Citation
Laddie

Material Information

Title:
Laddie and, Miss Toosey's mission
Added title page title:
Laddie and, Miss Toosey's mission
Added title page title:
Miss Toosey's mission
Creator:
Whitaker, Evelyn ( Author, Primary )
Altemus, Henry ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia
Publisher:
Henry Altemus
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1897
Language:
English
Physical Description:
150, 16 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Older women -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Missionaries -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Charity -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Intergenerational relations -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Outdoor life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Physicians -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Religious life and customs -- England -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1897
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors and title page printed in red and green.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
Evelyn Whitaker.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027015541 ( ALEPH )
ALJ0158 ( NOTIS )
20621088 ( OCLC )

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LADDIE.

CHAPTER I.

“Tuirp-cLass forward! Here you are, mum.
Plenty of room this way! Now then! that ain’t
third, that’s first. Come, look alive! All right be-
hind there? ”

Doors bang; a whistle; and the train moves off.

The guard had thrust into a third-class carriage,
already nearly full, a bandbox with a blue spotted
handkerchief round it, and a bunch of Michaelmas
daisies, southernwood, and rosemary tucked under
the knot at the top; a marketing-basket, one flap
of which was raised by a rosy-cheeked apple emit-
ting a powerful smell; a bundle done up in a hand-
kerchief of the same pattern as that round the
bandbox, only bright yellow; a large cotton um-
brella of a pale green color, with a decided waist to
it; and a pair of pattens! Anything else? Oh,
yes, of course! there was an old woman who be-
longed to the things; but she was so small and
frightened and overwhelmed that she appeared
quite a trifle beside her belongings, and might eas-

ily have been overlooked altogether. She re-
(9)



10 LADDIE.

mained just where the guard had pushed her, stand-
ing in the carriage, clutching as many of her things
as she could keep hold of, and being jerked by the
motion of the train, now against a burly bricklayer,
and now against his red-faced wife who sat oppo-
site; while her dazzled, blinking eyes followed the
hedges and banks that whirled past, and her breath
came with a catch and a gasp every time a bridge
crossed the line, as if it were a wave coming over
her. Her fellow-travellers watched her, in silence
at first, having rather resented her entrance, as the
carriage was already sufficiently full; but when a
sudden lurch of the train sent her violently forward
against a woman, from whom she carromed off
against the bricklayer, and flattened her drawn
black-satin bonnet out of all shape, the man found
his tongue, which was a kind one, though slow in
moving.

“Hold hard, missus!” he said; “we don’t pay
nothing extra for sitting down, so maybe you could
stow some of them traps under the seat, and make
it kind of more comfortable all round. Here,
mother, lend a hand with the old lady’s things,
can’t you? That’s my missus, mum, that my
better arf, as the saying is, and no chap needn't
wish for a better, though I say it as shouldn’t.”

This remark produced a playful kick, and a “Ge
along with you!” from the red-faced wife, which
did not show it was taken amiss, but that she was



LADDIE. 11

pleased with the delicate compliment, and she
helped to arrange the various baskets and bundles
with great energy and good nature.

“Now that’s better, ain’t it? Now you can just set
yourself down. Lor’ bless the woman! whatever
is she frightened at?”

For the bustling arrangements were seriously
alarming to the old woman, who was not sure that
a sudden movement might not upset the train, or
that, if she let go of anything in an unguarded mo-
ment, she might not fall out and be whirled off like
those hurrying blackberry bushes or patches of
chalk on the embankment; though, indeed, it was
only her pattens and umbrella that she was clutch-
ing as her one protection. The first thing that
roused her frorn her daze of fear was the bricklay-
er’s little boy beginning to cry, or, as his mother
called it, “to beller,” in consequence of his mother’s
elbow coming sharply in contact with his head;
and, at the sound, the old woman’s hand let go of
the umbrella and felt for the marketing-basket, and
drew out one of the powerful, yellow apples, and
held it towards the sufferer. The “bellerin” stopped
instantaneously at such a refreshing sight, even
while the mouth was wide open and two tears for-
cing their way laboriously out of the eyes. Finding
that she could accomplish this gymnastic feat with-
out any dangerous results, the old woman seemed
to gain more confidence, seated herself more com-



12 LADDIE.

fortably, straightened her bonnet, smiled at the
bricklayer, nodded to the little boy, and, by the
time the train stopped at the next station, felt her-
self quite a bold and experienced traveller.

“This ain’t London, I take it?” she asked, in a
little, thin, chirrupy voice.

“London? bless you! no. If you're bound for
London you'll have another five hours to go before
you can get there.”

“Oh, yes, I know as it’s a terrible long way off,
but we seemed coming along at such a pace as
there wasn’t no knowing.”

“You ain’t used to travelling, seemings?”

“Oh! I’ve been about as much as most folks.
I’ve been to Martel a smartish few times when Lad-
die was there, and once I went to Bristol when I
was a gal keeping company with my master, but
that ain’t yesterday, you'll be thinking.”

“Martel’s a nice place, I’ve heard tell?”

“So it be; but it’s a terrible big place, however.”

“You'll find London a pretty sight bigger.”

“TI know London pretty well, though I haven't
never been there; for Laddie, he’s been up there
nigh about fifteen year, and he’s told me a deal
about it. I know as it’s all rubbish what folks say
about the streets being paved with gold and such
like, though the young folks do get took in; but
Laddie, he says to me, ‘Mother,’ says he, ‘London
is paved with hard work like any other town; but,’



LADDIE, 13

he says, ‘good honest work is worth its weight in
gold any day;’ so it’s something more than a joke
after all.”

The old woman grew garrulous as the train rush-
ed along. Laddie was a subject, evidently, upon
which her tongue could not help being eloquent.

“An old hen with one chick,” the bricklayer
whispered to his wife; but they listened good-na-
turedly enough to the stories of the wonderful baby,
who had been larger, fatter, and stronger than any
baby before or since, who had taken notice, begun
teething, felt his feet, run off, and said “daddy” at
an incredibly early period.

Mrs. Bricklayer nodded her head and said,
“Really, now!” and “Well, I never!” inwardly, how-
ever, reserving her fixed opinion that the infant
bricklayers had outdone the wonderful Laddie in
every detail of babyhood.

Father Bricklayer could not restrain a mighty
yawn in the middle of a prolonged description of
how Laddie’s gums were lanced; but at this junc-
ture they reached the station which was the des-
tination of the bricklayer and his family, so the old
woman was not wounded by the discovery of their
want of thorough interest, and she parted from
them with great regret, feeling that she had lost
some quite old friends in them. But she soon
found another listener, and a more satisfactory one,
in a young woman, whom she had hardly noticed



14 LADDIE.

before, as she sat in the opposite corner of the car-
riage with her head bent down, neither speaking
nor being spoken to. She had a very young baby
wrapped in her shawl; and as one by one the other
passengers left the carriage and she was left alone
with the old woman, the two solitary creatures
drew together in the chill November twilight; and,
by and by, the wee baby was in the old woman’s
arms, and the young mother, almost a child her-
self, was telling her sad little story and hearing
Laddie’s story in return. There never had been
such a son; he had got on so wonderfully at school,
and had been a favorite with every one,—parson
and schoolmaster; “such a headpiece the lad had!”

“Was Laddie his real name?”

“Why, no! he was christened John Clement, af-
ter his father and mine; but he called himself ‘Lad-
die’ before ever he could speak plain, and it stuck
to him. His father was for making a schoolmaster
of him, but Laddie he didn’t take to that, so we
sent him into Martel to the chemist there, to be
shop-boy; and Mr. Stokes, the gentleman as keeps
the shop, took to him wonderful and spoke of him to
one and another, saying how sharp he were, and
such, till at last one of the doctors took him up and
taught him a lot; and when he went up to London _
he offered to take Laddie, and said as he’d take all
the expense, and as he’d made a man of him. He
come to see me himself, he did, and talked me over,



LADDIE. 15

for I was a bit loath to let him go, for ’twas the year
as the master died ; he died just at fall and Laddie
went at Christmas, and I was feeling a bit unked
and lonesome.’’

“Were that long ago?”

“Yes, ’twere a goodish time. Fifteen year come
Christmas.”

“But you'll have seen him many a time since?”

“Well, no, I ain’t. Many the time as he’s been
coming down but something always come between.
Once he had fixed the very day and all, and then he
were called off on business to Brighton or some-
where. That were a terrible disappointment to the
boy; my heart were that sore for him as I nearly for-
got how much I’d been longing for it myself.”

“But he’ll have wrote?”

“Bless you, yes! he’s a terrible one for his
mother, he is. He’ve not written so much of late
maybe; but then folks is that busy in London they
hasn’t the time to do things as we has in the coun-
try; but I’ll warrant he’ve written to me every time
he had a’spare moment; and so when I sees old
Giles the postman come up, and I says, ‘Anything
for me, master?’ and he says, ‘Nothing for you to-
day, mum’ (for I were always respected in Sunny-
brook from a girl up), I think to myself, thinks I,
“it ain’t for the want of the will as my Laddie hasn't
wrote. And then the presents as he’d send me,
bless his heart! Bank notes it were at first, till he



16 LADDIE.

found as I just paid ’em into the bank and left ’em
there; for what did I want with bank notes? And
then he sent me parcels of things, silk gownds fit
for a duchess, and shawls all the colors of the rain-
bow, till I almost began to think he’d forgot what
sort of an old body I be. Just to think of the likes of
me in such fine feathers! And there were flannel
enough for a big family, and blankets; and then he
sent tea and sugar, I don’t know how many pounds
of it; but it were good and no mistake, and I’d like
a cup of it now for you and me, my dear.”

“And have he sent for you now to come and live
with him?”

“No, he don’t know nothing about it; and I mean
to take him all by surprise. Old Master Heath, as
my cottage belonged to, died this summer; and the
man as took his farm wants my cottage for his
shepherd, and he give me notice to quit. I felt it
a bit and more, for I’d been in that cottage thirty-
five year, spring and fall, and I knows every crack
and cranny about it, and I fretted terrible at first;
but at last I says to myself, ‘Don’t you go for to
fret; go right off to Laddie, and he’ll make a home
for you and glad;’ and so I just stored ay things
away and come right off.”

“He’ve been doing well in London?”

“Well, my Laddie’s a gentleman! He’s a regu-
lar doctor, and keeps a carriage, and has a big
house and servants. Mr. Mason, our parish doc-



LADDIE. 17

’ tor, says as he’s one of the first doctors in London,
and that I may well be proud of him. Bless me!
how pleased the boy will be to see his old mother!
Maybe I shall see him walking in the streets, but if
I don’t I'll find his house and creep in at the back
door so as he sha’n’t see me, and tell the gal to say
to the doctor (doctor, indeed! my Laddie!) as some
one wants to see him very particular. And then”
—The old woman broke down here, half-sobbing,
half-laughing, with an anticipation too tenderly, ec-
statically sweet for words. “My dear,” she said,
as she wiped her brimming eyes, “I’ve thought of
it and dreamt of it so long, and to think as I should
have lived to see it!”

The expectations of her travelling companion
were far less bright, though she had youth to paint
the future with bright hopes, and only nineteen
winters to throw into the picture dark shadows of
foreboding. She had been well brought up, and
gone into comfortable service; and her life had run
on in a quiet, happy course till she met with Harry
Joyce.

“Folks says all manner of ill against him,” said
the girl’s trembling voice; “but he were always
good tome. I didn’t know much about him, except
as he liked me, and I liked him dearly; for he come
from London at fair-time, and he stopped about the
place doing odd jobs, and he come after me con-
stant. My mistress were sore set against him, but



18 LADDIE.

I were pretty near mad about him; so we was mar-
ried without letting any folks at home know naught
about it. Oh, yes! we was married all right. I’ve
got my lines, as I could show you as there wasn’t
no mistake about it; and it were all happy enough
for a bit, and he got took on as ostler at the
George; and there wasn’t a steadier, better-behaved
young feller in the place. But, oh, dear! it didn't
last long. He came in one day and said as how
he’d lost his place, and was going right off to Lon-
don to get work there. I didn’t say never a word,
‘but I got up and begun to put our bits of things to-
gether; and thcn he says as he’d best go first and
find a place for me, and I must go home to my
mother. I thought it would have broke my heart,
I did, to part with him; but he stuck to it, and I
went home. Our village is nigh upon eight mile
from Merrifield, and I’d never heard a word from
mother since I wrote to tell them I was wed. When
I got home that day, I almost thought as they’d
have shut the door on me. A story had got about
as I wasn’t married at all, and had brought shame
and trouble on my folks; and my coming home like
that made people talk all the more, though I
showed them my lines and told my story truthful.
Well, mother took me in, and I bided there till my
baby was born; and she and father was good to me,
I'll not say as they wasn’t; but they were always un-
easy and suspicious-like about Harry; and I got



LADDIE. 19

sick of folks looking and whispering, as if I ought
to be ashamed when I had naught to be ashamed
of. And I wrote to Harry more than once to say
as I’d rather come to him, if he’d a hole to put me
in; and he always wrote to bid me bide a bit longer,
till baby come; and then I just wrote and said I
must come anyhow, and so set off! But, oh! I feel
skeered to think of London, and Harry maybe not
glad to see me.”

It was.dark by this time, and the women peering
out could often see only the reflection of their own
faces in the windows or ghostly puffs of smoke flit-
ting past. Now and then little points of light in the
darkness told of homes where there were warm
hearths and bright lights; and once, up above, a star
showed, looking kindly and home-like to the old wo-
man. “Every bit as if it were that very same star as
comes out over the elm-tree by the pond, but that
ain’t likely all this way off.”

But soon the clouds covered the friendly star,
and a fine rain fell, splashing the windows with tiny
drops, and making the lights outside blurred and
hazy. And then the scattered lights drew closer
together, and the housed formed into rows, and gas
lamps marked out perspective lines; and then there
were houses bordering the line on either side in-
stead of banks and hedges; and then the train
stopped, and a damp and steaming ticket collector
opened the door, letting in a puff of fog, and de-



20 LADDIE.

manded the tickets, and was irritated to a great
pitch of exasperation by the fumbling and slowness
of the two women, who had put their tickets away
in some place of extra safety and forgotten where
that place was. And then in another minute the
train was in Paddington; gas and hurry and noise,
porters, cabs, and shrieking engines,—a night-
mare, indeed, to the dazzled country eyes and the
deafened country ears.

CHAPTER II.

In a quiet old-fashioned street near Portman
Square there is a door with a brass plate upon it,
bearing the name “Dr. Carter.” The door is not
singular in possessing a brass plate, for almost every
house in the street displays one, being inhabited
nearly entirely by doctors and musical professors.
I do not attempt to explain why it is so.—whether
that part of London is especially unhealthy, and so
requires constant and varied medical advice, or
whether there is something in the air conducive to
harmony; or whether the musical professors at-
tract the doctors, or the doctors the professors, I
leave to more learned heads to discover, only haz-
arding the suggestion that perhaps the highly
strung musical nerves may be an interesting study
to the faculty, or that music may have charms to
soothe the savage medical breast or drive away the



LADDIE. 24

evil spirits of the dissecting-room. Anyhow, the fact
remains that North Crediton Street is the resort of
doctors and musical men, and that on one of the
doors stands the plate of Dr. Carter.

It was an old-fashioned, substantially built house,
built about the beginning of the last century, when
people knew how to build solidly, if not beautifully.
It had good thick walls, to which you might whis-
per a secret without confiding itto your next-door
neighbor, and firm, well-laid floors, on which you
might dance, if you had a mind to, without fear of
descending suddenly into the basement. There
were heavy frames to the windows, and small
squares of glass, and wooden staircases with thick,
twisted banisters,—a house altogether, at which
housemaids looked with contempt, as something
infinitely less “genteel” than the “splendid man-
sions” of lath and plaster, paint and gilding, which
are run up with such magic speed nowadays. We
have no need to ring the bell and disturb the soft-
voiced, deferential man-servant, out of livery, from
the enjoyment of his evening paper in the pantry,
for we can pass uninvited and unannounced into
Dr. Carter’s consulting-room, and take a look at it
and him. There is nothing remarkable about the
room; a book-case full of medical and _ scientific
books; a large writing-table with pigeon holes for
papers and a stethoscope on the top; a reading-
lamp with a green shade, and an india-rubber tube



22 LADDIE,

to supply it with gas from the burner above;
a side-table with more books and papers and a
small galvanic battery; a large india-rubber plant
in the window; framed photographs of eminent
physicians and surgeons over the mantelpiece; a
fire burning low in the grate; a thick turkey carpet
and heavy leather chairs; and there you have an in-
ventory of the furniture, to arrange before your
mind’s eye if you think it worth while. ;
There is something remarkable in the man, John
Clement Carter, M. D., but I cannot give you an in-
‘yentory of him, or make a broker’s list of eyes
and forehead, nose and mouth. He is not a regu-
larly handsome man, not one that a sculptor would
model or an artist paint, but his is a face that
you never forget if you have once seen it; there is
something about him that makes people move out
of his path involuntarily; and strangers ask, “Whois
that?” Power is stamped in his deep-set eyes and
the firm lines of mouth and chin,—power which
gives beauty even to an ugly thing, throwing a
grandeur and dignity round a black, smoky engine,
or a huge, ponderous steam-hammer. Indeed,
power is beauty; for there is no real beauty in
weakness, physical or mental. His eyes had the
beauty of many doctors’ eyes,—kind and patient,
from experience of human weakness and trouble of
all sorts; keen and penetrating, as having looked
through the mists of pain and disease, searching for



LADDIE. 23

hope, ay, and finding it too sometimes where other
men could only find despair; brave and steady, as
having looked through the glorious glass of science
and seen, more plainly the more he looked, the
working of the Everlasting Arms; for surely when
science brings confusion and doubt, it proves that
the eye of the beholder is dim or distorted, or that
he is too ignorant to use the glass rightly. But
there is a different look in his eyes to-night; pain
and trouble and weakness are far from histhoughts;
and he is not gazing through the glass of science,
though he has a Medical Review open before him,
and a paper-knife in his hand to cut the leaves; his
eyes have wandered to a bunch of Russian violets
in a specimen glass on the table; and he is looking
through rose-colored spectacles at a successful
past, a satisfactory present, and a beautiful future.
I need not tell my readers that this Dr. John
Clement Carter was the Somersetshire boy whom
Dr. Savile had taken by the hand, and whose tal-
_ents had made the ladder which carried him up to
eminence. The kind old doctor liked to tell the
story over a glass of port wine to the friends round
his shining mahogany (he was old-fashioned, and
thought scorn of claret and dinners a la Russe). “I
was the making of the man,” he would say; “and
I’m as proud of him, by Jove! sir, as if he were a
son of my own.”
It is quite as difficult to rise in the world grace-



24 LADDIE.

fully as to come down; but every one agreed that
John Carter managed to do it, and just from this
reason, that there was no pretence about him. He
did not intrude his low origin on every one, forcing
it on people’s attention with that fidgety uneasiness
which will have people know it if they are interested
in the subject or not, which is only one remove
from the unworthy pride that tries to hide it away
altogether. Neither did he boast of it as something
very much to his credit; but to any one who cared
_to know he would say, “My family were poor work-
ing people in Somersetshire, and I don’t even know
if I had a grandfather; and I owe everything to Dr.
Savile.’ And he would say it with a smile and a
quiet manner, as if it were nothing to be ashamed
of and nothing to be proud of, but just a fact which
was hardly of interest; and his manner somehow
made people feel that birth and breeding were after
all mere insignificant circumstances of life, and of
no account by the side of talent and success. “He’s
a good fellow, John Carter, and a clever fellow too,
without any humbug about him,” the men said;
and the women thought much the same, though
they expressed it differently. Indeed, the glimpse
of his early humble country life, simply given,with-
out any pretence or concealment, grew to be consid-
ered an effective, picturesque background, which
showed up to advantage his present success and
dignified position. It was quite true that there



LADDIE. 25

was no humbug or concealment about him; that
was the very truth he told; and yet,somehow, astime
went on, the words lost the full meaning they had
to him at first. Don’t you know, if you use them
even in our prayers, alas! they are no longer the
expression of our feeling, but the words come first
and the feeling follows or does not follow. And
then, don’t you know sometimes how we hear with
other people’s ears, and see with other people’s
eyes? And so John Carter, when he said those
simple, truthful words, grew to see the picturesque
background,—the thatched cottage, and the honey-
suckle-covered porch, and the grand old patriarch
with white hair, one of nature’s noblemen, leaning
on his staff and blessing his son; and he gradually
forgot the pigsty close to the cottage door, and
father in a dirty green smock and hob-nailed boots,
doing what he called “mucking it out,” and stop-
ping to wipe the heat from his brow with a snuffy,
red cotton handkerchief.

But come back from the pigsty to the violets
which are scenting the consulting-room, and luring
Dr. Carter, not unwillingly, from the Medical Re-
view to thoughts of the giver. Her name is Violet,
too, and so are her eyes, though the long lashes
throw such a shadow that you might fancy they
were black themselves. It is not every one—in-
deed, it is John Carter alone—who is privileged ta
look straight down into those eyes, and see the



26 LADDIE,

beauty of their color; only he, poor, foolish fellow,
forgets to take advantage of his opportunity, and
only notices the great love for him that shines there
and turns his brain with happiness. His hand
trembles as he stretches it to take the specimen
glass; and the cool, fragrant flowers lightly touch
his lip as he raises them to his face. ‘“Pshaw!” I
hear you say, reminding me of my own words,
“there is no beauty in weakness, and this is weak-
ness indeed!—a sensible man, past the heyday and
folly of youth, growing maudlin and sentimental
over a bunch of violets!’ No, reader, it is power
—the strongest power on earth,—the power of love.

He had been used to say that his profession was
his lady-love, and he had looked on with wondering
incredulous eyes at the follies and excesses of
young lovers; he was inclined to think it was a mild
form of mania, and required physical treatment.
And so he reached five-and-thirty unscathed, and
slightly contemptuous of others less fortunate than
himself; when, one day, a girl’s blue eyes, looking
shyly at him through dark lashes, brought him
down once and forever from his pedestal of fancied
superiority; and before he could collect his argu-
ments, or reason himself out of it, he was past cure,
hopelessly, helplessly, foolishly in love. They had
been engaged for two days; it was two days since
this clever young doctor, this rising, successful
man, with such stores of learning, such a solid in-



LADDIE. 27

tullect, such a cool, calm brain, had stood blushing
and stammering before a girl of eighteen. If I
were to write down the words he said, you would
think my hero an idiot pure and simple; the most
mawkish and feeble twaddle of the most debased of
penny periodicals was vastly superior to what Dr.
Carter stammered out that day. But is not this
generally the case? Beautiful, poetical love scenes
are frequent in plays and books, but very rare in
real life. There is not one love scene in a thousand
that would bear being taken down in shorthand,
printed in plain, black type, and read by critical
eyes through commonplace spectacles. Neverthe-
less, the feelings are no doubt sublime, though the
words may be ridiculous. He was quite another
man altogether (happily for him) when he went to
Sir John Meredith, and told him plainly that he was
no match for his daughter as far as birth went. _

“My good fellow,” the sensible little baronet an-
swered, “there are only about ten families in Eng-
land that can put their pedigree by the side of the
Merediths, and it don’t seem to me to make much
difference, if you rise from the ranks yourself, or if
your father or grandfather did it.”

“T can scarcely claim even to be a gentleman,”
the young man went on, feeling pretty sure of suc-
cess by that time.

“Not another word, my dear boy; not another
word! I respect your candor, and I esteem you very



28 LADDIE.

highly as an honest man—the noblest work of God,
you know, eh?—though I’d like to hear any one
say that you were not a gentleman as well. There,
go along! shake hands! God bless you! You'll find
Violet in the drawing-room. Sly little puss! but
I saw what was coming—and mind you dine with
us this evening at seven sharp—old-fashioned folk,
old-fashioned hours.”

I think the wary old baronet also respected Dr.
Carter’s income, and esteemed very highly his suc-
cess, and having weighed the advantages of family
and birth against success and income, had found
that the latter were the more substantia! in the
worldly scales.

And so Dr. Carter was dreaming rosy dréams
that evening in his quiet room, as was fit and proper
after two days’ wandering in fairyland with Violet
Meredith. But as the scent of the violets had led
him to think of the giver, so it drew his thoughts
away from her again back to springtime many
years ago at Sunnybrook, and the bank where the
earliest violets grew in the sheltered lane leading to
the Croft farm. Did ever violets smell so sweet as
those? He remembered one afternoon, after school,
going to fetch the milk from the farm, and the scent
luring him across the little runlet by the side of the
path, which was swollen into a small, brawling
brook by the lately thawed snow. He set down the
can safely before he made the venture; and Dr.



LADDIE. 29

Carter laughed softly to himself to think how short
and fat the legs were that found the little stream
such a mighty stride. He was busy diving for the
flowers among the layers of dead elm leaves, which
the blustering autumn winds had blown there,
when a sound behind him caused him to look round
and there was the can upset, and the young fox-
hound quartered at the Croft licking up the white
pool from the pebbles. In his anger and fear and
haste, he slipped as he tried to jump back, and went
full-length into the stream, and scrambled out in a
sad plight, and went home crying bitterly, with a
very wet pinafore, and dirty face, and empty milk
can, with the cause of his mishap, the sweet violets,
still clasped unconsciously in his little scratched
hand. And his mother—ah! she was always a
good mother! He could remember still the com-
forting feeling of mother’s apron wiping away dirt
and tears, and the sound of her voice bidding him
“Never mind! and hush up like a good little Lad-
die.” His heart felt very warm just then toward
that mother of his; and he made up his mind that,
cost what trouble it might, he would go down and
see her before he was married, if it were only for an
hour or two, just to make sure that she was com-
fortable and not working about and wearing herself
out. His conscience pricked him a little at the
thought of what a pleasure the sight of him would
have been to the old woman, and how year after



30 LADDIE.

year had slipped away without his going down. But
still a comforting voice told him that he had been
substantially a good son, and it was accident and
not intention that had kept him away. “Anyhow,”
he said to himself, ‘‘ another month shall not pass
without my seeing my mother.”

At this moment the deferential man knocked at
the door and aroused Dr. Carter to the conscious-
ness of how far his wandering thoughts had carried
him from his consulting room and Medical Review.

“What is it, Hyder?”

“Please, sir, there’s some one wishes to see you.
I told her it was too late, and you was engaged very
particular, but she wouldn’t be put off nohow, sir.”

“What is her name?”

There was a slight smile disturbing the usually
unruffied serenity of Mr.,Hyder’s face, as if he hada
lingering remembrance of something amusing.

“She didn’t give no name, sir, and she wouldn’t
say what she wanted, though I asked if a message
wouldn’t do; but she said her business was too par-
ticular for that, sir,”

“What sort of person is she?”

The corners of the man’s mouth twitched, and he
had to give a little cough to conceal an incipient
chuckle.

“Beg your paron, sir. She appears to be from
the country, sir. Quite a countrified, homely old
body, sir.”





(31)






LADDIE. 33

Perhaps the odor of the violets and the country
memories they had called up made him more amia-
bly inclined; but instead of the sharp, decided re-
_ fusal the servant expected, “Tell her it is long past
my time for seeing patients, and I am busy, and she
must call again to-morrow,” he said, “Well, show
her in;” and the man withdrew in surprise.

“Countrified, homely old body.” Somehow the
description brought back to his mind his mother
coming down the brick path from the door at home,
with her Sunday bonnet on, and her pattens in her
hand, and the heavy-headed double stocks and co-
lumbines tapping against her short petticoats. The
doctor smiled to himself; and even while he smiled
the door was pushed open, and before him he saw,
with a background of the gas-lit hall and the re-
spectful Hyder, by this time developed into an in-
controllable grin, his mother, in her Sunday bonnet ©
and with her pattens in her hand.



CHAPTER III.

READER, think of some lovely picture of rustic
life, with tender lights and pleasant shadows, with
hard lines softened, and sharp angles touched into
gentle curves, with a background of picturesque,
satisfying appropriateness, with the magic touches
that bring out the beauty and refinement and ele-



34 LADDIE.

ganee of the scene, which are really there, and that
subtly tone down all the roughness and awkward-
ness and coarseness, which are also equally there.
And then, imagine it, if you can, changing under
your very eyes, with glaring lights and heavy shad-
ows deepening and sharpening and hardening
wrinkles and angles and lines, exaggerating defects,
bringing coarseness and age and ugliness into pain-
ful prominence, and taking away at a sweep the
pretty, rural background which might have relieved
and soothed the eye, and putting a dull, common-
place, incongruous one in its place. It was some-
thing of this sort that happened to John Carter that
night, when the picture he had been painting with
the sweet lights of love and childhood’s fancies, and
the tender shadows of memory throwing over it all
soft tones of long ago and far away, suddenly
stood before him in unvarnished reality, with all
the glamor taken away, an every-day fact in his
present London life.

I am glad to write it of him that, for the first min-
ute, pleasure was the uppermost feeling in his mind.
First thought are often the best and purest. He
started up, saying, “Mother! why mother!” in the
same tone of glad surprise as he would have done
fifteen years before if she had come unexpectedly
into the shop at Martel; he did not even think if the
door were closed, or what Mr. Hyder would think;
he did not notice that she was crumpled and dirty



LADDIE, 30

with travel, or that she put her pattens down on his
open book and upset the glass of violets; he just
took hold of her trembling, hard-worked hands,
and kissed her furrowed old cheek, wet with tears
of unutterable joy, and repeated “Mother! why,
mother!”

I am glad to write it of him; glad that she had
that great happiness, realizing the hopes and long-
ings of years past, consoling in days to come when
she had to turn back to the past for comfort, or for-
ward to the time of perfect satisfaction. There are
these exquisite moments in life, let people say what.
they will of the disappointments and vanity of the
world, when hope is realized, desire fulfilled; but
it is just for a moment, no more—just a fore taste of
the joys that shall be hereafter, when every moment
of the long years of eternity will be still more full
and perfect, when we shall “wake up” and “be sat- .
isfied.”

She was clinging meanwhile to his arm, sobbing
out, “Laddie, my boy, Laddie!” with her eyes too
dim with tears to see his face clearly, or to notice
how tall and grand and handsome her boy was
grown, and what a gentleman. Presently, when
she was seated in the armchair, and had got
her breath again, and wiped her foolish old eyes,
she was able to hunt in her capacious pocket for the
silver-rimmed spectacles that had descended from
her father, old Master Pullen, in the almshouse, and



36 LADDIE.

that Laddie remembered well, as being kept in the
old family Bible, and brought out with great pomp
and ceremony on Sunday evenings.

“I must have a good look at you, Laddie boy,”
she said.

And then I think her good angel must have
spread his soft wing between the mother and son
(though to her mind it seemed only like another
tear dimming her sight, with a rainbow light on it),
to keep her from seeing the look that was marring
that son’s face. All the pleasure was gone, and
embarrassment and disquiet had taken its place.

“However did you come, mother?” he said, trying
his best to keep a certain hardness and irritation
out of his voice.

“T come by the train, dear,” the old woman an-
swered “and it did not terrify me more nor a bit at
first, ’ll not go for to deny; but, bless you! I soon
got over it, and them trains is handy sort of things
when you gets used to’em. I was a good deal put
to though when we got to London station, there
seemed such a many folks about, and they did push
and hurry a body so. I don’t know whatever I
should ’a done if a gentleman hadn’t come and asked
me where I wanted to get to. He were a tallish
man with whiskers, a bit like Mr. Jones over at
Martel, and I dare say you knows him; but he was
terrible kind, however.”

John Carter did not stop to explain that there
were many tallish men with whiskers in London.



LADDIE. 37

“Why didn’t you write and say you were com-
ing?”

“Well, there! I thought as I’d give you a sur-
prise; and I ‘knew as you’d be worrying about the
journey and thinking as I’d not be able to manage;
but I’m not such a helpless old body, after all, Lad-
die.”

“Whom have you left in charge of the cottage?”

“Why, I’ve give it up altogether. Farmer Har-
ris, he wanted it for his shepherd, and he give me
notice. That’s why I come all on a sudden like. I
says to myself, says I, Laddie’s got a home and a
welcome for his old mother, and it’s only because
he thought as I was pretty nearly growed to the old
place, and couldn’t abear to leave it, that he ain't
said as I must come and keep house for him long
ago. But, bless you! I’ve been thinking so of the
pleasure of seeing you again that I’ve pretty nearly .
forgot as I was leaving my master’s grave and all.”

“And when must you go back?”

“Not till you gets tired of me, Laddie, or till you
takes me to lay me by the old master; for I’d like
to lay there, if so be as you can manage it, for I’ve
heard tell as it cost a mort of money buryin’ folks
out of the parish as they dies in, and maybe it
mightn’t be just convenient to you.”

John Carter busied himself with making the fire
burn up into a blaze, while his mother rambled on,
telling him little bits of village gossip about people



38 LADDIE.

he had long since forgotten or never heard of; or
describing her journey, which was a far greater ex-
ploit in the old woman’s eyes than Lieutenant Cam-
eron’s walk across Africa; or dwelling on the delight
of seeing him again. He paid little heed to what
she said, pretending to be intent on placing a re-
fractory piece of coal in a certain position, or coax-
ing an uncertain little flame into steadiness; but his
head was busy trying to form some plan for getting
himself out of his difficult position. He did not
want to hurt her, or to be unkind in any way; but
it was altogether out of the question having her
there to live with him. It would ruin all his pros-
pects in life, his position in his profession and in
society; as to his. engagement, he did not venture
to allow himself even to think of Violet just then.
He knew some doctors whose mothers lived with
them, and kept house for them, received their
guests, and sat at the head of their table, but they
were ladies, very different. The very idea of his
mother with three or four servants under her was
an absurdity. And this thought brought Hyder’s
grin before his mind. What had happened when
his mother arrived? Had she committed herself
and him frightfully by her behavior? No doubt
that impudent rascal was giving a highly facetious
account of it all to the maids in the kitchen. Chat-
tering magpies! And how they would pass it on!
How Mary Jane would describe it through the area



LADDIE. 39

gate to the milk woman next morning, and cook
add a pointed word or two from the front steps as
she cleaned them! He could almost smell the wet
hearthstone and hear the clinking of the tin milk
pails as Biddy hooked them to the yoke and passed
on with the story of his degradation. And he could
fancy what a choice morsel it would make for Hy-
der to tell Sir John Meredith’s solemn, red-nosed
butler, behind his hand, in a hoarse whisper, with
winks to emphasize strong points, and an occa-
sional jerk of the thumb over the shoulder and a
careful avoidance of names. This thought was too
much for his feelings, and the tongs went down
with an ominous clatter into the fender, making the
old woman jump nearly off her chair, and cutting
short a story about the distemper among Squire
Wellow’s pigs.

“There; it brought my heart into my mouth,
pretty near, and set me all of a tremble. I reckon
as I’m a little bit tired, and it have shook up my
nerves like, and a little do terrify one so.”

The sight of her white, trembling old face
touched his son’s and doctor’s heart under the fine,
closely woven, well-cut coat of fine gentlemanli-
ness and worldy wisdom which he was buttoning
so closely round him.

You are quite tired out, mother,” he said; “you
shall have some tea and go to bed. I can't have
you laid up you know.”



40 LADDIE.

“There now! if I wasn’t thinking as a dish of
tea would be the nicest thing in the world! and for
you to think of it! Ah! you remembers what your
mother likes, bless you!”

In that moment he had quickly made up his
mind that at any rate it was too late for that night
to do anything but just make her comfortable; to-
morrow something must bé done without delay;
but there was ten striking, and she was evidently
quite worn out. He must say something to silence
those jays of servants and get her off to bed, and
then he could sit down and arrange his plans
quietly; for the suddenness of the emergency had
confused and muddled him.

“T’ll tell them to get some tea,” he said, “you sit
still and rest.” And then he rang the bell decidedly
and went out into the hall, closing the doors be-
hind him. He had never felt so self-conscious and
uncomfortable as when the man-servant came up
the kitchen stairs and stood as deferentially as ever
before him. He felt as if he had not got entire con-
trol of voice, eyes, or hands. His eyes seemed to
avoid looking at the man’s face in spite of him, and
his voice tried hard to be apologetic and entreating
of its own accord. That would never do. He
thrust his obtrusive hands into his pockets, and
drew up his head, and looked sharply at the man
straight in the eyes with a “fight you for 2d.” ex-
pression, or “every bit as if I owed him a quarter’s



LADDIE. Al

rent,” as Hyder said afterwards; and he spoke in
a commanding, bullying tone, very unlike his usual
courteous behavior to servants, imagining that by
this he conveyed to the man’s mind that he was
quite at his ease, and that nothing unusual had
happened.

“Look here,” he said, “I want tea at once in the
dining-room, and tell cook to send up some cold
meat. I suppose it’s too late for cutlets or anything

like that?”

“Ts the lady going to stop the night, sir?”

The words stung Dr. Carter so, that he would
have liked to have kicked the man down the
kitchen stairs, but he luckily restrained himself.

“Yes, she is. The best bedroom must be got
ready, and a fire lighted, and everything made as
comfortable as possible. Do you hear?”

“Yes, sir.” The man hesitated a second to see
if there were any further orders, and Dr. Carter —
half turned, looking another way, as he added,
“She is a very old friend and nurse of mine when I
was a child, and I want her to be made comfortable.
She will only be here this one night.”

He felt as he turned the handle of the consulting-
room door that he had really done it rather well on
the whole, and carried it off with a high hand, and
not told any falsehood after all, for was she not his
oldest friend and his most natural nurse? In reality
he had never looked less like a gentleman, and
Hyder saw it too.



42 LADDIE.

They say a man is never a hero to his own valet.
I do not know if this includes men-servants in gen-
eral; but certain it is that, up to this time, Dr.
Carter had kept the respect of his servant. “I
know as he ain’t a swell,’ Mr. Hyder would say
to the coterie of footmen who met in the bar of the
snug little “public” round the corner; “but for all
that he ain’t a bad master neither; and as far as
my experience serves, he’s as good a gent as any
of them, and better any day than them dandy, half-
pay captings as locks up their wine and cigars, and
sells their old clothes, and keeps their men on
scraps, and cusses and swears as if they was made
of nothing else.”

But as Hyder went to his pantry that night, he
shook his head with a face of supreme disgust.
“*That’s what I call nasty!” he said, “I’m disap-
pointed in that man. I] thought better of him than
this comes to. Well, well! blood tells after all.
What’s bred in the bone will come out in the flesh
sooner or later. Nurse indeed! Get along! you
don’t humbug me, my gent!”

There were no signs, however, of these moraliz-
ings in the pantry, or the fuller discussion that fol-
lowed in the kitchen, when he announced that sup-
per was ready.

“Do ye have your victuals in the kitchen now, -
Laddie?” the old woman said. “Well, there! it is
the most comfortable to my thinking, though
gentle-folks do live in their best parlors constant.”



LADDIE, 43

Hyder discreetly drew back, and Dr. Carter
whispered with a crimson flush all over his face,
“Hush, we'll have our talk when this fellow is out
of the way. Don’t say anything till then.”

The old woman looked much surprised, but at
last concluded that there was something mysterious
against the character of “the very civil-spoken
young man as opened the door,” and so she kept
silence while her son led her into the dining-room,
where tea was spread, with what appeared to the
old woman royal magnificence of white damask
and shining silver.

“You can go,” the doctor said. “I will ring if
we want anything.”

“He don’t look such a baddish sort of young
man,” she said, when the door closed behind the ob-
servant Hyder; “and he seems to mind what you
says pretty sharp. I thought as he was a gent hisself_
when he opened the door, as he hadn’t got red
breeches or gaiters or nothing; but I suppose you
will put him in livery by and by?”

“Now, mother, you must have some tea. And
you are not to talk till you have eaten something.
Here! I’ll pour out the the tea.” For the glories
of the silver teapot were drawing her attention
from its reviving contents. “I hope they have
made it good. Ah! I remember well what tea you
used to make in that little brown teapot at home.”
It was very easy and pleasant to be kind to her,



44 LADDIE.

and make much of her now, when no one else was
there. He enjoyed waiting on her, and seeing her
brighten up and revive under the combined influ-
ence of food and warmth and kindness. He liked
to hear her admire and wonder at everything, and
he laughed naturally and boyishly at her odd little
innocent remarks. If they two could have been al-
ways alone together, with no spying eyes and spite-
ful tongues, it would have been all right and pleas-
ant, but as it was, it was quite impossible, and out
of the question.

“It ain’t the teapot, Laddie, as does it. It’s just
to let it stand till it’s drawed thorough and no
longer. Put it on the hob for ten minutes, say I,
but that’s enough. I don’t like stewed tea, and
moreover it ain’t wholesome neither. This is a
fine room, Laddie, and no mistake. Why, the par-
son ain’t got one to hold a candle to it. I'd just
like some of the Sunnybrook folk to have a look at
it. It would make them open their eyes wide, I
warrant!—to see me a-setting here like a lady, with
this-here carpet as soft as anything, and them cur-
tains, and pictures, and all! I wonder whatever
they would say if they could see? I suppose now,
as there’s a washus or a place out behind some-
wheres for them servants?”

Dr. Carter laughed at the idea of Mrs. Treasure
the cook, and the two smart housemaids, let alone
Mr. Hyder, being consigned to a wash-house at



LADDIE. 45

the back; and he explained the basement arrange-
ments.

“Underground. Well! I never did! But I think
T’ve heard tell of underground kitchens before, but
I never would believe it. It must be terrible dark
for the poor things, and damp moreover; and how
poor, silly gals is always worriting to get places in
London, passes me!”

Presently, when they had done tea, and gone
back into the consulting-room, when the old woman
was seated in the arm-chair, with her feet on the
fender, and her gown turned up over her knees,
Dr. Carter drew his chair up near hers, and pre-
pared for his difficult task.

“Mother,” he said, laying one of his hands car-
essingly on her arm (he was proud of his hands,—it
was one of his weaknesses that they were gentle-
man’s hands, white and well shaped, and there was
a plain gold strap-ring on the little finger, which
hit exactly the right medium between severity and
display, as a gentleman’s ring should),—‘Mother,
I wish you had written to tell me you were com-
ing.”

She took his hands between both her own, hard
and horny, with the veins standing up like cord
on the backs, rough and misshapen with years of
hard work, but with a world of tender mother’s love
in every touch, that made his words stick in his
throat and nearly choke him,



46 LADDIE.

“T knew as you'd be pleased to see me, Laddie,
come when I might or how I might.”

“Of course I’m glad to see you, mother, very
glad; and I was thinking just before you came in
that I would run down to Sunnybrook to see you
just before Christmas.”

And then he went on to explain how different
London life was to that at Sunnybrook, and how
she would never get used to it or feel happy there,
talking quickly and wrapping up his meaning in so
many words and elaborations that at the end of
half an hour the old woman had no more idea of
what he meant that she had at the beginning, and
was fairly mystified. She had a strange way, too,
of upsetting all his skilful arguments with a simple
word or two.

“Different from Sunnybrook? Yes, sure; but
she’d get used to it like other folks. Not happy?
Why she’d be happy anywheres with her Laddie.
There, don’t you fret yourself about me; as long as
you're comfortable I don’t mind nothing.”

How could he make her understand and see the
guif that lay between them,—her life and his? It
needed much plainer speaking; a spade must be
called a spade; and, somehow, it looked a very
much more ugly spade when it was so called. How
soon did she catch his meaning? He hardly knew,
for he could not bear to look into her face, and see
the smile fade from her lips and the brightness



LADDIE. 47

from her eyes. He only felt her hand suddenly
clasp his more tightly, as if he had tried to draw
it away from her; and she grew silent, while he
talked on quickly and nervously, telling her they
would go together to-morrow and find alittle snug
cottage not far from London, with everything
pretty and comfortable that heart could wish for,
and a little maid to do the work, so that she need
never lay her hand to anything; and how he would
come to see her often, very often, perhaps once a
week. Still never a word for or against, of pleas-
ure or of pain, till he said,—

“You would like it, mother, wouldn’t you?”

And then she answered slowly and faintly,

“T’m aweary, Laddie, too tired like for new
plans; and maybe, dearie, too old.”

“You must go to bed,” he said, with a burst of
overwhelming compunction. “I ought not to have
let you stop up like this. I should have kept what
I had to say till to-morrow when you were rested.
Come, think no more of it to-night, everything will
look brighter to-morrow. T’ll show you your bed-
room.”

And so he took her up-stairs, such a lot of stairs
to the old country legs; but her curiosity overcame
her fatigue sufficiently to make her peep into the
double drawing-room where the gas lamp in the
street threw weird lights and shadows on the ceil-
ing, and touched unexpectedly on parts of mirrors



48 LADDIE.

or gilded cornices, giving a mysterious effect to the
groups of furniture and the chandelier hanging in
its holland covering.

“°*Tis mighty fine!” she said, “but an unked place
to my mind; like a churchyard somat.”

Her bedroom did not look “unked,”’ however, with
a bright fire burning, and the inviting chintz-cur-
tained bed and the crisp muslin-covered toilet-
table, with two candles lighted. In the large look-
ing-glass on the toilet-table, the figure of the little
-old woman was reflected among the elegant com-
fort of the room, looking all the more small and
shabby and old, and out of place in contrast with
her surroundings.

“Now make haste to bed, there’s a good old
mother; my room is next to this if you want any-
thing, and I shall soon come up to bed. I hope
you'll be very comfortable. Good-night.”

And then he left her with a kiss; and she stood
for some minutes quite still, looking at the scene
reflected in the glass before her, peering curiously
and attentively at it.

“And so Laddie is ashamed of his old mother,”
she said softly, with a little sigh; “and it ain’t no
wonder!”

As Dr. Carter sat down again in his consulting-
room by himself, he told himself that he had done
wisely, though he had felt and inflicted pain, and
still felt very sore and ruffled. But it was wisest,



a

a3

Tag
ae eT ae



(49)






LADDIE. 5t

and practically kindest and best for her in the end,
more surely for her happiness and comfort; so
there was no need to regret it, or for that tiresome
little feeling in one corner of his heart that seemed
almost like remorse. This is no story-book world
of chivalry, romance, and poetry; and to get on in
it you must just lay aside sentimental fancies and
act by the light of reason and common sense. And
then he settled down to arrange the details of to-
morrow’s plans, and jotted down on a piece of
paper a few memoranda of suitable places, times of
trains, etc., and resolved that he would spare no
pains or expense in making her thoroughly com-
fortable. He even wrote a note or two to put off
some appointments, and felt quite gratified with the
idea that he was sacrificing something on his
mother’s account. The clock struck two as he
rose to go up to bed; and he went up feeling much.
more composed and satisfied with himself, having
pretty successfully argued and reasoned down his
troublesome, morbid misgivings. He listened at
his mother’s door, but all was quiet; and he made
haste into bed himself, feeling he had gone through
a good deal that day.

He was just turning over to sleep when his door
opened softly, and his mother came in,—such a
queer, funny, old figure, with a shawl wrapped
around her and a very large nightcap on—one of
the ol.{-fashioned sort, with very broad, flapping



52 LADDIE.

a

frills. She had a candle in her hand, and set it down
on the table by his bed. He jumped up as she came
in.

“Why, mother, what’s the matter? Not in bed?
Are you ill?”

“There, there! lie down; there ain’t nothing
wrong. But I’ve been listening for ye this long
time. ’Tis fifteen years and more since I tucked
you up in bed, and you used to say as you never
slept so sweet when I didn’t do it.”

She made him lie down, and smoothed his pil-
low, and brushed his hair off his forehead, and
tucked the clothes round him, and kissed him as
she spoke.

“And I thought as I’d like to do it for you once
more. Good-night, Laddie, good-night.”’

And then she went away quickly, and did not
hear him call, “Mother! O mother!” after her; for
the carefully tucked-in clothes were flung off, and
Laddie was out of bed with his hand on the handle
of the door, and then,—second thoughts being
cooler, if not better,—‘‘She had better sleep,” Dr.
Carter said, and got back into bed.

But sleep did not come at his call. He tossed
about feverishly and restlessly, with his mind tos-
sing hither and thither as much as his body, the
strong wind of his pride and will blowing against
the running tide of his love and conscience, and
making a rough sea between them, which would



LADDIE. 53

not allow of any repose. And which of them was.
the strongest? After long and fierce debate with
himself, he came to a conclusion which at all events
brought peace along with it. “Come what may,’ he
said, “I will keep my mother with me, let people say
or think what they will—even if it costs me Violet
herself, as most likely it will. I can’t turn my
mother out in her old age, so there’s an end of it.”
And there and then he went to sleep.

It must have been soon after this that he woke
with a start, with a sound in his ears like the shut-
ting of the street-door. It was still quite dark,
night to Londoners, morning to country people,
who were already going to their work and labor;
and Dr. Carter turned himself over and went to
sleep again, saying, “It was my fancy or a dream,”
while his old mother stood shivering in the cold
November morning outside his door, murmur-.
ing,—

“T’ll never be a shame to my boy, my Laddie;
God bless him!”

CHAPTER IV.

Wuen Dr. Carter opened his door next morning,
he found his mother’s room empty, and it seemed
almost as if the events of the night before had been
a bad dream; only the basket of apples, and the



54 LADDIE.

bandbox, still tied up in the spotted handkerchief,
confirmed his recollections; and when he went
down, the pattens, still on his writing-table, added
their testimony. But where was his mother? All
the servants could tell him was that they had found
her bedroom door open when they came down in
the morning, and the front door unbarred and un-
bolted, and that was all.

“She has gone back to Sunnybrook,” he said to
himself, with a very sore heart. “She saw what a
miserable, base-hearted cur of a son she had, who
grudged a welcome and a shelter to her who would
have given her right hand to keep my little finger
from aching. God forgive me for wounding the
brave old heart! I will go and bring her back. She
will be ready to forgive me nearly before I speak.”

He looked at the train paper, and found there
was an early, slow train by which his mother must
have gone, and an express that would start in about
an hour, and reach Martel only a quarter of an
hour after the slower one. This just gave him time
to make arrangements for his engagements, and
write a line to Violet, saying he was unexpectedly
called away from London, but that he would come
to her immediately on his return, for he had much
to telland explain. The cab was at the door to take
him to the station, and everything was ready, and
he was giving his last directions to Mr. Hyder.

“T shall be back to-morrow, Hyder, without fail,



LADDIE. 55

and I shall bring my mother with me.” He brought
out the word even now with an effort, and hated
himself for the flush that came up into his face; but
he went on firmly, “That was my mother who was
here last night, and no man ever had a better.”

I don’t know how it happened, but everything
seemed topsy-turvey that morning; for all at once
Dr. Carter found himself shaking hands with Hy-
der before he knew what he was about; and the
deferential, polite Hyder, whose respect had always
been slightly tinged with contempt, was saying,
with tears in his eyes, “Indeed, sir, I see that all
along; and I don’t think none the worse of you,
but a deal the better, for saying it out like a man;
and me and cook and the gals will do our best to
make the old lady comfortable, that we will!”

Dr. Carter felt a strange, dream-like feeling as
he got into the cab. Every one and everything.
seemed changed, and he could not make it out;
even Hyder seemed something more than an ex-
cellent servant. It was quite a relief to his mind,
on his return next day, to find Hyder the same im-
perturbable person as before, and the little episode
of hand-shaking and expressed sympathy not be-
come a confirmed habit. It was a trifling relief
even in the midst of his anxiety and disappoint-
ment; for he did not find his mother at Sunny-
brook, nor did she arrive by either of the trains
that followed the one he came by, though he waited



56 LADDIE.

the arrival of several at Martel. So he came back
to London, feeling that he had gone on the wrong
tack, but comforting himself with the thought
that he would soon be able to trace her out wher-
ever she had gone. But it was not so easy as he
expected; the most artful and experienced criminal,
escaping from justice, could not have gone to work
more skilfully than the old woman did quite un-
consciously. All his inquires were fruitless; she
had not been seen or noticed at Paddington, none
of the houses or shops about had been open or
astir at that early morning hour. Once he thought
he had a clew, but it came to nothing; and, tired
and dispirited, he was obliged, very unwillingly, to
put the matter into the hands of the police, who
undertook with great confidence to find the old
woman before another day was past.

It was with a very haggard, anxious face that he
came into the pretty drawing-room in Harley
Street, where Violet sprang up from her low chair
by the fire to meet him. How pretty she was! how
sweet! how elegant and graceful every movement
and look, every detail of her dress! His eyes took
in every beauty lovingly, as one who looks his last
on something dearer than life, and then lost all
consciousness of any other beauty, in the surpass-
ing beauty of the love for him in her eyes. She
stretched out both her soft hands to him, with the
ring he had given her the only ornament on them,
and said, “Tell me about it.”



LADDIE, 57

Do not you know some voices that have a caress
in every word and a comfort in every tone? Violet
Meredith’s was such a voice.

“T have come for that,’ he said; and he would
not trust himself to take those hands in his, or to
look any longer into her face; but he went to the
fire and looked into the red caves among the glow-
ing coals. ‘I have come to tell you about my
mother. I have deceived you shamefully.’’

And then he told her of his mother, describing
her as plainly and carefully as he could, trying to
set aside everything fanciful and picturesque, and
yet do justice to the kind, simple, old heart, trying
to make Violet see the great difference between
the cld countrywoman and herself. And then he
told of her having come to him, to end her days
under her son’s roof. “I could not ask you to live
with her,” he ended sadly.

She had clasped her hands round his arm shyly, |
for it was only a few days since she had had to hide
away her love, like a stolen treasure, out of sight.

“Tt is too late to think of that,” she said, with a
little coaxing laugh; “too late, for you asked me to
be your wife a week ago. Yes, John,”—the name
came still with a little hesitation,—“‘a whole week
ago, and I will not let you off. And then I have
no mother of my own; she died before I can re-
member; and it will be so nice to have one, for she
will like me for your sake, won’t she? And what



58 LADDIE.

does it matter what she is like, you silly old John?
—she is your mother, and that is quite enough for
me. And don’t you think I love you more ridicu-
lously than ever because you are so good and
noble and true to your old mother, and not
ashamed of her because she is not just exactly like
other people?” and she laid her soft cheek against
his sleeve, by her clasped hands, as she spoke.

But he drew away with almost a shudder. “Love
me less, then, Violet; hate me, for I was ashamed
of her; I was base and cowardly and untrue, and I
‘wanted to get her out of the way so that no one
should know, not even you, and I hurt and wounded
her,—her who would have done anything for her
‘Laddie,’ as she calls me,—and she went away dis-
appointed and sad and sorry, and I cannot find
her.”

He had sunk down into Violet’s low chair and
covered up his face with his hands, and through the
fingers forced their way the hot, burning tears,while
he told of his ineffectual efforts to find vee and his
shame and regret.

She stood listening, too pitiful and sorry for
words, longing to comfort him; and at last she
knelt down and pulled his hands gently away from
his face, and whispered very softly, as if he might
not like to hear her use his mother’s name, “We
will find her, never fear; your mother and mine,
Laddie.” And so she comforted him.



LADDIE. 59

What an awful place London is. I do not mean
awful in the sense in which the word is used by
fashionable young ladies, or schoolboys, by whom
it is applied indiscriminately to a “lark” or a
“bore,” into which two classes most events in life
may, according to them, be divided, and considered
equally descriptive of sudden death or a new bon-
net. I use it in its real meaning, full of awe, inspir-
ing fear and reverence, as Jacob said, “How dread-
ful is this place,”—this great London, with its mil-
lions cf souls, with its strange contrasts of riches
and poverty, business and pleasure, learning and
ignorance, and the sin everywhere. Awful indeed!
and the thought would be overwhelming in its aw-
fulness if we could not say also as Jacob did, “Sure-
ly the Lord is in this place, and I knew it not;” if
we did not know that there is the ladder set up,
reaching to heaven, and the angels of God ever as-
cending and decending; if we did not believe that
the Lord stands above it. It seemed a very terrible
place to the old countrywoman as she wandered
about its streets and squares, its parks and alleys,
that November day, too dazed and stupefied to form
any plan for herself, only longing to get out of sight,
that she might not shame‘her boy. She felt no bit-
terness against him; for it was not natural when he
was a gentleman, and she a poor homely old body?

In the early morning, when the streets were empty
except for policemen or late revellers hurrying



60 _ LADDIE.

home, or market carts coming in from the country,
with frosty moisture on the heaps of cabbages, she
got on pretty well. She had a cup of coffee at an
early coffee stall, and no one took any notice of her;
some of those that passed were country people too;
and at that early hour people are used to see odd,
out-of-the-way figures, that would be stared at in
the height of noon. But as the day went on the
streets filled with hurrying people, and the shops
opened, and omnibuses and cabs began to run, and
she got into more bustling, noisy thoroughfares,
‘and was hustled and pushed about and looked at,
the terrors of the situation came heavily upon her.
She tried to encourage herself with the thought
that before long she should get out of London and
reach the country, little knowing, poor old soul,
how many miles of streets and houses and
pavements lay between her and the nearest pre-
tence to real country. And then, too, in that maze
of streets where one seemed exactly like another,
her course was of a most devious character, often
describing a circle and bringing her back through
the same streets without the old woman knowing
that she was retracing her steps; sometimes a diffi-
cult crossing, with an apparently endless succession
of omnibuses and carts, turned her from her way;
sometimes a quieter looking street, with the trees
of a square showing at the end, enticed her aside.
Once she actually went up North Crediton street,



LADDIE. 61

unconsciously and unnoticed. She reached one of
the parks at last, and sat down very thankfully on
a seat, though it was clammy and damp, and the
fog was lurking under the gaunt black trees, and
hanging over the thin, coarse grass, which was be-
ing nibbled by dirty, desolate sheep, who looked
to the old woman’s eves like some new kind of Lon-
don animal, not to be recognized as belonging to the
same species as the soft, fleecy white flocks on the
hillsides and meadows of Sunnybrook. She sat
here a long time, resting, dozing, and trying to
think. “I don’t want to trouble no one, or shame
no one, I only want just to get out of the way.”
She was faint and tired, and she thought perhaps
she might be going to die. “It’s a bit unked to die
all alone, and I’d liefer have died in my bed comfort-
able-like; but there! it don’t much matter, it’ll soon
be all over and an end to it all.” But, no, that .
would not do either; and the old woman roused
herself and shook off the faintness. ‘Whatever
would folks say if Laddie’s mother was found dead
like any tramp in the road? He’d die of shame,
pretty near, to hear it in every one’s mouth.” Poor
old soul! she little knew how people can starve,
and break their hearts, and die for want of food or
love in London, and no one be the wiser or the sad-
der. It was just then she found out that her pocket
had been picked, or rather that her purse was gone;
for she did not wonder where or how it went, and,



62 LADDIE,

indeed, she did not feel the loss very acutely,
though, at home in the old days, she had turned
the house upside down and hunted high and low ~
and spared no pains to find a missing halfpenny.

It did not contain all her money, for with good,

old-fashioned caution, she had some notes sewed

up in her stays; but still it was a serious loss, and

one she would have made a great moan over in old

times. She did not know that the sight of her

worn old netted purse, with the rusty steel rings,

had touched a soft spot in a heart that for years

had seemed too dry and hard for any feeling. It

had lain in the hand of an expert London pick-

pocket; it was mere child’s play taking it; it did not

require any skill. There was a bit of lavender

stuck into the rings, and he smelt and looked at it,

and then the old woman turned and looked at him

with her country eyes; and then all at once, almost

in spite of himself, he held out the purse to her.

“Don’t you see as you’ve dropped your purse?” he

said in a surly, angry tone, and finished with an

oath that made the old woman tremble and turn’
pale; and he flung away, setting his teeth, and call-

ing himself a fool. That man was not all bad—who

is?—and his poor act of restitution is surely put to

his credit in the ledger of life, and will stand there

when the books shall be opened. The old woman

got little good from it, however, for the purse was

soon taken by a less scrupulous thief.



LADDIE. 63

How cold it was! The old woman shivered and
drew her damp shawl round her, and longed, oh,
how bitterly, for the old fireside, and the settle,

‘worn and polished by generations of shoulders; for
‘the arm-chair with its patchwork cushions; longed,
ah, how wearily, for the grave by the churchyard
wall, where the master rests free of all his troubles,
and where “there’s plenty of room for I;” and long-
ed, too, quite as simply and pathetically, for a cup of
tea out of the cracked brown teapot. But why
should I dwell on the feelings of a foolish, insignifi-
cant old woman? There are hundreds and thou-
sands about us whose lives are more interesting,
whose thoughts are more worth recording. ‘Are
not two sparrows sold for a farthing?’ and yet,
“doth not God take thought for sparrows?’ Then
surely, so may we. Does He indeed despise not
the desires of such as be sorrowful,—even though
the sorrowful one be only an old country woman,
and her desire a cup of tea? Then why should we
call that common and uninteresting which He piti-
fully beholds? And we shall find no life that is not
full of interest, tender feeling, noble poetry, deep
tragedy, just as there is nobody without the elab-
orate system of nerves and muscles and veins with
which we are fearfully and wonderfully made.

The early November dusk was coming on before
she set out on her pilgrimage again, the darkness
coming all the earlier for the fog and the London



64 LADDIE.

smoke and then, hardly caring which way she went,
she turned her face eastward, not knowing that she
was making for the very heart of London. The
streets were even more crowded and confusing than
they had been in the morning; and the gas and the
lighted shops, and the noise, and her own weariness
combined to increase her bewilderment.

Once, as she passed round the corner of a quieter
street, some one ran up against her, and nearly
threw her down,—a lady, the old woman would
- have described her, smartly, even handsomely,
dressed, with a bright color on her cheeks,and glow-
ing, restless, unhappy eyes, and dry, feverish lips.
She spoke a hasty word of apology, and then, all at
once, gave a sharp, sudden cry, and put her hands
on the old woman’s shoulders and looked eagerly
into her face. Then she pushed her away with a
painful little laugh. “I thought you were my
mother,” she said.

“No; I never had no gals.”

“You're in luck, then,” the girl said; “thank
Heaven for it.”

“Was your mother, maybe, from the country?”

“Yes; she lived in Somersetshire. But I don’t
even know that she’s alive, and I think she must be
dead. I hope she is—I hope it!”

There was something in the girl’s voice that told
of more bitter despair than words, and the old wo-
man put out her hand and laid it on the girl’s vel-
vet sleeve.



LADDIE. 65

“My dear,” she said, “maybe I could help you.”

“Help!” was the answer. “I’m past that. There,
good night! Don’t trouble your kind head about
me.”

And then the old woman went on again, getting
into narrow, darker streets, with fewer shops, and
people of a rougher, poorer class. But it would
overtax your patience and my powers to describe
the old woman’s wanderings in the maze of Lon-
don. Enough to say, that when, an hour or two
later, footsore and ready to drop, she stumbled
along a little street near Soho Square, a woman,
with a baby in her arms, uttered a loud cry of
pleased recognition, and darted out to stop her.

“Why, it ain’t never you! Whoever would have
thought of seeing you so soon; and however did
you find me out? This is the house. Why, there,
there! Dontee cry, sure! dontee, now! You're
tired out. Come in and have a cup of tea. I’ve
got the kettle boiling all ready, for my Harry’ll be
in soon.”

It was the young woman she travelled with the
day before,—only the day before, though it seemed
months to look back to; only her face was bright
and happy now, in spite of the fog and dirt about
her; for had not her Harry a home and welcome
for her, in spite of all her fears and people’s evil
prophecies; and was not this enough to make sun:
shine through the rainiest day?



66 LADDIE,

Very improbable, you will say, perhaps, that
these two waifs, these floating straws, should have
drifted together on the great ocean of London life.
Yes, very improbable, well-nigh impossible, I
agree, if it is mere chance that guides our way; but
stranger, more improbable things happen every
day; and, if we mean anything by Providence, it is
no longer difficult to understand, for we can see
the Hand leading, guiding, arranging, weaving the
tangled, confused threads of human life into the
grand, clear, noble pattern of divine purpose.

CHAPTER V.

EIGHTEEN months have passed away since my
story began; and it is no longer dull, foggy, No-
vember, but May, beautiful even in London, where
the squares and parks are green and fresh, and the
lilacs and laburnums in bloom, and the girls sell
lilies-of-the-valley and wall flowers in the streets,
and trucks with double stocks and narcissus “all
a-growing and a-blowing” pass along, leaving a
sweet, reviving scent behind them. The sky is
blue, with great soft masses of cotton-wool cloud;
and the air is balmy and pure in spite of smoke and
dirt; and sweet spring is making his power felt,
even in the very midst of London. It is blossom-










LADDIE. 69

ing time in the heart as well as in the Kentish ap-
ple orchards; and the heart cannot help feeling gay
and singing its happy little song even though its
cares, like the poor larks in the Seven Dial’s bird
shops, ruffling their soft breasts and knocking their
poor brown heads against their cages in their ec-
stacy of song.

Dr. Carter had good cause for happiness that
day, though, indeed, he was moving among sick-
ness and suffering in a great London hospital. He
had some lilies in his coat that Violet fastened
there with her own hands; and as she did so he had
whispered, “Only another week, Violet;” for their
wedding day was fixed in the next week. And was
not that a thought that suited well with the lovely
May weather, to make him carry a glad heart under
the lilies? The wedding had been long delayed
from one cause and another, but principally be-
cause the search for the old mother had been alto-
gether fruitless, in spite of the confidence of the po-
lice.

“We will find her first,’ Violet would say; “we
must find her, Laddie.” She adopted the old name
quite naturally. “And then we will talk of the
wedding.”

But the time rolled on, days, weeks, and months,
till at last it was more than a year ago that she had
gone; and though they never gave up the hope of
finding her, or their efforts to do so, still it no lon-



70 LADDIE.

ger seemed to stand between them and give a rea-
son for putting off the marriage, but rather to draw
them nearer together, and give a reason for marry-
ing at once. But on Dr. Carter’s writing table al-
ways stood the pair of pattens, much to the sur-
prise of patients; but he would not have them
moved, and in his heart lay the pain of regret, side
by side with his love and happiness.

The doctors were making their rounds in the
hospital, with a crowd of students about them.
‘There was a very interesting case in the accident
ward, over which much time was spent, and much
attention paid. I am not doctor enough to de-
scribe what the nature of the case was; and if I
were, I daresay you would not care to hear; but it
was a very interesting case to the doctors and
nurses; and that means that life and death were
fighting over that bed, and science bringing every
re-enforcement in its power in aid of the poor bat-
tered fortress that the grim king was attacking so
severely. An easy victory on either one side or
the other is very uninteresting to lookers-on,
though of deepest moment to the patient. And so
the doctors passed on with hardly a word by the
two next beds, in one of which life was the con-
queror, hanging out his flags of triumph in a tinge
of color on the cheeks, brightness in the eyes, and
vigor in the limbs; in the other, death was as plainly
to be seen in the still form and white, drawn face.



LADDIE. a1

After the doctors and students had passed by,
and finished their round, Dr. Carter came back
alone to No. 20. He had taken deep interest in the
case, and had something to say further about it to
the nurse. He was a great favorite with the nurses,
from his courteous, gentle manners; so they were
not disposed to regard his second visit as a trouble-
some, fidgety intrusion, as they might have done
with some. He had not been quite pleased with
the way in which a dresser had placed a bandage,
and he altered it himself with those strong, tender
fingers of his, and was just going off better satis-
fied, when he found the flowers had dropped from
his coat. If they had not been Violet’s gift it would
not have mattered; but he did not like to lose what
she had given, and he looked for them. They had
fallen, by some quick movement of his, on the next
bed, where death was having an easy victory.

The old woman’s arms were stretched outside
the bed clothes, and one of her hands, hardworked
hands, with the veins standing up on the backs
like cord, had closed, perhaps involuntarily, on the
flowers, the lilies and the dainty green leaf.

“Here they are, sir,” said the nurse; “they must
have dropped as you turned round.” And she tried
to draw them from the woman’s hand, but it only
closed the tighter. “She doesn’t know a bit what
she’s about. Leave go of the flowers, there’s a good
woman,” she said close te her ear; “the gentleman
wants them.”



72 LADDIE,

But the hand still held them.

“Well, never mind!’’ Dr. Carter said, with just a
shade of vexation; ‘‘let her keep them. It does not
matter, and you will only break them if you try to
get them away.”’

‘‘She’s not been conscious since they brought her
in,’’ the nurse said; ‘‘it’s a street accident; knocked
down by an omnibus. Wedon’t know her name,
or nothing, and no one’s been to ask about her.”’

The doctor still stopped, looking at the lilies in
the old hand.

“She is badly hurt,” he said.

The nurse explained what the house surgeon had
said: “Another day will see an end of it. I thought
she would have died this morning when I first came
on; she was restless then, and talked a little. I
fancy she’s Scotch, for I heard her say, ‘Laddie’
several times.”

The word seemed to catch the otherwise uncon-
scious ear, for the old woman turned her head on
the pillow, and said feebly, “Laddie.”

And then, all at once, the doctor gave a cry that
startled all the patients in the ward, and made many
a one lift up her head to see the cause of such a cry.

“Mother!” he cried, “mother, is it you?”

Dr. Carter was kneeling by the bed, looking ea-
gerly, wildly, at the wan white face. Was he mad?
The nurse thought he must be, and this sudden
frenzy: And then he called again —



LADDIE. 73

“Mother, mother, speak to me!”

A childless mother near said afterwards she
thought such a cry would have called her back from
the dead, and it almost seemed to do so in this case,
for the closed lids trembled and raised themselves
a very little, and the drawn mouth moved into the
ghost of a smile, and she said,—

“Eh, Laddie, here I be.”

And then the nurse came nearer to reason with
the madman.

“There is some mistake,
a poor old woman.”

And then he got up and looked at her, she said
afterwards, “like my lord duke, as proud as any-
thing.”

“Ves,” he said, ‘and she is my mother. I will
make arrangements at once for her removal to my
house if she can bear it.”

Ah! that was the question, and it wanted little
examination or experience to tell that the old wo-
man was past moving. The nurse, bewildered and
still incredulous, persuaded him not to attempt it;
and, instead, her bed was moved into a small ward
off the large one, where she could be left alone.

Love is stronger than death; many waters cannot
drown it. Yes, but it cannot turn back those cold
waters of death, when the soul has once entered
them; and so Dr. Carter found that with all his love
and with all his skill, he could only smooth, and

”

she said; “this is quite



74 LADDIE.

that but a very little, the steep, stony road down
into Jordan.

He got a nurse to attend specially upon her, but
he would not leave her; and the nurse said it was
not much good her being there, for he smoothed her
pillows, and raised her head, and damped her lips,
and fanned her with untiring patience and tender-
ness. Once when he had his arm under her head,
raising it, she opened her eyes wide and looked at
him.

“Ah, Laddie,” she said, “I’m a bit tired with my
journey. It’s a longish way from Sunnybrook.”

“Did you come from there?”

“Yes, sure; I’ve never been such a long way be-
fore and I’m tired out.”

“Why didn’t you write?” he asked presently,
when she opened her eyes again.

“T wanted to give you a surprise,” she said; “and
I knew as you'd be glad to see me at any time as
I liked to come.”

And then it dawned on him that the past eigh-
teen months had been blotted clean out of her mem-
ory, and that she thought she had just arrived. Then
she dozed and then again spoke, “And so this is
your house, Laddie? And mighty fine it be!” look-
ing round on the bare hospital room; “and I’m that
comfortable if I wasn’t so tired, but I'll be getting
up when I’m rested a bit. But it do me good to
see you when I opens my eyes. I’ve been thinking



LADDIE, 75
elt the way how pleased you’d be.” All this she
said a word or two at a time, and very low and
weakly, so that only a son’s ear could have heard.

As the evening came on she fell asleep very
quietly, such a sleep as, if hope had been possible,
might have given hope. Dr. Carter left the nurse
watching her and went away, got a hansom and of-
fered the man double fare to take him to Harley
Street as fast as possible. Violet had just come
in from a flower show, and looker a flower herself,
with her sweet face and dainty dress.

“T have found her,’ Laddie said. “Come.” And
she came without asking a question, only knowing
from Laddie’s face that there was sorrow as well as
joy in the finding.

“She is dying,” he said, as they went up the hos-
pital stairs together. “Can you bear it?”

She only answered by a pressure of her hand on
his arm, and they went on to the quiet room. There
was a shaded light burning, and the nurse sitting
by the bedside.

“She has not stirred, sir, since you left.”

But even as she spoke, the old woman moved and
opened her eyes, looking first at Laddie and then
on Violet.

“Who is it?” she asked.

And then Violet knelt down with her sweet face
close to the old woman’s, and said very softly,
“Mother, I am Laddie’s sweetheart.”



76 LADDIE.

“Laddie’s sweetheart;” she echoed; “he’s over-
young to be wed—but there! I forgot. He’s been
a good son, my dear, always good to his old
mother, and he’ll be a good husband. And you'll
make him a good wife, my dear, won’t you? God
bless you.”

And then her trembling hand was feeling for
something, and Laddie guessed her wish, and put
his own hand and Violet’s into it; two young hands,
full of life and health and pulsation, under the old,
-worn, hard worked hand, growing cold and weak
with death.

“God bless you, dears, Laddie and his sweet-
heart. But I’m a bit tired just now.”

And then she dozed again, and the two sat by in
the dim, quiet room, drawn closer together and
dearer to each other than they ever had been before,
in the presence of the Great Angel of Death who was
so near the old mother now. And very tenderly he
did his work that night! Only a sigh and then a
sudden hush, during which the listeners’ pulses
throbbed in their ears, as they listened for the next
long-drawr, painful, difficult breath that did not
come; and then the weary limbs relaxed into the
utter repose and stillness of rest after labor, for the
night had come when no man can work,—the holy
starlit night of death, with the silver streaks of the
great dawn of the Resurrection shining in the east.

For a moment they sat spell-bound; and then it



LADDIE, 1

was Laddie, he had so often seen death face to face,
who gave way, throwing himself on the bed with
an exceeding bitter cry, “O mother, mother, say
you forgive me!”

What need for words? Did he not know that she
forgave him? If indeed she knew she had anything
to forgive. But she was “a bit tired.”

Don’t you know when bedtime comes, and the
nurse calls the children, how sometimes they leave
their toys, which a few minutes before seemed all
in all to them, without a look, and the cake unfin-
ished, and are carried off with their heads bent
down, and their eyes heavy with sleep, too tired
even to say good night, or speak a pretty, lisping
word of the play-time past, or the pleasures coming
in the morning? And so it is often with us bigger
children; when the nurse Death calls us at our bed-
time, we are “a bit tired,” and glad to go, too.
sleepy even for thought or farewell.

They laid her by the old master in Sunnybrook
churchyard; and the village folks talked long after-
wards of the funeral, and how Dr. Carter, “he as
used to be called Laddie,” followed her to the
grave, “along with the pretty young lady as he was
going to marry; and, bless my heart! wouldn’t the
poor old soul have felt proud if she could have seen
*em? But she’s better where she is, where there
ain’t no buryin’ and no pride neither.”







MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION,






MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

CHAPTER I.

Miss Toosry always wore a black silk dress on
Sunday, and went three times to church. Morning,
afternoon, and evening, as soon as the bell changed
at the quarter, that black silk dress came out cf
Miss Toosey’s little house in North Street, turned
the corner into High Street, crossed the Market-
place, passed under the archway into the church-
yard, in at the west door, and up the middle aisle,
past the free seats, which occupy the lower end of
Martel church, and stopped at the second pew on
the left-hand side, one sitting in which has been
rented by Miss Toosey for many years. This pew
is immediately in front of the church-wardens’.
seat, where those two dignitaries sit majestically,
with a long rod placed conveniently on either hana,
ready to be seized at a moment’s notice, to execute
judgment on youthful offenders in the free seats,
though the well-known fact that generations of
paint and varnish have made them-fixtures some-
what takes off from the respect and awe felt for
them. Miss Toosey is short, and the pew-door has

(81)



82 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

a tendency to stick; and when you have a Bible,
prayer-book, hymn-book, spectacle-case, and um-
brella in your hands, you cannot enter into a strug-
gle on equal terms; and so when Mr. Church-
warden Wyatt happens to be in church in time, he
leans over and opens the pew-door for Miss Too-
sey, “and very kind of him, too, a most gentlemanly
man Mr. Wyatt is, my dear.”

The black silk was quite a part of Sunday in
Miss Toosey’s mind, and therefore holy, to a cer-
tain extent. She would have considered it disre-
‘spectful to the day to put on any other dress, and
no stress of weather could prevent her wearing it;
indeed, she thought it decidedly a want of trust in
Providence to fear the heavy rain or deep snow
might injure it.

She would pin up the skirt inside out round her
waist with a reckless disregard of appearance, so
that you could hardly guess she had any dress on
at all under her shawl; but nothing would have in-
duced her to put on another. Of late years, too,
she had not felt it quite right to wear it on week-
days when she was asked out to tea; it seemed to
her inappropriate, like reading a regular Sunday
book on week-days, which has something profane
about it. It had been through many vicissitudes;
not even Miss Toosey herself could accurately re-



MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 83

call what it was in its original form; and the first
distinct incident in its existence was the black crape
with which it was trimmed, in respect to the mem-
ory of Miss Toosey’s father—old Toosey, the
parish doctor. This was fifteen years ago; and
since then it had been unpicked and re-made sev-
eral times, turned, sponged, dipped, French-
chalked, cleaned, trimmed, and altered, till it would
have required vast ingenuity to do anything fresh
to it.

As the black silk was part of Sunday to Miss
Toosey, so was Miss Toosey part of Sunday to
many of the Martel people. The Miss Purts, the
draper’s daughters, in the Market-place, knew that
it was time to put on their smart bonnets (the latest
Paris fashion), when they saw Miss Toosey pass
the window, so as to insure their clattering into
church on their high heels, tossing and giggling,
not later than the Venite.

Old Budd, the clerk, with his white beard and
wooden leg, always said “Good morning, Miss
Toosey; fine day, mum,” as he stumped past her
pew-door on his way to the vestry, which made
her feel rather uncomfortable as he said it out loud,
and it did not seem quite right; but then Mr. Budd
is such a good man, and being a church official, no
* doubt he has a right to behave just as he pleases.



84 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

Even Mr. Dodson, the late curate, after baptizing
fifteen pugnacious babies, all crying lustily, said,
as he passed Miss Toosey on his way back to the
reading-desk, wiping the beads of perspiration
from his good-natured red face, “Warm work, Miss
Toosey.”

I think that both Mr. Peters the rector, and Mr.
Glover the curate, would quite have lost their place
in the service if Miss Toosey’s seat had been empty,
as they neither of them could have preached with
comfort without the fat, red-velvet cushion with the
tassels, on which they laid their books.

I do not think it ever occurred to Miss Toosey
that there was anything amiss in Martel church
or its services. She was proud of the fine, old gray
stone tower, which had been built when men gave
willingly of their best for the service of God, and
so built “for glory and for beauty;” and she loved
the roof of the nave, which was rich in oak carving,
bleached white by time, with angels and emblems
of wonderful variety and ingenuity. And all the
rest of the church she took for granted, and did
not wonder at the narrow, uncomfortable pews,
where, as Mr. Malone, the Irish curate, said, “it
was quite impossible to kneel down, and very diffi-
cult to get up again;” or at the free seats, put be-
hind all the others; or at the large, steep galleries;



MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 85

or at the high pulpit rich in red velvet and dusty
fringe on one side, and the reading-desk to match
on the other, with the clerk’s desk underneath
where Mr. Budd did his part of the service, i. e.,
the responses, as a clerk should do, in a strident,
penetrating voice, and took a well-earned nap in
the sermon when his duties were discharged. It
did not strike her as curious that the seats in the
chancel should be occupied by the Peters family on
one side and by the Rossiters on the other, while
the ladies and gentlemen of the choir displayed
their smart bonnets or Sunday waistcoats to great
advantage in front of the organ, where, in return
for their vocal exertions they were privileged to
behave as badly as their fancies led them. You
see, Miss Toosey was not critical, and she had not
been to any other church for many years, and cus-
tom draws a soft curtain over imperfections, and
reverence is not quick to see irreverence in others,
and prayer fills the air with clouds of incense
through which we cannot easily see bonnets, but
only Heaven itself; and as Miss Toosey knelt,
being very short, you remember, and the pews
high she could only with her outward eyes see the.
angels in the roof and her prayer-book. And it
was just the same with the sermons: as church was
church to Miss Toosey, so a sermon was a sermon.



86 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

Whether it was Mr. Peters, Mr. Glover, or Mr,
Malone, Miss Toosey lookd out the text in her
little brown Bible, and put the bookmarker, with
“Love the Jews,” into the place, and gave her head
a little nod, as if to show that the text was there,
and no mistake about it; and then took off her
spectacles, wiped them, put them into a case, gave
her black silk skirt a slight shake to prevent
creases, and then settled down to listen. I will not
undertake to say that Miss Toosey entered into all
the subtleties of doctrine set forth over the red
velvet pulpit-cushion; I will not even deny that
sometimes the lavender ribbons on Miss Toosey’s
bonnet nodded, without much connection with the
arguments of the discourse, and that the words
“election and grace” grew faint and dreamy in her
ears, and Mr. Peter’s gray hair or Mr. Glover's
whiskers disappeared from her sight. I am dis-
posed to think that she did not lose very much; but
Miss Toosey took it much to heart, so much so that
she could hardly believe herself capable of it, and
even contended that she was listening all the time,
though she closed her eyes to pay greater atten-
tion. But sometimes the sermons kept Miss Too-
sey awake effectually, and made her feel very un-
comfortable for some days afterwards; and this was
when they were on the subject of conversion. Mr.



MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 87

Malone was especially strong on this point; and,
after one of his powerful discourses, Miss Toosey
would have a wakeful night, going through the
course of her peaceful, uneventful life, trying to find
that moment of awakening which other Christians
seemed to find so easily, wondering if she might
date her conversion from a day when she was a
little child, crying and being comforted at her
mother’s knee; or in the quiet, sober joy of her
Confirmation; or when she followed her mother up
the aisle, one Easter Day, in trembling awe to her
first Communion; or in the days of her simple, girl-
ish romance long ago, when her heart was over-
flowing with pure happiness; or to the days follow-
ing so quickly when it came to an untimely end,
and she sobbed herself to sleep, night after night,
with her cheek (it was round and smooth then)
pressed to that same little brown Bible, with some:
faded flowers between the leaves; or could it have
been when her father died and she stood alone by
his grave? None of these events seemed quite to
answer to Mr. Malone’s descriptions, and some-
times Miss Toosey was driven to fear that she must
rank herself with the unconverted, to whom a few
scathing words were addressed at the conclusion
of the sermon.

On one occasion there was a revival at Martel,



88 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

and meetings were held at the schoolroom, one of
which Miss Toosey attended. There was much
heat and hymn-singing and excitement; and Miss
Toosey was agitated and hysterical and impressed;
but when the presiding clergyman, in an impas-
siened manner, invited all those who were con-
scious of conversion to remain and the rest to leave,
Miss Toosey, without a moment’s hesitation, went
out and found her way home, sobbing and broken-
hearted.

Then, too, the doctrine of assurance troubled her
sorely, feeling (as she did) sure only of her own
weakness and God’s great mercy. And so she
grew very nervous and uncomfortable when people
began to talk of their religious experiences, which
seemed so much more satisfactory than her own.

You must not, however, suppose that Miss Too-
sey was at all High Church; on the contrary, she
had a horror of Puseyites and of the opinions which
she fondly imagined them to hold; such, for exam-
ple, as works being the only means of salvation,
without the faintest mixture of faith, which, as Miss
Toosey said, is so directly opposite to the teaching
of the Bible. She also spoke of the danger of the
“multiplication of ordinances,” a well-sounding sen-
tence which Mr. Glover was rather fond of; and
Miss Toosey always gave a little triumphant sniff



UISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 89

after saying it, for it is not every one who can make
use of abtruse, theological expressions of many
syllables. It is true that she went to church her-
self whenever there was an opportunity, and would
have done so if Mr. Peters had largely increased
the services, but that, of course, was different. She
also regarded with suspicion the efforts of some of
the young ladies of tl > parish, who had “high” ten-
dencies, to introduce crosses surreptitiously into
the decorations at Christmas, cunningly disguised
with evergreens, and of odd and ornamental shapes.
She was firmly persuaded that the emblem of our
faith had something Romish about it, and that it
was safer to keep to circles and anchors and trian-
gles; indeed, she distrusted the decoration excite-
ment among the young ladies altogether, and
looked back with regret to the days when the pew-
opener used to put sprigs of holly in the windows, .
and fasten bushes of the same to the lamps in the
chancel.

CHAPTER II.

Now I must tell you about Miss Toosey’s Mis-
sion, and I think it will surprise you to hear that
her Mission was the conversion of the heathen,—



90 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

not the heathen at Martel, though there were
enough and to spare, even in that favored spot; not
the heathen in London, or our great towns even;
but the heathen in foreign parts, real bona fide black
heathen, with war-paint and feathers, and strings
of beads, and all the rest of it. Her Mission began
in this manner: A missionary Bishop came to
preach at Martel. I donot! aow quite how it hap-
pened, as he certainly did n.t pronounce ‘“‘Shibbo-
leth” with the same distinct and unctuous intona-
-. tion which was deemed essential at Martel; but I
have been told that he met Mr. Peters out at din-
ner, and that the rector, always good-natured, of-
fered his pulpit, red-velvet cushion and all, for the
Bishop’s use on the following Sunday evening.
The Bishop gladly accepted the offer. He was
not quick to see microscopic differences of opinion;
the cut of a coat, a posture, or the use of a cant
word, did not seem to him of such vital importance
as he found attached to them among Churchmen at
home; and he was fairly puzzled at the hot blood
and animosity that.arose from them, bidding fair
even at times to rend the woven garment without
seam. He had been used to a clearer, simpler atmo-
sphere, a larger horizon, a wider span of heaven
overhead, than we can get in our streets and lanes,
making it easier, perhaps, to look up steadfastly, as



MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 91

those should whose lives are ever teaching them
how far, how terribly ‘‘far, the heaven is from
the earth,’’ where the earth lies in darkness and
idolatry. To one who was used to the difference be-
tween Christian and heathen, the difference be-
tween Churchman and Churchman seemed unutter-
ably small; so that he was fain to say with Abra-
ham, ‘‘Let there be no strife between us, I pray, for
we are brethren.”’

He had come home with his heart burning within
him with the urgency of the work he left behind,
confident that he could not fail to find help and
sympathy in happy, rich Christian England. In
his waking thoughts, as well as in his dreams, there
always stood by him a man of Macedonia, the
Macedonia of his far-off labors, saying, ‘‘Come over
and help us;’’ and he found that the love of many
had waxed cold, and that indifference and scarcely -
concealed weariness received him wherever he
went.

So he was glad to accept Mr. Peters’s invitation,
and thought Mr. Malone looked rather sourly at
him in the vestry, and even the rector was not quite
so cordial to him as he had been at the dinner-
party, still he scaled the heights of the pulpit with
alacrity, to the enlivening strain of ‘‘From Green-
land’s Icy Mountains,’’ which not even the ‘‘Mitre



92 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

Hymn-book” and the Martel choir can rob of its
charms.

The text which Miss Toosey found out in her lit-
tle brown Bible was from St. John, the 6th chapter
and oth verse: “There is a lad here with five barley
loaves and two small fishes; but what are they
among so many?” The Bishop began by describ-
ing the scene where the miracle occurred,—the bar-
ren hillside; the blue sea of Galilee; the towns in
the distance, with their white, flat-roofed houses,
nestling in the green valley like ‘‘a handful of pearls
in a goblet of emerald;” the sun setting behind the
purple Galilean hills, and the soft evening light
touching the mountain-tops with gold, and casting
long shadows on the quiet sea, where the fishing-
boats were going forth to their nightly work. And
then he told of the weary, foot-sore crowd, gathered
on the slope of the hill, far from home, and hungry
and fainting,—women and little children, as well
as men,—many of whom had come from far-away
Capernaum and Cesarea, skirting the north side of
the lake for many a weary mile, on foot, to meet the
ship that bore our Lord across the sea.

Whence can they buy bread in this wilderness?
But among that hapless crowd there is One, foot-
sore and weary and fasting like them, yet Who is
the Creator himself. ‘He Who maketh the grass



MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 93

to grow upon the mountains, and herb for the use
of man,” Who “feedeth the young ravens,” and
Who “filleth the hungry soul with good things;”
and he is looking with infinite compassion on their
want; and He says to His disciples, “Give ye them
to eat.” And then, abruptly, the Bishop turned
from the story of the miracle to his own work, and
he told of the great extent of mountain forest, and
plain, of the mighty rivers, of the rich and fertile
land, and the luxuriant beauty all around, fair as
the promised land of which Moses said, “The eyes
of the Lord thy God are always upon it, from the
beginning of the year even unto the end of the
year.” But the people of this fair land are, like the
weary crowd on the hillside, far from home—ah!
how far from heaven, with the deep, deep sea of ig-
norance rolling between; they are hungry, sinking
for the want of the Bread of Life; but civilization
and knowledge and light are far away from them .
across the ocean, and “how can we satisfy these
men with bread here in the wilderness?” It is even-
ing too; surely the sun of this world is getting near
its setting, and casting long shadows, if we would
but see them. Shall we send these poor souls away
fasting?—these women and little children? Will
they not faint by the way? How can they hope to
reach their heavenly home without the Bread of
Life?



94 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. -

But the Lord is looking on them with the same
infinite compassion, and He is saying to me and to
you, “Give ye them to eat.” Is there not here this
evening, among you Martel people, a lad with five
barley loaves and two small fishes for the Lord’s
use? It seemed so little to the disciples, scarcely
worthy of mention. “What are they among so
many?” Merely enough for two or three, and here
are five thousand and more. But the Lord said,
“Bring them hither to Me.” He had no need of
them. He could have commanded the stones to be
made bread; He could have called manna down
from heaven; He could have satisfied them with
a word; but He was graciously pleased to take
that poor and humble little store in His all-pow-
erful hand; and it was sufficient; the people were
filled, they had as much as they would, and there
were yet fragments that remained. Never think of
the smallness, the poorness of the instrument, when
it is the Master’s hand that uses it,—He who made
this lovely world out of chaos, and formed the glor-
ious light out of utter darkness. Do not be kept
back by false humility, by thinking too much of the
insignificance and worthlessness of the gift. Give
your best,—give your all. “Bring them hither to
Me,” saith the Lord. What have you to give?
Turn over your store,—yourself, that is best of all,



MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 796:

most worthy offering, poor though it may be—
your money, your time, your influence, your pray-
ers. Who so poor but what he has one or more of
these barley loaves of daily life to offer to Him
Who gave us all? I am not here to beg and en-
treat for your money, though to our dim sight it
seems sorely needed just now, when, from village
after village, the cry comes to me for teachers and
for light, and I have no men or means to send
them; and worse still is the silence of those who
are in such utter darkness; they do not know their
own need. But still we know and believe that it is
the Lord’s work, and it will be done. It may not
be by me or you, but in His own good time it will
be done. He does not need your money; He only
offers you the glorious privilege of being fellow-
workers with Him. Yours is the loss if you do not
heed; the work will not suffer; only you will have
had no share; only you may not have another op-
portunity given you; only the time may come when
it will be said to you, “Forasmuch as ye did it not
to these” (who are indeed poor and sick and in
prison), “ye did it not to Me.”

It was not by any means what the almshouse
men called “a powerful discarse;” the old men be-
longing to Frowde’s charity, in their snuff-colored
coats, each with a large F on the left shoulder, clus:



96 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

tering round the north door after service, shook
their heads in disapproval.

“He don’t wrusstle with ’um,” said old Jacobs;
“he ain’t fit to hold a candle to old Thwackum,
down at Ebenezer. Why, I have seen him punish
that there pulpit cushion till the dust came out like
anything, and he had to take off his neckcloth, it
were that wet; that’s what I calls preaching now,
and to think of the likes of this ’un being a Bishop.”

Miss Baker, too, of the firm of Silver & Baker,
drapers in High street, expressed her opinion in a
high key, under an umbrella, as she went home
along Church lane, “that he did not preach the gos-
pel;” but then she was very particular, and the
Apostle Paul himself would scarcely have come up
to her standard of “gospel” sermons.

There was not a very good collection either. You
see, it was partly from its being a wet evening, so
that the congregation was altogether small; and it
had not been given out on the preceding Sunday;
and no bills had been printed and posted on the
church doors and principal public houses in the
town, as was always done in the case of sermons
in aid of the Irish Church Mission, or the Jew’s
Society. So people had not been attracted by the
announcement of a real live Bishop; and those who
came had not had time to get small change; and so



MISS TOOSEY'S MISSION. 97

at the endof the sermon,with the best intentionsand
a natural dislike to pass the basket without giving
anything, they found themselves devoid of the ne-
cessary threepenny-bits and sixpences. So, when
Mr. Mackenzie, the tall lawyer, who always held the
basket lined with green baize at the north door,
emptied its contents on the vestry table, and the
other baskets added their quota, there was but a
poor show; and Mr. Peters, kind man, when Mr.
Malone was not looking, slipped a sovereign out of
his waistcoat pocket to add to the heap, more for
the honor of Martel than from interest in the Mis-
sion; and he explained that unfortunately some of
his best people were not at church, and that they
had had a collection so very recently, and that he
hoped that next time the Bishop was in those parts
—but here a warning glance from Mr. Malone cut
him short, and he did not commit himself further.

What a fortunate thing it was that Mr. Peters
had a curate of such high principle!

“Who was the old woman sitting in front of Wy-
att?’ John Rossiter asked his mother, when the
brougham door was closed and they were going
down High Street slowly, with the drag on, for it
was very steep, with a blurred view of lights and
moving umbrellas through the rainy windows.

“My dear John, do you suppose I know every
old woman in Martel?”



98 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

“No; but I thought you might have noticed her;
her face was a sight to see in the sermon.”

“Well, John,” Mrs. Rossitter answered rather
fretfully, feeling conscious of a temporary oblivion
on her own part in the middle of the sermon, “‘it
was no wonder if any one went to sleep; the church
was so hot; I felt quite faint myself.”

And she felt whether her bonnet had got pushed
on one side, and hoped she had not wakened with
a snore.

John laughed: “I don’t mean a sight to see that
way, mother; that’s not so very unusual at Martel;
but it was her absorbed interest that struck me as
something out of the way.”

“Tt must have been one of the young women at
Purts.”

“My dear mother, don’t insult those elegant crea-
tures by supposing they would put on anything half
so respectable as my old woman’s bonnet; they
would rather die first.”

“Then I don’t know who it could have been, un-
less it was Miss Toosey—lavender ribbons and hair
done in a little curl on each side? Ah, then it is.
Her father was old Toosey the doctor; he was par-
ish doctor when we first came to Brooklands: and
she was a pretty young girl, in a green spencer;
and your father used to say’—



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LADDIE.

CHAPTER I.

“Tuirp-cLass forward! Here you are, mum.
Plenty of room this way! Now then! that ain’t
third, that’s first. Come, look alive! All right be-
hind there? ”

Doors bang; a whistle; and the train moves off.

The guard had thrust into a third-class carriage,
already nearly full, a bandbox with a blue spotted
handkerchief round it, and a bunch of Michaelmas
daisies, southernwood, and rosemary tucked under
the knot at the top; a marketing-basket, one flap
of which was raised by a rosy-cheeked apple emit-
ting a powerful smell; a bundle done up in a hand-
kerchief of the same pattern as that round the
bandbox, only bright yellow; a large cotton um-
brella of a pale green color, with a decided waist to
it; and a pair of pattens! Anything else? Oh,
yes, of course! there was an old woman who be-
longed to the things; but she was so small and
frightened and overwhelmed that she appeared
quite a trifle beside her belongings, and might eas-

ily have been overlooked altogether. She re-
(9)
10 LADDIE.

mained just where the guard had pushed her, stand-
ing in the carriage, clutching as many of her things
as she could keep hold of, and being jerked by the
motion of the train, now against a burly bricklayer,
and now against his red-faced wife who sat oppo-
site; while her dazzled, blinking eyes followed the
hedges and banks that whirled past, and her breath
came with a catch and a gasp every time a bridge
crossed the line, as if it were a wave coming over
her. Her fellow-travellers watched her, in silence
at first, having rather resented her entrance, as the
carriage was already sufficiently full; but when a
sudden lurch of the train sent her violently forward
against a woman, from whom she carromed off
against the bricklayer, and flattened her drawn
black-satin bonnet out of all shape, the man found
his tongue, which was a kind one, though slow in
moving.

“Hold hard, missus!” he said; “we don’t pay
nothing extra for sitting down, so maybe you could
stow some of them traps under the seat, and make
it kind of more comfortable all round. Here,
mother, lend a hand with the old lady’s things,
can’t you? That’s my missus, mum, that my
better arf, as the saying is, and no chap needn't
wish for a better, though I say it as shouldn’t.”

This remark produced a playful kick, and a “Ge
along with you!” from the red-faced wife, which
did not show it was taken amiss, but that she was
LADDIE. 11

pleased with the delicate compliment, and she
helped to arrange the various baskets and bundles
with great energy and good nature.

“Now that’s better, ain’t it? Now you can just set
yourself down. Lor’ bless the woman! whatever
is she frightened at?”

For the bustling arrangements were seriously
alarming to the old woman, who was not sure that
a sudden movement might not upset the train, or
that, if she let go of anything in an unguarded mo-
ment, she might not fall out and be whirled off like
those hurrying blackberry bushes or patches of
chalk on the embankment; though, indeed, it was
only her pattens and umbrella that she was clutch-
ing as her one protection. The first thing that
roused her frorn her daze of fear was the bricklay-
er’s little boy beginning to cry, or, as his mother
called it, “to beller,” in consequence of his mother’s
elbow coming sharply in contact with his head;
and, at the sound, the old woman’s hand let go of
the umbrella and felt for the marketing-basket, and
drew out one of the powerful, yellow apples, and
held it towards the sufferer. The “bellerin” stopped
instantaneously at such a refreshing sight, even
while the mouth was wide open and two tears for-
cing their way laboriously out of the eyes. Finding
that she could accomplish this gymnastic feat with-
out any dangerous results, the old woman seemed
to gain more confidence, seated herself more com-
12 LADDIE.

fortably, straightened her bonnet, smiled at the
bricklayer, nodded to the little boy, and, by the
time the train stopped at the next station, felt her-
self quite a bold and experienced traveller.

“This ain’t London, I take it?” she asked, in a
little, thin, chirrupy voice.

“London? bless you! no. If you're bound for
London you'll have another five hours to go before
you can get there.”

“Oh, yes, I know as it’s a terrible long way off,
but we seemed coming along at such a pace as
there wasn’t no knowing.”

“You ain’t used to travelling, seemings?”

“Oh! I’ve been about as much as most folks.
I’ve been to Martel a smartish few times when Lad-
die was there, and once I went to Bristol when I
was a gal keeping company with my master, but
that ain’t yesterday, you'll be thinking.”

“Martel’s a nice place, I’ve heard tell?”

“So it be; but it’s a terrible big place, however.”

“You'll find London a pretty sight bigger.”

“TI know London pretty well, though I haven't
never been there; for Laddie, he’s been up there
nigh about fifteen year, and he’s told me a deal
about it. I know as it’s all rubbish what folks say
about the streets being paved with gold and such
like, though the young folks do get took in; but
Laddie, he says to me, ‘Mother,’ says he, ‘London
is paved with hard work like any other town; but,’
LADDIE, 13

he says, ‘good honest work is worth its weight in
gold any day;’ so it’s something more than a joke
after all.”

The old woman grew garrulous as the train rush-
ed along. Laddie was a subject, evidently, upon
which her tongue could not help being eloquent.

“An old hen with one chick,” the bricklayer
whispered to his wife; but they listened good-na-
turedly enough to the stories of the wonderful baby,
who had been larger, fatter, and stronger than any
baby before or since, who had taken notice, begun
teething, felt his feet, run off, and said “daddy” at
an incredibly early period.

Mrs. Bricklayer nodded her head and said,
“Really, now!” and “Well, I never!” inwardly, how-
ever, reserving her fixed opinion that the infant
bricklayers had outdone the wonderful Laddie in
every detail of babyhood.

Father Bricklayer could not restrain a mighty
yawn in the middle of a prolonged description of
how Laddie’s gums were lanced; but at this junc-
ture they reached the station which was the des-
tination of the bricklayer and his family, so the old
woman was not wounded by the discovery of their
want of thorough interest, and she parted from
them with great regret, feeling that she had lost
some quite old friends in them. But she soon
found another listener, and a more satisfactory one,
in a young woman, whom she had hardly noticed
14 LADDIE.

before, as she sat in the opposite corner of the car-
riage with her head bent down, neither speaking
nor being spoken to. She had a very young baby
wrapped in her shawl; and as one by one the other
passengers left the carriage and she was left alone
with the old woman, the two solitary creatures
drew together in the chill November twilight; and,
by and by, the wee baby was in the old woman’s
arms, and the young mother, almost a child her-
self, was telling her sad little story and hearing
Laddie’s story in return. There never had been
such a son; he had got on so wonderfully at school,
and had been a favorite with every one,—parson
and schoolmaster; “such a headpiece the lad had!”

“Was Laddie his real name?”

“Why, no! he was christened John Clement, af-
ter his father and mine; but he called himself ‘Lad-
die’ before ever he could speak plain, and it stuck
to him. His father was for making a schoolmaster
of him, but Laddie he didn’t take to that, so we
sent him into Martel to the chemist there, to be
shop-boy; and Mr. Stokes, the gentleman as keeps
the shop, took to him wonderful and spoke of him to
one and another, saying how sharp he were, and
such, till at last one of the doctors took him up and
taught him a lot; and when he went up to London _
he offered to take Laddie, and said as he’d take all
the expense, and as he’d made a man of him. He
come to see me himself, he did, and talked me over,
LADDIE. 15

for I was a bit loath to let him go, for ’twas the year
as the master died ; he died just at fall and Laddie
went at Christmas, and I was feeling a bit unked
and lonesome.’’

“Were that long ago?”

“Yes, ’twere a goodish time. Fifteen year come
Christmas.”

“But you'll have seen him many a time since?”

“Well, no, I ain’t. Many the time as he’s been
coming down but something always come between.
Once he had fixed the very day and all, and then he
were called off on business to Brighton or some-
where. That were a terrible disappointment to the
boy; my heart were that sore for him as I nearly for-
got how much I’d been longing for it myself.”

“But he’ll have wrote?”

“Bless you, yes! he’s a terrible one for his
mother, he is. He’ve not written so much of late
maybe; but then folks is that busy in London they
hasn’t the time to do things as we has in the coun-
try; but I’ll warrant he’ve written to me every time
he had a’spare moment; and so when I sees old
Giles the postman come up, and I says, ‘Anything
for me, master?’ and he says, ‘Nothing for you to-
day, mum’ (for I were always respected in Sunny-
brook from a girl up), I think to myself, thinks I,
“it ain’t for the want of the will as my Laddie hasn't
wrote. And then the presents as he’d send me,
bless his heart! Bank notes it were at first, till he
16 LADDIE.

found as I just paid ’em into the bank and left ’em
there; for what did I want with bank notes? And
then he sent me parcels of things, silk gownds fit
for a duchess, and shawls all the colors of the rain-
bow, till I almost began to think he’d forgot what
sort of an old body I be. Just to think of the likes of
me in such fine feathers! And there were flannel
enough for a big family, and blankets; and then he
sent tea and sugar, I don’t know how many pounds
of it; but it were good and no mistake, and I’d like
a cup of it now for you and me, my dear.”

“And have he sent for you now to come and live
with him?”

“No, he don’t know nothing about it; and I mean
to take him all by surprise. Old Master Heath, as
my cottage belonged to, died this summer; and the
man as took his farm wants my cottage for his
shepherd, and he give me notice to quit. I felt it
a bit and more, for I’d been in that cottage thirty-
five year, spring and fall, and I knows every crack
and cranny about it, and I fretted terrible at first;
but at last I says to myself, ‘Don’t you go for to
fret; go right off to Laddie, and he’ll make a home
for you and glad;’ and so I just stored ay things
away and come right off.”

“He’ve been doing well in London?”

“Well, my Laddie’s a gentleman! He’s a regu-
lar doctor, and keeps a carriage, and has a big
house and servants. Mr. Mason, our parish doc-
LADDIE. 17

’ tor, says as he’s one of the first doctors in London,
and that I may well be proud of him. Bless me!
how pleased the boy will be to see his old mother!
Maybe I shall see him walking in the streets, but if
I don’t I'll find his house and creep in at the back
door so as he sha’n’t see me, and tell the gal to say
to the doctor (doctor, indeed! my Laddie!) as some
one wants to see him very particular. And then”
—The old woman broke down here, half-sobbing,
half-laughing, with an anticipation too tenderly, ec-
statically sweet for words. “My dear,” she said,
as she wiped her brimming eyes, “I’ve thought of
it and dreamt of it so long, and to think as I should
have lived to see it!”

The expectations of her travelling companion
were far less bright, though she had youth to paint
the future with bright hopes, and only nineteen
winters to throw into the picture dark shadows of
foreboding. She had been well brought up, and
gone into comfortable service; and her life had run
on in a quiet, happy course till she met with Harry
Joyce.

“Folks says all manner of ill against him,” said
the girl’s trembling voice; “but he were always
good tome. I didn’t know much about him, except
as he liked me, and I liked him dearly; for he come
from London at fair-time, and he stopped about the
place doing odd jobs, and he come after me con-
stant. My mistress were sore set against him, but
18 LADDIE.

I were pretty near mad about him; so we was mar-
ried without letting any folks at home know naught
about it. Oh, yes! we was married all right. I’ve
got my lines, as I could show you as there wasn’t
no mistake about it; and it were all happy enough
for a bit, and he got took on as ostler at the
George; and there wasn’t a steadier, better-behaved
young feller in the place. But, oh, dear! it didn't
last long. He came in one day and said as how
he’d lost his place, and was going right off to Lon-
don to get work there. I didn’t say never a word,
‘but I got up and begun to put our bits of things to-
gether; and thcn he says as he’d best go first and
find a place for me, and I must go home to my
mother. I thought it would have broke my heart,
I did, to part with him; but he stuck to it, and I
went home. Our village is nigh upon eight mile
from Merrifield, and I’d never heard a word from
mother since I wrote to tell them I was wed. When
I got home that day, I almost thought as they’d
have shut the door on me. A story had got about
as I wasn’t married at all, and had brought shame
and trouble on my folks; and my coming home like
that made people talk all the more, though I
showed them my lines and told my story truthful.
Well, mother took me in, and I bided there till my
baby was born; and she and father was good to me,
I'll not say as they wasn’t; but they were always un-
easy and suspicious-like about Harry; and I got
LADDIE. 19

sick of folks looking and whispering, as if I ought
to be ashamed when I had naught to be ashamed
of. And I wrote to Harry more than once to say
as I’d rather come to him, if he’d a hole to put me
in; and he always wrote to bid me bide a bit longer,
till baby come; and then I just wrote and said I
must come anyhow, and so set off! But, oh! I feel
skeered to think of London, and Harry maybe not
glad to see me.”

It was.dark by this time, and the women peering
out could often see only the reflection of their own
faces in the windows or ghostly puffs of smoke flit-
ting past. Now and then little points of light in the
darkness told of homes where there were warm
hearths and bright lights; and once, up above, a star
showed, looking kindly and home-like to the old wo-
man. “Every bit as if it were that very same star as
comes out over the elm-tree by the pond, but that
ain’t likely all this way off.”

But soon the clouds covered the friendly star,
and a fine rain fell, splashing the windows with tiny
drops, and making the lights outside blurred and
hazy. And then the scattered lights drew closer
together, and the housed formed into rows, and gas
lamps marked out perspective lines; and then there
were houses bordering the line on either side in-
stead of banks and hedges; and then the train
stopped, and a damp and steaming ticket collector
opened the door, letting in a puff of fog, and de-
20 LADDIE.

manded the tickets, and was irritated to a great
pitch of exasperation by the fumbling and slowness
of the two women, who had put their tickets away
in some place of extra safety and forgotten where
that place was. And then in another minute the
train was in Paddington; gas and hurry and noise,
porters, cabs, and shrieking engines,—a night-
mare, indeed, to the dazzled country eyes and the
deafened country ears.

CHAPTER II.

In a quiet old-fashioned street near Portman
Square there is a door with a brass plate upon it,
bearing the name “Dr. Carter.” The door is not
singular in possessing a brass plate, for almost every
house in the street displays one, being inhabited
nearly entirely by doctors and musical professors.
I do not attempt to explain why it is so.—whether
that part of London is especially unhealthy, and so
requires constant and varied medical advice, or
whether there is something in the air conducive to
harmony; or whether the musical professors at-
tract the doctors, or the doctors the professors, I
leave to more learned heads to discover, only haz-
arding the suggestion that perhaps the highly
strung musical nerves may be an interesting study
to the faculty, or that music may have charms to
soothe the savage medical breast or drive away the
LADDIE. 24

evil spirits of the dissecting-room. Anyhow, the fact
remains that North Crediton Street is the resort of
doctors and musical men, and that on one of the
doors stands the plate of Dr. Carter.

It was an old-fashioned, substantially built house,
built about the beginning of the last century, when
people knew how to build solidly, if not beautifully.
It had good thick walls, to which you might whis-
per a secret without confiding itto your next-door
neighbor, and firm, well-laid floors, on which you
might dance, if you had a mind to, without fear of
descending suddenly into the basement. There
were heavy frames to the windows, and small
squares of glass, and wooden staircases with thick,
twisted banisters,—a house altogether, at which
housemaids looked with contempt, as something
infinitely less “genteel” than the “splendid man-
sions” of lath and plaster, paint and gilding, which
are run up with such magic speed nowadays. We
have no need to ring the bell and disturb the soft-
voiced, deferential man-servant, out of livery, from
the enjoyment of his evening paper in the pantry,
for we can pass uninvited and unannounced into
Dr. Carter’s consulting-room, and take a look at it
and him. There is nothing remarkable about the
room; a book-case full of medical and _ scientific
books; a large writing-table with pigeon holes for
papers and a stethoscope on the top; a reading-
lamp with a green shade, and an india-rubber tube
22 LADDIE,

to supply it with gas from the burner above;
a side-table with more books and papers and a
small galvanic battery; a large india-rubber plant
in the window; framed photographs of eminent
physicians and surgeons over the mantelpiece; a
fire burning low in the grate; a thick turkey carpet
and heavy leather chairs; and there you have an in-
ventory of the furniture, to arrange before your
mind’s eye if you think it worth while. ;
There is something remarkable in the man, John
Clement Carter, M. D., but I cannot give you an in-
‘yentory of him, or make a broker’s list of eyes
and forehead, nose and mouth. He is not a regu-
larly handsome man, not one that a sculptor would
model or an artist paint, but his is a face that
you never forget if you have once seen it; there is
something about him that makes people move out
of his path involuntarily; and strangers ask, “Whois
that?” Power is stamped in his deep-set eyes and
the firm lines of mouth and chin,—power which
gives beauty even to an ugly thing, throwing a
grandeur and dignity round a black, smoky engine,
or a huge, ponderous steam-hammer. Indeed,
power is beauty; for there is no real beauty in
weakness, physical or mental. His eyes had the
beauty of many doctors’ eyes,—kind and patient,
from experience of human weakness and trouble of
all sorts; keen and penetrating, as having looked
through the mists of pain and disease, searching for
LADDIE. 23

hope, ay, and finding it too sometimes where other
men could only find despair; brave and steady, as
having looked through the glorious glass of science
and seen, more plainly the more he looked, the
working of the Everlasting Arms; for surely when
science brings confusion and doubt, it proves that
the eye of the beholder is dim or distorted, or that
he is too ignorant to use the glass rightly. But
there is a different look in his eyes to-night; pain
and trouble and weakness are far from histhoughts;
and he is not gazing through the glass of science,
though he has a Medical Review open before him,
and a paper-knife in his hand to cut the leaves; his
eyes have wandered to a bunch of Russian violets
in a specimen glass on the table; and he is looking
through rose-colored spectacles at a successful
past, a satisfactory present, and a beautiful future.
I need not tell my readers that this Dr. John
Clement Carter was the Somersetshire boy whom
Dr. Savile had taken by the hand, and whose tal-
_ents had made the ladder which carried him up to
eminence. The kind old doctor liked to tell the
story over a glass of port wine to the friends round
his shining mahogany (he was old-fashioned, and
thought scorn of claret and dinners a la Russe). “I
was the making of the man,” he would say; “and
I’m as proud of him, by Jove! sir, as if he were a
son of my own.”
It is quite as difficult to rise in the world grace-
24 LADDIE.

fully as to come down; but every one agreed that
John Carter managed to do it, and just from this
reason, that there was no pretence about him. He
did not intrude his low origin on every one, forcing
it on people’s attention with that fidgety uneasiness
which will have people know it if they are interested
in the subject or not, which is only one remove
from the unworthy pride that tries to hide it away
altogether. Neither did he boast of it as something
very much to his credit; but to any one who cared
_to know he would say, “My family were poor work-
ing people in Somersetshire, and I don’t even know
if I had a grandfather; and I owe everything to Dr.
Savile.’ And he would say it with a smile and a
quiet manner, as if it were nothing to be ashamed
of and nothing to be proud of, but just a fact which
was hardly of interest; and his manner somehow
made people feel that birth and breeding were after
all mere insignificant circumstances of life, and of
no account by the side of talent and success. “He’s
a good fellow, John Carter, and a clever fellow too,
without any humbug about him,” the men said;
and the women thought much the same, though
they expressed it differently. Indeed, the glimpse
of his early humble country life, simply given,with-
out any pretence or concealment, grew to be consid-
ered an effective, picturesque background, which
showed up to advantage his present success and
dignified position. It was quite true that there
LADDIE. 25

was no humbug or concealment about him; that
was the very truth he told; and yet,somehow, astime
went on, the words lost the full meaning they had
to him at first. Don’t you know, if you use them
even in our prayers, alas! they are no longer the
expression of our feeling, but the words come first
and the feeling follows or does not follow. And
then, don’t you know sometimes how we hear with
other people’s ears, and see with other people’s
eyes? And so John Carter, when he said those
simple, truthful words, grew to see the picturesque
background,—the thatched cottage, and the honey-
suckle-covered porch, and the grand old patriarch
with white hair, one of nature’s noblemen, leaning
on his staff and blessing his son; and he gradually
forgot the pigsty close to the cottage door, and
father in a dirty green smock and hob-nailed boots,
doing what he called “mucking it out,” and stop-
ping to wipe the heat from his brow with a snuffy,
red cotton handkerchief.

But come back from the pigsty to the violets
which are scenting the consulting-room, and luring
Dr. Carter, not unwillingly, from the Medical Re-
view to thoughts of the giver. Her name is Violet,
too, and so are her eyes, though the long lashes
throw such a shadow that you might fancy they
were black themselves. It is not every one—in-
deed, it is John Carter alone—who is privileged ta
look straight down into those eyes, and see the
26 LADDIE,

beauty of their color; only he, poor, foolish fellow,
forgets to take advantage of his opportunity, and
only notices the great love for him that shines there
and turns his brain with happiness. His hand
trembles as he stretches it to take the specimen
glass; and the cool, fragrant flowers lightly touch
his lip as he raises them to his face. ‘“Pshaw!” I
hear you say, reminding me of my own words,
“there is no beauty in weakness, and this is weak-
ness indeed!—a sensible man, past the heyday and
folly of youth, growing maudlin and sentimental
over a bunch of violets!’ No, reader, it is power
—the strongest power on earth,—the power of love.

He had been used to say that his profession was
his lady-love, and he had looked on with wondering
incredulous eyes at the follies and excesses of
young lovers; he was inclined to think it was a mild
form of mania, and required physical treatment.
And so he reached five-and-thirty unscathed, and
slightly contemptuous of others less fortunate than
himself; when, one day, a girl’s blue eyes, looking
shyly at him through dark lashes, brought him
down once and forever from his pedestal of fancied
superiority; and before he could collect his argu-
ments, or reason himself out of it, he was past cure,
hopelessly, helplessly, foolishly in love. They had
been engaged for two days; it was two days since
this clever young doctor, this rising, successful
man, with such stores of learning, such a solid in-
LADDIE. 27

tullect, such a cool, calm brain, had stood blushing
and stammering before a girl of eighteen. If I
were to write down the words he said, you would
think my hero an idiot pure and simple; the most
mawkish and feeble twaddle of the most debased of
penny periodicals was vastly superior to what Dr.
Carter stammered out that day. But is not this
generally the case? Beautiful, poetical love scenes
are frequent in plays and books, but very rare in
real life. There is not one love scene in a thousand
that would bear being taken down in shorthand,
printed in plain, black type, and read by critical
eyes through commonplace spectacles. Neverthe-
less, the feelings are no doubt sublime, though the
words may be ridiculous. He was quite another
man altogether (happily for him) when he went to
Sir John Meredith, and told him plainly that he was
no match for his daughter as far as birth went. _

“My good fellow,” the sensible little baronet an-
swered, “there are only about ten families in Eng-
land that can put their pedigree by the side of the
Merediths, and it don’t seem to me to make much
difference, if you rise from the ranks yourself, or if
your father or grandfather did it.”

“T can scarcely claim even to be a gentleman,”
the young man went on, feeling pretty sure of suc-
cess by that time.

“Not another word, my dear boy; not another
word! I respect your candor, and I esteem you very
28 LADDIE.

highly as an honest man—the noblest work of God,
you know, eh?—though I’d like to hear any one
say that you were not a gentleman as well. There,
go along! shake hands! God bless you! You'll find
Violet in the drawing-room. Sly little puss! but
I saw what was coming—and mind you dine with
us this evening at seven sharp—old-fashioned folk,
old-fashioned hours.”

I think the wary old baronet also respected Dr.
Carter’s income, and esteemed very highly his suc-
cess, and having weighed the advantages of family
and birth against success and income, had found
that the latter were the more substantia! in the
worldly scales.

And so Dr. Carter was dreaming rosy dréams
that evening in his quiet room, as was fit and proper
after two days’ wandering in fairyland with Violet
Meredith. But as the scent of the violets had led
him to think of the giver, so it drew his thoughts
away from her again back to springtime many
years ago at Sunnybrook, and the bank where the
earliest violets grew in the sheltered lane leading to
the Croft farm. Did ever violets smell so sweet as
those? He remembered one afternoon, after school,
going to fetch the milk from the farm, and the scent
luring him across the little runlet by the side of the
path, which was swollen into a small, brawling
brook by the lately thawed snow. He set down the
can safely before he made the venture; and Dr.
LADDIE. 29

Carter laughed softly to himself to think how short
and fat the legs were that found the little stream
such a mighty stride. He was busy diving for the
flowers among the layers of dead elm leaves, which
the blustering autumn winds had blown there,
when a sound behind him caused him to look round
and there was the can upset, and the young fox-
hound quartered at the Croft licking up the white
pool from the pebbles. In his anger and fear and
haste, he slipped as he tried to jump back, and went
full-length into the stream, and scrambled out in a
sad plight, and went home crying bitterly, with a
very wet pinafore, and dirty face, and empty milk
can, with the cause of his mishap, the sweet violets,
still clasped unconsciously in his little scratched
hand. And his mother—ah! she was always a
good mother! He could remember still the com-
forting feeling of mother’s apron wiping away dirt
and tears, and the sound of her voice bidding him
“Never mind! and hush up like a good little Lad-
die.” His heart felt very warm just then toward
that mother of his; and he made up his mind that,
cost what trouble it might, he would go down and
see her before he was married, if it were only for an
hour or two, just to make sure that she was com-
fortable and not working about and wearing herself
out. His conscience pricked him a little at the
thought of what a pleasure the sight of him would
have been to the old woman, and how year after
30 LADDIE.

year had slipped away without his going down. But
still a comforting voice told him that he had been
substantially a good son, and it was accident and
not intention that had kept him away. “Anyhow,”
he said to himself, ‘‘ another month shall not pass
without my seeing my mother.”

At this moment the deferential man knocked at
the door and aroused Dr. Carter to the conscious-
ness of how far his wandering thoughts had carried
him from his consulting room and Medical Review.

“What is it, Hyder?”

“Please, sir, there’s some one wishes to see you.
I told her it was too late, and you was engaged very
particular, but she wouldn’t be put off nohow, sir.”

“What is her name?”

There was a slight smile disturbing the usually
unruffied serenity of Mr.,Hyder’s face, as if he hada
lingering remembrance of something amusing.

“She didn’t give no name, sir, and she wouldn’t
say what she wanted, though I asked if a message
wouldn’t do; but she said her business was too par-
ticular for that, sir,”

“What sort of person is she?”

The corners of the man’s mouth twitched, and he
had to give a little cough to conceal an incipient
chuckle.

“Beg your paron, sir. She appears to be from
the country, sir. Quite a countrified, homely old
body, sir.”


(31)
LADDIE. 33

Perhaps the odor of the violets and the country
memories they had called up made him more amia-
bly inclined; but instead of the sharp, decided re-
_ fusal the servant expected, “Tell her it is long past
my time for seeing patients, and I am busy, and she
must call again to-morrow,” he said, “Well, show
her in;” and the man withdrew in surprise.

“Countrified, homely old body.” Somehow the
description brought back to his mind his mother
coming down the brick path from the door at home,
with her Sunday bonnet on, and her pattens in her
hand, and the heavy-headed double stocks and co-
lumbines tapping against her short petticoats. The
doctor smiled to himself; and even while he smiled
the door was pushed open, and before him he saw,
with a background of the gas-lit hall and the re-
spectful Hyder, by this time developed into an in-
controllable grin, his mother, in her Sunday bonnet ©
and with her pattens in her hand.



CHAPTER III.

READER, think of some lovely picture of rustic
life, with tender lights and pleasant shadows, with
hard lines softened, and sharp angles touched into
gentle curves, with a background of picturesque,
satisfying appropriateness, with the magic touches
that bring out the beauty and refinement and ele-
34 LADDIE.

ganee of the scene, which are really there, and that
subtly tone down all the roughness and awkward-
ness and coarseness, which are also equally there.
And then, imagine it, if you can, changing under
your very eyes, with glaring lights and heavy shad-
ows deepening and sharpening and hardening
wrinkles and angles and lines, exaggerating defects,
bringing coarseness and age and ugliness into pain-
ful prominence, and taking away at a sweep the
pretty, rural background which might have relieved
and soothed the eye, and putting a dull, common-
place, incongruous one in its place. It was some-
thing of this sort that happened to John Carter that
night, when the picture he had been painting with
the sweet lights of love and childhood’s fancies, and
the tender shadows of memory throwing over it all
soft tones of long ago and far away, suddenly
stood before him in unvarnished reality, with all
the glamor taken away, an every-day fact in his
present London life.

I am glad to write it of him that, for the first min-
ute, pleasure was the uppermost feeling in his mind.
First thought are often the best and purest. He
started up, saying, “Mother! why mother!” in the
same tone of glad surprise as he would have done
fifteen years before if she had come unexpectedly
into the shop at Martel; he did not even think if the
door were closed, or what Mr. Hyder would think;
he did not notice that she was crumpled and dirty
LADDIE, 30

with travel, or that she put her pattens down on his
open book and upset the glass of violets; he just
took hold of her trembling, hard-worked hands,
and kissed her furrowed old cheek, wet with tears
of unutterable joy, and repeated “Mother! why,
mother!”

I am glad to write it of him; glad that she had
that great happiness, realizing the hopes and long-
ings of years past, consoling in days to come when
she had to turn back to the past for comfort, or for-
ward to the time of perfect satisfaction. There are
these exquisite moments in life, let people say what.
they will of the disappointments and vanity of the
world, when hope is realized, desire fulfilled; but
it is just for a moment, no more—just a fore taste of
the joys that shall be hereafter, when every moment
of the long years of eternity will be still more full
and perfect, when we shall “wake up” and “be sat- .
isfied.”

She was clinging meanwhile to his arm, sobbing
out, “Laddie, my boy, Laddie!” with her eyes too
dim with tears to see his face clearly, or to notice
how tall and grand and handsome her boy was
grown, and what a gentleman. Presently, when
she was seated in the armchair, and had got
her breath again, and wiped her foolish old eyes,
she was able to hunt in her capacious pocket for the
silver-rimmed spectacles that had descended from
her father, old Master Pullen, in the almshouse, and
36 LADDIE.

that Laddie remembered well, as being kept in the
old family Bible, and brought out with great pomp
and ceremony on Sunday evenings.

“I must have a good look at you, Laddie boy,”
she said.

And then I think her good angel must have
spread his soft wing between the mother and son
(though to her mind it seemed only like another
tear dimming her sight, with a rainbow light on it),
to keep her from seeing the look that was marring
that son’s face. All the pleasure was gone, and
embarrassment and disquiet had taken its place.

“However did you come, mother?” he said, trying
his best to keep a certain hardness and irritation
out of his voice.

“T come by the train, dear,” the old woman an-
swered “and it did not terrify me more nor a bit at
first, ’ll not go for to deny; but, bless you! I soon
got over it, and them trains is handy sort of things
when you gets used to’em. I was a good deal put
to though when we got to London station, there
seemed such a many folks about, and they did push
and hurry a body so. I don’t know whatever I
should ’a done if a gentleman hadn’t come and asked
me where I wanted to get to. He were a tallish
man with whiskers, a bit like Mr. Jones over at
Martel, and I dare say you knows him; but he was
terrible kind, however.”

John Carter did not stop to explain that there
were many tallish men with whiskers in London.
LADDIE. 37

“Why didn’t you write and say you were com-
ing?”

“Well, there! I thought as I’d give you a sur-
prise; and I ‘knew as you’d be worrying about the
journey and thinking as I’d not be able to manage;
but I’m not such a helpless old body, after all, Lad-
die.”

“Whom have you left in charge of the cottage?”

“Why, I’ve give it up altogether. Farmer Har-
ris, he wanted it for his shepherd, and he give me
notice. That’s why I come all on a sudden like. I
says to myself, says I, Laddie’s got a home and a
welcome for his old mother, and it’s only because
he thought as I was pretty nearly growed to the old
place, and couldn’t abear to leave it, that he ain't
said as I must come and keep house for him long
ago. But, bless you! I’ve been thinking so of the
pleasure of seeing you again that I’ve pretty nearly .
forgot as I was leaving my master’s grave and all.”

“And when must you go back?”

“Not till you gets tired of me, Laddie, or till you
takes me to lay me by the old master; for I’d like
to lay there, if so be as you can manage it, for I’ve
heard tell as it cost a mort of money buryin’ folks
out of the parish as they dies in, and maybe it
mightn’t be just convenient to you.”

John Carter busied himself with making the fire
burn up into a blaze, while his mother rambled on,
telling him little bits of village gossip about people
38 LADDIE.

he had long since forgotten or never heard of; or
describing her journey, which was a far greater ex-
ploit in the old woman’s eyes than Lieutenant Cam-
eron’s walk across Africa; or dwelling on the delight
of seeing him again. He paid little heed to what
she said, pretending to be intent on placing a re-
fractory piece of coal in a certain position, or coax-
ing an uncertain little flame into steadiness; but his
head was busy trying to form some plan for getting
himself out of his difficult position. He did not
want to hurt her, or to be unkind in any way; but
it was altogether out of the question having her
there to live with him. It would ruin all his pros-
pects in life, his position in his profession and in
society; as to his. engagement, he did not venture
to allow himself even to think of Violet just then.
He knew some doctors whose mothers lived with
them, and kept house for them, received their
guests, and sat at the head of their table, but they
were ladies, very different. The very idea of his
mother with three or four servants under her was
an absurdity. And this thought brought Hyder’s
grin before his mind. What had happened when
his mother arrived? Had she committed herself
and him frightfully by her behavior? No doubt
that impudent rascal was giving a highly facetious
account of it all to the maids in the kitchen. Chat-
tering magpies! And how they would pass it on!
How Mary Jane would describe it through the area
LADDIE. 39

gate to the milk woman next morning, and cook
add a pointed word or two from the front steps as
she cleaned them! He could almost smell the wet
hearthstone and hear the clinking of the tin milk
pails as Biddy hooked them to the yoke and passed
on with the story of his degradation. And he could
fancy what a choice morsel it would make for Hy-
der to tell Sir John Meredith’s solemn, red-nosed
butler, behind his hand, in a hoarse whisper, with
winks to emphasize strong points, and an occa-
sional jerk of the thumb over the shoulder and a
careful avoidance of names. This thought was too
much for his feelings, and the tongs went down
with an ominous clatter into the fender, making the
old woman jump nearly off her chair, and cutting
short a story about the distemper among Squire
Wellow’s pigs.

“There; it brought my heart into my mouth,
pretty near, and set me all of a tremble. I reckon
as I’m a little bit tired, and it have shook up my
nerves like, and a little do terrify one so.”

The sight of her white, trembling old face
touched his son’s and doctor’s heart under the fine,
closely woven, well-cut coat of fine gentlemanli-
ness and worldy wisdom which he was buttoning
so closely round him.

You are quite tired out, mother,” he said; “you
shall have some tea and go to bed. I can't have
you laid up you know.”
40 LADDIE.

“There now! if I wasn’t thinking as a dish of
tea would be the nicest thing in the world! and for
you to think of it! Ah! you remembers what your
mother likes, bless you!”

In that moment he had quickly made up his
mind that at any rate it was too late for that night
to do anything but just make her comfortable; to-
morrow something must bé done without delay;
but there was ten striking, and she was evidently
quite worn out. He must say something to silence
those jays of servants and get her off to bed, and
then he could sit down and arrange his plans
quietly; for the suddenness of the emergency had
confused and muddled him.

“T’ll tell them to get some tea,” he said, “you sit
still and rest.” And then he rang the bell decidedly
and went out into the hall, closing the doors be-
hind him. He had never felt so self-conscious and
uncomfortable as when the man-servant came up
the kitchen stairs and stood as deferentially as ever
before him. He felt as if he had not got entire con-
trol of voice, eyes, or hands. His eyes seemed to
avoid looking at the man’s face in spite of him, and
his voice tried hard to be apologetic and entreating
of its own accord. That would never do. He
thrust his obtrusive hands into his pockets, and
drew up his head, and looked sharply at the man
straight in the eyes with a “fight you for 2d.” ex-
pression, or “every bit as if I owed him a quarter’s
LADDIE. Al

rent,” as Hyder said afterwards; and he spoke in
a commanding, bullying tone, very unlike his usual
courteous behavior to servants, imagining that by
this he conveyed to the man’s mind that he was
quite at his ease, and that nothing unusual had
happened.

“Look here,” he said, “I want tea at once in the
dining-room, and tell cook to send up some cold
meat. I suppose it’s too late for cutlets or anything

like that?”

“Ts the lady going to stop the night, sir?”

The words stung Dr. Carter so, that he would
have liked to have kicked the man down the
kitchen stairs, but he luckily restrained himself.

“Yes, she is. The best bedroom must be got
ready, and a fire lighted, and everything made as
comfortable as possible. Do you hear?”

“Yes, sir.” The man hesitated a second to see
if there were any further orders, and Dr. Carter —
half turned, looking another way, as he added,
“She is a very old friend and nurse of mine when I
was a child, and I want her to be made comfortable.
She will only be here this one night.”

He felt as he turned the handle of the consulting-
room door that he had really done it rather well on
the whole, and carried it off with a high hand, and
not told any falsehood after all, for was she not his
oldest friend and his most natural nurse? In reality
he had never looked less like a gentleman, and
Hyder saw it too.
42 LADDIE.

They say a man is never a hero to his own valet.
I do not know if this includes men-servants in gen-
eral; but certain it is that, up to this time, Dr.
Carter had kept the respect of his servant. “I
know as he ain’t a swell,’ Mr. Hyder would say
to the coterie of footmen who met in the bar of the
snug little “public” round the corner; “but for all
that he ain’t a bad master neither; and as far as
my experience serves, he’s as good a gent as any
of them, and better any day than them dandy, half-
pay captings as locks up their wine and cigars, and
sells their old clothes, and keeps their men on
scraps, and cusses and swears as if they was made
of nothing else.”

But as Hyder went to his pantry that night, he
shook his head with a face of supreme disgust.
“*That’s what I call nasty!” he said, “I’m disap-
pointed in that man. I] thought better of him than
this comes to. Well, well! blood tells after all.
What’s bred in the bone will come out in the flesh
sooner or later. Nurse indeed! Get along! you
don’t humbug me, my gent!”

There were no signs, however, of these moraliz-
ings in the pantry, or the fuller discussion that fol-
lowed in the kitchen, when he announced that sup-
per was ready.

“Do ye have your victuals in the kitchen now, -
Laddie?” the old woman said. “Well, there! it is
the most comfortable to my thinking, though
gentle-folks do live in their best parlors constant.”
LADDIE, 43

Hyder discreetly drew back, and Dr. Carter
whispered with a crimson flush all over his face,
“Hush, we'll have our talk when this fellow is out
of the way. Don’t say anything till then.”

The old woman looked much surprised, but at
last concluded that there was something mysterious
against the character of “the very civil-spoken
young man as opened the door,” and so she kept
silence while her son led her into the dining-room,
where tea was spread, with what appeared to the
old woman royal magnificence of white damask
and shining silver.

“You can go,” the doctor said. “I will ring if
we want anything.”

“He don’t look such a baddish sort of young
man,” she said, when the door closed behind the ob-
servant Hyder; “and he seems to mind what you
says pretty sharp. I thought as he was a gent hisself_
when he opened the door, as he hadn’t got red
breeches or gaiters or nothing; but I suppose you
will put him in livery by and by?”

“Now, mother, you must have some tea. And
you are not to talk till you have eaten something.
Here! I’ll pour out the the tea.” For the glories
of the silver teapot were drawing her attention
from its reviving contents. “I hope they have
made it good. Ah! I remember well what tea you
used to make in that little brown teapot at home.”
It was very easy and pleasant to be kind to her,
44 LADDIE.

and make much of her now, when no one else was
there. He enjoyed waiting on her, and seeing her
brighten up and revive under the combined influ-
ence of food and warmth and kindness. He liked
to hear her admire and wonder at everything, and
he laughed naturally and boyishly at her odd little
innocent remarks. If they two could have been al-
ways alone together, with no spying eyes and spite-
ful tongues, it would have been all right and pleas-
ant, but as it was, it was quite impossible, and out
of the question.

“It ain’t the teapot, Laddie, as does it. It’s just
to let it stand till it’s drawed thorough and no
longer. Put it on the hob for ten minutes, say I,
but that’s enough. I don’t like stewed tea, and
moreover it ain’t wholesome neither. This is a
fine room, Laddie, and no mistake. Why, the par-
son ain’t got one to hold a candle to it. I'd just
like some of the Sunnybrook folk to have a look at
it. It would make them open their eyes wide, I
warrant!—to see me a-setting here like a lady, with
this-here carpet as soft as anything, and them cur-
tains, and pictures, and all! I wonder whatever
they would say if they could see? I suppose now,
as there’s a washus or a place out behind some-
wheres for them servants?”

Dr. Carter laughed at the idea of Mrs. Treasure
the cook, and the two smart housemaids, let alone
Mr. Hyder, being consigned to a wash-house at
LADDIE. 45

the back; and he explained the basement arrange-
ments.

“Underground. Well! I never did! But I think
T’ve heard tell of underground kitchens before, but
I never would believe it. It must be terrible dark
for the poor things, and damp moreover; and how
poor, silly gals is always worriting to get places in
London, passes me!”

Presently, when they had done tea, and gone
back into the consulting-room, when the old woman
was seated in the arm-chair, with her feet on the
fender, and her gown turned up over her knees,
Dr. Carter drew his chair up near hers, and pre-
pared for his difficult task.

“Mother,” he said, laying one of his hands car-
essingly on her arm (he was proud of his hands,—it
was one of his weaknesses that they were gentle-
man’s hands, white and well shaped, and there was
a plain gold strap-ring on the little finger, which
hit exactly the right medium between severity and
display, as a gentleman’s ring should),—‘Mother,
I wish you had written to tell me you were com-
ing.”

She took his hands between both her own, hard
and horny, with the veins standing up like cord
on the backs, rough and misshapen with years of
hard work, but with a world of tender mother’s love
in every touch, that made his words stick in his
throat and nearly choke him,
46 LADDIE.

“T knew as you'd be pleased to see me, Laddie,
come when I might or how I might.”

“Of course I’m glad to see you, mother, very
glad; and I was thinking just before you came in
that I would run down to Sunnybrook to see you
just before Christmas.”

And then he went on to explain how different
London life was to that at Sunnybrook, and how
she would never get used to it or feel happy there,
talking quickly and wrapping up his meaning in so
many words and elaborations that at the end of
half an hour the old woman had no more idea of
what he meant that she had at the beginning, and
was fairly mystified. She had a strange way, too,
of upsetting all his skilful arguments with a simple
word or two.

“Different from Sunnybrook? Yes, sure; but
she’d get used to it like other folks. Not happy?
Why she’d be happy anywheres with her Laddie.
There, don’t you fret yourself about me; as long as
you're comfortable I don’t mind nothing.”

How could he make her understand and see the
guif that lay between them,—her life and his? It
needed much plainer speaking; a spade must be
called a spade; and, somehow, it looked a very
much more ugly spade when it was so called. How
soon did she catch his meaning? He hardly knew,
for he could not bear to look into her face, and see
the smile fade from her lips and the brightness
LADDIE. 47

from her eyes. He only felt her hand suddenly
clasp his more tightly, as if he had tried to draw
it away from her; and she grew silent, while he
talked on quickly and nervously, telling her they
would go together to-morrow and find alittle snug
cottage not far from London, with everything
pretty and comfortable that heart could wish for,
and a little maid to do the work, so that she need
never lay her hand to anything; and how he would
come to see her often, very often, perhaps once a
week. Still never a word for or against, of pleas-
ure or of pain, till he said,—

“You would like it, mother, wouldn’t you?”

And then she answered slowly and faintly,

“T’m aweary, Laddie, too tired like for new
plans; and maybe, dearie, too old.”

“You must go to bed,” he said, with a burst of
overwhelming compunction. “I ought not to have
let you stop up like this. I should have kept what
I had to say till to-morrow when you were rested.
Come, think no more of it to-night, everything will
look brighter to-morrow. T’ll show you your bed-
room.”

And so he took her up-stairs, such a lot of stairs
to the old country legs; but her curiosity overcame
her fatigue sufficiently to make her peep into the
double drawing-room where the gas lamp in the
street threw weird lights and shadows on the ceil-
ing, and touched unexpectedly on parts of mirrors
48 LADDIE.

or gilded cornices, giving a mysterious effect to the
groups of furniture and the chandelier hanging in
its holland covering.

“°*Tis mighty fine!” she said, “but an unked place
to my mind; like a churchyard somat.”

Her bedroom did not look “unked,”’ however, with
a bright fire burning, and the inviting chintz-cur-
tained bed and the crisp muslin-covered toilet-
table, with two candles lighted. In the large look-
ing-glass on the toilet-table, the figure of the little
-old woman was reflected among the elegant com-
fort of the room, looking all the more small and
shabby and old, and out of place in contrast with
her surroundings.

“Now make haste to bed, there’s a good old
mother; my room is next to this if you want any-
thing, and I shall soon come up to bed. I hope
you'll be very comfortable. Good-night.”

And then he left her with a kiss; and she stood
for some minutes quite still, looking at the scene
reflected in the glass before her, peering curiously
and attentively at it.

“And so Laddie is ashamed of his old mother,”
she said softly, with a little sigh; “and it ain’t no
wonder!”

As Dr. Carter sat down again in his consulting-
room by himself, he told himself that he had done
wisely, though he had felt and inflicted pain, and
still felt very sore and ruffled. But it was wisest,
a

a3

Tag
ae eT ae



(49)
LADDIE. 5t

and practically kindest and best for her in the end,
more surely for her happiness and comfort; so
there was no need to regret it, or for that tiresome
little feeling in one corner of his heart that seemed
almost like remorse. This is no story-book world
of chivalry, romance, and poetry; and to get on in
it you must just lay aside sentimental fancies and
act by the light of reason and common sense. And
then he settled down to arrange the details of to-
morrow’s plans, and jotted down on a piece of
paper a few memoranda of suitable places, times of
trains, etc., and resolved that he would spare no
pains or expense in making her thoroughly com-
fortable. He even wrote a note or two to put off
some appointments, and felt quite gratified with the
idea that he was sacrificing something on his
mother’s account. The clock struck two as he
rose to go up to bed; and he went up feeling much.
more composed and satisfied with himself, having
pretty successfully argued and reasoned down his
troublesome, morbid misgivings. He listened at
his mother’s door, but all was quiet; and he made
haste into bed himself, feeling he had gone through
a good deal that day.

He was just turning over to sleep when his door
opened softly, and his mother came in,—such a
queer, funny, old figure, with a shawl wrapped
around her and a very large nightcap on—one of
the ol.{-fashioned sort, with very broad, flapping
52 LADDIE.

a

frills. She had a candle in her hand, and set it down
on the table by his bed. He jumped up as she came
in.

“Why, mother, what’s the matter? Not in bed?
Are you ill?”

“There, there! lie down; there ain’t nothing
wrong. But I’ve been listening for ye this long
time. ’Tis fifteen years and more since I tucked
you up in bed, and you used to say as you never
slept so sweet when I didn’t do it.”

She made him lie down, and smoothed his pil-
low, and brushed his hair off his forehead, and
tucked the clothes round him, and kissed him as
she spoke.

“And I thought as I’d like to do it for you once
more. Good-night, Laddie, good-night.”’

And then she went away quickly, and did not
hear him call, “Mother! O mother!” after her; for
the carefully tucked-in clothes were flung off, and
Laddie was out of bed with his hand on the handle
of the door, and then,—second thoughts being
cooler, if not better,—‘‘She had better sleep,” Dr.
Carter said, and got back into bed.

But sleep did not come at his call. He tossed
about feverishly and restlessly, with his mind tos-
sing hither and thither as much as his body, the
strong wind of his pride and will blowing against
the running tide of his love and conscience, and
making a rough sea between them, which would
LADDIE. 53

not allow of any repose. And which of them was.
the strongest? After long and fierce debate with
himself, he came to a conclusion which at all events
brought peace along with it. “Come what may,’ he
said, “I will keep my mother with me, let people say
or think what they will—even if it costs me Violet
herself, as most likely it will. I can’t turn my
mother out in her old age, so there’s an end of it.”
And there and then he went to sleep.

It must have been soon after this that he woke
with a start, with a sound in his ears like the shut-
ting of the street-door. It was still quite dark,
night to Londoners, morning to country people,
who were already going to their work and labor;
and Dr. Carter turned himself over and went to
sleep again, saying, “It was my fancy or a dream,”
while his old mother stood shivering in the cold
November morning outside his door, murmur-.
ing,—

“T’ll never be a shame to my boy, my Laddie;
God bless him!”

CHAPTER IV.

Wuen Dr. Carter opened his door next morning,
he found his mother’s room empty, and it seemed
almost as if the events of the night before had been
a bad dream; only the basket of apples, and the
54 LADDIE.

bandbox, still tied up in the spotted handkerchief,
confirmed his recollections; and when he went
down, the pattens, still on his writing-table, added
their testimony. But where was his mother? All
the servants could tell him was that they had found
her bedroom door open when they came down in
the morning, and the front door unbarred and un-
bolted, and that was all.

“She has gone back to Sunnybrook,” he said to
himself, with a very sore heart. “She saw what a
miserable, base-hearted cur of a son she had, who
grudged a welcome and a shelter to her who would
have given her right hand to keep my little finger
from aching. God forgive me for wounding the
brave old heart! I will go and bring her back. She
will be ready to forgive me nearly before I speak.”

He looked at the train paper, and found there
was an early, slow train by which his mother must
have gone, and an express that would start in about
an hour, and reach Martel only a quarter of an
hour after the slower one. This just gave him time
to make arrangements for his engagements, and
write a line to Violet, saying he was unexpectedly
called away from London, but that he would come
to her immediately on his return, for he had much
to telland explain. The cab was at the door to take
him to the station, and everything was ready, and
he was giving his last directions to Mr. Hyder.

“T shall be back to-morrow, Hyder, without fail,
LADDIE. 55

and I shall bring my mother with me.” He brought
out the word even now with an effort, and hated
himself for the flush that came up into his face; but
he went on firmly, “That was my mother who was
here last night, and no man ever had a better.”

I don’t know how it happened, but everything
seemed topsy-turvey that morning; for all at once
Dr. Carter found himself shaking hands with Hy-
der before he knew what he was about; and the
deferential, polite Hyder, whose respect had always
been slightly tinged with contempt, was saying,
with tears in his eyes, “Indeed, sir, I see that all
along; and I don’t think none the worse of you,
but a deal the better, for saying it out like a man;
and me and cook and the gals will do our best to
make the old lady comfortable, that we will!”

Dr. Carter felt a strange, dream-like feeling as
he got into the cab. Every one and everything.
seemed changed, and he could not make it out;
even Hyder seemed something more than an ex-
cellent servant. It was quite a relief to his mind,
on his return next day, to find Hyder the same im-
perturbable person as before, and the little episode
of hand-shaking and expressed sympathy not be-
come a confirmed habit. It was a trifling relief
even in the midst of his anxiety and disappoint-
ment; for he did not find his mother at Sunny-
brook, nor did she arrive by either of the trains
that followed the one he came by, though he waited
56 LADDIE.

the arrival of several at Martel. So he came back
to London, feeling that he had gone on the wrong
tack, but comforting himself with the thought
that he would soon be able to trace her out wher-
ever she had gone. But it was not so easy as he
expected; the most artful and experienced criminal,
escaping from justice, could not have gone to work
more skilfully than the old woman did quite un-
consciously. All his inquires were fruitless; she
had not been seen or noticed at Paddington, none
of the houses or shops about had been open or
astir at that early morning hour. Once he thought
he had a clew, but it came to nothing; and, tired
and dispirited, he was obliged, very unwillingly, to
put the matter into the hands of the police, who
undertook with great confidence to find the old
woman before another day was past.

It was with a very haggard, anxious face that he
came into the pretty drawing-room in Harley
Street, where Violet sprang up from her low chair
by the fire to meet him. How pretty she was! how
sweet! how elegant and graceful every movement
and look, every detail of her dress! His eyes took
in every beauty lovingly, as one who looks his last
on something dearer than life, and then lost all
consciousness of any other beauty, in the surpass-
ing beauty of the love for him in her eyes. She
stretched out both her soft hands to him, with the
ring he had given her the only ornament on them,
and said, “Tell me about it.”
LADDIE, 57

Do not you know some voices that have a caress
in every word and a comfort in every tone? Violet
Meredith’s was such a voice.

“T have come for that,’ he said; and he would
not trust himself to take those hands in his, or to
look any longer into her face; but he went to the
fire and looked into the red caves among the glow-
ing coals. ‘I have come to tell you about my
mother. I have deceived you shamefully.’’

And then he told her of his mother, describing
her as plainly and carefully as he could, trying to
set aside everything fanciful and picturesque, and
yet do justice to the kind, simple, old heart, trying
to make Violet see the great difference between
the cld countrywoman and herself. And then he
told of her having come to him, to end her days
under her son’s roof. “I could not ask you to live
with her,” he ended sadly.

She had clasped her hands round his arm shyly, |
for it was only a few days since she had had to hide
away her love, like a stolen treasure, out of sight.

“Tt is too late to think of that,” she said, with a
little coaxing laugh; “too late, for you asked me to
be your wife a week ago. Yes, John,”—the name
came still with a little hesitation,—“‘a whole week
ago, and I will not let you off. And then I have
no mother of my own; she died before I can re-
member; and it will be so nice to have one, for she
will like me for your sake, won’t she? And what
58 LADDIE.

does it matter what she is like, you silly old John?
—she is your mother, and that is quite enough for
me. And don’t you think I love you more ridicu-
lously than ever because you are so good and
noble and true to your old mother, and not
ashamed of her because she is not just exactly like
other people?” and she laid her soft cheek against
his sleeve, by her clasped hands, as she spoke.

But he drew away with almost a shudder. “Love
me less, then, Violet; hate me, for I was ashamed
of her; I was base and cowardly and untrue, and I
‘wanted to get her out of the way so that no one
should know, not even you, and I hurt and wounded
her,—her who would have done anything for her
‘Laddie,’ as she calls me,—and she went away dis-
appointed and sad and sorry, and I cannot find
her.”

He had sunk down into Violet’s low chair and
covered up his face with his hands, and through the
fingers forced their way the hot, burning tears,while
he told of his ineffectual efforts to find vee and his
shame and regret.

She stood listening, too pitiful and sorry for
words, longing to comfort him; and at last she
knelt down and pulled his hands gently away from
his face, and whispered very softly, as if he might
not like to hear her use his mother’s name, “We
will find her, never fear; your mother and mine,
Laddie.” And so she comforted him.
LADDIE. 59

What an awful place London is. I do not mean
awful in the sense in which the word is used by
fashionable young ladies, or schoolboys, by whom
it is applied indiscriminately to a “lark” or a
“bore,” into which two classes most events in life
may, according to them, be divided, and considered
equally descriptive of sudden death or a new bon-
net. I use it in its real meaning, full of awe, inspir-
ing fear and reverence, as Jacob said, “How dread-
ful is this place,”—this great London, with its mil-
lions cf souls, with its strange contrasts of riches
and poverty, business and pleasure, learning and
ignorance, and the sin everywhere. Awful indeed!
and the thought would be overwhelming in its aw-
fulness if we could not say also as Jacob did, “Sure-
ly the Lord is in this place, and I knew it not;” if
we did not know that there is the ladder set up,
reaching to heaven, and the angels of God ever as-
cending and decending; if we did not believe that
the Lord stands above it. It seemed a very terrible
place to the old countrywoman as she wandered
about its streets and squares, its parks and alleys,
that November day, too dazed and stupefied to form
any plan for herself, only longing to get out of sight,
that she might not shame‘her boy. She felt no bit-
terness against him; for it was not natural when he
was a gentleman, and she a poor homely old body?

In the early morning, when the streets were empty
except for policemen or late revellers hurrying
60 _ LADDIE.

home, or market carts coming in from the country,
with frosty moisture on the heaps of cabbages, she
got on pretty well. She had a cup of coffee at an
early coffee stall, and no one took any notice of her;
some of those that passed were country people too;
and at that early hour people are used to see odd,
out-of-the-way figures, that would be stared at in
the height of noon. But as the day went on the
streets filled with hurrying people, and the shops
opened, and omnibuses and cabs began to run, and
she got into more bustling, noisy thoroughfares,
‘and was hustled and pushed about and looked at,
the terrors of the situation came heavily upon her.
She tried to encourage herself with the thought
that before long she should get out of London and
reach the country, little knowing, poor old soul,
how many miles of streets and houses and
pavements lay between her and the nearest pre-
tence to real country. And then, too, in that maze
of streets where one seemed exactly like another,
her course was of a most devious character, often
describing a circle and bringing her back through
the same streets without the old woman knowing
that she was retracing her steps; sometimes a diffi-
cult crossing, with an apparently endless succession
of omnibuses and carts, turned her from her way;
sometimes a quieter looking street, with the trees
of a square showing at the end, enticed her aside.
Once she actually went up North Crediton street,
LADDIE. 61

unconsciously and unnoticed. She reached one of
the parks at last, and sat down very thankfully on
a seat, though it was clammy and damp, and the
fog was lurking under the gaunt black trees, and
hanging over the thin, coarse grass, which was be-
ing nibbled by dirty, desolate sheep, who looked
to the old woman’s eves like some new kind of Lon-
don animal, not to be recognized as belonging to the
same species as the soft, fleecy white flocks on the
hillsides and meadows of Sunnybrook. She sat
here a long time, resting, dozing, and trying to
think. “I don’t want to trouble no one, or shame
no one, I only want just to get out of the way.”
She was faint and tired, and she thought perhaps
she might be going to die. “It’s a bit unked to die
all alone, and I’d liefer have died in my bed comfort-
able-like; but there! it don’t much matter, it’ll soon
be all over and an end to it all.” But, no, that .
would not do either; and the old woman roused
herself and shook off the faintness. ‘Whatever
would folks say if Laddie’s mother was found dead
like any tramp in the road? He’d die of shame,
pretty near, to hear it in every one’s mouth.” Poor
old soul! she little knew how people can starve,
and break their hearts, and die for want of food or
love in London, and no one be the wiser or the sad-
der. It was just then she found out that her pocket
had been picked, or rather that her purse was gone;
for she did not wonder where or how it went, and,
62 LADDIE,

indeed, she did not feel the loss very acutely,
though, at home in the old days, she had turned
the house upside down and hunted high and low ~
and spared no pains to find a missing halfpenny.

It did not contain all her money, for with good,

old-fashioned caution, she had some notes sewed

up in her stays; but still it was a serious loss, and

one she would have made a great moan over in old

times. She did not know that the sight of her

worn old netted purse, with the rusty steel rings,

had touched a soft spot in a heart that for years

had seemed too dry and hard for any feeling. It

had lain in the hand of an expert London pick-

pocket; it was mere child’s play taking it; it did not

require any skill. There was a bit of lavender

stuck into the rings, and he smelt and looked at it,

and then the old woman turned and looked at him

with her country eyes; and then all at once, almost

in spite of himself, he held out the purse to her.

“Don’t you see as you’ve dropped your purse?” he

said in a surly, angry tone, and finished with an

oath that made the old woman tremble and turn’
pale; and he flung away, setting his teeth, and call-

ing himself a fool. That man was not all bad—who

is?—and his poor act of restitution is surely put to

his credit in the ledger of life, and will stand there

when the books shall be opened. The old woman

got little good from it, however, for the purse was

soon taken by a less scrupulous thief.
LADDIE. 63

How cold it was! The old woman shivered and
drew her damp shawl round her, and longed, oh,
how bitterly, for the old fireside, and the settle,

‘worn and polished by generations of shoulders; for
‘the arm-chair with its patchwork cushions; longed,
ah, how wearily, for the grave by the churchyard
wall, where the master rests free of all his troubles,
and where “there’s plenty of room for I;” and long-
ed, too, quite as simply and pathetically, for a cup of
tea out of the cracked brown teapot. But why
should I dwell on the feelings of a foolish, insignifi-
cant old woman? There are hundreds and thou-
sands about us whose lives are more interesting,
whose thoughts are more worth recording. ‘Are
not two sparrows sold for a farthing?’ and yet,
“doth not God take thought for sparrows?’ Then
surely, so may we. Does He indeed despise not
the desires of such as be sorrowful,—even though
the sorrowful one be only an old country woman,
and her desire a cup of tea? Then why should we
call that common and uninteresting which He piti-
fully beholds? And we shall find no life that is not
full of interest, tender feeling, noble poetry, deep
tragedy, just as there is nobody without the elab-
orate system of nerves and muscles and veins with
which we are fearfully and wonderfully made.

The early November dusk was coming on before
she set out on her pilgrimage again, the darkness
coming all the earlier for the fog and the London
64 LADDIE.

smoke and then, hardly caring which way she went,
she turned her face eastward, not knowing that she
was making for the very heart of London. The
streets were even more crowded and confusing than
they had been in the morning; and the gas and the
lighted shops, and the noise, and her own weariness
combined to increase her bewilderment.

Once, as she passed round the corner of a quieter
street, some one ran up against her, and nearly
threw her down,—a lady, the old woman would
- have described her, smartly, even handsomely,
dressed, with a bright color on her cheeks,and glow-
ing, restless, unhappy eyes, and dry, feverish lips.
She spoke a hasty word of apology, and then, all at
once, gave a sharp, sudden cry, and put her hands
on the old woman’s shoulders and looked eagerly
into her face. Then she pushed her away with a
painful little laugh. “I thought you were my
mother,” she said.

“No; I never had no gals.”

“You're in luck, then,” the girl said; “thank
Heaven for it.”

“Was your mother, maybe, from the country?”

“Yes; she lived in Somersetshire. But I don’t
even know that she’s alive, and I think she must be
dead. I hope she is—I hope it!”

There was something in the girl’s voice that told
of more bitter despair than words, and the old wo-
man put out her hand and laid it on the girl’s vel-
vet sleeve.
LADDIE. 65

“My dear,” she said, “maybe I could help you.”

“Help!” was the answer. “I’m past that. There,
good night! Don’t trouble your kind head about
me.”

And then the old woman went on again, getting
into narrow, darker streets, with fewer shops, and
people of a rougher, poorer class. But it would
overtax your patience and my powers to describe
the old woman’s wanderings in the maze of Lon-
don. Enough to say, that when, an hour or two
later, footsore and ready to drop, she stumbled
along a little street near Soho Square, a woman,
with a baby in her arms, uttered a loud cry of
pleased recognition, and darted out to stop her.

“Why, it ain’t never you! Whoever would have
thought of seeing you so soon; and however did
you find me out? This is the house. Why, there,
there! Dontee cry, sure! dontee, now! You're
tired out. Come in and have a cup of tea. I’ve
got the kettle boiling all ready, for my Harry’ll be
in soon.”

It was the young woman she travelled with the
day before,—only the day before, though it seemed
months to look back to; only her face was bright
and happy now, in spite of the fog and dirt about
her; for had not her Harry a home and welcome
for her, in spite of all her fears and people’s evil
prophecies; and was not this enough to make sun:
shine through the rainiest day?
66 LADDIE,

Very improbable, you will say, perhaps, that
these two waifs, these floating straws, should have
drifted together on the great ocean of London life.
Yes, very improbable, well-nigh impossible, I
agree, if it is mere chance that guides our way; but
stranger, more improbable things happen every
day; and, if we mean anything by Providence, it is
no longer difficult to understand, for we can see
the Hand leading, guiding, arranging, weaving the
tangled, confused threads of human life into the
grand, clear, noble pattern of divine purpose.

CHAPTER V.

EIGHTEEN months have passed away since my
story began; and it is no longer dull, foggy, No-
vember, but May, beautiful even in London, where
the squares and parks are green and fresh, and the
lilacs and laburnums in bloom, and the girls sell
lilies-of-the-valley and wall flowers in the streets,
and trucks with double stocks and narcissus “all
a-growing and a-blowing” pass along, leaving a
sweet, reviving scent behind them. The sky is
blue, with great soft masses of cotton-wool cloud;
and the air is balmy and pure in spite of smoke and
dirt; and sweet spring is making his power felt,
even in the very midst of London. It is blossom-

LADDIE. 69

ing time in the heart as well as in the Kentish ap-
ple orchards; and the heart cannot help feeling gay
and singing its happy little song even though its
cares, like the poor larks in the Seven Dial’s bird
shops, ruffling their soft breasts and knocking their
poor brown heads against their cages in their ec-
stacy of song.

Dr. Carter had good cause for happiness that
day, though, indeed, he was moving among sick-
ness and suffering in a great London hospital. He
had some lilies in his coat that Violet fastened
there with her own hands; and as she did so he had
whispered, “Only another week, Violet;” for their
wedding day was fixed in the next week. And was
not that a thought that suited well with the lovely
May weather, to make him carry a glad heart under
the lilies? The wedding had been long delayed
from one cause and another, but principally be-
cause the search for the old mother had been alto-
gether fruitless, in spite of the confidence of the po-
lice.

“We will find her first,’ Violet would say; “we
must find her, Laddie.” She adopted the old name
quite naturally. “And then we will talk of the
wedding.”

But the time rolled on, days, weeks, and months,
till at last it was more than a year ago that she had
gone; and though they never gave up the hope of
finding her, or their efforts to do so, still it no lon-
70 LADDIE.

ger seemed to stand between them and give a rea-
son for putting off the marriage, but rather to draw
them nearer together, and give a reason for marry-
ing at once. But on Dr. Carter’s writing table al-
ways stood the pair of pattens, much to the sur-
prise of patients; but he would not have them
moved, and in his heart lay the pain of regret, side
by side with his love and happiness.

The doctors were making their rounds in the
hospital, with a crowd of students about them.
‘There was a very interesting case in the accident
ward, over which much time was spent, and much
attention paid. I am not doctor enough to de-
scribe what the nature of the case was; and if I
were, I daresay you would not care to hear; but it
was a very interesting case to the doctors and
nurses; and that means that life and death were
fighting over that bed, and science bringing every
re-enforcement in its power in aid of the poor bat-
tered fortress that the grim king was attacking so
severely. An easy victory on either one side or
the other is very uninteresting to lookers-on,
though of deepest moment to the patient. And so
the doctors passed on with hardly a word by the
two next beds, in one of which life was the con-
queror, hanging out his flags of triumph in a tinge
of color on the cheeks, brightness in the eyes, and
vigor in the limbs; in the other, death was as plainly
to be seen in the still form and white, drawn face.
LADDIE. a1

After the doctors and students had passed by,
and finished their round, Dr. Carter came back
alone to No. 20. He had taken deep interest in the
case, and had something to say further about it to
the nurse. He was a great favorite with the nurses,
from his courteous, gentle manners; so they were
not disposed to regard his second visit as a trouble-
some, fidgety intrusion, as they might have done
with some. He had not been quite pleased with
the way in which a dresser had placed a bandage,
and he altered it himself with those strong, tender
fingers of his, and was just going off better satis-
fied, when he found the flowers had dropped from
his coat. If they had not been Violet’s gift it would
not have mattered; but he did not like to lose what
she had given, and he looked for them. They had
fallen, by some quick movement of his, on the next
bed, where death was having an easy victory.

The old woman’s arms were stretched outside
the bed clothes, and one of her hands, hardworked
hands, with the veins standing up on the backs
like cord, had closed, perhaps involuntarily, on the
flowers, the lilies and the dainty green leaf.

“Here they are, sir,” said the nurse; “they must
have dropped as you turned round.” And she tried
to draw them from the woman’s hand, but it only
closed the tighter. “She doesn’t know a bit what
she’s about. Leave go of the flowers, there’s a good
woman,” she said close te her ear; “the gentleman
wants them.”
72 LADDIE,

But the hand still held them.

“Well, never mind!’’ Dr. Carter said, with just a
shade of vexation; ‘‘let her keep them. It does not
matter, and you will only break them if you try to
get them away.”’

‘‘She’s not been conscious since they brought her
in,’’ the nurse said; ‘‘it’s a street accident; knocked
down by an omnibus. Wedon’t know her name,
or nothing, and no one’s been to ask about her.”’

The doctor still stopped, looking at the lilies in
the old hand.

“She is badly hurt,” he said.

The nurse explained what the house surgeon had
said: “Another day will see an end of it. I thought
she would have died this morning when I first came
on; she was restless then, and talked a little. I
fancy she’s Scotch, for I heard her say, ‘Laddie’
several times.”

The word seemed to catch the otherwise uncon-
scious ear, for the old woman turned her head on
the pillow, and said feebly, “Laddie.”

And then, all at once, the doctor gave a cry that
startled all the patients in the ward, and made many
a one lift up her head to see the cause of such a cry.

“Mother!” he cried, “mother, is it you?”

Dr. Carter was kneeling by the bed, looking ea-
gerly, wildly, at the wan white face. Was he mad?
The nurse thought he must be, and this sudden
frenzy: And then he called again —
LADDIE. 73

“Mother, mother, speak to me!”

A childless mother near said afterwards she
thought such a cry would have called her back from
the dead, and it almost seemed to do so in this case,
for the closed lids trembled and raised themselves
a very little, and the drawn mouth moved into the
ghost of a smile, and she said,—

“Eh, Laddie, here I be.”

And then the nurse came nearer to reason with
the madman.

“There is some mistake,
a poor old woman.”

And then he got up and looked at her, she said
afterwards, “like my lord duke, as proud as any-
thing.”

“Ves,” he said, ‘and she is my mother. I will
make arrangements at once for her removal to my
house if she can bear it.”

Ah! that was the question, and it wanted little
examination or experience to tell that the old wo-
man was past moving. The nurse, bewildered and
still incredulous, persuaded him not to attempt it;
and, instead, her bed was moved into a small ward
off the large one, where she could be left alone.

Love is stronger than death; many waters cannot
drown it. Yes, but it cannot turn back those cold
waters of death, when the soul has once entered
them; and so Dr. Carter found that with all his love
and with all his skill, he could only smooth, and

”

she said; “this is quite
74 LADDIE.

that but a very little, the steep, stony road down
into Jordan.

He got a nurse to attend specially upon her, but
he would not leave her; and the nurse said it was
not much good her being there, for he smoothed her
pillows, and raised her head, and damped her lips,
and fanned her with untiring patience and tender-
ness. Once when he had his arm under her head,
raising it, she opened her eyes wide and looked at
him.

“Ah, Laddie,” she said, “I’m a bit tired with my
journey. It’s a longish way from Sunnybrook.”

“Did you come from there?”

“Yes, sure; I’ve never been such a long way be-
fore and I’m tired out.”

“Why didn’t you write?” he asked presently,
when she opened her eyes again.

“T wanted to give you a surprise,” she said; “and
I knew as you'd be glad to see me at any time as
I liked to come.”

And then it dawned on him that the past eigh-
teen months had been blotted clean out of her mem-
ory, and that she thought she had just arrived. Then
she dozed and then again spoke, “And so this is
your house, Laddie? And mighty fine it be!” look-
ing round on the bare hospital room; “and I’m that
comfortable if I wasn’t so tired, but I'll be getting
up when I’m rested a bit. But it do me good to
see you when I opens my eyes. I’ve been thinking
LADDIE, 75
elt the way how pleased you’d be.” All this she
said a word or two at a time, and very low and
weakly, so that only a son’s ear could have heard.

As the evening came on she fell asleep very
quietly, such a sleep as, if hope had been possible,
might have given hope. Dr. Carter left the nurse
watching her and went away, got a hansom and of-
fered the man double fare to take him to Harley
Street as fast as possible. Violet had just come
in from a flower show, and looker a flower herself,
with her sweet face and dainty dress.

“T have found her,’ Laddie said. “Come.” And
she came without asking a question, only knowing
from Laddie’s face that there was sorrow as well as
joy in the finding.

“She is dying,” he said, as they went up the hos-
pital stairs together. “Can you bear it?”

She only answered by a pressure of her hand on
his arm, and they went on to the quiet room. There
was a shaded light burning, and the nurse sitting
by the bedside.

“She has not stirred, sir, since you left.”

But even as she spoke, the old woman moved and
opened her eyes, looking first at Laddie and then
on Violet.

“Who is it?” she asked.

And then Violet knelt down with her sweet face
close to the old woman’s, and said very softly,
“Mother, I am Laddie’s sweetheart.”
76 LADDIE.

“Laddie’s sweetheart;” she echoed; “he’s over-
young to be wed—but there! I forgot. He’s been
a good son, my dear, always good to his old
mother, and he’ll be a good husband. And you'll
make him a good wife, my dear, won’t you? God
bless you.”

And then her trembling hand was feeling for
something, and Laddie guessed her wish, and put
his own hand and Violet’s into it; two young hands,
full of life and health and pulsation, under the old,
-worn, hard worked hand, growing cold and weak
with death.

“God bless you, dears, Laddie and his sweet-
heart. But I’m a bit tired just now.”

And then she dozed again, and the two sat by in
the dim, quiet room, drawn closer together and
dearer to each other than they ever had been before,
in the presence of the Great Angel of Death who was
so near the old mother now. And very tenderly he
did his work that night! Only a sigh and then a
sudden hush, during which the listeners’ pulses
throbbed in their ears, as they listened for the next
long-drawr, painful, difficult breath that did not
come; and then the weary limbs relaxed into the
utter repose and stillness of rest after labor, for the
night had come when no man can work,—the holy
starlit night of death, with the silver streaks of the
great dawn of the Resurrection shining in the east.

For a moment they sat spell-bound; and then it
LADDIE, 1

was Laddie, he had so often seen death face to face,
who gave way, throwing himself on the bed with
an exceeding bitter cry, “O mother, mother, say
you forgive me!”

What need for words? Did he not know that she
forgave him? If indeed she knew she had anything
to forgive. But she was “a bit tired.”

Don’t you know when bedtime comes, and the
nurse calls the children, how sometimes they leave
their toys, which a few minutes before seemed all
in all to them, without a look, and the cake unfin-
ished, and are carried off with their heads bent
down, and their eyes heavy with sleep, too tired
even to say good night, or speak a pretty, lisping
word of the play-time past, or the pleasures coming
in the morning? And so it is often with us bigger
children; when the nurse Death calls us at our bed-
time, we are “a bit tired,” and glad to go, too.
sleepy even for thought or farewell.

They laid her by the old master in Sunnybrook
churchyard; and the village folks talked long after-
wards of the funeral, and how Dr. Carter, “he as
used to be called Laddie,” followed her to the
grave, “along with the pretty young lady as he was
going to marry; and, bless my heart! wouldn’t the
poor old soul have felt proud if she could have seen
*em? But she’s better where she is, where there
ain’t no buryin’ and no pride neither.”

MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION,
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

CHAPTER I.

Miss Toosry always wore a black silk dress on
Sunday, and went three times to church. Morning,
afternoon, and evening, as soon as the bell changed
at the quarter, that black silk dress came out cf
Miss Toosey’s little house in North Street, turned
the corner into High Street, crossed the Market-
place, passed under the archway into the church-
yard, in at the west door, and up the middle aisle,
past the free seats, which occupy the lower end of
Martel church, and stopped at the second pew on
the left-hand side, one sitting in which has been
rented by Miss Toosey for many years. This pew
is immediately in front of the church-wardens’.
seat, where those two dignitaries sit majestically,
with a long rod placed conveniently on either hana,
ready to be seized at a moment’s notice, to execute
judgment on youthful offenders in the free seats,
though the well-known fact that generations of
paint and varnish have made them-fixtures some-
what takes off from the respect and awe felt for
them. Miss Toosey is short, and the pew-door has

(81)
82 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

a tendency to stick; and when you have a Bible,
prayer-book, hymn-book, spectacle-case, and um-
brella in your hands, you cannot enter into a strug-
gle on equal terms; and so when Mr. Church-
warden Wyatt happens to be in church in time, he
leans over and opens the pew-door for Miss Too-
sey, “and very kind of him, too, a most gentlemanly
man Mr. Wyatt is, my dear.”

The black silk was quite a part of Sunday in
Miss Toosey’s mind, and therefore holy, to a cer-
tain extent. She would have considered it disre-
‘spectful to the day to put on any other dress, and
no stress of weather could prevent her wearing it;
indeed, she thought it decidedly a want of trust in
Providence to fear the heavy rain or deep snow
might injure it.

She would pin up the skirt inside out round her
waist with a reckless disregard of appearance, so
that you could hardly guess she had any dress on
at all under her shawl; but nothing would have in-
duced her to put on another. Of late years, too,
she had not felt it quite right to wear it on week-
days when she was asked out to tea; it seemed to
her inappropriate, like reading a regular Sunday
book on week-days, which has something profane
about it. It had been through many vicissitudes;
not even Miss Toosey herself could accurately re-
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 83

call what it was in its original form; and the first
distinct incident in its existence was the black crape
with which it was trimmed, in respect to the mem-
ory of Miss Toosey’s father—old Toosey, the
parish doctor. This was fifteen years ago; and
since then it had been unpicked and re-made sev-
eral times, turned, sponged, dipped, French-
chalked, cleaned, trimmed, and altered, till it would
have required vast ingenuity to do anything fresh
to it.

As the black silk was part of Sunday to Miss
Toosey, so was Miss Toosey part of Sunday to
many of the Martel people. The Miss Purts, the
draper’s daughters, in the Market-place, knew that
it was time to put on their smart bonnets (the latest
Paris fashion), when they saw Miss Toosey pass
the window, so as to insure their clattering into
church on their high heels, tossing and giggling,
not later than the Venite.

Old Budd, the clerk, with his white beard and
wooden leg, always said “Good morning, Miss
Toosey; fine day, mum,” as he stumped past her
pew-door on his way to the vestry, which made
her feel rather uncomfortable as he said it out loud,
and it did not seem quite right; but then Mr. Budd
is such a good man, and being a church official, no
* doubt he has a right to behave just as he pleases.
84 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

Even Mr. Dodson, the late curate, after baptizing
fifteen pugnacious babies, all crying lustily, said,
as he passed Miss Toosey on his way back to the
reading-desk, wiping the beads of perspiration
from his good-natured red face, “Warm work, Miss
Toosey.”

I think that both Mr. Peters the rector, and Mr.
Glover the curate, would quite have lost their place
in the service if Miss Toosey’s seat had been empty,
as they neither of them could have preached with
comfort without the fat, red-velvet cushion with the
tassels, on which they laid their books.

I do not think it ever occurred to Miss Toosey
that there was anything amiss in Martel church
or its services. She was proud of the fine, old gray
stone tower, which had been built when men gave
willingly of their best for the service of God, and
so built “for glory and for beauty;” and she loved
the roof of the nave, which was rich in oak carving,
bleached white by time, with angels and emblems
of wonderful variety and ingenuity. And all the
rest of the church she took for granted, and did
not wonder at the narrow, uncomfortable pews,
where, as Mr. Malone, the Irish curate, said, “it
was quite impossible to kneel down, and very diffi-
cult to get up again;” or at the free seats, put be-
hind all the others; or at the large, steep galleries;
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 85

or at the high pulpit rich in red velvet and dusty
fringe on one side, and the reading-desk to match
on the other, with the clerk’s desk underneath
where Mr. Budd did his part of the service, i. e.,
the responses, as a clerk should do, in a strident,
penetrating voice, and took a well-earned nap in
the sermon when his duties were discharged. It
did not strike her as curious that the seats in the
chancel should be occupied by the Peters family on
one side and by the Rossiters on the other, while
the ladies and gentlemen of the choir displayed
their smart bonnets or Sunday waistcoats to great
advantage in front of the organ, where, in return
for their vocal exertions they were privileged to
behave as badly as their fancies led them. You
see, Miss Toosey was not critical, and she had not
been to any other church for many years, and cus-
tom draws a soft curtain over imperfections, and
reverence is not quick to see irreverence in others,
and prayer fills the air with clouds of incense
through which we cannot easily see bonnets, but
only Heaven itself; and as Miss Toosey knelt,
being very short, you remember, and the pews
high she could only with her outward eyes see the.
angels in the roof and her prayer-book. And it
was just the same with the sermons: as church was
church to Miss Toosey, so a sermon was a sermon.
86 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

Whether it was Mr. Peters, Mr. Glover, or Mr,
Malone, Miss Toosey lookd out the text in her
little brown Bible, and put the bookmarker, with
“Love the Jews,” into the place, and gave her head
a little nod, as if to show that the text was there,
and no mistake about it; and then took off her
spectacles, wiped them, put them into a case, gave
her black silk skirt a slight shake to prevent
creases, and then settled down to listen. I will not
undertake to say that Miss Toosey entered into all
the subtleties of doctrine set forth over the red
velvet pulpit-cushion; I will not even deny that
sometimes the lavender ribbons on Miss Toosey’s
bonnet nodded, without much connection with the
arguments of the discourse, and that the words
“election and grace” grew faint and dreamy in her
ears, and Mr. Peter’s gray hair or Mr. Glover's
whiskers disappeared from her sight. I am dis-
posed to think that she did not lose very much; but
Miss Toosey took it much to heart, so much so that
she could hardly believe herself capable of it, and
even contended that she was listening all the time,
though she closed her eyes to pay greater atten-
tion. But sometimes the sermons kept Miss Too-
sey awake effectually, and made her feel very un-
comfortable for some days afterwards; and this was
when they were on the subject of conversion. Mr.
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 87

Malone was especially strong on this point; and,
after one of his powerful discourses, Miss Toosey
would have a wakeful night, going through the
course of her peaceful, uneventful life, trying to find
that moment of awakening which other Christians
seemed to find so easily, wondering if she might
date her conversion from a day when she was a
little child, crying and being comforted at her
mother’s knee; or in the quiet, sober joy of her
Confirmation; or when she followed her mother up
the aisle, one Easter Day, in trembling awe to her
first Communion; or in the days of her simple, girl-
ish romance long ago, when her heart was over-
flowing with pure happiness; or to the days follow-
ing so quickly when it came to an untimely end,
and she sobbed herself to sleep, night after night,
with her cheek (it was round and smooth then)
pressed to that same little brown Bible, with some:
faded flowers between the leaves; or could it have
been when her father died and she stood alone by
his grave? None of these events seemed quite to
answer to Mr. Malone’s descriptions, and some-
times Miss Toosey was driven to fear that she must
rank herself with the unconverted, to whom a few
scathing words were addressed at the conclusion
of the sermon.

On one occasion there was a revival at Martel,
88 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

and meetings were held at the schoolroom, one of
which Miss Toosey attended. There was much
heat and hymn-singing and excitement; and Miss
Toosey was agitated and hysterical and impressed;
but when the presiding clergyman, in an impas-
siened manner, invited all those who were con-
scious of conversion to remain and the rest to leave,
Miss Toosey, without a moment’s hesitation, went
out and found her way home, sobbing and broken-
hearted.

Then, too, the doctrine of assurance troubled her
sorely, feeling (as she did) sure only of her own
weakness and God’s great mercy. And so she
grew very nervous and uncomfortable when people
began to talk of their religious experiences, which
seemed so much more satisfactory than her own.

You must not, however, suppose that Miss Too-
sey was at all High Church; on the contrary, she
had a horror of Puseyites and of the opinions which
she fondly imagined them to hold; such, for exam-
ple, as works being the only means of salvation,
without the faintest mixture of faith, which, as Miss
Toosey said, is so directly opposite to the teaching
of the Bible. She also spoke of the danger of the
“multiplication of ordinances,” a well-sounding sen-
tence which Mr. Glover was rather fond of; and
Miss Toosey always gave a little triumphant sniff
UISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 89

after saying it, for it is not every one who can make
use of abtruse, theological expressions of many
syllables. It is true that she went to church her-
self whenever there was an opportunity, and would
have done so if Mr. Peters had largely increased
the services, but that, of course, was different. She
also regarded with suspicion the efforts of some of
the young ladies of tl > parish, who had “high” ten-
dencies, to introduce crosses surreptitiously into
the decorations at Christmas, cunningly disguised
with evergreens, and of odd and ornamental shapes.
She was firmly persuaded that the emblem of our
faith had something Romish about it, and that it
was safer to keep to circles and anchors and trian-
gles; indeed, she distrusted the decoration excite-
ment among the young ladies altogether, and
looked back with regret to the days when the pew-
opener used to put sprigs of holly in the windows, .
and fasten bushes of the same to the lamps in the
chancel.

CHAPTER II.

Now I must tell you about Miss Toosey’s Mis-
sion, and I think it will surprise you to hear that
her Mission was the conversion of the heathen,—
90 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

not the heathen at Martel, though there were
enough and to spare, even in that favored spot; not
the heathen in London, or our great towns even;
but the heathen in foreign parts, real bona fide black
heathen, with war-paint and feathers, and strings
of beads, and all the rest of it. Her Mission began
in this manner: A missionary Bishop came to
preach at Martel. I donot! aow quite how it hap-
pened, as he certainly did n.t pronounce ‘“‘Shibbo-
leth” with the same distinct and unctuous intona-
-. tion which was deemed essential at Martel; but I
have been told that he met Mr. Peters out at din-
ner, and that the rector, always good-natured, of-
fered his pulpit, red-velvet cushion and all, for the
Bishop’s use on the following Sunday evening.
The Bishop gladly accepted the offer. He was
not quick to see microscopic differences of opinion;
the cut of a coat, a posture, or the use of a cant
word, did not seem to him of such vital importance
as he found attached to them among Churchmen at
home; and he was fairly puzzled at the hot blood
and animosity that.arose from them, bidding fair
even at times to rend the woven garment without
seam. He had been used to a clearer, simpler atmo-
sphere, a larger horizon, a wider span of heaven
overhead, than we can get in our streets and lanes,
making it easier, perhaps, to look up steadfastly, as
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 91

those should whose lives are ever teaching them
how far, how terribly ‘‘far, the heaven is from
the earth,’’ where the earth lies in darkness and
idolatry. To one who was used to the difference be-
tween Christian and heathen, the difference be-
tween Churchman and Churchman seemed unutter-
ably small; so that he was fain to say with Abra-
ham, ‘‘Let there be no strife between us, I pray, for
we are brethren.”’

He had come home with his heart burning within
him with the urgency of the work he left behind,
confident that he could not fail to find help and
sympathy in happy, rich Christian England. In
his waking thoughts, as well as in his dreams, there
always stood by him a man of Macedonia, the
Macedonia of his far-off labors, saying, ‘‘Come over
and help us;’’ and he found that the love of many
had waxed cold, and that indifference and scarcely -
concealed weariness received him wherever he
went.

So he was glad to accept Mr. Peters’s invitation,
and thought Mr. Malone looked rather sourly at
him in the vestry, and even the rector was not quite
so cordial to him as he had been at the dinner-
party, still he scaled the heights of the pulpit with
alacrity, to the enlivening strain of ‘‘From Green-
land’s Icy Mountains,’’ which not even the ‘‘Mitre
92 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

Hymn-book” and the Martel choir can rob of its
charms.

The text which Miss Toosey found out in her lit-
tle brown Bible was from St. John, the 6th chapter
and oth verse: “There is a lad here with five barley
loaves and two small fishes; but what are they
among so many?” The Bishop began by describ-
ing the scene where the miracle occurred,—the bar-
ren hillside; the blue sea of Galilee; the towns in
the distance, with their white, flat-roofed houses,
nestling in the green valley like ‘‘a handful of pearls
in a goblet of emerald;” the sun setting behind the
purple Galilean hills, and the soft evening light
touching the mountain-tops with gold, and casting
long shadows on the quiet sea, where the fishing-
boats were going forth to their nightly work. And
then he told of the weary, foot-sore crowd, gathered
on the slope of the hill, far from home, and hungry
and fainting,—women and little children, as well
as men,—many of whom had come from far-away
Capernaum and Cesarea, skirting the north side of
the lake for many a weary mile, on foot, to meet the
ship that bore our Lord across the sea.

Whence can they buy bread in this wilderness?
But among that hapless crowd there is One, foot-
sore and weary and fasting like them, yet Who is
the Creator himself. ‘He Who maketh the grass
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 93

to grow upon the mountains, and herb for the use
of man,” Who “feedeth the young ravens,” and
Who “filleth the hungry soul with good things;”
and he is looking with infinite compassion on their
want; and He says to His disciples, “Give ye them
to eat.” And then, abruptly, the Bishop turned
from the story of the miracle to his own work, and
he told of the great extent of mountain forest, and
plain, of the mighty rivers, of the rich and fertile
land, and the luxuriant beauty all around, fair as
the promised land of which Moses said, “The eyes
of the Lord thy God are always upon it, from the
beginning of the year even unto the end of the
year.” But the people of this fair land are, like the
weary crowd on the hillside, far from home—ah!
how far from heaven, with the deep, deep sea of ig-
norance rolling between; they are hungry, sinking
for the want of the Bread of Life; but civilization
and knowledge and light are far away from them .
across the ocean, and “how can we satisfy these
men with bread here in the wilderness?” It is even-
ing too; surely the sun of this world is getting near
its setting, and casting long shadows, if we would
but see them. Shall we send these poor souls away
fasting?—these women and little children? Will
they not faint by the way? How can they hope to
reach their heavenly home without the Bread of
Life?
94 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. -

But the Lord is looking on them with the same
infinite compassion, and He is saying to me and to
you, “Give ye them to eat.” Is there not here this
evening, among you Martel people, a lad with five
barley loaves and two small fishes for the Lord’s
use? It seemed so little to the disciples, scarcely
worthy of mention. “What are they among so
many?” Merely enough for two or three, and here
are five thousand and more. But the Lord said,
“Bring them hither to Me.” He had no need of
them. He could have commanded the stones to be
made bread; He could have called manna down
from heaven; He could have satisfied them with
a word; but He was graciously pleased to take
that poor and humble little store in His all-pow-
erful hand; and it was sufficient; the people were
filled, they had as much as they would, and there
were yet fragments that remained. Never think of
the smallness, the poorness of the instrument, when
it is the Master’s hand that uses it,—He who made
this lovely world out of chaos, and formed the glor-
ious light out of utter darkness. Do not be kept
back by false humility, by thinking too much of the
insignificance and worthlessness of the gift. Give
your best,—give your all. “Bring them hither to
Me,” saith the Lord. What have you to give?
Turn over your store,—yourself, that is best of all,
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 796:

most worthy offering, poor though it may be—
your money, your time, your influence, your pray-
ers. Who so poor but what he has one or more of
these barley loaves of daily life to offer to Him
Who gave us all? I am not here to beg and en-
treat for your money, though to our dim sight it
seems sorely needed just now, when, from village
after village, the cry comes to me for teachers and
for light, and I have no men or means to send
them; and worse still is the silence of those who
are in such utter darkness; they do not know their
own need. But still we know and believe that it is
the Lord’s work, and it will be done. It may not
be by me or you, but in His own good time it will
be done. He does not need your money; He only
offers you the glorious privilege of being fellow-
workers with Him. Yours is the loss if you do not
heed; the work will not suffer; only you will have
had no share; only you may not have another op-
portunity given you; only the time may come when
it will be said to you, “Forasmuch as ye did it not
to these” (who are indeed poor and sick and in
prison), “ye did it not to Me.”

It was not by any means what the almshouse
men called “a powerful discarse;” the old men be-
longing to Frowde’s charity, in their snuff-colored
coats, each with a large F on the left shoulder, clus:
96 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

tering round the north door after service, shook
their heads in disapproval.

“He don’t wrusstle with ’um,” said old Jacobs;
“he ain’t fit to hold a candle to old Thwackum,
down at Ebenezer. Why, I have seen him punish
that there pulpit cushion till the dust came out like
anything, and he had to take off his neckcloth, it
were that wet; that’s what I calls preaching now,
and to think of the likes of this ’un being a Bishop.”

Miss Baker, too, of the firm of Silver & Baker,
drapers in High street, expressed her opinion in a
high key, under an umbrella, as she went home
along Church lane, “that he did not preach the gos-
pel;” but then she was very particular, and the
Apostle Paul himself would scarcely have come up
to her standard of “gospel” sermons.

There was not a very good collection either. You
see, it was partly from its being a wet evening, so
that the congregation was altogether small; and it
had not been given out on the preceding Sunday;
and no bills had been printed and posted on the
church doors and principal public houses in the
town, as was always done in the case of sermons
in aid of the Irish Church Mission, or the Jew’s
Society. So people had not been attracted by the
announcement of a real live Bishop; and those who
came had not had time to get small change; and so
MISS TOOSEY'S MISSION. 97

at the endof the sermon,with the best intentionsand
a natural dislike to pass the basket without giving
anything, they found themselves devoid of the ne-
cessary threepenny-bits and sixpences. So, when
Mr. Mackenzie, the tall lawyer, who always held the
basket lined with green baize at the north door,
emptied its contents on the vestry table, and the
other baskets added their quota, there was but a
poor show; and Mr. Peters, kind man, when Mr.
Malone was not looking, slipped a sovereign out of
his waistcoat pocket to add to the heap, more for
the honor of Martel than from interest in the Mis-
sion; and he explained that unfortunately some of
his best people were not at church, and that they
had had a collection so very recently, and that he
hoped that next time the Bishop was in those parts
—but here a warning glance from Mr. Malone cut
him short, and he did not commit himself further.

What a fortunate thing it was that Mr. Peters
had a curate of such high principle!

“Who was the old woman sitting in front of Wy-
att?’ John Rossiter asked his mother, when the
brougham door was closed and they were going
down High Street slowly, with the drag on, for it
was very steep, with a blurred view of lights and
moving umbrellas through the rainy windows.

“My dear John, do you suppose I know every
old woman in Martel?”
98 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

“No; but I thought you might have noticed her;
her face was a sight to see in the sermon.”

“Well, John,” Mrs. Rossitter answered rather
fretfully, feeling conscious of a temporary oblivion
on her own part in the middle of the sermon, “‘it
was no wonder if any one went to sleep; the church
was so hot; I felt quite faint myself.”

And she felt whether her bonnet had got pushed
on one side, and hoped she had not wakened with
a snore.

John laughed: “I don’t mean a sight to see that
way, mother; that’s not so very unusual at Martel;
but it was her absorbed interest that struck me as
something out of the way.”

“Tt must have been one of the young women at
Purts.”

“My dear mother, don’t insult those elegant crea-
tures by supposing they would put on anything half
so respectable as my old woman’s bonnet; they
would rather die first.”

“Then I don’t know who it could have been, un-
less it was Miss Toosey—lavender ribbons and hair
done in a little curl on each side? Ah, then it is.
Her father was old Toosey the doctor; he was par-
ish doctor when we first came to Brooklands: and
she was a pretty young girl, in a green spencer;
and your father used to say’—
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 99

And here followed reminiscences unconnected
with Miss Toosey’s Mission, which I need not
chronicle.

Mrs. Rossitter lived two miles from Martel, at
Brooklands, and she attended church regularly
twice om Sunday, “because it is a duty to set a right
example to the lower orders.” So the lower or-
ders around Brooklands—mostly, as far as the men
were concerned, smoking their pipes in their shirt
sleeves, hanging over a pigsty, or nursing their
babies; mostly, as far as the women were concern-
ed, waxing fierce in preparations for dinner, or gos-
siping with their next-door neighbors—saw the
Brooklands brougham pass four times on Sunday;
and the children ran after and shouted “Whip be-
hind!” and the babies were possessed with suicidal
interest in the horses’ feet, and toddled, or crawled,
or rolled into imminent danger, according to their
age or walking capacities.

When John Rossitter was down from London, he
went with his mother; and when he was not, she
went alone, because Humphrey altogether declined
to go.

“It was more than any fellow could stand,” he
said, gnawing his yellow mustache, and looking
down at his mother with those handsome, idle gray
eys of his, which were the most convincing of argu-
100 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

ments, before which all her excellent reasons for
attending church—such as “what people would
say,” and “how would it look,” and “what a bad
example it would set,” if he did not go—crumbled
to ashes. She found John more amenable; but I
do not on this account credit John with any great
superiority to Humphrey only that he had greater
powers of endurance, and was not so sure as
Humphrey that the very surest way to please his
mother was to please himself. Then, too, Sunday
mornings at Brooklands were apt to hang heavy on
‘his hands, for he had not the resources of Humph-
rey. He could not spend an hour or two in con-
tented contemplation of a family of fox-terrier pup-
pies; he found that “the points” of the very clever-
est little mare in creation palled after five minutes’
serious consideration, and that the conversation of
grooms and stablemen still left a good deal to be
desired in the way of entertainment; in fact, he had
none of the elevated and refined tastes of an Eng-
lish country gentleman; so John Rossitter went to
church with his mother, and endured, with equal
stoicism, sermons from Mr. Peters, Mr. Glover, or
Mr. Malone. He did not yawn in the undisguised
manner of Dr. Gardener Jones opposite, who let
every one see what a fine set of teeth he had, and
healthy red tongue, at short intervals; he did not






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MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 103

go to sleep and snore like old Mrs. Robbins, and
one or two more; but when the regulation half hour
was over, his eyebrows would rise and the calm in-
attention of his face became ruffled, and his hand
move quietly to his waistcoat pocket and his watch
appear, an action which Mr. Glover felt acutely in
every fibre, though his back was turned to John
Rossitter, and he would grow red to the very fin-
ger-tips, and his “finally,” “lastly,” and “in conclu-
sion” would get sadly muddled in his nervous ef-
forts to make short cuts to the end. So strong had
this habit of inattention become, that it would have
required something much more striking than our
missionary Bishopto startle him out of it; and itwas
only the sight of Miss Toosey’s face that brought
back his thoughts from their wanderings, to Martel
church and its sleepy congregation, and the Bish-
op’s voice from the high pulpit. He could see her.
through a vista of heads between Mr. Cooper’s bald
head and Miss Purts’s feathers and pink rosebuds;
now and then the view was cut off by Mrs. Robbins
giving a convulsive nod, or one of the little Miss
Coopers fidgeting up a broad-brimmed hat.

“Was the sermon so eloquent?” John Rossitter
wondered. Certainly that listening, rapt face was
—quite a common, little, wizen, old-maidish face,
with nothing intellectual or noble about it, and yet
104 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

transfigured into something like beauty with the
brightness of a reflected light. Don’t you know
how sometimes a scrap of broken glass on a dust
heap will catch the sunlight and shine with quite
dazzling brilliancy,and how a little smutty raindrop
in a London court will hold the sun and a gleaming
changing rainbow in its little mirror?

CHAPTER III.

“WHERE does Miss Toosey live?” said John Ros-
sitter on Monday morning. “I think I may as well
go and call on her, as I have nothing else to do.”

I do not know what impelled him to go. It is
impossible to define motives accurately, even our
own. We cannot say sometimes why we do a
thing; every reason may be against it—common
sense, habit, inclination, experience, duty, all may
be pulling the other way, and yet we tear ourselves
loose, and do the thing, urged by some invisible
motive of whose existence we are hardly conscious.
And if it is so in ourselves, how much more difficult
to dissect other people’s motives! and it is generally
safer to leave the cause alone altogether, and only
regard the effects produced. So it is enough to
say that, on that Monday morning, Miss Toosey
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 105

heard the rattle of wheels along North Street, and,
looking out, saw the Rossitters’ dog-cart and high-
stepping chestnut mare, which, to her extreme sur-
prise, stopped in front of her door.

“Something wrong with the harness,” she con-
cluded, as the little groom flew out and stood at the
horse’s head, with his arms crossed.

“Bless the child!’ Miss Toosey said, “as if the
creature could not have swallowed him at a mouth-
ful, top-boots and all!”

But her observation of the groom from the bed-
room window was interrupted by a loud knock
at the door, and before she had time to tie
her cap-strings, or put a pin in the back of her col-
lar, Betty came rushing up, out of breath and red-
faced, with a card held in the corner of her apron,
bearing the name, “Mr. John Rossitter.”

“And he said he hoped as how you’d excuse his .
calling so early—and a flower in his button-hole
beautiful,” added Betty in a snorting whisper, dis-
tinctly audible in the parlor below.

Then followed some hasty opening and shutting
of drawers, and hurried footsteps; and then Miss
Toosey descended, rather fluttered and nervous,
with her Sunday cap on, and a clean pocket hand-
kerchief.

“T must introduce myself, Miss Toosey,” John
_ said, “for I dare say you have quite forgotten me.”
106 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

“Forgotten you, Mr. John? Why I knewyou long
before you were born, or thought of. Oh, dear!’
said Miss Toosey, “I don’t mean that, of course;
but I knew your mamma before she was born” —

“T ought to apologize,” John struck in, anxious
to save Miss Toosey from any further floundering
in the bogs of memory, “for coming so early; but
the fact is, that Iam going up to London this even-
ing; and my mother tells me that Dr. Toosey had a
very capital cure for toothache,and she thought you

_ would very likely have kept it, and would let me
have it.”

Impostor that he was! looking at her with such
serious, earnest eyes, when he had composed this
ridiculous and barefaced excuse for calling as he
came along.

Miss Toosey racked her brain to remember this
renowned remedy, and could only recall an occa-
sion when she had toothache, and her father
dragged out a double tooth, with great exertion
and bad language on his part, and great pain and
many tears on hers.

“I cannot quite remember the remedy your
mamma means; but I have a book full of very valu-
‘able prescriptions, which I will find at once.”

“Pray don‘t trouble, Miss Toesey; I have no
toothache at present; but if you would let my
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 107

mother have it some time at your leisure, I should
be greatly obliged.”

And then they talked for five minutes about
toothache; and John, smiling, showed such white,
even teeth that you would have fancied that he had
not had much trouble with them; and you would
have fancied right.

“What a curious book you have here,’ John
Rossitter said, looking at a book lying open on the
table. It was an old book called “Voyages and
Adventures;” and it was open at an awful picture
of a cannibal feast, with a man being roasted in
front of a fire, and a group of savages dancing fero-
ciously around, in all the horrors of war-paint and
feathers, and in a simple but effective costume of a
necklace, a fringe round the waist, a ring in the
nose, and a penny in the under lip.

Miss Toosey blushed; she was not used to fash-
ionable picture galleries where Eves and Venuses,
in unadorned beauty, are admired and criticised by
the sensible young people of the present day.

“Though to be sure,” she said afterwards, “it’s
not so bad, as the poor things are black, so they
don’t look quite so naked; and I always think a
white pig is a more indecent looking creature than
a black one.”

So she turned his attention with great tact to the
108 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

atlas that was also lying open on the table. It was
the atlas that was in use fifty years ago, and which
had been bought for Miss Toosey when she went
to Miss Singer’s “Academy for Young Ladies” to
be finished. At this abode of learning, she had
been taught to make wax flowers and do crochet,
to speak a few words of what was supposed to be
French, and to play a tune or two laboriously on
the piano, an education which was considered
very elegant and elaborate at that time, but would
- hardly, [ am afraid, qualify her for one of the Ox-
ford and Cambridge local examinations, or even
for a very high standard at a national school. She
had also learnt a little geography and the use of the
globes, but not enough to survive for fifty years;
and she felt quite at sea this morning, when she
reached down the long-unused atlas to find the po-
sition of the diocese of Nawaub, and, after long
study, had arrived at the conclusion that it must
be on the celestial globe, which had always been a
puzzle to her.

It was no wonder that she had not been able to
find Nawaub, for where the towns and rivers and
mountains and plains stood, which the Bishop had
described, there was only marked on the map “Un-
discovered territory,” a vague-locking spot alto-
gether, gradually shading off into the sea without
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 109

any distinct red or blue line to mark the extent of
terra firma, as in other parts of the world.

John Rossitter showed her where he imagined
Nawaub to be, and then inquired if she were inter-
ested in Missions.

“Well, Mr. John,” Miss Toosey said, “I don’t
mind telling you, though I have not told any one
else, except Betty; but I’ve made up my mind to go
out to Nawaub as soon as I can arrange every-
thing.”

“As a missionary, Miss Toosey?”

“Yes, Mr. John, as a missionary.”

She spoke quite quietly, as if she were not sixty-
five, with a tendency to asthma, and more than a
tendency to rheumatism,—a nervous, fidgety old
maid, to whom a journey to Bristol was an event
to flutter the nerves, and cause sleepless nights, and
take away the appetite for some time beforehand.
I think the very magnitude of her resolution took
away her attention from the terrible details, just as
we lose sight of the precipices, chasms, and rocks
that lie between, when we are looking to the moun-
tain top. The way to Bristol was beset with dan-
gers, such as losing the train, getting wrong
change when you take your ticket, the draughti-
ness of the waiting-room, the incivility of the por-
ters, the trains starting from unexpected platforms,
110 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

the difficulty of opening doors and shutting win.
dows, the constant tendency to get into smoking
carriages by mistake, not to speak of railway acci-
dents, and murderers and thieves for traveling com-
panions; but these were lost sight of in the prospect
of a journey to the other end of the world, full of
real, substantial dangers of which she was ignorant.
This ignorance was no doubt a great help to her
in some ways; she could not form the slightest idea
of what a missionary’s life really is; nor can you,
- reader, nor can I, though we may have read mis-
sionary books by the dozen, which Miss Toosey
had not. But this same ignorance, while it cov-
ered up many real difficulties, also painted gro-
tesque horrors before Miss Toosey’s mind, which
might well have frightened any old maiden lady of
sixty-five. She mixed up “Greenland’s icy moun-
tains” and “Afric’s coral strands” with great impar-
tialityin her ideasof Nawaub,forming such a fright-
ful combination of sandy deserts and icebergs, lions
and white bears, naked black savages and snow
drifts, that the stoutest heart might have quailed
at the prospect; and yet, when Miss Toosey came
down to breakfast that morning, with her mind
firmly made up to the venture, her little maid,
Betty, did not notice anything remarkable about
her, except that her cap was put on wrong side in
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 111

front,—which was not a very unusual occurrence
—and that she stirred up her tea with her specta-
cles once. Her interview with Betty had been
rather upsetting. Betty was not quick at taking
in new ideas; and she had got it so firmly into fee
head that Miss Toosey was wishing to administer a
reprcof to her about the handle of a certain vegeta-
ble dish, “which come to pieces in my hand as was
that cracked,” that it was some time before she
could be led to think differently; but when at last a
ray of the truth penetrated her mental fog, her feel-
ings can only be described by her own ejaculation,
“Lor, now!” which I fear may offend ears polite.
She had not been at church the evening before,
having stepped round to see her mother, who was
“doing nicely, thank you, with her fourteenth, a
fine boy, as kep’ on with fits constant, till Mr.
Glover half christened him, which James Joseph is
his name, and better ever since.”

So it required all Miss Toosey’s eloquence to put
her scheme before Betty’s plain common sense, so
as to appear anything but a very crazy notion after
all; and it was not till after half an hour’s severe
talking, and more than one tear falling on the two
and a half pounds of neck of mutton that Betty
gave in, which she did by throwing her apron over
her head, and declaring, with a sob, that if Miss
112 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

Toosey “would go for to do such a thing, she
(Betty) would take and go too, that she would;”
and Miss Toosey had to entreat her to remember
her poor mother before making up her mind to
such a step.

But to come back to John Rossitter. He was a
barrister, you must know, and used to examine wit-
nesses, and to turn their heads inside out to pick
out the grains of truth concealed there; and then,
too, he had a great talent for listening, which is a
_tarer and more valuable gift even than that of
fluent, speech, which he also had at command on
occasion. He had, too, a sympathetic, attentive in-
terest in his face, if it was assumed, would have
made a great actor of him, and that opened the peo-
ple’s hearts to him, as the sun does the flowers. And
so Miss Toosey found herself laying her mittened
hand on his coat sleeve, and looking up into his
eyes for sympathy, and calling him “my dear,”
“Sust for all the world,” she said ,“‘as if he had been
an old woman too.”

And what did he think of it all? Was he laugh-
ing at her? Certainly now and then there was a
little twitch at the corner of his mouth, and a spar-
kle in his eye, and once he laughed aloud in uncon-
cealed amusement; but I like John Rossitter toa
well to believe that he was doing what Dr. Gar-



MISS TOOSEY’ S MISSION. 115

dener Jones called “getting a rise out of the old
lady.” It was so very easy to make fun of Miss
Toosey, and draw her out and show up her absurdi-
ties—even Mr. Glover, who was not a wit, could be
exquisitely funny at her expense. But John Ros-
sitter was too much of a sportsman to aim with his
small-bore rifle at a little sparrowin a hedgerow; he
left that sort of game for the catapults and pop-
guns of the yokels.

And so Miss Toosey confided to him all the diffi-
culties that had already come crowding into her
head as she sat over her work that morning, any
one of which would have occupied her mind for
days at any other time,—the giving notice to leave
her house, the disposal of the furniture,—‘‘and you
know, Mr. John, I have some really valuable pic-
tures and things;” and she could not trust herself
to glance at the portrait of old Toosey over the fire- .
place, in a black satin waistcoat and bunch of seals,
a frilled shirt, a high complexion, and shiny black
hair, with Corinthian pillars behind him, lest her
eyes, already brimful, should overflow. She even
consulted him as to whether it would be worth
while to order in more coal, and lamented that she
should have taken her sitting in church for another
whole year only last Saturday. And then, without
quite knowing how, she found herself discussing
116 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

that all-important subject, dress, with John Rossit-
ter,

“Though to be sure, Mr. John, how should you
know about such things?”

“Indeed, Miss Toosey, I’m not so ignorant as
you think; and I quite agree with you that nothing
looks so nice as a black silk on Sunday.”

And Miss Toosey at once resolved to put a new
braid round the bottom of the skirt as a good be-
ginning of her preparations.

“T’ve got upstairs,” Miss Toosey said reflectively,
“a muslin dress that I wore when Rosina Smith
was married. You remember Rosina Smith, Mr.
John? No, of course not! She must have mar-
tied before you were born. Sweet girl, Mr. John,
very sweet! That dress has been rough dried for
thirty years, and it’s not quite in the fashion that
ladies wear now; in fact, the skirt has only three
breadths, which is scanty, you know, as dresses go;
but I thought,” and there Miss Toosey glanced
timidly at the picture of the cannibals, which still
lay open, “that perhaps it would not matter out
there.”

“No, indeed, Miss Toosey,” John answered, “I
should think that three breadths would appear lib-
eral and ample allowance among people whose
skirts’—he was going to say, “are conspicuous
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 117

from their absence,” but from Miss Toosey's
heightened color he changed it to “are not court
trains.”

The next question was whether she had better
have it got up before leaving Martel.

“It might get crumpled in packing; but then,
how can one guess what sort of laundresses one
may find at the other side of the world,—not used,
most likely, to getting up fine things.”

“T have heard,” said John very seriously, “that
in some parts missionaries try as much as possible
to become like the nations they are wishing to
convert, and that the Roman Catholic priests in
China shave their heads and wear pigtails.”

“Yes, Mr. John, I have heard that,’ Miss Too-
sey said; “and their wives” (you see she did not
rightly understand the arrangements of our sister
Church as to the celibacy of the clergy) “cripple
their feet in small shoes, blacken their teeth, and
let their finger-nails grow.”

“T suppose,” says John, drawing “Voyages and
Adventures” nearer, and looking at the pictures re-
flectively, “that the Nawaub missionaries don’t go
in for that sort of thing.”

Miss Toosey grew red to the very finger-tips,
and her back stiffened with horror.

“No, Mr. John, there is a point beyond which I
cannot go!”
118 MISS TOOSEY’ S MISSION.

“To be sure! to be sure!” said John consolingly,
“and you see there were no signs of anything of the
kind about the Bishop.”

“Then there is the food,” Miss Toosey went on,
reminded of the subject by a whiff of roast mutton
from the kitchen; “I’m afraid they are cannibals,
and I don’t think I ever could get used to such a
thing, for I have never been able to touch sucking
pig since an uncle of mine said it was just like a
baby, though of course he was only in joke.”

John reassured her on this point. But now he
presented quite a new difficulty to her mind.

“Do you understand the Nawaub language? I
am told it is difficult to acquire.”

It had never occurred to Miss Toosey that these
mysterious people, who were a sort of combination
of monkey and chimney sweep, spoke a language
of their own which she could not understand, and
that they might not be able to comprehend the pure
Somersetshire English with which she meant to
convert them. She had never been brought much
in contact with foreigners, so that she had never
realized fully the effect of the Tower of Babel. One
day a French beggar had come to the door, and
Miss Toosey had summoned up courage to pro-
nounce the magic words, “Parlez vous Francais,”
which was one of the sentences she had learned at
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 119

Miss Singers’s; and the beggar (the French being
proverbially quick-witted) had recognized his na-
tive tongue; and thereupon ensued such a torrent
of rapid speech and violent gesticulation, such gab-
bling and grimacing that Miss Toosey was quite
frightened, and relapsed into plain English when
she could edge in another word. But then this im-
pudent fellow pretended he did not understand,
and kept on saying, “Not know de English vot you
mean,” though Miss Toosey spoke slowly and very
loud, and even finally tried a little broken English,
which must be easier to foreigners than the ordin-
ary style of speaking. But the man was obstinate,
and went away at last shaking his head and shrug-
ging his shoulders in a way which Miss Toosey felt
was very impudent; “but then, poor creature, he
may have been a papist.”

“Tve not thought about that, Mr. John; but I
know that savages always like beads and looking-
glasses, though what pleasure such remarkably
plain people can get out of a looking-glass I can't
imagine. But I’ve a lot of beads put away in one of
my boxes up-stairs when I’ve time for a regular
good turn-out; and as for looking-glasses, I saw
some the other day at Gaiter’s, with gilt frames,
for a penny, that make one’s nose look crooked,
and one eye larger than the other, that I think will
do nicely.”
120 MISS TOOSEF’S MISSION.

“By Jove!” says John, “an uncommonly good
idea—the very thing! [ll take a look at them as
I go home, which I must do now, or I shall be late
for lunch.”

But before leaving he advised her not to do any-
thing in a hurry, but before taking any decided
step, such as having her dress starched, or giving
notice to leave her house, or laying in a stock of
looking-glasses, to consult some old friend, on
whose opinion she could rely.

“There’s Mackenzie,’ he said, “why not go to
him?”

But Miss Toosey had an uncomfortable feeling
about lawyers, connecting them with verses in the
gospels beginning with “woe;” and though the
little Mackenzies were her great friends and con-
stant visitors, she avoided their father. She sug-
gested Miss Baker; but when she added that she
was “a really Christian person,” John discouraged
the idea, and they finally agreed that she should
consult Mr. Peters, who had known her nearly all
her life.

“He’s not a bad sort of old fellow out of church,”
John said, rather shocking Miss Toosey by his
want of reverence for the rector; “and he has got
some sense in his head as well as good nature. So
you go to him, Miss Toosey, and the next time I
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 121

come home, I'll come in and have another crack
with you, if you are not off to the North Pole or
the Moon.”

John Rossiter smiled more than once as he drove
home in the dog-cart, at the recollection of Miss
Toosey’s confidences; but I fear my readers may
have grown impatient of the absurdities of an ig-
norant old woman, who had got a craze in her
head. Yes, she was old and poor and weak and
ignorant, it is quite true. It was a very contempt-
ible barley-loaf which she had to offer, compared
with your fine, white, wheaten cake of youth and
riches and strength and learning; but remember
she offered her best freely, willingly, faithfully; and
when once a thing is offered it is no longer the
little barley-loaf in the lad’s hand, but the miracu-
lous satisfying Bread of Heaven in the hand of the
Lord of the Harvest, more than sufficient for the
hungry multitude.

CHAPTER. TV,

“You are making fun of me, Mr. John.”

“I am incapable of such an action, Miss Toosey.”

Six months have passed since my last chapter,
and John Rossiter has paid many visits to the little
122 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

house in North Street. Indeed, he rarely came to
Brooklands without going to see Miss Toosey,
drawn by a strange attraction which he hardly un-
derstood himself; though he once told his mother
that he had fallen in love, and asked her how she
would like Miss Toosey for a daughter-in-law.

Miss Toosey is still at Martel, and likely to re-
main so. Her interview with Mr. Peters put an
end to her idea of becoming a missionary, as
John Rossiter quite expected, and also provided the
rector with a good joke, over which he laughs till
the tears run down his cheeks. It was a very alarm-
ing interview to Miss Toosey altogether, as the
rector was seized with an attack of coughing in the
middle, and sputtered and choked till Miss Toosey
longed to pat him on the back, if she had dared to
venture on such familiarity with a Church digni-
tary; and for many months she puzzled Mrs.
Peters by anxious inquiries after the rector’s cold
and the sad delicacy of his throat, and advised
gargling with port wine and alum, and other de-
coctions of marvellous efficacy.

Miss Toosey’s missionary ardor was by no means
damped; only it was turned into a fresh channel.
“Your money,” the Bishop had said, “was another
of those barley-loaves of every-day life that most
people had in some proportion to offer;” thinking
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. ——-123

principally of the luxury and extravagance of fash-
ionable life, and of the superfluity that might so
well be cast into his empty treasury. There was
not much luxury or extravagance in the little house
in North Street ; indeed, it was only by close man-
agement that two ends could be brought to meet;
and even in little charities to poor neighbors (in-
finitesimally small though they might be) she was
never in danger of offering to God that which cost
her nothing. So it was an unsatisfactory thing to
review her expenditure, with a view to greater econ-
omy, “‘with butchers’ meat quite a fancy price, and
everything else to match ;’’ but she was not easily
daunted, as you know, and she applied to Mr.
Peters to procure her a box in which to collect for
the Nawaub Mission. She did not allow him to
forget it or to convince her that a Church Mission-
ary box, or one for the Irish Society, would do
quite as well; and when at last she had it, she car-
ried it home with great pride, and gave it the place
of honor in the centre of her table on the bead mat,
in place of the lava inkstand that had been one of
Mrs. Toosey’s wedding presents.

It was this box that was now forming the sub-
ject of conversation between her and Mr. Rossitter,
for she was to take it that very afternoon to the
rectory to be opened, and the contents were to be
124 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

forwarded to the Bishop. John had been com-
menting on its weight, and had told Miss Toosey
that she would be obliged to have the omnibus
from the “Hare and Hounds” to take it to the
rectory, or at any rate a wheelbarrow and a strong
man. And so it came that she accused him of
laughing at her.

“But it really is very heavy. I wonder you are
not afraid of thieves coming to carry it off at
night.”

“Well, Mr. John, I was rather nervous now and
then. There have been very odd noises at night,
and though Betty says it’s the mice, I can’t always
quite believe it. I always hide the box when I go
out, and now and then I forget where I put it; and,
oh, dear! what a search we had the other day! I
was in such a fright, and where do you think it
was? Why, behind the shavings in the fireplace.
Wasn’t it a capital place? No thief would have
dreamt of looking there.”

“Tt’s a good thing that you are going to empty it
to-day, or I might have been tempted to play burg-
lar to-night.”

“Well, you see, Mr. John, it’s not really so valu-
able as you might think, for it’s chiefly pence anda
good sprinkling of farthings, and they don’t come
up tomuchofasum. You see I have been obliged
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 125

to take a little here and a little there, not being rich,
Mr. John, or having much to spare. One thing I
always put in, ‘Your change, with thanks;’ don’t
you know those pretty little envelopes that they put
pence in at Knight’s and Jones’s and one or two
other places, with ‘Your change, with thanks,’ in
mauve on the back? I always took that for my
box, and I felt quite pleased when they had not a
threepenny bit, so that I got more pence. And
then, when the butcher’s book came to five and
sixpence half penny, Mr. Barker often says, ‘Never
mind the halfpenny, Miss Toosey,’ and I put it into
my box; and sometimes I get a halfpenny on the
washing. Of course it seems very little, but it all
helps. And then I fine myself. I got a good deal
that way. A halfpenny if I lose my spectacles.
A penny if I go to sleep in church; yes, Mr. John,
I’m sorry to say I do drop off now and then. I
know it’s very wrong, but it’s wonderful how it
cures you of such habits if you have to pay for
them; I don’t lose my spectacles half so often as I
used to, indeed I feel quite vexed sometimes that I
don’t get more fines; but I don’t think it fair to
lose them on purpose. I might save a good deal
more if it wasn’t for Betty. She’s a good girl and
horest, and much attached to me; but she’s very
obstinate and wrong-headed. The fuss that girl
126 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

made about my letting the fire out now and then of
an afternoon, for the winter has been mild, Mr.
John, and coals such a price! After I’d done it
once or twice, she found out it was not an accident,
and she would come bouncing in and put on coals
every half-hour, till there was a fire fit to roast an
ox, and once she gave warning because I did not
take a second helping at dinner. But there’s one
thing I can do without another year, which no one
can object to, and that is my sitting in church. The
free seats are so comfortable that it really would be
a change for the better, except perhaps as to the
hearing.”

Just at this point some fresh visitors arrived, and
John prepared to go; but, finding the passage
blocked by a double perambulator, and a smiling
nurse and nursemaid exchanging confidences with
Betty at the door, and hearing the tallest of the
visitors (who was about as high as the table) de-
clare that “Mamma said they were not to stop, but
she sent her love and the Graphic,” he resumed his
seat, and offered a knee and an inspection of his
watch to the two nearest young Mackenzies. There
were nine young Mackenzies, of all ages; every
year a fresh curly head or Sunday hat appeared
in the square pew by the north door, which Mr.
Peters compared to a pigeon pie, till at last it ran
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 127

over altogether into another seat by the pulpit,
which could hardly contain them now.

Miss Toosey’s present visitors were the younger
detachment, all of them pretty more or less with
that beauty which has been called “the sacrament
of goodness and innocence,’—cheerful souls, not
tall enough to see troubles,—very well contented
with life as seen from near the ground, which is, I
fancy, a much more amusing point of view than
we enjoy. They had a good deal of information to
give, unintelligible to John, but Miss Toosey gave
a free translation, which enlightened his darkness.
Life was more than usually cheerful that morning,
for they had met that walking money-bag, papa,
as they went out, whose store of pennies was in-
exhaustible when he could be cajoled or teased into
feeling in his pocket. To-day in a moment of lavish
generosity, he had given a penny all round, even
to Kitty, who had conveyed it at once to her mouth,
without waiting for the visit to Mrs. Goodenough’s,
which transformed pennies into all that heart can
-desire.

“Mine penny!” says Mabel,who is rather solemn-
ized by her position on John’s knee; and she al-
lows him to catch a glimpse of her treasure, clasped
tightly in her soft knitted glove, in which the
fingers live all together in dimpled friendliness, and
the thumb only enjoys a house to itself,
128 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

“What are you going to buy?” asks John.

“Bung,” is the decided answer.

Meanwhile the other children are examining the
money-box on the table, rattling its contents in a
manner deafening to older ears, till Miss Toosey
begins to tell them of the poor little black children
who never go to church or say their prayers, which
rouses great interest.

“Naughty, wicked little children” is the univer-
sal opinion.

“Poor little things!” says Miss Toosey reprov-
ingly, “ they have not any church to go to, and
they have never been taught to say their prayers.”

I am afraid some of the little Mackenzies were
disposed to envy the little black children, who
could go straight into their cribs when they were
sleepy, and play at dolls any day in the week. But
they were discreetly silent while Miss Toosey ex-
plained that the money in the box was to go out
to make them good little black boys and girls,

“Make them white,” says Ben decisively.

Miss Toosey is embarrassed, regarding things
from a severely literal point of view; but John
comes to the rescue.

“Yes, that’s about it, young man.”

And just then Maudie discovers the “dear little
darling hole” at the top where the pennies go in,
[has of ;



MISS TCOSEY’S MISSION. 131

and all the children admire it and feel it, and Ma-
bel pats with her woolly gloves, repeating gravely,
“Make black boy white.”

I don’t know quite how it happened, for all the
other children were under the sofa, trying to catch:
Sammy the cat, and Miss Toosey distracted by her
anxiety lest they or the cat should get hurt, and.
Mabel was placidly tapping the box with her pen--
ny, repeating, “Make black boy white” at inter-
vals; when John heard a sudden rattle, and, look--
ing down, said, “Hullo!” for the knitted glove was.
empty, and Mabel looked up at him with rather an
awe-struck face, repeating, “Make black boy
white.”

“O Mr. John!” Miss Toosey exclaimed, her eyes
filling with tears, “the dear, sweet little angel, giv-
ing her little all to the Mission! How Boe ee
how beautiful!’

John, however, whose eyes were not full of tears,
saw an ominous quivering about the little angel’s
under lip, and an anxious feeling of knitted gloves
around the “dear, darling little hole,” as if the pen-
ny might yet be recovered, and as if the giver had
not realized the fatal and irretrievable nature of
putting into a missionary-box. The full sense of
her loss at last overwhelmed her, and she burst into
uncontrolable grief, “I wants my penny” being the
burden of the tale.
132 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

It was in vain John handed her over to Miss
Toosey who quickly supplied her with another
penny, and supplemented it with a biscuit and a
lump of sugar; it was not “mine penny, what papa
gave me!” and at last she was carried off sobbing,
and casting looks of fear and aversion at the mis-
sionary-box on the table.

That afternoon, as John was on the way to the
station, he saw Miss Toosey wending her way
thoughtfully up High Street, and he crossed over
and joined her. She was on her way home from
the rectory, and her first remark to John Rossitter
was, “Do you believe in miracles, Mr. John?”

“As described in the Bible?”

“Oh, no; of course every one believes in them.
I mean miracles now.”

“Well, Miss Toosey, if you mean winking Vir-
gins and hysterical peasant girls, I am afraid I am
rather skeptical.”

“Ah, Mr. John! that’s what I thought to myself.
It’s popish to believe in such things nowadays,—
all superstition and such like,—so I’m glad I did
not tell Miss Baker what came into my head.”

“May I ask what it was? I don’t think you are
at all popish.”

“Well, Pll tell you. It’s my missionary-box.
Now, Mr. John, how much do you think there was
in it?”
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 133

“T have not the least idea.”

“Well, there was six pounds nine and_ seven-
pence three farthings.” Miss Toosey’s voice sank
to an impressive whisper, and she stood still, look-
ing at John as if he might be so overcome by sur-
prise as to drop his bag and umbrella, or require
support to prevent him from falling. But he oniy
said,—

“You don’t say so,” in a very ordinary tone of
voice.

“Six pounds nine and sevenpence three farth-
ings,” repeated Miss Toosey, emphasizing the six
pounds, as if he had not appreciated the vastness
of the sum.

“Ah!” said John; “I’m sure it does credit to you,
Miss Toosey; who would have thought that ‘Your
change, with thanks’ would have added up so. E
am afraid you must have gone to sleep in church
very often.”

“But it could not have been that,’ went on Miss
Toosey solemnly. “One pound nine and seven-
pence three farthings were principally in coppers,
and any sixpenny or fourpenny bits I could ac-
count for. But the five pounds were in a note, so
it could not have been change or a fine.”

“You must have slipped it in some day by
chance with other money. ”
134 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

“No, for I never have notes. When I draw my
money I always get it in gold, for Iam always
afraid of notes blowing into the fire or getting torn
up. And, besides,” went on Miss Toosey, “I am
not so rich, Mr. John, that I could lose even six-
pence without knowing it.”

“It is very strange,” said John.

“Strange!” seemed a mild expression to Miss
Toosey, to whom it appeared miraculous. “I don’t
know how to account for it, Mr. John. I suppose
it’s wrong to think it a miracle, but I could not help
thinking of what happened this morning.”

“What was that?”

“Why, don’t you remember that dear child put- °
ting her penny into the box?”

“Oh, yes; and making such a hullaballoo after-
wards.”

Miss Toosey did not wish to recall that part of
the affair. “It was so sweetly done.”

“Ves; but you gave it back directly.”

Miss Toosey felt quite cross at such inconvenient
remarks interrupting her miracle; but she contin-
~ ued, relapsing into a confidential whisper,—

“You see, Mr. John, it was a lad that brought
the five barley-loaves, and I thought perhaps the
baby’s penny might have been turned into a five-
pound note.”
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 135

John made no comment, and she went on as
much to herself as to him,—

“T suppose it’s popish to think of such a thing;
and besides one would have thought if it had been
a miracle it would have been quite a new Bank of
England note; but it was one of Tuckey’s, crum-
pled and dirty, that had been cut in half, and joined
down the middle with the edge of stamps, and it
had Mr. Purts’s name written on the back. But
still,” said Miss Toosey wistfully, as they came to
the station-road, and John shook hands in parting,
“t's God that gives the increase anyhow, miracle
or not, and He knows all about it.”

CHAPTER V.

Miracies do not happen every day; and Miss
Toosey’s money-box did not contain a bank note
the next time it was opened, or any sum that Miss
Toosey could not well account for; indeed, it was
rather less than more than she expected, even
though the cost of her sitting in church was added
to it. She did not, however, carry out her plan of
sitting in the free seats, for when she spoke to Mr.
Budd about giving up her seat, Mr. Peters hap-
pened to be present, and he would not hear of
136 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

such a thing. “Why, Miss Toosey, we should not
know ourselves if you were not in your usual
place.” And Mr. Budd added, that “Some one, as
did not wish to be mentioned, had offered to pay
the rent rather than Miss Toosey should give it
up.” So it was arranged that she should still oc-
cupy the seat, at any rate till it was wanted for some
one else; and as the Martel congregation were not
overflowing, Miss Toosey was not likely to be
turned out. She did not quite like this arrange-
ment: she felt rather like an impostor as she passed
the free seats, and Mr. Wyatt opened the pew-
door for her; and it took off much of the pleasure
when she dropped the money (that would otherwise
have been paid to Mr. Budd) into her box; for, as
she said, she did not feel the want of it, so it’
hardly seemed like giving at all.

I must not stop to describe at any length Miss
Toosey’s other missionary efforts, though she did
not forget the other barley-loaves of which the
Bishop had spoken,—‘“her time, her influence, and
her prayers,’—or I could tell you of her numerous
disappointmens in answering advertisements such
as,—‘‘To those of either sex anxious to increase
their income;” and “£2 weekly easily realized;”
and of her venturing a 5s. subscription to a
“Ladies’ Needlework Society,” which entitled her
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 137

to send six articles for sale to a shop tn a fashion-
able part of London; and how she accomplished an
antimacassar of elaborate design to send up there.
As to her influence, that was a puzzling matter to
one who had such a humble opinion of herself as
Miss Toosey; and she nearly worked herself into a
nervous fever through her attempts to mention the
subject to some of the wealthy shopkeepers or
others in Martel; and at last she adopted the plan
of distributing leaflets, and invested in a small bun-
dle on missionary subjects, which she left about in a
surreptitious, stealthy way, in shops, or at the rail-
way station, or slipped between the pages of a “So-
ciety” book, or even sometimes on the high road,
with a stone to keep them from blowing away.
Even with these precautions she managed to give
great offence to Mrs. Gardener Jones, who found a
leaflet in a book sent on from Miss Toosey’s, and
who, being of a very dark complexion and Eastern
cast of countenance, took the matter as a personal
insinuation about her birth. So it was quite a relief
to Miss Toosey to run to the last barley-loaf that
the Bishop had mentioned—“her prayers;” at any
rate, she could give that with all her heart. She
found a missionary prayer in an old magazine, writ-
ten in an inflated, pompous style, with long words
and involved sentences,as different as possible from
138 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

the great simplicity of that prayer in which children
of all ages and degrees of learning through all time
are taught to address “Our Father;” but she was
not critical; and the feeling she expressed in those
words was not rendered less simple or earnest by
its pompous clothing.

“Where is Miss Toosey?” John Rossitter asked
his mother one Sunday morning, as they drove
home from church; “she was not there this morn-
ing.”

“Well, I think I heard some one say she was ill.
Yes, it was Mr. Ryder told me she was laid up
with cold or something. She has not been at
church for several Sundays; and really the draught
from the vestry door is dreadful.”

After church that evening, a sudden impulse
seized John to go and see how Miss Toosey was;
and when he had packed his mother into the
brougham, with her rugs and furs, he turned off
towards North Street, among the groups of peo-
ple returning from church. It was a cold October
evening, with great, solemn, bright stars overhead,
and a frosty stillness in the air, which sets one
listening for something above the trifling noises of
this little world. Sunday visitors were rare at Miss
Toosey‘s: and, as Betty said, “It give her quite a
turn” when John’s sharp knock came at the door.
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 139

“She’s very middlin’,”’ she said, in answer to
John’s inquiries; “and she’ve been terribly low
this evening, as ain’t like her.”

“What’s the matter?”

“Well, Mr. Ryder do say as it’s the brongtypus
and indigestion of the lungs,” said Betty in an aw-
ful voice, feeling that so many syllables must prove
fatal; “and as I was setting by the kitching fire
last night a coffin popped right out, and’”—

“All right,” said John: “Is she in bed?”

“No; she ain’t kep’ her bed a whole day, though
she did ought to. But come in, doee now; it will
cheer her up a bit to see you.”

John Rossitter was quite shocked to see the
change in Miss Toosey when he went into the
parlor. She was sitting in the arm-chair by the
fire, wrapped up in a big shawl, looking so small
and shrunken and old and feeble that you could
hardly have recognized the brisk little lady who
was prepared to cross the seas and enter on the
toils and perils of a missionary life; indeed, she
looked more ready for the last short journey across
Jordan’s narrow stream, which ends all our travel-
ling days, and to enter into the life where toils and
perils are replaced by rest. She had been crying
too, and could hardly summon up a wintry smile
to receive John; and the tears overflowed more
140 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

than once while he talked of his journey down, and
his mother’s rheumatism, and the tree that had been
blown down the night before in their garden, try-
ing to interest her and distract her thoughts by
talking on indifferent subjects. His hand was rest-
ing on the table as he spoke, and, without think-
ing, he took hold of the missionary-box close by,
and weighed it in his fingers. He hardly knew what
he had in his hand till Miss Toosey burst out cry-
ing, and covered her eyes with her handkerchief.

“It is nearly empty,” sobbed the poor old lady;

“nearly empty!”

And then John Rossitter pulled his chair nearer
to hers, and laid one of his warm, strong hands on
hee poor little weak cold one, and said, “What is it
you are fretting about? Tell me.”

And then she told him, sometimes interrupted by
her sobs, sometimes by the fits of coughing that left
her very breathless and exhausted. It had all failed,
all the five barley-loaves she had had to offer; they
were all worthless. She was too old and foolish
and ignorant to give lierself for the work; she was
too poor to give any moncy, and the little she had
saved with much care must go now for the doctor’s
bill; she had tried to give her time, but her anti-
macassars would not sell, and she could not paint
photographs; then she tried her influence; but she
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 141

did not think she had any, for every one laughed
when she spoke to them about the missions, and
Mrs. Gardner Jones was offended when she gave
her a tract with a negro’s face on it, and “Am I not
a man and a brother?”

“Then there was only my prayers, Mr. John, and
I did think I could have done that at least; and I
did keep on regularly with that prayer out of the
magazine, but the last three nights I’ve been so
tired and worn out that Betty would make me say
my prayers after I was in bed; and I don’t really
think I could have knelt down; and every night
I’ve dropped off to sleep before I got to the poor
heathen. So I’ve failed in that too. And I’ve been
thinking, thinking, thinking, as I sat here to-night,
Mr. John, that perhaps the Lord would not take my
barley-loaves, because they were so good-for-noth-
ing; but I’d nothing else, nothing else!”

I do not think that John Rossitter had ever
spoken a word on religious subjects in his life; he
avoided discussion on such matters like the plague;
and he was one of those reserved, deep natures
who shrink from letting curious eyes peer into the
sanctuary of their faith, and from dissecting their
religious opinions with that clumsy scalpel, the
tongue. Uninspired words seemed to him to be
too rude and unwieldy to convey the subtle mys-
142 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

teries of faith, to break with their jarring in-
sufficiency into the harmony of praise, to weigh
down the wing of prayer that is struggling towards
Heaven, to trouble the waters where we are trying
to see the reflection ‘‘as in a glass darkly.’’ ‘There
is but one power can open the close-sealed lips of
such a nature, and that-is when the angel takesa
live coal from the great Altar of love and lays it on
his mouth ; and then he speaks, and with a power
wanting in the glib outpourings of a shallower na-
nature. And so John Rossitter found himself speak-
ing words of comfort to Miss Toosey, which
seemed like a new language to his unaccustomed
lips; telling her how small, how poor everything
earthly is in God’s sight, and yet how nothing is
too small, nothing too poor for the good Lord’s no-
tice; how the greatest saint is, after all, only an un-
profitable servant ; and how He can take a loving,
bumble heart in His hand and make it as much as
He would.

‘‘And you’re sure, quite sure, that it’s not be-
cause He’s angry with me that He has not made
use of me?’’

‘* Dear old friend, He may make use of you yet.”

She was coughing badly just then, and when the
fit was over she shook her head. ‘‘ Not very likely
now Mr. John; but He knows I was willing, so it
doesn’t matter.’’
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 143

She got more cheerful then, and asked him to
come and see her again before he went back to
London, which he promised to do; and then he
rose to go away.

“You must not fret about the empty box,” he
said, “or I shall scold you next time I come. . And
look here, Miss Toosey, you have never asked me
to subscribe, though I have often teased you by
pretending to put buttons and rubbish into the
box.”

“Will you really?” she said. “I always fancied
that you did not hold with missions, and thought
them rather nonsense, though you were so kind to
me about it; but if you would it would be a comfort
to think the box was not quite empty.”

He felt in his pocket, but his purse was not there.
“You must give me credit, Miss Toosey,” he said,
smiling; “I shall consider it a debt. I promise tc
give—let me see—I must think how much I can
afford. I promise to give something to your Mis-
sion. And now make haste to bed, and get well.”

She was collecting her things together to go up-
stairs,—her spectacle-case, Bible, and one or two
books; and out of one of them a printed bit of
paper slipped and fluttered to John Rossitter’s
feet as he stood at the door. It was the prayer for
missions cut out of the magazine. He picked it up.
144 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

“And don’t fret yourself about the prayer either,”
he said; “let me have it, may I? And suppose I
say it for you? And don’t you think that ‘Thy
kingdom come’ will do for your missionary prayer
till you are better?”

And she smiled and nodded just like her old self
as she went out. ,

“She will soon be better,” John said to Betty, as
he passed her in the passage; but he did not guess
how soon.

“Mother,” he said next morning, coming into the
breakfast-room with a large bunch of bloomy
grapes in his hand, “will you make my peace with
Rogers? I have cut the best bunch in his house,
and I go in fear of my life from his vengeance.”

“My dear John, how very inconsiderate you are!
He will be so vexed! Why could not you have
asked him for it?”

“Tt was a sudden temptation that overtook me
when I passed through; and I am going to take
them to Miss Toosey; and if there is anything else
nice you can suggest for that poor little soul, I’ll
take it along with them.” :

Mrs. Rossitter was kind-hearted and liberal, and
she promised to send one of the maids into Martel
that afternoon with some invalid dainties; but John
insisted on taking the grapes himself, and marched
MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION. 145

off with them after breakfast, regardless of the ex-
postulations of his mother and Humphrey, who had
other views for passing the morning.

As John Rossitter turned the corner into North
Street he ran up against Mr. Ryder, and stopped
to talk to him about the pheasant-shooting in the
Rentmore coverts. ‘I am just going to ask for Miss
Toosey,” he said, as they were parting.

“Miss Toosey? Then you need not go any
further; she died last night.”

“Died!”

“Yes, poor old soul; and it was only a wonder
that she lived so long.”

John Ressitter turned and went on without
another word, leaving the doctor staring after him
in surprise. He went on to the house mechani-
cally, and had knocked at the door before he recol-
lected that there was no longer any object to his
visit. Betty opened the door, with a red, swollen
face and burst out crying at sight of him, and threw
her apron over her head in uncontrolled grief.

“All right,” he said, “I know;” and passed by
her and went into the little parlor, and sat down in
the same chair that he had sat in the night before,
and again involuntarily lifted the missionary-box
in his hand. Presently Betty, having partly recov-
ered herself, sidled into the room, glad of company
146 MISS TOOSE¥’?S MISSION.

in the “unked” quiet of the house. He asked no
questions; and by and by she sumoned cour-
age to tell him how the quiet end came at mid-
night. “Miss Baker have been in this morning al-
ready, asking me no end of questions; and she were
quite put out with me because I hadn’t nothing to
tell, and because Miss Toosey, poor dear! hadn't
said a lot of texes and fine things. She says, ‘Was
it a triumphal death? says she. And I said as how
I didn’t know what that might be; and then she
worrited to know what was the very last words as
ever Miss Toosey said, and I didn’t like for to tell
her, but she would have it. You see, sir, the old
lady said her prayers just as usual; and when I
went in to see as she were all right on my way to
bed, she says, ‘I’m pretty comfortable, Betty,’ says
she; ‘good-night to you; and you’ve not forgotten
to give Sammy his supper?’—as is the cat, sir. And
them’s the last words she uttered; for when I come
in half an hour after, hearing her cough, I see the
change was a-coming. But Miss Baker she didn't
like it when I told her, though it were her own
fault for asking; and she says, ‘So she didn’t testify
to her faith,’ says she. And I didn’t know what she
might mean, so I says, ‘ She were always good and
kind to me and every one,’ says 1; and so she
were,” added Betty, touching unknowingly on a




| Pi =1'
RY ||
Dye
" wh Wy i















(147)
MISS TOOSEY S MISSION. 149

great truth; “and if that’s testifying to her faith,
she’ve done it all her life.”

And then she left him sitting there and musing
on the quiet close of a quiet life, or rather the quiet
passing into fuller life; for what is death but “an
episode in life?’ There was nothing grand or
striking in Miss Toosey’s death—there very rarely
is; it is only now and then that there is a sunset
glory over this life’s evening; generally those
around see only the seed sown in weakness
and dishonor; generally when the glad summons
comes, “Friend, come up higher,’ the happy soul
rises up eager to obey and leave “the lower
places” without giving those left behind even a
glance of the brightness of the wedding garment,
or a word of the fulness of joy in the Bridegroom’s
presence.

And presently John Rossitter came away; and
though he held the missionary-box thoughtfully in
his hand, he put nothing into it. Had he forgotten
his promise to Miss Toosey, which he said he re-
garded as a debt, to give something to her Mission?

ES * ok ok * * xk *K *

“And so there is an end to poor Miss Toosey and

her Mission!” said Mr. Peters a few days later, as he
' met Mr. Glover returning from her funeral at the
cemetery; and Mr. Glover echoed the words with a
150 MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

superior, pitying smile: “So there is an end of poor
Miss Toosey and her Mission!”

Poor Miss Toosey! Why do people so often use
that expression about the happy dead? Surely they.
might find a more appropriate one for those who
have left the sordid poverty of life behind them and
have entered into so rich an inheritance! Of course
they do not really mean that it was “an end of Miss
Toosey,” for did they not say every Sunday, “T be-
lieve in the resurrection of the body and the life
everlasting’? and how could they call than an end
which was only the beginning of new life? So this
was only a figure of speech. But perhaps you will
echo Mr. Glover’s sigh over the end of her Mission,
and regret that such zeal and ardor should have
been wasted and produced no results. Wait a bit!
There is no waste in nature, science teaches us;
neither is there any in grace, says faith. We can-
not always see the results, but they are there as
surely in grace as in nature.,

That same evening John Rossitter wrote to the
Bishop cf Nawaub, and very humbly and diffidently
offered himself, his young life, his health and his
strength, his talents and energies, his younger son’s
portion, all that God had given him, for his Mas-
ter’s use; and the Bishop who never ceased to pray
“the Lord of the Harvest to send forth laborers
into the harvest,” “thanked God and took courage.”
HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.

PHILADELPHIA, PA.



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QUO VADIS. A tale of the time of Nero, by Henryk
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WITH FIRE AND SWORD. By the author of “ Quo

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THE AGE OF FABLE; OR, BEAUTIES OF MYTH-
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This work has always been regarded as classical
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HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.



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STEPHEN. A SOLDIER OF THE CROSS, by Flor-
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has so vividly portrayed the times of Christ.”—
“The Bookseller.” Cloth, 12mo, 369 pages, $1.00.

THE CROSS TRIUMPHANT, by Florence Morse
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The story of “a child of the law,” who
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death of Jesus, the deepening conflict between the
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Jerusalem’s downfall “The Cross Triumphant.”
Cloth, 12mo, 364 pages, $1.00.

PAUL. A HERALD OF THE CROSS, by Florence
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AMERICAN POLITICS (non-Partisan), by Hon.
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THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS, as John Bunyan wrote
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THE FAIREST OF THE FAIR, by Hildegarde Haw-
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HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.

AROUND THE WORLD IN EIGHTY MINUTES.
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PREPARATION FOR MOTHERHOOD, by Elisabeth
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BABY’S REQUIREMENTS, by Elisabeth R. Scovil.
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NAMES FOR CHILDREN, by Elisabeth Robinson Sco
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TRIF AND TRIXY, by John Habberton, author of
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SHE WHO WILL NOT WHEN SHE MAY, by Eleanor
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A SON OF THE CAROLINAS, by C. E. Satterthwaite.
A pure romance introducing a lifelike portrayal
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Cloth, 12mo, 280 pages, 50 cents.

THE DAY BREAKETH, by Fannie Alricks Shugert.
A tale of Rome and Jerusalem in the time of
Christ. Cloth, 12mo, 280 pages, 50 cents.

WHAT WOMEN SHOULD KNOW. A woman’s book
about women. By Mrs. E. B. Duffy. Cloth, 320
pages, 75 cents.

3
HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.



THE DORE BIBLE GALLERY. A complete pano-
rama of Bible History, containing 100 full-page en-
gravings by Gustave Dore.

MILTON;S PARADISE LOST, with 50 full-page engrav-
ings by Gustave Dore.

DANTE’S INFERNO, with 75 full-page engravings by
Gustave Dore.

DANTE’S PURGATORY AND PARADISE, with 60
full-page engravings by Gustave Dore.

TENNYSON’S IDYLLS OF THE KING, with 37 full-
page engravings by Gustave Dore.

THE RIME OF THE ANCIENT MARINER, by Sam-
uel Taylor Coleridge, with 46 full-page engravings
by Gustave Dore.

Cloth, ornamental, large quarto (9x12 inches,), each
$2.00.

BUNYAN’S PILGRIM’S PROGRESS, with 100 engrav-
ings by Frederick Barnard and others. Cloth,
small quarto (9x10 inches), $1.00.

DICKENS’ CHILD’S HISTORY OF ENGLAND, with
75 fine engravings by famous artists. Cloth, small

5 quarto, boxed (9x10 inches), $1.00.

BIBLE PICTURES AND STORIES, 100 full-page en-
gravings. Cloth, small quarto (7x9 inches), $1.00.

MY ODD LITTLE FOLK, some rhymes and verses
about them, by Malcolm Douglass. Numerous
original engravings. Cloth, small quarto (7x9
inches), $1.00. 2

PAUL AND VIRGINIA, by Bernardin de St. Pierre,
with 125 engravings by Maurice Leloir. Cloth,
small quarto (9x10), $1.00.

LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.
with 120 original engravings by Walter Paget.
Cloth, octavo (714x9%), $1.50.

ALTEMUS’ ILLUSTRATED LIBRARY OF
STANDARD AUTHORS.

Cloth, 12mo. Size 514x744 Inches. Each $1.00.

TALES FROM SHAKSPEARE, by Charles and Mary
Lamb, with 155 illustrations by famous artists.
HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.



PAUL AND VIRGINIA, by Bernardin de St. Pierre,
with 125 engravings by Maurice Leloir.

ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND, AND
THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS AND
WHAT ALICE FOUND THERE, by Lewis Car-
roll. Complete in one volume with 92 engravings
by John Tenniel.

LUCILE, by Owen Meredith, with numerous illustra-
tions by George Du Maurier, author of “ Trilby.”

BLACK BEAUTY, by Anna Sewell, with nearly 50
original engravings. ‘

SCARLET LETTER, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, with
numerous original full-page and text illustrations.

THE HOUSE OF THE SEVEN GABLES, by Nathan-
iel Hawthorne, with numerous original full-page
and text illustrations.

BATTLES OF THE WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE, by
Prescott Holmes, with 70 illustrations.

BATTLES OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION, by Pres-
ecott Holmes with 80 illustrations.

THE SONG OF HIAWATHA, by Henry W. Longfel-
low, with 100 illustrations.

ALTEMUS’ YOUNG PEOPLES’ LIBRARY.
Price, 50 cents each.

ROBINSON CRUSOE: (Chiefly in words of one sylla-
ble). His life and strange, surprising adventures,
with 70 beautiful illustrations by Walter Paget.

ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND, with
42 illustrations by John Tenniel. ‘“ The most de-
lightful of children’s stories. Elegant and de-
licious nonsense.”—“ Saturday Review.”

THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS AND WHAT
ALICE FOUND THERE; a companion to “Alice
in Wonderland,” with 50 illustrations by John
Tenniel.

BUNYAN’S PILGRIM’S PROGRESS, with 50 full-page
and text illustrations.
HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.

Altemus’ Young Peoples’ Library—Continued.

A CHILD’S STORY OF THE BIBLE, with 72 full-page

illustrations.

A CHILD’S LIFE OF CHRIST, with 49 illustrations.
God has implanted in the infant heart a desire
to hear of Jesus, and children are early attracted
and sweetly riveted by the wonderful Story of the

. Master from the Manger to the Throne,

SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON, with 50 illustrations.
The father of the family tells the tale of the
vicissitudes through which he and his wife and
children pass, the wonderful discoveries made and
dangers encountered. The book is full of interest
and instruction.

CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS AND THE DISCOV-
ERY OF AMERICA, with 70 illustrations. Every
American boy and girl should be acquainted with
the story of the life of the great discoverer, with
its struggles, adventures, and trials.

THE STORY OF EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY
IN AFRICA, with 80 illustrations. Records the
experiences of adventures and discoveries in de-
veloping the “ Dark Continent,” from the early
days of Bruce and Mungo Park down to Living-
stone and Stanley, and the heroes of our own
times. No present can be more acceptable than
‘such a volume as this, where courage, intrepidity,
resource, and devotion are so admirably mingled.

THE FABLES OF AESOP. Compiled from the best ac-
cepted sources. With 62 illustrations. The fables
of A’sop are among the very earliest compositions
of this kind, and probably have never been sur-
passed for point and brevity.

GULLIVER’S TRAVELS. Adapted for young readers,
with 50 illustrations.

MOTHER GOOSE’S RHYMES, JINGLES AND
FAIRY TALES, with 234 illustrations.
6
HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.



Altemus’ Young Peoples’ Library—Continued.

LIVES OF THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED
STATES, by Prescott Holmes. With portraits of
the Presidents and also of the unsuccessful can-
didates for the office; as well as the ablest of the
Cabinet officers. It is just the book for intelli-
gent boys, and it will help to make them intelli-
gent and patriotic citizens.

THE STORY OF ADVENTURE IN THE FROZEN
SEAS, with 70 illustrations. By Prescott Holmes.
We have here brought together the records of the
attempts to reach the North Pole. The book
shows how much can be accomplished by steady
perseverance and indomitable pluck.

ILLUSTRATED NATURAL HISTORY, by the Rev.
J. G. Wood, with 80 illustrations. This author
has done more to popularize the study of natural
history than any other writer. The illustrations
are striking and life-like.

A CHILD’S HISTORY OF ENGLAND, by Charles
Dickens, with 50 illustrations. Tired of listening
to his children memorize the twaddle of old-
fashioned English history, the author covered the
ground in his own peculiar and happy style for his
ewn children’s use. When the work was pub-
lished its success was instantaneous.

BLACK BEAUTY: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A
HORSE, by Anna Sewell, with 50 illustrations.
A work sure to educate boys and girls to treat
with kindness all members of the animal kingdom.
Recognized as the greatest story of animal life ex-
tant.

THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS, with
130 illustrations. Contains the most favorably
known of the stories.

GRIMM’S FAIRY TALES. With 55 illustrations.

The Tales are a wonderful collection, as inter-
esting, from a literary point of view, -.as they are
delightful as stories.

FLOWER FABLES. By Louisa May Alcott. With nu-
merous illustrations, full-page and text.

A series of very interesting fairy tales by the
most charming of American story-tellers.
HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.



.Altemus’ Young Peoples’ Library—Continued.

ANDERSEN’S FAIRY TALES. By Hans Christian
Andersen. With 77 illustrations.

The spirit of high moral teaching, and the deli-
cacy of sentiment, feeling, and expression that per-
vade these tales make these wonderful creations
not only attractive to the young, but equally ac-
ceptable to those of mature years, who are able
to understand their real significance and apprec-
ciate the depth of their meaning.

GRANDFATHER’S CHAIR; A HISTORY FOR
YOUTH. By Nathaniel Hawthorne. With 60 il-
lustrations.

The story of America from the landing of the
Puritans to the acknowledgment without reserve
of the Independence of the United States, told
with all the elegance, simplicity, grace, clearness

and force for which Hawthorne is conspicuously
noted.

AUNT MARTHA’S CORNER CUPBOARD, by Mary
and Elizabeth Kirby, with 60 illustrations. Stor-
ies about Tea, Coffee, Sugar, Rice and Chinaware,
and other accessories of the well-kept Cupboard.
A book full of interest for all the girls and many
of the boys. :

BATTLES OF THE WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE,
by Prescott Holmes, with 70 illustrations. A
graphic and full history of the Rebellion of the
American Colonies from the yoke and oppression
of England, with the causes that led thereto, and
including an account of the second war with Great
Britain, and the War with Mexico.

BATTLES OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION, by Pres-
cott Holmes, with 80 illustrations. A correct and
impartial account of the greatest civil war in the
annals of history. Both of these histories of
American wars are a necessary part of the educa:
tion of all intelligent American boys and girls.

8
HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.



ALTEMU®S’ KIPLING SERIES. :

Embracing the best known tales and stories of this
popular writer. Presented in attractive handy volume
size, and adapted for leisure moment reading. Large
type, superior paper and attractive binding. Cloth, 35
cents.

J. THE DRUMS OF THE FORE AND AFT.

THE MAN WHO WAS.

WITHOUT BENEFIT OF CLERGY.

RECRUDESCENCE OF IMRAY.

ON GREENHOW HILL.

WEE WILLIE WINKIE.

THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING.

MY OWN TRUE GHOST STORY.

THE COURTING OF DINAH SHADD.

THE INCARNATION OF KRISHNA MUL-
VANEY.

11. HIS MAJESTY THE KING. .

12. WITH THE MAIN GUARD.

13. THE THREE MUSKETEERS.

14. LISPETH. .

15. CUPID’S ARROWS.

16. IN THE HOUSE OF SUDDHOO.

17. THE BRONCKHORST DIVORCE-CASE.

18. THE JUDGMENT OF DUNGARA.

19. GEMINI.

20. AT TWENTY-TWO.

21. ON THE CITY WALL.

ALTEMU®S’ ILLUSTRATED ONE SYLLABLE
SERIES FOR YOUNG READEARS.

SO IO ore go

_

Embracing popular works arranged for the young folks
in words of one syllable.

Printed from extra large clear type on fine enamelled
paper and fully illustrated by famous artists. The hand-
somest line of books for young children before the pub-
lic.

Fine English cloth; handsome, new, original designs,
50° cents.

1. ASSOP’S FABLES. 62 illustrations.
2. A CHILD’S LIFE OF CHRIST. 49 illustrations.
9 i
HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.

e One Syllable Series—Continued.
8. A CHILD’S STORY OF THE BIBLE. 72 illustra-
tions. :

4. THE ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.
70 illustrations.

5. BUNYAN’S PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 46 illustra-
tions.

6. SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 50 illustrations.

7. GULLIVER’S TRAVELS. 50 illustrations.

HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.

ALTEMUS’ NEW ILLUSTRATED VADEMECUM
SERIES.

Masterpieces of English and American literature,
handy volume size, large type editions. Each volume
contains illuminated title pages, etched portrait of
author or colored frontispiece and numerous engravings.

Full cloth, ivory ‘finish, ornamental inlaid sides and
back, boxed, 40 cents. .

1. ABBE CONSTANTIN.—Halevy.

2. ADVENTURES OF A BROWNIE.—Mulock.

3. ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND.—
Carroll.

4. AMERICAN NOTES.—Kipling.

5. AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF BENJAMIN FRANK-

LIN.

6. AUTOCRAT OF THE BREAKFAST TABLE.—
Holmes.

11. BAB BALLALDS AND SAVOY SONGS.—Gil-
bert.

12. BACON’S ESSAYS.
13. BALZAC’S SHORTER STORIES.
14. BARRACK-ROOM BALLADS AND DITTIES.—
Kipling.
15. BATTLE OF LIFE.—Dickens.
16. BIGLOW PAPERS.—Lowell.
17. BLACK BEAUTY.—Sewell.
18. BLITHEDALE ROMANCE, THE.—Hawthorne.
19. BRACEBRIDGE HALL.—Irving.
20. BRYANT’S POEMS.
26. CAMILLE.—Dumas, Jr.
27. CARMEN.—Merimee.
10
28.
29.

30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.

36.
37.
38.
43.
44,

45.
46.
47.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
61.
62.
63.
67.
68.
69.
74.
75.
76.
ig
78.
79.
80.
81.
87.

88.

HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.

Vademecum Series—Continued. *

CHARLOTTE TEMPLE.—Rowson.
CHESTERFIELD’S LETTERS, SENTENCES
AND MAXIMS.
CHILD’S GARDEN OF VERSES.—Stevenson.
CHILDE HAROLD’S PILGRIMAGE.—Byron.
CHIMES, THE.—Dickens.
CHRISTIE’S OLD ORGAN.—Walton.
CHRISTMAS CAROL, A.—Dickens.
CONFESSIONS OF AN OPIUM EATER.—De
Quincey.
CRANFORD.—Gaskell.
CRICKET ON THE HEARTH.—Dickens.
CROWN OF WILD OLIVE, THE.—Ruskin.
DAY BREAKETH, THE. —Shug ert.
DAYS WITH SIR ROGER DE COVERLY.—
Addison.
DISCOURSES, EPICTETUS.
DOG OF FLANDERS, A.—Ouida.
DREAM LIFE.—Mitchell.
EMERSON’S ESSAYS, FIRST SERIES.
EMERSON’S ESSAYS, SECOND SERIES.
ENDYMEF0ON —Keats.
ESSAYS OF ELIA.—Lamb.
ETHICS OF THE DUST.—Ruskin.
EVANGELINE.—Longfellow.
FAIRY LAND OF SCIENCE.—Buckley.
FANCHON.—Sand.
FOR DAILY BREAD.—Sienkiewicz.
GRAMMAR OF PALMISTRY.—S8t. Hill.
GREEK HEROES.—Kingsley.
GULLIVER’S TRAVEL’S.—Swift.
HANIA.—Sienkiewicz.
HAUNTED MAN, THE.—Dickens.
HEROES AND HERO WORSHIP.—Carlyle.
HIAWATHA, THE SONG OF.—Longfellow.
HOLME’S POEMS.
HOUSE OF THE SEVEN GABLES.—Hawthorne.
HOUSE OF THE WOLF.—Weyman.
HYPERION.—Longfellow.
IDLE THOUGHTS OF AN IDLE FELLOW.—
Jerome.
IDYLLS OF THE KING.—Tennyson.
IMPREGNABLE ROCK OF HOLY SCRIPT-
URE.—Gladstone.
11
91.

97.
101.
102.
103.

107.
108.
109.
110.
lil.
112.
113,
114,
115.
116.
117.
118.
119.
120.
126.
127.
128.
129.
130.
131.
132,
133.
134.
140.

141.

145.
146,
150.
151.
152.
153.
154,
155,

HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.

Vademecum Series—Continued.

IN BLACK AND WHITE.—Kipling.

IN MEMORIAM.—Tennyson.

JESSICA’S FIRST PRAYER.—Stretton.

J. COLE.—Gellibrand.

KAVANAGH.—Longfellow.

KIDNAPPED.—Stevenson.

KNICKERBOCKER’S HISTORY OF NEW
YORK.—Irving.

LA BELLE NIVERNAISE.—Daudet. f

LADDIE AND MISS TOOSEY’S MISSION.

LADY OF THE LAKE.—Scott.

LALLA ROOKH.—Moore.

LAST ESSAYS OF ELIA.—Lamb.

LAYS OF ANCIENT ROME, THE.—Macaulay.

LET US FOLLOW HIM.—Sienkiewicz.

LIGHT OF ASIA.—Arnold.

LIGHT THAT FAILED, THE.—Kipling.

LITTLE LAME PRINCE.—Mulock.

LONGFELLOW’S POEMS, VOL. I.

LONGFELLOW’S POEMS, VOL. II.

LOWELL’S POEMS.

LUCILE.—Meredith.

MAGIC NUTS, THE.—Molesworth.

MANON LESCAUT.—Prevost.

MARMION.—Scott.

MASTER OF BALLANTRAE, THE.—Stevenson

MILTON’S POEMS.

MINE OWN PEOPLE.—Kipling.

MINISTER OF THE WORLD.—Mason.

MOSSES FROM AN OLD MANSE.—Hawthorne

MULVANEY STORIES.—Kipling.

NATURAL LAW IN THE SPIRITUAL
WORLD.—Drummond.

NATURE, ADDRESSES, AND LECTURES.—
Emerson.

OLD CHRISTMAS.—Irving.

OUTRE-MER.—Longfellow.

PARADISE LOST.—Milton.

PARADISE REGAINED.—Milton.

PAUL AND VIRGINIA.—Sainte Pierre.

PETER SCHLEMIHL.—Chamisso.

PHANTOM RICKSHAW.—Kipling.

PILGRIM’S PROGRESS, THE.—Bunyan.

12
156.
157.
158.
159.
160.

161.
162.
169.
172.
173.
174.
175.
176.

dats
182.
183.
184.
185.
186.
187.
188.
189.
190.
191.
192.
199.
200.
201.
202.
203.
204.
205.
206.
207.
208.
209.
210.
217.
218.

HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.

Vademecum Series—Continued.

PLAIN TALES FROM THE HILLS.—Kipling.
PLEASURES OF LIFE.—Lubbock.
PLUTARCH’S LIVES.
POE’S POEMS.
PRINCE OF THE HOUSE OF DAVID.—Ingra-
ham.
PRINCESS AND MAUD.—Tennyson.
PRUE AND I.—Curtis.
QUEEN OF THE AIR.—Ruskin.
RAB AND HIS FRIENDS.—Brown.
REPRESENTATIVE MEN.—Emerson.
REVERIES OF A BACHELOR.—Mitchell.
RIP VAN WINKLE.—Irving.
ROMANCE OF A POOR YOUNG MAN—
Feuillet.
RUBAIYAT OF OMAR KHAYYAM.—
SAMANTHA AT SARATOGA.—Holley.
SARTOR RESARTUS.—Carlyle.
SCARLET LETTER, THE.—Hawthorne.
SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL.—Sheridan.
SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY, A.—Sterne.
SESAME ANL LILIES.—Ruskin.
SHAKSPEARE’S HEROINES.—Jameson.
SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER.—Goldsmith.
SILAS MARNER.—Eliot.
SKETCH BOOK, THE.—Irving.
SNOW IMAGE, THE.—Hawthorne.
TALES FROM SHAKSPEARE.—Lamb.
TANGLEWOOD TALES.—Hawthorne.
TARTARIN OF TARASCON.—Daudet.
TARTARIN ON THE ALPS.—Daudet.
TEN NIGHTS IN A BAR-ROOM.—Arthur.
THINGS WILL TAKE A TURN.—Harraden.
THOUGHTS.—_MARCUS AURELIUS.
THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS.—Carroll.
TOM BROWN’S SCHOOL DAYS.—Hughes.
TREASURE ISLAND.—Stevenson.
TWICE TOLD TALES.—Hawthorne.
TWO YEARS BEFORE THE MAST.—Dana.
UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.—Stowe.
UNDINE.—Fouque.
VIC; THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A FOX:
TERRIER.—Marsh.
13
223.
226.
227.
228.
229.
230.
231.
232.
233.
234,
241,
244,

HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.
Vademecum Series—Continued.

VICAR OF WAKEFIELD.—Goldsmith.
WALDEN.—Thoreau.

WATER BABIES.—Kingsley.

WEIRD TALES.—Poe.

WHAT IS ART?—Tolstoi.

WHITTIER’S POEMS, VOL. I.
WHITTIER’S POEMS, VOL. IT.
WINDOW IN THRUMS.—Parrie.
WOMAN’S WORK IN THE HOME.—Farrar.
WONDER BOOK, A.—Hawthorne.
YELLOWPLUSH PAPERS, THE.—Thackeray.
ZOE.—By author of “ Laddie,”’ ete.

ALTEMUS' ILLUSTRATED DEVOTIONAL

SERIES.

Full White Vellum, handsome new mosaic design in

DD
SE SOO AOR SW G9 NDE -6O.200: tA 9 UNOS SND

wr
Noe

gold and colors, gold edges, Boxed, 50 cents.

ABIDE IN CHRIST.—Murray.

AT THE BEAUTIFUL GATE.

BEECHER’S ADDRESSES.

BEST THOUGHTS.—From Henry Drummond.

BIBLE BIRTHDAY BOOK.

BROOKS’ ADDRESSES.

CHAMBER OF PEACE.

CHANGED CROSS, THE.

CHRISTIAN LIFE.—Oxenden.

CHRISTIAN LIVING.—Meyer.

CHRISTIAN’S SECRET OF A HAPPY LIFE.

CHRISTIE’S OLD ORGAN.—Walton.

COMING TO CHRIST.—Havergal.

DAILY FOOD FOR CHRISTIANS.

DAY BREAKETH, THE.—Shugert.

DAYS OF GRACE.—Murray.

DRUMMOND’S ADDRESSES.

EVENING THOUGHTS.—Havergal.

GOLD DUST.

HOLY IN CHRIST.—Murray.

IMITATION OF CHRIST, THE.—A’Kemp’s.

IMPREGNABLE ROCK OF HOLY SCRIPTURE.
—Gladstone.

“ 14
23.
24,
25.
- 26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.

36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42,

43.
44,
45,
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.

HENRY ALTEMUS’ PUBLICATIONS.

Devotional Series—Continued.

JESSICA’S FIRST PRAYER.—Stretton.

JOHN PLOUGHMAN’S PICTURES.—Spurgeon.

JOHN PLOUGHMAN’S TALK.—Spurgeon.

KEPT FOR THE MASTER’S USE.—Havergal.

KEBLE’S CHRISTIAN YEAR.

LET US FOLLOW HIM.—Sienkiewicz.

LIKE CHRIST.—Murray.

LINE UPON LINE.

MANLINESS OF CHRIST, THE.—Hughes.

MESSAGE OF PEACE, THE.—Church.

MORNING THOUGHTS.—Havergal.

MY KING AND HIS SERVICE.—Havergal.

NATURAL LAW IN THE SPIRITUAL
WORLD.—Drummond.

PALACE OF THE KING.

PATHWAY OF PROMISE.

PATHWAY OF SAFETY.—Oxenden.

PEEP OF DAY.

PILGRIM’S PROGRESS, THE.—Bunyan.

PRECEPT UPON PRECEPT.

PRINCE OF THE HOUSE OF DAVID—Ingra-
ham.

SHADOW OF THE ROCK.

SHEPHERD PSALM.—Meyer.

STEPS INTO THE BLESSED LIFE.—Meyer,

STEPPING HEAVENWARD.—Prentiss,

THE THRONE OF GRACE.

UNTO THE DESIRED HAVEN,

UPLANDS OF GOD.

WITH CHRIST.—Murray.

15
ALTEMUS’ EDITION SHAKSPEARE PLAYS,

HANDY VOLUME SIZE.

Limp cloth binding, gold top, illuminated title 2
frontispiece, 35 cents.

no NYE eH eee
SSYSRRSBSESBSSNSSRSRESSSUSTR SEES SmNanReNE

ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL.
ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM.
AS YOU LIKE IT.

COMEDY OF ERRORS.
CORIOLANUS.

CYMBELINE.

HAMLET.

JULIUS CAISAR.

KING HENRY IV. (Part I).
KING HENRY IV. (Part II).
KING HENRY V.

KING HENRY VI. (Part I).
KING HENRY VI. (Part II).
KING HENRY VI. (Part III).
KING HENRY VIII.

KING JOHN.

KING LEAR.

KING RICHARD II.

KING RICHARD III.

LOVE’S LABOUR’S LOST.
MACBETH.

MEASURE FOR MEASURE.

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING,
OTHELLO.

PERICLES.

ROMEO AND JULIET.

THE MERCHANT OF VENICE.
THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR.
THE TAMING OF THE SHREW.
THE TEMPEST.

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA.

. THE WINTER’S TALE.

TIMON OF ATHENS.

TITUS ANDRONICUS.

TROILUS AND CRESSIDA.

TWELFTH NIGHT.

VENUS AND ADONIS AND LUCRECE.

SONNETS, PASSIONATE PILGRIM, ETC.
16
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04a876b473f2f6339775812ef1dbd2f2
b31608c4c4085b42fefd64e9d33da0ba11fb9554
'2012-01-15T05:50:49-05:00'
describe
'5476' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKF' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
a4b751fe8e71cb814e5eb766b2634f34
fdbeeb0be4890e7a48963f4439cc8048171061f8
'2012-01-15T05:50:27-05:00'
describe
'2170948' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKG' 'sip-files00014.tif'
a1ad0388a84be81bef13bac521940479
1bfe78751d26ea3d8f303443f8bcace8e0f7552b
'2012-01-15T05:50:41-05:00'
describe
'93' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKH' 'sip-files00014.txt'
50051a5e8eb6fc7e8813b6edbe923c54
c8f85d4c8c68400914b09855aeba1b2738f0d97e
'2012-01-15T05:50:05-05:00'
describe
'2614' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKI' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
7b7e92c4b3677a2bc70af45ee1f2770a
dfdac57c11c8762acd2b114a0ed1b88c1bb6a98e
'2012-01-15T05:49:50-05:00'
describe
'271904' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKJ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
aeafc5fb7a5fdf9dde8a851a6053e980
58ed160c654d136fb0690ea9ca4fc6e4ce2ca89d
describe
'17684' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKK' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
c6fa3283cc4839821f7fb4a29e94d33d
c03cd86748de878f0767463d101677e0c347a52a
describe
'450' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKL' 'sip-files00015.pro'
e029d2b32b045cccc9c84abcc9e18c5d
2347af7be91f8d50942b351cffb12e2a9120b347
'2012-01-15T05:49:49-05:00'
describe
'5848' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKM' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
9d9f49f58c5dbc198a007f54b17e6e8e
74d85e561b39a4ed6542a7a65cce15e45034db39
'2012-01-15T05:49:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKN' 'sip-files00015.tif'
009f77891a7cc8ccf4158fbfb50a2098
8722a72350b224fd051890be885e6acfea430611
describe
'34' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKO' 'sip-files00015.txt'
fd978e9ae77190d75fcc45fcb7ca5401
12ff58a14677680735b83bccbc9235933c42985c
'2012-01-15T05:48:44-05:00'
describe
'2075' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKP' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
ee3c011b1e885d446e4d8ed32067fcd7
ff797ff02b7bc7e59dffb18cf985def6ed84cc52
describe
'271919' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKQ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
be1408284eed02b1fbfb11443a90c4ee
9a58835147e1091f3ba7a9ac38a385d7cf092353
'2012-01-15T05:49:55-05:00'
describe
'63128' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKR' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
ac67f08e882d7cf35e0ce2a3f05e4d64
04d63efdd524f4f1789908806eb2faa8fcc49ebe
'2012-01-15T05:48:17-05:00'
describe
'20868' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKS' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
c97b7ee5cdb4b9ed600c5f0a842ad66d
210ea5217bb9c720d2c83936e593b93290e3d7ec
'2012-01-15T05:48:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKT' 'sip-files00018.tif'
769eb6fb4f70a3ddb0ab6a4be923786c
785ca129e3e19a605dc0cff26867be3359be201e
'2012-01-15T05:50:36-05:00'
describe
'6351' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKU' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
71ba916a2e959e429d415f37d3272368
4c6cc06b2a9366266dc9a1481fa6045e37641c6b
'2012-01-15T05:48:53-05:00'
describe
'271838' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKV' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
e62a20073869406e7f89a0750be373e0
b2a3d5733553b2066e44fbafca445da5b79220bc
'2012-01-15T05:50:47-05:00'
describe
'99903' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKW' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
300a4602f7e44df46193c8d5401b1b06
7913c5182030dc2def76bc58238126c4ed50ad28
'2012-01-15T05:49:14-05:00'
describe
'26445' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKX' 'sip-files00019.pro'
51519ed0f72e65081e83fd4990aa6320
78a09be17a2d8206cfc3f8fc0b9a6a9259da8fc6
'2012-01-15T05:48:36-05:00'
describe
'34621' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKY' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
f9c7b322212cfea842a40eb12e0ed0fb
45513aef959fec795737426a6f40b69454f527dc
'2012-01-15T05:50:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLKZ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
20d6797643458c05fc6fd8bc26deee64
ecf461fde41066ed519d65945881d04528a276f9
'2012-01-15T05:47:11-05:00'
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
2b6a63a9644a3334766a4f3a776931c6
d10ed3ca6caac6127827f6857dac70dc6ce56272
'2012-01-15T05:47:54-05:00'
describe
'8771' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLB' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
f17776a2fef8b50c7461ba9e28ae06ed
7cb8cfcb5f65a2cde8f0f349777d1824b4e45acd
'2012-01-15T05:51:01-05:00'
describe
'271887' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
a12e6fe2e2d66696f241d5fc6c59bf45
6a608e0481d6ace478fbca3cda944837453bc6e8
describe
'131725' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLD' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
b1f1de5759c323e162a1857a3d911e44
2b81eb321bad1d57a10f29429c9184ee72334b56
describe
'36506' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLE' 'sip-files00020.pro'
eaaf622eb42f69f1ca1cfd51e3917e10
9c01ea59f641c60a4753bc3f98b6dfa675c1fa46
'2012-01-15T05:50:52-05:00'
describe
'45679' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLF' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
95282f01998ea21407011e00f2fbd26a
42321a5b2cef416e8b3e4d65f474324fd5c9a7b3
'2012-01-15T05:47:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLG' 'sip-files00020.tif'
1f834e3a20f18fb140974b29afc1068d
677610704b9f93e1fef831cd8fad57838839391d
'2012-01-15T05:48:45-05:00'
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLH' 'sip-files00020.txt'
4e9f56aff165880e6375dc52fb15a3f7
e8abbf8b67a016454757096fa9cc3f7705b4ed2c
'2012-01-15T05:50:13-05:00'
describe
'10956' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLI' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
c8fbcb919f0f00049251c8865203b369
a4f56b6a0c7c6794cf05e12b0b5c6a18eff513df
'2012-01-15T05:48:58-05:00'
describe
'271899' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLJ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
e78aba33e3e8a5b604771e388b39730e
1fb631056bce05a141a4690f29c459df41028f38
'2012-01-15T05:47:59-05:00'
describe
'135454' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLK' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
50094c5ed86f26de9a5a069dd96923df
b6596930e1ff181c1dfe840824b29e594230bb9e
describe
'36298' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLL' 'sip-files00021.pro'
a4a6b7a4d5f16c23bc2ada6daec75b55
072117750475dc8303cd496d6c2187f5ba947406
'2012-01-15T05:50:59-05:00'
describe
'46424' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLM' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
d3fbe15a7e5f08a6b507da437b821500
b04721d2e2c12a2d6852c2f232d982415284b63b
'2012-01-15T05:48:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLN' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7ace62a45d85fd526ea93c7baf009046
50f15422e426951232bd3ec3f083e7a2a79f0bf4
'2012-01-15T05:47:27-05:00'
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLO' 'sip-files00021.txt'
35c9ec26dde2caca19e0a746abe1d788
67c515288bbbe96ebe7cda3d8fdde4a4b401bb0b
'2012-01-15T05:47:18-05:00'
describe
'11204' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLP' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
939f8c1df388e8dba12720a8a1113672
37cdd2113c62bf3751fced294c98febdec5502a8
'2012-01-15T05:49:34-05:00'
describe
'271886' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLQ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
ac0a0b811214e05b6271980daf619dc7
da7294b692c4d7a9f09dc093d3a6614953abdac5
'2012-01-15T05:47:19-05:00'
describe
'124922' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLR' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
5c356add97019efbf91ac4d7e3bb5b04
802635f339297816f84ac7bd9c7fbf5d8e5c9ec6
'2012-01-15T05:49:47-05:00'
describe
'33891' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLS' 'sip-files00022.pro'
e6ebead45d694ff6f4db2c258e9fe045
586850b0f4f847c4749b7e8a92ec1fb8a4af1f5f
'2012-01-15T05:50:53-05:00'
describe
'44707' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLT' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
edc33d135a889e61ca84a6b9e87c7c43
f9142e4f1f494220e143c0602a80821747cdb07e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLU' 'sip-files00022.tif'
c93efb3c1a5de0e61e14820370c2151c
2902d899f13d198896c5ba86a11b1b6ea1e5f987
'2012-01-15T05:48:43-05:00'
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLV' 'sip-files00022.txt'
2ab803d78e44986c58a4da5c52c7b2d5
6337d6996cba5d5d708906f9077af8cde8bdc257
'2012-01-15T05:48:12-05:00'
describe
'10996' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLW' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
b8a40ccbdf24b0bb7b8b6cadcc8459c9
2d1707baf1e2e527d3b3bd623e6015847a0a0d48
'2012-01-15T05:48:22-05:00'
describe
'271892' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLX' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
85a5fa88f61c574679c9ad15b5ff1173
4caca016f5ae91be64ab4031c907c79c93572f93
'2012-01-15T05:48:23-05:00'
describe
'129074' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLY' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
d0b6594ebe61dda888765aa0214bd1b9
958e3a32b4a885a0517357f9b2529d09e6167bfb
'2012-01-15T05:47:47-05:00'
describe
'33978' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLLZ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
11842e41bf73b20c8294b4335eeb868c
e88f4924274ab7fe9f24dbbfe9129d0326fb1fcf
'2012-01-15T05:50:46-05:00'
describe
'44998' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMA' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
056e5dfdd18e4b78adcbc968b8e397cf
247383902af852c0327d6323bcd8f8ac8bbf458f
'2012-01-15T05:49:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMB' 'sip-files00023.tif'
5f77ba496cc5fea3de6d09b2307e3dd9
99ea4003d8f762da0ee9f1b44a0476c8217220e3
'2012-01-15T05:47:15-05:00'
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMC' 'sip-files00023.txt'
86454845a96a991bcd905ec7d3ce9b26
f7c5fc25d932b29216c44a5a6349f0fece6930f8
describe
'10754' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMD' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
2092c7efe2e222e05432353d4abbaea5
08aae0c721db12cfa0704bb369f8462a33cf3a27
'2012-01-15T05:49:54-05:00'
describe
'271817' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLME' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
e2ce3b1154c1f61e17ac2a4b8ed34c1f
7b38087a7ff69caf918e713374337946c41b2fc4
'2012-01-15T05:48:42-05:00'
describe
'131872' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMF' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
a416d67e5c91aaec2a40066bd4eca310
cc37bd38beb8795fa14e7fc6d64150e2a4c06ecc
'2012-01-15T05:47:58-05:00'
describe
'35854' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMG' 'sip-files00024.pro'
7ff5b820860dbabcbcf0f3fa5f7f1765
fa2e5cc8d328916b57113baa9bdb8e68294966a2
'2012-01-15T05:49:03-05:00'
describe
'46005' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMH' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
d5ecb4fe32282764366f3cd189c83be8
a51bcfa9b9503c6f53a046bb27f612abfd30888e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMI' 'sip-files00024.tif'
d4050069786c7be1cf2ad80f69a16766
b5581f89721ad931def41b642e1e667a70cedd96
'2012-01-15T05:50:33-05:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMJ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
408e616f751d93a9d95f9b6d032a148d
92c3fc7f1b8916c59fffa1baa06bcce57fc266e0
'2012-01-15T05:50:51-05:00'
describe
'10966' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMK' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
614daf3cfee5d96bb367a4dcb607029e
a0adcc59f1c00e3be33b48acdcf11892492be410
'2012-01-15T05:48:41-05:00'
describe
'271913' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLML' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
43adf37ee024debd288304744fb860b9
73b2fbcd9070da5cb4b3ebdf5561354a1856db03
'2012-01-15T05:49:40-05:00'
describe
'124632' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMM' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
59a50c54c5f5fdeb427754d6273b9342
4419ab69ec6d4d6c162855cb485ca512a95a4568
'2012-01-15T05:49:00-05:00'
describe
'34685' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMN' 'sip-files00025.pro'
e92d60cf348fcfa4abe4310d72efeb07
08210adcc0bf8d47f396be142e5f03680dbb7e05
'2012-01-15T05:49:06-05:00'
describe
'43861' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMO' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
8fd0c4061566e886cc1fc110c2e59798
36e3661c5b141119038cab1e7fa4048a82155d51
'2012-01-15T05:48:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMP' 'sip-files00025.tif'
e6020e59faa870b877647e5e50777207
79ee388b9020f77b75036014c904afc05680b724
'2012-01-15T05:50:02-05:00'
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMQ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
357a1e87e7e0b7f24fcec0eb0e6c5a1b
45f3c04e40be6cf721a77fcf0d1b5d75dbbcdec8
'2012-01-15T05:49:17-05:00'
describe
'10725' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMR' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
dc0312e46c76e144f56fc7df6ad7a287
4241675430ef13d649b74dcb892d4e721acfa517
'2012-01-15T05:49:13-05:00'
describe
'271895' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMS' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
9ce1752cd684ac28f4cc26cdf22cb28e
51e4c59a312e35ab58dd5e86c4f925012b654525
'2012-01-15T05:50:18-05:00'
describe
'130025' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMT' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
077376eb1daa701989c593bf78d56a6c
7391b605ece2d7671105953c37507e1346ec8027
'2012-01-15T05:50:48-05:00'
describe
'36018' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMU' 'sip-files00026.pro'
3092ee2f4501433debf55f5f6aec1f8b
e75c964d7f0706a3b4ab0a0476abf6f461db1587
describe
'45299' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMV' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
320cd7568e1dec04b8bc55f688206cd6
b47012b15e4c779c08355bbc31be54800351aaa8
'2012-01-15T05:48:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMW' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e5f60c1d7647803f15d89cafe1b8d270
a340e75fffbc7cad7f2333643804cf839fec8333
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMX' 'sip-files00026.txt'
60212f381cf2d76d1dd2f3b2d307dc18
91dcbed124830b22dbeece08d721fdee4ff48b11
'2012-01-15T05:48:04-05:00'
describe
'11158' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMY' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
8e4734a9f3d9761ab217d5f0ea1ff236
3412fb854b6dc74247fd20a8b33d534567b3704a
'2012-01-15T05:47:08-05:00'
describe
'271911' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLMZ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
8379bb206f292f81003d6533928eae71
51df7a95c274c4c60a6f82c49ad9f7d19301b325
'2012-01-15T05:48:50-05:00'
describe
'131460' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNA' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
b788900205e18885306410915192c77c
72321d45229f6de99ba0f194fe72b3b1c2dccbb1
'2012-01-15T05:49:09-05:00'
describe
'36379' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNB' 'sip-files00027.pro'
ce8c27f5d1746038c6c91fa9e21735fe
4f0dcd61b9bc3b8f0a816ece6b5e211bbf36c3cc
'2012-01-15T05:50:44-05:00'
describe
'45198' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNC' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
e37047055aa3012ab208c1671576c4e3
df10c6828c11473da0a363c4718564f71db8613d
'2012-01-15T05:50:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLND' 'sip-files00027.tif'
3f9af1e2b70e8b06ac6c80aed1f97577
783d838763b431fc7c7c0c6101231b4b47e5701c
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNE' 'sip-files00027.txt'
4136332624203c43eacf8b91df291fbb
bcb273105bab803d33052e222f9a6e1fb3c304f6
'2012-01-15T05:47:17-05:00'
describe
'11157' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNF' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
3bbf2d260f88ebb2c6bca2bedb2f1ec7
f3c41c85ec7506dce8912ab3286e3f8b2210de5b
describe
'271898' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNG' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
eb264318e55520ed73df856b6564f911
b66cea1da109546fcb4c40454c50fc32238fc48b
describe
'131074' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNH' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
b86e92224f5ebdc5597cb651b93ce550
de5bcf0b3452d78906620b8b7ce824fcfb2910ae
'2012-01-15T05:50:10-05:00'
describe
'37748' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNI' 'sip-files00028.pro'
b3c17858ffed1a4a517f0c4746876ab3
3c3e5c7af416bb2f8806f313ea6128efcf95c14c
describe
'46175' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNJ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
7dca4cd450db0ca51b578c5bb3b53064
9ff41d78edf98b4b125fa1696d82d8f191aadce8
'2012-01-15T05:50:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNK' 'sip-files00028.tif'
99e5c5ba83fd41225f4a4cbee4b5db3b
c0ad0f59ba95256de05a9044aaf23986eb1e0e38
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNL' 'sip-files00028.txt'
9c85151985773007c2ba50329fdeff2a
578134c6b994a5491d0a89fda453edaaea364a46
describe
'11083' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNM' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
c4ec4ca1716d2e395c729da2cc4c490c
ed773c1dca387dc998fce83065ac5e2d7afe71a9
describe
'271912' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNN' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
373a5a5276055596d622ba572bfdac82
49cfdcd0711f35bd3acbeb6287d2015dbed34f55
'2012-01-15T05:48:54-05:00'
describe
'130557' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNO' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
5f3cbd617f27637ccd6abc505439cbef
d476d6ac995f7672bb52ddf952bea8a7547ff0d8
'2012-01-15T05:49:46-05:00'
describe
'36898' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNP' 'sip-files00029.pro'
181208472590bcc3016f33a33f9344f4
f752fe5502918c29f7b684a0d8d0eaadb2fd7a58
'2012-01-15T05:50:31-05:00'
describe
'44746' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNQ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
f373682b012d198e08af4c38b053f389
9b4fe26f1ccef99d47ed412f14d4c84d608113af
'2012-01-15T05:47:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNR' 'sip-files00029.tif'
9b6c47a53ff1b6f8a1a62196b27457fa
9b8e20a68466f6cb7478b213f758cd0869f8af05
'2012-01-15T05:47:30-05:00'
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNS' 'sip-files00029.txt'
8b9222c3f36fc12bb01f7defe872da6d
9de0c300036bd4f507b412464c8a1bb072584f34
describe
'10588' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNT' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
47f3359c9fe109db6170a1e4936902a6
0c5c93c75b2d6e9b82648e32465d893da182c137
describe
'271923' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNU' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
fcd9750b28703bbae0f3b228e2054ad0
d0c00bd28b8c84eedd56b86797e33f38812c1686
describe
'119390' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNV' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
57dc74085f123d359b32c7e59e5ce152
bba0e09288120a51163c64e5bfdaf97b9c6cf8a5
'2012-01-15T05:48:34-05:00'
describe
'32838' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNW' 'sip-files00030.pro'
d08d3d2d43e74b41b21addc090bca170
a8a072b4281cb0dbd4643aba7d91bcc3ced6f158
'2012-01-15T05:50:50-05:00'
describe
'41320' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNX' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
cf3c1352a798a8c2a327788739f59f08
785cc54322fcdd67357a507eb9ed43e337125b7b
'2012-01-15T05:47:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNY' 'sip-files00030.tif'
ecea8a03376a00f16c14b9af3c444dc8
9765c8f35c0feb08f31a5a933b1749f85a15cb24
'2012-01-15T05:47:40-05:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLNZ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
757db08b3203cf99f27d37da851964e1
11c796db08a81e3413112e372d6e50eb031d4099
'2012-01-15T05:50:04-05:00'
describe
'10166' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOA' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
78bf89a287ea329ac29d3d7b9a125194
496eb6b80bdf4ddd659acafaf6b8de25bf68bcd4
describe
'271820' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOB' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
2bf0abc4352005b1a8d539dcfc4d08ce
4248873d0b048e2849b3c918a3518f99ab204e95
'2012-01-15T05:49:32-05:00'
describe
'133432' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOC' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
bd0ad8f083e7466bc96718fd7cff49ca
97380ef0b4fe71ab73dbfb081df151274dae235e
describe
'37676' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOD' 'sip-files00031.pro'
673b8e6e65a861014aa8ce7c89a9253e
0445f98a4c75a540774b5fbc70bd92994cea7b6b
'2012-01-15T05:50:58-05:00'
describe
'45364' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOE' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
ed5f5ceecb3fc461f3724f13897eca50
8319b9e2ac0395949f2eb7ef52e2f8fa2869b381
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOF' 'sip-files00031.tif'
50f2450af74051b9121a1f0148da8a59
555a5973dee5c9112c7517e605079256114cfb74
'2012-01-15T05:48:19-05:00'
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOG' 'sip-files00031.txt'
f6723e255a13e8ca52cf6415b11ec912
2881b0561245073b24903b9d24d17770ad577466
describe
'10927' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOH' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
2d0df3f7c82137d34f106f10ae5c95f4
fe42687555c8ae844ae7e30541a06b7525c336b6
describe
'271869' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOI' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
91e00254a601913bbb1a20ddadc81ec7
9332aaf95a3f4fc76e965eac2ad3a97a896b5853
'2012-01-15T05:50:55-05:00'
describe
'131644' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOJ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
d0dbb148fea15732a6d4ec4457ce0503
b96f39ef16a3bf9e01ad059cd48e95792e809bee
describe
'36986' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOK' 'sip-files00032.pro'
0338ba04c1647f70d66d7470e91ed5bc
6aa66b6a55d3cb1978a1051a05bc6070a9b51e1f
describe
'45555' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOL' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
4312c0506da36b8345c7878a3dabe95b
f4875907b19cfd9a5e1d27ac59624e968d7d30af
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOM' 'sip-files00032.tif'
ecab1ab1d0fe755f0cbfb3917db3a133
89f9b185793c2c46923a2adc84e13f28a64d97d5
'2012-01-15T05:48:13-05:00'
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLON' 'sip-files00032.txt'
68d3c564b6a8b17a4626e56a8ced9138
be74367f7a9d545ee643b6e8561e0b354ac4ef57
'2012-01-15T05:49:04-05:00'
describe
'10769' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOO' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
440bb4fed4dc8480debf84968eb48a36
60b17f82cb71b0eaad9681bd23a48abbcd13ef49
describe
'271922' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOP' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
8ae57a0e89fe55d3dbfb87ee8617cdf7
9f2320fb3b7e9705d8ee95f4e800abb08c8837b1
'2012-01-15T05:49:15-05:00'
describe
'131575' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOQ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
2f46faacc7414abf6a0b9b46dbb553d6
b62a65b28ef0d671e9b510b6713d43fd75b97109
'2012-01-15T05:50:00-05:00'
describe
'37246' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOR' 'sip-files00033.pro'
5d645ea0a4ef4e8b16893e181f834cda
5435428775cadd3c2993a088ba060daa6e75427d
'2012-01-15T05:50:20-05:00'
describe
'45134' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOS' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
dfbd8d1dfee3ccc0d699fbf4ed32dfad
76a13f4f3e89f867791631a3673cb6314108b3f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOT' 'sip-files00033.tif'
8be4646e704577142c7867ea7f008a58
d63d4518ce6b86f121629f4764f77dc6ef0a0551
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOU' 'sip-files00033.txt'
188d7e84fb993d931e4e413c0419d6c4
0440e06d50162df437ce511f1d382de74e0d2de0
describe
'10878' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOV' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
e477c7863b9a743bac384ddb42762d68
5451ba6b110e3626869baf728f1c525ec9b166e3
describe
'271882' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOW' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
7987831c27bc23d66137b1c648fc7934
639dbdb6c115d1d39db240d4ddecca09fdf21a38
'2012-01-15T05:50:23-05:00'
describe
'133095' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOX' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
5392d6d73e104a852c12472815bbd8a9
35def5ac01bc8cd1bd21e47cf1229cfecf37a9af
'2012-01-15T05:47:26-05:00'
describe
'38320' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOY' 'sip-files00034.pro'
95cdf42384334fc9070fa2290745181e
15345bdcba228209c67f0d2a292cff972afb9b33
'2012-01-15T05:47:37-05:00'
describe
'45693' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLOZ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
80221cfb9779c7c0ee9c7dbf93c4ac98
f01b03aab3ed8620268026edec371a6b17d7e4e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPA' 'sip-files00034.tif'
0f798224a2c0a88c412e7b565658a45a
24e97ebb9af6b4a869fbf52c512f5721bfe89051
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPB' 'sip-files00034.txt'
faa9ace432d4b4767934145a3def8842
920801df2a4f0a0606731669b7047a529ff762dd
describe
'10820' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPC' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
3e975d774579b94289c8f8dc17cbb7d7
e537fb965144d651ca6b73e0ff413efc17567a15
'2012-01-15T05:47:42-05:00'
describe
'271868' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPD' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
bbd5788d5d2e6b63b29e54229d636928
bbc724cce1fc40b27e735c2da19ec62ccd656db7
describe
'134525' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPE' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
51e3aba4875cc49d6752ca7b8ab2b910
86c3cbf63a00cfa021ef2ead1f35e9e7b6cb74ae
describe
'36165' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPF' 'sip-files00035.pro'
dd9fcbe36db840896b74d2beedbdb7d9
e95fa0d44cfd861e455daf40d4b656bd1f87b325
describe
'46789' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPG' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
444acf3982464baf0a5d63691885f83d
f5bdb141ed780d0c6a6978c77abe73e3ae525436
'2012-01-15T05:47:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPH' 'sip-files00035.tif'
68c19f18eaaacff369e936514dc897a0
78d471acefa35c435b3ebfb7fd2ec931d20d1a7f
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPI' 'sip-files00035.txt'
5a590ad614addf9a5991ee9290edbd61
3c473b598ce1cd0b7711896978aad3ab000374ab
'2012-01-15T05:49:23-05:00'
describe
'11557' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPJ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
22efd8b75556af9fd4bc3fd00dc22e25
57eb26b5d11a02fc2f0ca5b298058b74c11fde19
'2012-01-15T05:51:03-05:00'
describe
'271783' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPK' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
ca96962def19de3cbb958fc29b2dbca2
f8675c914542f63be9b2d850626aacd0330c9a63
'2012-01-15T05:48:32-05:00'
describe
'134765' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPL' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
353174845c4d45be469db686ee5a0ae3
f70f472b8b2f00daf354a76b36c554b8391dbc75
'2012-01-15T05:49:52-05:00'
describe
'38147' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPM' 'sip-files00036.pro'
e06ade7678b44a7f832bd440614ed6a8
768986c8d610f31e4129f38d913ad95e8bcce6dd
'2012-01-15T05:50:24-05:00'
describe
'46833' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPN' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
0bfae63daf5ffdeb0ce652d9925e6456
a2d2ebcf3423034ad2f2f7b9c2ee6e7757c914a2
describe
'2191084' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPO' 'sip-files00036.tif'
90410c14a913659a39fb39c60a289ba6
ca67c17025483fcec97e2a5a416b8cb954ecff5a
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPP' 'sip-files00036.txt'
a0fce7330354ca5679348d6e4afe0296
ab7df388fea883bae7ac68aa0c98da42bc06465e
describe
'11143' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPQ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
7733631af0cda432d271ff1879982a83
913978908d549770f713a8c6085ee2a7840358ce
'2012-01-15T05:49:20-05:00'
describe
'271792' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPR' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
6151b88f9c08764de6f3b4f2ce607da5
ec9d18c72e80dfc3a60f5b3145ce7b123dcd5f93
'2012-01-15T05:49:53-05:00'
describe
'131937' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPS' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
3a826e34969f1f334bfee174fea25aaf
25454c47979c6e21d63c04f64314558fdc31754a
describe
'36710' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPT' 'sip-files00037.pro'
0832692fa5c5be1f1d726a191cd3bf66
41aad3b1d445664ce0c7cb4591bef681571c83a7
describe
'45433' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPU' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
3a9e9436052c6b590322552bedf08d6e
a66082ec75542c51bc4703740fb7d67f32d1af00
'2012-01-15T05:47:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPV' 'sip-files00037.tif'
178968d8b31484c4575c87b0b0e884ce
f6b885d2fdbff5ed4b5dce7974fc055ebfe55cba
'2012-01-15T05:47:23-05:00'
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPW' 'sip-files00037.txt'
f36bfbc7418e431432e53edbb4b774ad
f134cc0ef2012d20782cd4cc3e295c7971d39d29
'2012-01-15T05:48:09-05:00'
describe
'10992' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPX' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
a762d0566fe4172da97d2555e4f3b016
46ab37c60364f4d37acb541b42666ba4800b693a
describe
'271914' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPY' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
75280e9e68436dfc92755d406c68ea39
2a1ad13484da797866c24c8f80efb59a8a477f8c
describe
'129095' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLPZ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
8ec4071b6c94fe4ae84b61f317260902
18e90d53b7988cbe3c5f5c349b7f5c6a1d713d4f
describe
'36014' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQA' 'sip-files00038.pro'
ca56f4979ddcda07de9f7d7ea2198cd1
328342ffa7f19a7fc0e9b3dab321aa34526a3ea1
'2012-01-15T05:50:28-05:00'
describe
'44653' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQB' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
0e5e2bff9d5a8184e21a19a750c37b8e
58e365c4a31d1b3b1fa9b3ffdc2585ed40be30f4
'2012-01-15T05:47:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQC' 'sip-files00038.tif'
fc9413532ae8ca75b4cdb91846a1cd9a
698764d0ca623d03c5c785246e58979e2d6e8adc
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQD' 'sip-files00038.txt'
67187708bd72d2c55909f53a7f8b5528
095d47186129b8332320a19b36d84b421d790c60
describe
'10960' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQE' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ffe5b687055da5610a2b737aa218d482
61a7021f3ea7b49b7116f5aeb208768e4a6b1365
describe
'271877' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQF' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
05f4f6f5c1a9f986ead011b30d7286ad
02756d273a676901c60179a6b868734e316c6c4c
describe
'134887' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQG' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
6e87485fed4f45863ff6cb3eeae08a46
8026b9af01d90ed79929cab819afb7dbf34806b7
describe
'36740' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQH' 'sip-files00039.pro'
b22b945a7d9439dbc6a955f577506ac2
78439bfdfd0b42cc359930cc4669177008379873
'2012-01-15T05:50:38-05:00'
describe
'46403' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
82a870f67d42b5388201d70d164eb6c2
81c0fc0a2865d1f1328597e2771f0c1632b53d30
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQJ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
1455a0ae3508c65a04bb5f6f39be2032
241f29a24d3f847c493d40fe44a87e2b29754f12
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQK' 'sip-files00039.txt'
5118059349640a3e76dc2c782371f18f
c1a2118cda9e72ce724fba0540d459ca03541c9d
describe
'11299' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQL' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
f151926905679021e50aedc233764ce0
c124483e17668b617fe6ee0a0070952378e0ff56
describe
'271924' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQM' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
66d7d76ba8789907a68c9abfe8299c1a
660d5ac35e3297169b1972e4e9948f7588d8fb75
describe
'117573' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQN' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
1aacade934cea4c0e3dc6aba784199b1
ec836c192ea65287490d9afa3fb0dd3fa62671ff
'2012-01-15T05:48:57-05:00'
describe
'32584' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQO' 'sip-files00040.pro'
1d4b1c6aa1cb4769aa11dd9920150c1a
6e09fca19adb812f951442fff3fd659fad5ad182
'2012-01-15T05:47:01-05:00'
describe
'39754' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQP' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
f516691553edc28897cd54b54106cbdd
cb2ccf0fa99452bb06748d987bb1a39928a31db0
'2012-01-15T05:49:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQQ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
e5c9c043e0a50c765b6e3060973b7979
40c10aab8c420b6325fa646e4f2987a6b8a86aa4
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQR' 'sip-files00040.txt'
8c182bd17c9a37a0aea36c24608d019c
7fc2802b426ea30099ec983b10f65943d706c54e
describe
'10247' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQS' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
62a85f36f10cc145d44780759c3bbbe2
8b12374ed6850c0f12dd254ed22f8c6e6360b793
describe
'271808' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQT' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
fda0233e8c1e7b7221fbdb8bd3285b77
7256799d8708591714150174d6f8a4219a68bda0
'2012-01-15T05:46:56-05:00'
describe
'66380' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQU' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
3d8726b3d560547e1c72aaf314ceeab3
debe21ee0d036e0c945e607cb4552b438b532e50
describe
'19987' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQV' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
126bd7672273e41552bbebdbbcf3c682
c1d6cdf19c6c4eb07dd3d89c514f16914ef50b8f
'2012-01-15T05:49:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQW' 'sip-files00041.tif'
a4bae35a8bfc2a4d9ac9761a4db203e8
727e4d9702b373da18f028ce30aa96bea05ba7bc
'2012-01-15T05:47:24-05:00'
describe
'5277' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQX' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
a3fbf952b014895d082b609fa4fcb1eb
462091e95f77c4e5e6f44edec4a4884ed92dea97
'2012-01-15T05:50:25-05:00'
describe
'234288' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQY' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
f021b8626fe8850e7c2a0c5e1a7cedbf
c1468aaba7deb258fd29a2c049f37aacaeadcb5e
'2012-01-15T05:48:24-05:00'
describe
'11490' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLQZ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
6043d0e5b271ef912cbd6c41d36fd658
c21e62a9141c1c1bdb5edcfe608ebe2a5357b026
'2012-01-15T05:48:11-05:00'
describe
'3428' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRA' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
81894d484e968df3ac91513b1a199832
91b74d42a6dcd0bf3e1f0817bc3ad3eba962bdd6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRB' 'sip-files00042.tif'
0267196a5db88a5ed93a759967f78a1f
5a7a39a7c0b55f6bbfa9efa7925179a861317986
'2012-01-15T05:47:03-05:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRC' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
a57266f704f5ef30ab83a227c499505e
82a17613f9c6162b141f5c41478d3b9800e1d6ed
describe
'271920' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRD' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
f9846fddae27807955a444d65efad79d
007778bbe9c8cbc092cad67fdfb691bd9bd8963d
describe
'124171' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRE' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
bee5738b05dddc5c9964583decd4a641
1b5858057513aa8c43f49be73be92d3b88b451dc
'2012-01-15T05:50:22-05:00'
describe
'32179' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRF' 'sip-files00043.pro'
4fb3a2acab2e84d771e4024a1127fc7b
f5f05ef8caf3c9a11548121e3b6078a70a0c0cd6
describe
'42934' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRG' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
fae96b533b0b4a0ce3bccf5bea7d74a5
ac6188dc638f3ee87259ae7950c16c4d776bf38f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRH' 'sip-files00043.tif'
d0a7eaf877e92ace77bf4d11d73cf5b5
02dda49c2876f5dcc3f4b0438fe404791ab37b58
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRI' 'sip-files00043.txt'
8d48d3ed308589a462076235d08cb509
a0124380f2a72666c0b3043dbd6f1d88170470f0
describe
'10269' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRJ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
e254702c500ac82688576da109eaf4a0
c5f9b564cbe00bd6b1dbbe1adc2c8628bb8b89eb
'2012-01-15T05:49:16-05:00'
describe
'271878' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRK' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
bbb47bff05309eb854231e81c4bbb053
10aa9a7376240223f952890c05e99df19e48eff4
'2012-01-15T05:49:21-05:00'
describe
'136739' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRL' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
bf75910522a6991d2e0b340632e0e0eb
f8b4b3eb01d3502ff635233252b0c435d1f126cb
describe
'36737' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRM' 'sip-files00044.pro'
e6fb25f1392900c9149ed35a3d503b7c
cd9c0d8526496aab529e0c2590888b1337d40f34
'2012-01-15T05:48:40-05:00'
describe
'46792' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRN' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
df75b7d556ecd0ea47ec2d1a3ad1236a
e0c42d83ad894dc77e6a4cabfbbc1e8464356739
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRO' 'sip-files00044.tif'
5998e3e18ce46528da13992a0b31fa34
2563b6ea5d7d494d9b29ec010b04b6b18b5817b9
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRP' 'sip-files00044.txt'
d75935dbe5aabdc98e1446cbae716cfd
7897a3b4af071d2b944b2a83a92cc866d93fa2c0
describe
'11350' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRQ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
c78c117a83cca62bb747c054a7118e2d
9b3020b5cc133ce2453c7ba32f4b964261bdf8d3
'2012-01-15T05:50:57-05:00'
describe
'271905' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRR' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
78d4ce3eb1d26b6f5734882a4454a375
eaee3ac049c4340af33d20ffff2724e9326ec9a6
describe
'129030' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRS' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
0f3acc4c9f0824159acd2f5a3f9f657b
8a8d379dc06a0a28a55b408110afb408b8f45059
'2012-01-15T05:48:35-05:00'
describe
'36097' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRT' 'sip-files00045.pro'
9e52263b2d44fc2b9d4c17992ffbbf9a
c5e2cfdd89c9de87ea97b4266ff0e0a10f524c2f
describe
'45632' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRU' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
ebaaf657969e00d518af32d2f8e75577
e201ccc3f420d35a58f8807775305d613457e4dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRV' 'sip-files00045.tif'
0b580109966d05abf9fb7995a7914d39
2718f1d6737252714e9ef898d85ef221fc9067b8
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRW' 'sip-files00045.txt'
0621dc15821ee5ccf2bda68edec9937c
f9bd7398078009d521b367011cfd6bc96c8d196c
'2012-01-15T05:48:33-05:00'
describe
'10772' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRX' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
eaaf386c06ebcbaac8335820219ac937
ad69aa7fd4746ec8f9ed146a52c93a6778479af3
'2012-01-15T05:48:30-05:00'
describe
'271699' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRY' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
ef64897cd8d9bb41356315fcd821ffde
5fd6f8e51257682770cd1f64e0f50bec81a5bbee
describe
'126443' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLRZ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
3d3ce306a92c2436c457cb601c16145f
b975f25e1338f29b48ad520cad44305a29776b1e
'2012-01-15T05:47:25-05:00'
describe
'35627' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSA' 'sip-files00046.pro'
a5efb16ea6f15c0ff0212d1b88cd800f
7e456bedddf6d433bae4f8b6f279ae5caa5e1ea4
'2012-01-15T05:48:01-05:00'
describe
'44121' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSB' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
314eb77f37a1f124a4e5cfedbd495663
0b9160cc298830989eaf74e04b3ba7d32a6b1955
'2012-01-15T05:50:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSC' 'sip-files00046.tif'
d2e2c19992fe08c7e0832872d7b0b3eb
ba408edddd647f7663d97a5eef33f3a2853709b4
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSD' 'sip-files00046.txt'
224edcc673d3d676f881b387787e2ef6
cbb6d75f2e1241feb771ed751ec843f3df8b39b4
'2012-01-15T05:48:14-05:00'
describe
'11003' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSE' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
3c2f21cb206e7856e470dccbe8e4ba3a
75110373da1d2450bf702f93ae4f7b7265b7023b
describe
'271775' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSF' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
96fe5b6697d40a09896a43da2ddfa936
1f901a7ba4e6397a9970c3f020b209b14d1569f4
'2012-01-15T05:50:45-05:00'
describe
'124824' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSG' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
96fcdd837728d526a952626e11f244e8
42b524e32dd86f68ceab641720605ed1b681c236
'2012-01-15T05:50:35-05:00'
describe
'35179' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSH' 'sip-files00047.pro'
1048dfda3a5d1be4cef003083776d276
90fabcce7d61ef574789b2277810d42c1ef37c2c
describe
'43407' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSI' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
193ce60fe86157dac7d8fb32585235d0
fa7a7bae2be5e6a7c71ed84f07ffbf9af46ac7b8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSJ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
149215fa324ccda40f6277ee9bdc54d5
c4b987f1ed696e68c4713ee5dfa7c93ace1677e7
'2012-01-15T05:48:51-05:00'
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSK' 'sip-files00047.txt'
f9c3df32053de88128a8222dac8fdb89
6308039b4990cd070ea4317d2cad3dea6aed0ab9
'2012-01-15T05:47:10-05:00'
describe
'10532' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSL' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
72c6c4b66f4ce8bd4bda9890beaed8af
8709f6410c0675da217d18ef3f6c909ea8c15b8f
describe
'271698' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSM' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
d53caf159be094313a40b46aa8af3ff0
3ac05c4f7ef0fc9d8d01ae825eecd0f0331fa824
describe
'134698' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSN' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
550c8a425cdea723db935d1d93374953
319f4fa4e49f1b5702b6dd6d77aff702d64cf1f4
'2012-01-15T05:49:42-05:00'
describe
'37559' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSO' 'sip-files00048.pro'
c28c13d47865eb3d9c76535b20d34c9e
1853e197a1c942a632c74ec18ee081eb15efe79d
describe
'46451' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSP' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
c368c9eb44f412d78578333e07347adc
d45e74e59a88a18d03383aa7f21ec8686bd46e43
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSQ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
bc24da15d3f82b61b9a5a48387cc37bc
9ba0418e4820ddd57f4d539ec29328fd5a7d28e1
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSR' 'sip-files00048.txt'
35f29ba1e2d26e1f38b0919b8aae2d3d
3d597b354b88390a169df22be472535a465a0615
'2012-01-15T05:49:11-05:00'
describe
'11128' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSS' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
22953f8926bbb14d2518d0eb2e8b32ed
91ba97136dff885a1f6fa9966865481a1660df22
'2012-01-15T05:47:31-05:00'
describe
'271927' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLST' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
cfff43c739738bb4d17be5a01a97765a
30c264d74fab5ae75b5b2725cd2b40bc962a6edf
describe
'125494' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSU' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
1b0efa15a8ea3a946db793417fd4c4ce
8964d98eec8ecf15afec6afb3bb56ee9c7b21a37
describe
'34542' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSV' 'sip-files00049.pro'
24eb36e56452d16852cad434ca505e1f
bb33f648bdb12dffbe9b5d4f3350762f1ede1860
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSW' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
0c72fa337625851c5ca66f15dbab1919
f11ed800b02b3ebb24382169c9635bdd723693f5
'2012-01-15T05:48:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSX' 'sip-files00049.tif'
1c9ec0d1f2eb2b6043e83e8cfd1cc577
fb9f4f0baf01915cc997bffa55e85f8c90818be5
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSY' 'sip-files00049.txt'
6c34579c4aec46570b4b06c97207a59b
4aae0139de3514dcf8638f751ea769dcd8c8a014
'2012-01-15T05:51:02-05:00'
describe
'10583' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLSZ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
a9032c2571c03c2fc9fdae67492ebc4c
b533363e8e88a2dae0027a16246d96c6d4d2f8b3
describe
'271872' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
b0ddc9803267eeed31ae3fa59e09828b
2b43fa093cb6f4d0b7a0547bd3ba446b7739dca2
describe
'127161' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTB' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
9f76fdfefba8d97be7920c3e03da7603
fd44cea61d5c33e1f49e115f76761caf805e0bc5
describe
'36305' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTC' 'sip-files00050.pro'
cecc2342940daa225679ced2239a572f
8111a85cf9cc34c80eb07fb8d7fb751b70e666ca
describe
'44307' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTD' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
18fdce906c55bec8345e3463163c0d3c
7a0b1887f790184f5c0d84336c0d6248c9749ffe
'2012-01-15T05:49:22-05:00'
describe
'2192252' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTE' 'sip-files00050.tif'
ed921ee61be02abdf3250b89e3dc75f4
42870bef10d794f1d0926f3611d12f4ca4f6f2e5
'2012-01-15T05:50:39-05:00'
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTF' 'sip-files00050.txt'
b0bd13ff6c5d9c5a9d5daf4a53fa0537
4663af5b8ee8187b42970ee43a49d86e515ff60b
describe
'10639' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTG' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
09e96e43b77b9371009567a22db96d86
3622f6e1d79abe25dad3cb7b9761b3d76151ef1b
describe
'271867' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTH' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
5c12418d92365ca1b2fa5090e7978b14
ccafd8d5dfad4a160b0bedb3fdae72d785a12342
describe
'125138' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTI' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
08699c5cc31bbecd7eebd65f632ac786
70419c0978c9c27e488692e3e9e59729c82b34f7
describe
'34235' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTJ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
b925cf71f0b37908e19a8d75fad071f6
46c58fe7b897ecccb0e88462d340baccfb259b9a
describe
'42719' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTK' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
29ec787d8ccf8629c074d95a50ca9c87
d409d0e4b43629e0f82c297ca7a8a7c2267f0013
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTL' 'sip-files00051.tif'
19db75880c1ee92b67487463a66f81d9
79223423da27a9c3b2a154c6cf71bcac4ce1cc16
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTM' 'sip-files00051.txt'
c8807334e664700543102d00497289ed
5e41c96c5f0d058ea112efdc6acbe3031368b253
'2012-01-15T05:48:07-05:00'
describe
'10646' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTN' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
1781833519aa7fe25fb4bf3e45da81b7
666c1d11251bba56c6cd74c47ad207f1e9c81eba
describe
'271854' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTO' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
986dd64517d95c95ce581b83c59ffd52
e2e57b4237d573a2ca5d23f831b38f786d3b2af8
'2012-01-15T05:49:41-05:00'
describe
'126666' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTP' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
a838e715cb11bd8d67ea78769cf5bf67
a0b7f005c01b52b4316ce9b7d1ebb033dc3ea86f
'2012-01-15T05:49:26-05:00'
describe
'36679' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTQ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
68a1987f76a85c63e5656d3f78f00860
34c67915d253b459901e779cb6c9b7976b0093c8
describe
'43939' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTR' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
eec0de0422d2d0dfba2ebbf268442caf
088f08466085e855d2a8646a80123ae2aa46f212
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTS' 'sip-files00052.tif'
993354c61ff7b45bcb19ba8d485417ca
7e722b6b27dec362fb7f5fec930cfc2e9ce8a968
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTT' 'sip-files00052.txt'
8e56464e83e762d8ce5f0eb87c1131e7
be2299b013fd62fdcba419a08f6deef5dc7bf300
describe
'10765' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTU' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
4b2737acc65a1cdfeac912dc58214d9b
f929ad413954cc8290b883e1f8b76899f42113b0
'2012-01-15T05:48:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTV' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
9fb41ae9246a390940680ffdb8373e05
5358f51206dc3d47b955fa9d6a25500a3cfa3284
describe
'124535' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTW' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
ae629a30f461a60e957a56f872a19d04
78e32d2f18bdf920108363a1e0f645cb41f224aa
describe
'33576' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTX' 'sip-files00053.pro'
caaeae91e7c33238127b6ceeb486e84e
5e2dc3b8a6883749d38931def914015a7e935900
'2012-01-15T05:47:32-05:00'
describe
'42990' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTY' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
f4b8d8b5da1f6a5ddb0035f709ab0dd2
0631e5d4bccbd8a9e7f08a2a60edfde6d2f1bc0b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLTZ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
ba0adce763db0d100230ad29c3adf624
2848c5ce8d0a8e1af6c3c4fae8a5aa1605c397ef
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUA' 'sip-files00053.txt'
4f2bd849674d444a9b8247d268e6ee30
9f64fd8cb59d3380cd14e548f2913ae9de348ebb
'2012-01-15T05:47:16-05:00'
describe
'10732' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUB' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
780af9d116c3a5e6388b25e2e738beb3
d2b7c58e59e89d2a447bc49df5e4fd4b2f46ac0e
describe
'271769' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUC' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
214bbc886002f3b73a128dcea3526a73
66a1eeb985de40e7ef562facc591bc0b14515c55
'2012-01-15T05:48:00-05:00'
describe
'126445' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUD' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
02f93879fc44a33e90c93e19fcaec61f
b88890dfbfe84d478a3eece96d4205a1ced8f028
describe
'36303' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUE' 'sip-files00054.pro'
23a9b3ca75904d701d636de170d34b86
ef605608da3cc195ea454eeaf36250d6da6a58bc
'2012-01-15T05:49:01-05:00'
describe
'43584' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUF' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
1a4612b577e2ec079c8b838f07c2c4de
5123dfe4a187b12fdf6580392f9473cc2e34a6d7
'2012-01-15T05:48:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUG' 'sip-files00054.tif'
b532cb0531a104268dd9af444c2643f8
2a114fb62a5337da4cee06725bbe55b53256b85c
'2012-01-15T05:49:48-05:00'
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUH' 'sip-files00054.txt'
2d6761f4ffa82031f68f90e095632696
d28afe1ae508f0768b446646feec4748b0becb98
describe
'10675' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUI' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
bb2881f35eb8c1f7af88436d49c3f6a5
72c280ff3a2c8e4861d77a2685d7718059759781
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUJ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
81957ba40ae2af03370f290d6e95f999
c6bcfb8f7a96cd695b50a5c4e9a391d1b9f622fe
describe
'120071' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUK' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
d5b56c1f20f12658e9aced49823fb95b
4227cda2c03abc32138498faf52c3eb2af4b4842
describe
'32189' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUL' 'sip-files00055.pro'
0b3994b9d8492a00ee4a7ffbfbba1375
a06fb28814925bb12a182c97f29f03c90f0e1fd0
describe
'41861' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUM' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c839055e22916ce7049a42014c17e7ae
effc7e7a361dcc3047371970152aa84473bf17a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUN' 'sip-files00055.tif'
0e8b8a672dc8800ee9c7dfb501bcb1dd
ca5483cd11c53575847acfbeeb43c93e6ec2cee0
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUO' 'sip-files00055.txt'
293fcd2a7c0fa48ab987a71b14efd41d
68ab68faf7956557f6db54fd8160557ab763cca0
'2012-01-15T05:50:03-05:00'
describe
'10080' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUP' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
eeaa13180b8bec6945dbd7c053808373
d030b96009b1d7e56d8f162599e0ab270ab7d947
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUQ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
8e82a9ad09392463736a21955edc726a
fc41994ea790ec1e6a70d9ece1a825cf9a72b0da
describe
'122707' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUR' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
0c376e9ba312acce76131382402e77df
665b4d6567896c7d76f5401f2f22dc01c614cc86
describe
'34674' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUS' 'sip-files00056.pro'
72de89eb837814d321c30565f4895d77
9af292aeffa670c1ccd12891bc69c20f6c21a15b
describe
'42813' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUT' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
0faf974b8ee02fd53fad0821f7a5aef4
ee0ebe93fef169aaf2d0d53a191dd0d300f09cfa
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
2f291aa4fdcb84fd3a529fcae4a68e22
81bccec13a21bc9e6bb08db0c414527faea53558
'2012-01-15T05:49:02-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUV' 'sip-files00056.txt'
b23e91937e962feed60aebbe0b817c32
f92d7e1e7c09180c6787b6a44f86545476a02ccc
describe
'10661' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUW' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
ece31f5af84d137f15c491ee69517d9e
2da3678fc0667f06e2ce4a5b57ba58d590b70238
'2012-01-15T05:48:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUX' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
0b20986f22bc37b3fa9bdf7554a7706b
70569b27549b7ca0bc35d6ed41226d4c5454bb5b
describe
'126522' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUY' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
d894d361530f74126325cab73a96fcc4
19f5e8a1f62348f4867a874d67a00956bf97666d
describe
'35222' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLUZ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
596940683840b6ece13fb7c9567c0a04
b616d7c5f7d59d482f76c014364b5ff2de18df06
'2012-01-15T05:48:56-05:00'
describe
'42776' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVA' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
a9213749955847620aeb4b1a91855993
80cfaca7fd623da10ec8b080d366160fc41afbc8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVB' 'sip-files00057.tif'
8147144a26a35b35e8d4608257b3f881
fb78ec6b109e1237d46eb4c06a6e58f8339247b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVC' 'sip-files00057.txt'
15122b4ab74439055e64112ddd3eb1bb
4e77a8c333471085d342ee5646c7706c0fa7aaca
'2012-01-15T05:47:36-05:00'
describe
'10828' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVD' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
ad1f213c912e86fa623153a383ca9720
d10c5aa8cc364462d4e9bda7f6ac4a23f00af5e7
describe
'272153' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVE' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
7f9161b92450fdcb1c61a0f3c7c8dae7
8279eb7c284e31d4082461eb00fed072e6e547e1
describe
'122268' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVF' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
27f2b1a78882a1873b3a9c15e2909388
f289b7f5043861e8e295e5968698c8cebf294bcd
'2012-01-15T05:49:30-05:00'
describe
'34248' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVG' 'sip-files00058.pro'
577b29647fe4040a6a5aa1d205865538
4f6f820ebe3abd29d307d67345c8012383f41c92
describe
'42854' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVH' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
9defa9c70e9e074746fcf4c24490b2a1
f4fc30dadef5dc523cd200093b1d9b890eceea77
describe
'2194112' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVI' 'sip-files00058.tif'
eef9eab67b767b63a6e9394450a50ed4
cf679ee223513e9447f610ba802a006ef43220f4
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVJ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
c3104428e41711b3506c1e32ecc3b8c0
00a97020727c5b68a8392b554bf1bddf5742bcb3
describe
'10740' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVK' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
e10ce7323e880393850671d309d84803
e3b7e1cbf593ed2b9073b7d4f0e42391852da557
describe
'271756' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVL' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
4266cdc749aa1b1818a356eccd40ba67
f1dd21dc2d5e7a0ccc17277f3213b50ab1fe9ef3
describe
'75308' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVM' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
b189608bfbac9520cb7b844d06d1afce
e4d992d05771f1ffde8b7a6212a118205768f81e
describe
'23517' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVN' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
474a342690a9feec107d638a7160a992
59d1552ae6fb096eea24a18d87c8deb392b350ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVO' 'sip-files00059.tif'
90c7e7a4031a1da887f0e6fc8eb5bd49
d1025a4212304778b61a8e7121bf9431857778fc
'2012-01-15T05:48:18-05:00'
describe
'6714' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVP' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
b95e71132593cd9b1a3664e5179f1561
84cae69f5e26cec6f96073d443ee40b7a8e2ab2e
describe
'193286' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVQ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
b1e1006c8d0d2aca361de8bc673ce764
e9f30ca13c2d4dfde62cbff77e755436b9532768
describe
'9030' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVR' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
2b79ce632b6cb4fdb6e189d6eede21b8
3bbcc44f2bf04f8b1a702909a4be8ff15807ab44
describe
'2712' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVS' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
c43cdb3ec4f6aa6372668538493bfecc
b2bc32fb53f3ee64f973fd6bf1177eb6c1291481
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVT' 'sip-files00060.tif'
3a84a15e82b9d78a0b18172facdebcf2
13d6b9d5c1a6f7d2cad88857d249dc0ae0bfee8f
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVU' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
5e57dd7f535c0ff0f5ac025baf9c0c79
59911bd3b1976fb6b780ffaba488cb45fbb2ee79
'2012-01-15T05:49:18-05:00'
describe
'271880' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVV' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
3517d03c29356ff5e2fe78032f776af7
c3bee356eee8a5821b3dab3ad2c0be6671aa03ab
describe
'129627' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVW' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
723df3ee4f784fb0fead8210110fca53
c379a4f6c028c7308fb5dc33a4957eba0b972923
'2012-01-15T05:50:26-05:00'
describe
'36840' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVX' 'sip-files00061.pro'
f441853c77a77d7cf7294377cefc249b
6cfc1d52172c9d567e6628bcb7bd7a3eec3b82c5
describe
'45239' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVY' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
30efbb5929ba629f5a2ed773487da259
e62adf108485b7c83658829a53f7ec429f92d025
'2012-01-15T05:48:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLVZ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
cbab2c41661b33e5e87aa740ea71bbd7
621449466a162c9503b339927f469f675d13e650
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWA' 'sip-files00061.txt'
453c5fbd3fcbc7f3f50cb1f40f858c68
94a98f9ca0ab279f5f9e44268f131a6c66b863b7
describe
'10589' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWB' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
078adff1141ff54803da76c565ddef15
2499daa7dfac7626b02228810bca3123a55c5890
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWC' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
fa5944807fedb89aac5bf6ec94a8b268
e65147f83252feb5d05ebe2be0f7573619456727
describe
'115770' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWD' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
326daa0b934b64f16aa0b5da5e52abcd
898ac0a705c61a336250dc32f4a7f62e0991c205
describe
'32970' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWE' 'sip-files00062.pro'
354173ba62dddea6c66268dd74f89da1
ca8debc1e2106274947e0079666d93f43626ad05
describe
'39748' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWF' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
02097ec81f6cd0113fa59afbc5441970
fb0d9c96b382087c23ab046d2dd27878294dd81a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWG' 'sip-files00062.tif'
fec9fc309b0d98c35ac8404c940aba72
839b76f661ebaca49d185c6960ab27619f040d6e
'2012-01-15T05:47:48-05:00'
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWH' 'sip-files00062.txt'
6ba71dbffebec3b2629a7c83a1d2baaf
91c9945ed9f0cd018676eaf006ed04a886bad1c7
'2012-01-15T05:49:05-05:00'
describe
'10499' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWI' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
bec9d62690ca0f75ed37311815a0e613
daf5ec66416d5009b670f623a7b6cc5531b21a8d
describe
'271874' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWJ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
cf001b43d520a64ccfb8abecd2f02223
a77720280623f27148bfa4f38955ae5326d5eb30
describe
'109028' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWK' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
e4f9fb34f49c5723b05d3a99d66ef171
90166fbfbca3564b2ca9be48bed374d561dee9e8
describe
'30372' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWL' 'sip-files00063.pro'
e5b07321d79037579be4b4ee7fef5557
39d0c8fe841cf3423e2b0fd43ce0587266ed7685
describe
'38342' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWM' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
a3df90f7544bb805fe58425202aae9ea
4764533f747f617921c681d0144fa953758ae0d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWN' 'sip-files00063.tif'
520166f0c6f8347dc363bf38097d0206
fe12edbc3bb6dc99e9b58885cf32da9e153e3ac2
'2012-01-15T05:48:59-05:00'
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWO' 'sip-files00063.txt'
6a9019403f6b22a9602d4684e5051523
c67fbc2bf7569f1caf1165e396559b6612552194
'2012-01-15T05:49:38-05:00'
describe
'9681' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWP' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
085a4ad6a76f00404882d4d05e304380
8ea0464a2c27f7e975a6715fb0ad26776e91e8e5
describe
'272113' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWQ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
b47ef03356fb3c8f54efc065f2ea771c
4474b8a1bf6bb98ea5647c9757e7cc031ca497e1
describe
'131409' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWR' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
3c8986137de7c8ff49967c8441781d9c
141540fdb63ceb547d5aa219b7247a22bb7a21e3
describe
'36855' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWS' 'sip-files00064.pro'
ff31a98d21c2d3d203a4cd304e0ceb37
b1f24e0ad798118d87426eeeaac2cb07928737eb
describe
'45510' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWT' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
8b92ade9a620f0308a90a6081049276a
9115cbf967cf9bf84778baff9014d53fe059c0e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWU' 'sip-files00064.tif'
b726aef923675d2e1cfa83972e92faa9
5ab8839c16981f6e980bc46f857f4700b4bea66c
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWV' 'sip-files00064.txt'
621a583e69ba9d9dc63ebce936e6fbfa
6e0abadf2d8df0465446896a6b3d578b20e0e660
describe
'10936' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWW' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
98205ebddb5932cddcd609ac0bce0a78
71652b019bf24fdcd1319e0427b8fb9add3da5cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWX' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
c8afb91bd05b0634e8cf22bb11b59bc5
71ec7e995d19106ff98faf46975b0548bc5061d2
describe
'132978' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWY' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
ac78f9caa73bb26c3ddb6b0966da9a9c
e5f50d04bb4c8b94cdad80925f22f293a3a299a4
'2012-01-15T05:47:28-05:00'
describe
'37293' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLWZ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
0741b0308f7f5efe76ecf342c0b7523e
992d58d858b3818e658585f10e9ef4efb13490a5
describe
'46472' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXA' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
b9bef4fd1dfe11b4e23e0c980d03ec76
bed623de6204f99ac05213e8a8ab085ceae0ba6b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXB' 'sip-files00065.tif'
78b3fbfde5ce29934b04bd900e552587
6bb9455c7dd3d4f6dc460a3ab5faa3cefc2dc9d9
'2012-01-15T05:48:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXC' 'sip-files00065.txt'
b98f011c5f0222f4512653a449d13461
957cd569fa1cf49af2685303afee8ccc976f4bbb
describe
'11044' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXD' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
cfdc00c366bd059d0d206957bc20b9cc
0491dd1aef9089e974d100b07ed44f43928996e4
describe
'271750' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXE' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
730dd6647259c811d9349dc3c888ae1d
2d290743289eae0dd8dd0158fb5b08a3059c3ccd
describe
'134500' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXF' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
d1724407a7ee8aadd734277c0f4b1004
4c1113f67c7430d894b5e583abe182cf48e20eef
describe
'37732' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXG' 'sip-files00066.pro'
1ce8e1648a4a401b09a7018a71fbaf49
9afdf7b5ac8ba062dcbf09f4449b534759b820a8
describe
'47208' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXH' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
d49c92e2bcacf40c942c5a007369c8c4
89059b2e31b03b73f3dc61f95cd154ddc150fbd4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXI' 'sip-files00066.tif'
804751b6556d69ea043190a34eb6ce04
5e86a7de2fd2d8fcefb8c056f101f540ed80dbac
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXJ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
d7a4820dc5d4da08c4602283c14c897c
159ce7253cc651883eed1941c988d59c07439702
describe
'11392' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXK' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
41ecc183f4253f4d3e8da5a9a54cb5b5
eab03172643af1fa02348309e80a900030ca59b0
describe
'271800' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXL' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
111a0659036f716609ef80b5c9ce0bd9
f26fd0de45f560dad926b222d20e5e96da6e86b6
describe
'128491' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXM' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
c23265c51e3b09e07b994d3d046d6150
5ad678ac6b35df00d8f9cfff7d95a361e3715b91
describe
'35639' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXN' 'sip-files00067.pro'
75db5368858469a5fac7a8013ece48a3
84c35ccf1086f2c743ba816874e189f19db7f0fe
describe
'46190' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXO' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
c0d93cdb8aae6e9a8846e9fe74542feb
404fd29e77f8b4debd9efbac4eee3c11d64ba1eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXP' 'sip-files00067.tif'
ae1ef4e918bf150c1352de758a6136e5
cce1b43c44974d18fd5a5aafe30d6f33515faae5
'2012-01-15T05:50:12-05:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXQ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
f391e5fd52ad157c2e418b3e145a6454
1007c6a11864d7d42dae0f3246f528fe933aa375
describe
'11142' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXR' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
cca57f1fe49463cbd5f5081bf18a16b6
a65a84b596eb29ab02cc3a0decce5ae1ef516b1f
describe
'271740' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXS' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
1f783fc81573a9fdd15a3fe057856fd9
65bd0dcc56de8b78599ed89a603ff10f8843c1c2
'2012-01-15T05:49:59-05:00'
describe
'123785' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXT' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
2f518e7d81ed1ca3a62ae53058d3c6ca
193d70ca4b8b58287886780427b8645ef3f7c9dc
describe
'35134' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXU' 'sip-files00068.pro'
5191d5bdd1f94de5fda9e67f3c605be7
daa65bc524cc07f17022b2d40859aa388c289658
describe
'43125' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXV' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
27a7200fb74550c8324bf8d698b9a097
cb0e78840e3eb6a2ff97173b0dcdffe9ba7113df
'2012-01-15T05:48:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXW' 'sip-files00068.tif'
b11402c2d4c1f25791cc8461e37f705e
cd188cc1df85fe7f9de8a45e92be1963f17f948c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXX' 'sip-files00068.txt'
f2e676b155c63bc9e127d34535039e9d
df2310fede2b799793d9136d872b1c06b2510ac2
describe
'10411' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXY' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
b57223e698e78ce1dfb79476c9664b73
167fb432dc1950e231613448f15068276575c343
describe
'271844' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLXZ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
04ead923e02c224451f71e096761634b
21339673301beb6d3946ac3041b5ef067868b407
describe
'137082' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYA' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
8ef3f65992d18640d613c8cd4fbc9931
037b2aa897bafcff7f09f268fa4d5f7421fc67d3
describe
'38595' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYB' 'sip-files00069.pro'
08c00832da46e81b3178922e6fb9de7d
4669295cda968b93a463a46721dc2f50a9f5c51a
describe
'47705' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYC' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
a9a32bc09d952f5fa9601ea4868b3069
dab536d5e5acaca313284bde88829863c2bba008
'2012-01-15T05:50:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYD' 'sip-files00069.tif'
21df1abbc10897ae649134065bbd3c2c
09134f45224ec6839afc7dfbb6712f3500d61667
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYE' 'sip-files00069.txt'
b71a1cdb54659797cfdf72a00305298d
8026f59defa752cddbc3f72ffc455112bdc113bc
describe
'11506' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYF' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
a79d2b50ccbe50fbd65464e1f431b626
6727ee14a0b04c5f45ea57d8154dd63ef7df757b
describe
'271731' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYG' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
17407d41e62c6df8b192a7ecb0e96104
42108ce6cfb0e23c2d69e4234b5d2810866dd9ad
describe
'135059' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYH' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
7a4f11c711baaf03f7a76ca60a728e90
69178de89e7573dbe80c3e0e72c83a6144f30a74
'2012-01-15T05:49:43-05:00'
describe
'38089' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYI' 'sip-files00070.pro'
bfa15b98a42b0cf4730bcbc292880c0f
1a9de1e12e27168198a80b9e42dbf936de74d35c
describe
'46917' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYJ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
1361085028a6ca42b36d74bca03aee1b
23ca8cae427f6a10df38f158863806461966584a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYK' 'sip-files00070.tif'
9e86ef941abb68c0fa9afc7dc861bddf
6b79ad4b0b34ba1ddba53cf9c90e274971df20df
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYL' 'sip-files00070.txt'
e112aefd40559db72aed7674001765c0
2e89f3e3d469b8a625e3c84e1898fc7a7044b60d
describe
'11163' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYM' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
dc65992c82e1599839161ff91adc6d12
150fc50977b9f9f560b8547297987ac977779977
'2012-01-15T05:46:58-05:00'
describe
'271771' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYN' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
5df5780970df70a0c4262230b16ff53e
4188b79d2454099ca3b45ac0a5629c7bc412b794
'2012-01-15T05:48:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYO' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
391c42c7fb8252ee4d2f0a5e5030a4fd
5e09dfb8385f6683a069a9b0b262a72c1f73cf70
describe
'38051' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYP' 'sip-files00071.pro'
e2667ad4d1d17477e356b4b90cb6a30c
230fcb300cb0be457f1c6a80fed968091dcb8c13
describe
'46310' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYQ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
c014c05fca069484e959d8c28689acc6
00d108b6688b0f3bc5c96ef00ae7e141de9bb4d6
'2012-01-15T05:46:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYR' 'sip-files00071.tif'
a5c8c7f7ddc491b8fc3cea90ece92e38
184934b8123357aa2388d5c9c634ad22ae8a3c4d
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYS' 'sip-files00071.txt'
a5f389444f3a362d1a61fbd7fd8b3d43
88a461ddd6bdda82f95ce7f96f66db8c52bcee67
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYT' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
4afae743c6fac4a499e46599ab575e99
567bd9b601e9accd4d714a7a24a897cbe1b54aab
'2012-01-15T05:50:07-05:00'
describe
'271902' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYU' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
0d96b595cb2fd1b0cb958cfb64160059
ab5ee6fde18955e47749789a3353c229a521c557
describe
'130473' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYV' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
5518e83495ab48abcfa7ca6add8d14f3
1a8fa34c0b279ddc5c763c3ce90632dc5826fa46
'2012-01-15T05:50:32-05:00'
describe
'37335' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYW' 'sip-files00072.pro'
70ab802b6a6579aa6e648ce850400a78
caaa43777243e4e6022464045906730f1f8de483
'2012-01-15T05:50:54-05:00'
describe
'45450' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYX' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
e0c5897e799d6c381d453b957ebb76c0
5c731e33280b691b7c7681b1ecfaafef80d5dde6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYY' 'sip-files00072.tif'
5f807155204902ff80baa5d407f4b0b1
6999852799be8edf184142872aa149a121f3ac10
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLYZ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
652239ffa0e3dfeccc08d57e3959be6f
58073bedec37ee60421f011c6dac45d789f55b07
describe
'10858' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZA' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
b17a53e36e777204a25f107fca21095b
216458d832809fdcb9fec3e5253e119303355ec8
'2012-01-15T05:49:58-05:00'
describe
'271891' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZB' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
4c19987774fac5b66ea92b3b77c1ee6e
08480428db9cfef5b6598500ea3986b30c7c48f1
describe
'136960' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZC' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
b41025b90d1e41f80d2120733de40d6e
f5680f62ea376d8391648da76731aa0a350a7916
describe
'37509' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZD' 'sip-files00073.pro'
11fb17d579deb3f935ad4b6fe95a6869
85e361edfaddd0240fd66b6a3862e15542b90ce2
'2012-01-15T05:50:19-05:00'
describe
'47405' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZE' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
b6101b3c3d00cb4e8c299c4de9e15f16
a5b95781fe438b1e9ce9776d6c995e51190bed1d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZF' 'sip-files00073.tif'
ab91e261e8554e4826cd633869feec3e
98ee3dd940037addc5e4f90a56ba6b54c36af777
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZG' 'sip-files00073.txt'
649aa30d548945ef07c11df97718e08c
b9fc6557f51885e9f002620c976cc3f15ca5fd08
describe
'11332' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZH' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
342189297f790c0fc05f49614c8e788c
dd47e42595a6cd88bc1706ba7ee2d56d7226105f
describe
'271926' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZI' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
983554863da526206ce2c189553b09fe
3f551841838a58ac05f2b9a52c0bac562bf3f56e
describe
'124813' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZJ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
39358c29473341ad9c4f60296be8b84a
15e1a1fe758c56742b7d7d91696f4fab6a9d7907
describe
'33624' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZK' 'sip-files00074.pro'
eb2fbd70d34af34b13a7060ca42c53de
ebc39273133e785c1b50da87cc6667cbcb162b4d
'2012-01-15T05:50:34-05:00'
describe
'44128' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZL' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
ad96f2cbe2fc4dcdea6b7472cc1b24bd
2188c91c23cdbde8cefc7306bbe1540faa8451cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZM' 'sip-files00074.tif'
79fe7ac8f2dccb7b5ec1c0a96509c04b
147d7516a9c2500c730ab45e9b1c55966d829b74
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZN' 'sip-files00074.txt'
12c36e55563a383c362f05187823688e
8a67272053195959e80069fbe6047c0f99803945
describe
'10876' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZO' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
38e7e6f143e58885c0d2eb06ae2d3e06
f877e020bd259865871c3d83020a894ad6971d64
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZP' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
6bd4a2b19a34f7861f809b9df46ff82e
7b47be4a56373cb544084804cc2b8cbb4c5d5a93
describe
'125023' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZQ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
e04debca26ee85163e869674bacd6a60
1c8a4912eb81fc90bce7f5e94213e65658d921b7
describe
'33900' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZR' 'sip-files00075.pro'
c18d34fad629473f1493591d4a292b9a
7118a101b12dcf3ac4475c5710737350b2291eae
describe
'43408' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZS' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
13642ed3a891cfa12cb3735f27fbe97a
9d71fc578d0b40142a3aeaa9ca3e648ca6dbe3bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZT' 'sip-files00075.tif'
d2fb1b6a67c2bc137639472db618ba9c
902342ebe3e21b0a6067c2ed8c32e175c41b8268
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZU' 'sip-files00075.txt'
b17f4c363e2c6cd2522e7eff7d0bf65a
359d4aa7da004dc88c6d8be89e0f55510a3e7cfe
describe
'10847' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZV' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
34875a426185a73824642bf64f850a6d
2428a56a91d4a430a7f091f13023de9593286ffc
describe
'271834' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZW' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
2e3796d6738a33eaa5b2e6285420028f
146fff48c3c5c958fb2f3e9b5856b6a26f8757ab
describe
'114465' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZX' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
98a76643d18ec6b9963366e53f05b85f
e52941aa7515ca67e3c26a1fc1169ee10a854227
describe
'31120' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZY' 'sip-files00076.pro'
292fe5305b796a0ae188580fb289cb81
d68f837b165539588c0d0be03f23890e55389b19
describe
'39380' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACLZZ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
5d3961100d5fa148691a643260959b22
4a32fa69d2c7e37b349ee25a8d9cdf1a818559c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAA' 'sip-files00076.tif'
3141bc3c75d9e9cd6c826eb7417a9db6
2a6889557bb0de39a9d2fac35164b68493f349d1
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAB' 'sip-files00076.txt'
f2cdef86dc24d1b26a758bef35658495
dd80038d5f97c2ce9cd3ba0c2c829a1978955327
describe
'9845' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAC' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
9a859b0a0580daa9d3de93d9b671126f
8ef289b9e17f5f20b0a7fc2e76c57b1010d6f370
describe
'271706' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAD' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
d32b72fc2b2d44c562d4eac721f874f8
08ffd9a575fe53fe90e951eebc3cc449739f4cee
describe
'69700' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAE' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
ad64a97e650b18e9120ea904d7c31d91
efc38dd7666ecb0b4a0caa8202a27642b6c89682
describe
'21496' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAF' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
75979b0aac27b5976e802963611e6bbb
e32292beb0e9bc6f281b6be91a278ac5d70deb01
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAG' 'sip-files00077.tif'
40da968bba031a2682aae713580c0c71
a392be90693fb41f79955652a1e686bb3aa549d1
describe
'5685' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAH' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
70d2342024038a341ca9e132fb34eadf
03158b4a55a7daab7cd0d509b9021bdc09c8078d
describe
'190949' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAI' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
3c42bf4d932175cb99849d5b5c083c7f
acda82a03f0de04fef1e2183e266bd639a031cdd
describe
'8704' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAJ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
8d1306a4c328180d502f2ed7cc73f02b
0e5c769fc6c25d0b3d4da06d216454dec834dc6a
describe
'2718' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAK' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
dcf7877228eb1108f75b3be2dc84809d
25b2789894e3b1289a07b7b3cfb8bb23eacec69b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAL' 'sip-files00078.tif'
3e5e5186161fcc34077dd46c1c9c7f93
7237db6b71e8c8d2fc3c5f39b44bf4d550cd768c
describe
'954' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAM' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
32e6620f6366a2d5850636f118476881
fc360df37c97eae2c4212069bba8103d0e778ded
describe
'271839' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAN' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
0c48e1e38363be9d953217d089a98ea9
51a7e8bcdeeb31b105955b62f47662860882bf97
describe
'126857' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAO' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
04dfc3f7caaa62b3b6546a9dd4db4225
39db429d344034ab2584a96d7566be7bd8557ff4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAP' 'sip-files00079.pro'
719fde226718b26baf3dd337a02e2e5d
dafb18bd33351dc12427f0f35c164c8c53ad7f92
describe
'44703' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAQ' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
cf78f5bf79a9793800bd413faaf42a5f
6e69f6d673285cd697b8dd0f1e6c83f5d2519ab8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAR' 'sip-files00079.tif'
307ce637c97b91abf18b0132c83800d1
c3bbbd2e82f1d57892206a829804b0107641a481
'2012-01-15T05:50:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAS' 'sip-files00079.txt'
f07f1d323de8d9210334bb6a6f83cb34
5fb7ed120055545b63f7dd47ee3e087c1816cb2f
describe
'10749' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAT' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
e1b128842d87e2f5f1cb873c621c1052
28b8eb426aaf311a4ae4cd24ceaf82bba46c4413
describe
'271909' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAU' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
bb9fe146b40ecd05120fd933456f8db6
ccaaaa64988e75551de6f388e784403cc50c7d9e
describe
'127892' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAV' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
71ea6c142131b880d00c84ee1595fa68
12458822bdcff84a7bddff97cabd89da19f9b8d7
'2012-01-15T05:47:09-05:00'
describe
'37369' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAW' 'sip-files00080.pro'
626d99ec0a1448498d6722535e316448
f864ea6db16a00c5680db9cc8525b5b483102bea
describe
'44383' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAX' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
b04e45a9f8aee7ffa0c06fc1e0bfe727
152448eb48703c44ee989cbde2d25063a2819fc4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAY' 'sip-files00080.tif'
b9580bd9d2b000bf5b45431e875f1b23
83f0d8cc846c9a227b052e76fa2b007f18a08c57
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMAZ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
28702419ee93b10e5a8de333ffdbf7df
a7331c13ae9c5d1de2da4397d3cd3dd4639bb3b8
describe
'10512' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBA' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
68285eccf0b3f8a4c1332b0d2d51335a
24fb1a527b25e9be1a84d37a18c0d4c3a572d152
describe
'271843' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBB' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
f88c85e5c193ea478f4b01a96421f8f7
e11185ef016244a68cf72af4298ff161035aec30
describe
'131502' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBC' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
7ed7329c1dff1fb383e83e2f89f04614
187af93e311425e25cb84b147e00f79c3ebc07a5
describe
'38156' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBD' 'sip-files00081.pro'
3b610483145495d1ff5f83f6ed2210b6
57b6cf2ffd392c0d093c2db1e7589f387c6fceeb
describe
'44991' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBE' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
df4a197bc87ac4871ea5d1acd94ed92e
ee397efaf930e841fe8c1e72ba26e7905e4b7864
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBF' 'sip-files00081.tif'
3580d336ea7c177a3ecc6f3300e670ea
46757b6dcc7d3a11d3953bad0d5a9f3b4f68695a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBG' 'sip-files00081.txt'
7fe4bd0fe835f82fddac31168109c722
cdd711bca5fe0bc4e1b9b2df5f962a6da4ae1af0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBH' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
9426c1c6cfc014c12051031d7b14c79c
338151c2b35827e1f5df579b89440a7881e403c4
describe
'271925' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBI' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
88cf84e9395383c6241e05275dafb0a5
5f3a60ec13684709a07db94a1c8c80e0ae2e3626
describe
'120715' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBJ' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
9348f178c46628c0c341094b2194c3c3
eb52fb116afd97ff54183cc2939ae5e305da6555
describe
'32361' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBK' 'sip-files00082.pro'
2d2be08e775f05b8353fddb10e5e9945
15de200f1813cda8f324fcf541f3df487e7139b3
describe
'41987' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBL' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
f673234090aa912eca7520bb2f95644d
af42fbb9f0d92399bc8af05e976e56cb7575e6f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBM' 'sip-files00082.tif'
a4f099d8df487fd78e0e81573be5fbe3
281341671cc448808dca80fb2480e2c2face59e3
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBN' 'sip-files00082.txt'
564959c5f3506bcde2eaea1e08688f35
b432a1004f6d9c7ea47decca8aa10e3103831db8
describe
'10622' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBO' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
409981b8412ea31cd7a07c38cad637a8
99f694968a9ed8209e72e8fb7ed76d2e6a527864
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBP' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
d13815b47aa5af5dea6fdf7b7d24f333
4a31148616652a3aa62f45c4a927a815b4e5f1a0
describe
'116214' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBQ' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
86dfb6645a0aeea2b6fd320906c2c485
8ea988cf93cc30f66cf6a94d9f29afdbd72fbf12
describe
'32210' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBR' 'sip-files00083.pro'
b0048999503586c3d385fe326cd25bbe
2142e125e1e008df68ab560468f88bff25e87e3c
describe
'40678' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBS' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
54f173b7a72b71b06b115626720b8e2c
873c540d30914eefcac551c386ab681ce33e55e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBT' 'sip-files00083.tif'
5e7ac63ef3aeb512c7393c769d57baab
65d788768c67858d9ad22ec5fd2c8a9f2f46e50a
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBU' 'sip-files00083.txt'
923de3cf41d1c4a82f13e409a856d11c
a270a3a466dcd000d6c7110c9bc894309e695df7
'2012-01-15T05:49:44-05:00'
describe
'10034' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBV' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
46c1e2ea76c68570832203639493406a
0431c5188d697a9dfc0fc4ddbecd7c75625419c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBW' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
b84276409262619c8be091fdcf96a111
d5e9fe40c11fdf644b4789264dd7c1bc30d39002
describe
'114974' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBX' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
34c185c38da0954ab6b78657f9aa8567
24f13098f0061627cf5d0aaefc232baf485c223e
describe
'33070' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBY' 'sip-files00084.pro'
ca69aa8482e641fdc5dcb43dcd72f37d
c3fea658824d43a5ac14d78738ef04b008bff2bd
describe
'40284' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMBZ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
e4fdb84ad9205038496ec3df8fe9544b
298ccda741668aac20b975ad7a36aae96577c58a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCA' 'sip-files00084.tif'
7326d1ccd9fee3be0eaaa43fe5db71a3
2a488afee1e80a64e9e2443efb0d960d3e9dd6a1
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCB' 'sip-files00084.txt'
52aa7ca167103508e5609abbb6277e8a
99c21c0015c75cbe0f924a68ba8652f3318f833e
describe
'9943' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCC' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
fee0b62deab5697b553193ea8d9f96c6
bb75563625f6dc67354c517cad4f5381dfdba2f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCD' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
dc2b13151689a255f3b14efa37e1b8d2
2d7d4ac8c10552bd14c878e393a63390a2971edf
describe
'116218' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCE' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
908fa4ecc81900d5015562df2e683044
4d8b92d471c9bc2efb33d46bd1c146f7f7fec84d
describe
'33136' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCF' 'sip-files00085.pro'
769564fdf24f352026165cd79c2ad40a
4ba2262af5c6f5020c38941bbfeaef3363bd9a4c
describe
'39721' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCG' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
d140c155d3c299c689a50258c6f4544a
342e3d87256006612ead1001ab77f3b4189e5188
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCH' 'sip-files00085.tif'
0b3e082b3086b371e3a2522dc22f38bc
2f5190c2a0d6fe8bf2fa08a0ced9b2152f593446
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCI' 'sip-files00085.txt'
b855486d29909da0713b023c3fec397f
da6e5ee1365dc93528f3ec6db7dfa804afb09887
describe
'10083' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCJ' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
6e602dc3fe511e453177b679682b6320
4c951cb3d25cb2c25d7eec78be5c31c2ef1d9989
describe
'271929' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCK' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
b5546febefd4ead782c8bf9188d8f8af
5e8ed63c6ee6adae0a6ca65536e1ace2de1e82cc
describe
'125595' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCL' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
668a358158742482db1a7b88128f7a0e
13fdd9568690234a1a5ae7223eccc3e021134d46
describe
'33889' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCM' 'sip-files00086.pro'
2470983102bdcf0107c7d211ae0e6390
3cc8a2e925a05500d31b5dd79d3411abbad4fe96
describe
'42928' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCN' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
79c94069303854d3a2f8d443aa7fe109
2ba895e1525c4b8478cb3e30ce46db3c32f79c54
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCO' 'sip-files00086.tif'
672f74a64c9842d81a765de384c4da0c
34314478424431700cb1f0f08dc84523e6641421
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCP' 'sip-files00086.txt'
c3b7da43f3b98d7eadd28c7efa5115f3
5d7ebdf825a78d4b66808edad7b240e0fce4addd
describe
'10783' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCQ' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
e97cf542ce7abfcd587f0161ab5471cf
fed63b368241af658b8baf7d18f6d87ab2d178a0
'2012-01-15T05:50:11-05:00'
describe
'271910' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCR' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
a97e95960ca4c8ac41634389ff1468a1
380356e91f483bfa3b7ba15d7522bf5f4501b8fa
describe
'125743' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCS' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
73c80f6a22bd8b052a02d1c55db76a50
b72d2f171b4c42c5b5a36cd4d7287909099c3c0b
describe
'33549' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCT' 'sip-files00087.pro'
3897efa30b5f343d84500895b0a40c5d
fdb97f782d6c318642a109a7f4f3bd9bf974316a
describe
'43789' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCU' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
546dd070f6a9d00a48edd3f23d6b8c13
8f7f04ab561d8155d8e89bb5a5ff9bca9155a1f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCV' 'sip-files00087.tif'
9851b180bc6660a605ab746b12eb731c
21eaa0c20a13a070c6ce55a3271fb4b7030fede4
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCW' 'sip-files00087.txt'
ce3c520edb2f785865a0f95a98a28b7f
078fb649b93b02f9a632e68c1e6f67055d1858c2
describe
'10954' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCX' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
53fc10baadbad2ad2e466efb2a7f10a8
0ed8bb5156f9927cdc604ab45ed994e2c2817cf4
describe
'245931' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCY' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
0b97dc69ca91134ee60f564e93760156
a7dafe86afa8922c502106d08d404bb3af7c04a6
describe
'27845' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMCZ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
9983d16c61e3c234bf16645014b06b89
b9ec67548aa8c061def99ca2b67c96b10f211591
describe
'20721' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDA' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
f9d8a4679442bbe7941b3a0e89e8d386
aef2524dd8b25bde6fc825c4296fa512245d2cb5
'2012-01-15T05:49:35-05:00'
describe
'2419892' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDB' 'sip-files00088.tif'
2398a65af504d73bdac6bd9ec077c6b6
9093d7b68c038688813776cffad6dd29335e9e7b
describe
'18912' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDC' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
3bfea29a6b15581f342ea3c766ef45c3
977ef839ecbca568dd8ee60eb0ac93fa175f4c09
describe
'218077' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDD' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
b5f8737b59ec531ee494dd8f36d08d6d
412617ac4c9b21f255f33b52706622b7184aea9f
'2012-01-15T05:47:00-05:00'
describe
'14601' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDE' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
08afad0a292670037b3a6c2e6e86ce24
c847a9384ffc1d371ca1967e2865ded1362e391d
describe
'833' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDF' 'sip-files00089.pro'
a2fc91b22c342aa82c95599b5a164bf8
5f73bdea39ab89384f244d7e1aded8af0817c70e
describe
'4833' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDG' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
f070b5280616abd5ad6f9021dc43faa9
1f8657cbccad90adec535f6a28781016e3cd3558
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDH' 'sip-files00089.tif'
32e28ce1690703978c96791baada0efc
b48c96b2eaea9ca37b4c2bd9804092df420b3849
describe
'47' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDI' 'sip-files00089.txt'
76bc5121918bcdf35affd2fecf131d24
b0472595ce583115a9a2d753fc690d25db784485
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDJ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
41321ae224c0fe32b2e7366e623c02ac
4c01b189199a843701df4feabd74eb139955bf20
'2012-01-15T05:47:41-05:00'
describe
'145701' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDK' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
93cdc48798cf63cfbce7998b7fbd72b8
db9cd8487fb9f5f614cb92345186311a1bd2b5ab
describe
'9082' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDL' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
6f515cebe1dd3fffd503414276fd7149
cb6e3511b9f42f325d6429ea582f5c6a88abf162
describe
'2713' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDM' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
d99ace73c1502714b2026e53ece47a90
2591df0c2dcf5cd634abb0380752aff5394e4b1d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDN' 'sip-files00090.tif'
93d10006d7fffe2126fd9d5e01b542dc
322990726517718fa14952f21cb3452df63a9971
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDO' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
0c8a8c526bf3029ae5468bcdfb481d03
d9281d4e26ef1ac8533a01cdf7939e941f32b64f
'2012-01-15T05:47:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDP' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
78e3d2c9805b32ebe609acee87c0f4ca
bf71a084497819aced1f43fa246b4e77d449d888
describe
'104083' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDQ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
c0fb11319c844ebb1b441f457231b662
efd0020c16c88817ac0114ad29d3cce563064d18
describe
'28284' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDR' 'sip-files00091.pro'
3d9c071b62dd2872ddc963d2cf0a0abb
4f085ed3e852248cb26ca88e24425bf8e8f516c7
'2012-01-15T05:47:55-05:00'
describe
'36197' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDS' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
199415684c4a9752ee0ec4eac0ad287a
1ff5343361271249a61a769f472be5368835dfe8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDT' 'sip-files00091.tif'
ac08f0284fbbccf057cc550f9cd01969
3be992c5abb81ffc9f22f77fab62f3cf70b08d16
'2012-01-15T05:49:36-05:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDU' 'sip-files00091.txt'
db62dcdda549fee0afc6cea7b98d7fa7
d7bd168e186a41a402838d2c54e52d2ac19f9c55
describe
'9183' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDV' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
f0aac55cb7cad8cca2c68ab1f00b26e6
e82713339017025bbd32291d9f719ec3d811ce77
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDW' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
ffe56f34db0dedb227a0aaed455bdf91
442d6165e8d8a8b182998b109cac348f1be7ae6e
describe
'120415' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDX' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
0dcce018b73d3ec82424f3bbcee693f2
738934e5ae821b7988b5ab4b2b670116f0abf8b9
describe
'33877' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDY' 'sip-files00092.pro'
26a1d9b3cbc772b74b66390a51efd698
fe53af8613c53ec29f55c4dde5a9dc0ae5776d6a
describe
'41586' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMDZ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
f0c55d4090e9575fb4de6df4949c92ac
2962f708f0b378cfde0d709a558405d3f208eb5e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEA' 'sip-files00092.tif'
d7a81f32a876c66608a4f07a819f8004
fda2e26cc6683535fb622b19b60c589b018af739
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEB' 'sip-files00092.txt'
c70ea64409b156f01bcea9d77990c4e6
e072b11c93498288de600caba551fd5c795ead48
describe
'10428' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEC' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
1244113fc09a421567696c2ce9249fae
a9a20bf3e9d6f2009a9774925ff7bc4dcffc1da5
describe
'271876' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMED' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
bb2f8cfcd95eee68e8a85d4006896239
e50a0f8853ec29e359c1869208d039cfcbf3a077
describe
'120155' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEE' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
555a0dd100ecce08a54d2764dc5de936
3add7a954f5d6d699b3157a1acc54271a9036fe1
describe
'33542' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEF' 'sip-files00093.pro'
6515abda019e16a94f265b7d93e9cb89
f753cc09deb65d9fc8a4a727d597bd2a13305c5c
describe
'41544' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEG' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
1798fffc9462da898a969810326f97bb
fe49489688e86bd69b12b0ec2125eb44583486dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEH' 'sip-files00093.tif'
5786ff4984d898063a827863838a031d
0dea080f362fccc4f556cf37f1b8cedd51badc2e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEI' 'sip-files00093.txt'
e3f1ab836ae2c078c18b4c343ab304e4
0b6d0025122f141e8365373dd0a85e2405c3e598
describe
'10330' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEJ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
85cb9d4a8c3fb6cd8a97372a46327ad1
8bb5d4e7765fc33b4678b274bcdea26c0f483259
describe
'271894' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEK' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
79b20fc80bad0b972be2b622772f5166
8204d71d20efd67784f0e81e3743b7a1a1f6ae35
describe
'124927' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEL' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
c21fe3ca0e6ab044741da9e658ca765e
2ec0039513d3681e98f5d7ff7f6225b634849e3b
describe
'34117' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEM' 'sip-files00094.pro'
d168b976ee032c3459cf69ccd8544859
ce72c3469fcef11f1dcfb7a61abff6c898bf3e63
describe
'43372' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEN' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
08979726be67963294c5a766c4b40fd9
919bd20f3373a4d1fd39c2fc8ee38ef2300cffaf
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEO' 'sip-files00094.tif'
909f2292309abddf2afa79eac5fb47e6
7d3053e2aba2732d0ae87d2470e090101d81b9f5
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEP' 'sip-files00094.txt'
80d891a45d6507b6605e9b5fd9fee6eb
91eb4cadbb7e5b3611f92065a9b0ccdddf7e3983
describe
'10417' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEQ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
805841a8b1dc0c89130e6f3308d408ee
ffa3876cca77c470dbfce893f0e1c07fa340f925
'2012-01-15T05:49:31-05:00'
describe
'271889' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMER' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
a9b6b6b48595308f8877c91390047b5f
b0a6841c07b9f4d45326212d25ef1a988d91ab67
describe
'126729' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMES' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
bc1a8b279303bf1f1e0d2259f93e1faf
cf836296c38ff3ea360274af24578e90b5a691f8
'2012-01-15T05:48:25-05:00'
describe
'35392' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMET' 'sip-files00095.pro'
5864cd3c458ba48dca89ece46ff2e9da
bb8182ca7176c624e1f78d118932caa92f9fe817
describe
'42784' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEU' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
c31bcc5ab365ca4323c4dc1443867c7e
9c7c5fc3d82e0c7bbb786299debada429dfb622f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEV' 'sip-files00095.tif'
83dcdee0c907d53194de03c3d4673aee
dc20f60c50ddcdeb79d1fc47627ebfd3ba53eab3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEW' 'sip-files00095.txt'
a696512ba35e7cdcdbaa968fc37ca11c
bd226e88a897b975e1250657c6d6d3277140f99e
describe
'10559' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEX' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
ff24cb2abdc3144966bb3ed812a7623d
a573657ce9f9ceabe55fe749a4152061f8c86e50
describe
'271901' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEY' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
c7e82db587ce9d8531be1861dbde16d1
aab31b128320385ddfe12b8afb74d0bda67ffc73
describe
'125277' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMEZ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
81170b9a9e33eb5592b2dc90ef3fcadb
4d254a0e3894e6f61ad001968d35baf37314580c
describe
'35485' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFA' 'sip-files00096.pro'
1e0666d3e6a376c9f520d851ce4f0c3f
508bd857485fbd1667cd65d2110bd105ed84edda
describe
'43313' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFB' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
d170bef25a5a0925f3d1c852dd58c50d
e1fc5e27cecee5cf2c7a5405bdb924a2e1db6bdc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFC' 'sip-files00096.tif'
511c0e05fbfd795676e24996eb9efec6
5e0cfda63c7052c14de5b80acbda14f19c0ccd60
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFD' 'sip-files00096.txt'
93b069a8a84c3e6f1672e619740a6904
fd2e6efd241448de64f042b28c7c1d58d9261f36
describe
'10548' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFE' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
2912bf9cf4c255c9c62cfc5770efb454
64b453651e9b9d1ef9805c196043f5d9dca15afe
describe
'271917' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFF' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
a0d090f5e38c6e23e4f1986b33293230
a1adbdf0006862708cb85d57c66585c0572fa120
describe
'123071' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFG' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
8e5f193e7a2598cfbd54cfd18e641009
028ff949e7f5a2c2d076f4a37bcb70919649ce80
describe
'34386' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFH' 'sip-files00097.pro'
2faeda373a2cb7c81a83706b9e02731e
3b7b425831c092e47ddbb8dbe7cbfeb891095c5c
'2012-01-15T05:48:39-05:00'
describe
'41875' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFI' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
c474bec4fcf8243fc041744eebe6b1d0
a8798df08bf6ac55eb1f95e4d3c2c55c1ab70808
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFJ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
7cdefc47c8a300086f4966ddd128da27
0046b57bfc51cccb05af9bac65362e3825ad226e
'2012-01-15T05:51:00-05:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFK' 'sip-files00097.txt'
7c61b728e1e745281cc00c073f387cb0
14ffeb538c318180b392a254a52eb73a9ccf721c
describe
'10280' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFL' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
dc031aca1f463a2768c213968b0873fd
9cc6d843c3834d2a65823f3ddba23bcce518b5f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFM' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
aaf526c7112fc593f05e0e011f97a0c6
72601c6f599fd800fe1d4ef1dab2ca0ceec59fa2
describe
'125767' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFN' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
32d68c6446cd59a4992598e51baa52bb
fa106ca4069042763d41edfb0912805224a08c43
describe
'34207' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFO' 'sip-files00098.pro'
65b3d69eba0da1cbfad24690e05c17b4
4524785dd50dff05c26262441d159a413410a5d6
describe
'42240' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFP' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
7fa8e95884273745895b247a6ade790c
8b6b5a114e8270cb48040e84af05af397487ae45
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFQ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
d3169fad5eeb24a6dbebf652aae5f4ac
1cc4aca99f0648f052b3feb22a313b6f1dea4947
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFR' 'sip-files00098.txt'
c23d59da5ea53fa0c522dd93b03d0a6e
ad954b5d391d37115b74a22b493d9e5a825494a9
describe
'10636' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFS' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
18893e6dc4262edbe98d71ba35f1f59c
921ec6df7080354894c79fc9b2f3eacc29f71727
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFT' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
3a027f867b7ec921346d0b2fe6c7cac2
b2791e16bb026f6c278fa5bf6aeb5ce38a9deaa7
describe
'110491' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFU' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
1c09aca1e6396a892e9697073eaca195
1ff5ec8d16f37797ac7b1fe48234d20325902d90
describe
'29976' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFV' 'sip-files00099.pro'
b749b4b1e3d314222d1065a93c1ef5ac
15b5937dda89904503fd9f8bdc8b05177199fea6
describe
'38724' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFW' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
f9b606112fa65e1c85e21a34c45d92e6
b4be0574b2efa45d937cd32fd784d05a2a3a4989
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFX' 'sip-files00099.tif'
cee961dcfb29832d37e99d92d890bd00
77682a79deeca8f5b0e8cfb4b1a4e6f1ac27fde3
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFY' 'sip-files00099.txt'
1fa039c0a20125b5e3c6c25ce4405cfc
63b902769c2c704eb91bb4eb1b2607d0b411d738
describe
'9589' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMFZ' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
8ff529011d7b1909bceeb95f083ae03d
29124f947c10171e89117de3ae674d3cbb85716a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGA' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
3b49d9241688825d64e5c161d9bd6c80
9d8f3332094f2e01e07c14bccecce4df854b4384
describe
'125298' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGB' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
a5c60cc9a57eadf1099b5492b5392885
56612ee6f82dca574ab30eb5e58b9021832f1f01
describe
'35526' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGC' 'sip-files00100.pro'
67f03a841f1e3b8b45c32ebd31c69e5c
cfef092d72705c36775686e08e3b6dfc94a95c8e
describe
'43146' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGD' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
af3f24bd8bc357a538ebb03d71e7175d
39042a5a66e5ff58a337784c9ad5076e8ce8d92a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGE' 'sip-files00100.tif'
81e4c33388e007312a06cf36bd5b4262
dbd0c3117c83770c4cb7f061c787350b665a6583
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGF' 'sip-files00100.txt'
3f4b9a66caf7603a934f6842c4fd748c
fa56818b86d2b3123db502e1a39710b0015a1b6a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGG' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
fc0be152c05e24a342595f0584c4c643
d805b84549a2641ed23d908ad0ed5671e251701b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGH' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
15bbe6ab693891b19b1c3a54ae7100fd
b4be03e7cb8c4f29e3fd0e85772605646e9e78d9
describe
'121796' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGI' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
a5cd9000b4713549f6a6fd857524b1af
68f59bbbbaa1423d4a05e4e56e38cc9c6ba411e4
describe
'32238' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGJ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
08f9cd5bf85fc2ac1656a22151aaa20d
925c570a4828261ac61f15333c8f696b23f41c82
describe
'42441' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGK' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
bab442cd32990b6157a221a3f5f0d8f3
30869912769dd705e91bbb150bf0c61655558d8e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGL' 'sip-files00101.tif'
d9d7d9e559813e503f4d67bf9f74293a
99ad0b8d5e0074bce5a1d7a835958074d1e408b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGM' 'sip-files00101.txt'
cca3390067c026850ee9fac7fa534437
a6a32a9536797ad6084158aa0644249cea61ea1e
describe
'10465' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGN' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
b6c55c2982bb5e872d24343671f3a647
28f8e7d92303fad406df2553dcbb959765820f16
describe
'271873' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGO' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
1c8835b324c63733a29df7aaa5cc2999
389f31c74913f4fa265b5f1b371538f8c1860d7f
describe
'121780' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGP' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
9f08665012c1ea82697b934502831cc7
9a15a718dfc4a3535854aeb20b18a47e82285ead
describe
'33098' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGQ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
22f955ce86610b1fa77718811bdeabbb
51b11aced89e39659623755eafb2da89b09d522f
describe
'42292' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGR' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
5193eb37e18088c392d253158d29aa4f
272f2053b36458031704a74069080413a4458e8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGS' 'sip-files00102.tif'
d9276734925e8a4792ac522615bf8f69
155e081d1dadcdd5f569b70c7dec3b215b5590ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGT' 'sip-files00102.txt'
1937a4b39fc581c7e920c4658edfc723
0d8b163a54becc6af1d998356fe056edd527ce81
describe
'10248' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGU' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
0e7593b0dd8288f59e5745ec6caa77a6
a448cde485b5dc5e2c7a7b29de2e4697ae2ca16c
describe
'271921' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGV' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
16c7165a3df58738730fd7e94e14f5c3
c88dfce3650dfe633f8775dcec31bb821049b28f
describe
'130367' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGW' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
da629b086f6478671e211f551270fa35
e6fbdcf13b346ffecb1e566d05d25383db0482e8
'2012-01-15T05:47:33-05:00'
describe
'34382' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGX' 'sip-files00103.pro'
ed76342bb54bbf35ac8ac42d24203d84
d57dc4a5671bf801e7df4b4da1a13f845e768128
describe
'44927' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGY' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
36df0587828aea3ef8bf3dca8eccbefa
e397b4e14172e4dcb8c410d735b1dff70576936d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMGZ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
723204cb364ba3a9793feaaf468b5f0e
5968ee827278f20b178358570013ad0902d42156
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHA' 'sip-files00103.txt'
b1169cab96711eedf6934e1ed193fd37
822213f94ead3495a57da2af1680ebfebccaddfb
describe
'10777' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHB' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
97b9d470301de7ac2ad2f8465db6a381
0e67ed1adc2de3ac855f53d5a36db914b206cf52
describe
'271915' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHC' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
2a2e58b237e63eb59df5fa19a43988e5
b5349ca7cd08e05629d4f581fcc081a266ee02df
describe
'124805' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHD' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
27d2515e8cfa30354a5eb232ef74a3b6
22a8da150b43ff32f853e46c4f9826626a7dd50b
describe
'34358' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHE' 'sip-files00104.pro'
ae5159fd278f8c59b35f100a1659da50
30d160611bc86b14b6b5dad330d52bd45de9726a
describe
'43128' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHF' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
e058d829cec1b9b0025be5ba12587ea8
9783380f2076f1946db2975f140110b36b6b1c7c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHG' 'sip-files00104.tif'
6f170e49a82595e577761d083291f2c1
af2b72c0973ab7d3c840f277ddda047aa308997d
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHH' 'sip-files00104.txt'
9c055f96206d398112bd3634d6ad6072
463247d3f313789d8c297245a1e0bd5f4e7b7d7a
describe
'10612' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHI' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
fe0f9a9d61e50d7b3560306cfa25439f
39f7818a9eb77d697416631d4450abbc6f653119
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHJ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
0b8ce0f993f70286e796294671e9bef6
a0a3fbec1bf635186c2ed67479a700c4e98e0412
describe
'123650' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHK' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
870ce33ba1c4bddc565d690bee832c16
0d876aa38c90245dbc1471045f988ac5e5aa45b7
'2012-01-15T05:50:43-05:00'
describe
'34809' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHL' 'sip-files00105.pro'
154445e9c8d7f453abcb783d26033e09
0ab6784f5b8980cfe65ced91dd6d0dbb1d35bdb2
describe
'42461' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHM' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
2f67b0309c33d9c538fcf958ffe2f7a6
5533ecd551dbaea4817eee9a0e516ac8e473178c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHN' 'sip-files00105.tif'
ff1351e19d93b173c7ac8e426649b997
4e1234cf5a2bf6c28a51ad194cc1548c7b1495d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHO' 'sip-files00105.txt'
a5f376943c6193c6c0368eb766cc476c
57c57cfc63def72f140db2d8910c293aa6d29ca1
describe
'10441' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHP' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
252a11fd5f4a2d607ad7864a3fb9c15c
7d4866e47eab19e2eddd76d5e48406642098e8c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHQ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
1b2bcca6527072f5b2e1cec473fb6ec0
f5aec212d5d4b5ee41338e0d3a5ad68390513ab8
describe
'121805' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHR' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
902d267a482eb581c578a00bfc242486
557338974aac287cb59db70cdb34e1f931b26512
describe
'34693' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHS' 'sip-files00106.pro'
bdf67a7a94a82d3fd5f4c107cf248b51
d9dde96d01a5c2e44002f1303be018bf53075007
describe
'43681' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHT' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
03caad7677ed9886e6738f1e6aecba49
b37617b6be1f37759e3550e21a869c6693bed81b
'2012-01-15T05:47:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHU' 'sip-files00106.tif'
b3af49391c163a462b965d2fc131fbb5
90679838f2523c2ac12162952510af8df4ad9482
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHV' 'sip-files00106.txt'
f4bcef60647c737c7dc5b6a0f485f8e9
5a86cacc5c700dbfd50e1872a780242e5512f78c
describe
'10508' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHW' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
d473a60f7ba74a3891e3afee42487c05
e2f9ce0b34b68cf9eb16028f6eeb06a259b1b8ea
describe
'271845' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHX' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
99afb07247dbb5fdd95d267adc4b1475
5e6ec1132234e3464896a8e94f04720355261884
'2012-01-15T05:49:51-05:00'
describe
'130077' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHY' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
f1fd2248193ec2ba57216ad58adbd9ba
066e6ff1070bbb3fb156401b69be44aef9130598
describe
'34513' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMHZ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
02a3e6f0f14ddfb8b85006a6be0ee859
1fad620350672e091d330bbf435656b2e83aba8d
'2012-01-15T05:47:07-05:00'
describe
'45343' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIA' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
383fee6100618acf2e06595a07f4c1b5
9a23bca75255a704bdc51017358d1167d5eb92f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIB' 'sip-files00107.tif'
8d3eed4dad23c65126ec99440bd191b9
b2655389e5f1362df94803f8171ba1e9f2d88595
'2012-01-15T05:50:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIC' 'sip-files00107.txt'
540649d05bbd5aa127c4f5c378e481ec
42a8f1ce62134a38ba460d5dafbc2a5f464c3a9c
describe
'10924' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMID' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
dbadca12844d3536d9e8920b5353b1aa
9ce932ead654167c89dfc0c0e0e885f521c2cac6
describe
'271918' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIE' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
cce87287e566061ee578560a26d8722e
3ad26872b97171f6fe874eb1bdfa5b9424770b3a
describe
'111696' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIF' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
333ea7c41d3e3b1e3cdc4cc32343590b
fbf19a79b44c7c76f4a37d88d94ffbf23ba8052c
describe
'30493' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIG' 'sip-files00108.pro'
06ba6c34c5624aaf97453c7cec0f9860
2b5172d31f82e30f64d31e132bb63e5fd013cee7
describe
'38262' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIH' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
d126f497b4b608a62d1624b47e4ab85e
08f32bc6b27d82818269d8a62dd97444b640e7e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMII' 'sip-files00108.tif'
71535b7ca41a13a6b7dc5dc4356a8fa2
43c6f3925e2ce31066bb4d6584d312b6e9af8daf
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIJ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
4bbfb12dddba0d4c49c5da7472e636fb
0c37f3b735e29d582f2726252cccaa851d49ce3e
describe
'10342' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIK' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
36b06efe01842304740e0be946a8798c
35b9d9248c38724c70daee37fcdf940921fe32c5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIL' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
b113bc10deb90ba919991e20d73deb8c
afe0768540430d1d45785de2fbe45891aa7de537
describe
'118581' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIM' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
ce7cddb8df2d35c66ccd8df82b8cd255
5966c6e56cbf473231f86dd230cde82f1f35e3e9
describe
'32247' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIN' 'sip-files00109.pro'
b616ca7af9580e31be6c75f6b50e296e
816ab58d273ab1ae80bf9694ea5d8a4feb61c917
describe
'40811' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIO' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
a648c3157950425e63f392228c07566e
08e4cb05d5aa433e4043529591fa2a71c567496d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIP' 'sip-files00109.tif'
f766fbb6ee8a9674288fdf5207b4e70b
ededc144f5453ad8c913bf88fa22c0a6a4264902
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIQ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
dcf3f63902f7e76a8ba9ba59340fb427
cacaa1538eefe5c1d7bcdec97ae3fb70b61bcb91
describe
'10319' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIR' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
ed5915033d37b61b5e583c490f95b4ca
2651e52ffb4a44a9aa5acaa09f3105e8dc742a98
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIS' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
d017aa02c2bfb65e12378f19f9964f2f
ce1b8be7a0f96f1cff7c300a021e68464ebeada9
describe
'127701' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIT' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
6bcb72dde5e0700d879cf626976d1624
175f22b7d85f2ec0b3f0fe015b47a2c7ebc82121
describe
'35255' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIU' 'sip-files00110.pro'
b906a732393ceb8e8fcdf55c8e56c0dd
7bd5de3b80f8272777c9f0652aa1fc1f494d857b
describe
'44736' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIV' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
d32e96aa85478bff697344c75da6c217
697fafc7f1a458c37c3e53d25bf3a02a64a6b618
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIW' 'sip-files00110.tif'
c8a04c60958bf820486c5b434a240b26
dcfe401253ee6dc439b18c0a0590d16589e77a25
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIX' 'sip-files00110.txt'
fb7dc5fa43fe503bee2d07c77367ebb6
ac0e1988be55a6df761f838d2f40166d8e3b2117
describe
'10930' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIY' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
4f6486672e724f48e5c53815fa32d8bd
d9a78ac49928a7809d3c2f67a1f2d1747ee41d50
describe
'271807' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMIZ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
0e23ba3a20e71babf1d6261b4d197608
d9a846742677cfdd2d8a40995d8b932d869710a2
describe
'63229' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJA' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
2a3de2d1a943dccf60e23c4be8e24382
17655b1c8758ae7d6d5a740b5e4bca78b56cb7fb
'2012-01-15T05:50:21-05:00'
describe
'17330' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJB' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
49862ff2bb8f5ef6bc56fe6ef63e21de
c9ced3423ecdedcadeb304ad73ba9bc8b27ba70b
'2012-01-15T05:48:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJC' 'sip-files00111.tif'
7cb246fc2ad14f1aac3f283a8097fef5
373085287854c23e93ecef189adcee9eba6c536f
describe
'4646' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJD' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
38b9c9c2a973128ebeaa14093e48e075
7d3739bab983237e0cedf6eca76b9f5728d84259
describe
'153518' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJE' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
4f137ac41641782ea63c522f0890ddb2
ba963423b615428f46c45b38d89b3d8ed4ec52dd
describe
'8553' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJF' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
0a9e50f5da952b2f8a9e5b4e309d4155
ecbcfb341d9a7653f94bf79791a379b8427e2f8a
describe
'2482' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJG' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
d0e32091abcbb94f5480148e93767665
ef51b80943e32adacf423caa8c30bd5e4d7a1833
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJH' 'sip-files00112.tif'
8465101d04abf738b16fd7ea4b2f9b31
0ab2d65a289faa205c031dab76e8c76ca117abed
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJI' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
b40e8769ed1cad4c9e55b1ae9478b2df
d391c335aebebd84495d882d6313a92219a05ff7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJJ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
709fe09f2b31eb3b0a32d5e27525b0d2
bc943e288e21f368b5ef705629096b07c4238a4f
describe
'130619' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJK' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
a9b50f861a1ebf4e5be98ea6507803b0
aff8b3e7af2e65313fda5bb1d19ee8cd31222338
describe
'35365' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJL' 'sip-files00113.pro'
af192d9e59db868972dfc5c978fa2b13
d7b62f6bb3292d8e68e45bc965cb22cc13a8d3ea
describe
'44689' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJM' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
f139a0497491e029c282f32f611eede9
ac8c1aab436e13f8a21a3fa53af177ebf3c7d20f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJN' 'sip-files00113.tif'
5d04568ab76745013144b18caf510733
eff77d9e95686b7348fdd4175acb34e4158c165e
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJO' 'sip-files00113.txt'
a2bea76cd0ab02a9beae73b7b54006a6
2cef03015d5ff49901e387f32b286df7c7d0db6d
describe
'10463' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJP' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
13d2b3fae14079a717f7c63ead3f285c
a0b71643b4714b1852a4b5955556901e4fea4b67
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJQ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
09bcf2078e6e3156018936004d9a2907
bcc3305f31009322a2ab79d31b627ad270ed8bf9
describe
'114560' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJR' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
4f6d81b36aab708c6b81aa21d2b7f4df
acdfc19cf654402ec772f49c24d37c32e6805fec
describe
'30305' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJS' 'sip-files00114.pro'
90bf3d3cd84ce25a5e6e7e4bdc6e96f0
755b93bf6ec417dc8f92e919ecf50afb0e41080d
describe
'40774' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJT' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
3d2d54f9cc793c2023e5ea16e0612720
b671cdb847c80dd3ac9fc13947ee7f3625b039ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJU' 'sip-files00114.tif'
8a340894c3db58833632bb9a45482c4c
a5d2e1b6a127a194b937907c2c2d06c8e5c1d309
'2012-01-15T05:50:17-05:00'
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJV' 'sip-files00114.txt'
2d47651a98df23a3fb3b1cb21e696d4b
070c04ba5ec02489a1ecd289db4288144495eeb3
describe
'9899' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJW' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
cd85ebec8b36565af0a758bb94344da3
28bec14c54ae90e7ee3302f894b3e07136e789fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJX' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
87ad8e30cbd3264f94dacd6f894ff746
6a261753b300a92daa9d43888f46624e6268af7f
describe
'123602' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJY' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
a3f3233c53ffae3e0bb178f280e6ff8c
929bade56db8370b9cef042d4b0deceea14da80d
describe
'32397' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMJZ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
fb51ed7b6185658d4d43f4c81166fd61
11a734e67b01ba2571189dad19a74409363aa7cb
describe
'42806' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKA' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
6533763f27497c9cda5a003782a371da
4de855560e46183492e9b0c7dd1d3452d5e46393
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKB' 'sip-files00115.tif'
18a80f720690dfb50a56ccb32196a009
88bc47cc49268e1e020d1cc88ba543dd737f051f
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKC' 'sip-files00115.txt'
bced504730618a9aba8738e59d831cf7
892de2f72ac06678eded11bffb285f38e56365e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKD' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
cc159e75b002bbec85781a92c2dc8db2
470be7a06ff648f28a7b528d0eec93dca96afff4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKE' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
df1e3c566793222af44700e0c2aa8727
9b28e2722e319574b04a1423ebe3846c541bca1f
describe
'117523' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKF' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
35c08310babdbc0adbb8a3253a52a32e
48a141caed1e25831bb6e5806956bc8f9047a924
describe
'31710' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKG' 'sip-files00116.pro'
29c5a704bfe9f2331d5fde290f5adf75
20bc3ad4f1b4a5e60d6a34e7d6fbcbde7758ec7b
describe
'40211' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKH' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
7e5f45471be70e3ec7624e62fa3e217c
0ad1212416e9aaad5f71eaf34d41883ef7079de8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKI' 'sip-files00116.tif'
c3bd5233af22771a984798ca28085bdf
c17c74a5e40124ee8151133b63c80945a2135224
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKJ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
c5ca643fbab322d702bb8b3cfc486b65
240d9a6ebd37b867250e8bcb450c303fd656f8ef
describe
'9801' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKK' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
37a5dfcfbc74f4c7849a25db0c0f993c
1408c654b7bd9e1a2b77bbf13e35c45e96ea6895
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKL' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
0598499a4092c79fb25e6e8577124114
4663c235394c5b2d8d91c62ebce247e0733c9b6b
describe
'115995' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKM' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
8bd4ac517708a91d8018102c9918a531
5c4429978c890f3ae6b152bead592447640a5b06
describe
'32448' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKN' 'sip-files00117.pro'
8c42d40b5dc76a370404a81c283fb07e
093478ba77ed7fc196ca71fd7cbc6ae10d71c9f0
describe
'39473' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKO' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
292662d734f4e8a7093828cfdc7fe8fc
c854c8bdf6eee9bc876b5ec4d0a19100d2b073d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKP' 'sip-files00117.tif'
777d6ad955245b63154a90a16013eed1
c890b8642cc6be3b37ff157044496bfa4cc4e03f
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKQ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
c291e3ca0df724282f745cf4cb7b81cd
2a44b206bb213a5079df19c128370a8db8ddc62a
describe
'9767' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKR' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
ec8ad482db8b7ac67ad2c1c0d7b36641
b8d8725bcc791b836dfd95b3c747aff9d92817d5
describe
'271916' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKS' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
2c799a672781e146de5a0869e5a06f45
ffd07beaecac421b59b13b7b5e92bcf8db4e2a9d
describe
'125030' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKT' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
eedfb5eb97ca551b0c10a63334244cb0
856ec4919a1d3470d3858f46238dbd1fc6180697
describe
'34612' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKU' 'sip-files00118.pro'
141a436b09fc8dfd06042d2446e84cbc
d70119ad5652a1e51ef5c84e9c16e66f2941912e
describe
'42998' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKV' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
4c25d7037ef1293c6f9f60c1666c63ba
f3954287c4a18c0e626050abe8cd1a42bcde1c18
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKW' 'sip-files00118.tif'
3022114775b25c965800a98cec7719e7
dae8ac7104d2091a508247856554ad7e0c8c282a
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKX' 'sip-files00118.txt'
070d08466af7eb36b02d481d4923fed8
df49178fc1e66551358f86c74a16ceae24a33c73
describe
'10684' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKY' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
191a2658e87680e4838eaae77c87420e
b19a328de020ef464ede6f96e612c206ad747233
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMKZ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
4197cfe6170adaac49035f93536708de
da7cc3e318c567af63fa2b72ebf1029ea4b00413
describe
'119308' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLA' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
9db161edf3c3688698a1af8518ad4528
1707a702c1a82e044969d5255cf7a191a655682b
describe
'31507' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLB' 'sip-files00119.pro'
48b137b75a5dce1036fb2dd70282c961
3e5f0a033a42cdb12bde2b232a81542b7b1e6d0f
describe
'41131' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLC' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
3af726625aea9249da430f3c13a2e674
363e18cf5663c10e2cb0ea2f72f54ecb542714c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLD' 'sip-files00119.tif'
02fa0c4750788c042ca2083da4440421
ba0f246f4ee80983634e41835c8a1a74983560fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLE' 'sip-files00119.txt'
95c265c22824d282fba4f544803db10d
053881f9949c0e6d21d80a8e65435f27ea0d5841
describe
'10419' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLF' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
3c88c7e6e0d6ddfb5b4aac9f228f7589
f9718c7f3e1f325cee2d0222b5b5f335caebbcfd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLG' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
9a5f219fc7ac91ee6525279b159ed16c
921f9c6380e8b21806b044c3f9e021f5921c09da
describe
'128395' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLH' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
84f97645ec3070bd26688fa01180223d
adead883eb69633ee9571f016fb223ae9d10b2e9
describe
'35252' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLI' 'sip-files00120.pro'
d3994d2e8e1d6e07bfca192d3d512109
5e3e0f7ab1a9f86e172a4341dc03ad4f9f87d0df
describe
'44241' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLJ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
e610b1e48da8603801a3921baa47d8c5
859dcf7ebbe79860c68d10688a9146452a2fce5a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLK' 'sip-files00120.tif'
2a48f6d0a374fd97adeb985b428be1a4
b0866b0ae156a7b8de7132a7181cf8ceebc72b44
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLL' 'sip-files00120.txt'
6e574af94f34ac82a842fa3e683615bf
7ac714904b1fed262417eed42ae8caf5d2e2a95e
describe
'10714' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLM' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
e02382a1321026279aafc17225918ac6
ab56425a82da92bdfff3ff5eed0a75d09b790944
describe
'271866' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLN' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
7d693bd491af3e14c452dec0c238c19e
ad09ba8ebe18e0cef7766a44135c13101ffefe01
describe
'126075' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLO' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
ac6e1b5a4f534e594d7d75b158e3edfe
2b5bc81b9d4288b1f539edf51eeaffcd08d13a81
describe
'35227' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLP' 'sip-files00121.pro'
73bfeda8d1154e35e55c7502d767ad05
6daf31baddbcb22df204d287d9bd117a16351894
describe
'43975' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLQ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
8312d2545be8962a0335bf4f27458b96
cd4679b4a1952dff8be07e347a27ca41f27ee4aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLR' 'sip-files00121.tif'
59c1292d4af3b5202423ad7401a3d9ca
715e9d0f06c7738e7e5299a91ce98f61e3f34c67
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLS' 'sip-files00121.txt'
3ce0f313573540fbdca25026d66bfacf
77ea3a586d33db2cecd4a6c078bafd4efcb81ebc
describe
'10702' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLT' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
45a4d2e7849dfec412046a850c93cf1b
157897943bba1bc03b36c452a5efbb3f053d95b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLU' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
4094532d1df8cb1c69480ed6981d55e6
012c8f2a1e5e0c44dcc1d88f8b6c552211b4647a
describe
'119578' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLV' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
403eea8393c3baa8151c0bfe5adf2054
91588cb2e8f0857fd7684253eb4885596dfebca0
describe
'33669' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLW' 'sip-files00122.pro'
a62e4f1f299185b3d08bfd77ba8ae5e1
9fd395895f7e155e5e7006e6a1108f53b95333c2
describe
'42028' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLX' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
65cbd7ec41326ec13af64660fdd43538
50805d512af78ac2f58edee4ad60d3aa151feddb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLY' 'sip-files00122.tif'
837114f32f74d113ce7943d2317d7105
3cccd4108b486074e784cf913235bd1f04d972cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMLZ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
b2bd07c6b44e2aff030ac128552f5236
08b13f9e8d61820187991eed30949f6be139398e
describe
'10301' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMA' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
e34dcbf288a6f12ed83d0fc37be2d4e4
e23b9aa8a89f22eb6b3b321d05f86e711ff39fe4
describe
'271842' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMB' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
7b1ee6eecffd1ef48bcdd83ef1e34607
f8296b623c25fac4e2043cacf12a7286c6b661e3
describe
'133198' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMC' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
d379c5465210ff7fc87711a084634d86
644a0950b68c3c6b30dc915d69fac3a61fe35d69
describe
'38375' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMD' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
ec4d791ab3f9ec4657ae6f2cc8bc8262
6ed6edfe097b328eff960c1e23b8cacdbe069e7d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMME' 'sip-files00123.tif'
2b74d369d45a3105e60fcb5c0a31bf47
42c80ec164a3eb4a043e40ed123d2e246252fcd9
describe
'9571' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMF' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
cf6f7c7c7f0cf1fd1eed4989f797061d
03ba0a0f07281c3dd784b8e891ba8baf6b09a39a
describe
'176339' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMG' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
cff3dcf228bbae9f17b90b59ce97b82e
b2fcdf27ddf1c515924d28962362d751ad6a0a12
describe
'8573' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMH' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
7fb0240c8d73586d54b1f00f317df308
9425481e724d9b25e4864507dbf062a9a6673183
describe
'2578' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMI' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
1af1e6728b0baf1005cc264b33308c5a
7c2e4023c266a62540b0af098c1ce545bdf8e910
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMJ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
199657103a58b757bd221853872d4a10
1b6bd363b2ea9234c9da5b0803c539a93708a0ae
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMK' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
ce7ddc61e4125186b43d20395aa908a2
8926bdf2622a72318a9347d0404962053e36f1e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMML' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
a0b25f759ad4fae4922960fc9e6c9e61
25819fd9b6e442a8b64252a23eca293b51ad3ed4
describe
'126335' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMM' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
d3c1cf3d9a47536a7bbd71d698aabe56
e99ce042b678acf77825382be3c06f9a3171e370
describe
'33815' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMN' 'sip-files00125.pro'
1ce9dd77da042c3969075e2e0a44631b
404d91206f9453f4d0a38e80d6cf7e33fa65bb61
describe
'43164' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMO' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
dee03b0bfa9fade7e6ba6c8f59c99b60
bd7277f4e40eda80f870572da5e510fdfbfd2656
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMP' 'sip-files00125.tif'
5ca637ad8533ae1a761903e9cb4bce5c
b6e20f101073ac79efc3a2b11a5cf14307d7ad78
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMQ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
1ccdf3fcc0b052c2dee8530f7c194941
c4f867a39846b61186b2529832e9cd6607a84e32
describe
'10651' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMR' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
adb8364e6d0e13adc3558df467127db0
e0311733e84e9f0e281b035eb19c0c50ac563b27
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMS' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
a291a1e7b147773381b89ea0cfa90988
6dfb9e516e0bb991ddc3d44fd343f81c36774129
describe
'116821' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMT' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
f9f8ebb6469424ed1f573641c410f836
472a152ce395380c0904c330b23925e8764b2007
describe
'31124' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMU' 'sip-files00126.pro'
997807647461b9d133e069aaf54881a4
f30507ad642254da5acb13ef35edc46d6df6777d
describe
'40441' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMV' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
7803bd63fcdc6b11686c451755ca327a
d56bd544f380955f8b7bd1d3b059c15c1f6e31e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMW' 'sip-files00126.tif'
3503d5d36842a741b520823bd0182ab9
1896b0438929b173e3b8017d4c8f4118fd54f06e
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMX' 'sip-files00126.txt'
bd34f0338e59b80899589be32760e9d8
c93d5009cf773359e4cc2e9694a94f9a49f9334d
'2012-01-15T05:50:09-05:00'
describe
'10341' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMY' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
fe2c18a9ea582d79acc1d0943e2fa77a
cec351e290daa29d8d52ad45841c9d6acf0b7277
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMMZ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
384125bcb53c1fe242e413c21bc4db2b
562e4ef3e8467950081fc07ccf3e7faa7f6e27cf
describe
'117338' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNA' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
05e59dab25be2422abb123988ea04043
042d054503892fa49b500c24a1bb3551953cd27d
describe
'32076' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNB' 'sip-files00127.pro'
4d4bc3ee6003398c52a108263e6d3754
dc6445285f75e747729f768a0bcbe598f4d88506
describe
'40317' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNC' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
2bbea0c5cdc24ad1bba2fed74f9e9a42
3dafcc0b5eb3810d598616523f7f55bed3752592
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMND' 'sip-files00127.tif'
f92b8b2b74505582624c06d8a8968f1b
6dc6c2d1c3f760f3b5a009125d1865969ea2aa3d
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNE' 'sip-files00127.txt'
4926bf4633effbec9ba210aa6af3a289
adfeba25abbb4154962682e5968e76cefd9f269a
describe
'10122' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNF' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
296af99c30d9e78eab8dc2a65d6692f5
f667961b7d1f1963e6bbf641160797b40702b474
describe
'271900' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNG' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
28d5182280dd1b00f0e8fad0a3415e46
00af087b8d845539a0cef9c6d0cf6e0bf76915f3
describe
'121795' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNH' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
52caafad6c66412610533de4a7c0c05b
aa81e6a18c4c54361c8fa6b468292183b49b1ccc
describe
'33310' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNI' 'sip-files00128.pro'
82ab692110902405c66338272e465671
1331b7bf6e85083dd1153cb22f703684d5fc4da7
describe
'41130' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNJ' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
cc3349d9ea6994c08ebe864901862037
670db21af1c4e377078d17b3faab602887be9432
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNK' 'sip-files00128.tif'
c6098fd63ca79f8d370e99566ea7f513
f4edde8424a7773267c0eb95f64b0eace8bf4673
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNL' 'sip-files00128.txt'
45c1712d1927e0ac712a18f9dff3c60c
5d63900ec2f04b4af15941bc841b92a580067616
describe
'9982' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNM' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
613ccb1b95aa685c258efc3c7cbe763e
786eab34bc756393ba75be7ea460d5295d6e6acb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNN' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
55b80a747b551780707c22069d885a99
cd5e7b09ec52f319421bdc8f53882e67cb1071b9
describe
'126966' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNO' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
371ef3bcd27b96323ecae51c2261ef0e
30f3a32b4c0f7b15cdc94a4ae12e2c80cd892ce3
describe
'33934' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNP' 'sip-files00129.pro'
c82480022248749f8268a1be0ca0efa2
a1ba3dacab38a8f60b1cabf16c4bd750d7b01eda
describe
'43514' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNQ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
d1580a938ed5bf69b0e8262174519551
2c609437d8f6df634993ae1a7b5aa4eee3af30c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNR' 'sip-files00129.tif'
1a5943b917dafa13f25bb4e5dce749f4
0c36bfc6d2c92dd15289eb017f98a6c133f8c08b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNS' 'sip-files00129.txt'
d5e79c42ca45ac64e8f5d0a155b2b53c
08c58763c63bdb5f47482c2160df633b9e04e624
'2012-01-15T05:49:33-05:00'
describe
'10414' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNT' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
a9ce74a1badfc3195e96cf3b96884bf0
a7f56bf084b5924a168497c2cb1e0ce9a69bcbfe
describe
'271795' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNU' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
3869b4b73179084417cce47744bf3f56
2a5e7b2e72320fd90cca204340b0fa00d30723fe
describe
'114449' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNV' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
16934e18beb2c78342191451c12a0f0f
a8be8eba441496f3daac9a4dd1409f81644217a2
describe
'31340' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNW' 'sip-files00130.pro'
e5ab9bc8da4e3ee9d5795a5302516d78
d5622acb61e8df627997461dde3d1d355c01e2b3
describe
'39712' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNX' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
5a545e470c2d201aaf7936f44b88b5f6
c44ed55e1400aab04ad73c58f61c03dee687f1a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNY' 'sip-files00130.tif'
eb267034c1e65b8f4c82cd5d7ea10596
9b2eaa3a185fc21ec798a0501cb572bedea55fc7
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMNZ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
3123ba40a47c4b596df78655cdf4210c
a402184ed99d1aebbcc645d1c48c47e83369b548
describe
'10007' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOA' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
342af20d5a16a92bdaac450af4c5a601
8161d1280c35a6dd93d2d80f6be27b573e8ba7fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOB' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
485f935fd35b932d2fa4d15a8344b8fc
8ab24cf52daebd5631caadea9e8a52153be93bb7
describe
'105264' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOC' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
e988be1f39543725632276ec3422ba1f
3afbdffc63135d30da5e4d6189cab1e0f5df02da
describe
'28108' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOD' 'sip-files00131.pro'
02001d5fbc4e222311aca822674183a8
6401166bde81148e2f97ea137c1048b3967e9b1c
describe
'36387' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOE' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
c30eec50823b6da26db1a882bb81b90d
07192a3211c1635fa0e40b74ec3939dcf52e8dc6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOF' 'sip-files00131.tif'
3f9bbec7e0d344eb2f896e73baabef5d
48006f7510bf7012bffaa995b5dac47e8b75a6bf
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOG' 'sip-files00131.txt'
4a5791c5269b11787fedcbff6946c7aa
b3c24fe347513411a5ea0915b04b92deddb81491
describe
'9116' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOH' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
3bc6275e0480fc276d9109c3942ada09
82d3e5ba81d87363509f470b62be33e18fc77ce6
describe
'271847' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOI' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
e62c1b7ad92399d0303a79563745fcf9
983270324a8ef87717d058d3854e1e0313d0617b
describe
'121448' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOJ' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
74cce92fb5197904228897e3fe1fdc3e
676ba5ef69fb966885a69953db051d7f39822705
describe
'33498' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOK' 'sip-files00132.pro'
a319ec62bcdb424c2a6b095f88bc83d3
f2104fdf87882255d996ad0001cb8e810faa94f3
describe
'42334' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOL' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
a24139175bfcb412001c917fd8fa75ac
7e4b031fb18947e8920ce0dfa8d0ca2af1fdf189
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOM' 'sip-files00132.tif'
d8997eca444d5bc752d4b44328e8b6c6
619f0e18f3b8a2e936310e7e8e5d4a81b570d760
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMON' 'sip-files00132.txt'
dddc3b39e5aabc1c34f8e6fbd39cf192
9890e67e53257214fadaf5a6e303d6ea9aa16ce7
describe
'10202' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOO' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
6d0d6295d39c267da2e93d34151406b1
05a647416a17c6961b86778fb99b6747d62d9bcd
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOP' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
76fb9411a98919e73557d8c1722acf1d
3a1465afa56945845675e06013b91ed79a70256a
describe
'128320' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOQ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
c5d46c7d6659c5e5a5c21371e015bdaa
cacdcdda0e431d37d9d3ec4eff1e0193ce3abf39
describe
'34354' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOR' 'sip-files00133.pro'
cbbfb3f5536199407b5b6d5d396c3f50
0cc371f05fd8094747fa524ab33cf0466dd1173d
describe
'45121' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOS' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
f737dc9ddeb4b1add5ed89de29cce1c9
c3fc1aabcf2bdab97f7464cbdbd8a78a2feee135
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOT' 'sip-files00133.tif'
96f30f737de9bb2c84e4255510478a0c
a89f05ad4ac6f9139c5411307724c6cd536651a9
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOU' 'sip-files00133.txt'
3c23d22220aeea66ace142ff1eba8eb0
3ab6a22f929052f361e4029d15332ce134753343
describe
'10894' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOV' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
35ca035a5ecd5e61c8349a4e402c63c1
54d850f665162bc04f58af36242674146e83c5cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOW' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
5ef6afd410eec8891f3431b8b262dafb
6fa5fcf1bb8fefcf58135d4569c171ac5a37dba4
describe
'113620' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOX' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
4853517c5366da497bcdb3ef93af9fe6
51ca54a1699173707046361d24c09b63de4d90ee
describe
'31475' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOY' 'sip-files00134.pro'
bf20f6fab0f9633c6414f9c71a98ce36
c17a270292ab5a03d1df3946f4f90588c40c3bee
describe
'40517' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMOZ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
b0f86092749f09802149f0634ec2dfec
c1c855ab0a35fb1c0187c37e1de2028ffc624771
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPA' 'sip-files00134.tif'
864883b8fab89d13bc6df7e8e49efac3
027f086ace38ea44483e739338ca480bc8041750
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPB' 'sip-files00134.txt'
e70afd06c5d7ea0e0408197c836a663c
87d3c179aae6b842591c2fbd4297a9615d8d60cb
describe
'10182' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPC' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
5d2433a1fe758a9951c07a9d0e56c4bc
25b76950346c5cd89fb6644c39ed0ceac6799c97
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPD' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
aade915c5767255ab97c34855dcbaea6
10f4dc341f27ddfdf037d8067e1f7d58fbe79634
describe
'126760' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPE' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
3fb5a7f2e8991c4272a34f460a0fa219
132ee2d4be5036b6a11929209bb6051210c70d7c
describe
'35344' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPF' 'sip-files00135.pro'
c62af7e4dc9f43bcdfae94d16571eb88
0ffaa2e5deaa693a4cd1f0c270ed8e8883657c5d
describe
'44155' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPG' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
dc1c80588762e4434c746aff64de7510
87475eb659bce5d04c1be929679238f95d9f9b2e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPH' 'sip-files00135.tif'
700965d51457ab19a26ffc644bba2171
12fc5dc7920447a41957f421dad62e81e00f15f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPI' 'sip-files00135.txt'
392c522b1287c3595096731d9199d2f0
0845e2cf9d35909bb7f5c58ce9585ef11f779566
describe
'10741' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPJ' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
409da327ff1c979886b70d4f20646cf2
b051a6af02c8664e4c35d2e91dab9b64057fada5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPK' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
641e60cba2f54c5d412cec2bd5e19aca
b7ebbfdece0b0ab81d646ae47443cac6d447e259
describe
'122468' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPL' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
7ad823f590709e127d4595356880fba4
1f2292a9f7e65d12ef9710f16b0ae13969943eea
describe
'34689' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPM' 'sip-files00136.pro'
59a355e7148a4ee77a4108853423a5fa
1e4a90e84ba29be2ff0316500325206c473224ea
describe
'42832' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPN' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
8197f006fa4b62c5f5b58215ce6ed4c8
07198f9c12fc1f6d2e4fc22748a615cb6ed89a8f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPO' 'sip-files00136.tif'
e6d72e958d8fcf40d982d4f89491a592
4ec74e70efdef3186c97941fb823af6b3d080437
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPP' 'sip-files00136.txt'
ffd3267c77c9c31aba312a9614168c15
9b4cc83589f953274cd63c88d20d468fb775f107
describe
'10391' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPQ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
3248cbd545ff36f56dc1c56bfe7fb45a
11c511e71b71b80afccb7eb0274b14d7299e144b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPR' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
8204a142e37cadd823f44bdb59159bf4
5c833b10be5af62959b493f7580b9c1dbb262655
describe
'128578' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPS' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
e7d2220b0e9f562d8c1eb27b1238da18
1b1e4feba0d1924d4955c655c7d82fb82a89267d
describe
'35291' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPT' 'sip-files00137.pro'
e87781345a9b7a668dd40e9e36c2b623
d1b14b8bb4d676bddae3a8a59db1def1a98aa4e8
describe
'43684' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPU' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
8a122ffc7fe6ea3eeb232d7375373010
9e2c6246f3e47dc94be5811ad7de869c2138202d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPV' 'sip-files00137.tif'
4ea79b5520d79409129e3b9cd83e381e
caaaaf69b803b958e342775c4ed0df7182d26eeb
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPW' 'sip-files00137.txt'
5cd039df0d27ee0ee2e857e04020830d
1af157f756aa8ba8ce191535770e81f375413304
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPX' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
afa126267016ff1a4c4d6e27b63a792d
b5d3a9daf2caa4977a3773f744bdfd13682fbb3c
describe
'271884' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPY' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
727bd2e11f77437caf3178cdcf684daa
7fd59e75f6320466844f1953fff8aa72192107b4
describe
'112854' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMPZ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
39775e9ede71cb099147bcfa560d374b
e4ce95d79cc8611c4b420ac57ab7631a62239238
describe
'31643' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQA' 'sip-files00138.pro'
6d4926061afa6113c95542198d9c9fa9
3e97f7cb10ee9b430b48bf8bba4d898570382f87
describe
'39149' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQB' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
51fea8c0e11d9a525a2f9a8e116a12ac
849dd1fd22c815b22d0202b1ac18341ae74ae3d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQC' 'sip-files00138.tif'
f3cbc1ce918a57aa9c13da31abcf3ae2
26321e97eb57937a4edfffe96ab2678df6983cd3
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQD' 'sip-files00138.txt'
bec5a954e80d6670e469136ed32244f0
3bab72ec1f2c18f674d988d050e4def425c66f13
describe
'9843' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQE' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
c485cbc565b3482a83b3084f2a2cb688
4a82eed957dcff0aa490167d0ba4228b99490db8
describe
'271779' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQF' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
8e851193764d0722f9f51fe68c90e92d
0bd93a866b28b2da48f4fc7d55355ffb3362915f
describe
'126328' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQG' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
d6e317ce955e68948dd6e7675e73e87a
44606e8baf72e005a8d4d53218094c58806e0d06
describe
'36703' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQH' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
f1d0f816173e28fdaf58d9e2a90c292a
2c9e9aeae4976c2d4028601c5b3512be9b82e9b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQI' 'sip-files00139.tif'
7d4409a8c2a7e6599ae30f506a446af9
a47a0900b613c8b445f258f31a80f134711cc315
describe
'9216' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQJ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
3570c87c7c53bde3c5e5406787d77bfb
e63993e82f19e331dde0af462b10150ca60c6d39
describe
'202709' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQK' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
92d2e0f3db87669b23890854241c0207
47d8ef384acbe7d46f40c439eac04ffd61217b66
describe
'10536' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQL' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
45b5e9f9296c22aad6f93536c59d7c3f
bfd5c4e85f1b06a036b4f05d25d6c4cb3714d3ce
describe
'2972' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQM' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
55a03530f3a46a84f76cbfef1053ad07
f2c9441093edb8d081daa6fe146cdab4078274ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQN' 'sip-files00140.tif'
48118a987c1983397acd9288bf86ab63
93e0493fcf966a58bab8e580e8ddeacfa21494d3
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQO' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
4388352b24b2b3561c901f07cc16fa2b
d9c6bd1ac48fd37a3d8c2711a65ffbe910ff3dc3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQP' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
3877597ce0c6e1b158803a816e936133
cb26c1f7ec7361939ccbc1e557730da10f92d10a
describe
'120209' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQQ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
4c988f4ecdd14fb8782f284491b9d2d1
3f0d12ff9270b632da627e964a8a9b5d86c7ea35
describe
'33980' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQR' 'sip-files00141.pro'
b82f32d9a621f4a55016a603116502bd
2e808eb673dd0adbbef8ff2e44c9b63b424279ea
describe
'42082' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQS' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
6db01ff896f5c28182c6606df51e4575
a7d261b4b2b2dc7b3358ff76b866a85d70d6e562
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQT' 'sip-files00141.tif'
9fb242436ac2ba1b6c38481fdf6670aa
03c638e283147248eaea053ca34e0645308ae157
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQU' 'sip-files00141.txt'
6b9b1e26cd649fc16034afc40f9632e1
8a8851e4bb903ebd9062478cac58a7a341bce333
describe
'10239' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQV' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
0dc5e5f4686d5cb9bd83b8c2903462ea
9fd453e01081e7400d1a5a1916f40b69259cf8ed
describe
'271826' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQW' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
c5fca00a343e265cff23a84541d7b254
a820de95b4637afb4d978e3525bd97a0a4139b9e
describe
'113250' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQX' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
3f7c91f80fb6b5f2e1755196aeb0e7b7
721d661028601cea5eaca0854cbb966f2be97027
describe
'31121' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQY' 'sip-files00142.pro'
c6bc7e1918720df76028c2e4e66de8ca
37a2763cb26621550084f7198d03ea8b4432227f
describe
'39236' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMQZ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
04c0eb695d776aa9e1fbcd0bf9dd7328
de49f0cadd3623943a6a6f07994fa26a7492dcd0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRA' 'sip-files00142.tif'
4cbf95f91f38d032072bb50095be9b2c
425a59959a97bece78488759970de11f80224e53
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRB' 'sip-files00142.txt'
962fcda5e799664ea96ee13ff77b9e7c
fbc8549d551262b35e0e8ff960b1003cb5e9166f
describe
'10115' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRC' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
82c5acb9c91f897f7102de6f24b4a536
df86740529d51087bd0729eb69217cc73db46e64
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRD' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
d3bbd1f1af68c387af85f93b50aef0f3
49b1cb8c049bb238f2f8b3bb24fbdd82bbbfa305
describe
'106272' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRE' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
04dad097d1502c25e9de19b75218e1c2
dcc973d77c3578ab478c6b601438eba57c74a407
describe
'28407' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRF' 'sip-files00143.pro'
2e16f27ff576f729babd4f3135fdfb80
d2bd80ea4fcc25a022e5cc3a4516dddb3f2607ea
describe
'37404' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRG' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
ad9ed9872c761f2086020a26d338b32f
6d1ea46d2b50638eba288d3d3611d1c04688758c
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRH' 'sip-files00143.tif'
dca8afa12b9a46badf076b2c500faf79
b520fe368832e68b5d0084f9de39fa2936c20a4f
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRI' 'sip-files00143.txt'
e2b09f3411cd07e7046efc80454da67b
d82452c7660fff30ded1943c3eb2e5d5432f0d71
describe
'9618' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRJ' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
58162b3793d8ff31b73745d97ef5b002
f640eba29de0b613da93525b5dab74ba25ea16d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRK' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
11156657740919cdd0070c42cb4602de
f86a0f63bf6b075c25e4b1e215dae1332aa866d4
describe
'106285' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRL' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
0033ed22089138662f18e4dcebd51312
1ded654ec18a03da9c235347b7740f8b648d8ea9
describe
'29810' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRM' 'sip-files00144.pro'
14ca61846869a1ae6ffb6405da19e652
e4eab8f79641c2edd0efec3a57f9d2f9240f47a6
describe
'36558' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRN' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
b01c5e7feccb62bec752c7eafae6050a
7b16a3be50adfea1660f747ffcb9f057cfb84657
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRO' 'sip-files00144.tif'
d4d023da96d56d852c4b49e23a8aa7e9
6b80c8d3f4b346c06cc90c86121a14cdad839da7
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRP' 'sip-files00144.txt'
75023a725c09e35855225d90ddc862c1
81a7ded8fa2e5891356f9bedbc727fe76b2a237a
describe
'9224' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRQ' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
f86a85a568d78e036bd8ae4e7d3089b1
24df4c96a8bc4cedfc7be4d0fdc7338800571a8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRR' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
a9d791c3735300c4855ea7fe4dc255b3
d779bc76050023344852f6be056a3b9cff786198
describe
'108673' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRS' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
ee33f0f38103ba70303b500005ae0f48
780ddedaca6ee538d8e793c03a88cd034e5028e8
describe
'29142' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRT' 'sip-files00145.pro'
362eb973d4d5deb3a032ff3949b03e18
1b4fe697e887a321f6e4c3f9242629f1b67a11df
describe
'38299' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRU' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
9e2ef5c3c7b8be6cf976caef90da0443
71ad8dcada4bb5d8290bf861bc4dae03a514a2a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRV' 'sip-files00145.tif'
bd8e2f1254b6bd36721b6368284e52e2
e06187320e601f3643b5c88c8399f5995f39670e
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRW' 'sip-files00145.txt'
980f77de5cdfd6504e67117be7321b53
4e5907ca88d82b42cd044dd0e900ed24c409d8b8
describe
'9449' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRX' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
229efdae4d3af753e6d5ca91838a91fc
0a79f408d7e262e41346496eb77ab6dde1623369
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRY' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
615429d4fd8f44e692b4eee35a470b3f
dc7b4ab9c1c28ed294b91ceb5590b6bad8457d8a
describe
'122859' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMRZ' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
10238d86b1f1b18a5523a3bfb40b4f77
a968a3732a66cde3fb16feccf3cae789cd2e5461
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSA' 'sip-files00146.pro'
f960afebdc4879ed65eb9eeedfe92268
9022213cd6711b8957622e7974039d075b3ca762
describe
'43219' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSB' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
9cff71304dfa5a221e7ec319bdee4739
ec447f13e4cd0c2b370abf0ab713ed6e486440e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSC' 'sip-files00146.tif'
61abc12d61268da05b0162ca93b0a7c0
6e238734ec5d4268ec73e6e8a5da7a4555c8b14c
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSD' 'sip-files00146.txt'
b4b8988f4ae4ff48e812eefb2fc9090a
402693b90ad509d31e5fad1eab4974c6f6e95b35
describe
Invalid character
'10575' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSE' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
dbb54b2961612cd23b34d49106ba30e6
4f788fa97537115cbfc6b7a672abbd9c51797956
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSF' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
92e87e2f32b0fa39e59081b9bc34dec0
62a6986d85fd62179b75684bed289c37a6884d67
describe
'128677' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSG' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
27c915a7fb3f0d72848196785c3b1a02
93b2e2c561fd1211bc63534dc46af3b1a5efd939
describe
'36254' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSH' 'sip-files00147.pro'
36733070498deb43112c9bffc99b245a
3a8826eef93060a9b01467b8efa7b037fbab1f7c
describe
'43746' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSI' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
d937161bcc237df032b0c10497c9768f
8345d1c0b475ace0a1117d8a57d841e0a7a01ffa
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSJ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
83e74d87c9011ff732b6722cbee25b5a
4d56a332eaa130a85d1deefdbd66ed5b8a764956
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSK' 'sip-files00147.txt'
07863f50f1d71e1c64911b98109a06f0
f178b1bc6cecaa17d334ad3eb5ab6843c2e89ad4
describe
'10513' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSL' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
7e6ac4d52394d466ab7067fa0b33949d
823afe4ad5678b68e9906c302098537bc340389f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSM' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
daf9e53d52d0963b47db77221108015a
4106bcf30d59c9552f7080ca91e0c083dffcb58e
describe
'119378' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSN' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
b7517a0b9c6f703273be9d8a7c3b74f0
4a69930fd09adf39d9e237557da9ea9f6b187e83
describe
'32902' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSO' 'sip-files00148.pro'
94b2d909fb37042deb0090d7be6d7485
41528e50622753c9ab568bb89ca171eef12de3c3
describe
'42338' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSP' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
6dc937481b759c828716a074f6ee0ba7
d1b78ae930e4839c529093dc4416041aadd67433
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSQ' 'sip-files00148.tif'
3dd8c8d0505439e1d897b5ab913fded5
53de230d815eb4ab97e5fdffb5c362e32e58dd85
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSR' 'sip-files00148.txt'
7c7a0c85c47013f1083b44fbfbc5764d
b118a9b8c7d861c36e9a0b66f2f51c33c9e7bf46
describe
'10630' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSS' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
db6ff03d628f48ebddc97fce9ac5fd51
6b41762ec7fc3536f65071bb01eca491140a01a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMST' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
75cae0d58636b48277beda2c14299204
c7123d43c089a32c262ea26a9030518b321cfc40
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSU' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
2a3fb0d6cee543de7d73544d1e091e05
9ff1c66cf6dc67c350c575e5aadb02fa89c623ab
describe
'33190' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSV' 'sip-files00149.pro'
74d3dd43436a70ae2c4e9fbdc337cf95
e8817e33da41bed4874335f320b7b54c89cf03e4
describe
'42115' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSW' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
13f24cb5f6c048a7e714d8810d950e2e
e3d6382bbcfbaf96876539827d44002254c17d55
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSX' 'sip-files00149.tif'
51a50c4bbd23a487ad87cd828c55b6ea
dc4e0caa519bac3d004e5d5e6b2be66692aafaf2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSY' 'sip-files00149.txt'
bfd9f3f25a7e7adaf46fab2d2b06b80d
555e00fbdc3c0d537994a1b29db89ff92c0f9f6c
describe
'10355' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMSZ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
dded163d0dc5385cdec2e22d2e9f6ee7
d131178092447a8198f0906be3498fa24286cab6
describe
'271908' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTA' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
6068ac7e122fca16b3be2d65b33e7797
c8419d64519b40d026342d625f582fe2748fe03a
describe
'123138' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTB' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
ed4e3380ee9f7773bda4e4834678536b
a64eae066186d7bb782c5d79df1e08b381bf6bae
describe
'34565' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTC' 'sip-files00150.pro'
3b48e1dcdf619b1b90f10b51065e9efa
d5765570acb71821e607156c280a1d3403e15335
describe
'42439' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTD' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
9911e03f190257c80bc1e1243359c3ba
0d23c738b0325d63bb6a3a25bff092e32d396ab7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTE' 'sip-files00150.tif'
101f1f608b06f0a480d0af93fc43a8d1
580bee370efd62f934ecec3afd69d7633817c627
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTF' 'sip-files00150.txt'
022b228dbec447b0d8c69c97975f66cc
bc96c20a781d4e729a1af6ff7ae278aef0add300
describe
'10546' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTG' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
587124fa69f6d09d0e3b9f0af6cf74d6
574ed7527b1e8fdf38c6efd7ef07ae73e1937b49
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTH' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
868eb926e19868c71c6f1a1680d85392
076ab90835cb6c20424cb46edf87b9d22614b990
describe
'124566' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTI' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
d65f0f822c49243a2480cfaa5a44bcd8
cd1611a1d0aeb68e83e8058066224d8d5949c7ad
describe
'33250' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTJ' 'sip-files00151.pro'
1cb9c0b5d000a20e070a36c3867e6496
f7c869688036881d0d0b0147799b05e305ae90bb
describe
'43135' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTK' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
5cfbe9737d72512f22de1e44fc73b690
cb90c3173462959669f87478063015731ae0bee6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTL' 'sip-files00151.tif'
e774a5e6c6ced99aa89f3a728c36ceec
78c4d020ad2337de7d51fdb960914f142abf740d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTM' 'sip-files00151.txt'
4501012f0356516775fbd131b2de9b1d
2d00510437d134340fa8395df8478d037dbc31f0
describe
'10658' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTN' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
d817d51ad95ad312d01edabde1a3da61
3e5bbef4d7935d202f660a63cfa175dc0b380b8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTO' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
a8574396fdca3c161574445f4c19840b
31fdca8786bb34a1ae249fdabdba0a6045dcc2c9
describe
'124448' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTP' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
74eb47d09d073559c1f56c8469ea2c69
a3d7813f87c3749fbe17608ec576e367baa505ed
describe
'33979' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTQ' 'sip-files00152.pro'
4ce65f68cb5f640932a2ecf7b9894a69
57a21b9e7dee488aed1e4f09518c8d2757948ec2
describe
'44499' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTR' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
bf2d354f16af5b2f5f02d2dfbbeb087d
a0853e9e363f69ad6ad05535382585ca5784c8bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTS' 'sip-files00152.tif'
f784eee34ac19016b397fbb17e5afe5f
fd483039ac50f8d849eda08c3f4fbcc19ce90c84
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTT' 'sip-files00152.txt'
a6e562f62b463e349be40c2dc987c323
9311e4c3d9209904c2984324b39925d2d874680d
describe
'10596' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTU' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
86ce65997b4749f6e2dbe0c5df19c7f7
a0207a74c09077b226e1df4ae79aa7f33710727c
describe
'271790' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTV' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
db18b803418532c24168506d0d33b221
2fb2842e1b562aaaee0b7aae2a0a6d6ad4bae208
describe
'116381' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTW' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
2f8bffcf953b27e71e1f7ba1d6fbfe99
5bc140857bc4091b4525a0239381c49923bd462e
describe
'32552' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTX' 'sip-files00153.pro'
ea98336e00e6c5cbb487d9ab514ca8ab
c920d37e91414b82426c91fc2f811a3dfafb72d2
describe
'39924' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTY' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
44877d8c8f140a1c268a3af747f60a99
acfb3699af1a2bbe90d185a34873a3a6daa75cdb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMTZ' 'sip-files00153.tif'
7f6b08644d2f20c31b8fbb157a9a6516
86539d9e5b0cf0ab0451b4b7d6d37319a70692ac
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUA' 'sip-files00153.txt'
ebc46e90cd0e723d06433b81998118d1
f88b25b1ab6e3818d57dc1c9eea4e23fb63a90be
describe
'10107' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUB' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
4ed9d6d3950352338b3ffd05fce0fbf8
a8e8bb95cc021160c0e374f8ae9e99268c1f1c2e
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUC' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
8a6412554d89bce0b649af297153799d
8c3e6d7a43d7c9477bf9624245e035bc4e79a12e
describe
'113726' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUD' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
978034df5510aafbd412d2375fd02938
de2842029a81d4f4f2b1da600edd3b8f92b9e3cb
describe
'31049' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUE' 'sip-files00154.pro'
37ad9c19cacb4359df7486816917aa00
a2b371a1731c70b7e2aa3dbf03fda3f5d806308b
describe
'39517' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUF' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
c6fddf2326935a0425a2744ff10e74b5
927962e0cec96a77a1c57e2dc6c8c7df36c187c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUG' 'sip-files00154.tif'
36883a41fce0872c91d6c9cd6512a13d
3bf95be7fc3fef348047ff35be78dbe931124c42
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUH' 'sip-files00154.txt'
e5750b1bae3a46103ae92f65f2b3dd42
813a68d927d0a08513511eb10eb0170fa07ee638
describe
'10254' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUI' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
38318e39b184c1edfcd56264a8ebb9c9
1a7bd2cef2a0ce0663bdbaf802419b81d8c8acf3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUJ' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
088e75b0b5d56574dc458a8dc6a86bb1
e836d4be01058a40542fa426b54c31a4578eabd9
describe
'112405' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUK' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
4fafbf2956350a476f4e46082a439a49
75ad66e8ad3ba334f1e7e47aa21b1f485fecff23
describe
'32562' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUL' 'sip-files00155.pro'
6f5c0c2efedc55d37ebc63b1e67dd493
6fd1cb19cee78c91f8c93e9ef6969c31ddbd922b
describe
'38851' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUM' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
dc3bdd6c29db230a84e9b1414f1f183d
4487771254952de2be7fc929cd1124676f655f04
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUN' 'sip-files00155.tif'
888fdf28bf838b9626aec261d78ccc60
951084b815e92a3a391c21835bb9412adf32c506
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUO' 'sip-files00155.txt'
d4a1694c7add5e0720b7017e08658a42
e50ddce0b0532898a22c0bffe5aa4a065570deb7
describe
'9730' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUP' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
a000a37a0560841d02b3eba387a41b3d
08b78258f42b1e1383df74d8d19083044466eafa
describe
'271903' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUQ' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
06a70f396c27ba731958ec5b05cc6f54
20f500e44c7409e5841a8caec8bd5a1b599aa772
describe
'120764' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUR' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
bfa4d0b36ce1b0a9ae10e5add0b1659e
e737bdf782af50fa887de83ea0de9075811f4d0f
describe
'35603' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUS' 'sip-files00156.pro'
447d6932a0526307b134a63ba7e11bc6
248cfdff7a5d1058f521c34bcd6b572e586e3952
describe
'41357' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUT' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
22ec075e1600051d67600a08982ea343
16306b320e145e71e5f5a1295f49ddc047c271fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUU' 'sip-files00156.tif'
5529f1e1b1b80e9a350e8b8b772e4011
da8b0772c40ac85070ca4c6a19bf1924291f5125
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUV' 'sip-files00156.txt'
8e60250b823d9e86069a5fe9b9aa9e11
1d4bcfe02d70dad1567b5e2a708234382cc84259
describe
'9933' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUW' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
a054af5f66f3354bc2e5ee45165d2d20
934e8606e942029b0316b21f1462d18cac0b839b
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUX' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
efcf6553e980973c382b983393581fe0
740cb4966f17817b492d0a7b8414a33e37124b1b
describe
'133679' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUY' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
c773a0133c50e8a16f5492fc971f07c4
814940b9c5967ba23b49b87805a59d746960c98c
describe
'38989' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMUZ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
02afd5780704c9941a430a4c9dba2d43
a4b2363b17957de05c06f5e4699c63a1653ba942
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVA' 'sip-files00157.tif'
a1734629933fa47b30a96a3aa23496e6
095636266e12bc1ad04fe9b99b1424b81557ebd4
describe
'9765' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVB' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
d10d0007a3877c8d781dd3cc3291eaa0
85eddd265cb8c9002f8336f2639439118a2b8b24
describe
'171060' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVC' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
94982eed8358be7519b3bc35aa4c2129
bbc5f2b7619fd2c325f4b8139deb03f4ec4cecbd
describe
'8867' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVD' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
c7b4fbbd6cf973d56a68362708e49213
3e2d9182c37e9d99af2d0f216207fb19366179de
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVE' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
a8a22fc5499b2efe224f45160b3bed52
8f957d86a0f350977cd619b66495f492bd8d87fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVF' 'sip-files00158.tif'
daf13233e67cfb9420edc80074980188
7fa402722d97582488e4284d9d08a76be576af6d
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVG' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
2f157fd9d117e46e4e83eb6838a4eb85
0f29c68863b3a516bf33b408d52df0d534d6d7d0
describe
'272126' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVH' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
8ca0f719e5b05fd31f3fa0fc67d5a97e
d960a3d2b13bacc09c22ee541609adea3a3881d1
describe
'115920' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVI' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
af843924b821d0c18a536078c01af90f
30730f2c7012b9027fed679dfdf49db7d9cfc615
describe
'32268' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVJ' 'sip-files00159.pro'
3225ade6e8a98c47a9374a9ee4ae48e6
9670846ea0f2bba6fcbc7a03301614cb32162c06
describe
'40183' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVK' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
3500b968185b9d3c2a7ac51dc2c4bc32
9450ebe92499038fcabdc99cd79a7904091f6ea8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVL' 'sip-files00159.tif'
3f1706dce45aa7136263e83832f55a6d
b7bd0747f1079613da48023651fde2c4809169c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVM' 'sip-files00159.txt'
ea8b2633b862e2733cefcd8dbbb227f1
ba1c7a463e9d66e45311c7f0a17298e8ec295071
describe
'9846' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVN' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
44217fa2441545f3acd9900e1cc09197
53e9defe995d8f95a8d23f76f6f9873cc4a38cb8
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVO' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
607bb108b2cf351fc80741209d806c2e
6c24344769d2e9d3e70c20d97a45beda681bdfbe
describe
'126623' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVP' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
2515f11212e7761d31762f83d627f624
d830cefa9d6812cdec9d85576c7179b66978cb79
describe
'35979' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVQ' 'sip-files00160.pro'
b98082d1134889cf7756359315235b32
0a52a387bd8faf4d87fd64a0145f0f662bb6f894
describe
'43425' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVR' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
9c2e4d35067e142e23c29a573b854289
93de261f9bc7b64c7a854aa0d58590dad47b642a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVS' 'sip-files00160.tif'
07d6f0e8dc5dd218c15c42a5486666bd
be227c65b4a76ea49e9798e8a5f88b26f58f4e3b
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVT' 'sip-files00160.txt'
42e92353cb4661f9e14ecaef22fc68bd
f4d684f6dcc2f1f1d1066392f80ac280cec8d95e
describe
'10669' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVU' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
befc0ed936d209d0c91178817e3785f9
8b9cb11feb145878c8612edbc57fd2b3750815c1
describe
'271813' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVV' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
fd339fc988ab38781a83bfbbdab0fa63
155a2f28308847d3b137c37c0540be64488ad1bb
describe
'135664' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVW' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
e9d2304b914dc232929a0ef495c8b7f1
445488138f87527947b1f2973a6c61a62dff5890
describe
'45790' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVX' 'sip-files00163.pro'
a61b6464fd41178ffbacdbdfac115cf9
75ac6bb4c4182479d4d7d01cc51b65ed76999efb
describe
'41420' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVY' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
4291ce7ba44ac4249f9ac8c7c11ed583
97c0b6310cb041916614ea9efe4bd0eb893abb97
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMVZ' 'sip-files00163.tif'
2cf59aa23887f897dc2fe256c4a526d9
274bad49f7e74346ca4ea6e93e0f7fbf217546c2
describe
'2050' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWA' 'sip-files00163.txt'
9ffff50f8f022c17b54335d9d90e1e8a
b3a63d14482fd17e1c74ff841750c726c32ae34f
describe
'10127' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWB' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
e4efbc12e96a579afdbd2da98ee03850
41606430c3aba9813a10e805fe66c9ea1a447be0
describe
'271753' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWC' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
9da4886d3513d69916ef3e0366662279
7a18ec4b4322d856665bc90e0712b83f337de6c4
describe
'140848' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWD' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
8d0d5fea1b526801df96a8f1a843ebd4
55b6b38cd704b25cbd15b37994a3e7b9f91d9b5c
describe
'49549' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWE' 'sip-files00164.pro'
5eff69b34084b3e683152d92dd5b48d7
02a93ee8352a70f8ae404a83a5224c140f2eb5c0
describe
'43121' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWF' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
f2d4ad59138775f969c3c6d48c3fcebe
a727c3560141bc3c62cafe712077fb3fc09692e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWG' 'sip-files00164.tif'
f69f7a7223e61d3eced9e25e7065de66
09c6c9ebddaa6680816d784816ea3e842b491601
describe
'2207' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWH' 'sip-files00164.txt'
a2212720d8b47a3c437ea72cab0ef4b4
b739f79ec2c024f7a68d41642026ea10ba282f32
describe
'10207' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWI' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
b3e231877d493fe985737fcc7c541433
3f94e666dc671f3e2e45c40473fe9e4971113a1a
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWJ' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
c6a0a12bfb4a530ad0f2995a9b1b768c
c4e0c528cd65999db0cd46d9651e889c30960206
describe
'135966' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWK' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
0dc2a9ba6ec04d80dd8fbec65d603f7c
94181807a9dc341ecffb2c9925cb555a4fec404e
describe
'45516' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWL' 'sip-files00165.pro'
fa441434f6fe1e7fcfa962bbdd82d804
31644d6ac59a82a2c8831c83f29806d11fd35dc8
describe
'40942' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWM' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
448cbf253d6f3b3fe708a13d56a7f36d
670b95c76630bf3299f60353c2c6745a9938aacb
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWN' 'sip-files00165.tif'
77c6df7051dbc341f3f9c2537deae819
7f34fce2a72ffefbe804c798f2a655186ce668db
describe
'2049' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWO' 'sip-files00165.txt'
fe6a211235deb6dfa712c7d389347d6c
0b87837c035839e1a1ff22e7fce66bbd9c172478
describe
'10281' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWP' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
05acfcee1526b5229f075329d9c29539
b41721cff5beaca22dac4670bdfdbc3ed7438d81
describe
'271863' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWQ' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
d509e2208577377df4a835d59581b037
68c25191f9a6d86c2555055b7f5e3e2977d5a80e
describe
'126390' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWR' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
31633b0e446a3abf415c717026e123a3
cebb12015b4118a9530b66d2c9ab4138a045b68a
describe
'39116' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWS' 'sip-files00166.pro'
8b50ff4dc2a3494e29b359d8b224853a
1a2ba0da3f0a70ae510f601a0abf58a5f6355598
describe
'39975' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWT' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
39e478b70971a58bae4b3bfe4b4fffd3
c0d70d3358377df3f28a5daa82ba2c540d4f0917
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWU' 'sip-files00166.tif'
c4423101882f3c06a09f46d246964b39
3e61f809a72c6b034868780503c89cacc81a9573
describe
'1790' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWV' 'sip-files00166.txt'
1ec5ac988b8de416cc4114ba6151e380
e2f3188551f0489c884cddf1f0be667bb258a98c
describe
Invalid character
'9988' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWW' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
93a41e826320f4d278866a0adb801a7c
065e06a7d77682cd975681c3b3e8a85755742bf3
describe
'271890' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWX' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
b4ec2af6246ba5564874a5f2e855dc42
e8e02dce5f0e009e808ea767a226f22dc5c13a25
describe
'126115' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWY' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
fac3c0a42f7c0ce7be31caef96671234
230df8202ce7773494b0aa250bdf3b74643e2fb6
describe
'37576' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMWZ' 'sip-files00167.pro'
bb1ffc339c9c54003dfd07c4fa76ea76
d30aa73ac2f4aab0eb0665d19a4943d6fd72eec7
describe
'39271' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXA' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
914afc70a52159d000f79080fd28f0cb
e1af39cc451549de893026e25a9db7118f1d198d
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXB' 'sip-files00167.tif'
eb7be41ed240c31a0a06a0fda6255f55
a3f8d6f2ae572e37da1c625b7bfe6fef405b52be
describe
'1720' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXC' 'sip-files00167.txt'
6d3da43ad9fcd6534c8155dc5c294e1b
3b8c7b7c61372af0feb46819609c63fed411a0c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXD' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
0014b599729cefd49a54d2bf1b39495a
8637dc92be36318eee95700531dea6b66f225f91
describe
'271893' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXE' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
7af2f55d95c44a417cf742d98c60774b
88c0ef9641f3cb8c7c07bb59cc010f60062e2b6a
describe
'124787' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXF' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
42f5386078658a664bfa7af2e4ddb9a9
09a4cdeaf91088b622f3c1b88c60e6bd691fa92c
describe
'41828' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXG' 'sip-files00168.pro'
2b71bcdd946d0264789dae9bbbe13680
44e7ba2ff440dd872cb5d0d804c22d339bc5385a
describe
'39954' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXH' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
cfbc4e5b66c599c6a4056f2fe8e86cba
38bddcab91034a32c4c47dfe03c885ffac8cef99
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXI' 'sip-files00168.tif'
c9190ce5a813e3c1f97daad17fc05a3d
92302220c6da4acea4799498f14227bcbcb1d0c2
describe
'1880' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXJ' 'sip-files00168.txt'
7cb6fa17e3dc3c28cccc1aeb02f6badb
b50361b09cc4a8ffd1cd94b93f98c011c47cf331
describe
'9588' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXK' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
f3d7f1ecdcdf8b3bfe3b3ddd4fc39065
d12b2dc6844c8442ee55152b15ac0ca0da684d94
describe
'271849' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXL' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
e9fc7749ac8cda20acbec082fd22ad73
c57e06cf98667980daa56c98831f33a3e1bdbb33
describe
'140809' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXM' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
ab1515d8dc16c526e4e5b1cab5916014
26764afa8e01292bcf1df0c5eea8dae26bd7e308
describe
'47204' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXN' 'sip-files00169.pro'
810a07a8f14b47fe1082852f10eaded8
f4f1fdb9ea09685f2865dc03e788084cd50a68a6
describe
'43459' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXO' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
b43aefb092e6fdada3470a99bfe6a2fe
0fa07f4ae4ebd7f52fef91d7b995876f84587c68
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXP' 'sip-files00169.tif'
d0021071fcae8d279c0428df8785bc38
b29fe116b4b51f33a71308d64f2ddf6fc0b03f01
describe
'2161' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXQ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
fdb7988f0ef90fa39789271b277adc0e
59aea1c412cc3afd5bf6ab0266a7192292f2402a
describe
'10372' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXR' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
e443b10e6bbf04408cd96c30cca7142a
3dbf0c27de51f7dab2ac6324d0c3e1ac8c2e2f26
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXS' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
4e544d228625dfcef413e30e0c06957d
89a820295931a269f3ea3fedecdc7c4ee5210ff6
describe
'130554' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXT' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
a9f45ea79731ee4324dce54e35351754
b6eaa76a582539731b454f2df001ed02414a46da
describe
'42688' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXU' 'sip-files00170.pro'
4de29681db9ec0ef160ba5f5591b8bfe
94f1db0d50708ce9a29d4ef914cf591f26d94528
describe
'39876' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXV' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
83195cdee968c3a74caa25c21a54400f
e14ed500d1dd96fb99962467fe6053d03ef86d17
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXW' 'sip-files00170.tif'
1ddf5635c57e9b89722a37aae515244d
2d1ae1a7db29267547e5e9626fd5b82609bbae6f
describe
'1936' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXX' 'sip-files00170.txt'
dfb2c34cd4123ea5713f3766b8d3ba4a
af0cf07b1473ae55ec756abeec2a71d0b34acb61
describe
'9777' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXY' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
641e7eaa6522f4bcd067c1edd7b8eecb
525126c66d3e975c2cde83e22d1ee3eeb54f9841
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMXZ' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
2279bf5331aa1b37a14941dd0aa165bd
2cdcd12fa2d18765f3bdd8ed4c210b280e570c1c
describe
'116503' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYA' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
40aaed0503333e5738b024940ba5b99d
75572d9b479084415d71981b9699f73101ae060c
describe
'32080' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYB' 'sip-files00171.pro'
baf440e08ff1727ad71571b901891ac3
12cdfe63c66321ed230b430afe3933571a919f42
describe
'36439' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYC' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
0ec1578bed08d959a10e7ec7c5dd7ea0
0b7575707a27b1303706309c704732de898948d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYD' 'sip-files00171.tif'
d54c942bd990a61e460b5973b188fc22
cf8f8f4a20e67e329d2cd76108bda312da31bf67
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYE' 'sip-files00171.txt'
739b7d7faac82f5b8003372b0379c445
19b23a51ffd48eb49dbecc176738dbaf37992ee7
describe
'9638' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYF' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
e941ac142a529b3b8390c1e3d4a77ce1
2f1bac388f40ac24fefa3ea3f53c7a207cceec57
describe
'271832' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYG' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
a06adda8126bb460eac1e741519878ec
35a54d86264ce2d2e070a1c36df9c57781847633
describe
'113866' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYH' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
108e0ec6f8b47ec3fda78c1fb486d25c
1a22fb9c0526ad411a0c5e4833e5b7278b2691a9
describe
'32084' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYI' 'sip-files00172.pro'
69c3d4c822259bb80bd4313455f6014a
eeac7803920934afd1d28edf3cd453610f1704d1
describe
'35595' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYJ' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
26c441894ccea659f2e17da2c2431945
b9415fbacc4755d0a59e7fc83b7731656a182ee2
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYK' 'sip-files00172.tif'
5d6cb03aa11bf69e07759624c7830198
3c6cdba5985d9668d70bc968b590581568e813e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYL' 'sip-files00172.txt'
ba4da7dacc54fff350f82b1f531c073c
20a939566d45db81a05c8c1aeb69a4536c8002ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYM' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
07d505d200b066354d2556ce44f26c8d
76b404390f522f58823fb442c6fe53bbe70e9cdc
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYN' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
4d595796a6f232cb2cc73bcb8d69e8c1
b4b73b2db8e9bf31d39ef6f586cbf5486fd8b9e4
describe
'127738' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYO' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
e71e76e876eb5f69c8bed1b3b4e4018c
cfa65ddd55613917a517a81ae16d63ca607d9ddd
describe
'34360' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYP' 'sip-files00173.pro'
14db9bb8efe94adff3012dc1dab0f6b4
eeb769f5ef59e1328495aa476038a80c6f65a589
describe
'39454' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYQ' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
13fc674e487d6ff564a00f83c45f2cae
e056f3ee05c9f16ecfd0a643b815d98d80b05c55
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYR' 'sip-files00173.tif'
9446b735f61f121276b00a35efe0170f
ef124f082627bbddf9d136ad51ac4b41593baf60
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYS' 'sip-files00173.txt'
e1a934945cda8ed2007be72628a36cf2
ed92923de67a6405507ff372b2898b79bb8f1400
describe
'9809' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYT' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
42feb626d985c195b12ecf7772210b87
a56d17f0524ccb8106380f303e8f20e827e393ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYU' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
93223c8abba6a655a59037981385ee44
17e94238c8ad10f5e7347fcf75423a6f98c95055
describe
'126992' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYV' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
b101c89608406b755cf619a784787730
9dafd63a3083fb222853657b5072b4eac6a0a7e8
describe
'34954' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYW' 'sip-files00174.pro'
8b46b1ae8d9677db7290c5ffb2541c85
dc47bf03eb2ead6c096866b133fc3e01fe3bfb31
describe
'38565' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYX' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
55b03b6cba92ede5782d41ee7f37dcbe
dd892055dd58069d7a0368ebebe8a4c3ca91b6a0
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYY' 'sip-files00174.tif'
8ec46c68b2bb731720b6febca9ec88cc
dc274e28398f54b0736a2b4c65cd146393e1a840
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMYZ' 'sip-files00174.txt'
1f0d4c929c7867e4ea557f6e2697440d
67449d0a92b282fb910debee7e0b35dba74d3c87
describe
'9807' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZA' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
bec4428f7c1d98291b29b57e5c03ee6f
2be92648b6a8905fc0e9b6a465d21d608dc5a754
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZB' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
548e741cec7c2a75654acdc47bf1df44
d0f596d3cbbde29354517dbd03f1b3386577c1af
describe
'134345' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZC' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
39e9f56984299a609745a924a846c04c
846187aea0b6fc32e16335f778edf890e669eed6
describe
'36099' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZD' 'sip-files00175.pro'
21c529d94c6a68e9cae2f529db1a8909
db69554b99d562cd2ad17810ff92ba84d06407cc
describe
'40926' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZE' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
b6329d82501031fe9c782113322ea3f8
d1f29a4355eedde4f081071681d49f7d764b92c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZF' 'sip-files00175.tif'
823455c21867f83bbcc8765e71a67286
198b26d3edbf95bde44bd3119187c1141ac66ebe
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZG' 'sip-files00175.txt'
f79082df82fc39e15f50eceef2b6e147
a88c6643731ce7b42d02525cad12cfc4879be7f8
describe
'9857' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZH' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
73b95819cf9fd08a55e6351fbc232b53
10865775a7412361b1b2d940f84d4d019f2e3c83
describe
'271672' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZI' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
c021b6acdcd5ad9974aa1f74b7436a56
3f9783b7f26540d283224ea079fd797cdf927064
describe
'111110' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZJ' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
bb3f60c6dbbe144d72b68df0caac41ff
69cd7685f3e86fbf02265f3e9cd21dde0d23e3cc
describe
'31140' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZK' 'sip-files00176.pro'
f862cf6b4dda529fe3f758007f267713
90fa67c91b5cf901d006f02986f30d934410c00d
describe
'33646' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZL' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
f19e004599ce3db5ba20fb32e039a964
8ccc743ad4d9abe2846bdb7705f81b75dbfdce5f
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZM' 'sip-files00176.tif'
4a3ecb8c1d54da8350124207ff116a97
ec2e274b3581027562b593783119f630459c4633
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZN' 'sip-files00176.txt'
3ba38ce5c0834befeb3f6b7cb00870a1
1810387a5ddd6b6d8b1f474442b155ef3cb2be06
describe
'8437' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZO' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
2a0bc465661cf42f3ffa5cbe727aad0a
a01caecb70a15d68c8932328fa3f348bfa3d21a4
describe
'271879' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZP' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
62548f9536bb7fd1229cee5434ecb9f8
0ecaef9481b8f747429e1c93457d83cfa3563395
describe
'93486' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZQ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
cbcccd1c9091c8185d788ac6a856d316
d3d0978e9e8d9e7ff5e7dae8de428ce0624bd18d
describe
'23925' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZR' 'sip-files00177.pro'
e86f2e68e0c510c6b4efc6282d0ded80
a55d13a8423062e738e212a4f0127068966ed2e0
describe
'29008' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZS' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
5b4ef91b53885597e7103583631ec060
e9a2461de37d5782c8a0b652f6a13fc6bf5039a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZT' 'sip-files00177.tif'
782088a3f9a04497ac41961c30d41ee3
1c1eceb1121cbb4cc2f8d305d1504b77036d55af
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZU' 'sip-files00177.txt'
c4f76ec4ccf131cd6d1fbcc2ed174173
7fcf489e7f86babf3014e49820dc9aca56a650f9
describe
'7011' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZV' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
4e9b4ebf530d9ffad42da6bee7ae7fd0
b498e7bfe0bd94b49de1519b26bb44e0e2f30787
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZW' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
2b7b7806e314c67df50e57f9c843dec1
2894edeb3325be392f78610e084e49df61def331
describe
'100314' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZX' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
fba43bc6e2122fb99a0b28d632957ac3
3c3b0cd6a163ab818f9c5341c258c21f6bc9a95d
describe
'26501' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZY' 'sip-files00178.pro'
2782a05f72325b32b45c8416a67713f1
da3e4576fcf3d75f309cbaa5a4370274c525b265
describe
'31501' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACMZZ' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
06b4aba0a191a1e5dd24645876bfaf8a
d62c4a9a5a98b8ca777bb4be28e9177ddcbbbe99
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAA' 'sip-files00178.tif'
cac8a653719f6859e4b4ed0bc859d787
5be3917fade440ee7ba119842e84b30c2ef63138
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAB' 'sip-files00178.txt'
ccef25f67ad139f27a0b6dd11169fb9e
0d35fc01744cf178be60df30472b2006f6ed846d
describe
'7780' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAC' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
3b28cab5ea1ec7471a7b9c297ca7c6bb
eac23e7ec0a8d2de90f91ed559e72da56c2e8b20
describe
'278311' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAD' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
ead67090fbbb7e52ebf80b26b0aacee7
f63fa22e2b95ae0bef04af2e38117ce0d5ef799a
describe
'156661' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAE' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
f127fd37a48d72add5ee2612a4f9843e
2a7dc711c8aa52a9479470d8bb5b1cbdd1bfc9d9
describe
'47056' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAF' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
273920dec1c3f8626b9475de59ee86d0
fb2c099239ca94b05b594e06448d7c9073604a2c
describe
'6694844' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAG' 'sip-files00180.tif'
d13c8cbbccd1c7877bbbae6dbea5665f
3f2aeb3e4e887641297b7c0f80f88fe76af32136
describe
'11431' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAH' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
df4da530548f696eb59f14e44165aa45
d64e4e5f34ab0bb9fb97204105d2750b0edb4606
describe
'311158' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAI' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
642c1ad6934cd1c969f46fe6a52bb9ec
13fb1cfd5dfa331432b1c037a0844ba71d130c88
describe
'165729' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAJ' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
f0ae7fcf8d97fa336520414e59e11f65
dd3655c210c9998347572f4685a2e8624d0020f9
describe
'49010' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAK' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
7e92708e78b203f0f1a8403be8aaf919
e7384e3740f11951cfe4b9750f6809660fdec7e6
describe
'7483496' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAL' 'sip-files00181.tif'
39efdf24ae865518b11b58cd143b31de
ec6c0b115339310911ea955530dde89dd92c7d6a
describe
'12117' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAM' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
930466dd6aac9bdec2ba35a96e0067ba
9fbaf9278885f248428f50e8460a215d7da0a31b
describe
'304900' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAN' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
4189e98361b67ff62b460f095ca6a88a
bc5e96aa691c9ecbcb1f6c2795093173109460af
describe
'160319' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAO' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
860d594455773f63983a33148af53f4d
aef4d9cd8ad6d93875b2a9ecb34d53c14bc9432c
describe
'39761' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAP' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
c30e5069674e350af61506b7946aa02c
83487e9099ff068fdc657377fe992153b1854844
describe
'7333832' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAQ' 'sip-files00182.tif'
943c877b47319ce9e530d6abc9f4e128
0911aa65803d85cdfa0e4570cc08657dc4829a0a
describe
'10194' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAR' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
683cc505269c0d7086daff194c9582b1
d9332e954a0e9bcd2f5f2837e0730b510caed344
describe
'54313' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAS' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
adcf736925f8f2a7f90c6662af5e0b7c
0778598d37393f644f090fbd94540cff0a03f837
describe
'33390' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAT' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
758ac29f9d417e06391e75ecc1725d9c
4289c882011309e483d49f2a190fcf2187d9efd3
describe
'213' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAU' 'sip-files00183.pro'
52c71a3211244cd81b74b0695537edc1
afbcc3272dd9101caafbf8e6c6f80fc7510cfd21
describe
'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAV' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
a083e2f298521b757bad7d034293dbda
de6788689fc47cecfe9ce673799e2bf4c8b429e4
describe
'1318856' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAW' 'sip-files00183.tif'
dbd0792c9d9f3eaef7d443560df51709
a703da52c192b4a31481a16c3bcc21eb1972565c
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAX' 'sip-files00183.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'3928' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAY' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
129187d121a212bbda661c58bfee6234
cc0b1d8989689c93f371bb56deb3e9c9c2cadd73
describe
'184' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNAZ' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
14ef4970397d87559db9cafdfb53399c
47198ca4c55ee81afa9fe0b8f00370cd980758df
describe
'274685' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNBA' 'sip-filesUF00086082_00001.mets'
9bbca8a5e92462fca2dd92c12eea6f3e
7c074bb268c171cea124192eaf9619019f8d85da
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T03:56:15-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'358169' 'info:fdaE20090316_AAAACKfileF20090316_AACNBD' 'sip-filesUF00086082_00001.xml'
fb7703c7c5f21350410085d3dec73321
09ca25288976d8c3dee02811750a46f8f40d0924
describe
'2013-12-13T03:56:17-05:00'
xml resolution