Citation
A Little house in Pimlico

Material Information

Title:
A Little house in Pimlico
Creator:
Bouvet, Marguerite, 1865-1915 ( Author, Primary )
A.C. McClurg & Co ( Publisher )
Armstrong, Helen Maitland, 1869-1948 ( Illustrator )
Place of Publication:
Chicago
Publisher:
A.C. McClurg and Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
245, [4] p. : ill. ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fatherless families -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Mothers and sons -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Widows -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Kindness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Domestics -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Social classes -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Wealth -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1897 ( local )
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Marguerite Bouvet ; illustrated by Helen Maitland Armstrong.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026597407 ( ALEPH )
ALG2662 ( NOTIS )
04378807 ( OCLC )
12030869 ( LCCN )

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The Baldwin Library












A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO



BY MISS BOUVET.

A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. Small 4to. Illus-
trated. $1.50.

PIERRETTE. Small 4to. Illustrated. $1.25.

A CHILD OF TUSCANY. Small 4to. Illustrated. $1.50.

MY LADY: A Story of Long Ago. 16mo. Illustrated.

$1.25.

LITTLE MARJORIE’S LOVE STORY. Small 4to.
Illustrated $1.00.

PRINCE TIP TOP. A Fairy Tale. Small 4to. Illus-
trated. $1.00.

SWEET WILLIAM. Small 4to. Illustrated. $1.50,

A. C. McCLURG AND CO., CHICAGO.





A LitTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO

BY

MARGUERITE BOUVET

Fllustrated by

HELEN MAITLAND ARMSTRONG



CHICAGO
A. C. McCLURG AND COMPANY

1897



COPYRIGHT
By A. C. McCLure Aanpb Co.
A.D. 1897

All rights reserved



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GEORGE HERBERT AUGUSTINE JENNER
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IS AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE
“ As the game waxed more exciting”. . . . . . . Lrontispiece

“When suddenly the door flew open, and Beckie appeared from

Within ee Ate ae ee ee Te OZ
“¢And she gave me this rose, mother dear?” . . . . 2. . . 53
“ The little maid stopped short in arranging the tea-table” . . 66
“ There was an uncomfortable pause” 2. 2. 2 1 1. ew. O75
“It was here, too, that Martin Boggs added up his accounts” . 91
“¢Qh, look, mother dear, what smart little ponies’” . . . . 102

“For a long while that evening, little Sedley and his mother sat

Beside the Are. i ws aide af xk Ge Herve oe. ise ei oO
“Sedley sat rubbing his small legs up and down” . . . . . 128
“ Her small, white hand was resting on the back of the chair” . 166
“The curtain parted, and little Sedley ran.in” . De ee 168
“As the game waxed more exciting”. . . . . . . . . . 187
“They had carried him to the nearest couch”. . . . . . . 194
“The man looked at Beckie in mute astonishment”. . . . . 215

“Sedley ran down a second time and put the long roll back in
its place”.
Cousin Chadwick

231
ae ges ee . 236
“Oh, Sedley, dear, itis a beautiful place?” . . . . . . . 243



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.



CHAPTER I. |






~~ LITTLE house in Pimlico!
There is nothing wonderful in
: that, say you, for there are
many houses in Pimlico: some great,
and some small, some towering up into
the blue sky overhead, and others hid-
ing their modest roofs under the. shadow of their
grander neighbors; some old, and queer, and
tumbled down, and some quite new and‘ smart of
appearance; but the little house of which I speak is
different from all these. First, because although it
~ is small and humble, and its walls are gray with
years, it is yet the tidiest, brightest, cosiest house of
all the neighborhood. In fact, if you look about
you in Pimlico you will find that the prettiest, sun-
shiniest spot in all that section of the big city of Lon-
don is just where this Little House stands. There



14 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

is a small green park directly in front of it, where
the Pimlico children dance and sing and romp of a
summer evening, and the gentle south wind seems
never to tire of blowing thence its most refreshing
breezes during the long hot season, or the sun to
pour its warm rays in at its windows throughout
_the bleak winter.

But perhaps it is the people who live in this
Little House that make it most attractive. For
the neighbors well remember what a forlorn, dismal
place it was only a few years ago, before the sweet
face of pretty Mrs. Hamilton and that rosebud of
a babe smiled at them from the quaint windows as
they passed ; and before little Beckie, the housemaid,
filled the whole house with canary-birdlike notes as
she went about doing her dusting of a morning.

Now, Pimlico lies in one of the bends of that
most tortuous river, the Thames, —in the one just
above Vauxhall Bridge and this side of Chelsea.
It is one of those curious little suburbs which’ have
sprung up all about London in the most unexpected
places, and which have a little air of independence
quite their own. But Pimlico has the great advan-
tage, so its inhabitants think, of being very close to
that most aristocratic portion where dwell the nobil-
ity of England. If you turn from any one of the





A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. I5

little by-streets of Pimlico northward, you are sure
to come upon the highroad leading to Buckingham
Palace and St. James’s Park! The Pimlico world is
very proud of the reflected glory that shines upon it
from that luxurious quarter, and some of its bolder
spirits go even so far as to claim a doubtful inti-
' macy with certain superior beings in livery em-
ployed in that high-bred atmosphere.

For instance, there is Mr. Boggs, the genteel pro-
prietor of “ The Blue Flags,” without exception the
most famous chop-house in the borough, whose
brother-in-law’s brother, being head butler in. the
house of Joseph Trundlewood, Esquire, of Belgrave
Square, holds occasional intercourse with a first
cousin of one of the footmen at Clarence House.
Through this very direct and unquestionable source
Mr. Boggs derives most of the palace news and
court gossip, and with unfailing good nature, which
is his great characteristic, he deals out his knowl-
edge with many embellishments and repetitions to
- the willing ears of those whom he sees in the course
of the day.

Now this same Mr. Boggs is a notable personage,
—a leader, as one might say, in the community; not
only on account of his enviable intimacy with the
royalty, but because of many fine qualities and high



16 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

social position in Pimlico, a first-class establishment
all his own, and a thriving, prosperous business.
Added to all this, he possesses the kindest heart in
the world, and is what his lady admirers call, “a fine
figur’ of a man.” It is no wonder, then, that all the
maidens in Pimlico eye him with admiration, and
smile at him shyly, and use all their arts to captivate
him, and that their honest mothers agree in pro-
nouncing him a “most likely young man.” Mr.
Boggs is not what one might call handsome, but he
has a good, wholesome face, very broad and puffy,
and of a certain reddish hue which gives one the
impression that he is all the time trying to suppress
some explosive burst of merriment. He has good,
- clear, honest eyes, a generous nose, — with a small
wart on the end of it, to be sure; but no one minds
that in the least, for what matters so trifling a thing
as a wart, when the nose which it adorns has a snug
little income from the highly respectable business of
grilling chops for a hungry public?

One sunny afternoon in December, between
three and four o'clock, just at that most convenient
time of day, between luncheon and dinner, when
trade is not so brisk but that he could absent
himself for a brief period, Mr. Boggs stood at the
door of the Little House, a bottle under each

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A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. | 19

arm, and holding a covered dish with both hands.
He was just trying to arrange matters so that he
might reach the knocker without damage to his
provisions, when suddenly the door flew open, and
Beckie, who had noted his arrival from an upstairs
window, appeared from within, arrayed in fresh
white apron and smart little cap.

“ Mis-ter Boggs!” exclaimed the little maid, rais-
ing her hands in an attitude of the most profound
astonishment.

“Miss Bec-kie!” ejaculated Mr. Bogg s, feigning
to be equally astounded.

I must pause here to tell you that for some un-
accountable reason every time Mr. Boggs appeared
at the door of the Little House, which was seldom
less than three times a week, little Beckie would
clasp her hands and utter an exclamation of sur-
prise, as if perfectly overcome at anything so
unheard of and unexpected as the appearance of
Mr. Boggs. And every time that this rosy gentle-
man caught sight of the bewitching little cap, and
felt Beckie’s sharp, black eyes staring at him so, his
own eyes would grow big, his lower jaw drop, and a
look of unspeakable amazement come over his mild
countenance.

“Why, I thought it was the butter-woman,” said



20 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

Beckie, recovering from her surprise immediately.
“Oh, Mister Boggs, come in, do! Szch doin’s
you never dreamed of. We’reinsuchastate! That
man Binkle, the lawyer, ’s been and took Master Sed-
ley off in a coach to see his Uncle Trundlewood, at
the Square —a grand coach with two horses and a
footman, as made all the neighbors stare. And oh,
it was all done so in a minute, that my dear mistress
she’s all in a flutter about it, and can’t sit still a
second for looking out o’ the window!”

“Dear me!” cried Mr. Boggs, “it must ’a’ been
very suddent, for I saw James only night a-fore last,
and he never breathed a word, and surely he’d
’a’ told me if he’d knowed anythink.”

“Of course it was sudden; so sudden that it
most took our breaths away. But come into the
entry, pray do, Mister Boggs, and tell me who it is
you ’ve come to see.”

This was rather a perplexing question to put to
Mr. Boggs; for he was really so fond of all three of
the inmates of the Little House that it became a
difficult matter to specify. He hesitated, and looked
at little Beckie in a way that made her blush to the
very edge of her cap, and then mustered up courage
enough to say meekly, “ Mrs. ’Amilton.”

“Oh, is it?” replied the little creature, a trifle



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 21

disappointed, but trying to conceal it by assuming
an air of bustling importance. ‘“ Well, 1’ll call mis-
tress directly; she’s a-walking up and down the
library a-worritin’ herself over goodness only knows
what, for 7 think it’s high time that old fox of a
Uncle Trundlewood took a Z#é/e notice o’ that darl-
ing child, Master Sedley, and did something hand-
some for him! And what have you brought now,
Mister Boggs?” she added, before that gentleman
had a chance to get in another word, as she eyed
the two bottles and the covered dish.

“It’s only a bit o’ my best hale, and a little tooth-
some morsel for your dear mistress and the young
master, Miss Beckie, and I ’ope as you ll get a taste
on it yourself,” said the proprietor of “The Blue
Flags,” gazing at the little maid with ill-concealed
admiration.

Beckie had lifted the cover of the dish, which she
took from Mr. Boggs’ hands, and peered into it..

“ Bless you, Mister Boggs! what a dear man you
are!” cried she, having discovered its contents.
“Tt’s an uncommon fine bird, so brown and fat;”’
and she screwed up her lips in pleasing anticipation
of the feast, and looked up at him.

Mr. Boggs was on the verge of placing a sly kiss
on the tiny pursed-up mouth that was so temptingly



22. A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

near his face, when, suspecting his wily intention,
the artful Beckie skipped down the corridor like a
white-winged butterfly, so wide were the loops of
her apron strings, to inform Mrs. Hamilton of the
arrival of this visitor.

“Tt’s Mister Boggs, ma’am, as has brought you a
broiled partridge, a plump, juicy bird, ma’am, and
some fine old ale as’ll bé juSt the thing to set you
to rights to-day, after all this topsyturviness!”

“ How very good of Mr. Boggs!” said the young
mistress. “Ask him to come in, Rebecca.”

“You’re to step into the library, if you please, Mis-
ter Boggs,” said the fairy-footed Beckie, tripping back
immediately. “Mistress wants to thank you herself.
It’s a blessing you’ve come to-day, sir, of all agita-
tion days! The sight of you’ll do her a heap o’ good,
as I’m sure it has me,” said the sly minx, knowing
very well how this bit of flattery would thrill the
burly form of Mr. Boggs; and she led the way.

In the little room which Rebecca dignified with
the name of “the library,” and which was sitting-
room and drawing-room and library all in one, there
stood a young woman dressed in black whose features
were pale and delicate, but whose face was very
beautiful. She had large dark eyes, which glistened
with grateful pleasure as she crossed the room from



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. "23

where she had been standing by the window and
held out a small white hand to the good-natured
man, who, nevertheless, was always a trifle awkward
and timid in the presence of so genteel a lady.

“It is so kind of you, Mr. Boggs, so kind of you
to think of us again. I am afraid you are robbing

in a friendly manner.

“Not a bit of it, ma’am,” interposed the good fel-
low. “Ifthe flavor o’ that hinnoeent little partridge
pleases you and the young master, why, it'll give
-me a happetite. I attended to the grilling of the
bird myself, ma’am, and it popped into my ’ead as |
watched him sizzling and browning, what a plump,
nice bit as he’d make for you and Master Sedley.
And this hale, ma’am, is the best that can be found
in my cellars, and I bring it accordin’ to the doc-
tor’s directions; for I overheerd him say, the last
time I was visiting Beckie in your kitchen, as how
you ought to take a bit o’ somewhat to restore your
strength, and so I made so bold, ma’am.”

After delivering this speech, in a hurried and
blustering manner, Mr. Boggs drew a deep breath
-and fanned himself vigorously with his hat.

“Pray, sit down,” said the young woman, her
smile broadening as she listened to him; for, as



24 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

Beckie had said, there was something so genial and
comfortable about this good man that Mrs. Hamil-
ton felt better and calmer as soon as he entered the
room.

“ Begging your pardon, ma’am, and thanking you
for the honor,” returned Mr. Boggs, in answer to her
invitation, “no! I never could sit in the presence
of my betters, ma’am, and them betters a lady; I
was n't brought up to it, and I could n’t change my
‘abits at my hage. If you’ve no objection, Ill step
into the kitchen and have a word with Beckie;
I’ve something very partic’lar to say to her.”

“Certainly you may, Mr. Boggs. Rebecca is a
good girl—”

“A uncommon fine young woman!” broke in
Mr. Boggs with enthusiasm.

“ And she will be glad to see you,” Mrs. Hamil-
ton added with an encouraging smile, for she could
not help being amused. The worthy man never
took leave of her, after any of his visits of benevo-
lence, without expressing his firm intention of “hav-
ing a word” with Beckie, having something “ very
partic’lar” to say to her, which daring determination
seemed somehow to evaporate the moment he stood
in that fascinating young creature’s presence.

“Wishing you a good-day, ma’am, and good



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 25

ealth,” said Mr. Boggs, bowing himself with great
care and politeness, “and my respects to young
Master Sedley.”

“ Ah, my little boy has gone to Belgrave Square,
Mr. Boggs, to see his uncle, who expressed a desire
to know him for the first time since we came to
England;” and at the sudden recollection of the
thought her voice trembled, and she betrayed her
agitation. “I trust he will be pleased with my little
one, and love him!”

“ And sure, how could he help it, ma’am!” re-
sponded Mr. Boggs, retreating a few steps nearer the
exit, for he was in mortal terror lest the poor lady
should begin to weep. ‘ How could any one help
loving such a dear, blessed little creetur as Master
Sedley!”’ :

“He will be sorry to have missed you, Mr.
Boggs.”

“Thank you, thank you, ma’am, my compliments
to him.; and he knows as he’s always welcome at
the ‘Flags’ whensoever he feels inclined for a quiet
chat about politics, and the nobility, bless him!”
added Mr. Boggs, backing and backing himself out
until he struck up against the wall of the corridor
and could get no farther.

He speedily found his way to the kitchen, where



26 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

Beckie received him cordially, for she was proud
and pleased to be the one to inform him of the
“doin’s” at which she had hinted when he first came
into the house, and which he was no less eager to
hear the particulars of than she was to tell them.

The young widow returned to her place at the
window, her white hands clasped, and her eyes
eagerly fixed towards the place where the little
street in which they lived turned and lost itself in
the arms of a broad highroad.



CHAPTER II.



oe HE was a young woman, too young

We to have been left alone in the ©






world by the one being who had
loved her and taught her the true
meaning of happiness; to
have been left alone with a
little child that looked to her for every need and
comfort of its young life. It was the old sad story.
She had been a poor young governess in a rich
lady’s family, and had spent several lonely years
there without really knowing how lonely those years
were, until one day a young’ officer who came often
to the rich lady’s house noticed her, and loved her
for her delicate beauty, her modest manner, and
sweet gentle nature. He was an impetuous and
fearless young man, and had never loved any one so
much; and he vowed that he would make her his
wife, and a great lady, though he was then but
a young captain in the English army. He was
hopeful ahd ambitious; and when one is young



28 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

and in love, the whole pathway of life seems paved
with glorious promises, and nothing in the world
seems impossible. .

He was poor himself, but he had great.expecta-
tions, and this had made him welcome in the circles
of the rich; for every one firmly believed that
Uncle Trundlewood had chosen him from among
his many relatives to be the heir of his vast fortune.
That was just where the trouble all began. Mr.
Trundlewood no sooner heard of his nephew’s
attachment for the poor young governess, and his
determination to marry her, than he grew very angry
and unreasonable. He threatened to disown him,
and to cut him off without a shilling, if he persisted
in thus disgracing himself and his family.

Now, there was nothing whatever that could be
called disgraceful in the young man’s desire to
marry the pretty governess; for she was a lady by
nature, and was possessed of more inborn refine-
ment than many of the rich patrons who employed
her, or even than Mr. Trundlewood himself. She
was accomplished and beautiful and clever enough
to grace any position to which good fortune might
call her, and she had a tender, generous heart that
should have won for her the love of every one; but
she was poor and without station, and the great



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 29

world in which she lived took little account of her
many virtues because of these two unsurmountable
obstacles.

Uncle, Trundlewood was a cross, crotchety,
crabbed old bachelor, who had no real cause to feel
partictlarly aristocratic or above the rest of man-
kind, save for the power his money gave him to
assume airs of superiority and mastership. He had
made a large fortune in the manufacture of wines
and vinegars; and the one seemed to have heated
his temper and the other to have soured his dispo-
sition. He.lived in a very large and magnificent
establishment in Belgrave Square, kept a whole
retinue of servants, whom he bullied continually
and paid handsomely for the privilege, had his
horses and dogs, and a fine old country place in one
of the most picturesque districts of England; in
fact, put on all the outward appearance of a landed
gentleman of England, which it was in truth his
dearest ambition to become. He had also a bevy of
poor relatives, —cousins and second cousins, and a
whole regiment of nephews, — besides countless con-
nections by marriage, who cringed and fawned to
him, and courted his favor in every way that was
obnoxious to him, when they were in his presence,
and called him an old fox behind his back. But he



30 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

was too keen not to see through them, and gave
them full credit of their good intentions.

Much to the disgust of all these relatives, Uncle
Trundlewood had singled out young Hamilton from
the lot and made a sort of pet of him. Perhaps it
was because he was so unlike the other members of
the family, or because he was the son of a favorite sis-
ter; but he was certainly a handsome, spirited young
fellow, who was not afraid of Uncle Trundlewood,
and very often told the old man what he thought
of him. He did not care for Mr. Trundlewood’s
money, or what he did with it when he retired from
this world; and so far this independence had
pleased the old gentleman mightily, for it had never
yet conflicted with any of his plans, and he took a cer-
tain pride in the young man, —in his fine appearance
and gentlemanly bearing, his hearty, honest, genial
nature which made him so popular wherever he
went. Mr. Trundlewood had made up his mind
long ago that young Hamilton was the only one of
his family who could do him credit and who could
worthily hold the dignified position of heir to the »
Trundlewood fortune. He had planned that his
nephew should make a brilliant marriage. He had
money enough to buy almost any gentleman’s estate
in England, he thought, and to secure the hand of a



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 31

nobleman’s daughter for his nephew. The one great
ambition of his life which remained yet unfulfilled
was to ally himself with some great family, to
mingle.in the society of titled individuals, to be
recognized as a power among them, perhaps to be-
come titled himself some day; this is what he had
hoped to achieve with his great wealth.

You may imagine his disappointment, then, when
the only person on whom he had founded all his
hopes suddenly slipped from his power and brought
to bear all the independence of his spirit, which the
old man had so reckoned upon, to thwart him,
Trundlewood, in his dearest wish!

They had a stormy time of it: the old man flew
into a towering passion, and swore, and threatened
terrible things; but finding that the young man
was stronger than he, and more determined and
independent than ever, he tried another course. He
pleaded with his nephew, and promised him endless
benefits if he would give up the young woman and
be guided by him in the choice of a wife better
suited to his position. But it was all to no pur-
pose; young Hamilton declared, over and over
again, that he would rather live in a hovel all his days
with the woman he loved, than in a palace bought
with Uncle Trundlewood’s money, without her.



32 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

Then the old man told him to go and see how
long they would both live on such fine sentiments,
and how comfortable their romantic love would
make them when they were cold and hungry, and
warned him never to come back for help, as it was
not his habit to encourage worthless, ungrateful.
vagabonds with low tastes and no pride. To all
this the young man retorted that he hoped Heaven
would forgive him if he ever appealed to such a self-
ish, hard-hearted, unreasonable old man as he for
anything whatsoever. And with these high words
they parted.

It was not many days after this scene that the
two young people were married, and the same week
the young officer and his regiment were ordered off
to India. His wife followed him there —away
to that farther end of the world, glad to leave her
country, her few friends, and the scenes of her
sombre girlhood, only to be near him. She knew
nothing of the words that had passed between her
husband and his angry relative. He would not for ~
the world have grieved her tender heart by letting
her know that she had been the innocent cause of
so much strife or of any one’s ill-will. Away to
that remote country they went, to forget everything
in their old life but the sweet memory of their love.



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 33

It was a lonely, marshy, jungly district. in which
they were stationed; there were but few people at
the garrison, and still fewer comforts. The heat of
the summers was intense; there were dangers to be
faced, privations to be endured; and yet they were
happy there, happy for three short years, happy as
they had never been in their lives before. For what
were hardships and privations to them! what did it’
matter that they were strangers in a strange land,
and without friends! Had they not each other, and
was not the presence of the one to the other the
greatest of Heaven’s blessings! Beside which, every
trial, every endurance, every sacrifice was glorified
for love’s sake. .

He, in his heart, remembered his uncle’s parting
words of warning, and wondered at them; and
pitied the old man for having never known the
joy of a love like his. And she, thinking of her
lonely life in the homes of the rich, and having ©
seen no such happiness there, thought how infinitely
‘better it was to be a poor soldier's wife, living in
miserable quarters at the farthest end of the world
with him, than to dwell in the stately palaces she
had known, unbefriended and unloved.

Three years, I say, they were happy. Ah, they
can count themselves fortunate who have known

3



34 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

even three years of joy upon earth! What if it be
followed by calamity or cruel sorrow? Will not the
memory of it live forever, and bring a smile to sad-
dened lips even while they mourn? For a brief
period of earthly happiness is but the foretaste of
a more joyous hereafter.

One scorching August day young Hamilton’s
company was ordered some forty miles away to quell
some rebellion of the natives The burning sun,
the squalid air of the marshes, the long march, told
upon even his young and sturdy frame. Horses and
men dropped by the wayside, exhausted with the
heat ; and the elephants, drawing their heavy burden
of artillery, wearied and lagged. It was terrible.
There was no air to breathe, no water to slake their
thirst, and the sun high up in a torrid sky, and beat-
ing down upon them during two interminable days!

The day following the attack, the young captain
caught the fever, —a week later he was dead. At
home, in the garrison, —for that was their home, —a
little son had been born to them; a little child who
should never see his father’s face, who on the very
day of his coming into this great world had lost his
natural protector and friend.

It was nearly a month before the young wife
learned her misfortune. Alas, even that was too



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 35

soon to know the fate of the beloved one who
should never more return to her. There are scenes
in some lives over which we must draw a veil, — sor-
rows too deep for human eyes to read. Let us
gently close the door of the chamber where the
young mother lies suffering and weeping. We
may not stand in the presence of so much grief.
The whole garrison was hushed and sorrowful; but
none sought to give her comfort, for Heaven had
sent her the only thing that could soothe her mute
despair, —a little child, a beautiful boy, with his
father’s eyes and smile, whom she pressed to her
heart.

The news went home to England. The young
captain’s death was reported as having occurred in
combat; and Uncle Trundlewood read the account
with a shock, and was in a state of formidable
gloom for days after. Some thought that he re-
pented of his harshness to his handsome nephew;
others, that he was more disappointed than grieved,
—and perhaps these were not very far from right:
For this untimely death, at the beginning of a per-
haps glorious career, put an end to all hopes which
the old man might still have cherished of a recon-
ciliation. Many times he had thought it over, since
the parting with his nephew. He was not disposed



36 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

to be rancorous if his desires were to be gained in
the end. Many things might happen to change the
condition of things,—the woman might die, and:
leave the young captain once more free; he might
thereafter distinguish himself, and come back to be
. forgiven and received, as was not infrequently the
case in such affairs. But now death, that least ex-
pected of all calamities, had put an end to every
hope and plan which the old man had not been
willing to relinquish.

He ordered his whole establishment to be put in
mourning, for the sake of appearances and his posi-
tion, as he explained in a thundering voice to his
valet, and possibly because he liked to have the
world know that the brave officer of whom the
papers spoke so glowingly was related to him.
Hope now sprang afresh in the breasts of the many
relatives, when the object of their long-cherished
envy was thus removed. Some held up their hands
in thankfulness, and declared it to be a real dispen-
-sation of Providence to further their own cause; for
weré not their own sons and daughters quite as
worthy of their uncle’s favors? But it speedily died
out again when, some months later, it was learned
that Uncle Trundlewood had, after a long and
stormy consultation with his lawyer, sent a letter to



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 37

the widow of his nephew, offering her a living and
a home if she would return to England with her
son.

“]’ll make no promises,” he had said to the lawyer,
“as to the amount, or what I intend to do with
them, till I see the boy, and what sort of chap he
bids fair to be. - As for the mother, I don’t want to
see her, but I suppose she must be with the child, at
least until he’s old enough to look after himself.
They can have the house in Pimlico; it’s near
enough for me to see the boy when I choose, and
it’s a good-for-nothing, tumble-down old place any-
how, that brings me in nothing as it is. What did
‘those Briggses say they left it for?”

“Tt was very much out of repair, sir, very much
so; and you gave orders that nothing should be
done to it, as they were paying but fifty pounds
a year.”

. “I should think not,” growled old Trundlewood,
“fifty pounds a year, and calling for repairs!
That ’s just like the insolence of beggars!” and he
stamped his foot so violently upon the chimney tile
that he suffered a severe twinge in his gouty toe.
“You may have the roof patched where it leaks, and
new shutters put to the windows where the old ones
have tumbled off; that’s all, do you hearme? She’s



38 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

not been accustomed to anything better out there in
that mire of a country, and if the boy deserves
better, he shall have it. I’ve had enough experi-
ence with helping a pack of drivelling, maudlin,
blackguardy relations; I won't be caught any
more!” and with that he gave his lawyer a look of
sneering contempt which was. his dismissal.

It was a year or more before the young mother
could take the long, long journey ; for she received
gratefully the generous offer of this unknown friend,
this relative of her husband’s whose name she had:
never even heard mentioned, and whose immense
means of helping her and her little boy were quite
unsuspected by her. When the time came, how-
ever, she turned her face towards England with
something like pleasure in her heart. She was
going to Ads people; they would see her beautiful
child, and perhaps love her for her husband’s sake.

But when she reached her journey’s end, there
was no kind face to greet her, no fatherly smile to
reassure her, no strong protecting arms to comfort
her; but only Mr. Binkle, the lawyer, with his cold,
expressionless face; not a smile of welcome, not a
look of interest, as he hurried them into the hackney-
coach. And little Sedley, who was wont to make
friends with every one, shrank instinctively from the



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 39

tall, sallow gentleman and clung to his mother’s
dress. They drove in silence across the great city,
through one little street after another, through
crowds of busy, hurrying people, past brilliant shops
and miles of low dingy buildings, until at last they
reached the neighborhood of Pimlico, and finally
the door of the Little House where Beckie stood
with open arms,—the pleasantest and most com-
forting sight which had greeted the poor lady since
her arrival-into the big gloomy city. And here
they alighted, and were welcomed by the little maid,
in the gray twilight of a dull autumn day.



CHAPTER III.

ROM the very first moment
that Mrs. Hamilton entered
the Little House in Pimlico,
she and Beckie were fond of
one another. For where,
indeed, was there in all the
world, said the little creature,

another such a gentle, sweet, angel lady as her mis-

tress! and such a darling lamb of a child as Master

_ Sedley! Rebecca adored her mistress as soon as

she had set eyes on her, and tried to prove her de-

votion by immediately bustling about to make her
comfortable; and the young widow, when she
entered the strange, lonely little home, found the
girl’s pretty, smiling face and cheery words of wel-
come very soothing. She felt very weak and tired
after the tedious travelling; and somehow, when
she entered her own room and looked about her,
it was all so strange and different from what she
had expected that she sat down and cried pite-





A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 4I

ously. Whereupon little Beckie threw her arms
around her mistress and called her a score of
endearing names, and cried too; and the little boy,
who felt like a birdling in a strange nest, set up a
dismal wailing at the sight of his mother’s grief;
_and thus, in the midst of their tears, the three
became the best of friends.

It was not long before the news spread among
the good Pimlico folk that the dear lady had arrived
from India. All the neighborhood knew about her
long before she had come into their midst; though
how this should be is difficult to explain, except that
perhaps the head butler at Mr. Trundlewood'’s house
might have overheard something of that old gentle-
man’s conversations with his lawyer, —it is a trick
head butlers have sometimes of overhearing strange
things through the keyhole, — and, confiding the
intelligence to Mr. Boggs, that worthy spirit had
felt it his duty to make it known to the community
at large. But however that might be, every one in
Pimlico seemed to know the condition of young
Mrs. Hamilton’s affairs; how and why she was
come back to England, under what provisions she
was to live there; who was her so-called benefactor,
and what an uncertain, precarious lot hers was
indeed, having to do with that miserly, treacherous



42 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

old crow, Trundlewood. All the women were in
arms about it; indeed, they knew so much more
about the matter than did Mrs. Hamilton herself,
that perhaps they had reason to be indignant.

“It’s a sinful shame!” cried one, “to make that
pretty young creetur live alone in that rat-trap of -
a house, when he’s got a whole palace to himself.
She looks as if she’d been accustomed to somewhat
better! ”

“ There ’s room enough in that big house for him
and them too!” said another.

“ He’s a miserable old screw, and no mistake!”
said a third.

“Perhaps he’ll want to marry her himself when
he sees how pretty she is,” suggested one; “it would
be just like his impudence, the ridiculous old
vampire!”

For somehow that gentle, sorrowful young woman
and her lovely child had won the hearts of these
simple, well-meaning people before she had been
among them a week. And Mr. Boggs, who was
never slow in deeds of kindness, and who felt,
because of his connection with the butler at the Bel-
grave house, that he had been especially appointed
by Providence to watch over the fortunes of the new-
comers, was the very first to show his kindly feeling



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 43

by sending or bringing little dainties to the door of
the Little House at first, and later venturing with
much trepidation into the presence of the lady her-
self. He had spent many pleasant hours thus with
Miss Beckie, trying to initiate her into the art of
grilling a mutton-chop, of which he was a master.

It was wonderful to see how suddenly the Little
House was transformed by the magic hands of this
same Beckie, and the gentle presence of its young
mistress, and the merry voice of the child, who grew
up there in innocence and grace! A perfect bower
of flowers and green vines flourished at the windows,
behind the white curtains. The old stone steps in
front of the house were swept and scrubbed and
polished till they shone like granite. The window-
panes were always as clear as crystal, and any one
looking through them from without could have
seen a cheerful fire blazing in the hearth of the
pretty room, and flowers and books, and simple but
graceful ornaments, and a beautiful baby at play
upon the hearth-rug; in fact, all the things that
give to a humble home an atmosphere of comfort
and refinement.

Old Mr. Trundlewood himself would hardly have
recognized the place now, if he had happened to
- pass that way; but this he never did. From the.



44 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

day Mrs. Hamilton and her little boy had entered
the Little House, he had not been near it. He had
not even expressed a wish to see his nephew’s child,
and positively refused to meet the mother upon any
terms. Mr. Binkle, however, called upon her every
week, as punctually as time itself, and left an allow-
ance of two guineas; two guineas from a man who
was worth millions !— but she did not know of that,
and was grateful for even that little. To all her
inquiries regarding their benefactor, the young
widow received but one answer.

“Mr. Trundlewood, madam, is an eccentric per-
son. It is his will that you shall know nothing of
him until the proper time comes; and his will is
law.”

The lawyer passed for a very conservative, close-
mouthed individual, as his profession required him
to be. But he’ must certainly have grown more
communicative when he got with old Mr. Trundle-
wood. For there was not the smallest possible
detail concerning the young woman, —her appear-
ance, her manner, her conversation, her mode of
living, her house and interests and those of the child,
—that did not find their way to the old gentleman’s
ears. He knew all that went on at the Little
House, just as well as if he had lived there himself.



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 45

Once when Mr. Binkle expressed to him the
widow’s desire to thank her benefactor in person,
the old man had broken out into a great, harsh,
sneering laugh, and said: —

“ She wants to thank me, does she? Well, let
her try it; she “ll not care to do it again very soon!
Is the woman a fool, Binkle, that she thinks I am
favoring her?”

Mr. Binkle replied that the lady in question was
far from being a fool. From his personal observa-
tion of her, he had gathered an opinion quite to the
contrary. He judged her to be a woman of much
good sense, and of character. “Indeed, sir,’ he
concluded, “I was much surprised to find her so
much a lady in manner and appearance.”

But the old man scoffed at the idea of her being
a lady; a governess a lady! forsooth, a scheming,
intriguing hussy who had stepped in to spoil all his
plans, that’s what she was!

“And much you know what a lady is, you,”
added Mr. Trundlewood, with a look of the utmost
contempt at the imperturbable lawyer.

Although Uncle Trundlewood showed such a
deep aversion to having any intercourse whatsoever
with his nephew’s wife, his interest in the boy
was correspondingly great. He questioned Binkle



46 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

a great deal about the little fellow, never grew
weary of hearing accounts of him, however trifling
these might seem to be. Was the boy handsome,
and like his father? Did he show good breeding
and good blood? Was he a clever little chap, with
spirit enough not to be always tied to his mother’s
apron-strings? To all of which inquiries the lawyer
replied in the affirmative, with only one exception,
and this was that, unmistakably, the child was pas-
sionately fond of his mother; but, he added, by way
of reassuring the old man, that this was the conse-
quence of his extreme youth, and the fact of his
having had no other companion. This would
change, no doubt, when the lad grew up and the
time came for fulfilling Mr. Trundlewood’s wishes.
This one thought, however, annoyed the old uncle;
and for that reason he had made up his mind not to
see the little fellow until he was old enough to come
to him alone, to talk reasonably, and show “ what
there was in him,” as he expressed it.

Five years elapsed, and little Sedley had attained
the mature age of six, and showed such remarkable
cleverness and was such a quaint mixture of serious-
ness and childishness, that Mr. Binkle, who had
noted the development of the child’s characteris-
tics, deemed it high time he should make his



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 47

uncle’s acquaintance. It all happened in one short
afternoon in December, and it was a great event, I
assure you, for the dwellers of the Little House in
Pimlico.

Mr. Binkle drove up at the usual hour, but not in
the usual old hackney-coach in which he made his
weekly visits. He stepped out of an elegant
brougham drawn by handsome horses. He did not
wear his accustomed expression of placid indiffer-
ence; there was actually a gleam of .something like
excitement in his round beady eyes, and his thin
lips and dilated nostrils were perhaps a little more
contracted than ordinary; and there was a certain
air of importance and mystery about him, as he
entered the little library, that could hardly escape
the eye of the young mother. She greeted him
with her sweet simplicity of manner, and begged
him to be seated, and inquired after Mr. Trundle-
wood’s health. .

“Mr. Trundlewood is quite well,” replied the
lawyer with gravity, “and presents his compliments
to you, madam.”

This little extravagance Mr. Binkle permitted
himself on this one occasion, perhaps to make the
interview more impressive; although he had never
been, truthfully speaking, authorized by his grim



48 © A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. ©

old client to present his compliments to any one.
But somehow, the lawyer felt the gravity of the
situation, and wished to prepare the young widow
for it by prefacing his remarks with something of an
extraordinary nature. Mrs. Hamilton blushed and
smiled her acknowledgment of the attention, and
then he proceeded in a strictly legal tone of voice:

“Mr. Trundlewood, madam, as you have perhaps
had reason to observe, is a person of singularly
eccentric views. He has seen fit to induce you to
come here from India; and. though you and your
son have been in England now five years, he has
never until now expressed a desire to see his
nephew’s child.”

“J trust it is through no fault of ours, sir,” said
the young woman, “through no misunderstanding
he may have had with my dear husband,” she added —
hesitatingly, for she had not lived all this time in
this strange, solitary attitude towards her husband’s
relative without forming suspicions which she had
been too sensitive to give utterance to, even to her-
self, until now. “I hope you have told him how
very grateful I am, and how often I have wished to
thank him; how I have taught my little child to
love and respect him even without knowing him!”
and her lips quivered as she spoke.



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 49

“T have told him,” said the lawyer, “all that I
knew would interest him in regard to your son, in
whom, if I judge aright, his interest is centred.
But, it may be well for you to know that, that—”
and here the lawyer faltered for the first time in his
life; for how could he go on to say what must
surely grieve her, when he felt those tender, appeal-
ing eyes fixed on him? Yet he knew she must be
told, and went on after a slight pause: “It will be
best for you to know that there was a difference
between him and Captain Hamilton before they
parted. But this, 1 am confident, has not affected
materially the prospects of his heir. Perhaps you
are not aware, madam, that Mr. Trundlewood has
amassed immense wealth. He has no offspring;
but he has a great number of male relatives, any
one of whom would be glad to come in even for a
small share of his fortune. You are to be con-
gratulated, madam, that he has shown a disposi-
tion to: favor your son; it is his intention to make
him his heir. In fact, I have just come from draw-
ing up Mr. Trundlewood’s will, in which he leaves
everything to Master Hamilton.”

The young mother listened to him with wonder-
ing eyes.

“Qh, sir, ” she cried, clasping her hands, “how

4



50 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

can this be! My little child is too young, too young,
and we are too simple to alter our lives to the
demands of a great fortune. His father was a poor
man, though noble and generous, and the thought
that his child may some day be the master of such
wealth makes me tremble. Money is so dangerous
a thing, and my little Sedley is so good, so guileless
now!” —and she fell to weeping without knowing
why, except that the sudden news had bewildered
her, and that she had too unworldly, too sincere and
honest a nature not to be struck first of all with the
grave responsibility that such a change would bring
into the life of her little boy.

The lawyer looked at her in silence ; his lip curled
slightly, possibly with surprise at the simplicity of
this young creature, who, poor and dependent though
she was, could weep at the news he had brought.

“Pray, calm yourself, my dear madam,” he said.
“When your son is old enough to appreciate the
benefits derived from it, he will, I dare say, find a
fortune a most comfortable thing to be burdened
with.. Many of Mr. Trundlewood’s relatives would
look at the matter in a different light and take it as
a cause for rejoicing rather than grieving!”

But she did not hear his words, or comprehend
his business-like way of offering sympathy. What



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 51

did he know, this frigid, calculating, emotionless
man of the law, whose profession it had been for
many years to crush and stifle every generous im-
pulse that might rise in his breast? What could he
know of the thoughts and doubts and fears of a sen-
sitive heart like hers? She was thinking of Sedley,
the little child who had been the very thought and
substance of her life, of that close companionship in
which they had lived since the beginning of his own
short life, and how she had nursed fond, modest
hopes for his future. Now all this was to be
changed, and it seemed as if he should not be quite
like her own little boy, her own Sedley, when she
looked upon him again. She could not think of
him in this strange, new position.

Mr. Binkle was the first to break the silence.

“Tt is not possible that you can object upon
purely sentimental grounds to anything that will
so vastly affect the prospects of your son’s life.”

« Ah, no, I do not object,” cried the young mother.
“How can I object to so great a mark of Mr.
Trundlewood’s regard for my dear husband's mem-
ory! Who am I that I should stand in the way of
my child’s happiness! But, oh, sir! you cannot
understand a mother’s feeling in a moment like
this. Perhaps I am foolish and weak to feel thus;



52 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

but it is all so sudden and strange, so hard to
realize.”

“JT think it will make no change in your mode of
living, —at least not for many years, madam,” said
the lawyer. “You will have ample time to grow
accustomed to the thought. Mr. Trundlewood,
though an old man, is yet in excellent health, and
will, in all probability, outlive your son’s majority,
until which time he proposes to do nothing beyond
defraying the expenses of the boy’s education. He
has only expressed a wish to see him, and requests
that I bring him this afternoon to Belgrave Square.”

The young mother was all in a flutter. Sedley
had gone out for a promenade in the big park with
Beckie. Would it be possible for Mr. Binkle to
wait? She would herself go and fetch him. But
just as she rose the door of the little library flew
open, and in ran Master Sedley himself, with arms
outstretched towards his mother.

“Oh, you don’t know what has happened, mother
dear,” he cried, quite out of breath with eagerness.
His curls were tumbled with running, and his cheeks
glowing with the sharp December wind, and his
eyes dilated to a deep, dark blue.

“Indeed, ma’am, you would never guess,” inter-
rupted Beckie, who was even more agitated than



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 53

her young master. “I’ve always said as no one
could n’t tell Master Sedley from a prince; no, not

even princes themselves could n’t!”

' “We were looking at the deer, mother,” Sedley
explained, taking his mother’s face between his little
hands and trying to draw her atten-
tion to him, “and a grand lady
passed, and she stopped and looked
at us, and she came back and
kissed me.”















“Tt was one of the princesses,”
interrupted Beckie with energy;
“T know it was, for the person with
her kept saying continual’, ‘your
highness this’ and ‘your highness
that, and she asked me whose
child this was, and I said ‘ Mrs.
Hamilton’s, your Highness,’ and
she looked surprised and _ said,
‘Dear little boy,” and —”

“And she gave me this
rose, mother dear, and I’ve brought it to you!”

“Well, well,” said the young mother, blushing,
and smiling at the child’s pleasure, “this is a great
day for you, Sedley dear, for here is Mr. Binkle —
go and bid him good-day —who has come to fetch



54 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

you to Belgrave Square! Your Uncle Trundlewood
wishes to see his little nephew.” ,

Sedley had not noticed the presence of a third
person in the room as he came running in, for Mr.
Binkle was sitting in a remote corner, which was his
customary place, and from which he made all his
observations of the little family. The child went
straight to him, and held out his small hand in quite
a gentlemanly fashion, saying, —

“How do you do, Mr. Binkle? I hope you are
quite well, and my Uncle Trundlewood too.”

Mr. Binkle had been making a note of the little in-
cident about the princess, and thinking what a sooth-
ing effect it would have upon the old man’s pride
when he related the circumstance to him; and he
was in the act of replacing his note-book and pencil
in his pocket. He hastened to take the small hand
in his, and replied to. Sedley’s inquiry in as grave
and demure a manner as though he had been
addressing his most formidable client.

“You will be very pleased to go and see your
uncle, will you not, dear?” said Mrs. Hamilton,
coming close to her little boy, and laying her hand
on his shoulder; but her heart was beating very fast.

“Ves, indeed, I will! I’ve always wanted to know
my Uncle Trundlewood. Mr. Boggs has told me



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 55

so much about him. He and my uncle must be
great friends. And that’s very nice, for Mr. Boggs
is my friend, too.”

The lawyer raised his eyebrows incredulously.

“Excuse me,” heexplained with much delicacy, “but
is it not Mr. Trundlewood’s butler who is upon terms
of intimacy with the person of the name of Boggs?”

“Well, perhaps so; perhaps I did n’t understand
him ; but I thought he said it was my Uncle Trundle-
wood, — that doesn’t matter much, though. He’s
told me all about the house and the big rooms, and
the dogs and horses, and I should judge it was a very
wonderful place to visit. I am very glad I’m going
there with you, Mr. Binkle. How soon may we go?”

“ At once, if Mrs. Hamilton pleases.”

“Now, this very minute?” asked Sedley, in some
surprise.

“Yes, immediately,” said the lawyer.

Here, Miss Beckie, who had been standing behind
her mistress’s chair during the conversation, raised
her hands in her most emphatic and impressive way,
and exclaimed in an audible whisper, “ Well, I never
did, and 1’d like to know who ever did! Merrycles
will never cease!”

Of course, there was great excitement; and Mrs.
Hamilton and Beckie flew about in pretty confusion



56 . A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

to get the young master ready. He was immedi-
ately taken up to his bedroom and attired in his
comeliest little suit of black velvet, and his neatest
boots, and he wore a beautiful broad collar of real
lace, the gift of a rich patron to his mother some
years ago, and a little scarf-pin with the British
arms upon it which had belonged to his father, and
which always made the little boy feel like a loyal
young Briton. When he reappeared in the library,
a few moments later, the transformation was quite
perceptible to the observing eye of Mr. Binkle, who
uttered something flattering between his teeth, which
was heard, however, only by the clock on the mantel.

They stepped into the little street, and there the
great carriage door was opened by a tall footman in
gorgeous livery who looked somewhat amazed at
the sight of such a bright little apparition issuing
from so modest a home. He closed the door with a
dignified bang when Mr. Binkle and his small com-
panion were comfortably seated in the deep, soft
cushions; and then they drove off in great state,
the child’s bright face smiling from the window as
-long as he could see his mother standing at the
door — until they had turned the corner, and were
full on their way to Belgrave Square. And this was
indeed the first eventful day in little Sedley’s career.



CHAPTER IV.

HIS was the very afternoon upon
which Mr. Boggs appeared at
the door of the Little House
with his provisions of ale and
the plump brown partridge, and
you may be sure that he opened

his eyes very wide when Miss Rebecca, after in-

stalling him in the most comfortable chair of her
kitchen, began to relate in detail the day’s strange
happenings, and how she and Master Sedley, while
walking hand in hand in the park, had encountered
_a princess (wild horses could not make her say it



was any one but a princess); and how she had called
Master Sedley a. beautiful child and given him a
rose; and how the darling had looked up at the
lady, perfectly dauntless, and thanked her with a
pretty speech, “just as calm and easy-like as if he’d
been a-talking to you, Mr. Boggs. Oh, my, the
courage of the child is surpassin’! Every time I
see him going up to that dried-up, lantern-jawed



58 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

skeleton of a Binkle, and hold out his little hand
and smile his sweetest, and say ‘How d’ you do,’ I
think to myself, ‘It’s his Indian bringing up; no
child could do it as hadn’t been born in a country
alongside o’ crocodiles and panthers and birds o’
prey!’ Why, my goodness me, Mister Boggs, that
man Binkle gives me the shivers so with his green
eyes that I could'n’t a-bear to get that close to
him, myself!” —and little Beckie made a feint of
shrivelling all up, and drew her chair a trifle nearer
to Mr. Boggs, showing plainly that she entertained
no such aversion for him, at any rate. “So I don’t
fret about his meeting with his Uncle Trundlewood,
for I know he ’ll come out of it alive, and creditable
too; I just wonder at it, that’s all!” °

Mr. Boggs remained in thoughtful silence for a
second or two, his forefinger caressing the wart on
his nose, and presently gave utterance to this
prophetic outburst.

“JT tell you wot, Miss Beckie, I don’t like it!”

“Don’t like what, Mister Boggs?” asked she, a
little anxious, thinking he might be referring to his
entrenched position between her and the kitchen
grate.

“The turn things is taking,” said Mr. Boggs,
mysteriously.



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 59

“You mean that Master Sedley should come in
for all his uncle’s money?”

“That ’s wot I mean!”

“Why, Mister Boggs, I’m surprised at you, I really
am! Who better could he leave it to, I should like
to know? I always thought you was as fond o’
Master Sedley as any of us!” |

“And so I am fond o’ him, Miss Beckie, and
fonder’n some. I love him better’n—”

“Then why do you begrudge him his good for-
tune?” interrupted the loyal Beckie, whom it took
ever so little to throw into a temper when there
was any question of wronging her young master.

“Z don’t begrudge it him, bless you! if it was
a good fortune.’ I would n’t for the world, you know
I would n’t, Miss Beckie,” explained Mr. Boggs, per-
ceiving that he was misunderstood. “ Nobody’ud
- be gladder to see the little chap made a prince of, as
he well deserves to be; but I don’t like the looks o’
old Trundlewood’s wanting to see him and not the
ma. - I don’t like this lawyer-medium business; you
may be sure there’s somewhat crooked where you
find Binkle poking his nose; and I haven’t a grain
o’ faith in Uncle Trundlewood’s good intentions,
and would n’t give a ha’penny for his promises.
He’s a unaccountable, purse-proud, bullying old un,



60 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

without a speck o’ feeling in him, who’d as soon
disappoint a chap after raising his hexpectations as
not. I know a heap about him; James hears more
and sees more through that keyhole than most
people do with the doors and windows wide open,
and he knows all that goes on at the big house, and
keeps me pretty accurate.”

“Mis-ter Boggs! you don’t mean it?” exclaimed
Beckie, who had cooled down quite suddenly under
_the effect of that gentleman’s far-sighted wisdom
and the impressive manner in which he delivered
himself of these grave opinions. “Well, well, who
could ever have imagined such rascality as deceiving
a helpless, innocent infant!” added the little maid,
stirring up her fire, and looking as if she would like
to roast old Trundlewood, Lawyer Binkle, and the
whole Belgrave outfit over it.

“ These, of course, is only the private opinions of
Martin Boggs, Miss Beckie, and uttered in strict
confidence between us. I would n’t ’a’ breathed a
word of it to another living soul but you,” to which
the young lady made a modest courtesy in acknowl-
edgment of the compliment, “and I trust as the
mistress ll never hear of it through me, for I
would n’t have the dear young creetur a-worritin’ of
herself over things as may never happen.”



‘A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 61

“ Oh, you may be sure o’ one thing, Mister Boggs,”
said Beckie, “and that is she would n’t fret about
the money. She don’t want it, like the rest o’ old
Trundlewood’s vampire relations! All she wants is
to have him love her little boy and her. She cried
when she told me that Mr. Trundlewood had sent his
compliments to her, ‘For the first time, oh, Beckie,
for the first time in these five years!’ she said.”

“It’s a blessing she don’t know more about him,”
said Mr. Boggs.

“Ves, but how ’ll she feel when she finds out in
the end what a puckery old persimmon he is! Oh,
I’ve suspected him, Mister Boggs, from the very first
time I’ve laid eyes on him that day you and I was
a-walking in the Row, and he was a-lolling back
in his boorooch, a ugly, gouty old thing, looking as
cross as a hyena! Oh, my goodness me, it makes
my hair stand on end, like the fretfuls of the porcu-
pine, just to think of it!” —and little Beckie, who
had given her head a great many emphatic nods dur-
ing this speech, proceeded to readjust her cap and
to tuck her imaginary “ fretfuls ” underneath its brim,
at a little mirror that hung near the window.

Mr. Boggs, greatly admiring the performance,
could not help repeating under his breath, “ What
a uncommonly clever little woman that is, to be



62 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

sure!” and was just on the verge of launching into
that “something partic’lar” which he had come in
to say, when a rap at the kitchen door put a check
to his brave resolution.

This time it was indeed the butter-woman, and
Mr. Boggs, seeing his opportunity fly out of the
door as the butter-woman came in, determined, not
without a sigh of relief, to put it off uae a more
propitious season.

If any fellow-man had stopped Mr. Boggs on his
way from the Little House that afternoon, or indeed
at any time when Miss Rebecca was not by, and
asked him what were his intentions in regard to the
pretty housemaid, he would have answered, as bold
as a lion, “Why, I mean to marry her, sir, to make
her Mrs. Martin Boggs and mistress of ‘The Blue
Flags,’ and who’s got a word to say against it, sir,
I should like to know!” And this had been, in
truth, his firm intention for nearly a year, and
seemed but an easy, trifling thing to say, when
addressed to a disinterested party. But when it
came to putting it in the form of a question and
to the sharp, keen-eyed little Beckie herself, it
assumed the proportions of a momentous under-
taking, and quite staggered the big, good-natured
man. He knew that she regarded him with no aus



-A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 63

favor, and that he had begun his conquest of her in
the most promising manner, by bestowing his atten-
tions and kindness at first upon her young master
and mistress, in whom Beckie was wrapped up soul
and body. He had seen her often for the past five
years, in all her varied moods, and she had never
addressed a sharp word to him. She had accepted
his invitations to walk in the park of a Sunday after-
noon; she had been with him to a Punch-and-Judy
show, and several times to the Zoo, and yet with all
this encouragement he walked away that afternoon
with the tender avowal still trembling on his lips.

Do not laugh at good Mr. Boggs; there are
plenty of others in the world. just like him, who,
simple-hearted and modest in their own conceit,
would rather face a whole battery of the British
army, or a whole kit of wild animals, than hear the
fatal “no” of a little woman like Beckie !

While Mr. Boggs and the little maid had been
engaged in this little conference in the kitchen,
the young mother was still watching beside the
window of the library, and looking eagerly out
into the street toward the spot where the big car-
riage had turned and disappeared, although she
knew it would be some time before her little boy
could return. Yet Mr. Trundlewood’s house was



64 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

not such a distance off, she thought; it was but afew
minutes’ walk from Warwick Street, in which they
lived, to Belgrave Road, and then with those swift
horses they would soon be at the house in Belgrave
Square. She tried to follow him in imagination,
tried to picture his awe and wonder as he entered
that stately mansion, and hoped he would be his
own brave, natural little self when he came into the
presence of his mysterious relative. She hoped
they would be kind to him, — he had known nothing
but love and kindness in all his short life, and he
was so winning and so manly a little fellow that she
could not believe any one could do otherwise than
love him. Yet her heart was full of vague fears and
misgivings; she had not been able to grasp the full
meaning of all the lawyer said; she had been too
agitated and surprised; but now that she was alone,
and had time to think it over, his words came back
to her, and struck her with a strange significance.
He had said that Mr. Trundlewood was very rich,
and lived alone in a great, magnificent house, and
had no family to provide for or to think of, and she
wondered about a man who had shown enough
interest to send for them all the way from India,
and yet who had never made himself known to
them, except by communication through his lawyer.



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO 65

She was afraid to form an opinion of such a per-
son, —it was all so mysterious; but she had been
accustomed to live in this mystery for so long now,
and had met with so little encouragement when she
had tried to inform herself about her benefactor, that
she had long since accepted the situation and
become reconciled to it. She knew that Mr.
Trundlewood lived in Belgrave Square, but she did
not even know the house. The neighbors in Pimlico
had talked enough about it, but their comments had
never reached her ears; for these good people
among whom she seemed to have dropped like a
bright angel, kept from her anything which might
shock or grieve her sensitive nature.

While she stood there absorbed in her medita-
tions, it had grown suddenly dark ; for in December,
the moment the sun disappears behind the top of
the tall buildings, the little streets in Pimlico be-
come very dingy and dark. She was not roused
until Beckie came in to light the little parlor, and
fetch the tea-things, and mend the fre.

“Oh, it is you, Rebecca,” said Mrs. Hamilton ; “it
must be growing very late.”

“No, ma’am, it’s but a bit after four,” said the
little maid in a cheerful voice, “ though it’s been a
long afternoon to us, ma’am, and such strange goin’s

5



66 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

on! Z feel-as if I’d grown as old as Methooslam
since this morning, ma’am. It seems as if there ’d
been a funeral in the house since my dear darling
Master Sedley’s gone! But he ll be in directly, for
it’s nigh on to three hours since that hooked-
nosed harpy —”

“ Rebecca!” remon-
strated Mrs. Hamilton,
in gentle tones.

“T mean Mr. Binkle,
ma’am.”

“T am afraid you
, havea grudge against
5 that gentleman, Re-
becca,” said Mrs. Ham-
ilton, smiling at the
vehemence of Beckie’s




‘\ § utterance whenever she
\ had cause to speak of
eae = the lawyer at all.
“f—bear him a
grudge, ma’am, that wet curl-paper of a—” The
little maid stopped short in her operation of arrang-
ing the tea-table, and finished her sentence with
a look of utter contempt at the coal-scuttle. ‘No,
indeed, ma’am, except as I might wish his eyes



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 67

were n’t so green, and his nose so humped, and
his lips so smirking, and his voice so like a saw-
But one can’t owe folks a grudge for their ugliness,”
added that young lady with a superior air, as she
caught glimpses of her own pretty face and white
neck in a mirror above the chimney-piece.

The truth was that Miss Beckie did have a cause
of complaint against Mr. Binkle. He was the only
man who ever came into the Little House that did
not pay some tribute to her bright eyes or rosy
cheeks, and she had for a long time resented the
persistently frigid manner in which he ignored her
existence, “taking no more notice of me than if I
was a chink in the wall!” as she expressed it.
_ But it must be remembered that our little Beckie’s
admirers were among that artless class of men — the
butcher, the baker, and the candle-stick maker — who
make it no sin to show their admiration, and from
whom these pleasantries are as innocent as they are
agreeable; whereas Mr. Binkle was a gentleman of
grave profession and dignified deportment, which
forbade his noticing anything of so frivolous a
nature as Rebecca’s charms. Yet she was fond of
asserting that “better gentlemen than zm have
paid me compliments and given me a kind word in
passing !”



68 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“Come and have your tea, ma’am; it’s ready and
~ steaming,” said she, drawing Mrs. Hamilton’s arm-
chair near the hearth, and the little tea-table close
toit. “There, let me make you comfortable and
cosey, ma’am, and the tea will cheer you up a bit.
Master Sedley must find you bright and happy
when he comes back. And to think of all the won-
ders as hell have to tell about!” —andBeckie, with
many birdlike twitches of her head, and exclama-
tions of surprise at an imagined account of Master
Sedley’s adventures at Belgrave Square, flew about
her mistress with many little attentions, placing a
cushion for “her feet near the fender, wrapping a
white cloud about her shoulders, pouring and stir-
ring her tea; all of which was very pleasant to the
poor lonely lady. She laid her hand gently on
Beckie’s arm.

“You are a good comforter, my little Rebecca,”
said she. “Yes, I will take your advice, and stop
thinking. I will try to look happy, for Sedley must
find his little home, cheerful and bright when he
comes back to it.”



CHAPTER V.

been going through that most try-
ing of ordeals, in Beckie’s eyes, that
of being presented to his mysterious
uncle, of which, as she had pro-
phesied, he acquitted himself very
bravely indeed for a little boy. He
. was an honest, fearless little fellow, and the thought
of dreading the interview had never entered his
small imagination. His mamma had told him
many times how kind Uncle Trundlewood had
been to them, how he had loved his dear papa like a
son when he was a lad, and how all he had done for
- them both was for his sake. Little Sedley was
quite prepared to be on the friendliest terms with
the old gentleman.

If Sedley had been sitting next to Mr. Boggs, ia
the big carriage, instead of Mr. Binkle, as they rode
luxuriously up Belgrave Road, he would have been
moved to ask a great many questions about his





_7O A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

uncle. But Mr. Binkle always assumed, and that
afternoon especially, an attitude of the most profound
respect towards the little boy; always addressed him
as “sir,” and otherwise treated him as if he had been
a person of his own serious age. It was impossible
for this grave lawyer to stoop mentally to the level
of a little child’s thoughts; he always spoke to
Sedley in the most stilted terms, and the boy always
listened to him wonderingly, comprehending but
little of what he said. So, it could not be said that
there existed between them the same congeniality of
spirit and mutual interchange of ideas which Sedley
enjoyed so much with his amiable friend Mr. Boggs.
Their conversation on the way to Belgrave Square
was not particularly lively or voluble, although the
little fellow made manly efforts to keep it going.
When they reached the stately mansion, and the
wonderful footman in yellow livery had opened the
carriage door and lifted Master Sedley, and depos-
ited him on the broad flagstones, he and Mr. Binkle
walked silently up the steps, and were immediately
admitted by a tall, stately butler, who seemed to
‘have been born on purpose to fit the great house.
Sedley had never seen such remarkable looking
gentlemen, the Prince of Wales could scarcely have
presented a more majestic appearance than this



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 71

haughty individual, who, without changing a single
muscle of his countenance, led the way across a
great hall into Mr. Trundlewood’s study. It was
several minutes before little Sedley saw in this
butler the features of Mr. Boggs’ brother-in-law’s
brother, whom he had met once or twice “ off duty”
in his friend’s shop, now dignified and stiffened
almost beyond recognition.

They trod lightly over the dark carpet, which was
so rich and soft that one’s feet sank deep into it
without the slightest sound. Sedley caught sight of
a number of large portraits hanging up against the
wall,—portraits of queer old gentlemen in wigs and
neckcloths, with knee breeches and buckled shoes;
and of old ladies-in caps and kerchiefs, and white
ringlets falling around their faces; and one of a
pretty young girl with large eyes, and bare arms
and shoulders. He would have felt almost awed by
the grandeur of his surroundings, if he had had time
to think about the matter; but immediately the
door was opened, and the heavy curtains were
drawn aside, and he stood in the presence of Mr.
Trundlewood.

The old gentleman was seated in a large cushioned
chair between a huge mahogany writing-desk and
the open fire. His back was towards the window,



72 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

so that his face was in the shadow, and little Sedley
could but dimly discern the features of his uncle.
Hé could not see that the relative whom he had
been taught to love and revere ever since his earliest
recollection, who had been pictured to his childish
imagination as a benevolent and saintly person, was
in reality a cold, relentless, mercenary, ambitious old
man, whose heart had never been stirred by a pure
and noble feeling, who was incapable of being
- touched by the sight of others’ sufferings, and whose
hard, loveless nature showed itself in every line of
his face. No, Sedley did not see this. How should
he? The lightin the room was dim, and besides, he
was too little a boy to read character in a person’s
countenance.

But the old man saw the face of the child very
well, and read in an instant all there was in it. The
last faint glow of the afternoon sun shot across the
room from one of the west windows, and fell full
upon the sturdy little figure as he stood in front of
the dark green curtains; and he saw a round, child-
ish head, with a wealth of curls glittering like gold
under the light of the setting sun; a little face so
bright and pure and innocent, and eyes of such blue
depth and candor, that the old man gave a start and
grasped the arms of his chair. The three were



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 73

silent a moment, — Mr. Trundlewood was too much
surprised to speak, the lawyer did not dare; it was
Sedley’s voice that first broke the stillness of the
great sombre room.

“How do you do, Uncle Trundlewood,” said he,
walking up to the old man’s chair and offering his
hand with a fearlessness that puzzled that gentleman
mightily. “I hope I see you quite well.”

Mr. Trundlewood looked hard at the little hand,
and hesitated for a moment, not seeming to know
quite what he should do with it. He finally took it
in an irresponsive manner and then dropped it. But
he did not take his eyes from the child; he seemed
to be looking him through and through. ;

“So you ’re the boy, eh?” he said at last.

“Yes,” returned the child without wincing, “I’m
Sedley, I’m your little nephew, — George Douglass
Sedley Hamilton, that’s my name. It’s rather a
long one, is n’t it? But it was my papa’s, at least
George Douglass was, and Sedley is what my
mamma calls me. It was her papa’s name, and she
and my papa agreed to give it to me. You knew
my papa well, didn’t you?”

“Yes,” said the old uncle, with a strange gleam in
his eye.

“Well, do you know, I never saw him myself.



74 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

He was dead before I came; and you’re the first
‘person I’ve met since we came to England who
knew him. My mamma says he was very good and
brave and noble.”

“ Oh, I’ve no doubt,” said Mr. Trundlewood, dryly.
For the life of him he could not tell what there was
that fascinated him about that little fellow, as he sat
there with his legs crossed, and talked in the most
confidential and friendly manner after two minutes’
acquaintance.

“You have n’ta portrait of my papa in your house,
have you? I saw a number of old men in wigs
downstairs in your hall; he couldn’t have looked
like them, could he?”

“Not exactly,” was the reply.

There was an uncomfortable pause, during which
little Sedley gazed from his uncle to the lawyer, who
stood up near one corner of the chimney, and from
him to the frigid butler, wondering why these gen-
tlemen took no part in the conversation. He felt
the necessity of saying something.

“I suppose you know I was born away off in
India. That’s a long distance for one to be born
from his own country, isn’t it? Now, Mr. Boggs
thinks it’s very funny, and calls me ‘little cheroot,’

-and he tells everybody that I used to have pet

























































































ib

Vy ee A |














ee ei ul |
“s Zs, i Wen q
a : ‘4
eS Ae |
Mo af
—— NN

“ There was an uncomfortable pause.”






A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 77

panthers’ and hyenas to play with when I was a
baby. Did you ever see a hyena?”

“Yes,” said Mr. Trundlewood, with a low laugh
and a wicked leer at his lawyer, who was himself in
the act of displaying a row of white teeth. “I see
one quite frequently; I don’t have to go to India,”
and he laughed again, at which Sedley laughed too,
out of politeness, thinking that this must have been —
intended for some good-natured joke between his
uncle and Mr. Binkle which he could not quite
understand.

But it was becoming rather a difficult matter to
keep up the conversation. Sedley seemed to be
having it all to himself. He could not strike any
topic that particularly interested his curious old
relative, he thought; still he was trying his best to
be agreeable. a

“ How do you like living in such a big house?”
he asked, looking up at the high ceiling.

“Tolerably well,” replied the uncle, as his eyes
rested on the sumptuousness that surrounded him.
“How would you like it?” .

“Oh, I should like it immensely,” cried Sedley,
“and I dare say my mamma would too. But it is
such an awfully big house, beside the little one we live
in'on Warwick Street, I suppose I’d get lost in it.”



78 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“There would be plenty of people to find you;
how would you like to go about and learn the way
for yourself?”

“T should like to go around with you, but per-
haps you would n’t care to take the trouble to-day.”

“No, I can’t go about much; I’m very lame, you
see. It’s all I can do to get up and down stairs,
with this confounded toe!”

“Oh, I’m very sorry to hear that; what’s the
matter with it?” asked Sedley. “Did you run a
splinter in it?”

“No, it’s the gout.”

“Oh!” said the little fellow in a commiserating
tone, although he had not the least idea what this
malady was. “That must be very dreadful, I ’m
sure, — what is it like?”

“ Like the —” Uncle Trundlewood checked him-
self in his comparison, as the wide blue eyes rested
upon him inquiringly.

“ Like the what?” asked Sedley.

“Like the very worst twinges of a man’s con-
science,” said the old reprobate with a twinkle in
his fierce eyes.

“Well, you see, I’ve never had either of those
things, so I can’t very well realize how bad you
feel. All I’ve ever had is the measles. Mamma



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 79:

said I was very poorly for two days; and she and
Beckie wrapped me up in a flannel gown, and gave
me hot tea to drink. You can’t imagine what a
splendid nurse my mamma is; if you like I'll ask
her to come over and take care of you. I’m sure
she would make you well.”

Uncle Trundlewood turned from him to the fire,
and looked into it for a long time in silence. The
child’s good-natured trust completely disarmed him.
He could find no utterance for his usual gruff, harsh
expressions, which were his only means of communi-
cation with those about him; and he wondered at
it himself. As the flames lighted up his face Sedley
saw more clearly how deep-set his eyes were and
how his heavy brows were knit together; how thin
and compressed his lips were, and what a curious
expression they wore. He was neither attracted to
the old man nor afraid of him; but still there was
something in Uncle Trundlewood’s look, just then,
that bade him hold his peace for a time.

During the interval, he looked about the richly
furnished room, the like of which he had never seen
before. The walls were hung with soft silken tap-
estries, the furniture was of the rarest woods, ingen-
iously carved, and supported by curious claw-legs.
There was a large tiger-skin stretched out upon the



80 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

polished floor in front of Mr. Trundlewood’s desk,
with the head of the animal resting upon the fender ;
and the light of the fire played upon its face too,
and showed up its staring, glassy eyes, and sharp,
cruel teeth, in quite a ferocious manner.

While the old man seemed to be looking at the
flames as they danced and sported and then flew up
the chimney, he was looking now and then, out of
the corner of his eye, at the little figure sitting
beside him on a high chair, his legs hanging and his
feet crossed one over the other, and keeping time
with the pendulum on the mantel, sitting there and
gazing about him admiringly and with the utmost
composure; while Mr. Binkle and James, the but-
ler, almost trembled at this extraordinary coolness
of manner.

At length the old man stirred uneasily in his
chair; and little Sedley, with much delicacy and
presence of mind, judging that his uncle might be
wearying of the interview, slid down from his chair
and came and stood very near him; so near, in fact,
that the little arm rested on the brace of the old
man’s chair. “Perhaps I ought to go now; I’ve
made you quite a visit. I’m afraid you’re tired and
want to take your nap. May I come again to see
you,— and bring my mamma, too?”



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. SI

Mr. Trundlewood laid his hand upon the curly
head, and turned the small face up to his. He
wanted to make sure that all this innocence in
regard to the real state of things was purely genu-
ine, that his mother had not prepared him for the
meeting. But there was only truth and childish
trust in the blue eyes as they looked up at the old
man, and Sedley repeated, “ May I, Uncle Trundle-
wood?”

“Yes, you may come once a week, and I will give
you the guineas to take home. Binkle will not have
it to do; he’s a busy man, and his time is precious;
you need not trouble your mother to come with
you; I'll do myself the honor to call upon her,
when I’m well — and — wish to see her.”

“Oh, thank you, Uncle Trundlewood, she ’ll be
very happy to see you, I’m sure. Thank you, and
good-bye!” and the little fellow shook hands once
more and was about to take his leave when Mr.
Trundlewood called out : —

“Stop a bit; Collins will show you about the
house and into the conservatory if you like, and
treat you to something afterwards.”

“Good Mrs. Collins, the housekeeper, responded
‘immediately, though not without a slight tremor, to

the summons into her master’s presence.
6



82 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“Take Master Hamilton, ma’am, and show him
the best of your hospitality,” were the rather un-
expected orders she received; and making a humble
courtesy, and Sedley smiling a last good-bye, they
both disappeared behind the tall curtains.

“ Good Heavens! how like him the child is!” mut-
tered the old man, resuming his contemplation of the
fire, “and as handsome as a lord, too, by Jove!”

Mrs. Collins was never more agreeably surprised
than when she found herself in the company of an
amiable little boy who bade her good-day with a
smiling face and put his hand in hers in the friend-
liest manner possible. Mrs. Collins herself was a
good-natured, motherly person of forty or there-
abouts, who had never seen such a thing as a little
child in Mr. Trundlewood’s house, and could scarcely
believe her ears when young Master Sedley gave
her a glowing account of his interview with his
uncle, and praised that redoubtable gentleman so
genuinely, saying how very kind he had been. to him
and his mamma.

From that day, not only Mrs. Collins, but every
person employed at the big house, from Mr. James,
the butler, down to Thomas, the young groom who
tended the horses, agreed in pronouncing the young
master, as they soon styled him, “a reg’lar blue-



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 83

blooded little Briton, and a fine young gentleman
at that!” The good housekeeper could not remem-
ber a time when she had obeyed her master’s orders
with so much pleasure. She took the little guest
through the grand stately drawing-rooms, which
were very dark and dismal and had a musty smell,
so Sedley thought; into the great library with its
huge chimney-place, and deep leathern chairs, and
enormous bookcases filled with costly volumes, and
tall marble pedestals on the top of which stood
bronze busts of very grave-looking gentlemen in-
deed, whom Sedley did not as yet know to be some
of the greatest statesmen of England. They visited
the greenhouses where the rarest plants and flowers
grew; and in another part called the “ Grapery,” Sed-
ley saw a fine old vine, over a hundred years old, —
so he told his mamma afterward,— which had been
the possession of a great lord to whom the house
belonged before Uncle Trundlewood purchased it,
whose trunk was as big as that of a tree, and whose
branches covered the entire walls, and from which
hung the most perfect clusters of grapes. From
there they went into the spacious dining-hall where
old Mr. Trundlewood dined alone and in state
every evening, with almost as many servants to wait
upon him as there were dishes upon his table.



84 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

There was all the gorgeous, glittering plate dis.
played upon the oak sideboard; there were enor-
mous chandeliers with brilliant pendants of crystal; -:
the high-back, carved oak chairs; how gloomy, sol-
emn, and magnificent it all was! Little Sedley was
greatly impressed; but if the truth were known he
would have liked better to go and visit the ponies
and hounds, of which he had heard so much, and he
even ventured to suggest a visit to the stables; but
Mrs. Collins explained that they were quite out of
her department, although some day he might go
with Thomas to see the horses.

Then they passed through several other rooms and
went upstairs to a pretty sunny little parlor, decked
in bright flowered chintz, which was really the only
homelike spot in all the big house. It was Mrs. Col-
lins’ little sitting-room, and here she and Sedley had
a cosey cup of four o’clock tea together; that is to
say, Mrs. Collins drank the tea, while Master Sedley
regaled himself upon jam tarts and honey and lus-
cious fruit, and other like delicacies which the house-
maid had brought in by special request. He grew
very talkative, and found it much easier to entertain
Mrs. Collins than his uncle. He told her all about
himself and his mamma, about their little home in
Warwick Street, and Mr. Boggs and Beckie; in fact,



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 85

all who formed the small circle of his acquaintance.
He was quite surprised to find it had grown dark,
_ when at last a servant came in to announce that the
horses were ready and that Mr. Binkle awaited
Master Hamilton’s pleasure. He jumped down from
his chair, and went up and kissed Mrs. Collins on
both cheeks, in a way that won the good woman’s
heart on the spot.

“I’ve had a splendid visit,” he said. “I think
this is a lovely place to come to; and I hope I shall
see you every time I come to see my uncle.”

Mrs. Collins accompanied him down the stairs
and embraced him again at the door, and descended
straightway into the servants’ hall, where she went
into raptures over that dear child, and hoped Mr.
Trundlewood would always behave as civil to him,
which was, however, more than could be reasonably
expected of him. .

But that dreaded gentleman was anything but
civil to his lawyer, who had been standing up in his
same place, awaiting in silence the verdict of his
client. It was some time before he turned from the
fire, and when he did, it was only to abuse Mr. Binkle
in the most merciless terms for having given him a
false impression of the boy.

“What do you think I can make out of a



86 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

youngster like that!” he said contemptuously,
—“a sweetish, goodish, woman-bred brat. He’ll
never be anything but a milkweed; talks about his
confounded mother incessantly! and he ’ll be of no
mortal use to me as long as that lasts.”

“JT told you, sir, that I thought —”

“You thought!—you, what right have you to
think anything about my affairs!” thundered old
Trundlewood with rising anger. “It’s no use;
I won’t be made a fool of again with any of
your high-minded, pillar-of-righteousness sort of
chaps. I’ll never make any more of him than I
did of his father.”

“But is not the boy very young, sir, for you to
come to any decision? His character has hardly
had time to form itself,” ventured Mr. Binkle, who
was well used to Mr. Trundlewood’s manner and
took no offence at it.

“Heigh, ho! you’re for favoring the boy’s in-
terests, are you? What axe have you got to grind?
Perhaps you ’re dreaming of taking the mother your-
self, and coming in for a share of something! But
I'll knock all your fine schemes in the head as
quick as that!” —and with his cane, which he had in
his hand, Mr. Trundlewood administered such a
smart rap to a little marble bust of Queen Caroline



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 87

that it fell from the mantel upon the tiles below,
and was shattered into a thousand pieces.

Having thus worked himself up into quite a show
of temper, the old man wheeled himself round sud-
denly. “Send for Chadwick,—do you hear me?
Send for him immediately. I won’t have any more
foolishness,” he cried. And the lawyer was dis-
missed. But he was not surprised at this sudden
turn of sentiments; for he had witnessed scenes of
this sort more or less frequently during the past
twenty years. He went away, and his client’s words
- did not trouble him further; only that he was more
preoccupied, and scarcely heard the eager and ani-
mated talk of little Sedley on their drive homeward.

As for Mr. Trundlewood, who shall guess what
was really in his thoughts, as he was left alone in
the big room with his fire and his gout for only
companions? Did he mean what he had said to the
lawyer about the little boy, or was he only annoyed
with himself, and perhaps a little ashamed of the
civility he had shown the child and his first eon
to be pleased with him?



CHAPTER VL




R. BOGGS’ establishment,
otherwise known as the famous
“Blue Flags,” was not more than
half a square distant from the
Little House, and Sedley on this account

was often permitted to go there alone to visit;
for he and Mr. Boggs were the best of friends.
Nothing of any importance ever happened in
‘Warwick Street that the. little boy did not feel
it his duty to inform Mr. Boggs of the fact. In-
deed, this good-humored man had been his only
intimate companion, besides his mother and his
nurse. He and Mr. Boggs found endless topics of
mutual interest, from the royal] family down to the
distracting delights of rabbit-hunting. Mr. Boggs’
experience of life had not been very vast; he had
never been outside of London, excepting once, and
that had only been to Greenwich; but as he said
himself, he had not time to go and see the world, so



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 89

the world came around to see him; and you would
have been convinced of the truth of this statement,
if you had chanced to drop in at “The Blue Flags”
any day between twelve and one o’clock, and see
what a goodly portion of the world did come to Mr.
Boggs.

It was a cosey, hospitable-looking sort of place,
more like an old-time tavern than a modern grill-
room; a low-roofed corner house, delightfully ram-
bling and irregular, which always presented the
comfortable aspect of there being plenty of room
for everybody. There was a sign hanging above its
door, on which the emblematic Blue Flags flourished
in alarming profusion around an uncommonly fat
young mutton, which was temptingly suggestive of
savory chops and joints. At the entrance of the
dining-room, in ‘the corner at the left, was the fur-
nace where the grilling and roasting and sizzling
went on, and from where issued the most delicious
and appetizing odors. Here might always be seen
a number of young turn-spits, in white aprons and
caps, executing the orders that came shouted across
the different parts of the room for all the varied
dainties that “The Blue ad was capable of
producing.

At the farthest end of the room was a little



90 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

parlor set aside for Mr. Boggs’ privacy, where a
* cheerful wood fire blazed, and where he sat a good
part of the time in the company of his pet bird, — the
only home companion the good fellow had, but upon
which he lavished all the superfluous affection of his
big, strong nature. It was only a little tame canary,
a frail mite of a creature, that knew how comfortably
off it was, and never had the least desire to fly away,
although it was never caged, but allowed to fly
about the room at its own free will, and perched
wherever it liked. It was here, too, that Martin
Boggs, in his capacity of proprietor, added up his
accounts and made change for his customers, and
otherwise looked after his interests.

He was employed in this way one morning, his
little yellow friend perched on the top of his head,
when, looking up from some distracting columns of
shillings and pence over which he had been poring,
he beheld a little figure standing before him; a little
figure wrapped up to his ears in fur, his hands in
his pockets, and such a smiling, rosy face, so full of
mysterious importance, that Mr. Boggs could not
but feign to be vastly surprised, and slipping his
pen behind his ear he let fall his hands, and
exclaimed : —

“Well, Master Sedley, what fair wind has blown









——
aD
ae
bee
coe























i











































































































“ Tt was here, too, that Martin Boggs added up his accounts.’







A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. . 93

you here this cold morning ?”” —and he came round,
but instead of the cordial handshake with which
they usually met, Mr. Boggs made a very low and
courtly bow, and then drew up a chair for him near
the fire, but on no account would sit down until
Sedley had done so himself. But the little yellow
‘bird flew from its master’s head and greeted Sed-
ley quite familiarly, by alighting on his shoulder,
and began to gurgle and coo a welcome in his most
cordial manner, — for e was not aware of the great
change that had come in his little friend’s fortunes,
—at which Mr. Boggs tried to frown, and said ina
remonstrating tone, “Dickie, Dickie, Dickie!”

“Why, Mr. Boggs; what is the matter?” asked
Sedley, looking at him with a droll mixture of
amusement and wonder, “what makes you act
so strangely? I’ve only come to tell you the
news.” ;

“ News, indeed!” ejaculated Mr. Boggs, placing
his thumbs in his vest pockets and looking very
knowing indeed.

“Oh, have you heard all about it?”

“Well, I can’t say as I’ve heard af about it; —
leastway, not but what I’d like to hear more; but
I do say as I’ve heard tell how you took your first
header into haristocratic society yesterday.”



94 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“My first what, Mr. Boggs?” inquired Sedley,
looking still more puzzled.

“Made your first acquaintance with great folks.”

“You mean my Uncle Trundlewood ?”

“ The very indiwiddle.”

“ That is just what I came to tell you about, Mr.
Boggs. I went to see him yesterday in his big
house, and I enjoyed myself ever so much. You
know my uncle, don’t you?”

“Not intimately,” Mr. Boggs was forced to admit.

“Well, he’s quite old, and he has two dreadful
things the matter with him.”

“Which are they?” inquired Mr. Boggs, rever-
entially. :

“The gout, and twinges of conscience!” said
Sedley, quite seriously.

Any other day Mr. Boggs would have smiled;
but considering the solemnity of the subject, he
could not. The muscles of his mouth only twitched
a little, and Sedley went on without interruption.

“Do you know, Mr. Boggs, I think the butlers
and footmen in my uncle’s house wear very ele-
gant clothes; much handsomer than my uncle
himself.”

“Humph! they can well afford it,” returned Mr.
Boggs; “ your uncle buys all their clothes!”



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 95

“ Does he?” said Sedley, in some surprise. “Well,
he must be very rich then, don’t you think?”

“Lots o’ tin!” was the expressive reply.

“Lots.of what?”

“ Lots o’ this,” and Mr. Boggs winked sipnideantly
and rattled some loose shillings in his pockets.

Sedley seemed to understand his meaning. “ Well,
Mr. Boggs,” he said after a moment’s hesitation,
“Tm going to tell you something that will surprise
you!”

“No!” said that gentleman.

“Yes, I think perhaps it will. Mr. Binkle told
my mamma yesterday that some day I should have
all of my Uncle Trundlewood’s money and be very
rich.”

“Bless my soul! you don’t mean it,” cried Mr.
Boggs, pretending to be quite staggered by the
announcement, and taking hold of the corner of the
chimney to keep from falling.

“Yes, it’s quite true; and my mamma said it
was a great deal too much for a little boy like me,
and so I came over to talk with you about it, and
ask you if you-would n't like me to give you some
of it.”

This time Mr. Boggs was obliged to dive behind
his writing-table and fumble into one of its drawers,



96 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

until his features had regained their expression of
respectful attention. .

“Oh, I beg you won't think of it,” he said with
becoming modesty. “Really you won’t find it a bit
too much when you come to run that big ’ouse over
there with all the servants to buy uniforms for.”

“Well, and that’s another thing,” said Sedley.
“Mr. Binkle told my mamma that I should have the
big house too, and all the things in it; and as it’s
much too big for just mamma and me and Beckie, I
think you'll have to come and live with us, Mr.
Boggs.” |

That gentleman smiled ¢ at the impossible though
delightful prospect.

“It’s a beautiful house; I never imagined how
beautiful. But then you know all about it, for
you’ve been there.”

“ Well,” explained Mr. Boggs, with a slight cough
of embarrassment, “I’ve been in it as far as ‘ser-
vants’ hall,’ Master Sedley; but I think I could go
all over the place with my heyes. shut, I know it so
well from hearing James talk of it.”

“Did he tell you about the big portraits hanging
_in the hall of those funny looking gentlemen in
wigs?”

« Ves.”



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 97

“Who are they?”

“ They’re all your distant relations.”

“Really?” said Sedley, in some surprise. “1
suppose that’s why my mamma and I have never
seen them.”

“ Very likely,” assented Mr. Boggs.

“JT didn’t know I had so many. Do you know
who the pretty girl is?”

“The pretty young thing with the shoulders?
Why, she was your grandma.”

“My grandmother, Mr. Boggs? why, she’s only
a little girl in the picture.”

“Yes, she was then, but she grew up into a beau-
tiful young lady and married, and your pa was her
little boy.”

‘Sedley was very much mystified by these family
revelations. ‘Well, isn’t it queer,” said he, “how
one minute you think you never had any relations
at all, and the next minute you find you've got a
great many? I shall have to tell my mamma ; I’m
sure she doesn’t know about them.”

“And how do you like your Uncle Trundle-
wood?” inquired Mr. Boggs.

“Oh, I dare say I shall like him very well indeed
when I know him better. You see, I’ve only seen
him once, and it didn’t seem so easy to talk to him

7



98 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

as it does to talk to you; hedid n’t say much, but he
looked at me and at the fire. He said I was to
come and visit him every week, so I shall see a
great deal of him, and I dare say we'll get better
acquainted.”

Mr. Boggs signified by a wise nod that he under-
stood the situation perfectly.

“Tsay, Mr. Boggs,” resumed the little boy, “don’t
you think it is nice to be rich?”

“Bless my buttons! Now I really can’t say, never
having been rich myself; but I should think from
obserwation that it was a tolerable easy way o’ living.
What do you think about it, Master Sedley?”

“T should think it would be splendid; for, you
see, when you have plenty of money you can do so
much for other people, and for those you love.
When I’m rich,” said he, rubbing his small hands
together in quite a responsible manner, “ my mamma
shall have a pink silk dress to wear every day, and
a great many other beautiful things. And I shall
buy a house for Beckie’s grandmother, so she will
not have to pay any more rent; then I should like
to do something for the tart-woman too. You know
she is old and poor, and the school children buy her
tarts and don’t always pay her, and some of them ,
owe her a great many shillings, and the other day



A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 99

she went away crying, because she said she had no
money to buy wood and medicine for her little sick
grandchild, and so mamma and I gave her some
pence, and she called us ‘hangels!’ and said ‘ God
bless you!’ a great many times. I felt dreadfully
sorry for her. I should like to buy her a shawl,
and a new umbrella to hold over her wares, for the
old green one she has now is full of holes, and the
rain comes through and spoils her tarts.” .

During this touching narrative Mr. Boggs had
been standing in silent admiration of the little
speaker. .

“Dickie,” said he, after an impressive pause,
“come here!” and the little bird flew over and
perched upon its master’s finger. “Do you see any
one sitting there on a chair in front of.the fire?”

Dickie signified that he did by many chirps and
twitchings of his head.

“Well,” continued Mr. Boggs, in the same im-
pressive manner, “Dickie, that’s the finest little
gentleman in England, the kindest-heartedest, sweet-
est-temperedest, most unselfishest, amiablest, inno-
centest little chap in all the British Isles!” — and
Mr. Boggs firmly believed every word he said.



CHAPTER VII.

NE day, early in-the new year,
Sedley and his mamma _ were
returning from a promenade in
the park, — the great Hyde Park,
which is the scene of so much
life and gayety on a pleasant
afternoon; for here it is that the

rich and fashionable world repair, to drive or ride
and enjoy the welcome sunshine, so rare on a win-
try London day, and where the crowds swarm to
behold their gorgeous display. The day was so
fine and the air so crisp and invigorating that it
sent the warm blood surging through one’s veins,
and Mrs. Hamilton, who seldom went very far from
home because she was so delicate, had walked that
long distance almost without any weariness.

To be sure, little Sedley had entertained her all
the way with pleasant accounts of the great house
in Belgrave Square which he visited now regularly
once a week; of his Uncle Trundlewood, who was





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A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO
BY MISS BOUVET.

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A LitTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO

BY

MARGUERITE BOUVET

Fllustrated by

HELEN MAITLAND ARMSTRONG



CHICAGO
A. C. McCLURG AND COMPANY

1897
COPYRIGHT
By A. C. McCLure Aanpb Co.
A.D. 1897

All rights reserved
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TO
MY LITTLE ENGLISH NEPHEW
GEORGE HERBERT AUGUSTINE JENNER
This Story

IS AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE
“ As the game waxed more exciting”. . . . . . . Lrontispiece

“When suddenly the door flew open, and Beckie appeared from

Within ee Ate ae ee ee Te OZ
“¢And she gave me this rose, mother dear?” . . . . 2. . . 53
“ The little maid stopped short in arranging the tea-table” . . 66
“ There was an uncomfortable pause” 2. 2. 2 1 1. ew. O75
“It was here, too, that Martin Boggs added up his accounts” . 91
“¢Qh, look, mother dear, what smart little ponies’” . . . . 102

“For a long while that evening, little Sedley and his mother sat

Beside the Are. i ws aide af xk Ge Herve oe. ise ei oO
“Sedley sat rubbing his small legs up and down” . . . . . 128
“ Her small, white hand was resting on the back of the chair” . 166
“The curtain parted, and little Sedley ran.in” . De ee 168
“As the game waxed more exciting”. . . . . . . . . . 187
“They had carried him to the nearest couch”. . . . . . . 194
“The man looked at Beckie in mute astonishment”. . . . . 215

“Sedley ran down a second time and put the long roll back in
its place”.
Cousin Chadwick

231
ae ges ee . 236
“Oh, Sedley, dear, itis a beautiful place?” . . . . . . . 243
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.



CHAPTER I. |






~~ LITTLE house in Pimlico!
There is nothing wonderful in
: that, say you, for there are
many houses in Pimlico: some great,
and some small, some towering up into
the blue sky overhead, and others hid-
ing their modest roofs under the. shadow of their
grander neighbors; some old, and queer, and
tumbled down, and some quite new and‘ smart of
appearance; but the little house of which I speak is
different from all these. First, because although it
~ is small and humble, and its walls are gray with
years, it is yet the tidiest, brightest, cosiest house of
all the neighborhood. In fact, if you look about
you in Pimlico you will find that the prettiest, sun-
shiniest spot in all that section of the big city of Lon-
don is just where this Little House stands. There
14 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

is a small green park directly in front of it, where
the Pimlico children dance and sing and romp of a
summer evening, and the gentle south wind seems
never to tire of blowing thence its most refreshing
breezes during the long hot season, or the sun to
pour its warm rays in at its windows throughout
_the bleak winter.

But perhaps it is the people who live in this
Little House that make it most attractive. For
the neighbors well remember what a forlorn, dismal
place it was only a few years ago, before the sweet
face of pretty Mrs. Hamilton and that rosebud of
a babe smiled at them from the quaint windows as
they passed ; and before little Beckie, the housemaid,
filled the whole house with canary-birdlike notes as
she went about doing her dusting of a morning.

Now, Pimlico lies in one of the bends of that
most tortuous river, the Thames, —in the one just
above Vauxhall Bridge and this side of Chelsea.
It is one of those curious little suburbs which’ have
sprung up all about London in the most unexpected
places, and which have a little air of independence
quite their own. But Pimlico has the great advan-
tage, so its inhabitants think, of being very close to
that most aristocratic portion where dwell the nobil-
ity of England. If you turn from any one of the


A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. I5

little by-streets of Pimlico northward, you are sure
to come upon the highroad leading to Buckingham
Palace and St. James’s Park! The Pimlico world is
very proud of the reflected glory that shines upon it
from that luxurious quarter, and some of its bolder
spirits go even so far as to claim a doubtful inti-
' macy with certain superior beings in livery em-
ployed in that high-bred atmosphere.

For instance, there is Mr. Boggs, the genteel pro-
prietor of “ The Blue Flags,” without exception the
most famous chop-house in the borough, whose
brother-in-law’s brother, being head butler in. the
house of Joseph Trundlewood, Esquire, of Belgrave
Square, holds occasional intercourse with a first
cousin of one of the footmen at Clarence House.
Through this very direct and unquestionable source
Mr. Boggs derives most of the palace news and
court gossip, and with unfailing good nature, which
is his great characteristic, he deals out his knowl-
edge with many embellishments and repetitions to
- the willing ears of those whom he sees in the course
of the day.

Now this same Mr. Boggs is a notable personage,
—a leader, as one might say, in the community; not
only on account of his enviable intimacy with the
royalty, but because of many fine qualities and high
16 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

social position in Pimlico, a first-class establishment
all his own, and a thriving, prosperous business.
Added to all this, he possesses the kindest heart in
the world, and is what his lady admirers call, “a fine
figur’ of a man.” It is no wonder, then, that all the
maidens in Pimlico eye him with admiration, and
smile at him shyly, and use all their arts to captivate
him, and that their honest mothers agree in pro-
nouncing him a “most likely young man.” Mr.
Boggs is not what one might call handsome, but he
has a good, wholesome face, very broad and puffy,
and of a certain reddish hue which gives one the
impression that he is all the time trying to suppress
some explosive burst of merriment. He has good,
- clear, honest eyes, a generous nose, — with a small
wart on the end of it, to be sure; but no one minds
that in the least, for what matters so trifling a thing
as a wart, when the nose which it adorns has a snug
little income from the highly respectable business of
grilling chops for a hungry public?

One sunny afternoon in December, between
three and four o'clock, just at that most convenient
time of day, between luncheon and dinner, when
trade is not so brisk but that he could absent
himself for a brief period, Mr. Boggs stood at the
door of the Little House, a bottle under each

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A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. | 19

arm, and holding a covered dish with both hands.
He was just trying to arrange matters so that he
might reach the knocker without damage to his
provisions, when suddenly the door flew open, and
Beckie, who had noted his arrival from an upstairs
window, appeared from within, arrayed in fresh
white apron and smart little cap.

“ Mis-ter Boggs!” exclaimed the little maid, rais-
ing her hands in an attitude of the most profound
astonishment.

“Miss Bec-kie!” ejaculated Mr. Bogg s, feigning
to be equally astounded.

I must pause here to tell you that for some un-
accountable reason every time Mr. Boggs appeared
at the door of the Little House, which was seldom
less than three times a week, little Beckie would
clasp her hands and utter an exclamation of sur-
prise, as if perfectly overcome at anything so
unheard of and unexpected as the appearance of
Mr. Boggs. And every time that this rosy gentle-
man caught sight of the bewitching little cap, and
felt Beckie’s sharp, black eyes staring at him so, his
own eyes would grow big, his lower jaw drop, and a
look of unspeakable amazement come over his mild
countenance.

“Why, I thought it was the butter-woman,” said
20 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

Beckie, recovering from her surprise immediately.
“Oh, Mister Boggs, come in, do! Szch doin’s
you never dreamed of. We’reinsuchastate! That
man Binkle, the lawyer, ’s been and took Master Sed-
ley off in a coach to see his Uncle Trundlewood, at
the Square —a grand coach with two horses and a
footman, as made all the neighbors stare. And oh,
it was all done so in a minute, that my dear mistress
she’s all in a flutter about it, and can’t sit still a
second for looking out o’ the window!”

“Dear me!” cried Mr. Boggs, “it must ’a’ been
very suddent, for I saw James only night a-fore last,
and he never breathed a word, and surely he’d
’a’ told me if he’d knowed anythink.”

“Of course it was sudden; so sudden that it
most took our breaths away. But come into the
entry, pray do, Mister Boggs, and tell me who it is
you ’ve come to see.”

This was rather a perplexing question to put to
Mr. Boggs; for he was really so fond of all three of
the inmates of the Little House that it became a
difficult matter to specify. He hesitated, and looked
at little Beckie in a way that made her blush to the
very edge of her cap, and then mustered up courage
enough to say meekly, “ Mrs. ’Amilton.”

“Oh, is it?” replied the little creature, a trifle
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 21

disappointed, but trying to conceal it by assuming
an air of bustling importance. ‘“ Well, 1’ll call mis-
tress directly; she’s a-walking up and down the
library a-worritin’ herself over goodness only knows
what, for 7 think it’s high time that old fox of a
Uncle Trundlewood took a Z#é/e notice o’ that darl-
ing child, Master Sedley, and did something hand-
some for him! And what have you brought now,
Mister Boggs?” she added, before that gentleman
had a chance to get in another word, as she eyed
the two bottles and the covered dish.

“It’s only a bit o’ my best hale, and a little tooth-
some morsel for your dear mistress and the young
master, Miss Beckie, and I ’ope as you ll get a taste
on it yourself,” said the proprietor of “The Blue
Flags,” gazing at the little maid with ill-concealed
admiration.

Beckie had lifted the cover of the dish, which she
took from Mr. Boggs’ hands, and peered into it..

“ Bless you, Mister Boggs! what a dear man you
are!” cried she, having discovered its contents.
“Tt’s an uncommon fine bird, so brown and fat;”’
and she screwed up her lips in pleasing anticipation
of the feast, and looked up at him.

Mr. Boggs was on the verge of placing a sly kiss
on the tiny pursed-up mouth that was so temptingly
22. A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

near his face, when, suspecting his wily intention,
the artful Beckie skipped down the corridor like a
white-winged butterfly, so wide were the loops of
her apron strings, to inform Mrs. Hamilton of the
arrival of this visitor.

“Tt’s Mister Boggs, ma’am, as has brought you a
broiled partridge, a plump, juicy bird, ma’am, and
some fine old ale as’ll bé juSt the thing to set you
to rights to-day, after all this topsyturviness!”

“ How very good of Mr. Boggs!” said the young
mistress. “Ask him to come in, Rebecca.”

“You’re to step into the library, if you please, Mis-
ter Boggs,” said the fairy-footed Beckie, tripping back
immediately. “Mistress wants to thank you herself.
It’s a blessing you’ve come to-day, sir, of all agita-
tion days! The sight of you’ll do her a heap o’ good,
as I’m sure it has me,” said the sly minx, knowing
very well how this bit of flattery would thrill the
burly form of Mr. Boggs; and she led the way.

In the little room which Rebecca dignified with
the name of “the library,” and which was sitting-
room and drawing-room and library all in one, there
stood a young woman dressed in black whose features
were pale and delicate, but whose face was very
beautiful. She had large dark eyes, which glistened
with grateful pleasure as she crossed the room from
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. "23

where she had been standing by the window and
held out a small white hand to the good-natured
man, who, nevertheless, was always a trifle awkward
and timid in the presence of so genteel a lady.

“It is so kind of you, Mr. Boggs, so kind of you
to think of us again. I am afraid you are robbing

in a friendly manner.

“Not a bit of it, ma’am,” interposed the good fel-
low. “Ifthe flavor o’ that hinnoeent little partridge
pleases you and the young master, why, it'll give
-me a happetite. I attended to the grilling of the
bird myself, ma’am, and it popped into my ’ead as |
watched him sizzling and browning, what a plump,
nice bit as he’d make for you and Master Sedley.
And this hale, ma’am, is the best that can be found
in my cellars, and I bring it accordin’ to the doc-
tor’s directions; for I overheerd him say, the last
time I was visiting Beckie in your kitchen, as how
you ought to take a bit o’ somewhat to restore your
strength, and so I made so bold, ma’am.”

After delivering this speech, in a hurried and
blustering manner, Mr. Boggs drew a deep breath
-and fanned himself vigorously with his hat.

“Pray, sit down,” said the young woman, her
smile broadening as she listened to him; for, as
24 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

Beckie had said, there was something so genial and
comfortable about this good man that Mrs. Hamil-
ton felt better and calmer as soon as he entered the
room.

“ Begging your pardon, ma’am, and thanking you
for the honor,” returned Mr. Boggs, in answer to her
invitation, “no! I never could sit in the presence
of my betters, ma’am, and them betters a lady; I
was n't brought up to it, and I could n’t change my
‘abits at my hage. If you’ve no objection, Ill step
into the kitchen and have a word with Beckie;
I’ve something very partic’lar to say to her.”

“Certainly you may, Mr. Boggs. Rebecca is a
good girl—”

“A uncommon fine young woman!” broke in
Mr. Boggs with enthusiasm.

“ And she will be glad to see you,” Mrs. Hamil-
ton added with an encouraging smile, for she could
not help being amused. The worthy man never
took leave of her, after any of his visits of benevo-
lence, without expressing his firm intention of “hav-
ing a word” with Beckie, having something “ very
partic’lar” to say to her, which daring determination
seemed somehow to evaporate the moment he stood
in that fascinating young creature’s presence.

“Wishing you a good-day, ma’am, and good
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 25

ealth,” said Mr. Boggs, bowing himself with great
care and politeness, “and my respects to young
Master Sedley.”

“ Ah, my little boy has gone to Belgrave Square,
Mr. Boggs, to see his uncle, who expressed a desire
to know him for the first time since we came to
England;” and at the sudden recollection of the
thought her voice trembled, and she betrayed her
agitation. “I trust he will be pleased with my little
one, and love him!”

“ And sure, how could he help it, ma’am!” re-
sponded Mr. Boggs, retreating a few steps nearer the
exit, for he was in mortal terror lest the poor lady
should begin to weep. ‘ How could any one help
loving such a dear, blessed little creetur as Master
Sedley!”’ :

“He will be sorry to have missed you, Mr.
Boggs.”

“Thank you, thank you, ma’am, my compliments
to him.; and he knows as he’s always welcome at
the ‘Flags’ whensoever he feels inclined for a quiet
chat about politics, and the nobility, bless him!”
added Mr. Boggs, backing and backing himself out
until he struck up against the wall of the corridor
and could get no farther.

He speedily found his way to the kitchen, where
26 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

Beckie received him cordially, for she was proud
and pleased to be the one to inform him of the
“doin’s” at which she had hinted when he first came
into the house, and which he was no less eager to
hear the particulars of than she was to tell them.

The young widow returned to her place at the
window, her white hands clasped, and her eyes
eagerly fixed towards the place where the little
street in which they lived turned and lost itself in
the arms of a broad highroad.
CHAPTER II.



oe HE was a young woman, too young

We to have been left alone in the ©






world by the one being who had
loved her and taught her the true
meaning of happiness; to
have been left alone with a
little child that looked to her for every need and
comfort of its young life. It was the old sad story.
She had been a poor young governess in a rich
lady’s family, and had spent several lonely years
there without really knowing how lonely those years
were, until one day a young’ officer who came often
to the rich lady’s house noticed her, and loved her
for her delicate beauty, her modest manner, and
sweet gentle nature. He was an impetuous and
fearless young man, and had never loved any one so
much; and he vowed that he would make her his
wife, and a great lady, though he was then but
a young captain in the English army. He was
hopeful ahd ambitious; and when one is young
28 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

and in love, the whole pathway of life seems paved
with glorious promises, and nothing in the world
seems impossible. .

He was poor himself, but he had great.expecta-
tions, and this had made him welcome in the circles
of the rich; for every one firmly believed that
Uncle Trundlewood had chosen him from among
his many relatives to be the heir of his vast fortune.
That was just where the trouble all began. Mr.
Trundlewood no sooner heard of his nephew’s
attachment for the poor young governess, and his
determination to marry her, than he grew very angry
and unreasonable. He threatened to disown him,
and to cut him off without a shilling, if he persisted
in thus disgracing himself and his family.

Now, there was nothing whatever that could be
called disgraceful in the young man’s desire to
marry the pretty governess; for she was a lady by
nature, and was possessed of more inborn refine-
ment than many of the rich patrons who employed
her, or even than Mr. Trundlewood himself. She
was accomplished and beautiful and clever enough
to grace any position to which good fortune might
call her, and she had a tender, generous heart that
should have won for her the love of every one; but
she was poor and without station, and the great
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 29

world in which she lived took little account of her
many virtues because of these two unsurmountable
obstacles.

Uncle, Trundlewood was a cross, crotchety,
crabbed old bachelor, who had no real cause to feel
partictlarly aristocratic or above the rest of man-
kind, save for the power his money gave him to
assume airs of superiority and mastership. He had
made a large fortune in the manufacture of wines
and vinegars; and the one seemed to have heated
his temper and the other to have soured his dispo-
sition. He.lived in a very large and magnificent
establishment in Belgrave Square, kept a whole
retinue of servants, whom he bullied continually
and paid handsomely for the privilege, had his
horses and dogs, and a fine old country place in one
of the most picturesque districts of England; in
fact, put on all the outward appearance of a landed
gentleman of England, which it was in truth his
dearest ambition to become. He had also a bevy of
poor relatives, —cousins and second cousins, and a
whole regiment of nephews, — besides countless con-
nections by marriage, who cringed and fawned to
him, and courted his favor in every way that was
obnoxious to him, when they were in his presence,
and called him an old fox behind his back. But he
30 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

was too keen not to see through them, and gave
them full credit of their good intentions.

Much to the disgust of all these relatives, Uncle
Trundlewood had singled out young Hamilton from
the lot and made a sort of pet of him. Perhaps it
was because he was so unlike the other members of
the family, or because he was the son of a favorite sis-
ter; but he was certainly a handsome, spirited young
fellow, who was not afraid of Uncle Trundlewood,
and very often told the old man what he thought
of him. He did not care for Mr. Trundlewood’s
money, or what he did with it when he retired from
this world; and so far this independence had
pleased the old gentleman mightily, for it had never
yet conflicted with any of his plans, and he took a cer-
tain pride in the young man, —in his fine appearance
and gentlemanly bearing, his hearty, honest, genial
nature which made him so popular wherever he
went. Mr. Trundlewood had made up his mind
long ago that young Hamilton was the only one of
his family who could do him credit and who could
worthily hold the dignified position of heir to the »
Trundlewood fortune. He had planned that his
nephew should make a brilliant marriage. He had
money enough to buy almost any gentleman’s estate
in England, he thought, and to secure the hand of a
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 31

nobleman’s daughter for his nephew. The one great
ambition of his life which remained yet unfulfilled
was to ally himself with some great family, to
mingle.in the society of titled individuals, to be
recognized as a power among them, perhaps to be-
come titled himself some day; this is what he had
hoped to achieve with his great wealth.

You may imagine his disappointment, then, when
the only person on whom he had founded all his
hopes suddenly slipped from his power and brought
to bear all the independence of his spirit, which the
old man had so reckoned upon, to thwart him,
Trundlewood, in his dearest wish!

They had a stormy time of it: the old man flew
into a towering passion, and swore, and threatened
terrible things; but finding that the young man
was stronger than he, and more determined and
independent than ever, he tried another course. He
pleaded with his nephew, and promised him endless
benefits if he would give up the young woman and
be guided by him in the choice of a wife better
suited to his position. But it was all to no pur-
pose; young Hamilton declared, over and over
again, that he would rather live in a hovel all his days
with the woman he loved, than in a palace bought
with Uncle Trundlewood’s money, without her.
32 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

Then the old man told him to go and see how
long they would both live on such fine sentiments,
and how comfortable their romantic love would
make them when they were cold and hungry, and
warned him never to come back for help, as it was
not his habit to encourage worthless, ungrateful.
vagabonds with low tastes and no pride. To all
this the young man retorted that he hoped Heaven
would forgive him if he ever appealed to such a self-
ish, hard-hearted, unreasonable old man as he for
anything whatsoever. And with these high words
they parted.

It was not many days after this scene that the
two young people were married, and the same week
the young officer and his regiment were ordered off
to India. His wife followed him there —away
to that farther end of the world, glad to leave her
country, her few friends, and the scenes of her
sombre girlhood, only to be near him. She knew
nothing of the words that had passed between her
husband and his angry relative. He would not for ~
the world have grieved her tender heart by letting
her know that she had been the innocent cause of
so much strife or of any one’s ill-will. Away to
that remote country they went, to forget everything
in their old life but the sweet memory of their love.
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 33

It was a lonely, marshy, jungly district. in which
they were stationed; there were but few people at
the garrison, and still fewer comforts. The heat of
the summers was intense; there were dangers to be
faced, privations to be endured; and yet they were
happy there, happy for three short years, happy as
they had never been in their lives before. For what
were hardships and privations to them! what did it’
matter that they were strangers in a strange land,
and without friends! Had they not each other, and
was not the presence of the one to the other the
greatest of Heaven’s blessings! Beside which, every
trial, every endurance, every sacrifice was glorified
for love’s sake. .

He, in his heart, remembered his uncle’s parting
words of warning, and wondered at them; and
pitied the old man for having never known the
joy of a love like his. And she, thinking of her
lonely life in the homes of the rich, and having ©
seen no such happiness there, thought how infinitely
‘better it was to be a poor soldier's wife, living in
miserable quarters at the farthest end of the world
with him, than to dwell in the stately palaces she
had known, unbefriended and unloved.

Three years, I say, they were happy. Ah, they
can count themselves fortunate who have known

3
34 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

even three years of joy upon earth! What if it be
followed by calamity or cruel sorrow? Will not the
memory of it live forever, and bring a smile to sad-
dened lips even while they mourn? For a brief
period of earthly happiness is but the foretaste of
a more joyous hereafter.

One scorching August day young Hamilton’s
company was ordered some forty miles away to quell
some rebellion of the natives The burning sun,
the squalid air of the marshes, the long march, told
upon even his young and sturdy frame. Horses and
men dropped by the wayside, exhausted with the
heat ; and the elephants, drawing their heavy burden
of artillery, wearied and lagged. It was terrible.
There was no air to breathe, no water to slake their
thirst, and the sun high up in a torrid sky, and beat-
ing down upon them during two interminable days!

The day following the attack, the young captain
caught the fever, —a week later he was dead. At
home, in the garrison, —for that was their home, —a
little son had been born to them; a little child who
should never see his father’s face, who on the very
day of his coming into this great world had lost his
natural protector and friend.

It was nearly a month before the young wife
learned her misfortune. Alas, even that was too
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 35

soon to know the fate of the beloved one who
should never more return to her. There are scenes
in some lives over which we must draw a veil, — sor-
rows too deep for human eyes to read. Let us
gently close the door of the chamber where the
young mother lies suffering and weeping. We
may not stand in the presence of so much grief.
The whole garrison was hushed and sorrowful; but
none sought to give her comfort, for Heaven had
sent her the only thing that could soothe her mute
despair, —a little child, a beautiful boy, with his
father’s eyes and smile, whom she pressed to her
heart.

The news went home to England. The young
captain’s death was reported as having occurred in
combat; and Uncle Trundlewood read the account
with a shock, and was in a state of formidable
gloom for days after. Some thought that he re-
pented of his harshness to his handsome nephew;
others, that he was more disappointed than grieved,
—and perhaps these were not very far from right:
For this untimely death, at the beginning of a per-
haps glorious career, put an end to all hopes which
the old man might still have cherished of a recon-
ciliation. Many times he had thought it over, since
the parting with his nephew. He was not disposed
36 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

to be rancorous if his desires were to be gained in
the end. Many things might happen to change the
condition of things,—the woman might die, and:
leave the young captain once more free; he might
thereafter distinguish himself, and come back to be
. forgiven and received, as was not infrequently the
case in such affairs. But now death, that least ex-
pected of all calamities, had put an end to every
hope and plan which the old man had not been
willing to relinquish.

He ordered his whole establishment to be put in
mourning, for the sake of appearances and his posi-
tion, as he explained in a thundering voice to his
valet, and possibly because he liked to have the
world know that the brave officer of whom the
papers spoke so glowingly was related to him.
Hope now sprang afresh in the breasts of the many
relatives, when the object of their long-cherished
envy was thus removed. Some held up their hands
in thankfulness, and declared it to be a real dispen-
-sation of Providence to further their own cause; for
weré not their own sons and daughters quite as
worthy of their uncle’s favors? But it speedily died
out again when, some months later, it was learned
that Uncle Trundlewood had, after a long and
stormy consultation with his lawyer, sent a letter to
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 37

the widow of his nephew, offering her a living and
a home if she would return to England with her
son.

“]’ll make no promises,” he had said to the lawyer,
“as to the amount, or what I intend to do with
them, till I see the boy, and what sort of chap he
bids fair to be. - As for the mother, I don’t want to
see her, but I suppose she must be with the child, at
least until he’s old enough to look after himself.
They can have the house in Pimlico; it’s near
enough for me to see the boy when I choose, and
it’s a good-for-nothing, tumble-down old place any-
how, that brings me in nothing as it is. What did
‘those Briggses say they left it for?”

“Tt was very much out of repair, sir, very much
so; and you gave orders that nothing should be
done to it, as they were paying but fifty pounds
a year.”

. “I should think not,” growled old Trundlewood,
“fifty pounds a year, and calling for repairs!
That ’s just like the insolence of beggars!” and he
stamped his foot so violently upon the chimney tile
that he suffered a severe twinge in his gouty toe.
“You may have the roof patched where it leaks, and
new shutters put to the windows where the old ones
have tumbled off; that’s all, do you hearme? She’s
38 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

not been accustomed to anything better out there in
that mire of a country, and if the boy deserves
better, he shall have it. I’ve had enough experi-
ence with helping a pack of drivelling, maudlin,
blackguardy relations; I won't be caught any
more!” and with that he gave his lawyer a look of
sneering contempt which was. his dismissal.

It was a year or more before the young mother
could take the long, long journey ; for she received
gratefully the generous offer of this unknown friend,
this relative of her husband’s whose name she had:
never even heard mentioned, and whose immense
means of helping her and her little boy were quite
unsuspected by her. When the time came, how-
ever, she turned her face towards England with
something like pleasure in her heart. She was
going to Ads people; they would see her beautiful
child, and perhaps love her for her husband’s sake.

But when she reached her journey’s end, there
was no kind face to greet her, no fatherly smile to
reassure her, no strong protecting arms to comfort
her; but only Mr. Binkle, the lawyer, with his cold,
expressionless face; not a smile of welcome, not a
look of interest, as he hurried them into the hackney-
coach. And little Sedley, who was wont to make
friends with every one, shrank instinctively from the
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 39

tall, sallow gentleman and clung to his mother’s
dress. They drove in silence across the great city,
through one little street after another, through
crowds of busy, hurrying people, past brilliant shops
and miles of low dingy buildings, until at last they
reached the neighborhood of Pimlico, and finally
the door of the Little House where Beckie stood
with open arms,—the pleasantest and most com-
forting sight which had greeted the poor lady since
her arrival-into the big gloomy city. And here
they alighted, and were welcomed by the little maid,
in the gray twilight of a dull autumn day.
CHAPTER III.

ROM the very first moment
that Mrs. Hamilton entered
the Little House in Pimlico,
she and Beckie were fond of
one another. For where,
indeed, was there in all the
world, said the little creature,

another such a gentle, sweet, angel lady as her mis-

tress! and such a darling lamb of a child as Master

_ Sedley! Rebecca adored her mistress as soon as

she had set eyes on her, and tried to prove her de-

votion by immediately bustling about to make her
comfortable; and the young widow, when she
entered the strange, lonely little home, found the
girl’s pretty, smiling face and cheery words of wel-
come very soothing. She felt very weak and tired
after the tedious travelling; and somehow, when
she entered her own room and looked about her,
it was all so strange and different from what she
had expected that she sat down and cried pite-


A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 4I

ously. Whereupon little Beckie threw her arms
around her mistress and called her a score of
endearing names, and cried too; and the little boy,
who felt like a birdling in a strange nest, set up a
dismal wailing at the sight of his mother’s grief;
_and thus, in the midst of their tears, the three
became the best of friends.

It was not long before the news spread among
the good Pimlico folk that the dear lady had arrived
from India. All the neighborhood knew about her
long before she had come into their midst; though
how this should be is difficult to explain, except that
perhaps the head butler at Mr. Trundlewood'’s house
might have overheard something of that old gentle-
man’s conversations with his lawyer, —it is a trick
head butlers have sometimes of overhearing strange
things through the keyhole, — and, confiding the
intelligence to Mr. Boggs, that worthy spirit had
felt it his duty to make it known to the community
at large. But however that might be, every one in
Pimlico seemed to know the condition of young
Mrs. Hamilton’s affairs; how and why she was
come back to England, under what provisions she
was to live there; who was her so-called benefactor,
and what an uncertain, precarious lot hers was
indeed, having to do with that miserly, treacherous
42 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

old crow, Trundlewood. All the women were in
arms about it; indeed, they knew so much more
about the matter than did Mrs. Hamilton herself,
that perhaps they had reason to be indignant.

“It’s a sinful shame!” cried one, “to make that
pretty young creetur live alone in that rat-trap of -
a house, when he’s got a whole palace to himself.
She looks as if she’d been accustomed to somewhat
better! ”

“ There ’s room enough in that big house for him
and them too!” said another.

“ He’s a miserable old screw, and no mistake!”
said a third.

“Perhaps he’ll want to marry her himself when
he sees how pretty she is,” suggested one; “it would
be just like his impudence, the ridiculous old
vampire!”

For somehow that gentle, sorrowful young woman
and her lovely child had won the hearts of these
simple, well-meaning people before she had been
among them a week. And Mr. Boggs, who was
never slow in deeds of kindness, and who felt,
because of his connection with the butler at the Bel-
grave house, that he had been especially appointed
by Providence to watch over the fortunes of the new-
comers, was the very first to show his kindly feeling
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 43

by sending or bringing little dainties to the door of
the Little House at first, and later venturing with
much trepidation into the presence of the lady her-
self. He had spent many pleasant hours thus with
Miss Beckie, trying to initiate her into the art of
grilling a mutton-chop, of which he was a master.

It was wonderful to see how suddenly the Little
House was transformed by the magic hands of this
same Beckie, and the gentle presence of its young
mistress, and the merry voice of the child, who grew
up there in innocence and grace! A perfect bower
of flowers and green vines flourished at the windows,
behind the white curtains. The old stone steps in
front of the house were swept and scrubbed and
polished till they shone like granite. The window-
panes were always as clear as crystal, and any one
looking through them from without could have
seen a cheerful fire blazing in the hearth of the
pretty room, and flowers and books, and simple but
graceful ornaments, and a beautiful baby at play
upon the hearth-rug; in fact, all the things that
give to a humble home an atmosphere of comfort
and refinement.

Old Mr. Trundlewood himself would hardly have
recognized the place now, if he had happened to
- pass that way; but this he never did. From the.
44 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

day Mrs. Hamilton and her little boy had entered
the Little House, he had not been near it. He had
not even expressed a wish to see his nephew’s child,
and positively refused to meet the mother upon any
terms. Mr. Binkle, however, called upon her every
week, as punctually as time itself, and left an allow-
ance of two guineas; two guineas from a man who
was worth millions !— but she did not know of that,
and was grateful for even that little. To all her
inquiries regarding their benefactor, the young
widow received but one answer.

“Mr. Trundlewood, madam, is an eccentric per-
son. It is his will that you shall know nothing of
him until the proper time comes; and his will is
law.”

The lawyer passed for a very conservative, close-
mouthed individual, as his profession required him
to be. But he’ must certainly have grown more
communicative when he got with old Mr. Trundle-
wood. For there was not the smallest possible
detail concerning the young woman, —her appear-
ance, her manner, her conversation, her mode of
living, her house and interests and those of the child,
—that did not find their way to the old gentleman’s
ears. He knew all that went on at the Little
House, just as well as if he had lived there himself.
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 45

Once when Mr. Binkle expressed to him the
widow’s desire to thank her benefactor in person,
the old man had broken out into a great, harsh,
sneering laugh, and said: —

“ She wants to thank me, does she? Well, let
her try it; she “ll not care to do it again very soon!
Is the woman a fool, Binkle, that she thinks I am
favoring her?”

Mr. Binkle replied that the lady in question was
far from being a fool. From his personal observa-
tion of her, he had gathered an opinion quite to the
contrary. He judged her to be a woman of much
good sense, and of character. “Indeed, sir,’ he
concluded, “I was much surprised to find her so
much a lady in manner and appearance.”

But the old man scoffed at the idea of her being
a lady; a governess a lady! forsooth, a scheming,
intriguing hussy who had stepped in to spoil all his
plans, that’s what she was!

“And much you know what a lady is, you,”
added Mr. Trundlewood, with a look of the utmost
contempt at the imperturbable lawyer.

Although Uncle Trundlewood showed such a
deep aversion to having any intercourse whatsoever
with his nephew’s wife, his interest in the boy
was correspondingly great. He questioned Binkle
46 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

a great deal about the little fellow, never grew
weary of hearing accounts of him, however trifling
these might seem to be. Was the boy handsome,
and like his father? Did he show good breeding
and good blood? Was he a clever little chap, with
spirit enough not to be always tied to his mother’s
apron-strings? To all of which inquiries the lawyer
replied in the affirmative, with only one exception,
and this was that, unmistakably, the child was pas-
sionately fond of his mother; but, he added, by way
of reassuring the old man, that this was the conse-
quence of his extreme youth, and the fact of his
having had no other companion. This would
change, no doubt, when the lad grew up and the
time came for fulfilling Mr. Trundlewood’s wishes.
This one thought, however, annoyed the old uncle;
and for that reason he had made up his mind not to
see the little fellow until he was old enough to come
to him alone, to talk reasonably, and show “ what
there was in him,” as he expressed it.

Five years elapsed, and little Sedley had attained
the mature age of six, and showed such remarkable
cleverness and was such a quaint mixture of serious-
ness and childishness, that Mr. Binkle, who had
noted the development of the child’s characteris-
tics, deemed it high time he should make his
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 47

uncle’s acquaintance. It all happened in one short
afternoon in December, and it was a great event, I
assure you, for the dwellers of the Little House in
Pimlico.

Mr. Binkle drove up at the usual hour, but not in
the usual old hackney-coach in which he made his
weekly visits. He stepped out of an elegant
brougham drawn by handsome horses. He did not
wear his accustomed expression of placid indiffer-
ence; there was actually a gleam of .something like
excitement in his round beady eyes, and his thin
lips and dilated nostrils were perhaps a little more
contracted than ordinary; and there was a certain
air of importance and mystery about him, as he
entered the little library, that could hardly escape
the eye of the young mother. She greeted him
with her sweet simplicity of manner, and begged
him to be seated, and inquired after Mr. Trundle-
wood’s health. .

“Mr. Trundlewood is quite well,” replied the
lawyer with gravity, “and presents his compliments
to you, madam.”

This little extravagance Mr. Binkle permitted
himself on this one occasion, perhaps to make the
interview more impressive; although he had never
been, truthfully speaking, authorized by his grim
48 © A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. ©

old client to present his compliments to any one.
But somehow, the lawyer felt the gravity of the
situation, and wished to prepare the young widow
for it by prefacing his remarks with something of an
extraordinary nature. Mrs. Hamilton blushed and
smiled her acknowledgment of the attention, and
then he proceeded in a strictly legal tone of voice:

“Mr. Trundlewood, madam, as you have perhaps
had reason to observe, is a person of singularly
eccentric views. He has seen fit to induce you to
come here from India; and. though you and your
son have been in England now five years, he has
never until now expressed a desire to see his
nephew’s child.”

“J trust it is through no fault of ours, sir,” said
the young woman, “through no misunderstanding
he may have had with my dear husband,” she added —
hesitatingly, for she had not lived all this time in
this strange, solitary attitude towards her husband’s
relative without forming suspicions which she had
been too sensitive to give utterance to, even to her-
self, until now. “I hope you have told him how
very grateful I am, and how often I have wished to
thank him; how I have taught my little child to
love and respect him even without knowing him!”
and her lips quivered as she spoke.
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 49

“T have told him,” said the lawyer, “all that I
knew would interest him in regard to your son, in
whom, if I judge aright, his interest is centred.
But, it may be well for you to know that, that—”
and here the lawyer faltered for the first time in his
life; for how could he go on to say what must
surely grieve her, when he felt those tender, appeal-
ing eyes fixed on him? Yet he knew she must be
told, and went on after a slight pause: “It will be
best for you to know that there was a difference
between him and Captain Hamilton before they
parted. But this, 1 am confident, has not affected
materially the prospects of his heir. Perhaps you
are not aware, madam, that Mr. Trundlewood has
amassed immense wealth. He has no offspring;
but he has a great number of male relatives, any
one of whom would be glad to come in even for a
small share of his fortune. You are to be con-
gratulated, madam, that he has shown a disposi-
tion to: favor your son; it is his intention to make
him his heir. In fact, I have just come from draw-
ing up Mr. Trundlewood’s will, in which he leaves
everything to Master Hamilton.”

The young mother listened to him with wonder-
ing eyes.

“Qh, sir, ” she cried, clasping her hands, “how

4
50 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

can this be! My little child is too young, too young,
and we are too simple to alter our lives to the
demands of a great fortune. His father was a poor
man, though noble and generous, and the thought
that his child may some day be the master of such
wealth makes me tremble. Money is so dangerous
a thing, and my little Sedley is so good, so guileless
now!” —and she fell to weeping without knowing
why, except that the sudden news had bewildered
her, and that she had too unworldly, too sincere and
honest a nature not to be struck first of all with the
grave responsibility that such a change would bring
into the life of her little boy.

The lawyer looked at her in silence ; his lip curled
slightly, possibly with surprise at the simplicity of
this young creature, who, poor and dependent though
she was, could weep at the news he had brought.

“Pray, calm yourself, my dear madam,” he said.
“When your son is old enough to appreciate the
benefits derived from it, he will, I dare say, find a
fortune a most comfortable thing to be burdened
with.. Many of Mr. Trundlewood’s relatives would
look at the matter in a different light and take it as
a cause for rejoicing rather than grieving!”

But she did not hear his words, or comprehend
his business-like way of offering sympathy. What
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 51

did he know, this frigid, calculating, emotionless
man of the law, whose profession it had been for
many years to crush and stifle every generous im-
pulse that might rise in his breast? What could he
know of the thoughts and doubts and fears of a sen-
sitive heart like hers? She was thinking of Sedley,
the little child who had been the very thought and
substance of her life, of that close companionship in
which they had lived since the beginning of his own
short life, and how she had nursed fond, modest
hopes for his future. Now all this was to be
changed, and it seemed as if he should not be quite
like her own little boy, her own Sedley, when she
looked upon him again. She could not think of
him in this strange, new position.

Mr. Binkle was the first to break the silence.

“Tt is not possible that you can object upon
purely sentimental grounds to anything that will
so vastly affect the prospects of your son’s life.”

« Ah, no, I do not object,” cried the young mother.
“How can I object to so great a mark of Mr.
Trundlewood’s regard for my dear husband's mem-
ory! Who am I that I should stand in the way of
my child’s happiness! But, oh, sir! you cannot
understand a mother’s feeling in a moment like
this. Perhaps I am foolish and weak to feel thus;
52 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

but it is all so sudden and strange, so hard to
realize.”

“JT think it will make no change in your mode of
living, —at least not for many years, madam,” said
the lawyer. “You will have ample time to grow
accustomed to the thought. Mr. Trundlewood,
though an old man, is yet in excellent health, and
will, in all probability, outlive your son’s majority,
until which time he proposes to do nothing beyond
defraying the expenses of the boy’s education. He
has only expressed a wish to see him, and requests
that I bring him this afternoon to Belgrave Square.”

The young mother was all in a flutter. Sedley
had gone out for a promenade in the big park with
Beckie. Would it be possible for Mr. Binkle to
wait? She would herself go and fetch him. But
just as she rose the door of the little library flew
open, and in ran Master Sedley himself, with arms
outstretched towards his mother.

“Oh, you don’t know what has happened, mother
dear,” he cried, quite out of breath with eagerness.
His curls were tumbled with running, and his cheeks
glowing with the sharp December wind, and his
eyes dilated to a deep, dark blue.

“Indeed, ma’am, you would never guess,” inter-
rupted Beckie, who was even more agitated than
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 53

her young master. “I’ve always said as no one
could n’t tell Master Sedley from a prince; no, not

even princes themselves could n’t!”

' “We were looking at the deer, mother,” Sedley
explained, taking his mother’s face between his little
hands and trying to draw her atten-
tion to him, “and a grand lady
passed, and she stopped and looked
at us, and she came back and
kissed me.”















“Tt was one of the princesses,”
interrupted Beckie with energy;
“T know it was, for the person with
her kept saying continual’, ‘your
highness this’ and ‘your highness
that, and she asked me whose
child this was, and I said ‘ Mrs.
Hamilton’s, your Highness,’ and
she looked surprised and _ said,
‘Dear little boy,” and —”

“And she gave me this
rose, mother dear, and I’ve brought it to you!”

“Well, well,” said the young mother, blushing,
and smiling at the child’s pleasure, “this is a great
day for you, Sedley dear, for here is Mr. Binkle —
go and bid him good-day —who has come to fetch
54 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

you to Belgrave Square! Your Uncle Trundlewood
wishes to see his little nephew.” ,

Sedley had not noticed the presence of a third
person in the room as he came running in, for Mr.
Binkle was sitting in a remote corner, which was his
customary place, and from which he made all his
observations of the little family. The child went
straight to him, and held out his small hand in quite
a gentlemanly fashion, saying, —

“How do you do, Mr. Binkle? I hope you are
quite well, and my Uncle Trundlewood too.”

Mr. Binkle had been making a note of the little in-
cident about the princess, and thinking what a sooth-
ing effect it would have upon the old man’s pride
when he related the circumstance to him; and he
was in the act of replacing his note-book and pencil
in his pocket. He hastened to take the small hand
in his, and replied to. Sedley’s inquiry in as grave
and demure a manner as though he had been
addressing his most formidable client.

“You will be very pleased to go and see your
uncle, will you not, dear?” said Mrs. Hamilton,
coming close to her little boy, and laying her hand
on his shoulder; but her heart was beating very fast.

“Ves, indeed, I will! I’ve always wanted to know
my Uncle Trundlewood. Mr. Boggs has told me
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 55

so much about him. He and my uncle must be
great friends. And that’s very nice, for Mr. Boggs
is my friend, too.”

The lawyer raised his eyebrows incredulously.

“Excuse me,” heexplained with much delicacy, “but
is it not Mr. Trundlewood’s butler who is upon terms
of intimacy with the person of the name of Boggs?”

“Well, perhaps so; perhaps I did n’t understand
him ; but I thought he said it was my Uncle Trundle-
wood, — that doesn’t matter much, though. He’s
told me all about the house and the big rooms, and
the dogs and horses, and I should judge it was a very
wonderful place to visit. I am very glad I’m going
there with you, Mr. Binkle. How soon may we go?”

“ At once, if Mrs. Hamilton pleases.”

“Now, this very minute?” asked Sedley, in some
surprise.

“Yes, immediately,” said the lawyer.

Here, Miss Beckie, who had been standing behind
her mistress’s chair during the conversation, raised
her hands in her most emphatic and impressive way,
and exclaimed in an audible whisper, “ Well, I never
did, and 1’d like to know who ever did! Merrycles
will never cease!”

Of course, there was great excitement; and Mrs.
Hamilton and Beckie flew about in pretty confusion
56 . A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

to get the young master ready. He was immedi-
ately taken up to his bedroom and attired in his
comeliest little suit of black velvet, and his neatest
boots, and he wore a beautiful broad collar of real
lace, the gift of a rich patron to his mother some
years ago, and a little scarf-pin with the British
arms upon it which had belonged to his father, and
which always made the little boy feel like a loyal
young Briton. When he reappeared in the library,
a few moments later, the transformation was quite
perceptible to the observing eye of Mr. Binkle, who
uttered something flattering between his teeth, which
was heard, however, only by the clock on the mantel.

They stepped into the little street, and there the
great carriage door was opened by a tall footman in
gorgeous livery who looked somewhat amazed at
the sight of such a bright little apparition issuing
from so modest a home. He closed the door with a
dignified bang when Mr. Binkle and his small com-
panion were comfortably seated in the deep, soft
cushions; and then they drove off in great state,
the child’s bright face smiling from the window as
-long as he could see his mother standing at the
door — until they had turned the corner, and were
full on their way to Belgrave Square. And this was
indeed the first eventful day in little Sedley’s career.
CHAPTER IV.

HIS was the very afternoon upon
which Mr. Boggs appeared at
the door of the Little House
with his provisions of ale and
the plump brown partridge, and
you may be sure that he opened

his eyes very wide when Miss Rebecca, after in-

stalling him in the most comfortable chair of her
kitchen, began to relate in detail the day’s strange
happenings, and how she and Master Sedley, while
walking hand in hand in the park, had encountered
_a princess (wild horses could not make her say it



was any one but a princess); and how she had called
Master Sedley a. beautiful child and given him a
rose; and how the darling had looked up at the
lady, perfectly dauntless, and thanked her with a
pretty speech, “just as calm and easy-like as if he’d
been a-talking to you, Mr. Boggs. Oh, my, the
courage of the child is surpassin’! Every time I
see him going up to that dried-up, lantern-jawed
58 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

skeleton of a Binkle, and hold out his little hand
and smile his sweetest, and say ‘How d’ you do,’ I
think to myself, ‘It’s his Indian bringing up; no
child could do it as hadn’t been born in a country
alongside o’ crocodiles and panthers and birds o’
prey!’ Why, my goodness me, Mister Boggs, that
man Binkle gives me the shivers so with his green
eyes that I could'n’t a-bear to get that close to
him, myself!” —and little Beckie made a feint of
shrivelling all up, and drew her chair a trifle nearer
to Mr. Boggs, showing plainly that she entertained
no such aversion for him, at any rate. “So I don’t
fret about his meeting with his Uncle Trundlewood,
for I know he ’ll come out of it alive, and creditable
too; I just wonder at it, that’s all!” °

Mr. Boggs remained in thoughtful silence for a
second or two, his forefinger caressing the wart on
his nose, and presently gave utterance to this
prophetic outburst.

“JT tell you wot, Miss Beckie, I don’t like it!”

“Don’t like what, Mister Boggs?” asked she, a
little anxious, thinking he might be referring to his
entrenched position between her and the kitchen
grate.

“The turn things is taking,” said Mr. Boggs,
mysteriously.
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 59

“You mean that Master Sedley should come in
for all his uncle’s money?”

“That ’s wot I mean!”

“Why, Mister Boggs, I’m surprised at you, I really
am! Who better could he leave it to, I should like
to know? I always thought you was as fond o’
Master Sedley as any of us!” |

“And so I am fond o’ him, Miss Beckie, and
fonder’n some. I love him better’n—”

“Then why do you begrudge him his good for-
tune?” interrupted the loyal Beckie, whom it took
ever so little to throw into a temper when there
was any question of wronging her young master.

“Z don’t begrudge it him, bless you! if it was
a good fortune.’ I would n’t for the world, you know
I would n’t, Miss Beckie,” explained Mr. Boggs, per-
ceiving that he was misunderstood. “ Nobody’ud
- be gladder to see the little chap made a prince of, as
he well deserves to be; but I don’t like the looks o’
old Trundlewood’s wanting to see him and not the
ma. - I don’t like this lawyer-medium business; you
may be sure there’s somewhat crooked where you
find Binkle poking his nose; and I haven’t a grain
o’ faith in Uncle Trundlewood’s good intentions,
and would n’t give a ha’penny for his promises.
He’s a unaccountable, purse-proud, bullying old un,
60 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

without a speck o’ feeling in him, who’d as soon
disappoint a chap after raising his hexpectations as
not. I know a heap about him; James hears more
and sees more through that keyhole than most
people do with the doors and windows wide open,
and he knows all that goes on at the big house, and
keeps me pretty accurate.”

“Mis-ter Boggs! you don’t mean it?” exclaimed
Beckie, who had cooled down quite suddenly under
_the effect of that gentleman’s far-sighted wisdom
and the impressive manner in which he delivered
himself of these grave opinions. “Well, well, who
could ever have imagined such rascality as deceiving
a helpless, innocent infant!” added the little maid,
stirring up her fire, and looking as if she would like
to roast old Trundlewood, Lawyer Binkle, and the
whole Belgrave outfit over it.

“ These, of course, is only the private opinions of
Martin Boggs, Miss Beckie, and uttered in strict
confidence between us. I would n’t ’a’ breathed a
word of it to another living soul but you,” to which
the young lady made a modest courtesy in acknowl-
edgment of the compliment, “and I trust as the
mistress ll never hear of it through me, for I
would n’t have the dear young creetur a-worritin’ of
herself over things as may never happen.”
‘A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 61

“ Oh, you may be sure o’ one thing, Mister Boggs,”
said Beckie, “and that is she would n’t fret about
the money. She don’t want it, like the rest o’ old
Trundlewood’s vampire relations! All she wants is
to have him love her little boy and her. She cried
when she told me that Mr. Trundlewood had sent his
compliments to her, ‘For the first time, oh, Beckie,
for the first time in these five years!’ she said.”

“It’s a blessing she don’t know more about him,”
said Mr. Boggs.

“Ves, but how ’ll she feel when she finds out in
the end what a puckery old persimmon he is! Oh,
I’ve suspected him, Mister Boggs, from the very first
time I’ve laid eyes on him that day you and I was
a-walking in the Row, and he was a-lolling back
in his boorooch, a ugly, gouty old thing, looking as
cross as a hyena! Oh, my goodness me, it makes
my hair stand on end, like the fretfuls of the porcu-
pine, just to think of it!” —and little Beckie, who
had given her head a great many emphatic nods dur-
ing this speech, proceeded to readjust her cap and
to tuck her imaginary “ fretfuls ” underneath its brim,
at a little mirror that hung near the window.

Mr. Boggs, greatly admiring the performance,
could not help repeating under his breath, “ What
a uncommonly clever little woman that is, to be
62 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

sure!” and was just on the verge of launching into
that “something partic’lar” which he had come in
to say, when a rap at the kitchen door put a check
to his brave resolution.

This time it was indeed the butter-woman, and
Mr. Boggs, seeing his opportunity fly out of the
door as the butter-woman came in, determined, not
without a sigh of relief, to put it off uae a more
propitious season.

If any fellow-man had stopped Mr. Boggs on his
way from the Little House that afternoon, or indeed
at any time when Miss Rebecca was not by, and
asked him what were his intentions in regard to the
pretty housemaid, he would have answered, as bold
as a lion, “Why, I mean to marry her, sir, to make
her Mrs. Martin Boggs and mistress of ‘The Blue
Flags,’ and who’s got a word to say against it, sir,
I should like to know!” And this had been, in
truth, his firm intention for nearly a year, and
seemed but an easy, trifling thing to say, when
addressed to a disinterested party. But when it
came to putting it in the form of a question and
to the sharp, keen-eyed little Beckie herself, it
assumed the proportions of a momentous under-
taking, and quite staggered the big, good-natured
man. He knew that she regarded him with no aus
-A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 63

favor, and that he had begun his conquest of her in
the most promising manner, by bestowing his atten-
tions and kindness at first upon her young master
and mistress, in whom Beckie was wrapped up soul
and body. He had seen her often for the past five
years, in all her varied moods, and she had never
addressed a sharp word to him. She had accepted
his invitations to walk in the park of a Sunday after-
noon; she had been with him to a Punch-and-Judy
show, and several times to the Zoo, and yet with all
this encouragement he walked away that afternoon
with the tender avowal still trembling on his lips.

Do not laugh at good Mr. Boggs; there are
plenty of others in the world. just like him, who,
simple-hearted and modest in their own conceit,
would rather face a whole battery of the British
army, or a whole kit of wild animals, than hear the
fatal “no” of a little woman like Beckie !

While Mr. Boggs and the little maid had been
engaged in this little conference in the kitchen,
the young mother was still watching beside the
window of the library, and looking eagerly out
into the street toward the spot where the big car-
riage had turned and disappeared, although she
knew it would be some time before her little boy
could return. Yet Mr. Trundlewood’s house was
64 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

not such a distance off, she thought; it was but afew
minutes’ walk from Warwick Street, in which they
lived, to Belgrave Road, and then with those swift
horses they would soon be at the house in Belgrave
Square. She tried to follow him in imagination,
tried to picture his awe and wonder as he entered
that stately mansion, and hoped he would be his
own brave, natural little self when he came into the
presence of his mysterious relative. She hoped
they would be kind to him, — he had known nothing
but love and kindness in all his short life, and he
was so winning and so manly a little fellow that she
could not believe any one could do otherwise than
love him. Yet her heart was full of vague fears and
misgivings; she had not been able to grasp the full
meaning of all the lawyer said; she had been too
agitated and surprised; but now that she was alone,
and had time to think it over, his words came back
to her, and struck her with a strange significance.
He had said that Mr. Trundlewood was very rich,
and lived alone in a great, magnificent house, and
had no family to provide for or to think of, and she
wondered about a man who had shown enough
interest to send for them all the way from India,
and yet who had never made himself known to
them, except by communication through his lawyer.
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO 65

She was afraid to form an opinion of such a per-
son, —it was all so mysterious; but she had been
accustomed to live in this mystery for so long now,
and had met with so little encouragement when she
had tried to inform herself about her benefactor, that
she had long since accepted the situation and
become reconciled to it. She knew that Mr.
Trundlewood lived in Belgrave Square, but she did
not even know the house. The neighbors in Pimlico
had talked enough about it, but their comments had
never reached her ears; for these good people
among whom she seemed to have dropped like a
bright angel, kept from her anything which might
shock or grieve her sensitive nature.

While she stood there absorbed in her medita-
tions, it had grown suddenly dark ; for in December,
the moment the sun disappears behind the top of
the tall buildings, the little streets in Pimlico be-
come very dingy and dark. She was not roused
until Beckie came in to light the little parlor, and
fetch the tea-things, and mend the fre.

“Oh, it is you, Rebecca,” said Mrs. Hamilton ; “it
must be growing very late.”

“No, ma’am, it’s but a bit after four,” said the
little maid in a cheerful voice, “ though it’s been a
long afternoon to us, ma’am, and such strange goin’s

5
66 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

on! Z feel-as if I’d grown as old as Methooslam
since this morning, ma’am. It seems as if there ’d
been a funeral in the house since my dear darling
Master Sedley’s gone! But he ll be in directly, for
it’s nigh on to three hours since that hooked-
nosed harpy —”

“ Rebecca!” remon-
strated Mrs. Hamilton,
in gentle tones.

“T mean Mr. Binkle,
ma’am.”

“T am afraid you
, havea grudge against
5 that gentleman, Re-
becca,” said Mrs. Ham-
ilton, smiling at the
vehemence of Beckie’s




‘\ § utterance whenever she
\ had cause to speak of
eae = the lawyer at all.
“f—bear him a
grudge, ma’am, that wet curl-paper of a—” The
little maid stopped short in her operation of arrang-
ing the tea-table, and finished her sentence with
a look of utter contempt at the coal-scuttle. ‘No,
indeed, ma’am, except as I might wish his eyes
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 67

were n’t so green, and his nose so humped, and
his lips so smirking, and his voice so like a saw-
But one can’t owe folks a grudge for their ugliness,”
added that young lady with a superior air, as she
caught glimpses of her own pretty face and white
neck in a mirror above the chimney-piece.

The truth was that Miss Beckie did have a cause
of complaint against Mr. Binkle. He was the only
man who ever came into the Little House that did
not pay some tribute to her bright eyes or rosy
cheeks, and she had for a long time resented the
persistently frigid manner in which he ignored her
existence, “taking no more notice of me than if I
was a chink in the wall!” as she expressed it.
_ But it must be remembered that our little Beckie’s
admirers were among that artless class of men — the
butcher, the baker, and the candle-stick maker — who
make it no sin to show their admiration, and from
whom these pleasantries are as innocent as they are
agreeable; whereas Mr. Binkle was a gentleman of
grave profession and dignified deportment, which
forbade his noticing anything of so frivolous a
nature as Rebecca’s charms. Yet she was fond of
asserting that “better gentlemen than zm have
paid me compliments and given me a kind word in
passing !”
68 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“Come and have your tea, ma’am; it’s ready and
~ steaming,” said she, drawing Mrs. Hamilton’s arm-
chair near the hearth, and the little tea-table close
toit. “There, let me make you comfortable and
cosey, ma’am, and the tea will cheer you up a bit.
Master Sedley must find you bright and happy
when he comes back. And to think of all the won-
ders as hell have to tell about!” —andBeckie, with
many birdlike twitches of her head, and exclama-
tions of surprise at an imagined account of Master
Sedley’s adventures at Belgrave Square, flew about
her mistress with many little attentions, placing a
cushion for “her feet near the fender, wrapping a
white cloud about her shoulders, pouring and stir-
ring her tea; all of which was very pleasant to the
poor lonely lady. She laid her hand gently on
Beckie’s arm.

“You are a good comforter, my little Rebecca,”
said she. “Yes, I will take your advice, and stop
thinking. I will try to look happy, for Sedley must
find his little home, cheerful and bright when he
comes back to it.”
CHAPTER V.

been going through that most try-
ing of ordeals, in Beckie’s eyes, that
of being presented to his mysterious
uncle, of which, as she had pro-
phesied, he acquitted himself very
bravely indeed for a little boy. He
. was an honest, fearless little fellow, and the thought
of dreading the interview had never entered his
small imagination. His mamma had told him
many times how kind Uncle Trundlewood had
been to them, how he had loved his dear papa like a
son when he was a lad, and how all he had done for
- them both was for his sake. Little Sedley was
quite prepared to be on the friendliest terms with
the old gentleman.

If Sedley had been sitting next to Mr. Boggs, ia
the big carriage, instead of Mr. Binkle, as they rode
luxuriously up Belgrave Road, he would have been
moved to ask a great many questions about his


_7O A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

uncle. But Mr. Binkle always assumed, and that
afternoon especially, an attitude of the most profound
respect towards the little boy; always addressed him
as “sir,” and otherwise treated him as if he had been
a person of his own serious age. It was impossible
for this grave lawyer to stoop mentally to the level
of a little child’s thoughts; he always spoke to
Sedley in the most stilted terms, and the boy always
listened to him wonderingly, comprehending but
little of what he said. So, it could not be said that
there existed between them the same congeniality of
spirit and mutual interchange of ideas which Sedley
enjoyed so much with his amiable friend Mr. Boggs.
Their conversation on the way to Belgrave Square
was not particularly lively or voluble, although the
little fellow made manly efforts to keep it going.
When they reached the stately mansion, and the
wonderful footman in yellow livery had opened the
carriage door and lifted Master Sedley, and depos-
ited him on the broad flagstones, he and Mr. Binkle
walked silently up the steps, and were immediately
admitted by a tall, stately butler, who seemed to
‘have been born on purpose to fit the great house.
Sedley had never seen such remarkable looking
gentlemen, the Prince of Wales could scarcely have
presented a more majestic appearance than this
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 71

haughty individual, who, without changing a single
muscle of his countenance, led the way across a
great hall into Mr. Trundlewood’s study. It was
several minutes before little Sedley saw in this
butler the features of Mr. Boggs’ brother-in-law’s
brother, whom he had met once or twice “ off duty”
in his friend’s shop, now dignified and stiffened
almost beyond recognition.

They trod lightly over the dark carpet, which was
so rich and soft that one’s feet sank deep into it
without the slightest sound. Sedley caught sight of
a number of large portraits hanging up against the
wall,—portraits of queer old gentlemen in wigs and
neckcloths, with knee breeches and buckled shoes;
and of old ladies-in caps and kerchiefs, and white
ringlets falling around their faces; and one of a
pretty young girl with large eyes, and bare arms
and shoulders. He would have felt almost awed by
the grandeur of his surroundings, if he had had time
to think about the matter; but immediately the
door was opened, and the heavy curtains were
drawn aside, and he stood in the presence of Mr.
Trundlewood.

The old gentleman was seated in a large cushioned
chair between a huge mahogany writing-desk and
the open fire. His back was towards the window,
72 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

so that his face was in the shadow, and little Sedley
could but dimly discern the features of his uncle.
Hé could not see that the relative whom he had
been taught to love and revere ever since his earliest
recollection, who had been pictured to his childish
imagination as a benevolent and saintly person, was
in reality a cold, relentless, mercenary, ambitious old
man, whose heart had never been stirred by a pure
and noble feeling, who was incapable of being
- touched by the sight of others’ sufferings, and whose
hard, loveless nature showed itself in every line of
his face. No, Sedley did not see this. How should
he? The lightin the room was dim, and besides, he
was too little a boy to read character in a person’s
countenance.

But the old man saw the face of the child very
well, and read in an instant all there was in it. The
last faint glow of the afternoon sun shot across the
room from one of the west windows, and fell full
upon the sturdy little figure as he stood in front of
the dark green curtains; and he saw a round, child-
ish head, with a wealth of curls glittering like gold
under the light of the setting sun; a little face so
bright and pure and innocent, and eyes of such blue
depth and candor, that the old man gave a start and
grasped the arms of his chair. The three were
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 73

silent a moment, — Mr. Trundlewood was too much
surprised to speak, the lawyer did not dare; it was
Sedley’s voice that first broke the stillness of the
great sombre room.

“How do you do, Uncle Trundlewood,” said he,
walking up to the old man’s chair and offering his
hand with a fearlessness that puzzled that gentleman
mightily. “I hope I see you quite well.”

Mr. Trundlewood looked hard at the little hand,
and hesitated for a moment, not seeming to know
quite what he should do with it. He finally took it
in an irresponsive manner and then dropped it. But
he did not take his eyes from the child; he seemed
to be looking him through and through. ;

“So you ’re the boy, eh?” he said at last.

“Yes,” returned the child without wincing, “I’m
Sedley, I’m your little nephew, — George Douglass
Sedley Hamilton, that’s my name. It’s rather a
long one, is n’t it? But it was my papa’s, at least
George Douglass was, and Sedley is what my
mamma calls me. It was her papa’s name, and she
and my papa agreed to give it to me. You knew
my papa well, didn’t you?”

“Yes,” said the old uncle, with a strange gleam in
his eye.

“Well, do you know, I never saw him myself.
74 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

He was dead before I came; and you’re the first
‘person I’ve met since we came to England who
knew him. My mamma says he was very good and
brave and noble.”

“ Oh, I’ve no doubt,” said Mr. Trundlewood, dryly.
For the life of him he could not tell what there was
that fascinated him about that little fellow, as he sat
there with his legs crossed, and talked in the most
confidential and friendly manner after two minutes’
acquaintance.

“You have n’ta portrait of my papa in your house,
have you? I saw a number of old men in wigs
downstairs in your hall; he couldn’t have looked
like them, could he?”

“Not exactly,” was the reply.

There was an uncomfortable pause, during which
little Sedley gazed from his uncle to the lawyer, who
stood up near one corner of the chimney, and from
him to the frigid butler, wondering why these gen-
tlemen took no part in the conversation. He felt
the necessity of saying something.

“I suppose you know I was born away off in
India. That’s a long distance for one to be born
from his own country, isn’t it? Now, Mr. Boggs
thinks it’s very funny, and calls me ‘little cheroot,’

-and he tells everybody that I used to have pet






















































































ib

Vy ee A |














ee ei ul |
“s Zs, i Wen q
a : ‘4
eS Ae |
Mo af
—— NN

“ There was an uncomfortable pause.”
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 77

panthers’ and hyenas to play with when I was a
baby. Did you ever see a hyena?”

“Yes,” said Mr. Trundlewood, with a low laugh
and a wicked leer at his lawyer, who was himself in
the act of displaying a row of white teeth. “I see
one quite frequently; I don’t have to go to India,”
and he laughed again, at which Sedley laughed too,
out of politeness, thinking that this must have been —
intended for some good-natured joke between his
uncle and Mr. Binkle which he could not quite
understand.

But it was becoming rather a difficult matter to
keep up the conversation. Sedley seemed to be
having it all to himself. He could not strike any
topic that particularly interested his curious old
relative, he thought; still he was trying his best to
be agreeable. a

“ How do you like living in such a big house?”
he asked, looking up at the high ceiling.

“Tolerably well,” replied the uncle, as his eyes
rested on the sumptuousness that surrounded him.
“How would you like it?” .

“Oh, I should like it immensely,” cried Sedley,
“and I dare say my mamma would too. But it is
such an awfully big house, beside the little one we live
in'on Warwick Street, I suppose I’d get lost in it.”
78 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“There would be plenty of people to find you;
how would you like to go about and learn the way
for yourself?”

“T should like to go around with you, but per-
haps you would n’t care to take the trouble to-day.”

“No, I can’t go about much; I’m very lame, you
see. It’s all I can do to get up and down stairs,
with this confounded toe!”

“Oh, I’m very sorry to hear that; what’s the
matter with it?” asked Sedley. “Did you run a
splinter in it?”

“No, it’s the gout.”

“Oh!” said the little fellow in a commiserating
tone, although he had not the least idea what this
malady was. “That must be very dreadful, I ’m
sure, — what is it like?”

“ Like the —” Uncle Trundlewood checked him-
self in his comparison, as the wide blue eyes rested
upon him inquiringly.

“ Like the what?” asked Sedley.

“Like the very worst twinges of a man’s con-
science,” said the old reprobate with a twinkle in
his fierce eyes.

“Well, you see, I’ve never had either of those
things, so I can’t very well realize how bad you
feel. All I’ve ever had is the measles. Mamma
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 79:

said I was very poorly for two days; and she and
Beckie wrapped me up in a flannel gown, and gave
me hot tea to drink. You can’t imagine what a
splendid nurse my mamma is; if you like I'll ask
her to come over and take care of you. I’m sure
she would make you well.”

Uncle Trundlewood turned from him to the fire,
and looked into it for a long time in silence. The
child’s good-natured trust completely disarmed him.
He could find no utterance for his usual gruff, harsh
expressions, which were his only means of communi-
cation with those about him; and he wondered at
it himself. As the flames lighted up his face Sedley
saw more clearly how deep-set his eyes were and
how his heavy brows were knit together; how thin
and compressed his lips were, and what a curious
expression they wore. He was neither attracted to
the old man nor afraid of him; but still there was
something in Uncle Trundlewood’s look, just then,
that bade him hold his peace for a time.

During the interval, he looked about the richly
furnished room, the like of which he had never seen
before. The walls were hung with soft silken tap-
estries, the furniture was of the rarest woods, ingen-
iously carved, and supported by curious claw-legs.
There was a large tiger-skin stretched out upon the
80 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

polished floor in front of Mr. Trundlewood’s desk,
with the head of the animal resting upon the fender ;
and the light of the fire played upon its face too,
and showed up its staring, glassy eyes, and sharp,
cruel teeth, in quite a ferocious manner.

While the old man seemed to be looking at the
flames as they danced and sported and then flew up
the chimney, he was looking now and then, out of
the corner of his eye, at the little figure sitting
beside him on a high chair, his legs hanging and his
feet crossed one over the other, and keeping time
with the pendulum on the mantel, sitting there and
gazing about him admiringly and with the utmost
composure; while Mr. Binkle and James, the but-
ler, almost trembled at this extraordinary coolness
of manner.

At length the old man stirred uneasily in his
chair; and little Sedley, with much delicacy and
presence of mind, judging that his uncle might be
wearying of the interview, slid down from his chair
and came and stood very near him; so near, in fact,
that the little arm rested on the brace of the old
man’s chair. “Perhaps I ought to go now; I’ve
made you quite a visit. I’m afraid you’re tired and
want to take your nap. May I come again to see
you,— and bring my mamma, too?”
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. SI

Mr. Trundlewood laid his hand upon the curly
head, and turned the small face up to his. He
wanted to make sure that all this innocence in
regard to the real state of things was purely genu-
ine, that his mother had not prepared him for the
meeting. But there was only truth and childish
trust in the blue eyes as they looked up at the old
man, and Sedley repeated, “ May I, Uncle Trundle-
wood?”

“Yes, you may come once a week, and I will give
you the guineas to take home. Binkle will not have
it to do; he’s a busy man, and his time is precious;
you need not trouble your mother to come with
you; I'll do myself the honor to call upon her,
when I’m well — and — wish to see her.”

“Oh, thank you, Uncle Trundlewood, she ’ll be
very happy to see you, I’m sure. Thank you, and
good-bye!” and the little fellow shook hands once
more and was about to take his leave when Mr.
Trundlewood called out : —

“Stop a bit; Collins will show you about the
house and into the conservatory if you like, and
treat you to something afterwards.”

“Good Mrs. Collins, the housekeeper, responded
‘immediately, though not without a slight tremor, to

the summons into her master’s presence.
6
82 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“Take Master Hamilton, ma’am, and show him
the best of your hospitality,” were the rather un-
expected orders she received; and making a humble
courtesy, and Sedley smiling a last good-bye, they
both disappeared behind the tall curtains.

“ Good Heavens! how like him the child is!” mut-
tered the old man, resuming his contemplation of the
fire, “and as handsome as a lord, too, by Jove!”

Mrs. Collins was never more agreeably surprised
than when she found herself in the company of an
amiable little boy who bade her good-day with a
smiling face and put his hand in hers in the friend-
liest manner possible. Mrs. Collins herself was a
good-natured, motherly person of forty or there-
abouts, who had never seen such a thing as a little
child in Mr. Trundlewood’s house, and could scarcely
believe her ears when young Master Sedley gave
her a glowing account of his interview with his
uncle, and praised that redoubtable gentleman so
genuinely, saying how very kind he had been. to him
and his mamma.

From that day, not only Mrs. Collins, but every
person employed at the big house, from Mr. James,
the butler, down to Thomas, the young groom who
tended the horses, agreed in pronouncing the young
master, as they soon styled him, “a reg’lar blue-
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 83

blooded little Briton, and a fine young gentleman
at that!” The good housekeeper could not remem-
ber a time when she had obeyed her master’s orders
with so much pleasure. She took the little guest
through the grand stately drawing-rooms, which
were very dark and dismal and had a musty smell,
so Sedley thought; into the great library with its
huge chimney-place, and deep leathern chairs, and
enormous bookcases filled with costly volumes, and
tall marble pedestals on the top of which stood
bronze busts of very grave-looking gentlemen in-
deed, whom Sedley did not as yet know to be some
of the greatest statesmen of England. They visited
the greenhouses where the rarest plants and flowers
grew; and in another part called the “ Grapery,” Sed-
ley saw a fine old vine, over a hundred years old, —
so he told his mamma afterward,— which had been
the possession of a great lord to whom the house
belonged before Uncle Trundlewood purchased it,
whose trunk was as big as that of a tree, and whose
branches covered the entire walls, and from which
hung the most perfect clusters of grapes. From
there they went into the spacious dining-hall where
old Mr. Trundlewood dined alone and in state
every evening, with almost as many servants to wait
upon him as there were dishes upon his table.
84 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

There was all the gorgeous, glittering plate dis.
played upon the oak sideboard; there were enor-
mous chandeliers with brilliant pendants of crystal; -:
the high-back, carved oak chairs; how gloomy, sol-
emn, and magnificent it all was! Little Sedley was
greatly impressed; but if the truth were known he
would have liked better to go and visit the ponies
and hounds, of which he had heard so much, and he
even ventured to suggest a visit to the stables; but
Mrs. Collins explained that they were quite out of
her department, although some day he might go
with Thomas to see the horses.

Then they passed through several other rooms and
went upstairs to a pretty sunny little parlor, decked
in bright flowered chintz, which was really the only
homelike spot in all the big house. It was Mrs. Col-
lins’ little sitting-room, and here she and Sedley had
a cosey cup of four o’clock tea together; that is to
say, Mrs. Collins drank the tea, while Master Sedley
regaled himself upon jam tarts and honey and lus-
cious fruit, and other like delicacies which the house-
maid had brought in by special request. He grew
very talkative, and found it much easier to entertain
Mrs. Collins than his uncle. He told her all about
himself and his mamma, about their little home in
Warwick Street, and Mr. Boggs and Beckie; in fact,
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 85

all who formed the small circle of his acquaintance.
He was quite surprised to find it had grown dark,
_ when at last a servant came in to announce that the
horses were ready and that Mr. Binkle awaited
Master Hamilton’s pleasure. He jumped down from
his chair, and went up and kissed Mrs. Collins on
both cheeks, in a way that won the good woman’s
heart on the spot.

“I’ve had a splendid visit,” he said. “I think
this is a lovely place to come to; and I hope I shall
see you every time I come to see my uncle.”

Mrs. Collins accompanied him down the stairs
and embraced him again at the door, and descended
straightway into the servants’ hall, where she went
into raptures over that dear child, and hoped Mr.
Trundlewood would always behave as civil to him,
which was, however, more than could be reasonably
expected of him. .

But that dreaded gentleman was anything but
civil to his lawyer, who had been standing up in his
same place, awaiting in silence the verdict of his
client. It was some time before he turned from the
fire, and when he did, it was only to abuse Mr. Binkle
in the most merciless terms for having given him a
false impression of the boy.

“What do you think I can make out of a
86 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

youngster like that!” he said contemptuously,
—“a sweetish, goodish, woman-bred brat. He’ll
never be anything but a milkweed; talks about his
confounded mother incessantly! and he ’ll be of no
mortal use to me as long as that lasts.”

“JT told you, sir, that I thought —”

“You thought!—you, what right have you to
think anything about my affairs!” thundered old
Trundlewood with rising anger. “It’s no use;
I won’t be made a fool of again with any of
your high-minded, pillar-of-righteousness sort of
chaps. I’ll never make any more of him than I
did of his father.”

“But is not the boy very young, sir, for you to
come to any decision? His character has hardly
had time to form itself,” ventured Mr. Binkle, who
was well used to Mr. Trundlewood’s manner and
took no offence at it.

“Heigh, ho! you’re for favoring the boy’s in-
terests, are you? What axe have you got to grind?
Perhaps you ’re dreaming of taking the mother your-
self, and coming in for a share of something! But
I'll knock all your fine schemes in the head as
quick as that!” —and with his cane, which he had in
his hand, Mr. Trundlewood administered such a
smart rap to a little marble bust of Queen Caroline
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 87

that it fell from the mantel upon the tiles below,
and was shattered into a thousand pieces.

Having thus worked himself up into quite a show
of temper, the old man wheeled himself round sud-
denly. “Send for Chadwick,—do you hear me?
Send for him immediately. I won’t have any more
foolishness,” he cried. And the lawyer was dis-
missed. But he was not surprised at this sudden
turn of sentiments; for he had witnessed scenes of
this sort more or less frequently during the past
twenty years. He went away, and his client’s words
- did not trouble him further; only that he was more
preoccupied, and scarcely heard the eager and ani-
mated talk of little Sedley on their drive homeward.

As for Mr. Trundlewood, who shall guess what
was really in his thoughts, as he was left alone in
the big room with his fire and his gout for only
companions? Did he mean what he had said to the
lawyer about the little boy, or was he only annoyed
with himself, and perhaps a little ashamed of the
civility he had shown the child and his first eon
to be pleased with him?
CHAPTER VL




R. BOGGS’ establishment,
otherwise known as the famous
“Blue Flags,” was not more than
half a square distant from the
Little House, and Sedley on this account

was often permitted to go there alone to visit;
for he and Mr. Boggs were the best of friends.
Nothing of any importance ever happened in
‘Warwick Street that the. little boy did not feel
it his duty to inform Mr. Boggs of the fact. In-
deed, this good-humored man had been his only
intimate companion, besides his mother and his
nurse. He and Mr. Boggs found endless topics of
mutual interest, from the royal] family down to the
distracting delights of rabbit-hunting. Mr. Boggs’
experience of life had not been very vast; he had
never been outside of London, excepting once, and
that had only been to Greenwich; but as he said
himself, he had not time to go and see the world, so
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 89

the world came around to see him; and you would
have been convinced of the truth of this statement,
if you had chanced to drop in at “The Blue Flags”
any day between twelve and one o’clock, and see
what a goodly portion of the world did come to Mr.
Boggs.

It was a cosey, hospitable-looking sort of place,
more like an old-time tavern than a modern grill-
room; a low-roofed corner house, delightfully ram-
bling and irregular, which always presented the
comfortable aspect of there being plenty of room
for everybody. There was a sign hanging above its
door, on which the emblematic Blue Flags flourished
in alarming profusion around an uncommonly fat
young mutton, which was temptingly suggestive of
savory chops and joints. At the entrance of the
dining-room, in ‘the corner at the left, was the fur-
nace where the grilling and roasting and sizzling
went on, and from where issued the most delicious
and appetizing odors. Here might always be seen
a number of young turn-spits, in white aprons and
caps, executing the orders that came shouted across
the different parts of the room for all the varied
dainties that “The Blue ad was capable of
producing.

At the farthest end of the room was a little
90 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

parlor set aside for Mr. Boggs’ privacy, where a
* cheerful wood fire blazed, and where he sat a good
part of the time in the company of his pet bird, — the
only home companion the good fellow had, but upon
which he lavished all the superfluous affection of his
big, strong nature. It was only a little tame canary,
a frail mite of a creature, that knew how comfortably
off it was, and never had the least desire to fly away,
although it was never caged, but allowed to fly
about the room at its own free will, and perched
wherever it liked. It was here, too, that Martin
Boggs, in his capacity of proprietor, added up his
accounts and made change for his customers, and
otherwise looked after his interests.

He was employed in this way one morning, his
little yellow friend perched on the top of his head,
when, looking up from some distracting columns of
shillings and pence over which he had been poring,
he beheld a little figure standing before him; a little
figure wrapped up to his ears in fur, his hands in
his pockets, and such a smiling, rosy face, so full of
mysterious importance, that Mr. Boggs could not
but feign to be vastly surprised, and slipping his
pen behind his ear he let fall his hands, and
exclaimed : —

“Well, Master Sedley, what fair wind has blown






——
aD
ae
bee
coe























i











































































































“ Tt was here, too, that Martin Boggs added up his accounts.’

A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. . 93

you here this cold morning ?”” —and he came round,
but instead of the cordial handshake with which
they usually met, Mr. Boggs made a very low and
courtly bow, and then drew up a chair for him near
the fire, but on no account would sit down until
Sedley had done so himself. But the little yellow
‘bird flew from its master’s head and greeted Sed-
ley quite familiarly, by alighting on his shoulder,
and began to gurgle and coo a welcome in his most
cordial manner, — for e was not aware of the great
change that had come in his little friend’s fortunes,
—at which Mr. Boggs tried to frown, and said ina
remonstrating tone, “Dickie, Dickie, Dickie!”

“Why, Mr. Boggs; what is the matter?” asked
Sedley, looking at him with a droll mixture of
amusement and wonder, “what makes you act
so strangely? I’ve only come to tell you the
news.” ;

“ News, indeed!” ejaculated Mr. Boggs, placing
his thumbs in his vest pockets and looking very
knowing indeed.

“Oh, have you heard all about it?”

“Well, I can’t say as I’ve heard af about it; —
leastway, not but what I’d like to hear more; but
I do say as I’ve heard tell how you took your first
header into haristocratic society yesterday.”
94 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“My first what, Mr. Boggs?” inquired Sedley,
looking still more puzzled.

“Made your first acquaintance with great folks.”

“You mean my Uncle Trundlewood ?”

“ The very indiwiddle.”

“ That is just what I came to tell you about, Mr.
Boggs. I went to see him yesterday in his big
house, and I enjoyed myself ever so much. You
know my uncle, don’t you?”

“Not intimately,” Mr. Boggs was forced to admit.

“Well, he’s quite old, and he has two dreadful
things the matter with him.”

“Which are they?” inquired Mr. Boggs, rever-
entially. :

“The gout, and twinges of conscience!” said
Sedley, quite seriously.

Any other day Mr. Boggs would have smiled;
but considering the solemnity of the subject, he
could not. The muscles of his mouth only twitched
a little, and Sedley went on without interruption.

“Do you know, Mr. Boggs, I think the butlers
and footmen in my uncle’s house wear very ele-
gant clothes; much handsomer than my uncle
himself.”

“Humph! they can well afford it,” returned Mr.
Boggs; “ your uncle buys all their clothes!”
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 95

“ Does he?” said Sedley, in some surprise. “Well,
he must be very rich then, don’t you think?”

“Lots o’ tin!” was the expressive reply.

“Lots.of what?”

“ Lots o’ this,” and Mr. Boggs winked sipnideantly
and rattled some loose shillings in his pockets.

Sedley seemed to understand his meaning. “ Well,
Mr. Boggs,” he said after a moment’s hesitation,
“Tm going to tell you something that will surprise
you!”

“No!” said that gentleman.

“Yes, I think perhaps it will. Mr. Binkle told
my mamma yesterday that some day I should have
all of my Uncle Trundlewood’s money and be very
rich.”

“Bless my soul! you don’t mean it,” cried Mr.
Boggs, pretending to be quite staggered by the
announcement, and taking hold of the corner of the
chimney to keep from falling.

“Yes, it’s quite true; and my mamma said it
was a great deal too much for a little boy like me,
and so I came over to talk with you about it, and
ask you if you-would n't like me to give you some
of it.”

This time Mr. Boggs was obliged to dive behind
his writing-table and fumble into one of its drawers,
96 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

until his features had regained their expression of
respectful attention. .

“Oh, I beg you won't think of it,” he said with
becoming modesty. “Really you won’t find it a bit
too much when you come to run that big ’ouse over
there with all the servants to buy uniforms for.”

“Well, and that’s another thing,” said Sedley.
“Mr. Binkle told my mamma that I should have the
big house too, and all the things in it; and as it’s
much too big for just mamma and me and Beckie, I
think you'll have to come and live with us, Mr.
Boggs.” |

That gentleman smiled ¢ at the impossible though
delightful prospect.

“It’s a beautiful house; I never imagined how
beautiful. But then you know all about it, for
you’ve been there.”

“ Well,” explained Mr. Boggs, with a slight cough
of embarrassment, “I’ve been in it as far as ‘ser-
vants’ hall,’ Master Sedley; but I think I could go
all over the place with my heyes. shut, I know it so
well from hearing James talk of it.”

“Did he tell you about the big portraits hanging
_in the hall of those funny looking gentlemen in
wigs?”

« Ves.”
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 97

“Who are they?”

“ They’re all your distant relations.”

“Really?” said Sedley, in some surprise. “1
suppose that’s why my mamma and I have never
seen them.”

“ Very likely,” assented Mr. Boggs.

“JT didn’t know I had so many. Do you know
who the pretty girl is?”

“The pretty young thing with the shoulders?
Why, she was your grandma.”

“My grandmother, Mr. Boggs? why, she’s only
a little girl in the picture.”

“Yes, she was then, but she grew up into a beau-
tiful young lady and married, and your pa was her
little boy.”

‘Sedley was very much mystified by these family
revelations. ‘Well, isn’t it queer,” said he, “how
one minute you think you never had any relations
at all, and the next minute you find you've got a
great many? I shall have to tell my mamma ; I’m
sure she doesn’t know about them.”

“And how do you like your Uncle Trundle-
wood?” inquired Mr. Boggs.

“Oh, I dare say I shall like him very well indeed
when I know him better. You see, I’ve only seen
him once, and it didn’t seem so easy to talk to him

7
98 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

as it does to talk to you; hedid n’t say much, but he
looked at me and at the fire. He said I was to
come and visit him every week, so I shall see a
great deal of him, and I dare say we'll get better
acquainted.”

Mr. Boggs signified by a wise nod that he under-
stood the situation perfectly.

“Tsay, Mr. Boggs,” resumed the little boy, “don’t
you think it is nice to be rich?”

“Bless my buttons! Now I really can’t say, never
having been rich myself; but I should think from
obserwation that it was a tolerable easy way o’ living.
What do you think about it, Master Sedley?”

“T should think it would be splendid; for, you
see, when you have plenty of money you can do so
much for other people, and for those you love.
When I’m rich,” said he, rubbing his small hands
together in quite a responsible manner, “ my mamma
shall have a pink silk dress to wear every day, and
a great many other beautiful things. And I shall
buy a house for Beckie’s grandmother, so she will
not have to pay any more rent; then I should like
to do something for the tart-woman too. You know
she is old and poor, and the school children buy her
tarts and don’t always pay her, and some of them ,
owe her a great many shillings, and the other day
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 99

she went away crying, because she said she had no
money to buy wood and medicine for her little sick
grandchild, and so mamma and I gave her some
pence, and she called us ‘hangels!’ and said ‘ God
bless you!’ a great many times. I felt dreadfully
sorry for her. I should like to buy her a shawl,
and a new umbrella to hold over her wares, for the
old green one she has now is full of holes, and the
rain comes through and spoils her tarts.” .

During this touching narrative Mr. Boggs had
been standing in silent admiration of the little
speaker. .

“Dickie,” said he, after an impressive pause,
“come here!” and the little bird flew over and
perched upon its master’s finger. “Do you see any
one sitting there on a chair in front of.the fire?”

Dickie signified that he did by many chirps and
twitchings of his head.

“Well,” continued Mr. Boggs, in the same im-
pressive manner, “Dickie, that’s the finest little
gentleman in England, the kindest-heartedest, sweet-
est-temperedest, most unselfishest, amiablest, inno-
centest little chap in all the British Isles!” — and
Mr. Boggs firmly believed every word he said.
CHAPTER VII.

NE day, early in-the new year,
Sedley and his mamma _ were
returning from a promenade in
the park, — the great Hyde Park,
which is the scene of so much
life and gayety on a pleasant
afternoon; for here it is that the

rich and fashionable world repair, to drive or ride
and enjoy the welcome sunshine, so rare on a win-
try London day, and where the crowds swarm to
behold their gorgeous display. The day was so
fine and the air so crisp and invigorating that it
sent the warm blood surging through one’s veins,
and Mrs. Hamilton, who seldom went very far from
home because she was so delicate, had walked that
long distance almost without any weariness.

To be sure, little Sedley had entertained her all
the way with pleasant accounts of the great house
in Belgrave Square which he visited now regularly
once a week; of his Uncle Trundlewood, who was


A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. IOI

really a puzzling old person, and yet whom he grew
to like because it was his nature to love every one
about him; of good Mrs. Collins, the housekeeper,
and Mr. James, the butler, who were always so kind
to him, and the remarkable footmen, and indeed of
everything which interested him in those days of
new experiences, and about which the young mother
never wearied of hearing.

It was so strange to have her little boy moving in -
a world of which she knew nothing, or at least of
which she learned only through his childish, imper-
fect impressions. There was always a_ lingering
feeling of sadness and doubt in her heart when he
left her to go to this mysterious house with all its
mysterious attractions, and a great leap of joy when
- he returned from it unchanged, unharmed, his little
face all beaming with love and pleasure at being
with her again, innocent of the anxious thoughts
that had been her companions during his absence.
The child always told her everything; and she lis-
tened eagerly to his recitals of all that he said and
heard there, in the hope of catching a word that
would give her some clue to the state of Mr.
Trundlewood’s feelings towards her. She could
hardly think them friendly; she had ceased to
entertain that thought now; but still she hoped
102 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

that sometime, through her little child, he might
come to look more kindly upon her.

They were walking along the Serpentine,—a
picturesque little sheet of water which meanders
through the park,— admiring the bril-
liant crowds which the pleasant day
had brought out from all parts of the
city; the imposing equipages and spir-
ited horses in their glittering trappings,
as they passed to and fro, presided over
by sleek coachmen and
powdered footmen, and in
which sat most beautiful
ladies wrapped in rich furs ;
the numerous riders parad-
ing their prancing horses
up and down the Row, and
the eager crowd that fol-
lowed and deemed itself
fortunate only to be seen
in the company of such great folk.

“Oh, look, mother dear, what smart little ponies
those are!” cried Sedley, clapping his hands in
delight, as he caught sight of some children gallop-
ing in great glee on two beautiful little creatures,
followed by an old groom on a staid gray horse.






'A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 103

“Oh, how I wish I had one! It must be splendid
sport to ride like that!”

“Tt must indeed,” said his mother. gently press-
ing the little hand she held; “but you are very
young yet to ride, dear. Don’t you think you
might be afraid to ride so fast?” she asked, smiling.
“JT am sure I should.”

_“QOh, no, mother, I should n’t be afraid in the
least. Of course it would be quite natural for you
to be afraid, because you are a lady; but my uncle
says that even little boys should never be afraid of
anything; if they are, they will.never grow to be
brave men; and I told him I wanted to be just like
my papa, because he was the bravest and best man
in all the world.”

Mrs. Hamilton stooped down and kissed the little
boy, and put her arms about him, although the park
was full of people, and some had even stopped to wit-
ness this little love scene, and gaze at the handsome
child with his bright eyes and glowing cheeks, and
curls flying in the wintry breeze. Neither of them
noticed that they were observed, for they were look-
ing in the direction of the galloping ponies; neither
the mother nor the child saw a handsome carriage,
which had just entered at the Albert Gate, stop
directly in front of them, and a solitary old gentle-
104 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

man, who sat buried in its cushions, lean out and
gaze intently at them.

The young mother was the first to feel those
piercing eyes upon her; to feel the scowl of dis-
pleasure, the glare of hatred, that seemed directed
straight at her. In a second, and at a word from
the gentleman, the horses had resumed their pace
and darted past them in great speed.

“Why, mother!” exclaimed Sedley, in surprise,
“that was my Uncle Trundlewood! That’s his
carriage and coachman, and his horses! I wish I
had looked around to say good-day,” — and the lit-
tle boy stood and waved his cap at the retreating
figure in the carriage.

Mrs. Hamilton felt a sudden terror. Could this
be he indeed! Could this be her husband’s rela-
tive and her little boy’s benefactor, — this old man
with the cruel look and hard face! could this be
the same kind friend of whom the child spoke so
often! What was the meaning of that look? He
must have known who she was; and what had she
done to deserve such recognition? Oh, there was a
cruel mystery somewhere; something of which she
knew nothing, betrayed by that look! She stood
trembling, and her hands were icy cold as she took
the child’s and said faintly, “Come, dear, let us
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 105

hurry home; I feel very unwell;” and they has-
tened out of the park gates, and, hailing a passing
cab, drove straight to their Little House in Pimlico.
All the way home she was sad and thoughtful; but
little Sedley, having no suspicion of her thoughts,
amused himself with making comparisons between
his uncle’s magnificent equipage and the humble
‘ little coach in which they were driving home, and
recalled a time when Mr. Trundlewood had said
that he, Sedley, should ride in the elegant carriage
beside him, too, some day.

“Would you rather be in your uncle's carriage
than here with me, Sedley?” she asked, with an
anxious look; for the sight of that old man’s face
troubled her, and seemed to confirm all her vague
fears and doubts into some dreaded possibility, —
that in spite of appearances to the contrary, he
meant to harm her little one instead of befriending
him.

“ Oh, dear little mother, you know very well that
~I would rather be with you than with any one else
in the world!” cried Sedley, throwing both his
arms around her neck. “ But you are such a nice,
pretty mother that I would like you to ride in a beau-
tiful carriage every day. I was only speaking of
the time when you and my Uncle Trundlewood and
106 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

I shall all live together at the big house, and
ride out in the splendid carriage and be ever so
happy. My uncle is very kind and good, and I
am sure you will like him very much when you
know him too, mother dear. I dare say he was
very fond of my papa. He was telling me one day
how it was he who had sent my papa to college,
and bought him. his commission in the army, and
he would have done a great deal more for him if
my papa had lived.”

Then the young widow rebuked herself for hay-
ing entertained unjust thoughts toward one who
had been her husband’s protector and friend, and
tried hard to convince herself that he must be what
the child thought him, else how should he have
won Sedley’s love and trust. He had done much
to make her own life happy in his strange, myste-
rious way, — perhaps he was only eccentric, as peo-
ple called him. She hoped it might be so; it was
so much easier for her to believe good of people
than evil. But she could not but think it strange
that her husband had never spoken of him to her,
or of his great wealth. She recalled what the
lawyer had said of a difference between them ; but
she did not suspect that she had been the unhappy
cause of it.
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“For a long while that evening, little Sedley and his mother
sat beside the fire.”
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 109

For a long while that evening, little Sedley and
his mother sat together beside the sitting-room fire;
she in the big cushioned chair, and he on the arm
of it, with his head resting upon her shoulder, and
both their young faces looking into the firelight.
The young woman was relating to him, for the
‘ hundredth time, perhaps, all the incidents which the
child loved to hear about his father’s life, and she
repeated to him with more fervor than usual, how
unselfish and brave he had always been, and how
every one who had ever known him loved and
respected him because he was the kindest and gen-
tlest and humblest of men, and these, with his noble
courage, weie the virtues that made him a true
gentleman.

“J dare say the reason my Uncle Trundlewood
likes me is because I’m my papa’s little boy,’ ob-
served Sedley, after listening in thoughtful silence
to all she had said.

“T trust he loves you for yourself, dear, and no
one can fail to do that if you grow up to be a brave,
honest gentleman like your papa. You can never
do better than to resemble him in everything!”

“T will indeed,” exclaimed Sedley, earnestly.
“I wonder if my papa was anything like my Uncle
Trundlewood!” he added reflectively.
IIo A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“Oh, not at all,” said the young mother, remem-
bering suddenly the fleeting glimpse she had
~ caught of the old man’s. stern features. ‘“ Your
papa was very handsome, and quite young when
he died.”

“Well, I’m glad he wasn’t like him; for I feel.
very sorry for my uncle sometimes, because he is
old and the pain.in his foot is so bad. And then
he hasn’t any one to take care of him but the ser-
vants. Why hasn't he any little boys like me to
love him, mother? ”

“T do not know, dear,” she said, kissing him;
“little boys are blessings that do not come to every
one. Your uncle has lived alone all his life, I
think, and he is indeed to be pitied; for that is
a wretched way to live, even with ever so much
money. Money can never of itself bring love or
happiness to any one. You will understand this
better when you are older; and I hope you may
know some day how much more joy is made in the
world by aloving heart than by all the wealth
which men strive so hard to gain during their life-
time. Your dear papa had not much to give be-
sides his love, and yet he made every one about
him happy.”

“T will be just like him, mother dear, so that you
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. | III

may always be happy, and have some one to love
you and take care of you,” said the little boy, who
was always serious and impressed with the ideal
figure of his unknown father, which the gentle
mother held ever present before him.
was at his breakfast, some-
thing happened which quite
took away his appetite. He nearly always had his
morning meal alone, with Beckie to attend him, as
Mrs. Hamilton usually passed restless nights, and
found her most peaceful hours of sleep in the morn-
ing. It was not yet nine by the little ebony clock
on the mantel, and Beckie was buttering some toast
for her young master, and listening with what grace
she could to some glowing account of his uncle’s
virtues which Sedley was giving her, when a violent
thumping at the knocker of the front door made
them both ‘start. ,

“ Dearie me, how early to be -a-calling on folks
exclaimed the little maid, giving her last piece of
toast a hasty scrape, and adjusting her cap by the
reflection of the silver tea-tray, for she fancied it
might be Mr. Boggs. She hurried to the door,
with elbows out and white apron-strings flying,



1”
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 113

and in a very few minutes she had returned, her
hands up and her cheeks and eyes bright with
excitement. ;

“Oh, my dear darling pet!” she cried, wav-
ing her hands up and down in irrepressible glee,
“do come and see what there is out here for
you!”

“For me?” cried Sedley, looking puzzled.

“Yes, for you, my dearest and blessedest; all for
you! And such a little beauty, too! Oh, my good-
ness me, who could ’a’ sent it?” continued Rebecca,
mysteriously.

“What is it? Does mother know?”

“T don’t know; I don’t know who knows; but
just come out and see for yourself, my pet, if it is n’t
the prettiest one in the world.”

Little Sedley, who was by this time quite as
much excited as Beckie herself, dropped his but-
tered toast and napkin and ran to the entrance.
The little maid held her hand on the knob for a
second to heighten his suspense, and then threw it
open with a joyful, —

“There! just look at that, Master Sedley, and
tell me if you are not the fortunatest of boys!”

Sedley gave a leap of joy when he saw standing

at the edge of the walk a beautiful little black pony,
8
114 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

with brand-new saddle and bridle, and a young
groom in yellow livery holding him for inspection.

“For me! is it really for me?” cried the child,
hardly able to believe his good fortune, “to ride
whenever I like?”

“Yes, if you please, sir,” said the groom, “and
I’m to accompany you on Jack whenever you wish
to ride in the park; and I was to say as how it’s
a present to you from Mr. Trundlewood.”

Here Rebecca’s excess of joy received a sudden
check; for she had somehow entertained the very
improbable and extravagant idea that the gift came
from the unknown princess they had once met in
the park, especially when she had seen the young
groom in his gorgeous livery. Her enthusiasm
suffered a relapse when she learned that it came
from the person whose praises she had listened to
with sceptical ears all the morning. But little Sed-
ley was very glad of this convincing proof of his
uncle’s benevolence. He threw his arms around the
pony’s neck.

“Oh, he zs beautiful, Beckles see what handsome
eyes and long silken tail he has. He’s a hundred
times prettier than the ponies I saw yesterday in
the park. Now, isn’t my uncle the very kindest
uncle in the world?”
x

A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 115

But Beckie had disappeared to prepare her mis-
tress’s coffee, with certain doubts in her own mind
about the kindest uncle in the world; and Sedley
could not choose between the perfect delight of
standing there to admire his pony’s charms, patting
his head and smoothing his lovely mane, and trying
to realize that the exquisite little creature was all
his own, and his eagerness to run and tell his
mother about the splendid present.

“How soon may I ride him?” he asked of the
groom.

“ As soon as you please, sir; now, if you like, and
I’m to teach you to mount and how to stick on,
for, begging your pardon, it’s just a bit strange
when you’ve never done it a-fore.”

“Well, I think I'll try it now, if my mamma will
let me, for I want to learn directly, and show my
uncle how well I can do it. I'll be back in a
minute,” —and away he tripped to his mother’s
room to tell the joyful news and ask permission
to take his first riding-lesson.

Mrs. Hamilton gave it readily, and kissed him,
smiling at his pleasure. She had never seen him
so excited before; for his eyes were dilated, and his
‘cheeks flushed with the shock of sudden surprise.

“He must have heard Sedley’s wish yesterday!”
116 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

she thought, and wondered at the old man’s eager-
ness in gratifying it. And the strange feeling of
unrest and mistrust came back to her in spite of
her previous resolutions,—a vague fear that this
man, with his mysterious and: unaccountable ways,
and hard, unloving face, had some secret design in
thus trying to win her little boy’s affection. She
did not tremble at.the thought of her helplessness ;
at the thought that he was rich and powerful, and
might seek to use these weapons against her, — she
trusted to the loving heart of her child. She knew
that nothing could ever make him change towards
her, and felt comforted. But it was very strange
for this gentle, trusting woman to harbor such feel-
ings against any one, least of all against one who
had so benefited them; and although she tried to
suppress them, and reproached herself for them,
now and then something happened that brought
back all her fears. Yet she was careful that Sed-
ley should guess none of these thoughts, which
were indeed hardly more than-strong feelings with
her, so dim and unshaped ‘that she could not have
found words to express them. Her face was serene
as she looked and smiled from her window down.
upon the little scene below.

Sedley, to the astonishment and edification of
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 117

the whole neighborhood, was, after several attempts,
mounted astride the new saddle, and was parading
sedately up and down the little street, while the
young groom led the pony by the bit.

“I wish he’d gallop a little,’ said he, as soon as
he had become accustomed to his elevated position.
“T’m sure I could hold on, he’s so gentle!”

The handsome little creature, perhaps guessing
the wish of his light rider, or perhaps at some warn-
ing from the groom, immediately took the hint and
broke into a pleasant canter, that sent the blood
racing to little Sedley’s cheeks, and his curls flying
out against the wind. “Oh, my, isn’t this great
sport!” he cried, very much out of breath, after two
or three turns up the street, and pulled up under
his mother’s window.

“Just see there, ma’am, how he takes to it!”
exclaimed the admiring Beckie, who stood watching
her young master. with pride beaming from every
one of her dimples, “just as young ducks takes to
water. If he isn’t a plucky little Englishman, every
inch of him, even though he was born in India, then
I’m a Zulu, that’s all! Id like to see the country
as can produce anything so handsome as the way
that blessed child sits up on that animal, as if he ’d
done nothing but ride ponies ever since he was
118 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

born!” —and Beckie doubled up her little fist and
assumed an attitude of defence, as if there had been
some one disputing the fact.

Sedley went through all the delightful discover-
ies of pony-riding, and was so quick at learning,
that John, the young groom, declared he had never
had so apt a pupil. The pony seemed to enjoy the
frolic as much as any one, and entered into it with
great spirit. He very soon learned to know and
understand his little master, and Sedley became so
attached to his new friend that he could hardly
bear to part with him when the time came for him
to be taken back to the stables.

In the afternoon the little boy went to Belgrave
Square to thank his uncle for the splendid gift; he
had begged to be allowed to do so, although it was
not the day for his regular visit to the big house.
It was only his innocent trust in everybody’s good
nature, and his ignorance of his uncle’s severe ways,
that saved him from being an unwelcome as well as
an unexpected guest, when he presented himself in
Mr. Trundlewood’s study without having been pre-
viously bidden. The tall butler trembled in his
boots as he announced the unsuspecting little vis-
itor; and Rebecca, who had escorted him thither,
was sent shivering to one of the big hall chairs to.
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. II9g

hide herself, the moment she heard that dreaded
-gentleman’s voice as he exclaimed in thundering
tones: “ Highty-tighty, indeed! and who’s this?”

“Why, it’s Sedley,” cried the child, running to
him and laughing at the idea of not being recog-
nized, “I’ve come tothank you for that beautiful,
beautiful pony! Oh, it was so good of you to send
itto me! But how did you ever guess that a pony
was the thing I wanted more than anything else in
the world?”

Mr. Trundlewood looked for a second very much
as if he were a near relative to the fierce tiger-head
at his feet; but his expression changed suddenly as
he felt the warmth of that childish touch and heard
the clear voice ring out in merry laughter.

“Oh, so you liked the horse, did you?” said
Uncle Trundlewood, clearing his throat in an apol-
ogetic manner.

“Oh, immensely! You can’t think how gentle
he is, and how well he lets me ride him. Why, John
taught me every kind of step this morning, gallop-
ing and cantering, and everything but the trot. He
said I was too tired to try that; he said it shool:
one up considerably to trot till you learned how.”

When Sedley had finished talking, he noticed
that his uncle was not alone; in fact, there were two
120 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

other persons in the room. One of them was Mr.
Binkle, who stood at his accustomed angle near the
chimney, while the other was buried in a deep chair
set in the shadow of one of the tall bookcases.
This was a young man of singularly odd appear-
ance.’ He seemed to be-a tall sallow youth, with
bulging eyes that stared immoderately at the little
new-comer, so that when Sedley was attracted to
that part of the room, it seemed for a minute as if
there was nothing there but eyes, — something like
the grin of the fabled Cheshire cat; but after a little
he discovered that there was really some one be-
longing to the eyes; some one whose coat of pale
gray hung in lank fashion from his narrow shoul-
ders, and who sported a flashing light blue necktie,
and sat with his long legs crossed in a lackadai-
sical sort of attitude, twirling the ends of a small
sandy mustache.

Old Mr. Trundlewood sat a moment, enjoying the
effect produced by Sedley’s arrival, and the evident
wonder and surprise with which the youth regarded
the boldness of the child.

“ Oh,” said Mr. Trundlewood, as Sedley turned
to him with inquiring look, “ I forgot; this is Chad-
wick, a distant cousin of yours. Chadwick, this is
your young relative.” .
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. i121

Mr. Chadwick bounced out of his chair with more
energy than could have been expected of him, and
held out a flimsy hand to little Sedley.. “ Young
relative, how d’ ye do? howd’ yedo? I’m glad to
see you looking so well, I’m sure, and —and to find
you on such good terms with our — aw — common
uncle here!”

Sedley was somewhat puzzled by this sudden
effusion, but shook hands with his cousin, and. said
thank you.

“Fine looking chap, eh?” remarked Mr. Trun-
dlewood. a

“Uncommon fine looking,” replied Mr. Chad-
wick, “ but diminutive.” .

“Not so much so for his years.” ‘

“ Aw — what age?”

Six -

“ Still, slightly diminutive,” observed the tall cousin,
with the air of one who has an advantage.

“ But he ‘ll grow,” suggested the uncle.

“ Ah, true, very true, by Jove!” assented young
Chadwick, as if that possibility had not occurred
to him.

“TI suppose when I’m as tall as Cousin Chadwick,
I can ride a regular horse, can’t I, uncle?” ventured
Sedley, his mind still running on riding and riders.
122 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“Ha, ha, ha, Cousin Chadwick! that’s good,
that’s uncommonly good, Cousin Chadwick !” —
and that young gentleman went off into another
gale of laughter. “Come, let's shake hands again
on that, my little man; I like to be taken into the
family and to be on good terms with everybody,
don’t you know, and with you in particular,’ — and
he brought his chair close to where the little boy sat.
“You see,” he continued in an undertone, “we’re
both equally favored of our common uncle, just
now, and I see he’s got a soft spot for you, but m
kindly disposed, all the same, and would n't stand
in your way for the world!”

‘“Sedley could not quite follow the dritt of these
remarks. He had no idea to what they referred,
but he accepted the friendly invitation to “be on
good terms” and “shake hands again,” and thought
his new relative rather a droll but a very good-
humored young person.

Uncle Trundlewood cast a queer look in ‘the di-
rection of his lawyer. “Well, Binkle, what do you
think of this? Aren’t they a well matched team?”

“Your judgment is always correct, sir,” said the
lawyer, without changing countenance.

“Ah, well, that’s comforting! In either case, I -
sha’n’t feel I’ve made a great mistake.”
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 123

Mr. Binkle made no reply, as there had been no
direct question.

“When you learn to trot and ride like a gentle-
man, you can go with me in the park and ride be-
side my carriage,” said the old man, turning to
Sedley. .

“Oh, that will be splendid! I think I can keep
up very soon.” Then he sat silent for a moment,
as if he had something on his mind which he did
not quite know how to express. “ Uncle Trundle-
wood,” he ventured at length, “don’t you ever have
any one to drive with you in your carriage ?”

“No; there’s hardly room for any one else,” was
the grim reply.

“Oh,” he said, looking surprised, and added after
a pause, “I should think you’d have some nice
lady; ladies are small and don’t take up much
room.”

“Some take up a great deal too much !” rejoined
the old man with a gathering scowl.

“ Well, now, there’s my mamma, she’s small and
pretty, she wouldn't take’ up much room; and
she’s such pleasant company. Would n’t you like
to know my mamma?”

Mr. Trundlewood’s scowl grew quite alarming,
so much so that Cousin Chadwick began to edge
124 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

his chair nearer to the window, as if he contemplated
making his exit that way, if worse came to worse.
But Sedley, if he noticed it at all, probably laid it to
one of his uncle’s “ twinges,” as he called them.

~ “No,” said the old man, rather fiercely, and turn-
ing to his lawyer, “ Confound it, Binkle, get me out
of this; can’t you! ”

“Mr. Trundlewood is singularly averse to the
society of — of the gentler sex,” explained the lawyer
with magisterial gravity.

“T beg your pardon, Mr. Binkle, but what did
you say?” inquired Sedley, looking perplexed.

“He says,” interposed Mr. Chadwick, feeling it
his duty to come to the rescue, “that our common
uncle, for whom you and I have the most profound
admiration and respect, does n’t care for ladies,
don’t you know!”

“No, I didn’t know,” said Sedley, with a dis-
appointed look. “But I’m quite sure you would
like my mamma,” he said, turning to his uncle,
“because she’s a lovely lady.”

“T’m afraid I should n’t,” returned that gentle-
man, wincing. “It’s constitutional with me, you
see, and can’t be helped.”

“Ts that why you never married, and never had
any little boys of your own?”


A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 125

Mr. Trundlewood was busying himself with some
papers on his desk, and took no notice of the ques-
tion for some time. But presently he wheeled
round, and directing a sly look at the pale cousin,
said to Sedley : ““ And how would you like to be my
little boy?”

“Well, really I don’t know,” replied the child,
quite taken by surprise. “I think I should like it,
of course; only it. could n’t be, you see, uncle,
for I’m somebody else’s little boy already; and
I could n't care for you quite so much as I do for
my mamma, — ever.”

“Oh, you could n't?”

“Well, you know,” Sedley hastened to explain,
fearing he might have given offence, “one can love
a great many people; but one can never love any-
body quite so much as one’s mother,” and he turned
to Mr. Chadwick as if appealing to him for the truth
of that statement.

“ Now, really, young relative,” said the pale
cousin, “that’s a sentiment which does you credit;
‘pon my word, it does; but I can’t appreciate it
myself, for to be strictly honest with you, I have n't
got any mother.”

“Oh, have n’t you?” exclaimed the child, dole-
fully.
126 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“No, honor bright; never did have.”

“Well, that makes it easier to decide,” said Mr.
Trundlewood, his face growing more and more like
that of the tiger near the fender.

Sedley thought it time to take his leave. He
went up to the old man’s chair. “ Of course you
know I’m very fond of you, uncle,” he said, not
without a slight feeling of compunction for having
been forced into so truthful an avowal of the state
of his feelings, although his childish conscience did
not permit him to think that any other answer
would have been quite loyal to his mother. “ Shall
I come again on Monday?” he asked, looking in-
tently into the old man’s face.

“Yes,” was the answer, “come whenever you
choose,” —and for the first time Sedley put his
arms around his uncle’s neck and kissed him; and
he was not rebuked.
CHAPTER IX.

HE next day was Sunday, and
little Sedley was sitting near
the fire in the library, rubbing
his small legs up and down,
trying to get the “gout” out
of them, as he explained to Mr. Boggs, who came in
the afternoon to fetch Miss Beckie out for a walk;
for Sedley had experimented a little too long on his
pony the day before, and his muscles were very sore



in consequence.

“Oh, my, I don’t wonder my uncle is cross when
he has the ‘twinges;’ that is, if his legs feel like
mine,” he said, doubling over like an old man and
hugging his knees. “Do you know, Mr. Boggs,
it would make me dreadfully cross if my bones
ached like this all the time. My uncle says his
do, and I think he’s a very amiable old gentleman,
considering.”

Mr. Boggs looked very dubious, and might have
been tempted to enter upon some controversy on
128 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

the subject, if Miss Rebecca had not appeared
upon the scene all ready for her promenade, and
looking so bewitching in her new frock and kill-
ing pink bows that Mr. Boggs was struck speech-
less’ with admiration.

“La! miss,’ he said in
a subdued voice, after hav-
ing surveyed her round and
round as if she had been a
statue, — “ La! miss, but you
do look uncommon smart,
and I’m ’alf afear'd to walk
‘longside o’ you.”

“Get along with you, Mr.
Boggs; you know I detest
flattery!” she said, giving
him a saucy look, and blush-
ing red. ‘“ Now, my darling
pet, be very good and still
while I’m gone, for your blessed ma is napping
quiet, and don’t disturb her, for she’s had a bad
night.”

“No, I won’t, Beckie,” said the little boy. And
he hopped to the window to watch the departing
couple as they descended the little street, and the
new snowflakes frisked and sported merrily about


A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 129

their ears. He could not help smiling at the droll
appearance of Mr. Boggs’ stout figure trudging
beside that of the neat, trim Beckie. There was
discomfiture and embarrassment in his very gait,
and the naturally red hue of his complexion was
heightened immoderately, — whether by the sharp-
ness of the wintry wind, or the state of his own agi-
tated feelings, Sedley, of course, was not one to
judge.

It was a custom with Mr. Boggs to come for
Miss Beckie on a pleasant Sunday afternoon, and
take her for a walk in the park, ora sail up the
Thames, during the season, or for a visit to the
Zoo, which amusement that young woman pre-
ferred to any other. For it was there that she met
all the wild and curious beasts whose names she
was so fond of adapting to objectionable people.
She fancied she saw resemblances between certain
of these animals and persons whom she disliked,
and was never so relieved in her mind as when she
could call an enemy by the name of one or more
of the savage creatures. Mr. Boggs had often
marvelled at her talent, and admired the ingenuity
which she displayed in her choice of aD DET AHONS:
He was very glad that, being in that young woman’s
good graces, he had managed to escape that mild

9
130 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

form of calumny ; but he would have been far hap-
pier if she had shown signs of something more than
mere good-humored tolerance of him.

Mr. Boggs, after three years of ardent but silent
courtship, was come to a point when he felt that
his whole happiness depended on his putting the
ominous little question to Beckie, and in his being
answered in the proper manner; but the deuce of
it was, he said to himself, that the nearer he came
to it, the more slippery and uncertain she grew.
She was an unaccountable little creature to him; .
a mystery of smiles and dimples and sauciness, and
yet these were the very things that made her de-
lightful. When he fancied he had her secure, and
detected sly signs of encouragement, she would of
a sudden slip from his grasp, and he could no more
retain her than he could his little yellow canary
when it took a notion to flutter away from his
clumsy fingers. It was curious that this big rough
nature should cling to these two little creatures,
both so much weaker than he, and yet having such
power over him.

On this particular Sunday, Mr. Boggs was “ got
up” in fine style. His bushy hair was parted and
smoothed with more than usual care; his white
collar reached up to his ears, and his red necktie


A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 131

harmonized singularly with the brilliant hue of his
good face. His boots shone to such a degree that
he could have almost seen the reflection of his head
in them, had not the broad expanse of his shirt-front
interfered. No doubt for the twentieth time in the
past year Mr. Boggs had made up his mind that
to-day, of all days, would be the time for the dis
closure of his tender secret, and the state of his
mind would easily have been guessed by almost
any young maid, even though she had been less
bright and keen than Miss Beckie.

Mr. Boggs cleared his throat when they had walked
a short distance in silence, and ventured to observe
that it was a pleasant day. To which Miss Beckie
replied that she thought the day might have been
pleasanter if the sun were shining instead of the
snow falling. Whereupon he went on to explain
with growing boldness that all days were pleasant
so long as she walked by his side. Rebecca broke
into a pretty titter, like that of a young bird, appa-
rently not aware of the earnestness of his manner.
She was accustomed to the like compliments from
Mr. Boggs, and was not disposed to look upon them
seriously.

“Beckie!” said that gentleman, quaking at the
audacity of this familiar address, for he had never
\

132 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

called her anything but Miss Beckie, “T’ve got
somewhat to say to you.”

The little maid shot a quick glance at him out. of
her black eyes, and said with spirit, “ Oh, I know!
I’ve suspected it; don’t tell me. It’s some more
of that old Tartar’s doings. I’ve had a feeling this
long while, and was certain something was in the
wind ‘when that handsome pony came from Azm
yesterday. A pony to ride indeed! and a few mis-
erable guineas a week to live on! Oh, my good-
ness me! he’ll be the death of us all, will that old
chimpanzee, with his whimsical notions, and that
pasty-face Binkle, too!”

Poor Mr. Boggs’ advances were completely
drowned by this sudden outburst. He saw that
the little maid’s thoughts were travelling in quite
a different direction from his own. She was so
vehement it was hard to make a second attempt
without giving her a sudden shock. His thoughts
moved slowly, either advancing or retreating. He
sucked the knob of his cane, and was silent a mo-
ment. But Rebecca proceeded: “Of course, Mr.
Boggs, you know very well that when I say don’t
tell me, I mean do tell me. I don’t know anything
for certain, only just from my own feelings; but
they’re nearly always right, and I’ve felt all along
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 133

that there was something crooked about that old
man, ever since you yourself, Mr. Boggs, put the
notion into my head. I haven’t said a word to my
mistress, who thinks him the blessedest of saints,
but I’ve thought a heap, and I tell you it’s my
belief there’s mischief brewing in his old pate.”

Mr. Boggs was obliged to dismiss his own per-
sonal interests, and said gravely: “ Lor, Miss Beckie,
what makes you think so now more’n any other
time?” really fearing that some new reason had
come to confirm his own doubts about Mr. Trundle-
wood’s benevolence.

“Well,” said Beckie, mysteriously, “ there’s some
one else! I saw him myself, yesterday,— another
nephew who hangs about the old man; a moth of
a creature who pretends to have a fondness for him.
My young master talked the whole evening to his
ma about ‘Cousin Chadwick!’ Who’s Cousin
Chadwick, I should like to know?” said Beckie,
looking at Mr. Boggs as if he were roma for
that offensive relative.

Clearly, there was no hope for the lover that day.
Rebecca persisted in being absorbed in the inter-
ests and welfare of her mistress and master. “’Pon
my word, I don’t know,” returned he. “I know as
there is cousins, a whole population on’m; I ’ve
134 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

always understood as he hated ’em all; he’s a noble
figur’ at despising his relations, you know. It’s
really been surprisin’ to me how civil he’s behaved
to the little chap.”

“ He’s the only one as cares a fig for him, is
my young master. The others all hate him, and
would tell him so quick enough, if it wasn’t for
his guineas.” |

“The truth is, I have n’t seen James for a week,
and have learned very little o’ what’s going forward
at the Square. I’ve had thoughts o’ my own to ©
~ worry on, Miss Beckie;” and here Mr. Boggs
fetched a tremendous sigh, which ought to have left
little doubt in Rebecca’s mind as to the cause of
his trouble. But the provoking little creature only
added to his discomfiture by saying with energetic
nods of her small head, “ Well, there ’s ove thing
certain, Mr. Boggs, old eagle-beak may desert my
blessed child, and Binkle may, and you may, Mr.
Boggs, but / never shall.. I’ll stay with him and
my dear mistress all my days, and work for ’em, and
take care of ’em; and nobody, no, nor wild horses
sha’n’t drag me away from ’em.”

“Oh my stars, miss,” ejaculated Mr. Boggs, his
conflicting emotions becoming quite too much for
him, “how can you believe a minute as I’d desert
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 135

that sainted lady, and that little cherub! How can
you? As my name is Martin Boggs, miss, I'll stand
by’em alongside o’ you; we’ll both stand by ’em
to the last.”

“It does me good to hear you talk so, Mr. Boggs,”
rejoined she, with approval in her eye. “It’s really
a comfort to know as there ’s somebody big and
strong as would call that cld — old —” Beckie was
at a loss for a name, her whole menagerie of wild
animals offering, Just at that moment, nothing quite
suitable.

“Bird o’ prey!” suggested Mr. Boggs, timidly.

“Yes, bird of prey!” repeated the little maid.
“Call that old bird of prey out, if need were, and
pelt him with something hard and bruising, —
though it’s precious little praying he’s ever done,
I'll be bound, bird of prey though he may be!” she
added, with some misgivings as to the appropriate-
ness of the term for Mr. Trundlewood.

“’Pon my word, Miss Beckie, if so be as it was
necessary to please you, miss, I’d floor most any-
body; indeed, I’m ready to do anythink as ll be
agreeable, except give you up to any other feller.
Oh, Beckie, I’ve had you on my mind this long
time, and I can’t rest nor work, nor think of any-
think, till I know as you care for me a little, and ’ll
136 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

let me win you in the end!” said poor Martin
Boggs, surprised into blurting out a declaration in
quite different words from what he had expected.

Rebecca did not appear at all surprised, but there
was a softer look in her sharp black eyes which
admitted of the possibility of their being sometimes
moist with tender emotion, and her voice was lower
as she said : —

“I’m obliged to you, Mr. Boggs, for your feel-
ings towards me, and I should n’t be speaking true
if I was to say I did not care for you. I’m very
fond of you indeed ; but as I said before, I could n’t
go to you and leave my dear mistress, — at least not
now, — not till matters were more settled for her,
and I knew she would n’t need me to take care of
her.”

“Oh, Beckie!” cried the enraptured Boggs, seiz-
ing her little hand and bending his beaming face
close to hers, “Ill wait till ever you’re ready; I’ve
waited three years for you; I can waita little longer,
and I’ll never stand in the way o’ your doing any-
think you like, just so I know I’m to have you
sometime.”

Beckie could not but be touched by the expres-
sion of such unselfish devotion, and she silently re-
turned the pressure of his big hand. Encouraged
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 137 ,

by this mark of favor, Mr. Boggs was emboldened
to slip his arm about her waist; and thus they en-
tered hand in hand the Lovers’ Lane of the park,
through which they had just obtained the right of
way.
CHAPTER X.

LD Mr. Trundlewood, sitting
in his easy-chair before his
study fire, passing his soli-
tary evenings in no more
cheerful company than that



of a plaguing gout and of his
own thoughts, which were
apt to be quite as troublesome, found but little com-
fort, you may be sure, in the gloomy grandeur of his
great house. And any one looking in upon him
would scarcely have wondered at the melancholy
figure he presented as he sat there, watching the
murky shadows on the wall, his features darkened
and his brows contracted, the picture of what he
really was, —a dissatisfied, disappointed, unloved old
man. The very silence that reigned in his great
halls and rooms bespoke the dread he inspired in
those who served him, and made his own voice
sound more fearful when he uttered any command.
And he had labored a lifetime for this! He had
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 139

devoted all the strength and energy of his youth
and manhood to secure a fortune which he had
dreamed would make him powerful and happy!
He had forgotten to gather as he went those gen-
tler blossoms which spring up along the wayside of
life, here and there in hidden places, and which
prove to be our only real blessings in old age. He
had put aside love and duty and friendship for the
sake of ambition; and now that he had achieved his
aim and was a rich man, he was alone in the world,
old and infirm, and the fortune he had worked so
hard to amass was itself the cause of his greatest
perplexity. It had been the means of destroying
his faith in the sincerity of his fellow-men, of killing
his natural affection for his kindred, and poisoning
his trust in the world generally. He could not
believe that any of his kinsmen cared for him per-
sonally; he had behaved too hatefully to them all,
suspecting them of caring only for his money.
There had been one who might have held a place
in his heart, to whom he had looked for the very |
highest fulfilment of his ambition; but he had
spurned him and his money, and preferred the love
of a woman.to all the fortunes he could offer. Ah,
that was the thing that rankled in his soul, the one
thing that had made him hate the world and all its
140 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

false hopes. The one being whom he might have
trusted had not trusted him. Whenever that man’s
little child stood before him and looked up at him
with the eyes he knew so well, the old man had felt
a tremor — something approaching a yearning of
the heart —for the handsome, brave young fellow
whose virtues were magnified, and whose undutiful-
ness was effaced by that great Reconciler, Death.
Sometimes he longed to bestow his poor, withered
remnant of affection on that beautiful child, and
make him the recipient of what he had throughout
his life withheld from every other human creature.
But then the thought of the mother restrained him.
She had thwarted him with the father; she would
thwart him with the son. He could not forget the
sight of her in the park that day, kneeling beside
the boy, her arms around him. He knew the child
loved her passionately, and would cling to her, and
she would be always first in his thoughts, as she had
been first in his father’s. His jealous, revengeful
heart could not brook this added injury. Perhaps
he was not wholly callous and heartless, as most
people thought him. It is possible that now and
then he saw the emptiness of his life, and might
have wished to cling to the new soothing influence
that came upon him whenever the child was in his
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. I4I

presence. But he was a very vain old man; and it
is hard for vain, selfish people to forget a real, or
even a fancied injury. He.would not, he could not
forgive that woman for the wrong she had done
him; he could not forgive her for being lovely and
gentle and noble enough to have won his nephew’s
heart. He would not share the child’s love with
her, and this hatred was as bitter as his reasons for
it were unjust. He had thought to make the boy
his heir, he had hoped the child might in time be
weaned away from her; but that was before he had
known the little fellow. Now he knew that it would
be useless to separate them, and the thought that
in the end she would profit by the boy’s fortune
and be made happy in spite of him, was one which
kept Mr. Trundlewood in a perpetual state of inde-
cision. He could not but believe that she, like the
rest of the world, was scheming and mercenary,
although the lawyer had reported faithfully the
manner in which she had received the news of her
son's inheritance.

“It was all done for effect,” he had said con-
temptuously, unwilling to think any good of her;
but he knew very well that Mr. Binkle was not the
man to be mistaken in his reading of human nature,
and the possibility of any truth in the statement
vexed him the more. .
142 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

You see, Mr. Trundlewood was like a great many
people in this world; people who having nothing
in them to win the love of others, show their wicked
jealousy by hating and injuring those who do,
especially if these stand in the way of their own
selfish designs.

The gentle young mother, the innocent cause of
this old man’s bitterest feelings, was far from sus-
pecting the depth and strength of his aversion.
Her own nature was too generous, too free from envy
to have even a conception of such feelings, or to
attribute them to any person. But with the intui-
tive correctness of all sensitive souls, she was quick
to perceive the old man’s cold indifference, which
manifested itself only by his wholly and persistently
ignoring her existence. She never spoke of . her
fears, lest in the very expression of them they might
seem more real than she fancied them. But before
Sedley her vague suspicions almost took flight, so
anxious was she that he might never guess her
thoughts; that his trust in his uncle might never
be shaken. For the child was, in truth, grown
fond of the old man, his mysterious ways and sinis-
ter looks, notwithstanding.

So these three, who should have been bound
together by the closest tie of affection, lived in a
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 143

world quite apart from one another; each with his
own fears and doubts and hopes. That young
mother with her calm eyes and serene smile was
oftener in the old man’s thoughts than he would
have cared to own; and the recollection of that one
look from him gave her food for her most melan-
choly meditations; while Sedley only wondered at
the strange relations between his uncle and mamma.

At length the cold winter months were spent, and
the dreary winter melted into spring, that sweetest
time of early growth, when even gray old London
seems to smile and blossom with new life, with its
clumps and patches of green scattered here and
there among its dingy houses, as the young moun-
tain-flowers peep out from between the high rocks;
and when the country round about is blushing with
the apple and almond blossoms, and the hedgerows
put on their brightest hues; when the curling
Thames flows more swiftly from its source; and
better still when all hearts leap with gladness at the
return of the first sweet breath of summer, and the
first notes of its merry birds. It is surely the time
when our hearts, too, bloom anew with fresh hopes
and dreams wherever the soil is fertile and good,
just as nature in her ever recurring youth puts forth
new beauties for our enjoyment.
144 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

It was very natural for little Sedley and his
mamma to feel happy in these days; there was
happiness in the very air. The small park across
the way, to which they looked from their window,
was a little world of its own, unfolding before their
eyes the awaking delights of a larger nature. They
drew from it the sweet fragrance of budding flowers
and young verdure wafted to them on the evening
breezes, watched the opening of the leafy shoots from .
day to day, and heard the contented chirpings of
mating birds building their nests. They saw the
crowds of light-hearted human creatures that gath-
ered there each day to enjoy the warm sunlight;
and they themselves were happy for no other reason
than that the world seemed joyous and full of
promise.

But it was not so with old Mr. _ Trundlewood ;
for him the springtime had none of those nameless
joys. There was no happiness for him in the awak-
-ening of sleeping nature, for his heart, like his body,
was grown old and withered, and he saw with bitter-
ness that the rest of his days must be a cheerless
winter, without sunshine or hope, and that when
he was gone there would be no one to mourn, but
only those who would welcome the gain his death
brought them. It would be with him as with an
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 145

old tree, which, once cut down and cast away, is
forever forgotten !

These were his melancholy thoughts as he sat
beside his fire during the fleeting evenings of that
springtime; beside his fire, although the air with-
out was balmy as summer: for his great gloomy
house remained cold and cheerless long after the
spring sunshine had flooded and warmed the outer
world.

Pity the man who, leaving his youth and vigor
‘behind, enters the sombre pathway of old age alone;
who having had no thought or care for others in the
‘days of his strength, finds himself friendless in the
hour of his weakness. Poor Mr. Trundlewood had
never imagined that the time would come when he
should stand in need of human help, when he should
crave for the sympathy and affection which he had
spurned all his life. He was perhaps not exactly
conscious of that need. He would scarcely have
given it utterance; but it was there, like a hunger
of the heart, craving: to be satisfied, through which
his better feelings asserted themselves, now and
then, in spite of himself. Yes, he was to be pitied
indeed, for he had missed all the things that make
up the real sunshine of life.

To
CHAPTER XI.

NE morning, there was great
commotion down in the ser-
vants’ hall of Mr. Trundle-
wood’s house. It was caused
by the late appearance of Mr.

James at breakfast, wearing such a very grave and

mysterious countenance that the rest of the ser-

vants were moved to inquire of him what the mat-
ter was. It appears that the butler, who, when he
was on duty, could never have been suspected of
stooping to anything whatsoever, had actually spent
half the previous night with his dignified person’
doubled up like a jack-knife, in the most trying of
attitudes, in order to adjust his ear to the keyhole
of Mr. Trundlewood's study door. In this wise he
had made such astonishing discoveries that he could
hardly contain himself until the next morning, that
he might make them known to the rest of the
community.

True, he had been dismissed quite early in the
evening; but Mr. James, noting the entrance of


A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 147

the lawyer with an uncommonly important air, and

suspecting from Mr. Trundlewood’s restlessness
- and peevishness throughout his dinner that there
was something in the wind, had deemed it his duty
to remain close at hand. His attention was first
attracted by a great deal of excited talking; but it
was principally Mr. Trundlewood arguing with him-
self, abusing Mr. Binkle when he ventured to offer
an opinion, and finding fault with him when he did
not. Then it was that Mr. James drew nearer to
~the closed door. Gradually his head descended
as the talk within rose in animation, and finally
it stopped directly in front of the keyhole, which,
being unobstructed by its key, afforded sufficient
sound to assure him that the proceedings would be
of an interesting nature. Like the faithful and in-
terested domestic that he was, he stopped there
until a late hour, when he heard the lawyer. pre-
paring to take his leave, which that gentleman
_always did unattended, being like one of the house,
and knowing the way in and out perfectly; and
when the old gentleman rang his bell with a violent
jerk, to be assisted up to his bedroom, Mr. James
reappeared from some seemingly remote region, with
heavy eyes and yawning look, like one who had
been suddenly awakened out of a comfortable nap.
148 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“Lor, Mr. James, what’s the matter with you?”
demanded the housemaid, as soon as he appeared
in the servants’ dining-room, next morning, where
that young woman and the cook were still linger-
ing over their toast and tea. “Why, you look like
a ghost! What’s gone amiss now? — Do tell us,
and don’t stand there mum as a sphinx!”

“T?ll have to take a cup o’ tea, Mary, a-fore I can
talk about it,” said Mr. James.. “It’s something so
serious; something as is going to touch us all!”

“Lor! you don’t mean it!” exclaimed the cook
with alarm, and making a dive into the kitchen to
fetch some hot tea, while Mary prepared a cup
and plate, and waited upon Mr. James eagerly,
for she and the tall butler stood in that pleas-
ant relation to each other known as “keepin’
company.” |

A few other servants had straggled in, and finally
the housekeeper, Mrs. Collins, appeared, to upbraid
them for sitting so late at their several breakfasts ;
but Mr. James’s manner was’ so impressive, as he
took his cup of tea and began munching his toast
and shaking his head with melancholy gravity, that
she too sat down to hear what would follow.

“Well, it’s a uncommon blackguardy business,”
said he, after a little. ‘“That’s all I have to say;

*
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 149

and I’d’alf a mind to send in a month’s warnin’
when I learned it last night.” .
“ Learned what?” inquired two or three voices.
“Come, now, Mr. James, don’t you put on that
play-actor style o’ keepin’ what you ’ve got to say

. , till the last,” said the cook, impatiently.

“ Well, it’s no more’n one might expect of 42m,”
continued the butler, taking no notice of the cook’s
suggestion. “As eccentric, unsartin a old creetur
as lever stood attendance upon; but I must say it
surprised me.”

Here he took two interminable gulps of tea,
during which time everybody looked anxious and
expectant.

“Tf it’s that we’ve all got to quit,” said Mary,
with a pretence of indifference, “it’s all one to me,
for I’ve situations a-plenty to choose from, as soon
as ever I’m ready to take one!” and she added
with a toss of her head and a glance at the butler,
—‘“and one of’em is ata country-house at Fulham,
where I know the coachman, and where there’s
lawns and shrubbery, and a deal pleasanter outlook
than this tombstone of a place!”

This speech roused Mr. James, who sat up in his
chair and said reassuringly : —

i Oh, it’s not that, Miss Mary; it’s not that we ‘ll
150 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

have to go yet, unless we choose; for I don’t mis-
trust but that the old governor’s good for some years
tocome. It’s what’ll happen after he goes,” — and
here he took in all the assembly. ‘“ We all thought
as he was going to make the pretty little chap mas-
ter after him, and as we'd all set our ’eart on seein’
him made a fine gentleman of, as his pa was a-fore
him, and his pretty ma the mistress here; well, it’s
all up now, the old gentleman’s made a new will;
made it last night in my hearing, and everything’s
left to Chadwick !— the estate, the guineas, the coun-
try-place, everything; and the small chap isn’t to
have a farthin’. Now, if that isn’t the most extra-
ordinary piece o’ business, I ‘11—I’ll eat my ’ead!”
_ said Mr. James, emphatically, not realizing what
a very undignified proceeding that would be for a
high-toned butler.

“What, leave all to that young feather-head,
Chadwick! that mushroom! that weakest of weeds!”
screamed everybody in a chorus.

“That milky-eyed noodle, with no more sense
than a gosling just born, a-lording it over me!
Never!” cried Mary, in great indignation. “I'll
give a month’s notice first.”

“ Oh, it’s a terrible pity!” sighed good Mrs. Col-
lins, in genuine distress. “I’ve always said this house
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. I51

needed a bit of innocence and youth as much as it
needed fresh air; and I’ve been getting so fond of
the little fellow,-—one can’t help it, he’s got such
winning and confiding ways! Dear, dear, if it was n’t
for the worrit and strangeness of new places, and
my being here all these years, and remembering
Master Sedley’s pa when he was a handsome lad,
I’d have a mind to give warning myself!”

“It’s more’n a terrible pity, Mrs. Collins, ma’am ;
it’s shocking and disgraceful!” said the cook. “I
have n’t a moment’s patience with such a old repro-
bate! And if it wasn’t for the good wages, /’d give
notice to-morrow; but where’s the use o’ frettin’ and
worritin’ over what’s to come?” she added philo-
sophically, pouring out Mr. James’s third cup of tea.
“Like as not, the old man’ll live a good long time
yet, and things “ll go on as they are; that’s always
the way with disagreeable folks, — they live longer’n
anybody else.”

“ How old is he, anyhow?” some one inquired.

“Old as the hills, and not half so respectable!”
responded Mary.

“Well, it’s a pity indeed,” remarked Mr. James,
“if we’ve got to have a distant cousin, with a pink-
ish eye and weak legs, who comes from nobody
knows where, a-sot up over us, when we might ’a’ had
152 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

an own nevvy, a blood-relation, and an uncommon
handsome one at that, as we'd all ’a’ been proud to
own, and who’d ’a’ cut a more tolerable figure as
ead o’ the estate and fortunes! But as I said a-fore,
the old governor is a unaccountable customer, and a
feller never knows whether he’s to stand on his
’ead or his feet to please him.”

“T thought he was growing fond of the little boy,”
said Mrs. Collins; “he’s done more for him than
for any of his other kin these ten years.”

“Lor, ma’am, he could n’t be fond of anybody;
it’s not in him, he’s got no ’eart; if he has, it’s all
dried up like a old ’ickory-nut. It takes a ’eart,
' ma’am, to be fond o’ folks,”— and Mr. James placed
his vast palm upon the organ in question, and cast a
languishing glance at the housemaid.

“Then, what’s he giving everything to that
odious Chadwick, for?” inquired Mary, blushing,
but taking no apparent notice of Mr. James’s
pantomime.

“It’s not that he cares a straw more for Chadwick
than anybody else,” proceeded the butler; “ he abuses
him like a pickpocket, behind his back, and calls him
a coxcomb, and a dunce-head, and what not.. It’s
only one of his foxy tricks. He’s doing it to spite
the rest of the relations and make them jealous. J/
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 153

know him!” said the butler with a wise air, — “I
know him just as if I’d been through him with a
lantern!” — and he rose, leaving the mystified com-

pany to go about his duties with an unusual degree
of self-importance.

“Well,” broke in the cook, as the company began
to scatter, “it is known the world over, as even the
wisest o’ men let some o’ their foolishness ooze out
in their wills, and whatever could one expect o’ him,
I should like to know?”

It was remarkable how true were the motives
attributed to Mr. Trundlewood by his butler; but

James was an observing person, and could
scarcely have been in his master’s service all these
years without forming a very correct estimate of that
gentleman’s character. Perhaps Mr. Trundlewood
knew how his servants regarded him, and felt as
much cunning pleasure in thwarting them as he
did in thwarting other people; but as he did not
care about the good-will of anybody, their opinion
troubled him very little. If Mr. James could have
seen the old man’s secret chuckle at the thought
that there would be a goodly number of gaping and
disappointed fools when his will was read, it would
have gone far to confirm his belief in his master’s
foxiness.
154 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

It was not long before the news of what had
happened in Mr. Trundlewood’s study reached the
ears of Mr. Boggs, and he confided his first out-
burst of injured feelings to his small canary, the
nearest creature then at hand. After a few weeks
of modest hesitation he had been to the big house
to acquaint James with the tender news about him-
self and Beckie, and in return for this confidence
had received the butler’s story. It affected him
not a little, for he recalled what Beckie had said
on that memorable Sunday concerning her feel-
ings about old Mr. Trundlewood, and now that her
strange presentiments had come true, he looked
upon her as a veritable prophetess, and was filled
with awe. He remembered, too, her determination
to stand by her young master and mistress, and
never desert them, though every one else should,
and he naturally asked himself, would she leave
them to come to him now, when she learned that
everything was to be changed for them, and that
they would not live at the-big house, where good
Mrs. Collins had signified her wish to take the best
of care of the dear lady if she ever became the mis-
tress there? He felt almost sure that Beckie would
not consent to part with them now; and the pros-
pect of his own happiness seemed very remote in-
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 155

deed, by the strange turn events had taken. It was
late when he returned to his little parlor behind his
shop, that night, but he could not sleep. So he sat
down beside his lamp, after confiding his woes to
Dickie, and smoked a thoughtful pipe or two.
CHAPTER XII. .

RS. HAMILTON was
out in her little gar-
den, looking after her
plants and_ shrub-
bery; it was one of
her rare pleasures to



spend an hour or two
among her flowers in
that bright, sunshiny spot behind the Little House,
when the day was warm and the air soft. She
always: came in feeling stronger and better for her
outing. To-day,-her cheeks had a warmer tint, and
her large dark eyes a deeper glow in them as she
looked up from under her broad-brimmed hat, and
smiled inquiringly at her little maid, who came trip-
ping out towards her in a flurried and agitated way.

“If you please, ma’am,” said Beckie, very much
out of breath, and winking a great many times in a
second, “ there ’s some one in the library to see you,
ma’am; it’s a visitor.”
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 157

“Very well, I shall be in directly,” said the lady.
“Take these flowers, Beckie, and give them some
fresh water, and place them in the window; they are
so beautiful and fragrant it will make us glad to
look at them,’ — and she gathered a handful of
bright blossoms that lay in her lap.

“There isn’t a prettier blossom among them
than your sweet face, ma’am,” said the little maid,
casting a critical eye at the posies, and unable to
repress a tribute of admiration to her mistress, even
in the midst of her agitation.

Mrs. Hamilton rose from her garden chair and
walked towards the house; and Beckie following
her, felt little chills creeping up and down her back,
and shivered so, that the pretty flowers trembled
in her hands, although the day was so warm and
bright, and the sun’s rays: fell full upon her trim
figure. “It’s a very uncommon visitor, ma’am,” said -
she, hesitatingly, as her mistress neared the house
door; “one as’ll be a surprise to you to see, ma’am.”

“Oh, is it, Beckie?” said Mrs. Hamilton, smiling
at the little maid’s mysterious airs. “ Well, it is
pleasant to be surprised sometimes, you know,” and
she disappeared: into the house; and Beckie had _
not the heart to tell who it really was, for fear of
seeing her pretty bright looks vanish.
158 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

The young widow untied the strings of her gar-
den hat and went straight to the little parlor, ex-
pecting to see no more important personage than
some of her kind neighbors, or perhaps the new
rector; but when she drew the curtains aside, and
walked toward her visitor to greet him with out-
stretched hand, her heart stopped beating, and she
turned very white, for she stood face to face with
Mr. Trundlewood.

He did not take the small hand offered him;
perhaps because instinctively she had withdrawn
it the moment she recognized him. But he saw
the change that came over her, saw the delicate
beautiful face change color, and the large serene
eyes lose their trustful look. The old man had
risen when she entered, and sat down again im-
mediately, motioning her to.a chair at a distance
from his. ~

“You may well be surprised, madam, to see me
here,” he said in his coldest tones. “It is not often ©
I take the trouble to visit any of my connections.”

Mrs. Hamilton could not but admit that she was
greatly surprised, and wished that she might have
added that she was pleased as well; but pleas-
ure was the most remote of her feelings as she
stood in the long-dreaded presence of this man.
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 159

So she modestly thanked him for the honor he did
her.

“I’m conferring no honor upon you, madam,”
continued he, in the same icy voice. ‘I came here
to satisfy myself, and to acquaint you personally
with some changes in my affairs which may affect
your son’s future.”

The young mother listened attentively.

“You have been exceedingly kind to my little
boy,” she said, after a somewhat awkward silence
during which Mr. Trundlewood gazed at her pierc-
ingly, “and I have often wished for an opportun-
ity of thanking you o person, sir, for all you have
done for him and me.’

“ You will have no reason to thank me in rata
said the old man, with a malicious gleam in his
deep-set eyes. “ Binkle has doubtless told you that
I wished to make your son my heir.”

“Yes, he said it was your intention,” she re-
turned.

“He gave you some idea, I presume, of the
extent of the fortune to which the heir of the
-Trundlewood estate may look forward?”

“T think he said it was a very vast amount in-
deed, sir, a great deal more than is needed to make
my little child happy, for we have always been poor,
160 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

and his tastes and pleasures: have been simple.
Wealth is a great blessing; but it is also a great
charge for those who possess it,” she said tremu-
lously.

Mr. Trundlewood eyed her shrewdly. He
thought she was acting a part. She felt very un-
comfortable under that searching look; but she
made up her mind to be brave and yet humble
before him, because he was the only one of her hus-
band’s kindred whom she knew and who had taken
interest, however questionable it might be, in her
little Sedley. He moved uneasily in his. chair.

“Yes, I have heard that you considered it a re-
sponsibility,” said he, with a. slight sneer in his
voice, “and I am here to-day. for the purpose of
relieving you of that responsibility. I have changed
my mind in the matter; your son shall not be my
heir, and he need expect nothing from me after
my death!” —

He had expected to see her expression change,
to betray by some look or word her disappoint-
ment; but she remained calm. Indeed, a look of
something like relief came into her eyes, which he
could not mistake, and his angér rose at his own
failure. He had thought that this sudden revela-
tion would be the cruelest. shaft with which he
A- LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 161

-could pierce her. But to his utter astonishment she
was not moved by it; it had only sprung back upon
him for his own discomfiture. He had come to
witness her defeat, and it was .she who had been
conqueror. Perhaps the first thought that had
come to her was one of unspeakable relief at being
freed by his own words from so great an obliga-
tion to this man whose cold, hard nature made
her recoil from him the longer she remained in his
presence. Her voice was perfectly steady as she
said in reply: —

“T trust that my little child is in no way respon-
sible for that decision, that he has said or done
nothing to offend you. I should not grieve for the
loss of your fortune to him, but I should be exceed-
ingly sorry to have him forfeit your good-will; for
he has grown to love and trust you, sir, and he is
so young, and needs a protector. I am very weak
and helpless.”

The old man leaned forward in his chair, and
gazed at her keenly; his hand shook as it clasped
the knob of his cane. “Offence!” he cried, with
rising bitterness. “Have I not suffered offence
enough at the hands of those from whom I had the -
right to expect duty and obedience? Have I not

met with ingratitude and defiance, and scoundrelly
Il
162 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

behavior generally, from my own flesh and blood,
whom I, like a doting idiot, had striven to benefit
and advance? And am I likely to be made such a
dolt of again? Who talks to me of love and trust!
There is no such thing in the world, I tell you, or
I should have met some of it in the seventy years
I have walked this earth!”

“Ido not understand you, sir,” said the young
mother, wondering at his sudden violence, and yet
feeling a sort of compassion for the bitter old man.
“Who is it that has used you so ill, and caused you
to lose faith in every one, even in the sincerity of
an innocent child?”

“Who?” said he, his eye lighting up strangely.
“Who? How dare you ask! You know as well as
I do!”

“No, I do not,” said she.

“Who, indeed, but your husband, whom I cher-
ished and helped, and who deserted me in my
old age!”

“ How?” she asked, turning very pale, and trem-
bling for the first time.

in marrying you!”

“Oh, sir,” she cried with a rising sob, “bless
him for that! bless him for his generous, noble,
unselfish love; bless him for the happiness he gave
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 163

to one soul on earth. I have been a loyal and faith-
ful wife to him; loyal to his blessed memory. I
brought him no riches or station when he took me,
but I gave him a heart full of love, which he prized
above all earthly treasures, and which shall be his
until my life’s end!” —and she rose and walked to
the window, where she stood, while her silent tears
fell fast from her large dark eyes.

Mr. Trundlewood had meant to say a great many
more cruel things to her. He had taken the trouble
to come himself, in order to experience that satis-
faction; but when he saw her tears and the grief |
that prompted them, he could not go on; and yet
he was angered that he should thus be put under
a restraint. She was very different from the woman
he had expected to meet; more a lady, more gentle,
brave, and more beautiful; but he hated her beauty
and her virtues, for they had been the means of
winning that love which he had begrudged her, and
of frustrating his ambitious plans. No words were
spoken between them for some time; but at length,
overcoming her first impulse of aversion, and re-
membering that he was an old man, she went and
stood beside his chair.

“Oh, sir,” she said in a pleading voice, “try to
forgive him for having loved me, unworthy as I was
164 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

of so noble a feeling, and let the memory of his
good deeds be as sweet a comfort to you as it has
been to me. Try to think more kindly of his
widow, and to love his little son as you once loved
him. Believe me, I would so much rather have
your trust and affection than all the wealth you
could ever give us. What is money to us? what
has it been to you? It has not made you happy ;
that alone could never bring us any joy. Nothing
could make my little boy happier than to see his
uncle and his mother friends!”

“Friends!” he muttered between his teeth, “ you
and I friends! That can never be. Can I forget
‘that you have injured me; that you have stood
between me and the only creature I ever cared for;
that to-day you stand between me and his child,
whom I might have loved and benefited but for
your”

The young woman withdrew a step or two from
him. He was a cruel old man, she thought. Those
darkest of human passions —hatred and malice —
were at that moment depicted on every feature of
his wrinkled and careworn face. He seemed sud-
denly transformed into some loathsome creature;
and she could not reconcile in her mind the thought
that he was in any way related to the husband who
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 165

had possessed in her sight all the noblest virtues of
manhood.

“I think you do me great injustice, sir,’ she
said with spirit. “I would never consciously have
wronged you, had I known that I stood in your
way.” :

“He told you nothing?” inquired Mr. Trundle-
wood, and shot a quick, searching glance at her.

“I never heard my husband speak your name, sir.
I never knew from him that he had such a relative,
or how much he had given up for my sake until
now.”

“What!” cried the old man, and his head fell in
his hands and he uttered a smothered groan. That
he had been so completely dropped out of his
nephew’s life and remembrance was perhaps the
cruelest pang that his hard nature had ever felt.

She was the first to break the silence that fol-
lowed. “If you cannot think well of me, sir, at
least do not let that bias your affection for my son.
I am sure he will repay all his father’s debt of love
and gratitude to you, if you will let him.”

-Mr. Trundlewood looked up quickly; he had mis-
understood her; he thought she referred to the dis-
position of his fortune. For he could not but
believe that all she had previously said about being
166 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

happier with love than money was all sentimental
rubbish, and done for effect. - His mind could con-
ceive of but one choice between the two. There
_was a gleam in his eyes, as if some
Ce new hope had just dawned before him,
| and he said eagerly : —
“That may yet be done; shall I
tell you how?”
She bowed her head in reply.
“Let the boy come to me,” he said
in a trembling voice, “let me








bring him up, and train him
as I would have done his
father. I will make every-
thing right yet. You may
go back to India, America,
anywhere; you will have a
oe handsome allowance. Ill cut
Chadwick off with a hundred
pounds. Come,” he said, leaning forward in his
chair, “consent to it, and I-will make the lad the
finest gentleman in all England; by Heaven I
will!”
The young mother had followed him with a keen
look and quickening breath. Her small, white hand
was resting on the back of the chair from which
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 167

she had risen but a moment ago, and her hold upon
it grew tighter and tighter. All the life in her deli-
cate body rose to her cheeks; all the womanliness
of her nature rang out in her clear voice as she
answered him : —

“You wish me to take money to part from my
child; to deprive him of a mother’s love and com-
panionship, and all the sweetest blessings of child-
hood, for the sake of obtaining your fortune? That’
is a cowardly offer, sir; I will not accept it. I am
his natural friend and keeper, by God's will and law.
If I were to do as you wish, even putting my feel-
ings out of the question, I should be acting against
all the duties and obligations of a mother.”

The old man was utterly disconcerted. He had
not looked for so much spirit and moral courage
in that frail, delicate-looking woman,so much fire
from the depths of those habitually tender eyes.
He made an effort to rise from his chair with the
help of his cane. His face was set, and his lips
were white and stern. She thought he must be
going to take his leave, and went forward to assist
him; but he waved her away with his arm, and
stood leaning with one arm on the corner of the
mantel, as if he had something more to say.

But just at that moment the curtain parted, and
168 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

little Sedley ran in, his face flushed and his curls
all tangled from a brisk ride on his pony. “Oh,
uncle, you here!” he exclaimed in great surprise,
as soon as he spied the old man. “Oh, I’m so
glad you ’’recome at last!”
and he went straight up
to Mr. Trundlewood, and
pressed the hand that held
the cane with both his
small ones. But that gen-
tleman took no notice of
the caress. He only said
in a constrained voice:
“Call my man, will you?
I must be going; I’ve
been here a great deal
too long!” .
Sedley, accustomed to
the old man’s gruff ways,
did not seem to mind
this abrupt departure, and
ran out to call the footman; and presently Mr.
Trundlewood was escorted out of the Little House
and into his carriage, while Sedley stood on the
house steps and waved him: an adieu. When he
re-entered the little library, he found his mother









|



(Nees :


A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 169

reclining in her arm-chair, feeling quite faint and
weak. She would not tell him what had been the
purport of his uncle’s visit, nor why she felt sad,
only that she was tired; and she drew him to her
and held his face close to hers, and called him her
dear, loving little boy, a great many times over.
r

CHAPTER XIII.

Cw HAT night, when little Rebecca’
retired to her bed-chamber, away up
in the attic of the Little House, after
having looked some time in vain for



the coming of Mr. Boggs, she sat down
upon her bed and apostrophized the
four bedposts to relieve her feelings.

“T told you so!” she exclaimed, shaking her
small fists. “I told you so, even though I’m zo¢
a noracle. Oh, to think of that Chadwick, that. in-
sipidest of his sex, with a nose like a tea-kettle
spout, and no eyebrows to speak of, and ears that
all but flap like the union-jacks, and thinks himself
a irresistible creature, with it all,—to think o’ his
being favored over and above my blessed, darling
pet, a child as it ’ud go to anybody’s heart only to
look at! Oh, the heartless monster, as I’d as soon
see in this house again as the venomousest of croc-
odiles! I can bear a good deal, and have borne a
good deal, but I’m not a camel, with one hump nor
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. I7I

two humps, nor yet a dromedary, and I can’t a-bear
that, and I won’t!” she concluded in her pamenest
treble.

For little Beckie had gathered something of what
was going on in the library that afternoon, during
her sundry trips through the corridors, and hasty
flights up-stairs, and various responses to the en-
trance-door when no one had knocked. She had
caught a word here and there in the conversation,
and with her quick wit had guessed the rest. Her
loyal British blood rose up in arms, and her indig-
nation knew no bounds.

As for the young mother, she spent a feverish
night; the reaction after that dreadful interview
had shattered her delicate system, and she spent the
long night tossing and thinking, till her head burned
and her fingers were icy cold. She knew that she
had done right, —she was sure that Sedley’s father
would have approved no other course than the one
she had chosen. It was then that she recalled the
old man’s cruel revelation. Ah! what a crushing
thought it was, that she who had so loved him had
been the one to bring him the trial of a separa-
tion from his only kindred, —that for her sake he
had given up everything! How she clung to him
in her heart, and thanked him for having preferred
172 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

her and her love to wealth and honor and worldly
advancement! She had never truly known till now
‘how noble and generous and loyal he had been to
her. And she called and prayed to him in the
night to help her keep her.courage, for now in-
deed she felt they would be more alone in the
world than ever.

She knew that Mr. Trundlewood could never
make her child happy, for he had none of those
qualities that win the hearts of the young. She
felt, now that she really knew him, with his selfish
and worldly aims, that he would be but a poor ex-
ample of manhood for her little child to grow up
and look to. She knew, too, that to deprive him
suddenly of all the visible proofs of her love, of the
tender, close companionship which they had enjoyed
together since his very earliest consciousness, to
withdraw from. him that influence for good by
which she had sought daily to mould his young
nature, —all for the sake of a vast fortune which
might prove a fatal blight om his life, as it had al-
ready done on the life of this lonely old man, —
would be fulfilling a mother’s part but poorly in-
deed. Yet in spite of all these reasons, which were
so strong and just to her, she could not but be sor-
rowful at the great breach that had suddenly opened
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. — 173

between her and the man upon whom she had been
so dependent. They stood so terribly alone and
helpless in the world that the thought made her
shudder. Even braver and stronger souls than hers
have trembled at the prospect of facing alone life’s
greatest problems.
She had not been able to guess what the old
man’s feelings were after he had gone; what bit-
terness and disappointment and rage were his at
having his wishes in everything interfered with, as
he thought, by this one woman. She could not
imagine his sufferings, which were perhaps the
harder to bear because they brought with them the
torments of a consuming hatred. Therefore she
was perhaps not so surprised as relieved when, some
weeks later, a request came from Mr. Trundlewood
that Master Sedley should that evening dine with
him at his house in Belgrave Square. At once her
heart softened towards the old man. She could not
refuse to let Sedley go and cheer him in his loneli-
ness: this might be his way of showing he wished
still to be the child’s friend; and now that there
was no longer any question of his fatal money be-
tween them, she hoped that they might prove how
much more his friendship and good-will were to
them than anything else he could offer. This was
174 ' A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

a comforting. thought; for it was dreadful to her

to feel herself at enmity with any one, most of all

with one whom she had so long believed a benefac-

tor and friend. She herself was so ready to forgive

every wrong or injustice, so anxious was she to be

at peace with all who came within the scope of her .
simple life, that there was no room left in her mind

for hard feelings. to rankle there.

So little Sedley was made ready to go and dine
in state at the great house, and was himself in high -
spirits at the prospect. He fancied his uncle must
be much better of his gout, which Mrs. Collins had
told him had been very bad of late,—so bad that,
although he had made his usual frequent visits to
his uncle, the old man had been too poorly to see
him, and Sedley had passed the time quite pleas-
antly with the good housekeeper instead; always
leaving some affectionate message for his uncle,
which the worthy woman never dared to deliver in
person, but conveyed to Mr. James, who was con-
sidered the most fearless among the domestics.
Mr. Trundlewood took no heed of the messages
which the servant brought to him in the dignified
form of “ Master Hamilton’s compliments.” He
sat for the most part of the day with his back to the
door, his ailing foot resting on a stool before him,
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 175

steeped in the most sinister silence that had taken
possession of him for many a day. It was only
when the irresistible young Chadwick was an-
nounced to the old man that he broke that silence ;
and then it was to pour out such a volley of’ im-
precations and threats that he would have them
hanged every one, if they did not let him alone, that
even Mr. James trembled and turned pale as he re-
turned to the disappointed youth with his message
of dismissal.

Mr. Trundlewood dined at eight o’clock in the
evening, which was usually little Sedley’s bedtime.
However, he acquitted himself very well on this
occasion in his capacity of guest, and made heroic
efforts to entertain and amuse his uncle; for the
novelty of the situation, the brilliant lights that
made the silver and crystal sparkle and glitter so
dazzlingly, were quite enough to keep him as wide
awake as a young cockerel. He had never seen
such a big, broad table for two persons to dine at,
or such rich wonderful plate, or so many curious
dishes. He sat at one end of the table and his
uncle at the other, and they each had two servants
to wait upon them, besides Mr. James, the head but-
ler, who was there to see that the others discharged
their functions with propriety, and who himself
176 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

looked so magnificent and majestic that Sedley felt
once or twice as if it were a rudeness not to include
him in the conversation. For the little boy did
most of the talking, while Uncle Trundlewood ate
his. dinner in silence, and drank a great deal of
different colored wines which Mr. James himself
selected from the huge sideboard at the other end
of the room.

The dinner lasted a very long time, — much longer
than Sedley’s small appetite; for by the time the
soup, and the fish, and the joints were passed, and
the fowl was brought on, he could not proceed very
_ comfortably, and felt that he was not really doing
justice to the bountiful feast his uncle had prepared
for him. To cover his embarrassment, he talked a
great deal in his quaint, serious way; remarked
upon everything that was passed him, and praised
and passed.comments with quite the air of a con-
noisseur.- The old man eyed him from his end of
the table, and could not but admire his pluck and
determination to be agreeable in spite of so little
encouragement from himself. He had hardly done
more than nod once or twice at the child, or smile
a grim smile at some of his comments throughout
the entire meal. It was that lack of self-conscious-
ness, and perfect ease of behavior that pleased him
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 177

most about the boy. Sedley was always the same
cheerful, amiable little fellow, no matter in what
mood he found his uncle. And Mr. Trundlewood
had been accustomed to have people fear or flatter
him, or grow awkward in his presence. He had
never come across any one else, except the boy’s
father, years ago when he too was a lad, who could
be perfectly natural and frank with him. This child
-seemed to understand his moods, and to have a sort
-of quieting influence, for which he himself could
not account.

At length, when the dinner was over, and the
.dessert served, and the great pyramid of bright-col-
cored fruits was placed in the centre of the table,
and the servants had retired, the two were left alone
in the great dining-room.

“Well, how do you like dining like a lord, sir?”
asked Mr. Trundlewood, leaning back in his chair
and twirling his empty wine-glass between his
fingers.

“Do lords dine like this every day?” inquired
the child.

-“Yes, and so do I; some of them don’t dine
half so well, I’ll wager you,” —and he cast a sat-
isfied glance over the brilliant sumptuousness of his
table.
178 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“ Well, I think it is splendid,” said Sedley, with a
ring of genuine approval. “ And do their little boys
dine with them in the evening, too, as I did with
you to-night?” he asked.

“Not usually,” replied Uncle Trundlewood. “ But

you should do so every day, if you liked, if you
came to live with me and be my boy,” he added.
* You should have everything in this house, and
more too, and do as you liked all the rest of your
life.” .
_ Sedley looked at him wonderingly. “How do
you mean, Uncle Trundlewood? Do you mean if
my mamma and I came to live with you in this big
house? ”

“No, I mean if you would leave your mamma
and come and live with me alone,” said the old
man.

“Ah, well, you see, dear uncle, I could n’t very
well do that. I should be dreadfully lonesome with-
out her, and she would be so without me. She
hasn’t anybody but me to take care of her; and
I’ve promised to take care of her when I’m big.
Then I love her a great deal, and when you love
any one very much, you know, it makes you very
unhappy not to be always with them.”

Sedley had stepped down from his chair, and had
A LITFLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 179

come near to his uncle’s side, and his hand was rest-
ing on the old man’s arm. They remained silent
- for a moment, and then Mr. Trundlewood said, but
with no harshness in his voice, “ Then I shall have
to ask your Cousin Chadwick to.come and be my
boy, and give him everything I had intended for
you;” and there was an odd gleam in his deep eyes.

“Oh, that would be very nice!” cried Sedley,
quite relieved at his uncle’s having found so pleasant
and simple an alternative; “for, you see, he hasn't
any mother, and you have n’t any little boy, and that
would make things just exactly right. Only he’d be
a pretty big little boy,’ —and Sedley laughed as he
recalled the tall, gaunt figure of his Cousin Chadwick.
“But you’d love me, and let me come and see you
just the same, would n't you, uncle? ”

It would have been a hard-hearted man indeed
who had not been touched by this simple, tender
appeal. Mr. Trundlewood made no reply, but he
placed his hand not ungently upon the child’s head,
and looked a moment into the bright young face;
and little Sedley seemed quite satisfied with this for
an answer.

“It’s no use,” thought the old man, bitterly, “I
have not succeeded in making him care for me, in
spite of everything; I’ve gone at it in the wrong
180 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

way. But it’s only a part of my accursed luck that
every creature I might have loved has all my life
turned from me. Come,” he said aloud, “ring the
bell for James; we'll go into the drawing-room.”
Sedley rang, and presently the tall butler appeared,
and assisted Mr. Trundlewood on one side while the
boy walked on the other, trying to adjust his steps
to the hobbling, uncertain gait of the old man.
‘They crossed a wide, dimly-lighted corridor, and as
they were passing, Mr. Trundlewood pointed to a
low, square window at the farthest end of the hall
and said, in the irritable tone which he always used
when addressing his servants: “ Throw open that
window; the air of this house is suffocating!” It
was indeed a rather warm evening, with that heavy
murkiness in the atmosphere which precedes a fog.
Then they entered the great drawing-room, which
Sedley remembered having visited but that once
with Mrs. Collins, the first time he came to his
uncle’s house. There were the same queer old
pieces of furniture, looking more grim and curious
than ever by the light of the low lamp beside which
Mr. Trundlewood sat to read his “ London News.”
There stood the quaint little old piano, with its
bowed spindle-legs looking as if it might dance out
from its corner any minute when Mr. Trundlewood
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 181

was not by. Sedley wondered what its voice was
like; probably very cracked and wheezy, for it had
not been open for many years, not since Sedley’s
own grandmother had played upon it with girlish
fingers; and Mr. Trundlewood had never cared to
hear it since, being himself not fond of music. The
little boy had exerted himself so much to be enter-
taining during the long dinner that now, as he sat
on a low ottoman beside his uncle, passing in review
all the objects of the great half-darkened room, a cer-
tain sleepy feeling came over him, and his eyes
would close now and then, and his head drop over
on his uncle’s knee, in spite of brave efforts to keep
awake. .

“I’m afraid it must be getting late,” he said at
last, suppressing a yawn.

“Would you like to be going home?” asked
Uncle Trundlewood, looking up from his paper.

“JT think I would, please; that is, if you think I’ve
stayed long enough for —”

“Long enough for what?” inquired the old man,
as Sedley hesitated.

“Long enough to be quite polite. My mamma
said she would not expect me home so very early,
as it was never polite to leave right after dinner; but
you see I’m not accustomed to dining out much.
182 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

I’ve never been to a dinner-party before, and I
don’t really know just how long I ought to stay.”

“] think you ’ve stayed quite the correct length of
time,” said Mr. Trundlewood, pulling out his watch,
and looking at it with an odd mixture of seriousness
and amusement.

“Then I think I'll go, if you please,” said the
child, rising. “I’m getting just a little sleepy.”

Mr. Trundlewood reached out for the bell-rope,
and summoned a servant to have the carriage
brought round for. Master Hamilton.

“ Begging your pardon, sir,” said the man, with
an apologetic bow, “but there’s a thick fog just |
riz; thick as mud, sir; the blackest we ’ve had this
season; sO as you can’t see so much as your ’and
a-fore you. It ’ud be uncommon dangerous to start
out wi’ the ’osses yet a bit. And if ’t was so’s there
was a wall, as you could hitch on to all the way, a
body might go a-foot; but it’s a question which
side you’d land on, sir, when it comes to crossing
streets and turning corners on a Evil One’s own
night like this ’un. I don’ mistrust but it'll: lift
a-fore long, though.”

“ Have the horses in readiness, then,” replied Mr.
Trundlewood, gruffly; but he turned to Sedley and
said kindly, “ We ll have to keep you awake a while
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. _ 183

longer, my boy. Come, we must find something
to amuse you;” and he laid down his paper, for he
knew the peril of starting out for any distance in a
London fog, and was perhaps not ill pleased at
keeping the boy with him a little longer.

Sedley had run to the window to look out upon
the blackness of the night. “Oh, it is dreadfully
dark, uncle!” he cried. “You can’t see any lights
from the street lamps at all.”

There was indeed a dense fog over the whole
city, a thick veil that steeped everything in im-
penetrable night. The streets were silent. Hardly
a human footfall broke the black stillness; and the
little boy’s heart turned longingly homeward, to the
young mother from whom he was now separated
by this strange, impassable mist for the first time
in his life, and who was, he knew, waiting anxiously
for his return, at the window of the Little House
in Pimlico. Oh, how many days it was before he
saw again that gentle face, to know it and to
love it!
CHAPTER XIV.

HAT shall we talk about,
now?” asked Sedley, com-
ing back to seat himself
beside his uncle, and try-
ing hard to suppress a
little choking feeling that

—— = had risen in his throat.

He let his hands fall in his lap, and looked up

with moist but very round eyes at the old man

in order to seem quite wide-awake.

“T don’t know. It appears to me we’ve about
exhausted all our subjects of mutual interest,” said
Mr. Trundlewood, with a queer look. He could
not help seeing and admiring the child’s manly
efforts to resign himself amiably to the inevitable.
“Do you like to play games?” he asked.

-“Oh, yes; but I don’t know very many. All I
can play is draughts. My mamma and I often play
together in the evening. I think that’s a very nice
game, don’t you?”


A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 185

“T’ll teach you something that’s nicer. Fetch
me that case from the shelf;” and Mr. Trundlewood
pointed to a dark wood cabinet, from which Sedley
took a highly polished box, which upon being
opened he found to contain a beautiful game of
chess. He had never seen anything like it before.
The men were all of ivory, elaborately carved, and
of such curious shapes that when they were spread
out in their proper places upon the board Sedley’s
eyes opened with genuine delight. He drew upa
small table and set the game between himself and
his uncle, and then the old gentleman, not without
some misgivings in his own mind as to whether he
were not nearing his dotage, began to teach the
child what he remembered of the game. He had
not played it for a great many years, and his memory
needed about as much brushing up as did the little
red and white figures. It did not take Sedley long.
to learn the names of the chessmen, to distinguish
the kings and queens, the castles, the bishops, and
the knights and pawns; and he soon became
absorbed in making a way with his men into the
adversary’s lines, protecting his king with as skil-
ful management as if he had been an adept at
the game. Mr. Trundlewood watched his eager-
ness, and laughed aloud when he found himself
186 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

checkmated, at last, by his small opponent. Sed-
ley declared it was glorious sport, and was quite
ready for another game. Then Mr. Trundlewood,
who had at first given the little boy an advantage
by putting opportunities in his way for jumping his
men, now found that he had to look after his own
interests more sharply. Sedley had to work very
hard to hold his own. As the game waxed more
exciting, he leaned over the table eagerly, with a
thoughtful finger applied to his rounded chin, and
pondered a long time before making a move; but
do what he would, Uncle Trundlewood was too
cunning for him this time, and won the second
game.

“Now, we shall have to play the rubber,” said
Sedley, not one whit disheartened by his defeat.

“The rubber!” exclaimed Uncle Trundlewood,
raising his heavy eyebrows.

“Why, yes, to see which one of us is really the
better player, —the one who wins two games out:
of three, you know.”

“Well, really,” said the old man, leaning back in
his chair, and running his fingers through his iron-
gray hair, “I don’t know that I’m equal to another
game without my pipe. I need a smoke to clear the
cobwebs from my head in order to beat you; you’re






























































SS

ith

ec ye ly ;
BES ig tad
ae

~



“ As the game waxed more exciting.”

A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 189

getting to be such an uncommonly shrewd player,
you know.”

“Let me go and get it for you,” cried Sedley, jump-
ing from his chair. “ I know just where it hes on your
study mantel, and Ill hurry back with it directly.”

“ Very well, you may go and fetch it;” and the old
man’s eyes followed the little figure out of the room,
after which he settled himself in his easy-chair,
wondering why he felt so comfortable and amiabie,
and never once thinking of his gout.

Sedley turned into the hall, which was but dimly
lighted; for there was only one of the great chande-
liers burning, and that was turned down very low.
But he knew the house so well that he quickly
made his way to his uncle’s study. That room was
quite dark, except for a faint reflection of the hall
light that entered as he drew aside the heavy cur-
tains. Sedley remembered perfectly where the curi-
ous old darkened meerschaum lay; he had seen his
uncle place it upon a small gold tray on the mantel
before they had gone down to dinner, and although
he could not reach up so high, he knew there
was a tall stool always beside the hearth, upon
which Mr. Trundlewood rested his aching foot.
Climbing upon it, he secured the pipe without
difficulty.
190 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

As he was getting down from the stool he felt
some one standing very close to him; and turning
round suddenly, he saw outlined against the dim
light that streamed in at the open door the heavy,
stealthy figure of aman. ‘ Who’s that?” he asked,
in his clear ringing voice, startled, but not exactly
frightened.

“Hush!” came the answer in a gruff whisper.
“Don’t make any noise or you’ll wake the old
man.”

_ “ He’s awake already,” said Sedley, interpreting
this to mean his uncle.

“Is he?” said the man, laying his hand firmly on
the little boy’s shoulder. “ Well, it’s no matter; but
don’t you disturb him whatever you do.”

“Who are you?” inquired Sedley, beginning to
feel very uncomfortable in that uncouth grasp, and
yet not wishing to cry out; for he remembered what
his uncle had said about little boys who were afraid.

“Oh, I’m a friend o’ his’n, I am,” rejoined the
man, making an effort to moye himself and the boy
farther into the darker portion of the room.

But Sedley could not feel quite certain of this.
He had never seen such a looking person in his
uncle’s house before, and his heart began to beat
quickly, as he said, trying to free himself: —
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. IgI

“ Let me go, please, ny uncle is waiting for me;
I must hurry back with his pipe.”

The man only tightened his hold a little more
with his one hand, for in the other he held some-
thing heavy, wrapped in a cloth, that clicked together
now and then with a muffled metallic sound.

“Show me where the money box is,” he said in
a hurried whisper, and bringing his face very close
to the child’s, so that Sedley could feel a harsh,
shaggy beard, and see even by the dim light that he
looked like a ruffian. “Show me where your uncle
keeps his guineas; I’m a friend o’ his’n, you know,
and I promised to take care on ’em fur him, and
you needn’t trouble him about the matter arter
I’m gone.”

“T don’t know,” cried Sedley, in a louder voice,
“YT don’t know where any money is, and I want
to “go.”

“Come, now, none o’ your screechin’, younker,”
said the man, angrily. “You show me where the
money is, and do it suddent, or I’ll—’and he
raised the bundle threateningly.

. Sedley did not scream, although he felt convinced
that the man was a thief and had stolen into the
house to do some mischief. He was a very little
boy; but he had presence of mind and courage
192 A LITTLE HOUSE .IN PIMLICO.

enough ‘to take advantage of a moment when the
fellow relaxed his hand a little in order to allow
Sedley to lead him towards the desired object,
and with a quick movement he slipped out from
under his grasp, and, dodging the efforts of the
burglar’s one free hand, made his escape into the
hall.

The man had dropped his bundle in the tussle;
he stopped to pick it up, and followed the child out
into the hall, which was also his only means of
escape. But Sedley had hardly reached the turn
* which led down to the servants’ rooms, whither he

_ was flying to give the alarm, when the tall butler

appeared in answer to Mr. Trundlewood’s bell,
which had been ringing impatiently for some min-
utes to know the cause of Master Sedley’s delay.

The man, thinking himself trapped, dropped his
heavy bundle upon the floor and drew a revolver,
shooting twice at random to dispel attention from
himself, and delay pursuit. Hidden by the smoke
that followed his two shots, -he bolted towards the
open window at the opposite end of the hall, and
disappeared amid the lifting fog. 4

But the loud report in the still of the evening
had alarmed the whole house. Several of the ser-
vants hurried out to where the sound proceeded, and
_ A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 193

a shriek of terror issued from the women when they
saw the figure of little Sedley stretched out upon
the dark carpet, his face deadly pale, his white lips
parted, and his curls lying in a pool of blood.

Old Mr. Trundlewood, hearing the confusion, and
exasperated at receiving no response to his call,
found the means of hobbling to the door of the
drawing-room with the aid of his cane and a chair.

“What’s the meaning of this confounded row?”
he roared, seeing the group of servants at the lower
end of the hall.

“Qh, sir!” cried the tender-hearted Mary, who

was the only one among them that had the courage
to come and tell their master what had happened,
“it’s a terrible accident that’s just befallen Master
Sedley! He’s been shot, sir!” and she broke into
sobs.
“Shot!” gasped the old man, turning ashy pale,
and trembling in every limb. He could have borne
almost anything with more composure than the news
that the boy had been hurt, —killed, perhaps, —
there in his house.

“Ts he dead?” were the first words his lips could
frame when he had recovered from the sudden
shock. .

“Oh, no, no! Thank heaven, no, sir, he’s only

13
194 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

unconscious, and Mrs. Collins is attending on him;

but he looks dead, the dear, precious, darling!”
“Let Thomas gallop for a surgeon instantly !”
“He’s already gone, sir; James sent him o’ his

own account, knowing as you'd not question his



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doing it for Master Sedley, sir,” said Mary, forgetting
all her fears of the old man.

Mr. Trundlewood did not question anything at that
moment; what had occurred, or how it had occurred,
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 195

or who was to blame for it. His only anxiety was
to obtain immediate relief for the little fellow. He
stood leaning upon his chair and cane, giving orders
to his servants and trying to quell his own agita-
tion. At length he dragged himself to the spot
where Sedley lay. They had carried him to the
nearest couch in one of the adjoining rooms; and
the good housekeeper was caring for him with all
the motherly tenderness of which she was capable,
doing all that could be done for him until the doctor
arrived. Mr. Trundlewood sat down beside the
little figure, and a feeling of the most sincere agony
he had ever felt in his life pierced his stern old
heart, as he saw the little face that but a moment
ago had been so animated with rosy health, now
white and lifeless, the golden hair dyed with the
dark stain, and the blue eyes veiled with their deli-
cate, trembling lids. Oh, what would he not have
given to take that childish form within his arms, and
for the power to bring it back to consciousness and
health!

It seemed an interminable while to the anxious
old man before the entrance door swung open, and
the doctor’s light, swift tread was heard nearing the
room. The wound was examined and dressed, and
found to be not very dangerous, the ball having
196 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

lodged in the arm just above the elbow; but the
child was weak from loss of blood, and there was
danger of a fever setting in. It was some time before
he opened his eyes, and then the return to con-
sciousness only brought a moan of pain, and he
closed them again.

After an hour, it was thought safer and better
that he should be taken home to his mother, where
the sight of her and of his more familiar surround-
ings would be apt to have a quieting influence upon
him. Accordingly Mr. Trundlewood’s carriage and
swift horses were made ready, and little Sedley was
carried down in the arms of the tall butler, and laid
upon its soft broad cushions, while Mrs. Collins and
the doctor took their place beside him; and thus he
was borne back to the Little House in Pimlico,
where his young mother stood awaiting him at the
door. She was looking out upon the night, which
was now clear and starry, with such a nameless
dread in her heart, that when the boy was carried
in to her she made no outcry nor fainted; she
seemed to have guessed all that had happened, even
before they told her. She only knelt beside him
and prayed, and thanked Heaven that he was once
more within her arms, and that he breathed and
lived.
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 197

And when the big house in the Square had again
settled into its accustomed hush, after the dismal
happenings of that evening, and Mr. Trundlewood
was alone once more in his room, the picture of that
wounded child rose before him; a great wave of
tenderness rushed over him, and he buried his face
in his withered hand and wept.
CHAPTER XV.

LTHOUGH a careful search was
made through the big house, no
trace of the robber was found
until the next morning, when
Mr. James discovered the bun-

dle which had been dropped behind a bust of

William Pitt in a corner of the hall, and which

contained a number of valuable pieces of plate

taken from the dining-room. No one knew how
the thing had occurred; all that Mr. James could
say was that as he was coming out to answer Mr.

Trundlewood’s bell, he met little Master Sedley

running towards him with arms uplifted, and the

next instant the firing had come. Only the child
could tell what had taken place before ; and he was
now lying so ill with the fever, and his ideas were

so jumbled up in his little head, that it was doubt- °

ful if they ever learned the rights and wrongs of

anything. .


A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 199

Yes, poor little Sedley was very ill for many days
after; his pulse throbbed at such a rate, and his
sweet childish face was so flushed and wild, that
even the hopeful doctor, who had at first spoken
very confidently of his speedy recovery, began to
shake his head and to look serious. For days his
wide blue eyes stared about him vacantly, and he
seemed to know none of the familiar faces near him,
not even that of the gentle mother, who watched
over him day and night. He talked deliriously, in
a hoarse, unnatural voice, about the thief, and the
chessmen, and his Uncle Trundlewood, who seemed
all three tangled up together in his burning brain.
But early one morning, just as the bells of the city
were sounding the second hour, a great change
came over the little sick boy. His flushed cheeks
became suddenly cool and moist, and a delicate
pallor overspread his features; his little bandaged
arm was resting across his breast, his head lying ©
quietly to one side, and his bright hair streaming
over the pillow. The fever was gone, ane he had
fallen into a peaceful sleep.

The doctor, who had remained a part of the night, |
expecting a change either for better or worse, bent
over him, and saw the restful look steal over his
face. He turned to Mrs. Hamilton and said cheer-
200 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

fully, “He is quite safe now, my dear madam;
yes, the fever has left him, and I think the little
fellow will pull through this time.”

He was a homely man, but the young mother
thought him the most beautiful and lovable of men
as he uttered these few words. She knelt beside
the bed and kissed the beloved little face, now so
white and peaceful, and the grateful tears fell fast
for the first time during his illness..

And Beckie, who had overheard the joyful news
from her post in the hall, where she had been wait-
ing half the night, threw her apron over her face,
and then ran down to the kitchen, where Mr. Boggs
was also watching, to know the best or the worst
of the little patient. “Oh, my goodness me!” she
cried, throwing her arms around Mr. Boggs’ broad
neck, and bursting into tears.

“Oh, Beckie! it isn’t all up with the dear inno-
cent, is it?” said the good man, with a very grave
look.

“No, praise be given! the fever’s turned, and
he’s sleeping natural!” — and little Beckie laughed
and cried hysterically. .

“ Ah, praise be given indeed, Beckie!” repeated
Mr. Boggs. “It Il be all well with him now, since
the fever’s gone. There, there, my dear, try and
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 201

calm yourself,” and he patted her gently on the
back, very glad indeed of his right to soothe her
thus in her agitation. “Youll want to be brew-
ing a dish 0’ tea for your mistress and yourself, to
hearten you up a bit after this long pull o’ worrit.”

Rebecca was too sensible not to realize the
wisdom of Mr. Boggs’ counsel, and was soon her
sprightly self once more, busying herself with tea-
tray and biscuits, in order that her dear mistress
might have a little something to refresh her for the
rest of the night, as she would let no one else take
her place beside the little bed.

From that hour Sedley began to mend. Each
returning day brought him new strength. He
talked but little; but he looked around him a great
deal, and knew the faces of his kind friends once
more. He seemed to have no distinct remembrance
of what had happened, and it was thought best that
he should not be questioned in any way about it
until he had grown quite strong and well. Gradu-
ally the little arm healed, and he suffered no more
pain; new rosiness crept back into his wan, pale
cheeks, and he felt the quiet, peaceful happiness
that comes with returning life. It was bright, beau-
tiful summer, now, and the windows of the Little
House were opened to admit the warm air, and
202 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

flowers from the small garden were brought in
every day to gladden his eyes. And oh, the many
tokens of.love and interest that came from all the
neighborhood! What eager inquiries from all the
good tradespeople who were in the habit of coming
to the Little House! — the butter-woman and the
baker’s man, the butcher and the milk-boy, — in-
deed, every soul who had ever known him, and re-
membered his kind, affectionate ways. Sedley had
really no idea how many friends he had made in the
six short years of his life in London. He was very
grateful to them all, and sent them his love and
thanks. Good Mrs. Collins came often for news of
the little boy, which she might take to the servants
at the big house, who had been in great distress
about him; and James saw Mr. Boggs every day,
~ and could himself talk of nothing else for weeks,
marvelling at the bravery of the lad in having made |
no outcry, and lamenting the fact that he should
have been the one to suffer for the protection of the
Trundlewood house, when there were plenty of
good-for-nothing fellows, like himself, in the house
who would have been none the worse for a smell of
fire !

But there were two persons who were most as-
siduous in their visits and attentions to the small
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 203

invalid. One was good Mr. Boggs, who, as soon as
Sedley was well enough to “see company,” had
brought his yellow canary, perched on his finger, to
amuse the young master, and cheer him up with
his song. To be sure, Dickie was getting rather
old and grumpy, and his note had long since lost
its youthful freshness; he did hardly more than
croak. But Mr. Boggs, who had learned to love
the little creature's song, thought it the most
beautiful music in the world.

The other visitor was no less surprising a person
than Cousin Chadwick, whose heart was as kind as
his mind was simple. Regularly once a week he
drove up in a hansom, as became a young gen-
tleman of his dignified expectations, to inquire after
the health of his “diminutive relation.” He always
brought some trifling token of his regard, as he
expressed it, in the shape of cups and spoons and
coral beads, as though Sedley had been a new-born
babe. Sometimes his benevolence took the form
of sugar-plums; and once he went so far as to send
up, with his compliments and a radiant smile, a
delicious “veal and ham pie,’a delicacy of which
he himself was passionately fond, but which was
hardly relished by Sedley in his state of health.
The little boy and his mother laughed a good deal
204 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

over Cousin Chadwick’s oddities, particularly at his
queer notion of never coming into the house, be-
cause he had once seen Mrs. Hamilton looking out
of an upstairs window, and afterwards declared she
was the prettiest lady he had ever seen, and was,
therefore, afraid of her. He was always afraid of
ladies, but especially of the pretty ones, because, he
had explained, “they do make a fellow’s heart go
up and down like a churn-dasher, and that’s so
deuced awkward and uncomfortable, don’t you
know!”

The only person who did not come to ask about
Sedley, and whom the child really longed to see,
was Uncle Trundlewood. He often spoke of that
amusing game of chess, and hoped he would soon
be well enough to go and play another game. He
missed the strange companionship that had sprung
up between him and the old man; and he thought
a good deal about him in silence, — but not half so
much as Mr. Trundlewood thought of him!

The old man had watched with breathless anxiety
for the passing away of the shadow that had hung
over the young life. No one knew how eagerly he had
waited each night and each morning for the coming
of the doctor, who reported in person the condition
of the boy. No-one guessed how, under his stern,
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 205.

indifferent exterior, his heart was wrung with an-
guish. On that night when the little boy had lain
so ill, and there had been so little hope of his re-
covery, he had almost thrown away his pride and
hatred and gone himself to the cottage, only to
touch the little hand that had so often rested on his
indifferent one. But his old jealousy, and the hard
feelings he had harbored towards the young mother
for so many years, were too strong to admit of that
first generous impulse, and even a great fear and
sorrow were not sufficient to reconcile him. But
Mr. Trundlewood had never before been tempted
to act generously; he had never felt for any one
as he felt for this child, who had unconsciously
found the way to his heart; he had never before
had occasion to question the justice or injustice of
his own deeds; and it was not surprising that with
a nature so warped and withered as his was, even
the dread of losing the child had been powerless
to turn him suddenly and completely. Yet he was
softened, and his heart was touched; and. although
no message came from him to the Little House,
nor any word of sympathy or affection, he was wait-
ing yearningly for the time when the boy could .
come to him again, and he could show the genuine
affection he was beginning to feel for him.
206 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

Do you wonder that a little boy like Sedley was
able to call out the better side of a stern cold
nature like that of old Mr. Trundlewood, when no
one else had ever done so before? Perhaps it was
because he was grown old and weak, and felt more
the need of something to cling to, — perhaps it was
because he was grown old and wise, and saw the
folly and emptiness of his selfish and loveless life.
No one can say, for that is one of 'God’s myste-
ries, which can no more be understood than the
rising and ebbing of the tide, or the rushing and
quelling of the tempest. But there were times
when this old man had felt a certain awe in the
presence of that childish, trusting face, and felt that
the soft, confiding little hand might be the means
of leading him to better and brighter things, as the
angels, in days of old, had taken men by the hand
and led them away from the City of Destruction. _
CHAPTER XVI. _

UT there was one person who
made note, and with no small
degree of indignation, of Mr.
Trundlewood’s unfeeling be-
havior, and whose spirit was
so roused by the fact, that

every night as she addressed herself to her bed-

posts she threatened to do something desperate.

It was the fair Beckie. She could not understand

how any creature, not to mention “the most raven-



ous of vampires,” could be so stony-hearted as never
‘to take the least notice of a sweet, suffering, patient
child like her darling master! and a child “that
‘pears so fond o’ his uncle, too, and talks about him
continual, and wonders when Uncle Trundlewood
may come’ to see him!” Rebecca never failed to
pause in the midst of whatever occupation she was
engaged in to shake her fist energetically at some
invisible monster, every time that gentleman’s name
was mentioned. The sense of his injustice rankled
208 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

in her loyal breast; and although she had seen Mr.
Trundlewood but twice in her life, and knew very
little of him, except what she heard from Mr. Boggs
and from Master Sedley, who sang his praises inces-
santly, she had come to regard him as her natural
enemy.
She had often said to Mr. Boggs that she would
like to settle him, and give him a piece of her mind,
if she ever met him, and Mr. Boggs had opened
wide his eyes at the mere mention of such audacity.
But the time came when little Beckie’s patience
was quite exhausted; and as the opportunity for
meeting Mr. Trundlewood was not forthcoming, she
formed the bold resolve of going to see him herself.
One bright afternoon, when the little invalid was
sleeping and Mrs. Hamilton was quietly reading at
his window, Beckie tied on her neatest apron and
her smartest white cap, and with a look of defiance
in her snapping eyes, made her silent exit from the
Little House. Her step was singularly brisk, and
her attire unusually trim -and neat; everything
about her was expressive of daring determination.
She tripped lightly down the street, gathering
courage as she went, and hoping she would meet
no one she knew, lest her mind might be turned
from her great project. In less than an hour’s time
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 209

she had reached the big stone mansion in Belgrave
Square, and effected an entrance into the servants’
part of the house. Mrs. Collins received her cor-
dially, and would have had her sit down and rest,
but Rebecca could not think of it; she must see
Mr. Trundlewood immediately. Mrs. Collins looked
alarmed.

“T hope it’s no ill news of the little dear?” she
said, with some anxiety.

“It’s about Master Sedley,” replied Beckie, with
a mysterious air, and a pinched expression about
the lips, indicating that she could and would say _
no more. .

She learned from the housekeeper that old Mr.
Trundlewood was upstairs in his room. He had
had a bad spell, and had taken to his bed for several
days; but she thought he might be sitting up at
this time of day. He had been sadly out of humor,
but she would see if he could be troubled.

Mrs. Collins knocked cautiously at the bedroom
door, and the old gentleman growled “ Come in!”
such an uninviting tone of voice, that Beckie gave
a jump and was inclined to beat a retreat then and
there. However, she gave herself one or two final
twitches, and entered.

“Tt’s a young woman, sir,” said the housekeeper,

14
210 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

“who wishes to see you on Master Sedley’s ac-
count;” and not enjoying the neighborhood of the
peevish old man, she quickly retraced her steps
down the hall, leaving poor Beckie to face the
dragon alone, and acquit herself of her daring pur-
pose as best she might.

Mr. Trundlewood looked up from his sofa with
some slight show of interest when. he heard the
child’s name mentioned. But for a second Beckie’s
tongue clung to the roof of her mouth, and her
heart beat violently, as those piercing eyes looked
at her from under their shaggy brows. It was worse
than she had expected. From having been very
warm and red, she turned very white and cold.

“ What do you want?” asked Mr. Trundlewood,
sharply.

_ Beckie swallowed once or twice and winked a
great deal.

“What I want, sir,” replied she, finding her
tongue at last, when the need of it became imper-
ative, — “what I want, and have been a-wanting for
a long time, sir, is to tell you as how I think you’ve
behaved. like a Hottentot to that blessedest, sweetest
of children, Master Sedley, for a dearer, patienter,
prettier child God never made, sir, and I that speaks
ought to know; for I’ve been with him and tended
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 211

him and loved him ever since his first coming from
India, where you might as well have let him be,
alongside o’ all the wild beasts o’ the jungles, sooner
than fetch him here to be deceived and duped and
hurt, and then turned their back upon by them as have
no more feelings or heart in ’em than a porpoise!”

As Beckie fired this volley at the astounded old
man, who raised himself a little on his elbow, and
stared at her in blank amazement, she felt her spirit
rise; and finding that her tongue grew glibber
as she talked, proceeded without waiting for an
interruption. . .

“T’ve been in my lady’s service six years, come
this Michaelmas, sir, and I’ve seen her look and
long and wait for a kind word or message all that
time from you, sir, and never get it; and I’ve seen
my young master grow fond o’ you, and heard him |
praise you as if you was his very Garden Angel, and
speak your name oftener’n any one else’s all through
his ravings and sufferings; and now, as he’s lying
there weak and helpless, never a word comes from
you to know how he does, when every one in the
district’s been, most, even to that mushroom of a
Chadwick, whose heart is as soft as his head, though
praise be for that!”

“Wench!” cried Mr. Trundlewood, glaring at
212 ‘A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

her as if he would hurl the nearest footstool in her
direction. “What do you mean? How dare you
come into my house to insult me?”

“Tt’s not my wish to insult nobody,” resumed
Beckie, quite undaunted by the old. man’s threaten-
ing look, for she saw at a glance that he was com-
pletely at her mercy; the upper halls were deserted,
the bell-rope was beyond his reach, and she knew he
was too weak to walk to it, “but only to make ’em
see the rights and wrongs of things, and because I
can’t a-bear to see such treatment o’ the hinnocent!”

“Leave the room, you impudent hussy!” cried
the old gentleman in a fine rage, and making a grab
at his walking-stick.

“Not till I’ve had my say out, sir,’ retorted
_ Beckie, warming up to her subject, and waxing
rosier and prettier the saucier she grew. “I may
be a hussy, and I may be a wench, sir,” she went on,
punctuating each sentence with a jerk of her head,
“but I’m not a marble-figur, thank goodness, as can
stand by and see my tender lamb of a child crying
tears as he did only last night because you’d never
sent your love to him through all his illness, as was
caused by what happened in your house!” —and
here she stamped her foot to check a rising sob at the
recollection of Sedley’s grief.
A LITTLE HOUSE IN. PIMLICO, 213

Mr. Trundlewood made several unsuccessful
efforts to raise himself. “Is there no one by?” he
called out, his voice hoarse with anger. “Where
are the servants?”

“T’ll send one up to you, sir, as soon as ever I’m
done; but I’ve one thing more to say, and I think
it’s a mean, cowardly thing, sir, and I’m not the
only one as thinks so, for you to turn your back on
your nearest flesh and blood, after leading ’em to
think you’d do something handsome for them; and
all for no earthly reason, except to ’pear odd-like
and curious. But don’t deceive yourself, sir, it’s not
your guineas my mistress cares about for her nor
Master Sedley, neither. She wasn’t one mite dis-
appointed when you told her as you was going to
make Master Chadwick your heir,—a sweet, fetching |
heir he ll be! Perhaps you thought she’d take on
dreadful, as any other woman would; but she did n't.
She only sets up and smiles placid-like, and says,
‘Never mind, Beckie, don’t fret about it; it’s all for
the best. Mr. Trundlewood has been very kind to
us already, and he has the right to leave his money
to whomever he chooses.’ And so you have, sir,
but it'll do no good where it’s a-going, no more
than it’s done you; for you’ve robbed and deceived
the hinnocent, and may it be a thorn in your grave
as long as ever you lie there!”
214 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

As she uttered this parting shot, the little maid,
with many nods and twitches, backed up towards
the door, and suddenly came in contact with one of
the footmen who came to announce the doctor.

“Drag that hussy out by the hair!” exclaimed
Mr. Trundlewood, purple with rage, “and don’t you
dare to let her enter this house again!”

The man looked at Beckie in mute astonish-
ment, quite at a loss to know just how far to. obey
his master’s orders. But little Beckie relieved him
-of the responsibility of that blood-curdling com-
mand by making a very low courtesy, and promptly
disappearing behind him. She was all of a tremble
when she reached the foot of the stairs, partly at
the degree of indignation to which she had worked
herself up during her onslaught upon Mr. Trundle-
wood, and partly at the recollection of her boldness
in having approached so formidable a person. She
was not without some misgivings as to the probable
consequences of her rash deed, but she tried to jus-
tify herself by affirming frequently on her way home-
ward, that “she had always sazd she would, and now
she had/” She did not speak of her adventure on
her return to the Little House, but she was very
absent-minded and flustered all the rest of that
day, and Mrs. Hamilton noticed that there was an










“The man looked at Beckie in. mute astonishment.”

A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 217

unusual jerkiness and vivacity about her move-
ments, and that she talked to herself a great deal. .

By the time evening came, the fact of having
“relieved her mind to Mr. Trundlewood”” became
such an oppressive burden that she was obliged to
confess to Mr. Boggs.

“ Bec-kie!” ejaculated that terrified gentleman,
when she related the circumstance, “you don’t
mean to say as you made so bold as to stand up
and talk that fearless-like !”

“Yes, I did,” rejoined Beckie, not a bit comforted
by his serious and awed expression.

“ How ever did you dare, Beckie?”

“I don’t know ow I dared, but I dared, and
there ’s an end of it!” And she devoutly wished
that it might be the end of it, though she had some
doubts. “He can’t give me notice to leave, for I’m
not in his service: and if he makes my mistress do
it, then oh! oh!” and she held up her hands, and
forgot her courage to the extent of bursting into
tears.

“ Then, you ’ve got me, Beckie,” said Mr. Boggs,
soothingly. ;

“Oh, yes, I’ve got you, Martin; but do you
think I could abide being chased away from that
precious child and my dear mistress as though I’d
218. A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO:

been: a-thieving ’em and a-murdering ’em instead of
loving em with all my heart and soul and body!
Oh, oh, I could n’t part with ’em now; not now,
when my precious lamb is getting to be like his
own dear self again!”

“No, no, Beckie; I don’t think your mistress ’ud
let you go save o’ your own free will; though like as
not she'll upbraid you a bit for what you’ve done,
particular, too, when she knows as how the old gov-
ernor was suffering when you pounced on him.”

“ Well, upbraidin’ don’t do anybody any hurt, —
at least, it don’t tear the heart right out of one, as
parting from folks you love does. And I hope she
may upbraid; for itll make me feel a heap better
about it,” said Beckie, who began to feel pangs of
contrition at the recollection of her misdeed: For
she was altogether too kind-hearted a little creature,
in spite of her sharp tongue, not to think remorse-
fully of the advantage she had taken of the. ailing
and helpless old man.

Mr. Trundlewood’s physician found his patient
in a very perturbed state of mind when he entered.
The old man’s pulse was beating uncommonly fast,
and his nerves were badly shaken.. But he gave nlo
reason for the real cause of his excitement. In fact,
his anger soon subsided under the cool, quiet touch
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 219

of the doctors hand, and the calm, sympathetic
tone of his voice brought a more soothing influence
than all the medicine he prescribed.

It was only in the evening, when Mrs. Collins
came into the room with Mr. Trundlewood’s gruel,
that he referred to the little maid’s visit. ‘“ Who is
that impertinent hussy you brought here this after-
noon?” he inquired savagely.

“If you please, sir, it’s the house-servant at the
Little House in Warwick Street; it’s Master

Sedley’s nursemaid, sir.”
" * «Don’t you ever let the creature enter this house
again, —do you hear me?”

“Yes, sir,” replied Mrs. Collins, trembling, as she
handed him the gruel.

“ Are my servants a pack of fools, that anybody
is to enter here who will, and that I’m to be insulted
_in my own house by a bold-faced jade?”

Mrs. Collins looked horrified and hung down her
head, feeling that somehow she was the one to
blame.

“I'll turn the whole gang of you out of doors,
and: find those who can earn their wages better!”
and then Mr. Trundlewood swallowed his meal in
sullen silence.

Mrs. Collins stood at the foot of the bed with her:
220 _A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

hands meekly folded, not venturing to offer any
apology. She knew.that when her master was out
of temper it was better to be silent in his presence.

“Has the boy been wanting for anything?” he
asked abruptly, when he had finished eating. “I’ve
sent money there by Binkle, as usual.”

“No, sir, I think the little lad’s been wanting for
nothing; everybody’s been heavenly kind to him,
as he well deserves, he’s such a winning little
creature!”

“Tell James to have a dozen bottles of that
old port sent him to-morrow, and anything else
you ’ve got in the house that’s good for him!” and
Mr. Trundlewood turned over in his bed for the
night, not to sleep, for it was early morning before
he closed his eyes, but to think, and ponder, over
certain of little Beckie’s words that troubled him.
CHAPTER XVII.

HE next morning, little
Beckie’s mind was relieved
of a great load of anxiety
by the arrival of a case
of choice wine from Mr.

Trundlewood’s cellars, as well as many other dain-
ties from the big house, to hasten Master Sedley’s
recovery; but better than this came also a note to
the little boy, written in his uncle’s own unsteady
hand, sending his love and expressing a wish to
see him as soon as he was well enough to walk
abroad. He wrote that he had been too ill him-
self to come to see the boy; but he had had news
of him every day from the doctor, and hoped he
still continued to do well.

These few words had quite as much to do with
Sedley’s getting well, perhaps, as Mr. Trundlewood’s
_rich-colored port. Ina very short time he began to
sit up, and the little arm was taken out of its sling,
and he looked forward with eager pleasure to going


222 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. |

again to the big house, having no distinct or un-
pleasant recollection of what had happened when he
was there last. But he seemed to remember the
queer little chessmen very well, and hoped his
uncle would be able to have that other game with
him some time soon.

“Several weeks passed, and it was the middle of
July. It was one of those mild, beautiful days of
English summer when the sun’s rays seem to flood
all things living with new life; when the ascending
banks of the gracefully curving Thames are brilliant
with dense verdure and gay flowers, and the flow of
the old river is gentler, and its waters bluer beneath
the gray arching bridges, seeming to bring with |
them a reflection of the radiant fields and meadows
through which they have passed,— when the tall
grim giants of the city towering above all around
them sparkle and glisten like gold as the descend-
ing sunlight touches their peaks! It was a day
like this, when everything without breathed of life
and joy, that little Sedley returned for the first
time since his illness to the dreary, cheerless home
of his Uncle Trundlewood. The house was drearier
and gloomier than ever now, not only in contrast
with the beautifully smiling world outside, but be-
cause the old man, who had been its ruling spirit,
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 223

lay very ill in his room. Every sound was hushed,
even to the ticking of the clocks, and Sedley was
moved to speak in whispers when he entered the
place ; for even he felt the chill, foreboding silence
that reigned there.

Mr. Trundlewood had not returned to his study
since the night on which the little boy was hurt.
He had been more shocked and disturbed by the
accident than he or any one else suspected. He
was too ailing to go downstairs when he rose the
next morning; but he expected to go back to his
desk on the morrow. Still, one day after another
had passed, and the weeks had grown into months,
and he was finally obliged to take to his bed. No
one saw him but the doctor and his housekeeper,
who was the only person in the entire household
that had the good nature to feel any sympathy for
the peevish, suffering old man, or the patience to
wait upon him. Indeed, I doubt much if there was
any one in the world besides little Sedley who felt any
real sorrow at the thought that Mr. Trundlewood
was nearing his end. Even good Mrs. Collins could
not feel deeply grieved at the sight of a failing old
creature whose whole life had been spent in pursuit
of his own desires and pleasures, who had scarcely
ever had a kind word to give her orany one else,
224 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

who had never felt a strong love for any one but
himself, and who, in spite of his money, had not
a real friend in all the world. Fortunately, Sedley
did not know this, —and perhaps that is why Mr.
Trundlewood had wished to have the little boy near
him during his last moments. It may have been
comforting to the old man, if any remorse or regret
came to him at the last for an ill-spent and unpro-
fitable life, that this child, who knew no ill of him,
and loved and trusted him with ill-deserved sincer-
ity, should be the one to stand beside him, and per-
haps grieve for his loss, as he left a world that held
so little for him now.

When Sedley stood at the bedside of his uncle, -
he was shocked to find so great a change in his ap-
pearance. The old man’s face was thin and drawn,
his eyes were sunken, and had a dull, unnatural look
in them as they rested on the boy.

“T’ve come to stay with you to-night, uncle,”
said he, laying his hand gently on the coverlet and
speaking caressingly. “My mamma said I might,
and we are so very sorry to have you ill. I can’t
tell you how sorry Iam. I was ill, too, for a long
time, and I know just how it is; but I’m quite well
again now, and I ’ll come and take care of you every
time you want me.”
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 225

It had been Mr. Trundlewood’s request that the
child should remain with him during the coming
night. Was it a presentiment that perhaps this
night would be his last; that there was yet some-—
thing left undone which he wanted to do before he
died? He had been unusually quiet through the
day, and slept much; so that when night drew on >
he felt stronger, and his thoughts were clearer than
they had been for many days. Mrs. Collins, who
rested-in an adjoining room, came in every two
hours to administer some medicine, wondered at
this strange freak of her patient, to have that young
child sitting up with him, when there was a house-
ful of servants to relieve her of her watching. But
it did not seem at all strange to little Sedley to find
himself alone with his sick uncle, bringing what-
ever he called for, and soothing him in his own
affectionate way. For he had all his life been ac-
customed to wait on his delicate young mother,
sympathizing with her in her suffering, and that had
taught him to be gentle and thoughtful, so that he
was not at all out of place in a sick-chamber, in
spite of his youth.

He sat beside the low fire, which was kept burn-
ing for the old man, who felt the dreariness of his
great rooms more keenly than ever now, and he

5
226 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

amused himself with looking into the burnt coals
and fancying he saw all sorts of queer-shaped things.
in them. There was only one small lamp burning
very low in the room, and as the bed-curtains were
only partly drawn aside, he could not see his uncle’s
face as it lay propped up against the pillows; he
thought the old man was asleep, and tried to be
very quiet and yet to keep awake, which was rather
a difficult thing to do.

But Mr. Trundlewood was not sleeping; he was
watching the boy closely, — the pretty rounded face
with all its health and rosiness returned, the wide-
open blue eyes with their fringe of black lashes,
which he remembered to have been closed on that
fatal night when he lay so white and still before
him, the very image of death, —and the same yearn-
ing came over him now as it had then, not only to
cling to that simple, trustful creature, but that he
too might live, live a few more years to show the
love he felt and enjoy the tardy fruits of so great a
blessing. As he lay there awake his whole life
seemed to pass before him, his youthful struggles,
his manly successes and prosperity, his ambitious.
hopes, and his present helpless condition, and he
could not but see the emptiness of it all; see it
when it was too late!


A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 227

It must have been very far in the night, for Mrs.
Collins had been in three times with the potion,
and to place a fresh log on the fire, when Sedley
heard his uncle moving. He walked quietly to the
bedside, and saw that the old man was awake.
He had raised himself slightly on his elbow, and
his face wore a strangely excited expression. There
was a keen, eager look in his eyes, and he seemed
for the moment to have regained some of his old
strength and determination. There was in his face
such a restless desire to accomplish something while
this return of vigor was yet upon him, that Sedley
was startled when he came near, and drew back a
little. ;

“Come nearer, my boy,” said the old man, put-
ting out his wasted hand and gently drawing the
child to him; “you are not afraid of me, are you?”

“Oh, dear, no,” said Sedley, reassured by the
kind tones, and coming closer, “only I thought you
had been asleep. I have been keeping very still
so as not to wake you, and when I heard you move
I thought you might be wanting something.”

“IT do want something!” exclaimed the sick man,
earnestly. “Come nearer ;” and he drew the curly
head close to his face and spoke in a hoarse whis-
per. “I haven’t been sleeping. I’ve been think-


228 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

ing; I've been thinking of what I might have done
to make you care more for me.”

“Oh, but I do care for you, uncle, a great deal!”
said the child, not understanding, but anxious to
say something comforting. .

“Not as I wanted you to care for me; not as I
hoped you would some day! But it’s my fault;
I don’t deserve it; I chose the wrong way, and have
behaved like a brute to er; and now I can never
quite make it up. But Ill do what I can; it isn’t
too late to show her I was sorry at the last. Lis-
ten!” and he laid his shaking hand on the boy’s
arm. “You shall be the one to do it; go to that
chest and lift the cover, you will find a key there.
Take it and go to my desk downstairs ; it will open
the secret drawer. You know it, you have seen me
open it. There you will see two rolls of paper tied
with cord; bring them here to me. Move quietly
and quickly; it must be done before any of them
wake!”

Mr. Trundlewood had spoken so hurriedly that
Sedley, who had at first been puzzled by his strange
words, was immediately absorbed in following the
directions given him. Indeed, he was relieved to
have something to do, for he felt a little uncom-
fortable. He did not know his uncle in this strange
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 229

mood. When he had secured the key, he went out
into the hall, and descended the wide staircase.
His little slippered feet made no sound whatever
upon the thick carpets; the house was steeped in
deepest midnight silence. A slight tremor seized
him as he treaded the still, lonely halls on the way
to his uncle’s study. For the first time now, he
recalled vividly the scene of that night when he
had gone there alone. His little hands grew cold,
and his breath came fast; but he went straight on,
with no thought of turning back till his errand was
done. The lights were burning, and he felt reas-
sured when he saw a footman fast asleep in one of
the hall chairs;.for some one had been obliged to
stand in readiness, in case the doctor were needed
in the night.

Little Sedley soon returned to the sick chamber
with the two long rolls.

“Draw the small table near, and pull aside the
curtains,” said the old man, reaching eagerly for the ~
papers. “Now, raise the lamp a trifle, and bring
my pen and ink.”

The little voy obeyed, and Mr. Trundlewood
unfolded both the rolls and examined each with
care. He took up his pen and wrote a few
words at the bottom of one of them in a remark-

tg
230 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

ably clear hand, and dated it some two months
back. Then he tied it up once more and gave it
to Sedlev.

“ Take this and place it just where you found it;
lock the drawer and bring back the key!”

Sedley, quite at a loss to understand the meaning
of these mysterious proceedings, but only too glad
to be able to humor the sick old man, ran down a
second time, put the long roll back in its place, and
returned as swiftly and quietly as before, so that
not a soul in the house stirred, and the sleeping
footman in the hall went on snoring as peaceably
as ever.

The old man was leaning far over towards the
light when Sedley came back to. his bedside; he
held the second roll spread open before him. He
was examining it again to make sure that he had
“made no mistake.

“ Now, throw this into the fire, and see that every
scrap of itis burned to ashes!” he said. And for
-a moment the little boy and the old man looked
silently into the new-made flames as they rose like
pale ghosts and disappeared up the chimney.
Sedley was wondering what it was that his uncle
had been so eager to burn up; and Mr. Trundlewood
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' A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 233

the memory of some of the deeds of his life, as
easily and completely as he had that now meaning-
less sheet! He lay back upon his pillows, quite
weak and exhausted by the effort. Sedley lowered
the light once more, and then stood beside him.
He thought the old man’s face looked more quiet
and peaceful. .

“Do you think you can sleep now, uncle?” he
asked.

“Yes,” was the feeble reply, “I think I will sleep,
perhaps for a long time.” Then, after a pause:
“Lay your head down and let me feel your face
near mine, and try always to think engl of a
wretched old man!”

Sedley leaned over and kissed the withered
face; he was quite affected by his uncle's gentle-
ness. His heart swelled, and two large tears rolled
down from the blue eyes, and fell on the old man’s
cheek. It was thé last thing Uncle Trundlewood
ever felt, and perhaps the sweetest thing he had
ever known in all his life, — those two silent tears,
overflowing from the sympathy of a warm, innocent
young heart!

Presently, Sedley saw that his uncle was resting
quietly, and returned to his arm-chair. He stirred
the dry wood in the hearth, for it was growing to
234 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

be the chilliest hour of the morning, and the yellow
flames lighted up the big room for a minute and
then died out again. In spite of his efforts to keep
awake, the little boy’s head fell back against the
cushion. The deep silence, the gentle soothing
warmth of the hearth, had a drowsy effect upon him,
and soon the blue eyes closed, and he fell into a
deep sleep.

When the’ first faint streaks of early morning
entered slowly at the half-curtained window, and
chased away the shadows of the night, they fell
upon a strange sight in the great silent room! An
old man with motionless and pallid features, lying
with his head turned a little to the light, and his
hands crossed upon his breast,— the pitiful remnant
of a worn-out and bootless life; and near him, in
the deep arm-chair, a beautiful sleeping child, with
bright hair falling loosely about his neck, and rosy
rounded cheeks, and warm, moist dimples, —a soft,
living, breathing creature, in the full flush of health
and youth; the very symbol of Life, as it lay there
side by side with Death!
CHAPTER XVIII.

EVERAL days later, when Mr.
Trundlewood’s will was read, there
was a motley gathering of near
and distant relatives assembled in
the sombre study in which the old
man had been wont to spend his
solitary days; persons who had

not been inside the great house for a score of years,

and some who had never entered it at all; every
one who had the slightest claim upon, or connec-
tion with. Mr. Trundlewood, except little Sedley
and his mother, was present, not without some
secret, hope that the eccentric old man might
have made some startling revelation in his will,
to his or her advantage. . But the person who had
the best reasons. to be eager, and who was re-
garded by all the relatives with a certain mixture
of awe and envy, was young Chadwick, who already
moved about the establishment with a satisfied and
provoking air of proprietorship, and as Little Beckie


236 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

would have expressed it, “prying about with his
nose in the air, like an expectant giraffe.”

The lawyer, Mr. Binkle, was there, of course, feel-
ing sure that he knew very well who would be dis-
appointed and who would not before
the day was over; for he had always
known all of Mr. Trundlewood’s affairs,
— better than that old gentleman him-
self, he sometimes thought,— and he
was particularly silent and grave in his
“manner toward the supposed heir, who
was himself in such a cheerful state of
mind that he was benevolently dis-
posed toward everybody, even the dis-
tant and forbidding Mr. Binkle.

But when the lawyer opened the
well-known drawer, and read the con-
tents of the will found there before the
assembled company, he was quite as
much surprised as any of them to dis-

cover that it was the first document he had drawn up,
nearly a year ago, in which Mr. Trundlewood left all
his property, with the exception of a few small lega-
cies to near relatives, to George Douglass Sedley
Hamilton. The lawyer knew that there had been a
later will in which young Chadwick’s name had


A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 237

been substituted for. Sedley’s; but that was no-
where to be found. And when he came to the cod-
icil at the foot of the document, bearing so recent
a date, in which the old man left a large annuity
to Sedley’s mother, “the widow of my beloved
nephew, George Douglass Hamilton,” with a desire
that she should assume the position of mistress of
his house as guardian of the boy, it was very clear
that Mr. Trundlewood had changed his mind in
regard to the distant cousin, and had himself de-
stroyed the later testament.
Every one was greatly surprised; some few were
disappointed ; but nearly all were pleased, when
they found that the handsome little boy, who was
really the old man’s most natural heir, was to be
the possessor of the large fortune and magnificent
‘estates, after all... Cousin Chadwick, whose face had
been as blank as an eight-day clock, when he had
learned the final decision, and found himself cut
off without a shilling, was the very first to present
his congratulations to little Sedley. For he was
too simple-minded a youth to feel any jealousy
- toward his young relative; and.even the few nearer
relatives who had come in for offensive legacies of
a hundred pounds each, set aside their own disap-
pointment and heartily wished the little boy well.
238 A LITTLE HOUSE IN: PIMLICO.

The young mother was greatly touched when
she heard of Mr. Trundlewood’s change of feeling
towards her, as expressed in his last wishes, and
she could not but feel with a grateful heart that
her little Sedley had had much to do with bringing
this about. She took the child on her lap that
evening, and told him in simple words what his
uncle had done for them; how he had trusted to
their wisdom and generosity in. leaving his fortune
to them, and how it must ever be their duty to make
a just and careful use of it; how there were others
who had claims upon Mr. Trundlewood, and who
must be provided for; and they agreed together
that Cousin Chadwick, and others who were poor,
should have a generous share in the little boy’s good |
fortune. “ For, Sedley,” she said, looking at him
with sweet seriousness, “I wish my little boy to be
always as kind, as thoughtful of others, as he is now;
that possessing a fortune may not close his heart
to the needs and sufferings of those about him.
Money is a great and useful thing, dear, and Iam
glad that now you will never feel the bitter need
of it. But too much is often a great temptation,
and unless a wise and good use is made of it, it ‘is
apt to prove a fatal blight instead of a nBreoe and
powerful blessing!”
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. 239

There were many others who rejoiced at the unex-
pected turn events had taken for the little boy and
his mother. The entire Pimlico neighborhood was
in a fever of excitement over it, and could talk of
nothing else, demanding emphatically, “Who would
ever have dreamed of such a thing as that crotchety
old man Trundlewood,” as he was commonly spoken
of among them, “doing the right thing by owning
that sweet young woman at the last?” :

But the one person in Pimlico who, I think, was
made happiest was our good friend Mr. Boggs; not
only on account of the great good fortune which
had befallen little Sedley and his mamma, the two
creatures whom he loved and respected next to but
_one in the world, but because their good fortune
brought the prospect of his own happiness all the
nearer. Now, indeed, Beckie would have no ex-
cuse for making him wait; for Mrs. Hamilton and
Sedley were to occupy the big house and would be
safe in the care of good Mrs. Collins, who was the
only person to whom Beckie could ever have
thought of confiding them; and she would be so
near, and could see them so often, that the thought
of parting left no bitter regret in her heart.

So it was arranged that little Beckie and Mr.
Boggs should be married that summer; and as
240 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

pretty and happy as a rose-tree in the sunshine was
Beckie on her wedding-day. The Pimlico world
was in such fine spirits that it quite approved of the
match; for every one agreed that Mr. Boggs was
the “salt of the earth,” and while some said that -
Beckie was certainly the “pepper of it,” it was the
general opinion that they were well mated.

After Mr. Trundlewood’s affairs had been set-
tled, the gloomy old mansion in Belgrave Square
was closed for a time, and by the advice of Mr.
Binkle, who became their friend and counsellor,
Sedley and his mother went to spend the summer
at the pretty country-house, accompanied by the
housekeeper and Mr. James and Mary, the house-
maid, who all felt, as they turned their backs upon
the old house, which had been to them like a very
Tower of London for dreariness and awe of their
old master, as if a reign of peace and plenty were
“surely come, now that this lovely boy and gentle
lady were to rule over them.

- They started off on a warm August day, when
it is indeed a pleasure to leave behind the hot
smoky city for the fresh pure air of the fields and
meadows. Little Sedley and his mamma were very
happy as they rode away in the sumptuous carriage,
behind the spirited horses, which were his delight,
A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. - 241

and feasted their eyes‘ upon the varied beauty of
the surrounding country, —the tall meadow-grass
gently swelling at the light touch of the summer
wind, —the fields all yellow with buttercups, and
bright poppies peeping along their dark furrows;
the pleasant uplands, and wooded hills in the dis-
tance; the miles upon miles of dark-green hedge-
rows, and broken lines of cottages with their
thatched roofs, and clusters of golden ricks, where
the fragrant hawthorn and the tall red sorrel and
white hemlock grow in luxurious confusion along
the bushy paths; and the picturesque villages,
and handsome villas, and the dark, gently curving
river winding in and out the richly undulating
district !
_ The country-house was no less a surprise and
delight to them than the journey that led thither
had been. It was a fine old place of red brick,
softened down by a growth of pale gray lichens ©
that spread themselves in lacy irregularity all over
the outer walls; with tall gray gables and quaint
oriel windows, and surrounded by an immense park,
where beautiful deer were feeding, and where the.
cool shade of the limes and beeches, and silver-
stemmed birches, and sturdy oaks, and the healthy

‘scent of the firs offered the sweetest and most
16
242 A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO.

peaceful welcome that one*could wish for after a
long journey on a hot summer’s day.

“Oh, Sedley, dear, it is a beautiful place!” said
the young mother, as they paused a moment in
front of the great door, before entering. “I can
hardly believe it is all to be ours!”

“ Yes, mother dear, it is ours,” said Sedley, releas-
ing his hold of the big watch-dog’s neck, with whom
he had been making friends, and coming to stand
near her. “And was not my Uncle Trundlewood
a good kind uncle to give us so much to make us
happy?” .

“Oh, yes, dear, very kind and good,” said she, in-
wardly grateful that she had never given the child
cause to judge him otherwise.

As for the Little House in Pimlico, it is now
quite deserted. Its windows are closed, and its
steps moss-grown ; no sounds are heard from within
its walls, and the neighbors miss the happy face of
the little boy and the sweet smile of the mother that
used to greet them when they passed,—even the
little spring birds, that were wont to build their
nests beneath its eaves, seem to have fled from the
loneliness that dwells there. But there is a rumor,
and I think it is well grounded, that when Mr.


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“Oh, Sedley, dear, it is a beautiful place! ”


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A LITTLE HOUSE IN PIMLICO. | 245

Boggs, who is now a beaming and happy man, has
made his fortune and retired from business, which
he thinks will not be very far off, — he and his
pretty black-eyed Beckie are to take possession of
the Little House, and spend the rest of their happy
lives there, in the home which they have both
learned to love, because of the little child and the
gentle mother who once made its gloominess bright.


By Miss MARGUERITE BOUVET.

Pierrette. Illustrated by Will Phillip Hooper. Small 4to. $1.25,

It is a charming little French story of the temptation, the victory, and the beneficent .
result thereof of a French sewing woman and her little daughter, and these simple
materials are handled so delicately and attractively that the book possesses an unusual
charm. _It is pleasantly illustrated. — Congregationalist, Boston.

A Child of Tuscany. Illustrated by Will Phillip Hooper. Small
4to. $1.50.

It is a winsome tale of a Florentine peasant boy, a cheerful, unselfish little fellow,
who was lost when very young but was restored to his family eventually. The author,
who is unusually skilful in portraying child life, may fairly be said to rank with Mrs.
Burnett as a writer of wholesome, charming juvenile stories. — Public Opinion, New
York.

My Lady: A Story of Long Ago. Illustrated by Helen Mait-
land Armstrong. 16mo. $1.25.
The author of ‘‘ Sweet William” has but to write, and she is read. There is no
more universally beloved volume in the children’s library, and none with more reason.

“My Lady,” a tender love story, is as charming as anything she has ever written....
It is exquisite. — The Chicago Herald.

Sweet William. Illustrated by Helen and Margaret Armstrong.
Eleventh thousand. Small 4to. $41.50.
It is told with a grace of style that has not been surpassed in any of the juvenile
fiction of the year. ‘‘ Sweet William” is a charming little figure. The author has

given her story a marked individuality that must ensure it wide popularity. — The
Boston Advertiser.

Little Marjorie’s Love Story. Illustrated by Helen Maitland

Armstrong. Fifth thousand. Small 4to. $1.00.

It is one of the most fascinating tales for children of the season. ... The beauty
and pathos of the story are touching, and the delicate way in which the characteristics
of the one child are contrasted with those of the other is as skilful as the manage-
ment of the lights and shadows in an artistic picture. The illustrations by Miss Arm-

strong, it is needless to say, are exquisite, and the typography is a delight to the eye.
— The Philadelphia Press.

Prince Tip Top: A Fairy Tale. With numerous illustrations
by Helen M. Armstrong. Fourth thousand. Small 4to. $1.00.

It is a charming little fairy story. . .. Little folk will enjoy the tale hugely, and it
will do them no harm. .The style is simple and engaging, and the illustrations are all
conceived in the spirit of the text, and daintily sxeeue — The Commercial A dver-
tiser, New York.

For sale by booksellers generally, or will be sent, post-
paid, on receipt of price, by the publishers,

A. C. McCLURG & CO., CHICAGO.
By Miss ELIZABETH S. KIRKLAND.
A Short History of Italy. 12mo. 475 pages. $1.25.

The general reader will find in this book perhaps the best complete account of the
events that have occurred in that peninsula whose priceless contributions to the world’s
civilization make its history of perennial interest. — Ze Dzat, Chicago.

. Itis not a successive series of battles and descriptions of rulers, or dates of events,
but ‘an epitome of the spirit of the nation, with leaders in the front, the people as a
background, and the whole a beautiful picture. — Jter-Ocean, Chicago.

A Short History of English Literature for Young People.
With eleven portraits. 12mo. 398 pages. $1.50.

No better book could be placed in the hands of an intelligent boy or girl, as an
introduction to a primary knowledge of the subject to which it is devoted. Miss Kirk-
land is to be complimented and congratulated on the skill and judgment with which
she has performed her difficult task. — Boston Gazette.

The story of English literature has rarely been more delightfully told than in
these pages. — Fournal of Education. :

A Short History ‘of England for Young People. 12mo. 415
pages. $1.25.

“A Short History of England”? is never trite, never dull; while its brief explana-
tions of intricate systems—as, for example, the feudal system — and of great move-
ments — such as the developments which led to the Restoration — are almost flawlessly
clear. — The Evangelist, New York.

It strikes the line between history and chronicle very happily. It is critical
enough, without being so critical as to destroy the romantic glow of history which is
so dear (and really so valuable) to'a young reader. — The Independent, New York.

A Short History of France for Young People. 12mo. 398
pages. $1.25.

Miss Kirkland has admirably succeeded in her “Short History of France,” in
making a book both instructive and entertaining. It is not a dry compendium of dates
and facts, but a charmingly written history. — The Christian Union, New York.

The little history may be commended as the best of its kind that has yet appeared.
— Philadelphia Bulletin.

Six Little Cooks ; or, Aunt Jane’s Cooking Class. 12mo.
236 pages. 75 cents.

A lucky stroke of genius, because it is a good thing well done. Tt has the charm
of a bright story of real life, and is a useful essay on cooking. — The Times, N.Y.

Dora’s Housekeeping. 12mo. 275 pages. 75 cents.

_ .We cordially recommend these two books (“ Dora’s: Housekeeping? and ‘Six
Little Cooks’) as containing almost the whole gospel of domestic economy. — The
Nation, New York. oe :

Speech and Manners for Home and School. 12mo. 263 pages.

75 cents.

The author’s theory of manners and of speech is good. Her modest manual might
be read, re-read, and read again with great advantage in most American families. —
The Independent, New York.

For sale by booksellers generally, or will be sent, post-
paid, on receipt of price, by the publishers,

A. C. MeCLURG & CO., CHICAGO.






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'2012-01-15T04:27:24-05:00'
describe
'44591' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOFS' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
bc58f944f0a9d3899dfab910a084256d
e60149459f8ff57e6ce4a7462ee8f70b0cdb4b56
'2012-01-15T04:24:35-05:00'
describe
'3371280' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOFT' 'sip-files00012.tif'
7551929286b691f3322c7d232f812d17
57a3ba5ab3941f31fa5b69e49b261bcc29f84c56
'2012-01-15T04:31:19-05:00'
describe
'131' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOFU' 'sip-files00012.txt'
0ed03094932e623729a731aea8d4d3a9
0a8c9919110894b8516cbf68b586d832a3cec034
'2012-01-15T04:24:20-05:00'
describe
'19932' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOFV' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
3ce835bbd6546e014ca0300818f6b41e
390cb6ca123d7b73b6f10fe34470201cf226d10d
'2012-01-15T04:25:15-05:00'
describe
'419897' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOFW' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
21f4ca5d40f7ac7f21980f8ea3a8feba
b8422550e6dd0ddb1753a84078ceed6f52ec18f6
'2012-01-15T04:28:53-05:00'
describe
'121958' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOFX' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
bb9ee85bf36ae5e200c66cde5f1ce323
8896d206a7c2a3b7b03f837590dca1a9b11b5dfa
'2012-01-15T04:23:54-05:00'
describe
'3096' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOFY' 'sip-files00013.pro'
682b191ea646ebb7ff7147a381ebfbfe
0dfd9ef8e4d0c91ffee50679ce91086749f8cf63
'2012-01-15T04:25:09-05:00'
describe
'45683' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOFZ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
84340c570828ac2fc291a7cc134d9a9f
0af040a3dc9866df324bf59afad5e1247e2289bb
'2012-01-15T04:25:59-05:00'
describe
'3372468' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGA' 'sip-files00013.tif'
44b5c036e7fef1f6f0605a3a9d55b4fb
fa841154ff9360733b110e870422670b3a03ed35
'2012-01-15T04:25:55-05:00'
describe
'176' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGB' 'sip-files00013.txt'
69736d303eaca224c2d2fc1c6b51bb9d
214d497cd93d1dcb48901a28a0c2727c72861c9e
'2012-01-15T04:26:07-05:00'
describe
'21890' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGC' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
6fa9f8eb7d312a9df405c8e77c74702f
d977c0c871ea51143a12913863b009dd10a3530c
'2012-01-15T04:28:10-05:00'
describe
'135942' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGD' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
9762ce41fa6d0d937888e8b026045487
9aebe92054d1b6293b5ec3647711393e07d7672c
'2012-01-15T04:30:32-05:00'
describe
'24724' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGE' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
d3b4b95bff2d4e6a0c704fbb5712375e
4a229a70157752d1cfeaf0db13d96e3d07e7e67c
'2012-01-15T04:30:18-05:00'
describe
'2782' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGF' 'sip-files00015.pro'
ca02baee3b7b9e25bfbc3635fbc4628c
b3ced7db1dbd8ed4d8bbefb10aaa1bfa1033c7bb
describe
'14077' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGG' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
cff2becdd04b4f4a4422bcf936405293
83406e592b46d730b0865bfdb21013e526e8cd17
'2012-01-15T04:26:10-05:00'
describe
'3367600' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGH' 'sip-files00015.tif'
f296af6582544a8fd0b2732fe89f20b7
0375866f8301e9af0a9942c2abcd7da64e0804c1
'2012-01-15T04:31:12-05:00'
describe
'201' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGI' 'sip-files00015.txt'
109fe5ab8a717cf14ccadceb38cff259
e968d20a06984e79ecc100bf9e3b5f213e822a0d
'2012-01-15T04:24:41-05:00'
describe
'10062' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGJ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
6dbd3a425cf304c412a04401add262ec
b32c13471740de907ba1dd7e041daef8d943a3eb
describe
'419726' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGK' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
255f9a324560987d4d8696e74f71c9dd
b0906e8daa22006ce64dcc562d493753041308cd
'2012-01-15T04:24:33-05:00'
describe
'100915' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGL' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
d71d252481ad7adf140c90d34c97e7f4
c82b6cf7e3be9fc9152db5552c35447a6bf06229
'2012-01-15T04:30:16-05:00'
describe
'31105' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGM' 'sip-files00017.pro'
f4caf8f19f7595a992be898f7c87fa03
4fffbf8cd172f8246521def82122b9578709e28c
'2012-01-15T04:30:05-05:00'
describe
'41389' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGN' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
d2639dbb3ee93f33a09a3f8b7a4f7ecc
14bad0bce9515a67685e7d80e36282b6d47eb8d5
'2012-01-15T04:24:52-05:00'
describe
'3370668' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGO' 'sip-files00017.tif'
35b427596e83aed7aac926ade1d08fb9
906d014ad435c82ce55e7788a815482a52ccfb8d
'2012-01-15T04:27:28-05:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGP' 'sip-files00017.txt'
500be78c79d08c74b87e4c1a4d6fee19
356694d29c2b3b9187c4e3b7972ae74e5e17af70
'2012-01-15T04:27:00-05:00'
describe
'18596' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGQ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
d123e3d739cd20ba8e2d938418f7889d
563bfdcd6b74db03f016e3bf8ed78a5d6cad2064
'2012-01-15T04:29:37-05:00'
describe
'419905' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGR' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
113d7215ad1c24c43678354967fa3902
d42205fa47ac391d77aaa3691e5809c8277fc4a7
'2012-01-15T04:29:14-05:00'
describe
'116028' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGS' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
ac21ecd45b28d3d81426d3d7c1660744
012ccb5058215da68d9e17ad42f6dd91691d1b60
describe
'21402' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGT' 'sip-files00019.pro'
7bdf0fa7d4697afcb8cd96d14d7c7b09
aca45c0ac65a6db9d7f17db2e6f3316a80b0618a
'2012-01-15T04:24:04-05:00'
describe
'46553' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGU' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
0d0968324b673618a2c7a7f32541aa62
dffdd7e3d7cc8c33d7b409fff172aa317e909966
'2012-01-15T04:28:34-05:00'
describe
'3371120' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGV' 'sip-files00019.tif'
066c5e56805ebcf56946655f862f6661
66161f3f2d08b061ac8b6738ad9d6f45a1d145e7
'2012-01-15T04:25:07-05:00'
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGW' 'sip-files00019.txt'
ec4437df1f0926e672fa9d88d2733cf3
fd86b7df0a230b910dd2559894b7b64b9e94d84d
'2012-01-15T04:25:35-05:00'
describe
'19510' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGX' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
79da6f61220b856e9c0faf0974ec79d2
acd4231c2a803da80f657956bbe04ee0fb630067
'2012-01-15T04:30:45-05:00'
describe
'419901' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGY' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
7221e2f5aa987511b51da8b00005dfb3
98afdd38790136a52e71f5a9fcfeb89e7969ed90
'2012-01-15T04:23:56-05:00'
describe
'150678' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOGZ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
318acd616eb7238e212d2069426a20a2
1c8fa66b250fb0422e66795d1bd41d6a249e4236
'2012-01-15T04:27:56-05:00'
describe
'34259' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHA' 'sip-files00020.pro'
cefce7da47752d3b84514d43c744c879
cc2e5da672481c120e4e35e28fa93ffdd12bc760
'2012-01-15T04:26:22-05:00'
describe
'58601' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHB' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ad7ac30dd3f7dcfc6559c98b82c75a70
8c31719bd38ef8e23d0d44dcf5e4136f66368bb3
'2012-01-15T04:30:09-05:00'
describe
'3372092' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHC' 'sip-files00020.tif'
75893dc5840c4d0189bd4e05ecf260c8
19c6a68ddc158c3a9cf54280190c92f5ef53750d
'2012-01-15T04:27:21-05:00'
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHD' 'sip-files00020.txt'
6df2a4375c1fc41e0b5e9802d7504cc0
4adffd4e926304cdbb46b86d43f6081da121c294
describe
'22959' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHE' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
463f4e713f8c5826a3cb99601725bfd3
85aa9e58ac4651d064a98a96f031a81766092190
'2012-01-15T04:30:07-05:00'
describe
'419922' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHF' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
7360c9f5469ac1f15717f53522261837
c7800150c21920f58ef6c93ee399ee17d1be69de
'2012-01-15T04:28:31-05:00'
describe
'150644' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHG' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
fd7e62fd5c6172e6312860533f631eb5
0500e6522ccec5d6824d372343ba6b8585ede6b0
'2012-01-15T04:25:04-05:00'
describe
'33851' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHH' 'sip-files00021.pro'
fa351d018f04d1788f8ce8e0fe0693f7
b3068387c39216c39efee33bab3c340889aef0f2
'2012-01-15T04:25:46-05:00'
describe
'57613' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHI' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
17d5ff53a0a1dca3a2aeefc29d2f1c4b
dffc9f08a2197fc483d72422965c2c0c69a27c92
'2012-01-15T04:31:23-05:00'
describe
'3372008' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHJ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
780d2b30a28255ca28081bd2181ec307
5aeff60dcc82751571df20bf50e7e26c2eed7957
'2012-01-15T04:29:31-05:00'
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHK' 'sip-files00021.txt'
a4f0c7213455bfc7b62e32d239874b1f
92e61040be3f71ca2c4f5c00a64c5cf5eb659f69
'2012-01-15T04:31:41-05:00'
describe
'22720' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHL' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
31650306c34ad09585d791c667794ff1
54279b519d8896313dcf861676c379925667a2d1
describe
'419927' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHM' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
626cf3e2a449dbf15573919af084440f
e76474b63291dc9a2a9fa44900eb06af71f86b33
'2012-01-15T04:25:38-05:00'
describe
'147821' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHN' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
9d99b4809505ac75d92cd0d976b10cf3
fd27dd022f132f708cb54dc874e529bb332f7ca2
'2012-01-15T04:32:19-05:00'
describe
'35172' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHO' 'sip-files00022.pro'
0aaca65cfa46c59907be733fd37a3678
5436f6d631c3852b51b69e49701b7570886ebd03
'2012-01-15T04:24:12-05:00'
describe
'57181' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHP' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
ede14decd5cea2a16a5f731e0fff7756
e95230125e87f9c761ebc9f57af8743e7ac17ce8
'2012-01-15T04:31:07-05:00'
describe
'3371708' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHQ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
37e025478615af79f594bc2c4dbbd693
3ec789f8711a905cde5f71090c0c24d82341c591
'2012-01-15T04:26:11-05:00'
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHR' 'sip-files00022.txt'
152151ba8ff397de3b74ea948465183a
4c6b3aad4cf9dbed83210c8c9c2b0a4d7b09e4a3
describe
'22257' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHS' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
9b20c1a1720f2511519ef3f835d36c48
a1f88a1c5b5bda78509246efebabb3e2c9a5576f
'2012-01-15T04:27:22-05:00'
describe
'419877' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHT' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
b2b5943e8499dd43d0d0dfbe9a24973c
40364602708379de4cf2dd003baf3f53e78961d2
'2012-01-15T04:30:59-05:00'
describe
'153740' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHU' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
18ed0ecb9badf1b1ad5f96bc593dd961
c62622a2609af03ef92daa2a3ac2f67015b3183e
'2012-01-15T04:25:34-05:00'
describe
'2802' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHV' 'sip-files00023.pro'
c495c89693b18c04c6365db004c3aa17
bb44d088df9aa2ce689349507448e123e3858920
'2012-01-15T04:31:11-05:00'
describe
'48323' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHW' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
05cc23fd0f2d78669e9b878ddf2e0f96
e5175269084326d581115f31c9e4cf09f431241c
'2012-01-15T04:27:04-05:00'
describe
'3371748' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHX' 'sip-files00023.tif'
258ddc5ffd660bf8ed9a886fca223530
f376bc6d2f1ad807639238f377350d8ad015c173
describe
'153' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHY' 'sip-files00023.txt'
f4411bed01f767f3b2756cc27cf4d968
a020b3150855323789379e3b5b0a991b0fe2a794
'2012-01-15T04:25:36-05:00'
describe
'21196' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOHZ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
d89a5fa64796804c89891d7fd990f69b
1352f16be02292b252a4890ab647305143db8119
'2012-01-15T04:28:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
9d6a8fb11311bb2c5cdadda897134cc0
382672a8bc1fa2684ed72d0da2d6793fe093ca36
'2012-01-15T04:25:40-05:00'
describe
'10911' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIB' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
8bffc34ed0f3fb2dbde06a3bd6a71c74
2a98befc60f16b172bf1bda0802142e1c28b7263
'2012-01-15T04:24:15-05:00'
describe
'9230' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIC' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
dd515dc566ca5302a47bfbabc2c50b3b
bddf85f356548246cb13fb5c018c81184ff95964
'2012-01-15T04:26:59-05:00'
describe
'3367400' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOID' 'sip-files00024.tif'
2ba0ec2a36e5504dec4d884ce46fd238
71cbe6731892ceb2810b4e6969a745168be71793
describe
'8788' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIE' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
090b42c95a978ebbab0b9e9132c1e584
8f72a6f5cb4a0d29f8d32b2fa3077422a7d6e156
'2012-01-15T04:28:58-05:00'
describe
'419916' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIF' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
d91f9738cf068b54f5d0e1db2cc768e9
35798190af7450703fe389460c7257fc91ee03c4
describe
'142727' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIG' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
b66e2e4e3c4a251e730d51dc8285b609
4c418c425188c2db8a8846fb718bfdf426556e99
'2012-01-15T04:30:40-05:00'
describe
'31570' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIH' 'sip-files00025.pro'
08fc463b07ae30847442393c34bde2b5
668c9034c9381ab5ca4f92f35f05446fc4552c31
'2012-01-15T04:29:07-05:00'
describe
'55399' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOII' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
de0f780499b5c048b354e2a9fc68ff4a
87fa10efdbb82c13527577213fb254b1f73d95e4
'2012-01-15T04:27:19-05:00'
describe
'3371980' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIJ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
819493955d947fb1298cbe40213fe065
7741acb706e0431b5d1d17cc1f3b58352bac2f64
'2012-01-15T04:28:48-05:00'
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIK' 'sip-files00025.txt'
a110749f13f7872e0fb9a1795da15418
6e360c6b41460ff7ada9dca20adfefec58edcb3a
'2012-01-15T04:26:05-05:00'
describe
'22426' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIL' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
5904ee85436cb203b5636e54d5f04e6e
9e7b416e271cb96a4bfc052a26a72988733a0a0b
'2012-01-15T04:27:36-05:00'
describe
'419866' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIM' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
86dce7a62fe9b67bdbbc30306d8bbeb3
7248010b3b4288c6bff81f6859fb997edc06d211
'2012-01-15T04:25:19-05:00'
describe
'141180' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIN' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
a9839d38645c69dae27840c453494ecf
461608504d4e2e151316571a6b4c597b08b4b5c0
'2012-01-15T04:26:57-05:00'
describe
'33429' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIO' 'sip-files00026.pro'
efa7d6bb868a0ab8f78b3d1b687078bc
cba4d9ea98224efb74c2471705f64e42ddd4eab8
'2012-01-15T04:24:00-05:00'
describe
'55352' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIP' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
21bbd2009586491076f6c854f65d0553
ea43fde3bfbcc30b50387c501665a4a63db8995d
describe
'3372036' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIQ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
c2ce07a58105d0b634eb65051482c1e8
fc93f135b907392f15542b1e09c5184f6d85645d
'2012-01-15T04:28:21-05:00'
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIR' 'sip-files00026.txt'
6330026b2a1a4a22085dad51853f7e1f
fe3185778bf92519b81d4206f6096494c73377de
'2012-01-15T04:25:42-05:00'
describe
'22425' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIS' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
20215d0aaea20f1cfc324c7b5f544513
298a4133ac5ca979466690ec1fc8b5119aefe0e8
'2012-01-15T04:25:43-05:00'
describe
'419909' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIT' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
632ab553173ca5567a90aea4634fc01a
da9cb102ac89117bdcde3e8f7b4ca31dfd3d3ec6
'2012-01-15T04:25:14-05:00'
describe
'140983' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIU' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
59550aee2210389b699b4f7168ea72ba
21459c34b3dd3d125c4bc2a9ff06b21b020e3c73
describe
'33476' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIV' 'sip-files00027.pro'
82907c704c55264f815bf38f2d0dd5dd
34cd675b78e590f7f4a57f43a2de7db0b06835c4
describe
'56202' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIW' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
5ee0c12e998cf07fdbd2cd8e96271a7c
f9d781723293b121436ae0976f60f04e6e9412ba
describe
'3371824' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIX' 'sip-files00027.tif'
4b171ca36e24c23cbe578c15519d42d9
7124ba83608ad68064c127fefc726a4bbfba8a6c
'2012-01-15T04:26:58-05:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIY' 'sip-files00027.txt'
acca134100431bd3f59883596af6e39a
668f3b538e362e15a5e4562bdc08fd27a2fc55cd
describe
'22192' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOIZ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
9ecdba9eb18e800cfe96671ff37fc416
0a298bfba4eee66178e5fb2648e5d449491b8d0c
'2012-01-15T04:27:13-05:00'
describe
'419890' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJA' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
f299dbe73c31547fbe3d84282c390f53
5c4976e21cd04667e1dcccf99cbaa22cf1f0792b
'2012-01-15T04:26:35-05:00'
describe
'147477' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJB' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
d556b23916cf424f1fcceb27301c1b8d
0b9e63cdb51e50a8f716c4988575b121b59b11fd
'2012-01-15T04:31:43-05:00'
describe
'34897' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJC' 'sip-files00028.pro'
95440ad48e713b96e92a2fea27d8a415
2246f2a9801167c97b83e02172fa169764e1e287
describe
'57187' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJD' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
2ebfd67bfc1df05d721ad09aabdb7557
828b0bd5d1ea51795e21a21f554fb873f5629e2f
'2012-01-15T04:28:25-05:00'
describe
'3371812' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJE' 'sip-files00028.tif'
a334e22f0c23108c43a5b0f74bb929fc
90eef4d471d732174c06df32be090d68cafb3174
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJF' 'sip-files00028.txt'
9ea497b03598e4b0187a378049e39e5d
a86c14729ed3ca604825e22f2f86fc068a9b69fe
'2012-01-15T04:30:36-05:00'
describe
'22578' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJG' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
ade8866ed936eef7d57db9f64ec5b1a2
ad47f46e13eed6ba23374ec7ad99d7d61675d30e
'2012-01-15T04:24:34-05:00'
describe
'419929' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJH' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
6ca863f9bc56c81680e0982e07e651e3
9bc3f9ca1adda39e5d99d2cf11869a7ef20a5705
'2012-01-15T04:29:01-05:00'
describe
'144825' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJI' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
6b6102e955ccea157996ff29726c2c8b
558a5acce0cae2e91680156c63892365afac93a3
'2012-01-15T04:24:26-05:00'
describe
'33789' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJJ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
a6542b33de5e51559ee525b62c3ef821
ddd62b216c5985d1f23b6504e595fe4c73afb61e
'2012-01-15T04:27:44-05:00'
describe
'56830' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJK' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
9846601bca1f2b8883dae7af51ec6517
3d348b9a1f9b3ea2b0c40c398736c3ffabeebff0
describe
'3371816' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJL' 'sip-files00029.tif'
1410a93f2820c6131798cac4321b076e
7ae64a380f3ae646ea2cc098cbdcd4801497f2d3
'2012-01-15T04:29:17-05:00'
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJM' 'sip-files00029.txt'
16b42b88e2645d509ca5552db458b423
d02d1383cdce521b12ca6a7d620afdff98536eb8
'2012-01-15T04:32:26-05:00'
describe
'21921' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJN' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
02e7565d793822957adcd5a6625014b1
38955c499b17da1d89e9dea15dd1065e5528ca4a
'2012-01-15T04:30:34-05:00'
describe
'419915' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJO' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
03bc4c087336f26242aab49826785a11
22170fca153f3cb49f12b4f6bbd5058dc856fef9
describe
'132578' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJP' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
946d3592367fc0f690b8798ad73e0599
d5469877548c88684603f7ce0fbccfc585afae3c
'2012-01-15T04:29:48-05:00'
describe
'31734' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJQ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
372b1e2c51af7e42e33988f79d32c717
f7a330e1113e630e1a12bdf0aa2a334b085cf41b
'2012-01-15T04:30:49-05:00'
describe
'53913' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJR' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
c878bc5945747eff695a58424a8ffe80
3600732bf8534f248b0782d7dfec8c07bfcfbda1
'2012-01-15T04:28:07-05:00'
describe
'3371640' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJS' 'sip-files00030.tif'
f883bf6e13631f1ff3e6144bfea2488d
7abdda59366187db7e5cffb102c77b4cbadf94a7
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJT' 'sip-files00030.txt'
2c940b60e90922675d6e191280ecaa87
a5b9470e771fa616a16eb13343bfeeea5475776a
'2012-01-15T04:29:28-05:00'
describe
'21658' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJU' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
afd402fe062450c600253ecbf493a765
bd43b8c03c840c76192ac9dfb958f31927f9b4fb
'2012-01-15T04:30:53-05:00'
describe
'419918' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJV' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
48b9e758ff6f53f46fa3b298ce5432d4
35b95ac2a0c56aad4533811228748dec3cae0bed
'2012-01-15T04:24:58-05:00'
describe
'127036' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJW' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
3857cf9b482bbac31a4bb26d9e098fc6
429cda5d9699721d97705fdf42ddefaf462affba
'2012-01-15T04:26:56-05:00'
describe
'30227' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJX' 'sip-files00031.pro'
6269f740b63bbd2a44c4b606c63e1c2f
01b76fb3f4db69057fa782a52ac9c5f3385131d0
describe
'51897' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJY' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
2050e3dd80323bcc69303d1e8a3ef925
6e9950aabd4cba8e52f413ef438d9f19d920e7a0
'2012-01-15T04:24:45-05:00'
describe
'3371508' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOJZ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
7638bf04c85ee7ff8c2594b895ddf2d9
1070bf6433cc908427ba4946811951579eb7b15e
'2012-01-15T04:31:27-05:00'
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKA' 'sip-files00031.txt'
511a23784f9ce0b1c650a9a34f7994fa
9689d60fa0c4b068a9162bcbb117ef65dd3241c5
'2012-01-15T04:32:27-05:00'
describe
'21119' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKB' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
0d802728e2216a9ca11a0471387aec59
6eeae44b2b6d78a65dd91c3da543b650f54359d5
'2012-01-15T04:31:03-05:00'
describe
'419808' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKC' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
3a92331b9c049745dc0c94c12f7ea609
c893eceb1e5e67c70fb2561e1ca8a7dfd6d9eabd
describe
'73691' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKD' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
97f0e93169718ab3f99e3d59690d5f69
9eaef4ecc08c1b4a3d18bd42921df67520da82bd
'2012-01-15T04:31:56-05:00'
describe
'13380' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKE' 'sip-files00032.pro'
9bdbd40af72e836038ab12a038968acd
e282f0c2939b9204c6e2c95c8944d6be956aee00
'2012-01-15T04:24:49-05:00'
describe
'30963' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKF' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
555a4601066afddf3ce56bdde11b812b
8df7f73b045179fc048a7f4996935f34d54b7b62
'2012-01-15T04:29:12-05:00'
describe
'3369104' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKG' 'sip-files00032.tif'
ad93da3e3cc756955a2a6c885fe67e0c
2346d0df16d1af881fcb7b720bd49ed6532c7f84
'2012-01-15T04:28:30-05:00'
describe
'534' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKH' 'sip-files00032.txt'
0088a70e344e5abe542e015e68ecfe3e
4b778094faefd9c2aa0072b0ff1bb9344c2094cf
'2012-01-15T04:25:08-05:00'
describe
'14850' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKI' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
1152ca8a9dc2e56ecdd9d1b18cdcba67
1c1055d7af2af1adede94c8ef6ebc26b7b8d80c5
'2012-01-15T04:25:57-05:00'
describe
'419910' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKJ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
1004e01a1680ffbca974a12ad4272959
6c09f3893608f6f041ef9ef3cfd83bebd9686db4
'2012-01-15T04:26:04-05:00'
describe
'118517' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKK' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
c95181648dd1b4213d61e211cf9377db
08faf99bbe06b6cee5ce2651b315b4dad38ede6e
describe
'23456' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKL' 'sip-files00033.pro'
9a136eeda8b8763450d15a4a9d9c521e
685877319a5cc316398d6a8d207329a7b5542b28
'2012-01-15T04:32:18-05:00'
describe
'47547' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKM' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
716fd70de3ce357fb6d864aca72fbfa7
91a4abb9cbfcc6fc5f21698f47ecae4dd31fe546
'2012-01-15T04:26:21-05:00'
describe
'3371092' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKN' 'sip-files00033.tif'
44cde39e86121fdda2ffff88e3cf81fc
c671aeb7924693dc1f86c21f52a69346ce318b34
'2012-01-15T04:30:38-05:00'
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKO' 'sip-files00033.txt'
c1d49c01d4665c55f265faa6bbc6f0c8
5c34ffcce8fcc0ebe5332f15c4ca96eefd02072b
'2012-01-15T04:32:10-05:00'
describe
'20025' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKP' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
5a362f151c5856df262442cef2142214
e24a91958197146290cbeca36a5ed682810ed3b4
'2012-01-15T04:31:58-05:00'
describe
'419903' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKQ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
ed66e1483bcb2d915e2b493d241a2c4b
0cd58aa14c6719e61db2b2cafc4fcec4cc47aca0
'2012-01-15T04:31:28-05:00'
describe
'147555' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKR' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
10025100d1e1ccc166c18f9ba4e8eab4
571eb972a068c3cc1f4d285a0981cb0ad582471d
'2012-01-15T04:29:16-05:00'
describe
'33361' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKS' 'sip-files00034.pro'
2fc4f67b337242bd3be28b9c4f954594
b3f3b351e80fdc299a2bda4d17133f9a00717c28
'2012-01-15T04:24:47-05:00'
describe
'57566' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKT' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
f52ca2a0dcfa50de3ce180ad18678eaf
4e335b1d2aa61a2ad539cab6f59e32060f1b11e8
'2012-01-15T04:25:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKU' 'sip-files00034.tif'
6eaf401a48fc8ffa35f51d668dd51a28
180597e03a1bbf676c504ee79e237bb987a70549
'2012-01-15T04:30:27-05:00'
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKV' 'sip-files00034.txt'
014b3476ab51a4950e8cb365104d74b1
232a7232d269fa808f116df34d7666459023c9c9
describe
'22399' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKW' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
9d60377622ea6f9abddae7ff097c3f9a
0186fd040c024f1f14473d768b85619ba34d8e88
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKX' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
46998a3133e62d22a5eb7d6f0d8134aa
9a29593b4d98a3a8f328186cbc7c9ccddbac310d
'2012-01-15T04:25:06-05:00'
describe
'147413' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKY' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
8d6c34e65448f6331ce048b0ba095902
2d5ec72d2ffdb37fc40d9bf22eb1a5c5f11d321c
describe
'33475' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOKZ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
94c2b94c768ad016e0e8ddbc49ca06de
681f74b427741fb489a2843eb73fbeb0b6488881
'2012-01-15T04:32:34-05:00'
describe
'57398' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLA' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
bee3ebee62842896962e4172fdd54fcc
41e545be47e66e80488860992d2397cf69681e1b
'2012-01-15T04:24:28-05:00'
describe
'3371736' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLB' 'sip-files00035.tif'
ec8cf28186833fbfad140ec07eced7a9
90cb1a7a7ccc4d0c75ee5be12c7bf85aac8722cb
'2012-01-15T04:24:23-05:00'
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLC' 'sip-files00035.txt'
34fe1fb9067f7d6a30de085a9494bdfd
64d400123baf2b8024fc53132188f2fee000299a
describe
'21917' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLD' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
e08aaa72a0d6b576f5db5dfa0a9c67b6
8de9c0d183e3eb2c541ff25ecaf1ce8e7495ecf7
'2012-01-15T04:27:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLE' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
24e58548025f9273e57b12b8d4861823
129d3f2d953d95048f78572debe040d103c88d68
'2012-01-15T04:25:49-05:00'
describe
'149816' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLF' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
f49ea3faa895533447eb758e1e65667a
7ff29cc88b1c9da8e17aff7eab08c921b6b41e22
describe
'34563' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLG' 'sip-files00036.pro'
4ae96269f6bbb3a473f6861da1428ca0
ea551d6630795dfecfd2a9231c2b3cb8eb345bbc
'2012-01-15T04:31:13-05:00'
describe
'57786' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLH' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
ef124cf4c6e057e8a9cafe615a2bf4bd
89b7e617fb292aa8e0ff50297b614c572f23afdb
describe
'3372000' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLI' 'sip-files00036.tif'
e6719e7159a4dad03bcae06b6282e42b
439ed0d9b3298246ebbf6e94983473b599c56fd5
'2012-01-15T04:27:43-05:00'
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLJ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
86723cf329654a996d58bec094542dce
6b73ea9507e991058977552996ba530fdae0e380
describe
'22757' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLK' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
1b7e22afa9336242ca71d44af950bb5e
77420d51d59c84c2232892f09e46939e62267a81
'2012-01-15T04:26:06-05:00'
describe
'419924' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLL' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
977982f28a6f8a777a557cf2f4986074
4e50d7d0c92bf39211c91326c056f9dd141c697b
'2012-01-15T04:31:16-05:00'
describe
'148847' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLM' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
59222d11574d32e304bbc73722fe949b
cd19597d6e7b477199b14d68eb20286035151c20
'2012-01-15T04:24:48-05:00'
describe
'33729' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLN' 'sip-files00037.pro'
eb6202bff5d123e6355e6a1318ded727
abffc747df6a03efab1606071aed76a8f3152c1e
describe
'58119' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLO' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
113d1ed00ffb20fec394905750a82c0e
d1ae33e835c4099ef7712facc2212c9b4e79e4b6
'2012-01-15T04:24:07-05:00'
describe
'3371876' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLP' 'sip-files00037.tif'
675054be02cf56b9165e4b3633fdb5b1
372a893819f96f06dd11949f573864d04125479c
'2012-01-15T04:24:59-05:00'
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLQ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
dd59e73439965ea12bd26555a8959f34
3b60c66954c33497adfc89c2e9c7238103a1783f
'2012-01-15T04:26:03-05:00'
describe
'22587' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLR' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
696e3773203eb448fb03918f786ab8c9
6eb2ce285deef2bcf0f6a3c82b6da2c17b2b0bca
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLS' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
73409e576b1278286f2557010083ef5b
0879bb2dc4eb2ddbeb71746dacda9b7fd9b18903
'2012-01-15T04:32:33-05:00'
describe
'145544' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLT' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
4162dda8443e20880c8a6f3b45cfacd8
e91bcf7a6cda5f5ea8b6b4b3655055c32ea62fc8
'2012-01-15T04:30:48-05:00'
describe
'33304' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLU' 'sip-files00038.pro'
9d82b750952b6f4c86e39f87c4404b70
33952d8523e88d4ff3db0ef16cec0a94f038c6a5
'2012-01-15T04:26:25-05:00'
describe
'56685' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLV' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
ec77db8877f0fa85c9e927e3f1f92a7f
bd7bff48ee471be8ca73cbce1c93e818948c2b06
describe
'3371792' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLW' 'sip-files00038.tif'
2fb496ade14938b1c309c2ec33233362
a728668b3923baedf2f3a7393626a6562a504b54
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLX' 'sip-files00038.txt'
d9c27e61bac9637e16ffb3f5f48e6497
165923b7a6ca385a82ec500b99c7434db51e4417
describe
'22293' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLY' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
c53d20b761fe90f671e6973938ada61a
c6b02f9ce43d5ad3f1bf41b7c20c6aaf1eac8bd8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOLZ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
1b985e2cd34de427824932605209b717
84e2a9882c48b25d346bd28e9c0d60a0df3e2c89
describe
'148436' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMA' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
7220f34cba2e545826913283ed3ea4b2
3edf312bd2096c1b1bdba7fbe1de711c8b0664ca
'2012-01-15T04:27:20-05:00'
describe
'33827' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMB' 'sip-files00039.pro'
4c924b222ce1d7d0017e76f734f425c4
052df1e8b462e7ba68fb2ce5dfb58e4c20453ba3
'2012-01-15T04:26:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMC' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
c496273bb870e7ceb3265c6dcce8948b
c5b3ad3037da56e1bc747f7f9098cef51859f9a9
'2012-01-15T04:31:09-05:00'
describe
'3371956' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMD' 'sip-files00039.tif'
c1aea4222ea2fe2834e88ce2df714c08
971b02a28df76d0406c7526a0a99cadb3bb00801
'2012-01-15T04:31:05-05:00'
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOME' 'sip-files00039.txt'
5d9b48c223ee7eaf9e19264f0a2f0828
1373e15192a50bf826d9fa17a161a68050fb2666
describe
'22719' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMF' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
3565a8c86ec3fbca2701e77608f956f9
28d20b0f49abcd77be4a1e4f1f69783a9d5607b0
describe
'419907' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMG' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
8a7884587bdde20d46533dc98a4227a8
60d9d19268318e91c960a717959b63ed18498f7e
'2012-01-15T04:24:22-05:00'
describe
'145954' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMH' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
583fc8af37488ed498d15818dd8d1752
ece314cf2da5bff9e2b6210290e8dd73a1b57e3a
describe
'33737' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMI' 'sip-files00040.pro'
b0e20ecf6bfd29d84ce6159256314310
58665a43d0ea9f6ba036d84e6bf7c7cd1dd16a9d
describe
'57465' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMJ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
3dc2fb03a16875823b5c94f09fda0b3c
0199d1534ee023f631de4b2d3ae7e090cfe357ff
'2012-01-15T04:29:24-05:00'
describe
'3371784' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMK' 'sip-files00040.tif'
e6a95a149f8b1c6171da36e83f9ad80f
530b829d2fe8b9f8ef86a42c35adfb2a21179ecb
'2012-01-15T04:31:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOML' 'sip-files00040.txt'
46255a46cc1b1653a1ba891919363950
0f90440fd8d1cfbb0b9532aa5f1d2dd8cbf07563
'2012-01-15T04:24:08-05:00'
describe
'22161' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMM' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
45dfc3706f3d2b35f73c0ca988b00bc2
6da7793455e20180a813e8e2ef965c402658ff27
'2012-01-15T04:26:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMN' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
296badaadaac8d751ef9d2683493b6a3
9c6ebbfa14c76a226f1ca1e55018f8505585dd09
'2012-01-15T04:32:00-05:00'
describe
'146480' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMO' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
497caa8897f0145ce7f5c6cb6f412afc
6969a3c63bc2748699bb7726e1bdaa7f1b7bb332
'2012-01-15T04:29:32-05:00'
describe
'33042' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMP' 'sip-files00041.pro'
660de7ae38ccf9125640e8d6c291e3b0
24ac605cf7a6e2b44bc5e09055c40c0d450f5e58
'2012-01-15T04:28:05-05:00'
describe
'56765' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMQ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
2e4b32b5192c0c00d9d4371c148b19f3
b3d686c1634ed82f0b11dc9e7349414db4259cf2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMR' 'sip-files00041.tif'
61e176d62b949fa7e16699fca91cbde4
6874e2d131180fdcf569ed32074fa273c0064661
'2012-01-15T04:27:32-05:00'
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMS' 'sip-files00041.txt'
168e41007d83dbc135d79897d09dd2f5
4c7f1039a69e79e69aea32dca285a1341d6372e3
'2012-01-15T04:29:40-05:00'
describe
'22633' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMT' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
ff578011d518b2a0bab7dca3f00327c7
af0993ea45920a12c833c41f46e098d1b3732322
'2012-01-15T04:28:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMU' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
67cec30eeb27856e486060f29464a93a
61d1ca1698eba81da0112d07da1c4a554a4a4edf
'2012-01-15T04:26:01-05:00'
describe
'151887' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMV' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
04f4544b2dec2a1c677c150650c69dfd
9a3fa20a2dc03489e028ee8950c3ff5a5a411cf2
'2012-01-15T04:25:17-05:00'
describe
'34021' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMW' 'sip-files00042.pro'
a1cb483a9e5224776e4eb39de5072bba
211d35507631c422d1ae6bd4a0aa998b6537f3f6
describe
'59722' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMX' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
1db34e4e3a37f17c24cc9cdbb178249c
7f62bb307730825dc9683b5e96bbfd6555cc98c7
'2012-01-15T04:28:23-05:00'
describe
'3372168' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMY' 'sip-files00042.tif'
8f6779e18ab4cf720c1ceb643774b056
55a13ed427ec0b4a1ae90dbf0b9226dde1d402b5
'2012-01-15T04:28:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOMZ' 'sip-files00042.txt'
391e573e8cc39490ea0bead6a10a336a
2b9d1c59b47800058f5cade2bafef3202cf806ae
describe
'23118' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONA' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
85deac1e51d616f5311b9c617c8498b2
2bd248fd1e77f156af6efcecb01e5e1709be9256
describe
'419781' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONB' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
2068c228549c90926c68a9db477eab43
faf5330e111c8c5e602c719acbf9e251b68387f5
'2012-01-15T04:30:52-05:00'
describe
'147412' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONC' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
d0b40217385b0ef06bd6d56fb7d15ae9
1aad3a6d08e10b07d47f1918850677a400d961dc
'2012-01-15T04:27:33-05:00'
describe
'32468' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOND' 'sip-files00043.pro'
afef20a2a0d2b9df85aea70dab6d2711
0c08d3ac768d778aebac6739874ae677294468f2
describe
'56700' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONE' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
58fbe3520c94fb8f53eb5790424eb121
c1331a160ba6409cda43d1a815b12ea3251fd127
'2012-01-15T04:32:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONF' 'sip-files00043.tif'
003a031c888b36956462d808b48d66f3
c5e3037834955bd9b88e74a7af8cb7a3a0a40039
'2012-01-15T04:27:15-05:00'
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONG' 'sip-files00043.txt'
edd1caa98a99d096069c572a66f927b8
251d00244306f646dcf6eb3f863d365eb4f22d0e
'2012-01-15T04:25:54-05:00'
describe
'22465' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONH' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
8fa38e765ac255342d9408a1e6cb7b5c
e5ee7960d362461effff9ef45cfce81bb0258421
'2012-01-15T04:24:19-05:00'
describe
'419839' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONI' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
f360374c48c5f5c13ec346fb4f721bf5
b59f8b4fd4a269344fc2d989d82c95fda2ef43e3
describe
'151378' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONJ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
e6c65c18e4e3ce675c91c44dbbb8daf7
1830a7ab9e24227c0df95c73cf6e92dda34937fb
describe
'34575' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONK' 'sip-files00044.pro'
db44b22c6c446d32324da6d091951b8b
06f7693aecfa8e18c767bcd78c564808e401598c
'2012-01-15T04:27:57-05:00'
describe
'59077' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONL' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
d98364213ffea02ca9a1f9b881f3bc2a
20a6adbc98611f7ee36829c8e5a37f320970d243
'2012-01-15T04:23:59-05:00'
describe
'3372176' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONM' 'sip-files00044.tif'
7e47ad1e052509a0ea1f3d1d813ffa02
9a188e8ea6e606ac12a2dbba58ca1117fd64592c
'2012-01-15T04:28:57-05:00'
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONN' 'sip-files00044.txt'
64308cfb9ff1dbc302b62fb9cc2118f0
5b771290afadfca51e5d398852f360ccb7b6758c
'2012-01-15T04:26:23-05:00'
describe
'23127' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONO' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
2e810ba3122539e2c9bb17a87db12f39
b666e009dba4c8e7ad1135f17331afbd0d250f89
'2012-01-15T04:28:00-05:00'
describe
'419885' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONP' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
117f6dec7ec03464a7f402341c92710c
ec9bacab4116d6bc3c5e2c67cb2873e1b88455e6
'2012-01-15T04:30:02-05:00'
describe
'87832' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONQ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
b012c4f6bf187d3baae3bd1aa078d801
2cf81cd5cb313328f0041a30fd6b7b50513db0f8
'2012-01-15T04:24:31-05:00'
describe
'16532' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONR' 'sip-files00045.pro'
887d62d9333fe51870b4ede80b454233
8e00a0f0957f3406354542614533a790e1bc1780
describe
'34807' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONS' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
bda445adcfb3d2b5483f878f2ea43bfa
9bc9ba8c5a2d1483338cc7ce244b4603b6499ff6
'2012-01-15T04:28:28-05:00'
describe
'3369472' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONT' 'sip-files00045.tif'
397823fa408d2cc7e0990cdb54c3e855
a9659ba3453132e946ca523ef127daa950a736b2
describe
'668' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONU' 'sip-files00045.txt'
f69bfd3b59a1c843b432ee83528fd63b
d3a3933b2b30f4b593b2af12761e528df41104bd
describe
'15775' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONV' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
43a287b5dbc6ee5b2eac8751b30832fb
d9bd0f60223163f8d53c4b501c563d01a63e151c
describe
'419921' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONW' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
6776d628b981384a5a762470ee786d19
9c68cd21c7035d1c48a22f994ae5b3ee6eab3db6
describe
'117822' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONX' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
c0b3f66865421671c03369cbb6306ead
5ab2d56fe0d8d3c21db4a6459eb30e85d9646572
describe
'22749' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONY' 'sip-files00046.pro'
b3e57e5e8484fdcbace9475d7a232cab
e2cc85e9c902cdf3b8e344192f2eef9879fe2299
describe
'46966' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAONZ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
6cdb85bdb8db38d00cda86464344577d
58c04dd25147f525ae22bd0f5996643934f03731
describe
'3371096' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOA' 'sip-files00046.tif'
f7f81b1c977adeaeb1a32250b32a2653
951a2a74bcf509e487d079e620fdadfc81952bc1
'2012-01-15T04:28:55-05:00'
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOB' 'sip-files00046.txt'
a44119c24bc32343d3b6cdae2dbdf313
d5a295fbb5025679f4e2986782b0fce3dfd680f1
'2012-01-15T04:27:41-05:00'
describe
'19729' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOC' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8ffa5dd0233c058600728bc516537353
73e3c8e18b2c940f730dc37892fbeb53b1616715
'2012-01-15T04:32:04-05:00'
describe
'419853' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOD' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
26f9ecb8933001727328f32b480258ee
2d8c1fe85ede89cc689d15dc789b2020cd11c0c7
describe
'152155' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOE' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
ee73af901bedb22c402c8983e1766f77
efd511f99363dc6bcf1bb54eb358978688ebec37
describe
'34208' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOF' 'sip-files00047.pro'
4b7475888a71401a9f2936d7df0d03f2
5e9b28d144f9bfa37aa8c13281503452f0379d75
'2012-01-15T04:29:44-05:00'
describe
'58082' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOG' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
75e0653b8c265a35c5f87bb0dcb7ddac
5114867dba64cc6fda72b19a3b57281e0a9252fa
'2012-01-15T04:28:03-05:00'
describe
'3371752' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOH' 'sip-files00047.tif'
732e91936a5e4e6cfa912e85d19c6171
1a81af3870b0951725121aa2f2d4fc482bcf10a8
'2012-01-15T04:27:17-05:00'
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOI' 'sip-files00047.txt'
001a3a5904b99336d98ef42db496ec01
2ced37b4a9ffeaba328aa4597761edf103cd2ae9
describe
'22299' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOJ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
9b2428ce2f08eb628631f337cde8b44f
e8eb6e130fe87e32245ac547f95c474fec178c3c
describe
'419928' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOK' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
c41d65305c9c2511f8544b01bffe88f3
5ddeb9b12070414e5659b1ab6c96cb1833196e76
'2012-01-15T04:31:17-05:00'
describe
'138247' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOL' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
73660382dd3d5c841d573c12724ca0ba
db4d50c784e0881115ac80f43b3e83e6643da150
'2012-01-15T04:31:14-05:00'
describe
'30816' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOM' 'sip-files00048.pro'
51db856cf755b4055bb9728713807b97
43eeaf8acc9cab9a48e2363c9a80f2f04e53fafa
describe
'54861' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOON' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f413d6d7f1ef651f87cf4c317866e540
63c0e4d0c48995b1f092467eb462b59ee062cdb6
describe
'3372056' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOO' 'sip-files00048.tif'
d15d57299e147e7a1f27cd5db8d7e7d9
2de5150013cf6bed9d35cb0106d6a83d57633cdf
'2012-01-15T04:25:29-05:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOP' 'sip-files00048.txt'
415e4d0724bcf3b7354b12338c6fe7e1
7c21a06a3c4711da424f4fb22cb462d2e01166f4
'2012-01-15T04:30:43-05:00'
describe
'22636' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOQ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
84944c13edf2a32a125abadca5ef4fe6
396efbdc995b0d07e9ceb5fce17cb86c0f8de196
describe
'419914' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOR' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
f1b248469e618632844cf28e85d911c2
cc529a849b8037ad438df2c30d528189be2a2a06
describe
'148747' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOS' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
1fd8ff9b833b0b628534674f689e31b0
11da79e28c792adb04594f44ec3e49252de5da7a
'2012-01-15T04:29:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOT' 'sip-files00049.pro'
7c6abfeb3a9921272cdaba921348767e
17acb6851dc4fd9ccdc02d4551e80b60fa6fd2a9
'2012-01-15T04:24:27-05:00'
describe
'57519' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOU' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
2a180f3e1c833ce0ab359c22c736be94
6f53042186d8b5c11e82877c678a04f9ca5005ce
'2012-01-15T04:28:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOV' 'sip-files00049.tif'
9808d5ae86d95ebfbc5eea697ede6d86
cf23e38900dff65221ece1374052c8679d59421b
'2012-01-15T04:24:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOW' 'sip-files00049.txt'
850800cba496068dfed89ee6d47dbcbc
acae33c1a410a4d78eac1afc9b7d1fd5a49a8bbf
'2012-01-15T04:30:11-05:00'
describe
'22130' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOX' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
7683cce05a9e8e81d738d0720bb580c5
03a514be7ad4a0e244c5dc4ae01c22e4df2a5647
'2012-01-15T04:27:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOY' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
fc79beb35a39bb6e9ff6e8bd00a60ddf
b5e9d86ed74b26fcb76ec8a1d79fd6ad366ed2d6
'2012-01-15T04:29:04-05:00'
describe
'144201' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOOZ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
244eb7ec3a7f9de18d9ce0e1ce615663
8b5dcf82f547a429823773dd0cdebc164707637b
'2012-01-15T04:32:06-05:00'
describe
'33272' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPA' 'sip-files00050.pro'
a84049e137c76a9f27a193ab20b840fb
5a74597a662b4eb5ffcabdf00b1e1509499560d4
describe
'56723' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPB' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
13bea274fd01e264d776befd28af57fd
56863fad66ca30e13ac8e10d6e1d3b764e7e5f48
'2012-01-15T04:29:19-05:00'
describe
'3371908' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPC' 'sip-files00050.tif'
d082d8e4949de4f3de7431f7ad4a1bcb
c9437ae1fadb696b8d310c02a5d27d10da598cc6
'2012-01-15T04:25:47-05:00'
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPD' 'sip-files00050.txt'
1057d3f2c51b062ebe3d636c21e45a8c
01da404a533f01dc0ef8051bd5a997de0bf03cae
'2012-01-15T04:24:57-05:00'
describe
'22253' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPE' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
0bf13b5e2e5c0abde0279968f7be75a0
4ebd9d8efc04013b157fd3b14449f1b11c347f0d
'2012-01-15T04:25:18-05:00'
describe
'419913' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPF' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
26b38d77ec5373f92143a7f205abc1d3
853b49124e9f39f7a8c8e17053c2de0c9b74aefb
'2012-01-15T04:27:27-05:00'
describe
'139624' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPG' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
1aa2b5a5d4fbc4f06b63a65a12779f6d
af666ade6c05abc4a03f87ddf6c4cba43efb5711
describe
'31371' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPH' 'sip-files00051.pro'
1c4b2d8437b59ad1ebf0a26e438fb3a0
ad95e39c5664c05fe670b18a97325a1ac010e2f4
describe
'54627' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPI' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
9ea80ddab38c91e00cd84bba1ab7b229
15ba9d144c967745a95e08e7dad1799b85c82861
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPJ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
6ce4151b852185bad27bf623833b7403
e13314ca92a76f820220d8927640596ca25e5bfc
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPK' 'sip-files00051.txt'
70a3fc477f1e550c4bd60823460482d7
bb19044128c06d673f3422c89f55e62ffc53ce10
'2012-01-15T04:25:10-05:00'
describe
'22166' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPL' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
173764bb9dd79f43d614647ebf93ab5c
9f4145b7561745735aeb1ed8780a54bcea20020d
'2012-01-15T04:28:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPM' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
62f13578ae55f72c8fc46080e561478f
97dccde3775e28655a6642ef5a7cb1139c16e830
describe
'143812' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPN' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
3e13ea795399fbcf6f22a78db2d37e6a
c4e0aedc95ec83bdba66b1f572d2a86341202d64
'2012-01-15T04:31:06-05:00'
describe
'34590' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPO' 'sip-files00052.pro'
78a6e770fd9c7d03c5581608971a0516
7f9b2470671d127c57efbb303c9b0acf2b29b5c8
'2012-01-15T04:26:24-05:00'
describe
'56927' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPP' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
a9e0cf9c2d6be70fec1152f8b9d36f83
b1304d42aa2a1904633945d8393e37e29ff9ced3
describe
'3371856' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPQ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ac6e3116aac7a9bb2f41e5f4737bedae
fad52057c37fb5938bd4cb1bd34ce6e93c773eda
'2012-01-15T04:27:46-05:00'
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPR' 'sip-files00052.txt'
a8a1488721daf6da5ea68edda36a1ba2
52adde06cc4ca9acedee1964d89d3a9af07e8cff
'2012-01-15T04:28:06-05:00'
describe
'22186' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPS' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
3e665391f588eb3b3f9373abf5813d7e
7a35980b740cdaa502cc84abbf61135c1b07ebb4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPT' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
868ae524e41ef7f03fb1e9ae7c02292a
5a9a22e0a3c9ac266a9af7d067f807b3c0aa37aa
describe
'132909' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPU' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
c005aac60d72aed7e175b7feda429cae
bf583bcff2c877f8a322d85df493e86f9f4b7171
describe
'31563' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPV' 'sip-files00053.pro'
46d1a73afc956a2c5b3132a7de5620da
a6e28cf61e23027bffe078aa9c6467cbcb83d7c3
describe
'52795' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPW' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
f71c44be4cbfdfb608a76f188ad71875
fe7a582cdbe38e62a7d66d060733d486d376c427
'2012-01-15T04:30:03-05:00'
describe
'3371440' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPX' 'sip-files00053.tif'
344d669982b19f960f0a2ca2635ef100
de8813bb0d29def5671d30dbb5f2cf214dcadea3
'2012-01-15T04:24:05-05:00'
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPY' 'sip-files00053.txt'
b708e92ec2946dd493a82571d172bd2c
2d1e25c93d423a5c8f173cc2aefd3347781b08f4
describe
'20911' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOPZ' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
a22ef8170f8feae55880c47f9ed973a3
363f66eecea844e7424c0e3706276487435b585d
'2012-01-15T04:25:05-05:00'
describe
'419900' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQA' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
0c5c791dd74b5fdbc879aac68389b55b
1b209a8a51e8005b638f702022dc3c78fe7653fb
'2012-01-15T04:24:37-05:00'
describe
'143958' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQB' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
c87a1856955648a8323aa841a66e508c
611519dd0f501025d963e209a48f22d00311523a
describe
'33528' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQC' 'sip-files00054.pro'
597102e5251f56399f76a15bbcab2e54
1d1ebdc3733a1b8774a7097c0b17be72f11feaeb
'2012-01-15T04:31:50-05:00'
describe
'55956' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQD' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
d77ab9f425ced0f103b0a59e46e7a828
0841013520d97926bd9c87ef2e4263dec6b05e90
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQE' 'sip-files00054.tif'
1d36bc2f435061895b3d50a607719bc2
672ec134c45defdcf38881b1f5b06e3024460c82
'2012-01-15T04:29:41-05:00'
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQF' 'sip-files00054.txt'
2830c35c65bc393a81f17bb8c764aec5
ddccb1a2a0a687e92f272f8abe22c7a17f5a986c
'2012-01-15T04:29:10-05:00'
describe
'22228' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQG' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
948638e1a1b59dfa02c6b40e47a0f668
fb97927a98b7740d34ee3351abedcbad5a10942f
describe
'419876' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQH' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
878045578a0031e9e985e40a0c4f28d7
3ac6e5d809e813488d9bd0e0a62de8118bab7c84
describe
'140551' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQI' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
8130832b0da1d95e99fcebf90ad41449
ca85992f4649c20862273bdecd6b4599c3fe6acb
'2012-01-15T04:27:10-05:00'
describe
'32823' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQJ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
af9c39f1c23cb19de81217192932fcfa
3ea007c2c6f29900add1c685bfa27a750590dd8d
'2012-01-15T04:29:18-05:00'
describe
'55874' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQK' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
f2c9dd5ae238db1173fac7a80e69e58e
130b1ceb1da4441301e0dee103fea0ac3d7de271
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQL' 'sip-files00055.tif'
4e8bc5afab4d691e8bf4c57a4b693f68
1f8cf97cff23ce6c9d93b6cae65414169aee06f5
'2012-01-15T04:24:55-05:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQM' 'sip-files00055.txt'
042f495ee6181ea3958179e803c464f2
f73fd1f307095c6be52e481e170574821c79c269
describe
'22007' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQN' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
4c81e508af4420877fd61e76272f3d8e
fb8d39e93abdfedb0a9379e00d40a9a07a147ade
describe
'419834' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQO' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
49061596895641396f84903767551264
2b31e9644cc523bd1a7a800708b2e9f80beb616d
'2012-01-15T04:23:57-05:00'
describe
'147913' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQP' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
794aba08dee09df584246c65547cc308
654618bb8b8270a25c0b2f9129a41db02aa9c9e4
'2012-01-15T04:30:44-05:00'
describe
'34635' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQQ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
8d16cb489fdba4024cd5e7bf77cb6925
ca1dc039fbcbed87fcf2617e4614be5591d70867
describe
'56311' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQR' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
381d5f940df8cb43d3ff2386dbc2b90c
69afec576ee3c9490b6a9cfbca76bfaf3a008060
'2012-01-15T04:26:51-05:00'
describe
'3371944' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQS' 'sip-files00056.tif'
492606a64492c9e99c48ef5e712acb3a
d763b8cdc631d2e0815af6dce9ff1b68f54acd98
'2012-01-15T04:25:51-05:00'
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQT' 'sip-files00056.txt'
7eb1d60c19fb7e955f45e3746234b5e4
7b2f220d84c319e68b5719bd8624024f11488be4
'2012-01-15T04:27:49-05:00'
describe
'22457' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQU' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
bfc6a2b9936235f4d6a1584fe3628bfb
ef938ae41dfae83a32c52dcb4b7519af5464e66a
'2012-01-15T04:24:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQV' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
0adc4c17f8bfeb3b89526a2b0c6c2301
f86ca83f33af7d84a4c1ae1fad13bcc15dec7ab9
describe
'143095' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQW' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
f6a023135bd0eca881defe828d0e1865
fd7433e41f8624d7d9dd4629dab55ff930120f3e
describe
'34047' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQX' 'sip-files00057.pro'
43599e96eb4f3df046eb33bc5e36f512
ac01432b84f160ae0162a7fd879fd5e5be3b4c30
'2012-01-15T04:27:55-05:00'
describe
'56368' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQY' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
08154715c71fe0cb668b5d45256c0b0c
ec2fd37d264b1466736bcc4149db90d29ceeb860
'2012-01-15T04:25:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOQZ' 'sip-files00057.tif'
a747deec71a9dcd3a2c4e26fa765a55c
585bcbeaae8802be0145b0c127841cc46f791554
'2012-01-15T04:24:42-05:00'
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORA' 'sip-files00057.txt'
a634c800e8c5f9333a4a05b07ab38ea2
64e202af0a6f85925a48145ff68ff647cbc1bdff
'2012-01-15T04:24:06-05:00'
describe
'22075' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORB' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
e6a10e0828b0858b43e03cb4d20f8af6
822155b3ce0f2c2f16de5be60dbffcde49f390c3
'2012-01-15T04:31:10-05:00'
describe
'418626' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORC' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
6aa0906383162ec34d6cfd940caeac43
5164262fda6f98ae8e50de55369d2f6897e9b906
'2012-01-15T04:31:02-05:00'
describe
'140102' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORD' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
e78f4ae2805cc81c53d03244f2d35a3c
1c8ba2db83a5518e91d591ed74957640f58624db
'2012-01-15T04:24:09-05:00'
describe
'32642' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORE' 'sip-files00058.pro'
2576642fb29de376ed3b12675961f9f8
3644d860b06dc8a3c416022c18396b2f39d1c7ce
'2012-01-15T04:25:53-05:00'
describe
'54753' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORF' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
92df9164cc1bfb15fb0fcdbdba996c79
0bf1991ddcbb2c2d0ab1822c1d8de6176049a768
'2012-01-15T04:32:23-05:00'
describe
'3362036' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORG' 'sip-files00058.tif'
99a34c9845cf55662c2a2686426f0f90
a939b3f7e3e9933d3818b7b675102fd13ce54a11
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORH' 'sip-files00058.txt'
5829636f2e8392c7a5b810ceb54a943a
d60ec362147d86144cfc24483547c1f11cb32980
describe
'22045' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORI' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
cc816dc2365f760f17629be58efde0ef
5e4b9f7f0329fa952517ccd702420676ab8b5587
'2012-01-15T04:24:38-05:00'
describe
'419925' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORJ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
68caba5ea42639ad5764fa1a2f06fdc2
53fcfa9f1e54d007280f7e698c0b196289180706
'2012-01-15T04:28:11-05:00'
describe
'137530' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORK' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
1e60d883e353363f798d29349f36bb61
309497b3d7574440d881913edeec4b59d11d4178
describe
'26268' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORL' 'sip-files00059.pro'
fd1970c82018317073960d159f4bb003
9b4aff2313654e6bd4f9967226c79f08f3c4e181
describe
'53533' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORM' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
d597dcb67399ca5b90bb76c953bfb425
6c01bbb96fa1d23c915132d0a94c25617632f658
'2012-01-15T04:23:55-05:00'
describe
'3372060' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORN' 'sip-files00059.tif'
c55b4890202352f89687c21d349bee81
f9a5a818ad876a42046db1804b31a96359a3a254
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORO' 'sip-files00059.txt'
e80b41958c5bf5e227c1464b65071a01
7161e1015b409a28469888c235f60eddec2c6635
describe
'22628' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORP' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
0c1fdfadeed739d7fb702e955f90dcd7
28124a3319beaf09d4c3aef00db5e84e1823ca8d
'2012-01-15T04:25:20-05:00'
describe
'419912' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORQ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
2a8732a8ce79d2f4ac31ad4f77024356
d2642876b3daa9b9b8de65ffbd68c7fdee47148e
describe
'143788' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORR' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
20e841c7cfe209241f82dd662d2d2b16
1ca7317a4a4b55bd358fdf94ad8c32911b2b3cf7
describe
'33250' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORS' 'sip-files00060.pro'
3c12e49526058aa0d817e0ee812563b3
9a746d30919445efb148f3a69ccafba30fcfef9d
describe
'55760' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORT' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
7d9d3affaeaf25ca2c03c274217526c3
43584318c2653a3af6d2ed3f71f19e56d31b5425
'2012-01-15T04:32:03-05:00'
describe
'3371884' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORU' 'sip-files00060.tif'
c91b6e542e6cca66810625b7e286a447
d6a4e08623f92049424cc5298b9aec374be670e5
'2012-01-15T04:27:03-05:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORV' 'sip-files00060.txt'
c38bec72760d29085a591fa31d25d87a
e277f743aa240f765bfb67bf48a8dd6b4565da71
'2012-01-15T04:26:45-05:00'
describe
'22296' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORW' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
a6090a146ba3436f67fa82df2ab9e546
a2019e5c9eb6b6041df0624d6a3a47ca4cfea043
'2012-01-15T04:29:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORX' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
30d3962598b8c5b3b7d6d14b6c80d2dc
21b8475997054e366e72835cec911e71c4fa8dd4
'2012-01-15T04:24:39-05:00'
describe
'138502' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORY' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
f89cc68cfae6e49a26283669c7d7f3f7
20d2330ae4607e49ee9a4d41b039b98f4128ea8e
describe
'31761' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAORZ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
842a2bdac3534cd4115dfbdd6d134b5f
9161ca5c46e92747eb0ddf7e24169d459d1259e6
'2012-01-15T04:26:29-05:00'
describe
'53808' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSA' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
3eec7a15ba40213887394f91801e9b0b
b11f9c047cf1edb6394e0d1c73b43a3339874700
'2012-01-15T04:25:52-05:00'
describe
'3371528' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSB' 'sip-files00061.tif'
6fa17086764ab11e02cc9f821879ae27
9690a51864d121109b38898c0f050ecd73c3ccc7
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSC' 'sip-files00061.txt'
300c4711003ac39b74245c9b43875a14
ed9985dd33b244ff4f388d0763fc8a5a9be60b38
'2012-01-15T04:30:12-05:00'
describe
'21531' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSD' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
d77f280099eb55016de1686bc549caca
255fa5818297755265bfae3cf1e5ed9f2be162a4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSE' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
b46e0487274247adc291c731e674a47e
dfde2452343a33cdb97e0bf011a44af78221c33d
describe
'147585' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSF' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
ccb28c44a317130bd3f76346840cb7a3
f9ea655bd8ba26b9ab562b765a59a2c959af6046
'2012-01-15T04:29:52-05:00'
describe
'35428' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSG' 'sip-files00062.pro'
0af6afe8c5ffa36cd62a4f2ff80dad31
a3d75ea8146336596a087d48653c36d4ee210fd8
'2012-01-15T04:31:22-05:00'
describe
'57781' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSH' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
07d22cced7480021bfeb0407d79ea857
8ce03ab7a11ca5cfcf1e14f8e9a548e1b04ba416
'2012-01-15T04:24:24-05:00'
describe
'3371964' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSI' 'sip-files00062.tif'
7954e6f2a3b484af1b2ce0423d9f99a7
e3808f9bce872927bf2733d520e34f255a5dadaf
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSJ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
d308ffecd89a3a1cbea9764911c716db
fdc5176a73a11260bf36d3ae7a88ef2333b0ff69
'2012-01-15T04:29:55-05:00'
describe
'22433' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSK' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
896d73aade62746db94fe610fbc69f5b
053b1848668bcf829d528c081888caa78e61c99c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSL' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
421b5d3fe536181fb658098498d1e1b1
b5700425d3c4347610709a847147a72443f0fb5e
'2012-01-15T04:29:06-05:00'
describe
'117742' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSM' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
8c60611c8b2c268304c40929ab01ef4f
f5f014e692af09e52cb728e62056661fa9a6b8e6
describe
'23980' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSN' 'sip-files00063.pro'
4477c7eb9631f0f69df026030ad9fcbe
6d6d24368ad635719ed520a088c8942bd6d11d35
describe
'46491' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSO' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
cfc4a8c0eafccdcac1fa5564cfb40d37
166b10f3c0d4be131cc2f10867410a0ea74f2b4d
'2012-01-15T04:32:08-05:00'
describe
'3370932' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSP' 'sip-files00063.tif'
bff95cb6b73f3210547afed00e085cba
a60ec020baa4655336b918f2c48cb48d3f93f5c1
'2012-01-15T04:31:20-05:00'
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSQ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
cd5fcb2b6c6a078587308afe97d85637
404b725cfdd03573b2c5560e1d7e3862132814a5
describe
'19676' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSR' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
a87e0cb9e4e5659a5ac58fec5079cdf6
4a06e0c2780763875f5775f25315b5ce71749f13
describe
'419888' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSS' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
33a7d830d27214035d686ecc696a4f59
dbca3d090e98d422d692349ddde7de5aa40ec2c6
describe
'137869' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOST' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
b8c2ad53b8cc44b27f46bf52afe15525
53320168523103ea1f8cf107198340c81101dd72
'2012-01-15T04:26:50-05:00'
describe
'32050' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSU' 'sip-files00064.pro'
3bb0ddd54bbd80a4896977b72d24dfa0
58cef5cb0a50def941f4a73304dac4f455e741bf
'2012-01-15T04:32:11-05:00'
describe
'54716' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSV' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
f9408c566e115de5ba8b0a5285d82ee5
9493fcfc02d6218b46340bbee06d1a8ff5c221bb
describe
'3371948' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSW' 'sip-files00064.tif'
c336d3c923cb953f43df4abe452342ba
b26925163e0dfe1f76e25b9244def44a6066f85e
'2012-01-15T04:28:01-05:00'
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSX' 'sip-files00064.txt'
4d3aa556c1bf0034656c260e88b3a4c9
84b2211270f5ed4a62ace010be247b4a77912b9e
describe
'21911' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSY' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
37a678f2fdcc1e8b26f23d88439f09e8
380dba76a44504951664234e8314beb5eda3452e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOSZ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
ae8fe41255cf8fe51c4cb446084c0c72
db041e5e9e117b5528b33847338942619025ae95
'2012-01-15T04:31:33-05:00'
describe
'138865' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTA' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
a47cd026435f9782709541e6e6eff32d
9ffb6219185bea3f4df523809d3967f116f82606
describe
'32428' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTB' 'sip-files00065.pro'
ba6f56e3bfe7e8b8feb39f3400a20e8d
6e3c9ccf17a0f9bbf6109b544464b08032863440
describe
'54356' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTC' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
f43e127b1b22a7f923266277f1b5bfd0
2eac495748568c57200c23f754bac117b8e90c9b
describe
'3371932' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTD' 'sip-files00065.tif'
8ae7578d15afdb75424b5d1342c37928
a0811f04cc567d9da3ad18b815d6506e2278319c
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTE' 'sip-files00065.txt'
9b03243d58a0ac6a434bf2609451a0ad
f80ac9ace29454babfee85849612b61f7acbb831
describe
'22272' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTF' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
56c61bda2a66e86c25de7c6302e757ce
3fc9534b4c037cf2dfd1f3c151fdcf070428a767
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTG' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
14c1c829c15bb7378733f26ea8ec08e2
e6580cf9a9f293b91dfb36efba8b19240167640a
describe
'143270' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTH' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
a1d1fccc443b8fc69741672f2c3c085f
41f436fbb6c7d4ec1b103477f934c57fc849ddbf
describe
'33738' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTI' 'sip-files00066.pro'
99a25fce965e4f627a740312590cb2f7
a65b4abcf2d7d6080f62534113b0e7bedd6add78
describe
'56013' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTJ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
3d6fd8cac596fa3cf1e27a9a92370ebc
4d2c3d6d6ec3ee2819c05d646d7135e8477c7541
describe
'3372088' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTK' 'sip-files00066.tif'
c5c84f21288d9bf4a568945aa2b550fb
77636fb7e2d1ae74ff26a7e4877e7d02356a2c22
'2012-01-15T04:26:39-05:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTL' 'sip-files00066.txt'
d3b39ba25bf5c9cfdf4b9e530fe3c3e4
33eb4e19a3d3f141e4af6216ef4a7f732354af8d
describe
'22780' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTM' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
2f021963153181bdb943c3292ba829f9
ce91c37164f8487d6cc46347959b7a60d0a25ca6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTN' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
69128cdcc0599f02b545402f89fcf064
77baefcd0c1d3bac1ac0ff976dd2187aea775cb7
'2012-01-15T04:28:46-05:00'
describe
'146412' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTO' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
3e58b00c0c435abbba6ec9ae068a47b7
60f75d3ea568af46d78461d0c57e02ff155f4ff2
describe
'34384' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTP' 'sip-files00067.pro'
e69179d7a86971c2b4078774a446fd7a
c960c9bfbf16f775db4093ca90c3b95147ee2643
describe
'56144' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTQ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
3b02554fb2c5dafe6ab262176394b71c
799b3183f74edf0b530eb0f9cd0f1fd2d1ac3ee1
'2012-01-15T04:30:55-05:00'
describe
'3371836' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTR' 'sip-files00067.tif'
25850d758c137661313c38821984f59b
70c93c097c82b3a3567985f339a401535292ebf2
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTS' 'sip-files00067.txt'
67ac4ebcf3c15a66f707557e43b4e6ce
e74d4f91e620893dcfffafbb334e90e574629f56
'2012-01-15T04:27:35-05:00'
describe
'22230' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTT' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
29f692b759e2cc95694ed6fa0546e45e
8d36e9935cb20d269551ef59384de717d9de74b2
'2012-01-15T04:24:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTU' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
651459ab7309f1c84b8cf0e9cff845d9
eb1bcbe5904a50f329c0f60be20569092504be62
'2012-01-15T04:27:30-05:00'
describe
'142901' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTV' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
4ed870f1e3b1b19689e0f83cf7a16a92
e2a928a3c9f01eba16f70133c71037c5d0379587
describe
'33139' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTW' 'sip-files00068.pro'
004a7457bf7361834960769feaae798b
23aea5a09f7f0f4d6a2283b340d2b0b4404c9f56
describe
'56176' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTX' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
b53520b7fcf7a2c7c0e911d31b22b2a8
c166f7bf6ebc216e4a408f944856dee7def9ad08
describe
'3372020' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTY' 'sip-files00068.tif'
30d276b6cc0beed2ead1cf41a6c73939
2acc9b03e7914025b97b1440d2439acd98961672
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOTZ' 'sip-files00068.txt'
268b13c72d5121498182c38c827ff906
428f02386b80092f5af84c1d0298433693806eac
describe
'22661' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUA' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
5cad43494d8ac5f3b555751541961cd6
fc605e9b03cfe387712d326d887f575eaa657bca
describe
'419902' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUB' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
731f22aa75a34b877c5f38082604c2fe
30bdcfb241fbf831d55b618163785ea52c9d4720
'2012-01-15T04:25:41-05:00'
describe
'148672' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUC' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
bbf50959232970ae287e39a19bb4fdde
3027e901e2e9de50f02c2292a35d01a042de8e59
'2012-01-15T04:28:49-05:00'
describe
'34313' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUD' 'sip-files00069.pro'
114f694d68fff65d0c8caa534bb2e72a
bf55863565a764993ced8198a739fab4f04f341a
describe
'58301' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUE' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
688f62ede9d22ac7156ffe40a9ed2564
abd90a896df4c06640bff904f5a8af0a1e959332
'2012-01-15T04:30:10-05:00'
describe
'3372136' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUF' 'sip-files00069.tif'
f0db2f7ade562ca9d8ca1baacd28b801
cb4113a80805ebbb1c84c833a6287ccf4b10f504
'2012-01-15T04:31:38-05:00'
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUG' 'sip-files00069.txt'
a1f2712903626adae7cf63497bb153c6
cd2980397b460418d4e93f8f36c84ab893995f80
describe
'22988' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUH' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
9a098d2226771496e3f8eb7cd2ecf1b0
180aca4b36f6208e7e0b8f78a12ffb9d328c3a6b
'2012-01-15T04:24:54-05:00'
describe
'419869' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUI' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
2f64d4cc5d726ea83d297be8c1550d46
e6fbeabb4057b404235d64d5a32343e59e820ac2
describe
'148810' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUJ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
adf97850ce8f1e7be4db7882f40777b0
ef4648ea55d1ff1d417bbbea03889acd9e814ea8
'2012-01-15T04:28:54-05:00'
describe
'35071' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUK' 'sip-files00070.pro'
ba8bc3e72376e74aa531489febfd1693
4092bd9ccd03dce41adb3dbe73dd97f34face753
describe
'57648' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUL' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
cac032ed6b77ecda419c7c0dbb78b111
ac2f74de3cd8c2c973ba9bacf9d029ae9584e513
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUM' 'sip-files00070.tif'
4c89a349df6e83951fd315133357bdf6
5374842878324ff107a17882658f228ebc21c722
'2012-01-15T04:26:46-05:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUN' 'sip-files00070.txt'
946b1243055b3fd4c8698d050bfac414
9d2b78f3d730f4e78861aacb38f92da89580e31c
describe
'22413' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUO' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
915150af3e72b928451889dc10b6db77
03b243736672ec367776ad36f646ebf8a6d4352b
'2012-01-15T04:28:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUP' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
4b163bbb747bdc8080939c102e432848
046150f659babb2d937628893ea52c2b0d9fc9f7
'2012-01-15T04:26:52-05:00'
describe
'143054' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUQ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
e792fbb80807b36eabbe41ca8916690c
876adb9704ff442e1a60e624ea16583479e094a1
describe
'33679' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUR' 'sip-files00071.pro'
cc94dbfe45b5b0bb56687e6ae0af825e
c8ff10a336fc2e7214a9d20cbf417414a39e13d5
'2012-01-15T04:25:30-05:00'
describe
'56470' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUS' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
f1933eb980a195cbedca2ec883b56823
7cdaa2e331d0cbd87da2e2e973fbebadfa8eb687
'2012-01-15T04:30:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUT' 'sip-files00071.tif'
d081e40d8c98b320dec62fea39dd45b6
6d3aab62e2a407387a674e846818b9e02de5b013
'2012-01-15T04:24:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUU' 'sip-files00071.txt'
b85821006a872536b970faf8a433e523
5045b76ddf43298766a2b3020dcca3e45c460466
describe
'22339' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUV' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
18c8bb8eae9ca0368cc756d9d0e37274
e3194440d7f38d35eb19fc620083ad380a82882c
'2012-01-15T04:31:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUW' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
7a5360ad80a6f049632a1732a1fcf4e3
2057a42f222918c72e895eaade6f651b2459a3d1
describe
'131594' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUX' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
8aeccf8195e087544ee343e33e81d881
3be9da614ebf5f6ef0cc9d0b51843d5b63890d8d
'2012-01-15T04:25:23-05:00'
describe
'22298' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUY' 'sip-files00072.pro'
3e1567451aa98db8c57244db35424f67
0a11e0837eaad4ba0f3896ad8a916767910b653e
'2012-01-15T04:32:29-05:00'
describe
'51552' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOUZ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
1de66f73b64463612970bb9c60235c0b
c2cb386ede77919d247a360672185424ba9520c7
'2012-01-15T04:25:03-05:00'
describe
'3371984' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVA' 'sip-files00072.tif'
b8132ddc290e12b19d0ea528dcebec6e
a5113a00543f2f88addcf619c453f5f4748157ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVB' 'sip-files00072.txt'
b2c9abee0174362221bb94883f5b4f42
63905a04ac31eb8843f73abea9d0370c003d532a
describe
'22059' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVC' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
8ecee95aebf5cb7f692f54e9cc0fbe04
6e87f477f6bd02e592bd15c1c5f3057ac24f0678
'2012-01-15T04:26:34-05:00'
describe
'431017' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVD' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
45bbd5d121ceba7b1b010954ccd744bb
fd2c38eec4bc84f3141c785321a391ad5e89f920
describe
'149448' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVE' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
e5a2527dc64af3f36e68ad0c25162886
4e5cdf38d8b168b1ad2ac75b83874222636f6f1d
describe
'33330' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVF' 'sip-files00073.pro'
feb848e2bd4fbb699b418b71a3541d0d
e41cbf75a14886004241e483bf3d9ba34fecec47
describe
'58688' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVG' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
28c3eb4481a615039b962c93b875e4e3
493997f31eed32b31ae1ae4a50ffe28e412dfe00
describe
'3460720' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVH' 'sip-files00073.tif'
4d5c855f0fac1c728005c86c492b8b37
9afc242cf3608387100835de7c11e2a00587bce7
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVI' 'sip-files00073.txt'
318a07854b35984926ecac70c0f7794a
fd3002f64b8773adad330e03df1eb1a73313e528
'2012-01-15T04:28:15-05:00'
describe
'22859' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVJ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
53a323bf62870ca59077a5f402728b8d
8014b75c6394173ba4861d8bdafa76583842e0e1
describe
'419911' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVK' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
492b07134dc7b181982f80024ab32636
9867467bd44bb48453d612c48a397a9cd550fea6
'2012-01-15T04:26:53-05:00'
describe
'123359' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVL' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
4885431fb285cf2a0eb967327a136178
09e218bc3d2d46010f8829b1bc457037430d8289
'2012-01-15T04:32:14-05:00'
describe
'27923' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVM' 'sip-files00074.pro'
329622c55204a53281ad98d8808378d3
554e83e6cedf411def674bb51c896fa3a7b93ef5
'2012-01-15T04:31:15-05:00'
describe
'49384' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVN' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
8fd518ee594c4e70c0f6e5c0741c7e42
5cdb7e2bf49726f40d84827b97a92f86cd885aac
'2012-01-15T04:32:05-05:00'
describe
'3371152' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVO' 'sip-files00074.tif'
e748570f7ef3a369be68f7b682b8117f
0c591cb4cad89ea023709721583de1bb68a63fac
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVP' 'sip-files00074.txt'
648d196e07e6d27a994dd9466e022e33
a85a657d5589df71b678df58c38aacb6ef84c308
'2012-01-15T04:30:47-05:00'
describe
'20365' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVQ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
370111727efbee7b84b67fec6d8b2cc6
807e5708c9ae0c9e2b2d7a69d2d66877a66039d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVR' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
99360cada6a2ef9bdfa67ff5713bb494
4f5e403a48cef7a0fb75fda6e716ec023b318525
'2012-01-15T04:25:26-05:00'
describe
'116555' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVS' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
2115fb16ecda34e060fd77bdbb7ca457
a0f732745ffe26169b425f886faa872d8819a60c
'2012-01-15T04:25:13-05:00'
describe
'22990' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVT' 'sip-files00075.pro'
d81919b58665fc4938019b46b8d23f6e
6f1fa225c88c04ac655803b6a353d63029d0d257
describe
'46215' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVU' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
2f2dce77f0c06340b6218e6e6e63ed04
2f3623c49cbebe4c457b1754ada2874f2d15a381
'2012-01-15T04:27:39-05:00'
describe
'3370988' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVV' 'sip-files00075.tif'
e148ec81dc70f88f989079bfbf25a94e
0b149f4f05f18457b6639ec91ccde8cfd3406300
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVW' 'sip-files00075.txt'
f2805736e0b87f56ad06cc4bfb4ae025
521bd0b2de4497e9b2e66f567ef319ee78b966e1
describe
'19380' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVX' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
4fdaebb044569dd4271b80d4c6126cfa
3c56109b136222f1ce61fe0c0b2a8770bdb7cd96
'2012-01-15T04:32:21-05:00'
describe
'419868' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVY' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
b535b88eba4eb8435e1b32f6fdda7dfe
124e0e7b9b09f1fae5b52cc549a1100583d58a84
describe
'151903' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOVZ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
ada61224d069ba28f2849f527c15c16a
2b5222c2bd231545238428f682ed164b9855858c
'2012-01-15T04:26:08-05:00'
describe
'35494' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWA' 'sip-files00076.pro'
28329a05f02209924722849e0535fd3c
6db69b49e63be50477645908090de9a5b1a918c1
'2012-01-15T04:26:43-05:00'
describe
'58168' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWB' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
4199d4342d0106df15e4f7ffaa001890
5edef4b47d5a7d6da197ffe78ccdb04bcc6c592d
'2012-01-15T04:31:21-05:00'
describe
'3371972' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWC' 'sip-files00076.tif'
1cdd02a108fc546a3ae1a6666a503fe4
03812b8a49cb421298bc57157f4405f45c4e6ee0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWD' 'sip-files00076.txt'
1163ac12c175578a8f833539693e452b
3d1f2d2cd3659629a7edda279ecc8a6e822f07f8
'2012-01-15T04:30:21-05:00'
describe
'22630' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWE' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
8b421e3f97f6db227980b37a760444d9
8a3b0cfe1290b520c22e4429da6b041bc2cde881
'2012-01-15T04:32:28-05:00'
describe
'419920' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWF' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
b8d273e8a904b8327a9a1b9d9ab1ce53
a6bde72c542104829575c2a7f3758bd0f45a8b29
describe
'142930' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWG' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
ebdd4d690aec7e9476354d5e1e0285c7
81cf754b00641216684497dc9fa9e6aa56d22053
describe
'33146' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWH' 'sip-files00077.pro'
0bd6af5d0968f3dd340bfd67ff483a9d
4b7fa6fa4e971031502915bc66b757fce2fe9303
'2012-01-15T04:26:00-05:00'
describe
'55566' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWI' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
bce156b5cc3aa4b77d423d2b3ca745bb
5d711e53d056133f2ea4b1d68f9595cc61f5b71a
'2012-01-15T04:30:37-05:00'
describe
'3371688' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWJ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
fc80ba5aab50d71a5a02ddb5455fd039
65ab2205e40bf05bc9af78087070bf24dfa4f3fe
'2012-01-15T04:29:39-05:00'
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWK' 'sip-files00077.txt'
17c385a9fe3e68e0a353d95e99ac77ec
c997d81c846156a6fade7cb2073848c0948f5ed0
'2012-01-15T04:30:00-05:00'
describe
'21896' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWL' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
883beb9c05f7331d93df5d1f30b5dd94
9654f2356cbacc6dc3ff4a34fbd0beac92e3d81c
'2012-01-15T04:27:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWM' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
e31559b4eab531935a4d6178524b5589
483507aa6aafe6d713e18e4768e9e83495084a61
'2012-01-15T04:25:12-05:00'
describe
'146227' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWN' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
44a5e095020a9d1cad36a78c0eca2b7d
24b7bbb4988c63d43ec877b3e61f468d213ff956
'2012-01-15T04:27:01-05:00'
describe
'35059' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWO' 'sip-files00078.pro'
cdf5b2d04f0408ab5e157e5fe6fc3ad8
06428c52e56007c19786681ababc2a451df8f001
describe
'56572' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWP' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
896cf2cb08bf9a84d15144b91b15cfbd
41c780c0f13822afeceed4332ea17ae24baaf86a
describe
'3371796' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWQ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
d048d4ce61f9dfe2166c1a8aaedf4706
25021ad4ada75064e03063fe97b3f21adc9ce488
'2012-01-15T04:29:57-05:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWR' 'sip-files00078.txt'
99d8090fae4dffb9da87a94c5de3e6ae
06d807c1e87da6988f5669ece26612a7fc2a12f8
describe
'22517' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWS' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
1e1f608d0dcd7b1de815d904021a48b7
873baaeab867f29a29f6bcdf0c159ac656f98710
describe
'419891' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWT' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
3faf69356ead8954e4ebd656b94ec55a
31d90ae485a017d438d9cd8a0f98754afaa0f38f
describe
'136351' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWU' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
f96ecc6c934a930af1026c5e2a1428aa
e12fef09eb14b36bffbe2905b695bd4fdcb5fc61
'2012-01-15T04:28:37-05:00'
describe
'31498' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWV' 'sip-files00079.pro'
e1d5abecb666a5b821d24739fb19a4e7
615777ad120682b89fc06daaf7f1c9d3857615db
'2012-01-15T04:29:27-05:00'
describe
'54045' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWW' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
64902048372e1b34f122af6c11b120e3
8227893b1e751921203dce4516d125b24faec9fc
describe
'3371920' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWX' 'sip-files00079.tif'
32aa92313d24e112d9a3d3a76007551b
fbecef3e43256cef14cf7ffc0500219d0b4d0f47
'2012-01-15T04:31:34-05:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWY' 'sip-files00079.txt'
f6290936c55f1e0690694dae345295e4
6861588952615388597729da2517100e5ed73465
describe
'22105' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOWZ' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
4b1e5f1d2db61b7df5f8d13e138e73c5
58792d357e256f505a697f54952400fd3c560789
'2012-01-15T04:31:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXA' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
6d2693061a95ecdefce1181859a5a0b9
3aef051b3f5cfcf7132c9eb4c4a6e0ff4525a2f4
describe
'136021' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXB' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
3d89633857bac05997ce6859c4f6a9bb
ebdb3bfb3a1fbd5af1a17f0a3033dc950d908f0b
describe
'31372' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXC' 'sip-files00080.pro'
f0d24dc15e33b930065c6172c7285608
f221d613c9f8ae0033ebbf8cfd4dc03aaa9411ec
describe
'53124' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXD' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
152b79b69f1dc6277d028af642a9cf34
1298741fc813c5462390ad23339fa6979292967f
'2012-01-15T04:29:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXE' 'sip-files00080.tif'
4ea80fe577a396bc459d70638e279cf7
d388bf508871f63608affb7a3eb5721d5bf97cac
'2012-01-15T04:31:01-05:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXF' 'sip-files00080.txt'
9cee9ea83502af1f8d62bc1694b4084d
f50b9a39186d6432aeca17e4e32894958b374c09
'2012-01-15T04:30:19-05:00'
describe
'22132' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXG' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
7ed29f691bdc151a439e34182bca8bf6
025ccf413ef3bbd8509e202237f316cefe755f29
'2012-01-15T04:31:29-05:00'
describe
'419841' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXH' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
932817ecef57f4b125c248b49b1e0c11
e0e48cf4ee810a2ad567bedf6c9d628d6293932d
'2012-01-15T04:26:02-05:00'
describe
'163663' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXI' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
9bdf12f0effec7c18e117abfe88adc2d
903474d359318c5b5d49b72428d79f8029c96d4f
'2012-01-15T04:32:16-05:00'
describe
'2315' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXJ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
f056433ad0670ac8dc85a968947cf9e1
f5416d40c7c9aac71f5e59eb30e8b6bbe129100c
describe
'50072' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXK' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
4225362e7a98186eefafd23821959a72
7f3bb51f70290e0d93e85d1d917f018371ddb658
describe
'3371912' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXL' 'sip-files00081.tif'
0e5f25bdaa4b75db638f2c4596b01b74
4f098a7c9521368219fd1686ce08cc0163df288f
describe
'226' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXM' 'sip-files00081.txt'
a234eef8717b04a0f32431ec86359e45
dd444386adad091ef431fbef7e429aa6b715b39d
describe
Invalid character
'21662' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXN' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
3addd4470bd3d9899c87bd4a2378cf1c
31dff7254779e786560042dc19de9f5c7f2c5eac
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXO' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
b946cb7c0340e31ec5fb7c82093b6ea8
cb3dbe00a28861e87b850db8da08873cb5a6208e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXP' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
f33296c21a24513964be7abb1e932457
3b2d082da229c1b6b37df1698b2c1c0fe862d50c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXQ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
9fe92e26af6da3ddeb608b13557854f4
740a6a340230a4f5f496140b7593a42e0746f979
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXR' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
d76e947bdec4a3922d10d872517ab502
b24c100b51ce9121da647891c46fb899d57c5055
'2012-01-15T04:30:20-05:00'
describe
'419816' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXS' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
5653b6633b22dbded08cc7d3b1e628d9
266fef61af0fe92632ce575dccf7bf37aebe351a
'2012-01-15T04:26:26-05:00'
describe
'148598' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXT' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
2f3a1203920962d7d92ebd6566907134
c2d89de24ca8b56a9e3aef7a3a2d1a6d3f6241cd
'2012-01-15T04:29:50-05:00'
describe
'31622' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXU' 'sip-files00083.pro'
e17181a6a2fba1432db10040da59d432
3cb1006dec88252bf595d531c1a89c95ab2f4ea3
'2012-01-15T04:30:41-05:00'
describe
'57574' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXV' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
03a32c6a31d612c4c2883db681d63ba0
50b1f097ee6fbc4b7849420a0ded2f923addcb0e
'2012-01-15T04:26:55-05:00'
describe
'3371916' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXW' 'sip-files00083.tif'
8d2d0d61391727ab2c9e0e9bccd756cc
604b10e838f46728000bff86fbf0eea56b23252e
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXX' 'sip-files00083.txt'
bd8a6c90e5b732254e94ca542ab06650
912b3a54046ce17a8cb54f4f941459dd965b26ad
describe
'22404' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXY' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
cd7a3465d1efa421f63251251d556e6a
3336af7e01535d31d566400103676de572e25d00
'2012-01-15T04:30:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOXZ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
993018d553cc010e3af8292e00291b59
b59f21582e5518b8a102f4fc58506eb0f167c008
describe
'120782' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYA' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
9ed2809f65871ac8a2d5a1cecab5ca76
d1a56de086dc04e7cafaf99a7529f74af8c657ff
describe
'28482' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYB' 'sip-files00084.pro'
fb1cd183905c525a0da4bc535ae60a85
f0a2398948343c30fd4476c0fefb02962e500dc9
describe
'50095' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYC' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
204a9194529dc82f79b4dbae435a97d7
e3db189f8f161c6cbaced24ff9a683e516256abc
'2012-01-15T04:27:23-05:00'
describe
'3371432' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYD' 'sip-files00084.tif'
8938227800ab94eed4c4c63143192c19
2651ad5402195d2e088007d91b356cb7bc03ee88
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYE' 'sip-files00084.txt'
7707f2c37e72cb2bc267d0ce97457d56
f4a01043c1c1436be7179aeee8d57f7a9b06f648
describe
'21077' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYF' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
13734a717f76b23c29303fbf666e6707
7df8aa58668f6222dec8227916ea7c12bc1ed0fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYG' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
92c771720b6d6a3a1acac700271b33da
c6d62ba7f0c94328f37b3dee641896b8c1de1cd3
describe
'142621' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYH' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
bb4db619d2ed0ae22859754636924685
ddf89a6cf6f507b7629cf3113927e91ccaef7ac5
'2012-01-15T04:27:26-05:00'
describe
'34113' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYI' 'sip-files00085.pro'
a9ee1ce2ccff2fd2548144d96bc18e4e
480a0b31a930e0965cd82195680876b93aa37e74
describe
'55708' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYJ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
2c3866b04c72c28ebb997741b764f5ad
8aa8fe1a9ba4e6759b6bed9f4cc0154e8e8cab5b
describe
'3371588' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYK' 'sip-files00085.tif'
d2c719c667296819fbd51e2b03c9156a
858a662b318a962615ec831fbe2956440a0a6066
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYL' 'sip-files00085.txt'
5fe1aa13a104d4a5325dfa3d59d791dd
24e588ee520b269bf45d41f583915cfa471b9a16
describe
'21747' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYM' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
5ee33eefd9bcb82652526829dfa0bd9c
213d7925efb0c126bcd8007a60228c23f8987147
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYN' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
536931f424fa6e7a3782668e8dac3f00
d97401f689a2a0c1f70f05e7e401bff02a75b21b
'2012-01-15T04:32:32-05:00'
describe
'143484' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYO' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
eeb20f5cdbddaf43df3dfb500c91894f
f7a2252c6bd9b57caf918c851859f6e622582044
describe
'33412' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYP' 'sip-files00086.pro'
80ff9bd4dc3cc1cc1fcc42e3afe219d6
b323a76bf8fb46ae290b1b1b44f1e65d9c2dce42
describe
'55625' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYQ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
9e9b16725afd19ee04ba3c5a07ef0878
c8e0b30599a39f5c435af881c5d916c51db678e0
'2012-01-15T04:32:17-05:00'
describe
'3371804' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYR' 'sip-files00086.tif'
9519430c1a0a2ab4ea4eea1c989c9e01
4c565a57c66523add53909817220cdc5bf8c5842
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYS' 'sip-files00086.txt'
30fb650b731663cfbd313467917c1b97
70a454f45e69251ff9582496761e7163095d4d34
describe
'22504' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYT' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
7b2d521229693b5760209dcca02457c4
f153aa05fb4b3670f9663aeb1a9552fbc62d7bfd
describe
'419875' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYU' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
2682cd8ee083b9d37bb09c43c40a441c
001d43beb1f170983b518cdcd587da399f529b42
'2012-01-15T04:28:40-05:00'
describe
'136476' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYV' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
5a8518cc3d988fbdd1267a79886a7009
2e0485e40ac534b5d462cb5781276bd000d7bee3
'2012-01-15T04:24:50-05:00'
describe
'31578' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYW' 'sip-files00087.pro'
4245c49e9d04c622cfcbe8b60efe7757
2cb967581609f2406b5f61ace1c091e02e3b76e6
'2012-01-15T04:31:47-05:00'
describe
'55626' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYX' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
024a66c61a19ee05ef00296dad03cc23
c94c20b32caa5952c3111d1c9d8601980dd814f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYY' 'sip-files00087.tif'
7f6ce068ed263fa5c92414a907597ddc
cb50d3d74bb1cdfb2b01f0573a3552e365f0ea6d
'2012-01-15T04:31:32-05:00'
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOYZ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
6963381ee68ea0c7d27aa1222e2df709
d7270945d0e31434156af9b81285559deb106413
describe
'22202' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZA' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
532441d914d1279bee337a88cfb98bbc
218e06eae83e80555744fba20191fefc2e6f6e48
describe
'419892' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZB' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
487fa7e867d7eb4fee0261caae144550
386ef879cd9cc43fc50ad0a4383645f4e5d57bf5
describe
'147406' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZC' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
d7c3563dfc6c00b50a292e1f2b8dec42
fe35210176e9edd70d7a3520c8eab8d481b77c9d
'2012-01-15T04:31:55-05:00'
describe
'33614' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZD' 'sip-files00088.pro'
0ca69a3ceb5b5f586b3bffaff2f37025
73774ba26c7565e5c498a9c9ad7c76d9c4e61ddf
describe
'57665' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZE' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
a37b689206784877dc68c02de0e2888a
d82895d7b3f09e31565bea2b53c03a4bea4bce85
describe
'3371988' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZF' 'sip-files00088.tif'
e4d82421fd7c36d93ec5a7989960da6e
6163a8fa335dccfcdc6226d8ece07f08af9765e4
'2012-01-15T04:27:52-05:00'
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZG' 'sip-files00088.txt'
989fddab443de96fab4f280c3e802f27
40c855eb53db57c5671814aefb9a5f7d2a8200c9
describe
'22681' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZH' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
3fbd7aa58a6b19e33f5b27d5f308ed3f
1125d991c5be7634cb121a662cfc70efc84351f8
'2012-01-15T04:32:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZI' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
071aa46209ab6a0d4a7f15f7f4be5176
7fc67d125a584e8434add7df32f5cfc8c6db67f4
'2012-01-15T04:31:30-05:00'
describe
'149185' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZJ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
993559265d3b7d28f7a61cb7f7d5ed5e
600721d0d89e9983ee252c9250929331ce0fb1fc
describe
'34632' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZK' 'sip-files00089.pro'
7c786b93c6aff897883b2a3d58ad8cc1
ae66d11d2c65e98a87bee00927e5ea14208e4fc0
'2012-01-15T04:30:46-05:00'
describe
'58654' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZL' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
314352a2f7f32c2b5657b445bf606bca
d5b7df1e4ddff5b6fb8849bab79eb3f839dd513c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZM' 'sip-files00089.tif'
04a6d2dd2a03c3c65e8241844cf80222
472a54f171efea49265df70bba78aecc286dfdb6
'2012-01-15T04:26:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZN' 'sip-files00089.txt'
b791588e59ba050a740ef6e3a440fbb8
8cb64258432d972da089afefb80dc238b6191979
'2012-01-15T04:31:53-05:00'
describe
'22231' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZO' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
1b193b40054d8f76085eaf9321bb232b
56f07379b7abc2f4ae14f0f9c624a1152231fc55
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZP' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
7f26b2836dc512328bb76fab88b7530d
4f12848ea1ae1ee360ee14acbace6f7844059d45
'2012-01-15T04:31:04-05:00'
describe
'167837' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZQ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
cce040770da8355742283d505ff6c690
c70178ed169520bde1729e61ae549bd0d4789b83
describe
'35336' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZR' 'sip-files00090.pro'
13f10b780a2d0881b071c2e9f8858d24
fcfcfb61e9850a9336ba55ebdeaba20f81ae8dd6
describe
'61449' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZS' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
2c439da35314ffa0312030bcec43dad8
f60eccc5a4efe96ca5fc938612936a0b7e6b5a63
describe
'3372208' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZT' 'sip-files00090.tif'
40ffff22a3e39a9820b630e134a14d54
58fb41d7a497f97f8a0ce7f38b946e63a0122ab4
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZU' 'sip-files00090.txt'
a773a32be231cab242f40b07b44396e0
8e5694ca2eb5d6796e179515f1f854cc699f86f2
describe
'23501' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZV' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
d44f1cb75c40d5498b183b94b080e381
7e03c62be2d68724d487da07bfe0deef1ba7b001
'2012-01-15T04:28:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZW' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
86d3c68b573b59c1a959c01768fc2033
f26403d022ba3c38d4b153bcd23361edde0fec12
describe
'157427' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZX' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
2a5dfd7fb86826dd73ff4ce27478c9e1
89a331e68fe431f2595a1a4ec300c8b1053f45be
describe
'32258' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZY' 'sip-files00091.pro'
9dd8bc5fdf1d81551ec28bcf6e809ed9
d4bdf4352630bd48f43bfa2f5a1c67292c608b40
describe
'58369' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAOZZ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
3710e8d1fe4a93cff9ceac614dbe0a02
032beaf008344a3dcf104658541aa551513d88e7
'2012-01-15T04:28:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAA' 'sip-files00091.tif'
19d11baec11f7dbc929ac2e2a1cb9bda
64cc5cbf2308e1d0f70724047cd668e3532d1a3b
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAB' 'sip-files00091.txt'
9645cab9de140538abfeaff7a2d69d2d
15be8674e232201fb5ba9978653026ee4f7f2c01
'2012-01-15T04:24:30-05:00'
describe
'22766' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAC' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
ed9f50ab8a8a75f37b32b914924ca779
e910a1f4e325cb3948c441b69b0f2213d13d00a4
'2012-01-15T04:24:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAD' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
4fbc5ae5f392c2e03e62f09602f97d64
562324e1f29c11917216c7be4579e7c5f4e2f31a
describe
'136773' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAE' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
e2f1097fae528e1ecf83655082717fab
c871bf2393933069d577cfe616c2343b7be3a34d
'2012-01-15T04:29:42-05:00'
describe
'31999' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAF' 'sip-files00092.pro'
1de470ab40e088f81b537a155a9b6a83
b108e8e328c330ed81d7fdebf878fbda0c3b8915
'2012-01-15T04:28:56-05:00'
describe
'53857' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAG' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
18c0fd5b20a0c47e23f7fe70b036ca38
15010edc1bbd178aabc800e74a434cbfe140f872
'2012-01-15T04:26:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAH' 'sip-files00092.tif'
b229e54a566fe593b71ef306d35a9651
6d8d8c849d31c7ab0925ed574117f2ce61824991
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAI' 'sip-files00092.txt'
3c585bd0143be16b9fb80c3f93df608d
308eed6f4222f8a3f32541496c03ac4d5828c4be
describe
'21977' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAJ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
39ffdf3f28b1f3591e08e0f89021db44
01fdd8a1f92f11047bd5a24cf254bf66c102f8bd
'2012-01-15T04:30:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAK' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
6a2f9383ba17458dff161316f2a1651d
f726c698bdb554dbc9a7b036170fb75cb8a7ff2b
describe
'126474' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAL' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
ea4817e1eb3920ecc48db435e1b56b13
1313ab94d48805a262c73419e6ba79edd7011a9a
'2012-01-15T04:24:03-05:00'
describe
'28681' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAM' 'sip-files00093.pro'
9ce1e79c544348669e18a8a38fe79326
1861dbd12b6589b22479e14b08cab910c6c22442
'2012-01-15T04:31:25-05:00'
describe
'50298' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAN' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
8fe7247c9f803b3a746547ba3bce47ca
e2b0aed446dc11dd79209705d7a51c0e901eac00
'2012-01-15T04:26:27-05:00'
describe
'3371300' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAO' 'sip-files00093.tif'
2d7db89c53c38760073181b78fd6ab4f
f7f4204b94ed0308479f0cc6d30facf8f42cce52
'2012-01-15T04:25:22-05:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAP' 'sip-files00093.txt'
837e7728f8ab21cd4ca7cae7b35938ee
b2fdcb8348e29f6265dedbe93b21db36e7476f9a
'2012-01-15T04:27:45-05:00'
describe
'20665' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAQ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
2145abe68a10881450dcbecd5409a2ee
a4f9ecc9bb044de003a440eef76f89d1f09645f9
describe
'419893' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAR' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
3cc69a82c874bc54fa324431bf50a9cd
ad89233a4f672dfa2a087d7cdbc7a26bde2bc6c9
describe
'120399' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAS' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
5011d2a621ca6325951e079bd33f92b1
0f8d60176d7f2f5124976f93b946b65e01ac041e
describe
'22698' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAT' 'sip-files00094.pro'
90ed11dc429d1bdc1c2a7611e66d7625
b34721da4671f5000ec02aa7673ba75740cc420f
describe
'47324' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAU' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
f9600c44f9556c4e687bbbfc7c8e0d7f
3b3653a7eeabecf93a4e694e1fa4c836ccca6a37
'2012-01-15T04:27:07-05:00'
describe
'3371252' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAV' 'sip-files00094.tif'
a8b83bd812180375185fb9b49d709011
a7b0e6ba123149404dbdfa015f72e93c0ee703cf
'2012-01-15T04:32:25-05:00'
describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAW' 'sip-files00094.txt'
69813a06be80c8a3258b56caaf468552
c25fb0b96d840f800edf01e9f4334e80d2a8222f
describe
'20356' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAX' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
1be09827d2d41045759dc0760c4718b7
7e7dc1606d7efe4ac021387289d9f96fb4949830
describe
'419838' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAY' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
49a37eb9696237b2cf55ceb7a849baf3
c6d4e4845a5ffacf168f154de81119ef5ad631c0
describe
'141022' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPAZ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
c9a5edf85356f6d1778158297ee1c3a5
9665b62ef41bce4ee65c83d8d614ccdef714292c
describe
'32508' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBA' 'sip-files00095.pro'
503026abd5a86855d7b2c11566671fff
05950339ba673316c5afdb2ddb439530cbbc083b
describe
'55793' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBB' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
0b26e337af455c1f6c047ff7725d9f2d
8047017c1b38e610dd0d7128f32f375ee103ed68
'2012-01-15T04:25:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBC' 'sip-files00095.tif'
535143489037d68fcc74f45982ae66f7
b7f3d4c1b9cff66077dfb99ed60c045e42f50402
'2012-01-15T04:28:14-05:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBD' 'sip-files00095.txt'
388df4761551cef9146f8bfb11d82cf3
1185119321c6cbc3e8faba519f7277306ef54399
describe
'22314' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBE' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
d60786f264c82943cfe8c336349a8988
afdcce9ee7226d4fc5bef3f61d205fc29676241d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBF' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
3098b58fd70608503969147b83fe33a4
1c92e65d8e81e0ac2de21f82d2793b8a01dcc122
'2012-01-15T04:31:35-05:00'
describe
'145564' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBG' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
20ffb9d204896d4ce971d0951c524262
409917f7e6ca8f9853dda6be1b3bd0e104614295
describe
'34329' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBH' 'sip-files00096.pro'
8b32d948548c124c49365582e74a2e1a
3c74b2449dfadf21726608678f478afc7f36f19a
describe
'57035' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBI' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
ad88ea8763583e6c64a41c5b35330a23
49edd2733846c6648594c1594bd3449fbedd279c
'2012-01-15T04:30:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBJ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
aa4068671f40bd2843d5715d637af6fd
46c12259c502cf073eef2bbe6b4a14f199a153e6
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBK' 'sip-files00096.txt'
8f530ed5d316a2753450694766e06f3d
ee6148f8fac9ef214e0378be57d5a31400dd73b2
'2012-01-15T04:24:51-05:00'
describe
'22627' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBL' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
e5ffe07ee2a6971b8f453343c3f62104
df6c223f50b984410fade39d8f134b4dd798b399
'2012-01-15T04:32:20-05:00'
describe
'419863' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBM' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
7fcae406084a5c3c5a89347ce6680fbd
2f88f7d7bdbfb326877d0994c18768efcd631eb8
'2012-01-15T04:29:59-05:00'
describe
'175022' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBN' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
2284cf5b1cfc2685b28e61f1c316b0f3
b1ea317b5816ce29b164c61108650464dfb3d196
describe
'2082' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBO' 'sip-files00097.pro'
71f426e4692f6e44174ec44f70c94a50
c1eb1c1c9340e9f9cf0087ace10f6f8c033ad133
'2012-01-15T04:28:26-05:00'
describe
'51931' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBP' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
1aa0626b27c31e3ef7768f5c3d2cc3d7
265121eec18e73c1905209914729d093a10ba342
'2012-01-15T04:28:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBQ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
8ace0b14734589e296f39d3d498af68d
cc330b6a01cca69b2301bfdd19f67afa404e23ff
describe
'107' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBR' 'sip-files00097.txt'
771575b63c22d8f8ad15206606f38c5f
37b8d6d7b4caa083b4af8db98404d71237849f3e
describe
'22090' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBS' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
41568dbc50fe5a8600e838ff619e1704
2936b7cb50b8e2867ee7057af960c2948c2e137b
describe
'170840' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBT' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
0a0148c265cd97e168242d0ee25a4733
e300950e93b8b5f04ec101e33055ae3c443c5fb5
describe
'19256' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBU' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
ef5f69376f0aa0bb06bf073bbd638f8d
32f42952770c81f4cf48d5ca5fdf37bed0cefac0
'2012-01-15T04:26:30-05:00'
describe
'11055' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBV' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
9bf3d2465c9b1161947ad826b640d5c7
e2fb83543d7d33916b7a72cccf6070fcbba49962
describe
'3367236' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBW' 'sip-files00098.tif'
2e5e4d94fa4aecda5e7ea6a8e0e85e0b
eb3b9f62c6e6e63c508f6ed3763f48252747946c
'2012-01-15T04:24:32-05:00'
describe
'9070' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBX' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
674eef82d4d0a3b04922da74d72a1ecd
df4c2364d7062d78d4d96ea5c256e4cb6e4fde99
'2012-01-15T04:30:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBY' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
0618c9734731a95b2df889a3c2a5f1ed
a48fcdfe4227e934256f079b7d3e02b446a6c4b4
describe
'137304' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPBZ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
a27d8ecc92c8a781d6f8f55058fb6d9e
380d01d1d6b45584a565d8adde6097ea1e3188fe
'2012-01-15T04:26:15-05:00'
describe
'31706' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCA' 'sip-files00099.pro'
bf2970894e57e105114a95b91e9658be
3912c538535ab2caac29560ce8d6ca07e3c57468
'2012-01-15T04:26:16-05:00'
describe
'54473' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCB' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
cc58d946661ae395761662d5e95b48e1
a5a2ee50b02d88cf28382bd24c0c909387f3cc67
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCC' 'sip-files00099.tif'
772260b89a31295f14840ca204000f7a
ed7a7cb772ebb12570071ead41be2cbe6415837d
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCD' 'sip-files00099.txt'
59275ea5b174404a7d8c1c359a5c73d3
8643e47ca38d8f8090aa5bdb10f93054994da514
describe
'22246' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCE' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
4620a9749862e5975481b0ac4ae74cfa
9b635d3232e853ad5afd316c4e061a93acb73aad
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCF' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
efa59d7f8086906fed8e0c92b260c0cb
bd6cba6fd58514a9c60e64a8dbc24d00a43f83d2
describe
'124042' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCG' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
583c54749ebee1f4e0b8f5822d406c66
1b129fd0259b8240b71e1d1db75b4f81961d7c88
describe
'28194' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCH' 'sip-files00100.pro'
f33640944a4610a48ff5cb2df71c5ede
27381c6c68aa6d86e17317f21dddbfe05f6dacc3
describe
'49787' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCI' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
856ba0b70af387c23449046962eb7b9c
b0fcdd682394e67309aa23820f16757752f84cca
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCJ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
bf6d0a1acada510cf448211dc6c64399
37c1fafb2923dca95d8451fc4971a08d32c4bdd6
'2012-01-15T04:25:21-05:00'
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCK' 'sip-files00100.txt'
349f77fbda01f981d86e62d828b22c4c
96359dbf2b36f7b9d717c48392b6ad73ac8a617a
describe
'21212' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCL' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
78462bbb663421f02b73c85bc6896efe
59dd067c32dade93cb5e1760319a06473610b722
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCM' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
c23dff08ed082e2236dd7703698acfb3
01d059a4e94a64737dc0009e846c8d93090120f0
'2012-01-15T04:30:23-05:00'
describe
'123507' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCN' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
965a29c407cae67c0db445ac8ff83da3
a677b055a6e0b0a5ab27cfca24986a5b59ed619d
describe
'29047' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCO' 'sip-files00101.pro'
0943201fceecda152a267488f226c3f6
51a723cf7170b605124c734c177b155763b38642
describe
'48789' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCP' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
9b0ac498c82af7ab1be15c86db5c49fd
d7d694b97bb078accd7f6ee9a0a5f8b8256262f4
'2012-01-15T04:27:09-05:00'
describe
'3371212' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCQ' 'sip-files00101.tif'
eff82be8515c397f0ee0ae6acb15063c
fc10626d152ae0a436939479a68d614f53e493f9
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCR' 'sip-files00101.txt'
2a61f26cfbd68a6d9f6b02e18d75173c
2d512192fada5cb504e4669fcaf722cff0c65d15
describe
'20750' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCS' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
3d3cb1c9eb8e90af7f743dcf7fbce5d2
8f775b65ea56639808998a463287228541e21270
'2012-01-15T04:26:38-05:00'
describe
'419919' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCT' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
26f1116ce608ca331b1497fa6222b2d0
df5d99a56229d2aaa47053c9fc75bc5330ef215c
describe
'126350' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCU' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
f840bd51a77809164171e56986482b60
0ba8711f9f39a1737bf45eea7f7f9d23c5366940
describe
'28940' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCV' 'sip-files00102.pro'
2bc2cf69cd509c4fdd93bc2cb5c1fbbe
85965067f39cf5b06aed93d1b1a97d2d63d3f4d0
describe
'50927' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCW' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
4a7d895c0d69a5fea9f2342197ad8dc0
42ade82bed1d9c175381a55ac64fb0a6040c38c7
'2012-01-15T04:32:22-05:00'
describe
'3371540' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCX' 'sip-files00102.tif'
55614921de88f54750eb63ae19c2f099
ef10dd93ad0da4457f21d04287021f25f6b56a5e
'2012-01-15T04:24:02-05:00'
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCY' 'sip-files00102.txt'
9ea210a55b6ba93cd5031756f4459b52
d126bdd481ac88a210cc5ae8f4a3e52c63435c02
'2012-01-15T04:32:12-05:00'
describe
'21148' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPCZ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
eb67e3121c0f49a4a7aacb97533bc508
98d2e6e8fd04811433c6f8fe2c292035f5a9e8c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDA' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
e918bde1e8fe146732402f0c28a84b7d
6fa738962783fef708bf1d1f14b9bbc437e284d0
describe
'122126' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDB' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
807a1416e527ff43738f8a8da9434144
5ba227607d17cf435b4ea9e7479e6473ff01f5b0
describe
'27823' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDC' 'sip-files00103.pro'
8da860564e82ea35ab34af06ec36db9e
35bb4b94ca2ddf70d0df9b50adb9cfb17d5a3a64
'2012-01-15T04:27:29-05:00'
describe
'49093' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDD' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
282d129cc54d2ec08a6e646da3fe3e77
197e5a2356290161f06c7aca5c7812d053e02b07
'2012-01-15T04:30:31-05:00'
describe
'3371492' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDE' 'sip-files00103.tif'
721eb7bad0369fc1c4f01703824263d3
a913b7d751651535d5599fbd8f92cd0322abb029
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDF' 'sip-files00103.txt'
b5731b6fbe68fbda9bd5af593c679f8e
23e42102a9aff9afbde2f5c80704c659ffa9b6aa
describe
'21155' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDG' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
03df68d2a20d283e03d1175eff55a893
1ad612025b093d1db8c561b8c302442d3c1fdf1b
'2012-01-15T04:27:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDH' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
680e8c23d2b65a32d393762e4b4baa36
cbd505ff8b4ae40e592684183cf6e799dd56fe53
'2012-01-15T04:26:49-05:00'
describe
'140328' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDI' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
4a40f521fb167baa6bb83bc302d731ac
d3e4714d23ecdea3e57d237104052ccacfb3f0b3
'2012-01-15T04:26:40-05:00'
describe
'33149' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDJ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
3af1e2c50dd5dfff355af4521d54144c
4fa069b4db5a83480ec16a52169063cf221939d3
'2012-01-15T04:32:02-05:00'
describe
'54713' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDK' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
4ff07ab5c7f4f0cfdcb5773de5950f22
acbe1cd1476b0b5fb010496d4131119790def3e1
describe
'3371800' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDL' 'sip-files00104.tif'
946b5c0eec4c45c65beef795462236c0
15c00f0b5ff49dd2edd4a4ea790f84ec5fee45fe
'2012-01-15T04:28:09-05:00'
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDM' 'sip-files00104.txt'
96a9b57fd11b5eb1f9a66622975a5ac4
4c630ee5d38009585d599093319c9dd49e90693e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDN' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
ed797ec0635f32130ef8ec9ba009f770
43ec34ba952ca597b8ec310611a7f80897fe6059
describe
'419878' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDO' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
f187d36be1b50d198923f69f797e5634
6768281cbfc45096f1a9362718f83eada1bb1f65
describe
'128659' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDP' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
e8c900cca1b4c840aabf5d5cd85d6721
35372f076dd0bc56923490d002c4b2ab7da1ac1e
describe
'30046' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDQ' 'sip-files00105.pro'
7d26bdb02e69b249d6ea0826c2227bb0
d4a074a6e00efe59aa5d80c003a79bd4c633bd0b
describe
'51032' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDR' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
15abe3c34a712162cdd89653f9ec1658
b4963aec18b92ea2cb5ae0f5d77807a9ab6bb043
describe
'3371376' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDS' 'sip-files00105.tif'
f108b65ecc11fe9d71645a3e566fa8f4
08bbff45628a20d10e5ab0a09ab5dcf81c535724
'2012-01-15T04:27:51-05:00'
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDT' 'sip-files00105.txt'
994ae6e61bf6ebc0cafffc57c02a99e5
6d166c26f3c29c22fc1a5177bcd37e611494908e
'2012-01-15T04:25:27-05:00'
describe
'20817' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDU' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
7790d74b9cccb8526fb7fee392513f46
7ab709a6f0623dde4f63f466c6fdd5010d8c7d42
'2012-01-15T04:31:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDV' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
3a7d75b6f6ef7f50be6c9148b3349aa4
157fdfe7d88b55091d28127e1baf0847b70e1a78
'2012-01-15T04:24:29-05:00'
describe
'124434' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDW' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
e46e7d54ca4a2cf8e3dba0d9a7bb3e81
501283b45f3522bac35fde81cae922481f63b1a3
describe
'22991' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDX' 'sip-files00106.pro'
c4185cf96a037c93cd4da5c1d1f185b0
d926e06dc4a36ebd4b84fa78cb8c784397c5e66a
describe
'48609' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDY' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
97f227c08813225fcc7289fd78583782
cd51ccce44bb9ae02384cf837b155362b783bbdb
describe
'3371048' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPDZ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
b1b0e2f4fb5795eced55f4635e510a69
ab78409064b8d345e0dd2991e9064e47da009763
'2012-01-15T04:29:45-05:00'
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEA' 'sip-files00106.txt'
aea5816528106cb9a2c8efe9c9f5b6aa
c4f4ea275fbb13b1d1ea6a48864920baf2c57648
'2012-01-15T04:26:12-05:00'
describe
'20078' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEB' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
259e7736b95ec97071778e56d52220cd
55cab08ea3bd970063c7746b45cc11007cbdd108
describe
'419873' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEC' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
b8b354ebf25b1a69d9645265482dd93b
48ed0a21d38e854e11574ba9dca97a628c79bd36
describe
'162172' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPED' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
f65c3b37a560ee7e465adc1f3b6e05be
667470410a3f741d80af7e948086de89b210fdd7
describe
'34243' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEE' 'sip-files00107.pro'
ed6d921e2dc6b2c4397fddf336325f17
5de716d420c4287a0a953d239f9ca4fb7b373d64
describe
'60620' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEF' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
7bcac86f76a132e7822929027a11183a
5d2b36c283c69feae34f4baf42952ff7428938bc
describe
'3372148' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEG' 'sip-files00107.tif'
2404b24efb9b71661705a42ac997c7b5
131d52dbe3fb5ceed59691c3fb03c913883ccd53
'2012-01-15T04:28:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEH' 'sip-files00107.txt'
d9b2778208e01255b0514964acc37e85
bbe037aac47486b62557a2cea2b2355b87d4c264
describe
'23328' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEI' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
436635b8468a826f51259e04d41a5dc2
65c1f3b1642024c886ad7d6fad4ad3a17d7db619
describe
'419894' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEJ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
b5ca5a84a2372e6b82373c23985afdcb
f5eea9abac89611019fdc67428d3476c8c571eae
describe
'147628' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEK' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
5e727ca1e047bee6993ff068e6e3a36c
a0e49552a6328021cfa789d8b16816ee3629ef8c
describe
'26017' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEL' 'sip-files00108.pro'
289777a452d7ada7046610a46a430ce1
d70516cf21c3e5f2e321ca4846ec2e8a1911a847
describe
'55196' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEM' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
3bb7b451237df38d8b4b098debdae920
8c175f5c157636483aef56481cda22759998d92d
describe
'3372140' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEN' 'sip-files00108.tif'
7d1d13f118bb6bfcf733b0393d2767c0
e16fa3351b5d2fb3b20303a6cec35f2ae9c8011b
'2012-01-15T04:32:13-05:00'
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEO' 'sip-files00108.txt'
5dbb7e504e27c844383c4ae922a865f1
ac6030ac17d1d217e9a1ff434b220dba981b47d0
'2012-01-15T04:26:33-05:00'
describe
'22659' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEP' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
53250255454ca99e865f590b75e3bde6
8cb1265f242f617c1cab8b936038020703567096
describe
'419786' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEQ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
d87fb3c95db78dd6cc07231c886de611
5fe6e372678a5e26164d2c2ce3af69e00e30698f
describe
'146548' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPER' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
1143d63581ef6a6ed3566910087d5a31
dc561686455bd32913c484bc4ab3305733c64e5d
'2012-01-15T04:27:54-05:00'
describe
'33246' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPES' 'sip-files00109.pro'
aa084f3d589ec443c7577b0152443bcf
0110a690f060456422e46031294c43a0fb9156cc
'2012-01-15T04:31:18-05:00'
describe
'56724' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPET' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
4fb53b02ebb6703c48fa438f317aee19
47097af471dca5535c8720eb57aac1b78f96664c
describe
'3371828' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEU' 'sip-files00109.tif'
40aa7cd440453f7a13c161da5d0eed46
612ba60dfe4c2077b6a8f62b477c183ea64abc3f
'2012-01-15T04:25:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEV' 'sip-files00109.txt'
be45184f59965190ba49135b1e694617
368da4891b9ee3aee67eea01a7c4920f6607f7f2
describe
'22518' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEW' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
13ebbfef6c3ddf05c222fdb1e66e26bd
71835ba91ea43ec1fd23f2bf97e6212dd5f33d5a
describe
'419788' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEX' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
97655b65e4f7093a75b35ed8f6640b0d
19f166c0337720e1c60e04fcb9abdabcff65b47e
describe
'145243' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEY' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
66632992edc464aca3a4749122c9743a
25da7ea65a21660bbf06300f4338d91ec516780a
describe
'32251' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPEZ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
a7fe369651fea3df39c8c3a782fb8648
8525c372a790d9d5d7b1f2a238b868f9725730dd
describe
'57832' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFA' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
a82ca12bd2c9c15ea063ae48ddc954a7
8d10bb591119fbc38d9a472b0ab5f2d632996b4c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFB' 'sip-files00110.tif'
1f5fd0c80488ca12f09add141f59b246
9c3a0c3ca7fadc1fb0e8b0f87ad653b581fedf86
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFC' 'sip-files00110.txt'
ba7be91b187943adc3da17ad5f9787c3
6b3782bd3706ec46955da2ead2c3d06e5dba4097
'2012-01-15T04:26:13-05:00'
describe
'22620' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFD' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
ccba64b32877e96d7fb3f864c34426d3
cfc8954ee3463ba850d1f08fc71907df387e901e
'2012-01-15T04:30:56-05:00'
describe
'419859' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFE' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
9c7bca9811fb9ec35412832911b329f9
03045742478be1539a576dca8cc9302207d4f9ad
describe
'144458' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFF' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
ae6a97aeb8a78426e125094a7018323a
6ebf6809cc071d04a947eb88001e51140451d841
describe
'32923' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFG' 'sip-files00111.pro'
018ec3cceb2704797e23e14e8e08c350
4e975d23a602535a31223ddf225eb5a91035a121
describe
'56299' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFH' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
ef672a1cde526a86121c7f29bf549412
ae91bb58441fc9eab4486400c647b14fc48f214d
'2012-01-15T04:30:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFI' 'sip-files00111.tif'
54cd2713acb68efcdce8024220af8669
d25abdb1e2ff165a1ce4c448847ec321f9d197ed
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFJ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
f1ddc6fe05c39588f027702e99170948
265646f4ef43bb314c6025ed26aa5a6c82271983
'2012-01-15T04:24:43-05:00'
describe
'22294' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFK' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
d1a73d10dadd44dcc439bf43c664b892
1958c82c487bf0b8b306eb81b91d6eb45dd2780b
'2012-01-15T04:31:57-05:00'
describe
'428103' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFL' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
1ec95f367df9942f907dd62b1c94c96e
d93697cad56441c538e1e322b54b65a569f919fb
'2012-01-15T04:27:37-05:00'
describe
'143028' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFM' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
f2b473027fc9e4532d6697a7685680b8
ad79a5f1a5a1438e47db770df9ca888cc3a1616a
'2012-01-15T04:27:14-05:00'
describe
'32137' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFN' 'sip-files00112.pro'
7f4be9f7b4833b18ac25f43e40ec5576
48e9ab9dd06603e4067efcc17c0af12316ccd164
describe
'56594' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFO' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
1089ca318c29850d9d51b8da15f96cd3
f03fbec1cbad33d53df0fec7a342792fe328ecb4
describe
'3437604' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFP' 'sip-files00112.tif'
ea094f3f23170de395cacf24b1163524
09e4903208d5f9d2717ecb1af02852035599407d
'2012-01-15T04:32:15-05:00'
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFQ' 'sip-files00112.txt'
548b868714ef43f45d4dd93d5e4cdab6
e267fdee4f57a16ada640f0cd2e452169929e68d
describe
'22844' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFR' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
c6596f0ccffc865686a18e04f338f380
366ee61569d9b159e7a1080646950911df1c12d3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFS' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
0dfab0f761df1051408981d0f069ad69
bb6368ef5cf18533c3ad09b41cc71d284690cace
describe
'165524' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFT' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
8471ac1a87867eea6f23f3e4935e4099
0f99e0e6191c8841d79fb79d03b74d4f2f802321
describe
'2690' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFU' 'sip-files00113.pro'
8027792948b6ead88539403cef03ba7e
c76ce9fdf93b3aa3d179fc67d18361221c78b4bd
describe
'50999' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFV' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
513af73fb71a30daa863421087a20208
e64c8a34e80fc9161d0231e918297e526625d598
'2012-01-15T04:28:39-05:00'
describe
'3372032' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFW' 'sip-files00113.tif'
8f0cb5eb482e99c9778cb212451bd589
f0a9c709480c800f4f8fd01a35e3361874e9b5f0
describe
'196' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFX' 'sip-files00113.txt'
e456c3b08f0f6cc4eb61c82920fee9e7
52df4816bfab20aa39f2ff680f9bf7901d887fcd
'2012-01-15T04:30:25-05:00'
describe
'22142' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFY' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
da09caa37fac26cf4550753bab356107
637352906b209de2b690896f6fb17d04c775b793
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPFZ' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
c68ea9081421a2bf02f59094fdb0b9c5
17b66136aa974553f2e8d3efc963adc344185d39
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGA' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
ddc7db872ed3629bbcc6d2589619d147
4bdbc1efc6e3a9bba484e88448ebbc26fc791972
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGB' 'sip-files00114.tif'
a1eaa9e70ea814fe3234a0270940b78b
28d60ff9776756d28a9e2814f93af691cfa935dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGC' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
21c4e4a9169fd20ca27bb44d885582d2
e0eefa03caa96d889d0d666e732918a603d769fa
'2012-01-15T04:24:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGD' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
9e95b4c9d1ac2a90a873ac3c14ed4df7
15faee8cc0b1d352496b6135912c2bd23d6259bb
describe
'136820' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGE' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
3fef5a91cc27cf001f31522279573837
1418fd66b683565ce5047807abe611bb40722d85
'2012-01-15T04:31:26-05:00'
describe
'32715' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGF' 'sip-files00115.pro'
ae7a3b16c4c8aac3a6469e9c6367c96f
b61cbb3a271e6eb430441cb31b30bdc85a09d0de
'2012-01-15T04:31:00-05:00'
describe
'54450' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGG' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
d629e3b15a995181037607d1c28415a5
3df9632d6d1a36cccf9f8bee716f63e1a68c18b0
describe
'3371684' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGH' 'sip-files00115.tif'
32c79371d766bbe0814b4dd4ee267e06
c43fa4b1b435c2edf1ee86ac352fd8d0ff59d5b5
'2012-01-15T04:29:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGI' 'sip-files00115.txt'
024295fbbe19ddfd3abe16c649e91f33
4f1b136e3b1d772d6d9a5292ee4e87725e2162c0
describe
'21931' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGJ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
449f36201b9fc4a2972aae1694b92816
ed39f2f316bd6f8b9b853b6e42d30753c95a49e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGK' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
9558226a75abcef443388fee6be5b01e
678404de64e32de6279ed1b0ce92585cb70f79dd
describe
'137075' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGL' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
7917ee43fdad88dec0c2a07ef84aebc8
6ef99bf373da9cef39fa29861f58901415162d56
'2012-01-15T04:27:53-05:00'
describe
'31346' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGM' 'sip-files00116.pro'
ca07c37d67ee2b26f600bd9da5f921d3
85d9a1a324062b80988959c066f5fd6507089f04
describe
'54373' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGN' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
07d4da563728f60aaae450f5c2ea2995
54f63840d998ca8a9bc5a9e66a70bd67c63f0e04
describe
'3371808' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGO' 'sip-files00116.tif'
5d0e1b96d50278e9120552bd4f976f23
7a923a49fe19c0283c7231cd9dd8ca1779477811
'2012-01-15T04:30:30-05:00'
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGP' 'sip-files00116.txt'
ad6f6877189a9c2771225e4b361ee1e1
b6abc42687cb4ee932eab4ef9e977f18908531fa
'2012-01-15T04:30:04-05:00'
describe
'22566' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGQ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
a56abd4382feab162170bdcce88542b4
5baa6540fc7b305bdb285cfcb3c76f054539be11
describe
'382939' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGR' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
89feb1f475e3e5e0b76b6ad795f73acd
4838d2fcfd4e9d525046467f1fe97c2761a61aac
describe
'47576' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGS' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
be15aaabae8be3b7b4231f0ce3f9353d
66f7d324ad30742d484f5753bf53a1f38258f18f
describe
'7091' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGT' 'sip-files00117.pro'
af1f163957f986c76ed71b510aaa0aaf
c3d7aa92f5f72843b55bdea556b255a378fc5df2
'2012-01-15T04:29:05-05:00'
describe
'21165' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGU' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
4459f36fdef935fcc2a4cee3c50bb8a8
7010f3d34deb7b139be746a16f7b6e00dd1ace87
describe
'3368268' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGV' 'sip-files00117.tif'
ca7223f3a086eb1be1e34c788b16f97e
28ee9b27fd1e52916c278aa8b1ff562ab770cd46
describe
'297' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGW' 'sip-files00117.txt'
78e7078113d74c0ef5a504c70495ed38
b49b0c63e5dc71921a43385205a5f26336d215f0
describe
'12229' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGX' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
d83ce2dcd5c3150399d5991230b438fe
3eeb9df9c6701ac455322aeda821dd9272c63960
'2012-01-15T04:29:51-05:00'
describe
'419904' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGY' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
8e127455e30fe2e06270a1bd75aa120a
316416e9eae87732a593ca5c7477036cccbd43d5
describe
'121434' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPGZ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
a42ccfe989772be0e524f623602fd000
b6cf5d285c7fb4f171274b2d7f89bb58ac772d67
describe
'24615' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHA' 'sip-files00118.pro'
e39f530131e4791ca6b9c74f8ce83045
5dff8b70b63f42a86846a81c2e1ba457bfe7173b
describe
'48153' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHB' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
a40b113fb958801365464c33f5dd999f
d413b7cb66ed8c5e4ea73fab9c0d8e005d142c39
describe
'3371228' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHC' 'sip-files00118.tif'
aced82379d579380a50921827eee077c
4b40bccc5633d13c4d108dfc2581da1fb2838d72
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHD' 'sip-files00118.txt'
cfbcb947876c8c0934b1d0d5f226f923
96926a1f806fbca0c98ef69d3b56f143dec55690
describe
'20478' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHE' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
2e9d961269e69807e74608d617172414
e0a7de17a8e5581cc5091400524bf006a5ad0db4
'2012-01-15T04:28:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHF' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
79691318d2ce9c2bcd33018bbafc7885
6a6d52cec929af5bbcdc84eb19f80be43d79959e
describe
'130387' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHG' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
e925693a0d22a9d3506d97cd49686252
7179a00a903a60b4e7be87958d8ee23a8a0700b6
describe
'29309' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHH' 'sip-files00119.pro'
0dc6c174e683d5b073626120275b2ffb
f2c7c14b4869abdd599368c848311f85c28fb2e1
'2012-01-15T04:24:36-05:00'
describe
'52664' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHI' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
bf1f3babb622da0687cbd454294f259a
534a9c4ee8fc17ddbf1ea2bed9d11def8d169801
describe
'3371664' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHJ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
3870f308a54d906708ba781ddf6d013c
f8dd656f81627a93669cc10421b218faa6dfa8b1
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHK' 'sip-files00119.txt'
b2723af0b99004ff9f9d2a12791e62eb
52d54ed4ba7bb7a2459bd44bbbfa5db014971936
'2012-01-15T04:32:30-05:00'
describe
'21613' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHL' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
55712e85f51f0d543181934fcf057c93
d09bbe3e3c53c3b137b1ee43e9cb1ece1bbbcdba
'2012-01-15T04:28:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHM' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
8eb2a8bf0143d3ab519c17f22a7e84e6
c276b40761394cb617b3768aca0599274f2b0b5a
describe
'148240' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHN' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
75a86d747d98f8d823e830d7092b87c5
edc8bf43d93c69b62e8124b6c35dcafa74e7439b
describe
'31648' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHO' 'sip-files00120.pro'
144a5969c310876cd8c669f516fc1223
118bf0253023b1eb4c677a317ac871a47adbd63b
describe
'57177' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHP' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
7ddc11ddb860c1785242e7cadb1262fd
20a7bf2f56e1fc7762926955a2ea7dfa758c8ffc
describe
'3371952' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHQ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
34ab6f23677afe764e9de9125ecf2bf0
413279fc1841403904ee15a370e47c7da27297ae
'2012-01-15T04:31:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHR' 'sip-files00120.txt'
ab29df753a137dea4fa167cd6cb1ce73
644d45ef61964bbae3a8b04a0afa234736f48610
describe
'22658' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHS' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
8bf40eb1b6fae871a0eb06ea642769b9
1fafc799104cf5ac15d72a803154c465c222b8a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHT' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
a0c24c27dd68303b8549df3b5b47e5fa
f0b20418e87e780855ef536cf7592d27c55648a2
'2012-01-15T04:25:56-05:00'
describe
'147709' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHU' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
7005ab9df9a4ce3304b5d4f57a258e1e
e2a45190f43e48097d657461d7324c939912a6ce
'2012-01-15T04:30:33-05:00'
describe
'32198' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHV' 'sip-files00121.pro'
2039f3e39ce7f024036ab6f5b8c0e98c
9535749de5fd0733450fad2114634b706f9d55ed
describe
'56378' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHW' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
ccc851dc18079270bc0121dc8fad6e61
bd8dc72e4ac1611ef8aa65c2019629eda5628c28
describe
'3372144' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHX' 'sip-files00121.tif'
4362c7774e4b438a49c87d1a0ff82d76
3b9b76c8be42b118753c58f08df0f78d35018714
'2012-01-15T04:29:23-05:00'
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHY' 'sip-files00121.txt'
f7c275ac42ea9c31f93eba6756d41925
d4061695747ca061d69fea55e2667fe25eb4b866
describe
'22889' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPHZ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
0cb1847f728a7b27fdb3b5f388a02c91
2994a56eb2d32793ae3cefc24d9dd3f6f9a7d234
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIA' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
465d72e300ad014b721623984bcbb75e
463ce823600d5fe300be584e7340631c320dac27
describe
'157186' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIB' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
d891201a60d47eb11eea1e328a045b88
cbdb84877dee6c18bdd3713bffc000cb798d0646
describe
'34131' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIC' 'sip-files00122.pro'
de83684693be82a1b08e5e6c2fac89d5
d81628ca480518f11d8e9d8a1762c8d7ec6fb8c7
describe
'60347' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPID' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
2d0730d388f878218ee871f9eb2d5282
9dfc33e12f88f25e98e85c3fdda0dba6be34329e
describe
'3372080' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIE' 'sip-files00122.tif'
9b4eedc17188cb0235b026e0ae0c63f7
1f5c5dececdfc13b4380c1e1293a1aa88cc05a9d
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIF' 'sip-files00122.txt'
02863a07bb5025952065ead791f944fc
85d4be23f6cd3994a57596e86e160489f515ea43
describe
'23324' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIG' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
640e576a441801a713f3cdc7d5d697df
e07a60ab204bc6734eab4ef4095827a7a5b53a9e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIH' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
a72fbd6dbf848f84e489950dbba0e672
45ef36db15421cc0a51f3ffe6afe63d97fe2c480
describe
'159321' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPII' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
d1383b1d37b5885bf1de4de165212c25
ca040944595d0e22464d81fbaf1bc41e63405311
describe
'34302' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIJ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
d76f47deb66bd5db0909a732260683dd
f84e5e92ccb4a6e353c7672cbeede039ac0a3195
describe
'59763' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIK' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
0991a210b676bf4ed14494db42bcb4c4
c39eab41c311de10479dd14184ceedeb5c0669bf
describe
'3372128' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIL' 'sip-files00123.tif'
71d461a8f13001847423e0c76d4ed62b
c266d03d07f290f09e096ec9bf9b3ee78d9d72e3
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIM' 'sip-files00123.txt'
9ec4fa65b8e7b0bbc6b52d15d96e0fd9
f11941cb600d2c9e5f4faead694915375003fd61
describe
'23374' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIN' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
0bc4c3fd513ffaef42ea9d6060428439
6d5152aff152d936b04a9d563c6f540afdb68dc7
'2012-01-15T04:25:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIO' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
6e095ec76fe84576b2c537ee1ada6777
2f85cc656fc137670a63c8eeba627279414a0379
'2012-01-15T04:29:22-05:00'
describe
'140962' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIP' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
a3a0516b59fa538ef90dd344d2523c12
82bae924f43d122b3410202efd42ac4727360838
'2012-01-15T04:26:54-05:00'
describe
'34209' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIQ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
20385b8800eeab08b62deebc95fc80d8
c9c2e6fe31e8ac34c244f25b4623c06eb1de4e56
'2012-01-15T04:28:17-05:00'
describe
'54944' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIR' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
39ba990d2876f19511828d47ace8bab1
3306571512d7a8d627e17a82214d8813ed30748b
describe
'3371552' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIS' 'sip-files00124.tif'
c75c4870a3c8b945db1e50cf0b4e3e01
3c6c52f3e17d1b717c2572dcfdd93279e1fe8fc8
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIT' 'sip-files00124.txt'
84ec434a8766e90732cb11ffffe30c95
24defe94d83a6533d76af3aea0e47d270ef03b55
describe
'21617' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIU' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
14f87262ae341fbe85fe9c31aee10d6b
6b6b74fd566ba6b419466665b64b7e8ed4215b82
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIV' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
b6bcdf1b967646ff1ff342341d7c38dc
3f81eba39f16a29b2398f84a9e0ea7ea0c713687
describe
'136888' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIW' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
36d87d9b9b8ae254cf7da5c7e9e7f586
79d9f2c37010bf3d35906b15cec297492da1ea60
describe
'32913' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIX' 'sip-files00125.pro'
682736d3aaef047f711afb65891ef2c9
e62c30564663869bf1f395000dfb7e9225a42b60
describe
'53999' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIY' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
f60707ea39a736187241c6b6135f614b
7e367ae9e55a5a72d8db339a47577399f3520956
'2012-01-15T04:30:22-05:00'
describe
'3371892' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPIZ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
2315bc89adcb17178021bcd4eb8dcf87
7eee3ea511eeaf6ffe8e487bc00e253c891ec4ee
'2012-01-15T04:31:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJA' 'sip-files00125.txt'
cf191350bbd5dd6a9a7dc3f228d83f9b
62d3f345ecd715c1d33163f8bba1cfa8890d487a
describe
'22079' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJB' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
b189c31388ed467ad88ce511eb1108d5
d5e11fa95c6174e7bc64bff9e01f8c89f9730c1d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJC' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
7366b88e708b451b3927f57fca115c61
9e3c9dbb049a338dea2bc121b089f77452e32b23
'2012-01-15T04:29:49-05:00'
describe
'141861' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJD' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
1d544b56da12baa1becc17cbc9819f53
ba9bcd431728108f4e9ee3c79083384ead394aa7
'2012-01-15T04:23:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJE' 'sip-files00126.pro'
8b3d872f3b0260fa65e979fab00203d0
f64edccaa44d905bdd7d3496508def248b1812d1
describe
'56125' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJF' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
434759d8c3eea83e24736944e34454e2
821eaab2e378f66fcf2d9a352abc0cf5f0736496
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJG' 'sip-files00126.tif'
03263847001c5295e0a1e6369b77a192
e962868afcefb9e3609713ca55dea5fc980043cc
'2012-01-15T04:32:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJH' 'sip-files00126.txt'
ae32033edd7f7e9a6ae22513ecb1c7a2
b5366467b925a31f0a7b768d575bc80a245df2c7
describe
'22028' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJI' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
4f19a9464160845236760a174c4a107e
c782ae0c1ae3db38d56878f0d4ae6ed31c0a9344
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJJ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
054dae7fcc6963c70daa397f9669f739
3df81ff2ff493f7d250188508e9fdbbaf5f73179
describe
'117911' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJK' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
0d3f8666f640534a9da1e69eb42c0087
6c0e5fdbc2a2ff3b0683ff803ba9535da925fb41
describe
'27198' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJL' 'sip-files00127.pro'
948fcebdf9922fc14d15b7b1dce80e61
aa1aa6820e6048ef59ee4ddecfb8e4a08d51443b
'2012-01-15T04:31:42-05:00'
describe
'47406' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJM' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
45d21ddee25def37b5ada7da0b6f45b2
d83c80850f6904eda27c2075b0706629c81d91fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJN' 'sip-files00127.tif'
90cc4acfafd683db4e1dad5b04f411fe
e66d6a202980596c5ef3f3dda64652c723996509
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJO' 'sip-files00127.txt'
d4284431ec1b70571fe8a6bb9da79b3d
d1d3ce93f72257f0762fef5ad7d299a3bde25e44
'2012-01-15T04:32:36-05:00'
describe
'20008' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJP' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
a87652eb72becbe9d3ce9b3757ae33fa
ba7f5e1b869e878e19bf00b6812d27fe696db6ed
'2012-01-15T04:26:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJQ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
c3896775e5c9b40cec8e60a9e91d649a
18ff24f128453a3fcb06e4df3567972c78647722
describe
'139109' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJR' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
c6c683e928b9c1f621bba5663e14321b
e2dbec38172c1710d8459d53d691e5f8964df7c4
describe
'32837' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJS' 'sip-files00128.pro'
1ef99ce7a76c584c161bff4d785a911b
f2ed9de41d3263b9d16d1d9ee0d05b79ff42216c
describe
'56209' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJT' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
3405144c1cd81166d3866f41100928ff
13869a3f0e7c7dc45163d47a47325f878e301525
describe
'3371720' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJU' 'sip-files00128.tif'
327d22e69803b2e3dbc16db6ec4cd03a
b6510b266520244d0f99d0c398fa74b8d1b885f3
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJV' 'sip-files00128.txt'
27d37ded83a23bbf0e827a44cb1272b1
f8929e927f2c903e6ef50fbc7f07a944ac307582
describe
'22080' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJW' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
b38ca35d2d6203c5ac786cfe7ebc27df
305bce2b447f1befe2eba7923273f0d62bcf8103
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJX' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
c77a443197904be38c7691cc30fcefde
06d4397a66bb7640e780bbb3f261a854addf0fa1
describe
'126410' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJY' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
db4d3596b89ba8f558494d1b796c99f4
c329e89ad3fb46b8063b3f2d7c7903b630d69d21
describe
'28728' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPJZ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
58e2a9283c298d8de3aba6bde28f2a0a
2711c5b2298a3f380819f0d445d7be17ea025f30
describe
'50916' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKA' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
66d3d2367d4a9fd1e797b38f0c113292
a8b5da8f2d837402c4f793ae4d484b23f04fc131
describe
'3371608' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKB' 'sip-files00129.tif'
c30f03c37cd0b6ea1e1eca6fb5bf753f
2e9c3f18aa0fa6ecd71c4a215ac397cff845a747
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKC' 'sip-files00129.txt'
f932497413df1c8e70060fd09888814c
1b66035274a69128f6ca77d48aff3f96aa8cd013
describe
'21660' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKD' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
abdeb13ece1a997b3710c33206785edf
7f17657f1b979e59dde782497d7a268ef7ff832d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKE' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
a3aa30a11b45ce920a27080919f250bc
152d72f13602060a3b5c79a2a1c4dd12b88eed3c
'2012-01-15T04:26:20-05:00'
describe
'131650' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKF' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
1545bfc5056a672309ca776d970053f6
31a676f2d4c0d759c0cf9f698f495a8ac57dbab0
describe
'31041' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKG' 'sip-files00130.pro'
2e67fa3e9c9dd33e4159be0fb3ac6d62
e6bfd4295a8c027ad50f79f39374198962566614
'2012-01-15T04:30:06-05:00'
describe
'52206' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKH' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
8c1d28744cdecc1a52ca9a3cc7994686
76e00bb5c8d719481d0a470ff9714a45de89ee85
describe
'3371768' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKI' 'sip-files00130.tif'
8cc7f1f777ef16df54b7a121492c500f
5f4b3ce2fa38411b4a6601d342405c8f6e756048
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKJ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
123fcd22c738de512c25fd725665fac2
12ff6c08c793d1386e1cd78ce489a08855e99979
describe
'22011' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKK' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
0d95135c8651519c9e4c337a1b3b237c
a278c33383a849d6c549b26fb257c4037956e96f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKL' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
7173f5646e85be9e629a4b7e54498ba6
de3e95ac1e8f2330b8c3af431cb3f8f04be2130c
describe
'127640' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKM' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
9151bb1536db3aa34af83b337c8ae1da
54e30eb9fb9f1b57d3cc2a28a1a789a3d5f84ef1
describe
'29711' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKN' 'sip-files00131.pro'
3e29000e2598960dca56fce86cdf15b0
07e80fee5e193c5449939256fb5d18c45eb165be
describe
'49736' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKO' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
9bea90e7c717f2259e99ff88c6192b1d
75da2ac4d8cc103e7d60cfcaa617e195b320b363
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKP' 'sip-files00131.tif'
a832cea208e28f4bad883d3af0c585dc
b9af607dc0b53f1172b6784a0c66e9b5e1b1ed60
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKQ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
b35a83ff32b9f02aff372640d693294c
5017b17fed6b036209278d90537afc40e4c5fd34
describe
'21019' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKR' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
70ef4809162ef95aa336e98d996f26ad
d1065d10b8017925a105739b925399ac93f682b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKS' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
ee6d3d8c817770b163260884ff09bf2c
e1155d2e89e3c249dbafa53c9ec1d5040af0aed1
describe
'101070' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKT' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
6101aee642d8c3faf5f7d458a2ac67ce
86b2e086da0b1ec2a7af12ea33c7800b56f0cba2
'2012-01-15T04:25:32-05:00'
describe
'22081' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKU' 'sip-files00132.pro'
32bb2ea7fb8db1cffb17cc1073e235ff
c3bc3214af8fc0d11dc664886b78b406bfc1feb1
describe
'40455' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKV' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
09be126423e320981db14693bdc84123
e5fe2217a2407b36deac5d6b6d853b046c2520e5
describe
'3370328' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKW' 'sip-files00132.tif'
0cea83ddbfd6aff6c48a8aa1964c49dc
a61081740ea0472c99d5f2c66f566621480825c0
describe
'872' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKX' 'sip-files00132.txt'
509a3acc38ed0fc88e2c046374a6970c
0e6ad68eb5a288e3ab663b0f9e4e0792d8ae7827
describe
'18001' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKY' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
08d6406e02653b082bb53f70139818cf
4aa5978aa314ec88c226690c0248ab0f30f54381
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPKZ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
98bb342f4f81694560a22f828846b595
bb6c6558239bb26363100400b0b4cbe82ce3a177
describe
'112658' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLA' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
923c3aa1841f8dcce7de8d3919a49cfd
313bdacf8c7ade6048a8cbe1b848bddb0e0f8d32
describe
'22198' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLB' 'sip-files00133.pro'
14a16dc9a5fff8de9f6307e935727918
4bf3e815dffe50f91a7a45a1b67055ca5af6f1bc
describe
'44787' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLC' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
e9e8e6a22137060271cb79a7d1ebe80b
12c922abb53798293a27af1d884ed2b642866584
describe
'3371116' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLD' 'sip-files00133.tif'
d224571101ced3a35c0721f11d2f110b
af6cfba1a40ca9492fe610aa1849a3134d717422
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLE' 'sip-files00133.txt'
4082294c6eb21648fcc827474228c544
8758f3fbe14214c7d654e5884d8a84c20a82f776
describe
'19941' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLF' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
7514faecc5352b21f42f6515969870db
69f6f16610016a0adb6b3958a29ded3acce8c553
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLG' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
375ff0fd87d62525ac58fa5fc15bb1a2
e2720fe1fe8e7315813f77ff8e8f22eccb027a23
describe
'137637' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLH' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
224c5f14068dec3576fcdacc9ed1fdac
8279fc45c14479a993bb9e7d183639253aff5bbd
describe
'24373' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLI' 'sip-files00134.pro'
6095f56406e7d63baa3a6c4f05fc6878
d8723f8e1c0c288cf1d2e0ddb3b924c3b00ab32c
describe
'54017' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLJ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
51746d24a8a9fecc9b12fc5f5983658b
42b134cef38fb90aef182f7473d7571c7a180e71
describe
'3372064' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLK' 'sip-files00134.tif'
3a9541f4d9ad11d05520d6b19ed938ef
d721b20f765676c50a582e69d663c3349bbf705f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLL' 'sip-files00134.txt'
f486eee343659311da847a7e0b349e6b
9f96470a95e5407c0b7c6b051b8a9b2f1c87cf1e
describe
'22787' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLM' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
cfbcb90c0e44bf94b5d0b9effdf4c0a2
f6a64bb7365c0c1343414dbb572c2bdbf5091e94
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLN' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
98474b5007cc0d6b5c3c804e1bace69f
9709b91a73fd10a2f6685ff4c22fe314a46657a4
describe
'135766' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLO' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
041bceab09bad2dd5cb6620d7bbc951f
4b4eddd81ff60f3d9855c9ad5503dce029a44dc3
'2012-01-15T04:26:18-05:00'
describe
'33136' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLP' 'sip-files00135.pro'
18fb2831cf29813d51be1eca46427a53
ba9de3b4529b4c9fce7b0a3ba4ce5e66d9e00104
describe
'54660' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLQ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
6a7368be92b37c68662cb1a0d91ab653
758e4a87ef102dcc6718b8e6013cc9d643eca8cc
describe
'3371780' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLR' 'sip-files00135.tif'
329eaf742cd480261dc718b85f87eefa
209fcb8a5320d1cb3aab158da54662cf69d83bc8
'2012-01-15T04:31:39-05:00'
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLS' 'sip-files00135.txt'
0fe48d841be8bd99aff7ff18f5ea6cc6
b3cd8053ba8233cf188afd91736379a190bf6f90
describe
'21886' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLT' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
86181f55703d0ca99c7e7ebefdc580bd
18398ebecc5770366c3b37159a9a8679690e7eeb
describe
'419899' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLU' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
5167712dfdfdfdef83910c0e70ee9d4f
6eb41fc22a6181cb5de2ed31135dec636197809a
describe
'142085' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLV' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
9a3b101a98ef3718604db867e05ba47e
7c99bc9a83ee91c50097f6220aa25564966b4f2e
describe
'33406' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLW' 'sip-files00136.pro'
c121af61457acf24868b3702603962f6
d20d4c90973f0330a8557163e7c8c069868c9946
describe
'55731' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLX' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
2eb34108f22fc659acd8823d983441ea
63c12bdf8965ccba14334dbb22c955ba5d662db5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLY' 'sip-files00136.tif'
edf8baa00408bb6aff07490d7dc252d5
f1e050fee6266d43c908c6da7182b91c5e2e2541
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPLZ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
73c6a8dc6d81530bb5c253e71a0686b6
44e7f90f1cc24fc7aeb09645346d0608dab734fb
describe
'21992' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMA' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
312b254609675bb50170d23de7fc1a56
aea49095138d72bace28645d65852c7f840cffe0
'2012-01-15T04:29:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMB' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
92d4818783de47cae59996dd0b7f7be5
4bfb83690df46d4454d2c7ea765cbd54bc51440e
describe
'141323' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMC' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
3e3fb39d1b4b635f6054383b137bc56e
d0f7ce50e3bf372388ce5c8d7c1f6c5bc1e4706c
describe
'33457' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMD' 'sip-files00137.pro'
b02977f092617159699e9da41a179868
4f5f9f3899c07b902710dedefb1c22b0adc91885
'2012-01-15T04:30:24-05:00'
describe
'55398' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPME' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
8fa2df09d9eee07c30af8ffa42cfe2ee
73b894b7de16cbefd3d650b5f9d3af8d8af9b92c
describe
'3371652' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMF' 'sip-files00137.tif'
7fe6b966eeb14a4921139a2d6fc4750c
7c9d175b0d7bca4b19329f61d90e962da4fcc6bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMG' 'sip-files00137.txt'
425b73cbd97a22440b48bbe9b3371f48
bbc088e7f583aaecc7f8badb6de663fae2e25c6b
'2012-01-15T04:25:16-05:00'
describe
'22128' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMH' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
495a6162437357b90130607a92fbdc01
5c79485595d0ae6f6ae859f6f51bce764e6d14af
describe
'419917' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMI' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
938a0047f3a50a90dde178ab8588c69f
5ffc3bebfa8110a05424e30ff73ab45bb4e59bf5
describe
'140463' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMJ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
0ca9d4c4fad6791de749ac9e21464ec4
9f85265c4d137f6e1cd2488be2b386b523e681c8
describe
'32882' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMK' 'sip-files00138.pro'
e56404912862a98be6a1b00e0e59b8a2
8292b3b7c2af941418d58ca42e24be7c4155b05c
describe
'55885' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPML' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
464ba66aac0b9335f003177f9cb2593b
067ca304f7a3d303498153f54cfe6f57bfaf3897
describe
'3371776' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMM' 'sip-files00138.tif'
c2efd328c79c6d172e332c4204d6c159
9d10136a9c33e59cb31b8e1a2e783d9c56766ba6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMN' 'sip-files00138.txt'
f515c33e7a2fdf0895441fc99637b0b3
2e6be40ae78d01500c67bd89c199c6574ef581c4
describe
'22370' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMO' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
22bc29285dfd32947a785da493b33ff0
f10fe8eb7c0daed15be3c9d24fa9c16c2743e36f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMP' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
69508dc5bf84c697df3f8efb951277f5
9cc0a1a5a02cdf25972d7468b9d15bf4577aada9
describe
'141158' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMQ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
0399c70ba2c15f80d92eed14963f3f9a
cdaf62aa55c90fc272eb551fbd306f1ec3ee5cdd
describe
'32880' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMR' 'sip-files00139.pro'
1facb263f9e7be7c2dff94855d4bdf23
2aeba0b0024eea54405949bbc2f4c9661ff57c6e
describe
'56112' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMS' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
f7cf97a5412ca1b48deb2c6bcc938350
24690c0fb31541fb98b9ffabfafd8467709cf64e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMT' 'sip-files00139.tif'
fd6a64a61c52db3dcbe3d34e526b9420
5a2f8cfce52d4441636917f095b9a98037cbc32c
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMU' 'sip-files00139.txt'
7f3cbe6de3cc7f0df6014cfb2aceaaab
d20d7f4151304077347b2ac1acd8abb2cd272434
describe
'22244' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMV' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
0799d04d92d2be256c968f9d11d53577
8fa0116bc0551505b0c86bc9e75f6c27e0388855
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMW' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
dbabbff9c41a35b3162a4e0a860ce7ae
10d29f30278803a8b1f7c5e5f9194c914d402691
describe
'137790' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMX' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
68002b4a4f7cf0d4d5a9f33b73c15d5a
d5d2d9d22b55b7e760e77dba83e96daacec1f987
describe
'32525' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMY' 'sip-files00140.pro'
d6ec44c30bef245aa1d87017c8b472c8
7194877de04b61886768dbc236fc78bb919bc06f
describe
'54587' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPMZ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
ea1ff6d0a5b1f97063162d8a8ca41292
bb15a962ca681f4380f48184a47508cdc8ede5b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNA' 'sip-files00140.tif'
b518842407276db90c724a623aed56dc
e79220c18ca3a8a6cc609259c8898476afd85b95
'2012-01-15T04:31:31-05:00'
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNB' 'sip-files00140.txt'
b4ee36c98d8d43be74407d1bc6127dc2
8f6c7430f3ede8625913c47c475e10987d882d83
describe
'21999' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNC' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
4be922908f4026c1dbb13a75f38ba271
85f15c23784e3c555bb3b0b3e5d803c92f3942df
'2012-01-15T04:24:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPND' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
f0fa6979c5235b2d70baa6a5bed622cc
b47bfe5c5de0838122360d569b6716ba1abae0b1
describe
'136098' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNE' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
db6e2585b34029344294c715a9751ae4
b11b4b74ad20aa998d04486eeadccde0e389a406
describe
'32775' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNF' 'sip-files00141.pro'
715158fcc3fdf3184b21c4e14df597e3
712b16c34560136722c5649badeb0c4377743b28
describe
'54835' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNG' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
01a88c957e1131d5bc77b177b5e5cade
993c6ee324c355227f888d22a03e825b099d3eb1
'2012-01-15T04:32:24-05:00'
describe
'3371716' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNH' 'sip-files00141.tif'
63a5ddff4c60293d47c1f766894098a2
f91ad1f9d8febb2e18453713e8e4c6d3568a9a5e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNI' 'sip-files00141.txt'
aae4503f0ee9f28afaa460881d7e543d
02e89ae44b92498ac0d70c05a0baacc070307dab
describe
'21736' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNJ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
cc174c4aea995555649d12093eeee62c
65e6cf8d2a38098fa587c039a736bb3081be37fd
describe
'419852' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNK' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
9f110c38ce3cf4d1625c961965e8a2cf
b8fdd4150571a8d7f873fa147bcdbd2cf32de725
describe
'135954' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNL' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
e5788ff0f50b270f439eb0c4604f2ab4
40b4cca4ef58ffac6444e2c4cc0b3296f0a3bd96
describe
'32309' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNM' 'sip-files00142.pro'
571aea61762cd2d9f37e9d3be8365b84
b44906ec7bc153918be0257291edc39eaec3be30
describe
'54041' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNN' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
abb5ab97366ba682c9191c70b1a1f2c6
19254af7a16ec3e817e319d0eb2620eb8231bfe3
describe
'3371692' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNO' 'sip-files00142.tif'
119b91449e2059dcbe569a2e82db47c8
88866cc166aad4031d15ff1f7af5119e46c89416
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNP' 'sip-files00142.txt'
4245bb2e91d0a39f778a96e2a618cbb2
793d7093298edb62634f3084482686e6ccec5f0a
describe
'21967' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNQ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
ee934350f74bea198c2f2a5020d08d50
0e403815161c1e928f11426378beec6471a955de
describe
'286240' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNR' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
842d30836aaec13f9baa7cda57c6eb0e
a152ade38915ede5c5e1eddc79bfc21e313c90cc
describe
'42332' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNS' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
a310e23529134a2664d5dc79ffaca7e1
d8b689bc66ab06633a5542abea1cc3547d39a251
describe
'6373' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNT' 'sip-files00143.pro'
806cb5945e29445667c9d92d98ec0ffa
a6b5f6f21653772f028b2b67e5e920cc11675853
describe
'20186' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNU' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
5eaa7c689809c8841a4381c37ad32718
8f89a958ce63ef49e701d2c75f73a5915cdef4b3
describe
'3368176' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNV' 'sip-files00143.tif'
2e8c21b397ce1e8cdc5a781243aa4a65
4d27d4e76013795f231fcd09e8eb57da17c67851
describe
'267' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNW' 'sip-files00143.txt'
0e7612364657e071e8a636cc414fcb1c
6ced1b88c7df17e52c11b7401654570cfd42fdf3
describe
'11734' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNX' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
0e6f85f9a0f94df907308f0f82e9af7f
17a6890823344631f58821773ab3edcb1c66c325
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNY' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
b3b4a3bc76966a15f7f060edc1810903
d72e88e9b178f97c37733fcc44ef295267e10c5f
describe
'115351' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPNZ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
ec52a05c906614c0fd1b65a5d8a965d3
205a1d994c64da62a82ce64ab2817f6f69efaad1
describe
'22796' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOA' 'sip-files00144.pro'
2e1eeaa1cecc51a6c2b834cd1a3a439b
6b8313fd176b45101b8319476994a0045d2e9c5f
'2012-01-15T04:27:05-05:00'
describe
'45750' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOB' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
9a89a955fca8451711105958d6cd0b9e
4c7cb4234a20e64233887cc6b8ff07baaa7df50f
describe
'3370844' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOC' 'sip-files00144.tif'
632434efbe71c280dd85db0809fef3ef
58381444dbcf820a57b15c3dfad7e6f6f667a76e
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOD' 'sip-files00144.txt'
5fe6d26eb54be4d306aaad93f783ad0b
e9f71ed16966bef0e5275f6e48b530c591f3aa67
describe
Invalid character
'19341' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOE' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
1589a1390422a92ef7fca7d6c7a85d00
7038240f1f21ce661e9667d91ad81f0bbec9317c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOF' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
f617cb757f2084d9ec2e2a8982a56493
906a21250f4717253fd7938fec8585b879610936
describe
'148610' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOG' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
32e7abeba75ef33c75b2e35e426a1dd0
c309844b7cf19e9dd5ffb05d4ac0a5ecfccb2fd0
describe
'34681' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOH' 'sip-files00145.pro'
61ecb1da20a8257279e5bbb27e32fd0e
56ff69449034a2985f276cc0b32cd8efa0d77854
'2012-01-15T04:32:01-05:00'
describe
'56907' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOI' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
3434b5842ce194366da28b5a72dbf125
53db153a81465a2664c3fa99428af178a146198b
describe
'3371672' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOJ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
c65e7a38f77648bd4ced22faed6ae92a
e32e82375ce00bc40cae54e25e993decf74cf9f4
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOK' 'sip-files00145.txt'
917dbabb4f9efed0ab90ba5f3d12f89e
eea4e98e789e227babba20bdc01aa6cbcde0b964
describe
'22208' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOL' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
5588dec2a74a8ecb502b1b579d46501a
d5f929422fc805d7f54c73574207e08a6955a3db
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOM' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
5540505d98d99f494200ec950ba41271
cb013daeaea2fa5df0b55b104102d33aa2760cb3
describe
'147444' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPON' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
c7e8d6bc947a9fe12cff28e2da6edd06
cbbc83df6228f61666c019a00f290334dac598d7
describe
'34768' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOO' 'sip-files00146.pro'
201664345ea1f6bb5f8c98b9201f09c1
ea6af6139f3097568b709833d1c3b90379af0196
'2012-01-15T04:27:11-05:00'
describe
'57226' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOP' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
603f04bf0a16fb70edeca8d7afd9d526
0b0006f96a6d97a60d06ae39b4724e0369154f3f
'2012-01-15T04:27:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOQ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
e931164bf5c490a41b690a9051779534
cdddb32741669ecbf58a0e12dbe65c10e0578fa1
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOR' 'sip-files00146.txt'
48341fe78af649f7f208b91acbb70de7
2dcbe78c4ef4537a991c69ac0540a103a2a93cc9
describe
'22259' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOS' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
f16a2bb327c856b5019782337f6ceb0e
7f78f229bfec2805b706461e57e79cc4b518ed55
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOT' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
b5f196588e9dc352aeea4bbdab4000c2
505b6b32d8cf381929e53790cfb95f6f87517304
describe
'143583' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOU' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
0b8e74fc984d8e6c8b3e75e50b9fa318
fa65b49271abbac43acf7790b35c87db3f9aaf41
'2012-01-15T04:28:50-05:00'
describe
'34361' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOV' 'sip-files00147.pro'
f3a4023d3cbadecd0abac96976c1504f
26d2d244b20372a2174d37a4d0a91bdbffa6204d
describe
'56303' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOW' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
1b547db7b957cf89a4dd4d06e614b852
acf5123d6b057da1f30491ab6ee4cc17b6dd3a0e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOX' 'sip-files00147.tif'
a7cf59cbe3745fe490c0dac66153a29b
5ef767cba311d07008015bfd7b6b63c05d87393f
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOY' 'sip-files00147.txt'
3c778f6c6d6b6ab4d308712e29b4e647
672c7f6dc4e6f3b40c2df2b06d57c6674dcf97d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPOZ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
0ab4bcfedfbaa093230e15e8417de9c2
7e4fbe5972d81e13a61ef9b80b924d9108d291b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPA' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
4bd91fc84111f727eb19c11498000c36
0b52d5f5d5a18cde0205d2490a35e017580dfb85
describe
'138719' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPB' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
067fa60258910383a5464dc4a09303ba
ce599bd0939f86fc66bb21367aea521dedb0be31
describe
'33427' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPC' 'sip-files00148.pro'
78d33a833ff4cd57a1abec5ca7f7358f
d7fe87eb44df4a19e74a0d7f1c3b3f02e56ded99
describe
'54803' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPD' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
1e794bebd14fd6768732a4fb8ad04bf8
7f720d354dcd4618edd71366706ddfa5990b0c57
describe
'3371520' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPE' 'sip-files00148.tif'
8a8747833b908f58c30f334e4e824ef0
665306addc77f4985287f267129b220138725daf
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPF' 'sip-files00148.txt'
7f90281bea813a928c743beedb5566b8
493aaf1780cf4f0a40876bfbbecac8963d568645
describe
'21810' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPG' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
fa974f6579e3828756e13fff2c1e4f2a
923848a18cba140119620ca954eb2a8167fc28ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPH' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
c1d2f6c43ace85304737ca9f10d6b6ef
4ee157d949095121f816c2a0aca15b0d0b7a59e7
'2012-01-15T04:28:47-05:00'
describe
'141632' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPI' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
f547b29eb44451a6c0dd3fbaf49ee24a
61002c7cdc19cd0214e995f198c2bd4b91f28fd1
describe
'34436' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPJ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
12429376a16feb280f90d5a0d9d2a0e7
b9515848930e8212471cc520d1854f975ebba6d1
describe
'55922' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPK' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
29c3271bae7029859193288fc0857138
30e03cb2447d070517293454aa1ba123230ff4a5
describe
'3371600' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPL' 'sip-files00149.tif'
d2f4121903a187eb6f7fb61bace9d139
c11e41c58ab78edc39aae29e526341856f80dd6f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPM' 'sip-files00149.txt'
7fad9a909679c8b720d02e95f9a41b1b
5d449ea57ba1e3a6e5d5e6942f7d992ddea3baba
'2012-01-15T04:32:07-05:00'
describe
'21786' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPN' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
a988d6425888a5255bd0652b766fc881
60592ad4f360b4f9122c960d5a9f9612cfa28ec9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPO' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
322d0a3155aff9c6d2e10d663a3636be
ee89b1e35a98e9376b33e72a41eaca04b24dd545
describe
'142425' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPP' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
aeb603f4894045b900a4bfa361a88fab
468993c3b04f16a4d246ecdb95076cee4012117b
describe
'33563' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPQ' 'sip-files00150.pro'
20721fc960b40b70d3400646db8aeb38
4a4eec3f991a39a5366139791e9d1cfb62c3b01d
describe
'55093' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPR' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
6f1248c733b116a93572931a37f31e31
9d55ee836108f454085229c8160ab802747cfbce
describe
'3371648' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPS' 'sip-files00150.tif'
78e22007e260020d5779dfed924f348e
7407b01909e13ce75b09e2ca96bfe88bad031612
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPT' 'sip-files00150.txt'
744e7e9b2056651e80707f633b9816d1
2fb4f4d848d0442cd3041a417ea58af46c789ef6
describe
'21889' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPU' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
948369ff16b9616690c5ad7a77f1a517
bf36fe9384238f30f5b34e5c99c0afdd5cb784d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPV' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
25a6e9286bca24d0b9f1f5ae04dcfd51
8b37824c5d78b8cbca3e1bd26d7cc5fee3e9285d
describe
'134938' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPW' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
f46b876796653b54ed6c7fd4227e183f
63d9607ed13acea8e71276c09f3559a0dfb7043b
'2012-01-15T04:28:27-05:00'
describe
'31119' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPX' 'sip-files00151.pro'
878f65b40608f3b10b59a34fe1e96b81
5aba1992d6f02cf8ef2d663a23c5c653fa25c65a
describe
'53498' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPY' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
0d30fe431bcc96de9af3b096039be77a
acd35c3570b77aec088e04622b4b21417b8cc797
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPPZ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
afed779243c8bf089bfb2d1e3a90f811
e2fc2e3d228b61183bbd18b34236dbcf705c7131
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQA' 'sip-files00151.txt'
090d4d845b25fe77d1f373c410f51fc3
1a3ca8016d29e66eced86c4e159dfb4c24ce3db4
describe
'21814' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQB' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
fd26091a6934ce0ebfdf8c40ec220e63
b9a201e0d0a6440e8dc37a9bfff13d04fa01b03f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQC' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
1b0719d89d31577599e41234e586d49a
54fa074c582347282829ecdf03c4cc7541572d90
'2012-01-15T04:26:14-05:00'
describe
'115436' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQD' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
8e455a883602aeaf4c069e2502e09b51
87e64cf58aa0077805a9675586da7b180661123e
describe
'24438' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQE' 'sip-files00152.pro'
6e9352d27ef6995f59627211ca84734f
4c890e5be119777e7a5c0951261ffa0b3d098275
describe
'46223' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQF' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
14e09ea6e8270dc5cb4a9b1053df7340
216b020a5a6aeb89480709b23a44445dc9c1f44e
describe
'3371084' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQG' 'sip-files00152.tif'
960520658c65fb1df1f9aa7e7fa48201
79c6290999df6d68f5ea6b354388ddbae08a8fb7
'2012-01-15T04:29:26-05:00'
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQH' 'sip-files00152.txt'
c59023a0f30cf7fab2f0ff54d7a67350
7633214a2d4a8bf33d0ab3829b99099f6cf34cff
'2012-01-15T04:29:25-05:00'
describe
'20114' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQI' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
75e15e4f2d76e728b9c8248d21b2bb32
89b0f2e1843e63bd39318efdc04cd23da0e5dc3b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQJ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
b70bb0819a2d68056b95063bb8b0f33d
f0796887d0454b76ad739cb168c6e2ffc1d6072a
describe
'145355' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQK' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
e7e4f2865bfc84ab90a72fdadf8a37c6
1431a0e303700c5705f176da79a118573464872c
'2012-01-15T04:31:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQL' 'sip-files00153.pro'
804145520e137d8560d76b732404a7c8
7ef8da2f2ca579864fbe03c6dce8694ec8604536
describe
'56499' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQM' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
5b373e93e3c150d321b0d3d6c465d05e
66278e23a220a1adba13857285c5a3b71d485291
describe
'3371740' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQN' 'sip-files00153.tif'
3fb7145799c1173d0d5b5eb5359e074e
665b50557aac27fb52edba8ca9e0e9e5b8666758
'2012-01-15T04:27:58-05:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQO' 'sip-files00153.txt'
fa66d3f5f75484241d5ef92bcab03667
ec1936301fb0fa2be4982279babe4a06d8513139
'2012-01-15T04:27:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQP' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
091bfdd14ebeb55e0259c0f1c0b710fe
eecdb0a6c270e3ae44c89f8308fb7c37007ea1d8
'2012-01-15T04:29:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQQ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
bc1306b564391e238a51d95a0f00205a
327f7f0307ec5c3931af6e0fb0e63865f3ba1e1f
describe
'143620' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQR' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
372a290fd51c267a6f8d98d6d8de272a
7568eccc84674cb94808937bf85b2da364865cfe
describe
'33044' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQS' 'sip-files00154.pro'
6ce1bac9752c2b66325145c05c2d3038
ff612f858e8de1bac7f7982b8c333639653af197
describe
'56804' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQT' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
120239d0b9797599a58d812c2cc52039
aa33d2eb8a4956078cfc057cd03df9d9123e4594
'2012-01-15T04:26:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQU' 'sip-files00154.tif'
57870a2887317d0b9bb52fb85b8d8cd5
16fecbac3df39530fcdcd9924092802bb30529ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQV' 'sip-files00154.txt'
488cf7314425ed76017c18ac563acebd
73932a49f1841512b4064370fef40901e711c3cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQW' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
48b719a145e8550ffd25f50d67190f51
62bc450338623335c6269784f3ba5201440512db
'2012-01-15T04:29:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQX' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
789e4adeff72e3c6d77787c24802ca7a
8c9d1f9dc61bd42c41904155c81ae506c9bf6da3
describe
'140877' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQY' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
6f43f6e86f09922d65550ff069be81d9
7de4ad97d4c7ff3cc3c1337919b72b6c7891a022
describe
'31321' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPQZ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
c98652042f3acd74e76854c4e529cfe6
09f783750f698515e2d8be5152f77d0a5c2fd119
describe
'54635' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRA' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
3c6533cea70772dde87ecdbd1c8c6176
7e82a4c7259a713cd39aefbe186155249b31e40f
describe
'3372204' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRB' 'sip-files00155.tif'
b3a4c32faa3da472b96048b2a16be83f
68c6b3286bf426eb44dfadebb8f457fd2498a021
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRC' 'sip-files00155.txt'
47a11ef35d48dcbde5014d850952e891
26db9439d87d797aee7b595487867af0fdb4d74b
describe
'22907' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRD' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
065b273d307321ed9be0d2a11c935e77
635a6cda095c79b182b0f5fda02e5e9b3ca47d99
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRE' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
c44d24066141dc982615be820bd60cf1
d509a84212de141c1e76ac0e2f06af9f89efe365
describe
'142086' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRF' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
f255d9f2bd6a9bcd7e226378f9b96f6f
39ca930494ccbbe68da88e15ab94c33c9f2eaa89
describe
'34125' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRG' 'sip-files00156.pro'
4007a4fa07743293548a13065356cdbd
d2b319f068fdbed43044ded891f3db82b0f56d77
describe
'56350' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRH' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
0af9020db13d7849301a0770925b5c04
f66683d65d34f1604eddeb55e3975ef52a5f041b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRI' 'sip-files00156.tif'
112ebe1fa25e422a23103bc1b8790ee0
9968d94aa40bda1a9aed8eed6e8f54a1a089aa57
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRJ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
90b5f939035a219893875e9007629fe4
23fa9d6b6df5328b07c696a4412f4e6011d0ba0b
'2012-01-15T04:27:48-05:00'
describe
'22538' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRK' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
e256a9c1a0addac24faed48bd604bbaf
b1d7a035f8f0554a698fa45b378c7c2d2236f4ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRL' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
cfdb65929a662e70c0be7a76bbd86890
520e420417e72da99adfe5a0a875e28c006d015d
describe
'138946' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRM' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
3b2e1320fa262c99e0f9a0a93084ac39
336c70b468ccde6ba43dff4953725f33c51c7b7e
describe
'33686' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRN' 'sip-files00157.pro'
ee752e6147e19989384ed0dc218acf1d
a943805ee58c9d697e0f68c41ef27aad39e05144
describe
'55223' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRO' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
c5e858e17251fc38dbc9db8c376774a1
cbfdc589cf7c65a2409211bfda12f4730faae5b5
describe
'3372120' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRP' 'sip-files00157.tif'
76d3b6e0f88a2cd67a111ba20df27ea0
72dfb46acec8978a657cd6a0e1b8f231e7177f47
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRQ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
57f1bd55e85f87f132a88676e2ffb62f
a038e6875934378bf79a2f38ca502a438e96f9d8
describe
'22656' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRR' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
722b6ce281830f5176e8e5a4e91b7a57
52fd9411bcf06f5544936ea4b0738cfc8d1ee1f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRS' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
372f79f5c2ac1f1c03d63d0b90229ed8
73860ff63b9c9e26762df8bdccbf778d50eda3ce
describe
'141068' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRT' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
f08ee03716da348d1378f5b9d0a7d48e
98352215543a969a7c0a4b7bc7b355900276ec30
describe
'33294' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRU' 'sip-files00158.pro'
5feaa5413f36f301895c073344bc269f
8e800f5e4f12107d9eaa10f71ea1c4dfaedd2ffa
describe
'55746' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRV' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
53aef03bae5798c540195b59dc9cc0d5
2000c732c07a4d8a5f687f690930ecb33da74b29
describe
'3371860' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRW' 'sip-files00158.tif'
d76bb34e1922e2f9b0427b7bf7fcabf8
b161f479b231a390bbfc9b083ffc3f5377789bff
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRX' 'sip-files00158.txt'
ad9cbc8bcc66d763bb4afa7c2d770b8e
36b8bda6025e7feb01e7c7cdd40d6721eb92af4d
describe
'22428' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRY' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
610c43d6194e5f30204d802cd3a0b41f
100f83d1366d273b40bbc92134a02a90640e1c00
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPRZ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
6a98457d8f73ad96f263e6849df4995b
bad39e80d60164f25465d864cd2e94b7c86de73b
describe
'137394' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSA' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
f9a7a19e35c3fae34efc7c2e4dca2aa4
80ffaf914f7c2c99780af144113ed82c5eca92bd
'2012-01-15T04:28:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSB' 'sip-files00159.pro'
c6ca2c6b29183ee8e15446cbc06bb43c
f875cd1c257b8c7845457c7e3d4d4224b5102ce3
describe
'54399' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSC' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
8948ff639bcdc548794775993509fa99
710a9cffed0c48dab8e36654acbf5092990d8c1d
describe
'3371512' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSD' 'sip-files00159.tif'
da889098e111773088b1f4280402aef6
d710d743ed0bb971ed141f68f48a20a9188adf4b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSE' 'sip-files00159.txt'
642096f5fab930896eca754b301da4e7
d3acb9cc9cb85074231092a97f55d52ef65a59d8
describe
'21464' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSF' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
94ff333079847cd8f4eabf7d10449305
bb887881b9c03ab944607e4827c5f00e500a617b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSG' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
b3bbae44fbd43b80e4498fbd16963b1a
b96b81f6cc3094e11ac60beec1a65840952781d2
describe
'147850' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSH' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
964dfa1a4a6985958fe45428e8810d1f
83819e00895c97f3ec454a5c80f4407c685ac352
describe
'34620' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSI' 'sip-files00160.pro'
b87755a3f163d22584648caf6d6527e7
3d5e7a892c6723677ef31be8dcf49cd41c6f80ec
describe
'58948' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSJ' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
d7f000e7ec205debabf15e9d47246318
48556952e80b3e3d51aee6bb7231cf4da45780fd
describe
'3372044' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSK' 'sip-files00160.tif'
bda4f522790f483577560e7b140b1c80
c4e348a937a3a34569a2baf1931cd0ba13806709
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSL' 'sip-files00160.txt'
e39bf59946d4e898f168f5201af318f4
6abfceeabec9251cff924596733c87502ceebe59
describe
'22653' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSM' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
54de6f0202fe5a62bca7506f2259b9c5
b14da970f2ac00ebec72024427e8aede6ae10486
describe
'291115' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSN' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
a4804f39bcba8fc2f539780d9d4a1af4
9c6adeacabc3a73c56c1eaf827b16d9f50bd635a
describe
'46090' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSO' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
25e936c00471db6e36ce412eaaaccc3a
d026abbbf06a18abce414ca52637955dbdce3a6c
'2012-01-15T04:29:09-05:00'
describe
'7579' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSP' 'sip-files00161.pro'
6d582daddca33299a70cace0f9d2d90d
375c07bebef664957725f4b681f4538b0efb2f37
describe
'21074' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSQ' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
2e68d2392d30c726537380cf00a0c1b6
186912a391b7db3535a2f2f2c89ba5b397903bb1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSR' 'sip-files00161.tif'
fe6aba7c91e48659046f17ccd810b6c4
7a1139b0b771172e82feba49de7152ba75b39a71
describe
'315' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSS' 'sip-files00161.txt'
cf1378821af1a5f1136b7a3b4f374c79
51d2b9dac849cbcdd06a6521bd530920591f349d
describe
'12247' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPST' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
50199cf496adbbc8d22eb261385e2339
1cc7dbe49be866cddd3345a11164f11ef5733ebe
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSU' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
3350e2a137939e475273004287f6b889
ddc66a26ddf45f9ddd8f55e6ab4676768fe33b00
describe
'112428' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSV' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
3a70a50de6450ad4e4060b973b54d6e5
5fac636e4ed7e1e227cfbaaa746a00ecf5cd73d2
describe
'20343' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSW' 'sip-files00162.pro'
ee49a15f9d748084da94615e29bba3a6
c101b50a8c09c6b46d057306de3c74ac5b1258c5
'2012-01-15T04:27:47-05:00'
describe
'46163' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSX' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
a64a2cf8ab6c87fc643d51012e2b04fb
9c9fc5d8659bbeac4a2dbf1d5a750b5d6cd5968a
describe
'3371172' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSY' 'sip-files00162.tif'
0364452ef72a3b13ad6101dd73b45a32
98e6dc4f745391f3513b4c580057131d5bb5a4f9
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPSZ' 'sip-files00162.txt'
4182bad76530d7e0e37e1c7c77eb4ea9
4f057db3673328c69bb7fb4aa9a75798b34fc961
describe
'20162' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTA' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
168dc41637e8c75b25dc2e11320bae39
acbe55e6982ed475cb6c33ab2f6517041fa25128
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTB' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
ba84f69887477969b56a53443202c3e3
bdc6fa5488b571d4e9a8c756afd2034e3aad6361
describe
'140980' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTC' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
e62b2126a3bb3c5da790328bdc6caba7
65a88b15b118cc624125f16d20da02987d96fbe1
describe
'34141' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTD' 'sip-files00163.pro'
d9b63ceb31b5eb96aefd508c48a83ac9
a74f2e61f509bd5bfa188b7ae1009925092a807a
describe
'54999' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTE' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
e4af528f7b40bd6a57788e430770d68f
cb8d75758af4a33c26640dcdd0711ac0b7282d5b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTF' 'sip-files00163.tif'
0510b0dd879445b682a3df807dbb1b0b
4127dd496450763469a4eea930148bceec5e0495
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTG' 'sip-files00163.txt'
006f8e0cc6e26d35ca41c9b0baa9166a
f88dd587866369f28170d0a45e81ae5564648d64
describe
'22449' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTH' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
cf5ee27ee8c1cfdeb3173b6b3f387b12
d665f552840bd20a8e8f07a3975d1b0756454227
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTI' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
5b68c1710d769271ff273bce1ece693a
2ed3c11d209129db65b8c7b55eb673bfc1a42f5e
'2012-01-15T04:30:15-05:00'
describe
'138325' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTJ' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
8fc6e9e6adfc363bcf05ccb3c661ed34
51c77572395fb730fe9a226dcdb887449ce5192a
describe
'32361' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTK' 'sip-files00164.pro'
938ab5252b1679febe778d50b316ab56
fb526fca72736545e2f1d242b3606eb3a3673f2e
describe
'55917' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTL' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
2a0465681d26d8355f772f94948d52d6
b57bb2cd626fc19b551e2e3b8cce81d6abf0bb1d
describe
'3371880' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTM' 'sip-files00164.tif'
535f81ad9fa256bc022a08f7ea04fd19
b1a9bc242804c72ed1a92c00dbe6bf31d280f45c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTN' 'sip-files00164.txt'
1d5f282347030e2aa9e2e91b7904eb2c
8dfe3f22a63b538ba1aeba141281060c441e6a02
describe
'22622' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTO' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
7d584088bd84b9355720af73a9278ce9
dbfba514032dd1cc960b60b7bd7eedca4138c6ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTP' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
e037fc676f09737e6d7b094706a7836d
e1cd74e74fd20014c35ca82cef07cc8d914709cc
describe
'127844' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTQ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
81fef4561cd63e2684139f37f3f514a8
2e4b6175ab07f33f3eedae9dcce16412a0aab6c5
describe
'29869' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTR' 'sip-files00165.pro'
f0cdfdbb2ab6322d34dd8e024b78eb31
f268fc127ab5c767fd840b7b42225e0a9867708b
describe
'52792' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTS' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
f61993087dd6a560ae2c62d684d290f6
cdcd8b180dd9bea126452948cde7ed68096c766d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTT' 'sip-files00165.tif'
caa1821526ee98ecb114df142c9ed2ba
18ca2f1135bdf69c4c27e4debbff7bca581a7f12
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTU' 'sip-files00165.txt'
df0ea13e6a8133eeefb89a2f3024b77a
a07e30a915fd62b4d3488e79853d86f79c3efba2
describe
'22317' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTV' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
41336259b83bc287b02e546043d50d1b
7f3e9fb14335bb93af547c3be4db6b742937dff2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTW' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
ff96e1676becdc517c6bf56d6d746f9b
0c5577d563f3f24c9733d81320a1941dbce208bc
describe
'137015' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTX' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
be7f8a0a6c95de91611ae1472d148299
135f0503b7e670a41990e43f631422ab14942176
describe
'31776' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTY' 'sip-files00166.pro'
035045cf0e8bc141ea0a86a74acf6181
c29c57331bc033f9142db38a04f0719b19866081
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPTZ' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
10f5ba10f02bec8acf1db55bd1f64037
77c75687f20ed708e3548d0d252f0e5c786260b2
'2012-01-15T04:27:50-05:00'
describe
'3371604' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUA' 'sip-files00166.tif'
44fb7cb44e0ef765c2bc6b71b5cbbc34
328279560ef26960ec33668f86f3a9e45c6443a2
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUB' 'sip-files00166.txt'
1e428c86b24462d13cc41dd09b9060c8
1321c8eb814e3b728cf37b92c148e30088222556
describe
'21735' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUC' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
9de664304fac3462c18bd42eff7fcc2e
dcc906b2248ed3278fc4ef50db7f569776306404
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUD' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
0bd9dffffc3b6ab94b6797b2f08ccbf8
0c58a5b0c286b645965f9892b39b989b09976f2f
'2012-01-15T04:29:02-05:00'
describe
'139699' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUE' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
aa81c3116a2b0c29da7f962b19e570d1
41b318aa84e6095d5f0ccfb0ef0d78650e1c8c4d
describe
'32764' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUF' 'sip-files00167.pro'
9e6848a58101679ad775c9bdf36b53ab
13cb6c0ddefbb69cc21e1ef64ea90b7a7d8834f5
'2012-01-15T04:28:08-05:00'
describe
'55968' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUG' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
c909aad9b64d48f12d786e1c62fd27f7
0654f5b11ae8c470869c2741b9ba4837183387a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUH' 'sip-files00167.tif'
dfb472e2049e2b2058c8d553f786e5ad
593f15a5336915d848c624fa149c87958e3ac3e7
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUI' 'sip-files00167.txt'
86edc6861220e0cb10aab60fef9412c3
c259a386981d2a1287254f75e863f3199f5d204e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUJ' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
ce3cc9be97e10d68034e9fea14f50505
df43009e4d1956a30d73eda0b0a1166eca12b0b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUK' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
2b0e15595143c052d6798cbebea27d0c
f79eacf9bbe1332f028fd847ffc70fd88a81088a
describe
'126854' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUL' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
795a4ce52c2bd5aa103043924091164e
597b7287f5f88f5b4e17bc6cdb5fb1463a4852c3
describe
'29067' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUM' 'sip-files00168.pro'
f6b6144fd24551204f501444e5ffc60a
a472f937725c1ba84d444260cd7edc9fcdd6ea09
describe
'51963' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUN' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
993934a267a5c6407cbf391319041f67
f5a09677fbda0e1f690af06090aafdbb8f73df2c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUO' 'sip-files00168.tif'
552b0816b4bf6c8d343d85a9c491925c
cb109b4191f761cec14af44369eaab454877525e
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUP' 'sip-files00168.txt'
1c2b99cec10e3bcf73c378ff2fdb6cc7
8f211bede7e36a61f46a8baf608be8f9dc61a51f
describe
'21839' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUQ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
b32c3acfd6579778c94eb0ceeff3c342
6bb16ce5d1b36f8865118bdf46a9d1f05693dfae
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUR' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
9ecfdb22f8b5de82e0780c1ba6eaacee
72256158baf6b162061d316f4723f6c0caf3febc
describe
'145964' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUS' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
62dfa2d51c97a491754f393e78c9d038
5219fb9700888a5cec12138bf5fe3465bef3d80e
'2012-01-15T04:31:54-05:00'
describe
'34171' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUT' 'sip-files00169.pro'
d2d14d317f8693a7a037111c31436ed0
be9289419ffa4ec04d1f3ecf47babe012fd4fe20
describe
'58518' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUU' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
2f3c55048383ea0e6698ca1bba7c5fd4
f2efa45c7f83ba695a5244a19389967ec40f209c
describe
'3372172' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUV' 'sip-files00169.tif'
20bd4274624ac0fb7cb6cd16255d68ef
8cf05b95f53cc22f95606959cf30a704b60f98cb
'2012-01-15T04:28:52-05:00'
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUW' 'sip-files00169.txt'
03f3104c841de4e07237c909305719f3
7a040893746b97a8f508b8c33f5f04007952832b
describe
'23058' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUX' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
ef0cc254888297689a36c7f2c15ed8ad
a79c655575fb70a7d71986581443a6dc734c3282
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUY' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
9e9193991ae64aa6472c4d85819241f7
c3101b8fecbccaab635e0ae6683eb8ec566e6d60
describe
'139129' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPUZ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
419e95958071b676abf08eb0a5e60fa0
b470fc24194c78f412ad355af22ab49e0db72140
describe
'32069' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVA' 'sip-files00170.pro'
93d92fc2a72d2f70afd2694be4e46149
c815895caecf71bf251269dc8da50b424f993c59
describe
'56143' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVB' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
02d60946cb0a863fff79a035371a0344
c172526b09d4c9b25b6b609b558067345a42c3ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVC' 'sip-files00170.tif'
b442f0a227a849d801011a3d9e059e1c
2fad0c96674af74072848b4b0cf1024294b937db
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVD' 'sip-files00170.txt'
e8e0f32eee2b975d5a925daf36054746
84b12e45a1de2d8425ef93a0564e15abbd88cc17
describe
'22312' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVE' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
c3c155be8d286a2198603b4e09b6abf6
dbc021d36e58c19f250e3906e02de6a9841099c7
describe
'419880' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVF' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
b6a8443e9fd9b858ee4fb97909038bf7
6ff472ec593604ea2c4cb641e565d189deac69c6
'2012-01-15T04:30:28-05:00'
describe
'132677' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVG' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
3c295c81addeebbedd89b54a2cebe2d4
52216c6665ff32b07252305cbc96a03dcd493b34
describe
'31073' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVH' 'sip-files00171.pro'
99375fbf3780b66bbbd20994ff8a16d9
f09f9432b1181b69be64e318f8c1da5bcbdb1d85
describe
'53172' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVI' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
b3a324198661053e96aaa22637640fa0
783e8b3dcab2f14f620d06da6d2fea487d5564a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVJ' 'sip-files00171.tif'
53a19083430fb95e5e197d7d25e623a4
a629a4512a3f12600d13692e8c4ed2fd3c705606
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVK' 'sip-files00171.txt'
1088567be87c16e22d307298c77d9ea0
73c3f06f04570131667eb611d1d5daa866562eda
describe
'21959' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVL' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
6d4ce29964e84980395166d832642f6e
1f3e70157f29ff74f56b3737b32f4a2bc34937ff
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVM' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
28684796f8a6199402aafa3171cfcd95
e6ad8e79e80168d3e276866fa251c82d11ead8ff
describe
'136826' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVN' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
be7988c5513da296eea5a4f876970822
b39df4fdc0f0d57bbbab2a595c7e24990642072a
describe
'25192' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVO' 'sip-files00172.pro'
8207f8009559a4cab556282273fbb6c9
8c875430a9fdde38d9b348c9492cb368fd304586
describe
'53723' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVP' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
bf4f11f93d9ff33d1366531687f188e0
5e3aabcace3fbe7076272d83c9b36d1e46d866ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVQ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
01695ee086b08a38be8949386a766a24
b51c1b71df66cfcc4ae179dc38850b283d9b167a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVR' 'sip-files00172.txt'
ab272bee43892b03649234229a132d4e
8f1de963360a72162d173ae751626a6e90d3d540
describe
'22343' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVS' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
9d4efeed46e4cf56afcf990264f96b6d
10611778c7f94a0002b3ecaa0c42f2e681a78be4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVT' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
05335fb2d06545451266757774074e46
9819ba6d821292f4d9f0846927c0069246a5edff
describe
'140677' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVU' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
b7011667a3e19dd8e74678cecd463b93
f45305d0843bd2aec356bf9c6f1b5a6a1435962f
describe
'33645' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVV' 'sip-files00173.pro'
b6915037c13b777e40b0248ffcb3c1e8
fbc6a373c1f99c9971e44d583ab1cfa2fa70e7bb
'2012-01-15T04:28:20-05:00'
describe
'56268' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVW' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
80ae6a0d4cc305a99accb1d66d9b9c36
cb281b83c8d32bec752279f641f48469f28a201a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVX' 'sip-files00173.tif'
8f3808a0cbf8d8f229ce8487f7bc97b5
27a1096590b039f74f4e5d24c7f414bc713bf6c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVY' 'sip-files00173.txt'
c2f9ba68d7f408c96f3a5bf5e3da7d2e
f89da8bee4b69eb7c5bbaa65560cb9ccb83cf42c
describe
'22221' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPVZ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
99cb9d9f6f80aaf8a38e176cc3cb346d
9d70a2f69c375c66c6b1007e64ba0bef5a4f953c
describe
'419884' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWA' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
60b1608fc5f35024f40c1e8ab10857ac
78234f8409e310f86073af33683368fb7fc2c756
describe
'146059' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWB' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
522251ba654e49848110d3a28f9c5823
e5aa7aa5b647ed7bc5cae77850e4972935c37120
describe
'23807' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWC' 'sip-files00174.pro'
13c182aa6935ea3a11f70e6557a7917a
e999ab3b4360d1e3d499fee8f2459dcfc01cd20d
describe
'55979' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWD' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
fe0626dd95f5f6c0d60f50e14ba22450
f057d6c3194519e871aaebec6e6ca868b6b693af
describe
'3372212' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWE' 'sip-files00174.tif'
3001f234df9271014415f13cc718e3db
4d5220f6959b5cacee430e6cfd60b4d5fc10d30f
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWF' 'sip-files00174.txt'
9f600c7ce3fbd559c55b5748694198cf
39e7236c917bda37ddd66328e3c3b960a575c560
describe
'22973' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWG' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
464f2e98dcce39c28d97f1cd70220572
460e1b760a14e0ab4a16eb5b1b78464646b3daf7
describe
'308244' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWH' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
68ba126289bf1ff23d2c6236b129c7f5
28c2cef4841ce8b09b0e328ada1f51fa63e55474
describe
'50121' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWI' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
1138045f4b33cde08045e158bdef2020
dd0d3697eb8fd1a4706bbd4499eaa391a5a7bc97
'2012-01-15T04:30:35-05:00'
describe
'8957' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWJ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
45463282c230f17ad01c57db61407f8b
2591d6b01f714fad749ce7bc2bc31ed9bc28f375
describe
'23210' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWK' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
9fd8ac6bac73bede9811790397c14fe7
77fba6888e4c3ba734ad6759b03ec33f7aa45512
describe
'3368500' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWL' 'sip-files00175.tif'
3646024a233c1623eed7cc95b5648812
9a5e2d7800a69a78e7ae2af3ccb0667e4625bfa9
describe
'370' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWM' 'sip-files00175.txt'
f9aba3ab0bc0371ce793c39f61642e07
6ed8ab80290f31906e7d5c808abb672a2fa33b9f
describe
'12844' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWN' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
cc660defacdf36e5f95018a2a27e80b3
a874fb102c5c25b7ab59e85c5456179160328c97
describe
'419898' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWO' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
0637d13c967aecb8473dd85342d07d7f
560dd2a5d7a4c34603c17168e1cb36fb3f127909
describe
'113428' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWP' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
dd9406d9705244c29be3589cd7ead79b
c7f3b2e33622ce76091d81efd4c33448609262aa
describe
'24982' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWQ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
d7ad58493e2b2553109b218e6944fcc4
151b6abe53308e8b3307018022c77dddab7baeac
describe
'46703' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWR' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
de3ea73bca37be216e585ddf740f484d
572a641319f5fde0bdecc5c92837ae32310487b2
describe
'3371124' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWS' 'sip-files00176.tif'
dd67fdc201e2fd90345ad4d712eb76b6
49c633f57d67932362559ca87aada9982bb9d782
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWT' 'sip-files00176.txt'
b7366d6db35a6e23dee1e3a8284ff1b7
c8301c05690c89d6a6dc22fe752b71d53aaca3fc
'2012-01-15T04:28:59-05:00'
describe
'19776' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWU' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
c827ce3b79b8d37145c25cf13e79500b
396cd5d9baea16cfaa37c8000ce9a1faee9ecdc4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWV' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
46f80f97897bd74d19fcda6af8ad2ca6
32a82aa3e91aac813031e89842714efad5700a64
describe
'139896' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWW' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
7a0a74fc5a05204ca4c2f10a0a57c648
c1fc9358ad9e0128735bc02e3c8848e08c5ed846
describe
'33078' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWX' 'sip-files00177.pro'
f79a92436ef1876052db081bac85a40c
565e85ce7012764c9e6bf507924e07419f0e907b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWY' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
64a5c24d6bf318abab72cf287cc12485
2e26a34f46b91e56db799e69c7ad2992b8cf01fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPWZ' 'sip-files00177.tif'
5704843d733a17e83ce6734fdb06caf5
3135e5a0ad205114728ec26fa63e36e9da153b57
'2012-01-15T04:32:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXA' 'sip-files00177.txt'
d4d902bb6b226e615fa2a1c2c3d106d9
df71be0d9a4cd98bb6383740d88716c703e496c0
describe
'22409' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXB' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
e88c42232467df58d3999fddf056fb1e
427aa15a8c6f766e76f89fcef5b063c88f197ffc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXC' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
e1aa0a77faa4abe4e89ff159cad03780
6c73596f7d718e5201c4e3796ce06cbd9ffb06ed
describe
'140186' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXD' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
58626b3d47b6fc1793f3ee8a171d0b76
24aac779011f03a48a5b6e2d4b64bddae2970f43
describe
'33653' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXE' 'sip-files00178.pro'
4532d1d4c3194cb7f9f63ab9063c087a
7e83dbe5ee4367ae1aefd5707b6bbe960210a0a2
describe
'56081' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXF' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
958503728da35703ee794409a2281ab2
7d98b0b01a33125d5c78ad18d96335cbbe5862b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXG' 'sip-files00178.tif'
1e90af151295fd2eb6a2b5deaf1162e8
6161c542e14373eeea6e1c6a697a2280b9eb8949
'2012-01-15T04:31:45-05:00'
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXH' 'sip-files00178.txt'
153363abed2ed188248f4ecc85407175
a09145049fd7fe7fefb8979b43a5483cbea66e03
describe
'22585' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXI' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
d3f0a573ea210e08634bd11dbc7c490b
b15ad3e0ab55b51a734b339e418d0395072e6abc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXJ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
2a4765fcf10d5629be836719ddc87436
2681d737339e0f59d273609f8eddbbce23bd417d
describe
'143912' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXK' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
3fc9de12f3ce63e087bc9e7dbfed0f09
fae37eb6fe8877320d66e812ba429d284aa2f8d8
describe
'33455' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXL' 'sip-files00179.pro'
dc00f537612d5fd889aff7b8c4f527f7
9c129966c990bb82a8153191c9225df19167cb22
describe
'56735' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXM' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
ad68a1b7763b7b7b0fc7c58efa57a9f8
6acffb1671c149456b53019c126320a120432d3d
describe
'3372040' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXN' 'sip-files00179.tif'
2d11e09f81bd29035ecf64cb7e23d3c1
1e655528bf1c7f53ccbe8a7235c336a1c5df1c45
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXO' 'sip-files00179.txt'
8db369157d889ee423e8670e1b035d04
7d6d47c704bcfac45802256b539fb09191ec7863
describe
'22750' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXP' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
7acb7079133aab292a96ea5df72d2b2c
4c21e9e1a4f468ac5d2d92556cdab6182002e9ff
describe
'419864' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXQ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
58c6e286f77e455c46d686b1c2a46e6e
3c152982618fb3b08c48842ddc90f9cc58de5057
describe
'145823' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXR' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
b8c8489b9268e245080859132a4245a0
ee52bdadca4dddde5b26900e8b917f1f59ad8f48
describe
'34475' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXS' 'sip-files00180.pro'
a89d98158f5dd679d60ff72c1f31e7e7
5d93389e72caedfac6cfab02632b0b0cd7e03b4f
describe
'57603' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXT' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
283a1affcecf816653c87ab9b2b5769e
d6f993fdccba5eb352bec905ba6c58d16f7283cd
describe
'3371764' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXU' 'sip-files00180.tif'
589b3688efdf75b5a10e5ddf65da3db0
71b94feb1422b1fa458312848a61aa98a48fc316
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXV' 'sip-files00180.txt'
83c9889cf7f22724e637e8bd0554f7e2
812b6f06b46c8f06dee0a99654e6a3698e5ee488
describe
'22264' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXW' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
f5a79e3790dd17cc59af65fb8f721d74
e40f5ca5d31a0a485e820c6260a5b193480a0424
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXX' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
7c8e9f7afb4ad97b5436343f92fe1382
e5b51951594e26560e2bbb88bd2590e238f01a88
describe
'143511' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXY' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
b7a7138e050f1e62e2c79228b863f85f
0852b6eebdd1943748035068ab733a2d1a331c66
describe
'33807' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPXZ' 'sip-files00181.pro'
6c56fabdfaf2c03442c4c0c1c3d49d35
130cf4d6f54afa22cd58ec5311838b8e4c05e128
describe
'56886' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYA' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
3b5f26f99e32d1235a788cda85ad5e05
4a469c5733f6c7f852d80a336a79b8f7a5736d7e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYB' 'sip-files00181.tif'
7ef4b906c396c3a5066b9bd986674a61
10f279ed35d10ff6313956646919ffc9cfcb66dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYC' 'sip-files00181.txt'
899bd6b57d0633ea39a98ee72ca13755
576ce9f449958bdc8be02fa459b37c757006b059
describe
'22926' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYD' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
5993a7e26a8eb736f91ad384f4ce286e
092b46d4902886eacfb54790b522c5f3b71e4ec9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYE' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
1829a5486406774b91c936442ccc183b
259d85ca4fc915367b026bd7c7b1f2419108bf87
describe
'144764' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYF' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
902e97757443ec054626ff8b4a5737e3
4750519dd3b03459ca2a7f13332e6b120539396f
describe
'34129' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYG' 'sip-files00182.pro'
f46085de0ded756d680cfd41f69a1060
aaadf8e843a099b02b54912496b8fb0e2aac48c3
describe
'56524' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYH' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
f2a19e28da5d9a5166e17d3bafcfb6db
366157819d39f2a75e8e428ac9b48bd6ad485009
describe
'3371732' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYI' 'sip-files00182.tif'
8b75c4530efee9cdeddabb10b1bb65cc
e3c031292ec8b72fa0d4b705c4ae5a49bc0990bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYJ' 'sip-files00182.txt'
b6a4e5f0c60de6b49c8075002a57bb0b
6cd4fcd2644b851667acaa3b4dced4ecd5505e45
describe
'22126' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYK' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
931fe083ea4ffe5afbb43e950ebf05d4
eb98e8e084a30cb8a70916a0c1e93e9e7c584e19
describe
'419871' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYL' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
7fb833d39f76aaafb43975aec12a62a9
01f76a65e560888338fec1c1231f40eaf1fd5989
describe
'130260' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYM' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
a936375caa85c7ea3de9f3aab31628a7
bbfdbac430e6aa2d948fad070a836f8914a38215
describe
'30008' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYN' 'sip-files00183.pro'
717968e52a06419407a2e13c06223ad5
165286c52212e2ff6c80b6665e72e117326581d3
describe
'51831' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYO' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
5d2b0896fa75ba7babfbd97ffac61edc
894cad4073c7ad2f4cc9fcf75b384246d7a7322b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYP' 'sip-files00183.tif'
b54518ae8b687895568262c64b42f0b8
fb56ac5254f9757ab36a51c663514830dfccdbe8
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYQ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
a263c353aa0d10269c4c0fdf3a048391
ccdb581e7df85ea1b34246c59c216b2b9656f382
describe
'22112' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYR' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
6637c0945d4f373499c613ba4b6a6a3a
816d117e13efe89b57d3a321386e96995326f346
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYS' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
3677b036f56eb715bc91760ec11d9f5d
3d3e8c4eef6dd8608fd50226f459d56b22b624b9
describe
'128757' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYT' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
03d9f37d9a277d32ac42b0a42dbd2097
6ddd45cd01e4fe57eee5b9bc9c1580f55eb9b1bf
describe
'29741' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYU' 'sip-files00184.pro'
6524b54754b3c962a073d40e4a18f12e
1a29cc51d49924b79f9e7a1dcc6a840548c6a02c
describe
'52784' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYV' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
c6ec6676cf2dee5b427f10d9f94d5c6f
855150aca5313c736b6bd911b84ee762c404f162
describe
'3371660' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYW' 'sip-files00184.tif'
af8769533fe9e06faad2a592994a7761
b8ca59b0e906ce21f50c29e77ea12776a49eabe8
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYX' 'sip-files00184.txt'
a016cec55316239246d2062e6bd38f27
192b17da5611e6e04a3c3b16a49baa5f5a9f5d09
describe
'22036' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYY' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
9583e67707639aa3f5b2c09770cf10ca
f6cbe93cf374a4b1e3fbefd94fe5148803420267
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPYZ' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
26794a3f4e6cf2a25058c0cc4f959328
92e8f07f6c0615f75147c8d17d9771c916741c5a
describe
'145597' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZA' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
72c2291fb4299f9431ce5f39bf4026c8
505f4321141660bc59c13f73418b1bac4b82ab55
describe
'33818' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZB' 'sip-files00185.pro'
6f4b083f746b10ba3df1a655a648826b
d1264b8791f9250e4e2b7f42ffb8d38bc491d393
describe
'56424' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZC' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
fa482289fa83a5ad77e538251d8e4f0c
0e6a8a285d93cd2f357aa4ae18a52f8ce3fff386
describe
'3371712' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZD' 'sip-files00185.tif'
703de527675805e38927846add26a09b
be0bba009b46be73531e8ee690d1d395dec0bf7e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZE' 'sip-files00185.txt'
24fceaf743e34ff624625759f800af42
454541960b6b20d79425c005ed2e4c0c734d0b1b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZF' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
93279785b1878566fe4491d97844724a
f9fddc47e6ca77519e250684f6ad6825f3810ed5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZG' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
e0c6564af036968189f5f7912c8bcb9f
8283543a1f9654761387c48adf92b434d90108ea
describe
'144139' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZH' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
4b3c104af1f1e85131230c24579aadc8
fb79acc44cbecdd8a7b14ad39ef48330056ce070
describe
'35042' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZI' 'sip-files00186.pro'
938f15080c7739fad3066d316d16242d
9502cbdf3653e63cf1b786b64d6e3944c6bc9d2c
describe
'56596' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZJ' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
f6ae174890dcb83e7e15914943b1393e
62b88cc609f3265dd9a6c1ee179e30bcd492e8f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZK' 'sip-files00186.tif'
75e88df663234514b020e96385c11335
4f4dc65aa8a40775e39258784e0d32f96e87fe7f
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZL' 'sip-files00186.txt'
1932efc56da18db6832a5d6a442e71b2
a558665b46df58ac37e53f792c3cffd030844f78
describe
'22057' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZM' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
5b39f774b80acf5bdfa8874de87265d2
ab96393dd6b12fb1d9b5815e4cd1d6245064a038
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZN' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
1b8b9e3d4a982c90d3256bf387eb1dbc
c11fed291a82c0ae2026815f33dcd7fbb996729a
describe
'134260' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZO' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
958ead499c974277a19c2eaacebb4aef
e0b51a1fa55b4202dd879d38def13e96894dbeaf
describe
'31619' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZP' 'sip-files00187.pro'
0aa1ceb5ca3beddbe3da552297bff2ae
efe373c77e7f9eb5f835e0f16e736c37dd2c1573
describe
'54284' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZQ' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
66ebce5df6df67c71c1effbbe8625497
ce50727d52b49eafd7e32bf3c4eaa0ccc6f525fd
describe
'3371848' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZR' 'sip-files00187.tif'
5df2b4ec58fa95294c0825100ed1a195
cc6a41b23c641e1dd8220742c5a67a4eefd6cca9
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZS' 'sip-files00187.txt'
160160af0782c58395dcf8a32df24670
38d42069888b79c44aec7dff8d57434f8415ce3e
describe
'22072' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZT' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
59085fcf1addca3e08eee5ce85ff4f6a
720ce2cb7bb7bb6adbb166c9e65af0f071c59253
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZU' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
05b7cbc420af52e55ef32441150c5b9c
d959f1955d9db7e34041c1dfc73f83da37c034c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZV' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
9cc57de9fdc8c5c458c0d660b3325607
8ad9f46edc84f27527dfd57c9263c374490311da
describe
'33213' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZW' 'sip-files00188.pro'
5843f2fff9d461ced3197dc0698287b0
05556e10933e3224347259c38f5fe4d549b6ab6c
describe
'55067' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZX' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
89f1ee3f63de08eab66ccbb246663151
ef3c3377c69144999936fde235bdcc8b0d120c62
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZY' 'sip-files00188.tif'
1c0c8b9df00289e7ccc332fc410b574f
a7b473ebd2c58c993e90d68c10ac555f59c91b70
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAPZZ' 'sip-files00188.txt'
12ea5a61121f5ffecb789e761d291099
fd6134bdba6089c09459ef182bad38f1c38fe843
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAA' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
1335aee80cbfb1bd647d6462fbecd177
d9987d07b211ed9ee5aea529ed3bad2f7290d6d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAB' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
8ceb82e2e3349c00d5bff575ca743fbf
9fc2609efaf922392d7cd569991a173e7293a122
describe
'115093' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAC' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
71cd3f6159554d7ee5b993a8ff748b42
ba502719d2eefae50bc01a116b46f85fbce5a216
describe
'26275' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAD' 'sip-files00189.pro'
c5ae115c531ef627e465867ed2f4bba6
50ff2e1d0cd4a2e38d2b71b56d68d39a131abd1e
describe
'46449' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAE' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
def283b04e66917f0501fc1f568975e2
f3728aa53733c1d23dcbf64ec5db22fc88afd8d8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAF' 'sip-files00189.tif'
a14db02db436e1310929c0e5e9fdc171
108cab2bdaea0ae5df2601e062db7aa073290434
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAG' 'sip-files00189.txt'
fe71425a401636ac754d82db1d75b7d9
1ea99091b0fe4589d57da442f4cfbd5d498340ac
describe
'19609' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAH' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
197e979e8af059a7f257940ac0eee9d4
2d2d140451d05f33bd80b6951b7521d71483eaa4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAI' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
6fa36b76d84be8c43ef4b0431a82b74d
13ba91485234ae3a5a514b901c15986c5c8e52b8
describe
'115430' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAJ' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
0d5e4f5705f19a3d80004862bb6959cb
afe293275ce06b9a9cdd58dcc0286f2dffb12d58
describe
'20784' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAK' 'sip-files00190.pro'
589b1125a9f21361c0b1a9379ce8eaef
cce593a6f3c1e2520f3aaa034d32e9be9f68245e
describe
'45480' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAL' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
24a45aff6bb1e53ce2dc96d3266d04b9
f8f69734ffc86d37d6ba78efbc81c96a9746b212
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAM' 'sip-files00190.tif'
48a0bf403971b3989e730c3d4c00957b
4fc3c89cac42d705f76ff88d525517116be4a722
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAN' 'sip-files00190.txt'
ea600911d8e0000e1f235a7d1c2b0414
5bf01634cbb6269bbfa986871592bffb34eaeec8
describe
'19755' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAO' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
246ebecfe91971a759c7c548a79f4e8b
f8b87e14450b7c252b4c56a8d8f42ccd90d59278
'2012-01-15T04:29:21-05:00'
describe
'419858' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAP' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
8b5f3234d797b6361dd81b004283d94d
25dae198c75ffbb1df9fa0cb93596728fe214269
describe
'151138' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAQ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
06fef3d35a8f61fb2d3d8ab41ee4998c
e58b0f53e9620c99d023fae2c951853629f49585
describe
'34262' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAR' 'sip-files00191.pro'
354e07860780773354c02293758248ec
88ba415bd6fd5c09d0de7194abccd6ab64bf5cf7
describe
'58720' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAS' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
781038e9bd5843eddb38e354a8a251e3
97b6e682531c1b3c1b55ebc0b6bc52e1f60afbc4
describe
'3371968' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAT' 'sip-files00191.tif'
b070cec37f8e143e80cb230151b8f5ca
15b06cd30cba1bccc6af13f95ca4ce5735ffdf5e
'2012-01-15T04:29:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAU' 'sip-files00191.txt'
44e96aa5eabe13220734f55c376b143c
e537ccda53bec382136e3e4652ddcf34388b27de
describe
'22823' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAV' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
c15b4a6eb6db590491e300c4dc49d1b4
7bade99631762f2dd4655ca8769b0fcaadb3d753
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAW' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
75300f8dc9d4cb98340f4f5f0834d739
da4bd9e3f9e5b8632c7e6425fa3a3f4e7cf881dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAX' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
267633fef3e8c075b36cdbb81c775464
ea4d89aa1366e516183986e57524cdf4f17f2702
describe
'31759' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAY' 'sip-files00192.pro'
3c9536a124d3f07289f84f882b8c1793
c29aa073a1a31ede751b50f6b91b95fb7cc85436
describe
'56500' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQAZ' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
e082604c7649f7aa1ef9e9fa139af1c3
44d930988f57d27a8e7cdb57cb9a9aef905dbb0e
describe
'3371868' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBA' 'sip-files00192.tif'
073f8bbdb62fd2978e765b9b7dd8221f
e3de41927f1a2c3d3f2b8be717e6522ad29bb5c5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBB' 'sip-files00192.txt'
79fdde7907e4ec6e3924462c019a16e2
999c112d62a787deb80e48578790da23cef35382
describe
'22487' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBC' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
aeee00c238abe7d839cdc9cf63419eb5
6694d56c0260b166f3316fa0f7478ce43f9e5018
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBD' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
5709e7619bd7914749c8d19e7c7229c0
3218200e55921ae7c49c81726e195a07301afb33
describe
'145079' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBE' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
db3801b87105c949f5356c2e5dc57268
08be8b4833a4484df99bc16c8ae7032e5d4d14d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBF' 'sip-files00193.pro'
5899c102447cfe96c5c170c7361a6dd6
f2374bd576fa7bff43ac4207d950c1af162b7730
describe
'45701' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBG' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
3102d0b7bcd83e64fc88e3e1886b37f2
81735269defeb47c6cabe3f21d8781327f330504
describe
'3371436' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBH' 'sip-files00193.tif'
07062692e8b6ef2bb7adb17d5ee57833
2c3094e252e75c1ff3dfedf627759eb9f055c5a4
'2012-01-15T04:31:08-05:00'
describe
'191' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBI' 'sip-files00193.txt'
21ef9ba961d27cedea41801b095aa1e4
c04d0f95ab1d5a889143442ad86ea9c15e4bb12c
describe
'20455' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBJ' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
5dc20fccb7cfca43b0a7fc2f1d581f6d
984b289f0c7a022fb3b13b9775d2d1308ca27d8f
describe
'413921' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBK' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
2a71427fe09e67a0156ef6947d7fa1e4
3ea6c77e0c35299888a3240df9f72dd4fdec5756
describe
'32336' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBL' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
237811870370c0b100a7b832ed62c3d3
dfb9dbdee304c77be138c64c7e3d19a952152d26
describe
'13541' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBM' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
32329200618557df4e0687af88b0a464
9bfcd9a119dea0c6874da571c9cf15e4b494d541
describe
'3367432' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBN' 'sip-files00194.tif'
d6967025c4f5bc28c53d3d2a38d8145c
0df5bcde19ed55882266de070f5609673296cb25
describe
'9702' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBO' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
d38008970f8c3be49960d94844b020d3
accbf11066cbd1c14215479d3f40000dd749f890
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBP' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
7feb511fa837186b411e7bcb8840c178
08271012d06104b1d49cc8dd8c64a8cb80a0b3db
describe
'143006' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBQ' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
0476c920cf5e7ec077bda7a13d5885eb
8fd41fdcffaf3d560622f6335f537002b6f3ba82
describe
'33026' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBR' 'sip-files00195.pro'
e7e698d4f66199f0cb6c2cae9fcd3fa6
965b382cd60102d2c2b9b09a27a9da506923e682
describe
'55168' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBS' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
fd5dc4e350da0dd2672a5bb09061d292
740f07308ce05ef1de9d09c7ecfa388b2809210b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBT' 'sip-files00195.tif'
d95960a852db794c01d1365d4adc79bc
89b36390fd618b26f1387f5b8cfed737d0efbb42
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBU' 'sip-files00195.txt'
c871fcae820ace34c67e58976b165761
70dc74adb1c3cff17a723dae6a8ad183abd31a2b
describe
'22180' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBV' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
6a94ad5c3ee73da36fbba2a9a2fbe890
ea816000a22fc4e717be6a65b73ae4be0faa187a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBW' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
cddac6e6ba156674c36a01723980331e
eec1d0d9730a08db52064c755895c09a04a4373e
describe
'142101' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBX' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
db53e453edf7cdc52f8dd63afc2c77ed
b6b1cbb62ba283af3a0cfa6132e618e35b7fd249
describe
'31465' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBY' 'sip-files00196.pro'
b8f0b544e42f8bc78c9b7383522609e8
537f3e12736ff6af37df5d2a6a89e3d1c2235f13
describe
'54530' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQBZ' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
8da76820fe7c7f46b94c4d67181423c7
b960551feb904f2e841c196a85d873459a6e6fff
describe
'3371676' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCA' 'sip-files00196.tif'
177884f09205e7807d20c2bbef622ab4
fb60d4cab422d4a3f1b63634e87bdcb873e73a9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCB' 'sip-files00196.txt'
293ba9505e042b42e99eba7de02aaf5f
0fe990a49c4b244e6e75183e5fc0d12dbb6a1ec3
describe
'22251' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCC' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
e9fc525d1c30d3e863187fc45d52a9d4
b02734335b22ae46c560376a7e051e791ab06d85
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCD' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
5850b7128f065f3eaf1d3a369e69fa87
e4beb8388643c86fe4196517971e85b1084db7d0
describe
'139088' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCE' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
1885cd0dcc0f14ca8500f4c0606e7a58
4559976ce8ab8abef27da7687871e3ecb8183605
describe
'31170' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCF' 'sip-files00197.pro'
f3822881d2959814f6353fc8666b04c2
a50da8c528c93ab4529d7a1aebd761ff5f8aee99
describe
'54909' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCG' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
6c77518457809f0d60ab7a51683d0cf6
a45efa01c96299fbae3c83c216771825d8d23de1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCH' 'sip-files00197.tif'
16545669265df691fa6caa4ce0093c32
4234a43875300eca278a3655076ea524b2c8bd78
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCI' 'sip-files00197.txt'
81ed45eeb700166263fa17c32c195986
33c3258fc417e52a1ab99ef5c926eecf4c689852
describe
'22237' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCJ' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
34482e18a7f7478cf3610cf90cdb2776
63b0eaeb08bd17657581887f0baf99beae8f2b4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCK' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
336026e1b16140c9623bf1fa2b137317
8c97885604ef97f08aaba42db9ed67d054785ce9
describe
'147586' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCL' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
7c02dec3087d1ee1d4dcdf9bfcb65d71
9b347ab3a8f80e872632c3faa07f11eee413ffd4
describe
'32712' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCM' 'sip-files00198.pro'
eb05aefecbb279752e78a98e44835830
e54033abcc4e0bba163303fcd30cc6a3e27b8005
describe
'57860' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCN' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
e1418c5861eb194b58de2cf07a807552
68acf61cfc210a62b81f135a884b3a9296ca505d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCO' 'sip-files00198.tif'
3499072373dbd8c3d1840e17a2042aed
eb39e3dbcad3a78aaa3f194c3b3b3a79ae184780
'2012-01-15T04:28:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCP' 'sip-files00198.txt'
d9be2d8c69c76534818ab16bdc27b05a
2fa81f1dd4d69a4e89b4b04e10a985156eb5183a
describe
'22553' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCQ' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
689a2ae75e364b5f179b2d55f68316ba
aa9d3ada14083e0bf8ce3eda0f4cf5a847af1514
describe
'419926' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCR' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
2cf53a847153cd3ce88de1f787463ac4
55f3e0c95ab19f69672dbcec8f82b41c90a0e54a
describe
'142568' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCS' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
08a8467d793637e56566e05abd296e44
bbe35d9aa4c0d43e84599f37042178474898a42c
describe
'30766' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCT' 'sip-files00199.pro'
6f218d37f5883133cf0eebc9526425ac
e3a5ea6ffe6e965f5f3f26656ddb78170fde94cf
describe
'54732' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCU' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
295b975a6a80f6d5f31ead0e1c299f18
23741ef0d0f9214e4cd6f54106a11baeda0f95ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCV' 'sip-files00199.tif'
1cb569e21301e32fdecfdad0d86a28c7
6f8ef4293db5aa3010b7f40030950c16d1f51ed6
'2012-01-15T04:29:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCW' 'sip-files00199.txt'
b4950e20879158cfaa2a7217870028e8
0a51d3dcf4db97fbd91206ce86b1f510089f2595
'2012-01-15T04:29:34-05:00'
describe
'22937' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCX' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
6b0cb2a2303560857195435741ef63f7
7ad983ff1a913581e6d2007e60242269e8f9ee37
describe
'419748' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCY' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
53bb1796c71f2f5d73ee54e1f93c8076
50ef29c737cc74c6d5db80f029274930702aa5b4
describe
'127275' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQCZ' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
4487eebb1123e9ee7c7866dd8c1a8e2b
10553e30cffc12c33c490c83f437782cdc07de2b
describe
'12196' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDA' 'sip-files00200.pro'
5450ea51e0a4c6e876b5d2260ec680e8
19a6d1166ed544fb7b3101b05997db18d41f86f6
describe
'45312' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDB' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
753e6735ea55a404891b9fc361340944
669e4f361e5f36fbf2d9104f44de4ceb33278b87
describe
'3371036' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDC' 'sip-files00200.tif'
ef7d51e81ad3f0944e89e17f485ea567
73c4b37fa9290d97a60f96f0afad5895c370cffb
describe
'487' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDD' 'sip-files00200.txt'
c8bb914966d999c8edf570ba6ba3321c
87238cdc28c6863a4ca3af95e471104c2bb88b6a
describe
'19943' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDE' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
9cd19540531dc0a4a4f36fdd3961abdd
8dc2e30983c0648f61d05ddcb750773c1d5f0c40
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDF' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
c3c8b7472bb1f66c586b4555b01b28f0
857ba70c273f7dd0cba910dcb26822eec7934751
'2012-01-15T04:27:06-05:00'
describe
'143087' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDG' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
405b12d4becba1d89717798878d87ead
c8e1fb3789d9e48f950c7972fd1155590e81e55e
describe
'34007' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDH' 'sip-files00201.pro'
d007efab1ae3e926580d1ad5874e1ac8
0a1d06cb26ba4ea61e505a2c721d4c9a01ba117c
describe
'56074' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDI' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
5884dd0145bb802d7061d3ab8f94d668
7cf7cc7205ff839ea368f02e3d9c3e505a4ff6eb
describe
'3371864' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDJ' 'sip-files00201.tif'
98b36aa13c0e3817cfd663236d5ec996
c2ccb56e1c7a769123e07d99e4acc6827affde92
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDK' 'sip-files00201.txt'
0d7652ad88403eb2aeef9c1d251aafac
5825578ffb63428236630246d8fca0ebe08f9398
describe
'22694' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDL' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
9c6849def170563ca3a3118eefd2c94c
c7dc682ef89681be3ba975f844f797f66c12f17d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDM' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
ce4992cde5119339e3964d12caca8a56
2de04279e34d977f602d2e5140be3cae7e715e76
describe
'140332' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDN' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
e82dad36cd38371d5237df8812179241
3383681aeae41adaed917679aec0cd0274c3140f
describe
'32656' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDO' 'sip-files00202.pro'
e79484f86f0933cc2064c679464e9b08
6d50bb85b594d19bacf33db77e4e55ec2370fca8
describe
'55959' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDP' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
cf4702d6ce8d651c231ca0fdcc7a756f
656bf2e8b387352451dd923d9e1d95cb85030e00
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDQ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
329c1daa1589eb14105a419f3493c4b6
1c7e538cee168e3e707fe9a70609c1a756b58599
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDR' 'sip-files00202.txt'
fbd365fb043f1bdadd74507c87a111a4
c258b31637683ad9f1414c250b7fccfc6d655516
describe
'22356' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDS' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
a44b1ebd3bcb9f6a81fbbd811637a54b
10e6695b79ebc9990cf56256c2beca2aada0cd60
describe
'318622' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDT' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
478a187a2541b94b3a73049885f63070
f55d44cf7885d643888653a9c5bd0d5972f3f53e
describe
'54094' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDU' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
fa10a75db173e8ee536a972a7c59d1ae
acafa4b85986878ca1bc82ea82b59e2c1d7d0d4a
describe
'9531' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDV' 'sip-files00203.pro'
6f35e4298a69753865b6003a84f02d34
e0aa0536f13769c94ecbf134603835b6646ea596
describe
'23971' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDW' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
e4d9aa9655cc39af44192272e1b0081f
49d63f4b7d745e6e4536c9ec79427d2bb6ffe17a
describe
'3368580' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDX' 'sip-files00203.tif'
a4c3fa0e7eb9d3ebae2db59b294954e5
f0c224f705e656586e10264c1b885cdaa3b01e8f
describe
'395' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDY' 'sip-files00203.txt'
5095e84bf7e6bae050bc1bb84d3d03d9
6a8ceb8e1153c29c1a7e74946fdb5533ccc89f32
describe
'12945' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQDZ' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
857a397a4c4c243ddc68eb134c49870c
e25ecc0e4e92c5f2ba028c4c9306a98ae2685e80
describe
'419862' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEA' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
89d8aa3add4849d73f40a792bc2d5b86
27e61d0c06996409c727d447f31ae45d949c605f
describe
'114480' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEB' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
cffada7096709478b517acab1d6bddf9
060f708cb9fa719187d5c96ab83faa028935e9d3
describe
'21391' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEC' 'sip-files00204.pro'
0e4816f88d583fc8f2826efaea21da0f
8463fd20b99a1208505a06a8b86f09afc4a344c0
describe
'44789' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQED' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
480c58ac9ba119a3bf023f67a044f2e6
98488f851d52716465096a76a48d72ac062a9f79
describe
'3371000' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEE' 'sip-files00204.tif'
ba30a7f9e28ea6daf8d74da045507de7
f9fe064e11bbcee6ea242e78a97129873b38a30b
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEF' 'sip-files00204.txt'
bbcb0302206e0eb82a925def22f53204
232af2ddb2e7f7ebe937e2586c08168337d9fff5
describe
'19650' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEG' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
053c905ee1e8766c9e64f92786392a69
75bd31295dbd89d88cb886afb8ff742fce550127
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEH' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
451df893dfa9557574bec3967f4d1cf2
158b5efb6d66672ee4b488acefa950886b68f178
describe
'153653' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEI' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
6f33e0256fee645fa3f83b40c1d44c46
66606fcd74a4bb5922f39fc603afb29d312d968d
describe
'34448' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEJ' 'sip-files00205.pro'
43658acc5b6759d5488867bbd9a90156
88ef518968324e9df1af25b479a4138d1e5bbd4e
describe
'58620' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEK' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
cde366a5b9e8efea44b2327a50bd59ac
afed9a7427bc875632e84dac3f762f5e52bc9c92
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEL' 'sip-files00205.tif'
22f6865d3748442a232f04689a65f2bd
9c0d3889a4f2e8eb23ec3daf86a0522690a95cbf
'2012-01-15T04:29:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEM' 'sip-files00205.txt'
cf86def675ed1f40a748302899cbc7c0
9695ee58a4f59cb235a0e30e60975dad6ca2bb15
describe
'23079' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEN' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
33a0d0cf9cf28d76a58cae488eadfdd8
de2cffb8e0bf36bf764718f2c8c2b7c4101ee467
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEO' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
fb19ebcf986deb97e36f4c4b2f19d95e
e885dded84150e69e0c5d1fc9176b8224b47b7d8
describe
'150781' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEP' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
bae2d8291a20cdc70fe951086a85dfe8
d83344ad9170870e2ac9262cf34b68b36687fda8
describe
'32016' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEQ' 'sip-files00206.pro'
83b976a0b679a11708992ceece63f466
159a6a1a0d0de2cb0ca66a49277130ba1727c4c3
describe
'56466' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQER' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
77415adc8eb11bd270bf81d74be37df1
705a7e27ae184224b338f9e66046fa2a46473ec7
describe
'3372052' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQES' 'sip-files00206.tif'
e40b6de154f49b2312fe5ac9d9e049f6
4a48b983d50c8f2528ed8744251ca51a8551e841
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQET' 'sip-files00206.txt'
aafbb361a212f793e78d51915fa1b4b0
2539e3bbd39882b0a29113e9dad9110f445be076
describe
'22697' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEU' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
034044b53cb1b0a7b2b3cdc4ee68492f
7df657dcfbe82b5b67da6377b82f1e8308bd3c1e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEV' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
167598190bfef2fc83ee65ba672685ea
5aebf3abb0d344d79cc481661fbece35d2ffdf1b
describe
'158216' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEW' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
3aafe229e9fe83b231c8e3b6df24f588
4b3cb90b759b914adb12796371d9cd7856702ace
describe
'34189' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEX' 'sip-files00207.pro'
f16c58bae906be40e3870168796b067e
7bcd6cf72d61234d395393831559388eb892fa23
describe
'59334' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEY' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
17cda7e3516086f94bd36b667119515a
ae9889409d64def95c6d8d83ea5152a180a6ae66
describe
'3372096' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQEZ' 'sip-files00207.tif'
699ae8052dbe4e942bbc78e0cbff57e3
e87fcd824b97fb5a01cc2a4559a39793b4b15fd5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFA' 'sip-files00207.txt'
4ac910e7fce9a11a10da6730d239ba4e
f409e284ca6ca86efb9af6e2dcca3ef609be5855
describe
'22994' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFB' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
feb116bf6fa9efb93a279d7a81c26b20
891bd1e7288dcca252990bdf3cf49fb8daec9463
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFC' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
a2f8739c68a31077a727cae926b51c33
edc08407495b280fe1fc3665df6f3dde1989af0f
describe
'149611' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFD' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
71dfc5bf6378227c30f3f49615f3a250
3d55a3cfac2214644e09b9cd1e7cbea822415d81
describe
'33712' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFE' 'sip-files00208.pro'
02b3201e053ea86d015c6600bb1d9d41
4b40c05485d978c8310a02432fc18de62a76bb3a
describe
'58673' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFF' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
23ea5c8655dbf2bcb7374a0bab377b1c
664cedb3c00489b626e8b8c436236aff2918e72a
describe
'3372072' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFG' 'sip-files00208.tif'
5ed5c56ac3cb37a4aa3613059e8d9216
e0409b84d5c73e25a64c22dae08d2be7b9adca18
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFH' 'sip-files00208.txt'
3d2e456f24af05fcddfc7afc46aa3a85
934df3c232a5552216a4016dd7490b4e72feb238
describe
'23069' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFI' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
b7d09506f164a69fe3ebc7128bc659b3
ecc0fa01f959e0f36036b9d7a87bc9d837f7813d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFJ' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
b91e666ef951985cd5136132433158e7
a308ae0656f5c15c7db333ed03b760eaaae8cc23
describe
'150981' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFK' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
9440c2155221837cbc49114cf824681b
4a294b516fa96e8dd86c90eba5eaf8c7742b84e8
describe
'33709' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFL' 'sip-files00209.pro'
d4dd19a20cdae76fdcedb041789fa2ee
962cf632fab893e7072804541c84dc8dbefd17e8
describe
'59582' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFM' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
0726450f4fb916cb6243ccc61b3ee731
ab8df5bee5f4c6042694bc69d2b698d4b9f675a8
describe
'3372396' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFN' 'sip-files00209.tif'
10828bd6b633024ad9c9fd298ca562cb
a863a1850b1388507f5c7ee41f44742729b37c09
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFO' 'sip-files00209.txt'
1993596745ff1f20d6c87ab480018cf5
0fc29d7b657a575c139165009edc94c0efa9f3e0
describe
'23472' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFP' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
08cfe3f1968874cf51321f2dfd14076d
f18e03a3ebd3c0933c57d29d39c15f7c4498a975
describe
'419906' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFQ' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
95ca1415c00ed82cd43fa0c76f92e40a
04ffe9683b13f8bb265f369d8f56209c114aa349
'2012-01-15T04:30:17-05:00'
describe
'149290' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFR' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
598310a367dd930ce6dd9e2af9a815e7
448ef39ea864443ca06967241e049878240022f7
describe
'33286' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFS' 'sip-files00210.pro'
fe0aba9e9007af274b69c381d262841b
aee2f781a6c4d6f0f59498ba2efddf603a921745
describe
'58810' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFT' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
6be1f0df0694e6edc2e157e4a366eead
a445fe5969adaedf6f44dbadcd26f715f03f396d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFU' 'sip-files00210.tif'
61e8ec622955c5014693d904d3051155
4153899530372737fa4ca76f6ccc2d2fe8d2b71e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFV' 'sip-files00210.txt'
59ae02f636b6b53b230895ef1bb177aa
2fa0b1b530750eebcafc802ca3f0a397db8ee150
describe
'23167' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFW' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
737921dd86c6cfc5453dd313cd11835a
bb524847c6db895a2eef381e3406dae1cded9a26
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFX' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
389b5db0023bc83ba7a378d7c951d332
b34c700c86eeca4f3a25597e527530f216db9e94
'2012-01-15T04:28:12-05:00'
describe
'148999' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFY' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
b66eb226241557bb28048cb7551f3da0
ee08964b370d8eba6e8f59d9634e80e10429ae0f
describe
'34622' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQFZ' 'sip-files00211.pro'
dcb7dcb5720b772ef8456af33db6965f
27f4c33257f5b9f263164d9e9f233fdbbd311ec2
'2012-01-15T04:30:51-05:00'
describe
'58557' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGA' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
46ff15aad67c1ee56d414d21bc573a49
b8eead7db648ff720c5a7ba7d9435d4a9b0e52cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGB' 'sip-files00211.tif'
db73a8c015b4e17a197bc0694793cec7
e5bd73e9397781690c3ea5248beb7492e0bad216
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGC' 'sip-files00211.txt'
16b69056f26fc648075abd7736d953c4
73ca556525b2a801344055802af7e326d0dd76e7
describe
'22726' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGD' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
117b52c7b9b0c601ba16e8f13952f1c0
5c903faaad0e47c8f18843a798fc8cd559fc4ee4
describe
'419833' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGE' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
c7d6581fd25eb14452d1d5250c0d5fe9
1b1f4f3b093b6ab9496b65ad8d1017fcc523c978
describe
'115050' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGF' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
69ed8233fb360390581cda032d2af684
64bec5e61fbe377b7cfdcd6bfeb2a745b95be476
describe
'24498' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGG' 'sip-files00212.pro'
b5bd68a9b78dd670272e1b2a4c1fe05f
ad755b097b743d4b6c063e1d2b1ec8aa0c3dde10
describe
'46243' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGH' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
261d2f472552c052b18f82edd1284172
f6f3bbd1867c033b8ca86cf843b339051b104330
describe
'3370732' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGI' 'sip-files00212.tif'
230340a7af62bae05ef38b0bb89697ee
b5122b9ea16df125d95e2defbc1df3539b66e16e
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGJ' 'sip-files00212.txt'
29c1eb55480801aaa35721152c95c538
29e4ab9bb0cf76b04c5f7be336f9f57c65badd76
describe
'19174' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGK' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
3da16d20e85f8a3301762ec6d545e49f
d2ea2a5d9a45343327c0d9e639ebb1c4b0c6868c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGL' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
0a9ab0840a1954565837a60797dc3e96
6f3f334446afe97ff7d26b146aa50cf05ba46600
describe
'127849' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGM' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
3d0449c53bd3380daa12137e6a3979f2
9bc62f132120102a8f5066ef9e7d811a7e54d764
describe
'24243' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGN' 'sip-files00213.pro'
15a4273b3389c97e30bb7a4a2655d909
7977d40e331fcc1ecc5b8647c6fa0a44f9afeb86
describe
'49957' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGO' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
0795645e90b45ad9696e1224e8ec0ec0
e2200b59002c549b9181b47d4e5abddb8c9e9513
describe
'3371416' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGP' 'sip-files00213.tif'
2995422254376bff82d84e432eabfcd1
8b2fdeb56772d945e6f26a97608045e772ee520c
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGQ' 'sip-files00213.txt'
33ea7f9a29d8dadfef053f592fd3cf46
834716d399b90e78c45af1c01422ee99210dfd1d
describe
'20955' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGR' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
ab210f1fbf6885a9d05d92b71649eef7
22750edb761058cb5093476b24c5637b35de35f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGS' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
215ef67e87f1f24be986c531d7a8f86f
434751b925dae801e5a9ccd9001fb05e38e04a4f
describe
'147322' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGT' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
b6b403ec2584c224ad305cf1c66c26ac
a5919766b35475f33816416e351221b17a06bd29
describe
'33754' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGU' 'sip-files00214.pro'
a84496bb754f6818b01b39a195826193
6a34bb47f57d7cc9491b549ac9bd5b28870387a1
describe
'57740' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGV' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
18be9b82fc2070628604ab178fd74135
66464651d4fd35f773c433a34796dcfe292adf2f
describe
'3371996' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGW' 'sip-files00214.tif'
9786a34a55eebe591fb78b43b0c0ed72
9d93eefa83a38be14f82cd4f927cd36372248e33
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGX' 'sip-files00214.txt'
8249eeddfea26d74b016b2228d75856a
33095a18f114772ac3b48f9bcfb3dd0902adc320
describe
'22867' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGY' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
82ac9a9ff0f8c66bead92ca24bc7c31d
22569f90cf89edc5086303a53155c9e444f767be
describe
'419847' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQGZ' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
716bb1f64c21b86e1f9cc685b9a0b830
f2f38c08338abc751bbc6f0f1628d7a39a0d373f
describe
'140119' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHA' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
50d76ef7434d634588a1a86e9d8c90d9
6527b1287dddc452d96642a7eed84ed53e284b62
describe
'31173' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHB' 'sip-files00215.pro'
a6018e232cbf918938bd4975c6ed31b6
eeb241dd432a919c0168b2c3fe3e40ee91eeb44e
describe
'54149' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHC' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
799675aae869a7cfa6eca04ccce944cd
d6ce3d6d6f434a1d525091a7860c799ad354e686
describe
'3371724' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHD' 'sip-files00215.tif'
0505971c80f451288e988699e64f63ad
79b55538bc8b0945f56e12fd170e41df78e5fe58
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHE' 'sip-files00215.txt'
5e951b83580269da2ff1fe96cbc60238
75166a3ff7178816f6323d4235d81c91c6514135
describe
'22235' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHF' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
d3d8c11a12c2ec18d10ae0f2d04a38e4
807ab50bf8b7a25f616e4fdcf097db79ca57447f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHG' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
f268dcb043f841f224a7092bc1a12dc1
bfdd323a5f03a752dec0d9822d95c2ea7cf88b54
describe
'141236' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHH' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
c1c868fe2e21eec7cd7b1a10d9b30bf6
4e6609ad76136e118c674feba12be1863286e22f
describe
'31853' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHI' 'sip-files00216.pro'
9ebe91f8384fd5e302d9f25b509c29f7
161f54859f0ddec1faf466667bb312ff30e69be5
describe
'55826' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHJ' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
18476a3f4d608cade1407be78f239397
4fec0c5ba5e8f892034389f62f569f84d9b524fb
describe
'3371872' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHK' 'sip-files00216.tif'
0ef33f92795bfbf9f0c71a200eab745c
b6e8e33f15761961220e938b178873dc6991c9c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHL' 'sip-files00216.txt'
160be6f19702fc682df491ed417c4373
c8b42945d5e4bd1f77e9c392b1016a9a07fa367a
describe
'22143' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHM' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
ff66326ab3c20bb93945e1d9bc741558
18e9f186dac95824f9bbd896bb1176e741d77804
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHN' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
b5636ede75d856e9f0f0bb8cff1f1a52
8e509024fc567a3c4f2d72b16575de6dc250af67
describe
'148121' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHO' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
6a9f92dc5b292e091e785f6c92570fcc
f722fe17e86ad64aaa37e6828897bf79af04d519
describe
'33410' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHP' 'sip-files00217.pro'
359f8f262fca5bf5a79747e5058ce36c
4ba9932de05734a63a2d61faf40577c5fe1644ea
describe
'57491' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHQ' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
25f14445b25b16c85ed62d70c786746f
8aa27f58edf53bee5fb4342caeeb591547ef6701
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHR' 'sip-files00217.tif'
382a4744c8b1e3965705c3ebb8f486f4
05f0ea24c834e6fa361e4693f716fdfb3f2ee9d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHS' 'sip-files00217.txt'
a8489143f002bf3b0756a0e1e87da0de
4ba887b176e0075d5e9e71e9c05d731645faaf97
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHT' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
b5223b5c12243e6fab5037229666c333
8294159a633a46bacf176c21396da1561edcfd85
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHU' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
f7c967fa923920f222fb63596d16a015
3724c5f6d3f83e2d980120cc3231d8293890e0f1
describe
'147268' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHV' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
2d01abf90d5571c012b6a7014db75999
fae0914281592e87199ac47b3eb0e95e5aeb6304
describe
'33707' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHW' 'sip-files00218.pro'
7feeead20fa3ce1b6c68871ce8baac0e
2b3536c36e9dab727bcfc9c1f4baa51a25638788
describe
'57731' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHX' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
cd7fbf050261ac866569d0d1d587d060
c001dc32345c88f50575afdff3dcfe8165349918
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHY' 'sip-files00218.tif'
d4f9520c59f35c46c985650cb49d69de
964a3c07111bbc2d101cacd2f6a8283d0d85466d
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQHZ' 'sip-files00218.txt'
4fd7217b88843d38ead6f9605412b0f2
0392c58e1fc76ffac6d37e91bb93f7b20360fdac
describe
'22639' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIA' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
c7b9ee65cd5d6ae1ee8550028c3c1cbc
85477089eb65559715bcddf6c027f890f9efb75a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIB' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
759c9a2762cb663f457ad85dd58f81e2
9b6824906e046121bb6aadd4c63de1f6bd6d2280
describe
'155758' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIC' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
a586dfb31062febe6c4bfd4ffec74508
748007ccf9a672fb60771c370077287af45bcc26
describe
'35371' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQID' 'sip-files00219.pro'
3fd7dd7de27f65712a6a2f9f1c4b4e51
9b1035977ddf83a5190890f5675b636361d27694
describe
'60227' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIE' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
33ab727c0775d81036807e64c34833a2
d95a100712a5758b90dc20a3c0cc4a21f07f4478
describe
'3372252' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIF' 'sip-files00219.tif'
06fcc6730b5f126e1c1486c9d375bc08
de705adf869fef08698f44dd8b0bbfe07204d3bd
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIG' 'sip-files00219.txt'
c92f318531b11d4322dde6788c4b8c00
46ba9377ab1b0971e29a63defbbe354fa33eb753
describe
'23359' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIH' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
93777267b5ff07206f4da10771eb2004
7f345cdf0a4658f9af1cc7338e6c95fe107b466a
describe
'419908' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQII' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
9cdf9c6cf5b7c298176f5d475bedd6fb
f4d8a8a62e74f44200a485db0c4dbd4fa13cceea
describe
'153725' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIJ' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
8c3f9aeceefcd941fb198cbef053babb
7506d0451995bb41fd2f7ad0ec010d4a63784402
describe
'34611' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIK' 'sip-files00220.pro'
03f68d01bba2af1333f9d20b1fda7618
2a5c19f281dc2a321f866a52d36b58396392c6c0
describe
'58930' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIL' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
0fbe063ca6368acf0e0d47d75835ec75
950b2b061ad0b55a92ebd9400d1e714b21ec0381
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIM' 'sip-files00220.tif'
bea64b605c17add1d7bc0aa16d6d6c6f
d85f6fd72b3702b281ec8a9ea82f7c54b9934f2a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIN' 'sip-files00220.txt'
574ad5f416e4141c362466159a54182b
040ffeea2364dc088a3e934b4e2aa9c9f8a4058a
describe
'22827' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIO' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
915e4c3c8523610f83d8a0e77e710295
27f1b2b662fa47e78c2288aaadbb984a1a31cc81
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIP' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
3be5eca6dcee32db05518d8f76c837f7
d5534daccf1f039751533b0e5fe468908b2d70e5
describe
'101117' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIQ' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
7db18b3509068d3ae9353ce052aee117
9be1b802ebd26b45fc6dc0ad2064a5c0a3586d04
describe
'2307' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIR' 'sip-files00221.pro'
41aaf834ad0b389b0baddd381a2dad5b
fae9f81944ea9791b3cc6a1e45e3000a7c4f3199
describe
'34672' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIS' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
94e3ad15f886e53a8f0480cac4204d50
f8f7e30847adb3845b081547f4f9982affb57a2b
describe
'3370280' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIT' 'sip-files00221.tif'
2141e70aedb4a10cc5063738a15acd7c
2324dd931396cfad1aa1305c58888bbd3aac69ae
describe
'111' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIU' 'sip-files00221.txt'
c42f89b61225e9e7134635b8d70884bb
1bb4e2cd0a32abfd8b854b4ff437ba1415ec2638
describe
'17256' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIV' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
d559fc9e0602eac3a49a27b1d78fe340
cf699d16ef2e73ead3ed46eb3f13f7063139cbe5
'2012-01-15T04:30:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIW' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
4d4befa925c77a7e5ff4a3cdfb91e51a
1b32f9f9b15fa2d76afe70d59d73a54ddd3f7897
describe
'33874' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIX' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
05724954043dcf6f25ce6915f6c840dc
074064c3e67465ebe5a21a45ec51f0e213bff18e
describe
'13902' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIY' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
e89322f7092c69da84b2164e5440e3a9
c8bd0943582e331253e3853d72953c99c265a6cd
describe
'3367476' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQIZ' 'sip-files00222.tif'
b4427db71b3133a36beccfc2be67380a
6d57c5c77fda30599aa9b2d18021cf73f7dd09ec
describe
'9863' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJA' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
8efe36f908bbc864e7110e2a118a742d
2b39217f6c3dcedfd9a257ac58d5c0410af6c9e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJB' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
6dc5776058c81d759e5bf43853d8689c
8dc52c8c4452b30baeafd966b9a057b6903a6964
describe
'139120' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJC' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
5b36cd28b26e62cde2cdcdc3b4c06a18
4a4a9ed900faa1e92dc637b8f4d81afd2294d537
describe
'30302' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJD' 'sip-files00223.pro'
0776c3ca3a14bce3a319f669fca127c5
0e92edd46ec749d2aba8a3cb0ebc4745a4f35c90
describe
'54343' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJE' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
37189694587e76a652854d21d4036b47
e7fb92050a2d3397e7a5a615029586b94ed30488
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJF' 'sip-files00223.tif'
e30516e93e83888c902ccee2f8688b43
f0c14e4914383593050d84e9b6c00121537c886e
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJG' 'sip-files00223.txt'
1069c12bdbfeebb6c2e41ac2792c33ea
828df7c240288e0b461f20e44544853ce3feccd2
describe
'22717' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJH' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
e73d476cfee6878c174ccb7a04152c13
0a87bff8b63c505f340f1e753f55a6529128d9cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJI' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
71b0d2f374b429b205841fdb7d322477
2bfe9b5b7db9b3950949ab0a2cd1b1a1cf6ade2b
describe
'162416' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJJ' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
76e1e2033eb60ee27eeafb01c7fdae37
e86ff0b744a7a27e8699d578bf8cd598b3a4f04d
describe
'34078' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJK' 'sip-files00224.pro'
68b7bbec85e7db26561f0766f14d12ee
a234c145cf39b558239ac44d21e4e1ecec1410dd
describe
'60203' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJL' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
03ba798d3873a0affa0f86f12cdf356d
081b973e3f65514fcf8370b13ea0a7b46680fda7
describe
'3372112' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJM' 'sip-files00224.tif'
37b508e78fcb424f50559c27b3ec7c45
fa7c2819b4896f6ac9939c5f68f8791f4b2c912b
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJN' 'sip-files00224.txt'
b39b25c92a59b5dfee371c9eb6a037f1
00b2176ecb450d8e18990b219de4e6c203dc432c
describe
'23325' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJO' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
21dd0ce7394194bbf8c441b5d3bc4e83
cfcd7f8bde7c958b88cf254285ed2e140e742998
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJP' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
122cd280d234a6cb342bebea69ef14ca
21a81a9a77789ff84452ec50f069bc2823fee217
describe
'146539' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJQ' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
c1624af3b5834c3f8045a0e577cdc491
f07df65efb10021cc8b94863d19999b40d40c9e2
describe
'29670' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJR' 'sip-files00225.pro'
af7c9639a3874a2e0ad53bcf6fc870d9
68daa5b10d30001eb398424bbfff29bfbe94afa4
describe
'54236' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJS' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
d7f4630eea3c6fede4d6ebef14c167ae
6a7adc86a02f66aa4bda06f4a963b5e3ccc47eeb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJT' 'sip-files00225.tif'
7180d9b6811e8cede6815de118aac10a
de372bc9a14911ff0ec6654d2bdb5c7d46359c08
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJU' 'sip-files00225.txt'
b0e8efd42c599d9e8ef07f8c4982ca9d
366f86f457fea3cfe122e75075d1e5a6365b33d2
describe
'22304' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJV' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
9e1691dcae595ade6445ffe38bd37480
f44a783e4e04abe89865a236c8322ca5a183486a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJW' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
20a82bd9c350a80c5e2f648ec634dcc8
b9f773732968cb92cdb765f78d8c6defb6036039
describe
'109112' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJX' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
785c620716be0af81728125ce938206a
16e0ea586a9b5abb0803e0c66d897766e69a1892
'2012-01-15T04:28:44-05:00'
describe
'21682' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJY' 'sip-files00226.pro'
a19c32793eadc2d87332b16e1f45eb4d
6a13a9c1f9e45d79f453fa187f1f363af32b6fd8
describe
'42905' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQJZ' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
d191e04927716bc0826d5dc4f9ed0492
4d45021cc334705e5df8ea928888bd2562ab7257
describe
'3370440' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKA' 'sip-files00226.tif'
f3c4df5fc955831b26141a6ffaf5785f
089d3247ad8e4839310bb796ab8fb46526039d04
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKB' 'sip-files00226.txt'
9c805618dab54afc6b77dbb8257a620d
cc32cac2c14753b4b40b215833a1fa870d0c3d3e
describe
'18513' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKC' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
7890b18b073d8b9c57eb6d065d392edd
d538b8b46483b60076306a0ecf42a5e1d0c911b6
describe
'419828' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKD' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
150911927abaa8bd57716e7b23490225
952a246054dc227eee7b327d68707fc652c737a7
describe
'128349' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKE' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
82198746b30e69e5c9cae2abeaf2445c
6349ff2232f520e6d98f4638f6a151bce2089057
describe
'23092' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKF' 'sip-files00227.pro'
006670790dee791662a846bbdf3770fc
91c4c86bef334516fc23790aff0d8a19adf47d61
describe
'49351' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKG' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
4219dac40e9a6d16aac41cc25aa57d4a
b45c2c10204ea9cb1021c13f88a79484162112c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKH' 'sip-files00227.tif'
f43296825a1591391c0c3d9d35ef9e31
3b1b52b0a4b80e6e757a8405fa0d1c81c7bb5cc1
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKI' 'sip-files00227.txt'
46696e41f57b0bea08167f2ac6e10717
9e493758ea1f3bf9d6dceeb46a6883f60564dbec
describe
'20841' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKJ' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
06566f48577a1f67ee8c5304035a2f5b
1d98d58a6588843424f5f09c9bc55d865d89e19b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKK' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
9ac93073ede8529e62ae61c58881b6ae
577cd9cc7c4816df7c31b22fb3993bae12b00cf9
describe
'151441' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKL' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
60a3255a677c0b055cd2911450918742
9fd06ac62dc249ad1857a77ccfb63aa450e27b58
describe
'34485' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKM' 'sip-files00228.pro'
87ef5a2eaf1b5c5fc7383cf13099a918
8d42f8145d96e7c371506051c5f199afc629a070
describe
'58682' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKN' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
b859141a3e82356f4a1143b5ec07c1ef
17443f84ffade2505c49f287dc72dd97c5691f78
describe
'3371960' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKO' 'sip-files00228.tif'
c044ca3922180e1f51051b15616e6d05
6cd72718cc54b5406018300b3a81519e911c2ba9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKP' 'sip-files00228.txt'
98ff04fbc49cde0267767d634fe3785a
b287cfa8fbca094ae741453b0121fac4f9c2dec6
describe
'22919' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKQ' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
206b35b7a12fb5c345df4c0e799dbe7f
f042169efb8337d7a5ae68b4aa07f736258bcbdd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKR' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
001788b2b1b4e1f12f2f383123a97b80
5bc74a9a055e0274fa268cb8cd7868e15c1a0012
describe
'151806' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKS' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
e1ded517eb6b914c486e32ac0846127c
4f0f7dad23ea7af0b731d26714bf79afc71d2abf
describe
'33987' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKT' 'sip-files00229.pro'
1e7389204ddf8d9f1379cf7e350b41cd
08ed1a2e3e66bfd68cec0ea7b5fe41f7cf0b651f
describe
'57875' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKU' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
8a8238cebd6f1622b8fb6f80142a772d
6c83b5138dd4a582ef6631e92e537ffc16221b77
describe
'3372472' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKV' 'sip-files00229.tif'
ca6c4244c8d51b0374b54748014682f7
edae4fc41f4a6df107aadcc4f842b760952317bf
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKW' 'sip-files00229.txt'
7eb7eafffb18747c7448240e0fdff1e7
3ac0bdcc14b9c340920d9f494e7d2e22f54a4218
describe
'23428' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKX' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
12421e6501cc5baf0ec551d5432c3513
efdbec880a90c7e7a1528fac56a0c2586526da78
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKY' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
a522bdd0a6392ce8c269e285a1c107e6
09070c4cadb4f15c76a4973d688755c4346332b3
describe
'147325' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQKZ' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
9bb56089cebb6ad3331566e3f699aaee
5fefde32a64ce739dea0e51a6e4ef62455733469
describe
'33655' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLA' 'sip-files00230.pro'
2e6b1b06c7f45d01332cae9e76bbb36f
8bc4878b9b2f91ee504c0fad2d5a48e0f9a29de4
describe
'57327' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLB' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
ee676a033a5a266c8e13519df3796f6b
87cbbdf7b0304226cd799e2515f61c147a5c07cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLC' 'sip-files00230.tif'
584952a617f698c87495ccf0e72c88b6
91ad08f989108b6ccbfa6ab7ad184a5b8bd485c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLD' 'sip-files00230.txt'
1dec64c6158e4aec64cce5dd062e988d
604ef571465cbb0bb17de07e493543b21faf1584
describe
'22722' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLE' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
172e9f6a3762a5a51dbb9be12ae01a5e
46b73dcb2fc9765b0cef59d4bdf1d85df2e4aa4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLF' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
f8fff249a49210dc18e116eb3352bc09
50191cbb0c1f419974f51bdf30b2cb4fc02b29b9
describe
'152936' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLG' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
e1b1798e6039c7c657eff33a50dc7705
e3ca33d4f0ff48e5d8f4c1db38cbb5f7c6ffeebc
describe
'33923' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLH' 'sip-files00231.pro'
c1efedaaa02a25b6d9ea7940a3a836fe
e0467b358efe0c8e379f61d08f15a5c9e9bc01fd
describe
'59044' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLI' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
4e847a9c79ecde355eda9d17e052c189
b35563033caf984582198f86da92aa99860a7d50
describe
'3372188' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLJ' 'sip-files00231.tif'
0e0e1c892c7952785c69427983f5834b
8691c71ce8bf00331e7780eb550eab502e5669e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLK' 'sip-files00231.txt'
82ecd3ae614a97b991427d97aa558fb4
c5a629242308ab338c50776ec7d0122309a6dca4
describe
'23194' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLL' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
da29c6d8645dde1df3f4dd9203ddfb94
a2f234a4ff7012c425e713040c6e8f99d82842a5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLM' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
716eb206b3bb55fb9762de9ac8cf149f
d75354ca379ec5a9db8f4b7cd5c9320e8e76fd65
describe
'150423' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLN' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
67640ccbb1eb1f9ebb29d06b323eee7e
a35867d77db61f3d5703943b73b98976ea114087
describe
'33978' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLO' 'sip-files00232.pro'
81962d4f4d0849c5db43341dda01cb23
490fca736ce349c6c39d370e303609d747de7f13
describe
'57628' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLP' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
02b70dd4ec9bd719d4fbc3932e01d3f6
641bfe5208ca4001fda3aa1ba6510d9ae881e405
'2012-01-15T04:26:28-05:00'
describe
'3371832' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLQ' 'sip-files00232.tif'
9096afb303fc94f34774b809d6326399
526ad4bc57babea847cb42c0aa2947d4c85a4479
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLR' 'sip-files00232.txt'
e2e0747b66048f4944a7ad31776f5334
9571d6861a3bb7337dcebd31af909e6972631c18
describe
'22478' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLS' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
eef7e293187ee1e9e4b87718e8e9e270
1b30068aa15ac59c4113450f68cefd21f7787fb4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLT' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
d0b363fce2dccfa7f9d4a9209ce21c08
c8752429e245a5cfb353dd3d8a6cea202070a368
describe
'150676' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLU' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
f0361c270e7ab5de18435e698a7940f5
a86269c2cf00854d3134759996cf9de8dcb43bbc
describe
'33415' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLV' 'sip-files00233.pro'
79782e11790e5722c884de2dd0d39950
4e3a1aebf4adfe8c90ef658e3f175b70e413a4c3
describe
'58064' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLW' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
85a7460d02e3e7fe1f646192165e4d3c
eceeae664f971cab0d6c788155dbd7eea107fd2a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLX' 'sip-files00233.tif'
dfb63fef96a0c4baac7249e85ac53a6f
eb5a90b154198cc7df3fe7793aad7d984d29abb3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLY' 'sip-files00233.txt'
e539de6e46cabbfa23743a77e12318e5
b7224f7833f7b027d3a0a344fc73556ec9e28386
describe
'23086' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQLZ' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
4d30084e74c73aa7b488cb29009791d2
9840db5f8909dfc69c09d485e6315756e04075c5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMA' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
fbe255c00bbb89fdd8b3726fdd6f4ba9
d05161cf2658af92684ab67c02d57c833ddb7b38
describe
'138775' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMB' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
d44bae23009419d1a34964b220cbe3f3
1f4b835fb6fa8b1cf9168931aa850fac2c5fb373
describe
'32626' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMC' 'sip-files00234.pro'
566b8f5e22e74f5f9381fbebd83c9e4f
d16383e7afca741a7c32d5d3379d1004fb5489d0
describe
'55517' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMD' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
5b80d16527db3301c1f50feb2d75fa90
d0ab72dec3c4f9cc2abb3bc915d636a89222bfef
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQME' 'sip-files00234.tif'
bdb1b17fa128602c7beb788814746e16
cce364c8fa7ee270c740383b34f7532b2b0dd377
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMF' 'sip-files00234.txt'
edfb22c7002488a662f790721e83da00
5220707acebde893f4ba402169993b235cc4624b
describe
'22510' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMG' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
676bc62beeb9005acee51de489047379
f99280e6b44e74e5b7862402cf9fb5d01b4633fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMH' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
9c0d20ddb3afbfd866f6d47264c75a77
4c0f5394f388e6758a7cad976aeb6ea374e1414f
describe
'137129' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMI' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
14850ccd406813898b028f12b5a83ec9
3dc783a5c9d604c6fe0c54056a92798b55da1ac6
describe
'31774' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMJ' 'sip-files00235.pro'
567369935577f454a2796563adfc9e94
9e0b43a18d2dab7036046c81461ca7f83782320f
describe
'54983' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMK' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
9a4d7b42e1cf777d75163cf647319fd7
219150473a44c8f32ccec5ef68b4edb5eb3cd4fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQML' 'sip-files00235.tif'
9f3ad2298a68b9ae090d3bedaf6d14df
f36cb7506088993a02caadfe75573ab56d18d7c2
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMM' 'sip-files00235.txt'
f7ba1eb023260d06e38a8ef49209d952
5be2a22b0655adf7e0b2651330cce47d5e92f1a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMN' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
aff72dc5e4601473458256cf8aeed43c
2b5732b494de394e32bd1e92e222f44217d842eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMO' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
22bbb263d2641af73516d157954b129a
bbb6965680ce648962cb8608b409c10b73bdd1c6
describe
'132225' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMP' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
a42b8e357c18492222e37571429a9c8e
f2c3762cae197e9cd19b162c57fab93716beaa16
describe
'31384' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMQ' 'sip-files00236.pro'
52932d2d67753006432176eba10ae5e2
e6f937f682fc135bc99eb349044282f6172ef8b2
describe
'53360' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMR' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
0412138e4af614a61cd695e679dc7295
86db8f113971b5cd00c555c6d298a882b9e2593f
describe
'3371476' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMS' 'sip-files00236.tif'
33e7d8f1703fd5f6a9eec90f38b5ede3
9747bcb064ad5633055678ee54b338701d1b8428
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMT' 'sip-files00236.txt'
e793cd9adf25532355dfb598573158c3
9809f0b0eb308b78fe3f51c3698ed6184c1c02cb
describe
'21398' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMU' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
84862093de0bab7019f2a909d02b48b5
12bf22fc5c68846a4ac833369ef4b48c37ba215f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMV' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
91f5dee2532429b380aa94e2916b84a8
e2059d0889d80ee0b9e67f8924364461360b95ad
describe
'153295' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMW' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
a84b09d01d60e696e44d2ddad9d3380a
b5aec56a99601380871c8b1df6e442f5404948eb
describe
'2468' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMX' 'sip-files00237.pro'
fb7d54e2a762eaa8bbf7457fd260543d
2c7a1ea87e2c20d21e30e89137e694f8c278f6b1
describe
'47760' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMY' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
8a266342bdfd558970c055cf676d5471
3fbb41624f6323e6cfc7ab5983021d198275ba3f
describe
'3371656' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQMZ' 'sip-files00237.tif'
54ff9a1e93b2ef52ee9526d65796d8b5
b194e62a3dd81a3fa9fa67c63bc0c5044bf3426a
describe
'133' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNA' 'sip-files00237.txt'
43a93aecdf0127431186751894f25acb
bbb8c71d7922426f0ca8cd13fde208f2dfbd3261
describe
'20885' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNB' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
1c4b802c0d1520819d9651a7c2b80cf0
4effec4306060cb74f6798be454360db251f2914
describe
'182442' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNC' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
1245bca6549baab8584a6abbf67e8a43
208afd28549853771a812fff6148f812e8580b3f
describe
'20810' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQND' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
14e2e0280169f6702a818ce3686e4976
5169477880f2fbc48110c0c486e02d500c36dfb9
describe
'11286' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNE' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
df3516e1d8e37c00e4c6dc2a83d5ee1f
4b283b4e55464674d7bfe526e58873c7d59f5fe4
describe
'3367256' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNF' 'sip-files00238.tif'
1acce82757bdc13b5007655a7e8a2f2e
9b4e6cf7970ddbcf9ef44e69cf07af5bf4c2cc02
describe
'9142' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNG' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
6b457ee196f31e605327fd2086fa3ee3
cbd63f96b7284e2e3551f17c13b1d8a8cbf9858e
describe
'419889' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNH' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
9031f9093901db50efa066dd31e2b9ba
0dc4634aaf78ae8ad64b096fbb67ee33587ddf10
describe
'130167' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNI' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
465c60ef7c01460c46c140eaf62d73e4
431abc20e3e8ac687f35df9ad3ff25d1ac8aa28d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNJ' 'sip-files00239.pro'
99de827854b7a4b3d78103f161cb7938
a4d73f87b496ea7f27312838c9d8f93d20ec0f2d
describe
'52193' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNK' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
ebd2ef45c6ba0e5d1ae468d681a99278
91115f93ded07a87886b537b99deee4e772ef57d
describe
'3371616' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNL' 'sip-files00239.tif'
ff7a8621b55fe17d1906b7c0cc908bb1
f63658913cd2aa9d6dda4825c101566bab070ce4
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNM' 'sip-files00239.txt'
f3c908f71e2a9312fd408d4720e9e351
134956097a88d71a27e60c3d74a7bcdcfe733f38
describe
'21552' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNN' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
fbffd3a909edc1afa7360330f653d007
4d70d3b25c6e25e2785e6df462487d533c5ea1c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNO' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
b38ecc48eb27934016213a6a10b5d0c6
465c6fc49b8b693efdbcbcb21ee640a1728aa811
describe
'124846' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNP' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
c76861b5612eceec87e59a0787d26350
28dc273ce98d4dd1833abdffd3f1a2b2ea147b95
describe
'28607' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNQ' 'sip-files00240.pro'
15ad0a3172e34a9e461809afc38b3217
4a1742a011d632dd1037c3261aec4cc47da401ce
describe
'48915' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNR' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
1bb17a72d6f8a9ce388e9cac1b19e659
11f042e9f01510600b61724708b3fcccda1eb8a8
describe
'3370948' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNS' 'sip-files00240.tif'
b84cefb301da3b89ff2d24a316aecaf2
b413368577edf205ef95df208da85a54a8a12311
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNT' 'sip-files00240.txt'
366b02858a63a952205e6e75262f9f3f
f89335e15dc0dbcf2da42728f3bbedf62b73e669
describe
'19904' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNU' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
d0b7f661aca5be95bd855f62f0e256c0
62bac1cf5904372c504a07b3ea9b26a0f7b49b0d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNV' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
ef92f2fd54edc68da3b17ece1bd6f148
6c472f32b6b769240508d1349a7345082f4781c3
describe
'116009' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNW' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
16ed305fd81f36fc3ae323d9820d3968
877108dae986321f56b0a32b8971fe7d91dbe9d3
describe
'23661' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNX' 'sip-files00241.pro'
a41cec3b254538f0e0eefd5c8e4ca081
832be027359939bb9ec43429d30c96f23a45f0c4
describe
'46552' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNY' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
610bb72ed69bb577dea553950abbc0c9
abfd54ba074829704b8511f49a5ba90831eee2d4
describe
'3370868' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQNZ' 'sip-files00241.tif'
a75b3ca559fdf986aefeecd15c8f3aed
f2e006b73af5254d69f54e6559d08c38089f696e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOA' 'sip-files00241.txt'
dafafe5a66cd28fde19e58a894ed1957
0f8d48cf49867b428b89c9c4d4e4544f881d0716
describe
'19536' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOB' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
b1cce94c2957376476d14203fe1ae600
3a060a0fc44314b007f58fc7d0124ed9d0a0c1b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOC' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
10f6549cca8fef2b1a44dfe56abf3fd4
23a35f0f8381b1c99018248be54b86ce7bd31903
describe
'146776' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOD' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
edb77dc5db35a6d48b9c6f23c621e7a8
b159e599ee37c114e29926aac08687da96e492fe
describe
'30101' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOE' 'sip-files00242.pro'
94be0b65825881afae7a732f6ccfa23a
6c322803598cb90c361cdee488a481dcf76e9182
describe
'57189' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOF' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
680ac264179bca52de13751a4f9a89dc
2f145e62da9ae1728725d821f6a1f4eb3910401d
describe
'3372180' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOG' 'sip-files00242.tif'
10e3140c7f64e8fabd87385056848ed6
c515cf47ada0a1d4965180d8dbdc02076c4200f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOH' 'sip-files00242.txt'
84ebbf5869c5d5c772c795091950963c
9ea86663db7b0daa48603b91207b86030d599695
describe
'23033' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOI' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
336c216ae23e4894853c94c12cf5ef87
1698f33ad63834df6363f0a98b7a7c32ff41923b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOJ' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
8087cb4d2a729046e13aef804f0aae8f
8ea55783f6580f9499ac777d22e4102f69aa05c3
describe
'145997' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOK' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
7cac11256db8f29780b64b833afe6b1e
87f5c3c4f12322dfcc59f390a84ed26c6a1ac9d1
describe
'34158' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOL' 'sip-files00243.pro'
f0288974bfe1f8271660b6c6964215dc
874fbe9a2c7739b3e4ab138c7635cba290f9c738
describe
'57102' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOM' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
23eea51c3aadf8d558b217173c5bd0b5
8b2ab4b51636de3db609de17b097b73e2940b122
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQON' 'sip-files00243.tif'
21af2f3ff2ef735cefab4214ae0f6066
097816aaa62bee90ccdeee53c5bc8df7282afb97
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOO' 'sip-files00243.txt'
da4ca67c3200b1385f92330dd6e97e69
d8b7da2bae49b459847ecda3a70e42b50c0a16bf
describe
'21990' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOP' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
fec2140b6e1353e00c2d0bda8802fe94
a8d6a075ec470ce821523acf1e102c3d906881cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOQ' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
0afe76c15e0a4cef7be03d84d98a1ea2
be265f91ce6e3f224cf252fca96e97180188e176
describe
'145163' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOR' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
d14c8a18a803de5fc8a1165a075ff8cf
09279103ef06cd911eff42c645a1ba35480ea7c7
describe
'34306' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOS' 'sip-files00244.pro'
5a3972661c4821ae3bb141f9fda0f45c
f6ff256de4b0e419be7ce723434317edbfe8d354
describe
'56164' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOT' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
b9bdc70a36be2f89e93a453acde650da
cf85578967ce87ac4dbccf53584700fd8a75977a
describe
'3371760' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOU' 'sip-files00244.tif'
991b13f6c0b5e9d76d528b467681ba38
f5b96168afb67ba9a05a470b382145c1be4eafde
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOV' 'sip-files00244.txt'
9ba55f830772d906acf0c8da886acfa5
d8ff20e8bfe508e6c6b3d853f40a5aa60d4f263d
describe
'22289' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOW' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
48bc75d2f7ac1bbf950c560cfbf79cf4
073a641c8154c64d74b3a39cdf5e5b3f025e3e7a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOX' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
62590cef8daca6f67e8d20571e6c2071
93f8efd90c44d1ddd222504a48216de2f5c04c8f
describe
'147918' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOY' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
bab6657d9ffab098cf28f0cd78ead0fc
85a5fef54e12acbccd8cd3b59fb15b63b8796b4c
describe
'33866' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQOZ' 'sip-files00245.pro'
d93781312a10bc0372551effb3f08214
9d295873115f829f47c93a914d1b764d580aade5
describe
'56388' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPA' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
517f11d2caabc432478f15a4dce6b7b0
77e0bbe7253628ff4f3e4b4e6b0f4e8b0901e46f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPB' 'sip-files00245.tif'
2d15e6883ee88d2ffeabaf1e464308cb
105b2fbe9a6db15d641093b4347a3eb903755899
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPC' 'sip-files00245.txt'
013423f62ebe15573f894de7b9374393
1b5c1d18272b10c8183f958b2d15acae879190f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPD' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
684f9eb1be6505813f45874d9ded3d04
796548b4f774f29a15aea76de69ad9a0eb556dae
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPE' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
60946f75d821e2068607ef684817916a
8885bf1b8d445a2b52de3956de626d1672896207
describe
'146729' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPF' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
62d715a08d26cda8c4ca4cd6d4bac0d4
0209b2f5b657b3801609366ba419eabb7d99b65f
describe
'33764' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPG' 'sip-files00246.pro'
2d51fabe3955e27700819f1d547bce1e
2294036443eed88c2aa75db61461154098655570
describe
'57367' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPH' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
cf84366ef74ddb3a36e7cbba69be6732
b3671db7288c7bebd17014036c0610133e5b15d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPI' 'sip-files00246.tif'
3425601f78cf3c2ce20d6da94af59d9e
889915862d4c33e65a5e588f9860d147afd39b1e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPJ' 'sip-files00246.txt'
f32774711963e82a00951db3aa019eb6
3bc0068dd9493e1a183dd36aef3bc122e494c25b
describe
'22512' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPK' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
21e769b2d79263960cf9f0bd961632fb
c6eccf1b63582e2de2448baa70cba9422c11c4d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPL' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
dfd0ff6538fe96e8e4d5e051489ef97d
e300632c849bf754dd5b88be6deed3a402eb9baa
describe
'148256' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPM' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
a8b936d3995e71e036a8ec836a48b751
7d69464a07c9eef15cbededae07fdee40d7d5ca5
describe
'33284' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPN' 'sip-files00247.pro'
6451c0552cdafcebc063d90c12b7080b
b42fd68415688ab2c1a91325043a7ad0ba2b1712
describe
'58423' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPO' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
465e651f5e8488749d3f658140bc588f
8a51e86100734974c382d6223493ce423fe59502
describe
'3372224' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPP' 'sip-files00247.tif'
214f538957c2b99565774e2a22a81c0c
c6c358264691e2d956c8eb4215e7b889b85ec51f
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPQ' 'sip-files00247.txt'
74a2aaec34822da8df7d47b979acea1d
8c9eba4f2993ce74e36ff316d16017d804e7afe3
describe
'23197' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPR' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
d4e649a429faf7069b1702dad2c83254
5a25d706c12155ca603a4181509b3f9dc0cd0858
describe
'419881' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPS' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
db1049f09b9af188f435fd227b64f317
f1bef88af15a86d20d82948b35e43ce18576d927
describe
'135129' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPT' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
f7285f786c0606f6654fc9acb9d13346
034fa192b5320803c1c924262fde99248c97bc6e
describe
'31252' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPU' 'sip-files00248.pro'
e3c3daf48d36824c2b168b0fce69bf70
689ffad3a06466edfafdcf65f017e6a4e6b316cf
describe
'53238' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPV' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
56e756b35c77f644678d908ee2e08880
ad942bb794e9b4419c2e517c8340403112ce2435
describe
'3371576' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPW' 'sip-files00248.tif'
f519b1f7401221a39a7148c9b15b4c24
d5d561e93235463b9982f3fa39ec5dc02e2f1af0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPX' 'sip-files00248.txt'
ceaf9bdd3f475dd7caa1813cc88e9076
be54cb7b7dce725d153868fe9402cdd5d9deff8a
describe
'21655' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPY' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
b8babb8c8545af0e8b3532dc315592ed
77411524df33fb8feafcd51f5286d4ffcc052cd8
describe
'370487' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQPZ' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
495d0720685d652626fc0e994c68c9c3
1bbdc51ee43bd178ca2b77e578460b7cc234f784
describe
'204974' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQA' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
db2eb26dccb1549f46d3560c9d283143
a1fe4a9842de323107bb09a170a17fcd6efba1ae
describe
'2375' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQB' 'sip-files00249.pro'
754834c6f18a62212d2d5c2a49aefc9d
11a363a483a1ee3eda21a5cfac32f5ca0c912c18
describe
'63179' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQC' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
dfd18ce2238fa9e6c1516f1329e27994
5d649325e2990d9a44d9e31c5f2c61650b2d1ac7
describe
'2977560' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQD' 'sip-files00249.tif'
5440903b57969da57649ee60354ef120
b7bd33cf14fdf47a73af93fe2fd1f362e6d12b15
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQE' 'sip-files00249.txt'
46b5df9765802270d4b2d0f3edc73e10
2c8ea3d8798ad8433cc242d568977c31a9fe4969
describe
'25389' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQF' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
8a256d1f536b432d4d1a396916e76ca7
a7bd321dfbc34a1e8247da6d866df739a415fc05
describe
'395163' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQG' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
f1143f780fc218d11e86a5dc44efc90a
42d2c359cbfa8f95e44869899517928440bfe5e4
describe
'31147' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQH' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
f3c8c6c02d9fe7c403bd7945a6499385
bc6b1eabe68631b4214370e54e893f6a60c66949
describe
'13442' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQI' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
d89beb791ac45a918470f4db84081b18
e231f9b3b2dea153d728587445c3f8508dbcada6
describe
'3367384' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQJ' 'sip-files00250.tif'
2269929a42853b992de881e558432c94
ec39dda108380fbe7b1eaa27a0fa6e7a2be85ea7
describe
'9671' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQK' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
7f42174139fde5290270f7199a716da2
cc7c0018ea08a2f583154decd8cf28b1ab6ad454
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQL' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
af099927ad78da01e94f4e06d3914e32
ba89adc78754623b3a73fbbe21520c6969dfa672
describe
'102774' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQM' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
653dd7e0718fce8b75bb1e4c2ec58d40
1df723826af61bafef263bb9bceff4091d4d5d37
describe
'11456' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQN' 'sip-files00251.pro'
5a9251669d3b2b2e4bc3433fd5e53112
1b0dcacd143ffeba3ac273e3118f78df3d874b3b
describe
'38639' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQO' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
ed0e027cb37fff6f4c80d4ac73d87f30
fbb5e79b77a4ee24b826f68fb8af265f4f5b2e1e
describe
'3370412' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQP' 'sip-files00251.tif'
319ce45a798a2e81a8c10043dc67b66f
3aa79fc480a666d1b9c73b13e0fa2d39d3acca4a
describe
'464' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQQ' 'sip-files00251.txt'
5dc0831c41fc7419268fa4d8d924ffc1
713ea5c12e5ef4a0700add95d91a5d5e3942bdad
describe
'17847' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQR' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
1def9ab04598ebee2aaf11b2e4b3652d
0db4b170568eb9f0c91a03eb1aa32d96bb790ecb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQS' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
1bdbe783fa30706d16a0fc7b98278407
cd25cb46872907e255c4efe142f9e0e9eb783646
describe
'152307' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQT' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
165877005a3d7112248a663027d49293
a430d6a562a79a518eb672235cdee91d6ffc58c5
describe
'67947' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQU' 'sip-files00253.pro'
5a4644a99cb03d5047c5a33d433f7f24
18d1881f46fee1f5b1dab8a8838fa1aeba93ccb5
describe
'52024' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQV' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
78b5157e8d62c4a3577a203ab5793128
5d0b2a8715a4c43db91fb7e149619d039f5b27e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQW' 'sip-files00253.tif'
c107834c221e2a8fe212d1fcabf88116
3513c881942a4d8ca1c585e7041ed25ce0a1df05
describe
'2839' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQX' 'sip-files00253.txt'
7538f93d6247b791ccbd54d0edcdf40b
2cbc43f36e43f585a79d9f1aeac0c03a16fa0c03
describe
'22291' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQY' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
119684ed0b64a560a86ac318bea2d79e
8852782d2c2afc6a0ff6a9a396c1521156ddb3dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQQZ' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
f464a59d36f14fda84a6cf598a43864c
c596cae0e58fc69964ac12ecab6e5ef253bfdbf5
describe
'156157' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRA' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
a412edf5481f2c3432090ec0062e299d
81f4133e9e9b2fd162b0b6c984d359680fc73908
describe
'75861' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRB' 'sip-files00254.pro'
8acb8d3dc415e4d320347f903deebcde
2c917965b30b7853b5af71b032b313b32dc5d4a0
describe
'51184' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRC' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
3232df7c8a9536c74e1f79c94e994266
233a4696aa21fa0e165cfa46689f1a6df714c4f0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRD' 'sip-files00254.tif'
8436e0adfd6f6c2f9186220d428b1cda
dcef04dc4a50b6d4f56b51266bd15f052152b7c3
describe
'3184' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRE' 'sip-files00254.txt'
b19c1970bddd161d73701273c097fa7e
53dd5bd16e12a0d1bcf1990e4f880844149160de
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRF' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
df4f76db91a0ae32c1b2b29eeb761d12
431493d3582c2ac7fe9d00dd934e02890aa30685
describe
'465405' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRG' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
5080f88ba779a70ac5633ee8f2c4d83f
52517a921e820e05df51d56d889727466ad94e19
describe
'37016' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRH' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
769cb0e821acb8c057a1259113f0388a
ae0955d10e8af1d86f1897745f555426ee412dbb
describe
'632' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRI' 'sip-files00257.pro'
f7cb6f6f10656ee8f7f7b1caf2d9c2a7
5d238db128837e0b5b8c668a9177c311a2f087ce
describe
'15348' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRJ' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
d6ad5efd4e13199f2ec5d6c81cf3d01c
0c6b22b8023f72566f06322053d3815121c568a0
describe
'3731400' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRK' 'sip-files00257.tif'
c23647871348ec7cee39bd756fd6b1f1
17bab68243d958652281e09fa76281ef076605fc
describe
'22' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRL' 'sip-files00257.txt'
1314da612abe6acc6c4545e43c23c928
cf1c7f550ad249e7e11e7bc79e77f7f95ae5a9ac
describe
'10097' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRM' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
2a5092543503e4903f7364269f66ac7b
48262bc9e9c52c1a8d93000186b7d517d02418e8
describe
'467727' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRN' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
04481f774c5fc31eb8e23d679a212695
3ade1a71a068691e28ab5616797bb6c699cca81e
describe
'20081' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRO' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
f1d415455fe9e121fb65fc72d4f0d82f
a489be3e7d5264e40f8f9059beaa72dfbbbf4db6
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRP' 'sip-files00258.pro'
b15f3bc20af4b04c1b21122d9542eb72
5fbb0a6ea80e61beafdea45771f58af22516cb6f
describe
'10841' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRQ' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
cca3f15a5d9ab79e89ac776b46ea09f0
ee6fec3148ac5f3eb54827967d18fecca2a5f38a
describe
'3751032' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRR' 'sip-files00258.tif'
f33da4295b7c76ae1f128c787a158a4a
56168d348239ed869d5d9fef0bad977b69359184
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRS' 'sip-files00258.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'8970' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRT' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
50f0cc76a1e700e8a353bbca1718d899
03cda4d6f4a4a8bd3657c7bb6613fb21bb55fe57
describe
'519309' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRU' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
8e28f92eb12a7be293d5c143420284f3
ed28c3ae34d66d6acab4a0ab5770bd9a12a49929
describe
'109641' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRV' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
6609ac5eefd421986f5fbb417d1246db
88c5fd71d96aab40d610c5d1dff3547b752d6921
describe
'28945' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRW' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
c6f357605c41ff4988e13127c8bdf2c8
9cff2d5c834663ca9ddc0542be9bccfd9b606190
describe
'12470792' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRX' 'sip-files00259.tif'
09c0db3dce6d21b3f24a7d2e6634f2f3
a144d37f323a336d0c0c97cd89ad1cde565fb5ac
describe
'13715' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRY' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
890a939e52f39972fe87a007856806d4
fdda1ae152a812765d6642df1cb40678d39bdcb8
describe
'523924' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQRZ' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
21002fb414709be7d6a82e4199b30c60
9a1ff79adb0529380a2729447b164e6e5677e81b
describe
'151222' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQSA' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
63c32849ed00f4148f0c7b2c4f40b552
1da049b56bb7549fefa82db47f31608f94ed45f6
describe
'30999' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQSB' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
0ebcd4a4e39d416454a059cf2bfbd4db
774f2695371b9435cc2c56d5336316150da12cb0
describe
'12583656' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQSC' 'sip-files00260.tif'
413b3e2b7f990815dad027f4c619f6bf
7528a875ee19b47b7ed16601f29a0337e0f148a2
describe
'13198' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQSD' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
eeb8ee2b95c56960397857bc6115ee89
4123984adfcae94fb4e3f1a3305425a6db1b662e
describe
'117364' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQSE' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
598c170d75a2b7715c4508076a8656b9
cd862a5519a5836118615c2e92fd3606abcea95d
describe
'70413' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQSF' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
959e4751edb8a8f5fe9254a775eec71c
60be6b6a28afc2f8a5166ec55df88eda7b6e954e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQSG' 'sip-files00261.pro'
4eb71b664ff83d7fa8327028b2c279c0
267cdaee04cf4a5937404c0a8299920922e79aa5
describe
'22194' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQSH' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
f5890161fe710c1ea229c8d16375495d
4e1a5d4b8908f8be8cbc89fd2522b1d13cd41374
describe
'2825800' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQSI' 'sip-files00261.tif'
6f6a295562e463520ae5db7fa9348205
01c8abbf981f48d686583620258c4f1e0a5e2fdb
describe
'13949' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQSJ' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
4b5d69646c0e832267cadd34d3c3a71a
60f2d97d09ee269f65d9f17318b856e52fc68d6f
describe
'104' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQSK' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
872519f039727fbb880b85a7b0b36b06
9a4fd7f2b149a29344c6d84cd411746214833253
describe
'409274' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQSL' 'sip-filesUF00086393_00001.mets'
3ad066c20aba20ab5d281aa27b4b0951
e1f16dc10b578f396547879a4e160f3ebaf5c604
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T05:50:40-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'534946' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAPfileF20090316_AAAQSO' 'sip-filesUF00086393_00001.xml'
3205990103428616439b74c3dc56a99d
91dfffbad98544c0ef143362f4a2c5c846b76bc6
'2012-01-15T04:23:53-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-13T05:50:36-05:00'
xml resolution