Citation
All sorts of adventures

Material Information

Title:
All sorts of adventures
Creator:
Cassell & Company
Belle Sauvage Works ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Paris
New York
Publisher:
Cassell & Company, Limited
Manufacturer:
Cassell & Company, Limited ; La Belle Sauvage
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
78, [4] p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Floods -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
France -- Paris
United States -- New York -- New York
Australia -- Melbourne
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication on t.p. verso.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text, on endpapers, and on back cover.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026584225 ( aleph )
ALG2118 ( notis )
243827782 ( oclc )

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Soe Good a 2 Keey, and Speciat
proficiency, im

Suring ty far Posi 0 Li hif.. PLLA.

“Take fast hold of THatvaclion Jet hi freee eee ae her; for she mi
4 T3-

me



“FRISBY & CO.,.Te































































































(p. 80.)

PHIL’S BRAVE DEED.



ALL SORTS OF ADVENTURES









Twentyefirst Thousand

CASSELL ann COMPANY, Eimrren
LONDON, PARIS & MELBOURNE

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED





”
‘

First Edition Junz 1887.

1890, 1394, 1897.

3

Repriniea June 1883



CO hi a Nis:

SHEPHERD AND HIS CHILD, THE -Io
TUMBLE ON THE HILL,

WATCHING THE WRECK

ae ee
ADRIFT ! pene 24 ATTACKED BY BUFFALOES page
ARTIST AND THE BEAR, THE ... 12 BELLE AND THE GIPSIES
AT CLOSE QUARTERS)... ZO BoB THE COASTGUARDSMAN
BURNING STEAMER, THE 64
CAMP IN THE BACKWOODS, A _... me (40
CAPTURING SEALS 44
CAUGHT BY THE FLOOD ... eee Al Founp BY RAB...
DANGEROUS ERRAND, A... a 8 GROOM AND HIS HORSES, THE
FIGHT WITH A PUMA, A... peemarenl'G HAVELOCK-AND THE SAILORS
How NorAu ESCAPED 20
How THE TRAIN WAS STOPPED ... eae 30)
HUNTED CHAMOIS, THE 72
JENNIE’S PERIL... ie .. 68 MAGGIE’s ACCIDENT
KILLING A SERPENT ae fF 60 MIpDpDy AT HoME, THE
LILLIE AND THE BABY ... pee 73 MIMI’S RESCUE ... wee ae
NEGRO Boy AND THE EAGLE, THE ee SO)
OLD JOHN 16
OVERBOARD! ... 48
PHIL’S BRAVE DEED ae eee OO “ SHOOTING THE RaPiIDSs”
SAILOR Boy’s RETURN, THE... 66 SOLDIER’S RETURN, THE
SAVED BY NEPTUNE bo ane 6 SWIM FOR LIFE, A

TROPICAL FOREST, IN A...

A te eS

a i eae AO

WHERE THEY FouND BaBy ae Bg

54
36
56

32
52
26

14
76
34

22
70
62



SAV DB Yee NE Pr OiNis.

No one knew where Neptune came from. He was a big
black dog who, one morning, walked into the village,
looking very hungry. And the only real friend he found
there was little Nell the blacksmith’s daughter, for he
was not taken any notice of by others, and some, indeed—
because, I suppose, he was not a handsome doggie—said
that he ought to be killed. But Nell stood by him, and
she not only fed him, but coaxed her father to let him live
in the old kennel in the back yard. And one day this is
what happened. Nell would sometimes go down to the
village stream to gather forget-me-nots, and on the morn-
ing of which I am speaking, while trying to get some of the
pretty flowers, she saw some that looked finer than others,
and in reaching over she fell right into the water. Oh,
how she screamed! But it was some minutes before she.
was heard; and then how do you think she was helped ?
By Neptune! Yes, he first heard that the friend who had
been kind to him was in distress; and though some of
the villagers hastened to the water’s edge when they saw

him running towards it, he it was who saved little Nell.
6







SAVED BY NEPTUNE,



A DANGEROUS ERRAND.

How would you like to be hanging in mid-air, like the
man shown here? And on what errand do you think he
is bent? I will tell you. A few years ago some hunters
were in a wild part of North America, and after travelling
for some miles they could not find water. They searched
in every direction, but though they spent a long time in
doing so, all was in vain, and the poor fellows knew not °
what they should do. After another hour or two a shout
was heard, and one of the party, pointing to a great narrow
’ cavern that went far down into the earth, said he felt sure
there was water at the bottom. “But how was it to be
reached ? was the next difficulty that arose. There was
but one way—a man must be let down by ropes to fetch
it. One, braver than the others, now offered to go; and
down into the dizzy depths, with a tub across his head,
‘he was carefully lowered. The danger was greater than
any words can describe, but the man succeeded in his
task ; and how thankful to him were his “companions
when, with the tub filled with the precious water, the man

was pulled up to the surface again, I need not say.

8



A DANGEROUS

ERRAND.

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iL ed Tete Sede dette el otal 51) ae AVN pb) selbst yam lel Gees

AsBeL Ancus the shepherd was away on the hills with
his flock one day, and as he could not come back to
dinner that afternoon, his good wife had promised to send
it to him. And little Jack, their son, having offered to
take it, started on the journey, which was quite two miles
off. Hardly had he gone on his way, however, before
snow began to fall, and soon it came down in such tor-
rents that Jack felt that he ought to turn back. But
thinking for a moment, he remembered that his father had
had no food since breakfast, and must be very hungry.
This was enough; the brave little fellow determined that,
come what might, he would carry: out his errand. So on
he pressed, and with great difficulty he arrived within half
a mile of his journeys end. Yes, and he reached his
father’s wooden hut too, but that was all; for the same
instant he fell down in a faint. Abel quickly understood
what Jack had done; nor was it long before he was glad-
dened to see him move; and when that evening he returned
home it was with not a little pride that, in company with

his dog, he carried back the noble boy to his mother.

10















































THE SHEPHERD AND HIS CHILD.



Te ORS Tat Sola ene NID Ele aals be ele

A STRANGE scene is that which is shown on the next page.
It is in the region of the Rocky Mountains of North
America; and this is the story of it. Two gentlemen, Mr.
A

painting a picture; and as soon as the easel had been.



- and Mr. B——, had gone out for the purpose of

fixed and all preparations made, Mr. A sat down to



begin his work, while Mr. B—— went for a walk in the



neighbourhood. An hour afterwards, when Mr. B: re-
turned to the spot where he had left ae friend, he was
astounded to see him quietly going on with his painting,
while just behind him, on a piece of rock, sat a bear!

The bear seemed to be merely admiring the artist at his |
work, and there was nothing savage about his appear-

ance; but, all the same, Mr. A—— was placed in the



greatest danger, though not aware of it. Mr. B soon
made up his mind what to do, and in a little while was
ready to carry out his resolve. Creeping along until
he was within a distance that made it almost im-
possible that he could miss his aim, he levelled his rifle,

and in another instant Mr. Bear lay on the ground—lifeless.

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THE ARTIST AND THE BEAR.



MAGGIE’S -ACCIDENT.

Maccr MacGrecor was out on the ice with her two
brothers when, without any warning, a dark fog arose,
and within a little while it was difficult to see even for
a few yards. So most of the people made their way to
the shore; and it was in attempting to do so that Maggie
met with her accident. She was a rather daring little
girl, and thinking that she could manage without help
from her brothers, she started off alone. But, unfortunately,
in the darkness she went in a wrong direction, and before
she knew it she found herself quite alone—lost in the fog!
Frightened and trembling, she then went off again; but
she had gone hardly a dozen yards when down she fell,
and with such force that she fainted. Meantime she had,
of course, been missed by her brothers, but owing to the
darkness they could not find her. And not till a party
of men with lanterns had searched the ice for three hours
could any trace of Maggie be found; and then it was that
the poor child was discovered, lying just where she had
fallen. The doctor, who was sent for, said she had been

very badly bruised; but in a few days she was well again.

14













































































































































































































































































































































MAGGIE’S ACCIDENT.



OLD JOHN.

Untit I came to know old John Drake I often wondered
how he lived, and why he always looked so contented and
comfortable. I was staying at the seaside, and I had
often seen him on the beach walking about with his tele-
scope under his arm; so one day I had a talk with him,
and when he heard that I wanted to know all about him-
self, he told me his story. He said that some years before,
when he had been a boatman, he had one evening rowed
out to the rescue of a pleasure party who had been upset
in the bay, and he had been able to save all of them.
They had never forgotten what he had done, and they had
not contented themselves with thanking him, for they had
presented him with a new boat as well as a sum of
money from which he was able to have a small income
for life. Having thus been enabled to’ save, he had
after a time given up work; and though he liked to be
about on the beach, he was now, he said, ‘a man ot
leisure.” And the old boatman said he was happy to
think that his old age was provided for, and that he

need not work for a living, as many men of his age did.

16























































































































OLD JOHN.



A FIGHT WITH A PUMA.

My cousin George once told me of a narrow escape he had
in South America He was in one of the great forests of
that country, and by some means he got parted from his
black servant, Tom, who had been with him. All in a
moment there pounced on him a fierce animal called the
puma, which had been hidden in the long grass, and
before he quite knew what had happened he was thrown
to the ground. At that instant Tom came up; and,
leaving my cousin, the puma was about to dart towards
him, in order to serve him in the same way as he had
George. Tom was, however, well on his guard, and by
a crushing blow with the end of his gun he kept the
puma off. But the next minute on came his cruel foe
again, and it seemed as if it must master him. Again
Tom was prepared: with his long knife, which he always
carried, he boldly attacked the puma; and he did so with
such force that the animal almost directly fell over—dead.
Faithful Tom then. ran to the side of my cousin, who was
lying helplessly on the ground, and having succeeded in

restoring him, both were before long able. to go on their way.

18







A FIGHT WITH A PUMA.



HOW. NORAH ESCAPED.

UncLe Richard’s house stood by the side of a river, and
early one morning, some years ago, it was burned to the
ground. When the cry of ‘ Fire!’ was heard, every one in
the house had been aroused, and it was at first thought
that all had been able to save themselves; but it was
soon found that such was not the case. My cousin
Norah could not be seen! Search was at once made, but
in vain, and how great was the distress of every one you
will understand. Suddenly a cry was heard at the back
of the house, and then it was found what liad taken
place. Norah had got out by a side door, but had been
unable to reach the part of the house where the others
were; so she had taken refuge on the top of the wall
overlooking the river. The poor girl was in a terrible
fright, for she was too high up to move from where she
was; and she knew not what to do. But help was soon
at hand. Getting out his boat, my cousin Richard
rowed round to the place where Norah had betaken
herself, and by persuading her to let herself down the

river wall into his arms he was able to rescue her.

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HOW NORAH ESCAPED.





























































GEE SOLDIERS. isa Win:

I KNEW Dick Hope when he was a boy, and I remember
how he left his widowed mother and became a soldier,
and how soon afterwards he was ordered to go abroad
to fight for his country. A few years passed by, and then
one day there came a letter from a comrade of Dick’s, which
told the poor mother that he feared her son was dead.
So the old home in the village where Dick had spent his
early days was given up, and it was not very long after
that Mrs. Hope died. But, strange to say, Dick was
still living. Taken prisoner after a great battle, in which
he had fought bravely, he had been carried off by the
enemy, but when set free he had met with an accident
which kept “him in the hospital for many months.
At length, however, he had got well enough to walk
about, and after a while he made his way back to
England, hoping to find his mother as he had left her.
But he was too late! and it was with an almost broken
heart that, on arriving at his native village, he learned
that not only was his old home deserted, but that his
dear mother lay buried in the little churchyard hard by.

22













THE SOLDIER'S RETURN.





ED are

Jack Grey, a boatman who lived at an English seaport,
had one day rowed to a fishing village four miles off,
and he was on_his way home when a terrible storm
came on. Jack, who was about a mile out at sea when
this happened, did his best to get to the shore; but
every moment the tempest raged more and more, and at
last a great wave turned his boat right over. Jack was
a good swimmer, and he managed to catch hold of the
bottom of the boat, and to this he clung; while a few
minutes later he had raised himself on to it, and floated
on the water. But his worst trials were to follow, and
what he suffered as he hung on to the boat, tossed up
and down, no words can tell. Hour after hour went by,
while yet he had to remain in the same terrible position,
and then evening approached; but up to this time no
sign of help had come. Then it was, however, that he
saw, not far off, a welcome sight. A ship was sailing
towards him! Yes, and better still, he had been seen!
and within ten minutes Jack had been hauled on deck,

and on the next morning he was landed at his own port.

24

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































ADRIFT.



HAV ELOGG.AN De EIE Salk ORS.

WHEN Havelock, the brave Indian soldier, of whom I
daresay some of you. have heard, was once on a voyage,
a great storm came on, and before very long the ship
was tossed hither and thither, and went on to the rocks.
Every one except himself now became frightened; and
the captain and sailors, instead of doing all they could to
save the vessel, were so afraid that they ran up and down
the deck helplessly, feeling sure that their lives would be
lost. A few minutes later the ship struck on the rocks
again, and the sailors were more and more alarmed. Then
it was that Havelock, who felt that unless something was
done the ship and all on board would be lost, took com-
mand of the vessel himself; and mounting to the upper
portion of the ship, over their heads, appealed to the sailors
to do their duty by remaining at their posts. Then he
called out to them, “ Now, my men, if you will but
obey me, and keep from strong drink, we shall all be
saved.” And such was the effect of his prompt action
and his words upon the terrified men, that they were at

once calmed, and in the end not a man on board was lost.

26









































































HAVELOCK AND THE SAILORS.



AT CLOSE QUARTERS.

A FEW years ago a famous traveller, while in search of
game in Central Africa, had a narrow escape from being
attacked by an elephant. He was alone on this occasion,
all his companions being some distance off; and it was
while making his way through a very dense part of a
forest that, without any warning, he saw the head of the
huge animal. burst through the trees. For a moment
terror as well as astonishment was felt by him, which
only increased as he next saw the elephant’s trunk
stretched ouf as if to seize him by the neck. But cool-
ness saved his life; for had he let the elephant see that
he was really afraid the consequences might have been
very serious. Looking straight at his foe, as if to make
him understand that he was not frightened, he took a
sudden turn, and before the elephant had time to hurt
him he had taken to his heels and found refuge in a
neighbouring tree. And there he remained quietly perched
on one of the high branches, and thankful enough for his
escape from danger, until the great animal, who soon after-

wards went quietly away, was at a safe distance from him.

28







AT CLOSE QUARTERS,





HOW THE TRAIN WAS STOPPED.

It was a dark, fogey night, and there had been an accident
at Northdown Station. Two trains had run into each
other, the broken carriages were thrown right across the
line, and several of the passengers had been seriously
injured. It had all happened in a few minutes, and every
one at the station was full of fright, for, to make matters
worse, it was remembered that the express train was nearly
due: “Stop the sexpress)| * was the order now swiftly
sent to the signal-man. But more than one felt a dread
lest, owing to the dense fog, the coming train should not
see the signal; and among them was a man named John
Grant, who worked at the station. And quick as thought
this brave man determined what to do. He would go
down the line as far as he could beyond the signal-box,
and he himself would signal the express with his lantern.
And he did the deed; and though it might of course
have happened that the train would have been stopped by
the signal-man, yet he was none the less deserving of
praise for his forethought; nor did his superiors, when

‘they heard of what he had done, forget to reward him.

30





























































HOW THE TRAIN WAS STOPPED.



FOUND BY RAB.

Rap was a shepherd’s dog, whose master, Robert Ferguson
lived in Scotland; and I will tell you a story about his
cleverness. Jessie Ferguson, the shepherd’s little daughter,
had on a cold November evening gone on an errand for
her mother to Ayrton, a village some few miles off, and
while on the way home such a heavy snow-storm had
overtaken her that soon the poor child could hardly get
along. . She had trudged on bravely, however, and for a
while managed to make her way. But at last she could
keep up no longer, and, quite beaten and tired out, she
fell down. And how do you think she was saved? Good
old Rab had been in the shepherd’s cottage, and had
heard his mistress speaking to the other children of
Jessie; and then when Mrs. Ferguson had said to him,
“Find Jessie!” off he had started towards Ayrton. And
he it was who found her on the way-side, lying down in
the snow. He had then scampered home, and, as the
shepherd had by this time arrived, Rab was able to make
him understand what had happened, and within a little
while Jessie had been carried by her father to the cottage.

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SS ee



































FOUND BY RAB.



VEGMELS seis > Cees

I sHALL never forget the day on which my little sister
Mimi was nearly lost. We were at the seaside; and
one morning when out for a walk together I had taken
a book to read, and having sat down on a rock I became
so interested in my story that I did not notice that
Mimi had wandered away. At last I looked up, and I
could not see my sister anywhere! How frightened I
was I cannot tell you; and I know that I ran hither
and thither, calling at the top of my voice, but in vain.
At last I went towards home to tell my parents; and
it was in turning a corner of one of the cliffs that I
saw a sight which I never wish to see again. A coast-
guardsman was lifting up from the water a little girl. In
a few minutes I was by his side, and there was poor
Mimi, all dripping from head to foot! I then learned —
that she had made her way to the rocks, where the tide
had risen so high that it had partly covered her, and
that the coastguardsman having seen her had gone to the
rescue. Need I say how grateful we all were to him,

and how I repented of not having taken care of Mimi?

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MIMI’S RESCUE.



"BELLE AND aii eIrsies.

My cousin Belle always used to be frightened of gipsies;
but after what happened one day she was never again
afraid of them. She had been in a wood with her
younger brother Bertie, and while stretching forward at
the side of a river to get some rushes the little boy
somehow tumbled into the water. Fortunately, there was
a branch hanging over, of which Bertie was able to catch
hold; but in doing so his clothes got caught in such a
way that he found himself unable to move. Belle could
not help him, for he was too far off from her; so what
could she do? Then it was that she remembered that
they had seen some gipsies that morning; and all thoughts
of being afraid of them having been put away by her,
the brave little girl ran off to their encampment. Arrived
there, she went up boldly to where the gipsies were
sitting, and begged for help. Nor did they refuse, though
at first they hardly understood what she meant; and soon
the head gipsy was running by her side; and so Bertie
was released. The man was well rewarded by Bertie’s

father, and, as I say, Belle was not afraid of gipsies again.
36 ,





D THE GIPSIES.

BELLE AN



“SHOOTING THE RAPIDS.”

I wonDER how you would like to be in the curious-looking
canoes that are shown in this picture? I expect you would
not care to be in them at all, and would rather remain

on dry land. They are, however, in common use in certain
parts of America. These canoes are made of the bark of a
certain tree which is peculiarly suited to the purpose, and
owing to their lightness, and because they float so well on
rough water, they are preferred to other kinds for journey-
ing down rivers like the one which is here _ illustrated.
They are easy to paddle, and can be made to travel very
fast. At the foot of the picture, where the water looks so
very dangerous, are shown what are called the “rapids.”
At such places the river falls straight down for some
distance with great force; and the persons whom you see
in the canoe will be carried right over the edge by the
stream, while floating on the top of it. This is what is
known as “shooting the rapids.” It is rather a difficult
task to manage the canoes while they are being rushed
along in this manner; and you will not wonder that acci-

dents sometimes happen to people who are guiding them.
38

















“SHOOTING THE RAPIDS,”





WAICHING DHE WRECK

Wuat a dreadful scene this is, and yet it is one that, as
some of you know, is only too often seen on our coasts,
especially at certain times of the year. A great storm has
been raging, and news has come into the town that a ship
is being tossed about by the waves; and down to the
shore the people rush to see it. Sometimes it happens to
be a vessel which belongs to the very seaport near which
it has been caught by the tempest; and among the
people on shore who are waiting it are parents and
brothers and sisters of sailors who are on board. How
sad a sight it is then! Soon the word is passed that the
ship cannot help being wrecked; and the lifeboat, manned
by its noble crew, is launched so as to go off to the
rescue. Very often the poor sailors are saved only just in
time, and they find a few minutes afterwards that their ship
sinks or breaks up into pieces on the hard rocks; but some-
times it happens that the lifeboat is not able to arrive in
time, and then all on board are lost. Let us hope that the
ship which the people in our picture are-so anxiously watch-

ing did not, after all, meet with such a terrible fate as that!

40















































































































































































































WRECK.

THE

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a
H
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oO
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3





WHERE THEY FOUND BABY.

IN a certain part of Australia a great flood once took place,
and for miles and miles around there was little else but
water to be seen. Numbers of houses were partly covered
by it, and the people in them had to make their escape—
some in boats and some by other means—in the best way
they could. One of the many adventures that were "met
with during this terrible time happened to a little.
baby. He was sleeping in a wooden cradle when the flood
reached his parents’ home, and so suddenly had it come
that he had been forgotten. But, strange to say, no harm
came to the little fellow. Instead, the water caused his
cradle to float, and then, while he was sleeping soundly,
it carried it first out of the flooded house, and afterwards
some distance into the country. At length, having lodged
against a tree, it came to a standstill; and later in the
day it was discovered by some men who were rowing by
‘in a boat. The baby was still asleep, and of course
knew nothing of what had happened; and when—as they
did soon afterwards—the men found out his parents, and

took him to them, you can imagine how great was their joy.

42











































































































































































































































































































































































































































WHERE THEY FOUND DABY.



CA EwRING Se Ales:

THE brave men who voyage to the Arctic Seas endure
many hardships; and knowing as they do all the dangers
and sufferings which are before them, it seems wonderful
that so many should be willing to face them. But year
after year they go forth, and in the whale and seal
fisheries alone hundreds of our countrymen are engaged.
In the picture on the next page we get some idea of
how seals are captured, though this is only one of the
ways in which they are secured. When the ship arrives
in a “seal fishery” a certain number of the men land,
and then they make their preparations. Seals, as -you
know, are very ae and great caution has to be shown
in approaching them; otherwise they would of course soon
escape to a place of safety. The sealers, therefore, often
remain in hiding until a number of them are collected to-
gether on the ice, and then they shoot them with their guns.
Their bodies are afterwards placed by the men on board
the ship, and from them are obtained not only their skins
—which are taken home to be made into sealskin jackets and

other articles—but also oil, which is of considerable value.

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CAPTURING SEALS.



CAME SIN] tiie BACIQVOODs:

THis is a hunters’ camp in the backwoods of North
America, and the two men are sitting down after a hard
day’s work. They have, most likely, chosen as comfortable
a spot as they could find, and when they have had their
meal they will lie down to rest. They have been out since
early dawn, and from what we can see in the picture,
they have found enough game to supply them with food
for some little time, though, as their appetites are generally
very good, it will, probably, not last them very long.
There is, in addition to a member of the deer tribe, a large
bird, besides, I daresay, other smaller animals which we do.
not see, and the hunters are now about to cook their
supper. I expect that neither of the men would be sorry
if their meal were all ready for them instead of having:
to prepare it themselves. But they are used to do.
work of all kinds, and when we remember how hard is.
their life in other ways we may be quite sure that the
mere trouble of cooking a supper will seem anything
but a real task to them. Let us hope that they will
enjoy it, and that they both will sleep soundly afterwards..

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KWOODS

A CAMP IN THE BAC



OVERBOARD!

LirrLe Jack Ker was the son of the captain of a sailing
vessel, and sometimes he went with his father on a short
voyage. The lad was a favourite with all on board, and
as he was fond of being with the crew he soon’.began to
learn about the different parts of the vessel. But what he
wished above all to be able to do was to climb the rope
ladders like the sailors did. He was, however, too young
for that, and, of course, he was not allowed to do every-
thing he wished. Now Jack was very wilful, and I am
sorry to say that through being so he had a sad mishap.
He had been looking longingly at. the rope ladders, and
nobody being near, he was tempted to go up one of them.
But he had scarcely climbed a dozen yards when the vessel
gave a sudden lurch, and down, down he fell into the
sea! Fortunately, just as he was falling he was seen by
one of the sailors, and in a minute the man, having
jumped overboard, had managed to seize him; but even
then it was some time before the two were rescued by the ©
_ life-buoys and ropes which those on board threw to

them. It was a lesson which little Jack Ker never forgot.

48







OVERBOARD!

44



ae TNE RO eBONV AND ie AG EE,

A neGRO boy named Tom, living in America, had noticed
for some time that a pair of eagles were building a nest
in a neighbouring tree, and had made up his mind that
as soon as the eggs were hatched he would secure one of
the eaglets. So day by day he waited, and at last,
having watched the old birds go from the nest, leaving
their young ones alone, he climbed the tree. But
hardly had he reached the branch on which the nest was
built when there was such a fluttering and screaming near
him as he had never heard before. The old male eagle had
unexpectedly returned, and finding on what errand Tom
was engaged, he soon showed that he did not mean
to allow such conduct to go unpunished. Pouncing on
the young negro, he at once attacked him with his.
cruel talons in such a way that Tom yelled at the top
of his voice, and then descended the tree as fast as he
could. Even then the enraged eagle would not let him
go in peace, for, as Tom rushed off, he flew after him,
and but for a friendly hut, in which the frightened:
boy took refuge, would have still further hurt him.

50











THE EAGLE,

THE NEGRO BOY AND





THE GROOM AND HIS HORSES.

A FEW years ago an officer in the army was ordered to go
with his regiment to the West Indies; and he determined
to take with him his two favourite chargers. dhes ship
sailed from Southampton, and though there was some little
trouble in getting the horses on board, all went well for a
short time. But in a few days a storm arose, and the
poor animals became so terrified that it was with difficulty
that their groom could approach them. They neighed,
and kicked, and they dragged at their halters from morn-
ing to night; and all through the voyage they continued
in the same frightened condition. At length the day
came when the vessel arrived near land, and then what
do you think they did? Breaking away from the stalls
where they were tied up, they both leaped overboard and
swam towards the shore! But the groom was equal to the
occasion. Throwing off his coat, he at once, having
jumped into the sea, followed the two chargers; and having
swam after them, he not only succeeded in catching hold of
their halters, but by talking to them, guided both horses

until they reached the beach, where they were captured.

52





THE GROOM AND HIS HORSES.



“ATTACKED BY BUFFALOES.

WueEn the well-known missionary, Dr. Livingstone, was
in Southern Africa he sometimes had with him a large
number of negroes, who went about with him on certain
of the long journeys which he used to take. On one
occasion, while passing through a forest, the whole party
had an adventure which was very serious, and which
might have had even a worse ending than it had. A herd
of Cape buffaloes, enraged probably at the sight of so
many men coming near them, rushed upon the good doctor
and. his companions ; and in a very little while, before
there was time to get out of the way, there was, as you
may see from our picture, a scene of dreadful havoc.
Some of the poor negroes were tossed into the air, some
were crushed to death, while many others suffered most
severely from the injuries which they received. The
doctor, too, whom you will. find near the centre of the
illustration, hard pressed by some of the fierce animals,
had ay narrow escape, and it was only after a tough
struggle, which lasted some time, that he and those who

had escaped from harm were able to go on their journey.

54





ATTACKED BY BUFFALOES.



BOB THE COASTGUARDSMAN.

A FEW years ago we were having our summer holiday at
the seaside, and we made friends with Bob Nelson, the
coastguardsman. We had often seen him in our walks, |
and after we got to know him we used very often to
have talks with him. Bob soon found that we much
liked to hear tales’ of the. sea, and he would tell them by
the hour together. He had for many years been in the
Royal Navy, and very proud he was of having served
there. He said that every man who served his country
ought to be very glad he did so, however humble he
might be. Bob would tell us of the different ships in
which he had sailed, of the countries he had visited, and
of many an adventure he had had; and he seemed almost
as fond of relating his stories as we were of listening to
them. Sometimes Bob showed us pictures of ships, which
he brought from his cottage, and one day, as a_ special
treat, he let us see a wonderful collection of curious articles
which he had got together when abroad. Altogether, we
soon quite liked Bob, and we were very sorry when

our holiday at the seaside ended, and we had to go home.

56



PNW
AIT





}
HK

i

‘









BOB THE COASTGUARDSMAN,



ASSUMP EE ON Ee Eee,

Ir was indeed a tumble, and though my three cousins
laughed at it afterwards, they did not do so at the time.
They had had made for them what is called a “toboggan”
—and you can see what this is by a glance at the box-like
object in the picture; and with this they were going to have
some real fun by seating themselves in it and sliding down
the hill on the snow. Well, having dragged the toboggan
up to the top of the hill, they took their seats, and then
off they started, shouting—as only boys can—as they slid
along. Then when they had made one journey to the
bottom they went up again, to try another, never thinking,
I daresay, that there was anything else but enjoyment in
store for them. But they soon found that their sport was
full of danger; for this time they had only gone a short
distance when, through striking against a large stone
which they had not before seen, bump! bump! went the
toboggan, and over tumbled the three boys in the snow!
It was with swch a crash that they rolled on the top of one
another, .but, as I have said, though rather frightened they

were not hurt, and were soon on their way up the hill again.
58







A TUMBLE ON THE HILL.



KILLING A SERPENT.

An officer in India, while passing through a forest not far
from where he lived, saw one of the great serpents known
as boa-constrictors coiled round a tree. These creatures are
very powerful—indeed, if once they seize a man they can
easily crush him to death; and the officer, knowing that
this one might prove very dangerous, determined that it
should be killed. So on his return he called together some
of his men, and, telling them of what he had seen, went
back to the forest with them. When they got there, how-
‘ever, a surprise awaited them; for instead of being round
the tree the serpent had uncoiled itself. It was no light
task, therefore, to begin the attack, and at first the officer
thought that it would be too dangerous to do so; but
unwilling that the journey should have been in vain, he
at length determined that the attempt should be made.
So with great care the men were arranged in such a
manner as to surround the big reptile; then a sudden
rush was made towards it; and while the officer thrust a
bayonet through the serpent’s neck the others fell on

it from behind, and so the ugly creature was killed.

60





KILLING A SERPENT.



Nee ORCA Pir ONE oily

WHEN we hear of persons travelling in wild parts of the
world it is not always easy to understand the difficulties
which they meet with. Their lives are, however, often
passed amidst the greatest dangers, as well as discom-
_ forts. In our picture are shown a party of men who are
making their way through one of the forests of South
America, and what hard. work it seems for them—indeed,
it looks as if they will scarcely be able to get along!
They have, as you see, to actually cut their way through
all the tangled trees and bushes which are before them, and
as they have their baggage to carry as well they are able
to move very, very slowly. And this is only one part of their
task, for in these forests wild animals are met with, and
travellers have often to protect themselves from their attacks
as well as to hunt them so as to secure food, for they do
not as a rule take provisions with them. The brave men
who journey in such countries are, however, fond of all
kinds of adventure, and think little of the hardships which
they often have to endure; so their life is not, we may be

sure, so unpleasant to them as it may seem to be to us..
62











TROPICAL FOREST.

IN A





THE BURNING] Sib AMik.

I am going to tell you the story of a brave man who,
when a steamboat was on fire, saved those ‘who were on
board at the cost of his own life. It was on a dark
night, and the discovery that the vessel was in flames was
made when she was only a short distance from land. Pas-
sengers and crew then became so frightened that in a few
minutes they crowded to the front part of the ship. Strong
men, who ought to have known better, left the weaker
people to do the best they could, and only thought of their
own safety; and a scene of dire confusion followed. But
amidst it all one man never stirred from his post. This
was John Maynard, the pilot, who was guiding the ship.
Though enveloped in flames he stood at the helm, and
while all others were crying and shouting, he still steered
the steamer. And ere very long the vessel reached the
shore, and those on board were taken off in boats. Alas!
but not all of them. After having been the means of saving
those around him, John Maynard’s own life was sacrificed.
For just as his great task was done, one of the boilers of

the steamer burst, and the heroic pilot fell—a martyr to duty.

64

















THE BURNING STEAMER.



THE SAILOR BOY’S RETURN.

Bogs BraAZzIER always wanted to go to sea; so when he was
fourteen—though he would not agree to it at first, as he
did not like to think of his boy going away from him—
his father let him have his way. Bob had completed.
a voyage to China, and when at length the day came
for the vessel to start for home his joy knew no bounds.
But a great disappointment was in store for the lad.
After being at sea for a fortnight the ship was wrecked, |
and I am sorry to say that for more than two months
the captain and crew had to stay on a desert island.
It was a sad and dreary time for all, and as day after
day went by Bob began to think that he might never see
his native land again. But one morning a shout was heard
on the island, for in the far distance a ship was seen.
Better still, in a little while the sailors were gladdened by
knowing that their signals had been answered, and that the
vessel was coming towards them. And on the next day
all were taken on board, and were soon sailing towards
England. Some weeks later there was great gladness in

Bob’s home, for the sailor-boy had arrived safe and sound.

66



Th

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SSI
SS
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THE SAILOR BOY’S RETURN.



JENNIE’S PERIL.

JENNIE BRETT was a daring little rider, and her papa,
knowing how well she had always managed her pony, gave
her a black horse as a birthday present. He was a beauti-
ful creature, and as he had been tried several times, Mr.
Brett said he felt sure that Jennie would safely ride him.
So on the day when Blackbird, as he was called, arrived,
Jennie, with the groom, started off; and all went well for
half an hour. But just as they reached the village of
W

way, suddenly dashed out from a blacksmith’s shop; and in



another horse, which had been frightened in some

a moment Jennie knew that Blackbird had.also taken fright,
and was running away with her. Away the animal fled
through the village, and every moment, though she did
her very best to keep from falling, it seemed as if poor
Jennie must be overthrown. But just as Farmer Dean’s
gate was reached, out rushed a boy, and in an instant
the rein was firmly seized, and Blackbird brought
to a standstill. It was, indeed, a brave act, and. it
probably saved Jennie’s life; and you need not be told how

grateful she was, and how well her father rewarded the lad.

68





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































JENNIE’S PERIL.



APS MWIMSEOR LiME:

Joss was the name of a man who, at the time when gold
was being discovered in a wild part of Mexico, had, like
many others, gone there in the hope of making a fortune.
But Joss was not only a lazy man, but a bad man. In-
stead of working hard as his companions did, he thought
to get rich by robbery; and on one occasion, when he had
attempted to steal some gold belonging to another man,
he was caught in the act. The miners were rough men,
who placed little value on life, and some of them declared
that he should no longer live. But the dreadful threat
was not to be carried out. On the same evening, when the
persons who were supposed to be guarding him were asleep,
Joss crept out of the camp, and making his way to the
end of the forest, he plunged into the river at the end,
and escaped to the other side. It was pouring with rain,
as Joss swam for his life, and he was only just in time;
for close on his heels were a number of the miners, who
had started in pursuit of him, and had he been five
minutes later he would have been caught. He was never

afterwards seen, and what became of him no one ever knew.

79















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A SWIM FOR LIFE.



THE HUNTED CHAMOIS:

In the mountains of Italy and Switzerland is the home of
the chamois; and here, ever on the watch lest their
enemy, man, should be in search of them, herds of these
pretty nimble-footed creatures are to be found. When
feeding on the mountain-side, one of their number is.
generally on guard as sentinel, and if any danger arises he
gives warning to the others, who then flee to a place of
safety. The chamois is sought by hunters, not only for the
sake of its flesh, but because its skin can be made into the
soft leather with which most of you are familiar; and when
it is chased it will betake itself to the most dangerous
spots in the mountains, so as to escape. In our picture
we see a chamois which, after reaching a high cliff, has
been shot by the hunter, and has then fallen down, only
to die, and the man is now risking his own life to obtain
the poor creature’s body. To us it would seem impossible
to descend such: a; rugged rock. as.is here shown; but
the hardy men whose lives are passed in the mountains
think nothing of such dangers, and we can - only

» hope that this bold hunter will not meet with any harm

72







































































































































THE HUNTED CHAMOIS.



CAUCE BYo Tie soo:

DENNIS BRYAN was a poor labourer living in Ireland. He
was a hard-working man, who did his best to keep up his
little home and make his wife and children happy.
But one autumn a sad trouble came. Rain had _ been
pouring down for some days, and at length the neigh-
bouring river had become so flooded that the water found
its way into Dennis’s home, and it was plain that he and
his family would not be able to remain in it. They hoped
on, however, trusting that the flood might get low; but
at last there was a sudden rush of water, and they had to
flee for their lives. They now made their way to the
next village, and it was indeed a piteous sight to see the
four—Dennis carrying the little girl, and his wife leading
their son—as they waded through the water which lay
before them. But they reached the end of their journey;
and I am glad to say that in a few days an end came to
their trouble in an unexpected way. Dennis’s master, when |
he heard of what had happened, told him that, knowing
what a good father and husband he was, he intended to give

him enough money to fit up a new home. And he did so.

74



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CAUGHT BY THE FLOOD.



THE MIDDY AT HOME.

CHARLIE Harpy was a young midshipman, and when he
came home from his first voyage his two sisters delighted
to listen while he told them of his doings on the ship,
and of all the wonderful sights he had seen. He had
been on board one of the big men-of-war belonging to the
Royal Navy; and as his ship had been round the world,
of course he had seen all kinds of strange places and
peoples. Sometimes Charlie would take his sisters into
the library, where their father had a big globe; and then
he would trace with his finger the direction in which his
vessel had gone. This always made his stories much
more enjoyable to the little girls, for they said they
seemed ‘‘more real” when they were shown the very
places of which he spoke. Once his ship had been nearly
wrecked on the rocks, and Charlie said that two minutes
later she would have been wrecked, but fortunately the
captain had been able to save her, so all was well. About
this and. many other of his adventures the two girls
never tired of hearing, and would often ask Charlie to

tell his ‘yarns,’ as he called them, over and over again.

76





sai

TTT
Witt

THE MIDDY

| : EE

AK i
eer ME om MS

wl flo tiny rie sit







AT HOME.



Lici a AND EEE BABY?

Lititz Ray was one day walking down a country lane,
when she heard a strange noise. At first she could not
think what it was; but on looking about, this is what
met her eyes. A dear little baby, comfortably covered up,
was lying asleep beneath the hedge! Lillie was so sur-
prised that she did not know what to do, so she knelt
by the little one’s side and stayed there a few minutes to
think. At last she rose to her feet to see if any person
was near, for she could not believe that a baby would
be left quite alone; but no one could she find.
Lillie was now rather frightened, but seeing a high gate
not far off, she mounted to the top and looked round the
field. To her great joy she saw at some ‘distance the
form of a girl, and off she ran as fast as she could. It
was the baby’s nurse. Wanting to gather some blackberries,
she had placed the child on the ground, and had then
‘gone into the field, and intending to be there only a few
minutes had lingered much longer. Poor Lillie was so
glad she had found her, but she could not help thinking

-how very wrong the nurse had been. And I think so too.

78











LILLIE AND THE BABY.



PHIL’S BRAVE DEED.
(See Frontispiece.)
“ Frre! Fire!” was the cry shouted in a crowded London

street; and soon the engines dashed down to the burning |
house, and began to pump water on to the flames. Then
there arose another cry, “Save the children!” Up at a
top window two little girls were seen, and the cruel fire
was getting nearer and nearer. To the front of the house
was now wheeled a tall fire-escape, and swiftly up its steps
climbed Phil Wood, one of the brave firemen. But
before he could reach the top the two children were gone.
Frightened by the smoke, the poor little girls had
run to a back room, where they had hidden behind
a door, and before Phil could find them, alas! not only
smoke but flames were around them. There was, how-
ever, just time to reach the front, though it was only
done by rushing through the fire, which was already burn-
ing the stairs; and when Phil was seen at the window,
with the children clinging to him, you would have liked

to hear the shout that went up from the people below.

PRINTED BY CASSELL & CoMPANY, LIMITED, LA BELLE SAUVAGE, Lonpon, E.C.

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**Golden Mottoes” Series, The.
Full-page Original Illustrations.
“Nil Desperandum.” By the Rev. F. Lang-
bridge, M.A.
“Bear and Forbear.” By Sarah Pitt.
“Foremost if I Can.” By Helen Atteridge.

Jack Marston’s Anchor. *

Frank’s Life-Battle.

Major Monk’s Motto; or, “Look Before
you Leap.”

Tim Thomson’s Trial; or, “ Allis not Gold
that Glitters.”

Ursula’s Stumbling-Block.

Ruth’s Life-Work; or,“No Pains, no Gains.”

Unele William’s Charge. ‘

Each Book containing 208 pages, with Four
Crown 8vo, cloth gilt, 2s, each.

“*Honour is my Guide.”
(Mrs. Adams-Acton).

< Aim ata Sure End.” By Emily Searchfield.

“He Conquers who Endures.” By the Author
of “* May Cunningham's Trial,” &c.

By Jeanie Hering

“Cross and Crown” Series, The. With Four Illustrations in each Book. Crown

8vo, 256 pages, 2s. 6d. each.

Heroes of the Indian Empire; or, Stories of
Valour and Victory. By Emest Foster.
Through Trial to Triumph; or, “The

Royal Way.” By Madeline Bonavia Hunt.

Strong to Suffer: A Story of the Jews. By
E. Wynne. : :
Fire and Sword: A Story of the Hugue-
By nots. By Thomas Archer

Adam Hepburn’s Vow: A Tale of Kirk and
Covenant. By Annie S, Swan.

No. XIII. ; or, The Story of the Lost Vestal.
A Tale of Early Christian Days. By Emma
Marshall.

Freedom’s Sword: A Story of the Days of
Wallace and Bruce. By Annie S, Swan.

Pet Series—4.98.





Selections from Cassell & Company's Publications.



Albums for Children. Price 3s. 6d. each.

The Album for Home, School, and Play. Picture Album of All Sorts. Illustrated.
Set in bold type, and illustrated throughout, The Chit-Chat Album. Illustrated:
““Wanted—a King” Series. Cheap Edition. Illustrated. 2s. 6d. each.

Fairy Talesin Other Lands. By Julia God- W
dard. Wursery Khymes to Rights. By Maggie
BRobin’s Ride. By Ellinor Davenport Adams.

Wanted—a King; or, How Merle set the
Browne.

“Peeps Abroad” Library. Cheap Editions. Cloth gilt, 2s. 6d. each.

Rambles Round London. By Cc. L, Wild Adventures in Wild Places. By Dr.
Re DiateaaaeY ttustrated& eevee Gordon Stables, R.N, Illustrated.

ound an out an iy

TaeWatéauc Wy lastrated: e. Modern Explorers. By Thomas Frost.

trated. New and Cheaper Edition.

Paws and Cl . By o f the Authors of
and Claws. y one 0} e rs Barly Explorers.

‘Poems Written for a Child.” Tllustrated.
By Thomas

By Thomas Frost.

Decisive Events in History. - 5
Gia snes a Original Illustrations. Sea eS Young Folks. Illus-
e True Robinson Crusoes.
Peeps Abroad for Folks at Home. Tllus- Jungle, Peak, and Plain Illustrated

trated throughout.

Three-and-Sixpenny Books for Young People. With Original Illustrations.
Cloth gilt, 3s. 6d. each. fs

Told Out of School. By A.J. Daniels.

throughont.

+ The White House at Inch Gow. By Sarah

+Red Rose and Tiger Lily. By L. T. Pitt.
Meade. a + Polly. By L. T. Meade.
hes pomence of Invention. By James | + the Palace Beautiful. By L. T. Meade,

+ Bashful Fifteen. By L. T. Meade. Follow my Leader.”

The King’s Command, A Story for Girls.
By Maggie Symington.

For Fortune and Glory.
Lost among White Africans,

+ A Sweet Girl Graduate.

By L. T. Meade.

+ A World of Girls. By L. T. Meade.

Books marked thus + can also be had in extra cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s. each.

Books by Edward §. Ellis.

A Strange Craft and its
Wonderful Voyage.
Pontiac, Chief of the

Ottawas. A Tale of the
Siege of Detroit. _
Inthe Days of the Pioneers.
The Phantom of the River.
Shod with Silence. _
The Great Cattle Trail.
The Path in the Ravine.

Illustrated. Cloth, 2s. 6d. each,

The Hunters of the Ozark.
The Camp in the Mountains
Wedinthe Woods. A Tale
of Early Days in the West.
Down the Mississippi.
The Last War Trail.
Wed on the River. A Tale
of Indian River Warfare.
OOF D Ets. in the Forest.
Up the Tapajos,

Wed in the Block House.
A Story of Pioneer Life in
Kentucky.

The Young Ranchers,

The Lost ‘Prail.

Camp-Fire and Wigwam.

Lost in the Wilds.

Lost in Samoa. A Tale of
Adventure in the Navigator
Islands,

Tad; or, “Getting Even” with Him.

Cassell’s Picture Story Books. Each containing 60 pages. 6d. each.

Little Talks.
Bright Stars.
Nursery Joys.
Pet’s Posy.
Tiny Tales.

Iilustrated Books for the Little Ones.

Illustrated. od. each.

Bright Tales and Funny
Mery Little Tal
erry Little es.
attic. Tales for Little
People. %
BL eee cODie and Their

ets.
Tales Told for Sunday.
Sunday Stories for Small
People. 7
Stories and Pictures for
Sunday.

|
|

Daisy’s Story Book.

Dot’s Story Book.

A Nest of Stories.

Good Night Stories.

Chats for Small Chatterers.

Bible Pictures for Boys
and Girls.

Firelight Stories.

Sunlight and Shade.

Rub-a-dub Tales.

ae Feathers and Fluffy

ur.

Scrambles and Scrapes.

Tittle Tattle Tales.

Dumb Friends,

Indoors and Out.

Some Farm Friends,

Containing

Auntie’s Stories.
Birdie’s Story Book.
Little Chimes,

A Sheaf of Tales,
Dewdrop Stories.

interesting Stories. All

Those Golden Sands.
Little Mothers and their

Children.
Our Pretty Pets.

Our Schoolday Hours.
Creatures Tame, -
Creatures Wild.

A and Down the Garden,

Sorts of Adventures.

Our Sunday Stories,
Our Holiday Hours,

Wandering Ways.

Shilling Story Books. All Illustrated, and containing Interesting Stories.

Seventeen Cats.

Bunty and the Boys.

The Heir of Elmdale.

Claimed at Last, andRoy’s
Reward. Bt

Thorns and Tangles,

| The History of Five Little

The Cuckoo in the Robin’s
John’s Mistake. (Nest.
Diamonds in the Sand,
Surly Bob.

Pitchers.

The Giant’s Cradle.

Shag and Doll.
The Cost of Revenge.
Clever Frank.

Among the Redskins
The Ferryman of Brill

Harry Maxwell,







Selections from Cassell & Company's Publications.
a eS Se Ms LD es RA
Eighteenpenny Story Books. All Illustrated throughout.

Wee Willie Winkie. The Chip Boy. Tom Morris’s Error,

Ups and Downs of a Don-| Roses from Thorns. “Through Flood—Through
ey’s Life. Faith’s Father. Fire.’

Three Wee Ulster Lassies. . By Land and Sea, The Girl with the Golden

Up the Ladder, i The Young Berringtons, Locks.

Dick’s Hero; & other Stories. |! Jeff and Leff. Stories of the Olden Time.



Library of Wonders. [Illustrated Gift-books for Boys. Cloth, 1s. 6d.

Wonders of Animal Instinct, | Wonders of Bodily Strength and Skill.
Wonderful Balloon Ascents,



The “World in Pictures” Series. [Illustrated throughout. Cheap Zdition.



1s. 6d. each.
All the Russias. reg eater NMOn Goran (Japan).
. pses of Sou erica.
Chats I eanie Roundvatrica’
Peeps into Be The Land of Temples (India).
The Land of Pyramids (Egypt). The Isles of the Pacific.
Two-Shilling Story Books, All Illustrated,
Margaret’s Enemy. Little Flotsam, Poor Nelly.
Stories of the Tower. The Children of the Court.| Tom Heriot.
Mr. Burke’s Nieces. the Zour Cats (ot the Tip- | jung Tabitha's Walt:
The Top of the Ladder:| f,ttle Folks? Sunday Book.| In Mischief Again.
How to Reach it. Two Fourpenny Bits. Peggy, and other Tales.



Half-Crown Story Books. 0
OnBoard the Esmeralda; or, | Perils Afloat and Brigands Pictures of School Life

Martin Leigh’s Log. Ashore. and Boyhood.
Esther West. Working to Win.
For Queen and King. At the South Pole,



Cassell’s Pictorial Scrap Book. In Six Books, each containing 32 pages,
6d. each.



Books for the Little Ones. Fully Illustrated.
Rhymes for the Young Folk. By William Cassell’s Robinson Crusoe. With 100

igham. Beautifully Illustrated. 1s. 6d, Illustrations. Cloth, 3s. 6d.; gilt edges, fi
i The Old Fairy Tales. With Original Illus-
The Sunday Scrap Book. With Several trations, Cloth, xs.
Hundred Illustrations, Boards, 3s. 6d. ; cloth, Cassell’s Swiss Family Robinson. IIlus-
gilt edges, 5s. trated, Cloth, 3s. 6d.; gilt edges, ss,

The New “Little Folks” Painting Book. Containing nearly 350 Outline Illustrations suitable for
Colouring. 1s,

The World’s Workers. A Series of New and Original Volumes by Popular
Authors. With Portraits printed on a tint as F: rontispiece. 1s. each.



John Cassell. By G. Holden Pike. Dr. Guthrie, Father Mathew, Elihu Bur-
Charles Haddon Spurgeon. By G. Holden ritt, Joseph Livesey.

Pike. Sir Henry Havelock and Colin Campbell,
Dr, Arnold of Rugby. By Rose E. Selfe. ‘Clyde. i
The Earl of Shaftesbury. only ce

Sarah Robinson, Agnes Weston, and Mrs, Abraham Lincoln.

Meredith. David Livingstone,
Thomas A. Edison and Samuel F, B. Morse. George Miiller and Andrew Reed.
Mrs. Somerville and Mary Carpenter. Richard Cobden.

General Gordon. Benjamin Franklin,
Charles Dickens. Handel,

Florence Nightingale, Catherine Marsh, Turner the Artist.
Frances Ridley Havergal, Mrs. Ran- George and Robert Stephenson,
yard (“L, N.R.”). Sir Titus Salt and George Moore,
#4 The above Works can also be had Three in One Vol., cloth, gilt edges, 35.



CASSELL & COMPANY, Limited, Ludgate Hil, London ;
Paris, New York & Melbourne






































Monthly, 6d.

Little Folks,

“Lirr_e Forns is af
the head of English tlits-
trated agazines for
eae: thes. Ere
4 * ana: popnilarity hs
(27 -} placed: it beyond both
\Y AW) © | rivalry and criticism.”—
i pQueen.
» -| “Everyone ought. to
| know, by this time thats
Litrie Fouxs is the best



hic.



The Half-Yearly
— Volume of Little
Folks, price 38, 6d., |





- for Children of all
ages.

Cassell & Com, any J-iniited,
» Lidgate Hid, London.

A Sunday Story Book,”



38. 6d,
Magazine for Children.” |The Chit-Chat Album

or cloth gilt, 5s.,\
- most \
ie Gift-book \k




Book
For the Little Ones.
Picture Boards, 9d. each.
Bright Tales and Funny
Pictures.

Me: Little Tales.
Little: Tales for Little






People. ~ 4
qe, Little People and their
A Book of Merry Tales, Pets.

containing “ Bright Tales | Bible Pictures for Boys
Patan Pi 5s and Girls. se

: unny ~ Pictures,” | ales told for Sunday.
‘Merry Little Tales,"| Stories and Pictures for
“Little Tales for Little |. Sunday. = nall
People,” and “Little People | Saneas Bones tS f
and their Pets.” Illustrated. | Firelight Stories, ~

38. 6d. -. Sunlight and Shade,














Fine Feathers, &

Tittle-Tattle Tales,

oer Tones cue Serapes,

andering Ways,

Dumb Friends,

Up & Down the Garden.
Sorts of Adventures.

Our Sunday Stories.

Our Holiday Hours,

Indoors and Out,

Some Farm Friends,

Those Golden Sands,

Our Pretty Pets,

Little Mothers,

Our School-day Hours,

Creatures Tame,

Creatures Wild,

Containing ‘Bible’
tures,” Tales for Sunday,”
“Stories and Pictures for
Sunday,” and ‘* Sunday
Stories for Small People,”
Illustrated 3s. 6d.

Picture Album of all
Sorts. Containing “Up
and Down the Garden,”
‘ All Sorts of Adventures,”
“Our Sunday Stories,” and
“Holiday Hours.” Illus










































ones ; Cassell &C Limited,
The Album for Home, SSE mea TES oe
School, and Play. Con- TCE LP Poggene

taining ‘‘ Indoors and Out,”

“Those Golden Sands,”

“Little Mothers\and their

Children,”'and “Our School

Day Hours.” Illustrated.
6d.





Containing ‘* Scrambles and
Scrapes,” ~ *#Tittle-Tattle

Tales,” “Wandering Ways,”
and ‘Dumb Friends,” 1b -}:
lustrated, 3s. 6d, *

Casselicr Company, Limited,
Ludgate Hill, London. :









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describe
'15833' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILK' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
3ed64d8dbbcbd5e9329438665c8ad1be
49d5bc7b843879f8835a3c0d853f827b7f382295
describe
'1858' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILL' 'sip-files00008.pro'
2e306ce4d361ad1ee2403b1c8e44ba94
3ea85d8d9ca7841d5c0b9e1996186fc6f0afe1c2
'2012-01-15T05:34:23-05:00'
describe
'4557' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILM' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
b672c7ce639f03ed1b6f417f3c500d4c
2b8ee6782aed96c297dcee894fa0697ea7f8de2d
'2012-01-15T05:32:05-05:00'
describe
'4720220' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILN' 'sip-files00008.tif'
9f047b5c6c916e2a860fc034e2a143f4
4f21410c4dde30beb978f66a21b5834f0a48898f
'2012-01-15T05:34:06-05:00'
describe
'147' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILO' 'sip-files00008.txt'
687259ad31b00961a18bdf59bd977e77
7438ab8535387ed841297eabe434a08044dd4574
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILP' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
5a88ddd057ad4e24566666d92f539ff9
fed8e056732bb2f2f4d0176723198a187e10e7ba
'2012-01-15T05:34:50-05:00'
describe
'587860' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILQ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
1badaa4842f11003f819bf32882567f8
8037bacaafcaa208fd931ef3247df1bc2a1bcb89
'2012-01-15T05:32:17-05:00'
describe
'56671' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILR' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
52735ac287b663a5f8468eabf68cd2c7
dc5b7588f9d6ec6ea9a7e1d184c1da617eaf3503
'2012-01-15T05:32:31-05:00'
describe
'31897' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILS' 'sip-files00009.pro'
b32df41d34ae0ffde62f48661fa83e08
04f375b418c8719100c1460ebcc71270588e076e
'2012-01-15T05:32:11-05:00'
describe
'18940' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILT' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
1014024f7a388600b24087f69fab271e
8324ddccd4d97600a0bfb1d13d799769ab36bb08
'2012-01-15T05:32:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILU' 'sip-files00009.tif'
38803073a8f4f88aeafb4fafb1cd2573
be9a3cd6a79315a059e02dbd6f4e5873c533aac4
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILV' 'sip-files00009.txt'
de0fa1c7a1a97ffb965aa77c09c8142e
56c4139376ec1859ffb101c21282c4fb19957ea9
describe
'4882' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILW' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
e9551c65f4faf2b3470034c6b63e4dc5
7523db98006aa638d577db4e07c49321b559feaa
'2012-01-15T05:33:44-05:00'
describe
'587898' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILX' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
d3f5aa2ef43f6c22eca0fb7faed0c696
43eb10496f0881efcc46c51fe81dace6c12dd188
'2012-01-15T05:33:52-05:00'
describe
'92508' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILY' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
5583168f6bd03892d9c2b07cda65e400
35146eabb376d7929da3ed96d8ccec0f58aca86c
'2012-01-15T05:34:10-05:00'
describe
'29997' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACILZ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
d73cf63f4cd4c175507efc1eb1271663
a84634b66002974191bb057460f43414f84b8fb8
'2012-01-15T05:32:22-05:00'
describe
'36791' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMA' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
fa1db8bea82395b6f86e33539552a117
d496b675ffee1f0d674ac4abe9f2759760876a39
'2012-01-15T05:34:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMB' 'sip-files00010.tif'
3928854f47e993427e386743e58bd1ab
97577825f375ad6847b7668630bb11735ae56218
'2012-01-15T05:32:25-05:00'
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMC' 'sip-files00010.txt'
7d449fcad7b6435801a63014436ef2fb
9896bd2c32783dc8d078694d0a7225d45c896f83
'2012-01-15T05:33:13-05:00'
describe
'8302' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMD' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
812a2b018f14589e60e0c9ddc3ac7cd8
5cf145e252761c2fd43ed853aadbe93358d26d5a
'2012-01-15T05:32:08-05:00'
describe
'587882' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIME' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
c78d65692f1dbfa2560a9b64c967bbac
9831c99a687bd9d756e765c125815600ac8dd292
'2012-01-15T05:34:16-05:00'
describe
'178072' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMF' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
53776b7ecf6e85cf4a7965dc5e703ae5
073741662eb7fd517daf1e58a629393a4c7370e6
'2012-01-15T05:34:28-05:00'
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMG' 'sip-files00011.pro'
84b22a5e0f293aa28e5ee3473b1bbc2d
83522d37d5c13e48b6ce9594eca34f2f0f879eb6
'2012-01-15T05:33:30-05:00'
describe
'40392' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMH' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
e1f6a6b48c845653829abb84a4791462
8db95cf740e28333bfb439ac5ebccff1028726ef
describe
'4713568' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMI' 'sip-files00011.tif'
2922b3b4bf1424e89a2e4e9866666cd6
d759ffaf18489b64d52a1fd80425aeb563de2456
'2012-01-15T05:32:19-05:00'
describe
'108' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMJ' 'sip-files00011.txt'
978462eff2025553cd38bd58425e2710
26af2071c849ee76607bf10e22854a8b235a32ca
describe
Invalid character
'9050' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMK' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
9422e76d9b66ee6c6abe487bc13136eb
5a99990415aa9c4545b3f18c202a43ae884216c4
'2012-01-15T05:32:53-05:00'
describe
'587916' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIML' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
2b1fa3c82b0902c12b46de649ceb24b6
daf64adb6417cf467570266df25d1f94b202ea3f
'2012-01-15T05:33:08-05:00'
describe
'89129' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMM' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
ca1268030b3cd85b36649900b032468a
7aca5e2998a7d8cb525826182a54b01c2f591a21
'2012-01-15T05:32:13-05:00'
describe
'29862' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMN' 'sip-files00012.pro'
1ce0143ac527249ef2112cca0a94d1ea
b376c7ea4a73b24a0e969a74af5519a206862fd5
'2012-01-15T05:33:41-05:00'
describe
'31936' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMO' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
417b1853ac5b29545d71e0699a723fa6
887667ea16631c33f594be0a117afac1ef6f78f5
'2012-01-15T05:34:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMP' 'sip-files00012.tif'
db233a07bd260aad2e6376ea615d79f5
289c8dfabe67ff38df6f3d316bd7def7902b8176
'2012-01-15T05:33:55-05:00'
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMQ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
0b1d3bb536ade4634036695551f5ec7d
8116faa68f32038feb7cffd4d3f1022aa75f780e
'2012-01-15T05:34:07-05:00'
describe
'8055' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMR' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
a53c268819d9a8e52dbe8ae619a41220
b2ed7f822d56852de00ea8863b144a79e5225669
'2012-01-15T05:33:46-05:00'
describe
'587869' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMS' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
82887ecdd0a5dd90bcc8277cd0407db8
6c03cd67172a10d95e90610cc4fb16869fdc7c28
describe
'185175' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMT' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
bb399418fd2fa525aee2dd48900d6a46
cc4ce0fdba73563c7ca9505d76011d012a5788fc
describe
'743' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMU' 'sip-files00013.pro'
719e4659bb232d0abd9c17c340f80fa9
71646f8bb27c6b3f5e1c8b2e7df509e21359e77a
describe
'40861' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMV' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
0998eaa6843fc18cc52a3754b37a104d
c0534368047b9e4c92e8ec1483c2ae52648fb2e5
describe
'4712920' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMW' 'sip-files00013.tif'
7b2342776d34dbf3974e3da1101cb0db
90cb44bc8414b75bfc9d7137ee33b7fedd8ae6b3
describe
'170' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMX' 'sip-files00013.txt'
2037c55f4b90e233edf0a29f6893c1fd
ded31cd732307f41e5818904bc7bcbed14a5a2f8
'2012-01-15T05:34:46-05:00'
describe
'8834' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMY' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
acc78d16ad8d05685859b8afa50403d5
b44b319b343c97a2c5de356a4ed3df0d0538c1e7
describe
'587906' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIMZ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
ebe9c77f7673e3df6248a1950eef7e53
a8663110c63592cc2bb86454ff511c584ce508cf
'2012-01-15T05:34:04-05:00'
describe
'87163' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINA' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
04ea44c3c0b1f16ee3dc20a7b0f1b16d
06408a6d326e35f17a59b1f774040b568e3c305f
'2012-01-15T05:34:01-05:00'
describe
'30357' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINB' 'sip-files00014.pro'
bfb87c5d533fb450c75d977053251de5
1e15c4a2831151ddde330472deb0716be93be0e2
'2012-01-15T05:33:16-05:00'
describe
'32634' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINC' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
197854799e08adeb29b4292626a10175
349f0d340a32f61e318ead96c8bba9d14068d2f5
describe
'4720216' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIND' 'sip-files00014.tif'
68a1b5faff1faea2196f576063adc04b
9319e7c381606d3bd5419d3b13e150faab4a38c0
'2012-01-15T05:34:18-05:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINE' 'sip-files00014.txt'
9c6d250ba00bd68ed6de43b2ede5d8d6
9ed3061ac37640cf611fbd9a08d50447e413adb4
'2012-01-15T05:33:47-05:00'
describe
'8083' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINF' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
dbe6fbdd6bfddb411e176e9c5c9747d8
2a7d62026c7aa9d4a570cf79caa6771c370a32c5
'2012-01-15T05:33:02-05:00'
describe
'587888' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACING' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
e2a0e329e9ec59387f226a8166267fc7
093dfd897004052db9f72af136a4a8563020973f
describe
'157067' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINH' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
8653cfd4c2b8f3607ba842f212004cb7
3d711604034dc6e4b4a4859fb3c41a4f0c47d8e3
'2012-01-15T05:33:50-05:00'
describe
'2841' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINI' 'sip-files00015.pro'
03b858f6400a58b7ff9e6b6f9afb9831
0fa32e7cca5ff5798bc52c3582b764dd99f20f2b
'2012-01-15T05:33:32-05:00'
describe
'35997' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINJ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
31cda67879474040cd4b3440e5b0fa99
b92f0aa2b24f46d8389eaee1043c86053585c5d6
'2012-01-15T05:33:20-05:00'
describe
'4712500' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINK' 'sip-files00015.tif'
a46b6c2ba1aa7414c05a94995c9e875b
e500435d5784615be719a8922f15254ed8c52840
describe
'173' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINL' 'sip-files00015.txt'
6c247fd0e1ab1700a403f757f24dc13e
8f932aed183a5dab4a5949561d8d44a674a80684
'2012-01-15T05:33:28-05:00'
describe
'7772' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINM' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
2f8a176ea9717a78efd457f67861d327
e542458275ffda0866534153bfe35fa702e13d11
describe
'587901' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINN' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
c98a29af66ceeb7fabbb1e5fdd67816a
6dc47df9fc28d3fa8ed9970a4bd574e83e87e4b0
'2012-01-15T05:32:01-05:00'
describe
'86250' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINO' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
396199230dc59b8d245e35c2290b9e4b
cebd90c6ca4e335887c24b8ab607cdfe7e4f7f1f
'2012-01-15T05:33:09-05:00'
describe
'29806' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINP' 'sip-files00016.pro'
137c60d0e769eed4de8bde9acb25a5de
48e409188f9ffc75661a09cceaca2e8e207454a7
'2012-01-15T05:32:33-05:00'
describe
'28588' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINQ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
fd7e046a01a1c6519805440dd8278146
70620aac137ad20ef4571a60b8216cc67852d035
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINR' 'sip-files00016.tif'
8b6f85cd25ccaf45d86a79657b1c097f
c9d3ace7c1877f78e6d9f2fb2e55a2beb76f1f2f
'2012-01-15T05:34:30-05:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINS' 'sip-files00016.txt'
509468a4c6c0265d3e61940143a8e1a9
6717165b0186210eb346d794ad9bb3a3411a809b
'2012-01-15T05:32:58-05:00'
describe
'8130' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINT' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
618ac9e8a0935c7e01db2080d4f3fc01
4f8a5727cda700cd5a4e31a8929ff192ad7baaad
'2012-01-15T05:33:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINU' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
13fa91769d6a352608f0b39d73092164
2ff32e03557010c90b59d4cd2644db3f9a554a6b
'2012-01-15T05:32:03-05:00'
describe
'165889' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINV' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
7e0bb6005a6e3df775e89e7ba3874780
8393131b72b355d98f2d4683319d3271f6f5764d
describe
'2412' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINW' 'sip-files00017.pro'
3157604905f871bbd17523dec5dde857
76bf996735535d5453b24c25ea5bb85a1a9034cd
describe
'37499' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINX' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
65892a78abf0f06abd2ec73ad6a85a5c
f12b4c7986ec9aa01de75fdd760b59c6d552d0cb
'2012-01-15T05:32:34-05:00'
describe
'4712804' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINY' 'sip-files00017.tif'
117dfd432b2ab5dd6f251f0bdeb6e1d1
96f510185ac47cfad2892e8c8d33008bc81628ed
'2012-01-15T05:33:45-05:00'
describe
'433' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACINZ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
0ea1df0ff490332984853fa0fa4af6dd
ac9b46884d2555e514536bbccae25f190bf635fb
'2012-01-15T05:33:26-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8352' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOA' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
6b134f5c203d0a707e8bc9f8bc465289
9a7cd8a5e85324a43257e5edd040a25b9fa127a6
describe
'587921' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOB' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
bb8be4ad5ad95b5f5a0a1bd28484da8e
3b5571d7d4d7f923c41d8328cb51b6e78096a43e
'2012-01-15T05:32:26-05:00'
describe
'89598' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOC' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
c3d1f90dba91c7e7445869a0d0e3b9a1
a9eedbab86e075fb9ea06cae64d071a2f0f62591
describe
'30369' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOD' 'sip-files00018.pro'
c488e2c586d4725e50fe64ff1f5c0d67
bcda07a60dcbd118d29335731b937ed2a2927019
'2012-01-15T05:32:07-05:00'
describe
'34535' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOE' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
cf5c382af74153130275408f287f0b3b
ce0ca2dde182d707c3eab0e100cf75d540ba8ead
'2012-01-15T05:34:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOF' 'sip-files00018.tif'
7899e03a2aaf48e77062e66f3e08bd85
bd162149539cf6d4e54d246475ebed147e5e1451
'2012-01-15T05:34:00-05:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOG' 'sip-files00018.txt'
c026fffa3d40f313380a3520efd9e08f
b206745805160161571708a33bfbd1921ce9434f
'2012-01-15T05:32:57-05:00'
describe
'8542' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOH' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
2698346f5d561b77f0eb0ec598a99ed2
762fba53800413ef53fdd6624249572e903dfa1b
'2012-01-15T05:32:00-05:00'
describe
'587878' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOI' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
582b10f744d2dfff4a7007d5be82b892
8e5c3e1b18325653c8c2c7d28f09ab7038684ec6
describe
'149816' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOJ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
c9389cceb5d0d7c8a68096120fce9954
bfd3ccd6504b6d1952c0bd43490b053fafab3e91
'2012-01-15T05:33:25-05:00'
describe
'718' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOK' 'sip-files00019.pro'
9e22da0b9363332c8b76caba15872fca
1ad0f9df7ae0487821c6f2d73b1a9e361b3a67cc
describe
'35031' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOL' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
5390d0ab3e343e07d45474af28858167
b0c0e176a2cfc8306ce7faf71d694693290f97c7
describe
'4712852' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOM' 'sip-files00019.tif'
31c8dd29ca20447db970bbf544875685
4cce6060066bf7c56566e570ec2fed1c129f781d
describe
'167' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACION' 'sip-files00019.txt'
d6366b3e389ad25ba92d533c575031c6
d0c6a391255b683c5ef1d119a3648133642588c8
describe
'8185' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOO' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
3f96d2eb8d7c97835cbb11bb1973e702
ff2a5d2255a263af5ab551c3ce019c827adb72b6
describe
'587909' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOP' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
1591ddec82b926e970eec194a9f1ac07
54f92a47dd7d70a63de5945f78dc34f9c3b27d12
describe
'88028' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOQ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
5cb9558cfec3593ee9a4692b4d109b82
0a02e952541df0ad4116b24cd69edfec6331c095
'2012-01-15T05:33:06-05:00'
describe
'29059' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOR' 'sip-files00020.pro'
8bc2eb4c97288004761f1ddca4928503
e426eebf51b0c949181b5b1b4b0da96c4450c327
'2012-01-15T05:32:38-05:00'
describe
'28916' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOS' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
a353251fbe6e874722e8459b87b42c16
730783daa8963286f87e7a38236f09b4a225b7bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOT' 'sip-files00020.tif'
8fec61d09450a4f58f8d0f10bebbc4d5
af3ec28f79eeefcdcd22ff82cfb2bafd1f99b68b
'2012-01-15T05:32:24-05:00'
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOU' 'sip-files00020.txt'
902c16b3cad7da063ee3872272a0fa77
63a9a82f3944b5b358b6f1eb74b9453c94c4f678
describe
'8047' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOV' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
c6da5370cb39c07fbb0bc3a0cac03ea5
8967a786b6410ad2b64066d7c61f512b6479acd2
describe
'587891' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOW' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
d2488621e3c76b4a87015bcaba7cd2b3
00bd8930e6de7475e231bb7cc570f9d3b692fbc4
describe
'139082' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOX' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
cf3ffb553447eba24d9300e8b12a2718
9087e3d7cfa8096be7e85923932ee14bc8993850
'2012-01-15T05:31:55-05:00'
describe
'581' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOY' 'sip-files00021.pro'
10c37aac517fd83e43695532f3ae6401
15ab5a31ff77e54e53f5bcf32c333ed0778a364e
describe
'32541' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIOZ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
2323d76a897bfb384223a9a9dc3ec336
58b46277100ec8cfa7e31a64b2af33cb74578dbe
'2012-01-15T05:33:22-05:00'
describe
'4712632' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPA' 'sip-files00021.tif'
658db471bc53db5a5d695941278b70e4
079ffc4eeac2c26ac33ee4ede9f5ae23089b56d5
describe
'155' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPB' 'sip-files00021.txt'
d438b1700ba9ecdad274b9628bc82437
b0c6bfd8c877c959e5b48a4914281ebad76e1651
describe
'7675' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPC' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
cc1f9b8d56a72bea7254bb3f93930ea6
fc9998fcbd7f28bdfc8f47715d8cafec874c856d
describe
'587852' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPD' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
e166a3fb690952bafe4198ef6c5b99cc
023204482b524b2357ead93f15e6057e85956986
'2012-01-15T05:33:21-05:00'
describe
'91605' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPE' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
f84d2283dbe9177b5e6b25147af371e1
51ee5e56424b99fbd98501a7af1f21fe65fc29f8
'2012-01-15T05:34:20-05:00'
describe
'29564' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPF' 'sip-files00022.pro'
29baa4956f0814ac0aaf0eda07b811f5
a1a6e67211c3b2eca90f5085094afef66c8c2eed
describe
'35587' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPG' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
ccddc27d4e716961cdafd246527fe408
1bbe7014fbfdc7bfffe2707631d7d337a7c212f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPH' 'sip-files00022.tif'
1bcc96f6f8919fe351a78e5c0926df8a
11169ead8b80378c54e9624b4cebccf622caaaae
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPI' 'sip-files00022.txt'
5689491d8bcda04cfa1c2e65d6f24639
ac39988de569c0bfd697886fa3a41419f4b0cf5d
'2012-01-15T05:34:08-05:00'
describe
'8292' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPJ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
96740fb7cf87b76b43aeaed805e2c13b
cdb9a082136b07deb2bb84d4c324d633501f5c8f
'2012-01-15T05:33:15-05:00'
describe
'587924' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPK' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
c1c7832917f4635d203ca445164e8140
6708f989ac4a973330d98f9be25a20617b2f2699
describe
'184700' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPL' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
214d38c2baecebc53e6d60273ab869f5
e497791cdbf3e3f8a5b4c63de83449720f89e609
'2012-01-15T05:32:59-05:00'
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPM' 'sip-files00023.pro'
905aac17d64ba9102e19f427462d6f48
5a4bca80ebcc03cbcda91afb1d7ef34f887ddedc
'2012-01-15T05:33:27-05:00'
describe
'41392' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPN' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
24110fb0f0acd5af0895df029bd3116a
1837776e2dc2e1b80d95cad5f0fac88bf4f0604b
describe
'4713272' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPO' 'sip-files00023.tif'
aa344b7491c5bddd01d72d0539e00cf7
9fe83a30c020ec795199b6e8b35e33b005b3aff9
describe
'121' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPP' 'sip-files00023.txt'
85734518cf24aaa10e60344a2e4793b1
aae6828fc41fec6906be9fd9766d50ac73e28412
describe
'9102' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPQ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
fead45a949e89e0b56e64ea6e9c6a298
534252bcca06d462c7725fb37010c73deabaa71e
'2012-01-15T05:32:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPR' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
5221d0cdd256eccb42b5ad542217d458
f952523a7d01764b02558280fec9695873485392
'2012-01-15T05:33:34-05:00'
describe
'88163' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPS' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
5a2f7e491339e630b2a932c8be5c0b58
ce80fc4bfab1b4f6608cecaab7ee16ba438e2d89
describe
'29601' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPT' 'sip-files00024.pro'
21638b72f0c32202d8b1babdcae39cf9
86bd77a33326c84094cc662629f65699ac2c7fd0
'2012-01-15T05:32:14-05:00'
describe
'29657' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPU' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
298ba85cd5bef2736ddee982223a09b1
b4fbfa85b6729570e711f50ca41f7c17d62c9793
'2012-01-15T05:31:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPV' 'sip-files00024.tif'
3164713a0163c2d8c62009ab68eabcb6
b65916d7e6151c498026291a1a9d8315a570392e
'2012-01-15T05:31:56-05:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPW' 'sip-files00024.txt'
50d55de8dcc4923b6ace100c17f33203
a3f70a4b03328f1f2c8681a7d1f00e48715e7bcb
describe
'8241' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPX' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
8a65f236d44e331d36adf0d10c350fba
ef2834cbe446b3aee1345d5c79b43a2991b6bb12
'2012-01-15T05:33:07-05:00'
describe
'587868' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPY' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
0d3ab79a8a4181e3fabe5b47105971dc
9b04c67985319e647737fb13e8180cbb49a13b9c
'2012-01-15T05:33:01-05:00'
describe
'158853' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIPZ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
f143b6d6fd63ba93a80ca4a4a3422c4b
085014e53da72c52dbb8b6024a02f73f09391ec0
'2012-01-15T05:32:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQA' 'sip-files00025.pro'
e73f1a4952da414e45a8a78831d75f9c
a6849bf90dc68ccd8662f15d056e45fc3ca52840
describe
'37065' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQB' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
4f24bc16de9de9edb7825932fe86ebec
1d7718cb5c18d4da97c8988fcf99c1b773923319
describe
'4712368' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQC' 'sip-files00025.tif'
ee94c8a481e445d3885c1e7fd6af7bda
abeb74b1d54119821cf8736f343e473db02a9ebd
'2012-01-15T05:33:14-05:00'
describe
'159' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQD' 'sip-files00025.txt'
fd5147669081a11afdb9de2c3185fb8f
6c673eb562bd37064600e55bba42ff0a87967332
'2012-01-15T05:33:31-05:00'
describe
'8413' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQE' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
fe9244377a94bb55efca6fa5eff920f9
dd4dcc860d51e8247092a94fa0619ab7615b786f
describe
'587913' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQF' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
614a2ac1d8fb63e99a34bb56a641115a
5cf9b1e55926bcde7ffeedea51f20fce17f55c02
'2012-01-15T05:32:36-05:00'
describe
'85375' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQG' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
290c89c6978419020e234d31046b9295
6eb8b9af044cbd8df466db56874cb88777ec017d
'2012-01-15T05:34:27-05:00'
describe
'29466' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQH' 'sip-files00026.pro'
4e6e602c24b76c7b71409152a30df722
e3cd6a2b75b013a08072319a53049c1698d72e91
describe
'25684' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQI' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
176df669de8e01b81d7bc1c0d09a0911
25e4248433bbb96ef8f23b6d73b2985b94540fa4
'2012-01-15T05:33:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQJ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
15c02727526d18bea4dae8487eafb6be
b758d8d624a2e3e6866738d64ecda4610663ee42
'2012-01-15T05:34:42-05:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQK' 'sip-files00026.txt'
ade3e75147a775dfc5f39e055c2cecea
f13848fc49ad8949c4314132b30cea6f6b5e45f3
describe
'8305' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQL' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
7503566ffe753ab30e05348f0e0c9bdf
6700c762a8a192db35249b210a9eed149107ebf3
describe
'587908' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQM' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
361a771d0b4797c0cb4d999bc27b1f4c
433c009f6444dff84af830e698e63ed25fdf1f5b
describe
'166359' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQN' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
022b87e725705b6bf0f91cad2717775a
8013b6ca69cb9f64a176c97bc85c46b89b885664
'2012-01-15T05:32:46-05:00'
describe
'793' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQO' 'sip-files00027.pro'
31b940246e3ae0de74b9548a08a19981
8a34c9d0e3372bd49b39746595d08edf27009764
'2012-01-15T05:32:51-05:00'
describe
'37216' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQP' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
fb6cfd0316f5fa89108cb56cc43df3fe
958adb3fb5dbf5ceb1b86fe53920a226eb7ac548
describe
'4712788' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQQ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
574ab5e572ac0c329760d8936b0ba968
bf5839f08d1c3aaa1285e4785321de362c97b10a
'2012-01-15T05:34:36-05:00'
describe
'174' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQR' 'sip-files00027.txt'
a7d0741a157400469075771a8f5d2a11
8e61f5ca1ffcc8e8078e3df5ca4df0740577e2fe
'2012-01-15T05:34:11-05:00'
describe
'8135' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQS' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
a327783546be5b9a52f5ec721fee3c3c
54c2f7eae510795420bd7fa3b7090b018d57f133
'2012-01-15T05:34:44-05:00'
describe
'587914' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQT' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
f7a9d32c44ec6c4d3e4df8968e8b11c4
54b66a7552b735ed76cdfb1ef8f2a15b6b98c941
describe
'85925' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQU' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
aac7795e4856774a463ee7af05131a58
fc2b284e9d8d44d6bc474c92e32922532ad2f16e
describe
'28874' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQV' 'sip-files00028.pro'
e5d49545c298205e24399ed515e37200
5c4f8fea9d3b4ff010a2590ca0c416ce75fe6745
'2012-01-15T05:32:10-05:00'
describe
'34506' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQW' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
6a7b6dae46d4a2bf57a10171deb4de70
cc6ea69a96cc9401b6ec38915cfee8652004c9f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQX' 'sip-files00028.tif'
2808cf143fb0c6ddf7b6e1b8eddd4039
8766b4d1154b030f88469a05ee362c21e7bbb535
'2012-01-15T05:32:43-05:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQY' 'sip-files00028.txt'
532a3c63d04a601328a47db4e7a48708
4a6f66f30b54820d4212757a6a316b33fb2dea22
describe
'7775' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIQZ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
e95b6e593cbec6a6ab8a477e9dd31df8
d5eaa01eaeb2d70c2d518efad63496d964e85bab
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRA' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
fe017b78480e35b679a796e15772468a
2df5f8c3776e76cc95cbc94850019af4e95a85b7
'2012-01-15T05:34:12-05:00'
describe
'144375' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRB' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
6dcfcb690ae61b1e8a66e0afa1212934
da11dc4d419c9651a5d3479f1dc3896a47d5ab18
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRC' 'sip-files00029.pro'
a5e6bbf6498391b7d32a8ab678f7b416
2102763eb5a74f5d699b16345096919d5c3225cb
describe
'32310' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRD' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
4be1e08486c0f340e28ccbd0fd6bec56
bb7f42bbd10d23be592df491f2d529f209f969d6
'2012-01-15T05:34:38-05:00'
describe
'4712336' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRE' 'sip-files00029.tif'
249a48b6f56058639f83a662cd114ce0
bebdf5757d58e2770756923b06db53bca22e782d
describe
'261' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRF' 'sip-files00029.txt'
2404bb49de91807cec7f1420437deda3
14f7c300a20b84de64ddc0b1e3e6ab59d8415cf5
describe
Invalid character
'7282' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRG' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
22a96ca0daee72a71522c6d50627aca2
2c8ecd5bf2231981ef5c72fb9d64d76ff0bd66e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRH' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
73357e4f5ecc6df8dbf19a3db624541f
ebf1f3f8e6eba1013d67b587a59ab0976bc85ffa
describe
'92317' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRI' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
aacb57fd8b111090fb54ba69b076bf83
34f5f8189ce7db7259fb0a1945a28c6b080732a1
describe
'30193' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRJ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
2699f583f5f5b896c2e398b1c3616826
bf8d700001fddc49e4412f1f5257f9b1f296fe7c
describe
'27026' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRK' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
3fc4d1d3358654bb469a9bf3c238dcab
1ac89691e139f4a330984f553ea79caede26ee0c
'2012-01-15T05:33:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRL' 'sip-files00030.tif'
09e0ea7ca44ac9f469ee6a5f2aed329f
5a9c3b85e6f8f2730a9364ded35607e99db8ebaf
'2012-01-15T05:32:50-05:00'
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRM' 'sip-files00030.txt'
b1a8e360757a0bae50b3c3668be375cf
d8c3b86ecb04c45e2b592acd14367f1fa336e1b9
describe
'8237' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRN' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
eae207cf490e9b32088a6183967094f7
7a86cf46aea6cf59f6885325ddf1f65cddacc2e7
'2012-01-15T05:32:06-05:00'
describe
'587893' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRO' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
ad3f0f94818c2c93e7cda4cf24b694db
2118a6f7e69d61eb29c21a1a75b40cd711c81a29
describe
'166162' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRP' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
e0e3e32d1522ffbfe1ea05635b8ce6d4
5c40eaf095d4da5250aea2e3c808902d24665a0f
'2012-01-15T05:32:09-05:00'
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRQ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
e7006de803ccb53322591d352ef05c1f
bc9550d9bfce104ed8d6ea0de5b5b9277fed0eb2
describe
'38738' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRR' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
1f26ba7e8a3cb3edcf59e147fb095560
90353eee97b94b7896dd37697a669a090c027bf8
describe
'4713076' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRS' 'sip-files00031.tif'
b2b4a98e8748503f1351b25ec04fdec0
467d0ff2dbc9923a680c67e6ac9c5174be577734
describe
'76' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRT' 'sip-files00031.txt'
35b0f1db402d22a2df7389658a26a2fc
59c1aa55a3c26448c69d6e289918ca681a01872d
describe
'8522' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRU' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
19268d92f77fdac1cc4ef9508433d9f3
3969f9946eb57d028a83780b60315221a7a4f01d
describe
'587905' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRV' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
4f1fae8317d1e386e29e5bfc71e95545
1cd43867e3b7898b21a94a3e31e2bc2ce4734595
describe
'90862' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRW' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
e90a7f534634511e8f65ea207cd474e6
57be5cb29f211bd1e85eee80f099b5b93a5475e8
describe
'29792' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRX' 'sip-files00032.pro'
4e76bb1650fe61a84e5a68af927cb6b8
acd9d4fef345adfde012a554ab77b17772b2a4c9
describe
'33298' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRY' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
277ca92d9a6687d638c755d933a8b25a
94df73ff2b261b688bbedff0b5e6d46fc31cd267
'2012-01-15T05:34:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIRZ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
68c22dee96879aede4df4565a9e6e46f
7fb5216021d16d7b80afd8fda1d54da1a843db6b
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISA' 'sip-files00032.txt'
a4977100bc07f3a780660f9eed9ccd73
743b4d2fb7a6362945e4f0eda42c47b2420f633f
describe
'8073' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISB' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
c86cce4fd4e96dd82695c13956816a49
b04d7e66d3559955c2794c229c81fb0a88b92109
'2012-01-15T05:32:30-05:00'
describe
'587899' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISC' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
375e68c95af305decf6b9c9861faa49b
9306be5900a30e2cc705860a23920a2e0a7da056
describe
'174833' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISD' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
509d13ab0abd2c8f11065396f4ce5625
95651b7f27eeb346f68e875d21a68072ff42fdd4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISE' 'sip-files00033.pro'
d554a1146ea48245b8fa72cf24119554
19b2ecb2926a414cc7552e456b60fb6774f15af8
describe
'38990' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISF' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
22748f2ffc87ea3a748507fe8cfddfef
1c6159eea63e4e0f9e93f96a307af18007aee3fa
describe
'4713396' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISG' 'sip-files00033.tif'
84145fa4a96b7ab033ead1d185b2a745
5af866da0271baf332d17fd2d0ac2a8b01a27aa7
'2012-01-15T05:34:33-05:00'
describe
'171' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISH' 'sip-files00033.txt'
92a825725c1cb20c5a223d15a8f6726c
70fbdf89ea8aff99f50c7ffd9f2cc260a83e0b98
describe
'8729' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISI' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
0450769488b683bb8b60f80587c6248a
2a502d13cce2d96fae1f1c6abe5d1c3beb638d75
describe
'587918' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISJ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
cacfe96b233c51f2263722016f755d01
8e3f3a77c65a1f3a0de5c53f6eaf3aee85e1e5cd
'2012-01-15T05:33:17-05:00'
describe
'94456' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISK' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
cfd42caa8ae932eedbc35799b46983d9
d2e56b2e31bc5c059913d8b1b7cb8be94ab8140a
'2012-01-15T05:33:39-05:00'
describe
'30130' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISL' 'sip-files00034.pro'
e56144a1a53f75d96b5cfe66ae9c0b68
7af5f65b2ae39690dd9c05d3f1516677d6cf084e
describe
'33889' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISM' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
0b0f3d3194a8241c6445df916b946f90
c67e187467bb5d5470f372df4b7b44654d95a7b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISN' 'sip-files00034.tif'
007d601558609ba8ac0e8044e92a3aca
9dad4bfa684f80b0b947202983daef75ebc352d0
'2012-01-15T05:31:57-05:00'
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISO' 'sip-files00034.txt'
76712049aa235c6ec159d217c4674341
457d58e054634e4c3e08f22d51cd4f85a81e4457
describe
'8180' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISP' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
79da58015281dd783826b8314993786c
030e430ebd1357a32b7064c4c356eaf8d42057f8
'2012-01-15T05:34:26-05:00'
describe
'587836' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISQ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
b620919df44c4cb73835f0aea6b071b0
a5bc1e92e29672fcbf6d9004eb3d45e692a64532
describe
'161266' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISR' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
851ca2e05502689417b4dfc972d39315
5f45246b9256a8057b0dd471c93fa62f87bde2b9
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISS' 'sip-files00035.pro'
b94a15caaf72153d6525d8a09654871a
1458fc4efaa2736fd22429e3cfa50bbb12987481
describe
'37670' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIST' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
027f7dcca3f0349d212fba444848fe24
baf584aa14e3ea8937f556d8d7e66dd3b07a1b35
describe
'4712536' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISU' 'sip-files00035.tif'
6cb46a95c4af02c9102c77130e08c95a
592f1b07da2893c3fb92c1dd0af3fc271fe5a3ba
describe
'181' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISV' 'sip-files00035.txt'
8e112761f75bbafc0e42030d1eda33d5
3dcc4f878b987dfbc8a3fc926ab3b71d3c00c034
describe
'8514' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISW' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
0d43abbc7f51d194b03ff4766f027741
ad1acf8a02d606c9ce88adf0380b2992a42f5ab9
'2012-01-15T05:32:52-05:00'
describe
'587896' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISX' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
1095a1ef56e933132baa3b3d23531165
6fa0213a2622dc09fc2f3876e274fdab89c10f4a
describe
'88052' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISY' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
2354568f8be6b89656daa6ca0b0ce68c
3aec25aa61ffe102bd2cd47570650e59d0ebecac
'2012-01-15T05:33:43-05:00'
describe
'29490' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACISZ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
d0f5590815e5dc0b103cb996eb57fb9a
fdc42bdaceb467d8d3528ccc43079e8529e6baac
describe
'35945' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITA' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
b5c08509beb7aaf18e92ebe6004008a4
04da28d7f4ef7166e5ca39fa71d93c488433cc86
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITB' 'sip-files00036.tif'
b053ef90e0365a627eb3792e6bd41fb6
42170a0a0e96ce5460e9721087f97f6432ff293c
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITC' 'sip-files00036.txt'
f4f32160180bc0a0957682cf7c1190f8
b97c2b357ce30646d90198b24f00306718b62c5e
'2012-01-15T05:32:45-05:00'
describe
'8191' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITD' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
9da052df558e88cce7b3092205b172f1
60f7e017fe3aa951c341b0bd7975e08bc1a6db77
describe
'587829' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITE' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
00d50515ebafe8c801d3d8b70fb922ef
a66c36cf62a4fac4e9cfb22b41ffa75ab74ee785
describe
'143890' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITF' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
d4fa81b02c4ad4d4e4b1f90a76912f63
c5c3d9558fa2b5191c3b63f4215f44de83ea6f08
describe
'690' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITG' 'sip-files00037.pro'
3737dfffa69565b7553a6302588689ff
66b33e5ec7457e775aa716cfa708fba4010ecd6a
describe
'32853' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITH' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
9c109ce694e1466fa03dd47a51818726
f9e2ed78d9009bd59e5acf1f331ac842b719a32a
describe
'4712556' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITI' 'sip-files00037.tif'
3651c688e97489fe539ed32d626518ab
5d0e2019d7453898695d8993902ffc733109d975
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITJ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
5d2716b6a6f8b9d902c8f958cbed3fad
1f5eb2d11c610f3bfa1afef2ce67482723ce5378
describe
'8133' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITK' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
298de251a12dafb6669e50edf6a4e979
cea3b88d24454b00381a4b2e7a403b926606b434
describe
'587915' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITL' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
4a41c8b02431f33275e6b7a4ecdcb5a9
dd5e33f48b9ecafb5eb97c4b53c6797ccf1d9e59
'2012-01-15T05:34:02-05:00'
describe
'82373' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITM' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
b83cef6813bea9a3556c7c94d9a14d59
ceb051095c7c72e6cb651f66f3dbec5ba4c073be
describe
'29028' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITN' 'sip-files00038.pro'
1f7cd708b00369811eb250fc96e80b5d
fe1dc1e9b198b51061e59509847f2d0dcc1d904a
describe
'27032' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITO' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
387f06d782044e79c38d884912c1e1b1
e3fd13519df2eae83ec8f5618fdd2781ef436f95
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITP' 'sip-files00038.tif'
e13bf0ee17c1e136e2f065d37d8e6146
dc333298f9c133890c1800898349567cf7aa2d66
'2012-01-15T05:32:27-05:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITQ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
1d17c5083a8e2193bd0fab1b2498cf5e
d65ec9182eb8414b566583ef764c4c9e672f440c
describe
'7895' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITR' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
2341603386a2cd2f9868fbb2c30a8dc5
f2f3de5c4ca7e865fa9bbdd19c523fd706f2426e
describe
'587775' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITS' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
5eb052f1ccad8204bd97e8f8d684ca72
c71815cc9f9e3e28f092326724a0292be2a3ff9b
'2012-01-15T05:33:24-05:00'
describe
'153343' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITT' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
971b732e746a3833d6e4ee29830c771a
d9885a0133f8d66dc926aab6e66a4465adc3cff9
'2012-01-15T05:32:02-05:00'
describe
'618' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITU' 'sip-files00039.pro'
da507250ca43c9f9bdf8cc060dd44d0c
168a377836c825f5cbbe523abdbf9c450f646a6a
describe
'36169' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITV' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
9904f1481b93c0ad8bf4af54fcbe5b19
7e6c431bd67d60e1cc13c85aa437196e1ebd37c6
'2012-01-15T05:32:23-05:00'
describe
'4712780' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITW' 'sip-files00039.tif'
29b345bd0e5f585d0f8e2ab42bdd182f
d9e755c9569f4b09d57cf0b446bbdb8192769e6e
'2012-01-15T05:33:40-05:00'
describe
'169' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITX' 'sip-files00039.txt'
082cd01850960027ca1fc03eeecf7933
20338b3076ba6a9d4a9b9d93b59a1a9483532ed5
describe
'8594' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITY' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
d1b1f209efac66ae5beb5683dd2065f8
27c2ba2584b55ef5b0f8bc9b484b1cf07587a7eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACITZ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
66a182a5e4f59dbba8c33f1c99e0dbec
483c6d6ce7e42e132a33707c2effb1cc142745c9
'2012-01-15T05:34:35-05:00'
describe
'88423' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUA' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
5f6c62487abe1ae3eb4369ad1b2be454
120c371bfdb90132f01449e8711c8290af493502
describe
'29901' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUB' 'sip-files00040.pro'
d5a5791901adaa586864b4a1283638e9
2e3a957b66300656957217be7c108f9442edc838
'2012-01-15T05:34:14-05:00'
describe
'32849' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUC' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
baf46cfdd33e9bf9a3d72f751448fda7
8d4358e5c667ac84adbd94936dff0b855a6d25fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUD' 'sip-files00040.tif'
9a3bd082def07b4e705ffdf1d63b5835
b48372cae160e5afe8f3313e2828f11c203cfc6c
'2012-01-15T05:32:15-05:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUE' 'sip-files00040.txt'
50dd831580bde6a629433a6a978d342b
b13f4fd219b86cc5ed6e9e3b6dd484a5ffa2eefa
'2012-01-15T05:32:56-05:00'
describe
'8283' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUF' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
d93142070e70cf5e6aeaae6da6ad7c4b
6e91fac5983f49949ffe0909ef7623a9412ba378
describe
'587804' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUG' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
7b53d61a07f4932ac530782bb8ddbc7b
046cc6b8970c6f1a233601229bc329352c52267f
describe
'159526' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUH' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
388c09e91dda16fa17a7e1066ff23b8b
225a2b8b65822b53731ec2a847c8beb6d6e8ed54
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUI' 'sip-files00041.pro'
0fe0b02a248fe5e258cf6861cddbcc76
04f06df623ea326776f440ba9fbb8789fdb9691d
'2012-01-15T05:32:49-05:00'
describe
'36704' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUJ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
70472147146cdd5e6915cecf0b2906a8
0ba77df6c52b0688aeab54d5ce384999179de97b
describe
'4713012' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUK' 'sip-files00041.tif'
b9e57e96b2d1110827af95e830658105
f0d124f78f406dcf693a7cc4531309ea4e7fa1a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUL' 'sip-files00041.txt'
4d14d58b932698d88a2151bde1d1def3
acbe380b13f8c630b99a67673c97e0cf7064f173
describe
'8211' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUM' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
144a1cb11dc1d2952cf44dc70c6297a2
0be22b24e5d08a0fc3fbb0f3358c34bad1348392
describe
'587922' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUN' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
dfaa9e65fa303b3f91546dcd88dd5c47
6ab948175bf3919060c56c65d2e041809c051f76
describe
'88633' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUO' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
aad0f83be57c6403b883caac87f23fa3
57334772283c9403923ec4235379679a36f2fe0b
describe
'30723' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUP' 'sip-files00042.pro'
251d9f9e9c8d5772187ce7dcc146f72e
97507dbfb7a409781b95bb4e4f52490e8ffa6d72
describe
'34045' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUQ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
252f2d1541d11d82c04c41a895ada2be
68e66a71670d4b9c4c41687cc68930ce3946e273
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUR' 'sip-files00042.tif'
0582f837aa9ce32a0544a64fd48c133d
f05f5addd900f3253fe94ea12ff20d9e07cccf7e
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUS' 'sip-files00042.txt'
f4a25653b66d7f7ab1543addd32f16d0
b7dd0136e541eee31a2e88d4a75a3abd6ab5fcf1
describe
'8329' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUT' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
356793ffd078f86a965e2c13a38d7e7c
38312bea15646c7ed7a0dfe92bc2c9622312d188
'2012-01-15T05:34:37-05:00'
describe
'587925' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUU' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
df67ce0d546f7d777d061e9b41db175a
292f23a90c067f7561d103fc0b21d40b4a5b48e5
describe
'163476' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUV' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
a4c798fe8bc38e494b23c45152795479
855e4c59a037cb9d6df3416e4b27b5c7e0420cf8
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUW' 'sip-files00043.pro'
5a6ed84236428810645f8742748aa095
9d9cac8abc55f798a0fd85f724252bdf7c943e21
describe
'35772' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUX' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
96304f36f70a7f90554a1f7f78a2ac19
bfd1e37b18db4733912f45de1715a17d4d8803e3
'2012-01-15T05:32:35-05:00'
describe
'4712784' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUY' 'sip-files00043.tif'
eedf32a8d652f77a6f9c727920febaba
46a68e4978c7a53abe64d17531166f5c41b24dce
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIUZ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
6d1f58e717ab8b55b64915400f341cd4
0f35670c3052423932db578bed860ab983a5085a
describe
'7813' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVA' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
9c01d1aecb910dcc07b069f81852ba00
1809a5c6ada49a7eb3011e220f7711ffd97aa7b6
'2012-01-15T05:31:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVB' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
c955b3f6d2e09c32d2bb0c4c59b6c353
e1ac2b9fd79e9aded8dfb28fc2a4a718b45b7cb2
describe
'94002' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVC' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
654b41d3722e9d550b4820eae8545119
09f058fe6b7d65d9f41d81f122e61021b4712867
describe
'30788' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVD' 'sip-files00044.pro'
beb72c0e026ae91ebd13144af58c6364
a44448842273976dc61a8a2f66104842925d4d9d
describe
'27627' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVE' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
dbb847aeb5330f1826c364ca7c68064f
9927382e4d581be9ef183297b4618ac6ce3edb24
'2012-01-15T05:33:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVF' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9fed4be9e45196da25a929696ac20892
ea2d8624109faf5963fc8d2abcc4644ec6722a3c
'2012-01-15T05:34:25-05:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVG' 'sip-files00044.txt'
71730764fc22dfddbb9e23d8cf9cf81a
64b12ad1c0e14d54f748ecf49eefaf5dbe301830
'2012-01-15T05:34:52-05:00'
describe
'8694' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVH' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
3741139b58e80007dda587947f5e9169
93061a5e5c31392fe2cff458869346b111e4d7d3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVI' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
9ac927ee8dc7d4b6fb63e31e92262b6c
7a415dd3ee875299277f388f278ace887fd32100
'2012-01-15T05:33:58-05:00'
describe
'150224' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVJ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
643274f5509976bceca112946c1d79c7
e92b2e9217b8094d70957c3016ec21090a37c965
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVK' 'sip-files00045.pro'
aa7ee43f972500af14644e0969053eb7
a8e0ccd9baa2c17e92ce3821f91f8a727dc5ee82
describe
'32816' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVL' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
e18a7b025778aba31eca6b4593833297
58ea134e69e48ee5bc74a650ce7ec2ad56c9e3f9
describe
'4712392' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVM' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b91af31f88af565cb87776c714b7d4a2
eec21607be78d6d45a3a9df73ab574081fbc920b
describe
'172' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVN' 'sip-files00045.txt'
a858c7475cf13c8f578219208ac49c61
926d93086b8b5ce61ba5089a249ac2205d1fc06a
describe
'7340' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVO' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
a8d3a6f048d0209282aacd6adb8c6416
4fcdd31da704fa56a57e76d53545d62fc7d2bf46
describe
'587879' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVP' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
a3da822c6e56d304e2f5cfb9656e31cf
88e06965ef2036e1c87c79cbae0a37bcb034bc80
'2012-01-15T05:33:29-05:00'
describe
'89061' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVQ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
ec0dfa0030a25269c92fff479c738dd5
5a62647384c90ca2f4ed6a069405a24f5b44283e
'2012-01-15T05:33:23-05:00'
describe
'30446' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVR' 'sip-files00046.pro'
a689124341d7b083c0ba0cfeb7dbf896
3a5b17c5eb7de4f2fc507f11fa610014b0ae33b1
describe
'27925' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVS' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
f48be4dbad7adbe0ae7a30eeba057bcc
b6a6b0cc72ad49ba6aecc5db4e4cde752eb7fdf4
'2012-01-15T05:34:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVT' 'sip-files00046.tif'
afd554071fb13bb9f327379c3d701e28
fb49598b24695df169bc15f0065df4b0135f3c62
'2012-01-15T05:32:20-05:00'
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVU' 'sip-files00046.txt'
afb766afc182960be69e722ca9b9bb47
4e4afd2d36f93a1131d2220cdba366c973e1d3e5
describe
'8353' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVV' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
938241636af158c53d1f8990b2d42068
82162eef3636d06720aa82653f4cf1194f7ccd8a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVW' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
3a71334aea08e6f837f2426bbf82b03f
b31577d9655af0b5304516dc67cceb2a791ebc28
describe
'166222' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVX' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
ce621a6a8e8bd1f094944d3b2a0251f3
292f886352dce981f33c01a580e462ba527f3bf2
'2012-01-15T05:33:10-05:00'
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVY' 'sip-files00047.pro'
35861aa7a9b0d857ee53c28f4b281fb6
34a35209c75acce28e927de074c9596ab585143a
describe
'39749' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIVZ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
c2a1fe3e2e8162e3347408eb247b2e81
e2f029f815ecff3f707e190bcbab15056c424c2b
describe
'4713496' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWA' 'sip-files00047.tif'
768eca1688252351edc89d9be0d7795a
bfcfa873b4589f267085dc854b731ff688b11b25
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWB' 'sip-files00047.txt'
13c30ed3fa5ebbd823401acff5cf8754
d535686b80905d4dd3c61de26b31df02ce0066c6
describe
'9242' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWC' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
d43e9e2ac93ac46e5981636ff3e97901
99d9c9f36a1a2be3af76f0b7ea0c6234e59bd891
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWD' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
0d120318ba216a02964769b01c2efe1d
e8c86336755de7757617e5ef94459cd44c02203f
describe
'87395' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWE' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
26230fa487ebdd119748c09be2a751b3
5da5035450bd32fe50e5d31893f06bbc3f1ba918
describe
'30166' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWF' 'sip-files00048.pro'
c22044d852d035798fd1ac0e06beafad
8c107ac9bae0c64e9bc33b6262a6bde94c5d23d0
describe
'29264' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWG' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
ade49ca92c71d6798bf1803c05ac9bda
1bd4ad3bc28fb7d525472db524d48bb0d573766b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWH' 'sip-files00048.tif'
7161173ed55971f3860a84226a26b0e8
2375a91f6f7d2cba45a12198cdbfa8e9ecca6448
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWI' 'sip-files00048.txt'
76edabd3a4be4e70eda4c824233348e0
47e3b13a4300f0de5b7fc5340b8b551ccd93c704
describe
'8443' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWJ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
935fc5109923978077ad6b81fbf66646
0d8a2ba06982216f988edaa50493f1faaf2a7209
'2012-01-15T05:32:47-05:00'
describe
'587719' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWK' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
9066b475fb735e31e32925669f93dca4
2b7ea384c6b5432a2c9b95c0b9c5e82514eee87e
describe
'150194' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWL' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
7db84c6314cb689ecfc0a21aded5cb28
457342d50a3144ee43d30f89d2b0b5f1a0832cd7
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWM' 'sip-files00049.pro'
15949b5584967f18e1f04f056012f578
017a8c07ada3b97591ddd802284538ff0fb98c84
describe
'35878' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWN' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
55a4abc1af562ced29e549a1fdad89e1
dbd078250fa9ed17721841c90999b1ab9335c394
'2012-01-15T05:32:16-05:00'
describe
'4712812' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWO' 'sip-files00049.tif'
649fc15d25101a9f2b351aa57e12d2b9
23a6075b460e99345b85434f6f1b39ca7e408c5d
'2012-01-15T05:32:55-05:00'
describe
'187' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWP' 'sip-files00049.txt'
d1b9cb48192a3c3b6222407d4d04e3f8
22ef02abeda612014d6b6258f0b0dd5363903168
describe
Invalid character
'8381' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWQ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
138f15f645c4011c32a18079f98ade86
ede2129353732eddb272042b106bf36ec85337cf
'2012-01-15T05:33:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWR' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
f5cbe8271c6ad2930e991903ee774eee
a4cb19307899313eedd5692a6b470bc4bdb6da91
describe
'91398' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWS' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
f618bf52b2e9bb4afc40e0f9917c7111
25be614b4e1c15b410c6b7082af1dd540a7ffc56
'2012-01-15T05:33:37-05:00'
describe
'30297' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWT' 'sip-files00050.pro'
5f3576ab2604f68c304ddfd76ac5cc51
6aff264846030857b4feed82f0c8297eec194538
describe
'26921' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWU' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
591bde54bc76cf07d4eee682cf2a0922
85680c60e85d69f994b36de728054aad16dd7f30
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWV' 'sip-files00050.tif'
21c4022c635e13db09bf8a70fadeb9b5
8e26716a1dd1b1a36b9fecac6d72f448bff6bff2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWW' 'sip-files00050.txt'
1642d6eefc51e37eb54152ad34834569
43b6873a9d28fc38037558fc980a0db47e0958b6
describe
'8482' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWX' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
bff9d03050438b2e7deeb2c0cbaf4265
0a859556f5ed4dcbdcb45c05fc05fcf9b5e1e146
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWY' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
4702edd9e1dc3460f6ea9c7486715bda
34b2a16f84f10c20aad10d166e37e359b30d9b29
describe
'170974' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIWZ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
93ee1980307168ccbf155ca8a6f9f0f8
367527d2544258b52deae155db2328fcaf644d64
describe
'868' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXA' 'sip-files00051.pro'
1b66f21eccaa3c8e1fdc7ad3292a88c9
81d4e0bafde8e021f74c33f56b9b0695c06c2225
describe
'39162' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXB' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
03d6b39cae29aa0426194262f510d2f4
e5c25ec6362754ca58d9db1cebc046a8a6986081
describe
'4712580' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXC' 'sip-files00051.tif'
8f48ad4161b5cf497b3e81ad25d12d39
f5600bd9835464d2c6efeeefc40544a0da3bac60
'2012-01-15T05:32:29-05:00'
describe
'175' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXD' 'sip-files00051.txt'
a2d94674f26836d6a78b60a594cacec3
0173e192a25d7e933ded1f09dc5b8c61d8477c55
describe
'8546' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXE' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
6485054df3521352c7fd2fb26a71377e
f552009f6fd3c328020741f81ba545f8e62e2d23
describe
'587902' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXF' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
5f60e1b9c863199e8224b37385f0aa4a
20ff49316295b5348e0a24138a0cf23caaa171a6
describe
'91976' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXG' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
5154e7f291090b483def70fdff1254b5
1d39d9b2f20526b1b44e67c3f0252ef5ab652fac
describe
'29796' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXH' 'sip-files00052.pro'
4135bc18077840d6e11477cec23cade2
6bbe925fbaf07e684e767343baf2fba130292ff7
describe
'36133' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXI' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
93433556d4b79151455c600b438a2d92
e608b1881881ff5174bc319edc3b13a664713448
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXJ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
a1700c82faea88d95264fe707c7acc31
ca61158de0ef4bd37215d88492c5d104df7a7978
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXK' 'sip-files00052.txt'
83df07cb65faf5cbf164173d27dcb3b3
15b65b8a10900612a9956aa5e78555557e2c9280
describe
'8116' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXL' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
3f618e2096eb0980f987739f769e82e0
861707e4b6fb622306b19553fb31279f1fc6da03
'2012-01-15T05:32:42-05:00'
describe
'587875' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXM' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
55f12b024314233e812d73f56889d994
82871b9b3c789a970a37c93924d2f69922c50f3d
describe
'154781' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXN' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
9f7b610a0fa554409d02632836145813
b9c6791182e3c9a8d2463c302c277620f44ed4eb
describe
'669' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXO' 'sip-files00053.pro'
5bb446f005792a7af304aa94430e9577
0ecd15ba555a9edfaf9fc09e8356e941705620f1
describe
'36255' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXP' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
cef8270c88016c09c9354f7278586094
a181be7ac5d7e05c5a152ade0d21de3bc467225d
describe
'4713188' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXQ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
864ecb5338c9dad67844dc71222e549e
44cbaa1614ee9315c60f695f5fe6ccd4fc6f8ae3
describe
'145' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXR' 'sip-files00053.txt'
41b05650eea9f5fdf0eefb0e88dcd3f9
1e156c0505e13faa1d71cb7f9030ef8d55e007ce
describe
'8455' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXS' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
ec5d5dfb128640d6d76053def2033455
d9699da0ba53f48e5176cf6da3e15f26a5ad4bad
describe
'587897' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXT' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
29b4821183c26c74507b0a8c80671ef1
772e682f0fb081dbc72c760d063878e278907589
describe
'87240' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXU' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
97fe6ad52941bcb7569915833c538e47
f1765168398a370f3308c1062d6b06ff58c5d884
'2012-01-15T05:32:32-05:00'
describe
'29398' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXV' 'sip-files00054.pro'
2993c0c60c0681758ce6009741db4594
348cd657ab5109a08470100e841e33945e00ce81
describe
'27728' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXW' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
af944e6ef3baca7c13f8ac77db9aa0a9
4c15c36d282366b209315b214b2d3c5e776b11d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXX' 'sip-files00054.tif'
af477f04089e75bf8e1d5fe9c084f961
7b1feee3198a462d5cb63584b4c3b2a9a7f55570
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXY' 'sip-files00054.txt'
a5bd2724d926d4314158a175c6179dca
575b5f8089c31c7edee27c69575628d3a315e91b
describe
'8293' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIXZ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
2df6009fe0ed881bcbc291759e430a51
ffdae2c83ad7385bc11f1fa0e4f8111b91827061
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYA' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
88e38d5d0662ba7997bcba76ac2ab608
ce61a75416d242734db500db281d4581fa5911d3
describe
'164665' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYB' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
69dc18b8facaf7b70f13d6dc160524f8
6855f06dd4c914ce0b1768152dd5c03df956733d
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYC' 'sip-files00055.pro'
8839d9b2089307aee52c33652f65ba87
b6e74eb5ceaa8bcccdec440632d1a1ddd227b665
describe
'36867' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYD' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
3898296a9b68fbc16b335a662a67b9e1
7d00571789fe2cf199495ba3f2250e9553782c1d
describe
'4712904' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYE' 'sip-files00055.tif'
70e6ba01849d1772c421d28bc29a18fe
d69329439cf21b2b2958b18de02f6e45c15ddcf9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYF' 'sip-files00055.txt'
7c040f4ecf825d1812676c8116a8ae96
833dc6d800aee22eb72d72ff160953361980dbd8
describe
'8126' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYG' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
26047fb7c2ff6d4f2a77be74607dde39
eb2f3306cd29c176a47304423200007fd8eca34e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
3c13078bfb52ca296fe15aaff4c00097
dbb4c8044b6b44bd80bc68ae6e86ba7e423a5e25
describe
'90046' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYI' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
0c59e70612a28d978e44e603c80a1b53
924b8ee204e09e6fd9eca0a1d55082c7bc780f43
describe
'30432' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYJ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
9cc1ad1604180973455c05b3c82bcfce
26a2d9ade585ec93b8360ed757f260b806f0c4f8
describe
'29397' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYK' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
7daa1553d23d474f4cc624a88c235c27
ff38384027b70f236e45f246550ea0f7a980d6a5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYL' 'sip-files00056.tif'
2da9338a0f0ff497269ee6317a982985
a6c43e77e6d7ff57d9c7fd4ec094475880682ae0
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYM' 'sip-files00056.txt'
884468d6f2d269482361a752ea7efd1c
12fdcef170a90126e3da7c653dde5df2b273e555
describe
'8452' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYN' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
a56546d5d0301916a379946ccdc20505
3aafc15b2e50ba05d789c2d1802499159defa976
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYO' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
5019cc5e2d9f547d0171dbc896807c7f
00a2375b3c0d8220ddddba4f3d867aa488ea3163
describe
'171740' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
d2c129d17fb5c61abe756b0736c87dde
11fb3ad0aae5e660fbe544a398ef8650a557983c
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYQ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
c08d83a4e3f58f991af1c92011f720b7
2918b84689928b95d33c59d64414330c06dd69e5
describe
'40638' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYR' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
8235b400b486d2036e79b7a6ef7d290e
aa51261f23398e0e128945cecb7105d4af218f2e
describe
'4713324' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYS' 'sip-files00057.tif'
2a5afb171faa375a1f32d177bd8cb956
61c496cf6353225a1a1910be9babcf48a36b3967
describe
'138' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYT' 'sip-files00057.txt'
39d134edb15db6e673b8b12996974597
dc6f5e6efb345df8bb23414b60739e956da00fae
describe
'8945' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYU' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
14d089c759a46131c5b8214ee633e1cb
457624c5e0d47364da133f32a1ae6daa66d75fe5
'2012-01-15T05:34:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYV' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
d874cad67e399c63d677f4941f7748b7
6150f557d62650f9386ec4a38e28c277ff8353e0
describe
'90570' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYW' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
9c5e711d60d7d2a4181ecc5386101cc3
8d72d3ea672b9217f7e916dd9067d29c7a023443
describe
'29668' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYX' 'sip-files00058.pro'
ad818e7baf835f32ecc045ebdd8ceade
41ab38afd9afc29cf7fcef84c7bd8d4f7f74a8f1
describe
'35560' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYY' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
1f343f3607669936cd9427b8ac6014c9
1fc696bc9b848297a1b955e439dade4115aca153
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIYZ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
6562375561fa866057481cb7b10b5f83
44177778c43bf24095524cff4af30eb80aaa97eb
'2012-01-15T05:34:49-05:00'
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZA' 'sip-files00058.txt'
ab9ed68d70997cea00fad5d2ab5c44f6
40ecd075e384104c75c6cc7fd3bb19ff68a80b58
describe
'8262' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZB' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
680987eb4ab2467432f6f768017fd274
2d314547e7d590b102d8bf150eb94abc0159c59a
describe
'587840' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZC' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
83295d63aafaa8b08004e657439b93a8
bea143aa1d0e0f15dd31adc248c20b920ca11a56
describe
'180674' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZD' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
6ff73052c3be7b9df10cbf86074c8ce5
70b0889728d2f671adc2f3fc8f5025f2735e66eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZE' 'sip-files00059.pro'
103ad32a09573218427af1e2838e60e3
e56ac2dd9fecde90bebb0a95aa09604e23791af7
describe
'39959' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZF' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
27d1b7a2c09bb32919e1c4eb8f40c09a
00462556d70caf1cfb98e7cc5bd791be177c9a8e
describe
'4713320' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZG' 'sip-files00059.tif'
d829b8a5d1b719dd578f2d8f4ce63929
061ddea43c353778cc664004369f7dd8cabc10b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZH' 'sip-files00059.txt'
59f4374f83b0c34663dafb9bcd3dce0a
68625c728b2875179d3ccb6b577a5cdf836f4b38
describe
'8923' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZI' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
2f007c74cef9ce223ab191127b0a0716
7d9f1ec41c3448a2e2c1285329392a94bca45e35
describe
'587877' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZJ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
89bbfb2ebbbbb7405900c97dd08bc324
91df83e5b2f636a3d159018060a80e65b9d6a0d6
describe
'90831' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZK' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
bcb1ad6e8704576705aa9716e15a2497
916e6918e08d2dc82098c92652816baced4597a0
describe
'29518' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZL' 'sip-files00060.pro'
437122dbf0ce0a8979e67d4b1de2adcf
5e1ec9eae5afe7b8192be58ed4a2f99b462f90e2
describe
'32936' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZM' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
e6e27ccd57467c7f505e532f7b541ce2
7163e29915a3a6d668b2d18aee0d102a7c7943b8
'2012-01-15T05:34:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZN' 'sip-files00060.tif'
ca4c827d50af3242acfbfdc45cca1bff
e94ac736b364494d0c491c09206c9061d1c6f775
'2012-01-15T05:34:29-05:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZO' 'sip-files00060.txt'
40b3c519fc90866006fd75209686cf0c
98da9c53e2ecddcd8f87f941907c5f21403d8acf
describe
'7961' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZP' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
e6dd66030cccec14d78cb48a74520fb7
417962dadf724503f465d1f76546b16a2f88945e
describe
'587876' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZQ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
3660f3a6d387ec14c0bbcb496f2bba1d
fa94efce6b679b736719981138c12cb28a87cdf2
'2012-01-15T05:32:41-05:00'
describe
'149928' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZR' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
7d52576201e2b26fb3c0be84e0033c41
4772d65b90eff177a5394e5827f2d9a1786cbde2
describe
'1834' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZS' 'sip-files00061.pro'
44ce5de954770b249d54dae785ab832d
f3f6c03f46af8192ef55604c7e2355b77bad7e7d
describe
'34862' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZT' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
ae9c84014e37bd2143ed3f60948c07a3
17d8fe1b79f7ade41738942d1d5db6c8e5b9813e
describe
'4713316' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZU' 'sip-files00061.tif'
2f9c032109e01521464a9d9da64ed82b
bc68b7b2626cc84eec2f5a3d12a6afbdf83b4a1b
describe
'109' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZV' 'sip-files00061.txt'
777ef663ebc32a574f4aefc027367dbc
a0aed2f097e871154406a37b78c212f2e40f8361
describe
Invalid character
'8471' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZW' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
1927c2ac780e1633c8199fce1d95d80e
a2f70d300c24d618412e9e3343fafaa7f69afaf0
describe
'587907' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZX' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
5a42b646570a0c723ba198cfbfb973c8
c99bb57ffa4eb9e2d4d16e4cdba162b3b440dd6d
describe
'91873' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZY' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
c0d696472d32685faedcf3e2fc91fdb7
ba01a8401a6e293a0f041b2b0566791087aaac46
describe
'30791' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACIZZ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
3c70fa8a5f8740a6e5bbd7d36eac68b2
c6a2895f5e5c29e902980b49181ed07401475a5b
'2012-01-15T05:34:43-05:00'
describe
'32114' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAA' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
0afc0b0ebbb49b92ae0ad161013f1e4c
48958f4ccb0a431a2bdbfdd1287a36d6db84c6d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAB' 'sip-files00062.tif'
b9d67f3baa4c7123d216989745d43f9c
4dffbd5c2fdab8fe628b36737034962e1c8b20e1
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAC' 'sip-files00062.txt'
cc13d0b9ab8d79a85610825d9325b255
82ff0fe54deda0f893b654cc8101af164fd250bd
describe
'8420' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAD' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
603e56343645b1df97710a4e5eb2ab14
bcb19ec2787b6f0461571972fb184acb7e313910
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAE' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
7d8e6d912f8e526098a32cdd10c61712
18e1894c9ecd89ef35ddecbd43920cb1cce2f890
describe
'158726' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAF' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
8312146aff054c8ff43e27750aea2894
d85af01dcea18ad0ce0d56da1ef3148f3c46b231
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAG' 'sip-files00063.pro'
830a6b0e4a72d95c81cc399c622f9d3a
94b09f1a5fa6e0604be392a913be59848b381b40
describe
'35730' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAH' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
33700c6d396808d4520f110ee764f5be
01423f9747cdad15c8849ad63363e90c28b13c09
'2012-01-15T05:32:12-05:00'
describe
'4713300' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAI' 'sip-files00063.tif'
54c31e1436586790e9a96472bcd2cd2f
0935653c41673be7a2fb734e8ca29606fd24cf4e
'2012-01-15T05:31:58-05:00'
describe
'283' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAJ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
5d7c953765e2ef0508e364dd6bd9fabf
b8457c493444dfa38bd32717047fe5f65d0f7880
describe
'8303' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAK' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
7180d6a8684e12378bde7997271fc969
c8fd40e6c54cba4fde74bf79724bb82e0f4ce146
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAL' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
c1cee343bc347dac6e13b73171fb86ba
556e57ebf04344d4f48ea732137f1f5c9eb53a43
describe
'91742' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAM' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
a221662924993671490bcbc4fd4b0a43
ea5fda570eab691c16b1d6de474c2bc5f19a95a9
describe
'30489' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAN' 'sip-files00064.pro'
edbe6da1a55e954cf7710c0d5d66497e
ffdce64453b7b8efa44d58c0eac64c58391e479c
describe
'34092' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAO' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
c8c65048e04dcd8fcf375eb18ebc0eb0
0fb15572d86a938adde3364ebc6acf5a7f6c8d78
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAP' 'sip-files00064.tif'
a3134ebcb04cda24815ea1747df57fc1
082c140b152db3b54c1b3577604b14874a8bfd5d
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAQ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
3226bd2e5d08bccb6700834c54d7f712
bfbba9d1126a322f20a9cc9968dc54f8c89741c8
describe
'8334' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAR' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
fcd54bf4191205217297640e78728acc
1189f12447888d264aead4d20a41c0b9b6edad23
describe
'587807' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAS' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
8c0e933876f2f61fc994d5baf1279b69
3e026fdd97a78f70a012d0518671d03a375886fb
describe
'177265' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAT' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
0ea248307cfa95a3730f913c5e1b9726
5bfe0489e11584656bd005c1ca43503a868a85d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAU' 'sip-files00065.pro'
d84779d3213c51b354c344653ca0bdcc
2a3d6367d1c6a40a015edb2c2885945517017373
describe
'40408' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAV' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
9bf621577fca395bbef3147aeef7f0d8
2f96c0cd0cca4f70c3166ffad97c74d4da5b6d94
describe
'4713296' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAW' 'sip-files00065.tif'
1c014830e6614be15d7e6aa838cd2782
c34cecaa1dba851d7ceaf257c680e397defdfc27
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAX' 'sip-files00065.txt'
4e3da7639945564bdbc42dcd055f0418
a3f64cb5f8b080b247df2629fdf648f18c4310c8
describe
'8966' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAY' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
041aa865a3f97510e3e8e118686c4fb4
0b5e800d3fa5eff192b9096e3e04aac7396120c0
describe
'587883' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJAZ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
9fa41e9aa450c1574e5031af20115556
4fd0ce21e28dacf11be44e5b43b1e50511a4ca7c
describe
'93998' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBA' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
b49695f9ea450a7f86dacb4d9d5a94fb
e5f4b6c302354c857ff036efafad4e6761f59730
describe
'31007' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBB' 'sip-files00066.pro'
c5ff8f53a66854ac977844bb0c1bdb35
3050d06ca756191b2282a816e6c29cad2927a0a7
describe
'34507' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBC' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
899d58ab956826108d591832bce11949
18a864462afd623002539f2de3f9bf36bdf67d13
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBD' 'sip-files00066.tif'
924b98149fcaa936d05881c9004ee9d7
f7c8d0b6fbc6be91959e3b56d6ba8c5be45da0df
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBE' 'sip-files00066.txt'
f809698d8fa775002409d317da6b6599
cf9acfde7d417013d2977e18acee2052aba7f6d6
describe
'8490' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBF' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
64974f8cf94486e1dee8b77327176b86
fa6ec0ad7e0f74db74d35345a956a72b26b6d879
describe
'587837' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBG' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
9da696cab53dd03a71bd8266ca4ab214
b353d6a6cdc6f6f7de49866ecf366f5949225fa4
describe
'167686' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBH' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
0840d40c89957eec9968f625752f853b
03dc27dc6ef484cc261a8080f11a2aef50f55250
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBI' 'sip-files00067.pro'
126b5140788285169142cb1ba147cb19
042e6b854bb781ba57ffd581c1531b5dbc075bdb
describe
'36540' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBJ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
d56e839085c157f863d9657001715880
45f51f982c26dfed5845a67caa9f1d42c95781ed
describe
'4712816' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBK' 'sip-files00067.tif'
091e80cfcc504e16091db4617e17ac54
766f26c99a91f9d914a13ae32f87e941559d63ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBL' 'sip-files00067.txt'
79eea17291063c720a491b93f7fe001d
c69e47c1796f3d27c39fc23a74026a233e5eb8d1
describe
'8051' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBM' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
e6cd00257827cc53f315c1ca263ba511
baca17abcb51fad45330374ae14fe34c4420499a
describe
'587923' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBN' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
c44f696ef2869129c50ba080268fddbe
087e2bd14309cca91ca28def7236a04be69a1755
describe
'92210' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBO' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
b7e577d7dae8417c698903d123e96005
808347be24464e04e84a600057caabf29614efd8
describe
'30717' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBP' 'sip-files00068.pro'
432bedbb132fc94c99b85adbf3232733
7f757bb9924060baa6836f525e22d2c2f7b62231
describe
'27471' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBQ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
7ef95b261a126aa6a17ef1e6d438e92f
c79e8c52b8d9af43efa20bdad6adaef1ba5d8926
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBR' 'sip-files00068.tif'
2eed8d5a129cf97b16deadbb5561807d
7dc25e196e0ff6e243085ce1a337864313a01e27
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBS' 'sip-files00068.txt'
0c636d8d5f14aac3ffdf25df0f160b0f
82d3ac73aaccf017b627d3aa322b21940f16db85
describe
'8613' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBT' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
16020532a2f9c9676bc702444e0f743c
2bd40c16743404c0c13fe52bee034066a6bed85a
describe
'587799' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBU' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
073579ace15b6f6ee7124ad9c234e7e4
8e839dfea393aacbdc36e4731526cfc908925db3
describe
'152694' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBV' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
9f1d0618560bcf3cd99e488e1b1890bc
76d8be22ad9b3dce981d1e7ac974e02726be8f18
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBW' 'sip-files00069.pro'
e8659c97a43c1a91f9deb5ad949eeef5
13e3e2f95a643d23ac400ec61630b201c07f5e5a
describe
'35737' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBX' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
07d9164578ab27ab6b981aa65ca5531f
a8d52dc426c908b0d07f907a233201abfcaa6a3d
describe
'4712572' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBY' 'sip-files00069.tif'
fde5412c15e67fcf009759d976b45d6a
acef6ea35528d7f02c14bd7ed69d33cb1ca8497a
describe
'248' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJBZ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
bddafcd3a5f2942edbfa72c51db83c0c
d24aee584c52df5521c4339f4b838fdd3e5f6eb6
describe
'8364' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCA' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
65b44108b102d746c23ad408e3335d36
d91ee9d17908c2f31b9246b4c4e355d3bbe5c321
describe
'587846' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCB' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
4cd5637c235a9d192535425fb60acdc3
dd92b202affad3a9dba5263c0db7426d05113c4f
describe
'90565' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCC' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
fe63f740bf5c2dff69b77fa6402d8012
300fb72213168a49a1bbc2fadf2054ebf3b4b1e1
describe
'30037' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCD' 'sip-files00070.pro'
1c25bd47ae578cf2f10ad5b07f06598d
ce4b9fe1edddc6f7994c47fe2442e6e31bbf1a23
describe
'34571' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCE' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
8fece8f488af7ea5fd2f622075c3e91e
29d4ccaad91d2e9a5961fe75a8ceb715b9758dba
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCF' 'sip-files00070.tif'
98afdfe422c8bd6562dbe754bc21dcfb
5064b0cda0febaf3f6d27f697a5e3b195312ced8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCG' 'sip-files00070.txt'
3083fb3d1e0e98fb3a3442bf2408fa1d
d3ce29c12c984cdc212ec03733208010ddc9990b
describe
'8278' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCH' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
370de76df233c1a6b672b7af9b314cab
b8116a9dc1f5d0d1d81ec31ab0dc1e5c7ca3f668
describe
'587830' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCI' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
43ae9d375bbbc584049bf30df1adfc7b
b87186e1e86896df9f8ce8b6e0916a903fcd5b4c
describe
'179075' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCJ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
fcd2e5f3a20fa471dab49fd82d8e41fb
b0d66443139558180a3f954bb9c61c548f1427f7
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCK' 'sip-files00071.pro'
8e127c92306a897a55d773b39fc19c90
60eed71530701d9196d05091e1151271934100ec
describe
'41146' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCL' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
a1ed51feb1f8a38bd3a2e38156e0d646
29977b64f5c70bc406521f0d4a18df2cd0db2a61
describe
'4713520' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCM' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b7adf8ab0a9ede4a8e19a4e802ed8968
d7a96c37f82521bc4ecd79867eb541842f382689
describe
'99' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCN' 'sip-files00071.txt'
92660339863cd15f9090082e2bc669eb
5a3359e16478d76e95435ffa2210f3b7b926ca46
describe
'9320' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCO' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
2a61d600eceb077bd3e51b6ca9053714
7138d179c88b06c33294ba9b901076979dbb340d
describe
'587910' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCP' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
569daa479224a90ca9091d09f8c73b71
766648adc8bcd4f0fad3a3485b2d0868aa6d6910
describe
'90961' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCQ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
fe454f45f5a6a070a08711488457a6a3
4922f35c32ee9d52c1356ffae474999568230a0e
describe
'30174' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCR' 'sip-files00072.pro'
c3df995d3d940aae2e27ce13117d2d81
5da80b987c2abcd12a81e60010851ec188ce3c03
describe
'30253' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCS' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
c49671a4593a60a9c4f5823ec7c9a678
f7079c945230e3ddc206e7535a7711af267d9d16
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCT' 'sip-files00072.tif'
5c9550d06582fd1b21fa314c0eab4bc7
cb5d814a73a214e253a24301c44d5a6fe70ab1c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCU' 'sip-files00072.txt'
b219ceca3c7e4da653e6129f6f7070a8
4df2fd265f9fa8f4a049c727c7521f096aa727b9
describe
'8255' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCV' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
748138f046562d9153c7746596d7019c
e83d8d1e9e06754000fcfb939b6e4b157bcf9a6f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCW' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
0a78e3977569c7b9a980d96999a9dc95
329ef9aeb29328c78cc83b8e4793cfa1235e6db5
describe
'157753' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCX' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
150e7e18fc010ffc57d3b470f3bab74c
2e78f97a488bd2cd29a78484615a1856f861beb0
describe
'643' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCY' 'sip-files00073.pro'
37dbeccdab164e058dbb80763de61150
5290afe59a470a27fdc2e79dd79e4fd929909658
describe
'36607' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJCZ' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
8fd9cdd43289e00aaf7aaf79d7558526
61448d0ea5cffcd4e541c5e71b7966299edf2fd8
describe
'4713116' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDA' 'sip-files00073.tif'
237bcc5b28ed3631f5762580610e2d0f
c5ea0f621ef0b6f291d24b58db81ebda6a4b8926
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDB' 'sip-files00073.txt'
5a0225549e696fc274b2c42ed004c70c
35eecb45e3b01a96ee7e74595f0f9f70bdf79952
describe
'8654' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDC' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
fcb8eafea02191a3f7149ab37ece9a49
6fcf168edfe40c8bf0a8ecb84792e216b828de85
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDD' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
e5befce2a964cc545b81a4199634ca19
00f5f6f9382e31ba9ebfe8987f92892725d60d99
describe
'91586' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDE' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
4eeaccdfa01eac6a8b39bfbc649fdc2a
5cb50a7c4bec928174372133d5ff0e9c754d43f4
'2012-01-15T05:33:19-05:00'
describe
'30079' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDF' 'sip-files00074.pro'
77d1a033a8bb850a0236e25ea038e714
16c37337e1958aad448fb63bb033aec92c9e7568
describe
'27674' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDG' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
dc7045a2c6e6dcc8d4fa748163090713
bf005ab2398773486f955b58f19596924c3c4517
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDH' 'sip-files00074.tif'
889e10a53d8a0c752285ff58574bb801
cebe5d6f2e6ed7cccff9a8e6dda795f42518869b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDI' 'sip-files00074.txt'
b772f7bb83796cc5ac1b5c26941a510c
6c83d94829ebd50a4672892dec29f89c5e4d5a7b
describe
'8196' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDJ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
14a6f434f9563684ea1215e9b86918a0
f1243e4aff91e5523534647abc5d56dbf61aa354
describe
'587844' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDK' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
14dd25e061abe36440997c0bc94e8a5c
467914eb504b1150956132dd72f7cf83658e5123
describe
'145935' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDL' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
6828278bb2e5628145bde5b843507500
b3a73d5bcdfc5a6c9395578387362121f36e8acd
describe
'668' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDM' 'sip-files00075.pro'
bf2703a843c7a660736236a23d89a21d
f0e136170540405eb73da43a0ada23b067a7fe50
describe
'33113' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDN' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
1338a6ea781ddc4111882c0792f275f9
9627be78f41e2e82af97a1ef9e2ffec98bc17507
describe
'4712200' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDO' 'sip-files00075.tif'
eb97418afea2ce8062431ef9271cec7a
bad9ef1269e6429f49144120edd064cd9260dced
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDP' 'sip-files00075.txt'
1bf66190a029469ad830b66e87d4e8d9
bca4b0a5528eeebb36feab0ff44dd6cf58ef8619
describe
'7808' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDQ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
54eb7696126824fcb928e3305d999064
ac2a572635099cc8e87d0b9bf8225a64a50577c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDR' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
2fcb66d9d56563fbf2b99f7a44d881a2
bb7f12d44175a9bf1188e2a7d540f2c89df55bdd
describe
'86508' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDS' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
bd5d077a1a941ad5d62dee5aae66d719
8e07798ef3f66d3e69361c17d4e144efb4ecdcd6
describe
'30367' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDT' 'sip-files00076.pro'
11209459eeb0aeaff632d89281a02646
6ce40341babfd84af628daf12a76fa5fba45aac2
describe
'28455' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDU' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
6bac2a338f002d5b04c7a3f1c184e0a0
a131da87b3e68e1e8f7daef9ceaeb454eb57607e
'2012-01-15T05:33:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDV' 'sip-files00076.tif'
cffa7247bdcb419616d4c093ca8aa44e
f71093ecf5329412b09b9a7268b3ff6d39f4bb5a
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDW' 'sip-files00076.txt'
438b38cae0a5a92261e57531eeebcedc
f02e5e3f24f20823eeb1c2d2cb829a4f4847452f
describe
'8427' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDX' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
1dc2ef2090c95318fcc67b3176737324
ed3a4e79ca64434e01532c6319d5d0959d6d17be
describe
'587818' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDY' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
09f153184dcf8ae05bb37153b24e6cbb
b22ecd472fee7847d4a214ff0ec9ed8015dd20bd
describe
'152796' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJDZ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
8938ff21c86e996530f4c54d25c6e34f
d0491faeec01fe9029e8286f1f25d553178ca7c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEA' 'sip-files00077.pro'
f371dff01d7fac3ea405c460ca1ec73f
1d515305dbb1df131106a483ff21c5939e6af6bc
describe
'34262' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEB' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
f83f5540cec61b9ae51be6bc04ad3af4
0a46932893c6ef693cb21a3dd9720a94da515d36
describe
'4712916' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEC' 'sip-files00077.tif'
562f0875a57ffc0e470554d0e9554cb4
87294d52315e80027be95911cf290e3e6720ab5f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJED' 'sip-files00077.txt'
79e073a10cc1750af78ef4122ca3a65c
d8813e370a0c465795117e4e71e8c9db238fff38
describe
'7883' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEE' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
a9a67220a1288f42db95b75a31a66fcc
9f73da69cb1b5f45fc5a5094abfe6eb93cc1c848
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEF' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
2588f941d8e9d85643d664cdb26db356
38202cf1118a06b4bb3d7fd2e2c8ed26b10dfe06
describe
'89088' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEG' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
eea5c988776d5226de22ca91c9747d91
d5028a26124a1285387ae19a0c8a6eada9bc21cb
describe
'29926' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEH' 'sip-files00078.pro'
60c47dd708b674dfbbfe4d4cef787acc
bab643e4f91c33391c7b519d1b9f6ceea6cec301
describe
'27457' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEI' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
b5cfad627e3188db579bc5c141a02300
fcb4ec1c25f8c86f74e05c82f7b64cb36389d304
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEJ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
58c0d58c55c5050d0cfe4e052e9dd5f8
37e288c5d29b4b831c9472c5af71d3845cea7dff
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEK' 'sip-files00078.txt'
efa50e2855a082b7b29c174eae69877d
013a2f94e932acd9e195d3197853a40f6d4f64d4
describe
'8433' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEL' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
8aeb16775dd1b8feb661654bf3ba5312
1f8e6c5bbec0e6931656a651470704dc86225c02
describe
'587904' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEM' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
6890ffbf982be402e8234b374cce1b0c
bd30090ffa06b43a22a4575fc09ea800b000efb4
describe
'153339' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEN' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
d4fa404f29e33644f59a01e53562fbd0
9b2f17714770ce63099c10d60512746b21520631
'2012-01-15T05:33:56-05:00'
describe
'768' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEO' 'sip-files00079.pro'
f50f5fad6728484786fb335c719bc9e7
a08bd05c3cde411d512cd71b3e1fc0c0b783979a
describe
'35816' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEP' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
836e9e1946e88e89a3dfee94072cfa4f
7187ba337f789597a36ba7aca75a553035a697b2
describe
'4712748' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEQ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
b8072221673df669da4f328532985761
bae4f0a694c66b65dc8dd8aeec91fb6ea5c41cf2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJER' 'sip-files00079.txt'
3c9d06caa1be94d19d7c40e520dea8a4
e81ee92294ce603256b61645857a494031e02736
describe
'8388' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJES' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
c9f44f792f5b74f33bcbab2c4b435c3a
ffdb411028376f638c79be8418a6948c23e71a98
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJET' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
bf419c905366855f792118cc3f343ce5
f2be88f88abb297d3154692b826a27fc0d99560d
describe
'82908' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEU' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
8bf41ee8335bbe2cdff0c7f021d0ced0
262badbc1fda442c6adf1d01963e4df64c9d7071
describe
'29733' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEV' 'sip-files00080.pro'
3332c419e7340a9aa3514132897b5c5a
856a8a5f9ba23d972aee0bd1751a11e8164871d0
describe
'25632' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEW' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
8b37d48afcca2bc3c34909944a96e8af
c46f5d69cc16f285b4b65510b80ee4746c9649bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEX' 'sip-files00080.tif'
cc49d7ff3cc4d3652760dc97e766c489
c942018a61f8f93b7ab9f55f582c9c6608d343b3
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEY' 'sip-files00080.txt'
9cce270092ed168b84597edf71863172
08dac695db14e9513d1775c74901a84e26f08188
describe
'7994' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJEZ' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
45e841e483ffdd66c92281a667e0ee5f
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describe
'587892' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFA' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
7a94eb84f2fb8438304cce1fd4446d75
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describe
'143893' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFB' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
0b45f2dc98f9eab4c26359745c585b17
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describe
'3525' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFC' 'sip-files00081.pro'
8cb08cb01c7c6de45c55af5bde6398c3
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describe
'33454' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFD' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
3f163b518c3839f74142cb837fb10f1d
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describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFE' 'sip-files00081.tif'
b7d48b127fbf2efdaf31f976a2cdb475
7ff34115b7829f394f7d39c1765acc3ffe575009
describe
'372' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFF' 'sip-files00081.txt'
1d8b313d3a8220429b9b15221d7c8a97
4dd7b98adbd8e2642d2a579f72e3cd51cc78d9a5
describe
Invalid character
'7547' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFG' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
b53d4fff7e24741da8957c46f883e2e0
591e400151713f103372075d2e45151ed1a50fe1
describe
'587693' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFH' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
224f362fe9efeacb2936d1cc79fef81e
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describe
'87361' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFI' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
d528774e1124e7fc4d5ab6f916bc8559
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describe
'30112' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFJ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
a160b541131bb6976c7f5fde77baec6f
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describe
'32200' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFK' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
6baa8fc1141d6fe25be730ded17506e2
5d09a43dcc9ec4d6468bf85786f05ffac9d34a66
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFL' 'sip-files00082.tif'
2aaf8a832df0637fdfe09a5f21fab9f3
087ec189bcc2ac386f936cff3dbcfeb830f6e22d
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFM' 'sip-files00082.txt'
0f0b62a72a20c34d4ee596e9feee478e
8192cc6a967f70b2d8eb7e30e251d389653bb6ca
describe
'8008' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFN' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
243300e8c6b143743172521a12947ca1
8c4f7db41d63dd5af9b51f99b1053cc2f2652f8a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFO' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
b1333af8bda29ab8e8f28cf98f558036
0f586a7155b25a8347530132cf204472acde813a
describe
'160018' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFP' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
fc1ac5ff317d095b0b0ebd6a220ec8c0
0b913151935cf4634ce83958f11ab25ea9d5b201
describe
'4161' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFQ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
3318ea8729a04992360f56b3a18849f7
83bc2564dc1c46295335edba5fa4d0964d93e11f
describe
'38650' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFR' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
550e0687865e29ce2de976d6be5ba25f
670d83e136c82e3cfb2eb15268b8186ce8bbe227
describe
'4713528' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFS' 'sip-files00083.tif'
ddbf63f4c8f74e235a94226ebee40d2c
903be567850ecf7608c2f28ff33a5ba8df64f38b
describe
'478' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFT' 'sip-files00083.txt'
4347b2f25a8b8bdb990c41c6fc51cd33
abea065da3a25b56412316bde2d12418503a4972
describe
Invalid character
'8927' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFU' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
ae9c05b4e0c0a122d415319bc2306e3e
80e4f3f525d6629fff4146d8296ecebd037805e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFV' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
ad4e8279c48ccba30f9e33bb2a94f118
9238d791a89f3be873457d025999b257de18284d
describe
'81489' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFW' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
608eba99bf5bc2437a2e2a1a8c4d8e1a
b1f9e5b00eba6b3a4a2838d1669bc5632e6d0f2e
describe
'29384' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFX' 'sip-files00084.pro'
1764b6893c91c4330bb2492f188b737c
1998209165d6768cfe6b23fea25bc026316f58c3
describe
'32256' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFY' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
e241ed5eeca982ba335f386c596925ce
b20c6d34c3c490f32d7d08b24fbc3240e3d9e8bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJFZ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
4a105ac23ed49f37ad09f0a7ef3cafa4
b109654a9c9063629facc69f53aef24775b6cf6c
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGA' 'sip-files00084.txt'
cc7cc031fc3bb557a5000072235463a6
104824af7cd0f9383cccef5a7ba0c379ef3ee4b7
describe
'7962' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGB' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
91e2cb3f073bf8d00aa3990ce81efd7c
2db21584a3b4dc2dc741baae81e1ca51c046ff16
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGC' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
e587c161289acde8022ebd16c3f1fe7c
1f38942ddf55d25048c0e5774b6bc01827c4fe6d
describe
'143724' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGD' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
921c7c1bd33b9de76f8a93337a95ee6e
42ac910799eda37d5f5fe54e4870fcb167565fac
describe
'107110' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGE' 'sip-files00085.pro'
89c71ddffa0f378a079e5fe1b248c7ee
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describe
'35573' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGF' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
94905d0c6616192fb58fe416ecdb6cf0
7ec97203b4f2bbc6f3f0b76bfc410d48cc808de6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGG' 'sip-files00085.tif'
82b5e2c1212d2be15f4914c1abc2e4c0
ebb3daa78aaa7fb705210806fa8f833cbe846675
describe
'4705' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGH' 'sip-files00085.txt'
e726f19e7174b9fc64ecec636bd64c9f
e17ab4e25f7918a2397fd326aa7cb5000ddc8a40
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGI' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
7f3d799dfc4d06f3b02f50fdf2682dae
e9af123e49f89b3b8c49ba4dcd588cc313790b23
describe
'587872' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGJ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
07be7de667a1520383a82df527373290
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describe
'143955' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGK' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
7406b228fdca4088187834b690b07f02
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describe
'113413' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGL' 'sip-files00086.pro'
a32b16dad13556af159337bb10bccb7f
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describe
'32177' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGM' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
c2610f4675d7153755cea2f3b8ca8e3c
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describe
'14117200' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGN' 'sip-files00086.tif'
7dee4a4c1ab0181564e04bfb8b947fa2
ac168320a3650ed9d6786e886bd13b1dec42d2e9
describe
'4980' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGO' 'sip-files00086.txt'
cc540212716c9861ec91349b798e2d53
633fde93713b93b65c04f4063f0da33620310947
describe
Invalid character
'7224' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGP' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
d8d319243384728ab5e3ecbc91d2b739
677a99d48abd11104c72d587d91ac4d8ec4fc4f2
describe
'587825' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGQ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
c73f1ec8ce683f12074667cedfad299a
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describe
'132834' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGR' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
a03d52442c872a0b1509199049dbb5aa
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describe
'86169' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGS' 'sip-files00087.pro'
5e401768794c7c7c7f44f71a7260dd48
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describe
'31125' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGT' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
6aeb5f3fc8aba1134264da1643f9232e
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describe
'14117244' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGU' 'sip-files00087.tif'
8f7d68cea9e50717e9eb5e2653344018
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describe
'3953' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGV' 'sip-files00087.txt'
3907d1e3b76db0c7f4420fe72aa037a5
3645dcca134ca30f70256528a5adbb209dd4c2e4
describe
Invalid character
'7209' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGW' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
68f36925828b4219983e5011a3bc3e47
50284cc03edbeac403041bd1dec99a8fdf088baf
describe
'661780' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGX' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
bb7b161f28d9c3c803f8de5117f7cf42
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describe
'139311' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGY' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
8be8bedb63cde04faa0aa2719391102e
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describe
'45051' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJGZ' 'sip-files00088.pro'
2153e4bc0ed4f11f88a9613fb33b601e
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describe
'32236' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJHA' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
5ca6177521186adcdef0d7581b555533
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describe
'15892476' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJHB' 'sip-files00088.tif'
71ff95108c426546afa1fdb0929a1fb1
20e1aff75550d66dcc7b7ae5d3b65766b90be932
describe
'2789' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJHC' 'sip-files00088.txt'
01ac79489d9e84308bc8fffbef6dc2f0
a32058d591e64e4d534bb690deae958b7d5a001c
describe
Invalid character
'7826' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJHD' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
ab3cb51d855ae9a82392081163e75290
d6bf88f3a2ab7021fc727f28b0729250fcbb8ba7
describe
'150646' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJHE' 'sip-filesUF00086086_00001.mets'
94ec571780cd86162965cfd0ff1fd27d
2a0a4a3f551cc9fa0f9a351ea3f3972a81c46c24
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T04:09:29-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'191499' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACGfileF20090316_AACJHH' 'sip-filesUF00086086_00001.xml'
90a14bf1835550c643b34e2a114e7566
bd9ccf67da507b41f6bf8038f81c2941be6c7b3f
describe
'2013-12-13T04:09:31-05:00'
xml resolution





E.
a
5
a
é


Soe Good a 2 Keey, and Speciat
proficiency, im

Suring ty far Posi 0 Li hif.. PLLA.

“Take fast hold of THatvaclion Jet hi freee eee ae her; for she mi
4 T3-

me



“FRISBY & CO.,.Te




























































































(p. 80.)

PHIL’S BRAVE DEED.
ALL SORTS OF ADVENTURES









Twentyefirst Thousand

CASSELL ann COMPANY, Eimrren
LONDON, PARIS & MELBOURNE

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


”
‘

First Edition Junz 1887.

1890, 1394, 1897.

3

Repriniea June 1883
CO hi a Nis:

SHEPHERD AND HIS CHILD, THE -Io
TUMBLE ON THE HILL,

WATCHING THE WRECK

ae ee
ADRIFT ! pene 24 ATTACKED BY BUFFALOES page
ARTIST AND THE BEAR, THE ... 12 BELLE AND THE GIPSIES
AT CLOSE QUARTERS)... ZO BoB THE COASTGUARDSMAN
BURNING STEAMER, THE 64
CAMP IN THE BACKWOODS, A _... me (40
CAPTURING SEALS 44
CAUGHT BY THE FLOOD ... eee Al Founp BY RAB...
DANGEROUS ERRAND, A... a 8 GROOM AND HIS HORSES, THE
FIGHT WITH A PUMA, A... peemarenl'G HAVELOCK-AND THE SAILORS
How NorAu ESCAPED 20
How THE TRAIN WAS STOPPED ... eae 30)
HUNTED CHAMOIS, THE 72
JENNIE’S PERIL... ie .. 68 MAGGIE’s ACCIDENT
KILLING A SERPENT ae fF 60 MIpDpDy AT HoME, THE
LILLIE AND THE BABY ... pee 73 MIMI’S RESCUE ... wee ae
NEGRO Boy AND THE EAGLE, THE ee SO)
OLD JOHN 16
OVERBOARD! ... 48
PHIL’S BRAVE DEED ae eee OO “ SHOOTING THE RaPiIDSs”
SAILOR Boy’s RETURN, THE... 66 SOLDIER’S RETURN, THE
SAVED BY NEPTUNE bo ane 6 SWIM FOR LIFE, A

TROPICAL FOREST, IN A...

A te eS

a i eae AO

WHERE THEY FouND BaBy ae Bg

54
36
56

32
52
26

14
76
34

22
70
62
SAV DB Yee NE Pr OiNis.

No one knew where Neptune came from. He was a big
black dog who, one morning, walked into the village,
looking very hungry. And the only real friend he found
there was little Nell the blacksmith’s daughter, for he
was not taken any notice of by others, and some, indeed—
because, I suppose, he was not a handsome doggie—said
that he ought to be killed. But Nell stood by him, and
she not only fed him, but coaxed her father to let him live
in the old kennel in the back yard. And one day this is
what happened. Nell would sometimes go down to the
village stream to gather forget-me-nots, and on the morn-
ing of which I am speaking, while trying to get some of the
pretty flowers, she saw some that looked finer than others,
and in reaching over she fell right into the water. Oh,
how she screamed! But it was some minutes before she.
was heard; and then how do you think she was helped ?
By Neptune! Yes, he first heard that the friend who had
been kind to him was in distress; and though some of
the villagers hastened to the water’s edge when they saw

him running towards it, he it was who saved little Nell.
6




SAVED BY NEPTUNE,
A DANGEROUS ERRAND.

How would you like to be hanging in mid-air, like the
man shown here? And on what errand do you think he
is bent? I will tell you. A few years ago some hunters
were in a wild part of North America, and after travelling
for some miles they could not find water. They searched
in every direction, but though they spent a long time in
doing so, all was in vain, and the poor fellows knew not °
what they should do. After another hour or two a shout
was heard, and one of the party, pointing to a great narrow
’ cavern that went far down into the earth, said he felt sure
there was water at the bottom. “But how was it to be
reached ? was the next difficulty that arose. There was
but one way—a man must be let down by ropes to fetch
it. One, braver than the others, now offered to go; and
down into the dizzy depths, with a tub across his head,
‘he was carefully lowered. The danger was greater than
any words can describe, but the man succeeded in his
task ; and how thankful to him were his “companions
when, with the tub filled with the precious water, the man

was pulled up to the surface again, I need not say.

8
A DANGEROUS

ERRAND.

U)
PTA
GAH

j
H

Ltt | uy
Ba
eta
a he
hie

a i Hi
ae
PUT aa
ti Ha

HH} He
Hes
i


iL ed Tete Sede dette el otal 51) ae AVN pb) selbst yam lel Gees

AsBeL Ancus the shepherd was away on the hills with
his flock one day, and as he could not come back to
dinner that afternoon, his good wife had promised to send
it to him. And little Jack, their son, having offered to
take it, started on the journey, which was quite two miles
off. Hardly had he gone on his way, however, before
snow began to fall, and soon it came down in such tor-
rents that Jack felt that he ought to turn back. But
thinking for a moment, he remembered that his father had
had no food since breakfast, and must be very hungry.
This was enough; the brave little fellow determined that,
come what might, he would carry: out his errand. So on
he pressed, and with great difficulty he arrived within half
a mile of his journeys end. Yes, and he reached his
father’s wooden hut too, but that was all; for the same
instant he fell down in a faint. Abel quickly understood
what Jack had done; nor was it long before he was glad-
dened to see him move; and when that evening he returned
home it was with not a little pride that, in company with

his dog, he carried back the noble boy to his mother.

10












































THE SHEPHERD AND HIS CHILD.
Te ORS Tat Sola ene NID Ele aals be ele

A STRANGE scene is that which is shown on the next page.
It is in the region of the Rocky Mountains of North
America; and this is the story of it. Two gentlemen, Mr.
A

painting a picture; and as soon as the easel had been.



- and Mr. B——, had gone out for the purpose of

fixed and all preparations made, Mr. A sat down to



begin his work, while Mr. B—— went for a walk in the



neighbourhood. An hour afterwards, when Mr. B: re-
turned to the spot where he had left ae friend, he was
astounded to see him quietly going on with his painting,
while just behind him, on a piece of rock, sat a bear!

The bear seemed to be merely admiring the artist at his |
work, and there was nothing savage about his appear-

ance; but, all the same, Mr. A—— was placed in the



greatest danger, though not aware of it. Mr. B soon
made up his mind what to do, and in a little while was
ready to carry out his resolve. Creeping along until
he was within a distance that made it almost im-
possible that he could miss his aim, he levelled his rifle,

and in another instant Mr. Bear lay on the ground—lifeless.

12




































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE ARTIST AND THE BEAR.
MAGGIE’S -ACCIDENT.

Maccr MacGrecor was out on the ice with her two
brothers when, without any warning, a dark fog arose,
and within a little while it was difficult to see even for
a few yards. So most of the people made their way to
the shore; and it was in attempting to do so that Maggie
met with her accident. She was a rather daring little
girl, and thinking that she could manage without help
from her brothers, she started off alone. But, unfortunately,
in the darkness she went in a wrong direction, and before
she knew it she found herself quite alone—lost in the fog!
Frightened and trembling, she then went off again; but
she had gone hardly a dozen yards when down she fell,
and with such force that she fainted. Meantime she had,
of course, been missed by her brothers, but owing to the
darkness they could not find her. And not till a party
of men with lanterns had searched the ice for three hours
could any trace of Maggie be found; and then it was that
the poor child was discovered, lying just where she had
fallen. The doctor, who was sent for, said she had been

very badly bruised; but in a few days she was well again.

14










































































































































































































































































































































MAGGIE’S ACCIDENT.
OLD JOHN.

Untit I came to know old John Drake I often wondered
how he lived, and why he always looked so contented and
comfortable. I was staying at the seaside, and I had
often seen him on the beach walking about with his tele-
scope under his arm; so one day I had a talk with him,
and when he heard that I wanted to know all about him-
self, he told me his story. He said that some years before,
when he had been a boatman, he had one evening rowed
out to the rescue of a pleasure party who had been upset
in the bay, and he had been able to save all of them.
They had never forgotten what he had done, and they had
not contented themselves with thanking him, for they had
presented him with a new boat as well as a sum of
money from which he was able to have a small income
for life. Having thus been enabled to’ save, he had
after a time given up work; and though he liked to be
about on the beach, he was now, he said, ‘a man ot
leisure.” And the old boatman said he was happy to
think that his old age was provided for, and that he

need not work for a living, as many men of his age did.

16




















































































































OLD JOHN.
A FIGHT WITH A PUMA.

My cousin George once told me of a narrow escape he had
in South America He was in one of the great forests of
that country, and by some means he got parted from his
black servant, Tom, who had been with him. All in a
moment there pounced on him a fierce animal called the
puma, which had been hidden in the long grass, and
before he quite knew what had happened he was thrown
to the ground. At that instant Tom came up; and,
leaving my cousin, the puma was about to dart towards
him, in order to serve him in the same way as he had
George. Tom was, however, well on his guard, and by
a crushing blow with the end of his gun he kept the
puma off. But the next minute on came his cruel foe
again, and it seemed as if it must master him. Again
Tom was prepared: with his long knife, which he always
carried, he boldly attacked the puma; and he did so with
such force that the animal almost directly fell over—dead.
Faithful Tom then. ran to the side of my cousin, who was
lying helplessly on the ground, and having succeeded in

restoring him, both were before long able. to go on their way.

18




A FIGHT WITH A PUMA.
HOW. NORAH ESCAPED.

UncLe Richard’s house stood by the side of a river, and
early one morning, some years ago, it was burned to the
ground. When the cry of ‘ Fire!’ was heard, every one in
the house had been aroused, and it was at first thought
that all had been able to save themselves; but it was
soon found that such was not the case. My cousin
Norah could not be seen! Search was at once made, but
in vain, and how great was the distress of every one you
will understand. Suddenly a cry was heard at the back
of the house, and then it was found what liad taken
place. Norah had got out by a side door, but had been
unable to reach the part of the house where the others
were; so she had taken refuge on the top of the wall
overlooking the river. The poor girl was in a terrible
fright, for she was too high up to move from where she
was; and she knew not what to do. But help was soon
at hand. Getting out his boat, my cousin Richard
rowed round to the place where Norah had betaken
herself, and by persuading her to let herself down the

river wall into his arms he was able to rescue her.

20


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































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HOW NORAH ESCAPED.


























































GEE SOLDIERS. isa Win:

I KNEW Dick Hope when he was a boy, and I remember
how he left his widowed mother and became a soldier,
and how soon afterwards he was ordered to go abroad
to fight for his country. A few years passed by, and then
one day there came a letter from a comrade of Dick’s, which
told the poor mother that he feared her son was dead.
So the old home in the village where Dick had spent his
early days was given up, and it was not very long after
that Mrs. Hope died. But, strange to say, Dick was
still living. Taken prisoner after a great battle, in which
he had fought bravely, he had been carried off by the
enemy, but when set free he had met with an accident
which kept “him in the hospital for many months.
At length, however, he had got well enough to walk
about, and after a while he made his way back to
England, hoping to find his mother as he had left her.
But he was too late! and it was with an almost broken
heart that, on arriving at his native village, he learned
that not only was his old home deserted, but that his
dear mother lay buried in the little churchyard hard by.

22










THE SOLDIER'S RETURN.


ED are

Jack Grey, a boatman who lived at an English seaport,
had one day rowed to a fishing village four miles off,
and he was on_his way home when a terrible storm
came on. Jack, who was about a mile out at sea when
this happened, did his best to get to the shore; but
every moment the tempest raged more and more, and at
last a great wave turned his boat right over. Jack was
a good swimmer, and he managed to catch hold of the
bottom of the boat, and to this he clung; while a few
minutes later he had raised himself on to it, and floated
on the water. But his worst trials were to follow, and
what he suffered as he hung on to the boat, tossed up
and down, no words can tell. Hour after hour went by,
while yet he had to remain in the same terrible position,
and then evening approached; but up to this time no
sign of help had come. Then it was, however, that he
saw, not far off, a welcome sight. A ship was sailing
towards him! Yes, and better still, he had been seen!
and within ten minutes Jack had been hauled on deck,

and on the next morning he was landed at his own port.

24














































































































































































































































































































































































































































ADRIFT.
HAV ELOGG.AN De EIE Salk ORS.

WHEN Havelock, the brave Indian soldier, of whom I
daresay some of you. have heard, was once on a voyage,
a great storm came on, and before very long the ship
was tossed hither and thither, and went on to the rocks.
Every one except himself now became frightened; and
the captain and sailors, instead of doing all they could to
save the vessel, were so afraid that they ran up and down
the deck helplessly, feeling sure that their lives would be
lost. A few minutes later the ship struck on the rocks
again, and the sailors were more and more alarmed. Then
it was that Havelock, who felt that unless something was
done the ship and all on board would be lost, took com-
mand of the vessel himself; and mounting to the upper
portion of the ship, over their heads, appealed to the sailors
to do their duty by remaining at their posts. Then he
called out to them, “ Now, my men, if you will but
obey me, and keep from strong drink, we shall all be
saved.” And such was the effect of his prompt action
and his words upon the terrified men, that they were at

once calmed, and in the end not a man on board was lost.

26






































































HAVELOCK AND THE SAILORS.
AT CLOSE QUARTERS.

A FEW years ago a famous traveller, while in search of
game in Central Africa, had a narrow escape from being
attacked by an elephant. He was alone on this occasion,
all his companions being some distance off; and it was
while making his way through a very dense part of a
forest that, without any warning, he saw the head of the
huge animal. burst through the trees. For a moment
terror as well as astonishment was felt by him, which
only increased as he next saw the elephant’s trunk
stretched ouf as if to seize him by the neck. But cool-
ness saved his life; for had he let the elephant see that
he was really afraid the consequences might have been
very serious. Looking straight at his foe, as if to make
him understand that he was not frightened, he took a
sudden turn, and before the elephant had time to hurt
him he had taken to his heels and found refuge in a
neighbouring tree. And there he remained quietly perched
on one of the high branches, and thankful enough for his
escape from danger, until the great animal, who soon after-

wards went quietly away, was at a safe distance from him.

28




AT CLOSE QUARTERS,


HOW THE TRAIN WAS STOPPED.

It was a dark, fogey night, and there had been an accident
at Northdown Station. Two trains had run into each
other, the broken carriages were thrown right across the
line, and several of the passengers had been seriously
injured. It had all happened in a few minutes, and every
one at the station was full of fright, for, to make matters
worse, it was remembered that the express train was nearly
due: “Stop the sexpress)| * was the order now swiftly
sent to the signal-man. But more than one felt a dread
lest, owing to the dense fog, the coming train should not
see the signal; and among them was a man named John
Grant, who worked at the station. And quick as thought
this brave man determined what to do. He would go
down the line as far as he could beyond the signal-box,
and he himself would signal the express with his lantern.
And he did the deed; and though it might of course
have happened that the train would have been stopped by
the signal-man, yet he was none the less deserving of
praise for his forethought; nor did his superiors, when

‘they heard of what he had done, forget to reward him.

30


























































HOW THE TRAIN WAS STOPPED.
FOUND BY RAB.

Rap was a shepherd’s dog, whose master, Robert Ferguson
lived in Scotland; and I will tell you a story about his
cleverness. Jessie Ferguson, the shepherd’s little daughter,
had on a cold November evening gone on an errand for
her mother to Ayrton, a village some few miles off, and
while on the way home such a heavy snow-storm had
overtaken her that soon the poor child could hardly get
along. . She had trudged on bravely, however, and for a
while managed to make her way. But at last she could
keep up no longer, and, quite beaten and tired out, she
fell down. And how do you think she was saved? Good
old Rab had been in the shepherd’s cottage, and had
heard his mistress speaking to the other children of
Jessie; and then when Mrs. Ferguson had said to him,
“Find Jessie!” off he had started towards Ayrton. And
he it was who found her on the way-side, lying down in
the snow. He had then scampered home, and, as the
shepherd had by this time arrived, Rab was able to make
him understand what had happened, and within a little
while Jessie had been carried by her father to the cottage.

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SS ee



































FOUND BY RAB.
VEGMELS seis > Cees

I sHALL never forget the day on which my little sister
Mimi was nearly lost. We were at the seaside; and
one morning when out for a walk together I had taken
a book to read, and having sat down on a rock I became
so interested in my story that I did not notice that
Mimi had wandered away. At last I looked up, and I
could not see my sister anywhere! How frightened I
was I cannot tell you; and I know that I ran hither
and thither, calling at the top of my voice, but in vain.
At last I went towards home to tell my parents; and
it was in turning a corner of one of the cliffs that I
saw a sight which I never wish to see again. A coast-
guardsman was lifting up from the water a little girl. In
a few minutes I was by his side, and there was poor
Mimi, all dripping from head to foot! I then learned —
that she had made her way to the rocks, where the tide
had risen so high that it had partly covered her, and
that the coastguardsman having seen her had gone to the
rescue. Need I say how grateful we all were to him,

and how I repented of not having taken care of Mimi?

34














































































































































































































































































































































































































































MIMI’S RESCUE.
"BELLE AND aii eIrsies.

My cousin Belle always used to be frightened of gipsies;
but after what happened one day she was never again
afraid of them. She had been in a wood with her
younger brother Bertie, and while stretching forward at
the side of a river to get some rushes the little boy
somehow tumbled into the water. Fortunately, there was
a branch hanging over, of which Bertie was able to catch
hold; but in doing so his clothes got caught in such a
way that he found himself unable to move. Belle could
not help him, for he was too far off from her; so what
could she do? Then it was that she remembered that
they had seen some gipsies that morning; and all thoughts
of being afraid of them having been put away by her,
the brave little girl ran off to their encampment. Arrived
there, she went up boldly to where the gipsies were
sitting, and begged for help. Nor did they refuse, though
at first they hardly understood what she meant; and soon
the head gipsy was running by her side; and so Bertie
was released. The man was well rewarded by Bertie’s

father, and, as I say, Belle was not afraid of gipsies again.
36 ,


D THE GIPSIES.

BELLE AN
“SHOOTING THE RAPIDS.”

I wonDER how you would like to be in the curious-looking
canoes that are shown in this picture? I expect you would
not care to be in them at all, and would rather remain

on dry land. They are, however, in common use in certain
parts of America. These canoes are made of the bark of a
certain tree which is peculiarly suited to the purpose, and
owing to their lightness, and because they float so well on
rough water, they are preferred to other kinds for journey-
ing down rivers like the one which is here _ illustrated.
They are easy to paddle, and can be made to travel very
fast. At the foot of the picture, where the water looks so
very dangerous, are shown what are called the “rapids.”
At such places the river falls straight down for some
distance with great force; and the persons whom you see
in the canoe will be carried right over the edge by the
stream, while floating on the top of it. This is what is
known as “shooting the rapids.” It is rather a difficult
task to manage the canoes while they are being rushed
along in this manner; and you will not wonder that acci-

dents sometimes happen to people who are guiding them.
38














“SHOOTING THE RAPIDS,”


WAICHING DHE WRECK

Wuat a dreadful scene this is, and yet it is one that, as
some of you know, is only too often seen on our coasts,
especially at certain times of the year. A great storm has
been raging, and news has come into the town that a ship
is being tossed about by the waves; and down to the
shore the people rush to see it. Sometimes it happens to
be a vessel which belongs to the very seaport near which
it has been caught by the tempest; and among the
people on shore who are waiting it are parents and
brothers and sisters of sailors who are on board. How
sad a sight it is then! Soon the word is passed that the
ship cannot help being wrecked; and the lifeboat, manned
by its noble crew, is launched so as to go off to the
rescue. Very often the poor sailors are saved only just in
time, and they find a few minutes afterwards that their ship
sinks or breaks up into pieces on the hard rocks; but some-
times it happens that the lifeboat is not able to arrive in
time, and then all on board are lost. Let us hope that the
ship which the people in our picture are-so anxiously watch-

ing did not, after all, meet with such a terrible fate as that!

40












































































































































































































WRECK.

THE

o
a
H
se
oO
a
a
3


WHERE THEY FOUND BABY.

IN a certain part of Australia a great flood once took place,
and for miles and miles around there was little else but
water to be seen. Numbers of houses were partly covered
by it, and the people in them had to make their escape—
some in boats and some by other means—in the best way
they could. One of the many adventures that were "met
with during this terrible time happened to a little.
baby. He was sleeping in a wooden cradle when the flood
reached his parents’ home, and so suddenly had it come
that he had been forgotten. But, strange to say, no harm
came to the little fellow. Instead, the water caused his
cradle to float, and then, while he was sleeping soundly,
it carried it first out of the flooded house, and afterwards
some distance into the country. At length, having lodged
against a tree, it came to a standstill; and later in the
day it was discovered by some men who were rowing by
‘in a boat. The baby was still asleep, and of course
knew nothing of what had happened; and when—as they
did soon afterwards—the men found out his parents, and

took him to them, you can imagine how great was their joy.

42








































































































































































































































































































































































































































WHERE THEY FOUND DABY.
CA EwRING Se Ales:

THE brave men who voyage to the Arctic Seas endure
many hardships; and knowing as they do all the dangers
and sufferings which are before them, it seems wonderful
that so many should be willing to face them. But year
after year they go forth, and in the whale and seal
fisheries alone hundreds of our countrymen are engaged.
In the picture on the next page we get some idea of
how seals are captured, though this is only one of the
ways in which they are secured. When the ship arrives
in a “seal fishery” a certain number of the men land,
and then they make their preparations. Seals, as -you
know, are very ae and great caution has to be shown
in approaching them; otherwise they would of course soon
escape to a place of safety. The sealers, therefore, often
remain in hiding until a number of them are collected to-
gether on the ice, and then they shoot them with their guns.
Their bodies are afterwards placed by the men on board
the ship, and from them are obtained not only their skins
—which are taken home to be made into sealskin jackets and

other articles—but also oil, which is of considerable value.

44








































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CAPTURING SEALS.
CAME SIN] tiie BACIQVOODs:

THis is a hunters’ camp in the backwoods of North
America, and the two men are sitting down after a hard
day’s work. They have, most likely, chosen as comfortable
a spot as they could find, and when they have had their
meal they will lie down to rest. They have been out since
early dawn, and from what we can see in the picture,
they have found enough game to supply them with food
for some little time, though, as their appetites are generally
very good, it will, probably, not last them very long.
There is, in addition to a member of the deer tribe, a large
bird, besides, I daresay, other smaller animals which we do.
not see, and the hunters are now about to cook their
supper. I expect that neither of the men would be sorry
if their meal were all ready for them instead of having:
to prepare it themselves. But they are used to do.
work of all kinds, and when we remember how hard is.
their life in other ways we may be quite sure that the
mere trouble of cooking a supper will seem anything
but a real task to them. Let us hope that they will
enjoy it, and that they both will sleep soundly afterwards..

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KWOODS

A CAMP IN THE BAC
OVERBOARD!

LirrLe Jack Ker was the son of the captain of a sailing
vessel, and sometimes he went with his father on a short
voyage. The lad was a favourite with all on board, and
as he was fond of being with the crew he soon’.began to
learn about the different parts of the vessel. But what he
wished above all to be able to do was to climb the rope
ladders like the sailors did. He was, however, too young
for that, and, of course, he was not allowed to do every-
thing he wished. Now Jack was very wilful, and I am
sorry to say that through being so he had a sad mishap.
He had been looking longingly at. the rope ladders, and
nobody being near, he was tempted to go up one of them.
But he had scarcely climbed a dozen yards when the vessel
gave a sudden lurch, and down, down he fell into the
sea! Fortunately, just as he was falling he was seen by
one of the sailors, and in a minute the man, having
jumped overboard, had managed to seize him; but even
then it was some time before the two were rescued by the ©
_ life-buoys and ropes which those on board threw to

them. It was a lesson which little Jack Ker never forgot.

48




OVERBOARD!

44
ae TNE RO eBONV AND ie AG EE,

A neGRO boy named Tom, living in America, had noticed
for some time that a pair of eagles were building a nest
in a neighbouring tree, and had made up his mind that
as soon as the eggs were hatched he would secure one of
the eaglets. So day by day he waited, and at last,
having watched the old birds go from the nest, leaving
their young ones alone, he climbed the tree. But
hardly had he reached the branch on which the nest was
built when there was such a fluttering and screaming near
him as he had never heard before. The old male eagle had
unexpectedly returned, and finding on what errand Tom
was engaged, he soon showed that he did not mean
to allow such conduct to go unpunished. Pouncing on
the young negro, he at once attacked him with his.
cruel talons in such a way that Tom yelled at the top
of his voice, and then descended the tree as fast as he
could. Even then the enraged eagle would not let him
go in peace, for, as Tom rushed off, he flew after him,
and but for a friendly hut, in which the frightened:
boy took refuge, would have still further hurt him.

50








THE EAGLE,

THE NEGRO BOY AND


THE GROOM AND HIS HORSES.

A FEW years ago an officer in the army was ordered to go
with his regiment to the West Indies; and he determined
to take with him his two favourite chargers. dhes ship
sailed from Southampton, and though there was some little
trouble in getting the horses on board, all went well for a
short time. But in a few days a storm arose, and the
poor animals became so terrified that it was with difficulty
that their groom could approach them. They neighed,
and kicked, and they dragged at their halters from morn-
ing to night; and all through the voyage they continued
in the same frightened condition. At length the day
came when the vessel arrived near land, and then what
do you think they did? Breaking away from the stalls
where they were tied up, they both leaped overboard and
swam towards the shore! But the groom was equal to the
occasion. Throwing off his coat, he at once, having
jumped into the sea, followed the two chargers; and having
swam after them, he not only succeeded in catching hold of
their halters, but by talking to them, guided both horses

until they reached the beach, where they were captured.

52


THE GROOM AND HIS HORSES.
“ATTACKED BY BUFFALOES.

WueEn the well-known missionary, Dr. Livingstone, was
in Southern Africa he sometimes had with him a large
number of negroes, who went about with him on certain
of the long journeys which he used to take. On one
occasion, while passing through a forest, the whole party
had an adventure which was very serious, and which
might have had even a worse ending than it had. A herd
of Cape buffaloes, enraged probably at the sight of so
many men coming near them, rushed upon the good doctor
and. his companions ; and in a very little while, before
there was time to get out of the way, there was, as you
may see from our picture, a scene of dreadful havoc.
Some of the poor negroes were tossed into the air, some
were crushed to death, while many others suffered most
severely from the injuries which they received. The
doctor, too, whom you will. find near the centre of the
illustration, hard pressed by some of the fierce animals,
had ay narrow escape, and it was only after a tough
struggle, which lasted some time, that he and those who

had escaped from harm were able to go on their journey.

54


ATTACKED BY BUFFALOES.
BOB THE COASTGUARDSMAN.

A FEW years ago we were having our summer holiday at
the seaside, and we made friends with Bob Nelson, the
coastguardsman. We had often seen him in our walks, |
and after we got to know him we used very often to
have talks with him. Bob soon found that we much
liked to hear tales’ of the. sea, and he would tell them by
the hour together. He had for many years been in the
Royal Navy, and very proud he was of having served
there. He said that every man who served his country
ought to be very glad he did so, however humble he
might be. Bob would tell us of the different ships in
which he had sailed, of the countries he had visited, and
of many an adventure he had had; and he seemed almost
as fond of relating his stories as we were of listening to
them. Sometimes Bob showed us pictures of ships, which
he brought from his cottage, and one day, as a_ special
treat, he let us see a wonderful collection of curious articles
which he had got together when abroad. Altogether, we
soon quite liked Bob, and we were very sorry when

our holiday at the seaside ended, and we had to go home.

56
PNW
AIT





}
HK

i

‘









BOB THE COASTGUARDSMAN,
ASSUMP EE ON Ee Eee,

Ir was indeed a tumble, and though my three cousins
laughed at it afterwards, they did not do so at the time.
They had had made for them what is called a “toboggan”
—and you can see what this is by a glance at the box-like
object in the picture; and with this they were going to have
some real fun by seating themselves in it and sliding down
the hill on the snow. Well, having dragged the toboggan
up to the top of the hill, they took their seats, and then
off they started, shouting—as only boys can—as they slid
along. Then when they had made one journey to the
bottom they went up again, to try another, never thinking,
I daresay, that there was anything else but enjoyment in
store for them. But they soon found that their sport was
full of danger; for this time they had only gone a short
distance when, through striking against a large stone
which they had not before seen, bump! bump! went the
toboggan, and over tumbled the three boys in the snow!
It was with swch a crash that they rolled on the top of one
another, .but, as I have said, though rather frightened they

were not hurt, and were soon on their way up the hill again.
58




A TUMBLE ON THE HILL.
KILLING A SERPENT.

An officer in India, while passing through a forest not far
from where he lived, saw one of the great serpents known
as boa-constrictors coiled round a tree. These creatures are
very powerful—indeed, if once they seize a man they can
easily crush him to death; and the officer, knowing that
this one might prove very dangerous, determined that it
should be killed. So on his return he called together some
of his men, and, telling them of what he had seen, went
back to the forest with them. When they got there, how-
‘ever, a surprise awaited them; for instead of being round
the tree the serpent had uncoiled itself. It was no light
task, therefore, to begin the attack, and at first the officer
thought that it would be too dangerous to do so; but
unwilling that the journey should have been in vain, he
at length determined that the attempt should be made.
So with great care the men were arranged in such a
manner as to surround the big reptile; then a sudden
rush was made towards it; and while the officer thrust a
bayonet through the serpent’s neck the others fell on

it from behind, and so the ugly creature was killed.

60


KILLING A SERPENT.
Nee ORCA Pir ONE oily

WHEN we hear of persons travelling in wild parts of the
world it is not always easy to understand the difficulties
which they meet with. Their lives are, however, often
passed amidst the greatest dangers, as well as discom-
_ forts. In our picture are shown a party of men who are
making their way through one of the forests of South
America, and what hard. work it seems for them—indeed,
it looks as if they will scarcely be able to get along!
They have, as you see, to actually cut their way through
all the tangled trees and bushes which are before them, and
as they have their baggage to carry as well they are able
to move very, very slowly. And this is only one part of their
task, for in these forests wild animals are met with, and
travellers have often to protect themselves from their attacks
as well as to hunt them so as to secure food, for they do
not as a rule take provisions with them. The brave men
who journey in such countries are, however, fond of all
kinds of adventure, and think little of the hardships which
they often have to endure; so their life is not, we may be

sure, so unpleasant to them as it may seem to be to us..
62








TROPICAL FOREST.

IN A


THE BURNING] Sib AMik.

I am going to tell you the story of a brave man who,
when a steamboat was on fire, saved those ‘who were on
board at the cost of his own life. It was on a dark
night, and the discovery that the vessel was in flames was
made when she was only a short distance from land. Pas-
sengers and crew then became so frightened that in a few
minutes they crowded to the front part of the ship. Strong
men, who ought to have known better, left the weaker
people to do the best they could, and only thought of their
own safety; and a scene of dire confusion followed. But
amidst it all one man never stirred from his post. This
was John Maynard, the pilot, who was guiding the ship.
Though enveloped in flames he stood at the helm, and
while all others were crying and shouting, he still steered
the steamer. And ere very long the vessel reached the
shore, and those on board were taken off in boats. Alas!
but not all of them. After having been the means of saving
those around him, John Maynard’s own life was sacrificed.
For just as his great task was done, one of the boilers of

the steamer burst, and the heroic pilot fell—a martyr to duty.

64














THE BURNING STEAMER.
THE SAILOR BOY’S RETURN.

Bogs BraAZzIER always wanted to go to sea; so when he was
fourteen—though he would not agree to it at first, as he
did not like to think of his boy going away from him—
his father let him have his way. Bob had completed.
a voyage to China, and when at length the day came
for the vessel to start for home his joy knew no bounds.
But a great disappointment was in store for the lad.
After being at sea for a fortnight the ship was wrecked, |
and I am sorry to say that for more than two months
the captain and crew had to stay on a desert island.
It was a sad and dreary time for all, and as day after
day went by Bob began to think that he might never see
his native land again. But one morning a shout was heard
on the island, for in the far distance a ship was seen.
Better still, in a little while the sailors were gladdened by
knowing that their signals had been answered, and that the
vessel was coming towards them. And on the next day
all were taken on board, and were soon sailing towards
England. Some weeks later there was great gladness in

Bob’s home, for the sailor-boy had arrived safe and sound.

66
Th

Wa?
























(MT Se





=i
————
SSI
SS
Hl
sali







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SS



























































































































































































































































































THE SAILOR BOY’S RETURN.
JENNIE’S PERIL.

JENNIE BRETT was a daring little rider, and her papa,
knowing how well she had always managed her pony, gave
her a black horse as a birthday present. He was a beauti-
ful creature, and as he had been tried several times, Mr.
Brett said he felt sure that Jennie would safely ride him.
So on the day when Blackbird, as he was called, arrived,
Jennie, with the groom, started off; and all went well for
half an hour. But just as they reached the village of
W

way, suddenly dashed out from a blacksmith’s shop; and in



another horse, which had been frightened in some

a moment Jennie knew that Blackbird had.also taken fright,
and was running away with her. Away the animal fled
through the village, and every moment, though she did
her very best to keep from falling, it seemed as if poor
Jennie must be overthrown. But just as Farmer Dean’s
gate was reached, out rushed a boy, and in an instant
the rein was firmly seized, and Blackbird brought
to a standstill. It was, indeed, a brave act, and. it
probably saved Jennie’s life; and you need not be told how

grateful she was, and how well her father rewarded the lad.

68


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































JENNIE’S PERIL.
APS MWIMSEOR LiME:

Joss was the name of a man who, at the time when gold
was being discovered in a wild part of Mexico, had, like
many others, gone there in the hope of making a fortune.
But Joss was not only a lazy man, but a bad man. In-
stead of working hard as his companions did, he thought
to get rich by robbery; and on one occasion, when he had
attempted to steal some gold belonging to another man,
he was caught in the act. The miners were rough men,
who placed little value on life, and some of them declared
that he should no longer live. But the dreadful threat
was not to be carried out. On the same evening, when the
persons who were supposed to be guarding him were asleep,
Joss crept out of the camp, and making his way to the
end of the forest, he plunged into the river at the end,
and escaped to the other side. It was pouring with rain,
as Joss swam for his life, and he was only just in time;
for close on his heels were a number of the miners, who
had started in pursuit of him, and had he been five
minutes later he would have been caught. He was never

afterwards seen, and what became of him no one ever knew.

79












































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A SWIM FOR LIFE.
THE HUNTED CHAMOIS:

In the mountains of Italy and Switzerland is the home of
the chamois; and here, ever on the watch lest their
enemy, man, should be in search of them, herds of these
pretty nimble-footed creatures are to be found. When
feeding on the mountain-side, one of their number is.
generally on guard as sentinel, and if any danger arises he
gives warning to the others, who then flee to a place of
safety. The chamois is sought by hunters, not only for the
sake of its flesh, but because its skin can be made into the
soft leather with which most of you are familiar; and when
it is chased it will betake itself to the most dangerous
spots in the mountains, so as to escape. In our picture
we see a chamois which, after reaching a high cliff, has
been shot by the hunter, and has then fallen down, only
to die, and the man is now risking his own life to obtain
the poor creature’s body. To us it would seem impossible
to descend such: a; rugged rock. as.is here shown; but
the hardy men whose lives are passed in the mountains
think nothing of such dangers, and we can - only

» hope that this bold hunter will not meet with any harm

72




































































































































THE HUNTED CHAMOIS.
CAUCE BYo Tie soo:

DENNIS BRYAN was a poor labourer living in Ireland. He
was a hard-working man, who did his best to keep up his
little home and make his wife and children happy.
But one autumn a sad trouble came. Rain had _ been
pouring down for some days, and at length the neigh-
bouring river had become so flooded that the water found
its way into Dennis’s home, and it was plain that he and
his family would not be able to remain in it. They hoped
on, however, trusting that the flood might get low; but
at last there was a sudden rush of water, and they had to
flee for their lives. They now made their way to the
next village, and it was indeed a piteous sight to see the
four—Dennis carrying the little girl, and his wife leading
their son—as they waded through the water which lay
before them. But they reached the end of their journey;
and I am glad to say that in a few days an end came to
their trouble in an unexpected way. Dennis’s master, when |
he heard of what had happened, told him that, knowing
what a good father and husband he was, he intended to give

him enough money to fit up a new home. And he did so.

74
























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CAUGHT BY THE FLOOD.
THE MIDDY AT HOME.

CHARLIE Harpy was a young midshipman, and when he
came home from his first voyage his two sisters delighted
to listen while he told them of his doings on the ship,
and of all the wonderful sights he had seen. He had
been on board one of the big men-of-war belonging to the
Royal Navy; and as his ship had been round the world,
of course he had seen all kinds of strange places and
peoples. Sometimes Charlie would take his sisters into
the library, where their father had a big globe; and then
he would trace with his finger the direction in which his
vessel had gone. This always made his stories much
more enjoyable to the little girls, for they said they
seemed ‘‘more real” when they were shown the very
places of which he spoke. Once his ship had been nearly
wrecked on the rocks, and Charlie said that two minutes
later she would have been wrecked, but fortunately the
captain had been able to save her, so all was well. About
this and. many other of his adventures the two girls
never tired of hearing, and would often ask Charlie to

tell his ‘yarns,’ as he called them, over and over again.

76


sai

TTT
Witt

THE MIDDY

| : EE

AK i
eer ME om MS

wl flo tiny rie sit







AT HOME.
Lici a AND EEE BABY?

Lititz Ray was one day walking down a country lane,
when she heard a strange noise. At first she could not
think what it was; but on looking about, this is what
met her eyes. A dear little baby, comfortably covered up,
was lying asleep beneath the hedge! Lillie was so sur-
prised that she did not know what to do, so she knelt
by the little one’s side and stayed there a few minutes to
think. At last she rose to her feet to see if any person
was near, for she could not believe that a baby would
be left quite alone; but no one could she find.
Lillie was now rather frightened, but seeing a high gate
not far off, she mounted to the top and looked round the
field. To her great joy she saw at some ‘distance the
form of a girl, and off she ran as fast as she could. It
was the baby’s nurse. Wanting to gather some blackberries,
she had placed the child on the ground, and had then
‘gone into the field, and intending to be there only a few
minutes had lingered much longer. Poor Lillie was so
glad she had found her, but she could not help thinking

-how very wrong the nurse had been. And I think so too.

78








LILLIE AND THE BABY.
PHIL’S BRAVE DEED.
(See Frontispiece.)
“ Frre! Fire!” was the cry shouted in a crowded London

street; and soon the engines dashed down to the burning |
house, and began to pump water on to the flames. Then
there arose another cry, “Save the children!” Up at a
top window two little girls were seen, and the cruel fire
was getting nearer and nearer. To the front of the house
was now wheeled a tall fire-escape, and swiftly up its steps
climbed Phil Wood, one of the brave firemen. But
before he could reach the top the two children were gone.
Frightened by the smoke, the poor little girls had
run to a back room, where they had hidden behind
a door, and before Phil could find them, alas! not only
smoke but flames were around them. There was, how-
ever, just time to reach the front, though it was only
done by rushing through the fire, which was already burn-
ing the stairs; and when Phil was seen at the window,
with the children clinging to him, you would have liked

to hear the shout that went up from the people below.

PRINTED BY CASSELL & CoMPANY, LIMITED, LA BELLE SAUVAGE, Lonpon, E.C.

35-497




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Monthly, 6d.

Little Folks,

“Lirr_e Forns is af
the head of English tlits-
trated agazines for
eae: thes. Ere
4 * ana: popnilarity hs
(27 -} placed: it beyond both
\Y AW) © | rivalry and criticism.”—
i pQueen.
» -| “Everyone ought. to
| know, by this time thats
Litrie Fouxs is the best



hic.



The Half-Yearly
— Volume of Little
Folks, price 38, 6d., |





- for Children of all
ages.

Cassell & Com, any J-iniited,
» Lidgate Hid, London.

A Sunday Story Book,”



38. 6d,
Magazine for Children.” |The Chit-Chat Album

or cloth gilt, 5s.,\
- most \
ie Gift-book \k




Book
For the Little Ones.
Picture Boards, 9d. each.
Bright Tales and Funny
Pictures.

Me: Little Tales.
Little: Tales for Little






People. ~ 4
qe, Little People and their
A Book of Merry Tales, Pets.

containing “ Bright Tales | Bible Pictures for Boys
Patan Pi 5s and Girls. se

: unny ~ Pictures,” | ales told for Sunday.
‘Merry Little Tales,"| Stories and Pictures for
“Little Tales for Little |. Sunday. = nall
People,” and “Little People | Saneas Bones tS f
and their Pets.” Illustrated. | Firelight Stories, ~

38. 6d. -. Sunlight and Shade,














Fine Feathers, &

Tittle-Tattle Tales,

oer Tones cue Serapes,

andering Ways,

Dumb Friends,

Up & Down the Garden.
Sorts of Adventures.

Our Sunday Stories.

Our Holiday Hours,

Indoors and Out,

Some Farm Friends,

Those Golden Sands,

Our Pretty Pets,

Little Mothers,

Our School-day Hours,

Creatures Tame,

Creatures Wild,

Containing ‘Bible’
tures,” Tales for Sunday,”
“Stories and Pictures for
Sunday,” and ‘* Sunday
Stories for Small People,”
Illustrated 3s. 6d.

Picture Album of all
Sorts. Containing “Up
and Down the Garden,”
‘ All Sorts of Adventures,”
“Our Sunday Stories,” and
“Holiday Hours.” Illus










































ones ; Cassell &C Limited,
The Album for Home, SSE mea TES oe
School, and Play. Con- TCE LP Poggene

taining ‘‘ Indoors and Out,”

“Those Golden Sands,”

“Little Mothers\and their

Children,”'and “Our School

Day Hours.” Illustrated.
6d.





Containing ‘* Scrambles and
Scrapes,” ~ *#Tittle-Tattle

Tales,” “Wandering Ways,”
and ‘Dumb Friends,” 1b -}:
lustrated, 3s. 6d, *

Casselicr Company, Limited,
Ludgate Hill, London. :