Citation
Lizzie's experiment

Material Information

Title:
Lizzie's experiment : a story of London life
Creator:
Leslie, Emma ( Author, Primary )
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
William Clowes and Sons ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Religious Tract Society
Manufacturer:
William Clowes and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
80 p., [1] leaf of plates : col. ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Pride and vanity -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Domestics -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Accidents -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
City and town life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- London (England) ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Emma Leslie.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026845188 ( ALEPH )
ALH3358 ( NOTIS )
243769213 ( OCLC )

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Full Text


“-EMMA-LESLIE





The Baldwin Library

University
RyeD
Florida













LIZZIES EXPERIMENT.

Q Story of London Life.

BY

EMMA LESLIE,

166

i AUTHOR OF ‘' BERTIE DANBY’S TRAINING, FOR MERRIE ENGLAND,”

“AUDREY’S JEWELS,” ETC.



LONDON
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY,

56 PATERNOSTER Row, AND 65 St. PAUL’s CHURCHYARD,







CONTENTS.

Be
CHAPTER PAGE
J. Aw Accrpent a ae Re cree)
II. Lizzin’s Hour... og ee cab 15
III. Sunpay Mornine te vee na dee
IV. Lonpon Bripce ... vas one tes 36
VY. A Hat anp FEATHER nee a week.
VI. Sap News rrom ASHMEAD vee coe 56

VII. ConcLtsion ... cae KS, oe 00.



















LIZZIES EXPERIMENT.



CHAPTER I.
AN ACCIDENT.

yiaere! now I hope everybody will be
satisfied, and let me go to London.”

: And as she spoke, Lizzie Milner
Peel the group of girls who were leaving school,
to see what effect her words had upon them.

“The examination is over; but do you think
you have passed, Lizzie?” asked her particular
friend, Harriet Martin.

“ Teacher says I answered very well, so I am
sure to pass,” replied Lizzie, in a tone of
triumph. ‘ What will you give for my chance
of going to London now? There’s no excuse
for keeping me in this dull old village any
longer, you know.”

“What will Miss Passingham say?” sug-
gested one of the girls.

“T don’t care; I don’t mean to be moped to






6 Lizgte's Experiment.

death here. My aunt lives in London, and my
brother Jack has gone there, so I don’t see
why I shouldn’t go too, now that I can leave
school.”

** But I thought you were going to be Miss
Passingham’s servant,” said Harriet Martin,
a little eagerly. ‘‘She will be disappointed,
Lizzie, and the Vicar too,” she added.

“T can’t help that; I’ve been thinking it all
over, and it won’t be much better up at the
Vicarage than it is here in the village; what
fun is there to be had up there, with just the
Vicar and Miss Passingham and those two old
servants in the kitchen ?”

‘But there’s Miss Elsie Channing and Miss
Marion; neither of them are old,’ exclaimed
several of the girls together.

Lizzie made a wry face. ‘‘Cf course you are
all in love with Miss Marion, because she is
the Vicar’s daughter,” she said in a mocking
tone.

“No; because she is kind and gentle, and is
always trying to do something for us school
girls,’’ said another.

“Yes; mother says things are a good deal
better since the new Vicar came,” put in a
third.

‘And nobody could help loving poor Miss
Passingham,” said Harriet.

“** Poor Miss Passingham!’” protested half a
dozen voices at once.

“T don’t think she would like to hear you
call her ‘poor Miss Passingham ;’ and I am
sure she seems the happiest woman in the place,



An Accident. 7

though she does have to lie on that couch
always, and has a great deal of pain sometimes,”
said Harriet, warmly.

‘*Yes—yes, of course, everybody loves dear
Miss Passingham; but we were talking about
going to London. Who else wants to go? You
are going to leave school, Harriet; what are you
going to do?”

Harriet shook her head. ‘‘ I might get a place
to help in the dairy up at the Mead Farm,”
she said.

“Why not make up your mind to go to
London instead ?” suggested Lizzie. “Do. I
want one of you to say you will go, and then
father won’t mind it so much. I have talked
mother over, but father has odd notions about
girls and what they ought to do. Say you will
go, Harriet, and I will write to my aunt and
tell her we are coming.”

“What are you going to do when you get to
London—go to service ? ”’

The girls had linked their arms and were
walking slowly down the village street, too
deeply interested in the discussion going on to
notice anything beyond, until a loud warning
whoop made them start asunder and scamper
in all directions out of the way, for tearing
down the road came an infuriated bull that had
made his escape from a field half a mile beyond
the village.

The girls rushed screaming in all directions
out of the way, while the bull, followed by the
men whooping and yelling, careered from one
side of the road to the other, yet always



8 Lizete’s Experiment.

managing to elude its pursuers, until just as
the group of girls was reached by the animal
one of the men contrived to throw a rope over
its horns. But at the same moment there was
a piercing scream of agony from one of the
scattered group, and amid the blinding cloud of
dust one of them could be seen lying helpless
in the road, struck down by the beast just as
he was stopped from tossing or trampling on
her.

While some of the men secured the bull from
running off in the opposite direction, one of
them went to see if the girl was much hurt, and
the rest came back when they found the danger
was over.

“It’s Harriet Martin,” called one, and Lizzie
ran to the side of her friend, eager and anxious
to find out whether she was hurt.

The man had lifted her in his arms and was
wiping the dust from her face, but although
there was neither bruise nor blood to be seen,
the girl appeared to be quite lifeless as she lay
white and still in the man’s arms.

‘Where does she live?” he asked, for he had
only lately come to live at the farm, and did
not know any of the girls.

‘Tl show you,” said Lizzie; ‘‘ but you don’t
think she’s going to die, do you?” she added,
the tears rising to her eyes as she spoke.

To the great relief of everybody Mr. Passing-
ham appeared the next moment, for, having
heard the noise, he had left the school to
hurry down the street and see what was the
matter.



An Accident. 9

“Oh, sir, it’s Harriet Martin; the bull has

knocked her down!” said all the girls in a
breath.
. “Farmer Pattison’s bull, I suppose?” he
said rather sternly to the young man who had
lifted the girl, and whom he knew to be the
farmer’s nephew.

“We can’t tell at all how he got away
from the paddock,” said the man by way of
excuse.

‘No, I suppose not; but I shall come and
see the farmer about this, Can you carry the
girl as far as the Vicarage? It is close by.
Lizzie, you run and tell Mr. Tyrrell he is wanted
at once; this is a case for the doctor, I am
afraid,” added the Vicar, as he walked on first
to prepare his daughter and sister for the coming
of the injured girl.

She was carried into a little morning-room on
the ground floor and laid upon a couch, and a
few minutes afterwards the doctor came; but
as yet Harriet had shown no sign of returning
consciousness.

It was a sad story the girls went home with,
though the Vicar had taken the precaution to
go himself and tell the mother something of
what had happened, to save her needless alarm,
for he knew Harriet was not dead, as the girls
supposed.

“There! If we only lived in London, or in any
nice town, that wouldn’t have happened,” said
Lizzie, as she went down the vicarage garden.
“Tf Harriet isn’t dead, she’s so badly hurt she
won't beable to go with me now. Poor Harriet!



10 Ligzte’s Experiment.

I wonder where she is hurt, and how long she
will be ill.”

Lizzie was very fond of her friend; but there
was a good deal of disappointment on her own
account mingled with her grief now, for she had
set her heart on being able to persuade Harriet
to go with her to London, and she talked of thig
still as they went along the road.

“You seem to think it is all settled; but
people can’t get to London without money, and
it costs a lot of money to get there, I know,” said -
one of her companions, who had often thought
she would like to go to the wonderful city, only
she knew it was useless for her to think of such
a thing, ;

“Yes, it costs money, of course,” replied
Lizzie; ‘‘ but when once you get there you can
earn such a lot that you could soon send it back.
My brother earns nearly a pound a week now,
and when he was here he only got five shillings ;
and, of course, it is the same for girls. My father
could let me have the money to go, and I meant
to ask him to lend some to Harriet, and then we
would pay him between us out of the first money
we earned,”’ added Lizzie.

““ Well, there's an end of that for poor Harriet!”
and the girls dropped into silence again, for this
accident seemed to have made the idea of London
a little like sacrilege—at least the talk about it
just now.

They carried the news home; and later in the
day, when the sun was setting behind the distant
hills, Lizzie and one or two others went up to
the Vicarage to inquire how their friend was,



An Accident. II

and whether the doctor thought she would soon
get well, for they had heard that she was not
dead, as they had at first supposed.

Miss Marion Passingham saw them coming
before they reached the house, and went down
into the garden to meet them.

“She is a little better now, Lizzie,” said the
young lady in answer to the girl’s eager inquiry
for her friend.

“Do you think she will be ill long, Miss
Marion ?” asked Lizzie.

“I hope not; but we cannot tell yet. The
doctor says she must stay here for a few days,
and we may have to send for another doctor to
see her; but she has to be kept very quiet, you
know.”

‘* Willshe have to go to the hospital in London
if she don’t get better soon? Jack went there,
you know, Miss Marion, and did not come home
any more.”

“‘ Did he die in the hospital ?”’ asked the lady
in a gentle voice.

“Oh no; but he heard that people could do
ever so much better in London than in the
country, and so he got work there. I’m going
to London too,” she said, dropping her head
an eyes and kicking a stone on the gravel
path.

“You, Lizzie!” uttered the lady in a tone of
surprise. ‘But I thought you were coming to
wait upon my aunt. You know she wants a
young girl to attend upon her, and I thought it
was settled that you were to come as soon as
you could leave school.”



12 Lizzie’s Experiment.

“No, not settled, ma'am. Miss Passingham
spoke about it, and I thought I should like it at
first; but we’ve had a letter from Jack, and I
have an aunt in London, and so I would much
rather go there.”

“But you had much better come here for a
year or two at least. What can you do in
London? Youhavenotlearned anything yet!”
said the lady in a tone of astonishment.

The girl looked equally astonished to hear the
statement, for in her own esteem she knew
everything. She was at the top of her class in
school, and had just passed the sixth standard,
what else could there be for her to learn ?

“Tam one of the best scholars in the school,”
she said in a tone of protest.

“Yes, I know you are, Lizzie,” said the young
lady; “‘but learning history and geography
won't teach you how to make a bed or sweep a
room properly. Now, if you were to come here
for a year, our housemaid would show you how
to set about this sort of work in a proper way,
and then, with a good character, you could get a
situation anywhere. But if you go to London
now, you will just have to take anything you
can get—a hard, drudging place most likely,
where you will learn very little beyond the
drudgery.”

‘But I don’t know that I shall go to service,”
said Lizzie, with something like a toss of the
head. ‘My aunt takes work in from the shops,
and employs a lot of young girls, and I think I
should like that better than going to service.”

* Well, come and talk to Miss Passingham



An Accident. Tg

about it,” said the young lady after a pause;
‘‘she will not be able to see you to-day, for she
has been upset by this accident to Harriet, but
to-morrow will be a half-holiday, and you will
come for the choir-practice, of course, and I will
tell auntie that you are coming to see her after-
wards,” and with these words the lady dismissed
the girls and went back to her aunt and cousin.

‘What do you think?” exclaimed the young
lady as she entered her aunt’s room after leaving
the girls. ‘Lizzie Milner doesn’t want to come
here after all!”

“‘ Not come here!” repeated her cousin; ‘‘ but
I thought she was to be Aunt Letitia’s maid when
she could leave school.”

. _ Has she changed her mind about it?” said

the invalid, a faint smile spreading over the
fair delicate face as she looked at her two
nieces. ‘‘What has tempted her to break her
promise ?” she added.

“© Oh, some aunt and brother in London. I
do think I shall begin to hate the very name of
London, for all our nice girls go off there,” said
Marion in a tone of vexation.

“Tt is a shame to disappoint Aunt Letty like
this!” said Miss Channing, who was no less
disturbed than her cousin over the news. ‘I
thought if Lizzie came to aunt and learned her
ways she might by-and-by become a lady’s maid
instead of an ordinary servant, for she is quick
and clever at learning things—much quicker
than most of the girls.”

‘And for that very reason is less likely to be
satisfied with quiet village life,” said the invalid.



14 Lizete’s Experiment.

‘You must not be unjust to Lizzie in your
vexation about my disappointment, but try to
remember that there are two sides to this
question.”

‘But, auntie, think what we have heard
about London!” said Marion.

“Yes, and we must think of what Lizzie has
heard. Her brother gets much higher wages
there than he did here; she told me all about it
last week, and though she said nothing then,
I thought I saw a dawning desire in her to go
and try the wonderful city for herself. She is
just the sort of girl who would naturally want to
go, and though I do feel disappointed that she
is not coming to me, we must not let this spoil
our sympathy for the girl, or we may lose a
chance of helping her by-and-by, when she may
need our help.”

‘Then you think she will come to grief
through it;” said Marion. :

““T don’t know, my dear; you see we cannot
judge, as we do not know what sort of a person
her aunt is, or what kind of work Lizzie thinks
of seeking. The one thing we have to do, dear,
is to make sure that she goes with the full con-
fidence that she leaves friends behind who will
still be ready to help her if she is disappointed
in her search. It is the want of this that drives
many-a poor girl to ruin, I am sure, when a
little timely help and advice might save them
from a lifetime of sorrow.”

“‘T don’t believe Lizzie will take anybody’s
advice just now,” said her niece with a sigh, for
this resolution of her aunt’s promised maid to



Lizzte's Hlome. 15

go to London was likely to upset some of her
own plans, unless they could soon supply her
place. ‘‘ Lizzie won’t listen to advice.”

‘‘ This would scarcely be the time to offer it,”
replied Miss Passingham, ‘‘ unless we are pre-
pared to put aside our own wishes in the matter,
and try to look at things from Lizzie’s stand-
point. Unless we can do this, we have no right
to call ourselves the girl’s friends, and blame her
for taking her own way without much regard
for our advice.”

** Now, auntie, you must not talk any more, or
your head will be bad to-morrow,” put in Miss
Channing at this point, and to ensure that quiet
was secured she went out of the room, taking
her cousin with her. ‘It won’t do, Marion, to
upset aunt about this,’ she said as soon as the
door was closed, and so the matter ended for
that time.

CHAPTER II.
LIZZIE'S HOME.

aapRint Martin was more seriously hurt
than the doctor at first supposed, and
after lying a week at the vicarage, it
was decided to remove her to a London hospital,
where she would receive care and attention that
could not be obtained elsewhere.

The news that Harriet was going to London





16 Lizeve’s Experiment.

soon spread among her companions, and made
Lizzie Milner more eager than ever to go at
once, in spite of what Miss Marion Passingham
had said to her upon the subject.

“Mother says I can go if aunt will take me,
and we are expecting a letter from her every day
about it, so that if she says I had better go at
once, I shan’t be able to go to the Vicarage even
for a little while, ma’am.” This was what
Lizzie said to Miss Channing, but it was said
with a defiant air, and the young lady felt sure
that whatever her cousin had said was resented
by Lizzie, and so she had determined to get
away from Ashmead as soon as she could. -

Unfortunately her aunt had been too ill to see
Lizzie herself, and so they had to think where
they could find another girl who could take
Lizzie’s place in waiting upon the invalid.

‘‘Now I hope that’s settled,” said Lizzie to
another friend, after leaving Miss Channing.
“Father’s in the humour to let me have the
money to go to London now, but if I went up to
the Vicarage he would say I could stop there
instead of going to London.”

But her father was unwilling to part with her,
although he did not mind giving her the money.

“Well, if she goes I hope she will make up
her mind to stop, and not throw herself upon
our hands again after the expense of sending
her there,” said her step-mother.

“Of course I shall stop,” said Lizzie, who
made up her mind that she would not come
home again to her step-mother, however un-
comfortable she might be. Not that she had



Lizzte’'s Home. 17

really anything to complain of, except that she
could not have her own way; but she was a
proud, wilful girl, and would never like to own
that she was disappointed in her venture.

So after a little more talk about the matter it
was settled that Lizzie should go to her aunt’s
"as soon as her clothes could be got ready, and
she set about the task of mending her stockings
that very night.

Harriet Martin could not be removed to the
hospital the next day, and so it was arranged
that when she went Lizzie should go up with
her; and when Miss Passingham heard of this
she sent for Lizzie to come and see her before
she went away.

“Would you have gone to London without
coming to say good-bye to me and the Vicar ?”
said the invalid, when Lizzie went into the
room where she was lying on her couch.

Lizzie hung her head, and said something
about Miss Marion being so cross; but no one
could be many minutes with the Vicar’s sister
before their better nature was touched, and so
Lizzie was soon sitting in the low chair that
always stood near the couch for visitors, and
the tears were in her eyes at the thought of
leaving this kind friend.

“TI really am sorry to go away from you,”
she said, looking at ‘the pale, gentle face, and
wondering whether she would ever see it again,
for Miss Passingham had been very ill the
last few days, and so looked more fragile than
ever.

“But as the matter is settled now, of course

B



18 Lizzies Experiment.

you must go, Lizzie,” said the lady, without
mentioning the vexation it had caused her.
‘You must try and remember that an engage-
ment once made should not be lightly broken,”
she said. ‘But what I wanted to say to you
was this: If you find the work and life in
London harder than you can bear without in-
jury to your health, then let us know about it
before it is too late. Many a girl has her
health and life ruined because she will not let
her friends know the true state of affairs with
her.

“And this applies not only to health, but
to happiness and moral well-being, which is
sreater than all. If you find yourself thrown
into the company of girls who would lead you
into sin, and that you cannot avoid them with-
out giving up the employment you have taken,
then send at once and let us know all about it,
that we may be able to help you out of it in
some way. Of course I do not mean that you
are to fill your letters with complaints about
trifles when you write home; for you will be
sure to meet with some difficulty, some un-
pleasantness that is hard to bear or overcome.
These you will be brave enough to endure with-
out grumbling, I am sure; but in the graver
matters of health and strength being exhausted
by long hours of labour, insufficient food, or
being -thrown among companions who would
lead you into folly and sin, don’t trust to your
own judgment, but let us know at once”

‘*But I should be laughed at for going away
then,” said Lizzie.



Lizzte's Hlome. 19

“No sensible person would laugh; and surely
it would be better to put up with that than ruin
your life—ruin soul and body alike, perhaps,”
said the lady earnestly.

“Soul and body!” repeated Lizzie, with
widely opened eyes.

Miss Passingham laid her thin white hand
upon the girl’s shoulder, and looked earnestly
and lovingly into her eyes.

“My dear girl, you are going into a new
strange life,” she said—‘‘a life of which you
know nothing, and of which I can only tell you
as an outsider; but I do know this, Lizzie, that
you will meet with temptations and dangers
there you have not dreamed of as yet. The
country has its temptations, I know, but here,
with father and mother and friends, you are
more protected than you are likely to be in
London.”

“But I am going to my aunt, ma’am, and
she will take care of me,” said the girl quickly.

“Yes, my dear, and I hope you will make a
friend of her; but this was what I wanted to
say, Lizzie, that whether you can make a friend
of your aunt or not, there is one Friend who
will be near you, ready to help you in every
hour of need. The Lord Jesus Christ will know
and understand, better than any earthly friend
can, just what the danger is, and where it will
hurt you. What would be a danger or tempta-
tion to your aunt, or to some other girl, might
have no attraction for you; and then, something
that they might not care for, would be almost
irresistible to you, because it stirs into life and



20 Liszie’s Experiment.

desire something that is hidden within you.
Unless there was this ‘something’ within us—
this seed of sin—the outside temptations could
do us no harm. I do not know what form this
seed of sin may take in you, but the Lord
Jesus Christ does, and only His blood—His life
in you—can kill this seed of sin, and cleanse
you from its taint, and so make these outer
temptations powerless to hurt you. Now, Lizzie,
I want you to remember this, that this seed of
sin is in you, bué the Lord Jesus Christ gave
His life—shed His blood—that sin or Satan
outside might have no power to hurt you.

“You remember that when the Lord Himself
was tempted, He said, ‘Get thee behind me,
Satan.’ He could say this, and the tempter
had no power to hurt Him, because there was
no seed of sin in Him. But there is this seed
in each one of us, and though it may lie so
quiet that no one even suspects it to be there,
some sudden temptation may come, and then,
before we are aware of it, the sin has been
committed that overwhelms us with sorrow and
trouble. «

‘Now, my dear, you are going away from us
into unknown dangers, and you carry with you
that which will give them the power to hurt
you, unless the life of Christ in you kills this,
or, as the Bible says, ‘The blood of Jesus
Christ cleanses you from all sin.’ It may be
—it often is—that until this seed of sin has
brought trouble upon us, we do not realise that
we need a Saviour, and then too often when the
trouble comes, we are filled with despair, and

Â¥
a



Lizete's Home. 21

think there can be no pardon, no forgiveness
for us.

“Now this is what I particularly want you
to remember, Lizzie, that if sin does thus bring
sorrow and shame to you—no matter what it
may be—the blood of Jesus Christ can cleanse
you from this sin as well as that which is
hidden, and though you may and must bear
the pain and sorrow that sin ever brings with
it, still, peace and comfort will come to you
through this forgiveness, that nothing else can
give. It is the only way God can teach us
sometimes, and so He lets us have our own way,
until the shame and pain compel us to seek
and find pardon and peace.”

“Oh, ma’am! you seem to think I am going
to quite a dreadful place,’ exclaimed Lizzie,
when Miss Passingham paused and looked at
her. ‘These things are not at all likely to
happen to me. I am not going to strange
people. I am going to my aunt.”

“But she is a stranger to you, Lizzie; or, at
least, you know very little of her, and tempta-
tion is sure to come to you in some way or
other. I know something of the condition of
working girls in London, and that is why I
have spoken to you so seriously to-day. For
one thing, you will find the work harder than
you expect, | am afraid, and you may be tempted
to think there is no time to pray, even morning
and evening, and there will be the danger of
you forgetting this Friend of sinners. Your
aunt may be a kind, sympathetic woman—l
hope she is—but hard work is apt to make



22 Lizzte’s Experiment.

people hard in their ways, and if your aunt is.
like this, your life is not likely to be a pleasant
one—at least at first.”

At this point the Vicar put his head in at the
door to see who was talking. ‘“‘Oh, is this our
truant?” he said pleasantly, as Lizzie rose
from her seat. “So you have made up your
mind to go to London, your father tells me,”
he added, as he came in and took a seat near
the invalid.

. “T have just been having a little talk with

Lizzie, and telling her she must not forget
to write to her friends here, and let us know
just how she is getting on,” said the lady.

“Yes, of course; and I hope she will go and
see her friend Harriet while she is in the
hospital.”

‘‘How is Harriet now, sir?” asked Lizzie,
anxious to turn the conversation from herself
and her projected journey, for she did not mean
to give any promise about telling them every-
thing concerning her London life.

‘“She seems a little better to-day, and the
doctor hopes the spine may not be so seriously
injured after all. You are going up to London
with her, I hear ?”’

“Yes, sir. Father thought it was a good
chance for me to go, and aunt wants me soon;
she is so busy just now.”

“Yes, of course it was a good opportunity for
you, and I hope you will try and see Harriet
sometimes. On Sunday afternoon most of the
hospitals are open for visitors, and so I hope
you will find time to go and see your old friend



Lizzie’s FTome. oe

and go to church too. Never forget that God
is near you, though earthly friends may be far
away, and in His house of prayer you can
always feel at home. Miss Passingham has a
Bible and Prayer book for you, I know, that you
may not forget Ashmead friends in your new
home. We shall remember you, do not fear;
and you must try to think of us sometimes, and
then it will not be so hard to write, if you
should need our help at any time.”

Then the Vicar bade her good-bye, and left:
his sister to have the last words with her, while
he went to make the final arrangements for
Harriet being moved to the railway station the
next day.

“The Vicar brought these for me to give
you,” said the lady, taking a neatly bound Bible
and Prayer-book from her table and handing
them to Lizzie. ‘‘They are keepsakes, you
know, to remind you of the friends left behind
in Ashmead. Never forget that we are friends
still, though we may feel a little disappointed
that you should prefer going to London instead
of coming to live with us.”

“T never can forget you, and how kind you
have been to all us girls,” said Lizzie, as she
took the books and prepared to go.

The tears were in her eyes once more, and
she could scarce speak the last words of fare-
well to this kind friend without sobbing aloud,
for she felé sure she should never see Miss
Passingham again, and certainly she could not
expect to find a friend like her anywhere else.

For a moment she half regretted that she was



24 Lizgie’s Experiment.

going away. But it was too late for regrets
now, she thought, as she wiped her eyes; but
it was with a subdued feeling that she walked
home after this talk with Miss Passingham.

CHAPTER III.
SUNDAY MORNING.

ow, Lizzie, if we get up at six o'clock
to-morrow we shall have first turn
with the copper, and then you will be
able to go and see your friend in the hospital
directly after dinner.”
It was Saturday night, and Mrs. Glossop had
just been out marketing, while Lizzie folded up



. and finished off the last dozen of shirts.

The other girls had left at eight o’clock; but
it was nearly eleven now, and, truth to tell,
Lizzie had been indulging in a good ery, out
of sheer weariness and disappointment, while
her aunt was out. She had comforted herself,
however, with the thought that to-morrow was
Sunday, and she would not have to get up so
early in the morning, or be worried by the din
of the machines all day, so that her aunt’s sug-
gestion about getting up at six o’clock was any-
thing but welcome to Lizzie just now. She had
been about ten days in London, and already the
reality of life in the great city had begun to
lose its charm. .



Sunday Morning. 25

It was not the first disappointment of that
evening either, for she had anticipated going
out to see the brilliantly lighted main-road, that
was like a fair; but she had to stay at home
and do the shirts while her aunt went marketing
in the neighbourhood.

“Tt’g nothing but work, work, all day and all
night, Sunday and week-day alike,” said Lizzie
with a sob.

“Thats just about it, my girl; but if you
don’t like it you can go home again, and it
ain’t every gal as can get that choice,” said her
aunt equably.

Lizzie shed a few tears; but Mrs. Glossop
took care to produce the fried fish she had
brought in for supper, and the sight and smell
of that was some small consolation to the girl,
for she was hungry as well as tired.

“There, get the bread out, and we will have
supper; you will feel better then,” said the
widow. “It is a disappointment, I suppose, to
find that people have to work as hard, or harder, ~
in London than they do in the country.”

‘‘T wouldn’t mind working at proper times,
but to have to wash and clean on Sundays!”
And then poor Lizzie almost broke down again,
as she recalled the tender hush that wrapped all
the village on Sunday at home in the country.

“Well, we must clean on Sundays or go
dirty ; and you don’t like dirt, I know.”

““T never was in such dirt before in my life ;
and it seems impossible to be clean here,”
answered Lizzie.

‘People can’t afford it, that’s how it is.



26 Lizzies Experiment.

They would be as clean as you would like to be;
but it takes time, don’t you see, and time
means money when you have to work for every
mouthful of bread, that a dozen others are
waiting for a chance to snatch from you.”

“Tg it always like this?” asked Lizzie;
‘because, if it is, 1 think I would rather go to
service than stop here.”

“T don’t know anything about going to service ;
so if you ain’t content to do as I do, and live as
I live, why, you’d better write and ask your
mother to send you the money to go back at
once, without any more bother.”

«TJ don’t want to go back if I can help it;
the country is so dull.”

“To be sure it is, and there is chances to go
out and see the sights when we ain’t quite so
busy. There’s slack times as well as busy times,
and then I always manage to clear up Friday
or Saturday.”

This was some comfort to Lizzie, and she
dried her tears and ate her supper, resolving to
put up with the present hard work and dis-
comfort for the sake of the pleasure that would
be awaiting her when the present rush of work
was over.

Her aunt roused her at six o’clock the next
morning, but it was hard work for her to keep
from going to sleep again instead of getting out
of bed, for her head and limbs ached, and she
felt altogether unfit to do washing and cleaning.

But she had to follow her aunt out to the
little scullery at the back, which was for the
joint use of all the lodgers in the house.



Sunday Morning. 2,

Mrs. Glossop had got the copper fire going,
and had already begun rubbing some of the
clothes.

“You can begin with that pail,” she said, as
Lizzie appeared, looking white and sleepy still.
‘You wash your own clothes, and I'll manage
the rest. We must get ’em all done and hung
out in the yard to dry by eight o’clock, or else
there will be a row with Mrs. Collins, and I
hate having a fuss with the other lodgers.”

Mrs. Glossop was rubbing away all the time
she was talking, though after she had set Lizzie
to work she lapsed into silence, for, as she re-
marked, she wanted her breakfast before she
could talk much.

It was a relief to both when Lizzie had done
her share, and could go and light the fire and
put the kettle on.

“You must bring the bits of carpet out as
soon as you’ve got the fire alight, and shake
them at once, or we shall have to take them
out in the street to do it. I haven’t been used
to that, and so I like to get it done early, before
anybody’s clothes are out.”

Mrs. Glossop’s back-room was covered with
little odd bits of carpet of all sizes, patterns,
and qualities ; but, as she said, it made the place
comfortable and warm in the winter-time.

By the time these were shaken the clothes
were ready to hang out on the line, for the
whole business had to be hurried through that
other lodgers might have their turn with the
copper.

By eight o’clock, when breakfast was ready,



28 Lizsies Experiment.

the whole of it was finished and blowing in the
wind, and Mrs. Glossop brought in a pailful
of the hot suds to clean the place.

“T always manage to do my washing and
cleaning at the same time,” she remarked as
she dropped into a chair near the table, while
Lizzie cut the bread-and-butter for breakfast.

There was no need to hurry now that the
scullery was left in readiness for the other
lodgers, and so they sat longer over this meal
than they usually did, though the force of habit
made the widow swallow her tea scalding hot,
and eat her bread as though the machines were
still going in the next room.

Lizzie, however, took her time this morning,
and discussed what was to follow the washing-
up of the breakfast-things.

“T’ll clean the cupboard out, shall I, while
you wash up?” she said.

“Does the cupboard want turning out? It’s
been done once this summer; and I want you
to clean the next room, if you’ve got time.”

‘“‘ Oh, the cupboard must be done; it smells of
mice, and all sorts of things,” said Lizzie, ina
tone of disgust.

She did not wait for further objections to be
raised, but began to clear the things out as she
spoke, for the love of cleanliness was strong
in Lizzie, though she did feel stiff and tired
still.

By dinner-time both roomshad been thoroughly
cleaned, though neither looked much the better,
to the girl’s great disappointment.

“T told you it wasn’t much use cleaning



Sunday Morning. 29

here,” gaid Mrs. Glossop, when Lizzie spoke
about this. ‘If you just keep the dirt out of
your mouth, it’s about all you can do.”

“‘T suppose it is,” said Lizzie, looking at the
front-room, which she had taken so much pains
to scrub, in the hope of making the floor whiter,
or rather, a little less black. But her labour
had been in vain, and now she felt ready to cry
with weariness and vexation, for it seemed to
justify her aunt’s plan of doing no more than
she was actually obliged in the way of cleaning.

“There! come and have your dinner,” said
her aunt. ‘‘We don’t have baked meat and
potatoes every day, but I do like a bit of hot
meat on Sunday when I can get it.”

She had just brought it in from the baker’s
next door, and the smell was very appetising,
and soon made the girl forget her annoyance
about the room.

“ Now, after I’ve washed up the dinner-things
I’m going to lie down and have a rest, and you
can do the same if you like, or you can go to
the hospital,” said Mrs. Glossop, as she pushed
her plate forward for some more potatoes.

“T should like to lie down and go to sleep,
but I must go and see Harriet at the hospital,”
said Lizzie.

“There'll be small chance of getting any
sleep, for the children will be up and down
stairs all the afternoon; but it’s something to
be able to lie down and feel you have a right
to do it. IT’ll do my folding first, though, and
then I can put the things under the bed to
mangle them. I always do that, it saves the



30 Lizzte’s Experiment.

trouble of taking ’em to the mangle, and the
money it would cost too.”

Lizzie helped her aunt to clear the table and
fold the clothes, then dressed herself, ready to
go to the hospital, for unless she was ready to
go in when the gates opened, she would have
so little time to spend with her old friend, and
she quite longed to see her now, and hear what
her impression of London life was.

Harriet was very ill when she came up from
the country, and there was some doubt whether
she would ever get much better; but the clever
doctors at the hospital had been able to discover
exactly where her back had been injured by the
bull, and apply the proper remedies, so that now,
to Lizzie’s amazement, the invalid was able to
greet her with a pleasant smile as she walked
up the ward between the two rows of little beds.

“Oh, Harriet, how much better you look
already !’’ exclaimed her friend, as she seated
herself beside the bed.

“T am better, too; the doctors here are so
clever and everybody is so kind, that it would
be strange if I did not get better. How are
you, dear? You don’t look very well, I think
_-—not so well as you did when you went to
school.”

“T suppose not. Going to school and going
out in the world makes-a difference, for when
school is over we have to begin real work; and,
of course, I have hardly got used to London

She did not want to give Harriet a bad im-
pression of London, or the work she had to do,



Sunday Morning. 31

until she knew more about it than she did at
present, so she said nothing about the washing
and cleaning being done on Sunday at her
aunt’s home.

‘‘ What work do you do?” asked Harriet,
eagerly.

“Oh, I finish off the shirts or aprons, do the
little bits at the end where the machine don’t
touch—everything has to be finished off, to
make sure it is right before it goes home,”
added Lizzie.

“That must be easy enough, I should think,”
said Harriet; ‘“‘ easier than going to service to
do house-work.”

‘Well, you have to work very fast, and it
makes your head and back ache to sit still so
long,” replied Lizzie.

“Oh yes, of course; but just sewing and
hemming can’t be very hard work, you know.
I wonder what they are doing at home now,
Lizzie? Don’t you wish you could just peep
in and see them ?—not to stay, of course ; for,
as we have come to London, we shan’t want to
go home again yet awhile. I mean to try and
stay now I am here, and I want you to look out
for a chance for me—you said you would, you
know.”

““Ye-es,”’ answered Lizzie, slowly. She did
not like to say how different the reality of this
London life was from the fancy picture she had
imagined concerning it; but she did manage to
say, ‘Sewing and finishing off isn’t the easy
work you think it is, Harriet; and the girls say
’ the machine-work is harder still.”



32 Lizzte's Experiment.

“You haven't tried that yet?” asked the
invalid.

‘‘There isn’t a machine to spare, because
there igs such a rush of work just now,”
answered Lizzie. ‘‘My aunt takes the work,
you know, and the machines are hers; but the
girls who come to work for her pay for the use
of them every week, and then aunt pays them,
for every dozen of things they make, a little
less than the shops pay her; so while there is
s0 much work to do, everybody has their own
machine, don’t you see.”

‘* But—but I thought you were going to learn
your aunt’s business properly,” said Harriet, in
a disappointed tone. “I was thinking when
you got on a bit she might be willing to teach
me too.”

‘So she will, I dare say, when you are well
and can come out of the hospital; but that
won't be yet awhile, I expect,” added Lizzie.

‘Well, I don’t know; I heard the doctor say
yesterday that I should not be ill so long as
they thought I should at first, so I may soon
be able to come out and begin some work.
Wouldn’t mother be glad to hear that, for she
said after we got here she was afraid I should
never have such a chance as you had got. Will
you ask your aunt about it before you come
next Sunday? You will come next Sunday and
see me, won’t you?” added the invalid, eagerly.

She could not quite understand her old friend.
Lizzie was more thoughtful, more gentle in her
manner, and yet Harriet could see that she was
somehow unwilling to ask her aunt about this



Sunday Morning. 33

work for her, in spite of all she had said about
it as they came up in the train together.
Harriet had not been able to say much about
it then. She felt too ill, and was in too much
pain ; but since the pain had been relieved and
she had felt better, she had recalled these
promises of help from her old friend, and was
now eager to avail herself of her proffered
help.

“Don’t you think we'd better wait and see
how I get on with the work before you make up
your mind to begin it? I tell you it ain’t so
easy to get a living in London as you may
think, and so, if I find things ain’t what we
thought they would be, why, it would be better
for you to go straight home when you get well,”
said Lizzie.

The tears rose to Harriet’s eyes at these
discouraging words from her friend. “ What
am Ito do at home?” she said. “You know
what a lot of us there is in that little house,
and father often out of work in the winter-time.
I tell you, Lizzie, I won’t go home again if I
can help it, for 've made up my mind to stop
here and earn some money, so that I can send
some home and help mother a bit. With seven
mouths to fill out of father’s wages, you don’t
know what a hard pinch it was for us some-
times. You were better off than anybody else
in the village, and so you don’t know,” said
Harriet, now fairly crying at the recollection of
the pinching times of poverty, when food and
firing alike were scarce.

“Don’t ery, don’t cry, dear, and I’ll see what

C



34 Lizgte's Experiment,

I can do,” whispered Lizzie, tenderly kissing
her, yet the tears were in her own eyes as she
spoke. ‘You see, I don’t know enough about
the work yet to really find out whether you
could do it, and how much money you could
earn; but I’ll ask aunt to tell me about this
when I go home, or perhaps Lydia Perkins
would tell me if I asked her.”

“ Arven’t you friendly with the girls who work
for your aunt?” said Harriet in some surprise
as she wiped her eyes.

“They're not very friendly with me. You
see, they don’t like fresh girls coming to do
their work; they call it taking the bread out of
their mouths, and said aunt had no business to
have me. Lydia is not quite so bad as the rest,
and Til ask her to tell me what a girl can
earn when there isn’t such a rush as there is
just now. I don’t like rushes of work like
this; there isn’t time for anything else, and—
and——”’ But there Lizzie stopped, fearing
she had already said too much.

She did not want anybody at Ashmead to
know she was not quite satisfied with her
London life.

“You see, I haven’t seen enough of the work
yet,” she said by way of explanation; “but
I don’t want mother and Miss Passingham to
think I’m not satisfied, for I’ve told them I like
it ever so much, so mind what you say when
you write home.”

“But I’m not allowed to write yet,’ said
Harriet. ‘‘ Nurse wrote a letter for me the other
day, as you didn’t come on Sunday, for you told



Sunday Morning. 35

mother you would write and let her know how
I was getting on.”

“And I lost my way last Sunday afternoon,
for the gates shut at four o’clock, they told me,
and it struck four when I got back to aunt’s,
after going ever so far the wrong way. But I'll
write when I get home if you like, and tell her
how much better you are.”

‘Oh yes, do, please Lizzie; mother will feel
ever so much better if she knows you have been
to see me. Tell her you lost your way last
Sunday, for I had to tell her in nurse’s letter
that I had not seen you.”

“All right, Pll make her understand,” said
Lizzie, greatly relieved to have the home corre-
spondence left to her, for she could prevent any
awkward questions being asked or answered if
she did the letter writing.

So, this matter settled, the girls spent a
pleasant hour together until the bell rang, and
the nurse came to remind her that she must go
now.

“Your friend is better, and will soon be able
to go out if-she is very careful; and we don’t
want to keep her here when she ought to be at
home. She has talked long enough now; if
there is too much talking her back will be bad
again, and she will get no sleep to-night.” And.
nurse stood by the bed while the girl said good-
bye, for she could see the traces of excitement
in Harriet’s flushed face, and was determined
that Lizzie should not linger to say any more
now that the bell had rung.

So Lizzie hurried out of the hospital and



36 Lizetes Experiment.

made the best of her way home, for she wanted
to go to church in the evening; and to do this,
and keep her promise to Harriet as well, the
letter must be written before she went, or there
would be no chance of doing it until the next
Sunday.

CHAPTER IV.
LONDON BRIDGE.

quEn Lizzie left the hospital she thought
she would go for a walk before returning
home, that she might be able to say she
had seen some of the grand places when she
wrote her letter, otherwise they might think
she had no time to go about and see the sights
of London.

Jack had spoken of London Bridge in one of
his letters, and it was near London Bridge that
he worked, so that she thought she could not do
better than find her way there, and perhaps she
might see Jack, for she had not seen him yet,
though he had promised to come one evening
when he left off work.

But when at last the bridge was reached, she
was too tired and foot-sore even to feel the
wonder that she thought she ought to experi-
ence. She peeped over the parapet and saw a
few dirty barges drawn close up to the shore,
and a steamboat in the distance, but there were






London Bridge. 297.

no grand ships such as she had expected to see;
and the river looked a muddy, sluggish stream
—not nearly so wide as she had thought it would
be, and she turned away feeling ready to cry, for
now she had all that long walk to go back, and
to increase her dismay a neighbouring church:
clock struck five as she turned round to retrace
her steps.

“Oh dear, what shall I do; what will aunt
say ?”’ exclaimed Lizzie half-aloud in her
fright.

She walked as fast as she could, but in spite
of all her efforts the clock had struck six before
she got home, and her aunt was standing at the
door looking for her when she turned the corner
of the street.

“‘ Wherever have you been, Lizzie?” said
Mrs. Glossop in a cross tone.

“To see London Bridge,” replied Lizzie with
a Weary sigh.

‘London Bridge!” uttered her aunt. ‘‘ But
I thought you wanted to go to the hospital and
see that friend of.yours.”

‘Oh, I went there first,” answered the girl.
“T thought I might go and see the bridge when
I came out.”

“And you’ve seenit, Is’pose. Tired as a dog,
ain’t you? Well, if you country-people don’t
beat all for seeing sights. Fancy walking all
that way to look at a bridge.” And, in spite of:
her vexation, Mrs. Glossop could not help
laughing, though Lizzie could not see what
there was to laugh about.

‘‘ Have you had your tea, aunt?” she ventured



38 Lizete’s Experiment.

to ask as she followed the widow into the back
room.

“Why, yes, an hour ago. I thought you
would have been home to get the tea ready for
me,” she added in an injured tone.

“TJ didn’t think you’d want tea at four o’clock,
when I came out of the hospital, and so I went
to find London Bridge,” said Lizzie, dropping
into the first chair she reached.

She felt too tired to eat anything yet; but her
aunt was evidently in a hurry to get the tea-things
out of the way this evening, for she poured out
the tea at once, and so Lizzie was obliged to take
off her hat-and begin to eat some bread-and-
butter.

“Now you will want to write a letter, I
suppose,” said Mrs. Glossop.

“Yes; I promised Harriet I would write to her
mother. But I want to go to church too,” said
Lizzie, as the bells of a neighbouring church
began to ring for evening service.

« Well, you can’t do both, that’s certain,” said
her aunt; ‘‘and if you mean to go to church
you'll have to make haste over your tea.”

“Do you think I should be able to write my
letter to-morrow night?” asked Lizzie, but not
venturing to look at her aunt as she asked the
question.

‘Bless the girl! What can you be thinking
of 2 With all that work in the house, that must
be got in by Tuesday morning, what time will
there be to write letters?” demanded Mrs.
Glossop. She began to think Lizzie was a
most unreasonable girl. ‘‘ You didn’t come



London Bridge. 39
here to see the sights and write letters about
them,” she said; ‘‘you came here to work, and
work you must while you are with me.”

“Do you think I could write my letter when
I came home from church ?” Lizzie ventured to
ask when she was putting the tea-things away.

“Tt will be bed-time then. You ought to go
to bed now, so as to get well rested for to-
morrow. You seem to forget that is what
Sunday is for. What we should do without it
I don’t know, though I do grumble sometimes
at having to keep the machines still all day
when there happens to be a sudden spurt of -
work in the slack time, as there sometimes is.
Ah, no, I’m very thankful for Sunday on the
whole, for if it wasn’t for that day coming
round we should never get a proper clean up, or
a rest either. Sunday is to rest, that we may
work better on Monday; but we shan’t do that
if you get so tired out that you ain’t fit for
Monday morning’s work,” added the widow
severely.

It seemed rather a hard doctrine to Lizzie,
for at that rate life was quite as hard in London
as it was in the country; and again came the
thought—should she write a letter to Miss
Passingham and tell her frankly all about her
work here, and ask her, if she was not suited
with a girl, to let her come to the Vicarage and
be her servant, as it was arranged before she
thought of coming to London ?

But the thought of what friends and neigh-
bours would say if she went back made Lizzie
hesitate. And when at last a sheet of paper was



40 Lizeie’s Experiment.

found, it was too dirty to write to a lady like
Miss Passingham; she must just write to Mrs.
Martin and tell her about Harriet, and that she
had been to see London Bridge, and she would
wait a little longer before writing her letter to
the Vicarage.

It took Lizzie a long time to write Mrs.
Martin’s letter, for she knew she would be ex-
pected to say something about her work, or else
the omission would be sure to cause some talk

in the village, and what to say puzzled the girl
not a little. She could not honestly say she
liked it, and she began to fear, from the nume-
rous hints dropped by her aunt, that the present
conditions were not so much worse than those
that usually prevailed, as she had at first
imagined.

But to tell all the truth, and say she was
bitterly disappointed at the grim reality of life
in J:ondon would never do, and so she must be
careful what she said about the work. She
could truthfully say that her aunt was kind, for
she was less snappish than her step-mother;
and if she spoke sharply sometimes, it was
because she was constantly harassed, lest some-
thing should go wrong with the work.

Yes, she could say, “‘ Aunt is kind, and we
have plenty of work, and I am learning to do it
faster than I could at first.” That would sound
as though she was learning the business, and
was very comfortable in her new home.

Of course she could write freely about her
visit to the hospital, and how much better
Harriet was, and how pleased they were to see



London Bridge. 4I

each other; but she was careful to say nothing
about her friend taking up the same kind of
work that she was doing. Her visit to London
Bridge was spoken of that country friends might
know she had seen some of the wonderful sights
of London; and having told about this, she
closed her letter, thinking she had managed it
all very cleverly.

Perhaps if there had been no eyes to see it
but those for whom it was intended, it might
have served its purpose very well, for Mrs.
Martin had no time to think much about the
letter when once it had been read to her. That
Harriet was getting better, and Lizzie had been
to see her, set her mind at rest about her
daughter ; and so, when her husband had seen
the letter too, she sent it up to the Vicarage,
that Miss Passingham might hear about the two
girls.

Possibly, if the lady had been occupied with
the outer stir and bustle of life, she might not
have thought much about the matter, and sup-
posed that Lizzie was quite happy in her new
home; but, shut in as she was, she had time to
think more deeply than her neighbours. about
many things, and this letter disquieted her. It
was as though another sense taught her to read
between the lines, and so the things Lizzie did
not mention came to be uppermost in her mind;
and when Miss Channing came into the room to
sit with her, she said, ‘‘ Read this letter, Hlsie,
and tell me what you think about it.”

“‘Tt’s from Lizzie Milner. Her father told -
me last week he had had a letter from her;



42 —— Lizgie’s Experiment.

but she did not say much about her work,” said
the young lady, as she seated herself beside her
aunt.

“What do you think about it, aunt?” she
asked when she had finished reading it.

“T believe she is disappointed, and won't
own it. My dear, we must keep the girls from
running off to London as they do,” said the
lady earnestly.

“But how is it to be done?” asked Miss
Channing.

‘““Well, there will have to be changes all
round, and your uncle’s plan of letting the
glebe land at-a cheap rent for allotment gardens
will be one way to help; for, if the labourers
are a little better off, the girls could stay at
home and help their mothers, who often need
them very badly, but can’t afford to keep them.
Then Mr. Pattison and your uncle have a plan
for starting a dairy school, that the girls may
be taught to make butter. and cheese in a better
manner than they do now. Mr. Pattison says
he could rent more land and do more butter-
making if it wasn’t such a bother to get decent
dairymaids; and he thinks if the girls could be
persuaded to stay and learn this as a business,
there would be no need for them to go to
London.”

‘But it’s the sights of London that charm
them so much. See what Lizzie says about
the grand streets, and this walk to London
Bridge! We haven’t got a London Bridge, and
a river with ships for them to look at,” added
the young lady with a sigh.



London Bridge. A3

“No; but we might make the evenings
pleasant for them down at the schoolroom some-
times. Suppose we had the old piano moved
down there, and in the winter-time invite the
elder girls to come there two or three times a
week. Their homes are often cold and miser-
able in the winter-time, because there is not
room for them all to crowd round the one little
fire; but if the schoolroom was well warmed
and lighted, and some picture-books and a few
parlour games provided, it would make a break
in the dullness of their lives.”

“Oh, auntie, I wonder we had not thought of
it before! Marion and I could play for them,
of course, and show them the games. Why, it
would make our own winter evenings more
pleasant,” exclaimed the young lady eagerly.
“Oh! Marion will be pleased, for she is con-
stantly worrying me about the girls going to
London to this miserable needlework as they
do,” and without waiting for further discussion
with her aunt, she went in search of her cousin
to tell her of Miss Passingham’s idea for the
coming winter. :

“Oh, you clever auntie!’ was Marion’s ex-
clamation when she came into the room with
her cousin a few minutes later. ‘‘Tell us more
about it, please.”

« Well, I hardly think that will be necessary,”
said the invalid, smiling. ‘‘ Surely your active
young brains can work out the details. Just
think what you would do if you had a party of
young friends of your own to amuse. Some of
the girls will like one thing, and others another ;



44 Lizzie's Experiment.

but you will find out as you go on. Experience
will teach you to correct the first mistakes.
There will be a little expense, of course, for gas
and firing, but that I will pay out of my own
pocket for the first year; and the girls can do
the extra sweeping and cleaning themselves, for
if you give the elder ones a share in the manage-
ment of these social evenings, it will be much
better than doing it all yourselves.

“This is a mistake often made. People like
to amuse themselves in their own way better
than being amused, so you must take care not
to fall into this error in forming your plans.
At first have things as simple and informal as
possible. One of you can show a group how to
manage some parlour game at the table, while
the other gives them some simple music on the
piano. Then you could have musical chairs,
and blind man’s buff, and the sort of games we
used to have for a birthday party when you
were little children. Depend upon it, the girls
will like this much better than being sung
to.”

“T should, I know. Why, I like a game at
musical chairs even now,” said Elsie Channing.

“Oh, auntie, Iam so glad you thought of it.
Now, if Mr. Pattison will only do what papa
wants him about the dairy school, I shall think
it was a good thing we came here, and that the
horrid bull knocked Harriet Martin down and
made you worse. I was cross about that at
first, for it seemed so dreadful that Harriet
should suffer so much from farmer Pattison’s
carelessness; but if papa can get him to make



London Bridge. 45

some compensation by starting a dairy school,
and taking Harriet for the first scholar, good
will come out of it very soon for all the village
girls.”

“Yes; but you must not try to hurry papa’s
plans by talking of them too soon. At present
nothing is settled, remember, so be careful when
you write to Harriet not to mention what we
have been talking about. She will not be able
to leave the hospital for some time, so there will
be no need for telling her our plans for her
future just now.”

The girls readily promised to do as their aunt
wished about this matter, but the talk con-
cerning the glebe land being turned into allot-
ment gardens had already got beyond the
Vicarage, and was not long in spreading all over
the village.

It caused quite a ferment in the little com-
munity, for it was what many of them had
long desired; but their wishes seemed doomed
to disappointment, because there was no land
available for the purpose, until the Vicar had
offered the glebe meadow to be divided as fairly
as it could be into plots, to suit the convenience
of the different applicants.

This would mean increased comfort in every
cotiage home, so that women as well as men
were equally stirred by the news when they
heard it. With an allotment garden, there
would always be a plentiful supply of good fresh
vegetables for the dinner- and supper-table.

It would also occupy the men’s spare time,
and keep them out of the public-house; and boys



46 Lizzte’s Experiment.

and girls could be set to work here with profit
to themselves and their parents.

Such talking and debating as there was over
the Vicar’s offer had never been known in
Ashmead before, and one of the most eager
among them was Lizzie’s father. In his slow
way he had been talking about the matter for
years, and now that his hopes seemed to be on
the eve of fulfilment he grew more excited every
day.

The worst of it was the ale-house tap-room
was the only place where they could meet to
discuss the different points that to them seemed
to need threshing out before they could decide
what sized plots to apply for, and Milner had
not been used to drink more than a pint of ale
of his own brewing, which was very different
from the stuff they sold at the Red Cow.

Perhaps if he had limited himself to his usual
pint of home-brewed it would have been different,
but he drank and drank without much thought
of what he was doing in the heat of argument,
until the unwonted quantity of strange liquor
made itself felis unpleasantly both to himself
and his neighbours, and he grew dictatorial and
quarrelsome, and his wife’s scolding ways did
not improve matters.

Perhaps if Lizzie had been at home he would
have taken warning for his girl’s sake, and
avoided the Red Cow after the first mishap ;
but, as it was, there was nobody to say a kind,
coaxing word now, as Lizzie used to do, and so
he went again and again, to the injury of his
health and pocket alike, although the Vicar



A Hat and Feather. 47

heard nothing’ of it for some time afterwards—
not, indeed, til the mischief had been done, and
the doctor called in to attend Milner for a bad
fall he had had going home late one night from
this social gathering at the Red Cow.

CHAPTER VY.
A HAT AND FEATHER.

{| EANWHILE, Lizzie had been promoted to the

| use of a sewing-machine. She had to
learn to use it after work hours were
over, for, as Mrs. Glossop said, she could not
afford to keep a machine idle, or as bad as idle.
She had to stitch away on odd bits of rag after
the other girls had left at eight o’clock, tired as
she might be with her own share of the work—
the finishing off each garment.

This included taking home the big bundles to
the shops, and sometimes having to stand for
an hour waiting for the money or the next bundle
of work. But, in spite of this dreaded ordeal,
Lizzie was more hopeful now, for her aunt had
promised to pay her threepence a dozen for the
shirts she made, in addition to keeping her, and
so she was very eager and anxious to master the
difficulties of the sewing-machine, that she might
begin regular work like the other girls.

Her aunt was not so busy now, and one of
these could more easily be spared; and so, on the





48 Lizzie’s Experiment.

first opportunity, one of them was discharged
that Lizzie might have her machine. The rest
grumbled and refused to be friendly with Lizzie
for pushing herself into their overcrowded ranks,
and for a few days they made her feel very un-
comfortable ; but the close attention she had to
give to her work under the machine-needle pre-
vented her from giving much heed to the dis-
agreeable remarks that were made about her.

For the first hour or two in the day this
machine-work seemed far more interesting than
merely sewing and hemming scraps here and
there, by way of finishing off the garments, and
when she went to see Harriet the following
Sunday she told her she had begun to use a
sewing-machine and liked it very much, and
thought she would soon get on now. “I am
going to have a hat with a red feather for best,”
she added, and she was delighted to see how
wonder-stricken Harriet looked as she told this
piece of news.

‘““Won’t it cost a lot of money?” said the
sick girl rather enviously, for she did not get
well as fast as she would like.

“Oh, but I can afford it now; aunt is going to
pay me threepence a dozen for the shirts I make,
as well as keep me. When I have been here
three months I shall have all I can earn, aunt
says, and pay her for my board, and then I shall
be able to get a new dress, I expect.

“‘But—but you'll have to make twelve shirts
for threepence!”’ said Harriet. “‘ Justa farthing
each for all the sewing and hemming in a shirt!”
repeated the invalid.



A Flat and Feather. 49

“Oh, but they are different from those we
used to make at school,” said Lizzie in a tone
of superior wisdom, and smiling at her friend’s
ignorance. ‘‘ We just race along the hem as fast
as we can make the machine go, and it gets done
like lightning.”

‘‘How many can you make in a day?” asked
Harriet.

“Oh, not many yet, because I can’t make the
machine go as fast as the other girls do. You
see, I only began to use it yesterday, so I can’t
expect to do it all at once.”

“Oh no, of course not; only I thought you
might have heard how many the other girls
could make in a day, and how much they could
earn. I wonder you did not ask them; I should
if I had been you,” added her friend.

‘No you wouldn't, if they had been as dis-
agreeable with you as they are with me always.
T should like to see you ask Hetty Collins what
she earned, and how much her hats cost her.
She has a new hat nearly every week, so she
must have earned a lot of money I am sure.”

“Why didn’t you ask your aunt what you
could earn?” said Harriet.

“*T did once, and she said as much as the
other girls, if I liked to try.”

“And you never asked her how much they
could earn!” exclaimed Harriet in a tone of
surprise.

“ Well, I have hinted at it once or twice, but
I didn’t like to ask it straight out, as she didn’t
tell me. Of course I know they have to work
hard for what they get; but still it must bea
D



50 Lizee's Experiment.

good lot, or else they wouldn’t be able to buy so
many new hats as they do—hats with feathers
too, not just a straw one with a bit of ribbon on
it, like yours and mine,” added Lizzie.

The liberty to wear a fine hat with a feather
in it was evidently a great delight to Lizzie, and
had some fascination for the invalid, though she
could not be expected to show the same eagerness
about it just now, as she could not hope to wear
one yet awhile.

With Lizzie it was different. She was within
measurable distance of possessing a hat with
a red feather; or, at least, she thought so,
and wondered whether it would not be possible
to get it by the following Sunday, that she
might wear it when she came to see Harriet
again.

“‘T wonder what they will say at home when
they hear I have bought myself a hat with a
feather in it,” said Lizzie, with a smile of
eager anticipation. She had forgotten Miss
. Passingham’s talk about temptation by this
time.

“‘T wonder,” repeated Harriet; ‘‘ but I forgot
to tell you they have got something of their own
to wonder over now. There’s going to be allot-
ment gardens, if you know what they are. Miss
Channing wrote and told me about it, and she
says everybody is very pleased. JI wonder
whether it will make any difference to mother
and the little ones. You see, I am the eldest,
and so I have to think about them,” she added,
by way of excuse.

“T should think it would make a good deal of



A Hat and Feather. 51

difference,” said Lizzie. ‘I have heard father
say a bit of garden is worth five shillings a week
to a labouring man. I have heard lots about
the gardens—not that we wanted one very badly,
for we had a good long piece belonging to our
house; but you have only gota tiny bit of garden
—not enough to grow all the potatoes and
cabbage and carrots you want to eat—and so if
your father could get an allotment garden it
would be a fine thing.”

‘Well, we shall have one, I expect, if it’s like
you say; but still, I know mother would be glad
if I could help her with a shilling or two now
and then, so I hope you will speak to your aunt
for me the first chance you get.”

‘Oh, I will, never fear! But I can’t under-
stand about the allotment gardens, for I re-
member father saying one day Ashmead couldn’t
never hope to get them, for there was no land
to be had near enough.”

‘But Miss Channing says it is nearly settled,
so they must have found the land somewhere.
T am glad, if it is likely to make all that differ-
. ence to mother. I don’t believe you know how
hard things are for some of us in the winter-
time, or you would understand how anxious I
am to find out all about this work. Tell your
aunt I don’t mind how hard I have to work so
that I can earn enough to help mother a
bit.”

‘And buy a hat like mine,” put in Lizzie,
with a smile.

‘* Of course I should like a nice hat if I could
get one, but I won’t mind wearing a shabby one



52 Lizzie's Experiment.

so that I can help mother. We shall have
winter coming again soon, and I do want to get
to work so that the money I earn may help
them over it a bit at home.”

“Well, I have spoken to aunt about you, and
she said when you could leave the hospital you
might come and see her about it, unless they
send for you to go home.”

“Oh, mother wouldn’t do that,” said Harriet.
“T know she wants me to get some work in
London if I can now I am here.”

‘Well, I don’t think you need worry yourself
much about the work, for there seems such a
lot to be done that there will be enough for you
and me too. If your mother should say any-
thing about it, tell her you are coming to work
with me when you are well enough.”

Lizzie was more cheerful and hopeful to-day
than Harriet had seen her since she had been
in London; and, of course, she thought as she
got more used to the work she found it more
easy to do.*

Perhaps Lizzie had persuaded herself that
this would be the case; at all events, under the
stimulus of buying a new smart hat, she worked
on through the next few days, trying to per-
‘suade herself and her aunt too that she could
work on until ten o’clock at night, instead of
leaving off at eight as the others did. But Mrs.
Glossop could not allow this, and so she had to
put aside her work and clean her machine, and
put it ready for the next day’s work as the
others did.

Four shirts was all she had done for her

«



A Flat and Feather. 53

twelve hours’ labour, and the large sum of one
penny was all she had earned the first day.
Of course she would be able to do more the next
day, and still more the one following; but, work
as she would, she could not get the coveted
hat by the following Sunday. It was doubtful
whether she would get it in a month, although
it was the cheapest and most splendid hat
Lizzie had ever seen. It was in a shop window
a few streets off, and Lizzie went to look at it
as often as she could, dreading each time she
went to see that the stand had got another in
its place—that this one was sold and altogether
beyond her reach.

On Saturday, when she went to fetch some
fried fish for supper, she went on as far as this
shop, and saw, to her relief, that the hat was
still in its old place, though there were some
girls in the shop buying hats. Lizzie stood
with her nose pressed against the glass of the
window to watch whether they did buy what
she had set her heart upon possessing, but they
did not seem to be charmed with what had
captivated her fancy, and she breathed a sigh
of relief when she saw them leave the shop,
while her hat still hung on its stand safely.

She ran home as fast as she could with the
fish for supper, but her aunt was rather cross
at being kept waiting so long.

““There’s a letter come for you,” she said,
when they had nearly finished their meal, and
as she spoke she pointed to the mantelpiece,
where she had put it.

Lizzie took it down eagerly enough, but she



54 Lizzte’s Experiment.

did not look so pleased when she saw the hand-
writing on the envelope.

““Tt’s from Miss Marion,’ she said—‘‘ the
young lady I told you about, who scolded me
for wanting to come to London.”

“And now she wants you to go back, I sup-
pose,” said Mrs. Glossop.

Lizzie opened her letter and read it. ‘‘ She
says if Iam not comfortable, or do not like the
work, I can go back to be waiting-maid to her
aunt—the lady who is always ill.”

“Then good-bye to the hat and red feather,”
said her aunt with a short laugh.

“But ’m not going,” said Lizzie. ‘I should
be a stupid to go back just as I’m beginning
to get on with the work. You say I shall soon
be able to earn enough to get some new things,
so I think [ll wait till I get them before I go
home again.”

“Gals that come to London don’t often want
to go back, I can tell you,” said her aunt.
‘The country’s dull, and there’s no chance to
wear fine clothes down there.”

“Miss Marion says father ain’t been well,’’-
remarked Lizzie, without noticing her aunt’s
last words,

“Well, your mother’s there to look after him G
I don’t suppose they want you at home to do it.
Did the lady say they did?”

“Ohno! She only wants me to go back and
be Miss Passingham’s servant. She just men-
tions about father. I don’t suppose it’s much
more than a little rheumatism again,” added
Lizzie; and then she put the letter in her



A Hat and Feather. 55

pocket and went to bed—not to think about it,
or the offer it brought, but of the smart hat and
cloak she intended to buy as soon as she could
earn money enough.

The following Saturday Lizzie went and
bought the coveted hat with the red feather.
She had not earned the whole of the money
required, but her aunt lent her a shilling to
make it up, so that she was able to go to the
hospital the following Sunday, looking as unlike
the neat, tidy Lizzie Miller who first went there
as it was possible to imagine. She had cut her
hair in front, as most of the work-girls wore it
in that fashion, and with the hat and red
feather perched on the top of her head, she
looked almost as vulgar as any of them.

If Miss Passingham could have seen her, she
would have known that her warnings had all
been forgotten; but the unseen Friend was
watching over the girl, although she had no
time to pray, and no time to think of anything
but work, and how she could manage to earn
enough to buy a cloak, now she had got her
smart hat.





56 Lizzie’s Experiment.

CHAPTER VI.
SAD NEWS FROM ASHMEAD.

for a few days after the hat was bought,
Lizzie was pleased enough, but as the
days went on she found that her fatigue
increased rather than diminished as she sat
closer to the work; and it was poor comfort to
think of the hat laid away in the cupboard,
when her back ached until she felt sick.

She had buoyed herself up with the hope that
it would get better as she grew more used to
the motion of the machine, but this proved a
cruel fallacy, and at last her long-tried hope
and patience gave way. The immediate cause
of this was the discovery that, work as hard as
she might when work was brisk, she could not
hope to earn more than four or five shillings a
week, and of this she would always have to
pay her aunt four if she continued to live with
her.

To earn four or five shillings a week sounded
a great deal at first, but she had learned that
here in London it soon went, for the purchasing
power of money seemed so much less than it
was in the country. How it was she could not
quite understand; but the discovery that she
would only be able to earn this small amount,
though she laboured for twelve or thirteen hours
a day, made her resolve to tell Harriet Martin





Sad News from Ashmead, 57

not to attempt living in London if she had the
chance of going back.”

“But five shillings a week is a lot,” said
Harriet. ‘‘Father often earns only seven, and
there were six of us to live upon it!”

“Ah, yes! But five shillings at Ashmead and
five shillings in London are very different: I
have learned that much. Here every little drop
of milk has to be paid for, and every bit of
vegetable too. I can tell you, Harriet, people
make a fine mistake when they think that
money means so much more comfort in London,
for it don’t. Aunt has to pay seven and six-
pence a week for her two rooms. Think of it—
seven and sixpence a week! and the man comes
for it every Monday, and woe betide you if it
isn’t ready! I could hardly believe it at first,
but I had to pay it one day when aunt had
gone out, so I know it’s true enough. Then
nobody has a garden to get a bit of vege-
table here; and there don’t seem to be any
neighbours to give you a bit of anything
either.”

“Oh, how dreadful!” exclaimed Harriet.
“What should we have done last winter if it
hadn’t been for your father and one or two
others sending us in potatoes and things?”

“T don’t know about being dreadful; but it
ain’t half so good as I thought it was; I know
that,” said Lizzie. ‘‘Of course you can do as
you like here, and wear what you like, and all
that, but you soon get tired of it. There’s this
hat now; you know how wild I was to get it—
thought of nothing else for a little while after



58 Lizzte’s Experiment.

Pd made up my mind to buy it. Well, I almost
hate the sight of the thing now, it looks so
shabby since I got caught in the rain one day;
and I think sometimes if I hadn’t been looking
at it in the shop window I might have taken
Miss Marion’s offer when it came and gone
back to Ashmead, where, if I didn’t have a
hat with a feather to wear, I shouldn’t have
the back-ache so continually, or be compelled
to do washing on Sundays.”

“Washing on Sundays! What do you mean,
Lizzie?’ for she had never told her friend of
this custom in the neighbourhood where she
lived.

“Tt’s true enough, Harriet. I was shocked
enough about it at first, but I can see now, as
aunt says, poor people haven’t time to do it any
other day, when other work wants doing. Aunt
thinks she is lucky to be obliged to work on
Sunday like that, for if we could do it on Friday
or Saturday it would mean that we had no work
to do for the shops, and the next thing we
should starve, or be turned out of doors if we
couldn’t pay the rent.”

“Oh, dear! I’m afraid I shall have to go
home then,” said the invalid; but the tears
rose to her eyes as she spoke, and Lizzie pitied
her and herself too, for what she should do
when she had lost this old friend she did not
know.

As she walked home from the hospital that
day she resolved to write and tell Miss Passing-
ham that the work she was doing would be too
hard for Harriet, and ask her to take Harriet



Sad News from Ashmead. 59

to wait upon her, as she dreaded to come home
for fear of being a burden upon her mother and
father.

Sunday was the only day there was time to
write letters, and so after tea she sat down and
wrote her letter instead of going to church.
She was very careful what she said, for she did
not want her friends to know how disappointed
she was with her work. She could easily say
that Harriet would not be strong enough to use
a machine, even when she got well, for Lizzie
was determined to protect her from the misery
of trying it, feeling sure now that she would be
far happier and better off at the vicarage, or
even as Farmer Pattison’s dairymaid, than as a
weary London work-girl. _

She felt as she posted the letter that she was
giving up her own last chance of returning to
Ashmead, by thus asking Miss Passingham to
take Harriet for the place that had been offered
to her; but she was determined to save her
friend at all costs, and so she did not regret
writing as she had done. She could battle
with the difficulties of London life better than
Harriet, she decided, so that it was just as
well that she, and not Harriet, had made this
experiment.

The next day a letter came from her mother
to tell her that her father was dead—had died
on Saturday morning.

“T cannot afford to send the money for you
to come home,” wrote Mrs. Milner, “for I
expect I shall have to come to London to get
work for myself as soon as I can get rid of the



60 Liszete’s Experiment.

cottage. Ishall bring some of the things with
me—enough to furnish two rooms, as your aunt
does, and then you can work with me, and Jack
can come and live with us.”

Lizzie was stunned; she had never thought
of her father’s illness as being at all serious.
He was subject to rheumatic attacks, and she
had concluded that the illness referred to one
of these old troubles. And now he was dead!
Dead, and she would never see him again; never
put her arms round his neck and call him her
dear old daddy, as she used to do when she
wanted to coax him to let her do something
—as she had done when she wanted to come
to London. Ah! if only he had not been
coaxed into consenting, she might be at the
Vicarage now. She would have known all about
her father’s illness, and perhaps gone home to
help nurse him; at least, she would have seen
him before he died.

“What is it?” asked Mrs. Glossop, with her
mouth full of bread and butter, for it was
breakfast-time ; but Lizzie had not spoken or
moved or attempted to eat anything since she
had opened her letter.

She could not speak now, but silently handed
the letter to her aunt, and then stared straight
before her into the empty grate.

Mrs. Glossop wondered what this strange
dumb grief could mean, for Lizzie’s white, pain-
drawn face was enough to convince her aunt
that she was terribly upset by the news of her
father’s death.

Lizzie took the cup of tea that her aunt



Sad News from Ashmead. 61

poured out, and tried to drink it, but she had to
put it down again, for she felt as though she
would choke. ‘I shall be better presently,”
she said in a hoarse whisper.

“It won't do to give way, you know; we've
got our living to get,” said her aunt warn-
ingly.

“Tl go and begin work at once,” said Lizzie,
and she went to her machine and commenced
stitching away at the shirt she was doing.
She could do it almost mechanically, and the
rattle of the machine prevented the other girls
talking to her when they came in; and this
was a sort of relief to her, though she was
scarcely conscious of having any wish in the
matter. -

But her aunt would far rather have seen her
crying and making a fuss, which would be only
natural, she thought, for she knew Lizzie was
very fond of her father; and so at last she
decided to send her to take a small bundle of
work home that had to be sent in by ten
o'clock.

“You'd better put your things on and go to
Morris’s for me,” she said; ‘“ the walk will do
you good, perhaps.”

Lizzie was quite willing to go; she was willing
to do anything just now, because she had no
power to resist any suggestion that might be
made. The only feeling she was conscious of
was a desire to hide herself and her grief from
the notice of everybody. But she could not
altogether conceal its effects, for her white, set
face of abject misery told the tale, causing one



62 Lizeie’s Experiment.

of the girls to exclaim as she passed, ‘“‘ Whatever
is the matter with Liz this morning?” And
then every head was turned to look at the
drooping figure of the girl as she went out of
the room.

“T never saw anybody look so bad in all my
life,” said one in an awestruck whisper, gazing
round at the rest, as if asking for an explana-
tion.

Mrs. Glossop waited until Lizzie had closed
the door, and then she said, shortly, ‘“‘ Her
father’s dead; she had the letter about it this
morning.”

“Ah! and she’s cried herself sick over abe?
said one, in a compassionate tone. “Shall I
go with her, and help with the bundle?” she
added ; “I won’t mind losing the time.”

But Mrs. Glossop did not believe in such a
wilful waste of time; and she had an idea that
Lizzie would rather be alone with her trouble
until she had got over it a little, so she said
at once—

“No, no; Lizzie can go to the shop by her-
self.” And as she was going out of the door
she said in a kindly tone, “You need not hurry
this morning; take your time about it, Lizzie,
and the walk will do you good.”

“Yes, aunt,” answered the girl, mechanically.

She neither saw nor heard anything that was
passing in the street as she went along, neither
did she quicken the slow pace at which she was
walking when she heard a neighbouring clock
strike ten, though she still had some little
distance to walk to the shop.



Sad News from Ashmead. 63

‘“‘ How’s this?” said the shopman, sharply ;
“‘T told Mrs. Glossop if she couldn’t let me have
these things by ten o’clock she wasn’t to take
them.”

Lizzie lifted her white face to the man
and said, meekly, ‘He was only ill a little
while.”

‘Stand aside and wait,” commanded the
man, thinking Lizzie intended some impudence
by her remark.

It was not the first time Lizzie had had to
suffer in this way, but it did not matter in the
least to her now. Nothing would ever matter
much again, and so she folded her hands and
took her place to wait the shopman’s pleasure
to serve her with some more work and pay her
for what she had brought home.

She stood thus nearly an hour, and then other
customers having come and gone, and the man
having nothing else to do, he condescended to
finish the business with Lizzie.

“Now, mind, I must have all this home by
Thursday by half-past nine,” he said. “Do you
hear, or are you deaf?” he added, as he looked
at Lizzie.

It was only by a desperate effort that she
could summon her failing energy and senses to
take in what was being said, and that she was
expected to tie up the bundle of shirts in her
wrapper and take them away.

The bundle was heavier and larger than the
one she had brought, and on the steps Lizzie
staggered under its weight and almost fell to
the ground. But she went on, and might in



64 Lizete’s Experiment.

time have reached home safely if there had
been no pushing and jostling along the road to
contend with.

No one saw her white, pain-drawn face.
She was only a girl with a big bundle that
was in their way, and must be pushed out
of it.

‘There! go on a bit faster,” said a man with
a basket as they were crossing a road, already
much crowded with foot-passengers, while every
second minute a cart or waggon would turn into
it from the main thoroughfare. As the man
spoke he gaze Lizzie’s bundle a push that he
might pass with his basket, and the next
moment Lizzie was down in the road, and,
before any one could come to her rescue, a cart
had dashed round the corner, and the horse and
one wheel of the cart went over her.

There was a crowd collected in a moment,
and Lizzie and her bundle carried to the pave-
ment ; but the girl showed no sign of life, and so
the man who had picked her up carried her to
the hospital, which was close by.

It was soon ascertained that her leg was
broken, but whether there were any other
injuries the doctor could not say; and no one
knew who she was until she was carried to the
ward and laid on the bed, and then one of the
patients recognised her ag the girl who had been
there to see a friend the previous day; for
Harriet had been taken out into the garden just
before Lizzie was carried in.

As soon as she came back, however, she was
told that her friend had been brought in with a



Conclusion. 65

broken leg, and she could tell the sister her
name and where she lived, so that Mrs. Glossop
might be informed of what had happened, for
Lizzie herself showed no sign of returning con-
sciousness for some hours after arrival.

“‘I wonder whether she has been hurt any-
where else, because a broken leg would not
cause this,” said one of the patients, when she
heard that Lizzie had neither moved or spoken
since she had been brought to the hospital. The
doctors and nurses, too, seemed puzzled and
anxious about the new patient’s condition, and
they sent a messenger to fetch her aunt at
once.

CHAPTER VII.
CONCLUSION.

i] HE account Mrs. Glossop gave of the news
that had reached them that morning,
: and the effect it had upon Lizzie, was
sufficient to convince the doctors that Lizzie
was seriously ill from the previous shock, before
her leg was broken.

‘““She never cried, you say, when she read
this letter ?’’

‘No, sir ; she never spoke a word hardly, and
yet I know she was very fond of her father.
Harriet Martin will tell you the same,” she
E





66 Lizzie’s Experiment.

added, looking round, and wondering whether
she was near.

She was allowed to go and see Lizzie after
speaking to the doctor, and finding a young
girl sitting beside the bed, she guessed it was
her friend Harriet, and spoke to her.

“You know, poor Lizzie has lost her father,”
said the widow with a sigh as she stood looking
at the unconscious girl.

““Mr. Milner dead!” exclaimed Harriet. ‘‘Then
that was how it all happened, I suppose, for I
know how fond of each other they were. Oh
dear! she will wish she had never left the
country, I know. They told me he was ill;
but when we talked about it yesterday, Lizzie
said it was sure to be the rheumatism again. Oh,
Miss Passingham will be sorry to hear she is so
bad.”

“Miss Passingham—that was the lady who
wanted her to go back to the country a little
while ago, wasn’t it?” said the widow a little
eagerly. She was wondering what she had
better do, for if Lizzie soon got well she would
not be fit for work directly she came out of the
hospital, and to have her a useless burden upon
her hands for weeks or months was not to be
thought of, especially during the winter when
work might be slack, and food and firing
scarce.

So, after thinking over the matter for a minute
or two in silence, she said at last, ‘‘ Yes, you had
better write and tell this lady what has happened
to Lizzie, and that I have told you she won’t be
fit for machine-work with a broken leg.”



Conclusion. 67

“But they will mend her leg while she ig
here,” said Harriet.

“Yes, yes, of course; and she will come
out of the hospital in the beginning of winter,
and not be able to earn a penny. You write
and tell the lady what I say.” ‘She took care
to impress upon the nurge that she was not
really any relation to the girl, but had taken
her to please her sister, who was the girl’s step-
mother,

The nurse quite understood Mrs. Glossop’s
fears upon the matter, and told Harriet after-
wards that she was not so much to blame, for of
course Lizzie would be unable to use a machine
for some time, and so would be a burden upon
her aunt’s hands, unless other friends were
found who were willing to help her.

Harriet had not ventured to write any letters,
as the doctor had forbidden it when ‘she first
came; but she was glad to do it now that nurse
gave her leave.

So the day after Lizzie’s letter had reached
Ashmead, Miss Passingham received another
from Harriet, telling her that Lizzie was in the
hospital, but had not spoken since she had been
brought in.

Fortunately, the invalid was better than she
had been some months when this second letter
reached her, but still she was much disturbed
about it.

“Our two girls are in the London Hospital,”
she said to the Vicar, who came in just after the
letter.

“Dear me, what has happened to Lizzie?



68 Lizzte’s Experiment.

Perhaps I had better go and see myself when I
go to London next week.”

“You have made up your mind to go to
London, then?” said hig sister.

““T must see about this business concerning
Elsie’s property, and [ think lam equally bound
to go and look after these two poor girls in the
hospital. Poor Lizzie! Iam afraid her life in
London has not been a happy one, from what she
told you in her own letter, so that she may be
glad after this accident to come to us or go to
the dairy school. Iam sure country girls could
do better than going to swell the ranks of half-
starved London work-girls.”

“I should be very glad if you could go and
see about them. Poor Lizzie is an orphan
now, and Harriet needs looking after quite as
much. If you went to the hospital you would
learn a great deal more of what has really hap-
pened than we could find out by half a dozen
letters.”

So the following week Mr. Passingham walked
into the ward where Harriet was sitting by
Lizzie’s bed, reading to her for a little while.
She was still very ill, suffering more from the
shock of her father’s death than from the acci-
dent, and so the nurse had given Harriet leave
to read to her for half an hour to divert her
mind from its all-absorbing thought about her
father.

“Here's our Vicar,” suddenly exclaimed
Harriet, with a heightened colour, as she saw
the clergyman speaking to the sister at the other
end of the ward.



Conclusion. ° 69

They walked down between the beds together,
the sister telling him what she knew about the
two girls.

“It isn’t one thing alone that has brought on
this illness,” she was saying; ‘‘ the girl’s health
seems to be broken down by hard work and poor
food, as well as the shock of her father’s death.
She is in avery different condition from the one
who came straight from the country to us.. A
girl working twelve hours a day on bread and
dripping or fried fish for dinner, hasn’t much
spare strength. That is how this girl has lived
since she has been in London, and she has
confessed that she was seldom free from pains
in her back or chest. This accident has just
brought her to us a little earlier, but she was
certain to break down sooner or later.” -

‘Then I am very glad the accident happened,
for we may be able to save her now from her
own folly, if she is only wise enough to see that
life in London is not what she thought it,” and
as he spoke the Vicar nodded to Harriet, and then
came across to speak to them.

But the sound of the Vicar’s tender voice
asking if she was in much pain, was too much
for Lizzie, and the tears that would not flow
before, now burst forth with such violence that
the sister came hurrying up to see what was the
matter.

“Tt will do her good, if it does not continue
too long,” she said, speaking to the Vicar; and
then she beckoned Harriet away, and placed
a chair for the clergyman beside the girl’s
bed.“



70 Lizzie’s Experiment.

Mr. Passingham sat down and took the
gitl’s hand, but did not speak for a minute
or two—not until the storm of sobs and tears
had somewhat exhausted itself, and then he
said—

“Now, Lizzie, shall we have a little talk
about your father? I went to see him every
day the last week of his life, and he spoke of
you several times.”

“Oh! why didn’t father send and tell me he
was so bad?” exclaimed Lizzie, her tears break-
ing out afresh.

““We did not know the end was so near; and
then you had written several times to say you
were very busy, and that your aunt had a
great deal of work to do, so that we thought it
would not be fair to fetch you away. This was
how your father looked at it ; and not until your
letter reached my sister, asking her to let Harriet
have the place she had offered you, did we know
for certain that your life in London was harder
than you could well bear ; it was too late then
to send for you. Your father had died the
previous day; but I had promised him to look
after you, and so I thought I had better come
and ascertain the whole truth when I heard you
were in the hospital.”

Lizzie was crying more quietly now. “I wish
I had told father just how things were ; only I
hoped to the very last that I should be able to
earn a lot of money, and so did Harriet. She
was to have come to aunt’s when she left the
hospital, only when I found that the work was
so hard, and there was no time ever to have a



Concluston, aI

rest, and yet we could not earn much money,
however hard we worked, I persuaded her not to
stay in London, and wrote to Miss Passingham
to let her have my place.”

“Ah, I see! and in trying to save your friend
from suffering, we learned a little of what you
must have suffered yourself. God had provided
a way of escape for you, and in seeking to save
your friend you have opened this for yourself—
that is, if you want to get away from this life in
London,” added the clergyman.

“TI should be glad enough now to take the
offer Miss Passingham gave me, if I could ; but
I don’t know what I ought to do now. It father
was alive, and things were just as they used to
be, I should be glad enough to come home
again as soon as I could leave the hospital ;
but I have been thinking of many things
since I have been here, and I don’t think TI
ought to try and please myself about every-
thing, as I used to think I had the right to
do.”

“Then you do not want to come back to
Ashmead ?” said the clergyman in a question-
ing tone.

“Yes, I should like to come and be Misg
Passingham’s servant better than anything ;
but as mother is coming to London to do work
like aunt does, she may want me to stay and
help her.”

“But I do not think your mother is coming
to London, and if she is, I feel sure she would
be quite willing for you to come to us,” said Mr,
Passingham, ‘TI spoke to her about it before



72 Lizsie’s Experiment.

I came away, and she said she never thought
needlework would suit you as well as service.
She said nothing then about coming to London
herself.”

“She told me when she wrote about father—
said it was no good for me to go home for the
funeral, as she would be coming up. It was
this that made me feel so bad about it—that I
should never see father’s face again; and I
came away from home knowing he didn’t want
me to come.” And Lizzie’s tears broke out
afresh, and she sobbed out, “Oh, sir, can
God ever forgive such a wicked girl as I
am ?”

“Hush! hush! Lizzie. You must try and
calm yourself, or you will be worse. Now try
and listen, and I will tell you something your
father said to me just before he died. I think
he must have known then how you would feel
about it, for he said, ‘ Tell my little girl she need
not blame herself over much for going to Lon-
don, even though she don’t make her fortune
by it. Tell her I freely forgave her, if she ever
thinks I felé bad about her going away. And
when I promised to give you this message, and
bring you back to the vicarage, if ever you
should want to come, he said he could die in
peace if he knew his little girl would be cared
for. He always spoke of you as his little girl
while he was ill,’ added the Vicar.

“Oh, father! father! and I never half cared
for you!” sobbed Lizzie.

- “Lizzie, your father’s love and care for you
was but a faint picture of the love of your



Conclusion, 73

heavenly Father, whom you have also grieved
and forsaken. It was because of this that He
sent His dear Son, the Lord Jesus Christ, into
the world to seek and save those who were
lost.”

“Oh, I wish you had sent for me when
father spoke about dying!” said Lizzie, ‘I
would have given anything to be able to see
him.”

“But no one thought there was any im-
mediate danger; and he said himself, when I
spoke to him about it, that as you were so
comfortable it was a pity to upset you. He had
all he wanted, except the sight of you. I believe
he longed to see you at the last, but was not
quite sure whether you would come, as you
were so busy and happy in London. I told him
I was quite sure you would if you knew you
were wanted, and it was agreed that if he did
not soon get better I was to send for you. It
was the day before he died that he had that
talk, and then the end came so suddenly that
there was scarcely time for me to get down from
the vicarage. His last words and his last
thoughts were for you and your brother. I was
to give his love to both of you.”
~ “Qh, sir, I am glad you told father I would
come to him,” said Lizzie. ‘Nothing would
have kept me away if I had known he was really
ate?

It was the only bit of comfort to be got out
of the whole miserable mistake now, and Lizzie
hugged this thought. The Vicar, seeing that
she began to look weary after their talk, very



74 Lizstes Experiment.

soon left her, but promised to come and see her
again before he returned to Ashmead.

When he came again he found Lizzie very
much better, and looking forward to the time
when she could return to the country.

‘‘Aunt has been to see me since you were
here, sir,” said Lizzie, ‘‘and she thinks I had
better give up all thought of working in London,
because my leg may be weak for a long time,
she says—too weak to use the treadle of the
machine; and I can see she will be very glad
to get rid of me now,” she added, with a
smile.

“So this is another difficulty removed out
of the way of your return,” said the clergy-
man.

“Yes, sir. I did not know what aunt would
say about it. She did not want me to come
back to the country when Miss Passingham
wrote to me, and she has been as kind as she
could be to me since I have been here, so that
it was only fair to ask her what she thought
before deciding things altogether.”

“Yes, you are quite right, Lizzie, to consider
the engagement you made with your aunt when
you undertook this work ; but I am equally glad
that you will be able to come home when you
leave the hospital.

“T have been making inquiries all round
since I was here last, and I am sure if country
girls only knew the hardships they were likely
to meet with when they come to London, they
would very gladly go to service or learn to
do something near their own homes rather



Conclusion. 75,

ae half-starve in London, as many of them
0.”

“TI won’t mind telling anybody now what I
had to put up with,” said Lizzie, “if it will
only prevent them making such a mistake as I
did; and I was better off than many girls, for
aunt was good to me in her way. It was the
work being so hard, and the payment for it so
bad, that made things as they were. Why,
poor people can’t afford to be clean and tidy,
because it takes so much time from their work ;
and if it wasn’t for Sunday, when they mostly
do their washing and cleaning, I don’t know
what would happen.” And then she told the
clergyman of her experience in this matter
while living with her aunt.

“T have heard of worse things than that
during my inquiry,” said the clergyman, sadly.
‘““T can well believe that you owe a debt of
gratitude to your aunt for her care of you, for
God gave her as a protector to you from many
and great evils that beset most girls, who come
here unprotected and unprovided with friends ;
so that I hope your experiment may be a
warning to other girls in the village—especially
as we hope to provide occupation for them near
their own homes for the future.”

It was arranged before the Vicar left that
both girls should stay at the hospital until they
were well enough to return to the country, and
that one of the nurses should see them into the
train safely when they did go.

This visit from the Vicar did Lizzie more
good than all the medicine she had taken, and



76 Lizzie’s Experiment.

in a few weeks’ time she was well enough to
undertake the journey home, though she had to
walk upon crutches at first, and would have to
continue to use them for a few weeks, the doctor
said. ;

Harriet was quite well and strong again by
that time, and both girls were glad to see their
native place once more, basking in the autumn
sunshine, the apples they had left green and
sour, glowing ripe and mellow as they hung in
the orchard waiting to be gathered.

‘Harriet spoke of this as they drove home
from the station, for the Vicar had come to meet
them with Marion and Miss Channing. /

‘‘ Ah, we may learn a lesson from the apples,
Lizzie,” said the clergyman, as he gave old
Dobbin a flick with the whip. “ They have
been exposed to a good many hot suns and cold
winds since you left them green and sour. Their
ruddy ripeness is the result of all these, and
God deals in the same way with His chil-
dren, and for the same result—that they may
grow tender and gentle towards others. And
so the painful experience you have had in
London should perfect and ripen your charac-
ter, for this is the object to be attained by all
trial.”

“T am sure Lizzie will be able to tell us a
great deal that we want to know about London,”’
said Marion.

“Yes, I think she will give you a fair account”

of it now,” said the Vicar. ‘But until she had
learned her lesson she was not willing to do
this. She was too proud to let us know she



Conclusion, 09

had made a mistake in what she had done, and
this is the fault of many a girl who goes there.
Rather than let her friends know exactly how
things are with her, she hides the worst half of
her life until it is too late to remedy the mischief.
that has been done slowly, but surely. Lizzie
has been saved from this, and in her thank-
fulness for her own escape from lifelong misery,
I hope she will always be willing to let others
profit by her experiment, by telling them
fairly just what they are likely to meet with
if they start out in the world as London work-
girls.”

“Oh! but they won’t be in such a hurry to
go now, I hope, uncle,” said Miss Channing.
‘““You see, we shall make life in the village so
much more interesting, I hope. You don’t know
what changes have been going on here while
you have been away,” she said, turning to the
two girls.

“‘Unele’s glebe land has been turned into
allotment gardens, and the men have begun to
work in them.”

“Yes, and we are going to have evening
entertainments in the schoolrooms nearly every
night,” said Marion, eagerly.

‘And there is to be a reading- and smoking-
room for the men too, so that they won’t have
to go to the Red Cow to talk over things, or
to get out of the way when the washing is about
at home,” put in Miss Channing.

It was at her expense the alteration was to
be made in the Vicar’s barn, which stood suf-
ficiently near the village for the purpose, and



78 Lizse's Lauper anent,

yet far enough from the Red Cow to avoid
passing its door, which some of the men
would find it hard work to accomplish at
first.

“Yes, we are going to try and keep the
girls and boys from wandering off to London
by making it worth their while to stop in
the country, so that I hope the whole village
will profit by Lizzie’s experiment,” said the
Vicar.

They drove straight to the vicarage first, for
Miss Passingham wanted to see her girls after
their long absence; but Lizzie was to go and
stay with her stepmother until she could do
without the crutches; and, of course, Harriet
would go home for a day or two before going to
the dairy school, when she would live at the
farmhouse.

Mrs. Milner had so far profited by Lizzie’s
experience in London as to decide not to remove
there at once—not until she had tried what she
could do here. She was busy enough at present
getting things ready for Lizzie to go to the
vicarage, and for which Miss Passingham had
agreed to pay her, for she had provided the
material for her little maid’s outfit, feeling sure
that she would have very few clothes fit to wear
in her service, even if any had been bought in
London.

Truth to tell, Lizzie had come home in the
same hat and jacket she went away in, for the
only article she had bought—the coveted hat
and feather—she felt so much ashamed of, that
when her aunt brought it to the hospital she



Concluston. 79

begged her to take it home again and give it to
one of the other girls, for she could never bear
the sight of it again. The odious fashion in
which she had cut her hair in the front was
less objectionable now, because during the
first days of her stay at the hospital it had
all been cut to a similar length to relieve her
head, as the doctor feared brain fever would
set in.

So no one but Harriet knew about the fringe
on her forehead, and the hat and red feather,
until she told the whole story of it to Miss
Passingham afterwards, with many tears of
regret ; for if this folly of wanting a fine hat as
she did had not seized her, she might have
taken the offer again made to her and returned
home before her father died. Some people went
further than this, and said if Lizzie had come
home then, Milner would never have been ill,
for he would have spent his evenings at home,
as he always had done when Lizzie was there
to read to him. This gossip was not allowed to
reach her ears when people saw how deeply she
grieved for her father’s death. Not until years
afterwards did she learn what all the village
believed—that her experiment in trying what
the work of London was like had cost her
father his life; and when this whisper did reach
her, it revived all the bitter sorrow she had
passed through when she first heard of his
death.

She gained health and strength each day
after her return from London, so that she was
able to walk without the help of her crutches



80 Lizzte’s Experiment.

much earlier than the doctors anticipated. For
this she was very glad, as she was anxious to
enter upon her duties at the vicarage, and let
her friends know by her deeds, as well as by her
words, how grateful she was for the timely help
that had rescued her from the full effects that
might have followed upon her London experi-
ment.





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Full Text


“-EMMA-LESLIE


The Baldwin Library

University
RyeD
Florida




LIZZIES EXPERIMENT.

Q Story of London Life.

BY

EMMA LESLIE,

166

i AUTHOR OF ‘' BERTIE DANBY’S TRAINING, FOR MERRIE ENGLAND,”

“AUDREY’S JEWELS,” ETC.



LONDON
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY,

56 PATERNOSTER Row, AND 65 St. PAUL’s CHURCHYARD,

CONTENTS.

Be
CHAPTER PAGE
J. Aw Accrpent a ae Re cree)
II. Lizzin’s Hour... og ee cab 15
III. Sunpay Mornine te vee na dee
IV. Lonpon Bripce ... vas one tes 36
VY. A Hat anp FEATHER nee a week.
VI. Sap News rrom ASHMEAD vee coe 56

VII. ConcLtsion ... cae KS, oe 00.













LIZZIES EXPERIMENT.



CHAPTER I.
AN ACCIDENT.

yiaere! now I hope everybody will be
satisfied, and let me go to London.”

: And as she spoke, Lizzie Milner
Peel the group of girls who were leaving school,
to see what effect her words had upon them.

“The examination is over; but do you think
you have passed, Lizzie?” asked her particular
friend, Harriet Martin.

“ Teacher says I answered very well, so I am
sure to pass,” replied Lizzie, in a tone of
triumph. ‘ What will you give for my chance
of going to London now? There’s no excuse
for keeping me in this dull old village any
longer, you know.”

“What will Miss Passingham say?” sug-
gested one of the girls.

“T don’t care; I don’t mean to be moped to



6 Lizgte's Experiment.

death here. My aunt lives in London, and my
brother Jack has gone there, so I don’t see
why I shouldn’t go too, now that I can leave
school.”

** But I thought you were going to be Miss
Passingham’s servant,” said Harriet Martin,
a little eagerly. ‘‘She will be disappointed,
Lizzie, and the Vicar too,” she added.

“T can’t help that; I’ve been thinking it all
over, and it won’t be much better up at the
Vicarage than it is here in the village; what
fun is there to be had up there, with just the
Vicar and Miss Passingham and those two old
servants in the kitchen ?”

‘But there’s Miss Elsie Channing and Miss
Marion; neither of them are old,’ exclaimed
several of the girls together.

Lizzie made a wry face. ‘‘Cf course you are
all in love with Miss Marion, because she is
the Vicar’s daughter,” she said in a mocking
tone.

“No; because she is kind and gentle, and is
always trying to do something for us school
girls,’’ said another.

“Yes; mother says things are a good deal
better since the new Vicar came,” put in a
third.

‘And nobody could help loving poor Miss
Passingham,” said Harriet.

“** Poor Miss Passingham!’” protested half a
dozen voices at once.

“T don’t think she would like to hear you
call her ‘poor Miss Passingham ;’ and I am
sure she seems the happiest woman in the place,
An Accident. 7

though she does have to lie on that couch
always, and has a great deal of pain sometimes,”
said Harriet, warmly.

‘*Yes—yes, of course, everybody loves dear
Miss Passingham; but we were talking about
going to London. Who else wants to go? You
are going to leave school, Harriet; what are you
going to do?”

Harriet shook her head. ‘‘ I might get a place
to help in the dairy up at the Mead Farm,”
she said.

“Why not make up your mind to go to
London instead ?” suggested Lizzie. “Do. I
want one of you to say you will go, and then
father won’t mind it so much. I have talked
mother over, but father has odd notions about
girls and what they ought to do. Say you will
go, Harriet, and I will write to my aunt and
tell her we are coming.”

“What are you going to do when you get to
London—go to service ? ”’

The girls had linked their arms and were
walking slowly down the village street, too
deeply interested in the discussion going on to
notice anything beyond, until a loud warning
whoop made them start asunder and scamper
in all directions out of the way, for tearing
down the road came an infuriated bull that had
made his escape from a field half a mile beyond
the village.

The girls rushed screaming in all directions
out of the way, while the bull, followed by the
men whooping and yelling, careered from one
side of the road to the other, yet always
8 Lizete’s Experiment.

managing to elude its pursuers, until just as
the group of girls was reached by the animal
one of the men contrived to throw a rope over
its horns. But at the same moment there was
a piercing scream of agony from one of the
scattered group, and amid the blinding cloud of
dust one of them could be seen lying helpless
in the road, struck down by the beast just as
he was stopped from tossing or trampling on
her.

While some of the men secured the bull from
running off in the opposite direction, one of
them went to see if the girl was much hurt, and
the rest came back when they found the danger
was over.

“It’s Harriet Martin,” called one, and Lizzie
ran to the side of her friend, eager and anxious
to find out whether she was hurt.

The man had lifted her in his arms and was
wiping the dust from her face, but although
there was neither bruise nor blood to be seen,
the girl appeared to be quite lifeless as she lay
white and still in the man’s arms.

‘Where does she live?” he asked, for he had
only lately come to live at the farm, and did
not know any of the girls.

‘Tl show you,” said Lizzie; ‘‘ but you don’t
think she’s going to die, do you?” she added,
the tears rising to her eyes as she spoke.

To the great relief of everybody Mr. Passing-
ham appeared the next moment, for, having
heard the noise, he had left the school to
hurry down the street and see what was the
matter.
An Accident. 9

“Oh, sir, it’s Harriet Martin; the bull has

knocked her down!” said all the girls in a
breath.
. “Farmer Pattison’s bull, I suppose?” he
said rather sternly to the young man who had
lifted the girl, and whom he knew to be the
farmer’s nephew.

“We can’t tell at all how he got away
from the paddock,” said the man by way of
excuse.

‘No, I suppose not; but I shall come and
see the farmer about this, Can you carry the
girl as far as the Vicarage? It is close by.
Lizzie, you run and tell Mr. Tyrrell he is wanted
at once; this is a case for the doctor, I am
afraid,” added the Vicar, as he walked on first
to prepare his daughter and sister for the coming
of the injured girl.

She was carried into a little morning-room on
the ground floor and laid upon a couch, and a
few minutes afterwards the doctor came; but
as yet Harriet had shown no sign of returning
consciousness.

It was a sad story the girls went home with,
though the Vicar had taken the precaution to
go himself and tell the mother something of
what had happened, to save her needless alarm,
for he knew Harriet was not dead, as the girls
supposed.

“There! If we only lived in London, or in any
nice town, that wouldn’t have happened,” said
Lizzie, as she went down the vicarage garden.
“Tf Harriet isn’t dead, she’s so badly hurt she
won't beable to go with me now. Poor Harriet!
10 Ligzte’s Experiment.

I wonder where she is hurt, and how long she
will be ill.”

Lizzie was very fond of her friend; but there
was a good deal of disappointment on her own
account mingled with her grief now, for she had
set her heart on being able to persuade Harriet
to go with her to London, and she talked of thig
still as they went along the road.

“You seem to think it is all settled; but
people can’t get to London without money, and
it costs a lot of money to get there, I know,” said -
one of her companions, who had often thought
she would like to go to the wonderful city, only
she knew it was useless for her to think of such
a thing, ;

“Yes, it costs money, of course,” replied
Lizzie; ‘‘ but when once you get there you can
earn such a lot that you could soon send it back.
My brother earns nearly a pound a week now,
and when he was here he only got five shillings ;
and, of course, it is the same for girls. My father
could let me have the money to go, and I meant
to ask him to lend some to Harriet, and then we
would pay him between us out of the first money
we earned,”’ added Lizzie.

““ Well, there's an end of that for poor Harriet!”
and the girls dropped into silence again, for this
accident seemed to have made the idea of London
a little like sacrilege—at least the talk about it
just now.

They carried the news home; and later in the
day, when the sun was setting behind the distant
hills, Lizzie and one or two others went up to
the Vicarage to inquire how their friend was,
An Accident. II

and whether the doctor thought she would soon
get well, for they had heard that she was not
dead, as they had at first supposed.

Miss Marion Passingham saw them coming
before they reached the house, and went down
into the garden to meet them.

“She is a little better now, Lizzie,” said the
young lady in answer to the girl’s eager inquiry
for her friend.

“Do you think she will be ill long, Miss
Marion ?” asked Lizzie.

“I hope not; but we cannot tell yet. The
doctor says she must stay here for a few days,
and we may have to send for another doctor to
see her; but she has to be kept very quiet, you
know.”

‘* Willshe have to go to the hospital in London
if she don’t get better soon? Jack went there,
you know, Miss Marion, and did not come home
any more.”

“‘ Did he die in the hospital ?”’ asked the lady
in a gentle voice.

“Oh no; but he heard that people could do
ever so much better in London than in the
country, and so he got work there. I’m going
to London too,” she said, dropping her head
an eyes and kicking a stone on the gravel
path.

“You, Lizzie!” uttered the lady in a tone of
surprise. ‘But I thought you were coming to
wait upon my aunt. You know she wants a
young girl to attend upon her, and I thought it
was settled that you were to come as soon as
you could leave school.”
12 Lizzie’s Experiment.

“No, not settled, ma'am. Miss Passingham
spoke about it, and I thought I should like it at
first; but we’ve had a letter from Jack, and I
have an aunt in London, and so I would much
rather go there.”

“But you had much better come here for a
year or two at least. What can you do in
London? Youhavenotlearned anything yet!”
said the lady in a tone of astonishment.

The girl looked equally astonished to hear the
statement, for in her own esteem she knew
everything. She was at the top of her class in
school, and had just passed the sixth standard,
what else could there be for her to learn ?

“Tam one of the best scholars in the school,”
she said in a tone of protest.

“Yes, I know you are, Lizzie,” said the young
lady; “‘but learning history and geography
won't teach you how to make a bed or sweep a
room properly. Now, if you were to come here
for a year, our housemaid would show you how
to set about this sort of work in a proper way,
and then, with a good character, you could get a
situation anywhere. But if you go to London
now, you will just have to take anything you
can get—a hard, drudging place most likely,
where you will learn very little beyond the
drudgery.”

‘But I don’t know that I shall go to service,”
said Lizzie, with something like a toss of the
head. ‘My aunt takes work in from the shops,
and employs a lot of young girls, and I think I
should like that better than going to service.”

* Well, come and talk to Miss Passingham
An Accident. Tg

about it,” said the young lady after a pause;
‘‘she will not be able to see you to-day, for she
has been upset by this accident to Harriet, but
to-morrow will be a half-holiday, and you will
come for the choir-practice, of course, and I will
tell auntie that you are coming to see her after-
wards,” and with these words the lady dismissed
the girls and went back to her aunt and cousin.

‘What do you think?” exclaimed the young
lady as she entered her aunt’s room after leaving
the girls. ‘Lizzie Milner doesn’t want to come
here after all!”

“‘ Not come here!” repeated her cousin; ‘‘ but
I thought she was to be Aunt Letitia’s maid when
she could leave school.”

. _ Has she changed her mind about it?” said

the invalid, a faint smile spreading over the
fair delicate face as she looked at her two
nieces. ‘‘What has tempted her to break her
promise ?” she added.

“© Oh, some aunt and brother in London. I
do think I shall begin to hate the very name of
London, for all our nice girls go off there,” said
Marion in a tone of vexation.

“Tt is a shame to disappoint Aunt Letty like
this!” said Miss Channing, who was no less
disturbed than her cousin over the news. ‘I
thought if Lizzie came to aunt and learned her
ways she might by-and-by become a lady’s maid
instead of an ordinary servant, for she is quick
and clever at learning things—much quicker
than most of the girls.”

‘And for that very reason is less likely to be
satisfied with quiet village life,” said the invalid.
14 Lizete’s Experiment.

‘You must not be unjust to Lizzie in your
vexation about my disappointment, but try to
remember that there are two sides to this
question.”

‘But, auntie, think what we have heard
about London!” said Marion.

“Yes, and we must think of what Lizzie has
heard. Her brother gets much higher wages
there than he did here; she told me all about it
last week, and though she said nothing then,
I thought I saw a dawning desire in her to go
and try the wonderful city for herself. She is
just the sort of girl who would naturally want to
go, and though I do feel disappointed that she
is not coming to me, we must not let this spoil
our sympathy for the girl, or we may lose a
chance of helping her by-and-by, when she may
need our help.”

‘Then you think she will come to grief
through it;” said Marion. :

““T don’t know, my dear; you see we cannot
judge, as we do not know what sort of a person
her aunt is, or what kind of work Lizzie thinks
of seeking. The one thing we have to do, dear,
is to make sure that she goes with the full con-
fidence that she leaves friends behind who will
still be ready to help her if she is disappointed
in her search. It is the want of this that drives
many-a poor girl to ruin, I am sure, when a
little timely help and advice might save them
from a lifetime of sorrow.”

“‘T don’t believe Lizzie will take anybody’s
advice just now,” said her niece with a sigh, for
this resolution of her aunt’s promised maid to
Lizzte's Hlome. 15

go to London was likely to upset some of her
own plans, unless they could soon supply her
place. ‘‘ Lizzie won’t listen to advice.”

‘‘ This would scarcely be the time to offer it,”
replied Miss Passingham, ‘‘ unless we are pre-
pared to put aside our own wishes in the matter,
and try to look at things from Lizzie’s stand-
point. Unless we can do this, we have no right
to call ourselves the girl’s friends, and blame her
for taking her own way without much regard
for our advice.”

** Now, auntie, you must not talk any more, or
your head will be bad to-morrow,” put in Miss
Channing at this point, and to ensure that quiet
was secured she went out of the room, taking
her cousin with her. ‘It won’t do, Marion, to
upset aunt about this,’ she said as soon as the
door was closed, and so the matter ended for
that time.

CHAPTER II.
LIZZIE'S HOME.

aapRint Martin was more seriously hurt
than the doctor at first supposed, and
after lying a week at the vicarage, it
was decided to remove her to a London hospital,
where she would receive care and attention that
could not be obtained elsewhere.

The news that Harriet was going to London


16 Lizeve’s Experiment.

soon spread among her companions, and made
Lizzie Milner more eager than ever to go at
once, in spite of what Miss Marion Passingham
had said to her upon the subject.

“Mother says I can go if aunt will take me,
and we are expecting a letter from her every day
about it, so that if she says I had better go at
once, I shan’t be able to go to the Vicarage even
for a little while, ma’am.” This was what
Lizzie said to Miss Channing, but it was said
with a defiant air, and the young lady felt sure
that whatever her cousin had said was resented
by Lizzie, and so she had determined to get
away from Ashmead as soon as she could. -

Unfortunately her aunt had been too ill to see
Lizzie herself, and so they had to think where
they could find another girl who could take
Lizzie’s place in waiting upon the invalid.

‘‘Now I hope that’s settled,” said Lizzie to
another friend, after leaving Miss Channing.
“Father’s in the humour to let me have the
money to go to London now, but if I went up to
the Vicarage he would say I could stop there
instead of going to London.”

But her father was unwilling to part with her,
although he did not mind giving her the money.

“Well, if she goes I hope she will make up
her mind to stop, and not throw herself upon
our hands again after the expense of sending
her there,” said her step-mother.

“Of course I shall stop,” said Lizzie, who
made up her mind that she would not come
home again to her step-mother, however un-
comfortable she might be. Not that she had
Lizzte’'s Home. 17

really anything to complain of, except that she
could not have her own way; but she was a
proud, wilful girl, and would never like to own
that she was disappointed in her venture.

So after a little more talk about the matter it
was settled that Lizzie should go to her aunt’s
"as soon as her clothes could be got ready, and
she set about the task of mending her stockings
that very night.

Harriet Martin could not be removed to the
hospital the next day, and so it was arranged
that when she went Lizzie should go up with
her; and when Miss Passingham heard of this
she sent for Lizzie to come and see her before
she went away.

“Would you have gone to London without
coming to say good-bye to me and the Vicar ?”
said the invalid, when Lizzie went into the
room where she was lying on her couch.

Lizzie hung her head, and said something
about Miss Marion being so cross; but no one
could be many minutes with the Vicar’s sister
before their better nature was touched, and so
Lizzie was soon sitting in the low chair that
always stood near the couch for visitors, and
the tears were in her eyes at the thought of
leaving this kind friend.

“TI really am sorry to go away from you,”
she said, looking at ‘the pale, gentle face, and
wondering whether she would ever see it again,
for Miss Passingham had been very ill the
last few days, and so looked more fragile than
ever.

“But as the matter is settled now, of course

B
18 Lizzies Experiment.

you must go, Lizzie,” said the lady, without
mentioning the vexation it had caused her.
‘You must try and remember that an engage-
ment once made should not be lightly broken,”
she said. ‘But what I wanted to say to you
was this: If you find the work and life in
London harder than you can bear without in-
jury to your health, then let us know about it
before it is too late. Many a girl has her
health and life ruined because she will not let
her friends know the true state of affairs with
her.

“And this applies not only to health, but
to happiness and moral well-being, which is
sreater than all. If you find yourself thrown
into the company of girls who would lead you
into sin, and that you cannot avoid them with-
out giving up the employment you have taken,
then send at once and let us know all about it,
that we may be able to help you out of it in
some way. Of course I do not mean that you
are to fill your letters with complaints about
trifles when you write home; for you will be
sure to meet with some difficulty, some un-
pleasantness that is hard to bear or overcome.
These you will be brave enough to endure with-
out grumbling, I am sure; but in the graver
matters of health and strength being exhausted
by long hours of labour, insufficient food, or
being -thrown among companions who would
lead you into folly and sin, don’t trust to your
own judgment, but let us know at once”

‘*But I should be laughed at for going away
then,” said Lizzie.
Lizzte's Hlome. 19

“No sensible person would laugh; and surely
it would be better to put up with that than ruin
your life—ruin soul and body alike, perhaps,”
said the lady earnestly.

“Soul and body!” repeated Lizzie, with
widely opened eyes.

Miss Passingham laid her thin white hand
upon the girl’s shoulder, and looked earnestly
and lovingly into her eyes.

“My dear girl, you are going into a new
strange life,” she said—‘‘a life of which you
know nothing, and of which I can only tell you
as an outsider; but I do know this, Lizzie, that
you will meet with temptations and dangers
there you have not dreamed of as yet. The
country has its temptations, I know, but here,
with father and mother and friends, you are
more protected than you are likely to be in
London.”

“But I am going to my aunt, ma’am, and
she will take care of me,” said the girl quickly.

“Yes, my dear, and I hope you will make a
friend of her; but this was what I wanted to
say, Lizzie, that whether you can make a friend
of your aunt or not, there is one Friend who
will be near you, ready to help you in every
hour of need. The Lord Jesus Christ will know
and understand, better than any earthly friend
can, just what the danger is, and where it will
hurt you. What would be a danger or tempta-
tion to your aunt, or to some other girl, might
have no attraction for you; and then, something
that they might not care for, would be almost
irresistible to you, because it stirs into life and
20 Liszie’s Experiment.

desire something that is hidden within you.
Unless there was this ‘something’ within us—
this seed of sin—the outside temptations could
do us no harm. I do not know what form this
seed of sin may take in you, but the Lord
Jesus Christ does, and only His blood—His life
in you—can kill this seed of sin, and cleanse
you from its taint, and so make these outer
temptations powerless to hurt you. Now, Lizzie,
I want you to remember this, that this seed of
sin is in you, bué the Lord Jesus Christ gave
His life—shed His blood—that sin or Satan
outside might have no power to hurt you.

“You remember that when the Lord Himself
was tempted, He said, ‘Get thee behind me,
Satan.’ He could say this, and the tempter
had no power to hurt Him, because there was
no seed of sin in Him. But there is this seed
in each one of us, and though it may lie so
quiet that no one even suspects it to be there,
some sudden temptation may come, and then,
before we are aware of it, the sin has been
committed that overwhelms us with sorrow and
trouble. «

‘Now, my dear, you are going away from us
into unknown dangers, and you carry with you
that which will give them the power to hurt
you, unless the life of Christ in you kills this,
or, as the Bible says, ‘The blood of Jesus
Christ cleanses you from all sin.’ It may be
—it often is—that until this seed of sin has
brought trouble upon us, we do not realise that
we need a Saviour, and then too often when the
trouble comes, we are filled with despair, and

Â¥
a
Lizete's Home. 21

think there can be no pardon, no forgiveness
for us.

“Now this is what I particularly want you
to remember, Lizzie, that if sin does thus bring
sorrow and shame to you—no matter what it
may be—the blood of Jesus Christ can cleanse
you from this sin as well as that which is
hidden, and though you may and must bear
the pain and sorrow that sin ever brings with
it, still, peace and comfort will come to you
through this forgiveness, that nothing else can
give. It is the only way God can teach us
sometimes, and so He lets us have our own way,
until the shame and pain compel us to seek
and find pardon and peace.”

“Oh, ma’am! you seem to think I am going
to quite a dreadful place,’ exclaimed Lizzie,
when Miss Passingham paused and looked at
her. ‘These things are not at all likely to
happen to me. I am not going to strange
people. I am going to my aunt.”

“But she is a stranger to you, Lizzie; or, at
least, you know very little of her, and tempta-
tion is sure to come to you in some way or
other. I know something of the condition of
working girls in London, and that is why I
have spoken to you so seriously to-day. For
one thing, you will find the work harder than
you expect, | am afraid, and you may be tempted
to think there is no time to pray, even morning
and evening, and there will be the danger of
you forgetting this Friend of sinners. Your
aunt may be a kind, sympathetic woman—l
hope she is—but hard work is apt to make
22 Lizzte’s Experiment.

people hard in their ways, and if your aunt is.
like this, your life is not likely to be a pleasant
one—at least at first.”

At this point the Vicar put his head in at the
door to see who was talking. ‘“‘Oh, is this our
truant?” he said pleasantly, as Lizzie rose
from her seat. “So you have made up your
mind to go to London, your father tells me,”
he added, as he came in and took a seat near
the invalid.

. “T have just been having a little talk with

Lizzie, and telling her she must not forget
to write to her friends here, and let us know
just how she is getting on,” said the lady.

“Yes, of course; and I hope she will go and
see her friend Harriet while she is in the
hospital.”

‘‘How is Harriet now, sir?” asked Lizzie,
anxious to turn the conversation from herself
and her projected journey, for she did not mean
to give any promise about telling them every-
thing concerning her London life.

‘“She seems a little better to-day, and the
doctor hopes the spine may not be so seriously
injured after all. You are going up to London
with her, I hear ?”’

“Yes, sir. Father thought it was a good
chance for me to go, and aunt wants me soon;
she is so busy just now.”

“Yes, of course it was a good opportunity for
you, and I hope you will try and see Harriet
sometimes. On Sunday afternoon most of the
hospitals are open for visitors, and so I hope
you will find time to go and see your old friend
Lizzie’s FTome. oe

and go to church too. Never forget that God
is near you, though earthly friends may be far
away, and in His house of prayer you can
always feel at home. Miss Passingham has a
Bible and Prayer book for you, I know, that you
may not forget Ashmead friends in your new
home. We shall remember you, do not fear;
and you must try to think of us sometimes, and
then it will not be so hard to write, if you
should need our help at any time.”

Then the Vicar bade her good-bye, and left:
his sister to have the last words with her, while
he went to make the final arrangements for
Harriet being moved to the railway station the
next day.

“The Vicar brought these for me to give
you,” said the lady, taking a neatly bound Bible
and Prayer-book from her table and handing
them to Lizzie. ‘‘They are keepsakes, you
know, to remind you of the friends left behind
in Ashmead. Never forget that we are friends
still, though we may feel a little disappointed
that you should prefer going to London instead
of coming to live with us.”

“T never can forget you, and how kind you
have been to all us girls,” said Lizzie, as she
took the books and prepared to go.

The tears were in her eyes once more, and
she could scarce speak the last words of fare-
well to this kind friend without sobbing aloud,
for she felé sure she should never see Miss
Passingham again, and certainly she could not
expect to find a friend like her anywhere else.

For a moment she half regretted that she was
24 Lizgie’s Experiment.

going away. But it was too late for regrets
now, she thought, as she wiped her eyes; but
it was with a subdued feeling that she walked
home after this talk with Miss Passingham.

CHAPTER III.
SUNDAY MORNING.

ow, Lizzie, if we get up at six o'clock
to-morrow we shall have first turn
with the copper, and then you will be
able to go and see your friend in the hospital
directly after dinner.”
It was Saturday night, and Mrs. Glossop had
just been out marketing, while Lizzie folded up



. and finished off the last dozen of shirts.

The other girls had left at eight o’clock; but
it was nearly eleven now, and, truth to tell,
Lizzie had been indulging in a good ery, out
of sheer weariness and disappointment, while
her aunt was out. She had comforted herself,
however, with the thought that to-morrow was
Sunday, and she would not have to get up so
early in the morning, or be worried by the din
of the machines all day, so that her aunt’s sug-
gestion about getting up at six o’clock was any-
thing but welcome to Lizzie just now. She had
been about ten days in London, and already the
reality of life in the great city had begun to
lose its charm. .
Sunday Morning. 25

It was not the first disappointment of that
evening either, for she had anticipated going
out to see the brilliantly lighted main-road, that
was like a fair; but she had to stay at home
and do the shirts while her aunt went marketing
in the neighbourhood.

“Tt’g nothing but work, work, all day and all
night, Sunday and week-day alike,” said Lizzie
with a sob.

“Thats just about it, my girl; but if you
don’t like it you can go home again, and it
ain’t every gal as can get that choice,” said her
aunt equably.

Lizzie shed a few tears; but Mrs. Glossop
took care to produce the fried fish she had
brought in for supper, and the sight and smell
of that was some small consolation to the girl,
for she was hungry as well as tired.

“There, get the bread out, and we will have
supper; you will feel better then,” said the
widow. “It is a disappointment, I suppose, to
find that people have to work as hard, or harder, ~
in London than they do in the country.”

‘‘T wouldn’t mind working at proper times,
but to have to wash and clean on Sundays!”
And then poor Lizzie almost broke down again,
as she recalled the tender hush that wrapped all
the village on Sunday at home in the country.

“Well, we must clean on Sundays or go
dirty ; and you don’t like dirt, I know.”

““T never was in such dirt before in my life ;
and it seems impossible to be clean here,”
answered Lizzie.

‘People can’t afford it, that’s how it is.
26 Lizzies Experiment.

They would be as clean as you would like to be;
but it takes time, don’t you see, and time
means money when you have to work for every
mouthful of bread, that a dozen others are
waiting for a chance to snatch from you.”

“Tg it always like this?” asked Lizzie;
‘because, if it is, 1 think I would rather go to
service than stop here.”

“T don’t know anything about going to service ;
so if you ain’t content to do as I do, and live as
I live, why, you’d better write and ask your
mother to send you the money to go back at
once, without any more bother.”

«TJ don’t want to go back if I can help it;
the country is so dull.”

“To be sure it is, and there is chances to go
out and see the sights when we ain’t quite so
busy. There’s slack times as well as busy times,
and then I always manage to clear up Friday
or Saturday.”

This was some comfort to Lizzie, and she
dried her tears and ate her supper, resolving to
put up with the present hard work and dis-
comfort for the sake of the pleasure that would
be awaiting her when the present rush of work
was over.

Her aunt roused her at six o’clock the next
morning, but it was hard work for her to keep
from going to sleep again instead of getting out
of bed, for her head and limbs ached, and she
felt altogether unfit to do washing and cleaning.

But she had to follow her aunt out to the
little scullery at the back, which was for the
joint use of all the lodgers in the house.
Sunday Morning. 2,

Mrs. Glossop had got the copper fire going,
and had already begun rubbing some of the
clothes.

“You can begin with that pail,” she said, as
Lizzie appeared, looking white and sleepy still.
‘You wash your own clothes, and I'll manage
the rest. We must get ’em all done and hung
out in the yard to dry by eight o’clock, or else
there will be a row with Mrs. Collins, and I
hate having a fuss with the other lodgers.”

Mrs. Glossop was rubbing away all the time
she was talking, though after she had set Lizzie
to work she lapsed into silence, for, as she re-
marked, she wanted her breakfast before she
could talk much.

It was a relief to both when Lizzie had done
her share, and could go and light the fire and
put the kettle on.

“You must bring the bits of carpet out as
soon as you’ve got the fire alight, and shake
them at once, or we shall have to take them
out in the street to do it. I haven’t been used
to that, and so I like to get it done early, before
anybody’s clothes are out.”

Mrs. Glossop’s back-room was covered with
little odd bits of carpet of all sizes, patterns,
and qualities ; but, as she said, it made the place
comfortable and warm in the winter-time.

By the time these were shaken the clothes
were ready to hang out on the line, for the
whole business had to be hurried through that
other lodgers might have their turn with the
copper.

By eight o’clock, when breakfast was ready,
28 Lizsies Experiment.

the whole of it was finished and blowing in the
wind, and Mrs. Glossop brought in a pailful
of the hot suds to clean the place.

“T always manage to do my washing and
cleaning at the same time,” she remarked as
she dropped into a chair near the table, while
Lizzie cut the bread-and-butter for breakfast.

There was no need to hurry now that the
scullery was left in readiness for the other
lodgers, and so they sat longer over this meal
than they usually did, though the force of habit
made the widow swallow her tea scalding hot,
and eat her bread as though the machines were
still going in the next room.

Lizzie, however, took her time this morning,
and discussed what was to follow the washing-
up of the breakfast-things.

“T’ll clean the cupboard out, shall I, while
you wash up?” she said.

“Does the cupboard want turning out? It’s
been done once this summer; and I want you
to clean the next room, if you’ve got time.”

‘“‘ Oh, the cupboard must be done; it smells of
mice, and all sorts of things,” said Lizzie, ina
tone of disgust.

She did not wait for further objections to be
raised, but began to clear the things out as she
spoke, for the love of cleanliness was strong
in Lizzie, though she did feel stiff and tired
still.

By dinner-time both roomshad been thoroughly
cleaned, though neither looked much the better,
to the girl’s great disappointment.

“T told you it wasn’t much use cleaning
Sunday Morning. 29

here,” gaid Mrs. Glossop, when Lizzie spoke
about this. ‘If you just keep the dirt out of
your mouth, it’s about all you can do.”

“‘T suppose it is,” said Lizzie, looking at the
front-room, which she had taken so much pains
to scrub, in the hope of making the floor whiter,
or rather, a little less black. But her labour
had been in vain, and now she felt ready to cry
with weariness and vexation, for it seemed to
justify her aunt’s plan of doing no more than
she was actually obliged in the way of cleaning.

“There! come and have your dinner,” said
her aunt. ‘‘We don’t have baked meat and
potatoes every day, but I do like a bit of hot
meat on Sunday when I can get it.”

She had just brought it in from the baker’s
next door, and the smell was very appetising,
and soon made the girl forget her annoyance
about the room.

“ Now, after I’ve washed up the dinner-things
I’m going to lie down and have a rest, and you
can do the same if you like, or you can go to
the hospital,” said Mrs. Glossop, as she pushed
her plate forward for some more potatoes.

“T should like to lie down and go to sleep,
but I must go and see Harriet at the hospital,”
said Lizzie.

“There'll be small chance of getting any
sleep, for the children will be up and down
stairs all the afternoon; but it’s something to
be able to lie down and feel you have a right
to do it. IT’ll do my folding first, though, and
then I can put the things under the bed to
mangle them. I always do that, it saves the
30 Lizzte’s Experiment.

trouble of taking ’em to the mangle, and the
money it would cost too.”

Lizzie helped her aunt to clear the table and
fold the clothes, then dressed herself, ready to
go to the hospital, for unless she was ready to
go in when the gates opened, she would have
so little time to spend with her old friend, and
she quite longed to see her now, and hear what
her impression of London life was.

Harriet was very ill when she came up from
the country, and there was some doubt whether
she would ever get much better; but the clever
doctors at the hospital had been able to discover
exactly where her back had been injured by the
bull, and apply the proper remedies, so that now,
to Lizzie’s amazement, the invalid was able to
greet her with a pleasant smile as she walked
up the ward between the two rows of little beds.

“Oh, Harriet, how much better you look
already !’’ exclaimed her friend, as she seated
herself beside the bed.

“T am better, too; the doctors here are so
clever and everybody is so kind, that it would
be strange if I did not get better. How are
you, dear? You don’t look very well, I think
_-—not so well as you did when you went to
school.”

“T suppose not. Going to school and going
out in the world makes-a difference, for when
school is over we have to begin real work; and,
of course, I have hardly got used to London

She did not want to give Harriet a bad im-
pression of London, or the work she had to do,
Sunday Morning. 31

until she knew more about it than she did at
present, so she said nothing about the washing
and cleaning being done on Sunday at her
aunt’s home.

‘‘ What work do you do?” asked Harriet,
eagerly.

“Oh, I finish off the shirts or aprons, do the
little bits at the end where the machine don’t
touch—everything has to be finished off, to
make sure it is right before it goes home,”
added Lizzie.

“That must be easy enough, I should think,”
said Harriet; ‘“‘ easier than going to service to
do house-work.”

‘Well, you have to work very fast, and it
makes your head and back ache to sit still so
long,” replied Lizzie.

“Oh yes, of course; but just sewing and
hemming can’t be very hard work, you know.
I wonder what they are doing at home now,
Lizzie? Don’t you wish you could just peep
in and see them ?—not to stay, of course ; for,
as we have come to London, we shan’t want to
go home again yet awhile. I mean to try and
stay now I am here, and I want you to look out
for a chance for me—you said you would, you
know.”

““Ye-es,”’ answered Lizzie, slowly. She did
not like to say how different the reality of this
London life was from the fancy picture she had
imagined concerning it; but she did manage to
say, ‘Sewing and finishing off isn’t the easy
work you think it is, Harriet; and the girls say
’ the machine-work is harder still.”
32 Lizzte's Experiment.

“You haven't tried that yet?” asked the
invalid.

‘‘There isn’t a machine to spare, because
there igs such a rush of work just now,”
answered Lizzie. ‘‘My aunt takes the work,
you know, and the machines are hers; but the
girls who come to work for her pay for the use
of them every week, and then aunt pays them,
for every dozen of things they make, a little
less than the shops pay her; so while there is
s0 much work to do, everybody has their own
machine, don’t you see.”

‘* But—but I thought you were going to learn
your aunt’s business properly,” said Harriet, in
a disappointed tone. “I was thinking when
you got on a bit she might be willing to teach
me too.”

‘So she will, I dare say, when you are well
and can come out of the hospital; but that
won't be yet awhile, I expect,” added Lizzie.

‘Well, I don’t know; I heard the doctor say
yesterday that I should not be ill so long as
they thought I should at first, so I may soon
be able to come out and begin some work.
Wouldn’t mother be glad to hear that, for she
said after we got here she was afraid I should
never have such a chance as you had got. Will
you ask your aunt about it before you come
next Sunday? You will come next Sunday and
see me, won’t you?” added the invalid, eagerly.

She could not quite understand her old friend.
Lizzie was more thoughtful, more gentle in her
manner, and yet Harriet could see that she was
somehow unwilling to ask her aunt about this
Sunday Morning. 33

work for her, in spite of all she had said about
it as they came up in the train together.
Harriet had not been able to say much about
it then. She felt too ill, and was in too much
pain ; but since the pain had been relieved and
she had felt better, she had recalled these
promises of help from her old friend, and was
now eager to avail herself of her proffered
help.

“Don’t you think we'd better wait and see
how I get on with the work before you make up
your mind to begin it? I tell you it ain’t so
easy to get a living in London as you may
think, and so, if I find things ain’t what we
thought they would be, why, it would be better
for you to go straight home when you get well,”
said Lizzie.

The tears rose to Harriet’s eyes at these
discouraging words from her friend. “ What
am Ito do at home?” she said. “You know
what a lot of us there is in that little house,
and father often out of work in the winter-time.
I tell you, Lizzie, I won’t go home again if I
can help it, for 've made up my mind to stop
here and earn some money, so that I can send
some home and help mother a bit. With seven
mouths to fill out of father’s wages, you don’t
know what a hard pinch it was for us some-
times. You were better off than anybody else
in the village, and so you don’t know,” said
Harriet, now fairly crying at the recollection of
the pinching times of poverty, when food and
firing alike were scarce.

“Don’t ery, don’t cry, dear, and I’ll see what

C
34 Lizgte's Experiment,

I can do,” whispered Lizzie, tenderly kissing
her, yet the tears were in her own eyes as she
spoke. ‘You see, I don’t know enough about
the work yet to really find out whether you
could do it, and how much money you could
earn; but I’ll ask aunt to tell me about this
when I go home, or perhaps Lydia Perkins
would tell me if I asked her.”

“ Arven’t you friendly with the girls who work
for your aunt?” said Harriet in some surprise
as she wiped her eyes.

“They're not very friendly with me. You
see, they don’t like fresh girls coming to do
their work; they call it taking the bread out of
their mouths, and said aunt had no business to
have me. Lydia is not quite so bad as the rest,
and Til ask her to tell me what a girl can
earn when there isn’t such a rush as there is
just now. I don’t like rushes of work like
this; there isn’t time for anything else, and—
and——”’ But there Lizzie stopped, fearing
she had already said too much.

She did not want anybody at Ashmead to
know she was not quite satisfied with her
London life.

“You see, I haven’t seen enough of the work
yet,” she said by way of explanation; “but
I don’t want mother and Miss Passingham to
think I’m not satisfied, for I’ve told them I like
it ever so much, so mind what you say when
you write home.”

“But I’m not allowed to write yet,’ said
Harriet. ‘‘ Nurse wrote a letter for me the other
day, as you didn’t come on Sunday, for you told
Sunday Morning. 35

mother you would write and let her know how
I was getting on.”

“And I lost my way last Sunday afternoon,
for the gates shut at four o’clock, they told me,
and it struck four when I got back to aunt’s,
after going ever so far the wrong way. But I'll
write when I get home if you like, and tell her
how much better you are.”

‘Oh yes, do, please Lizzie; mother will feel
ever so much better if she knows you have been
to see me. Tell her you lost your way last
Sunday, for I had to tell her in nurse’s letter
that I had not seen you.”

“All right, Pll make her understand,” said
Lizzie, greatly relieved to have the home corre-
spondence left to her, for she could prevent any
awkward questions being asked or answered if
she did the letter writing.

So, this matter settled, the girls spent a
pleasant hour together until the bell rang, and
the nurse came to remind her that she must go
now.

“Your friend is better, and will soon be able
to go out if-she is very careful; and we don’t
want to keep her here when she ought to be at
home. She has talked long enough now; if
there is too much talking her back will be bad
again, and she will get no sleep to-night.” And.
nurse stood by the bed while the girl said good-
bye, for she could see the traces of excitement
in Harriet’s flushed face, and was determined
that Lizzie should not linger to say any more
now that the bell had rung.

So Lizzie hurried out of the hospital and
36 Lizetes Experiment.

made the best of her way home, for she wanted
to go to church in the evening; and to do this,
and keep her promise to Harriet as well, the
letter must be written before she went, or there
would be no chance of doing it until the next
Sunday.

CHAPTER IV.
LONDON BRIDGE.

quEn Lizzie left the hospital she thought
she would go for a walk before returning
home, that she might be able to say she
had seen some of the grand places when she
wrote her letter, otherwise they might think
she had no time to go about and see the sights
of London.

Jack had spoken of London Bridge in one of
his letters, and it was near London Bridge that
he worked, so that she thought she could not do
better than find her way there, and perhaps she
might see Jack, for she had not seen him yet,
though he had promised to come one evening
when he left off work.

But when at last the bridge was reached, she
was too tired and foot-sore even to feel the
wonder that she thought she ought to experi-
ence. She peeped over the parapet and saw a
few dirty barges drawn close up to the shore,
and a steamboat in the distance, but there were



London Bridge. 297.

no grand ships such as she had expected to see;
and the river looked a muddy, sluggish stream
—not nearly so wide as she had thought it would
be, and she turned away feeling ready to cry, for
now she had all that long walk to go back, and
to increase her dismay a neighbouring church:
clock struck five as she turned round to retrace
her steps.

“Oh dear, what shall I do; what will aunt
say ?”’ exclaimed Lizzie half-aloud in her
fright.

She walked as fast as she could, but in spite
of all her efforts the clock had struck six before
she got home, and her aunt was standing at the
door looking for her when she turned the corner
of the street.

“‘ Wherever have you been, Lizzie?” said
Mrs. Glossop in a cross tone.

“To see London Bridge,” replied Lizzie with
a Weary sigh.

‘London Bridge!” uttered her aunt. ‘‘ But
I thought you wanted to go to the hospital and
see that friend of.yours.”

‘Oh, I went there first,” answered the girl.
“T thought I might go and see the bridge when
I came out.”

“And you’ve seenit, Is’pose. Tired as a dog,
ain’t you? Well, if you country-people don’t
beat all for seeing sights. Fancy walking all
that way to look at a bridge.” And, in spite of:
her vexation, Mrs. Glossop could not help
laughing, though Lizzie could not see what
there was to laugh about.

‘‘ Have you had your tea, aunt?” she ventured
38 Lizete’s Experiment.

to ask as she followed the widow into the back
room.

“Why, yes, an hour ago. I thought you
would have been home to get the tea ready for
me,” she added in an injured tone.

“TJ didn’t think you’d want tea at four o’clock,
when I came out of the hospital, and so I went
to find London Bridge,” said Lizzie, dropping
into the first chair she reached.

She felt too tired to eat anything yet; but her
aunt was evidently in a hurry to get the tea-things
out of the way this evening, for she poured out
the tea at once, and so Lizzie was obliged to take
off her hat-and begin to eat some bread-and-
butter.

“Now you will want to write a letter, I
suppose,” said Mrs. Glossop.

“Yes; I promised Harriet I would write to her
mother. But I want to go to church too,” said
Lizzie, as the bells of a neighbouring church
began to ring for evening service.

« Well, you can’t do both, that’s certain,” said
her aunt; ‘‘and if you mean to go to church
you'll have to make haste over your tea.”

“Do you think I should be able to write my
letter to-morrow night?” asked Lizzie, but not
venturing to look at her aunt as she asked the
question.

‘Bless the girl! What can you be thinking
of 2 With all that work in the house, that must
be got in by Tuesday morning, what time will
there be to write letters?” demanded Mrs.
Glossop. She began to think Lizzie was a
most unreasonable girl. ‘‘ You didn’t come
London Bridge. 39
here to see the sights and write letters about
them,” she said; ‘‘you came here to work, and
work you must while you are with me.”

“Do you think I could write my letter when
I came home from church ?” Lizzie ventured to
ask when she was putting the tea-things away.

“Tt will be bed-time then. You ought to go
to bed now, so as to get well rested for to-
morrow. You seem to forget that is what
Sunday is for. What we should do without it
I don’t know, though I do grumble sometimes
at having to keep the machines still all day
when there happens to be a sudden spurt of -
work in the slack time, as there sometimes is.
Ah, no, I’m very thankful for Sunday on the
whole, for if it wasn’t for that day coming
round we should never get a proper clean up, or
a rest either. Sunday is to rest, that we may
work better on Monday; but we shan’t do that
if you get so tired out that you ain’t fit for
Monday morning’s work,” added the widow
severely.

It seemed rather a hard doctrine to Lizzie,
for at that rate life was quite as hard in London
as it was in the country; and again came the
thought—should she write a letter to Miss
Passingham and tell her frankly all about her
work here, and ask her, if she was not suited
with a girl, to let her come to the Vicarage and
be her servant, as it was arranged before she
thought of coming to London ?

But the thought of what friends and neigh-
bours would say if she went back made Lizzie
hesitate. And when at last a sheet of paper was
40 Lizeie’s Experiment.

found, it was too dirty to write to a lady like
Miss Passingham; she must just write to Mrs.
Martin and tell her about Harriet, and that she
had been to see London Bridge, and she would
wait a little longer before writing her letter to
the Vicarage.

It took Lizzie a long time to write Mrs.
Martin’s letter, for she knew she would be ex-
pected to say something about her work, or else
the omission would be sure to cause some talk

in the village, and what to say puzzled the girl
not a little. She could not honestly say she
liked it, and she began to fear, from the nume-
rous hints dropped by her aunt, that the present
conditions were not so much worse than those
that usually prevailed, as she had at first
imagined.

But to tell all the truth, and say she was
bitterly disappointed at the grim reality of life
in J:ondon would never do, and so she must be
careful what she said about the work. She
could truthfully say that her aunt was kind, for
she was less snappish than her step-mother;
and if she spoke sharply sometimes, it was
because she was constantly harassed, lest some-
thing should go wrong with the work.

Yes, she could say, “‘ Aunt is kind, and we
have plenty of work, and I am learning to do it
faster than I could at first.” That would sound
as though she was learning the business, and
was very comfortable in her new home.

Of course she could write freely about her
visit to the hospital, and how much better
Harriet was, and how pleased they were to see
London Bridge. 4I

each other; but she was careful to say nothing
about her friend taking up the same kind of
work that she was doing. Her visit to London
Bridge was spoken of that country friends might
know she had seen some of the wonderful sights
of London; and having told about this, she
closed her letter, thinking she had managed it
all very cleverly.

Perhaps if there had been no eyes to see it
but those for whom it was intended, it might
have served its purpose very well, for Mrs.
Martin had no time to think much about the
letter when once it had been read to her. That
Harriet was getting better, and Lizzie had been
to see her, set her mind at rest about her
daughter ; and so, when her husband had seen
the letter too, she sent it up to the Vicarage,
that Miss Passingham might hear about the two
girls.

Possibly, if the lady had been occupied with
the outer stir and bustle of life, she might not
have thought much about the matter, and sup-
posed that Lizzie was quite happy in her new
home; but, shut in as she was, she had time to
think more deeply than her neighbours. about
many things, and this letter disquieted her. It
was as though another sense taught her to read
between the lines, and so the things Lizzie did
not mention came to be uppermost in her mind;
and when Miss Channing came into the room to
sit with her, she said, ‘‘ Read this letter, Hlsie,
and tell me what you think about it.”

“‘Tt’s from Lizzie Milner. Her father told -
me last week he had had a letter from her;
42 —— Lizgie’s Experiment.

but she did not say much about her work,” said
the young lady, as she seated herself beside her
aunt.

“What do you think about it, aunt?” she
asked when she had finished reading it.

“T believe she is disappointed, and won't
own it. My dear, we must keep the girls from
running off to London as they do,” said the
lady earnestly.

“But how is it to be done?” asked Miss
Channing.

‘““Well, there will have to be changes all
round, and your uncle’s plan of letting the
glebe land at-a cheap rent for allotment gardens
will be one way to help; for, if the labourers
are a little better off, the girls could stay at
home and help their mothers, who often need
them very badly, but can’t afford to keep them.
Then Mr. Pattison and your uncle have a plan
for starting a dairy school, that the girls may
be taught to make butter. and cheese in a better
manner than they do now. Mr. Pattison says
he could rent more land and do more butter-
making if it wasn’t such a bother to get decent
dairymaids; and he thinks if the girls could be
persuaded to stay and learn this as a business,
there would be no need for them to go to
London.”

‘But it’s the sights of London that charm
them so much. See what Lizzie says about
the grand streets, and this walk to London
Bridge! We haven’t got a London Bridge, and
a river with ships for them to look at,” added
the young lady with a sigh.
London Bridge. A3

“No; but we might make the evenings
pleasant for them down at the schoolroom some-
times. Suppose we had the old piano moved
down there, and in the winter-time invite the
elder girls to come there two or three times a
week. Their homes are often cold and miser-
able in the winter-time, because there is not
room for them all to crowd round the one little
fire; but if the schoolroom was well warmed
and lighted, and some picture-books and a few
parlour games provided, it would make a break
in the dullness of their lives.”

“Oh, auntie, I wonder we had not thought of
it before! Marion and I could play for them,
of course, and show them the games. Why, it
would make our own winter evenings more
pleasant,” exclaimed the young lady eagerly.
“Oh! Marion will be pleased, for she is con-
stantly worrying me about the girls going to
London to this miserable needlework as they
do,” and without waiting for further discussion
with her aunt, she went in search of her cousin
to tell her of Miss Passingham’s idea for the
coming winter. :

“Oh, you clever auntie!’ was Marion’s ex-
clamation when she came into the room with
her cousin a few minutes later. ‘‘Tell us more
about it, please.”

« Well, I hardly think that will be necessary,”
said the invalid, smiling. ‘‘ Surely your active
young brains can work out the details. Just
think what you would do if you had a party of
young friends of your own to amuse. Some of
the girls will like one thing, and others another ;
44 Lizzie's Experiment.

but you will find out as you go on. Experience
will teach you to correct the first mistakes.
There will be a little expense, of course, for gas
and firing, but that I will pay out of my own
pocket for the first year; and the girls can do
the extra sweeping and cleaning themselves, for
if you give the elder ones a share in the manage-
ment of these social evenings, it will be much
better than doing it all yourselves.

“This is a mistake often made. People like
to amuse themselves in their own way better
than being amused, so you must take care not
to fall into this error in forming your plans.
At first have things as simple and informal as
possible. One of you can show a group how to
manage some parlour game at the table, while
the other gives them some simple music on the
piano. Then you could have musical chairs,
and blind man’s buff, and the sort of games we
used to have for a birthday party when you
were little children. Depend upon it, the girls
will like this much better than being sung
to.”

“T should, I know. Why, I like a game at
musical chairs even now,” said Elsie Channing.

“Oh, auntie, Iam so glad you thought of it.
Now, if Mr. Pattison will only do what papa
wants him about the dairy school, I shall think
it was a good thing we came here, and that the
horrid bull knocked Harriet Martin down and
made you worse. I was cross about that at
first, for it seemed so dreadful that Harriet
should suffer so much from farmer Pattison’s
carelessness; but if papa can get him to make
London Bridge. 45

some compensation by starting a dairy school,
and taking Harriet for the first scholar, good
will come out of it very soon for all the village
girls.”

“Yes; but you must not try to hurry papa’s
plans by talking of them too soon. At present
nothing is settled, remember, so be careful when
you write to Harriet not to mention what we
have been talking about. She will not be able
to leave the hospital for some time, so there will
be no need for telling her our plans for her
future just now.”

The girls readily promised to do as their aunt
wished about this matter, but the talk con-
cerning the glebe land being turned into allot-
ment gardens had already got beyond the
Vicarage, and was not long in spreading all over
the village.

It caused quite a ferment in the little com-
munity, for it was what many of them had
long desired; but their wishes seemed doomed
to disappointment, because there was no land
available for the purpose, until the Vicar had
offered the glebe meadow to be divided as fairly
as it could be into plots, to suit the convenience
of the different applicants.

This would mean increased comfort in every
cotiage home, so that women as well as men
were equally stirred by the news when they
heard it. With an allotment garden, there
would always be a plentiful supply of good fresh
vegetables for the dinner- and supper-table.

It would also occupy the men’s spare time,
and keep them out of the public-house; and boys
46 Lizzte’s Experiment.

and girls could be set to work here with profit
to themselves and their parents.

Such talking and debating as there was over
the Vicar’s offer had never been known in
Ashmead before, and one of the most eager
among them was Lizzie’s father. In his slow
way he had been talking about the matter for
years, and now that his hopes seemed to be on
the eve of fulfilment he grew more excited every
day.

The worst of it was the ale-house tap-room
was the only place where they could meet to
discuss the different points that to them seemed
to need threshing out before they could decide
what sized plots to apply for, and Milner had
not been used to drink more than a pint of ale
of his own brewing, which was very different
from the stuff they sold at the Red Cow.

Perhaps if he had limited himself to his usual
pint of home-brewed it would have been different,
but he drank and drank without much thought
of what he was doing in the heat of argument,
until the unwonted quantity of strange liquor
made itself felis unpleasantly both to himself
and his neighbours, and he grew dictatorial and
quarrelsome, and his wife’s scolding ways did
not improve matters.

Perhaps if Lizzie had been at home he would
have taken warning for his girl’s sake, and
avoided the Red Cow after the first mishap ;
but, as it was, there was nobody to say a kind,
coaxing word now, as Lizzie used to do, and so
he went again and again, to the injury of his
health and pocket alike, although the Vicar
A Hat and Feather. 47

heard nothing’ of it for some time afterwards—
not, indeed, til the mischief had been done, and
the doctor called in to attend Milner for a bad
fall he had had going home late one night from
this social gathering at the Red Cow.

CHAPTER VY.
A HAT AND FEATHER.

{| EANWHILE, Lizzie had been promoted to the

| use of a sewing-machine. She had to
learn to use it after work hours were
over, for, as Mrs. Glossop said, she could not
afford to keep a machine idle, or as bad as idle.
She had to stitch away on odd bits of rag after
the other girls had left at eight o’clock, tired as
she might be with her own share of the work—
the finishing off each garment.

This included taking home the big bundles to
the shops, and sometimes having to stand for
an hour waiting for the money or the next bundle
of work. But, in spite of this dreaded ordeal,
Lizzie was more hopeful now, for her aunt had
promised to pay her threepence a dozen for the
shirts she made, in addition to keeping her, and
so she was very eager and anxious to master the
difficulties of the sewing-machine, that she might
begin regular work like the other girls.

Her aunt was not so busy now, and one of
these could more easily be spared; and so, on the


48 Lizzie’s Experiment.

first opportunity, one of them was discharged
that Lizzie might have her machine. The rest
grumbled and refused to be friendly with Lizzie
for pushing herself into their overcrowded ranks,
and for a few days they made her feel very un-
comfortable ; but the close attention she had to
give to her work under the machine-needle pre-
vented her from giving much heed to the dis-
agreeable remarks that were made about her.

For the first hour or two in the day this
machine-work seemed far more interesting than
merely sewing and hemming scraps here and
there, by way of finishing off the garments, and
when she went to see Harriet the following
Sunday she told her she had begun to use a
sewing-machine and liked it very much, and
thought she would soon get on now. “I am
going to have a hat with a red feather for best,”
she added, and she was delighted to see how
wonder-stricken Harriet looked as she told this
piece of news.

‘““Won’t it cost a lot of money?” said the
sick girl rather enviously, for she did not get
well as fast as she would like.

“Oh, but I can afford it now; aunt is going to
pay me threepence a dozen for the shirts I make,
as well as keep me. When I have been here
three months I shall have all I can earn, aunt
says, and pay her for my board, and then I shall
be able to get a new dress, I expect.

“‘But—but you'll have to make twelve shirts
for threepence!”’ said Harriet. “‘ Justa farthing
each for all the sewing and hemming in a shirt!”
repeated the invalid.
A Flat and Feather. 49

“Oh, but they are different from those we
used to make at school,” said Lizzie in a tone
of superior wisdom, and smiling at her friend’s
ignorance. ‘‘ We just race along the hem as fast
as we can make the machine go, and it gets done
like lightning.”

‘‘How many can you make in a day?” asked
Harriet.

“Oh, not many yet, because I can’t make the
machine go as fast as the other girls do. You
see, I only began to use it yesterday, so I can’t
expect to do it all at once.”

“Oh no, of course not; only I thought you
might have heard how many the other girls
could make in a day, and how much they could
earn. I wonder you did not ask them; I should
if I had been you,” added her friend.

‘No you wouldn't, if they had been as dis-
agreeable with you as they are with me always.
T should like to see you ask Hetty Collins what
she earned, and how much her hats cost her.
She has a new hat nearly every week, so she
must have earned a lot of money I am sure.”

“Why didn’t you ask your aunt what you
could earn?” said Harriet.

“*T did once, and she said as much as the
other girls, if I liked to try.”

“And you never asked her how much they
could earn!” exclaimed Harriet in a tone of
surprise.

“ Well, I have hinted at it once or twice, but
I didn’t like to ask it straight out, as she didn’t
tell me. Of course I know they have to work
hard for what they get; but still it must bea
D
50 Lizee's Experiment.

good lot, or else they wouldn’t be able to buy so
many new hats as they do—hats with feathers
too, not just a straw one with a bit of ribbon on
it, like yours and mine,” added Lizzie.

The liberty to wear a fine hat with a feather
in it was evidently a great delight to Lizzie, and
had some fascination for the invalid, though she
could not be expected to show the same eagerness
about it just now, as she could not hope to wear
one yet awhile.

With Lizzie it was different. She was within
measurable distance of possessing a hat with
a red feather; or, at least, she thought so,
and wondered whether it would not be possible
to get it by the following Sunday, that she
might wear it when she came to see Harriet
again.

“‘T wonder what they will say at home when
they hear I have bought myself a hat with a
feather in it,” said Lizzie, with a smile of
eager anticipation. She had forgotten Miss
. Passingham’s talk about temptation by this
time.

“‘T wonder,” repeated Harriet; ‘‘ but I forgot
to tell you they have got something of their own
to wonder over now. There’s going to be allot-
ment gardens, if you know what they are. Miss
Channing wrote and told me about it, and she
says everybody is very pleased. JI wonder
whether it will make any difference to mother
and the little ones. You see, I am the eldest,
and so I have to think about them,” she added,
by way of excuse.

“T should think it would make a good deal of
A Hat and Feather. 51

difference,” said Lizzie. ‘I have heard father
say a bit of garden is worth five shillings a week
to a labouring man. I have heard lots about
the gardens—not that we wanted one very badly,
for we had a good long piece belonging to our
house; but you have only gota tiny bit of garden
—not enough to grow all the potatoes and
cabbage and carrots you want to eat—and so if
your father could get an allotment garden it
would be a fine thing.”

‘Well, we shall have one, I expect, if it’s like
you say; but still, I know mother would be glad
if I could help her with a shilling or two now
and then, so I hope you will speak to your aunt
for me the first chance you get.”

‘Oh, I will, never fear! But I can’t under-
stand about the allotment gardens, for I re-
member father saying one day Ashmead couldn’t
never hope to get them, for there was no land
to be had near enough.”

‘But Miss Channing says it is nearly settled,
so they must have found the land somewhere.
T am glad, if it is likely to make all that differ-
. ence to mother. I don’t believe you know how
hard things are for some of us in the winter-
time, or you would understand how anxious I
am to find out all about this work. Tell your
aunt I don’t mind how hard I have to work so
that I can earn enough to help mother a
bit.”

‘And buy a hat like mine,” put in Lizzie,
with a smile.

‘* Of course I should like a nice hat if I could
get one, but I won’t mind wearing a shabby one
52 Lizzie's Experiment.

so that I can help mother. We shall have
winter coming again soon, and I do want to get
to work so that the money I earn may help
them over it a bit at home.”

“Well, I have spoken to aunt about you, and
she said when you could leave the hospital you
might come and see her about it, unless they
send for you to go home.”

“Oh, mother wouldn’t do that,” said Harriet.
“T know she wants me to get some work in
London if I can now I am here.”

‘Well, I don’t think you need worry yourself
much about the work, for there seems such a
lot to be done that there will be enough for you
and me too. If your mother should say any-
thing about it, tell her you are coming to work
with me when you are well enough.”

Lizzie was more cheerful and hopeful to-day
than Harriet had seen her since she had been
in London; and, of course, she thought as she
got more used to the work she found it more
easy to do.*

Perhaps Lizzie had persuaded herself that
this would be the case; at all events, under the
stimulus of buying a new smart hat, she worked
on through the next few days, trying to per-
‘suade herself and her aunt too that she could
work on until ten o’clock at night, instead of
leaving off at eight as the others did. But Mrs.
Glossop could not allow this, and so she had to
put aside her work and clean her machine, and
put it ready for the next day’s work as the
others did.

Four shirts was all she had done for her

«
A Flat and Feather. 53

twelve hours’ labour, and the large sum of one
penny was all she had earned the first day.
Of course she would be able to do more the next
day, and still more the one following; but, work
as she would, she could not get the coveted
hat by the following Sunday. It was doubtful
whether she would get it in a month, although
it was the cheapest and most splendid hat
Lizzie had ever seen. It was in a shop window
a few streets off, and Lizzie went to look at it
as often as she could, dreading each time she
went to see that the stand had got another in
its place—that this one was sold and altogether
beyond her reach.

On Saturday, when she went to fetch some
fried fish for supper, she went on as far as this
shop, and saw, to her relief, that the hat was
still in its old place, though there were some
girls in the shop buying hats. Lizzie stood
with her nose pressed against the glass of the
window to watch whether they did buy what
she had set her heart upon possessing, but they
did not seem to be charmed with what had
captivated her fancy, and she breathed a sigh
of relief when she saw them leave the shop,
while her hat still hung on its stand safely.

She ran home as fast as she could with the
fish for supper, but her aunt was rather cross
at being kept waiting so long.

““There’s a letter come for you,” she said,
when they had nearly finished their meal, and
as she spoke she pointed to the mantelpiece,
where she had put it.

Lizzie took it down eagerly enough, but she
54 Lizzte’s Experiment.

did not look so pleased when she saw the hand-
writing on the envelope.

““Tt’s from Miss Marion,’ she said—‘‘ the
young lady I told you about, who scolded me
for wanting to come to London.”

“And now she wants you to go back, I sup-
pose,” said Mrs. Glossop.

Lizzie opened her letter and read it. ‘‘ She
says if Iam not comfortable, or do not like the
work, I can go back to be waiting-maid to her
aunt—the lady who is always ill.”

“Then good-bye to the hat and red feather,”
said her aunt with a short laugh.

“But ’m not going,” said Lizzie. ‘I should
be a stupid to go back just as I’m beginning
to get on with the work. You say I shall soon
be able to earn enough to get some new things,
so I think [ll wait till I get them before I go
home again.”

“Gals that come to London don’t often want
to go back, I can tell you,” said her aunt.
‘The country’s dull, and there’s no chance to
wear fine clothes down there.”

“Miss Marion says father ain’t been well,’’-
remarked Lizzie, without noticing her aunt’s
last words,

“Well, your mother’s there to look after him G
I don’t suppose they want you at home to do it.
Did the lady say they did?”

“Ohno! She only wants me to go back and
be Miss Passingham’s servant. She just men-
tions about father. I don’t suppose it’s much
more than a little rheumatism again,” added
Lizzie; and then she put the letter in her
A Hat and Feather. 55

pocket and went to bed—not to think about it,
or the offer it brought, but of the smart hat and
cloak she intended to buy as soon as she could
earn money enough.

The following Saturday Lizzie went and
bought the coveted hat with the red feather.
She had not earned the whole of the money
required, but her aunt lent her a shilling to
make it up, so that she was able to go to the
hospital the following Sunday, looking as unlike
the neat, tidy Lizzie Miller who first went there
as it was possible to imagine. She had cut her
hair in front, as most of the work-girls wore it
in that fashion, and with the hat and red
feather perched on the top of her head, she
looked almost as vulgar as any of them.

If Miss Passingham could have seen her, she
would have known that her warnings had all
been forgotten; but the unseen Friend was
watching over the girl, although she had no
time to pray, and no time to think of anything
but work, and how she could manage to earn
enough to buy a cloak, now she had got her
smart hat.


56 Lizzie’s Experiment.

CHAPTER VI.
SAD NEWS FROM ASHMEAD.

for a few days after the hat was bought,
Lizzie was pleased enough, but as the
days went on she found that her fatigue
increased rather than diminished as she sat
closer to the work; and it was poor comfort to
think of the hat laid away in the cupboard,
when her back ached until she felt sick.

She had buoyed herself up with the hope that
it would get better as she grew more used to
the motion of the machine, but this proved a
cruel fallacy, and at last her long-tried hope
and patience gave way. The immediate cause
of this was the discovery that, work as hard as
she might when work was brisk, she could not
hope to earn more than four or five shillings a
week, and of this she would always have to
pay her aunt four if she continued to live with
her.

To earn four or five shillings a week sounded
a great deal at first, but she had learned that
here in London it soon went, for the purchasing
power of money seemed so much less than it
was in the country. How it was she could not
quite understand; but the discovery that she
would only be able to earn this small amount,
though she laboured for twelve or thirteen hours
a day, made her resolve to tell Harriet Martin


Sad News from Ashmead, 57

not to attempt living in London if she had the
chance of going back.”

“But five shillings a week is a lot,” said
Harriet. ‘‘Father often earns only seven, and
there were six of us to live upon it!”

“Ah, yes! But five shillings at Ashmead and
five shillings in London are very different: I
have learned that much. Here every little drop
of milk has to be paid for, and every bit of
vegetable too. I can tell you, Harriet, people
make a fine mistake when they think that
money means so much more comfort in London,
for it don’t. Aunt has to pay seven and six-
pence a week for her two rooms. Think of it—
seven and sixpence a week! and the man comes
for it every Monday, and woe betide you if it
isn’t ready! I could hardly believe it at first,
but I had to pay it one day when aunt had
gone out, so I know it’s true enough. Then
nobody has a garden to get a bit of vege-
table here; and there don’t seem to be any
neighbours to give you a bit of anything
either.”

“Oh, how dreadful!” exclaimed Harriet.
“What should we have done last winter if it
hadn’t been for your father and one or two
others sending us in potatoes and things?”

“T don’t know about being dreadful; but it
ain’t half so good as I thought it was; I know
that,” said Lizzie. ‘‘Of course you can do as
you like here, and wear what you like, and all
that, but you soon get tired of it. There’s this
hat now; you know how wild I was to get it—
thought of nothing else for a little while after
58 Lizzte’s Experiment.

Pd made up my mind to buy it. Well, I almost
hate the sight of the thing now, it looks so
shabby since I got caught in the rain one day;
and I think sometimes if I hadn’t been looking
at it in the shop window I might have taken
Miss Marion’s offer when it came and gone
back to Ashmead, where, if I didn’t have a
hat with a feather to wear, I shouldn’t have
the back-ache so continually, or be compelled
to do washing on Sundays.”

“Washing on Sundays! What do you mean,
Lizzie?’ for she had never told her friend of
this custom in the neighbourhood where she
lived.

“Tt’s true enough, Harriet. I was shocked
enough about it at first, but I can see now, as
aunt says, poor people haven’t time to do it any
other day, when other work wants doing. Aunt
thinks she is lucky to be obliged to work on
Sunday like that, for if we could do it on Friday
or Saturday it would mean that we had no work
to do for the shops, and the next thing we
should starve, or be turned out of doors if we
couldn’t pay the rent.”

“Oh, dear! I’m afraid I shall have to go
home then,” said the invalid; but the tears
rose to her eyes as she spoke, and Lizzie pitied
her and herself too, for what she should do
when she had lost this old friend she did not
know.

As she walked home from the hospital that
day she resolved to write and tell Miss Passing-
ham that the work she was doing would be too
hard for Harriet, and ask her to take Harriet
Sad News from Ashmead. 59

to wait upon her, as she dreaded to come home
for fear of being a burden upon her mother and
father.

Sunday was the only day there was time to
write letters, and so after tea she sat down and
wrote her letter instead of going to church.
She was very careful what she said, for she did
not want her friends to know how disappointed
she was with her work. She could easily say
that Harriet would not be strong enough to use
a machine, even when she got well, for Lizzie
was determined to protect her from the misery
of trying it, feeling sure now that she would be
far happier and better off at the vicarage, or
even as Farmer Pattison’s dairymaid, than as a
weary London work-girl. _

She felt as she posted the letter that she was
giving up her own last chance of returning to
Ashmead, by thus asking Miss Passingham to
take Harriet for the place that had been offered
to her; but she was determined to save her
friend at all costs, and so she did not regret
writing as she had done. She could battle
with the difficulties of London life better than
Harriet, she decided, so that it was just as
well that she, and not Harriet, had made this
experiment.

The next day a letter came from her mother
to tell her that her father was dead—had died
on Saturday morning.

“T cannot afford to send the money for you
to come home,” wrote Mrs. Milner, “for I
expect I shall have to come to London to get
work for myself as soon as I can get rid of the
60 Liszete’s Experiment.

cottage. Ishall bring some of the things with
me—enough to furnish two rooms, as your aunt
does, and then you can work with me, and Jack
can come and live with us.”

Lizzie was stunned; she had never thought
of her father’s illness as being at all serious.
He was subject to rheumatic attacks, and she
had concluded that the illness referred to one
of these old troubles. And now he was dead!
Dead, and she would never see him again; never
put her arms round his neck and call him her
dear old daddy, as she used to do when she
wanted to coax him to let her do something
—as she had done when she wanted to come
to London. Ah! if only he had not been
coaxed into consenting, she might be at the
Vicarage now. She would have known all about
her father’s illness, and perhaps gone home to
help nurse him; at least, she would have seen
him before he died.

“What is it?” asked Mrs. Glossop, with her
mouth full of bread and butter, for it was
breakfast-time ; but Lizzie had not spoken or
moved or attempted to eat anything since she
had opened her letter.

She could not speak now, but silently handed
the letter to her aunt, and then stared straight
before her into the empty grate.

Mrs. Glossop wondered what this strange
dumb grief could mean, for Lizzie’s white, pain-
drawn face was enough to convince her aunt
that she was terribly upset by the news of her
father’s death.

Lizzie took the cup of tea that her aunt
Sad News from Ashmead. 61

poured out, and tried to drink it, but she had to
put it down again, for she felt as though she
would choke. ‘I shall be better presently,”
she said in a hoarse whisper.

“It won't do to give way, you know; we've
got our living to get,” said her aunt warn-
ingly.

“Tl go and begin work at once,” said Lizzie,
and she went to her machine and commenced
stitching away at the shirt she was doing.
She could do it almost mechanically, and the
rattle of the machine prevented the other girls
talking to her when they came in; and this
was a sort of relief to her, though she was
scarcely conscious of having any wish in the
matter. -

But her aunt would far rather have seen her
crying and making a fuss, which would be only
natural, she thought, for she knew Lizzie was
very fond of her father; and so at last she
decided to send her to take a small bundle of
work home that had to be sent in by ten
o'clock.

“You'd better put your things on and go to
Morris’s for me,” she said; ‘“ the walk will do
you good, perhaps.”

Lizzie was quite willing to go; she was willing
to do anything just now, because she had no
power to resist any suggestion that might be
made. The only feeling she was conscious of
was a desire to hide herself and her grief from
the notice of everybody. But she could not
altogether conceal its effects, for her white, set
face of abject misery told the tale, causing one
62 Lizeie’s Experiment.

of the girls to exclaim as she passed, ‘“‘ Whatever
is the matter with Liz this morning?” And
then every head was turned to look at the
drooping figure of the girl as she went out of
the room.

“T never saw anybody look so bad in all my
life,” said one in an awestruck whisper, gazing
round at the rest, as if asking for an explana-
tion.

Mrs. Glossop waited until Lizzie had closed
the door, and then she said, shortly, ‘“‘ Her
father’s dead; she had the letter about it this
morning.”

“Ah! and she’s cried herself sick over abe?
said one, in a compassionate tone. “Shall I
go with her, and help with the bundle?” she
added ; “I won’t mind losing the time.”

But Mrs. Glossop did not believe in such a
wilful waste of time; and she had an idea that
Lizzie would rather be alone with her trouble
until she had got over it a little, so she said
at once—

“No, no; Lizzie can go to the shop by her-
self.” And as she was going out of the door
she said in a kindly tone, “You need not hurry
this morning; take your time about it, Lizzie,
and the walk will do you good.”

“Yes, aunt,” answered the girl, mechanically.

She neither saw nor heard anything that was
passing in the street as she went along, neither
did she quicken the slow pace at which she was
walking when she heard a neighbouring clock
strike ten, though she still had some little
distance to walk to the shop.
Sad News from Ashmead. 63

‘“‘ How’s this?” said the shopman, sharply ;
“‘T told Mrs. Glossop if she couldn’t let me have
these things by ten o’clock she wasn’t to take
them.”

Lizzie lifted her white face to the man
and said, meekly, ‘He was only ill a little
while.”

‘Stand aside and wait,” commanded the
man, thinking Lizzie intended some impudence
by her remark.

It was not the first time Lizzie had had to
suffer in this way, but it did not matter in the
least to her now. Nothing would ever matter
much again, and so she folded her hands and
took her place to wait the shopman’s pleasure
to serve her with some more work and pay her
for what she had brought home.

She stood thus nearly an hour, and then other
customers having come and gone, and the man
having nothing else to do, he condescended to
finish the business with Lizzie.

“Now, mind, I must have all this home by
Thursday by half-past nine,” he said. “Do you
hear, or are you deaf?” he added, as he looked
at Lizzie.

It was only by a desperate effort that she
could summon her failing energy and senses to
take in what was being said, and that she was
expected to tie up the bundle of shirts in her
wrapper and take them away.

The bundle was heavier and larger than the
one she had brought, and on the steps Lizzie
staggered under its weight and almost fell to
the ground. But she went on, and might in
64 Lizete’s Experiment.

time have reached home safely if there had
been no pushing and jostling along the road to
contend with.

No one saw her white, pain-drawn face.
She was only a girl with a big bundle that
was in their way, and must be pushed out
of it.

‘There! go on a bit faster,” said a man with
a basket as they were crossing a road, already
much crowded with foot-passengers, while every
second minute a cart or waggon would turn into
it from the main thoroughfare. As the man
spoke he gaze Lizzie’s bundle a push that he
might pass with his basket, and the next
moment Lizzie was down in the road, and,
before any one could come to her rescue, a cart
had dashed round the corner, and the horse and
one wheel of the cart went over her.

There was a crowd collected in a moment,
and Lizzie and her bundle carried to the pave-
ment ; but the girl showed no sign of life, and so
the man who had picked her up carried her to
the hospital, which was close by.

It was soon ascertained that her leg was
broken, but whether there were any other
injuries the doctor could not say; and no one
knew who she was until she was carried to the
ward and laid on the bed, and then one of the
patients recognised her ag the girl who had been
there to see a friend the previous day; for
Harriet had been taken out into the garden just
before Lizzie was carried in.

As soon as she came back, however, she was
told that her friend had been brought in with a
Conclusion. 65

broken leg, and she could tell the sister her
name and where she lived, so that Mrs. Glossop
might be informed of what had happened, for
Lizzie herself showed no sign of returning con-
sciousness for some hours after arrival.

“‘I wonder whether she has been hurt any-
where else, because a broken leg would not
cause this,” said one of the patients, when she
heard that Lizzie had neither moved or spoken
since she had been brought to the hospital. The
doctors and nurses, too, seemed puzzled and
anxious about the new patient’s condition, and
they sent a messenger to fetch her aunt at
once.

CHAPTER VII.
CONCLUSION.

i] HE account Mrs. Glossop gave of the news
that had reached them that morning,
: and the effect it had upon Lizzie, was
sufficient to convince the doctors that Lizzie
was seriously ill from the previous shock, before
her leg was broken.

‘““She never cried, you say, when she read
this letter ?’’

‘No, sir ; she never spoke a word hardly, and
yet I know she was very fond of her father.
Harriet Martin will tell you the same,” she
E


66 Lizzie’s Experiment.

added, looking round, and wondering whether
she was near.

She was allowed to go and see Lizzie after
speaking to the doctor, and finding a young
girl sitting beside the bed, she guessed it was
her friend Harriet, and spoke to her.

“You know, poor Lizzie has lost her father,”
said the widow with a sigh as she stood looking
at the unconscious girl.

““Mr. Milner dead!” exclaimed Harriet. ‘‘Then
that was how it all happened, I suppose, for I
know how fond of each other they were. Oh
dear! she will wish she had never left the
country, I know. They told me he was ill;
but when we talked about it yesterday, Lizzie
said it was sure to be the rheumatism again. Oh,
Miss Passingham will be sorry to hear she is so
bad.”

“Miss Passingham—that was the lady who
wanted her to go back to the country a little
while ago, wasn’t it?” said the widow a little
eagerly. She was wondering what she had
better do, for if Lizzie soon got well she would
not be fit for work directly she came out of the
hospital, and to have her a useless burden upon
her hands for weeks or months was not to be
thought of, especially during the winter when
work might be slack, and food and firing
scarce.

So, after thinking over the matter for a minute
or two in silence, she said at last, ‘‘ Yes, you had
better write and tell this lady what has happened
to Lizzie, and that I have told you she won’t be
fit for machine-work with a broken leg.”
Conclusion. 67

“But they will mend her leg while she ig
here,” said Harriet.

“Yes, yes, of course; and she will come
out of the hospital in the beginning of winter,
and not be able to earn a penny. You write
and tell the lady what I say.” ‘She took care
to impress upon the nurge that she was not
really any relation to the girl, but had taken
her to please her sister, who was the girl’s step-
mother,

The nurse quite understood Mrs. Glossop’s
fears upon the matter, and told Harriet after-
wards that she was not so much to blame, for of
course Lizzie would be unable to use a machine
for some time, and so would be a burden upon
her aunt’s hands, unless other friends were
found who were willing to help her.

Harriet had not ventured to write any letters,
as the doctor had forbidden it when ‘she first
came; but she was glad to do it now that nurse
gave her leave.

So the day after Lizzie’s letter had reached
Ashmead, Miss Passingham received another
from Harriet, telling her that Lizzie was in the
hospital, but had not spoken since she had been
brought in.

Fortunately, the invalid was better than she
had been some months when this second letter
reached her, but still she was much disturbed
about it.

“Our two girls are in the London Hospital,”
she said to the Vicar, who came in just after the
letter.

“Dear me, what has happened to Lizzie?
68 Lizzte’s Experiment.

Perhaps I had better go and see myself when I
go to London next week.”

“You have made up your mind to go to
London, then?” said hig sister.

““T must see about this business concerning
Elsie’s property, and [ think lam equally bound
to go and look after these two poor girls in the
hospital. Poor Lizzie! Iam afraid her life in
London has not been a happy one, from what she
told you in her own letter, so that she may be
glad after this accident to come to us or go to
the dairy school. Iam sure country girls could
do better than going to swell the ranks of half-
starved London work-girls.”

“I should be very glad if you could go and
see about them. Poor Lizzie is an orphan
now, and Harriet needs looking after quite as
much. If you went to the hospital you would
learn a great deal more of what has really hap-
pened than we could find out by half a dozen
letters.”

So the following week Mr. Passingham walked
into the ward where Harriet was sitting by
Lizzie’s bed, reading to her for a little while.
She was still very ill, suffering more from the
shock of her father’s death than from the acci-
dent, and so the nurse had given Harriet leave
to read to her for half an hour to divert her
mind from its all-absorbing thought about her
father.

“Here's our Vicar,” suddenly exclaimed
Harriet, with a heightened colour, as she saw
the clergyman speaking to the sister at the other
end of the ward.
Conclusion. ° 69

They walked down between the beds together,
the sister telling him what she knew about the
two girls.

“It isn’t one thing alone that has brought on
this illness,” she was saying; ‘‘ the girl’s health
seems to be broken down by hard work and poor
food, as well as the shock of her father’s death.
She is in avery different condition from the one
who came straight from the country to us.. A
girl working twelve hours a day on bread and
dripping or fried fish for dinner, hasn’t much
spare strength. That is how this girl has lived
since she has been in London, and she has
confessed that she was seldom free from pains
in her back or chest. This accident has just
brought her to us a little earlier, but she was
certain to break down sooner or later.” -

‘Then I am very glad the accident happened,
for we may be able to save her now from her
own folly, if she is only wise enough to see that
life in London is not what she thought it,” and
as he spoke the Vicar nodded to Harriet, and then
came across to speak to them.

But the sound of the Vicar’s tender voice
asking if she was in much pain, was too much
for Lizzie, and the tears that would not flow
before, now burst forth with such violence that
the sister came hurrying up to see what was the
matter.

“Tt will do her good, if it does not continue
too long,” she said, speaking to the Vicar; and
then she beckoned Harriet away, and placed
a chair for the clergyman beside the girl’s
bed.“
70 Lizzie’s Experiment.

Mr. Passingham sat down and took the
gitl’s hand, but did not speak for a minute
or two—not until the storm of sobs and tears
had somewhat exhausted itself, and then he
said—

“Now, Lizzie, shall we have a little talk
about your father? I went to see him every
day the last week of his life, and he spoke of
you several times.”

“Oh! why didn’t father send and tell me he
was so bad?” exclaimed Lizzie, her tears break-
ing out afresh.

““We did not know the end was so near; and
then you had written several times to say you
were very busy, and that your aunt had a
great deal of work to do, so that we thought it
would not be fair to fetch you away. This was
how your father looked at it ; and not until your
letter reached my sister, asking her to let Harriet
have the place she had offered you, did we know
for certain that your life in London was harder
than you could well bear ; it was too late then
to send for you. Your father had died the
previous day; but I had promised him to look
after you, and so I thought I had better come
and ascertain the whole truth when I heard you
were in the hospital.”

Lizzie was crying more quietly now. “I wish
I had told father just how things were ; only I
hoped to the very last that I should be able to
earn a lot of money, and so did Harriet. She
was to have come to aunt’s when she left the
hospital, only when I found that the work was
so hard, and there was no time ever to have a
Concluston, aI

rest, and yet we could not earn much money,
however hard we worked, I persuaded her not to
stay in London, and wrote to Miss Passingham
to let her have my place.”

“Ah, I see! and in trying to save your friend
from suffering, we learned a little of what you
must have suffered yourself. God had provided
a way of escape for you, and in seeking to save
your friend you have opened this for yourself—
that is, if you want to get away from this life in
London,” added the clergyman.

“TI should be glad enough now to take the
offer Miss Passingham gave me, if I could ; but
I don’t know what I ought to do now. It father
was alive, and things were just as they used to
be, I should be glad enough to come home
again as soon as I could leave the hospital ;
but I have been thinking of many things
since I have been here, and I don’t think TI
ought to try and please myself about every-
thing, as I used to think I had the right to
do.”

“Then you do not want to come back to
Ashmead ?” said the clergyman in a question-
ing tone.

“Yes, I should like to come and be Misg
Passingham’s servant better than anything ;
but as mother is coming to London to do work
like aunt does, she may want me to stay and
help her.”

“But I do not think your mother is coming
to London, and if she is, I feel sure she would
be quite willing for you to come to us,” said Mr,
Passingham, ‘TI spoke to her about it before
72 Lizsie’s Experiment.

I came away, and she said she never thought
needlework would suit you as well as service.
She said nothing then about coming to London
herself.”

“She told me when she wrote about father—
said it was no good for me to go home for the
funeral, as she would be coming up. It was
this that made me feel so bad about it—that I
should never see father’s face again; and I
came away from home knowing he didn’t want
me to come.” And Lizzie’s tears broke out
afresh, and she sobbed out, “Oh, sir, can
God ever forgive such a wicked girl as I
am ?”

“Hush! hush! Lizzie. You must try and
calm yourself, or you will be worse. Now try
and listen, and I will tell you something your
father said to me just before he died. I think
he must have known then how you would feel
about it, for he said, ‘ Tell my little girl she need
not blame herself over much for going to Lon-
don, even though she don’t make her fortune
by it. Tell her I freely forgave her, if she ever
thinks I felé bad about her going away. And
when I promised to give you this message, and
bring you back to the vicarage, if ever you
should want to come, he said he could die in
peace if he knew his little girl would be cared
for. He always spoke of you as his little girl
while he was ill,’ added the Vicar.

“Oh, father! father! and I never half cared
for you!” sobbed Lizzie.

- “Lizzie, your father’s love and care for you
was but a faint picture of the love of your
Conclusion, 73

heavenly Father, whom you have also grieved
and forsaken. It was because of this that He
sent His dear Son, the Lord Jesus Christ, into
the world to seek and save those who were
lost.”

“Oh, I wish you had sent for me when
father spoke about dying!” said Lizzie, ‘I
would have given anything to be able to see
him.”

“But no one thought there was any im-
mediate danger; and he said himself, when I
spoke to him about it, that as you were so
comfortable it was a pity to upset you. He had
all he wanted, except the sight of you. I believe
he longed to see you at the last, but was not
quite sure whether you would come, as you
were so busy and happy in London. I told him
I was quite sure you would if you knew you
were wanted, and it was agreed that if he did
not soon get better I was to send for you. It
was the day before he died that he had that
talk, and then the end came so suddenly that
there was scarcely time for me to get down from
the vicarage. His last words and his last
thoughts were for you and your brother. I was
to give his love to both of you.”
~ “Qh, sir, I am glad you told father I would
come to him,” said Lizzie. ‘Nothing would
have kept me away if I had known he was really
ate?

It was the only bit of comfort to be got out
of the whole miserable mistake now, and Lizzie
hugged this thought. The Vicar, seeing that
she began to look weary after their talk, very
74 Lizstes Experiment.

soon left her, but promised to come and see her
again before he returned to Ashmead.

When he came again he found Lizzie very
much better, and looking forward to the time
when she could return to the country.

‘‘Aunt has been to see me since you were
here, sir,” said Lizzie, ‘‘and she thinks I had
better give up all thought of working in London,
because my leg may be weak for a long time,
she says—too weak to use the treadle of the
machine; and I can see she will be very glad
to get rid of me now,” she added, with a
smile.

“So this is another difficulty removed out
of the way of your return,” said the clergy-
man.

“Yes, sir. I did not know what aunt would
say about it. She did not want me to come
back to the country when Miss Passingham
wrote to me, and she has been as kind as she
could be to me since I have been here, so that
it was only fair to ask her what she thought
before deciding things altogether.”

“Yes, you are quite right, Lizzie, to consider
the engagement you made with your aunt when
you undertook this work ; but I am equally glad
that you will be able to come home when you
leave the hospital.

“T have been making inquiries all round
since I was here last, and I am sure if country
girls only knew the hardships they were likely
to meet with when they come to London, they
would very gladly go to service or learn to
do something near their own homes rather
Conclusion. 75,

ae half-starve in London, as many of them
0.”

“TI won’t mind telling anybody now what I
had to put up with,” said Lizzie, “if it will
only prevent them making such a mistake as I
did; and I was better off than many girls, for
aunt was good to me in her way. It was the
work being so hard, and the payment for it so
bad, that made things as they were. Why,
poor people can’t afford to be clean and tidy,
because it takes so much time from their work ;
and if it wasn’t for Sunday, when they mostly
do their washing and cleaning, I don’t know
what would happen.” And then she told the
clergyman of her experience in this matter
while living with her aunt.

“T have heard of worse things than that
during my inquiry,” said the clergyman, sadly.
‘““T can well believe that you owe a debt of
gratitude to your aunt for her care of you, for
God gave her as a protector to you from many
and great evils that beset most girls, who come
here unprotected and unprovided with friends ;
so that I hope your experiment may be a
warning to other girls in the village—especially
as we hope to provide occupation for them near
their own homes for the future.”

It was arranged before the Vicar left that
both girls should stay at the hospital until they
were well enough to return to the country, and
that one of the nurses should see them into the
train safely when they did go.

This visit from the Vicar did Lizzie more
good than all the medicine she had taken, and
76 Lizzie’s Experiment.

in a few weeks’ time she was well enough to
undertake the journey home, though she had to
walk upon crutches at first, and would have to
continue to use them for a few weeks, the doctor
said. ;

Harriet was quite well and strong again by
that time, and both girls were glad to see their
native place once more, basking in the autumn
sunshine, the apples they had left green and
sour, glowing ripe and mellow as they hung in
the orchard waiting to be gathered.

‘Harriet spoke of this as they drove home
from the station, for the Vicar had come to meet
them with Marion and Miss Channing. /

‘‘ Ah, we may learn a lesson from the apples,
Lizzie,” said the clergyman, as he gave old
Dobbin a flick with the whip. “ They have
been exposed to a good many hot suns and cold
winds since you left them green and sour. Their
ruddy ripeness is the result of all these, and
God deals in the same way with His chil-
dren, and for the same result—that they may
grow tender and gentle towards others. And
so the painful experience you have had in
London should perfect and ripen your charac-
ter, for this is the object to be attained by all
trial.”

“T am sure Lizzie will be able to tell us a
great deal that we want to know about London,”’
said Marion.

“Yes, I think she will give you a fair account”

of it now,” said the Vicar. ‘But until she had
learned her lesson she was not willing to do
this. She was too proud to let us know she
Conclusion, 09

had made a mistake in what she had done, and
this is the fault of many a girl who goes there.
Rather than let her friends know exactly how
things are with her, she hides the worst half of
her life until it is too late to remedy the mischief.
that has been done slowly, but surely. Lizzie
has been saved from this, and in her thank-
fulness for her own escape from lifelong misery,
I hope she will always be willing to let others
profit by her experiment, by telling them
fairly just what they are likely to meet with
if they start out in the world as London work-
girls.”

“Oh! but they won’t be in such a hurry to
go now, I hope, uncle,” said Miss Channing.
‘““You see, we shall make life in the village so
much more interesting, I hope. You don’t know
what changes have been going on here while
you have been away,” she said, turning to the
two girls.

“‘Unele’s glebe land has been turned into
allotment gardens, and the men have begun to
work in them.”

“Yes, and we are going to have evening
entertainments in the schoolrooms nearly every
night,” said Marion, eagerly.

‘And there is to be a reading- and smoking-
room for the men too, so that they won’t have
to go to the Red Cow to talk over things, or
to get out of the way when the washing is about
at home,” put in Miss Channing.

It was at her expense the alteration was to
be made in the Vicar’s barn, which stood suf-
ficiently near the village for the purpose, and
78 Lizse's Lauper anent,

yet far enough from the Red Cow to avoid
passing its door, which some of the men
would find it hard work to accomplish at
first.

“Yes, we are going to try and keep the
girls and boys from wandering off to London
by making it worth their while to stop in
the country, so that I hope the whole village
will profit by Lizzie’s experiment,” said the
Vicar.

They drove straight to the vicarage first, for
Miss Passingham wanted to see her girls after
their long absence; but Lizzie was to go and
stay with her stepmother until she could do
without the crutches; and, of course, Harriet
would go home for a day or two before going to
the dairy school, when she would live at the
farmhouse.

Mrs. Milner had so far profited by Lizzie’s
experience in London as to decide not to remove
there at once—not until she had tried what she
could do here. She was busy enough at present
getting things ready for Lizzie to go to the
vicarage, and for which Miss Passingham had
agreed to pay her, for she had provided the
material for her little maid’s outfit, feeling sure
that she would have very few clothes fit to wear
in her service, even if any had been bought in
London.

Truth to tell, Lizzie had come home in the
same hat and jacket she went away in, for the
only article she had bought—the coveted hat
and feather—she felt so much ashamed of, that
when her aunt brought it to the hospital she
Concluston. 79

begged her to take it home again and give it to
one of the other girls, for she could never bear
the sight of it again. The odious fashion in
which she had cut her hair in the front was
less objectionable now, because during the
first days of her stay at the hospital it had
all been cut to a similar length to relieve her
head, as the doctor feared brain fever would
set in.

So no one but Harriet knew about the fringe
on her forehead, and the hat and red feather,
until she told the whole story of it to Miss
Passingham afterwards, with many tears of
regret ; for if this folly of wanting a fine hat as
she did had not seized her, she might have
taken the offer again made to her and returned
home before her father died. Some people went
further than this, and said if Lizzie had come
home then, Milner would never have been ill,
for he would have spent his evenings at home,
as he always had done when Lizzie was there
to read to him. This gossip was not allowed to
reach her ears when people saw how deeply she
grieved for her father’s death. Not until years
afterwards did she learn what all the village
believed—that her experiment in trying what
the work of London was like had cost her
father his life; and when this whisper did reach
her, it revived all the bitter sorrow she had
passed through when she first heard of his
death.

She gained health and strength each day
after her return from London, so that she was
able to walk without the help of her crutches
80 Lizzte’s Experiment.

much earlier than the doctors anticipated. For
this she was very glad, as she was anxious to
enter upon her duties at the vicarage, and let
her friends know by her deeds, as well as by her
words, how grateful she was for the timely help
that had rescued her from the full effects that
might have followed upon her London experi-
ment.





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IGS. Be

















lt Pine HY y

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Prt LG EEE ey













Das THE

S| Religious Tract oe . .

Are the Publishers of a very large number of

Zs Ail ELEGANTLY BOUND BOOKS FOR PRESENTATION.
4, POPULAR STORY BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.
INSTRUCTIVE BOOKS FOR ALL READERS.

BOOKS FOR STUDENTS.
BOOKS FOR WORKING PEOPLE.
BOOKS FOR PRIZES.
BOOKS FOR LIBRARIES.

BOOKS FOR THE FIRESIDE.
" BOOKS FOR THE HOLIDAYS.
l BOOKS FOR ADULTS.
BOOKS FOR GHILDREN.

( BOOKS FOR EVERYBODY.
BOOKS AT ALL PRIGES,
FROM 1D, TO 2Is.







NAR A RAR Rn nnd

TRacTs, Hanostuts, PICTURES, CARDS.







Ce ieykies gratis on aipittecen” at
56, PATERNOSTER ROW, and 65, ST. PAULUS
CHURCHYARD, LONDON;
31, Western Road, Brighton ;
' 18, Slater Street, Bold Street, Liverpool;
100, Corporation Street, Manchester ;
or from anu Bookseller,












xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20081113_AAAAOE' PACKAGE 'UF00086073_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-11-14T03:03:05-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:36:27-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299186; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-14T19:04:47-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '3' DFID 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00093.txt'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2011-11-05T07:48:51-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-11-05T07:47:36-04:00'
redup
'316964' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFL' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
ebc788cd49295c8b5d2dac0022bc3f6b
93eebce8486b7d1fe58702416d87ef29a55d49ca
'2011-11-05T07:48:54-04:00'
describe
'134328' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFM' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
f3285a5f4a6ac3fe0fef5940ae1821db
57f5d04a609161cf6dd3e41ec5e21229b0d28495
'2011-11-05T07:49:08-04:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFN' 'sip-files00001.pro'
8a309af18bd9c0ddb7f5375a1125c4eb
f343d4e8d018f0f3564cceb7f814ec1c1d455cf4
'2011-11-05T07:48:23-04:00'
describe
'30796' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFO' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
0bbef99380ed40de7bb33e4b8a725eb5
d69335a4139fd612ee67515d4f152b7d9de2e6f6
'2011-11-05T07:47:50-04:00'
describe
'7627144' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFP' 'sip-files00001.tif'
003f73fa34bc60e45c1cc86ca8d8b957
d4dd647e5c5278f640dd0960daaf9bfadd86916b
'2011-11-05T07:48:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFQ' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-11-05T07:48:01-04:00'
describe
'7343' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFR' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
dcf637462f00cea6246e9286d4d20064
791acd72d74b52aee4797a4607eee75ca73aea43
describe
'335870' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFS' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
6c430803718e16dfa536569f1fa321b0
97dcbb6e04f76399411b0afa0a9144b9ce9cb078
'2011-11-05T07:48:06-04:00'
describe
'79313' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFT' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
ad697614131ebef5681d63f0cf1aa43a
4b6a4ae1413cd4e537108dc999d32e5f37fb85a0
'2011-11-05T07:48:40-04:00'
describe
'532' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFU' 'sip-files00002.pro'
0ef26eec9aad3cf9dd57903beea6db0f
0663a3fd0fba359d5305a537eb645b72a647e677
describe
'18453' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFV' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
74ca9fe63c1f83849ab503824650ee81
e1e8b1ef6733d96ef0a19643a487e477cafb2c47
'2011-11-05T07:48:09-04:00'
describe
'8080552' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFW' 'sip-files00002.tif'
6109e9abffdb6b9b328f9a7cf1b726c9
e9d5869731741e84b2ee5ef7c3e0721de5cbaf58
'2011-11-05T07:48:00-04:00'
describe
'183' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFX' 'sip-files00002.txt'
1295bf9666e31a6198dd554d5364e167
c05affc5173d8a63fe6f45659093c24a9a9a7998
'2011-11-05T07:49:04-04:00'
describe
'4924' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFY' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
30400a627a38c0b5b7df5720d96a34ae
4ad604532188f128f2771aed80ef297971dcf821
'2011-11-05T07:47:58-04:00'
describe
'312668' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGFZ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
3595b950d41a632752d890f49c5b8c88
5841a27f8f2bde4783ad7d82f6aaec0827f0fca9
'2011-11-05T07:49:06-04:00'
describe
'154858' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGA' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
71472a00d70a7c80698b139007ca1e11
7b3f0ff431d06cb9f77207212ab5299d7b2dc538
describe
'3822' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGB' 'sip-files00003.pro'
1dc829347aca41cd00e0897f4b784107
b6198d5fe6902e9f560d0e49f76a72ffe05210a5
'2011-11-05T07:49:05-04:00'
describe
'35323' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGC' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
ba40fb321fd56bb39fb8581d7149e7ee
e1fe361bc53e54263ddc07101a374d7e02e86cc8
'2011-11-05T07:48:39-04:00'
describe
'2519840' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGD' 'sip-files00003.tif'
702f61411e372bd76c2bada870d2a835
ede3687a888cb2e80491f233501283933b04e65c
'2011-11-05T07:48:07-04:00'
describe
'218' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGE' 'sip-files00003.txt'
6bca095e6078536187a5ffce64c70e44
acd9289802966428f273230f9a918fc3bd8ac553
'2011-11-05T07:48:58-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'8544' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGF' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
caa1b3a051821c4d488308225e43fed5
4bac9ca2c90465165fb73e150ae17ff02c0f58a0
'2011-11-05T07:48:36-04:00'
describe
'296702' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGG' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
42c30d09c34700cb27fbc32978ff1b52
492f8ca2f81376d8a66e37b225a0fdbcf5c27e2b
describe
'143764' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGH' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
2bf5e5542814d2542f0bcb7c97e981b0
ac88ca76c61deae82bea6b1282ea1c5aeca49b26
'2011-11-05T07:47:52-04:00'
describe
'492' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGI' 'sip-files00006.pro'
a2a50e6d088a69b158cdf91dd9d7519c
28f3b088cff2774e410dc291386303db2f78814a
'2011-11-05T07:48:19-04:00'
describe
'35775' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGJ' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
5e3a45b4370941a81db59b2fd12b2429
dd4c02bab3be1e0174340ba3946fbaee450f59cc
'2011-11-05T07:47:40-04:00'
describe
'7141932' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGK' 'sip-files00006.tif'
6296bac86dc521ed2f75d644c0de62f4
d65f18a20db0f997aff1875831191ec5d04f01df
'2011-11-05T07:47:47-04:00'
describe
'105' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGL' 'sip-files00006.txt'
b80a6106788c9bae39cc16b1d36dd623
57f598d11dcc6e41d7b48eae28a84c821114c99d
'2011-11-05T07:48:24-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8947' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGM' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
49c9597c97d735ed257df2b6548d79e9
993b22b697fb48b8b12ac2a7108e9f099c825b00
'2011-11-05T07:48:43-04:00'
describe
'286385' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGN' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
86aab24c29babda15226f083f2556ceb
0810f267251fc4c937e1221ffa32c101686d7dfe
'2011-11-05T07:48:41-04:00'
describe
'47952' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGO' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
8077ee0926ac3c8e476163a2fe4ad42c
c93395fdddfd6b48476ddee1f7ba966d757f0e3a
describe
'6378' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGP' 'sip-files00009.pro'
3476996534f1f0458fd14d0e8b664d5b
3c7ff8f42a7824bf32e0f315bf3e47b542038523
describe
'13673' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGQ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
3027ccc989c9740c717624003fd9c523
cefef6e1d730bb4207c417eea26e1a1a69ecb437
describe
'2309124' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGR' 'sip-files00009.tif'
9164021bed1d52a9e14388e70f6e63f7
fed57b365e598357881ae112a1d5712872431724
'2011-11-05T07:48:35-04:00'
describe
'338' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGS' 'sip-files00009.txt'
75e704d3351afcb831db107ca445b722
be90a6e2fcab5f64c9020b9e069da5e66527ea27
describe
'4663' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGT' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
c081086ceb60c3fd29c99229ba30923b
eecbbbc6bd61a7da7162a40c4d8a83925d9c5d90
'2011-11-05T07:47:41-04:00'
describe
'286508' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGU' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
145047ec393ecbff7ac928189cf6b51b
bd7637591b7ea284ba116d5bbfa59b90c1d6e22a
'2011-11-05T07:47:45-04:00'
describe
'62292' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGV' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
9856cb14049e15deb6161fd6fa80d39d
01ec5e142e297b1caa60e1d95fae221265f3fa73
'2011-11-05T07:48:02-04:00'
describe
'535' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGW' 'sip-files00010.pro'
951fee42b52d8977ac1eaaa69f621ec8
da447dd8a79235ee82f13b145beb022e318a2430
describe
'13885' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGX' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
b920e96645e5883852c3ebfb88df9793
df3ce93389f706ccb7ef433234c4205e1a0396dc
'2011-11-05T07:49:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGY' 'sip-files00010.tif'
4336174218d0d796eda4f7fcd650c002
c01faf68901dd87d89ab521a5c0dd4de95a9ed31
'2011-11-05T07:47:48-04:00'
describe
'65' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGGZ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
abcfd586b7e09d91c15260dc5db17039
74da690f775a9bfde66ca33ee6aecc907d801e84
'2011-11-05T07:48:20-04:00'
describe
'3682' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHA' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
676a86b8fa08d848d6192856a1dd94d0
cf04ddca0f1b1e3efe3d3a606509e778ec7fa7e1
'2011-11-05T07:48:59-04:00'
describe
'286464' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHB' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
5bf54347a222e7dd288060190097bc7d
8caf6eb465509a4ebe727844d6e6ede2bb24799e
describe
'35363' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHC' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
9f675c81a0a78548670c01e345e737b4
c78cbde1df96c44deec4aa4d806feddb31663b0a
describe
'6667' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHD' 'sip-files00011.pro'
7c07b14fdd717270afbe67651fd40601
80130b55b87d9fd4851953b29008b72ad4f84a32
'2011-11-05T07:48:28-04:00'
describe
'9928' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHE' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
acead54a56f0eb68a0666413c4f0ba17
e2d9b815668f7b276fa613f77d7ab87c9bf679c5
'2011-11-05T07:47:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHF' 'sip-files00011.tif'
4c7190b52ef07700ee2ffed3251d2433
a1cdfb568e9b276a3e19408da16b19f7e7c526e3
'2011-11-05T07:48:21-04:00'
describe
'452' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHG' 'sip-files00011.txt'
1973522b1a03f0010d19d0d3b51b8693
ca5b4c4726f60f12fafbce54b5d7036fd78ec269
describe
'3252' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHH' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
e716fb792ac7976e7cf326ffa24702d9
4784088d54757edfae9ed018cb6a8b2e2d0daead
describe
'286285' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHI' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
048047dc7ed6cadf26c1eb3f4ae10966
ac83a81215579b0912c6c033c7e5d0e6dc6866ac
describe
'63428' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHJ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
7409e37fdb2e9f3e027ecc103726b897
a7ace5e67e38a522a7d4f2f455b167772266fb5b
describe
'14976' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHK' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
cb607073d36ab26ce85d1207576f33cc
cb954d9363d9b12a005c1a39b5df844f910ca0f5
'2011-11-05T07:48:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHL' 'sip-files00012.tif'
c5d32b977aa9724c76c1b9e6476623ea
a9a9435fcc729fc2c568fd88384909219908cb9c
'2011-11-05T07:49:03-04:00'
describe
'3962' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHM' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
4b432b9c72eeabe7f1f69439875d9ceb
2fa9a9786e89176fee6b172008e4317bcb47b728
describe
'286546' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHN' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
8f14eadda4b59e364cee8eb41270bdd7
1aca792d80cecce61db5f6951ff23ac35f4dc035
describe
'101945' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHO' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
3392cd86c4291ae87fbe3cec46134c2e
35bcfbb5c2934ad4ae4aad4042f7856592d59eaf
describe
'18811' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHP' 'sip-files00013.pro'
4cb357a4de60209a59feee35da543834
385bfd3bac88c1f630fba20aede5b7892cdc8f85
describe
'31099' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHQ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
32f78c807be0f3e548f5f7f573a5df71
e766c82b0eada1c40afeeb2d8a85c5045e0072ca
'2011-11-05T07:48:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHR' 'sip-files00013.tif'
bf452393ea1947d7ffd6f013b14af23d
5345562b5626b3f9f54446eb5117acd804abdbc2
'2011-11-05T07:48:34-04:00'
describe
'838' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHS' 'sip-files00013.txt'
81804da532eebd0410ce2be05209c554
277109e6fcdb628443485b35aa284a9224972f17
'2011-11-05T07:48:04-04:00'
describe
'8532' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHT' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
63dcdd596065f5392da0b51bbc500c34
62fc9c65d6cb976fcb365402548d8b3b9015b0c9
'2011-11-05T07:49:02-04:00'
describe
'286475' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHU' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
d24f4b597815cd93b568eca0ca2d6d2a
1fc19ff2859631f08c86730bdfb4305c19e73f3b
describe
'141000' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHV' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
742662edfd0513e224cf0895d44fe10a
118a3daec2d391d55e8b0450fe57b24f0384e9a3
'2011-11-05T07:48:29-04:00'
describe
'34680' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHW' 'sip-files00014.pro'
8046de6a0492aadf281e1560f293bdbe
2b4065183238dea896385cb8d320345c9fb2097b
describe
'42991' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHX' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
5bbd7c9013483b55de9e4939a80dcc8e
fcf9bdc25ce010bd221dbf010b64e4b5cbb073a2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHY' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e30bf596e96d62fd479e6b19fa165e5a
1b98522b45baf92d8b0f419286db39b0954fe3dd
'2011-11-05T07:48:17-04:00'
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGHZ' 'sip-files00014.txt'
b1bcc3419258607bab425c34ed326ea9
b1bab72aef04504657f80e38e287419da4b5704c
describe
'11914' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIA' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
1eea2c5a33247fa65d8c04f53f582191
e175eb2eb753f10dbbc21f8239cd3fdeada4adf4
describe
'286552' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIB' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
a40dd77681d434413838528cc995d45f
8307fb02ee5135d9289b7f2902278cdd86300832
describe
'146140' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIC' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
b7e894aa15ebee52f3c211d4b550ad4d
67c96e1d5698e275cd936d04a8ae77ccfad42b43
'2011-11-05T07:48:33-04:00'
describe
'35734' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGID' 'sip-files00015.pro'
8f97ade3a097669e0a0626ed9387cda4
5f466b6c1870d0d578df658aa8e7767d976827c8
describe
'44964' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIE' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
572c6e15f67c430bbed54dfd22c30b48
5ce8e45a67b48e96e38d08614cc308d0c19cad51
'2011-11-05T07:47:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIF' 'sip-files00015.tif'
e9bb1e17428d0803ce658fad9a915f4d
204d90807251ffce3a713929d59473f4f7b3dba6
'2011-11-05T07:47:56-04:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIG' 'sip-files00015.txt'
6f2ef7a3391fe9f7315d30b59d48c146
c5feae63f395ed7cd80f21ad4cb34bfd53bd17bc
describe
'11742' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIH' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
020d0834c0465c3ac459c9a6668b716d
aaee3e1437e7ca2c2d1c7040943411c88637da47
'2011-11-05T07:48:25-04:00'
describe
'286551' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGII' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
39fb8059ff8f516e8b723cc41a65d5f2
e399b20837c63b7600e0d48877f80942861ae0ac
'2011-11-05T07:48:55-04:00'
describe
'147871' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIJ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
3f2b45b540dcf896794c3e77dd6dc950
32560744726c2f7c6c8cccdd1750400f9e24475c
describe
'37209' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIK' 'sip-files00016.pro'
21e231eb955947c0848ee19be44bdab3
491d7979baf4a0218c00eaf2f63c5fcc937fb924
describe
'45035' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIL' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
3a84d1720175a45b79a303e768db041c
aa7d45e1f15cd2483a85b9230803c597aeb9d7e9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIM' 'sip-files00016.tif'
1fddca19a0af7f7002bf30b9f983b26a
3084552d53b556999987cb3348593a45d53081e9
'2011-11-05T07:48:22-04:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIN' 'sip-files00016.txt'
309ab9cf576ab21d5aea534c6e387299
5624da1a9677d4f1b25b86a6a5f0ab65d22a1c1a
'2011-11-05T07:48:44-04:00'
describe
'11658' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIO' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
12cfb039a550d76a8b1b9ad65384b47a
373eae255f711883d514889ba1730bef8ebc81b6
'2011-11-05T07:49:01-04:00'
describe
'286550' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIP' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
915f870cd91f9139e463a11f40bb3ace
07facdf1deb5a881940cc7b30cc30d5b778fdfe4
describe
'142560' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIQ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
d5cb8943bda7660f15124c29a0f4e487
84b55f9cd752751019b4219da7a949898fb6649e
'2011-11-05T07:48:12-04:00'
describe
'35566' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIR' 'sip-files00017.pro'
1c2c82a505f9c359fa0f49f0eb83818a
f5cfdfa42d864881601986c8382b3f3b11be89fd
describe
'43577' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIS' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
54b351525ed489fd79e69028a4a4599a
661dc4948cb6ca4232dec07b8e2761645de5d53b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIT' 'sip-files00017.tif'
d7995f14c09d214fa0a699a6d818bde2
7d96513bd0da1b76cf2274de842bcafa56507470
'2011-11-05T07:48:38-04:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIU' 'sip-files00017.txt'
887c07c40f032aaf00f5e4ea50fe3f42
137af6ecdbc88e60318e114f85716e9ab26cc6f2
'2011-11-05T07:48:57-04:00'
describe
'11290' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIV' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
8da46aac2265e9061a9fef2fa24a43a0
d02f6c295c8157d5b3c451a34877fef390ab6508
describe
'286533' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIW' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
4cd0e4511511f55f9f5cf2f0d773afdd
a667948ccea8fee185356da1713748f5cb46468e
describe
'154243' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIX' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
df7f549c1508875f51eaf6700c838134
5396dc4993df22fafe6032126f170f8b4473eb58
describe
'39250' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIY' 'sip-files00018.pro'
5e212bd51a18cdd7b947b968b8f0770a
7567765d2e44a3f44a9c0932414c316ce80c457a
describe
'46193' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGIZ' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
7567eb4f0575188f36d548f2ca8bb784
b97dfef4f8c857de176704698eb66671c48b2ae9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJA' 'sip-files00018.tif'
9f1bbb3b0183ef4e3ff8bbf22c8f40fb
5d3a65524d1514777978563bd1e5f3af8aa8c339
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJB' 'sip-files00018.txt'
f3b2c66cbdbe32e1ebd498efbbcccf89
1d595f76d94f2beaaa75b3fc043c916a2f173daa
describe
'11811' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJC' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
8b7700cbdf96c5e63a106da7707c70a2
ceb62dbca04083188fb1098469646acb279283c7
'2011-11-05T07:48:05-04:00'
describe
'286547' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJD' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
17a00dd88bd73a977ca5ba003243403d
2f90fbba82498571535d9c3a9273fa336ff12953
describe
'139716' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJE' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
58595e312d25e3d3923205c1edec0001
b53f23ff84027e1a584e169aca05fb7e1b6fcf74
'2011-11-05T07:48:18-04:00'
describe
'34146' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJF' 'sip-files00019.pro'
90b9daf78f1d13bbecd3e3aff36e8e36
61eb9e00f8efc8c65c318ef8a7d14c0cc0039091
describe
'42892' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJG' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
db7169132f8b95f2356f30fabce1b101
7ec076bc4a84f737055c881f96f18191c4769608
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJH' 'sip-files00019.tif'
907cea56100e7587573a5b1421e70865
45a93b4b44c7c8fdcf25cd4c063d3dca5e64a3d2
'2011-11-05T07:48:08-04:00'
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJI' 'sip-files00019.txt'
4c73ff6dfca3958216c04bab542bca7b
c612364e6ee52fd196dce59efbcc8ff853bd2574
describe
'11654' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJJ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
bc4c5c7da31e39f7ef757ff5742d3001
292d221d2da81dc645608d2d585de6ff0458aae5
'2011-11-05T07:49:09-04:00'
describe
'286513' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJK' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
95b87198fa1b286023322100272e4995
0745a5ed49f92308541177132e7945135b7d1383
describe
'153386' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJL' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
b6eb6404b64d4e197fa39e6899dd7014
fa2c299f36a92b19959d739546b188278c906cb9
describe
'39213' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJM' 'sip-files00020.pro'
71e36d9f3c2d5784703295c0aebc739a
928e4911f8e4bd4e696863790154c30ec359250b
'2011-11-05T07:47:43-04:00'
describe
'46781' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJN' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
4b4a65de5bfe3bcd4b704d7fac1222de
bf1c1bfddfd30ba0f9b142879fd40d3b84157d70
describe
'2314940' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJO' 'sip-files00020.tif'
d54cb379c80a4bfb12abfa18a829439c
8373cdf4b666f1cf69102aff8f814194f8e778e2
'2011-11-05T07:48:46-04:00'
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJP' 'sip-files00020.txt'
52540ca0744781fe546deaea930ed00e
0c305e468c1b164d24c0c7a149e7d99959f5043f
describe
'11599' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJQ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
9013cab044773cb163f0c7cab0bc6c07
180678382ea8fdd37ab345e66c7f5b15950f978c
describe
'286530' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJR' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
cf3c0d6e327e4d42c40e38bc500cf96b
eac5ca542ce5d6ed1356340ac65ecefe4c49f671
'2011-11-05T07:47:57-04:00'
describe
'153170' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJS' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
a004c165a0647b272c25ce7bf6d5fe00
8c538e83b4cfe01796b831935e54a90aa6135e6e
describe
'38820' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJT' 'sip-files00021.pro'
e0c9f9c5e8eab4d333b2feecdbca04ab
87958b8e4f8e1e994a5da802fd09649b95f07f2b
describe
'45430' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJU' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
1e0b832a1b5e020e902ec6e546425390
4ac37b6ff297996753acb6af948b153e9d02503c
describe
'2309120' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJV' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ae21eb4587c6a8281dbe60e4791df034
ee461e22d12d66ba8ef0bd10f988b7950c7a09ce
'2011-11-05T07:48:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJW' 'sip-files00021.txt'
8629505fb7e6b6013e5e11caeae9ba37
15d52e2bd2f74111bc3d397d102c9902a341cb36
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJX' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
dadef59fe1af7cf73ecd588dae0f087a
abfa7c24653cbef6c2f1a9f5c8015b2ab720944f
describe
'286515' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJY' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
241a2bd8ff8baf2840e48517de10e918
6ca49d0fa173ab91b7204c848c006dbc305efa2a
describe
'153071' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGJZ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
708d383c36fed0159d04261c8a53b6ef
1c5e06a7765e1575117510eb8ce5b8704ab88412
'2011-11-05T07:48:27-04:00'
describe
'38590' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKA' 'sip-files00022.pro'
2b043b889359fc0f973549b498cb120e
e18802aacde783946c451715eda46d550588d36b
describe
'46018' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKB' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
f8039ae5d13a47a0bd4c601001cdf1ed
7bd9a199526f94e629a4be22048418700173d138
'2011-11-05T07:48:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKC' 'sip-files00022.tif'
479ef6d546276e17c4493782b1ff6db1
2f247131c4601018236464fa153c10debe72c497
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKD' 'sip-files00022.txt'
4351e5895ad812bb493898f2ca4cef13
db3fe8f34f70b8012726c40ae002e8c9ab15f9c1
describe
'11468' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKE' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
382da41e67dcd7847dd42a5c4c1c5248
48e28bde249f9f0f7eae512effc5483fe4fb7ef3
describe
'286529' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKF' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
e6873b1b687efd7d8e83e1609afdc0a3
dcaaae1835a02472144bbd43e90e0ba1ec2efadb
describe
'125096' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKG' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
c5fd6763b6798b361ac7061e64223251
2a0ceaf430d286f768910f3158c6f4221a406322
describe
'30075' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKH' 'sip-files00023.pro'
d96fab01bcd15a58820893f3d3099099
87a06fa734d140fd50d30eb19e991e13110a7b54
describe
'37401' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKI' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
0aff67c2c8a7154cad10fd6416d1ca73
a1de9a50299c799f16d5662f490ec208e66f0a83
'2011-11-05T07:48:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKJ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
3a97dd92654c9e886c5fe5d4c36ae2e8
b7e31dc4f38e4584e8def34e2d2c9b17e17b22f7
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKK' 'sip-files00023.txt'
b75ce8a7f01dd5d288def35840317bfc
da923f9b29a1228ee0ac7463237c0c3c84d68abb
'2011-11-05T07:47:51-04:00'
describe
'9782' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKL' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
ca962ed563218645604a75cb186cd40a
8ec710c0a0527da57588801859afecff3475d99d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKM' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
870280f596c2410e6f28babbc93c8131
f498ffb40b7cb00ffd186ea2345c2e128e7b172f
describe
'158816' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKN' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
cacc779305ff6e38b4e3d5f167ae9d9c
56500b68a66b1d25c4a58893402e5493f9bdd19b
describe
'40031' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKO' 'sip-files00024.pro'
0f74e1e96bd772287aa4bc26c1bd415e
e683d6b4a4bff95e4d5a1f97c0c478ab286edce4
describe
'46725' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKP' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
13be1db7af6d9ced588512de51ea5cd7
eb8474ece8d5b9eab8daf1c6d87d516500414ea4
'2011-11-05T07:49:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKQ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
e7785561d0f327e371a32606fd2f4175
11f81b17f68d2e1f7709f5c8e292cea596c8405e
'2011-11-05T07:48:53-04:00'
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKR' 'sip-files00024.txt'
18a066b1ac1291c000f20104f0359789
9f86af7dc034e446c5c2c3b066e71418831d7b47
describe
'12301' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKS' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
6656faba22fc95424c51ad2a2b44cf0b
c14d9937ae41ba3cba043a993e1dc471b7dcc0ca
describe
'286494' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKT' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
374e0ca5a2694cf2a4406f20943bd2e0
b704ed39624d7d05297c5ef9e63542270005628f
'2011-11-05T07:47:54-04:00'
describe
'150895' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKU' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
5d9d7d022d5de95ebdf43c058402a0f2
e12737b0a37b0faa49864a6d7cb7a6640e3223a3
'2011-11-05T07:47:59-04:00'
describe
'37416' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKV' 'sip-files00025.pro'
8a0104ef9fad6fade56a76c929dc056e
12958c70f63e2a5b36f1c9044c5fd2d12d889a4a
describe
'45881' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKW' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
20f368b4bd975145cc879aabf5351099
a6d82d5fa1717a58496b21fc814d6cb79b9ab56a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKX' 'sip-files00025.tif'
38a0f21d0ee95f09df4ec52c4832db5c
f4f6b4ac87d390b66090c6a4e46e1f4dcf3b709c
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKY' 'sip-files00025.txt'
fa431119d4cc1d392987268ef3d75ec5
c46e3149022411b271b1aea0edc34281e11100d9
describe
'12029' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGKZ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
ff3840be59b570733fbf6bf03cd07471
d2054e1db7310f142ced49cb6f0449dd8001ce46
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLA' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
30b19c369e1801d91334e44ce0095e0d
24a779ac1b988ab3033652892fd2e022a859f555
describe
'154255' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLB' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
84b9d388cba56637797c069b5388f612
c526f993c4539b7543ca10df572739980b9c17d8
'2011-11-05T07:48:45-04:00'
describe
'39309' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLC' 'sip-files00026.pro'
35a351a677eeab57fa458a811c3bc1d6
3326e4214c07e39f426bb2d65382fe79d73805cd
describe
'47030' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLD' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
b723765da4a4c2beb925be742f4ecd2e
b2f8824a8305aa61f469158c6284c506afcd0761
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLE' 'sip-files00026.tif'
3f155b5d1287b0ba2d3a2c30e65790b0
07f17bd340332d66b6eef749caafbfa935c2d120
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLF' 'sip-files00026.txt'
a85bed900cbe7160d26511df3d77b9d8
6b23730ad586d6682fde583f6b3f5cbb661960a5
describe
'11569' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLG' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
41f7599eeab38d516583ef293897e572
b1b665c05a528cd60a06b4aeb6fc3f93587ef6cc
describe
'286527' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLH' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
bf1dba6ce87b01226f3ded69a3f40d82
f4e59f39adb0e0c957e14dc8f34c0d0094d56801
'2011-11-05T07:47:42-04:00'
describe
'151262' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLI' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
fc84e9aea1461952f67942106f57bfe2
206e953c0384430efbc1c89bb258bcb4167a62b9
describe
'38078' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLJ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
e5ab85a529a32f8f3c100cbbf76be83d
6ded348f967dbbed3b49746deb687e7f48b06082
describe
'46435' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLK' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
e81f6c9e8681dad7a7bda3d5600dcb29
8343345b81c0e98dafba653ee21e045135862f40
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLL' 'sip-files00027.tif'
c6e1af309312b80d08a736e9a02c4d05
73f7df09f084585ee1ff15ca7da2edd8df9a6248
'2011-11-05T07:49:07-04:00'
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLM' 'sip-files00027.txt'
4254fb4eb493c9a2483e80f17c5fc3d1
f1ab78fa6a14065b1c726d83f28428f0559125ab
describe
'11621' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLN' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
86d6e24144d66d29975c04dec7e66af5
5d009018caed66e99a8a3bde9627b34265ea0534
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLO' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
864d8163730babea2069a477d4ec9ef8
83fc62b00ff047ce1d3f47cfdc74806130e4566e
'2011-11-05T07:48:37-04:00'
describe
'156893' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLP' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
df61f1445bdb0f29545d3793a21a07ac
455a341261c5227e9f5b5bb4e219fc3784bf49b2
'2011-11-05T07:48:15-04:00'
describe
'39850' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLQ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
a1f7db46a7d9ff9a2e1345376b3d880d
bd4867016f1fba85bdfbba743d0d2cbd876498d6
'2011-11-05T07:48:14-04:00'
describe
'46975' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLR' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
cabbeaa6c86fa541dcec2e4c1e8ebe8e
c1adbf7e92e443d878f6454eca768f980fe7c34c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLS' 'sip-files00028.tif'
0f84330d1f3865627c56f56566fbd997
0a5f1fd0f27a042c3af1136f80c59c766d0fdbe8
'2011-11-05T07:48:03-04:00'
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLT' 'sip-files00028.txt'
c680ce56ccfd840eb3d37a848d243c8d
c209df8a94917d46bc1c0135c45f84e357df3b9f
describe
'11684' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLU' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
937f66ba95965c993a8cb52d9844d7e2
bf4fada4c63e2d8a6f589b9eaed44db8f1007f08
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLV' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
a4d4058554d883cb4a460968879f785e
bbb01f26f0791ba28910e53bea028d3f9ea55884
describe
'151625' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLW' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
362f9c1c6e59055f94a321f7daab5ab9
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describe
'37912' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLX' 'sip-files00029.pro'
a75edbd21878a7dd1b7b5935c60b6bcb
5bbff3ea79c7da7b69f16a3ae19594d17323d31a
describe
'46639' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLY' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
8f06900c984bd48b9d415e5cc08afa9c
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGLZ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
19817f46f6660c0bc8e3c562176a93cd
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describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMA' 'sip-files00029.txt'
563ad505c241a7fcf5818805fe0134fb
7aa7f3b6471cd7ffdd1f8be0ce75587fe5cb0d68
describe
'11912' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMB' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
eefe3cc3790495e5643ba3beeb5ac351
a5d0973fcd9c9617aef6ccda27884567d25e52a5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMC' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
95b2ce9e55a93fba6337f6959df9a4a6
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describe
'144217' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMD' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
b0dc45dc361542ee506d8c174eb6200d
f8e3e966d5aae62bd832694f11d2c8dc30be4e52
describe
'37523' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGME' 'sip-files00030.pro'
caeea194451d68c66941f348e6dc2214
064545194e05038e7949fe89887455b0089ecf18
'2011-11-05T07:48:32-04:00'
describe
'44370' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMF' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
66045743d75a8a327a05eb25fdec7989
b7a1fbd4df1f321ca84c19cf1809758d73f557f2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMG' 'sip-files00030.tif'
8e67f11ebf320433286d19cb2a378629
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describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMH' 'sip-files00030.txt'
e6c7be60ffaf7c0d8e21c2d5908fbba9
e297d0ebb03163ee7c61e46a56916fa0cd4b4fdc
describe
'11494' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMI' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
6de5bfa73c588eb9c7365b6f11eb187c
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describe
'286542' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMJ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
f78e62c07271b5d7a5155f4afff13a3d
a44f8a81df250b2e2ec003c83c4d13d8b8d4ffa9
'2011-11-05T07:48:48-04:00'
describe
'153246' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMK' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
8d5ab415a4a0237770ed182646ba6dcc
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describe
'38556' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGML' 'sip-files00031.pro'
2330c47813543a90b3dc375acb82f915
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describe
'46364' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMM' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
816821bb8c8aec8b370e25c53cfeb703
0ffb39496bf32847918ba1e382959385eda6a77e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMN' 'sip-files00031.tif'
24b6acbc23ccf393f9102d585f030958
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describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMO' 'sip-files00031.txt'
06eb1ce72f67709ebd6b66f6cf4e6e01
0e18dbfc84394cfbd55bc50a591ecd4b2351fbbf
'2011-11-05T07:48:50-04:00'
describe
'11619' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMP' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
c77989033e339278502cfa2fb9608b5a
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describe
'286490' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMQ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
b9ae719a8ecf9a88208a64d4d109500a
6ec7348c27c37e7642acb14f1d773c7f89e85ede
'2011-11-05T07:48:52-04:00'
describe
'127361' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMR' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
040dd0b4765ca8a519087e27d0ccd6ef
9fa5d8b900ef77cf27e1a4450cbb4265857c5350
describe
'31367' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMS' 'sip-files00032.pro'
8f18473610db55aa5508814221dcca52
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describe
'38255' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMT' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
85b8a1d28e4a3aec6192d9c7b70df182
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMU' 'sip-files00032.tif'
b032421a2cde11437330273a4728778e
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describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMV' 'sip-files00032.txt'
0abdde698114db4eae84dbc6553a7947
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describe
'10195' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMW' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
f5a8b91f25410ddf33de873424fc1d8d
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describe
'286549' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMX' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
499973e19efbe9fbafdacd3d193a1332
0a4a9f96c7ec6423c6af5d2c3d24eb07901ce5b8
describe
'147569' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMY' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
1ff18c2a81bc8cebc02ce82821612ded
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describe
'37308' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGMZ' 'sip-files00033.pro'
7ac064bcbec4461f946dd6a911966c1b
2070110071824c37293893d8667a54b8c80b8c2d
describe
'45054' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNA' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
19832748feca6d3f113f93ab1b7057d4
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNB' 'sip-files00033.tif'
0eadd12f8bc1ae7b3f4b6f846808f58f
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describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNC' 'sip-files00033.txt'
e77175ad32a2f352139540278c154f82
5f7c881dac51214c79773fb4175e8c071b57a405
'2011-11-05T07:47:44-04:00'
describe
'11286' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGND' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
22b348c1a2ca7196d66708ccd52d7d15
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNE' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
c937b643368dd9904893d5214c354d80
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describe
'147236' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNF' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
381ac34171db422e77937c173ba2b8fd
ddeb68e7a98585140c42b786826128b71b7c7c0d
'2011-11-05T07:49:00-04:00'
describe
'38081' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNG' 'sip-files00034.pro'
6be207a5c56bf3df41cbc9384da348df
a2224a809ef96f5396deee0330c4501e49cd28a7
'2011-11-05T07:48:56-04:00'
describe
'45029' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNH' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
80a37e927fa3c146cc073932e7bd0b0b
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNI' 'sip-files00034.tif'
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describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNJ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
01072c31386d52ab689bb3765bb599fa
c99700b3b848c00b0ca860a5e4c641b59424b5e3
describe
'11857' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNK' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
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describe
'286555' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNL' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
c7acb7940289e45bcae644e62325dcf8
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describe
'145684' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNM' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
609ccda6780b22b7f0491e7815d70ef1
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describe
'36971' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNN' 'sip-files00035.pro'
708d35471d25245976a11fa31aaa8e96
c7a2c7d5ad540705d65841d160775e4b58ef67b3
'2011-11-05T07:48:30-04:00'
describe
'43882' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNO' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
9baac946b9fcb184a2118f33b21cebd9
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNP' 'sip-files00035.tif'
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describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNQ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
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describe
'11570' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNR' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
66a484ac7653322a81497c59d55e9a39
a8edc38f1616f03fc90218749eb0d411f13c6e8c
'2011-11-05T07:47:55-04:00'
describe
'286539' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNS' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
06a002df08c910bff9f36c288783b61b
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describe
'147564' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNT' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
bcf0e3b1b08be32ccafd371fdc1f40cb
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describe
'37581' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNU' 'sip-files00036.pro'
a1a97676128439f17b0a523c372c7dd6
bf0043e9f045c23a4f723b8da6aec857cc2b1c2a
describe
'45094' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNV' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
6b1b811529ec4ec7d0319201db73819c
933d76cfafdb813828baea6410dc63a0405e3dbd
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNW' 'sip-files00036.tif'
08df1efd63e2af5497d0c2c2ae95eb79
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describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNX' 'sip-files00036.txt'
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describe
'11391' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNY' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
d1bf8ca09dec8293d0a06fbcffa6c1bb
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describe
'286520' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGNZ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
a78839980e579c42373ed4d125315d91
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describe
'152121' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOA' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
33368d50d3dec9e9addd1f28307cba97
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describe
'38761' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOB' 'sip-files00037.pro'
d2dad61b8a13b9d5d4f49747930d97f6
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describe
'45895' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOC' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
a129f7d7c97d5e5eac4de15779e49d9d
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOD' 'sip-files00037.tif'
04ab56d2ce2adb82c4362e04f89f2c7e
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describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOE' 'sip-files00037.txt'
ae893068d62f22005de5ccb0eef5ef38
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describe
'11552' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOF' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
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describe
'286402' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOG' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
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describe
'149368' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOH' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
60b40dca29b654fde965346e27a1d50f
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describe
'38213' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOI' 'sip-files00038.pro'
2741d0af4be355af3173c8aa4201f671
39a8a7c9c124a136ef9c47d623786b585e3a00a1
'2011-11-05T07:47:38-04:00'
describe
'44877' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOJ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
16c01d17826a9ab4cb81009203f34b40
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describe
'2307944' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOK' 'sip-files00038.tif'
fd15559cb1cb681da385cb19624dd2dc
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOL' 'sip-files00038.txt'
7d7908f19cd950590de51943375458b5
20cc9ab5c2fd3ab0955fa060ea781b71b11dde9f
describe
'11425' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOM' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ee67f15a34ee76fd0cba16ebf9c84bad
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGON' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
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describe
'141839' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOO' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
b3c6460399c8d93506bf60845aa01e54
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describe
'35111' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOP' 'sip-files00039.pro'
53a086929dd295b07a5e72741fc2e1c4
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describe
'43756' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOQ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
548988bd831a03cb82fbc2ce9bc04b88
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOR' 'sip-files00039.tif'
a86732652380a25b7fe701870364f723
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describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOS' 'sip-files00039.txt'
17235ff643684d095ca564a2728c1188
d76f66c8f67d908e201a78a7446244976fec39c3
'2011-11-05T07:47:39-04:00'
describe
'11237' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOT' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
20576670faa262342323fee1fba2c0a1
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'2011-11-05T07:47:46-04:00'
describe
'286797' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOU' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
553709d90ce660b6213fadf60fb83a70
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describe
'152411' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOV' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
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a1d09ac672554602f624e353e0ea6274e8e7ab7e
describe
'38424' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOW' 'sip-files00040.pro'
dacf1ca7fe75ee65138e8d7c57a3ec22
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describe
'46235' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOX' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
23c86ef783c0d2dc14c8be8b2a042aa2
08018eeea726f42fb8632ad06fd1c5c0da9c670d
describe
'2311068' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOY' 'sip-files00040.tif'
fbd1b7ce2ad48e42c948b8bbab460ee1
98fcc059806e9548afe49efa7cc3e20ee329f250
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGOZ' 'sip-files00040.txt'
20ba614d9296bc6f4b1a9d8f0ec48663
019024d3517f985afe1ab038692237dead305bb0
describe
'11559' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPA' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
3c759dcdee6895ac2b73f106d4325053
157244ace08e68f69e378d81e5905a652d2c45f9
describe
'286553' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPB' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
55cab6a4287c6f946c175cc767e66577
3e5d4539478e51d3ff3962dc7f500226f0b55df1
describe
'152083' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPC' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
c1e31283cf45a05bd709732e9afe0245
5fbf003c874a9b00f4e205e922dd53d0b6681bb8
describe
'38226' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPD' 'sip-files00041.pro'
e546fe4def63872737a95c3c90e7271a
88911da26a59ed646a8d1206db9ae374b185a106
describe
'46000' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPE' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
5e4725d4e422300ecd2da58001b037cb
b96054c83fd3487c699d6b0d3f3c02d647ec2825
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPF' 'sip-files00041.tif'
4b5a2841be6bf7c62d6cc48382efa9e7
4f29e93159643c81b2e9e0340fff249762e1f460
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPG' 'sip-files00041.txt'
c005acce02f9f96e66af5a0b227bd511
1d345a5951fbb83c9018010bdbeac0328aaee37a
describe
'12001' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPH' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
89823c35078dd850c2b5cc53604da9d0
fe56a291b432a140fa33038b4a788de50e7f0ad7
describe
'286534' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPI' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
9f6a20e8ca3512685c1184a860b791c7
244feddfe449d9f660f6d46345d8c663ac5d2660
describe
'150047' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPJ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
c9bb35c69aaa59dda4118bdb694e8bc4
ffa42d22477db3baf85da925b08b42ab8defce72
describe
'37981' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPK' 'sip-files00042.pro'
9b0a46ca2f85e42a56cf7ecac44ada77
6479b88c413b69c6233da641bad6603edda8e448
describe
'45568' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPL' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
687a65a2584562770ffe094e0d283815
31d738540ce0b85c277b661fcefe90599988229f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPM' 'sip-files00042.tif'
12dc84c5dd8caaaa1d3f66adb97d3069
56050a789e7480e59bb2eaec6b3892a1b4c78b0c
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPN' 'sip-files00042.txt'
7c9beea9867c5b318a9fd925207ab6a6
f097832fc115414f5cad24c264056bfcfac773cd
describe
'11737' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPO' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
820cb9fdf28723c12bdc99790bb3abc7
cdd0500db40ca06e1618cdab7dbdc62a2278c62f
describe
'282962' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPP' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
7e9ec4014d0d303cc65aff12d6203129
5648d481e737e5ec9e8f1ddea91a919af9dca815
describe
'208895' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPQ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
85a8a8644f48950ab7b4debd221a2a0c
829eb2c1c1fb98967b9f9fde633145e36498d096
'2011-11-05T07:48:47-04:00'
describe
'37634' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPR' 'sip-files00043.pro'
b766d2a2e39efb04d12a9e094ebdc3f4
48dfa7b79e786ffb60754ac32de90f60a95af68c
describe
'77421' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPS' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
c92e40ea7a62724a881107f6eaa02a33
fc9780a0ebe5ca4d8732b58a38b00fbaf7b5f1cf
describe
'2286376' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPT' 'sip-files00043.tif'
98d5aa987808c3edb95a6602c76f581f
1a15a6a1f2a9d20c7d267b1d199cf8bf3b12744e
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPU' 'sip-files00043.txt'
c249bc8280a1bdfc74598a0f29d60d21
240d4a1f0a1510692ed97e9e1a2005c2a0eb308e
describe
'35124' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPV' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
a9a767286d41504519d6c91893bf6448
f9aae5a7e1066fb4905293716746045807ceb394
describe
'284132' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPW' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
78a7bd88dac7371edd96cf559c8b2ece
6fbce18e1d5b575eb665b1995af580ef6abee5c3
describe
'179791' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPX' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
f490854bf8c1c6833f10fdecb7cea2bd
f879cd9a32178c288c69c3cf102822975683533e
describe
'29914' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPY' 'sip-files00044.pro'
60982e7e9b400669956a5a0e2ce3fbfd
dc6b20fed6027732088a0c047b979e17739d4077
describe
'67666' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGPZ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
3402f8d49818d9de15dd781eab07281d
b5b9cf7cce2b5e01374a9fde13035a240af2653f
describe
'2295244' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQA' 'sip-files00044.tif'
4a77a13ff669b429cc0846a308084478
96d75126c0b23c163fd23707ea5996348d1ced1a
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQB' 'sip-files00044.txt'
8b6628b8b8fac6f53cdd19e6e9a2680a
eb0fc036800ce3b35f21472b71f2027293934798
describe
'33185' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQC' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
2f4ee209151cf4d00d4199b1ff42cbed
dc0e3332218b4c22fabd5d96deee1d10bd729420
describe
'286524' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQD' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
ba1c4d15e0e503521a363176b17290d3
1e47b4508580173ca5dd1d1ef8afb5d9bdd743d3
describe
'141496' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQE' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
c27ed46e0a4a3ad84d5577d7542846c3
4368fa590874b42dc73d7340821aca11eadb6cb5
describe
'35400' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQF' 'sip-files00045.pro'
eee1d8148d884ace6e287ef82bb55aba
e44ba117f37527477dabcc0d3c9d2174f020639f
describe
'42464' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQG' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
badbf01654e35e24017f27759c8f9105
9a7c0315e7824f3ea90c9defc1f59675e363f34e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQH' 'sip-files00045.tif'
c7bab22155fc66b3200d940723f71947
34b7a54c0005abc41afaec190e7d83043f372cd6
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQI' 'sip-files00045.txt'
4d8b438a03d70a05d7d295bdb6a5c220
cd8e694c92d2b64d10c973a31b3c996b9a9dd2bc
describe
'11132' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQJ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
6292c1c860237b66113bb2cae6bb51fb
0f49d629e8b521a45598713659123536d7d89f7c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQK' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
025b9917ba927a77aca542c1e6562c74
46877169bd631808871dbab76c0a13875137bdf0
describe
'145181' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQL' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
47ad6e21ec115424dd15fa7344e130c7
7d8d091858da144b3e8b7d0cf443e5fdc439d561
describe
'37116' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQM' 'sip-files00046.pro'
4112685ad1a9b3d390fdd1650029859d
8cf779ae56da876014b6a7057040a1476cd78c59
describe
'43772' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQN' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
b9a0d5d5c67a866efaff4cc3e564eff4
998be0956f6d8e961b164210f7f6ecfbf25e5851
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQO' 'sip-files00046.tif'
5861df9f26475382696ecc410eda83fc
69844df96e33da1f0a3ef9921394d4c169594528
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQP' 'sip-files00046.txt'
93cc5192c9a74d2ae9e689688ef29970
e9b249f2ecf6c98026ae9186f871e63d1396bd9c
describe
'11458' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQQ' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
08f6675fcb6a2511733720b6b34608be
8ed264fead47cdc6c878e27687736430835802d5
describe
'286503' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQR' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
833dcb4d2800261af4472dd440a68401
1a8dfe29e1370750e73b50780c60ca0181a0794c
describe
'153783' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQS' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
b823c2431449c3ad7951af61982ae052
cbba6132c6d7106bd169d3ee7b3881188a763443
describe
'38980' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQT' 'sip-files00047.pro'
93abae3a537c8c2c4c52abc5101163c7
c774d2b8775813c0d55f1f42405f394adc92368c
describe
'46696' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQU' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
e276f61d5a9bf3268faa1491f0174a46
9267da61145c0be3df8fac8fcaf55cd8d4bc90a2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQV' 'sip-files00047.tif'
f6ac4f467598b1affb0545414b5a81f9
e8d5ff2b9e533023660b7d3c3d1816a69572305f
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQW' 'sip-files00047.txt'
8b3f64ebcf49a9f517825fc2dd640535
fb07aaa59583ab3041881524dc1dd8f21f2bb435
describe
'11735' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQX' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
2a1dc3cbdc383f64d92dfb0ef66d697e
95432c6f46b8545dae3bd49a36d980f59ab96c53
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQY' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
acf223f20cfefb038a9af708e51e7caa
0d099afd9911517fe42662fe956e7b456617eb2c
describe
'153101' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGQZ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
516969587f9f7427efcc177b5e44e89c
008e02268072a6781d27830851b9c918b037ce2c
describe
'39546' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRA' 'sip-files00048.pro'
790d2799b05f01631ec9b9cedb2e29fd
c3e7475a4f8e2fe14c2dfebbd5e36842b9e3df82
describe
'46095' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRB' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
4d762f92266abae217b4e992e07da938
f836d4dc25982343e2df7ae9e9df87e421fc4a60
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRC' 'sip-files00048.tif'
f15d961ef91a2388cd7827a75f1cbf32
93778860bcc238b11e63b1a2d5446c0cfbd376b7
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRD' 'sip-files00048.txt'
51f65bcb758143e8f38b156a8e3d1577
0b74559c4d4a7e85dfa483338a0b9de5425d8ece
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRE' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
399dcf888219feb1c4c625c6684e6172
5e906f44187b83b0a217b37d6d101407c2844f55
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRF' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
46efa33484495cafb018deb26e6c3ff2
5d55f3338d4e08c129ab0d413257eb5bbfdfb422
describe
'155715' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRG' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
6f090a3b054bcd5dfa701e2342a59f14
ec4ab93313d141b6851a901065fa36fca4f09bc1
describe
'39090' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRH' 'sip-files00049.pro'
5614aed927d1537aa05d1fe701c5c6f2
987ec76f1d0ae047a896f9e9be517cd72c4c9577
describe
'47026' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRI' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ec64437908b656c62b8ef0bdd051f21c
576e128e114e9f8fcaa7ab659dfacb22109b5479
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRJ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
7c61e9ac9887efd32ea680f2cbeb8cf5
16cd7386ac85ce5a37e13867188166e108757ce3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRK' 'sip-files00049.txt'
cfa677e35fd312c9761b545b59f7b81a
1f1a7e27113c8adaea473d14f2eb7b32fda20f10
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRL' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
97d27b8d0fb704e87ee3c1944c1a7c85
be4514a32714d15d11cb40a39514c3c23f2f1efb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRM' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
9a0b2249eb36b7a0147ffa52572dbd0b
b0727ad453fe276efb63dccc97c5f345eff77188
describe
'146966' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRN' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
b48315fa9d9929ae7c57f58209e035c7
0ef00f0a1fabf8d388dba7f23da0afc3fa9cb556
describe
'36775' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRO' 'sip-files00050.pro'
7abbe1b44317e3a871da1d84f50e4f3d
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describe
'44533' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRP' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
1e8c315566ee174ee22f204d9a98532f
0f63292de63d56143ff993ec843919c83627f59c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRQ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
69228d968759c88d2fdff49bb849e662
63e482b635fb1057fcf1fc254d58b783f1543916
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRR' 'sip-files00050.txt'
ed8086f74d01090fb3fa45f79d8915ff
136b4257db21226b94d62e9a750cce0b3fa0ca8c
describe
'11632' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRS' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
73df7347f564119839ad8b26652dad3e
f9c070b1f59e996c414b98227696659b183984bb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRT' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
a4c049a9c1e18a0d0b593ce46c91c3b2
9382c350f30d88749fc63aeea3db3bf49451dc0c
describe
'153003' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRU' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
f5d8b50fdb91c4d87f706acb2a6aef1b
92615a114f523430ffc3b417ba13aafa29fbd279
describe
'38772' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRV' 'sip-files00051.pro'
f52b12f712a50c2aec58d59b8ba39dba
0bbd9136f33debfe715ce3a521376144fb5e87cc
describe
'45637' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRW' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
9fc49734b95e6271485f87d53b25b441
eabe3fbfaf0dc1564b72dd94303c687af0e310b6
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRX' 'sip-files00051.tif'
6b2101702f162a1cce05670b1971e7b9
c38528b9d234a3f45366d7dec421af3f5569aa43
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRY' 'sip-files00051.txt'
54b8815bac2082baed68e277595ca53d
adadcdcc57f108bb1e46152e2f3e7e499fc2bcb9
describe
'11503' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGRZ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
5fe7925694702e63a859aa71c33d662d
31a26b1328178fda55b378ae958854b43b871e30
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSA' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
3e318df572dc6b8d12038f6ac110e44c
f99fc8fb36468fd5f1a88991a74f1f43e3af2e5b
describe
'152813' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSB' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
b916d88a02ee3fbc1698395457db588c
82f355d862e9fe047b67b17bf55364d286528a2b
describe
'40225' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSC' 'sip-files00052.pro'
0e614c4ea4732d49635e70146342df77
8940068a00450c123090238916a3353b87922a2e
describe
'46609' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSD' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
abb9a02ac8efb37a7225a06e0ae2e3ce
b671ced62d018ec2ba67db827563c68b6f36b33f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSE' 'sip-files00052.tif'
b4017d0e46f6c33fdf74a107f651d0c0
a93c5c1e93dfe2bdd32f4b4382cc026d0c7c97d3
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSF' 'sip-files00052.txt'
1283030e42de9960e68825b6ea1eef72
c14656ac001456d5798dc541ce71ab3b601c78c1
describe
'11547' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSG' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
26be642974ae6ae6fcc4a051622e0e29
37af94536e4bf1b7186c4151786d6f2a235ff3c4
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSH' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d89b908b592dad72ce38d130fa595e65
ad0db70c8dbee57b2c5967dba5c7944216e7ee35
describe
'148223' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSI' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
35afd1f33f2549870206595bdf10d94c
c0e29d87fdd4b5250dcb8be54443120fd1e7079e
describe
'38071' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSJ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
4c271ff76d956084d06cfc8c091f4180
35265d8080521f97a7a3dcd6ba81284b74524ce7
describe
'46181' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSK' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
2cbe1ea71c943faf1807ee74d612b2cf
186c0ab1a0af3b765067d89a5e00faa5add8af1b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSL' 'sip-files00053.tif'
32baf5b088343ef7042c6557a491f70e
8fbad0019ae9e89cee9b1ed45130ffff81814ccd
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSM' 'sip-files00053.txt'
a03226ba16a7f7b1e3c03f81105e1e46
2450094c311b73a414acccddcac2d32f3b05a50c
describe
'11408' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSN' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
2e33f8e37ad0f095e3386b833eb86608
3cf5c29112ef11f7d7e72761044758b833705998
describe
'286531' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSO' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
283a68665502ae37c99d2487c122b6ed
8b89b62cc67ddcc66b101256ddd7c5a0f8b7e3a3
describe
'153752' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSP' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
874d459abdea76e351110673e90b0d4e
59574bc56839078ba5c3dd01150b0e782bbdd134
describe
'39251' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSQ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
1e8b6e2b2afae21625b19d37b0d83b62
9b004c120f60dfc147b9c78cfb7fc8ef0eab3c42
describe
'46064' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSR' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
f50a037f09a466b6494f85753fe98aa4
1f4bc58cf18004368ff6994eb86678378aecc896
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSS' 'sip-files00054.tif'
ae5878bec06e6be420803fcd60299f41
76c08a7776d3cd93cd57d99edcb8603a6c5b22d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGST' 'sip-files00054.txt'
d269d99cdc03c297ce3a8e8a63f1a46a
0bd67ea7eee408e0cd9043a6b3f1171e5a90e85b
describe
'11950' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSU' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
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describe
'286458' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSV' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
7c17ad59af84ab3dcc970eceb61b16aa
3201aa6157c6985782d478559e85b420a94acf6f
describe
'130732' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSW' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
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describe
'32158' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSX' 'sip-files00055.pro'
1bce35ab42c332f87052f611b95427fe
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describe
'39491' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSY' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
834a7143e1a0d30289a773304e3a267d
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGSZ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
0c78b02514bf74af74d04a11d427a4a1
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describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTA' 'sip-files00055.txt'
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describe
'10241' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTB' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
d465a6aa2198f0948c2698d2ee59bfe7
252a22ee93cb01b5e18c665513ef74fba8b8bf75
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTC' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
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describe
'153863' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTD' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
4df50bdc0bf275e6284319168774ce7f
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describe
'39606' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTE' 'sip-files00056.pro'
2424b4f07abbff0da81dfdbd10c9d84b
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describe
'46532' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTF' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
43188c0c7110b055b72ae37cd8f0b2ca
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTG' 'sip-files00056.tif'
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describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTH' 'sip-files00056.txt'
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describe
'11801' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTI' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
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describe
'284017' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTJ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
f7abe7025657c3d86372f8981d213a62
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describe
'145271' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTK' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
e8794f65e9f6a89bca411bd518f7db2f
9acddbfe69331e9fa12eaa636a6d7722661659b1
describe
'36619' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTL' 'sip-files00057.pro'
5feb2199dc7f0793ef359857bc1bb4b6
8a6af1cc5857540f208356d886ee0d7e85864ee8
describe
'44669' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTM' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
fbe37673fe56d9303ad8464c040f11f9
6fe9185cf519573ec0e8abe06a455f49d631924d
describe
'2289064' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTN' 'sip-files00057.tif'
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describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTO' 'sip-files00057.txt'
0eb54d8408682bda85eff58213f2525c
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describe
'11320' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTP' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
4806bd71cdc4788a7da6d50784bcd14e
e4923b3bac525e5892f82704ce25993a8aa41a7b
describe
'286364' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTQ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
47861f84ed307e8c967452853354818e
d3bb4f251090edc4a1b85ae28cbf1c2dd1f9056f
describe
'150991' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTR' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
ed466c396593b6f2afe4d1c32cc1134e
0eedc4de15cac294d247adaf597a58550eec7450
describe
'38175' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTS' 'sip-files00058.pro'
0e7fe0948d86351601eaeecf378a10e1
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describe
'45182' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTT' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
a7d3f72c7b8f7179e58ec37e75c66804
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTU' 'sip-files00058.tif'
ae23de156e7d5878a36966de19cec3f2
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describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTV' 'sip-files00058.txt'
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describe
'11271' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTW' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
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describe
'286457' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTX' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
deae381d169207cecda9449aa8935214
851466845a9489c30eb4039c1385c92f47188305
describe
'205755' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTY' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
c5e2b4db8a2ec22481bf1d51a11be7a9
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describe
'38239' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGTZ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
95f2a38d0a9b869353db097e69878b33
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describe
'77634' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUA' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
fb0a67d43a6fc1b7305ee274aa0c13b0
fb3b84a936918e59c9d186af76c39368bf4df8e4
describe
'2314744' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUB' 'sip-files00059.tif'
7bd6e45e8def9978e7a3059d6d95b980
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describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUC' 'sip-files00059.txt'
3e6569ac68ab8c038e75188f0a6c468b
83022f431ec3c83df2192d194b75ab51b77b4cac
describe
'35664' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUD' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
d205a673d66d2bd1da1ab8f485c0d3a2
d632c01c22a5635a049093c719c74f0e5f94db92
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUE' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
092ed1bde938c100d6756004a729f4b6
5937c7e3d1b208310e1e477ce708b5991ee72459
describe
'151769' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUF' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
7f37cb0211b34dbd715832c4eb98157b
f0df696629b0a685d71fc792ee51c80147d05c8b
'2011-11-05T07:48:16-04:00'
describe
'37754' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUG' 'sip-files00060.pro'
170a5bba63aad440405db631fdb76982
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describe
'46886' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUH' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
57c9b57bb21fa7617475c8666cfda2b2
c53a6e0a3386c219001004ce36f4359e58c1fa45
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUI' 'sip-files00060.tif'
12a18e679f0497bdb2b8e07150f8fc52
dfc7a07632e5df86afb3af327e9a6d4857fed3ef
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUJ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
530cb234c019bb8a8f346ae557fa0602
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describe
'11911' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUK' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
3f5b99e8cfa51637ef5406c627a164de
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUL' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
8be2052dc0fcfb14b1ea947f3d8ac1a6
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describe
'157030' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUM' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
61df6ce4a25c955a774eca99f17f6cf6
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describe
'39299' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUN' 'sip-files00061.pro'
dc5391361ac0f465e65eab210176c926
94f8341569e0138f54e4f78ca2578df1e29fe9a4
describe
'46973' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUO' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
7ba3bc541c256305896ae7521132f71c
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUP' 'sip-files00061.tif'
10cd01e99d769a7447b0cd11db8b3853
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUQ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
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describe
'12028' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUR' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
07d82727589aeaab48871103e0b03476
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describe
'286556' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUS' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
1b7f9bc52490552d3e3880193ee09bb4
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describe
'145290' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUT' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
bd32eba6526e8c3c7661c6dd0d520095
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describe
'36324' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUU' 'sip-files00062.pro'
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describe
'43924' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUV' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUW' 'sip-files00062.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUX' 'sip-files00062.txt'
23f92b767d8bc33151677a903fe2c73a
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describe
'11504' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUY' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
3ed611ea79d1e8eecc1150b1e9dbcc25
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describe
'286507' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGUZ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
e4814e2f3157df688e6e2651b57adb7e
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describe
'131481' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVA' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
c94adc2fc51d2ad58b899e4c2727f8a3
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describe
'27240' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVB' 'sip-files00063.pro'
209042e2a9b101cf1f8c73ed90c96996
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describe
'38458' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVC' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
7d71b21c53622062f129640438d27958
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVD' 'sip-files00063.tif'
d94a97b4bc30e7757323f62fd31eba92
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describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVE' 'sip-files00063.txt'
40ce3217d275be2578cbcd0ef8b90c4a
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describe
'9650' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVF' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
3d1c929e7e0971b09ce292c848b4b1db
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVG' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
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describe
'132286' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVH' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
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describe
'32511' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVI' 'sip-files00064.pro'
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describe
'40185' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVJ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
2fb9f7c4d27082d923624c984c16a580
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVK' 'sip-files00064.tif'
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describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVL' 'sip-files00064.txt'
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describe
'10086' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVM' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVN' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
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describe
'151454' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVO' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
0047930525c5e29d6e5d70d36cac31f3
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describe
'38804' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVP' 'sip-files00065.pro'
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describe
'46483' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVQ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVR' 'sip-files00065.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVS' 'sip-files00065.txt'
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describe
'11679' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVT' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
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describe
'286537' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVU' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
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describe
'148977' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVV' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
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describe
'38020' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVW' 'sip-files00066.pro'
e60ac6da98b1353872c8eac078e2054a
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describe
'45554' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVX' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
967665acc6ee1e66a33f5919b8b9b7d8
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describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVY' 'sip-files00066.tif'
67411003fda9dd3fb220c5f55828dff9
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describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGVZ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
6dd8707055438f501684d0db67b59cf5
2f94b34b32ba0cf0183a050fb4485e33652c1342
describe
'11345' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWA' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
206455dd459f0a7b382f4a684a7ac818
1aa44e80e643eed3854b953a5a2492c9d502d7f6
describe
'284783' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWB' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
5f924d91136c74b8e030bf1720deb031
868202b04d171d0f91a20d717ee8c231d0108bea
describe
'153318' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWC' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
317dd8ee89a416781f627f7e0aa57bc9
de8c5b1e60ba17aca77aeedc619dfe63818b0996
describe
'38192' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWD' 'sip-files00067.pro'
47d27838d94736b362ad36523579ece1
cafb17371f8cd720fb65c283f4f2ac903f754783
describe
'47034' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWE' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
8fb17f62d6872bb912e95f911c95135a
920d67a062c5d5f39613d7d0c052178378787efb
describe
'2294964' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWF' 'sip-files00067.tif'
ea97ddbe9bc85b8b93dc23ebff17e0cf
1a7b512bcfa6b51ec5c62c340ce89b3dfd23b0fa
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWG' 'sip-files00067.txt'
ef1c51025a7a5fadcb98f08bec35af20
29d58fe885516ab2aeefa90f9017bcddfc6e5d93
describe
'11551' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWH' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
2a44d8b4b6bcb6e6b63ce234c9f7a002
bae1921af2e1323c9e3a0e912c6d4b7bd1cfa669
describe
'286535' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWI' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
e757b8a907c2ecd79e6059576f3699df
bd13c4f958ef978756e22d3c989373910d6aebf6
describe
'149080' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWJ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
b6ca5e8fae8f08c3b518da3fc55e82c1
e6b1524043d786d9785744abc2d457869f53b486
describe
'37996' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWK' 'sip-files00068.pro'
8bcbe972ce4da0723840c9bceda5f441
eac0306213a5397e28c8395812ca68ede7db2597
describe
'45914' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWL' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
b8e3bc1a3c58804da10e49c18580681f
a4019256cc3716824d5f055d63dd8060215ab77a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWM' 'sip-files00068.tif'
d28a56360208f68aa7041aa1393e700a
62f7d83e720682540b15bb6b787770cf203a5b3d
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWN' 'sip-files00068.txt'
99f50cef7015aea93171f6e292a05275
d4f8920e06d4f7d75c3ab1718f1dc4887faf9b56
describe
'11512' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWO' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
636b49e32db1fb2d4a2e81940dbabba8
40a0aeb260b6931108f481252d6875e501632b72
describe
'286526' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWP' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
d77628e67ad347e2424fd52d9e08587d
bdaf8e7c4d98e81079748fc11ce3fbee4908a808
describe
'146908' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWQ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
a91fa953f8bc50736424d893ba2cc46e
1e64baea124789e260827a3734f0eeed5ffbd845
describe
'36743' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWR' 'sip-files00069.pro'
b3ebbe5edc2e2851848891f2de896b1f
c58f88b717c17f7e1a582c80fa7ed8898a676652
describe
'44906' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWS' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
833e10152b056a680f1ba5e851081d93
ec8494a876e9b98ed56277fdfa9ee5204efc7c0a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWT' 'sip-files00069.tif'
778cc4ad6fe5f5ac9a004b8f32736575
efd1a97854ad60dbe6e831baa03dbffd8ae79f13
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWU' 'sip-files00069.txt'
8150d18233b3d17680bf921788e6447c
84ff31ec3d456dbb245f1e8afbbe86e779039731
describe
'11544' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWV' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
d617d48d926e6576afa9d653bf7b8c1c
1afc09de3b6bd15a348f0c4536963cfd0e07da2f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWW' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
45488fd8c45d6ae2793c529b2ed139c0
37b2bb9afb7fba0453cbf561303d6a48528b4a4a
describe
'146016' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWX' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
8a3ff6a261414b2e013b2f580c86a59b
47314aaf4f5d47d4fee10c8f7f46aaecff9d6a3b
describe
'36649' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWY' 'sip-files00070.pro'
b5d0d4e3ec1993b5fa607aee3ce617a7
5d7f627d7160f141abd498cc530e3777c029e1de
describe
'44579' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGWZ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
50cb299269579a6e12f6433a35efcad5
2275b24eee38e373e60ebe8bdb836f92d07a87ae
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXA' 'sip-files00070.tif'
bfae21bb7d2d473b119e784e9f7b4896
f61d91af083e16703c12d05c3efb7ccc48e053d7
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXB' 'sip-files00070.txt'
74b226597aaee333d28e8bc6f0cc1fae
7d0586eb4bba3e62e657942136019fb278ead73c
describe
'11595' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXC' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
331abb2738555ac09a6cc57bb6e8b97f
ece43f69b1b8ea374eadc341560b11d3fd3ff476
describe
'286456' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXD' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
011c13f64bff681289fc018b6a1263e9
e4f1964d51c680798cd1d1e4fb3420c6416c6e75
describe
'145989' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXE' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
462209cde772e26d88dd7e3f54bf8da5
3b17aea5e69fb38dcbffa33c8a817d8523918bbd
describe
'35585' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXF' 'sip-files00071.pro'
048ed001d5109103e8d341bde9bf0d77
0a7e1c680a4476eaa02785cfe06468a6a00625c5
describe
'44097' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXG' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
7a697f4ae31089bd8517a1c296ed3127
a203226b5d91e018badde721e116dda712e90cb9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXH' 'sip-files00071.tif'
193372173982ed9f0ac263a61eae5ea9
f02f36f78ff38a7449e5fd5b9d54df6d4caf5af2
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXI' 'sip-files00071.txt'
70db011759ac70d6f8f987f570bbdb48
9a3b734fbacd28466fa059b037626841bed8aab3
describe
'11683' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXJ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
429d5fb8395e98573fb6eb18136b8814
a2fcabab0e85d2ae276f4bb12a4d2945a786de98
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXK' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
e13f34bb13b7a4aaa826b0e29166dbaf
017abb860a7f1512df781accbb29a84a95e29c8f
describe
'152676' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXL' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
6e43b70e1a6f7c6d5035b85a5090f686
b53f828318d19aeee1f1c0b7c84a54dd41c86681
describe
'37945' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXM' 'sip-files00072.pro'
56aa72864e3c8c9d374acb2913a088c0
a60944027c0a8ed246b76f9881c6b8f7cb75aba5
describe
'45910' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXN' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
70c07e92b1da83d59e432f935a0c395c
5ddbf96d498a22ad5000e4219e06e6fc58393ea3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXO' 'sip-files00072.tif'
57e365083af11a02d9809aff86f568b5
c67d6d6c328e7f338cf531a162e87c8c2cded360
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXP' 'sip-files00072.txt'
1fa01c456f5d1a99a9c728406a45484f
8beb76c52be32cb14dddd256545e7b8b72bd2b64
describe
'11822' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXQ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
94f46d3431c5e5520fee539e143fa184
00810d8f49eaadcd7c93f5b31f11c6d9fffaba9e
describe
'286543' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXR' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
5792d236e764cd9b4dc28577a86696d7
f960820a90df88b806d7f16d2d7a8c3aca4be1fe
describe
'119246' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXS' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
b7aec25d5157828ea389818817355ed3
ba9bd9f35bc16b8774ca1fa1a8123f837d747169
describe
'27766' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXT' 'sip-files00073.pro'
acee7a2171d765ca1c01ab59a71906be
def121e7e85cfc38fdde100fb650716d3d3f6ebb
describe
'35475' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXU' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
6c3bbee3fd8140c0d1905e7a90582c3a
5ec3e8f5899ced784bfd8cf96cfc1efd9628f1c8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXV' 'sip-files00073.tif'
4c7abb7c2cc2bfbc7f953ceacf4764db
35979f609d7dc0918095e85268f8ae1e0fe8ce5e
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXW' 'sip-files00073.txt'
889dd746750d3dcf4bffc453e952d6d5
9512eff3984786acfe7b019eaca48a3187783911
describe
'9288' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXX' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
0343b02bdf8a3fb386df4333d1d00eac
09e49137446a27bae46d897568ed9045788e4697
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXY' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
d4fa54f618c3edf49bb04e4a0fafbebc
c418a7d0afc12d9cb065f62dfc759a74342b0af9
describe
'149649' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGXZ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
4fc9d819bd15eb5d9e4bb55d7cdce068
b65b7247231c2fe757949db2292b7f7fb0c4a430
describe
'37831' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYA' 'sip-files00074.pro'
a3c52fa7d800162f980b6109fad8c825
6816204f5c3353458b5d6d69ff534169e5e8bef9
describe
'45203' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYB' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
899300de63e8324f4d9caa718843862f
b136e66828c51f6dd51ff9f5c100d3880576ab6e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYC' 'sip-files00074.tif'
9461010a1f8fe1a85bd5e9d30b367f80
8fa9cea3e24cdcf010af11423741bd2a1aec07a7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYD' 'sip-files00074.txt'
c69824a868d0a20362aba6c2902e0d7a
b337fd9c13c5c199465a5e7fd9e3e6106729a625
describe
'11871' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYE' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
7638817a4fb847b224f477a34b6a7e1e
23a73fc42699f407a8835639bc40495dc23fd773
describe
'286495' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYF' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
3f484cba543a907c1df2553d2ab53a29
718d65de52730bf97090be99941c57f8a10be8f2
describe
'142852' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYG' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
2666f2e98b18ff1b956f3c50e90c931b
4ee800b31c27d0f007cc6246896cf1b2f129ab99
describe
'35296' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYH' 'sip-files00075.pro'
9c76f040b9ea195d1c312bc2e7c0e5f6
471ed4507a2fd507362ff654d365a126ab0ddd24
describe
'43153' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYI' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
0702e70960afdce80dae22d0f16da083
b4eb9ae5dae25b24091f7aa4c969ed79ac49e27d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYJ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
6041027248da7af5979420995d0585f8
a2155fefc2f9a996c4e91701aaf896474a786eef
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYK' 'sip-files00075.txt'
73bd5fcd8fb72f893691e635afd1730a
776a368af1198a0a40756474b0bbf9367c7c7aaa
describe
'11188' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYL' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
2867c41e5ed0bd06c65d037cb876cfdd
1dd93fed93abbf519f08452d8c8395a4c930c1e0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYM' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
5daa112ea9d2125e2edb074918ad2c6e
7393e8ca5021990e263c495a495ac2cf1b1e5bf3
describe
'146029' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYN' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
ae22807f6661406e0e86206cdb7ebaba
de5e462317673ae98feed82611011bd1efcfeefa
describe
'37717' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYO' 'sip-files00076.pro'
c91cbb3c17147a47a6f34cb15388dbc1
d69318c88ee6c432ea917b8a14dbf2ff27ec0d01
describe
'44113' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYP' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
68cf8902e85f4287c56b5e22fff63f5a
5cac680d908403dbfa34c5b8f111f68813957217
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYQ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
6c46fd24e008498ca97e2546d30ef35c
7b53e5bbf938a78d1ec696610f782e22c9525a2c
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYR' 'sip-files00076.txt'
5c37430b72c02f268ad04bef621aad08
410cb615af9cb2ddbabf9e1e40ef5533a2b2f682
describe
'11428' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYS' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
235d3a5bdb7c3fb038540fb30fc25c9f
62dafba535b1adca1a2d2f35038fb985fc4b01d3
describe
'286536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYT' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
ff1b487e8d8efd731c416e87be165ac3
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describe
'147935' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYU' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
5b0b003d1ac315249bf8c76dd1b3dc5d
f7ca91e8322429d3302cf1df13da868c6d44b918
describe
'38069' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYV' 'sip-files00077.pro'
6ea6e9d8fd0a4356f967213394de0f03
148a839bc4903b54036e7a7f284b6e0103161837
describe
'44762' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYW' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
b87a2f4d16679f095e1140b797d02d62
6101abd286356586916bd0f1bec7c9f57d1a08e9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYX' 'sip-files00077.tif'
6ac7e42d807e2df1411a69cc8288456c
0afb121a38b0aaca9f56e6c6d2e602d6bf140422
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYY' 'sip-files00077.txt'
6fc3e9ca9e353555ba280f50c05abeb3
07c3db7b04b2f78d1422a5b3d89eb3d6640834a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGYZ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
21272963daf89e197c9797bd1eb36de7
01076f3391c19c27abe0ceacb461757590f17928
describe
'286461' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZA' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
6c535e18f8e2979029245779c45f1815
216bdfb964ec5096f2f67230a68d44f1b74adb65
describe
'148490' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZB' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
c128a725e514f2609fffc93c2495a5ff
e4920b0199ab82aaeff1a45262adf11b2517209e
describe
'38363' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZC' 'sip-files00078.pro'
c847a9aef9818b87a123837e75f9057d
4cca8d44c43f6b8be083631c1d314cfb80b18986
describe
'45786' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZD' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
960d14c44097a857423b650f4cbd8890
04c09bcf9c23bfd4dccfb6635a35dbbb533b8083
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZE' 'sip-files00078.tif'
bd8c13a834af85deeebbeca7250cd698
ce0270c4aa4a56b9f830a85c284f1215128d3287
describe
'1560' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZF' 'sip-files00078.txt'
faa46ee4020152c2d6ba53de4777ae95
bbe2481c5eae0a10043d0f734e9a7c15268af9fc
describe
'11700' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZG' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
8789561c2935f674b11df7b667c6a074
6089ca7fb201b3d32b73cc8c19c866e2ae83e5f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZH' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
eb0d1549855a4559fb69ba57fcf4bb7e
7551e81971de1b331c3fe363edc1c6a81b07bd69
describe
'144701' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZI' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
5fa7dc21439832dd1796d4a0ca8ab133
dc948859c6ddb07600f629a4e71e7436c85480c1
describe
'36713' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZJ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
f8dee9db65787463506fd2a90fdbe713
9095e6585d4a4f77f720b33cbb9c5dc058007c8c
describe
'44227' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZK' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
e8fd34374e4f905be619a7cf2f054d73
f57dc97fc3cd0a41e33562a4d2b77571a2ed2c19
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZL' 'sip-files00079.tif'
22858c41f6f07f1505a335d2ca2f4422
52302063e93368e8a53704985b0a8fbc21db4c25
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZM' 'sip-files00079.txt'
0389f61556a7ec98b583fa25f0f02661
e508a99cbd47a7c42224bd85907f6a92d1b6eba8
describe
'11386' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZN' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
d6129469fb65977d5e689bc2f1baf3ee
bd345104155fec78c0fa77e4bd9153e5fdd9eeb1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZO' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
23800c1fec20b73f258a7108e2cfa1a5
85557dfa12db6abe36af871b1d80c18f1c82a82e
describe
'148476' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZP' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
6494981b3c1804a597e271759c2613ee
c43c0a4db95256abe4835c989127b2c96ecb3426
describe
'38215' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZQ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
0b9550c85c8098b5284d6afa80659b1c
d9850599cac6fa454a09368dc174bda923287af4
describe
'45235' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZR' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
f3eb710a1592988987e84ebf217b0296
b776e77808ad50e100cef270bae347028d8a7c81
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZS' 'sip-files00080.tif'
6884b050eb826b44921ca1e4716b9a4b
ead67d604636bd990f5391d1661e7ddc50eb8210
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZT' 'sip-files00080.txt'
0d95147558ca8c20349968f47805ce4b
929e079071a20e6ba5e7153dcaefbc882e0206d7
describe
'11676' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZU' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
c84385ebf2dfc7af38c4891ef1b0bd8b
02b8e64ec304ad7949366aa05a05d82aa121d0aa
describe
'286540' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZV' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
4d0714609839630dbe9fb23bb63e6e81
bf42f1da292b1a658f7c8c3d0dca8f2b246b16a9
describe
'146184' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZW' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
488f40b758dd7ade3596f9c182726b1e
f139406499a3c0d718b12a63d7500547eca79b16
describe
'36671' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZX' 'sip-files00081.pro'
4c76d2739e19f69f3100e8d1ff3a3d9c
43490a1feb6d4f487a62e1843642adb01f19c23c
describe
'44268' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZY' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
f9ec813db6f40b212ff1338f27969427
c54082d0a51ffd973a24bf494dc1dbc40107a410
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABGZZ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
6ff19c9006064fc7c0dc07ab76c712ce
3de65eb76509f7f870e633bb256af37b28f36a4e
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAA' 'sip-files00081.txt'
70b281c0dbbcac60adba4af4c2fec1de
4714e77f8dc5d316af3b5cd48d43dec13de300c3
describe
'11260' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAB' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
4240d02f092194685ae2d21a533160a3
ceb31311a07e2775b3c38e8c9bc0f0bdff9058a0
describe
'286382' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAC' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
e995cb6ace1b3afcb15386fe4d3c159c
ccad9d6ca400c298d2231d77d393e2f12866d923
describe
'144551' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAD' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
49e366240768277c9dd5b20dd2dc4175
aef63fbf47f8b5bdf87f213b351f5ac654b9eb36
describe
'37141' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAE' 'sip-files00082.pro'
6f40d3a03cf1b78013807b4903ce646e
0817ec71125bee1526ed3a8234b963f50b591898
describe
'44623' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAF' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
a98d75ae996a6138bb447ec3e336c6f6
599b7ab4566c1781057277f6bf60541d91b0fe05
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAG' 'sip-files00082.tif'
4da2322f410b255a8c63996005424015
a0e6c28603444c2b01b9c6bcf62a95223bb3df95
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAH' 'sip-files00082.txt'
cb37fe34701c7ec8889c04cf12e63104
c112731bcefadc81af7c26f72689158484dc5999
describe
'11605' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAI' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
e92a3aaf96bbc623b6a36cfb75096463
548592aa18faf17d98c4b5272ffda513f6e06e5b
describe
'286489' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAJ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
258179e26bc2a8eba874c45136d08204
53b2c7c9bd739087a68f2647f12838e88e12afe5
describe
'152070' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAK' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
63c285bdc5504325b2589879718d77b5
d7d8d1d0c0c06c0d6ed30602de8a56141834f301
describe
'38210' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAL' 'sip-files00083.pro'
9edd7521ae8682d8d2b323f39b43f3b3
441e603df6a791175405a41ea03c630805d3fd54
describe
'45790' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAM' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
60c45cc734072c5631d338840c80d291
f1b91e5acfe0a3bf308e569d71fc61e622a6a5bb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAN' 'sip-files00083.tif'
bd998f407dfd3c874543010dda09baee
36e5e9e9477ff74ecca6aaef8d419434b7f1bad0
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAO' 'sip-files00083.txt'
93d46d0d93d20b7790062b17059d1b9a
15b47640482165b342a39f8d83938d82d0fcfc0e
describe
'11656' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAP' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
dfd1d8b105270caf9ba33f2931599c6a
f784af61a84d3a409054a3e9b53484d9d207b419
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAQ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
6e0714b24287428a0ddfcc2eb9d17adb
a458abd16345b6f257acd03224afe628e6393ac8
describe
'148425' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAR' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
552f1a8b937af5d4f252ae75129a0d17
60cdc7e1b3e0d3fd828f642140260c5feafe8c94
describe
'37983' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAS' 'sip-files00084.pro'
b2a6233589c0e9751dc96ccdb9fbc498
2583bacaa16c34c64fc211bb4b941cfa9322ffa4
describe
'44829' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAT' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
86bf5e342d5d3aa7f4bdba53b529d705
65f70ff7230c2b09ea9b90fdce8f721de8621186
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAU' 'sip-files00084.tif'
9f3c99b7db52f4a64b50fc9fc0b8e7ff
18ab91a72f47999a0f7101762a0383d9607b52e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAV' 'sip-files00084.txt'
3d7c06a7a2033e65d68e0d3bb92ad3b0
1d69bd22b318411308f34cec68072d8a6ec09a5d
describe
'11309' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAW' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
da247b6cdef1405f113fd0e35f1e9a72
10f34a2c9951e4a97231abb116fd1f49bfe930b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAX' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
b51c8f4015a1ae5b5ed910c04cb8af02
86e2ff37adfa35ac92f581bf477c9fc5b32c634a
describe
'148613' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAY' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
9ee32ad37d4af6b60a8c85bd3467f6ed
18547f44d11cf17b5984433be04db98e48f85dd6
describe
'37475' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHAZ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
7507ee47afd74f50a46e2f2261ac981c
96604ea60c69eb7a443189d572bcb854e1af2a88
describe
'44933' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBA' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
8cb2273a286cdce787fda3aeff41fc70
4bd430ca315beec9c5dc6548c8ebb9026bf6bcb3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBB' 'sip-files00085.tif'
675c881137c0218433b5138c5810d996
6e378e4a1206a6e9ecfa777e788e012af5b4647f
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBC' 'sip-files00085.txt'
5b791a8336d73161624570c3c12f3b60
f3286f4dc593401a8c9a98cf11c0064be483dd7e
describe
'11329' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBD' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
84859054fc47de4ff42f088cde37d031
7ca81e5b4360e49a3da50da5df2be3cbbc137902
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBE' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
b4b6a0813330527018aaa137b6835bf2
80ed90363b3e110f9191d44f27d8461d50343d8a
describe
'148183' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBF' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
24f22a1263ca2f859a8033a1facf45e8
5b1ceaf7dee46b9710ddce1a076c6838569eeaff
describe
'37050' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBG' 'sip-files00086.pro'
68ff9ac540ce3b62fde7dfefea35262e
6d243c0a9001be91546525550e4b85dc7c7026b4
describe
'45685' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBH' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
9779d13ed621052375ef219ae825de68
da23c293049dde6e4450d773abd53444bafc9c0e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBI' 'sip-files00086.tif'
26582736d2d4910fddf081b2c8e828ec
e21a99b872f411d407a4c39e245ddc618f63422e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBJ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
e8bc02b174a6aed7709db2f076633158
be6a2befb3c6fb37e81746c3edc047a1cf0e7895
describe
'12020' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBK' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
95719542937563f9a09fe8fc7f02d07f
96cd232abe79de0eaa935ab2d01d334c79065137
describe
'286480' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBL' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
ce0015387ab647fb5371e4691c5a5430
379ff839d7821ae32edd2c4f91bdba612079449c
describe
'153533' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBM' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
d4f05ee1658d66b880e1d9c95009d808
c90eefb82e6c44b3e430745b7685e118c169c8fe
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBN' 'sip-files00087.pro'
05b4349a2083657338137108b4808de5
74411d7db7b14a883eb72ae18d78bbaf7a56946a
describe
'46740' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBO' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
0a2813ad3b7974321fb74006e3ab0384
08e6722a72b49808a1157dc578f356380147ba07
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBP' 'sip-files00087.tif'
0dc84534d1a009c2cf63ad714ca792ac
6125ac4d47dbf0ed5288fbe3aa633eab006fa7bd
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBQ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
a80abe84ade381590b5e16aeaf6cb1a0
c95bd9dbba87d5a8b287f973bfda51f14c78081e
describe
'11535' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBR' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
904e454c4196603e2800bbc98fe75d22
278402c3df6a21e5d13554db7c0a1a12a056292a
describe
'286413' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBS' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
a33d21f8bb640d1a0426ff29a6099313
9e3c86cf45277b70e7d5b042b038e5cb10830b5d
describe
'93962' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBT' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
6f401cd09343637abe46c75fe3ccb89d
3ad1667e06626aebd7b45973609dfb3e88d8da59
describe
'12159' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBU' 'sip-files00088.pro'
3e0efd4f24a27373bc50dbc21d338ac8
8cd59cf3643a1f111e1d8d1dd35c62e872504cbd
describe
'24872' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBV' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
95cdde63d348324231e21439be277bbb
d949b6bf032933b9f162763767de53cf139c786c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBW' 'sip-files00088.tif'
ecf00860ea4f1724243b73a2eab6637a
7873b310af0e0f1d1735d30a269be755ae86e54e
describe
'553' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBX' 'sip-files00088.txt'
69789283684c7078a00387c1f2c98690
51b551d7bf39ee6c8467fc10a7f11b6f8ba220f4
describe
'6479' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBY' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
35f27edce9dd3919e517d12335699cc3
d916216251c9496fa45743d8144a976763677eb6
describe
'301641' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHBZ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
cd497ac830b90e8ab69438bafe0c75c7
759fc4d67934701d83cb248e1cc8067c688d8e7c
describe
'179891' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCA' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
ba1206891274de0bdc3b984de2a54d2d
b72fd4bd1193f0971f3f63e17c6515826c0aff39
describe
'56620' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCB' 'sip-files00090.pro'
cb83d1fe1b3ff5bbac262f673e305496
156a183462d28ae4914aa1fe81abb34cf2e624e4
describe
'47376' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCC' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
7087e62df1861f5a8af56d2636c19b2c
d8690778ad61b754eee0ac78f33ca6cc689225cc
describe
'7268536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCD' 'sip-files00090.tif'
f64dc46d8eea7a80f67199e11c28491b
65f7bc895f0d120800d4e8bc16db43de2a49549c
describe
'2386' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCE' 'sip-files00090.txt'
2d0af5066a33386f09863afa2ab65c44
76e14a68c7a17ac7bc7e4cc95ad1a7ebdec8bfd2
describe
Invalid character
'10974' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCF' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
1ecde3625cb7425504c83642709e8998
2d0d6787a0413fd4d3b5cf08b49bc0bdbc517dd8
describe
'326717' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCG' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
dc0feb1ab4b2277be88377e6e1c966ed
2c032ad237865e39c20ad7a4a4e9228b68f14d57
describe
'147363' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCH' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
3d8a777ac28b9652c68bb0313c31652c
ad98deda150297be5ee2f6606020109cb9bd010c
describe
'19624' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCI' 'sip-files00091.pro'
d1b15d3ce85f9b79530182a62c7418ab
b9ae785950959fde389e10a383dcbf8db47b5a43
describe
'41828' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCJ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
05aa8ba9737860cf9e167e52278f3edd
88d77ed9906734fbe33db3fa3869abec9ef3a844
describe
'7864908' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCK' 'sip-files00091.tif'
c00d718756ca8b5116a5c2416dc7b257
2fe2318364c161fd8a3da8ea9f9e390b33e19b82
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCL' 'sip-files00091.txt'
0d764b6b7be66a6b3a03890b9134ce5f
7304f8e7fc525a67dd88b917176aeb863d9995e7
describe
Invalid character
'10711' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCM' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
0f51924ca90d17937f6934e0adb5f80c
81bafe5686b4e3d67fda54b3dff1ce51ba6091ca
describe
'306047' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCN' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
93f0bc46345c0e2c3cc23ef7e5c7bdce
bbb13e21fda38cb12b8d67e31bdf45757cb58d7b
describe
'111346' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCO' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
5f91b9a0d7d55e5a9d8be8911b5f28ed
42f4c404fa93e77c4b81f5c7352a45b2e3654cfd
describe
'20417' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCP' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
42978aee28b46d5759c60ba9df49cc3f
4d6f4d8d7dc8430da692abfc309aa0fbacb21fe0
describe
'7361940' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCQ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
d29b6c8b5f3ab3f1769fca715e6dc85e
80d733536af0f464f926a2043a9b33d4b9e679f6
describe
'4223' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCR' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
f1960e1a48026f09f8597f999e2a1459
3fd249f3bd750400b0e4e346bbcc0fd0fb33f2dc
describe
'51840' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCS' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
52b58febc01204d131a052d9b9a5deb5
5ef40b841ec3a3727cb750d51057a48cc72f5b3e
describe
'27355' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCT' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
29958518f2cd8ba7d5a5d06427dc5ae7
ff1ba94e96a33a1584dc37a3aff8da46740751fd
describe
'213' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCU' 'sip-files00093.pro'
a72f8e80685a1a4238a686ca13d53050
c35cf37a9a8b4e8080e36944e6fb7eb1a6f2a73a
describe
'6878' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCV' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
5d87183af62ec33ff813cb1fdd401382
d65157971912c90b688f22a3ed1048a24b5091ab
describe
'1261940' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCW' 'sip-files00093.tif'
c346e90fd6c40533ed338a04d943462d
0cd387977f9470ed13fe8d68c7621ba46b35b549
describe
'2600' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCX' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
a4aa75a8d9668fadbd6cf8273e98c4f3
5d88bc3febc44ecd37cdf3e18c84445eac8ef7f1
describe
'16' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCY' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
671782db8553a69b6edb5fda02dc1c1e
8cdf378be3248374dbc64acf1a4210ae6b39aa98
describe
'150110' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHCZ' 'sip-filesUF00086073_00001.mets'
b00a177ecab13bec45d0293fe498c0ea
366628c9754b4cf0af1952442471f633cab6dab5
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T19:00:53-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'191986' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAOEfileF20081114_AABHDC' 'sip-filesUF00086073_00001.xml'
94b781fcec85896f2bb313abe6fb8397
53f12860faf6e696f7d13191934140af1f1d436e
describe
'2013-12-14T19:00:54-05:00'
xml resolution