Citation
Playtime pictures and stories

Material Information

Title:
Playtime pictures and stories
Creator:
Uncle Harry
Copping, Harold, 1863-1932 ( Illustrator )
Lydon, A. F ( Alexander Francis ) ( Illustrator )
Scannell, Edith ( Illustrator )
Butterworth and Heath ( Illustrator )
S. W. Partridge & Co. (London, England) ( Publisher )
Hazell, Watson & Viney ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
S.W. Partridge & Co.
Manufacturer:
Hazell, Watson & Viney
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vi, [2], 94 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Picture books for children ( lcsh )
Games -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Play -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1897 ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1897 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Children's literature ( fast )
Children's poetry
Children's stories
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Aylesbury
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Pictorial front cover.
General Note:
Contains prose and verse.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements on endpapers.
General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Some illustrations by A.F. Lydon, E. Scannell, Butterworth & Heath, and Harold Copping.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Uncle Harry.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027001893 ( ALEPH )
ALH9615 ( NOTIS )
243613237 ( OCLC )

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LONDON:
Co OO PIPTERID GE RE Eo:







Daily Telegraph.

One Penny Monthly.
THE CHILDREN’S
ERIEND.

THE FAVOURITH MAGAZINE
FOR CHILDREN,



With splendid Pictures and de-
lightfal Stories.

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gilt edges, 2s. 6d.

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EAE KAMILY ERIEND.
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MAGAZINE FOR THE
HOME CIRCLE,
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paper cover, Is. 6d.; cloth, 2s.;
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WORKMAN.

An Illustrated Paper

Containing Popular Articles and
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sover,1s. 6d.; cloth, gilt edges,2s. 6d.

















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pictures and full of excellent reading, suitable to the various
Classes and ages for which they are intended.”—sShefield

/ LONDON: 8. W. PARTRIDGE & CO,,

FOR !I890.



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id. 6a
he Ae
® @

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\unustraten YVearuy Voutwes

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many Engravings, Domestic Recipes, etc., is for family use, and
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——————— a

THE HOME

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*BUNCH OF CHERRIES (A). a
or,
*THE HOUSEHOLD ANGEL. By
RUTH ERSKINE’S CROSSES.
ESTER RIED. :
ESTER RIED YET SPEAKING.
THREE PEOPLE.

FOUR GIRLS AT CHAUTAUQUA.

AN ENDLESS CHAIN.

THE KING’S DAUGHTER.
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HOME.



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224 pages.





**PANSY ”’

Cover printed in 5 colours.

THREE PEOPLE.

FOUR GIRLS AT CHAUTAUQUA.

AN ENDLESS CHAIN.

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THE CHAUTAUQUA GIRLS AT
HOME.

WISE AND OTHERWISE.

SERIES.
4.d.. each.











CO., 9, PaTERNosTER Row, E.C.







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PLAYTIME PICTURES AND STORIES.









































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































“ BUILDING

























































































































































































CAMPS AND CASTLES.”











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PICTURES
s° STORIE

! LONDON :
S. W. PARTRIDGE & CO.,

‘ BY
UNCLE HARRY,

Author of “ Holiday Hours in Animal-Lana.”

PATERNOSTER ROW.

9









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Printed by HazELL, WaTson; & Viney, Ld., London and Aylesbury,



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CONTENTS:

PLAYTIME . :
Our First Grice Marcu A ‘
BaATTLEDORE AND SHUTTLECOCK .
Tup Donkey Race % 5 :
Tue Younc BUILDERS . 5 ;
A Musicat Eveninc , i

Biinp Man’s Burr : j

Wirtiam GLADSTONE AT MARBLES
Frank and His WHISTLE .

Tue Battle. 3 ei : -
Jacr’s Boat. : Ree eee eee
Our Four-in-HanpD .... Z

Buitpinc Houses. 3 : 5
Harr Hotipays . BES cy :
Artuur’s New Kite . ... ;

Syuapows ON THE WALL : :
Tue Five FISHERS : : a
Tue Race . : - e
Tue Boat BUILDER $ ae he
A Funny REGIMENT

PAGE



vi Contents.



f PAGE
THE Swine . : : : ; ; ; ‘ : : ; : . 46
THE Younc PoLicEMEN ‘ . j : : : : : . . 48
Goinc A-WHALING . : : : : : ; : ; : . 50
Tue Tennis PLAYERS .. : : : : : : : ; : . 52
Tue Paper CHASE : . : : , : : : : ‘ . 54
Franx’s New Horse . : : . : . : : : : . 56
THE Bic SNOWBALL. ‘ : : ‘ : . : : : . 58
Tue SLIDE . : : . ; . ’ ee : ; we, 60
Driving Home . ; . : : ; , : : . : . 62
Our Picnic . : ; : ; : : ee : . . 64
THE Top SPINNERS : ; . ‘ : ‘ j ‘ . : . 66
A Day In THE HayrFiELD. oe. : : . . : : . 68
A Sick Dott 2 . : . ; : : “ : ‘ , £70
Tue Banp or THE Rep, WHITE aNnD BLUE . . j ; : : eeZ2
Tue May QuEEN. . ; : : ; : . . : : oT".
“SEE-Saw” . : ; : . ; : ; : : . : . 76.
Noau’s Ark. : . ‘ : . ; . ; ; : . . 78
Tom’s Hotray . : j : . ‘ . : : : ; . 80
Tue Home Concert . : : . . : ‘ : : : 82
Dotiy’s New Heap. : . : . ; : : : : . 84
THe Younc ARTIST. : : : : 3 : : : ; . 86
PLAYING AT SCHOOL . ; ; . : . ‘ . . : . 88
Lonety Mituiz : oe . : : : : : . - go
Tue PLayMaTES . : : . : ae . : : : - 92
Tue Boys or Dirron . : . . . . . ‘ : . - 94
THe Hoppy Horse . : ‘ : . : ‘ : : : - 96







EdScannell = <~s een pe a

PLAYTIME.

no

pie iMeE. What pleasant thoughts the word calls to

our mind! Playtime by the sea—digging on the sands,’
rowing round the harbour, or watching the passing ships
through that big telescope which old Jack the coastguardsman
carries under his arm. Playtime in the country—gathering
wild flowers and fruit, listening to the birds singing so merrily,
or, after climbing those great hills, resting in the shade of the
trees, while some of our elder brothers and sisters are searching
for curious insects to add to their collections. Playtime after
school—when lessons being over for the day we run away to
the field, glad of the.fresh air and bright sunshine. Or play-
time at home—like little Will Robinson in our picture, who
is pretending to be Robinson Crusoe on the desert island,
waiting for man Friday to appear.







8
OUR FIRST CRICKET MATCH.

~

My Dear UNCLE,—

Knowing how glad you are to hear
what Tom and I are doing at School, I send
you a short account of our first cricket match
ee this season. Most ofthe boys in our school
({---t2>--- -- are very young so'we do not like to play
oe 7 apainet other schools near, where the boys

are older. Achallenge reached us from the
Manor House School, and Tom, our Captain, accepted it, and
we prepared for the match. Tom made us practise every
evening, and when the day came we all felt ready. We had
to go in first, and two wickets fell without a run. Then Tom
took the bat; at first he played very carefully, only getting
one run at a time, then he made a big hit right over the fence.
~ You should have heard how we cheered him. He kept in till
the last, and made thirty-five runs. We were all out for
seventy-five. Ionly made two, but Tom says I shall do better
soon. The Manor House boys made ninety, and so beat us by
fifteen runs. Weare pleased with our captain, and he says
we worked well.

The photograph, from which the picture is made, was
taken by ourteacher. That is Tom at the wicket, looking just
as he did on the day of the match; and the boy behind is
Bertie Graham, our wicket-keeper. Henever flinches, however
hard the ball comes in, and very few balls go by him. I have
sent a picture on to mamma, and she has written to say she
is much pleased with it.

With love to Auntie, I remain, Dear Uncle,

Your affectionate nephew, JOHN.















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Playtime Pictures. B..



Io

-BATTLEDORE AND SHUTTLECOCK.





* ALLY BROWN had been away at school
si) for several months, and now she is at home
for the summer holidays. She is a bright,

happy girl, always ready to help her school-
. fellows, either.in their lessons or at play.. No matter
vice. how dull the weather is, Sally is always cheerful, for
she can find many ways to fill up the time, both indoors and
out. Her mamma calls her Sally Sunbeam. She is often

_ heard to say how much she misses her little daughter's bright
‘smile and cheerful ways when Sally is away at school.

Knowing that it would please her daughter, Mrs. Brown
invited little Mary Bates, one of Sally’s cousins, to spend.a
few weeks in the pretty country house in which they dwell.
Mary had been very ill, and her parents were glad to send her
away from the crowded town where they liye to kind Mrs.
Brown’s country home: = |

Yesterday Sally took Mary round the garden, and told
her the names of all the flowers, and helped her to pick a pretty
nosegay for her aunt. Then they wandered to the farm to get
some fresh milk. Mary was afraid to pass the big dog, but.
Sally and he were old friends, so she made him put his Dae
into Mary’s hand in token of friendship.

This morning Sally showed her cousin how to play at
battledore and shuttlecock. Mary looked on.with wondering
eyes, while her cousin kept the shuttlecock from falling to the
ground. ~ Sally beat it up into the air fifty times, and then the
wind caught the feathers and blew it out of reach. To-morrow
a new battledore is to be bought for Mary, and the two chil- ,
dren will play at beating the shuttlecock from one to the other.





TWENTY-ONE, TWENTY-TWO !”



[2

THE DONKEY RACE.

()* a fine summer day last year, the
. children of our Band of Hope were
g: taken for a trip to Epsom Downs. When
ee’ they arrived on the downs the sun was
ae shining brightly, the birds were singing,
e3 and the merry voices of other children, who
were already there, made the little ones think it was just the
place in which to spend a happy day. After dinner, Harry
Wilson and his three friends agreed: to have a donkey race.
They were all kind-hearted boys, SO. they’ told the donkey-
drivers that they would not. allow them to run after the
donkeys and beat them with sticks; they would rather not go
at all than that this’should be done. At first the donkey-
drivers would not let the donkeys go out alone with the boys,
but Harry and his friends were firm in their. determination,
and so the drivers had to give way.

| First the donkeys were got into line, ad then the signal
was given to start, but the donkeys would not go. They
threw up their heels, and off fell severai of the boys. At’ last
the donkeys started, Harry's taking the’ lead ; but his hat blew
away, and he had to wait until his: brother. picked itup. Poor -
Charley was not used to donkey riding, and he felt afraid
when his donkey. galloped, so he put his arms round its neck
and clung there just like Johnny. Gilpin did when he took his
famous ride to Edmonton. One.of the boys had to get down
and lead his donkey, as it would not go with him upon its
back. Still, it was great fun, and the boys said they liked it
much better as it was, than they would have'done had the
donkey-drivers run behind to beat the’ pope's dumb’ animals.























































































ON THE DOWNS.



qo

THE YOUNG BUILDERS.




ot “BOYS and girls, come,
a 4 : haste away !
aie ——_ The tide is low on the sands
-—~ to-day. 7
oe Come for a sail, or come and
ee ade 7 :

AL =~. But we'll be busy with pail and
6 spade.

PAu 2 At once to work let us all begin
Before the tide shall come flowing in.
We have not a single: minute to waste,
Wel: build our best though we build in haste ;
And'‘wide and high our walls shall be
To-stand the siege of the rushing sea.”
Busily toiled these children, and well,
Building more castles than I can tell ;
Piers and bridges, and harbours, too. _
But the tide came up, and the fresh wind blew :
One minute the buildings stood firm and fair,
And the next, they vanished ; please tell me

Where ?







My Ah





16

Ae MUSICAL EVENING.

* NOW'S the « OW’S the time for a game at drum-
and-fife band,” said Willy Austin, to
his brothers. ‘‘ Mother and father have gone
for a walk, and they will not mind us making
‘Yas much noise as we like, if we do no harm.
<>] I will be bandmaster, Tom shall play the
: fife, aad George the drum.” ;
Neither of these musical instruments |
were in the house, so the boys looked about to find things
that would suit their purpose. Tom found an old water-can -
with a hole in the’ bottom, which the bandmaster said would
act asa finger key. George brought a saucepan, but Willy
knew. his mother would not like that played with, so two old
iron lids were found, which when banged together, made a ©
grand noise. Willy had the micutstand’ but he called it a.
triangle ; and a small poker with which to beat time. ‘“ Now |
what shall we play?” said the bandmaster. George proposed
“Rule Britannia!” as his drum would be wanted in the loud -
parts. _Tommy thought “ Home, Sweet Héme” was better,
but Willy preferred ‘ "God Save the Queen.”

The bandmaster gave four flourishes with the poker, and
the concert dirmenced. . The fife was a little out of tune, as
Tom could not make the key act. The drum did not sound
quite so well as that used in the band which passed the house
last week, but it pleased George. The triangle was very nice,
for Willy loved music, and was learning at school to sing by
notes. After they had played all the tunes they knew, their
parents returned, and came into the room just as the boys

were finishing ‘‘ Welcome, ever Welcome, Friends.”































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































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YOUNG MUSICIANS?



18

BLIND MAN’S BUFF.

NEN Hetty Bowen was ten years old,
her parents gave a birthday party to a
SE" _| number of her little friends. For nearly a
|. week Hetty and her mother were busy sending
out invitations, decorating the rooms, and in
tt’! seeing that all things were being got ready.
- When the day arrived, the children had a quiet tea, that is,
- aS quiet as twelve merry little children could be. After that
they. all went into the large parlour for the evening’s amuse-
ment. There were plenty of good things on the tables, and,
as it was Christmas time, the room was bright with holly
and mistletoe. First they had singing, then musical chairs,
and next a little girl proposed Blind Man’s Buff. The tables
were put on one side of the room, and a handkerchief was
tied over Hetty’s eyes. Then one of the children put these
questions: ‘‘How many horses has your father got? oo EATee:
“What colour are they?” ‘Black, white, and grey.” After this |
all the children ran to hide themselves, and Hetty was told to
“turn round three times and catch whom you may.” Hetty
caught several of the boys, but they were so much alike in
height that she could not guess their names correctly. Then
Hetty’s playmate, Jennie Summers, was caught. ‘I know
you,” said Hetty. ‘“ Who is it?” ‘My Jennie!” “Then
Jennie had to be blind man, and so the fun went on till the
Christmas tree was brought in, and the toys were distributed.
Many toys were left after the party was over. These were
taken by Hetty on the following day to the Children’s Hospital,
for Mrs. Bowen taught her daughter to think of those who had
not the same pleasures and comforts as she had.





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20

WILLIAM GLADSTONE -AT MARBLES.

WG \ AVE a game at marbles, will you, George?” said
Ralph Coleman to his.companion. ‘“ Yes, I will,
Ralph, if you will set me up with two. I have lost
< all mine.” This was done, and the two boys were
soon deeply interested. in their game. Sometimes
George won and sometimes Ralph, but at the end
of the game George had just managed to get suffi-
cient from Ralph to pay back those he had borrowed.
y As they were walking home they met their teacher
"> & and told him what'a fine game at marbles they had
had. ‘I remember,” said their teacher, ‘ reading
a very interesting story of Mr. Gladstone, when
a boy, playing at marbles with the lads in a Scotch village
where he was staying. One day the village boys were playing
at taw, the name given to marbles in Scotland, when a well-
dressed lad came out of a farmhouse near at hand, and asked
whether he might join them ina game. The boys were quite
willing, so they gave him a few marbles to start with, just as
you, Ralph, did to George to-day. The boys, who were good
players, thought they would easily beat Willie Gladstone, and
‘win their marbles back, but they found that he could play —
uncommonly well.. Next day he came again and began to
play, and would soon have won all their marbles, when one of
the boys got cross, and used a bad word. At this William .
Gladstone said, ‘If there is any more of this you will prevent
my having the pleasure of playing with you.. I detest bad
words, and I will not play with boys who use them.’”

This was a good lesson for the boys, and it should be one
for you. Never play with those who use bad words.





























A GAME AT MARBLES.

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22

FRANK. AND HIS WHISTLE.

a, RANK CLIFFORD is the happy possessor of a
sae new brass whistle. For a long time his only
musical instrument was an old tin one, much
knocked about by constant use. But many a
sweet tune had he played on it, to the delight of
his mother and sister, for Frank can play well.
One day, when passing a music shop, he saw a fine
brass whistle in the window, and having enquired
the price, he determined to save all his pocket-money until
he could afford to buy it. And at last he obtained it. The
first day after he purchased the new whistle he took it with
him to school, and when the lessons were over he, with
several other boys, went into the playground, and to their
delight produced his treasure. Frank played some stirring
tunes, and the boys thought they were soldiers going to battle,
with Frank as their leader. Then he changed the music to |
some of the fine.old hymns they sang each Sunday in church,
and the boys’ warlike thoughts passed away and they became
true-hearted, peaceful English boys once more. But Frank’s
greatest joy was in playing to the loved ones at home. His
mother was always glad to see him return from school, for he
was helpful to her-in so many ways. After he had done all
his mother wished, he asked his sister Nelly to have her tea
‘in the wood-shed while he played his new whistle. Nelly was.
pleased to do so, for she had spent many a happy hour before
in listening to him. Indeed, she thought his. performances
; “just lovely.” Sometimes Nelly sings while Frank accom-.
panies her on the whistle, and their father and mother sit by
listening to them.



























































































































JUST LOVELY.’”

3

“SHE THOUGHT HIS PERFORMANCES



24

Tite. BATE E.



Sie boys at Highfield area
merry lot, full of fun and

frolic. Charley Blake, who is
looked upon as their captain, is
| always ready to lead them in
| their games. It had been snow-
ing very heavily for some days,
when Charley suggested that
they should go and meet the
boys as they left the Grammar
ae School, on the top of the hill,
and have a battle of snowballs. It was a half-holiday in
Charley's School, so they had plenty of time to reach the gates
of the Grammar School, and make up a good supply of
snowballs, before the boys came out. ‘“ Now, boys,” said
Charley, “play fair, do not put any stones in with the snow.
We will give them one volley only, and then allow them time
to make a good supply like we have.” Charley posted him-
self near the gate, in order to give the signal to fire; but
when he saw George Hawkins, who had been very ill during
the summer, leaning on Ernest Kent’s arm, he stepped forward
so that all the boys might see him. Ernest was quite as ready
for fun as Charley and his friends were, so as soon as George
was safely on his way home, the battle commenced. All the
younger boys were ordered to stand behind and make up
snowballs, while the elder ones pelted each other until they
were tired. Dr. Mason, the master of the school, stood by, and
seemed to enjoy the fun almost as muchas the boys. When the
boys left for home, Charley called for three cheers for Dr. Mason.



































WAITING FOR ‘THE











FOE.



Playlime Pictures.



JACK’S BOAT.

- Q)H, brother Jack, how hard



you work
To make our little vessel
: pe Ns: ready ! |
re el ‘“Of course,” said Jack, ‘I wish
A\ i = to see

That she can float quite
straight and steady.

_ She is the best we yet
_ have made,
For she can sail and
cargo carry,
And if by see ace delayed,
We'll know Bs well what makes her tarry.”



| Said Eva, ‘‘ Tom sits over there,

He waits to‘see the launch, and cheer her.
[Il put a tiny doll on board,

And fancy it’s the ‘cox,’ to steer her.

- And Jack, I think we'll take her name
From what we read about in history.”
Said Jack, ‘‘Oh, it shall be the same
As Nelson’s famous ship—the ‘Vzctory.’

”







THE FIRST VOYAGE.

if



23

OUR FOUR-IN-HAND.







MY & HO’S for a good game at Horses?” shouted

‘\ Philip Stevens, as he ran round the playground
AS after school was over. All the boys were ready,
so two teams.were made up, Philip being the
driver of one, and.Samuel Morris of the other.
“Twill drive down Farmer Ashton’s lane, through

road to ‘the school,” said Philip, “and you go the reverse
way and. see who gets home first.” Phil soon fastened on
the reins and started his horses, but they were all young
and frisky and did not pull well together. In fact, several
‘times the new-mown grass in the meadows attracted their
attention, and the driver had hard work to keep them from
staying to eat—no, I mean play with it. Whenever the driver
said, as drivers do, ‘“‘ Steady David, steady boy,” David, one
of the leaders, kicked up his heels and did not pull at all, while
Charley, the other leader, looked round at the driver and
/seemed-to laugh, as much as to say, ‘‘ You are not much of a
_ driver.” Half way over the meadows the other team appeared
‘in sight, and the horses neighed and jumped about all over the
path. Still Philip knew he had four good horses, which if
“properly managed, could run as fast as any other four in the
school, so he did not use a whip, but with kind words got
them well in-hand, and racing down the road in fine style,
‘reached the school door’ nearly two minutes before Samuel’s
‘team came out of Farmer Ashton’s lane. |
_ The drivers agreed to have another run on the next fine
day, when Samuel no 9 doubt will do. his: “best to get his team
“home first.

‘the meadow, over Mount Pleasant, and round the ~















“ GEE-UP.”



ecu 30 Meets
BUILDING TOD PES:
Bare WALLIS has been wery!
ill. Fora long time his mother:
watched — by his bedside almost’
ris, night and day, but at last a change
‘“i-7 came and he began to get better.
Ge” His sister Elsie was not allowed in-
> the sick room, and this pained her .
very much. She dearly loved Bertie,
but many times, before his illness, she had been cross with him
because he interrupted her in her lessons. Her mother often
chided her for being vexed with her little brother, but the
reproof was soon forgotten. Now-God was Speaking to her.
She remembered how on the last day before his illnéss,
.Bertie was in the nursery, and she scolded him because he.
wanted her to join him at play. “Oh, you must play by.
yourself; I have no time,” she had said, and poor Bertie
had run to his mother and cried. But during those sad
days of his illness she prayed that God.would sparé Bertie,
and that she ‘might learn to control her temper, and be kind
and affectionate to him. To-day he has come downstairs
for the first time. There he sits on the floor, trying to build a
Roman Temple with a new box of bricks his father has bought
him. Elsie sits near, ready to help by picking up the blocks
- when they fallout of her brother's reach. She built several
very curious houses in order to please him. Mrs. Wallis sat
by the window watching the two children, and her heart was
made glad when she saw Bertie put his arms round Elsie’s
neck and say, ‘‘ You are a dear sister,” and heard the reply,
“T will try never to get cross with you again.”









BUILDING HOUSES.





32

HALF HOLIDAYS.



LL work and no play makes Jack a ~
dull boy.” So says Mr. Longman,
the schoolmaster, and all his scholars agree
—. With him. Nothing pleases him more
em ,. than to see the children enjoy their play, for
SMU Nl afterwards he expects that they will give
attention to their lessons. Sometimes
Mr. Longman goes out with his scholars, and enters, into all
their games just as if he was a boy once more.

Some of the girls have skipping ropes, or shuttlecock and
battledore, and others play at lawn tennis. The boys amuse
themselves at rounder or. trap and ball. Last week they
had a game at cricket. Mr. Longman was captain on one
side, and Mr. Smallman, the second master, on the other.
The game went on nicely till Tommy Traddles’ dog Pincher
came to the field to search for his young master. The ball was
rolling along when Pincher arrived on the ground. He looked
at it very seriously and
then he jumped after it
and caught it in his
mouth. ‘‘ Good dog,”
said Billy Buttons, “give
it tome.” But Pincher
wagged his tail and 4
looked roguishly at &
Billy Buttons as much
as to say, “It is my
innings now,” and away
he started across the








lx







. 33,

field, with Billy, Tommy, and the two
captains in hot pursuit. Pincher ran
round the field at full speed, and not
one of them could catch him. It was
no use calling out “ Stop thief!” for
no policeman would try to stop
Pincher, so Tommy had to follow
the dog home. The two boys who
were batting took advantage of
Pincher’s . wicked trick to make eight
runs before they were. stopped.

There is no chance for Pincher to play
at cricket now. Every half-holiday
when the school children are playing
in the fields he is fastened in his kennel. He looks very
dejected on those days, and does not seem at all like the dog”
which ran across the cricket field with the ball in his mouth.

But perhaps Pincher hardly deserves his punishment, as he
did not understand the rules of the game.







34
ARTHUR'S NEW KITE.

TILLY,” said Arthur Janes,
“will you come home with
me.and draw some figures on my
new kite? ‘You know I cannot
draw as well as you, and I want
it to look very nice.”
_Arthur had been making a
' kite. He bought some flat cane
and used a long piece for the
centre, then fixed a bow and a
cross piece at the top, and covered
the whole. with strong, white
paper. Next he made paper
tassels for the ends of the bow,
and a long tail. String was
_ fixed near the middle so that the
kite might balance properly. But it looked white and bare, so
Arthur asked his companion to help him to ornament it.
Willy soon drew some pictures on the kite, including a most
-wonderful-looking bird, and Arthur painted them. Soon after,
two other boys came inand helped to finish the kite. “ “There,” |
said Arthur, “is it not a beauty ?”
Mr. Janes was called out of the house to give his opinion.
He thought it was very well made. “But,” said he, “I have
seen many finer kites in China. There they are sometimes:
made the shape of a bird or bat, or even of animals. Itis |
quite usual to see a number of men out in the fields gravely
holding a piece of string in their hands, and if you look up
you will see many strange-shaped kites flying about.”







i

|

|

q 7 |









































“THERE ! ISN'T IT A BEAUTY?”



30 .
SHADOWS ON THE WALL.

aT a one

WISH Edward and Gracie
were home from school. We
do not know what to play at, nurse.”
This was said by Willy Lee,
one wet November afternoon. He
and his brothers and sisters were —
kept indoors because of the rain.
They had played at school until
~ they were tired, then Willy got his
bricks and tried to build a church,
like the picture.on the lid of the
box. He only built a few rows when little Essie knocked them
down. He tried again, and Essie again upset them, so he ©
gave up the attempt. Then they stood at the window and
watched for the return of their elder brother and sister, Edward
and Grace. ‘When they saw them open the garden gate, the
children ran to open the front door before they could knock.
Tea was soon ready, and, after it was cleared away, the
children told Grace what they had been doing during the day.
She praised Willy for amusing his sisters, and promised
that Edward should show them some funny tricks. after the
lamp was lit. Grace lit the lamp. Then Edward clasped
his hands and held them near the wall, and there they saw a
shadow just like a rabbit. It moved its paws and ears, and
when Edward squeaked, Essie thought there was a rabbit in
the room. Then he made a cat which mewed, and a goose
which seemed to say “‘ Quack, quack,” when it opened its mouth.
Then the little ones were sent to bed: and Gracie and Edward
were left to do their lessons.



















A ee
| | ee

LAR
Sa A
rt 1! |
Wi

ma

Hl
SATAN

||
WANN | //
IKK Nipl
ae
! HHH NY
ERIN AAI Ky
ANNAN

MAM, 8
» KANN iN a)
Hn AN
on al



THE RABBIT ON THE WALL. .













38
THE FIVE FISHERS.

NT

eae five boys in our picture are -
sf new friends. They are staying
‘ with their parents at a pretty fishing
= village in the south of England, and
# they have formed a friendship with
m each other. Many a jolly day they
; * have spent together. Sometimes
they have been out with their parents on the water, or they have
rambled along the shore picking up shells and fossils, or
running and shouting as only boys can do. To-day they are
on more serious business. Frank Hamer’s mother has been
speaking of a poor old woman, Mrs. Walton, who is very ill,
and in need of food. Frank is a generous boy; and when his
mother was speaking, he put his hands into his pockets, but
found them empty, all his pocket-money having been spent.
‘Mother,’ said he, “I have no money left, but I should like
to help; may I try to catch some fish and give them to Mrs.
Walton?” ‘Yes, Frank,” replied Mrs. Hamer, “I do not like
‘boys to fish simply for fun, but this is a good purpose, and I
am willing for you to try.” Frank had no trouble in getting
friends to join him. Soon they were seated on the pier,
waiting for a bite. “Look out, Frank,” shouted George
Hunter, “there's a big one, be steady! Here, wait, I’ll put
my hat underit.” It was safely landed, and proved to be a very
fine mackerel. Next they caught a whiting, and by tea-time
they had twenty fish of various sizes. Mrs. Walton was very
grateful to the boys for their kindness, and they felt that the
day had been Dieser spent 2 and that their efforts to do good
had been successful.


























- THE FIRST BITE. - pa



i

THE RACE.

eee

LO! boysand girls. Ho!
haste away,
The race is coming off to-day.
Franky and Freddy, Jim and
Joe,
Are standing ready in a row.

They are the horses strong
as and fleet ; -
-ye~ And they will gallop down




i the street,
S— - Along the shore, across the
sands
So - To where the tall, black
20 Pe 5 beacon stands.

Who is this, sitting by the way?
“Tis Willie and his sister, May.
Poor thing, she is not well, and he
Has carried her a mile to see

The race, because he thinks that it
May cheer his sister up a bit.
The race is started! Off they go!
Hurrah for Jim! Hurrah for Joe!
Franky and Freddy keep the pace :

The steadiest runner wins the race.









“ THE RACE IS STARTED!”
Playtime Pictures.



42
THE BOAT BUILDER.

TT was was a good day for Arthur
Stanley when his father gave
him a box of tools. Arthur was fond
of making toys for his younger
brother, Ronald, even when the only
tool he had was his pocket knife, one
blade of which was broken. Ronald
had long wished to have a boat, just
= like one he often saw sailing on the
pond: in oat af ‘hele home, and Arthur promised to make.
one. He did not succeed at first, but after several failures he
_ managed to cut a well-shaped boat out of an old log of wood.
He then made the masts, and Mary, his sister, sewed the sails
and made a pretty blue-and-white. flag to fly at the peak.
Arthur first tested the boat’s floating power in a large tub of
water, and he found it very steady.

On the great day of the launch, George Quick came with
his dog Rose to help at the ceremony. Ronald launched the
boat into the pond, saying, ‘“‘ Your name shall be the Sz/ver
_ Cloud.” It sailed along quite steadily, but just in the middle
of the pond there -grew a lot of weeds ;.and-the wind carried
the boat into their midst, and_ there it remained fast. The
boys feared that the Si/ver Cloud would be lost on its first
voyage. But George’s dog was watching the boat, and when
the dog saw that the boys could not get the boat, it jumped
into the water and brought it safely ashore.

Arthur is now the head of a shipbuilder’s yard. His early
training in the use of tools became of great value to him -
when he made his first start in business life.



































































































































































































































































THE LAUNCH OF THE “SILVER CLOUD.”



44
A. FUNNY REGIMENT.

To is not v is. not very easy to eal at soldiers
when you areas short of menas Tom
Tomkins was. But Tom was not easily
discouraged. He lived in a lonely part
of the country, far away from other houses,
y so he and his brother James had to make
all the fun for themselves. Tom had been
to the nearest town and had seen a number of soldiers, drawn
up in line, being drilled by an officer. When he returned home
_ he determined to form a regiment, and be its captain. ‘“ Now,
James, you must be the bugler and flag-bearer, and we will
march round the house and get our soldiers together.” So
away they went, James blowing a penny trumpet, and waving
an oid red handkerchief tied to a long stick. But no recruits
came, so Fido the dog was enlisted, and made to follow the
flag. This was easily done, as Fido was usually to be found
____ following one of the two boys. Puss was tried, but she-ob-
_— jected. Then James got his old wooden horse, and it followed
‘in the rear by means of a piece of string attached to its head.
Then all marched into the drill ground, and Tom put his
soldiers through their drill. ‘‘ Now! attention!” Fido took
no notice of this order, except to wag his tail. ‘‘ Stand straight!”
was the next command, and Fido rose upon his hind legs and
looked at his young master. “Eyes right! Now, Master
; Bugler, your eyes are wrong. March!” and away they went
‘round the house, with trumpet blowing, flag waving, Fido
{benny and Tom singing a merry tune. They marched so
_ well that Captain *Fom promised to take them out again
another day.



%







































“EYES RIGHT!”



46
THE SWING.

Ne CURTIS had a pleasant surprise
to-day. It is her rule every bright.
morning to wander in the wood at the back
of the house, and gather a few wild flowers
or leaves to put on the table. As she entered
the wood this morning, she saw a large swing
hanging from the old oak tree. It was not
there yesterday, she was certain. ‘ Perhaps.
» papa has -had it put up for me,” she said to
herself. She ran back to the house, forgetting
her usual floral tribute, and met her father in
the garden. ‘Oh, papa,” said she, “there
is such a beautiful swing in the wood. Did
you have it put up for me?” “Yes, my
dear, I did, and I hope you will have pleasant swings on it,
only do not try to,swing too high. Your Cousin Ernest i iS
coming to-day, and he will take care of you. No doubt you
will enjoy his company.” :
When Ernest came the two children went out to try the
_ swing. Nelly got on first, and her cousin pushed her gently.
“T do like this, Ernest,” said Nelly; ‘don’t you think my
papa is very kind to have the swing put up forme? And Iam
so glad you came to-day, for you know I could not swing
myself well.” Ernest then had a swing, but as he was astrong
boy he did not want anyone to push him. Many times after
this Nelly had a swing in the early morning; but she never
_ Stayed too long, as she knew her mamma would miss the nice



fresh flowers it was her custom to take indoors to decorate. the

table with.









Z é

NELLY’S FIRST SWING,



48
THE YOUNG POLICEMEN.

DOs vw

OW! you are police con-
stable number one, and I
ay =©60 am «sergeant number two,” said
) Teddy to Duncan. The boys had
’ dressed themselves so as to look as
much like policemen as: possible.
They had put on their overcoats,
and buttoned them up to the throat.
The leathern straps which they used
to carry their books to school made fine belts, and they begged
‘from the gardener some old leathern gloves to stick under the
belts. ‘We will use our hoop sticks as truncheons, and
perhaps mamma will let us have two old hats of papa’s, and
then we shall be complete,” said Ted. ‘Oh, no, sergeant,”
said number one, “‘ when on duty we must wear a badge round
our sleeve.” ‘Ah, I forgot that, our handkerchiefs must do.
Iwill tie your badge on, and you must commence duty at once.
If you need any help, blow your whistle, and I will come to-you.”
Number one marched away, looking very important.
First he went into the garden and found everything quiet.
Then he peeped into the coal hole, but no suspicious persons
were there. As he passed the kitchen door he noticed a very
nice smell, so he entered and asked the cook whether she
needed any help. Cook was much amused, and rewarded him.
with.a tart. ‘ My sergeant said I was to whistle if I needed
help. I must do so‘at once.” The sergeant quickly came, .
and gave efficient aid in disposing of the troublesome tarts.
_ Both constable and sergeant told the cook they would be
on duty the next day, and would see that she was protected.









































































































































































































































THE ‘‘ SPECIALS.”





50,

GOING A-WHALING.,



AWAY we went a-whaling,
A-sailing on the sea ;

Tom, Johnny, and Jemima,

And they of course made three.




‘he Sam and Sue, and they made two,
And three and two are five ;

And Johnny took the kitchen tongs
To catch the whale alive.

And Harry was the north-east wind,
And he blew strong and fast

Against our sail—a handkerchief ;
A broomstick was our mast.

Said Tom, “ Well catch him by the nose,”
Said Johnny, “ By the tail,”

And Sam said, ‘“‘ By the middle fin,
That’s how to catch a whale.”

“Tl put him in a pail,” said Sue,
“* And take him home to mother ;’

Jemima said, “ I’ve brought a jug,
In case we catch another.”

And so we went a-whaling,
But no whale could we see—

_We turned the good ship round about,
And home again sailed we. |





-WHALING.

GOING A



52
THE TENNIS PLAYERS.

{} ERE, Joe,” said Willy Brown, “are you ready’
for some fun?” “Yes, Willy, what is it?”
AX “Why, the ladies and gentlemen who were
: ie playing at lawn tennis just-now have gone into
I\\/_ the house and left their bats and balls on the grass.
' “f Suppose we have a game, eh?” “All right,” re- _
plied Willy, ‘I don’t mind.”

Willy was the elder, and he should have
known it was not right to touch things that did
4, 7 \ not belong to him; but they were poor boys who

o ge had not received the home training that my
young readers have had.

The boys had been lying on the grass, looking at the
ladies and gentlemen playing, and had heard the various names
called as the ball was struck, or the games were won. Joe
started their game with a vigorous blow at the ball, which
Willy just managed to stop, and with equal vigour he returned
it to his companion. They were so busy that they did not
notice the return of the proper players, until a lady laid her
hand on Joe’s shoulder and said, ‘“‘ What are you doing, my
boy?” Joe looked up very bashfully, and recognised the lady
as one who taught. in the ragged school which he sometimes
attended. “I’m very sorry, ma’am, if I’ve done wrong; I did
not think of it,” said Joe, very quietly. “It is wrong,” said
the lady, ‘“‘to touch things like these without permission, but
we do not blame you this time. I see you enjoyed the fun.
Will you and your companion stay and look after lost balls?”
The boys gladly consented to do this, and were pleased when
they had plenty of work to do in seeking for stray balls.

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































IM

“JOE STARTED THEIR GAME WITH A VIGOROUS BLOW.”

: . ue





54

THE PAPER-CHASE.

. E have had such a glorious run .

this afternoon,” said Harold
Denham to his sister Jane, as he entered
_ the house, his cheeks flushed and his
- eyes sparkling. ‘Stephen and I were
’ the hares. Stephen knows his way all
- over the place, and he is one of our
> best runners. We hada good supply
of paper in the bags you made for me,
and we started five minutes.before the hounds. We went
down Crocket’s Lane, through the wood to Broadmoor, over
the old bridge, and then up the hill for home. Just as we
reached the other side of the wood we saw two of the hounds
coming straight down the path. We both ran back again into
the wood, of course leaving plenty of paper so that the hounds
could follow the scent ; then back again out of the wood to the
old bridge before the hounds had found out the trick, There
was a strong wind blowing, which sent our papers in all direc-
tions, and we were afterwards told by the hounds that they
often lost our trail. You know, Jane, that many picnic parties
are held there, and I suppose the paper left by them confused
our pursuers. After reaching the top of the hill, Stephen and
I sat down to rest; we, did not wish to get too far ahead of
the hounds. We got to the goal three minutes before the first
hound crossed. the stile opposite the winning-post. All the
boys were very pleased with the run. They would like to have
caught us, but Stephen and I prefer it as it is.. The boys
promise that we shall be the hares again, and they intend to
have a good try to bring us home in triumph.”





CHASE

4
=
Ay
<<
Ay
2
q
a





56
- FRANK’S NEW. HORSE.

nw



Y AST week a large box was delivered at Sunshine
( Villa, addressed to Master Frank Trueman,
Sunshine Villa, Homepeace Road. It was so

large that it had to stand in the garden until Mr.

Trueman came home from business. The children

waited anxiously for their father to arrive, as they

- were impatient to know what the box contained.

As soon as possiblé, Mr. Trueman opened it;

when first there appeared the head, and then the

body of a grand-looking horse. It was not alive,
but when it was put upon the ground, it was seen
that it could gallop almost as well as a live horse,
for it was fixed to a long wooden rocker. Mr.

Trueman carried the horse to its stable—the

nursery—and the children followed it. Then he

took from his pocket a:letter- which he read aloud :

» “ My Dear Brotuer,—I send a rocking-horse addressed

to Nephew Frank. I know that he shares all his toys with his

brother and sister, so that what is given to him will be equally
shared by them. Your Affectionate Brother, FRANK.”

Mr. Trueman then placed Frank on the horse’s back, and
left the children to enjoy their new treasure. The horse
_ plunged and kicked much to the delight of the boys, and the
astonishment of Lottie. She thought her dear donkey, which
only nodded its head as it travelled along, was much better
than this great “ gee-gee.” When Frank had enjoyed a good
tide, Walter mounted upon. its back, and raced along ina
most exciting way. Then they asked papa to write and thank
uncle for his beautiful present.





i

lie
Cu



.THE FIRST GALLOP. ee Ree S, :
Playtime Pictures. : E



THE BIG SNOWBALL.

URRAH for the snow!
- Here’s a glorious treat,”
cried little Jack Brown. ‘‘Come
along Polly and Bertie, we will
make such a big snowball.”
The little ones ran down the
garden path, their ears tingling
_f and cheeks glowing, ready to
\ join in the fun. Little by little
the ball grew in size until it was
almost as tall as the children,
and aule as heavy. Puffing and blowing they rolled it along
until they could get it no further, when, just at the right
moment, their big brother, Robert, came home and helped them
to roll it near the garden door. Then taking Polly in his arms,
Robert led the way indoors to ‘‘ thaw Polly’s red nose,” as he
said; and the boys quickly followed. ‘‘ Well, Bertie,” said
Robert, “ how do you like making big snowballs, eh?” ‘Oh!
it is fun,” replied Bertie; ‘it is hard work, though, but it
mcs you feel so warm.” ‘Yes it does,” chimed in Jack,
“and hungry, too.”
After tea they went out again to look at Robert making
a snow man. It was a very funny figure, with pieces of coal
where its eyes and nose should have been. Onits head Robert
put an old hat of Bertie’s, which had a large hole in the top,
through which the snow peeped. Robert said this would keep
its head cool.* When going to bed, Polly whispered to her
mother, “I think, dear mainma, ae God sent the snow to-
day to make us happy.”







\\

AK

\\

























“PUFFING AND BLOWING THEY ROLLED IT ALONG.”



60

THE ‘SLIDE.

“Hip, hip, hooray!
The ice will stand
Our weight to-day,
My merry band.” .

Ep LBSE words were sung to a tune of his own,

by “laughing: John Layton,” as he was
called by his schoolmates, as he and three other
boys ran down the Jane to the old mill pond, one cold winter
day. The boys had been warned by their schoolmaster not to
venture on the ice until it was strong enough to bear them
with safety, but to-day permission had been given, and the
boys quickly took advantage of it. They soon reached the
pond, John being the first to start sliding. ‘ Hip, hip,
hooray!” he shouted, as one after the other they went down
one long slide and up another, made by its side, so as to lose
no time. George Fielder was second, Charley Ray third, and
Willy Cotton brought up the rear. Charley was a big boy,
not used to sliding, and he felt rather timid. Once he just
touched George’s heels and over went the two boys in the snow,
and Willy Cotton fell on top of them. No harm was done
~ except that each boy got a lot of snow in his ears and down
his collar. Laughing John helped them up, brushed them
well, and away they went down the slide, one behind the
other, as happy as before.

The little girl and the young sailor boy who are looking on
are learning to skate. The sailor you see belongs to the good
ship &xotic, which means “of foreign origin.” . His skates
are quite foreign to him, but he intends to conquer that diffi-
culty, and will soon venture to race his sister across the ice.















































































































































































































































































































62°

DRIVING HOME.
A oer the meadows! away and
away! —
When all things are beatiful,
blithe, and gay ;
Oh! isn’t it nice !” to his sister
said Will, |
As they sat, side by side, on the
slope of the hill.
She had wandered on by down and
dell,

To gather the flowers she loved so well ;



6



Now, wearied and worn, had come to rest,
Her arm around him she loved the best.
Father and mother both were dead.

She sweetly smiled, and to Will she said,
“ Across the meadows we two may roam,
But we have no carriage to drive us home !
So tie your reins to the broom or sloe,

And off at a merry pace we'll go!”









HOMEWARD BOUND.



64
OUR PIC-NIC.

ah ON a lovely day in September,

when. the green leaves of the
trees were becoming golden, Jane
and her little sister, Dot, and her
brothers, Robert and Willy, got
leave from their mother to go for a
ramble through the forest. Off
they went, as soon as breakfast
was over. Jane carried the basket
which held the sandwiches, a few
apples, and the bottles of milk ; and
Dot took with her her father’s large umbrella, to make a tent
for herself and her newdoll. Of course, kind, brave Fido went
with the children as a protector. He was very useful and
trustworthy. - When they got to the forest, he took charge of
thé basket of provisions while the children went to search for
blackbérries and wood-nuts.

What pretty sights they saw! Up froma pond under the

shade of the trees, rose a dragon-fly with its glittering body
and its four wings, finer than the finest gauze. Bobby was
_ much interested in a stag-beetle with its crooked horns, which
-he saw walking down the path. From the shade of the ferns
a pheasant popped out its beautiful head, decked in blue and
purple, green and brown. A thrush was seen by Jane, hunting
for snails. Some rabbits were searching for tender grasses
and other nice things to eat; anda pair of hedgehogs were
giving their babies an airing in the sunshine. When the
children were tired, they returned to Fido, and then all sat
down together in a sunny corner of the wood, and held their
pic-nic.

















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THE PICNIC IN THE WOODS.





66
THE TOP-SPINNERS.

Wee more delightful game ‘can

boys play at after school hours
than “peg top?” George and Arthur,
James and Henry, had taken their tops
with them to school, and sometimes



=> the pockets in which the tops were con-
cealed.. All of the boys owned good
tops, of which they were very proud ;

- some . of these were made of boxwood, with bright steel pegs,
and coloured circles round them.

After school they met in the playground, and laying down
two well-worn wooden tops, they carefully wound up their own
tops, and tried to knock the old ones into a hole between the
stones. ‘ Just listen,” said Arthur, as he took the top up in
his hand while it was spinning, and held it to George’s ear,
“how finely mine hums!” Arthur then hit the old tops with
his, and sent one near the hole. George managed with a well-
directed shot to knock it a little nearer, and James with a tap
put it in.

In China mez amuse themselves with huge tops made
out of empty barrels. These tops need three men to spin
them, one to hold the barrel upright, and two to pull the
string which sets it in motion. When spinning, the top sounds
like the whistle of a steamer, and it can be heard many yards
away. I fancy I can hear the Chinese top-spinner saying,
“ How finely it hums!”



















































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**HOW FINELY MINE HUMS.



68°

A DAY IN THE HAYFIELD.

THERE are I suppose few boys
and girls who do not love to be |
in a hayfield. It is a delightful
place. How pleasant it is to watch
; the mowers! There they goin along
row, moving up and down the field
_ as they cut the grass. And some-
* times they stop to sharpen their
BB: —— scythes, when the sound fills the

~ meadows with pleasant music,

Such were the sights and sounds which greeted the
children at Kirby Cross last hay season. The sun had been
shining in all its glory from early morning. It had peeped
into the children’s window, and caused first one eye to open,
and then the other. Their ears then caught the sound of the
men sharpening their scythes, and out of bed they jumped
anxious to help at hay-making.

Farmer Brown did not mind how many children came to
see him at hay time. “There is something for little hands to
do,” said he, “as well as for big boys and girls. All must be
‘busy bees’ here to-day; no drones are wanted.”

Fred and Susan, Kate and Harry, were each provided with
a wooden rake, with which to turn the grass over, so that all
parts might be exposed to the sun.

They all worked well, and their faces got red and their
arms brown with the heat. When tired they sat down to rest,
but Fred could not sit still long, and tried to bury his sister
Susan in the hay, and Kate did the same to her brother Harry.
And Milly and Baby enjoyed the play as much as anyone.













































































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MILLY AND BABY IN THE HAY-FIELD.



——S>



9S
A SIEK DOLL.

a 7? HREE happy children were Ethel, Dora, and
9 § Alfred Gray. Alfred was a bright, cheerful boy,
fond of pranks, but never of that kind which
S| caused more pain than pleasure to those about
wy e GC “him. And Ethel and Dora loved their only
| C “eC of brother too dearly to complain when he joined
ge ‘Awe in their games, even if at times he was a little
y= (7 rough and noisy. Ethel. had a doll, in whose
ti“ company all her quiet moments were spent. It
| ‘y _ was undressed and put to bed every night, and
; f in the morning it was washed and dressed, and
if possible, taken for a ride in its perambulator.:
oN One day Ethel thought that her doll did not
- \ #~ look well, so she took it in her arms and pre-
Y tended to send it to sleep. Harry was in the
room, and he made a squeaking noise with his
mouth as if the doll was in pain. ‘I think I must send for
Grandma Dora,” said Ethel, ‘she is quite as good as any
doctor.” Frank, like a good brother, went at once to Grandma
Dora’s house (the parlour above), and found her seated in her
arm-chair, knitting some stockings. Frank looked very grave ~
when he told her the news, so grandma put down her work at
once, fixed her spectacles firmly on her nose so that she could -
see over them, and went with Frank to see the sick doll.

_ Grandma Dora looked with much concern at ‘Miss Dolly,
and asked Ethel whether she had left the window of its bed-
room open last evening. ‘ Yes,” said Ethel, “I did.” “Ah!
poor thing, it has caught cold, you must give it a warm bath,
then tuck it up in bed, and it will be better in the morning.”









































































































































' DR. GRANDMA.





Jos
THE BAND OF ‘THE RED, WHITE
AND BLUE., :

HERE waves the Flag of England,
i The old “ Red, White and Blue!”
Nii Play up, my gallant drummer,
is . A loud, rat-tat-a-too,
= As we go marching onward
: ; In all our brave array,
On to the field of battle,
To conquer, not to slay.
Look at our Sergeant Maggie,
How boldly she steps out!
Were she to meet.a foeman
She’d send him “right about.”
. And as for Private Johnnie,
Our noble Grenadier,
He’s every inch a soldier—
Don’t talk to Aim of fear.
We're fighting for the children
Who pine in rags for bread ;
‘We're fighting for te pennies
To get them clothed and fed.
We're fighting for the children
Who have no homes like ours,
_ Who never see the sunshine,
And never. smell the flowers.
“ Rat-tat-a-too, rat-tat-a-too,”
All who have pennies, give them, do! —








“\RAT-TAT-A-TOO, RAT-TAT-A-TOO.”

Playtime Pictures.



he
THE MAY QUEEN.

AAR N



HE children in our picture are
scholars in a school in sunny France.
They have chosen one of their number to

have tied two ropes to a little wooden cart,
and placed a seat upon it, and the queen,
having been first crowned with a garland’
of flowers, is now seated in state on the
cart. The boys and girls are taking their
queen home, shouting and singing her praises.

A like custom to this used to prevail in England in olden
times. Lord Tennyson has written a beautiful poe in which
the chosen May Queen says—

“You must wake and call me early,
Call-me early, mother dear.”

_ Perhaps Mary Walden, the queen of the little French school, is
_. thinking of these words, Sheis an English girl, living with



"her widowed mother in the village. Mary attends the school,

for she wishes to perfect herself in the French language, so
that she may be able to help her mother. by becoming a teacher.
All the scholars have learned to love her, and now they are
rewarding her by promising to obey her commands during the
-. coming year. And very gentle those commands will be, for
-- Mary knows it is easier to rule by words than blows.

When they reached Mary's home, Mrs. Walden was at
the door waiting her daughter’s return, so Mary dismissed her _
young subjects with this first command: “To-morrow is a
holiday. You must all meet me here early, and we will spend
‘a happy day in.the woods together.”

be their queen for the year. The boys ©





OUR MAY QUEEN.



76

“ SEE-SAW.”

ES had been a warm day, and the
boys in school were hot and tired.

Their eyes often wandered to the
windows, through which they could
see the trees just waving in the breeze;
they were so eager to feel themselves
at liberty. When the school was
‘dismissed, out ran the boys, and soon
they were. jumping over each other’s backs, playing at cricket,

or running after each other as lively as minnows:in a stream.

_ But four of the boys evidently had some special purpose
in view. They left their’:companions, and crossed the old
wooden bridge without even looking at the fish beneath. Then
they climbed a stile leading to a field covered with long grass,
in which thousands of buttercups and daisies. were growing.
Just. over the field the trunk of an old tree was lying, and a
long plank was close by. ‘‘ There,” said William Ferris, “I
told you we could have a fine see-saw ; here, come and help

me put the plank across the old tree.” Soon he and John
Arnold were seated on the plank, and when. they were balanced

‘ well William went up, shouting—
“Here we go up, up, up,”

while John called out—
“Here we go down, down, down.”

- But the board struck the ground with a bump, and John
in Kis turn went up. Timothy Connell and Eddie Lister soon
had their turn, and while they were see-sawing Farmer Jones
crossed the field ; but seeing that the boys were doing no harm, |
he det them play on, only warning Tim not to fall off the plank.





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“SEE-SAW,”





7
NOAH’S ARS

pm eae Harrison aha
a very pretty box of toys. It
is intended to represent Noah’s Ark:
S\ It contains several wooden figures
f= which were meant by the maker to
<> represent Mr. and Mrs. Noah and
their sons and their wives. But as
all the figures are the same size and
shape, Charley has not yet found out which is Noah or which
is his wife. This, however, does not worry him.. He likes
the figures very much, for they will stand on the table without
trouble ; but when he tries to put the elephants and pigs, lions’
and lambs on their legs, he generally fails. They fall out of
Charley’s fat fingers; or if he succeeds in putting up one, the
other refuses to stand, and knocks its companion down. The
camel and cow, donkey and dormouse often get paired together,
much to the amusement of Charley’s sisters, Bessie and Jenny.
It is not often that they can spare time from their lessons
to play with their brother. When they do so, order is brought
out of confusion, and the animals are arranged in pairs for the
journey properly. They pick up the toys and hand them to
Charley, telling him at the same time what they are called.
Charley has his own names for some of the animals, which’
he much prefers to the more correct ones given by his sisters.
When a duck is handed him he looks up at his sisters, with a
nee look on his round face, and calls out, Quack, quack ;’
“ Mee-ow, mee-ow,” when the cat-comes out. ° On ie
ee Charley puts all his toys away, sighing just a little as he
says, “ Good-bye, till Mondays ae







’S ARK

NOAH



80

TOM’S HOLIDAY.

POM HA HARRIS occupies the posi-
tion of junior clerk in a ware-
S house in a large manufacturing town.
” His parents live in a pretty village
é’ named Riversdale, and so Tom has
to reside with his Uncle and Aunt in
a house not far from his place of
business.
Tom does not fare many oppor-
tunities of seeing the country now that he is at business, and
the anticipation of a holiday to be spent in his little country
village is a very pleasant one. Last year his employers told
‘him he might take a fortnight’s holiday. When he heard this
he could scarcely contain himsélf for joy. What a fine chance
of going home to see his parents it afforded him! So he
wrote to them immediately, asking them to meet him on the
following Saturday at Riversdale Station.

The next four or five days were Jong ones to Tom, but
they passed away at last, and he was soon speeding along to
Riversdale. When he alighted from the train he found quite
a large party of friends waiting to greet him. There were his
mother and sister, his friend George Hurley, and Hector, his
father’s dog.

Now, Tom’s friend George owned a boat, and as he knew
of Tom’s fondness for rowing he asked him to use the boat
whenever he cared to do so. Tom took advantage of this kind
offer, and every day he might have been seen going for a

“spin” up the river. And capital exercise he found it. His
mother declared that she never saw a boy with such an appetite.






























































































































































































































































































































































































































































SH Dy, |

A “SPIN” UP THE RIVER.



82 |

THE HOME CONCERT.

LEASANT and happy children live in
Woodbine Cottage. No black looks
disfigure their smiling faces, no unkind
words are heard to pass their lips. One
day last month our little daughter Ellen
was asked to pay them a visit. “ Weare
going to have a musical evening all by ©
ourselves, Nelly,” said one of the little
girls. ‘We would like you to come, and
- bring some of your dolls with you. We
: like to have plenty of listeners.”

The following is a description of the visit as told by Nelly
on the next day :—‘ When I got there I found Maggie and
Agnes with Reggié in the front room. . There were a number
of dolls seated on the table and on chairs close by. I gave
Maggie’ the dolls I had with me, and one of them was put
right in the centre, as Agnes said it was the queen. There
were several books of music in the room, containing some of
the pretty pieces we sing at school. These were handed round
by Reggie, after which he stood on a stool to act as conductor.
I think we sang nearly every pretty piece in the book, but Reggie
said there were many more which they like. While we were
singing ‘ Suffer little children to come unto Me’ we heard the
garden gate creak, and when Esther looked through the
window she saw poor Tommy Burton, leaning on the gate
listening to us. Reggie took him out a nice piece of cake,
and Tommy thought he was to go away, but Reggie said he
might stay as long as heliked. It was such a happy evening,
_ papa; I do hope they will ask me to go again.”









THE HOME CONCERT.



84
DOLLYS NEW HEAD. >

we

‘ FATHER sat beside the fire,
And, as the news he read,
a Sle heard his children tell a tale
ng About their Dolly's head :—
“ Don't you remember Christmas day,
When Aunt brought Dolly down ? |
8, She said it was the finest doll
She saw in London town!”
‘Ves; Janie, I remember well
When Dolly first came here,
“ And we all kissed her, for she was
A sweet and darling dear.
~ Alas! one day she lost her head,
While romping, I’m afraid ;
But, with our rags and box of paints,
So fine a head we made
That each one wished to have her,
And, one day, after tea,
A quarrel rose, ‘tis sad to say,
“TP wixt Mary Jane and me.
"Twas wrong, I know, but very soon
We made it up again,
And darling Mary Jane kissed me,
And I kissed Mary Jane.”







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PAINTING DOLLY’S FACE,



86
THE YOUNG ARTIST.

OUBTLESS many of my young readers are
_ just as fond of drawing and painting as
Arthur Hamilton was. His first attempt to
. draw a man was very amusing. The head
looked like a triangle with marks for the eyes
and nose, and he left the, poor man without a
mouth. But it pleased him greatly; he thought
it was first-rate, so he tried again.

Arthur was a diligent boy at school as well as at home.
~ He gained several prizes, one of which was a box of paints.
This seemed to give him a new start, and he began to
‘ colour his drawings. He copied a picture out of the
CHILDREN’S FRrEND—the head of a cow. When he tried to
colour it he found that he did not know what colours to use in
order to make his picture look natural.. So he went into the
fields and noted the colours just as they appeared on the living
animal. Then he returned home, and using the knowledge
thus gained, coloured his drawing in good style.

~ His success in this effort made him desirous of leaning
how to paint a real picture, and he hopes by diligence and
perseverance to make for himself a good name.

When Benjamin West, the celebrated painter, was a boy,
he was on one occasion asked by his mother to watch his little
sister, who was asleep in the cradle. While he was watching
her he drew a picture of the sleeping babe, which he showed
to his mother. She saw that it was well done, and gave him
_akiss and praised him for his drawing.

In after life eoaigmin West used to say, ‘‘ That kiss made
me an artist.”



















































THE YOUNG ARTIST.







































































































































































































88

-~PLAYING AT SCHOOL.

“EF! us play at school, Mary,” said Flossie

Ingham to her sister. ‘‘ You must be our
teacher, and we will be your scholars.” It did not
take Mary very long to prepare herself for her new
position. First she tied over her bright curls a
white night-cap, put on her nose a large pair of
spectacles, which, as they happened to be without
glasses, she could see through very well, then took
a pretty picture book in one hand and a long cane |
in the other, and. called her brother Benny before
her for the first lesson. Now, Benny was very backward at
school, and he often made sad mistakes there, and was in
constant disgrace with the schoolmistress. ‘‘ How many are
twice four,” said Mary. Benny put ona very puzzled look,
_ but did not answer. When the question was repeated he bent
down his head and said,. “‘ Please teacher I have not learned
that yet.” ‘Oh, dear,” said teacher Mary, ‘I must make an
example of you ; put on the Dunce’s cap and stand on the
chair till I call you.” Benny knew it was only play, and he at
once obeyed. ae
“Now, Flossie, it is your turn. Can you spell work?”
“Ves teacher, W-O-R-K.” “That's right. Now go and
help mother, while I hear Amy.” Amy was always studying
when she had time, so she was able to answer all questions
without mistakes. ‘‘ Please teacher,” said Amy, “if you will
forgive Benny now I will teach him the multiplication table.”
Benny. was called down from the chair, the Dunce’s cap was
taken off, and in a short time Amy and he were heard singing
“‘twice one are two, twice two are four.”







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Playtime Pictures. :



90

LONELY MILLIE.

Ee an old-fashioned village, many miles away
from London, lives Millie Davis. Her
’ father is the gardener at the nobleman’s house
| there, and Millie lives with her parents and
David her brother in a pretty lodge just by the
en park gates. David and Millie are companions.
eT a -” David is-only two years older than his sister,
: oe but he acts as her protector as. well as her
playmate. He is always with her whether at school or play,
taking care that she does not come to any harm.
To-day Millie’s companion is very ill, and the doctor has
_ been to see him. Millie would like to be near David; even if
she had to keep her little tongue quite still all day long, which
_ would be a very difficult task indeed, for she is always talking
_ about-something.. But her mother sent her into the garden to
play alone. -
Millie tried hard to play, but she was too dull to do so.
She brought out of the house David's cart and drum, one end
of which is broken. She placed her doll in the broken end,
and walked up and down pulling the cart along, but all the
_ pleasure has gone now David cannot play. She gently pulled
the cart on towards the house. Seeing her mother at thedoor ~*
she ran up to her and said, “I cannot play alone, mother dear,
do ask the doctor to make David well.” “My dear Millie,”
replied Mrs. Davis, “it is God alone that can make David
well.” When Millie went to bed she remembered her mother’s
words, and prayed earnestly that David might get well. “God
_ bless my dear brother and make him well, so that he can play
with me again,” was her prayer: — -







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“THE PLAYMATES.

WHo guards the farm-
house night and day ?

“T do!” says true and
trusty Tray.

Who is it. that loves ‘Tray
so well ? ;

tis Lt” says darling little Nell.

There sit the two-in an old barrel! |



They never. sulk and never quarrel.
Yet, why should Nell be sitting there,
, When all around is fine and fair ?
. This is the reason: look at Tray! !
“You see, he is on guard to-day,
And as he cannot now get out
‘With his dear friend to roam about,
She comes-to him, and sits and talks’
About their long and pleasant walks ;
And Tray will-smile as if to say,
“T thank you for your call to-day !”



NELLY AND DOG TRAY.





94
THE BOYS OF DITTON, —

. GROUP of boys were talking at the corner ofa
street in the little town of Ditton. The subject
of conversation was evidently one of a serious
character, judging by their countenances. One of
the taller of the. lads—Stanley Winton by name—
was speaking:

‘Now, boys, I think it would be very cowardly
to take advantage of our master’s absence by stay-
ing away from school ; and you know how he would

punish such a mean trick. I propose we go to school as usual.

‘The subject was argued for some time longer ; but eventu-
ally the advice of the elder lad was taken, and the boys moved
in a body towards the school and trooped in, They were
‘surprised, however, to see the schoolmaster there before them.
Why had ‘he not gone to keep his appointment in London?
‘Seeing their surprise he said, “ You no doubt wonder why I
‘am in school this afternoon, boys, but the gentleman whom I
was to visit has just arrived here, and as I hae some business.
to do with him this afternoon, I shall dismiss the school at
three o'clock.”

“When the boys were again out of school, four of their
‘number walked down the street, on their way to the fields,
where they meant to spend the remainder of the afternoon.

‘Tt am very glad we took Stanley’s advice and went in to
school,” said one. ‘We have got the holiday as it happens,
and are likely to enjoy it much better than if we played the
truant.” And to this they all agreed.

Very quickly they reached the fields, and were soon playing
leap-frog, shouting and laughing as only healthy boys can.
Evidently they are thorenenb, enjoying themselves.







rl
“ THEY WERE SOON PLAYING LEAP-FROG,”







THE HOBBY HORSE.



WE are off for a canter on Carpet Down, .

Past Coalbox Castle and Sideboard Town,
Round Hearthrug Corner and Armchair Place,
Then home to the stable at galloping pace.

My horse is a beauty, he goes so fast,

That tables and chairs seem flying past,

He never wants whipping, he never kicks,
And he knows me too well to play any tricks.

Gee up! Ho! ho! We're off and away,
He's really so frisky I dare not stay,
But I shan’t tumble off, no, no, not I ;

You'll see us come galloping home bysanid: -by.
From Hobby Florse. By L. Hasxett.



f

:

——— wy

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PLAYTIME PICTURES AND STORIES.






































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































“ BUILDING

























































































































































































CAMPS AND CASTLES.”








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PICTURES
s° STORIE

! LONDON :
S. W. PARTRIDGE & CO.,

‘ BY
UNCLE HARRY,

Author of “ Holiday Hours in Animal-Lana.”

PATERNOSTER ROW.

9






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Printed by HazELL, WaTson; & Viney, Ld., London and Aylesbury,
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CONTENTS:

PLAYTIME . :
Our First Grice Marcu A ‘
BaATTLEDORE AND SHUTTLECOCK .
Tup Donkey Race % 5 :
Tue Younc BUILDERS . 5 ;
A Musicat Eveninc , i

Biinp Man’s Burr : j

Wirtiam GLADSTONE AT MARBLES
Frank and His WHISTLE .

Tue Battle. 3 ei : -
Jacr’s Boat. : Ree eee eee
Our Four-in-HanpD .... Z

Buitpinc Houses. 3 : 5
Harr Hotipays . BES cy :
Artuur’s New Kite . ... ;

Syuapows ON THE WALL : :
Tue Five FISHERS : : a
Tue Race . : - e
Tue Boat BUILDER $ ae he
A Funny REGIMENT

PAGE
vi Contents.



f PAGE
THE Swine . : : : ; ; ; ‘ : : ; : . 46
THE Younc PoLicEMEN ‘ . j : : : : : . . 48
Goinc A-WHALING . : : : : : ; : ; : . 50
Tue Tennis PLAYERS .. : : : : : : : ; : . 52
Tue Paper CHASE : . : : , : : : : ‘ . 54
Franx’s New Horse . : : . : . : : : : . 56
THE Bic SNOWBALL. ‘ : : ‘ : . : : : . 58
Tue SLIDE . : : . ; . ’ ee : ; we, 60
Driving Home . ; . : : ; , : : . : . 62
Our Picnic . : ; : ; : : ee : . . 64
THE Top SPINNERS : ; . ‘ : ‘ j ‘ . : . 66
A Day In THE HayrFiELD. oe. : : . . : : . 68
A Sick Dott 2 . : . ; : : “ : ‘ , £70
Tue Banp or THE Rep, WHITE aNnD BLUE . . j ; : : eeZ2
Tue May QuEEN. . ; : : ; : . . : : oT".
“SEE-Saw” . : ; : . ; : ; : : . : . 76.
Noau’s Ark. : . ‘ : . ; . ; ; : . . 78
Tom’s Hotray . : j : . ‘ . : : : ; . 80
Tue Home Concert . : : . . : ‘ : : : 82
Dotiy’s New Heap. : . : . ; : : : : . 84
THe Younc ARTIST. : : : : 3 : : : ; . 86
PLAYING AT SCHOOL . ; ; . : . ‘ . . : . 88
Lonety Mituiz : oe . : : : : : . - go
Tue PLayMaTES . : : . : ae . : : : - 92
Tue Boys or Dirron . : . . . . . ‘ : . - 94
THe Hoppy Horse . : ‘ : . : ‘ : : : - 96




EdScannell = <~s een pe a

PLAYTIME.

no

pie iMeE. What pleasant thoughts the word calls to

our mind! Playtime by the sea—digging on the sands,’
rowing round the harbour, or watching the passing ships
through that big telescope which old Jack the coastguardsman
carries under his arm. Playtime in the country—gathering
wild flowers and fruit, listening to the birds singing so merrily,
or, after climbing those great hills, resting in the shade of the
trees, while some of our elder brothers and sisters are searching
for curious insects to add to their collections. Playtime after
school—when lessons being over for the day we run away to
the field, glad of the.fresh air and bright sunshine. Or play-
time at home—like little Will Robinson in our picture, who
is pretending to be Robinson Crusoe on the desert island,
waiting for man Friday to appear.




8
OUR FIRST CRICKET MATCH.

~

My Dear UNCLE,—

Knowing how glad you are to hear
what Tom and I are doing at School, I send
you a short account of our first cricket match
ee this season. Most ofthe boys in our school
({---t2>--- -- are very young so'we do not like to play
oe 7 apainet other schools near, where the boys

are older. Achallenge reached us from the
Manor House School, and Tom, our Captain, accepted it, and
we prepared for the match. Tom made us practise every
evening, and when the day came we all felt ready. We had
to go in first, and two wickets fell without a run. Then Tom
took the bat; at first he played very carefully, only getting
one run at a time, then he made a big hit right over the fence.
~ You should have heard how we cheered him. He kept in till
the last, and made thirty-five runs. We were all out for
seventy-five. Ionly made two, but Tom says I shall do better
soon. The Manor House boys made ninety, and so beat us by
fifteen runs. Weare pleased with our captain, and he says
we worked well.

The photograph, from which the picture is made, was
taken by ourteacher. That is Tom at the wicket, looking just
as he did on the day of the match; and the boy behind is
Bertie Graham, our wicket-keeper. Henever flinches, however
hard the ball comes in, and very few balls go by him. I have
sent a picture on to mamma, and she has written to say she
is much pleased with it.

With love to Auntie, I remain, Dear Uncle,

Your affectionate nephew, JOHN.












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Playtime Pictures. B..
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-BATTLEDORE AND SHUTTLECOCK.





* ALLY BROWN had been away at school
si) for several months, and now she is at home
for the summer holidays. She is a bright,

happy girl, always ready to help her school-
. fellows, either.in their lessons or at play.. No matter
vice. how dull the weather is, Sally is always cheerful, for
she can find many ways to fill up the time, both indoors and
out. Her mamma calls her Sally Sunbeam. She is often

_ heard to say how much she misses her little daughter's bright
‘smile and cheerful ways when Sally is away at school.

Knowing that it would please her daughter, Mrs. Brown
invited little Mary Bates, one of Sally’s cousins, to spend.a
few weeks in the pretty country house in which they dwell.
Mary had been very ill, and her parents were glad to send her
away from the crowded town where they liye to kind Mrs.
Brown’s country home: = |

Yesterday Sally took Mary round the garden, and told
her the names of all the flowers, and helped her to pick a pretty
nosegay for her aunt. Then they wandered to the farm to get
some fresh milk. Mary was afraid to pass the big dog, but.
Sally and he were old friends, so she made him put his Dae
into Mary’s hand in token of friendship.

This morning Sally showed her cousin how to play at
battledore and shuttlecock. Mary looked on.with wondering
eyes, while her cousin kept the shuttlecock from falling to the
ground. ~ Sally beat it up into the air fifty times, and then the
wind caught the feathers and blew it out of reach. To-morrow
a new battledore is to be bought for Mary, and the two chil- ,
dren will play at beating the shuttlecock from one to the other.


TWENTY-ONE, TWENTY-TWO !”
[2

THE DONKEY RACE.

()* a fine summer day last year, the
. children of our Band of Hope were
g: taken for a trip to Epsom Downs. When
ee’ they arrived on the downs the sun was
ae shining brightly, the birds were singing,
e3 and the merry voices of other children, who
were already there, made the little ones think it was just the
place in which to spend a happy day. After dinner, Harry
Wilson and his three friends agreed: to have a donkey race.
They were all kind-hearted boys, SO. they’ told the donkey-
drivers that they would not. allow them to run after the
donkeys and beat them with sticks; they would rather not go
at all than that this’should be done. At first the donkey-
drivers would not let the donkeys go out alone with the boys,
but Harry and his friends were firm in their. determination,
and so the drivers had to give way.

| First the donkeys were got into line, ad then the signal
was given to start, but the donkeys would not go. They
threw up their heels, and off fell severai of the boys. At’ last
the donkeys started, Harry's taking the’ lead ; but his hat blew
away, and he had to wait until his: brother. picked itup. Poor -
Charley was not used to donkey riding, and he felt afraid
when his donkey. galloped, so he put his arms round its neck
and clung there just like Johnny. Gilpin did when he took his
famous ride to Edmonton. One.of the boys had to get down
and lead his donkey, as it would not go with him upon its
back. Still, it was great fun, and the boys said they liked it
much better as it was, than they would have'done had the
donkey-drivers run behind to beat the’ pope's dumb’ animals.




















































































ON THE DOWNS.
qo

THE YOUNG BUILDERS.




ot “BOYS and girls, come,
a 4 : haste away !
aie ——_ The tide is low on the sands
-—~ to-day. 7
oe Come for a sail, or come and
ee ade 7 :

AL =~. But we'll be busy with pail and
6 spade.

PAu 2 At once to work let us all begin
Before the tide shall come flowing in.
We have not a single: minute to waste,
Wel: build our best though we build in haste ;
And'‘wide and high our walls shall be
To-stand the siege of the rushing sea.”
Busily toiled these children, and well,
Building more castles than I can tell ;
Piers and bridges, and harbours, too. _
But the tide came up, and the fresh wind blew :
One minute the buildings stood firm and fair,
And the next, they vanished ; please tell me

Where ?




My Ah


16

Ae MUSICAL EVENING.

* NOW'S the « OW’S the time for a game at drum-
and-fife band,” said Willy Austin, to
his brothers. ‘‘ Mother and father have gone
for a walk, and they will not mind us making
‘Yas much noise as we like, if we do no harm.
<>] I will be bandmaster, Tom shall play the
: fife, aad George the drum.” ;
Neither of these musical instruments |
were in the house, so the boys looked about to find things
that would suit their purpose. Tom found an old water-can -
with a hole in the’ bottom, which the bandmaster said would
act asa finger key. George brought a saucepan, but Willy
knew. his mother would not like that played with, so two old
iron lids were found, which when banged together, made a ©
grand noise. Willy had the micutstand’ but he called it a.
triangle ; and a small poker with which to beat time. ‘“ Now |
what shall we play?” said the bandmaster. George proposed
“Rule Britannia!” as his drum would be wanted in the loud -
parts. _Tommy thought “ Home, Sweet Héme” was better,
but Willy preferred ‘ "God Save the Queen.”

The bandmaster gave four flourishes with the poker, and
the concert dirmenced. . The fife was a little out of tune, as
Tom could not make the key act. The drum did not sound
quite so well as that used in the band which passed the house
last week, but it pleased George. The triangle was very nice,
for Willy loved music, and was learning at school to sing by
notes. After they had played all the tunes they knew, their
parents returned, and came into the room just as the boys

were finishing ‘‘ Welcome, ever Welcome, Friends.”




























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































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YOUNG MUSICIANS?
18

BLIND MAN’S BUFF.

NEN Hetty Bowen was ten years old,
her parents gave a birthday party to a
SE" _| number of her little friends. For nearly a
|. week Hetty and her mother were busy sending
out invitations, decorating the rooms, and in
tt’! seeing that all things were being got ready.
- When the day arrived, the children had a quiet tea, that is,
- aS quiet as twelve merry little children could be. After that
they. all went into the large parlour for the evening’s amuse-
ment. There were plenty of good things on the tables, and,
as it was Christmas time, the room was bright with holly
and mistletoe. First they had singing, then musical chairs,
and next a little girl proposed Blind Man’s Buff. The tables
were put on one side of the room, and a handkerchief was
tied over Hetty’s eyes. Then one of the children put these
questions: ‘‘How many horses has your father got? oo EATee:
“What colour are they?” ‘Black, white, and grey.” After this |
all the children ran to hide themselves, and Hetty was told to
“turn round three times and catch whom you may.” Hetty
caught several of the boys, but they were so much alike in
height that she could not guess their names correctly. Then
Hetty’s playmate, Jennie Summers, was caught. ‘I know
you,” said Hetty. ‘“ Who is it?” ‘My Jennie!” “Then
Jennie had to be blind man, and so the fun went on till the
Christmas tree was brought in, and the toys were distributed.
Many toys were left after the party was over. These were
taken by Hetty on the following day to the Children’s Hospital,
for Mrs. Bowen taught her daughter to think of those who had
not the same pleasures and comforts as she had.


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“PvE GOT you!”


20

WILLIAM GLADSTONE -AT MARBLES.

WG \ AVE a game at marbles, will you, George?” said
Ralph Coleman to his.companion. ‘“ Yes, I will,
Ralph, if you will set me up with two. I have lost
< all mine.” This was done, and the two boys were
soon deeply interested. in their game. Sometimes
George won and sometimes Ralph, but at the end
of the game George had just managed to get suffi-
cient from Ralph to pay back those he had borrowed.
y As they were walking home they met their teacher
"> & and told him what'a fine game at marbles they had
had. ‘I remember,” said their teacher, ‘ reading
a very interesting story of Mr. Gladstone, when
a boy, playing at marbles with the lads in a Scotch village
where he was staying. One day the village boys were playing
at taw, the name given to marbles in Scotland, when a well-
dressed lad came out of a farmhouse near at hand, and asked
whether he might join them ina game. The boys were quite
willing, so they gave him a few marbles to start with, just as
you, Ralph, did to George to-day. The boys, who were good
players, thought they would easily beat Willie Gladstone, and
‘win their marbles back, but they found that he could play —
uncommonly well.. Next day he came again and began to
play, and would soon have won all their marbles, when one of
the boys got cross, and used a bad word. At this William .
Gladstone said, ‘If there is any more of this you will prevent
my having the pleasure of playing with you.. I detest bad
words, and I will not play with boys who use them.’”

This was a good lesson for the boys, and it should be one
for you. Never play with those who use bad words.


























A GAME AT MARBLES.

q \~

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22

FRANK. AND HIS WHISTLE.

a, RANK CLIFFORD is the happy possessor of a
sae new brass whistle. For a long time his only
musical instrument was an old tin one, much
knocked about by constant use. But many a
sweet tune had he played on it, to the delight of
his mother and sister, for Frank can play well.
One day, when passing a music shop, he saw a fine
brass whistle in the window, and having enquired
the price, he determined to save all his pocket-money until
he could afford to buy it. And at last he obtained it. The
first day after he purchased the new whistle he took it with
him to school, and when the lessons were over he, with
several other boys, went into the playground, and to their
delight produced his treasure. Frank played some stirring
tunes, and the boys thought they were soldiers going to battle,
with Frank as their leader. Then he changed the music to |
some of the fine.old hymns they sang each Sunday in church,
and the boys’ warlike thoughts passed away and they became
true-hearted, peaceful English boys once more. But Frank’s
greatest joy was in playing to the loved ones at home. His
mother was always glad to see him return from school, for he
was helpful to her-in so many ways. After he had done all
his mother wished, he asked his sister Nelly to have her tea
‘in the wood-shed while he played his new whistle. Nelly was.
pleased to do so, for she had spent many a happy hour before
in listening to him. Indeed, she thought his. performances
; “just lovely.” Sometimes Nelly sings while Frank accom-.
panies her on the whistle, and their father and mother sit by
listening to them.
























































































































JUST LOVELY.’”

3

“SHE THOUGHT HIS PERFORMANCES
24

Tite. BATE E.



Sie boys at Highfield area
merry lot, full of fun and

frolic. Charley Blake, who is
looked upon as their captain, is
| always ready to lead them in
| their games. It had been snow-
ing very heavily for some days,
when Charley suggested that
they should go and meet the
boys as they left the Grammar
ae School, on the top of the hill,
and have a battle of snowballs. It was a half-holiday in
Charley's School, so they had plenty of time to reach the gates
of the Grammar School, and make up a good supply of
snowballs, before the boys came out. ‘“ Now, boys,” said
Charley, “play fair, do not put any stones in with the snow.
We will give them one volley only, and then allow them time
to make a good supply like we have.” Charley posted him-
self near the gate, in order to give the signal to fire; but
when he saw George Hawkins, who had been very ill during
the summer, leaning on Ernest Kent’s arm, he stepped forward
so that all the boys might see him. Ernest was quite as ready
for fun as Charley and his friends were, so as soon as George
was safely on his way home, the battle commenced. All the
younger boys were ordered to stand behind and make up
snowballs, while the elder ones pelted each other until they
were tired. Dr. Mason, the master of the school, stood by, and
seemed to enjoy the fun almost as muchas the boys. When the
boys left for home, Charley called for three cheers for Dr. Mason.
































WAITING FOR ‘THE











FOE.



Playlime Pictures.
JACK’S BOAT.

- Q)H, brother Jack, how hard



you work
To make our little vessel
: pe Ns: ready ! |
re el ‘“Of course,” said Jack, ‘I wish
A\ i = to see

That she can float quite
straight and steady.

_ She is the best we yet
_ have made,
For she can sail and
cargo carry,
And if by see ace delayed,
We'll know Bs well what makes her tarry.”



| Said Eva, ‘‘ Tom sits over there,

He waits to‘see the launch, and cheer her.
[Il put a tiny doll on board,

And fancy it’s the ‘cox,’ to steer her.

- And Jack, I think we'll take her name
From what we read about in history.”
Said Jack, ‘‘Oh, it shall be the same
As Nelson’s famous ship—the ‘Vzctory.’

”




THE FIRST VOYAGE.

if
23

OUR FOUR-IN-HAND.







MY & HO’S for a good game at Horses?” shouted

‘\ Philip Stevens, as he ran round the playground
AS after school was over. All the boys were ready,
so two teams.were made up, Philip being the
driver of one, and.Samuel Morris of the other.
“Twill drive down Farmer Ashton’s lane, through

road to ‘the school,” said Philip, “and you go the reverse
way and. see who gets home first.” Phil soon fastened on
the reins and started his horses, but they were all young
and frisky and did not pull well together. In fact, several
‘times the new-mown grass in the meadows attracted their
attention, and the driver had hard work to keep them from
staying to eat—no, I mean play with it. Whenever the driver
said, as drivers do, ‘“‘ Steady David, steady boy,” David, one
of the leaders, kicked up his heels and did not pull at all, while
Charley, the other leader, looked round at the driver and
/seemed-to laugh, as much as to say, ‘‘ You are not much of a
_ driver.” Half way over the meadows the other team appeared
‘in sight, and the horses neighed and jumped about all over the
path. Still Philip knew he had four good horses, which if
“properly managed, could run as fast as any other four in the
school, so he did not use a whip, but with kind words got
them well in-hand, and racing down the road in fine style,
‘reached the school door’ nearly two minutes before Samuel’s
‘team came out of Farmer Ashton’s lane. |
_ The drivers agreed to have another run on the next fine
day, when Samuel no 9 doubt will do. his: “best to get his team
“home first.

‘the meadow, over Mount Pleasant, and round the ~












“ GEE-UP.”
ecu 30 Meets
BUILDING TOD PES:
Bare WALLIS has been wery!
ill. Fora long time his mother:
watched — by his bedside almost’
ris, night and day, but at last a change
‘“i-7 came and he began to get better.
Ge” His sister Elsie was not allowed in-
> the sick room, and this pained her .
very much. She dearly loved Bertie,
but many times, before his illness, she had been cross with him
because he interrupted her in her lessons. Her mother often
chided her for being vexed with her little brother, but the
reproof was soon forgotten. Now-God was Speaking to her.
She remembered how on the last day before his illnéss,
.Bertie was in the nursery, and she scolded him because he.
wanted her to join him at play. “Oh, you must play by.
yourself; I have no time,” she had said, and poor Bertie
had run to his mother and cried. But during those sad
days of his illness she prayed that God.would sparé Bertie,
and that she ‘might learn to control her temper, and be kind
and affectionate to him. To-day he has come downstairs
for the first time. There he sits on the floor, trying to build a
Roman Temple with a new box of bricks his father has bought
him. Elsie sits near, ready to help by picking up the blocks
- when they fallout of her brother's reach. She built several
very curious houses in order to please him. Mrs. Wallis sat
by the window watching the two children, and her heart was
made glad when she saw Bertie put his arms round Elsie’s
neck and say, ‘‘ You are a dear sister,” and heard the reply,
“T will try never to get cross with you again.”






BUILDING HOUSES.


32

HALF HOLIDAYS.



LL work and no play makes Jack a ~
dull boy.” So says Mr. Longman,
the schoolmaster, and all his scholars agree
—. With him. Nothing pleases him more
em ,. than to see the children enjoy their play, for
SMU Nl afterwards he expects that they will give
attention to their lessons. Sometimes
Mr. Longman goes out with his scholars, and enters, into all
their games just as if he was a boy once more.

Some of the girls have skipping ropes, or shuttlecock and
battledore, and others play at lawn tennis. The boys amuse
themselves at rounder or. trap and ball. Last week they
had a game at cricket. Mr. Longman was captain on one
side, and Mr. Smallman, the second master, on the other.
The game went on nicely till Tommy Traddles’ dog Pincher
came to the field to search for his young master. The ball was
rolling along when Pincher arrived on the ground. He looked
at it very seriously and
then he jumped after it
and caught it in his
mouth. ‘‘ Good dog,”
said Billy Buttons, “give
it tome.” But Pincher
wagged his tail and 4
looked roguishly at &
Billy Buttons as much
as to say, “It is my
innings now,” and away
he started across the








lx




. 33,

field, with Billy, Tommy, and the two
captains in hot pursuit. Pincher ran
round the field at full speed, and not
one of them could catch him. It was
no use calling out “ Stop thief!” for
no policeman would try to stop
Pincher, so Tommy had to follow
the dog home. The two boys who
were batting took advantage of
Pincher’s . wicked trick to make eight
runs before they were. stopped.

There is no chance for Pincher to play
at cricket now. Every half-holiday
when the school children are playing
in the fields he is fastened in his kennel. He looks very
dejected on those days, and does not seem at all like the dog”
which ran across the cricket field with the ball in his mouth.

But perhaps Pincher hardly deserves his punishment, as he
did not understand the rules of the game.




34
ARTHUR'S NEW KITE.

TILLY,” said Arthur Janes,
“will you come home with
me.and draw some figures on my
new kite? ‘You know I cannot
draw as well as you, and I want
it to look very nice.”
_Arthur had been making a
' kite. He bought some flat cane
and used a long piece for the
centre, then fixed a bow and a
cross piece at the top, and covered
the whole. with strong, white
paper. Next he made paper
tassels for the ends of the bow,
and a long tail. String was
_ fixed near the middle so that the
kite might balance properly. But it looked white and bare, so
Arthur asked his companion to help him to ornament it.
Willy soon drew some pictures on the kite, including a most
-wonderful-looking bird, and Arthur painted them. Soon after,
two other boys came inand helped to finish the kite. “ “There,” |
said Arthur, “is it not a beauty ?”
Mr. Janes was called out of the house to give his opinion.
He thought it was very well made. “But,” said he, “I have
seen many finer kites in China. There they are sometimes:
made the shape of a bird or bat, or even of animals. Itis |
quite usual to see a number of men out in the fields gravely
holding a piece of string in their hands, and if you look up
you will see many strange-shaped kites flying about.”




i

|

|

q 7 |









































“THERE ! ISN'T IT A BEAUTY?”
30 .
SHADOWS ON THE WALL.

aT a one

WISH Edward and Gracie
were home from school. We
do not know what to play at, nurse.”
This was said by Willy Lee,
one wet November afternoon. He
and his brothers and sisters were —
kept indoors because of the rain.
They had played at school until
~ they were tired, then Willy got his
bricks and tried to build a church,
like the picture.on the lid of the
box. He only built a few rows when little Essie knocked them
down. He tried again, and Essie again upset them, so he ©
gave up the attempt. Then they stood at the window and
watched for the return of their elder brother and sister, Edward
and Grace. ‘When they saw them open the garden gate, the
children ran to open the front door before they could knock.
Tea was soon ready, and, after it was cleared away, the
children told Grace what they had been doing during the day.
She praised Willy for amusing his sisters, and promised
that Edward should show them some funny tricks. after the
lamp was lit. Grace lit the lamp. Then Edward clasped
his hands and held them near the wall, and there they saw a
shadow just like a rabbit. It moved its paws and ears, and
when Edward squeaked, Essie thought there was a rabbit in
the room. Then he made a cat which mewed, and a goose
which seemed to say “‘ Quack, quack,” when it opened its mouth.
Then the little ones were sent to bed: and Gracie and Edward
were left to do their lessons.
















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THE RABBIT ON THE WALL. .










38
THE FIVE FISHERS.

NT

eae five boys in our picture are -
sf new friends. They are staying
‘ with their parents at a pretty fishing
= village in the south of England, and
# they have formed a friendship with
m each other. Many a jolly day they
; * have spent together. Sometimes
they have been out with their parents on the water, or they have
rambled along the shore picking up shells and fossils, or
running and shouting as only boys can do. To-day they are
on more serious business. Frank Hamer’s mother has been
speaking of a poor old woman, Mrs. Walton, who is very ill,
and in need of food. Frank is a generous boy; and when his
mother was speaking, he put his hands into his pockets, but
found them empty, all his pocket-money having been spent.
‘Mother,’ said he, “I have no money left, but I should like
to help; may I try to catch some fish and give them to Mrs.
Walton?” ‘Yes, Frank,” replied Mrs. Hamer, “I do not like
‘boys to fish simply for fun, but this is a good purpose, and I
am willing for you to try.” Frank had no trouble in getting
friends to join him. Soon they were seated on the pier,
waiting for a bite. “Look out, Frank,” shouted George
Hunter, “there's a big one, be steady! Here, wait, I’ll put
my hat underit.” It was safely landed, and proved to be a very
fine mackerel. Next they caught a whiting, and by tea-time
they had twenty fish of various sizes. Mrs. Walton was very
grateful to the boys for their kindness, and they felt that the
day had been Dieser spent 2 and that their efforts to do good
had been successful.























- THE FIRST BITE. - pa
i

THE RACE.

eee

LO! boysand girls. Ho!
haste away,
The race is coming off to-day.
Franky and Freddy, Jim and
Joe,
Are standing ready in a row.

They are the horses strong
as and fleet ; -
-ye~ And they will gallop down




i the street,
S— - Along the shore, across the
sands
So - To where the tall, black
20 Pe 5 beacon stands.

Who is this, sitting by the way?
“Tis Willie and his sister, May.
Poor thing, she is not well, and he
Has carried her a mile to see

The race, because he thinks that it
May cheer his sister up a bit.
The race is started! Off they go!
Hurrah for Jim! Hurrah for Joe!
Franky and Freddy keep the pace :

The steadiest runner wins the race.






“ THE RACE IS STARTED!”
Playtime Pictures.
42
THE BOAT BUILDER.

TT was was a good day for Arthur
Stanley when his father gave
him a box of tools. Arthur was fond
of making toys for his younger
brother, Ronald, even when the only
tool he had was his pocket knife, one
blade of which was broken. Ronald
had long wished to have a boat, just
= like one he often saw sailing on the
pond: in oat af ‘hele home, and Arthur promised to make.
one. He did not succeed at first, but after several failures he
_ managed to cut a well-shaped boat out of an old log of wood.
He then made the masts, and Mary, his sister, sewed the sails
and made a pretty blue-and-white. flag to fly at the peak.
Arthur first tested the boat’s floating power in a large tub of
water, and he found it very steady.

On the great day of the launch, George Quick came with
his dog Rose to help at the ceremony. Ronald launched the
boat into the pond, saying, ‘“‘ Your name shall be the Sz/ver
_ Cloud.” It sailed along quite steadily, but just in the middle
of the pond there -grew a lot of weeds ;.and-the wind carried
the boat into their midst, and_ there it remained fast. The
boys feared that the Si/ver Cloud would be lost on its first
voyage. But George’s dog was watching the boat, and when
the dog saw that the boys could not get the boat, it jumped
into the water and brought it safely ashore.

Arthur is now the head of a shipbuilder’s yard. His early
training in the use of tools became of great value to him -
when he made his first start in business life.
































































































































































































































































THE LAUNCH OF THE “SILVER CLOUD.”
44
A. FUNNY REGIMENT.

To is not v is. not very easy to eal at soldiers
when you areas short of menas Tom
Tomkins was. But Tom was not easily
discouraged. He lived in a lonely part
of the country, far away from other houses,
y so he and his brother James had to make
all the fun for themselves. Tom had been
to the nearest town and had seen a number of soldiers, drawn
up in line, being drilled by an officer. When he returned home
_ he determined to form a regiment, and be its captain. ‘“ Now,
James, you must be the bugler and flag-bearer, and we will
march round the house and get our soldiers together.” So
away they went, James blowing a penny trumpet, and waving
an oid red handkerchief tied to a long stick. But no recruits
came, so Fido the dog was enlisted, and made to follow the
flag. This was easily done, as Fido was usually to be found
____ following one of the two boys. Puss was tried, but she-ob-
_— jected. Then James got his old wooden horse, and it followed
‘in the rear by means of a piece of string attached to its head.
Then all marched into the drill ground, and Tom put his
soldiers through their drill. ‘‘ Now! attention!” Fido took
no notice of this order, except to wag his tail. ‘‘ Stand straight!”
was the next command, and Fido rose upon his hind legs and
looked at his young master. “Eyes right! Now, Master
; Bugler, your eyes are wrong. March!” and away they went
‘round the house, with trumpet blowing, flag waving, Fido
{benny and Tom singing a merry tune. They marched so
_ well that Captain *Fom promised to take them out again
another day.



%




































“EYES RIGHT!”
46
THE SWING.

Ne CURTIS had a pleasant surprise
to-day. It is her rule every bright.
morning to wander in the wood at the back
of the house, and gather a few wild flowers
or leaves to put on the table. As she entered
the wood this morning, she saw a large swing
hanging from the old oak tree. It was not
there yesterday, she was certain. ‘ Perhaps.
» papa has -had it put up for me,” she said to
herself. She ran back to the house, forgetting
her usual floral tribute, and met her father in
the garden. ‘Oh, papa,” said she, “there
is such a beautiful swing in the wood. Did
you have it put up for me?” “Yes, my
dear, I did, and I hope you will have pleasant swings on it,
only do not try to,swing too high. Your Cousin Ernest i iS
coming to-day, and he will take care of you. No doubt you
will enjoy his company.” :
When Ernest came the two children went out to try the
_ swing. Nelly got on first, and her cousin pushed her gently.
“T do like this, Ernest,” said Nelly; ‘don’t you think my
papa is very kind to have the swing put up forme? And Iam
so glad you came to-day, for you know I could not swing
myself well.” Ernest then had a swing, but as he was astrong
boy he did not want anyone to push him. Many times after
this Nelly had a swing in the early morning; but she never
_ Stayed too long, as she knew her mamma would miss the nice



fresh flowers it was her custom to take indoors to decorate. the

table with.






Z é

NELLY’S FIRST SWING,
48
THE YOUNG POLICEMEN.

DOs vw

OW! you are police con-
stable number one, and I
ay =©60 am «sergeant number two,” said
) Teddy to Duncan. The boys had
’ dressed themselves so as to look as
much like policemen as: possible.
They had put on their overcoats,
and buttoned them up to the throat.
The leathern straps which they used
to carry their books to school made fine belts, and they begged
‘from the gardener some old leathern gloves to stick under the
belts. ‘We will use our hoop sticks as truncheons, and
perhaps mamma will let us have two old hats of papa’s, and
then we shall be complete,” said Ted. ‘Oh, no, sergeant,”
said number one, “‘ when on duty we must wear a badge round
our sleeve.” ‘Ah, I forgot that, our handkerchiefs must do.
Iwill tie your badge on, and you must commence duty at once.
If you need any help, blow your whistle, and I will come to-you.”
Number one marched away, looking very important.
First he went into the garden and found everything quiet.
Then he peeped into the coal hole, but no suspicious persons
were there. As he passed the kitchen door he noticed a very
nice smell, so he entered and asked the cook whether she
needed any help. Cook was much amused, and rewarded him.
with.a tart. ‘ My sergeant said I was to whistle if I needed
help. I must do so‘at once.” The sergeant quickly came, .
and gave efficient aid in disposing of the troublesome tarts.
_ Both constable and sergeant told the cook they would be
on duty the next day, and would see that she was protected.






































































































































































































































THE ‘‘ SPECIALS.”


50,

GOING A-WHALING.,



AWAY we went a-whaling,
A-sailing on the sea ;

Tom, Johnny, and Jemima,

And they of course made three.




‘he Sam and Sue, and they made two,
And three and two are five ;

And Johnny took the kitchen tongs
To catch the whale alive.

And Harry was the north-east wind,
And he blew strong and fast

Against our sail—a handkerchief ;
A broomstick was our mast.

Said Tom, “ Well catch him by the nose,”
Said Johnny, “ By the tail,”

And Sam said, ‘“‘ By the middle fin,
That’s how to catch a whale.”

“Tl put him in a pail,” said Sue,
“* And take him home to mother ;’

Jemima said, “ I’ve brought a jug,
In case we catch another.”

And so we went a-whaling,
But no whale could we see—

_We turned the good ship round about,
And home again sailed we. |


-WHALING.

GOING A
52
THE TENNIS PLAYERS.

{} ERE, Joe,” said Willy Brown, “are you ready’
for some fun?” “Yes, Willy, what is it?”
AX “Why, the ladies and gentlemen who were
: ie playing at lawn tennis just-now have gone into
I\\/_ the house and left their bats and balls on the grass.
' “f Suppose we have a game, eh?” “All right,” re- _
plied Willy, ‘I don’t mind.”

Willy was the elder, and he should have
known it was not right to touch things that did
4, 7 \ not belong to him; but they were poor boys who

o ge had not received the home training that my
young readers have had.

The boys had been lying on the grass, looking at the
ladies and gentlemen playing, and had heard the various names
called as the ball was struck, or the games were won. Joe
started their game with a vigorous blow at the ball, which
Willy just managed to stop, and with equal vigour he returned
it to his companion. They were so busy that they did not
notice the return of the proper players, until a lady laid her
hand on Joe’s shoulder and said, ‘“‘ What are you doing, my
boy?” Joe looked up very bashfully, and recognised the lady
as one who taught. in the ragged school which he sometimes
attended. “I’m very sorry, ma’am, if I’ve done wrong; I did
not think of it,” said Joe, very quietly. “It is wrong,” said
the lady, ‘“‘to touch things like these without permission, but
we do not blame you this time. I see you enjoyed the fun.
Will you and your companion stay and look after lost balls?”
The boys gladly consented to do this, and were pleased when
they had plenty of work to do in seeking for stray balls.














































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































IM

“JOE STARTED THEIR GAME WITH A VIGOROUS BLOW.”

: . ue


54

THE PAPER-CHASE.

. E have had such a glorious run .

this afternoon,” said Harold
Denham to his sister Jane, as he entered
_ the house, his cheeks flushed and his
- eyes sparkling. ‘Stephen and I were
’ the hares. Stephen knows his way all
- over the place, and he is one of our
> best runners. We hada good supply
of paper in the bags you made for me,
and we started five minutes.before the hounds. We went
down Crocket’s Lane, through the wood to Broadmoor, over
the old bridge, and then up the hill for home. Just as we
reached the other side of the wood we saw two of the hounds
coming straight down the path. We both ran back again into
the wood, of course leaving plenty of paper so that the hounds
could follow the scent ; then back again out of the wood to the
old bridge before the hounds had found out the trick, There
was a strong wind blowing, which sent our papers in all direc-
tions, and we were afterwards told by the hounds that they
often lost our trail. You know, Jane, that many picnic parties
are held there, and I suppose the paper left by them confused
our pursuers. After reaching the top of the hill, Stephen and
I sat down to rest; we, did not wish to get too far ahead of
the hounds. We got to the goal three minutes before the first
hound crossed. the stile opposite the winning-post. All the
boys were very pleased with the run. They would like to have
caught us, but Stephen and I prefer it as it is.. The boys
promise that we shall be the hares again, and they intend to
have a good try to bring us home in triumph.”


CHASE

4
=
Ay
<<
Ay
2
q
a


56
- FRANK’S NEW. HORSE.

nw



Y AST week a large box was delivered at Sunshine
( Villa, addressed to Master Frank Trueman,
Sunshine Villa, Homepeace Road. It was so

large that it had to stand in the garden until Mr.

Trueman came home from business. The children

waited anxiously for their father to arrive, as they

- were impatient to know what the box contained.

As soon as possiblé, Mr. Trueman opened it;

when first there appeared the head, and then the

body of a grand-looking horse. It was not alive,
but when it was put upon the ground, it was seen
that it could gallop almost as well as a live horse,
for it was fixed to a long wooden rocker. Mr.

Trueman carried the horse to its stable—the

nursery—and the children followed it. Then he

took from his pocket a:letter- which he read aloud :

» “ My Dear Brotuer,—I send a rocking-horse addressed

to Nephew Frank. I know that he shares all his toys with his

brother and sister, so that what is given to him will be equally
shared by them. Your Affectionate Brother, FRANK.”

Mr. Trueman then placed Frank on the horse’s back, and
left the children to enjoy their new treasure. The horse
_ plunged and kicked much to the delight of the boys, and the
astonishment of Lottie. She thought her dear donkey, which
only nodded its head as it travelled along, was much better
than this great “ gee-gee.” When Frank had enjoyed a good
tide, Walter mounted upon. its back, and raced along ina
most exciting way. Then they asked papa to write and thank
uncle for his beautiful present.


i

lie
Cu



.THE FIRST GALLOP. ee Ree S, :
Playtime Pictures. : E
THE BIG SNOWBALL.

URRAH for the snow!
- Here’s a glorious treat,”
cried little Jack Brown. ‘‘Come
along Polly and Bertie, we will
make such a big snowball.”
The little ones ran down the
garden path, their ears tingling
_f and cheeks glowing, ready to
\ join in the fun. Little by little
the ball grew in size until it was
almost as tall as the children,
and aule as heavy. Puffing and blowing they rolled it along
until they could get it no further, when, just at the right
moment, their big brother, Robert, came home and helped them
to roll it near the garden door. Then taking Polly in his arms,
Robert led the way indoors to ‘‘ thaw Polly’s red nose,” as he
said; and the boys quickly followed. ‘‘ Well, Bertie,” said
Robert, “ how do you like making big snowballs, eh?” ‘Oh!
it is fun,” replied Bertie; ‘it is hard work, though, but it
mcs you feel so warm.” ‘Yes it does,” chimed in Jack,
“and hungry, too.”
After tea they went out again to look at Robert making
a snow man. It was a very funny figure, with pieces of coal
where its eyes and nose should have been. Onits head Robert
put an old hat of Bertie’s, which had a large hole in the top,
through which the snow peeped. Robert said this would keep
its head cool.* When going to bed, Polly whispered to her
mother, “I think, dear mainma, ae God sent the snow to-
day to make us happy.”




\\

AK

\\

























“PUFFING AND BLOWING THEY ROLLED IT ALONG.”
60

THE ‘SLIDE.

“Hip, hip, hooray!
The ice will stand
Our weight to-day,
My merry band.” .

Ep LBSE words were sung to a tune of his own,

by “laughing: John Layton,” as he was
called by his schoolmates, as he and three other
boys ran down the Jane to the old mill pond, one cold winter
day. The boys had been warned by their schoolmaster not to
venture on the ice until it was strong enough to bear them
with safety, but to-day permission had been given, and the
boys quickly took advantage of it. They soon reached the
pond, John being the first to start sliding. ‘ Hip, hip,
hooray!” he shouted, as one after the other they went down
one long slide and up another, made by its side, so as to lose
no time. George Fielder was second, Charley Ray third, and
Willy Cotton brought up the rear. Charley was a big boy,
not used to sliding, and he felt rather timid. Once he just
touched George’s heels and over went the two boys in the snow,
and Willy Cotton fell on top of them. No harm was done
~ except that each boy got a lot of snow in his ears and down
his collar. Laughing John helped them up, brushed them
well, and away they went down the slide, one behind the
other, as happy as before.

The little girl and the young sailor boy who are looking on
are learning to skate. The sailor you see belongs to the good
ship &xotic, which means “of foreign origin.” . His skates
are quite foreign to him, but he intends to conquer that diffi-
culty, and will soon venture to race his sister across the ice.









































































































































































































































































































62°

DRIVING HOME.
A oer the meadows! away and
away! —
When all things are beatiful,
blithe, and gay ;
Oh! isn’t it nice !” to his sister
said Will, |
As they sat, side by side, on the
slope of the hill.
She had wandered on by down and
dell,

To gather the flowers she loved so well ;



6



Now, wearied and worn, had come to rest,
Her arm around him she loved the best.
Father and mother both were dead.

She sweetly smiled, and to Will she said,
“ Across the meadows we two may roam,
But we have no carriage to drive us home !
So tie your reins to the broom or sloe,

And off at a merry pace we'll go!”






HOMEWARD BOUND.
64
OUR PIC-NIC.

ah ON a lovely day in September,

when. the green leaves of the
trees were becoming golden, Jane
and her little sister, Dot, and her
brothers, Robert and Willy, got
leave from their mother to go for a
ramble through the forest. Off
they went, as soon as breakfast
was over. Jane carried the basket
which held the sandwiches, a few
apples, and the bottles of milk ; and
Dot took with her her father’s large umbrella, to make a tent
for herself and her newdoll. Of course, kind, brave Fido went
with the children as a protector. He was very useful and
trustworthy. - When they got to the forest, he took charge of
thé basket of provisions while the children went to search for
blackbérries and wood-nuts.

What pretty sights they saw! Up froma pond under the

shade of the trees, rose a dragon-fly with its glittering body
and its four wings, finer than the finest gauze. Bobby was
_ much interested in a stag-beetle with its crooked horns, which
-he saw walking down the path. From the shade of the ferns
a pheasant popped out its beautiful head, decked in blue and
purple, green and brown. A thrush was seen by Jane, hunting
for snails. Some rabbits were searching for tender grasses
and other nice things to eat; anda pair of hedgehogs were
giving their babies an airing in the sunshine. When the
children were tired, they returned to Fido, and then all sat
down together in a sunny corner of the wood, and held their
pic-nic.

















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THE PICNIC IN THE WOODS.


66
THE TOP-SPINNERS.

Wee more delightful game ‘can

boys play at after school hours
than “peg top?” George and Arthur,
James and Henry, had taken their tops
with them to school, and sometimes



=> the pockets in which the tops were con-
cealed.. All of the boys owned good
tops, of which they were very proud ;

- some . of these were made of boxwood, with bright steel pegs,
and coloured circles round them.

After school they met in the playground, and laying down
two well-worn wooden tops, they carefully wound up their own
tops, and tried to knock the old ones into a hole between the
stones. ‘ Just listen,” said Arthur, as he took the top up in
his hand while it was spinning, and held it to George’s ear,
“how finely mine hums!” Arthur then hit the old tops with
his, and sent one near the hole. George managed with a well-
directed shot to knock it a little nearer, and James with a tap
put it in.

In China mez amuse themselves with huge tops made
out of empty barrels. These tops need three men to spin
them, one to hold the barrel upright, and two to pull the
string which sets it in motion. When spinning, the top sounds
like the whistle of a steamer, and it can be heard many yards
away. I fancy I can hear the Chinese top-spinner saying,
“ How finely it hums!”
















































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**HOW FINELY MINE HUMS.
68°

A DAY IN THE HAYFIELD.

THERE are I suppose few boys
and girls who do not love to be |
in a hayfield. It is a delightful
place. How pleasant it is to watch
; the mowers! There they goin along
row, moving up and down the field
_ as they cut the grass. And some-
* times they stop to sharpen their
BB: —— scythes, when the sound fills the

~ meadows with pleasant music,

Such were the sights and sounds which greeted the
children at Kirby Cross last hay season. The sun had been
shining in all its glory from early morning. It had peeped
into the children’s window, and caused first one eye to open,
and then the other. Their ears then caught the sound of the
men sharpening their scythes, and out of bed they jumped
anxious to help at hay-making.

Farmer Brown did not mind how many children came to
see him at hay time. “There is something for little hands to
do,” said he, “as well as for big boys and girls. All must be
‘busy bees’ here to-day; no drones are wanted.”

Fred and Susan, Kate and Harry, were each provided with
a wooden rake, with which to turn the grass over, so that all
parts might be exposed to the sun.

They all worked well, and their faces got red and their
arms brown with the heat. When tired they sat down to rest,
but Fred could not sit still long, and tried to bury his sister
Susan in the hay, and Kate did the same to her brother Harry.
And Milly and Baby enjoyed the play as much as anyone.










































































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MILLY AND BABY IN THE HAY-FIELD.



——S>
9S
A SIEK DOLL.

a 7? HREE happy children were Ethel, Dora, and
9 § Alfred Gray. Alfred was a bright, cheerful boy,
fond of pranks, but never of that kind which
S| caused more pain than pleasure to those about
wy e GC “him. And Ethel and Dora loved their only
| C “eC of brother too dearly to complain when he joined
ge ‘Awe in their games, even if at times he was a little
y= (7 rough and noisy. Ethel. had a doll, in whose
ti“ company all her quiet moments were spent. It
| ‘y _ was undressed and put to bed every night, and
; f in the morning it was washed and dressed, and
if possible, taken for a ride in its perambulator.:
oN One day Ethel thought that her doll did not
- \ #~ look well, so she took it in her arms and pre-
Y tended to send it to sleep. Harry was in the
room, and he made a squeaking noise with his
mouth as if the doll was in pain. ‘I think I must send for
Grandma Dora,” said Ethel, ‘she is quite as good as any
doctor.” Frank, like a good brother, went at once to Grandma
Dora’s house (the parlour above), and found her seated in her
arm-chair, knitting some stockings. Frank looked very grave ~
when he told her the news, so grandma put down her work at
once, fixed her spectacles firmly on her nose so that she could -
see over them, and went with Frank to see the sick doll.

_ Grandma Dora looked with much concern at ‘Miss Dolly,
and asked Ethel whether she had left the window of its bed-
room open last evening. ‘ Yes,” said Ethel, “I did.” “Ah!
poor thing, it has caught cold, you must give it a warm bath,
then tuck it up in bed, and it will be better in the morning.”






































































































































' DR. GRANDMA.


Jos
THE BAND OF ‘THE RED, WHITE
AND BLUE., :

HERE waves the Flag of England,
i The old “ Red, White and Blue!”
Nii Play up, my gallant drummer,
is . A loud, rat-tat-a-too,
= As we go marching onward
: ; In all our brave array,
On to the field of battle,
To conquer, not to slay.
Look at our Sergeant Maggie,
How boldly she steps out!
Were she to meet.a foeman
She’d send him “right about.”
. And as for Private Johnnie,
Our noble Grenadier,
He’s every inch a soldier—
Don’t talk to Aim of fear.
We're fighting for the children
Who pine in rags for bread ;
‘We're fighting for te pennies
To get them clothed and fed.
We're fighting for the children
Who have no homes like ours,
_ Who never see the sunshine,
And never. smell the flowers.
“ Rat-tat-a-too, rat-tat-a-too,”
All who have pennies, give them, do! —





“\RAT-TAT-A-TOO, RAT-TAT-A-TOO.”

Playtime Pictures.
he
THE MAY QUEEN.

AAR N



HE children in our picture are
scholars in a school in sunny France.
They have chosen one of their number to

have tied two ropes to a little wooden cart,
and placed a seat upon it, and the queen,
having been first crowned with a garland’
of flowers, is now seated in state on the
cart. The boys and girls are taking their
queen home, shouting and singing her praises.

A like custom to this used to prevail in England in olden
times. Lord Tennyson has written a beautiful poe in which
the chosen May Queen says—

“You must wake and call me early,
Call-me early, mother dear.”

_ Perhaps Mary Walden, the queen of the little French school, is
_. thinking of these words, Sheis an English girl, living with



"her widowed mother in the village. Mary attends the school,

for she wishes to perfect herself in the French language, so
that she may be able to help her mother. by becoming a teacher.
All the scholars have learned to love her, and now they are
rewarding her by promising to obey her commands during the
-. coming year. And very gentle those commands will be, for
-- Mary knows it is easier to rule by words than blows.

When they reached Mary's home, Mrs. Walden was at
the door waiting her daughter’s return, so Mary dismissed her _
young subjects with this first command: “To-morrow is a
holiday. You must all meet me here early, and we will spend
‘a happy day in.the woods together.”

be their queen for the year. The boys ©


OUR MAY QUEEN.
76

“ SEE-SAW.”

ES had been a warm day, and the
boys in school were hot and tired.

Their eyes often wandered to the
windows, through which they could
see the trees just waving in the breeze;
they were so eager to feel themselves
at liberty. When the school was
‘dismissed, out ran the boys, and soon
they were. jumping over each other’s backs, playing at cricket,

or running after each other as lively as minnows:in a stream.

_ But four of the boys evidently had some special purpose
in view. They left their’:companions, and crossed the old
wooden bridge without even looking at the fish beneath. Then
they climbed a stile leading to a field covered with long grass,
in which thousands of buttercups and daisies. were growing.
Just. over the field the trunk of an old tree was lying, and a
long plank was close by. ‘‘ There,” said William Ferris, “I
told you we could have a fine see-saw ; here, come and help

me put the plank across the old tree.” Soon he and John
Arnold were seated on the plank, and when. they were balanced

‘ well William went up, shouting—
“Here we go up, up, up,”

while John called out—
“Here we go down, down, down.”

- But the board struck the ground with a bump, and John
in Kis turn went up. Timothy Connell and Eddie Lister soon
had their turn, and while they were see-sawing Farmer Jones
crossed the field ; but seeing that the boys were doing no harm, |
he det them play on, only warning Tim not to fall off the plank.


SSS
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SSS

“SEE-SAW,”


7
NOAH’S ARS

pm eae Harrison aha
a very pretty box of toys. It
is intended to represent Noah’s Ark:
S\ It contains several wooden figures
f= which were meant by the maker to
<> represent Mr. and Mrs. Noah and
their sons and their wives. But as
all the figures are the same size and
shape, Charley has not yet found out which is Noah or which
is his wife. This, however, does not worry him.. He likes
the figures very much, for they will stand on the table without
trouble ; but when he tries to put the elephants and pigs, lions’
and lambs on their legs, he generally fails. They fall out of
Charley’s fat fingers; or if he succeeds in putting up one, the
other refuses to stand, and knocks its companion down. The
camel and cow, donkey and dormouse often get paired together,
much to the amusement of Charley’s sisters, Bessie and Jenny.
It is not often that they can spare time from their lessons
to play with their brother. When they do so, order is brought
out of confusion, and the animals are arranged in pairs for the
journey properly. They pick up the toys and hand them to
Charley, telling him at the same time what they are called.
Charley has his own names for some of the animals, which’
he much prefers to the more correct ones given by his sisters.
When a duck is handed him he looks up at his sisters, with a
nee look on his round face, and calls out, Quack, quack ;’
“ Mee-ow, mee-ow,” when the cat-comes out. ° On ie
ee Charley puts all his toys away, sighing just a little as he
says, “ Good-bye, till Mondays ae




’S ARK

NOAH
80

TOM’S HOLIDAY.

POM HA HARRIS occupies the posi-
tion of junior clerk in a ware-
S house in a large manufacturing town.
” His parents live in a pretty village
é’ named Riversdale, and so Tom has
to reside with his Uncle and Aunt in
a house not far from his place of
business.
Tom does not fare many oppor-
tunities of seeing the country now that he is at business, and
the anticipation of a holiday to be spent in his little country
village is a very pleasant one. Last year his employers told
‘him he might take a fortnight’s holiday. When he heard this
he could scarcely contain himsélf for joy. What a fine chance
of going home to see his parents it afforded him! So he
wrote to them immediately, asking them to meet him on the
following Saturday at Riversdale Station.

The next four or five days were Jong ones to Tom, but
they passed away at last, and he was soon speeding along to
Riversdale. When he alighted from the train he found quite
a large party of friends waiting to greet him. There were his
mother and sister, his friend George Hurley, and Hector, his
father’s dog.

Now, Tom’s friend George owned a boat, and as he knew
of Tom’s fondness for rowing he asked him to use the boat
whenever he cared to do so. Tom took advantage of this kind
offer, and every day he might have been seen going for a

“spin” up the river. And capital exercise he found it. His
mother declared that she never saw a boy with such an appetite.



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































SH Dy, |

A “SPIN” UP THE RIVER.
82 |

THE HOME CONCERT.

LEASANT and happy children live in
Woodbine Cottage. No black looks
disfigure their smiling faces, no unkind
words are heard to pass their lips. One
day last month our little daughter Ellen
was asked to pay them a visit. “ Weare
going to have a musical evening all by ©
ourselves, Nelly,” said one of the little
girls. ‘We would like you to come, and
- bring some of your dolls with you. We
: like to have plenty of listeners.”

The following is a description of the visit as told by Nelly
on the next day :—‘ When I got there I found Maggie and
Agnes with Reggié in the front room. . There were a number
of dolls seated on the table and on chairs close by. I gave
Maggie’ the dolls I had with me, and one of them was put
right in the centre, as Agnes said it was the queen. There
were several books of music in the room, containing some of
the pretty pieces we sing at school. These were handed round
by Reggie, after which he stood on a stool to act as conductor.
I think we sang nearly every pretty piece in the book, but Reggie
said there were many more which they like. While we were
singing ‘ Suffer little children to come unto Me’ we heard the
garden gate creak, and when Esther looked through the
window she saw poor Tommy Burton, leaning on the gate
listening to us. Reggie took him out a nice piece of cake,
and Tommy thought he was to go away, but Reggie said he
might stay as long as heliked. It was such a happy evening,
_ papa; I do hope they will ask me to go again.”






THE HOME CONCERT.
84
DOLLYS NEW HEAD. >

we

‘ FATHER sat beside the fire,
And, as the news he read,
a Sle heard his children tell a tale
ng About their Dolly's head :—
“ Don't you remember Christmas day,
When Aunt brought Dolly down ? |
8, She said it was the finest doll
She saw in London town!”
‘Ves; Janie, I remember well
When Dolly first came here,
“ And we all kissed her, for she was
A sweet and darling dear.
~ Alas! one day she lost her head,
While romping, I’m afraid ;
But, with our rags and box of paints,
So fine a head we made
That each one wished to have her,
And, one day, after tea,
A quarrel rose, ‘tis sad to say,
“TP wixt Mary Jane and me.
"Twas wrong, I know, but very soon
We made it up again,
And darling Mary Jane kissed me,
And I kissed Mary Jane.”




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PAINTING DOLLY’S FACE,
86
THE YOUNG ARTIST.

OUBTLESS many of my young readers are
_ just as fond of drawing and painting as
Arthur Hamilton was. His first attempt to
. draw a man was very amusing. The head
looked like a triangle with marks for the eyes
and nose, and he left the, poor man without a
mouth. But it pleased him greatly; he thought
it was first-rate, so he tried again.

Arthur was a diligent boy at school as well as at home.
~ He gained several prizes, one of which was a box of paints.
This seemed to give him a new start, and he began to
‘ colour his drawings. He copied a picture out of the
CHILDREN’S FRrEND—the head of a cow. When he tried to
colour it he found that he did not know what colours to use in
order to make his picture look natural.. So he went into the
fields and noted the colours just as they appeared on the living
animal. Then he returned home, and using the knowledge
thus gained, coloured his drawing in good style.

~ His success in this effort made him desirous of leaning
how to paint a real picture, and he hopes by diligence and
perseverance to make for himself a good name.

When Benjamin West, the celebrated painter, was a boy,
he was on one occasion asked by his mother to watch his little
sister, who was asleep in the cradle. While he was watching
her he drew a picture of the sleeping babe, which he showed
to his mother. She saw that it was well done, and gave him
_akiss and praised him for his drawing.

In after life eoaigmin West used to say, ‘‘ That kiss made
me an artist.”
















































THE YOUNG ARTIST.




































































































































































































88

-~PLAYING AT SCHOOL.

“EF! us play at school, Mary,” said Flossie

Ingham to her sister. ‘‘ You must be our
teacher, and we will be your scholars.” It did not
take Mary very long to prepare herself for her new
position. First she tied over her bright curls a
white night-cap, put on her nose a large pair of
spectacles, which, as they happened to be without
glasses, she could see through very well, then took
a pretty picture book in one hand and a long cane |
in the other, and. called her brother Benny before
her for the first lesson. Now, Benny was very backward at
school, and he often made sad mistakes there, and was in
constant disgrace with the schoolmistress. ‘‘ How many are
twice four,” said Mary. Benny put ona very puzzled look,
_ but did not answer. When the question was repeated he bent
down his head and said,. “‘ Please teacher I have not learned
that yet.” ‘Oh, dear,” said teacher Mary, ‘I must make an
example of you ; put on the Dunce’s cap and stand on the
chair till I call you.” Benny knew it was only play, and he at
once obeyed. ae
“Now, Flossie, it is your turn. Can you spell work?”
“Ves teacher, W-O-R-K.” “That's right. Now go and
help mother, while I hear Amy.” Amy was always studying
when she had time, so she was able to answer all questions
without mistakes. ‘‘ Please teacher,” said Amy, “if you will
forgive Benny now I will teach him the multiplication table.”
Benny. was called down from the chair, the Dunce’s cap was
taken off, and in a short time Amy and he were heard singing
“‘twice one are two, twice two are four.”




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Playtime Pictures. :
90

LONELY MILLIE.

Ee an old-fashioned village, many miles away
from London, lives Millie Davis. Her
’ father is the gardener at the nobleman’s house
| there, and Millie lives with her parents and
David her brother in a pretty lodge just by the
en park gates. David and Millie are companions.
eT a -” David is-only two years older than his sister,
: oe but he acts as her protector as. well as her
playmate. He is always with her whether at school or play,
taking care that she does not come to any harm.
To-day Millie’s companion is very ill, and the doctor has
_ been to see him. Millie would like to be near David; even if
she had to keep her little tongue quite still all day long, which
_ would be a very difficult task indeed, for she is always talking
_ about-something.. But her mother sent her into the garden to
play alone. -
Millie tried hard to play, but she was too dull to do so.
She brought out of the house David's cart and drum, one end
of which is broken. She placed her doll in the broken end,
and walked up and down pulling the cart along, but all the
_ pleasure has gone now David cannot play. She gently pulled
the cart on towards the house. Seeing her mother at thedoor ~*
she ran up to her and said, “I cannot play alone, mother dear,
do ask the doctor to make David well.” “My dear Millie,”
replied Mrs. Davis, “it is God alone that can make David
well.” When Millie went to bed she remembered her mother’s
words, and prayed earnestly that David might get well. “God
_ bless my dear brother and make him well, so that he can play
with me again,” was her prayer: — -




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“THE PLAYMATES.

WHo guards the farm-
house night and day ?

“T do!” says true and
trusty Tray.

Who is it. that loves ‘Tray
so well ? ;

tis Lt” says darling little Nell.

There sit the two-in an old barrel! |



They never. sulk and never quarrel.
Yet, why should Nell be sitting there,
, When all around is fine and fair ?
. This is the reason: look at Tray! !
“You see, he is on guard to-day,
And as he cannot now get out
‘With his dear friend to roam about,
She comes-to him, and sits and talks’
About their long and pleasant walks ;
And Tray will-smile as if to say,
“T thank you for your call to-day !”
NELLY AND DOG TRAY.


94
THE BOYS OF DITTON, —

. GROUP of boys were talking at the corner ofa
street in the little town of Ditton. The subject
of conversation was evidently one of a serious
character, judging by their countenances. One of
the taller of the. lads—Stanley Winton by name—
was speaking:

‘Now, boys, I think it would be very cowardly
to take advantage of our master’s absence by stay-
ing away from school ; and you know how he would

punish such a mean trick. I propose we go to school as usual.

‘The subject was argued for some time longer ; but eventu-
ally the advice of the elder lad was taken, and the boys moved
in a body towards the school and trooped in, They were
‘surprised, however, to see the schoolmaster there before them.
Why had ‘he not gone to keep his appointment in London?
‘Seeing their surprise he said, “ You no doubt wonder why I
‘am in school this afternoon, boys, but the gentleman whom I
was to visit has just arrived here, and as I hae some business.
to do with him this afternoon, I shall dismiss the school at
three o'clock.”

“When the boys were again out of school, four of their
‘number walked down the street, on their way to the fields,
where they meant to spend the remainder of the afternoon.

‘Tt am very glad we took Stanley’s advice and went in to
school,” said one. ‘We have got the holiday as it happens,
and are likely to enjoy it much better than if we played the
truant.” And to this they all agreed.

Very quickly they reached the fields, and were soon playing
leap-frog, shouting and laughing as only healthy boys can.
Evidently they are thorenenb, enjoying themselves.




rl
“ THEY WERE SOON PLAYING LEAP-FROG,”




THE HOBBY HORSE.



WE are off for a canter on Carpet Down, .

Past Coalbox Castle and Sideboard Town,
Round Hearthrug Corner and Armchair Place,
Then home to the stable at galloping pace.

My horse is a beauty, he goes so fast,

That tables and chairs seem flying past,

He never wants whipping, he never kicks,
And he knows me too well to play any tricks.

Gee up! Ho! ho! We're off and away,
He's really so frisky I dare not stay,
But I shan’t tumble off, no, no, not I ;

You'll see us come galloping home bysanid: -by.
From Hobby Florse. By L. Hasxett.
f

:

——— wy

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HAMILTON OF KINGS. By Aticrz Pricer, Author of ‘ sells St. John,” ‘* Who is eylvines etc. With 10

Illustrations by Alfred Pearse. Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. 2s. 6d.

RED MOUNTAIN OF ALASKA. By Wittts-Boyp ALLEN, Author of ‘* Pine Coves,” ‘‘The Northern

Cross,” etc. With 15 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. 2s. 6d.

A splendid book of Travel and Adventure in the Far North-West. ‘
A RIDE TO PICTURE-LAND: A Book of Joys for Girls and Boys. By R. V., Author of ‘* Sunshine for

Showery Days.” With charming Coloured Frontispiece, and full of beautiful pictures for children. Paper boards, with
coloured design on cover. 2s. 6d.

A delightful Picture Book for little folks. A Picture Gallery by first-rate artists.
THE STORY OF JESUS: For Little Children. By Mrs. G. E. Morton, Author of ‘‘ Wee Donald,” etc

etc. Seventh Edition. Cloth, bevelled boards, with bold design in coloured inks on cover. Imperial 16mo. as. 6d.

aun ae HISTORY STORIES. By Mary Howirr. With 32 full-page Engravings by Harrison Weir,
L. Huard, etc., and numerous smaller Illustrations. Foolscap 4to, Cloth gilt, bevelled boards. (Unifoon with “Our
Dumb Companions.’ By pu2Ss

SUNNY TEACHINGS: A Coloured Bible Picture Roll. Size 124 by 193 inches. Contains 12 beautifully coloured
Pictures of Bible Subjects, printed on good paper. Mounted on roller, with cord for hanging, and with glazed coloured
cover. 28. ‘A treasure Sor the Schoolroom or Nursery.

CLOYIE AND MADGE. By Mrs, G. S. REANEY, Author of ‘‘ Our Daughters,” ‘‘ Found at Last,”

Crown 8vo. Illustrated. Cloth extra. 1s. 6d.

FINE GOLD; or, Ravenswood Courtenay. By Emma MarsHALL, Author of ‘‘Eaglehurst Towers,’ ‘A
Flight with the Swallows,” etc. Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. 1s. 6d.

GERALD’S DILEMMA. By Emma Lestiz, Author of “ Bolingbroke’s Folly,” ‘‘The Five Cousins,’ etc,

Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. 1s. 6d.

CHINE CABIN. By Mrs. Haycrarr, Author of ‘*Red Dave,” ‘‘ Little Mother,” etc, Fully Illustrated.

Crown 8vo, Cloth extra, 1s.

DULCIE DELIGHT, By Jenniz CHappeLt, Author of ‘‘ Her Saddest Blessing,” ‘‘ For Honour’s Sake,” etc,
With 5 full-page Engravings. Crown 8yo, Cloth extra. 1s. ;

JEMMY LAWSON; 3 or, Beware of Crooked Ways. By E. C. Kenyon, Author of ‘‘Jack’s Heroism.”

illustrated. Crown 8vo, Cloth extra, 1s,

MARION AND AUGUSTA; or, Love and Selfishness. By Emma Lusiz, Author of ‘Ellerslie House,”

“The Five Cousins,” e c. With 6 full-page Illustrations. Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. 1s.

THE MOTHER’S CHAIN; or, The Broken Link. By Emma Marsuatt, Author of ‘Fine Gold; or,

Ravenswood Courtenay,” etc. Fully Illustrated. -Crown 8vo, handsomely bound in Cloth. 1s.

DAYBREAK IN THE SOUL; or, The Belieyver’s Entrance upon Full Salvation. By Rev. E, W.
Moorg, M A,, Author of ‘The Overcoming Life,” etc. Imp. 32mo, 144 pages, Cloth gilt, 1s.

Lonpon : S. W. PARTRIDGE, 9, Parrrnoster Row, E.C.











al










a

NEW POPULAR BIOGRAPHIES, 22° 650°

H. M. STANLEY, the African Explorer. By ARTHUR MONTEFIORE, F.R.G.S. Seventh Edition. 38th
Thousand. Crown 8vo. 192 pages, 3 Maps, and 38 Illustrations. Cloth extra. (Brought up to date.) 1s. 6d.

JAMES OAS or, Dark to Dawn in Fiji. By R. VERNON. Fully Illustrated. Crown '8v0, Cloth
extra. 1S.

HENRY MARTYN. | By JEssz Pacs, Author of ‘‘Samuel Crowther, the Slave Boy who became Bishop of the
Niger,” etc. Crown 8vo. Illustrated. Cloth extra. 1s, 6d.

TWO NOBLE LIVES: John Wicliffe, the Morning Star of the Reformation; and Martin Luther,
the Reformer. By Davip J. Dang, Author of ‘‘ Robert Moffat, the Missionary "Hero of Kuruman,” ete.
With rq full-page Illustrations. Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. 1s. 6d.

Other Volumes in the same Series, uniform in style and price :—

“ONE AND ALL.” An Autobiography of Richard Tangye, of the Cornwall Works, Birmingham. With 21
original Illustrations by Frank Hewett. (192 pages.)

DAVID LIVINGSTONE: His Labours and His Legacy. By ARTHUR MONTEFIORE, F.R.G.S., Author of
‘“(H. M. Stanley, the African Explorer.”

SAMUEL CROWTHER, the Slave Boy who became Bishop of the Niger. By Jesse Pace, Author of
‘« Bishop Patteson, the Martyr of Melanesia.”

THOMAS J. COMBER, Missionary Pioneer to the Congo. By Rev. J. B. Myers, Association Secretary,
Baptist Missionary Society, Author of ‘‘ William Carey, the Shoemaker who became the Father and Founder of Modern
Missions.”

ee CAREY, the Shoemaker who became the Father and Founder of Modern Missions. By

v. J. B. Myers, ‘Association Secretary, Baptist Missionary Society.

ROBERT MOFFAT, the Missionary Hero of Kuruman. By Davip J. Drang, Author of ‘‘ Martin
Luther, the Reformer,” ‘‘ John Wicliffe,” etc. A

JAMES CHALMERS, Missionary and Explorer of Rarotonga and New Guinea, By WILLIAM Rosson
of the London MissiGuane Society.

ROBERT MORRISON, the Pioneer of Chinese Missions. By WriLLt1AM JoHN TOWNSEND, General
peer cnny, of the Mefhodist New Connexion Missionary Society, Author of ‘‘The Great Schoolmen of the Middle

BISHOP PATTESON, the Martyr of Melanesia. By Jesse PAGE,
GRIFFITH JOHN, Founder of the Hankow Mission, Central China. By WiLLIaM Rosson, of the
London Missionary Society.

JOHN WILLIAMS, the Martyr Missionary of Polynesia. By Rev. JAMES J. ELLIs.

SHILLING PICTURE BOOKS.

Feap. 4to, 96 pages. Coloured Boards, ]/=, Cloth, 1/6.
FUST PUBLISHED.
SMILES AND DIMPLES;; or, Happy Hours for Little Pets. By J. D., Author of “ Merry Times for

Tiny Folks.” With 4 full-page coloured and many other Illustrations.
PLAYTIME PICTURES AND STORIES. By UncLE _Harry, Author of “ Holiday Hours in Animal-
land.” Full of Illustrations.
Other Volumes in this Series, ee in style and price :—
HOLIDAY HOURS IN ANIMAL-LAND. By UncLe Harry. Second Edition. 20th Thousand.
BIBLE PICTURES AND STORIES: Old Mectamient! Third Edition. 30th Thousand.
BIBLE PICTURES AND STORIES: New Testament. Sixth Edition, 65th Thousand.
SUNNY FACES: A Picture Book for Happy Hours. By D. J.D. Second Edition. 20th Thousand.
RIOR IES AND PICTURES OF ANIMAL LIFE. By James Weston, Author of ‘‘Pretty Pictures for
Tiny Pets.’
STORIES AND PICTURES OF BIRDS, BEASTS, AND FISHES. By James Weston, Author of

“Stories and Pictures of Animal Life.” Second Edition. "Uist Thousand.

NEW SERIES OF 9” BOOKS.

Small Crown 8vo, Cloth extra. Illustrated.
NEW WOLUMES.
COUSIN BESSIE: A Story of Youthful Harnestness. By CLara Lucas BALFouR. New Edition,
ROSA; or, The Two Castles. By ExizA WEAVER BRADBURN. New Edition.
BEN’ s BOYHOOD. By the Author of “Jack the Conqueror,” ‘* Dick and His Donkey,” etc.
Eleven other Volumes in this Series, uniform in style and price.

THE “RED DAVE” SERIES OF ILLUSTRATED BOOKS.

Feap. 8vo, 64 pages. Cloth extra. @d. each.
NEW WOLUMES. \
WANDERINGS OF A BIBLE. By Ciara Lucas BaLroor. :
HARRY’S MONKEY: How it Helped the Missionaries, and other Stories.
HERBERT’S FIRST YEAR AT BRAMFORD. By the Author of ‘‘ Dick and His Donkey.”
NO WORK, NO BREAD. By the Author of “ Jessica’s First Prayer.”
And thirty other Volumes in this Series, uniform in style and price.

Lonpon: S. W. PARTRIDGE, 9, PaterNostER Row, E.C.

SSS SIS ISI IS I I OO






tus



their best interests,

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The favourite Magazine for Children, with Splendid Pictures and delightful Stories.
The Yearty Votume: coloured cover, Is. 6d.; cloth, 2s.; gilt edges, 2s. 6d.

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THE INFANTS’ MAGAZINE.

Full of Bright Pictures: and Pleasant Reading,
printed in large typ-. Y

The Yearty Votume coloured cover, ts. 6d.;
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THE BAND OF HOPE REVIEW.

The Leading Temperance Journal for Youth, with
striking Illustrations by the foremost Artists of
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coloured paper cover, Is.;
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Containing Serial Stories, and. papers upon all
matters relating to Home Management. Well Illus-
trated. ee zt

The Yearty Votumr, coloured cover, 1s, 64,5
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ee

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An Illustrated Paper containing Popular Articles as

and Stories inculcating Religion, Temperance, Thrift,

and the general well-being of the Working Classes. eas
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cloth, gilt edges, 2s. 6d.



OnE Penny Montuty.

THE FAMILY FRIEND.

A Beautifully Illustrated Magazine for the Home~
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The Yxearty Votume, coloured cover, ts, 6¢.;
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Onze Penny MonrtHty. - ;

THE FRIENDLY VISITOR.

Gospel Stories and Poems, printed in Large Type,

and Finely Illustrated.
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'2012-01-15T03:16:35-05:00'
describe
'562916' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNA' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
7daede7b73e8087780314cc4a276c18c
16ff17c14b6fbc1c3511ece43e2b526bf8a001d5
'2012-01-15T03:15:42-05:00'
describe
'88274' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNB' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
2ba50f49b7c5491d1f0689d028333491
340f3c7bf6e7c544e0c0bdbdc4f6b29646ea30fd
describe
'1922' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNC' 'sip-files00008.pro'
34dc942b311ab5fb94499e4fce86a0d9
fd637d2b3f6c8da9fdaefc8d3bb07d75f7aaa5e6
'2012-01-15T03:14:21-05:00'
describe
'23592' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGND' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
59dfb3b052931bd934a1d2d0fa909e69
9332fb48cdbb4cac53c33eeabaa54c67e5145de2
'2012-01-15T03:16:42-05:00'
describe
'4513520' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNE' 'sip-files00008.tif'
e98f097bf3310059e9d1e2cb2322dc9d
e33f907bf8c23054774ce6928301a56826860578
'2012-01-15T03:15:49-05:00'
describe
'253' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNF' 'sip-files00008.txt'
2ecdc610db969477804b1496ee3f587d
a3f7bdf41e0c18f199fbe7b65d6b64c052d53372
'2012-01-15T03:15:37-05:00'
describe
'12413' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNG' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
fddd43bb181b482183faf8741d87e9b3
038f7fdede55e8a4b0cd03a28549799741ebd33b
describe
'495435' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNH' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
6e85e37991a7cc4a87b508bae8e82498
b4350a47baf1d371ebacafdc062eb5a2bad2dd65
describe
'167626' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNI' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
04936b18ffc4238095b18d1c1a92bb78
d93793c8c9996d67b16a285d60cdd4aab5386e58
describe
'11355' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNJ' 'sip-files00009.pro'
2ebf377ac419c3a6f536e5b9dbf0b18d
43b235908d9e762a3072bd2aaa7a5a44cd1ba163
'2012-01-15T03:14:24-05:00'
describe
'55185' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNK' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
724835127531076b91af0d47875242d2
5eb9baabed27e77c7188ce52e7ef2661da6a3593
'2012-01-15T03:16:26-05:00'
describe
'3977108' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNL' 'sip-files00009.tif'
68ab354abcdad07c09882f4b261e4d38
d866daca15c75fdb680d4681d5d3836668e4836a
'2012-01-15T03:16:13-05:00'
describe
'512' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNM' 'sip-files00009.txt'
cc6383bd69686deea6371467b9614104
63467a5bb466d04f2c368670c7fece30ef9cd8b2
'2012-01-15T03:14:18-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'23331' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNN' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
b85c79f3acf6667bfcd022c2c0f3342f
60f19e49cfb6188ac137ea9b28c299abdbe7f1a6
'2012-01-15T03:15:52-05:00'
describe
'562897' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNO' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
7d5d2befcf37037b63e501054830f07e
10ee169d1e22249cab78ece275586ddcfdcc0c90
'2012-01-15T03:16:54-05:00'
describe
'90111' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNP' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
c558b37f4c06ba43ef898e95898cc7e6
bc04e1561cf4204bd45602070b75bf0bbe87062d
'2012-01-15T03:16:37-05:00'
describe
'16000' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNQ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
c87e42c360160e15b0eeaaf5fc2db1bd
8d00d86cae3a54ff7312d77209838ee619811456
'2012-01-15T03:14:04-05:00'
describe
'37552' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNR' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
09649722c2219a5451f41fc54943dadf
71339a7dc6fa1c240cba97fa44b1250785d79d59
describe
'4516156' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNS' 'sip-files00010.tif'
ce10556cd30c58e4afb648b5d2d3cdce
1e8fdcc9f034486197f9c9b77b6e02eb8cf710ec
'2012-01-15T03:14:39-05:00'
describe
'689' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNT' 'sip-files00010.txt'
d2be601fb62715fe835a7088f5440220
d3cb21e5be79be1c4d34c53217b0edc4418a037b
'2012-01-15T03:14:58-05:00'
describe
'18583' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNU' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
56fdb91896971f7b56c62255e9354b30
691cdd854f9d2fb7dfec689a0b1dd3769dd9225e
'2012-01-15T03:15:54-05:00'
describe
'563052' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNV' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
7c6a61be6bc566a3aa4b6588d9c4bc41
21bc1ad0b7198b3938a908464c2a5cf1f9788953
'2012-01-15T03:15:23-05:00'
describe
'169734' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNW' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
3a8fe372d2d49125880fed35f1261368
353307bce7b89a9c8f1f84cbaedcd34d6c1ae50a
describe
'21767' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNX' 'sip-files00011.pro'
d2e63d57c31ccfcc1f4ab5205d0f543f
739698f45f3bae57c32a12d5e5c483ebe8c1fb2d
'2012-01-15T03:15:25-05:00'
describe
'59279' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNY' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
75deb8929e39d895042b276c6b7b0476
6a03b866b211f1e1d3c32fdebe3e350530167844
describe
'4519232' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGNZ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
5191413a2748d64ad7f196b978ae60d5
228b6f631c9ae201d817263791fb3672f1852480
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOA' 'sip-files00011.txt'
c4d9258c5eec5e1b33d18ee35b6fa6fa
310c8f118bceed191e6bd0fb8de04618da0594c8
'2012-01-15T03:13:59-05:00'
describe
'25224' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOB' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
1432aa6808e6b8da9b4020c1e8ed3b13
8f61009231895def13f3c8df6ebf9c7d52c12533
'2012-01-15T03:15:13-05:00'
describe
'563042' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOC' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
eb210816261d142dd39c0caa67cba5a1
da8ab911447e803b52ffd30af700bc4997a95494
'2012-01-15T03:16:44-05:00'
describe
'167490' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOD' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
e1064ec0b5aed99eb5a8898ac1d6e99b
4c4cd3c4a998c9fade0c55d08d40ae9d1cb3fdbe
describe
'38793' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOE' 'sip-files00012.pro'
a35e6ecb16f28edc183871a3e5bbf634
6f93a7ee305f874502d703f757e8002551c013a2
'2012-01-15T03:16:27-05:00'
describe
'60507' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOF' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
650b7e27bf9f5a9aa1ab042a7c095771
cb346584029cbfb03872b56925c346c415fc36d4
'2012-01-15T03:15:01-05:00'
describe
'4518996' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOG' 'sip-files00012.tif'
3aa6410fabc0a8c433b3e965cf74919f
67dafd9766203dda47303151eb34746fe877c456
'2012-01-15T03:15:08-05:00'
describe
'1689' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOH' 'sip-files00012.txt'
c28558aa218597bd448d284e218f84d8
ed019ee2899c6a3102d3942ed4a47d6f8d2c67e5
'2012-01-15T03:16:09-05:00'
describe
'24813' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOI' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
02630f0b90204903f689247577b72b5e
96e3eea163adfea3270288afa0bff2e67da1880c
'2012-01-15T03:14:09-05:00'
describe
'563058' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOJ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
3f8d27025efafe3bad34adae9dbb247e
8ba16cbf0180ca0efe63eb7594b7d12765ef2874
'2012-01-15T03:16:04-05:00'
describe
'222867' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOK' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
d9c73e6c24648f71ceb5657f96da8dc3
4efd0af9c9fcdabc907fd6a91b5c3871edc68017
'2012-01-15T03:15:12-05:00'
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOL' 'sip-files00013.pro'
eb8c68a22536c51bdd55b99217fb1032
a96790cba3b7208fb8ec7b06520d6961d0846306
'2012-01-15T03:14:29-05:00'
describe
'61765' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOM' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
6feb1de4953fd8664af8f2429512f550
8b1e9e8dc3f186bf0276e742f7cf111b32350784
'2012-01-15T03:16:49-05:00'
describe
'4519308' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGON' 'sip-files00013.tif'
434eb0e4889c1a6e7ee6d2ca3b65b772
fd15d39961207a89e513ba29fbe23374baa25afd
'2012-01-15T03:15:57-05:00'
describe
'110' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOO' 'sip-files00013.txt'
2cfee57bb3c75703bb870900753232c0
330db835dd2ec00ec981499b8006b6bdb2b8df5b
'2012-01-15T03:15:50-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'25496' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOP' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
1e9db57c4b793bcd0b18a402828ed6f5
5ac267f5cc09233ce7d9e51736f1703e0263dda3
describe
'562965' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOQ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
8a684dd4702679c4655daf60c31606e5
9af1b80a0f1f5a7db9a64c3477afe5fbf04e3620
describe
'199471' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOR' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
b276a326ccad4e60e0ab78820d47353d
33528290e5c2020e688d5ba172e597f372a6ccbf
describe
'43464' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOS' 'sip-files00014.pro'
4cf3703c1563965fee2a3b7a40435afa
96e235b5456ef855303dc47629e6e97687f7bad6
'2012-01-15T03:16:03-05:00'
describe
'66851' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOT' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
dabb189c58548e43e16cacde2fad733c
fe7d2faa108da0c9cbcd69bf96e3430d49257988
'2012-01-15T03:15:11-05:00'
describe
'4519488' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOU' 'sip-files00014.tif'
d7cbeb389b186fe18611ccc7d1bd3d01
1e6a9cb595fffd9a809b486369b31c19bd93ac5d
'2012-01-15T03:15:18-05:00'
describe
'1846' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOV' 'sip-files00014.txt'
02853b63d794b93caf7030576283a179
aa4a5e4865929a3813d508686370582c91d02238
describe
'26200' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOW' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
fa2fee2d1585ed2ae734b5e87126238d
db2c4f47e0c414f55dffbd60852c15d2b64978ef
'2012-01-15T03:16:52-05:00'
describe
'563063' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOX' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
e0661692ed6b0fa4067ec38a94d60f95
3548f07161c79e184a7c3c6cd4858f695c222d96
describe
'232463' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOY' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
e93303baaa901b140af3e00fb8d85555
0c5b56cfe4fcbf0259177ffa267628702f85c990
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGOZ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
76f3b738fb284d57fc91cba33aea65d2
3fd9f8012a15faa8dbe9a6dd015a88f8516f7621
'2012-01-15T03:14:01-05:00'
describe
'67183' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPA' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
547b0e57508829eb88f8378e2c1ffdd1
51eb0fd5eceab35288b7a63ddd74e033a7ccc3c8
'2012-01-15T03:14:17-05:00'
describe
'4520644' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPB' 'sip-files00015.tif'
cec60fc26359868b823172835fa5f064
5324a8d102df469410de6affa21f8f876c9a47f5
'2012-01-15T03:14:43-05:00'
describe
'228' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPC' 'sip-files00015.txt'
bc7f10eeb864570dd8997051bab51b93
b7d029cbeb4d84baed4bb6eda67b584bf50a02cd
describe
Invalid character
'28245' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPD' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
15c4134a16d925c1f1b712c05e4929d6
3722926166c333aa23d605a09fdd93509e7b5d0b
describe
'563041' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPE' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
594b6bc11c7b56848a16714aef3c08c4
16f0474072de99d01122e3d0bc5dd88afc67f485
'2012-01-15T03:14:35-05:00'
describe
'178188' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPF' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
bcac94505cae0c2d33625967d64324c0
17edb17c9e74b9be7219f972fa2334698a9e9092
'2012-01-15T03:14:00-05:00'
describe
'42682' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPG' 'sip-files00016.pro'
41af53e62aca9de0e46671b1c443902e
a8b0ebd33d95422ea8dcdd9c42792a8bfe5e249f
describe
'62622' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPH' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
505285d0dfdff869ab778c4dccd2644b
1fceda74b292b4b1c1bc352b80d3bdaf8a0e17c0
describe
'4518784' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPI' 'sip-files00016.tif'
10671938c0ea892101a03ad9db027fb7
5ffee498f7e86dbd488eae5c256cb0d49822d63f
'2012-01-15T03:16:11-05:00'
describe
'1792' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPJ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
4fa92898b8bef35e521e251740334b19
1b547feb806f6780f519acf27fd602f3f47409b0
describe
'24691' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPK' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
a9e5e9b61d05312c62bb9d770cdc14e9
4c13186053685889eddf8032085295ed1301cd76
'2012-01-15T03:16:18-05:00'
describe
'563054' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPL' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
b14e524f6fae9ee5231c89f03a2df002
53fca2fda78c15508675d80b33569dd455f1b608
describe
'193571' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPM' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
5063c01324ba67dcb015c95cb0a1a6e3
970912e00c388b1d69aa2a76e34a244cb75857c3
'2012-01-15T03:15:40-05:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPN' 'sip-files00017.pro'
9d6e49e65a3203c833ad6f63a182f941
3ee92a8fd6a593dc777a9989ddfd48ea6aafa2a4
describe
'59344' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPO' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
ab12d6e71c8c88d1519a586f540909c8
55368ed8df6837ebdf32deeaef14f8a2b2123d16
'2012-01-15T03:15:59-05:00'
describe
'4519844' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPP' 'sip-files00017.tif'
6e7e4c4cbf478ef17344be06a4fb8c9b
12e598a3ee2c7fa33e5ba3f15649410a815329ec
'2012-01-15T03:15:38-05:00'
describe
'211' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPQ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
db232cfaf61320faaee422759c87a425
09ea3e75f270ec45431d6944f5ac8782c07e5b8c
describe
Invalid character
'26357' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPR' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
9f9a7311636563184b0dea8062835a1f
fe5b317a34e779f1f9ad9aab200b175d9f7a3c59
describe
'562924' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPS' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
78b83ca2ddfa061982b88c820311d737
35bef80154a5dfd936b263a5263bf4e1b42745cd
'2012-01-15T03:14:40-05:00'
describe
'154784' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPT' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
34fc59f0ba1134f1177de5b58805e352
78043ecae6d36822e7ef79f988f075522f8143c1
'2012-01-15T03:14:20-05:00'
describe
'18373' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPU' 'sip-files00018.pro'
bb21fac2c0aff53cfefa40994bc30c13
e7c614f0f6b4f755198ef6db290d396ad92ac897
describe
'51589' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPV' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
92436ad1c5b9dfd72d9d283486b54947
cd455b24705b25a18d6491083f6d7d88e140d223
describe
'4517828' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPW' 'sip-files00018.tif'
aeb458e93f7f778dbe8a151df2270698
4d4a38b83c10350b988c160ba15d591e60e95aa6
'2012-01-15T03:14:08-05:00'
describe
'758' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPX' 'sip-files00018.txt'
7307177e3e12d6c59221840d543f4f26
8491cdd86f3b556abaea95b47c8538c5677f4af9
'2012-01-15T03:14:37-05:00'
describe
'22504' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPY' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
e63270f97b3b5e314a3576fd47ac113f
58d13f23bab9296cca88c29c8cfbca208a4ba8eb
describe
'562992' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGPZ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
120a37f864d97822777a31033d163c3a
34c30ef2ec15699190d06871b523209aca80486b
'2012-01-15T03:15:09-05:00'
describe
'203855' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQA' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
f0df59ffcb7e230f7e0e6d0d3ab497fa
69d4bb26337524520f00f0f65e7fc6ddd3e6833b
describe
'2306' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQB' 'sip-files00019.pro'
300397e651596f58cc4d857294dc564a
bdbf7ae64b83617e232f625526f5a72e57599f9b
'2012-01-15T03:14:26-05:00'
describe
'59709' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQC' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
8fa49057ec844f22e9427c4bb748a2f5
bfaf06b2d62cfd1a8dd1295b1482cfbf7510e033
'2012-01-15T03:15:16-05:00'
describe
'4519852' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQD' 'sip-files00019.tif'
3f3d6801bf5bf5ee300227c9cd092e52
b42bc5bf1263502f141fc0cc74ef89cebdb8f861
'2012-01-15T03:14:30-05:00'
describe
'199' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQE' 'sip-files00019.txt'
1ecd29e80709fc49d0facd7e50180a0a
d91c3bcc87cd9e0a68ec779f8742882cdafd824d
'2012-01-15T03:15:24-05:00'
describe
'26407' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQF' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
dbca2fa1657747c7f612365447b27173
abf1e02afafd933c8ed82a6b1c017764898d8d82
'2012-01-15T03:15:46-05:00'
describe
'562974' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQG' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
4af2067538e659dc2560eb92292895a2
5654d21262291c14d03fd44dffeedc3a0b522f30
describe
'192517' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQH' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
c5f5260bfdbea7bcb78a7e5a040aab07
9e3db23930edb41a6c9fdaa09d5e57135445797c
'2012-01-15T03:15:55-05:00'
describe
'40989' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQI' 'sip-files00020.pro'
eca604f297480a4014467b0bdca3211a
cd898da8197ad6e5197dad2939641c12af68b1eb
describe
'64189' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQJ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
8636f9c073728f92dc3df18a58b77925
f56ef74bdb6694b117701c2a00e0ed8627319076
describe
'4518968' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQK' 'sip-files00020.tif'
ff1cb919fa45e8a43ba89688162adb3a
4356be5a6dab28534d3c83d2d320a50fe3a88fbc
'2012-01-15T03:14:23-05:00'
describe
'1773' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQL' 'sip-files00020.txt'
a0c66db2ac5e85b27fc79d27469a8036
ae14dd3eb5dded7219c6b605bdc31fa10d109771
'2012-01-15T03:15:19-05:00'
describe
'25146' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQM' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
d3a645ef9fff5b94b29e96e318dbeb80
e50eecbc2ba8ccf4235e4cb60776d944ee122964
'2012-01-15T03:17:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQN' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
e46b98e061dd0b5f6bbd6daa4da98549
17801db5254e3ed30e6293bff5976939245b636f
describe
'188639' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQO' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
bcc1b377e27983aa8067052389e7df8e
1f523a5cbd5fa92e3c7ebd9bf465e24b2c075db7
describe
'905' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQP' 'sip-files00021.pro'
09881c9d980ba12c42e0cb846a61946e
3ee22c1cc218e0e1c153c62688bf5643a481a50b
describe
'52564' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQQ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
6518d2af89ffe1daba1346d05cb36e8c
409872fbfd04742a676132965f1a109d3df0ad34
describe
'4518372' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQR' 'sip-files00021.tif'
a0d79584ae55fc634132dfd09b0d2dd1
64fb1059fc41ac4e8e47ff3fa26c80ec4a0b0808
describe
'76' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQS' 'sip-files00021.txt'
87372c4750047bb28e06e089a9c8db52
bdea01fb9cf0c06e705789f7884e798a565c0602
describe
'23123' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQT' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
ecb4cf1fbac7838a6d370a2115191f79
22773dd675b65f5869710f73033561125762cfe7
describe
'562993' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQU' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
3a0b4b1f6cee0e9151e071dc8f8f56c9
b81238f1ea94ad8d4c1b967a7c4c269e960c17a3
describe
'195663' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQV' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
91aa1686165a49e14e4955a0ce8563ef
b1c597022257a2a60840e25a13b6a768b8dc5682
describe
'43442' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQW' 'sip-files00022.pro'
21e168395a322a90dcb32e72366ed863
9684f98bbbf1f6d10a24160f628bf167112eef6e
describe
'65761' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQX' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
6db1f28792eae73e0e915a9d8318ba53
9617692df89c6dc269d716f2a818b3d4521f299b
'2012-01-15T03:15:32-05:00'
describe
'4518888' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQY' 'sip-files00022.tif'
eb8473aaa51bcd386811d87946d1c35d
db2a57449bea07a62defe5abf51971b1bfe5b1fe
'2012-01-15T03:16:05-05:00'
describe
'1782' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGQZ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
80bc2d2ec4c4598664d9e304893b277a
e4a9d8543330d43a7fc6b693097d7fbda7bfc902
describe
'24893' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRA' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
04ece3bd2b6e949f664f7db9e0355315
6c63812f14aeb27530d280c49522912861175905
'2012-01-15T03:14:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRB' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
4c5f17a29f0e3e66e0ed946c54c19d01
863411de1694db8c50ea4ef5ab9d786f1d60886e
'2012-01-15T03:14:11-05:00'
describe
'219605' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRC' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
cae061561434c513ff26f36abafa5be2
63cf1afaed01a7b3f25fed1aca30bf9d7e31ba30
describe
'2674' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRD' 'sip-files00023.pro'
6718b30444efad052be537feea4b87fc
f30d1969338a29463b83d58aee7d4262d4be587e
'2012-01-15T03:15:06-05:00'
describe
'60115' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRE' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
d983520bd0d27dd23a2102eb9262939f
315ad507a7f2ec705a7fda5831366628e966bf5b
'2012-01-15T03:14:52-05:00'
describe
'4519384' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRF' 'sip-files00023.tif'
9c171e93ba8723a47aa6969a2fef2255
5d35c54b2b74ecef35ce53efd4d9c0052ce06483
'2012-01-15T03:16:57-05:00'
describe
'187' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRG' 'sip-files00023.txt'
6a65dbaeb378a0a7ed371e7219e40b7e
5ac89bb599f3abdb1ac69b9caf732d0f34c9686c
describe
Invalid character
'25614' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRH' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
37f9ea72de181385f9bde8c783261dda
2c57c2da0e4a4d78cdccee7420237f887b330cc9
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRI' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
4fda8cf94f0d3b77e77a70657e605b4e
5d0ac2a281545881962517860528bb5a65a0e700
'2012-01-15T03:15:45-05:00'
describe
'190268' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRJ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
ed777c1b6001c198e3289eb52c47133c
31651202479258feaeb3ac6bfd1ad5bc8c046412
describe
'42832' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRK' 'sip-files00024.pro'
2662ffecb2b5029bcae7231da118c88c
81f0221130edfd9da301c8a3dc2ad03e7973718d
'2012-01-15T03:14:22-05:00'
describe
'63446' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRL' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
8907c2269f47be6b60262af020c39940
a42ee6e764b6880aae164c62a572a3d69d370a91
'2012-01-15T03:16:23-05:00'
describe
'4518860' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRM' 'sip-files00024.tif'
aefae8c5354975358e67ff12c72b3b4a
bd98855174ad768578a9346f08757903546e490c
describe
'1810' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRN' 'sip-files00024.txt'
7620b6f15b5f49d113d995b715ce251c
ce308d7909745b448f1df7d2258e73b945215ad5
describe
'24810' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRO' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
95651f43e81b969cb584a16fc0d69907
fc3ee4d54f8fd5866c4fb19e9ae087147f8301d1
describe
'563044' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRP' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
f6688d04414a6b5ae38e38dffb49428c
88651c18adfef9d67c306905ca6592709341df28
describe
'186069' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRQ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
0e368ca0f58fd68558b7684a618cff79
b9c1a0ceaac3a446381d9ea3c0ae574ff1bb2374
'2012-01-15T03:15:04-05:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRR' 'sip-files00025.pro'
b270c557ea1a98811033bd6faca18e78
5782cd67d9b5bf6c681f94f9c61a7170ad80b07a
describe
'55993' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRS' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
f88a2047fa5811618507649209d95609
14ea63d137ebd0c633bc7c850ab25daf16a0006a
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRT' 'sip-files00025.tif'
490634c77e685e584e94e867a1b078f1
b76a6d642f06118cfc3b388e5bbeb931dbbd84de
'2012-01-15T03:14:55-05:00'
describe
'61' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRU' 'sip-files00025.txt'
ede46997033d196db23265aaa530a0db
51ea0e17d5cff7102790345bc34fcc6ca323dde1
describe
Invalid character
'25378' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRV' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
f88f60eb83b47b684d925caa766cc61e
a12a31e395952e2594b2938dccad2c2095d5cfb3
describe
'563046' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRW' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
4d197449746217cdbc0c9306d89feb45
3d432d21c524455b29cf26ac14a9d8d1b4150564
describe
'194936' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRX' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
fcfc013ee9effababf3702e42db08f00
d8e789bc7a1c754fffff2a5ed796f9762424a5ca
'2012-01-15T03:16:30-05:00'
describe
'42376' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRY' 'sip-files00026.pro'
cab26bb3212db843ad46d583d03a00af
699684fcb2936814a51ab75430545e234e772cae
describe
'66572' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGRZ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
b78c8dc41ecca5b299f6cccff81b1105
2142c0dc4d4ebd5f3a0f0a9680d74cfec94f90c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSA' 'sip-files00026.tif'
27d55a0e7a8a7aaa706e1d63c9d606d7
9d5a4c3a3859f10b22ea40be66e2b81183751813
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSB' 'sip-files00026.txt'
94f5939c48a6fe1c0749dd3108f289dc
5d9ac529d21af2d9903c29accae27dba44539810
'2012-01-15T03:16:28-05:00'
describe
'25710' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSC' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
8e571d4f94be67f3d1c48d61a61e791f
a6e643fdd899cc0731610e73759c5e07eac084ae
describe
'563061' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSD' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
0345573a73f8656d1a0e6c4c95a49a50
a5d987e076a7485c3fed2592bf0a303460e503fa
describe
'174797' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSE' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
6da0b94638464e3e0233d92597512a26
da433e79d48dcfdf0119adefc73ca2bbd8144852
describe
'2658' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSF' 'sip-files00027.pro'
9aea08d87cf8a6d44829f1fde512a7b7
b8eb601725f75ff0ec71868b223dddec1ab034cc
'2012-01-15T03:15:44-05:00'
describe
'45289' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSG' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
70d552013826ce7be890e5520b8ee074
40a3a5cf60250a20c61a5a2de322bcc732abd20f
'2012-01-15T03:16:19-05:00'
describe
'4517336' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSH' 'sip-files00027.tif'
f2b59fdeda269d7e118d80f35fe94fe4
e49d99423e915379d4f184e84238ab780b457a44
describe
'162' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSI' 'sip-files00027.txt'
c1c714c44d2d954d6dd827e474b6d5c6
644d9c8cea38c5329fd414d770a38c09c3d10b5b
describe
Invalid character
'574721' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSJ' 'sip-files00027a.jp2'
14f243ab71d89146e037d49b8a5edfb0
6f2bb48333e1c61fae822eca6168d415593822db
describe
'169817' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSK' 'sip-files00027a.jpg'
6ae43ce0f0c9bf9d042f15d629d911b1
70e499fceddc7e738fb2bab9ff842957f1bc8433
'2012-01-15T03:15:48-05:00'
describe
'38991' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSL' 'sip-files00027a.pro'
35ab6f7d10c56982fd5f83df8fb1356e
cf019ae8dc5b3209e7bd92af8eb8dab8b5529c08
describe
'66323' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSM' 'sip-files00027a.QC.jpg'
12701665220f4e306a17e87728381ba7
92b8c22723eb9a50995d0ea992be009484b42460
describe
'4620740' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSN' 'sip-files00027a.tif'
97cafdc137536c61bba2096c6c93fb18
25373b3f0720f0067af02d0c01b434cdd3b937f1
'2012-01-15T03:14:42-05:00'
describe
'1765' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSO' 'sip-files00027a.txt'
5d2261fb1dda2af2b1b108d0b3830c25
eb15585bf67b9849ce1af9e3bd4fff0475f57d85
describe
'32296' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSP' 'sip-files00027athm.jpg'
eb6f5806d7240855f3a5622938e9d540
f7145b173093d5828851d554f12604fdc0ac139a
describe
'588616' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSQ' 'sip-files00027b.jp2'
f30e7eeced23cb2122c49492b7e9b543
86e607cdb852f59db5c37ae590bd2fed2967c965
describe
'126630' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSR' 'sip-files00027b.jpg'
24a493ca12d4d27f58b6b3bbec57a157
a7fccd899b867f4af0998cd75f193495a695977d
'2012-01-15T03:15:47-05:00'
describe
'2464' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSS' 'sip-files00027b.pro'
208a8d9f8498059d2f00efa25ddf9bf8
c9aac0b20da713bf455188e9656902df0dd1c3e7
'2012-01-15T03:14:57-05:00'
describe
'51804' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGST' 'sip-files00027b.QC.jpg'
484dc70eca90d8d20ef7ee57621ab28a
d65f0f88ee28fc126df4d9ef17ee3ec318a67cc4
'2012-01-15T03:16:22-05:00'
describe
'4733968' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSU' 'sip-files00027b.tif'
1b32d7e3eb2b61db9e1040b24f9fa5d5
c8c4b35d93bc463412cafec7b3b5e282c3aa20e1
describe
'179' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSV' 'sip-files00027b.txt'
7976ac4cd1fa47c52c2b35f6595dbed3
7617301a0f6d0990be9cece49cd3d87b68f0e3da
describe
Invalid character
'32303' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSW' 'sip-files00027bthm.jpg'
79a06a57c920fbe0fe6b9c3ef898693e
1a0e8995d84ba2e8c5837b9a58a6b500838c5749
'2012-01-15T03:14:53-05:00'
describe
'21049' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSX' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
27c8717aa6e61d50718433d3cb566fed
9c647f665ccab1de48bc43b938878d1f1cb1078c
'2012-01-15T03:15:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSY' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
7a3e41ae75c4d200034f0c0da56a89dc
5bb1aed3f527ae95c0a6ac39eac10211375b9184
'2012-01-15T03:14:34-05:00'
describe
'147626' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGSZ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
58be3d5cecb6f7ebde13e12af31d5734
738f92d306069a2c87ea6b2d78bb6d3e74b26b69
describe
'17348' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTA' 'sip-files00028.pro'
1e7a9a776ffbca63a0a3beadf13f3228
f4ede703a76ba6c1466c7027fb02163e4f551fea
'2012-01-15T03:16:00-05:00'
describe
'51774' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTB' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
4934ce0517f8ad8d13435ffdd34a785e
51a9f741a8dd941d13b4b5f0000091ce28a200af
describe
'4518352' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTC' 'sip-files00028.tif'
5e99570e1879260361b68436fb27976e
de4e231fd89aadf47230f95f93817ce37127670c
'2012-01-15T03:15:26-05:00'
describe
'920' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTD' 'sip-files00028.txt'
ced8cc1a38cac49d26b07a3f8b73a485
d223ac3c04c617af9779f2105ead21e86f095924
'2012-01-15T03:16:25-05:00'
describe
'23064' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTE' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
1affcdbc431361c67937bd5c1913517e
beed85973e94daf94dfb717f3e231b0d9ec84151
'2012-01-15T03:16:51-05:00'
describe
'563039' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTF' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
5475e70d94d7276a99282b20c44dd988
0ff9933b0dc836afb489f8bdcff99567ff9030f1
describe
'197512' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTG' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
3e883615285398f39e649dd494cf3c06
fcfd84dd53746fca47a8312f318cd8b6fa125256
'2012-01-15T03:15:34-05:00'
describe
'692' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTH' 'sip-files00029.pro'
7c6e4e003802238be8385783ea98f265
a8623c7bf0594a1149f411545f7b0c183881e79f
describe
'57773' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTI' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
bf31de49ed077d05453bb6663d232cc8
0dda4861ca8407ac6ff509e2aebc562ccbb80200
describe
'4519376' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTJ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
d14d033b935745acddf616ee03fb797f
1d19a0fc705f73bd04847b03a4a2ebb673091db5
'2012-01-15T03:14:50-05:00'
describe
'164' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTK' 'sip-files00029.txt'
6d5dad958d303549410ea2229428b559
786aea825f4fb78d0037df08fc748d62dffa72c1
'2012-01-15T03:14:32-05:00'
describe
'25400' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTL' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
f858b11f14c72379f712198aa2bcb75e
1806483acbe962de47b7fea3dc1735bdfb1e09ac
describe
'563009' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTM' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
70a77b6acc76e79402e75e3000fcde8a
6637e586c58efe6ce389bef39b3c35924f9ac7ca
describe
'194379' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTN' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
19a902240a207b1b70791c060f6d3485
9d9648920db3d15292ff3d6d01bf46bedcd7a7e6
describe
'41761' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTO' 'sip-files00030.pro'
d03802bb9f5cd9bf37f5d34382ccd518
7ab45896fed70553fd4495ee7f89cdd52d0a6655
describe
'65669' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTP' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
a683971bded917bd158f1629f539d478
eb731cd43c37e0f0122d2ec13a9df6727ef7853c
describe
'4519252' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTQ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
66f0ea00615b4367cfa29b1c4e528b92
08aca1ba4854e461b8085668ca5927b58776c6fe
'2012-01-15T03:16:14-05:00'
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTR' 'sip-files00030.txt'
63802dade0a20e0ae03d74fd45a4c020
89aa50adfbe7cac06b0d79cea8ceb1c970de323c
'2012-01-15T03:15:36-05:00'
describe
'25694' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTS' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
37116957ce5f2c55dd48164ca5e02cc5
ca144434898ce3fe23752168543ea24586b66ebc
describe
'563050' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTT' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
c726b9e07da9ba040dd19dc0ddc91151
bfef2a8caf03a6dfa00ce8280f19985cfb665634
describe
'218128' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTU' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
ae966104dca78c64ce7448da58f85915
d9ba7d70c7b83285e25ec60417c22e9f24f625cb
'2012-01-15T03:16:59-05:00'
describe
'1563' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTV' 'sip-files00031.pro'
b3efd231ce30622d474a019aa6c9e586
420dda0ded7d36c447367096e409f53505418670
describe
'60497' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTW' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
b133dec4c2df3d76e4aba763c06a2e5d
0fcabd64063210b28881f849f89459c65afe1c7e
'2012-01-15T03:15:15-05:00'
describe
'4519484' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTX' 'sip-files00031.tif'
e1d14c2578cff3f34aff0cccf126a9bd
cbf69d5a8f2ff08f5dd4551213f3bfa3edfb92ff
describe
'270' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTY' 'sip-files00031.txt'
ec407dd273863cd9b1db40725e370411
1e5f66bca60fca10841c7801e6093c6c8724e198
'2012-01-15T03:16:50-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'25641' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGTZ' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
2b5f7d292efa56ba4f57f55cb7399eba
6a05bcd3df8079374fbdc1c5edbe0a86ee5124b8
'2012-01-15T03:15:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUA' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
7dd614b6c1a97b29154d9535479909da
6e347a7cb42fd4e91036d20ba31a06a7531073c3
'2012-01-15T03:16:16-05:00'
describe
'193103' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUB' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
9fd3769256b06af4253ae6daf1490eaf
bdf0415fc74628a754831135e81f2f5e5a6aae85
describe
'42196' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUC' 'sip-files00032.pro'
b1dc773b1b50ff56a9adb5cbc022e48c
bbe79c327c5b27cc0cb76c555bc0b6f7c38a32f6
describe
'65707' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUD' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
3b217a7be7e0d4808a57ce9db53126cd
ae1068ade3e557c6a33749ff34fe9b5c966ef93e
'2012-01-15T03:14:13-05:00'
describe
'4519104' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUE' 'sip-files00032.tif'
b629e6bf483a3a90d36b168671532044
5ea5411b091da1d9a62ad7705a31c0a7b94ef574
'2012-01-15T03:14:05-05:00'
describe
'1809' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUF' 'sip-files00032.txt'
6bcccaa7b90d6c8ece2705e0d17079a5
90f71c70aaeb5ae2ea7f9a25e124b290825e2a34
'2012-01-15T03:15:53-05:00'
describe
'25364' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUG' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
9c6bb84b6999a764308a1af1369dad88
4aaee2c9195de200f4aba38be0d5ff0cff3f4d99
describe
'563030' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUH' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
e51e6c7c4f928e127f8d20765c47f3f0
998507dd922788df4f55be325ba12921b49412ae
describe
'203242' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUI' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
267e91a26aa4b2ce5922ef5da69c2e8b
624e6a8dc7b3b75d9bd3ac4a586e4d27d19982f3
describe
'667' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUJ' 'sip-files00033.pro'
e62c0a0021deb94598d8414e58a4a145
4a2d51f242a6ff203db7c021df130e4822983269
'2012-01-15T03:16:41-05:00'
describe
'55935' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUK' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
9462cacfe8f7a2a12034f5f246213660
7219bc0656c93d386b90235f1864262c66700852
'2012-01-15T03:16:31-05:00'
describe
'4518608' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUL' 'sip-files00033.tif'
25028a00ad35cdedc71b906ce2ef3d49
5029789376e0b70d264a7e43f99a3e3de9ccc36e
describe
'165' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUM' 'sip-files00033.txt'
29138f42960493a1d96c01869c86661b
9ca025cf857879a9934432f8234693dda2dd994c
describe
'23752' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUN' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
6529bd497ca261f7cbf17c63fd359ac1
e13b10e5094f760a1dd7082f8eb47b238d48f8cb
describe
'563033' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUO' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
fa0949f9ab92878c2092ff33fe04a6db
3830e16dc36f5d2d381c69fc11e11efc818364e6
'2012-01-15T03:16:33-05:00'
describe
'170406' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUP' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
f37d24d5e6261d6329b73ca9582d2fa0
cda19d1525dded7537642490cb3a46e48afd8a54
describe
'30278' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUQ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
abe22d25ba62e0f8699e11b696c1d1c3
7bc44f72f8e61314a6a922accfbb057713188c56
describe
'60444' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUR' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
0260f41ca7a652323353dcc8691c159b
ae9a02677255635043139113e68429991cb6ab83
describe
'4519296' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUS' 'sip-files00034.tif'
6cfd32a5618eeae62ebf7102e4931729
e80fcf3017233e8e3211fe014a77c8e38cd493fd
'2012-01-15T03:15:33-05:00'
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUT' 'sip-files00034.txt'
111cbbc434f7764feccb1841582cd1e6
b6a3c13b2cd00082443abfdf076e6f3a3c09143d
describe
'25742' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUU' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
51101570a98a13fac5db9940c5e2d818
aa064122cbb1d433d65af80294fe9d96ad3d9357
'2012-01-15T03:15:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUV' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
41f3531610f59341195a2ba36ff0b3a5
845c2e5b8001c0948b86150b28951767637e38c2
describe
'154840' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUW' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
69c8b5e4ee8cea36a22b8ad8dfcc5ff4
b3b46ad0193a458784831be0f3f8a3c4153501a9
describe
'24668' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUX' 'sip-files00035.pro'
3e823ae4b29163175d65482adb288b33
e7d7893159d8b789dec23516483cadfbc0ade762
describe
'56077' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUY' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
6f854a5648e1850d1c26df1e1daf3480
a6e8ae840ed96dd061b8457791a9b92e5e2b5d0d
describe
'4518772' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGUZ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
eeff06f2d7ee08487b284ceb8409040a
c877d3032b193386d7d643077caa54971792df8d
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVA' 'sip-files00035.txt'
8e58a84a820992c83c05dd4f7dbe3646
86a1a6729d9ecc4bd274a765f7b68989d7bfdaa3
describe
Invalid character
'24207' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVB' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
b8c010346f695ebb32ccece38c869b8f
e0b1709aec847b74ff956c9005aae16d2082ee3d
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVC' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
10b2e03aeb7e8963afda93eb35b0f82d
1c3a90dd606fa9a55074d7d551b1c76e03a1b746
describe
'178717' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVD' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
b13091ccbeba80d4e20b5d7bedc00a4b
53ea36c6352c55afbe4fd7fc74d1147f1e4684d4
'2012-01-15T03:15:39-05:00'
describe
'33604' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVE' 'sip-files00036.pro'
8f38e29fce8e3b38bd2750208dbe7213
34f3a544240ebaf1064bb1dd2577aad93f1aa1e8
describe
'62819' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVF' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
a50cf7d289e3db276670e1887aba5d41
31706eeaa32628b1359aa02ae185e1549bda3e32
describe
'4519396' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVG' 'sip-files00036.tif'
586a92630f1aaf59b2cad82e993a2d2c
9df6ea5172298d4baf8dbb02540dddc6910ad725
'2012-01-15T03:14:46-05:00'
describe
'1714' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVH' 'sip-files00036.txt'
3de1d5887e18985a5bf2e2a759255c08
f41cf44b54036d5347b10dde8dfbe858ac75e4a1
'2012-01-15T03:16:40-05:00'
describe
'25889' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVI' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
e0ebfb6ea1e4eb9bf5086dbc0bad1a1a
9bf7210f9233537154cb46716616a4bb7d0ca1d5
describe
'562943' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVJ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
f1061a9b299409c9242b96f736828b70
b16f82914ac85be8efafeb0b31b136212b15d8b2
describe
'190346' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVK' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
df930be2418716767eade269fd381a4b
75c0b5e1ff0bc7877f6c3ce8d91d62ccd8c422f3
'2012-01-15T03:15:14-05:00'
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVL' 'sip-files00037.pro'
fbfe5767c135ba84504648525e636024
e783a96b90845d4dd9d397210f7e05c3461eaa3e
'2012-01-15T03:16:36-05:00'
describe
'58223' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVM' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
1605911ecdceafb9e6959e1ad3e71450
dab765181db05c2110550d17682a953a019aef16
'2012-01-15T03:14:14-05:00'
describe
'4520072' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVN' 'sip-files00037.tif'
bdeca0d61e05ab2b52aa73d57db42bf6
fabc36ad53cf48c1ec8588277d8e1644fc2781ca
describe
'160' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVO' 'sip-files00037.txt'
3d4f74f15bc901865ea092a2e981b217
7bf8032c5e6d54b1a60a06930568c4bffedb4a3e
describe
'26810' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVP' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
6afd6c65d881b4529df62529c63d9450
a0efff92b384dbb4b9947c8ccbfcaf196e217f8b
'2012-01-15T03:14:49-05:00'
describe
'563057' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVQ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
12d652b9f713528b73eb2bea7c8158eb
6f950201d64ee34a663356bae15e8898087667d8
describe
'184192' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVR' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
55e9233d2303919eabe06e9c6c544bfb
33c3bbffe4dbd5034b7d86fb449a55fb3f8a6409
describe
'37237' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVS' 'sip-files00038.pro'
1dd23b6053540a98b9365373c62fb031
8502d3b714f3df33a9bf844fa71605d361c094c0
'2012-01-15T03:16:43-05:00'
describe
'63622' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVT' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
784e40abe78ebb6fbe300367bda68756
3aeec4509ab7db085c1a857000ef629461a2fce6
describe
'4519440' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVU' 'sip-files00038.tif'
d17b90ad9d2313f16c8ad0ed6a756694
141b1829496dac8f6e04298b057d9fe95ee0ae51
describe
'1751' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVV' 'sip-files00038.txt'
3d6cd1d4a9a4bcb22b8ffaf64f8fa744
1d05d13cffeb2c62d060a38454925e71e2b464d9
'2012-01-15T03:16:38-05:00'
describe
'25775' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVW' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
dd2107d8ab9ef3e3ce95d5f8e6108914
33082e42aa2976ce6bb2522e79901b865eb249d2
describe
'562973' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVX' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
a5c9e2825b897f51ab900b8f6489a56f
c6c5f1cc4337b975581336691e69dc93e1f1ba19
describe
'212998' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVY' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
021ce0ee0ba33e15c2b79264192937f3
22845d3693e839bd4b620e93b90cd2d228dc4306
'2012-01-15T03:14:36-05:00'
describe
'1929' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGVZ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
ff35583e089b74a4104837e96b13559b
2e682c0a8e19750fbcb94c537dd0c02cdb154954
'2012-01-15T03:14:56-05:00'
describe
'60198' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWA' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
63e4cf1a794ad7df280ed77dd57118c3
3e8debafcebe5d59f82d312d45dc922680471812
describe
'4519620' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWB' 'sip-files00039.tif'
feec7c5b83b3c9018ceeaa51c38db73b
2d560c40f4d011d1b36d1c4ff4342588b9ee667c
describe
'133' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWC' 'sip-files00039.txt'
5d596aadc67b4c6329573db845fd273a
4d805df2760cb6e29f138f43e67a20a5ea4528c1
describe
'26079' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWD' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
0581d7b330361539a5445b3dadf4f117
67f0ad531a2c12b83da47357ddcbf4f669f7f9e0
'2012-01-15T03:14:48-05:00'
describe
'563062' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWE' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
840a3d33933d7f29853afc2e8191489e
2aa0cde2da3c579dbfa0464e6f208040421f41ef
describe
'184179' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWF' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
c38ad6ecb8b84e41fc8db43db16d61b1
537d0a4b7fce6d18879f32cfe80322654242751f
'2012-01-15T03:16:21-05:00'
describe
'41019' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWG' 'sip-files00040.pro'
4722b5de491be4c1a373aac6d655d4a5
8580f43736da534a5603ccdbbf289b736857e6ce
describe
'64011' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWH' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
6043df924d4c19df0adf0e7ab96d66fb
8568e2a087a3b8f7b11d347699bf6718c3667ba4
describe
'4519004' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWI' 'sip-files00040.tif'
805baf1295a1ebffe592c6f7259774da
95b959570a5102aa250f1dce988f754673394361
describe
'1771' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWJ' 'sip-files00040.txt'
e385509a7025adfd61a9f5a48b1f43e5
d5987b760275a5fd514d98e25e8e21e24816d69d
describe
'25035' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWK' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
b7916d72547def2497b33b93c8053fba
c39ce1e68418c685d76193b6b258ab096e11978b
describe
'563010' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWL' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
4b98e42b1ffc12bfbf5f7876f48c4d0e
acbf5e17ba158d0fa30beb7de0f092013942e01f
describe
'163075' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWM' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
32b464f712ef0f20a7c8f2c1dfa6337c
7768e94c3975972df51d1127574f5e1144fe8110
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWN' 'sip-files00041.pro'
94f3b0662b64950fbf31c33770ccc802
5604b8e9b8ec0160c60966524fd628a43e23cdea
'2012-01-15T03:15:41-05:00'
describe
'50583' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWO' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
797d310abbc52dfe01591953c1d7e376
f54811ec29ba8cfe9fdea60f519df1f6aff2ad22
describe
'4518680' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWP' 'sip-files00041.tif'
538c8e2b5f12747db3a731fc3f0d6bb1
ec4964a0fa383536a2158d80d690e68967c61d30
describe
'341' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWQ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
cdc3552013561689a0a8e44a85fe372f
aca1997cbe47f940f9eed0a89aa7d274d14bfb61
describe
Invalid character
'23520' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWR' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
55abb96e2f2385d683c0e0992c7acc55
e5a51c87e29dd84b2e60711c66978ede03aeead7
describe
'562991' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWS' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
00451185bbe7a8bf4d78c26eec64b3f6
c64fd7f0f3ad21f992b012abacd4d68022d41a6c
describe
'140028' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWT' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
029f0f2d0d51953af457593c54000022
bd9508da018acf4e3fa7f6c8d6e650ab211855a6
'2012-01-15T03:15:20-05:00'
describe
'17361' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWU' 'sip-files00042.pro'
582e4ce217aef3a534580a680705b7a1
9c8de1fb76c956a79367be2c0e69471ea7d540da
describe
'50406' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWV' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
8d2752d516f8eb7cccefcf243e9e7e8c
efa79bd21b2249193eba313fa9081305a4263aa3
describe
'4518184' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWW' 'sip-files00042.tif'
3bc95d0765237f54892f13e1e79cc1a8
328140b6c36da52161ea8e08a76a0af3c8bfa044
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWX' 'sip-files00042.txt'
1788a45def4e22c2ca092404c1bc8805
7a54442a9fd99eae5ccce913dfdedac1413bb0ca
describe
'23102' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWY' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
441e1b0ed8d41690bb516782a6ec2bca
b0a5aaa3acb233da10939a64c155d863d9f674dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGWZ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
a680b22bb36b4e5fc114e665de07218d
6f93b572d07ff35e7dd56ecd84a9b19f8e424bce
'2012-01-15T03:16:06-05:00'
describe
'141857' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXA' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
344d4083ad680bff9e12765d577b2c26
1444edc1ac5d2b4a4dc3a3d4e54580eaf1c824b0
describe
'3106' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXB' 'sip-files00043.pro'
6412422eaa3e40a035742ffa0640672e
8a110da6a801cbb7475813a1294e9d9f1a9a4baf
describe
'46914' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXC' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
033b4838281d6850172f2d260ff90743
25375a58895ad10fb279eebfe95aeac5563bf407
describe
'4518040' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXD' 'sip-files00043.tif'
b2d06c305d7b6e37bba9dab7999c982a
ed99fabde862700440f05ab1b973ff95249db034
describe
'213' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXE' 'sip-files00043.txt'
f32318dbd57d3fbbfe56ae7e1e9888d9
e01ea1a6c9caeb61806541172325d11d7a3b358d
describe
Invalid character
'22644' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXF' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
f1037e9c38113de3d20376ff4be034f5
16bc936fa5419cd2dc0ee0779320ab805aa551e2
'2012-01-15T03:14:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXG' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
d9f04b7da0c9a91b74d6679cda071858
0fc517f030f15caf8a36012fe27655f3ae8313f2
describe
'180961' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXH' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
a001204e285e0abd294355b53c09b221
055044577c53b9c7cc74005ff332f3ded5b7e86f
describe
'39035' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXI' 'sip-files00044.pro'
d7454490855940ca723720ffe9134c92
18474a6850bd4091fbb58bf8ed968476948cfa02
describe
'62168' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXJ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
6232e9aa0928dfcf5fc87843143193a9
09f8d0f860b1d61d54c91a9ef2673e6b3907acfe
describe
'4518868' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXK' 'sip-files00044.tif'
11840663f00fca5fffeecec141cd95f9
a8c24cff321bf85029ec342725e78aba87e83df2
'2012-01-15T03:15:58-05:00'
describe
'1761' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXL' 'sip-files00044.txt'
eb722bd0a0e170147aa88b61b0c73cb2
c403f33ddd96fa0a10e6516f6d0f76879e330062
describe
'24631' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXM' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
5f0c97e061c10e08f09afffd57f86c4f
f6f760e473e4f81b8d2b11a23576bea157e32c79
'2012-01-15T03:15:30-05:00'
describe
'562932' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXN' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
20b890f1a8188dfcd9b4c2e34fbc0949
78594dabaa49be26e8ff66ee7403a8bbd3416d8e
describe
'200598' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXO' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
2c8322b7ee8d0a75650e640e3914665c
1a32b3da1dc6fa78ac794d8f7f59fbea193bfc2d
describe
'1834' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXP' 'sip-files00045.pro'
227f10fdad4e224bcfe946b9f1b7a691
fd4071db8668b9bbb2384a03b2f3d12c14efedaf
'2012-01-15T03:14:59-05:00'
describe
'61092' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXQ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
4eb542a6af1c025e285cf92ea26cdee9
044e3c144b7fa7b06e8b5eeb96c4a938b2c97471
describe
'4520156' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXR' 'sip-files00045.tif'
bd63d8bb1b747710603ef574ac8e1390
bfdf183713c7fe25c82a5a8bc99f3b97b8fbfc77
'2012-01-15T03:16:17-05:00'
describe
'171' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXS' 'sip-files00045.txt'
f9cc68e02fcfd0e2da219e21df436fc8
4e7872add06ebe19940e7170b3f86cdc1af111cd
describe
'26917' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXT' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
5697fd67843ee08f18fa67258fd9d6db
19744cc92d114845ea0615fbb4c53e8f90303a4f
'2012-01-15T03:14:54-05:00'
describe
'563055' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXU' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
05a356be0d3b05740d6538d91aadffe2
f207fe5a31b566259d0b2483d8e5f1472c9c7219
'2012-01-15T03:16:55-05:00'
describe
'183387' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXV' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
9e0afc595dbb692e2f229e4ccf47c8fc
0ec95e5ca128a4f38772a587fd2a283b8607747c
describe
'41183' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXW' 'sip-files00046.pro'
f10a5c4f80de33798898304b4d4428cd
b643f7107b5a4d741f027a0839c9ef59c1e1c43c
describe
'63840' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXX' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
1941e28365db27dc7c997c1fd6690100
e01db42985b550170ce0dea7ac4f549147c0c3d4
describe
'4519068' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXY' 'sip-files00046.tif'
f664deb83119aa336e79817a6417f6d7
b5da25736d3d6a56cd70e3903b41a5a384dc4719
'2012-01-15T03:15:05-05:00'
describe
'1854' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGXZ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
7a65ce4c54a2982222d1bb13f067a271
570e502b03cf23f19b45e0e3b6a35ab099af32d9
describe
'25375' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYA' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
2f342b38c06fc30922f075a8a2f5964e
178ddf5f664dc08afa2452d4374f3081c63e59f3
describe
'563056' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYB' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
41a01cd4c3851dc04ae9c5ddff43278a
02a359d4ac8aa5af5596b05f6811feb1ee0d945c
describe
'197981' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYC' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
2d202ed4a653518589383d2a2ebc5d32
f68a0224a698a02f49266f6b45887abd605b1fc9
describe
'788' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYD' 'sip-files00047.pro'
981dd15bebfd6f1408eb48ab6f3ffe00
2f71989dc7d1669b83f4c87a9cb307634944f300
describe
'57276' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYE' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
5f119441f27741522f6c59c8a48989a9
cc3e1ccdc3dc3787e987462b18699f3efcaf933b
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYF' 'sip-files00047.tif'
e6659b8cd22f0766aeea6a7cfdeaa607
7da575e4747db09ecb99cfc9ea52f6e9e290418e
describe
'146' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYG' 'sip-files00047.txt'
08ded0c18a2254d854f60f2127a50aa3
4f796356691f718447171f5077b42449e00e201e
describe
'25410' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYH' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
7bf5e9e45fa2ed6a6151d10887b5e7bd
a77b1afacca8afa6d5555dc09fa74b25e16b9770
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYI' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
ed9cce1b5373633ab261351500c97a3e
4aaba46a5f6ace96fd2cdaa0a7b643dd835e240b
describe
'182646' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYJ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
bccc2b0d4b487f4cc8f64cd0b358b760
e21e099f64df602f3e514f4fa74ae48e13a5fc4e
describe
'37501' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYK' 'sip-files00048.pro'
01ba8c2a33b5007197eae087d48f535a
21cb78d55fadfd51723061bc32b99ce9bc77e457
'2012-01-15T03:16:29-05:00'
describe
'61238' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYL' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
3ad4ae16d44bcfd4cfffb77f549ecbe1
d3bb6b5d9236aa60c912832a6848a547f0dac888
describe
'4518660' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYM' 'sip-files00048.tif'
3d6a06e0a726b9930cf8a04a469c58ae
cdd7d42be0e79eca212d38456a49a8647ccaeb91
describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYN' 'sip-files00048.txt'
20a75e73be44ff0c0275aaaface0ce0c
ed6d033bb43a6fe9d83df6fe0652c5203613e6f4
'2012-01-15T03:15:28-05:00'
describe
'24384' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYO' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
98a47a8dcdb5bf1f27088c1646d18133
bb8c16774aaddb6259cf6162fbf044089c7efeb7
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYP' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
bdc16dc76cb5e2e7097997aecb1578d8
49be5cc53609bb61ac0ccf1f84c01f3e6337e6d3
describe
'228897' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYQ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
38db1715d6a14e2c8ce00279d28b385a
5298ae088edcae242dee2b376937908e134b39fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYR' 'sip-files00049.pro'
1bed9becdce3c87ede3c4c4f6c7a8c9c
1fcd3413e1d6e3f682139227a662896d67f1fbea
'2012-01-15T03:14:10-05:00'
describe
'66048' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYS' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
fca570bc2066fe8d231d166e7ccf2481
2bea2cf57d58949a8018ba24a8470ed63849f8f4
describe
'4520604' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYT' 'sip-files00049.tif'
420880a0e4582c00582d7fafde950032
dbb342d2b09f784a4bed2d51ad4b1b57c55be575
describe
'147' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYU' 'sip-files00049.txt'
1cb93feb2104ce2934a8a43ad9b8cf40
9478c8f4d5900a16476dd1d651dd082ea7c74077
'2012-01-15T03:16:24-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'28093' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYV' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
debd693e3214ff4c8aa12dc45fc11163
303f01a50c64aa1459fa5e9a6ccf3a30bd0023d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYW' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
2fce2fca95ca351d0ddce2ddd3d1cc91
e03c1de48beee07c3d7df5eb865fd540631c9d3b
'2012-01-15T03:14:33-05:00'
describe
'183721' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYX' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
ada4f033a77f0d615224092664b19d0a
b61b40b4d583fc528b2cf403d89521f453c32c54
describe
'39461' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYY' 'sip-files00050.pro'
05be6f7247eee3b55d29fd5b4efee26e
f0fabd15ea495a3d7a8452b9f6ef3e9b73729797
describe
'62018' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGYZ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
47a90afa46243d77461bb84eb234f5e8
6d4d6ddf599a7058d3ba34197926f21e5936850a
'2012-01-15T03:16:08-05:00'
describe
'4518984' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZA' 'sip-files00050.tif'
ee6e2fe49aba91377743656b564aede4
90265c0c9fad49b5ffb260d082feca0655f68b0a
describe
'1801' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZB' 'sip-files00050.txt'
beff44e314e9659fbe5cf65ea3657129
d7a55a749a9fab7767637e228d71572de01142e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZC' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
c51884be9a89e49725239a6aa0710288
b67eeb83ec0efcfd8812809284269bbc9410b45b
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZD' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
a5828b03491b4333635c78d6e5a9eca2
c5ec12dda8f00def85cf87a457942d0728b1c589
describe
'168369' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZE' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
622e5bc2472d83a78ece65aa241ee472
3906d8f05713502841d2860c854beb9dc8b13ce6
describe
'642' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZF' 'sip-files00051.pro'
e159304ab625efd6e45631b180e8c93e
6ff0c74aaa31d33f19416ff922c68a7c257ed90b
describe
'45115' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZG' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
dd93f096027faaba674c529dba986ffc
e61678da53f288305d48483c2ff71aa21fced8c9
describe
'4517140' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZH' 'sip-files00051.tif'
81658c7e373fe164241abdd28c93777f
58d6b7617d6dacfa6d92a1164b2d0bcbd30434b7
describe
'172' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZI' 'sip-files00051.txt'
a072602f453efb7bd00ab650908929ef
cec845aabadce9cf3c37e95699f8392f97374620
describe
'20747' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZJ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
384ee91fde05376443f00262c66e7242
7cfed530a1244b35112f985a6737016b9ae5f6f0
describe
'563026' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZK' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
ccb6b0cdfe6a52371c545e98acec0414
f2281a54374dae20973842519f8a2aaa1aaec591
describe
'136670' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZL' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
ab7555a30fe3a90a0c1467aed31314ec
5f1031b3008e69cdebd3b108be670ec057c41976
describe
'20328' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZM' 'sip-files00052.pro'
ff083eff0ea06a633b3da2426952f2f0
3988bf2fa1af3aa8fce06c0a7900a15d24747edf
describe
'48766' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZN' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
55d6472b6af9c1cdd294cbaeefa8548d
e6237f3144f3554b3afcfc6128779af9b0d97aa6
describe
'4517512' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZO' 'sip-files00052.tif'
207621a4a8d7c511a431acb23b26e25d
9ce45e8437ec6d9a5d0de14bfea62dcf13d4f51c
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZP' 'sip-files00052.txt'
449f9da67466d8e24e32990132f4f311
a198859ca464c356509a8eb17b4be4f45fc16ecf
describe
'21546' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZQ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
70f559c38b6201f75c42a9a891271663
9a8d6aa32101ab486962307a48c8a31525684d1f
describe
'562925' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZR' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
f37e793e817aaa92456c63126c01988c
2e8b4fd22d968158735ad4802386fd431a8bea03
describe
'184388' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZS' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
23c84e78e5f7be7a9c6e590b99ff7257
734c60e8a260a1bf0d9820347299d7718497f0ce
describe
'698' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZT' 'sip-files00053.pro'
e80c9f43e4d98aefc87ad8281f3273fd
17029be7ec03a8108e7ffa22dd023ad4d44efd44
describe
'55188' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZU' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
9f72286be6ba7e30dd45ceecd1c4fc2f
28281970957f500d7b92b821b630e7d3e26e1e47
describe
'4519148' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZV' 'sip-files00053.tif'
a7ccdcd276f9d8e7cd5134ada06c47b2
5aaf9e3b0bc02fa5680adefca8d42271c0eb6836
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZW' 'sip-files00053.txt'
d87b72cb2391c0c7da2b26c1dd9069b9
8c1916222589fb55033d57eb9f196c95a82020d9
describe
'24931' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZX' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
7a07bb793977f41b7f0fd4fee494452d
8fe34cae6fc19a38ec1f0028ecbfc68549066da9
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZY' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
39b405c65ecf3d610e7877fa1b2bc798
2066ccb20d90f4bd2abffcf3875549c7648627b5
describe
'179563' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACGZZ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
877736c7ceb46dfe809356746c9900f3
f062b0139429e5dcb1cb2d67c7d9541c5884c558
describe
'40825' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAA' 'sip-files00054.pro'
32b89abcc4b13e37c7a9b57da5a8fbd8
1294b54b9b091721d170494519ab50d0aafb1ebb
'2012-01-15T03:16:01-05:00'
describe
'63084' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAB' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
ec214efb7d156e32654e59d5c9fb7983
5c653320a4c4737614a6c9758f754649d390e4ba
describe
'4519156' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAC' 'sip-files00054.tif'
c4edc4d315793d8e069732fcd97f8aea
245dbff56a78fab51a34d324ab5a414a544b52c6
describe
'1776' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAD' 'sip-files00054.txt'
1e846583c1cc6086dbfe5370d060f7db
3f206a2f1ed3521fc1cc5905b33fc3564e92acc4
describe
'25401' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAE' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
ae21e0d156a8c2450534591bf25b40dd
47798376d726007625ab24cb6524f26c58dc326d
describe
'563032' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAF' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
2ac6932ddd7b81cf3dd60fb27622df34
81dd6adb53acc694c8a15c141f9b14d78f8b97bc
describe
'125066' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAG' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
cc8bb5a1ab1b43b81ae969b7fe40ab4a
ccd2f7ac3d1edeed3555c80222b4bb50f7528d70
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAH' 'sip-files00055.pro'
692fc72842f771b1cf58ad886a2c803a
58a8e2e1ce052d5f8465fb197b086a7f05735fb9
describe
'39142' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAI' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
666a2a90a837dba5fe7146440fce37fb
f20683c381a0a28d72f6e54f1d64f6e3ffe828a6
describe
'4518924' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAJ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
a85cb939c718bd8756aea883462b1101
bbdf422afe9bd0ff4582c1e1c0caf771324003c8
describe
'151' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAK' 'sip-files00055.txt'
773f27a475f02586b4a37deb84eede94
9c85847a16b0036b158e0be6d9afb259287ef6e1
describe
'20780' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAL' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
4d6626bd7af0005e5cb844a52438ccdd
7f260163ee33e659f30db8dcfd3d96071859eaaa
describe
'562979' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAM' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
304aadb7fbebea0027087cf439fa53d1
b8e9775f253b99e068c828ff1007687639c94467
describe
'187557' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAN' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
40861bf48c798ac11144bce9779ee093
de7ac81c3dd034d0574054268d921ce8199ee582
'2012-01-15T03:15:02-05:00'
describe
'40750' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAO' 'sip-files00056.pro'
65d2c9ce3795fe3cfe7c606854a81aa8
430b93f46ac7495676ad28f9f4ca385aae334709
describe
'64123' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAP' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
6e6779c61931d9c9fb8471219881462f
7a0759940d7a3bc7c60cd7cddfd36ef9a991394f
'2012-01-15T03:15:35-05:00'
describe
'4519364' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAQ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
e209275a4aea41215baa5b2565d4e15c
87b1cdf8f612f589c45aed126c700742585db4cd
describe
'1788' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAR' 'sip-files00056.txt'
a1bf3b24e34ab4c49b9618e47e7c057c
e7feea1589cdeb537253ad71023e5c6b972c840c
describe
'25735' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAS' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
445d8d9705f132851993c7f5f7385ec3
840c7815ab0fb63490e3ba377ed52bda961193c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAT' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
ed43d87651ea4ec6bbf52c7f101cce67
2b6415766ade992fd4e2412630bece18f15ebdf0
describe
'199671' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAU' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
6e2234c126c08884738e78813923ff00
e91581e4345613d3e8efa90d0177a271976bc2a7
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAV' 'sip-files00057.pro'
fb5fe928506aca68b47ad7d738f320aa
a3505fabe5effc5b0166a368d46d472059d49f0c
describe
'59946' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAW' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
5ca418ff5001de22e5b09e4d04dd2dfa
37531d366dd0ed743cb76a14370e908a6a9496b0
describe
'4520124' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAX' 'sip-files00057.tif'
06cc0905f1feb41c6bf4db15031d9da2
edc3f5abfe44765a47389e638bd9f895d06704d2
'2012-01-15T03:16:02-05:00'
describe
'248' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAY' 'sip-files00057.txt'
2903493231d6168712cefc3051ab3e40
26d0e2305a3f050f30e8c161e336a5655ce41cf6
describe
Invalid character
'26764' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHAZ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
4215281f0380f1f1ba7c3d244cc9afdb
f368e5d35801978344cc10c9aa2866d1feb4623f
describe
'562971' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBA' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
67e1152c1d63cd10efafedeef49112c3
96b67085dd6890401a79a48c40f6e71d9b85c6d0
describe
'182850' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBB' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
01ae39d2fa520717226b2dfcf6202afb
d6849fb5d82bd0d1f99ef0c0b428033a2feda898
describe
'39928' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBC' 'sip-files00058.pro'
8f9b21aaf1a39860815dea96ad3092a7
6ec9c9a2b0c42fcdbb4355b53e68c457ff2b322d
describe
'63128' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBD' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
8528e20ff910ea9a4265f164415b0287
8be144bb3469b00b092143b643ddf1ccb7e2a1e8
describe
'4519088' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBE' 'sip-files00058.tif'
8e60217989a9c7e6ce2ba767d83e0e70
ddf01dc16934885ad11bc7a822723d921fe1d2fa
describe
'1743' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBF' 'sip-files00058.txt'
fe1c63134ec3129dca529c4721cf5dcb
1b55e3433b71cfd7f0c46611b655764251ff830d
describe
'25167' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBG' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
9bc44e5014472a8c55ef8ed35a37c021
fb81de71c086697931dcdc8240353bdf74471793
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBH' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
1a41a6c8617c78373c87ad53111eaf8d
1a7d1f6521bdf2ce09e78f44ba809dc9321dadfa
describe
'200711' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBI' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
96016d6cfdf3fb946d1f284602fc4bd1
149e93a3891b09252a942dccf012a2ee4f6f949f
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBJ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
581eafd24d1ff97abf4df88e36bee065
7b50b05daa43fe3d176e0f5afb40b6d4a45c02ac
'2012-01-15T03:15:29-05:00'
describe
'57988' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBK' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
daae6948398fc5d278ce6f8f4fb81518
8fbfe8701af79ee95694dde0bcab8480650a11c6
describe
'4519248' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBL' 'sip-files00059.tif'
0cf69afa5b40bb0599fa072f81123143
dd84c1517b9dfa05fcbf395e850728d026a93b50
describe
'205' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBM' 'sip-files00059.txt'
b34e2508b3a27fba2afd724efed797a8
44bcee67a484ca12593d0c9fcc80a5c8a79ce75d
'2012-01-15T03:16:20-05:00'
describe
'25214' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBN' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
3be74a1976025ad3d48483b03b1fcf09
e1a683636379b36c751fdc77d65b6998cd549381
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBO' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
3bb153707652ee78f9c35f87662f9667
7b153593aba1e856f49c6b63c7295827b2a20f53
describe
'172553' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBP' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
f10c9b1e22cdd52b011d859159d6cd53
7556c1507943ad9ef5ff860c6151cf5d49fdc72f
describe
'36947' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBQ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
32ca2bd5cfc2fad16de6ed33a7b6ad79
ccf8e44ed5b856314e53e1040ca4542b524b2c76
describe
'59629' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBR' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
8508544f53b185e49639bc9291d4407f
ca449068498dd84e75cb1a1cc8c823901e51c2ca
describe
'4519048' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBS' 'sip-files00060.tif'
a71946531c7db6360e842b11bddaa7a1
12674ca058972b1bf51827f1651ab9a732cd3a3d
'2012-01-15T03:14:25-05:00'
describe
'1722' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBT' 'sip-files00060.txt'
440b4bdbb413b2a8ad73c2781e460c54
5eadf21479b76fcff5d4f3e25928ca2f2d92e7b8
describe
'25057' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBU' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
f8eba3aedf2dfae5cc1e9ede648f4f4b
8895be37ab391796c8cdd8e5e6e4d2cab1bdb8b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBV' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
816ea37b88b478cd56423197da360a3c
84c5a5958d5a13fbbc6b74d5b24234577a0a0807
describe
'166959' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBW' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
f2f431ff4a2ea5872e4253de86301c24
1c3a56bd737726c5ba77bf3ebc02f709862b18b4
describe
'5900' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBX' 'sip-files00061.pro'
266ff824f597c792d458e3829660739d
96455df4d80ce84e0aa64921406619c1e08869ff
describe
'48587' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBY' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
1595ebd105a96bd3aa1f72a7f6461f7b
b24b0cfaf740be2b2c8a0a99a3bcd69434ca0537
describe
'4517752' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHBZ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
c82b3e81a108b814430d54daa5b7c5fa
55957714a97209113c3019e9db01fc70c500fb82
describe
'373' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCA' 'sip-files00061.txt'
53d69456a92016282c1bd21149d3e02a
2ba05fa0fc6b2b045222b0de3575aba65061993e
describe
Invalid character
'21897' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCB' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
e98f03cd231b1b1706c3659730a17cd4
e52fa7d3f00d22cf515db3ec6632c897a581f402
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCC' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
e6e274fe87ae673ad891f893c43e5257
c4bf035c04d0e52162bb8a68dd4fa3a8ad16ded3
describe
'173620' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCD' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
d3762bbe97176fb0ab12d116d50ec623
82ed0c2312293618c466166c090dad57474ec67c
describe
'39359' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCE' 'sip-files00062.pro'
85c0d50bdf666e3ee23442d7beb59808
7e1989d194bf641c667773b91e45998c44add91b
describe
'59502' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCF' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
1dc0ff63888c8c2eb0ba6201981531eb
50e7340ae0daf6fc50badea81c0b26a963166fc0
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCG' 'sip-files00062.tif'
92f6903e8c539d655740841e0090f6a9
efe28712f6908f4abe5e5b7c4437282bfee567a6
describe
'1710' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCH' 'sip-files00062.txt'
4d360abfa246a1a365258b0e57af9c22
a923b62973b5c7eee7ce99429ef72ab8d1ea1d2a
describe
'24181' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCI' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
93274d5ca74acab01b7f0fd58b1a1e3b
74c9ccc32730fb804d094a6df761e6897ebba5a9
describe
'563024' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCJ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
587b7de3ed0772f99a440465982f2844
4aa037f499d5958838b33476e8f2c1103c816d9c
describe
'186714' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCK' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
9d4d64121e9c1baa7b3dd9e762755256
59bc5e2d5a5a4d5ec135f19f5dcda499be67fd72
describe
'1881' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCL' 'sip-files00063.pro'
5044f9e71b5883633d4c481cf5e74207
5fb09bef13daa4d9b5c8bc4a77ae1cd928b16cb7
describe
'57864' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCM' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
afddd9fe070eed8a3234264b5eca1bf0
0bdd1508125bc36f5e9930f791125500604a95fe
describe
'4519996' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCN' 'sip-files00063.tif'
cce223b394fb85af9ecd2c373ab601e0
d55ccd4e1814a094e01c3f5543725bdbd830682f
'2012-01-15T03:14:03-05:00'
describe
'240' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCO' 'sip-files00063.txt'
e8620992ed570af9ccad88c76b616604
91149a3a91b9be3446b6b1acf50d4b6f01a01ebe
describe
Invalid character
'26745' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCP' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
ba68d417690e44506b47ffd502c92566
1575bfef333903cbe840c48a75dbd08848151158
describe
'563022' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCQ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
85608c3a87919cf1e2f199653e40d08b
633b88af4a552f0f9cc4d933285c690a5d0bc99e
describe
'131233' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCR' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
9a676caff2f87722ceff0eff258be7c1
56134905e9b8895e955afc5ed5ca7067b50214f4
describe
'16325' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCS' 'sip-files00064.pro'
6d44e79f247cdf66e842788056363a85
f0dc529d9b7dff57b838f9c2477af854c94e8c62
describe
'46861' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCT' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
f15e1c5aa1c34f99b52d68b68fbea14d
0ad6bdad05a50c7ec24a4f51d05056166613f612
describe
'4517660' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCU' 'sip-files00064.tif'
93860210dfeefa8250c045f549b7adec
6b1890bdbcfe541d4a76aff380b864a827e8f979
describe
'781' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCV' 'sip-files00064.txt'
f2870ff72964e6ac76ea2df3eb73d235
f6c5c25d2539b02612683304da70bf9f2242015b
describe
'21693' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCW' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
5faa8b724db93fb31bcbb229c86ebe53
b73fc00e8f8ea6a2f30249485b5f31d98f17b599
describe
'562962' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCX' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
e8e94b7eed7ba52384406900968d96db
a1d0a9c867231f0f681595cf4e7ecd674eb3ddde
describe
'166994' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCY' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
da8af4d6d181ecbbc3e6981ba4347883
198072b7e234231ff28e6f5cd5027213bd676270
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHCZ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
379d44b76bbd11d178037d94089304f5
7544d00372305e0b4fa47bb62e80b6ebe2531806
describe
'51617' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDA' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
074ab6c6a97491e75874cd31ee7a06d5
0f1461f784e2237cecbd0b8ae409a4d327bfd3ac
describe
'4518792' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDB' 'sip-files00065.tif'
fca7f62578d67a22427399157dc5fc63
4a424ee74506b5bd0f9feeda944aca47c5e7a200
describe
'97' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDC' 'sip-files00065.txt'
cfff4ec1803a349c9cef86db324ccd9e
f8997922b5787a82212756edbb8691df9f630eb8
describe
'23993' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDD' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
248511d8ab4563fe1e32f989d6fba41a
a76f22d259d750b76f87bb26583a0fb63975f6e6
describe
'562944' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDE' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
08959d8aacd3c17c0008f8b52c08552a
1143c25bcca8b88f3f1ffa64e96f602443785a36
describe
'190796' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDF' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
af74f127c0541e5664615d9018787f7e
6d2af6c341427519a023213f042e32a70ac54b13
describe
'38194' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDG' 'sip-files00066.pro'
02fbc65b8af7e4d4555cabe43f641c29
4c756b34c9fd77f14f07cdf17ef8b30f8a74e7db
describe
'62603' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDH' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
b24fb52f3b7f5e32d95f99ef88506a8b
1e2d0620194c6cbd1ca7402244dfb72d9c3f734f
describe
'4518972' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDI' 'sip-files00066.tif'
4daa93b25dccbccf36ee7c851fa6e41d
def08b51fdd900ca623f7310028f2c89dcb61f91
describe
'1798' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDJ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
fd08caebcc7c3d58dddbefc31adc93b5
37c4e10fddacd649a0133c044caa54fe853eaa75
describe
'24968' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDK' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
ba1b020a1102afd88ed06595a0fcf86a
8ecbb53429dcb87cff75c0361f9e8c5cacec428d
describe
'562936' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDL' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
83aa618e856414a84f2ba16c49d23168
adcb74388c621240fbd47066e538ab27dd1e3a05
describe
'194858' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDM' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
bfa4f318c86ef91021786e0160f6cacf
40ef91178afd96a2dcfa9a799443e946a8e79f3c
describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDN' 'sip-files00067.pro'
6eb97a839ec1df4752d015c0d49d9bdf
49055ff8a417ea1a89606b789f7a9c196269de94
describe
'59887' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDO' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
3bb40af973b588c8d019f7787fb80bce
5ab3653f0d37fd46f9bebe06987ea0c528771529
describe
'4520048' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDP' 'sip-files00067.tif'
54fa9a7e0b70402a09a52cb5b8611d05
d8bf6d6d541fd0d63ed7bab27e44c63d17eedf51
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDQ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
d5ee2ccb4263bf5038f3925e75f98cc0
9adb0919fa17ac08e1ed009d3a21c4f9eed339d7
describe
'26818' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDR' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
fd8f472e4f21003bbb3b797dce1600fe
6138ce68f43249f62dd1feb54d4c8f83b84f633a
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDS' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
3ff9c8c625c1d2bae7e7e5bf59bb3c42
615a903308c1c9f73c6907a8a7f6f90c5729be56
describe
'166170' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDT' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
7bf3e5af135cd69d8918535f9c1ee752
5cb349e9182f59b8d58decf6490d38fe4e73e500
describe
'35880' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDU' 'sip-files00068.pro'
1180d45dc302005bc47a69f2690b56b5
240077e3bc3d735220820b76d963e674b63afc78
describe
'57804' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDV' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
b5423fddc2f2ff2a982383d603701d60
90b0766e00dd252b9fa561f3db2a064c170a76f9
describe
'4518448' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDW' 'sip-files00068.tif'
dbd914ade342e4dac4ab179e39b1e4a0
bb0f1d153b9cf078ad2c815c9616f1cf68a2a3ff
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDX' 'sip-files00068.txt'
631dccb8f37e9cda8ec255d335abb374
176a4977ecdbc244dc241a9671ba05012c713d17
describe
Invalid character
'23533' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDY' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
d871febbc6d2b766806d68acdb997fad
baaa26698a919db19b1bed3ab19e1b5bd21b1430
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHDZ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
17850ac1624ce41aeb0997bcf2c581e6
0fb82f331f515ff319af754a1bdad7cfa86fb95b
describe
'209597' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEA' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
e49200f26cefcfaf7108ffa581db3878
eb0b3242f4254331153950d67129b591afff28cd
describe
'2511' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEB' 'sip-files00069.pro'
8196f9a6554c49f23c3f1d43ba5bb57d
2c73b857ac823172acc5d8ea90ba0d6589b23744
describe
'60899' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEC' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
45e0bac00061b44b62437e83e7fbdacb
c9bd3a7c3ad18d1e72e8dd8513bc54a22baf546a
describe
'4519628' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHED' 'sip-files00069.tif'
f445514384066129846103ffacfa5050
cf8fb1b4230c8fe8890496e917224cad6a8e93db
describe
'209' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEE' 'sip-files00069.txt'
d12f86e9ffb383bbad239977dceec7fa
5297261c063e14e06651506dc2c24363bd2da0c0
describe
'26009' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEF' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
21e5904d32c7f8f8b3c196cd737d1010
c2800cafe7719c5f4c0e69488aee38df7d6720c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEG' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
6f3eae4d2220b34a0d8c52583dc49ca4
0cc083da58b851e5e44b4a060b0ad234668d18e8
describe
'179879' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEH' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
855257b1523101a47cc57eed13abcd48
b5503b37b0cc480c042a1488cca9be1af3c5402c
describe
'37714' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEI' 'sip-files00070.pro'
c28d98bc942e92ca44c24da4d931742f
2527cc664111e8ce1003106cdbbf49815fd31156
describe
'61473' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEJ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
a389efa8c6ab6c7c5b13b789979b1383
c7b043c369d3bf97ece2887e5d8a5450c5cf4af0
describe
'4518876' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEK' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b63946874bc17f697679496a4c935743
9fcdd84ab15c9cf2c99172638b9f93204fe910e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEL' 'sip-files00070.txt'
c657f4241357a80745d0bacb5c9def79
e9a0f23e6c6ac175afe513f0637b10922d485df9
describe
'24665' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEM' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
26019df61fe3e0ae70e79278ab4d849a
34bd154ff29a06f6e3d3f5eb6d3f6503866d3860
describe
'562987' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEN' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
806a3f1e1e660025372726543c797c88
f57432f5a94f88a1c13ce69379669c408decbfc6
describe
'216406' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEO' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
1b98045914971af69337ad05c1aef59c
f2a6b72d35fca950168b09f870afb9f53d777e3c
describe
'1911' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEP' 'sip-files00071.pro'
3e38320b6e5c21ce0ccdef193dbd63ea
72b9e72a87352b93b2f505efef9efed172b61fd5
describe
'63658' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEQ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
4905d155315044ce0db2532a24b71e25
d0cf34e2fe9f327daf0032523719e7f6eb59393f
describe
'4520224' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHER' 'sip-files00071.tif'
2f3b8891c77cdbba0da5bd4e90ff0f7a
d30b96738ebc42b46c3aee87cab15b9410366f6c
describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHES' 'sip-files00071.txt'
359fc97b1c15e503fe586d4a74de81e4
68878ea4e5a471cf78fc8f62d137afc9e790cc44
describe
Invalid character
'27143' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHET' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
242c62e6a7f6f292c614db1371ed670f
6519e156033b6c4b4023350d8ddb3367a72693cd
'2012-01-15T03:14:31-05:00'
describe
'563036' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEU' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
33b551933af03b7c671bf05479a5f7f0
e2216841a7d7f60cc913a28ad3a67f1deb67c0a4
describe
'194384' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEV' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
74fcb528f0406b1becf71649d0b2af72
1a87ccb4b653ce464812d84cac76a99e130c9215
describe
'40699' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEW' 'sip-files00072.pro'
317db2daf6fe1b9da724e8dff1030747
fa411918c20158ca240b4b08b94df61749843073
describe
'64034' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEX' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
bdefd79b72bc7083d4e7fde83f1dac59
f0802421004b8bf65ed5dbee419ff1a63f007bf4
describe
'4519128' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEY' 'sip-files00072.tif'
c6e87e781e61370afc356d569ee48e82
86cb17546228821b413ecbfd314bf472c376362d
describe
'1804' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHEZ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
ca8b77811f93f21c2ee4c85b4d2dfec2
cd64e2819f85459dd8ab9f514bfcafaf51505944
describe
'25428' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFA' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
d66e008c3d6964950705af8b472db2be
fdb76c66e676e84e1bd8e7145bfe52be749008a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFB' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
cd5b707ab8d27da44857a5a5062610f5
467a09ad20c42e8eb5f33304f2e6afb7294adcf9
describe
'194238' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFC' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
0a67ffef83385ef2c04a6ac1e08b69aa
ee17c23e48ac780bab9c08e5557f1e844f71411a
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFD' 'sip-files00073.pro'
6e5f3526435e90716a69df00aacf3852
35ee4e567f5641e387fd3456c5663265ca91f3b0
describe
'54619' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFE' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
a3adaf3df71c1eaa21495e1d7290dfbc
55098a6637f899e2e817092367dd6514c3062ed1
describe
'4518696' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFF' 'sip-files00073.tif'
9fdb77252ed188dab89e342dabab3d00
a3631a0ba611bc2da075fccafb6f5c5b4a35f50f
describe
'194' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFG' 'sip-files00073.txt'
a02cc89af88465b2fcae50ea2354e0df
3f47001af1a73b40b5aeb0d6aeceee07a057860d
describe
'23839' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFH' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
1a8c20f6dde67320f1633d8b8a5b96b8
a7f5e29d0e4908662f4bc30efa8db5b585291e2b
describe
'563017' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFI' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
213f8ac1bb6147b07c23477dfa84a530
dba69118923e8fc5388d71bca57e55f173420d38
describe
'135316' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFJ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
8d3c09556b1433fabd428b26414f0beb
c57493597c5e56d419b9225c14899ee480735da4
describe
'21097' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFK' 'sip-files00074.pro'
acd8e2357a39c27fcb1b46cd73dbe9be
549e09f1c0ecdf25cb0f40743ec538e59911a758
describe
'45346' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFL' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
527ef50d47e243afb4cfb77eb18c4e77
305b8b312f292fa77a7c29298ed2f035cd1e77bd
describe
'4516588' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFM' 'sip-files00074.tif'
c073979c05ebf46474c4a99a61409556
73a940073d4d6670b2df9309297d155461a89063
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFN' 'sip-files00074.txt'
6122434ec4c55a3f52d89cbc3a678798
aa7d3926b8c21c8f82750be1280100291fdccc5d
describe
'19719' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFO' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
87010e5bce5f6b344db9c800093b3345
0e01da618cbcdea80bb1033642a209fbf6f1813d
describe
'562891' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFP' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
e1b4ec208ea07401ba26fb739e88fc8a
94ee6c3e3d59935e3658bf3dec3ebad911bdef85
describe
'176330' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFQ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
ee61f1453bb7014bab5b87d7b652f9f1
8075d9409cf4f741c952cb7cd7eeef265b8813c6
describe
'2700' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFR' 'sip-files00075.pro'
01f3bb5823e44e8ac62b9ad3ac57e8c5
1ee433cb4579238e23ed4b7fcdf6078e96d105b7
describe
'55651' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFS' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
eaf06ba4a337c49bf70e6320f1ec4498
4115c25113f811c2a1ea989087b350fb85375d7f
describe
'4519632' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFT' 'sip-files00075.tif'
2cf91258d6df7de7d1a71ed68838fb9f
220e07197de4e9871f84f325b760c1ec772b0939
describe
'250' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFU' 'sip-files00075.txt'
1843c486edd36c164c6f536cfbf9ba1e
d7f4a9e54ccdf697a4e745b489033c4eabe861a2
describe
'25703' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFV' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
3ee0f42353716f47221a0f2865b59568
df0a4c2065ea7913b4147c70b671434078357eed
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFW' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
8ce49b2320326b423f254ff096508566
329becbc8eb470012ee24000c34819234c047997
describe
'177242' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFX' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
5e0a5cf82d2851e757e1d2c4181f74c4
41d0f8d39215c307e7febb240a8348436dbff45e
describe
'38832' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFY' 'sip-files00076.pro'
8c845f9eedc6dbe76a2dc80bff912cc8
34204ef38377624cfcd52f0249fc6c4b6eec3d54
'2012-01-15T03:15:31-05:00'
describe
'60729' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHFZ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
19bca44ad56b6385be3813b036acc7ab
fdc9d3396d36aa9739d1d90f20c5441fd37d4f2b
describe
'4518832' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGA' 'sip-files00076.tif'
23d42a5fdcf97725d2b34e998a98932c
78250f3bc01d3604c1227dfc38e5cb1d89e77f18
describe
'1740' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGB' 'sip-files00076.txt'
6ea56052b14a32aece8b9b0c3f88c683
5f708bcdaf2d04f0ecd366c8174871343982ce61
describe
'24755' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGC' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
4b4d9c8238ce9d46af99aa19af876c23
1690ea64c8b97b83233658b6412219f34fc19dd9
describe
'502441' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGD' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
4641878149dd44265f1b960a8a1ce7c9
d1e59d292e4c7ab0dcad3bb2f6d71939e81d2e6a
describe
'227652' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGE' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
77dc267920694bef96200b1c4bf59420
ca94cc885177f11b5f7a084e7efe09e2995bf3fb
describe
'2559' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGF' 'sip-files00077.pro'
8f2a9f76122260ad1c61e337775ed890
8a4e8daf6fdbcf00be195066ae8cd0d5d686f6ed
describe
'69087' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGG' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
886df6a9ba26b77f9ea58094d9eb8158
5325ee3503cb6383cc45bec8f8c7266032c3b925
describe
'4036424' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGH' 'sip-files00077.tif'
20aa8ec5c383b9655b1b2f637d4d191b
1e05adcf648cd0cab455d0127791d16f2bc7dc28
describe
'278' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGI' 'sip-files00077.txt'
819dfd14490ee143d81fb4ef7ccc0495
d68570c2cef5f59cfd512f1c50ce4746b796e09f
describe
'29931' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGJ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
298bca1617f526deae0d531b7b0fdbd6
d5a17f40ae217efaee5f8960b5a1b2620507071f
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGK' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
a32eaf77e45e7a421345a15efcade15a
05c4ee55d2d86e79fb9518a0e787f25a9cf458b6
describe
'187594' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGL' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
7d9be8c10a6f138c6428e2f323582bbb
64d62446a4507a59419daad20f9d145b7ebe6a95
describe
'38104' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGM' 'sip-files00078.pro'
030e0e5231bee8bb5ad3768212559207
f3064c24e1bba4ce132db02d1aa168feb0249f9e
describe
'62172' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGN' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
b51dfb911596459e6963a729399f920c
b757188898b5358fad0d7abed6f38cacbeaf3a67
describe
'4518992' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGO' 'sip-files00078.tif'
e9c1f27544c58e987e1330259d5f7cd0
10f22286799685058582286a6357207c00f70d2b
describe
'1729' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGP' 'sip-files00078.txt'
319b75f4e15c751efc5026d390b46dc1
3b8b5ef1542e46b9b46042b8cdea03ae5b0ba3ac
describe
'24868' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGQ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
fbcd4b95b9cc78ea187f9afdcdfa007e
8821a0433ab2d52d59f552d6b9f728c17e78bbde
describe
'562948' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGR' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
63e5ed10a1015b73a59cf4258f8edbef
6f84d525a14123fbd800db763de2bab4f39e7634
describe
'188491' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGS' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
7bd824521b96bce6b7a6b2e84e83dc08
f504677c40b1a9a590d9871e018ff6091e6d2a3e
describe
'542' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGT' 'sip-files00079.pro'
df1de94e2eabe047e971ee6581896a5a
272a0dde54db90659cad8a9b87a0ab4e0d1c36fb
describe
'58715' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGU' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
5f2e04ce7f26a160b245cf6579bab89a
d7bb70af166418987eabbe5a46ff43620b79491f
describe
'4520132' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGV' 'sip-files00079.tif'
90d4e9b43e4af4dd8fac26437d759af6
943a6696a68e4fc5c9cf5686f7500b2ec77f9f74
describe
'154' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGW' 'sip-files00079.txt'
736fe41abbe505203e70283e0ce823cf
5c2911cb654b9cc096513372d431994bb065ef24
describe
'27023' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGX' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
0e8f183e2cf9055fe96429bb4df00804
f5fe43a280ffbbf77a980ed4eba34e0c6e5a35d4
describe
'563015' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGY' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
335e059c88b545f099a59637aa23e1c1
5dbb8c507fa33206dcaa6460f71faa6a318f0f12
describe
'198598' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHGZ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
4fbe6bb106d81eea4a9ae175500889fd
154776134b219e6603b6228a3f461e703c7d8c15
describe
'41255' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHA' 'sip-files00080.pro'
646d1e116de8fa05ffac4dfff43085c3
ab9b75d1f8ec71c898bab5fd9ae3e5c0dd5ed982
describe
'64898' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHB' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
264248fa5e5207a27bc82af8336140db
c02c164e50900b62934b0073cf3b38adf3e65d90
describe
'4519172' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHC' 'sip-files00080.tif'
de4243b7d3e8aba26f2d0f8c925b35b2
b36a20b15775bbab4986df21cdd79717ee9a5964
describe
'1811' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHD' 'sip-files00080.txt'
43d46c4e39b3895a628280d9a2c7b481
82a88554ddbaad6568a4a7e5673e371fd7975785
describe
'25329' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHE' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
2a639c6a03893421d5a5bea5d7cf0dd4
5181a113ecf50125a5f0f650037db1d852c0fd34
describe
'563051' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHF' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
b9bad97c25361894ed23c56e50b22891
ead4b51d0ec6744bda83efa8bf6d1f89011fabcb
describe
'216077' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHG' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
5478de6aa352d8350b31e753a82d84bd
e05c9daaf111c83a9af0d3ccdeb9146928e32ee1
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHH' 'sip-files00081.pro'
7ea447f06ae2833f46f2b81e3425a36a
302062e29877775902dbccc725ca2222ed75f93b
describe
'60133' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHI' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
e25966ac698dcb11675fb94da020608d
7c2a4389e8618360fad9aee7c24dcef986313098
describe
'4519740' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHJ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
55d1525dbcc18f64f67a11283d17f321
ae2ba0fab70b12f4c79e489da7a430d1f410e405
describe
'134' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHK' 'sip-files00081.txt'
33130ccbc3aa22e56488dcd1aeba6c1f
1cf2b9988dc59650e1ea751a9ac10403dc053aae
describe
Invalid character
'26151' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHL' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
6243e05368ce2b953187adbf9a186a28
71ca333f66aef6c18ac0fc750549fc8a6b41048b
describe
'563013' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHM' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
cb0b9702b0cb0f26c9f311cd1190579f
1b98894063cfeecfa3551558ec0fbf3ced06b286
describe
'182231' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHN' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
0c52103ae638b28ab17175f97763468e
4a17deabf2ffe29773dbaf67a1efe518a3af3f97
describe
'37990' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHO' 'sip-files00082.pro'
4bfe0baf17d06644ae719128cb4fdae0
1c4af34f071c0f0b37c9b7e2213749b77ce47a09
describe
'62233' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHP' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
3c1eb0ac4718e9536e2344056c9b98f6
0eeaad72c9646d95f51f5ea819ab69a0cf947355
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHQ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
d4bf71e3569e0162ed671a88f0d0d846
20a30bca8e1110080054f4aa1fbb60d669c18deb
describe
'1703' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHR' 'sip-files00082.txt'
a0a6876468e9a69c2be5891650af3edb
3cfe31db098c2f5156bf9c1740df0a6af6f81ae4
describe
'24548' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHS' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
10e48a12fa537d24dcbfa2993dd10c4e
a02b4a2b4af623008f1f5ff2c3dcab5fb0dd7064
describe
'562949' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHT' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
14942d8b8b98ff391ca3933b5057400a
68fbdd5dd2c1804453bfd204919ef57b783f75bd
describe
'197470' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHU' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
7f3d1314dfdb87096d64fc1b5362c02f
0c6fe016e5deb0fa46e8f9c4f14cc586018291f9
describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHV' 'sip-files00083.pro'
dd5788de3a12d65231b7db9c3947ec52
00ebaa74c7b0f1770f87eb930823c63d81670082
describe
'59769' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHW' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
6003f913bfef1d6a2137b4267aded0d2
a21feef032ab1958b7ba959368c4a2e7696c1f9d
describe
'4519972' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHX' 'sip-files00083.tif'
997f312759f9d2e2dd354e8ed26c018d
40d0c6a1ed4f71d359962eb3b1fc87628be02eb0
describe
'225' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHY' 'sip-files00083.txt'
0c5376ad6d79eac3bb5864b08e218d6c
8b71a0eb2b7456dda7a5c7f1c52f92aa2cb19592
describe
'26564' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHHZ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
2f347e8aaf5fe685126b523897e6cc57
ea1df46ae295a0ac3ad82179316773d4b0e65b06
describe
'562955' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIA' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
a60f406f5c2ac1602f7abe138a332a6b
c719401f0ccce9f4289b13ff1a3b93c5b61b52fb
describe
'188862' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIB' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
a41fd5929a4ea8d880fd52d08e03e874
3d8faea59a6f6b5f29c6ad40e884cc8ba5de91ea
describe
'40189' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIC' 'sip-files00084.pro'
5ed649dcdf54705973c9f1225e33b0c5
b29d3234e2cc95dc6b75343cb2a7758f6ec050db
describe
'63786' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHID' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
eb83d7d7683752d824598993daefe418
1db0b079cd2c19b40547d30f3679153c64c495a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIE' 'sip-files00084.tif'
ee494322c6b8d7b59de53e42747fcaac
5184495acb424bc137ba008799f58e9fbaced772
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIF' 'sip-files00084.txt'
acc204c034e7aad2c930667de17cb311
4b1eaa8234266cfe11ef88e41c952cc5be75194d
describe
'25653' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIG' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
9a72b752cabb141489f7082bd7b27fb5
6a684a9b701138cd5e241d3f976f622bc8300424
describe
'563038' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIH' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
18bdd07e7ccf90e48fdaf79a65215fba
bb1039f9a1a04bc367aea47fb5e1ae7eaa38da0c
describe
'204583' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHII' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
d24a863bb805209770d82da3df37242c
61781f96a0bd3aa433637713c336c0d5f4362a28
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIJ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
3102953938904b99f3bbd25a39c64472
cdda831f747753bb517ebad195029697dd92b59c
describe
'61277' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIK' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
e8f3b6dcd615507a07815fd10dbfe9cc
236648c10b45628023d88b24ff3e45bd9614810d
describe
'4520140' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIL' 'sip-files00085.tif'
b29cdffba37730102dcd1c184992a200
d31e595de5d6ec4da51a750dd3688b69544946f3
describe
'95' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIM' 'sip-files00085.txt'
dcfa29a4bc0971649782a3ef447536fc
b4fc93ba605535ad61ded9095b92e8655a467957
describe
'27045' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIN' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
0ea1808e5cad9ef1eb4313eadd2d9287
3ff2d7178097af57b61021bcce2b402dfe1f0da6
describe
'563043' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIO' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
511f75d0278c2c0c22879f3704ae81ff
3cc47c7f3b8c327f1e22ac27d79a99988f7935b3
describe
'143903' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIP' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
5005551561c590306cc82e3823dae056
36e7319f7c88546fb67ec7a2a5756eb343fe159f
describe
'19643' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIQ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
3e0bc2094a9536bb777b4d4c51c6d3d4
6d36ee314aa3fba98fc4851052b59e8f533fc011
describe
'49717' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIR' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
daa43eee733dbbf7a974254531afbec1
b5056fbc9cb4c17f6e6b4222706fdd26c6fc6c4b
describe
'4517656' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIS' 'sip-files00086.tif'
0fc9df1a8c651e1969c7f8423979c2a9
188f0404cb2b7a3c5f532c792bb55b558ec4ddb8
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIT' 'sip-files00086.txt'
49e08095d8eeefd9016ea39cb99b33d3
4d35fb07cf88c84fe92ed9ac2ba37edb3a0998dd
describe
'21891' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIU' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
fab2142806366527b6c9488c3a3add75
4dccaf19fe936eec3c4fb47d79c2749565c5b408
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIV' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
7c632a81cea9790da2d040cbca559c4b
8f4b23e521029e8e011c079ee82a9882e13a7e7f
describe
'217053' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIW' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
1b7dd430c5f20f451b93032c0ffc4c83
1f3491fdc26a1ed4980411e708c0580348638fde
describe
'3234' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIX' 'sip-files00087.pro'
5c01db9d86d024e9cb8437f522be4bfe
a046101807188ba9cc09e6c1d7c98d267d965596
describe
'59660' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIY' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
2ee630022e217a4e84a7e74e36221b78
ea1340c76cb36bfc47bf715c44be2e702be1d8e6
describe
'4518896' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHIZ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
0e553a1b2dd096fdb307cd3119bf1914
d5dee48b2cba467c34717bb40beb2255a84c55c5
describe
'280' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJA' 'sip-files00087.txt'
61da225aff0f169c670817cbd5609983
e2dc54f338d5dbe824381ff07f2010f64a946251
describe
Invalid character
'24398' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJB' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
8c8d42caae96e1ef2ec3ce10b1e0271a
ee143263206a7439dd24aea295f76e27d6249241
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJC' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
fc1df25eddbb2ad44022200576f6d436
60ac879df9316cf3143319ae3ec1a4e8c715aa9d
describe
'181640' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJD' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
4013487152fcc1b97cae14dad3499f12
5c110101051ee2159b932484efcc39a87edabac6
describe
'39662' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJE' 'sip-files00088.pro'
b34a5ed41a7898183a5ed0d5417bded3
e437f1dcc16c9ae1c539e18a06a6c2548b6a0525
describe
'61934' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJF' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
0cdf060f5cf5ccc5d4e846db79b0093d
9ab2b00963d2c30161d32a1a8ac65308e2602125
describe
'4518712' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJG' 'sip-files00088.tif'
4ac5f786126c8044edda2044d83cdeae
49f244cf508662130ab037b4eb886176e48040db
describe
'1670' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJH' 'sip-files00088.txt'
c785ebb10256bb492c39c1abd0d54329
da0744f711291349633d68c015563a993276db90
describe
'24593' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJI' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
3039a9966331cc6247e4c547636e188d
6e8873ce5f21659837ae9bd66316d32236e5c8c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJJ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
ad1099c59431fe99894212769477797e
77524c2e33322862e34338626afb71a07d32d728
describe
'173909' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJK' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
ed6d6b34f1532fae42507f7e0fa9d998
cf46cc6171fea1b51799c5204a0288bac13e2b48
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJL' 'sip-files00089.pro'
561edac8186a2d8ebc37967c1069ed83
17175d741cf027da3f50abe433a8094a10a55100
describe
'47025' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJM' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
12ff3c7423ffff01d2c1b154227f3800
9ce372bfe17926bc5d05a3bc105983aa636cdc9d
describe
'4517296' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJN' 'sip-files00089.tif'
a417f526e857aeefc02dc0cf7fc38450
876f8aab0beffc82f1a1f68280461a1962a309a0
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJO' 'sip-files00089.txt'
87bbb0b7b7911644c0e63ec1232d8ceb
ddccfcb1daa2049faee148ce5544d346834012f9
describe
'20857' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJP' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
67780ec93611861a1ecda06ae25cea8f
7c93d2ecf24306d4f74a5dff7039b61f08873cd4
describe
'563003' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJQ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
3c2b37ebdda90c1b3b85a872b42a3382
b1c665015361cc4540b4b769319512878f35b2ca
describe
'180355' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJR' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
c65b563f4c7a46f8bb55b8b93cb8c6d8
62db593f5f9a98272c0335cfe093049945f795fd
describe
'40910' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJS' 'sip-files00090.pro'
609b234dbbe1aa81a20d8258327cb977
c76eed83131f2046dce51503623128ca0beb7f3f
describe
'62378' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJT' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
4e29512d67b5cb5c143bacda8ec56903
a47d72e09cdda5c68e23af1c228a2acf59aea4a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJU' 'sip-files00090.tif'
43aa952d812c5edc759e4e6c12c4c529
d95c7db79511a22d711882d5eede54fc5143041e
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJV' 'sip-files00090.txt'
8c2d2cda99df636e5b360f3a1c5fe123
12345473845b744d140d00846d2ce1113bc8c281
describe
'25083' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJW' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
e5b6ecfd6aa0bf9bba97f8097d4a9651
70c4635b016f839619d3f9da6e0d1430d1a7adff
describe
'563006' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJX' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
9f430cf009e027db8caaecedf41f3a7c
51b438068deb307fb8face33a5056f985ecaf1fa
describe
'205979' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJY' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
237820f2adad9342a107b9c51f1fae15
cd5b0e7367d9f55c244a90c41921742ab331a6ae
describe
'2409' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHJZ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
a4de22f7b94468df9e5c5ca543956c30
e83f9a533c157d2c4b9cbef04b85871185a339b4
describe
'61670' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKA' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
1d0330a79cc8990fc9c4db5168a4be8b
a1f0971e7f47223e6474dd9a71f7a7514bf8e2eb
describe
'4520016' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKB' 'sip-files00091.tif'
d29ad10c63b415f1819f7b3b6cc8ffaa
a8b8bec7c47ec30490696078565426cc1ffe68c7
describe
'109' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKC' 'sip-files00091.txt'
968b0c8b71445b0d358d5df17e712a5b
1aa07b570a97d5d9f8d276092ee2d473afb1911b
describe
Invalid character
'26819' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKD' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
8cd3ba65bc547e69aace6bf4bb1f896f
20f75294584b3501163001a71da0e6ad0e303d21
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKE' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
22f4be644dc846b9e9bf85bf74796452
1d28d12cebe602b9ed5f13868401492f03820e69
describe
'193674' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKF' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
385b07e802db8d6124dce43994ea4290
0c78bdaa34ef5a614fa8d535231920dd57f1aa37
describe
'41426' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKG' 'sip-files00092.pro'
21f949609a7e63d028de859964715de8
cb3cde9fc601e59ae3beab640211f4a4ab6e95b3
describe
'65026' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKH' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
960c2fe2e977a913c25fb080a5d947e5
382f937e442386ef0feb8e57aa3cd382e7bb2bc7
describe
'4519164' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKI' 'sip-files00092.tif'
7cc3b104b2b422df08e75075de1a2cf5
16855ea0e245e6e048216cbedfb288357e46454b
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKJ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
a84ec65e58487b2dd42147c6aa9f1e45
5bd91474a22006eba49d6f4f3df561cd42fe72ed
describe
'25481' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKK' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
f23bb7981b1e4c3e46f1c45f03f3eba1
a3d416d32f6aefcab110c583c704c16d37807eb6
describe
'562980' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKL' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
5fcac83b206527b3ee043183e72ddaa1
d033b3d8949efb4386ea4e6d6702da754a50750a
describe
'213988' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKM' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
53564d297a06a9e9b6022826826010ef
41b6c0db923490ffe5be8903fe6567143bf320a4
describe
'2973' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKN' 'sip-files00093.pro'
f28aed1276ef5dd59788db2dd6b9d70d
316c84dcb884af971df937040308c32154a86515
describe
'60669' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKO' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
72b00adf5158073162bd2e65b5ab0cb6
0e96546281005d3a47a94e4f333cb4c91f8dfd51
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKP' 'sip-files00093.tif'
e39c127f1f0f811bf94dfd1867579ede
9d9314acc3855f0248466b175e27d57bf2bc711b
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKQ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
2fb4268ddbbdb328f6a8134616f5b431
07c98e6b4a0945239d3f6ac23bf26fcd0fe63b51
describe
Invalid character
'25427' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKR' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
b7bc7cb998fec1d0b4909fa618fd1896
b92fa26d1c114687bdfb01388d8eaff5eb2d40d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKS' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
3fc7f36020ddf0a7c0d6d76b2500ca71
290a35b881b62090fe410a17e28e7f4916b46f68
describe
'166672' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKT' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
bedba6a130c01be8c9222950b22153cb
b983ea21a3dbe167a54d25f3a2c0baebffbb3cc3
describe
'16316' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKU' 'sip-files00094.pro'
28d30a23b09153d3b837347e404821a2
1e599632d50cb5e213770786f8d77f6a2e482159
describe
'52695' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKV' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
6367f7ef9fa538db0a8975b5f139a1ce
f80c9863bf203ed085c53c38f19f5c6a40813ba5
describe
'4517932' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKW' 'sip-files00094.tif'
5032d7aa6c9231a427cfcf70548bf6ab
b2ded557244e106074b0f0b5a86a217ebbaacd2f
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKX' 'sip-files00094.txt'
259ffdc41102de7fb2ceb35bf2bdc586
317e37e5087ea6e23cb67e93a5a2ee8d88390df6
describe
'22765' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKY' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
4b28f5542229197965e141320f0e864e
a6c6d1bd4efe80a34e7787f8f9a94c74ca94aa0e
describe
'563014' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHKZ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
2eea2491fc03f3156fc76b2082bcf9b6
9cf4ac6805637f19f811add26b001abd401584a1
describe
'183640' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLA' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
ee7b26bf6767a2e6f080ce8c354e5c5e
787a675cc39abac7ce394141a17102f52f0babb0
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLB' 'sip-files00095.pro'
40bbf6b08b5f935bdb48e29c63bdabef
999956bc97795397e319b156b1b9a813c59e8e6d
describe
'51631' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLC' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
39cbe44b092d7a7c4bfbbfbedafbf0da
7d2eeb66cf76d8bd8f7516f8d1669ef235f7bdbf
describe
'4518596' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLD' 'sip-files00095.tif'
6339dc7c688dee402983acc32112e216
092bb3ab8c0b77f62c55835fb977d24a66afc783
describe
'74' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLE' 'sip-files00095.txt'
8d45a7187a57398d8c8faba640353d98
46e8c512db2bd0284af7bdc653b1f6e150b6f9bd
describe
'23694' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLF' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
3671a5bbd87436daab300c40c106f9ea
272753bf032c633bfa4d898334bd5af175717ed7
describe
'563029' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLG' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
09ab043c5740dcc0f424b39016ce400f
86043a53d83c578d687332e4612a65503092425d
describe
'205891' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLH' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
95bfd0aa815b0d2b62fe7ebc09045070
a3b72bdc2db82f29ca2430530f20f65958c1c7c3
describe
'42245' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLI' 'sip-files00096.pro'
5c8ef77e13c454f4f290a2e89ab1fbcd
1f6bbaf28e5a2699a255c243a52f5af46fe39e60
describe
'66223' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLJ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
79d0fbd42dfbf75403088fe26c3bc1bb
e4d8130bf5fc95d822077010b202e7796aa62187
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLK' 'sip-files00096.tif'
e701240c4aad91396feb45fe01f2294f
049b70dc792a4629b36ed4d5818df179b6613511
describe
'1777' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLL' 'sip-files00096.txt'
dc2d86d2c091c09c69a0e3c3706ba370
27c463ca97eaf54d855326a3c29cdbf0ee8c48c6
describe
'25784' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLM' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
e7086772a5263bc33b724b3e5fba5113
ad30e985148b88714c81a3cd5e55258e94a51610
describe
'563028' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLN' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
b35d3716b727c63c3c12b102de2b926e
2d57810ce2d6e1dc6380776d94983e07833d7f0c
describe
'194664' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLO' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
17c94f87c170869e634078a3d09f7257
5b25f002b1a011c925c41267e2ed95a09d5ceb81
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLP' 'sip-files00097.pro'
29a2c2c3f43b89b7e60e921dc6d30584
bcecd05240a93a9b5b4b69ad63ac5797fe02fc5a
describe
'56446' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLQ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
301b5a3e77d7375c3066cb3e5cdb0ecd
09ec5ab571acc13d19f672a0c82a3413d883752d
describe
'4519096' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLR' 'sip-files00097.tif'
a41e2dcb37bd3d7bc4649345b55fd6fc
435559d44d6e29f45fd7dea1d74c17c25cb947bc
describe
'238' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLS' 'sip-files00097.txt'
f5a906a67644df852ebb55c304c5b088
de68fb7d46afc58a91503b9731f25c49d005da74
describe
'24924' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLT' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
fad4fcf1ec5875338d9f1602025f70d1
92b6da0985064dc479cf1b6d35ada2334b69567a
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLU' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
676d9204e84e0c77b7f1912cf8f5690c
b4dc48be2d3d84a95d7ca3b0a9a292f6fb2f1082
describe
'111375' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLV' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
9335891d404af975edbcea9435e4bc9a
7d40c49eeb2cb3beb94c2f1631327c1876a100e2
describe
'14535' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLW' 'sip-files00098.pro'
bd83e997fe894f2ce767850fbc32ea9a
f1e186314a10f63c2ea6da8c5e3f1a9ffef6a47d
describe
'39675' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLX' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
6490db835619ee4b8ed0caae1700dc24
03125d1f9735fe6b2a3a941ec3dc86c459ac1658
describe
'4516656' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLY' 'sip-files00098.tif'
795b3fa8d7e500516856831482645acb
9117d6d4a5707c2db2dfe8aa769283a784a694da
describe
'644' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHLZ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
6614c91268933d426b09a565feb32cc8
9632c36e679061cdfe6c4441a50037c744397dc7
describe
'19474' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMA' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
95df4d54737a25dd9b96248318d13ade
799f60b30e028ab823b401b98d9cb8a670ed310f
describe
'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMB' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
e81e1c72d24046544e4707b665604473
c80672d09b587d1eed5e3d85966a79b411c13fca
describe
'216243' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMC' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
183a046a4402bea1c55a0dc4d82f81b0
560f9fe0f305a49731f3eae55524e41a4421f23e
describe
'105437' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMD' 'sip-files00100.pro'
4713498656c6c0e91c284598bd46b5c6
a2966928a38ddd1d58eae87ea7e134d15c2abd39
describe
'67956' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHME' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
db64c332b1fb9ff57733d6901cd00fdf
fa057ffb6c22a602988f3af72928f974624b01aa
describe
'13526956' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMF' 'sip-files00100.tif'
02f221b2019f14550c1ab5cb5068a95e
7a6da8cd0a11609da7c2c07cce79b633fd102b0c
'2012-01-15T03:14:07-05:00'
describe
'4530' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMG' 'sip-files00100.txt'
4c7dc2a85541d738ecc10ecdb0a9d851
c40ad65a58ed29ab543d6316cc82f7fdaee1c2c6
describe
Invalid character
'26977' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMH' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
bdf9f8cff0e77feb04b88b924ed1341e
e4be4e6b25defa372b546949d975498ebc060427
describe
'578145' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMI' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
273fb4086988dc338e2bb2cef16215aa
020934e97d7147b506bd9946c6d874d484b2a6a2
describe
'229821' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMJ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
a1512d29f04406cbc4dff3278225faaf
37ea61229d2b0c63994caffee8317641116f98e4
describe
'105545' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMK' 'sip-files00101.pro'
cedcfc1b70614c87f6a9275969c34bbb
37a99c5b8eea5cb114a7446480488e09771d2ca3
describe
'70750' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHML' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
a8a9992f71e1632adc3f01c5cd526adb
7ff52880707aefc15ff1f5a29bc92fd59d6d7a8b
describe
'13890512' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMM' 'sip-files00101.tif'
39d4295831688bee2a31515d275551e5
0839ef97a5c6272832c56beb33a504f0a14bbcd9
describe
'4669' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMN' 'sip-files00101.txt'
466f429bb181a3febaaa48e40ac862d1
0e8969dc30b44cf64645a3b3c0452b8db0478248
describe
Invalid character
'27918' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMO' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
4c1c9cd0809c8d67aa6e97fc5dcb4ec8
54b948ba6523e89a52853d4a2758591f0e39d3d5
describe
'563657' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMP' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
03532d69f374ae6b41362051503e4288
d3b5507678ffecf487d1da342c21353b67d1c2e0
describe
'230207' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMQ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
bdf435e504ea1ccfc5d5a460c34172a0
017703835c00a5d8b47adf75700562a27bddb638
describe
'47056' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMR' 'sip-files00102.pro'
18fa0143cefbe3a638b320553f6cbb83
dc0e5bae57e6ebda24154b5a43df1672e7edfd47
describe
'63844' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMS' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
85fe8d8e66b1c146dd816e494a42a38b
3fd7631139de6062e00872614edef24725b669f6
describe
'13545236' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMT' 'sip-files00102.tif'
9b50a1ba12307a27162df0d9bf1586cb
363cdb31c4079387faee82b51924a34e72f386da
describe
'2138' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
dd9ed7f17a7b666e7ab4e6b33f57c834
53e8c59de39e66ef47e96141516daafce1b73e17
describe
'26578' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMV' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
4030a45fae112f4d025732b4b6569f0f
61c9566d77436c62edd447fc14e8c0ef764f3573
describe
'60609' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMW' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
161507e22d1a32f7bb20805325ce67f7
b6648a03241b2429823076f51392441d0af127f6
describe
'41211' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMX' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
d42b34fce8e68eaf825cdbda2aee6dda
db8a53e7bb6085a2742414dbcb8a1fc1f8f96c11
describe
'571' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMY' 'sip-files00103.pro'
32f12178b93d867e7cfed00b6426936c
212665ba3f6c929f88ab504042775ff04f9d8b83
describe
'17621' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHMZ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
cf61b24abfef9a51ede45cb87aeccceb
651225789167a8b1bd4a6c0f915da6c42133bb6f
describe
'1463812' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHNA' 'sip-files00103.tif'
3dd9098019db17519926e08cbbfa2021
dc02ee322871371ba4db289e14db6dbe3b142ac2
describe
'41' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHNB' 'sip-files00103.txt'
e7850b6abf25c895b88e6cc3f6cdb5b7
bf4883f882019089db309a98af737a65d4647fc1
describe
Invalid character
'12408' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHNC' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
f4d4b3bca21db19cbb52117154e7254e
e9d6bfb0dc12e21fb01451dc6e934ce83b360ed6
describe
'173200' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHND' 'sip-filesUF00086080_00001.mets'
e5716b1dedc2a9690c34b40c0caf5487
e1cd1ac8ee1b5a8ca49bf9abab3eab67630cd223
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T05:59:22-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'222309' 'info:fdaE20090315_AAAABZfileF20090315_AACHNG' 'sip-filesUF00086080_00001.xml'
4f61119ba0d4529dbd7a72c654fd9492
0c0f04a1ceb66ebd883a8cbd6308027edac5bd34
describe
'2013-12-13T05:59:24-05:00'
xml resolution