Citation
Sea-side and way-side

Material Information

Title:
Sea-side and way-side
Series Title:
Nature readers
Alternate title:
Seaside and wayside
Creator:
Wright, Julia McNair, 1840-1903
King, C. S ( Illustrator )
D.C. Heath and Company ( Publisher )
J.S. Cushing & Co ( Typographer )
Rockwell and Churchill ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
D.C. Heath & Co.
Manufacturer:
Typography by J.S. Cushing & Co. ; Rockwell & Churchill
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1888
Language:
English
Physical Description:
viii, 175, [6] p. : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Natural history -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Seashore animals -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Readers -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Readers ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Julia McNair Wright ; illustrated by C.S. King.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027028775 ( ALEPH )
ALJ0642 ( NOTIS )
243770695 ( OCLC )

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ature Readers.

Saco AND W AYoSEDIn:

No. 2.

BY

JULIA McNAIR WRIGHT.

ILLUSTRATED BY C. S. KING.

* $0 he wandered away and away
With Nature, that dear old nurse,
Who sang to him, night and day,
The songs of the universe.”

Lonereiow, Birthday Poem for Agassiz.

y BOSTON, U.S.A.,
D. C. HEATH & CO., PUBLISHERS.
1897.



CoryrIGHT, 1888,

By Junta McNair WRIGHT,

TypoGRAPHY BY J. 8. Cusuine & Co., Boston, U.S.A.



PRESSWORK BY ROCKWELL & CHURCHILL, BosToN, U.S.A.







PREFACE.

To tHe Boys AND GIRLS :—

In this book we shall together wander a little farther,
by the sea-side and by the way-side. Sometimes we shall walk
on the breezy hills; sometimes in the low, marshy places, where
ferns and rushes grow.

Sometimes we shall stroll along the way-side path, where the
wild-flowers and grasses are woven into a wreath.

Sometimes we shall go to the hard white sand, where the
ocean waves roll to our feet, and bring us shells and curious
treasure from the sea. Again, we shall go down to the still
ponds, where lilies float on the water, and dragon-flies swim in
the air.

Wherever we go, let us keep our eyes open, and our minds
awake, to the lessons of Nature. Then we shall be able to
learn what beauty and wisdom lie hid, even in such humble
things as flies and worms. We shall find much to delight us
in beetles; and be as happy as kings, while we search out the
secrets of airy hunters and marvellous little fishers.

J. M. N. W.



LESSON

I.
rile
TI.
Iv.
Ve
VI.
VI.
VIII.
xe
x
XI.
XI.
XI.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.
XVII.
XVIII.
XIX.
Exo
XXI.
KONI IE
XXII.

CONTENTS.

A Loox at AN ANT

THE
THE
THE
THE
THE

LirE OF AN ANT
Ant’s Home .
Ants at Homer
Ants on A TRIP
FARMER ANTS

ANTS AND THEIR TRADES

THE

Suave Ants .

Wonper ANTS

THE
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.

Ways or ANTS

Worm and His amity .
Earru-worm at Homer -
Worm at Work

Worm’s CorraGk BY THE SEA
Worm av Home

A Loox ar A Housr-Fiy

How tro Loox at A Fry

-Mrs.

Fry AND HER Fors

Or wHat Use art Fries

A Swarm or Fries

Some QurEER Fiirs

In Armor Crap

Wuen Mr. BeerLe was YOuNG

85
38
42
45
48
52
55
5k
61
63
66
69
73



vill

LEsson

XXIV.
XXYV.
XXVI.
XXVII.
XXVIII.
XXIX.
XXX.
XXXI.
XXXII.
XXXII.
XXXIV.
XXXYV.
XXXVI.
XXXVI.
XXXVIII.
XXXIX.
XL.
XLI.
XLII.
XLII.
XLIV.
XLV.

CONTENTS.

Sa mee

How to Learn asout BEETLES
Tue Rose BEETLE . . .
PRINCES AND GIANTS . .
Tue Lirrte SEXTON

Tue Srory oF THE STaG BEETLE
Mr. BreetLe SEEKS FOR A Home
Tue Litrrte Water-Mrn
Wurriicig BEETLES

Wuar a Fisoerman Toip

Mr. BARNACLE AND HIS SON

A Fisuinc Parry

A Last Look at Mr. Barnacle
FLOWERS OF THE SEA

Tue Lire or a JELLY-FisH
SEA-STARS

A Sra-CHANGE

Tue Star-FisH with AN OvERCcOAT

THE Frying FLOWERS

UNDER THE WaTER

A Happy CHANncE

Tue DracGon-FLy aNnp HIs COUSINS
Toe Wines or THE Dracon-FLy

Review LeEssons 5 ; ‘ : e

Pace
76
79
83
87
92
95
99

104
107
110
114
117
120
123
128
132
135
140
144
149
152
156

163



SEA-SIDE AND WAVY-SIDE.

—ofa40o—_

LESSON LI.
A LOOK AT AN ANT.

You have been told’ that an insect is a living creature
with a body made in rings, and divided into three
parts. Most insects have six legs, four wings, and
two feelers.

There is a great Order of insects which we shall call
the hook-wing family.

The wasp, the bee, the saw-fly, and ant belong to this
family. They are the chief of all the insects.

' They can do many strange and curious things.

You will know insects of this great family by their
wings. The front wings are larger than the back
ones. They fold back over them when at rest.

In flight the upper wings hook fast to the lower.’

If you look carefully at some kinds of insects, you will
soon say I have told you what is not quite true.

1 First Book, Nature Readers. 2 See First Book, p. 28.



aCe

SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

et

Why will you think that? You will say to me,
«The fly has two wings, and not TOUT ae Ene
ant has no wings at all.”

but wait until you study about ants and flies, and
see if you will then think the same way.

The mouth of all the hook-wing insects has two jaws

for cutting.

These insects have two big eyes, one on each side of

‘the head. Between the two big eyes they have
some little ones, on the top of the head.

You sce insects are as well supplied with eyes as crabs

are with legs.

The back part of an insect’s body is made fast to the

The
The

Get

middle part by a small joint, or thread. That is
because the insect needs to bend, or even double
itself up, in some of its work.

Hook-wing Order is divided into two great kinds.
insects of one kind carry a little saw. The others
carry a sword. The sword is a sting. The saw
is to cut up leaves and wood to make nice soft
nests or houses for the eggs. The sword is to fight
with, or to kill things for food. Among the saw-
carriers is the fine, long fly, called a saw-fly. Bees,
ants, wasps, and others carry the sting.

one of these insects, and you will see all the parts

of which I have told you.



A LOOK AT AN ANT.

—

Let us first take an ant to look at.
The head of an ant seems very large for its body, and

Oo

the eyes seem very large for the head. The third
or back part of the body is made in six rings.

On the tip or pointed end of the hind part of the body
is the sting. On the part of the body, next the
head, are set the six legs. These legs, and also the
feet, have joints.

The wings are set on the upper side of the middle part
of the body. The legs are set on its under side.
There are four wings,— two large and two small
ones. The upper wings are larger than the lower
ones.

Now I hear you cry out, “Oh, my ant has no wings!”
Well, let me tell you a secret. The wings of your
ant have been cut off, or unhooked, as you shall
hear by and eby.

There are many families of ants. Hach has its own
name and its own ways. All ants are very
wise in their actions. I shall tell you many
strange things about them. Ants have always
been called “the wise insects.” Would you not
like to learn something about them ?

Before you study the ants in any book, I wish you
would go out into your garden or into the fields.
Find an ant-hill, and sit or lie by it for an hour



4 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

a

or so. Take some sugar or
bits of cake to feed the ants.
Find out for yourselves all that



you can about them. Facts
that you learn in this way will
be worth very much to you.

—_00$¢40-0—_—_.

LESSON II.
THE LIFE OF AN ANT.

In ant-hills we find drone ants,
queen ants, and worker ants.
The drone ants have no sting
and do no work. Their bodies
are longer and more slim than
those of queens. The drone
ants have wings.

The queen ants also have wings.
They have stings, and their
bodies are round and dark.

The workers are smaller than queens
and drones. They are also
darker, and have no wings and
no stings. Workers are of two



sizes, large and small. They



THE LIFE OF AN ANT. o

are the builders, nurses, soldiers, and servants
of the others.

In an ant-hill there may be many queens at one time.
Often the ant-queens work. They are both
mothers and queens. They will also act as sol-
diers. The queen ant is not like the queen
bee, who will allow no other queen to live near
her.

The word “queen” may make you think that this ant
rules the rest. That is not so. Ants have no
leader and no ruler. Each ant seems to act as
it pleases.

The chief work of the queen ant is to lay eggs. Ina
short time, out of each egg comes a lively, hungry,
little baby ant. It is called a larva. A larva is
like a small white worm.

This little being needs to be washed, fed, kept warm
and dry, and taken into the airand sun. It must
be cared for, very much as the baby in your home
is cared for.

The workers, who act as nurses, are very kind to the
young larve. How do they wash these little

things? They lick them all over, as the cat licks
the kitten. They use such care that they keep
them nearly as white as snow.

The nurses feed the baby ants four or five times each



6 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

day. The nurses prepare the food in their crops,
to make it soft and fit for the little ants. .

The nurses stroke and smooth the larva baby. It seems
as if they patted and petted it. When the weather
is cold, they keep the larvee’* in-doors. When it
is warm and dry, they hurry to carry them up to
the top of the hill. They place them there to
bask in the sun.

If any rain comes, or the hill is broken, the nurses run
to carry the babies to a safe place.

When the larva is full grown, it spins around itself a
little fine net, which wraps it all up. When
people see these white bundles in the ant-hills,
they call them “ant-eggs.” They are not eggs.
They are pupa-cases. In them the baby ants are
getting ready to come out, with legs and wings,
as full-grown ants.

The pupa-cases are of several sizes. The largest ones
are for queens and drones. The next size holds
large workers; the smallest cases hold the smallest

‘workers.

There are often in the hills very wee ants called dwarf
ants. When you study more about ants in other
books, you can learn about the dwarfs.

After the ants have been in the little cases some time,

1 When we mean only one we say larva; when we mean more than one we
say larve.



THE LIFE OF AN ANT. q



they are ready to come out. The nurse ants help
them to get free.

Many hundreds come out of the cases. They crowd
the old home so full that they can scarcely find
room to move about.

Then they see the light shine in at the little gates on
the top of the hill. They feel the warmth of the
sun. They crawl out.

They push upon each other. The hill is not wide and
high enough for so many uncles and cousins and
sisters and brothers.

Young ants, like young people, wish to set up for them-
selves in a new home. They spread their fine
wings. Off they fly !

They swarm as the bees do. As they rise high from
the earth, they drift off on the wind.

Very many of them tire out and die, or are blown into
the water, and are drowned.

A few live and settle on places fit for a new ant-hill.
Tt is the mother or queen ant, who chooses the
new home.

When she has found the right place, what do you think

-she does? She takes off her wings, as she does
not care to fly any more.

The ant does not tear off her wings. She unhooks
them, and lets them fall away, and does not seem

to miss them.



8 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

LESSON III.

THE ANT’S HOME.

A
Lt = iL pe ,
OS i, Kis K- Es



THE NEW HOME.

Ants live in nests, made in the earth. We call them
ant-hills, from the shape of the part that is above
ground. It is the queen ant who begins to build
the ant-hill.

Like the mother wasp, the ant works on her nest until
enough ants grow up to do all the work. After
that, like the queen bee, she does no work. The
work ants will not allow her to go from home.’

When the ant finds a place for her home, she takes off

"her wings. They would be in her way while she
worked. Then she begins to dig. She acts at

1 For Lessons on Bees and Wasps, see First Book.



THE ANTS HOME. 9

ete

first much as your dog does when he digs after a
chipmunk or a rabbit.

The ant lays her big head close to the ground. With
her fore-feet she digs up the soil, and tosses it
back between her hind legs. She digs as her
cousin, Mrs. Wasp, digs.

She keeps waving her little feelers, as if to find out the
kind of soil. Soon she has a hole deep enough to
cover her body. It is too deep for her to throw
out the dirt with her feet. Now she uses her feet,
and her jaws, also, to dig with.

She rolls and moulds the earth into little balls. She
carries each ball out. Where the soil is sandy, she
takes it out, grain by grain. At first, she must
back out of her hole. Soon her hall-way is so
wide that she can turn about after she has backed
a few steps.

Ants are very kind to each other in their work. If
they push or tread on each other in their haste,
they never fight about it. |

The ants know how to work and how to rest. After
a little hard work they stop, clean their bodies,
take some food, and sleep.

As the making of the hall goes on, the ants bite off
with their jaws bits of dirt, and roll them up
with their feet. They soon use the hind part



10 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

-Ah 9e-

of the body to press and push the earth into a
firm pall.

When the hall is two or three inches long, they make
a room. The rooms are for eggs, for larve, for
pup,’ and for food.

People who have studied much about ants have had
them build nests in glass jars. Thus they have

been able to see how they work.





SAPPERS AND MINERS. 4
*

To make a room, the ants often have to stand on their
hind legs, and bite the earth off, as they reach up
their heads. Sometimes the ant lies on its side, to
clean off or smooth the side wall. They have
been seen at work, lying on their backs, as men
do in mines. 7

The jaws of the ant have tiny teeth. In old work ants
the teeth are often quite worn off.

1 Pupa is used when we speak of one, and pupew when we mean more than

one.



THE ANTS AT HOME. 1]

to

The feet and jaws of the ant are well made for digging.
The feet have small hairs. By the aid of these the
ants can run up a piece of glass, or hang on a wall,
as you would say, “upside down.”

An ant-hill is made of very many little halls and. rooms.
Some open into each other; some do not. The
rooms are bed-rooms, nurseries, pantries, and din-
Ing-rooms.

Many of the rooms are shaped like a horseshoe. Some
are round.

The ants press and knead the floors and walls to make
them hard and smooth. Sometimes they line them
with a sticky soil, like paste, to keep the earth from
falling in.

/Some ants seem to make a kind of glue, or varnish,
with which they line their walls.

——00 £§3,0-0-—_-

‘LESSON IV.
THE ANTS AT HOME.

We have taken a look at the ants and have seen how
the hill is made. Let us now see how the ants live
in their hill-home.

When we go to visit them, we shall find ants running
all about the hill and in the halls. These are the



12 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

te

work ants. Some seem to stand on the hill to
watch lest any danger may come near. -

When the drone ants and the queens are young, the
work ants let them go out and fly. When they go
out, the drones do not often come back. They get
lost or die.

The young queens come back, except those who go off to
make new hills. But when the young queen set-
tles down in life, to her work of laying eggs, the
workers do not let her leave the hill any more.

How do they keep her in? If she has not taken off
her pretty wings, they take them off and throw
them away! If she tries to walk off, a worker
picks her up in its jaws and carries her back.

The ants are kind to their queen. They feed her and |
pet her, and she becomes very lazy. She does not
even care to lay her eggs in a nice clean place.

The idle queen drops her eggs anywhere. The kind
worker ants pick them up, and take them to a soft
bed-room.

When there are too many young queens in one hill,
they do not have a war, as the bees do. The
workers settle the trouble, by taking off the wings
of some of the young queens, and turning them
into work ants. This is done before the queens
begin to lay eggs.



THE ANTS AT HOME. 13

te

New-born ants and queens, who do not go out into the
sunshine are of a light color. The other ants are
dark.

In cold, wet weather the ants stay at home. If a rain
comes up when they are out, they hurry home.
Early in the day, and late in the afternoon, they
all seem very busy. In the hot hours of the day
they stay in the hill and rest.

In very hot lands the ants stir about all winter. Such
ants lay up stores of food. You shall hear of them
by and by. In cooler lands, during winter, the .
ants are asleep, or, as we say, are torpid.

The young swarms usually go outin autumn. I have
seen very large swarms in the spring.

Ants like sugar and honey best of all food. They get
honey from flowers, and in other ways of which
T will soon tell you. Some like seeds which have
a sweet taste. For this reason they eat some
kinds of grass-seeds, oats, apple-seeds, and such
things.

Ants take their food by licking it. Their little rough
tongues wear away bits of the seed ; they also suck
up the oil and juice. They seem to press the food
with their jaws.

It has been found out that they know how to moisten
their food and make it soft. If you give them



' 414 SEA-SIDE AND WAY~SIDE.

dry sugar or cake, they turn it into a kind of paste
or honey.

If you put a nest of ants into a large glass jar, and put
some food near by for the ants to eat, they may set-
tle down in the jar, to make a home. If you cover
the outside of the jar with thick, dark paper, the
ants may build close to the glass. Then, when
you take off the paper, you will be able to see the
halls and storerooms.

You might put such a jar in a safe place out of doors.
Then you would be able to study the ants, as they
roam around near by, or do their work inside the

jar.

LESSON V.
THE ANTS ON A TRIP.

Tue round hole in the ant-hill is called the gate. The
ants can close it, if they like, with a bit of stone.
Often there are two, three, or even more, gates
for one ant-hill. Once I saw a hill with six large
gates.

Now I will tell you of a very queer ant-hill. It was
made by big, black ants, in a little valley be-
tween two hills of sand.



THE ANTS ON A TRIP. 16

oe

Into this valley had blown a very large sheet of thick
paper. It had been around a ham and was very
greasy. It had lain on the ground, crumpled up,
in sun, and snow, and rain, for a year.

By that time it was hard and stiff, and weeds had
grown up about it. One day, as I was going
by, I saw ants running in and out of the folds
of the paper. I took a stick and turned the top
fold open like a lid.



ON THE MARCH

It was full of ants and of white pupa-cases. The
ants, I think, liked the folds of the paper for
halls, and the larger wrinkles for rooms. They
had found out how to have a house without much
work in making it.

But when I opened the hill, they ran in swarms to
pick up the white bundles. Poor things! They
did not know where to go for safety. So I laid



16 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

te

the lid of their house back in its place, and soon
they were quiet again.

Now I will tell you how ants move from one house
to another. One day, I saw by my garden path -
a line of ants moving all one way. They were
black ants.

They went two by two, or one and two, close to each
other. Every one had in its jaws a white bundle.
I found that they all came from an ant-hill.
They came up out of the gate very fast, one by
one, each with its bundle.

About two or three inches from this line of ants I
saw another line. This line went to the hill,
not from it. They went in good order.

They had no bundles when they went into the hill;
when they came out, each had a bundle, and
joined the other line of ants.

I went along with the stream of ants that had the
white bundles. I found that they went to a
new hill, about thirty feet from the old hill.

There they laid down their bundles, and went back
to the old hill to bring more. The bundles lay
heaped in a ring all about the gate of the new
city. a

Out of this gate ran up other ants in haste. They
caught up the bundles, one by one, and carried



THE ANTS ON A TRIP. 17



them in. In about half an hour they were nearly
all taken in, and the ants brought no more. The
moving was over.

With a long blade of grass, | gently took up a little
bundle. I hid it behind a stone, some six inches
off. I took three bundles and hid them, lifting
them with the tip of the grass-blade.

When all the bundles left at the hill were carried in,
the ants went down the gates. But in a min-
ute out came three or four ants. They ran
about wildly and searched the ground.

They went in circles and looked over the ground with
much care. The circles grew wider. At last one
came up behind the stone and found the bundles.

The ant picked up one bundle and ran. Then this
ant met the other ants, and, I think, told them
the news. For at once the other ants ran up to
the stone, and each took up a bundle.

Then they all ran into the hill. Can ants count?
That looked as if they knew how many bundles
they had. It also looked as if they knew that
two ants must go for two bundles.

A man who took bundles from a march in this way
thinks that the ants smell the hidden bundles.
He says they will not search for them if you
hide them in the earth.



18 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

eee

LESSON Vf.
THE FARMER ANTS.

You have heard of the spider which
makes a den in the ground.
You know that it puts a trap-
door on its den, and plants
ferns on the door to hide it.’

The spider turns gardener in this
way, and all his plants grow
well. There is an ant that has
a farm, or garden.

This ant lives in warm lands. In
this country they are found in
Texas, Florida, and in one or
two other warm States.

These farmer ants raise grain to
eat. The grain is a kind of





grass with a large seed. It is

called by some “ ant-rice.”



There is also a large ant which is
fond of the seeds of the sun-

3 i iN
all

THE LITTLE FARMER. 1 See First Book, p. 63.



THE FARMER ANTS. ~ 19

tt

flower. It is said that the ants plant the sun-
flowers in a ring around their hill.

The ants have not been seen to carry the seed and
plant it. So we may not be quite sure that
they do so. .

But it is very possible that the ant does plant seeds.
You see there are yet in the world many things
left for you to find out. It will be well for you
to keep your eyes open.

The farmer ants do not live in a small hill that you
could cover with your hand. Their hill, or disk,
is sometimes flat, and sometimes high. It is
often as large as a large room. It is in the shape
of a circle.

In this circle all weeds and all kinds of grasses are
cut down, except the one kind which the ants |
like. The earth of the disk is kept clean and
smooth. Only the seeds of the ant-rice are left
to grow.

When the ant-rice is ripe, the ants pick up the seeds
as they fall, and take them into the hill to their
storerooms.

It is most likely that as the ants let this ant-rice, and
nothing else, grow on their hills, it sows itself
by its fallen seed.

Still the ants are real farmers, as they keep their



20 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

gage

land clean. They tend and gather the crop,
store it up, and eat it.

When the ant-rice is ripe, and the seeds have fallen,
the ants cut down the old stems, and take them
away. ‘The disk is then clean for the next crop.

The ants will go a long way from their hill to find
seeds to bring home. They like to go where
horses have fed, for there they find scattered
oats. In some lands they carry off much grain
from the fields.

An ant in Florida climbs the stalk of the millet and
cuts off the seeds. When ants take seeds to their
hill, they husk and clean them. They throw: bad
seeds away.

The ants watch the seeds, and after rains carry them
out to dry im the sun. This is because if left
wet, they would sprout and grow.

Some ants also cut the seed, so that it will not sprout.

The ants eat the seeds that they gather. They also
feed their young with them.

One ant in Florida rolls up into little balls the dust,
or pollen, of pine cones, and stores that up to eat.

An ant in New Jersey cuts in pieces the little new
pine-trees, just as they get above the ground,
and carries them to its nest.

1 See Third Book.



ANTS AND THEIR TRADES. 21



Did you ever see the ant which likes sunflower seeds
to eat? It is a large ant, and when it has climbed
to the disk of the sunflower, it pulls out one of
the ripe seeds and carries it away.

When people keep a nest of ants in order to watch
their ways, they feed them with sugar, oats, apple-
seeds, and wheat.

How does the ant eat the hard grain? Its tongue is
like a file, or something like that of the little
shell-fish of which I told you.’ The ant can rasp,
file, and press the grain, so it can get at and lick
up the oil and juice.

00 Sf§0-0—-—

i toesON Ave

ANTS AND THEIR TRADES.

Since you know that bees, ants.” and wasps all belong
to the same great family of living creatures,
you will not wonder that many of their ways are
alike.

You know there are wasps and bees that live alone.

You have read how, in the spring, Mrs. Social Wasp
builds her home and raises a brood of babies.

1 See First Book, p. 86.
2 For lessons on Wasps, Bees, and Spiders, see First Book.



22 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

tt

These, as soon as full-grown, begin to build more
rooms and nurse the next babies. Mrs. Ant does
as Mrs. Wasp does.

Mrs. Ant begins a new hill, and as her children grow
they help her. But Mrs. Ant does not often begin
her hill in the spring. She chooses the early fall!
to begin work.

As the eggs change into working ants, Mrs. Ant gets
plenty of help in her work.

You have seen bees swarm, and hang in a bunch, or
curtain. Ants also cling together and form balls.
But this is for warmth or safety. It is called
“snugging.’ In some lands, in times of flood, ants
form balls as large as your play ball. Thus they
can float on the water, and do not drown.

As Mrs. Wasp makes paper, so Mrs. Ant can make a
thin paper, for her nest. But it is poor paper,
not so good as Mrs. Wasp makes. Mrs. Wasp is
the chief of the paper-makers.

I told you how one Mrs. Bee cuts leaves to line her
nest. So one Mrs. Ant does. With cut leaves
she lines a neat little nest. As the spider makes
a fine spun ball to put her babies m, there is an
ant that makes a woolly nest.

You have read of the Tower Spider, that builds a neat
tower of sticks, straw, and grass over her nest.



ANTS AND THEIR TRADES. 23

a

There is an ant that thatches its hill in much the
same way.

There is a brown ant that is a mason. She makes her
nest of little balls of mud, laid up like bricks in
a wall.

Then there is a carpenter ant, as there is a carpenter
bee. These carpenters cut their way into trees
and logs. In this manner they do much harm.

These ants hollow out the inside of a tree, or beam,
until it is ready to fall to pieces.

Besides their other trades, the ants know the trade of
war. There are soldier ants. Ants are mild and
kind to eaeh other while at work. But they are
brave, and have armies for war.

It is odd to-see how much ant ways and ant soldiers
are like human ways and human soldiers. |

The ants make war to get slaves, or servants. I will
tell you more of that in the next lesson. They
also make war to get cows, as you will hear by and
by. They seem to have some other reasons for war.

When the ant army marches, it keeps in line and order.
It seems to have captains to rule and lead it.
Scouts go before to seek out the way.

The ant-hill has some soldiers for sentries, to see that
no danger comes near. When a work ant gets
into trouble, it will run to a soldier for help.



24 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE. .

th

The soldier ants do not appear to be cross. They have
very large heads, as if they wore big hats. Some
of them have smooth heads and some, hairy heads.
They eat much and love to sleep.

The soldier ants do not do much work. They rouse up
only for a battle. In an ant-hill, the soldiers are
larger, and often more in number, than the other
ants.

The workers are the smallest ants in a hill. There are
fewer queens than any other kind, except after the
drone ants go off and die. At that time there are
very few drones.

In a battle, two ants will often cling to each other by

~ their jaws, until both die. The usual way in which
an ant soldier kills a foe is by cutting off the head.

Sometimes the battle ends without any killing At
other times the ants are very fierce, and large
numbers are cut to pieces,

When strange ants get into a hill, sometimes they are
driven out; sometimes they are killed; sometimes
they are treated kindly.

[I put a black ant into the gate of a city of brown
ants. You should have seen how they drove him
out! He ran as if he were wild with fear.
Three or four brown ants came after him to the
edge of their hill.



THE SLAVE ANTS. 95

oe

But though some strange ants are cast out so fiercely,
there are two or three kinds of beetles which go
into ant-hills and live with the ants. The ants do
not. harm them in any way. You shall hear about
that when we have some lessons about beetles.

——070500—_

LESSON VIIL.

THE SLAVE ANTS.



THE PARASOL ANTS.

Now I must tell you about the slave ants and their
owners. The chief family of the slave-making
ants is called “The Shining,” for its body shines
with a gloss like varnish. -

The slave-making ants and their slaves are found_in

many parts of the world. The masters are of a
light or red color, with a bright gloss. The slave
ants are dark or black.



26 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

Tn nests where slaves are held the masters never do any
work. They make war and steal slaves, or slave
babies.

The slave ants do all the work. Ifa war rises, they also
fight for the hill and their owners.

The army of the slave makers will march to the hill of
a tribe of ants which they wish to seize for slaves.
They carry off the pupa cases, where the little new
ants are getting legs and wings.

These baby ants are taken to the hill of the owners and
brought up with their own young. No slave-ant
egos are laid in a hill, for the queens lay all the
egos, and the queens are not slaves. The slaves.

- are stolen when they are eggs, or larvee.

The owners seem to be very kind to their little slaves,
and as the slaves grow up and fill the hill they
seem to do very much as they please.

The slaves build new hills and take their owners to live
in the new home. If a mistress ant wishes to
wander off her hill, her slaves drag her back. If
she does not wish to move to a new home, her
slaves carry her off, all the same.

The slave-owning ants walk about their hill in an idle
way. If war comes, then they fight bravely.

The owners do not build the house, nor nurse their
babies, nor feed themselves. Often they do not even



THE SLAVE ANTS, 27

ee

clean their own bodies. They leave all these
duties to the slaves. The slaves feed their owners,
and brush and clean them, as a servant cleans his
master’s coat. When the ants are to make a
move, the slaves pick up their masters, and carry
them away.

How can they do that? The ants carry all burdens in
their jaws. The slave and the master lock their
jaws, the owner curls up the back of her body,
and the slave carries her off.

The grip of an ant’s jaws is very strong. She can
carry things much larger than her own body.

There is an ant which uses the pine needles for food.
She carries the bits of pine laid over her back,
much as a man carries a gun. There is a little
groove in this ant’s head, where the bits of pine
rest.

There is an ant called the “parasol ant,” because it
cuts off tiny bits of leaf, and carries them along.
Each ant holds a piece of leaf over its head, like a
parasol.

An army of this kind on the march looks very funny.
These ants line their nests with the bits of leaf, to
keep the dirt from falling in.

These parasol ants are very large. Their nests cover a
large space. The bits of leaf are cut about the



28 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

size of a dime. The ants carry them in their jaws,
each piece by a little end left for a stem.

We have some parasol ants in this country, in
Florida and Texas, and there are many of them

in South America.

——-070300—

LESSON IX,
WONDER ANTS.

You may perhaps read of what are called “Termites,”
or White Ants. You must not think that these
are true ants, for they are not. They belong to
another Order of insects. They have four wings
all of the same size. But true ants have one
pair of wings smaller than the other. The white
ants live in the ground and also in trees. They
do much harm by gnawing wood and trees. They
swarm into houses, and eat. the tables and chairs”
and such things. They eat all kinds of food.
They are much like real ants in their ways.

There are many of them in our country.

Now you must hear about the ants that keep cows. -I
have told you that ants like honey. They take
all their food by lapping and sucking it. They
suck honey from flowers.



WONDER ANTS. 29

ee

If you look at the plants in the garden or house, you
may see on the leaves some very small green
things, that seem to eat the leaves. Your mother
will tell you these are “plant lice,” and that they
spoil her plants.

The name of this little insect is Aphis. That is a
very pretty name. The aphis is very small, and
is often of the color of the leaf it feeds on.

This wee thing can make honey in its body much as bees
do. But the aphis does not store up the honey;
it drops it on the leaf as it feeds. This is called
“honey dew.”

The ants eat the honey dew from the leaves, and they
know that it comes from the aphis. They stroke
and tap the aphis with their feelers, so that more
dew will be let fall.

Have you seen the milkmaid go from cow to cow, and
fill her pail with milk? So the ants go from one
aphis to another, until they get all the honey they
want. — ;

The ants can carry home this honey, and give it to
others. The nurse ants will carry it tc the baby
ants. The workers take it to the quéens, owners,
and soldiers.

The aphis is called “the ant’s cow.” A hill of ants will
seem to own a herd of these wee green cows.



30 SEA-SIDE AND WAY--SIDE.

od

They go to them on their leaf, and get the honey.
They know and claim their own cows. It is just
like having a drove of cows in pasture, as the
farmer does.

But you know that people often keep cows in stables
and feed them there. The ant has this way also.

There is a kind of aphis that loves the dark and feeds
on roots. Some ants keep a herd of these, hidden
in the ground. They pet, stroke, and clean them
to get their honey dew.

Ants have been seen to fight for days over a herd of
aphis-cows. One hill of ants had no cows, and
they tried to steal the cows that belonged to
another hill.

After four days the lady that watched them got twenty
cows, and gave them to the hill that had none.

Then the war ended.

The ants which got the new cows seemed very glad.
They licked and petted the cows, and put them in
a safe place. They took honey from them and fed
the soldiers.

This seems just like a fairy tale. But it is quite true.
All these things can be seen if you look out for
them. But you must be patient and anxious to
learn.

In warm summer days, when your mother tells you that



THE WAYS OF ANTS. 31

a

it is too hot to run about much,
what will you do? Why not
make a tent of an umbrella,
placed near an ant-hill, and
watch these pretty and curi-
ous little creatures?

—~0795 00———_

LESSON X.

THE WAYS OF ANTS.

I wave told you that ants like
honey and sweets. They will
also suck the juices and soft
parts of many other kinds of
food. Some ants eat nearly
everything that can be eaten.

Almost all ants will eat other in-
sects, and suck the eggs or pups
of other insects. This habit
makes ants very useful. Cer-
tain worms and bugs that de-
stroy orange trees and cotton
plants are killed by ants.

Ants also eat other insects that in-



jure men. If a coat that has (QUEER CAPERS.



32 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

the

these on it is laid near an ant-hill, in an hour or
two the ants will have made it quite clean.

You have seen a fly sit and clean her body and wings.
She does this by drawing her feet over her head
and body. So you have seen the cat clean her fur
coat with her paws and tongue. ‘The ant washes
or brushes herself in just such a way.

The ant is very neat and clean in her habits. She
takes many naps in a day, and after each nap she
brushes herself. She brushes herself tidy after
work and after taking food

The action of the ant in cleansing herself is much like
that of the cat. The ant has on her foreleg a
little comb, shaped like your thumb. With this
she strokes and combs all dust and dirt from her
body.

If you watch an ant as she dresses herself, you will see
that she draws her fore-foot through her mouth.
This is to clean the comb and to make it moist, so
that it will do its work well.

The ant has also little brushes on her other feet; so
you see there is no reason why she should not keep
herself very trim and tidy.

Ants are very neat about their nests. They carry out
all husks of grain and*seeds and all dead bodies.
They carry these quite off their hill.



THE WAYS OF ANTS. 33

i

I knew of an ant’s nest that had been set on a post in
water. It was kept clean by the ants. They soon
learned to drop all refuse over into the water.
That is as the sailor does, when he cleans his ship.

Ants bury their dead. When an ant dies, some of the
other ants pick up the body to carry it off and
bury it. They do not like to put dead bodies near
their hill. The ants will carry the dead ones round
and round, till they find a good place for them.

A lady who spent much time in the study of ants said
that the slave-owning ants do not bury the slaves
with the masters. They put the dead slaves in
one place and the owners in another.

Ants will now and then change their home. They
leave an old hill and make a new one. When
they do this, if some of the ants do not seem ready
to leave the old hill, the others drag them off by
force.

Most ants have very good eyes, and can see above
ground and under ground. But there is one kind
of ant that is blind.

Ants can bite with their sharp jaws. They also have
a sting. They seldom use it if they are let alone.
Some ants have quite a sharp sting. The sting is
on the hind part of the ant’s body.

A sting is made in three parts. There is the sac for



34. SEA-SIDE. AND WAY-SIDE.

noe

poison, the needle which gives the prick, and the
case to keep the needle or prickle in. This needle,
of a light color, is like a little thorn.

The ant seizes with its jaws the part which it wishes
to sting. Then it lifts its body up on the hind
legs, and swings its sting part under, so that it
can drive the sting into the place held by the jaws.

The sting does not do much harm to people, but will
no doubt kill ants and other insects.

Ants make also a kind of juice called “ant acid.”
They can throw this about when the hill is dis-
turbed.

This acid must be pretty strong. It will make a dog
sneeze and rub his nose. The ant uses it to keep
dogs, mice, beetles, and such things, away from
the ant-hill.

T have told you that some ants harm trees and plants
by gnawing or cutting them. It is only fair now
to tell you that ants help plants to grow. As
they creep into flowers for honey, they carry
about from flower to flower the dust or pollen
which makes new seeds grow. This dust sticks to
the ant’s body, and what is taken from one flower
is carried to another. Bees also carry pollen.

Thus, you see that the ants help the flowers, which in
their turn give food to the ants. But, of course,



MR. WORM AND HIS FAMILY. 35

the ants do not know what they are doing for the
flowers." Nor do the bees know that they help
the flowers. The bees and ants do not know that
pollen sticks to them, to be carried about. :

These lessons about the ant contain only a few of the
many things that can be said of this+insect. I
hope you will like the ants well enough to get
other books about them, and study and watch the
ants for yourselves.

—0590400-—

LESSON XI.

MR. WORM AND HIS FAMILY.



LIKE AND NOT LIKE.

OnE day I saw a boy making a hole in the ground,
and he dug out a worm.

1$ee Third Book,



36 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

I said to the boy, “What can you tell me about
worms ?”

The boy said, “ Worms are long, soft things, alike at
both ends. If you cut one in two, each end goes
off, and makes a whole new worm. They have
no heads and no feet and no feelings, and are no
good but for fish-bait.”

That boy thought he knew all about worms. But
really he knew very little about them. All that
he had told me was wrong.

Worms belong to the great class of ringed, or jointed,
animals. These creatures have bodies made in
rings or joints.

Let us take a careful look at our humble friend, the
earth worm.

He is a long, round, soft, dark, slimy thing, and you
say “He is alike at both ends.”

Is he? Let us see. His body is made of from one
hundred to two hundred rings. These rings are
smaller toward the two ends of the body, which
are the head and tail.

Each ring has on it tiny hooks, too small for you to
see. These hooks take the place of the jointed
feet that his cousins have. The feet on a cater-
pillar will show you about how these hooks would
look, if you could see them.



MR.. WORM AND HIS FAMILY. 37

ee

By these hooks the worm moves along, and digs his
way in the ground. Mr. Worm can hold so fast
to his den or hole, that you have hard work to
pull him out.

Have you seen Mr. Robin brace his feet and tug with
all his might, when he pulls out a worm? ‘The
worm is holding fast by his hooks.

You see the hooks are Mr. Worm’s feet. Let us now
look for his head. You have five senses. You can
hear, see, feel, smell, taste. The worm can feel
and taste. Some think he can smell some things.
He cannot see or hear.

Why do we say he has a head, if he has no eyes nor
ears nor nose? We say he has a head because
he has a mouth and a brain.

His mouth has two lips. The upper lip is larger than
the under. He has no teeth. In the back of his
head, not far from his mouth, is his brain, or
nerve-centre.

The worm is the only jointed animal that has red
blood. . Mr. Worm is dark-colored because his
body is full of the earth which he swallows.

If you keep him out of the earth for a while, his skin
will get pale and clear. Then you can see his
red blood run in two long veins. He needs fresh
air to keep this red blood pure. He dies very
soon if he is shut up in a close box or case.



_ 388 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

en

LESSON XII.
MR. EARTH-WORM AT HOME,

I rotp you-the earth-worm has two veins. One runs
down his back, the other runs along the under
side of his body.

There are tiny holes, like pin. pricks, in his body.
These are for the air to reach his blood, to keep
it red and pure.

In his body poor Mr.. Worm has something that no
other creature has. He has two bags or sacks for
lime. This is in some way to help him with his food.

Mr. Worm has no teeth with which to grind his food.
He has inside his body. small bits of stone. These
are as small as grains of sand. They are instead
of teeth to grind his food.

When you study birds you will find that, like Mr.
Worm, they have no teeth. They, too, carry little
millstones inside their bodies.

The little bags of lime help to grind or change the
worm’s food in some way, not yet well known.

The soft body of the worm will stretch like India-rub-
ber. It will hold a great deal of food.



MR. EARTH-WORM AT HOME. 39

to

Now you see that Mr. Worm is noé alike at both ends.
One end has the head, the stomach, the parts
that serve for a brain, and a heart.

The hooks begin at the fourth ring behind the head.
Look at the worm when he lifts his head, and you
will see his mouth.

The tail end has very strong hooks with which to hold
fast to his cell. This tail end is also his trowel,
or mould, a too] with which this poor, ugly worm
helps to build the world.

Ah! now I have told you a great thing, a strange
thing. Is it true that the feeble, useless worm
helps to build the world? Where is that boy who
knew 30 much about worms ?

But before you hear how the worm helps to build the
world, let us go back to what the boy said. He
said, “If you cut the worm in two, each end will
go off and be a whole worm.”

That is not true of the worm. When the worm is cut
in two, the parts do not die at once. As there
are hooks and rings on each part, they each can
move off.

It is thought that if the fore part is left safe, the cut
can close wp, and the worm can still live. A new
tail may grow upon the front part, as Mr. Crab’s
new claw or eye-peg grows.



40 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ot

But the hind part cannot live and grow. It cannot
get a new mouth or heart, so it can take no food,
and have no blood. So the hind part soon dries
up and dies.

The boy told me that the worm “had no feelings.” A
worm can feel. The sense of touch is the best
sense it has. Put your finger on its body, and
see 1t move and shrink.

The worm cannot hear. It moves off as you come

near, because it feels the jar of the earth.

The worm cannot see. Creatures that live under
ground have but little use for eyes. Fishes that
live in dark cave-rivers have no eyes.

If the worm moves from the light and hides from it,
it is because it feels the action of light on its skin.
It does not see the light.

What does Mr. Worm eat? Some tell you that he eats
dirt. It is true that he fills his body full of earth.
That is to carry it to the top of the ground. Mr.
Crab has claws and legs to bend into the shape
of a basket. Poor Mr. Worm has no arms, legs,
or claws, so he must make a basket of himself.

Suppose you should be sent for fruit, and turn your-
self mto a basket in that way! Your mamma
might find fault. She would not wish you to act

like 1 worm.



MR. EARTH-WORM AT HOME, 4]

It is true that the worm may find a little food in the
earth which he swallows. But the chief food of
the worm is dead leaves and stems of plants. It
does not care for fresh, live leaves and stems and
roots.

The worm also likes meat,— fat, raw, or cooked. Worms
will gnaw or suck the bodies of dead worms. We
say worms gnaw. As they have no teeth, they do
not really gnaw. They pinch off what they eat.

Worms like onions and cabbage best of all food. They
like water, and must live in damp places.

When the worm gets food into its mouth, the rings of
its body begin to move out and in. They look as
if they were opening and shutting. By this mo-
tion they press the food down into the body.

When the worm wants to move, it stretches out its
body to its full length. Then it takes hold of the
earth with its hooks. Next it draws up its body,
and so moves on. This is a wave-like motion,
you see.

Watch it, and you will see that it travels with a mo-
tion like waves.

If you wish to find worms to study, you must seek for
them in early morning or late in the evening.
You will be likely to find them when all the earth
is moist with dew, or when it is raining.



42, SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

Worms hurry to the surface of the soil to enjoy the
falling rain. When there is a long, dry time, the
worms go down deeper and deeper into the earth.
You cannot find them when you dig for them.

—-059400—_

LESSON XIII.
MR. WORM AT WORK.

Worms are found in all parts of the world. I have
told you that they help to build the world, and
make it fit for the home of man.

Man cannot live without food. He gets his food from
the earth. The worms help to fit the earth to
bring forth the food of man.

Oh, this is very strange, that humble and dirty worms
can be a help toman! Man is the highest of all
animals. Worms are nearly the lowest. And
can worms help man?

Now let us see how this is done.

The worms live under ground. They make long, wind-
ing halls, like streets, some inches below the top
soil. These halls, or little tunnels, help to keep
the earth loose, so that the fine roots of the plants
can grow well in it.

These tunnels also serve to help the air move more



MR. WORM AT WORK. 43

re

easily through the soil. By their constant motion
below the surface the worms till the earth, as
rakes, spades, or ploughs till it above.

All this is of great use, and people say, “Many worms,
rich land.” Now and then you will hear, on the
other hand, that the worms have eaten up the seed
sown. Or, people say the worms have bitten off
the roots of the plants. Some say that the worms
cut the vines below the soil.

You need not think the earth-worms did that. Not at
all! The earth-worms never behave so ill. The
“worms” that people mean, when they speak of
this harm done, are the grubs or larve of some

insects, as of the daddy-long-legs and others.

These grubs and cut-worms will eat living plants, but
Mr. Worm likes dead leaves and stems best. He
wants his food made soft by decay.

Now we come to the chief work of the true earth
worms. When they make their halls and houses
they fill their long bodies with the earth. Some
say it is their food.

Mr. Darwin says, “‘Oh, no! they fill their bodies with
earth just to get it out of their way.” I£ they
get any food from the dirt it is not much. They
turn themselves into baskets to carry the dirt out,
from their houses.



A4 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

to

The worms work, work, work all the time, taking out
earth, and carrying it to the top of the ground.

There they pile it in heaps, called worm-casts. Hach
piece is the shape of a small worm.

The earth takes this shape as the worm presses it out
of its long, soft body. arly in the day you can
find these worm-casts over all the garden paths.
So you can after a rain.

There are so many worms busy all the time that each
year they bring up tons of earth. This shows
you the power that is in small, weak things. In
India there are worm-casts in heaps six inches
high.

The worms make the earth fine and loose, by pinching
it off with their mouths. Then they bring this
rich soil from below, and lay it on top, and so
on and on.

It is only some twenty years since this work of worms
was known. At first people said, “Oh, no, no! It
cannot be that little, soft worms could cover a
great field, some inches deep, with new earth.”
But it was shown to be quite true.

Fields once stony and hard have become rich and fine.
Things grow now where once scarcely anything
would grow. Ashes and gravel, once on veR) go
two or three inches below.



MR. WORM’S COTTAGE BY THE SEA. 45

te

All this is done by the busy worms. That is why I
said that you could call the tail end of the worm
the tool with which he helps to build the world. |

Worms at work under ground have caused great walls
and pavements to sink, as the earth sinks over
mines. Also, they have helped to bury ruins and
old cities, and to keep them safe hidden, until we
found them. We are glad when we learn of the
old world days, from ruins which the worms
helped to hide.

Then, too, the worms help make the soil rich, by the
dead leaves and stems which they drag into their
holes to decay. When the worms die, their bodies
also help to make the earth rich.

—0-0594 00——_.

LESSON XIV.
MR. WORM’S COTTAGE BY THE SEA.

On the seashore you will find two or three kinds of
worms. These are called “Tube Worms,” from the
shape of the houses which they build. Some of
them are called “Swimming Worms.”

The swimming worm is cousin to another family of
creatures which look like worms, but have many
feet. They have a name which means “many feet.”



46 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

You know that on most of the rings, in the body of
the worm, are hairs or hooks. You can see how
easy it would be for these to become feet. Now
each animal seems to have parts that are like
some other animals, and some new forms of its
own. .

Thus, next the worm, with his rings and hooks, comes
another animal with rings and feet. Of all the
ring animals, Mr. Worm is the pattern, and after
him comes his cousin, Mr. Many-Feet.

Then, while Mr. Many-Feet is like Mr. Worm, he is
also like Mrs. Fly, and seems to come between the
two, a little related to both.

Now let us look at the sea-side worms. Here we find
some worms that have eyes. We also find some
that have little hard teeth, set in a ring inside
their mouths. There are some that have fine
plumes, as gay as any bird. These poor worms
gleam like a rainbow.

New parts can grow on these worms as well as on the
earth-worm, or even better. Some say that they
can even get a new head if the old one is lost.

Some of these worms can bore into very hard things,
as wood or stone. Some of them shine like a fire.
Ask some one to tell you of this kind of light; it
is like what we call Jack o’ Lantern.



MR. WORM’S COTTAGE BY THE SEA. AT

ee

Dig in the sea sand anywhere, and you will find
worms, black, brown, green, red, orange. They
bore through sand and mud, and move very fast.

It is not yet known how these worms bore into stone
and wood. Perhaps it is by means of some acid
stuff in their mouths. Perhaps it is by a file,
such as Mr. Drill has.’

{f you look along the sea sand of some shores, you will
find the tube-homes of these sea worms. In their
way of making a shell-home, and making it larger
as they grow, they are like the little shell-fish you
have read of.’

Most of these tube-homes are small, but.some are very
large. A gentleman told me he had one with the
bore or hole as large as his arm.

These worms by the sea serve as food for many fish
and other creatures. You know that nearly all
fish like to eat worms, and that they are used for
bait. The boy who knew nothing else about
worms knew they made good bait.

He would have been full of wonder if I had told him
that large worms are used for food by men in
some parts of the world. In this country we do
not make use of such food.

1 Book First, Lesson 39, 2 Book First, Lesson 36.



48 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

——a—

LESSON XV.

MR. WORM AT HOME.

Basy worms are just like the parent worms, only
smaller, and have not so many rings. As they
grow, they get more rings by the dividing of the
last one.

In some kinds of soil the wee worms are born in a
little hard skin bag. This keeps them from harm,
until they get strong enough to take care of them-
selves.

Mr. Worm’s home is like a row of long halls. These
halls are lined with a kind of glue from the
worm’s body. This glue makes the walls firm;
then they will not fall in.

The halls are not very deep under ground. If the
weather is very cold, or very dry, the worms dig
down deeper. Worms dislike cold or drought.
They enjoy warmth. They also like water and
wet soil.

When winter comes the worms plug up the doors of
their houses. This is done by dragging into it a



MR. WORM AT HOME, 49

—

plant stem that will fit and fill it. The worms
carry into their homes leaves and stalks to eat.
They bring out, and throw away, things wo
they do not like.

Worms show much sense in the way in which they
carry things in and out of their holes. If a stem
will not go in, they turn it over, and try it in
some other way.

Worms usually come out of their holes at night or in —
wet weather. If they go far from their house,
they cannot find their way back. Then they make
anew hole. Each worm lives alone. —

Often in the evening or early morning, or during rain,
you will see worms near their houses. You may
find them with their heads just put out of their
doors. You will see the worm casts in early day
or after rain. It is then the worms dare to come
out. Sun and heat dry worms up very fast, and
so kill them.

The birds know all these ways of the worms. Watch
a robin or a bluebird. He searches for his food
at sunrise, or after sunset, or while it rains.

Now his keen eyes see the worm at his door! In goes
his sharp bill! He pulls like a good fellow! He
is hungry. He wants his breakfast. The worm
holds fast by his hooks. The bird braces his feet



50 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

and his tail, and tugs hard. Out comes the worm
to feed Mr. Bird.t

The bird shows great skill in the way he pulls the
worm out of the hole. He does not break off even
one little bit of his soft body. No boy could get
him out in that way.



ipa

MR. WORM AT HOME,

Some say that the worm lies by his door at sunrise for
warmth. I donot think that is so. I think what
he likes is the fresh dew. He loves dampness.
He fears cold, but he also dies of heat.

A worm will die in one day in dry air, but he will live
for weeks quite down under water. He needs an
even, moist warmth. His home must not be hot,
nor cold, nor dry.

Little young worms know how to dig houses, make
worm casts, carry out the soil, find food, and plug

1 See Third Book.



MR. WORM AT HOME. ol

te

up the door of their houses. They know at once
all that old worms do. But then worm houses do
not require as much skill as bee or wasp houses.

The sea-side worms make the prettiest worm houses.
On shells, stone, wood, or wound alone in a lump,
you will find their tubes. They are white and as

- hard as shell.

These tubes curve and twist about, as the worm went
that built them. Some are very pretty. There is
a soft kind of tube made of sand and bits of shell,
stone, and weed. The sand and weed are held
together by a kind of glue. The worm makes
this glue in its mouth.

I have some tubes very clear and white. You can see
the lines where the worm went when he built
them, ring by rmg. Some of these tubes are so
small, you can just run a fine needle into them.
Some are as large as a straw, and some as large
as a fine, fat, earth-worm.

Now you see how much is to be learned, even of such
a small, humble thing as a worm. Think how
much even such a weak creature can do!

There is much more to be found out about worms,
which I hope you will be glad to learn for your-
selves.



52 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

LESSON XVI.
A LOOK AT A HOUSE-FLY.

Loox at a worm crawling about on the earth. Then
look at a fly with blue or green body and thin
wings. See how it whirls in the air! You will
say, “These two are not at all alike.”

Yet there is one time in a fly’s life when it is very like
a worm.

For this reason: many wise people set flies and worms
next to each other when they study them.

You know, as soon as you look at a fly, that it is an
insect.

You have learned that an insect has wings, six legs,
a body in three parts, and a pair of feelers like
horns.

Insects breathe through all the body, and not by lungs
as you do. They have a row of holes in each
side to breathe through.

The life of an insect passes through three states.
These are the egg, the grub or worm, and the
pupa. When it is in the pupa it gets legs and
wings. The word “pupa” means baby or doll.



A LOOK AT A HOUSE-FLY. 53

—

There are some kinds of insects that vary in some of
these points. The fly is one that varies from
this rule.

If you look at a fly, you will see that it has two wings,
not four. It is not one of the hook-wings.

Many insects can fold their wings. The fly cannot
fold its wings; it lays them back over its body.

Let us first look at a fly when it is most like an earth-
worm. The fly comes, in the first place, from a
tiny egg laid by the mother fly.

When the egg opens, the baby fly is not like a fly,

‘but like a little earth-worm, both in its looks
and in the way in which it is made. It is a
small white worm with rings, and on the rings
are hooks.

If you wish to watch this change, lay a bit of meat
in the sun on a hot day. Soon flies will lay eggs
on it. .

The next day these eggs will be turned to grubs, which
grow very fast. The fly’s eggs are small and white,
and are put upon the meat as if they had been
planted on one end.

The worm of the fly has a pair of jaws like hooks.
It has two little dots which will become eyes
when it has grown to a fly. In the hooked jaws
and these eye-points it is not like an earth-worm.



5+ SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

The fly grub eats and grows. Then its skin gets
tough and hard, and forms a little case like a
barrel. This shuts the worm in it, as in a coffin.
Now the baby fly seems to be dead.

But it is not dead. It is turning into a creature that
has wings and legs, and can fly and walk.

As the fly lies in its case, first the legs and then the
wings grow. It gets a head with mouth, eyes,
and a trunk or tube, and from a poor worm it
turns to a wonder, as you will see.

But in its little coffin it is shut close, and its legs
and wings are all bent up. In a few days the
change is made. Now it is ready to come out.

It moves, and pulls, and gets free from the hard case.
Then it strikes the end of the case with its head
time after time. At last it breaks the case open,
and out comes the fly !

Then it stands in the air, and in the sun if it can,
and shakes itself. It is cold and weak; but the
air dries its wings and blows out the wrinkles.

In a very few minutes the fly is strong and gay.

Then it spreads its wings and sails off to enjoy its
life, and to look for something good to eat.



HOW TO LOUK AT A FLY. dd

i

EES SiON Xcve nr:
HOW TO LOOK AT A FLY.

Do you think a fly is a very small and common thing?
Is it not worth looking at? Let us see about that.

First, here is its head with two great eyes. We will
soon look at the eyes. Then you will see how
“curious they are.

There are, besides the big eyes, three little eyes. These
are set on the top of the head. Then, too, on the
front of the head we find a trunk or tube. And
here is a pair of feelers. Inside the head is the
brain, very much like a worm’s brain. It is only
a tiny white dot.

Next behind the head is the chest. The head has the
shape of half of an egg laid sidewise. The chest
is nearly square. It is made of three rings.

On the first rmg is a pair of legs. On the next ring is
a pair of legs and a pair of wings. The fly has
only one pair of wings.

On the last ring is a pair of legs. And near these legs
are two little clubs covered with fine hair. It is
by means of these clubs that the fly can halt or



56 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

eR ee

balance on the wing. They help the fly as the
second pair of wings helps other insects.

The third part of a fly’s body is the largest. It is egg-
shaped, and joins the chest by the thick end. This
also is made of rings.

Now let us look again at the head of a fly. The feelers
are like two long, fine plumes made in joints.
Most people think these feelers are made to touch
with. Their full, true use is not yet known.

You see, even in a fly, there is much left for some of
you to find out.

Some people think that flies smell and hear with these
“feelers.” But then they are so fine that a breath
can jar them, and the fly might seem to hear
when it only feels.

In some schools for the deaf and dumb, the apie are
called to class or table by rapping on the floor.
The deaf do not hear the noise, but they feel the
jar, and come as if they could hear.

Next comes the mouth of the fly. The lower lip of a
fly runs out into a long, slim tube or pipe. With
this it sucks up its food.

At the end of this tube is a little flat plate. Close by
it are two sharp hairs. These are to prick the
food, so that the tube can suck it more easily.

When the fly is not eating, it can shut up this tube like



HOW TO LOOK AT A FLY. 57

a

a telescope, to keep it safe. Did you ever see an
elephant’ Did yousee histrunk? The fly’s tube
is his trunk.

But the chief parts to notice in a fly’s head are its eyes.
These are so large that they make up nearly all
the head.

These big bright eyes look as if they had varnish on
them. Now each of these eyes is made up of a
very great many small eyes. There are four thou-
sand of these small eyes. iy a

Between these two big eyes are three



little single eyes, set in this way Z

Wise men have studied the eyes of flies for many years,
and do not yet know all about them.

The wings of a fly have a fine, thin, clear covering.
This is held out on a tiny frame, like a network.
The fly moves these wings very quickly. The
motion of the wings helps to make the sound or
buzz of the fly.

Now we come to the legs and feet of our fly. The leg
is made in five joints. The foot also has five
joints. The last joint of the foot has two claws
and a little pad. These are covered with fine
hairs.

The hairs catch on little points or rough edges. Thus
the fly can walk, as you would say, “upside



58 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.



down,” and does not fall. Be-
sides, the pad and hairs act like
a sucker. They suck air from
under the foot. So they hold the
fly from falling as he runs up a

pane of glass.

——00;0300—

LESSON XVIII.

MRS. FLY AND HER FOES.

wish there were not so many flies.
The fact is, flies make us much
trouble. Their noise tires and
vexes people. They lay eggs in
and on the food, and so spoil it.
They cover cur clean walls and
glass with small black spots.
Will you wonder that there are so
many flies when I tell you that
one fly can in one season be the
mother of two million others!
Many insects die soon after laying
egos. Bees and wasps do not,



A TAVERN BY THE WAY, nor do flies. Bees and wasps take



MRS. FLY AND HER FOES. 59

—

care of their eggs and their young, but the fly
mother does not.

Mrs. Fly has more than a hundred eggs to lay at once.-
It is quite plain that she could not take care of so -
many babies. She must let them all look out for
themselves.

Still Mrs. Fly shows much sense as to where she puts
her eggs. She finds a place where they will be
likely to live and get food and grow.

If the place is too wet, the baby flies would drown
when they leave the egg. If the place is too dry,
they would wither up and die. Then, too, they
must have soft food.

The fly does not lay her eggs on a stone or a piece of
wood. She lays them in some kind of food.

The fly can live all summer if it has a fair chance.
Cold kills flies. A frosty day will kill them.
Some few flies, like a few of the wasps, hide, and
live over winter in a torpid state, and in the

’ spring they come out to rear new swarms.

Birds, spiders, wasps, cats, dogs, and some other ani-
mals eat flies. These creatures kill flies by mil-
lions. People kill flies with poison and fly-traps.
If so many were not killed, we should be overrun
-with them.

{fn the South is a plant with a leaf like a jug. On the



60 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

8-3

seam of this leaf hang drops of honey. Its juice
can make the flies drunk.

Flies like this juice. But as soon as they get it they
turn dizzy and act just like drunken men. They
fall into the jug-like space of the leaf and scon die.
One of these plants will kill many flies in one day.

Many of our best birds live on flies, and if our birds

~ were all dead we should have much greater
trouble with the flies.

In the autumn you will see flies sitting about as if they
feel dull and ill. If you look carefully, you will
see that the back part of the body is white. It
seems to be covered with meal or mould.

Soon the fly dies. This white dust is a disease of the
fly. It does not curl up its legs when it dies from
this cause. They are stiff and spread out. The
fly looks like a live fly. If you touch it, it crum-
bles to dust.

All around such a dead fly you will see a ring of white
mould. This is perhaps a real mould,.or tiny
plant, that seizes on the body of the fly. It uses
up all the soft parts, and so kills it, leaving only
the dry shell.

There is another strange thing about this. The body
of a fly that dies in this way is rent or burst open.
The fly looks as if this dust or mould had grown
large in the body and so torn it open.



OF WHAT USE ARE. FLIES? 61

eo *

LESSON XIX.
OF WHAT USE ARE FLIES?

How often people cry out, “Oh, I wish there were no
flies! What is the use of a fly?”

But all things that God has made have their uses. And
all God’s works are worthy of study.

You have learned that worms are of great use. Let us
see if Mrs. Fly does any good in the world.

Mrs. Fly is of great use to man. She helps keep him
in health. Do you think that very strange ?
People say,“ Oh, these dirty flies!” And yet these

“ dirty flies” help to keep the world clean!
Now you know that over all the world, great numbers
of animals die each minute, and many of their
bodies lie on the ground and decay.

The foul smell of such bodies in decay causes disease
and death to men. In winter, and in cold places,
such things do not decay so fast, and so do not
make these bad odors.

But in hot days, if such dead things lie about, they
will poison the air. Soon we should all be ull.



62 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.
. oe

The work of Mrs. Fly is to lay many eggs in these dead
bodies. In a few hours these eggs turn to grubs,
and these grubs to little live worms, which begin
to eat as fast as they can.

Soon they leave only dry bones, which can do no harm.
They change the dead stuff into their own fat,
live bodies.

You know that the crabs are among the street-cleaners
of the sea. So the flies are among the street-
cleaners of the air and land.

Did you ‘ever watch flies dart about, here and there,
with a flight like hawks? They are eating up
small, evil things, too small for us to see. But
these are yet big enough to hurt us if we should
get them into our lungs.

Ask your teacher to tell you a little about your lungs.

In and about our homes many bits of things drop, and
might decay and mould. This would make the air
foul. But the busy and greedy fly drinks up all
the soft part of these things.

So we see that what we call the dirty flies help to clean
away much dirt.

Then, too, the fly serves for food for many birds, and
fish, and frogs, and some insects. Some of these
things we use for our food. Others are full of
beauty, or are of use to us, each in its own way.



A SWARM OF FLIES. 63

to

Thus, though the fly is often a trouble to us, we find
it is not without its uses. Look at one of these
little creatures through a glass that will magnify
it. You will see that the poor insect has really
much beauty.

From what you have read in this lesson you must not
think that all foul smells kill, nor that things that
have no bad smell are always safe. There are
some gases that have no odor at all, which yet
are very deadly.

LESSON XX.
A SWARM OF FLIES.

Have you heard people speak of swarms of flies?
By a swarm of flies we mean a great number of
flies rather near together. By a swarm of bees

' we mean a number of bees that live and work in
one place. A swarm of bees divides the work of
its hive. It has one queen bee. She is the mother
and ruler of the rest. But flies have no home
where they live in common. They have no work.
They have no one mother or queen, for whom the
rest work. Each mother fly drops her eggs where



64 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

it seems best to her. Then she goes off. She
leaves her children to grow as best they can.

I have said that the fly likes best to place her eggs on
a piece of fresh meat.

These eggs soon turn to worms or grubs, and so spoil
the meat. To keep the meat from the tlies the
cook puts a cover over it. The cover is often
made of wire net.

“Now,” says the cook, “I can keep away that dirty
fly.”

But Mrs. Fly says, “Oh, can you, Mrs. Cook? We
will see about that.”

So Mrs. Fly sits on top of the wire cover. She puts.
her little egg tube through one of the fine holes in
the net. She-drops egg after egg from the tube.
The eggs fall right on the meat, just where Mrs.
Fly wishes them to be.

Then the cook cries out, “How ever did that fly get to
my meat!”

Is it not strange that Mrs. Fly knows that her egg tube
is the right size to go through the mesh of the
wire net? How does she know that the eggs will
fall on the meat ?

Flies do another queer thing. If many flies are in a
room, and you begin to chase them to kill them,
they hide. They creep into holes and cracks.



A SWARM OF FLIES. 65

—

They hide in curtains. They go behind pictures.
After the hunt is over, out they come, one by one!

Flies also know how to sham death, — “play dead,” you
would say.

If you hit one and make it fall, it will lie very still, and
seems to be dead. Then, after a little, it softly
spreads out its legs and its wings. Then it shakes
itself. A moment more, off it goes.

This fashion of making believe to be dead does not
belong to flies only. Nearly all insects, and many
other animals sham death.

[t is worth while to watch and see how well they do it.

When a fly is killed other flies come to eat up its body.
They put their trunks or mouth tubes on the dead ~
fly and begin to suck.

Soon the body is sucked dry of all its juice. It is only
a dry shell.

T will tell you something that you can do with a dead
fly. If.it has not been dead so long that it has
grown too stiff you can make the wings move.
Hold it by the body. Gently tip up one wing.
As you lift up one wing the other will rise too.
They move together. It is as if they were set on
a little spring. .



66 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

LESSON XXI.
SOME QUEER FLIES.

- AutHoueH flies are of use, they also do evil to men in
many ways. It is well to look at things on all
sides.

The fly you have been reading about is the common
house-fly. That fly, with its noise, dirt, and spoil-
ing of food by laying eggs in it, is bad enough.
But yet the house-fly makes the least trouble of
any of its kind.

There are many kinds of flies. To the family of flies
belong gnats, midges, mosquitoes, and the ‘big
daddy-long-legs with wings.

You know well, how some of these things sting, you
say “bite” you. Mr. Daddy-long-legs hurts the
grass lands with his grubs, which spoil grass roots

. and the shoots of plants.

There is a fly called a “gall-fly”” because it bites-trees,
and lays eggs in twigs. Then upon the twigs
grow over the eggs round balls called “ a and
these injure the trees.



SOME QUEER FLIES. 67

te

There is also the “bot-fly,” which lays its eggs on the
hide of the horse. The egg causes the skin of the
horse to itch. He licks the place, and the egg
goes into his stomach.

The egg of the bot-fly is apt to make the horse sick.
The grub eats holes in the stomach of the horse.
That makes the horse sick. The farmer will say
that his horse is sick with “bots.”

In Africa flies kill horses and oxen by biting them.
The bite poisons the cattle and causes fever.

Farmers will tell you of a very bad fly that spoils
wheat and other grain. It is called the “Hes-
sian”’ fly.

Flies, as they flit from place to place, sometimes carry
with them the poison of disease, as of sores and
ulcers. Thus they spread these troubles among
people.

But while I tell you of that, I must not fail to say

_ that flies, as they go to flowers for honey, carry
the dust of the flowers from one to another. This
helps new flowers to grow.

There is a large and handsome Dron green fly, very
fine to look at, which bites horses and worries
them. It is called the “ horse-fly.”

In some lands a small sand-fly causes sore eyes.

Flies have been on the earth about as long as men



68 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

have, or a little longer, and there are some dead
flies worth a great deal of money.

How is that? There are flies in amber. Amber is
clear, hard, and bright yellow. It is used for
jewelry. Sometimes we see a perfect fly, held in
a clear, light mass of amber.

How did it come there? The amber was once a soft
gum and the fly lit on it. It stuck fast, and the
amber flowed over it and grew hard, and so buried
the fly in a clear, golden tomb.

A piece of amber with a fly in it will bring a high
price.

The “Spanish fly” is a large blue-green beetle. It is
very handsome, and is most useful when it is dead.
It is used in medicine. It makes blisters on the
skin.

Do you say, “Oh, blisters are very bad!” Yes, they
cause pain. But even pain can be of use in this
world. The blister, though it pains us, is of use.
It cures what might be a worse pain.

This Spanish fly is not a fly at all. It is a beetle
which has been given a fly’s name. It is put here
at the end of the lessons on flies, because in the
next lessons you are to read about beetles.



IN ARMOR CLAD. 69

a

LESS: ONe x CLL:

IN ARMOR CLAD.



BEETLE AND CRAB. ARE WE COUSINS’

Go to the garden or to the home plants, and after a
little search you will find one of the wonders of
the world.

You will find a small, horny, shining, red thing, with

~ black spots on its back. “Why!” you say, “that
is only a lady-bug, or lady-bird. We say a little
rhyme to it.” Yes, it is one of the beetles, and
every beetle is a wonder.

The winged insects are divided into two great classes,
Eaters and Drinkers. That is what their Latin
names mean. Butterflies, house-flies, bees, and



70 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

——

others, are drinkers. That is, they get their food
by sucking it through a pipe or tube.

This tube is on the fore part of the head; it is really
the upper lip grown long and round.

The other great class, the Eaters, eat their food with
their mouths. Some suck or lick it; some use
their jaws to crush and break their food.

Beetles belong to the class Eaters.

The beetles are covered with a hard, horny shell, like
a case. In this they are like the old-time soldiers,
who wore armor from head to foot.

Beetles belong to the great family of the ring-made
creatures. Take a large, round beetle, with big
jaws, feelers, and legs. Does he not look much
like Mr. Crab, who is also rmg-made?

In the picture above this lesson you see Mr. Crab and
Mr. Beetle. This is a large beetle that likes to
live antong the grasses and weeds near the sea-
shore. When he and Mr. Crab meet on the sand
they may think they are cousins.

Now let us get a beetle and look at him closely. You
will often find dead beetles on your path or in the
grass. You can take them to pieces and compare
them with what you read about them.

The first thing that you will notice in the beetle is
the hard case over the wing. The wing-cases look



IN ARMOR CLAD. 71

to s

like little shells, and have a nice hinge to hold
them in their place.

These two wing-covers fit close to each other over the
beetle’s back. When he flies he utts them away
from the wings. When you take off these covers
you will see lying under the cases a pair of neatly
folded wings. These wings are made much as
Mrs. Wasp’s are.

The cases are used for armor, not for flymg. They
are really a pair of wings. The fine silken under-
wings are the pair with which beetles fly.

There are some beetles that do not have this second
pair, and so cannot fly. There are some that have
the upper pair so short tha. they do not half
cover the body. Beetles wnich do not have the
lower wings creep, and cannot fly.

Watch a beetle as he crawls on the ground. Now see
him! When his back flies’ open two bright-hued
shells rise up. This crawling thing sweeps into
the air ona pair of wide thin wings!

The part of the beetle’s body that 1s under the wings
has rings like those of the wasp. The body is
made in the three parts imsects have. The wings
and six legs are fastened on what you would call
the chest or middle part.

The wings fastened on the upper or back part of the



12 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

oe

beetle’s chest fold down over the hind part of the
body. On the end of the hind part is what is
called “the egg-placer.” With that Mrs. Beetle
lays her eggs in safe places.

The legs and feet of the beetle are made in joints.
They have hairs on them. The legs are so made
and set that they cannot spread out as far as
those of spiders, wasps, flies.

Now here is Mr. Beetle’s head. It has two jaws and
two feelers, the mouth, and the eyes. There is
a little horn shield over the mouth. In fact, the
whole beetle is in a snug horn coat. We may
call this coat a suit of armor.

The eyes of the beetle are like those of the fly. Very
many eyes are set in what seem to be two big
eyes. The beetle does not have three single eyes
on the top of his head. Sometimes he has two
small simple eyes at the back of his head.

The splendid colors of Mr. Beetle are on his horn
coat. I caught a beetle last night which had
the under part of his breast covered with close
hairs, so*that it looked like velvet. He seemed
to have on a rich brown velvet vest.



WHEN MR. BEETLE WAS YOUNG. 73°

i

LESSON XXIIL

WHEN MR. BEETLE WAS YOUNG,

In the lessons about the Ant, Fly,

Wasp, Bee, and others, you
have heard that the young
insect makes three changes.

First it is a small, white or light-

colored egg ; then a fat, greedy
larva; then a pupa.

The insects you have thus far heard

of, pass through all these
changes in a short time. So

do some of the young beetles.

- But there are beetles which

The

spend one, two, three, even
more years as eggs and grubs.
long part of the lives of these
other insects comes after they
get their wings. The short
part of a beetle’s life generally
comes after he is winged.



BEETLE LARVA ‘“ BEFORE
HE HAS WINGS”



74 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

to

You will not care to hear about the beetle while he
is only an egg. As an egg he lies quiet where
the mother beetle hid him. These eggs are placed
in earth or in water. Sometimes they are put
into the bodies of dead animals, or into holes in
trees, or into fruit. Some kinds of beetles choose
one place, some another, for their eggs.

Then, after a time, the larva comes out. Some day
you may find a long, soft, stupid, white worm,
with its body made in rings. It has two big
eyes, two jaws, no feet, or, perhaps, very small
ones, never any wings. Would you guess it was
Mrs. Beetle’s child? Some day it will have strong
wings, long, strong legs, a horny body, and very
often colors like a rainbow.

But this which you call a “white worm” is the beetle
larva after it is born from the egg. Sometimes
it. has no eyes. It is always very greedy. Beetle
larve will eat almost everything but metals.
They harm wood, trees, fruit, flowers, meal, furs,
clothes, by gnawing and eating these things.

The larva of beetles looks like the larva of butterflies.
But it has no wings. No larva ever has wings.

The change of getting wings must come when the
larva has gone into the pupa cradle. Often in
this state it lies as if asleep or dead.



WHEN MR. BEETLE WAS YOUNG. 45

—

When it is a pupa it lies in a case or cradle shaped

The

much like a hen’s egg. There the pupa lies, its
legs folded over the front of its body, its wings
packed by its side, its jaws and feelers laid on
its breast. It looks very much like a baby laid -
asleep in a bed.

larva could eat, walk, roll, or swim. The pupa
in this little case can do nothing but wait. The
full-grown beetle can fly, swim, eat, walk, and is
often a thing of great beauty.

If you dig about the roots of plants or under stones,

you will, no doubt, find larva and pupa to look
at. It is well to seek out these things for your-
selves.

In some books you may read of a state of the insect

called the image state. This name is given to
the full-grown, perfect insect. It means that it
has reached the same form that its mother had,
which laid the egg. Larva means mask, and

_ pupa means baby.



76 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

te

LESSON XXIV.
HOW TO LEARN ABOUT BEETLES.

No class of insects has been more studied and written
about than beetles. Why is this? They are not
as wise as the ants. They do not build homes and
cities, as bees and wasps do. They make no
honey and no wax. They have not the many
trades of that busy Mrs. Wasp.

There are a few beetles which make little mud cells, or
balls of dirt for their eggs, or weave little nests
for the pupa. But their work is poor and rude,
and not as fine as Mrs. Wasp can do.

No doubt the reason why beetles have had so much
notice is, that there are very many of them, of
very many kinds. They live where we can often
see them. We can easily take them to pieces, to
study their parts, for their bodies are firm and
strong.

The parts of their bodies are very curious. Beetles can
be kept a long time after they are dead. They
will not spoil as soon as soft-bodied insects.



HOW TO LEARN ABOUT BEETLES. 17
—+-9 4—__.

After all, the chief reason of the notice. taken of
beetles is their great beauty. It is a beauty of
color and shape. Often the cases are lined and
dotted as if carved with great care.

Would you like to have some beetles to keep, to look
at and show to your friends? Let me tell you
how to get them.

Have a sheet of thick pasteboard, to fasten them on.
When you walk out, carry with you a bottle with
a wide mouth and a good cork. If this bottle
has broken laurel leaves in it, the beetles will die
as soon as you put them in.

Or, you can kill the beetles with a little ether. Or, you
can take up the beetle with a little forked stick,
and plunge it into very hot or boiling water.

“QO,” you say, “that would be so cruel!”” But the
truth is, the beetle dies the instant he is plunged
into hot water. He has no time to feel pain.

Why do these things kill beetles so quickly? Here,
now, is a great fact that you must know. The
insects do not breath through the mouth or nose,
as you do. They have no lungs. They breathe
through pipes or tubes, wound over all the body.
These tubes are very fine, and too small to be seen
with the naked eye. They
are held open by a little stiff,
spiral thread, like this:






CM

£30990000)







78 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

These tubes spread even to the legs and feet of the
insect. They reach the open air by many open-
ings, or breath holes. Now, when you plunge the
beetle into hot water, ether, or laurel odor, all its
tubes are filled and it dies at once. When your
beetle is dead, set it on the sheet of stiff paper.

Draw the legs, feelers, and jaws into place with a pin
or toothpick. Then fasten the beetle to the paper
with a tiny drop of thick glue put under the body.
Or, you can puta fine needle or pin through the
body. Be very sure that your beetle is quite dead
before you put the pin into him.

If you take this way of saving beetles, you will soon
have very many, of all colors, sizes, and shapes.
They will be brown, black, red, green, golden. I
can hardly tell you how pretty the beetles are !

Put some on the paper, with the wing-cases raised, and
the flying-wings drawn out from beneath. The
under wings are larger than the upper. You will:
wonder that the beetle can pack them in the cases.

The feelers of beetles take many forms. Some are like
plumes, some are like scales or leaves, some like
clubs. Some are nearly round like balls, some are
cone-shaped, some plain and straight; some are
bent like a new moon.

A farmer or gardener will like your beetles better dead



THE ROSE BEETLE. 79

ae

than alive. As he will tell
you, the beetles and their larvee
are very greedy things. They
often eat leaves and spoil crops
and trees.

LESSON XXV.
THE ROSE BEETLE.

Tuer chief family of the beetles is a
large one. It is found in all
parts of the world. The beetles
that belong to it are large, and
often of fine color and shape.

In old times the people of Egypt
called one of this family the

_ sacred beetle. They kept it as
an object of worship. They
often wore a stone or metal
image of it, to keep themselves
from harm.

Let us now'study one of this fam-
ily. It is called the Rose Bee-
tle. That is a very pretty ee Le





80 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

name. The beetle itself is pretty. It chooses a
pretty home and dainty food.

Some call this the Golden Beetle, because of its color.
It is a fine large beetle, with a thick body, round
at the tail part. The feelers are short and club-
shaped. The body, head, legs, and wing-cases
are a fine golden green, with silver spots and
lines.

This beetle does not hold the wing-cases apart when it
flies. It tips them only a little. The wide, thin
wings come out from beneath them.

The rose beetle is seen most in May and June. You
will find it in the garden, about the flowers. Its
chief food is honey and flower petals. Its mouth
is not horny, but soft and skin-like.

The feelers have ten joints, and wave lightly as the
beetle flies. It likes the sunshine. When it flashes
about in the light, it looks like a piece of melted
gold with green tints on it.

The rose beetle chooses for its home and food the
brightest and largest flowers. It digs deep into
the hearts of the roses. It sucks the honey and
chews the petals.

When the mother rose beetle wishes to lay her eggs,
she finds a place at the foot of a tree. She goes
down among the roots, where the wood is old and





THE ROSE BEETLE. 81

—

soft. Then she puts her eggs between the bark
and the wood.

Sometimes she changes her whole plan, and puts her
eggs into an ant’s nest! The ants do not seem
vexed at this.

The larva of the rose beetle is a fat, round, white thing,
like a thick worm. The head is round, and of a
pale brown color. The thin skin has hairs on it.

These larvee move very slowly, and always rest upon
one side. They have strong jaws, and their feelers
have five joints. A number of them live together.
They are dull and lazy, and always eating. They
eat leaves and soft wood.

While the weather is warm, the larvee keep near the top
of the soil. When it is cold, they dig down, even
one or two feet, and lie asleep until spring, comes
again.

They live in this way for three years. Then they make
a round or egg-shaped ball. They make the ball
of grains of earth, bits of dead leaves, and grass.
Or, they use the wood or sawdust they have cut
up with their jaws. They fasten all this stuff
together with glue from their mouths.

When the larve are shut up in this ball, they change
very quickly. At first the ball, or case, seems full
of a milky fluid. Then the legs and wings grow.



82 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

te

After a few weeks the white worm has changed to
a fine beetle that looks like a jewel.

Some of these beetles are so fine that they are put into
hoops of gold for ear-rings and brooches. In the
island of Manilla ladies keep rose beetles in tiny
cages for pets!

There is a beetle much like the rose beetle. It is called
the May, or June bug. These June bugs come in
great numbers. They eat the leaves of trees, and
even kill trees in this way. They fly by night;
and they like to get into a room where a lamp is
burning.

They blunder about, making a great buzz with their
horny wings. They hit their heads on walls and
panes of glass. Some people are afraid of them.
That is foolish, for they can do no harm to them.

These June bugs hide all day in the shade. They do
not like the sun. It is no wonder there are so
many of them, as each mother lays forty eggs.
The larvae do much damage by eating plant roots.

Watch June beetles to see how they lift their wing-
covers when about to fly. Look well at the fold-
ing of the inner wings.



. PRINCES AND GIANTS. 83

4

LESSON XXVI.

PRINCES AND GIANTS.



PRINCES AND GIANTS, |

BEETLES vary much in size. Some are so small that
you can hardly see them as they creep among the
grasses.

Others are so large that a child might fear them. He
might think that with their thick legs and claw-
like feet and strong jaws they must surely be able
to hurt him. But beetles are quiet, mild things,
and seldom pinch or bite anybody.

Why do these beetles have these strong coats like mail?
To keep them from harm. They live under stones,
and among roots, and dig about in the earth.
Their horny bodies protect them.



84 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

Many animals might eat the beetles if they had not
the horny coats to shield them.

Fish, birds, and other animals eat them and their grubs.
Enough are killed and eaten to prevent the world
being too full of beetles.

Beetles have few weapons. I will tell you of one or
two of them. Stag beetles have very large, strong

J jaws, and can give a good pinch with them.

One family of beetles is called the “ Oil family.” They
have an oil in them. They drop this from their
legs when they are touched.

This oil has a bad smell. It can make a blister on the
skin. Because of this oil people let them alone,
and perhaps small animals do the same.

There is a beetle that carries a gun! This is like a gun
with several barrels, for it can be fired three or
four times without being reloaded! Oh, how can
that be?

Near the tail of the gun beetle is a little sack or bag
full of fluid. When an enemy comes near him,
My. Beetle, as he runs, throws off a drop of this
fluid. The fluid flies out of the bag with a little
bang. It sounds like the report of a tiny gun, and
makes a kind of mist or blue smoke.

Three or four of these shots follow each other. This

1 See p. 68.



PRINCES AND GIANTS. 85

te

beetle is a small fellow. Big beetles like to chase
him. When the wee gun goes off in the big
beetle’s face, the big beetle backs away. Then he
folds down his feelers and stands still.

He acts very much as a dog does when he drops his tail
between his legs and runs off !

These little gun-owning beetles live in damp places.
Often a group of them will hide under a stone. If
you lift up the stone, the poor beetles are in a
great fright. They begin to fire off their guns
like a squad of soldiers.

Now after talking about these little beetles, let us talk
of great ones. I told you some beetles are very
small, and some are very large. One beetle is so
big that it is called the Giant. Another is
called Goliath, from the huge giant whom King
David slew. Others are called Atlas and Hercules,
from tales told in old times of giants.

The very large beetles live in hot lands and are scarce.
Some have the jaws large and curved like a crab’s
claw. At first sight you might think them
crabs. Some of these odd ones are shown in
the picture.

The colors of these great beetles are often very splendid.
Some of them have long horns on the front of
their heads. Some of them have the hind legs so



86 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

large, and of such a queer shape, that they do not
look like beetles.

Some of these giant beetles have large teeth or knobs
upon their jaws; they need them to crush and
break their food. These teeth are like the knobs
on Mr. Crab’s claw, which he uses for playing a
tune. The beetle can use his knobs to make
music.

Beetles are fond of their own tunes. Often they
make, for hours, a shrill hum, or buzz. They
make this by rubbing their wing-cases.

There is a great’ beetle in Brazil called the Prince of
Beetles. He gets this name from his size and
beauty. Some of the princes have been sold for
two hundred dollars each.

When you walk in the field, you might carry a bottle

_ with a wide mouth. In this you can collect
beetles to study. It may be very pleasant to study
them when you go home. But have something in
the bottle to kill them, for, shut up in a small
space, and frightened, they are likely to pull each
other to pieces.



THE LITTLE SEXTON. 87

ot

LESSON XXVII.

THE LITTLE SEXTON.











Once, when I was a little girl, I saw a dark beetle
standing on its hind pair of legs. It was holding
its fore legs clasped over its head, as you can hold
up your hands.

An old man who was near said, “That is a holy bug,
and shows what man ought to do. It is saying
its prayers. People call it the ‘ praying beetle.’”

[ think the old man meant what he said, but of course
the beetle was neither holy nor praying. The
queer way of standing was only one of the odd
ways of beetles. Now I will tell you of another.



88 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE

— te

Very often on the road you will see a beetle, or a pair
of beetles, rolling about a small ball like a marble.
The ball is of dirt, or some soft stuff, and is often
larger than the beetle. But she rolls it with ease,
for she is very strong.

The beetle is not playing marbles nor base-ball. She is
only doing her work. She has been flying about,
looking for a good place in which to lay her eggs,
and now she has gone to work with all her might.

She lays her egg in a morsel of the stuff of which she
will make her ball. When the larva comes from
the egg, this ball will be its food until it is strong
enough to crawl about and seek food for itself.

The beetle moulds the soft stuff over the egg, like a
pill. Then, as she rolls it about, it grows larger,
as your snowball grows when you roll it about in
the snow.

When the ball is large enough, Mrs. Beetle does not

leave it in the road for wheels to run over or feet
to tread upon. She seeks a place where the larva
may be safe and feed well when it comes from
the egg.

She shows much sense in the choice of a place. She
drags the ball along between her hind feet, or she
pushes it with her fore feet or her hind feet, or
rolls it along toward the safe place which she has





8.
THE LITTLE SEXTON. 89

—

chosen. If the ground is so rough that she can-
not drag her ball, she carries it on her head.

This Mrs. Beetle’s head is flat, arid has some wee knobs
upon it. These knobs hold her load firmly in
place as she carries it along.

Perhaps Mrs. Beetle finds that she cannot without help
take her ball to a good place. Then she flies off,
and soon comes back with other beetles of her
own kind. They all help her until her ball is
where she wishes it to be.

How does she tell them what she needs?) Who knows
that? No one. I haye seen four or five beetles
at work on one ball.

When the ball is in the right spot, Mrs. Beetle digs a

hole with her jaws and horny fore legs. Then she -
rolls the ball in. She fills up the hole with earth
_ and presses it down flat.

This is not the only beetle that buries its eggs. There
is another one, called the Sexton Beetle. When it
finds a dead bird or mouse or frog or other small
animal, it sets to work to bury it. It digs a little
grave for it. This is why it is called a sexton.

This beetle begins to dig under the dead body. As it
takes out the earth, the dead thing sinks more and
more. At last it is deep enough to be covered, as
a coffin is covered in a grave.



e
90 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

a

In this way this beetle helps to keep the earth and air
clean. Is that why it buries things? Oh, no!
The reason the beetle does this is, it wants to get
a good place for its eggs.

These sexton beetles are black, with yellow bands.
They are rather large, and go in pairs. You might
think these beetles and the one who makes the ball
would be dirty from their work, but they are not.

These beetles have a kind of oil over their bodies.
This keeps any dirt from sticking to them. So,
though they work in dirty places, they are always
clean and bright.

These burying beetles have a keen scent. They can
smell a dead body even if it is a long way off.
Let us watch Mr. and Mrs. Sexton Beetle at work.
Here is a dead mouse. Through the air come fly-
ing these, two beetles. Their wings hum as they
come.

When they alight, Mr. Beetle goes briskly to his work,
and Mrs. Beetle stands looking on. Her work in
this world is not to dig, but to lay eggs. Before
the work begins, they both make a good meal off
the dead mouse. All sexton beetles eat flesh.

Mr. Beetle works a while. Then he drops down as if
very tired, and sleeps. Then up he gets and
ploughs furrow after furrow about the mouse.



THE LITTLE SEXTON. 9]

te

Mr. Beetle uses his head for a plough. Now the
dead body has sunk out of sight. Mr. Beetle has
put over it the earth he took out from the grave
which he made. He makes all the little grave
smooth and trim.

But what is this queer little fellow doing now? He
has made a little side door into the grave. He
and Mrs. Beetle walk in. They have gone to take
another meal from the mouse.

When their dinner is over, Mrs. Beetle lays some eggs
in the dead body. She knows that when the
larvee come from the eggs, they will like to eat
the food which they find all around them. After
the eggs are laid, Mr. and Mrs. Beetle come out
into the air.

Mr. Beetle fills up the doorway. Then off the two fly
to find other things to bury.

The larva of the sexton beetle looks much like a beach
flea or sand-hopper.

Does the strength of beetles surprise you? Once I
found a fine grass-green beetle, with silver spots.
I wanted him for my card of beetles. I tied him
in the hem of my handkerchief to carry him home.
The hem was double, but he ate a hole through
it; then away he went.

Once I shut up ten beetles in a box. I forgot them
for two days. When I opened the box, they were



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describe
'6865' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJID' 'sip-files00002.pro'
eb19e50632aeb5c347588b16c2c41e33
22049c64247b20b005a65db37edaac177fe1d29a
'2012-01-15T06:09:43-05:00'
describe
'24946' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIE' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
45b69443e18ce4464c4670dbdb32c0d4
55ea4476b158be0fe7ed409e6abd3ee32fd57bae
describe
'10412616' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIF' 'sip-files00002.tif'
5abe15c0f85cd65e926cda13d4d1f859
3d8a3fed3ebe38781b610a8c2473474423124199
'2012-01-15T06:04:38-05:00'
describe
'458' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIG' 'sip-files00002.txt'
9a3c8426ca9f9902cbe06bc5cc25ea1f
4e4d10e1e95e6e0f84a08d8fc5ec5fd31e2839fe
'2012-01-15T06:10:04-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6413' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIH' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
780f1f017ed5fba742d47c00cb5f5410
cf74aaa1f6d99bb81677d278591f67b837b7e4b2
'2012-01-15T06:09:22-05:00'
describe
'360097' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJII' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
58e01d33ce0ce706b76d966171faf508
439e9d5e196b833b7560e589c3b6262652fcbb64
'2012-01-15T06:07:07-05:00'
describe
'67846' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIJ' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
17e1c8f0f094cd721fd688105459224e
f347f152a06763ef9da5a10545848b4bbfb52591
'2012-01-15T06:09:54-05:00'
describe
'926' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIK' 'sip-files00003.pro'
4416160be8c1f479ab3dd493a0176ba1
9bbad041b8ef2933bfd20f81a878b316ddc2e23d
'2012-01-15T06:07:23-05:00'
describe
'14478' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIL' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
0b3e7e21d55c6ca638080bba7ff842d4
ba2e720776ac3ad103f1556520cc6581ed57ab81
'2012-01-15T06:10:46-05:00'
describe
'8658060' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIM' 'sip-files00003.tif'
4f65ce0952d8731db60f45eb8bf4c520
39bbb063f8a5ef6d277468f28071fdfd3e98f0d3
'2012-01-15T06:05:07-05:00'
describe
'41' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIN' 'sip-files00003.txt'
eccf0952a3fc6e1a7aa43ed4aeb74db1
a3f09f97d89dec726d4ef25de506938fb3ab797d
'2012-01-15T06:04:56-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3589' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIO' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
5254caf1c0b05f924ec954c745fb4a86
76e28463994787d433ffaa99858fa3b92b2ce732
'2012-01-15T06:07:39-05:00'
describe
'360274' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIP' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
f8e0f2aea0d4c173e0027aac59c1a03f
7482dd3860e7b8d348a098d1b676d5ee1df62aa0
'2012-01-15T06:04:47-05:00'
describe
'72442' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIQ' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
1f4608ed0caab05f2e82a9d3cab75fec
d533b8e18d84103e63196ad6cb92eba8dad2c54d
'2012-01-15T06:05:21-05:00'
describe
'826' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIR' 'sip-files00006.pro'
0d3fe4afd0d08d532b83ba65e55a647f
2cd52e1863eac130fb4d80339ec51985359fdf75
describe
'19268' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIS' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
513811ced27bfa6f02bc612edfab080d
dd6dad450b11706f7b5533017073f7bd6390d1e2
'2012-01-15T06:06:00-05:00'
describe
'2899108' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIT' 'sip-files00006.tif'
e71b675490299fa41e76a17903fb8f9c
91d3173cb2156099b5908db4affa5a6e9991414e
'2012-01-15T06:07:32-05:00'
describe
'47' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIU' 'sip-files00006.txt'
13449ab81854456203449b92188d56a0
b5f37e02e33f4e7eefd7a378f7d85bf50eaf507f
'2012-01-15T06:07:02-05:00'
describe
'5211' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIV' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
6f2e446008e034c8c8d76249dfd708d0
cfc4ccf1c12789a3191d44a6ccaac9a69530399f
'2012-01-15T06:09:52-05:00'
describe
'360081' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIW' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
0afb0201ac0c744309732f94b60efe4c
379942adf748cd62f993a98ac82531f50fdaa837
'2012-01-15T06:04:44-05:00'
describe
'37015' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIX' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
6619e61c5526e4df0191f720e79e393e
b538afb70508418334d8cc0ad7bf1b40b4f43a10
'2012-01-15T06:04:52-05:00'
describe
'8606' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIY' 'sip-files00007.pro'
49fd33c05100ba031a465f0f97c0e4e0
e150237d9a08c641d1e0e66308d045759f3e8e45
'2012-01-15T06:09:37-05:00'
describe
'12283' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJIZ' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
5436893c3f79dc094f214721806a6b95
ab0e3edc2d3e65275b4e967fc2ec5e3f7e55234f
'2012-01-15T06:09:20-05:00'
describe
'2897732' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJA' 'sip-files00007.tif'
bbd1a172d4432747548cf86a78e345aa
e53b263c8091f1c2a879912e8c045560d6cd521f
'2012-01-15T06:09:44-05:00'
describe
'450' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJB' 'sip-files00007.txt'
98cd2148130bc4dee41e8596b24d0a93
9a5740b7745e1219342ff60c85acfe29b033fdb0
'2012-01-15T06:04:37-05:00'
describe
'3969' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJC' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
4ee94b237a704473cb5f087d705094b7
ddc6547923d54a7b22825f0a9db17cc75ef43162
'2012-01-15T06:06:48-05:00'
describe
'292792' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJD' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
169fb15751b5fd9d2143924ece5b01ce
2217f54d0cdf20548c7145d8bf66cbe558c1e9c6
'2012-01-15T06:08:01-05:00'
describe
'18267' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJE' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
ab2c06975dd57f9d5927f9153b51d104
15b394800969e6a36e84089309ca03f335a7879f
'2012-01-15T06:05:10-05:00'
describe
'3812' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJF' 'sip-files00008.pro'
2ee2d3a3cf20c47cd9d6e967a92dd80a
5ed4b9e4ff18ebddb7062bdf7e4d1ec9d1bd7bf9
'2012-01-15T06:08:29-05:00'
describe
'5503' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJG' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
cc5e90bd1ea7cb2c61deb112da1a319a
1ebdd103b4a2a3ffbb3857aacfa1c337fbe29242
'2012-01-15T06:05:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJH' 'sip-files00008.tif'
d7131a39e64668ac74f2f87dd5a19367
4f27b076f4aa099576bd45c84c33f60b6e0c8bdc
'2012-01-15T06:10:35-05:00'
describe
'292' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJI' 'sip-files00008.txt'
e8df70221a88daf7013de8d459f72cf0
4c2114ae0f164e5307fe97ea3be526dcf0ec63bd
'2012-01-15T06:07:40-05:00'
describe
'1770' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJJ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
ba5b48808befe11d9f913842b1033705
7dde3aad70bc7000353ade7863624d8045da1ee0
'2012-01-15T06:09:17-05:00'
describe
'360024' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJK' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
cdaa6dad0bf7760470591f4189d36588
ce7c11a1d3fb8e4fa2f9e3f27867331b18e07d08
'2012-01-15T06:07:01-05:00'
describe
'74071' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJL' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
ee135779c0791b2a1b565b1424530221
c422b95e6f4552aab448d869003070ccdd0a8367
'2012-01-15T06:05:29-05:00'
describe
'24452' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJM' 'sip-files00009.pro'
9b5a5bd582b8bd58f8ce44f5e75004cd
ae4cdb93beee2b6f8c2b3ad07a460dbad1da49d4
'2012-01-15T06:04:57-05:00'
describe
'25642' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJN' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
1fed5e7ebf7ecac3a7aa0e211d59cd8d
6b0a690b289a627eb72f5fd7e6208de1c21cf2b8
'2012-01-15T06:10:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJO' 'sip-files00009.tif'
62954e3db8bf9e8fa802c95d3e30f135
89cfb4aa40f764541fe39cf3d8d49b4e20094db1
'2012-01-15T06:09:25-05:00'
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJP' 'sip-files00009.txt'
fe93745cb6994c2c7f5d729a52951bc1
e7b50e380bf66cf842f3d97a35f792ece57b4267
'2012-01-15T06:10:05-05:00'
describe
'7350' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJQ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
31769f10f838fe4ea6d3c6e536e21999
3a87ac83c5d4aebc5c031736f6e8d410029120e4
'2012-01-15T06:05:06-05:00'
describe
'360271' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJR' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
854ce562cae8d7060a7aa7f2bd03001d
8772c9fccad080570b1adb35ed4785ac39480a00
describe
'60100' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJS' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
5e40b204ebef8b847eef06151951f59b
97dacacedd66e940ea2efe1a7fb043350216eb39
'2012-01-15T06:06:57-05:00'
describe
'18483' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJT' 'sip-files00011.pro'
51e60abd5c101c129139d46bdcccc51f
19ebf6a9106544c78da3d7d78f3df1ac04f50a74
'2012-01-15T06:06:06-05:00'
describe
'22452' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJU' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
e36dc5bf98120e9dfb839e377879ea37
7905be552052419c2a709788d6fb26f36d02aa51
'2012-01-15T06:06:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJV' 'sip-files00011.tif'
fafbac9c54f88fcc1a8e1355c7057d5e
3e48311bcb11751387dea1c398b6744ec6d0f010
'2012-01-15T06:06:58-05:00'
describe
'864' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJW' 'sip-files00011.txt'
b60c6e7e5c0adb83aaaf4d32dc96d56c
112638ca5421921ece8de810a06d1e0252358270
'2012-01-15T06:10:03-05:00'
describe
'6169' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJX' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
476a29b5e79f9b49f9d9f1bda0887a0d
736a9248ba6c184f113c6f47d2580b688915cc5a
'2012-01-15T06:09:41-05:00'
describe
'360352' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJY' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
d156b7a122aa71ad1c62e60988f1b453
72970fc1625107aaecd8c087209297fdce7ac4f5
'2012-01-15T06:06:34-05:00'
describe
'72399' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJJZ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
fe2c27c57678b146c091681b66b17a7f
835a5b47b405e50e3d15e805d7306f2cc2d25b0c
'2012-01-15T06:09:56-05:00'
describe
'23877' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKA' 'sip-files00012.pro'
bf097332fe04b0777c8a1452414a7a40
b615d0ba8cb390dee3c94c3364b052f8772f55a8
'2012-01-15T06:09:14-05:00'
describe
'25660' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKB' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
61ed6fea06b932a75121779d21373c80
8d6568314dfa5693c54beb8d17ee3ce0bf397830
'2012-01-15T06:10:31-05:00'
describe
'2899820' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKC' 'sip-files00012.tif'
ae44dfc043d0b7301e03a1e89c898ab4
65b23fb58d5b1d2c105451a6ce592c515938e6e7
'2012-01-15T06:09:04-05:00'
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKD' 'sip-files00012.txt'
24c4a3704abfc41d7168d321404be35a
dc350be8b3aa961e3259e2f8755e32a721bb6b31
'2012-01-15T06:05:47-05:00'
describe
'7504' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKE' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
dfe8a319ad0d3ae26ae052be50750a49
7fb2adb34490d13cfc9d7bfb12091a7bb24ccab5
'2012-01-15T06:10:41-05:00'
describe
'360113' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKF' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
8acf129d089d433af7ea422d56998505
a799e1a6369643efdd7ca4139141d0edca29fffd
'2012-01-15T06:10:32-05:00'
describe
'78438' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKG' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
b4cd96570679c636e32db305d02b1bd4
e08a9aa5c89f99170761962bda302e78dce351d7
'2012-01-15T06:06:25-05:00'
describe
'21352' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKH' 'sip-files00013.pro'
4cb35c9e01c235ef4c6146d5e53b3d00
ee56e6f06fa76afee7bfb1221a3ba605c32188f1
'2012-01-15T06:07:43-05:00'
describe
'26012' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKI' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
3ffec0ec8b656a61f4fed5966584cc4a
b191d35cca3fcde41903625df8587a06297daa6e
'2012-01-15T06:07:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKJ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
1a172b195773a0abaca0a423794ccd92
bd1df63df80566dc98daadd843c003957bda4c8d
'2012-01-15T06:05:50-05:00'
describe
'953' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKK' 'sip-files00013.txt'
1a88a0f06b77d62bb879ae3f7d1b2921
bf3e614db6004eeedfc6161f4be57412c6e61415
'2012-01-15T06:04:45-05:00'
describe
'7406' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKL' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
76b9e38c915a12e9d598e8b06134c1fe
4f17d6517ae902addad686cd18610695faeefb3d
'2012-01-15T06:06:45-05:00'
describe
'360360' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKM' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
160f883e48b6192b0ad140e4421addab
b072b355b51a488a6b2108e651865edce5747476
'2012-01-15T06:07:59-05:00'
describe
'106085' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKN' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
0a19a76c0c66be5cf2333837731e76ad
f909d3ad592b910b98ca94e0b5fe7a4636bc8de5
'2012-01-15T06:08:03-05:00'
describe
'31405' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKO' 'sip-files00014.pro'
6c8eb562f75fb7002bb8604d6bd8c02e
4a2db1bd212f5d620834a88f0308f792e6e66589
'2012-01-15T06:09:06-05:00'
describe
'35856' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKP' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
5aba09ba0bba944e82f3d2c29dc835a0
b0b8b9b1d70e5bd2fd3e907f5791a8a41959d7e2
'2012-01-15T06:05:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKQ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
397a517413fa9aec4936d36b9bcab9e1
b8be18bc4674e00a022bd5b12a908531ec259fe6
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKR' 'sip-files00014.txt'
f3c3f52e369934a6c7c6258a7366ad42
fa0639dab4897f44d330b1bc0d585e7bf0df75ac
'2012-01-15T06:09:53-05:00'
describe
'9712' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKS' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
a82879adb5ac26d29caf9fcc2a73e80e
bdf9a6ffa1920aa3d2a9e7b9328a4382f7df2279
describe
'360112' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKT' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
17c5d216e6b85592ebc8356783524e0d
49789996c47fbff753cb9b3c6de4b1f0b835273b
'2012-01-15T06:05:38-05:00'
describe
'107768' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKU' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
f98602ac0e2c92a918b2e74e2007def1
56dd63cf70b3358accd193c784ff825aadc61c3d
'2012-01-15T06:08:51-05:00'
describe
'30844' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKV' 'sip-files00015.pro'
342b3c4218afefb7c947e5c23f829c8b
f20fe6e637b53460975adb14905af7053acf4698
'2012-01-15T06:05:33-05:00'
describe
'36624' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKW' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
ede5448361b1990cdab0c6e1336cf5bd
6ad3c8d48d4b56a9adb16912c29e6721c69fd765
'2012-01-15T06:05:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKX' 'sip-files00015.tif'
cb3f9fae85a1391be4c79a0e8352aead
e795829660f0180bf7c917e35ea7b37aefb2f2dc
'2012-01-15T06:09:57-05:00'
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKY' 'sip-files00015.txt'
ea1b84d301fe828b97dee8fd9b22922f
08e3a4ea019183865aa568e49524efd6ccccc03d
'2012-01-15T06:06:44-05:00'
describe
'10238' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJKZ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
a886d5cfc1ae89bd5388c628d8dbdd17
f68211752771108ebe52083187de0439a0c2b4f3
'2012-01-15T06:07:27-05:00'
describe
'360247' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLA' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
b60d0c5adf6c7c590306f94632a5ae6f
21612a134a1dd2d4b3ad19f2fdc6f8c0ad538677
'2012-01-15T06:07:17-05:00'
describe
'115978' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLB' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
9fb74baa027e17a42228481eb397e8d5
3433b3129a7217d58a69963ddcc06cf9ac5bb1ae
describe
'18821' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLC' 'sip-files00016.pro'
0b55de17c3f6f8ca1943ca4faa40aa29
2ee0e93213e1855f4375da54be21b059f4ee3226
describe
'36894' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLD' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
551d5b019d88a05dfcd30110c61c2a1f
f0aaa19a113c1c11a541fc66fb71e597221e35b6
'2012-01-15T06:07:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLE' 'sip-files00016.tif'
1cc11bf4930d48eb7093e97a87c1d019
683f5a18fad8ff711f01d270062c71339463b0ba
'2012-01-15T06:05:43-05:00'
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLF' 'sip-files00016.txt'
43d013829c67523d91d54f5ead0fa5ff
b2e5d4857a6de3fdbf06347053b411e655fcf579
describe
'9668' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLG' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
3560cc38b5318a3002dfe0a48f496a15
81a5ffc132b31a31d62bd712a6eaceeedd8891ef
'2012-01-15T06:08:00-05:00'
describe
'360049' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLH' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
4ae5ee20692b8bf3c0c003ffceaf7a8d
a52878967790a68e62058ba879af5aa51f495d48
describe
'98946' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLI' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
a3fc2bc24072fcf49afc91867e28c3a5
618ff249120f2cd63026e1ff0259c0182c7e5385
'2012-01-15T06:04:36-05:00'
describe
'29251' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLJ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
10c2d5d2995992cc4ff4733ca0fb6aec
008dd779ece568e1cb058ccea12efe6ed53065cb
describe
'34847' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLK' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
3df9ce6655e397f30523714c568fc398
b5d6dbef3cdcdb8d4472a5ab0aec7674dcd0c2da
'2012-01-15T06:05:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLL' 'sip-files00017.tif'
2ba0460a7726679b61cccc3aadc2d0d8
804587615f4a07d98a2cf2bd36341eddaf221168
'2012-01-15T06:10:06-05:00'
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLM' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a9583dead4cbf7706ed132bc5eef2606
a4c28cce95d1aff1cb4f4d4b2ed5858a91255ed3
describe
'9507' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLN' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
94c7587ed45bddc79f3f309a69028fa9
7106726f95f832a22d390860aaf67cf52b6d671f
'2012-01-15T06:07:57-05:00'
describe
'360095' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLO' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
46e8c2d0b57c5d842e4ec0358c46fe4a
0043f581a27037789b48f418b6d4504880b69d50
'2012-01-15T06:10:36-05:00'
describe
'107828' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLP' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
74b5521947352a896447b44ce084d56f
35e257c33df1c27abff0344c9b810a3eb93eb551
'2012-01-15T06:10:42-05:00'
describe
'32553' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLQ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
8fc70493fbcddc292277092fd693e5a9
75f2e7b0daa643e10a2b2827bbf7d868399f395a
'2012-01-15T06:07:30-05:00'
describe
'37236' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLR' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
9d08922936a31b31132aa55e4da39594
83794b50ea1c7f99809b05033829b1fa2b46e2ee
'2012-01-15T06:06:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLS' 'sip-files00018.tif'
13e8c27c728cad958f1da3ddd7bdbca0
6a1456a8486c57735f08275fcf3cc1f55b2d8185
'2012-01-15T06:05:03-05:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLT' 'sip-files00018.txt'
268fa293af18859bceb7e66a736ac6a5
7bad2d7c2ed85d46391248e84900d37327936429
'2012-01-15T06:04:40-05:00'
describe
'9869' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLU' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
2756d0e9f1a31d10d6e0e29e9eb51d54
756816d3733d1ec41faf5b259a607418c15a6bdd
'2012-01-15T06:10:39-05:00'
describe
'360045' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLV' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
8e3cb94be1e07edefefd37d5e738889a
f287c881df437a2bd83b67d14a8720a870130b38
'2012-01-15T06:06:36-05:00'
describe
'97720' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLW' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
bfc488a76fc242120b30f3525152da96
d80aef237fa21271540998d2f231dbac20b44fe5
'2012-01-15T06:05:01-05:00'
describe
'28965' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLX' 'sip-files00019.pro'
6aa79fd5f5a3d3a52fe2192d7798dc5b
d9c1b6e1eb0730e076382c6a01101823b7a49bb5
'2012-01-15T06:04:50-05:00'
describe
'34119' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLY' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
d412eb67193b057ff695031e42d2a244
2b1d77545754e7104f9c570409beebcdbb0dbc11
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJLZ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
994cb4bb44603261eac9817b39c6e16a
4f0db44b79897cfe59db297a9bb99127015cc4da
'2012-01-15T06:08:12-05:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
2c05da10594828d567fd73c757b75773
b48e5131857e7cb7a29baa294bd82ea125b5edce
'2012-01-15T06:10:24-05:00'
describe
'9307' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMB' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
33dc195ce70fe2788802b6d2a60e1e16
58f3e8ef4ba9bd10a8a1e46234d9fcb13fa43a30
'2012-01-15T06:06:15-05:00'
describe
'360106' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
c2e1c0b1cb2408cdcf2a1d2f78ee5f00
b34a2f2271619fb901ebdaf6036e3da5857dd9b6
'2012-01-15T06:08:06-05:00'
describe
'105272' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMD' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
79a06196934bd305005f6d3bed798706
d1be155732e9488a70cbe05bb80c81a333d16220
describe
'16480' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJME' 'sip-files00020.pro'
04abc2eea8255269b6efbd1dccf567c6
ab55029d37751b4312eb67d27acc97d4452b4838
'2012-01-15T06:10:37-05:00'
describe
'33566' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMF' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
2d20c74cbf37b7892874b606856d2208
8010a4f78a455f30194f246e359f40463c578cb8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMG' 'sip-files00020.tif'
36241bd05570a208842b88a050ed6f74
731b4633d4cce1885d63ae7ce3269aec45631fdd
'2012-01-15T06:06:49-05:00'
describe
'766' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMH' 'sip-files00020.txt'
46c57e42ce8817fe75304273bbbe8b66
2193f4bba75eec57da77e6f8cbdd1d54b4d786f6
'2012-01-15T06:04:42-05:00'
describe
'8795' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMI' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
ae7458e627b0d17e89ebc7fd38b5ea40
052560fa14b6d513e4a9946fac8be4966c508e81
describe
'360102' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMJ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
516675136339bbdffbca438d90280cae
e4594c657fed7d0075086a0dbffb5ab09e52c7e2
'2012-01-15T06:05:35-05:00'
describe
'105256' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMK' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
e3090f31cd37d1e155860936ca4c92c5
1099c96bd52e7e7ee0ace5e60dd06de5144eab2f
'2012-01-15T06:06:32-05:00'
describe
'30796' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJML' 'sip-files00021.pro'
33fd54d10b1359fcd5f172a215a96d8e
f1de0d438ec5f915f78c8c97647edfc6158ceabf
'2012-01-15T06:09:51-05:00'
describe
'37669' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMM' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
d896477c085f525c93625ea744ccb609
939cff73409ce1382275ed8482d2d375cea9477e
'2012-01-15T06:08:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMN' 'sip-files00021.tif'
fed5af8c536a8fbf55dc9f97a01dedd1
76339516936adb2c64e2ec921592ecdee87e0c40
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMO' 'sip-files00021.txt'
6e501414c9d1319ddfe3e0db39af4688
adc4d3f69c2841989740dd2421ea0b6c595fdb14
'2012-01-15T06:06:43-05:00'
describe
'9961' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMP' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
a380f5d7785a831b7bd7f2ab6c2379f1
a4a6acebdcd257d7f3d9a7e6b0bcb850d8274dea
'2012-01-15T06:09:48-05:00'
describe
'360536' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMQ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
fc83aa6cb8e5c43e8632da5cb920f080
c16d6a47b13d856f2a83fe86c1410f58732ead7b
'2012-01-15T06:05:27-05:00'
describe
'124678' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMR' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
39e2b75a3b42a66088e0052a065ce94d
f508bd0d2586fbc23dc113490f8d28263ef8fff0
'2012-01-15T06:06:01-05:00'
describe
'21051' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMS' 'sip-files00022.pro'
22a2b626c260debaa264699713eebae5
6ed4de2820eb919d6cb761a6028479b61f1217d8
'2012-01-15T06:07:29-05:00'
describe
'38191' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMT' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
d54c39406a7f543f557cf62d10820fa7
3c5bbcb8281900446a80322b55bb79e63318432f
'2012-01-15T06:09:02-05:00'
describe
'2901200' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMU' 'sip-files00022.tif'
c6a72215b047f406acd60de2961483ce
37652fcb465972583ba4de54118962a02231cfe8
'2012-01-15T06:05:54-05:00'
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMV' 'sip-files00022.txt'
bd0fc2880c63a5ebbce82cb4c596af2c
2117c484a300c8d0f276120987bf2f23d9ca4330
'2012-01-15T06:06:55-05:00'
describe
'10073' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMW' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
beea3268c21979a06f5e42155c6aefa2
c3389efe34f921a698e3df56e6870892033cd519
'2012-01-15T06:04:48-05:00'
describe
'360280' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMX' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
cdbee55454abb3a805f494c33f535e45
b5bb98dd169bb20bfc474298cbed312c75573d98
'2012-01-15T06:06:02-05:00'
describe
'89729' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMY' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
a56f1d91003bf29d303ee4d68303d648
dec244641b281f794f99283713f7ab204b3c5854
'2012-01-15T06:09:19-05:00'
describe
'25736' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJMZ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
5f37e52b1a4b8081041d6f60e69a35ad
170cd54a9925fa31a49b068f7a64473bc33fbdd4
'2012-01-15T06:05:28-05:00'
describe
'30234' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNA' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
90d9a322e273780ff210b3f86325a2d4
4e049a886da92b6bbf95478fb245aae6688cc088
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNB' 'sip-files00023.tif'
18d5c6c09680454af3769749d08fbbed
7af9eba031e38cf603e2b0294d9fb746e51dadf0
'2012-01-15T06:06:54-05:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNC' 'sip-files00023.txt'
dab77042eb85d02c23dfbf7fd5e9ca1f
4c36f1399ae7d7fde25ef36a2c79fbbde838209e
describe
Invalid character
'8861' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJND' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
f868b381dfc03025bc75740c4f21ec7f
79b3827dbbc2da332106b482616c89cd92eedc05
'2012-01-15T06:07:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNE' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
ea89803a56941fce7326644559bc4d96
539e4ab049a792ffd73665385304f17ed98c8634
'2012-01-15T06:05:37-05:00'
describe
'108210' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNF' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
f7a4d8a26c5cc25fc1fe245dab346b52
de0928ba2f05cec2aa72d7228213cc083f35e63f
describe
'31220' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNG' 'sip-files00024.pro'
f412411cbdf3e0e7fa7b95bb533a5261
b90755bacce6a7f9273558dc4f38d13137071172
'2012-01-15T06:05:12-05:00'
describe
'38239' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNH' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
65bed0b971e4aa5476b5a2ef0f66f2c8
975ebaf322bc98194eca4ed26dfcac4750acbfc1
'2012-01-15T06:07:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNI' 'sip-files00024.tif'
816615736696d6acdeb3a79798fccc17
258814761758c0ebcd10725dd520354ac139ca46
'2012-01-15T06:07:24-05:00'
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNJ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
f449673e92f99dd683ad23adda771272
2d27eca5cdf25eb47903715f4d389cfb5af37167
'2012-01-15T06:06:20-05:00'
describe
'9843' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNK' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
ca1e477232e1931982d8599302088311
ffb7a2872891aa8e8a5907d612a6ba9f2e740558
'2012-01-15T06:06:26-05:00'
describe
'360255' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNL' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
1ea35e8770fe34351e54a93123f5446c
672c693f47c5fd28e02fd22769d521e0679263a1
'2012-01-15T06:10:00-05:00'
describe
'105411' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNM' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
6abea38e7ebda729b78e88b49d113427
73611ffb8d8bda46e28b2dcdc4f4395e8fc0ba83
'2012-01-15T06:07:41-05:00'
describe
'30847' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNN' 'sip-files00025.pro'
d4e3836ea43592abeab931dee54c0419
0be22fb6353e824660dca846a0a1e4f52f800dcc
'2012-01-15T06:09:58-05:00'
describe
'35992' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNO' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
92a3aa18c5cc55dc9c76095b040a35c4
ed6cefbca6194cb67e6722fa8a65036835bb241d
'2012-01-15T06:07:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNP' 'sip-files00025.tif'
75b039f01faa67ac289a5fc4341184bb
314c8aac0e9dc1755bc438e27dfb19cd51d07151
'2012-01-15T06:09:49-05:00'
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNQ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
c69e57e32d29163c4aa991ce95674d1c
f381ab0b5132e055ee0db3e6166a2c1c06c3f5a6
describe
'9617' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNR' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
fe32a9b4bbf62422d4747c13e04f6a1d
0c68786212f40bd9fffb752a256e0bb76fc4f75a
'2012-01-15T06:07:58-05:00'
describe
'360087' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNS' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
189890523ff509d7ae87a1c58a76080c
d370e57b0c8c97986cb8c3761c3a9c83c0cf40f4
'2012-01-15T06:05:52-05:00'
describe
'88828' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNT' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
463d72db9f3a4f070dd8468f4bce8cd9
b292d950cfb003f95ea93c2f856d066f4fef8621
'2012-01-15T06:09:01-05:00'
describe
'25323' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNU' 'sip-files00026.pro'
5997942f4f6ba57b4d32464d2358f5e4
599ba642f06f1a0227eb0aa18439f4204703f426
'2012-01-15T06:05:34-05:00'
describe
'28713' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNV' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
8fcab0e55e1a393893c1e55580dc6b5c
6739dfe171a441fdc2003663f7938b70601bc3d6
'2012-01-15T06:05:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNW' 'sip-files00026.tif'
842b3eaac1afa2241d714804e4a21705
af1e8d5ec99c775276ff2d6fe6474fc76ec0878c
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNX' 'sip-files00026.txt'
354913ffba27149bbed18ebb7fa079b1
0147946f8433640babe49e379072839cec118afe
'2012-01-15T06:08:40-05:00'
describe
'8340' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNY' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
a67331cfd173409aea4fc41586923c74
3aa98b715c4fac3bf56a77f6648f8d784c9488bd
describe
'359976' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJNZ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
d23b2dd3ae4547997e7b647bd96da7c1
a34769c1700baaceb804bf9e9627ef0b3fe28a0e
'2012-01-15T06:06:50-05:00'
describe
'110156' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOA' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
47974d184d2ce6bbd921c6e8b0bd92c9
5f41f058951dff82329c0c10c7c40663983f0ffe
'2012-01-15T06:07:08-05:00'
describe
'21776' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOB' 'sip-files00027.pro'
c5103c5ff5d67919ed90ee192f9faf93
d86b472bef7d142e5e5dc827b04186c1225315ef
'2012-01-15T06:07:19-05:00'
describe
'35739' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOC' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
d2f1a3989bfd462c9129e2fb61925d87
792b007c8964af64ecab878d31617409c90ac85f
'2012-01-15T06:07:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOD' 'sip-files00027.tif'
3d156c593bdc4cf49729af348af598db
886c145fb7d3c3c444317998dc880d3c288d389f
'2012-01-15T06:09:29-05:00'
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOE' 'sip-files00027.txt'
22b1f4f5a57f2c97bd07b2a9c0efd5ed
742198edb9724555ea90c7cde7af3162cc3e3d98
describe
'9531' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOF' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
7901c517817bffe99ec0ae5ae40e762a
7fd93913b61b7393df2f79391a66248bbc97d0f1
describe
'360094' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOG' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
f3409b54441aa7ee259b17178608be1b
4e3755113642d886f61361728d6636ba0cd0af97
describe
'103808' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOH' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
d0f0761698714a792f2eea5079e23e34
91e8d1bb6636bc76ea3f8994d66d64d642af339f
'2012-01-15T06:10:30-05:00'
describe
'29528' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOI' 'sip-files00028.pro'
0975e21faef9634f4168b948081f5f6e
0b150eb4c142e79bb4f528723c6464c285785b68
'2012-01-15T06:08:38-05:00'
describe
'35637' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOJ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
c60bfaafe92d072207acca9693bb500d
3bf6b81f1bc8ddfcd6da9d3a760111341f76d22c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOK' 'sip-files00028.tif'
59d1177188aa9919b9abffbf91dd9e09
eb14d75c207d8bcf1ac7c0f4d9a1fcaca3a67bc4
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOL' 'sip-files00028.txt'
7525c2659845ce0f9b2c3fe581394161
00d5693f38c283a360a4ff66faa738740b884043
describe
'10253' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOM' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
31e158c3896f681032bca0bc26518d14
56786f5f40eb8b6783f973ba9e99f05c0baa3abe
describe
'360186' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJON' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
a679e18449b1176a458f36ede588c5e3
0eeb2a5b1db8d87411021a944c3840d7984cb011
'2012-01-15T06:06:04-05:00'
describe
'105868' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOO' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
17e81232d88a2e3c6e63bb63647ec14b
6319eb7809631e928b087f01f557e6b97c6181e7
'2012-01-15T06:05:48-05:00'
describe
'31016' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOP' 'sip-files00029.pro'
3f1bff562df67b0d78dd85527cf5db16
af982a0bcc05feee26a56c0eba13c5833598ea18
describe
'37916' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOQ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
2755d6744c43dd70fc837f158a20ff3b
d10d3e500f5c56184e1f54cff1d3d728cb8ee1af
'2012-01-15T06:04:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOR' 'sip-files00029.tif'
3bc62b724b12d9428c4106ab642f450b
5919a53d74b8a2ea28406ad8b90b380a09cb8e97
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOS' 'sip-files00029.txt'
46206c3acdbb7eefaa2e2e64d7d82e73
a45f44efc294666e0a7b11d42a336a45c3fed6f7
describe
'10001' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOT' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
1e5870354b4e2abf03800a2bf92ff719
d12c44f74bb8f226a59fa876ec14b441245762e9
describe
'360073' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOU' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
d8b68c59cdc042769b01b102c11f519e
d9cc3af551a576dbece2231067ac55cd03e9146f
'2012-01-15T06:05:25-05:00'
describe
'114774' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOV' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
11dd9e024889965a992a0bdfeb9a7701
7eb3d649ee0f7f7437637f54028b4ab17db14ac3
'2012-01-15T06:04:34-05:00'
describe
'17917' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOW' 'sip-files00030.pro'
e3a35ec27df1e989b46b81e46c23afa9
0984ba2d736d0a0143374dd6012efc3a5edb3adb
describe
'34777' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOX' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
6c4182a58fc6ff7a5886966c3fd8ae32
63e5a99970357c8848a3f8310d82869a2c2a6621
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOY' 'sip-files00030.tif'
c94523b93895b780cb0b9335995c5c10
f4690a91e14ac3925c52e4d35d33378441731ca9
describe
'827' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJOZ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
afb229ef607a397ccba9cfc3f99d2dc7
e3ccc7e1f13f935eeb1765f8ed7cf343e6338644
'2012-01-15T06:04:49-05:00'
describe
'9154' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPA' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
af5957ee3256fc869dd98dfce4b1cc99
369096e160a5c0fa8584a3f4f03ab5d56de3de50
describe
'360258' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPB' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
41c94934169c85d3eb193e02ccd50055
2c8e336ba91cf5fc36c5cda5f5f98b41c370059d
'2012-01-15T06:06:07-05:00'
describe
'96621' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPC' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
7b8d29df3fce258e7dff0dd3ca726818
4376974932f8bbd7fd0430de2c136582f79c1225
describe
'29332' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPD' 'sip-files00031.pro'
f581f7f0e9cdfcb8e104c57787e8dbd6
4f5b5af1e8daedce39e890cf8d0c373e62f4ed7c
describe
'33082' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPE' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
f34b694a86f5473a407cf3cb00cbdd82
7cfd1b91b89cea329407e93e21c988b4f12f0e77
'2012-01-15T06:05:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPF' 'sip-files00031.tif'
5aa7b17679c317f1a2ff3b02a5430cdf
ef9fb361be8e7bfc734d0bee09d762a95afe1e7f
'2012-01-15T06:05:44-05:00'
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPG' 'sip-files00031.txt'
f58b34f2e2df8862071d5f2443fe0e47
cdcce9acc8d3f1f0a53d10b993d1fddc98642668
'2012-01-15T06:05:18-05:00'
describe
'9183' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPH' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
019a246ba22aea4def7c79bdd4fd2f20
02394a17e486a259c7f23f363416b52bcdc6cee7
'2012-01-15T06:04:55-05:00'
describe
'360207' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPI' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
039efc1cd08f36bd1e6562e3c85421dc
74a2249c20ada5bba1478dc41bab1025e204b60d
describe
'102249' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPJ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
2f9519d788aa9eeb248b2c80854239ed
d5acf7685a6e72463e30829d7b455f391a3ee8a9
describe
'30549' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPK' 'sip-files00032.pro'
43822e7f1ffbd4a0aeb40047bc75e6d1
88b096f00cb082896016a54ba6eae552f5b20589
describe
'36803' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPL' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
e8eba0929637e54818504fed096c4943
b8a0222955603fcd7f232a7b9368eefc4619da34
'2012-01-15T06:05:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPM' 'sip-files00032.tif'
2ed5fe7cc71d456bc67c542f90c29060
cf6af0c6cc5b7689107c694de2a50e98a432979b
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPN' 'sip-files00032.txt'
00e906fe5d16579e84b93138fcbd4287
a3ffbc285a2f06f2d6c63f8aaa9e489a9d540818
'2012-01-15T06:08:35-05:00'
describe
'9339' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPO' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
0625df0879ba0cd3b7be7c3499c0df51
267a2eec6601ca4a82df82c53605ab92776fdedc
describe
'360263' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPP' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
5e4526e5fcac13e459205ff1fb1944ee
758a651c16bca9266c2afb9370754a8a25ec1ef0
'2012-01-15T06:10:12-05:00'
describe
'87548' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPQ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
0ca255cf156307286f9297fcee66d3ed
e1306745e3db8508ab5937b7f7095b8c6d6b16c3
'2012-01-15T06:08:11-05:00'
describe
'26123' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPR' 'sip-files00033.pro'
a1df49b68f718d3c32fd31a0c4a2ebb6
903a1b0efa4328e6307844155208539d6d52a98c
'2012-01-15T06:10:23-05:00'
describe
'30623' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPS' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
655ace8fb64a1a9a321a711ef21e5a63
85627d84a1a7080a53343324f2c016a324b912c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPT' 'sip-files00033.tif'
5a101f5efef7ae43d53b791d103bd359
58eaa3af79d17a727bb5c6529cc489fe5d149f8a
'2012-01-15T06:07:49-05:00'
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPU' 'sip-files00033.txt'
c93ed4dd91265043c2cd25fc173d2677
13625b3e2a5bc259912bde43b5d3b51eb16feb81
describe
'8267' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPV' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
d24c0d28cfb925b9123b717c75fda87a
1c6cb023ab8918c1ee416a7e33911cf70d7e258d
'2012-01-15T06:05:57-05:00'
describe
'360267' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPW' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
e4bbefab4cf5707e6d1e5cb6558ed6f7
ea9b4fcc3059e50cce19a9a23eb34dd2e9e10a63
describe
'109582' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPX' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
b62daa4284fad36b9c8fd8779b3588da
429464a447736f3d5cb39b3795e3adb626c9f0d0
'2012-01-15T06:10:44-05:00'
describe
'31455' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPY' 'sip-files00034.pro'
666b3332bf64130e7bae602cb6839623
f05fb0e7fa1333f0150277335567f1d96d8a065a
'2012-01-15T06:10:09-05:00'
describe
'36045' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJPZ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
bca7221bc5b571a10268a38eea7bf0a5
69e05cf5500252a7a0c548dd8951cdda5a7f85a5
'2012-01-15T06:05:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQA' 'sip-files00034.tif'
8af71d94ec0fdce6ee263b51d9eeaf26
12b16df9f6bd81091dcdc815ff10c6b6c62e0816
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQB' 'sip-files00034.txt'
7c5d5579110f2fb2d147bd20346ab505
aa03ed055ab86076f51a572139eb40d9a73b9109
'2012-01-15T06:09:21-05:00'
describe
'10081' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQC' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
8ee2da4c98c833199cb0860ac75cb180
de2f039cc3fba78b84859368011fc1bc91077bc6
describe
'360236' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQD' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
7af1e52aee54ff1ba78d7cba0432e0c8
b0ed72ace89bbada38e79a2e759e8b9c4c4f274d
describe
'105750' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQE' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
40dc208217ddbc08ffc6d2306339fd3a
d3e703685d333ecd31101c9a0b072e595ff7eaec
'2012-01-15T06:09:33-05:00'
describe
'31577' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQF' 'sip-files00035.pro'
efbb65cf801dfbffe880c0527fbc4737
c28009b66f2660d4dd872e575e2b00edd0d21f7f
'2012-01-15T06:08:27-05:00'
describe
'36898' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQG' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
aa1b2d36c980604c2be8de65c5234d2d
99b6b06e46b47dd7bc66fca26571c7e8c7a9c1d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQH' 'sip-files00035.tif'
b3eaca5b4cce6b0a4ef5c907de5dd4f1
fd39765d63355316516284b9832abbf36fac9578
'2012-01-15T06:09:55-05:00'
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQI' 'sip-files00035.txt'
e55b0f7172d72a6dc703857b6bd8d318
78f6b3fb165beb6c906e29addcf995d87c3f30c8
'2012-01-15T06:05:22-05:00'
describe
'10051' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQJ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
777d500e29091b2f6736a5287f1c0ec1
ab2b3012faa5da4d9ef9a86aeacf24241172f4a7
describe
'360283' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQK' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
c8467741886823d791d2f3159c2c1b81
f2dd85b00b3b6846dc49e734461fd6889f8451f2
'2012-01-15T06:04:59-05:00'
describe
'108311' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQL' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
f9399bacdb791cef8f4288865d6ab47e
b75d33bb63ca9c76779e6f6638dade07cbe40ea8
describe
'30654' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQM' 'sip-files00036.pro'
9b14f0f5623042eb33d1d0796d507164
590bfdea62206202dda390b6a47531e9f45e9c5d
describe
'36301' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQN' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
14eed9e0d31f4499c6f38b19709103d8
40ebe0bf1723fa922e3037afc8b2501e559f27ac
'2012-01-15T06:10:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQO' 'sip-files00036.tif'
41b9ab14bb9c5326f8a1ccd77071e42a
50e7a121dd5b505858d2d6f494b9d487037faee2
'2012-01-15T06:07:55-05:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQP' 'sip-files00036.txt'
b4fb55853113963f99d3dc0ef89235bf
174f7b7080aa8b01d6ed113668969bc82933a6ae
describe
'9959' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQQ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
0c58908a440f76c3aaecbf08b791eae8
e5b30a62851ebbe6cb941cb503f80d0eee716ac1
describe
'360532' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQR' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
39b7bb6314ef534a06b8454e87b53608
c67bc8529245ab4820f37ed9488417ef64c6dac9
'2012-01-15T06:06:22-05:00'
describe
'122911' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQS' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
4bfd6e1694cdf851278964e53431dd26
8d9a623d525465834a33b2b1a781f133251cb9df
describe
'17787' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQT' 'sip-files00037.pro'
c7d2367d96045841fad859b7074200b4
a3cde5fce479c55a369a06c44deb7725f0f46b9f
describe
'34971' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQU' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
b9a86beb0b83ef6638b650074c1aba69
cb1550a88e36b9fb49376c085e7817d6b6da61dd
'2012-01-15T06:06:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQV' 'sip-files00037.tif'
6df1d2df0f0a34932a78663f93141e97
d03aed0928963f27b26f99d8f68aa40dc44741dd
'2012-01-15T06:05:16-05:00'
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQW' 'sip-files00037.txt'
a20ac3d247af31afc43e7c422ee276bf
8e3b36e2144ad559f8ad49499cec9d4d92e96b1c
describe
'9394' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQX' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
753a7b533a5a9951b9b03c4c0523714b
27f6b753750cad5263723174b3e78610f18547fd
describe
'360507' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQY' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
7541afd55e653d1dd2893efda9ad1b58
d6649a24f2c1894a0cde79bdcceef872cc479f20
describe
'114068' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJQZ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
2d8e6fc720bd0ed54c4d4480ca94b75e
ef25ae9ce47cc9861dd45aa16450e554711899fa
describe
'32865' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRA' 'sip-files00038.pro'
a53c44b9f235e7a2db128b842db58a94
c7d7ae3e60ec12e995f7a76df5ef671c1500810c
describe
'37660' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRB' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
92845a7b8a5f0243d6893f17f83c4dc6
feb0960f736fffe6d168118ada8f2da4739f0394
'2012-01-15T06:10:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRC' 'sip-files00038.tif'
de6c1bbcd2d72fa14bb78e9d9038c1da
2e20aee96116d1a58801e7399bff5ffb0865a669
'2012-01-15T06:07:20-05:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRD' 'sip-files00038.txt'
4c885330289b8de5251afcc56713265d
ec4e47ac98034b58064ed48ec6ea4c4966326a3b
describe
'10378' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRE' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
99aad966696b17a317caec616436df3e
17fe522b0552e63aa3bde339440b7bd0927280a4
'2012-01-15T06:04:54-05:00'
describe
'360474' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRF' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
807bd70b0aef1964676d269a090974a0
56bec09d094039fa4379b60523a87d19168cb538
'2012-01-15T06:07:34-05:00'
describe
'103687' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRG' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
94d9bd6b59a9352295337566782aec9d
3556b55b295b06d55a0ac0091c81b9ba39c55a8c
describe
'30395' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRH' 'sip-files00039.pro'
fa583ffbf054f67706f77c20685ccb48
5f30ed6fd1771eab487e47fae89a3156a94a34ce
'2012-01-15T06:09:47-05:00'
describe
'35448' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
a56a5417ef386cf53f2253e6ea6bec48
a1ba655b7514e22ba530a6e0b46e356fcdb5f855
'2012-01-15T06:08:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRJ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
72cf3e2fd586a88aaeb03d86082542a4
ae90387a7d7f0458867ec9b6c959fa07b5ad91cf
'2012-01-15T06:06:19-05:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRK' 'sip-files00039.txt'
124730608e5952717b43f6a7e888fd9e
a11479f35a2ec705a0ed1e3958ce0d5b55f48e3f
'2012-01-15T06:07:42-05:00'
describe
'9222' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRL' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
de4f391789e859e2d28e4a4ba0da4871
e60f7951ba6f63d7ea6e30eb4bb2e36b32cd3278
describe
'360506' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRM' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
762be4af1fe652132acffb22188aebe4
8c1732241ffdf59bf0c66fbab6248192db3f2f7b
describe
'93259' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRN' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
552be879640d677d13e6fca579f3b452
5e6f0aa025a5efe645f91bd803f2c19aad4a5af3
describe
'26073' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRO' 'sip-files00040.pro'
d50041d2ce7d98d5a92888b8562723b1
7c02f3dcf53fb956ec2050f28567b4a2cb608a15
'2012-01-15T06:09:59-05:00'
describe
'30777' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRP' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
cbcb602fec55ad1a98282d09c00e839b
6c46c1c2f91978c374ca93e46ec7363480638cc0
'2012-01-15T06:05:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRQ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d83d3cd38eea1bd8ab1f9212d980c6db
6667b1b0d0318b1e95bcf20c2e4a08866ffbeaf4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRR' 'sip-files00040.txt'
d234554c0e98d7d4dd1d0252e21ae4be
d20df82ac678f8c1db12d4cbe450f3e5c7bb0f29
'2012-01-15T06:08:24-05:00'
describe
'8454' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRS' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
5e384e90674b1f25ef93513a8629e24b
cea92de48653dc6b52e5fd0ed5ec650f5c08f985
'2012-01-15T06:07:06-05:00'
describe
'360526' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRT' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
820575b3adbd72f53135660f8f644b2e
bf3f78185f019e32a9ce53a428b8af4e08084e6f
describe
'104583' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRU' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
bcbb398d6e090aa6c6f9b8c7a914183c
6f0f149f1d196ba20f65fb0f9cf4b74599b4f4f6
'2012-01-15T06:06:24-05:00'
describe
'30358' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRV' 'sip-files00041.pro'
b0a196ad569183d6cf65d02a9e8a7949
22151753d051ac45d7cdad485d9df5c3bfce6d69
describe
'36438' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRW' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
f65744a5da297c099feb192fb7dd6720
4df142f364bf118835a170ca95dd420689c089ea
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRX' 'sip-files00041.tif'
7c31e9915cfe6699b3c444cd1469419f
0b5e476f1c5ebc10fe86e0466f5b6b3d561d87e0
'2012-01-15T06:09:42-05:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRY' 'sip-files00041.txt'
400789b6412c7b08f6fa2f6a64914e72
e9cfbcf5e121bee86c9094879afbe05b209e4e8c
'2012-01-15T06:09:24-05:00'
describe
'9568' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJRZ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
dd683b3b2e2fd91648cc5c04f7115250
c9666b20985fd4026d070d26a10759b97f57436f
'2012-01-15T06:07:22-05:00'
describe
'360451' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSA' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
3f55ac673ceca4982834421c81217205
a729158d4ee4a8b298b53b0cc10b37a7bbe25fff
describe
'104831' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSB' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
d9f9055ab0272fa0c3585600cdee475f
83f39c55a414379eaabde5eb2aa93f539f337afb
describe
'29593' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSC' 'sip-files00042.pro'
087b2806d9af6be566e8ff01690677b3
00dbad919f5f947a41d3747a16eb2441d0229e01
describe
'35884' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSD' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
0bf31ef7748020cf55f7ee802518f63b
41475341940dfac96625d923cb2c52a67e31bfb1
'2012-01-15T06:06:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSE' 'sip-files00042.tif'
32b6850f7e7c7be7b322f1522e9d279d
ee7d5038983ee0551fa15314df2ab342f3bb99f6
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSF' 'sip-files00042.txt'
285c4da7d91b2033cadbb827e763789f
a556caf74bc46b3599c4c859538e0bb58185d5a4
'2012-01-15T06:06:56-05:00'
describe
'9753' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSG' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
58fb17e963af178a452bcb8021ab9401
b737f5af979e11b87be58c7c8ec0ff590bc939e2
describe
'360285' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSH' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
8003b6db3fca24e7677c176ea60bc6db
6d5cb486ecc2373d74407bd2bf4f2276b0038733
describe
'116971' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSI' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
eee6747de288bc7d144c2d73202e411d
af65bf6dd0c5354dd37f09193581915df74fbac0
describe
'18284' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSJ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
42c901f8e0708affdd766e0c087b13ea
2f949d7dcbe4a2f63bf33887c313c2b20a53cfbb
describe
'35731' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSK' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
a9005e2119981dc0c22c28a35c18e160
d1d95b60816eaf4f435110ab6de21edc6c43b1c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSL' 'sip-files00043.tif'
bacf75dcd4c7893b210fdc6755e33c5f
16bfd52241a492eb60ce4091c171d3b20612f3b4
'2012-01-15T06:06:16-05:00'
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSM' 'sip-files00043.txt'
70fc7a019c9638c4b1cd8a9481e5dad7
4cfff1c1647103c3bda4634671f5c766c9e45cad
'2012-01-15T06:07:26-05:00'
describe
'9721' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSN' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
29bdcc0b74cfb43c2966c450c72ffdf0
64151834bce7afddb5faefd84a23ee5183aebc32
'2012-01-15T06:06:30-05:00'
describe
'360215' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSO' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
71bfa04015b7ad28e2d59b448297e5b6
aa9d625b1fe8b54644c30c07ab082f8a51e70073
describe
'111005' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSP' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
bb586dadcabcf029f3524e4876658f48
856ab12ff339109faed6160dc4f514a017af2e02
'2012-01-15T06:05:04-05:00'
describe
'31788' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSQ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
acf6150b78b61b73297f801e65d61550
111a59a7087622d9a109fbd40905a24f93e952b8
describe
'39019' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSR' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
a7cf3c4a53cf0505dbf7088eeed6a9df
cc1c5da9fa18ce4417dbe6c856e7435dd66a7b11
'2012-01-15T06:09:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSS' 'sip-files00044.tif'
5f726f2014e88529c37f055b92bfb3c7
6990ddb3348ac18d3a15a789202548649254e7a7
'2012-01-15T06:05:17-05:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJST' 'sip-files00044.txt'
36baa3d0935d626979a7b95a85c64e2b
ab03da1085d97e6ec6cac6b0288b55b673637485
'2012-01-15T06:08:57-05:00'
describe
'10328' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSU' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
e6e9e27f01b457fd04221debbb5a3729
9d30b547482b2da3fdf7e92685fac78230820a14
'2012-01-15T06:10:10-05:00'
describe
'360238' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
7ebdafa10fde353429ddb80c7e3c6021
01b601016aa951662fb1f2705f1786b72920056e
describe
'111588' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSW' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
6e2545d178b1ddb90c37ddcc3b5dbaf5
3a8fdbd08bbc0ecf0dea9e04473819cb7e6c96dd
'2012-01-15T06:06:41-05:00'
describe
'32162' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSX' 'sip-files00045.pro'
54db6335754dc45f669b7f3e07d82384
4dde0d7f78e27e9c4afc0b5da8a1d5324e067746
'2012-01-15T06:07:21-05:00'
describe
'37031' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSY' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
cb413500332ae1de55a926ebe5953a77
80338df488226b981c6305642ae76415d1480072
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJSZ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b6e35b5cf04ca02c21fb2fdf88e6c5b6
6a6a7a1e091fd0b78326fc371d2d7b072dfbaff9
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTA' 'sip-files00045.txt'
6ee6705c22065e7766903dc33d8bc9a6
b5f730a04628ebc843e87f81b993955de2325c18
'2012-01-15T06:06:51-05:00'
describe
'9979' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTB' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
8539196fdb9ea5f46b1b9284603fe745
5b6e68c189c20e63addfd4ec101a31f1bd4219fb
describe
'360511' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTC' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
024a39649f7c2b36f9c7a36897353232
c689913f7073b39f3caf9a03c3d77395891e1760
'2012-01-15T06:10:26-05:00'
describe
'109292' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTD' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
0e036f53f767be0f7071a4984d300e11
bbba7775dd3e00c64a55dc15d228a7d80dda2960
describe
'32512' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTE' 'sip-files00046.pro'
a1dff28c34c9008bb9d524cdc80e119b
10b298937ff2b25d9fdc6f9122cbbfdb7441d8f1
'2012-01-15T06:04:35-05:00'
describe
'37504' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTF' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
1bd7abb8d9a032144dcd1a127b383c5b
f662c5d2ad4e81a8a7f307e143642bc9d9b0d77c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTG' 'sip-files00046.tif'
24b6d6970f8dd5d5814aac7ea219301e
319bb07a27de655817ea3d0c5129f0f0d0768313
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTH' 'sip-files00046.txt'
e669cde4fd7b7fca4ecc5e381bd8197b
3507f7e4ff24d0ab74882c7a17fdfa65334fb596
'2012-01-15T06:08:02-05:00'
describe
'10084' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTI' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
7fe2a252bd3f0b804066c6236e7486ef
0f6fef92287aec0db75f4653b27976e68d055298
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTJ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
704513c36ebbf8670a3753ef638269eb
8aa0f261757653ffb321a7050263eaaf27e97416
'2012-01-15T06:05:51-05:00'
describe
'97137' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTK' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
ace7a32070425669ff9cbbdfd9037b49
7413e0527bde86b22ca69047503b8f7fb2f84fb5
describe
'15444' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTL' 'sip-files00047.pro'
51ba3acf5daeec4049224a1986dcb231
90f6bebca769dace01a10b32fc2152d6884a7104
describe
'30880' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTM' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
6996c2488b4fbf06377239f86b8a9e43
9b5beba83fb3802d5dd5f664b448d62ea0039351
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTN' 'sip-files00047.tif'
765a70429ae69d1a6514e5acb4ff05a5
87fdc5a8f17abc87c7b439578cd2f644100873a1
describe
'755' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTO' 'sip-files00047.txt'
0453c1b0e9ecf2f85b3ab531796bde31
3b2349f028eafd4da88a1b2fd6309e2861fef656
'2012-01-15T06:07:15-05:00'
describe
'8075' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTP' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
3d8e83225fa0305c7bca211696d8ba72
d48f01c7f1e62be1ca62da925f847e6226ce8fdb
'2012-01-15T06:05:53-05:00'
describe
'360534' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTQ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
2091a28934ebafc69fa5e74260dde905
c347f5a5b9a6e9f8eb0357f4b32268777b4c4a61
describe
'100714' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTR' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
bd0ae8d6e2e4647de6259d3a324e41c4
38b45545730864f0b45eb3a5de56c5f4c4408880
describe
'28916' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTS' 'sip-files00048.pro'
5f02a55e04491f5f36f3fccf3ae9c2cf
5a2e8a85c1764025b4548606e14427e41c5e325d
describe
'33759' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTT' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
fb9bbf4acea4f8eba6199a369075c2a6
a704f27f3745b3dd2f98849be9e2dded1fcb197c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTU' 'sip-files00048.tif'
9fd8996b297bf75bbd5fa410753f3173
fbb87688f8386fc0ba8d5121ca79004c4a71c75a
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTV' 'sip-files00048.txt'
214bedce536fac9a0f12c5a99cdf7b61
6738a7bcf831e6d3580f453e60f6f7eb4fb3918f
'2012-01-15T06:06:10-05:00'
describe
'9602' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTW' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
8f88a33f65b7600c9648d8cecd800bc5
5284e60561476960661762c05ae02ebfdb297b02
'2012-01-15T06:06:31-05:00'
describe
'360242' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTX' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
e2a4a2da33fa1c80a771a165d16d220e
7a6ae1806106c12bd57ca5b063386987c3d27d4c
describe
'110981' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTY' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
1ee74625c3ef1b6e42ad5880feaccf72
7b91cc3586e2e2ca01fa81f92578ed5e7b3f2638
describe
'31660' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJTZ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
48fb68a0b14fe1decaa708f3d25730c1
3ac11438887c171d9023e3ef4ce49298ce99d0ba
describe
'38661' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUA' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
85d64697c17d2195ddc93321d4ec0f63
822cc4588d5d47107feff015883118c062e79083
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUB' 'sip-files00049.tif'
0e4c401e728aaef6991c2caa9359b26e
24f72acc0426b0e7e3c1ada0daa00688cddd15d1
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
43ebe8a13aa20afcdef954f6e0bedd48
40d449a528cfe07e204e642132d87107948248bb
describe
'10453' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUD' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
868114329b2babfa00dcf81952d2e286
b9246946eb1ab4f2ef66e9a74e0b6e5ce939ca3b
describe
'360546' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUE' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
044844952feb24618d083a0e70bb15e4
ceb99c1e0fdc2d4a2b39081be778e5e0b27d1c95
describe
'88842' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUF' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
6aadac3a9bd4e43e1647c7396098d889
a32651d502e233efdc8a75b5bf7dafd2783e476c
describe
'25431' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUG' 'sip-files00050.pro'
11ab5f023fc0be4491e8b4c70d8dc6c8
6267068c46c90e53493865cc369df6475225e4b8
describe
'31181' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUH' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
1fd7eb7f75d40fb6ab69732f2e4230ed
e0acf518a50e2441be5542210812dff429d6030c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUI' 'sip-files00050.tif'
e3d3c4a8dc6760f50dcdd7c1b1cd0b58
2b7ec1c071d3cba04fc2a203017119fb3e39057e
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUJ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
9ba40723c59083c77ec25e27d8167f12
b87c60a10ecd9e905819e555306e0ccfc99e6220
'2012-01-15T06:04:41-05:00'
describe
'8272' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUK' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
3a00e898abc7d9f5aabb2901d8ab8746
4a051372a5efae19b5ba232e66040154162076a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUL' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
1bf5ebab731de68cdfb03921dda3177d
9160662fe3d9612cf314e3d0cd95675d0374bb9a
'2012-01-15T06:10:38-05:00'
describe
'105402' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUM' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
db22f70a5b2fb30636553c655c64253a
3c10d5ae0f5adaa2abf8500e163ea52c92384dc1
describe
'30327' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUN' 'sip-files00051.pro'
095ad26e9587c6bde7e30ac5110c64c0
4a3851e570c88384eea2075fc39acdebb5c0dcb0
'2012-01-15T06:06:03-05:00'
describe
'36420' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUO' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
bf32727c9950665206d64d2320f9a4e1
563033f734bc77b34358abb470cb7083214cdf8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUP' 'sip-files00051.tif'
9a06efb685d77aaa4dd4760523998a96
03442025b9548b71ab7258c96a3d37ac813fc2ea
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUQ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
0270386dcd6f4e71ea3dc320d81f8ae2
183c7933ab519a9f81cc1c2b1f69b49c15d728a0
describe
'9729' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUR' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
68f28d07913cdfc2279fa9895749991b
6699dcfd732363515f81ba4308006e843048ce80
describe
'360282' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUS' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
a8776b8d4553c11eb9380bf363672397
c464d7fff4caffb9a48f2d26686bb7b0e4338f16
describe
'106974' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUT' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
3a74c6abd00a70a558844ecdf3e306d9
7ec45b5cdbb71b7e883a47a1c243b2f09bf7c521
'2012-01-15T06:07:54-05:00'
describe
'31249' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUU' 'sip-files00052.pro'
66f6ed86e4b9075e2b089ecc013e5a46
7a02c90c3176e23841acb9124b82827ce0c9c91d
describe
'36856' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUV' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
d80ecbd1d1ead63c97a10a471bcc0ed1
c5f66ceb2d8123c9efc44891ebd742e1eace8029
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUW' 'sip-files00052.tif'
cd8b11a88626490453ee5348f82bf91d
fe8517531af5979ce4ae54c7ec829fcd97caa0d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUX' 'sip-files00052.txt'
e86e6b94029a33e86cadacc74707201f
b5c24b013eb987aa982a41682e89a50ee547027e
describe
'9860' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUY' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
9752e7bd4bb1a1435598750d8568f74d
dfaca14acf9114667024f3dc9131676fe923b11c
'2012-01-15T06:09:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJUZ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
3155e3ab82462a6368158fc666bd0584
acda26fbddec2badedce0755b37fa4a3beb7102b
describe
'113047' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVA' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
dea0d5fc9e9cc5dad3dddf01e114d9d2
68e031c6827901d825a48c67d65723ed9871987b
'2012-01-15T06:10:28-05:00'
describe
'31474' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVB' 'sip-files00053.pro'
b7a1e5b6032305a70168272b090dc268
8b5f03fb828623d396bde756b025a19916eb4031
describe
'38027' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVC' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
51d76ce6b7e54a24a6c49b7d2d04b1fe
352360cc718c6f8347fa721d254572411c0a2981
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVD' 'sip-files00053.tif'
0dddea111ac90faf4da680c323b51aa0
9cde10950994b0389e3082d37445d3ac621cfdda
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVE' 'sip-files00053.txt'
8ed5405b30044128c4b37a47005ac700
ab56ae159442ac3ced3dd76779ee09aa7daa6dc8
describe
'10706' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVF' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
e8336d5e7e5090a5b39db875b4378975
9de2243e47b2221a32396f143736029460955bee
describe
'360544' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVG' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
3ca64ef08eac57856bc4d19aa2dce590
c6d6c78d0bef217772c19aae84b5eb0bccd09bab
describe
'97213' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVH' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
c16b303b149b38066f1b7fa169aae652
1e6acd9120301d5e514461c8e9cc600a641fedf0
'2012-01-15T06:04:58-05:00'
describe
'26393' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVI' 'sip-files00054.pro'
5989afe0790b2005fe4f41f9181c8443
8ccc0002abf7bc2f44d47af245a02c7ce5ca2479
'2012-01-15T06:06:11-05:00'
describe
'31941' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVJ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
0434afc82d3e926aab3e7e9e349ca555
dbd1393e4206077fbfc45bf1baf4d41c0a438f48
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVK' 'sip-files00054.tif'
acb0cccd3fe36a6927661bcba1e56afb
3dc55df02bd03817f50739c2196fe32d65804454
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVL' 'sip-files00054.txt'
8e854a40f79c6a272c14769281617a96
77ab3038f1416358c654ea55ecb8cbfe11034638
describe
'9430' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVM' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
d5922ff35d8cd1260aa6c7a5985a47a2
ced51be10925adf8c8765b89fd82f021b7071964
describe
'360237' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVN' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
26f17ef5fbf67ec325c99892118eb1d2
58746cd62ad8d4468f803f39be450559374a8b41
describe
'111894' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVO' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
1f3c1104b7ad8eba6fed74bb4f1b18e6
140c9f5eb07d948e38556170d46b385dabd0b303
describe
'31527' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVP' 'sip-files00055.pro'
7ac283ac53d732dec2b7ba3766306ff9
99854d334ec30775c464f11bc305c37d3393509a
describe
'38115' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVQ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
8930a75e50ebe0a4315d3ac63a9bcdaf
46a8f211f09eb13b62b567db34d324dfb1acb267
'2012-01-15T06:05:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVR' 'sip-files00055.tif'
5eb978074f17a79f51332353551e9c2d
f5b4d40b61eb695d9093bc3ae7d35679730379c4
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVS' 'sip-files00055.txt'
a194138b79369f22331de6c538883236
4c0a22683588527624f75fdf735440cfd4e3fe4b
describe
'9815' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVT' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
e3ee749aba809a41bd65814d3be487c3
c4306e0a5cfd2a80fc2d24b6bb922ac1b68ed329
'2012-01-15T06:06:52-05:00'
describe
'360518' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVU' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
9c251885e47e577c02a667141c355b4f
ea4f65625a2397434f9d9f8447c703217c1137d3
describe
'108382' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVV' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
66d60320f41d25a7b76d0c25f3a2cc45
19c499a0c3eb425cbd2045577733fd5950704d81
'2012-01-15T06:05:30-05:00'
describe
'30692' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVW' 'sip-files00056.pro'
3701cdb22140a5daf5919ac3e3b56493
c69017870a12ba501567e13e5652506e8d2cec45
describe
'37242' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVX' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
f63876f33596077771bb37885f9773ce
0e8a5f7cfe198519b7038f87f4dd8109eaebd3c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVY' 'sip-files00056.tif'
b2567bf4e3a467f21215253452016107
3a3875f583786b14f2f6e1f489425f24fd8062e5
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJVZ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
f69a0138ddcef9ee4a5863ceeb4273b3
33ab6d7aa25b5829351440a177fb39107ee43067
'2012-01-15T06:04:46-05:00'
describe
'9879' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWA' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
c8e08dd0f2489df8ad29e8688831ee34
b2999b496218015924f37f3dfbf8f50c99dd1c63
describe
'360273' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWB' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
5448fea6bac53a7b61371e40e074ff05
c59e08699ed324d0e61c995eb5f35e16f7c25f01
describe
'100028' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWC' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
c22cdeff245e17df707d4de21cf36a30
1e788e61ab4eeedddf4e323f4a92b644eeef61c9
describe
'27334' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWD' 'sip-files00057.pro'
eb24b7319c76faa3c9e1facee83c5891
cdbf3307981527eabcaec84be5e5a6c14a468e63
describe
'34342' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWE' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
bedf8a209871b9ec96aca17220cede5a
59a53db192c4083611652d19d18031d4f7356907
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWF' 'sip-files00057.tif'
47a34d7d1fc4f33f5f4ec4bc55d82063
016308b240a33f83c758338c2af0ba2c68196233
'2012-01-15T06:05:00-05:00'
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWG' 'sip-files00057.txt'
806f074b5d4188ad25865a4d29a0ec5e
d0c4d10d3ef40334cfec5780461c6f1b6a3b7f7e
describe
'9157' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWH' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
e8b229cca7f03a10126f2a6545ec0d25
cb78354ef4a475a9d81fa0c724600b69859e4925
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWI' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
a5ca1974db4fd0c1643801f6e4c02e55
2f3ef2aa07a039bdd2426ea4fd016a4f0e72d713
describe
'106380' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWJ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
7655c604c71522f4226b4c95e0e7b734
697243d5cb69e53017fedf4bffd83deadb6476f7
'2012-01-15T06:10:25-05:00'
describe
'31335' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWK' 'sip-files00058.pro'
ad2f87fbc91cd59d7d84235df79d3bad
547423703602bcd15026ddc9b764b631627ce27b
describe
'35635' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWL' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
864da255312661e6d73d86f40f500185
835395ed5dc0492583793a6635296e736e566ca3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWM' 'sip-files00058.tif'
4e977ddd333c439e8fecbdf893a0b7c9
57f529e49d779266fdf890a67eb754bb305b7939
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWN' 'sip-files00058.txt'
c8eda6a2496edfc46c6fb6d36f1a3cfc
7d4e0ff05d61da8a92ba2f625c4d03efa820c2b9
describe
'9913' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWO' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
519368af88b163f97844151edad2a23a
36bce217b86aae6fd474dc54fa2d937d20fe10f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWP' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
63f5e30984fd28f802a81deb9892fd5e
e1a1d71f902c268a65f46f1f2ca68bd99285c9a9
describe
'107067' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWQ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
81b96f56b13c30a38e3e3585de605066
f10d36f15f188ccec9b246902c639536858178e8
describe
'30366' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWR' 'sip-files00059.pro'
64f2cb7bd012c1504301f221eed8df2f
5313458f09deb1b7423c0b98d0934e12ddba084e
describe
'35827' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWS' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
025d22eede7d30e614433a1e8b57a11d
ba36b4c1d1a71f344da9868bac1a67a7de1b9eea
'2012-01-15T06:05:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWT' 'sip-files00059.tif'
8e090416f7f0d38ed259e82fbdc5f0ba
ff368adab58057df02dfd6897526aa0ded1f574d
'2012-01-15T06:07:04-05:00'
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWU' 'sip-files00059.txt'
d6faccc531e80b5a1d06c0b4d7a5cb26
c134b8afb6bbd171b79dba504671ed2b4549e2e2
describe
'9875' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWV' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
932ad6dd269a45b189f3eb137df65231
38c25303b91fd1e9dd6c796046434c12441efb70
describe
'360533' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWW' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
3e375f4b297eef1c978cb749438e78fe
96178e0771f272d7ef3e6260a08e67c4165c0654
'2012-01-15T06:08:19-05:00'
describe
'82870' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWX' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
c0037772029f8e47b48be5c030192e57
48228381e0e4b210cddf37d8eb325b1b5d911aaf
'2012-01-15T06:10:02-05:00'
describe
'22141' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWY' 'sip-files00060.pro'
2d66981acf59879a849958753022613e
71309e5156972de1bb0c048ba9f73b41114847ac
'2012-01-15T06:06:09-05:00'
describe
'28762' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJWZ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
ad4122c1c9bf43640467afce6763e4c8
6f7d702db351e6d751bdc34b4b12b64000c31306
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXA' 'sip-files00060.tif'
317721b7aad31eb8c1f0df13d86d8549
0269dc0ce43995955f07b39edd759e0f55b35c78
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXB' 'sip-files00060.txt'
91b7f0d9ec88f98c20ab9d8677b28929
5c7c68643b6ad554274e42cd313901ce5b2ff175
describe
'8026' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXC' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
bfbd49dfc49f76eec8dc53d2b20ee8b9
f21a7f406f4083e75c2c62fdddd77dcc1703eb5f
'2012-01-15T06:07:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXD' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
80150edd2d2d52ca2c6a80942134c96c
6748f64154c2ec145053108c0de3680a375db3e6
describe
'109195' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXE' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
5934626116320fbd07855216ae2c75b1
631a140bbc153313fa4468c67c3e5aba0405ce64
'2012-01-15T06:08:54-05:00'
describe
'30986' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXF' 'sip-files00061.pro'
473fbe645e917264fa2876918d48ece7
a1514fe83453a34af21875dc89fc6188e9e7a277
describe
'37937' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXG' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
8c2156894a5bd10ab7c2732d7aeb025a
f9fdcaf8144a089a1ee2de916b2701cf8e5092b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXH' 'sip-files00061.tif'
d4bbc94e5c02ba834682d5d71c765b2b
0212bae4366219b7eb764fb4710d2e99757d56a5
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXI' 'sip-files00061.txt'
e692e2cf0dadc2025608c65e3186e1f8
e28b5f24f945dbbd0a3fdc308dd01a2339301a49
describe
'10050' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXJ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
01a2f46820ca89a8306fd4e63b0b0514
cb1cfcd0f4d107d5e108d6ac7756becfea4ce543
'2012-01-15T06:06:46-05:00'
describe
'360491' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXK' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
9036b22829de9e9ad0a1b956a471dd2d
40902db25313b950c7af02772d6e327b89e1aad7
describe
'118835' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXL' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
d19ad2fd92e99c67d32d8a9eaa1e79ff
7be18f9d43b692027aaf435e42f2fd9dc66f31f9
describe
'20331' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXM' 'sip-files00062.pro'
8561a037ace4a52c677ca3579688deb0
20f9e79e70d3703966ee65c86b800a3a75d91b48
describe
'35158' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXN' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
3691b8cddcbf751072dc6a8032c6a5df
db5db8068aad28bca9155978d0d1244d1ad55093
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXO' 'sip-files00062.tif'
9724f659a0235250ff6c088c16ac38c9
47c6b3c537364f78455a1c7e1e1b3616ac387e7c
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXP' 'sip-files00062.txt'
8d5f4fafd2e6e80e1a5dbcd38a663a28
7b82625c1de8cdbbbbd3a3e32d7f18db5f8746b9
'2012-01-15T06:09:39-05:00'
describe
'9768' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXQ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
40b3b4a4d4347b912f36bf84fb579ccc
5cb5d89aa7604c0d6a7c0917175db6b4db043bac
describe
'360229' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXR' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
66dccffb87050a539c695a23d9ef2a31
1f3d88b0201b398480a55177102171b17d96c28a
describe
'103174' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXS' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
f4576606d0aa53756af327b450117915
174684de1db7576e3e34e4e32cff4cf2f036f798
describe
'29050' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXT' 'sip-files00063.pro'
dc830d31168a258d1c91437735cf7b9b
ae18618628cbdd0518e4bb9d728e8e23171581b6
describe
'35946' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXU' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
8efafd9c739fc9fba5b43a56ae9c57ec
61dd2bae64fcf34436342397c096f1dd5d0ed471
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXV' 'sip-files00063.tif'
a05b6152ccea50b3af1a2d5cd10609a3
e6da384f15d6c2c3aea69b7cad903f13ebcf68f8
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXW' 'sip-files00063.txt'
6975a38af7dedb56b81dd6da4ee279ca
9b89887278958d8e43c5508defb27a8f4f65bb35
describe
'9460' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXX' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
382a0f72710451ddffce926692042729
a4db80043594ab88588f3d1dcb0e8df9a7a0cabc
'2012-01-15T06:05:05-05:00'
describe
'360509' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXY' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
fb73f99d805e2aeec3a45a0ac79a27f0
ac23e26fc2d6d605d7e12293cb6394716fd23ddf
describe
'84823' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJXZ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
0a348af085cc34cc5efdc3cc36bdac28
4df371f5d05e146a8880c62d1d8e1c90682b93b4
describe
'23440' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYA' 'sip-files00064.pro'
f3ddd7e0b39c65d36e6722200a59bcad
a12eef75544552a36b542f3781bcd5b02a130a90
describe
'28651' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYB' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
be11fbd7fe8f15ecad4e663735c96da2
432680246e6af8a8220a0a6020cda5bac2c695b0
'2012-01-15T06:05:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYC' 'sip-files00064.tif'
a846534f52c4b5e42ae86c1afb2e249d
98434a620edd2da34c0521bc7b3c2a4b8678a04e
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYD' 'sip-files00064.txt'
914604496d6b920343fae1c466115313
08d9537c719e3e0d8d30bf4cacf11e0c6c36e727
describe
'8244' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYE' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
c6d6cba327535b4d3a29e28314f9e8c9
4cc7cdd4a33333e7166800455e59da977eef9e68
'2012-01-15T06:07:46-05:00'
describe
'360253' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYF' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
f35881bcb10756d209dec76bc2f565ab
1a1eab5dc0c8eca6f76dbb83a9c6499c83e6c07a
'2012-01-15T06:10:08-05:00'
describe
'105897' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYG' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
01ebd50f2ea940323b728c7c42611756
dd7448a33953c195995e59a07fce0570215d0900
'2012-01-15T06:05:32-05:00'
describe
'30576' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYH' 'sip-files00065.pro'
347ef53240ab63ff70afe2a5b5f06f19
544f454bf0434ed6e21015c041bc289c3ef2d690
'2012-01-15T06:06:13-05:00'
describe
'36840' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYI' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
9141637d1f68527a88241c2a15e878c1
9d6e5841fac59e00aece991f3622fb0cdcfc76f2
describe
'2899104' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYJ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
6182bdf92649e9af722263b53f80bf67
45a86f41e08c80c3c9ab1fd197291fbc30649155
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYK' 'sip-files00065.txt'
c68bfdf77da12f3f47798fd2fac29032
7362e160f284e483c7ad436d164e8d0f62d1d580
'2012-01-15T06:07:00-05:00'
describe
'10268' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYL' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
81362cd0a3e69995f0614035bbcab920
a955cf4fc35fb721eedc478e986f46ccff9486ab
describe
'360279' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYM' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
528af6e711a9cd3d985da82a75e89432
ebd62a674ab593ff60790437a0f6aac4f4670825
describe
'102572' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYN' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
f89672b2b110adac30c86c71feb7cc2f
160808539906bbb88b13070411ee720431154d1d
'2012-01-15T06:07:53-05:00'
describe
'29483' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYO' 'sip-files00066.pro'
7dbf0c456d0c0a595db9d604a046d758
881c64df8a7cc24bb6908bd5bb0b7b379f9ab0a9
describe
'36905' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYP' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
6c920733b672653732508af8562343fe
8bcffb3424421f01323d5da04bfa6999d90c08e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYQ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
31500625ec49fcf0ecefe25072cb1a9c
443688f15d28817fbd197b73be6170fb9121b363
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYR' 'sip-files00066.txt'
0aa50f20e4e45a011ca679b5f6a6b140
81a5fa17b79b5957eadf74c9e9266f093ba928e5
'2012-01-15T06:07:25-05:00'
describe
'9483' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYS' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
41b3119e05d6f9c9f8a43720a29f4b76
23809533e12231ae0d6a0427bd87a1e25d1ff549
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYT' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
81fa9b27921899f4005d2d080ef796bb
23fa5af977401662f0444bcf36e2ddf8e01da106
'2012-01-15T06:10:40-05:00'
describe
'93343' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYU' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
d64fd1ca60c2e25166fc75e73e25bf27
7bf9da6ede3779d10c51a2e8526fc5717a89d110
describe
'25886' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYV' 'sip-files00067.pro'
b91c36ea5636e6209fccca7fd433a74c
904a3b87059df6f73a1f11145f77ed9f3750192c
describe
'32353' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYW' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
6798a7366ec9fb86c4236b8c934378ea
386a4c24f3f1d6a4a2153b0bf8ad0322170f61b3
'2012-01-15T06:06:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYX' 'sip-files00067.tif'
fb93e7bd3fb034f78ef828c15672654b
d9c99555c60cc72825c78d3a8f22a448b79d0a41
'2012-01-15T06:07:05-05:00'
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYY' 'sip-files00067.txt'
1666ec5f872a07877e96b4b8a05b3ffc
9851d5c80226d220b63573d9ad56dbb749559088
describe
'8768' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJYZ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
d752ae19d5a04f6a794780a160145adf
c66ccd28511b5431bcb9b85d7f7f6358a3bdd49a
describe
'360239' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZA' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
b76dc8e67bbebee8a8b927bee8d58d1d
a026bf848449fa9a7f4c16fe577b4bb12958f307
describe
'110087' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZB' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
51c48f4ebb638fcaa02f8881b501a547
a9b0dff996edc6d396c9af182b8091c15ae71175
describe
'32295' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZC' 'sip-files00068.pro'
fc0b4b075ecd6fcf405f19ee75782482
e731e310ff85b751492e15e6f004ff2fc31a363d
describe
'38792' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZD' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
33e243cf7bdd242de81a837242f46652
d5d1bc75620b29f4c9017b869b2eca0f1dce1444
'2012-01-15T06:10:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZE' 'sip-files00068.tif'
528b5103dcd454180831131d1fa8a7cf
169201665162162386c6c8925726908475d776de
'2012-01-15T06:04:43-05:00'
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZF' 'sip-files00068.txt'
500951de338a5690379594b9b093bfe2
a1ecaf60f911bee9a15244223ef35a0590969413
'2012-01-15T06:06:17-05:00'
describe
'10388' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZG' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
bdd9031095776c276506484cdbf3e786
f37a7f9b2ad24585610a0cfa1cfe8e109b0ab16d
'2012-01-15T06:09:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZH' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
babb3dffe164c5ba4af4bb93046e5c06
d8b956b9e583270a7df080db5de3b68ebb1de740
describe
'107699' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZI' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
bd2ffbf724a5055f7c5b196a1a7d2cd0
5fb41bc2131e1300a8e2c0ac4af6fa420b62c2d9
'2012-01-15T06:07:48-05:00'
describe
'29610' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZJ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
777ea01b61b36abbc9905052b494ee41
f7a4ec1b661af5562c8342162c623d42d5700207
describe
'37885' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZK' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
30c95eb6c9530d367e268b061b79c0c2
ac0966fc614e92c0371d786b931e5a2f24441ff5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZL' 'sip-files00069.tif'
1a2b229ef0e73b63e1fbbc61679525fc
7c9c890ca7ea7768be6e19743ad0942c9ead53fb
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZM' 'sip-files00069.txt'
ecaec668afed2d412757d1f6060af555
ea3cc21156727f8ea1d5b24f1aff8207dba817c0
describe
'10066' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZN' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
7fcbaf2308bf48abb0bbe64a9e02f046
6365c8f5a52e0347cb28aa170cb62f48275152a6
'2012-01-15T06:08:52-05:00'
describe
'360272' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZO' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
06e8f985bd477d072f555aeee9cbe6f8
e09b0cb9082f4164147e26939760bf2cd904a8cc
describe
'115805' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZP' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
ea78db1e09cd5c616b9a30172e78a239
a4b984b27f7672500471cfc4778f9e82d1563cb9
describe
'19403' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZQ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
fb8f4e67d6f8584e71ddf63cf6ffd797
0d8d1be641745ae430accbd5ec32ed39df6cde8a
'2012-01-15T06:06:47-05:00'
describe
'37014' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZR' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
f9b403d7d2d81cd72c4d9d6c0dd3ec8c
570c0867233ded705729b7c839866e5a126323cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZS' 'sip-files00070.tif'
bd874ee763f372633936fd67abf845e6
58101f8d0b1dec317c3db2a339cf524bdc08adb9
describe
'861' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZT' 'sip-files00070.txt'
c473e5498cc4edebdb3ca46aee37f9ef
f0cbcb1052a3763c598e10c402f1cd7d3470082f
'2012-01-15T06:10:43-05:00'
describe
'9638' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZU' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
b04d39c500e25d96dc429b1315750bc4
738a8854dd06c58e716283be7e937bdfb19d690b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZV' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
c0ca71a1bf0e4418bb5934942a97978d
6a572ae647551790cc95ce695f882f8aa0abdd7a
describe
'108016' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZW' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
91a348b06eab173f9012f073e20675c3
8e4e27f6a2377033a8361eac8dc7dd3623b4f24d
describe
'31030' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZX' 'sip-files00071.pro'
6a4a7577af59ef9853869e03bfc6fcb7
f39b49c87a1f76865404daa632ea0f387ca55cc2
'2012-01-15T06:09:12-05:00'
describe
'37600' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZY' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
1faca245d66fb21bdae31d951350c93e
819c859f8ffaffdd6639c350414e83393bc26d00
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACJZZ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
07df49fe1b851de4a974a14b875dd2af
0ff6e631ad88188a1f33cfe576798cae161e3104
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAA' 'sip-files00071.txt'
f11cafd98c175df36f4f40a01aaba6bd
b2eb3c5b58596b6c0383fa602104fda14a3ec119
describe
'10309' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAB' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
056d4a601cdbc9e595704738cd1218b8
f768ccc2f3142c424a755ed066f9e241ffc3b18b
'2012-01-15T06:06:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAC' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
d0d737d7365c1ee4b4c7e27179ec574f
24d8515e96fefc4666b771f1952ad1a1ae7b5ee6
describe
'115085' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAD' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
4880fd3676c5b8b08717dac4a3b93182
3c4b716029cc648adc56e3e94c018dfbdc5cb684
describe
'33824' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAE' 'sip-files00072.pro'
bbd0b834ec92284074175f1a7a30865f
d945c105470cf4982dd1bf839943119e0b1bd3dc
describe
'39581' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAF' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
dcb092f8b08a66c607d7a5d5399b5d6c
02422d3f583a8cb590cf73ac59016adf3bb8c22e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAG' 'sip-files00072.tif'
dd503a19fa1e4a763f8e0ac0bc21473a
6d7e6af9f41b09540bb4ebdf4c85bd3b77edea22
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAH' 'sip-files00072.txt'
7220cd7d2c90509bd593e60747555238
64f96058eec651d58893f5537115f27a8c8dbb76
describe
'10523' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAI' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
d2dfe0dd8f894908cfdac77b8f3d1005
a7a5b46bf6acbcd5453027df924a2232a37c2c94
describe
'360265' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAJ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
6274006257802e1bb39f32fdca4c5d44
987eb6f9b4b4e4f98a0e525cdf65e80382e2d575
describe
'91240' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAK' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
87e13c20e6c9e2a3025f0555ad877698
b55f51f433457fdf28ddcdcd8025ee0477521fbb
describe
'24911' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAL' 'sip-files00073.pro'
0fb3bf56c59efdd16eb94a3fb04933b4
e721393679924832c02898b1372bd05d3177a180
describe
'31312' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAM' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
6eaf21b3403bc55b64382d70a812d105
2a5f56991623fcf988bfcce9656a0546c0b4dea9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAN' 'sip-files00073.tif'
089b5a39f5ba8185aa2c955c785af149
6148d67de8402e45b9e4b3bb585964614a6841bb
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAO' 'sip-files00073.txt'
c9805cdcafa5ddde5153e1a4dba1b1be
845db09b1fa6a19938ef88fc39c577619bd7f8fb
describe
'8309' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAP' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
730e70ea4dd151f155fdd74c5107956f
6fe5ec1df16f8511fd48af54259b6ec5d7cdb2ad
describe
'360257' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAQ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
c58fdf32a6425cb81d1220ca2cc9c295
14b3081c10b1119e7d16b0c8ca9817a7d0515f48
'2012-01-15T06:08:58-05:00'
describe
'108088' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAR' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
08f79cff5486f73b7c4adb606a55e0f0
66c373aad5c502bf670b30a227ce2870e9773c3b
'2012-01-15T06:05:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAS' 'sip-files00074.pro'
7dc89dd9977e2bcaac66a905bb77385c
f79ad4e0516cc1edfd6471bf64dcebc9ceba59c6
describe
'34931' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAT' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
1b057b34c5e54e245f48909ae548308e
4f3bef020a0678a21e44029fa87df40a2a2fa6e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAU' 'sip-files00074.tif'
67a1a40c24c5e54b2b6887784fdbac09
1573889fb1341b43c272d1706c7cbd1b5adaf3d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAV' 'sip-files00074.txt'
99f4e376ffef0213f20b2f5fd42d58e1
8beec28a8bba1d3135c400df3409eb7536735aa7
describe
'9629' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAW' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
0e6715a4378779e5e4e6c55d5a0d2005
42768ba393d702d3ce1d81a5700d8db77daa85ef
describe
'360262' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAX' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
75c78b5ceaa40a9f539e26587d7f3741
4633432e0966c5823d597104abcb8118331e99ad
describe
'92549' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAY' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
6af6c0a51d98132b3f3de395b978ae2e
eafd2e044e9ec3abae71f295e7f002edfb20a2ab
describe
'25259' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKAZ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
8d77c3c26b4c60da387207c4f05b0804
577f2cbe3523d0e740ca11f2fd3f68fcfe02b97b
describe
'32316' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBA' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
a14bbd4e7db5d641e27d8dbb4be138bf
110479c96a468d9a91ca81ba96d1563efca2c3be
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBB' 'sip-files00075.tif'
a5d9620ecdafa9cad28d25aac6d90ad6
b238238136d0e87799ffd408c5251d31af99b4a5
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBC' 'sip-files00075.txt'
2d165666300e6466986ef88ac362fb1b
68f6b6856f82d13e3766f266594c2cc4de188bb6
describe
'8896' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBD' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
96e4bcd78e54a080556ccc0a4b1771f8
efd33256425ac116fe52a79f7285ed8eeab65936
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBE' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
6f61dedff06c449ea034ee74a21842c7
80497065d0ad59518ac300d3017451a0e1323ad8
'2012-01-15T06:05:42-05:00'
describe
'103088' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBF' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
cebb30e02cedfb89596a4cf59484bf3f
e7d41df5ef0ac6bf22a28604cead3f20eab83a67
describe
'29222' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBG' 'sip-files00076.pro'
fdd18954ec215fa2d3fd5688958566c8
dcfd2cd00bc30b20e6b7274d28318c4fe0a7ecb5
describe
'35485' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBH' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
39da39959ca739d784fdad9ea41f774c
7117aa51e504cc16b4e8a90bbbf36f8d10f2805c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBI' 'sip-files00076.tif'
f3098eb7822bc1495ec31a694ee4a0d8
251f2f709cd360cb48de0a0b626ff8c021e4a9bd
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBJ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
64f1a58b67edede7a2aca51f87bfe9f0
446a19a8bdfa0dc4fc1e824b1f0314d894097799
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBK' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
3e5f2406ca6a11d341e24153d84f5d15
380a640bfa02402ffe7d6d5ca76cd8111c9247ee
describe
'360260' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBL' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
236b24537ddc1769b6e1605db5050003
63af5bcedb51578af0bd433690dabb3b6839b255
'2012-01-15T06:08:34-05:00'
describe
'99822' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBM' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
13ee4106bedac88683bb2170b17f31b2
1234f6e32d1517fe96fd65fb7fb45ae9df65945a
describe
'28458' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBN' 'sip-files00077.pro'
cbf7f3bf2a4c18a77011c3d67b245388
f881d5588ab31e309ba32184311ee1293680860d
describe
'35277' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBO' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
a0adb4c37ff0750ac494a52c7ab3737d
506e3e73c596947d9e1b67bd4f2f9c5aabd058d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBP' 'sip-files00077.tif'
c7e2ea5cb8fa4e2421d3f9c4642ea829
1c921df1a3fc7625dca0c9b5ca9cfadd1e5b7507
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBQ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
626110573a0747d6d3a7dd24fa9c869a
5ff4ef9abc346d82834855c22fcf4fcac8849ef1
'2012-01-15T06:07:47-05:00'
describe
'9182' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBR' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
c68af13b42f3a9109b4d29225c0e9ac4
fc7dff1a8ad49e45ef3ef9ad8ccb4fb9f8cdea0d
'2012-01-15T06:05:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBS' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
93691e116e79101ccdc0ad99436d5458
b9923f8559bc57403fbe7f868f7215d05266b388
describe
'82617' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBT' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
0bda2cb8e5f87ad6e6efa304cbc1e8f3
2a880fb128e984bc9038ee29938618a132ab098d
'2012-01-15T06:07:09-05:00'
describe
'23250' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBU' 'sip-files00078.pro'
9610a5ff3e00b22b9e29ca0ff9e99a9d
5047b89e435ef707a8224d5864ca1d0fbf794fe5
describe
'28670' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBV' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
cde9e1cf20ea2120412f6f3ee57c23ee
10c3c8e579e5bd7f8fe4d6574072d3bb35201b9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBW' 'sip-files00078.tif'
3180f9354d1929b9cd98242cca1f8f60
d9c80aa0b1f16d9e2b08409123ba5cd46fcca63c
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBX' 'sip-files00078.txt'
9dd9622f04f30b99a342a75060cd989d
63b976afec04a4c8aacb7800c074ccc3297ce5bc
describe
'7811' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBY' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
96c5a2ca2f151f73adde80b8d9d3b60e
11d22238792d1b049d8f5a66e8e452e4c452c039
describe
'360214' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKBZ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
0d8211e8e4652f400387e849a2b5ead0
dd9ad9f295e9e71a7a428c6867290e6b4e764488
describe
'108868' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCA' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
63ee250a1dbc04d5749f328c3b8237ed
f37947e93a48fd62ea59203a8eb2f8f31125e764
describe
'30957' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCB' 'sip-files00079.pro'
4c533b034ec7f5933f04085d20337f6c
b41f26f550daf991f364f4747d14a64d06afaada
describe
'37891' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCC' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
eea3a0df20beed2c1bd55bdc26c5e8e9
0a7cf302057ec81a4b1ed6fd5c01db57763495b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCD' 'sip-files00079.tif'
9d09556494c3e1b5aa854a3e4158723d
900c2a6be691de5b12f7db52f37e72fe3b1d4de1
'2012-01-15T06:08:32-05:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCE' 'sip-files00079.txt'
7799c8b066a41f9773908b4836d0646b
e80187aa275b3923322f4b3800c611381facbfaf
describe
'10042' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCF' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
fed2e4bf4a56fe20aa2ab4f38a77ce6a
a8d6acfd69ecebf214b784bbd0c04baf158ff9ac
describe
'360266' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCG' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
b60c9e33830e0fa0b243daee46b97e75
69ee6bf442ac945e0b567a801f7f4ead62d6d8c5
'2012-01-15T06:06:29-05:00'
describe
'99454' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCH' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
ffdea043402ab3578e1665366405af14
7ad5fbe17b53f576b2fe6d4f83b0ea46d5d9b7dc
describe
'28712' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCI' 'sip-files00080.pro'
27fbacc9a63d61878fc4fac05e8f720f
cb0571f543a336102bc37d840a30210550a00d5a
describe
'34209' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCJ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
4ff31dadaa38c50270219f1bcb807818
296555d2480775a620280bda0f1b9f41b7ba7de1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCK' 'sip-files00080.tif'
4966301448b22077a95223b08fb94087
11d5d5314131d334c7cdb64aa83c0676fef6c3a2
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCL' 'sip-files00080.txt'
9ea66f40a0f9a0f6fbb6a57bbd2eb411
41ef9cb47c6d839e678781bc17a6c29e2b6cd097
describe
'9141' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCM' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
e512fe69a038f74234e102274242342b
bbed487892b04e9b09150784db3a0d61dcbb8632
'2012-01-15T06:05:23-05:00'
describe
'360259' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCN' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
b616855ddf06c5f81ae58b35ba60778f
2169091487827c3209b50a61f6fa96b39003e1dd
describe
'94794' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCO' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
47bed861b8c41dae16909ec93432c99e
b9bb475b73ef35c17239ca1f9e09f14cc1d3fc10
'2012-01-15T06:05:36-05:00'
describe
'15224' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCP' 'sip-files00081.pro'
f5d4059a22aa2b4bafbf94f6977bef9f
94834774180fd0d7dec875b99e7d90ba51c3f8dc
describe
'30256' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCQ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
c6029518866d58a63f4539bf7da85c46
9b8ffafc7c486d5954665ff68921428c88c42b3b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCR' 'sip-files00081.tif'
f05922ff95b377e089fabe3b5f2226c5
f35ea6563febd123f2b1e16078047a6ffde69bde
'2012-01-15T06:06:14-05:00'
describe
'654' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCS' 'sip-files00081.txt'
0af1f31ba6c8b66e560781a0695b1abf
2614e475de62f37a22df3bcb7b009361c2924dc7
describe
'8101' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCT' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
f3c07bc6edab68623e361a679ae23cba
4f264f8856f098a6f5983f67738f1e8190caa04c
describe
'360221' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCU' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
f47ac159640ec6433d698a775a843c26
c6a4fa4e751919be86b28a9e49362aa5aaf67b3e
'2012-01-15T06:10:22-05:00'
describe
'114033' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCV' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
e5d37122aa7ee34aa58d2027c2d2d2ae
553aac3cc37c6b1aefc3b3b6ffc4c9fce139394d
describe
'32628' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCW' 'sip-files00082.pro'
5fa4da0c601db2ead542a0fb76327e67
ac24f400b4a8fa8b2fb1585375d91ab85cc21ef4
describe
'38544' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCX' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
c3bf4756e09fea6aad019406327b3789
19a573795265fa8327734ad4c16addad32b97ccc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCY' 'sip-files00082.tif'
96cafafcf6d1479b57e441502d4c377f
b09fcfd360ef0885c32398e54518aaba5c675db8
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKCZ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
f5b354e44439d2eda8e8f04204bd7867
415ee5422e74eb180dbfea9b4ee320d495c1cc54
describe
'10271' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDA' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
8d957cb47b65f2d275697ab1dafaae21
faed0bf26d7e399b2444d40302b37b49b6a4ac8d
describe
'360281' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDB' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
84a8785a154a9b7d4bb617969b66b613
67cce8d43a50549a5fa8d33ddffc71d4fc81e11d
describe
'108415' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDC' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
e83324c11e9756782dcbfb24aaf14f44
ef55d5cf062ec9a829ffb1c768cb04c1184abdba
describe
'31330' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDD' 'sip-files00083.pro'
4b25b24ee88d24b3ceed4d5828d9cd36
41b437207d644d1128d1020fb7555790b2cdc5e8
describe
'37676' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDE' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
844bc4cc330b5d35d19eb41d739a59cf
79c343362e4a98eb81bb1f420c2ed062ca889812
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDF' 'sip-files00083.tif'
0bc883a7b1e3722dbba6e7209d033f70
b1bd105f464be4bc139a234a3564430922880f81
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDG' 'sip-files00083.txt'
d64c22e36f09fd6a41f5b18d50563d85
98baf16f1a24dbc67147893a07be90ede497f6b5
describe
'10105' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDH' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
90ee41470ee2d3a0c1a194f13e9cbbd6
b219a4e7199c5f4b3e95eca172337a7910bf30c4
describe
'360277' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDI' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
233a6fd218c0af93bb0f548e4799ddf4
f8de07265fbb5ae2210ccd5281034ced98e0c683
describe
'99878' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDJ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
3623ff8fd5fc1191e3128274c283412b
884d1e583182d9e097c1a151d50f4607c01b3192
'2012-01-15T06:06:38-05:00'
describe
'28176' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDK' 'sip-files00084.pro'
57bfe9f438aa032acdc17218d050fc23
6897c435eb1d22b1d8ed0bec5295bcf3e69a7c1d
describe
'34045' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDL' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
90219948655e6ef30a1d3b11edf6ac40
15d438c84e47e34227eea381db5b40a9f9cc7601
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDM' 'sip-files00084.tif'
946792d125ffa2cce0237c9de8a7c60f
ff06f1373110ca4ff0480a4ae8ffb50b4897e994
'2012-01-15T06:10:01-05:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDN' 'sip-files00084.txt'
e738a1d68d62678dd703554ecfcfd019
4d7d43a1b85f7b9122f8626ea64e2e53f6bfc8c0
describe
'9068' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDO' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
750d23c2b3aa5862cf09ecc40a6671d6
4c834c0043e9b4a593bd62a13f256457263a3b86
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDP' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
6447d6e8da652b8148a0596ab11407f2
f93cb3296298ebe68fa2dde7be6b4cbd90778a00
'2012-01-15T06:08:49-05:00'
describe
'121427' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDQ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
506fee5eac4cf50eebca610edfacf548
e7dfdb1317bb0f1e852d3176925b041b9a706904
describe
'17669' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDR' 'sip-files00085.pro'
f010f322545a276637d425ff38117d5d
8e4467dcc84ec6b5e50513f7db02ecf5dd09e4a0
describe
'37581' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDS' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
493880885dee58c1debeb6db4d53b060
3c7c5b0a2d56fed4ea35f7240d53560625f457cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDT' 'sip-files00085.tif'
b3df3fa0dca8fa8ae726b5ed05b08855
4328859482fa60d41a22ec798ca9d29e61e8ed18
describe
'803' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDU' 'sip-files00085.txt'
a5806a87f86181315325a7a7db3f535b
12c4d09ad6b4f7d41e38c6cab2ccb0a1dc9042a9
describe
'9927' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDV' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
6106c7e34021dc44c1b3961857ec2e0c
3fe7ab382a55c43267da6a6ac72519d4f00ca2fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDW' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
88da8f9512b68d7f3e5d365680eca96e
5374639c80df08cc4ac7179139150a36d0a6df4c
describe
'117091' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDX' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
e4d04e5a24c7d287943d3ca7d1c35038
de70f36be3bd2a112539967f221a904467b77b68
describe
'33417' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDY' 'sip-files00086.pro'
526e5e116c630954dfa814944e73ea44
3cbcb78ed8ffe7f5df98b1ebe88aaf0d16e3ef8f
describe
'40983' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKDZ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
f04ff71e60e41ccd8c4058a412df896e
48deeed7d911ee0727d7afc11aea2b75282bec99
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEA' 'sip-files00086.tif'
fb4d1eb42543083c0e74f285f0e9973c
d5454a7107322513dee01cd855302d0614444018
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEB' 'sip-files00086.txt'
8eab2a6e3b2158f65b648f4cc2a59db0
6bc20774a9656066ec24d136ceaab89b5d46cfe1
describe
'10398' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEC' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
623bcb791018e12c5ea1d00c2b3b7eff
475a856f52034712370b65762bba86346de3c461
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKED' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
3e7f665190200ac2638117294a0f7228
468851eec6641b8acf50a6152a68f0027a2c6395
describe
'84744' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEE' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
5c30e6a265d3cf82c87c6dbf8ff8283a
7df819226f123ff09fa9136564b2e67899773fb6
describe
'23439' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEF' 'sip-files00087.pro'
56cc126bc4b50c6549246ca1f693528f
231a40be1d691c99c19f3d454d90eb1a4d4b26cc
describe
'29588' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEG' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
a2cc798012b97e62101204c46299c456
7fc0741a96f00d1f848e4658ee8f17b39633e36d
'2012-01-15T06:05:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEH' 'sip-files00087.tif'
ce89b0a8db48eecb64a8a4aaae731138
e2405a802a8f2149067d2646c0bc7e69ce6eaee6
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEI' 'sip-files00087.txt'
c271530850a169b5d8153d7667631f5b
47e68f49d6c28c02f18a304c9bb284704fc895cb
describe
'7824' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEJ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
4b929409dbd893b2c8ff1e49f0946466
f299e64c7a84ce4e7a766eac97e4ecdc6059b293
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEK' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
16823d4710a523961fd4349a7dd6dcdf
e5727170520db53eaea360727af8d20cbb9a569a
'2012-01-15T06:07:16-05:00'
describe
'87862' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEL' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
0e0439a4d897b00c1eff61f7f8ebc93d
7da554f542ca478a76347ba4c294f7829d7054ea
'2012-01-15T06:08:46-05:00'
describe
'24709' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEM' 'sip-files00088.pro'
b366def4ea237efc6a801ffcda3b33b1
a40064d867313bc8ebbcf0c1ec102eb3b89c0b61
describe
'30572' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEN' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
55074627642c147dea12722008bf9453
a0434c748c9ee5dd53c4af6e2e046997327abfe8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEO' 'sip-files00088.tif'
d92c7827fca749664c924dd46d3bcf27
700626c1412b7383ecebde2b23a8ed548ff3bcfb
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEP' 'sip-files00088.txt'
97cc09b629ccf58218478a898efd7ffe
fca6407e62f2e2e285f6b9996a4f0c8e2b661574
describe
'8179' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEQ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
109b93baa1109dd6f4a810143e39bcb0
a9e00fed9e93d49a4d0be3e161ad59d4f7d2fbaa
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKER' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
3143b9c93b2e466909a82b8f7ff53b96
1e12dae01d70d845e035ee113225e646faa867d4
'2012-01-15T06:09:08-05:00'
describe
'115888' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKES' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
51a60ec81e75a132af54be975d51f233
c130d3dcd9f6548eef65463bb290926109682381
describe
'32746' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKET' 'sip-files00089.pro'
1f0d920fa402bc56edde6f7c091948d9
91f4b9916aca6baaa343416f7338aeade609bd93
describe
'38849' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEU' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
b7477d862d3fbdfd9d5a78af58cd48f3
a9375827a9c27352ffd6c1b6ddc718fa13425b02
'2012-01-15T06:06:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEV' 'sip-files00089.tif'
9e17884ee1ed624aa2c7718d594d8496
986e22a9439826dc2b3966f91cdb7aa8db8abd28
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEW' 'sip-files00089.txt'
9ffe38a8c9bafdc942daadb86f806d0e
93ab6975560bf6e4627d39bf9ec1cb0cf59b1b78
'2012-01-15T06:09:35-05:00'
describe
'10260' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEX' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
1cc8b0c08a93a900b01ef0b91ad7c143
6261e79fc819f5b50c8aa9f99283da1d3e7e4241
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEY' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
a5da8c8008bd5ea4d286a9e19bbe0a75
91b1208ff203e3826a882dccfa486f33b03bd9e1
describe
'118445' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKEZ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
93e37754ea2a63476c3d300ae5a1004b
a199d9697cfdf78050c9ad90593d4e1c5e60efd8
describe
'34247' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFA' 'sip-files00090.pro'
59bf92e0c7d762141b1335e3bda51a62
c9be3847562a038beedab3eedd9032b98855875d
describe
'38592' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFB' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
eb01851affcf5fb45f87a3478265aa04
a213ab94177e0020d33c3cb31cd741503037fe26
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFC' 'sip-files00090.tif'
201cc57041cbd7bf9d659cd642e36f11
c0c9ba2f05064d2ab473bfc1a7c8d07094642544
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFD' 'sip-files00090.txt'
6d116bff6f9ac8f2079f0d7b0f6b710a
44a6bed0ec739111d4ddc5717a9c0cc29e57e46b
describe
'10343' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFE' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
111b117c17ca8751f116864e446c744c
c09117833b1e5424fdc765c26b7963eb38f72d86
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFF' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
74127b7bc43c71abc712c818e0402a24
ebf574f1b8ee88f3e9f4f9d22706496702a19a80
describe
'111450' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFG' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
5594905e4514bdc75e9f19f71464591a
dc4a0bfa5977666d75db1daed3b6356648f05557
describe
'17615' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFH' 'sip-files00091.pro'
fa103163d88e80b03846c696465417f4
6231ceb11a78dcfc514fef1fe7709decf1f8cc10
describe
'34840' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFI' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
e419e2719a0f8531c60f5fb8bc8137b6
f35329f9ad4845b302097a6661c3d2341ee01ed6
'2012-01-15T06:07:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFJ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
073342f452a2f04515efd9b7640cb46f
f1ffc88b31aea45d41aa0c70974d34ebc424dc5e
describe
'831' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFK' 'sip-files00091.txt'
18e4277467238521f76c07802ddcaece
f3982bdbbf7e87e7545afec28f5d249c160ae03c
describe
'9287' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFL' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
b28affbed789604a7ee6a6d7478a81fe
3e6d48f8030777c3510a6d4ffe6c90073f4785a5
describe
'360540' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFM' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
8d1ace548ac6f4de2593ccfe01049699
07db4e62e86c2ab855a5409e9e27cb5efdfba32c
describe
'112093' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFN' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
22d48822fd0718d6689fa5787be97ffd
1d72fa258124b108f0b09ade76a5af0495e79537
'2012-01-15T06:09:45-05:00'
describe
'31491' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFO' 'sip-files00092.pro'
9a788c4c4fd1a9bcc8c83e514b98868f
4529db300f5582c3b97171f63f344d45df5902e0
describe
'40142' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFP' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
7b24fae9b732c5c4058dbbda8372c18f
cedd3858425680166bed9222662f8033e9b729f8
'2012-01-15T06:09:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFQ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
7d35d3afef84c68eaa1df0c358386fb9
2008edee62a2320b986caf0346bb6a10b0c7f410
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFR' 'sip-files00092.txt'
0b6babef6aea830da5736ab60841046d
e6165336a6efddc0299786e438f69f211dc68c52
'2012-01-15T06:07:14-05:00'
describe
'10362' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFS' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
3413054661ad32bd3139b8a39d095e9e
7668082b3d2af345d86cfd803ddff92e5e3eef50
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFT' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
93a0c87df1f66861c9503208bb13df16
06641dac68277e3e4d328b8b587f07544c5cf9ae
describe
'110717' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFU' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
3f1886cff7c434270bc78c9ccaf823da
0ce5ddd59a33f28a67b8ece7d786e006ba5c0cfb
describe
'31140' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFV' 'sip-files00093.pro'
2d4f75ce4e8f116f54e3a3baee52e932
03c9c19693c446d3f332d34236dd6cc591e3f51c
describe
'38685' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFW' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
6f6ca17cde15a9e2ada16a8fc89309ee
9ce923fd8e135bfea6cde40d4bdf88d1df7f1b42
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFX' 'sip-files00093.tif'
e5dbd333228e3add0980619298e590bc
b732692529183e07aad3ed44ab3b28fd39b03e56
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFY' 'sip-files00093.txt'
26effa29fe615fa5c2451759c4c7be60
af86ad2400ac97ec897f30130669569112211747
describe
'10631' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKFZ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
84c56753592f869b739024cec32ff179
196b3ea927cc43a82f1d9188f50a34a72a84c171
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGA' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
06f488489c4c66ea5d592cec2faafee2
e501c63bec121dde295975453c97200af52bffdb
describe
'100914' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGB' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
0a1c0658a44e25ecd73e10fe762df9fb
295b76b494ac3fc9677ed6841cab66aa8cf726c9
'2012-01-15T06:07:31-05:00'
describe
'28206' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGC' 'sip-files00094.pro'
a17fbe6e7903c13489cbfa5d69a2c916
210dcef09edd3e9700682ce8178a06573a27ebfa
describe
'33681' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGD' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
95e78947f9cd837196a719363d92d1c4
e9629912ac8690080c5f1a17833a35cdc769d566
'2012-01-15T06:07:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGE' 'sip-files00094.tif'
f9db3f03c83d43e13bbbfac684c67121
d5f0d20b756bf6f95086542f6b185e6826b86195
'2012-01-15T06:06:42-05:00'
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGF' 'sip-files00094.txt'
82985c5ca7d8f3ba5ba4273e213ffcbe
536f07069d6049b50e51c02dec7679c58c2c3965
'2012-01-15T06:09:00-05:00'
describe
'9075' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGG' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
01a5ecc63db16e4eed20aec8bb10392f
c4b719c0519631ec1b023859b01d4d77a06bf851
describe
'360245' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGH' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
a198c756c12f5d25de64a53d3acf29c3
fecc5cd56710ee8c4cfee8f529503b02d23b901c
describe
'97887' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGI' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
9050c3463edf2d37b596242db88ef9ee
e667a751dd042073fd6d3ab8e005e66943cd2621
describe
'15974' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGJ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
d5151a25789aec20a72cca1db3061c5e
2757834e7c672e4c56904ef34c20267923245ee1
describe
'31439' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGK' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
84e6900ed08829b8837439e88b4acfec
e46fceb775facd7146c8ce3afcfed7345cc37047
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGL' 'sip-files00095.tif'
ba480d57a5e4717087b6c2aa6a111be5
0eaf5b60f18579b849a6e704da11d2d9ee206652
describe
'737' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGM' 'sip-files00095.txt'
39a79f1776bc47e8122345b7bc567ce6
cf2e3d47b5b5da2969311e1ca055a9e003e4798a
'2012-01-15T06:06:05-05:00'
describe
'8458' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGN' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
7eec480c6b5138eb2812fc5f72bcf00a
8c333adefa8eb61dde99628ecc4efcaaa2fd5f51
'2012-01-15T06:07:33-05:00'
describe
'360512' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGO' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
1a7d8b7f12bc0b701332fb3ab1bd4618
26e6e466c98376826ebd62a51e5dd7e377f476eb
describe
'109472' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGP' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
a496de59b706164b697257535b96cb31
a4eafd4aeacf1c70c108ddc9dda672ed8d6cbe4c
describe
'31583' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGQ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
25281fa1025a39971866d4e0fc655354
b99a438ce34dac04b5b6e58ed20fcdaaa0ac328b
describe
'37814' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGR' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
c922261ef64df8ba15440400ddd1fa0d
2fa5f2ddd7644222d8d7bb9d1896fe41db0dbaf3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGS' 'sip-files00096.tif'
9ef8015f9c9b2af89cbd381af14cccce
7bf2e974dcb5314e5b52821bc6c0a7268007b60c
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGT' 'sip-files00096.txt'
1e747a206ee35d259cadfbc214fbd80d
7b62a82d50f04157ea9e963b26cfb50ef90f0d1c
describe
'9767' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGU' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
7bd7dc39caa18cbaee01e2e44cd9e220
7fc2a674a00383d828b9a3d059d127f59f2ada73
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGV' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
1ed65d9586f24cd5e5ee0e21ef0c7130
235210ffd2ad8629ddd14425b9ed5d8b5320d56e
describe
'110212' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGW' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
93ba6b0b84ea043845471ff864cfb8bc
6dd1645ea92ed8eaf0855a9b723e621c84ce86c0
describe
'32258' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGX' 'sip-files00097.pro'
c1a5a30ea7302602b91385ef9115e089
9640c9a49910500ffc0516c054d04becf40c5765
describe
'36452' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGY' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
a8aef12f73b6b12cd1d3ed92ba395bb9
f91fbc96cc1649b02bbefbf5690878a7369c69a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKGZ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
ce3ff63e0bdb14185cb53699671b470c
4506b81444a56666ef04607d6c8b78f474093682
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHA' 'sip-files00097.txt'
58055b97261aa2029799ad954f044cf4
c754537b77bc0e99ffd0597f85502c30f1337b25
describe
'9848' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHB' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
238b1861b233eec92c7790eebe8ca6fd
2e856077ca25ceb66c9ae076b8591de6de66987a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHC' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
cc8319eaa2f715e9badc4874e1a7aa97
28acc4590fd1923b725d5ddfc78b51480cb6cf74
'2012-01-15T06:05:56-05:00'
describe
'91922' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHD' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
21539eccd3385549cafa7e79d1211385
b88d0c895dd6dd01983cb6c6c03a8ffe42e0b5b3
describe
'25768' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHE' 'sip-files00098.pro'
f90482584035e84af2f752533e3b002e
3e06e9c80df5280ff543a2ee801013eecb4dded1
describe
'30565' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHF' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
9242be38f1ca9bb109e22bacca4d419d
7dc7001c03f8677f65451a08b56046e376e2679a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHG' 'sip-files00098.tif'
12e014afade454ab8dc36a9312eb0c00
2b93f343120fb2eedabe318cf7042f09af117f60
'2012-01-15T06:09:46-05:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHH' 'sip-files00098.txt'
e739ce64675c9a4707331205fc6c4fcf
23aedf0bf2c784a6486f70bb98a1377010ef3984
describe
'8264' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHI' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
6d3a4a52b5c3b58da77bf8de4d89d708
02e3bc4556ede37bca531f0b21036adf5e639183
describe
'360223' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHJ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
53288dcf37b04a4b10133f1054bab462
f9cc73ebafdc5a5cec0978ac6fc584c5f57feb7f
describe
'93290' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHK' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
671379f41d66bb27f1ae13590642a666
e65f5184c9c71dcc513b5d18285ae1fc52193512
describe
'15582' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHL' 'sip-files00099.pro'
90374ef3d3443accbf74e57c7f502d9d
bb50fdadd112d1585628da72cde7e75d96b44edd
describe
'28858' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHM' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
ee38053b9bf9886556da01b9b0ad1c2a
31c0a93159c20eaf731ee6510190759e19c8e642
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHN' 'sip-files00099.tif'
77d5af087b37b6abbbf13e51a570cff8
a7bfc1934d76882ec21086d2d66d45d5dfe0dd16
describe
'661' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHO' 'sip-files00099.txt'
6c429b1504e25d181dde0562cf57d77f
4a5c2e443fc782f94bf4734b8786303e2c68636b
describe
'7965' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHP' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
5df6a6c11f1cb0ff9dc83ecb1f4265a3
3dcaccd9977454b18f1d5270afd7655235565e7c
'2012-01-15T06:09:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHQ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
05d869f70caf6b0f3329ba0646f95bd3
50a1c7d3073464030818652d334b0c43edd140a8
describe
'112210' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHR' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
35041a9f3ac2e61fd36b3ceb593ffbec
a2ed33363d9225bcf20673581be8c3ee4afbb924
describe
'32845' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHS' 'sip-files00100.pro'
8bceafb31d532286ed189a97c3a0e619
956fe5e0895bb5c4cd5af707643f908d5878acd8
describe
'36956' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHT' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
27ab3c98e9d3f48a5c5254085be8211e
14c99f2f8897941e777f546c5ad4d92761528f39
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHU' 'sip-files00100.tif'
a27967537eb2414a806893f685247784
0b9341c9e48195b0805106da59e1059fd614ae3b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHV' 'sip-files00100.txt'
22cd03aee33227912170ef41e445a871
3a53b38ab037ac84e485ac4791b3dc6c81928855
describe
'10048' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHW' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
f9314d4708a0c98d54f47b725bb0ff76
47e4a982615f49027a342e9b90807c907ff27da5
describe
'360224' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHX' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
ac69e2fd84e2a4df11e3550d16648fec
71419128c750f4af5aa33a46ecb37fadf2d2c9a9
'2012-01-15T06:04:53-05:00'
describe
'107563' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHY' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
8bdcac11aaa2734c701e1ef3be854b09
94a23c3d09f33155cc57e97420270001c5c338a9
describe
'32241' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKHZ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
d38728d75c2cc1a148e90091f24afb1f
8c135d79992d447b7574df6b4aee111009330eea
describe
'38500' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIA' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
2fa5eddf8f094268571a439af1613aca
02e171877bb36cca897649cdef2f8b0c466c7939
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIB' 'sip-files00101.tif'
fa41d6bbcd75effd1c1a62886bde0bea
69445ea149cdcb1278433e299edcedf90c899e54
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIC' 'sip-files00101.txt'
03b0ab57dfcfd47f5c158aa5bb1ee1d5
252bf296fa5f15d27065c019c033fff8542bd8c0
describe
'10116' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKID' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
d5435d34737eae7b5d77c202d32867d1
e8f8695a3212fed6da8fd72c7abbd76f8545ef59
describe
'360204' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIE' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
09dbb18569dfef28f520e6197f470002
8fc9569c611984c739adf4ec38bdf1115e5f09d8
describe
'113492' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIF' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
d4bcd6718261fb7700fead5b1620f5ee
c31d2f033be33776c8d3e0546110723dc25a315f
describe
'32116' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIG' 'sip-files00102.pro'
495245cdd68fa02b5a432ce12f8905ea
525e335795f97e4a4bec258fc77b6631bba1fd1c
describe
'40267' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIH' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
6c97c53ec4ec6e1a57c9d009bfd48356
0e0eef1ec329ca16cbfb1bf5f0e6aa72bfe5b8f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKII' 'sip-files00102.tif'
4e7d058e762919053795a343d57b9f31
8e6829283ca86cad05c8a03096584cd612cdddb5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIJ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
ac45766bcc9a634d80e01d57b25002d1
3da0e221b2e2d1c654d8ae70dbbdc43c131e674e
describe
'10305' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIK' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
eb036789993b46533974a2a8e735324b
af6ec25fc02201883663a48f1b467c932f3a46b1
describe
'360230' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIL' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
1874773be816929c646b7ee6c228c8ea
bfab222c2d43fb470021d029074b99543386a6c0
describe
'107319' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIM' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
0ec56e888459adabb9a2e3e1572d5ac3
7c103616380290d62ff14ec329fdb07912020233
describe
'31280' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIN' 'sip-files00103.pro'
2db83684e6ccbf8db9ce64b2227bef7f
99c196d90cfe3ec63ed1c668de0a7299abb8deae
describe
'36217' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIO' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
cf6f27cef9db69795da8a03e5b975fe3
2c61d1489ce788a08dfc4477a0d10fece4742e2e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIP' 'sip-files00103.tif'
2bf86f0470821009d8e23c5e98461bf9
086a4845462465ffe070c08c6b870d508dda9cdd
'2012-01-15T06:06:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIQ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
72c03a656fa69d3eab9fede64060330f
c7c6f96f399454200a00d846a40ca4fdf1c61824
describe
'9756' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIR' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
172f223c9d38faabea6b793f6d3c3266
7e9829291ef20129dac9c28e55926ff78ab29d4b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIS' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
4fc38567a9ee1acc9092ab305c3e989b
7889091197baf12c91291db9b9acb19bc4944b1c
describe
'123405' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIT' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
d45b6d1672368ccb279cbbdee5b595da
c49cd41ca3e6fc0a628dc08c0c456daec5a6366f
describe
'18553' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIU' 'sip-files00104.pro'
28042920057f38574967a895dae19d58
673b2c44b3c309419d41ffe6e56335ab44a7d9e6
describe
'37588' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIV' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
cab1c78db68a1bd617cebe17adace7be
d2e202e3aa7e9f3eb3c6267f3e9cd1b015b839c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIW' 'sip-files00104.tif'
e358a0ed085d19d70190ef01e59c2639
50b5abf44151f23208414c506df23662697eec42
'2012-01-15T06:10:29-05:00'
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIX' 'sip-files00104.txt'
23ee384501201ef2b7fd69e99ade61de
8e67e37be6217012705a83483dcbb72ebbdaafa7
describe
'9872' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIY' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
2dbee88a876f9c4dc3230a9ac6e16cab
caa7a1a5b0180f6fa8da6b5a79d7bc99bff23d9f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKIZ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
c114c239835123660cbf934eab07d797
2aad468b5643b422a401e18582c5d18a9cfcb68b
describe
'103364' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJA' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
9a8a8450f1b5990c421280591dd5b808
be0351a03d3be068b24ce813b5b06a6aac32d0e2
'2012-01-15T06:05:41-05:00'
describe
'30009' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJB' 'sip-files00105.pro'
1698f563478492e443f45f0689b6a82c
71945f606b117ff644ae93333eb0055abaa304d9
describe
'36110' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJC' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
d10a44c2d8bed3c77d1c70f6a0ed1a33
6770c40343f6388c18f2cfc06c0e61eef23ecdeb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJD' 'sip-files00105.tif'
86131bd2e150955f2ecbecf1bc4c422e
dda98d0ff57d7a7e31341dc822d5ffee69c49205
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJE' 'sip-files00105.txt'
cc873387163201d03d2d549823988bd9
e86b1d48f64823db1e6f0ee5b5f939253d7c9c55
describe
'10062' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJF' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
6e830acc9ac168359c8497d071443e02
b00f953362f52e980ddc225f95184e2b2be1f882
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJG' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
3b57b83d2b8cd4d136678723adab41c5
ca9dedf40b75927f4d169b02b4c97cedea571f81
describe
'110742' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJH' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
ef38eea4d7401178d862cdecd7352196
b65e75e1f6e771e938976e7900e46bf8a49770ad
describe
'32090' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJI' 'sip-files00106.pro'
f449213ab61e11ec491a55a86177f386
d3ba3f40bfee0bd7f2391a0bef53c6b591e871a8
describe
'37264' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJJ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
a5098b818acc97cd193ac8cf6f70810c
d1f719a1e343c75bf3508504e26a034109d4033a
'2012-01-15T06:07:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJK' 'sip-files00106.tif'
329b8c7a866ffb792aea6bf8f08b6a3e
45ac9f7a5ed241f1b9b4151d7b0e8c2416bff2f1
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJL' 'sip-files00106.txt'
e967ec79dd9984de1877831928321a80
d5ec7b60af344b127665fb9a3d343098454b1a9c
describe
'10052' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJM' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
8c26719014baf5e53b8f169f1a917391
9d2f3ff8b58f4c659b5e146d5c2b7cfca6ae9428
describe
'360217' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJN' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
57c12d71c4d77e807f20164287fa86ac
54c1fa7a60f3081af916f3b480be24e4df40cce3
describe
'98732' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJO' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
636f3ae1cff1bdf07fe60073877371bb
0eb570f427c277557c7ab5872745a0e4dc8041fa
describe
'28277' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJP' 'sip-files00107.pro'
afa943c52d188df9c10ccb0d05b8125f
85e88041ff8a19d4cdff85a3df0882a8f8fec622
describe
'33775' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJQ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
2f75ecb04d6892c6a538767a96fca3c9
6ebbfa791cea5596a5ffc8db4fa6aeb74da9ad4a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJR' 'sip-files00107.tif'
9e3567a29352fb65864cd899c5f82e0c
ea65a81a4cafaeeff0ea8430cd9c2ba14ea33759
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJS' 'sip-files00107.txt'
558b546e6f6c1a059a9905067c456b8c
ca0e25fb0a34385ecdef16c3580d4f84fb391178
describe
'8803' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJT' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
7fc8e5f12ca112b2012b8e22e02e6207
0b3422c0fcbef3c3199d92f9f57599a25f6b1d8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJU' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
4fd3c1938b2f296eccb8fb32c93fbe74
865356a4a7e71a24d18c860762514c86b7c88fff
describe
'118684' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJV' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
f1a983c5d3acc66c81df4114c0617ab6
d65793ee02a5a425fd2d0f26ae5d7df217424dca
describe
'21658' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJW' 'sip-files00108.pro'
e497c4303d308616d2def29163eabb30
2e48333b9e651810ebae1eafb902c5e08a34c19f
describe
'38326' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJX' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
0afb63db860d7e3dc94c503d8d6beade
56007bc58be2bbc60aaf689d601fc803dda0c2f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJY' 'sip-files00108.tif'
b09f37fe5545f2d4b980cc8999b9d42a
e0585544d4463f9b06272d04fb13ab00a74a75b1
'2012-01-15T06:07:11-05:00'
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKJZ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
739f6c590ffe1a093089782fe4017601
c75d365cb94437262d4fc6594926ade6effd3ab8
describe
'10040' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKA' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
0ad32c6007a7af6142c29a996487e268
82c9f5a3ed719c500e6a4dbe3a1da1f91e7b5043
describe
'360261' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKB' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
912f15e690e592b3468c519f70b9d94e
093bf9bb166ecd850a880852010aa55f3436d6f0
describe
'109912' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKC' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
8273243f30f5e90652fb3f8f94e0afac
c313a3ef57b0fb23ecf009e0c477c6afed731e09
describe
'32053' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKD' 'sip-files00109.pro'
df22d361e81b23ac706b9fb63efabfc3
c909ee876b011e79f311ddd5bba29745af7e4e35
describe
'37523' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKE' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
b1dc4c9e81416f998b2110ccb0c49f62
763729febec9edbf95f6a3148efa2abefa4cf4f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKF' 'sip-files00109.tif'
0c52c3f35031a54710b7ec1703da9648
84ebfe9eb588f4f21b7da6cdc350ac46ac7fe1ce
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKG' 'sip-files00109.txt'
8a22bd53a3633149b95f8c4beb0fe5f2
809d7d46ebcf69901a9b89b90b2412dd6d1c0924
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKH' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
08947b60b1882d4a9e2a9cbae125a83b
6568d6c927db6a604ca9200f0233287f69a4e944
describe
'360454' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKI' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
363e77a5129801cf2e257b48c340c7cc
8d6ad192b012d9177cb215813e77f96397b16b13
'2012-01-15T06:06:21-05:00'
describe
'109189' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKJ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
36a3e12b09a36c8b967c05c78d7401a1
4e909d11f5cf4cf0fa2503e83d9c53c6dfcb7bf9
describe
'32399' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKK' 'sip-files00110.pro'
e343b0279fe7004b59d18bdd8ff9c3c7
2d64faf4670c6a8188b1702f15f6538c3d8a23cc
describe
'36221' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKL' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
3744d0ddd8b9bd7d8095ebb7c8709f60
bee0fe62b892c71594a7e5b5624a5033d7a214be
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKM' 'sip-files00110.tif'
064b8b274ceeb31dfc891063496b3573
33cda08723b2061fb826a7402a51bd95183d5e46
'2012-01-15T06:09:50-05:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKN' 'sip-files00110.txt'
1afd3688329ba3af515ba496e6e0c2e5
c8933802b10809957f0c7c7f41a6a054e22a9c91
describe
'9842' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKO' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
42ef44104aa0735b133e05ff2f8de246
724d66697a01ee98a9a5591bf58b883feeda9d9a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKP' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
35fb48db9d2169ff1add1270dc3ac27c
e9e4f0e6cd3a1dfce0f44e6e742f544a367f4518
describe
'108014' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKQ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
e58272ba65f5a8dc86b1f528edf2fc6a
b1a398fd39a33d43ed985dc5592dd0ec523ced32
describe
'17736' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKR' 'sip-files00111.pro'
0d9b7f7b558593d38f3b8f1be3e17f79
646ba21579aee88ef6171491e62e3ff28cc53797
describe
'34669' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKS' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
d942e1feb88b2489dae90bc631e32073
254f7de7e5758eccac3e9187a66cbd814e1a5e32
'2012-01-15T06:08:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKT' 'sip-files00111.tif'
ac025d0450d1cde857a2fec163c09d67
24a68b4a9e08365a1f536aa2e7b2c4a74754cef1
describe
'833' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKU' 'sip-files00111.txt'
2c3fe786de7c7b07689d9eed614e788b
1f2067169cbe20e1797519329aee08796906eb43
describe
'9332' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKV' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
6f00f2944c3a6174dd61d9b736f17ecc
5aeb76705631b44c5273cea1b1d8c2f740455d32
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKW' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
ec33dce372960c8320b258dffd872a82
8c5f5e12a7cd26c9e4c46f6df881b05c8123786b
'2012-01-15T06:05:31-05:00'
describe
'114773' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKX' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
0ca821b0242a3fd443dccf148b2498fe
c508581a56d658f055a6182a984d943546c5902e
describe
'33459' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKY' 'sip-files00112.pro'
de16b3ca5c72cbadc24ce8f27ae1d5a2
2ef976f5a7d61d0b9dd5ae7a4d345b83383ad1ec
describe
'40202' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKKZ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
b68a03b52c311ca030352e5c98923878
e82adbb19a94f28727a234b8f57e19c99724992d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLA' 'sip-files00112.tif'
000e42ad32cae2cbcf71a4adc00d77b7
afe0c8dbf13fc42ea883f9dd41f02495f4fe72f4
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLB' 'sip-files00112.txt'
7bcff8a47aa3be9c6ef472598ae2963a
d361c85bb1a1cd74f8e18595bcdcfd4999566448
describe
'10274' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLC' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
268cbbbd2db2e06691438e3641a02db2
8e20cf1ee8c654cea04136842a093845cff82b14
describe
'360228' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLD' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
f5dfecc791e5758762017b5c6cd05025
aedd98ca7370e447b7784afd86e2ceface767e80
describe
'111844' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLE' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
7e6d643876c23ca736b6095ded9e3c3d
4d1d38e8b0e0d8106eeda6166b3b430a51998321
describe
'31734' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLF' 'sip-files00113.pro'
08f61c672450c06bca3bb7d7877e095c
308cef5d0f7cdb3a732529de6a332690c94820bf
describe
'38761' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLG' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
81aa6143ae4304aad52ba0f65bf2a9ff
8efa659c387ccc52a2958debab89fc78ea46f65b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLH' 'sip-files00113.tif'
f62787f163ea83ebf94c08bbd2893ebe
62540cb7a4747e4af73b4ce65df706fe93416df5
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLI' 'sip-files00113.txt'
2102760f0e5b65cdc45850648e897c5d
be7892e21378abe6e1ac09d05aa2ef5d169519a0
describe
'10433' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLJ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
7712830fa86779c9d5ad17ae41022006
c80729ffd0cac43ef0a3ec632cd815f6fb79ee32
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLK' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
473d725ca0c9c0f069908260d504fce3
3c50c62de22872adf32d832d874c52892872e3dd
describe
'109408' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLL' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
70f9a5cae8daf9f625cf23d5d76350b9
d91ec61f9e196b97c0440974967aa2301a096342
describe
'30535' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLM' 'sip-files00114.pro'
915aefef0519d7fbe0a1ef61a92e2b80
f3b3a96eca1cb405b4121690a3051b75dc872d4f
describe
'37731' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLN' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
4cfc1e5b86812f99f5e371e138853f15
ba7d442de6128159530b8cfe71cac5a2161a81b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLO' 'sip-files00114.tif'
34b32c20797891bcf9e4c22efd26920b
80f187e1da0b6b20f5c853ee7b677aaa30d8c36c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLP' 'sip-files00114.txt'
46a39b85ac3c04e7d9ba0b37e388c0b1
0841c70ec8cc3983bc130a7ab7baf16f37d17ed7
describe
'10217' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLQ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
923761366d16ba4c5bdcb4a5d24ab292
ffb631897dece1ef75f581a68ce1363f8c6066ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLR' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
9e3d98ddf20419413469191f4a77c61c
967a8e9aaf9189fe1572c1ccdd5112a9d1f1a196
describe
'109693' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLS' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
495a41a14afe74a5d346ae6d3bafcf15
89c308a6d62633493b2365f16bd46228fa27c5d4
describe
'31500' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLT' 'sip-files00115.pro'
22de5cd521bae06860dc9bb32064a4b0
cdfa81be3ad9fe5f750be3a2858d5c4bab1483fb
describe
'37415' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLU' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
6032efe93dcb838cf9b0e15acbaafcd2
c5a10d7be4d556c6727ede652670ca35e74429bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLV' 'sip-files00115.tif'
c3ee819929a51bd3b5975dedab7c4236
39648cc12525a4eb3efa5d5fe7df6426e1a81b11
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLW' 'sip-files00115.txt'
42dbe0dd4f449f6d96653986a2e5174a
143b853f6e97302fcad94754af63fc4afbb792e1
describe
'9901' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLX' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
046b5e7074c54685da4a8d925a067b1c
8ba6d11014b1f93cfb5d1191286ba085b53f16cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLY' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
7058ffbdeb30f529cb00805fae254591
9a119a9686cde623193eba1ea510bd9fe7c0f8c1
'2012-01-15T06:04:51-05:00'
describe
'89904' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKLZ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
cfcea2c5d3a8a1cd4d99cdc0e121b653
17769c1e21722e2fdf1aaebe6f6159df99ad2a2e
describe
'25954' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMA' 'sip-files00116.pro'
b5f08502890198f8be2c1ce4b1de073c
222208fa796e2ac4536da01a5e1d2da65754c5fb
describe
'32657' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMB' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
d7f69c4cd0c7680a940751301aed487e
18ff538297416ace23c274ecd57fd2009c5916ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMC' 'sip-files00116.tif'
2d96f1f34d986f100eaf4080f6823a4d
16a652236ebd2eb83442c05144e9bf5070c7d684
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMD' 'sip-files00116.txt'
1876992f8fe48f09b669a28a18542480
9b1bb869e25f6c96df9245276e410e5267d5c7f2
describe
'8510' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKME' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
f325daf0f4cd9a3183d8e50e9ec52438
c4a224b6f2bcfcc589b4914d88574f94ac79970f
describe
'360513' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMF' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
9709e5017a0ac639f053ee48ba09f653
f59b806e6b67a628ba5cbc8dfa113749a9a4a24d
describe
'109070' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMG' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
19bff0f70c597809afb2ac5bcf88d0c6
b7c16d6c30e6449847a052694fcad04d4b137306
describe
'32543' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMH' 'sip-files00117.pro'
ed36df1cf85e46487f3f3cc3105bf54e
ebf2fc642e8ccc0e7a95cc8ff5f5cb2bc183b1b7
'2012-01-15T06:09:15-05:00'
describe
'37896' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMI' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
19a68f8857cc8dc2360afa6a29916bff
fd7d97fdbfb054dd35d5573eb2bdb48313afcf0b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMJ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
7ba779c4182437e9cb82f855d8a8b951
deb22826575683fdd6de0b26b06167965ab717af
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMK' 'sip-files00117.txt'
2b8039ce3e002bfd414da4421114599d
cdca679f5584309e2c1242af4adf0ea0bf9968b5
describe
'9996' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKML' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
df76bf70883c1d605ea339d624f41de6
395f1d7fe3eea828845276f0205b7c1ad38ccb68
describe
'360276' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMM' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
5728cd7b4cbe5b42adf634a11b24fde6
3c7172e69cde0b7b49f5015af137274925f1c7fe
describe
'90147' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMN' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
2ff7ca6f8840c7cfa5ba8fe6f5d3244c
2212763c82b0513f1235fbc5e4ce82ba5aa2bf51
describe
'24424' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMO' 'sip-files00118.pro'
ee0697a03b75fe9d43289660b4842aa0
87e9391fb7efa9ab6aa36f5bfb7bb805ac57b245
describe
'30609' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMP' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
aaba28ca5b327a582d289c5b07e737cd
0c926b1593a6ce2fe0f94b3cb82cd2932663c662
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMQ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
294352afbceff1d4e60751c47afe8250
8c60e85263345417a5f941688aacd136a9a7781f
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMR' 'sip-files00118.txt'
99756bfe5dd502fc01fbbdc78bf12c97
4e547e412e8ac548383749df1d532aa9e09a0e03
describe
'8226' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMS' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
2595f953ad126f12fe7e59685c6e5637
f95dd99aee5d0ecdc8ab6fe44c227a2f3b4f5356
describe
'360445' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMT' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
13167d555b5d7d4285d7409bcd2f06ea
133b42571eb3db1f2689eb9df824f425aa6d458e
describe
'90037' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMU' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
077a5e73aa6091604e6049c2215eee26
11c06ecdc9dc8f77d492b85474308f5fa896f70c
describe
'24544' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMV' 'sip-files00119.pro'
a8989bf91faf889f309ead0e70b5275b
2743dad71b36841b8eccd7ab405b0c4eb22dd586
describe
'30887' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMW' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
c7fe06ff4e25c2b9a90841b25bcfc501
9ef50804dfe3e1ee59872653ee2cb7203b1d2665
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMX' 'sip-files00119.tif'
21cf24f9ee164fe0176193912e8abdba
54e98b33ebae3e96137af9d2bb2e6e1df6beb16d
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMY' 'sip-files00119.txt'
45b47300fa1ac0c7089b7f6a250e90ab
f82b2cd1a479974de067e8aea4b19a19dc0a9ebc
describe
'8668' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKMZ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
bf020ad46c5dec36fefd47b01b7d115c
349999b65df97e5514562b0216493b57ffee3641
describe
'360252' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNA' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
5115ba910234f9af44b78359c6962dc4
6743a31db840c272cae96804f64d5195ee60bce4
describe
'113264' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNB' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
68e4bc9a053b36d67a1526375e8fa17e
4010fe98368419bd3ef7ac985c76f3751ea08180
'2012-01-15T06:06:35-05:00'
describe
'31768' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNC' 'sip-files00120.pro'
79b0f76c9f2382c8b125847f91470559
901ee7bb2b1364fca257bc47b2803b27c758656a
describe
'40597' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKND' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
32769391a4b6e500e940cab322e784d6
b7448f4cc21ca66ad6c3f2a4b625abd5fe88932a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNE' 'sip-files00120.tif'
1802b68a43f3406538f1d69ff75d49f3
b60515fca0aa4d7c35547750cad3cfc7444c367f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNF' 'sip-files00120.txt'
a4c66c29dcad620fc7e490846f13d5e4
ac983e3cf1f600576b6df1d55c9824cfb18d69ce
describe
'10592' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNG' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
90ef49b20f13f4e2f103c85e8f492f0e
d9cab5ca5e0f0b0fc84aac53a98ce03e2da12de1
describe
'360235' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNH' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
c49234c7432c4e3c417df46661212bb1
141c20d6062945a79d576a7fc6e1b678de1d5e8f
describe
'114698' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNI' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
6201f11da485de8c82bb901dfa58a575
9096b57d9c21fb824422f734870c95e7d64ad25f
describe
'32882' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNJ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
8d501e90ed2062e4961a297898124146
96bd4818de259efbc0f5f121f14c0f802609b37a
describe
'40008' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNK' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
a14c7bc209b6bd8a38358119188e4dea
6abbd402657566a7077d55d7efefddef1cd1b279
'2012-01-15T06:09:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNL' 'sip-files00121.tif'
d9265f1de2f2c8a7368b280a15b21a9a
be84a4c9d7d47389eba7f65b25296a8c3c01c22c
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNM' 'sip-files00121.txt'
e6a7559fe88ad1d414d6c352f92fb0ff
ce5db87068228f0d4dca03d787a74e6868287640
describe
'10409' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNN' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
174d40233c8fd4bdf43bb592579e99d9
c411ac091fe230a73d48f27eda031b011edef5b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNO' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
3b5899fc69bc48926e9f7217838e26cf
7e6ad70ab2b62b7e2ca30d3aeee553e734a0c9f2
describe
'104948' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNP' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
3eff66278b535348137559209d48f1f7
2a484fae80b968288986d4f2604534c74eefc4d8
describe
'17197' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNQ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
4258c105bf8201fe0f8d0610505e69dd
b4525f7e301894ec7369df5845559e2af9e40830
describe
'33046' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNR' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
efdfae04f5623be8b149cc6dfb4cc416
4e1e23199989ed7fca66271e2201497b18be0bb7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNS' 'sip-files00122.tif'
cb16cf429e0bb68600744f412eae6435
4b5b57e4d14c57ad1918eac4d9e33d97e33e8d2f
'2012-01-15T06:07:38-05:00'
describe
'795' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNT' 'sip-files00122.txt'
b295e4c4df750939c38433f422435cee
544c47471e4c121d90adf140864be19cb7a5e6c5
'2012-01-15T06:06:37-05:00'
describe
'8503' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNU' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
0a86a0ebc74a3ee52fca93b271d59bfb
7a7b86e9b60bf78157348fbfccf6fec26dfeefdc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNV' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
6a98101c9f0024c51d015b59fbc37d84
22f396057916a9e3221729796e60e18f6d284224
describe
'116774' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNW' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
6c0f5ec61f0f94ea4c6f89a66ed73302
bd078d82e9c85cc637dd9b0b3f389d4695ec3a85
describe
'34229' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNX' 'sip-files00123.pro'
9d7b53ea01126751cdef7cb73065cf12
d86ce4cd85e1f50cc04a282fbb5ae246df6fa058
'2012-01-15T06:10:33-05:00'
describe
'40059' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNY' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
d6413b829192b4adf619c048a0df9dc4
2efbfaa9ea78293743e7f5467851142c243bd0a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKNZ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
f428ced5f31040392d54fb4aa2a2ccd6
bc46ccc4d81878f3fa8432a300e849a82da3e7e7
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOA' 'sip-files00123.txt'
10ca448c1f2c115995b67e5d2cdf6bd7
d2c687329bb9c45537be744264862b883a4fd72a
describe
'10332' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOB' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
515f191b59a2e5ddb265da3d7c7de7a1
44852758218a73c200e35eb028f1c5bc6850c3cc
describe
'360268' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOC' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
aabf64ed6ff4af85fd47b9d54b8a08e2
9a9cf3fd5cd20292272a8b556675ac65d872de2f
describe
'110280' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOD' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
974197536703e28cf2aaa0261ebb4a93
ab30dabad823ab435b1a3be03571c729911f0627
describe
'32101' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOE' 'sip-files00124.pro'
b8c68124c7216c225713dd721d7eebd0
bb70258aa07ea1a5471110b20b4426a348570cbf
describe
'37410' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOF' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
f2778d93679f7aff028a0ba1796f97bb
8f6682b901293d7bcc4dba66bd9e558558044e25
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOG' 'sip-files00124.tif'
cdc64283acacff8ab51853c1e5cef977
eed96d74d32d5aff260bc0e17f06f428ee9bdcbb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOH' 'sip-files00124.txt'
e6890207128652b46255d911ca985517
d95d93a645bb0023a15cc83a8102e7e80c1aaee9
describe
'9859' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOI' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
7524270948f59ada551fe3ff2cafdd03
2dd1a683f83315daf2da2a6e4d332b1cf9f3e3c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOJ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
d8b45e89e1c779d0bb6cf87ba75acfaf
6cd69d0749a54486f8319c059f3bf0b54d5a7bcd
describe
'103759' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOK' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
9acf14ad861889cdca48952911e83f6d
8d0dce0bf759f4de936d382776cae113d48108e1
describe
'31825' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOL' 'sip-files00125.pro'
647e26f9e8a80caed0665de6fa4f2e4a
c67318aaa87ce517a966b8ae4a2be441646bd46f
describe
'37838' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOM' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
81324e1f7f096554384d39aa34433b3e
54e06a87e03decdcc9b3cbc34054e76666ca19dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKON' 'sip-files00125.tif'
db20d817df2d1a05ee19bc552b58b232
038cb7a758d44236aeff28e2d4f9694aacaeda7f
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOO' 'sip-files00125.txt'
bd6978bd5e7bb2dece02c724cae45baa
a07dea16cf11f747d2de788adbb9263f32ba5867
describe
'10044' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOP' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
a4e7cba91ed38d2d90b5209bd942fac8
0732996c5108e74a98b68012136e2dc97bc56c0c
'2012-01-15T06:07:45-05:00'
describe
'360527' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOQ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
0b1fbba7f8c6655ce527db7dbda3f6ef
fd534182f052247eda82006880cb6f715a3ec246
describe
'114217' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOR' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
e0b4eb62e2a853566b816c5c5836a655
5c436ce8388f629dbf0c2a5d0227858b54c067d6
describe
'17974' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOS' 'sip-files00126.pro'
7418446fe9aef5e54d7e8ce7cd4dbdd9
d69d0410517063b1cb55c312222028a91bc2913d
'2012-01-15T06:08:23-05:00'
describe
'36233' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOT' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
6939375e8d3db0ed415781f1c31df665
db56a45b016013b11d10bce60fa82af6de6e972f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOU' 'sip-files00126.tif'
85980d0590229b544a486570fecc7300
b83aa8e131da156961db23ac063b8db8aaa282cf
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOV' 'sip-files00126.txt'
97bd840a4f48f83b8110e625f75e9ca7
b7b83b3f9b774e755cbf2e0d1b9588d4c2f5595d
describe
'9606' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOW' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
bd24698cc807a2aef7ec626524f0333e
24c9663ec46565fd2bf5a56271ae312bc805bf7c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOX' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
a6609b5e3305ea1bf72bb426ffa32ead
c9bc8f8593f9aadb4d4461a71b592bb618857baa
describe
'103936' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOY' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
11c0f01865aa69040ed4096668e6cc59
64e31a14659995e5f3cd47c146de9a496ffa453d
describe
'29791' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKOZ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
3b29dc72584a01e90770d6f4ebfd0931
2caec4a38e8e21a74146a6bcfaa4516cbd5e2df2
describe
'36238' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPA' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
819e057cd27a35244f59350e7e9d8931
156b0466761e3d5842d56e14003dad017e5f152b
'2012-01-15T06:09:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPB' 'sip-files00127.tif'
75f0b51c9228a8b07c59b67a7629cc23
e152980a4c70f753ca08c3fe86c8dbca998396a0
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPC' 'sip-files00127.txt'
0100ffda7fbea09f618b8c3da4dda02a
5a5c90baa1c0379c3fb83fc0b07a007afa5e2fd7
describe
'10122' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPD' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
2fa05048684d85504cc6ca6394dac9f7
467f07c478deed0149eb8deecbcffe88a917dd6c
describe
'360249' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPE' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
141dcbea524fc52f97b3d9e4ff07365b
5384f8fdaeb108677441cab787b5426104350493
describe
'108711' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPF' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
ed7b69f1e7194576906aeed4172d8037
9a5bd76df1117c78a813dd062c5511a8fdd42dff
describe
'31120' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPG' 'sip-files00128.pro'
9f0d30efaa4db171f165c74d7a5becad
1013258f9ef255b5e2deedc3778ac639f8b6a397
describe
'38691' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPH' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
31a790d945c14a69b59f6331c7e6a7e4
bafb050554d21c62009cb29efaf174907e6fa125
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPI' 'sip-files00128.tif'
0334db8b845f1cad48bf96ccf7944ccd
b3780a5e32be417c136c8fc35b49865d32b91432
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPJ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
675c63f9e14d138b594b2201e5a87d60
2be111ed1674dc1d2506950f9eaab0644083a965
describe
'9920' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPK' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
c52aa1c48cd4766bc7b46b615e49186f
431e2cba102da624fd8981333146477013cedba9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPL' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
3cc8f63ed5fde25e73fa4721c4246064
d4428db6a18f9e76056868971536bc378c7ae731
describe
'102359' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPM' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
e8a6236ee08ecbf65f366f840c0bd9b8
16da91eabd44678ff56b63ad92ee1de7926e7979
describe
'28740' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPN' 'sip-files00129.pro'
5dbd5d500968385839955785cadc250d
745fe15298871351bd1e369adf52cce05db0b66a
describe
'34246' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPO' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
b53a7513392348856e59676ef51f3d68
9861d4301e5dd74dbed7650e575ffb23aec3fa89
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPP' 'sip-files00129.tif'
8cab508d1dfa04e75ebe84a577d20692
2f190d6feea851adc631495ac086b30604c48f2b
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPQ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
63a7297efdc3d56bb78808dec69d271d
b8804e877f63680f79f390f6515486c833cf5b13
describe
'9249' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPR' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
f7c9705a421f0d7205be89e9b4500e78
d2f95bb2b5a8d8c0646b0e63031a5fcfa1f29b15
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPS' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
6c19b3d02b7af33f98b13e9977f1dbb3
a7cba104b2201a1b6946a8fb68625fa31bfde9e4
describe
'111784' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPT' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
9e06717f1908b7cf0905107282acd4dd
19041638c63e50a857b72ab54eb5a3491262f700
describe
'31760' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPU' 'sip-files00130.pro'
7426eed3f8f76ece7fa6a42841544a6d
12e77ed4ac39cc5d5b966947648dd611de4df01a
describe
'37195' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPV' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
81034b81f1339fcc94bf47bc81ddce93
c9f502d92df2095814d6e47ff4c007f151d49bef
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPW' 'sip-files00130.tif'
105883e2ddce02e5d2446318cdaf7a96
d31343995492f9b1d0850cdc42ee97d55e62c4f2
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPX' 'sip-files00130.txt'
3cbdbd11c0b36be9bd7a5e6d4b64a260
e805aba10bb0d586cfb11cf149299328ab21cf4b
describe
'9922' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPY' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
434c0dd0348ffe0f5974e6b19d1cc380
919a9ceb3d07d4ba9791d7c836e439222b3050a6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKPZ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
0ff939da97c448d275bf6724357c7db5
fcc51470fd0585094900e15f943663c8cf951f90
describe
'79073' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQA' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
ac9c2456fd26f28448681052264602f2
f66e1a173cf59003d7e993c419dd6dbd0647a1f8
describe
'22539' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQB' 'sip-files00131.pro'
66359bfc419c3f588476f40d39039f7d
0c27371b8b0da8e387356c6fd9e06d52fb478629
describe
'26683' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQC' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
13b9da1b2eb8c0c6afb9fe5102d790db
a582f5910322fa8b8ac987175185f27d016fdb52
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQD' 'sip-files00131.tif'
a85ab61fbc0251e173577f9c437d034e
373de16cf9efc96e539aaeea1e747a58a804da1a
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQE' 'sip-files00131.txt'
d4702058c1713aae60c9f1ff5b61759f
cc661113a0013da3bef5236563bf6794f569a07f
describe
'7301' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQF' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
94ea591ae661ff62aaa5275bb486cbe8
ae8e00cca8576394b8f639826a36d1902b7199a0
describe
'360275' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQG' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
37c8fb27a4c99b0b859a7379f787431d
9ca12ca00ce864925f260b3cd735de10d8383c4d
describe
'120218' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQH' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
12d9b71f131337fa370812b3f9a019d0
02e4b2bf15dc059b0d917f0024dc0dbaa12f8c42
describe
'18841' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQI' 'sip-files00132.pro'
be3d2e96f8bc13c6ae57b3403f9985a1
27a04e7569e76a48104027f46f55cfc42cca9ef2
describe
'36571' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQJ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
de1a748653e04515b98d6fd854905429
86db451fad766fd78db9a244e0a04af8567c12b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQK' 'sip-files00132.tif'
97980f368a4bb0937421cb13696789ba
2bf5f2f529eed97eaabe6e89b3ecdb585a9a4971
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQL' 'sip-files00132.txt'
49bfca23d76cb928139dfd9d43541ab9
d4ebf270efd71d518b783a253a874cdd6a76e841
describe
'9235' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQM' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
f31312ca1339b773f329fbe3d0ab9330
228a832d276997dede2c8fb07354cd805a9dea38
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQN' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
1d0f1a148df1b1034aebb95c9b44b7b8
d68544a2ad383c80eb46ed83c9f60356c14a52a3
describe
'115814' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQO' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
346625b48701418324667429710fabb1
2522d7d2db63da5ab6a84fe18c4291afdcddd4bd
describe
'32361' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQP' 'sip-files00133.pro'
e28ecf268a1814542a24f38b95ccee50
831d82ded26c17e8a5dd524ff4ca30a622db0940
describe
'40512' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQQ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
5220f8dae3e5fccf985ae69edf0cf4c5
a9d1649518f83e7aadaaeadb1f117ecdbc003bcc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQR' 'sip-files00133.tif'
c1da0959b316969d8fa42d8774c0d6c8
5e505e6dddd1a19879bfc8a8fb39bda1e3f8eb08
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQS' 'sip-files00133.txt'
1963029177db59a2fbb80b0aa17e3263
0307986fd51304704fa7f8c2e28c7ff4120baa98
describe
'10902' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQT' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
07f09598f5df54ab99e6a95e5819d484
147319061e54757adf503d23b5e53ff50b241ab1
describe
'360243' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQU' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
524ce4fdc9da27f3d45d47f1fb588964
662c4c4f930a970ce588065a82bef7d64eb94baf
'2012-01-15T06:08:47-05:00'
describe
'114146' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQV' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
a0d867f472be66ca9cb4696f88f5a336
a864c9d0982f015687b68d6093dd6896c14042f5
describe
'32498' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQW' 'sip-files00134.pro'
5a814e74e1339bfe80cf1394f7db3a36
9636ad812de88a72550d9704909d589f9891bb20
describe
'39051' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQX' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
b7ccb8cadf80f8ed4e16be263a295746
a3590458e7f57f2dd55cf2b3b941fb6efcfadfd8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQY' 'sip-files00134.tif'
76bbd48988c9587ff3aa01c7a1b549fd
7fbaed80d5d21066f1647f81ff4eda2aa2ee987b
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKQZ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
4f86072adefcec24a7a490bb7430b47d
cb10e36e9d4dc848798b3ce47122e190fc1358cf
describe
'10517' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRA' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
7b9966cf991263e7012c66fb6ed2fdfb
1a05e31f672db457c7ad99a2915ea9f4ed31420f
describe
'360284' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRB' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
3515aa08120b63dfb7ad079e6018292a
ac4b4d12e17659c8d592855d5ff3680041982682
describe
'92225' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRC' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
e6bcd47239aef002fd0a1514bf955bdb
c8979dd6e5cc86c858c2b291d4eb4e0d74990598
describe
'24370' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRD' 'sip-files00135.pro'
9e8e4137b26d8a909f9869b6236d782c
810a802b847f4810c391f597df3710f19f510b7f
describe
'33138' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRE' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
1013006eeb6c7e49b38d4d281a881d56
956499ce24f2b96a29ee753a538c1688e332e0e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRF' 'sip-files00135.tif'
bb9cf507fb7559c61d3889c51d59238f
7dfcfd8e6b702863a961c3a21cf2372d35fb319e
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRG' 'sip-files00135.txt'
5899215440a3ca16919fcef41aa33530
fddc6b3bf472d811dc69a735d83371fd922b35cc
describe
'8960' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRH' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
93f5a6c40be29ad2d8e4a1a513e0aa83
9edecc13886e1531cc52895c05b9fad6c153aaee
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRI' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
d75c18e288b61e1a8595e59452d85892
423078eaae7f6d446e159956746a606f58198141
describe
'127417' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRJ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
1acacd8363c0a7eddc6e9f9932582981
a99fef16b1ccfec1201c711c8fc613d13c2295ab
describe
'22002' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRK' 'sip-files00136.pro'
a9370389674a8a20c0efad6dfe8dd2e5
89365f33d28488e996f2005ef6563188bcaa783d
describe
'39758' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRL' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
76d35727ce3f35ce6a6cf4d3917385f3
7e4d006b2181c0e2e6813a1e853206ee5cc72d85
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRM' 'sip-files00136.tif'
1bb5223d47e285036fe542d0e0254c72
ce7de4aa8fd4b7cc2ab8cf4dbeff1f42c3b2c3aa
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRN' 'sip-files00136.txt'
be334f48e5e6648d4ce36cced89aef23
b8cf0eadecff20e2286b8d7f926bfb51e2689f40
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRO' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
2144667909bf02dde1fc38d65523bac4
4365c867df030ed8fa0286a4b4d886bb96dc7da0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRP' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
dd33d14bc68357ef0af20dea19e6eaf6
4adb6a8089e77e6aaa008d483314f2259a2eb174
describe
'115528' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRQ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
eec609ee44bdd0bea149113f57067d24
9399cf4782bc2a71777b2437fd6c6c54e18fcd3b
describe
'33029' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRR' 'sip-files00137.pro'
5424c5e4974975ee979444db2537a62a
b61d0f0bbd663e6c7ab227decf90572b181ed8a3
describe
'41350' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRS' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
e8978ef17a5d4886097c62a3a1cf3629
5eec81707e6ea7d966038f1a1a0e1701ad1d24cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRT' 'sip-files00137.tif'
6f8e7f64676749b8bb88a10636780500
b509af49c9f1173c81b6af4e30cb1958713479b5
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRU' 'sip-files00137.txt'
e7e3db44fe3a2201d179de174cbf1bce
29392df1c0b1ad6fc0de2debae5fde827c96a64a
describe
'10407' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRV' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
7ee4a8b0e8926fa5f778d13c0dcd4774
00bc39bf4f58ecc87e4d7214112f88959e939a96
'2012-01-15T06:08:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRW' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
a653528252d9ec6dcac64fac1df2ca6f
2571e58cb05f33edd548bd699ab70072305c515f
describe
'111768' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRX' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
583082e05ff5ea60a2fb2c577cd3a97c
bff31f76a2d9e2a718785341930d44010d4452ed
describe
'31460' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRY' 'sip-files00138.pro'
d6feb11d240c9e4f0ad164a4234f30e7
b4e534663f81197b606a6cb261e8bd67c0decf0d
describe
'39348' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKRZ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
a18fd0f09a48eaa7ada1a60a6b26ffa3
d3181ef817ee1d2574259bf91f0af5b78b504faa
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSA' 'sip-files00138.tif'
dfc9f5f5f98abc66f66ac7fc863664ed
51cd29077af0e8da0289ad977afa27f7c2a7a9a4
'2012-01-15T06:10:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSB' 'sip-files00138.txt'
0295af6de63dc93a159a7174e6429728
7f9dd764085e2ea16a68201baf1161ff212b32aa
describe
'10284' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSC' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
0b5c112ed65625564a576c08b572f647
0c9dcdfc513c8ad3ebb99d804da2fe2b5919798a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSD' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
04fa88950ae8453a6331b5a038334447
9153fee338ab2d76be92c7feb418c98cb337ef21
describe
'118134' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSE' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
61817370c59469c47a3436d68b014b0a
7d2a86ec31f986c6c8e81b50506a7f792aa6bdc9
describe
'33967' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSF' 'sip-files00139.pro'
51691eb207d83ab4f0a18b9ac2bbe8d4
d64c3916b1d8059e3cdacb9057471c3b54aa112d
describe
'42536' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSG' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
367a96b7e605f56be580fbca5174908d
5bdb1df284fd5e8eb5aad848ff52c6e490923f50
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSH' 'sip-files00139.tif'
4182a2343b9742c6fa5d220e147205df
709958427250daf2cd1188fbdbc9f63b0878fbc7
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSI' 'sip-files00139.txt'
2edd2b8ad197698a0f650392be8e5253
0f0c70f0f6ab36da1637de2fde765d0d1e983d3a
describe
'10721' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSJ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
1f25bc698bf5109f237c494096bada8e
c9459e6659286ba98256d99774af4a481d1df432
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSK' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
ac83428990a91bd53f9f74063cd3fb5b
a9c2db182c0bc0d060cdb25ef2c091bff0a61ef1
describe
'117607' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSL' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
226d0f0922a9f970c5d7abef08e00e24
6ea6a6eb53d960ae6cff954efd44ee4527d4d327
describe
'18460' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSM' 'sip-files00140.pro'
21ad2649d6f8babb07b0f04c518b1309
d7bfced3175924aed958f57c04f6f50044239ca0
describe
'35508' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSN' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
d32ebe7c1adaca46122d2e59a111c5fa
6a6b73d806c13a718a91a3be58194ca767f09485
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSO' 'sip-files00140.tif'
70de5d429dc0b943aa7b07ef6abfc2ce
38682573f26810dfc04c52019b16cc60dbe4a288
describe
'816' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSP' 'sip-files00140.txt'
432696c47475bc87694e28ce9cbcd58c
ece12a38f6980a197eb08c02f5694688ef754361
describe
'9541' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSQ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
08fc488ecf6fa4eb71326d1d1c0e19bb
347a7dd423f759f0e38d937a542c5f0297d71da3
'2012-01-15T06:09:34-05:00'
describe
'360208' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSR' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
8e6dca318e0926357082dbe2c3322768
575846fce9150fdd3a10426ad005c1a66ebc64a3
describe
'106731' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSS' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
1be35e23420c69847d3c1ac338e27540
b3e0dde5fe5ad8b9081c2c5ba894a5172116cc91
describe
'32199' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKST' 'sip-files00141.pro'
9610c0b9ddd978c48e55826674e82647
dbc3d08eb9e4bb8ff6775c74e0f9447f42af3271
describe
'37053' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSU' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
c50bda14515dd2a8fc67ae2b4506d842
01865dfab892a196e87a1fe9d83ccdc25e8057cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSV' 'sip-files00141.tif'
dc646e992ff71d0bae9ae5a28b1a4043
afcd7b97ff8fb6a1c88b63f4d569ee1c17299010
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSW' 'sip-files00141.txt'
55b9ed700d722ae23c3ae29cc0ed050e
dfd8a67966242d815e67151fe3e7b4b0c33c13a2
describe
'10158' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSX' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
779f851b3c329500db0c23c4d24ac782
4d3dea7c2fa475eaea0e07e22c45c57256feee6d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSY' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
738f8a4321769e8619f3cc9e6815fdcb
34c5906a6a3233028eead0e8c6e2d70c1e5bd8d6
describe
'114968' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKSZ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
3daff484391c341aacae8a13fef9afce
9c329fd6871635aa39e45a15b7aead9a11175aa0
describe
'34411' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTA' 'sip-files00142.pro'
8a0f7b51804f2d84266d3dd0b198a984
822d41464f3e60a3a003a4b451acf527068f9951
describe
'37617' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTB' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
d15ac8c4e718ae17afbeab20e2a5100c
d1e87ecf7808f55bc1ad729ac5541979f6792275
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTC' 'sip-files00142.tif'
b96d3313fe0fd4d3e351a806a3bc1401
3077bdb84eed4785def3432cd7ed277375435c1f
'2012-01-15T06:09:07-05:00'
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTD' 'sip-files00142.txt'
6055041ccd1ac7754cc354167bbff129
3bcb7bc034d297636ea747bb52574c4f0860850f
describe
'10221' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTE' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
c18a72bb705cc29eaec646dad24ede72
a55568fe54254fb6de44938b71cd32bfe4eec554
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTF' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
1391ec3b9228adee90320d58c78060e0
739d2b3565f38d005274dbf4d1dfd1194d449ecf
describe
'105339' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTG' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
1224dc5f0fd6faa4cc952ff26a80f361
1fdd327f7300feaf2f90edf1175f8adbbcb8458d
describe
'29890' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTH' 'sip-files00143.pro'
6f7103bd1786fdc39db08bd2593185b5
8fe6f90d8d7aedc67a7c4834b2db0c1e3489d34f
describe
'35717' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTI' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
6de93be8bfc3c834f58669c5a8ae3bc2
83d0af7e2aa583dcadd7902ace09a23ca550bb2b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTJ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
e6fd8094737d17988c07a05e418210aa
1b477c8367b24986fc79d54f96458f6bc064485b
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTK' 'sip-files00143.txt'
07532e272a15e75c59e16721c0c381f5
f711e59bc356578c07570b53dc72818a415842cc
describe
'9476' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTL' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
9b404629c7348de6045a380dd9b56c1a
6128250012252b574d4771e7edebb4ea8c4ea67c
describe
'360256' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTM' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
3ae2ba1c075ec034d2ab0250d9ad7ddd
e9a4c8ad36437f1cbe731d7495863b0150543fcc
describe
'111792' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTN' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
ec8f6da20a8ef53acf22bc92777ad99f
720d60d6e85661473b5ef9bcaf9e27275dff91cd
describe
'17140' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTO' 'sip-files00144.pro'
880f966d0a63b143764e660befc82ae1
ad9763a7fc8238f17ea2a88a61acc91e76273339
describe
'34433' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTP' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
1acc951810513a4b2122ba7af85b2685
a7f0a4ac75b3db5af8704f050c6eefcfd28aef3e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTQ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
2411ff438322adae2b68a400bbb2d68e
f3fe3bb35c75cf4804972d021cdc5cbf2ffc2901
'2012-01-15T06:06:59-05:00'
describe
'759' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTR' 'sip-files00144.txt'
b8cf761798b2be828cb25a37db131ae5
d29b75eac12cea4d34ab5ba278f5ecf7171dc239
describe
'9096' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTS' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
3b4ed2fce7b3115d166b901d2ea47496
d4703c3fa2fded6591711ab841dafd84850d9883
describe
'360254' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTT' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
c45d2bef460a65b88b52187f0a6bfb28
3846a043dd43db93aab3d41a6ec1162428ace27b
describe
'115080' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTU' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
60f773afe0a65fe30f59ba63f35e8e7c
fa2944e71b1ce9cb4a428a466dc561f53db08385
describe
'33664' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTV' 'sip-files00145.pro'
a84869d8b88fe4b3c8d4b0bf61f10768
95759abe400a8e7065addc0a045b7bb46421f14a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTW' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
70670ca23374c637f506ae7bdd12a32e
291fbabbd5ebab94af25bcbe6ee2dd3ad0bc7006
'2012-01-15T06:08:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTX' 'sip-files00145.tif'
d5d2281ecc4522ca997ba559b92a0fb1
095fefa13104fa8a3ce931bd652d0fd23961660b
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTY' 'sip-files00145.txt'
fdf7f97311ebcf3bbaf693ceb1fdb8a3
ec02fb108ab8a95411a530e0b2abfb6966a6fb82
describe
'10513' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKTZ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
50840bd2500ff820fae1b6aadbb69b0f
d36d99c26f2bc3f2c1a46fbd9a9cbe7ba123a108
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUA' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
c2bf2da743bb179742616714063dc13a
b31bfa3d3c83404d62746aafb9d461a78f71741f
describe
'113724' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUB' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
912ea81c33ad583efd2114a7981830db
17184e6fe53583d905fad5628b4c8e2e34774782
describe
'32968' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUC' 'sip-files00146.pro'
4b997767bfc1574ca1f2bcbf7240a17e
d5bd43602bfdfccc13ddca643ab56cb3631e4744
describe
'38552' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUD' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
d25a9e907f929d5d4983fde918b5db7a
7eec45e890ea62d4cc3d325e35e88a75f95500ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUE' 'sip-files00146.tif'
2df2f9899d3b01432a9e1a2e006ba762
9de736d99bc721c77e6a169bba53e584fa7326c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUF' 'sip-files00146.txt'
72be5d09d8001d52251fc69e2ea8d48e
f8f311c0b5ac98f98751ffc87e4590fcc5866d06
describe
'10512' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUG' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
5b56dd9e3c88d24849a3def5b7a3348c
78ab3552d0dc59dc7b01449f783f646fa398d4cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUH' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
c59467d3667b91bce626a2427c43c3d0
44e1a993d419c48d7c20fcffcb6ed8c21f7000e7
describe
'90532' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUI' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
06f494b7f56a0cb932995051bf5675dd
46c68aad9d4aaf0e43a1a6f491a198cced775d15
describe
'23392' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUJ' 'sip-files00147.pro'
1f33a842a4e4003348040de59533b90f
599c949262390d14b9bdf1195cc8fea9dd5c556d
describe
'29091' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUK' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
8e3f5deef0036dcadf06ad5eeadf59c9
bd625173a61e9a7e140038fd42819164abbefa21
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUL' 'sip-files00147.tif'
c80d124405e2afec08b1d70e85f91bfb
176ebb9fc628bdaee96bb5465fd3183de0cce305
'2012-01-15T06:08:56-05:00'
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUM' 'sip-files00147.txt'
c3b6e360b17de580986024a275ac829f
c041300cff6126a94b97d01b7936e304aab29b9b
describe
'8835' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUN' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
20b5b9a7e9faf3a7706ed4b649d11379
b032d4934a38a1c6dda161cab8909207ddb87316
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUO' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
e657b3d7a9f7ce8cd2b1f73e358c4185
6c2e4790f1f235492c6487c9bd815c63c707f92a
describe
'120933' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUP' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
ac39ad005567ab60fc3b32f6dbe88494
08e3d5be8da690f60d8b4f21861e57591ab9845b
describe
'22511' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUQ' 'sip-files00148.pro'
a6cf4926fe63cb565ce8a81164dbb7d3
50482826e765d02d4d308eac721cedf9cb17e821
describe
'39398' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUR' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
961d2404a2743520b808020bbd8617e9
15111705d20a54b049a56200c4d28cddce7cd9ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUS' 'sip-files00148.tif'
6de9a494f56ca504867dac0a0b305c9b
74986bb534786588f0fe63b8bb5b0ddefa14fb22
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUT' 'sip-files00148.txt'
a45897ab1d468f50ed6eeba9532ee99e
945d1d48c5233521d171d3f4cbb90fb12eecc342
describe
'9930' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUU' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
5b7140cb054ba2c0ee00934d62fa363b
98c54e389b4099b6441aa80c5be92ec5ae9345c4
describe
'360227' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUV' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
e8174fad4d061b0562241b0b6626195e
bfbd85becd1ca442227c35e5029ff96a8e841e1a
describe
'109444' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUW' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
df6d8828422061fa86be760fd0d017cf
d10e8ee16b59f4581307f443196f7f4c6a00e090
describe
'31811' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUX' 'sip-files00149.pro'
9e565c42f88875e380ca233232581222
a192ca36040fc73cd2b2a36d11f440a665c2357d
describe
'38579' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUY' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
021659b6e28e453f792607406529b51c
1534cd930808cfd75780f2b586872ca4304e189e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKUZ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
96b96f5cc02b627a22ce754b7ac9e598
46ed199571530b6b9db8611ce48d6862423d6171
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVA' 'sip-files00149.txt'
878afb3895fb3bc9bcaa7680c8ed7f62
a10ba09471614c82aa667b70f6fde985490a7ce5
'2012-01-15T06:09:13-05:00'
describe
'9970' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVB' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
649cce087acb8f871f15074d22c964e2
c8710009e087d1fcb60b698e1c326baf3b07056c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVC' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
064ab6cf859e0008d221caf219a7e8ee
3932402c59546738a8a0179b9df210441b5d40d9
describe
'109536' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVD' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
a072ccb4929db0e2697228b0cdd65749
bbc8bb9ff023f6a05e0a53dab0994cb0f78a36c8
describe
'31763' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVE' 'sip-files00150.pro'
661a967dbb4e7da09fa261f5e129a588
948e23d10804449fded385c4faf7dddfbcfae1c2
describe
'37975' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVF' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
7e953e8dcd9e86e517b01b3009a3e77d
2fa7494db8f9cd13818c0e37ceacbe8f2d2e40d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVG' 'sip-files00150.tif'
c8b444c4a2d662943bfc88a95f14eb90
e65238a75947e5b639274ef67708aedce41d58fd
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVH' 'sip-files00150.txt'
4a201a83c73175ea7ec3110701b7fb35
47ad0165556ec5b51e5747e468bfd763b0bd4119
describe
'9704' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVI' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
8ed0eea1dfa5129a7e1829c1f310b203
fa1ba2d638fbacbd937ac4e292050c5ce8aaee99
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVJ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
21781adc6763b17256cd535ab95ed412
7e3ce86e413d2d7ba841ec5b4748a038262977ca
describe
'119554' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVK' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
5dbc4c9272bd5abc3f10b18145d65da1
1c8d25f26be840324f45d834d1cffb0ffb7ccea2
describe
'33920' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVL' 'sip-files00151.pro'
74b7b6bcade4f123eaa4be1cd2c68eb9
a582a891724b415beb58f2eba73f890e555077db
describe
'41564' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVM' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
63325c16002724022270f2da5e1cfb53
f1c9867dcc699302a73775b79d8403e9d2943751
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVN' 'sip-files00151.tif'
f30f2eefa4f03e37c1bb4a09416743b9
33ff2c4550fd8411d666df29113a4eb2a4e213aa
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVO' 'sip-files00151.txt'
7b139d2c981d1d893539aad2aaa07ab7
14e7e7ffd874c99d6da3be22652d417ea61f600d
describe
'10600' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVP' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
83da084bd9df9ee5abff177a62de4bc5
abe0a7c02658c43a9f9de1f2c94401aa9fcfc494
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVQ' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
5c5d1192483dccf7981603ac3a461d40
957add2c8e42ea5cb28a5e3f50e0d43c85b19901
describe
'119152' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVR' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
3ae75a983a4c9b4d5c3cceac2126cb8e
12870f7c5ede07a13ab4f9194204a1444d40879a
describe
'20255' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVS' 'sip-files00152.pro'
e84e128c6da71b1a6705a0d3e7c77cb6
b9826aa9d005ce99bb05c47593d8f55fcac80e05
describe
'38153' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVT' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
36a8df1883554417efda438e7d2935b8
8b8215d9c290b75d0facd593bba5bb25ad81eb5a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVU' 'sip-files00152.tif'
2882cb64d3d53fca11ec37fe507aeecb
038ffe12390d4635fe3b46b9790a7b745c579342
'2012-01-15T06:05:02-05:00'
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVV' 'sip-files00152.txt'
3fff8a0ae461151c969b4ef59a12f913
58eed3ba397c310038573d70fecca39cda669548
describe
Invalid character
'10500' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVW' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
4565a0dd9ef9668338620fd40b8059fc
caff2952adec2089e80904d65e3b93d3ce9c0005
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVX' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
4c8738d9c1de3cb19b4adb310076a4a7
a812dcebccb43cba48505a4ba2df1c6535d7009b
describe
'109922' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVY' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
4643ad4f9985498f6a8f2a85c10a63bc
a390a4757a4b2e8258b27be15e47b6067bfd8622
describe
'30486' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKVZ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
f3d2dab938f6659044d1f745169f25ac
0c86f306e824b340742c66268166233c8cffd216
describe
'39087' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWA' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
e525d17f4eb35e8387880fd8e260a311
0aee454382688c4d452c4dbead8c1f9c1830abe5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWB' 'sip-files00153.tif'
a79beca6c674f6296adb0afccb7d5623
06d44b4cfd484b3b407c41bbcb61aa80a3d317ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWC' 'sip-files00153.txt'
3bf4a5ef27c52dc23a3d64f80aace266
8b275c45e8d6944eea13c58e25db189fa5bfbd87
describe
'10300' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWD' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
53fcd16a7e3853407294c9c30237e3c4
b5cd1ed2607422eccae64a06a6044e765d717172
describe
'360220' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWE' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
1a42b23dbe8bec56cf6423d7b55ae8e8
af66e018f801b8957691a6c744527458759ba3b4
describe
'117751' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWF' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
b42dbea64820d2f22d5f4b43ff103291
3c70e964e10b398cc4ef5c1208f62d23e8c28b2f
describe
'33488' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWG' 'sip-files00154.pro'
d52b09ccb490d1ebbd984307d7a17255
70aa8ba2451118fdba5a1a15cb122f72f1acc962
describe
'41854' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWH' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
282371329d4b598b2ce9eaba661efad6
2d33c00e3c3b1f5e4036477f960642c74cd870bc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWI' 'sip-files00154.tif'
ae3783b80af6928d8da072f7abbf2d20
2e88d9454fb6db495befbdbb8120326786251b83
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWJ' 'sip-files00154.txt'
bc01f9396555f33b2bca4a7254d2780a
6ef923f72e180a51ef0ecf5c3a7b79ae33b7b1f9
describe
'10461' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWK' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
710cca1454d9ebb0e3fa0adca8813c99
73d6d4d540eef53055be33df8313e3f2cbc80f8c
describe
'360269' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWL' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
27607ac59c8a7e5bc7f907cf148efc08
bf220416bbd1ed144a55cca7085b77cdd538860c
describe
'110799' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWM' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
b206136d8eeea636cccbb30053412004
0a265c28f52023d0b9dc88c293144d1ff18aba13
describe
'31755' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWN' 'sip-files00155.pro'
ceb76002d616af03e33388488ff1c71b
cec404165d47c237ae8f7215ed1e11d7bbf65634
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWO' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
c69a04aaa1383e80fa59d8cbbe67a798
ded74ff7bb7ddf9b37ce809c65fbe96600309729
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWP' 'sip-files00155.tif'
5f4fb1ed5ff1855e6abeaa6a08345039
d2d4e36197fceee3d8c98750b2d5be7e25a5658d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWQ' 'sip-files00155.txt'
ce39015c65bdad6f8951e2af7af5ec09
12cd960d9c68d991bf3f9154f8a7abbfef640d6f
'2012-01-15T06:09:32-05:00'
describe
'10172' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWR' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
0f820ad0cb28af70463ffba1856d64dd
fdbd55073672861fd3af14cf0d0a5fe850d2a02a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWS' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
5cbe92252302f908691628af896cdfe2
670f855365e5b91d38a98b02e7b39e719bcdba28
describe
'99443' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWT' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
ed0734a98e0d1d1fe46fbef41974d91b
b0f95365b3b809b9f494ece924e23dfbc9608e5d
describe
'27958' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWU' 'sip-files00156.pro'
fb36301fd8c10cf7397a5507d6d8fa09
94000104fc0a9e9279ea5fbbe3675d2235f83997
describe
'36600' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWV' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
1b994d7d98e9a13e634826f7e0317628
1f535b5c9dc1d0fa89b94404be677966119fa21c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWW' 'sip-files00156.tif'
a35a2978f5f90ca302757e7670918dd5
da9a496823762ed07585b30b961967642832c455
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWX' 'sip-files00156.txt'
77ed450657053aa9613ce5cfe05209a5
8abc874f0fbd002e72fe9bc98ef590084178888c
describe
'9281' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWY' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
5554341bb28ef1c5db158ecac9a6c5d8
5c6ea3acae4cc91a3f0d567e60d7be9b8b638ccb
'2012-01-15T06:09:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKWZ' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
3e25fd4bc57903948d64ca7a26d12cde
dba39daced59755a835e77176d275b8cef892529
describe
'121369' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXA' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
e534aa38b40dae36af6bf1bc84cf75ce
d101c60cfacbd1eafa3363cd2c18789c1bfbb8ed
describe
'21987' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXB' 'sip-files00157.pro'
7d53afee59df6f657745db371a1107c6
61536530ae5f59ca90663193942335744c425d2d
describe
'37768' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXC' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
1799acf273a9dc1175b0f273f7f811b0
5b0112edf8e00e719b8fb0253851a5d7f99baf99
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXD' 'sip-files00157.tif'
2d0ebb82a89a6ae5dafe216eaafa473e
01a6cdda0d8d753b4ab452635d3f4ee58a8e555a
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXE' 'sip-files00157.txt'
41516df204c0427278f07194ac43a4f1
3c7a8efa1398d2937a1beb14d0c46bb7bd769f3f
describe
'10080' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXF' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
8a161bbdad037920f3e86adf9ae8016c
4814971b0126d05f703ad191c332bf0455ce462b
describe
'360219' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXG' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
75bc9d89c14f7c787bbce8b24d16b309
b736e75cb8cd7c4082e4f46eff6e162142b64d44
describe
'114904' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXH' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
e4441616190a8d1ed9a76a6af3b1dbd9
bca993a39749b671cee77e83a24185b21722dfbf
describe
'32938' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXI' 'sip-files00158.pro'
8919810fddd80d286b1d4c407cf49cf2
d9828d8cd31ea2878be2b9b24a1d2220814ec14c
describe
'38550' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXJ' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
a66541557bbf912a9075bb7a10339ffa
7fbcac2c88954ed5828925b1573ea3c1a69ccd07
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXK' 'sip-files00158.tif'
78293ea31faba4a120d4fc315736fc34
932e32001b199dea1e302162a751354c8f52cede
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXL' 'sip-files00158.txt'
4550660bb141b8b0ce175bcb40fd3833
04d0b52e84dd75c514e6ba18226983c500f60847
describe
'10194' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXM' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
73ff9158d37edc1e01d37527e1694a03
1157e03523751cc14835f791863a8b7c8bb0ea36
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXN' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
a0ae986a9992251712caadb374ecf20d
cd7bc0fe47a4d022a8e9d0dec77a174ba704f05e
describe
'111356' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXO' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
f14fd0bd2db3d3bda2905efd4b87d22a
e3e89aee4172eaed3def5604e38e158eeab6c41f
describe
'32040' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXP' 'sip-files00159.pro'
9c95ea3b5d7532f74f2f5d24357e204b
652e73d0d58a64f79f66ed64f6b1346e72dd26a7
describe
'37397' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXQ' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
ce4213c7420985f2363a34d9ac14a990
71aa480f308eb4503f92f6810af3f3eabe25b04c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXR' 'sip-files00159.tif'
9f35b26939530e55e0084b707c579843
26d1086391e888705d6592a36e58a41136e17332
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXS' 'sip-files00159.txt'
7afb8f88a09395b6497dd5ce227a7c63
b4c893a83b6c1b6546f85cf98bc88b4070c39209
describe
'10047' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXT' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
e49856a739b282e892ee07341a3d1f91
a8f9d8b365397c923d6e9b4b4624a08ee5a9b9c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXU' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
183ad0456cf5f5a43abac73021da664a
0c69300904e412724b9b02ffc1e809875508c0fb
describe
'114781' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXV' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
633fa20c328fea8cbfa293bcf63ebfcf
31c4313f41e86c234cb7c0e207444295258deef5
describe
'31619' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXW' 'sip-files00160.pro'
5c085ad4c229e980a3e1fb5e404707cd
713bce374b72354951a45e2737b3aaf3d18b741f
describe
'40035' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXX' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
cd2105cd952010ea3294c7477fb39fda
bddf0895c3e976aee40d04a6e903c7c5bcbc017d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXY' 'sip-files00160.tif'
bbbe43fca19867eec9df24d607d8092d
205e125c044902539c827e1f13f0fef60bb8181f
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKXZ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
f840ea85d2985b266fdc9e020a71de24
d725c9772d35fc70e8d7f86fd431ea3fe8836de7
describe
'10239' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYA' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
22fd31e693c62f98c15539d97ce9078e
9717630a2dc8a2c4848bd80901f41ee5b5cd9d3c
describe
'360270' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYB' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
7d2015a0cc465613e0b5244807e9dca7
2854cfe3d07a5cc80a031f08b1924db0b8f2f21d
describe
'93917' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYC' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
502378feea5a15d8caee21500b64409c
8a2360a80131850bc99841bd63832f8f32eeef4c
describe
'25502' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYD' 'sip-files00161.pro'
00a477ebbed6c98128b14c32f1c4f3d5
af8fd81582d2fad4c02b43567c768bc6865d4417
describe
'33324' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYE' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
30924ef2458ca06dfac7e9dca7feca69
d950feed546dec274e3ea7279db182d4a748ab1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYF' 'sip-files00161.tif'
bc895e24f474cc970db86d917a92fc45
6c998d341ea943b24f309baaec9b20e618a25a41
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYG' 'sip-files00161.txt'
d838925ee2e1da8bbe52a81b3a5cd975
f02309ff9e7e8640ca5bee2039f044f8d260b77e
describe
'8692' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYH' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
3b3dc0bc51105d3f6f7dc78b6f24ceeb
a8db2a03b0ea7e263f2f0e30d89f5d961d5a503a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYI' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
dfaf661823237d9818067468a6cc1d23
0fffdbb3eaa59f9b57f4eb5163f154ce3746b82e
describe
'115313' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYJ' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
e507e27b9d9bcf5ca0d756bf257e97ed
95b8bfb252a8d4b41dc8b64ce8c2e1e2e916f2e3
'2012-01-15T06:10:45-05:00'
describe
'33085' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYK' 'sip-files00162.pro'
a092bb5cdeec66e6cfe102940ca8de1d
b74bdeefa4d6ed313fb011dbfca9e7dbe1166baa
describe
'41846' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYL' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
62c6d0dd609f2479f6e2673e18431116
ecdedaf944b6d7dc659d5702049118979c6a72b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYM' 'sip-files00162.tif'
fd5d03475bbeba8d383c4b52010e0f99
3006b1bc97a28f2045a41bbcd0e42282c7f4818c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYN' 'sip-files00162.txt'
fd2fdf867b0a2e2b9cd2a95c516db273
68885900702f2f8e4214ec01d94849767f9dfc70
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYO' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
f370a52ee292214666748fea8f474362
6b6675b92622de8d9a1e20d0c39ff0c896d4204e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYP' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
ec3e178d6ef44c688cef04e956c94193
1a90f855b1f2b0bed29ec9487a33118c0753bc63
describe
'108771' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYQ' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
1f322a8e79ca250c17a84c28e9012c72
5461796ef4520f5468ee0e958c2f7122c7b842b3
describe
'31784' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYR' 'sip-files00163.pro'
0a2b5dfb6f6c5d1a1976ccaba02041c4
3fa327d5d1b48c72f11d0115d991f2cba27903f6
describe
'36872' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYS' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
5f31c056fce303bebb3704cbe0ab1f42
6c550c09ff27ee5c2e93f04613ed52e3e0616754
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYT' 'sip-files00163.tif'
f6f3e56850c63a93c216137be2813e6b
ce8a09b22c8b78ac439e815effca31755520a123
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYU' 'sip-files00163.txt'
ec01a292aa0bd97908e31dcccaf0c47f
27de9e75481f1827554f8d46d0256052dbfd5ace
describe
'10214' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYV' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
aacbe8836341203d38182ecc839a31fb
cddfb0d49eace9bc5f8c8622a0700e4dc4c90b37
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYW' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
d88ff215d54c9f497f5d737fe841917b
ad14e7792902cd55f8c088f19cb7571d47afcb68
describe
'97846' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYX' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
3973026041e9435d0fe6a18edabd7ddf
73fd988d1122fc007550e1a788b1fe72f84cf385
describe
'26509' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYY' 'sip-files00164.pro'
4d0872a42faea871564a88844d64a68a
81a5884b1c17040f2a6246dbf41d3a76045e5488
describe
'31402' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKYZ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
3d490bd83b5c1a31bdf862874567a58c
2ed4cfe0fe96a1da62f1ea46db82ca2fdff4c0a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZA' 'sip-files00164.tif'
9d94c5c8156d1527d3b5eeb4a945c174
94765c197b0fe5c6fc7cb53209b51184515575bb
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZB' 'sip-files00164.txt'
8590d05238c38abef43ce0c843b3f02c
301f3f35c23013af032a6040ddb42b7e95c21317
describe
'9237' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZC' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
79483c0738d06b3fbd7fddf2f1a74daf
a3de382cd0587b59f85a9764dc96b3363b533f7f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZD' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
0927fb1a47c48937f03806979ce0a09e
132bd698f6c0a3985520262ddfc0a36b8747c7c2
describe
'117372' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZE' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
51721165d4b7340c344b88b4570cd5fa
9e8aaa95c728c549db8dc0b5b82ec665dbc9bb1b
describe
'32469' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZF' 'sip-files00165.pro'
10c4acaa910f39ee93680ca3cafab787
779e5d92d2fbbdbb52ec4887f5f1a0087f42e123
describe
'41063' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZG' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
7fd39682bcb6abf23d7458c97a9dcdfc
8a741ab349d5fd973083a2ac0e10903b30775ad4
'2012-01-15T06:08:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZH' 'sip-files00165.tif'
a38029ac2eca6017a3d8313d621e3327
ed3b744a084ff43955a11b1bf72d8a63bc4daf86
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZI' 'sip-files00165.txt'
c30a14c1e677a7b95a8122ffccdea18c
d2b965767cd07f52c6cea7018375444edf72a400
describe
'10760' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZJ' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
15410491bcd33bf89ef038d195062e64
0fd91e342d64d367dc5ecf5c6b4c5e20c18c6b4c
describe
'360190' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZK' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
737c30d01216cc0266481ba4d8b2a325
021a8f08fd0eaf61e2e33acc98a1a2b0d43e21c7
describe
'116689' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZL' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
c9cd85af42b91369720d09b452dcd45e
922714dd9422d9022d152ab8f1982fa92854c79c
describe
'22593' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZM' 'sip-files00166.pro'
25f0f0abbb23811879fef1f72609eef4
e168694922bc4865bd6ee6e961019a2126a502be
describe
'39802' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZN' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
9fb5cc8e178738bd86ace4e77deeb954
b4c3d6a361e2ac28de73ea0d8322b06d56688b97
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZO' 'sip-files00166.tif'
4abaa86b053a0f11f80f09e2361f55c3
f51e89e3348fd0135a3fbceff967e6d706f16cee
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZP' 'sip-files00166.txt'
c02f2b7c1af97d28ec093d70f16bea39
36beb31249e6c08aac0104769ee15e2557ab237d
describe
'10430' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZQ' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
54e860807f85f24959fceed69104416d
9f269c1cae03adbfe728ae0769c9b167e306f107
describe
'360246' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZR' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
15df401866aeee9f9ff8fa4abc942741
3827e7785cf65389296680022d719974b9661774
describe
'114311' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZS' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
bda02eeb602869006a9b5b51d0fa99cd
606f99c407ac5f53c30640b16d9f99e418bf7ef8
describe
'32297' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZT' 'sip-files00167.pro'
3ebe01d9249b0dd2b98ad3c7d6c932fd
33396d949bc7e4a6445d8689c05c367e60f07e55
describe
'40965' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZU' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
26272077e4362c6b1347c271b2aedd93
23c4132730c360067ab54f24e4cd21a142cac4bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZV' 'sip-files00167.tif'
150a1eb03fd1c36942b8aa9aa8b00daf
424b150eebb4148850111940166e53762e23967d
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZW' 'sip-files00167.txt'
90ca764d2a22c2be3743e2e77efab49f
525428a2641c8dea2d2b176bdce9b5374892fb05
describe
'10494' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZX' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
fcd63b5b3c82c129e3b8b94265b4513d
456344be2b6b34dfba7a1b0b6129bde6c924b6e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZY' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
eb9721cb9cb9f9caec15eadb17f3e97c
6f74740136a9070a7013c48f7f8dc2de518b4e24
describe
'88038' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACKZZ' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
c9e06bf160c103aee46810f05082b99d
b42def838430d9d508cad43a3c3c2b0d062e3cc5
describe
'23964' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAA' 'sip-files00168.pro'
d0bfe48d5e7b4455193cb7f492627d76
883fcaf99e73c002187b66905316b593a9100203
describe
'29166' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAB' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
49fbeace069cef8d46875aae9240cbf9
42c95c8bf472fdf42d3d0970e48c8c58e63149e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAC' 'sip-files00168.tif'
4ee9c3f1f5b9dce8479ec2af4f7214be
31f9e75985257685b445a46cb1652a3661a00272
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAD' 'sip-files00168.txt'
cd8f1ad571105d0b2fe597c638719daa
edd8d9c32cc570b980f51cc4aba745072cf414c5
describe
'8317' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAE' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
a63011b487c1b7f34e40ed97663b1dab
ebe032687cc71446c11dcfce78c5284dc99825fe
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAF' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
5526eca75d896d68129612b25e33eda9
588828c395a143bfb4f482722db837013afd7b1a
describe
'113327' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAG' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
dac6a8931380ddac46ca00633250193e
261c12fcdd32495ffc41663ed3544380c8ab1bb1
describe
'31988' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAH' 'sip-files00169.pro'
324084de5fe31d7146a7aae8909d118f
33ac96c452e48d08c757f6e4aacdde1dc3aa42ca
describe
'38971' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAI' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
f223b5930ce3dceab791d11212a720fb
3c0afee0f454e590f70337da769d072b55330740
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAJ' 'sip-files00169.tif'
168e71fe0e4a7f7e523459a7fadf4771
61e509ee22af157fc5158ae5cb12c1a2b2f29dd8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAK' 'sip-files00169.txt'
119f05ad59fa3c6cc15133290864b9f6
8216f092c1819c8699575ed811ea27aa2d0adc8b
describe
'10556' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAL' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
49be94789713d5f4e6b9591972b82001
fd69a502c48d4b9931a88bc16cbc91f9d1c73ea3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAM' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
bad471abdcb7db3a3c3747c7d2f1d803
8a5ede274086e971c15c8fcda9806d34b2b6d91c
describe
'109606' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAN' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
a47f643f1c8fcf729a86ee8a15dd49ac
e7d328fdee59bada5692ea8d9b1606cdfb05eb34
describe
'31492' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAO' 'sip-files00170.pro'
ea80ccfbf282e381088c58f7a746ec84
200fce1746187f753e348aa600ed9db388e76a4d
describe
'38771' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAP' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
bc00a25c0001b9262e8345151c45e0da
2c37201cce0e85bf04be486f01d53db0874489bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAQ' 'sip-files00170.tif'
3b5ef4b085427142e1b1a1377a440013
deec20ea1d7d740a3b268681d67180edad4389a6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAR' 'sip-files00170.txt'
3980746517b81612f6406e5be09f3ded
192cbff261bc584edf2360ff7e13f27f8c26ec85
describe
'10135' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAS' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
e24e0717e750fd43962e3b368e3834d5
47fd82f3fb9c0e269431fe6a8dd6f887247d6d0f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAT' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
8152569acb750fd2a4574b70c32a30d5
a8dc52de9f849392db39c571005fcd84cb44c377
describe
'116863' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAU' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
6aada226c5735ae421a023638fb1d43d
cfae72add1b5a2dd2ad301f47d6e2ee6a4ffe872
'2012-01-15T06:08:39-05:00'
describe
'22352' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAV' 'sip-files00171.pro'
c9662d929bc37bd0c77b1ce8952cfb4f
0034835d3e2a22b1fa42cbc2165a0b3ba0b6cabc
describe
'37629' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAW' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
cde79075a23ff29a78116ddba7a59899
46eb51443a09c47e6bb620a08becedaba0e1a296
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAX' 'sip-files00171.tif'
f62a2e1496321d871eb077e154faa657
98967702ed42c59e993c50c8292d69d951e2215b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAY' 'sip-files00171.txt'
def982cd387a4dedb50ab5dcaaf98c70
66a4df1d8abe87d2945705a49dee4e808d8c4092
describe
'9870' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLAZ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
e8d6092a7e18385cce3c0c7d40325334
c7da5e6a6e98544f69e4a2d3ffd0b648d7e179ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBA' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
2ac00cf7e915ae57c63a4dbef9e5b590
671e60a0cdfb0f1b96f33c34b971819fc9dde9c3
describe
'112864' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBB' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
706606c4ee3e5f55c07360a05bddb234
10ab96d03fb699f9d594a11ae0c793a65cc2189d
describe
'32231' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBC' 'sip-files00172.pro'
4f64c54c36a9fa3e1cc2137b6675619f
f0271653ead9b025c2205af21e5559fe044c145e
describe
'40358' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBD' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
6cc2c5cacf5c46924ca1fa6bc1c090ea
b188f6a3c7f7309f3179549b9ec5eab33a399763
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBE' 'sip-files00172.tif'
acbabc642958391a51ef810631dcf66c
ad8cfab2e8d0d98cced3c8320fff8a32762d12a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBF' 'sip-files00172.txt'
ec9feedbf9281f5e8102deb933bb8ed1
fe394e9e80a3c857f4df89003f40ef72f9802ef7
describe
'10498' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBG' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
d8e57e572b29db817c2494ac243b7dc7
63aca2b770e6ebd85018a8784b9a55ab13d72ce6
describe
'360212' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBH' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
16398bc928cc05ef3d981ce273d68a0c
fbf4635a16e97f9137a93b66ec027b1132dfcc9f
describe
'43771' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBI' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
03fafef665f720cfeb68719208041eeb
897ba261b888d1f6b3b3e2a7b8a9984070209601
describe
'10964' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBJ' 'sip-files00173.pro'
3da008a61ff6414d503e7e8b29d385f2
8d169bca088dcdced8a8bf1839374c7154366c49
describe
'13251' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBK' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
4fa18c2594a9dd5a2d01c06fb72a8a00
25dbf89dca13dc22a50dd2d93f16733f03355812
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBL' 'sip-files00173.tif'
ba4f87b20f425cd29b08cacca10ba473
05338c43c1732e27163095a205f8c1d9a404e5f1
describe
'481' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBM' 'sip-files00173.txt'
b19906044e44efe8d8190a1b130d58f8
2f89b70649438389db4b2bb187393a880f83cfb7
describe
'4098' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBN' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
83b9b3c3bd48a16dd416192cd2a66630
db5129b41f29aa0950366ff0581db9072792451c
describe
'240915' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBO' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
dd44edb5bfe994b7cdb88c479855acbd
604f52c0e56577baa90b8a892612ada04067b0e8
describe
'8944' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBP' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
eff2b8c0fe627528fa9ba73eb76faffc
6e8fe66e565eefcef6b0a8dda2b02bb1369508f8
describe
'2445' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBQ' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
95a835361e96c8c9704a0322bea311bd
882f0d6a655b4c66bd3988bd36d4f9a1c44505af
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBR' 'sip-files00174.tif'
204a736308e35244b2d607da60de7c8e
8983b1145809f8256584c0583ac75206817b75d6
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBS' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
60f53440697996e47edf311c98cb4634
2ade55efc65721d0d0db813575cac9428579701b
describe
'360206' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBT' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
b7bf5abcc51a8573712da4065951b0ef
98303b24113dde434db3bd7112e1527866f6a777
describe
'69935' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBU' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
706107d1c7a7b060d33b0e771fbebee6
4111878b2f53d232beffa57a94bca257769fb833
describe
'18575' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBV' 'sip-files00175.pro'
e7e21b0ef805e9dc7b45a3177d6bc4bc
5e82f8921db74610866aca08c21b0efdd3fa4fab
describe
'23871' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBW' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
4c8d7ec579253ca693a4f8637b510b33
1f32aa991d6c3389f4ab701dde0f887aefae7434
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBX' 'sip-files00175.tif'
baaaeb00a84204f599913abfa9e06710
25b8be1d96bc674f62531282e5102ba0833e756c
describe
'802' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBY' 'sip-files00175.txt'
de3fd42c15365b616b4cdd45b6cc8716
a3418dc51e9675e42fa7f9457e9534af82aefe5a
describe
'6734' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLBZ' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
f064fe24c2f7baccc813d24c1e0e2755
3635e1f22c532386d6243029b0cd1727a91c0bf9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCA' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
d9db44ce8ba7efb17a81a594eb4fbd02
b06ce44e4f173ef9ff2655ba5f7ab3afffe01e7b
describe
'87412' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCB' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
f87659df25de468c4fecdc296ae70519
c414399587da72b20a67446654a8e1f15466d6d9
describe
'23591' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCC' 'sip-files00176.pro'
fb5e6727cb4b7febf7c491ee6a8eae61
7f665f844e0b587bb5135ece3680e8046bb340bc
'2012-01-15T06:09:30-05:00'
describe
'29019' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCD' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
b8f1def36f4f6e4a9f98da3d6b42ee0e
fab661dac229c955691eb6828a8dbbcd91e8bfa7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCE' 'sip-files00176.tif'
b727acd77c09bd40ce2cbcbed0014418
cec13fa27dc9d5b9c42b42c1b88b75c2495ada5e
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCF' 'sip-files00176.txt'
15257d183f5b40444429e955d8fb1475
c33826bce6731996289093f1beb90a8fbb218e00
describe
'8471' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCG' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
8cddaab13920f774a2863b8516e1f23e
76f8916be3090528831be2cfa8e5ca056ff3c823
describe
'360241' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCH' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
7c164b84fbe0eef35628902481a66fb5
fb4742402d7fccafb07ec219b7adb8b4ee97b2f6
describe
'101234' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCI' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
2374622e59732aabc0fa4493aead0db3
ff79a547e43d7aed44530004834f3d544e11231c
describe
'27624' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCJ' 'sip-files00177.pro'
1e06e91b0d2c4c266b28280dd0d3f85b
494ce2c2db130e9a226baa052e834bde05dc2947
describe
'33956' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCK' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
e5163bed0338e5caf4dcddafd453def0
b861e28785efcd0023e4a82686688e07f063a047
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCL' 'sip-files00177.tif'
efee5911357e471cb79982c612ed24e6
51d6e8ca72923d7c012ef15a67778da69b0f96d9
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCM' 'sip-files00177.txt'
85c4a62f9032b5911ef1e15404db11ac
b5c855f02bdb41f10e06926fed082d9cf3d979aa
describe
'9001' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCN' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
2d34d1fd483b4ae7e8da2162ff6ef371
9b329d849d011fa2dd64b1debe6d6e375414154b
describe
'360278' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCO' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
d8dfeae45e596a36ad4b7ef1d901da2d
b4967c150e9aeaf4b8175baa251427e3c2a138db
describe
'85480' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCP' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
84fb4fb84d4dc1b2306232996f644e48
1fcf3eadff85067fb96844297956befc0666ffdf
describe
'23867' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCQ' 'sip-files00178.pro'
159c9f2f8d5b7f2d6fe10a1bff8efcab
10484151ccf6ef8ecb1edd73f7fdf30744086ecf
'2012-01-15T06:08:31-05:00'
describe
'29619' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCR' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
d6bafa468886f4ede264d4a40878455c
03d5bfc98a68b5113666d0e429335e4c246149a0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCS' 'sip-files00178.tif'
e16a859e2fc13b6ba7a2e56d4d8525cb
4a954ddc17d8423862c2d3152baf3e47a220d2fb
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCT' 'sip-files00178.txt'
91434890f02f7ab33dd7ec6248971a1e
226c57a692e31cb098dde6a04626cfc149702333
describe
'7919' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCU' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
83c7fa2c8837a1ac49b7f3a679681054
ee47ecd68efc15666ff13c3eeee1e8140bf063ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCV' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
ef3a28b0eab22f194e814421596d2319
322e2cc7e14d7db67820c5be4410c3b25610107b
describe
'86874' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCW' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
de8c8831c66f06562ac7294fa6c24202
3d2301a0636a29c4b9d9d3a026512e7592976777
describe
'23851' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCX' 'sip-files00179.pro'
57a20ca255f59b1e71e2ca18ea3330bd
521b69b51355bd673e290fcf026995240cb517f4
describe
'30163' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCY' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
03bad8809db03c75303f1b176f91e410
3f3fcae88d1b363c7d03606e3b279ba954b52bc1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLCZ' 'sip-files00179.tif'
c5e9c766a13acba0ca2eea73e6f19a0e
2bedcc0c813833f258d3c9cf1ff70f45b33f18f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDA' 'sip-files00179.txt'
81f201bd9eab07e3d6aa0bc3096eb745
586b256cac2fc4527089dea2682a2996baf1f4d1
describe
'8170' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDB' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
2d61d747077555bd766cbb40b4f72f1e
01f648706ce994aabdb4b41f6a83a8fa79f8eb24
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDC' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
81068e49fce3c2c51abb15fe69c2419b
e9d47008f18906221a2c518bc57783b65c704bf4
describe
'103001' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDD' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
fbe710b41126d3c960d054a444ed713e
b349bfb83a7f42e5ec127260fd77d59459b7fbd7
describe
'28507' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDE' 'sip-files00180.pro'
dd25ea63b7bd1195e42cb1348e5a4aca
cfaf3e5c2819421509d130307d9ed8d31544a272
describe
'36961' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDF' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
04c32bccb818ebc8ba4756ddb58edade
00661a5ef38dcc07a070dd6cd60d3ba5cf37d91f
'2012-01-15T06:09:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDG' 'sip-files00180.tif'
a9976f9cd3bb5d23af28e68e96b18c98
ba1c7caa446bf17049860e303024fee4446687b3
'2012-01-15T06:08:55-05:00'
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDH' 'sip-files00180.txt'
bd5f93d4840e2b04e87a2fe6a981a2bd
b9c9e78f23268ea53c845a0225b6322dfc444e29
describe
'9544' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDI' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
24a7cb08d8baf2bb7bb603d2434ac034
37b77fb562404cb55d16760200c06489c428efd0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDJ' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
b3b8f415042c8336cffe11b83d3cc42c
6296bde650a16da336c045633c52996de86d8b08
describe
'86683' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDK' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
c2630e4c6555d3d1d8ebf7e359876de5
35aa5e1f698dbac3a31c1a7d79822e07a6f8c21b
describe
'24149' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDL' 'sip-files00181.pro'
509a4fd6d18baf883c09b1fc8db3ffc1
8b477d8b8fbb045869aea85108da12f1dad1a1de
describe
'30711' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDM' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
1c66cc51733002efd7c2a28804b2dc53
40c44b98977f73ee6aae5bd927eabda16efbac3f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDN' 'sip-files00181.tif'
625b33126fb32ac07b2d0f79a619d923
3f6c2be77ad5e8d17a87dfcec434c753dbc53fc2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDO' 'sip-files00181.txt'
1893614eeb7a4345c3921cfb3b4cd356
34316b83671e1e23d68c1491d0dc9db33bb7b444
describe
'8191' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDP' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
6eb36550ae449a4a7fd31f83dfcc280a
673fafd80f9b025ca9a8f60094dbc15a862d0a6d
describe
'360264' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDQ' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
0c7841a2affb2f5f84d3bf21d5290ec1
81fc6459ac0aab6c16b2aacc64194367e817b1c5
describe
'83985' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDR' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
e9a03b41831ef6cda6aa9b250ca26e4d
71761a7e024529bedbeeb122b4acc279429af27c
describe
'23554' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDS' 'sip-files00182.pro'
d5d698404eb9527f567c5037a11317c3
935d9e6a34bf3e03112b405c3e492e7815b16ed4
describe
'30405' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDT' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
331bb5bb5437370b729865ba79ddf040
4a961aa580f276504564e20878fcfa514a496d6d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDU' 'sip-files00182.tif'
3520a5c3a647c3e2fad518346abe74bb
5db225670accc9041f63b8de713a607c341ef56e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDV' 'sip-files00182.txt'
fb24912fc4e7f7cd3a77c8bf8641c3cc
32aae99e50e85f06a0df3ba6231aca91d7c8d276
describe
'8415' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDW' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
e54884d18bed3e154481e96c8c985aa7
de5755ac6df8b2f34ce430a7a724a2cb4198d2ea
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDX' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
5c5b36bb889768ce294b7f607dd1db9b
e90ca51b91a73150fb72e46991458f0636565def
describe
'101734' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDY' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
743b8d899b7e47aea7ed950560e573f2
8acde5648e8d697fb58483fd9979b10d6a8aa002
describe
'28809' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLDZ' 'sip-files00183.pro'
98120c1407da8fd7e40c10c15c5a11c3
8d950e54f06b4c9659e82776bb8068c4207f2efa
describe
'33363' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEA' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
be78b5da6dc0d6935e3f629ad9707317
776ebac8bf6631cc68cbbc79bcac3245ce924644
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEB' 'sip-files00183.tif'
db4718f8049efed134c3cf5f20189d95
b6144bb097b97913a0ed130eff6e19c4cf72fd23
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEC' 'sip-files00183.txt'
49390c18acebb7486e15fb0404f872cd
98e391f07e0d92b9e3c74954e017e339bb6b47db
describe
'9167' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLED' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
a33b3a0163b8967329e6704e7c2b142d
eed8650cea127b13d1a1f2b1488fb1b3761de064
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEE' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
ea59614203771ff5b4020927c426d7eb
bde10414b5c19d21eb700545e4b8ad218a6df3a4
describe
'86186' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEF' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
bebc95ee210dc992757092d738c3c7ed
47f7c944cd545c16d144a3ad5cb0385314e917b1
describe
'24533' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEG' 'sip-files00184.pro'
bacdeccd40d3d8535f14536e84e793e6
246ea55e17136b21774e605855912bc632b73e62
describe
'29000' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEH' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
421be50b9c1109eb58ebcf6c4a77731a
e47ea43b4c3aee71dcb064bf188666e011e77e6d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEI' 'sip-files00184.tif'
e713462586be5fb14b63d01da9bcdc1b
aa0d37b0401bfcf55ba3a86b0d27e664c15c4dcc
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEJ' 'sip-files00184.txt'
a8dea9d9ae77e24619088d4d4f1bbfd8
314de7992903223668eab1ecfb0fdd0c3d0ceb12
describe
'8165' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEK' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
8a88eb9e415b429cc3383096160e823b
9c37f61a60f27e4752e311beef4cca28d16556f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEL' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
f071f1132c5344054b63d733b2a630b7
435d88e87b66b9f12113af2ea34af64c1f6dd510
describe
'91365' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEM' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
ee0e9ac3e779e892bef81bcf1f5d8e35
2e1b4c6ba8a72742fe182b839cc6f841cd9e7941
describe
'25505' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEN' 'sip-files00185.pro'
251a3172f5c1a772ad66060a77a53c4c
a133d9149b67ec60caf5b9f53317ecfc3d77ea75
describe
'30337' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEO' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
ce57ecf35983aeae5d1e68042339f92d
b6bee28239f425d98f94e1a4dec3421f2b8af747
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEP' 'sip-files00185.tif'
6a9c3dbbc6ac6377b585bc17b39a7df5
55ad865a72e5b1c72bc47aad178de9b5e8e75975
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEQ' 'sip-files00185.txt'
4b2f9f70353b107bab7e1886243f0719
0d885060363a4a54ca8a6171b6893d9655b28189
describe
'8566' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLER' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
b56b49b4f7045b2f502f90552b7db4da
41df46f2853b1feb06d0b172c0ce976fb90ce6ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLES' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
20fd5b6906281179a4bafffca4d39dd8
f91bf8c9cd7c33434ab2df4a22b461a1d83edbb7
describe
'97461' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLET' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
e0b4eeea4a22b1fc390cecaa89f14c46
707b95cde0bcbd356c1615c2b2dde65d299e1760
describe
'27075' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEU' 'sip-files00186.pro'
c7dbd69e7775c039b0069de50b2ce503
495b1bfb41d75c39be8cc777016a1f92ace3c766
describe
'32649' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEV' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
765f0da8d4a9cf5c6d1ad9fd758f7564
4efbbd392cd2a66f03258bc1a0a67d8b9460799d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEW' 'sip-files00186.tif'
551a3363555bf725e6937bc4b9f38955
4f09f751f3c2d09ed2035a3d6bd56896224980b7
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEX' 'sip-files00186.txt'
527a05ddae80b58d150eb366c03a7ee5
531945ec85aebaa5ece7da034246e1a5b6cbdb71
describe
'9143' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEY' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
d541340987c3ac805af6358772840c91
3608a151a017f0b92f56abd778903c080c57cefd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLEZ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
601c94131feaee12d344a7b391338f55
92b997f63f242656006871df42cba56f8cf22224
describe
'38755' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFA' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
b389a3dc7e1f470e7d6196d2df05a92c
4ec5c93a81583cb6f9c2fe861e39d9ad3eb3b6fb
describe
'9495' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFB' 'sip-files00187.pro'
810812039a6ec3559c528a3c88a22950
c27fee8cc6ee88d20d3ed05756661362efb40761
describe
'12724' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFC' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
3213ac8b40a4e5b98df4534d305bafd6
5262c1dc66b15fd9a736590a04c8c7c033de3836
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFD' 'sip-files00187.tif'
20c4f376e9114d0de2b89056bebfd340
83f9480e676abb574aa1fea4f7dc527d2b090b7e
describe
'415' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFE' 'sip-files00187.txt'
934af576f8fdae75e7520ee1161504a9
3f23e390382aef0805702f810c3b78cf43564a93
describe
'3781' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFF' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
af48c0555513f8972198f01cc4a3f7f8
d0c07798416d623eaf420658329b02e9b8a7c0a0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFG' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
3ab1663c82baf3030faf737ac7d17b73
449c6e3bb0be7b0d3c8d3c9c0e802d030905c173
describe
'128250' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFH' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
d0fca71bba589e134975084f604cb164
30bc4683ace34869fdf4fcdb730bc0ceb5d14f85
describe
'72327' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFI' 'sip-files00189.pro'
2a75e7bc74a9d72172c711aa642430e0
7a9985f7d63dc92e7816a89ed41865af11d79439
describe
'38487' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFJ' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
b714e6cc77ce06c9ce613a695aa0874d
2e28de9fdc608535d9f49efd41d283baf8edefe2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFK' 'sip-files00189.tif'
225e55de3f37c374bb6bf22ad9cb9a7f
0abc7baa13ca0b60e02937828f1863b895c6035f
describe
'3200' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFL' 'sip-files00189.txt'
0b87313f299d7f004fb3143c68d8e17f
edd6096a07250ba68d11d2d8bc0379b6b3c0d832
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFM' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
817db6bba374ee28a35e1aef5279fd7e
5bc8a466a9a7a8a0ed63efe0a474a5cf4280a352
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFN' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
878affb2e8e34f244ed5f8dd67c72ebd
212bb4ebe5110fc9cfe827a4104fc7252a2776f0
describe
'134264' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFO' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
f61641d1297373f6f18b233dba9abcd2
dce70811015d875362555f88f64f7f0d023ee5a0
describe
'69432' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFP' 'sip-files00190.pro'
4ba40b033a20ff1d2783afc9ca3ee329
27b3516cfa7cfbf079c88beceeb3c99eef4f11f1
describe
'38587' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFQ' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
9968d6eb8001bc32c0496bfbfdcada6f
43892233ce489f1744e97dc92e09c54c74c747c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFR' 'sip-files00190.tif'
e91cfca825bd74efe4f78b9d77f08fa8
69f59b9bbd8846c9da5acf65da8ee7ab2766e6ec
describe
'3013' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFS' 'sip-files00190.txt'
34f8dd245f3cce1ac5b1e5cd9242dc02
4680696c6ab1128c364ee1533153d536949d98e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACIfileF20090316_AACLFT' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
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THE BUSYBODIES.


ature Readers.

Saco AND W AYoSEDIn:

No. 2.

BY

JULIA McNAIR WRIGHT.

ILLUSTRATED BY C. S. KING.

* $0 he wandered away and away
With Nature, that dear old nurse,
Who sang to him, night and day,
The songs of the universe.”

Lonereiow, Birthday Poem for Agassiz.

y BOSTON, U.S.A.,
D. C. HEATH & CO., PUBLISHERS.
1897.
CoryrIGHT, 1888,

By Junta McNair WRIGHT,

TypoGRAPHY BY J. 8. Cusuine & Co., Boston, U.S.A.



PRESSWORK BY ROCKWELL & CHURCHILL, BosToN, U.S.A.




PREFACE.

To tHe Boys AND GIRLS :—

In this book we shall together wander a little farther,
by the sea-side and by the way-side. Sometimes we shall walk
on the breezy hills; sometimes in the low, marshy places, where
ferns and rushes grow.

Sometimes we shall stroll along the way-side path, where the
wild-flowers and grasses are woven into a wreath.

Sometimes we shall go to the hard white sand, where the
ocean waves roll to our feet, and bring us shells and curious
treasure from the sea. Again, we shall go down to the still
ponds, where lilies float on the water, and dragon-flies swim in
the air.

Wherever we go, let us keep our eyes open, and our minds
awake, to the lessons of Nature. Then we shall be able to
learn what beauty and wisdom lie hid, even in such humble
things as flies and worms. We shall find much to delight us
in beetles; and be as happy as kings, while we search out the
secrets of airy hunters and marvellous little fishers.

J. M. N. W.
LESSON

I.
rile
TI.
Iv.
Ve
VI.
VI.
VIII.
xe
x
XI.
XI.
XI.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.
XVII.
XVIII.
XIX.
Exo
XXI.
KONI IE
XXII.

CONTENTS.

A Loox at AN ANT

THE
THE
THE
THE
THE

LirE OF AN ANT
Ant’s Home .
Ants at Homer
Ants on A TRIP
FARMER ANTS

ANTS AND THEIR TRADES

THE

Suave Ants .

Wonper ANTS

THE
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.

Ways or ANTS

Worm and His amity .
Earru-worm at Homer -
Worm at Work

Worm’s CorraGk BY THE SEA
Worm av Home

A Loox ar A Housr-Fiy

How tro Loox at A Fry

-Mrs.

Fry AND HER Fors

Or wHat Use art Fries

A Swarm or Fries

Some QurEER Fiirs

In Armor Crap

Wuen Mr. BeerLe was YOuNG

85
38
42
45
48
52
55
5k
61
63
66
69
73
vill

LEsson

XXIV.
XXYV.
XXVI.
XXVII.
XXVIII.
XXIX.
XXX.
XXXI.
XXXII.
XXXII.
XXXIV.
XXXYV.
XXXVI.
XXXVI.
XXXVIII.
XXXIX.
XL.
XLI.
XLII.
XLII.
XLIV.
XLV.

CONTENTS.

Sa mee

How to Learn asout BEETLES
Tue Rose BEETLE . . .
PRINCES AND GIANTS . .
Tue Lirrte SEXTON

Tue Srory oF THE STaG BEETLE
Mr. BreetLe SEEKS FOR A Home
Tue Litrrte Water-Mrn
Wurriicig BEETLES

Wuar a Fisoerman Toip

Mr. BARNACLE AND HIS SON

A Fisuinc Parry

A Last Look at Mr. Barnacle
FLOWERS OF THE SEA

Tue Lire or a JELLY-FisH
SEA-STARS

A Sra-CHANGE

Tue Star-FisH with AN OvERCcOAT

THE Frying FLOWERS

UNDER THE WaTER

A Happy CHANncE

Tue DracGon-FLy aNnp HIs COUSINS
Toe Wines or THE Dracon-FLy

Review LeEssons 5 ; ‘ : e

Pace
76
79
83
87
92
95
99

104
107
110
114
117
120
123
128
132
135
140
144
149
152
156

163
SEA-SIDE AND WAVY-SIDE.

—ofa40o—_

LESSON LI.
A LOOK AT AN ANT.

You have been told’ that an insect is a living creature
with a body made in rings, and divided into three
parts. Most insects have six legs, four wings, and
two feelers.

There is a great Order of insects which we shall call
the hook-wing family.

The wasp, the bee, the saw-fly, and ant belong to this
family. They are the chief of all the insects.

' They can do many strange and curious things.

You will know insects of this great family by their
wings. The front wings are larger than the back
ones. They fold back over them when at rest.

In flight the upper wings hook fast to the lower.’

If you look carefully at some kinds of insects, you will
soon say I have told you what is not quite true.

1 First Book, Nature Readers. 2 See First Book, p. 28.
aCe

SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

et

Why will you think that? You will say to me,
«The fly has two wings, and not TOUT ae Ene
ant has no wings at all.”

but wait until you study about ants and flies, and
see if you will then think the same way.

The mouth of all the hook-wing insects has two jaws

for cutting.

These insects have two big eyes, one on each side of

‘the head. Between the two big eyes they have
some little ones, on the top of the head.

You sce insects are as well supplied with eyes as crabs

are with legs.

The back part of an insect’s body is made fast to the

The
The

Get

middle part by a small joint, or thread. That is
because the insect needs to bend, or even double
itself up, in some of its work.

Hook-wing Order is divided into two great kinds.
insects of one kind carry a little saw. The others
carry a sword. The sword is a sting. The saw
is to cut up leaves and wood to make nice soft
nests or houses for the eggs. The sword is to fight
with, or to kill things for food. Among the saw-
carriers is the fine, long fly, called a saw-fly. Bees,
ants, wasps, and others carry the sting.

one of these insects, and you will see all the parts

of which I have told you.
A LOOK AT AN ANT.

—

Let us first take an ant to look at.
The head of an ant seems very large for its body, and

Oo

the eyes seem very large for the head. The third
or back part of the body is made in six rings.

On the tip or pointed end of the hind part of the body
is the sting. On the part of the body, next the
head, are set the six legs. These legs, and also the
feet, have joints.

The wings are set on the upper side of the middle part
of the body. The legs are set on its under side.
There are four wings,— two large and two small
ones. The upper wings are larger than the lower
ones.

Now I hear you cry out, “Oh, my ant has no wings!”
Well, let me tell you a secret. The wings of your
ant have been cut off, or unhooked, as you shall
hear by and eby.

There are many families of ants. Hach has its own
name and its own ways. All ants are very
wise in their actions. I shall tell you many
strange things about them. Ants have always
been called “the wise insects.” Would you not
like to learn something about them ?

Before you study the ants in any book, I wish you
would go out into your garden or into the fields.
Find an ant-hill, and sit or lie by it for an hour
4 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

a

or so. Take some sugar or
bits of cake to feed the ants.
Find out for yourselves all that



you can about them. Facts
that you learn in this way will
be worth very much to you.

—_00$¢40-0—_—_.

LESSON II.
THE LIFE OF AN ANT.

In ant-hills we find drone ants,
queen ants, and worker ants.
The drone ants have no sting
and do no work. Their bodies
are longer and more slim than
those of queens. The drone
ants have wings.

The queen ants also have wings.
They have stings, and their
bodies are round and dark.

The workers are smaller than queens
and drones. They are also
darker, and have no wings and
no stings. Workers are of two



sizes, large and small. They
THE LIFE OF AN ANT. o

are the builders, nurses, soldiers, and servants
of the others.

In an ant-hill there may be many queens at one time.
Often the ant-queens work. They are both
mothers and queens. They will also act as sol-
diers. The queen ant is not like the queen
bee, who will allow no other queen to live near
her.

The word “queen” may make you think that this ant
rules the rest. That is not so. Ants have no
leader and no ruler. Each ant seems to act as
it pleases.

The chief work of the queen ant is to lay eggs. Ina
short time, out of each egg comes a lively, hungry,
little baby ant. It is called a larva. A larva is
like a small white worm.

This little being needs to be washed, fed, kept warm
and dry, and taken into the airand sun. It must
be cared for, very much as the baby in your home
is cared for.

The workers, who act as nurses, are very kind to the
young larve. How do they wash these little

things? They lick them all over, as the cat licks
the kitten. They use such care that they keep
them nearly as white as snow.

The nurses feed the baby ants four or five times each
6 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

day. The nurses prepare the food in their crops,
to make it soft and fit for the little ants. .

The nurses stroke and smooth the larva baby. It seems
as if they patted and petted it. When the weather
is cold, they keep the larvee’* in-doors. When it
is warm and dry, they hurry to carry them up to
the top of the hill. They place them there to
bask in the sun.

If any rain comes, or the hill is broken, the nurses run
to carry the babies to a safe place.

When the larva is full grown, it spins around itself a
little fine net, which wraps it all up. When
people see these white bundles in the ant-hills,
they call them “ant-eggs.” They are not eggs.
They are pupa-cases. In them the baby ants are
getting ready to come out, with legs and wings,
as full-grown ants.

The pupa-cases are of several sizes. The largest ones
are for queens and drones. The next size holds
large workers; the smallest cases hold the smallest

‘workers.

There are often in the hills very wee ants called dwarf
ants. When you study more about ants in other
books, you can learn about the dwarfs.

After the ants have been in the little cases some time,

1 When we mean only one we say larva; when we mean more than one we
say larve.
THE LIFE OF AN ANT. q



they are ready to come out. The nurse ants help
them to get free.

Many hundreds come out of the cases. They crowd
the old home so full that they can scarcely find
room to move about.

Then they see the light shine in at the little gates on
the top of the hill. They feel the warmth of the
sun. They crawl out.

They push upon each other. The hill is not wide and
high enough for so many uncles and cousins and
sisters and brothers.

Young ants, like young people, wish to set up for them-
selves in a new home. They spread their fine
wings. Off they fly !

They swarm as the bees do. As they rise high from
the earth, they drift off on the wind.

Very many of them tire out and die, or are blown into
the water, and are drowned.

A few live and settle on places fit for a new ant-hill.
Tt is the mother or queen ant, who chooses the
new home.

When she has found the right place, what do you think

-she does? She takes off her wings, as she does
not care to fly any more.

The ant does not tear off her wings. She unhooks
them, and lets them fall away, and does not seem

to miss them.
8 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

LESSON III.

THE ANT’S HOME.

A
Lt = iL pe ,
OS i, Kis K- Es



THE NEW HOME.

Ants live in nests, made in the earth. We call them
ant-hills, from the shape of the part that is above
ground. It is the queen ant who begins to build
the ant-hill.

Like the mother wasp, the ant works on her nest until
enough ants grow up to do all the work. After
that, like the queen bee, she does no work. The
work ants will not allow her to go from home.’

When the ant finds a place for her home, she takes off

"her wings. They would be in her way while she
worked. Then she begins to dig. She acts at

1 For Lessons on Bees and Wasps, see First Book.
THE ANTS HOME. 9

ete

first much as your dog does when he digs after a
chipmunk or a rabbit.

The ant lays her big head close to the ground. With
her fore-feet she digs up the soil, and tosses it
back between her hind legs. She digs as her
cousin, Mrs. Wasp, digs.

She keeps waving her little feelers, as if to find out the
kind of soil. Soon she has a hole deep enough to
cover her body. It is too deep for her to throw
out the dirt with her feet. Now she uses her feet,
and her jaws, also, to dig with.

She rolls and moulds the earth into little balls. She
carries each ball out. Where the soil is sandy, she
takes it out, grain by grain. At first, she must
back out of her hole. Soon her hall-way is so
wide that she can turn about after she has backed
a few steps.

Ants are very kind to each other in their work. If
they push or tread on each other in their haste,
they never fight about it. |

The ants know how to work and how to rest. After
a little hard work they stop, clean their bodies,
take some food, and sleep.

As the making of the hall goes on, the ants bite off
with their jaws bits of dirt, and roll them up
with their feet. They soon use the hind part
10 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

-Ah 9e-

of the body to press and push the earth into a
firm pall.

When the hall is two or three inches long, they make
a room. The rooms are for eggs, for larve, for
pup,’ and for food.

People who have studied much about ants have had
them build nests in glass jars. Thus they have

been able to see how they work.





SAPPERS AND MINERS. 4
*

To make a room, the ants often have to stand on their
hind legs, and bite the earth off, as they reach up
their heads. Sometimes the ant lies on its side, to
clean off or smooth the side wall. They have
been seen at work, lying on their backs, as men
do in mines. 7

The jaws of the ant have tiny teeth. In old work ants
the teeth are often quite worn off.

1 Pupa is used when we speak of one, and pupew when we mean more than

one.
THE ANTS AT HOME. 1]

to

The feet and jaws of the ant are well made for digging.
The feet have small hairs. By the aid of these the
ants can run up a piece of glass, or hang on a wall,
as you would say, “upside down.”

An ant-hill is made of very many little halls and. rooms.
Some open into each other; some do not. The
rooms are bed-rooms, nurseries, pantries, and din-
Ing-rooms.

Many of the rooms are shaped like a horseshoe. Some
are round.

The ants press and knead the floors and walls to make
them hard and smooth. Sometimes they line them
with a sticky soil, like paste, to keep the earth from
falling in.

/Some ants seem to make a kind of glue, or varnish,
with which they line their walls.

——00 £§3,0-0-—_-

‘LESSON IV.
THE ANTS AT HOME.

We have taken a look at the ants and have seen how
the hill is made. Let us now see how the ants live
in their hill-home.

When we go to visit them, we shall find ants running
all about the hill and in the halls. These are the
12 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

te

work ants. Some seem to stand on the hill to
watch lest any danger may come near. -

When the drone ants and the queens are young, the
work ants let them go out and fly. When they go
out, the drones do not often come back. They get
lost or die.

The young queens come back, except those who go off to
make new hills. But when the young queen set-
tles down in life, to her work of laying eggs, the
workers do not let her leave the hill any more.

How do they keep her in? If she has not taken off
her pretty wings, they take them off and throw
them away! If she tries to walk off, a worker
picks her up in its jaws and carries her back.

The ants are kind to their queen. They feed her and |
pet her, and she becomes very lazy. She does not
even care to lay her eggs in a nice clean place.

The idle queen drops her eggs anywhere. The kind
worker ants pick them up, and take them to a soft
bed-room.

When there are too many young queens in one hill,
they do not have a war, as the bees do. The
workers settle the trouble, by taking off the wings
of some of the young queens, and turning them
into work ants. This is done before the queens
begin to lay eggs.
THE ANTS AT HOME. 13

te

New-born ants and queens, who do not go out into the
sunshine are of a light color. The other ants are
dark.

In cold, wet weather the ants stay at home. If a rain
comes up when they are out, they hurry home.
Early in the day, and late in the afternoon, they
all seem very busy. In the hot hours of the day
they stay in the hill and rest.

In very hot lands the ants stir about all winter. Such
ants lay up stores of food. You shall hear of them
by and by. In cooler lands, during winter, the .
ants are asleep, or, as we say, are torpid.

The young swarms usually go outin autumn. I have
seen very large swarms in the spring.

Ants like sugar and honey best of all food. They get
honey from flowers, and in other ways of which
T will soon tell you. Some like seeds which have
a sweet taste. For this reason they eat some
kinds of grass-seeds, oats, apple-seeds, and such
things.

Ants take their food by licking it. Their little rough
tongues wear away bits of the seed ; they also suck
up the oil and juice. They seem to press the food
with their jaws.

It has been found out that they know how to moisten
their food and make it soft. If you give them
' 414 SEA-SIDE AND WAY~SIDE.

dry sugar or cake, they turn it into a kind of paste
or honey.

If you put a nest of ants into a large glass jar, and put
some food near by for the ants to eat, they may set-
tle down in the jar, to make a home. If you cover
the outside of the jar with thick, dark paper, the
ants may build close to the glass. Then, when
you take off the paper, you will be able to see the
halls and storerooms.

You might put such a jar in a safe place out of doors.
Then you would be able to study the ants, as they
roam around near by, or do their work inside the

jar.

LESSON V.
THE ANTS ON A TRIP.

Tue round hole in the ant-hill is called the gate. The
ants can close it, if they like, with a bit of stone.
Often there are two, three, or even more, gates
for one ant-hill. Once I saw a hill with six large
gates.

Now I will tell you of a very queer ant-hill. It was
made by big, black ants, in a little valley be-
tween two hills of sand.
THE ANTS ON A TRIP. 16

oe

Into this valley had blown a very large sheet of thick
paper. It had been around a ham and was very
greasy. It had lain on the ground, crumpled up,
in sun, and snow, and rain, for a year.

By that time it was hard and stiff, and weeds had
grown up about it. One day, as I was going
by, I saw ants running in and out of the folds
of the paper. I took a stick and turned the top
fold open like a lid.



ON THE MARCH

It was full of ants and of white pupa-cases. The
ants, I think, liked the folds of the paper for
halls, and the larger wrinkles for rooms. They
had found out how to have a house without much
work in making it.

But when I opened the hill, they ran in swarms to
pick up the white bundles. Poor things! They
did not know where to go for safety. So I laid
16 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

te

the lid of their house back in its place, and soon
they were quiet again.

Now I will tell you how ants move from one house
to another. One day, I saw by my garden path -
a line of ants moving all one way. They were
black ants.

They went two by two, or one and two, close to each
other. Every one had in its jaws a white bundle.
I found that they all came from an ant-hill.
They came up out of the gate very fast, one by
one, each with its bundle.

About two or three inches from this line of ants I
saw another line. This line went to the hill,
not from it. They went in good order.

They had no bundles when they went into the hill;
when they came out, each had a bundle, and
joined the other line of ants.

I went along with the stream of ants that had the
white bundles. I found that they went to a
new hill, about thirty feet from the old hill.

There they laid down their bundles, and went back
to the old hill to bring more. The bundles lay
heaped in a ring all about the gate of the new
city. a

Out of this gate ran up other ants in haste. They
caught up the bundles, one by one, and carried
THE ANTS ON A TRIP. 17



them in. In about half an hour they were nearly
all taken in, and the ants brought no more. The
moving was over.

With a long blade of grass, | gently took up a little
bundle. I hid it behind a stone, some six inches
off. I took three bundles and hid them, lifting
them with the tip of the grass-blade.

When all the bundles left at the hill were carried in,
the ants went down the gates. But in a min-
ute out came three or four ants. They ran
about wildly and searched the ground.

They went in circles and looked over the ground with
much care. The circles grew wider. At last one
came up behind the stone and found the bundles.

The ant picked up one bundle and ran. Then this
ant met the other ants, and, I think, told them
the news. For at once the other ants ran up to
the stone, and each took up a bundle.

Then they all ran into the hill. Can ants count?
That looked as if they knew how many bundles
they had. It also looked as if they knew that
two ants must go for two bundles.

A man who took bundles from a march in this way
thinks that the ants smell the hidden bundles.
He says they will not search for them if you
hide them in the earth.
18 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

eee

LESSON Vf.
THE FARMER ANTS.

You have heard of the spider which
makes a den in the ground.
You know that it puts a trap-
door on its den, and plants
ferns on the door to hide it.’

The spider turns gardener in this
way, and all his plants grow
well. There is an ant that has
a farm, or garden.

This ant lives in warm lands. In
this country they are found in
Texas, Florida, and in one or
two other warm States.

These farmer ants raise grain to
eat. The grain is a kind of





grass with a large seed. It is

called by some “ ant-rice.”



There is also a large ant which is
fond of the seeds of the sun-

3 i iN
all

THE LITTLE FARMER. 1 See First Book, p. 63.
THE FARMER ANTS. ~ 19

tt

flower. It is said that the ants plant the sun-
flowers in a ring around their hill.

The ants have not been seen to carry the seed and
plant it. So we may not be quite sure that
they do so. .

But it is very possible that the ant does plant seeds.
You see there are yet in the world many things
left for you to find out. It will be well for you
to keep your eyes open.

The farmer ants do not live in a small hill that you
could cover with your hand. Their hill, or disk,
is sometimes flat, and sometimes high. It is
often as large as a large room. It is in the shape
of a circle.

In this circle all weeds and all kinds of grasses are
cut down, except the one kind which the ants |
like. The earth of the disk is kept clean and
smooth. Only the seeds of the ant-rice are left
to grow.

When the ant-rice is ripe, the ants pick up the seeds
as they fall, and take them into the hill to their
storerooms.

It is most likely that as the ants let this ant-rice, and
nothing else, grow on their hills, it sows itself
by its fallen seed.

Still the ants are real farmers, as they keep their
20 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

gage

land clean. They tend and gather the crop,
store it up, and eat it.

When the ant-rice is ripe, and the seeds have fallen,
the ants cut down the old stems, and take them
away. ‘The disk is then clean for the next crop.

The ants will go a long way from their hill to find
seeds to bring home. They like to go where
horses have fed, for there they find scattered
oats. In some lands they carry off much grain
from the fields.

An ant in Florida climbs the stalk of the millet and
cuts off the seeds. When ants take seeds to their
hill, they husk and clean them. They throw: bad
seeds away.

The ants watch the seeds, and after rains carry them
out to dry im the sun. This is because if left
wet, they would sprout and grow.

Some ants also cut the seed, so that it will not sprout.

The ants eat the seeds that they gather. They also
feed their young with them.

One ant in Florida rolls up into little balls the dust,
or pollen, of pine cones, and stores that up to eat.

An ant in New Jersey cuts in pieces the little new
pine-trees, just as they get above the ground,
and carries them to its nest.

1 See Third Book.
ANTS AND THEIR TRADES. 21



Did you ever see the ant which likes sunflower seeds
to eat? It is a large ant, and when it has climbed
to the disk of the sunflower, it pulls out one of
the ripe seeds and carries it away.

When people keep a nest of ants in order to watch
their ways, they feed them with sugar, oats, apple-
seeds, and wheat.

How does the ant eat the hard grain? Its tongue is
like a file, or something like that of the little
shell-fish of which I told you.’ The ant can rasp,
file, and press the grain, so it can get at and lick
up the oil and juice.

00 Sf§0-0—-—

i toesON Ave

ANTS AND THEIR TRADES.

Since you know that bees, ants.” and wasps all belong
to the same great family of living creatures,
you will not wonder that many of their ways are
alike.

You know there are wasps and bees that live alone.

You have read how, in the spring, Mrs. Social Wasp
builds her home and raises a brood of babies.

1 See First Book, p. 86.
2 For lessons on Wasps, Bees, and Spiders, see First Book.
22 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

tt

These, as soon as full-grown, begin to build more
rooms and nurse the next babies. Mrs. Ant does
as Mrs. Wasp does.

Mrs. Ant begins a new hill, and as her children grow
they help her. But Mrs. Ant does not often begin
her hill in the spring. She chooses the early fall!
to begin work.

As the eggs change into working ants, Mrs. Ant gets
plenty of help in her work.

You have seen bees swarm, and hang in a bunch, or
curtain. Ants also cling together and form balls.
But this is for warmth or safety. It is called
“snugging.’ In some lands, in times of flood, ants
form balls as large as your play ball. Thus they
can float on the water, and do not drown.

As Mrs. Wasp makes paper, so Mrs. Ant can make a
thin paper, for her nest. But it is poor paper,
not so good as Mrs. Wasp makes. Mrs. Wasp is
the chief of the paper-makers.

I told you how one Mrs. Bee cuts leaves to line her
nest. So one Mrs. Ant does. With cut leaves
she lines a neat little nest. As the spider makes
a fine spun ball to put her babies m, there is an
ant that makes a woolly nest.

You have read of the Tower Spider, that builds a neat
tower of sticks, straw, and grass over her nest.
ANTS AND THEIR TRADES. 23

a

There is an ant that thatches its hill in much the
same way.

There is a brown ant that is a mason. She makes her
nest of little balls of mud, laid up like bricks in
a wall.

Then there is a carpenter ant, as there is a carpenter
bee. These carpenters cut their way into trees
and logs. In this manner they do much harm.

These ants hollow out the inside of a tree, or beam,
until it is ready to fall to pieces.

Besides their other trades, the ants know the trade of
war. There are soldier ants. Ants are mild and
kind to eaeh other while at work. But they are
brave, and have armies for war.

It is odd to-see how much ant ways and ant soldiers
are like human ways and human soldiers. |

The ants make war to get slaves, or servants. I will
tell you more of that in the next lesson. They
also make war to get cows, as you will hear by and
by. They seem to have some other reasons for war.

When the ant army marches, it keeps in line and order.
It seems to have captains to rule and lead it.
Scouts go before to seek out the way.

The ant-hill has some soldiers for sentries, to see that
no danger comes near. When a work ant gets
into trouble, it will run to a soldier for help.
24 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE. .

th

The soldier ants do not appear to be cross. They have
very large heads, as if they wore big hats. Some
of them have smooth heads and some, hairy heads.
They eat much and love to sleep.

The soldier ants do not do much work. They rouse up
only for a battle. In an ant-hill, the soldiers are
larger, and often more in number, than the other
ants.

The workers are the smallest ants in a hill. There are
fewer queens than any other kind, except after the
drone ants go off and die. At that time there are
very few drones.

In a battle, two ants will often cling to each other by

~ their jaws, until both die. The usual way in which
an ant soldier kills a foe is by cutting off the head.

Sometimes the battle ends without any killing At
other times the ants are very fierce, and large
numbers are cut to pieces,

When strange ants get into a hill, sometimes they are
driven out; sometimes they are killed; sometimes
they are treated kindly.

[I put a black ant into the gate of a city of brown
ants. You should have seen how they drove him
out! He ran as if he were wild with fear.
Three or four brown ants came after him to the
edge of their hill.
THE SLAVE ANTS. 95

oe

But though some strange ants are cast out so fiercely,
there are two or three kinds of beetles which go
into ant-hills and live with the ants. The ants do
not. harm them in any way. You shall hear about
that when we have some lessons about beetles.

——070500—_

LESSON VIIL.

THE SLAVE ANTS.



THE PARASOL ANTS.

Now I must tell you about the slave ants and their
owners. The chief family of the slave-making
ants is called “The Shining,” for its body shines
with a gloss like varnish. -

The slave-making ants and their slaves are found_in

many parts of the world. The masters are of a
light or red color, with a bright gloss. The slave
ants are dark or black.
26 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

Tn nests where slaves are held the masters never do any
work. They make war and steal slaves, or slave
babies.

The slave ants do all the work. Ifa war rises, they also
fight for the hill and their owners.

The army of the slave makers will march to the hill of
a tribe of ants which they wish to seize for slaves.
They carry off the pupa cases, where the little new
ants are getting legs and wings.

These baby ants are taken to the hill of the owners and
brought up with their own young. No slave-ant
egos are laid in a hill, for the queens lay all the
egos, and the queens are not slaves. The slaves.

- are stolen when they are eggs, or larvee.

The owners seem to be very kind to their little slaves,
and as the slaves grow up and fill the hill they
seem to do very much as they please.

The slaves build new hills and take their owners to live
in the new home. If a mistress ant wishes to
wander off her hill, her slaves drag her back. If
she does not wish to move to a new home, her
slaves carry her off, all the same.

The slave-owning ants walk about their hill in an idle
way. If war comes, then they fight bravely.

The owners do not build the house, nor nurse their
babies, nor feed themselves. Often they do not even
THE SLAVE ANTS, 27

ee

clean their own bodies. They leave all these
duties to the slaves. The slaves feed their owners,
and brush and clean them, as a servant cleans his
master’s coat. When the ants are to make a
move, the slaves pick up their masters, and carry
them away.

How can they do that? The ants carry all burdens in
their jaws. The slave and the master lock their
jaws, the owner curls up the back of her body,
and the slave carries her off.

The grip of an ant’s jaws is very strong. She can
carry things much larger than her own body.

There is an ant which uses the pine needles for food.
She carries the bits of pine laid over her back,
much as a man carries a gun. There is a little
groove in this ant’s head, where the bits of pine
rest.

There is an ant called the “parasol ant,” because it
cuts off tiny bits of leaf, and carries them along.
Each ant holds a piece of leaf over its head, like a
parasol.

An army of this kind on the march looks very funny.
These ants line their nests with the bits of leaf, to
keep the dirt from falling in.

These parasol ants are very large. Their nests cover a
large space. The bits of leaf are cut about the
28 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

size of a dime. The ants carry them in their jaws,
each piece by a little end left for a stem.

We have some parasol ants in this country, in
Florida and Texas, and there are many of them

in South America.

——-070300—

LESSON IX,
WONDER ANTS.

You may perhaps read of what are called “Termites,”
or White Ants. You must not think that these
are true ants, for they are not. They belong to
another Order of insects. They have four wings
all of the same size. But true ants have one
pair of wings smaller than the other. The white
ants live in the ground and also in trees. They
do much harm by gnawing wood and trees. They
swarm into houses, and eat. the tables and chairs”
and such things. They eat all kinds of food.
They are much like real ants in their ways.

There are many of them in our country.

Now you must hear about the ants that keep cows. -I
have told you that ants like honey. They take
all their food by lapping and sucking it. They
suck honey from flowers.
WONDER ANTS. 29

ee

If you look at the plants in the garden or house, you
may see on the leaves some very small green
things, that seem to eat the leaves. Your mother
will tell you these are “plant lice,” and that they
spoil her plants.

The name of this little insect is Aphis. That is a
very pretty name. The aphis is very small, and
is often of the color of the leaf it feeds on.

This wee thing can make honey in its body much as bees
do. But the aphis does not store up the honey;
it drops it on the leaf as it feeds. This is called
“honey dew.”

The ants eat the honey dew from the leaves, and they
know that it comes from the aphis. They stroke
and tap the aphis with their feelers, so that more
dew will be let fall.

Have you seen the milkmaid go from cow to cow, and
fill her pail with milk? So the ants go from one
aphis to another, until they get all the honey they
want. — ;

The ants can carry home this honey, and give it to
others. The nurse ants will carry it tc the baby
ants. The workers take it to the quéens, owners,
and soldiers.

The aphis is called “the ant’s cow.” A hill of ants will
seem to own a herd of these wee green cows.
30 SEA-SIDE AND WAY--SIDE.

od

They go to them on their leaf, and get the honey.
They know and claim their own cows. It is just
like having a drove of cows in pasture, as the
farmer does.

But you know that people often keep cows in stables
and feed them there. The ant has this way also.

There is a kind of aphis that loves the dark and feeds
on roots. Some ants keep a herd of these, hidden
in the ground. They pet, stroke, and clean them
to get their honey dew.

Ants have been seen to fight for days over a herd of
aphis-cows. One hill of ants had no cows, and
they tried to steal the cows that belonged to
another hill.

After four days the lady that watched them got twenty
cows, and gave them to the hill that had none.

Then the war ended.

The ants which got the new cows seemed very glad.
They licked and petted the cows, and put them in
a safe place. They took honey from them and fed
the soldiers.

This seems just like a fairy tale. But it is quite true.
All these things can be seen if you look out for
them. But you must be patient and anxious to
learn.

In warm summer days, when your mother tells you that
THE WAYS OF ANTS. 31

a

it is too hot to run about much,
what will you do? Why not
make a tent of an umbrella,
placed near an ant-hill, and
watch these pretty and curi-
ous little creatures?

—~0795 00———_

LESSON X.

THE WAYS OF ANTS.

I wave told you that ants like
honey and sweets. They will
also suck the juices and soft
parts of many other kinds of
food. Some ants eat nearly
everything that can be eaten.

Almost all ants will eat other in-
sects, and suck the eggs or pups
of other insects. This habit
makes ants very useful. Cer-
tain worms and bugs that de-
stroy orange trees and cotton
plants are killed by ants.

Ants also eat other insects that in-



jure men. If a coat that has (QUEER CAPERS.
32 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

the

these on it is laid near an ant-hill, in an hour or
two the ants will have made it quite clean.

You have seen a fly sit and clean her body and wings.
She does this by drawing her feet over her head
and body. So you have seen the cat clean her fur
coat with her paws and tongue. ‘The ant washes
or brushes herself in just such a way.

The ant is very neat and clean in her habits. She
takes many naps in a day, and after each nap she
brushes herself. She brushes herself tidy after
work and after taking food

The action of the ant in cleansing herself is much like
that of the cat. The ant has on her foreleg a
little comb, shaped like your thumb. With this
she strokes and combs all dust and dirt from her
body.

If you watch an ant as she dresses herself, you will see
that she draws her fore-foot through her mouth.
This is to clean the comb and to make it moist, so
that it will do its work well.

The ant has also little brushes on her other feet; so
you see there is no reason why she should not keep
herself very trim and tidy.

Ants are very neat about their nests. They carry out
all husks of grain and*seeds and all dead bodies.
They carry these quite off their hill.
THE WAYS OF ANTS. 33

i

I knew of an ant’s nest that had been set on a post in
water. It was kept clean by the ants. They soon
learned to drop all refuse over into the water.
That is as the sailor does, when he cleans his ship.

Ants bury their dead. When an ant dies, some of the
other ants pick up the body to carry it off and
bury it. They do not like to put dead bodies near
their hill. The ants will carry the dead ones round
and round, till they find a good place for them.

A lady who spent much time in the study of ants said
that the slave-owning ants do not bury the slaves
with the masters. They put the dead slaves in
one place and the owners in another.

Ants will now and then change their home. They
leave an old hill and make a new one. When
they do this, if some of the ants do not seem ready
to leave the old hill, the others drag them off by
force.

Most ants have very good eyes, and can see above
ground and under ground. But there is one kind
of ant that is blind.

Ants can bite with their sharp jaws. They also have
a sting. They seldom use it if they are let alone.
Some ants have quite a sharp sting. The sting is
on the hind part of the ant’s body.

A sting is made in three parts. There is the sac for
34. SEA-SIDE. AND WAY-SIDE.

noe

poison, the needle which gives the prick, and the
case to keep the needle or prickle in. This needle,
of a light color, is like a little thorn.

The ant seizes with its jaws the part which it wishes
to sting. Then it lifts its body up on the hind
legs, and swings its sting part under, so that it
can drive the sting into the place held by the jaws.

The sting does not do much harm to people, but will
no doubt kill ants and other insects.

Ants make also a kind of juice called “ant acid.”
They can throw this about when the hill is dis-
turbed.

This acid must be pretty strong. It will make a dog
sneeze and rub his nose. The ant uses it to keep
dogs, mice, beetles, and such things, away from
the ant-hill.

T have told you that some ants harm trees and plants
by gnawing or cutting them. It is only fair now
to tell you that ants help plants to grow. As
they creep into flowers for honey, they carry
about from flower to flower the dust or pollen
which makes new seeds grow. This dust sticks to
the ant’s body, and what is taken from one flower
is carried to another. Bees also carry pollen.

Thus, you see that the ants help the flowers, which in
their turn give food to the ants. But, of course,
MR. WORM AND HIS FAMILY. 35

the ants do not know what they are doing for the
flowers." Nor do the bees know that they help
the flowers. The bees and ants do not know that
pollen sticks to them, to be carried about. :

These lessons about the ant contain only a few of the
many things that can be said of this+insect. I
hope you will like the ants well enough to get
other books about them, and study and watch the
ants for yourselves.

—0590400-—

LESSON XI.

MR. WORM AND HIS FAMILY.



LIKE AND NOT LIKE.

OnE day I saw a boy making a hole in the ground,
and he dug out a worm.

1$ee Third Book,
36 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

I said to the boy, “What can you tell me about
worms ?”

The boy said, “ Worms are long, soft things, alike at
both ends. If you cut one in two, each end goes
off, and makes a whole new worm. They have
no heads and no feet and no feelings, and are no
good but for fish-bait.”

That boy thought he knew all about worms. But
really he knew very little about them. All that
he had told me was wrong.

Worms belong to the great class of ringed, or jointed,
animals. These creatures have bodies made in
rings or joints.

Let us take a careful look at our humble friend, the
earth worm.

He is a long, round, soft, dark, slimy thing, and you
say “He is alike at both ends.”

Is he? Let us see. His body is made of from one
hundred to two hundred rings. These rings are
smaller toward the two ends of the body, which
are the head and tail.

Each ring has on it tiny hooks, too small for you to
see. These hooks take the place of the jointed
feet that his cousins have. The feet on a cater-
pillar will show you about how these hooks would
look, if you could see them.
MR.. WORM AND HIS FAMILY. 37

ee

By these hooks the worm moves along, and digs his
way in the ground. Mr. Worm can hold so fast
to his den or hole, that you have hard work to
pull him out.

Have you seen Mr. Robin brace his feet and tug with
all his might, when he pulls out a worm? ‘The
worm is holding fast by his hooks.

You see the hooks are Mr. Worm’s feet. Let us now
look for his head. You have five senses. You can
hear, see, feel, smell, taste. The worm can feel
and taste. Some think he can smell some things.
He cannot see or hear.

Why do we say he has a head, if he has no eyes nor
ears nor nose? We say he has a head because
he has a mouth and a brain.

His mouth has two lips. The upper lip is larger than
the under. He has no teeth. In the back of his
head, not far from his mouth, is his brain, or
nerve-centre.

The worm is the only jointed animal that has red
blood. . Mr. Worm is dark-colored because his
body is full of the earth which he swallows.

If you keep him out of the earth for a while, his skin
will get pale and clear. Then you can see his
red blood run in two long veins. He needs fresh
air to keep this red blood pure. He dies very
soon if he is shut up in a close box or case.
_ 388 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

en

LESSON XII.
MR. EARTH-WORM AT HOME,

I rotp you-the earth-worm has two veins. One runs
down his back, the other runs along the under
side of his body.

There are tiny holes, like pin. pricks, in his body.
These are for the air to reach his blood, to keep
it red and pure.

In his body poor Mr.. Worm has something that no
other creature has. He has two bags or sacks for
lime. This is in some way to help him with his food.

Mr. Worm has no teeth with which to grind his food.
He has inside his body. small bits of stone. These
are as small as grains of sand. They are instead
of teeth to grind his food.

When you study birds you will find that, like Mr.
Worm, they have no teeth. They, too, carry little
millstones inside their bodies.

The little bags of lime help to grind or change the
worm’s food in some way, not yet well known.

The soft body of the worm will stretch like India-rub-
ber. It will hold a great deal of food.
MR. EARTH-WORM AT HOME. 39

to

Now you see that Mr. Worm is noé alike at both ends.
One end has the head, the stomach, the parts
that serve for a brain, and a heart.

The hooks begin at the fourth ring behind the head.
Look at the worm when he lifts his head, and you
will see his mouth.

The tail end has very strong hooks with which to hold
fast to his cell. This tail end is also his trowel,
or mould, a too] with which this poor, ugly worm
helps to build the world.

Ah! now I have told you a great thing, a strange
thing. Is it true that the feeble, useless worm
helps to build the world? Where is that boy who
knew 30 much about worms ?

But before you hear how the worm helps to build the
world, let us go back to what the boy said. He
said, “If you cut the worm in two, each end will
go off and be a whole worm.”

That is not true of the worm. When the worm is cut
in two, the parts do not die at once. As there
are hooks and rings on each part, they each can
move off.

It is thought that if the fore part is left safe, the cut
can close wp, and the worm can still live. A new
tail may grow upon the front part, as Mr. Crab’s
new claw or eye-peg grows.
40 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ot

But the hind part cannot live and grow. It cannot
get a new mouth or heart, so it can take no food,
and have no blood. So the hind part soon dries
up and dies.

The boy told me that the worm “had no feelings.” A
worm can feel. The sense of touch is the best
sense it has. Put your finger on its body, and
see 1t move and shrink.

The worm cannot hear. It moves off as you come

near, because it feels the jar of the earth.

The worm cannot see. Creatures that live under
ground have but little use for eyes. Fishes that
live in dark cave-rivers have no eyes.

If the worm moves from the light and hides from it,
it is because it feels the action of light on its skin.
It does not see the light.

What does Mr. Worm eat? Some tell you that he eats
dirt. It is true that he fills his body full of earth.
That is to carry it to the top of the ground. Mr.
Crab has claws and legs to bend into the shape
of a basket. Poor Mr. Worm has no arms, legs,
or claws, so he must make a basket of himself.

Suppose you should be sent for fruit, and turn your-
self mto a basket in that way! Your mamma
might find fault. She would not wish you to act

like 1 worm.
MR. EARTH-WORM AT HOME, 4]

It is true that the worm may find a little food in the
earth which he swallows. But the chief food of
the worm is dead leaves and stems of plants. It
does not care for fresh, live leaves and stems and
roots.

The worm also likes meat,— fat, raw, or cooked. Worms
will gnaw or suck the bodies of dead worms. We
say worms gnaw. As they have no teeth, they do
not really gnaw. They pinch off what they eat.

Worms like onions and cabbage best of all food. They
like water, and must live in damp places.

When the worm gets food into its mouth, the rings of
its body begin to move out and in. They look as
if they were opening and shutting. By this mo-
tion they press the food down into the body.

When the worm wants to move, it stretches out its
body to its full length. Then it takes hold of the
earth with its hooks. Next it draws up its body,
and so moves on. This is a wave-like motion,
you see.

Watch it, and you will see that it travels with a mo-
tion like waves.

If you wish to find worms to study, you must seek for
them in early morning or late in the evening.
You will be likely to find them when all the earth
is moist with dew, or when it is raining.
42, SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

Worms hurry to the surface of the soil to enjoy the
falling rain. When there is a long, dry time, the
worms go down deeper and deeper into the earth.
You cannot find them when you dig for them.

—-059400—_

LESSON XIII.
MR. WORM AT WORK.

Worms are found in all parts of the world. I have
told you that they help to build the world, and
make it fit for the home of man.

Man cannot live without food. He gets his food from
the earth. The worms help to fit the earth to
bring forth the food of man.

Oh, this is very strange, that humble and dirty worms
can be a help toman! Man is the highest of all
animals. Worms are nearly the lowest. And
can worms help man?

Now let us see how this is done.

The worms live under ground. They make long, wind-
ing halls, like streets, some inches below the top
soil. These halls, or little tunnels, help to keep
the earth loose, so that the fine roots of the plants
can grow well in it.

These tunnels also serve to help the air move more
MR. WORM AT WORK. 43

re

easily through the soil. By their constant motion
below the surface the worms till the earth, as
rakes, spades, or ploughs till it above.

All this is of great use, and people say, “Many worms,
rich land.” Now and then you will hear, on the
other hand, that the worms have eaten up the seed
sown. Or, people say the worms have bitten off
the roots of the plants. Some say that the worms
cut the vines below the soil.

You need not think the earth-worms did that. Not at
all! The earth-worms never behave so ill. The
“worms” that people mean, when they speak of
this harm done, are the grubs or larve of some

insects, as of the daddy-long-legs and others.

These grubs and cut-worms will eat living plants, but
Mr. Worm likes dead leaves and stems best. He
wants his food made soft by decay.

Now we come to the chief work of the true earth
worms. When they make their halls and houses
they fill their long bodies with the earth. Some
say it is their food.

Mr. Darwin says, “‘Oh, no! they fill their bodies with
earth just to get it out of their way.” I£ they
get any food from the dirt it is not much. They
turn themselves into baskets to carry the dirt out,
from their houses.
A4 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

to

The worms work, work, work all the time, taking out
earth, and carrying it to the top of the ground.

There they pile it in heaps, called worm-casts. Hach
piece is the shape of a small worm.

The earth takes this shape as the worm presses it out
of its long, soft body. arly in the day you can
find these worm-casts over all the garden paths.
So you can after a rain.

There are so many worms busy all the time that each
year they bring up tons of earth. This shows
you the power that is in small, weak things. In
India there are worm-casts in heaps six inches
high.

The worms make the earth fine and loose, by pinching
it off with their mouths. Then they bring this
rich soil from below, and lay it on top, and so
on and on.

It is only some twenty years since this work of worms
was known. At first people said, “Oh, no, no! It
cannot be that little, soft worms could cover a
great field, some inches deep, with new earth.”
But it was shown to be quite true.

Fields once stony and hard have become rich and fine.
Things grow now where once scarcely anything
would grow. Ashes and gravel, once on veR) go
two or three inches below.
MR. WORM’S COTTAGE BY THE SEA. 45

te

All this is done by the busy worms. That is why I
said that you could call the tail end of the worm
the tool with which he helps to build the world. |

Worms at work under ground have caused great walls
and pavements to sink, as the earth sinks over
mines. Also, they have helped to bury ruins and
old cities, and to keep them safe hidden, until we
found them. We are glad when we learn of the
old world days, from ruins which the worms
helped to hide.

Then, too, the worms help make the soil rich, by the
dead leaves and stems which they drag into their
holes to decay. When the worms die, their bodies
also help to make the earth rich.

—0-0594 00——_.

LESSON XIV.
MR. WORM’S COTTAGE BY THE SEA.

On the seashore you will find two or three kinds of
worms. These are called “Tube Worms,” from the
shape of the houses which they build. Some of
them are called “Swimming Worms.”

The swimming worm is cousin to another family of
creatures which look like worms, but have many
feet. They have a name which means “many feet.”
46 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

You know that on most of the rings, in the body of
the worm, are hairs or hooks. You can see how
easy it would be for these to become feet. Now
each animal seems to have parts that are like
some other animals, and some new forms of its
own. .

Thus, next the worm, with his rings and hooks, comes
another animal with rings and feet. Of all the
ring animals, Mr. Worm is the pattern, and after
him comes his cousin, Mr. Many-Feet.

Then, while Mr. Many-Feet is like Mr. Worm, he is
also like Mrs. Fly, and seems to come between the
two, a little related to both.

Now let us look at the sea-side worms. Here we find
some worms that have eyes. We also find some
that have little hard teeth, set in a ring inside
their mouths. There are some that have fine
plumes, as gay as any bird. These poor worms
gleam like a rainbow.

New parts can grow on these worms as well as on the
earth-worm, or even better. Some say that they
can even get a new head if the old one is lost.

Some of these worms can bore into very hard things,
as wood or stone. Some of them shine like a fire.
Ask some one to tell you of this kind of light; it
is like what we call Jack o’ Lantern.
MR. WORM’S COTTAGE BY THE SEA. AT

ee

Dig in the sea sand anywhere, and you will find
worms, black, brown, green, red, orange. They
bore through sand and mud, and move very fast.

It is not yet known how these worms bore into stone
and wood. Perhaps it is by means of some acid
stuff in their mouths. Perhaps it is by a file,
such as Mr. Drill has.’

{f you look along the sea sand of some shores, you will
find the tube-homes of these sea worms. In their
way of making a shell-home, and making it larger
as they grow, they are like the little shell-fish you
have read of.’

Most of these tube-homes are small, but.some are very
large. A gentleman told me he had one with the
bore or hole as large as his arm.

These worms by the sea serve as food for many fish
and other creatures. You know that nearly all
fish like to eat worms, and that they are used for
bait. The boy who knew nothing else about
worms knew they made good bait.

He would have been full of wonder if I had told him
that large worms are used for food by men in
some parts of the world. In this country we do
not make use of such food.

1 Book First, Lesson 39, 2 Book First, Lesson 36.
48 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

——a—

LESSON XV.

MR. WORM AT HOME.

Basy worms are just like the parent worms, only
smaller, and have not so many rings. As they
grow, they get more rings by the dividing of the
last one.

In some kinds of soil the wee worms are born in a
little hard skin bag. This keeps them from harm,
until they get strong enough to take care of them-
selves.

Mr. Worm’s home is like a row of long halls. These
halls are lined with a kind of glue from the
worm’s body. This glue makes the walls firm;
then they will not fall in.

The halls are not very deep under ground. If the
weather is very cold, or very dry, the worms dig
down deeper. Worms dislike cold or drought.
They enjoy warmth. They also like water and
wet soil.

When winter comes the worms plug up the doors of
their houses. This is done by dragging into it a
MR. WORM AT HOME, 49

—

plant stem that will fit and fill it. The worms
carry into their homes leaves and stalks to eat.
They bring out, and throw away, things wo
they do not like.

Worms show much sense in the way in which they
carry things in and out of their holes. If a stem
will not go in, they turn it over, and try it in
some other way.

Worms usually come out of their holes at night or in —
wet weather. If they go far from their house,
they cannot find their way back. Then they make
anew hole. Each worm lives alone. —

Often in the evening or early morning, or during rain,
you will see worms near their houses. You may
find them with their heads just put out of their
doors. You will see the worm casts in early day
or after rain. It is then the worms dare to come
out. Sun and heat dry worms up very fast, and
so kill them.

The birds know all these ways of the worms. Watch
a robin or a bluebird. He searches for his food
at sunrise, or after sunset, or while it rains.

Now his keen eyes see the worm at his door! In goes
his sharp bill! He pulls like a good fellow! He
is hungry. He wants his breakfast. The worm
holds fast by his hooks. The bird braces his feet
50 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

and his tail, and tugs hard. Out comes the worm
to feed Mr. Bird.t

The bird shows great skill in the way he pulls the
worm out of the hole. He does not break off even
one little bit of his soft body. No boy could get
him out in that way.



ipa

MR. WORM AT HOME,

Some say that the worm lies by his door at sunrise for
warmth. I donot think that is so. I think what
he likes is the fresh dew. He loves dampness.
He fears cold, but he also dies of heat.

A worm will die in one day in dry air, but he will live
for weeks quite down under water. He needs an
even, moist warmth. His home must not be hot,
nor cold, nor dry.

Little young worms know how to dig houses, make
worm casts, carry out the soil, find food, and plug

1 See Third Book.
MR. WORM AT HOME. ol

te

up the door of their houses. They know at once
all that old worms do. But then worm houses do
not require as much skill as bee or wasp houses.

The sea-side worms make the prettiest worm houses.
On shells, stone, wood, or wound alone in a lump,
you will find their tubes. They are white and as

- hard as shell.

These tubes curve and twist about, as the worm went
that built them. Some are very pretty. There is
a soft kind of tube made of sand and bits of shell,
stone, and weed. The sand and weed are held
together by a kind of glue. The worm makes
this glue in its mouth.

I have some tubes very clear and white. You can see
the lines where the worm went when he built
them, ring by rmg. Some of these tubes are so
small, you can just run a fine needle into them.
Some are as large as a straw, and some as large
as a fine, fat, earth-worm.

Now you see how much is to be learned, even of such
a small, humble thing as a worm. Think how
much even such a weak creature can do!

There is much more to be found out about worms,
which I hope you will be glad to learn for your-
selves.
52 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

LESSON XVI.
A LOOK AT A HOUSE-FLY.

Loox at a worm crawling about on the earth. Then
look at a fly with blue or green body and thin
wings. See how it whirls in the air! You will
say, “These two are not at all alike.”

Yet there is one time in a fly’s life when it is very like
a worm.

For this reason: many wise people set flies and worms
next to each other when they study them.

You know, as soon as you look at a fly, that it is an
insect.

You have learned that an insect has wings, six legs,
a body in three parts, and a pair of feelers like
horns.

Insects breathe through all the body, and not by lungs
as you do. They have a row of holes in each
side to breathe through.

The life of an insect passes through three states.
These are the egg, the grub or worm, and the
pupa. When it is in the pupa it gets legs and
wings. The word “pupa” means baby or doll.
A LOOK AT A HOUSE-FLY. 53

—

There are some kinds of insects that vary in some of
these points. The fly is one that varies from
this rule.

If you look at a fly, you will see that it has two wings,
not four. It is not one of the hook-wings.

Many insects can fold their wings. The fly cannot
fold its wings; it lays them back over its body.

Let us first look at a fly when it is most like an earth-
worm. The fly comes, in the first place, from a
tiny egg laid by the mother fly.

When the egg opens, the baby fly is not like a fly,

‘but like a little earth-worm, both in its looks
and in the way in which it is made. It is a
small white worm with rings, and on the rings
are hooks.

If you wish to watch this change, lay a bit of meat
in the sun on a hot day. Soon flies will lay eggs
on it. .

The next day these eggs will be turned to grubs, which
grow very fast. The fly’s eggs are small and white,
and are put upon the meat as if they had been
planted on one end.

The worm of the fly has a pair of jaws like hooks.
It has two little dots which will become eyes
when it has grown to a fly. In the hooked jaws
and these eye-points it is not like an earth-worm.
5+ SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

The fly grub eats and grows. Then its skin gets
tough and hard, and forms a little case like a
barrel. This shuts the worm in it, as in a coffin.
Now the baby fly seems to be dead.

But it is not dead. It is turning into a creature that
has wings and legs, and can fly and walk.

As the fly lies in its case, first the legs and then the
wings grow. It gets a head with mouth, eyes,
and a trunk or tube, and from a poor worm it
turns to a wonder, as you will see.

But in its little coffin it is shut close, and its legs
and wings are all bent up. In a few days the
change is made. Now it is ready to come out.

It moves, and pulls, and gets free from the hard case.
Then it strikes the end of the case with its head
time after time. At last it breaks the case open,
and out comes the fly !

Then it stands in the air, and in the sun if it can,
and shakes itself. It is cold and weak; but the
air dries its wings and blows out the wrinkles.

In a very few minutes the fly is strong and gay.

Then it spreads its wings and sails off to enjoy its
life, and to look for something good to eat.
HOW TO LOUK AT A FLY. dd

i

EES SiON Xcve nr:
HOW TO LOOK AT A FLY.

Do you think a fly is a very small and common thing?
Is it not worth looking at? Let us see about that.

First, here is its head with two great eyes. We will
soon look at the eyes. Then you will see how
“curious they are.

There are, besides the big eyes, three little eyes. These
are set on the top of the head. Then, too, on the
front of the head we find a trunk or tube. And
here is a pair of feelers. Inside the head is the
brain, very much like a worm’s brain. It is only
a tiny white dot.

Next behind the head is the chest. The head has the
shape of half of an egg laid sidewise. The chest
is nearly square. It is made of three rings.

On the first rmg is a pair of legs. On the next ring is
a pair of legs and a pair of wings. The fly has
only one pair of wings.

On the last ring is a pair of legs. And near these legs
are two little clubs covered with fine hair. It is
by means of these clubs that the fly can halt or
56 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

eR ee

balance on the wing. They help the fly as the
second pair of wings helps other insects.

The third part of a fly’s body is the largest. It is egg-
shaped, and joins the chest by the thick end. This
also is made of rings.

Now let us look again at the head of a fly. The feelers
are like two long, fine plumes made in joints.
Most people think these feelers are made to touch
with. Their full, true use is not yet known.

You see, even in a fly, there is much left for some of
you to find out.

Some people think that flies smell and hear with these
“feelers.” But then they are so fine that a breath
can jar them, and the fly might seem to hear
when it only feels.

In some schools for the deaf and dumb, the apie are
called to class or table by rapping on the floor.
The deaf do not hear the noise, but they feel the
jar, and come as if they could hear.

Next comes the mouth of the fly. The lower lip of a
fly runs out into a long, slim tube or pipe. With
this it sucks up its food.

At the end of this tube is a little flat plate. Close by
it are two sharp hairs. These are to prick the
food, so that the tube can suck it more easily.

When the fly is not eating, it can shut up this tube like
HOW TO LOOK AT A FLY. 57

a

a telescope, to keep it safe. Did you ever see an
elephant’ Did yousee histrunk? The fly’s tube
is his trunk.

But the chief parts to notice in a fly’s head are its eyes.
These are so large that they make up nearly all
the head.

These big bright eyes look as if they had varnish on
them. Now each of these eyes is made up of a
very great many small eyes. There are four thou-
sand of these small eyes. iy a

Between these two big eyes are three



little single eyes, set in this way Z

Wise men have studied the eyes of flies for many years,
and do not yet know all about them.

The wings of a fly have a fine, thin, clear covering.
This is held out on a tiny frame, like a network.
The fly moves these wings very quickly. The
motion of the wings helps to make the sound or
buzz of the fly.

Now we come to the legs and feet of our fly. The leg
is made in five joints. The foot also has five
joints. The last joint of the foot has two claws
and a little pad. These are covered with fine
hairs.

The hairs catch on little points or rough edges. Thus
the fly can walk, as you would say, “upside
58 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.



down,” and does not fall. Be-
sides, the pad and hairs act like
a sucker. They suck air from
under the foot. So they hold the
fly from falling as he runs up a

pane of glass.

——00;0300—

LESSON XVIII.

MRS. FLY AND HER FOES.

wish there were not so many flies.
The fact is, flies make us much
trouble. Their noise tires and
vexes people. They lay eggs in
and on the food, and so spoil it.
They cover cur clean walls and
glass with small black spots.
Will you wonder that there are so
many flies when I tell you that
one fly can in one season be the
mother of two million others!
Many insects die soon after laying
egos. Bees and wasps do not,



A TAVERN BY THE WAY, nor do flies. Bees and wasps take
MRS. FLY AND HER FOES. 59

—

care of their eggs and their young, but the fly
mother does not.

Mrs. Fly has more than a hundred eggs to lay at once.-
It is quite plain that she could not take care of so -
many babies. She must let them all look out for
themselves.

Still Mrs. Fly shows much sense as to where she puts
her eggs. She finds a place where they will be
likely to live and get food and grow.

If the place is too wet, the baby flies would drown
when they leave the egg. If the place is too dry,
they would wither up and die. Then, too, they
must have soft food.

The fly does not lay her eggs on a stone or a piece of
wood. She lays them in some kind of food.

The fly can live all summer if it has a fair chance.
Cold kills flies. A frosty day will kill them.
Some few flies, like a few of the wasps, hide, and
live over winter in a torpid state, and in the

’ spring they come out to rear new swarms.

Birds, spiders, wasps, cats, dogs, and some other ani-
mals eat flies. These creatures kill flies by mil-
lions. People kill flies with poison and fly-traps.
If so many were not killed, we should be overrun
-with them.

{fn the South is a plant with a leaf like a jug. On the
60 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

8-3

seam of this leaf hang drops of honey. Its juice
can make the flies drunk.

Flies like this juice. But as soon as they get it they
turn dizzy and act just like drunken men. They
fall into the jug-like space of the leaf and scon die.
One of these plants will kill many flies in one day.

Many of our best birds live on flies, and if our birds

~ were all dead we should have much greater
trouble with the flies.

In the autumn you will see flies sitting about as if they
feel dull and ill. If you look carefully, you will
see that the back part of the body is white. It
seems to be covered with meal or mould.

Soon the fly dies. This white dust is a disease of the
fly. It does not curl up its legs when it dies from
this cause. They are stiff and spread out. The
fly looks like a live fly. If you touch it, it crum-
bles to dust.

All around such a dead fly you will see a ring of white
mould. This is perhaps a real mould,.or tiny
plant, that seizes on the body of the fly. It uses
up all the soft parts, and so kills it, leaving only
the dry shell.

There is another strange thing about this. The body
of a fly that dies in this way is rent or burst open.
The fly looks as if this dust or mould had grown
large in the body and so torn it open.
OF WHAT USE ARE. FLIES? 61

eo *

LESSON XIX.
OF WHAT USE ARE FLIES?

How often people cry out, “Oh, I wish there were no
flies! What is the use of a fly?”

But all things that God has made have their uses. And
all God’s works are worthy of study.

You have learned that worms are of great use. Let us
see if Mrs. Fly does any good in the world.

Mrs. Fly is of great use to man. She helps keep him
in health. Do you think that very strange ?
People say,“ Oh, these dirty flies!” And yet these

“ dirty flies” help to keep the world clean!
Now you know that over all the world, great numbers
of animals die each minute, and many of their
bodies lie on the ground and decay.

The foul smell of such bodies in decay causes disease
and death to men. In winter, and in cold places,
such things do not decay so fast, and so do not
make these bad odors.

But in hot days, if such dead things lie about, they
will poison the air. Soon we should all be ull.
62 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.
. oe

The work of Mrs. Fly is to lay many eggs in these dead
bodies. In a few hours these eggs turn to grubs,
and these grubs to little live worms, which begin
to eat as fast as they can.

Soon they leave only dry bones, which can do no harm.
They change the dead stuff into their own fat,
live bodies.

You know that the crabs are among the street-cleaners
of the sea. So the flies are among the street-
cleaners of the air and land.

Did you ‘ever watch flies dart about, here and there,
with a flight like hawks? They are eating up
small, evil things, too small for us to see. But
these are yet big enough to hurt us if we should
get them into our lungs.

Ask your teacher to tell you a little about your lungs.

In and about our homes many bits of things drop, and
might decay and mould. This would make the air
foul. But the busy and greedy fly drinks up all
the soft part of these things.

So we see that what we call the dirty flies help to clean
away much dirt.

Then, too, the fly serves for food for many birds, and
fish, and frogs, and some insects. Some of these
things we use for our food. Others are full of
beauty, or are of use to us, each in its own way.
A SWARM OF FLIES. 63

to

Thus, though the fly is often a trouble to us, we find
it is not without its uses. Look at one of these
little creatures through a glass that will magnify
it. You will see that the poor insect has really
much beauty.

From what you have read in this lesson you must not
think that all foul smells kill, nor that things that
have no bad smell are always safe. There are
some gases that have no odor at all, which yet
are very deadly.

LESSON XX.
A SWARM OF FLIES.

Have you heard people speak of swarms of flies?
By a swarm of flies we mean a great number of
flies rather near together. By a swarm of bees

' we mean a number of bees that live and work in
one place. A swarm of bees divides the work of
its hive. It has one queen bee. She is the mother
and ruler of the rest. But flies have no home
where they live in common. They have no work.
They have no one mother or queen, for whom the
rest work. Each mother fly drops her eggs where
64 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

it seems best to her. Then she goes off. She
leaves her children to grow as best they can.

I have said that the fly likes best to place her eggs on
a piece of fresh meat.

These eggs soon turn to worms or grubs, and so spoil
the meat. To keep the meat from the tlies the
cook puts a cover over it. The cover is often
made of wire net.

“Now,” says the cook, “I can keep away that dirty
fly.”

But Mrs. Fly says, “Oh, can you, Mrs. Cook? We
will see about that.”

So Mrs. Fly sits on top of the wire cover. She puts.
her little egg tube through one of the fine holes in
the net. She-drops egg after egg from the tube.
The eggs fall right on the meat, just where Mrs.
Fly wishes them to be.

Then the cook cries out, “How ever did that fly get to
my meat!”

Is it not strange that Mrs. Fly knows that her egg tube
is the right size to go through the mesh of the
wire net? How does she know that the eggs will
fall on the meat ?

Flies do another queer thing. If many flies are in a
room, and you begin to chase them to kill them,
they hide. They creep into holes and cracks.
A SWARM OF FLIES. 65

—

They hide in curtains. They go behind pictures.
After the hunt is over, out they come, one by one!

Flies also know how to sham death, — “play dead,” you
would say.

If you hit one and make it fall, it will lie very still, and
seems to be dead. Then, after a little, it softly
spreads out its legs and its wings. Then it shakes
itself. A moment more, off it goes.

This fashion of making believe to be dead does not
belong to flies only. Nearly all insects, and many
other animals sham death.

[t is worth while to watch and see how well they do it.

When a fly is killed other flies come to eat up its body.
They put their trunks or mouth tubes on the dead ~
fly and begin to suck.

Soon the body is sucked dry of all its juice. It is only
a dry shell.

T will tell you something that you can do with a dead
fly. If.it has not been dead so long that it has
grown too stiff you can make the wings move.
Hold it by the body. Gently tip up one wing.
As you lift up one wing the other will rise too.
They move together. It is as if they were set on
a little spring. .
66 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

LESSON XXI.
SOME QUEER FLIES.

- AutHoueH flies are of use, they also do evil to men in
many ways. It is well to look at things on all
sides.

The fly you have been reading about is the common
house-fly. That fly, with its noise, dirt, and spoil-
ing of food by laying eggs in it, is bad enough.
But yet the house-fly makes the least trouble of
any of its kind.

There are many kinds of flies. To the family of flies
belong gnats, midges, mosquitoes, and the ‘big
daddy-long-legs with wings.

You know well, how some of these things sting, you
say “bite” you. Mr. Daddy-long-legs hurts the
grass lands with his grubs, which spoil grass roots

. and the shoots of plants.

There is a fly called a “gall-fly”” because it bites-trees,
and lays eggs in twigs. Then upon the twigs
grow over the eggs round balls called “ a and
these injure the trees.
SOME QUEER FLIES. 67

te

There is also the “bot-fly,” which lays its eggs on the
hide of the horse. The egg causes the skin of the
horse to itch. He licks the place, and the egg
goes into his stomach.

The egg of the bot-fly is apt to make the horse sick.
The grub eats holes in the stomach of the horse.
That makes the horse sick. The farmer will say
that his horse is sick with “bots.”

In Africa flies kill horses and oxen by biting them.
The bite poisons the cattle and causes fever.

Farmers will tell you of a very bad fly that spoils
wheat and other grain. It is called the “Hes-
sian”’ fly.

Flies, as they flit from place to place, sometimes carry
with them the poison of disease, as of sores and
ulcers. Thus they spread these troubles among
people.

But while I tell you of that, I must not fail to say

_ that flies, as they go to flowers for honey, carry
the dust of the flowers from one to another. This
helps new flowers to grow.

There is a large and handsome Dron green fly, very
fine to look at, which bites horses and worries
them. It is called the “ horse-fly.”

In some lands a small sand-fly causes sore eyes.

Flies have been on the earth about as long as men
68 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

have, or a little longer, and there are some dead
flies worth a great deal of money.

How is that? There are flies in amber. Amber is
clear, hard, and bright yellow. It is used for
jewelry. Sometimes we see a perfect fly, held in
a clear, light mass of amber.

How did it come there? The amber was once a soft
gum and the fly lit on it. It stuck fast, and the
amber flowed over it and grew hard, and so buried
the fly in a clear, golden tomb.

A piece of amber with a fly in it will bring a high
price.

The “Spanish fly” is a large blue-green beetle. It is
very handsome, and is most useful when it is dead.
It is used in medicine. It makes blisters on the
skin.

Do you say, “Oh, blisters are very bad!” Yes, they
cause pain. But even pain can be of use in this
world. The blister, though it pains us, is of use.
It cures what might be a worse pain.

This Spanish fly is not a fly at all. It is a beetle
which has been given a fly’s name. It is put here
at the end of the lessons on flies, because in the
next lessons you are to read about beetles.
IN ARMOR CLAD. 69

a

LESS: ONe x CLL:

IN ARMOR CLAD.



BEETLE AND CRAB. ARE WE COUSINS’

Go to the garden or to the home plants, and after a
little search you will find one of the wonders of
the world.

You will find a small, horny, shining, red thing, with

~ black spots on its back. “Why!” you say, “that
is only a lady-bug, or lady-bird. We say a little
rhyme to it.” Yes, it is one of the beetles, and
every beetle is a wonder.

The winged insects are divided into two great classes,
Eaters and Drinkers. That is what their Latin
names mean. Butterflies, house-flies, bees, and
70 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

——

others, are drinkers. That is, they get their food
by sucking it through a pipe or tube.

This tube is on the fore part of the head; it is really
the upper lip grown long and round.

The other great class, the Eaters, eat their food with
their mouths. Some suck or lick it; some use
their jaws to crush and break their food.

Beetles belong to the class Eaters.

The beetles are covered with a hard, horny shell, like
a case. In this they are like the old-time soldiers,
who wore armor from head to foot.

Beetles belong to the great family of the ring-made
creatures. Take a large, round beetle, with big
jaws, feelers, and legs. Does he not look much
like Mr. Crab, who is also rmg-made?

In the picture above this lesson you see Mr. Crab and
Mr. Beetle. This is a large beetle that likes to
live antong the grasses and weeds near the sea-
shore. When he and Mr. Crab meet on the sand
they may think they are cousins.

Now let us get a beetle and look at him closely. You
will often find dead beetles on your path or in the
grass. You can take them to pieces and compare
them with what you read about them.

The first thing that you will notice in the beetle is
the hard case over the wing. The wing-cases look
IN ARMOR CLAD. 71

to s

like little shells, and have a nice hinge to hold
them in their place.

These two wing-covers fit close to each other over the
beetle’s back. When he flies he utts them away
from the wings. When you take off these covers
you will see lying under the cases a pair of neatly
folded wings. These wings are made much as
Mrs. Wasp’s are.

The cases are used for armor, not for flymg. They
are really a pair of wings. The fine silken under-
wings are the pair with which beetles fly.

There are some beetles that do not have this second
pair, and so cannot fly. There are some that have
the upper pair so short tha. they do not half
cover the body. Beetles wnich do not have the
lower wings creep, and cannot fly.

Watch a beetle as he crawls on the ground. Now see
him! When his back flies’ open two bright-hued
shells rise up. This crawling thing sweeps into
the air ona pair of wide thin wings!

The part of the beetle’s body that 1s under the wings
has rings like those of the wasp. The body is
made in the three parts imsects have. The wings
and six legs are fastened on what you would call
the chest or middle part.

The wings fastened on the upper or back part of the
12 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

oe

beetle’s chest fold down over the hind part of the
body. On the end of the hind part is what is
called “the egg-placer.” With that Mrs. Beetle
lays her eggs in safe places.

The legs and feet of the beetle are made in joints.
They have hairs on them. The legs are so made
and set that they cannot spread out as far as
those of spiders, wasps, flies.

Now here is Mr. Beetle’s head. It has two jaws and
two feelers, the mouth, and the eyes. There is
a little horn shield over the mouth. In fact, the
whole beetle is in a snug horn coat. We may
call this coat a suit of armor.

The eyes of the beetle are like those of the fly. Very
many eyes are set in what seem to be two big
eyes. The beetle does not have three single eyes
on the top of his head. Sometimes he has two
small simple eyes at the back of his head.

The splendid colors of Mr. Beetle are on his horn
coat. I caught a beetle last night which had
the under part of his breast covered with close
hairs, so*that it looked like velvet. He seemed
to have on a rich brown velvet vest.
WHEN MR. BEETLE WAS YOUNG. 73°

i

LESSON XXIIL

WHEN MR. BEETLE WAS YOUNG,

In the lessons about the Ant, Fly,

Wasp, Bee, and others, you
have heard that the young
insect makes three changes.

First it is a small, white or light-

colored egg ; then a fat, greedy
larva; then a pupa.

The insects you have thus far heard

of, pass through all these
changes in a short time. So

do some of the young beetles.

- But there are beetles which

The

spend one, two, three, even
more years as eggs and grubs.
long part of the lives of these
other insects comes after they
get their wings. The short
part of a beetle’s life generally
comes after he is winged.



BEETLE LARVA ‘“ BEFORE
HE HAS WINGS”
74 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

to

You will not care to hear about the beetle while he
is only an egg. As an egg he lies quiet where
the mother beetle hid him. These eggs are placed
in earth or in water. Sometimes they are put
into the bodies of dead animals, or into holes in
trees, or into fruit. Some kinds of beetles choose
one place, some another, for their eggs.

Then, after a time, the larva comes out. Some day
you may find a long, soft, stupid, white worm,
with its body made in rings. It has two big
eyes, two jaws, no feet, or, perhaps, very small
ones, never any wings. Would you guess it was
Mrs. Beetle’s child? Some day it will have strong
wings, long, strong legs, a horny body, and very
often colors like a rainbow.

But this which you call a “white worm” is the beetle
larva after it is born from the egg. Sometimes
it. has no eyes. It is always very greedy. Beetle
larve will eat almost everything but metals.
They harm wood, trees, fruit, flowers, meal, furs,
clothes, by gnawing and eating these things.

The larva of beetles looks like the larva of butterflies.
But it has no wings. No larva ever has wings.

The change of getting wings must come when the
larva has gone into the pupa cradle. Often in
this state it lies as if asleep or dead.
WHEN MR. BEETLE WAS YOUNG. 45

—

When it is a pupa it lies in a case or cradle shaped

The

much like a hen’s egg. There the pupa lies, its
legs folded over the front of its body, its wings
packed by its side, its jaws and feelers laid on
its breast. It looks very much like a baby laid -
asleep in a bed.

larva could eat, walk, roll, or swim. The pupa
in this little case can do nothing but wait. The
full-grown beetle can fly, swim, eat, walk, and is
often a thing of great beauty.

If you dig about the roots of plants or under stones,

you will, no doubt, find larva and pupa to look
at. It is well to seek out these things for your-
selves.

In some books you may read of a state of the insect

called the image state. This name is given to
the full-grown, perfect insect. It means that it
has reached the same form that its mother had,
which laid the egg. Larva means mask, and

_ pupa means baby.
76 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

te

LESSON XXIV.
HOW TO LEARN ABOUT BEETLES.

No class of insects has been more studied and written
about than beetles. Why is this? They are not
as wise as the ants. They do not build homes and
cities, as bees and wasps do. They make no
honey and no wax. They have not the many
trades of that busy Mrs. Wasp.

There are a few beetles which make little mud cells, or
balls of dirt for their eggs, or weave little nests
for the pupa. But their work is poor and rude,
and not as fine as Mrs. Wasp can do.

No doubt the reason why beetles have had so much
notice is, that there are very many of them, of
very many kinds. They live where we can often
see them. We can easily take them to pieces, to
study their parts, for their bodies are firm and
strong.

The parts of their bodies are very curious. Beetles can
be kept a long time after they are dead. They
will not spoil as soon as soft-bodied insects.
HOW TO LEARN ABOUT BEETLES. 17
—+-9 4—__.

After all, the chief reason of the notice. taken of
beetles is their great beauty. It is a beauty of
color and shape. Often the cases are lined and
dotted as if carved with great care.

Would you like to have some beetles to keep, to look
at and show to your friends? Let me tell you
how to get them.

Have a sheet of thick pasteboard, to fasten them on.
When you walk out, carry with you a bottle with
a wide mouth and a good cork. If this bottle
has broken laurel leaves in it, the beetles will die
as soon as you put them in.

Or, you can kill the beetles with a little ether. Or, you
can take up the beetle with a little forked stick,
and plunge it into very hot or boiling water.

“QO,” you say, “that would be so cruel!”” But the
truth is, the beetle dies the instant he is plunged
into hot water. He has no time to feel pain.

Why do these things kill beetles so quickly? Here,
now, is a great fact that you must know. The
insects do not breath through the mouth or nose,
as you do. They have no lungs. They breathe
through pipes or tubes, wound over all the body.
These tubes are very fine, and too small to be seen
with the naked eye. They
are held open by a little stiff,
spiral thread, like this:






CM

£30990000)




78 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

These tubes spread even to the legs and feet of the
insect. They reach the open air by many open-
ings, or breath holes. Now, when you plunge the
beetle into hot water, ether, or laurel odor, all its
tubes are filled and it dies at once. When your
beetle is dead, set it on the sheet of stiff paper.

Draw the legs, feelers, and jaws into place with a pin
or toothpick. Then fasten the beetle to the paper
with a tiny drop of thick glue put under the body.
Or, you can puta fine needle or pin through the
body. Be very sure that your beetle is quite dead
before you put the pin into him.

If you take this way of saving beetles, you will soon
have very many, of all colors, sizes, and shapes.
They will be brown, black, red, green, golden. I
can hardly tell you how pretty the beetles are !

Put some on the paper, with the wing-cases raised, and
the flying-wings drawn out from beneath. The
under wings are larger than the upper. You will:
wonder that the beetle can pack them in the cases.

The feelers of beetles take many forms. Some are like
plumes, some are like scales or leaves, some like
clubs. Some are nearly round like balls, some are
cone-shaped, some plain and straight; some are
bent like a new moon.

A farmer or gardener will like your beetles better dead
THE ROSE BEETLE. 79

ae

than alive. As he will tell
you, the beetles and their larvee
are very greedy things. They
often eat leaves and spoil crops
and trees.

LESSON XXV.
THE ROSE BEETLE.

Tuer chief family of the beetles is a
large one. It is found in all
parts of the world. The beetles
that belong to it are large, and
often of fine color and shape.

In old times the people of Egypt
called one of this family the

_ sacred beetle. They kept it as
an object of worship. They
often wore a stone or metal
image of it, to keep themselves
from harm.

Let us now'study one of this fam-
ily. It is called the Rose Bee-
tle. That is a very pretty ee Le


80 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

name. The beetle itself is pretty. It chooses a
pretty home and dainty food.

Some call this the Golden Beetle, because of its color.
It is a fine large beetle, with a thick body, round
at the tail part. The feelers are short and club-
shaped. The body, head, legs, and wing-cases
are a fine golden green, with silver spots and
lines.

This beetle does not hold the wing-cases apart when it
flies. It tips them only a little. The wide, thin
wings come out from beneath them.

The rose beetle is seen most in May and June. You
will find it in the garden, about the flowers. Its
chief food is honey and flower petals. Its mouth
is not horny, but soft and skin-like.

The feelers have ten joints, and wave lightly as the
beetle flies. It likes the sunshine. When it flashes
about in the light, it looks like a piece of melted
gold with green tints on it.

The rose beetle chooses for its home and food the
brightest and largest flowers. It digs deep into
the hearts of the roses. It sucks the honey and
chews the petals.

When the mother rose beetle wishes to lay her eggs,
she finds a place at the foot of a tree. She goes
down among the roots, where the wood is old and


THE ROSE BEETLE. 81

—

soft. Then she puts her eggs between the bark
and the wood.

Sometimes she changes her whole plan, and puts her
eggs into an ant’s nest! The ants do not seem
vexed at this.

The larva of the rose beetle is a fat, round, white thing,
like a thick worm. The head is round, and of a
pale brown color. The thin skin has hairs on it.

These larvee move very slowly, and always rest upon
one side. They have strong jaws, and their feelers
have five joints. A number of them live together.
They are dull and lazy, and always eating. They
eat leaves and soft wood.

While the weather is warm, the larvee keep near the top
of the soil. When it is cold, they dig down, even
one or two feet, and lie asleep until spring, comes
again.

They live in this way for three years. Then they make
a round or egg-shaped ball. They make the ball
of grains of earth, bits of dead leaves, and grass.
Or, they use the wood or sawdust they have cut
up with their jaws. They fasten all this stuff
together with glue from their mouths.

When the larve are shut up in this ball, they change
very quickly. At first the ball, or case, seems full
of a milky fluid. Then the legs and wings grow.
82 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

te

After a few weeks the white worm has changed to
a fine beetle that looks like a jewel.

Some of these beetles are so fine that they are put into
hoops of gold for ear-rings and brooches. In the
island of Manilla ladies keep rose beetles in tiny
cages for pets!

There is a beetle much like the rose beetle. It is called
the May, or June bug. These June bugs come in
great numbers. They eat the leaves of trees, and
even kill trees in this way. They fly by night;
and they like to get into a room where a lamp is
burning.

They blunder about, making a great buzz with their
horny wings. They hit their heads on walls and
panes of glass. Some people are afraid of them.
That is foolish, for they can do no harm to them.

These June bugs hide all day in the shade. They do
not like the sun. It is no wonder there are so
many of them, as each mother lays forty eggs.
The larvae do much damage by eating plant roots.

Watch June beetles to see how they lift their wing-
covers when about to fly. Look well at the fold-
ing of the inner wings.
. PRINCES AND GIANTS. 83

4

LESSON XXVI.

PRINCES AND GIANTS.



PRINCES AND GIANTS, |

BEETLES vary much in size. Some are so small that
you can hardly see them as they creep among the
grasses.

Others are so large that a child might fear them. He
might think that with their thick legs and claw-
like feet and strong jaws they must surely be able
to hurt him. But beetles are quiet, mild things,
and seldom pinch or bite anybody.

Why do these beetles have these strong coats like mail?
To keep them from harm. They live under stones,
and among roots, and dig about in the earth.
Their horny bodies protect them.
84 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

Many animals might eat the beetles if they had not
the horny coats to shield them.

Fish, birds, and other animals eat them and their grubs.
Enough are killed and eaten to prevent the world
being too full of beetles.

Beetles have few weapons. I will tell you of one or
two of them. Stag beetles have very large, strong

J jaws, and can give a good pinch with them.

One family of beetles is called the “ Oil family.” They
have an oil in them. They drop this from their
legs when they are touched.

This oil has a bad smell. It can make a blister on the
skin. Because of this oil people let them alone,
and perhaps small animals do the same.

There is a beetle that carries a gun! This is like a gun
with several barrels, for it can be fired three or
four times without being reloaded! Oh, how can
that be?

Near the tail of the gun beetle is a little sack or bag
full of fluid. When an enemy comes near him,
My. Beetle, as he runs, throws off a drop of this
fluid. The fluid flies out of the bag with a little
bang. It sounds like the report of a tiny gun, and
makes a kind of mist or blue smoke.

Three or four of these shots follow each other. This

1 See p. 68.
PRINCES AND GIANTS. 85

te

beetle is a small fellow. Big beetles like to chase
him. When the wee gun goes off in the big
beetle’s face, the big beetle backs away. Then he
folds down his feelers and stands still.

He acts very much as a dog does when he drops his tail
between his legs and runs off !

These little gun-owning beetles live in damp places.
Often a group of them will hide under a stone. If
you lift up the stone, the poor beetles are in a
great fright. They begin to fire off their guns
like a squad of soldiers.

Now after talking about these little beetles, let us talk
of great ones. I told you some beetles are very
small, and some are very large. One beetle is so
big that it is called the Giant. Another is
called Goliath, from the huge giant whom King
David slew. Others are called Atlas and Hercules,
from tales told in old times of giants.

The very large beetles live in hot lands and are scarce.
Some have the jaws large and curved like a crab’s
claw. At first sight you might think them
crabs. Some of these odd ones are shown in
the picture.

The colors of these great beetles are often very splendid.
Some of them have long horns on the front of
their heads. Some of them have the hind legs so
86 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

large, and of such a queer shape, that they do not
look like beetles.

Some of these giant beetles have large teeth or knobs
upon their jaws; they need them to crush and
break their food. These teeth are like the knobs
on Mr. Crab’s claw, which he uses for playing a
tune. The beetle can use his knobs to make
music.

Beetles are fond of their own tunes. Often they
make, for hours, a shrill hum, or buzz. They
make this by rubbing their wing-cases.

There is a great’ beetle in Brazil called the Prince of
Beetles. He gets this name from his size and
beauty. Some of the princes have been sold for
two hundred dollars each.

When you walk in the field, you might carry a bottle

_ with a wide mouth. In this you can collect
beetles to study. It may be very pleasant to study
them when you go home. But have something in
the bottle to kill them, for, shut up in a small
space, and frightened, they are likely to pull each
other to pieces.
THE LITTLE SEXTON. 87

ot

LESSON XXVII.

THE LITTLE SEXTON.











Once, when I was a little girl, I saw a dark beetle
standing on its hind pair of legs. It was holding
its fore legs clasped over its head, as you can hold
up your hands.

An old man who was near said, “That is a holy bug,
and shows what man ought to do. It is saying
its prayers. People call it the ‘ praying beetle.’”

[ think the old man meant what he said, but of course
the beetle was neither holy nor praying. The
queer way of standing was only one of the odd
ways of beetles. Now I will tell you of another.
88 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE

— te

Very often on the road you will see a beetle, or a pair
of beetles, rolling about a small ball like a marble.
The ball is of dirt, or some soft stuff, and is often
larger than the beetle. But she rolls it with ease,
for she is very strong.

The beetle is not playing marbles nor base-ball. She is
only doing her work. She has been flying about,
looking for a good place in which to lay her eggs,
and now she has gone to work with all her might.

She lays her egg in a morsel of the stuff of which she
will make her ball. When the larva comes from
the egg, this ball will be its food until it is strong
enough to crawl about and seek food for itself.

The beetle moulds the soft stuff over the egg, like a
pill. Then, as she rolls it about, it grows larger,
as your snowball grows when you roll it about in
the snow.

When the ball is large enough, Mrs. Beetle does not

leave it in the road for wheels to run over or feet
to tread upon. She seeks a place where the larva
may be safe and feed well when it comes from
the egg.

She shows much sense in the choice of a place. She
drags the ball along between her hind feet, or she
pushes it with her fore feet or her hind feet, or
rolls it along toward the safe place which she has


8.
THE LITTLE SEXTON. 89

—

chosen. If the ground is so rough that she can-
not drag her ball, she carries it on her head.

This Mrs. Beetle’s head is flat, arid has some wee knobs
upon it. These knobs hold her load firmly in
place as she carries it along.

Perhaps Mrs. Beetle finds that she cannot without help
take her ball to a good place. Then she flies off,
and soon comes back with other beetles of her
own kind. They all help her until her ball is
where she wishes it to be.

How does she tell them what she needs?) Who knows
that? No one. I haye seen four or five beetles
at work on one ball.

When the ball is in the right spot, Mrs. Beetle digs a

hole with her jaws and horny fore legs. Then she -
rolls the ball in. She fills up the hole with earth
_ and presses it down flat.

This is not the only beetle that buries its eggs. There
is another one, called the Sexton Beetle. When it
finds a dead bird or mouse or frog or other small
animal, it sets to work to bury it. It digs a little
grave for it. This is why it is called a sexton.

This beetle begins to dig under the dead body. As it
takes out the earth, the dead thing sinks more and
more. At last it is deep enough to be covered, as
a coffin is covered in a grave.
e
90 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

a

In this way this beetle helps to keep the earth and air
clean. Is that why it buries things? Oh, no!
The reason the beetle does this is, it wants to get
a good place for its eggs.

These sexton beetles are black, with yellow bands.
They are rather large, and go in pairs. You might
think these beetles and the one who makes the ball
would be dirty from their work, but they are not.

These beetles have a kind of oil over their bodies.
This keeps any dirt from sticking to them. So,
though they work in dirty places, they are always
clean and bright.

These burying beetles have a keen scent. They can
smell a dead body even if it is a long way off.
Let us watch Mr. and Mrs. Sexton Beetle at work.
Here is a dead mouse. Through the air come fly-
ing these, two beetles. Their wings hum as they
come.

When they alight, Mr. Beetle goes briskly to his work,
and Mrs. Beetle stands looking on. Her work in
this world is not to dig, but to lay eggs. Before
the work begins, they both make a good meal off
the dead mouse. All sexton beetles eat flesh.

Mr. Beetle works a while. Then he drops down as if
very tired, and sleeps. Then up he gets and
ploughs furrow after furrow about the mouse.
THE LITTLE SEXTON. 9]

te

Mr. Beetle uses his head for a plough. Now the
dead body has sunk out of sight. Mr. Beetle has
put over it the earth he took out from the grave
which he made. He makes all the little grave
smooth and trim.

But what is this queer little fellow doing now? He
has made a little side door into the grave. He
and Mrs. Beetle walk in. They have gone to take
another meal from the mouse.

When their dinner is over, Mrs. Beetle lays some eggs
in the dead body. She knows that when the
larvee come from the eggs, they will like to eat
the food which they find all around them. After
the eggs are laid, Mr. and Mrs. Beetle come out
into the air.

Mr. Beetle fills up the doorway. Then off the two fly
to find other things to bury.

The larva of the sexton beetle looks much like a beach
flea or sand-hopper.

Does the strength of beetles surprise you? Once I
found a fine grass-green beetle, with silver spots.
I wanted him for my card of beetles. I tied him
in the hem of my handkerchief to carry him home.
The hem was double, but he ate a hole through
it; then away he went.

Once I shut up ten beetles in a box. I forgot them
for two days. When I opened the box, they were
92



SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

all dead. They had killed each
other. The box had in it only
heads and legs and wings. The
last beetle that had been left
had lost his legs and wings.
He had won the battle, but
died on the field. Some other
great captains have done the
same.

—-059300—

LESSON XXVIII.

THE STORY OF THE STAG BEETLE.

Amone the largest beetles that we

have in this country are the
Stag Beetles. They get this
name from the size of their

jaws.

If you look at the picture, you will

see that the great jaws look
like horns. If you should ever
see the head of a stag or deer,
you may notice that this bee-
tle’s jaws are very like the
stag’s horns in shape.
THE STORY OF THE STAG BEETLE 93

te

These jaws can give a very hard pinch in time of need.

The

Still, you need not be afraid of the stag beetle;

he will not hurt you.

use of these great jaws is not yet fully known.
You will see that they have knobs on the inner
edge.

Only Mr. Stag Beetle has these horns. Mrs. Stag

Beetle has small jaws, and her head is not so
wide as her shoulders. Mr. Stag Beetle has a
very wide head. He needs a wide, strong head to
hold up his big jaws.

If you will look at the large beetle in the picture “ Are

The

We Related,’ + you will see that its feelers are like
a plume of six feathers. These feathers are so
set that the beetle can fold them on each other
into a single club, as you can fold a fan. They
are called scale-feelers.

stag beetle has also curious feelers. They are
made in scales, but he cannot close them into a
club. ‘The scales are set like the teeth of a comb.
He has comb-feelers. Perhaps they are of use to
him in cleaning his body and legs.

These stag beetles during the day crawl about on

trees. They fly by night. Their eggs are usually
laid in the trunks of old oak-trees.

1 Lesson 21.

4
94 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

a

The larva of the stag beetle has six strong legs and a
pair of strong jaws for cutting leaves and wood.
The bark, wood, leaves, and roots of the oak and
willow are their chief food.

This larva is very large, and lies with its body curled
in a half-ring. If you look at it, you will see that
it has nine round spots down its side, on the rings
of its body. It looks as if it wore a coat with
big buttons on the side.

Now let me tell you a new wonder. These buttons
are the air-holes through which this larva breathes.
Come, let us hear the whole story of the insect’s
breathing. . ;

You know you draw the air in through your nose and
mouth, and this air fills your lungs. You know
also that the insect breathes through long, fine
tubes. They are kept open with a stiff thread,
and wound over all its body.

Now these tubes have openings for air to pass in and
out. These can open and close. In shape they are
a little like the lid of a glass jar. These are the
holes that we see so clearly along the side of the
body of this larva. Both the larva and the pupa
must breathe, or they cannot live.

The larva of a stag beetle lives and grows for four or
six years; then it passes into the pupa state.
MR. BEETLE SEEKS FOR A HOME. 95

—

When it is ready to change, it makes a case for
itself of the fine chips, the juice of which it has
been sucking. It binds this sort of coarse saw-
dust together with glue from its mouth.

When the stag beetle finally comes from this pupa-case,
he is a fine-looking fellow. His head and chest
are black, with fine dots like carving. His wing-
cases are a deep chestnut.

There are some stag beetles that never get the large,
strong horns. We do not know why this is so.
Mr. Stag Beetle with the horns fights with and
beats his cousins who have no horns.

Stag beetles are fond of fighting. They are like Mr.
Crab in that. They have duels with each other.

Mrs. Stag Beetle does not behave in this way. She
looks on at the fight, but takes no part in it. Her

- business is to lay eggs in safe places. She has no
time to fight. And then —she has no horns!

——-0595 0o—_—_—.

LESSON XXIX.
MR, BEETLE SEEKS FOR A HOME.

Now I shall tell you of a very odd beetle. If ever
you find one of this family, you will say, “This
poor beetle has outgrown his coat!” You will say
96

2

AS)



HE SEEKS A HOME.

SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

But



that when you see how very
short his wing-cases are.

no! the beetle has not out-
grown his coat. Insects do not
grow after they leave the pupa-
case. Mr. Beetle and his coat
are both of the same size that
they always were.

In fact, this beetle’s coat was cut

The

short for him at the first. It is
the fashion in his family to
wear short clothes!

flying-wings of this beetle are
large, but the wing-covers are
very short. They do not cover
half the length of the body.
Yet this beetle can fold up and
tuck his flymg-wings under the

short wing-cases.

Most of the short-coated beetles are

small. Some of them are an
inch long. They are very lively
insects. They are very greedy
little creatures too.

Some of these beetles eat only ani-



mal food. They are always
MR. BEETLE SEEKS FOR A HOME. 97

—

busy hunting for it. Others of them are fond of
mushrooms. Some of them ‘have a ‘bad smell.
People do not care to touch them.

Since their hard shell coat is so short, it would be easy
to hurt them. No doubt they have this bad smell
to keep away creatures that would eat them.
The smell keeps them from harm.

The short-coats do not all have a bad smell. Some
‘beetles with long coats have this foul odor. And
there are beetles that smell like roses, and like musk.

Some of the short-coated beetles curl the hind part
of their body over. The end is held up above
their backs. If they had a long, hard coat, they
could not do that.

You have read about the termites, or white ants." In
Brazil people may find one kind of the short-

coat beetle living in the nests of the termites.

These beetles that live with the termites are very
curious. The back part of their body is too large
for the front part. It looks like a great ball, and
is turned up over the upper part of the back.

These are the only beetles that do not lay eggs and go
off and leave them. They keep their eggs in this
large, round part of the body until they hatch.
Then the wee larve come out alive.

1 See Lesson 9.
98 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

Why do the ants allow these beetles to live with them ?
Perhaps it is ‘because they make no trouble, and
so. the termites do not care one way or the other.
Perhaps, like the little Aphis," this beetle has a
way of making honey; so it pays its house-
rent with honey!

There are also other short-coat beetles which do not
have these big, round bodies. They lay their eggs
like other beetles ; yet they live in ant-hills. Per-
haps these beetles and their larve like to feed on
the husks and rubbish they may find in the ant-
hill. The ants do not drive them out.

The short-coat beetles are not the only ones that take
lodgings. Perhaps you may hear your mother say
that “the moths have got into her furs.” If she
looks at the furs, she may find, not only moths, but
small beetles. They are having a fine time eating
up the fur!

These beetles destroy furs, skins, skin rugs, and stuffed
animals. Their greedy larve can make much
havoc. These larve are like tiny black worms.
They are fond of ham, bacon, and lard.

One very large short-coat beetle is called the “coach-
horse.” The larva of this coach-horse beetle looks
like the full-grown insect. It carries its tail aloft,

1 See Lesson 9.
THE LITTLE WATER-MEN.

he

in the same way. It can run
fast, and seeks its food all day
long.

These larvee often hide under stones.

The

In the winter they go deeper
under ground. They are fierce,
and they eat animal food. |
baby lives only about three
weeks in the pupa-case. This
case is of an odd shape, like a
wedge, with a rounded top. It
is of a shining gold color, and
has a plume or crown of hairs
in front.

—0b9200——_.
LESSON XXX.

THE LITTLE WATER-MEN.

You know of spiders that live on

land. You also know of spi
ders that run upon the water.
There are also land-beetles and
water-beetles.

The water-spiders have rafts, boats,

skates, and diving-bells. They



A HAPPY RACE,

99
100 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

re

sit and float on lily leaves. Their homes are all
cool and bright under the clear, still waters.

There-is also a happy race of beetles that have all these
things. The story of these beetles is like the story
of a fairy prince, but it is a true story.

All living things are fitted for the places where they

are to live. The animals that live in cold lands
have thick fur. Birds are made with light bodies,’
so that they can fly easily. The fish have scaly,
pointed, slippery bodies, so they can glide swiftly
through the water.

So you must expect to find that the water-beetles are
not quite like the land-beetles. They have bodies
made fit to live in their water-home.

If you place a water-beetle beside a land-beetle, you
will see that the parts of the water-beetle fit more
closely than the land-beetle’s. They join each other
so as to form a smooth, water-tight case. When
we build a boat, is it not our first care to make it
tight, so that it will not leak ?

Next you will see that the water-beetle’s body is longer,
narrower, and more pointed in front than the
land-beetle’s. It is made so as to part the water
as it moves along. The water-beetle’s shape is
more fish-like than that of the land-beetle. When

1 See Third Book,
THE LITTLE WATER-MEN. 101



we build a boat, we do not make it broad or square
at both ends. We make the fore-part narrow and
sharp, to cleave the water as the fish does.

As the water-beetles will swim much and walk very
little, their first and second pairs of legs are small
and feeble, but the hind legs are wide and strong,
and reach far back. They are used for swimming.

Mr. Swimming Crab has broad hind-legs, used for oars
or paddles. Mr. Water-Beetle’s- legs are made
in much the same way, and have hairs or bristles
upon them.

But though the water-beetles are to walk but little,
they are to fly much, and so their wings are fine
and large.

In fact, the water-beetle likes to fly. Very often he
flies at night, and he seems to delight in a clear
moonlight. Then the water of his pond spreads
out like a sheet of silver, and the crickets chirp in
the grass.

On such nights the water-beetles rise quite high into
the air, and fly here and there, as if full of joy.
Then they turn, close their wings, and drop into
the water with a plash, like a stone.

When a number of these beetles drop with this quick
plash, what do you think happens? Why, the
green frogs who sit on logs or rocks, with their
102 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

i

big eyes above the water, dive in a great fright.
I wonder if the beetles think it is fun to scare the
frogs ?

The larvee of water-beetles live in the water, as their
parents do. They are very greedy, and hunt their
food as if they were angry. They have large
jaws, shaped like a sickle. Their bodies are long
and narrow, and they have on each side of the
head six tiny eyes.

With so many eyes, they can see all about them, so
they keep out of danger. They also see bugs which
they wish to catch. Their straight, narrow bodies
dart through the water with such quick motion as
Mr. Crab has when he runs on the sand. They
pounce on their prey, and their curved jaws hold
it fast.

Some of these great water-beetles have a sharp point,
like a thorn, on the under side of the breast. This
is not of use to kill what they eat, or to fight
their enemies. The beetle seizes his prey with
his jaws, or with his fore feet. But if you try to
hold him, then he draws his body back, and drives
this thorn into your hand.

Water-beetles have flat pads on their feet, as water-
spiders do. The hairs on these pads hold tiny
bubbles of air.
THE LITTLE WATER-MEN. 103

or

When these beetles wish to fly, they do not rise straight
out of the water; they climb up the stem of some
plant. Then, when they are high enough to make
a good start, they spread their lovely wings, and
skim away.

If you watch the ponds, you may see a water-beetle
floating with his head down, and the tip of his

tail stuck out of the water. What does he mean
by that queer action ? :

He is getting air to breathe. Though he lives under the
water, he breathes air, and he is filling up his div-
ing-bell; or, rather, he is turning himself into a
diving-bell. How does he do that? Let us see.

This beetle’s wing-covers are air-tight. The mouths of
his breathing-tubes open under the wing-covers.
When he has used all the fresh air he had, he
wants some more. So he comes to the top of the
water, turns his head down, and spreads out his
feet to balance himself. Then, with a little jerk,
he drives out all the air from under his wing-
covers.

Then he draws in a little fresh air, shuts his wing-
covers up close, and goes down with plenty of
fresh, pure air to breathe. =

I have known people who will shut themselves up in a
room and breathe the same air over and over
104 SEA-SiDE AND WAY-SIDE.

again.! The beetle, you see, is more sensible. He
knows that if he is to keep his health and spirits,
he must have good, fresh, clean air to breathe.
So he takes all this trouble to get pure air.

—_co t40-0——_

LESSON XXXI.

WHIRLIGIG BEETLES.

THERE is a Mrs. Water-Beetle who has on the under
side of her body two little knobs for spinning silk.
These are much like the silk-spmners of Mrs.
Spider.

As soon as this Mrs. Beetle has laid some eggs, she
goes to work, like a good mother, to keep her
babies safe and warm. She spins a little silk ball,
or bag, for the eggs. This ball is water-tight. It
is woven so close that it does not leak. It is so
light that it will float.

There are other beetles, and fish, and frogs in the
water, that are seeking food, and they might eat
these eggs, but will not touch them when in this
tough silk ball. The balls are of a fine bright
color, like gold thread.

1 Let the teacher explain the evils of vitiated air.
WHIRLIGIG BEETLES. 108

—

Another of the water-beetles makes a little silk ‘bag,
packs it full of eggs, and glues it to the under side
of a leaf of some water-plant.

You know that a fly has a little pair of wings, called
alulets, below its true wings. One of the beetles
has such clubs or alulets. So you see, in one part
they are somewhat like a spider, in another part
somewhat like a fly. And some things about them
are like what a crab has.

Among all animals you will find points of likeness be-
tween one creature and another.

Did you ever see a whirligig beetle? He takes his
name from the top, or whirligig, because he spins
round, and round, and round. Go to the pond, and
you will see some of these merry fellows. They
act as if they felt so happy that they could not
keep still.

These whirligigs are of a fine bronze color. They use
their hind legs for oars, and their fore legs for
rudders. They have their eyes divided, so that
each one seems to have a pair of eyes on each side
of its head; one half the eye looks up, and one
looks down.

These are small beetles, and they whirl, whirl, whirl.
Then they stand still for a second. If you make
a dart at them, and try to catch them, you will
find that it is not easy to do so.
106 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-~SIDE,

—

These whirlers lay their eggs on leaves above water.
The larve spin silk pupa-cases which hang on
leaves, or on stems, above the top of the water.

These and other water-beetles live m ponds or very
quiet streams, not in swift water.

Now I hope the peep you have had at beetle-life will
make you wish to study it more. Study not so
much in books, as out-of-doors for yourselves.

Of what use are beetles? Wise people have not yet
found out very much about the use of beetles.
Some of them, as you have read, devour or bury
spoiled things, that it would be bad to have lying
about on the ground. They help to keep the world
clean.

Some of them eat insects that harm plants. Some of
them make good food for fish, birds, and other
creatures. But very many of the beetles do much
harm to plants, clothes, and other valuable things.
On the whole, I fear that beetles are pretty rather
than useful!
WHAT A FISHERMAN TOLD. 107

——i—

LESSON XXXII.
WHAT A FISHERMAN TOLD.

OnE day, on the sea-beach, I saw a man. He was busy
‘ mending a net. He took from the net two small
things like shells. They clung to the meshes of
the net. They were white and hard. They
looked like two or three shells put one inside the
other.

The fisherman said, “There are in the world more of
these things than there are leaves on the trees, I
think.” :

“Where do they grow, Mr. Fisherman ?”

“Tt is easier,” said the fisherman, “to say where they
do not grow, unless I just say, they grow wher-
ever there is sea-water. The pier yonder, below
high-water mark, is covered with hundreds of
them. All the rocks that we see bare at low
tide are white with them. Every log or stick that
drifts on the sea has them on it. All the old
shells on the beach, and many new shells, have
dozens fastened on them.”

*T have seen an old King Crab crawl up the beach,”
108 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

the fisherman said. “He had his shell so coated
with these things, that it seemed as if he had two
shells, one on top of the other. It was so heavy
that he could hardly walk.

“J have also seen them growing in the skins of whales,
and sharks, and other fish. I have sailed all
around the world, and I have found these things
everywhere.”

“ What do you call them, Mr. Fisherman?”

“Some call them Sea-Acorns, some Sea-Rose-Buds.
These are pretty names; but Barnacle is the right
name.”

“Do you know, Mr. Fisherman, that they are cousins
of the crabs?”

“T’ll never believe that,’ said the fisherman. “They
do not look like crabs. When I was a boy, folks
told me that out of these shells came a little bird
that grew into a goose. I saw a picture once,
of a tree all covered with big barnacles, and out
of each one hung a little bird’s head. Is that tale
true? They were not quite like these barnacles.”

“No, Mr. Fisherman, it is not at all true. No birds
grow from barnacles. That is an old-time fable.”

“Well,” said the fisherman, “once in the water I saw
something hanging out of the shell of a fellow like
this. It opened and shut, and looked a little
like a bird’s foot.”
WHAT A FISHERMAN TOLD. 109

—

“Tt was a foot, Mr. Fisherman, but not a bird’s- foot.
It was Mr. Barnacle’s own foot, and as he has no
hands, he uses his feet to catch his dinner.”

“T know,” said the fisherman, “that horse-hairs in
ponds will turn into long worms. But I never
did think these shells would turn into birds.”

“ And horse-hairs will never turn into worms. Long,
thin, black worms in ponds look much like the
hairs of a horse’s tail, so some people think they
must once have been horse-tail hairs. But it is
not so. Horse-hairs are always only horse-hairs,
and worms all come from eggs which were laid to
bring out a worm.”

“Tt is a pity,” said the fisherman, “that when I was a
boy in school my books did not tell me of these
things. It would have been nice to know what I
was looking at as I went about the world.”

Now let us study these barnacles of which our fisher-
man spoke. He told us truly about their number
and where they grow. He told us what he knew
because it was what he had seen.

There are two kinds of barnacles, — those that have
stems, and those that have no stems.

The kind that has no stems is the kind you will see

oftener, though there are plenty of the other kind.

The stemless, or acorn barnacles, are placed flat upon
110 _ SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

See enen

whatever they grow on. Try to pull one off a
stone. You cannot do it while the animal is alive.

When the animal is dead or dying, you can move the
shell from what it grows upon. After the animal
has been dead some time, the shells drop from their
places, and leave room for others to grow.

—059400-—_

LESSON: XXX IIT,
MR. BARNACLE AND HIS SON.

Wuat is a barnacle? A barnacle is a kind of crab.
How many families of barnacles are there? * Two, —
the stem family and the stemless family.















































































































































































































OLD AND YOUNG BARNACLES.

A stem barnacle is a kind of crab with a three-cornered
shell. It grows fast to some object by a long, thick

stem.
MR. BARNACLE AND. HIS SON. 111

te

A stemless barnacle has a shell shaped like an acorn, or

like a rose-bud with the top bitten off. Instead of a
stem, it is held fast to the object on which it grows
by a thin plate of shell at its broad, or flat end.
This plate has a tiny hole in the centre. |

When you first saw a barnacle, you would not think it

Let

The

The

The

was a crab, or any relative of Mr. Crab. When
grown up it does not look at all like the Crab Fam-
ily. When crabs and barnacles are very young,
they look more like each other. .

us look at an acorn barnacle. ‘The shell is in
plates, as if two or three shells were set one over
another. The shell grows by added bits of lime,
as a conch shell does. The thin skin that lines it,
and holds it together, is shed, like Mr. Crab’s coat.
Then the shell has room to grow.

shell is hard and white. It is lined with a very
thin skin, which often has a faint, pretty tint.
stem barnacles have long, flesh-like stems which
move and sway with the motion of the water.
They look much like a little, queer, pale plum
hung by a long, thick stem.

end of the barnacle, which clings to the stone, log,
shell, or fish on which it has fastened itself, is the
head end. The two feelers, which all these ani-
mals have, are turned into two fine tubes, or pipes.
112 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.



These make a strong cement. Cement is like glue,
but much more strong and stiff.

This cement fastens Mr. Barnacle to his place. So
after he has settled himself in life, he never wan-
ders about any more.

Did Mr. Barnacle ever go abroad? Oh, yes! When
he was young he swam about the water-world, in
a very brisk way. Let us hear about that.

Mr. Barnacle makes the same changes of life that an
insect does. First he is an egg, then a larva, then
a pupa, and at last a steady old barnacle. But
the Jarva barnacle makes two or three changes of
shape before it turns into a pupa.

Barnacles grow fast. They change their coats often
when they are young.

Here is an old acorn barnacle fast upon a stone. It
is about as big as the end of your little finger.
Tt has some eggs which it packs into the shape
of a small leaf. It-tucks this leaf of eggs into
a fold of the thin skin that lines the thick shell.

As the eggs get ready to hatch into larvee, the old bar.
nacle is also growing, and making more shell.
Soon it is ready to enlarge the outer shell. So
the inside skin cracks apart and falls off. By
degrees some barnacles become quite large as
fresh shell grows from within.
MR. BARNACLE ‘AND HIS SON 113

a

When the old inside skin falls off, the eggs are
set free. Out of them come the larve. The
larve are active, hungry little fellows, who know
how to swim as soon as they are loose in the
water.

The larva acts as if it liked to be free from the shell-
prison. It darts about in the sea, and each day
its shape changes. It has one eye, a mouth, two
feelers like horns, and six legs. It can swim,
and can walk over sea-weed.

Some parts of this gay little larva will one day turn
into tubes to make cement to hold it fast to a
stone. Then it will be a stay-at-home barnacle
all its life long.

When the larva becomes a pupa, it drifts about until
at last it is time for it to stop travelling and
keep still. Then it fixes itself by its head to the
place that will always be its home. All it has
to do after that, is to fish and eat. As it makes
new shell, it will enlarge the old shell. And it
will have little eggs, packed in the shape of a
wee leaf between the skin and outer shell.

By and by Mr. Barnacle has a hard shell of many
plates, his eye has gone down near his stomach.
Do you think he can see what he eats? His legs
are not used for walking, but to fish with; his
114 | SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

Dip

=——=| My little fishers fish for food, and



A FISHING PARTY.



mouth is near his feet. The rest
of his head has gone off with
his feelers, to attend to mak-
ing cement and shell. What a

queer creature he is!
——0-059300-——

LESSON XXXIV.
A FISHING PARTY.

you ever go fishing? Did you
fish with a rod and line? Or,
did you sit on a pier and let
your line drop into the water
from your hand? Or, did you
go out with the boats and see
the men throw a net into the
water ?

There are many ways of fishing,

and now I shall tell you of
some queer little fishers and
their ways.

Why did you want to catch fish ?

Oh, just for fun!

they eat their fish without any
A FISHING PARTY. 115

Sencen aca

cooking. Their fish are so small that you cannot
see them without the help of a glass that mag-
nifies.

I saw a fishing party to-day. There were twenty
fishers in it. They were all dressed in white
coats. They all sat on one stone.

“What a big stone!” you cry. You had better say,
“Oh, what little fishers!”” For, to tell you the
truth, I covered the whole party up with one of
my hands!

Was this a fairy. fishing party? No; it was a barna-
cle fishing party. I will tell you about it.

The sun shone on the water, the sea was still, and
the tide was slowly going out. It was half-low
tide. A gray rock lay in the water. The water
was yet about two or three inches above the top
of the rock.

On this rock were about twenty stemless barnacles,

| clean, white, and acorn-shaped. They were of the
size of small acorns. You must know that barna-
cles grow. They are of many sizes. Some are
the size of a small glove-button. Others are of
the size of a small acorn, or of the end of your
little finger.

As I looked at these twenty little fishers, the plates of
the shells were opened a little. Out of the top of
eK , SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

each shell came a fine little plume, like five or six
tiny feathers.

This plume waved up and down in the water. It
seemed to open and shut gently, as you would open
and shut your hand.

Every now and then this little plume was drawn quite
back into the shell. In a minute out it came
again and waved as before. What did all this
mean ?

It meant that the barnacles were having a fishing party.
They were catching their dinner while the tide was
over their shells. Mr. Crab gets his dinner at low
tide, and hides at high tide. Mr. Barnacle fishes
and eats at high tide. - At low tide he shuts his
shell house and clings to his place. He is waiting
for the tide to come up and cover him once more.

When Mr. Barnacle opened and shut this fine plume, it
was his net, or his set of lines with which to fish
little live creatures from the water. He tangles
his prey (or food) up in his fine plumes.

Among the things he catches are tiny crabs, too small
for the naked eye to see.

When the plume net is full, he draws it into his shell.
Then he empties it into his mouth. After this he
puts his plume out of his house once more, to fish

1 See First Book.
A LAST LOOK AT MR. BARNACLE. ian

He

for other things. In the mean time, he feeds on
what he has taken. He has no pantry in which to
store things, as Mr. Crab has.

Near this fishing party on the stone, drifted a log. On
the under side of the log were some stem barna-
cles. They were fishing, too. They fished in the
same way, and for the same kind of things.

They opened their shells, pushed out a lovely plume,
and this pretty thing caught food in its meshes.

Does their net never break and need to be mended as
the fisherman’s net does? No doubt, if it does, a
new piece will soon grow. What is his net? It
is Mr. Barnacle’s feet. His crab cousins have
many legs and feet. The crabs also have jaw feet,
and a big claw, or hand. When he was young he
had six legs. The barnacle now has more than six
feet. They look very like a cluster of long fingers
or toes. He uses them to fish with. For what else
should he use them? He never walks nor swims.

——o0205 00——_

LESSON XXXV.
A LAST LOOK AT MR. BARNACLE.

Iv is well to know all you can about barnacles, for you
will see them wherever you go by the sea-side.
- 118 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

If you study them, you will not, like the fisherman,
believe foolish things about them, and refuse to
believe true things.

Will it not be pleasant to think of what you know of
their story ? When you see an acorn barnacle fast
to a stone, you can think of the days when he was
young and went sailing about. I wonder if he
calls those days “the good old times!”

When you see a stem barnacle swinging in the water,
you can think of what a good time he is having,
fishing with his pretty feet.

The name of the Barnacle Family means curl-feet, from
this fine, curly plume, which is his fish-net. The
stemless ones also have, from their shape, a name
which means acorn.

These, acorn shells can live out of water for a few hours
atatime. When the tide is low, many of them are
left high and dry. But if they should be out of
water too long, they will die for want of food and
water. Perhaps, also, the dry heat of the air kills
them,

If you wish to study them for yourselves, take home a
stone, shell, or stick, with some of them on it.
Put it in a bowl of sea-water. Soon they will open
their shells and begin fishing.

Those barnacles which grow fast to living fish, sharks,
A LAST LOOK AT MR. BARNACLE. 119

—

or whales, bury their heads and tubes in the skins
of these animals.

The barnacles that make the most trouble are those
which fasten upon the outside of ships. The bot-
toms of ships are often covered with barnacles.
They make the hull of the ship rough and heavy.
That hinders its motion through the water.

In such a case the ship must be put into a dry dock.
There it is scraped clean. Because of this trouble
and waiting, sailors dislike barnacles. They often
say that they wish there were none.

In some parts of the world there is a large kind of
barnacles. People eat these as we eat oysters or
mussels.

You need not expect to see the young barnacles swim-
ming about in the water. They are very tiny
creatures, of the shape of an apple-seed. If you
should see them, I think you would never guess

what they are.
120

i

a

AN OCEAN GARDEN.





SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

LESSON XXXVI.

FLOWERS OF THE SEA.

THERE are flowers in the sea as well

as on the land. Under the
waves of the ocean are fields
of green sea-grasses, and groves
of great sea-weeds, like trees.
Diving-men go down to the sea-
bottom and walk about. They
often find it hard to,move in
the tall weeds. The weeds tan-
gle the men’s feet. The divers

' feel as you would among the

brush and vines of a great
wood. There are splendid sea-
plants of all colors, — red, pink,
white, green, brown, purple,
yellow, and orange.

The leaves of these sea-plants are of

many shapes. They are round
or long; they are flat or curly.
Some are cut into fine fingers ;


FLOWERS OF THE SEA. 12]

they have spots, dots, or knobs, upon them that
shine like silver and gold.

The sea has also another kind of flowers. These are
animals or fishes that look more like lovely flowers
than like any other thing. We call them sea-
flowers or animal-flowers. We name some of them
after dainty little plents that grow in the woods
im spring.

The name “flowers” which we give to these is only a
pretty fancy. You must know that really they
are a kind of animal. It is. then, flower-animals
which we shall now study for a few lessons.

They belong to a family called the Raprate Famuty.
You have been learning about the Ring Famizy.
Now look at the Radiates. They have this name
because they are made in the shape of a stay. .

The pattern on which they are made is very simple
(see cut). And yet this simple pat-
tern is so built upon and changed,
that the members of this Family are
among the most lovely of animals.

These animal-plants have, from their odd and pretty
shapes, such names as the sunflower, the aster, the
fern, the crown, the fan, the pen, and so on. I
will now tell you about one of these Radiates.

Early one day I went from my door to the beach, which
was near, and there I saw a lovely object. —
122 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

The water was very still and clear, and floating in it
was something all rose and cream color.

This pretty thing was as large as a very large dinner-
plate. It was not flat, but shaped like half an
orange, with the rounded side up. It was of a fine
rose color, and as clear as jelly. It looked much
like pink jelly.

From the centre of the top to the edge went lines of a
deeper pink. There were also dots around the
outer edge. This edge seemed to have a soft full
ruffle of cream color about it. Looking closer, I
saw that the under side was not flat. It was
shaped like a bell or an open parasol. It had
something which looked like long leaves, and
which opened and shut.

But this was not all that I saw. From the darker lines
on the upper part of the bell ran out long pink
arms. These were almost a yard long. Their
edges had full ruffles. They were of a cream
color, like soft lace.

These long arms hung down in the water, which spread
out their pretty edges. With a soft and gentle
motion they waved from side to side.

In my boat I went quietly near this creature. It
floated here and there, spread out in all its
beauty. I kept near it to watch it. This lovely
thing was a jelly-fish. .
THE LIFE OF A JELLY-FISH. 123

Ht

It was easy to see that the creature was a Radiate, but

it had four, and not five rays. Its plan was like
Figure 1. If these rays are bent down, you
will see that they may form the frame of a bell-
shape, like Figure 2. The ends of these four rays
often run out into arms, like Figure 3. All the
soft pink-and-cream jelly-like stuff fills up between
the upper part of the rays and gathers into the
ruffles along the edge.



FIG. |. FIG. 3,

This is the plan on which the jelly-fish is built. His

frame is built of four rays. The four parts between
the rays may be again divided and be eight and not
four. Again, there may be sixteen rays instead of
eight. But the plan is the same.

——00 £0,0-0———

Ess ON xe Xe Vale
THE CIFE OF A JELLY-PISH.

Ir is from the clear stuff between the rays, the stuff

which forms the bell or disk part, that the jelly-
fish has its common name.
124 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

The



FLOWERS OF THE SEA,

et

It has also another name, which

means nettle, from the plant
called a nettle. The leaves of
this plant can prick and sting
your skin, and make it burn.
The fine, long arms of the jelly-
fish can sting in the same way.
jelly-fish is nearly all water.
It is made of flesh as fluid as
the white of an egg. If taken
from the water, jelly-fish die
in a very short time. They die
by drying up. A very large
jelly-fish will dry to a thin,
small skin.

I do not know of any other living

creature so soft, or so nearly all
water, as a jelly-fish. And yet
these are true animals. They
can hear, see, feel, and, no
doubt, can also taste as other
animals do.

All along the edge of the ‘bell part

you can see some dark dots,
which are the eyes. Some of
the jelly-fish have these little
THE LIFE OF A JELLY-FISH. 125

—

eyes bare; that is, they have no lid or cover over
them. These are called bare-eyed jelly-fish. Others
have a little hood like a lid over each eye. Also
along the bell part are little sacs which take the
place of ears. The long arms which droop from the
edge of the bell are the feelers. These are used to
touch things with. They wave gently to and fro
and help the fish to move through the water.

Up in the centre of the under side of the bell is the
mouth. It has over it a little fine frill. Even a
jelly-fish, you see, does not wish to keep its mouth
wide open all the time!

Below the mouth, the jelly-fish has fishing-lines or
nets, as the barnacle has. The soft, pretty ruffles
move up and down in the water, and catch things
to put into the mouth of the jelly-fish.

It would surprise you to know what large and hard

_ things these soft jelly-fish can soften and use as
food. Fish, crabs, shell-fish, are caught and eaten
by jelly-fish.

There is something in the jelly-fish which can dissolve
these hard things. But he often casts out from
his mouth-sac the harder and larger shells and
bones. He does this as you would put from your
mouth nut-shells or plum-stones.

How do the jelly-fish move in the water? They have
126 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

oe

no swimming-feet as Mr. Crab has. They have
no fins, as the fish has. Some of them move by
spreading out the bell, or round part, of their
bodies, and then drawing it up again. This
motion, which is like the rise and fall of your
chest when you breathe, drives them through the
water.

Other jelly-fish have a motion more like the opening
and closing of the hands. Some have little oars,
paddles, or hairs on the edge of the disk. Some
seem to open and close as you would slowly open
and shut an umbrella.

I told you that jelly-fish could sting. They can also
shine. They can make a fine bright light, some-
thing as glow-worms or fire-flies do, but more
steady. From this power, they have been called
Lamps of the Sea. I have seen the ocean bright
with them for miles. It looked as if all the stars
had fallen from the sky, and were glowing in the
water.

When the jelly-fish shine so, the light is like a
ball. It is not in straight lines, long, or square.
It is round, like fire-balls, or balls of melted iron,
or of glass. These balls are sometimes red, or
blue, or white, or green, or yellow.

Jelly-fish differ much in size. Some are so small that
THE LIFE OF A JELLY-FISH 127

Sa na

you can hardly see them; some are as large
as a split pea. Then some are the size of a dime,
of a dollar, of a plate, and so on, up to the size
of a huge wheel. e

As they are of many sizes, so they are of many shapes,
as I told you at first. They are like balls, fans,
bells, bottles, plumes, baskets, cups, flowers.

And now, here is another odd thing to tell you. You
know that when Mr. Barnacle is. young he swims
about. When he is grown up, he settles down
to stay in one place. The jelly-fish stays in one
place, and grows fast, when he is young, but when
he has grown up he swims about wherever he
chooses. I wonder which is the better way!
Which way would you children like best?

Some of the young jelly-fishes come from an egg. Some
of them come from what is called a bud. Let us
look at them from the bud or from the egg. The
egg at once fastens to some solid thing on the sea-
bottom. It grows into what looks like a plant
with stems and branches.

On these branches are little cup-shaped buds. These
buds are so many little jelly-fish growing on one
stem. This is the larva state. After a time, these
buds open, and a young jelly-fish breaks from the
slender stem, and at once goes swimming away,
as happy as a jelly-fish knows how to be.
128 - SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.











THE RAY FAMILY AT HOME.



The

ee

LESSON XXXVIII.

SEA-STARS.

Now we come to another member

of the Radiate Family. Here
you see pictures of him in the
water, where he has his home.
Is he not a pretty thing?

jelly-fish has one of his names
from his shape, and another
naine from his power to sting.
This fish gets one name from
his shape, — star-fish. And he
has a long, hard name from his
coat. His coat is a thick, tough
skin. It has upon it prickles
much like those of a hedge-hog.
star-fish is made on the pattern
of the Rays, as I showed you
in another lesson. Most of
them have five rays, or ten, be-
cause each single ray has been
made into two, and so on.
SEA-STARS. 129

te

But all of the star-fish do not keep to the plan of five.
The sun-star has twelve rays. He is of a splendid,
bright red color.

I will tell you of some kinds of star-fish, and then will
tell you how they grow.

In the picture you see a star-fish with the thin, crooked
rays, orarms. He is called a sand-star, because he
likes to lie close to the sand on the sea-bottom.
He is of a sand color.

The one with the curled arms, like plumes, is called the
brittle-star. That is because he breaks so easily.
He is a very queer fellow. When things do not
please him, he drops all to pieces. It would be a
queer thing, if, when you feel cross or afraid, you
could throw yourself down and fly to pieces, jerk-
ing off your head, your arms, and your legs!

You have heard how crabs can drop off a claw, and
then another grows out. You also know that a
spider does not mind much about losing a leg or
two. These facts cause us to feel sure that these
creatures do not suffer pain at the Joss of a part
of their bodies. If the loss of legs, claws, or rays
caused pain, these animals would not be so ready
to drop them.

There is no other creature that breaks itself so readily
and so entirely as the brittle-star. It will throw
130 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

a

off all its rays, and they will float away in many
directions, while the little disk is left alone to
sink or to float.

When the star-fish loses one or more, or even four rays,
others will soon grow. All the Radiate Family
renew lost parts even more easily than crabs do.

It is very hard to get a brittle-star out of the water. As
soon as it feels a net or scoop or the upper air
about it, or a pail of fresh water rising gently
around it, it breaks into many pieces.

On the end of every ray is a little sharp eye. When
you frighten Mr. Brittle-Star, off swim his legs,
every one by itself, and each has its one eye to look
out for it. I never saw anything else so queer ;
did you?

The strong, prim-looking starfish, with five points, is
called the cross-star. It is the common, or pattern
star-fish. There are many other kinds. I will
tell you in the next lesson of one very pretty kind.
You must go to larger books to learn all that is
known about these strange and pretty creatures.

We will look at the model, or cross-star. Turn the
animal over. The mouth is in the centre of the
under-side. Do you not find that there is a seam,
or groove of the hard skin, all the way down the
centre of each ray? From the mouth a nerve runs
down to the point of each of the rays.
SEA-STARS. 131

te

Along the centres of the under openings in the rays are

set very, very many little blunt points. These
points are like tiny tubes close together. It is on
these that the star-fish can walk or creep on the
bottom of the sea, or over rocks. The star-fish
seek their food as they crawl slowly about.

Star-fish are very greedy. They are always hungry.

The

‘They make the fishermen much trouble by eating

the fish-bait off their hooks. They also devour
oysters. When they get into an oyster-bed they
are as bad as the drill. When an army of star-
fish go to a part of the coast where oysters grow,
the oysters are soon killed.

star-fish are of many bright and pretty colors.
They are green, brown, gray, red, pink, or with
several colors on the same star.

When they are dead, the flesh, which has much water

in it, dries away. The tough shell-like skin is left.
You can dry them by pinning them on a board.
Leave them for a few days in the sun and wind.
Tf you do not pin out the rays, they may curl up.

They look better kept in alcohol, but that is not a good

way for children. I fear the bottles would soon
be broken.
132 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

LESSON XXXIX.
A SEA-CHANGE.

Tue star-fish lay a great number of
egos. Let us see what happens |
to eggs of one kind. They are
not dropped one by one into
the water, or strung on threads
like chains.

They stick to the under-side of the
parent fish, which settles on the
sand or rocks, resting on its
back, and bends up its five rays,
like a basket, to hold and pro-
tect the eggs.

You see that in this state the par-
ent can neither walk nor eat.
And although star-fish are both
greedy and restless, when they





have eggs to take care of, they
patiently lie quiet for ten days,



WATER-BABIES. = until the eggs hatch.
A SEA-CHANGE. 133

—

In those ten days the parent star-fish can not eat nor
move. But at the end of ten days, the eggs hatch
out the larve, and they float away. ‘Then the
star-fish finds that its work is done, and it bends
back and begins to walk, swim, and fish.

Many of the larvee, when they first come from the egg,
have no rays, and do not look one bit like star-fish.
They look like wee specks of barrels, with little
hairy hoops, and a plume of hairs on one end.

The larva can swim; the hairs help it through the
waters. Slowly it begins to change its shape and
to lose its loop of hairs. All it wants is to swim
and to grow. When no larger than a flax-seed it
looks like the grown-up star-fish.

A most curious thing is the lily-star egg, which fastens
upon a coral, or something firm and hard. Then
it takes as fast hold as the barnacle on the rock.

It shoots up a stem, and on the top of the stem
grows a cup like a lily-bell. It does not look like
a star-fish, but like a lovely lily. Fine plumes are
waving from its cup.

Some kinds of star-fish have larve that take other
shapes. I cannot tell you about them all. But
only the feather-star grows fast to some object
for the larval state. In the larval state they do
not look at all like the parent. T[inally, like the
134 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

oto

jelly-fish, they change their shape, get loose, and
swim off to see the water-world. Then they are
like their parents.

Now let us look again at our star-fish. The little
things like tubes on the under-side are each one
set ina groove. They are full of fluid, and each
has a tiny sucker. The star-fish can move them.
They not only serve for feet, but for hands, to
catch, and hold, and kill his prey.

Most of the star-fish are dull and slow of motion.
There is one kind which moves quickly. It is
called the Snake’s-tail-Star, from the shape of the
rays, which are long and thin.

There is one kind of Radiate often found on the coast
of the Southern States, which has all the space
between the rays filled up with a hard, stony, or
shell-like matter. So the shape of this animal is
not like a star. It is like a flat box with five
sides. There are some little loop-holes quite
through this hard box. On the middle of the top
is the pattern of a five-pointed star-fish, like a
picture! It is not a star-fish, but an urchin.

In this Radiate, the disk spreads out, so as to include,
or shut in, the rays. On the other hand, there
are some star-fish that have the disk very small.
They seem to be all rays and no disk.
THE STAR-FISH WITH AN OVERCOAT. 135

People who have studied star-fish divide them into
six families. I have told you about all but the
fifth. The fifth family are of such a queer shape
that they are called cucumbers — Sea-Cucumbers.
The Chinese like to eat them, and ships are sent
out to fish for them. They grow in the shallows,
near the islands in tropic seas. We have some
also on our coasts.

——-0 595, 00———
LESSON XL.
THE STAR-FISH WITH AN OVERCOAT.
THERE is a very pretty star-fish called the Sea~-Hgg, or
Sea-Urchin. This creature has not five points or
rays; it is in the shape cf a ball, somewhat
flattened.



FIG. |. FIG. 2. FIG. 3.

Do you say, “Can this belong to the Ray Family, when
it has no rays?” Well, let us see. Let Figure 1
represent our Ray pattern. Bend the rays up, and
the plan looks like Figure 2. Then bend them
until the tips touch, and you have the form of
136 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

Figure 38. The cover of this star-fish, called the
sea-urchin, is not tough and skin-like; it is hard
and. shell-like.

If you look at it, you will see that it has up and down
it lines of knobs and dots set in double rows.
You will find five double lines of large knobs, and
as many lines of small dots between the larger ones.

But do not think that you can see these marks as soon
as you find a sea-urchin. By no means! The sea-
urchin wears a fine thick overcoat, which hides

his shell.





WELL DRESSED.

I knew a boy who found a number of sea-eggs lying
on the beach. He cried out, “Oh! look at all the
chestnut burrs in the water!” The sea-egg when
it is alive looks much like a chestnut burr, ripe,
but not open. It is covered all over with thorns
or prickles like the burr. and the water gives it
the dark brown color.
THE STAR-FISH WITH AN OVERCOAT. 137



Now let us look into this matter. You have read that
a cross-star-fish has along the under edges of
its rays a great many little tubes full of some-
thing like water. He can move them, and upon
them he walks.

The sea-urchin has hard, sharp spines, which cover all
the shell, and look like a rough coat. In the pic-
ture you see the urchin with his shell bare, with
his shell half bare, and with his full overcoat of
quills.

When the shell is bare, you will see upon it little lines
of points or knobs. These are very pretty, but
they are for use, rather than for beauty.

On every tiny knob is placed a spine, and the urchin
can turn and move his spines, in all directions, just
as easily as you can move your arm at the shoulder-
joint.

When the urchin is alive, the quills stand out all about
him. After he is dead, the quills drop off.

Between the rows of knobs are five double rows of
holes, like pin-pricks. Out of these grow such
little suckers as I told you the star-fish had.

In some countries the sea-urchins are small —not much
larger than a dime. In warmer seas the urchins
grow large, even as large as a large orange.
People often use these larger ones for food.
138 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

The sea-urchin walks on his spines, as the cross-star-
fish does on his. But as the quills of the urchin
are all around him, like a ball-cover, his walk is
aroll! By the little suckers he can cling to the
rocks. And he can climb up their sides.

Turn over the bare urchin shell, and you will see that
while at the top it has no opening larger than a
pin-prick, on the under side there is a hole where
the curved rays do not come entirely together.
You see the urchin must have this open place
for his fish-lines, and to put food into his ever-
hungry mouth.

Since the sea-urchin eats so much, he must grow! Does
he?

Yes, the sea-urchin grows, and it cannot cast its shell
as acrab can. It has not a soft skin as you have,
yet his shell is never too tight. How can the
shell expand as the urchin grows ? ’

The shell is made up of a great many little plates, or
scales. As the urchin within grows and needs
more room, these little scale-plates grow larger
all around. :

Here is a strange thing: these wee plates are set like
bricks in a dome. You know the urchin is made
on the five-ray pattern bent like a flattened ball.

About the body of the urchin, within the shell, is
THE STAR-FISH WITH AN OVERCOAT. 139

—

wrapped a soft, pretty, silk-like mantle. This
mantle lines the shell. It takes lime from the sea-

water and builds it into more shell along the five

edges of these wee plates. It also adds new plates.

So, as the urchin keeps growing all the time, its man-

The

The

tle is building upon the plates all the time. The
house or coat, whichever you choose to call it,
grows with the growth of its owner. I think
your mother would be glad if she could find you
a coat to grow with the growth of your body.
shell part of the urchin is gray or greenish gray.
The quills are often red, brown, pink, or purple.
When a number of these urchins are fast upon a
rock, they look like a bed of lovely fringed flowers.
urchins are able to bore holes even in the hard
limestone rock. They bore these holes to live in,
and, as they grow, they make the holes larger, but
not the openings. So, after a time, they are shut
into a prison which they have dug for them-
selves. They do not do this on our coast.

On the coast of Spain you will find the rocks covered

with these urchins, fixed in holes. No doubt they
feel that stone walls are safe walls. If they had
wished to get away, and go and come freely, I
think they could have made their doorways as
large as themselves.
SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.



There is much more to be learned
about sea-urchins. You will do
well to study them when you can.
In fact, the longest life is not
long enough in which to learn
even what is to be learned of
very simple and common things.
There is danger that when we
have learned a little we shall be-
come proud, and that we shall not
take the trouble to learn the very
much more which we do not know.

—00t640-0-——_

LESSON XLI.
THE FLYING FLOWERS.

| You have been reading about some
of the Radiate Family. From
their beauty they have been called
Flowers of the Sea. We will
now hear about some insects
which might be called Flying
Flowers.

I knew a little boy who, the first time



A FLIGHT OF DRAGON- . . e
FLIES. - that he noticed butterflies, cried
THE FLYING FLOWERS. 141

Ht

out, “Oh, see all those flowers flying!” That was
a pretty idea. It well described the butterflies,
as you will see when you come to read about
them."

There is another family of insects which also deserves
the name of Flying Flowers. Their shape, colors,
and motions are very lovely. These insects are
the Dragon-Flies.

I am sorry that such beautiful creatures have had harsh
names given to them. They are called Dragon-
Flies, Horse-Stingers, Darning-Needles, Spindles,
and so on. ‘These names have nothing true in
them. These pretty insects never harm any one.

The French people call them Little Ladies. Now, that
is a nicer name. It is given to them because they
are graceful and pretty, and also neat and delicate, *
in their looks and motions.

I knew a man who called these insects Air-Jewels.
That was because they are almost always on the
wing, and their eyes and bodies flash and shine
like precious gems. .

[ have known silly people to start and scream when one
of these dragon-flies came darting by. That was
foolish ; they might as well scream at a rose or a
violet. There is no need of running away from

1 See Third Book.
142

The

The

SEA-SIDE AND WAY--SIDE.



one of them. The great trouble is that they are
so swift and shy, you cannot easily catch one to
examine it.

dragon-flies are cousins of the termites, the may-
flies, lace-wing flies, and many others. They have
four large, fine, lace-like wings, divided into a
great many spaces or meshes.

two pairs of wings are nearly or quite equal in
size. The head is large. The body is long and
light. They are very active in their motions, and.
are very seldom at rest. They fly so swiftly that
you can scarcely see their thin wings, but only the
flash of their bright-colored bodies.

Dragon-flies like damp or wet places. You will find

them above lakes and ponds. They fly over
marshy places or by the edges of quiet streams.

Go out to some still, silver-like pond, where the tall

trees stand in a ring about the water. The ferns,
the tall yellow spikes of the St. John’s-wort, and
the blue clubs of the arrow-plant make a wreath
around the sandy margin. There you will see
hundreds of gay dragon-flies darting up and down.
They swing in the sunbeams, as if glad to be alive.

In their great beauty the dragon-flies are as pretty as

the butterflies. Like them, they love the sunshine.
They are the children of the summer time. The
Let

The

\
THE FLYING FLOWERS. 143

ee

hotter the weather, the happier the dragon-flies
seem to be.

us look for a little time at a dragon-fly. It
belongs to the class of the ring-made creatures.
Its body is made in rings, and its feet and legs are
jointed. The body is very long and slim. Some
kinds of dragon-flies have the body rather flat,
but usually it is round, is slimmest in the middle,
and thickens a little both at the tail and where it
joins the breast.

wings of the dragon-fly are horny and of iris or
golden hues. Sometimes the body is a vivid blue
or bright green. Sometimes it is banded or spotted
with yellow or scarlet.

The wide wings look like delicate lace spread on a fine

The

frame. A little child who found one of these
wings, brought it to me, saying, “I dot a dood
piece of lace!”

head of the dragon-fly is large, and has on each
side what you would call a great eye. But like
that of the house-fly, this eye is made up of many
eyes set so as to seem to be one. I hardly dare tell
you how many there are—over twelve thousand!
Through these wonderfu! eyes the light plays and
flashes like fire. Between these big eyes, three little
simple eyes are set in a band across the head.
144 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

The dragen-fly has a queer mouth. The jaws are hid-
den under two thin, skin-like lips. These move
up and down as it eats. It does not suck food,
like the butterflies and house-flies, but eats after
the manner of the beetle.

Thus, you see, the dragon-fly belongs to the great
Division of the Eaters, not of the Drinkers. Instead
of feeding on nectar, as we would think so lovely
a thing should, it eats insects.

All its life long, from the egg, it is always greedy
because it is always hungry. It spends all its
time hunting for food.

—.0$t{0-0—_—.

LESSON XLII.
UNDER THE WATER,

Now let us hear the story of the dragon-fly from its
beginning. While it is an egg, a larva, and a
pupa, it lives under the water. Only when about to
burst from the pupa-case, and at last get its wings,
does it leave the water and seek the upper air.

In all its early stages the dragon-fly lives in cool, still
shallows, among green and graceful water-plants.
There the sunshine glows all about it, as it darts
over the bottom of the pond, hunting for food.
UNDER THE WATER. 145



The mother dragon-fly, as she flits
over the water, drops her eggs
upon it. They sink to the bot-
tom. She may put them into
plant stems. Their cases are
water-proof. If the eggs are not
eaten up by beetles and other
fellow-citizens under water, they
are quite safe, and soon the
larvee hatch out.

Most insects move quickly in the
larva state, and are dull or
quite asleep in the pupa-case.
This is not the way with the
dragon-fly. He is active and
brisk all his life. The egg
settled upon the pond bottom
is quiet ; the larva moves about,



















but is rather slow and lazy.
The pupa dashes here and there,
and frightens all the little ani-
mals in the pond. At last, the
perfect insect rises on the wing.
It darts about with almost the
swiftness of light.





ee

The larva of the dragon-fly is gray. Home oF THe DRAGONFLY,
146 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

It has six legs. It is always hungry, and feeds
on small water-animals, as beetles, grubs, shrimps,
leeches, and their young.

This larva does not run after its food, but lies waiting
for it. On the bottom of the pond, hidden in the
shadow of a leaf, root, or stone, or seated on stems
or leaves that are under water, the larva waits
patiently for its prey to come by.

Did you ever see a person with a net for catching in-
sects? This net is a fine bag set on a little hoop.
The hoop is fastened upon a long handle. Some-
times the handle has joints, and will fold up. As
insects dart by, the person with the net brings it
down over them with a quick motion.

The dragon-fly larva has something much like this with
which to catch its food. The lower jaw is fas-
tened by a hinge to a little jointed rod. The rod,
and the jaw-plate upon the end of it, when not in
use, are folded down upon the head of the insect.

The plate has fine teeth upon its edge. When the
prey comes by, the larva snaps ovt its rod, with
the plate, as if they both were on a spring, and so
catches the things that are swimming along a
little way off. They do not see their foe, and do
not know that he can reach so far with his sweep
net.
UNDER THE WATER. 147

—

The teeth on the edge of the plate shut up, and then
the rod folds back, and puts the food into the
hungry larva’s throat. I suppose the little crea-
tures that swim along feel quite happy and safe,
and then, all at once, out springs this weapon, and
they are gone.

But this little plague of the pond is not quite safe
himself. There are some other creatures down
under the water that eat him. All nature is a
kind of game of “tit for tat,” you see.

The larva of the dragon-fly breathes air. He has no -
lungs as you have, but gills as a fish has. How
does he get air?

Through his body goes a long tube. The tube ends in
a horny point at the tail. This point is made of
five very fine spikes. These spikes and this tube
are able to take from the water some of the air
that is in it. Thus he gets air much as a fish does.

This spike on the tail of the larva has a very strange
use. It shoots out the water which it has taken
in, as you would shoot water from a squirt-gun.
It shoots the water out with such power that it
drives the larva along in the water.

Did you ever see a steamboat driven through the water
by a screw or wheel at the stern, or hind part?

1 See Third Book. Lessons on Fish.
148 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

ee

What do you think that the man who first made
such a boat said? He said that he took his idea
of how it should be made by seeing this queer
larva move in the water.

When this creature seizes food, he likes to strike it
from below. He rises under it in the stroke, as
the shark does. Dragon-fly larve are very bold.
They can eat large and hard insects.

When the larva changes to a pupa, it becomes more
lively, fierce, and hungry than ever. It does not
change its form at this time as much as most
insects do.

The dragon-fly pupa has six legs, and each foot has °
strong hooks on it. Its color is pale brown, clear
and shining, and its case is horny. Some rings of
the body have horny spikes upon them.. Upon the
case of the chest is a pattern like wings.

These pupe dash about the bottom, swimming or run-
ning, and eat almost everything that lives in the
pond. The body and head of the pupa are thicker
than those of the grown-up dragon-fly.

When it is nearly time for the pupa to come out as a
dragon-fly, tie case grows clearer, like glass. The
large, beautiful eyes grow brighter and brighter,
and the pupa leaves the deeper part and gets
near the edge of the pond.
A HAPPY CHANGE. 149

coo

LESSON XLIITI.
A HAPPY CHANGE.

Wuen the close of the pupa state draws near, the
coming dragon-fly loses its fierce appetite. It
seems to feel tired and heavy. It breathes slowly,
as if it could not get air enough. The body has
changed inside the horny case, and the time is
near when it will leave the water for air, and
walking for flying.

Once the larva wanted nothing better than to chase
bugs about under water. Now, all at once, it
longs for the free air and for the sun. It needs
no one to tell it what to do. In some way it
knows exactly how it should act.

This tired pupa now seeks the stem of some tall reed
or grass that grows in the water. Slowly it
crawls up the stem. The hooks on the feet take
fast hold as it goes, and it keeps on until it is
nearly a yard above water.

‘The hooks, though very small, are so sharp and hard
that they can go into wood. When the pupa is
as high up as he wants to be, it drives the hooks
150

The

The

SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

te

into the stem. Thus it will hold firm even when
it twists and struggles hard.

pupa likes best to find two reeds or stems near,
so that it can take hold of both and swing be-
tween the two. Then, like a child in a swing, it
begins to sway to and fro. Now, as it sways, a
strange thing happens. The hard pupa-case splits
open upon the back, and look, inside the case, we
see the perfect insect, with its wings!

pupa-case is firmly held by its hooked feet, while
the new insect twists and pulls, and so gets free ;
and little by little its head, legs, wings, and long
body come forth, and finally hang only by the last
ring of the body.

Then you would think it was dead. For after it

stretches out first one leg and then the other, it
hangs by its last ring, stiff and still. But it is
only resting. After about fifteen minutes it
awakes. Taking hold firm with its feet upon a
stem or leaf, it lets go its hold upon the pupa-case.
That is left hanging by its hooks in its place.

Here is now a dragon-fly, with large head, with two

great cluster eyes, six legs, four wings, and long,
bright-hued body! And now, at last, it can
breathe freely through all those tubes and air-
holes you have been told about.
A HAPPY CHANGE. 151

i

But still the insect does not look like the full-made
dragon-fly. The colors are dull, and the wings
are folded up. The body is soft, damp, and too
short. The big eyes are dim.

As if half asleep it still clings to the stem, not far from
the case, which is the old shape of itself. Hang-
ing to the reeds by the pond you will often find
these old coffins, if you look for them.

But the new insect is in the sunshine and fresh air.
It stands still and breathes hard, fillmg its new
body with pure, dry air. Now and then its wings
quiver.

As they quiver they spread out, fold after fold, as
‘silken banners wave out upon the air. Then at
last they are spread out wide in all their beauty.
The dragon-fly has reached its last and highest
state. It can sail away where it pleases on its
new wings.

As the wings grow larger, the eyes of the dragon-fly
grow brave and bright; its body dries. Then it
gleams like a jewel. Its fresh colors come out
clearly. It feels strong and active.

Then, all at once, it uses its new wings. It rises into
the air and flashes here and there, just as hungry
and ten times swifter than ever before.

The flight of the dragon-fly is called hawking, for it is
152 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.



like the motion of that strong bird, the hawk. If
it gets caught in a place where its wide wings
cannot turn, it ean fly backwards and get off safely.
In a place where the wings might be injured by
striking against leaves or branches, it flies out in
this way.

When dragon-flies are dead, the great beauty of their
bodies passes away. They fade and grow dull, as
when they first came from the pupa-case. The
scarlet, yellow, blue, or green, turns to a dull drab.
So you cannot keep them as well as you can keep
beetles.

LESSON XLIV.
THE DRAGON-FLY AND HIS COUSINS.

Tue dragon-fly eats almost every kind of insects which
you have thus far read about. Beetles, spiders,
flies, centipedes, fresh-water shrimps and polliwogs
are its food.

[he dragon-fly is a larva for a year. It is a perfect
dragon-fly only a part of one summer. You will
find the most dragon-flies in July or August.
When the frost comes, they die.

Dragon-flies are very strong; they are fond of chasing
THE DRAGON-FLY AND HIS COUSINS 1538

He

other insects. They seem to catch and tear them
for the mere pleasure of pulling them to pieces.
They alse fight with each other, and Mr. and Mrs.
Dragon-fly have some hard battles.

The dragon-fly does not have a long lip, or mask, set
on a rod, as the larva had. They fly so swiftly
that they do not need such help in getting food.

Few insects are so easy on the wing as S this, and few
have such beauty of wing.

Yet I think, after all, that the chief. beauty of the
dragon-fly is in its eyes. These are like two great
flaming jewels.

The eyes are beautiful, for this clear, glowing light in
them; the body, for vivid color; the wings, for
their lace-like texture. Each of the wings has a
dark spot on the front edge. Often, in flying, this
spot and the line of bright color of the body,
almost like a streak of fire, are all that can be
seen of the insect.

There are several kinds of dragon-flies. These are dif-
ferent in color and size, and in the shape of their
bodies. One, with a very long, thin, dark body,
is called the Darning-Needle. One, with a thicker
body, is called the Ringed-Club. Its body is
largest at the tail end. This one is dressed in
black and gold, and is large and strong.
154 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

re

A smaller kind of dragon-fly, which has no spots on the
wings, is called the Little Lady. This is among
the prettiest of all; some of them are bright red;
some a clear light blue. They look more like
creatures in some dream about fairies, than like
real live insects, for they flit here and there like
streaks of gay-colored light, and you can scarcely
see the wings on which they. fly.





















THE DRAGON-FLY AND HiS COUSINS.

The dragon-fly has some very handsome relations. One
of these is called the Lace-Wing.

The head and body of the lace-wing are bright green,
its wings are like white gauze; but its chief beauty
is in its eyes. Some call it the Golden-Hye,
because its eyes are like a drop of amber, or
melted gold.

The veins in the wings of the lace-wing are very fine.
As the light falls on them, they change in color,
THE DRAGON-FLY AND HIS COUSINS. 155

re

and look like pink, red, blue green, or gold
threads.

These lovely lace-wings do not like the bright light of
‘the noon-day, as the dragon-fly does. They prefer
to come out in the moonlight, or when the sun is
setting.

The lace-wing is not a water lover, as the dragon-fly

; is. It lays its eggs on leaves, and every egg is
held upon a little silken stem. The stem is much
like the silk which the spider spins. These eggs
are laid in groups.

When the young lace-wings come out of the eggs, they
feed on the little aphis. You remember the aphis
makes the honey that ants are so fond of.

In two weeks these larvee change to pups. To do this
the lace-wing larva spins a nice silk ball, in which
it goes to bed for a nap while it is a pupa.

In this, you see, it is not at all like the young dragon
fly, which hunts and runs about while it is a pupa.
The ball of the sleeping lace-wing is about the size
and shape of a wild pea, or vetch seed.

The lace-wings are short-lived. One summer makes a
life-time for them. In a summer they grow from
infancy to age, make all their changes, and live
out their time as complete insects.

When the lace-wing is dead, it loses all its fine colors in
a very few hours.
156 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

Sa ee

LESSON XLV.
THE WINGS OF THE DRAGON-FLY

We ean find no better example than the dragon-fly, of
the way in which insects behave when they leave
the pupa-case.

You know that this ease is horny or tough, and always
seems smaller than the grown-up insect; so the
insect must be very closely packed in. >

No person could pack a new insect back into the case
it has just left.

While the dragon-fly pupa is under water, the case is
kept tough, and yet soft enough to bend. But
when the pupa crawls up the stem of the plant
into the air, the case soon dries and becomes
brittle.

As the fly struggles within, the dry case will easily
split. The little wet coat, which covers the body
while it is in the case, makes it more easy to slip
out of the shell when it cracks open. You know
if you have on your finger a ring which is too
tight, you can pull it off if you wet your finger.
THE WINGS OF THE DRAGON-FLY. 157

——

The wet coat of the fly in the case keeps the wings
from being hurt by their close folding. After
they are dry and spread out, they are easy to
break. Then it is very easy to hurt or spoil
them. . .

The fly seems to know this, and is careful of its
wings. In the act of unfolding, the fly holds its
wings from touching any object, even its own body.

When the dragon-fly gets free from the case, it seems to
know just how to spread its lovely wings into per-
fect shape. It stands quite still, and far enough
from stems or leaves to keep its wide wings safe.

Ié does not move its wings, but lets the air do the work,
while it holds its bent body away from the wings.
The quiver you see through it, now and then, is a
motion of the'‘body; and I will soon tell you what

it means.

When the fly first comes from the case, its wings are
soft, and will bend as easily as wet paper. After
they are dry, they are like very thin plates of
glass.

These wings have very many nerves through them.
Their frame is like a fine net-work; and, as it
is touched by the air, it spreads slowly to its
full size. If, at this drying-time, the wings are
hurt, they will never come to their right shape.
158 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

When first the pupa comes from the case, the wings
and body are of a dull, faded color. But as it
stands in the sun and air, you can see it change
from minute to minute.

Fold after fold of the wings shakes out; ring after
ring of the body stretches to its proper length;
the joints of the legs come to their right shape
and firmness. From all the body of the insect
a mist seems to pass away; and the colors of the
fly come out, and the red, blue, green, gold, shine
in all their beauty.

Now let us look closely at these fine wide wings. Al-
though they are so thin, like gauze, yet they are
double. There is a surface on each side, spread
over a very fine frame. The parts of this frame
are small as the finest hairs.

And yet, though so tiny, they are all hollow. They
are tubes or pipes. They carry through the wing,
air and a very thin white fluid, which is the blood
of the insect.

Now that you know this, can you clearly see how the
wings expand? As soon as the dragon-fly is born
from its pupa-case, air and this thin fluid are driven
through these fine tubes. As they fill, they stretch
out, and the thin surface which covers therh spreads
with them.
THE WINGS OF THE DRAGON-FLY.

—

‘If you notice the fly as it is thus

getting its shape, you will see

that quiver which I spoke of.

By

The

That motion is the pumping of |

air and fluid through its tubes ;
and, no doubt, by this action
the fly spreads out its wings
and its body.

such a motion the blow-fly ]

spreads out its big head.

dragon-fly spends about fifteen
minutes in getting into shape.
Sometimes half an hour is need-
ed. After that, the fly rests for
an hour or two, before it tries
its wings in the air. Very likely

it wishes to give its wings time

to get quite firm and hard.

Butterflies, Lace-wings, May-flies, and

other insects of the kind have
their wings made in this way ;
so what you learn about one
will help you to understand the
others.

Y think you would like to know a

little about the May-fly. You



159
160

The

SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

read of the Lace-wing, in the last lesson, and in
the next book you will hear about Butterflies.

May-flies are very pretty insects. They are some-
thing like dragon-flies, but smaller, and not fond
of tearing up other insects. You will find them in
moist places. The body of the May-fly is much
slimmer even than that of the dragon-fly. The
wings are unequal. Their heads are smaller.
May-flies have two fore-legs, almost as long as the
body, held almost straight out as they fly. On

their tails they have three long stiff hairs, like

spun glass, twice as long as the body. These hairs
spread out, fan-shape.

These insects. are often called May-flies, because they

usually come in May. But they have another
name, which means the “child of an hour.” This
name is given them because they very seldom
live longer than one day, and often only for an
hour or two. :

In the egg, larva, and pupa they live about two years ;

but, once born with wings, they seldom live over
a half-day.

And how do they spend that short life? They do not

eat, for they have no mouths. As they are not
hungry, they do not hunt. They spend their
whole time in flying. Their flight is a sort of
THE WINGS OF THE DRAGON-FLY. 161

dance in the air; they rise and fall, and spin
about.

Great numbers of them come out together, spin about,
and drop their eggs in the water. But soon they
flutter down, dead, among the grasses. That is
the story of the pretty May-fly.

Would you not like to seek out in their homes, and
then read and study about, the very many strange
and wonderful insects that are in the world?
bo

REVIEW QUESTIONS.

—-909—

1 THE ANT.

. Describe an insect.
. How are the wings of hook-winged insects fastened

together in flight ?

. Describe an ant.
. Describe queen ants, and worker ants.

What becomes of the queen ant’s wings ?

. Tell me how an ant-hill is begun.

. Describe an ant-hill.

. Tell me how nurse ants take care of baby ants.
. What can you say of soldier ants ?

HO:
ill
2:
13.
14.
16.
16.
ie

How do the ants make slaves ?

What insect is called the “ant’s cow” ?

Tell me something about the ants and their cow.
How does the ant dress and cleanse its body ?
What do you know about the farmer ants ?
What kinds of food do ants eat ?

How do ants eat ?

Tell me how ants bury their dead.
164 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

He

18. What do you think about termites, or white ants,
being of the same order as other ants ?

19. What do you know about parasol ants ?

20. Will you tell me how ants move from one hill to
another ? |

21. What can you say of the march of an ant army?

22. What do you know about ant acid?

23. What is the opening into an ant-hill called ?

24. Have ant-hills more than one gate?

25.: What do you mean by a queen ant?

26. How do ants treat each other while they are at
work ?

27. What becomes of ants during winter, in cold
countries ?

28. Of what use are ants ?

29. How can you study ants for yourselves ?

30. How do ants carry things?

— tr

I. THE EARTH-WORM.

1. To what family of creatures does the earth-worm
belong ?

2. What can you say about a ring-made creature ?

3. How do the rings in a worm’s body increase in
number ?

4. Has a worm any eyes, or ears, or nose?
REVIEW QUESTIONS. 165

eH

. Tell me about a worm’s mouth.
. What kind of food does he eat ?

How does he eat his food ?

. What has he inside his body to help grind his food ?
. Tell me about the worm’s veins.

10.
fale
12.
‘18.
14,
15:
16.
17.
LS:
19.
20.
mile
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
ai
28.
29.

Is a worm “alike at both ends” ?

What has he at one end and what at the other?
If a worm is cut in two, will both parts live ?
What has the worm instead of feet? _

What makes the worm’s body so dark ?

Why is it so hard to pull a worm out of its hole?
Tell me how a worm makes its hole.

Why does the worm fill itself with earth ?

What are worm-casts ?

How do worms help to build the world ?

What kind of weather do worms like best ?

How does a worm close up the door of its hole ?
What becomes of worms in very hot, dry weather?
When can you find worms outside their holes ?
Of what use are worms ?

Can you tell me about sea-side worms?

What kinds of houses do tube-worms make ?

Can earth-worms feel ?

Do they harm crops or grass ?

Is there any worm which has teeth ?
166

So Or HB OO

“I

co Co

SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

a

Ill. THE FLY

. How many wings has a fly ?
. What has a fly instead of the second pair of

wings ?

. Tell me about a fly’s eyes.

. Describe a fly’s mouth.

. Does a fly chew or suck its food ?

. What care does the mother fly take of her eggs or

her young ?

. Do flies have queens or live in swarms, as bees do?
. Where do flies place their eggs?
. What can you tell me of the changes from the egg

to the full-grown fly ?

. Tell me how the fly comes from the pupa-case.
. What things do flies eat ?

. How is it that a fly can run up a pane of glass?
. How can a fly walk on a ceiling?

. Will you describe the fly’s feet ?

. How does the fly make its buzzing sound ?

. What is a box fly ?

. Tell me of some of the queer ways of flies.

. What do flies do when cold weather comes on %
. What do we mean by a swarm of flies ?

. Of what use are flies ?
“Nm Ot RE Oo b

REVIEW QUESTIONS. 167

a

. What harm do flies do?

. Tell me of some of the fly’s enemies.

. Is a Spanish fly a true fly ?

. At what part of a fly’s life is it like a worm ?
. What is a fly in amber?

. Tell me the names of some kinds of flies.

. Why do people dislike flies?

IV. THE BEETLE.

. Into what two classes are insects divided because

of their way of taking food ?

- To what family of insects does a lady-bird belong?
. With what is a beetle’s body covered ?

. In what is a beetle like a crab ?

. What can you tell me about a beetle’s wing-covers ?
. Where are the beetle’s flying wings ?

What does the beetle do with his wing-covers
when he flies?

. Describe a beetle.

. What can you say of Mr. Beetle’s colors ?
10.
ele
. What changes does the beetle make before he is

Which is the largest family of insects ?
Why have people studied beetles so much ?

full-grown ?
168

13.

14.
15.
16.
i
18.
bo:

20.
2
22.
23.
24,
25,
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34,
35.
36.
37.

SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

How much time do some beetles spend as eggs,
larve, and pups?

Where are the eggs of beetles laid ?

Describe a beetle larva..

?

How does this “ white worm,” or larva, behave ?

Does any larva ever have wings?

Tell me how the pupa is packed in the pupa-case.

Where will you be likely to find beetle larve and
pup to study?

What does larva mean ?

What does pupa mean ?

Tell me how insects breathe.

How do beetles injure plants ?

Describe a rose beetle.

What can you tell me about giant beetles ?

In what country does the prince of beetles live ?

How do beetles make a noise or tune ?

Tell me how a sexton beetle buries a mouse or a bird.

Why do they do this?

How does the pill beetle make a place for her eggs ?

Of what use are beetles?

Who can tell me about a stag beetle ?

Do all stag beetles have horns ?

Tell me about the short-coat beetles.

Give me the history of the water beetles.

What about the beetles that eat furs and clothes?

What do beetles eat ?
oo b

COC OO 2 tn oe OU th

10:
ills
12.
18.
14.
16.
16.
17.
18.
19.

KeviEW QUESTIONS. (169

i

Vv. THE BARNACLE.

. What did the old fisherman say of the number of

barnacles ?

. Do horse-hairs ever become worms ?
. What was the old fable about a bird coming from

a barnacle ?

. What two kinds of barnacles are there ?

. What does an acorn barnacle look like?

. At what part of a barnacle’s life does he sail about ?
. When does he fasten to one place for life ?

. Describe a stem barnacle.

. What does the Latin name of the barnacle family

mean ?
What harm can barnacles do to ships?

How do barnacles get their food ?

Describe a barnacle fishing party.

What does a barnacle molt as he grows ?

How do the shell plates of a barnacle become larger ?

Are barnacles ever eaten ?

How long can barnacles live out of water?

What does a barnacle eat?

What is Mr. Barnacle’s fishing net ?

What is it that holds a barnacle fast to a log or
rock ?
170 SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

20. At what part of his life is a barnacle like a crab?

21. Where is Mr. Barnacle’s eye?

22. Where is the head part of a stem barnacle ?

23. Where are the barnacles’ eggs before they get
loose in the water ?

24. What can you say of the size of barnacles?

25. What color are barnacles ?

26. Tell me what changes a barnacle inakes during
his life.

27. Describe a barnacle when in the larva state..

28. When we mean more than one larva, what do
we say?

29. When we mean more than one pupa, what do
we say?

30. What sound do we give the ae in these words?
(An e sound.)

Vi. JELLY-FISH.

. What are some of the names given to jelly-fish ?

. Why are they called jelly-fish ?

. Why are they called nettles ?

Why are they given the names of flowers ?

. Can a jelly-fish live out of water ?

. At what part of its life does a jelly-fish grow fast
m one place ?
SOP OO eT:

24.
25.
26.
il
28.

REVIEW QUESTIONS, rat

or

. What do jelly-fish eat ?

. How do they get their food ?

. What are the fishing lines of a jelly-fish ?

. How does a jelly-fish move through the water ?

. Where are its eyes ?

. Where is the mouth of a jelly-fish ?

3. Where are its ears?

. Why have jelly-fish been called sea-lamps ?

. What>can you say of jelly-fish ?

. Tell me of the shape and color of some one jelly-fish.
. On what plan is the body of a jelly-fish made ?

. To what family do the jelly-fish belong ?

. Which of you can draw the plan of the radiates on

the blackboard ?

. Has the jelly-fish much water in its body ?
. Can you tell me of what shapes jelly-fish are ?
. What. are some of the names which they get from

their shapes ?

. What do you know about jelly-fish before they

swim about ?
What are the long arms of the jelly-fish called ?
How many rays are there in the jelly-fish pattern ?
Can you tell me how the eyes of jelly-fish differ?
Did you ever see a jelly-fish in the ocean ?
What does the light of jelly-fishes look like in the

water ?
172

oR oF DH

10.
ae
2

13.
14.

16.
16.
ie
es

19.
20.

SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.

—

Vil. THE STAR-FISH.

. To what family does the star-fish belong ?

How many rays have most star-fish ?

. How many rays has the sun-star ?
. What can you tell me about the brittle-star ?

Tell me how the brittle-star breaks into pieces.
What kind of coat or skin has the star-fish ?
Where is its mouth ?

. Do star-fishes swim or crawl ?

. What do they eat?

What colors have star-fish ?

Tell me how the cross-star-fish hatches its eggs.

What does the star-fish look like when it leaves
the egg?

Which one star-fish grows fast for the larva state?

Tell me about the quills on the under side of the
star-fish.

How many kinds of star-fish can you describe ?

How many families of star-fish are there ?

What is a sea-cucumber ?

You may draw on the blackboard the sea-egg
pattern.

What is a sea-egg or sea-urchin ?

To what family does it belong ?
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.

OT.
28.
29.

Oo on Do KF CH DP eH

eH pu
HO

REVIEW QUESTIONS. - 173

ea

Tell me about the urchin’s overcoat.

What can you tell me of its quills and suckers ?

What can you say of the size and color of urchins?

How does the urchin’s shell increase in size ?

Where is its mouth ?

Can urchins bore holes in rocks? ‘Tell me about
that. j

How does the urchin walk and climb ?

Are urchins and sea-cucumbers ever eaten ?

Describe an urchin shell when the quills are gone.

VII. THE DRAGON-FLY.

. What insects have we called flying flowers?

. What are some of the names given to dragon-flies ?
. Can a dragon-fly do you any harm ? |
. What cousins has the dragon-fly ?

. Describe a dragon-fly.

. What kind of places and weather do dragon-flies like ?
. What do they eat ?

. What has the flight of dragon-flies been called ?

. Tell me about the dragon-fly’s wonderful eyes.

. Is the dragon-fly an eater or a drinker ?

. Where does the dragon-fly live while egg, larva,

and pupa?
174

12.

14.
15.
16.

17.

18.

LO?

20.
Zile
22.
23.
24.

25.
26.

ZH
28.
29,
30.
31.

SEA-SIDE AND WAY-SIDE.



How do the eggs get into the water?

. Tell me about the dragon-fly pupa.

Tell me about the queer mouth of the larva.

Tell me how he catches his food.

How does the larva get air while he lives undex
water ?

Where did the pattern of a stern wheel, or screw
boat, come from ?

How does the pupa-case change before the dragon-
fly comes. out ?

Tell me how the pupa leaves the water when it is
to change its state.

What can you say about the hooks on its feet ?

In what way does the pupa get free of its case?

Tell me about the wings of the dragon-fly.

What care does it take of its wings?

How long does the dragon-fly live in the larva
state ?

How long does it live in the perfect state ?

What can you say of the way the dragon-fly hunts
insects ?

What dragon-fly is called “The Little Lady” ?

Tell me about a lace-wing fly.

Where are the lace-wing’s eggs laid?

What do lace-wing larva eat ?

How long do lace-wings live?
32.

33.
34.

39.
36.
37.

REVIEW QUESTIONS. | 175

Do dragon-flies and lace-wings keep their colors
when dead ?

Tell me how the new dragon-fly expands its wings.

Why will the wings bend when they first come
from the case ?

What can you tell me about May-flies ?

How long do they live in the perfect state ?

Do they eat? How do they spend their short lives ?
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COOK

III.



CONTENTS.
Lgsson. LEsson.

I, The Great Mother. XXV.

II. The Earth’s Eldest Child. XXVI,

III. A Look at a Plant. XXVII.

IV. A Year in a Plant’s Life. XXVIII.

V. The Growth of Plants. XXIX.

VI. The Food of Plants. XXX,

VII. Seeds and Leaves.

VIII. The Color of Plants. XXXI.

IX. The Motion of Plants. XXXII.

X. Plants and their Partners. XXXII.

XI. Air, Water, and Sand Plants.| XXXIV.

XXII. Plants that eat Animals. XXXV.

XIII. Weather Prophet Plants. XXXVI.

XIV. Plant Clocks. XXXVIL.

XV. The School Cabinet. XXXVIII.

XVI. The Old Man of the Meadow.| XXXIX.

XVII. The Life of the Old Man. XL.

AVIII. The Robber Cousin. XLI.

XIX. The Merry Cousins. XLII.

XX. Queer Cricket. XLII.

XIX. Other Hoppers. XLIV.

XXII. A Real Live Fairy. ALY.

XXIII. The Child of the Day. XLVI.
XXIV. Life Among Snow and Roses.

Illustration from No, 3. — BEAKs,

Book ITI. 300 pages.

29 illustrations.

4

Joseph’s Coat,

Cousin Moth.

The Child of the Night.

The Bird.

Beaks and Claws.

Trees, Ground, and Water
Birds.

On the Wing.

Nest Building.

The Bird at Home.

Birds of Song.

The Other Partner.

A Brigade of Birds.

The Birds in the Woods.

The Birds in the House.

The Lost Birds.

The Fin Family.

Outside and Inside.

Where they live.

How they Behave.

Fry and School.

Scales and Teeth.

Big and Little Brothers,

50 cts.
RICKS’ NATURAL HISTORY OBJECT
LESSONS.

PART I.— PLANTS AND ANIMALS.





CHAPTER. CHAPTER.
I. Introduction. XVIII. Tea, Coffee and Chocolate.
II. A Typical Plant. XIX. Spices.
III. General Classification of Plants. XX. Opium, Quinine and Camphor.
IV. Minute Structure of Plants. XXI. Indigo, Oak-Galls, etc.
V. Roots and their Functions. XXII. Classification of Animals.
VI. Stems and their Uses. XXIII. and XXIV. Classification of
VII. Leaves and Buds. Vertebrata.
VIII. Flowers, their Parts and Uses. XXV. Classification of Invertebrata.
IX. Fruits and Seeds. XXVI. Coverings of Vertebrate Ani-
X. The Palm Trees. mals,
XI. Cereals, the Sugar-Cane, etc, XXVII. The Bony Skeleton and its

XII. Starches. Modifications.

XIII. Oils and Fats. XXVIII. Teeth, — Varieties and Uses.

XIV. Gums, Resins, Gum-Resins, etc. XXIX. Tongues.

XV. Cotton, Hemp, Flax, Jute. XXX. Tails and their Uses.

XVI. Paper. XXXI. The Principal Internal Organs

XVIL. Bleaching and Dyeing. of Animals.
PART II. —SPECIMEN LESSONS. "
Lgsson. Lesson.

I. Paws and Claws. XXXIV. The Mole.

II. Cocoa-Nut. XXXV. Cotton.
III. Cotton and Wool. XXXVI. Vertebrata and Invertebrata.
Iv. An Egg. XXXVII. The Cockroach.

V. Acorn and Hazel-Nut. XXXVIII. The Earthworm.
VI. Milks XXXIX. Spider’s Threads.

VII. Onion, Turnip, Carrot. XL. Bleaching.

VIII. Cat and Dog. XL The Rat and His Relatives.
IX. Down. XLII. Beaks of Birds.
X. A Quill Feather. XLIII. and XLIV. Snakes.
XI. Gutta Percha. XLV. and XLVI. Fishes.

XII. Leaves. XLVII. Insects— Form and Structure.
XIII., XIV. and XV. Starch. XLVIII. Insects — Benefits and Injuries.
XVI. The Horse. XLIX. Insects,— Metamorphosis.

XVII. The Cow and the Sheep. L. Insects, Legs and Feet.
XVIII. Honey and Wax. LI. Insect and Spider.
XIX. Ivory. LII.-LIV. Legs and Feet,--Mammals.

XX. and XXI. Seeds and Seedlings. LV.-LVI. Legs and Feet, — Birds.

XXII. Olive Oil. LVII. Flour.
XXIII. Liber. LVIII. The Frog. :
XXIV. Mammals and Birds. LIX. The Frog,— Life History.
XXV. Reptiles and Fishes. LX. and LXI. Eggs.
XXVI. Mammals. LXII. Snails.
XXVII. Chewing the Cud. LXIII. Snails — Whelk and Periwinkle
XXVIII. Horns and their Uses. LXIV. Snails.
XXIX. Parts of a Flower. LXV. The Amoeba and Foraminifera
XXX. Birds’ Nests. LXVI. The Hydra.
XXXI. The Hedgehog. LXVII. Sea Anemones and Corals.
XXXII. Whale Oil. LXVIII. Plant Factories.
XXXIII. Leather.
352 pages. 121 illustrations and seven plates. Cloth, $1.50.

6
THE NATURAL SYSTEI OF

Vertical Writing

By A. F. NEWLANDS and R. K. ROW. Six Books. Per doz., 75 cts



Some of the special merits of our system are : —

Practicability. It is the outgrowth of nearly five years’ experi-
ence in vertical writing with thousands of pupils of all school ages.
The authors of other series have not had this experience.

Strength. The books are in marked contrast to most of the
systems recently published, which are efforts to adapt the sloping
hand to the upright position.

Harmony. This system has been carefully worked out with a
central idea as to form and movement.

Ease. Our round vertical script can be easily written. En-
gravers often produce graceful forms and combinations, but such as
one cannot reproduce easily with the pen. Every form and combina-
tion in our system has been thoroughly tested to avoid such difficulties.

Rapidity. Many of the letter-forms at first considered because
they were artistic and graceful, after having been put to the test were
discarded because they did not permit rapid execution.

Educative. The copies in the primary numbers are large and
are illustrated with tasty outline drawings, stimulating interest in the
writing and correlating reading, number, nature study, and spelling
with the special writing lesson. So far as practicable the correlation
of studies has been carried throughout the series. The size of the
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Economy. Such facilities have been secured for their manufac-
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lowest prices.

Descriptive circular and scmple copies sent on request.

D. C. HEATH & CO., Publishers
BOSTON NEW YORK CHICAGO LONDON
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