56cc3058ec019879ec5d9
'2011-12-20T16:51:14-05:00'
describe
'698120' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWA' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
1a7ff6d85b5f434f6a33f82aeed7a8ff
ead678896ccd7978aeff4dba95c0a9a1408a9803
'2011-12-20T16:52:41-05:00'
describe
'697961' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWB' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
2f85defcedd4b2decf0b231f0c8f7470
83dc08aa2a5944586ea65f76c615a46dd0c23a08
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWC' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
3ee693243fc7e8081d096e78f9a79ba1
fe876c0423fadf447a3c56d84f15cf4499bbffe1
'2011-12-20T16:54:45-05:00'
describe
'698108' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWD' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
aad5c40afdaeb4691bf19f380c69ea7e
daaa3defd4e5464368c6c03d69c36980d44cb81b
describe
'698226' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWE' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
3103b2db46fc50cbde66659c08715a12
9ceded047e5d7193fbc9aded0b1f76a4851ce7c7
'2011-12-20T16:53:18-05:00'
describe
'698214' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWF' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
de8430d8a257c540dc37ebd302fc56b7
3c8835364b7e354620186f1a796e6f3b1064563f
describe
'698204' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWG' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
de1e0a0eda1732aedd3a64a3136b680a
6ea05f0ac7cc1fa65cd740bdc981ae0b953a00ef
describe
'697771' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWH' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
f94d390310d187197873fd882085eb75
bf078f8937f360d5e9c0a54d95a782828e1cd901
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWI' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
dedf755babb75c56778f6ebbdf34116c
3cc0dc314ba8ca0aa0c48e8e471fe93a6b934aa0
'2011-12-20T16:55:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWJ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
ed5f9e5283933f7b0e02e088560876b1
68c6f2f4744af8a4182ff43846c14a1abfa0db10
describe
'698064' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWK' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
224fc7ec861a2fee757a600a1a9c1f92
7ee4ba93eaafd39ff7246faa58a04b9bc9a34ba2
describe
'698191' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWL' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
48e38c518a863231a9cb9f3544d8a91d
44189f02996a21094d705e0917c32506b15d197d
'2011-12-20T16:54:11-05:00'
describe
'698225' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWM' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
c6b98b35d1293f6d42b8c872c8458df4
5739cda30c63fba993f3c00b72ca89fa0b2943dd
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWN' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
318546c387096624f92b6cdc7b21ac65
b609f11ce3a18d9a92c93416712f4e75b720d828
describe
'698233' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWO' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
45b84e23311206bcb3262a38635a3c26
dd1d6e94151c868b90d616a4f404f98a0f1067a6
'2011-12-20T16:50:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWP' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
6febb0d89c851d29e05d2530b84f4769
c8570b1aa553218d98db7b267e3867995ca901e6
describe
'698235' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWQ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
0cba7ac980cecf3c5806c7bcc88b0d61
85829f6aa632e60cf9cd2963f267950fd241d38e
'2011-12-20T16:52:09-05:00'
describe
'697888' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWR' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
5eb49bf8e5b6c8b6617736e8d5cba4f5
4eb4f524728c8703bf82c735841b39903be6e1a9
describe
'697910' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWS' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
c89bed01f63ed7d34de6c520e5b42eb4
9a9000a7fe46d94f5aeedc114083f3f636b397ca
describe
'697951' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWT' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
80b863d9f5d4dd4f4a9ef0e530eee506
c5623e3272108e0790ba2fd112bf7fcfde426ef7
'2011-12-20T16:57:18-05:00'
describe
'698173' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWU' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
cf4fae1dd0d67bff864a0e356fed46ab
b583766a41a7fca6e4650abd5065757222fa0b66
describe
'697927' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWV' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
1522621fc5e0f68c8f6b5219c0018f26
03209a356c88cb0d6b915472f1d669dc86918729
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWW' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
764b3ac032d9dfe61043ba916dbb47ee
38a15d89358522d661262e0b5a0047e870f9deaf
describe
'698139' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWX' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
28797fd72559e15ea5fd672c2173971c
7cf04284655b161f55372df1168ea2d89ebf745f
'2011-12-20T16:52:13-05:00'
describe
'698131' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWY' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
9e7c2cf818018322a1b853f61b86fc30
cb39fd56c415f6e6192593b5825457db82f6b47c
'2011-12-20T16:50:22-05:00'
describe
'698172' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHWZ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
7625fd506957d0d5f2b724c6d9b06bb6
382f8b5b73ef65e6a7ea1416b56f5eaf165bbd4b
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXA' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
e006174b8802c0d6c947dafaf86c8089
b4e2cced69e1cea8ac04d8864b3ea97e9a69b8a6
describe
'698202' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXB' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
c9511763ccb65d7ad6332318ec1b39fb
121bb0534eb46cac4837bd51c785a2c81f2c3acf
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXC' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
c99b618ca1a73b8eded1e07db074b488
40cdb36e8e8fa660992547b107476d845f10d1b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXD' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
53b7d17b2492266754f1524e8bb8cc16
de79f4589ac2005285689abefcc8d36b81e7ca62
'2011-12-20T16:50:56-05:00'
describe
'698146' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXE' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
56e0ad32c6e485ed281e599bc76c1ba1
16283b58ed6d5f73a9c9e766050189a31a63ca4c
describe
'698205' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXF' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
6e21b5095f3b49da4aa2d1555736ab77
ebf6fa604bbb010704cef1a7b161f3efeba80029
describe
'697768' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXG' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
df580780c8af7bc38e57e21b0faa5f63
10b8dbe07643e23bb1366a017385545efc51981a
'2011-12-20T16:53:11-05:00'
describe
'698224' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXH' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
878cecb3449bf45f3db4814c41c41a65
c9fd703949023225d7e7650de6350747078699dd
'2011-12-20T16:51:57-05:00'
describe
'698123' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXI' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
faeefa6773454fe181dd05108b4708aa
cd6ceaa4618170574cbaa95488471ec43c5582e9
'2011-12-20T16:54:53-05:00'
describe
'698078' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXJ' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
abaafa6b669965f024c3c2a1eac8edee
866c3c42906dfacb7b21b39ea39f37142cd8b74b
'2011-12-20T16:53:49-05:00'
describe
'697809' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXK' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
5c5b3f00519daa6900a3f1caa9a3c36e
e2415c49ab06b838fdee7a293dab638d0c7c64a6
describe
'698029' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXL' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
c87e672d89a26e3e55bcdd70e3ec9ba9
87ecbeecf41230b5d6222827e775688dbfb04efa
'2011-12-20T16:53:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXM' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
819ea10facd8c85e33af568f26b73158
4cd88ac04a6bcb8a1be1f6057b259be752c5f4ff
describe
'698129' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXN' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
11f1b13d0fc6b0e1da337f111c646280
b8fb89bcd9b2572bd78dd9fb44874e9d121306eb
'2011-12-20T16:50:17-05:00'
describe
'698232' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXO' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
e3a6e9b04780e1a0d94e97b79ba707cc
4a8e396e343a1a5e7aa90ede89dcf94372747d6c
describe
'697795' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXP' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
e5dd6a798da18621b53f0d09362af6d0
aef4824c78316628dfcbde3a28321ac54c3183b4
'2011-12-20T16:50:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXQ' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
ece28f45ec5e50a5446343ece0526e94
dec8f62eda2a810af3f016f9be7779dd8bb8d1ce
describe
'697728' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXR' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
77c22245dc1eb0d72aba53abf88b5606
ec98c20854e6f2555efe6280d9f3f537bb1d6fa9
describe
'698025' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXS' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
9855310ce323cf6b13267a97e2079bd0
144e2d66fdb72fb166fb8294ccd90701458e7a74
'2011-12-20T16:56:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXT' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
47c4070cf486414301904d432fd98f3b
7dc44c8baf5909bc49dcc974f52d604c2155c8d1
describe
'698211' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXU' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
1852df00b7db312dcbfe6f9c7cad9a9a
fb4e71da0bb3b7458f98df6c20d0000d9e5a953d
describe
'698071' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXV' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
ca85e6ecdc0ea39a6df85c367eea4b2d
1cd1e94001ff1d56cb5a7dff7e07308af13426f9
describe
'697881' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXW' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
f8de8be3f0c33006fce12194234db7e3
f8a7774fe9cca69c6ab12bb2329bc2f81bb22ef0
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXX' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
1a3850b10b139616e01d6a798ef80e64
b3c7e0b3ea54d1396e19101c4129f1136168a38f
describe
'698229' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXY' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
853cb427a41ceb0a613c39833d83ef40
145546622d5c7a9afd3ad6b3dbdd80a9723daca6
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHXZ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
af6d1dd506a0c49c08f94bd7fbc06fc7
2f3ff98da4b8e903e5664700c2c36b00233620d9
describe
'698109' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYA' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
3e2b06b623d23d8649b9b39536ee9c31
ecf590cdcb491c23e970f4a89e0d78a5e090ddb4
'2011-12-20T16:57:46-05:00'
describe
'697983' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYB' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
f0179dac627638845c8741273f0464d3
ac0364b3dbb13dd69b6891f29cb448bf2cf6bdf9
describe
'698186' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYC' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
1f681a42e9bae200f7dda2caee7fc856
89dfffcf6abb323dd0f5b6623ef612df862c4da8
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYD' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
4db7478a24a309bd18105e83cd85a61b
32b7851a4cbb2157812624266476d1e574ea8e62
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYE' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
c88044ed2fc858a03cb266fcd5ad1f9f
642291322a47d85819da105ce43c0bbb64ccbe1b
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYF' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
03c980047c7835211c4df588aa784e11
82b8dc968d259733eb7bba81aa70a21c5e7aa73e
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYG' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
1b92a518b666e1ca39b942beaeec39f8
f07686abf615ea6c13cd047d10542bcec69a7691
'2011-12-20T16:55:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYH' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
9ff62c6c8b77cf9063f1734f9a1fdacc
bfb50873a9987fe7e55bbf466c9181a6f313543a
describe
'697970' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYI' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
c63e3393e4967f8842e0102b7a609276
7fd04d895318bb313364efcc60688f8ec0715805
'2011-12-20T16:54:15-05:00'
describe
'697853' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYJ' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
4c96119833db26cdfb3e8c10ae49c2dd
0397d875f94b66179e24d1277b59b071ea3dd865
'2011-12-20T16:51:06-05:00'
describe
'698220' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYK' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
860221f4bfd3787869945e6374bfba9f
b33df7ba78477db5b118be4f03047a783e3378ae
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYL' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
588cd7b06b1db82587981e17cf09a2bd
2912b56c72f5bac5db82f9a7fd155cf5b369d818
'2011-12-20T16:56:01-05:00'
describe
'698208' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYM' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
c3fe1d3264ac847c3e5bdfdffd742029
158cb8c2b2c30d6edc2eeaf865d9f439026ff546
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYN' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
5e569de9389e9e67b5478558e0242476
4720472010fb560cea86fb76c9fa8fe414a73359
describe
'698020' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYO' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
0e3453c53ba58df4d39dec0e06b50ae9
b09086f12dbfb2375f964c6acf07cc55f22fdcab
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYP' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
f4483f5b24ef02f863193d5ca0807c60
920accdc079cca316ffbd756d9ef70cfea731b88
describe
'698195' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYQ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
75b48facdfdf7b64149f1152c583e49e
b509498b8d41d74a998cdb66b5c012e4942d6c05
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYR' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
0fb15c27f1f23e104b131e4482528db4
ec2b0ce47394215171d45117e4cd8e779124850d
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYS' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
908814ac6f9f4e613c88e0fcf7d7f92b
c3947cd7dcad4907fda64f88921be9dc9bb52b4d
describe
'698119' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYT' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
15374830e2f2b276de919270a88073ac
df970f81c534f93ce2513f59492db25b99d6e372
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYU' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
09b294fd26642d546bae4291528a5dd6
65983934d2d853f1319077687baf8d8e7096ec67
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYV' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
5561c0007879266becbfe3bb54de26d9
3fe84cba110d37530961fb144a9aaf81471cf73e
'2011-12-20T16:53:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYW' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
1fb099fba974ef7935ddf43080181c85
350257d74580a46d084b8c54665e54ab9e8b189c
describe
'698061' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYX' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
65ad25174b1dd38bbe4dfa4df66eb810
373e6c40a3ee08af7289e2549bc13d5a53ca2688
describe
'697922' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYY' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
08c64ea5c23a9f762d6146420eebb114
47c7daeda9510152444a458784cfa73f993c2103
describe
'698142' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHYZ' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
73b01278fad4e3a55c6738a3178047aa
c750e92739a0590cf55a79e3bd00c94e7e96da87
describe
'697972' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZA' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
fe5b97e1d79e9753353f1965ba44ccd4
4f2973526adb5f5d7d884ab3a6622f3829078df3
describe
'697954' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZB' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
22a09f85345b8300cc292557b8908d0c
8b2325727e8d224d14b349c1035f89b6ea47df41
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZC' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
27479290340b5567edc19f99b7842fce
b7c507c0cf408544b291ceb9292e0fbb48fe9a8a
describe
'697909' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZD' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
96bcf374eed405e98091c0503dd06dc2
3b61cf34d3caff85af453b82a738bbb791ca3507
'2011-12-20T16:57:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZE' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
02f2a311e7512ef379da74f9230d1a8b
86401742b2577b19f0a9b05bd8b1113723c0a8ff
'2011-12-20T16:56:00-05:00'
describe
'698154' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZF' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
ef7f6a724e08e84e59b094d8ca5775ee
8f4afcf86cb686b3e009175ffb4570be08b8ee61
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZG' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
4c4ac57a75dd74883e5ccb2af4652c0f
b008f694f1cd88e0fc3505a9e76a3007d94dbfd1
'2011-12-20T16:56:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZH' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
d6736095a7f5baeada93461c897f7569
a99f002431e7b6a4efb4a2d47a06950f90f6d99a
'2011-12-20T16:51:05-05:00'
describe
'698170' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZI' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
ff2ee57b431a5503eb2241c2ff72523c
a32ebe1ac77f9769e656b5df88d514d54ee1f48e
describe
'697860' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZJ' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
bc20044d7a2975d9a3d5c6644484abab
a706b22c7f06f276e471fc98332b8d3b52ab8ff7
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZK' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
9e97577a609069e646b0dca97d165177
78f10be55f372a7388eb861a8e40e43478dd03ca
describe
'697797' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZL' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
91663156b44011f85ffe698fea065ef2
2acf2f2121b7478c610a0941acd67d797212a935
describe
'697958' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZM' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
b3c9817cec205169da94561d4e1d0607
4edb5ebe48f7319a653d94d4ab86c621edd81356
describe
'698221' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZN' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
177caccb80a50c185cecc20d353ae500
c270c20a500465b94477aa2651fc6f4af135eb49
'2011-12-20T16:55:01-05:00'
describe
'698230' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZO' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
c3b10f577b5ea6050bef34df82bd0493
5e2a1bc12ff7921ee8b2f77db6143597d9d0c593
'2011-12-20T16:56:13-05:00'
describe
'698145' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZP' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
570818686f43f931cc3c5830f4c3402a
a648148ff855ac5a4481538b2f993f87dee5509b
describe
'698194' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZQ' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
d7a76831c8048e4789406db791c28f5b
17e7ef107a8928213df8954e13d33be92f6f1e97
describe
'698030' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZR' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
713562b908e1e5d0da45da58792b9548
91112fcc92d72596b6a9c0ea759737a2bd605bff
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZS' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
25eb31f404d813960a699c023042ea3c
5ec19a1d473b1c884f6b1e17afe4e945a4927474
describe
'698140' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZT' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
d4963030a42d9f7dc191af17f1c541fd
36c02a2024343f4fea5ba865115ae5fa840ff937
describe
'697877' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZU' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
1b15642064c31e618f68b85563035e47
d2f9264d5262c0a27659c127b49ac773282c794a
describe
'698210' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZV' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
ab77c32c2c823c76099a600d662de505
b243bdf17963f8f00b2181b8ddf72324f0a3afe5
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZW' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
f0597493af97b0a8bc2607b3034100f5
e608c493b22111efdbb0f4f2dd84a897ce140c89
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZX' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
5de0448b350f9c280939d577c9144534
e70145593f210c655476f2f8b6a4fbf152a03dc6
'2011-12-20T16:58:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZY' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
e997d3b2f88e2590b53c086a8ce95d7a
9a978ffe6f3428844961d9fed2349f8a8dc6984e
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABHZZ' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
49f8f5e185284ce2490423109958a706
ad463328140e22909f0ed5a40ca4ffea0cfa04f2
describe
'697789' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAA' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
f7283fcd75f5cc3deecb71a730de3d09
1c3fc3563f6d5718cd9d4f0f3ecdc240a3633b4e
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAB' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
f1649b4509c3fbf5241328ca4e3a77c3
71c4031f7cb2981383ecbcae6590ca936efac30a
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAC' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
0cb9e88171b7f9db76a8906299974818
898d6c53302b43e5b87d209c3a8ce4d82ded675c
describe
'802170' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAD' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
d2beda38f2f80a092b506c41958b4eb1
0aa81bb6f296af0e43aef4196964f98219e333d1
'2011-12-20T16:53:46-05:00'
describe
'143177' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAE' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
7e9ca8b33a2d53c42306cfd83150401a
79281255b6f4a8962cec75cf16683eec3350ccb3
describe
'758263' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAF' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
a5cfc214c1ff91aa170a635df5dc16bd
96bb99fb683decf4a9fd5b56c1c85643ad03f7a4
describe
'19369260' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAG' 'sip-files00001.tif'
20e57366608ca362e67b0a7c5edd11f2
23d5e08c865f085f27abc27276a29c7a99f5ec48
'2011-12-20T16:55:21-05:00'
describe
'19329440' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAH' 'sip-files00002.tif'
1b8b51cce71f50f282d4ed95e5eab759
e830b864056e4310ae8aa82c3eafadcd70136a08
describe
'16766504' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAI' 'sip-files00003.tif'
bd8ca3096c98b2acd9ad242527b1adc7
d5d3176a3240c83678b20a963d4782a387d60a7d
'2011-12-20T16:54:40-05:00'
describe
'5602200' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAJ' 'sip-files00004.tif'
ddb371c1adeb95ff425b84d603e73369
4cd6b7b40b4f87b4afad8383511c199d4df992b6
describe
'5600192' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAK' 'sip-files00005.tif'
09d4554817117b2c4c49bbd67e5b0183
e9589d6f1ef0915b79f67946e04a94db3cf914a2
'2011-12-20T16:50:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAL' 'sip-files00006.tif'
fc7ab02fbecb9769b7da8e93b90af14f
ceb1140f561e5c221363e4ed9428ec6dc82148fe
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAM' 'sip-files00007.tif'
bb1107c066bffc582e0acd7f257bf7c3
b27504913f7c652035cc12ddfa31a1bff8009f56
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAN' 'sip-files00008.tif'
c9003242563ecf094af32889fbf83053
2c369c67915759fe94d8de08f89511c7ba9ab100
describe
'5603180' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAO' 'sip-files00009.tif'
d801a7277a0d51e031ca96f2fbd6f4dd
61ddd10d71f4e7f970b27b6bc9c74c26fbe11379
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAP' 'sip-files00010.tif'
228a9994404d9c3387c6a75881a1e010
0af702b867a4266752cabcea4b281b9f9d9c4d71
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAQ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
62596ccc31abc0b6020cd2f39d1a073b
eb9bc84efcfc6ba31f2b14b37262b5f7788f0036
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAR' 'sip-files00012.tif'
9c86d302942faec3ec9fcff72109e4d9
9a03586c2a9f792fdf72d2695a401d9a071989c6
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAS' 'sip-files00013.tif'
cd63ab84dfab6063e00f2090d91561c9
4a75b6e0beebf69da01a19585e1aaddfc62463b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAT' 'sip-files00014.tif'
a6f051f21eeed0c09969b570b71a6e96
771ab6fc085de9de575285b6f6bb9993f42393b2
'2011-12-20T16:50:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAU' 'sip-files00015.tif'
38010fdefea91527181922a238f30f32
6879c5a5d9b47e991015708e954a3a1784bf62bf
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAV' 'sip-files00016.tif'
dc416f8f9d7b1d75611969940f4e01d6
d535a2e1e84c75c1b1b30b3e25bd78766a5a92e4
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAW' 'sip-files00017.tif'
4416d4098ef1d7a6a9146a641dc67fd5
bf45f349b0fde3bf09a00f61c9ab522d7915d0fa
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAX' 'sip-files00018.tif'
2cd5818ca46b53fbf39eee2df290ede2
5dab1433e739ef61a41fd2c021ea656aa52f85fc
'2011-12-20T16:50:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAY' 'sip-files00019.tif'
36b8ea423eeab7505c658b52ce33d9cc
d88a51230dd4c816978404a87e7806cd241f87ae
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIAZ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
936cb1f1d33546ac3bddf26cf6774857
18c6db48d1f2c3ec0232c41df1085d49d573e51a
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBA' 'sip-files00021.tif'
e83272c73ca7aedfea54f9d97b08a961
931a038a7bb64ceb516c8c88f675a423e6c498f1
'2011-12-20T16:51:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBB' 'sip-files00022.tif'
f87e2254a4f0092fa8e556f0a283d8f0
54d0764b236c909b38a1514d0e1f513a8c0e82d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBC' 'sip-files00023.tif'
1d82c13b431b6fbc42ef60764d5ca0e9
14a2561cf3c84d1e657a1960020178dd2b9c8286
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBD' 'sip-files00024.tif'
f816a06dc25e6cef5598b8c41e2cadec
529a725170e06caa21974a46f7be494a13d3d504
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBE' 'sip-files00025.tif'
59a763e42761e823f6ad4160eb9b1bd3
b74119ea26595c0df2876f29e424d5b2f7a70118
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBF' 'sip-files00026.tif'
a1fc261a094638f8c7aa605d9af305eb
807d4fa5d64f3b77767a7cdbb9635c82d477abea
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBG' 'sip-files00027.tif'
640bab9ad73c74dc63b39a5bd4ec8f69
9c08466fbea1d4f08c0e95772e936e4b0b1bf89a
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBH' 'sip-files00028.tif'
cc2dc2551f263b66b97a9de673a03fac
42ccb0d32ef7a817e3b0e0e4cb8698a387dba4b2
describe
'5606740' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBI' 'sip-files00029.tif'
557f62946ec7bf6063ce2ecdcb9b45bd
edc27dade810ba3b1adca0912d12ab8ac62fc909
'2011-12-20T16:50:47-05:00'
describe
'5606392' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBJ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
abf9812815cf8edfcabefd9a150e0436
8bd7338279b9c83dad4128aa3410330242c3724f
'2011-12-20T16:50:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBK' 'sip-files00031.tif'
ac579ffd2eb7194caf7a19844869bddc
aedc6be91d05d03600dbe49cce733bd159f48ffb
'2011-12-20T16:53:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBL' 'sip-files00033.tif'
0660be348394aee846c45f60b1b729ef
4d62620eab18ee3796779cc493a83893f5c2e46a
'2011-12-20T16:52:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBM' 'sip-files00034.tif'
7d211b82ae2b864833e52dbcc831768b
dc55887e225351fef17d0e7a42c9d23e30068617
'2011-12-20T16:57:16-05:00'
describe
'5600184' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBN' 'sip-files00035.tif'
ff9277ce6604023c74505b00d7ef696f
7593328f87b469667822cda3c7953e21d4c9dd9d
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBO' 'sip-files00036.tif'
b6cc74b9060a6c071cedd383d0d420cb
26fbb84f266b4071f29228e4efbe34f265db37b6
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBP' 'sip-files00037.tif'
5e400aeb04b851037ed760e96985ff00
de98f8f7d9652e27ae5c980fec85bfc3294b6c37
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBQ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
0a25b4f3bc4ef33624f3e512e4d89f3e
4a4c6a2c5f0244301fe4f453020d56d630554456
'2011-12-20T16:56:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBR' 'sip-files00039.tif'
10adff3bc222241aaec8f3f6176b2bb6
8b98406bbc9f5c9bf5c3713f9c86c6d25aaae0a2
'2011-12-20T16:53:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBS' 'sip-files00040.tif'
1bea3a0270be14f5c54d51be14c3c8f2
e3bea7094f89439def1a160cf681ea998056e945
'2011-12-20T16:54:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBT' 'sip-files00041.tif'
247bf8d5212cda412951c01ff08a28d9
2a603662d0c50508409a4a75fa73b72ecae4281c
'2011-12-20T16:55:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBU' 'sip-files00042.tif'
eef72a1c1da2228fd0305f5f2f85b380
ee566de4b14f54fae3443b7ce79ed0343e941ad5
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBV' 'sip-files00043.tif'
6beb9f2237603e507f58d23431437302
c0dce6ad168704a463e10cdf08c78093a4ccc975
'2011-12-20T16:52:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBW' 'sip-files00044.tif'
53a77c418eba1cf0782d5c44757ed711
f5a82bbb3358630b0dd2b00560e2c9a1951ba050
'2011-12-20T16:56:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBX' 'sip-files00046.tif'
09b2156f72ad05364066c98aa05275a7
0ddd99f6ee406fb1e3d06564670f306ef9d58f4f
describe
'5608084' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBY' 'sip-files00047.tif'
2b9f045e8e0b529c6db322efa3337065
3a153448a3b60acd98fb74d3725045b2ea86fdf3
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIBZ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
20c156cee33b2b3af8549ad3abf98743
8dcb0d66b12464755a0f99e25ae2dc2fe0b77238
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICA' 'sip-files00049.tif'
467257756e19a49d7c7dca33fd904a76
5b6e0423ff207c40b2ae37f9a4efb097ea8cb463
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICB' 'sip-files00050.tif'
af1168ece263cfed55b211e3413b2296
b8ae152f065b05ea81048e40da811da212721028
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICC' 'sip-files00051.tif'
dcb3edcc5be38144ff008b57168a6aaa
bdae7ec4b99a51aa3ab53ad633995a47e5c55094
'2011-12-20T16:52:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICD' 'sip-files00052.tif'
e25113a3553a148bd77e9167e89a066f
eded600d1552b3cddb89c6d0f0558274231ad4aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICE' 'sip-files00053.tif'
3bb70494c5d3af21765c1f984096193b
8ff455f2c2a89070dfd563fae23111b234767f68
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICF' 'sip-files00054.tif'
561bc871a80ed73eaaeb3f2a82ed5577
47401dcdb1d991f92e75ba71c65cc0c3b182fc9a
'2011-12-20T16:58:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICG' 'sip-files00055.tif'
58bc5ff14e6f9cc97abf9e1b4d0c3809
628d06302dea42c8b4810562426c0ec338238522
'2011-12-20T16:50:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICH' 'sip-files00056.tif'
f9eccfbcf2bec232fe3db1eabbf14492
dc9a5c7c5ca6bbd142c8cf4de4df932d808436ab
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICI' 'sip-files00057.tif'
adb0a6f3c0d8866ecad19a0573514bac
679524a9b6e884d8dd253b4eda6626cf3ca1982c
'2011-12-20T16:55:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICJ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
655f45f4ade49800fa3e9c77eb770951
ffe5ced5b47557e3c0ce778ab8ade126872d5802
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICK' 'sip-files00059.tif'
6832c173273905c3df8e85501b0ea3ed
f809b5f3775d76289f5904b8df94095cf2c239ad
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICL' 'sip-files00060.tif'
0185df5daaf7a0a1b99c718b6fe30eab
4bb93e22f0a50219244c253d6b29007fe038281d
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICM' 'sip-files00061.tif'
79cd28e89fe02e244c8d62f90e394168
2095401f1dc3b90337ff8843bcc789fef4644947
describe
'5606480' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICN' 'sip-files00062.tif'
2690f687918aa7590443c2560b8eb842
5dda357751d74bfacc2895765f2a35ca4093c16f
'2011-12-20T16:54:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICO' 'sip-files00063.tif'
252d966013838f23e3e3611d8be37208
e07f3f7ea9f23968335dc934bd85d924c2dfa67c
'2011-12-20T16:52:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICP' 'sip-files00065.tif'
336e73d70e02344ada5398cae36c8169
728a260f62e4fbc8273f7d2d157daea0604fb749
'2011-12-20T16:57:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICQ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
edd98f65f05446de41371cd93792be7e
cd534dbebfd6ab8d79597d75c25ac384e4e85286
'2011-12-20T16:52:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICR' 'sip-files00067.tif'
c189eacea34cec234bff0e35190ed73e
a76de733ee7775e6668980bec2255c9a305d63e6
'2011-12-20T16:51:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICS' 'sip-files00068.tif'
22ce994f882f07fec3c8290e7a71e4d7
d37ab6ac0a69bcea7fa62eddd03393b641d30332
'2011-12-20T16:57:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICT' 'sip-files00069.tif'
668ae257dd92348d6e7d2e47bbb91331
e15744819d937b31cca25d5708fa09169ec2e384
'2011-12-20T16:53:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICU' 'sip-files00070.tif'
56d628217d8ac73d14ed854465295813
5c1d0ee82fc373baa68d3b8ba587349af9cde8a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICV' 'sip-files00071.tif'
9ad34923b241101e4764f6011e82f19c
2eeb4ff2b2359a58ce7d7d81ba3c3fbefb1335d8
'2011-12-20T16:57:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICW' 'sip-files00072.tif'
1c5c0c512abb21a29e4252c2e2196d27
0150f30e99d053a083f1ae62972d0ff1a14c8222
'2011-12-20T16:53:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICX' 'sip-files00073.tif'
fef9d55941f571404666815e410660c7
f30c2f0a5cb2d578447f5ce218bd27e00902ad96
'2011-12-20T16:51:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICY' 'sip-files00074.tif'
d54319dedf2ba1a39eb8611a0d9eb5af
453ff532d2e7340ff50e705bb4be35ef14ed2411
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABICZ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
6bddb4d15ff01ceb633125b0d6ce71c4
388e54ab6ae997c4b78833e4465faae619264901
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDA' 'sip-files00076.tif'
854781ff87415fe9f2aadb74de565126
b86f6e8563aab527063d90d3e7b67161c605062d
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDB' 'sip-files00077.tif'
f034c16dfe46f8d593643dc10317987c
0d27e2fb2326627da05068d7635be0fd9a18a506
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDC' 'sip-files00078.tif'
7c99267af61d41829ba7578fac1b4273
028f2c538a1feecde8dbabdbf97d4aba526d10c2
describe
'16772528' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDD' 'sip-files00079.tif'
9b6bd9b24d9d0dc3b53ab7b1cad03914
9ad482f27ab7d3492f918f20b7a9d92b0bbe82d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDE' 'sip-files00081.tif'
990c451a2a82fbd08a8380de0d936ef2
67e28dd14ee32b8b14c93c75c34a38bfbd4cc69e
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDF' 'sip-files00082.tif'
8b94106c5a3d09851e46c11f8e28f86d
2e117017c4309b40bbb5279dc0ecc3e11b36f50a
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDG' 'sip-files00083.tif'
5bf63780775d01dc5edfa7f15ce1ff1c
30cfdaedcd5963c7007dbbc6f39f55930af38ac4
'2011-12-20T16:52:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDH' 'sip-files00084.tif'
cd0e49b780417577ed75b9ba7698901a
2b5f33a0ccb50cbeb0b962af9a503cf2af3abcb4
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDI' 'sip-files00085.tif'
a5b62169980c0706df36a10bc5e27a3c
58bbcc785db51775cb5e9d10acf29ca29b227799
'2011-12-20T16:52:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDJ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
db53d3afed08f0417d4acc7057a8b40b
3b51f6d347366c88fd7b8bbde70c90705cc61434
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDK' 'sip-files00087.tif'
d01937c7ca35340c75707d295768ad16
4f7cd3423d3bfd6f364b441dfffd6330c817c40b
'2011-12-20T16:53:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDL' 'sip-files00088.tif'
64102e12a1f07db1d5bb6231747b128c
c9ae1884ba70601704a9d1f030d00e368128bb44
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDM' 'sip-files00089.tif'
86e535e588bea6592db751a8369dcb64
52bc75f7bc6eea7541c5edb9a9a882d762764b45
'2011-12-20T16:52:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDN' 'sip-files00090.tif'
0a0d6dae594ca2d7630d82edca115365
c058b61e6d2fec46f337b0d3d443fa61bb320445
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDO' 'sip-files00091.tif'
54fcfd1b6bc71593c166fe1347e2a64e
5e1131432c559badaf9ccc0d92ddd7a704ac2d8c
'2011-12-20T16:51:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDP' 'sip-files00092.tif'
0dad96fd6ca4568e726627ab596b9ecd
bf7ab72eabce0eb344d0f5f1b4600b23ae9aa3ce
'2011-12-20T16:53:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDQ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
74a0e5af030ed247bc326b65d09171c9
8bf9760f974dbfdeae34e13e88369ccfd53e5e0a
'2011-12-20T16:56:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDR' 'sip-files00094.tif'
bb5e1292f92154fd0ea9d952c9f6ad8b
cbeec1dc79f865294af01498b0872b8b546999d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDS' 'sip-files00095.tif'
ce0e4f03a2d34a0dcc359dbb5526f351
6aa9bd87117b2f6a5633b23f2f0e7ea30de862ad
describe
'5600188' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDT' 'sip-files00096.tif'
0449a2fc88529d7ccc88fd4b06974e3e
bf4819678c3b3895080f95ba2c45e2666eaab6a5
'2011-12-20T16:52:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDU' 'sip-files00097.tif'
c9c611eba25be68f7d5850431a9b225f
f6d5862977a621c477a0e3564743e2ada705bd45
'2011-12-20T16:56:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDV' 'sip-files00098.tif'
b8ccd49e435a712ae727b4a11eb6628f
a3688279c9e2ec40b975b1c458e8ab511b51ec5f
'2011-12-20T16:56:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDW' 'sip-files00099.tif'
dbb8fb9d75f7d64839048b71e66275f0
dc799cc8747e3d8360251b13c8f023f38731db99
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDX' 'sip-files00100.tif'
b936b996074812e96796748cd6e61eb4
bfb152577248df6362719f7967acb7762b2e134a
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDY' 'sip-files00101.tif'
fd554878357cc817a571fa7f4ffa58ef
e6c615904aaea6863232741615eb25582c11dc69
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIDZ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
e49b2643038d30a5a098d4a450bd22a1
f0c08bdebd11066111f1eaa597f0fa5126274f76
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEA' 'sip-files00103.tif'
41b40cd9bdf82856c8988ccf7f99b241
89197e415b72efdb3431643e3a8681d7f0f1df6c
'2011-12-20T16:51:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEB' 'sip-files00104.tif'
a0e1a25d42a3723a44b0ac0f2e49848b
1c945b43253f498c395479dc9b48006d863c2c65
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEC' 'sip-files00105.tif'
b7d9881f0b676a91229adef3e1e2d462
f0c08d01fbf86d6ea005c97c250a2432d9a3c8ce
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIED' 'sip-files00106.tif'
b8747102fc9fa32e5f083cfcf0b2626d
9e163c3323bbeff5d83d5de57beefa4a81f12082
'2011-12-20T16:51:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEE' 'sip-files00107.tif'
5078f98e42c9e77a0041ece6be6b4c2b
c3db1df103d9fd8e79a7d6949d8d03147ff9ed7c
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEF' 'sip-files00108.tif'
79ba98de284aee073fc488ad1a118a61
6a4c051f2f9a80af8d9cab69fcd7df0a6615cf31
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEG' 'sip-files00109.tif'
c0f79ce5f8ed8d8731a81c9ec4791bb2
0802566f68baa8aaf7fdaae90048310a5f694b7f
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEH' 'sip-files00110.tif'
72031a6e8157176ade102d130e69034d
bc159e706229e58f1cd43454034a01ebbc3ef282
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEI' 'sip-files00111.tif'
9ca38ba2d09908a479aa1f92c8c6367f
68d683a352dca8e721bb9aea86d5221ff224429b
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEJ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
642f16bdfb15f2aab87d607292ca1841
7421deb067349fdd0ea85f51dde7c4ce0fb34915
'2011-12-20T16:54:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEK' 'sip-files00113.tif'
e29d747735ac82d3c8d80a5b46ea2ebb
d56386688bad035a7e5bd0a63e57f71194f35672
'2011-12-20T16:52:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEL' 'sip-files00114.tif'
2bca718bb19f914755115f132e30a862
733bd231787034fd171fd68cf7ff609f5450188a
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEM' 'sip-files00115.tif'
9f5743dd263397ce61c28159afce62fc
e26600942f3f6741109fd4495e1ba2fcc8bbb37c
'2011-12-20T16:54:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEN' 'sip-files00116.tif'
851aecedf15a9ef5c93b7038f1362d5b
c585581dc8d498647d1b23830706fb0887ba24df
'2011-12-20T16:55:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEO' 'sip-files00117.tif'
a373d571c2e841076cd8ed888236030b
2df9200907400eebcce37c0b51b14420b2167f59
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEP' 'sip-files00118.tif'
d8e109cc083447c6dde1fdfc2f05d281
fbff29bbb6698cd9fe67f2d8ebbabe39d4235a31
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEQ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
750106d561def0d688a1f49cc59ef329
6e616f36d2dbb8178390334efdf71fb7a740166d
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIER' 'sip-files00120.tif'
a8ebc39fb4589c62cc44960c801342df
bfa370a990e13601e3451151f5263639b8961f6b
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIES' 'sip-files00121.tif'
2909377553fb32630397820ef4acd1a9
6440e6466b7648c7e789452d8a610af6aad29f2b
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIET' 'sip-files00122.tif'
f65faf4b347871ceed4aad5f89364413
4359ac373298bdb728cb90d0d9ae23795bc99983
'2011-12-20T16:55:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEU' 'sip-files00123.tif'
b9d54191834d855b169e70b91e73a48f
cedd66bf6c3809bcfaae2b60657d478277c29f34
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEV' 'sip-files00124.tif'
f54a6447667cf0d0f426f69da6ba7203
19621a902a4ae43577336d5be057b08cb30e1444
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEW' 'sip-files00125.tif'
806e3e575585bda0de8a7d6cbb693363
ca212fe40eb3e38e925bb1cbd887f6aeb2d2c3e2
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEX' 'sip-files00126.tif'
480bfb716b2c3b29e4a77fb10ea91aa4
d02cb5395eb1c80e3f589bc3ef68e04e96cb8bd9
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEY' 'sip-files00127.tif'
bf4556b5c05c25547d4deac329ff7b52
8bdb12aa1d75c7bee67a832db23b50212725558a
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIEZ' 'sip-files00128.tif'
aedddc73928b38855496bb82c9e51cd8
9a7a181df378a1a27557021487d1ca73ac940088
'2011-12-20T16:53:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFA' 'sip-files00129.tif'
871818e6cc1bebfd3ae4122969961fd2
266473fed8defedb1800d15350b22c25b037996a
'2011-12-20T16:52:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFB' 'sip-files00130.tif'
eb8723a1dda134531294cb4f0b77c717
7381f1b3f1d7dc7cf1858b339fced097ba4476a1
'2011-12-20T16:53:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFC' 'sip-files00131.tif'
863c26bbce661e635e54cc9ed7a7a9a6
5842906190cecbf55bf673841aeee88c4a2e12fa
'2011-12-20T16:53:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFD' 'sip-files00132.tif'
8bd28cb83ceb9f2ada34a06e9c506919
cc1ac638dce831096bf3375b944a51084a62feda
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFE' 'sip-files00133.tif'
17264a40269c6b156503f38434dd7952
03f654f4ea9a0d320b6cb7fe3d0c8b888b2c7e1b
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFF' 'sip-files00134.tif'
66d343a4bbceb557703266f2923f724c
d3338f5effbc129073f9300b70d31d75eaff4d52
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFG' 'sip-files00135.tif'
baf54bc792f783dd68277679ca1d8c06
0d89565a6e35e805c48e8e33d7b949b7fe181123
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFH' 'sip-files00136.tif'
76977315e1466520c03df1d5c0822da7
b7bfb61ef82c98ec7e9e3e615008e098d1499091
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFI' 'sip-files00137.tif'
9e374b9edf75b3e39704410e7e484baa
d3d8ec89973e067d7bcfe72db13d05b50b498519
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFJ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
d6c67b27bdef280e0862f69097fdc649
9aeb880855e28a88e1f04dac4b73c92ceec20266
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFK' 'sip-files00139.tif'
e64d2a5f734fbb5f1fdeaabbbe5ee944
0ec7ebfda3d4c13349dec9705545455928d17f16
'2011-12-20T16:54:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFL' 'sip-files00140.tif'
672dd37927313076d62fa503bf92907a
5b8efb9759bbca5325f2db09685a203068ca884e
'2011-12-20T16:54:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFM' 'sip-files00141.tif'
c81b0c10bee62af434522fc10fb8cfa8
d8478734a8b1d47d1726de688f0bde3d58c39539
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFN' 'sip-files00142.tif'
e8b9032b706bb3d4e6f6a4ff11f86886
0864844af06e03418fcdd896b11e6fcfa46d0899
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFO' 'sip-files00143.tif'
2b73a2ca0d2553adf4309adf0cf28b43
412320d2bbc03b95ab898f2ee3a0f2b2c1da4f9c
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFP' 'sip-files00144.tif'
747fa3538df3bcfc10a26f01bbbeff6b
591c8eed197f1824d76cd4861473a70ed9781b1b
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFQ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
3447d8e0b9b4d974a8a3b9dd4a92e8aa
11b8c0a74c409430eb852e8e0476c466413cd22f
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFR' 'sip-files00146.tif'
58ac48a13022b7b7b153071b6150cb1c
ef2263be584f8c39bbd0360cde22b835f627c269
'2011-12-20T16:52:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFS' 'sip-files00147.tif'
c9d1f9ac90207ccb1f65943df98d0736
958101047c7b4ed3fa28f5eb7918bec9e4d931d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFT' 'sip-files00148.tif'
f8cf3e21a6a6d7d68e62264efb55f205
c85d790263e52e0e0a91b042f8c631a69ac75ce8
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFU' 'sip-files00149.tif'
f766f39ea6b61521679d59cc6262a04e
228838caf4bb009fa8e8adae74c6a5dde7b0833e
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFV' 'sip-files00150.tif'
63b9a466ef686bb33780a7907a3a15a9
d06fe73e0ee474d44233d515dc82505a3531afd9
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFW' 'sip-files00151.tif'
e60745ea4f14f537ae841a72ae462ac8
93c46279140cc2b2b30eca70a47f48e6f00d5581
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFX' 'sip-files00152.tif'
d2203e9acb650a991569bb40b4560d54
c5ede31931f48ec0b16e6505c6fe9e484a5c28f3
'2011-12-20T16:52:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFY' 'sip-files00153.tif'
fd7d1d0de64720f07ae78f1fce54db6a
bf7dc19de83b9c909b6e9e02f437b7b3f9aabc73
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIFZ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
37481b65aa1ac06ac1228cb7177928a8
83be752ef02cf9d417ecd34f84af1b5a272d98df
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGA' 'sip-files00155.tif'
e1daa7e7613dae3a96be28ccd5663c48
395aa1dc970c871cd49a646dc55787446de70be5
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGB' 'sip-files00156.tif'
334f070fd04858d57562cbd031d432ff
ba345a33bffe2f8e87bb00ac3ad92bdcd8b6fa7d
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGC' 'sip-files00157.tif'
86c6a9e894a96f7335a234c47c4cd402
a3c717f77f3821330149eba468efc6a8a8757bf4
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGD' 'sip-files00158.tif'
f249c7d3ed4ebb042021f8dd7d1b64c6
14ce60dd43490b9b5fb1163ad4222f6219064811
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGE' 'sip-files00159.tif'
eb462ed3b0797c56447119a3301fbf28
a5c9ae0859ecdf09d8a0f98dfbab388ac8ec263a
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGF' 'sip-files00160.tif'
6919a64ac2b23118d7ff3a03be34ae2a
ff474ddf4bfae8f476f0c5d9a3167a2701f7bfbd
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGG' 'sip-files00161.tif'
7240ae05a03b491bfb7aea1ddeaebd3f
df94e7c8481478f8df39e72946d041bba2ed1d62
'2011-12-20T16:50:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGH' 'sip-files00162.tif'
1231430cb64ab7c2daef4d58e115b188
230191407a518e69bb5669170a6b144dc4c74929
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGI' 'sip-files00163.tif'
599472b292936130c8b11a00a084111a
562857f71593ad6934d84def771df6f74c66ca03
'2011-12-20T16:54:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGJ' 'sip-files00164.tif'
60aa38818d702fce734634d49017ea7a
34da660db14b50e3588a4860218e4521f80febce
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGK' 'sip-files00165.tif'
6efee60bf408c9984c711ddfa2050b46
a8267cffc9b08a68aac4b5ef9f3c58f14a0c8d15
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGL' 'sip-files00166.tif'
8cb5bd4445e39f5de7c2e29fed7a654b
a0faf696835fd1a9ea59e0100b015aa3d720c628
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGM' 'sip-files00167.tif'
3d2d9a037c444669dd3468318a91eb54
a5978ac2aac92d240c82a5f031ba98514f2d378e
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGN' 'sip-files00168.tif'
5f16953f96db4177601807d5cdc49b20
ebcc8cabd0a14533754901a673de5855c1a67eb2
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGO' 'sip-files00170.tif'
9ed48ff19da0a9945ec49a31b05c3c4a
24e817fdf6def6b33b525753ef08a9fc227c7515
'2011-12-20T16:57:02-05:00'
describe
'5601172' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGP' 'sip-files00171.tif'
fb3348514188601282366249faee0b2b
83cdbe23c57b6743c9c25df54df6f5cd8cb5a557
'2011-12-20T16:51:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGQ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
349b3c09ac6c0579bd279a115e020eb8
83c014dd1e529be1238426978660d597a25a93c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGR' 'sip-files00173.tif'
d5ed65c27fa55089f46e9744ae6a0bcc
3d856bd35e2c37e09f237f0e4a054b996316659e
'2011-12-20T16:55:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGS' 'sip-files00174.tif'
585917c440240d0d8a9f1837dfed1265
bf02cdd01f5839365d5190376976587d1736fef6
'2011-12-20T16:54:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGT' 'sip-files00175.tif'
4e567f142ad9326b775db33728184bc0
03f215683fc0e0afad509ce7346e3ab23b47116a
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGU' 'sip-files00176.tif'
170481e06240200571dd20cc014f2079
a95b79f4b06e48a5b4362f4b04745b98e97131f4
'2011-12-20T16:53:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGV' 'sip-files00177.tif'
a96e185146ac830cb7b859d3aed0cec1
25bbcc75914c3b279190b8b7e6d0cc260135aa8f
'2011-12-20T16:55:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGW' 'sip-files00178.tif'
26b0f81bd9cb76bfad1c044df4551bda
55df407a27aa245e1afd5f4c45474a2d927f8113
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGX' 'sip-files00179.tif'
df6ac18b488a408280722909f6fc07a3
9c91b9a541f0a45c567b56de26e8c520430949ea
'2011-12-20T16:52:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGY' 'sip-files00180.tif'
7402d74097b5c05ebf433e9fa926e6d1
e581ca8e724d279c1c233c8c9c88666a607992b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIGZ' 'sip-files00181.tif'
dc283d2e2e1e47c11c32eb01c1489e60
fe3ae04bbd82625d6cf656a08982fbc32b322b00
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHA' 'sip-files00182.tif'
37071f16d6a5572c78c86f27a493ef0d
a43759006d99530b85d2e92883e17c98ecd6b24d
'2011-12-20T16:56:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHB' 'sip-files00183.tif'
dba5def1634d0bc96c20b95caf7c1a8d
28d41ed6871dfe1c3482183f71ab26fc3c9a2243
'2011-12-20T16:55:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHC' 'sip-files00184.tif'
3a50a3e4c7a477079830bf9df2d70bfd
3f2e8f2c5403d080ec2e1601d04600d3cda041e8
'2011-12-20T16:53:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHD' 'sip-files00185.tif'
56a3632874edaaad77bbdbb281f9383c
5c25498efad9e12a35cd462164da5d6f38b99322
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHE' 'sip-files00186.tif'
b3e9cc0653dc52dcaa6e8ee844691f83
636db7d4419ef920a5771f8e68918886321acfe9
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHF' 'sip-files00187.tif'
e63e030c8b451471a633223157b8fb89
58d84f9595448a74b8aef570e1f50f3a5762c639
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHG' 'sip-files00188.tif'
415f8a12496d48cf3d90f124a4277e35
b0c665153148d5ac2c22938069da3069cb85dea3
'2011-12-20T16:54:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHH' 'sip-files00189.tif'
9f46514bfe32aafaff05d009468e6a54
13f40fec6a640f6ee399ae90ade36c58def3f031
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHI' 'sip-files00190.tif'
df6e7bf68b14a457d6775164de3c335e
b7e6a12c28e07818896dc6765fe7ece605084a71
'2011-12-20T16:52:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHJ' 'sip-files00191.tif'
3a15f87b6b96203ef77618e0e70b0536
c8154c0aa9df5e5e11e9c9171b6cf908eddf8e64
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHK' 'sip-files00192.tif'
a97c26330760528953086ecf3a6454d7
0a851215db67805f82eef4445ff860fbece6249b
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHL' 'sip-files00193.tif'
3f5337a45bc17784dd2e237be5d936b6
ad071b3f6f4b28bc0d2dcc7d736473db435f9f8c
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHM' 'sip-files00194.tif'
82ad107633a6eaa352c56fa5212a09e3
44ddb3b4a119899d7574ec08019d6b7c638b8775
'2011-12-20T16:57:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHN' 'sip-files00195.tif'
be2f648bc544f80b8b314c970ae23e11
af52912bac48c31d14bc92a01e1f8860de11791c
describe
'5602196' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHO' 'sip-files00196.tif'
408b6f2046ea1b629af4551aaebc57a5
11875fc52e6d07aa09671d8c29794306b5f62059
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHP' 'sip-files00197.tif'
954c10e3ea5fdd7b40232edb16956a9d
7f8310972828e4e4a3c17e050cb62293e9d05490
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHQ' 'sip-files00198.tif'
6f775317b4b0598944a56b8cbf4abb02
32462c9ed2d6dcd94f673de812b040d56343ed81
'2011-12-20T16:53:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHR' 'sip-files00199.tif'
68f2af5f6b3a305a8795c141c3c9f425
846145ae910a50f3b8894b7d9d072fdd1ea127f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHS' 'sip-files00200.tif'
4c3aca73ae9d0b5a779d2aff59054b71
8e489113904768f17c8ccb55a78d3c738578d5e4
'2011-12-20T16:54:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHT' 'sip-files00201.tif'
31b845f4882df78c7b1a69819b114ce1
f74c100b10a53fa558145185707a195b04d89b3c
'2011-12-20T16:54:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHU' 'sip-files00202.tif'
e965396cafc877fbaa45d6649acd3d9a
c4959af2629cf4aace29c727b244d39de96584bb
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHV' 'sip-files00203.tif'
5708c1d0f65ea96489427dcf094428a5
d17001647e166a86870db2439d17979e1f96a096
'2011-12-20T16:53:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHW' 'sip-files00204.tif'
41350689fc4f1692465570a0ee72553a
d7221f2d387ccc9bd2e612049d65aed6f69eb7f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHX' 'sip-files00205.tif'
1c77ff05cf0ad7f012b4dd362fe4c8fb
5600e6257b6eeef82b6a3dd4ef13b73bdf000e84
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHY' 'sip-files00206.tif'
4a37720876156be8e850935efdc27725
304bb039084a275802436e3d573fa844d68da1c4
'2011-12-20T16:58:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIHZ' 'sip-files00207.tif'
728c4f4ffbaebf378673c371e5a48100
b9f09a7ebc98fe8a6d67ef7a783f09e33fa7adc6
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIA' 'sip-files00208.tif'
20a68436e31a41816fc28f985c62e242
a61ade3461d6ad7a1c87308930951dfe5545a677
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIB' 'sip-files00209.tif'
aae71f138cb0af709e0895fe41713ee0
54895e4f9a41ded93c8969297016d9ef731022f9
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIC' 'sip-files00210.tif'
9e7b97d9c7862b50505a3cb7aaff5e2c
128ea71b56e6dd5ab23b6e21d9b0f84a2e7b97fa
'2011-12-20T16:52:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIID' 'sip-files00211.tif'
15be2fc20e8218b10e0e053b58256388
efa054901c65f1946a921b6955b7d3e06c0249f6
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIE' 'sip-files00212.tif'
7f18df1e1f884f02090fd7539f400d9a
17c59442529c5088ffef3fb1acdeaba277bfaea7
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIF' 'sip-files00213.tif'
27ecb23abed238c6764c350beb8756b9
3a4fdbe19c06122a7ede95b63a3f9578334f5c5a
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIG' 'sip-files00214.tif'
5d0d160276ce15c4871198b17967e6a3
dbc11bb6e6bd3021024cd12ddfde7f0206cdc508
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIH' 'sip-files00215.tif'
526909a5ddcc56d9861e20816508f96a
e8f91f0447551aa6c4e0f964d143ee0a156486e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIII' 'sip-files00216.tif'
1099487a2eade3e211cc5ac6bc0cbf96
0f3b9c10dded334a14ca68d12da2a5a78a673f77
'2011-12-20T16:50:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIJ' 'sip-files00220.tif'
6c7a430c984a83739926b6028d3bc6a6
a05162a15980575f1208d8a46103dc16124fd50b
'2011-12-20T16:57:54-05:00'
describe
'19271780' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIK' 'sip-files00221.tif'
01336f2f651298d2ea99fe7dff433a50
28d4b41e251ab503f6654b84ca7a7e17fed61f9d
describe
'3454432' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIL' 'sip-files00222.tif'
20f4aeb2aa90c1f9236a0acb701f54ec
3d7d1495687fe7a5806186aa810a8caaf24dfea4
describe
'18215416' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIM' 'sip-files00224.tif'
4be9352dbd334c77e9bb880e0660ec2c
f2f51a00cee1f5399ce2194910d05e436e2f8756
describe
'201886' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIN' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
7cd50a933df0d1b7c19ff0f5d6657138
3a5f68f4e61099e7cca2837325c40d24c581713e
describe
'177300' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIO' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
8e673c8f35c62ed22f3aae756853e282
9a60f1f9819f849d9a56b7e1cbd0240658cee87d
describe
'171902' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIP' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
b3b0119887e7bdde45b077b3164e829c
1d95de57092f5d6210ac11bc1c58b740f31dc242
describe
'58062' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIQ' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
0ca8286c7480a23b64703c8812e39a1f
cfa10621636a2bcd804d58fbb9161778d2fa1c14
describe
'68852' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIR' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
9d32328575c51762015124fa44efd6d4
a69049d02898318101a4767d61c6f3beba0c2647
'2011-12-20T16:51:13-05:00'
describe
'61373' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIS' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
3cbec0ad49f980cabe2895393a65bdaf
94e14b9d2d8db99f7df243c3dd8020fc76cbd0eb
describe
'70595' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIT' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
e4f6fef6f45abdfef191fde1bb4c8629
2882a3e073ebb47f880abbaa6caa7e36eccbe307
describe
'173937' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIU' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
64ffa9032cf7655e614892965523ba4b
fb11c776976276116f6fe286dc4581afa2dc93fc
describe
'132898' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIV' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
ed31a3fedfc19d92d806c0902e618d10
1ce56c63bf2bad7b4aacf022e9c2a69dd25f2587
'2011-12-20T16:56:42-05:00'
describe
'67365' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIW' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
e72ca6194fbc1b4b634b7d17f8839c6e
00e2a624aaf95b207fe53480e3c82e05729d0c56
'2011-12-20T16:56:33-05:00'
describe
'128026' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIX' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
2fc1cfa2bb13a32c7fa2d6a13285fbec
6839a5893099255aae356271d45575ca7c12754f
describe
'126874' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIY' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
37430929c20be9759fa1faef7145008f
9be7c7d1f6459fc6f539b0b827ad8559cfee2b11
describe
'180567' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIIZ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
b63b80c8a8173af905afccc426f3c5dc
2f28227112d16973b71f44c8d4000be56f2e76a7
'2011-12-20T16:50:32-05:00'
describe
'79591' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJA' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
f754929ea17e8be3a0698076479aca53
0ed3713543f920e3a362b061ce8849c4ccbce51d
describe
'155053' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJB' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
dc9a85b86d41aa662e7aacb9c41d157c
684b9e15b68ea5e2764fe01fae7261ecff312f3c
describe
'201551' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJC' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
4491c7d47119f831d5dada859b086d4c
33b63d753bb368498bbc3444e35b94a31961ba47
describe
'162160' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJD' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
8396e8cb9e3386c4da92d23551ddbe1d
aba60e20987f688be88be8cbaba8eca546c1ca79
describe
'200701' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJE' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
c9224e0ecc0bb2e0a806562acbc8f630
2ff1730036b8dea930ee174210d929bb22d18798
describe
'154456' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJF' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
2f6d51d091b9386b1064b820140b1059
6459cefff944e03d3c1fcad81d9c96d5ed79f25a
describe
'203974' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJG' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
36771ba1872a1e06cda28685e1c601ce
fc3e7df61fcd6e44f77a03540c78170800f29ef9
'2011-12-20T16:57:55-05:00'
describe
'197409' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJH' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
929d2bbe2ab8df9a7f96382a48e5bd2b
837f96c98f22be22afbac18d790166c68c29bcdd
describe
'174381' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJI' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
3bc6d5a9937d76904584e6114f5d9f67
33f857de7b9b36fd1bba650ff70eee820128da72
describe
'205147' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJJ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
87cdf7b36d0da6704e4cd4bb9d1e286a
152a57aef9a8e557ebd8b49fd5cb77aa6b71b358
describe
'188792' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJK' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
4ce4313d63696b88752b820e13f8239a
13763369fd8c4440af07e853276c7d7f7738b5a8
describe
'209110' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJL' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
15314073cc4322045f05218e0cb61d39
f012e43c69b0fa3e907d18cef32365b3324d3265
describe
'170006' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJM' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
50bae7ac34042779a77de1e6931d4240
2088ee5547a21403a409fcf26a31273d5906fa28
'2011-12-20T16:51:49-05:00'
describe
'209421' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJN' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
a6991bd31ad265dd5e5aee159f278b68
5a5602efc1dace78d73e44d2f5ed6b42d9b1059e
describe
'194875' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJO' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
eeaebeee94f829ce9048e672719914ec
ef060e924264db57ada4160dafab92585b195e90
describe
'211520' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJP' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
0171da617bb5b95ee2ee014ea75acdb6
1c0ed827881c1b8a40d5c7e88d71766e7c24e87f
describe
'176159' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJQ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
63d9f4019c8946dbdd5a1a7c4951567d
a88771edd322b1bc7a9936d7cbffda60879f6ebf
describe
'172856' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJR' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
5acf0ea8189b771a989049c599dfae05
89bdfd55f189ef7375d9b594462c07fe1942693e
describe
'171767' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJS' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
79633051c91955c703062763b0137275
f46c571272cc1923dff094f45622da49487e6664
describe
'185413' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJT' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
70b7810624681752bcdb0d3ef6b15949
6d2bdeec5b23bf0c254fb426fe6430acb3d547f2
describe
'202256' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJU' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
6d95c0b23f2158f766031adde471ba6a
a933cbd54f84c689fb7a3c34628cfcebf0916ab5
'2011-12-20T16:52:05-05:00'
describe
'167816' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJV' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
c15749e922a997aeb0904146aaedbcbe
718f575b395cd6db3713c8d6b0e429cfb7fbb605
describe
'208594' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJW' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
b799506c2d131035459ebad5d8edbfbe
6f74d0a21cfb867f0f385bfa53e81416e805407a
describe
'173448' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJX' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
bd1b8ade9315ed1b79329a611167552b
375f03c7fd25b49de60f70f0cfbb9fe4ed68b068
describe
'200858' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJY' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
e77f51a7eecefa51c215a80b75436d74
5fdeff8b7f94105da12c1aeec207810a57c15735
'2011-12-20T16:51:03-05:00'
describe
'201609' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIJZ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
ab8b11169e2e975b048cdf4129678510
e78660d9f044738bc967f7a1492b9ff5c5b2c39e
describe
'174936' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKA' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
c63b47e7763127d39ecdd29066a8061a
eceea5b8a669be7b0d3411c562a7225f30f8e75c
describe
'200880' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKB' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
afaa3e34f5315c0996bb873defe787b0
1897340f675d700e7f20906258d82f9addd73473
describe
'180852' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKC' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
eb031483373f9f351a336120899494ca
301a6aa1f73232ea4b6341d4882f548602f7dbec
describe
'114293' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKD' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
920141440e5f2818e68cdf7db27c6a13
8e0bda28153103e4b66ca9c948d22649ef4c9698
'2011-12-20T16:57:35-05:00'
describe
'172581' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKE' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
8eea160974d4d1306932143bd9394433
9fec3c4329b57cad8499c3e6ab11b9742d0ba26f
'2011-12-20T16:51:36-05:00'
describe
'152582' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKF' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
a24b4fc7386b26664c4ff2ff04036dfb
df99542c6565c305f697b333751b70c58e54bd83
describe
'204942' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKG' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
6a787b21beaec8044ba8c68f57a30481
5e83da44ef3e9036ce5401ec247512db09232b75
describe
'210742' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKH' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
a4823dbc4b9ca5041ef608da8dda3e0d
6210b85412715f887e6da69c2d547c7518ab444b
describe
'177411' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKI' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
5cf88bb659a96a275c6ad4856705e37c
19a8ad29582fbd27fb4967e17f03e78964b6f0a4
describe
'179061' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKJ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
eb0132ed92dfdd7e178e2efb87068278
19c27e5351a623d8bf2f41fbbb04a0d785b2bf9b
describe
'208835' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKK' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
ec8c9d013de99a55a2d78275c9de66fd
087667d5d80385db767f529843d41aa5293b1ea6
describe
'182403' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKL' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
c519614f77899049f24ccd48b7947a96
a4279d5576e1b3685cedd91b2e5a1ef4a5686485
describe
'194587' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKM' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
9a4382d4adbc36acac4c67c631d0e078
f0a5e191f2afbb0bc1d8511162e6d42ec1009f1e
describe
'169024' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKN' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
ae469e21e5d9866c7eeaf4c8bae50809
91324f143cc7d5b736edf4f94d3bbb8e81da466f
describe
'188037' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKO' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
da7f582dc9ad9c3240dd2ba84c15310d
1d83305a54e1f948ea16fc9014a5a3d34b2640dc
describe
'207494' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
79a0c2bf721b9f50acd90a0d5913090b
8c412c99b5343245dfbf4fe8af5a6b38cca83570
describe
'176861' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKQ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
d6b1455ef233386c483c757343f4d221
ee16a437782dc3e19ae67c85c9c005e8bf649f33
describe
'169911' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKR' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
86bbdee81cfb959717d92a7d4ffa9c67
63a53774995a0c05e55eb0753d49e2872869b01c
describe
'205212' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKS' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
0fa44bc1420c219d40ddf32400266ea0
8912570a2bb03c8910a6923af1ab4b87e9431d58
describe
'140635' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKT' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
22839c4c491486d6b0e36aef190d934c
30a988248ae54bb4998e5dd7dad3d3fa9f22747d
describe
'168050' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKU' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
6df8e88aae3d597b469635d89afe3526
871df7d82d0fc5b991a2cfcb7789d8b9975b1a35
describe
'183218' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKV' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
6bbe5a3b28d234a8d40bf2856f6480e8
5f6eeff70aeafac89b6e948ab23f9ff25f756f3f
describe
'152090' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKW' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
60e97dccb1c0c1b2aa1ac5b86b5b34ce
69a4c6917636ee26c30292e79fa87df8b36705fa
describe
'202978' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKX' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
fd90876d9e7b32ce6c37e7f6845af86c
b350ea130c4c3c5b38781d69dea5ae6c83f92712
describe
'184238' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKY' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
f29fa4516ba5f9a3de42c73638fdf194
7c729ccd6609419bbf6051acdd89a2aeb7be829b
describe
'194403' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIKZ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
cd510cb04e7ff799a273051eeb095b5a
c8b6b913a7dd06fef14631d9e1c7d72117b3d754
describe
'164180' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILA' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
535da99d58d047ea61f17f6ac9336294
cc237be8a5e47e2e4226f1b443174135cbe43371
describe
'210428' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILB' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
8c5168ff6fa2efc758f910d687a36e49
d7330755537fab2d62986a7af8e0abfdb9bdbe35
describe
'171170' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILC' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
93de30fbfaab0247249a2fd894fc54e4
b972fd2ecb00a9b31da3a2e095daa58c1a8cd99f
describe
'198958' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILD' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
2280dddf3248e6fafc93c0cab5d9cdcd
f04a8fc65448218d0e0c26cfc84932824140cbbf
describe
'154489' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILE' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
019e75a2536ed2a4ab9c50254213aa70
03c7aeb6511f878caada51ec8dbd9b22e4247d6d
describe
'208601' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILF' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
2c92b4049b5daaa3953fa1e202b6381e
efef2e5b8499a6a56dd836338f79a48070c2cc31
'2011-12-20T16:50:36-05:00'
describe
'195970' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILG' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
f2509c5a9f7ec97b69c20ee4c6364f71
30d1c049ba717e19381327d8173bdcbf821e5809
describe
'174712' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILH' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
afd7bdd7a931fc87d7b29eb144a193b1
14b0ca7864ae9ac59c0a17f1b9e129e8f265b921
describe
'122211' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILI' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
a8ff8aab37e3be882fadda935345614a
8673814534cf153c332fad6dbd20d32d53e2e9c6
describe
'167231' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILJ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
9d8c56a85acfd90e03fc9bef727c2714
49aae24499f74ceea0d50024b9eff95c0d79a87c
describe
'183464' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILK' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
2e5ec4f9aa5eda2c056fe32826fd447b
754612cd78a273a24468053a92c8ba9deb99dfac
describe
'203370' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILL' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
3cf70afc0c41d8d5a12a5204575b5bc3
6a31622c86c889c338060347228b9f9d866210d8
describe
'160862' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILM' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
8abada61a96ea3c82fe1feac55fd36b5
c84dfde429f2c7a3730262072995bb32dbfcd44a
describe
'183109' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILN' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
0a651dcfded8665286366e05c1e1d529
3737e588d2d52bd2a3148a8ff825241c388eafe9
describe
'175168' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILO' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
b0fbb61d546de8d0dd334d828639ce12
7f924b376e076e33bcd5f419141e04f99966d8fe
describe
'209907' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILP' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
eaf3b333f743217322cd3ed592bf966e
e8814fb54cc520a20ebaf5e1a5a270f073c98192
describe
'159277' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILQ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
d0275526ec19ca7a34887458009839da
5c3c8d643a0720fc92d47c452cdfb7b4ca39359c
describe
'197122' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILR' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
eaec9b0f90ce4d80049f0a66673ad698
8bd0c9145a5e68266ce2eeb414664ca2d47f97ab
describe
'196084' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILS' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
e60bf6238b8469ce96e7420541075cef
25a0f95a9636b749da08121317efdead7ae4a403
describe
'149045' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILT' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
5c7e326d32638bbc03cf5e61372b2bd1
9ce273c0778eac9942dd3917ae0175812e9daf36
describe
'199065' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILU' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
e3a8c8eac8e5c1a146068a6c75ca0224
ef5ebb3f65aa0f98094938db5f5856259be56c38
describe
'209992' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILV' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
311bc6e3cc5105a125a7df249548d02e
8831b898856f55661a250e715bfc9ffece09c00a
describe
'155420' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILW' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
8a025ccf7360a2179acfbe267115fe3f
ea32e4fe505ed21330928988862b99d09ee2499f
describe
'183908' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILX' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
dc87a055396450db83b406153c01e386
767251018fe1014e9f9ba2a24377bb42192ab6a7
describe
'192828' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILY' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
a79fc1a2c94970a049efe288601623a2
1792f2e9583ecdbd34a770ec979a283b37f13130
describe
'165585' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABILZ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
2821acb75171f6bc32d04dff233db1ab
a1ba9eb82060108948d807beeccfd700a3bbefbb
describe
'169447' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMA' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
3456316903e5fd18ab1f9f024ce7710d
eca037458173504e2afbbfca0f4913643c0db759
describe
'205519' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMB' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
8a23e7863742fa00c080ae4d0907a42c
c20465fec91acde501f395469f155491468d497e
describe
'211617' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMC' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
2a5686f8d2ae6b6b851e68789a3ae981
0bbb5b5f50f7ab957faba087fe85ab34af9aea88
describe
'175965' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMD' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
ebe7fae976c8516794583b431f350bbe
dc9eaeb5e58cb3e5f2d5efd9c1a63e3962c7adcf
describe
'205384' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIME' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
60b0316c7cb550ecd78289844db6d8ff
8537e1914d764ece796ec00b11bce9c4ed9618cc
describe
'208732' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMF' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
b740c85f655376a03a5e1dec362b25d6
d368a6d30a685a16e40acf4f995efe6ecdfe8824
'2011-12-20T16:53:02-05:00'
describe
'174327' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMG' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
40b6e3c02f195646951e46b3f142f6ac
8b114607718a8c5faa6759ce704993d0bfb38a93
describe
'209522' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMH' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
2d7c8223deffaadc818e49b79de4ec09
ab4481b0d7fcd907c17d3f0062c0d97c18f27874
describe
'209133' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMI' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
6528fbeab4e025b8a50a4eba6ce87b11
5b24d1cc4745fe6bb50f32c9122312ae0ef12089
describe
'206049' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMJ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
ab7c3d030cc1b9d425a2b04964f7e811
92657b00a930adf903fcd1f3fd0e563135278d7f
describe
'206397' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMK' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
5ac068cff223dbd57ba214ef1f679dd7
9a09f3a9f95d44e827ec334ab3d7297481ce8e17
describe
'199933' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIML' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
17b1f9ee46da2b727962473678c8af10
856fb3442ec8ea633a3d403566f0edf191725638
describe
'203507' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMM' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
0aca3c7f46ae6c433776ec912d881751
7dcf862c986c6e4b2dad349683c420279eb2cc96
describe
'204394' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMN' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
7faf5d3e3adc3f4625ca079b56bdd28f
d7e1369f05c0f9a408e5056f2443c95332c8b8f2
describe
'206801' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMO' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
0c9fa5da809aa8c80dc4cd3b708c9d68
4a3856f1820306904af5ab65a5bab1b9a9aa3052
describe
'205546' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMP' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
bcaf2c5e2831bc58a39fd2fb67c800f9
9196cc99c6b51cb0478d54149589ddfe5630f46b
describe
'174238' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMQ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
2d6d4d3c060238773ee108981e5a74e3
fa866e33f356bbd72795946ecd9b2b8e34678473
describe
'202798' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMR' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
90b7a7fc2015b31cceee769793727d71
b2f73cb45b1246e6d93d2a971d5121710691c534
describe
'203058' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMS' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
b57fec950fd9948c5fbb755af7b27e30
f1096ca557f6db5b0a012c980b21ae0d0816ea25
describe
'188313' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMT' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
b0f601f49b002c3a1d252d40a35f928d
660d32e98da4d37757c96167739a62c008b1b4d7
'2011-12-20T16:52:42-05:00'
describe
'203416' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMU' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
cfb9de87be1c4949bff937b6be61d453
e0052dc5e8823fd4193152221b878632f870698a
describe
'192849' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMV' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
983b78d2e565ddb4e616d4c2ab94a507
6ea920b644cac777524c025300ccbf80250b08cd
describe
'163238' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMW' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
a3076fe2a8a0f0c8bf26e9689471a036
dc4b7dac1bf19b0b675055f9b0d8cb1fde4c8f54
describe
'210221' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMX' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
10d439292e267e2189f0051f0c798fcd
ffc8549fea4b3e800d1ae4f86b5a05bef424599d
'2011-12-20T16:56:26-05:00'
describe
'210380' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMY' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
9a9b7d972d2fc1bbfaa1264aa18dccc5
3102e7d9777f2e8c9c8a97d6a0a94f73c21a2767
describe
'187499' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIMZ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
3d92f1066506df10aa77ae8924edce6b
a0b1350931be7b3138397d82bcf28e713ed5fdef
describe
'180464' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINA' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
4a94c73d16e7bad721477c9c0a346a46
2a477b56895fed7736db2a031bcef1c71dfcf7e0
describe
'214248' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINB' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
6293c92c02d880ee4ed8907d8532f75a
87a5b410a09a626a49d3b130f066b00745feef7c
describe
'211620' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINC' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
867ef59ee7b576fd97cd18ff295ed44e
27f4be8f12fc02f31dbdf2653302749d85c0f515
describe
'212251' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIND' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
91627c94b9ed0b6dd8f213b482110643
9a2613a275c390556845f5b5adf2d635faa8e758
describe
'177276' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINE' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
2bd93f9557edd23adb7fef9469ccf591
6b9daa5553964218af9f241fad4f98c9e9532882
describe
'204843' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINF' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
c26b814e524002d543ab21f7214c3ef7
b7426274dbf0fd7fd77c2e20dd72d7e76b60d252
describe
'203189' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABING' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
1a5f8e9b1ff4541b102c91264186f322
7eb952f642c0edad33f4faeb14c67f327d41203d
describe
'207247' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINH' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
5bbb66a18ca5e7c79f00b627fa913baa
81d721f3b253dee18303723cb33575ce3628ac5b
describe
'204186' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINI' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
14fcad3f8b2c0fb4b6f82c57ccbabdb9
4a1210a678840d3deb2f5fba9b7dbbca98e0f438
describe
'205238' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINJ' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
2a7beb6ed3aa933862a096b7535b3877
0001699d2712f54c20464b1c7f26fd2af82381f0
describe
'206262' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINK' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
aeaeee4e7f182bbb849d17a996ede942
fe8e94cba1415c8e46fa89a16a6bc06ddd841c62
describe
'215607' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINL' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
d3c66e4bd6257e5635bb3d0a66486f97
41a3268c5db5c9c3861d17c1ff8801afc70e81c8
describe
'194692' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINM' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
18f6fa1767c1901c763a8b5be7daad49
9be9b0c722bc909498571bf7b39e352eab4b2f78
describe
'208361' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINN' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
7d79cb682e8594de816a762b13d99757
d5d380e41c22b5de11b834168a9ab326b6065ec6
describe
'202915' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINO' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
b4b1c24d8c2042524fffa5f387f14049
7e6e8450fc975f91fc61a8316ea607934d640122
describe
'202478' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINP' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
de4a7ea15512a2f24498d9bf33ff7120
bc01bfdb3737be07c872fffd861b01c620f50134
describe
'190455' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINQ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
734bbe6bc2559ef00b6930ad9b006574
933937f8dc742996185610cc37f737a4a3b93fe3
describe
'165681' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINR' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
8ed4de63b5c66f4a43bad06af5896dc2
1aa48399e99a5d35bd476aab67cc597e9a3ef65e
describe
'207815' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINS' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
6ad3df66a5b4ad91c925a08c78a4076a
80bbddc7fd09911e508e9d6937d50ce741457202
describe
'208900' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINT' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
677da17e64a06429b160f80a48f0122c
7e5e2924075ed3c07f91dd97a6041f53c9199d3f
describe
'203702' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINU' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
19d91fcc4394f16ee6e09949360ddb72
0617cf5a5a999b17608d4cbc07c61f90fa059130
describe
'188004' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINV' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
9ca3937a66fd62f29da20e0787798ffe
a33fd8aaf0202d591195b23860905c3935dad564
describe
'205390' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINW' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
eae187fa49ccf89a7304eaad8b5a98c4
208d5f3fbb00880fd54c169f5336361a109daeaa
describe
'205012' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINX' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
06ee8bdcf87823aaa6cb1866e6ac6b8e
cbf34cd372076f60fea55d62c84914251f9b6824
describe
'206145' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINY' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
5ea2ebe08fed0032fc8b2ff195ad5311
adcb35ed91a10b1a2777f919b38f87aaf389d31e
describe
'182012' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABINZ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
50381fded2839b271f03696b8202a00c
17756a2e03675d57975e14a93fdabb1e09882b35
describe
'207984' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOA' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
b6b6cf39585fefd88c31af0fec1627cc
6c0f502c8bb82895070e511363c496a1442e5a86
describe
'179783' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOB' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
9e93e6686f80da34636ca1192f08752e
87201fb5b642bddf4d6be05424f7d5b2e9862ef4
describe
'205439' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOC' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
3cfbf1108693227b56d0dc8bd07bf79b
cbad28d9a2664638977ee8e1f321ac3209d7f11f
describe
'207004' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOD' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
4998c8b1911201fcdb2e4d85a4ccb5b0
8a963cd0ad9df3ffb94f332b5be0e4cc503ea588
describe
'166346' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOE' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
21809ab30b348a104d7fd9d1f61dec78
bf9de226a997790b2ccb3d6ac48595253566e763
describe
'172803' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOF' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
500a9f47f38daed30896a4c96cf0480e
ecf6b958e21f7aa769c8a3125d50516975f2b920
describe
'204043' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOG' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
2190a5d070735d6130d13bbdf3d106b5
e49a8b4cb202f4f681ff5e8234e55fcc424c459f
describe
'209252' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOH' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
6e2a6cdb20f0f9e53b182ae132ed1964
a6d8405df66230e995d9cb8bf4b771e98002f7a7
describe
'207900' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOI' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
4ead3806d4a811af46d98c4bf3500488
e91e74a1459dbf750887f774362901bebab6661a
describe
'206652' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOJ' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
59bd4cd0e86f8f8ade48ccf597d45736
806b118867fe63389278c1221982d92838413bec
describe
'203504' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOK' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
3443469bccca84da6681863696b8207e
5de7571a36aa985c04e8c610ab6d5810a0c55dd7
describe
'206727' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOL' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
0c11114c4703599c77fc306cfaa3ad6a
cff70056ba16446512d1fa32eb80c74d0125caee
describe
'208593' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOM' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
d9c0d3e6df3f75829c431f21cb1d1622
589fc72605d775959ff14607ef4a017824714e5b
describe
'198978' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABION' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
909398a9ff1c390325dc5289ee16f526
ed9aec43fac6b30a61470fed9489379c29f014a4
describe
'208517' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOO' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
4c5523efd9c0828f6720cad87c427f9e
22dd79554634a9db2079f7f065a5d9855a54bc07
describe
'202997' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOP' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
acc8ff73b9e7c3ebb2f830717b1d8a74
929e2ec9f84985ae29e20f6bddc1119cdd5259e7
describe
'206510' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOQ' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
776804cb0f24fa844788e01b9027ba28
68485bd0e63ab7f75dcb5d95690f5c84323e1c9c
describe
'203862' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOR' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
3c35776ffbd2fbbc6571124a6c1a263f
877e247f10b42e82dc331c314abe34b4e2d004e8
describe
'193561' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOS' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
c54b8d51f8cc0d81726692fb1cdd241a
6e91fc12a2fc41182b7b1b3e762e62e2d8e930d1
describe
'202977' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOT' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
0273d88c3fe0a7a53fee8abda5792c53
437cc4b0a01bc00000e0b7f3fba9d03b07a7ed8a
describe
'193391' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOU' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
6ee33fb4702211bf523bb92a7a3424c0
7a873ba53d623520521dc2fab100d28ecbe8aa19
describe
'185535' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOV' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
a9db82f407579381eac2a9f280e84f1f
f7288f56280b97e4d9161f8a3f92430bb16aa240
describe
'169995' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOW' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
ce981f3737ed7c9add0c290e56474c67
4ae50d16dbf78049671f6540a4c7e2cea4f3fb09
describe
'206401' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOX' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
21419dd579a167e3128421e1c1b5ad72
bdeec00f8536d18484e225c8abc36b4441bef587
'2011-12-20T16:53:20-05:00'
describe
'187878' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOY' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
62058f5c1c6c151a2341ced0fd8fbfec
f0f50316b662d515fada9cd83a5a2279bc7a577b
describe
'205978' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIOZ' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
3cf4ed4a1472b1eb888205ea399e0ac2
e913cc5721097735f03eb868cf0bb8caa79e68d8
describe
'201581' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPA' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
2ee29fd0fddb439a6ba0250129a27c01
400744a9a5b67cad0510d5014aeb3c59afef2b20
describe
'202602' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPB' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
635c50b2f85c660fa4993dd2db2d2473
6b834fbf58f6b424faf9e037d6363adac464c063
describe
'208858' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPC' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
56d9721581932ccef3c6748e65c72ca0
f8a5ce0189cbaacd8873d967c7d0c70b9f051543
describe
'190655' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPD' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
9ec984e718de9d5af676e210fbaa7c48
84b20ac3eeae78416ed0551f102ec2ed052716a0
describe
'203499' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPE' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
bd0ff52c5b27563ddfee5ef86610e816
9313cd92fbffc51885a9b301a6c6d94922b9c45a
describe
'197545' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPF' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
9e4ec2343c3ccc9cd647c340ecda1080
a1d99ab31181ffa38ff971da5afe65274212e7fd
describe
'206830' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPG' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
1bd5dde2da77ff869e646983fee51cc8
d08502d4275337a620e6639c3f4186262686126b
describe
'206099' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPH' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
089d1655895cca4d89cf66a7eb935d26
81c339e465bdd389ffc26ea494f96640a59f44c3
describe
'207091' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPI' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
63490b706dedb498ec55774c9d8c49b0
f1e5ec576dc616ded773e4322ed74a3b403b72c1
describe
'200145' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPJ' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
00d6a9651f1d48a7c8680f346a6d2488
2348d0c6984ed06c3bd5cca2c434d2fd4d356145
describe
'205052' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPK' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
77840732d7da644641a29e45f5bfd58f
326977982391cfc202a9414bb090b2d5c73f211f
describe
'206629' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPL' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
9552ae4cfab868e66e5dbed7ac3e6554
f79f2027dbba6d691cbcd8a8fb30dcd451145dca
describe
'192326' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPM' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
92878398ffe5f0b23280e4034eb11524
9525d5f670361db393fffc3cf22bbaaa0d972671
describe
'206545' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPN' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
00c55752e4f9bacfc2d028672361b125
5133d5a976c2f485acb7fab91cb246a97a162833
'2011-12-20T16:53:48-05:00'
describe
'182697' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPO' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
911d455df97d6178b38981e5e6d9324d
04553206553333545d24d08e64e26fc3cb109233
describe
'160899' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPP' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
875e595a7570fdf2e1593a24fbcc86ba
4a0d5ccae0b16c169df158bdea2285e6b451a94d
describe
'210778' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPQ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
41d96a024e0d8cb69d3f5c18befa19b3
b0f2258252ff6feb701b3294423c8490b537340a
describe
'205169' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPR' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
499e263d38e220975d8022877acb5c3e
d97c7d0435b06753d682fe3758637a10aebd69b6
describe
'202210' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPS' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
fb4c8d933e7d3798819e11a5447db07c
46c8844f00b8327a91bd6c14ce69f02205dc92d3
describe
'206919' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPT' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
a686b25718551c45f3442ab5ed4cccc3
811a2921db27cf6efff6394daad38fa25a526d05
describe
'205024' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPU' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
b406a7239139c29abe8eb7dbc3b3366f
f2ac21bc45a2fcc7c10e67ec9ff42b0e162c65c3
describe
'180042' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPV' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
cfcfa014e43decddd1611cb9ff7c39aa
4a80d4f4be1f5b984e06e33629c67af60a3e45c1
describe
'185570' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPW' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
faedd352f46ba895a2fa173934abbc90
715dcfef2734671ed8e054c0810b5572c5b659e9
describe
'204676' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPX' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
cd6be85b1d2fa90c0605b64b06a239f0
acd5a93ce7dbae724585ad456a57ef752e2fee9a
describe
'197745' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPY' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
6a6b46738e7ebd43a04fb2276ad23af5
7498ddc10fc5e2fdc8433c57c2ae8cb7f2f9693f
describe
'202469' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIPZ' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
88f5f5a92c8d2cab90086ada3161061f
5389578023b61b34a412b3a5ae904f018df08433
describe
'196452' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQA' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
e21a91ad7b235f4734c5bcafc974a719
7529896c947f438644fcb91985199209a054d1d2
describe
'212462' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQB' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
4de5c4fa8765c75b29d3e7bf890bd773
3f2dd12ed2796c0e03d14c7055e958c08bc6f15e
describe
'178105' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQC' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
a9ed2de13f4ea49741c7e1246b9d0fda
6db4d18a118851d546026242d21bdb99a84e2ee3
describe
'159163' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQD' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
b75a36eccc9f1b4ee1cc58bfe3ef1a93
98b112e1db2938200e66b9d097fc63f2d9ab183d
describe
'201686' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQE' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
426139e6088fc1afbdf6765c182f15a7
8faec5a5b936dbe5e2854a37af31d8594266dee6
describe
'209013' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQF' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
6c7583b1a6168008528bba9c17d3fb30
5db6b99236223602a5832e512bbda8570dd232ad
describe
'211498' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQG' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
027f80ce449c4ac45999ccce80fadb39
076b5de04e498cb2598ca67477417835a0645a16
describe
'198222' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQH' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
4eb6f1dd9145558b1a25cb9c55d2f2e6
09ca4e2049e0fa1c0794bf7b30fb1488a43b6920
describe
'203319' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQI' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
d7a23b8d28c8992e91ad637bf16330b6
65eb92716fd8eda041bde49be6c22552dc788aef
describe
'205116' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQJ' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
54906f4178a8581b9bf05ba42b568ea5
189d560df4e783955912d660c431de69f5b257cb
describe
'211912' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQK' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
f1e6b2b2111e46aad5af5328a3f86c66
2395a8f087d174283d82cb83ef916f493f2bb9d2
describe
'206340' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQL' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
62f951934e99bcaa6a1f13421a3dc308
3741055883ed8cfb96d0ad08699e4dad58159964
describe
'186505' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQM' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
5a1fb625b31bf54d2b5e8bff10e31d1a
a62db5e86b042a2b41e29e915241aa84ee0552b0
describe
'209474' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQN' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
b678c6b8c3191b9b0323e1d509d2e4d2
cd1d4c47a11883ea1b3c0b8c5378fa4186e1b5b5
'2011-12-20T16:52:24-05:00'
describe
'202254' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQO' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
0008162797bda75e5ac256a30d780238
2d53f1e91a2becb209e97360da2258b7595d9306
describe
'204598' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQP' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
4c3401405d172ebf9e4159eb32e54333
f95935cf8420525dacbe6d2d268c8250648947e4
describe
'165618' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQQ' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
d89527e8241326d71fc6d6f13bf7a05f
68523ecbf5983748dcfac5a164fe384aa9158fce
describe
'175130' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQR' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
f8653c6350cf7775cd4939375cf245aa
7deedbfe188c2640142214c7ecf171fccf1cf3fc
'2011-12-20T16:53:13-05:00'
describe
'68676' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQS' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
995fb1d3aa45fe5a75cfdcedf4aca964
96c7ee916125e6c63d6339c7f89a7d2d2e828e09
describe
'130107' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQT' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
5f937ea2ed2642a560574e754c3d3c78
5ca5133b9b8232c7f35c40fccdab06c9bbbfea22
describe
'34349' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQU' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
650a04e339f6637819096bc562681340
5e19295455f50ce4a519f3b859c3e84322d26a2a
'2011-12-20T16:53:21-05:00'
describe
'68730' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQV' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
035f068a64e19fff7efd3c17b7e357c2
68fbba3e8c5121c1a02077c26d6ac98a1ff2e3b6
describe
'60371' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQW' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
36961b908d30787e2be2ca7a55d8d9d1
3ffb2ed96d72630118716a9f6c698165db6e05e1
describe
'30121' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQX' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
11dacac2a585ade92a3c3ad2b59ee9a2
0d6f63c46eb402f91030bdc213d9cc2fdbcfacab
describe
'55156' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQY' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
6b819727aed8fac207a81a771fee8afc
a5fcbe3e2b2449c56b95438bbc85d7e9bddae8ef
describe
'24912' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIQZ' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
d3d4a4c969c576225b05b9da4cda4636
7f0b9a83eeda8bdefb700802d6fe480d3281c190
describe
'23456' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRA' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
2fdc6f6d7fab7d1ce2a3b7ec2f9693b0
912e280a7546467ae4b1c8ae3919cfa3dbece919
describe
'18194' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRB' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
09d5b82a1d18307ffa3773bc0190fca6
209d70b6640c5a7fa9d5bb22ad8494db407badfa
'2011-12-20T16:53:52-05:00'
describe
'26684' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRC' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
8a4055805fb74cfbededd680f11246c6
1778c5f62de98526fedc3959f06253f1157ecf2a
describe
'19025' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRD' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
29644b8dedd5e4c82c14177b2eca0965
4d2c1c8e41680216fc38a1795d8f202b09cf0e93
describe
'23391' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRE' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
5add12fb6ffaf79227104c66581087a4
e1d36aa18f63b84525abdebaaf9fde667aa2f0a6
describe
'18095' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRF' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
35d6d30371321bb6313c9b44a469091d
9369a2b27751047e655d4b9cbfe839906ad07908
describe
'25975' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRG' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
2f1f2633b79e03ea21ee6d001d5a9fe2
1881ed34d518148c50e56f7ef1cded7049763381
describe
'18742' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRH' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
07bcb63f7889019c887fdad153e789fb
af1900826b060879ea199508824e4e08092bc0d5
'2011-12-20T16:51:21-05:00'
describe
'53739' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRI' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
03c532152c4f8a4aa44d2ceb434251ad
c31df1a3188c228c0e26a465e6220b3ffc14b0b4
describe
'26592' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRJ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
9e545dfbfeeac0126b8d87d822ead4b6
9d35c979924c5d561590ebc1307d79927c56ba0f
describe
'45565' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRK' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
0f8f04a2f756e90c3955dd7bdd8ffe41
2c497c0dad29fe0a059312296d69de724cd56952
describe
'24858' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRL' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
9633c77d6b6cf3f0d65587f409530eb5
e9c21a7844860cc297e4d673d4fbacd51754ee4b
describe
'25677' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRM' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
a3f7b126a14bf7a7d6027e5c51694aa9
7d781bcbecce66c8ddb213ebe20c683baaf9c124
describe
'18885' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRN' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
0d5c50cd3d256563ad314e37a47a9260
b8d201abbb593db5b751e4cbe8ebb8891b5b99a2
describe
'46071' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRO' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
afaa01a2bc67df505b614c299ba39828
5509669044a8cbf4d69fd17201d1bd7a30aefacf
describe
'23185' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRP' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
0535847dc13b7f07d84fbebc438145ed
d764e046e71856a36832cb29d7072506810d70f2
describe
'45669' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRQ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
e10d9ac83c08936d247baa306286c5c6
22cdf9fc0cc80ed6206a45a9fa5f19913371405e
describe
'23312' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRR' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
658cdd6aa7b2365c0011ba6a8dc10e26
4bc5cd0d60b7c45c44f9fd1b94838cd98bd75a9b
'2011-12-20T16:50:13-05:00'
describe
'54007' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRS' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
97d1d55b9ac9cbea1d4c42974be435d8
7ef3313d14b08443c22032915f154d96d7622710
'2011-12-20T16:53:41-05:00'
describe
'24023' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRT' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
35c3a879a9b7f624a817d8b6345bcc54
dea408e3962592ba9bce339521024e5bb2e68e8a
describe
'30436' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRU' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
ec8c7df3ed6ecf1b2727e091ac87883b
ff9caa51dac94cce00d6289ee740faa53c44a776
describe
'20049' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRV' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
6bce93f6d29781915f07311da13ec5fa
4c3ad06db405305a3353a62f9f816240ef5ac24e
describe
'51776' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRW' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
b3a104c793aada314da84369bce9d2c5
3a39fda7de2bb46f4e6bce0523380c1ec6ccdb72
'2011-12-20T16:50:48-05:00'
describe
'24935' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRX' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
4dc7aa8134f0bbca78b3173d8e2b01f3
05cc6b29888d7c6a824a527b22a99aad8b1c5b68
describe
'66117' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRY' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
72119e1a22f756b157a0b2ae24b27328
0c67543d3f22c28dc1bb5979b61968f3596bbb97
describe
'26901' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIRZ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
60181eb36998283426dcd98b6c0a6bfa
e280d0b2cdbf2e2e67121f7337384d432d6fff3d
describe
'50881' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISA' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
c4f65bd28fcc2c187095242067a64af2
e75f877af4204731600ffa18cf6e2b125f4121f6
describe
'24758' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISB' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
2d8b5e692d5531f867b0a11c7d1b423a
28f1b624e1defd64dfab992487fc0c310e7deafe
describe
'66255' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISC' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
b409a9bad51d1c91b30efbd25a26181c
bc79afb4d38c597c0627590ee332ab17e4fedd96
describe
'26492' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISD' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
d4721ea44e3d47b540fc14c57f1c35f6
fd075dca20b279ce5d14f63815c0b6b5ca185295
describe
'50721' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISE' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
58d799f7924a4b92af3a546f563ee880
bc2db669f660f18468e4de1790cc30c72fd8134c
describe
'24410' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISF' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
b8ab224705f887078bcc1e706c155084
630a87a4d66e0c8c3420ec25e7edbf190ea365b0
describe
'65617' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISG' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
4ce4d0f96b9b08a3799cf0dcfc59c1c8
11c017b667a186f58caaadb16587afb4903edd9a
describe
'26290' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISH' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
ef5841fcc472af7c43a63e7cd0e5507b
3c37827218a8d8dc71de9c7754de03ef768cbbb5
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISI' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
1d537375fa22840ebef1f78434ccead0
9d21d71f64e1fedf06021df56c2d10e0d9d60599
'2011-12-20T16:50:51-05:00'
describe
'26009' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISJ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
e4b39bce11a3fe3f6b9cc7c63cbcc802
e92febb93ad2689fe8a55db438bfa717040e4dc8
describe
'55160' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISK' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
a958d0db33989d43e9e9a28cb283dadd
14b23faaace28d4e5c64ee41fe0f9cf2769a00dc
describe
'25144' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISL' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
0844a33cb9f524d50b2097e83895e9a8
b0a6525e3e7b3b46cd38e69bc4c8a738cd2722cc
describe
'66016' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISM' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
813aa15f839c1bd6d5d61cad6a76ab37
dec9b2e8e86b740fa8f9547228048c51842b6184
describe
'26286' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISN' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
41f6be7180d3a19ff7051266d01516f5
d6cf4698c281294d49a7db0db38128f522bbd81f
describe
'58681' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISO' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
ff80989331ac290aea8bcd967552daf3
45e4a4790a6eafb06367d160803002f8ab03ffd0
'2011-12-20T16:53:14-05:00'
describe
'26357' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISP' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
c876e3b3bd74d0d5c346d51d1ed7d96b
2ed423d9fa4e4c0b4af058b7faac61a5316889de
describe
'66917' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISQ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
29677bb96a72e604feaeef2f25b73794
e6798759797e7813e1f25db5242eca5fc2242231
describe
'26553' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISR' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
e1691124565b5077c2167140e6a302ea
a4516f2a3c8dec7d5aad7b566fd7e34e1d8dfe3c
describe
'53333' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISS' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
0dc191ea3d452756b1b47fc24eeb3cf5
9e278ae00cfd802d273bb01457e5d36bb19671e5
describe
'25052' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIST' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
3c2076bacc99fec2357501b72f2387b9
cfb66b575d24ebd5b5740ed049ace1820085ff82
describe
'67746' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISU' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
7e5407922b6553e49f6eaca12f8be71f
ca591e7e43dc3c6760f3096acbf513bb5358ed83
describe
'26732' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISV' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
86d6111709510f394088fe9fb2ccdcef
9ec83020b31dbaf4162a8f545c0f2b880e66a953
describe
'62290' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISW' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
5b60caf31fc90b8ad6293c55a225b75e
1a593b613ac9aadb351575d27b3d57eff0bfe3aa
describe
'26018' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISX' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
cfe77ec0ec64d40e99a7e0a597da43be
42dc50401ce467f856bc0a42c60f9e8046b7d0f5
describe
'73071' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISY' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
1ad20f3e9b8f0f290d3cc4ca62475590
d46ce1db50add9c675b5093f2ef041a7b4f2cc56
describe
'33319' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABISZ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d79caec4c77129a312826e64e8c38f55
214b6112854ba5d019d8c5b66b52b86b1ea987ae
describe
'63034' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITA' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
371cbf8c216168b8131c6ec3e612b80a
0f806e00036d6b0e9f13978ff1be78f3d47c22b9
describe
'31157' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITB' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
c991bf27f73a2b8cb74fec53f9b2f134
d80f54a138b090886e78a819b6953f23e46ac64d
describe
'51594' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITC' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
af3ad9fe55894d923ea9387b954d2446
778185df74fdbf70f661c47777d3d74a7d931c70
describe
'25732' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITD' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
1e0f7fb853b157da191ecbdbebb4132e
346b1307f466ebc42462fa44a8c00824fd1b9ef6
describe
'55300' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITE' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
c2a9979652d1169a1c4b82719fcb6f2b
2210e4d96c9b4c1cdd0486902cb37b76c2cbc83b
describe
'25382' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
ae9b46096b1a4df43e06e5060f37887c
d654067b339e0ac1f3ebb2bba7e07bbdfb888cc1
describe
'56263' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
1b000cbf14597686ad3a942ac47f3ab3
f8bc4ded4476aa458ec074158879aa1981aab757
describe
'25363' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITH' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
22f2439e14d7f0d6d0cb37de97c78502
1389fab5bee5dded9b3a8b7051a8e1c298fa6d89
describe
'65635' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITI' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
a97503a9c39cb1a11a5073cac4927b73
5e09b4a34d25ab5d2359984916f25b6e09dc7cb4
describe
'26705' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITJ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
067183f82d699bea291d86034eb8935d
3f670ad6ad3667d3ab989e7ba08e03725e8ad645
describe
'52179' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITK' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
659fafc5c9501027d73cc42c5a6f49ba
300bdf661e9e088c5d237da104f7ed176c3b8470
describe
'24619' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
cd149c3bcb913c90c468500320156da1
03942408ad0c1b2d43ea23d20ad30067b4a3f278
describe
'67715' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITM' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
a7b11f4e3a5847153510636ecc14860e
25c3a9d1f1e48df8eb58049d659f186735c542be
describe
'26662' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITN' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
b3d3f88b454578b97cdeb687dd4a5400
569b56858f85249453a08f4d90822e36a4c5664c
describe
'53857' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITO' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
324a212d0e8c9f19dc405668d0693dcc
d1b1913b9a119479c76166c60054d71e99e10b76
describe
'24938' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITP' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
bf9c77a95d761c39e8166aca47145537
c0fd8fc6ab440d6732eb28941ed7d187d293d6fd
describe
'66655' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITQ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
93176c4b979c5bff91996c38ec1326ee
8e3a12bafaa7ac8bada40405ecd8fbcde78f26c2
describe
'26694' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITR' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
5b9621d0a7f7304a1ed44a9696f0b1c0
38302b1a0429bcb28804b26d55cfbfdee8697a95
'2011-12-20T16:53:39-05:00'
describe
'65483' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
dff92df5d9f0c5cb475ab68447329ca4
150a7713d681bfbf704642abf6e93dada2455901
describe
'26453' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITT' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
36e71f7cec4a4efa15cb351f0282e35b
e4a6ff902187bed6f66a5f08becf4c8f4a3f616e
describe
'56498' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITU' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
dbb56fd96e6ef8d1a4a8fd5137597f4f
08fcd1dc741fd58c699b24895dcfc89613fc096c
describe
'25256' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITV' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
eeffeff3061530f9a7ed02e19731cc43
dc791697709f0c8c074128e076d10c5a5725d9e3
describe
'65279' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
fdc72699f98a9eb2923e39183e55a63f
6684fb4fcf6779ff70d661e8a379ed19a64168d5
describe
'26520' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITX' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
60440526f8e68f391ac174304193193c
45efb5d1dc10134fd232b82142fa2799b946f859
describe
'56837' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITY' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
2dba29af9bdcbd11ca12e322eb41b665
257d5e0d358f3b852c6960aac5c8d75e5639efa0
describe
'25384' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABITZ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
ab5a3f4adc9efe9176741541329105c6
fbc51dba472b8b9117aec9ef7e72a90585fdf21c
describe
'39030' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUA' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
69daeced65a7a3d6e579837c3b2cef99
fb2f78e223adbf65fb773ed859cfc0d0e9374c9c
describe
'21388' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUB' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
f86f3422f7f1014910d5ee7e6afeff04
daec345012051aa4b1b74164a5875e6f1450e8fd
describe
'51200' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUC' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
e0198b0c9d4085283dcb491d9c532f0e
9157da5dbad54be3606608d9a4b1d52fd9d4255c
describe
'25564' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUD' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
3d0177393f53ad8bf58b753462c648a2
0e24e2f47c41f2fcf8cd60a273ba57ed380314bb
describe
'53341' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUE' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
95838d383968b7b686b39853c9993a57
ef0c83876330617575b95c060164df01d0aef989
describe
'29802' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUF' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
8a5e1971980e82828a3b7a177e0f5fff
e80eeccab440a612774498a828233114898f6f2b
describe
'66679' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUG' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
457aabb45c4d0ad5e3b15198c422f002
33c5b550dda75116819d59d6756eefa78d69c73f
describe
'26698' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUH' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
9c7ab8681aa9265c0d732f89f236c31d
40afa18467f0c5f57e093f1c50e42b08b43d5823
describe
'67865' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUI' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
eb313521e000e699cd4665fa7377f445
fe25b86fa3ade32b6125b69768cd5e9836128a76
describe
'26959' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUJ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
23d0a41c0afc346cc656b699935b2073
539413a36c12bb23bc39e9517f307544a36dc7b5
describe
'55956' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUK' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
05ae4550d6102fea3660f07e292c49ce
e3c09da36457ec702ef8fa8d5cafde6cdb9eea4b
describe
'25366' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUL' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
3f4322f102ffcea7811c89af5ebcb2a7
5c2f21448b172c327fb248ad8f70e7dba6acac7c
describe
'58378' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUM' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
7b7a08867b40e9d7bd2c6f83cf6220b9
2ed562f298f42e113a81565ad3a6f05dbeea5597
describe
'25719' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUN' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
3b23ba529d31a26885fbbf9c09f47a1e
5be9a38a759fdbab244663884c9a59ff0c673510
describe
'66771' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUO' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
2c0b1e524378819f32650a84e01b6ee9
0acb4f92d2c9d73b120ad6cf17fabf57dd3b431a
describe
'26486' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUP' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
de3ef26fd6870b06d13e812a459f3aac
a3b973b39f89aa99245247af80591209fbfbf008
describe
'56294' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUQ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
0fa69d335c2b29592c10a593de5aa16f
1013aa060a90892cd961ddd677c026da59573e57
describe
'25681' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUR' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
b761ecf72a28702a91788209b52b9f21
3eca2f8a6cb71ac134ce2d7d2afcc489dfa1eb13
describe
'63406' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUS' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
3af1d376ef5479ebfca352b278499cc6
7dcb2212e852e5c9fc753ccdd49cc2a07ae1a5ab
describe
'26020' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUT' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
628e918a5d9310c6b3884a7ced21bc9d
5d229f13da035324a7cb583a0384f0fb4e0dcf08
describe
'54405' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUU' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
27bd00102e507a055c12b1310786d781
4ec2ead38ad7ca0451064fae56e415a0f762f7f5
describe
'25049' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUV' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
26539eb5077e80bd3a2fb65ad58d87b6
119a3b35e18398da250fc60dcf778caa3eb612cb
describe
'62008' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUW' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
5a1c13d508085785a7f50669cb602a58
33621bc4342bd5992be01d44c8b729562d6c8778
describe
'26191' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUX' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
4164723ebaa30ab1b512a62943ac1d19
74c0f812cabd7c056aa24312e30a8a4a80238f5b
describe
'67241' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUY' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
bd24e589412e64d9398aadebbdd88e40
0ce669d40e488fadd2b0e1b3ac2d297b010642ca
describe
'26562' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIUZ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
e50587aaed80615531d1e464817a49f2
18da6254e1168bb34311dd9701a06721866fc42b
describe
'56002' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVA' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
23da2cda9902ae6b758ffa57a1644997
6199e50ead37de6ea860f4c42d2462e593c67223
describe
'25369' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVB' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
d91a51a23b124efbd09b2ffa101cb655
ac34b582072e44781be685c4d5657d4b5b8d24bd
describe
'54427' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVC' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
3031fd326852b2d66687ae10ff536734
b9f2a0a6e626a0c01b75c1e35434c707a6c1df07
describe
'25360' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVD' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
a0ba4d1001f387e7d7a394262b80612b
bd271198cb16bf1610a06fbfa91c3e58ac8908aa
describe
'66619' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVE' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
87a000c97381df4e3d0a7026bb133b08
c95c43b388a3d77487365f42fa617a3ae71142bd
describe
'26874' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVF' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
82d17606c3ce41d042dc06492a25796f
576063e285511d825ea32b007103a13eabd8de38
describe
'47413' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVG' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
d6362e090396974e44c0c4b2fff9e676
91c3dda791b3ae0b353c343b66e27cfcf2f27a9e
describe
'22860' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVH' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
5d078c07f9e64216b20d9a9e41c661ba
7c34923e70af1adc9f5da9c946abd08c2858a8ca
describe
'61125' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVI' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
52e87a7cd8a1388d4f9cdc9f78523dec
851d86099b6d408bb50ab51e7840d8c93e3e841e
describe
'31046' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVJ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
5ebed08ed3226e504ead056052b0fd65
6a676370bdf4bbab2560bad870f143d2a6b584e4
describe
'53628' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVK' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
5310ac19f79e0ced15923919b0054a4f
a6b593b64f9ccd7b12ff4d1a5d7d43bf2b1582be
describe
'26328' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVL' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
52445416b6bc7808326034f87e76c114
17c14a0e4ccb55f0bb52230b428693afc6020946
describe
'47978' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVM' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
eac0b3180f386b857c00062f3c84f882
94054f620355e7261478979e63930351b098f3c6
describe
'23963' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVN' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
e35a27544c0f95c3b2216f538233d323
a76bc0b6529ae68b92959f2a316a3f4a5277821d
describe
'65437' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVO' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
654c3d1f8ae726efdf881245ba4bb41f
a4d4494aaa9a16c445abdeb37c7217a90bb6a49d
describe
'26371' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVP' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
fec0117bd77a9e0546edcae3a611bd1c
3e37f164ba9110cd146fcaa7e89351d5c39dab9f
describe
'55906' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVQ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
582bc17fbbad6646455d866f10f989e1
d899d3bafd7f2645cbfb9ebe9c8a420c63f77fc5
'2011-12-20T16:50:57-05:00'
describe
'25576' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVR' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
4c595db2018075b7934d7e6f38aa2014
bd8c5721c59493ad1b6039ca54fe61041d07fc2a
describe
'63970' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVS' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
df0f69dffaa8cbed2c12145dc2d00f22
0c81a6961a10bdbc23a15ca5453976d644657a95
describe
'26280' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVT' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
59858bd35d8a05d0bbefb60f7a9a7786
117ebabb6973dba4e6f32c61d7651931f909eff0
describe
'49829' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVU' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
b38474b266a06f6b214a9aefd3d15d00
f25ddade3682008465c2e22c8d7045379aff9b54
describe
'24039' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVV' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
7497d1c04461fc68f3570b9a3afccae7
0f3d51bc493ffbf3b420b6826e3f1f2ded3bd33b
describe
'67211' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVW' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
70d1874f0901d6d8b101532c91ae8183
49c041a0ae478a8f0abd12247937bbed9047caf4
describe
'26801' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVX' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
20b4980379d6259b6ef2f7a716626f7a
b84686fa2f1ae9711328d6b042b032422d4c0a42
describe
'53898' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVY' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
3d9551d30afbac222b80d4ef61bf1ed8
9bd903d55d79ac2e8977805e1768ce1eb0990785
describe
'25002' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIVZ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
cfdcd5bdd5b6262b10e3bda21a4d8959
0215f06109f9f4f8cfa5184e4c942fdd7ae84a8a
describe
'63962' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWA' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
93bc0abf5219bc4ef5ffbaf1d39f408f
7de415d65edfe24606c196aaaab2017e151ad53d
describe
'26008' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWB' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
d01fe8386ac2ccd6bf5c999aa23e2cd5
c3df33b9aabc3f1b08abd8d47590482cf32af3cf
describe
'48589' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWC' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
2054d482e8796aaac3dbce1e174eb92a
fe57f54114d32caa6194fbacd8e17cf187cb8467
describe
'24168' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWD' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
6ba92eb81aa74dc62e0232b637d26050
918404d86acc604622641d8526ed5e76b8d66816
'2011-12-20T16:52:03-05:00'
describe
'66959' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWE' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
075d18adfa6dca759f99524bddc65c9d
52d14ac64e6c24be7bcbbd6e246e9631a7df4206
describe
'26571' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWF' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
deda52830f11bac1d17a2c02c61f86fd
9dd82f79963d45a9eb6413987899474c1306e788
describe
'57977' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWG' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
496953ee3ea9fa81170cb48b72d97559
36c0471711144a6a9157ada5f8b827e4d376a241
describe
'25585' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWH' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
c6fea42f39552201b9f5469a221b3766
5d3311b112c4cd2fee93ff5c60b2b5732203a958
describe
'54736' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWI' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
b66215b6908953577a70e0dc849bf4fa
dd6ce8a20ce6c107ec2df5455db3813439316948
describe
'25168' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWJ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
937e87cf4b821d6631e38657fda91000
f34183654b21bb179d6615695e540feb98c62424
describe
'41672' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWK' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
8a4262f08f4285218c57eb4329e9c04e
7da6b418adca2a94ed867a708fda1a252e1bd360
describe
'21941' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWL' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
00f2f60a73d14a732f070b0214c6105d
5449d2c53205c1617de363f3df163a453594dee9
describe
'55340' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWM' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
345cad78f236bae41d1948c732a0823f
83888f6544165a5da90169458a3668c354325118
describe
'26157' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWN' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
463f8f074f5ae85bab2d3cb06d6cf1b0
e60f008bf41f879188de6fb13604f0bad451d941
describe
'50128' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWO' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
d00be49fef1500e2c912a0e6eb0af8f9
f03c25816ce7f213621c8c19e29d6e8eccfcf622
describe
'25691' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWP' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
f7fe88533957deb2b42ac8ed23aa4937
e3fda1392b72009be92dfadce0ffad0dc7410f83
describe
'65942' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWQ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
4b3a8091360d1a363ba2272e9c1a7730
5d396f2d2984958e3335b93779af4b982cf07fd7
describe
'26442' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWR' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
8113947c41d11b52b1ab0c0418da38d5
050de7832b0762785f175a9deb60e53c7d0fe84f
describe
'51896' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWS' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
68202448ebac9dec58a97b863af51d6f
b4a90ea03b2f226a1d23fa15e0933989afddc184
describe
'24601' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWT' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
05b3e1bf783caa2e59492d97a6f50732
3d7e6a1d8c8e83630ef6d3f075d06660ed6b5e6a
describe
'60730' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWU' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
f2f0eea7406f88b9eb60b019d5b9cf7b
3f84e69fcf17ffd6dd612ca7bf42884e5871d3a9
describe
'25533' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWV' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
0f05396e9b19ee068544525e2332d492
d5b9844a11ca3b71601f662db9c2ecb48fbd102e
describe
'55090' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWW' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
d52aeafb8304ce626f6cb0a514f445d4
bbaadb5539034d1b2cf601161c35de573ba3067a
describe
'25498' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWX' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
03111385ce63e0fea9366717d801686d
8754104211d3136d227dab06f00af0a2f52bc2df
'2011-12-20T16:52:50-05:00'
describe
'67576' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWY' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
09c7fc69d0d3a603bde79ee0ed54f4dd
58ee9b4425af00f06c7dd3f99a32f32b26c86d70
describe
'26639' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIWZ' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
ac7521af971611cbff5880e6976295d5
4708f2b5183c1d1e90e10f898c7cb92cb55d3a8a
describe
'50467' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXA' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
50d717eb85319bee9bf077c53addc014
60c0d637d61a0687637d85c5dcea3f7e83c1766c
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXB' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
0182a7af9473c4fb2743e7ec681cad75
224c067cdd203331434b33760b596d00e3186392
describe
'62781' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXC' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
79ac2aa47e6b5fc10268d8043a271fcb
7b6ac454bbde9bdc638409cecb2e3cc2398ff1df
describe
'26004' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXD' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
dab25fbdcfba0bf2d315966343d29da2
1e77be6eaa291ee06477330973e6e41a37cda70a
describe
'64128' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXE' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
f2930802b60fa7cabd51ebec197e3c0c
b8a1dd609b2621ee54cb4aa22dbecad79ab9bfa4
describe
'26089' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXF' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
9f8bb6b87c2669997b4f3c457a1d85cd
0290cfbbb60563247e28444af073f1efc65b18d1
'2011-12-20T16:50:43-05:00'
describe
'47976' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXG' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
2f7b57c447559876d469c41989fe6439
48839f71a2f64ba372cd0ff6a212dc92a8a8cc39
describe
'24072' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXH' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
90889006bfb9265d544e6e76aaa9dff2
7b3ec3df7b9813fc40c116d2c1a42b0df40f2cff
describe
'64106' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXI' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
1dc80428e5ba22098033464600b8d8b8
4e30b39fdfe9e5cbbb3be0bd9de1a4046a27d827
describe
'26053' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXJ' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
0c800b56d940893d6616c73aca63aa12
5dc8bea75baf705eb46707115e95bfc7c40aebdb
describe
'66438' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXK' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
38e0cb6667a899b6c6754520b014228b
75b231137117cb180b4ab075b4acdc3b0b2ae71e
describe
'26590' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXL' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
d511841e9493a7f27693808a413b6e1d
f24a0ac2152bb88e6d9e799a94e7d5a514babe15
describe
'49262' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXM' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
d1647d54a7a2ec1aae25676385d0ce72
d3d5247cbc5818b4b2913593515eeaf3334f14d3
describe
'24189' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXN' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
f8f2733bba47ede3ad56d0dff301f4b0
9564dd8dbbd6f6872781c4d8f80e244e0f1909fb
describe
'61360' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXO' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
25d007b3dd7e70d4db0240c825659037
9257ac8e53199863f096f345dd0c930a50878bb3
describe
'25907' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXP' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
a402c61e991d71ccdb33635c6b4a6fed
b63bd95f939d415becd8a656bea5ba1f429f937c
describe
'62624' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXQ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
b8d23ac1db3c92e9b49f064abfb92306
a370afe4c4d22106051cebe84056ab941cfd407b
describe
'26218' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXR' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
6475eb1dbaa1d7eaf7a63639afdb674a
a6937a06b5cb06304de599a6b1ed5466b5880248
describe
'54528' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXS' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
a8c9de7f323e4066e4f9ae49715efd14
2c75f2b77534f511e227b89df6cd3a4214cfcad2
describe
'24408' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXT' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
f75ee8dd93d0c154f07f26394f7903af
877472a14fdcaafd63ccabc4f715b292c137cb08
describe
'54072' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXU' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
0e41c061d3ea611c67a8fbd92007a60e
ae6e96edf82ff4838c410a5aa30ce77e3c669437
describe
'25036' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXV' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
99ea210d7c861387b2a47a3c6c3f30a5
fb657dc9acda8cdfe1e2d0beb49bcafe20e3da5d
describe
'66183' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXW' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
cc3cdfd28daa8b49c6b8b9aa2c33e466
40eef55703e416071a1efb8ccc87e97dd0ad8cbe
describe
'26312' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXX' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
669af325ad2219879e0c393cabd9a799
fdd7a9f92ca4dfab3a4c47d751d69d805c923d9c
describe
'68443' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXY' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
e84b471e04cc5990ece8b60ae7ffc854
38b7b69479a7a80f7e6547be985500e738943a14
describe
'26701' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIXZ' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
4f94d63c66c404efd4cb6d51397f3f58
3123e849dc7a5bde63ad02fc9c5b489db57aa904
describe
'53346' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYA' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
6934b1379cd7d7af147890475f2da9f0
0ea17b4176ab52b7f4a0eb3de5f681cd34d49c23
describe
'24985' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYB' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
ffd6bf470aeb53f126ab391aea4e1d65
a931a9827b127018fbdfeeaaf5f2dd6cca408782
describe
'66102' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYC' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
129dc4f47dfd355b8566a8a47d799ba9
d00960750c787730fc097fd3431c9d6167d247e7
describe
'26173' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYD' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
c99d7bc2cacbc0a98d32781233e90c54
4d4600ef6b140c2e213135ed1ecad3491655f007
'2011-12-20T16:57:15-05:00'
describe
'66923' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYE' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
da84a57d98b26ab5b04c4b742bf72e60
80477d33fc8dfcd4433c9d945a3a2f18c5a4e431
describe
'26377' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYF' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
95bf67596eddd20b4655fb3b553b61f6
7caa54690cf0de4a08527af734c12a3190843eeb
describe
'53665' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYG' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
0d9048d905387243d6889675628315d9
3afafc080e591fe6286e6d1b65003daba1e11614
describe
'24773' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYH' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
c1b53e76e5d073ca46e6c7bd31f84855
9863f1c819ec9ae4788e42969cca41c5ce4afd4a
describe
'67228' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYI' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
f8900f8fce38143a37bffdf590a1b933
37142e50e4be22fa21eca44ee2c2956560021f50
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYJ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
805415b7c7535fc1fca17aeb552d2bb7
1c670ed58a11f33955db6484b725296614fcf0b2
describe
'66791' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYK' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
d4c72ddf3cfdbcc220efef395d97f0cb
e9065a5ad4b62b2515d41ca4787741ded0e6ff18
describe
'26596' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYL' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
cd98d2099a3d9c23744485668abf85e2
27d3d0033fd4e1cf6a242c669645a2d63c0578d0
describe
'66189' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYM' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
2bcad3548b81e6be5854b7f77b944370
13074ab597228a271203bbc7de99bad0a6953c45
describe
'26152' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYN' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
c4001fe1bfe1a278de5b643f221b8e33
fd6de9bfe1cce0038019c96d1dec8f06503a0f68
describe
'66079' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYO' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
6b34d1c746dbbb63d0f728b08e6b701b
b22e9f2de0cb58a17603364d8543a4fd04ba2cda
describe
'26334' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYP' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
595c9fa231a7edf2048d4dc03fb2961c
639f76dece7c47aac71d5a7d48f065c11816e58c
describe
'64166' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYQ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
44f290e9f929707e7512916bfd44474c
c569ede6fa6bc89e4cbdb4e0f16401dc25913c30
describe
'25956' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYR' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
043cab09f83b975df942d8fbdc95ec6a
a838d5e64285452b2a2e32191dd6db9beba2d7c5
describe
'65361' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYS' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
39e1c92e9aaffa3f5171d01134eb4e9e
b918390bdb8408c329b153dd75c4f19c21533b4f
describe
'26408' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYT' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
ea18f4fa649918522dfc98f4c5435014
af94556f583313f559f803da7cc3de2de6fc4618
describe
'65753' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYU' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
343380357cfad484889dd52a640bfa57
40f3111531f911ddefc66afbb7cc53d15ecbe643
describe
'26379' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYV' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
1d9b54873bb4424de1b0cb91dc8cf27c
5eec8e99031437ee970b7fcabcc04be035be0bf1
describe
'66032' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYW' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
8616aa5a52b39690ac89f3ef259009e7
388a72c39680cfbf67084a01e8d703941b7e7600
describe
'26245' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYX' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
c29469321fcae3e9e5200b48992977f2
2c08a9f93b4191111d7ffff3c137bc6735e9fa4b
describe
'66112' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYY' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
dea941b7c04a543d88b64bed2bd6c42b
8a173d6d816a4699d5fd0cb1c3cc55aecd4cacea
describe
'26186' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIYZ' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
4e13671255bd1089af83da62a7d7a655
b7386646a86c9a38aba621d1ff01f2ea565fed15
describe
'52347' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZA' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
6375fb33a08daeccc50f50c25997d5e9
10df48a07f5ee393bc02790cbf862547eaa6cfce
describe
'24564' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZB' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
f418cb9753b974ce25519b160cb8d2ef
9e3c66a85f1d7659f39c76d200a97fb4dedb97b0
describe
'65418' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZC' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
9154ef2d2dec3c6bb37dd9734366b649
6d6e48169612e9aefc9aeea195ed158181f34469
describe
'26019' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZD' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
5f93aa055597124ffd24e125b0a3033c
a1aa447c17a124a90c90414dbac91dc69c87541b
describe
'65685' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZE' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
743dc84dbe226d7b46c232e40b0f4a20
f0704559cc73633ececb4995706d00058fd69c4f
describe
'26338' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZF' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
cf3339f9840c0fab103952c48efa8f16
e56cb6de683e0719dea2c7a209135b669ab273e0
describe
'55934' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZG' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
4edaf71b5888c5e5f3b907301b958df4
098f28caa8ff26f15e9f861bd448335ae764f799
describe
'25499' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZH' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
a2c428db93c888d3bf62becdb59bc136
8772ac3893647bce0ab9c5e37e4aee76fde2314c
describe
'65120' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZI' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
a08c346ca6d9fd266c77118bc8dd19f9
302e8a8673cc54a28c855263dee2733e8b752527
describe
'26216' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZJ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
a1160e80b34946a9b8f9a86287ff74b7
d0e190c5ffed5519bb9e027f9ba0c610bb36ac46
describe
'60567' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZK' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
98a1a095f84f9388c641cfcd70c868d9
8ca3cac2c6d336f7cbb848c6302bc8e1cfb3acde
describe
'25630' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZL' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
c5cea15d5a8f363f5c46d54d15b76362
dcae1a2d6a716258686127fcc906073000f7e75b
describe
'52625' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZM' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
4d9333969e5bca328f98fb65b9766cc3
a8068aa9cb554595db7e59a3c457df6ab9069994
describe
'24188' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZN' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
36a74e5ab91b8361c862e05a3372828f
49ed35d87b1903f00265bab6841c623d4162e973
describe
'67388' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZO' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
c33ed0dfb2b9ebd1537fdef8b0fb2172
fe223583bfb42a29c2e2145bec65924d8e72f0ba
describe
'26370' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZP' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
88e9262a176fa771d447707a117c0ecc
e3aa56392ea12402524d367143b4d65bc672664f
'2011-12-20T16:52:26-05:00'
describe
'66269' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZQ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
0b2ef7790c9303e383cca39f1fd8829e
dc37f3118658bbd4327526b781100fe38f4a4bc6
describe
'26431' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZR' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
037c9a3a69850978cc663c06365c3024
36253cca2017e82c6724c2d701cc42c042dcf8fc
describe
'55583' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZS' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
c0b6c4ec4955ff4607794c2d70a1fc16
c602c9fd978a6044b57b5b7a0d430c09ada97651
describe
'25396' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZT' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
55f1b5d1d44d617866f652e79a12095e
b3a656fa7532b91143ab1113934ee3f9e12c40f6
describe
'57258' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZU' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
6171a91fd1ae7c38fffa0170cdd1cfb9
372d22985f88f92a3e4b93dad2180de7d1e99b45
describe
'26136' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZV' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
b21d0dc43d847ae0186c713bc7818802
9226a126ebdb05969692e5053a36f35965c2ffe7
describe
'68446' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZW' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
2a9dbd98d5e479f2ea067b1cf5095ed1
1215afb5abd18d102824637e6d0f1befb5bcf2d2
describe
'26730' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZX' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
7188e24495456606a11f7e82641e0fc9
862644bbcfc34bc603bb956a9049e3816086a67b
describe
'67530' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZY' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
42cd5bf029695f7be7eef772a77dc8c4
423ce8311e9ca04a7a8a9aba0c1a0e75a3cf3049
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABIZZ' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
efa4eb081bd3f3723a96f3c3aa829ae1
132c7c4286194b606a30e01fbb5c5a5290a18bf4
describe
'67403' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAA' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
45b7abc334e9684823aa3bf4642498af
fecd50456b78fc581bcbd22eb98ceee70fb49a01
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAB' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
013bf3c50da61362adb7c9eb982bcffa
41ea8ed3321b7deae2b2c66e3b8264d6894d406f
describe
'55281' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAC' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
da58de45333c81942ed5469a744a4f93
18f9774ce8e9c60293637fb825045d03ec2668e9
describe
'25531' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAD' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
fa5d644a562877ae9d485a92bd42c1c6
c6a1551ef46a93cef0903b2cb680a24108c786c4
'2011-12-20T16:50:49-05:00'
describe
'66349' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAE' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
803c9bd7a241961e2b77f8063db4eb20
d9f89675bc84114907ffa5bafa86ba14aea6e2a8
describe
'26400' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAF' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
c983ddf8806069a244760389b10dcb74
dc4a7ff2dab777962596e3c632a7541cdc7a9850
describe
'65521' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAG' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
4960a61cfbd84ac2b47df3c077b782c3
f0f5275dc031985168a7ead0ad5e1e21d6f23850
describe
'26588' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAH' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
bb0735f401171dd84c6e49a070a75511
2c32a01f26191bfbd6b12d1b9d868533a154d13f
'2011-12-20T16:51:43-05:00'
describe
'66920' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAI' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
48a27920f03cd28531cb12bad42cd7ca
446f57e066bd814d9967fc4e6e2ecab5f92e61d8
describe
'26417' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAJ' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
ced1445eb51f6f515ab3944ab85865fb
5f7dac0f6954d385f0c7f413fec6adef414d10c6
describe
'67559' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAK' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
e7f1af12dd174987bbebd86a0ce89916
4692a388741b4e479baede6691d23f8188d3b5d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAL' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
66d870db04a5b3f1bae255a9376aa018
e3bbbb53aed32ba8d98859aa3bf9acdcd8b5ec6c
describe
'66881' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAM' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
73aaed0c82e4797f07dc57c8429fab89
e9e60540e42ad10ee95e207d13b6f5d3354691af
describe
'26469' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAN' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
5fa4b62639cbcc1078218ace40fb1872
fca9ee9aeb0bbc0f8be17991473de54e89eb7992
describe
'66561' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAO' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
eaa27928f46ada6aca10b72b0874c068
2ccc24545be768c45bda501c48b4ccd3d082352e
describe
'26502' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAP' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
c42b0abf7f82a1f39d65108f88e88fc7
88aa839aa82e2e9c9732d4883395aae62671ef3c
describe
'62286' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAQ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
18a325ed902586c7ce66fb75845c69eb
083e3bc6f76a9a03832bd23b74e33845accf5204
describe
'26211' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAR' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
b29e916341a6ea1669add7407a5a3cfb
a7019d565a7ef27bf9f858d0bf16bed412471c81
describe
'64461' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAS' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
f07ddd49397eee285a622b30d207248a
821908c00ffdcbf73d5d3eb43a72e255bd6e066b
describe
'26333' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAT' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
abff34b288a679b1379aad9dc5ec8d15
8f6b4018f4ed7a087d7e13cbb737a2a9d4b61df0
describe
'65063' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAU' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
455683ea3a7f3de8cdc9b08b00d5aabd
95f7f437ac35a1306dee4fb6d91fcb4fcee6d08e
describe
'26452' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAV' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
f908acd8ccbc2a2a3ca00e0c57c26934
13934df131f16fd5d2925fb2d24b7bfac1e2e81f
describe
'64852' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAW' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
78d29c80492f9403d22f72576adea5da
75058868651111568330b8e3834e6de2bdd45173
describe
'26410' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAX' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
59043b1ddb2548495d7f9afd39ef2ca0
edf83f9e34733985593f64c199136dfd380dbb3d
describe
'61336' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAY' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
6ed19d65c5a75791e76230dc02a9d5de
bac425cd331f0cf9026d9235bc105cbf60b143f8
describe
'26454' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJAZ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
c483927161ffaa24a5f11b10a5b27db9
0c3e22babe24893660c78c92ce6f028f6b7a395a
describe
'62152' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBA' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
f80cf7886c13d20b17d0afab21405ea9
e74c2fe3edfbf47c8a0c2d1ffb5d8167faa17ea9
describe
'25590' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBB' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
f4a8847013b846c7c7b0e0d3579b52d3
8dac5604ec2dd056d7ed37a4d472ec5edcbebd3e
describe
'52353' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBC' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
39e9818805c4e5c03c6c97bed006f581
c84108837fcd23d080fc5db2485c0872fdbe329d
describe
'24741' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBD' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
d68dab9d0cc707c965e564371664acd0
8669113da228006a4bcd1ccd138446084d7ea563
describe
'66931' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBE' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
ca3b21d7ef146533dd460fa570d36f1d
9738d2b96bcaf5427752cb7bd11aa4654dc961fe
describe
'26818' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBF' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
b777d9c760887783980c0a94da4cc044
cf4e309f6d25c77557bcd257cc1ef8ce834755f3
describe
'66430' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBG' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
fc3542d900d93e3c4ba508677e5747bc
c9f9047713eec06aa6faeb9d4c0c8763cd24e09b
describe
'26464' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBH' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
bc8eebe23d24cd4f7daf57ba05b64fdc
3ed6b76ea80fa9211d8bccf0d5882909a94653b3
describe
'65905' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBI' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
285f21087afd8f372a7effbf2794bbf0
4f248bfd7fad446edf1dccdb049d8bb660ca5ae0
describe
'26228' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBJ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
0a6682357b38923e4ae142b6268bbe62
557a3e49b85e3c2231d8299d050ac8c60c2f6886
describe
'57869' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBK' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
dc644030cb26a05d690db3e204f374a3
d496f2f091c6eddc479ef88f1e834bfd0fc336ce
describe
'25093' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBL' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
a840ff2d74e64840256480c0696fb1ac
5422dd1cac3b2e93f873b27b10e474e5a641e502
describe
'65656' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBM' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
54a339120ace9eced34ab5c811a0cc28
7753452fee459f21bd35cbe08cbec780d98e2f34
describe
'26215' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBN' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
ddd142a73327d299c65603316ec414b2
eb39fa36932b678551afd026b926dbfb8ec4eb45
describe
'65876' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBO' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
f4e0ac78c5301e24b9c7fd434621e435
1c685f690642cb7ecd4c4f8d387c4c09598eb1de
describe
'26169' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBP' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
8ac3f5d7fb3c7ec4e1a4e9dd9e088dcc
2e190550a69abb9c4f4123198d23d93b6dc16874
describe
'66254' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBQ' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
e4e983a2a3f66c06594093cb019554b2
736753b35324b8c254f047d600eae60cea98e3ae
describe
'26207' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBR' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
c109308b291585b4d162081ce266fd99
04bfdf62e3e3eb768b192731eddc8ee8b7dd21fe
'2011-12-20T16:52:36-05:00'
describe
'59029' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBS' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
415fa1e762d221edaabc6e9b20adb8b0
f29c48d9949fae7f541fcc52d2ff8067c511c7e2
describe
'25761' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBT' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
5f3cb7f906b31d7ee03d5a88228a0ded
fb08d895c3e28fbebe434767ae7a13b547000c3b
describe
'66223' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBU' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
07ad9c25d516a8ffc15702f74709aa04
8f4e6e542e2d8d6791f19ca2194724c6dca0f894
describe
'26329' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBV' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
9a3732cb4b7bcffce4b33e1a5143e5f0
4b9f02bf3617482522e346bd6bf1eed40dbc7e84
describe
'57349' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBW' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
8c93b551489fc98763653b71b22e7d7e
01538d137cd89a0d839f4b2b4e8503b8b5bf4bec
describe
'25127' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBX' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
e9e78f682c2f7971a006659eea866cd6
7d8f5e1b3c66e32d4537e10d9fa0ccc9d98c63b1
describe
'66107' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBY' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
97a4ea0440236416030d66eb0ef736db
ea44fc89074065bcd7475f2a17af3aa75ad4120f
describe
'26131' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJBZ' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
2c383f33de4bd14151378921ae38cbfb
1d08e3d208901deb17c68b5e85d01c55656a7372
describe
'67455' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCA' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
0dccd828f4d1d106589dc2d8e1517bbd
e0d89d7e3dfb839e3a1910b3c6b31d4ea18fc1bb
describe
'26403' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCB' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
7f706e8e086f410b4beb29da0bd2d4aa
738d61b323a6c36febf9bbd860870eeb1d50579e
describe
'53301' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCC' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
71a6d19cc260907c54274964cf42e4a8
d7443b5228dea124cceafac68d9c05b11d71214c
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCD' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
7db7019b076896b9fe1c9ccc7c524664
71f94cb80eeb43c92cf4f257f31696d8c8563eba
describe
'54589' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCE' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
535c735ada5fbfdf47a6bb269a02847f
c50d3c09e0b4320a2ba7ba87013de1104cf0a14d
describe
'25044' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCF' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
1832ef1867d7669d84c82e627e485cef
86c0a16d6ea87691754705dcc90e607da4097757
describe
'66625' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCG' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
a883b08ad6b9c77638e77cffd0a50c56
ca82dbfdc3479aafff1fb9a0708dfd223dc5fbf5
describe
'26668' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCH' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
a27ebd9b061065eb5f7eb10bc8c20a99
db1efd37c853bfcacfadd0b800a8c5b472201db6
describe
'67377' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCI' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
47a69c872c09374295a85c3537d8a872
72adfaa6609b8db07738e03fcfa78268e25d67e5
describe
'26813' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCJ' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
22337711b6c4896ec9a532b5fcd0c9b3
a275f062e6bb7a6e3906347caa492d96780ed2e5
describe
'67227' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCK' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
9ccdbeeea1befc4d17b833bda0bb044d
0f82eca575459ab137a3df8ac85ae160698b3c85
describe
'26744' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCL' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
f6de877e93027d8e4cda335d08ec953b
d651b80aa40418b1e72fd44a04ee088f51dc145f
describe
'66329' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCM' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
4d514f88b0e8e634d983181b63635c92
497320970c106b1d40273131d344d6482f80758b
describe
'26343' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCN' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
c304554482e8ef66a2efdcd30afaced2
d6fafab6f758c975d0f7982c53cceb460ced7d4b
describe
'67197' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCO' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
ee9a2ac554f311ee980ad739e8a4d683
c75ce4081b289dff4d95493b6d356bd125befab0
describe
'26419' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCP' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
13968e4a366119a24b575afbc4072d40
a4a7e6c6fb0be60a4afd6b888ff20c8f7febdcd4
describe
'67536' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCQ' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
f99562027d6b331a267cd88d9f92b74e
f0592ecea1dc1eec8575b43c099a4e66ef73486b
describe
'26482' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCR' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
418f957747a341f491b950b009908cdd
94d5d862622e70b2ed8a498ab652674b30ad605c
describe
'67650' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCS' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
5aa0f6cca07657f38e65639c780de341
eb77d6218d5d204a14a793538cc5e70001e718ff
describe
'26556' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCT' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
778dc4f5e6d60c6e57257bcb11fd6b59
8f2dc5b84623edb7ffc58b766c93218ac297235a
describe
'62805' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCU' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
70570ac00107d6f47a045004768f810e
1a75a60f7cc86e1a2119cd75dfbfb9bb138f5599
describe
'26670' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCV' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
a1176cad0d7bd70445c414bcd31667d2
2b6264beeb27e61066641e12e09c45b9f77cadfd
describe
'67173' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCW' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
c5365dd50a720cfc52eca51ded6f2c10
b24d66869d5aad02a0b03acda9e43a4e2ec08ca4
describe
'26433' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCX' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
64267dcddb473a829f9c2b7ecf254907
3446c49dd5c70a244b4c61780c9b91b722270a1b
describe
'61000' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCY' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
1a890f855991824228e529440ccae9ef
711deb715e75f3e79a70cd9732e1a542edf95fef
describe
'25721' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJCZ' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
a7c4fc394c85a8c3532f08921916f14e
2318764198ca52f7666f01240626cdbb92fc2181
describe
'67202' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDA' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
55add4abcbf8e0622edfbfbad526fd2a
88142e1f8891427096bab53267106f3d048cdab0
describe
'26406' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDB' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
2a2b6747ffac39cf9da117974b883110
8fa86f38738d1331aa598a5e60b3eb51cba60dfe
describe
'65855' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDC' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
910c65cc9b04c689e2aba99e70c4460a
8854715872ad12e91b59831a642d6afc354d5862
describe
'26344' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDD' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
c30fb046d860942149f7c008de182554
2aac3b5d79b195376fe7dc575e60b9ddeffe1f17
describe
'59492' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDE' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
b5cd63b82217bf4666d2562e8c7c3206
8d401cf844c2a6359f2b7c65878a04ddb2f08180
describe
'25940' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDF' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
58b9a0138cabf249ef9affaa71836086
7cc0e1ed912f6c5c722b6dd8881941580579fa77
describe
'65108' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDG' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
51f2eaaa4159d52829c921d14816565f
eed0759320714e8f6b7ccec431eed8fde6eecc0a
describe
'26437' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDH' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
bcb3bc36245c560875223e11b49fb4b4
f721bfbd5c99b81c7bd2be64fb16cf5756d527d1
describe
'62677' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDI' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
00db8223c9f71b0cc292e1ca41aee47d
58d480c1caa8c44fd593865e2499dfbed8202c59
describe
'25602' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDJ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
b93a1e4cf730e4d9e11843007e5ca8a2
53b648e88358a75ec0bf85722ed913fc640fca2f
describe
'50134' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDK' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
911d62861ff3dbbfae6dcfc05065bf16
3596613a9f89d0b21d273ba25a66c001c5d1dd19
describe
'25463' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDL' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
d3fe02a37af2b7e0574465361eab9bfc
157a334137ad232210bc58e701c8ba38b40f43e1
describe
'53780' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDM' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
147338871448f61e625142aa8a26fc61
15f233baa39a524f689d914e0cc96db3aba9fe6b
describe
'25746' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDN' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
a66d6b10f50f6b34fcaac4e80eee4a51
eabfc50cc0ca9933e90605987227d28ac513e086
describe
'67033' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDO' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
ca99370411bd8dc363c2d85b74477129
ada37b401412cf0ab2f20601b57396eb6acf92de
describe
'26589' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDP' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
98ed1ff9dc0742eebcbcf130ab85d12f
905a9afb4b84533eda927ebeb6d593df0203b8c0
describe
'57692' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDQ' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
064c9499d2a7c3efa93699c15c010c21
1823ff2548c0d24b815ec147780a75cfd58c3660
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDR' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
01e5d67398af11879526a8e70aa3c6ea
8074798212067c6aba9d95a102de968687156440
describe
'66560' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDS' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
3c7f049c3d4278b509078bf2b639db2b
b42c065e9456e3bf6e31a68d1bf637962d8ed13c
describe
'26806' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDT' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
a803b513286fd95a83dd0ae4423a82f6
d384f2824c5ea5336b620925aeaf9a4c506abcef
describe
'65343' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDU' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
32148bb5a8856f326ff9fa53690e9f64
83af6fcccc761ace5709d297f0b7826c8611dedf
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDV' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
1d49ad7066bbec36bc25269b8f6c79f9
778c1877d4f2b7d6f44024771dc429c231dcae6f
describe
'65253' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDW' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
19f39c99aeb3b449614a8ac889fc150f
1b2b3e98e99f9f2f35d77eb24d7d65d1ac0a3330
describe
'26629' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDX' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
5c331b4fb18ab4a7bb8893c7bafc14e2
d3e18f11495e85dff4d7676afb1a34de7c2e46bf
describe
'66454' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDY' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
93f57191c0ee022ae2f7deb31ae0451d
a7516d1a6ea6f57393928c125799a0a5aec97fa0
describe
'26726' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJDZ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
57b6994b67715068f6a2255eaf64c59c
cb1459fa1b9654990c4484d878c53c715d330d77
describe
'60561' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEA' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
b6a5ba5b48fb3eb4afc38656cc291c77
a67b8967a0df66f817903b74f60778f4d74c1fed
describe
'25897' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEB' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
cbff6b4b35eba7bc1b620e13905b6544
1e7b83eb8142ac906c62b8f8bb9b73a88aefef9c
describe
'65637' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEC' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
0ccbd4377ad3ee5e0bf4c611b773968d
6eabdb286e25adde7420b884b20697ccf1f2dd17
describe
'26306' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJED' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
f18f4ee1bdffd1a6f014cd1159170e24
1a9c098a530c1b4f5e97955d35608f123de3b4ba
describe
'65409' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEE' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
4e0e87b13edcff57e38404f4957b36be
29fc028966fb7c3d46af9c9b883a8f168c171ca9
describe
'26733' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEF' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
bdc77324a7d3c49a59afde912f7ed5bf
b37ff0326b3f34c8bd99e511401b55e30a67d910
describe
'67385' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEG' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
0d652dacc22cf5cfae711a4da5a84154
fbc285a62fcf80ac935032a2ee8ccada0db30978
describe
'26597' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEH' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
ae3ea1829e2f0895ede2cc5e44cd2458
1d5a34e63366929806e4bba2304f7bd271c9b8b5
describe
'67406' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEI' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
0575d46d34162f7ba03b6044e35f0f8b
ac2350f24c07c464ea3749265546e0c0a959a634
describe
'26680' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEJ' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
076890a430e867fde0db6fefefab3053
cc83f1573d5fefeea3340a856541b2fa2b87911a
describe
'63523' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEK' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
e060f8fa3832175fc4de5705bd6fbcfd
6710be24c7ef773f84bc044b1fbebc0d12a86fd1
describe
'26367' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEL' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
3f3cbe3584e9fc12e2f73fc818fe317b
d14dade57c3574e6797bfdf9b258c89d5920808b
describe
'65709' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEM' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
87b1479a530ec18a9454282f8dbfcadc
f9cae9b0774d3e630a56ade2ea5e319cce7b2f05
describe
'26725' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEN' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
1afa152935cc55e2690076759c51a617
16b38bd808231525bba710e2e941e59561e4edc4
describe
'66838' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEO' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
9f6435f9f4add57e53adec04e9a542d5
d0a8ad00d1fd3a7c76f6d0de98f6db4d074c131f
describe
'26460' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEP' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
cd1bbf2d7798027ee947f26e2bc2b0da
61c9af8ba902266193472e93052b1746af244c30
describe
'67180' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEQ' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
ee1f43e3d67e89065b1b193ec20ca156
e97b6d652786e3883972eb01d599a6c769d2449a
describe
'26576' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJER' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
d4bd414209992e32db5f152376910342
731569888be252c3099e10188e3114dad1ab2c01
describe
'59730' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJES' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
e0f56a45b05f24120076cd4821a2fa2f
65d4c2bbb3004965989de655f68ce90277e3c421
describe
'25717' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJET' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
2a718c5d2f9d0eb5ee4d511a87041685
ccf5434c7f88aa2c98e031fe7044b4e2b831a994
describe
'66632' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEU' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
077046acfe0737db6584be82949eee59
e4ed72c22ae646f86cbf7e75762b910b38d0db07
describe
'26669' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEV' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
89372f839cb1bbfa11fcb8ae0755c035
e2e6a86c9d86138b8b5fb112eb2f343a418a75b0
describe
'56364' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEW' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
c3dd3a13b9c2219b334bfab4212eac1f
cd696256539bd7a6c2c055d726bb36bf30835bd7
describe
'24947' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEX' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
da2aee5a35a60505ddbf2efd33bf522e
6c727048b06b19366283579ac256625c7a313733
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEY' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
8b6c6db5f5405e6864c178bb331e4e44
ada5eda3992be14e6d34d79fba44eb12166b27e1
describe
'24891' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJEZ' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
d0e89d214cc74760db2756c97f8c2936
de6a8b2669b8fffc960f0168448f08ad3186115c
describe
'68456' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFA' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
e93bccb1e5d889be73e31a1dac5d43ed
894f93d697a5617429ba803ca7cb1a21eb98a47f
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFB' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
0d1d33f202b359b785f699d26a62c5e4
a65414a2d0d6b530e3e927f0c2cadbbde0ef635a
describe
'63208' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFC' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
6b4fc8d8d82b4286621d1643be1dd9b1
b4109939f8de06c2edad3f389b589144a5c91f3a
describe
'26905' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFD' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
e2eb21e4e9c4f6f37c8f5772fab4540e
770b3e811d229da30b61ce9d17bf522e92d0467a
describe
'66206' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFE' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
3f6ae19aad23a2867bdbbc22f5d6be00
54a91fc2eb75543a7ec1784cf5a36b52a1b8ff51
describe
'26805' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFF' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
a5bac321adb027ba5429df6198f77642
ec783f8b79ca56fab39e156ec7ade1cc434c344d
describe
'67470' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFG' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
f9104ca953b46f0659018ce68d9e227d
28d65a3f8d8b4a9b1071e666ff4271c0b2dcfd63
describe
'26982' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFH' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
d16c56dd7a460f2983ed97b6d9488fca
713cf174a61bd315b102783454e29e93c1430caa
describe
'66123' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFI' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
342c51d61cc51b970a731997aec6da62
bf507771582cb40dbd3ff62761e91d893efd8ca7
describe
'26610' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFJ' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
e551589a5895ec42fd9983331b981e90
02f9c0ab87e49ee71b7ad2450718da49dd38f259
describe
'57736' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFK' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
1d4943c386fa83919fefd17ee7427dc2
1b362345169bc92be1f08ae8369eda49a20dd465
describe
'25540' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFL' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
4a67d73fc26000818c2c19c1a9242e35
66290c3c13d630eb613620e5ec304ac846790a9c
describe
'60962' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFM' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
4a4a433e0a7d5a70333db522b5cc75e6
a0beee5d255acae1238e3c5ad880e0d11c837b14
describe
'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFN' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
74bcd6465590d4649d3c3e45f65e5ca1
4ba9fa4f3a037c80d9dac4d64e7c90bbc81d54c9
describe
'66620' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFO' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
04154a737166d54073b44e81c68f2a42
c4c7dbb1d51405d8772757982b286e66c1842d14
describe
'26595' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFP' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
49da572eade2e6447a17e8ad8c8fc3be
b93511786ebd1b02abe0d55821d5445568fa81b4
describe
'60929' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFQ' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
67123e6bcc8fa7285e06e8685aa7e5ce
7e19119a732f63ed23cd4dc835c5992d362929f9
describe
'26060' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFR' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
eb659d41d2a805f6185bb62f632a8e4c
bc26db998ca1b507a0b5661c4b08b66ab2c79fcb
describe
'65998' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFS' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
ad706bae29d29b7b3962e1c8e414179f
50856e66768e65e3893352460ea3cc7e81c6e6e6
describe
'26487' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFT' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
3967302de8fa65af559268d1fceaa016
4bb41e6a62a73eb226161c11ce7232ae226f09f6
describe
'61137' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFU' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
0e55bbd3467e7c3d75f02bc53bbb6ab8
182d1da95d837a42b9d9d639983ff26fd9a632cc
describe
'25810' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFV' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
ae3846744a05265879f6506b902d281e
1ebd3bddcfd9c42f295dc534826085d0e280815e
describe
'68248' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFW' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
b180da95b09d1cabc1f952182b2692c7
f3fec86aa054c27f8959ba64b547e8ac5c9330f3
describe
'26671' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFX' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
9cfe8adf6d1a49b2b40a4795f09f09d5
fa8a44e496a42370b43cdc28e029294104a66b56
describe
'56935' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFY' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
7ce1d124be1b5effdf2330b67af4f76c
6f978a82230a8b032ce0971b515676d4095ca0d2
describe
'24791' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJFZ' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
a90126fbb5ca84bbfe26a708c7c5f1ee
dc838849cc30ee8c3484140c4b83754f5d68cd1b
describe
'52064' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGA' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
41fbbb24febea7c69cf032097e6993ab
264082c41cac606da8352a00af38ee3960cb5e20
describe
'24618' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGB' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
3059e894c77a79320c193a69f4a5de67
0cd0d401e9ec9383bf43c7546e7de103cb176fd2
describe
'65798' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGC' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
5630341a3aac10485d1692fdab1ac913
0bbaa9c2d6e1934db8e87b1590c56d45177b2094
describe
'26543' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGD' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
d3cdd841bf7a45f45d5127109b5156c2
0f3c18139c69ec1abc62b5e840fe06733dc73dbe
describe
'68161' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGE' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
8ab2c3444b1473880da57738a0f1bf41
77a10bdad12b040786d63e68a5353cf7ec446e20
describe
'27095' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGF' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
4dcfc000877b46c768ce500992b2c8a5
358c5b5b35e63bb9c0bbde80a212ea9c45f273f3
describe
'68165' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGG' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
4a39b8d82e8f054fd002062b840900e6
af270dda6a94a5ba19d5b743a6ee4e5b1b92918d
describe
'26752' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGH' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
33189e045a3fbcedf8bd5cba1a2f49c7
ac5d097f6f3b50929da6a21698c4aca746731f69
describe
'64583' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGI' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
a053e4001f321baeb665af14612e8d89
bdf5bc7db36b3da14f9fb3262df6e8a622a83615
describe
'26287' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGJ' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
b73e289ad1c52dd9cedb19f00710aa81
b291296adeba90eefc1f177f340c65c9db747d97
describe
'66804' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGK' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
e2d7fb8d085bd54b16e28f6ea0024d86
2f8d76ba09d8abdcd01733ec07cc9df2722efc09
describe
'26316' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGL' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
11d8d59eb7699556b78270e500299334
b029a5a66cf7b494bd8f6f4d9bc98eee27c7dbde
describe
'66484' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGM' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
73df9f5a87f6ee20bb73af0f7c4fef9f
4b7a521cc857a71d00f396fde476ba62b3fc2dfe
describe
'26568' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGN' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
e406da842a33b1249caeadd9a7a1b0a1
77a4ac950885c2db8839f7e40fcee07ab4c1d5b0
describe
'68458' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGO' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
2dcd1d00118c9534b52dba66da83abd3
d72db5d9b48b975cb804eaf8cd275c6892e8effb
describe
'26950' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGP' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
417de61dfc29643328e9fd5fc27cad30
bf985949153271f7a8a06c8210b253e594423b2f
describe
'66661' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGQ' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
20c66d47c4a584a6eca8a133b485fcac
be60deaacd6795e133f5bdc65162586d8cf18859
describe
'26613' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGR' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
d213502a6a55114f56812d34b9ffaeb4
4d6957e5d34c0ee53f77e907be722e8d284d956b
describe
'57828' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGS' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
5df5845100fcb65ff1595c8d9994e68c
980e8e6903d29a9001839488952913604c29c6c0
describe
'25574' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGT' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
0429c3635602384979cc5fa8577f03ce
abdf13fc236f4ff9a4c698f80c489edf6ff0de1f
describe
'67680' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGU' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
46c506278a221f55dd5c0addd5f2cb6b
629225da27feda0bca62b0fb378b3fe325630d42
describe
'26778' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGV' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
cd5137a637111bb775f158d36f3e93a9
e590286eb37724003bba426fdf157cc3c0ca34fc
describe
'61510' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGW' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
cf805b480ef48f4c4d9da464e3e6b56a
8130e3e1f48b322bc649799e0ec2e12c64eb8aca
describe
'25922' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGX' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
ba4f52efe5da809941bb3a76c99c43c4
cd94a7a89a5d0d46e887960349efc0a729cc27df
describe
'66363' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGY' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
f2a7d714446af327f105aef61b5f3fe1
da8f9d2b29caf53e5a420df5d9beeffdba4f4aee
describe
'26552' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJGZ' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
d39e266b911cc05962d58bb8b0e94985
fc3ca4500884cc5abe993b2a830b2f3373ceb155
describe
'54487' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJHA' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
648336f6907e98c9f2e77d3e213d4495
3dd081efd91a20e7dc9e725d7b48990a3683997d
describe
'24802' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJHB' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
76330e16930609ead566d9762d299a4b
0321cea5dafd18c7484ccf25f3af64e2ebe54e68
describe
'59781' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJHC' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
02a32afdb2df45f1d3ecd9d8ed3b8a43
3ca89f566c99630496e8581e33b1949e0af0ee30
describe
'29950' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJHD' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
be68d73f05d8a009c2d4fc475f7bf00d
017752945839a2ddca57cfc3911ea137eecabb42
describe
'32007' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJHE' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
f1587cb881312d9304f5c30bedfa8735
1dff125e93c51417339c7bab71e07fb3eaf6e5ea
describe
'24329' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJHF' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
f4626623dca37cc8b785a480e35d9031
ecb69a420aa8f2b415c85644947a371d6b9755db
describe
'40265' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJHG' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
b12623e8e114ca8efa159d04369c6cbf
8867e1d8a4df49c677fcda7846f4d2a3a3791512
describe
'23908' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJHH' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
655c2deef21a36657ae8413e1fbb0257
ab1f38cab64af166e9f65a008ec1c30258f7c745
describe
'56' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJHI' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
0c10769439c9aceb23040cdcb3e87cd5
9907d5056de3299305ce28fa8a2b5f92fcac81f5
describe
'356316' 'info:fdaE20081125_AAAASCfileF20081126_AABJHJ' 'sip-filesUF00086464_00001.mets'
33d8a9b5974f2723f11279ec853ec7d5
7278c7981e472545175798e6b9a7b237ab831bc4
'2011-12-20T16:57:01-05:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T13:41:28-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.