Citation
The great island, or, Cast away in Papua  by Willis Boyd Allen

Material Information

Title:
The great island, or, Cast away in Papua by Willis Boyd Allen
Series Title:
Camp and tramp series
Portion of title:
Cast away in Papua
Creator:
Allen, Willis Boyd, 1855-1938
Lothrop Publishing Company ( Publisher )
C.J. Peters & Son ( Typographer )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Lothrop Publishing Company
Manufacturer:
C.J. Peters & Son
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
176 p., [6] leaves of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Seafaring life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Discoveries in geography -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Explorers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Camping -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Outdoor life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Ships -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Storms -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Papuans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Compassion -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Social life and customs -- Juvenile fiction -- Papua New Guinea ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Papua New Guinea ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Photograps -- 1897 ( gmgpc )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
photograph ( lcgft )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations are either drawings or photographs.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002373890 ( ALEPH )
ALX8587 ( NOTIS )
36971358 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

E20090316_AAAAAJ.xml

UF00086390_00001.pdf

UF00086390_00001.txt

00006.txt

00199.txt

00026.txt

00047.txt

00080.txt

00058.txt

00105.txt

00060.txt

00054.txt

00092.txt

00051.txt

00177.txt

00055.txt

00061.txt

00153.txt

00137.txt

00183.txt

00067.txt

00142.txt

00181.txt

00037.txt

00033.txt

00100.txt

00096.txt

00145.txt

00108.txt

00174.txt

00062.txt

00002.txt

00112.txt

00146.txt

00076.txt

00057.txt

00182.txt

00158.txt

00087.txt

00186.txt

00073.txt

00075.txt

00194.txt

00007.txt

00127.txt

00027.txt

00063.txt

00114.txt

00091.txt

00071.txt

00059.txt

00136.txt

00150.txt

00042.txt

00012.txt

00156.txt

00125.txt

00023.txt

00167.txt

00039.txt

00122.txt

00163.txt

00133.txt

00072.txt

00081.txt

00020.txt

00038.txt

00188.txt

00179.txt

00193.txt

00151.txt

00101.txt

00011.txt

00190.txt

00160.txt

00034.txt

00083.txt

00157.txt

00143.txt

00024.txt

00110.txt

00093.txt

00117.txt

00152.txt

00184.txt

00022.txt

00119.txt

00189.txt

00168.txt

00111.txt

00154.txt

00019.txt

00126.txt

00135.txt

00172.txt

00191.txt

00169.txt

00070.txt

00032.txt

00138.txt

00068.txt

00107.txt

00128.txt

00140.txt

00064.txt

00008.txt

00035.txt

00095.txt

00090.txt

00196.txt

00116.txt

00118.txt

00103.txt

00166.txt

00197.txt

00017.txt

00139.txt

00178.txt

00097.txt

00050.txt

00121.txt

00085.txt

00018.txt

00098.txt

00113.txt

00052.txt

00144.txt

00084.txt

00069.txt

00134.txt

00088.txt

00187.txt

00029.txt

00175.txt

UF00086390_00001_pdf.txt

00074.txt

00132.txt

00077.txt

00041.txt

00053.txt

00164.txt

00198.txt

00104.txt

00185.txt

00115.txt

00078.txt

00149.txt

00141.txt

00131.txt

00021.txt

E20090316_AAAAAJ_xml.txt

00028.txt

00031.txt

00046.txt

00147.txt

00044.txt

00013.txt

00001.txt

00109.txt

00099.txt

00102.txt

00180.txt

00040.txt

00129.txt

00094.txt

00159.txt

00086.txt

00130.txt

00049.txt

00079.txt

00048.txt

00165.txt

00123.txt

00065.txt

00106.txt

00015.txt

00056.txt

00192.txt

00045.txt

00161.txt

00171.txt

00176.txt

00173.txt

00030.txt

00089.txt

00082.txt

00155.txt

00036.txt

00124.txt

00043.txt

00025.txt


Full Text




PRESENTED BY

. Mr. JAMES V. LOTT,



BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION
416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.

The Baldwin Library ||

University ||
RMB ike ||
Florida





Camp and Lramp Series.
By WILLIS BOYD ALLEN.

I. LOST ON UMBAGOG.

Il. THE MAMMOTH HUNTERS.
Ill. THE GREAT ISLAND.
IV. (im preparation.)

LOTHROP PUBLISHING GOMPANY, BOSTON.













Tre Lorry Prison.

“Tt was built twenty feet above the ground.”
(See Page 119.)



THE GREAT ISLAND

OR

CAST AWAY IN PAPUA

BY

WILLIS BOYD ALLEN

AUTHOR OF

“Lost oN UMBAGOG,” “THE MAMMOTH HUNTERS,” “ PINE CONE
STORIES,” ‘JOHN BROWNLOW’S FOLKS,” “ THE
LIon Ciry oF AFRICA,” ETc,

BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION
416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.

BOSTON
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY
1897



COPYRIGHT, 1897,
BY

LoTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY.

All rights reserved.

C. J. PeTErRs & Son, TYPOGRAPHERS.
Boston.



CHAPTER —

He

II.
III.
IV.
NE
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
XII.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.

XVII.

XVIII.

CONTENTS.

Tue Lonety Camp—Fire
PLANNING THE TRIP .
Across THE Paci¥FIc .
Lost oN THE OCEAN .
A Lone Nieut .

Tur StrRANGE LANDING.
A Nove. Britt or Fare
A Srartuine Discovery
Two WrercHep NieHts
In Camp AGAIN
UNINVITED GUESTS
CarptuRED By Hrap—Hunters
Looxine BACKWARD .
A Lorty Prison

Tue VALLEY oF GoLp
A Papuan WaAR-PARTY
DESERTED .

CONCLUSION .

PAGE

14
26
35
46
53
64
71
83
91
98

113

122

131

142

150

162

169



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Tue Lorry Prison .. . . . . . FRONTISPIECE.
“Tt was built twenty feet above the ground.”
PAGE
Tue Stranee Lanping . . . . . facing page 56
“Thump! went the bows against the half-submerged
roots.”
CapPTuRED BY Heap-Hunters. . . facing page 108
“A sharp whish came past my ear, and an arrow
quivered in the trunk of a tree.”
In THE VittAGE oF WoLv . . . . facing page 134
“Pigs were family pets, and swine were at a pre-
mium.”
In tHe~ VaLLEy or Gotp . . . . facing page 146
‘‘ We had discovered the well-kept secret of the wealth
of Wolu.” :
Native Parvans ... . . . . facing page 152

Scene in the vicinity of Port Moresby.

7
BEDFORD BRANCH,

YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION

416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.



THE GREAT ISLAND.

CHAPTER I.
THE LONELY CAMP—FIRE.

RE you willing to take a long tramp with
me this time, my boy reader? And to
camp no longer on wind-swept, frozen Um-
bagog or the dreary tundras of Alaska, but
in the Tropics, where our rest may be broken
by a hurricane, our skins punctured by the
stings of myriads of insects,— nay, worse
dangers threatened by poisonous serpents, by
huge crocodiles, and, worst of all, by a race of
natives who have never before seen a white
man, and whose delight is to kill and slay?
Yes, you say, you are quite ready for all
this — on paper, at any rate! Good! Come
9



10 THE GREAT ISLAND.

with me, then, to one of the Pacific islands,
five times as large as all the rest put to-
gether ; the largest island in the world, if we
promote Australia to the rank of a continent,
and leave Greenland’s coast-line to be settled
by Lieutenant Peary or some other intrepid
Arctic explorer.

Have you guessed the name of our island ?
It is practically unexplored to-day, save a nar-
row strip along some parts of its coast, and
the tracks of half a dozen travellers who
have pierced its mighty forests at as many
points. ‘Those same forests are partly known,
partly guessed, to be the home, not only of
the savages referred to above, but of some of
the loveliest of God’s creatures — so beautiful
in their glossy plumage, gleaming among the
dark foliage of palm and mangrove and teak,
that men long ago named them “birds of
Paradise.”

Now, have I given you a sufficient hint?
Right: it is the huge body of land washed
by the waves of the Pacific, and lying just



THE LONELY CAMP—FIRE. 11

north of Australia; it is none other than New
Guinea, or Paptia as the natives call it. We
shall learn more about it, I can promise you,
before we reach home again.

It was on a calm August evening not many
years ago that a little group of three persons
gathered about a camp-fire near the shore of
one of the loneliest portions of southern Papua.
They all were boys; and though they busied
themselves cheerfully about their encampment,
an onlooker must have seen that at least two
of the party were down-hearted. The third
had a good-natured, freckled face, a snub nose,
and a broad brogue which stamped him at once
a native of Ireland.

“What’ll I do now?” said he, addressing the
taller of the two youths, as he flung down an
armful of sticks near the fire. “Shure, it’s me-
self don’t know whether this haythin wood’ll
burn at all; but there’s enough of it, anyway.”

“That'll do for now, Teddy,” replied the boy
addressed. “Just open a can of beef, will



12 THE GREAT ISLAND.

you? What do you say, Nat, shall we have
supper ?”

“T suppose we may as well,’ said Nat dis-
consolately; “though I can’t say Pve much
appetite, Will. Do you think the yams are
done?” |

“Soon find out. Here, Ted, give us a stick.
Now, then” —and he scraped away a pile of
glowing ashes from a corner of the fire, disclos-
ing what looked like several scorched bunches
of leaves. “Look out! they’re hot as pepper!
Ah-b-h! how’s that, my boy!”

Will had poked out the wads of leaves, and
now extracted from their midst several long,
blackened vegetables not unlike sweet potatoes
in appearance.

Nat took one up, and scraping off the burned
portion with the blade of his jack-knife, tasted
the big tuber rather dubiously.

“Needs salt.”

The seasoning applied, all three castaways —
for such they seemed to be —ate their novel
supper with much apparent relish. Teddy,



. THE LONELY CAMP-—FIRE. 13

who appeared to be a sort of half servant, half
companion, to the others, received his share of
both yams and beef, and did full justice to
them.

That we may understand who the three boys
were, and how they came to be in camp in one
of the least-known portions of the habitable
globe, it will be best for me to yield the pen
to one who can tell you the story much more
accurately and vividly than I could; one who
had good reason to know all the details of the
trip, or expedition, or shipwreck, or whatever
it was, that was accountable for their presence
on this inhospitable shore; none other than one
of the boys themselves, Nat Dutton.



14 THE GREAT ISLAND.

CHAPTER II.
PLANNING THE TRIP.

TJNHE fellows have made up their minds that
J, Nathaniel P. Dutton, must write out the
story of our latest tramp, and our astonish-
ing adventures in a land which, but for our
expedition, would remain to-day practically un-
plored. I say “latest,” because some of us
have been together before, and we all belong
to a sort of society which we call the “ Camp
and Tramp Club.” It was organized about
two years ago by Rod Bigelow and three other
fellows, who spent a week or two in the Maine
woods in the winter time, near the Rangeley dis-
trict. Perhaps you have read Will Martin’s ac-
count of it? He called it “ Lost on Umbagog.”
Then Rodney got two chums of his, namely,
Malcolm MacDonald and myself, —being new



PLANNING THE TRIP. 15

members of the aforesaid club,—to join him
in a much longer and even more exciting trip
to Alaska, on what most people would call a
wild-goose chase. Mac was appointed historian,
and wrote up the affair in good style, naming
the book “The Mammoth Hunters.” I told
him people would think it was about hunters
of mammoth size; but he liked the title, and
said if a boy could not understand that he
meant we were hunting for mammoths (as
“Tion Hunters” meant hunting for lions), he
wouldn’t know enough to read a book any-
way. Rod, by the way, figured in that book
as “ Winter.” His whole name is Rodney Win-
ter Bigelow; so you can bear in mind, please,
that he is the same Rodney who was “lost on
Umbagog.” It was a notion of his to use

his middle name in Will’s Umbagog story.
Well, it takes me a long time to get started,
doesn’t it? You see, it’s my first attempt at
writing a book; and you must put up with
a good many shortcomings, if you are good-
natured enough to follow me through all these

BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION

#16420 GATES AVENUE,

BROOKLYN, N, Y,



16 THE GREAT ISLAND.

pages while I fight my battles over again. Ad-
ventures enough I can promise you, —some of
them funny, and some of them far too serious
for laughter. When I think of that terrible
night — but no, Pll not begin like that, right
in the middle of my story.

_The first time we ever thought of going
to Australia was a few weeks after our return
from Alaska. The club had met informally
at my house (we had moved to Boston, from
Sheldon, soon after the ‘Red Mountain” trip
which some of you have read about), and
were having a jolly evening of it. Mabel
Armstrong was with us, visiting my sister
Flossie. Even Rob and Hugh were on hand,
being at home for the Thanksgiving recess.
They are my brothers, you know; one was
then in the senior class at Harvard, and the
other was a sophomore. I hope to enter the
freshman class myself next fall.

Well, we were sitting around a blazing fire
in the sitting-room, laughing and talking, when
Mr. Bigelow was announced.



PLANNING THE TRIP. 17

“A regular camp-fire, isn’t it, Nat?” said
he, as he joined us. “What are you doing?
telling stories ?”

“Oh! talking over old times, sir” —

Here our guest broke in with another laugh.

{»

“Hear him!” said he to my father, who was
enjoying his after-dinner cigar in his easy-
chair. “What do they know about ‘old
times’ !”

“Now, Mr. Bigelow,” put in Floss, “you
mustn't think we are infants. Mabel and I
were both seventeen last month—”

“Sure, that’s eight-and-a-half apace,’ mur-
mured Teddy Ryan as he brought in an arm-
ful of wood; but nobody paid any attention
to him. We must break that boy of the
habit of interrupting. He’s more like one of
the family than a servant now.

“ And Rodney is almost nineteen!”

“Whew!” whistled Mr. Bigelow, — with a
very pleasant glance at the girls, but especi-
ally at Mabel, I thought, — “I really had for-

gotten your gray hairs, my dears. As for



18 THE GREAT ISLAND.

Rod, I wish—ah, there he is now!” and
our fellow “ Vagabond” came forward into
the firelight, and shook hands all round.
“Rod,” continued his father, “I haven’t
got to my errand yet, so you can explain it
yourself.”
“Why,” said Rodney, flinging himself down

on a big grizzly-bear rug in front of the fire,

“Tve been thinking of taking another little
strip ==

“ Not this winter!” exclaimed Mabel.

“Well, not before March or April, anyway.
I’m going to put in four or five months’ hard
study, and then, if father is willing, I want
to travel a little.”

Rodney looked over at us, and, I regret to
say, winked. It’s a bad habit he has.

I understood him in a twinkling. There
was another scheme on foot for the “Camp
and Tramp Club”!

I was on my feet in a moment; and so were
Will and Ned Martin, who were spending the
evening with us.



PLANNING THE TRIP. 19

“ Where?” we shouted in one breath.

“Oh! I don’t know,” said Rod carelessly;
“somewhere where it’s warm. I’ve got enough,
for one, of camping within the Arctic circle.”

“But we must have some useful object,”

put in Ned. “That's Rule III. of the club,
you know.”
' “J declare, it reminds me of getting up
tableaux or a fair,’ exclaimed Miss Flossie
indignantly. ‘Those crazy boys are wild to
sail off on some expedition or other, and the
only trouble is to— to” —

“Ballast it?” suggested Rodney calmly.

“Yes, with a Useful Object,” concluded my
sister. “As if they couldn’t find useful objects
enough in Boston!”

“Oh! Boston’s all right,’ sang out Will.
“She doesn’t need anything.”

“Perhaps you think the club conferred a
lasting benefit on Alaska last summer!” re-
torted Floss..

“Well, we relieved the natives of that old
scarecrow of a mammoth, anyway,” chuckled



20 THE GREAT ISLAND.

Malcolm, the sixth member of our club pres-
ent.

“Tf the boys work hard this winter,” re-
marked father soberly, “I don’t know that I
should object to their spending their summer
in camp. It’s wholesome amusement for the
lads; and we can afford it, eh, Bigelow?”

The other gentleman smiled and nodded, and
we fellows wisely let the conversation drift into
other channels.

A week later we met in Rod’s cosey room,
and discussed the details of the new expedition.
It was Rodney himself who made the sugges-
tion which was to mould our plans for the
coming trip.

“You will remember, fellows,” he said, “that
last winter we looked up all the. large un-
explored tracts of the earth. Among others,
Australia was mentioned.”

“You let that go without a word,” I inter-
rupted, “because you knew the doctors had
ordered me north. It was too bad to have the
plans of the whole club broken up by the poor



PLANNING THE TRIP. 21

health of one member. Australia’s an awfully
interesting country.”

“You're all right now, aren’t you, Nat?”
queried Rod.

“Indeed I am, and ready to go anywhere
between the Poles.”

“Very well. What I propose is, that we
make for Australia!”

For a moment we all sat silent at the mag-
nitude of the conception. Then came a volley
of eager questions.

“How do we get there?”

“Ts there any big game?”

“ What’s the ‘useful object’ ?”

Our leader answered the last question first.

“The useful objects of the Australian expe-
dition —if we take it—are two. First, to
carry a new line of exploration across a coun-
try which, while it is highly civilized in por-
tions, is in others one of the least-known
portions of the earth’s surface. Second —
gold!”

“Gold! Why, what’s the use” —
BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION

416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.



22 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“T know others have been before us,” said
Rodney calmly, answering the objection before
it was fairly made. “Gold has been washed
—or ‘hydraulicked,’ as the practical miners
call it nowadays—for years, perhaps centu-
ries, in Australia. I see no reason, however,
why we should not find new deposits in the
interior ; why, indeed, we might not be the
discoverers of the headquarters, the treasury,
from which these gold-bearing streams flow.
Who knows that we shall not discover a hith-
erto unknown range of mountains, another
‘Cloud King,’ as Stanley called Ruwenzori,
the big African peak.”

His enthusiasm was contagious.

“ Hurrah for the Cloud King!” we shouted.
“ Australia forever!”

Plans were now eagerly discussed, and the
wildest possibilities mentioned. I do not think
any of us who, as it turned out, actually par-
ticipated in the expedition, thought much about
the wealth we might amass. It was the spirit
of adventure and discovery that moved us, as



PLANNING THE TRIP. 23

it stirs the hearts of older men to pierce the
secrets of the lonely Arctic wastes year after
year. People say they are heroes, sacrificing
themselves for the good of humankind. But
it’s pretty hard, I notice, to point out any great
benefit which has arisen, or which seems likely
to arise, from Arctic exploration. The real
incitement, I believe, is the boyish love of
adventure and peril which must lie in the
hearts of such men as Greely and Peary and
Nansen, just as it does in ours.

At any rate, there was not a doubt as to
the state of our feelings. We were wild to
start; and meeting after meeting of the club
was held, to arrange details, and talk of our
coming voyage.

As our fathers made the trip conditional
on our studiousness during the winter, we
worked over our books as never before; not
omitting, you may be sure, an exhaustive pe-
rusal of every authority we could find on
Australia, —its fauna, flora, geography, topog-
raphy, and history.



24. THE GREAT ISLAND.

I well remember how sheepishly Will Mar-
tin, having been deputed to study up the
river-systems of Australia and report on them
(that was our regular method), confessed that
he had taken home the N volume of the En-
cyclopedia by mistake, instead of the A, and
having become interested in the island of
New Guinea, had sat up reading till after
eleven o'clock. Lucky for us it was,—vno, I
will not say “lucky,’ —it was a kind and
overruling Providence that directed our com-
rade’s hand to the wrong volume that day,
and stored in his memory a host of facts
about the strange land that so nearly joins
the great Australian continent on the north!

Will was the botanist of all our expedi-
tions; and it was the account of the flora of
Papua that had particularly interested him, he
said. He would have given us a lecture then
and there; but we suppressed him, after the
custom of the club whenever irrelevant matter
was introduced by a member, and clamored for
more Australia.



PLANNING THE TRIP. 25

So the days flew by; wintry storms came
and went; snow-drifts lay deep on the streets,
and slowly melted before the gathering strength
of the sun as he climbed northward. At
length the day set for our departure was at
hand.



26 THE GREAT ISLAND.

CHAPTER III.
ACROSS THE PACIFIC.

T was a lovely day in April when we
started from New York for San Fran-
cisco. The party consisted of Will Martin,
Rod Bigelow, and myself, as well as my
father and mother, who, together with Flossie,
and by special invitation Mabel Armstrong,
had decided to accompany us as far as Syd-
ney, and then keep on, through India and the
Suez Canal, around the world. Teddy, too,
was taken along as “ man-of-all-work.’ We
all expected to meet at home some time in
November. Quite a long stay was to be
made at Hawaii on the way out; so that,
taking into account also a necessary delay in
San Francisco, we did not expect to reach
Australia much before July.



ACROSS THE PACIFIC. 27

You can guess that we had a jolly time
crossing our own continent. At first we didn’t
much like the idea of the girls going along,
but before we reached the prairies we were
glad enough that they had come. Why, they
were just the life of the crowd, I can tell you.
Floss has a fine voice; and with Mabel’s alto,
and the rest of us coming in pretty much
anywhere on the chorus, we made the old
“ Pennsylvania” (that was the name of our
car) ring with our college songs. Sunday
evening we had hymns, and a lot of folks
came from the other cars to listen and join
in. Mother said it was like a good old Shel-
don prayer-meeting; and all the while we
were thundering along, over desolate tracts
of sage-brush, among prairie-dog settlements,
and past Indian encampments, at the rate of
thirty odd miles an hour!

We reached San Francisco on time, and
sailed in the Empire of Japan a few days
later. I won’t linger over the voyage, though
I might fill a good many pages with descrip-



28 THE GREAT ISLAND.

tions of the Pacific, and the steamer life, the
fun we had on deck, and the stories that
were told every night, when we all gathered
in some sheltered corner, and father was ap-
pointed chief story-teller.

We had a smooth passage to Honolulu; and,
right there, a change was made in our plans
which threatened to spoil the whole expedi-
tion. Father found that the life at sea, the
salt breezes and the perfect rest, agreed so well
with both him and mother, that he decided to
let the steamer go on without us, and take
passage in a sailing-vessel, the Southern Cross,
that was billed to start for Sydney a few days
later. I have already said that we meant to
stop a week or two at Honolulu; but this new
plan would bring us to Australia too late for
any extended trip inland. Of course we felt
badly, and father offered to let Rod and me go
on without the others, by steam; but we felt
that this would be deserting the party, and de-
cided to wait and go with the rest. We agreed
to give up the idea we had at the outset of



ACROSS THE PACIFIC. 29

exploring an unknown country, and content
ourselves with one or two excursions inland,
just to see how it looked, and hunt a little.
We had rifles, shotguns, plenty of ammunition,
and a regular camp outfit with us, all of which
could be used in the shorter trips, just as well
as in the more ambitious journey we had first
planned.

It was about the middle of May when we
went on board the bark Southern Cross, and
set sail for Sydney, a little over five thousand
miles distant. I don’t know much about ships,
so I can’t give you the regular nautical terms
for the rigging of the Southern Cross, the va-
rious evolutions of the sailors, or the details
of the voyage. You must go to Clark Russell
for that, you know.

We laid our course a little west of south,
and for several days hummed along merrily
enough, right before the “north-east trades.”
Then the wind died away, or only came in
little puffs, as we neared the equator, until
we woke one morning to find the bark per-



30 THE GREAT ISLAND.

fectly motionless, except for the long, lazy
swing of the everlasting Pacific swell. It was
a dead calm, sure enough. I dropped a lead
pencil overboard in the forenoon, and at sun-
set I happened to look over the side, and
there it was, not having moved an inch.

Oh, how hot it was! Awnings were rigged
on the quarter-deck for us passengers; and we
lay there gasping, in our thinnest clothes, long-
ing for a breath of wind. I saw a black
thing sticking up out of the water near the
ship; and the boatswain, a fine old fellow
named Snaggs, told me it was the back fin of
a shark. There was some talk of getting out
a hook and trying to catch him; but either
we were too lazy to take the trouble, or the
captain disliked to have his nice white decks
mussed,up; at any rate, the scheme fell through,
and “John Sharkee,” as the sailors called him,
was left alone.

Slowly but surely we crept southward, tak-
ing advantage of every ripple on the water
to gain a few miles, until we had crossed the



ACROSS THE PACIFIC. 31

equator, and were fairly in Southern latitudes.
I expected to see a great jollification when we
“crossed the line ;” but the old customs have
died out, and there was no visit of Neptune
or other celebration of the day.

We passed just west of the Phoenix islands;
and as we left the latitudes of the Feejees about
fifty miles away, the weather grew worse.
Will, who had read up the whole business,
told us that we were now in the range of the
south-east trade-winds, but that the thing to
be feared was a real, first-class monsoon.

“Shure, pwhat’s a monsoon, thin?” asked
Ted, with open mouth and eyes.

“Oh! it’s a special kind of wind they cul-
tivate in these regions, my boy,” explained
Will. “The great trouble with them is, you
never know just which way they're coming.
At this season of the year we’d be more apt
to get them from the east, I guess.”

Teddy, who seemed to have fancied the un-
known enemy to be a sort of sea-monster,
went away only half satisfied with the expla-



32 THE GREAT ISLAND.

nation. As for the rest of us, we were too
eager in discussing our plans to dwell on the
possible dangers of contrary winds. Within
twenty-four hours everybody on board knew
pretty well what a monsoon was, though. It
struck us that very night.

We were wakened a little after midnight
by the sound of creaking timbers, of waves
thundering against the sides of the ship, of
crockery smashing about in the pantry, of
coils of rope flung down on the deck over
our heads, of hoarse voices shouting orders,
of women screaming with fright. I jumped
into my clothes, and rushed for the deck. It
was pitch dark as I made my way up the
companion stairs, clinging to the hand-rail,
toward the wild commotion above; but before
I could reach the deck I was met by a deluge
of water, which poured down into the cabin,
and flooded the staterooms three inches deep.

That was enough for me, and I turned
back to the small saloon where we usually
took our meals. Some one had lighted one



9

ACROSS THE PACIFIC. 33

of the lamps, which swung fearfully, ligating
up the pale faces of the men and women
who were gathering there, half-dressed, and
wholly out of their wits.

By the time I reached the foot of the
stairs I heard the door above come to with
a bang, so we were relieved from the fear of
another flood. But what a night it was!
Nobody dared to go to bed again. We all
sat there in the dimly lighted saloon, our si-
lence only broken by an occasional scream
from some woman or girl as a big wave
would crash against the side of the ship,
which would tip over until it seemed as if
it could never come up straight again. Poor
mother was white as a sheet, but was plucky
too, and never said a word, except to encour-
age Floss and Mabel, who clung to her, too
frightened even to scream. Will Martin did
us all good; for he managed to find a man
who had been on deck and seen the captain.
There was no danger, he said. There was
a stiff gale blowing from the east; but the



34 THE GREAT ISLAND.

ship was running before it, and behaving well.
If the wind kept on from the same quarter,
and the sea got up, we should heave to in
the morning; for the present he had plenty
of sea-room, and should let her drive.

All this Will reported. in a cheerful sort of
a way that heartened us up. Some one
found a steward who managed to pass round
refreshments, including hot tea for all of us.
I shall never forget how good that tea
tasted !

Toward morning word came that the wind
was letting up a little, and we could feel
that the motion of the vessel was less. Most
of us took courage to go to bed, though we
were tossed about so that we didn’t get much
sleep.



LOST ON THE OCEAN. 35

CHAPTER IV.
LOST ON THE OCEAN.

E thought the storm was over, but we
didn’t know a monsoon then as well
as we do now. All that day the sky was
gray, and the wind blew steadily, though not
fiercely, from the south-east. The ship had
been brought to her course again, and with
about a third of her sails set, staggered ahead
toward Australia. One sail, we found, had
been blown away by the first violence of the
gale. The men were sent aloft to rig a new
one in its place, and we crushed along on our
voyage at a terrific pace.
I managed to get a word with old Snaggs,
and asked him what he thought of the weather.
The boatswain shook his head, and cocked
his bleary old eyes up toward the eastern sky.

ra



86 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“'Thar’s goin’ to be more afore thar’s less,”
said he at length; and without another word,
having finished the job on which he had come
aft, he lurched away forward.

This was not cheering, but it was a true
prophecy; for before supper-time the gale in-
creased in force, and we were nearly as badly
off as on the preceding night. The ship was
hove-to just before dark; and there we lay
all night, our bows meeting the huge waves,
which beat like pile-drivers on the deck, our
saloon lamp swinging wildly, and everything
in an uproar. Of course we understood that
although we were no longer being swept from
our course as we had been when the ship was
before the wind, still we must be drifting
rapidly in a north-westerly direction, and far
away from the port for which we were aim-
ing.

The storm imcreased as the night wore on,
and again most of us were too frightened to
sleep. It was, I guess, about four o’clock in
the morning, when a wave, bigger than any



LOST ON THE OCEAN. 37

that had come before, caught the ship and
threw her swiftly up. We held our breath
as she settled over slantwise into the trough.
It was fearful! It seemed impossible that she
could right herself again. ‘Two or three of
the passengers on the upper side of the sa-
loon, who were drowsy from sheer exhaustion,
lost their hold on the settees, and came rolling
down upon us, shouting wildly that we were
going to the bottom. This set all the women
screaming, when, in the midst of the cries and
confusion, there came an awful crash, and the
ship slowly recovered herself.

“A mast has gone!” cried some one; and
then, “There goes another!” and “Hark!
they’re at the pumps!”

Well, I won’t stop any longer to describe
that terrible night. None of us expected to
see morning, but the gray light did come
creeping in at last. The vessel rolled much
‘less violently, and we were cheering one an-
other up with hopes of a speedy and happy
conclusion of our voyage, even in a ship so



38 THE GREAT ISLAND.

crippled, when the door of the saloon was
flung open, and the captain entered. His face
was white as a sheet, and he was dripping
from head to foot.

I shall never forget the speech he made.
It was short and to the point.

“Ladies and gentlemen,” he said, “the bark
has sprung a leak, and is taking in water fast.
God knows how long we can keep her afloat,
but there’s time for ye all to get some break-
fast.”

A dozen voices, shrill and eager, rose at
once.

“What then, Captain? What then?”

“Then, passengers all, we must take to the
boats,” replied the captain grimly. “ Steward,
set the table, and look sharp!”

Before any more questions could be asked,
he had left the cabin.

We had hardly looked one another in the
face, when a cry arose on deck. It seemed to
have a new tone,—an accent of hope and
cheer. I rushed up the steps, and gaining the



LOST ON THE OCEAN. 39

deck, saw a clump of sailors gathered at the
rail, pointing and gesticulating.

“What is it?” I asked the man at the
wheel; for the fog and drizzling rain were
so thick that I could see nothing.

“Steamer alongside,” said the sailor tersely,
nodding in the direction indicated by the ges-
tures of the men.

T listened a moment until I heard the hoarse
escape of steam from her pipes, and then ran
below to tell the good news. Everybody was
heartened by it. Some difference between set-
ting off in an open boat on that gray waste
of waters, and being placed on board a stout
vessel, no matter where she was bound !

To make a long story short, we all gathered
on deck as soon as we had eaten a bit of
breakfast; and you may believe everybody
was eager to leave. Our own ship was a dis-
mal sight. Two out of the three masts were
gone, leaving the splintered ends sticking up,
one at about the height of a man’s head from
the deck, the other a little higher. The deck



40 THE GREAT ISLAND.

was littered with coils of rope, broken pieces
of spars, and loose casks. Worst of all, the
water outside looked dreadfully near; for we
had settled down two or three feet already.
The pumps were going all the time, clang-
clang.

The first officer of the strange vessel had
come on board from the Petrel, for that was
- her name. She was a small steamer, brig-
rigged, bound round the Horn to Montevideo ;
but there was no help for it. Our own ship
seemed to be sinking fast, and “any port in
a storm” was the word now.

After a consultation, however, between our
captain and the mate of the Petrel, and a
careful examination of the depth of water in
the hold of the Southern Cross, it was agreed
that the Petre’ should lend us four men, whom
they could well spare, and whom we needed
badly, our sailors being almost exhausted, and
two hands having been lost overboard (that
was the first we heard of it) during the night.
Our captain believed that he could then work



LOST ON THE OCEAN. Al

_ the Southern Cross to the nearest port; the
~* weather giving good promise, and the leakage
not so fast but that it could be kept under
by relief gangs of men at the pumps. The
passenge’s were all to be transshipped at once,
as they would not risk their lives on his dis-
abled ship, and they would only be in the
way, and require attention which could not be
given. If he succeeded in navigating the
Southern Cross safely to port, he said he would
store our goods, and communicate with us at
once at Montevideo.

There was of course a great deal of confu-
sion in the cabin, and rummaging for valuables.
We were allowed to take small hand-bags and
boxes, but no large baggage. The weather
began to look uncertain again, and the offi-
cers hurried us up on deck and into the boats.
There were only fifteen passengers in all; and
two trips had been taken, the women going
first. Each boat carried six; and it happened
that Will, Teddy, and I, being strong young
fellows, were left to the last. Yes, I suppose



42 THE GREAT ISLAND.

we did hang back a little to let the others go
first; why shouldn’t we?

There were only two sailors in the boat
when she came back for her last trip, to take
us three boys, and a few odds and ends that
the other passengers had forgotten.

I staggered up the staircase with a heavy
box, which, with one that Will carried, had
been stowed in our cabins, having been taken
on board at Honolulu after the trunks had
gone into the hold. Teddy had Will’s shot-
gun and bag, and we tumbled down into the
boat, which was rising and falling by the ship’s
side at a rate to make a landsman’s hair stand
onend. One of the sailors had gone on board
for a minute—to get some tobacco of one of
our foremast hands, I suspect.

“Now, I've got to go back for my bag and
Ted’s,” said I, looking dubiously at the roll-
ing ship and the swaying ladder over the side.

“Whar is it? Tl get it,’ said the good-
natured sailor who remained in the boat.

I told him, and put a shilling in his hand,



LOST ON THE OCEAN. 43

which increased his good-humored smile to a
broad grin, as he sprang nimbly up the lad-
der, and disappeared over the bulwarks.

How it happened I never can tell, but with-
in half a minute after the sailor left us we
were adrift.

Teddy saw it first, and fairly shrieked,
“Look, look! Sure, the ship’s sailin’ away
from us!”

“Help, help!” we shouted, springing to our
feet, and waving our hats frantically. No one
saw or heard us. When a man’s head finally
appeared at the head of the ladder we were
a hundred feet away, driven by a furious
squall, which came down upon us without
warning, and whitened the water all about.

We seized the heavy oars, and threw them
over the gunwales, but we might as well have
tried to fly as make headway against the
wind. In less time than it has taken to tell
it both ship and brig were lost to sight in
the driving rain.

And now a new peril beset us. We wene



44 THE GREAT ISLAND.

not only adrift, and every moment hurrying
away from our friends, but the boat got in
the trough of the sea, and we began to roll
terribly, the water coming in at every dip.

Who will say that light reading isn’t use-
ful? I remembered, all of a sudden, reading
in one of Clark Russell’s sea-stories that a party
adrift in an open boat kept themselves from
capsizing by throwing out the oars, tied to-
gether as a drag, and thus keeping the boat’s
head to the waves.

I shouted my idea to Will; and we pulled
in the painter, which was trailing from the
bows, and managed to lash the oars together
in a bungling fashion, and get them overboard.
The advantage of this move was seen in a
minute, and I have no doubt it saved our
lives. Held back by the heavy drag, our bows
came up into the wind, and we were no longer
in danger of capsizing. The water, however,
continued to break into the boat, though in
quantities that we could easily manage, if we
could only throw out the six or seven inches of



LOST ON THE OCEAN. 45

it that already threatened our safety. Luck-
ily the Petrel’s men had taken a large tin
can with them when they crossed in the rough
sea; and Will now went to work manfully
with this, while Teddy and I helped with our
caps.

“ Kvery — capful — counts!” panted Will,
as he saw us ladling out the water. “Don’t
‘— fall overboard — you fellows! This ship
can’t — spare —a man!”

We all three worked with such a good will
that we soon cleared the boat of most of the
water that had come in; and then we faced
the situation.

Where were we? What was to be done?
What were our chances of life?



46 THE GREAT ISLAND

CHAPTER V.
A LONG NIGHT.

ILL Martin was the only one of us
three whose opinion as to our where-
abouts was worth having. He had made a
special study in advance of our trip, and
could at least give a reasonable guess in the
" premises.

“As nearly as I can recollect,” said Will
slowly, “we were in the vicinity of the New
Hebrides when the hurricane struck us. Of
course I don’t know how much to allow for
our drift, nor for the currents in this part of
the ocean; but I don’t believe we can be far
from the coast of Queensland, somewhere be-
tween Brisbane and Cape Melville.”

“How much range does that give us be-
tween your two limits?” I asked.



A LONG NIGHT. 47

“Something over a thousand miles,” re-
plied Will calmly.

“And how near is the most favorable of
the two to Sydney?”

“ Brisbane? Not far from half that dis-
tance.”

“Whew!” I whistled. “A pretty poor
out-look for reaching port!”

“Tndade, we'd better have stayed on the
ould ship,” groaned Ted. “ How do you think
we're goin’ to walk all those miles at all?”

“Tt can’t be done,’ said Will. “We must
first think of getting ashore. Then take ad-
vantage of every good spell of weather to
row southward along the coast, till we strike
a settlement.”

“ An’ what'll we be afther atin’ ?” inquired
poor Ted, who was sitting in a pool of sea-
water in the bottom of the pitching boat,
and whose spirits were at the lowest ebb.

“Well, we’ve one good shotgun, and that
farther box has ammunition in it, judging
from the weight.”



48 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“That’s so!’’ I cried, with new courage.
“T just grabbed what came to hand first ;
but I remember now that it was awful heavy,
and it must be those shells loaded with buck-
shot and duck that we bought in Honolulu
just before sailing. There are two hundred
of them.”

“ Hurrah!’ shouted Will, waving his wet
cap. “Once let us get ashore in Australia,
and well give you all you want to eat,
Teddy, I can promise you. What’s in that
other box, Nat?”

“ Smoked beef in cans, and a few other small
things we stuffed in at the last minute.”

“Let's have some now!” said Ted, look-
ing interested.

“Wait,” said Will soberly. “ What shall
we have to drink with it?”

Our faces fell. In a twinkling we were all
dreadfully thirsty, at the very thought of be-
ing deprived of water.

“Spread your handkerchiefs, and wring them
when they've got wet,” suggested Will.



A LONG NIGHT. 49

It was raining, a fine, steady drizzle, for
which we could not be too thankful, though a
moment before we had been grumbling at the
discomfort of sitting in wet clothes.

Following Will’s plan, we soon assuaged the
first pangs of thirst; and then all of us wrung
out our handkerchiefs, over and over again,
into the bailer, until it was nearly full.

“ Be careful not to tip that over,” cautioned
Will, placing the precious can under a thwart
where the spray could not dash into it. “Our
lives may depend upon those two or three
quarts of fresh water to-morrow, if the weather
clears.”

We drifted slowly for hours, when the sea
fell so perceptibly that we pulled in our drag,
and having pried open our box enough to ex-
tract a small can of beef, made a hearty meal,
refreshing ourselves from our improvised rain-
collectors without disturbing our reserve supply
in the can.

Will and Ted, who were the strongest, now
shipped the oars, and pulled away steadily be-



50 THE GREAT ISLAND.

fore the wind, as we judged that course would
take us directly toward the land we longed so
to see. The fog and rain were still so thick
that we could make out nothing beyond two
or three hundred feet from the boat. I forgot
to say that from the time of our loss of the
ship we had at intervals shouted all together
and with all our might, in the vain hope that
one of the two vessels might be cruising about
for us and hear our cries.

Night came on at last, and a long and dreary
night it was too. We threw out the drag
again, and curling up in the bottom of the
boat, tried to rest. We all got some sleep, I
suppose ; but for my part I was so cold and
wet and hungry, and worried over our future,
that it seemed as if I hardly closed my eyes
throughout those dreary, dreary hours of dark-
ness. I was afraid, too, of our being run down
by the steamer, which I was sure was looking
for us; or, worse still, of her passing us within
hail and unseen. Every time a wave broke
near us or ran with a rush and roar along



A LONG NIGHT. _ ob

our sides, I started up, with eyes strained to
see a glimmer of light through the blackness
that fairly made them ache.

Morning came at last, and a sorry trio it
disclosed. I was awake first (granting that I
had been asleep), and saw Will begin to stir
uneasily, and at last open his eyes with a be-
wildered look about him. I shall never for-
get his face when he realized where we were,
and how little real hope there was of our ever
reaching home again.

Then Ted, with a sort of groan, started
wide awake all at once, as if from a bad dream.
Before I could stop him he threw out legs and
arms widely, stretching himself and yawning.
His right foot just reached the bailing-can, and
in a second the precious contents were a part
of the salt bilge-water slopping about in the
bottom of the boat.

At the same instant a pink flush appeared
in the eastern sky. Will pointed to it. ‘The
weather has cleared,’ he said simply. “In
these latitudes there are only short storms at



Sees THE GREAT ISLAND.

this time of the year. There will be no more
rain for days, perhaps weeks.”

“Then unless” —I managed to stammer ;
I could get no farther.. My tongue seemed
already glued to the roof of my mouth with
thirst.

“ Unless,” said Will, concluding my sentence
for me, “we reach land or are picked up to-
day, we are lost.”



THE STRANGE LANDING. 53

CHAPTER VI.
THE STRANGE LANDING.

ILL had hardly ceased speaking when
Teddy, who had been aghast at the
mischief he had done, jumped on a thwart
with a wild cry, pointing directly over the
stern of the boat in the direction in which
we were drifting, our bows being still held
up to the light wind by the drag.
“ Look at that!” shrieked the young Irish-
man. “Land! Land! Hooray fer Australy!”
We had thought ourselves a moment before
too stiff and cramped to move; but we forgot
all our pains and aches, and even our empty
stomachs and the overturned cistern, in our
excitement, as we, too, sprang up, and gazed
in the direction indicated. '
Sure enough, that long, cloudy line could be



54 THE GREAT ISLAND.

nothing but land. In came the oars, not
wearily and slowly this time, but hand over
fist. They rattled down between the thole-
pins on the gunwales in quick time; and the
two rowers, turning the boat with a couple
of powerful strokes, pulled for the shore with
all their might.

Before long, I having “spelled”? Will for
a while, we all had to rest. We ventured to
eat a little of the beef, though it made us
dreadfully thirsty ; but we felt sure we should
find fresh water on shore. After this hasty
breakfast, we buckled to our work once more,
making the heavy ship’s boat fairly boil
through the water.

The sun came out, and did us good service
in drying our clothes; but oh, how hot it was!
However, the land kept climbing into the sky,
until we could distinguish the shapes of a
range of lofty mountains far inland, while the
shore appeared low and heavily wooded right
down to the water’s edge.

By noon we calculated that we were within



THE STRANGE LANDING. 55

two miles of land, which lay directly north of
us, judging from the sun’s position. This
puzzled us a little; but Will explained it by
the surmise that we were in some sort of large
bay on the east coast of Australia, shut in by
a long peninsula.

We stopped rowing, and ate a little more
beef; though we were by this time so parched
with thirst that we could scarcely swallow. It
was plain that we must obtain water soon or
perish.

Taking to the heavy oars again, we once
more moved forward, stopping every few min-
utes to scan the coast-line for any sign of
human life, savage or civilized. Not a curl of
smoke or glimpse of habitation of any sort
rewarded our search; and half relieved, half
apprehensive, at the solitary character of the
wilderness before us, we pushed in boldly
toward the shore, frantic with thirst as the
prospect of quenching it increased.

Thump! went the bows against the half-
submerged root of an enormous tree.



06 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“Well,” remarked Ted, looking around him,
“if I wasn’t jist crazed fer wather, sure I’d
go to say agin. It’s a haythin counthry we’ve
got to this toime!”

Ted wasn’t far out of the way, for a gloomier
bit of shore I never saw.

Directly in front of us, and both east and
west as far as the eye could reach, the sea
was bordered with a dense growth of huge
trees of some kind, the roots of which grew
half in the air. The trunks, big and black,
towered. crookedly upward till they were lost
in a mass of heavy foliage. Many of them
had fallen, and lay rotting in the mud; and
the odor of decaying vegetation was almost
everpowering.

“What kind of ornamental shrubbery is
this, Will?” I sang out, resolved to make the
best of things.

_ “They're mangroves,” said our naturalist-
geographer, surveying with interest the repul-
sive growth. “I’ve read lots about them.”

“Well, they may be all right on paper,”





TH STRANGE LANDING.

© Thump! went the bows against the half-submerged roots.”



THE STRANGE LANDING. 57

said Ted, clambering out over the boughs, and
stepping gingerly on one of the great slimy
roots; “but—owch/” and down he went into
the mud.

We had our laugh; but time was flying,
and we knew we must strike. inland if we
wanted to find higher ground and the pre-
cious liquid that meant life and strength to
us.

Making fast the painter to the trunk of the
nearest tree, we clambered out of the boat,
taking the gun, the bag, and our two boxes.
These last were sure to prove a dreadful bother,
especially the case of ammunition, which must
have weighed over twenty pounds; but fear
of natives forbade our leaving anything be-
hind. Will had spent some time that morn-
ing, while I had his oar, in drying and rubbing
up his shotgun; and before starting, he un-
screwed the lid of the box with his jackknife,
and took out a dozen cartridges, charged with
large shot and small. He was requested to
take the lead, carrying the gun and his bag.



58 THE GREAT ISLAND.

I came next with the provision box; and
Teddy brought up the rear, grumbling over
the weight of the ammunition.

We made slow enough progress, and after
a few minutes’ hard work we had to stop to
rest. All around us were the mangrove-trees,
over and among the slippery roots of which
we scrambled, slid, and tumbled. Once we
had heard a sudden “squattering” in the mud
just in front of us, and were startled by the
sight of a huge crocodile, just disappearing in
an oozy creek close by. The mud was every-
where black and soft, and at times we sank
into it up to our knees. There was not a
breath of air stirring. The heat was intense,
and the odors of all sorts of decaying sub-
stances simply indescribable. Although the
sun was still high in the heavens, we were
in the gloomiest of shadows, so that it seemed
like advancing through a nightmare forest as
we plunged on once more.

Overhead the boughs at times resounded
with a hideous, cackling cry.



THE STRANGE LANDING. 59

“What in the world is that?” I asked, as
these strange noises were redoubled.

“ “A near relation of the ‘laughing jackass’
you've read about.”

“Sure, he’s well named,” said Ted wrath-
fully, “if he lives in this baste of a wood.”

A moment later the boy gave a wild howl
of dismay. We turned back, and didn’t blame
him when we saw him staring at a huge
snake, coiled around a limb of a tree just
over his head. It was of a bluish lead-color
above, and lemon-yellow beneath.

“Tt’s only a python,” said Will. “He isn’t
poisonous, and won’t touch you if you don’t
meddle with him. Come on, Ted; and don’t
drop that box for your life!”

For two hours longer we struggled on,
noting with satisfaction that the soil was be-
coming firmer beneath our feet, and the for-
est a little more open.

_ “Hurrah, boys!” shouted Will, “I see the
sunshine ahead. We'll soon strike the hills,



60 THE GREAT ISLAND.

and there’s sure to be running water there
somewhere !”
Five minutes more brought us to a little
grassy glade, beyond which the land rose in
a steady slope. We pushed forward eagerly.
Mangroves had now given place to a tall,
straight kind of tree, which Will told us was
the famous eucalyptus. Tall grass waved in
the sunshine wherever there was an open
space; and ghoulish kingfishers, with their
horrid laughter, gave place to hundreds of coo-
ing pigeons. Will was some distance ahead
of us when he gave a shout of delight, and,
running off a little to the right, dropped on
his knees. When we reached his side we
found him drinking from a little stream which
rippled merrily downward toward the sea.
- We all threw ourselves down on the grass,
and drank till we could drink no more. Then
rolling over on our backs with long sighs of
relief, we lay there for a good half-hour, too
tired, and filled with too grateful a sense of
refreshment, to care to stir.



THE STRANGE LANDING. 61

Will was the first to raise himself on his
elbow and propose a move.

“There couldn’t be a better place to camp
in,” said he, “than right where we are.”

“Td rather spend the night here than lie
on the soft side of a board in that old boat,”
I agreed; “and to-morrow we can stock up
on provisions and water, and start down the
coast.”

“There’s one sure thing,’ exclaimed Will,
jumping smartly to his feet; “we must take a
look at the boat, and make sure that she’s se-
cure. We forgot something when we moored
her.”

“What's that?”

“The tide! It must rise and fall several
feet here; and the old craft might work loose,
sliding about on those mangrove roots. At
any rate, ’m going to have one more look at
her before the sun sets. You and Ted knock
up some kind of shelter, and gather firewood
for the night. Ill be back inside of two
hours at the utmost.”



62 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“Don’t you want the gun?”

“No; I’m going to travel light this time.
Good-by.” And he was gone.

I knew Will was a good woodsman, so I
didn’t worry about him, but set at work at
once preparing for the night.

With the small camp-hatchet that I had
fortunately buckled around my waist when I
left the ship, I soon cut down enough small
trees to make a rude shelter tent, the front
being framed by two crotched uprights and a
crosspiece.

Ted found a grove of young cocoa-palms
growing near the camp, and two or three arm-
fuls of these thatched the roof nicely. I should
have liked some good fir boughs, such as we
had in Alaska, for our bed; but of course this
was out of the question in the tropics.

By sunset Ted had gathered a big pile of
dry wood; and the camp was finished, with
a bright fire blazing cheerfully in front of it.
Five minutes later Will appeared, making his
way slowly up to us from the low ground.



THE STRANGE LANDING. 63

I saw from his face in a moment that some-
thing was wrong.

“ Will, old fellow, what’s the matter?” I
inquired anxiously.

“Matter enough,” said Will, throwing him-
self down wearily before the fire.

“You haven’t been bitten by a snake or
anything, have you?”

“T wish that were all!” said Will. “No,
there’s no danger of snakes at present; but
there may be worse enemies than that about
us.”

“Shall we take to the boat, then?”

“We can’t. The boat is gone!”



64 THE GREAT ISLAND.

CHAPTER VII.
A NOVEL BILL OF FARE.

E-gazed at Will blankly. No boat! Then
how were we ever to escape? Hun-
dreds of miles, through a country infested by
savages, and possibly by gangs of escaped con-
victs, — the dreaded “ bushrangers,’ — lay be-
tween us and the nearest civilized port. We
could not remain by the shore in that unclean
forest of mangroves, watching for rescuers ;
even I knew enough of the tropics to realize
that we were liable, one and all, to be taken
down with fever if we lingered near the swamps
with their deadly exhalations. Besides, it was
possible that other and more imminent dan-
gers were lurking about us. How were we
to account. for the disappearance of the boat ?
We questioned Will eagerly.



A NOVEL BILL OF FARE. 65

Will said that he could see no traces of
human agency in the matter. The tide, he
declared, had fallen two feet or more; and it
was possible that the painter had worked loose
with the natural movements of the boat, and
drifted out with the ebb. The wind still
blew, though mildly, and off shore.

Well, there was nothing for it but to eat our
supper, and spend the night where we were.

After the first yielding to discouragement
and fatigue, Will sprang up, and began look-
ing about carefully, as if for something he had
lost on the ground.

“This place looks to me,’ he mused aloud,
“like an old native plantation, neglected and
gone to waste. I shouldn’t wonder — ah,
there it is!” And dropping down, he began
to dig and pull at some broad-leaved plants
among the grass.

A moment later he held something aloft
with a shout of triumph. It was a cluster of
two or three big, ungainly roots, or rather
“tubers,” of a dirty yellow color.



66 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“What have you got there?” I called out,
hurrying up.

“Swate potatoes!” cried Ted in rapture.

“Not quite that, but something just as
good, or better.”

“What, then?”

“Yams!”

I looked curiously at the vegetable of
which I had so often heard and read. “How
do you cook them, Will? Can’t eat them
raw, I suppose!”

“Not much! Got a good fire there?”

“ Tip-top.”

; “Well, clear away the sticks where there’s

‘a good bed of ashes, and I'll have these fel-
lows ready for the oven in a twinkling.”

While Ted and I followed directions, Will
washed the big tubers in the brook, and
wrapped them carefully in two or three
layers of their own leaves. He then buried
them in the hot ashes, and raked the burn-
ing coals and brands over them once more.

“Now let’s keep a good fire going, and in



A NOVEL BILL OF FARE. 67

something over half an hour supper will be

>

ready,” announced the cook.

We gathered a lot more firewood, and
then sat down in front of our camp, which
appeared every moment more cosey and home-
like as the sunset light faded from the west-
ern sky and the shadows began to deepen.

With nightfall came thoughts of the dear
ones we had left at sea; and we spoke of
each one separately, and how they must be
worrying or mourning over us.

“I know your father will charter a vessel
and hunt for us,” remarked Will; “but what
good will that do? We can’t live on the
shore, keeping up signals; for a night or two
down there would be the death of us.”

“‘ Besides,” I added, “ how does he know
where we are? The wind may have baffled
round half a dozen times that first day, when
we had no sun to go by. He may spend
weeks or months searching the coast a thou-
sand miles from here.”

“JT wish we knew exactly where we are,”

e



68 THE GREAT ISLAND.

said Will. “Somehow I can’t get ‘the lay of
the land.” It has seemed all day as if the
sun rose in the north and set in the south,
instead of travelling from east to west in a
civilized fashion.”

“ Maybe that’s the way it goes, thin, in this
haythin country,’ growled Ted, throwing a
dry eucalyptus branch on the fire. “It’s me-
self that’s turned round intirely.”

“Well, we can make some definite plan by
and by, and to-morrow we'll take a fresh start
for somewhere,” said Will. “By that time
perhaps I can get my bearings. Pull out a
can of beef, will you, Nat?”

I did so, and at the same time made an
important discovery ; namely, a small tin box
of salt, which for some reason had been packed
with the beef. We could have dispensed with
such a luxury, of course ; but it proved a great
comfort, and rendered our meals palatable as
well as nutritious. We had evidence of this
when we came to eat our yams, which were
delicious. To be sure, they were not exactly



A NOVEL BILL OF FARE. 69

“done to a turn,’ being rather scorchy out-
side, and raw in the middle; but we were
hungry, and supper tasted good, washed down,
as Teddy gravely remarked “wid smoked
bafe.”

That night we took an inventory of our
possessions, the list being as follows :—

1 shotgun.
100 central-fire shells, buck-shot.
100 central-fire shells, duck-shot.
8 two-pound cans smoked beef.
1 half-pound can salt.
6 small bottles quinine pills.
20 boxes safety-matches.

Besides the above articles, we found in Will’s
bag, which he had filled during the voyage
with a variety of little things needed in camp-
life, a package of fishlines and hooks, needles
and thread, twine, buttons, pins, a small roll
of cotton cloth, and a number of other odds
and ends, which, trifling in themselves, bade
fair to prove of inestimable value in the long
- tramp which lay before us.



70 THE GREAT ISLAND.

We talked long and earnestly of our pros-
pects, but could arrive at no definite conclu-
sion beyond the necessity of immediate action
on the morrow; in other words, a start toward
the south, or in the nearest approach to that
direction which the singular and perplexing
configuration of the east-to-west coast would
allow. —

Not feeling safe from the incursions of un-
friendly natives, we divided the night into
three watches, of which the first was given
to Teddy, the second to Will (from midnight
to three), and the third to myself.

Leaving the Irish boy, therefore, to keep
the fire going and himself awake, Will and
I turned in, and were soon sound asleep.



A STARTLING DISCOVERY. 71

CHAPTER VIII.
A STARTLING DISCOVERY.

JILL called me promptly at three, accor-

ding to our agreement; and rubbing my

eyes open savagely, I crawled out to the fire,

which I could see had just been freshly built up.

The stars were shining; and the great cross,

so strange to northerners, gleamed brightly
in the southern sky.

There had been no disturbance of any kind,
so far as I knew, during the night; and for
this I was very thankful, feeling sure that if
natives were about us, they would have mani-
fested their presence in some way before now.

Soon the east began to pale, and then grow
rosy. As soon as it was fairly daylight, I
took up the gun, loaded it with the larger
shot, and started off to see if I could make

| BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION

416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.



72 THE GREAT ISLAND

an addition to our rather scanty .arder. The
forest was full of birds, — strange, lovely
creatures I had never before seen; some of
them with long, glossy tail-feathers trailing
after them as they flew from bough to bough,
some with breasts of iridescent green gleam-
ing in the morning sunlight. I knew they
must be birds-of-paradise, although I was ig-
norant of their names.

Before long I came upon a large track, sev-
eral inches long, having three front toes and
one in the rear, like the footprint of a huge
hen. No big game appeared in sight, how-
ever; and I crept cautiously on, glancing to
right and left.

I had not gone a hundred feet farther, when
I caught sight of a curious little animal,
about the size of a large cat, crouching on a
horizontal bough some ten or fifteen feet from
the ground. Its fur was a dingy white, spotted
with brown; and it had a long, yellowish tail,
the end of which was tightly curled around
a smaller branch, as if to steady its owner.



A STARTLING DISCOVERY. 73

T had never seen such a beast before; but
I took the chance of its being edible, and,
taking careful aim, fired.

Down came the clumsy creature; and run-
ning up, I found it quite dead. I knew the
fellows would be roused and startled by the
report of the gun near camp; so back I went,
dragging my odd game by the tail, which I
found to be unpleasantly bare, like a rat’s.

“Hello, Nat, what on earth — why!” —

A queer look came into Will’s face as he
hurried to meet me, and surveyed the odd
little animal I had shot.

“That's what I want you to tell me, Will,”
I laughed, throwing down my booty. “‘ What
on earth’ is it?”

Will stooped, and turned the animal over.

“Tt can’t be—yes, there’s the bare, pre-
hensile tail and the blotches of brown fur’? —

“Well?”

“Tf that’s the animal I think it is—and,
yes, it must be—there’s no mistake” — He
paused again.



74, THE GREAT ISLAND.

“Well,” I repeated, rather impatiently,
“what is the beast? and what does he in-
dicate? Don’t be mysterious, Will!”

“There’s no doubt that he’s a cuscus macu-

~ latus.”

Teddy, who had joined us, broke down in
the middle of a terrific yawn, and stared at
our young naturalist with eyes, like the dog
in the fairy, tale, “as big as saucers.”

“And his presence here,” continued Will,
unmoved; “proves, my hearers, that we have
made a little mistake. We are not in Aus-
tralia at all.”

“His being here proves that we are not
here! What are you talking about, Will?
Wake up, old fellow! You're half asleep yet.”

“T didn’t say we were not here,’ laughed
Will. “I merely remarked that we were not
in Australia. The spotted cuscus lives only in
the Spice Islands and New Guinea.t Now,
we can’t be in any of the Spice Islands, which

1 Nore. — Will was right in his conclusions, though not strictly
accurate in his premises. The cuscus maculatus is sometimes
found in Australia. —W. B. A.



A STARTLING DISCOVERY. 75

are hundreds of miles to the west of any pos-
sible course we may have been driven over, —
with lots of islands between.”

“Tt follows then that” —

“We are in New Guinea!”

This was, sure enough, an astounding, not.
to say an appalling, piece of news. The cus-
cus lay forgotten on the ground, and we looked
at one another with faces from ,which the
mirth died out rapidly as we recognized the
full significance of the information the ani-
mal had unwittingly given us.

New Guinea — Papua! I remembered it
vaguely as a big, oddly shaped island north
of Australia, peopled by little-known and sav-
age tribes, and possessing but few, if any, white
settlements.

Ted and I opened upon Will with broad-
sides of questions as soon as we could find
tongue to speak.

How large was the island upon which we
had ‘been so strangely cast? Where were the
settlements, if any? Were the savages dan-



76 THE GREAT ISLAND.

gerous? How about noxious beasts and rep-
tiles? These and many other questions Will
answered with a readiness that showed how
thoroughly he had studied this strange island,
as well as the adjacent continent.

He told us, in brief, that Papua was about
fourteen hundred miles long, and in its widest
spot perhaps half as many from north to south;
that there.were a few settlements only, scat-
tered along its inhospitable coast, especially
at the eastern and western extremities.

“What nation does Papua belong to?” we
interrupted at this point.

“Oh!” said Will, “various countries claim
portions of it. The Dutch have the best hold,
perhaps, along the coast; though the French
and Great Britain control portions toward the
west. Where we are at this present minute,
the land is populated —I can’t say ‘ governed’
— by natives alone.”

“And how about the interior?”

“Nobody knows.”

“What! this big island unexplored?”



A STARTLING DISCOVERY. 77

“A good deal of it, yes. An Italian named
D’Albertis spent some time a hundred miles
or so from where we probably are, and forced
his way up the Fly River. One or two others
have done as much in other parts of the
island, and that’s about all the exploration
on record.”

“Where do you make it out we are, then,
old fellow?”

“We must be somewheres near the head of
the Gulf of Papua,” answered Will. “TI see
now that the wind drove us right up through
the Coral Sea, in a westerly direction. Then
it veered to the south, and blew us in a
northerly direction, till we struck the main-
land. If we had gone west, young man, to
any great extent, we should have landed among
the islands in Torres Strait, a good deal
worse off than we are now, in my humble
opinion. We are in a country full of game,
with plenty of ammunition for the present,
and. health and strength enough to get to the
nearest settlements toward the east, say two



78 THE GREAT ISLAND.

or three hundred miles from here. There are
no big beasts to fear, and the only danger is
from the natives.”

“Flere goes, then,” I shouted; “come on,
you fellows! Every foot toward the east is
clear gain!” And off we went, Indian file,
toward the rising sun.

For two days we made our way steadily
eastward. Most of our walking was done in
the early forenoon ahd late afternoon; for it
was very hot in the middle of the day. We
no longer took the trouble to build a camp
at night, but lay down beside our fire in the
softest spot we could find. We did not mind
the heat; for so long as the sun shone we
could find our way without a compass. Our
one thought was eastward ho! to some port
where we could obtain conveyance to Australia,
and, by means of mail and telegraph, relieve
the terrible anxiety we knew must be felt by
our dear ones.

The third day was one to be remembered.
We had not been on our feet long before we



A STARTLING DISCOVERY. 79

found it was the hottest morning we had yet
experienced.

“Whew!” whistled Teddy at ten o'clock
or thereabouts. “It’s meself that’s meltin’
intirely. Can’t we shtop a while to cool
Ol

Will and I were only too willing to drop
our loads, and fling ourselves down in the
shade of a tree, which was one of the ad-
vance guard of a much heavier growth than
had yet been in our path. Will said whey
were mostly teak-wood.

We had some debate whether to try to
make a détour inland around this forest; but
as we could see no limits to it, north or
south, we concluded to make the best of it,
and push on, hoping to emerge on the other
side before nightfall.

At three o'clock we started ahead, and
plunged into the shadows of the wood.

Then it was that we found what travelling
in the unexplored tropics means. Hitherto
our course had led us across grassy uplands,



80 THE GREAT ISLAND.

cheered by the sunshine and the songs of birds,
and meeting with little difficulty in moving
ahead at a good pace. We must have cov-
ered nearly twenty miles each day.

But now we were enveloped in the half
twilight of the deep forest. Only occasional
glimpses of the sun enabled us to hold a
true course. Moreover, we were impeded at
every step by tough vegetable creepers which
lay in wait for our stumbling feet, so that
we went down again and again. .

Just after one of these falls poor Teddy
began to thrash the air wildly, and run,
shouting for help.

“What is it, Ted? What's the matter?”
we both cried at once.

“Ow! Ow!” howled Teddy. “The bees
are shtinging me to death. Murther! Take
"em off!’’ and he thrashed more wildly than
ever.

At first both Will and I went off into
peals of laughter; but, as our afflicted com-
rade drew near, our tone changed, and we too



A STARTLING DISCOVERY. 81

plunged ahead, screaming, through the under-
growth.

Fortunately we soon came to a muddy lit-
tle brook, where we got rid of the last of
the little winged pests whose nest Teddy had
unwittingly struck. They were wasps, and
the ugliest ones I ever saw. All of us
were smarting from their stings, and poor
Ted’s face was already swollen terribly.

We hardly felt like going farther, but picked
up our loads again, and were ready to start,
when Will sung out, —

“Hold on a minute! Which way are we
to go? Where’s the sun?”

Not a sign of it! One part of the sky was
like another, as we saw it through the tree-
tops. We now noticed how rapidly it had

grown dark while we were bathing our faces.
“Sure, it’s not sunset yet,” groaned poor
Ted, trying to cool his smarting face and
neck.

No, it was several hours before the time
for the sun’s legitimate disappearance. There



82 THE GREAT ISLAND.

was only one explanation for the suddenly
approaching darkness.

“There’s a storm coming, and a big one,”
said Will briefly. “Hurry and make ready
for it!”



TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS. 83

CHAPTER IX.
TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS.

HERE was not much that we could do in
the way of preparation, after all. Will

put his jacket over the ammunition-box, which
was placed, moreover, beneath all the other
baggage, with Teddy sitting on top of that.
It was of no use to go farther, so we waited.

It grew darker and darker.

“No use to light a fire,” said Will, “for the
rain will put it out. Here it comes now!”

A big drop, down through the trees — an-
other and another. Then a blinding flash of
lightning, without any thunder! There was
something awful about this solemn, silent ap-
proach of the storm; and I own I was more
scared than at any time since we were swept
away from the ship.



84 THE GREAT ISLAND.

We had not long to wait, however. A
weary, listless breeze swept through the tree-
tops. The rain began to fall faster. A rum-
ble of thunder followed another vivid flash.
Then we heard a dull roar, like the sea, in-
creasing every moment, until it struck the
forest. The trees all around us writhed and
groaned, and one not far away fell with a
crash. Down came the rain in sheets, while
the dazzling lightning and deafening thunder
glittered and roared almost incessantly. .

It was a wretched, wretched night. We
were absolutely unprotected from the storm,
and could simply crouch together, striving to
keep our possessions from being soaked, while
we ourselves were drenched with the driving
rain, which poured steadily even after, at
about midnight, the violence of the thunder
and lightning had passed.

Morning found us almost too stiff, cold,
and wet to move. The rain had ceased at
last, but a thick white mist rose from the
swampy ground all about us. The brook was



TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS. 85

a small river, and foamed over the spot where
we had first halted. The wasp-stings still
plagued us, and altogether we were an un-
happy crowd.

“Get a can of beef open,” said Will. “There
are two more left, and we can’t get a fire go-
ing, to cook anything. As soon as we have
eaten some breakfast we must start on, for
this place would mean death if we stayed. here
long.”

We managed to force down a few mouth-
fuls of smoked beef, — fortunately the brook-
water, though turbid, was still drinkable, — and
resumed our march. The sun was not out,
but lighted up the eastern sky sufficiently for
us to guess at our bearings. Anything was
better, as Will said, than staying where we
were.

We soon struck the worst piece of woods we
had yet found, —sago, Will said it was; and
I never want a plate of sago pudding again.
The thorns of last year’s growth lay on the
ground, and stabbed through our well-worn



86 THE GREAT ISLAND.

?

shoes, which were “squeechin’” wet, as Teddy
put it. Then, too, there was a kind of rattan
underbrush through which it was almost im-
possible to make any progress. The long, tough
stems tripped us up; we often went up to our
knees in black mud, and our hands and faces
were scratched and torn and bruised until we
agreed that we would rather tackle another
wasps nest in open growth than have an
additional half-day of such travelling.

After a while the sun came out, and the for-
est was filled with the cries of cockatoos, the
cooing of great pigeons, and the songs of birds-
of-paradise. We were cheered by the bright
rays; but the air remained very sultry, and
by three o’clock the clouds closed in again,
putting a stop to our march.

Then followed a repetition of our experiences
of the previous night. It rained heavily; and
though the storm was not as severe as the last,
it was quite as effective in wetting us through,
and rendering us thoroughly miserable. I got
asleep in my wet clothes toward morning, but



TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS. 87

had only troubled dreams, and woke with a
raging headache.

Will felt my pulse and looked serious. None
of us had ever seen jungle fever; but my
symptoms corresponded exactly with our gen-
eral idea of it, and the accounts we had read
in books, — Stanley’s and others. ,

“You'd better take a big dose of quinine,
and then do your best to keep on your feet,”
said Will with a world of anxiety in his tone.
“We surely shall reach open and higher ground
before night, and then we can build a decent
camp, and rest a day or two.”

It was hard work, but I managed to stumble
ahead five or six hours that day. The air
was cooler, we could catch glimpses of blue
sky through the tops of the palms; and this
gave me courage to push on, though | was
shivery and weak, and my head felt as though
it were burning up. To our great joy the
trees became more scattered in the afternoon;
and long before sunset we found ourselves in
the bright sunshine once more, on a slope that



88 THE GREAT ISLAND.

seemed to extend inland, mounting steadily
until the highest ground was lost in the dis-
tance.

I could go no farther; and we decided to
camp on a little knoll about fifty feet from
a clear stream that came leaping down from
the heights like our dear old New England
brooks, which I then feared I might never live
to see. Will and Teddy would not let me
do any real work; though I staggered about,
gathering a little firewood, and trying to be-
lieve I was helping.

Will took the gun, and in half an hour came
back with a real prize, a wild pig, which insured
us food for the morrow at least. As for me,
I cared little about the state of the larder, for
not a bit could I touch when the boys brought
me a nice bit of roast pig for my supper.
Teddy then boiled some of the meat, using
our old bailer, which we had thus far carried
throughout our weary march, and made me
some soup. I forced down a little, took some
more quinine, and turned in early.



TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS. 89

The next day I woke up feeling very weak,.
but better. It was useless to think of march-
ing, so we prepared for a day of rest. After
breakfast Will strolled off to find game; Teddy
undertook to enact the part of washerwoman
for the crowd; and I occupied my time in writ-
ing up these notes, using a pencil and a small
blank book which had formed a part of Will’s
camp outfit.

I had said but little heretofore about the
strange things we met with in our tramp. This
day gave me a chance to describe a little of
the animal and vegetable life in the midst of
which we had found ourselves since landing on
the great island. Will had kept us informed,
so far as he was able, as to the names and
habits of the fauna of New Guinea which we
had thus far run across.

In making up this narrative, I have recast
and rewritten most of the brief notes I made
on the spot; but perhaps it will give a clearer
idea of our surroundings if I copy the account



90 THE GREAT ISLAND.

of this special day directly from my diary,
_ merely filling out and completing abbreviated
words and sentences.

The account is long enough, I guess, to de-
serve a separate chapter.



IN CAMP AGAIN. 91

CHAPTER X.
IN CAMP AGAIN.

HIS morning we had yams, bananas, and
roast pig for breakfast. I ate a little of
the fruit; and Ted made me some pig-broth,
which tasted good. We have only two more
cans of beef left. The salt holds out well,
for we are very sparing in our use of it.
Asked Will how far he thought we were
from settlements, and he said he reckoned not
more than one hundred and fifty miles. This
is encouraging; though I can see he is mak-
ing our prospects as bright as possible, to
cheer me up. He has taken the gun, and
gone up the hill to take a look for game, but
will keep near the camp. We have seen no
sign of natives yet, beyond one or two ancient
plantations of yams, sago, and bananas, all



92 THE GREAT ISLAND.

overgrown and run out. Still, we feel that
we must keep on the watch.

As I sit in the door of our little camp,
which is thatched with the long, broad leaves
of the banana-trees, I hear the birds-of-para-
dise whistling in the woods near by. Teddy,
too, is whistling at his work, as he washes our
clothes in the brook. That boy is a treasure.
I have just heard the report of a gun.

Here comes Will with something dangling
from his right hand. The left, with the shot-
gun in it, he waves to us.

Will’s game turns out to be a huge pigeon,
the biggest I ever saw. It is called a “ goura,”
he says, and lives only in this island, Java,
and the Moluccas. This is the bird, it seems,
which we have heard several times on our
march. Its cry is something between a turkey’s
gobble and a low note on a trombone. It is
of a bluish, slaty color, with a patch of white
on each wing. The head is the queerest part,
being surmounted by a high crest of feathers.
The bird Will shot is as large as a fair-



IN CAMP AGAIN. 93

sized turkey, and promises us high living, for
the flesh is said to be delicious. Ted says
we'll have a regular Thanksgiving dinner. I
am afraid I sha’n’t do much justice to it;
though I don’t say much about my feelings,
for fear of discouraging the boys.

Eleven o'clock. — Teddy has hung out his
wash to dry, and is fishing in the stream, with
good luck I should judge from his frequent
erles of “Hurrah!” “Tve got ye then!”
“That's a good wan!” Yes, here he comes
with as fine a string of little fellows as if
he had been fishing in a New Hampshire
brook. I don’t in the least know what they
are, but no doubt they are good to eat. No
danger of starving here. Oh, my head!

Later. — Will has got back from another
tramp in the woods. He is a restless fellow,
and can’t remain quietly in camp. He says
he narrowly escaped a strange accident which
might have proved fatal; in which case a thou-
sand guesses from our friends at home would
hardly have hit on the cause of his death.



94 THE GREAT ISLAND.

He was making his way through a thick
piece of woods when he caught sight of a
big hornbill—a bird with a huge beak —in
the topmost boughs of a very high tree. He
could not resist the temptation of firing.
Down dropped the heavy bird, beak first.
Will saw him coming, and tried to get out of
the way, but tripped in a vine, and as he
went sprawling the tremendous beak whizzed
past, just grazing his arm, where he has a
pretty deep cut to show for his adventure.
If the bird had struck his head —!

Teddy managed to climb a palm-tree, after
his piscatory success, and dislodged a dozen
good-sized cocoanuts, which came bouncing
down on the ground like so many cannon-
balls. The milk is just beginning to harden;
and they are delicious, as we soon found, even
I relishing the sweet white paste. How little
we know about real cocoanuts at home! I
got Will to give me the names of some of
the trees hereabouts. They are Greek to me,
most of them; but I can look them up in the



IN CAMP AGAIN. 95

encyclopedia if we ever get home. Here they
are: Besides the nutmeg, sago, banana, palm,
and mangrove (all of which I now know well
enough by sight), we have in our immediate
neighborhood the eucalyptus, teak, myristica,
canarium, casuarina, and mango and nipa.
This last grows in wet places, along the banks
of streams; and the long leaves have bothered
us a good deal. I’m too tired and sick to
write any more of the hard names.

Later.—The afternoon has passed slowly.
I am not feeling so well. The fever seems to
be returning, my head “prickles” with heat,
and my limbs are much swollen —a new
symptom. I’m going to keep on writing as
long as I can, to take up my mind, if noth-
ing more.

Teddy got another snake-fright soon after
dinner. One of the enormous bluish-backed
fellows, a python, took it into his head to in-
vestigate our camp. The Irish boy was just
returning from the brook, when he caught
sight of the serpent slowly moving right



96 THE GREAT ISLAND.

across his path. I never heard such a yell,
even when Ted collided with the wasps’ nest
the other day. The snake made off in one
direction and he in another. I didn’t know
what was the matter till Ted came creeping
back on the other side of the camp. Truly,
this is not the pleasantest country for an
afternoon stroll!

Will reports some huge tracks in the mud,
not far up-stream. Either a giant cassowary
has been near us within twenty-four hours, or
some great creature unknown to naturalists.
Will says that such tracks have been seen
before in New Guinea; and some people think
there are a few animals or saurians still alive
in the unexplored interior of the island, though
generally believed extinct centuries ago. This
sounds like the talk about “mammoths” in
Alaska. I shall not soon forget my ride on
one! The fellow that illustrated that book of
our adventures hasn’t half done justice to the
big beast, as he appeared emerging from the
river.



IN CAMP AGAIN. 97

There are kangaroos near here, beyond a
doubt. Their tracks are thick, Will says, with-
in ten minutes’ walk of our camp. He wanted
to get a shot at one, but hasn’t succeeded yet.
Oh, dear! I don’t care what he shoots — if
only my head would stop aching! How I
wish Flossie was here; and mother! I can
just feel her hand on my hot forehead —

Well, I mustn't give up to it. What was
I writing about? Oh! kangaroos. Teddy
caught sight of one yesterday, and has been
giving an exhibition of how he jumped.

The sun is going down, and I must stop
writing. It seems as if my head would split.
The boys are getting ready for supper. Teddy
has built a fire, and is making some more
broth for me. Will says we can stay here
another day as well as not. I’m glad of that.
If I don’t get better to-morrow I don’t know —

(Nat's Journal breaks off here.)



98 THE GREAT ISLAND.

CHAPTER XI. .
UNINVITED GUESTS.

IVE minutes after poor Nat left off writing’

in his diary he was delirious. I picked

up the little book in which he had kept a
faithful record of our adventures, even through-
out the day when his fever was increasing and
he was suffering terribly, as we afterward
knew, until the pen dropped from his hands.

For several days that followed I kept the
“log” up, though I knew how much better

Nat would have done it.
Ted and I tried to make the poor fellow as
comfortable as possible; but he was out of

1 Notr.— The different handwriting in Nat’s diary, from
which this account is mainly compiled, shows where his com-
panion began to record the trying events which succeeded that
unhappy day. Will’s notes are harder to read, and require
much more “‘editing’’ than those of his predecessor, who wrote
in a neat, firm hand, and abbreviated but little. —W. B. A.

cae



Full Text

PRESENTED BY

. Mr. JAMES V. LOTT,



BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION
416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.

The Baldwin Library ||

University ||
RMB ike ||
Florida


Camp and Lramp Series.
By WILLIS BOYD ALLEN.

I. LOST ON UMBAGOG.

Il. THE MAMMOTH HUNTERS.
Ill. THE GREAT ISLAND.
IV. (im preparation.)

LOTHROP PUBLISHING GOMPANY, BOSTON.







Tre Lorry Prison.

“Tt was built twenty feet above the ground.”
(See Page 119.)
THE GREAT ISLAND

OR

CAST AWAY IN PAPUA

BY

WILLIS BOYD ALLEN

AUTHOR OF

“Lost oN UMBAGOG,” “THE MAMMOTH HUNTERS,” “ PINE CONE
STORIES,” ‘JOHN BROWNLOW’S FOLKS,” “ THE
LIon Ciry oF AFRICA,” ETc,

BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION
416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.

BOSTON
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY
1897
COPYRIGHT, 1897,
BY

LoTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY.

All rights reserved.

C. J. PeTErRs & Son, TYPOGRAPHERS.
Boston.
CHAPTER —

He

II.
III.
IV.
NE
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
XII.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.

XVII.

XVIII.

CONTENTS.

Tue Lonety Camp—Fire
PLANNING THE TRIP .
Across THE Paci¥FIc .
Lost oN THE OCEAN .
A Lone Nieut .

Tur StrRANGE LANDING.
A Nove. Britt or Fare
A Srartuine Discovery
Two WrercHep NieHts
In Camp AGAIN
UNINVITED GUESTS
CarptuRED By Hrap—Hunters
Looxine BACKWARD .
A Lorty Prison

Tue VALLEY oF GoLp
A Papuan WaAR-PARTY
DESERTED .

CONCLUSION .

PAGE

14
26
35
46
53
64
71
83
91
98

113

122

131

142

150

162

169
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Tue Lorry Prison .. . . . . . FRONTISPIECE.
“Tt was built twenty feet above the ground.”
PAGE
Tue Stranee Lanping . . . . . facing page 56
“Thump! went the bows against the half-submerged
roots.”
CapPTuRED BY Heap-Hunters. . . facing page 108
“A sharp whish came past my ear, and an arrow
quivered in the trunk of a tree.”
In THE VittAGE oF WoLv . . . . facing page 134
“Pigs were family pets, and swine were at a pre-
mium.”
In tHe~ VaLLEy or Gotp . . . . facing page 146
‘‘ We had discovered the well-kept secret of the wealth
of Wolu.” :
Native Parvans ... . . . . facing page 152

Scene in the vicinity of Port Moresby.

7
BEDFORD BRANCH,

YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION

416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.
THE GREAT ISLAND.

CHAPTER I.
THE LONELY CAMP—FIRE.

RE you willing to take a long tramp with
me this time, my boy reader? And to
camp no longer on wind-swept, frozen Um-
bagog or the dreary tundras of Alaska, but
in the Tropics, where our rest may be broken
by a hurricane, our skins punctured by the
stings of myriads of insects,— nay, worse
dangers threatened by poisonous serpents, by
huge crocodiles, and, worst of all, by a race of
natives who have never before seen a white
man, and whose delight is to kill and slay?
Yes, you say, you are quite ready for all
this — on paper, at any rate! Good! Come
9
10 THE GREAT ISLAND.

with me, then, to one of the Pacific islands,
five times as large as all the rest put to-
gether ; the largest island in the world, if we
promote Australia to the rank of a continent,
and leave Greenland’s coast-line to be settled
by Lieutenant Peary or some other intrepid
Arctic explorer.

Have you guessed the name of our island ?
It is practically unexplored to-day, save a nar-
row strip along some parts of its coast, and
the tracks of half a dozen travellers who
have pierced its mighty forests at as many
points. ‘Those same forests are partly known,
partly guessed, to be the home, not only of
the savages referred to above, but of some of
the loveliest of God’s creatures — so beautiful
in their glossy plumage, gleaming among the
dark foliage of palm and mangrove and teak,
that men long ago named them “birds of
Paradise.”

Now, have I given you a sufficient hint?
Right: it is the huge body of land washed
by the waves of the Pacific, and lying just
THE LONELY CAMP—FIRE. 11

north of Australia; it is none other than New
Guinea, or Paptia as the natives call it. We
shall learn more about it, I can promise you,
before we reach home again.

It was on a calm August evening not many
years ago that a little group of three persons
gathered about a camp-fire near the shore of
one of the loneliest portions of southern Papua.
They all were boys; and though they busied
themselves cheerfully about their encampment,
an onlooker must have seen that at least two
of the party were down-hearted. The third
had a good-natured, freckled face, a snub nose,
and a broad brogue which stamped him at once
a native of Ireland.

“What’ll I do now?” said he, addressing the
taller of the two youths, as he flung down an
armful of sticks near the fire. “Shure, it’s me-
self don’t know whether this haythin wood’ll
burn at all; but there’s enough of it, anyway.”

“That'll do for now, Teddy,” replied the boy
addressed. “Just open a can of beef, will
12 THE GREAT ISLAND.

you? What do you say, Nat, shall we have
supper ?”

“T suppose we may as well,’ said Nat dis-
consolately; “though I can’t say Pve much
appetite, Will. Do you think the yams are
done?” |

“Soon find out. Here, Ted, give us a stick.
Now, then” —and he scraped away a pile of
glowing ashes from a corner of the fire, disclos-
ing what looked like several scorched bunches
of leaves. “Look out! they’re hot as pepper!
Ah-b-h! how’s that, my boy!”

Will had poked out the wads of leaves, and
now extracted from their midst several long,
blackened vegetables not unlike sweet potatoes
in appearance.

Nat took one up, and scraping off the burned
portion with the blade of his jack-knife, tasted
the big tuber rather dubiously.

“Needs salt.”

The seasoning applied, all three castaways —
for such they seemed to be —ate their novel
supper with much apparent relish. Teddy,
. THE LONELY CAMP-—FIRE. 13

who appeared to be a sort of half servant, half
companion, to the others, received his share of
both yams and beef, and did full justice to
them.

That we may understand who the three boys
were, and how they came to be in camp in one
of the least-known portions of the habitable
globe, it will be best for me to yield the pen
to one who can tell you the story much more
accurately and vividly than I could; one who
had good reason to know all the details of the
trip, or expedition, or shipwreck, or whatever
it was, that was accountable for their presence
on this inhospitable shore; none other than one
of the boys themselves, Nat Dutton.
14 THE GREAT ISLAND.

CHAPTER II.
PLANNING THE TRIP.

TJNHE fellows have made up their minds that
J, Nathaniel P. Dutton, must write out the
story of our latest tramp, and our astonish-
ing adventures in a land which, but for our
expedition, would remain to-day practically un-
plored. I say “latest,” because some of us
have been together before, and we all belong
to a sort of society which we call the “ Camp
and Tramp Club.” It was organized about
two years ago by Rod Bigelow and three other
fellows, who spent a week or two in the Maine
woods in the winter time, near the Rangeley dis-
trict. Perhaps you have read Will Martin’s ac-
count of it? He called it “ Lost on Umbagog.”
Then Rodney got two chums of his, namely,
Malcolm MacDonald and myself, —being new
PLANNING THE TRIP. 15

members of the aforesaid club,—to join him
in a much longer and even more exciting trip
to Alaska, on what most people would call a
wild-goose chase. Mac was appointed historian,
and wrote up the affair in good style, naming
the book “The Mammoth Hunters.” I told
him people would think it was about hunters
of mammoth size; but he liked the title, and
said if a boy could not understand that he
meant we were hunting for mammoths (as
“Tion Hunters” meant hunting for lions), he
wouldn’t know enough to read a book any-
way. Rod, by the way, figured in that book
as “ Winter.” His whole name is Rodney Win-
ter Bigelow; so you can bear in mind, please,
that he is the same Rodney who was “lost on
Umbagog.” It was a notion of his to use

his middle name in Will’s Umbagog story.
Well, it takes me a long time to get started,
doesn’t it? You see, it’s my first attempt at
writing a book; and you must put up with
a good many shortcomings, if you are good-
natured enough to follow me through all these

BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION

#16420 GATES AVENUE,

BROOKLYN, N, Y,
16 THE GREAT ISLAND.

pages while I fight my battles over again. Ad-
ventures enough I can promise you, —some of
them funny, and some of them far too serious
for laughter. When I think of that terrible
night — but no, Pll not begin like that, right
in the middle of my story.

_The first time we ever thought of going
to Australia was a few weeks after our return
from Alaska. The club had met informally
at my house (we had moved to Boston, from
Sheldon, soon after the ‘Red Mountain” trip
which some of you have read about), and
were having a jolly evening of it. Mabel
Armstrong was with us, visiting my sister
Flossie. Even Rob and Hugh were on hand,
being at home for the Thanksgiving recess.
They are my brothers, you know; one was
then in the senior class at Harvard, and the
other was a sophomore. I hope to enter the
freshman class myself next fall.

Well, we were sitting around a blazing fire
in the sitting-room, laughing and talking, when
Mr. Bigelow was announced.
PLANNING THE TRIP. 17

“A regular camp-fire, isn’t it, Nat?” said
he, as he joined us. “What are you doing?
telling stories ?”

“Oh! talking over old times, sir” —

Here our guest broke in with another laugh.

{»

“Hear him!” said he to my father, who was
enjoying his after-dinner cigar in his easy-
chair. “What do they know about ‘old
times’ !”

“Now, Mr. Bigelow,” put in Floss, “you
mustn't think we are infants. Mabel and I
were both seventeen last month—”

“Sure, that’s eight-and-a-half apace,’ mur-
mured Teddy Ryan as he brought in an arm-
ful of wood; but nobody paid any attention
to him. We must break that boy of the
habit of interrupting. He’s more like one of
the family than a servant now.

“ And Rodney is almost nineteen!”

“Whew!” whistled Mr. Bigelow, — with a
very pleasant glance at the girls, but especi-
ally at Mabel, I thought, — “I really had for-

gotten your gray hairs, my dears. As for
18 THE GREAT ISLAND.

Rod, I wish—ah, there he is now!” and
our fellow “ Vagabond” came forward into
the firelight, and shook hands all round.
“Rod,” continued his father, “I haven’t
got to my errand yet, so you can explain it
yourself.”
“Why,” said Rodney, flinging himself down

on a big grizzly-bear rug in front of the fire,

“Tve been thinking of taking another little
strip ==

“ Not this winter!” exclaimed Mabel.

“Well, not before March or April, anyway.
I’m going to put in four or five months’ hard
study, and then, if father is willing, I want
to travel a little.”

Rodney looked over at us, and, I regret to
say, winked. It’s a bad habit he has.

I understood him in a twinkling. There
was another scheme on foot for the “Camp
and Tramp Club”!

I was on my feet in a moment; and so were
Will and Ned Martin, who were spending the
evening with us.
PLANNING THE TRIP. 19

“ Where?” we shouted in one breath.

“Oh! I don’t know,” said Rod carelessly;
“somewhere where it’s warm. I’ve got enough,
for one, of camping within the Arctic circle.”

“But we must have some useful object,”

put in Ned. “That's Rule III. of the club,
you know.”
' “J declare, it reminds me of getting up
tableaux or a fair,’ exclaimed Miss Flossie
indignantly. ‘Those crazy boys are wild to
sail off on some expedition or other, and the
only trouble is to— to” —

“Ballast it?” suggested Rodney calmly.

“Yes, with a Useful Object,” concluded my
sister. “As if they couldn’t find useful objects
enough in Boston!”

“Oh! Boston’s all right,’ sang out Will.
“She doesn’t need anything.”

“Perhaps you think the club conferred a
lasting benefit on Alaska last summer!” re-
torted Floss..

“Well, we relieved the natives of that old
scarecrow of a mammoth, anyway,” chuckled
20 THE GREAT ISLAND.

Malcolm, the sixth member of our club pres-
ent.

“Tf the boys work hard this winter,” re-
marked father soberly, “I don’t know that I
should object to their spending their summer
in camp. It’s wholesome amusement for the
lads; and we can afford it, eh, Bigelow?”

The other gentleman smiled and nodded, and
we fellows wisely let the conversation drift into
other channels.

A week later we met in Rod’s cosey room,
and discussed the details of the new expedition.
It was Rodney himself who made the sugges-
tion which was to mould our plans for the
coming trip.

“You will remember, fellows,” he said, “that
last winter we looked up all the. large un-
explored tracts of the earth. Among others,
Australia was mentioned.”

“You let that go without a word,” I inter-
rupted, “because you knew the doctors had
ordered me north. It was too bad to have the
plans of the whole club broken up by the poor
PLANNING THE TRIP. 21

health of one member. Australia’s an awfully
interesting country.”

“You're all right now, aren’t you, Nat?”
queried Rod.

“Indeed I am, and ready to go anywhere
between the Poles.”

“Very well. What I propose is, that we
make for Australia!”

For a moment we all sat silent at the mag-
nitude of the conception. Then came a volley
of eager questions.

“How do we get there?”

“Ts there any big game?”

“ What’s the ‘useful object’ ?”

Our leader answered the last question first.

“The useful objects of the Australian expe-
dition —if we take it—are two. First, to
carry a new line of exploration across a coun-
try which, while it is highly civilized in por-
tions, is in others one of the least-known
portions of the earth’s surface. Second —
gold!”

“Gold! Why, what’s the use” —
BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION

416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.
22 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“T know others have been before us,” said
Rodney calmly, answering the objection before
it was fairly made. “Gold has been washed
—or ‘hydraulicked,’ as the practical miners
call it nowadays—for years, perhaps centu-
ries, in Australia. I see no reason, however,
why we should not find new deposits in the
interior ; why, indeed, we might not be the
discoverers of the headquarters, the treasury,
from which these gold-bearing streams flow.
Who knows that we shall not discover a hith-
erto unknown range of mountains, another
‘Cloud King,’ as Stanley called Ruwenzori,
the big African peak.”

His enthusiasm was contagious.

“ Hurrah for the Cloud King!” we shouted.
“ Australia forever!”

Plans were now eagerly discussed, and the
wildest possibilities mentioned. I do not think
any of us who, as it turned out, actually par-
ticipated in the expedition, thought much about
the wealth we might amass. It was the spirit
of adventure and discovery that moved us, as
PLANNING THE TRIP. 23

it stirs the hearts of older men to pierce the
secrets of the lonely Arctic wastes year after
year. People say they are heroes, sacrificing
themselves for the good of humankind. But
it’s pretty hard, I notice, to point out any great
benefit which has arisen, or which seems likely
to arise, from Arctic exploration. The real
incitement, I believe, is the boyish love of
adventure and peril which must lie in the
hearts of such men as Greely and Peary and
Nansen, just as it does in ours.

At any rate, there was not a doubt as to
the state of our feelings. We were wild to
start; and meeting after meeting of the club
was held, to arrange details, and talk of our
coming voyage.

As our fathers made the trip conditional
on our studiousness during the winter, we
worked over our books as never before; not
omitting, you may be sure, an exhaustive pe-
rusal of every authority we could find on
Australia, —its fauna, flora, geography, topog-
raphy, and history.
24. THE GREAT ISLAND.

I well remember how sheepishly Will Mar-
tin, having been deputed to study up the
river-systems of Australia and report on them
(that was our regular method), confessed that
he had taken home the N volume of the En-
cyclopedia by mistake, instead of the A, and
having become interested in the island of
New Guinea, had sat up reading till after
eleven o'clock. Lucky for us it was,—vno, I
will not say “lucky,’ —it was a kind and
overruling Providence that directed our com-
rade’s hand to the wrong volume that day,
and stored in his memory a host of facts
about the strange land that so nearly joins
the great Australian continent on the north!

Will was the botanist of all our expedi-
tions; and it was the account of the flora of
Papua that had particularly interested him, he
said. He would have given us a lecture then
and there; but we suppressed him, after the
custom of the club whenever irrelevant matter
was introduced by a member, and clamored for
more Australia.
PLANNING THE TRIP. 25

So the days flew by; wintry storms came
and went; snow-drifts lay deep on the streets,
and slowly melted before the gathering strength
of the sun as he climbed northward. At
length the day set for our departure was at
hand.
26 THE GREAT ISLAND.

CHAPTER III.
ACROSS THE PACIFIC.

T was a lovely day in April when we
started from New York for San Fran-
cisco. The party consisted of Will Martin,
Rod Bigelow, and myself, as well as my
father and mother, who, together with Flossie,
and by special invitation Mabel Armstrong,
had decided to accompany us as far as Syd-
ney, and then keep on, through India and the
Suez Canal, around the world. Teddy, too,
was taken along as “ man-of-all-work.’ We
all expected to meet at home some time in
November. Quite a long stay was to be
made at Hawaii on the way out; so that,
taking into account also a necessary delay in
San Francisco, we did not expect to reach
Australia much before July.
ACROSS THE PACIFIC. 27

You can guess that we had a jolly time
crossing our own continent. At first we didn’t
much like the idea of the girls going along,
but before we reached the prairies we were
glad enough that they had come. Why, they
were just the life of the crowd, I can tell you.
Floss has a fine voice; and with Mabel’s alto,
and the rest of us coming in pretty much
anywhere on the chorus, we made the old
“ Pennsylvania” (that was the name of our
car) ring with our college songs. Sunday
evening we had hymns, and a lot of folks
came from the other cars to listen and join
in. Mother said it was like a good old Shel-
don prayer-meeting; and all the while we
were thundering along, over desolate tracts
of sage-brush, among prairie-dog settlements,
and past Indian encampments, at the rate of
thirty odd miles an hour!

We reached San Francisco on time, and
sailed in the Empire of Japan a few days
later. I won’t linger over the voyage, though
I might fill a good many pages with descrip-
28 THE GREAT ISLAND.

tions of the Pacific, and the steamer life, the
fun we had on deck, and the stories that
were told every night, when we all gathered
in some sheltered corner, and father was ap-
pointed chief story-teller.

We had a smooth passage to Honolulu; and,
right there, a change was made in our plans
which threatened to spoil the whole expedi-
tion. Father found that the life at sea, the
salt breezes and the perfect rest, agreed so well
with both him and mother, that he decided to
let the steamer go on without us, and take
passage in a sailing-vessel, the Southern Cross,
that was billed to start for Sydney a few days
later. I have already said that we meant to
stop a week or two at Honolulu; but this new
plan would bring us to Australia too late for
any extended trip inland. Of course we felt
badly, and father offered to let Rod and me go
on without the others, by steam; but we felt
that this would be deserting the party, and de-
cided to wait and go with the rest. We agreed
to give up the idea we had at the outset of
ACROSS THE PACIFIC. 29

exploring an unknown country, and content
ourselves with one or two excursions inland,
just to see how it looked, and hunt a little.
We had rifles, shotguns, plenty of ammunition,
and a regular camp outfit with us, all of which
could be used in the shorter trips, just as well
as in the more ambitious journey we had first
planned.

It was about the middle of May when we
went on board the bark Southern Cross, and
set sail for Sydney, a little over five thousand
miles distant. I don’t know much about ships,
so I can’t give you the regular nautical terms
for the rigging of the Southern Cross, the va-
rious evolutions of the sailors, or the details
of the voyage. You must go to Clark Russell
for that, you know.

We laid our course a little west of south,
and for several days hummed along merrily
enough, right before the “north-east trades.”
Then the wind died away, or only came in
little puffs, as we neared the equator, until
we woke one morning to find the bark per-
30 THE GREAT ISLAND.

fectly motionless, except for the long, lazy
swing of the everlasting Pacific swell. It was
a dead calm, sure enough. I dropped a lead
pencil overboard in the forenoon, and at sun-
set I happened to look over the side, and
there it was, not having moved an inch.

Oh, how hot it was! Awnings were rigged
on the quarter-deck for us passengers; and we
lay there gasping, in our thinnest clothes, long-
ing for a breath of wind. I saw a black
thing sticking up out of the water near the
ship; and the boatswain, a fine old fellow
named Snaggs, told me it was the back fin of
a shark. There was some talk of getting out
a hook and trying to catch him; but either
we were too lazy to take the trouble, or the
captain disliked to have his nice white decks
mussed,up; at any rate, the scheme fell through,
and “John Sharkee,” as the sailors called him,
was left alone.

Slowly but surely we crept southward, tak-
ing advantage of every ripple on the water
to gain a few miles, until we had crossed the
ACROSS THE PACIFIC. 31

equator, and were fairly in Southern latitudes.
I expected to see a great jollification when we
“crossed the line ;” but the old customs have
died out, and there was no visit of Neptune
or other celebration of the day.

We passed just west of the Phoenix islands;
and as we left the latitudes of the Feejees about
fifty miles away, the weather grew worse.
Will, who had read up the whole business,
told us that we were now in the range of the
south-east trade-winds, but that the thing to
be feared was a real, first-class monsoon.

“Shure, pwhat’s a monsoon, thin?” asked
Ted, with open mouth and eyes.

“Oh! it’s a special kind of wind they cul-
tivate in these regions, my boy,” explained
Will. “The great trouble with them is, you
never know just which way they're coming.
At this season of the year we’d be more apt
to get them from the east, I guess.”

Teddy, who seemed to have fancied the un-
known enemy to be a sort of sea-monster,
went away only half satisfied with the expla-
32 THE GREAT ISLAND.

nation. As for the rest of us, we were too
eager in discussing our plans to dwell on the
possible dangers of contrary winds. Within
twenty-four hours everybody on board knew
pretty well what a monsoon was, though. It
struck us that very night.

We were wakened a little after midnight
by the sound of creaking timbers, of waves
thundering against the sides of the ship, of
crockery smashing about in the pantry, of
coils of rope flung down on the deck over
our heads, of hoarse voices shouting orders,
of women screaming with fright. I jumped
into my clothes, and rushed for the deck. It
was pitch dark as I made my way up the
companion stairs, clinging to the hand-rail,
toward the wild commotion above; but before
I could reach the deck I was met by a deluge
of water, which poured down into the cabin,
and flooded the staterooms three inches deep.

That was enough for me, and I turned
back to the small saloon where we usually
took our meals. Some one had lighted one
9

ACROSS THE PACIFIC. 33

of the lamps, which swung fearfully, ligating
up the pale faces of the men and women
who were gathering there, half-dressed, and
wholly out of their wits.

By the time I reached the foot of the
stairs I heard the door above come to with
a bang, so we were relieved from the fear of
another flood. But what a night it was!
Nobody dared to go to bed again. We all
sat there in the dimly lighted saloon, our si-
lence only broken by an occasional scream
from some woman or girl as a big wave
would crash against the side of the ship,
which would tip over until it seemed as if
it could never come up straight again. Poor
mother was white as a sheet, but was plucky
too, and never said a word, except to encour-
age Floss and Mabel, who clung to her, too
frightened even to scream. Will Martin did
us all good; for he managed to find a man
who had been on deck and seen the captain.
There was no danger, he said. There was
a stiff gale blowing from the east; but the
34 THE GREAT ISLAND.

ship was running before it, and behaving well.
If the wind kept on from the same quarter,
and the sea got up, we should heave to in
the morning; for the present he had plenty
of sea-room, and should let her drive.

All this Will reported. in a cheerful sort of
a way that heartened us up. Some one
found a steward who managed to pass round
refreshments, including hot tea for all of us.
I shall never forget how good that tea
tasted !

Toward morning word came that the wind
was letting up a little, and we could feel
that the motion of the vessel was less. Most
of us took courage to go to bed, though we
were tossed about so that we didn’t get much
sleep.
LOST ON THE OCEAN. 35

CHAPTER IV.
LOST ON THE OCEAN.

E thought the storm was over, but we
didn’t know a monsoon then as well
as we do now. All that day the sky was
gray, and the wind blew steadily, though not
fiercely, from the south-east. The ship had
been brought to her course again, and with
about a third of her sails set, staggered ahead
toward Australia. One sail, we found, had
been blown away by the first violence of the
gale. The men were sent aloft to rig a new
one in its place, and we crushed along on our
voyage at a terrific pace.
I managed to get a word with old Snaggs,
and asked him what he thought of the weather.
The boatswain shook his head, and cocked
his bleary old eyes up toward the eastern sky.

ra
86 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“'Thar’s goin’ to be more afore thar’s less,”
said he at length; and without another word,
having finished the job on which he had come
aft, he lurched away forward.

This was not cheering, but it was a true
prophecy; for before supper-time the gale in-
creased in force, and we were nearly as badly
off as on the preceding night. The ship was
hove-to just before dark; and there we lay
all night, our bows meeting the huge waves,
which beat like pile-drivers on the deck, our
saloon lamp swinging wildly, and everything
in an uproar. Of course we understood that
although we were no longer being swept from
our course as we had been when the ship was
before the wind, still we must be drifting
rapidly in a north-westerly direction, and far
away from the port for which we were aim-
ing.

The storm imcreased as the night wore on,
and again most of us were too frightened to
sleep. It was, I guess, about four o’clock in
the morning, when a wave, bigger than any
LOST ON THE OCEAN. 37

that had come before, caught the ship and
threw her swiftly up. We held our breath
as she settled over slantwise into the trough.
It was fearful! It seemed impossible that she
could right herself again. ‘Two or three of
the passengers on the upper side of the sa-
loon, who were drowsy from sheer exhaustion,
lost their hold on the settees, and came rolling
down upon us, shouting wildly that we were
going to the bottom. This set all the women
screaming, when, in the midst of the cries and
confusion, there came an awful crash, and the
ship slowly recovered herself.

“A mast has gone!” cried some one; and
then, “There goes another!” and “Hark!
they’re at the pumps!”

Well, I won’t stop any longer to describe
that terrible night. None of us expected to
see morning, but the gray light did come
creeping in at last. The vessel rolled much
‘less violently, and we were cheering one an-
other up with hopes of a speedy and happy
conclusion of our voyage, even in a ship so
38 THE GREAT ISLAND.

crippled, when the door of the saloon was
flung open, and the captain entered. His face
was white as a sheet, and he was dripping
from head to foot.

I shall never forget the speech he made.
It was short and to the point.

“Ladies and gentlemen,” he said, “the bark
has sprung a leak, and is taking in water fast.
God knows how long we can keep her afloat,
but there’s time for ye all to get some break-
fast.”

A dozen voices, shrill and eager, rose at
once.

“What then, Captain? What then?”

“Then, passengers all, we must take to the
boats,” replied the captain grimly. “ Steward,
set the table, and look sharp!”

Before any more questions could be asked,
he had left the cabin.

We had hardly looked one another in the
face, when a cry arose on deck. It seemed to
have a new tone,—an accent of hope and
cheer. I rushed up the steps, and gaining the
LOST ON THE OCEAN. 39

deck, saw a clump of sailors gathered at the
rail, pointing and gesticulating.

“What is it?” I asked the man at the
wheel; for the fog and drizzling rain were
so thick that I could see nothing.

“Steamer alongside,” said the sailor tersely,
nodding in the direction indicated by the ges-
tures of the men.

T listened a moment until I heard the hoarse
escape of steam from her pipes, and then ran
below to tell the good news. Everybody was
heartened by it. Some difference between set-
ting off in an open boat on that gray waste
of waters, and being placed on board a stout
vessel, no matter where she was bound !

To make a long story short, we all gathered
on deck as soon as we had eaten a bit of
breakfast; and you may believe everybody
was eager to leave. Our own ship was a dis-
mal sight. Two out of the three masts were
gone, leaving the splintered ends sticking up,
one at about the height of a man’s head from
the deck, the other a little higher. The deck
40 THE GREAT ISLAND.

was littered with coils of rope, broken pieces
of spars, and loose casks. Worst of all, the
water outside looked dreadfully near; for we
had settled down two or three feet already.
The pumps were going all the time, clang-
clang.

The first officer of the strange vessel had
come on board from the Petrel, for that was
- her name. She was a small steamer, brig-
rigged, bound round the Horn to Montevideo ;
but there was no help for it. Our own ship
seemed to be sinking fast, and “any port in
a storm” was the word now.

After a consultation, however, between our
captain and the mate of the Petrel, and a
careful examination of the depth of water in
the hold of the Southern Cross, it was agreed
that the Petre’ should lend us four men, whom
they could well spare, and whom we needed
badly, our sailors being almost exhausted, and
two hands having been lost overboard (that
was the first we heard of it) during the night.
Our captain believed that he could then work
LOST ON THE OCEAN. Al

_ the Southern Cross to the nearest port; the
~* weather giving good promise, and the leakage
not so fast but that it could be kept under
by relief gangs of men at the pumps. The
passenge’s were all to be transshipped at once,
as they would not risk their lives on his dis-
abled ship, and they would only be in the
way, and require attention which could not be
given. If he succeeded in navigating the
Southern Cross safely to port, he said he would
store our goods, and communicate with us at
once at Montevideo.

There was of course a great deal of confu-
sion in the cabin, and rummaging for valuables.
We were allowed to take small hand-bags and
boxes, but no large baggage. The weather
began to look uncertain again, and the offi-
cers hurried us up on deck and into the boats.
There were only fifteen passengers in all; and
two trips had been taken, the women going
first. Each boat carried six; and it happened
that Will, Teddy, and I, being strong young
fellows, were left to the last. Yes, I suppose
42 THE GREAT ISLAND.

we did hang back a little to let the others go
first; why shouldn’t we?

There were only two sailors in the boat
when she came back for her last trip, to take
us three boys, and a few odds and ends that
the other passengers had forgotten.

I staggered up the staircase with a heavy
box, which, with one that Will carried, had
been stowed in our cabins, having been taken
on board at Honolulu after the trunks had
gone into the hold. Teddy had Will’s shot-
gun and bag, and we tumbled down into the
boat, which was rising and falling by the ship’s
side at a rate to make a landsman’s hair stand
onend. One of the sailors had gone on board
for a minute—to get some tobacco of one of
our foremast hands, I suspect.

“Now, I've got to go back for my bag and
Ted’s,” said I, looking dubiously at the roll-
ing ship and the swaying ladder over the side.

“Whar is it? Tl get it,’ said the good-
natured sailor who remained in the boat.

I told him, and put a shilling in his hand,
LOST ON THE OCEAN. 43

which increased his good-humored smile to a
broad grin, as he sprang nimbly up the lad-
der, and disappeared over the bulwarks.

How it happened I never can tell, but with-
in half a minute after the sailor left us we
were adrift.

Teddy saw it first, and fairly shrieked,
“Look, look! Sure, the ship’s sailin’ away
from us!”

“Help, help!” we shouted, springing to our
feet, and waving our hats frantically. No one
saw or heard us. When a man’s head finally
appeared at the head of the ladder we were
a hundred feet away, driven by a furious
squall, which came down upon us without
warning, and whitened the water all about.

We seized the heavy oars, and threw them
over the gunwales, but we might as well have
tried to fly as make headway against the
wind. In less time than it has taken to tell
it both ship and brig were lost to sight in
the driving rain.

And now a new peril beset us. We wene
44 THE GREAT ISLAND.

not only adrift, and every moment hurrying
away from our friends, but the boat got in
the trough of the sea, and we began to roll
terribly, the water coming in at every dip.

Who will say that light reading isn’t use-
ful? I remembered, all of a sudden, reading
in one of Clark Russell’s sea-stories that a party
adrift in an open boat kept themselves from
capsizing by throwing out the oars, tied to-
gether as a drag, and thus keeping the boat’s
head to the waves.

I shouted my idea to Will; and we pulled
in the painter, which was trailing from the
bows, and managed to lash the oars together
in a bungling fashion, and get them overboard.
The advantage of this move was seen in a
minute, and I have no doubt it saved our
lives. Held back by the heavy drag, our bows
came up into the wind, and we were no longer
in danger of capsizing. The water, however,
continued to break into the boat, though in
quantities that we could easily manage, if we
could only throw out the six or seven inches of
LOST ON THE OCEAN. 45

it that already threatened our safety. Luck-
ily the Petrel’s men had taken a large tin
can with them when they crossed in the rough
sea; and Will now went to work manfully
with this, while Teddy and I helped with our
caps.

“ Kvery — capful — counts!” panted Will,
as he saw us ladling out the water. “Don’t
‘— fall overboard — you fellows! This ship
can’t — spare —a man!”

We all three worked with such a good will
that we soon cleared the boat of most of the
water that had come in; and then we faced
the situation.

Where were we? What was to be done?
What were our chances of life?
46 THE GREAT ISLAND

CHAPTER V.
A LONG NIGHT.

ILL Martin was the only one of us
three whose opinion as to our where-
abouts was worth having. He had made a
special study in advance of our trip, and
could at least give a reasonable guess in the
" premises.

“As nearly as I can recollect,” said Will
slowly, “we were in the vicinity of the New
Hebrides when the hurricane struck us. Of
course I don’t know how much to allow for
our drift, nor for the currents in this part of
the ocean; but I don’t believe we can be far
from the coast of Queensland, somewhere be-
tween Brisbane and Cape Melville.”

“How much range does that give us be-
tween your two limits?” I asked.
A LONG NIGHT. 47

“Something over a thousand miles,” re-
plied Will calmly.

“And how near is the most favorable of
the two to Sydney?”

“ Brisbane? Not far from half that dis-
tance.”

“Whew!” I whistled. “A pretty poor
out-look for reaching port!”

“Tndade, we'd better have stayed on the
ould ship,” groaned Ted. “ How do you think
we're goin’ to walk all those miles at all?”

“Tt can’t be done,’ said Will. “We must
first think of getting ashore. Then take ad-
vantage of every good spell of weather to
row southward along the coast, till we strike
a settlement.”

“ An’ what'll we be afther atin’ ?” inquired
poor Ted, who was sitting in a pool of sea-
water in the bottom of the pitching boat,
and whose spirits were at the lowest ebb.

“Well, we’ve one good shotgun, and that
farther box has ammunition in it, judging
from the weight.”
48 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“That’s so!’’ I cried, with new courage.
“T just grabbed what came to hand first ;
but I remember now that it was awful heavy,
and it must be those shells loaded with buck-
shot and duck that we bought in Honolulu
just before sailing. There are two hundred
of them.”

“ Hurrah!’ shouted Will, waving his wet
cap. “Once let us get ashore in Australia,
and well give you all you want to eat,
Teddy, I can promise you. What’s in that
other box, Nat?”

“ Smoked beef in cans, and a few other small
things we stuffed in at the last minute.”

“Let's have some now!” said Ted, look-
ing interested.

“Wait,” said Will soberly. “ What shall
we have to drink with it?”

Our faces fell. In a twinkling we were all
dreadfully thirsty, at the very thought of be-
ing deprived of water.

“Spread your handkerchiefs, and wring them
when they've got wet,” suggested Will.
A LONG NIGHT. 49

It was raining, a fine, steady drizzle, for
which we could not be too thankful, though a
moment before we had been grumbling at the
discomfort of sitting in wet clothes.

Following Will’s plan, we soon assuaged the
first pangs of thirst; and then all of us wrung
out our handkerchiefs, over and over again,
into the bailer, until it was nearly full.

“ Be careful not to tip that over,” cautioned
Will, placing the precious can under a thwart
where the spray could not dash into it. “Our
lives may depend upon those two or three
quarts of fresh water to-morrow, if the weather
clears.”

We drifted slowly for hours, when the sea
fell so perceptibly that we pulled in our drag,
and having pried open our box enough to ex-
tract a small can of beef, made a hearty meal,
refreshing ourselves from our improvised rain-
collectors without disturbing our reserve supply
in the can.

Will and Ted, who were the strongest, now
shipped the oars, and pulled away steadily be-
50 THE GREAT ISLAND.

fore the wind, as we judged that course would
take us directly toward the land we longed so
to see. The fog and rain were still so thick
that we could make out nothing beyond two
or three hundred feet from the boat. I forgot
to say that from the time of our loss of the
ship we had at intervals shouted all together
and with all our might, in the vain hope that
one of the two vessels might be cruising about
for us and hear our cries.

Night came on at last, and a long and dreary
night it was too. We threw out the drag
again, and curling up in the bottom of the
boat, tried to rest. We all got some sleep, I
suppose ; but for my part I was so cold and
wet and hungry, and worried over our future,
that it seemed as if I hardly closed my eyes
throughout those dreary, dreary hours of dark-
ness. I was afraid, too, of our being run down
by the steamer, which I was sure was looking
for us; or, worse still, of her passing us within
hail and unseen. Every time a wave broke
near us or ran with a rush and roar along
A LONG NIGHT. _ ob

our sides, I started up, with eyes strained to
see a glimmer of light through the blackness
that fairly made them ache.

Morning came at last, and a sorry trio it
disclosed. I was awake first (granting that I
had been asleep), and saw Will begin to stir
uneasily, and at last open his eyes with a be-
wildered look about him. I shall never for-
get his face when he realized where we were,
and how little real hope there was of our ever
reaching home again.

Then Ted, with a sort of groan, started
wide awake all at once, as if from a bad dream.
Before I could stop him he threw out legs and
arms widely, stretching himself and yawning.
His right foot just reached the bailing-can, and
in a second the precious contents were a part
of the salt bilge-water slopping about in the
bottom of the boat.

At the same instant a pink flush appeared
in the eastern sky. Will pointed to it. ‘The
weather has cleared,’ he said simply. “In
these latitudes there are only short storms at
Sees THE GREAT ISLAND.

this time of the year. There will be no more
rain for days, perhaps weeks.”

“Then unless” —I managed to stammer ;
I could get no farther.. My tongue seemed
already glued to the roof of my mouth with
thirst.

“ Unless,” said Will, concluding my sentence
for me, “we reach land or are picked up to-
day, we are lost.”
THE STRANGE LANDING. 53

CHAPTER VI.
THE STRANGE LANDING.

ILL had hardly ceased speaking when
Teddy, who had been aghast at the
mischief he had done, jumped on a thwart
with a wild cry, pointing directly over the
stern of the boat in the direction in which
we were drifting, our bows being still held
up to the light wind by the drag.
“ Look at that!” shrieked the young Irish-
man. “Land! Land! Hooray fer Australy!”
We had thought ourselves a moment before
too stiff and cramped to move; but we forgot
all our pains and aches, and even our empty
stomachs and the overturned cistern, in our
excitement, as we, too, sprang up, and gazed
in the direction indicated. '
Sure enough, that long, cloudy line could be
54 THE GREAT ISLAND.

nothing but land. In came the oars, not
wearily and slowly this time, but hand over
fist. They rattled down between the thole-
pins on the gunwales in quick time; and the
two rowers, turning the boat with a couple
of powerful strokes, pulled for the shore with
all their might.

Before long, I having “spelled”? Will for
a while, we all had to rest. We ventured to
eat a little of the beef, though it made us
dreadfully thirsty ; but we felt sure we should
find fresh water on shore. After this hasty
breakfast, we buckled to our work once more,
making the heavy ship’s boat fairly boil
through the water.

The sun came out, and did us good service
in drying our clothes; but oh, how hot it was!
However, the land kept climbing into the sky,
until we could distinguish the shapes of a
range of lofty mountains far inland, while the
shore appeared low and heavily wooded right
down to the water’s edge.

By noon we calculated that we were within
THE STRANGE LANDING. 55

two miles of land, which lay directly north of
us, judging from the sun’s position. This
puzzled us a little; but Will explained it by
the surmise that we were in some sort of large
bay on the east coast of Australia, shut in by
a long peninsula.

We stopped rowing, and ate a little more
beef; though we were by this time so parched
with thirst that we could scarcely swallow. It
was plain that we must obtain water soon or
perish.

Taking to the heavy oars again, we once
more moved forward, stopping every few min-
utes to scan the coast-line for any sign of
human life, savage or civilized. Not a curl of
smoke or glimpse of habitation of any sort
rewarded our search; and half relieved, half
apprehensive, at the solitary character of the
wilderness before us, we pushed in boldly
toward the shore, frantic with thirst as the
prospect of quenching it increased.

Thump! went the bows against the half-
submerged root of an enormous tree.
06 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“Well,” remarked Ted, looking around him,
“if I wasn’t jist crazed fer wather, sure I’d
go to say agin. It’s a haythin counthry we’ve
got to this toime!”

Ted wasn’t far out of the way, for a gloomier
bit of shore I never saw.

Directly in front of us, and both east and
west as far as the eye could reach, the sea
was bordered with a dense growth of huge
trees of some kind, the roots of which grew
half in the air. The trunks, big and black,
towered. crookedly upward till they were lost
in a mass of heavy foliage. Many of them
had fallen, and lay rotting in the mud; and
the odor of decaying vegetation was almost
everpowering.

“What kind of ornamental shrubbery is
this, Will?” I sang out, resolved to make the
best of things.

_ “They're mangroves,” said our naturalist-
geographer, surveying with interest the repul-
sive growth. “I’ve read lots about them.”

“Well, they may be all right on paper,”


TH STRANGE LANDING.

© Thump! went the bows against the half-submerged roots.”
THE STRANGE LANDING. 57

said Ted, clambering out over the boughs, and
stepping gingerly on one of the great slimy
roots; “but—owch/” and down he went into
the mud.

We had our laugh; but time was flying,
and we knew we must strike. inland if we
wanted to find higher ground and the pre-
cious liquid that meant life and strength to
us.

Making fast the painter to the trunk of the
nearest tree, we clambered out of the boat,
taking the gun, the bag, and our two boxes.
These last were sure to prove a dreadful bother,
especially the case of ammunition, which must
have weighed over twenty pounds; but fear
of natives forbade our leaving anything be-
hind. Will had spent some time that morn-
ing, while I had his oar, in drying and rubbing
up his shotgun; and before starting, he un-
screwed the lid of the box with his jackknife,
and took out a dozen cartridges, charged with
large shot and small. He was requested to
take the lead, carrying the gun and his bag.
58 THE GREAT ISLAND.

I came next with the provision box; and
Teddy brought up the rear, grumbling over
the weight of the ammunition.

We made slow enough progress, and after
a few minutes’ hard work we had to stop to
rest. All around us were the mangrove-trees,
over and among the slippery roots of which
we scrambled, slid, and tumbled. Once we
had heard a sudden “squattering” in the mud
just in front of us, and were startled by the
sight of a huge crocodile, just disappearing in
an oozy creek close by. The mud was every-
where black and soft, and at times we sank
into it up to our knees. There was not a
breath of air stirring. The heat was intense,
and the odors of all sorts of decaying sub-
stances simply indescribable. Although the
sun was still high in the heavens, we were
in the gloomiest of shadows, so that it seemed
like advancing through a nightmare forest as
we plunged on once more.

Overhead the boughs at times resounded
with a hideous, cackling cry.
THE STRANGE LANDING. 59

“What in the world is that?” I asked, as
these strange noises were redoubled.

“ “A near relation of the ‘laughing jackass’
you've read about.”

“Sure, he’s well named,” said Ted wrath-
fully, “if he lives in this baste of a wood.”

A moment later the boy gave a wild howl
of dismay. We turned back, and didn’t blame
him when we saw him staring at a huge
snake, coiled around a limb of a tree just
over his head. It was of a bluish lead-color
above, and lemon-yellow beneath.

“Tt’s only a python,” said Will. “He isn’t
poisonous, and won’t touch you if you don’t
meddle with him. Come on, Ted; and don’t
drop that box for your life!”

For two hours longer we struggled on,
noting with satisfaction that the soil was be-
coming firmer beneath our feet, and the for-
est a little more open.

_ “Hurrah, boys!” shouted Will, “I see the
sunshine ahead. We'll soon strike the hills,
60 THE GREAT ISLAND.

and there’s sure to be running water there
somewhere !”
Five minutes more brought us to a little
grassy glade, beyond which the land rose in
a steady slope. We pushed forward eagerly.
Mangroves had now given place to a tall,
straight kind of tree, which Will told us was
the famous eucalyptus. Tall grass waved in
the sunshine wherever there was an open
space; and ghoulish kingfishers, with their
horrid laughter, gave place to hundreds of coo-
ing pigeons. Will was some distance ahead
of us when he gave a shout of delight, and,
running off a little to the right, dropped on
his knees. When we reached his side we
found him drinking from a little stream which
rippled merrily downward toward the sea.
- We all threw ourselves down on the grass,
and drank till we could drink no more. Then
rolling over on our backs with long sighs of
relief, we lay there for a good half-hour, too
tired, and filled with too grateful a sense of
refreshment, to care to stir.
THE STRANGE LANDING. 61

Will was the first to raise himself on his
elbow and propose a move.

“There couldn’t be a better place to camp
in,” said he, “than right where we are.”

“Td rather spend the night here than lie
on the soft side of a board in that old boat,”
I agreed; “and to-morrow we can stock up
on provisions and water, and start down the
coast.”

“There’s one sure thing,’ exclaimed Will,
jumping smartly to his feet; “we must take a
look at the boat, and make sure that she’s se-
cure. We forgot something when we moored
her.”

“What's that?”

“The tide! It must rise and fall several
feet here; and the old craft might work loose,
sliding about on those mangrove roots. At
any rate, ’m going to have one more look at
her before the sun sets. You and Ted knock
up some kind of shelter, and gather firewood
for the night. Ill be back inside of two
hours at the utmost.”
62 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“Don’t you want the gun?”

“No; I’m going to travel light this time.
Good-by.” And he was gone.

I knew Will was a good woodsman, so I
didn’t worry about him, but set at work at
once preparing for the night.

With the small camp-hatchet that I had
fortunately buckled around my waist when I
left the ship, I soon cut down enough small
trees to make a rude shelter tent, the front
being framed by two crotched uprights and a
crosspiece.

Ted found a grove of young cocoa-palms
growing near the camp, and two or three arm-
fuls of these thatched the roof nicely. I should
have liked some good fir boughs, such as we
had in Alaska, for our bed; but of course this
was out of the question in the tropics.

By sunset Ted had gathered a big pile of
dry wood; and the camp was finished, with
a bright fire blazing cheerfully in front of it.
Five minutes later Will appeared, making his
way slowly up to us from the low ground.
THE STRANGE LANDING. 63

I saw from his face in a moment that some-
thing was wrong.

“ Will, old fellow, what’s the matter?” I
inquired anxiously.

“Matter enough,” said Will, throwing him-
self down wearily before the fire.

“You haven’t been bitten by a snake or
anything, have you?”

“T wish that were all!” said Will. “No,
there’s no danger of snakes at present; but
there may be worse enemies than that about
us.”

“Shall we take to the boat, then?”

“We can’t. The boat is gone!”
64 THE GREAT ISLAND.

CHAPTER VII.
A NOVEL BILL OF FARE.

E-gazed at Will blankly. No boat! Then
how were we ever to escape? Hun-
dreds of miles, through a country infested by
savages, and possibly by gangs of escaped con-
victs, — the dreaded “ bushrangers,’ — lay be-
tween us and the nearest civilized port. We
could not remain by the shore in that unclean
forest of mangroves, watching for rescuers ;
even I knew enough of the tropics to realize
that we were liable, one and all, to be taken
down with fever if we lingered near the swamps
with their deadly exhalations. Besides, it was
possible that other and more imminent dan-
gers were lurking about us. How were we
to account. for the disappearance of the boat ?
We questioned Will eagerly.
A NOVEL BILL OF FARE. 65

Will said that he could see no traces of
human agency in the matter. The tide, he
declared, had fallen two feet or more; and it
was possible that the painter had worked loose
with the natural movements of the boat, and
drifted out with the ebb. The wind still
blew, though mildly, and off shore.

Well, there was nothing for it but to eat our
supper, and spend the night where we were.

After the first yielding to discouragement
and fatigue, Will sprang up, and began look-
ing about carefully, as if for something he had
lost on the ground.

“This place looks to me,’ he mused aloud,
“like an old native plantation, neglected and
gone to waste. I shouldn’t wonder — ah,
there it is!” And dropping down, he began
to dig and pull at some broad-leaved plants
among the grass.

A moment later he held something aloft
with a shout of triumph. It was a cluster of
two or three big, ungainly roots, or rather
“tubers,” of a dirty yellow color.
66 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“What have you got there?” I called out,
hurrying up.

“Swate potatoes!” cried Ted in rapture.

“Not quite that, but something just as
good, or better.”

“What, then?”

“Yams!”

I looked curiously at the vegetable of
which I had so often heard and read. “How
do you cook them, Will? Can’t eat them
raw, I suppose!”

“Not much! Got a good fire there?”

“ Tip-top.”

; “Well, clear away the sticks where there’s

‘a good bed of ashes, and I'll have these fel-
lows ready for the oven in a twinkling.”

While Ted and I followed directions, Will
washed the big tubers in the brook, and
wrapped them carefully in two or three
layers of their own leaves. He then buried
them in the hot ashes, and raked the burn-
ing coals and brands over them once more.

“Now let’s keep a good fire going, and in
A NOVEL BILL OF FARE. 67

something over half an hour supper will be

>

ready,” announced the cook.

We gathered a lot more firewood, and
then sat down in front of our camp, which
appeared every moment more cosey and home-
like as the sunset light faded from the west-
ern sky and the shadows began to deepen.

With nightfall came thoughts of the dear
ones we had left at sea; and we spoke of
each one separately, and how they must be
worrying or mourning over us.

“I know your father will charter a vessel
and hunt for us,” remarked Will; “but what
good will that do? We can’t live on the
shore, keeping up signals; for a night or two
down there would be the death of us.”

“‘ Besides,” I added, “ how does he know
where we are? The wind may have baffled
round half a dozen times that first day, when
we had no sun to go by. He may spend
weeks or months searching the coast a thou-
sand miles from here.”

“JT wish we knew exactly where we are,”

e
68 THE GREAT ISLAND.

said Will. “Somehow I can’t get ‘the lay of
the land.” It has seemed all day as if the
sun rose in the north and set in the south,
instead of travelling from east to west in a
civilized fashion.”

“ Maybe that’s the way it goes, thin, in this
haythin country,’ growled Ted, throwing a
dry eucalyptus branch on the fire. “It’s me-
self that’s turned round intirely.”

“Well, we can make some definite plan by
and by, and to-morrow we'll take a fresh start
for somewhere,” said Will. “By that time
perhaps I can get my bearings. Pull out a
can of beef, will you, Nat?”

I did so, and at the same time made an
important discovery ; namely, a small tin box
of salt, which for some reason had been packed
with the beef. We could have dispensed with
such a luxury, of course ; but it proved a great
comfort, and rendered our meals palatable as
well as nutritious. We had evidence of this
when we came to eat our yams, which were
delicious. To be sure, they were not exactly
A NOVEL BILL OF FARE. 69

“done to a turn,’ being rather scorchy out-
side, and raw in the middle; but we were
hungry, and supper tasted good, washed down,
as Teddy gravely remarked “wid smoked
bafe.”

That night we took an inventory of our
possessions, the list being as follows :—

1 shotgun.
100 central-fire shells, buck-shot.
100 central-fire shells, duck-shot.
8 two-pound cans smoked beef.
1 half-pound can salt.
6 small bottles quinine pills.
20 boxes safety-matches.

Besides the above articles, we found in Will’s
bag, which he had filled during the voyage
with a variety of little things needed in camp-
life, a package of fishlines and hooks, needles
and thread, twine, buttons, pins, a small roll
of cotton cloth, and a number of other odds
and ends, which, trifling in themselves, bade
fair to prove of inestimable value in the long
- tramp which lay before us.
70 THE GREAT ISLAND.

We talked long and earnestly of our pros-
pects, but could arrive at no definite conclu-
sion beyond the necessity of immediate action
on the morrow; in other words, a start toward
the south, or in the nearest approach to that
direction which the singular and perplexing
configuration of the east-to-west coast would
allow. —

Not feeling safe from the incursions of un-
friendly natives, we divided the night into
three watches, of which the first was given
to Teddy, the second to Will (from midnight
to three), and the third to myself.

Leaving the Irish boy, therefore, to keep
the fire going and himself awake, Will and
I turned in, and were soon sound asleep.
A STARTLING DISCOVERY. 71

CHAPTER VIII.
A STARTLING DISCOVERY.

JILL called me promptly at three, accor-

ding to our agreement; and rubbing my

eyes open savagely, I crawled out to the fire,

which I could see had just been freshly built up.

The stars were shining; and the great cross,

so strange to northerners, gleamed brightly
in the southern sky.

There had been no disturbance of any kind,
so far as I knew, during the night; and for
this I was very thankful, feeling sure that if
natives were about us, they would have mani-
fested their presence in some way before now.

Soon the east began to pale, and then grow
rosy. As soon as it was fairly daylight, I
took up the gun, loaded it with the larger
shot, and started off to see if I could make

| BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION

416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.
72 THE GREAT ISLAND

an addition to our rather scanty .arder. The
forest was full of birds, — strange, lovely
creatures I had never before seen; some of
them with long, glossy tail-feathers trailing
after them as they flew from bough to bough,
some with breasts of iridescent green gleam-
ing in the morning sunlight. I knew they
must be birds-of-paradise, although I was ig-
norant of their names.

Before long I came upon a large track, sev-
eral inches long, having three front toes and
one in the rear, like the footprint of a huge
hen. No big game appeared in sight, how-
ever; and I crept cautiously on, glancing to
right and left.

I had not gone a hundred feet farther, when
I caught sight of a curious little animal,
about the size of a large cat, crouching on a
horizontal bough some ten or fifteen feet from
the ground. Its fur was a dingy white, spotted
with brown; and it had a long, yellowish tail,
the end of which was tightly curled around
a smaller branch, as if to steady its owner.
A STARTLING DISCOVERY. 73

T had never seen such a beast before; but
I took the chance of its being edible, and,
taking careful aim, fired.

Down came the clumsy creature; and run-
ning up, I found it quite dead. I knew the
fellows would be roused and startled by the
report of the gun near camp; so back I went,
dragging my odd game by the tail, which I
found to be unpleasantly bare, like a rat’s.

“Hello, Nat, what on earth — why!” —

A queer look came into Will’s face as he
hurried to meet me, and surveyed the odd
little animal I had shot.

“That's what I want you to tell me, Will,”
I laughed, throwing down my booty. “‘ What
on earth’ is it?”

Will stooped, and turned the animal over.

“Tt can’t be—yes, there’s the bare, pre-
hensile tail and the blotches of brown fur’? —

“Well?”

“Tf that’s the animal I think it is—and,
yes, it must be—there’s no mistake” — He
paused again.
74, THE GREAT ISLAND.

“Well,” I repeated, rather impatiently,
“what is the beast? and what does he in-
dicate? Don’t be mysterious, Will!”

“There’s no doubt that he’s a cuscus macu-

~ latus.”

Teddy, who had joined us, broke down in
the middle of a terrific yawn, and stared at
our young naturalist with eyes, like the dog
in the fairy, tale, “as big as saucers.”

“And his presence here,” continued Will,
unmoved; “proves, my hearers, that we have
made a little mistake. We are not in Aus-
tralia at all.”

“His being here proves that we are not
here! What are you talking about, Will?
Wake up, old fellow! You're half asleep yet.”

“T didn’t say we were not here,’ laughed
Will. “I merely remarked that we were not
in Australia. The spotted cuscus lives only in
the Spice Islands and New Guinea.t Now,
we can’t be in any of the Spice Islands, which

1 Nore. — Will was right in his conclusions, though not strictly
accurate in his premises. The cuscus maculatus is sometimes
found in Australia. —W. B. A.
A STARTLING DISCOVERY. 75

are hundreds of miles to the west of any pos-
sible course we may have been driven over, —
with lots of islands between.”

“Tt follows then that” —

“We are in New Guinea!”

This was, sure enough, an astounding, not.
to say an appalling, piece of news. The cus-
cus lay forgotten on the ground, and we looked
at one another with faces from ,which the
mirth died out rapidly as we recognized the
full significance of the information the ani-
mal had unwittingly given us.

New Guinea — Papua! I remembered it
vaguely as a big, oddly shaped island north
of Australia, peopled by little-known and sav-
age tribes, and possessing but few, if any, white
settlements.

Ted and I opened upon Will with broad-
sides of questions as soon as we could find
tongue to speak.

How large was the island upon which we
had ‘been so strangely cast? Where were the
settlements, if any? Were the savages dan-
76 THE GREAT ISLAND.

gerous? How about noxious beasts and rep-
tiles? These and many other questions Will
answered with a readiness that showed how
thoroughly he had studied this strange island,
as well as the adjacent continent.

He told us, in brief, that Papua was about
fourteen hundred miles long, and in its widest
spot perhaps half as many from north to south;
that there.were a few settlements only, scat-
tered along its inhospitable coast, especially
at the eastern and western extremities.

“What nation does Papua belong to?” we
interrupted at this point.

“Oh!” said Will, “various countries claim
portions of it. The Dutch have the best hold,
perhaps, along the coast; though the French
and Great Britain control portions toward the
west. Where we are at this present minute,
the land is populated —I can’t say ‘ governed’
— by natives alone.”

“And how about the interior?”

“Nobody knows.”

“What! this big island unexplored?”
A STARTLING DISCOVERY. 77

“A good deal of it, yes. An Italian named
D’Albertis spent some time a hundred miles
or so from where we probably are, and forced
his way up the Fly River. One or two others
have done as much in other parts of the
island, and that’s about all the exploration
on record.”

“Where do you make it out we are, then,
old fellow?”

“We must be somewheres near the head of
the Gulf of Papua,” answered Will. “TI see
now that the wind drove us right up through
the Coral Sea, in a westerly direction. Then
it veered to the south, and blew us in a
northerly direction, till we struck the main-
land. If we had gone west, young man, to
any great extent, we should have landed among
the islands in Torres Strait, a good deal
worse off than we are now, in my humble
opinion. We are in a country full of game,
with plenty of ammunition for the present,
and. health and strength enough to get to the
nearest settlements toward the east, say two
78 THE GREAT ISLAND.

or three hundred miles from here. There are
no big beasts to fear, and the only danger is
from the natives.”

“Flere goes, then,” I shouted; “come on,
you fellows! Every foot toward the east is
clear gain!” And off we went, Indian file,
toward the rising sun.

For two days we made our way steadily
eastward. Most of our walking was done in
the early forenoon ahd late afternoon; for it
was very hot in the middle of the day. We
no longer took the trouble to build a camp
at night, but lay down beside our fire in the
softest spot we could find. We did not mind
the heat; for so long as the sun shone we
could find our way without a compass. Our
one thought was eastward ho! to some port
where we could obtain conveyance to Australia,
and, by means of mail and telegraph, relieve
the terrible anxiety we knew must be felt by
our dear ones.

The third day was one to be remembered.
We had not been on our feet long before we
A STARTLING DISCOVERY. 79

found it was the hottest morning we had yet
experienced.

“Whew!” whistled Teddy at ten o'clock
or thereabouts. “It’s meself that’s meltin’
intirely. Can’t we shtop a while to cool
Ol

Will and I were only too willing to drop
our loads, and fling ourselves down in the
shade of a tree, which was one of the ad-
vance guard of a much heavier growth than
had yet been in our path. Will said whey
were mostly teak-wood.

We had some debate whether to try to
make a détour inland around this forest; but
as we could see no limits to it, north or
south, we concluded to make the best of it,
and push on, hoping to emerge on the other
side before nightfall.

At three o'clock we started ahead, and
plunged into the shadows of the wood.

Then it was that we found what travelling
in the unexplored tropics means. Hitherto
our course had led us across grassy uplands,
80 THE GREAT ISLAND.

cheered by the sunshine and the songs of birds,
and meeting with little difficulty in moving
ahead at a good pace. We must have cov-
ered nearly twenty miles each day.

But now we were enveloped in the half
twilight of the deep forest. Only occasional
glimpses of the sun enabled us to hold a
true course. Moreover, we were impeded at
every step by tough vegetable creepers which
lay in wait for our stumbling feet, so that
we went down again and again. .

Just after one of these falls poor Teddy
began to thrash the air wildly, and run,
shouting for help.

“What is it, Ted? What's the matter?”
we both cried at once.

“Ow! Ow!” howled Teddy. “The bees
are shtinging me to death. Murther! Take
"em off!’’ and he thrashed more wildly than
ever.

At first both Will and I went off into
peals of laughter; but, as our afflicted com-
rade drew near, our tone changed, and we too
A STARTLING DISCOVERY. 81

plunged ahead, screaming, through the under-
growth.

Fortunately we soon came to a muddy lit-
tle brook, where we got rid of the last of
the little winged pests whose nest Teddy had
unwittingly struck. They were wasps, and
the ugliest ones I ever saw. All of us
were smarting from their stings, and poor
Ted’s face was already swollen terribly.

We hardly felt like going farther, but picked
up our loads again, and were ready to start,
when Will sung out, —

“Hold on a minute! Which way are we
to go? Where’s the sun?”

Not a sign of it! One part of the sky was
like another, as we saw it through the tree-
tops. We now noticed how rapidly it had

grown dark while we were bathing our faces.
“Sure, it’s not sunset yet,” groaned poor
Ted, trying to cool his smarting face and
neck.

No, it was several hours before the time
for the sun’s legitimate disappearance. There
82 THE GREAT ISLAND.

was only one explanation for the suddenly
approaching darkness.

“There’s a storm coming, and a big one,”
said Will briefly. “Hurry and make ready
for it!”
TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS. 83

CHAPTER IX.
TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS.

HERE was not much that we could do in
the way of preparation, after all. Will

put his jacket over the ammunition-box, which
was placed, moreover, beneath all the other
baggage, with Teddy sitting on top of that.
It was of no use to go farther, so we waited.

It grew darker and darker.

“No use to light a fire,” said Will, “for the
rain will put it out. Here it comes now!”

A big drop, down through the trees — an-
other and another. Then a blinding flash of
lightning, without any thunder! There was
something awful about this solemn, silent ap-
proach of the storm; and I own I was more
scared than at any time since we were swept
away from the ship.
84 THE GREAT ISLAND.

We had not long to wait, however. A
weary, listless breeze swept through the tree-
tops. The rain began to fall faster. A rum-
ble of thunder followed another vivid flash.
Then we heard a dull roar, like the sea, in-
creasing every moment, until it struck the
forest. The trees all around us writhed and
groaned, and one not far away fell with a
crash. Down came the rain in sheets, while
the dazzling lightning and deafening thunder
glittered and roared almost incessantly. .

It was a wretched, wretched night. We
were absolutely unprotected from the storm,
and could simply crouch together, striving to
keep our possessions from being soaked, while
we ourselves were drenched with the driving
rain, which poured steadily even after, at
about midnight, the violence of the thunder
and lightning had passed.

Morning found us almost too stiff, cold,
and wet to move. The rain had ceased at
last, but a thick white mist rose from the
swampy ground all about us. The brook was
TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS. 85

a small river, and foamed over the spot where
we had first halted. The wasp-stings still
plagued us, and altogether we were an un-
happy crowd.

“Get a can of beef open,” said Will. “There
are two more left, and we can’t get a fire go-
ing, to cook anything. As soon as we have
eaten some breakfast we must start on, for
this place would mean death if we stayed. here
long.”

We managed to force down a few mouth-
fuls of smoked beef, — fortunately the brook-
water, though turbid, was still drinkable, — and
resumed our march. The sun was not out,
but lighted up the eastern sky sufficiently for
us to guess at our bearings. Anything was
better, as Will said, than staying where we
were.

We soon struck the worst piece of woods we
had yet found, —sago, Will said it was; and
I never want a plate of sago pudding again.
The thorns of last year’s growth lay on the
ground, and stabbed through our well-worn
86 THE GREAT ISLAND.

?

shoes, which were “squeechin’” wet, as Teddy
put it. Then, too, there was a kind of rattan
underbrush through which it was almost im-
possible to make any progress. The long, tough
stems tripped us up; we often went up to our
knees in black mud, and our hands and faces
were scratched and torn and bruised until we
agreed that we would rather tackle another
wasps nest in open growth than have an
additional half-day of such travelling.

After a while the sun came out, and the for-
est was filled with the cries of cockatoos, the
cooing of great pigeons, and the songs of birds-
of-paradise. We were cheered by the bright
rays; but the air remained very sultry, and
by three o’clock the clouds closed in again,
putting a stop to our march.

Then followed a repetition of our experiences
of the previous night. It rained heavily; and
though the storm was not as severe as the last,
it was quite as effective in wetting us through,
and rendering us thoroughly miserable. I got
asleep in my wet clothes toward morning, but
TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS. 87

had only troubled dreams, and woke with a
raging headache.

Will felt my pulse and looked serious. None
of us had ever seen jungle fever; but my
symptoms corresponded exactly with our gen-
eral idea of it, and the accounts we had read
in books, — Stanley’s and others. ,

“You'd better take a big dose of quinine,
and then do your best to keep on your feet,”
said Will with a world of anxiety in his tone.
“We surely shall reach open and higher ground
before night, and then we can build a decent
camp, and rest a day or two.”

It was hard work, but I managed to stumble
ahead five or six hours that day. The air
was cooler, we could catch glimpses of blue
sky through the tops of the palms; and this
gave me courage to push on, though | was
shivery and weak, and my head felt as though
it were burning up. To our great joy the
trees became more scattered in the afternoon;
and long before sunset we found ourselves in
the bright sunshine once more, on a slope that
88 THE GREAT ISLAND.

seemed to extend inland, mounting steadily
until the highest ground was lost in the dis-
tance.

I could go no farther; and we decided to
camp on a little knoll about fifty feet from
a clear stream that came leaping down from
the heights like our dear old New England
brooks, which I then feared I might never live
to see. Will and Teddy would not let me
do any real work; though I staggered about,
gathering a little firewood, and trying to be-
lieve I was helping.

Will took the gun, and in half an hour came
back with a real prize, a wild pig, which insured
us food for the morrow at least. As for me,
I cared little about the state of the larder, for
not a bit could I touch when the boys brought
me a nice bit of roast pig for my supper.
Teddy then boiled some of the meat, using
our old bailer, which we had thus far carried
throughout our weary march, and made me
some soup. I forced down a little, took some
more quinine, and turned in early.
TWO WRETCHED NIGHTS. 89

The next day I woke up feeling very weak,.
but better. It was useless to think of march-
ing, so we prepared for a day of rest. After
breakfast Will strolled off to find game; Teddy
undertook to enact the part of washerwoman
for the crowd; and I occupied my time in writ-
ing up these notes, using a pencil and a small
blank book which had formed a part of Will’s
camp outfit.

I had said but little heretofore about the
strange things we met with in our tramp. This
day gave me a chance to describe a little of
the animal and vegetable life in the midst of
which we had found ourselves since landing on
the great island. Will had kept us informed,
so far as he was able, as to the names and
habits of the fauna of New Guinea which we
had thus far run across.

In making up this narrative, I have recast
and rewritten most of the brief notes I made
on the spot; but perhaps it will give a clearer
idea of our surroundings if I copy the account
90 THE GREAT ISLAND.

of this special day directly from my diary,
_ merely filling out and completing abbreviated
words and sentences.

The account is long enough, I guess, to de-
serve a separate chapter.
IN CAMP AGAIN. 91

CHAPTER X.
IN CAMP AGAIN.

HIS morning we had yams, bananas, and
roast pig for breakfast. I ate a little of
the fruit; and Ted made me some pig-broth,
which tasted good. We have only two more
cans of beef left. The salt holds out well,
for we are very sparing in our use of it.
Asked Will how far he thought we were
from settlements, and he said he reckoned not
more than one hundred and fifty miles. This
is encouraging; though I can see he is mak-
ing our prospects as bright as possible, to
cheer me up. He has taken the gun, and
gone up the hill to take a look for game, but
will keep near the camp. We have seen no
sign of natives yet, beyond one or two ancient
plantations of yams, sago, and bananas, all
92 THE GREAT ISLAND.

overgrown and run out. Still, we feel that
we must keep on the watch.

As I sit in the door of our little camp,
which is thatched with the long, broad leaves
of the banana-trees, I hear the birds-of-para-
dise whistling in the woods near by. Teddy,
too, is whistling at his work, as he washes our
clothes in the brook. That boy is a treasure.
I have just heard the report of a gun.

Here comes Will with something dangling
from his right hand. The left, with the shot-
gun in it, he waves to us.

Will’s game turns out to be a huge pigeon,
the biggest I ever saw. It is called a “ goura,”
he says, and lives only in this island, Java,
and the Moluccas. This is the bird, it seems,
which we have heard several times on our
march. Its cry is something between a turkey’s
gobble and a low note on a trombone. It is
of a bluish, slaty color, with a patch of white
on each wing. The head is the queerest part,
being surmounted by a high crest of feathers.
The bird Will shot is as large as a fair-
IN CAMP AGAIN. 93

sized turkey, and promises us high living, for
the flesh is said to be delicious. Ted says
we'll have a regular Thanksgiving dinner. I
am afraid I sha’n’t do much justice to it;
though I don’t say much about my feelings,
for fear of discouraging the boys.

Eleven o'clock. — Teddy has hung out his
wash to dry, and is fishing in the stream, with
good luck I should judge from his frequent
erles of “Hurrah!” “Tve got ye then!”
“That's a good wan!” Yes, here he comes
with as fine a string of little fellows as if
he had been fishing in a New Hampshire
brook. I don’t in the least know what they
are, but no doubt they are good to eat. No
danger of starving here. Oh, my head!

Later. — Will has got back from another
tramp in the woods. He is a restless fellow,
and can’t remain quietly in camp. He says
he narrowly escaped a strange accident which
might have proved fatal; in which case a thou-
sand guesses from our friends at home would
hardly have hit on the cause of his death.
94 THE GREAT ISLAND.

He was making his way through a thick
piece of woods when he caught sight of a
big hornbill—a bird with a huge beak —in
the topmost boughs of a very high tree. He
could not resist the temptation of firing.
Down dropped the heavy bird, beak first.
Will saw him coming, and tried to get out of
the way, but tripped in a vine, and as he
went sprawling the tremendous beak whizzed
past, just grazing his arm, where he has a
pretty deep cut to show for his adventure.
If the bird had struck his head —!

Teddy managed to climb a palm-tree, after
his piscatory success, and dislodged a dozen
good-sized cocoanuts, which came bouncing
down on the ground like so many cannon-
balls. The milk is just beginning to harden;
and they are delicious, as we soon found, even
I relishing the sweet white paste. How little
we know about real cocoanuts at home! I
got Will to give me the names of some of
the trees hereabouts. They are Greek to me,
most of them; but I can look them up in the
IN CAMP AGAIN. 95

encyclopedia if we ever get home. Here they
are: Besides the nutmeg, sago, banana, palm,
and mangrove (all of which I now know well
enough by sight), we have in our immediate
neighborhood the eucalyptus, teak, myristica,
canarium, casuarina, and mango and nipa.
This last grows in wet places, along the banks
of streams; and the long leaves have bothered
us a good deal. I’m too tired and sick to
write any more of the hard names.

Later.—The afternoon has passed slowly.
I am not feeling so well. The fever seems to
be returning, my head “prickles” with heat,
and my limbs are much swollen —a new
symptom. I’m going to keep on writing as
long as I can, to take up my mind, if noth-
ing more.

Teddy got another snake-fright soon after
dinner. One of the enormous bluish-backed
fellows, a python, took it into his head to in-
vestigate our camp. The Irish boy was just
returning from the brook, when he caught
sight of the serpent slowly moving right
96 THE GREAT ISLAND.

across his path. I never heard such a yell,
even when Ted collided with the wasps’ nest
the other day. The snake made off in one
direction and he in another. I didn’t know
what was the matter till Ted came creeping
back on the other side of the camp. Truly,
this is not the pleasantest country for an
afternoon stroll!

Will reports some huge tracks in the mud,
not far up-stream. Either a giant cassowary
has been near us within twenty-four hours, or
some great creature unknown to naturalists.
Will says that such tracks have been seen
before in New Guinea; and some people think
there are a few animals or saurians still alive
in the unexplored interior of the island, though
generally believed extinct centuries ago. This
sounds like the talk about “mammoths” in
Alaska. I shall not soon forget my ride on
one! The fellow that illustrated that book of
our adventures hasn’t half done justice to the
big beast, as he appeared emerging from the
river.
IN CAMP AGAIN. 97

There are kangaroos near here, beyond a
doubt. Their tracks are thick, Will says, with-
in ten minutes’ walk of our camp. He wanted
to get a shot at one, but hasn’t succeeded yet.
Oh, dear! I don’t care what he shoots — if
only my head would stop aching! How I
wish Flossie was here; and mother! I can
just feel her hand on my hot forehead —

Well, I mustn't give up to it. What was
I writing about? Oh! kangaroos. Teddy
caught sight of one yesterday, and has been
giving an exhibition of how he jumped.

The sun is going down, and I must stop
writing. It seems as if my head would split.
The boys are getting ready for supper. Teddy
has built a fire, and is making some more
broth for me. Will says we can stay here
another day as well as not. I’m glad of that.
If I don’t get better to-morrow I don’t know —

(Nat's Journal breaks off here.)
98 THE GREAT ISLAND.

CHAPTER XI. .
UNINVITED GUESTS.

IVE minutes after poor Nat left off writing’

in his diary he was delirious. I picked

up the little book in which he had kept a
faithful record of our adventures, even through-
out the day when his fever was increasing and
he was suffering terribly, as we afterward
knew, until the pen dropped from his hands.

For several days that followed I kept the
“log” up, though I knew how much better

Nat would have done it.
Ted and I tried to make the poor fellow as
comfortable as possible; but he was out of

1 Notr.— The different handwriting in Nat’s diary, from
which this account is mainly compiled, shows where his com-
panion began to record the trying events which succeeded that
unhappy day. Will’s notes are harder to read, and require
much more “‘editing’’ than those of his predecessor, who wrote
in a neat, firm hand, and abbreviated but little. —W. B. A.

cae
UNINVITED GUESTS. 99

his head all night, crying for his mother and
sister, and trying to go on board an imagi-
nary ship just outside the camp. He thought
the rushing of the brook was surf on the
shore, and we had fairly to hold him down
at times.

We got through the long night at last, and
Teddy got breakfast. It was a sorry lookout
as we two sat down together and discussed
the situation over our meal, while Nat lay
tossing and burning up with fever a few feet
away.

Of course we could not go on; but we had
to live, and I took my gun to look for food.
The high ground up-stream had seemed to fur-
nish the most game thus far; and I clambered
up in that direction, keeping near the brook,
as a guide to my way back.

I had not gone far when I heard a low
moaning sound, that seemed to come from a
clump of bushes on the bank of the stream.
Creeping up cautiously, I saw what looked like
a little old woman, with a baby in her arms,

r
100 THE GREAT ISLAND.

seated on the ground, and rocking herself to and
fro over the child. No one else was in sight.

Drawing nearer, I saw that she was younger
than I had at first supposed, but was terribly
emaciated. She was of a light copper color,
and seemed to have on but one loose garment,
made of native grasscloth, and hanging from
her shoulders to her knees, which were so thin
that the bones almost seemed to protrude.

As soon as she caught sight of me, she
uttered a queer sort of cry, and tried to run
away; but she was evidently too weak, and
lay gasping on the grass as I stood over her
a moment later.

I stooped down, and tried to quiet the poor
creature's terror by stroking her hands and
hair, until the frightened look faded out of
her eyes a little, and she gasped out a word I
could make nothing of ; but her gestures, point-
ing to her mouth, and laying her hand on her
stomach, gave me to understand that she and
the child — who was perhaps two years old —
were dying of starvation.
UNINVITED GUESTS. 101

I made the motions of eating, and she nodded
eagerly. Then I held out my hand, and beck-.
oned for her to come with me; but she was
timid, and did not stir. There was nothing
for it but to pick her up, baby and all, and
carry her into camp. She struggled at first,
poor thing, but soon gave up all attempt to
escape, resigning herself (as she afterward told
me) to be eaten by the white man, who was
evidently carrying her off for that purpose!

Teddy was astonished, you can believe, when —
he saw me coming with my armful!

“What have ye got there?” he sang out.
“A gorilla, is it?” |

“Don’t hurt the lady’s feelings, Ted,” said
I, “but give me a bit of that cold pigeon, and
the broth Nat couldn’t eat this morning.”

Ted obeyed with wide-open eyes; and setting
my burden down, but with one hand on her
wrist, to keep her from running away, I placed
food before her, and by gestures bade her fall to.
_ She needed no second invitation, poor thing;
but before she would touch anything herself
102 THE GREAT ISLAND.

she smelled of the broth, and then held the
tin to the lips of the famished child, who drank
half the contents before I took it away for fear
it would kill him. 3

« Ah, sure, she’s a woman afther all,” said
Teddy. “Make her ate something herself
now, or she'll be starvin’ before our eyes.”

Before he had finished, the mother had
fallen upon the cold pigeon, and devoured it
ravenously. We gave her a roast yam, and
a little of our remaining smoked beef; all of
which, pausing occasionally to offer some to
her boy, she finished to the last shred.

While she was eating we had a chance to
survey our pensioner at leisure. She was
rather under-sized, and not bad-looking; yel-
lowish copper-colored, and with smooth, curly
black hair, not crinkled like a negro’s.. Her
face showed a fair degree of intelligence, and
her big dark eyes shone gratefully as she
pegged away at the last drumstick; though
she evidently had some misgivings that we
were but fattening her up for a feast.
UNINVITED GUESTS. 103

_ At: last she could eat no more, and with a
sigh of relief she laid down the well-picked
bone.

- At this moment her ear caught poor Nat’s
moans; and turning, she saw him for the first
time, through the open front of the rough
shelter in which he lay.

“ Eh-h, temé-temé,” she said softly. I after-
ward learned that this was the native term
for fever. alts

She placed her child, who was now asleep,
on the grass, and crept timidly up to the
sick boy’s side. Then, with a supplicating
glance from her baby to us, she darted off
into the woods before we could stop her.

“Well,” says Ted, with an attempt at his
usual jolly grin, “sure, it’s an asylum for in-
fants we've set up here!”

I made no reply, being too chagrined at the
ingratitude of our guest, through whom I had
vaguely hoped we might obtain some assist-
ance in this emergency.

I went in and sat by Nat a few minutes,
104 THE GREAT ISLAND.

laying my hand on his hot forehead,- when
a loud shout from Ted called me out again.

“Tt’s more company we have!” he cried.
“Here comes the little woman again, and
sure, she’s got a twin brother with her!”

I guessed at once, as I looked at the pair,
that they were not twins, but husband and
wife... The man was even shorter than his
companion; but he was a tough-looking little
fellow, with no clothing but a necklace of
bones and a girdle around his waist.

On reaching us, he fell prostrate on the
ground, making signs of hunger as his wife
had done, and jabbering all the time in a
lingo that I could make nothing of.

I set food before him, and leaving Teddy
to attend to his wants, turned to the woman,
who had stood patiently by, with a bunch of
green leaves in her hand.

“ Massoi! massoi!” she exclaimed several
times, pointing to the leaves.

I then remembered reading about a plant or
tree of that name which is indigenous to New
UNINVITED GUESTS. 105

Guinea, and is said by the natives to possess
marvellous medicinal properties. The thought
brought with it a new hope.

I pointed to the sick boy, and then to the
leaves.

She nodded eagerly, and catching up the
old bailer, ran to the brook, and dipped up
some water. She then adjusted it skilfully
on the fire, and as soon as the steam began
to rise, threw in some of the massoi.

She allowed it to boil for fifteen minutes,
and then set the tin in the brook. As soon
as the beverage was cool enough to drink, she
carried it to the camp, and held it. to Nat’s
lips. He took a little, and after a while his
new nurse administered another draft of the
clear brown liquid. JI never saw a woman
more gentle beside a sick-bed than this poor
ignorant Papuan savage.

Her husband, whom she addressed as Ma-
ruki, had taken up the sleeping child, and
was nursing it in his arms with every appear-
ance of satisfaction and thankfulness.
106 THE GREAT ISLAND.

Presently the woman—her name, we soon
learned, was Abia, and I may as well call her
that now—crept softly out of the hut, and.
pointing to Nat, murmured, “ Utua!”’ at the
same time closing her eyes and breathing reg-
ularly.

‘Sure enough, the dear fellow was sound
asleep; and it wasn’t long before a profuse
perspiration broke out on his forehead.

Abia’s eyes shone with pride and satisfac-.
tion; and I could have hugged her on the
spot, I was so happy at the turn affairs had
taken.

Toward noon Nat woke up; and the first
glance showed us that he was no longer delir-
ious. Abia wouldn’t let him speak, but bent
over him instantly, and administered another
dose of her potent medicine, which he took
like a baby, though, as he afterward told us,
it tasted awfully. I suppose he thought he
was dreaming. Anyway, he turned over and
went to sleep again without a word.

The next two days passed quietly enough.
UNINVITED GUESTS. 107

Nat improved steadily under Abia’s care ; Ma-
ruki made himself useful in gathering cocoa-
nuts, yams, and bananas, and helping us about
camp; and little Oa, the boy, kept us all
laughing with his antics, as he tumbled about
in the grass.

For a long time I did not understand how
these savages were so reduced by hunger, in
the midst of the lavish provisions Nature was
showering upon us. It seemed, however, that
they were lost in the forest, and had wan-
dered a long way through an inhospitable part
of the island, besides being drenched and dis-
couraged by the two heavy storms which had
proved so nearly fatal to one of our own
party.

On the fourth day Nat was well enough to
walk, and we all set out together. I made
our new friends understand that we wanted
to go toward the rising sun, and they followed
along willingly enough. I think they must
have fallen in with whites before; for although
they had a great respect. for my gun, and
108 THE GREAT ISLAND.

stopped their ears when I fired, they showed
none of that utter terror with which firearms
usually strike a savage unaccustomed to them.

We found that Maruki was a capital pioneer,
and our line of march was much less fatiguing
than before, under his guidance. In the next
two days we must have advanced at least
twenty miles, in spite of Nat’s weakness. We
were now far inland; and I could see that we
must be crossing the great eastern spur of the
island, always provided my first calculations
as to our landing-place were correct.

The third day was cloudy; but Maruki ad-
vanced confidently, and we could do no bet-
ter than follow his lead. We had just finished
our noon meal, when a sharp whish came past
my ear, and an arrow quivered in the trunk
of a tree just behind us.

Maruki and Abia were on their feet in a
moment, shouting, capering, and screaming out
a volley of expletives, which had the effect of
stopping any further missiles, but brought our
hidden assailant out of the woods, together


CAPTURED BY HEAD-TuNTERS.

sharp wish came past my ear, and an arrow quivered in the triuuk
of a tree,”
UNINVITED GUESTS. 109

with a dozen others. They were savages, al-
most wholly naked, and quite unlike Maruki
and his wife, in that their skin was blacker,
and their hair crinkly like true negroes.

Their language was evidently somewhat dif-
ferent from that of our guide; but he easily
made himself understood, and an animated
parley ensued. The savages gathered around
us during this talk, and suddenly, without
the slightest warning, caught away our guns
and baggage, and seizing us, tied our arms be-
- hind our backs. Maruki, who was untouched,
seemed to expostulate at this treatment of his
friends, but not very earnestly, I thought.

“ What shall we do, Will?” asked Nat, who
showed a disposition to struggle with his
captors.

“Don’t resist, Nat,” I said hastily. “It’s of
no use, and they may turn out friendly after
all. Hold still, Ted!” for the boy’s Irish
blood was boiling at the indignity offered us.

Just then half a dozen more savages emerged
from the woods, and to my horror they exul-
110 THE GREAT ISLAND.

tantly held up two or three black human heads.
These they affixed to their belts with wild
cries of triumph.

“Nat!” I exclaimed, appalled at what I had
seen, “these fellows are ‘head-hunters.’ They
are out on an expedition against their enemies,
and every head counts.”

“It’s a poor show for us, then. Id better
have died of the fever!” eee

“Don’t say that. While there’s life there’s
hope. I don’t see the way out of this, old
fellow; but I have some hopes of Abia, if not
of Maruki. They won't forget how we've
treated them.”

“Maybe they think they've squared it up by
curing me,’ said Nat. “Do you know, I’ve
got an idea that Maruki has been playing a
game to get us into the hands of these mur-
derous-looking chaps.”

“JT don’t believe it. He was as much sur-
prised at the arrow as we were. He’ll see us
through it yet, or his wife will.”

— “Och! if I could only get wan fist out,”
UNINVITED GUESTS. 111

groaned Teddy, “I'd give these blaekguatda
something to remember.”

“Don’t struggle, Ted,” I advised Barnaeilee
“Tt will only make them mad, and they’re
nearly ten to our one.”

The tiresome conference of the natives came
to an end at last; and we were driven in the
forest, deflecting from our easterly course to-
ward the north. After about an hour’s walk,
the forest growing constantly more and more
gloomy and difficult to penetrate, we arrived
at the bank of a wide stream, the current of
which was so sluggish that at first glance I
hardly knew which way it was flowing. There
is no such river on any map that I have
seen, and it must be unknown to geographers.
Two or three crocodiles plunged into its muddy
depths as we halted on the bank.

Several of our captors now disappeared in
the bushes, and were shortly seen approaching
in a huge canoe, at least fifty feet in length.
It was merely a section of a large tree, hol-
lowed out, and was square at both ends.

ae
112 THE GREAT ISLAND.

In obedience to a sign from the leader of
the band, we entered the canoe, and sat down
in the centre, with Abia, Maruki, and little
Oa next to us. The Papuans took their places
before and behind, and with a dozen of them
paddling vigorously, the clumsy craft surged
out into the centre of the river. Its prow
turning to the north, we were soon gliding
rapidly up-stream, without the remotest idea
of our destination. Our prospects had never
looked so dark.
CAPTURED BY HEAD—HUNTERS. 113

CHAPTER XII.
CAPTURED BY HEAD-HUNTERS.

LL that afternoon the canoe, urged by a
dozen pairs of strong arms, made its way
steadily up the river. Although we were in
no mood to enjoy it, the scenes through which
we were passing were beautiful in the extreme.
Vines, embracing the tree trunks and over-
hanging boughs, wreathed them in garlands
of flowers, or swayed in long trailing clusters
above our heads. Birds in plumage of scarlet
and blue and glossy green flashed across from
one bank to the other. Cockatoos spread their
snowy wings, and shrieked discordant answers
to the kingfishers and pigeons that called to
them from the depths of the forest.
Of all the varied life along the river, the

human creatures alone were silent, or nearly
114 THE GREAT ISLAND.

so. We boys said but little, and the natives
never opened their lips.

“Sure, I feel as if I was goin’ to me own
funeral,” muttered Teddy at one time; and I
think we all had the same sensation. It was a
weird voyage up that black, unknown stream.

At sunset we reached what would be called
in our Maine woods a “carry.” The current
had been growing more and more swift for
some time, and at this point it became im-
possible to make headway against it.

The natives had overcome the difficulty much
as we manage such matters at home. Landing
on the right bank, and compelling us to do
the same, they drew the heavy canoe up on
shore, where we found a path leading around
the rapids, and “corduroyed” by cross-logs set
in the mud about half a yard apart. Over
these they slowly dragged and pushed the ca-
noe for a quarter of a mile or so, when we
reached quiet water above the falls.

The ground was firm and dry; and here it
was decided to spend the night. The Papuans
CAPTURED BY HEAD—HUNTERS. 115

lighted fires, dug and roasted some yams, and
made cakes from a flour which was probably
obtained from sago, and which they produced
from bags of dried plantain leaves.

While they were preparing their meal, they
glanced at their white prisoners in a way I
did not like; but nothing came of it, and sup-
per progressed quietly enough.

Our feet were tied, and our hands released,
to enable us to eat the food which Maruki
and Abia brought to us before they touched
their own share. The cakes were palatable,
but that is all that can be said in their
favor.

We were well guarded all night, watches of
three savages alternating from sunset to dawn,
when we had another hasty meal, and started
on up the river.

This second day of our captivity was but
- a repetition of the first, save that our hands
were left unbound. We were closely watched,
however; and any attempt to escape without
our gun and ammunition, which were kept in
116. THE GREAT ISLAND.

the bows with the hatchet and luggage, out of
our reach, would have been madness.

There were several carries, as the stream
became more and more rapid, and in many
places it was with great difficulty that the
boat made any headway against the current.

That evening we sprung a new sensation on
our dark-skinned captors.

Teddy was humming a snatch of “ Wearin’
o the Green,” as we sat around the camp-fire
after supper, when it occurred to me that we
might soothe the savage breast by a concert.
_ “What do you say, boys,” I remarked, “ shall
we have a little sing, just for the sake of old
times ?”

“’Twon’t do any harm,” said Nat, with a
dismal sort of laugh; “unless it goads the au-
dience up to spear us on the spot.”

‘Come on, then!” And I started “ March-
ing through Georgia” in my best baritone.

Nat has a good tenor voice, and with Ted
chiming in lustily on the chorus, ‘we made that
strange tropical forest ring with the music.
CAPTURED BY HEAD-HUNTERS. 117

The Papuans stopped chattering, and listened
with open eyes and mouths. There was a stir
among them when we had finished the last
verse ; and as they remained silent, and seem-
ingly expectant, we were encouraged to give
them another number.

This was “John Brown’s Body,” which was
followed by “My Love at the Window,” with
a thrilling yodel in the chorus by Nat.

_ There was no question about the success of

this last piece. The savages nodded, waved
their arms, jabbered to each other, and in one
or two cases even tried to imitate the yodel —
with’ results which may be imagined !

We chose to regard this as an encore, and
repeated the last two verses; at which one
Papuan, the youngest-looking one of the lot,
sprang to his feet, and began dancing and howl-
ing as a dog will act sometimes at home when
-he hears a handorgan. I never saw anything
‘more absolutely ridiculous; and all three of
us laughed till we cried, while even the grim
-visages of our guard relaxed at the sight.
118 THE GREAT ISLAND.

Before the concert was finished we had given
several other college songs, winding up with
“Sweet Home,” which I am not ashamed to
say we had hard work to finish. Teddy broke
down utterly, and cried like a baby. After this
all was quiet till morning.

To make a long story short, we abandoned
the canoe the next day before noon, its own-
ers hiding it carefully under the overhanging
boughs of some nipa-trees, just as I have seen
a guide conceal his birch on the shores of
one of the Rangeley Lakes. We plodded on
through the woods until the middle of the
afternoon, the path rising all the time, and
the forest becoming less dense.

At last we came out into fairly open ground,
and could see that we must be on an eleva-
tion several thousand feet above the sea level.
The view embraced the heavily wooded valley
we had left, the rolling uplands before us, and
several lofty and rugged peaks within a dis-
tance of twenty miles or so. The land about
showed signs of cultivation, and we passed
CAPTURED BY HEAD—HUNTERS. 119

several thrifty plantations of bananas and taro.
Once or twice we caught sight of natives la-
zily working; but they paid little heed to our
small caravan, which marched steadily on-
ward.

It was growing dark when we reached the
outskirts of a village, as was evident from
the sounds of talk and laughter, the crying of
babies, and grunting of pigs. We soon came
up with the first dwelling-place, and a few
minutes later were in the heart of the village.

A crowd of women and children and a few
men gathered curiously about us, and shouted
and screamed hilariously as the returning party
held up their hideous booty.

Presently we were conducted to our prison,
which deserves special mention.

Like every other hut in the village, it was
built, not on the ground, but from twenty to
twenty-five feet above the surface, resting on
long piles, and reached by a ladder of tough
vines, with crosspieces of bamboo, up which
we scrambled with some difficulty, followed
120 ' THE GREAT ISLAND.

by four men, who had evidently been detailed
to guard us. The hut, made of bamboo, and
thatched with dry grass and palm leaves, was
about twenty-five feet square, and was shaped
like the hull of a boat, cut across in the
middle, with the keel sticking up in front
like a sort of comb. There was a fireplace,
lined with clay, and half filled with ashes, in
a sunken place in the centre of the room.

' Our guards brought with them a big piece
of fresh pork, which they proceeded to roast
in the most approved fashion. It smelt good,
and altogether our spirits revived a little.
Whatever the Papuans meant to do with us,
we were certainly “well fixed,’ as Ted re-
marked, at present.

Looking out of the low doorway, we saw
that some of the huts were built on a natural
support, instead of piling; that is, they rested
on the cut-off trunks and boughs of trees, at
about the same height as our own above the
ground. Around the base of the support of
each was a small area enclosed in palings.
CAPTURED BY HEAD-HUNTERS. 121

and here the pigs grunted and rooted to their
hearts’ content.

It was plain that swine were at a premium
here ; indeed, I saw one woman carrying ten-
derly in her arms what I at first thought was
a white baby, but which proved to be a young
pig! The women, by the way, were not as
extensively dressed as our little Abia, a grass
petticoat from waist to knees being their only
garment. Children ran about among the pigs
without a stitch of clothing.

We made a hearty meal off the rellicooked
food that was placed before us, and committing
ourselves to the care of Him who had thus
far watched over us through all our perils,
flung ourselves on the couches of matting, and
were soon sound asleep.

(End of the portion of the Journal written by Will).
122 THE GREAT ISLAND.

CHAPTER XIII.
LOOKING BACKWARD.

EAVING our three young castaways not
uncomfortably situated-—save for their
apprehensions of the future —at the mountain
village of the Papuans, it is time for us to
glance at the bereaved family whom we left
on the deck of the Petrel.

As it happened, it was a good while before
the loss of the small boat containing the boys
was discovered. The officers and seamen on
both ships had their hands full in meeting the
squall; and when it was found that the boat
was missing the sailors who had crossed in it
supposed their young passengers had become
impatient and pulled to the Peérel, intending
to send the boat back for the men.

On the Petrel, the captain and Mr. Dut-
LOOKING BACKWARD. 123

ton’s family waited anxiously for the belated
little ferry-boat, which, as we know, was drift-
ing rapidly away to leeward, out of sight and
hearing. The fog and rain now set in heavy-
ily; and after waiting an hour or two, the cap-
tain of the Southern Cross, to whom every
moment was precious, declared he could delay
no longer, but must head for the nearest port
at once, to save his leaking ship. The two
seamen from the Petrel were told they should
have extra pay for helping work the vessel
to Brisbane or Sydney; and being provided
with one or two necessary articles by the sail-
ors, were willing enough to remain on board,
it being clear that they could in any case not
return to their own ship till the next day at
least, if at all. The two vessels had lost sight
of each other when the squall came down, and
might cruise for days without meeting again.
The Southern Cross was therefore headed for
the east coast of Australia, and soon -was
leagues away from the scene of the accident.

The captain of the Petrel came to the con-
124 THE GREAT ISLAND.

clusion, on his part, that the boys and men
had sensibly decided to wait till the weather
cleared, before starting on such a rash under-
taking as a hunt for his own vessel in a
dense fog and high sea. At Mr. Dutton’s ear-
nest request he consented to remain on the
ground until the next day, blowing his whistle
at intervals; but he said plainly that he did
not think the Southern Cross was in a condi-
tion to wait. With the pumps well manned,
and several extra hands on board, he had no
doubt she would make port all right.

Mrs. Dutton spent another sleepless night,
and the whole family were worn with anxi-
ety when the day dawned at last.

The storm had ceased, and the fog lifted
slightly, but the eye could not. reach farther
than half a mile in any direction. As the
weather cleared still more, it was evident that
the Southern Cross had disappeared. There
was no longer any excuse for remaining in
that dangerous latitude; and the brig steamed
away toward the east, on her course. Mr.
LOOKING BACKWARD. 125

Dutton, indeed, made the captain a large offer
to head about for Sydney; but the latter
had a valuable cargo on board, and said he
should surely lose his position if he should
make such a wide deviation. There was no
help for it. They must go on; and on they
went.

It therefore happened that at about the
time when the captured boys arrived at the
Papuan village, the stanch little Petrel, hav-
ing passed through the Strait of Magellan,
thus avoiding the ice and stormy seas south
of Cape Horn, steamed into the broad mouth
of the Rio de la Plata, and up to her moor-
ings off Montevideo.

The Duttons found the city a fine one,
with a good harbor open only to the south-
west, and thus protected from the storms of
the Atlantic. The streets were well paved and
lighted, and traversed. by lines of horse-cars,
which gave a singularly homelike look to the
place.

It may well be imagined, however, that
126 THE GREAT ISLAND.

our friends had little heart for such objects
and sights as interest the average tourist.

After seeing the party comfortably settled
at the principal hotel, Mr. Dutton and Rodney
Bigelow hurried at once to the telegraph-office,
where they spent the afternoon trying to estab-
lish connection with Sydney. Not until noon
of the next day did they receive an answer to
their despatch, which had gone nearly around
the world to reach Australia. The reply was
brief and to the point. It read:

“ Southern Cross arrived. Luggage held for orders.
No passengers on board. Boys left ship in small boat.
Probably lost at sea.’

Mr. Dutton paid the heavy bill with a sink-
ing heart, and walked back to the hotel with
Rodney. Neither of them spoke a word on
the way. “Probably lost at sea!” The words
rang in their ears as if they heard the words
across all those leagues of land and ocean.

Mr. Dutton broke the news as gently as he —
could to his wife and the girls, and when the
LOOKING BACKWARD. 127

little sobbing group had attained some degree
of composure, tried to form the best plan for ac-
tion. The kind-hearted captain of the Petrel
was hunted up, and called into the consulta-
tion. It was finally decided that Mrs. Dutton,
with her two daughters, should take passage in
a steamer for home, via Panama. They had
no more appetite for foreign travel, and could
be of no service in the well-nigh hopeless
search for the castaways.

Mr. Dutton and Rodney, having telegraphed
to have all the luggage forwarded to Boston,
succeeded in chartering a small steamer, in
which they proposed to return as near as pos- .
sible to the scene of the transshipment, and,
speaking every vessel that came in sight, leave
no measure untried for obtaining news of the
lost boat and its passengers. Word was to be
also sent by telegraph and mail to every port
on the north and east coast of Australia, with
the same end in view.

_ The parting was a sad one, and we will
not linger over it. Within a week from their
128 THE GREAT ISLAND.

arrival at Montevideo, the ladies were on their
way home, and Mr. Dutton and Rodney south-
ward bound on the swift little steam fruiter
Seftorita.

The first port made was Sydney, where they
found the Southern Cross in the dry-dock, un-
dergoing repairs. From the seamen, several
of whom were with great difficulty hunted up
among the saloons and along the wharves of
the city, the sorrowing father gathered every
detail of the transshipment, as far as known.
A minute description of the missing boat had
already been obtained from the officers of the
Petrel. One of the Southern Cross crew said
he had run to the side of the ship when the
squall came down, meaning to tell the boys to
climb back on board and wait for a better op-
portunity to cross to the steamer. The boat,
however, was already gone, and out of sight
in the driving rain. He had, indeed, seen a
sort of “‘smudge”’ for an instant in the midst
of the fog; but it was so far to leeward
that he did not think it was the boat, which
LOOKING BACKWARD. 129

he believed to be already close aboard. the
steamer. : j

“T thought “twas kind er reckless o’ the
youngsters to start,’ he said; “but I knowed
they was anxious to get over with their
folks on the Petrel, so I thought no more
about it.”

Learning that their luggage had already been
shipped, and having no further reason for lin-
gering in Sydney, the two searchers started
northward along the coast in the Seforita.
They hailed and questioned several masters
of vessels southward bound, but no news was
heard of the lost party.

Reaching the mouth of the Brisbane River,
they steamed up-stream twenty-five miles to
the thriving capital of Queensland.

The Seforita ran up alongside a vacant
wharf, and Mr. Dutton and Rodney stepped
ashore. Glancing along the river front as
they walked toward the head of the pier, their
eyes were caught by an object which arrested
their steps instantly. It was a common ship’s
130 THE GREAT ISLAND.

boat, moored to the stern of a dingy old
schooner at the very next wharf.

“Look!” gasped Mr. Dutton, seizing Rod’s
arm. “Am I mistaken? Can it—can it
be” —

Rodney read the name on the stern of the
boat. It was quite clear: — PETREL.

“The missing boat!” they exclaimed in one
breath, and started on a run to the schooner’s
side.
A LOFTY PRISON ell

CHAPTER XIV.
A LOFTY PRISON.

AM glad to be well enough to handle a

pen again ;* for though Will can write so
much more clearly and concisely than I, he
does not like the job, and I do. It takes up
my mind, and encourages me to think that
some time I may be reading these little blurred
diary pages to the dear ones at home.

In Will’s account he carried our adventures
up to the first night in Wolu, which seems to
be the name of this village. Strange to say,
nothing especial happened for several days after
our long journey from the coast. The natives
allowed us to go and come about the village,
knowing that we could not escape without our
weapons, but at the same time keeping a sharp

1 Here Nat resumes the narrative. — W. B. A.

e
132 THE GREAT ISLAND.

watch on all our movements, as we found
- whenever we strayed a bit farther than usual
from headquarters. We were allowed, too, the
exclusive use of our hut, and were well fed.
Every day Abia and Maruki brought us sweet
potatoes, Indian corn, bananas, rice or sago;
and our bill of fare was occasionally varied by
a bird, or roast kangaroo, killed by the natives
with their arrows.

Will spent a good deal of his time in bot-
anizing and investigating the general features
of the country. I set myself to learn, during
my convalescence, as much as possible of the
language spoken by the people about me.
Abia proved a most patient and faithful
teacher; and in a week’s time I could con-
verse a little with her, and make most of my
wants known. My vocabulary went on in-
creasing rapidly, and the knowledge that I
thus acquired proved afterward of inestimable
value.

Ted had improved his time, I should add, in
making friends of all the women and chil-
A LOFTY PRISON. 133

dren in the village. He took the babies in
his arms, and tossed them up, singing Irish lul-
labies to them. He helped the women at their
work, chased pigs, brought firewood, and made
himself generally useful.

Two or three weeks passed in this manner
quietly enough. In our talks among our-
selves, we had decided that our best policy
was to propitiate the natives in every possible
way, and bide our time. We were a long dis-
tance from the coast, and would stand little
chance of ever reaching civilized districts with-
out a guide.

One morning as we sat at our breakfast, a
loud wailing was heard among the women in
the street below. Going out upon the little
veranda which ran across the front of the

hut, we saw a party of men coming, bearing
a burden which proved to be the body of one
of the most popular young men of the Wolu.
We called down to Abia, who was standing
-at the foot of our ladder, to ask what had
happened.
134 ; THE GREAT ISLAND.

Agile as a monkey, she was-by our side in
a moment, and explained, as nearly as I could
understand her, that the young man, the son
of the head chief of the village, had gone out
to gather massoi for a fever patient the af-
ternoon before. He had failed to return at
night; and this morning a search party had
found his body, mutilated in the usual way,
where he had evidently been slain by a wan-
dering band from a neighboring tribe, whose _
tracks, and one or two arrows, betrayed their
identity. .

The sound of yells and war-drums presently
announced that the blood of the fighting men
of Wolu was up, and an expedition on foot
to avenge their wrongs.

“Some good may come out of this for us,”
said Will excitedly, as we watched the wild
antics of the frenzied Papuans. “ Why should
not we volunteer in the war-party?”

“Qh! you don’t want to go into the head-
hunter business, do you?” I asked, not under-
standing the whole plan.




In tHe VILLAGE or Wom.

“ Pigs were family pets, and swine were ata preminn,”
A LOFTY PRISON. 135

“Not much! But if we can manage to
get our gun and ammunition, and go on the
warpath with our friends here, what’s to hin-
der our slipping off when we are once away
from the village, and making our escape?”

“Sure, I’d like to shtrike one blow for ’em
before I left,’ put in Teddy. “They mane
well, especially the women, an’ they've trated
us first-class so far.”

“T certainly wouldn’t fight against them,”
said Will; “and we might be able to help them
a little, without actually taking part in the
fray. lLet’s sound Abia and Maruki.”

We called to our copper-colored friend to
come up and join his wife, and entering the
hut once more, cautiously suggested the plan
we had just conceived.

Abia, to whom I, as interpreter, did most
of the talking, nodded her head several times,
and held an animated conversation with her
husband, who appeared at first to look with
little favor on our plan, but was gradually
won over to approve it.
186 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“What about the bracelets and things?”
asked the Irish boy while the two natives
were chattering together.

This question requires a little digression from
the direct thread of my tale, as novelists would
say.

I find that both Will and I have omitted
all mention of one important feature of our
residence in Wolu. On the fourth morning,
I think it was, after our arrival, Abia, who
always brought provisions for our meals, and
cooked them in our own fireplace, deposited
beside a generous heap of rice a small armlet
of yellow metal, which she said the chief of
the village had sent to the strangers. That
is, I have no doubt, from what afterward
occurred, that such was the substance of her
remarks. I then understood only a few words
of her language.

“What is it made of?” asked Ted curi-
ously.

Will had taken it up, and was examining
the ornament with great care and interest.
A LOFTY PRISON. 137

“TJ don’t know surely,” said he at length;
“but Pm very much mistaken if it isn’t gold.”

“Gold!” cried Master Ted. “Why, I’ve
seen lots o those things, and bigger wans
too, on the women already. Sure, the people
must be made o’ gold here.”

“Can there be a mine near by?” I asked,
now as excited as the rest.

“T don’t know. ‘There’s no reason why
there shouldn’t be gold in New Guinea as well
as in Australia, as far as I know.”

“Then our trip may turn out some good,
after all,” said I. “You know that was our
‘useful purpose’ when we left home.” -

We let the subject drop for a while; but as
I began to manage the language a little better,
I questioned Abia more closely as to the mat-
ter, and the reason for the gift.

It seemed that our hosts had got it into
their heads that we were spirits, or, at the
very least, great medicine-men; and they had
sent the gift by way of propitiating us for the
hard measures they had used in our capture. .
138 THE GREAT ISLAND.

Abia and Maruki themselves, who evidently
belonged to a higher and more intelligent or-
der of natives than those of the interior, felt
no scruples in fostering the idea; and we did
not feel it necessary to disabuse our captors
of their mistake. They still retained our gun
and ammunition, but they promised to return
the rest of the things they had taken from
us.

In addition to this, and the promise of the
restoration of our goods and chattels, the
chief had sent us, at various times, several
more pieces of the precious metal, wrought
into various shapes, of the uses of which we
were ignorant. No amount of questioning,
however, led us to discover the source of this
wealth. It was a secret, Abia said, which
the chief refused to divulge, and which he
showed by his manner it would be unsafe to
probe farther at present.

Teddy’s question, it will now be seen, was
quite to the point.

“Oh, we'll fill our pockets; or, better still,
A LOFTY PRISON. 189

wear the things on our arms, as these fellows
~ do,” said Will.

“T wish we could find where they get all
their gold—if gold it is,” I observed.

“ Perhaps we may have the chance yet.”

“T don’t see how, if we are to-go to war
to-day.” .

“They won’t start to-day; they need more
than twenty-four hours to get up their cour-
age.”

It soon appeared that Will was right.
When Abia came with a brace of pigeons for
our noon meal, she informed us that the peo-
ple of Wolu were about to go through with
some religious rite, which would occupy three
days, before taking the war-path.

“They talk much of the ‘White Spirits,’
too,” she added demurely. “ Perchance they
will appeal to you for aid.”

When I translated this to Will, he was
greatly delighted.

“Tt’s all coming out just as I expected,” he
said, rubbing his hands.
140 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“But, Will, is it just right for us to let
them think we are spirits or gods, or I don’t
know what? Not much missionary work in
this business, I’m afraid.”

“Don’t you say a word, Nat,” said Will
energetically. “Our lives may depend on this
delusion of theirs. One thing is certain, our
race is enormously superior to their own—so
far, they’re right. We won't hold ourselves
out as gods, but we must let them do their
own thinking for a time. If we ever get out
of this alive, and reach home, we'll tell all we
know about the Papuans, and as like as not
some missionary board will start a mission
right in Wolu. That’s the best we can do
for them at present, anyway.” .

I could not gainsay his arguments, and was
silent, though it went against my grain to
think of permitting any kind of worship of —
ourselves as divine or supernatural beings. I
couldn’t help thinking of Paul at Lystra.

It was evident all day that the people
were in a ferment. The village was like an
A LOFTY PRISON. 141

ant-hill into which a hostile foot has broken.
Men, women, and children scurried to and fro
with no apparent errands, dogs barked,' pigs
squealed, and war-drums sounded.

At night there was a great bonfire in the
central square or market-place of the village;
and a wild group of hideously bedaubed war-
riors danced around it, making gestures which
filled us with horror.

1»

“Cannibals!” exclaimed Will, as we watched
their frenzied antics from our veranda.

“Tt looks like it!”

“The sooner we are out of this the better.
They may take a sudden fancy to ‘white
spirits,’ if the supply of prisoners runs short.”

I quite agreed with my companion that a
determined effort to escape, and that an early
one, must be made.

1 Nors. — Nat has not before mentioned the presence of dogs

in the village. Could these have been a variety of the wild
‘dingo’ of Australia ? —W. B. A.
142 THE GREAT ISLAND.

CHAPTER XV.
THE VALLEY OF GOLD.

T was high noon of the third day of the
religious war festival in Wolu, when a band
of warriors, their faces and bodies bedaubed with
red and yellow clay, gathered around the foot
of our ladder, and, brandishing their spears,
bows, and arrows, began dancing and singing
a monotonous song, the burden of which, as
nearly as I could make out, was to the effect
that three white spirits had visited the village,
for the express purpose of avenging them upon
their foes; and that the aforesaid spirits were
besought to descend to terra firma, and lead
them on to victory; in which case they would
be invited to join in the great feast that was
sure to follow — wow-wow !
“It’s time for us to start if were going
THE VALLEY OF GOLD. 143

to,” said I to my two companions, after about
fifteen minutes of this novel serenade.

“Tucky we have just finished dinner,” re-
marked Will philosophically. “All right, Nat,
I’m ready. Come on, Ted!”

We slowly descended our bamboo ladder,
amid the shrieks of the natives, and signified
our readiness to move at once against the
enemy.

It seemed, however, that one more rite re-
mained to be performed, to which our presence
was necessary ; and that the real start was to
be made early the next morning.

Followed by every man, woman, and child
who walked, we were marched out of the vil-
lage toward the north, a direction which we
had never before taken, the forest being es-
pecially thick, and encumbered with a growth
of lianas and other bothersome underbrush on
that side of Wolu. We found that a good
beaten path was known to our guides; and this
we followed in single file, our long procession
winding in and out through natural gorges and

BEDFORD BRANCH,
MOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION.
| ~ #46420 GATES AVENUE,
Ee BROOKLYN, N. Y.
144 THE GREAT ISLAND.

ravines, and always tending upward. Once,
indeed, we passed through an underground pas-
_sage a hundred yards or more in length, tun-
nelling, I judged, by a series of interstices in
the rocks, a rugged mountain spur that appar-
ently barred farther progress. The entrance to
and the exit from this passage were completely
concealed by vines and long drooping fronds of
ferns that grew everywhere in luxuriant trop-
ical profusion.

Inside the tunnel it was dark as night; but
the Papuans in advance of us kept confidently
on, and we could do nothing but follow.
The footway must have been cleared and lev-
elled with great pains, for we did not stum-
ble or make a single misstep throughout its
length.

Emerging from this gloomy passageway,
- through the second screen of ferns, we were
dazzled by the bright sunlight. As if by magic
the dense forest had ceased, and on the boldly
rising ledges of bare red rock there was no
sign of a path.
THE VALLEY OF GOLD. 145

“Hm!” muttered Will. “ Pretty good dodge
for defending the village, isn’t it? An enemy
might hunt a week for that entrance without
finding it; and if they did, it could be held by
half a dozen men against a thousand!”

I found the scramble that ensued leit me no
spare breath for conversation. Our guides led
us through the wildest and strangest bit of
country New Guinea had yet exhibited. Moun-
tain peaks arose all around us, some of them
shaped like Alpine azguwilles, several with their
summits hidden in clouds. Vegetation was of
a stunted order and most forbidding to the
eye, save a species of small rhododendron (so
our botanist said) with lovely white blossoms
growing in clumps close to the ground.

“Where are we comin’ now?” exclaimed
Teddy, a few steps farther on. “By the pow-
ers! it looks like a big theayter.”’

The comparison was a good one. We had
passed through a narrow defile, clambering |
along the banks of a brawling stream, and
now entered a vast natural amphitheatre,
146 ' THE GREAT ISLAND.

miles in extent. Some of the slopes were cov-
ered with low forest trees, and here and there
we caught the glint of falling water. The
stream which we had just encountered was
here expanded into a number of small lakes,
bordered with a sort of coarse gravel. I no-
ticed Will looking sharply at this gravel, and
then at the mighty cliffs and rocky bluffs that
shut in the valley.

The natives halted beside a little brook,
where, to my surprise, I found a number of
the lowest caste of Wolu men, who must have
preceded us. They were ladling up water and
sand in earthen pans, and twisting them about
in a queer way. Presently one of them rose
and presented the chief with a small bag of wo-
ven bark. The latter poured its contents into
a dish which was ready to receive it.

Will clutched my arm with a grip like
steel. |

“Look, look, Nat!” he whispered hoarsely.
“Do you see what that is?”

My heart almost stood still as I recognized


In the VALLEY or Goup.

© We had discovered the well-kept secret of the wealth of Wolu.”
THE VALLEY OF GOLD. 147

the character of the small heap of yellow grains
in the pan. It was unmistakably pure gold!

Like a flash the whole thing was plain to
me. We had discovered the well-kept secret
of the wealth of Wolu. These men were —
“washing” gold by the simplest methods —
“placer mining” it was, of the most primitive
sort; yet one after another of those half-dozen
miners contributed to the heap, until at least
forty ounces lay gleaming in the sunlight,
the result of half a day’s work, for I had seen
two of the men in the village several times
the day before!

“Think of it!” gasped Will under his
breath. “There’s a small fortune right in
that pile, and they must lose half of it in
washing!”

“Where can it all come from?”

Will made a sweeping gesture with his hand.

“The hills! They must be full of it, and
for thousands on thousands of years have
been pouring it down into this reservoir.
Why, the ground under our feet, the whole
148 THE GREAT ISLAND.

centre of this basin, must be filled with the
stuff, besides what’s left up there in the rocks.
It’s a regular Valley of Gold. With an
hydraulic engine here, and stamps to crush
| quartz, you could take out a million dollars a
year!”?

Any further computations on our part were
interrupted by our conductors, who, having
waited for the stragglers to come up, now
formed themselves in a great circle, leaving
us with the chief, beside the little glistening
pile of gold in the centre.

“What is the next number on the pro-
gramme, I wonder?” whispered Will, as a low
dismal chant arose by degrees from the ranks
around us. “This beats our concert all out!”

The chief spoke a few words to a tribes-

1 Note. — Will was undoubtedly right in regard to this natural
storehouse of the precious metal. Just such a valley, the famous
“Silver Bow Basin,” exists near Juneau, Alaska, and is profit-
ably worked exactly as he describes the process. Prospecting
parties are already invading New Guinea in search of gold; and
as this book goes to press, news is received of the massacre of a
whole ‘‘ gold’ expedition by the natives. — W. B. A.
THE VALLEY OF GOLD. 149

man, who ran forward with an armful of
sticks and dry grass, with which he lighted a
fire directly on top of the gold, much to the
disgust of Teddy, whose fingers itched to grasp
the shining particles.

As the fire rose higher, more and more fuel
was added, and the sound of wailing and
chanting grew louder.

Another sharp command, and two of the
Papuans led forward our poor Abia, trembling
in every limb. In her arms was little Oa, who
kicked out his hands and feet with delight as
the flames crackled and mounted higher.

Nearer came the dark-skinned mother, who
now tottered and could hardly stand. She
pressed the child to her heart, and then
glanced at the flames.

Up to this moment we had been puzzled
and stupefied at the whole movement. Sud-
denly her purpose was revealed to us. She
was about to cast her child into the fire, a
sacrifice to the gods of Wolu!
150 THE GREAT ISLAND.

CHAPTER XVI.
A PAPUAN WAR-PARTY.

“TOP!” shouted Will and I in one breath.

Will at the same time sprang between
Abia and the roaring fire, which, had we hesi-
tated an instant, would have been the fu-
neral pyre of poor little Oa.

The chief looked displeased, and said some-
thing quickly to a couple of attendants. They
were advancing to brush Will away, and carry
out the fearful sacrifice, when I spoke again,
this time in their own language, —

“Tf the child is burned,’ I said as impres-
sively as I could, “the people of Wolu will suf-
fer defeat, their warriors will be slaughtered,
their heads hung in their enemies’ lodges,
and their village laid in ashes. The White
Spirits have spoken.”
A PAPUAN WAR-—PARTY. 151

The chief conferred with his guard, who
looked particularly ugly at having the services
interrupted at the most interesting point; but
their superstitious regard for us was too much
for them, and the child was safe for a time
at least.

“Take the infant away and bring a pig,”
said the chief. The exchange of victims
sounds ludicrous; but we knew the Papuans
were thoroughly in earnest, and as pigs were
universally petted and cherished among this
singular people, the ceremony would touch
them almost more closely than the death of a
stranger's child.

Not caring to see poor piggy meet his fate,
we boys strolled away a few rods, without
hindrance, to the edge of the stream, where
we met Abia. She threw herself at our feet,
and would have clasped our knees, her grate-
ful eyes streaming with tears.

“Rise, Abia,” I said to her, hastily glancing
over my shoulder; “you mustn’t show too
much feeling about it, or it may go worse
152 THE GREAT ISLAND.

with you, and the little fellow too. I don’t
feel as if he were safe yet.” ?

“Nor I,” added Will, with an angry look at
our unfeeling captors. “The long and short
of it is, Nat, that we must part company with
these fiery gentlemen the very first chance we

”?

get. ,

“What’ll they be doin’ wid the little hape
o gold under the foire?” asked Teddy, whose
curlosity was greatly aroused by the strange
rites of the natives.

Abia explained that the patron saints of
Wolu were supposed to inhabit the desolate
fastnesses about us, and to sprinkle gold in

1 Nore. — Being somewhat sceptical as to Nat’s easy conver-
sation in a difficult language which he had only studied for a few
weeks, I asked him to explain his proficiency in the South Pa-
puan tongue. He said at once that he had written out his re-
marks at various points of his narrative, not exactly as they were
spoken, but as he afterward remembered the substance of them.
His vocabulary was a very limited one ; and he helped it out by
signs and gestures, often repeating what he had to say in two or
three forms before it was understood. Abia, in particular, was
very quick in catching the gist of his remarks, and often inter-
preted them to the Wolu people, although he has not always
thought it necessary to mention the fact.— W. B. A.




NATIVE PAPUANS.

Scene in the vicinity of Port Moresby.
A PAPUAN WAR-PARTY. 153

the rivers for the special benefit of this tribe,
who alone knew the secret of the “Valley
of Gold,” as, indeed, it was popularly called.
When any great undertaking was on foot, as
on the present occasion, a pilgrimage was made
to this spot, and certain ceremonies, resembling
in some respects those of the ancient fire-wor-
shippers, were performed, with the accompani-
ment, if possible, of human sacrifice.

While we were talking, the Papuans began
dancing about the fire, brandishing their weap-
ons, and shrieking invocations to their gods
and dire threats against their enemies. _

“T don’t know,’ remarked Will, “why
their actions are not just as praiseworthy as
those of Cromwell’s old ‘Ironsides, who used
to pray and sing hymns on the field of battle.
They are brave fellows, after all; and many of
them will probably be killed in this little war
‘cfore another week. It’s a pity” —

“What's a pity?” I asked, as he hesitated
and flushed a little. —

“To leave them without a word about the
154 THE GREAT ISLAND.

true religion! Well, we must do our best to
interest the missionary people when we get
back, if we ever do. Just now it’s certainly
a question of life and death with us.”

“And we can do them a good deal more
_ good alive than dead,” I put in.

At this point we thought it best to return
to the. circle, so as to avoid suspicion. Telling
Abia to keep Oa out of sight all she could,
but to remain, together with Maruki, as near
us as possible, we sauntered back to the fire,
where the poor little four-footed victim had
already been sacrificed in Oa’s place.

Well, I must hurry on with my story; for
TPve spun it out pretty long already, and we
were far from being at the end of our ad-
ventures when we stood beside the sacrificial
flames in the sacred “Valley of Gold.”

After a couple of hours more of this pran-
cing and howling, the dark-skinned worshippers
began to show signs of fatigue; the more par-
donable when one considers that they had kept
pretty steadily at this sort of thing for the
A PAPUAN WAR-PARTY. 155

last forty-eight hours. Their dancing became
slower and slower; they panted like tired dogs,
with tongues lolling from their open mouths,
and at length, to our relief, dropped, one by
one, from sheer inability to continue on their
feet.

The fire meanwhile had died out, and the
ashes being raked away, a small, irregular
molten mass of yellow metal was removed
with great reverence, and packed in a casket
of plaited grass for transportation. A sort of
collation was now served out to all hands;
and a strange sight we must have presented,
sitting among our dark-featured hosts, eating
and drinking.

“Sure, this is the quarest picnic I iver went
to,” remarked the irrepressible Irish lad, munch-
ing away at a banana. “I thought they might
give us a taste o’ roast pig wid gold sauce,
but the poor little baste is burnt up in-
tirely !”

In due time the meal was finished; and the
procession being formed, we “marched down
156 THE GREAT ISLAND.

again,” like the French army. It was easier
going this way; and the guides in the van
hit the tunnel with unerring accuracy, though
we had looked in vain for some sign of an
opening as we approached.

At daybreak the next morning we were
awakened by a tremendous beating of drums.
Abia soon came clambering up to our castle-
in-the-air with our breakfast, and informed us
that the expedition was to start in less than
an hour. She, with her husband and child,
were to accompany it as special attendants
upon the White Spirits.

“Good enough!” exclaimed Will with great
satisfaction. “I was only afraid these fellows
would insist on Mr. and Mrs. Maruki remain-
ing behind. Now for our gun and cartridges,
Nat!”

We sent Abia to headquarters with our re-
quest; and she returned almost immediately,
bearing a point-blank refusal.

“Very well,” said Will, “then we don’t stir
from home; or, if we are taken by force, the
A PAPUAN WAR—PARTY. 157

war-party will come to grief, and before two
suns are past, will come fleeing back to Wolu
like women, without a head, except a few of
their own, to show for the pleasure-trip. No
gun, no White Spirits on this picnic!”

I translated the import of Will’s remarks
to Abia, who listened with a look of perfect
intelligence, and glided down the ladder again.

This time the conference was a longer one;
but at the end of ten minutes we saw, to
our delight, Maruki approaching with our long-
lost weapon, followed by his wife tugging a
heavy little bag which we knew could contain
nothing else than fixed ammunition, No. 40.

In spite of their solemn promise, all our
other belongings were retained by the natives.
They were scattered, Abia explained, among
the chief men of the tribe; and indeed we
afterward saw several warriors with small pill-
bottles hung on their necklaces as charms!

We now took a last look at the airy little
hut which for several weeks had formed our
home, and which we devoutly hoped never to en-
158 THE GREAT ISLAND.

ter again, and descended to terra firma, where
the war-party was already waiting.

The sable warriors hailed us with a shout,
and placing us in the centre of the vanguard,
set out at once in an easterly direction.

For several hours we plodded on, now
through patches of tangled forest, now across
the open country. The drums were no longer
beaten ; and the Papuans, hideously daubed with
ochre and armed to the teeth, had resumed
the sullen and vindictive expression which had
characterized the band who originally captured
our own little party.

At noon we stopped for a hasty meal. Abia
waited on us; and I was glad to see that both
she and Maruki carried as big a sack of food
as was consistent with our rapid march.

While we were eating, a scout came in and
made a report to the headman which caused an
immediate commotion. The savages dropped
their half-devoured yams and sago-cakes, tight-
ened their girdles, and fell into line.

We followed suit; and the whole column,
A PAPUAN WAR—PARTY. 159

comprising perhaps fifty able-bodied men, moved
cautiously forward.

Suddenly the advance guard halted, and nim-
bly sprang behind tree-trunks. We were not
slow in imitating them; and none too speedily,
for a sudden volley of arrows whizzed through
the air over our heads and past our natural
defences.

Instantly the forest resounded with fright-
ful war-cries. The Wolu men pressed for-
ward, discharging their arrows whenever they
saw the figure of an enemy, and spearing the
wounded without mercy.

Their opponents, on the other hand, met
them with equal fury, and the fight seemed
about equal.

Just then Maruki, who had remained with
us as a non-combatant, seized my arm and
pointed to the right, where dark forms could
be seen dodging from tree to tree, at some dis-
tance from the main struggle.

“They're executing a flank movement on us,
Will!” I cried, showing him the new danger.
160 THE GREAT ISLAND.

“That's so,” he replied coolly. “It’s about
time for the White Spirits to take a hand in
this game,” and he raised the gun as he
spoke.

“Don’t kill any of ’em if you can help it,
Will,” I said hastily. “ We've nothing against
them.”

“Don’t you worry, my boy. A few bird-
shot may go wild and tickle them a little,
but that’s all.”

Without further words he clapped the gun
to his shoulder, and pulled the trigger. It
was so long since I had heard the old fowl-
ing-piece speak, that the report fairly made
me jump.

The Wolu men tumbled backward over each
other; but seeing that the enemy were still
more dismayed, and in full flight, they forgot
their own fear, and sprang after them with
fierce cries of exultation.

Will threw in another cartridge, and fired
once more; then the chase swept away through
the woods, the wild cries of the pursuers and
A PAPUAN WAR-PARTY. 161

pursued growing fainter and fainter, till they
died away altogether.

Once more we were alone in the wilderness
of New Guinea!

“Now,” said Will joyously, “for the sea!
Come, Abia! Come, Maruki! Don’t drop the
baby! Hurrah, boys! we’re free at last.”
162 THE GREAT ISLAND

CHAPTER XVII.
DESERTED.

HAVE hurried over the scenes of the last

day or two, because I see that I am drag-
ging my story out to too great a length. Our
march with the Wolu warriors was an excit-
ing one, full of details which it would take
many pages of my diary to relate; and if for
no other reason, I must be as brief as possible
because my paper is giving out !

On leaving our Papuan friends, we struck
off in as nearly a southeast direction as pos-
sible, our little party being reduced to its old
proportions, and consisting of Maruki, Abia,
and Oa, in addition to “us boys.”

We told our dark-skinned allies that we
wanted to make for the missionary settle-
ments; and they promised that if nothing un-

rm.
DESERTED. 163

foreseen happened, we should reach our goal
within a week’s time.

All that afternoon and the whole of the
next day we travelled as swiftly as possible,
under Maruki’s guidance. The ammunition
was divided among the party, and Will had
the gun. Abia took the whole charge of her
little boy, and carried him hour after hour,
astride on her shoulder, merely pausing now
and then to shift her burden from one side
to the other.

At night we camped in a dense thicket,
and supped off fruits and cold meat, not dar-
ing to kindle a fire lest we should betray our
whereabouts to any pursuers who might be
lurking about.

Bright and early the next morning we were
on the march again; but before noon I began
to feel light-headed. I could see that Abia
was looking at. me anxiously.

“ Temé-temé!” she murmured; and I knew
she discerned new symptoms of the dreaded
fever which had already prostrated me.

a
164 THE GREAT ISLAND.

We had no quinine and no massoi. There
was nothing to be done but to push on as
rapidly as possible.

Before night I was feeling very feverish and
feeble, with hot head and swelling limbs —
sure symptoms of fever. Worse still, when
we camped at dark it was discovered that
little .Oa was il too. Abia cuddled him in
her arms, and rocked to and fro, crooning to
him, just as an American mother would do
with her sick baby. At intervals during the
night we heard that low, pitiful lullaby, in-
terrupted by a wailing cry from the child.

When morning came after the long and
dreary night, I ate a little soup which Teddy
managed to concoct from a bird Will had
shot; and we moved on. I staggered and
stumbled blindly; but my two faithful com-
rades supported me, and we managed to cover
a few miles before we halted at noon.

According to Will’s calculations, Port Mores-
by, with its mission settlement, was not more
than twenty-five or thirty miles distant. A
DESERTED. 165

council of war was held around the camp-
fire.

We had now reached the season of the year
when heavy and long-continued rains might be
expected to set in at any time; and a delay
in such weather, without shelter or nourish-
ing food, would mean almost certain death
to me, in my enfeebled condition.

Teddy proposed that we should let him and
Maruki leave us, and, making a forced march
to the settlements, return with help. But how
could we be sure that they could find their way _
at once to Port Moresby; or, having reached
the settlement, could find us again in that
illimitable forest ?

While we were talking, a loud, shrill cry
arose from Abia, who had been seated with
little Oa at a short distance from us.

“My boy! My boy!” she cried in her own
language. “He is dead!”

Will hurried to the poor woman’s side, and
found it to be too true; the baby’s troubles
were over. Oa had gone to the Father of us
166 THE GREAT ISLAND.

all, white or black, and the little dark figure
in Abia’s arms was still and silent.

We were all shocked by this death in our
midst, which we had not dreamed was immi-
nent. Teddy had relieved the mother more
than once in carrying him; and we all had
grown fond of the little fellow, with his great
solemn eyes and pretty ways.

I tried to comfort Abia, and tell her where
we believed her baby was gone; but I am
afraid she did not listen. After that first cry
of grief she was silent, holding the little form
clasped to her bosom, and crouching over it,
almost as motionless as the child itself. Ma-
ruki was more successful; and after a while she
let him take the baby, and prepare it for burial.
There was no time to be lost, and everything
had to be done quickly. Will took off his coat
and gave it to Maruki, who accepted it with
a grateful look, and wrapped little Oa in it.
A small grave was hastily dug at the foot of
a great eucalyptus-tree; and the baby, tenderly
covered by Will’s coat, was laid in it. We re-
DESERTED. 167

peated the Lord’s Prayer over the grave, —
it was the best we could do; and when it
was filled, and covered with palm leaves, Abia
flung herself upon it. All night long she lay
there moaning, “Come! Come!”?

In the morning Maruki turned his attention
to my case, and tried a new remedy. He
stripped me naked, and rubbed me from head
to foot in hot ashes. After a while I began
to perspire a little, and felt decidedly better.
Abia joined our circle at breakfast-time, hollow-
eyed and silent; and by nine o’clock we re-
sumed our weary march. .

After a long, long day, the details of which
I hardly know, so miserable and dazed I was,
we flung ourselves down once more to rest,
but in my own case not to sleep. I tossed
to and fro, alternately burning and shivering,
until morning. At the first gray of dawn I

a Norz. —A scene very similar to this was witnessed by Sig.
Albertis, near Yule Island, New Guinea. ‘Can these people
be called savages ?”? he says. I am glad Nat and the boys
tried to comfort the poor mother as they did.— W. B. A.
168 THE GREAT ISLAND.

saw some one standing before me. It was
Will.

“Nat,” he said hoarsely, “the worst blow
of all has come!”

“What?” I stammered, trying in vain to
raise my heavy head. “Are—are you and
Teddy sick too?”

“No; but we are alone.”

“ Alone ?”

“ Alone in this wilderness. Maruki and Abia
have deserted us!”

I remember no more. Trees, Will, and all
seemed to dance before my eyes in a fiery cir-
cle, and then consciousness left me.

(End of Nat's Journal.)
CONCLUSION. 169

CHAPTER XVIII.
CONCLUSION.

O you remember, my young friends, that I
promised you a long and hard tramp
this time? Well, you have had it, if you
have followed Nat and his comrades through-
out their wanderings on the great tropical isl-
and. You have been adrift at sea, have been
in the hands of the most cruel and relentless
savages known to the explorer, — closely akin
to those who slew Captain Cook, — have vis-
ited the wonderful Valley of Gold, and now
are doubtless glad enough to be safe at home
once more in your easy-chair by a New Eng-
land fireside.
“But you haven’t told us what became of
the three lost boys! Did Nat get well, or die
in the wilderness? Was anything ever heard
170 THE GREAT ISLAND.

of Maruki and Abia? Where did Mr. Dutton
go when he recognized the boat of the Pet-
rel in the harbor of Brisbane?”

Patience, patience! and you shall know all
about it, and in a few words too.

On catching sight of the word Petrel on
the boat, the rich mine-owner and Rodney hur-
ried on board the weather-beaten old craft to
which it was moored.

The captain was ashore, but the first mate
was luckily on board. The old schooner, it
appeared, was a “tramp,” which had carried
a small cargo, it matters not what, from Syd-
ney to Somerset, a small English town on the |
extreme northeast point of Australia. Return-
ing in ballast, they had been driven out of
their course by a severe blow, — doubtless the
same which had disabled the Southern Cross, —
and when the storm passed, found themselves
within a dozen miles of the coast of New
Guinea.

They repaired such small damage as the
storm had caused, and trimmed sail for port,
CONCLUSION. 171

when some one caught sight of a dark object
floating in the water about a quarter of a
mile distant, on the port bow. The sunlight
glistened upon it, and at first they thought it
was a small whale, dead, or asleep on the sur-
face; but on cautiously approaching it, they
found it to be a boat, which, as it was sound
and in good condition, they hoisted aboard.
That was the whole story.

Mr. Dutton turned to Rodney, —

“Then they must have been driven north-
ward ”—

“To the coast of New Guinea!”

Two hours later the Seforita was on her way
once more, steaming swiftly down the Bris-
bane River. Once in the open sea, she headed
northward.

For weeks she skirted along the coast and
adjacent islands. Mr. Dutton was tireless in
his inquiries, and more than once encountered
serious danger from menaced attack on the
part of the natives.

Discouraged and heartsick, he kept on, and
172 THE GREAT ISLAND.

in due time the Seforita anchored off Port
Moresby.

Mr. Dutton and Rodney at once went ashore,
and sought out the English missionary, as be-
ing most likely to have information of the
castaways.

The two anxious visitors were courteously
received, but had hardly entered upon their
narrative when the missionary, a gray-bearded
kindly man, interrupted them almost rudely, —

“Wait, wait!’ he exclaimed, running to
the door. :

They heard him call to a native who was
passing by, and give him eager directions in
a strange tongue. Three minutes later a mur-
muring was heard in the village street. Quite
a crowd of dark-faced natives appeared, led
by a man and woman who were eagerly talk-
ing and gesticulating to the rest.

“Tell your story, Maruki,” said the mission-
ary, leading the man and his wife Abia into
the room where the two Americans remained.
in the keenest suspense.
CONCLUSION. 173

Their host interpreted as the savages talked.
Three young white men were encamped within
a day’s march of the village. One of them
was dangerously sick; and the two natives,
fearing that the others would not let them
go, had stolen out of camp in the night, and
hurried forward to secure assistance.

They had arrived, the missionary added,
late that afternoon, hungry and footsore, but
had set about at once securing volunteers for
a rescue party. Two or three of the white
men at the station would accompany the ex-
pedition, which was to start within half an
hour. It may be guessed that the party was
immediately increased by two! The start was
made on time, and at nightfall the expedition
encamped ten miles inland.

Maruki never lost the trail, but, keen-eyed
as a hawk, led the party through brake and
brier, straight to the little camp where the
boys, now almost hopeless, were awaiting their
fate.

The meeting of father and son, as well as
174 THE GREAT ISLAND.

of the old friends, may better be imagined
than described. Nat had conscious intervals,
and recognized his father at the moment of
his arrival. A sort of litter was made of
boughs; and stimulating food and drink hav-
ing been administered to the sick lad, the
whole party started for the little seaport.

At Port Moresby Nat’s fever was properly
treated; and in a week he had recovered suf-
ficiently to enable him to go on board the
Sefiorita with the rest, en route for Sydney.

Maruki and Abia were loaded with presents
by the grateful father, and the missionary
promised to make their welfare his special
care. They cried like children when the boys
left them; and as long as the landing-place
was in sight, Will and Teddy stood on deck,
waving their handkerchiefs.

The run to Sydney was a short one. From
that port passage was secured to New York
in a steamer which sailed two days after their
arrival. The voyage was prosperous, without
special incident, and in due time the ship
CONCLUSION. 175

reached her pier in the great American me-
tropolis.

“JT see them! There’s mother and Flossie!”
cried Nat ungrammatically, the tears stream-
ing over his cheeks.

“And Mabel!” added Rodney, waving his
hat.

Telegrams had long ago reached the Dut-
ton household; and all were there to welcome
the wanderers, who seemed to have returned
from the dead.

The crowd hurrahed and the band played
lustily as the passengers poured down over
the gang-plank, and clasped their dear ones in
their arms. Two hours later our friends were
all in a Pullman car, speeding over the rails
toward Boston; and at night they were once
more at home, safe and well.

In conclusion, it should be said that the
queer ornaments which the boys had brought
from Wolu proved to be of solid gold, with
very little alloy. The young explorers did not
sell them, but preferred to keep the strange
176 THE GREAT ISLAND. -

objects as souvenirs of their life among the
Papuans.

Mr. Winter and Mr. Dutton talked the mat-
ter over, and decided to send out a prospecting
expedition, to search for the “ Valley of Gold,”
and if possible buy rights of the native mine-
owners to work the rich slopes and alluvial
deposits of the valley; so it may prove, after
all, that the “useful object” of the boys’ ex-
pedition will be attained. At any rate, now
that they are once more safe at home, they
never will regret the weeks of toil and anxi-
ety they spent in The Great Island of Papua.
BEDFORD BRANCH,
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION
416-420 GATES AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.








xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20090316_AAAAAJ' PACKAGE 'UF00086390_00001' INGEST_TIME '2009-03-16T03:05:42-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:48:10-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299644; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-13T06:22:37-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '3' DFID 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00007.txt '
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2012-01-15T04:10:58-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2012-01-15T04:05:20-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfile1' 'sip-files00199.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-01-15T04:09:35-05:00'
describe
'2012-01-15T04:05:23-05:00'
redup
'7975' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZJ' 'sip-files.BridgeSort'
8637aa2d81c5f5f016304e4e96167900
f02c262ddaf56356b191051426d2abc534021f2e
'2012-01-15T04:08:55-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-13T06:13:28-05:00' 'failure'
xml resolution
'410052' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZK' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
6cd631383cfaf6a5b52084da08957694
66bf21788af7a73d1db3de169f049afe7682745d
'2012-01-15T04:08:32-05:00'
describe
'139309' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZL' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
dd2c7b75c8664111ebc38f7df1d0bc32
820f716aad4ae9e0b664d6eab345eb2075b0ba5f
'2012-01-15T04:07:06-05:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZM' 'sip-files00001.pro'
52905af4ad9dac92fa2c0242e1a7de95
9b1305090db1bf532347208d0c520b3848aff005
'2012-01-15T04:08:35-05:00'
describe
'30098' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZN' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
44093e2f2cadc0c684923016b422d864
4390f91d7172667a952c1a8e4094d03748664bb6
'2012-01-15T04:06:36-05:00'
describe
'9849452' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZO' 'sip-files00001.tif'
a5f4c4ec76a9393ac4c5f8cba69adda7
eed9a5cecfc351543ca26fadda4c95cf9b26ecac
'2012-01-15T04:09:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZP' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-01-15T04:12:00-05:00'
describe
'7140' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZQ' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
e84f5c3a345463bc70126484ec466730
1edd10924938cdc849c8eafac5f43f2b1d0a750f
'2012-01-15T04:11:39-05:00'
describe
'416704' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZR' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
8bdd56f968453b0f3cf015982765655a
13d16c9d7a3875e67aaf934793f53f896353377d
'2012-01-15T04:10:57-05:00'
describe
'84821' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZS' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
08452671a76566f1348f9a4bd4894f23
33ea001a5f9bd2495aa87019eb99123721c778a8
'2012-01-15T04:08:38-05:00'
describe
'4551' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZT' 'sip-files00002.pro'
5379b9905f5a726b6b6662e9429be498
dd090310713c552475cc00255726f25c1503db1f
'2012-01-15T04:08:51-05:00'
describe
'19743' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZU' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
b87a2e1ffdcfc451e14350b4082d58dc
76be2536faef3e3835c33076f273af840317792d
'2012-01-15T04:09:07-05:00'
describe
'10006564' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZV' 'sip-files00002.tif'
29c06673d57df0132d6b2140fe5fb67d
52d695a07cefbd66f88d21245bbabd1629b4f2ab
'2012-01-15T04:10:19-05:00'
describe
'345' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZW' 'sip-files00002.txt'
7c705688fd6a531ead21fcba8cbe41cd
f1ac9088f430fcb6d3b431f9fdd07a979720c302
'2012-01-15T04:11:15-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'4968' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZX' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
ebce9379c50dcf8cb61e6538c9ed4046
bf2de6426e33ba78e57545aebd5f12734ff9a0f1
'2012-01-15T04:08:00-05:00'
describe
'324416' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZY' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
b5a65dff6fa043cddb119ca8120446a1
f117f8ce942e9f120602e8ed485d9a5e78c9b801
'2012-01-15T04:10:47-05:00'
describe
'30617' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAKZZ' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
2f75a81f044d63a44d25f32a82976025
a0038d14904e0ab50d32c9daad202d100efa0678
'2012-01-15T04:10:49-05:00'
describe
'4711' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAA' 'sip-files00006.pro'
220efc04b53a19aa33ea11eb81af9800
2763fb18d6bfaa7f1bfff2f0e165ec6e5a897195
'2012-01-15T04:06:54-05:00'
describe
'9702' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAB' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
a1b6f268171a235c127e41377cc68c46
b9328e8eca24accfd6c65a75a16265c9e27f0d69
'2012-01-15T04:06:00-05:00'
describe
'2612252' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAC' 'sip-files00006.tif'
26f566c77e5f69d8b0694181bad4c4b6
6208c14192774a194ff0af82192f1a0bb14852c8
'2012-01-15T04:05:42-05:00'
describe
'237' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAD' 'sip-files00006.txt'
ce517ae59f88c868da2be1d9ee405ba0
57d18fab2322b9a71ac1dbaa7c1374e1b905c194
'2012-01-15T04:05:58-05:00'
describe
'3306' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAE' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
25e9f591563f824afe2dfa2d8408cfb7
5f2526d0f28439f47ec1de83228a2f79bfcf579d
'2012-01-15T04:06:06-05:00'
describe
'324832' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAF' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
291e40577188ba84ada327d2d7a5764c
719a13b8e2993d79b02adc9aa89f258a19c2de30
'2012-01-15T04:09:49-05:00'
describe
'12955' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAG' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
a6ef894157172dfbaf2233fefddd7689
f90429c5935b40b20440258761193dcd7a4afc04
'2012-01-15T04:09:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAH' 'sip-files00007.pro'
72dddcc74a94449be39dd73e7e896750
7926a1f444f31aab1e182aa36d5759f06e306568
describe
'3210' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAI' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
e2090da45dc2aba6e35aa46d2d85729d
5262ef2dc87ce13f958c203e815412eee1452d51
'2012-01-15T04:09:19-05:00'
describe
'2615584' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAJ' 'sip-files00007.tif'
0097a79f2bc4cdda85eaa8aa1c79e21b
b07ac8902f17c9916ef7c92bc4308f0c63a62768
'2012-01-15T04:09:24-05:00'
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAK' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
1da186f0b69d3a2dc48a3791c82b3163
8fbf20138a01b4917156f5a1af6348c20f756da7
'2012-01-15T04:10:30-05:00'
describe
'324659' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAL' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
ce58de6503e837f18c2194725f61b0b1
f583fe6bfe03df5148cbe6ca9d44d75e0e844122
'2012-01-15T04:08:49-05:00'
describe
'185701' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAM' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
3142b37f8e067008c9d99ddea651a93b
ae6e378a4a35be4c0a7442bf9df24939fd1d8b9f
'2012-01-15T04:09:16-05:00'
describe
'3650' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAN' 'sip-files00008.pro'
75e369d478fc43d874cb66bc1dcde379
a84c68164f97e38b27c17ebe6a4d07723dd5cf47
'2012-01-15T04:08:06-05:00'
describe
'44249' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAO' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
79cd5117def0efbe8078bd8c69d15e7c
02d1bc306bfd9346d338ef27f1aa458bd67b5469
describe
'2614340' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAP' 'sip-files00008.tif'
58d95ac026af9bf7914fabca1f5c4adf
250a19d1b747ea8c31b756bfd2dd4025c18b06d5
'2012-01-15T04:12:02-05:00'
describe
'442' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAQ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
c324bc1eb835c399f0e60884c5f2c1a6
8adcabb5059f29ca3b6c5a630a2568ad05ba779d
describe
'11233' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAR' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
3949ac14fc3af2f7ca19cdce230cc960
065cf31831c3ff20708d2ce50402b26beae12812
'2012-01-15T04:11:59-05:00'
describe
'324573' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAS' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
25a892e092317fa73a6fbac04b872b21
24c7728ed9f4c8bc07caa79adf7ecd6eb488e5a9
'2012-01-15T04:06:02-05:00'
describe
'45858' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAT' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
5a855c5fdedc519c444fd33389055934
a78ffbbdd6c40b155e4fc2c28343ac54dd519af0
'2012-01-15T04:09:36-05:00'
describe
'8730' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAU' 'sip-files00011.pro'
a295952388276e7b2da9f41fe93be997
9a8ed71a1456eba52f1af44818f72e5bedb5aa0d
'2012-01-15T04:10:41-05:00'
describe
'15542' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAV' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
08a19841ad4a6f5cf1ba7dfbc45464ba
09bdf3f77f946aed4f8d11eeb84ed853b21745d4
'2012-01-15T04:11:24-05:00'
describe
'2613492' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAW' 'sip-files00011.tif'
77952d5c4a5ad496c38b081a0b41a179
cb1940d79690a8905658651b797c837c7de46dac
'2012-01-15T04:07:38-05:00'
describe
'568' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAX' 'sip-files00011.txt'
23f35ed79c8d6828c01015b4e87cb59e
263e67addaa472c03d14d288c58592bbf4746dca
'2012-01-15T04:07:20-05:00'
describe
'5137' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAY' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
883d3dcd81147f5e174e90fc54b5c55f
c136506bfa83ea72166b391aeadef8531eb7d9c2
'2012-01-15T04:09:40-05:00'
describe
'324346' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALAZ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
d4ae4e7cc64f0952ae4d99c29209837d
72bd016f380cad99f48f16abb02c42f18adddeb0
'2012-01-15T04:10:10-05:00'
describe
'16369' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBA' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
691e30654976ddaca8fc089c9cb65988
e23fa5bc21069caafad7a5e2f5628146985d5aac
'2012-01-15T04:11:26-05:00'
describe
'3092' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBB' 'sip-files00012.pro'
eb248ebd768ca1bec484d32f657a862d
045324a6adea363976b4860e556b1fb410070a87
describe
'4875' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBC' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
e359233cd45ff94573e433542a37e390
5c669c8c0c75b18772c3f892bd651b831f6cd7ea
'2012-01-15T04:06:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBD' 'sip-files00012.tif'
b88478c65973ccf548b4d077b76ea47b
0a465c23970d055b992bf50deff7ef443e7f4190
describe
'273' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBE' 'sip-files00012.txt'
66a111de167bcdfd87d2d5f6abc0b0c0
36aa8fa70c6529e08ec65b650ed0b555b8790649
'2012-01-15T04:08:02-05:00'
describe
'1743' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBF' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
8704d4dfdcf0b08ca6c9ff47d7c92d08
0a63004849c1f9703a2a87042a19b89818a8d33c
'2012-01-15T04:08:25-05:00'
describe
'324566' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBG' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
25ad7a035d02f62fa95f0461d0056030
45e9147680c098f18c970305c289f3780882a675
'2012-01-15T04:07:27-05:00'
describe
'58264' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBH' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
9999bf59af45ace766fdf021f7bbeeca
c3cb5575cd6c1c9c08bd5f423ec6947129d102d1
'2012-01-15T04:05:35-05:00'
describe
'20445' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBI' 'sip-files00013.pro'
636ad3004251eba81016280560c63b06
20fda9f3a08aaaa0cc2816fc4fe25a0bf63c7bed
'2012-01-15T04:05:40-05:00'
describe
'22547' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBJ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
dfffc449acdb7697a64a5695f21d5afc
a557cf3ae1fab7d7b7886ad2f10f02680417d3db
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBK' 'sip-files00013.tif'
2aa76bf14cea94b5c34c6961e161819c
8e29c236fe8bc5dfcfe6610fdc1c744893443941
'2012-01-15T04:08:27-05:00'
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBL' 'sip-files00013.txt'
714d43246035f7c58bfd5e795503c371
ef338d1c2b8008ceac20d109f4c7b5232767b569
'2012-01-15T04:09:33-05:00'
describe
'6587' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBM' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
52ca92faa37fdbd1d5379ff8a865b6e4
a08a127b635c757682f3a48b42c911a2886c20a4
describe
'324650' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBN' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
3f0adaace55f65a61b5514fdd5eb1c0c
6b42c9b6e291813b982ce616e050e80785eadaca
'2012-01-15T04:05:38-05:00'
describe
'66067' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBO' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
3898ccf083e7e1197b3c6d2016c489a7
1ac565956a8e942e95ee65b8c4fbb527d31f8cbb
'2012-01-15T04:10:59-05:00'
describe
'19391' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBP' 'sip-files00015.pro'
feb5197ce49fd0017f6ff3c81ccba60c
d529ec55065ea0e0799adbe56e120b704ea7d474
'2012-01-15T04:06:14-05:00'
describe
'21628' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBQ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
428765bbdfea69a2214add290f7962d5
c143eba57e24944dade288b49d063317cb0b646f
'2012-01-15T04:06:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBR' 'sip-files00015.tif'
fe57cbd6e4e070065b77a36307918dfc
d6a5db99955f5ecb8e75ca572f5d285ddc9fe319
'2012-01-15T04:11:58-05:00'
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBS' 'sip-files00015.txt'
b9e9e4008361665bea77700b5454abd5
044c1fc8774d750d864327d71f8cc959444bc803
'2012-01-15T04:07:07-05:00'
describe
'6784' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBT' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
e73b2029441bdeef8198b1a808a6b822
8b0017684e6bab64f7003987357117313d80efa5
'2012-01-15T04:06:55-05:00'
describe
'324404' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBU' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
8ef2af8c3a7647943bb6c6135893fddd
85827aed50de6b77f73890c0e9cfb375aa5463ed
'2012-01-15T04:10:07-05:00'
describe
'74439' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBV' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
7cf505177d4a1b8abb542db16f6f82b2
a4916728a891ce215dfd56a001b08cddab46e9df
'2012-01-15T04:09:17-05:00'
describe
'16318' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBW' 'sip-files00017.pro'
f45f8b01e22f92b6ff90bd7eb0101737
a40c9ec9cc33a9abcf69620006a72acbebd8122c
'2012-01-15T04:11:20-05:00'
describe
'23244' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBX' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
25cde3838f29906280698a8260a0b6b8
8acdfab7308cd6f596bcad3a7e386107a175b062
'2012-01-15T04:07:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBY' 'sip-files00017.tif'
3d1093bbb34c77ef1dd05059603d5df6
41135d6a371f29ac1db9b953e331ef5382c9d17e
'2012-01-15T04:07:19-05:00'
describe
'716' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALBZ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
59f06205df29abb922f543c5201e0c60
b7c3cd7648f5b39e455c10aca7225bae6447469c
'2012-01-15T04:06:11-05:00'
describe
'7588' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCA' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
a88d402c194d4ef38818a07d24437de6
d999b1db0edca5e737fb5f4d182431adc213204e
'2012-01-15T04:06:16-05:00'
describe
'324807' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCB' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
255af6504fa72d4f6164f283697cb370
9d6826f89a10346f33a249409e1e8bf7ed61e233
'2012-01-15T04:09:03-05:00'
describe
'108271' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCC' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
de4bafb977ee81de2a5d65a13de17558
c368c2f3f6799f26900c2bf9012bed9f8ee5eb61
'2012-01-15T04:06:43-05:00'
describe
'25732' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCD' 'sip-files00018.pro'
a634c4ec9d58931cd3e15315d91de8a4
2e705ea0bbc0190f9465c5c92286059a3bc2a4c8
'2012-01-15T04:11:18-05:00'
describe
'36224' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCE' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
25f369c8cead1def4386535d252bd910
ae8e8b1b6debc20e02268c9b5b6b7a3e92e5241a
'2012-01-15T04:07:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCF' 'sip-files00018.tif'
faa474109caee8584466618e85f6afb6
075c4607fe899b9a0a2576d6bd1420be94023725
'2012-01-15T04:07:10-05:00'
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCG' 'sip-files00018.txt'
21cb9de3f1c093006fd7a6cf229fcf4b
906602f5c424ba6590439029553ce72cd4cf57a9
'2012-01-15T04:11:45-05:00'
describe
'10372' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCH' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
0cec0fea55929a093ff7fffb00d37255
23d8712dc4355887a1e4928a118267288ed56cb1
'2012-01-15T04:06:34-05:00'
describe
'324574' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCI' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
e21ea7e83646d15ad8f02c31476d69b5
bc8d47529352a1b6e9650fdc69e02d14fd7fdcf0
'2012-01-15T04:06:50-05:00'
describe
'108104' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCJ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
2a7ed0de387a48e7a8eda8fb77ef2bbc
d43e6df66b94ca21a9ac28c3905fba03e256bb41
'2012-01-15T04:05:33-05:00'
describe
'25781' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCK' 'sip-files00019.pro'
183629cbe72155e2352f0bc7383bd14f
c3a2421a0d4b701bcb6a58fdd347a060a53f2d7e
'2012-01-15T04:11:11-05:00'
describe
'36430' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCL' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
653f50f18298bc3be2cf8b0f94527705
568e88e079eb58d9c37e3263e91d0987c1193ad8
'2012-01-15T04:07:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCM' 'sip-files00019.tif'
d41997ae5fecd0750f9b9ee8e92f6a2e
421e303dc68c147fc941d90adcda2423fb251f84
'2012-01-15T04:06:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCN' 'sip-files00019.txt'
0fa51450467189941a8a1696c99c9c44
d506899a340ff48f0cc1ab333a4152c9c6bbbad2
'2012-01-15T04:10:31-05:00'
describe
'10747' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCO' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
9b5f5705da4002df70a58b5dd2315ccc
371b72f2b9897f8ac9ac213405a80fa4559f4f65
'2012-01-15T04:07:18-05:00'
describe
'324801' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCP' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
b9ba7b923021b721c5877fecd396af35
9390521b0f3864da43b4169f2154f4b3d5492fe9
describe
'96222' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCQ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
1c9167294422fff22284169dd63ee3da
905b9f9cacd609bba5d0bb4150babcd38c96ba83
'2012-01-15T04:11:57-05:00'
describe
'23349' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCR' 'sip-files00020.pro'
cded20e1719b06fb0102ae7749e15b17
42d9188d8d8de2935d8d965b90d98be87096a3ac
'2012-01-15T04:08:46-05:00'
describe
'32581' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCS' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ca65b9d4a8f4072dff8b0189a6e04a34
c887dd67b1acf90c444e1b60e04dc50012d555c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCT' 'sip-files00020.tif'
c520b7782fa1fd21d5631bc6372f0d58
5b0006258ebc36ea7cfbdc2af49e7d298946083c
'2012-01-15T04:10:26-05:00'
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCU' 'sip-files00020.txt'
6340d17590cc26406baafd56a0179461
951b5b684795508fd952061e57fa22eea7a46fc8
describe
'9588' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCV' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
7340195b6edae0f988dddabcc742612c
de52df4750499c6afa4d0057da43cf20046206c1
'2012-01-15T04:11:50-05:00'
describe
'324622' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCW' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
2acf51a6ad119a03cf1159c1b1ab56b8
b73b9ba961279adf64c7a42b227fe1ccb1e42522
'2012-01-15T04:05:31-05:00'
describe
'74452' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCX' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
b2c63edfcf0de1283fc5416987516723
33518a763869f81aed2fb60fd3fcbf69ea1167a4
describe
'17447' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCY' 'sip-files00021.pro'
7999cfef59f9a848dab03a64267dd8aa
edb4d7347a8e7ed615525388f152447629487329
describe
'25302' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALCZ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
f30095918bbf1e1efad0a5fff0a61a15
6f26142765c0bd03d9428f7e09d2ccca5a18dace
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDA' 'sip-files00021.tif'
9fdfdfb69be743263877e53b238cbfcb
cd3b90dda2b17b86cdf4d4ea7e7d86ec41c9da47
'2012-01-15T04:05:34-05:00'
describe
'695' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDB' 'sip-files00021.txt'
067f1969f6741e24c099597870f0b786
2cfd612aba6435bc374aee660a3f4dce7ce88be6
describe
'7478' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDC' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
512f4ee260609816139884e9ea891273
bf321b74c37c3383df7d4349cac4704a91338fba
'2012-01-15T04:08:26-05:00'
describe
'324548' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDD' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
d5644baaa8d68e6144f6888e87dae948
9834ec920f8929c051676ec030af8d7a83691ef0
'2012-01-15T04:08:14-05:00'
describe
'90854' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDE' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
c7127aa808409b92d57d073947ec106d
f28afb469308a9c17fa9b6e5c111b4f199432b84
'2012-01-15T04:07:59-05:00'
describe
'20082' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDF' 'sip-files00022.pro'
ab95e7624cf8fee988f846b7ce23b772
73448daddaa7ffe16d1943a0c6f11cc970c2c82a
'2012-01-15T04:11:47-05:00'
describe
'29060' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDG' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
2a8544369f7dbce3f3ffaef2124c0b3a
b970b52bdf67435c6840e451eaf2d5f36a26bf28
'2012-01-15T04:06:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDH' 'sip-files00022.tif'
2f18c1a51b8d39d02c99b78eb18bea64
d1d045a52d23b7076b192461550198db6e5d916e
'2012-01-15T04:08:37-05:00'
describe
'830' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDI' 'sip-files00022.txt'
8f107268f3b14931d5a51d70435a5156
7f74c8cf5943de3207a2cda8b42e4be52c85e519
'2012-01-15T04:06:51-05:00'
describe
'8856' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDJ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
fb6da18bdf65bd63c7396adb2719bdee
a73c382f2ed7feb4ef7708c0292c22104b6f9c46
describe
'324342' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDK' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
c5ede27ed291c106506d98668ce15322
9df70bbb28370b97c42acbc999c05691c076a250
'2012-01-15T04:06:10-05:00'
describe
'124807' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDL' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
cf370640e2a6f8f21d99ccead1e5c824
72fc8977929900e0a108259e510d4d783698ecdc
'2012-01-15T04:11:42-05:00'
describe
'29274' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDM' 'sip-files00023.pro'
7c763f127cb0153765a963a15875646a
5f66150a790229a8032d10e6ad70e71cee70b23f
'2012-01-15T04:08:08-05:00'
describe
'41955' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDN' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
e6dac6e3db3a71fceab84b04a39b69fd
48948bf88a84de35b3e8d58b65498d07f49c28e1
'2012-01-15T04:07:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDO' 'sip-files00023.tif'
9ea7b20b4a97978704d6ca5fc4212a31
d0d1eae9a4c4abe4bbfb8cf7f755cbba5c112592
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDP' 'sip-files00023.txt'
8b14aee1b07fea284a7e478ed6828ba2
d8b8fd62ec8c216d8b66da05fef4d5a47209850d
'2012-01-15T04:10:51-05:00'
describe
'12197' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDQ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
9e789eb808f18a743ab8f2da345f785b
5bfb9a246642be7ea45d4647200c62f2de0b6810
'2012-01-15T04:10:00-05:00'
describe
'324665' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDR' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
da7cf005af36a0d33ad56e2009e0b651
643dae567399adc7385ca5995cc23e72de9b0547
describe
'108087' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDS' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
ffe549d5e8b13d27f5c72845b44cfedb
9c886da7f15717b5d3b39ac1c739a3870da79797
describe
'25670' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDT' 'sip-files00024.pro'
7b3ab281a5fea3aa20edf167eb59f7a2
c43a5ff1523208825bab4456b075881797a7e938
'2012-01-15T04:10:11-05:00'
describe
'37279' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDU' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
434d59c6688afa55621312bef710ec38
099c1b7643a7ad297a41d71aac0b754dd29fd92b
'2012-01-15T04:07:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDV' 'sip-files00024.tif'
7e7a0d11ac06e447876485520114f70b
dafc46e8309e12b119444baadc9e7538f3bf5d66
'2012-01-15T04:11:54-05:00'
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDW' 'sip-files00024.txt'
51fc320a0772432a38d122788811ca64
8b1799b4936a8739a898221fd2bd97430608639a
'2012-01-15T04:08:28-05:00'
describe
'10886' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDX' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
53ec9134e638ffd9626b1c22070fb2e1
c9fa082ec668553602bc385a2e880286cad26a09
'2012-01-15T04:08:42-05:00'
describe
'324685' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDY' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
c1224e0dc4819f4504a4d196c3ad592c
d08e8d859a214b8d48cf73db556dd301c3ce4fe0
'2012-01-15T04:05:41-05:00'
describe
'100716' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALDZ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
6ef44c0a7bdf7d097fa034b8f26ea26a
a1de031ddf65475c19099c650e9481836336352c
'2012-01-15T04:11:37-05:00'
describe
'23949' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEA' 'sip-files00025.pro'
f9842b916de645df18861b218e213976
abe48fc5a5cd8fdec8be786ee7b6ff6eb9b0b51c
'2012-01-15T04:11:49-05:00'
describe
'34462' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEB' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
6946c13b7058931d86673f41959d4379
2194cf8756c9b5d9de0f9efb6fdfdf8cecb858c1
'2012-01-15T04:09:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEC' 'sip-files00025.tif'
30fa44676d63d5c9ef4c2c69aaab48b5
a09806387c6ec5a0e2b8913804c202b02e328bdc
'2012-01-15T04:09:06-05:00'
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALED' 'sip-files00025.txt'
06ac2a2da375684dab6e169c0b8d16c0
f28cd19fb011fb1d9c77ef11c69d5aca41610b1c
'2012-01-15T04:09:55-05:00'
describe
'10101' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEE' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
b653ebf1fdfd0a5c67e1a33f47ec78be
a6a2fd2ba198ce49374a19b08f577ec9d16eb207
'2012-01-15T04:06:42-05:00'
describe
'324580' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEF' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
261038ec11a54800d20d3c593302dfa3
e197e61f0e46816dbd1cdd1475c4fcf583c240fb
'2012-01-15T04:05:39-05:00'
describe
'96082' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEG' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
72486b4cde4119f658c6784ed127105b
f6a9e7c4e641c21719c38be28d55c3fc780dfef1
'2012-01-15T04:07:00-05:00'
describe
'22581' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEH' 'sip-files00026.pro'
5e1861a63309cd0a2a38b63a83ef121e
beb42ffa0907ade47ac7f5bd5705ce6f33a182a1
'2012-01-15T04:11:31-05:00'
describe
'32838' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEI' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
ead058dfa41f7c53c0ce40d0a7f0d193
76a571e4caf1d51b807f2e5cd12e3ee3cc7c36c7
'2012-01-15T04:10:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEJ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
9c7cfbf6a08a36043939827b545a8531
f90ec1a8a6fc13e9b31242d239a491d1d9682ade
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEK' 'sip-files00026.txt'
762686a856217be7baedd13eb613729c
260e38656578bf528417713ceb1213091b321cd6
'2012-01-15T04:08:50-05:00'
describe
'10088' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEL' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
12b2c104834d8a5e3e9b3df8fa9f69b4
48675553cc925ae1a4112959b63321b69912c6af
'2012-01-15T04:06:19-05:00'
describe
'324410' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEM' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
b9e4875b9f7f4aa17348b295b84c6376
29baa480829a10aa1b44378c1bd15d648b496254
'2012-01-15T04:11:17-05:00'
describe
'97167' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEN' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
740f67b54cc4c7e110773c17dfb91a68
2e7608a65c1e62203b00f36871a6e4fd2f66f0ca
'2012-01-15T04:07:05-05:00'
describe
'23329' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEO' 'sip-files00027.pro'
fe0c13702cf081b3765e3b7b2aa03a54
8ee38fe93e48bafaf2021164611a9ac276714853
'2012-01-15T04:11:19-05:00'
describe
'31658' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEP' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
bfb911c02ea47ecb504403be661bbb99
2d868cd81446d68ce9d9c3ee1dd9038a70550c52
'2012-01-15T04:07:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEQ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
e5f1878210e70d13efab86638b50af41
fa69b810a118cb9912dff0a6573f140e2a15fdb7
'2012-01-15T04:08:44-05:00'
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALER' 'sip-files00027.txt'
7d0f60e3684f87060c0a2679462dd136
6199e896c8c116464e31b64ccbc5d2bbecc95b28
'2012-01-15T04:11:21-05:00'
describe
'10013' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALES' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
5c39e3d0235eb1f1df388211ed1151a3
eb65b468b70ff8bb342d90c51f8a64381d5e9d51
'2012-01-15T04:09:05-05:00'
describe
'324687' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALET' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
e9bfba511cd28cbcbbbaa2dbc38ab0d7
6a9213ab8b657d6e7f249983d175295640a18e17
'2012-01-15T04:10:42-05:00'
describe
'102397' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEU' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
e08360b82e09e20cc695b48536e0e7bb
5c6e8c42d9d83f44a6a54acfb31af8d7e8e2ee8c
'2012-01-15T04:08:13-05:00'
describe
'24012' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEV' 'sip-files00028.pro'
2d9fa8c87adf3f7276fe2f6639709317
2ff5c4034e2666603d6e4a1ed7d9f788fa35be3d
'2012-01-15T04:11:28-05:00'
describe
'35037' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEW' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
9db7cedd9cd2cfabaa0d781e06bd5047
b6c80e4524dbcb1072e57613134061909fec17ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEX' 'sip-files00028.tif'
6ad7d444d47f26051247fed9bc335ad9
71b262e2df42196ffe7f013ab3e934ca9175ea9c
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEY' 'sip-files00028.txt'
c86d9fd367fb3fbbb1c4eacc2dfdcff0
57287b1243bb3f7adfefe3db8b5c77497e455a91
'2012-01-15T04:06:04-05:00'
describe
'10318' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALEZ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
054867aeb8eb8b5ce74af5b34814bed9
4f5c280b95a924e87a597fffd79d2347f252ae5d
'2012-01-15T04:09:59-05:00'
describe
'324838' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFA' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
e27948fc2d07ea34587c5f62d29824a2
15058cfe042ba17016660844aa32a27bff7cd852
'2012-01-15T04:08:41-05:00'
describe
'100393' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFB' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
62a3a8d7536cae084e9454237ec7e2e1
cffd9a431d84ab90ea811dd6d11c7013d62d4002
describe
'23641' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFC' 'sip-files00029.pro'
891ea3b94b92f75d12881357ffe17717
5e5eee193838a11b0c590e89a5efae81437204d4
describe
'33897' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFD' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
eaa2ac8a605c040057e0c4eecd2ff79d
f77c0d3a1e0cea82fbd77d1ea8cca61f58b58325
'2012-01-15T04:05:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFE' 'sip-files00029.tif'
7fc981ce18cc8e97408649e7295a9434
2d60dd502f79682c29e0dee9efef0e120327b71b
'2012-01-15T04:09:45-05:00'
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFF' 'sip-files00029.txt'
991bd8036c44c4098849307dcffb4df2
e158759ed12f223d725cbdaa08c10a8f89316606
'2012-01-15T04:07:30-05:00'
describe
'9975' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFG' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
a52d3d82eb0b6f6186f610cb9b252b62
2788df5687e98134000f2a9d9f9990fea166ff23
'2012-01-15T04:09:22-05:00'
describe
'324826' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFH' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
e7200091037931ab08ac1f65fadd9ad2
757ef4b3ade3f672f5d6b325f70988d3146b8586
'2012-01-15T04:07:03-05:00'
describe
'110137' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFI' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
62a28d6db57b0a3b8618b7c99dd744f7
62bf288d9cabf396e0456ff16a452eebe627ae2c
'2012-01-15T04:08:33-05:00'
describe
'25836' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFJ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
59aaba97c6d12a6e93d121fe05aad98b
8113da632cca080822b3d6c6806c2303e17dd14b
'2012-01-15T04:10:37-05:00'
describe
'36863' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFK' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
27b1580978ae210b67f59e421cccc43a
98710ca6c0934be0bc2cc4f0ff37ba278049d656
'2012-01-15T04:07:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFL' 'sip-files00030.tif'
8f0c4e9043ad127998e7ee83bae4815f
65fc21f9fa800a7bdb6939007b7882f8b5a4374f
'2012-01-15T04:11:51-05:00'
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFM' 'sip-files00030.txt'
7e1b60c52786b0ff124af3da88df6d5b
cdc9d1c02f498a743ab900cf8bfb6e1f9e6dd486
'2012-01-15T04:07:22-05:00'
describe
'10982' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFN' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
5dec504c2aae48e5a56e2cc029699b8f
b3b93715edb05341fa8cbc26dd60ac075e033188
'2012-01-15T04:05:37-05:00'
describe
'324840' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFO' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
564ebd40c2a92e393bd577bd03703a0a
9f1bf1940cde20e478a1a86bf5667efe08ef332a
describe
'105812' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFP' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
f72a0abe7bfe50eb15a0bed96b42524c
c329c17d63efe8540675ba9240b34952fbec3dbd
'2012-01-15T04:06:03-05:00'
describe
'25749' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFQ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
cfb4b6785395aa2c86fe8470a20bcd6a
c02a5b6fec1ff0c08ae9b2da7578e4bc1ec24811
'2012-01-15T04:09:54-05:00'
describe
'35533' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFR' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
016cf0fdad6b90aad48a21422df64876
00f9f0bef6f13c9da2e8ff06f969a4bcb5f01256
'2012-01-15T04:05:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFS' 'sip-files00031.tif'
946abb129fb4e316055813a55c793e45
b9e833203945989d137d14c1998e0edc20ea3469
'2012-01-15T04:06:49-05:00'
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFT' 'sip-files00031.txt'
91ee80d9d8eeb9723c2fa3b96e7229f1
8a0038084a39703966c5cd3e2fe47705eb3a5418
'2012-01-15T04:07:24-05:00'
describe
'10494' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFU' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
14d180ceddcc88e22c4697a2115426cb
a81d7e2b69045e1a67873b87c97b73d9a0eed2e5
'2012-01-15T04:07:14-05:00'
describe
'324676' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFV' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
79caf0c81aa9d93c08beaf08b70a2565
46aaf8db0d74ddbbc098406c086d9dd439f5150a
'2012-01-15T04:08:53-05:00'
describe
'108001' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFW' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
eca4dc081100020d3ee305f8395503f9
2331ac5b0b819e1a3d8a3c85d5dc3e4c5447c50d
describe
'26204' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFX' 'sip-files00032.pro'
6349304866e0fdf89849e2dcf5c633a0
b9ad9fc8cbf5c26398838e1cf6299301eeeaf742
describe
'36108' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFY' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
9e4b0741919cbf109014990deda394f7
099ac95f4f7fe3b17bd64dfc29e561fd804d49a1
'2012-01-15T04:09:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALFZ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
e205845363488dc3dd0255dfb74fedb3
8d13f0ff265fa225d9f8598aca354775c35fe0c7
'2012-01-15T04:06:15-05:00'
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGA' 'sip-files00032.txt'
9b0564ced09dfefdb98966e30b1215a8
893b3b0c8072cfd116149a2014b2170c4aff77b8
'2012-01-15T04:11:46-05:00'
describe
'10624' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGB' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
4155bd458879766b80d35db76bb0596c
2ff91a44abc87cf9a80d25705ba66f93da517b2a
describe
'324595' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGC' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
85481defb5ae2e48f9cda37ae95beac3
a62db17af59603bcc3ae4ff587dbd4955a2eb4da
'2012-01-15T04:10:32-05:00'
describe
'36951' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGD' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
3314ef05a0530ff6c6f0a744930cc53d
1a4be040052c278795eefed6201f34645224ab0f
describe
'6721' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGE' 'sip-files00033.pro'
ed487a0b78b2740d04ad44df06e64740
438c0528e12850ab79ed86239312581848e51528
'2012-01-15T04:05:30-05:00'
describe
'10490' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGF' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
05363837f7f44b8dc8dbf6b28ef5aeff
1b308f6551a6a851c7430376d5cd89dd5887c255
'2012-01-15T04:11:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGG' 'sip-files00033.tif'
de801436cc8f8591c80e2c751cb96b52
d65480014859a141b644e01e6aebf1a281c05f90
'2012-01-15T04:11:48-05:00'
describe
'289' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGH' 'sip-files00033.txt'
b1be552f83b59ce502c455afee6a3ae7
478fa84d4ed916aaed690b2811c142c8dfc0e23d
'2012-01-15T04:08:22-05:00'
describe
'3413' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGI' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
7d54cb6521b66efde157f9c9d77c3ae4
f35c7e5ddbb8ea01d2527d0c93c2fd2151d3e383
describe
'324836' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGJ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
4d039c5cffd39e8642a8a7d9b0a2363f
ca0274440206829f6641ba485f7173ef624e042d
'2012-01-15T04:06:25-05:00'
describe
'84618' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGK' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
f49865990dcd9b3fe9bf3e7244d6ad0b
923ad3fb20a240597098bb471823f774822bade5
'2012-01-15T04:10:16-05:00'
describe
'18657' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGL' 'sip-files00034.pro'
4c73040435982337cedd5b4bb0d65a0a
d40c2168654edddd567f4182e75c716395abf4ae
describe
'27024' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGM' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
115c5c558d8b1c442872ada6a0c4a20b
539eb8478eb256cef7fb5fdf7a3ecd688287c861
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGN' 'sip-files00034.tif'
01681e405303e028554db8cfe6001308
2635c185f5eebab8864be0c24e558a667a7b8af4
'2012-01-15T04:08:36-05:00'
describe
'772' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGO' 'sip-files00034.txt'
a39e95af8456e729e45ca49616c26c65
fbd2dc6bef110915663a20ce56c0179af3506bfa
'2012-01-15T04:07:47-05:00'
describe
'8592' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGP' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
b26b76dd440f472a20ba4fdbbbc5b418
4783ecc2b06690dc85e4f1b5f6903dad88d0b8f2
'2012-01-15T04:07:13-05:00'
describe
'324403' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGQ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
f99a792552a343e058dbbde36f5e92a5
8ba5e00e8e76e66865c9ca068c18a396f5970109
describe
'112975' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGR' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
005d3c8fecc95e736335789dac41c89b
5bb139cf1d39ded3b7427f8d4869dd1497e672ff
'2012-01-15T04:07:55-05:00'
describe
'26260' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGS' 'sip-files00035.pro'
9035bd509861bd29c0046ca9c16116cd
7974b326c483a47241e2319173edf276c1cb0f0b
describe
'37713' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGT' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
3451fc2dbdf0302daee35274fd794a9e
4f261c0203171e3cac622869e560bd56aea623b8
'2012-01-15T04:10:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGU' 'sip-files00035.tif'
e05c7f64513cc126f912d70e270315ee
b40d103daee945a54dda9092d13d0fdf5e2c3687
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGV' 'sip-files00035.txt'
8e59ba036621e323767964d610ea2950
57dc15f4abb40f7c5ae0294c1996d9b0b5a61a86
'2012-01-15T04:10:36-05:00'
describe
'11093' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGW' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
8dd758fa0b748f03b7db2c8bc22e7b3a
ae37120df8171c30af847f0bdb7721e7d4acbd27
'2012-01-15T04:05:44-05:00'
describe
'324425' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGX' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
912e0cbbd6055775e24c4361b60aeff4
d3e6b5b4c0a3671cd3c7db561320e0ce1fb162d4
describe
'114553' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGY' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
9d45f835e5e960cbc606c88cde3acc46
110799e81176d568344c064a5da0bc799ff52974
'2012-01-15T04:07:37-05:00'
describe
'27460' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALGZ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
26fdc11da8afe8c7162a4772014eb177
e26c3bc9bb039e847393d80c3cf657a40b083db4
describe
'38890' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHA' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
ade46d067a317643fbc95a2df3cdf8f4
52d0d2a97154afd231e1cf5cc9a582f8307da738
'2012-01-15T04:11:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHB' 'sip-files00036.tif'
3bc5e5397d43dc833c67323ac788c429
06b5389f4f90463cc751acdc6e084734b2443bdd
'2012-01-15T04:07:15-05:00'
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHC' 'sip-files00036.txt'
3770fc8a1fae986c3e03bda1592853ff
43bd99a5dcfd240d1e7a3e7db32836d3a524c717
describe
'11368' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHD' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
e633984bc7b4627b18c6c388cf558b12
106503af57745ef22952cd56dbd6c121ea0cbccb
'2012-01-15T04:11:35-05:00'
describe
'324813' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHE' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
7113c86d18438d1bb4e55e5852e103ce
c13e7d834daff829124452f248279fb25dea96be
describe
'108939' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHF' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
c091c58d6e850fc8f625ff2611a8cae0
328d77e6e274e5bf3ce594d4fa1a214719da2d54
'2012-01-15T04:06:17-05:00'
describe
'26128' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHG' 'sip-files00037.pro'
1005e12fa3c96617b69c808445a25fa2
7c8eebd0cd00cb0f6a8ddb561169020661f656f2
'2012-01-15T04:11:00-05:00'
describe
'37202' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHH' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
9f787b9ac664dce31e88a7e8b3ad5ffd
d0a6c7e25f95caa6f95ab6bafdeaca84282b5913
'2012-01-15T04:08:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHI' 'sip-files00037.tif'
88469703848dd37c8e21e615baa68c70
118f84d52e2cf48a3f3fd976f8e69e00ed3d9bb0
'2012-01-15T04:11:38-05:00'
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHJ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
603e74c30651216aac645f52e4a0d829
eedb52c3b9b8d728cf389f597d458939c5f5f92a
'2012-01-15T04:07:34-05:00'
describe
'10822' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHK' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
ce1ce45cf5b7396cb0844d38db67a975
7378baf9886e141ff0a3db0cf039efdb22a39fbb
'2012-01-15T04:05:50-05:00'
describe
'324797' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHL' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
074d75fee2e357ec40f94265f24ff37f
4f51374122f5998db91783c73060f302a72b6c61
describe
'111368' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHM' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
6b6d506266089497b0aaf61034fa2220
4f7e1a490176538eb1c9f7e6f1f931e45f9ec658
describe
'26751' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHN' 'sip-files00038.pro'
7e908778b6bb1dc5553fb2fdf4043df0
b5dac7b928ca844732595f4e4d1d4582d97f9269
'2012-01-15T04:06:39-05:00'
describe
'36598' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHO' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
cee896eaf45d137ff25c1c701784d5cd
d8d15a1cf76def237b1053b1f3ebfa68c8527a4d
'2012-01-15T04:11:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHP' 'sip-files00038.tif'
eeb8f20cde5b2c6c82704af2f5821e18
998d6f1b448f24887eb9afdaefdba1a4edff6fe2
'2012-01-15T04:10:54-05:00'
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHQ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
d3c08bc46b0c3bdfbbce076f3f8cf30b
c79aa9303f0cec7a83419e28ad010defe746238b
'2012-01-15T04:10:14-05:00'
describe
'10812' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHR' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
448cafc20c5f51fcfcffd52a20ec4514
51062b2b47da63c6ed4f82ea7bc595e1310b5ef2
'2012-01-15T04:12:05-05:00'
describe
'324776' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHS' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
920a5840d857f4738ddf0e6f1f97a505
f8d0fc277acc28bd87891bb0528afcbc4b22e570
'2012-01-15T04:11:56-05:00'
describe
'111389' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHT' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
1c35ad1ee87e87e3d402fb53a3979d8c
776fa980d87700c8bf738f9fc7471e39bbdaee40
'2012-01-15T04:07:58-05:00'
describe
'26499' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHU' 'sip-files00039.pro'
a02d10091bee8accada46d35a41d90d7
2599d773928d52187a83c8595b519c8b5515a265
'2012-01-15T04:06:46-05:00'
describe
'37218' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHV' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
24d8a27546a5e9e8cb92a852c9c0ef21
0f8c5817b106b660e77c40f8e44cc86a679cfdec
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHW' 'sip-files00039.tif'
4c59051fb90d7abe25a5faefbb2a0e76
1d0838b51b80e3a35078dab5b21e9ebab92cb9f6
'2012-01-15T04:09:13-05:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHX' 'sip-files00039.txt'
ca586cd77f8fc74471694582fcf7c750
4850870383293163ef2b8e5083ddc5c72e665d10
describe
'10682' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHY' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
48ce0f99783adb8ec7f4809b3f69c5ee
091cfdb87cde9d189a6a9e187e7b7a012af79d48
'2012-01-15T04:11:27-05:00'
describe
'324644' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALHZ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
3c78fd01d116d3188691a74e784d8f12
ea1e8e10c0119aa06af5592b69486b6b6b6f7bf8
describe
'109648' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIA' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
6844ba874357ae893fe14b7f832c9315
9a5ac2f58d5ae7c067e296da5dc12503343e9e05
describe
'26048' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIB' 'sip-files00040.pro'
faf1e9b9d8a34ecb59b9509772e6d425
c9c798b6bc8b4e5c3b3598c6ba6a345d1e86f49f
'2012-01-15T04:07:32-05:00'
describe
'37889' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIC' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
a0c6aa83d3d38bedb9c8b8457888bc58
0e08c56a8332e53d3af5947e0b1112653e38d79a
'2012-01-15T04:09:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALID' 'sip-files00040.tif'
e38e83354707d943f0be30aa6f79f52f
b5b7567980f365b184db66ba7ac8709d77cfe401
'2012-01-15T04:09:44-05:00'
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIE' 'sip-files00040.txt'
ba35e2a55f32992e3f0ac15f4fbed4cb
63af0d4e92456312f0e1ec757ebd8458422d78ca
'2012-01-15T04:07:56-05:00'
describe
'11029' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIF' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
1271b1d3823ef95ae07e61d5002c4816
ec43f10bc05db0abc1934f729e91c04dbad37a97
'2012-01-15T04:07:01-05:00'
describe
'324564' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIG' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
dcc8456603fffc5371e9b255a9de11fe
5edf5db4931e5560b667431be80238bcb1533f4f
'2012-01-15T04:06:13-05:00'
describe
'108605' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIH' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
f467921dc9e67189e30dad5efbdf830c
d6c2ade922850ee8e13e9a4d59e76d6f5437175d
'2012-01-15T04:10:12-05:00'
describe
'25927' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALII' 'sip-files00041.pro'
8d2cd5a0b0f6774302a4f66ca16fd8b4
e2ab147d4830e9e2582d75ad4086f697f17fa7be
describe
'36489' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIJ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
96635ebbdbc80faf5a75915764407032
42d84d229479042ff9e5be0c4e8f5b436e12aa27
'2012-01-15T04:07:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIK' 'sip-files00041.tif'
df2a80b72bc64652763c367aff5c7861
15e08a551bf9f160fe72a4b997f2829a9878b36b
'2012-01-15T04:10:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIL' 'sip-files00041.txt'
4a6c4162792abf2d11b64daf4b2e16f3
71179bd83040184252e5bcf63d3b92c22ab86af7
describe
'10669' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIM' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
5ff514f0c2ddc512090d1fc25a9866e5
12097f50fec57d017217218da9e25785e893ed4f
'2012-01-15T04:09:39-05:00'
describe
'324568' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIN' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
c260840125e75c810082091b234b317a
9e2f50a34632b4e9f5fb81f1323d1aed0e78728c
'2012-01-15T04:10:43-05:00'
describe
'76411' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIO' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
699e274dccc895bc4faa2df12d5f65e5
8f2dec3ce7913436a081dc0c558a99ff6e5265fd
describe
'18046' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIP' 'sip-files00042.pro'
25a759aada785c679165fa23ae339ce4
687e9cdcd7655c8916a3a10ca37c642b41f4f56d
'2012-01-15T04:09:23-05:00'
describe
'25132' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIQ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
1bc34f72680e994c5c3dba552c556c4e
83c6d4c9cd02f8acf45392c210e026d02adc320d
'2012-01-15T04:05:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIR' 'sip-files00042.tif'
2460e85eef2e78aab8e20c4c55554e86
3803b29fe1595a9118260aa5c98faae5b0e476d6
describe
'720' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIS' 'sip-files00042.txt'
ec51c7d5ac23c81ec6551f6ed7d53101
3d13611defbeac3e23cfac8b0b0e4655d8393cde
describe
'8175' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIT' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
ca8c10f2f3f0cbe5101c33b8b8984970
d5981c0132c5fece657b650555a1d03111e481a3
'2012-01-15T04:12:04-05:00'
describe
'324844' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIU' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
da6a2d00608e6be9d5d78e1c6bc3a5f6
f6e7955ad547d2d51524b837ddf5fe6562be596a
'2012-01-15T04:10:48-05:00'
describe
'82359' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIV' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
8adb31dc4a0a1c6bf76f077bee38d848
e78d84bc17195c283697436b93fcf2697d3ae2d7
'2012-01-15T04:08:10-05:00'
describe
'19054' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIW' 'sip-files00043.pro'
b70ed395bc9a90c33b4e88e34ff9e969
95a73d0a6bff2d579f8a2803f7b4373da46d1e76
describe
'28655' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIX' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
09228a559e110756238b2f0f68d510fb
ef302d591aceae3ab418abc0625777a6284c639e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIY' 'sip-files00043.tif'
cde39680320e5e270ba353db280ffb3e
a472ed118c9a5224005161998ad092f7c976d904
describe
'796' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALIZ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
8478d3e5a56a89825641643b173385fa
b318e64f5f79b6373c23ab606697cbee14c475cd
'2012-01-15T04:10:56-05:00'
describe
'8366' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJA' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
9dcc22727982a44e1199f632b9bbeb84
0ec9affe1d73be6fc18cab436b186b509b9ca1f2
describe
'324563' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJB' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
f7b0baf0ad0991fa1c309023cb404615
2d8781d9e9d5b9c92ddfa7c4d673fa16ee6c1db8
'2012-01-15T04:09:11-05:00'
describe
'104215' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJC' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
6f5be466ca51b28f981f2663d3f5fdad
84f8f8f40f488bd030080e9b321e12332113970f
describe
'25871' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJD' 'sip-files00044.pro'
ab6f482c07c6b6bf95bdacadd543b43a
c45b2db1900717417f67ebfa81f29535c486fe0c
'2012-01-15T04:10:55-05:00'
describe
'34886' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJE' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
aa4ac7ff85bbe0e742ddae5802708f0e
76979b234533049185c56e36ead4873bb4bd461d
'2012-01-15T04:05:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJF' 'sip-files00044.tif'
f0be16d8147280e5f773a64dc590bd23
e58da54e11dc7a2df0a789919b05b1d1e1d87a0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJG' 'sip-files00044.txt'
05c11f09b00f4dcee8568224425f6e9c
56f24eaf4a366496aa9c93abfd8129a0140992a5
'2012-01-15T04:07:29-05:00'
describe
'10821' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJH' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
d1e069d779c25e718b87eab5b3461345
77b16a54f0eb1201648b9ba4f59d5a0acd7371e1
describe
'324534' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJI' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
39af344619c63f5a0f541f9ad0c0c228
227f8e26ef9054bed97d79f6f878af05707c5dc4
describe
'108090' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJJ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
c489ae32d50f38492b6bf3adcc1a6c7e
1ca98dfe46a3eaec357e2c2a00923cb8048a8e32
'2012-01-15T04:08:16-05:00'
describe
'26229' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJK' 'sip-files00045.pro'
a5cc0a7e1647e67eba6c6bbee03a10c0
0551479be0f597bf4a4a85855ba8cbc3854cabc9
describe
'36977' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJL' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
a388ca115986cb71cc0e27bb2da9c448
435f8f7c73e2dd425f69557acabebbae21eb3ac3
'2012-01-15T04:09:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJM' 'sip-files00045.tif'
9b7db09cc83c5ae4e3a820f92d63c9fc
71fea70ae02845c01a29c895254a520272edf9de
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJN' 'sip-files00045.txt'
72bc7b9586289989cb29938e6ef4cd2c
267102c2cf2e26ca96ed390df8a2fd360e8e900c
'2012-01-15T04:08:54-05:00'
describe
'10919' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJO' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
9235d0ad1b2ecd19881d5d88f3162ff1
1470072b82d14f3d295124ab8b9cb2d59491ab84
describe
'324567' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJP' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
e711b348e51bc2c439b343f6c02b9bcc
a389eb47937717bc7e0211651a613fd5b176e2ae
describe
'97656' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJQ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
43bf4dab86570392b6ba947a8bd18bc4
6991e325b7356e96fbbf0cc26a93b650e0446d57
'2012-01-15T04:10:53-05:00'
describe
'23118' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJR' 'sip-files00046.pro'
5dc935c347fd3004d5350bc8e5fa01c8
9619d95d1e3c064796cec65cbd1c6708ca5ffdae
'2012-01-15T04:09:30-05:00'
describe
'32950' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJS' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
bedf25c59810ffab9506187953739ee4
996c5448471c6257c5c4ea24cde87a8bd43d10cb
'2012-01-15T04:07:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJT' 'sip-files00046.tif'
a42e3def1cba7f23e85d123ba18b735b
9db5fb85da415548af70580997d9c468095c7095
'2012-01-15T04:06:48-05:00'
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJU' 'sip-files00046.txt'
be3d4099e6a8bfe06e87d57febb7bca8
599212a6f540508c4059ec80c2586aa00a6b0bc4
describe
'9893' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJV' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
89aa8e3c70e9c57730468442cd3710f5
a8087dfe50354894b424a40272eda740e8408bb7
'2012-01-15T04:10:33-05:00'
describe
'324535' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJW' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
9cc701a3e3f00527c94853d3d03fa213
fa3d85df2cce06a6532a4b619ab0b40703b39dba
'2012-01-15T04:05:48-05:00'
describe
'109897' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJX' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
08324ab1030aa9bb79f202aebf2eea63
128fb622f3d65ad174a642e3bbbf1bf0cdd8ef15
'2012-01-15T04:10:09-05:00'
describe
'25886' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJY' 'sip-files00047.pro'
ad72fd8342904cf7c04f9c7204fe57ec
a9879cdcf91584679fcc896ae41e88cb07b6d6b3
describe
'36514' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALJZ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4c05f30e36f9d1492fa00a78c03bedcc
5bf1a2c0f6d92c7eed9da85dbe86fbedec0d1f83
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKA' 'sip-files00047.tif'
972bc1270eecb16d551cbf20f84881f6
9a038f67768a114ec02040fd613e19eed821285b
'2012-01-15T04:08:23-05:00'
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKB' 'sip-files00047.txt'
6a1877d1530749e70e587bfdbf7c5c96
a97483015c380cd4bca5d697042a49222e9be142
describe
'10502' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKC' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
d16dd0b454eca1d61b6448c64db9266a
98bc3da5b0679a9ce003a294250e73fa3e3f5775
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKD' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
d42fd6332c0b4a0848fe988ec6f02628
e0194573b6395b34a9fd44980dd160157de7f1ac
'2012-01-15T04:11:44-05:00'
describe
'108016' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKE' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
1a6b64da93c11e2fa6da6c034ad58c1c
944c603c20cc0395254dca66ad3654637743b9ac
describe
'25867' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKF' 'sip-files00048.pro'
8962f900b610914f51d16f61cfdd77b5
f58e8d5c965bb671b1191f4013321c84e03d7dec
'2012-01-15T04:07:39-05:00'
describe
'36179' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKG' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
24fec83bf969a3add66f6fb51ae18e91
886edd63769e381d764b3463d6ef833c3fcf92f5
'2012-01-15T04:05:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKH' 'sip-files00048.tif'
45375b80d372a132dc7130babc1e974a
801a962efac800ee28e8d4ce44aa3b43cb7740d3
'2012-01-15T04:07:23-05:00'
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKI' 'sip-files00048.txt'
2a153a580513a14b1dbb116f3a8828c0
029df82481e679690917df59ead5015b39a15936
describe
'10665' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKJ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
bbb694164064719aaa575cf9ea04f225
8e59c8866ba3e9a9ae8f6a148aac8a32cace0542
'2012-01-15T04:06:30-05:00'
describe
'324399' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKK' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
b7a208380328225f2310245855a1a9bc
1e950c1624f5604a3d50b1fb582690631c7c4af8
describe
'112126' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKL' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
c4602bd895b852b21f6e10b01c37586d
7df3fd0f08eb3d905b10696a28248c13472857e3
'2012-01-15T04:10:45-05:00'
describe
'27046' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKM' 'sip-files00049.pro'
00cfde73211b47ff8110a7b31cf3dc78
d10729d60c5216648ef89622143c433daf6c00c0
'2012-01-15T04:08:58-05:00'
describe
'37772' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKN' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
748e3c8f70b81c3e79f1ccf712d07ea7
0e0e14883b84f6f859602277e3055483be10f0e3
'2012-01-15T04:07:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKO' 'sip-files00049.tif'
1cc5dd22cc54a0cfac217b3f75f57219
76390e1b54e5a5557ef6126f26463ae32e48a2f0
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKP' 'sip-files00049.txt'
7183db377fbad6faf077396bf43309be
6da2e6cc33c473e6aa335b70524cf5002618c491
'2012-01-15T04:10:18-05:00'
describe
'10980' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKQ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
42e724a13087ca0a8f40d595741a0b49
d6e73009e97b93bfda9e28ab181f4fca7bdc34fe
describe
'324839' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKR' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
2a76f9703bb8a6ffa4e16517f8737587
9e57e615e90402e456c18116a3985fa0c8c4f203
'2012-01-15T04:09:37-05:00'
describe
'109755' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKS' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
ee26ab7fc0eb291c37706b7c84487c01
d1e25ea185bb69068d9614dec25babce98447f89
describe
'26164' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKT' 'sip-files00050.pro'
41b359e6364ab0e94934b0d74f4a93ec
c0efa40362596e48a4fcebf03196885daa5cbe61
'2012-01-15T04:11:02-05:00'
describe
'37217' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKU' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
14c7cd1202241e0aa2965f0d9a9839e5
0108c11db17fbade02f3a1fbfd121d81611ad2f2
'2012-01-15T04:10:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKV' 'sip-files00050.tif'
965006ed535a31065fcef3194339656f
d06809262949c1f453b04fe7ca0c7f9ed869a291
'2012-01-15T04:08:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKW' 'sip-files00050.txt'
458f6d3a8e3f941004ec2aee7fb73ac7
28dccc9c183e987c810a7fc50b34200ff206c459
'2012-01-15T04:10:44-05:00'
describe
'10444' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKX' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
622b71b532580b918a008a630aef73dd
519ba4d4a254de78a1a7c335e144ffad2457cef4
'2012-01-15T04:09:43-05:00'
describe
'324414' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKY' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
ae317af2df1588e2b53c09fb3d52bbae
6359181d83513c6bf91e8872fa95abae5ed1f7fa
'2012-01-15T04:11:30-05:00'
describe
'103373' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
0e89be0fa19b9d7d94fbf2564c3726a0
853a4341f64c6dfd4740aaa3304e0e636315609d
'2012-01-15T04:10:17-05:00'
describe
'24076' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLA' 'sip-files00051.pro'
53ee8f05e111bb5054244ea97667cd0b
3921634e29d1b909af4a68a08dadb65c34a593f1
'2012-01-15T04:10:25-05:00'
describe
'35045' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLB' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
23b0c574fe2774cb18c927acf3897da1
032c2a478390fc05ec6794d20d054fd71f0c6fbd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLC' 'sip-files00051.tif'
9b3b16bdbcaf03d2969e32de09f542d1
20f80adb2a228fbedb79acc19e2b3ec5ce6e642b
'2012-01-15T04:05:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLD' 'sip-files00051.txt'
5fde9f90d3216ef750292078b23b38a2
48423eddbd5f1c7fbe58068d852f7b813b415363
'2012-01-15T04:11:40-05:00'
describe
'10345' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLE' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
b06b2994bbdbd0d3f8789d0359c5f7ee
24027c75e9e61f24a97b327ad6c7219770c2e4b2
'2012-01-15T04:06:37-05:00'
describe
'324576' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLF' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
708d5d2c199419b684a021c557b07ba8
a9531a33abec59a376ec3c405a2a19082557589a
'2012-01-15T04:06:58-05:00'
describe
'110909' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLG' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
2b9f78a6edeacc449b8d9fe0ccf7aba6
4edc2c42e624d8812830e669866f19968f2b0aa1
'2012-01-15T04:09:32-05:00'
describe
'26684' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLH' 'sip-files00052.pro'
8f589dc589710bacdc6e3880ffa4d41b
893f1421fc3c0d0b45558e14117857ea04f63b8e
describe
'37763' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLI' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
e194001fd78bd0fa153e844c4cbd79bf
ab84f8e60d8818be3d72c5f6d907a5c418650703
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
51a3ff8491a144ea679c5241b889b8b2
afdcd9e50b4612f982f40e32f3ef8a01ac220c31
'2012-01-15T04:09:57-05:00'
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLK' 'sip-files00052.txt'
40bd0c284694acb6d3f747a5548f312b
1cef8e59b85402c2bc3af13355bf73314ae2150b
describe
'10760' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLL' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
c79a18eb9c8bd179739a02e34a7ba43f
07663f2de8db4a2dbb3c65959cc4c2131566193d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLM' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
663a275fa7605a62d0cc4fe1f944b6d3
5470d417dd1f9ffe93510baac526e71b55042fe0
'2012-01-15T04:10:22-05:00'
describe
'70470' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLN' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
62472f2ee4a4ab9b035b85c9436e6063
355c1edc35370b6fb27b89b09d683632cafa94a4
describe
'16160' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLO' 'sip-files00053.pro'
177cb0a94c64ad3de1c4cfc74bfba450
4e73a4aa8a4f56402e50e69ab5700d68cfc55591
describe
'24446' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLP' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
fe8e0beb4c6f876949507dc86d5be3b5
d5dc91084c3d5b326746c83e838f4d4f785a795b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLQ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
d1fd7f7e06781c7263d0dcef3f0f2018
26bc0e6bf45bb1b2ee41a96e9d2e88081923a0f5
'2012-01-15T04:11:52-05:00'
describe
'647' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLR' 'sip-files00053.txt'
05b4de85708895de64cce3af030ea132
bd398182a5373a3c882aee720da158e29ad7822b
describe
'6838' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLS' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
b92b5e416a59fbb140561f9e57f809e6
21c13dfe1ac73966480978eb1458dbb496d5d372
'2012-01-15T04:09:29-05:00'
describe
'324493' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLT' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
b1a7b2d1a83ed19c7fd105b3b4fbe16a
f9d6ca22697d3ccc58549c6885a384723f9dba4c
'2012-01-15T04:08:29-05:00'
describe
'76783' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLU' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
ed557a4939a7dcefb7ef0c767244b56a
3944c2683d9b7210eaa78b0d12ab70488c2c6a97
'2012-01-15T04:05:45-05:00'
describe
'17763' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLV' 'sip-files00054.pro'
25cf189b60b94f3d7b4a3feb572d63ca
00adc877dbf2df6f8ac4180f5aeb62c1762cc097
describe
'26541' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLW' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
0b01b42659e5d9282cbfd4853ec66675
e3f95650848a89faa44da6c9e3287c56a737083d
'2012-01-15T04:09:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLX' 'sip-files00054.tif'
51ef03cfa75723b4f001205edfc16cc3
e2365c47ad23cbac01f88616853c11aefa6f6bd7
describe
'748' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLY' 'sip-files00054.txt'
34f2551d6424ba548810eca767d1edcb
c2e72e9f374e08c75ac62165c827f253400bb2ab
'2012-01-15T04:07:42-05:00'
describe
'8276' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALLZ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
a6d983973e3a105d2e4df9601aa6f989
019ccf894397105d723a07a81e4730727ec20a01
'2012-01-15T04:06:01-05:00'
describe
'324660' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMA' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
08413e3ad03cf0ab2dd4ec5bbeb9f4fa
b154875994176d98bd950b006a8b68dfcd0c9c59
'2012-01-15T04:07:48-05:00'
describe
'94757' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMB' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
48995fcb7d2912351c0890ab653929ee
77a65976be5973d31a006a816afb90241244fcf3
describe
'22189' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMC' 'sip-files00055.pro'
baf76d011b006e662d91a91ddcf0fe51
0296cca7cd79d4fb370b8a6f2663e40d7103861b
describe
'31715' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMD' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
3821293daf834ff63395277f21f35555
cdb599ffcc5881434a7e449c61c81da24a16ade3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALME' 'sip-files00055.tif'
5d379042efcea6c6675c6504f825023e
c1055723ebb06375e1d850af787dbd5c4ac932e6
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMF' 'sip-files00055.txt'
6e29065873c678478ebb94c1dcad35a9
1ef70cae80f31954d01ea59139944165760e9ee7
describe
'9546' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMG' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
0236a8f13e35ad5325ad97d3196f0415
329aca9495d0378b838a4c5217dae3d519310e34
'2012-01-15T04:07:09-05:00'
describe
'324397' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
f6749e040092afba9f1ef712acce2c31
4c0ac20e37f753e35b83847e8c671caef7262cda
'2012-01-15T04:09:50-05:00'
describe
'96202' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMI' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
48264f78afc1351d3821681b5a5d2a25
5a3487a0fb61134f0e9da48d1a2804b4ceddab0a
describe
'22932' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMJ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
73b2515d6f29f6e60d242db3444be0ce
cad15457647280c3d1d8c90c67399277335daead
describe
'34047' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMK' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
a87d2281db1c43ecaea82a4397c3a477
5b61c9dd004192cbb917d1350bdbc430634516b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALML' 'sip-files00056.tif'
1de0683764667ebd82fd0cbdfd6c1b2f
a9492f2e7ff9c19ec1c2ac7c2474f91f128fd6e0
describe
'920' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMM' 'sip-files00056.txt'
7a2b549cb8a130f0f5bbd0cd6301c55f
f7593f6cb6e461132923779e8ede22b10a243428
'2012-01-15T04:11:32-05:00'
describe
'9758' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMN' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
63f7c2eaa77d73c0422dc92a874ca7ed
f2f0936734f55aceac74fcc93e3ae8cba50594a2
'2012-01-15T04:10:21-05:00'
describe
'324550' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMO' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
6cf87a55005ec115fc6052fcd1c4a4c1
a43c27f157c85babf546b1a9a7b24a5ec57e8c10
describe
'108862' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
eb869d095a2521d02bd1c50aadd8a7a8
d14bf1f70b421ce5883ca620ed2850ced4502f8d
'2012-01-15T04:06:33-05:00'
describe
'25677' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMQ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
2de4fae86c81b9bb043953cf4b0c74bc
98e461fb732c92ae5de874f44a2a840befceea77
'2012-01-15T04:08:03-05:00'
describe
'36271' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMR' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
d8e1f1d03fa0fc0f0ad2851ea45e9b6b
5fce6ee03ca3aa2a2f2c78efdde4efced2666856
'2012-01-15T04:06:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMS' 'sip-files00057.tif'
45c3a5c8cb451b7452b99f305a03aa3b
370ac90b7e8ac4e9d78bef7f847320784ba59167
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMT' 'sip-files00057.txt'
9269729b69827588f16a7ec3c79cf471
b0e5badba4e4237291f50fc4ee1750801f1e6e13
'2012-01-15T04:10:23-05:00'
describe
'10567' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMU' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
6cc1a5fdcd5e221a466a9e449a98ca5d
0c698b4be1c3ff8943a7fcf36e458b80aa6d8074
describe
'324579' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMV' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
18950acccfd42dd6c3d5206a3e08c7ce
c13a1a7acab354aa9b362a2e8e7a24637fd6fb6c
describe
'111626' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMW' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
4ab0914e4911d2f124fb381bfa6d0b9a
9f1ee440d6ce0f7d08941c8a3b49242e2ffeeece
describe
'27234' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMX' 'sip-files00058.pro'
afce878771c1f94fa700f92e1a145e88
08f96c31ddb912ea6cc2bfceca23db5944cb67df
'2012-01-15T04:11:43-05:00'
describe
'38126' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMY' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
f51f73cda7ab899b20774559544fdb10
3837c731c147892abf21645d86fe4c47a4bc78a3
'2012-01-15T04:08:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALMZ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
465ac41a6b461f1261cb0db838cb413f
11e1895dbffa80b0b78cdc1899d6d673b6ff9a75
'2012-01-15T04:06:07-05:00'
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNA' 'sip-files00058.txt'
e6ca45914613959a21dc27371cedacce
5ca9cdc0a4e02b0c59ddff213c314d031dc3f951
'2012-01-15T04:08:09-05:00'
describe
'11298' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNB' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
8fc0bb992808328522aeb5aae6cd7991
a982ca5a7c019efa95d35236373f094e6ae03f4a
'2012-01-15T04:10:03-05:00'
describe
'324557' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNC' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
607d68edeb576e1f6ded1df56a310a8a
54af353789594df6d003609253cb49243b64c2cd
'2012-01-15T04:09:15-05:00'
describe
'107148' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALND' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
c5c4af159d602d4ed0b3cd3a8d462b0e
ec8d1dd179b9863629f8dbcc1dd19d7a86a70d1a
describe
'26115' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNE' 'sip-files00059.pro'
2c688e54665b2ca26019a1098d96c4e2
5cf066c7fb9550a489ba723da5d1cbf3d3d23c34
'2012-01-15T04:09:34-05:00'
describe
'36038' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNF' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
814d20c4dfbff01d12992d78e841c58d
1844777de0271d77135647b2cb05987fce042675
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNG' 'sip-files00059.tif'
4e5ba5d323132d853b2d8de45b26b43a
9d8e5293a18b2a1c2552677df2a5d154b8febe2e
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNH' 'sip-files00059.txt'
2145159063a91799a730399e2b7595f7
0417457384eb32071ed2bf3af4ea139542e09396
describe
'10418' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNI' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
05f331ee92b63bc8f232c33d88d3c059
7ee5d4906dd96f80fa708507253d9979f1ce8f69
'2012-01-15T04:11:34-05:00'
describe
'324382' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNJ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
bfd7b0d241c33ee917ad13314ec05ca5
a683a69d34def41707ec3e9de48b098704fe8461
describe
'44036' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNK' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
2de68d953708bad7777a2519349db152
e665c079139cefbe201349795c66daa838023c95
'2012-01-15T04:09:58-05:00'
describe
'9077' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNL' 'sip-files00060.pro'
ecefdf143b6c2da428699d92952030e8
69991c851532b42331e519d9a399ac52e5c68bb7
describe
'14234' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNM' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
cfe87a88f7f91f28f4ee9985622784e0
a89c112f9f13f137ec5ec3467c4d44e91b921502
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNN' 'sip-files00060.tif'
65fb3ce62f32a4ad776b641178325a01
8c1d206dfad4b230c6441ba6e8b1105cf9b4aa7a
'2012-01-15T04:10:15-05:00'
describe
'373' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNO' 'sip-files00060.txt'
1655221d9d4b10eb2b56c3ff5dc7d4b7
e50f52f3feb09387e4ce185e908bb9c2d2f4def3
describe
'4963' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNP' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
108561c81194269d4037c273322d5f1d
f4f024e4bbeda3d5e7d74c36a2840db4ddf1657a
describe
'324843' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNQ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
d4dd4caa383716fd6ddbb4a05d185de0
009b5e27d9ec2375367e65dae7e0ad5958a8f04c
describe
'83891' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNR' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
6c1d7fba79a0008f5d94c84b874ab39e
5ed3becd970325bad6a6cd2235650216ab1777be
'2012-01-15T04:08:57-05:00'
describe
'18870' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNS' 'sip-files00061.pro'
43d54fc61d13cbeefb0eaac0379ecb25
a7e595de40f43073321a7d34a3a4647f9731c2f5
describe
'29338' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNT' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
230460e8963b87b67769e9a1001cfa9b
8ef47d3ce951237362dcd4df85671f4ba85e125b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNU' 'sip-files00061.tif'
66f7107ec72b75f6e029ff2df5fc19d5
fd5acf9ebb380e97a32447cd5d2872814f0f3bc7
describe
'789' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNV' 'sip-files00061.txt'
53f0f2617d26e7a68c7a1e652fc00e82
d215ffb04974393e0c45ee73e487134b8bf80543
'2012-01-15T04:06:31-05:00'
describe
'8125' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNW' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
5e4aa8064c23b637751f0bff3ce89b41
0a6a8cb7589d15d9826665db0296168302cf6b57
'2012-01-15T04:10:04-05:00'
describe
'324549' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNX' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
147e2d460c94b15a50b5388fba22e608
85f1fb26d12ca9d61c5be3180dedce140778eb83
'2012-01-15T04:09:47-05:00'
describe
'105834' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNY' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
6406d7917a06954e8bd6228fdd36c1de
dc658339347ffd1016dd7e79b8acdf25a64afc96
describe
'25401' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALNZ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
7ec2e9bddb3c7bf6197805bdff35b2a7
db1ed9243501d574c254f8c576858405d504aaf0
describe
'35861' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOA' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
849c1fa76232cb80b2fb862e73890bb4
0fd2e08b641acb23cdd6ef65582ca0123f890624
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOB' 'sip-files00062.tif'
4c477b3eb80e7a5caeaa4c9a23d800cc
18d75f219354ea63b7e3640e738fdb3261d51c14
'2012-01-15T04:09:04-05:00'
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOC' 'sip-files00062.txt'
4ca99e71b4bce8aa5a4649ba16451bcc
8e7565c4733cbf96a239bfe6141aba43bd2b2ebb
describe
'10253' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOD' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
3057ebac3891484b8c91956826617abd
a9e69b2986748c7c490347e5bdab523233f81a6b
describe
'324825' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOE' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
300fc5028a3113b2674855cb2e84395a
3451c8fadaabf43ddcd950a47154aaa16302c40d
'2012-01-15T04:11:41-05:00'
describe
'107479' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOF' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
ce496af7aac608d9b0826a0675de4535
e5418927ae7bae6c7c7b1fd7cd441f685b24846e
describe
'25308' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOG' 'sip-files00063.pro'
9c98ad7b1c1bb34b3d10b0d8a0853e80
3923806cef20f81677f9209f5ebf0abbf871e70b
describe
'36279' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOH' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
012e19636828e1c8060ec259805d7b33
d075b120aaab7cf94266c58d8bc2e607f58d08f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOI' 'sip-files00063.tif'
5e3c323d06255054ed3e418f8d3aec5d
e0dc260cb8ee7a2a2067462617bfded1ff90bc4a
'2012-01-15T04:07:02-05:00'
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOJ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
98d7f48b77ad54faa8164039d7eded36
d1dc540d55e38eb5f06117daa6abac254326e668
'2012-01-15T04:11:08-05:00'
describe
'10462' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOK' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
4c4de34d515fda12e5c66135e25c48e5
c407458e04c8a0f043cf6a47a03d1c262d8926c1
describe
'324781' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOL' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
ca4d4fcda8fb9462ebfa5593d3a3c0a6
4e32a82aee7ca249549056270cd0523a2c9ed404
describe
'102206' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOM' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
e16b45114ddd88358efcf08a897cd5ef
b3cfeec730a45814380377ddf8872fd4f9e74c4e
'2012-01-15T04:06:52-05:00'
describe
'24224' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALON' 'sip-files00064.pro'
177ebcb8fc01071ac9e8cc728ff12e57
d14e37354d86e9462ce0ba4a971636b0d120cd57
describe
'34787' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOO' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
677a207928d98c4a1b6c1eaa6418f93c
a085226f28a4104c544527cfdac9b2a7d9b61c0c
'2012-01-15T04:05:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOP' 'sip-files00064.tif'
8ffe026e080a32dc2f0912e778b39316
76c533b834f0ce59868e4e6f6fb7e18ce64b4b96
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOQ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
512159733aed58d813056584c398c97b
67d42545ead7a1e1f0841987ffc91d48ba7ea6b8
describe
'10327' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOR' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
83d5130266191e6e2bdb6bbbd01f7567
4e0679bfae31e09d72d1937be58b9f06d4b2f2f3
describe
'324729' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOS' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
49a8013019fafe1f7d45f9316737ca26
bdfd350cd48057f99e8214e6e2d0cb40b53aa416
describe
'201107' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOT' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
47a0b7faeedd481ee8e4f0c612e12114
90970f6162df1fbd0fe67242dda3268f70551240
'2012-01-15T04:10:40-05:00'
describe
'2771' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOU' 'sip-files00065.pro'
092154bc8748144ca77d2b3b3860ad46
922d02c70f679b419942f778845279a5644d44f4
describe
'48042' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOV' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
0688484faf6792d0f1f0958dcdb0b79d
3c9bdf6adc44f23ee5facb394d805e35f8f50044
'2012-01-15T04:07:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOW' 'sip-files00065.tif'
472af7cf2a1ef1dea284dd172f1d4550
95011246d7374580324d253101773659e7a7b72b
'2012-01-15T04:11:29-05:00'
describe
'218' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOX' 'sip-files00065.txt'
3cfb656520e8c825e9fe4cf3270f6a45
3ca9f0c73b798d22a09c2b4c59fca2d5713d6182
describe
'12712' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOY' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
1ae55c1270d50d16132458ef09c483f2
26e37d16bf92b87ee7fc472412b23be154210e10
describe
'324829' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
6f54480afa3557ce2a9bfdfab8a02fcb
5b413852caa7e6c1616c3e144609118b0b0cecd0
describe
'105975' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPA' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
d955e7332151adfb08398e31987fd7b6
ee374a8611e7ddfdb90f536377337ac319a952bd
'2012-01-15T04:10:01-05:00'
describe
'25296' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPB' 'sip-files00067.pro'
9b1e5741a4e59b82681d59c11740f2c4
891ac9101d9e2c4951b6dce431898ab69974f578
describe
'36294' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPC' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
49c69e170b8e66e610530341e98b36db
95f0deac8e898173a982cd6a94fba36672bade3c
'2012-01-15T04:05:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPD' 'sip-files00067.tif'
143033c860f7605bb5d72d76e75d9dc9
28db660f1a747aaa7cef451ef4e64241b2cf8436
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPE' 'sip-files00067.txt'
358b5103b30de1b660dae41d14f2985b
5e48897fef354eaf08eb1f3f12dcd3bd03c754c1
'2012-01-15T04:08:45-05:00'
describe
'10712' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPF' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
3356cff52666940b8915675ec4ef7d46
78b7df901bcbc4ff3a8655d677893b020d750bd2
describe
'324640' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPG' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
68f723bb9445b7e8b537c1b06f698588
283c01d92d22687e63b40259d2872d85aafc9038
describe
'106185' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPH' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
4e18ec20922b404b0d8ffb8296bb98b5
5a8509c2538cacb34d3f88c6ebebfdbd4160d19d
'2012-01-15T04:06:32-05:00'
describe
'25576' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPI' 'sip-files00068.pro'
15260a4f276b82f85981bf76f4b10a3f
c0ea36f56d5842db414e4b1bbf40f1efb508a807
describe
'36800' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
16ff866d082bea38d4d0a11718c2d6ce
7af705d25eea2b42388f0ca2a907e4a80ded0501
'2012-01-15T04:08:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPK' 'sip-files00068.tif'
6c5b2a85979aa36047662c4c7f63298b
5e093f13dbe85ac60c0e8434679554695db5734a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPL' 'sip-files00068.txt'
3db2f3ad4b24b8c39a7b9cc95d476629
3327958fdfe86618ba076f060aa22d2abdd21c93
describe
'10948' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPM' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
071ed024966ed38277f36ea1014e5341
949287d87af923635709191ed2f0cd9dd732e651
'2012-01-15T04:10:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPN' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
4bef0d0555912c0cee42b5a7d278d2c2
7c0cee6c58c50caab1d4957499f73921cd3410bb
describe
'101898' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPO' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
f505786ed979ad0f4e50ac22900f9cae
626413146782e60c25fb031881b47873a3a8f45d
describe
'24642' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPP' 'sip-files00069.pro'
007632bfeda570fa063b1c4b16bb0b95
61afd630a78bce9d9163a86f6c7aeeb6a21c15bc
describe
'35937' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
99cf27bc3ef2fd6df5849730e0588c0c
3e1f78f267815161f2005d468860a2683c697219
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPR' 'sip-files00069.tif'
b0c7d9ab850445308d7962b4852e647f
a6bf41445d9852aeaf843211fea10bf24b9eb71a
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPS' 'sip-files00069.txt'
4c6736bc828a0a5fc0ecbc7a08c99253
a20bd0968249b376dc0be0c0722d7053e896e363
describe
'10413' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPT' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
b7e1df9f1acf9c254e9d1b3becb1e7ea
c35eab7160713b2365ccccbb2615c9463416f1f4
'2012-01-15T04:08:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPU' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
cea3712ced5e3468d14bd41b9b43976e
0d0b7f7005d9afe4a62781fa71cd345574fa0a14
describe
'108761' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPV' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
160350ad16646618493a8a1817eadea1
784d4036c37a711af99cb9e2f422cfc94a059ac8
describe
'25828' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPW' 'sip-files00070.pro'
88e27cdfc797b5c72289f9dc7c7db610
729a89c13302e1288b1329638f6e646cc8d2181c
'2012-01-15T04:07:26-05:00'
describe
'37894' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPX' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
3930dacfe2d1d6c9fe60e627f34d58e6
4af790cd3e73497665ba9fee950aaf6608ed4422
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPY' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b39c5bd48105c25974f90cf26c2c2d14
e45a933e7e0dd665d861d62f5ff3cb64afc5af2c
'2012-01-15T04:10:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
3489c6fb1abd3d786c70ad4114bf9310
3dee7ef280bdc988b80d7c72ea3aed031c246a80
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQA' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
5a4bed34ab453db947211d7754d61783
c99a4423738de1c7d1b614ebd15679b5382c1b43
describe
'324555' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQB' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
3f95d3e3c14699c7b4ac6005be6368ea
13dfa96c9d0e4abf02eb4fd6cb70329fe890ef16
describe
'99323' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQC' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
d36577b19547a9450edbe6e2cd51fd57
7dde4076b88b4987d494c7eea9ae1fd7875e0746
'2012-01-15T04:08:15-05:00'
describe
'23165' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQD' 'sip-files00071.pro'
a16340807a99089f30ddf26e97c45795
65484603d35ee4d911ef1204445a24ced808d817
'2012-01-15T04:09:56-05:00'
describe
'33115' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQE' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
a7829ac1492ebdfb153c82a96645ff5a
94e7cd50e05ef09d917b85fe8e1e3c413e4c88fe
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQF' 'sip-files00071.tif'
52cd42b1831e04b924bbddcfbd07af5f
7185faf5a86ac7710440417e99be046a61924178
'2012-01-15T04:06:23-05:00'
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQG' 'sip-files00071.txt'
4c8f511c8436107a4cc41746ede14080
5916cc8d018959757935b29f531391ae27483d2c
describe
'10019' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQH' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
7600800ad5f6c0120b91d6ae3dac59bd
5fcc3f2af23aee731a5f33709684e0609e96bab9
describe
'324427' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQI' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
549fc45aa395af11a19877c1230b7b2b
719eaf98c1024d22b6393cda0de82c64943d7ce5
'2012-01-15T04:06:09-05:00'
describe
'103480' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
7462dfda80824fa29f27b32bbd56c22b
7b68b1e2412f1734927ad49f90f1dfc8e265b011
describe
'24648' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQK' 'sip-files00072.pro'
e01144b7ba3c160cefdf61687aefab77
aa86811131c9d27d7437643db8d4244e34dfb3a0
'2012-01-15T04:08:07-05:00'
describe
'36467' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQL' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
e2bbafc6e103fcdd3c704c7c6271397f
f32fba283164637b99fff17d2e9470af99b46050
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQM' 'sip-files00072.tif'
3df7f9f0a7ddf7cfa55b1d3bf3183a87
6c4ca0ebbdebfdd70e52f94b485dc82c772430f5
describe
'986' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQN' 'sip-files00072.txt'
8e74b52e7ec3d9b8a9e68ddbe21b4079
4eb96d20888f5d8eddcef1ca309c7059982bae3a
describe
'10384' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQO' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
6a727895776bfaf2beea1ad356204684
d21d58463d381fdf98508fd3a54d59d9801eba47
describe
'324304' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQP' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
2f34fd05a04afe3e230ba5687cdd4bea
8d336c1c2ff3e9b9d33e4976b3464bb9eb449e7d
describe
'58333' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
70e6c010e356463d0f0bddf1b619c0ef
fe36692623465258c67feca43c11dcb47508333d
describe
'12754' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQR' 'sip-files00073.pro'
f0354efbc93adfb335c81be473451c41
43cc97f0bf05a3d79dd2ebf4284faf72e77ea20c
'2012-01-15T04:05:54-05:00'
describe
'18327' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQS' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
ec180a679f2f366b675a537b8e1c2ed1
edf1e68cb7918f678be24feceffa8b5ac75970c9
'2012-01-15T04:10:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQT' 'sip-files00073.tif'
cf6b68b43fc4623ed6483d11bd5efe99
789bd1ef06a50baace4f142823869ae65a0d23d6
describe
'521' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQU' 'sip-files00073.txt'
8670d11c8c770a3a427d3449de89139f
1860985ce13f6c58f1f58d7802c6c7a77f5c51d4
describe
'5748' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQV' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
2ea1bc8016c7208d679933e476fb8f76
000d5df7b835ae4d68693196992bef7a9195a74a
describe
'324824' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQW' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
fefab9d0f9a4476bb54d0feaa3def2b3
f260072848d8e6c87fbd32eb58660ec57e689890
describe
'86453' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQX' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
4067167198a6ee2ee4b5ad7b337d2979
3af7327046d5cea6579d4acf1e2b2ef62ffb7bce
'2012-01-15T04:08:39-05:00'
describe
'19754' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQY' 'sip-files00074.pro'
2a9a91c2873b42c96aaa34c54a1c0d7a
34bdcd5ea23e8d350c8ada5860310ecb130faccf
describe
'31102' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALQZ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
f1328184f38e95307734368aaedb0966
2c1ad2f0588ef47ba657540fc4461c81abf812be
'2012-01-15T04:06:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRA' 'sip-files00074.tif'
5037ecd992b930348be43a5375ee957c
4f19b212a6bc1482f148d529d5868d6052e7c33c
describe
'817' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRB' 'sip-files00074.txt'
61305dc7f7c6a4c68e8000075fc7accd
3108a4bdb9ba6208381e6954899e7df76fadf098
describe
'8635' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRC' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
64092b0c26cf616ccdb25e81326b38c5
946aba96235699b72b80a017a30cc0694ca7b356
'2012-01-15T04:11:09-05:00'
describe
'324688' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRD' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
00a7d3229e2d23f3a9b275fae2edcf8d
c69cb044cfc517c300030356ec894c4acbb4ce46
'2012-01-15T04:05:29-05:00'
describe
'105066' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRE' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
1ed2444d2b0fa495b0861d75ecfef019
63ec7d8a07f5e647e58bdf6fb751c51a24ce6ae6
describe
'25237' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRF' 'sip-files00075.pro'
6278be531fa1915e01f0f72b3258623b
08d0baac48fe682d7fcc56202abd08b6d70f681b
describe
'36483' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRG' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
6dd7d499fc903b856b92dfd3dada6577
a295946a7a25d701d3c5de25feb03fd4486a474e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRH' 'sip-files00075.tif'
d036937edc6280a59158a0fec008d7d2
570ad2ccb213d85ee8277a9a169e8fc14286d3ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRI' 'sip-files00075.txt'
74ac87ee0bebd9ca13755dc72a5821c5
d6f86ed9373fcd602242c97de4ccd6e819d5c68f
describe
'10725' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRJ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
5732b95d02455f46f6ec50f82b9ba3fe
06df470125ad62c429c3ee240826d6ed26bc68b3
describe
'324589' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRK' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
c73235145b93db6c2db08422064bddfd
c1d5e06b3c8b430a54858bc08216d2112f2001e7
describe
'92032' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRL' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
aa8314046693f41ae17947476453a472
e2c6ad634fba045a7a65f0db4ca65a7cee79f254
describe
'21252' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRM' 'sip-files00076.pro'
0f97d157e9a00415813f9f1f82f7e618
86ab8826a413bba199d91c69cdb607949bbc19d5
'2012-01-15T04:07:40-05:00'
describe
'32180' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRN' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
9e9504dd03e11862c8829885dc428c91
d2f633883e22157e82af3f2c02a05e3d4dba4931
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRO' 'sip-files00076.tif'
dd18dd9f872d435cde2ba26975f78347
40a6c65b9edf845171633e988321c1e4299bd234
'2012-01-15T04:11:07-05:00'
describe
'864' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRP' 'sip-files00076.txt'
0316437ca9d454b1c2f40931c9a8ea6c
ae58b4d5cc8abb50f7287e504ded2f03ab469a9b
'2012-01-15T04:06:27-05:00'
describe
'9349' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRQ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
8fed55fef52eadb0ef7f1317228685bb
da461848b6475f5f2002efb25f8740ff6bd646bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRR' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
ed0dfe5c11abf97fce0486f7378af441
9a18e475d679bfc46ebe6a61e40edc108c145c6b
describe
'102916' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRS' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
4a8bae5821363b02a8b4f4cffec9e403
f4bdd2c2d8da5ca5cb019c20c36b6ee5049438e8
'2012-01-15T04:06:53-05:00'
describe
'24565' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRT' 'sip-files00077.pro'
a7a40f154aa4a03b6a317cb485a49b40
9e75bbbeb5fcf154be39076c8510a721baae68c4
'2012-01-15T04:11:04-05:00'
describe
'35359' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRU' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
c19e6e4ad6ef2455998c77d2e2282ab8
09e0ebbdb44fd57b1963f11e6252a9a2948465fa
'2012-01-15T04:08:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRV' 'sip-files00077.tif'
e6a1984c2e8c2d4d8ec8fd8b2e2f7680
6c30199a53dd43389d9c1d58663ee19dd868b182
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRW' 'sip-files00077.txt'
5070425f8b105febc917f317e5a190f9
d7ff1cdc18dbf6a688b7c808838c305a57743f5f
describe
'10409' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRX' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
01bb52f99f490e78b469847c1df96e55
fe96c8e71259e245fa243a896cce40e04826af77
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRY' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
e411dc7b964dacd1171cb12cbf2ceaf8
c8d6da61addc4af91a948d56d1e55f2f05dc01fb
describe
'103894' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALRZ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
6e16775f0a972141e5f96daa0bf008fd
7209f06b569b8ab336513167c2246919c2fde945
describe
'25911' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSA' 'sip-files00078.pro'
14a60e5b58ff71ce11a102428e95fb95
06cf84b4d7674164b63c51a28fc68884ad19075a
'2012-01-15T04:09:00-05:00'
describe
'35228' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSB' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
b22b433fc6b7b15ecdca2dab3fe8931f
0c2217a68e8fc4222997ad0761f11efada8618e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSC' 'sip-files00078.tif'
6c466cf90fba04c020fe61d98ee151dd
3cebd07585dcdaf5aee3d369247f45c56e8ab04e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSD' 'sip-files00078.txt'
3b69bf8833883e8ae6d8f09196b46d7e
d99f9e792ad56a881e8d36a86718942180e20af2
describe
'10562' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSE' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
2c0af85bcfd0ce58e651bfc3dc8a3918
34f73702c61044b992d4d047275119579d132693
describe
'324200' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSF' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
ad6a6ffcf6ba60e01e8ff6c92c27e62a
1677c46a5c857ced6efd909a265eb0f4a66b382b
describe
'91081' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSG' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
9cb7eb65467976ab39014f098bca0890
bb3abf3f15bc2275706c158ee5bcd7e971660b98
'2012-01-15T04:06:44-05:00'
describe
'23070' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSH' 'sip-files00079.pro'
a6cd4f780d98adeaab98aae4272c173e
874b121877571a53313c7feb94708853b269391a
describe
'29667' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSI' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
da36d83c87ada890f590fd0affd1ac86
fcbfb0dd2bd56fb6473627680e3b75882b5a63db
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSJ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
45e50aed1bf34f68b24b3e5317f372f5
b23526992acbc833078792038976febfce23e8ec
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSK' 'sip-files00079.txt'
ef8b785247c6a90290b9806f47e7d5fc
966e1e04d413b45da3d683001ff80c10a407fc6b
describe
'8984' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSL' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
487aa8779011d0c743ed6eb9e647dce6
2e516506eff572c35da096f09efe628244004500
'2012-01-15T04:06:57-05:00'
describe
'324577' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSM' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
8ab85bb1829bb0d0b44e66b065be3b73
f2f0b3a650707e997879a3783a6b410250efc8bb
'2012-01-15T04:11:03-05:00'
describe
'77878' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSN' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
0308294fef22b8fa6735bf12d5631156
c5e23c508c74fbfd25c6898d7c7c1aa2c7053bfe
describe
'17978' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSO' 'sip-files00080.pro'
88bb3ae4f96db814b68a018c00a9fe7c
054cfe06c6bda6e17d85305e60921ed10836929f
describe
'27311' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSP' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
ad28dcc3159a71bba150bea24552023d
cff5bea3cdd4cbf65745e0ffc87203e9ab46d414
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSQ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
cbfd10556de7be823e3c97aa4825409d
5f6881e5adb153634de6bc8855eccd04da0a5e32
describe
'717' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSR' 'sip-files00080.txt'
98f667cc326369ea3b059781ef81d258
8a5b6067f2b071b6e6e496a4250a77279849a367
describe
'7459' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSS' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
b2bdfe68dcf6cf61c1aa784a3a02d6a0
d3298fdbc96bc8a68f13e08221f56cf8b841b207
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALST' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
599a3b92ff26adc6ded749e56ce932a6
c64e38a722aa3549214acbf7fe72bd8ba01461c8
describe
'97593' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSU' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
32172ef09c21bfda2aa67b7dc1f5607c
9c066ccc334b47b11ec7f7e8893e72f705520cce
describe
'22227' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSV' 'sip-files00081.pro'
121e58041a923f6654ebe55e69241322
e4edc3a69a62e17d9db555ca61f93fe3436131dc
describe
'32460' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSW' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
27a5f8832fcf53d6a26760d661d43413
acbe7696fec48a8b4c218e433e4059ab9ba7104b
'2012-01-15T04:08:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSX' 'sip-files00081.tif'
80cd9a8f17247a564ffc7d1b609cc0db
b9ad94def10a66170d691935db1a302fcfa6870f
'2012-01-15T04:09:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSY' 'sip-files00081.txt'
f98160d7e3e554d622aa861308e8239b
6cdce3b37fba38135dcffccfb42105a123fd0e77
describe
'9340' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
bd91f23bee5b60dac71c20550f09c6e2
0c58bb39ccc160c9841abedf66356ece39f515be
describe
'324808' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTA' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
54c7d1216bbdcdde1a7a144f3993aa80
8318b85987f40ef4f7bd5b133de37d0ed464943e
describe
'108210' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTB' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
ce2760b2d74ad6093a6776228b4c959a
ccfe4070730081e1325db338d8723acc0871c3c6
describe
'26241' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTC' 'sip-files00082.pro'
1a2aa8dd876b9efffe295e5c47b7a9e6
6acd44f7d7b270e7833a2ac6b61a8e38f730ce42
describe
'38950' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTD' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
c25185e24bcd4f49afcc933c8d9f2dee
89145e5317d82653342276f921302ddef19b79c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTE' 'sip-files00082.tif'
07cd69863dc7a96b5a7db1c8a07adf44
fd1b67df7add9386073256382117f74955a02905
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTF' 'sip-files00082.txt'
33d27d2abea2554f23cc2871ff171338
156bb4bae0ee75d68bbff99b0e68716c24abf0f1
describe
'10842' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTG' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
408ed64acb786d914e215b1e23f4dbf7
63edf93b55ff7853d49e77bc7fa8f27b11b7b14e
'2012-01-15T04:11:22-05:00'
describe
'324789' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTH' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
0d95dbbf7452bc3e563ab1073c60832f
87a877c1fc6ef47eba3bafe18f2997d18918c287
'2012-01-15T04:11:13-05:00'
describe
'96059' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTI' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
565f8a8017cac8d74fa5e73ed294f70e
d40b7f0071d0a7565174daf056d41249e38e0ece
describe
'23251' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
48a04c64229ae453de6ef67dfaea056c
a7dc555fcfe3e1ce3100f4fc53ded9499d133e57
'2012-01-15T04:05:32-05:00'
describe
'33406' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTK' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
f447d02558da8de879f52ea33a1791e7
7e819bf5b261b7f36e7ed5c8ddcaad460e432f03
'2012-01-15T04:07:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTL' 'sip-files00083.tif'
8a3055138a1de903d1d1f31243de8879
c04ebe6bb379de7ee24a6d492d500876644c4342
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTM' 'sip-files00083.txt'
bda79aedb764207981cfe35b514f5b16
4a16319fad86b8499095dad6b9e3c1a684274f91
'2012-01-15T04:05:47-05:00'
describe
'9852' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTN' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
f77e76329996de450763f7e0da20f741
5ac9920494055be1eb21ab288276df7be6804ebc
'2012-01-15T04:11:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTO' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
45fe762619892c56d6222d1a6e467439
70a0a8dcd15ede4acda442bbd5f459a2b3cd6038
'2012-01-15T04:06:20-05:00'
describe
'103358' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTP' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
e5d507ff9089587699fecb518a246b66
7815046e5eaed7f85af4808fdf1bd698f55ebd64
'2012-01-15T04:09:12-05:00'
describe
'26393' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
7cbf927a65139115a98b289b0f07503f
790df9c6fe822f27816236c338cf0e1f11bf4429
describe
'36634' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTR' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
7189f0064ff477264d1e996acecdf2af
94319dc9d7014de8033521ec71df5194d62bfe72
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTS' 'sip-files00084.tif'
f7a427d7c7290c2d8e633c810478dee4
f34f8791443454cd7eaefaa9463d08cbed597721
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTT' 'sip-files00084.txt'
03cc731fc5067405dcb5586f6f162783
d6355f41901b8139d84acdf0c74ca7a0779e013f
describe
'10347' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTU' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
99144d60b6b6973eec76c7433146d36a
bb3ff0fb2558d43830ed18bfbdb442eb6f429160
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTV' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
04749923dd8d836116e9671791a4720e
062bb147e446924e58e60d7859e363109b94b59b
describe
'102567' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTW' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
924f67e597ff42e3dfba96f265c24591
f6a19f0e9c81e5b4545572f7192b7e1dd856baac
'2012-01-15T04:09:51-05:00'
describe
'23750' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTX' 'sip-files00085.pro'
252d5b5f3a8228947f8485a487d13541
6f1065f0e8abdda14818f39918fdd62870cf8720
describe
'35285' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTY' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
78e10cccd28f2c9319ad1b10089407ff
b11b8957a3d5a0e4b063b0cf1c946b472a41194f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
99e598fdf4aba0e3b169e9d02f511ae7
19128eac7ede284c527d407e2adcf9e640148da2
'2012-01-15T04:09:21-05:00'
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUA' 'sip-files00085.txt'
c38ef246bec5c0ecf15da873034d5fac
d25f16b19cae34defacb6ffe9073f18b275022b9
describe
'10522' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUB' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
7b591143e7ade0edf1f7120162abfc94
a13f8db11f7f679cc791c35d10c454133bc4f901
describe
'324426' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUC' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
654b49fb8b182f93de65a6f5f6f727bf
b0efa22b57a31da302a661148c512499f009975a
'2012-01-15T04:06:45-05:00'
describe
'104731' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUD' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
5d88f7be767405b813f374aa26ce001a
587252d973ca18e058115ca10126bb17cdbe6b4a
'2012-01-15T04:09:31-05:00'
describe
'24721' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUE' 'sip-files00086.pro'
718bd1e9f1a895158abe3ef72b6e6780
da2146dcb84ce0edc9cd3a072ead5109535f0619
describe
'35866' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUF' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
cb83fdd08ad99748838fff77ddf99eb1
a99759a6727fdd9648f99ed22c8fc3b33340bf15
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUG' 'sip-files00086.tif'
0f6a770ba1ddcb4d29908b7ce842cdac
f6201d38ef8efb8b342020e56b758a940207df42
'2012-01-15T04:09:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUH' 'sip-files00086.txt'
1a950cda0c6a2158b87c0f19d3d2cb52
156b6445a0228332a45145e199b44c426025ba41
describe
'10133' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUI' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
929db76d07c4cfad7f0255c954a13af9
7bd9d58718bc93ba643c8188720eee78a956b3a6
'2012-01-15T04:09:10-05:00'
describe
'324780' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
3da315f6d453bda29b1950419ac0be87
f0a8088caa9459600652dd5d942bd2177959f39c
'2012-01-15T04:11:33-05:00'
describe
'103791' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUK' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
c2a54178577ef9dd40add55edaa58ed1
96d25a3027eb2eb590b7f6dfb3f9ff4bd359dc3c
describe
'25031' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUL' 'sip-files00087.pro'
0b796f921f35396dcf74d9723ef0c0ad
01896da7fa25a32d8d989fec0aeca3e58263307b
'2012-01-15T04:08:04-05:00'
describe
'35986' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUM' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
9960dec4b931a3434f70fa5b3e408485
f8dd322a55c543d960a272917746d345cb47db1f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUN' 'sip-files00087.tif'
7d84e743d23aeb4b978a52c2a7b5e927
a5972be9487e094de3917ac9cc46986a37819d17
describe
'998' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUO' 'sip-files00087.txt'
bab98abef330b0a916234a60d73ba7f5
8c218a13968783e712f0b424c5cdf14e4c5b94d1
describe
'10531' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUP' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
ce4a493127dae76ed56490f9079696a9
5d4b67ea34ce2c6c56dd0483c21cd008eb868ecd
describe
'324420' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
f01511e34a3d5ff3ed183cf1754f48d9
1d26d3e11ce19aa7bfef9e4275aa3cee06fc0de6
describe
'104841' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUR' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
c60da923f1dd508e2a9cc3bdf2d1c4c9
ea7b3f831d1c0139f98d03a6f2c6343248aeae2d
'2012-01-15T04:08:43-05:00'
describe
'24821' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUS' 'sip-files00088.pro'
8849c36d1ce91a960c580b5d750dc670
cae439db6ff509768bbeeb96720fee144db40a3b
'2012-01-15T04:08:12-05:00'
describe
'35932' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUT' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
d98d7746cf8563f0f65fe2c9c9c4b9f1
46c705367df8c731254fda41476df37d1265b5b3
'2012-01-15T04:11:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUU' 'sip-files00088.tif'
4de9cde50898e6062649c0fe7d20a6c6
d498bda6de519b2e97eeb72ee82312320038ec0c
'2012-01-15T04:06:59-05:00'
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUV' 'sip-files00088.txt'
545f1c147cfb5b4c2a2d0c61a767225b
fd0865fee90802b96f020ae274ff2af0b669fb75
describe
'10525' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUW' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
f98597028fe2d7c328bf9d96f5e64f1c
31d8906ac3de6d4265169411949108535a74535d
describe
'324674' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUX' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
37ef23ac60a57efffd4df6550beb53e3
366c03ce68b573cead8bb2aad5f203b40f1b8517
describe
'100935' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUY' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
9e13f1c89eca4b252900ac9bc30565fd
b01ff4898f7eea41fb9afb87ccd5865fdf722ee1
describe
'23422' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
78cc836a34210897f03a0bb746565fb8
11b35ac45cedf0dba05e4dbcfd866fcccd816edd
describe
'34019' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVA' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
c06751b610f94c0edb6d30f77c3f6277
2bcf3c8c26ac1e966c32fb283d0453f1ebb79ba7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVB' 'sip-files00089.tif'
33e300494b33544a46429ed5df6f72f4
9b4a0788b1cc7b7c8b87a2c1e264e378ad6d1130
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVC' 'sip-files00089.txt'
da066a029a1b016ce44687321af60638
969e3fa311ec16212bc70fa1a42fb405c3611851
describe
'10260' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVD' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
d93510c845e7b1586d506527c1b2447a
e612512813de30285dc86217f0421ef919238b1f
describe
'324778' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVE' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
5602f40e9e7289ce6ee18268a9f95865
524ef0504268908b1522a4ce76bfcb9a846b71b5
describe
'98732' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVF' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
f62518a6124fdc0d5d3f8288bdaeb393
26787ed30da94489577c5e34168af26a7b4835fd
describe
'23421' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVG' 'sip-files00090.pro'
f92cb98fae8e400ab94186dc03b28b89
262b1c1a451c73850ec0c88d2e2a12b4508263b3
describe
'33303' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVH' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
7b7e7d8987b6082746c4b6d8cb05851a
96e7f18790430848f414a44648c3d1ea9b8062fc
'2012-01-15T04:10:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVI' 'sip-files00090.tif'
9b9cec7afd83de06172c0ad416c39038
3478a91cdf79fdfd9e95cf1b2a1c1de6c5defc1e
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
7a8d6de63e815ec6f14e9e07cc438dbc
7f84f14bce0f47b062820ac978a2fe90eadb9a9a
describe
'10312' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVK' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
41874b31fad0b8deb638ba160007490e
bb4150fa36bd3dce7575062b349b5692f33a680e
describe
'324386' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVL' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
5709eb138f3a0e9f32198638bee63e0e
c9a66854045b047de09ac2efaff25c9a32103c3a
describe
'101501' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVM' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
94271c369a578f902fd5468205cdcaae
3ef5b633706485af32831ce5597ba69ab4fcc297
describe
'23508' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVN' 'sip-files00091.pro'
2d622a3a581deeb964540b420003e64b
a5c0bfec2eba4c883500d93d6fd27ffe22fd5827
describe
'34579' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVO' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
c6dd7681f269c0a855ac48b71f7f5135
05b484df3085bbee80a625e633decf158198a0be
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVP' 'sip-files00091.tif'
d3c7070ce9d6102d66aadce4542cd837
028867dbc3cdcc77b25bcad38cc2b17888b9a364
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
ac7aa195c41dbefbf808e02da1793b7f
c65b6aa5b4be28c7acd11e27efac719f2ca6b38a
describe
'10317' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVR' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
84cd1f37301e46e78db96d94c56434ac
2dc767f9bfcc93c9c07c9878603ad00cd8b957a2
describe
'324409' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVS' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
c06076116b820df1452651c02a4fc40c
3511b1def7da292a605613d1b15e157fbbbd5052
describe
'29557' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVT' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
29c347a2992541a381ecdb0cb978c7f2
ae4325001d6b5baeb349d25f45aa1165f7701b2c
describe
'4920' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVU' 'sip-files00092.pro'
018cc33b601ac94392f8da6fb81f62bd
f08c1baf47ffcf8b8399c9c4a3ef7b3d01d97a78
describe
'9910' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVV' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
ef5f0a85ae97e0582425f23338fdf76d
5a507082d673491bfb555c81216ebab1a5b4cd72
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVW' 'sip-files00092.tif'
67b355af4c85e10a141ace7796a1af11
4fb8937355e3a8741aa29f8523d1d01824f0e82a
'2012-01-15T04:11:55-05:00'
describe
'206' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVX' 'sip-files00092.txt'
dac0c9e7f8f7b4e40f52610d6fe4e606
ec889d3958582d3e115f8338a190bb312e82cb8c
describe
'2916' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVY' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
f90ff2d1a470af86703b7f94a6f56f51
0604961b92e81d1f6a41d257918520f24c1bcced
'2012-01-15T04:08:05-05:00'
describe
'324736' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
490166b80c773c8038a31735b2678493
81da9f891c71bcad960a3be275d320b5fd90a355
'2012-01-15T04:10:50-05:00'
describe
'84908' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWA' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
07488c1d12662872b624124d83692ae5
036340a6148d5bde95459a9034f7ff9c7a408ae2
'2012-01-15T04:07:57-05:00'
describe
'18783' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWB' 'sip-files00093.pro'
bce95d7f829aa459fb74c2f0d145b32b
0d857a7746285745236e6c0323d8a330b5ac42b1
describe
'29028' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWC' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
efc1ed5cd18af946d4b0e14182393134
fe65a11e8fec87b90319e86d34cee368429a404e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWD' 'sip-files00093.tif'
1284e162c08ff884ccb23634fbb031ea
9523d6441a3a7f3b3d80ace29b5b7296543c9379
describe
'781' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWE' 'sip-files00093.txt'
5498394dea432981194d0b234c70d002
7539112de35aa668275bd693393dcd6c97686f80
describe
'8073' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWF' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
9eaea22a301dedc2279f435974e13499
cb6fb7986ac63554c7def2a37d112069f81f6717
describe
'324582' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWG' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
114ac5b39bb52e2a8612b65ad8dee557
77ccbf26415befec0948d62a4f231feaa996aba5
describe
'108773' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWH' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
f0c1270cbcb178d31e1887d7046ab059
74f465a182c50ac30f19da814395299ea2ee5c5f
describe
'26281' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWI' 'sip-files00094.pro'
6ddce8111ac258216cfb6fb12ccc4816
0187e5cc96871927626e3d08c9ead49c7a65e4ea
describe
'36477' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
ce08edca5b5b0264b4487a0413fef89f
b6609b2ed06736f3e27fe05862d37df09cf5bd27
'2012-01-15T04:08:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWK' 'sip-files00094.tif'
ec69363f98a464f7f316e2f872c453a2
1b5e43a970c29d8a886d34663ccb526345e67fd3
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWL' 'sip-files00094.txt'
ed7406706341f3dcc6ee4c5f4152f255
9819ac12d20694f6e4b99258ab464d2350842dcd
describe
'10603' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWM' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
99193400cd16904fba4c063d8f72a450
6343d300d071de53226befd8ac27434b6babd3e9
describe
'324837' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWN' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
6f016efe038770e23ce0378bb6f36595
5ca7d75f61ee118069756d4f2039efd4ced7e952
describe
'103870' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWO' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
0f50702bc9b1ccb464f5e71eb347fda7
ca019460216830d01da08b1e265d9d22c6b149e5
describe
'24448' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWP' 'sip-files00095.pro'
8ded14661fb7c28ac626e01a4644b4fc
faeb8b5349c7a32b7c8cd5642db8e7494df1609a
describe
'34285' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
67b753250ce557a51ddbd939a15cc59f
b8b246c0f89e43f363077441ba1960aaad9f474f
'2012-01-15T04:05:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWR' 'sip-files00095.tif'
80b3d4bdbd40f397d221b0d25232be9d
e777ef84e471cdf30d19c9a4d0371bafaf386829
'2012-01-15T04:12:03-05:00'
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWS' 'sip-files00095.txt'
3e3143e46002666a9c9f8c0620b60bff
c9d75b2b1419db73e729105faf17d7e48a9fb009
describe
'10381' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWT' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
0f54562c1b07b3e0be704e2147233df3
d6395389a52a5d2c79dd49e9e67056639e8369b5
describe
'324668' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWU' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
a269e6b09386e03e500bdcb5010ed8b5
db4e7cf255e283e280e133c4e3d383455a081570
describe
'113787' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWV' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
f902e7ffca0870052d1763fa4df08f64
2c5fcadf89f82e15a2ee5c0174e5ad7eebe2a68b
describe
'27342' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWW' 'sip-files00096.pro'
f11b584b96566973b8fd724269b03edc
ad954a8c45bcb6533c3e136b79508773a91aa57a
describe
'38851' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWX' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
bd0cc4aaecafea092a0463e80d011502
1586fbc6adfca72b29d0f056f4d68be5722086c7
'2012-01-15T04:09:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWY' 'sip-files00096.tif'
7ed4600ae84b0b0d924f03673f3e6e58
8861f05bccfac47685850f3771bec9a322e9127d
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
e2bc486142a92c527c225667ab9ea733
7972676d6491c5a06f8740a10f5b9656ef5db85d
describe
'11187' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXA' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
ff024969a1ed2c5d0b3140ef0b3f79df
41a6fc727fd5887c8c072e245d41ae71c34e1012
describe
'324812' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXB' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
04ceedeaef064ecfb4d6363bc764406b
f9eb943d175748d0d86147e2fbe7ffc2f1ce0741
describe
'111888' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXC' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
b116dd14a3919e1015a854cdedb93f24
e0b4f7300bd23e48b591c61d3164cbbb25b444ec
describe
'25827' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXD' 'sip-files00097.pro'
3f5ddf0b95ca59c10d37e3f1a6c4f268
46083c53c93562f92a69b4af7259f99303ec2a98
describe
'39043' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXE' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
33795a7b1f79523a570448ded064e36f
70a980aefa6d2675d1a9be8c67e299869899af8f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXF' 'sip-files00097.tif'
30566d6166fcbcb9323a82c6e2d07885
7fe738b1c6adfe434adc7e208db5abf8e989b75f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXG' 'sip-files00097.txt'
052242a5f4eb1f18fbf2b060e2e71865
ab58dc8578f7450d5ba98f57f3fe44d9ea060f35
describe
'11225' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXH' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
c7f8ed5d4e26d631bf75079807dca1da
c99cca09daa5bfd870fb62f8a9e2c87316839363
describe
'324841' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXI' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
6d6bf422512ffc9f408455595cf96f21
89356bad3556523b9b547f8cc7952d1b668d15f1
describe
'106615' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
f38ac0ab245147c27ca594ac63d096e3
850e2a25f31dd0c73312c65e2ab0b5233863b809
describe
'25463' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXK' 'sip-files00098.pro'
05d404e5dc2165e9c94fdd7d8d26f838
95d431c3f80ecf65e6422dd4391188e7d5494f38
describe
'36135' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXL' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
0c09befae03a5eb97fd8dfce8d2938a0
1cf31dac7a45476c196c26854910d9761b7710e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXM' 'sip-files00098.tif'
3411657967629239bbff1aa8ef33a2b6
0eb3a4a1a34005a1c422e72825c9dcddb46a2b3d
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXN' 'sip-files00098.txt'
c638219c68259657404250d22ad1d11f
687bdd9f999bdceed199e0fa2d7151a561abde2e
describe
'10571' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXO' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
1660d3c3c48c20d3c9ff07f7b85cd084
da8071bec5b6dc8d7fcc0db6e39819b2ee59d49b
describe
'324783' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXP' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
9bded0f0e75fa47060a0485eee90cc9c
30fcdb5fb904b72ab098af2a7b67d4a213a52628
describe
'106709' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
78f98cd9c119fe29f5b683ebe22598a0
bc2a38e9dc4cad753292317660e26e418aba874b
describe
'25290' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXR' 'sip-files00099.pro'
89f2715f01c364fba897bc2f25538b36
35dde15f59934aea89683c232ede30ceb1933514
'2012-01-15T04:07:45-05:00'
describe
'36618' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXS' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
bf9d6baff5f135a49d8bfe1669528076
b4c7864c90778a911288dcd928ed60c637fc153c
'2012-01-15T04:11:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXT' 'sip-files00099.tif'
3feed74823fcb55f9c82eb0cb5bb937c
294c18800b8d056ffa89f741af8e4e288c1cb1be
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXU' 'sip-files00099.txt'
ca4794a30ce74ce421fbbabce093c517
6864c31ee0115ab9a69b771f59af0cb758a75086
describe
'10859' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXV' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
27fd176b9587c45813af11c4dc65f2d0
378c31d2410a33a23ec499740da56001f18ab19a
'2012-01-15T04:06:47-05:00'
describe
'324136' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXW' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
6d9e483a0c89f51c3216e91e2478e6dd
d30a7b05ddf06817c27a3a0a7a7fd57e655515e6
'2012-01-15T04:06:28-05:00'
describe
'29876' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXX' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
ce582d9ce4d56594f20b220b419dfac2
cbdafb02e953fb4230bc5d48a50cc100525371fe
'2012-01-15T04:10:34-05:00'
describe
'5578' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXY' 'sip-files00100.pro'
c9a1ebae39761bded6f2002b24346ae7
9256acdaf7c98c6037987c465653ff99a8c207e9
'2012-01-15T04:09:48-05:00'
describe
'10293' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
ed6049c2f7d76e54dc7c34dad6a422ad
580eb3cfeb91e55cb458c30dccf4ddc960438180
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYA' 'sip-files00100.tif'
a7a701f3008a32112bc25774912229cb
a401a78e3e2f94e6f0cb20761674ae0a18f3355f
'2012-01-15T04:06:05-05:00'
describe
'231' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYB' 'sip-files00100.txt'
bb76f0b746aa8ae3d3938616a81e2ad7
aa66de99e366157cdd6e128c88583d5aef4c07e4
describe
'3000' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYC' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
f47583152cbc80a2f629f9bc480aecf2
d358221ce76388f0669b44f023e39297b19b770c
describe
'324400' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYD' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
3bc5defcb73f80b770fd396477a743ba
e7a2a508a36e036a70ff0417f0658be3d0dedf8e
'2012-01-15T04:11:25-05:00'
describe
'83093' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYE' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
a358e331f681aaad0c7d7e5673a689b9
6cf25e9a50cecc5f0aed30c0614786d053bcd512
describe
'19220' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYF' 'sip-files00101.pro'
88c238eefe9f5cf3ed743ce395f3c830
78b1a78ca2b2efc18558d6d925c342c70c4ce301
describe
'28620' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYG' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
508c6161cc6f389afcb025bfcbfbba51
195c0022812491598db6afd3a04a4afe7025c3b6
'2012-01-15T04:11:01-05:00'
describe
'2613488' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYH' 'sip-files00101.tif'
29bfc7e478d3f8337e3562d8c4093d4b
f6ef91d21466b84ef35cc1b4ffa8389fade22b0e
describe
'801' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYI' 'sip-files00101.txt'
b2c79408877d0b40614a80382ebb9919
d8418470c9459e427e24e1a787d989fbc5c98c0b
describe
'8705' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
c249990e8b63489bcbff2b43617b71e5
e10bd2f6eeff8b65ee951a834b037474bf454b08
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYK' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
8ea46055360262fad7cd8d72dee6beb1
1a51e97f19763d5dde1de67b4c65f4d0cf3301f6
describe
'109515' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYL' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
d3a90e98f4b09ee268186c048217a446
25dbf0aee4f73366d2114eabc0a45311660a66fd
describe
'26661' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYM' 'sip-files00102.pro'
e7f4ab2d2f62885cc76fa37a1ef62698
0d86d55febbe51872380481f32ee30070f8e5d04
'2012-01-15T04:09:42-05:00'
describe
'37207' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYN' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
300bdba7e70bcf9f6495138e47980342
07fc52c7c65f7a4c0f532d5b8feec9f665ea811c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYO' 'sip-files00102.tif'
13e8f803bdf0ac63306c89591f88d631
7ab3e95f6172ffa49b8002a047df390ef2a86f9f
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYP' 'sip-files00102.txt'
c361e1601a61d78b87778f26bbf12ecc
dfff5c8caf3f7428edc8f8a026843c2ca9effaf3
describe
'11046' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYQ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
7380c0f6d4f472dc58e5bbfe3e10e69f
cefe61e3da02472241f1ffa520c38f94776d843c
describe
'324536' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYR' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
71c8d1bc5ff27575e0674c4af8b75441
21d0b6b97dc8a7c4ae83c3c3d954c0445e80d4b3
describe
'108951' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYS' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
8f23f8649747e38082933fdd2d6e9d45
8880d05c1a0d4d5519f6b61ef0702458503402de
describe
'26361' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYT' 'sip-files00103.pro'
ef53b71bc214e724dbfeb63be1ff481d
19522c94a6b9ecf5044496fa5a71bc943e6e6336
describe
'36930' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYU' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
b9376cac5e74ce2660cd6ad22c1919d6
78caff02a65dff4e30bbbafe62a9ab3e79dadfe3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYV' 'sip-files00103.tif'
78db6b2f9716e8a42c6a1b50963c2551
99a5564ed3750858960c5f92cf06ac4979b8a36c
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYW' 'sip-files00103.txt'
9920f36705fc881a61b5f84658bfac21
ef111cdad5542dbf990c44a16babd7852a56baeb
describe
'10878' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYX' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
138c4cc0b2e79a3a38d03c582d281b43
b6a4230e1a6a8837a85378f55f6cff370d196a4a
describe
'324392' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYY' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
0470d12df66c7cdce8e5c7444ace6d0d
018feca4eafea908a2ff15bde370749c0d85d10c
describe
'109662' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALYZ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
898a6841aab1a010651d233e1131e3aa
aa09ac104da9bd7ffc2b3bea788e034091aa5908
describe
'26222' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZA' 'sip-files00104.pro'
364679ba18005a01fa5de6565bdb4bf6
6d3b15474ee6733196e7145b519f38aedaa833d9
describe
'37523' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZB' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
7d315bc60626b4858203cf02fa7c273e
f46118604b3df34c4431a5945a7860167d48a517
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZC' 'sip-files00104.tif'
fddeb4540924ea9b631e0a5909e79c3d
7f148b48d781001bc73f4fad900617703d7c5d8a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZD' 'sip-files00104.txt'
e0e1eb6bd590c627c3932099f725300a
af38abc028ab467bd6f98120b4d5ef92941fced4
describe
'10827' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZE' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
ab5cd50927f116f8f93b8f66bf463898
9392ac63f4206ab3836d47a072f66d7e3159fdd8
describe
'324642' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZF' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
fceac2ca6ee1adc0933776aab91b6dba
df97a48cdab87d753751363b46c91596acb0392e
describe
'107331' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZG' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
11abb4960e10dde5e2bd3554ffb743f9
ac604bd500ed4ab9452c3fdb0ba5833c515ea1cc
describe
'25490' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZH' 'sip-files00105.pro'
42ecf8cfd6d462b8af3b447b0eca2177
6fc57c683646e1ea48c59196c6233789d649120c
describe
'36167' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZI' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
35c1f3f0b8ae638d522c95d707777328
2149d7b7399c5d812f40e07655cee31e9c0fe6a6
'2012-01-15T04:06:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZJ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
3d32f6c21daefa3b134e51ef787b7186
82cb317f8927764f0a95a6588d8d5d8aec7fb548
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZK' 'sip-files00105.txt'
ca8570894ea4a54c2bd7c64c79cab3ef
98e715f864da457c86733d154b9258c2c4096343
describe
'11065' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZL' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
2170514d32f07b54126abff821b20265
d613880bff20d364e6eda35915dff7c0af99b151
describe
'324762' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZM' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
2ed9ec60bc3a33acbd55e14f6bdf1812
33f3cbf697d9aa345779fb833c1bf7a7341b1d7f
describe
'107813' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZN' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
c30928c9964053c60e6ef8168cb8c2d0
faf0630c72a0fd6f025dd6a0ca4759609c7d7748
describe
'25655' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZO' 'sip-files00106.pro'
b2cf0b816a85d4397b2b264b915fa6ef
fc042e5cce56869918073bc9be269cfe11ff888e
describe
'36996' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZP' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
4db3b26d3ebff4fa8cfa81f97fe71fe2
3fb99691b54377ef51076d576e239eac54cd9411
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZQ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
fa3b8634c44f526954d0612a72ad13a0
d6f2b0bd3e444b26644d8a06b90acecad8035b9a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZR' 'sip-files00106.txt'
2cf6473769bfa363fb60ed1224bad800
79efbe9bce5d70728be4201257d7d669c35b20e5
describe
'10486' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZS' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
c8d9b436a3af9f2a3bc3bbd4760c2724
9ab4d3cc60ebd9e0444310b3f1d0501959e70167
describe
'324681' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZT' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
6b3d509bbe7a3e2d3b1455339ea6e081
71773e6f822d8f34988cf1d20d8687343aa1e029
'2012-01-15T04:09:41-05:00'
describe
'95494' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZU' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
4da6007d7f8d942c4399fb521e456073
89990a415d2dc39a9c516efe872ff4a2f855d456
describe
'22791' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZV' 'sip-files00107.pro'
72b35cd852da0cbec77ff048a377583e
e0e04398fb46fdf7772cec26f972c50a8294385e
'2012-01-15T04:10:13-05:00'
describe
'33254' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZW' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
0ef5f4977e5989e01a16de1f2e4a72c2
a5e89eb3bbcd07583efc7cea15e7a0f0d6aa67bf
'2012-01-15T04:07:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZX' 'sip-files00107.tif'
e8ba2e097d105a89cd92e76e401c891c
4a7229aad882a7b25931ce99cba02f6cde20f09a
describe
'913' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZY' 'sip-files00107.txt'
0384ae69d3f86ef9d61c9b9881c97304
79ae4b24fe8ce10409f6e652d71d63a83095358e
'2012-01-15T04:09:27-05:00'
describe
'9817' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAALZZ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
5147439844cbc860698634777b88d09e
88c368bf0b4835b64bfda7280cb8048a1dd14a8e
describe
'324559' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAA' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
aa63687e09b57524ae9fe547cd9cf494
8ccf3b07dcd705dfc77342a90bd5c8e4df8287c2
describe
'90669' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAB' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
d7635b6ad0ce7c03da5ca56d0d6e48c5
5a21a2b4947afde2c2d6e2390e966e83477f6df1
describe
'23638' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAC' 'sip-files00108.pro'
f4a8c5d01caef010c46c38aa9241a06b
6e36dc1202001bd3a1928c2a5c12563a6bf246de
describe
'31570' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAD' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
255be94d096a89a9d0babca7a248574c
b5f729b004f2cb0d0cc68b639f43778b44fde288
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAE' 'sip-files00108.tif'
0d990a5fab1a0b055767484b82aba8b9
3785e52fc0f5db1f4ff56ae017ba215f7e330889
'2012-01-15T04:07:46-05:00'
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAF' 'sip-files00108.txt'
205633ea5be03c369b87cc805e3155b5
bed3ad172373d07f80cf0e2f1415fc0a10b54085
describe
'8887' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAG' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
fa5f9e115993eae9a0e2a295c3dacbaf
52f3bd5caa8224654d13e7a5102a5223fb722ebd
describe
'324775' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAH' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
2053a96ceb7c5dec25dadd98fa9e9e0a
2abf26287bd08792616ed2eeaa26494bfe010b15
'2012-01-15T04:07:04-05:00'
describe
'102623' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAI' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
edb32bfcfe3bacb736328c11be8f1a60
e3eaae06a94e53f76a15f0e52ed0c875a7a63632
describe
'24538' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAJ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
460c31ce36a9b2a2fc7f7fb315d0b34d
febae2396f27dd7c3e17183f8ddb77f9f0746c37
'2012-01-15T04:11:05-05:00'
describe
'35194' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAK' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
379a7b5b050fe2621200bf0435f8bf66
cd8658bc9beda061cde958f2ac082d33d644be6f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAL' 'sip-files00109.tif'
f9aea773d28a62fb8248c7ca916b68f1
be531e0f78077970255f784959adebc9d69af32e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAM' 'sip-files00109.txt'
34f7f6201aeacc236705ae30eea86dda
f10fbbefe1b034b72867853b67b4f9ef33914b12
describe
'10090' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAN' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
cb60bac5299f45f63c7d1bf9f6f91bc2
1de960d472512a9ce90de0366bf35fddc26f3c5f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAO' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
1c9bf0c248b85beb16d82a36c10ca6f6
2dce7e84d039b82918434fe034a42840aa560f88
describe
'109531' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAP' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
4d40b30a9908f77097af6258301166cc
c198f575357cf9c571e5c0202dc372557248fca8
describe
'26316' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAQ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
3bdcd8294e931658faaa1ca6e6b0ea2a
4977471497731a659c35dce55a227b8c5653c9ef
describe
'37846' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAR' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
7564e62234fba13d2c60caad6dcffc3f
7833e4e87acc13e49cce22d201c55a3a3374f42d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAS' 'sip-files00110.tif'
bf64af80776557e1ee3f7f64b9628875
e56f75e9024cbeb6f070c2b901e81b3601b0594e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAT' 'sip-files00110.txt'
3eb7a832c892a19ad4e6001caab09e29
7611a639f9dfee454682395747603e3cac5fff84
describe
'10662' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAU' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
3ad0e0dab53c879bee0c00d0bb1ee709
d5e0ab1b63b7b0b5ceaf5f57309d39764513983c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAV' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
e7b374167e76b3262f47d4e9f24cb27d
b449a36c950f2bf6bb04554fba83726282d2b620
describe
'111237' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAW' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
9597c124ce895d4d368de1a4051f21c3
6b5d8eea7a05619cb2db762685ea2740478b6d4b
describe
'26347' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAX' 'sip-files00111.pro'
30d59e504ed2e0d51c585d5e01cf5a6f
2d77b5c8943c154824db61515b86bca68d52d170
describe
'37029' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAY' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
a3536d87eaf2a411ffede04fcf873f2d
f26fc098a2849a11ffba30c3ddfadd44bff977e2
'2012-01-15T04:09:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMAZ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
0044dc68b28bd35ce5b8e821f8cb53ae
7ea93e25baa822491fd98106e1fdbfb961ef34d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBA' 'sip-files00111.txt'
86c3379239f0c8f0f9e25ccf22b76a25
642208b24a0c85edd3ac91eee13bf9730b218ee6
describe
'10889' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBB' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
cbbf9365bd5714d0cba2cb250d8e59e2
7c8c96d12b8dd5cc0cbd0cfcfa2f4cc3d18b1ef0
describe
'324798' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBC' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
43866e33d340f6d7c2e1fd47e5fdf953
e5e8e7c8860b1e927670395fc74467d42221b47d
describe
'112496' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBD' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
8ce0ec7f18b28a5debbd49f555a0c001
3e22a3c7baf6365a10440b47dd5206e124abf649
'2012-01-15T04:07:35-05:00'
describe
'26366' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBE' 'sip-files00112.pro'
5d350872524c8ab977c1f67ab34fc567
3cb639b699a42867a23d62597b122969efed9fb1
'2012-01-15T04:09:46-05:00'
describe
'38372' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBF' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
25da73cc1ae48ee9c23da625648825c7
d213d88548a34e76cf4136a118ac11d99c2d64ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBG' 'sip-files00112.tif'
f2b8ad199808f5123358c2044a327d80
de9455e932ca43716c3b3548cb4df510416cf59c
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBH' 'sip-files00112.txt'
6d7275e84b85d350436cededff6c9217
53164bc9994ac520649e904a127cd97ce3933a16
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBI' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
9ee5cff8ff6bf3300927ce4071bfab8b
12dc7e8449039e6a73ae6a115fc70551cd596733
describe
'324686' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBJ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
98c290dbbe1022ec93b7c5f3351c4af0
86b0648af71e785ff2ee4c038b0d209eba1647d3
describe
'101055' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBK' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
c6806e10de0382b93be3745677bd5b81
ff1c3396d9ad8326306de39aa3dfa840d106c768
describe
'23569' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBL' 'sip-files00113.pro'
ae9f6cb1261230ac50ea427a0a88afac
61f3cc23b3f7098c30972f28c69ec4c6154ee016
describe
'34801' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBM' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
26e7034b3205391b4c69a70c646bed74
393eb669f0889f956fd25134e17b8817d959b915
'2012-01-15T04:10:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBN' 'sip-files00113.tif'
1aa99ced4f106f047f5975a1bc196ada
06cabf3bbc039dbd8c5776841efaf39758e33254
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBO' 'sip-files00113.txt'
4873eee043839972229819c482f6c649
e850d4233383ef0f28dc152528fea4686ec344ed
describe
'10519' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBP' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
67da7e109a4e13519e148d594ad2aa87
174d39bbcff30705d3d7e2e357eeeb80b21bbfa9
describe
'324532' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBQ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
158f74b95217d9ae80bf52238afef0f6
d00573006e4991616acc7d9898c843b4300d4803
describe
'107746' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBR' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
6a5397624051a5f0a003b62a7af79435
10d6087ca6845c1df3db0701c69531f17a6fa6e0
describe
'25084' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBS' 'sip-files00114.pro'
a8351b73a0b6a8f0bddd5dd979ee50d4
3a08389185748dbb0a54f949c9622d8453279d2a
describe
'37026' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBT' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
94df9cea73a69b82215748a8d736f050
1c439353e5c9cc26b5540871f357075ef89311dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBU' 'sip-files00114.tif'
65442a980b438f79c3278891d1f8c0b6
dfa20e69212d9b240cc4fe6d0c5b94da3942dd52
'2012-01-15T04:07:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBV' 'sip-files00114.txt'
6abea91609abf0f0942ca53d93104375
7b62f59af8ed3ce04ddcd90719f005426a3c407e
describe
'11133' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBW' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
6736442946466e15ad6fdacbf4a7b92b
d388002e2ee4b51cddb7891becf1e7ec7c764a7b
describe
'324509' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBX' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
1a454cad1ea000251551c9470d36eca3
6e8d095c6d38dac8d4eb1d3158561be6250ba491
describe
'105830' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBY' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
97402f38d1aa1536038b6aad9bd32101
eb2c28c5ca886e1ccf3bec42303d27638b544e97
describe
'24907' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMBZ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
1378ad7b1ce4aadd08d334a88b810f58
862632688cffadb0fdc2c76a9f2e31b399082711
describe
'36433' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCA' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
a580b0139470b21b6be009553826690a
e9bfcacdd3f3721d28591d718b6903575e46f423
'2012-01-15T04:11:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCB' 'sip-files00115.tif'
e3ba155ce95759987f0d46f740b293a6
86334ca14b66051befba217f8a97e8eca4b2b606
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCC' 'sip-files00115.txt'
7ce42ac84c845b9c7cbb0323d4c40692
0a40cb8f40bcd630cb747484870ab733324f9dbf
describe
'10796' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCD' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
d19d2393e828b9c6ed7f21f18b7a2ae6
924a95435978fff4dd8a714b0cbb825bb6fa19cc
describe
'324667' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCE' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
d1f8d8b5713f563597c3422e850f9764
d057c21620a3fbf2d49cd60ea8482729f6f88a80
describe
'105298' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCF' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
fce0073ba6f3b86e92f4278ee02a5904
d1653fa01f2dc5c970e9ab0ca861f86fa91492fa
describe
'24506' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCG' 'sip-files00116.pro'
5f478610552d6c779f5d4a39e39f5d30
7e409299473e8fbed178009e61029103b9f9b9f8
describe
'36078' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCH' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
1a0ec870affe02243eb2f8e0859ad0be
bc629ac5e3b3b5c9ca294c1e9d2a6c1ed9837e77
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCI' 'sip-files00116.tif'
a8bd8b849ff2cf4ce98110ceb3f77764
d7c3125c361b22c6de5f67432b6d025836c97d1e
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCJ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
735b3cda63afa852a6181dcac63a3bd9
346fe3f482c6c4a882a898a9c9bfb6bf3851f0ee
describe
'10856' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCK' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
10cc014205fca0b7133dfd9f3b2e15cb
64bff203bd59cfa5115091623a9eeeb88de4141f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCL' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
1bdc6e30f1eaffd873a77e6e43afef7b
230fea4c249c840d1270d27ee99df2afe10f14b5
describe
'107992' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCM' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
9c29c256711482af166f5f7abf71c40e
bcfdaf94ba79b1ab23438a1d1282ca0e6600e523
describe
'25288' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCN' 'sip-files00117.pro'
234583b5907ca37d2b01b286a990a154
00bd2fe7b6e589f65c1089b406c85f0a63aa3e95
'2012-01-15T04:08:11-05:00'
describe
'36748' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCO' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
fba87ca70d9c2304354c32a96755793f
5bde5479c43f408a958eb0be2e5d54bb9fa3fea3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCP' 'sip-files00117.tif'
da09fc5586c0c5706d1d62a87c74b7fe
f72c378be5589ad7a8d6862d8ba0bfdef79113df
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCQ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
942a5960ce8d02fa79fd4d1f7db27626
71312b832a32db6917bd1108496d9a4c02520c87
'2012-01-15T04:10:20-05:00'
describe
'10945' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCR' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
491cd60daeb64575705a59196faa9277
43b02d24951048aad319d03eb08563ad8be39465
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCS' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
bca36fdbcef20a1e801e1a5d2641c706
edd4a62f65a6468c92a50cb36dda2c5cdfa7c0fe
describe
'113784' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCT' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
68e3bd19b776c7cdc290ad8a797ecd88
a877b87c1b261a9ad2fd31e85605645c2aef29cc
describe
'26891' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCU' 'sip-files00118.pro'
7d7ccea31839ed0d04f8464195eadef3
991959c6368b587cba1d68ed7fc0913809f4776f
describe
'38797' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCV' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
4a461785498d4d3d69ae54a02361e395
85f58bcc8c298ec0a73d81c2503f4f8add19a10f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCW' 'sip-files00118.tif'
b0a33c637d3f7ca74556df142f88c05c
ec530a4b628132583f06256bc19dca43f28d128d
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCX' 'sip-files00118.txt'
d578c4953ebbd52dd63eae36f43678c0
a77f656fb3541307eb74be4ceb50b7896f536993
describe
'10995' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCY' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
f27ee12064b2070437ad4a55b9694ea9
6bcbea49e54cb9d70331bab964c2060920133542
describe
'324683' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMCZ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
e3b84a6e1b58611f7bfeeacf580d4c63
ab375567899688abd65c46eb283f219c12751fe3
describe
'74561' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDA' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
17ce7b596875dec10eb1a9b96544f236
7ee2585cb49a65d2dc5fd7b90df9ac09f4d983a1
describe
'5021' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDB' 'sip-files00119.pro'
71942610a8bca7fed3c1b1ba0397e275
f1278121b456516052e702869db4fbe1b5388282
describe
'18828' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDC' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
8a495886312186f9fec0803f5d876e33
27875a8c15eed460eedffad8efda85cb1af7d023
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDD' 'sip-files00119.tif'
f1547a359f9dee92c0bfc78487c365f1
d46f31d861d728262e6dc70210e69c09f3977f45
describe
'276' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDE' 'sip-files00119.txt'
3c4b1bf02df3f017efa9492dc01db5e3
3211e37c6758c363f4a8d3496989e3c34d08125d
describe
Invalid character
'4715' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDF' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
5a579089634c1e3b762bca172abb39e5
a78f2f6a933dcc7c9f2ba44e6614e5a00e467f6d
describe
'324556' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDG' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
235a6430e4f7ebcffa8f9393ba525530
d4939a49547c02b5204ab989db7371e2678b5475
describe
'110055' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDH' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
231a13a492a4586681d36bc99a25b013
2704ecc93c46e0ce7b82687103725d3b43b932bf
'2012-01-15T04:06:38-05:00'
describe
'26511' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDI' 'sip-files00121.pro'
a1f5f7f18b7274841a0ddfafcca2d691
20929f102760e1cef91f8f462e7b75dfb9c576f5
describe
'37926' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDJ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
e02ccbfd5355fdbd1590e649c5b52504
e1e9b121ab5fc5889856ab146460ff89e3a30dd0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDK' 'sip-files00121.tif'
c7b775e4606728f75c480b0a03538e16
410559361ebad29753456326380613754c991193
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDL' 'sip-files00121.txt'
8b5fd88bc5d2180bc720b89774fb98b1
5daa7925138588394ca90eacc38f41a631e72461
describe
'10787' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDM' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
a2e7960caa7c2c13398b3f24c6a0d895
aeb7df79a17ed8b6e9a96ac284b501705953145f
describe
'324527' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDN' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
d9127d22388a36c997ac622db083b161
edd2caabb816e816279c8dbff5c5d5b5a949b4c0
describe
'101357' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDO' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
33774da12277885d2d199f1d24667670
1181f2849d01830b31c96ae9b00d20cf09dcb5c2
describe
'23757' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDP' 'sip-files00122.pro'
d49b268dda881c10ce0306c299a0d156
42731fd817fc2c852b9519ea085d857b3c0251f5
describe
'34471' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDQ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
f117791dd82c7c44aad2f5d2ea3d97a4
d6f37857d6776c783a952b8d0885e80db2d9cfec
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDR' 'sip-files00122.tif'
015628447235f573d637d40d184e2dfa
ca2fb46da8f5fbdb00f0258f493465502e121098
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDS' 'sip-files00122.txt'
418032ee75f329ea3dfc1acf5a4129d2
a8ed243051a6123a9c5f126f277057c4092a71dd
describe
'9945' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDT' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
ae4ebb6ddf6d6bc2b103b419ce14d3c4
377b36c07c31addab3e2b057349ef61d4fc46fde
describe
'324558' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDU' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
368859759d1219e7245670b22357b516
b1d9ceefad3205bc2dc3d040400892e2cdc14b17
describe
'110517' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDV' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
d65724271987d55ab9e317ba66c4ee3f
b71a26994a1ed5f781e9d15e6ba8d8a2c2b79c3b
'2012-01-15T04:06:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDW' 'sip-files00123.pro'
cfc509469e5e7567d329a6a40c3c5d4d
ad55a2391b1d5f94441b85bd27f3ea7cca2f3a9c
describe
'36832' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDX' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
692e5bd4fd1d656df799e907ecb247a5
8bbc0b7110dd6d6024d2638109a995942f4b0504
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDY' 'sip-files00123.tif'
3877877936695b7d8162be56baa3e1c8
4c7afd2876b741ad2498729a091cc126752f754a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMDZ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
51c42a4d3cf9278c9a2dd0d3c54bdc78
b9102fe26f7a729c76a114c686fa24bedb1e5072
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEA' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
d14601a8766a4bd5cf5e18405fc59220
690cf20e1a567f3c9eb6c15bb34dac8a77116843
describe
'324628' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEB' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
c199b2e86628bd007fadbc46ed1f81e4
81d4af3403d463bdbe024cae0aab0a2c51987ca0
describe
'60279' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEC' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
a6d87048e8673e31676e9ef924f91c8e
acfce5ac60301f7803f8755fa4f014be7ae08c07
describe
'12750' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMED' 'sip-files00124.pro'
c0a6ac28064c4dbd07b4b26f44bfb9b7
25daae5f0a46242789f56c946945484ae080789b
describe
'21902' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEE' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
2d2a8d9559f40e5e40f2a64c5460f77a
0c22e5e6280679be80d1390db3ffa450e922f695
'2012-01-15T04:10:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEF' 'sip-files00124.tif'
976158833fc24f884eebec3e414a4c2e
beb92bbd4de03db42404ddddf8ca409c091a0bab
describe
'514' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEG' 'sip-files00124.txt'
734e474acd3a0a48be611a5622a4f1dc
e2624f84280c282724b66a5183a76b559c286738
describe
'5960' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEH' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
d93a17d55a7f8e5aa192231bf6d206d9
8da0f0d7e8b22614f6688caa9cf6b76e4022bf5a
'2012-01-15T04:08:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEI' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
4d3d7f165d844fbad78137bd4695e3da
833bffcef8b6c7764834d3fdce309c05f7d006b3
describe
'92968' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEJ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
d814948b057eb5c7cd47d7be93f9aafa
71575ea3dcf8611bf25e9f9982426ebe31ce2c39
describe
'20279' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEK' 'sip-files00125.pro'
62330367cfc55dc7269192fb210c66d2
f6c7e90fad86923fce4ec3ad71bd682f3451a16d
'2012-01-15T04:09:20-05:00'
describe
'31684' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEL' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
1f6264cedfd9df1772ce7510e4b5e859
d473ee62b1a54bd09a5f337d32eabc19bd4fcc62
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEM' 'sip-files00125.tif'
3026bae0699946ad2d70050c85a12941
b35cc114d64847b10495c869207cb29a822399e8
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEN' 'sip-files00125.txt'
b642dd2f7543b97394fcc526f6848e02
41cd40348dd9887ba066c5fff465dba075d2e02f
describe
'9085' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEO' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
4a667ff79774c83fd001da518e8aab8f
eff867e3d70a944657e6ef5853bf7adce83d0e83
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEP' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
0eaf15028e37543eae251cebb6aba85b
f541ebd845fbf7aea412d9daaef2a414c800680a
describe
'111087' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEQ' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
05eac1b4e2b522ea989f847f297fa4b4
b812b1748bfd97b605ba98222a13970b7a1a2876
describe
'26190' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMER' 'sip-files00126.pro'
b7683f600d3deef25cacc1726685f30d
8453c3126293c18d50dbea77243485b790711bff
describe
'37429' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMES' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
cdd911acd4b101874b749b0587e70dcd
1a20de597aaacce0b31b6b544a46d17a81a44fd4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMET' 'sip-files00126.tif'
26f4196d351a2184743a96aa3ed127da
26ff19110c75b84643c7f915dc417d6c8b637bb0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEU' 'sip-files00126.txt'
579865b6bea70284db1a98e537ef0dd4
1715815acfe298a51bd3e31a337232d08cf09516
describe
'11027' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEV' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
ef3b40473235475dd57de08f62eede9a
4810cb8f7e98f6ce9dd7c38f240faada91d8e6c9
describe
'324645' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEW' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
965fa985d2529dd8e71b79a4aac14b7e
308b85c18d584eb6391375f68d4138eac51f075d
describe
'108452' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEX' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
b8e3fb043bd412023bf3d4cb58a12dc2
f741fa910352301953a273e5c740c2a9f348b677
'2012-01-15T04:07:51-05:00'
describe
'25058' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEY' 'sip-files00127.pro'
2d4b61fec2d5fd0d66961786bf52c1cc
aa6ff8f358fd686f7601320c4a4ddf6f3bee7f55
describe
'35711' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMEZ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
b0f667a37f8742201094fa3c9a76a5e2
55025c9aac38c029959a25f00b0148ea8b281444
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFA' 'sip-files00127.tif'
bc1b8d93f5a9f689cef7a4b724cbcc6c
d5b3119106ca2b06e0b49378f9a02e3d9eb5f5bd
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFB' 'sip-files00127.txt'
68f4565d229c8e6922c7c8084dc8dbed
9b79a94d476880e5cf3f7ecd0cc3257bfdd78ca4
describe
'10545' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFC' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
3e14ba038fb14a084f26478d4c0d51e1
1beb5930719612c2cbac07bd3b59e93348568ef9
describe
'324675' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFD' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
18c48acf70ded9f5fabb20dc21a1d510
60d56daf85a9f573d8f28ebb6e266571e516ecd3
describe
'108544' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFE' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
4af48ba91345663e11fde0b139b17ef1
6ebb53756a9bb0c19215c122a34b40d25545f2bd
describe
'25459' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFF' 'sip-files00128.pro'
0a2a39673d446cbe0332cfa1612ebd6d
65fea244394072120331fd82fca7027501147ce7
describe
'37593' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFG' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
bd7958e92ecfe9abbbb02051dc4a8a37
e3ae8e0be02af38e7c70580c96b85409c86405e8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFH' 'sip-files00128.tif'
2bf25005157bb8be66c90030bd8b4e0c
7b4eb202e863f869b75387768744bb34b187a400
'2012-01-15T04:06:08-05:00'
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFI' 'sip-files00128.txt'
75fde2e6eb64f3f9da4f2d05c0a86a32
6be5f275cd51ecf435140889b3ee35eec84e1734
describe
'10967' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFJ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
854702fca5671a6bc734388f49f78f3c
fd85492c3dc88ef15c9782c4ae943442b5b16532
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFK' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
820045d47299ffc5196c41d0687bc521
0bccc55fc94a5b2714f9d02cfe446b610c19db2e
'2012-01-15T04:08:19-05:00'
describe
'114833' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFL' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
a886564c09a0cfbe4750e2558fc5ec97
d7f708a3f5e9f50704ce7510420e6ca07b1db0ff
describe
'26464' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFM' 'sip-files00129.pro'
3431f7cbe499dc70fead1e87aa10afa1
4b6cac5053ef731b8da5550460026a8cbd065f7a
describe
'38622' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFN' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
d31cf3cb05ab8ea2890a2b7ca4ae4e30
c73397f3e73f6bd3950ae247fd93c99b96768c9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFO' 'sip-files00129.tif'
c7889c51da87ac7305e420ce6934f560
e97b9e2a5c265ddb9090d994004982ee0df27c40
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFP' 'sip-files00129.txt'
5334c0ec97ca2c724539617c8c02a4a3
60f410eaf3d874cfcf86af5db196ccaee51069a5
describe
'11009' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFQ' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
ed62e3f6bca732c1baeedfc0f60bb224
6d0984fb1f168e67d83e6251c061fe8418bc7420
describe
'324805' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFR' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
abdc96512d890ce906ffe82d74559e6f
9adedfc483c604ce4967b356d5f5fbe7459c99b9
describe
'112188' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFS' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
b2aaa02b8ca6b44b6e584bfd96e53808
684efbe8496ab56ad8afe4b5a8b65aae0b56624a
'2012-01-15T04:10:46-05:00'
describe
'26570' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFT' 'sip-files00130.pro'
d01b65249764cf0bbac4b3c7e5849d7e
b0623b5507033320add01959393556373e736d9a
describe
'37359' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFU' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
e30d6b63e6ddb02a1b6ecba1207d3601
b98d3024314f1180fc7045b10cd8910bb76cf7df
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFV' 'sip-files00130.tif'
04f5afb2bcb100bc828837f37a61197d
149c32879a6d3702c980af1759db60c1563877ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFW' 'sip-files00130.txt'
05ef93bc945e50a9194d99f88cc47cdf
5e2c9010a8177980305be3ef9bb3121d0b61f858
describe
'10885' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFX' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
8e844a4f8a1ca72462bf06eafb373458
c96b328d02f4ca5917af551a8a5fbebdf7784115
describe
'324810' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFY' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
3113dc8836afeaf95d254e0d68c7a7e2
6e051711255a4eff7bef0d73acf7c9bf910f787c
'2012-01-15T04:07:54-05:00'
describe
'112004' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMFZ' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
f709a20d4c2c4c32489a7f4cfaf04c95
a9474b2dbdb23a2f94f1dd51e547d403522c1e2c
describe
'26122' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGA' 'sip-files00131.pro'
3f3a810eeedfa50095f72a091bdcd952
31f5759efd303fc42972bd249672a886821a3a06
'2012-01-15T04:07:11-05:00'
describe
'37253' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGB' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
898f9bd2f13e3c38faf5522095d1a206
4a1ac5e3a5524a39c726296629c04fb42f33c704
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGC' 'sip-files00131.tif'
c54288a28f9c450d597ece62ad329459
ea97cdcde9ad326393e1545059b4aee30e3ec321
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGD' 'sip-files00131.txt'
44a714d8ab1993d8c831202f785affc9
4b39a3f516af0085b4c58908913c4c980f658aec
describe
'10849' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGE' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
2e2be4f38bdf538e280c75f2899acf78
67e88837b5a0f11a92382fd03e3f6f910ffcb5a9
describe
'324578' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGF' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
72970144a4a2ee669083f6fc23125e25
436fc5ad947bc91b3a89495c16f9897bc08443f9
describe
'111507' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGG' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
71670cd62a80cf2480f953e49fdf59a9
77c8da6b29fc56408fe6555aaf9fb140606e5981
describe
'26656' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGH' 'sip-files00132.pro'
72624d857da32fc578a6acf19093aee6
32a05479c6a5d90326ad2db0d73496db89d05d44
'2012-01-15T04:07:16-05:00'
describe
'39077' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGI' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
6bcb16773dbcbe9ec9ae59ab3dfe470a
236f65e281496edffe0b28fffaf6eb8fc75af44f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGJ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
dcd653494083428fb11aa179df94200a
416576a44dc550427391bb34188a248845b6b055
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGK' 'sip-files00132.txt'
1f41c995d7e4b2ac92f85397b214d5ca
0d849f60390702aad3fff1fb60bbaf6a318b6622
describe
'11263' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGL' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
76f5c2628a525e5b723653e3c7e95bb3
dff9b3d2d9c79bd1afd02a67177494d204606367
describe
'324835' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGM' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
00c40008b30ddfbb5fac50576ea4025a
ba6dcefea888703004c0a6335d3ce508849b5f37
describe
'90659' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGN' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
93c6255389adaaef7d64ffe556b6981b
dd3a35d374447c45281b0758e408ce6e832c0f7c
describe
'20462' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGO' 'sip-files00133.pro'
e493113ba1fe42af0e2ae2cb5cfae367
68b1ba1c24bc1ee0c27f16d827edab52d05dc656
describe
'31214' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGP' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
c8320577489e06241c1faf8fe7af0bad
4502347beff76e3e0062e78326aa0fa3e9fd20d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGQ' 'sip-files00133.tif'
8834ecdcd2ca39988978dd07864c98f9
1a5163c54280ec9379100721938c6d49de527560
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGR' 'sip-files00133.txt'
2a5742c68b0b2b51daaae75538120848
8a866b0766e1fbc565d179395ec1c1111e5aeda3
describe
'8976' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGS' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
11415df9cecae929bde36e695cd929c7
5db286799890026ef72c6e0c1b239cdb3418663b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGT' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
643935a9799a24f07b1c55e9475b13cb
f08e6df9d43872b59d96e7e0879b348e9bb54106
describe
'85371' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGU' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
97915f52afa1405e04829e67292dee3f
13d5dd53eea4fa163317546b6a5098e29c285b66
describe
'19121' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGV' 'sip-files00134.pro'
452e4209ce6b166b6cdd648163d8b5b3
839849280da8ead044fbe55ec4bbaeba30498353
describe
'29494' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGW' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
bddd6c21bbda7cdcd1b2cadab6923b99
65975d64c32ce67897ec10753862375adc388845
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGX' 'sip-files00134.tif'
3e9c7309b948ab1aac5d8238e42970ed
f1dff73f6eabbd7301ad81ee550984e7d9c2cd64
describe
'797' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGY' 'sip-files00134.txt'
1ca77a99316a641587c0f537608b5ec4
0c68b06dfb8ceaf49fbceec09c3cdfd8197cb6d3
describe
'8586' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMGZ' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
925409334d69cc0810f7e68bc0e14820
f0a71df542ef14ab3c196a7d61d7695173223c5e
describe
'324413' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHA' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
541e9c4d6dd798e44e36173ba7e0abc9
62ba0e65b1770bb4c7e90df5fcb094b2749804ec
describe
'115979' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHB' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
cc105ce1b79bd4a29953b13241551ebd
e25cc4afc4a8956af60db598346ba94f6a870c40
describe
'27909' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHC' 'sip-files00135.pro'
7290d3692256832a9cb2f04ac0c69ea2
331377ffbcdc84bb9415f9a06ec803b0f5fe81ba
describe
'40057' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHD' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
99c4844846c1eda946cdecda9e71c8f7
b68f11396779ace958dfe756ee38b0eeb8a52458
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHE' 'sip-files00135.tif'
c632b6556a8f98be96795dd36ccdca5c
6a4779a82077f58dec9852a780f30de0454efb47
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHF' 'sip-files00135.txt'
c342d33eb3f9d0b1aa291828750f3fee
480cd98a6adfad46e22f61599ff4990763c043b4
describe
'11353' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHG' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
0d4cd81896f91dc38329a7efbd01e517
4931cc8728b819ec3aed6ecace754e6794f4a92d
'2012-01-15T04:05:57-05:00'
describe
'324842' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHH' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
17c775393fd1e64c0a3cd13149946ae9
3949b57d887ebcdd4aae0d23d43e025f6ddda081
describe
'114325' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHI' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
a9adefc6db432ad645bb98c559414bc2
3b73d7623a813416eb2f03551ab8cd2884a19670
describe
'26855' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHJ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
66921472be57ed2534fe4a46d4db6a65
a7883084fd8bd85fab7df457d10625211044ba3e
describe
'38487' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHK' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
4eae77f7e961c7beb614f172953ff71f
681c93738841e1087ff9a1ce121c36a90eb5b15c
describe
'2615580' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHL' 'sip-files00136.tif'
70156eb99451fb5b3a03a00fd14a7ce8
6a738ec93414c34ec329ca3591cd8dacda3d5a53
'2012-01-15T04:07:21-05:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHM' 'sip-files00136.txt'
8b374e0087d3c345c0bb688858a76ada
c3e9f4ada5efa8e4462af294e42a51463380f98b
describe
'11509' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHN' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
625e935ec656926dded38efea17638ef
8cf400db6dc450e2cf755de0a1f4454f4e4f8e6d
describe
'324790' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHO' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
fc3a5677b947585a92067a5bbec8139a
5380aa49505be202162abf9fc3d6dda504a08773
describe
'105906' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHP' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
60baf426cdca4b9267f59f6446155a69
c6620f3c84af9824c4bb662c043fb6b57da310ef
describe
'24350' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHQ' 'sip-files00137.pro'
7d58d5e3b619287824f7cf8d009d1a2d
9a7f87fd19da99e97c4463ae472cedc492976db9
describe
'35708' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHR' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
318ba3816be6f84fe002058bbac98598
5b94f00a5ff90072aa78434e9101e858c047b103
'2012-01-15T04:12:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHS' 'sip-files00137.tif'
c78633144098188f55bb2dd1324957a8
937b3c68116acd2a13127343bfa3eebf64072317
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHT' 'sip-files00137.txt'
6823039513f15d2596a47d45a57e289d
14327019db08150bc5567b9215b0469404af2e3c
describe
'10738' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHU' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
e5ae24434a8323519283b0e9709768dd
226dab1e978702141dfc99c3ecbcaa1fa7fb8acb
describe
'324651' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHV' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
f5ccd50dc9a2946ea5561970d6a75b12
246fa2c4854ab4d1f171ec5ba775175c2f046d7b
describe
'106321' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHW' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
c9b11375f5d6215abffb4af0ac54f5e7
2d8078afc14d11a644aa46aa51a621bef7b80627
describe
'26108' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHX' 'sip-files00138.pro'
8305520cef0e6a93afb1336a9ea39186
c7020eff003bbe65f2a1a25ec48c43931c313335
describe
'35938' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHY' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
f5a990df8aa0c76871d977e8c7f7685a
e841b04a4c61357969d261de4cce8c1e76139f1e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMHZ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
c954df84258d45baf0232077a95ad4ed
24f70515815064b0c44df0a579d4c1bc98e3c529
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIA' 'sip-files00138.txt'
a8096e3f553c8d18ef5c4babc5b5b3de
6a49504990f79ab636a89ef5334303eec23449c8
describe
'10415' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIB' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
5156267d89abe788ce9b7b23c3391526
6326b1426c92fb0c9c05df68e6ed5ab29d35263b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIC' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
ab4f5f8b5fb10f290bedb11e84c02613
b116e001e85b7192a5d99b70b5c05fb2e7db2a4f
describe
'111639' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMID' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
7e8d568f8ce009d903e8be4885a2a6b7
2339573317d4bd7cbe8b53dc6bc4fae6d5964126
describe
'26870' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIE' 'sip-files00139.pro'
33689e4f7891589ebd4492868022fc91
890d73ee93ac76ba81d5307d082a0ea793cff0d7
describe
'37699' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIF' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
0388427f04dab6101690c14646e35fb5
7c8aafb7a3248280a9323a2f7bdbdae15f6d0cae
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIG' 'sip-files00139.tif'
71f6e03a76899994f4dd20a3d8cde0be
44eaf4539c76109f927520d15b609ea582bed3b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIH' 'sip-files00139.txt'
eeefaf853fc409f3660775140f5f06d5
828b8fe567dedbf51e9189601d6e9ddccf046a0b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMII' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
f2e22aff6994f43f7ec215009d5a1f3d
07ca78309dd4212b6a928671194168588cbf3d37
describe
'324669' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIJ' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
af3d08e91488e1f00eb2081ca72371de
dd2fbaf0345c7b5f2586859208b4da1099adaa8a
'2012-01-15T04:08:48-05:00'
describe
'114788' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIK' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
0e2e3a05282a6ecf070a20f2a1a0d4f2
ae821053df1e94129d663153f7f15a55abe84df5
describe
'26730' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIL' 'sip-files00140.pro'
5de66afe0c693e0ef76dfedc2a2fc568
2bdad04077e5dec735b3652c67b3398b79e54746
describe
'39404' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIM' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
8307fc58b213d83b2ffca76849885065
b0b2869857d0891e19008ba59a3bb9b6104b777e
describe
'2614336' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIN' 'sip-files00140.tif'
b2ada22ed879318538952f60ff59f6a5
c1a720ac954887be724249c9ed51c616f529535f
'2012-01-15T04:06:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIO' 'sip-files00140.txt'
a0c82012268bba7619c3bdaefc2a3bd6
e41a671f22de5aaff58afec5656ccc7659f11359
describe
'11651' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIP' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
102d7c00ef844cce3de31185321f81fa
4775f15a403ce6569e477c6e91cd3e3838ae7613
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIQ' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
f01ec5026e0f92cdafc0c95b9bebb995
86c3451ada64047fa71e9bfbf711049efeb1c823
describe
'104263' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIR' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
09b86b1c3b9dee05b0790b3ffcaf7021
5a3cf427b8f2412a5bba907e6cc20829b832f162
describe
'24411' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIS' 'sip-files00141.pro'
79e4a6b5386d468d813ec5e76bd9bd0b
65db5d27643f8b4e02e69e1b80a41c2811006c56
describe
'35138' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIT' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
f04dcc3410e2863f080f1974a1dc8047
0c7fb80eb1458fadc4012bcec3b6b15daf5ba0ff
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIU' 'sip-files00141.tif'
73e22eb5a3db45210a36c2105f0d64a6
9f4c2c809e07ac0bccc4aa69e4fa9d232982c7d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIV' 'sip-files00141.txt'
8585cfcf70af4a3086166898cb6acdcc
69e48b4eb533cb60e4c7eb7c2fec907e11150a1c
describe
'10535' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIW' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
fe14f06e8e60952673bb3481f1f0c1b1
eb15b2496a50f38a3ed7d1dc79b59682999a4a11
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIX' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
5785fd46747f26706846057d45e9d981
4e57af8e7831b2d202881c4333141daf796d2e7a
'2012-01-15T04:05:59-05:00'
describe
'45721' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIY' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
edd188f307bdbc051dbd213a8d3fd7db
e392ae2105c4f58bf27fa63357bbf903bedf3497
describe
'9593' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMIZ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
e1e819986776a8e6f642d03cec8172aa
2b2dc129e34b86899abce03e74145ef066def659
describe
'14344' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJA' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
088a55933bd3a837526b675cdfab0f58
f5d1fd2de547182dafd95ad23f046c82b8b15102
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJB' 'sip-files00142.tif'
64f3ab14bb3bb25644607a2e10c60890
85714d70b10a784d93132c0d1114d1cee3175b9c
describe
'397' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJC' 'sip-files00142.txt'
5923ef401f4199c961656e89027162b5
edc6aa38626852c7b10f2ca908d1e82518f2c267
describe
'4574' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJD' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
1d379f31ea6bcfc54132b31694237bc3
ed1920b7639fbc983ec10bfc6287e2ea4b8dc241
describe
'324707' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJE' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
724d4c42690bcc0ae6f6bdb6cf2917ab
7c99bb844ca1f048218d7bbb3b6335ad28aaf96e
describe
'86041' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJF' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
e8771c66da0fadc300930bcd864db5c3
a85e8b720432512d764345e858d3e2536f88c033
describe
'19790' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJG' 'sip-files00143.pro'
980b321235d6d89c25f6b339b00d8f57
2aea40b9f32e02bab2800d8a3a526336651a303a
describe
'30260' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJH' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
8ec3596f9f449946dc836679759f4fcb
6adc8ea811aefc6dc2e364f103b38406d6638b34
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJI' 'sip-files00143.tif'
66fdb84aa639171968e6d0aa028a0f3b
df003342efe287c39d8e13e960107d7cd16f5eb8
describe
'828' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJJ' 'sip-files00143.txt'
4cc98bd4de42dc2cd6252271489bdc1d
b97d4e5623b731fe2c33c7f73f37954f6b3047b1
describe
'8471' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJK' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
13c043a22e2be4e384f6fbd51c080bc4
3eacb05fe5cff45bdfe6825f742a4d6594af7960
describe
'324664' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJL' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
8d373d24557619e686a7bd0c5776fac6
c3706f09440e5075c65a6b46a4b5f5103616eace
describe
'108817' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJM' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
8ccc9484640cd3d4f809c1b4e907fd0a
f829fe8af8494818f5f98831f7bd024272d9adc6
describe
'25707' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJN' 'sip-files00144.pro'
14e8f319e12f5e4cd29d4630d9cd4648
32fc15c2b92a2c063d51baaf2bf3297b1acdc236
describe
'36712' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJO' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
9868e8259ac44c0c8ecf592c4060e964
a0bed111b92ca3b29e61a15fd4799b17ea950f7b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJP' 'sip-files00144.tif'
1d8f09b9cd91a6d918e53165c7fcf06a
b23bef937770d1792972b9975f73f1f86c3d67c1
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJQ' 'sip-files00144.txt'
4fd19d4b26cd61ae935f6008cd452766
9a8e2fda7d9de8166005dd27ccb097c03c6090ad
describe
'11332' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJR' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
ee61a17e72c7776a0315827a0193a576
92b404b3de865b57290e87e5cf4adddf574772bd
describe
'324374' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJS' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
44649bc0e10047b6edc1c235229c3b8a
75d2da9654538e94fd94d3a090180d96a9f8d196
describe
'107462' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJT' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
089c25c9e36649fb4d3ae2b3020c3fec
1e1d9563e99084ed8816903cd8244d4351a92c20
describe
'24993' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJU' 'sip-files00145.pro'
561d47edb0443d2759524ada02204be1
cfef9d80d94aec6e890d26f4b1f3b73f3c7d9ccd
describe
'36791' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJV' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
515ec7ef9585da2d597167248cfbaf6d
93dd2a64df18412c41a30cafd218682790daef6c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJW' 'sip-files00145.tif'
e1a837be4dc23d9b56b45e86b382907e
66c3fc867dec81d2e29d2d0fc06ff4847d687997
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJX' 'sip-files00145.txt'
4ec183316a3e489c86a25971c1169d99
1e2f898ea7bea040470b74c9c2d22078976de460
describe
'10599' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJY' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
e9cb14a9295437921f0d08c875eec8f1
5212739732589f44d4218890348cda91e6cac077
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMJZ' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
a58d16a63a16a670b1e5b2913e1594af
4b475103206489430e8fa531cd962955742f096e
describe
'107288' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKA' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
4ac87488ece10169c276403f5c133639
f2697bf8e82ca1486257fecc635db40e0a69f7ac
describe
'25158' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKB' 'sip-files00146.pro'
7356220784c6f6ac1899cf08c0ef36cc
e13969b71fd5cbfd969aeddd6aacdbfc4460451b
describe
'36203' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKC' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
a294b2d41a9e9f142f82d89de0ef4430
69d6052c0d1181720e9d06766fb1457647d38ce6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKD' 'sip-files00146.tif'
5132f51308bc4d0802d0564d1a65bcb6
30de6d717fa6c5779cb720ac037b4edb9c62ad15
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKE' 'sip-files00146.txt'
93b443b3e1727e2eeaac9de9d038009b
544a68d566c74bfd712d525e7d21103731a97194
describe
'10338' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKF' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
9cdcf1f48d6ed238195f331af26555ec
ec7eed193e27a531b7c3c8010bf23cef96f7faad
describe
'324761' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKG' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
689bdd7ca38b62aae0c0388d9d81dc09
d31b914f3e25f3ffe2350770d57ff4f8b37899fb
describe
'64209' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKH' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
43f4169c87fce20d2f25182e008f6530
81caa6e3e4212a24422431ca1c7676925d0c6cc3
'2012-01-15T04:07:50-05:00'
describe
'3026' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKI' 'sip-files00147.pro'
ba2e28210a2ac8f1c4e16bb7b8c12ec0
fbef64d8512c3bf93225a69d0297537c3dba394b
describe
'15142' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKJ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
10270d9caa6d87658ca81d2091c254a6
8cc44feafbd4230d7c6132c4d773d8642a5ce0fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKK' 'sip-files00147.tif'
54dc91d6993474349e7d7865c0a52cf1
91284e71ed18ffc9e233882283d864eb1f195fc0
describe
'174' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKL' 'sip-files00147.txt'
ee4fa126f4628ed6b61fe62f84896ca0
13ba4507c2999e1d39c31d31ce34529db27a565a
describe
'3811' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKM' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
cd2a33d24c41009ac178a5c415eef5fc
9da5d3c3b4a72089b13cb2d5fb718f6f59973b8a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKN' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
76ae5c5e3768f0e565f4cf60ca3635e9
f92c58d3e3c200812f9cb4eda385cfde5dbd7e43
describe
'105930' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKO' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
88be8ecba1282346fd1d82c17373ba12
8534dfa24c37e92db37081bf617bf1c08ec24900
describe
'25283' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKP' 'sip-files00149.pro'
469940123920c483cb4348266807b466
04d9c9433dafaaa474a27686f573c112d9d1570b
describe
'36194' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKQ' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
561ff6dc371ff2853de16d8bcf68bdf7
998a89d20fb482b5934abf2623d51be01a351524
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKR' 'sip-files00149.tif'
d210b37adc3c41c371211f641537c76c
8c7efefdb636e3acdb4ccadf808bd0a1508b29a3
'2012-01-15T04:06:24-05:00'
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKS' 'sip-files00149.txt'
661ba8cbb74f4ef1ca095a2da21b2ddd
1e43edee6d717e661adf1748133052677d4e3ca1
describe
'10565' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKT' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
2815c55cc4a883c955c58f90a2cdad94
fd215499c7a8adff74f21af0e3d32b98d889cf68
'2012-01-15T04:10:38-05:00'
describe
'324575' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKU' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
517d9d78af95d082c7a4032430e72967
18a27d0d5efd8c1e9f4f947db125705b2a340615
describe
'99042' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKV' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
5782593696e5d6ced1945abb1c1fb4e5
893d492956732e7d926836a222f70cfb92e11fb7
describe
'23863' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKW' 'sip-files00150.pro'
6e815ad74ec69b0f85888574ded1fb60
a2e4f2f9b3f3fc8eca74b6a6d0e5fcf318e345b5
describe
'34778' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKX' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
74efba9ca8c1e4f938630b2f4ced00dc
9f67879a86ac1a7f04bfb1c9b06896e5bd4e096c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKY' 'sip-files00150.tif'
3d50884edb3ffcb26e776dc809e1f09f
74b50b1828d6f85c2ec12cfa840ba8abb796394e
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMKZ' 'sip-files00150.txt'
3c6ef4bf875897e98c8d081bc1299da5
4acddae62f596defa7aed898903576b1040a9ed9
describe
'10254' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLA' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
76e8b4aaff0d8368ce3f6562cb819106
bdcc0536bf50563a67f00f000d637e62f1ea7f21
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLB' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
11f69dba45b3ac7c9f6fc5b424fb7a41
b7237ac37820233a3a347db4d8274fd7498502a3
describe
'104620' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLC' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
47b1420f62d5c6d9afcf62d8b47dfc34
2d17ca42d5d1ce3fd2cd9c1dc6a286da1ba00f5c
describe
'25341' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLD' 'sip-files00151.pro'
f4668bb9ee56cc9ea46197223f02b34a
21d308110f3dca57b1da735bda45b22cb701b39e
describe
'35749' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLE' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
de6586b28051c3d3ea4498b923a1f19e
73c6a0ff07148166fb7bae6d1c254d69844926c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLF' 'sip-files00151.tif'
a2ed4844a16a232b71aff0d3b43d9966
ab7add925f936ad9de9559f6971654ce51d35b66
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLG' 'sip-files00151.txt'
d6f40a3450e7ddfa21bdb5e5c4454a88
1a56deff78122e4bb329ab034525013257341da3
describe
'10695' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLH' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
007f61754df419d366e472cdb17461a8
74b82c44c644c795b9e0f29b392e71b0ffa08df3
describe
'324571' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLI' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
2ebe9b033086d0181f9c106e91dcd828
0c27e099b9ed075abd185dcaf99124ec2c129e18
describe
'103623' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLJ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
827dc63d5d9e3df9774a67180f0bd103
5de2ce0d0d6cbaf25173b7978c6c906160586a09
describe
'25402' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLK' 'sip-files00152.pro'
6e63356165ebc5346094d2fd0b48df8f
9a9bd43fc50102453792a2fd49b46c476d755d3b
describe
'35433' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLL' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
31f01a01ae19268e4f591acd14f1fc11
5eee2fa1dfeb93b45a696c70b50e17e1c2163764
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLM' 'sip-files00152.tif'
5045fb7ad12132c71307f29396b2613e
a44c68c2ef3cb3686fb5b74e14d17e2f1a693ca5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLN' 'sip-files00152.txt'
c09c16f6488af5eaae4fda6be502461f
010a93f7afbc7c1b5b94e0053527693ae7821a4e
describe
'10577' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLO' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
35d83b7cf081de00fcea1a1058ac147d
55a42123cb6f7d4fc44dedd101096707a343911d
describe
'324475' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLP' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
5c14d9e833f8d687124471aa9b6ef406
c6e418c43e1cffff8f618ae1eb8ae4cbb932eb15
describe
'91516' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLQ' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
108416506fb53dc9acb397439b22a6fe
d2df6ce2b59347c9230d852dc44c39ea10516c5b
describe
'22121' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLR' 'sip-files00153.pro'
0f09084ff6e454a38b00c016a5c5d4e4
d9217b134a933243fa7a6280bc7d955d70a742e3
describe
'30975' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLS' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
61fee102abcbe69045c4211e541aa2b1
ead6ba1855c0fbaf853bd2c73ca0bbd960382d43
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLT' 'sip-files00153.tif'
701fd9bc8c5ef69749ab02de74e2b677
57697df9ba0d57a1ecb3b86cd59203e5e706c93b
describe
'894' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLU' 'sip-files00153.txt'
2c8a62fd7a7be01e36bbde71d76f967c
491ce76c815eefd997bd18e1385cf635f43f68b0
describe
'9764' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLV' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
de6205801d48f6aa0f4aadb1e07178fb
48718c0e446b42b783f39c1ace0a1d375744a0f0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLW' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
8dea4c75456a30c68fa7f4cc397cc7c6
8ef312efb4e5b259dec7f2fe546260084ce271c0
describe
'107042' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLX' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
8ded7e48968c04e133ae60ef07298f41
327d9ba09a3cdf515766dab043f131c6d2306285
describe
'25999' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLY' 'sip-files00154.pro'
f240fd1bc5d33aefcbef7f513fc90307
7d447d2e834beff24eda461ab0afed5bddbe80c8
describe
'36678' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMLZ' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
e6b0fb66d602114adce6af4fb446a151
0e93c939f45b101c43bd4386c1594419276c0b9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMA' 'sip-files00154.tif'
601646946a421d4df94b440d59737bdf
242e3a24e42a66de336224d59e1f8fb199402ddf
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMB' 'sip-files00154.txt'
4015a07717c8e15954043125f3d7a104
37fa1ab0be33bb704ec51309b7581e3a59ca2a02
'2012-01-15T04:08:52-05:00'
describe
'11049' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMC' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
e3c344df14800bfa7ada6d6c05226ec4
7192e773c298703c10b769b5c2c4c2a7e3f5f5e5
describe
'324494' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMD' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
99dccc5f15e0385fbe08877b80b0db8d
75cb6b8cff3b1820c7e2fd15eb955b21e4c68cb6
'2012-01-15T04:05:53-05:00'
describe
'92253' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMME' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
47a90181b4d21f7b083e4779f0057f55
7a66a52850d2672edaa6dd9cf4dca5f8d7fb33e8
describe
'23148' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMF' 'sip-files00155.pro'
25fcf5302bf5b177a0799657c44488f6
daca397060e10df7bdd3ee4bd705c92d527fcf64
describe
'31227' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMG' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
302f419eaa609398595f48ebcd36823a
be5b9223a1724e504c9cbde2df0f1279e1e7441d
'2012-01-15T04:08:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMH' 'sip-files00155.tif'
39082acc22f437d4654ab454a2c3239a
b12fa02ecad8c4fec3f4680ab094f50bc54a519c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMI' 'sip-files00155.txt'
26b0736bcc1bcac03742e16b813c0b33
4ca1e78130af7c5039dd11f826116f00b11dd7d7
describe
'9503' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMJ' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
ba309bac489c061de07c96355a73ae1b
67b1970dfb178f281ea3ae8dc03e16f3ed7fa59d
describe
'324682' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMK' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
dc12432505ab1850601c07837fce8864
701b272c8281a7f1e39c0e5d262b82619f5bf4d8
describe
'86855' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMML' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
30b1844e46d78fb9758a4c2a54189080
f0b6416d76535e7b908873246bdd992b0168b16a
describe
'20045' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMM' 'sip-files00156.pro'
e0ea5d9569d92869dac5d047454b756d
d4efdf4c63ab6a4f9992669ef2b782bfb02d0b52
describe
'30849' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMN' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
f90e194b7d08d9482078036741e3d495
f98a335a8afda26b478aff0128135511e3bacdb4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMO' 'sip-files00156.tif'
77a18a8f80a5406511133106344e3663
34b8f4079237cf866681b7539b8aabf976c9fb60
describe
'827' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMP' 'sip-files00156.txt'
8a187b03308e4df4b0906394ef8c302d
b5110e175a807aaa5a558a556bcbc8436167dfba
describe
'8528' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMQ' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
2f2bc9b77a52711f38456abdf19f52a4
ad393f77e1f46103a57056bf4717593d7458b714
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMR' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
2ee25a99ad145b774cd236f92fde5573
d9f67d4c1dfbef7b78ef893980792f77284fd805
describe
'116868' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMS' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
3d20c19e1a953938118c757d7cfc401a
b1ede539679574fd30f98f459319b4e855eee7f7
describe
'27986' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMT' 'sip-files00157.pro'
c6c5b1e00692e85717316968ac57cdde
89135a4d54b5e5d1b591c6c16fa5f4597fbb358b
describe
'39725' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMU' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
d2c17c1c80b312bb13c39e91476a02f7
d6c1cdb546beda52756a8812e83fd5a2899ef997
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMV' 'sip-files00157.tif'
c40a5e63ef8a89bc20326191d794e383
7f136e51c71bf3dd79e29236a092c3a1f2546ed8
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMW' 'sip-files00157.txt'
9ba1773442d509e38f546f134a5d307d
102a1a2e41b33194bd93f8bf971867397171d83d
describe
'11606' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMX' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
65818dd200e0114e70158a1d41342f8b
1f42a234dabb760ec3ce4505e9904847704b2586
describe
'324822' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMY' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
b9a1deed31fc03f77c8742ebe1d41682
4c9d1677eaf490b39d94d10dd9703c35794495df
describe
'105612' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMMZ' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
4637454aed2bff2161a03c896c398ab6
9bb5f80cfa773226eaca1abb44b29bba73b23bd3
describe
'25242' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNA' 'sip-files00158.pro'
c7a0a134fb04bb5c4f7a87dae468fbb5
a33af7f5571a26794a30d1a8d1b38f148f958685
describe
'35169' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNB' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
04d071c13ed8f79944db6bc09e66734d
6405e067c71088fc7b74fb9ec08651f3be82f648
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNC' 'sip-files00158.tif'
d57e5253f17c29b3fa6b530bdad5d5ce
40f2b9bb3e88e79a63150530736b17b08794b5a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMND' 'sip-files00158.txt'
20c345b1df9660508dd76f0b50823a9c
aa99404d77056391f0c4b6f41f06f8a1614cfb59
describe
'10790' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNE' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
c167e74f510ac60044ee4d69879e2a7c
7614579b7fd075b8c6e3aa63c8aa1632c327a770
describe
'324419' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNF' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
e37b867fc3d2593bd7f1b00dc5a2719f
cbcb6a1b43fec76c2536d0582ff6f39b3d99bdf7
describe
'111552' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNG' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
42a36eebf528227045bfb9635fa08525
fdef2c56a8f83e5eb9b2f9cdfded86537a522421
describe
'26712' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNH' 'sip-files00159.pro'
521fcb613c4f9c6588a0718cbbd2e5fc
0e1e0da5b79ad0200973dd0a284e2a06d66af477
describe
'38300' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNI' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
b89a92b176bc11b28c11ff3882ebb91d
dab5005492896c8139b737a962825f0588269b99
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNJ' 'sip-files00159.tif'
a74590bdf52fccf4826c268ddb3ac8ec
5983c817f3320afa4569d137d7e2623c253d872f
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNK' 'sip-files00159.txt'
4dcdf7ad2327ed7ee9d5cc9e9e81b6c3
f70fb6ef57e1199a83e6ba5f06c57008fa949d2d
describe
'11194' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNL' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
e4c63b240a578e5685594bc9a94dc3ff
1d2d72e4bff1004981665360f5f37a5f376322ed
describe
'324673' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNM' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
f58198f07a35cc586a49fdc7cca0eeeb
df4e8e12771fecdd9f584b0b1808cca54d70d758
describe
'102362' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNN' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
8480874b256b934f66bdf4a76e77612c
4f7ccb91983c2a70278f44c6c955d1200dbf3d74
describe
'25124' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNO' 'sip-files00160.pro'
ec41206fa144a58d7a1f9e92fb4996a0
c386462bba1f340aa59bdf772cdee6c21b0ddcb0
describe
'35468' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNP' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
62c98c7efb0ce51413900988a3f5050d
af614fd38c4c9e2a46b8d928da909a7b07ca3884
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNQ' 'sip-files00160.tif'
37b30701c533ff0729cf14652d1e28a8
97e49e369e1f666b38940c5b430e6a1f3a0d7b13
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNR' 'sip-files00160.txt'
ced6b41a1325d3779e1d969befc65293
08df287bb9497007b21dcd059ca99ae526e44751
describe
'11056' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNS' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
b3ada6b138d495c2c52b9763f808f4a0
f730d8e3859f7154c7892ce4e9431204ab1d280b
describe
'324393' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNT' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
220198c11756db03324bd4566d3545ff
55fda89a6eae2576c7e80833d2868b8bba91e48a
describe
'67985' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNU' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
89f866a7f484efbda8322730e0fc2b1c
44b9ba20a3dc49f75650abb4fbb9306c1b200243
describe
'2632' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNV' 'sip-files00161.pro'
4d23e86540865838f4d42477a08903db
c1b46ff473fe8e6473f5d49698d078e822fd4720
describe
'17164' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNW' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
c012914e32a92494dff9e23491e5ab15
b4746cac7e68cfff4b6c13f734111a2b2f9ae79b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNX' 'sip-files00161.tif'
d47e07829e209a071da9db5c019d60e8
1c80f929e19cdbdeb716fdd96862104f7a587b69
describe
'182' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNY' 'sip-files00161.txt'
9bf8dc67a74ed0b6bbbac5e32a2fa8f2
7ebed3cbce5910ae985196c0c07aab2669f5bd8b
describe
'4226' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMNZ' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
d3c69ce86829fc191d891cff7c143ea4
f882e5fe7c931e77521774d949836f4186ba0990
describe
'324394' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOA' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
f54a7e8a12f6e7868a8ef7750070ea5f
19764c1a2f0ad45b15c7db24592a598314608cb7
describe
'104775' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOB' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
079119e0f2447566c4909f09a4cb19b5
97c4dec449803ce108abcf4334177b5021d4bce3
describe
'25300' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOC' 'sip-files00163.pro'
5eb11fbf75c372c72e2608fdf10a2419
855024ee74139de5186bb766606d9e1ba1ae593a
describe
'35411' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOD' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
439f0ad1e87ccb19fc24f7d4bb3372fd
3bf71242deaed727abe7b2965056182dc8ba999a
describe
'2612248' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOE' 'sip-files00163.tif'
c2cb925a0a864667eae86a83b4e4bb20
3c5f36bd32f1560235436754f8b3a3a9bfbc6cfe
'2012-01-15T04:11:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOF' 'sip-files00163.txt'
5864e080d30a83a836a2392a4af0fbed
152630499d743bc01d2805a38b1d56572659a8df
describe
'11007' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOG' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
457450f65831a825995a006c2ba94c62
aba61e0eb0927a71570f4672b94fb96778983f48
describe
'324570' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOH' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
a086ea418c9a1769c2aef3ab0bea5eda
eaf884f35e04815e907bdec6dd38b74ed092873b
describe
'106490' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOI' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
60417810755b9f1301e547dc06419986
ad82a5780c24e4763676a5585ca956d49289428e
describe
'30394' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOJ' 'sip-files00164.pro'
67d6c429f2567e9e37bd458ec77b30d4
155d50d8f08cbf04b13b10ee5767bc3d8ffb0e8f
describe
'37497' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOK' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
52ec23dcabffc622590eab35d010f56a
303ede652f65798295bf14b1b03e022a7eac5545
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOL' 'sip-files00164.tif'
a91e899d4e009a4b6c855bebea0b74a0
72a29a836323bfe56e30e74e002ae57a39a07759
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOM' 'sip-files00164.txt'
69c33992b4f7b226f995f80fd05b47f3
9897724018978dc155719cb63de85478d9770931
describe
'10360' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMON' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
b2594f96a6d17756f8e0bf7b731ad163
5cf6df4d2820bd76d27cc5c068c9d9f8f6090d9d
describe
'324817' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOO' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
95741906b92044b70e3a911836795e6f
d8901734978a051e235450012c26f4a857a65fa8
describe
'99463' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOP' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
d74d2bfbd0c9cf69740e449f41f60446
310e7e47c404c72e8d10131f11d81bbf580db0af
describe
'23467' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOQ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
4fdc6a329615e8482c2a828caf1c566a
e3999199f170d88ce1c38007363eadac4fda551a
describe
'34843' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOR' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
0dabf501e9530ea78e0e7b6b280fa957
a847e15c56ccab5c43b6dec622d3cfae4d6835bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOS' 'sip-files00165.tif'
cd9113cce3c84ffd5ccdcb6ddc036c37
2bcc516530f7e586df8ef829c1bb31a78ae43463
describe
'936' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOT' 'sip-files00165.txt'
7e1192b03ed14e221e6c3b89f2128336
bd759c8aa96ac53c001e8d20ce1e1125853de6de
describe
'9965' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOU' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
7df63a90b90662cbcf64d84100cc4939
d303f71ad188ae70746669daaf4f34a04ccfae04
describe
'324784' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOV' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
3ad9a7a003d04101257f8a7237a89264
44c098e837b0557fc0c32326a30852019246032f
describe
'82753' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOW' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
e26069a0cee696d3ac9c939dd3455e23
e5f08501e789a4eca639d87a84d3bdb177b4d1d5
'2012-01-15T04:08:34-05:00'
describe
'18917' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOX' 'sip-files00166.pro'
08210a9089df009d0d6fd52df6771026
d0d07034901d49c64f1a19758f4e5d77dddbef43
describe
'29034' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOY' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
f4257d9d5936be4f073d63b5058465ca
3608e3da0ba829bf40515ceea735e9b9aa8157ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMOZ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
5bf54aa0e5818b78f7f50e047db0018e
93f6623dc49049aff19f5b6791864c8929462a15
describe
'785' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPA' 'sip-files00166.txt'
a1cf794b54ffac70028aba1266452ad4
f8a6051951f8699b2e6662db35a75f1bf560ba9b
describe
'8098' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPB' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
cc8df8a91c5d1728ca6ef8bdb458dae0
b7f49d4bb753d4880d9a28fdabb68e45eae457af
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPC' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
40fafb035d73ce01029caab2949fda69
df56a8044a5a367d3ee1e77e09ab1954093e7668
describe
'105892' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPD' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
8f744cee46d0df75859acfd7ad32da30
b2c6275efe9b2a2c9f4cd1dbf2ac253884f548ff
describe
'25136' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPE' 'sip-files00167.pro'
9d3646b2bd45698e12e71f377685b943
406efd8b8a8d09d1fa1473e38a889dd22c418d35
describe
'35641' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPF' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
76cb8b62ee8d66b8f1ac7ca97be8e92a
f48ab1c738d422a265427cf82affac1060aa6dd5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPG' 'sip-files00167.tif'
d5e322c9d67aff466e42cb1e3c571f70
c5e04259c1f0a26ba93e1f6dafda07c615aca1f9
'2012-01-15T04:05:56-05:00'
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPH' 'sip-files00167.txt'
0c3df4ab760294f8018a347883a7395b
dfa2fbe9952fd347329994ef6a4432a39ed7909e
describe
'10809' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPI' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
5489d641fe78ac3b5f7fee699acca760
f351dca1105f6f2e289f0a42ffc7475fafebcce6
describe
'324670' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPJ' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
06cd58d7d94f8509f5449f853f1ea3ef
d77faf87c2d3a40fb7d4b714ede95c74b0a161b9
describe
'111675' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPK' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
08663d7a25d965d6b4a9d008502752ea
26c0f4678975133c4ea7578cae5fc881016f40ca
describe
'33894' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPL' 'sip-files00168.pro'
2eb83fdae5171e98c6dae024028f09bd
550c8a61a75884d95a5cf79fd3292f88a3cb7391
describe
'38499' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPM' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
c982156607a61521922ea6aa7bcf5b4b
1fdb41ceca3f168b6a82b9985ffb5b3a38ea7270
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPN' 'sip-files00168.tif'
9e3ca57e766ff1c963911f59313e1e72
626cf98c7700d19612b0e64396572b45d5077ae5
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPO' 'sip-files00168.txt'
13b44faf97e78256eaa05e9b6311aa33
5f7cc98b94b32eb797de2814fd01c9e98e7f79ba
describe
'10765' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPP' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
d66a3c3f4f5e506db75c55f3ff87292e
c7389c77d966c8821f135700e1a033d7abe14a59
describe
'324303' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPQ' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
591883ca6e73325fec0c54905158606f
b7d064f43bbc3bbaa5b06979bf9728a02ad7d3a8
describe
'61992' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPR' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
43efe986f175236ab4432433f3022d22
bd8b904f824caedd729a0960ed1e4ae4090af415
describe
'2919' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPS' 'sip-files00169.pro'
e990c927d40c142a992ec84a3c8a4cf2
a455f121b40e2483105bb1ca5021a0f978bda19d
describe
'13923' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPT' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
339264afc28bd2258ab4b1f18823ef5e
59107d15f145a5716cabe58bf4b88fd60da4a7a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPU' 'sip-files00169.tif'
5329b833fef573da0ba19ad42cae60fd
263461b1ee4c2e5728e35573ec33e971950a5556
describe
'172' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPV' 'sip-files00169.txt'
97eb873901c585dcf9e041310c71fc99
74f6e0ee31216ec0a5f7d51b21aa973844015fd6
describe
Invalid character
'3364' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPW' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
fa56fab2f70c10a98526b167af898135
1a30556b35dfd62a359185488dfcc4bbe6f90eb2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPX' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
53088145adaf35ad4f1cf0aaf9901399
8ed6dd979fc564f432f156e2914501af4918d37b
describe
'108685' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPY' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
81196243b02dacb7f54980fdbe911d0d
3804e8896840d3ebdf07fab0c70b304cef0a7d3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMPZ' 'sip-files00171.pro'
eeecbf2c4259546bb0b82ed7076db67b
583b3848f4e50788ce00c14107ffa2cfbeb2cfaf
describe
'37485' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQA' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
450089d0104324d4fc8cc7270b83f1d3
0cf8a6dd2b6989d46eb424eefbf68e402f9805a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQB' 'sip-files00171.tif'
4e090ab80f99ef893f63e0ca42162fd5
c74178c551a9612d812c990aaf41b97e4a240315
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQC' 'sip-files00171.txt'
e9bc5e24f224997653e1aa1ed851cc4b
55ac01be84a728a20a4b17d11b5a489844086485
describe
'10997' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQD' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
8f6210c551b779fae5040d67a36b84f6
42422852d70b4285d5c7bd6b64dea237426d3510
describe
'324528' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQE' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
e6c1ce1f272cd202ded8c04655b7c470
b694e4f97c32804a2f43b12c8216d6b851488935
describe
'110199' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQF' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
4c4c95e06cfadcd15f3bee781022d8f7
115a222c86f3f404218428f5aa9b4103147b479c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQG' 'sip-files00172.pro'
b0fb13c2979dad1d500df877ffcdf75a
adb3a50b48c5ba84916014b8cb01f8f13f969bdf
describe
'38774' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQH' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
271761c7c9cc41c53b7891806e3d5c28
2c735fcb9fca82abf92977b6e603b097cf663a52
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQI' 'sip-files00172.tif'
1e4e9f61602d54e7b9fe86b15fa8cd05
1c4af3cf049b2a0ad9f8edee18ed45ddd2931386
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQJ' 'sip-files00172.txt'
8a98293a47be085753ceaed021b8d9dc
bcff556d1e850bfeff1d6bb540faf9e4a1c60340
describe
'11331' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQK' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
e07e08ca88948ed7a21027e3fb738d0c
c10145e154a302b1bdf470b616f5be1e0005fdb1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQL' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
0d93b4d917456db10bdf4a40b25b08bf
c00b257f8715cc1960f76cd0ab8fb074a09296d3
describe
'105349' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQM' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
2dc463ba69a96d32e32d1525a5119749
7fafb5654b1ed33f2824c70ebc6704679490aad5
describe
'24829' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQN' 'sip-files00173.pro'
724d781f9ba5b429bbc9a42450b7a05e
718ccd951030f5b6022b6dec6d84cd83991718e3
describe
'36086' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQO' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
fbad25669d1186f634da17a4c26c00bf
6788b816bd847f2f5dae9bd8139c6bedcd378db8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQP' 'sip-files00173.tif'
a7ccd18251bda7239f4d0d4ceb335ce9
64c85de0788d14a239560dba9915ee95028c67d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQQ' 'sip-files00173.txt'
f69a75c494846d352d3ce5404ab43a9f
bf50512a086a8472c07d0285b5ea4a7387604c6d
describe
'10557' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQR' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
9c242bea0992ea05b0b1938ace1f37fa
cb4e3ef47b522688b0cd6e9c759bd1876def08ab
describe
'324581' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQS' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
d48581dd5cfaf4752e03bab8cbb74777
c4a040a89154ceff84d5054d975370a348a48212
describe
'106228' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQT' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
9c906db31d8488f3ef4d88f2081dc411
33a66db9c33d1dd406687c7bac2728cee6ee6296
describe
'24609' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQU' 'sip-files00174.pro'
70431a8b96e43d6f3e98ac546c1ef946
f0c31c05715e674d3a0f740674abbf86b1402a4d
describe
'36715' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQV' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
06e97962b5e5070045ba2dde3ac2697b
55748221e6cf5847efa038b914ada81c06a9b9aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQW' 'sip-files00174.tif'
ee9dab11d9ef15788e06d42597af4611
7aaebe8eb71aea6cb9014adf78f1de6bf1e38478
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQX' 'sip-files00174.txt'
5488331fc984f3ac2f93746cbb7d0f5c
aa14c581176260a952d5cb3af60086240cfe6f1b
describe
'10864' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQY' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
f070249d54fe6a04156d2cbfce631588
287e5cfe99e64cb3a1d7c8d7fa74072a70d9eee2
describe
'324412' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMQZ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
cac076db20d573bcac0fc0a5e5e411eb
8d73bdc4ed72c04a4b5464e6966cb93d36528325
describe
'114009' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRA' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
4e4b5c1ed28073436f36a74babef3351
38c0b709b4c5e0a11d94de774ea203896c70d2bc
describe
'27407' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRB' 'sip-files00175.pro'
e26a6365a5ae4bb4c9299b6e0781c2a2
193b4c19f3690aee6171a44f1e9069b5422bd600
describe
'38149' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRC' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
bf172d0cd64ec35473b56a9648ed71dc
d896ebfe3e64deee480c8f73f2e3d3ae0fbc76ae
'2012-01-15T04:10:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRD' 'sip-files00175.tif'
93d2a496ecf02cf83367eb6131b1312a
bd3cb650a0a15be941bab146d5c8a3454331310a
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRE' 'sip-files00175.txt'
eb6ccd0c1a22d09a72d8c189f5172a80
dc043d51c7eb2e5767c6ad9f2a50662974a7e175
describe
'11255' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRF' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
cc52840a8f3a40699751bc2068477a92
878b3621e1991d7e436e2abbcc710bd1275e5b4e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRG' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
164be1d6342451ec2dd2943940aabf2c
3956b73daf3ebab2d50e2630e11982181090b6f6
describe
'111096' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRH' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
0bc9f1c836eb630b151626fdd5a5ea25
ef5e409c55a818957b5191d54547a160f23b8f65
describe
'26130' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRI' 'sip-files00176.pro'
69ead737d92e2089292bef02cd3e866b
dcddf2e9851f918cb808b886fbc2e7d6e93cec91
describe
'37060' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRJ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
42c1672e905d10bd70fddd7045cdb35a
71cafdba6bfbffc1c67e638b380c06bff5a0c854
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRK' 'sip-files00176.tif'
925c944f9a087f2639f84432d9dd1644
74ebb82203a2fd71b28e1e926f7f3d480d10551a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRL' 'sip-files00176.txt'
12303cb904f12127237287b50d9fed7f
53cdd4198ee820ec4ba0f81b47ab8df657811e0c
describe
'10977' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRM' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
697c40c323560886f7d9feae3502075e
927e45f7402d122a771a42d2a54b5416560d4275
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRN' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
b93f1058a785d76feadb8abbdf60d324
c28bd970b6febebd69a4c5a879b4694c8160d595
describe
'103885' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRO' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
0cda354fe91160d02b8e4975149a7f03
6e0a7d1e8548a08288fef15bbc8fecaf281c6988
describe
'23919' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRP' 'sip-files00177.pro'
1b3b9eec555ea7f7852ad790ce0edc91
ecae1457f09cb45a7b2f018faf72db54348c1783
describe
'34023' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRQ' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
eae2d1226f0b023a9e3b025dfe0acc48
b9fba3b32fd9b7049c26a89743068ff63e1c9707
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRR' 'sip-files00177.tif'
4353bf593261f8a26257f715f58b4efd
303e9220a2c908104366c77d4dbb8d74dd2f5ccc
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRS' 'sip-files00177.txt'
2e750dc2a196e15d9e3c035be077749f
d4cb19ef5f329a429e2460d60824806fe7c5eb2c
describe
'10383' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRT' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
cf35650a0bad458847f4cebfd9a7a05c
f02da58d6490a0ee274c628fc6e5d5daf10ce9ae
describe
'324364' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRU' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
f7eec464a854442111c083f397021d8f
833d2a0171b1b8dd598ac0d2250fd056f474a502
describe
'96934' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRV' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
6a1746a4f6e073068842963fc50c82a4
a82f9cca4eb5240662215ff85b27e6843d8eac67
describe
'23083' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRW' 'sip-files00178.pro'
396a46a28a3a0e060dae1a33b2a7aa83
ce6d0acbb4866a8c6b37244ae3ca34bc036c40f2
describe
'32355' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRX' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
220e155e4bd50fba7e1cdbdf243c6a5b
cf457d436192b6db7c13d924e3314a5eb0cf078c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRY' 'sip-files00178.tif'
8c45a5a6c4782b01915bd8fff26fd6d6
99d62b245b64d42c2cb4e46cad91363e38aebea6
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMRZ' 'sip-files00178.txt'
61ce913be413129ad769550ca034be43
cfc6f53ce3bd00e6e765953988b252437a3b31ac
describe
'9940' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSA' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
f03b3389f87185fc0d78bdcf67cef962
04871fe0a69a3ff9208bece784f44a2f7d8e33c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSB' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
0ee6fd768823e92a901b81b7cf31f3fc
4c30cb4049d9b8fbac3299651898c4c1903b4299
describe
'39626' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSC' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
bd56947d2e5591728d37ea69e7153e68
1cf89c655dd3badf77922ade4bb31557f84d1594
describe
'7412' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSD' 'sip-files00179.pro'
e638a85188da4e5af40920904a07ceec
12f3ad7f80adb700b0681216b87d190dd2c87081
describe
'11810' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSE' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
4f9dacc8cfafd399faaee0e1412f3255
c83ca9f44e0a190fbb091c8c79e68f707d94c843
describe
'2615576' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSF' 'sip-files00179.tif'
5535573db381fd51193175731203d38f
0bc0a5c56cec9fa2f805c08f9ea54427572c7bd6
describe
'318' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSG' 'sip-files00179.txt'
75d4cd7bef0322dda4e7c348129c18cf
c80917db609f23cbb3e3327f4aa40fb5df1b668a
describe
'4030' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSH' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
b23b520c9442eacfbd6b3820f834150d
37235714c58ddd1dbe40217e9a85aef04ea1e532
describe
'324643' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSI' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
8e7bd060f5546e574516ffcb24a9e12c
e739111b85358162afca9025ba637fe4167b2eea
describe
'82995' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSJ' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
e10c00a410ce077254e5270c7bd67df4
0690b4cc218ee4959551d7ba177e8c5838be35ad
describe
'19442' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSK' 'sip-files00180.pro'
bfb12fac4c2d0e8d0ea989f933e231b2
c0f569fd41a7b3c9d7a843931fc5b4b55b3d1883
describe
'28810' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSL' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
3d1f21b67a83fca70d0125c533e7194d
66fb366c2cb38ca733e80d4b505973f15ea8ce69
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSM' 'sip-files00180.tif'
9b951c07ee53f321441b186f2e1a0ca3
0f381257edcb7a2a84424e9d1cb14dd93d66791c
describe
'813' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSN' 'sip-files00180.txt'
7c99a29f478c87d55c4cd189810636d4
6d2d3033e1fb7d63c568f72c1209a8955e2d479a
describe
'8724' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSO' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
e5c3538d29049895fd14c70bbad7adf6
7980d543e77d7597363e909919722347cc7ea37d
describe
'324828' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSP' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
95e06210bff75227e0b0ad10206459d4
d424fc0e715876c117ad6a8e02021a93db59479c
describe
'102704' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSQ' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
dc7cf5ed63f13e00283cac8a9f83bcbd
0defa2d92fd68ee58828a41e209d6478f56cd641
describe
'23751' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSR' 'sip-files00181.pro'
1873a0ccd8ef632e65069b5961a741a5
0a9a03f3931e2c12fd83c123bd9366c5583986fd
describe
'35530' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSS' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
ad50892bbbe621b06fc7e85b59a6a4c9
a4b51bb8aa86e407fdce2d9fac45a5335f4dbc9b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMST' 'sip-files00181.tif'
5c6a59a061a1b3c3fdc9fd5dc3eeba45
603a2c7e93e9a46bd4160a658224ba9bdcef641f
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSU' 'sip-files00181.txt'
36afa74479b8dafba383902f1d07ccac
b5babd3e0f3f75e93d2ef793083da2910c41bbda
describe
'10533' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSV' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
f3245711f8b83d0df4da4ae1007f53c9
cac4ba4c17f327259a743bff7beac3109c48498e
describe
'324421' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSW' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
ea969aff3665bfcbef31efc06209633c
731d8386475f86e48297d5a91c5ee71a22abbe4b
describe
'108627' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSX' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
b8da11cc4b0c1c31c314c66d5c9fb904
5f3e676004bf25386a9738273360d35c1cf8bc43
describe
'26014' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSY' 'sip-files00182.pro'
81dab325f5e2c831cc43aafd9436ba90
be26427e1e3145d39f09feb1efc40670cc9a6b61
describe
'36736' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMSZ' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
1d28e9c15a6fb67cd90ad2cd8add981b
739fb9c3f5c7a5973d0f2dc29ae4d3f1c70f845a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTA' 'sip-files00182.tif'
df9dfffc66d6ce4982cf43be77a13248
36631c2a16fd943b0456f888a3f72495773580a4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTB' 'sip-files00182.txt'
2f0e587c063ce2cef9597ad40173ff2b
2b6f2642776c3d2d6d5812e45be5b9008ecfc015
describe
'10813' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTC' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
4db663b6b7650d9a2290c14a1fd8ecb6
f5cc534876745c8eb68dac9fe6e0d6e19e08f571
describe
'324340' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTD' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
2205a10a60eb7e240c5c973a4d22f054
669255a7b3f73ee3b75d8f2dcfb69a4f9463d479
describe
'104272' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTE' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
671ba7f6d99ad72a4277f2980a03357e
e88adbfdaec74ebb7eae2961805029ad0f6c2a45
describe
'24252' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTF' 'sip-files00183.pro'
fad597454247560cb4e041cd3a228e11
31e3d45a4afd83022d382df9ac6fe974c4c327e6
describe
'34559' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTG' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
6b91e83ff4a4a5ab73ecbc6371f8e6fc
9c02d8f21e174f3761947696c33ac59f56950fc8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTH' 'sip-files00183.tif'
285033eadf71d89e54b857c3ecf09caf
6f5339acfc45afb04749b6a5187b35723ad6e5da
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTI' 'sip-files00183.txt'
d4638b567a87342db9cbd691dfa3a5e3
a150a9a96daa6f791adead4c9174514de67b276e
describe
'10506' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTJ' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
b4f7a95eba32ec325f652d5249f7c5f2
5458339646c83062517ad11f3a3f28b026d51aac
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTK' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
b8a5f8f3102a36241ed500dc4a1828b8
04f434414f3f894def3c42e7f88837157af0ef66
describe
'114300' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTL' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
91b610f820b24e126a3afa72ea881500
6d505976bf59b15887155be40148e5c965177fd1
describe
'27498' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTM' 'sip-files00184.pro'
0680edd8d33120e063a0d5b95124e177
5629c24da00ee8dbce1c31ce5099772e871fb50a
describe
'39143' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTN' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
bf79a59c909db589b023dfa5c2dd8607
d823639ea3a3e1629f47ec86150bf5d3515d09b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTO' 'sip-files00184.tif'
4a7f34410e23a5767c580df130c69b4d
a83e5a0886a8bf65bb07dc5ee842c66af8f040a8
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTP' 'sip-files00184.txt'
568ff7493c73cab50073b283dd1062ac
35141c7f0fa1445f557284643eafc1f8f407de1c
describe
'11296' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTQ' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
c351e065a95c5be7dc45a1ab7c278030
52b21703ed381ca25675c479a5aabac23b5f841f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTR' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
1e04aecbd2b3deaeb13aacbbdf766cd3
e3c3955065cf24de041162bec067d2a4b86b42e3
describe
'108942' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTS' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
dbeee206d5353cadd1d6e85e148bf485
4d4cef55e217a35c7eed0d7a118538a4abb1a633
describe
'27546' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTT' 'sip-files00185.pro'
ef1883a2e5214ffe4cabbe3bb65c3687
2d58c0c3b46209362eea0a6a3d0ae6b2b6f0ba2c
describe
'37351' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTU' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
767cae8379be232ea46adb398b4a0764
39795680f792129c29ac7123fa62f9b53876cd9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTV' 'sip-files00185.tif'
3419da7621db47fe5d114697a84a3d6f
ad0c1a3a9e3df41b3a6c2333be4a85eeee8a4589
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTW' 'sip-files00185.txt'
8389f2b0e8375d2d56734f8b678523c3
f9a7e2db2c21b1a9dc0c77b0d351edd33377a361
describe
'10706' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTX' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
dde7bd76e85be07b695758ffa86093f3
fec6bee482586733ed18df458063ab6843f2a6e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTY' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
9ca037d196e1d1bd2251e275bb4df6a2
18ba19bde941fc48d3bb768a3aeb008d8b17d9f1
describe
'57933' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMTZ' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
f6c11dd3ee474f6f069a200992024bd6
e7cfa1f166e99c89229997faeb731fca4f651d57
describe
'12673' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUA' 'sip-files00186.pro'
2893c2fd3f8de085e111bb14787c02db
01c0c7be342f0b99b30b27e9df5b6c4d5269a13c
describe
'19959' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUB' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
b83e679c5161d280b40a486a5f88aab2
6495f71e38530ff77668028dc27a9edc1b9623ff
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUC' 'sip-files00186.tif'
f96726ebcff97d58d25be4164da52bee
56aca896e5d0d4122c6f323a6e49c7f4bcb756e9
describe
'523' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUD' 'sip-files00186.txt'
ca401fc134296e4fa6adda22feb6c0f2
b7139fd5ece658090cad04eb787633b97b9d9fdb
describe
'6574' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUE' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
82d2375bf57d811496dd5e7e3e76eab8
495b8a3cce6fe954356ae5e68a982f78bc5d543c
describe
'324337' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUF' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
547f74a78e38702ba3a474fdc735e01b
e679e64d9f90df6a738e5bfbb6e3b264dad635a2
describe
'82433' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUG' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
d509a5edbf971537d016fce49049fdd7
0970cec5f4bdc649038081ae983b1860146cb9f0
describe
'18812' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUH' 'sip-files00187.pro'
31d1f081027784610626ea84cde5a7a0
562da37afeefa17ebbf128e12545b0c3af9579ae
describe
'28855' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUI' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
0b7c55b1b4295b9018da9f9ec1366b55
b90e8cd3f0a517faeb4cc6cfe8a6be30848d1ad2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUJ' 'sip-files00187.tif'
e21a9577047262cdd2429a526a2058f6
8f92c0983bd2b0da7dd20eb54275714e590aa36d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUK' 'sip-files00187.txt'
31927da7ef37163f6d123d12bcfa20f4
1939bff218320046ff7ed3684bbc58e180756764
'2012-01-15T04:09:14-05:00'
describe
'8239' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUL' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
5486b3ef29db42a33b74b6dbf69989b1
85ad63c505262d6eed25f7df118c9811029cc3e8
describe
'324418' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUM' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
24c9a2027c003680b67dd3c50e17c700
af83a26a59b1652a74087131027d27b513d5c9ad
describe
'106993' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUN' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
42adfbea40dd63bd29079c92935858b2
d7f21ab61dad740e773c80479d35cc411af1d325
describe
'25054' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUO' 'sip-files00188.pro'
a6c07b55800d3dbcdfaf724c0d7f3361
a290cdff39e33ecb73a30bd499efc31cb10dd5cf
describe
'35697' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUP' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
7d32e8df0e7e8d64483e17717bd4e0e6
64546a40a5f49965add21126825206ea0d2c00f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUQ' 'sip-files00188.tif'
fad8f1845a4b85574452ed43d7f39b7f
d59e200d887beabc744515cd993eb3c522c9017d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUR' 'sip-files00188.txt'
efe9dc58490fd60adb8ca4b284418dda
bc2d5b05b167e43fdb5e21c59b0395a2368dd2c8
describe
'10786' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUS' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
a820f7429dd8f0c0491d8572afe2ac7a
1109ae8b303e07408e0c3d97e1027964a7aa2a70
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUT' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
e9313b80c65fcc18b0cfe45ca88dc302
fe0efde33f52d16f4ae8da50342393d0c365432c
describe
'100529' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUU' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
eea88e72ff1804b427ae01e2b7cfbd4a
fb993df555b9872bad098cdeaa96bec34895f4b2
describe
'23472' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUV' 'sip-files00189.pro'
2c9e19015ad2d5e6df93b9b0db5707de
bddb4025295aadf570a73eb701399bee1118c7ea
describe
'34127' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUW' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
92c16164db8cceed5a2bc40acdf6ca12
4a5e9aac81fdfae8d8a256bf26f46686dfa8ffa9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUX' 'sip-files00189.tif'
0ed20d1918167a1822dae986cbe477ab
cb2157910dd2501627d6244d037edb331a636478
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUY' 'sip-files00189.txt'
f7d656a0a38f28eb080c030f4b11ce3c
b992d98a216b1b136d51449cd96eff95081a7177
describe
'9845' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMUZ' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
e050bd35c35070b850c0c0fb68febb1a
db508a924e2d42adcc25c7c61e916be2955dcef2
'2012-01-15T04:08:01-05:00'
describe
'324329' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVA' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
65dfb55990625e04eaada3ec3da19d7c
7a5231211b052654f14c454ce4856b716124400f
describe
'102391' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVB' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
b82df668eb2fc2dbb16c39f61e9cfe7a
d7c5f3e78f7c7a51871587063f3f2044949fc926
describe
'23591' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVC' 'sip-files00190.pro'
9c33ca429d8e347079dceef8014d08c7
4296f87cd51f35ff5a34e8e05bdf91b5a1c0795c
describe
'34042' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVD' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
2ec7549423851fd32a3b3f6c0e3c7efe
2be7abe2a8fabd42ba98c2d2b18c3bf3af320e43
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVE' 'sip-files00190.tif'
311f93ea921c4875bee4a9480dd9f4a9
06d6425dfa6c082a9cb0624ed8cab8f0f9751fd7
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVF' 'sip-files00190.txt'
c7c0eb7c1d7894d2adc5bb5867dc059b
498d6d83a388abeaf138bbdfdec1d0a953e11e49
describe
'10148' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVG' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
8e7dc5d6605299599f10cfdd83912413
4423c42631d0dce20a7f32ae569306b44cbba380
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVH' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
aa00bc42299041858345841d1d3a95de
4bfa4a2943da74817e4fdd152511b48f92818fde
describe
'108160' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVI' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
33a518ecb8fe35129046964c1efd9706
1fb93a5f9f23ff398fa3c0abe5cba0d5bf763f73
describe
'25524' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVJ' 'sip-files00191.pro'
a7b91905fb7b4e65dbf88f73974a9fc1
5dfd523130de3b3a4555edc27aee44049b713b5d
describe
'35442' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVK' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
01ad0269344e0f61983d917c880a0c9b
6d0a77fc7194f831145924332ed32e0f4f490094
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVL' 'sip-files00191.tif'
3aa8fb4073ea1f58c7d11e72d8cb3f3b
d20aad67e5b50a27e4e1d20f30c520962f607f5a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVM' 'sip-files00191.txt'
4df1f14451a9fa743f707c7951258c7d
f4fe22bf567e80b9682a38ee609b3a2f9916d5ab
describe
'10702' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVN' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
12d940c6a0864d6969f04b7d2c874814
5743b234d8828198f809c5bdff2a4cb09c4e15e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVO' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
b314dde9af251cf0d74409d3872c69f7
88f5b6daeb3a60e27d15c6eb8bf2e9a3eeedaba9
describe
'112241' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVP' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
a7bb09b94e4c195e0fe831d2c741a1a2
59bc3513d8612b7a88e3271929b34aef3f58d52e
describe
'26418' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVQ' 'sip-files00192.pro'
271eb63cf2b4e7969046cb7eebe11b4f
2482ab31120f8e34cb47f7aab547c4fc0b5af918
describe
'38229' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVR' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
e644ba47c14624616f350a8df117eacf
ffdc8674d294bdf74bb054b634b4f2e6b3bc4c76
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVS' 'sip-files00192.tif'
24e702cb62eaa244f74804933bb275b1
9141d9b883874495c0234c1081a76351704cc484
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVT' 'sip-files00192.txt'
73119b76d6f2eba1eee68ef93b8ae360
e8cb3997fbf20f847e67879eb4a886ea3189ef44
describe
'11066' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVU' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
cee479dc00ff59844b72437ed19567ca
7749a73d9ed373c8de21166069d15d4e3103cf1f
describe
'324592' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVV' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
5a705e41adf9e102136b2c20a400669c
284f748c515167477a9ba68f7e44f6120b50e72a
describe
'100170' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVW' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
30ef3b485cdca697e3dd3fcad33f2e8b
9dcf00b3c4a97278d92e38d83ef3782af2d52aa1
describe
'23154' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVX' 'sip-files00193.pro'
50f802e5538c4319cd8b843da1c2ad71
d6876e8ed89ae83831f0808759798eff9e1d0cca
describe
'34121' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVY' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
ee6736b8f0d23b5ff5503efd15d612de
5107156c65ea205a8876a17e629309e5b4c3ec00
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMVZ' 'sip-files00193.tif'
a316fd6488465738fb8513e72b68e0eb
7fc2bb4b84e8cefc599e0073f40bc2091d45b72d
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWA' 'sip-files00193.txt'
5c300d44a276e37d07ddcfefedaac142
025cced8d1fb363c8298de07a03eec9fb4979b65
'2012-01-15T04:08:40-05:00'
describe
'10078' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWB' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
fb402359b863593d2092a3d32f362aff
78075393257cf5b16dd642e4e2b3da8f1a5e69bd
describe
'324671' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWC' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
92075d67839d459311352157a327c731
669486270a5ed6abd057008a1927b2ef72157dd8
'2012-01-15T04:12:06-05:00'
describe
'68437' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWD' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
912d31b6ce15968a39b69dae2ecd46b2
688eafcd60caf2dadfc79fad6d29dd61b1c0bb34
describe
'15326' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWE' 'sip-files00194.pro'
e00ee75c31e00cc9af018405bf38e226
45e7b8df15bba0f7d3ad38eccfcdcf81516d7a09
describe
'20603' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWF' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
90decfdb3c2e80ac27819256b5589b25
b7e0f524c337652dfa98eba8c2278c6b81d6a453
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWG' 'sip-files00194.tif'
9411979fb3336c146994a888b9fb6697
9d5b1602ff2d763c1c21f3142356674dfde06ddd
describe
'613' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWH' 'sip-files00194.txt'
727ac93807352aed1ef4d4b8db78202c
31c57d1a5d0ac1e029683443937d5d601c677d96
'2012-01-15T04:05:27-05:00'
describe
'6637' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWI' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
3a80fc3eae61202c960cb3941eace688
b49d6279f6690f94eac9433ae6dcdabd3e54a5e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWJ' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
243b33a70e8757b23c67dcda2aa4c6ad
7e1b0911e3d07356ecca200d3c3be18c4ec98b08
describe
'21324' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWK' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
bcfb43617697fd6f7980ea89aa8b9d5c
4442fde63281fb53cc652f7e2b74581485ff5149
describe
'2728' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWL' 'sip-files00196.pro'
3cfc10fb42d29e28444f860d781652a0
598922d44c44b445f12c02bde571942ee9ece5b2
describe
'6385' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWM' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
7ccf0554f5b0824e3dc51becb52177d7
ee9f347435336fe5ef2bbaa60d0334c883d3410c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWN' 'sip-files00196.tif'
aeca37bb272ff168da3ed1256ac6698a
a8aa4efc8ffbe2962a5c8127593fc294a90c618e
describe
'150' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWO' 'sip-files00196.txt'
204f3ef650b0b55b199b3f696cf0ead6
bac640543725ee9b6efba3c49f6ae36936024d20
describe
'2114' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWP' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
ebe7a15fcf9b9600327e4a3ed93ea5ca
03bcadf341e5a0420db49116b726836a038adcbe
describe
'417908' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWQ' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
a7fec0cb1df972044d578c91b77ce520
7455e8bbf4e1fa2faff7dc489f3cde6dee20ea18
describe
'75134' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWR' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
043110fdd04443876d8f707940bd40d9
e6a054b74c9488ca1adfd72ec3fb4243773f864a
describe
'15658' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWS' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
40b0db2056cd528f67f39a8696dc1720
8e9c2c69cdf01795bc780e691b5990446218122b
describe
'10037244' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWT' 'sip-files00197.tif'
545bdfdcba5b215efce079892f746e4a
f992346bd5752bfca606de6505130a1818264ba3
describe
'4009' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWU' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
4b0d1c4389b996c8c8957a4f79635542
12e9d4ce762ddc61cda4d966ff5b069eadc914d3
describe
'401062' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWV' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
b30e75dc16c82c293e0c52c03d5827e9
9000c7b84c242265122648c7f76f650e896761bb
describe
'105970' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWW' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
db13aceeea8739946a6a5826e53cdc5b
424a65a991f16c4ad41ffa39fcf00fa582aee797
describe
'19081' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWX' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
e38831772b5baade34b1d4885ff0f38e
dd029d0b2615434b04156434c031533039d71b92
describe
'9632004' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWY' 'sip-files00198.tif'
eb70b317360747b3afa5348031eaf9d6
2a14694885b93412157111986271bf7b7fece3df
describe
'4453' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMWZ' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
e5e10dfd167fd47095b2520ed3bab3c3
502f772f6a01ec35a521705f3cae9b5cfcce3032
describe
'87474' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMXA' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
12fb409b662bf732e326eae83dc23bea
4e8500456b23c15abc21e1601731d80aaff6784b
describe
'34412' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMXB' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
53bfd9a03a405d59ef971cf27d8dd2dd
f59e98569e38734a7f6da961ee08aa6eb35c4847
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMXC' 'sip-files00199.pro'
2bd4e6e4a09ea0a073f81f65ee2b6bd6
803ebf7e8986c687dfb472e9945ea9440413336f
describe
'8173' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMXD' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
f4e8cdba73e21dbaa11716c086370985
23ce0c78c6f3342056393e653400778dfeb3ddd6
describe
'2105496' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMXE' 'sip-files00199.tif'
402116d46132b416669ff1b7f1f8b8b6
0a2b05039479f2dc0d5ceaf6593374919d1af2cc
describe
'3347' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMXF' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
0298c5f82b30c768468b619ddc160006
cf145f9b7d771f49641c45e2985653f78ec8fe9e
describe
'16' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMXG' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
cf2dfe34af7354d1c9f9676987ede942
6a9bb4daa0ba3ecb91bbdaa6d40a34f8bde61f92
describe
'308966' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMXH' 'sip-filesUF00086390_00001.mets'
fe07f1da618c4a391b4a4b4464904010
2a087e834ff5ea53f6435f2fc1c8ba253b204e07
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T06:13:22-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'399621' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAAAJfileF20090316_AAAMXK' 'sip-filesUF00086390_00001.xml'
161d277228be9f8b82b1bfb528d6842a
be1c4c4bfdd66b04d670d4ec1bc29975e261cee9
describe
'2013-12-13T06:13:25-05:00'
xml resolution