Citation
Afloat with Nelson, or, From Nile to Trafalgar

Material Information

Title:
Afloat with Nelson, or, From Nile to Trafalgar
Portion of title:
From Nile to Trafalgar
Creator:
Eden, Charles H ( Charles Henry ), 1839-1900
MacQueen, John ( Publisher )
Colston & Coy ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
John MacQueen
Manufacturer:
Colston & Coy
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
viii, 340 p., [10] leaves of plates : ill ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Seafaring life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sailors -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Nile, Battle of the, Egypt, 1798 -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Trafalgar, Battle of, 1805 -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
War -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Loyalty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Pictorial front cover and spine.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Charles H. Eden.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002391414 ( ALEPH )
ALZ6304 ( NOTIS )
60384279 ( OCLC )

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Full Text














AFLOAT WITH NELSON





THE BURNING OF 17ORIENT AT THE BATTLE OF THE NILE.

Frontispiece.



AFLOAT WITH NELSON

OR

FROM NILE TO TRAFALGAR

BY
CHARLES H. EDEN

AUTHOR OF :
‘GEORGE DONNINGTON,’ ‘QUERR CHUMS,’ ETC., ETC.

‘Thou art our Admiral.’—Henry IV.

LONDON .
JOHN MACQUEEN
HASTINGS HOUSE, NORFOLK ST., STRAND
1897



PREFACE

Ir is proposed to write a series, each volume
of which will deal with some British admiral ;
and it is natural to begin with the greatest
of our naval heroes—Horatio Nelson. Although
the works themselves will be romances, the
fiction will be based upon facts, the events
narrated in historical sequence, and the dates
rigidly adhered to. In the present volume it
may be objected to that certain incidents in the
life of the hero are either passed over lightly
or altogether omitted, and for this I am pre-
pared to take the entire blame. A fierce light
is thrown upon the private life of all illustrious
men, and what would pass unnoticed in less
exalted individuals becomes matter of common
knowledge in them. Lord Nelson’s life was not

a perfect one, but if he erred, such errors never
Vv



vi PREFACE

led him into neglect of the duty which he
owed to his king and his country, and it is
in this latter aspect that I have endeavoured
to portray him. The volume to follow this will
be devoted to the great Elizabethan hero, Sir
Francis Drake.

CHE



CONTENTS

CHAPTER I

A Mipyieut ADVENTURE,

CHAPTER II
A CHANGE or SEX, .

CHAPTER III
A WALK IN PETTICOATS,

CHAPTER IV
Sir Horatio NELson,

CHAPTER V
H. M. 8. Vaneuarp,

CHAPTER VI
In SEARCH OF THE FRENCH, .

CHAPTER VII
Tue BarrLe or THE NILE, .

CHAPTER VIII
TRIAL or A TRAITOR,

vii

PAGE

19

48

69

90

105

122



viii CONTENTS

CHAPTER IX

Tue LEANDER AND GENEREUX,

CHAPTER X
STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE,

CHAPTER XI
BEpro THE BANDIT, .

CHAPTER XII
TEsss,

CHAPTER XIII
Tue CASTLE oF TARANTO,

CHAPTER XIV
Av Homer AGaIn,

CHAPTER XV
THE Barrie oF THE BALTIC,

CHAPTER XVI
“Twas IN TRAFALGAR Bay,”

CHAPTER XVII
My First Commanp,

CHAPTER XVIII
Leonora Dri BrANcANovA, .

POSTSCRIPT,

184

205

228

251

284

302

318

338



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

THE BURNING OF L’ORIENT AT THE BATTLE OF THE

NILE, ; . . ; . Erontispiece
PAGE

“TAKE THAT,’ SHE CRIED, DARTING SUDDENLY ACROSS THE
ROAD, . 7 7 . ‘ 7 : 25
Tue FIGHT oN BoarD THE VANGUARD, : . Fi 87

A SLIGHT FIGURE, WITH A LINE ATTACHED TO THE WAIST,

SPRANG INTO THE SEA, . : : ‘ : 97
HE MANAGED TO DROP IT AT THE RIGHT MOMENT, . . 175
BEPPO RECEIVES CroucHER AND HIS COMRADES, . . 198
TESSA DEFENDS THE Boys FRoM BEPPO, . . . 221

RUSHING FORWARD, I FOUND HER CONFRONTED BY AN OLD
SHE-WOLF, WITH THREE HALF-GROWN CUBS AT HER
HEELS, . : : : é ; . 248

NELSON SPREAD THE WAX AND IMPRESSED IT CAREFULLY
WITH THE SEAL HANGING TO HIS WATCH, : . 288

“STEPHEN CROUCHER!” I ROARED AGAIN, . : . 296



Afloat with Nelson

CHAPTER I
A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE

My father closed the Bible with a bang, and I
had risen to my feet before the solemn “Amen”
had died away in the room. The three women-
servants, who composed our household, passed
through the door into the back premises, and
the family was alone.

My father left the table, where he had been
seated to read the evening prayers, and took
possession of a large easy-chair at the chimney-
corner. My mother seated herself in another
chair facing him, and the quick click of her
knitting-needles was heard as she resumed her
constant task. My sister Emily and I set about
the work which was expected from us nightly.
She placed a kettle of boiling water upon a trivet
attached to the grate, and then moved a small,

A



2 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

round table beside my father, on which she
placed glasses, lemons, and a basin of lump-
sugar—the latter a great luxury in the days of
which I write. Having done this, she seated
herself on a small stool drawn close to the feet
of her mother, For my part, I received the key
which my father silently handed to me, and un-
locking the private cupboard at the end of the
room, took from it two old-fashioned decanters
of cut-glass, both of which contained spirits—one
Hollands gin, the other brandy. These I carried
to the table, but my hands shook so with an
excitement which I endeavoured to conceal that
I nearly broke one of the bottles, a clumsy act
which called forth a mild rebuke from both my
parents, who prized these articles very highly.
Then I proceeded to mix a glass of punch for
each of them, in the proportion which I had ©
been taught was most acceptable to both—my
father’s gill of brandy being exactly double my
mother’s measure of Hollands. When the hot
water was added and my father stirred his grog
slowly round, a pleasant fragrance rose from the
glasses, and when he had tasted his jorum, and .
pronounced it perfect, I also got a small stool
and seated myself between my father and the
fire, which crackled merrily up the chimney, fed
by billets of wreck-wood, for it was mid-winter
and the nights were very cold.



A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 3

After he had taken his third sip I made my
usual request, “ Now, father, spin us a yarn.”

“What about, Jack ?”

“Qh, about smugglers,” I cried; “about the
fight which took place on the beach ten years
ago, when Tom Holden shot the Preventive
Officer.”

“ve told you that a dozen times, Jack. You
are too fond of listening to stories about these
lawless men. What put smuggling into your
brain to-night ?”

I turned my head away, for, despite my utmost
efforts, my face flushed crimson at the unexpected
question; but my father did not perceive it, and
I was saved from making a reply which might
have betrayed me, by his suddenly asking,
“Mary, how do the kegs hold out?”

“The last of the brandy is in the decanter,
but there are at least half-a-dozen bottles of gin
left,” replied my mother. He gave a low whistle
on hearing this,

“The brandy run out, eh?. That’s a bad job.
This smuggling is wild work and does mischief
to every man, woman and child, in the parish.
Instead of being honest fisher-folk, and getting
their living from the sea, they are for ever look-
ing out for Dutch or French luggers, and en-
-deavouring to enrich themselves by defrauding
the King’s revenue. Jack, my boy,” he added,



4 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“just step outside and see what the night is
like. Look to seaward, and try to make out
if there are any lights there, also notice in what
quarter the wind sits, and whether the moon is
shining, or clouded over.”

I departed on my errand only too gladly, and
soon returned with the information that the sky
was overcast and very dark, and that what wind
there was came from the south-eastward.

This news seemed to give my father pleasure,
for I heard him murmur to himself, “That will
do. Did you see Stephen Croucher in the village
to-day ?” he continued.

“Yes,” replied my mother, with some asperity
in her gentle voice. “Yes, I saw him at the door
of ‘The Toothsome Herring, talking to Bess
Wilson. I dislike that young man, John, and
I’m always sorry to see him about here. When-
ever he comes there is mischief brewing.”

“Yes, he’s a reckless ne’er-do-weel, but a good
seaman for all that,” replied my father. “There’s
not a man on the coast of Norfolk that can handle
a boat better than Steve Croucher.”

“It’s a pity he doesn’t use his knowledge to
some better purpose,” rejoined my mother, drily.

“Jack, you may mix me another small glass of
punch,” said my father, after a pause.

“The brandy is running low, John,” observed
my mother.



A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 5

‘I think it will hold out if the wind is in the
south-east, as Jack says it is,’ returned my father,
with a twinkle in his eye, and a smile at my
mother, which she returned, little Emily gazing up
into her face in mute astonishment, for this con-
.versation was Greek to her, and, for the matter of
that, should have been the same to me, but, as the
sequel will show, I was more behind the scenes
than my younger sister.

Somehow, my father’s mind seemed running on
the subject of smuggling, although he could spin
us no yarn, for he said, somewhat inconsequently,
“Those fellows don’t care one bit whose -horses
they take out of the stable to run their contraband
goods. Do you remember, Mary, that on the
morning of last Good Friday, Farmer Easton found
his three best cart-horses covered with mud and
sweat?”

“Yes, dear; and I remarked that Mrs Easton
and her daughters wore silk dresses trimmed with
‘French lace during the summer,” said my mother,
with a little smile.

“Tt is very wrong,” continued my father, “and
locks are no good, for these fellows stand at
nothing, and will break open any door. Jack, my
boy, just go to the stable and give the mare a feed
of corn. Padlock the door after you, and bring
me. the key.”

“Ts that wise, John?” asked my mother.



6 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“It’s as well to be prepared since the wind is in
the south-east, and the night gloomy,” returned
my father. “Besides, the staple is loose and will
come out at the slightest pull. They know this,”
he added, with another twinkle in his eye.

When I returned from my errand, I found my
little sister had already gone to bed, and I at once
followed her, only too glad to be released, for
during the whole evening I had fidgeted about
on my stool, and greatly feared that my excite-
ment would have been detected by the watchful
eyes of my mother. Both my parents, however,
seemed preoccupied, and my restlessness called
forth no remark. *

It was just nine o’clock when I retired, for we
were early folks in those days, going to bed betimes,
and rising with the sun. The little room which I
occupied stood at the end of the passage on the
first floor, and had one window looking out on
to the garden. My proceedings on reaching this
little chamber would have puzzled an onlooker:
Instead of undressing, I went to the basket con-
taining my sea-fishing lines; selecting one of
these, I unwound some ten fathoms, then, opening
the window as noiselessly as possible, I threw the
wooden reel on to the lawn beneath, and then
nearly re-closed the sash, although leaving a gap
sufficiently wide for the line to travel freely. I
then took off my shoes, fastened the inner end of



A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 4

the line to my wrist, and, clothed as I was, jumped
into bed, and lay between the sheets with a beat-
ing heart and nerves wound up by excitement.
Through the crack in the window the outer air
rushed in cold and raw, but this I heeded not, for
an adventure lay before me, and all personal
discomforts were forgotten in pleasurable antici-
pation. For perhaps half-an-hour I lay awake,
hearing the footsteps of my parents as they
ascended the stairs, followed by the closing of
their bedroom door, Then profound silence reigned
throughout the house, and, despite my heroic
efforts to keep my eyes open, I fell asleep, which
was a, bad beginning for a watchful smuggler, but
it must be said in excuse that I was not quite
thirteen years of age.

After a couple of hours of profound slumber, I
was rudely awakened by a sharp tugging at my
wrist. Forgetful of the circumstances, it was
with difficulty that I repressed a cry of alarm, but
memory returned in time to save me from this
indignity, and I slipped quietly out of bed, having
thrice jerked at the cord in signal that I was astir.
Slowly and carefully I opened the bedroom door,
carrying my shoes in one hand, whilst feeling
along the passage wall with the other, for I
did not dare to kindle a light, and indeed had no
_ phosphorus to do so. I knew every inch of the
house, and must have gone as silently as a mouse,



8 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

yet it seemed to me that each step I took would
awaken my parents. Once a board creaked beneath
my light weight, then I stood still with a beating
heart and blanched cheek, with difficulty repressing
the inclination to retrace my steps and abandon
the adventure, for smuggling by daylight with
life and movement around is a widely different
thing from smuggling at the dead of night, and
stealing out of the house like a thief. On reaching
the head of the stairs, the tall clock in the hall
beneath burred dismally before sounding the first
stroke of midnight, making the hair on my head
bristle up with terror, as I stood motionless till
the tale was completed, and, whilst descending,
each separate stair seemed to groan dolefully, as
though anxious to proclaim my escapade to the
other inmates of the house. But when I had
gained the passage leading to the back premises,
and recognised that my movements had been
unobserved, I speedily regained courage, and,
slipping noiselessly out of the back door, I put on
my shoes and stole cautiously round to the lawn,
where Will Barrett was awaiting me.

We exchanged no word, but crept silently
towards the gate opening on to the road, through
which we passed, and it was not until the Parson-
age was left two hundred yards behind us that
I ventured to ask the question which was burning
on my lips, “ Has the lugger been sighted, Will?”



A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 9

“She hove in sight an hour before sundown
and stood to the northward after her signal had
been answered. Stephen Croucher and old Grim-
bold were whispering to my father at the bar,
and I heard Steve say, ‘It is high-water shortly
after midnight, and if old Oliver has got his night-
cap on then, the boats will come ashore.’ They
paid no attention to me, and did not know I under-
stood that ‘Oliver’ meant the moon. It is very
dark now, and the run will certainly be made
within an hour’s time. We must hurry along,
Jack, and get down to the beach unperceived.”

My heart beat fast on learning that the moment
for action was so close at hand, but before moving
on, I put one more question to my companion.
“Have you got the barkers with you?”

“Yes, I’ve got them right enough,” replied Will,
with a proud sense of proprietorship. “I took
them out of father’s bedroom when he was busy
with the customers this evening. Look here!”
and he produced from his pocket a pistol, which
I put my hand eagerly forth to seize.

“Not so quick, Master Jack,” was the reply,
as he replaced the weapon in his pocket; “you
shall have it when we reach the beach. Some
accident might happen whilst we are scrambling
down; besides, you are rather young to be trusted
with firearms.”

“Tm only six months younger than you,” I



Io AFLOAT. WITH NELSON

cried angrily, “and have used a pistol often. I
know more about firearms than you do, for I am
a gentleman’s son and your father is only an inn-
keeper.”

“If that’s your fashion of talking, my young
bantam cock, you sha’n’t have it at all, and you
had better go back to your father, the parson.”

“T won’t go back, and I will have the pistol.
If you don’t give it to me, Will Barrett, Ill take
it,” and I began stripping off my coat, preparatory
to putting this rash resolve into execution, for my
blood was up, and I had no idea of being hectored
over by a lad who was my inferior in position;
but before any active steps could be taken, a
bright flash was seen to seaward, and we com-
pletely forgot our dispute at the sight of this
signal,

“Come along, Jack!” cried my companion.
“Hurry up, or we shall be too late.”

We pushed through a gap in the hedge, ran
recklessly across a small stretch of turf, and slid
down the descent leading to the beach. On reach-
ing this, Will handed me the coveted pistol, which
I stuck in my belt with an air of triumph, feeling
that now I was a smuggler indeed, and fit to cope
with an army of Preventive Officers.

“Come along,” urged Will, “and let us get into
the cave before the boat’s ashore. We can stay
there until the landing begins, when all hands





A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE It

will be too busy to notice us and send us
home.”

The cave of which my companion spoke stood
about a quarter of a mile north of the little quay
where the cargo would be landed, and was in no
way connected with smuggling purposes, being
used by our fishermen as a convenient place in
which to stow old nets, empty casks, and such-
like lumber. ‘Towards this recess we speeded
swiftly and silently, keeping close under the
shadow of the cliff, which was strewn with
fragments of rock, causing each of us more than
one fall. This was a needless precaution, since -
the night was so dark that no one could have
observed us had we taken the more open way’
by the edge of the sea.

We reached the cavern, bruised and breathless,
and flung ourselves upon a heap of nets which
lay within the entrance, from which position we
could view the sea, and the spot at which the
lugger probably lay, had she been visible, but
the darkness was too great to allow of our
making her out. We had lain thus for perhaps
a couple of minutes, panting hard, but exchang-
ing no word, when suddenly the noise of a dis-
lodged stone came from the direction of the
village, followed by a coarse oath in a man’s
gruff voice.

“It's Steve Croucher,” whispered Will, hurriedly ;



12 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“let us hide behind the casks. He would send
us home if he saw us.”

Quick as thought we dived behind the barrels,
and remained there motionless, in the hope that
the man would pass, but, to our consternation,
he paused at the mouth of the cave and gave
utterance to a long, low whistle, which he repeated
three times at regular intervals. From our hiding-
place we could make out the smuggler’s form

‘ silhouetted dimly against the murky background,
and we observed with surprise that his face was
turned towards the north, and not in the direc-
tion of the village from whence he had come.
What could be the meaning of this?

After the lapse of perhaps a minute, Steve
Croucher repeated the signal, but in a louder
tone than before, and then it seemed to our
straining ears that we detected a faint answer,
and this was confirmed when the sound of foot-
steps was heard coming over the rocks from the
northward. Stephen advanced to meet the new-
comer, and I felt my arm tightly grasped by
Will, who took advantage of the man’s absence
to draw the pistol from his pocket and cock it
—a motion which I faithfully followed—whilst
he hissed into my ears the one word—“ treachery.”

All this occupied but a few seconds, at the
termination of which two figures could be dis-
cerned at the mouth of the cave.



A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 13

“When should my men make the attack?”
asked the new-comer, whose tone was imperious
and sharp.

“Don’t speak so loud, captain,” said Steve, in
low, anxious tones, “there might be someone
within ear-shot.”

“That's your affair, not mine,” returned the
stranger, curtly. “Answer my question.”

“Best to get the landing half over before
dropping down on them. They will be too busy
removing the tubs to notice your approach until
you are close to them. I will go back and join
them, and when the right moment has arrived,
I will manage to swing a lantern from side to
side as a signal.”

“You are a pretty scoundrel,” we heard the
stranger mutter.

“Where are the men now, sir?” asked Steve,
hesitatingly, for the officer’s contemptuous words
had reached him also.

“Close to. I hear them coming now, and they
will be here in less than a minute.”

“Have you a strong force, sir?—for these
Norfolk men are sure to show fight, and I shall
be forced to do the same to avoid suspicion.”

“There are fifteen Preventive Officers and a
press-gang of twenty men from my frigate. I
hope to fill up my complement from your village,
Mr Croucher.”



14 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“Hush, sir, hush!” said the traitor. “No
names, sir, even when we are quite alone. And
about the money,” he continued falteringly. “A
hundred guineas was to be paid when I brought
you to the spot, and another hundred when the
job was completed.”

“There’s your money,” said the officer, con-
temptuously, and we heard the chink of gold
as he threw a bag upon the floor of the cave,
not deigning to soil his hands by contact with

the dirty rascal. “Here are the men, too,”
continued the officer, stepping out into the
open.

We could see Steve stoop to pick up the
bag, but, at this moment, there came a flash close
beside me, accompanied by a loud report—in
his agitation Will Barrett's finger had pressed
the trigger of his weapon, and the pistol exploded.

“Bolt!” cried my companion, springing to his
feet, and dashing out into the darkness. I
followed him unhesitatingly, with my weapon
at full cock, but, unfortunately, my foot was
caught in the meshes of a net hanging from
the cask behind which I had been concealed,
and I came to the ground almost at the feet
of Steve Croucher. In a moment his strong
hands had grasped me, but my right arm re-
mained free, and, in desperation, I pointed the
pistol at his head and fired, dropping the weapon



A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 15

the moment I had done so. With an oath, he
staggered back and loosened his grasp, upon
which I fled swiftly towards the quay, zig-zagging
from side to side like a snipe in its first flight,
and thus avoiding a bullet sent after me by
some person then unknown, but. whom I after-
wards discovered to be the traitor Croucher.
The distance from the cave to the quay was
about five hundred yards, and I covered the
ground more quickly than I have ever done
since, although more than once I have had a
race for life. On three several occasions I tripped
and fell, but I was a feather-weight and regained
my legs in a moment, heedless of pain or bruises
in the excitement of the wild race. I could
not see Will Barrett in front of me, but could
hear the sound of his footsteps some fifty yards
in advance, and I could also hear the tread of
the Preventive Officers and bluejackets as they
pressed forward in pursuit, for the alarm had
now been given, and the surprise, so cleverly
arranged by Steve Croucher, rendered impossible.
When about half-way on my course, a second
flash came from the lugger, and I knew that the
boats with their contraband cargo had left her
side for the shore, and to prevent this valuable
booty from falling into the hands of the excise
men became my one determination. There were
lanterns now dancing on the quay, and, as I



16 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

drew near, I could distinguish the form of many
men assembled to unload the boats. To warn.
them of the approaching danger was of the
utmost importance, so, when within a hundred
yards of the quay —by which time I was
slightly ahead of Will Barrett—I began to shout
“Treachery! Gaugers! Gaugers! Press-gang!
Press-gang!” at the top of my shrill voice,
which rang through the night air with wonder-
ful distinctness.

The effect was magical. In an instant every
lantern was extinguished, whilst at the same
moment a flash rose from the pier-head as a
signal of danger to the approaching boats, and
by the time I reached the spot, so lately crowded
with figures, it was absolutely deserted, and no
sound could be heard but the footsteps of the
men as they hurried away to their respective
hiding-places, more terrified at the single word
“ Press-gang” than by the penalty they would
have incurred had the Preventive Officers caught
them red-handed in their illicit occupation.

Delighted to find that our warning had pro-
duced the desired effect—for Will Barrett had
joined in the cry on catching the cue from me
—I halted for a moment to allow my companion
to come up. ‘Together we stood listening, but
‘could hear no sound of pursuing footsteps,
although a voice which we recognised as that



A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 17

of the officer accosted by Steve as “captain”
was audible at some distance in our rear.
Evidently his men, unaccustomed to the ground,
finding themselves no match at running with
two swift-footed boys, had given up the chase
in despair, and the officer was probably forming
them into order before advancing to the village.
In the excitement of my flight I had thought
only of escaping from the Preventive men, and
of saving our poor fellows from the hands of
the dreaded press-gang, but a question which
my companion panted forth filled me suddenly
with unutterable horror and anguish.

“Did you kill Steve?” whispered Will, in
awestricken tones, and I fancied that he edged
a little away from me, as though shunning the
companionship of one with human blood upon
his hands.

“TI don’t know,” was my reply, and my voice
seemed strange to myself, for a great horror
seemed to choke me and strangle all utterance.

If for a moment I had suspected Will of
standing aloof from me I was speedily reassured,
for he seized me by the hand, whispering eagerly,
“They couldn’t know us, and none of our fellows
would peach if their lives depended on it. If
you shot that rascal Steve it served him right
for his treachery. Come along, Jack. Let’s
hurry to my father’s house. We must make a

B



18 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

clean breast of it to him, and, if the worst
comes, he can hide us.”

We ran on towards “The Toothsome Herring,”
which stood at the corner of the main street
leading downward to the quay, at the door of
which stood the tall figure of Bess Wilson.

“Come in, lads!” she cried, standing aside to
let us pass. “You youngsters have saved the
whole boiling of us.”

Then, when we were in the passage, she
noiselessly closed the door, which she bolted and
barred securely.



CHAPTER II
A CHANGE OF SEX

THE moment the door was closed the round form
of Joe Barrett, the landlord of “The Toothsome
Herring,” emerged from the side door which
communicated with the tap-room. In a few
hurried words his son and I put him in posses-
sion of the incidents which had _ transpired,
adding that the Preventive men would be
hammering at the door within ten minutes.

“Where are the pistols now, Will?” he asked
his son after a moment’s reflection.

“TI dropped mine behind the barrel,” said the lad.

“Mine fell on the floor of the cave directly I
had fired,” I added.

Joe gave a low whistle. “My name is on the
butt of each of them,” he murmured. “What is
‘to be done, Bess?”

“Tf Master Jack shot that villain Steve Croucher
there'll be a proper row, although it served the
sneaking loafer perfectly right. Will has done
nothing that the law can touch him for, but
Master Jack must be concealed at once.”

19



20 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“That's true enough, my girl; but where can
we hide him? These gauger chaps will search
every nook and cranny in the house, and it’s as
much as my license is worth if he’s found here.
Never fear that I am going to desert you, sir,”
che continued, turning to me. “Your pluck has
saved us all, and Joe Barrett will stand by you
to the last—and so, for the matter of that, will
every man in Silversands.”

“T have it,” cried quick-witted Bess. “We must
let Mr Strutwell into the secret, and in five minutes
he'll change Master Jack so that his own mother
would not know him. You get to bed at once,
Will, and don’t stir if all the gaugers in Norfolk
come into your room. Come upstairs with me,
sir,”” she continued, seizing me by the hand, and
hurrying me forward.

On reaching the first floor landing, she rapped
loudly at a door, and, receiving no reply, burst
abruptly into the room, dragging me after her.

“Wake up, Mr Strutwell!” she cried, vigorously
shaking the shoulder of a man sleeping in the
bed. “Wake up! Here's a play-acting job for
‘ee to do.”

A strange, lank figure sat upright in the bed
at this abrupt summons, blinking confusedly at
the lantern which Bess held close to his eyes,
whilst she poured into his ears the service roquited
of him.



A CHANGE OF SEX 21

“Thy will is mine, thou goddess of the tap,
cried this strange being, leaping from the bed
with such alacrity that the girl was compelled
to flee without another word.

“Wouldst thou be changed, thou varlet page,
And veil the honours of thy manly state ?
Then here’s the hand shall work the transformation.”

Whilst uttering this high-sounding phrase, my
queer companion was rummaging the contents of
a large chest, from the depths of which he dragged
forth sundry articles of feminine apparel, together
with a wig, adorned with long, flaxen ringlets,
which latter article he promptly clapped upon my
astonished head.

“Unrobe thee, Junius Brutus, doff thy dress
Ere yet the sleuth-hounds settle on thy track,”

and, leaving me to comply with this strangely-
worded command, he hurried from the room, and
I soon heard him in earnest conversation with
Bess Wilson. His absence, however, was of
_ Short duration, for before I had stripped off my
breeches and hose he was in the room again.

“Haste thee, Lucilius, for the hunt is up. :
Go, hide thy limbs beneath this virgin smock,”

and, with the latter words, he threw over my



22 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

shoulders a frilled night-gown, which completely
concealed my shirt and under-garments.

“Now, view thy image mirrored in this plane,”

he mouthed out, holding before me a looking-glass
which, to my great astonishment, reflected the
face of a pretty girl, instead of the impish features
which I had been accustomed to see there.

- He looked at me critically, adjusting the wig
and arranging the flaxen curls; and then burried
me into a room on the opposite side of the pas-
sage, in which stood a bed, and beside it a small
table with a lighted candle,—

“Get thee to rest. No dangers shall assail.
Thy peaceful slumber—couch thee well and sleep,”

with which words he lifted me up and literally
tossed me into the bed with a strength for
which I should never have given his attenuated
frame credit. Raising the pillows, he propped
me up in a half-sitting position, and again dis-
posed the ringlets to the best advantage over
my neck and shoulder; but my appearance was
evidently still unsatisfactory to his artistic eye,
for he suddenly quitted the room, murmuring,—

“Too much, in love, the sun hath kissed thy cheeks.”

In a minute he re-appeared carrying in his
hand a small box containing theatrical pigments



A CHANGE OF SEX 23

with which he proceeded to daub my face and
hands whilst muttering,—
“Tet concealment, like a worm i’ the bud,
Feed on her damask cheek. *Twill do, ’twill do.
Restored to life, Clarinda fair,

Shall prove to me a daughter dear,
And I a father fond.”

At the conclusion of this doggerel rhyme the
tragedian drew from the pocket of an old velvet
robe, in which he had enveloped his lean form, a
couple of medicine bottles and a wine-glass, all
of which he disposed conspicuously on the table
beside the bed, and then seated himself in an
arm-chair drawn near my pillow, from whence
he gazed at my recumbent form with an air of
exaggerated parental anxiety and affection which
would have drawn forth rapturous applause from
the audience at any theatre. This little comedy
would have amused me greatly at any other time,
but just then the deepest despair held full posses-
sion of my mind. Here was I—a boy but just
thirteen years of age—with hands already im-
brued in human blood, and compelled to evade
_ the fangs of the law by the contemptible method
of disguising myself. That I should be hanged
for the murder of Stephen Croucher seemed
certain, but, strange to say, this thought affected
me little. What filled my mind chiefly was the
misery which my hasty deed would bring upon



24 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

my parents. It was horrible to reflect upon, and
a groan burst from my lips which seemed to touch
the heart of the kindly actor, for he assumed his
natural expression whilst bending forward to
whisper words of comfort, and bid me summon
up all my courage for the approaching ordeal.

' “Speak no word!” he said impressively, and
with more coherence than usual. “Lie quite still,
with closed eyes. You are my sick daughter be-
side whose bedside I am watching.”

The last words of the speaker were sharp and
hurried, for the sound of many feet was now
audible approaching the inn, followed immediately
by a heavy hammering at the door.

“Who is there?” I heard Bess Wilson ask, after
a pause. “What good-for-nothing fellows are you
who come in the middle of the night to wake
honest folk out of their sleep? Be off with you,
you drunken swabs! There’s no more drink for
you to-night at ‘The Toothsome Herring.”

“Open at once, you jade—open, in the name
of the law, or we will break the door in!” cried
a stern voice.

“Law be hanged!” yelled back the undaunted
Bess. “If there was any law in the land, the
likes of you wouldn’t be about threatening an
honest: maid. Be off home with you!”

At this reply, a heavy blow was dealt upon the
panel, probably by the butt-end of a musket,



?

“TAKE THAT,’

SHE CRIED, DARTING SUDDENLY ACROSS THE





A CHANGE OF SEX 28

whereupon Bess hastily unbolted and unbarred the
door, which she flung open, and stepped forward to
the entrance, brandishing in both hands a heavy
broomstick.

“Who be you?” shouted the Amazon, whirling
her weapon round so effectually that the Pre-
ventive men recoiled. “Who be you? Ah!
gaugers, I see. Well, we don't want none of
your sort here, for all our liquor has paid duty.
Come at proper hours, and you shall be admitted,
but the first man that tries to cross this thres-
hold will get a broken sconce, or my name is
not Bess Wilson. Ah!” she continued, “who's
that fellow standing there with his face muffled
up? Is that you, Steve Croucher? You can’t
hide yourself from me, you pitiful cur, for I
know the cut of your ugly jib too well. So
you're alive, are you? It’s a pity Master Jack -
hadn’t scuttled your figure-head with a bullet,
and you dared to come a-courting and a-whisper-
ing soft words to Bess Wilson. Stick close to
the gaugers, you sneak, for if any of the Silver-
sands lads get hold of your ugly carcase, they'll
-keel-haul you under every boat in the fleet, and
dumbscrape the flesh off your ribs with barnacle
shells. Take that!” she cried, darting suddenly
across the road, and dealing Steve a swinging
blow over the head with her broom-stick. “Take
that as a parting present from Bess Wilson.”



26 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

A loud burst of laughter rose from the press-
gang who were drawn up close by, but had left
the work of gaining an entrance to the excise-
men. These men were already within the house,
having taken advantage of the guardian’s moment-
ary withdrawal to slip through the doorway.

On hearing the laugh, Bess dropped the weapon
which she had used with such good effect, and,
addressing the bluejackets, cried, “ You are honest
sailor-men and can’t help the dirty work you are
ordered to do; it’s different with them low gauger
chaps, who are always a-sneaking about, and a-
prying into other people’s business. Come into
the tap-room, Jads, and I'll call my master to
give you a tot of grog all round. Kindly step
into the parlour, sir,’ she added, curtseying to
the officer, who had stood aloof, watching the
whole scene with scarcely-suppressed amusement.
“There is nothing in ‘The Toothsome Herring’
of which we have any call to be ashamed, and
all that the house affords is at the command of
you and your men.”

“You are a fine specimen of a Norfolk lass,”
laughed the officer, chucking the girl under the
chin. “ Here’s something to get yourself a pair
of earrings with,” and he slipped a guinea into
her hand, whilst following her into the parlour.

Meanwhile, the gaugers, on their way upstairs,
had been stopped by Joe Barrett, who appeared in



A CHANGE OF SEX 24

a half-dressed condition as though just awakened
from a profound sleep.

“You are the man we are in search of,” cried
the Preventive Officer. “There’s been an attempt
at murder, and the deed was done with a pistol
bearing your name on the butt. How do you
explain this?”

“J know nothing about it,” replied Joe, stolidly.
“When I saw the pistols last they were hanging
up in my bedroom, and someone must have taken
them unknown to me. I can prove that I have
never left the house since noon yesterday, and,
besides, you’ve no right here without a warrant.
Show your authority for entering a man’s dwell-
ing in the middle of the night, and, if you have
not any, I'll take the law of you as trespassers
and housebreakers.”

“We intend searching the house,” replied the
Preventive Officer, doggedly. “If you didn’t fire
the shot, the man who did so is in your house.”

“Tf you proceed, it is at your own peril,” re-
turned Joe, still barring the way. “'There’s no
one in the house but a guest and his sick
daughter, and if you frighten the child to death,
you and your men must stand the consequences.”

“Stand aside! Come on, lads,” cried the head
gauger, pushing Joe roughly aside.

From my bed, I had heard every word of stout
Bess Wilson's harangue, and an inexpressible sense



28 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

of relief and thankfulness had filled my heart, on
learning that Steve Croucher was not only alive
but, apparently, none the worse for my pistol-
shot. Thank God, I was not a murderer, and
the proportion of my offence was reduced to
comparatively nothing.

The Preventive men were already at the half-
open door of the room, and Strutwell rose to pre-
vent their entrance, stretching forth his arm for-
biddingly.

“Enter not here, rude men!” he cried in
sepulchral tones. “When sickness sleepeth, wake
it not! Wouldst kill my daughter.by thy rash
intrusion?” and he pointed towards the bed in
which I lay propped up with half-closed eyes.

The gaugers were evidently thoroughly taken
aback at the spectacle presented to them, and
slunk out of the room with an air of shame and
disappointment, closely followed by the actor, who
cried after them,—_.

“ Begone, base varlets! Hasten ! quit the presence
Of this long-suffering and afflicted Queen.
Now sleep, my liege, the danger is o’erpast,”

he continued, closing the door behind the discom-
fited gang, and indulging in a series of grotesque
antics in the exuberance of his joy, the remem-
brance of which afterwards caused me to laugh
heartily.



A CHANGE OF SEX 29

Lights had been brought into the parlour, and
refreshment provided for the officer in command,
whose name I afterwards learnt was Captain Dixon,
commanding His Majesty’s frigate Mermaid. The
seamen were accommodated in the tap-room, for
all hope of capturing any of the Silversands fisher-
men, and pressing them for service afloat, came
to an end when Will and I had raised the alarm,
for the whole village might have been searched
for the next week without any able-bodied man
being found within its precincts. This was not
the first time, by many, that an attempt had been
made to surprise the fishermen, each of whom had
a hiding-place of his own, in which he would lie
quietly concealed until the press-gang had with-
drawn from the neighbourhood. Captain Dixon
was fully aware of this, and avoided irritating
the inhabitants by a fruitless search. But Mr
Nicholls, the head gauger, and his men were
too much enraged at the loss of the rich cargo
they had so confidently expected to capture, to
let matters pass as easily as the naval officer,
and the fact of my having fired at Stephen
Croucher afforded them a pretext for further
inquiries.

“Who is the nearest magistrate, and where does
he live?” asked Nicholls of Joe Barrett, when he
and his men had searched the house from attic to
basement without discovering anything more



30 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

formidable than the landlord’s son, Will, who
was snoring peacefully in his bed.

“The Rev. John Brandon, at the Rectory,”
replied Joe, who was anxious to get rid of these
unwelcome intruders at any cost. oo

“Can you guide us there?” asked the head
gauger.

‘Tl take ’ee to him,” cried stout Bess Wilson,
“and much good may your visit do ’ee. Come
along!” and she marched into the dark street,
followed by the gaugers.

Arrived at the Rectory, which stood about a
quarter of a mile from the village, Mr Nicholls
knocked at the door for a good half hour before
gaining the slightest response from any of the
inmates, for it was a singular fact that my father .
and all his establishment were invariably buried
in the deepest slumber on certain nights, when
the wind chanced to be in the south-east—a
breeze from that quarter appearing to exercise
a narcotic influence over all of them. But the
gaugers were persistent, and finally my father
appeared in his dressing-gown, admitting the
men to his study after learning their errand.

“You wish to obtain a warrant for the arrest
of some person unknown, accused of attempting
the life of one, Stephen Croucher,” remarked my
father. “Is the man much injured ?”

Nicholls hesitated. “His face is burnt with



A CHANGE OF SEX “ae

the powder, and he will carry the marks to his
grave,” he said at last.

“But he can walk, I suppose?”

“Yes, your worship,” assented the head gauger,
sullenly; for he saw that the magistrate was not
disposed to lend him more assistance than he
could help.

“Then why does not the aggrieved party come
and lay information in person? Has he deputed
you to do this for him ?” asked my father, sternly.

“No, your worship,” faltered the man.

“Then I refuse to grant a warrant on such
insufficient evidence.”

“Tt’s all a flam, your reverence,” broke in Bess.
“Steve Croucher is alive and well, except for a rap
on the head I gave him with my broomstick, to
teach him manners when next he comes a-courting
Bess Wilson. My master is a-coming to your
worship in the morning for a warrant against
these gauger chaps for housebreaking and rioting
in the streets of a peaceful village like Silver-
sands. No, I won’t guide you back. You can
find your own way, or, better still, get Steve
Croucher to show it to you,” cried Bess, de-
risively, as the discomfited Nicholls and his
followers filed out of the room.

“Its Master Jack, sir, as singed that rascal
Steve’s whiskers, and saved the whole village from
the gaugers and the press-gang,” she continued,



32 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

after following the excisemen to the front door
and closing it behind them. “The pistol was only
loaded with powder, and can only have spoilt the
fellow’s beauty—if he had any to lose,” she added,
with a snort of contempt.

“Do you mean my boy Jack?” asked my father,
in greatest surprise, “ Why, he is asleep in his
room upstairs.”

“Not a bit of it, sir. He and our Will went out
to see the cargo land—to see the moon a-shining,
I mean—and they overheard a plot to surprise our
poor fellows in bed, and press them into the navy.
Steve Croucher had turned informer, and tried to
nab Master Jack when his treachery was discovered,
but the lad—ah, he’s a game ’un, parson !—flashed
one of master’s pistols in his face, and the rascal
let him go. It’s all a flam, sir. There ain’t no
harm done to anyone; and Master Jack saved our
poor lads by giving the alarm. You won’t hear
any more of them gaugers, or of Steve Croucher,
either—you take Bess Wilson’s word for it, sir.”

“But where is the boy now?” asked my father,
anxiously.”

“In bed, at‘The Toothsome Herring,’ dressed
up as a girl by Mr Strutwell, and a pretty girl he
makes, parson ; I’d a-kissed and a-hugged him if
them gauger chaps had been out of the road. The
press-gang is at the house now—a nice, civil set,
as sailor-men always is. Their officer is in our



A CHANGE OF SEX 33

parlour, as smooth-spoken and gentle as a lamb.
I must get back, sir, for I’m wanted.

“Wait a moment and I will come with you,”
said my father, sorely perplexed at the girl’s
explanation, and determined to find out for him-
self how matters stood.

Not a sign of movement was visible in the
village as my father and Bess Wilson passed
through it, nor was a light to be seen at a single
casement, although every one in the place, except-
ing the youngest children, must have been wide
awake, But at the little inn there was much
movement, and the sound of revelry, for Captain
Dixon had determined that his men should quarter
themselves there until the day broke, and had
ordered them a supper of bread and cheese and
beer. As Bess Wilson had shrewdly prophesied,
Mr Nicholls and his gang had not returned to
“The Toothsome Herring,” but had departed crest-
fallen and dispirited to the place from whence
they came. After a few words with Joe Barrett,
my father was conducted upstairs and ushered
quietly into the room where I was now sleeping
profoundly, with the flaxen curls still hanging
over my face and shoulders. Having satisfied
himself of my safety—for he did not wake me,
and I only learnt later on that he had visited me
—he descended and desired his name to be sent
in to Captain Dixon.



34 AFLOAT WITH.NELSON

A very few minutes’ conversation convinced
my father that the captain of the frigate had
no greater liking for the Preventive men than
the fishermen of Silversands, and, with all a
sailor’s frankness, he avowed it openly.

“My object, Mr Brandon,” he said, “was to
get some good seamen for my ship, and as your
fellows have the character of being able to
outwit any press-gang, I was obliged to join
forees with the excisemen, who had learnt of
the intended run through information laid by
that rascal Croucher. Whilst the gaugers were
seizing the contraband goods, I hoped to secure
a score of your men, and so much are seamen
required just now, that I came in person instead
of entrusting the mission to one of my officers.
It is not a task that I like, and it is cruel work
for the poor fellows impressed. But His Majesty’s
ships must be manned, and if sufficient volun-
teers are not forthcoming, we must make up the
remainder by force.”

“Well, Captain Dixon, you are frank with
me, and I will be equally outspoken with you.
I heartily rejoice that your plan failed, and am
pleased to. think that my lad was the principal
agent in thwarting it.”

“Your lad?” repeated i Dixon, “I
don’t understand.”

“You are not the man to bear a grudge, I



A CHANGE OF SEX 35

can see,” said my father, looking into the officer’s
good-natured face, “so I may tell you at once
that it was my son Jack who overheard the
conversation between you and Stephen Croucher,
and managed to give the alarm after singeing
the rascal’s whiskers with a pistol, which I have
yet to learn how he became possessed of.”

The officer burst into ahearty laugh. “You
are all tarred with one brush at Silversands—
parson and all—and neither the excise nor the
press-gang can make anything of you.”

“I only do my duty by my parishioners when
I try to save them, and you do yours, sir, when
you try to impress them,” replied my father,
simply.

“True enough,” said the officer. “Your lad’s
presence in the cave has lost King George a
handful of good seamen, but it cannot be helped.
You do not wish any particulars to be known,
of course, and as you have shown confidence in
me, your secret shall be respected. But I cannot
answer for the Preventive men, who are very
angry at being baulked of their booty, and who
will sift the matter to the bottom. There were
two lads in the cave, and, if you will take my
advice, Mr Brandon, I should get them both
out of Silversands as soon as possible. If there
was a vacancy on board my frigate, I would
offer to take your son with me and put him



36 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

on the quarter-deck, for he must be a smart
lad with his head screwed on the right way,
but my complement of officers is filled up, and
I cannot do as I should have liked.”

My father thanked the kind-hearted sailor,
and after some further conversation, which need
not ‘be here recorded, they parted, never to meet
again, for we learnt in the following year, with
deep regret, that Captain Dixon had been killed
in action.



CHAPTER III
A WALK IN PETTICOATS

Ir was ten o'clock before I awoke and stared
about me with much surprise and a little alarm
at the strange apartment in which I found
myself, but the sight of Mr Strutwell sitting
at the window in the quaint attire which he
habitually wore, recalled like a flash every
incident of the midnight adventure, and after
staring wonderingly at my whitened hands,
I put them to my head, which I found to be
still enveloped in the flaxen ringlets.

On observing that I was awake, the actor
advanced to the bed and said pleasantly,—

“Weare awake! As serpent casts its skin,
So banished slumber flies our rested limbs.
Wouldst eat? Wouldst drink? Here,

Goddess of the spigot,
Purvey refreshments for this weakling girl.”

The last two lines were bawled down the stairs
at the full pitch of Strutwell’s voice, and although
it is abundantly certain that Bess Wilson under-

stood no single word of the jargon in which he
37



38 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

couched his demand, she had become sufficiently
accustomed to this strange -being to guess his
meaning, for when she appeared a tray was in
her hands, from which issued the appetising
odour of a rasher of bacon.

“What am I to do, Bess? Am I to get up?”
I eried, delighted to see the comely face of the
stalwart wench.

“Lawks, what a pretty girl you be! If I was
a lad, I’d-have a lass just the likes of you,” and
she kissed my cheek, which annoyed me, for,
boy-like, I resented all outward demonstrations
of affection.

“Fall to, and eat up your breakfast, then
Mr Strutwell will take ’ee up to the Rectory,
and you'll be dressed in girl’s clothes, so, Lord’s
sake! look prim and demure like a proper maid,
Master Jack. Parson was down here an hour
agone and left word what you was to do.”

“Why mayn’t I wear my own clothes?” I
asked angrily, for the idea of masquerading
through the streets of Silversands in feminine
attire was hateful to me.

“Night-hawks are abroad. Infests our streets and devastates the land,”

broke in Strutwell, striking an attitude and
scowling horribly, whilst pointing with his fore-
finger in the direction of the street beneath.



A WALK IN PETTICOATS 39

“That chap’s tongue runs like a_ cherry-
clapper, and his arms is always a-going like the
sails of a Lincolnshire windmill,” said out-
spoken Bess. “Don't ’ee take any notice of
him, dearie. What he means is that them
gauger chaps are likely to be about soon, and
if they sniff out that you slept here last night,
they’d smell a rat. Eat up your breakfast,
Master Jack, and then Mr Strutwell will help
‘ee to dress, and a winsome little maid you'll
make.”

I writhed at the last remark, but there was
no use in protesting, so I made the best of it
and fell to upon the rasher with considerable
vigour, after which I felt greatly refreshed, and
submitted to the actor’s ministrations with an
outward show of resignation.

In a short time he had completed his work,
and was, apparently, quite satisfied with the
transformation he had effected, for he led me
downstairs, and then, mounting me onthe table
in the parlour, bade me look at myself in the
mirror above the mantelpiece. There I beheld
a pale, girlish face framed in a mass of ringlets,
and the blush of shame which mounted to my
cheek at this sight would have been apparent
but for the mask of paint with which my face
was covered. As it was, in my hurry to get.
rid of the hateful spectacle, I leapt down from



- 40 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

the table with unbecoming agility, and begged
the actor to end the farce by taking me home
at once.

Poor Mr Strutwell! This was no comedy to
him, but a tragic proceeding which his cracked
brain invested with the deepest interest. Bess
would have called Will down to see me, but
this I stoutly refused to allow, knowing the
sense of the ridiculous possessed by that
youngster, and not feeling disposed to be a butt
for his jeers in the days to come. So, after
many solemn warnings from the actor as to my
gait and the deportment I should assume,
together with a final kiss from Bess Wilson, we
sallied forth, my hands, for the first time in my
life, being encased in gloves, the fingers of which
were considerably too long.

Even at the hour when I write this, my cheek
grows red at the memory of that walk. If poor
Strutwell had only gone on his way quietly I
should have walked beside him in the same
fashion, but the overpowering sense of responsi-
bility with which he imagined himself to be
invested led to a thousand grotesque vagaries
on his part. Luckily the street through which
we had to pass was almost deserted, for the men
were all in hiding, and the few faces at the
windows were those of women and children.
Apparently my companion considered this most



A WALK IN PETTICOATS 4I

natural circumstance as part of a deep-laid con-
spiracy, to frustrate which his utmost vigilance
must be brought into play. Scarcely had we
left the inn twenty yards behind us than he
suddenly stopped, ordered me in a tragic whisper,
which could be heard for fifty yards around, to
remain where I was, and then started off on
tip-toe with a finger laid mysteriously across his
lips, to peep stealthily round the corner of an
adjoining alley. Finding no hidden danger to
exist, he .stalked back with head erect, an an
expression of triumph on his face, to seize me by
the hand and lead me forward until his crazy
brain imagined another phantom peril, when the
same ceremony was gone through with variations
which it would be tedious to recount.
As we proceeded, he mouthed out,—

“Her watchful scouts had cleared the way,

’ No lurking foe in ambush lay,

The maid pursued her reckless flight

Past torrent, vale, and rock-crowned height.”
And tears of rage and mortification rose to my
eyes, as I heard bursts of ill-suppressed merriment
from the neighbouring windows, whilst the children
gathered on the doorsteps stared in speechless
amazement.

These ill-timed stoppages, besides drawing upon

us unnecessary attention, caused considerable delay,
and we had barely made our way half the length



42 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

of the street when the actor hurried back from one
of his reconnaissances, with a grave face and less
theatrical contortion than usual. He had evidently
seen something which caused him alarm, but this
did not prevent him from whispering to me,—
“ On, stricken maid, in search of rest
Find shelter on thy sire’s fond breast,

The hateful crew are close at hand,
Now must thy father by thee stand.

Feign weakness, and lean on me for support,” he
added hurriedly, in a low tone, quite unlike his
former rambling utterances, for the presence of
real danger had brought back the poor fellow’s
scattered senses.

He passed his left arm round my waist, whilst
I leant my head listlessly upon his shoulder, and
searcely had we adopted this position when Mr
Nicholls, followed by four gaugers, turned suddenly
out of a side street in front of us. Strutwell
played his part well, and we went slowly forward
as though unconscious of their presence. No
suspicion that I was other than I seemed entered
into the minds of the Preventive men, but their
leader thought fit to vent his ill-humour by dis-
paraging remarks and a coarse jest.

“Halt, men!” cried Nicholls. “Halt, and stand
aside whilst these vagabond mummers pass.”

I could feel the arm which encircled me twitch-
ing nervously at the insult, but with the skill of



A WALK IN PETTICOATS 43

his craft, Strutwell allowed no sign of resentment
to appear in his face, merely bending his head
over mine and whispering a few words of en-
couragement.

From the deserted appearance of the street, the
intruders evidently thought that they could do
much as they pleased in Silversands, particularly
with the press-gang in the village, for they re-
mained unaware that Captain Dixon and_ his
seamen had departed after an early breakfast.
This consciousness of security led to a fresh
insult, and, when we were abreast of the gaugers,
their leader took off his cap with mock humility,
saying to his men, “Uncover, lads! salute the
player and his whey-faced trull,” and he showed
them the example by making us a low, derisive
bow.

This was more than my companion could stand,
for he was of gentle birth although in straitened
circumstances, and I felt the muscles of his arm
harden as he suddenly lifted me over the thres-
hold of the nearest cottage, then with a bound he
was across the strect, his left arm shot out a clean
blow straight from the hip, followed by a dull,
smashing sound, and Mr Nicholls, the chief Pre-
ventive Officer, lay prostrate in the kennel,
engaged in staunching the blood which flowed
from his mouth and nose.

His followers rushed upon Strutwell, who, with ~



44 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

his back planted against a wall, fought like a lion
at bay; but he was not to continue the combat
long unaided, for assistance speedily came to
hand. For the last few hours a feeling of sup-
pressed wrath had burned in the breasts of the
Silversands fishing-folk. By the treachery of
Stephen Croucher and the consequent failure to
run the contraband cargo, the men had lost money
and the women the silks and other frippery which
formed their share on such occasions. In addition,
the men had narrowly escaped the clutches of
the press-gang—the worst fate which could befall
them—so it needed but a spark to cause a con-
flagration, and Strutwell’s prompt action had this
effect. It would have been better for the gaugers
to have stirred up a nest of hornets than to have
provoked the villagers in their present mood.
From every door in the street, stout-limbed fisher-
women hurried forth, armed with broomsticks,
mops and rolling-pins, and fell upon the Preventive
men, who would gladly have cut and run when
_ they found their shouts for help unanswered by
the seamen of the press-gang, but were quite un-
able to break through the hostile throng surround-
ing them. In less than a minute the struggle was
over. Strutwell had disposed of one of his foes,
two others lay on the ground beside their leader,
the fourth was a prisoner in the hands of a
huge woman, whose gruff voice showed that the



A WALK IN PETTICOATS 45

short petticoats were worn by one of the sterner
sex. This individual had seized the first weapon
which presented itself—a battered old frying-pan
—and had brought this homely utensil down
with such force on the skull of the gauger that
the bottom gave way, and the fellow found him-
self fitted with an iron collar, by the handle of
which his captor dragged him along triumphantly,
crying out, “Shoulder the others and come along
wi’ me, lasses. We'll give ’em a drink of salt
water at the pier-head, to wash the spirits out
of their constitooshuns. Then we'll tar and
feather ’em, and send ’em home, like the cowardly
chickens they be.” A roar of laughter followed
the suggestion. The fallen men were hoisted up
and borne away by the infuriated women, and
serious mischief would certainly have followed
had not my father appeared upon the scene, and
used his influence to divert his flock from the
pastime they meditated. He could not, however,
save them from a good ducking, after receiving
which the unhappy creatures were led triumph-
antly to the outskirts of the village and allowed
to depart, followed by many threats of what
would befall them if they again thought fit to
honour Silversands with a visit.

Whilst the ducking process was going on,
Strutwell took me from the cottage in which
he had placed me for safety, and we resumed



46 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

our walk to the Rectory, but this time at a
smart pace and without halting, although occa-
sionally my strange companion brandished his
fists, and I could hear him muttering to him-
self,—
“?*Zounds, show me what thou’lt do :
_ Woul’t weep? woul’t fight? woul’t fast? woul’t tear thy -
self ? :
drink up Esil ? eat a crocodile ?

Pll do’t.”

Poor Strutwell! the class to which he belonged
is now extinct as the dodo. Dicing and ex-
travagance had brought him down from a good
position to the réle of a strolling player. This
doubtless preyed upon his mind, and as will
be guessed he was already half insane at the
time of which I write. I heard afterwards
that he died in a madhouse, a raving lunatic;
but after he had handed me to my mother at
the Rectory I saw him no more, neither will
he re-appear again in these pages. So ended
my attempt to turn myself into a smuggler,
and I may here say that the action of the
Silversands women in maltreating gaugers brought
with it no serious result. The men themselves
were little disposed to own that they had been
beaten by a parcel of petticoats, and, beyond
the ducking and a few bruises, they were little
the worse for the encounter. Mr Nicholls had



A WALK IN PETTICOATS 47

overstepped his duty in searching “The Tooth-
some Herring” without a warrant, and although
the actor had handled him pretty severely, he
felt that discretion was the better part of valour,
and let the matter drop. This resolve, however,
was not known at the time, and my parents, after
anxious consultation, determined to follow Captain
Dixon’s advice, and get me away, for some time
at least, from the scene of my escapade.

It is difficult to say whether I was regarded
at the Rectory as a hero or a scapegrace. The
servants, who all belonged to the village, evidently
looked upon me in the former light, and I imagine
that my mother was of the same way of thinking,
but my father, whatever his private opinion may
have been, manifested his sense of my conduct
by giving me a sound thrashing the moment he
returned home; in fact, I had hardly resumed
the dignity of a boy’s apparel before I was
compelled to let down my small-clothes for this
ignominious purpose. I need say no more on this
painful subject. At that time the rod was the
order of the day, and I daresay a sound whipping
did me a great deal of good.



CHAPTER IV
SIR HORATIO NELSON

Durine the afternoon, I observed that my small
wardrobe was being put in order and generally
overhauled by the maids. This at once aroused
my suspicions, and made me sure that my early
removal was meditated. Neither the girls to
whom I applied for information, nor my little
sister Emily, could tell me anything, so I was
driven at length to take my courage in both
hands, as the French say, and apply to my
mother.

“You are to go to school at Burnham. Your
father will drive you there to-morrow.”

“May I run down and tell Will Barrett?” I
asked, when I had recovered composure, for I
must confess that my courage sank at the first
thought of leaving home, since, up to this time,
my father had been my only tutor.

My mother hesitated, but ultimately gave me
leave, and I ran out of the house at top speed
on my way to the village, but my progress was

even more halting than it had been in the fore-
48



SIR HORATIO NELSON 49

noon, for the fisher-folk insisted that I had saved
them from the terrors of the press-gang, and I
had to submit to many kindly greetings and
much praise, which would have pleased my
vanity had it not been that all the women and
girls lifted me up and kissed me, and to be
treated in this familiar fashion in the open street
did not at all accord with my idea of the respect
due to a hero.

I found that Will Barrett had undergone the
same discipline at the hands of his parent as
myself, so neither had the advantage of the other
on this score, and we were able to mingle our
sorrows on this tender subject.

“T shall run away and go to sea,” said Will
“Captain Dixon’s frigate is at Harwich, and wants
men.”

“But you are not a man,” I said innocently .
“you are only a little boy.”

“Tm man enough to thrash you,” cried Will,
indignantly.

“Six of you might, but no two of you could,”
I retorted angrily, using the words which I had
heard dropped during a quarrel between two
fishermen on the quay.

“We'll see,” said Will, and at it we went,
until Bess Wilson, attracted by the scufiling,
rushed up and cuffed both our heads soundly.

There was nothing unusual in this sudden

D



50 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

quarrel; good friends as we were, I do not think
that we were ever two hours in each other’s
company without a fight. The prize-ring was in
the height of its glory in those days, and the
art of self-defence was considered a necessary
accomplishment for every Englishman, whatever
his degree. We youngsters followed suit, of
course, but no animosity was ever borne when
the matter had been fairly settled, and victory ©
had declared itself for one side or the other. It
is the fashion now to call this rough-and-ready
method of settling disputes brutal. With this
I cannot agree. A good fight showed what lads
were made of, whilst it taught them to be manly
and self-reliant.

Forced by Bess’s strong arm to keep the peace,
we had no alternative but to relapse into con-
fidences.

“Tf you run away to sea, I'll go .too,” I said
doggedly.

“But you are going to school at Burnham.”

“JT don’t care; I can run away from Burnham
as easily as from the Rectory here,” I replied
undauntedly. “Or we could go together, if you
will wait until my holidays come.” So it was
agreed, and we parted.

That evening I mixed my father’s grog for the
last time for many a long day, and I observed
that the brandy in the decanter had not been



SIR HORATIO NELSON 51

replenished, although the wind continued to sit
in the south-east. Poor little Emily cried bitterly
when we parted for the night, for my father
and I were to make an early start, and I should
not see her in the morning. Under the impression
that bold smugglers were never known to weep,
I restrained my tears until I reached my bed-
room, then, with no one to look on, they flowed
unrestrainedly.

When I descended at daybreak, both my parents
were already at breakfast, and the greeting which
I received from each was as affectionate as ever.
If I had done wrong I had been punished, and
there it ended in a manner which, to my mind,
is a great deal better than brooding over little
peccadilloes and keeping up an estrangement for
several days.

The mare and gig were brought round to the
front door, and I mounted, after having been
kissed by my mother and all the maids. When
was this hateful kissing to end? I wondered. My
little box was stowed away, my father took the
reins, and we were off.

“Give my kind regards to Mr Nelson, John,”
cried out my mother; “and compliment him on
his son’s achievements.”

The mare stepped out well, and we bowled
rapidly over the long, level road. I remember
that we passed several sheets of half-frozen water,



52 ' AFLOAT WITH NELSON

on which a large number of wildfowl were con-
gregated, whilst a strange cry overhead caused me
to look up, when I saw a great flight of swans
winging their way inland with outstretched necks
and a loud, rustling sound as their pinions beat
the air.

By one o’clock we had reached the little village
of Burnham Thorpe, and pulled the mare up at
the door of the Rectory, an unpretentious house,
little more than a large cottage in size.

Before his appointment to the living of Silver-
sands, my father had been curate at the little
town of Burnham, and had often assisted the
Rector of Burnham Thorpe in his duties, for Mr
Nelson’s health was far from good. In this
manner an intimacy amounting to friendship
had sprung up between the two families, more
particularly with Mr Nelson’s sons, William and
Horatio. The latter had been then a captain in
the Royal Navy, an obscure and unknown ofiicer,
waiting for employment afloat; now he was
Rear-Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson, K.C.B., the most
promising officer in His Majesty’s Service, the hero
‘of St Vincent and Teneriffe, with a name known
throughout the length and breadth of England.

“What good wind blows you here, John Bran-
don?” asked the old rector, when we had been
ushered into his study and were warming our-
selves at the fire.



SIR HORATIO NELSON 53

“T am taking this youngster to school at Burn-
ham,” replied my father, “and seized the oppor-
tunity of calling to see you and to congratulate
you upon Sir Horatio’s brilliant achievements.”

As he spoke the door opened, and a slight
figure in undress naval uniform advanced into the
room, holding out his left hand—the right sleeve
was empty and looped up to the breast of the
coat — saying, “Always plain Horatio with you,
John Brandon.”

My father grasped the extended hand in speech-
less astonishment. “I knew you were in Eng-
land,” he said at last, “but never dreamt it
would be my good luck to find you here. The
papers said that you were at Bath recovering
from your wound. Let me first offer you my
heartiest congratulations, and then inquire after
your health.”

My father’s speech at the beginning was falter-
ing and awkward, for he was evidently em-
barrassed at this unexpected meeting with one
who, although an old friend, had no claim to
greatness in the days of their intimacy. The
parson was four years the senior of the sailor
in age, but whilst one had remained an obscure
country clergyman, the other had leapt at a
bound into fame and position. The Admiral’s
quick sympathy understood the situation at a
glance, and, with the marvellous tact which never



54 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

failed him, he put an end to my father’s awkward-
ness by advancing to me and laying his hand
kindly upon my head.

“Surely you don’t forget your shooting-com-
panion, little Jack?” he asked, sinking into an
arm-chair and drawing me between his knees.
“Do you remember how you crawled out on
that mud-flat to bring back the ducks I had
shot when the old retriever turned sulky and
went home? I shall never handle a gun again
now, for the Dons have robbed me of a fin,” and
he shook his empty sleeve laughingly.

I stared up into the clean-shaven, kindly face
in mute admiration, and with a thrill of pride
and delight that the great sailor should not only
remember me, but even the little circumstance
that had happened when I last saw him, four
years before. What I answered, or what I did,
I cannot recall. I do not think that I spoke
at all, but stood with my eyes riveted on the
man who was the hero of our Silversands fisher-
men, and of whose daring genius they were
never tired of talking. Perhaps this speech-
less tribute was the best form in which my
admiration could have shown itself, but sud-
denly there rushed across my mind a story
which I had heard upon the quay at Silver-
sands, and I asked impulsively, “What did you
do with the bundle of swords?”



SIR HORATIO NELSON 55

“Do you mean the swords I took on board the
San Josef?” laughed the Admiral, “Has that
story reached you here in quiet Norfolk, John?”
he added, turning to my father. “Well, Jack, I
think I can gratify your curiosity, for I have
one of them here with me now.”

“May I see it?” I cried, with all a boy’s
pertinacious eagerness.

Nelson left the room, to return immediately with
the coveted weapon, which he laid in my hands
saying, “That sword belonged to a brave man
youngster, who died for his king and his
country,” and there was a touch of sadness in
his voice as he spoke. “I have brought it here
to present it to the city of Norwich. It was
worn by the Spanish Admiral.”

-“You will dine with us, of course,” broke in Mr
Nelson. “Dinner will be ready in a few minutes.”

“Then we can have a yarn over the old days,
John,” said the Admiral, “and Jack and I can
renew our friendship.”

Isaw my father lay his hand upon the sailor's
shoulder, and heard him whisper, “Greatness has
not spoiled you, Horatio. I thank God that I
have such a friend, and that England has such
an Admiral.”

>

After dinner my father related my midnight
adventure at Silversands, and the precautions
which he was compelled to take by withdrawing



56 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

me from the place until all fear of inquiry had
died away. The Admiral seemed to take a deep
interest in the whole of that night’s proceedings,
applying to me for information, and asking such
questions as showed that the subject was occupy-
ing his entire attention.

“Who is this fellow, Stephen Croucher?” he
asked.

“His is a curious story,” replied my father.
“Stephen is the gon of an old man now living
in my parish, who was once a University man
and a Fellow of his College. He entertained queer
notions, was lax in his morality, and took to the
bottle, finally losing his position by marrying im-
properly and much beneath him. He and his wife
came to live near Silversands, and Stephen was
their only child. Poor old Croucher sank lower
and lower under the woman’s harsh rule and
sharp tongue, until he became a_ habitual
drunkard. About ten years ago she died. Then
matters mended a little, and the old student found
time to give young Steve a good education. He
proved a clever lad, endowed with a marvellous
gift for the acquirement of languages, and I am
told that he speaks both French and Italian per-
fectly. This acquirement caused him to be sought
out by some of our smugglers as a means of
communication with the French, and I know the
young fellow went to St Malo and became quite



SIR HORATIO NELSON gy

as much at home under the tricolour as under
the Union Jack. He showed a disposition to run
crooked from his earliest boyhood, taking after
his mother, and resembling his father in nothing
but his aptitude for learning. He is a good and
daring seaman, and in one particular he differs
entirely from his father—he never drinks. This
extraordinary self-restraint in a man of his
position has secured him great ascendency over
his companions; but all that is gone now, for he
will never dare to show his face in Silversands
again to his dying day, and if any of our men
fall across him there will be bad work. I pity
the old man, who clung to his unworthy son and
will miss him terribly. For my part, as parson
of the parish, I am remarkably glad that such a
young scoundrel is out of it.”

“Yes, John, I don’t think that men who give
information to the Excise are likely to be in much
favour at Silversands,” said the Admiral, glancing
at my father with an amused twinkle in his eye;
“but come out and take a turn with me in the
garden.”

.They arose and went out, leaving me alone
with the old rector, who took no notice of me
whatever, being apparently occupied with his
own thoughts. He was a gentle, narrow-minded,
well-meaning country parson of the old style, and
I well remember as a child what it meant to sit



58 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

through one of his sermons, which commonly
occupied from sixty to eighty minutes. His figure
was frail and his health feeble, and both these
qualities he transmitted to his son ; but by no other
means could the relationship in which they stood
to one another be guessed at. The sympathy,
vivacity, and genius, for which the great sailor
was remarkable, must have come to him from
his mother.

Presently the Admiral and my father returned,
and I observed a look of great satisfaction on the
face of the latter. Sir Horatio called me to him
and said abruptly, “Well, Jack, how should you
like to thrash the Dons, and take a sword such as
I showed you before dinner? Should you like it
better than going to school?”

“With you, sir?” I asked, trembling with eager-
ness. “May I go to sea with you? Oh! I should
love it.”

“John,” he asked, turning to my father, “are
you prepared to spare this youngster? If you
and his mother like to trust him to me, I’ll do my
best to forward his interest and to turn him out a
good sailor and a good officer, and I will see that
he does not forget the precepts he learnt under
his father’s roof, as I have ever remembered those
taught me in this very room,” and he looked
affectionately at the old rector as he spoke.

I now know that Sir Horatio had made this



SIR HORATIO NELSON 59

most generous offer to my father when he drew
him aside into the garden, but had bargained that
his friend’s parental authority was not to be em-
ployed in forming my decision. I am an old man
now, and have passed through a career as chequered
and hard as falls to the lot of most sailors, yet the
memory of the moment when that brilliant offer
for protection and patronage was made to me, a
youngster of twelve years old, by the greatest
sailor the world has ever known, will never be
obliterated from my mind. The tears of joy that —
sprang up into my eyes nearly blinded me, and
all speech was choked by the intensity of my
emotion. There could be no mistake as to my
wishes, and I think that the generous-hearted
Admiral was pleased at my attitude, for he con-
tinued, “That is agreed then, Jack. You shall
return with me to London, where your outfit shall
be got ready, and then you shall go down to my
flag-ship, the Vanguard, at Portsmouth. Why,
what is it now?” he added, for he saw that I was
struggling with some request.

“Please, sir, may Will Barrett come too?” I
faltered, more than half afraid of my own audacity,
but mindful of my promise to my friend.

My father, I saw, was annoyed at my request,
but the Admiral put us at once at our ease by
laughing, “You are quite right to stick to your
chum, youngster. If your young friend’s father



60 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

likes to send the boy to Portsmouth, he shall be
received on board, and it will depend on his own
good conduct whether he ever exchanges the
forecastle for the quarter-deck.

Sir Horatio was returning to town in three
days’ time, and it was arranged that I should be
an inmate of the Rectory until his departure.
My father also accepted Mr Nelson’s invitation
to remain there until the following morning, when
his duties would necessitate his return to Silver-
sands. I was permitted to stay with my elders
during the evening, and listened, open-mouthed, to
the answers given by the Admiral to my father’s
questions concerning his recent exploits. As re-
gards his own personal share in the victory of
Cape St Vincent the great sailor was modestly
silent, but he described the action in terms which
even I could understand, more particularly as he
illustrated the positions of the opposing fleets,
and of the several ships, by placing fragments of
biscuit on the table; and I hold it as one of the
greatest events in my life to have been permitted
to hear the account of the fight from the lips of
the man who contributed so largely towards that
glorious victory.

“We had been cruising for some time off the
coast of Spain in the hope of falling in with the
Spanish fleet, which we knew would make an
attempt to gain Cadiz. Our force consisted of



SIR HORATIO.NELSON 61

fifteen ships of the line—six of which were three-
deckers —with several frigates and small craft. I
flew my broad pennant on board the Captain,
with as fine a crew as ever trod a plank, and also
a small detachment of the 69th Regiment. It was
weary work waiting for the Dons, and all hands
prayed for their speedy appearance.

“A thick fog hung over the sea on the morning
of the 14th February—St Valentine’s Day—and
we could only tell the positions of the ships
nearest to us by the sound of their bells struck
at intervals. About ten o’clock the fog lifted,
and there, within a few leagues of us, to the
southward, lay the Spanish fleet in two divisions,
numbering twenty-seven sail of the line, most of
them far superior in size to any ships in our
fleet.

“It would have done your heart good, John,
to have heard the cheer that rose from our fellows
as they caught’ sight of these great lumbering
arks, rolling from side to side in the Atlantic
swell, and huddled together so confusedly that
the two divisions were almost one, and the cheers
were redoubled when, from the Victory, carrying
Sir John Jervis’s flag, the signal was given to form
line ahead—that is to say, in single file, one ship’
following immediately in the wake of the other,”
and he arranged a row of biscuits on the table
to make the formation clear to us.



62 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“The wind was from the westward and so fair
for the Dons to run into Cadiz. Our ships fell
into line according to the position they occupied
when the signal was made, and thus it chanced
that the Captain was the last but two, whilst
the Culloden, under my dear friend Troubridge,
took the lead.

“As we bore down upon them, the Spaniards
made a clumsy attempt to form line of battle,
but with very ill effect, and the Culloden was
down upon the leading ships of their lee division
—if such it can be called—before they were any-
thing like in order. The enemy opened fire upon
Troubridge as he approached, and it seemed to
us as if he would fall on board of the nearest
Spaniard, so closely did he approach her, but
when a collision seemed inevitable he put his
helm down, and as the Culloden shot up into
the wind, she gave the Don the whole of her
double-shotted larboard broadside and then stood
to the northward. It was a pretty sight to
witness, but there are sure to be hard knocks
wherever Troubridge finds himself.

“The ship following the Culloden stood on and
delivered her broadside in a similar manner. Then
the Victory signalled that the line was to tack
in succession, that is to say that each ship was
to stand on until she had reached the point where
the Culloden went about and then follow her



SIR HORATIO NELSON 63

example, by which means, as you will easily
understand, our liné would remain unbroken.

“The Dons evidently saw Sir John’s intention,
and also that this manceuvre, if persevered in, would
afford them an opportunity of passing astern of
the last ship of our line and making a run of it
with a fair wind for Cadiz, and this they at once
attempted todo. I saw that they would slip out
of our clutches unless something was done imme-
diately to stop them; indeed, the leading Spaniards
were already on the lee quarter of the Excellent,
the last ship in our line. There was no time to
signal and ask for permission, so, acting on my
own responsibility, I wore the Captain out of the
line and headed her straight for the Spanish
Admiral’s flagship, a huge four-decker carrying
one hundred and thirty-six guns, named the
Santissima Trinidad.

“Then we fell to work, hammer and tongs, and
at one time I had the fire of nine ships upon
me, but I cared nothing about what happened
to me so that I stopped their escape; and
Troubridge in the jolly old Culloden soon came
to. my assistance, for Sir John had recognised
my object and had signalled the Excellent and
other ships to support me. I can tell you, John,
that it was a brave sight to watch the way our
fellows handled their guns. The huge four-decker
towered high above the little Captain, and every



64 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

shot told against the ribs of the Don, which, after
a while, hoisted an English ensign in token of
surrender, but we were too busy to take posses-
sion of her.

“You must not suppose that the Captain had
come off scathless, for I had lost a great number
in killed and wounded, my masts, rigging and
running gear were cut to pieces, and the ship
had become almost unmanageable. I had been
pounding into a two-decker called the San Nicolas
and into a three-decker called the San Josef, after
we had made a good account of the Santissima
Trinidad, and observing that these two ships had
dropped alongside of each other, I thought it best
to join them as the Captain was quite unfit to
chase; so I put my helm down and my bow fell
aboard of the two-decker’s quarter, the Captain’s
spritsail-yard hooking into the lanyards of her
mizzen rigging, and thus we all three lay in a
heap, grinding together in the long Atlantic swell.

“Going forward to the forecastle, I gave the
order to board, and a number of our fellows and
many of the soldiers scrambled into the mizzen
chains and quarter-gallery, a feat requiring much
agility, as the ships rolled heavily and the din
below was infernal, for our main and lower deck:
guns were slamming away all the time, and the
smoke was blinding. A corporal of the 69th
Regiment broke open a quarter-gallery window



SIR HORATIO NELSON 65

with the butt end of his musket. He was an
Irishman, and I heard him say, ‘It’s knocking at
your door I am, Father Nicolas. Where’s your
manners, ye ould Spanish haythen ?’ ;

“T got into the cabin through the opening, and
we found the doors locked, but the soldiers beat
down the bulkheads, and we rushed on to the
quarter-deck, where several pistols were fired at
us by the Spanish officers, though I don’t think
they intended to hit us. Many of our fellows
had climbed over the bulwarks on to the poop,
and one of them shot down the Spanish brigadier,
whereupon the remainder surrendered, whilst
my friend, Captain Berry, hauled down the
prize’s colours, and a strong party of my men
rushed below to drive the Spanish crew under
hatches.

“Meanwhile a brisk fire of musketry was opened
upon us from the San Josef, and there was only
one way of silencing this, so I called for more
men from the Captain, and we prepared to board
the three-decker; but before we could do so, a
Spanish officer looked over the side and said
that she surrendered. Our fellows swarmed over
her side, and with the help of a dozen friendly
arms I was soon amongst them, and then it
was, whilst standing on the quarter-deck of the
second prize, that the Spanish officers gave me
their swords, which I handed to one of my

E



66 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

bargemen, William Fearney, as I received them;
and this man, who seemed to think the whole
thing an excellent joke, tucked them under his
arm like a bundle of firewood. The Spanish
Admiral was below, dying of his wounds, but
he sent his sword up to me, and that is the
weapon which your youngster, Jaek, had in his
hands just now, and I saved it for presentation
to the city of Norwich. It was a novel position,
and I do not think that anyone ever before
boarded an enemy’s three-decker by making use
of a captured two-decker as a bridge. It tickled
the fancy of my men immensely; indeed, they
regarded the whole day’s work as a bit of
skylarking, although it was rather grim fun to
the poor fellows lying wounded in the Captain’s
cockpit, and to those who lost the number of their
mess altogether.”

“And you came out of it unhurt?” asked my
father.

“I received a blow on my side, but in what
manner I could never tell,” said Sir Horatio.
“And with the capture of the San Josef my
personal share in the action was over. As the
other British ships passed the Captain and her
prizes, still lying in a heap, they cheered us
heartily, and I was glad of it, for my men had
done their work nobly, and deserved this recog-
nition; but it is a mistake to think that the



SIR HORATIO NELSON 67

Captain took the two Spaniards single-handed,
for both of them were virtually knocked out of
time when we boarded. Our chief merit lay in
stopping the escape of the bulk of the Spanish
fleet into Cadiz, and holding them in play until
the English ships could come up. As it was,
several of the disabled Dons managed to crawl
into port, amongst them the huge Santissima
Trinidad, which had struck, but in the hurry
had not been taken possession of.

“Politically, it was a great victory, for it
prevented the junction of the Spanish fleet with
the French; but although the enemy’s ships were
of great size, and they were numerically superior
to us, their crews were inexperienced and the
discipline very lax.”

“I understand the action perfectly now,” said
my father, “and can appreciate the great share
you had in bringing it to a final issue, although
I know that you'll not allow me to pay you
compliments to your face.”

“But you must hear about Teneriffe as well,
John,” and a shade passed over the Admiral’s face
as, unconsciously, he glanced down at his empty
sleeve. “The attempt to capture Santa Cruz,”
he said, “was a failure, but I shall always hold
that I was fully justified in making the attack.
Wind, weather, and the darkness of the night,
all combined to make our task as difficult as



68 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

possible. If we were unsuccessful, the enter-
prise cast no reflection on British courage. The
Dons claim it as a victory, I suppose, although
gallant Troubridge brought his men off with
all the honours of war. They gave me some-
thing to remember that night by to the last
hour of my life.”

“Does the wounded arm still cause you great
pain?” asked my father, forbearing to seek
further information regarding the Santa Cruz
disaster.

“Not now,” replied the Admiral. “Up to a
couple of months ago the agony was at times
excruciating, for the nerve had been tied in with
an artery, and it was feared that a second
amputation would be necessary, but the nerve
freed itself and then the pain ceased. But I
have talked quite enough about myself, John,
and it is time our young friend Jack went to
roost.”

I went to bed but not to sleep, for the glamour
of the great sailor's personality had entered into
my soul, and, without being able to express it
to myself, I could understand already why both
officers and men would follow to the death such
a leader as Horatio Nelson.



CHAPTER V

H.M.S. VANGUARD

I AWOKE in the morning with a joyous feeling
at my heart, but this was soon damped when,
after breakfast, the mare and gig were brought
round to the front door to bear my father back
to Silversands. It is all very well to say that
as a matter of course the young birds must leave
the nest when they are fully feathered and pre-
pared to take care of themselves. To embrace a
career and launch forth into the ocean of life is
very fascinating in the abstract, but when it
comes to actually saying good-bye, and breaking
with all the old associations, it becomes a different
matter, more particularly for a youngster just
thirteen years of age; so when my father em-
braced me, and, in a choking voice, prayed God
to bless me and keep me firm in the duty that
I owed to my king and my country, I fell
a-sobbing as if my heart would break, and for
one moment I think I should have been glad to
creep into the gig beside the parent who had

ever been so indulgent to me and be carried back
69



70 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

to my mother and the Rectory I loved so well.
Even the purse containing five golden guineas
which was slipped into my hand failed to console
me, and I wandered to the garden gate from
whence I watched the retreating gig until it was
lost to sight in the distance. Then I felt a hand
on my shoulder, and the Admiral’s kindly voice
said, “This is what we all of us must go through,
Jack. Don’t mind your tears, my lad; no brave
man need be ashamed of shedding them when he
leaves his home and those he loves.”

Three days later Sir Horatio left Burnham
Thorpe for London. I was not witness to the
leave-taking between the old rector and his son,
but when we entered the post-chaise the latter
was visibly affected, and spoke no word during
the whole of the first stage. My own grief had
already passed away, to be succeeded by a joyful
expectation of all the good things that the future
held in store for me, and the rapid motion of
the vehicle, with the new objects that met my
eye, filled me with wild excitement. Hitherto
I had never been in any conveyance more im-
posing than my father’s gig, and to be whirled
over the frosty road by a pair of quick-stepping
horses, with a smart post-boy to guide them, was
in itself a delight. At each inn where we changed
horses, or stopped for refreshment, there occurred
a scene which filled me with pride. The Admiral



-H.M.S. VANGUARD qt

had given orders that his name was not to be
made known, but the precaution was useless, for
that slight figure with the looped-up sleeve could
never be disguised. People thronged the carriage
or besieged the portals of the inn, and, when the
hero appeared, loud huzzas were raised; mothers
lifted their children aloft that they might see the
great sailor, and many a heartfelt “God bless you,
sir!” arose from the crowd. The Admiral received
this spontaneous recognition of his popularity with
kindly smiles and a gentle dignity which never
deserted him, and I think the enthusiasm of the
people gratified him, for it showed that they
appreciated the great share he bore in the victory
off Cape St Vincent which the Government and
Admiralty had only ungraciously and grudgingly
acknowledged. This, of course, I only learnt
later on, for I never heard one murmur pass the
lips of the Admiral himself, although he must
have felt deeply the slight conveyed by the
omission of his name in the despatches sent home
after the eventful 14th February. It has now
been ascertained that professional jealousy led to
_ this extraordinary and unwarrantable oversight.
On’ reaching London, we drove straight to
Conduit Street, where Lady Nelson had secured
apartments, and was herself awaiting the arrival
of her husband. Her ladyship was pleased to
receive me very graciously, and behaved towards



72 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

me with a motherly kindness which quite won
my heart. She was good enough to superintend
the purchase of my outfit, and before I had
been two days in the house she had drawn
from me all the particulars of my smuggling
escapade, together with such fragments of poor
Strutwell’s disjointed utterances.as I could
remember. These seemed to amuse her vastly,
and whenever she wished to make merry at my
expense she would call me “Clarinda,” and bid
me come and be kissed—an offer which invariably
led to some petulant reply on my part, and an
assertion of my own dignity, which must have
been very grotesque in such a little jackanapes.

These are small things to chronicle, but it
would be sheer ingratitude on my part were I
to leave unmentioned this sweet woman who
was my protector and benefactress in those
early days, and whose affectionate friendship
has been of life-long duration.

Under her direction I was taken to see some of
the sights of London—notably St Paul’s Cathe-
dral, the Royal Exchange, with its menagerie
of wild beasts, the great Monument, and the
Tower of London.

When I visited the latter place, I wore, for
the first time, my midshipman’s uniform, and
my delight when the Beef-eaters and sentries
accorded me a salute may be imagined, and



H.M.S. VANGUARD 73

certainly served to impress the whole scene
vividly on my memory.

My outfit being completed, there was nothing
further to detain me in London, so the Admiral
procured me a passage to Portsmouth in a
Government tender which lay in the stream off
Tower Hill, and with my arrival on board
this abominable little craft my sea-life may
be said to have fairly begun.

It took the Phantom eleven days to make
the passage to Portsmouth, for she sailed very
slowly, was deeply laden, and a strong westerly
gale was blowing, which kept us at anchor in
the Downs for nearly a week. The little vessel
was crowded with supernumeraries, many of
them pressed men, who sought occasion to desert
on the first opportunity, so that the master of
the tender anchored her as far from the shore
as possible, which caused the. vessel to pitch
and roll horribly in the short, chopping sea.
The accommodation was quite insufficient for the
number of hands she had on board, and during
the whole time that I was cooped up in this
miserable little craft’ I never once took my
clothes off, and scarcely got a decent meal. It
was a rough experience for a youngster fresh
from the comforts of home, and rubbed much
of the gilt off the gingerbread of a sailor's life,
whilst taking the gloss out of my brand-new



74 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

uniform; but it had the good effect of curing
me of sea-sickness—though that malady visited
me lightly, as I was accustomed to knocking
about in our fishing-boats at Silversands.

When the Phantom ultimately reached Ports-
mouth, I placed myself and my chest in a
waterman’s wherry, and ordered the man _ to
pull me to the Vanguard.

“Ah! she’s alongside the dockyard, and her
crew are hulked on board the Centurion. I
had better take your traps there, sir.”

To the old hulk we accordingly went, and
I mounted her side with some trepidation, for
it was the first time that I had ever set foot
on board a King’s ship.

“Hullo, youngster! Come on board to join?”
cried a lieutenant, advancing towards me as I
stood confused and irresolute. “Well, go below
until your chest is struck down, and then go to
the Vanguard in the first boat that leaves the
hulk. You look half-starved,” he added kindly;
“tell the gun-room steward to give you some
grub before you come on deck. Another nut
for the Devil to crack,’ I heard him say to an
officer who was standing by as I descended
the hatchway.

I found the gun-room deserted, for all hands
were on board the Vanguard; but a cabin-boy
ferreted out some cold meat and biscuit, which



H.M.S. VANGUARD 75

I had difficulty in swallowing, for all around
me seemed so strange and lonely. I had expected
to meet youngsters of my own age, to be ques-
tioned, perhaps to be bullied, and the desolation
of this empty place weighed heavily on my
spirits; so, having made a pretence of eating,
I went on deck where the officer to whom I
had first spoken ordered me into a boat which
was then going to the ship.

The Vanguard was lying with her larboard
side alongside the Camber, with her lower masts
and bowsprit already in, and the men were turn-
ing in the dead-eyes of the lower rigging as we
came alongside. A deafening noise struck my
ears as I stepped over the gangway, for the
caulkers were at work on the upper deck, and
the din they made with their mallets and irons
was deafening. In a timid voice I asked one
of the seamen for the first lieutenant, and was
pointed out an officer standing on the poop and
bawling out orders to a party of men on the
wharf. Picking my way through the caulkers
I mounted the poop ladder and stood beside this
gentleman for fully ten minutes before he seemed
to be aware of my presence, during the whole
of which time he was issuing orders and giving
directions in a stentorian voice, and employing a
nautical jargon quite incomprehensible to me at
that time.



76 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“Who are you?” he said suddenly, looking down
at me. “Oh! you are young Brandon, are you?”
he continued, when I had meekly given my name.
“Where have you been all this time, sir? The
captain had a letter from the Admiral this morning
inquiring after you. The Service is going to the
devil when every stray youngster is to be looked
after as if he was the Archbishop of Canterbury,”
he grumbled on, but with no real unkindness in
his tone. ‘Foretop, there!” he shouted. “Are
you all going to sleep aloft? That starboard
after-swifter is not sitting fairly. Here, Mr
Hammond,” and he called a midshipman who
was standing abaft the mizzen-mast, “this is
Mr Brandon, a new messmate for you. Take
charge of him, and see that he has a hammock
slung on board the hulk to-night. Run away
now, youngster. Main top there! Do you call
yourselves tinkers or washerwomen, for I'll be
d—d if you're sailors ...” and the hard-worked
officer went on with his duties without bestowing
another thought upon me. The young gentle-
man to whose care I was consigned I found to
possess two qualities which distinguished him
from any other person whom it had been my
lot to meet. Physically he was a_ well-made
lad about eighteen months my senior, with a
very bright, intelligent countenance, to which an
extraordinary appearance was imparted by a



H.M.S. VANGUARD 17

most appalling squint. When I advanced towards
him his right eye seemed fixed on the starboard
cathead, whilst his left optic took stock of the
larboard quarter-davits. In reality, he was look-
ing me full in the face, but it would be wrong
to say that I “caught his eye,” for the pupils
were turned askance and only the whites pre-
sented to my gaze. The other quality was
mental. For Tommy Hammond was the proud
possessor of an imaginative faculty which rose
nearly to genius. He seemed glad to see me,
not, as I soon found out, of any predisposition
on his part towards my insignificant person, but
because my advent gave him a pretext for roam-
ing over the length and breadth of the ship, and
also because I was virgin soil upon which the
seeds of his inventive powers could be scattered
broadcast.

Having led me between decks and out of
range of the first lieutenant’s watchful eye, he
proceeded to put a series of questions to me
regarding my age, members of my family, and
such-like minor details. Having satisfied his
curiosity on this score, I ventured to put a few
questions in my turn.

“Have you been long at sea?” I asked.

“Long at sea!” he repeated scornfully, “I was
born at sea—was cradled on the deep, as the
poet says. My nurse was the ship’s cook of the



78 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

Nonsuch, and my foster-mother the captain’s
she-goat. I used a belaying-pin for a teething-
coral, and my infant head was pillowed on a
swab. It’s no wonder that I am every inch a
sailor—the heart-yarn of a mainstay, every hair
of my head a rope-yarn, every arm a studding-
sail boom, each leg a spare top-mast—for I was
brought up on Stockholm tar.”

I conceived a sudden and deep veneration for
this child of ocean, who could observe my features
and measure my credulity without my knowing
that he was looking at me.

“Have you ever been in action?” I asked
timidly.

“ About forty-seven times, counting boat actions
and cutting-out expeditions. The last little affair
I was in was St Vincent, last year; people here
call it a great battle, but I didn’t think much
of it.”

“I heard a full account of it the other day,”
I cried eagerly. “I heard Sir Horatio describe
it to my father.”

Perhaps I had some secret hope that the
mention of the great Admiral’s name would raise
me in the estimation of my new friend, but this
was far from being the case.

“Oh, Nelson told you about it, did he? Then
I wouldn’t mind betting that he never even
mentioned my name, never owned that he owed



H.M.S. VANGUARD 79

his knighthood and fame entirely to Tom
Hammond. He’s an ungrateful dog, like all the
rest of them.”

“What on earth do you mean?” I cried.

“Well, you’ve heard his garbled version of the
battle, and it is only fair that you should hear
mine, and learn how the greatest instruments
in the making of history are left entirely
unnoticed in her deceptive pages,” and he drew
himself up to his full height of five feet two
inches, and endeavoured to impart a look of
unappreciated merit to his countenance.

“Let us go ashore,” he said suddenly. “I can
hear the first luff on the forecastle; he won't
miss us) We'll go on to the Hard and get some
grub, and then Ill tell you the true story of the
battle of Cape St Vincent.”

I was quite unaware that the proceeding
suggested by my grandiloquent companion was ©
a serious breach of duty, and followed him with
the utmost complacency, although it struck me
as rather curious that we should make the earlier
part of the journey by stages, dodging behind
bollards, cranes and other objects which served to
conceal our small persons; but when the sail-loft
shut the Vanguard out of view, Master Tommy
led the way with unabashed confidence, and we
passed out of the dockyard gates’ unquestioned.

We went to an eating-house, where my friend



80 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

was apparently well known, and when we had
tucked the standing part of a cold fowl under
our belts, I asked for the story.

“Tf there’s one thing more than another that
I dislike, Brandon,”
tones, “it is speaking of myself, for, as you will
have already observed, I am singularly modest
by nature. I feel that my retiring disposition
will remain my bane through life; but after all
it is a fault on the right side, for I hold vain-
glorious boasting as little less than a crime.”

Having observed—by looking out of opposite
windows at the same moment—that this preamble
had sunk deeply into my soul, this modest ocean
flower continued, “I was told off to help the
signal midshipman on St Valentine’s day, and
this led to my being on the poop of the Captain
during the whole of the action. My proper

said Tommy, in deprecatory

station was at the after main-deck quarters, and
the meaning of the change was only known to
me—Nelson liked to have me near him in case
of an emergency arising. Jack made the signal
to form line ahead—”

“Who's Jack?” I broke in.

“Jack Jervis, of course—Lord St Vincent now
—you shouldn’t interrupt, Brandon. Well, Jack
made the signal, and we obeyed it; but when I
saw that the Dons were likely to slip away in the
rear of our line, I went to the commodore, who



H.M.S. VANGUARD 81

was standing at the break of the poop, and seizing
an opportunity when no one could overhear us,
I said, ‘Those d—d fellows will slip away under
your lee, if you don’t put your helm up,
Horry.” ,

“Who’s Horry?” I asked in amazement.

“Youre little better than a fool, Brandon,”
said my veracious companion, in a tone of fine
contempt. “‘Gad! you're right, Tommy, as you
always are, said Nelson, glancing over the lee-
quarter where the Santissima Trinidad was
bruising through the water like an old swan
followed by a flock of geese. ‘Put the helm up,
quartermaster; round in the weather-braces, Mr
Johnson. Hang asking for permission! What
Tommy Hammond says is bound to be right.
We'll bring the Dons to, Berry, and remember,
if I fall, that His Majesty knows that I acted
by the advice of my gallant young friend, Mr
Hammond here.’

“Berry, who was a volunteer on board the
Captain, looked at me with an angry frown,
which, luckily for him, Horry didn’t see, or he
would have put him under arrest on the spot.
That fellow was always jealous of me, and so are
many others whom I could name, for the matter of
that, but I forgive them all—good wine needs
no bush,” and Mr Hammond’s expressive features
assumed an aspect of mingled magnanimity and

F



82 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

generosity. “I'll be bound Horry—Nelson, I mean
—didn’t tell your father this, Brandon.”

“No, he certainly did not,” I replied.

“Tt is sad to see a great nature warped by
professional jealousy. Nelson means well, but he
is human, like the rest of them. Ill undertake
to. say that he didn’t tell you about the Spanish
Admiral’s sword, either.” :

“No, but he showed it to me,’ I cried eagerly.

“And he hadn’t even the grace to say how it
came into his possession,” soliloquised Tommy,
in accents of pitying resignation. “You'll not
find it in the despatches, Brandon, but I was the
first man on board the San Josef, and she sur-
rendered to me before a living soul from the
Captain put his foot over her side. I got through
one of her main-deck ports and went aft to the
cabin where the Spanish Admiral lay dying, sur-
rounded by a group of his officers. I advanced
with a pistol in each hand, and the circle round
the wounded officer made way for me. ‘Brave
men honour those who follow the path of duty
and die for their king and their country,’ I said
in purest Castilian.”

“Do you speak Spanish ?” I asked in astonish-
ment, but he put the question aside with a majestic
wave of his hand and continued,—

“* Caballero, your last moments shall be undis-
turbed by me, but I must ask for your sword.’



H.M.S. VANGUARD 83

“The dying man gave me a look of unutterable
gratitude, which will haunt me through life, and
his captain, picking up the sword which lay
beside the wounded Admiral, presented the hilt
to me with a low bow and expressions of joy
that this unsullied weapon had fallen into the
hands of so noble a cavalier—truth compels me
to tell you the exact words, Brandon.

“I bowed gracefully, and leaving the grief-
stricken group, ascended to the quarter-deck
where Nelson was receiving the swords of the
other officers. I handed the Admiral’s weapon to
Fearney, and silently withdrew. Nelson alone
knew of the deed that I had performed, and the
consciousness of my own merit will remain my
sole reward. By Jove! there’s seven bells strik-
ing. We must get back to the ship or we shall
be missed.”

‘We skirmished from bollard to crane in the
same stealthy fashion as before, but without our
previous luck, for the quick eye of the first
lieutenant lighted upon us and his stern voice
rang out, “Come here, young gentlemen!”

“Where have you been?” he asked sharply
when we stood before him.

“We went to the Hard, sir, to get something
to eat,” answered Hammond, truthfully and
simply.

“Then you had no business to do so without



84 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

asking my leave. I put this youngster under
your charge, and the first thing you do is to lead
him astray. Now mount the main-bitts and
stand there till they knock off work.”

The unknown hero of Cape St Vincent and the
bosom friend of “Jack” and “Horry” departed
ruefully to take up the position assigned to
him, and as I saw the bluejackets turning their
quids and laughing in their sleeves, I could not
help reflecting the base uses to which some of
us are put from men of coarser mould failing
to appreciate our real greatness.

At sunset work ceased for the day, and the
ship’s company returned to the hulk for the night.
During the evening the gun-room presented a
much less chilling aspect than on my previous
visit, for the whole of my future messmates
were there, and a babel of tongues arose from
all hands. Some of my companions were then
between thirty and forty years of age—old
masters’ mates who, from want of interest at
headquarters, had been passed over and neglected
until they had grown grey-headed in an un-
grateful Service. These ill-used. officers were
excellent seamen, and as their conversation was
almost entirely on nautical matters, we youngsters
were enabled to gain much professional knowledge
from listening to their yarns and arguments ;
but it must be confessed that these scurvily-



H.M.S. VANGUARD 85

treated old sea-dogs were inveterate grumblers ;
nor was it to be wondered at, for the neglect
they had undergone would have jaundiced the
temper of an archangel. Bred to the sea, they
were only happy afloat, and useless for any
employment ashore. Sometimes, when paid off,
they took a trip in a merchantman, but almost
invariably drifted back into the gun-room of a
King’s ship in the hope that “a bloody war and
a sickly season” would give them their lieu-
tenant’s epaulette.

I was the youngest in the mess, and my brother
midshipmen ranged from thirteen to nineteen
years of age. They were a fine, dashing set of
young men, for the flower of the navy sought
service under Admiral Nelson.

Tea was over, and most of my messmates
were seated round the long table which occupied
the greater portion of the gun-room. Half-a-
dozen tallow candles, in battered old tin candle-
sticks, gave a dim light to the cabin, and showed
the party split up into groups, the senior members
of which were each furnished with a glass of
rum and water.

I was too strange to attach myself to any
particular section, but, after a time, observing
that Tommy Hammond had gathered round him
a select party of the younger midshipmen, to whom
he was holding forth in flowery rhetoric, I drew



86 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

near, feeling that I had found a friend, but halted
on discovering that I, myself, was the text for
this voluble youth’s oration.

“We shall have all Norfolk on board the Van-
guard soon,” cried Tommy, unconscious or careless
of my proximity. “Here’s another parson’s son
come to cut the fat. He’s a ‘towny’ of Nelson’s
There’s been the devil to pay because the tender
was a fortnight at sea with His Excellency on
board. Seven special messengers were sent down
by the Admiralty, and the semaphores kept going
all along the south coast. If the Phantom hadn’t
turned up this morning the Channel fleet was to
have gone to sea to-morrow at daylight in search
of her. Directly he reported himself, the first luff
sent me up to the Admiral’s office with the joyful
tidings of his safe arrival, and from the top of the
Observatory I could see the mounted messenger —
galloping up Portsdown Hill carrying the news to
London. I was told to get his hammock ready for
him, but it’s no business of mine to day-nurse a
Yarmouth bloater. Horry can come and tuck him
up himself, and so I shall tell him directly I see
him. He ought to be down here now attending
to his duty, but he is detained in London whilst
the gun factory of Woolwich Arsenal is manu-
facturing a copper warming-pan to warm young
Brandon’s hammock with. If Nelson can’t bring it
himself, it’s to be sent here by express waggon with



THE FIGHT ON BOARD THE VANGUARD.





H.M.S. VANGUARD 87°

a party of soldiers from the Tower to guard it.
His mother and his dear little sister Emily made
Nelson promise that his sheets should be well
aired and—’” :

“You're a liar!” I broke in, for I am hot-
tempered, and the mention of my sister’s name
made me reckless. “You're a liar, now, and I
believe you've been lying to me all day.”

I think Tommy was a little taken aback at
this interruption, but immediately replied by
throwing the contents of his glass of grog full
in my face, as a vindication of his dignity.

I struck him on the mouth with all my force,
and then we closed, rolling on the deck and pom-
melling at each other's heads savagely.

“Get up, you young rascals!” cried an old
master’s mate, bending down and dragging us
apart. “Don’t pinch and scratch like women;
stand up and have it out fairly. Here, young
Shiver-the-mizzen,” he cried, pulling me towards
him, “Ill give you my knee, and if you don't
give Tom Pepper a thrashing, I’m a Dutchman.
Strip to your waist, lad. Now, a ring and fair
play.” é

At it we went with tolerable coolness at first,
but fighting more wildly as our tempers rose and
the blood began to flow, but I was no match for
Tommy Hammond, who was eighteen months
older and had considerably longer reach of arm



Full Text





AFLOAT WITH NELSON


THE BURNING OF 17ORIENT AT THE BATTLE OF THE NILE.

Frontispiece.
AFLOAT WITH NELSON

OR

FROM NILE TO TRAFALGAR

BY
CHARLES H. EDEN

AUTHOR OF :
‘GEORGE DONNINGTON,’ ‘QUERR CHUMS,’ ETC., ETC.

‘Thou art our Admiral.’—Henry IV.

LONDON .
JOHN MACQUEEN
HASTINGS HOUSE, NORFOLK ST., STRAND
1897
PREFACE

Ir is proposed to write a series, each volume
of which will deal with some British admiral ;
and it is natural to begin with the greatest
of our naval heroes—Horatio Nelson. Although
the works themselves will be romances, the
fiction will be based upon facts, the events
narrated in historical sequence, and the dates
rigidly adhered to. In the present volume it
may be objected to that certain incidents in the
life of the hero are either passed over lightly
or altogether omitted, and for this I am pre-
pared to take the entire blame. A fierce light
is thrown upon the private life of all illustrious
men, and what would pass unnoticed in less
exalted individuals becomes matter of common
knowledge in them. Lord Nelson’s life was not

a perfect one, but if he erred, such errors never
Vv
vi PREFACE

led him into neglect of the duty which he
owed to his king and his country, and it is
in this latter aspect that I have endeavoured
to portray him. The volume to follow this will
be devoted to the great Elizabethan hero, Sir
Francis Drake.

CHE
CONTENTS

CHAPTER I

A Mipyieut ADVENTURE,

CHAPTER II
A CHANGE or SEX, .

CHAPTER III
A WALK IN PETTICOATS,

CHAPTER IV
Sir Horatio NELson,

CHAPTER V
H. M. 8. Vaneuarp,

CHAPTER VI
In SEARCH OF THE FRENCH, .

CHAPTER VII
Tue BarrLe or THE NILE, .

CHAPTER VIII
TRIAL or A TRAITOR,

vii

PAGE

19

48

69

90

105

122
viii CONTENTS

CHAPTER IX

Tue LEANDER AND GENEREUX,

CHAPTER X
STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE,

CHAPTER XI
BEpro THE BANDIT, .

CHAPTER XII
TEsss,

CHAPTER XIII
Tue CASTLE oF TARANTO,

CHAPTER XIV
Av Homer AGaIn,

CHAPTER XV
THE Barrie oF THE BALTIC,

CHAPTER XVI
“Twas IN TRAFALGAR Bay,”

CHAPTER XVII
My First Commanp,

CHAPTER XVIII
Leonora Dri BrANcANovA, .

POSTSCRIPT,

184

205

228

251

284

302

318

338
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

THE BURNING OF L’ORIENT AT THE BATTLE OF THE

NILE, ; . . ; . Erontispiece
PAGE

“TAKE THAT,’ SHE CRIED, DARTING SUDDENLY ACROSS THE
ROAD, . 7 7 . ‘ 7 : 25
Tue FIGHT oN BoarD THE VANGUARD, : . Fi 87

A SLIGHT FIGURE, WITH A LINE ATTACHED TO THE WAIST,

SPRANG INTO THE SEA, . : : ‘ : 97
HE MANAGED TO DROP IT AT THE RIGHT MOMENT, . . 175
BEPPO RECEIVES CroucHER AND HIS COMRADES, . . 198
TESSA DEFENDS THE Boys FRoM BEPPO, . . . 221

RUSHING FORWARD, I FOUND HER CONFRONTED BY AN OLD
SHE-WOLF, WITH THREE HALF-GROWN CUBS AT HER
HEELS, . : : : é ; . 248

NELSON SPREAD THE WAX AND IMPRESSED IT CAREFULLY
WITH THE SEAL HANGING TO HIS WATCH, : . 288

“STEPHEN CROUCHER!” I ROARED AGAIN, . : . 296
Afloat with Nelson

CHAPTER I
A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE

My father closed the Bible with a bang, and I
had risen to my feet before the solemn “Amen”
had died away in the room. The three women-
servants, who composed our household, passed
through the door into the back premises, and
the family was alone.

My father left the table, where he had been
seated to read the evening prayers, and took
possession of a large easy-chair at the chimney-
corner. My mother seated herself in another
chair facing him, and the quick click of her
knitting-needles was heard as she resumed her
constant task. My sister Emily and I set about
the work which was expected from us nightly.
She placed a kettle of boiling water upon a trivet
attached to the grate, and then moved a small,

A
2 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

round table beside my father, on which she
placed glasses, lemons, and a basin of lump-
sugar—the latter a great luxury in the days of
which I write. Having done this, she seated
herself on a small stool drawn close to the feet
of her mother, For my part, I received the key
which my father silently handed to me, and un-
locking the private cupboard at the end of the
room, took from it two old-fashioned decanters
of cut-glass, both of which contained spirits—one
Hollands gin, the other brandy. These I carried
to the table, but my hands shook so with an
excitement which I endeavoured to conceal that
I nearly broke one of the bottles, a clumsy act
which called forth a mild rebuke from both my
parents, who prized these articles very highly.
Then I proceeded to mix a glass of punch for
each of them, in the proportion which I had ©
been taught was most acceptable to both—my
father’s gill of brandy being exactly double my
mother’s measure of Hollands. When the hot
water was added and my father stirred his grog
slowly round, a pleasant fragrance rose from the
glasses, and when he had tasted his jorum, and .
pronounced it perfect, I also got a small stool
and seated myself between my father and the
fire, which crackled merrily up the chimney, fed
by billets of wreck-wood, for it was mid-winter
and the nights were very cold.
A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 3

After he had taken his third sip I made my
usual request, “ Now, father, spin us a yarn.”

“What about, Jack ?”

“Qh, about smugglers,” I cried; “about the
fight which took place on the beach ten years
ago, when Tom Holden shot the Preventive
Officer.”

“ve told you that a dozen times, Jack. You
are too fond of listening to stories about these
lawless men. What put smuggling into your
brain to-night ?”

I turned my head away, for, despite my utmost
efforts, my face flushed crimson at the unexpected
question; but my father did not perceive it, and
I was saved from making a reply which might
have betrayed me, by his suddenly asking,
“Mary, how do the kegs hold out?”

“The last of the brandy is in the decanter,
but there are at least half-a-dozen bottles of gin
left,” replied my mother. He gave a low whistle
on hearing this,

“The brandy run out, eh?. That’s a bad job.
This smuggling is wild work and does mischief
to every man, woman and child, in the parish.
Instead of being honest fisher-folk, and getting
their living from the sea, they are for ever look-
ing out for Dutch or French luggers, and en-
-deavouring to enrich themselves by defrauding
the King’s revenue. Jack, my boy,” he added,
4 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“just step outside and see what the night is
like. Look to seaward, and try to make out
if there are any lights there, also notice in what
quarter the wind sits, and whether the moon is
shining, or clouded over.”

I departed on my errand only too gladly, and
soon returned with the information that the sky
was overcast and very dark, and that what wind
there was came from the south-eastward.

This news seemed to give my father pleasure,
for I heard him murmur to himself, “That will
do. Did you see Stephen Croucher in the village
to-day ?” he continued.

“Yes,” replied my mother, with some asperity
in her gentle voice. “Yes, I saw him at the door
of ‘The Toothsome Herring, talking to Bess
Wilson. I dislike that young man, John, and
I’m always sorry to see him about here. When-
ever he comes there is mischief brewing.”

“Yes, he’s a reckless ne’er-do-weel, but a good
seaman for all that,” replied my father. “There’s
not a man on the coast of Norfolk that can handle
a boat better than Steve Croucher.”

“It’s a pity he doesn’t use his knowledge to
some better purpose,” rejoined my mother, drily.

“Jack, you may mix me another small glass of
punch,” said my father, after a pause.

“The brandy is running low, John,” observed
my mother.
A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 5

‘I think it will hold out if the wind is in the
south-east, as Jack says it is,’ returned my father,
with a twinkle in his eye, and a smile at my
mother, which she returned, little Emily gazing up
into her face in mute astonishment, for this con-
.versation was Greek to her, and, for the matter of
that, should have been the same to me, but, as the
sequel will show, I was more behind the scenes
than my younger sister.

Somehow, my father’s mind seemed running on
the subject of smuggling, although he could spin
us no yarn, for he said, somewhat inconsequently,
“Those fellows don’t care one bit whose -horses
they take out of the stable to run their contraband
goods. Do you remember, Mary, that on the
morning of last Good Friday, Farmer Easton found
his three best cart-horses covered with mud and
sweat?”

“Yes, dear; and I remarked that Mrs Easton
and her daughters wore silk dresses trimmed with
‘French lace during the summer,” said my mother,
with a little smile.

“Tt is very wrong,” continued my father, “and
locks are no good, for these fellows stand at
nothing, and will break open any door. Jack, my
boy, just go to the stable and give the mare a feed
of corn. Padlock the door after you, and bring
me. the key.”

“Ts that wise, John?” asked my mother.
6 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“It’s as well to be prepared since the wind is in
the south-east, and the night gloomy,” returned
my father. “Besides, the staple is loose and will
come out at the slightest pull. They know this,”
he added, with another twinkle in his eye.

When I returned from my errand, I found my
little sister had already gone to bed, and I at once
followed her, only too glad to be released, for
during the whole evening I had fidgeted about
on my stool, and greatly feared that my excite-
ment would have been detected by the watchful
eyes of my mother. Both my parents, however,
seemed preoccupied, and my restlessness called
forth no remark. *

It was just nine o’clock when I retired, for we
were early folks in those days, going to bed betimes,
and rising with the sun. The little room which I
occupied stood at the end of the passage on the
first floor, and had one window looking out on
to the garden. My proceedings on reaching this
little chamber would have puzzled an onlooker:
Instead of undressing, I went to the basket con-
taining my sea-fishing lines; selecting one of
these, I unwound some ten fathoms, then, opening
the window as noiselessly as possible, I threw the
wooden reel on to the lawn beneath, and then
nearly re-closed the sash, although leaving a gap
sufficiently wide for the line to travel freely. I
then took off my shoes, fastened the inner end of
A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 4

the line to my wrist, and, clothed as I was, jumped
into bed, and lay between the sheets with a beat-
ing heart and nerves wound up by excitement.
Through the crack in the window the outer air
rushed in cold and raw, but this I heeded not, for
an adventure lay before me, and all personal
discomforts were forgotten in pleasurable antici-
pation. For perhaps half-an-hour I lay awake,
hearing the footsteps of my parents as they
ascended the stairs, followed by the closing of
their bedroom door, Then profound silence reigned
throughout the house, and, despite my heroic
efforts to keep my eyes open, I fell asleep, which
was a, bad beginning for a watchful smuggler, but
it must be said in excuse that I was not quite
thirteen years of age.

After a couple of hours of profound slumber, I
was rudely awakened by a sharp tugging at my
wrist. Forgetful of the circumstances, it was
with difficulty that I repressed a cry of alarm, but
memory returned in time to save me from this
indignity, and I slipped quietly out of bed, having
thrice jerked at the cord in signal that I was astir.
Slowly and carefully I opened the bedroom door,
carrying my shoes in one hand, whilst feeling
along the passage wall with the other, for I
did not dare to kindle a light, and indeed had no
_ phosphorus to do so. I knew every inch of the
house, and must have gone as silently as a mouse,
8 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

yet it seemed to me that each step I took would
awaken my parents. Once a board creaked beneath
my light weight, then I stood still with a beating
heart and blanched cheek, with difficulty repressing
the inclination to retrace my steps and abandon
the adventure, for smuggling by daylight with
life and movement around is a widely different
thing from smuggling at the dead of night, and
stealing out of the house like a thief. On reaching
the head of the stairs, the tall clock in the hall
beneath burred dismally before sounding the first
stroke of midnight, making the hair on my head
bristle up with terror, as I stood motionless till
the tale was completed, and, whilst descending,
each separate stair seemed to groan dolefully, as
though anxious to proclaim my escapade to the
other inmates of the house. But when I had
gained the passage leading to the back premises,
and recognised that my movements had been
unobserved, I speedily regained courage, and,
slipping noiselessly out of the back door, I put on
my shoes and stole cautiously round to the lawn,
where Will Barrett was awaiting me.

We exchanged no word, but crept silently
towards the gate opening on to the road, through
which we passed, and it was not until the Parson-
age was left two hundred yards behind us that
I ventured to ask the question which was burning
on my lips, “ Has the lugger been sighted, Will?”
A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 9

“She hove in sight an hour before sundown
and stood to the northward after her signal had
been answered. Stephen Croucher and old Grim-
bold were whispering to my father at the bar,
and I heard Steve say, ‘It is high-water shortly
after midnight, and if old Oliver has got his night-
cap on then, the boats will come ashore.’ They
paid no attention to me, and did not know I under-
stood that ‘Oliver’ meant the moon. It is very
dark now, and the run will certainly be made
within an hour’s time. We must hurry along,
Jack, and get down to the beach unperceived.”

My heart beat fast on learning that the moment
for action was so close at hand, but before moving
on, I put one more question to my companion.
“Have you got the barkers with you?”

“Yes, I’ve got them right enough,” replied Will,
with a proud sense of proprietorship. “I took
them out of father’s bedroom when he was busy
with the customers this evening. Look here!”
and he produced from his pocket a pistol, which
I put my hand eagerly forth to seize.

“Not so quick, Master Jack,” was the reply,
as he replaced the weapon in his pocket; “you
shall have it when we reach the beach. Some
accident might happen whilst we are scrambling
down; besides, you are rather young to be trusted
with firearms.”

“Tm only six months younger than you,” I
Io AFLOAT. WITH NELSON

cried angrily, “and have used a pistol often. I
know more about firearms than you do, for I am
a gentleman’s son and your father is only an inn-
keeper.”

“If that’s your fashion of talking, my young
bantam cock, you sha’n’t have it at all, and you
had better go back to your father, the parson.”

“T won’t go back, and I will have the pistol.
If you don’t give it to me, Will Barrett, Ill take
it,” and I began stripping off my coat, preparatory
to putting this rash resolve into execution, for my
blood was up, and I had no idea of being hectored
over by a lad who was my inferior in position;
but before any active steps could be taken, a
bright flash was seen to seaward, and we com-
pletely forgot our dispute at the sight of this
signal,

“Come along, Jack!” cried my companion.
“Hurry up, or we shall be too late.”

We pushed through a gap in the hedge, ran
recklessly across a small stretch of turf, and slid
down the descent leading to the beach. On reach-
ing this, Will handed me the coveted pistol, which
I stuck in my belt with an air of triumph, feeling
that now I was a smuggler indeed, and fit to cope
with an army of Preventive Officers.

“Come along,” urged Will, “and let us get into
the cave before the boat’s ashore. We can stay
there until the landing begins, when all hands


A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE It

will be too busy to notice us and send us
home.”

The cave of which my companion spoke stood
about a quarter of a mile north of the little quay
where the cargo would be landed, and was in no
way connected with smuggling purposes, being
used by our fishermen as a convenient place in
which to stow old nets, empty casks, and such-
like lumber. ‘Towards this recess we speeded
swiftly and silently, keeping close under the
shadow of the cliff, which was strewn with
fragments of rock, causing each of us more than
one fall. This was a needless precaution, since -
the night was so dark that no one could have
observed us had we taken the more open way’
by the edge of the sea.

We reached the cavern, bruised and breathless,
and flung ourselves upon a heap of nets which
lay within the entrance, from which position we
could view the sea, and the spot at which the
lugger probably lay, had she been visible, but
the darkness was too great to allow of our
making her out. We had lain thus for perhaps
a couple of minutes, panting hard, but exchang-
ing no word, when suddenly the noise of a dis-
lodged stone came from the direction of the
village, followed by a coarse oath in a man’s
gruff voice.

“It's Steve Croucher,” whispered Will, hurriedly ;
12 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“let us hide behind the casks. He would send
us home if he saw us.”

Quick as thought we dived behind the barrels,
and remained there motionless, in the hope that
the man would pass, but, to our consternation,
he paused at the mouth of the cave and gave
utterance to a long, low whistle, which he repeated
three times at regular intervals. From our hiding-
place we could make out the smuggler’s form

‘ silhouetted dimly against the murky background,
and we observed with surprise that his face was
turned towards the north, and not in the direc-
tion of the village from whence he had come.
What could be the meaning of this?

After the lapse of perhaps a minute, Steve
Croucher repeated the signal, but in a louder
tone than before, and then it seemed to our
straining ears that we detected a faint answer,
and this was confirmed when the sound of foot-
steps was heard coming over the rocks from the
northward. Stephen advanced to meet the new-
comer, and I felt my arm tightly grasped by
Will, who took advantage of the man’s absence
to draw the pistol from his pocket and cock it
—a motion which I faithfully followed—whilst
he hissed into my ears the one word—“ treachery.”

All this occupied but a few seconds, at the
termination of which two figures could be dis-
cerned at the mouth of the cave.
A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 13

“When should my men make the attack?”
asked the new-comer, whose tone was imperious
and sharp.

“Don’t speak so loud, captain,” said Steve, in
low, anxious tones, “there might be someone
within ear-shot.”

“That's your affair, not mine,” returned the
stranger, curtly. “Answer my question.”

“Best to get the landing half over before
dropping down on them. They will be too busy
removing the tubs to notice your approach until
you are close to them. I will go back and join
them, and when the right moment has arrived,
I will manage to swing a lantern from side to
side as a signal.”

“You are a pretty scoundrel,” we heard the
stranger mutter.

“Where are the men now, sir?” asked Steve,
hesitatingly, for the officer’s contemptuous words
had reached him also.

“Close to. I hear them coming now, and they
will be here in less than a minute.”

“Have you a strong force, sir?—for these
Norfolk men are sure to show fight, and I shall
be forced to do the same to avoid suspicion.”

“There are fifteen Preventive Officers and a
press-gang of twenty men from my frigate. I
hope to fill up my complement from your village,
Mr Croucher.”
14 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“Hush, sir, hush!” said the traitor. “No
names, sir, even when we are quite alone. And
about the money,” he continued falteringly. “A
hundred guineas was to be paid when I brought
you to the spot, and another hundred when the
job was completed.”

“There’s your money,” said the officer, con-
temptuously, and we heard the chink of gold
as he threw a bag upon the floor of the cave,
not deigning to soil his hands by contact with

the dirty rascal. “Here are the men, too,”
continued the officer, stepping out into the
open.

We could see Steve stoop to pick up the
bag, but, at this moment, there came a flash close
beside me, accompanied by a loud report—in
his agitation Will Barrett's finger had pressed
the trigger of his weapon, and the pistol exploded.

“Bolt!” cried my companion, springing to his
feet, and dashing out into the darkness. I
followed him unhesitatingly, with my weapon
at full cock, but, unfortunately, my foot was
caught in the meshes of a net hanging from
the cask behind which I had been concealed,
and I came to the ground almost at the feet
of Steve Croucher. In a moment his strong
hands had grasped me, but my right arm re-
mained free, and, in desperation, I pointed the
pistol at his head and fired, dropping the weapon
A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 15

the moment I had done so. With an oath, he
staggered back and loosened his grasp, upon
which I fled swiftly towards the quay, zig-zagging
from side to side like a snipe in its first flight,
and thus avoiding a bullet sent after me by
some person then unknown, but. whom I after-
wards discovered to be the traitor Croucher.
The distance from the cave to the quay was
about five hundred yards, and I covered the
ground more quickly than I have ever done
since, although more than once I have had a
race for life. On three several occasions I tripped
and fell, but I was a feather-weight and regained
my legs in a moment, heedless of pain or bruises
in the excitement of the wild race. I could
not see Will Barrett in front of me, but could
hear the sound of his footsteps some fifty yards
in advance, and I could also hear the tread of
the Preventive Officers and bluejackets as they
pressed forward in pursuit, for the alarm had
now been given, and the surprise, so cleverly
arranged by Steve Croucher, rendered impossible.
When about half-way on my course, a second
flash came from the lugger, and I knew that the
boats with their contraband cargo had left her
side for the shore, and to prevent this valuable
booty from falling into the hands of the excise
men became my one determination. There were
lanterns now dancing on the quay, and, as I
16 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

drew near, I could distinguish the form of many
men assembled to unload the boats. To warn.
them of the approaching danger was of the
utmost importance, so, when within a hundred
yards of the quay —by which time I was
slightly ahead of Will Barrett—I began to shout
“Treachery! Gaugers! Gaugers! Press-gang!
Press-gang!” at the top of my shrill voice,
which rang through the night air with wonder-
ful distinctness.

The effect was magical. In an instant every
lantern was extinguished, whilst at the same
moment a flash rose from the pier-head as a
signal of danger to the approaching boats, and
by the time I reached the spot, so lately crowded
with figures, it was absolutely deserted, and no
sound could be heard but the footsteps of the
men as they hurried away to their respective
hiding-places, more terrified at the single word
“ Press-gang” than by the penalty they would
have incurred had the Preventive Officers caught
them red-handed in their illicit occupation.

Delighted to find that our warning had pro-
duced the desired effect—for Will Barrett had
joined in the cry on catching the cue from me
—I halted for a moment to allow my companion
to come up. ‘Together we stood listening, but
‘could hear no sound of pursuing footsteps,
although a voice which we recognised as that
A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE 17

of the officer accosted by Steve as “captain”
was audible at some distance in our rear.
Evidently his men, unaccustomed to the ground,
finding themselves no match at running with
two swift-footed boys, had given up the chase
in despair, and the officer was probably forming
them into order before advancing to the village.
In the excitement of my flight I had thought
only of escaping from the Preventive men, and
of saving our poor fellows from the hands of
the dreaded press-gang, but a question which
my companion panted forth filled me suddenly
with unutterable horror and anguish.

“Did you kill Steve?” whispered Will, in
awestricken tones, and I fancied that he edged
a little away from me, as though shunning the
companionship of one with human blood upon
his hands.

“TI don’t know,” was my reply, and my voice
seemed strange to myself, for a great horror
seemed to choke me and strangle all utterance.

If for a moment I had suspected Will of
standing aloof from me I was speedily reassured,
for he seized me by the hand, whispering eagerly,
“They couldn’t know us, and none of our fellows
would peach if their lives depended on it. If
you shot that rascal Steve it served him right
for his treachery. Come along, Jack. Let’s
hurry to my father’s house. We must make a

B
18 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

clean breast of it to him, and, if the worst
comes, he can hide us.”

We ran on towards “The Toothsome Herring,”
which stood at the corner of the main street
leading downward to the quay, at the door of
which stood the tall figure of Bess Wilson.

“Come in, lads!” she cried, standing aside to
let us pass. “You youngsters have saved the
whole boiling of us.”

Then, when we were in the passage, she
noiselessly closed the door, which she bolted and
barred securely.
CHAPTER II
A CHANGE OF SEX

THE moment the door was closed the round form
of Joe Barrett, the landlord of “The Toothsome
Herring,” emerged from the side door which
communicated with the tap-room. In a few
hurried words his son and I put him in posses-
sion of the incidents which had _ transpired,
adding that the Preventive men would be
hammering at the door within ten minutes.

“Where are the pistols now, Will?” he asked
his son after a moment’s reflection.

“TI dropped mine behind the barrel,” said the lad.

“Mine fell on the floor of the cave directly I
had fired,” I added.

Joe gave a low whistle. “My name is on the
butt of each of them,” he murmured. “What is
‘to be done, Bess?”

“Tf Master Jack shot that villain Steve Croucher
there'll be a proper row, although it served the
sneaking loafer perfectly right. Will has done
nothing that the law can touch him for, but
Master Jack must be concealed at once.”

19
20 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“That's true enough, my girl; but where can
we hide him? These gauger chaps will search
every nook and cranny in the house, and it’s as
much as my license is worth if he’s found here.
Never fear that I am going to desert you, sir,”
che continued, turning to me. “Your pluck has
saved us all, and Joe Barrett will stand by you
to the last—and so, for the matter of that, will
every man in Silversands.”

“T have it,” cried quick-witted Bess. “We must
let Mr Strutwell into the secret, and in five minutes
he'll change Master Jack so that his own mother
would not know him. You get to bed at once,
Will, and don’t stir if all the gaugers in Norfolk
come into your room. Come upstairs with me,
sir,”” she continued, seizing me by the hand, and
hurrying me forward.

On reaching the first floor landing, she rapped
loudly at a door, and, receiving no reply, burst
abruptly into the room, dragging me after her.

“Wake up, Mr Strutwell!” she cried, vigorously
shaking the shoulder of a man sleeping in the
bed. “Wake up! Here's a play-acting job for
‘ee to do.”

A strange, lank figure sat upright in the bed
at this abrupt summons, blinking confusedly at
the lantern which Bess held close to his eyes,
whilst she poured into his ears the service roquited
of him.
A CHANGE OF SEX 21

“Thy will is mine, thou goddess of the tap,
cried this strange being, leaping from the bed
with such alacrity that the girl was compelled
to flee without another word.

“Wouldst thou be changed, thou varlet page,
And veil the honours of thy manly state ?
Then here’s the hand shall work the transformation.”

Whilst uttering this high-sounding phrase, my
queer companion was rummaging the contents of
a large chest, from the depths of which he dragged
forth sundry articles of feminine apparel, together
with a wig, adorned with long, flaxen ringlets,
which latter article he promptly clapped upon my
astonished head.

“Unrobe thee, Junius Brutus, doff thy dress
Ere yet the sleuth-hounds settle on thy track,”

and, leaving me to comply with this strangely-
worded command, he hurried from the room, and
I soon heard him in earnest conversation with
Bess Wilson. His absence, however, was of
_ Short duration, for before I had stripped off my
breeches and hose he was in the room again.

“Haste thee, Lucilius, for the hunt is up. :
Go, hide thy limbs beneath this virgin smock,”

and, with the latter words, he threw over my
22 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

shoulders a frilled night-gown, which completely
concealed my shirt and under-garments.

“Now, view thy image mirrored in this plane,”

he mouthed out, holding before me a looking-glass
which, to my great astonishment, reflected the
face of a pretty girl, instead of the impish features
which I had been accustomed to see there.

- He looked at me critically, adjusting the wig
and arranging the flaxen curls; and then burried
me into a room on the opposite side of the pas-
sage, in which stood a bed, and beside it a small
table with a lighted candle,—

“Get thee to rest. No dangers shall assail.
Thy peaceful slumber—couch thee well and sleep,”

with which words he lifted me up and literally
tossed me into the bed with a strength for
which I should never have given his attenuated
frame credit. Raising the pillows, he propped
me up in a half-sitting position, and again dis-
posed the ringlets to the best advantage over
my neck and shoulder; but my appearance was
evidently still unsatisfactory to his artistic eye,
for he suddenly quitted the room, murmuring,—

“Too much, in love, the sun hath kissed thy cheeks.”

In a minute he re-appeared carrying in his
hand a small box containing theatrical pigments
A CHANGE OF SEX 23

with which he proceeded to daub my face and
hands whilst muttering,—
“Tet concealment, like a worm i’ the bud,
Feed on her damask cheek. *Twill do, ’twill do.
Restored to life, Clarinda fair,

Shall prove to me a daughter dear,
And I a father fond.”

At the conclusion of this doggerel rhyme the
tragedian drew from the pocket of an old velvet
robe, in which he had enveloped his lean form, a
couple of medicine bottles and a wine-glass, all
of which he disposed conspicuously on the table
beside the bed, and then seated himself in an
arm-chair drawn near my pillow, from whence
he gazed at my recumbent form with an air of
exaggerated parental anxiety and affection which
would have drawn forth rapturous applause from
the audience at any theatre. This little comedy
would have amused me greatly at any other time,
but just then the deepest despair held full posses-
sion of my mind. Here was I—a boy but just
thirteen years of age—with hands already im-
brued in human blood, and compelled to evade
_ the fangs of the law by the contemptible method
of disguising myself. That I should be hanged
for the murder of Stephen Croucher seemed
certain, but, strange to say, this thought affected
me little. What filled my mind chiefly was the
misery which my hasty deed would bring upon
24 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

my parents. It was horrible to reflect upon, and
a groan burst from my lips which seemed to touch
the heart of the kindly actor, for he assumed his
natural expression whilst bending forward to
whisper words of comfort, and bid me summon
up all my courage for the approaching ordeal.

' “Speak no word!” he said impressively, and
with more coherence than usual. “Lie quite still,
with closed eyes. You are my sick daughter be-
side whose bedside I am watching.”

The last words of the speaker were sharp and
hurried, for the sound of many feet was now
audible approaching the inn, followed immediately
by a heavy hammering at the door.

“Who is there?” I heard Bess Wilson ask, after
a pause. “What good-for-nothing fellows are you
who come in the middle of the night to wake
honest folk out of their sleep? Be off with you,
you drunken swabs! There’s no more drink for
you to-night at ‘The Toothsome Herring.”

“Open at once, you jade—open, in the name
of the law, or we will break the door in!” cried
a stern voice.

“Law be hanged!” yelled back the undaunted
Bess. “If there was any law in the land, the
likes of you wouldn’t be about threatening an
honest: maid. Be off home with you!”

At this reply, a heavy blow was dealt upon the
panel, probably by the butt-end of a musket,
?

“TAKE THAT,’

SHE CRIED, DARTING SUDDENLY ACROSS THE


A CHANGE OF SEX 28

whereupon Bess hastily unbolted and unbarred the
door, which she flung open, and stepped forward to
the entrance, brandishing in both hands a heavy
broomstick.

“Who be you?” shouted the Amazon, whirling
her weapon round so effectually that the Pre-
ventive men recoiled. “Who be you? Ah!
gaugers, I see. Well, we don't want none of
your sort here, for all our liquor has paid duty.
Come at proper hours, and you shall be admitted,
but the first man that tries to cross this thres-
hold will get a broken sconce, or my name is
not Bess Wilson. Ah!” she continued, “who's
that fellow standing there with his face muffled
up? Is that you, Steve Croucher? You can’t
hide yourself from me, you pitiful cur, for I
know the cut of your ugly jib too well. So
you're alive, are you? It’s a pity Master Jack -
hadn’t scuttled your figure-head with a bullet,
and you dared to come a-courting and a-whisper-
ing soft words to Bess Wilson. Stick close to
the gaugers, you sneak, for if any of the Silver-
sands lads get hold of your ugly carcase, they'll
-keel-haul you under every boat in the fleet, and
dumbscrape the flesh off your ribs with barnacle
shells. Take that!” she cried, darting suddenly
across the road, and dealing Steve a swinging
blow over the head with her broom-stick. “Take
that as a parting present from Bess Wilson.”
26 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

A loud burst of laughter rose from the press-
gang who were drawn up close by, but had left
the work of gaining an entrance to the excise-
men. These men were already within the house,
having taken advantage of the guardian’s moment-
ary withdrawal to slip through the doorway.

On hearing the laugh, Bess dropped the weapon
which she had used with such good effect, and,
addressing the bluejackets, cried, “ You are honest
sailor-men and can’t help the dirty work you are
ordered to do; it’s different with them low gauger
chaps, who are always a-sneaking about, and a-
prying into other people’s business. Come into
the tap-room, Jads, and I'll call my master to
give you a tot of grog all round. Kindly step
into the parlour, sir,’ she added, curtseying to
the officer, who had stood aloof, watching the
whole scene with scarcely-suppressed amusement.
“There is nothing in ‘The Toothsome Herring’
of which we have any call to be ashamed, and
all that the house affords is at the command of
you and your men.”

“You are a fine specimen of a Norfolk lass,”
laughed the officer, chucking the girl under the
chin. “ Here’s something to get yourself a pair
of earrings with,” and he slipped a guinea into
her hand, whilst following her into the parlour.

Meanwhile, the gaugers, on their way upstairs,
had been stopped by Joe Barrett, who appeared in
A CHANGE OF SEX 24

a half-dressed condition as though just awakened
from a profound sleep.

“You are the man we are in search of,” cried
the Preventive Officer. “There’s been an attempt
at murder, and the deed was done with a pistol
bearing your name on the butt. How do you
explain this?”

“J know nothing about it,” replied Joe, stolidly.
“When I saw the pistols last they were hanging
up in my bedroom, and someone must have taken
them unknown to me. I can prove that I have
never left the house since noon yesterday, and,
besides, you’ve no right here without a warrant.
Show your authority for entering a man’s dwell-
ing in the middle of the night, and, if you have
not any, I'll take the law of you as trespassers
and housebreakers.”

“We intend searching the house,” replied the
Preventive Officer, doggedly. “If you didn’t fire
the shot, the man who did so is in your house.”

“Tf you proceed, it is at your own peril,” re-
turned Joe, still barring the way. “'There’s no
one in the house but a guest and his sick
daughter, and if you frighten the child to death,
you and your men must stand the consequences.”

“Stand aside! Come on, lads,” cried the head
gauger, pushing Joe roughly aside.

From my bed, I had heard every word of stout
Bess Wilson's harangue, and an inexpressible sense
28 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

of relief and thankfulness had filled my heart, on
learning that Steve Croucher was not only alive
but, apparently, none the worse for my pistol-
shot. Thank God, I was not a murderer, and
the proportion of my offence was reduced to
comparatively nothing.

The Preventive men were already at the half-
open door of the room, and Strutwell rose to pre-
vent their entrance, stretching forth his arm for-
biddingly.

“Enter not here, rude men!” he cried in
sepulchral tones. “When sickness sleepeth, wake
it not! Wouldst kill my daughter.by thy rash
intrusion?” and he pointed towards the bed in
which I lay propped up with half-closed eyes.

The gaugers were evidently thoroughly taken
aback at the spectacle presented to them, and
slunk out of the room with an air of shame and
disappointment, closely followed by the actor, who
cried after them,—_.

“ Begone, base varlets! Hasten ! quit the presence
Of this long-suffering and afflicted Queen.
Now sleep, my liege, the danger is o’erpast,”

he continued, closing the door behind the discom-
fited gang, and indulging in a series of grotesque
antics in the exuberance of his joy, the remem-
brance of which afterwards caused me to laugh
heartily.
A CHANGE OF SEX 29

Lights had been brought into the parlour, and
refreshment provided for the officer in command,
whose name I afterwards learnt was Captain Dixon,
commanding His Majesty’s frigate Mermaid. The
seamen were accommodated in the tap-room, for
all hope of capturing any of the Silversands fisher-
men, and pressing them for service afloat, came
to an end when Will and I had raised the alarm,
for the whole village might have been searched
for the next week without any able-bodied man
being found within its precincts. This was not
the first time, by many, that an attempt had been
made to surprise the fishermen, each of whom had
a hiding-place of his own, in which he would lie
quietly concealed until the press-gang had with-
drawn from the neighbourhood. Captain Dixon
was fully aware of this, and avoided irritating
the inhabitants by a fruitless search. But Mr
Nicholls, the head gauger, and his men were
too much enraged at the loss of the rich cargo
they had so confidently expected to capture, to
let matters pass as easily as the naval officer,
and the fact of my having fired at Stephen
Croucher afforded them a pretext for further
inquiries.

“Who is the nearest magistrate, and where does
he live?” asked Nicholls of Joe Barrett, when he
and his men had searched the house from attic to
basement without discovering anything more
30 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

formidable than the landlord’s son, Will, who
was snoring peacefully in his bed.

“The Rev. John Brandon, at the Rectory,”
replied Joe, who was anxious to get rid of these
unwelcome intruders at any cost. oo

“Can you guide us there?” asked the head
gauger.

‘Tl take ’ee to him,” cried stout Bess Wilson,
“and much good may your visit do ’ee. Come
along!” and she marched into the dark street,
followed by the gaugers.

Arrived at the Rectory, which stood about a
quarter of a mile from the village, Mr Nicholls
knocked at the door for a good half hour before
gaining the slightest response from any of the
inmates, for it was a singular fact that my father .
and all his establishment were invariably buried
in the deepest slumber on certain nights, when
the wind chanced to be in the south-east—a
breeze from that quarter appearing to exercise
a narcotic influence over all of them. But the
gaugers were persistent, and finally my father
appeared in his dressing-gown, admitting the
men to his study after learning their errand.

“You wish to obtain a warrant for the arrest
of some person unknown, accused of attempting
the life of one, Stephen Croucher,” remarked my
father. “Is the man much injured ?”

Nicholls hesitated. “His face is burnt with
A CHANGE OF SEX “ae

the powder, and he will carry the marks to his
grave,” he said at last.

“But he can walk, I suppose?”

“Yes, your worship,” assented the head gauger,
sullenly; for he saw that the magistrate was not
disposed to lend him more assistance than he
could help.

“Then why does not the aggrieved party come
and lay information in person? Has he deputed
you to do this for him ?” asked my father, sternly.

“No, your worship,” faltered the man.

“Then I refuse to grant a warrant on such
insufficient evidence.”

“Tt’s all a flam, your reverence,” broke in Bess.
“Steve Croucher is alive and well, except for a rap
on the head I gave him with my broomstick, to
teach him manners when next he comes a-courting
Bess Wilson. My master is a-coming to your
worship in the morning for a warrant against
these gauger chaps for housebreaking and rioting
in the streets of a peaceful village like Silver-
sands. No, I won’t guide you back. You can
find your own way, or, better still, get Steve
Croucher to show it to you,” cried Bess, de-
risively, as the discomfited Nicholls and his
followers filed out of the room.

“Its Master Jack, sir, as singed that rascal
Steve’s whiskers, and saved the whole village from
the gaugers and the press-gang,” she continued,
32 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

after following the excisemen to the front door
and closing it behind them. “The pistol was only
loaded with powder, and can only have spoilt the
fellow’s beauty—if he had any to lose,” she added,
with a snort of contempt.

“Do you mean my boy Jack?” asked my father,
in greatest surprise, “ Why, he is asleep in his
room upstairs.”

“Not a bit of it, sir. He and our Will went out
to see the cargo land—to see the moon a-shining,
I mean—and they overheard a plot to surprise our
poor fellows in bed, and press them into the navy.
Steve Croucher had turned informer, and tried to
nab Master Jack when his treachery was discovered,
but the lad—ah, he’s a game ’un, parson !—flashed
one of master’s pistols in his face, and the rascal
let him go. It’s all a flam, sir. There ain’t no
harm done to anyone; and Master Jack saved our
poor lads by giving the alarm. You won’t hear
any more of them gaugers, or of Steve Croucher,
either—you take Bess Wilson’s word for it, sir.”

“But where is the boy now?” asked my father,
anxiously.”

“In bed, at‘The Toothsome Herring,’ dressed
up as a girl by Mr Strutwell, and a pretty girl he
makes, parson ; I’d a-kissed and a-hugged him if
them gauger chaps had been out of the road. The
press-gang is at the house now—a nice, civil set,
as sailor-men always is. Their officer is in our
A CHANGE OF SEX 33

parlour, as smooth-spoken and gentle as a lamb.
I must get back, sir, for I’m wanted.

“Wait a moment and I will come with you,”
said my father, sorely perplexed at the girl’s
explanation, and determined to find out for him-
self how matters stood.

Not a sign of movement was visible in the
village as my father and Bess Wilson passed
through it, nor was a light to be seen at a single
casement, although every one in the place, except-
ing the youngest children, must have been wide
awake, But at the little inn there was much
movement, and the sound of revelry, for Captain
Dixon had determined that his men should quarter
themselves there until the day broke, and had
ordered them a supper of bread and cheese and
beer. As Bess Wilson had shrewdly prophesied,
Mr Nicholls and his gang had not returned to
“The Toothsome Herring,” but had departed crest-
fallen and dispirited to the place from whence
they came. After a few words with Joe Barrett,
my father was conducted upstairs and ushered
quietly into the room where I was now sleeping
profoundly, with the flaxen curls still hanging
over my face and shoulders. Having satisfied
himself of my safety—for he did not wake me,
and I only learnt later on that he had visited me
—he descended and desired his name to be sent
in to Captain Dixon.
34 AFLOAT WITH.NELSON

A very few minutes’ conversation convinced
my father that the captain of the frigate had
no greater liking for the Preventive men than
the fishermen of Silversands, and, with all a
sailor’s frankness, he avowed it openly.

“My object, Mr Brandon,” he said, “was to
get some good seamen for my ship, and as your
fellows have the character of being able to
outwit any press-gang, I was obliged to join
forees with the excisemen, who had learnt of
the intended run through information laid by
that rascal Croucher. Whilst the gaugers were
seizing the contraband goods, I hoped to secure
a score of your men, and so much are seamen
required just now, that I came in person instead
of entrusting the mission to one of my officers.
It is not a task that I like, and it is cruel work
for the poor fellows impressed. But His Majesty’s
ships must be manned, and if sufficient volun-
teers are not forthcoming, we must make up the
remainder by force.”

“Well, Captain Dixon, you are frank with
me, and I will be equally outspoken with you.
I heartily rejoice that your plan failed, and am
pleased to. think that my lad was the principal
agent in thwarting it.”

“Your lad?” repeated i Dixon, “I
don’t understand.”

“You are not the man to bear a grudge, I
A CHANGE OF SEX 35

can see,” said my father, looking into the officer’s
good-natured face, “so I may tell you at once
that it was my son Jack who overheard the
conversation between you and Stephen Croucher,
and managed to give the alarm after singeing
the rascal’s whiskers with a pistol, which I have
yet to learn how he became possessed of.”

The officer burst into ahearty laugh. “You
are all tarred with one brush at Silversands—
parson and all—and neither the excise nor the
press-gang can make anything of you.”

“I only do my duty by my parishioners when
I try to save them, and you do yours, sir, when
you try to impress them,” replied my father,
simply.

“True enough,” said the officer. “Your lad’s
presence in the cave has lost King George a
handful of good seamen, but it cannot be helped.
You do not wish any particulars to be known,
of course, and as you have shown confidence in
me, your secret shall be respected. But I cannot
answer for the Preventive men, who are very
angry at being baulked of their booty, and who
will sift the matter to the bottom. There were
two lads in the cave, and, if you will take my
advice, Mr Brandon, I should get them both
out of Silversands as soon as possible. If there
was a vacancy on board my frigate, I would
offer to take your son with me and put him
36 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

on the quarter-deck, for he must be a smart
lad with his head screwed on the right way,
but my complement of officers is filled up, and
I cannot do as I should have liked.”

My father thanked the kind-hearted sailor,
and after some further conversation, which need
not ‘be here recorded, they parted, never to meet
again, for we learnt in the following year, with
deep regret, that Captain Dixon had been killed
in action.
CHAPTER III
A WALK IN PETTICOATS

Ir was ten o'clock before I awoke and stared
about me with much surprise and a little alarm
at the strange apartment in which I found
myself, but the sight of Mr Strutwell sitting
at the window in the quaint attire which he
habitually wore, recalled like a flash every
incident of the midnight adventure, and after
staring wonderingly at my whitened hands,
I put them to my head, which I found to be
still enveloped in the flaxen ringlets.

On observing that I was awake, the actor
advanced to the bed and said pleasantly,—

“Weare awake! As serpent casts its skin,
So banished slumber flies our rested limbs.
Wouldst eat? Wouldst drink? Here,

Goddess of the spigot,
Purvey refreshments for this weakling girl.”

The last two lines were bawled down the stairs
at the full pitch of Strutwell’s voice, and although
it is abundantly certain that Bess Wilson under-

stood no single word of the jargon in which he
37
38 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

couched his demand, she had become sufficiently
accustomed to this strange -being to guess his
meaning, for when she appeared a tray was in
her hands, from which issued the appetising
odour of a rasher of bacon.

“What am I to do, Bess? Am I to get up?”
I eried, delighted to see the comely face of the
stalwart wench.

“Lawks, what a pretty girl you be! If I was
a lad, I’d-have a lass just the likes of you,” and
she kissed my cheek, which annoyed me, for,
boy-like, I resented all outward demonstrations
of affection.

“Fall to, and eat up your breakfast, then
Mr Strutwell will take ’ee up to the Rectory,
and you'll be dressed in girl’s clothes, so, Lord’s
sake! look prim and demure like a proper maid,
Master Jack. Parson was down here an hour
agone and left word what you was to do.”

“Why mayn’t I wear my own clothes?” I
asked angrily, for the idea of masquerading
through the streets of Silversands in feminine
attire was hateful to me.

“Night-hawks are abroad. Infests our streets and devastates the land,”

broke in Strutwell, striking an attitude and
scowling horribly, whilst pointing with his fore-
finger in the direction of the street beneath.
A WALK IN PETTICOATS 39

“That chap’s tongue runs like a_ cherry-
clapper, and his arms is always a-going like the
sails of a Lincolnshire windmill,” said out-
spoken Bess. “Don't ’ee take any notice of
him, dearie. What he means is that them
gauger chaps are likely to be about soon, and
if they sniff out that you slept here last night,
they’d smell a rat. Eat up your breakfast,
Master Jack, and then Mr Strutwell will help
‘ee to dress, and a winsome little maid you'll
make.”

I writhed at the last remark, but there was
no use in protesting, so I made the best of it
and fell to upon the rasher with considerable
vigour, after which I felt greatly refreshed, and
submitted to the actor’s ministrations with an
outward show of resignation.

In a short time he had completed his work,
and was, apparently, quite satisfied with the
transformation he had effected, for he led me
downstairs, and then, mounting me onthe table
in the parlour, bade me look at myself in the
mirror above the mantelpiece. There I beheld
a pale, girlish face framed in a mass of ringlets,
and the blush of shame which mounted to my
cheek at this sight would have been apparent
but for the mask of paint with which my face
was covered. As it was, in my hurry to get.
rid of the hateful spectacle, I leapt down from
- 40 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

the table with unbecoming agility, and begged
the actor to end the farce by taking me home
at once.

Poor Mr Strutwell! This was no comedy to
him, but a tragic proceeding which his cracked
brain invested with the deepest interest. Bess
would have called Will down to see me, but
this I stoutly refused to allow, knowing the
sense of the ridiculous possessed by that
youngster, and not feeling disposed to be a butt
for his jeers in the days to come. So, after
many solemn warnings from the actor as to my
gait and the deportment I should assume,
together with a final kiss from Bess Wilson, we
sallied forth, my hands, for the first time in my
life, being encased in gloves, the fingers of which
were considerably too long.

Even at the hour when I write this, my cheek
grows red at the memory of that walk. If poor
Strutwell had only gone on his way quietly I
should have walked beside him in the same
fashion, but the overpowering sense of responsi-
bility with which he imagined himself to be
invested led to a thousand grotesque vagaries
on his part. Luckily the street through which
we had to pass was almost deserted, for the men
were all in hiding, and the few faces at the
windows were those of women and children.
Apparently my companion considered this most
A WALK IN PETTICOATS 4I

natural circumstance as part of a deep-laid con-
spiracy, to frustrate which his utmost vigilance
must be brought into play. Scarcely had we
left the inn twenty yards behind us than he
suddenly stopped, ordered me in a tragic whisper,
which could be heard for fifty yards around, to
remain where I was, and then started off on
tip-toe with a finger laid mysteriously across his
lips, to peep stealthily round the corner of an
adjoining alley. Finding no hidden danger to
exist, he .stalked back with head erect, an an
expression of triumph on his face, to seize me by
the hand and lead me forward until his crazy
brain imagined another phantom peril, when the
same ceremony was gone through with variations
which it would be tedious to recount.
As we proceeded, he mouthed out,—

“Her watchful scouts had cleared the way,

’ No lurking foe in ambush lay,

The maid pursued her reckless flight

Past torrent, vale, and rock-crowned height.”
And tears of rage and mortification rose to my
eyes, as I heard bursts of ill-suppressed merriment
from the neighbouring windows, whilst the children
gathered on the doorsteps stared in speechless
amazement.

These ill-timed stoppages, besides drawing upon

us unnecessary attention, caused considerable delay,
and we had barely made our way half the length
42 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

of the street when the actor hurried back from one
of his reconnaissances, with a grave face and less
theatrical contortion than usual. He had evidently
seen something which caused him alarm, but this
did not prevent him from whispering to me,—
“ On, stricken maid, in search of rest
Find shelter on thy sire’s fond breast,

The hateful crew are close at hand,
Now must thy father by thee stand.

Feign weakness, and lean on me for support,” he
added hurriedly, in a low tone, quite unlike his
former rambling utterances, for the presence of
real danger had brought back the poor fellow’s
scattered senses.

He passed his left arm round my waist, whilst
I leant my head listlessly upon his shoulder, and
searcely had we adopted this position when Mr
Nicholls, followed by four gaugers, turned suddenly
out of a side street in front of us. Strutwell
played his part well, and we went slowly forward
as though unconscious of their presence. No
suspicion that I was other than I seemed entered
into the minds of the Preventive men, but their
leader thought fit to vent his ill-humour by dis-
paraging remarks and a coarse jest.

“Halt, men!” cried Nicholls. “Halt, and stand
aside whilst these vagabond mummers pass.”

I could feel the arm which encircled me twitch-
ing nervously at the insult, but with the skill of
A WALK IN PETTICOATS 43

his craft, Strutwell allowed no sign of resentment
to appear in his face, merely bending his head
over mine and whispering a few words of en-
couragement.

From the deserted appearance of the street, the
intruders evidently thought that they could do
much as they pleased in Silversands, particularly
with the press-gang in the village, for they re-
mained unaware that Captain Dixon and_ his
seamen had departed after an early breakfast.
This consciousness of security led to a fresh
insult, and, when we were abreast of the gaugers,
their leader took off his cap with mock humility,
saying to his men, “Uncover, lads! salute the
player and his whey-faced trull,” and he showed
them the example by making us a low, derisive
bow.

This was more than my companion could stand,
for he was of gentle birth although in straitened
circumstances, and I felt the muscles of his arm
harden as he suddenly lifted me over the thres-
hold of the nearest cottage, then with a bound he
was across the strect, his left arm shot out a clean
blow straight from the hip, followed by a dull,
smashing sound, and Mr Nicholls, the chief Pre-
ventive Officer, lay prostrate in the kennel,
engaged in staunching the blood which flowed
from his mouth and nose.

His followers rushed upon Strutwell, who, with ~
44 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

his back planted against a wall, fought like a lion
at bay; but he was not to continue the combat
long unaided, for assistance speedily came to
hand. For the last few hours a feeling of sup-
pressed wrath had burned in the breasts of the
Silversands fishing-folk. By the treachery of
Stephen Croucher and the consequent failure to
run the contraband cargo, the men had lost money
and the women the silks and other frippery which
formed their share on such occasions. In addition,
the men had narrowly escaped the clutches of
the press-gang—the worst fate which could befall
them—so it needed but a spark to cause a con-
flagration, and Strutwell’s prompt action had this
effect. It would have been better for the gaugers
to have stirred up a nest of hornets than to have
provoked the villagers in their present mood.
From every door in the street, stout-limbed fisher-
women hurried forth, armed with broomsticks,
mops and rolling-pins, and fell upon the Preventive
men, who would gladly have cut and run when
_ they found their shouts for help unanswered by
the seamen of the press-gang, but were quite un-
able to break through the hostile throng surround-
ing them. In less than a minute the struggle was
over. Strutwell had disposed of one of his foes,
two others lay on the ground beside their leader,
the fourth was a prisoner in the hands of a
huge woman, whose gruff voice showed that the
A WALK IN PETTICOATS 45

short petticoats were worn by one of the sterner
sex. This individual had seized the first weapon
which presented itself—a battered old frying-pan
—and had brought this homely utensil down
with such force on the skull of the gauger that
the bottom gave way, and the fellow found him-
self fitted with an iron collar, by the handle of
which his captor dragged him along triumphantly,
crying out, “Shoulder the others and come along
wi’ me, lasses. We'll give ’em a drink of salt
water at the pier-head, to wash the spirits out
of their constitooshuns. Then we'll tar and
feather ’em, and send ’em home, like the cowardly
chickens they be.” A roar of laughter followed
the suggestion. The fallen men were hoisted up
and borne away by the infuriated women, and
serious mischief would certainly have followed
had not my father appeared upon the scene, and
used his influence to divert his flock from the
pastime they meditated. He could not, however,
save them from a good ducking, after receiving
which the unhappy creatures were led triumph-
antly to the outskirts of the village and allowed
to depart, followed by many threats of what
would befall them if they again thought fit to
honour Silversands with a visit.

Whilst the ducking process was going on,
Strutwell took me from the cottage in which
he had placed me for safety, and we resumed
46 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

our walk to the Rectory, but this time at a
smart pace and without halting, although occa-
sionally my strange companion brandished his
fists, and I could hear him muttering to him-
self,—
“?*Zounds, show me what thou’lt do :
_ Woul’t weep? woul’t fight? woul’t fast? woul’t tear thy -
self ? :
drink up Esil ? eat a crocodile ?

Pll do’t.”

Poor Strutwell! the class to which he belonged
is now extinct as the dodo. Dicing and ex-
travagance had brought him down from a good
position to the réle of a strolling player. This
doubtless preyed upon his mind, and as will
be guessed he was already half insane at the
time of which I write. I heard afterwards
that he died in a madhouse, a raving lunatic;
but after he had handed me to my mother at
the Rectory I saw him no more, neither will
he re-appear again in these pages. So ended
my attempt to turn myself into a smuggler,
and I may here say that the action of the
Silversands women in maltreating gaugers brought
with it no serious result. The men themselves
were little disposed to own that they had been
beaten by a parcel of petticoats, and, beyond
the ducking and a few bruises, they were little
the worse for the encounter. Mr Nicholls had
A WALK IN PETTICOATS 47

overstepped his duty in searching “The Tooth-
some Herring” without a warrant, and although
the actor had handled him pretty severely, he
felt that discretion was the better part of valour,
and let the matter drop. This resolve, however,
was not known at the time, and my parents, after
anxious consultation, determined to follow Captain
Dixon’s advice, and get me away, for some time
at least, from the scene of my escapade.

It is difficult to say whether I was regarded
at the Rectory as a hero or a scapegrace. The
servants, who all belonged to the village, evidently
looked upon me in the former light, and I imagine
that my mother was of the same way of thinking,
but my father, whatever his private opinion may
have been, manifested his sense of my conduct
by giving me a sound thrashing the moment he
returned home; in fact, I had hardly resumed
the dignity of a boy’s apparel before I was
compelled to let down my small-clothes for this
ignominious purpose. I need say no more on this
painful subject. At that time the rod was the
order of the day, and I daresay a sound whipping
did me a great deal of good.
CHAPTER IV
SIR HORATIO NELSON

Durine the afternoon, I observed that my small
wardrobe was being put in order and generally
overhauled by the maids. This at once aroused
my suspicions, and made me sure that my early
removal was meditated. Neither the girls to
whom I applied for information, nor my little
sister Emily, could tell me anything, so I was
driven at length to take my courage in both
hands, as the French say, and apply to my
mother.

“You are to go to school at Burnham. Your
father will drive you there to-morrow.”

“May I run down and tell Will Barrett?” I
asked, when I had recovered composure, for I
must confess that my courage sank at the first
thought of leaving home, since, up to this time,
my father had been my only tutor.

My mother hesitated, but ultimately gave me
leave, and I ran out of the house at top speed
on my way to the village, but my progress was

even more halting than it had been in the fore-
48
SIR HORATIO NELSON 49

noon, for the fisher-folk insisted that I had saved
them from the terrors of the press-gang, and I
had to submit to many kindly greetings and
much praise, which would have pleased my
vanity had it not been that all the women and
girls lifted me up and kissed me, and to be
treated in this familiar fashion in the open street
did not at all accord with my idea of the respect
due to a hero.

I found that Will Barrett had undergone the
same discipline at the hands of his parent as
myself, so neither had the advantage of the other
on this score, and we were able to mingle our
sorrows on this tender subject.

“T shall run away and go to sea,” said Will
“Captain Dixon’s frigate is at Harwich, and wants
men.”

“But you are not a man,” I said innocently .
“you are only a little boy.”

“Tm man enough to thrash you,” cried Will,
indignantly.

“Six of you might, but no two of you could,”
I retorted angrily, using the words which I had
heard dropped during a quarrel between two
fishermen on the quay.

“We'll see,” said Will, and at it we went,
until Bess Wilson, attracted by the scufiling,
rushed up and cuffed both our heads soundly.

There was nothing unusual in this sudden

D
50 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

quarrel; good friends as we were, I do not think
that we were ever two hours in each other’s
company without a fight. The prize-ring was in
the height of its glory in those days, and the
art of self-defence was considered a necessary
accomplishment for every Englishman, whatever
his degree. We youngsters followed suit, of
course, but no animosity was ever borne when
the matter had been fairly settled, and victory ©
had declared itself for one side or the other. It
is the fashion now to call this rough-and-ready
method of settling disputes brutal. With this
I cannot agree. A good fight showed what lads
were made of, whilst it taught them to be manly
and self-reliant.

Forced by Bess’s strong arm to keep the peace,
we had no alternative but to relapse into con-
fidences.

“Tf you run away to sea, I'll go .too,” I said
doggedly.

“But you are going to school at Burnham.”

“JT don’t care; I can run away from Burnham
as easily as from the Rectory here,” I replied
undauntedly. “Or we could go together, if you
will wait until my holidays come.” So it was
agreed, and we parted.

That evening I mixed my father’s grog for the
last time for many a long day, and I observed
that the brandy in the decanter had not been
SIR HORATIO NELSON 51

replenished, although the wind continued to sit
in the south-east. Poor little Emily cried bitterly
when we parted for the night, for my father
and I were to make an early start, and I should
not see her in the morning. Under the impression
that bold smugglers were never known to weep,
I restrained my tears until I reached my bed-
room, then, with no one to look on, they flowed
unrestrainedly.

When I descended at daybreak, both my parents
were already at breakfast, and the greeting which
I received from each was as affectionate as ever.
If I had done wrong I had been punished, and
there it ended in a manner which, to my mind,
is a great deal better than brooding over little
peccadilloes and keeping up an estrangement for
several days.

The mare and gig were brought round to the
front door, and I mounted, after having been
kissed by my mother and all the maids. When
was this hateful kissing to end? I wondered. My
little box was stowed away, my father took the
reins, and we were off.

“Give my kind regards to Mr Nelson, John,”
cried out my mother; “and compliment him on
his son’s achievements.”

The mare stepped out well, and we bowled
rapidly over the long, level road. I remember
that we passed several sheets of half-frozen water,
52 ' AFLOAT WITH NELSON

on which a large number of wildfowl were con-
gregated, whilst a strange cry overhead caused me
to look up, when I saw a great flight of swans
winging their way inland with outstretched necks
and a loud, rustling sound as their pinions beat
the air.

By one o’clock we had reached the little village
of Burnham Thorpe, and pulled the mare up at
the door of the Rectory, an unpretentious house,
little more than a large cottage in size.

Before his appointment to the living of Silver-
sands, my father had been curate at the little
town of Burnham, and had often assisted the
Rector of Burnham Thorpe in his duties, for Mr
Nelson’s health was far from good. In this
manner an intimacy amounting to friendship
had sprung up between the two families, more
particularly with Mr Nelson’s sons, William and
Horatio. The latter had been then a captain in
the Royal Navy, an obscure and unknown ofiicer,
waiting for employment afloat; now he was
Rear-Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson, K.C.B., the most
promising officer in His Majesty’s Service, the hero
‘of St Vincent and Teneriffe, with a name known
throughout the length and breadth of England.

“What good wind blows you here, John Bran-
don?” asked the old rector, when we had been
ushered into his study and were warming our-
selves at the fire.
SIR HORATIO NELSON 53

“T am taking this youngster to school at Burn-
ham,” replied my father, “and seized the oppor-
tunity of calling to see you and to congratulate
you upon Sir Horatio’s brilliant achievements.”

As he spoke the door opened, and a slight
figure in undress naval uniform advanced into the
room, holding out his left hand—the right sleeve
was empty and looped up to the breast of the
coat — saying, “Always plain Horatio with you,
John Brandon.”

My father grasped the extended hand in speech-
less astonishment. “I knew you were in Eng-
land,” he said at last, “but never dreamt it
would be my good luck to find you here. The
papers said that you were at Bath recovering
from your wound. Let me first offer you my
heartiest congratulations, and then inquire after
your health.”

My father’s speech at the beginning was falter-
ing and awkward, for he was evidently em-
barrassed at this unexpected meeting with one
who, although an old friend, had no claim to
greatness in the days of their intimacy. The
parson was four years the senior of the sailor
in age, but whilst one had remained an obscure
country clergyman, the other had leapt at a
bound into fame and position. The Admiral’s
quick sympathy understood the situation at a
glance, and, with the marvellous tact which never
54 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

failed him, he put an end to my father’s awkward-
ness by advancing to me and laying his hand
kindly upon my head.

“Surely you don’t forget your shooting-com-
panion, little Jack?” he asked, sinking into an
arm-chair and drawing me between his knees.
“Do you remember how you crawled out on
that mud-flat to bring back the ducks I had
shot when the old retriever turned sulky and
went home? I shall never handle a gun again
now, for the Dons have robbed me of a fin,” and
he shook his empty sleeve laughingly.

I stared up into the clean-shaven, kindly face
in mute admiration, and with a thrill of pride
and delight that the great sailor should not only
remember me, but even the little circumstance
that had happened when I last saw him, four
years before. What I answered, or what I did,
I cannot recall. I do not think that I spoke
at all, but stood with my eyes riveted on the
man who was the hero of our Silversands fisher-
men, and of whose daring genius they were
never tired of talking. Perhaps this speech-
less tribute was the best form in which my
admiration could have shown itself, but sud-
denly there rushed across my mind a story
which I had heard upon the quay at Silver-
sands, and I asked impulsively, “What did you
do with the bundle of swords?”
SIR HORATIO NELSON 55

“Do you mean the swords I took on board the
San Josef?” laughed the Admiral, “Has that
story reached you here in quiet Norfolk, John?”
he added, turning to my father. “Well, Jack, I
think I can gratify your curiosity, for I have
one of them here with me now.”

“May I see it?” I cried, with all a boy’s
pertinacious eagerness.

Nelson left the room, to return immediately with
the coveted weapon, which he laid in my hands
saying, “That sword belonged to a brave man
youngster, who died for his king and his
country,” and there was a touch of sadness in
his voice as he spoke. “I have brought it here
to present it to the city of Norwich. It was
worn by the Spanish Admiral.”

-“You will dine with us, of course,” broke in Mr
Nelson. “Dinner will be ready in a few minutes.”

“Then we can have a yarn over the old days,
John,” said the Admiral, “and Jack and I can
renew our friendship.”

Isaw my father lay his hand upon the sailor's
shoulder, and heard him whisper, “Greatness has
not spoiled you, Horatio. I thank God that I
have such a friend, and that England has such
an Admiral.”

>

After dinner my father related my midnight
adventure at Silversands, and the precautions
which he was compelled to take by withdrawing
56 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

me from the place until all fear of inquiry had
died away. The Admiral seemed to take a deep
interest in the whole of that night’s proceedings,
applying to me for information, and asking such
questions as showed that the subject was occupy-
ing his entire attention.

“Who is this fellow, Stephen Croucher?” he
asked.

“His is a curious story,” replied my father.
“Stephen is the gon of an old man now living
in my parish, who was once a University man
and a Fellow of his College. He entertained queer
notions, was lax in his morality, and took to the
bottle, finally losing his position by marrying im-
properly and much beneath him. He and his wife
came to live near Silversands, and Stephen was
their only child. Poor old Croucher sank lower
and lower under the woman’s harsh rule and
sharp tongue, until he became a_ habitual
drunkard. About ten years ago she died. Then
matters mended a little, and the old student found
time to give young Steve a good education. He
proved a clever lad, endowed with a marvellous
gift for the acquirement of languages, and I am
told that he speaks both French and Italian per-
fectly. This acquirement caused him to be sought
out by some of our smugglers as a means of
communication with the French, and I know the
young fellow went to St Malo and became quite
SIR HORATIO NELSON gy

as much at home under the tricolour as under
the Union Jack. He showed a disposition to run
crooked from his earliest boyhood, taking after
his mother, and resembling his father in nothing
but his aptitude for learning. He is a good and
daring seaman, and in one particular he differs
entirely from his father—he never drinks. This
extraordinary self-restraint in a man of his
position has secured him great ascendency over
his companions; but all that is gone now, for he
will never dare to show his face in Silversands
again to his dying day, and if any of our men
fall across him there will be bad work. I pity
the old man, who clung to his unworthy son and
will miss him terribly. For my part, as parson
of the parish, I am remarkably glad that such a
young scoundrel is out of it.”

“Yes, John, I don’t think that men who give
information to the Excise are likely to be in much
favour at Silversands,” said the Admiral, glancing
at my father with an amused twinkle in his eye;
“but come out and take a turn with me in the
garden.”

.They arose and went out, leaving me alone
with the old rector, who took no notice of me
whatever, being apparently occupied with his
own thoughts. He was a gentle, narrow-minded,
well-meaning country parson of the old style, and
I well remember as a child what it meant to sit
58 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

through one of his sermons, which commonly
occupied from sixty to eighty minutes. His figure
was frail and his health feeble, and both these
qualities he transmitted to his son ; but by no other
means could the relationship in which they stood
to one another be guessed at. The sympathy,
vivacity, and genius, for which the great sailor
was remarkable, must have come to him from
his mother.

Presently the Admiral and my father returned,
and I observed a look of great satisfaction on the
face of the latter. Sir Horatio called me to him
and said abruptly, “Well, Jack, how should you
like to thrash the Dons, and take a sword such as
I showed you before dinner? Should you like it
better than going to school?”

“With you, sir?” I asked, trembling with eager-
ness. “May I go to sea with you? Oh! I should
love it.”

“John,” he asked, turning to my father, “are
you prepared to spare this youngster? If you
and his mother like to trust him to me, I’ll do my
best to forward his interest and to turn him out a
good sailor and a good officer, and I will see that
he does not forget the precepts he learnt under
his father’s roof, as I have ever remembered those
taught me in this very room,” and he looked
affectionately at the old rector as he spoke.

I now know that Sir Horatio had made this
SIR HORATIO NELSON 59

most generous offer to my father when he drew
him aside into the garden, but had bargained that
his friend’s parental authority was not to be em-
ployed in forming my decision. I am an old man
now, and have passed through a career as chequered
and hard as falls to the lot of most sailors, yet the
memory of the moment when that brilliant offer
for protection and patronage was made to me, a
youngster of twelve years old, by the greatest
sailor the world has ever known, will never be
obliterated from my mind. The tears of joy that —
sprang up into my eyes nearly blinded me, and
all speech was choked by the intensity of my
emotion. There could be no mistake as to my
wishes, and I think that the generous-hearted
Admiral was pleased at my attitude, for he con-
tinued, “That is agreed then, Jack. You shall
return with me to London, where your outfit shall
be got ready, and then you shall go down to my
flag-ship, the Vanguard, at Portsmouth. Why,
what is it now?” he added, for he saw that I was
struggling with some request.

“Please, sir, may Will Barrett come too?” I
faltered, more than half afraid of my own audacity,
but mindful of my promise to my friend.

My father, I saw, was annoyed at my request,
but the Admiral put us at once at our ease by
laughing, “You are quite right to stick to your
chum, youngster. If your young friend’s father
60 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

likes to send the boy to Portsmouth, he shall be
received on board, and it will depend on his own
good conduct whether he ever exchanges the
forecastle for the quarter-deck.

Sir Horatio was returning to town in three
days’ time, and it was arranged that I should be
an inmate of the Rectory until his departure.
My father also accepted Mr Nelson’s invitation
to remain there until the following morning, when
his duties would necessitate his return to Silver-
sands. I was permitted to stay with my elders
during the evening, and listened, open-mouthed, to
the answers given by the Admiral to my father’s
questions concerning his recent exploits. As re-
gards his own personal share in the victory of
Cape St Vincent the great sailor was modestly
silent, but he described the action in terms which
even I could understand, more particularly as he
illustrated the positions of the opposing fleets,
and of the several ships, by placing fragments of
biscuit on the table; and I hold it as one of the
greatest events in my life to have been permitted
to hear the account of the fight from the lips of
the man who contributed so largely towards that
glorious victory.

“We had been cruising for some time off the
coast of Spain in the hope of falling in with the
Spanish fleet, which we knew would make an
attempt to gain Cadiz. Our force consisted of
SIR HORATIO.NELSON 61

fifteen ships of the line—six of which were three-
deckers —with several frigates and small craft. I
flew my broad pennant on board the Captain,
with as fine a crew as ever trod a plank, and also
a small detachment of the 69th Regiment. It was
weary work waiting for the Dons, and all hands
prayed for their speedy appearance.

“A thick fog hung over the sea on the morning
of the 14th February—St Valentine’s Day—and
we could only tell the positions of the ships
nearest to us by the sound of their bells struck
at intervals. About ten o’clock the fog lifted,
and there, within a few leagues of us, to the
southward, lay the Spanish fleet in two divisions,
numbering twenty-seven sail of the line, most of
them far superior in size to any ships in our
fleet.

“It would have done your heart good, John,
to have heard the cheer that rose from our fellows
as they caught’ sight of these great lumbering
arks, rolling from side to side in the Atlantic
swell, and huddled together so confusedly that
the two divisions were almost one, and the cheers
were redoubled when, from the Victory, carrying
Sir John Jervis’s flag, the signal was given to form
line ahead—that is to say, in single file, one ship’
following immediately in the wake of the other,”
and he arranged a row of biscuits on the table
to make the formation clear to us.
62 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“The wind was from the westward and so fair
for the Dons to run into Cadiz. Our ships fell
into line according to the position they occupied
when the signal was made, and thus it chanced
that the Captain was the last but two, whilst
the Culloden, under my dear friend Troubridge,
took the lead.

“As we bore down upon them, the Spaniards
made a clumsy attempt to form line of battle,
but with very ill effect, and the Culloden was
down upon the leading ships of their lee division
—if such it can be called—before they were any-
thing like in order. The enemy opened fire upon
Troubridge as he approached, and it seemed to
us as if he would fall on board of the nearest
Spaniard, so closely did he approach her, but
when a collision seemed inevitable he put his
helm down, and as the Culloden shot up into
the wind, she gave the Don the whole of her
double-shotted larboard broadside and then stood
to the northward. It was a pretty sight to
witness, but there are sure to be hard knocks
wherever Troubridge finds himself.

“The ship following the Culloden stood on and
delivered her broadside in a similar manner. Then
the Victory signalled that the line was to tack
in succession, that is to say that each ship was
to stand on until she had reached the point where
the Culloden went about and then follow her
SIR HORATIO NELSON 63

example, by which means, as you will easily
understand, our liné would remain unbroken.

“The Dons evidently saw Sir John’s intention,
and also that this manceuvre, if persevered in, would
afford them an opportunity of passing astern of
the last ship of our line and making a run of it
with a fair wind for Cadiz, and this they at once
attempted todo. I saw that they would slip out
of our clutches unless something was done imme-
diately to stop them; indeed, the leading Spaniards
were already on the lee quarter of the Excellent,
the last ship in our line. There was no time to
signal and ask for permission, so, acting on my
own responsibility, I wore the Captain out of the
line and headed her straight for the Spanish
Admiral’s flagship, a huge four-decker carrying
one hundred and thirty-six guns, named the
Santissima Trinidad.

“Then we fell to work, hammer and tongs, and
at one time I had the fire of nine ships upon
me, but I cared nothing about what happened
to me so that I stopped their escape; and
Troubridge in the jolly old Culloden soon came
to. my assistance, for Sir John had recognised
my object and had signalled the Excellent and
other ships to support me. I can tell you, John,
that it was a brave sight to watch the way our
fellows handled their guns. The huge four-decker
towered high above the little Captain, and every
64 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

shot told against the ribs of the Don, which, after
a while, hoisted an English ensign in token of
surrender, but we were too busy to take posses-
sion of her.

“You must not suppose that the Captain had
come off scathless, for I had lost a great number
in killed and wounded, my masts, rigging and
running gear were cut to pieces, and the ship
had become almost unmanageable. I had been
pounding into a two-decker called the San Nicolas
and into a three-decker called the San Josef, after
we had made a good account of the Santissima
Trinidad, and observing that these two ships had
dropped alongside of each other, I thought it best
to join them as the Captain was quite unfit to
chase; so I put my helm down and my bow fell
aboard of the two-decker’s quarter, the Captain’s
spritsail-yard hooking into the lanyards of her
mizzen rigging, and thus we all three lay in a
heap, grinding together in the long Atlantic swell.

“Going forward to the forecastle, I gave the
order to board, and a number of our fellows and
many of the soldiers scrambled into the mizzen
chains and quarter-gallery, a feat requiring much
agility, as the ships rolled heavily and the din
below was infernal, for our main and lower deck:
guns were slamming away all the time, and the
smoke was blinding. A corporal of the 69th
Regiment broke open a quarter-gallery window
SIR HORATIO NELSON 65

with the butt end of his musket. He was an
Irishman, and I heard him say, ‘It’s knocking at
your door I am, Father Nicolas. Where’s your
manners, ye ould Spanish haythen ?’ ;

“T got into the cabin through the opening, and
we found the doors locked, but the soldiers beat
down the bulkheads, and we rushed on to the
quarter-deck, where several pistols were fired at
us by the Spanish officers, though I don’t think
they intended to hit us. Many of our fellows
had climbed over the bulwarks on to the poop,
and one of them shot down the Spanish brigadier,
whereupon the remainder surrendered, whilst
my friend, Captain Berry, hauled down the
prize’s colours, and a strong party of my men
rushed below to drive the Spanish crew under
hatches.

“Meanwhile a brisk fire of musketry was opened
upon us from the San Josef, and there was only
one way of silencing this, so I called for more
men from the Captain, and we prepared to board
the three-decker; but before we could do so, a
Spanish officer looked over the side and said
that she surrendered. Our fellows swarmed over
her side, and with the help of a dozen friendly
arms I was soon amongst them, and then it
was, whilst standing on the quarter-deck of the
second prize, that the Spanish officers gave me
their swords, which I handed to one of my

E
66 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

bargemen, William Fearney, as I received them;
and this man, who seemed to think the whole
thing an excellent joke, tucked them under his
arm like a bundle of firewood. The Spanish
Admiral was below, dying of his wounds, but
he sent his sword up to me, and that is the
weapon which your youngster, Jaek, had in his
hands just now, and I saved it for presentation
to the city of Norwich. It was a novel position,
and I do not think that anyone ever before
boarded an enemy’s three-decker by making use
of a captured two-decker as a bridge. It tickled
the fancy of my men immensely; indeed, they
regarded the whole day’s work as a bit of
skylarking, although it was rather grim fun to
the poor fellows lying wounded in the Captain’s
cockpit, and to those who lost the number of their
mess altogether.”

“And you came out of it unhurt?” asked my
father.

“I received a blow on my side, but in what
manner I could never tell,” said Sir Horatio.
“And with the capture of the San Josef my
personal share in the action was over. As the
other British ships passed the Captain and her
prizes, still lying in a heap, they cheered us
heartily, and I was glad of it, for my men had
done their work nobly, and deserved this recog-
nition; but it is a mistake to think that the
SIR HORATIO NELSON 67

Captain took the two Spaniards single-handed,
for both of them were virtually knocked out of
time when we boarded. Our chief merit lay in
stopping the escape of the bulk of the Spanish
fleet into Cadiz, and holding them in play until
the English ships could come up. As it was,
several of the disabled Dons managed to crawl
into port, amongst them the huge Santissima
Trinidad, which had struck, but in the hurry
had not been taken possession of.

“Politically, it was a great victory, for it
prevented the junction of the Spanish fleet with
the French; but although the enemy’s ships were
of great size, and they were numerically superior
to us, their crews were inexperienced and the
discipline very lax.”

“I understand the action perfectly now,” said
my father, “and can appreciate the great share
you had in bringing it to a final issue, although
I know that you'll not allow me to pay you
compliments to your face.”

“But you must hear about Teneriffe as well,
John,” and a shade passed over the Admiral’s face
as, unconsciously, he glanced down at his empty
sleeve. “The attempt to capture Santa Cruz,”
he said, “was a failure, but I shall always hold
that I was fully justified in making the attack.
Wind, weather, and the darkness of the night,
all combined to make our task as difficult as
68 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

possible. If we were unsuccessful, the enter-
prise cast no reflection on British courage. The
Dons claim it as a victory, I suppose, although
gallant Troubridge brought his men off with
all the honours of war. They gave me some-
thing to remember that night by to the last
hour of my life.”

“Does the wounded arm still cause you great
pain?” asked my father, forbearing to seek
further information regarding the Santa Cruz
disaster.

“Not now,” replied the Admiral. “Up to a
couple of months ago the agony was at times
excruciating, for the nerve had been tied in with
an artery, and it was feared that a second
amputation would be necessary, but the nerve
freed itself and then the pain ceased. But I
have talked quite enough about myself, John,
and it is time our young friend Jack went to
roost.”

I went to bed but not to sleep, for the glamour
of the great sailor's personality had entered into
my soul, and, without being able to express it
to myself, I could understand already why both
officers and men would follow to the death such
a leader as Horatio Nelson.
CHAPTER V

H.M.S. VANGUARD

I AWOKE in the morning with a joyous feeling
at my heart, but this was soon damped when,
after breakfast, the mare and gig were brought
round to the front door to bear my father back
to Silversands. It is all very well to say that
as a matter of course the young birds must leave
the nest when they are fully feathered and pre-
pared to take care of themselves. To embrace a
career and launch forth into the ocean of life is
very fascinating in the abstract, but when it
comes to actually saying good-bye, and breaking
with all the old associations, it becomes a different
matter, more particularly for a youngster just
thirteen years of age; so when my father em-
braced me, and, in a choking voice, prayed God
to bless me and keep me firm in the duty that
I owed to my king and my country, I fell
a-sobbing as if my heart would break, and for
one moment I think I should have been glad to
creep into the gig beside the parent who had

ever been so indulgent to me and be carried back
69
70 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

to my mother and the Rectory I loved so well.
Even the purse containing five golden guineas
which was slipped into my hand failed to console
me, and I wandered to the garden gate from
whence I watched the retreating gig until it was
lost to sight in the distance. Then I felt a hand
on my shoulder, and the Admiral’s kindly voice
said, “This is what we all of us must go through,
Jack. Don’t mind your tears, my lad; no brave
man need be ashamed of shedding them when he
leaves his home and those he loves.”

Three days later Sir Horatio left Burnham
Thorpe for London. I was not witness to the
leave-taking between the old rector and his son,
but when we entered the post-chaise the latter
was visibly affected, and spoke no word during
the whole of the first stage. My own grief had
already passed away, to be succeeded by a joyful
expectation of all the good things that the future
held in store for me, and the rapid motion of
the vehicle, with the new objects that met my
eye, filled me with wild excitement. Hitherto
I had never been in any conveyance more im-
posing than my father’s gig, and to be whirled
over the frosty road by a pair of quick-stepping
horses, with a smart post-boy to guide them, was
in itself a delight. At each inn where we changed
horses, or stopped for refreshment, there occurred
a scene which filled me with pride. The Admiral
-H.M.S. VANGUARD qt

had given orders that his name was not to be
made known, but the precaution was useless, for
that slight figure with the looped-up sleeve could
never be disguised. People thronged the carriage
or besieged the portals of the inn, and, when the
hero appeared, loud huzzas were raised; mothers
lifted their children aloft that they might see the
great sailor, and many a heartfelt “God bless you,
sir!” arose from the crowd. The Admiral received
this spontaneous recognition of his popularity with
kindly smiles and a gentle dignity which never
deserted him, and I think the enthusiasm of the
people gratified him, for it showed that they
appreciated the great share he bore in the victory
off Cape St Vincent which the Government and
Admiralty had only ungraciously and grudgingly
acknowledged. This, of course, I only learnt
later on, for I never heard one murmur pass the
lips of the Admiral himself, although he must
have felt deeply the slight conveyed by the
omission of his name in the despatches sent home
after the eventful 14th February. It has now
been ascertained that professional jealousy led to
_ this extraordinary and unwarrantable oversight.
On’ reaching London, we drove straight to
Conduit Street, where Lady Nelson had secured
apartments, and was herself awaiting the arrival
of her husband. Her ladyship was pleased to
receive me very graciously, and behaved towards
72 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

me with a motherly kindness which quite won
my heart. She was good enough to superintend
the purchase of my outfit, and before I had
been two days in the house she had drawn
from me all the particulars of my smuggling
escapade, together with such fragments of poor
Strutwell’s disjointed utterances.as I could
remember. These seemed to amuse her vastly,
and whenever she wished to make merry at my
expense she would call me “Clarinda,” and bid
me come and be kissed—an offer which invariably
led to some petulant reply on my part, and an
assertion of my own dignity, which must have
been very grotesque in such a little jackanapes.

These are small things to chronicle, but it
would be sheer ingratitude on my part were I
to leave unmentioned this sweet woman who
was my protector and benefactress in those
early days, and whose affectionate friendship
has been of life-long duration.

Under her direction I was taken to see some of
the sights of London—notably St Paul’s Cathe-
dral, the Royal Exchange, with its menagerie
of wild beasts, the great Monument, and the
Tower of London.

When I visited the latter place, I wore, for
the first time, my midshipman’s uniform, and
my delight when the Beef-eaters and sentries
accorded me a salute may be imagined, and
H.M.S. VANGUARD 73

certainly served to impress the whole scene
vividly on my memory.

My outfit being completed, there was nothing
further to detain me in London, so the Admiral
procured me a passage to Portsmouth in a
Government tender which lay in the stream off
Tower Hill, and with my arrival on board
this abominable little craft my sea-life may
be said to have fairly begun.

It took the Phantom eleven days to make
the passage to Portsmouth, for she sailed very
slowly, was deeply laden, and a strong westerly
gale was blowing, which kept us at anchor in
the Downs for nearly a week. The little vessel
was crowded with supernumeraries, many of
them pressed men, who sought occasion to desert
on the first opportunity, so that the master of
the tender anchored her as far from the shore
as possible, which caused the. vessel to pitch
and roll horribly in the short, chopping sea.
The accommodation was quite insufficient for the
number of hands she had on board, and during
the whole time that I was cooped up in this
miserable little craft’ I never once took my
clothes off, and scarcely got a decent meal. It
was a rough experience for a youngster fresh
from the comforts of home, and rubbed much
of the gilt off the gingerbread of a sailor's life,
whilst taking the gloss out of my brand-new
74 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

uniform; but it had the good effect of curing
me of sea-sickness—though that malady visited
me lightly, as I was accustomed to knocking
about in our fishing-boats at Silversands.

When the Phantom ultimately reached Ports-
mouth, I placed myself and my chest in a
waterman’s wherry, and ordered the man _ to
pull me to the Vanguard.

“Ah! she’s alongside the dockyard, and her
crew are hulked on board the Centurion. I
had better take your traps there, sir.”

To the old hulk we accordingly went, and
I mounted her side with some trepidation, for
it was the first time that I had ever set foot
on board a King’s ship.

“Hullo, youngster! Come on board to join?”
cried a lieutenant, advancing towards me as I
stood confused and irresolute. “Well, go below
until your chest is struck down, and then go to
the Vanguard in the first boat that leaves the
hulk. You look half-starved,” he added kindly;
“tell the gun-room steward to give you some
grub before you come on deck. Another nut
for the Devil to crack,’ I heard him say to an
officer who was standing by as I descended
the hatchway.

I found the gun-room deserted, for all hands
were on board the Vanguard; but a cabin-boy
ferreted out some cold meat and biscuit, which
H.M.S. VANGUARD 75

I had difficulty in swallowing, for all around
me seemed so strange and lonely. I had expected
to meet youngsters of my own age, to be ques-
tioned, perhaps to be bullied, and the desolation
of this empty place weighed heavily on my
spirits; so, having made a pretence of eating,
I went on deck where the officer to whom I
had first spoken ordered me into a boat which
was then going to the ship.

The Vanguard was lying with her larboard
side alongside the Camber, with her lower masts
and bowsprit already in, and the men were turn-
ing in the dead-eyes of the lower rigging as we
came alongside. A deafening noise struck my
ears as I stepped over the gangway, for the
caulkers were at work on the upper deck, and
the din they made with their mallets and irons
was deafening. In a timid voice I asked one
of the seamen for the first lieutenant, and was
pointed out an officer standing on the poop and
bawling out orders to a party of men on the
wharf. Picking my way through the caulkers
I mounted the poop ladder and stood beside this
gentleman for fully ten minutes before he seemed
to be aware of my presence, during the whole
of which time he was issuing orders and giving
directions in a stentorian voice, and employing a
nautical jargon quite incomprehensible to me at
that time.
76 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“Who are you?” he said suddenly, looking down
at me. “Oh! you are young Brandon, are you?”
he continued, when I had meekly given my name.
“Where have you been all this time, sir? The
captain had a letter from the Admiral this morning
inquiring after you. The Service is going to the
devil when every stray youngster is to be looked
after as if he was the Archbishop of Canterbury,”
he grumbled on, but with no real unkindness in
his tone. ‘Foretop, there!” he shouted. “Are
you all going to sleep aloft? That starboard
after-swifter is not sitting fairly. Here, Mr
Hammond,” and he called a midshipman who
was standing abaft the mizzen-mast, “this is
Mr Brandon, a new messmate for you. Take
charge of him, and see that he has a hammock
slung on board the hulk to-night. Run away
now, youngster. Main top there! Do you call
yourselves tinkers or washerwomen, for I'll be
d—d if you're sailors ...” and the hard-worked
officer went on with his duties without bestowing
another thought upon me. The young gentle-
man to whose care I was consigned I found to
possess two qualities which distinguished him
from any other person whom it had been my
lot to meet. Physically he was a_ well-made
lad about eighteen months my senior, with a
very bright, intelligent countenance, to which an
extraordinary appearance was imparted by a
H.M.S. VANGUARD 17

most appalling squint. When I advanced towards
him his right eye seemed fixed on the starboard
cathead, whilst his left optic took stock of the
larboard quarter-davits. In reality, he was look-
ing me full in the face, but it would be wrong
to say that I “caught his eye,” for the pupils
were turned askance and only the whites pre-
sented to my gaze. The other quality was
mental. For Tommy Hammond was the proud
possessor of an imaginative faculty which rose
nearly to genius. He seemed glad to see me,
not, as I soon found out, of any predisposition
on his part towards my insignificant person, but
because my advent gave him a pretext for roam-
ing over the length and breadth of the ship, and
also because I was virgin soil upon which the
seeds of his inventive powers could be scattered
broadcast.

Having led me between decks and out of
range of the first lieutenant’s watchful eye, he
proceeded to put a series of questions to me
regarding my age, members of my family, and
such-like minor details. Having satisfied his
curiosity on this score, I ventured to put a few
questions in my turn.

“Have you been long at sea?” I asked.

“Long at sea!” he repeated scornfully, “I was
born at sea—was cradled on the deep, as the
poet says. My nurse was the ship’s cook of the
78 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

Nonsuch, and my foster-mother the captain’s
she-goat. I used a belaying-pin for a teething-
coral, and my infant head was pillowed on a
swab. It’s no wonder that I am every inch a
sailor—the heart-yarn of a mainstay, every hair
of my head a rope-yarn, every arm a studding-
sail boom, each leg a spare top-mast—for I was
brought up on Stockholm tar.”

I conceived a sudden and deep veneration for
this child of ocean, who could observe my features
and measure my credulity without my knowing
that he was looking at me.

“Have you ever been in action?” I asked
timidly.

“ About forty-seven times, counting boat actions
and cutting-out expeditions. The last little affair
I was in was St Vincent, last year; people here
call it a great battle, but I didn’t think much
of it.”

“I heard a full account of it the other day,”
I cried eagerly. “I heard Sir Horatio describe
it to my father.”

Perhaps I had some secret hope that the
mention of the great Admiral’s name would raise
me in the estimation of my new friend, but this
was far from being the case.

“Oh, Nelson told you about it, did he? Then
I wouldn’t mind betting that he never even
mentioned my name, never owned that he owed
H.M.S. VANGUARD 79

his knighthood and fame entirely to Tom
Hammond. He’s an ungrateful dog, like all the
rest of them.”

“What on earth do you mean?” I cried.

“Well, you’ve heard his garbled version of the
battle, and it is only fair that you should hear
mine, and learn how the greatest instruments
in the making of history are left entirely
unnoticed in her deceptive pages,” and he drew
himself up to his full height of five feet two
inches, and endeavoured to impart a look of
unappreciated merit to his countenance.

“Let us go ashore,” he said suddenly. “I can
hear the first luff on the forecastle; he won't
miss us) We'll go on to the Hard and get some
grub, and then Ill tell you the true story of the
battle of Cape St Vincent.”

I was quite unaware that the proceeding
suggested by my grandiloquent companion was ©
a serious breach of duty, and followed him with
the utmost complacency, although it struck me
as rather curious that we should make the earlier
part of the journey by stages, dodging behind
bollards, cranes and other objects which served to
conceal our small persons; but when the sail-loft
shut the Vanguard out of view, Master Tommy
led the way with unabashed confidence, and we
passed out of the dockyard gates’ unquestioned.

We went to an eating-house, where my friend
80 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

was apparently well known, and when we had
tucked the standing part of a cold fowl under
our belts, I asked for the story.

“Tf there’s one thing more than another that
I dislike, Brandon,”
tones, “it is speaking of myself, for, as you will
have already observed, I am singularly modest
by nature. I feel that my retiring disposition
will remain my bane through life; but after all
it is a fault on the right side, for I hold vain-
glorious boasting as little less than a crime.”

Having observed—by looking out of opposite
windows at the same moment—that this preamble
had sunk deeply into my soul, this modest ocean
flower continued, “I was told off to help the
signal midshipman on St Valentine’s day, and
this led to my being on the poop of the Captain
during the whole of the action. My proper

said Tommy, in deprecatory

station was at the after main-deck quarters, and
the meaning of the change was only known to
me—Nelson liked to have me near him in case
of an emergency arising. Jack made the signal
to form line ahead—”

“Who's Jack?” I broke in.

“Jack Jervis, of course—Lord St Vincent now
—you shouldn’t interrupt, Brandon. Well, Jack
made the signal, and we obeyed it; but when I
saw that the Dons were likely to slip away in the
rear of our line, I went to the commodore, who
H.M.S. VANGUARD 81

was standing at the break of the poop, and seizing
an opportunity when no one could overhear us,
I said, ‘Those d—d fellows will slip away under
your lee, if you don’t put your helm up,
Horry.” ,

“Who’s Horry?” I asked in amazement.

“Youre little better than a fool, Brandon,”
said my veracious companion, in a tone of fine
contempt. “‘Gad! you're right, Tommy, as you
always are, said Nelson, glancing over the lee-
quarter where the Santissima Trinidad was
bruising through the water like an old swan
followed by a flock of geese. ‘Put the helm up,
quartermaster; round in the weather-braces, Mr
Johnson. Hang asking for permission! What
Tommy Hammond says is bound to be right.
We'll bring the Dons to, Berry, and remember,
if I fall, that His Majesty knows that I acted
by the advice of my gallant young friend, Mr
Hammond here.’

“Berry, who was a volunteer on board the
Captain, looked at me with an angry frown,
which, luckily for him, Horry didn’t see, or he
would have put him under arrest on the spot.
That fellow was always jealous of me, and so are
many others whom I could name, for the matter of
that, but I forgive them all—good wine needs
no bush,” and Mr Hammond’s expressive features
assumed an aspect of mingled magnanimity and

F
82 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

generosity. “I'll be bound Horry—Nelson, I mean
—didn’t tell your father this, Brandon.”

“No, he certainly did not,” I replied.

“Tt is sad to see a great nature warped by
professional jealousy. Nelson means well, but he
is human, like the rest of them. Ill undertake
to. say that he didn’t tell you about the Spanish
Admiral’s sword, either.” :

“No, but he showed it to me,’ I cried eagerly.

“And he hadn’t even the grace to say how it
came into his possession,” soliloquised Tommy,
in accents of pitying resignation. “You'll not
find it in the despatches, Brandon, but I was the
first man on board the San Josef, and she sur-
rendered to me before a living soul from the
Captain put his foot over her side. I got through
one of her main-deck ports and went aft to the
cabin where the Spanish Admiral lay dying, sur-
rounded by a group of his officers. I advanced
with a pistol in each hand, and the circle round
the wounded officer made way for me. ‘Brave
men honour those who follow the path of duty
and die for their king and their country,’ I said
in purest Castilian.”

“Do you speak Spanish ?” I asked in astonish-
ment, but he put the question aside with a majestic
wave of his hand and continued,—

“* Caballero, your last moments shall be undis-
turbed by me, but I must ask for your sword.’
H.M.S. VANGUARD 83

“The dying man gave me a look of unutterable
gratitude, which will haunt me through life, and
his captain, picking up the sword which lay
beside the wounded Admiral, presented the hilt
to me with a low bow and expressions of joy
that this unsullied weapon had fallen into the
hands of so noble a cavalier—truth compels me
to tell you the exact words, Brandon.

“I bowed gracefully, and leaving the grief-
stricken group, ascended to the quarter-deck
where Nelson was receiving the swords of the
other officers. I handed the Admiral’s weapon to
Fearney, and silently withdrew. Nelson alone
knew of the deed that I had performed, and the
consciousness of my own merit will remain my
sole reward. By Jove! there’s seven bells strik-
ing. We must get back to the ship or we shall
be missed.”

‘We skirmished from bollard to crane in the
same stealthy fashion as before, but without our
previous luck, for the quick eye of the first
lieutenant lighted upon us and his stern voice
rang out, “Come here, young gentlemen!”

“Where have you been?” he asked sharply
when we stood before him.

“We went to the Hard, sir, to get something
to eat,” answered Hammond, truthfully and
simply.

“Then you had no business to do so without
84 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

asking my leave. I put this youngster under
your charge, and the first thing you do is to lead
him astray. Now mount the main-bitts and
stand there till they knock off work.”

The unknown hero of Cape St Vincent and the
bosom friend of “Jack” and “Horry” departed
ruefully to take up the position assigned to
him, and as I saw the bluejackets turning their
quids and laughing in their sleeves, I could not
help reflecting the base uses to which some of
us are put from men of coarser mould failing
to appreciate our real greatness.

At sunset work ceased for the day, and the
ship’s company returned to the hulk for the night.
During the evening the gun-room presented a
much less chilling aspect than on my previous
visit, for the whole of my future messmates
were there, and a babel of tongues arose from
all hands. Some of my companions were then
between thirty and forty years of age—old
masters’ mates who, from want of interest at
headquarters, had been passed over and neglected
until they had grown grey-headed in an un-
grateful Service. These ill-used. officers were
excellent seamen, and as their conversation was
almost entirely on nautical matters, we youngsters
were enabled to gain much professional knowledge
from listening to their yarns and arguments ;
but it must be confessed that these scurvily-
H.M.S. VANGUARD 85

treated old sea-dogs were inveterate grumblers ;
nor was it to be wondered at, for the neglect
they had undergone would have jaundiced the
temper of an archangel. Bred to the sea, they
were only happy afloat, and useless for any
employment ashore. Sometimes, when paid off,
they took a trip in a merchantman, but almost
invariably drifted back into the gun-room of a
King’s ship in the hope that “a bloody war and
a sickly season” would give them their lieu-
tenant’s epaulette.

I was the youngest in the mess, and my brother
midshipmen ranged from thirteen to nineteen
years of age. They were a fine, dashing set of
young men, for the flower of the navy sought
service under Admiral Nelson.

Tea was over, and most of my messmates
were seated round the long table which occupied
the greater portion of the gun-room. Half-a-
dozen tallow candles, in battered old tin candle-
sticks, gave a dim light to the cabin, and showed
the party split up into groups, the senior members
of which were each furnished with a glass of
rum and water.

I was too strange to attach myself to any
particular section, but, after a time, observing
that Tommy Hammond had gathered round him
a select party of the younger midshipmen, to whom
he was holding forth in flowery rhetoric, I drew
86 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

near, feeling that I had found a friend, but halted
on discovering that I, myself, was the text for
this voluble youth’s oration.

“We shall have all Norfolk on board the Van-
guard soon,” cried Tommy, unconscious or careless
of my proximity. “Here’s another parson’s son
come to cut the fat. He’s a ‘towny’ of Nelson’s
There’s been the devil to pay because the tender
was a fortnight at sea with His Excellency on
board. Seven special messengers were sent down
by the Admiralty, and the semaphores kept going
all along the south coast. If the Phantom hadn’t
turned up this morning the Channel fleet was to
have gone to sea to-morrow at daylight in search
of her. Directly he reported himself, the first luff
sent me up to the Admiral’s office with the joyful
tidings of his safe arrival, and from the top of the
Observatory I could see the mounted messenger —
galloping up Portsdown Hill carrying the news to
London. I was told to get his hammock ready for
him, but it’s no business of mine to day-nurse a
Yarmouth bloater. Horry can come and tuck him
up himself, and so I shall tell him directly I see
him. He ought to be down here now attending
to his duty, but he is detained in London whilst
the gun factory of Woolwich Arsenal is manu-
facturing a copper warming-pan to warm young
Brandon’s hammock with. If Nelson can’t bring it
himself, it’s to be sent here by express waggon with
THE FIGHT ON BOARD THE VANGUARD.


H.M.S. VANGUARD 87°

a party of soldiers from the Tower to guard it.
His mother and his dear little sister Emily made
Nelson promise that his sheets should be well
aired and—’” :

“You're a liar!” I broke in, for I am hot-
tempered, and the mention of my sister’s name
made me reckless. “You're a liar, now, and I
believe you've been lying to me all day.”

I think Tommy was a little taken aback at
this interruption, but immediately replied by
throwing the contents of his glass of grog full
in my face, as a vindication of his dignity.

I struck him on the mouth with all my force,
and then we closed, rolling on the deck and pom-
melling at each other's heads savagely.

“Get up, you young rascals!” cried an old
master’s mate, bending down and dragging us
apart. “Don’t pinch and scratch like women;
stand up and have it out fairly. Here, young
Shiver-the-mizzen,” he cried, pulling me towards
him, “Ill give you my knee, and if you don't
give Tom Pepper a thrashing, I’m a Dutchman.
Strip to your waist, lad. Now, a ring and fair
play.” é

At it we went with tolerable coolness at first,
but fighting more wildly as our tempers rose and
the blood began to flow, but I was no match for
Tommy Hammond, who was eighteen months
older and had considerably longer reach of arm
88 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

than myself. The old master’s mate—my backer
and bottle-holder—encouraged me to persevere,
so I fought on, but I should soon have thrown
up the sponge, vanquished by sheer weight of
metal, had not poor Tommy’s foot caught in a
ring-bolt, which tripped him up and brought him
heavily to the ground, the back of his head
striking against the heel of a wooden stanchion.

This brought the fight to a close, and I may
add that it was the first and last rough-and-
tumble that I had on board the Vanguard; in-
deed this game of fisticuffs in the very beginning
of my career was of the greatest service to me
and saved me from a hundred petty annoyances.
The old master’s mate took me under his pro-
tection, and it seemed the general opinion that
if I had not won my spurs, I had at least made
a good attempt to do so.

Tommy Hammond had received a pretty deep
wound on the back of the head, which placed
him in the doctor’s hands for a while. He bore
‘me no enmity whatever, and I used to sit be-
side his hammock listening to his yarns with a
patience to which he was unaccustomed, and
which made him regard me as a real friend.
When, a week later, I told him that the Admiral
would arrive at Portsmouth on the following day,
he at once ascribed it to a burning anxiety on
Nelson’s part concerning his—Hammond’s—health
H.M.S. VANGUARD 89

and welfare. “He can’t get on without me, you
see, Brandon, and he’s naturally anxious since
hearing how I thrashed that prize-fighter at
Portsdown Fair. There were over three thou-
sand people looking on, and we fought for two
hours, twenty-three minutes, forty-seven seconds
before I dropped him with a blow under the
jaw. They carried him off the ground senseless,
whilst many said that he was dead, and that I
should be tried for manslaughter. He never
reached me once, and at the end of the twenty-
third round I was as fresh as paint and hadn’t
turned a hair. The fight made a tremendous stir
in the sporting world, and Horry naturally be-
came anxious and hurried down. Unrecognised
greatness has its drawbacks, Brandon.”

I may add that, on questioning my friend, the
master’s mate, as to why he called Hammond
“Tom Pepper,” the old sailor replied, “Tom
Pepper is the name of the chap who was kicked
out of Hell for telling lies.” Tommy was right
—unrecognised greatness has many drawbacks.
CHAPTER VI
IN SEARCH OF THE FRENCH

I soon shook down into my place and became
familiar with my messmates. The life of a
youngster in the gun-room or berth of a man-
of-war has been handled by Marryat, Chamier,
and many others, far more ably than my pen
could ever hope to portray. As a matter of
fact, the habits and conversation of one set of
young men is remarkably like that of any other
set, but tinged, of course, by local colouring.
Between the timbers of a ship, whether great
or small, the objects presented to the view and
the daily routine are almost precisely the same,
and there can be but very little difference in the
youngsters, unless some of their number possess:
an individuality so marked as to lead the others
into unwonted paths of thought and expression.
None of my messmates on board the Vanguard
showed the slightest disposition to leave the beaten
track themselves, or to persuade others to do so,
therefore we may be looked upon as a very average

set, who talked shop, fell out and made friends
90
IN SEARCH OF THE FRENCH gi

again, did our duty, and held all foreigners in fine
contempt —particularly General Buonaparte—but
whose daily doings are certainly not worthy of
record.

On the first of April 1798, the Vanguard sailed
for Lisbon and went from thence to join the fleet
under the Earl of St Vincent, then blockading
Cadiz.

Only those who have had personal experience
of the process known as blockading can form any
idea of the awful and wearisome tedium the term
conveys. For this system of warfare to be effectual,
it is absolutely necessary that the guard over the
blockaded port should be so rigid in its nature
that not even a cock-boat can slip in or out un-
observed. Blow high, blow low, the blockading
fleet must maintain its position off the mouth of
the port, with sufficient force to deter the enemy
from taking advantage of a slant of wind, and
breaking out, whilst it is equally necessary to
prevent reinforcements reaching the harbour by
ships breaking in.

For months and months the British fleet had
been kept at this work, perpetually under sail,
the crews never knowing what a real night’s
rest meant; the provisions salt, and often bad;
the water scanty and almost undrinkable. There
is small wonder that under these circumstances
a spirit of discontent should arise amongst the
92 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

crews, which it required great tact and firmness
to dispel. Both these qualities Lord St Vincent
possessed in a marked degree, but some of his
captains showed want of judgment by harassing
their men at all hours of the day and night, under
the impression that they were driving the devil
out of their minds, but the method was one pre-
cisely calculated to drive the devil into their
minds, and, in more than one instance, the spirit
of insubordination was manifested which verged
on mutiny.

I doubt if there is to be found on the whole face
of the earth any body of men more long-suffer-
ing than British sailors, and the injustice must
be very great which will rouse their resentment.
But it must be remembered that many of these
poor fellows were the victims of the press-gang,
and had been torn from their wives and families
without even a farewell word at parting, whilst
in some cases the fate that had befallen them could
only be guessed at by their relatives. In the last
century few of the forecastle hands could write,
and Jack never dreamed of communicating by
letter in those days.

When the Vanguard joined the blockading fleet
off Cadiz, we learnt that a serious outbreak had
taken place on board one of the line-of-battle
ships—I shall not mention her name, for no good
end would be served by so doing — two days
IN SEARCH OF THE FRENCH 93

previously. A court-martial was assembled, and
the principal actors in the mutiny brought before
it. However great the provocation, no overt act
of insubordination could be tolerated in the face of
an enemy, and it was felt that the spirit of mutiny
must be crushed with a strong hand. Two of the
ringleaders were sentenced to death, and several
others to heavy punishment at the gangway.
The judgment of the court was delivered on a
Saturday afternoon, with a recommendation that
the capital punishment should be carried out on
the following morning; and this was done,
although many officers in the fleet objected to
the desecration of the Sabbath by such an act.

I remember every incident of this impressive
scene. It was a lovely morning, with a light
breeze from the westward and a smooth sea. A
boat from each ship in the fleet went alongside
of the vessel containing the prisoners, and the
bowmen of each stepped on board, for it is a
curious old sea custom that sailors condemned to
be hung should not be launched into eternity by
their own shipmates, but by the bowmen of the
boats belonging to the fleet, and these unwilling
executioners do not witness the act which they
perform, for the fatal rope is led down on to the
main deck, from whence no view of the proceed-
ings is obtainable.

The fleet was hove-to as near to the scene of
94 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

punishment as safety permitted, and all hands
were turned up to witness the carrying out of
the dread sentence. Under other circumstances
it would have been a beautiful sight. The great
ships, with their main top-sails thrown aback,
rising and falling gracefully on the long swell,
the sun shining bright on their snowy canvas,
the ocean around of deepest sapphire blue, and
the towers of Cadiz lying on the eastern horizon.
Precisely as the bells of the ships chimed eight,
two puffs of smoke arose from either bow of the
prisoners’ ship, and before the fleecy blanket had
rolled slowly to leeward the forms of the criminals
were swinging at each fore yard-arm, and the
stern decrees of justice had been satisfied. It
was a gruesome sight, and made a deep impres-
sion upon me, as doubtless it did upon all who
witnessed it. Apparently an act of great severity,
it was in reality one of mercy, for had not the
spirit of mutiny been thus promptly crushed, it
would have spread, and many lives must ulti-
mately have paid the penalty of wrongdoing.
Neither on board the Vanguard nor in any
other ship which Nelson commanded was such a
thing as insubordination, even of the most trifling
kind, ever known, for the great sailor loved his
men down to the smallest boy, looked to their
comfort and welfare, and obtained from them in
return an affectionate reverence which bore good
IN SEARCH OF THE FRENCH __ 95

fruit in the hour of need. There was no slack-
ness of discipline; but this mutual confidence was
due to the sympathy of the famous Admiral,
which kept him in touch with his men and
gained their unquestioning devotion.

But the weary work of blockading was not of
long duration for the Vanguard. Information
was brought to Lord St Vincent that the French
were fitting out a great armament at Toulon and
Genoa, and gathering together transports for the
embarkation of a large force, comprising horse,
foot and artillery. General Buonaparte held the
French Press in an iron grip, and no inkling of
the destination for which this expedition was
intended could be gained.

The two Sicilies, Malta, Egypt and Ireland were
each suggested as the object of the Corsican’s
enterprise, but the secret was well kept and the
real goal of the expedition effectually concealed.

To capture, sink, burn, or otherwise destroy this
armament was the order received from England
by Lord St Vincent, and it became his duty to
select the man best fitted to accomplish this all-
important object. The Earl had under him three
admirals—Sir William Parker, Sir John Orde
and Sir Horatio Nelson—and his choice fell upon
the last-named officer, of -whose genius, zeal and
courage he had received such convincing proofs.

The selection of the junior admiral gave rise to
96 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

bitter heart - burning and much angry recrimina-
tion, but into this painful subject I shall not enter
in these pages. I am not a historian, and such
matters are wholly outside the four corners of this
volume, which is a simple, personal narrative, and
I have no wish to discuss the subject of which my
age and junior position make me a very incom-
petent judge. This much, however, I can safely
assert, that Lord St Vincent’s selection showed
the great insight into character which he pos-
sessed, and the sequel will prove that the onerous
task could not have been confided to abler hands.

In compliance with the new instructions, the
Vanguard left the blockading fleet off Cadiz for
the Mediterranean, and took up the post of ob-
servation off the Port of Toulon, in company with
the seventy-four gun ships Orion and Alexander,
together with four frigates and a brig.

On the evening of May 20th the sun set red
and angry, and the fresh breeze which had been
blowing all day strengthened into a violent gale
from the north-west, which dispersed the squadron
and drove the scattered ships to the southward. |
It was the first real storm which I had ever
encountered, and I was now to witness how im-
potent was the power of man when engaged in
combat with the forces of Nature. Every pre-
caution that seamanship and long experience
could suggest was adopted on board the Van-
A SLIGHT FIGURE, WITH A LINE ATTACHED TO THE WAIST, SPRANG
INTO THE SEA,


IN SEARCH OF THE FRENCH 97

guard, but the fury of the gale rendered all
these unavailing, and by the following morning
the ship was wallowing in the trough of the
sea, a dismasted hulk, making water rapidly and
in momentary danger of foundering. Had aid
not been at hand we should certainly have been
lost, but, fortunately, the Alexander was in sight,
and her gallant captain, Ball, at once brought her
to our assistance, although she had been roughly
handled by the gale, and was in little better
plight than ourselves.

The Alexander at once made preparation for
taking the Vanguard in tow, but it was impos-
sible to effect this until communication had been
established between the two ships, and the sea
was running too high to permit of any boat being
lowered by either. We lay dismasted and helpless,
but the Alexander, by dint of skilful seamanship, |
took up a position at about half a cable’s length
to windward and then veered down to us a light
line, the end of which was attached to a barrico,
or keg. The wind and sea carried the little cask
towards us, and men were slung over the side in
readiness to grasp it, but it passed twenty yards
under our stern and completely out of reach.

A murmur of admiration broke the silence
enjoined by discipline as a slight figure- with a
line attached to the waist sprang from the lar-
board quarter-gallery into the sea. For a few

G
98 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

seconds the gallant swimmer was buried beneath
the crest of a huge wave, then his head appeared
upon the surface and he struck out resolutely
for the keg which, after a while, he succeeded in
reaching, when he and his prize were drawn
skilfully and cautiously on board. The rest was
now easy. Using the slender communication thus
established as a hauling line, a rope of greater
size and strength was hauled on board, and to
this was made fast the hawser by which the
Alexander was to tow us.

After this had been effected, and we were labour-
ing along heavily in the wake of our consort, the
Admiral desired that the man who had risked his
iife in so gallant a fashion should be brought
before him. The hero of the moment was not
a man at all, but the merest stripling, and my
astonishment may be guessed at when I recog-
nised in the dripping little figure my fellow-
scapegrace at Silversands—Will Barrett of “The
Toothsome Herring.”

“Barrett? ... Barrett?” repeated Nelson, when
the lad stood trembling before him, more nervous
at this face-to-face interview with the great sailor
than he would have been in the heaviest sea that
ever ran, for Will’s swimming powers were cele-
brated in his native village.

“Barrett? I seem to recognise that name. Are
you the youngster who turned smuggler with Mr
IN SEARCH OF THE FRENCH 99

Brandon? Well,” he continued, as the boy with
chattering teeth acknowledged his identity, “well,
you have done a deed to-day which is better than
running cargoes of lace and tobacco. You shall
have the rank of a midshipman directly a vacancy
occurs, and you can do duty on the quarter-deck
here as soon as the tailor can put you into uniform.
See to this, Mr Purvis,” he added, addressing the
purser, “and let it be placed to my account. Here,
Brandon! take your old friend below to my steward,
get him a good tumbler of wine, and then put him
into dry clothes. He will be your messmate in the
future. If you go on as you have begun, my lad,
you will be a credit to the King’s Service.”

One of the most remarkable traits in the
great sailor’s character was the attention he
would bestow on things of comparatively small
importance when his mind was filled with
weighty matters which of themselves would
have proved a sufficient burden for the shoulders
of most men. His kindly nature and great
sympathy made such acts as the one just re-
corded spontaneous, and enhanced the affection
with which he was regarded by all around him.
There was not a bluejacket on board the Van-
guard who did not feel a thrill of pleasure at
this prompt recognition of a gallant deed, and
although the newly-made officer was only the son
of an obscure Norfolk innkeeper, he was received
100 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

frankly as an equal by the inmates of the Van-
guard’s gun-room, nor did I ever hear of his
humble origin being once cast in his teeth, even
in jest. The pleasure caused me by Will
Barrett’s promotion need not be dwelt upon.
“We had met daily, and had contrived several
opportunities for a private chat, but these inter-
views had taken place in the recesses of the
cable-tier, for the difference in our relative
positions was more clearly marked when afloat
than on shore. Now we could meet on equal
terms; and when I had seen Will rigged out
in a spare suit of my uniform, I shook him
warmly by both hands, feeling proud of my com-
panion, of my Admiral, and of dear old Norfolk.

Whilst we youngsters were thus occupied, the
' Vanguard was plunging and rolling sullenly,
and the clank of the chain-pumps never ceased
as gang after gang of men strove to reduce
the water which had entered into the hold by
leakage and through the heavy seas which at
times broke-over her. The gale lost nothing of
its intensity, and both ships laboured so heavily
that the foundering of one or both seemed in-
evitable. The Alexander was heading for the
harbour of San Pietro in Sardinia, but with the
dead weight of the Vanguard dragging in her
wake she made slow progress, and at last the
risk that both ships ran became so imminent
IN SEARCH OF THE FRENCH IOI

that Nelson hailed the Alexander, desiring her
to cast off the towing-hawsers, and leave the
Vanguard and her crew to their fate. It is
difficult to say which of these great minds
showed the most heroism—the Admiral in his
self-sacrifice, or Captain Ball in his refusal to
seek safety by the desertion of his superior.
The latter refused to obey the order, but hung
on to his disabled chief, and, by the mercy of
God, his gallantry was rewarded, and both ships
ultimately reached the haven they were seeking.
Every man on board the Vanguard owed his
life to Captain Ball, and to his undaunted courage
was due the preservation of one whom England
could never have replaced—Horatio Nelson. No
sooner had we anchored than the work of repair-
ing damages began. The Orion had sought refuge
at San Pietro, and the carpenters’ crews of all three
ships set about refitting the Vanguard with jury-
masts. In four days’ time the ship was ready for
sea again, a feat of which Mr Morrison, the Van-
guard’s carpenter, might well be proud, for as an
achievement it stands unparalleled in the annals
of the British Navy.

‘Returning to Toulon, our chagrin was intense
to find the port deserted. The gale which had so
mauled us gave the Frenchmen the opportunity
they sought, and they had slipped away to sea,
although the course they had steered remained
102 AFLOAT WITH NELSON %

unknown, for, by a strange fatality, our frigates
which should have dogged their path had all
returned to Gibraltar. On the 7th of June our
squadron was strengthened by the arrival of ten
sail-of-the-line and the fifty-gun frigate Leander.
Now began a search for the Frenchmen, and Malta
was first visited as the most likely place, but no
trace of them could be found there, nor was any
information to be gained as to the course the
expedition had taken. Steering to the eastward,
the British fleet looked in vain for the enemy at
Alexandria and on the coast of Syria, until want
of provisions compelled Nelson to seek supplies at
Syracuse. Abundant provisions having been ob-
tained from this place, the squadron started again,
and on the morning of the 1st of August was once
more off the harbour of Alexandria, which, instead
of the inactivity hitherto prevailing there, now pre-
sented a scene of bustle and movement, for the
anchorage was full of transports and the tricolour
everywhere visible. There could be no doubt now
that Egypt had been the aim of General Buonaparte,
and the expedition was run to earth at last; but
where was the French fleet? For weeks the
British had scoured the Mediterranean in the hope
of meeting the foe, but they seemed to have
mysteriously vanished, and no tidings of their
whereabouts could be obtained from such passing
ships as we boarded,
IN SEARCH OF THE FRENCH 103

During the whole of this search it was the
- Adiniral’s custom, in calms or light winds, to signal
his captains on board the Vanguard for the
purpose of discussing the line of action to be
adopted when the enemy were discovered. It was
my privilege to be attached to the Admiral as a
kind of aide-de-camp, and it was by me that these
gallant officers were ushered into the cabin, where
I was often detained to hand down books of
reference, search out charts, and such-like small
services which could better be performed by a
youngster than by a grown man. In this manner —
I gained the personal acquaintance of most of these
officers, who would pat me on the shoulder and
frequently joke with me in a very friendly manner.
I was also present at many of the consultations,
but as these were of a confidential nature I do not
think that I am even now at liberty to reveal
their import; this much, however, I may say, that
Nelson’s burning desire was to find the enemy and
then immediately to attack, whether at anchor or
at sea, by night or by day, blow high, blow low.
Every conceivable position in which the French
might be found was considered by the Admiral,
and the captains were instructed by him what
course to pursue under any contingency. The
advantage of these consultations was evident; for
by word of mouth the designs of the Commander
could be communicated much more clearly than by
104 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

signal, and the spirit which animated the leader
was transmitted from the fountain-head to the
- breast of each of his followers, and a perfectly
harmonious understanding established. Enthusiasm
was kindled to the highest point, but it was guided
by sound judgment, nothing being left to chance
that foresight could take account of.

But, meanwhile, where was the French fleet ?

At four o’clock in the afternoon the Zealous
answered the question. A ball of bunting was
seen going aloft, the signal broke and the flag
streamed out, carrying to the whole squadron
the joyful tidings that the enemy was in sight
—thirteen sail-of-the-line, besides frigates and
smaller craft, were lying at anchor in Aboukir Bay.

A ringing cheer went from ship to ship as
the signal was read. The weary search was. at
an end, and now our men were to show what
stuff they were made of. A smile of joy lighted
up Nelson’s face. For weeks past the weight
of anxiety had preyed upon his mind and
destroyed his appetite. Now the strain was
over, and he descended to dinner full of con-
fidence in himself, his officers, and his men.
With the sight of the foe all the old elasticity
of spirit had returned.

“By this time to-morrow, gentlemen,” he said
to his officers, “I shall have won a Peerage or
Westminster Abbey.”
CHAPTER VII
THE BATTLE OF THE NILE

It was four o’clock in the afternoon of the first
of August when the French fleet were dis-
covered lying at anchor in Aboukir Bay. The
land swept round in a curve, having Aboukir
Island at its western horn, and both island and
coast were fringed with sandbanks, the extent
and bearings of which were not marked upon
any charts that we possessed. The French
fleet was anchored in a single line of over a
mile and a half in length, the bearing of the
line being, roughly, north-west and south-east.
It consisted of one three-decker, L’Orient, of one
hundred and twenty guns, three two-deckers of
eighty guns, and nine two-deckers of seventy-
four guns, two frigates of forty guns, two
frigates of thirty-six guns, two brigs, together
with several gun-boats and bomb ships. In
addition to this, the French had a mortar battery
on Aboukir Island.

The British force consisted of thirteen two-
deckers of seventy-four guns each, one frigate

105
106 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

of fifty guns, and one brig. Troubridge’s ship,
the Culloden, got ashore off the island and never
entered into action at all, by which the disparity
of strength between the two fleets was greatly
increased.

The wind was north-westerly at the time of
sighting the enemy, and fair for the English fleet
to bear down upon the French.

The above will give a general idea of the re-
lative positions and strengths of the opposing
forces to such as are unacquainted with the facts,
and it is not my intention to attempt any historical
description of the great battle. My object will be
amply fulfilled if I relate what passed under my
own observation during the action.

On that eventful night each ship made a history
of her own, and it is only by massing together and
comparing the separate accounts that a general
description of the battle can be given. This task
I leave to abler pens, being quite content if { can
convey an intelligible idea of what happened to
myself and the ship in which I served.

After the signal was made by the Zealous, and
whilst our squadron was forming into line and
heading down upon the enemy, each separate ship
was engaged in preparing for battle. ‘This was
my first action; I had never seen a shot fired in
anger, and the whole situation was perfectly new
tome. It made the blood tingle in the veins and
THE BATTLE OF THE NILE 107

the pulse beat fast to watch the men preparing
for this grim carnival as if it were some festivity
to which they were bidden as favoured guests.
Not a sign of foreboding, not a doubt as to the
issue of the struggle seemed to enter into the
mind of anyone from the Admiral down to the
smallest powder-boy. As the men set about their
work, jests were passed and merry laughter pealed
forth from lips unconscious of impending doom,
but which, within a few brief hours, would be
stilled by death. At the time, and amidst the
excitement of the hour, it seemed quite natural
that it should be thus, and both Will Barrett and
I caught the contagion, although we were new to
the life.

Tommy Hammond’s imaginative faculties seemed
rather sharpened than otherwise by the impending
conflict. Seeing that Will and I were watching
the shot being piled at the rear of each gun, he
pointed to the pyramids, saying, “British pills to
purge French pride. You fellows will have to
dispense these. My duty is of a loftier nature.”

“What do you mean?” I asked. “You are
stationed at the after-lower deck quarters.”

“ Nominally,” replied Tommy, airily ; “ but Horry
knows better than to keep me too long out of
sight. I am now on my way to the boatswain’s
yeoman to draw the gear I require to carry out
the honourable duty imposed upon me. It is
108 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

simple enough, merely a hammer and a bag of
nails, and with these insignificant implements I
secure the honour of my country. Ah! you don’t
understand,” he continued, seeing the puzzled ex-
pressions worn by Will and myself. “Well, my
duty is to nail the colours to the mast, and then
unreeve the halliards—”

“Go down to your quarters, you clinker-built
young Ananias,” growled a lieutenant, whose ear
had caught Master Tommy’s speech. “You ought
to be down on your knees praying God to bless
the arms of your king and your country instead
of telling lies as fast as a round shot will travel,”
continued the officer, who was of the Methodist
persuasion.

Tommy smiled unabashed, murmuring, “Our
schismatic friend is jealous. It is a pity.” But
he obeyed the order, nevertheless, and disappeared
down the hatchway.

When the enemy were discovered, our squadron
was sailing without any regular formation, and
two ships, the Zealous and Goliath, were several
miles ahead of the main body. Without waiting
for support, these two vessels stood in and en-
gaged the enemy's van, and a cheer rose from
the fleet as, about six o'clock, the boom of their
guns announced that the battle had begun.

My station was on the poop, near the mizzen-
mast, in readiness to carry orders from the Admiral
THE BATTLE OF THE NILE 109

or Captain to any other part of the ship, for
amidst the thunder of many guns any word of
command would be useless. It was an excellent
position, for it enabled me to see everything that .
went on, which would not have been the case
had I remained between decks.

A curious thing happened just at the time the
battle began. A little bird—a species of fly-
catcher—flew on board the Vanguard and settled
on her deck, where it ran about as if quite at
home. Those of the ship’s company who saw it
were delighted, regarding the little visitor as a
harbinger of victory. Strange to say, the bird
remained on board throughout the action and for
several weeks afterwards, and only took its leave
when the Vanguard reached Naples.

As we stood on, the thunder of the guns in-
creased as ship after ship of our squadron came
into action. We could see the Zealous and Goliath
at anchor inside the van of the enemy’s line, into
the leading ships of which they were pouring a
terrible fire, by which the Guerrier and Conquérant
were already dismasted.

_ To gain the position that the Admiral wished
the Vanguard to assume, she had to pass the
leading French ships, and these opened a heavy
fire upon us as we sailed on without returning
a shot, and it was then that I experienced for
the first time the rush of air from a cannon-ball -
I10 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

fired in anger. When the Frenchmen opened
on us, several shots passed close over the poop,
and one struck the jaws of the spanker-boom,
close to where I was standing. The whistle of
the shot and the crashing of the timber made
me involuntarily duck my head, and the action
was. observed by Nelson, who, even at that
critical moment, was mindful of others. Calling
me to him, he laid his hand kindly on my
shoulder, saying, “You'll soon get used to it,
lad. Think of England and old Norfolk, and
youll care nothing for these French rascals.”
The words cheered me up, and with the example
set by all around me, my courage soon returned.

The Vanguard had now come to an anchor
within eighty yards of a French liner, the
Spartiate. Sail had been shortened, and a
terrific artillery duel had begun. I was sent
by Captain Berry with a message to the officer
commanding the lower deck, and then got my
first glimpse of the ’tween-decks of a ship in
close action. So thick was the smoke, that at.
no time could I see more than ten paces around
me, frequently not more than ten feet, and
dimly discernible amidst this were the forms of
men stripped to the waist, some with handker-
chiefs bound round their heads, some with pig-
tails flowing over their bare backs, all working
at the guns with desperate energy, but, for the
THE BATTLE OF THE NILE III

most part, in grim silence. The noise was deafen-
ing, for added to the roar of the cannon was
the rending sound as the enemy’s shot ripped
through our timbers, driving the splinters to right
and left. Every now and then a sharp cry of
agony arose, as some poor fellow was struck
down and fell writhing on the deck, but the
body was carried hastily below by the sufferer’s
nearest companions, and only these were aware of
the casualty which had occurred. In that sul-
phurous cloud it was impossible for any man to
tell what happened a few feet away from him,
and the guns’ crews continued to load and fire
with desperate energy, certain, owing to the short-
ness of the distance, that each discharge took effect
upon the enemy, but otherwise ignorant how the
battle was proceeding. I went below into the
cockpit where the surgeons were at work. It
was a horrible sight, and I was glad to find myself
on deck again once more.

So the fight raged on as ship after ship took
up her position and opened fire on the French
van. Darkness had now fallen, but the flashings
of the guns lighted up the bay, and the fighting-
lanterns gave light to the combatants between
decks.

The Admiral was on the upper deck, watching
the position taken up -by each of his ships as
she arrived and giving vent to words of pleasure
112 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

as he saw how thoroughly his orders had been
understood by his captains, and how splendidly
each ship performed the task allotted to her.
At about half-past eight he directed me to get a
rough sketch of Aboukir Bay which had been
taken from a French ship, and bring it to him in
the poop cabin. I had some difficulty in finding
the.sheet, and when I brought it both the Admiral
and Captain Berry were impatiently awaiting my
arrival, The former seized the sketch, spread it
on the table, and both he and Berry bent over it,
whilst I held a lantern. Suddenly I saw Nelson
reel, and heard him exclaim, “I am killed; re-
member me to my wife.” Captain Berry caught
him in his arms, when I saw that the blood was
streaming from a wound in his forehead, the skin
and flesh hanging down over the eye and pre-
senting a horrible sight.

“Get some men to carry him below, youngster,”
cried the captain, hurriedly. “Go down with
him,” he added, “and bring the doctor’s report
to me as soon as he has examined the Admiral.”
I had already obtained a glimpse of the cockpit,
and was by no means anxious to enter it again,
but there was no help for it now; neither in my
distress of mind at the danger of my wounded
benefactor did I think much of anything but
him, so with a heavy heart I followed the men
-who were supporting Nelson below.
THE BATTLE OF THE NILE 113

The surgeon and his mates had just finished
amputating a poor fellow’s leg when Nelson
arrived, and although he fully imagined the
wound he had received to be mortal, he declined
the attendance of the surgeon till the sufferers
already on the spot had all been attended to.
“T will take my turn with my brave followers,”
he was heard to say aloud, and a faint cheer
broke from the wounded men around who caught
the words. Examination proved that the skin
of the forehead had been cut at right angles by
a fragment of scrap iron, and the pain was so
excruciating that Nelson fully believed the wound
to be mortal even after the surgeon had probed
it and found that the skull was uninjured. The
flap of skin hanging down was sewn up, and the
head bandaged, after which the wounded chief
was removed to the bread-room, where a mattress
was laid down, but the excitement under which
he laboured prevented him from taking repose—
indeed it was with the greatest difficulty that he
was dissuaded from going on deck again directly
his wound was dressed. He only consented to
remain below when Captain Berry promised that
he ‘should be informed of everything that
transpired.

Thus it happened that I became the means of
communication between the deck and the wounded
admiral, remaining on the poop until any event

H
114 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

of importance occurred, when I hurried down to
tell it, and then returned to my post again in
quest of further information.

Although the night was intensely dark, the
unceasing flashes from the guns lit up the scene
around and showed the havoc which our fire had
wrought. The van ships of the enemy’s line,
battered and dismasted, had already hauled down
their colours, and the British ships engaged with
them were dropping down to assist their consorts
in the destruction of the enemy’s centre. At this
point lay the huge three-decker L’Orient, bearing
the flag of Admiral Brueys now hotly engaged by
two British seventy-fours, one on her bow, the
other on her quarter. Suddenly a new and per-
manent light was added to the flashes of the guns
as flames were seen to rise from the poop of the
Orient. The shots of our ships were directed at
the burning quarter, to prevent the Frenchmen
from extinguishing the fire. We could see them
using their utmost endeavours to subdue this
terrible enemy, but our guns spread havoc amongst
them, whilst the flames advanced with appalling
rapidity, and it soon became evident that this
noble vessel was doomed to destruction.

Nelson would have come on deck to witness
the conflagration, but yielded to the entreaties
of the surgeon and chaplain, and remained in the
bread-room; but his eagerness to know every
THE BATTLE OF THE NILE 115

detail of what was passing caused me to descend
every quarter of an hour to report and answer his
questions. When convinced that the Orient was
doomed and must blow up when the flames reached
her magazine, he sent for Captain Berry and gave
directions concerning the safety of the Vanguard,
but all precautions were already in progress to pre-
vent burning masses of the French ship setting us
on fire should they descend on our decks. The sails
which had been hanging in the clewlines and
buntlines were secured to the yards by gaskets
passed roughly round them and wetted with water
drawn up to the tops in buckets. Everything
inflammable about the upper deck was removed
or hastily covered with wet canvas or tarpaulins,
and men were stationed with: buckets in readiness
to rush to any threatened part. The hoses were
fitted and led along, and thus, with the murderous
duel continuing between decks, the opposing fleets
fought grimly on, awaiting the coming catastrophe.

During my journeyings to and fro I had many
escapes, but never received the smallest injury.
I was talking to the signalman on the poop when
a round-shot took his head from his shoulders
and covered me with blood, and once my life was
saved by my foot slipping, for before I could
recover myself, a shot crashed through the netting,
which would have cut me in half had I been in
an upright position.
116 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

It will naturally be expected of me to say
whether or not I was frightened, and I may at
once candidly confess that at the beginning of
the action my heart leapt into my mouth and
my limbs quaked at every shot, but when I saw
the carelessness of those around me to the danger
they were in, and heard the jests passed even by
the wounded, the old Viking spirit which we
Brandons have lurking in our blood rose ‘to the
surface, so that a mad excitement took the place
of timidity, and I believe the same thing happened
to every man and boy on board our fleet then
under fire for the first time.

When L’Orient had been burning for about an
hour—that is to say about half-past nine o’clock
—whilst I stood at the foot of the cockpit ladder
waiting to ascend after making a report to the
admiral, two men came down the steps support-
ing a burden in their arms, from which issued a
faint voice calling me by name; it was Tommy
Hammond. They placed him gently upon the
amputation table, where I stood holding the lad’s
hand whilst the surgeon made a hasty examina-
tion. Nothing could be done, both legs were shot
away, and he was laid down upon the deck with
a rolled-up coat as a pillow to await the end
which was only a question of a few minutes.

“We've drubbed them soundly, Brandon,” he
whispered, as I bent over him “but they’ve
THE BATTLE OF THE NILE 117

nailed me this time,’ and by the feeble flicker
of the purser’s dip in the horn lantern hanging
from the beams I saw a smile shape itself on his
white lips as he said the word “nailed.”
“Are you in great pain, Tommy?” I asked.-
“Not a bit, only sleepy, and oh, so tired! Write

to my mother, Jack. ... See her if you can....
You know where she lives. We've thrashed them
properly ... properly ... prop—.. .” and his

spirit passed away.

Amidst the noise and turmoil of an action there
is little room for present grief. It is afterwards,
when the blood is cool and the surroundings are
tranquil, that the memory of such scenes as this
returns in full force, bringing with it little details
till then unnoticed. Even now, though long, long
years have passed, in the watches of the night that
scene comes back to me and I can feel again the
faint hand-clasp of the dying lad, and can hear his
last words, in which filial love was mingled with a
sense of pride in duty done and an end crowned by
victory.

The scene from my position on the Vanguard’s
poop was magnificent and impressive beyond all
description. The fire had full possession of the
doomed ship, and columns of flame leapt aloft,
licking the spars with their forked tongues and
lighting up the whole scene for miles around.
Although the night was of pitchy darkness, I
118 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

could have seen to pick up a needle from the
deck, and could plainly feel the heat from the
fiery mass. By the blaze the bull and rigging
of every ship in both fleets stood silhouetted
sharply against the dark background, and the
eye rested on shattered hulls, splintered spars,
and shot-torn canvas. The sandy sweep of the
bay was clearly visible, and groups of Arabs
gathered together on the dunes stood watching
the awful spectacle with Oriental immobility.
My gaze was chiefly directed towards the
burning ship, on the forepart of which numbers
of her crew were assembled, clustering on bow-
sprit jibboom and sprit sail-yard like a swarm
of bees. Amongst the few human beings remain-
ing on the quarter-deck I could distinguish the
figure of a little boy—almost a child—and learned
afterwards that it was young Casabianca, the son
of the French commodore, whose fate Mrs Hemans
has perpetuated in her beautiful poem. But though
the flames enshrouded the chief part of the ship,
and the heat must have been intense, the gallant
Frenchmen fought on savagely, working their guns
until actually driven from them by the fire. Many of
her crew leaped overboard, mostly to find a watery
grave, though some swam to the adjacent ships and
were saved by ropes thrown to their assistance.

As the conflagration advanced, the firing on
both sides ceased, and friend and foe stood with
THE BATTLE OF THE NILE 119

straining eye and bated breath awaiting the ex-
plosion which another few minutes must bring.

It came. With an awful roar as though a
voleano’had belched up its fiery entrails, the
burning mass was hurled aloft, the flaming spars
rising high towards heaven, pausing for an
instant at the zenith of their parabolic flight,
then descending into the sea with incredible
swiftness, and vanishing from sight in a cloud
of steam. Each ship reeled from stem to stern-
post, the seams opened, and every timber in
their massive fabrics quivered. Each man stared
speechless into the pale face of his nearest
comrade, then all vision became lost, for the
black shroud of night fell with redoubled
intensity, and pitchy darkness reigned supreme.

For full a quarter of an hour no shot was
fired on either side, the crews of each ship being
engaged in the task of quenching such portions
of the burning fabric as had fallen on their
decks. Then the French liner Franklin opened
fire, and the cannonading began afresh.

I was sent in the jolly-boat to the Leander with
a message from the admiral to Captain Thompson,
and when within a couple of hundred yards of
the frigate, I heard a cry for help in English.
Pulling towards the spot from whence the voice
came, we rescued a French oflicer—apparently,
from his uniform, an enseigne de vaisseau, one of
120 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

the survivors from the Orient. The man was
greatly exhausted, and replied to my question
in broken English, widely different from the
pure English he had employed when hailing us
for help. I took no notice of this circumstance
_at the time, but as I caught glimpses of the
fellow’s face by the light of the gun flashes, it
seemed to me strangely familiar, although I could
not call to mind where I had seen it before. The
left cheek and ear of the Frenchinan were marked
deep blue by an explosion of gunpowder, and as I
had certainly never seen anyone similarly disfigured
I dismissed the matter from my thoughts, after
putting the man on board the Leander, making
sure that my fancy or imagination had misled me.

Although the action continued in a desultory
fashion until five o'clock in the morning, the
victory was completely with the British, and
when day broke there remained only two French
line-of-battle ships, Le Généreua and Le Guillaume
Yell, with their colours flying; the whole of the
remainder were either in our possession or had
cut their cables and driven ashore.

Never in the annals of naval warfare was so
complete a victory recorded. Of thirteen French
line-of-battle ships — one of them a powerful
three-decker—only two escaped. And this great
deed was accomplished by twelve British seventy-
four gun ships, for our thirteenth ship, the
THE BATTLE OF THE NILE 121

Culloden, never entered into the action at all,
being aground on the tail of the Aboukir Island
sandbank, with gallant Troubridge and his crew
eating their hearts out at losing their share of
this glorious night’s work. That such a feat
could be accomplished seems almost incredible,
when it is remembered that the French had
chosen their own ground, and assumed a position
which they considered impregnable. It was not
a case in which superior seamanship gave the
British an advantage. There was no need for
manceuvring on the side of the enemy, for their
vessels were at anchor with furled sails, and were
turned, for the nonce, into floating batteries. The
whole key to the victory under such apparently
disadvantageous circumstances lay in the genius of
the great admiral who massed his attack on the
enemy’s van, which was captured or destroyed
without the rear of the French line being able
to assist their leading ships. When also it is
considered that the Bay of Aboukir was guarded
by sandbanks, of whose whereabouts the British
had no knowledge, the action of our leading ships
in boldly taking up a position inside of the enemy
shows a tactical judgment which has never been
rivalled, and which, up to the present, marks the
battle of the Nile as the most brilliant victory
ever gained by the skill of a British admiral and
the prowess of the men who so nobly supported him.
CHAPTER VIII
TRIAL OF A TRAITOR

NELSON suffered great pain from the wound in his
head, which had the effect of making him nervous
. and irritable, although nothing could lastingly
mar the kindliness of his disposition.

Let me here say that although throughout this
memoir I frequently make use of the plain word
“Nelson,” without the official prefix of “admiral”
or “lord,” there is no want of respect implied by
the omission, neither is any familiarity intended.
A man such as Nelson becomes possessed of a
personality which places him above the social
designations which distinguish other men. Neither
title nor rank can add to his glory, and when a
national hero is always spoken of by his plain
name it simply testifies to the deep and abiding
hold he has gained in the hearts of the people.
No one would dream of saying “ Mr” Shakespeare.
As there has been but one Shakespeare, so there
has been but one Nelson, and it is by this simple,
unadorned name that his fame will go down to
posterity.

122
TRIAL OF A TRAITOR 123

The work which lay before the British fleet
did not terminate with the close of the battle.
The actual fighting was over, it is true; but to
what a pitiable condition were the fleets of both
nations reduced. All alike had suffered, in a
greater or lesser degree, by that night’s fierce
conflict. The Guerrier and Conquérant, the
leading ships of the French van, were totally
dismasted and terribly mauled. Most of the
others had suffered grievously in hulls and rigging
from the sustained fire of the British, whilst three
of the enemy’s rear ships had drifted on shore;
only two, the Généreux and the Guillaume Tell,
made their escape, and of the former I shall have
more to say later on.

Our own ships had suffered severely, more
particularly the Bellerophon, which had drifted
out of action dismasted and crippled, whilst the
Culloden, which had been ashore during the night
and was saved from total-wreck only by the skill
and energy of Troubridge, had five feet of water in
her hold, and was compelled to keep the pumps
going day and night to avoid foundering. The
remaining ships were all more or less cut about,
and, under the circumstances, it will be apparent
that, in order to make both our squadron and its
prizes seaworthy, there remained an enormous
amount of work, and that victory by no means
indicated idleness and rejoicing.
124 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

Nelson’s first object was to convey the news of
his triumph to England and to Lord St Vincent off
Cadiz. He had only one frigate, the Leander, and
one brig, the Mutine, with him, and both of these
were employed for the required services. Captain
Berry of the Vauguard was selected as the bearer
of the glorious tidings, and the repairs on board
the Leander—for she had suffered, considerably
in the action—were hurried forward with such
promptitude that she was ready to sail by the
fifth of August.

Since the close of the action and the removal of
the admiral to his cabin, I had seen little of him,
and was greatly surprised by a message desiring
my immediate attendance. I found him alone,
seated at a desk at which he evidently had been
writing, for a letter, still unfolded, lay before him.

After a few kindly words in answer to my
stammering inquiries concerning his health, he said,
“JT want an eye-witness who will tell the whole
story of the first of August to Lady Nelson, and
I shall send you to England with Berry, which will
give you an opportunity of seeing your father and
mother. I have ordered both you and Mr Barrett
to be appointed as supernumeraries to the Leander.
This will enable young Barrett to get an outfit.
Go and get your traps ready ; the frigate will sail
this afternoon. Come to me in an hour’s time,
when I shall have this letter ready.”
TRIAL OF A TRAITOR 125

I left the cabin and ran below in search of Will
Barrett, delighted at the important private mission
assigned to me, and yet sorry at the thought of
being parted from the great Admiral, even for a
few months. Will Barrett was even more pleased
than myself at the news, for his wardrobe was of
the scantiest for the quarter-deck. That Nelson
should have remembered this lad amidst the pain
from his wound and the heavy responsibilities
which lay upon him is another proof of this great
man’s thoughtful, generous nature—if any proof is
still wanted.

Poor Will Barrett's personal effects were easily
stowed away in a bag, whilst mine—thanks to
kind Lady Nelson’s forethought—filled a good-sized
chest, a circumstance to which my companion drew
attention with a rueful smile as we drew near the
Leander’s side. Neither of us then dreamt that
within a few days we were to be stripped of every
rag we possessed.

My interview with Nelson before leaving the
Vanguard was entirely of a private nature. Honour-
ing me by the confidence he was pleased to place in
me, he instructed me as to those of his family whom
I was to visit, and entrusted me with a letter to be
personally delivered to her ladyship. With as much
delicacy as though I had been a friend of his own
standing, Nelson intimated his intention of bearing
all my expenses, for which purpose he had lodged a-
126 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

sum of money with Captain Berry. He desired me
to write full particulars concerning the state of
health in which I found Lady Nelson and the old
rector of Burnham Thorpe; and then, after many
generous and kindly words, bade me farewell, with
the assurance that my name should be kept on the
books of the Vanguard, and that I should be sent
out again directly my mission was completed.
Needless to say that I never breathed to anyone
the confidential nature of the service on which I
was employed. My messmates in the Vanguard
wondered a little when they found that both the
Norfolk lads were going to England, but attached
no real importance to the matter.

An hour after our traps were on board the Leander,
she weighed and we stood to the westward, bound
for Gibraltar and Lord St Vincent's fleet off Cadiz.

I had never been to sea in a frigate before,
and the Leander seemed very small after the
line-of-battle ship. There was ample accom-
modation, however, for she was short of her
complement, eighty of her hands having been
drafted into the various ships which had suffered
most in the great action. She had several officers
wounded in the battle on board, and half-a-dozen
French prisoners, rescued by her at the burning of
L’Orient. Everyone in the frigate was proud that
it should have fallen to her lot to bear the tidings
of the great victory, and every rag of canvas was
TRIAL OF A TRAITOR 127

clapped upon her to shorten the passage, but the
wind remained obstinately in the west, with fre-
quent calms, so that our progress in the desired
direction was painfully slow, and I could observe
how Captains Thompson and Berry fretted under
the delay as they paced the deck together. I sup-
pose it must have been through some hint conveyed
by Captain Berry to the Leander’s first lieutenant
that my duties on board the frigate were exceed-
ingly light, being confined to day-watches, so that
I had every night in bed, a luxury to which I was
unaccustomed, and which I found to suit my con-
stitution in every way. Will Barrett took his share
of duty with the other midshipmen, and when we
had been ten days at sea he imparted to me a dis-
covery he had made which perplexed us greatly at
the time, for we were both youngsters without
much experience to guide us.

It was about four bells in the first watch when,
the lights in the midshipmen’s berth having been
put out, I went on deck for a walk, before turning
in, with Will Barrett, who was on duty. It was a
lovely night, but there was little or no wind, and
the frigate rolled lazily from side to side with her
canvas flapping against the mast. Will led me
into the waist, where there was no chance of our
conversation being overheard, and then whispered
mysteriously, “Jack, ve made a discovery. Who
do you think is on board?”
128 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“ How can I tell! Out with it, Will.”

“You remember telling me about that Frenchman
who sung out to you in English after the Orient
blew up, and whom you pulled out of the water?”

“Yes, of course I do,” I replied, my attention
suddenly arrested, and my interest aroused; “the
fellow is on board now. Ive seen his back several
times, but have had no word ‘with him.”

“That's not to be wondered at. Words are the
last. thing he wants with either you or me. Do
you know who that chap is, Jack ?’

“No,” I replied ; “the face struck me as familiar,
but if I had ever seen a man with that blue brand
on his cheek I should remember him.” |

Will clutched me by the arm and bent his head
forward to whisper, “ You branded him yourself,
Jack, with father’s pistol. That chap you take for
a Frenchman is Steve Croucher. I recognised him
at once, although he has altered the cut of his jib
as much as possible, and has managed to prevent
my getting a good look into his phiz till this after-
noon. Lord bless you, Jack, I knew the rascal at
once! I’ve seen him hanging about Bess Wilson too
often not to be sure of him, but he did not recognise
me; if he had, his eyes would have betrayed him.
Now, Jack, what are we to do? for the chap’s a
traitor, and—” But at this moment the voice of
the officer of the watch rang out, calling for Will
Barrett, and our conference was at an end for the
TRIAL OF A TRAITOR 129

night, so I went below and turned in to think the
matter out in my hammock.

If Will Barrett’s assertion was a correct one, then
there was on board the Leander a most dangerous
and unscrupulous traitor, one who had sold his own
' comrades at Silversands without compunction, and
who had now added to that crime by becoming a
renegade and fighting against hisown country. This
scoundrel possessed qualities for mischief and in-
trigue such as are rarely combined in one man. He
was an excellent linguist, and so well acquainted
with French sea-life that his English nationality
would never be suspected when he chose to conceal
it. Asa spy he would be invaluable, for, mixed up
with the contraband trade as he was, he could cross
with impunity between the two countries, probably
selling his services to both governments whilst true
to neither. Such a rascal was an element of constant
danger, and before going to sleep I made up my mind
to tell Captain Berry everything I knew about this
man, and follow his advice as to the course I should
pursue. Captain Berry was only a passenger on
board the Leander, and any communication to him
might be regarded as unofficial, in case he deemed
it best to defer action until we reached the fleet; in
any case, making him acquainted with the business
would take the responsibility from the shoulders of
both Will Barrett and myself.

On the following morning I found a pretext for

I
130 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

seeing Captain Berry in his cabin, but, before I had
spoken half-a-dozen sentences he stopped me, say-
ing, “By heaven, Thompson must hear of this!
Stay here, youngster, and I'll bring him.”

Will Barrett was sent for on the conclusion of
my narrative, and confirmed it in every particular.
Then we were dismissed with strict injunctions
to keep silent, whilst the twd captains consulted
with the purser, who was learned in naval law,
as to what should be done,

“The best plan,” said the latter, “would be to
assemble a court-martial on board, try the fellow,
and hang him at once if his guilt can be proved.”

“Wouldn't this be informal?” asked Captain.
Thompson.

“ Of course it would,” broke in Berry, “but, none
the less, I would do it. Ill take my share of the
responsibility if the fellow swings at the yard-
arm to-morrow morning. Such a rascal is unfit
to breathe the same air as honest sailor-men.”

' The half-a-dozen French prisoners on board the
Leander were not kept in confinement whilst the
ship was at sea, but allowed to wander about in
absolute freedom. In virtue of his rank, the man
whom I had picked up was entitled to ness in the
midshipmen’s berth; but this he declined to do,
electing to share the quarters of his fellow-prisoners,
although these were all of inferior position, These
men were well treated by the frigate’s crew, who
TRIAL OF A TRAITOR 131

did them little acts of kindness with a sort of pity-
ing contempt for their nationality, and in return
for this the French sailors were civil and obliging.
The officer alone remained sullen and morose, and
when the good-natured bluejackets found he re-
jected all their advances, they simply considered
him an ill-conditioned fellow and left him to his
own devices.
There was great surprise - amongst the ship’s
company when, without a moment’s warning, a
guard of marines under their sergeant arrested the
French midshipman and marched him aft to the
poop cabin, where Captains Thompson and Berry,
together with the two senior lieutenants, were
seated round a table awaiting the prisoner. When
the latter appeared and was placed between two
marines with drawn bayonets in front of Captain
Thompson, the president of the improvised court, he
glared sullenly around but uttered no word of protest.
“The name you have given as being yours is Jean
Legros, late ensergne de varsseau of L’Orient, but
information has been given us that your real name
is Stephen Croucher of Silversands in the county
of Norfolk ; that you are an Englishman by birth,
parentage and education; and that your being in
the employment of the French Republic constitutes
an act of treason against His Majesty King George.
What have you to say in answer to this charge,
which those who advance it are ready to prove?”
132 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

The prisoner listened attentively, and replied in
very broken English, “I do not understand. I
speak little ze English. This court has no power
to try me. I answer not this court,” and he looked
defiantly around.

“Tf you will not reply,” said the president,
“the trial must proceed, and you have only
yourself to blame if you refuse to question the
witnesses. Call Mr John Brandon.”

I was duly sworn, and then repeated to the
court every circumstance attending the smuggling
adventure at Silversands, together with the fact
that I had flashed off a pistol in the face of
Stephen Croucher, the discharge from which would
fully account for the gunpowder patch which
marked the prisoner’s cheek and ear. I stated
my knowledge of his father, his home, and _ his
habits, and also how his treachery had driven
him from Silversands, where he would never dare
to show his face again. JI also added that the
prisoner, when desirous of being picked up from
the water, had hailed the boat in pure English,
and mentioned how familiar his face had seemed
to me, even in the excitement of the scene and
viewed only by the flashes of the guns. I was
‘now prepared to swear that the man standing
before the court was not the Frenchman,
Jean Legros, but the Englishman, Stephen
Croucher.
TRIAL OF A TRAITOR 133

“What have you to say to this?” asked the
president.

“Te leetle boy he tell big lie,’ replied the
prisoner, and the blood rushed in my face at
the insult.

“Stand aside, Mr Brandon. Call Mr Barrett.’

When Will stepped forward to be sworn, a
manifest change came over the prisoner's face.
He had recognised me, and had nerved himself
to brazen out my accusation should I make any,
but for Will Barrett’s appearance here in the ©
middle of the Mediterranean he was wholly un-
prepared. It was to avoid meeting me that he
declined to mess in the berth, and somehow he
had never recognised Will Barrett in the midship-
man who came on board with me from the
Vanguard, and the appearance of this unexpected
accuser was sufficient to have carried dismay into
the heart of a bolder man than Stephen Croucher ;
but after the first surprise he recovered himself,
and listened composedly to the new witness’s
statement, although I could detect the anxiety
which oppressed him by the twitching of his
fingers which he held behind his back.

Will Barrett's account was far ampler than
mine as regarded the prisoner’s identity, for,
during his visits to Silversands, Steve Croucher
had much frequented “The Toothsome Herring,”
attracted by the presence of comely Bess Wilson,
134 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

and the lad had become intimately acquainted with
him. He also expressed his readiness to swear
that the prisoner was Stephen Croucher, a man
who had betrayed his comrades at Silversands.

“What have you to say in reply to this?”
asked the president.

“Tis leetle boy he lie, like ze other leetler hoy.”
replied the prisoner, with amazing effrontery.

“T don’t lie, sir,” cried Will, indignantly, “and
let this prove it. Look inside that man’s left
hand, and if there is a mark near the fleshy part
of the thumb, then he is Stephen Croucher. I
was fishing with him at night when a conger-
hook became imbedded in his hand and had to
be cut out by the doctor, leaving a mark behind
which will never wear out. Make him show his
hand, sir, and then you'll see whether or not I am
a liar.”

At the president’s order the sergeant of
marines seized the prisoner by the wrist, but
the latter saw that the game was up, and
wrenched the hand free, whilst shaking his
clenched fist at Will Barrett and myself.

“Curse you,” he cried, in purest English, “you’ve
run me down. But you dare not pass any
sentence,” he continued, facing the president,
fiercely, “for this is an informal court, without
a vestige of jurisdiction. I admit that I am
Stephen Croucher, a British subject, but I joined
TRIAL OF A TRAITOR 135

the French navy by order of the British Govern-
ment, whom I have furnished with valuable in-
formation. This I can prove easily on reaching
England, although unable to do so here, for every
rag I had was burnt in L’Orient. By exposing
my true character to the French, you have com-
mitted a blunder for which your government will
not thank you, since it precludes me from ever
again being in a position to acquire information.
You will deal with me at your peril, gentlemen.”

“Lead the prisoner away,” cried the president,
“and clear the court.”

An hour later the court was declared open,
and most of the officers of the frigate attended as
spectators to hear the verdict. The prisoner once
more stood in his former position, with a marine on
either side and the sergeant standing behind him. .

The president, when silence was established, said
sternly, “Stephen Croucher, you have confessed
to serving under the French Republic and have
thus proved yourself a traitor to your king and
your country. You challenge the jurisdiction of
this court, but every member of it is willing to
bear the responsibility that his share in the pro-
ceedings may incur. You also allege that you
are in the employ of the British Government.
This we disbelieve, for there is not one shred of
evidence to support it, nor is the statement backed
by probability. Every government stands in need
136 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

of secret agents, but none would employ a man
so degraded as to betray his own comrades. The
sentence of the court is that you be hung from
the fore yardarm of this frigate, and may your
sins be forgiven you, for the sentence will be
carried out at eight o’clock to-morrow morning.
Gentlemen, this court is dissolved,” and the officers
rose from their chairs as the prisoner, pale and
speechless, was led away by the guards and placed
in irons, with a marine sentry over him, between
two of the after main-deck guns.

The circumstances attending this trial were, as
may be imagined, very exciting to me, and at the
same time very painful, owing to the previous
knowledge which I possessed of the prisoner. It
was the first time that I had ever witnessed a
court-martial, and although this one was divested
of much of its imposing character, owing to the
small number of officers constituting the tribunal,
and the absence of such ceremonials as full uniform,
still there was a stern determination to fulfil the
ends of justice about the whole proceedings which
filled my mind with awe and admiration. To see
a fellow-being brought to the bar on a capital
charge must always be an impressive spectacle,
even to the most callous. Think then how deeply
it must have affected two such youngsters as Will
Barrett and myself, on whom the burden of pro-
secution was laid, whose evidence attested the
TRIAL OF A TRAITOR 137

prisoner’s guilt, and whose accidental appearance
on the scene was the cause whereby the machinery
of justice was set in motion. The trial was finished
before noon, and when, at eight bells, I went below
to the midshipmen’s berth for dinner, my heart
was so full of the morning’s proceedings that I
could swallow no mouthful, and found myself
wondering, in a vague way, how my companions
could talk on any other subject than the one which
engrossed my whole thoughts. They laughed and
jested concerning indifferent matters, and if the
solemn scene which had been enacted an hour
before was mentioned, it was briefly dismissed
with the general remark, “That it served the
traitor right.”

Will Barrett and I stole aloft to the quiet of
the main-top to talk the matter over, and I saw,
with some surprise, that the fate of Stephen
Croucher weighed as heavily upon him as upon
me. In truth we both passed a very miserable
day—such a day as I hope I may never be com-
pelled to live through again.

Early in the second dog-watch, the sergeant of
marines came with the information that the
prisoner wished to speak with me, and that
Captain Thompson had given permission that I
should see him. This news was both a surprise
and a source of trouble to me, for I could only
imagine that the doomed man wished to upbraid
138 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

me for my personal share in his conviction and
I felt, at first, strongly tempted to decline the
interview, but ultimately resolved to go, and so
followed the sergeant, though, it must be confessed,
with reluctant steps and much inward agitation.

Throughout the day I had pictured the con-
demned man filled with despair and contrition for
the crime of which he had been found guilty. When
taken below he had appeared pale and terrified,
and I had thought of him sitting hopelessly
between those two guns—his feet in fetters, and
the sentry walking stolidly to and fro before him
—living over the memories of the past, lamenting
opportunities wasted, and crushed by the know-
ledge of an ill-spent life, which to-morrow would
see ended by a felon’s halter. Judge then of my
surprise on finding that my sympathy had been
wholly thrown away, and that his impending fate
had lessened nothing of Croucher’s truculent bearing.

“Here, sergeant,’ he cried as we approached,
“take your soldier the other side of the deck out
of earshot, and let him sentry-go there whilst
Master Jack and I have a talk. We've State
secrets to tell each other, and we don’t want the
Royal Marine from Chatham—the only animal in
this menagerie that’s allowed to carry a musket—
to overhear our conversation. Tut, man!” he con-
tinued, as the sergeant’s face darkened at his badin-
age, “tut, man, don’t be afraid that I shall jump
TRIAL OF A TRAITOR 139

overboard, or wring this youngster’s neck. I’m too
fast in the darbies for that,” and he tapped the iron
bands round his ankles.

“You're a cool scoundrel,’ muttered the angry
sergeant, but he complied with the prisoner’s re-
quest and ordered the sentry to the other side of
the deck.

“Well, young Parson Jack,” continued Steve,
“who would have thought of meeting you out
here? Yow’re coming across my path too often,
young fellow, and most of those who do that, if
they live at all, live to repent it. You and that
young scoundrel, Will Barrett, had it all your own.
way this morning, but I'll be even with you both
yet, as sure as—” and he swore a horrible oath,

“Tf you speak like that I shall leave you,” I re-
plied angrily, for the tone of the ruffian grated on
me, and I felt annoyed that I had passed so many
miserable hours in pitying his condition.

“Sit down, you young fool!” he growled, for I
had half-risen from the side tackle of the gun on
which I was seated. “Sit down and listen to me.
You don’t suppose I believe in this tomfoolery
about hanging to-morrow morning, do you? No,
my lad, Steve Croucher has had his neck in peril
too often not to have studied the Articles of War,
and I know it’s as much as his commission is worth
for that fool Thompson, with his cocked hat, and
tinsel epaulettes, to lay a finger on me.”
140 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“You are mistaken,” I said sadly, for the fellow’s
levity shocked me. “The sentence of the court
will certainly be carried out to-morrow.”

“Curse the court!” he muttered. “If I had
Will Barrett within my reach I’d wring his neck,
as I would yours if you could not be of use to me.”

Again I rose, but he pulled me down on my seat
with a grumbling apology, for he saw that he had
gone too far.

“You mustn’t mind all I say,” he continued, “for
I am a desperate man. Now, listen to me, Master
Jack. You ruined me at Silversands, and it was
not your fault that you didn’t blow my brains out ;
as it is, I shall carry the marks of your pistol to
my grave. But, in return for this, you saved my
life at Aboukir Bay, for in another moment I
should have sunk. So far then we are quits.
You. think I shall be hung to-morrow morning.
Well, attend to the request of a dying man”—he
smiled derisively—‘ and tell those cocked-hatted
gentlemen what I am about to say to you. The
British thrashed the Frenchmen handsomely at
Aboukir, but they would not have done half so
well had it not been for me—Stephen Croucher,
the man now in irons and condemned to a felon’s
~ death in return for his services to his king and his
country. Bend your ear down, lad, and mark what
I say. The French admiral’s ship, the most power-
' ful vessel in their fleet, caught fire before the
TRIAL OF A TRAITOR 141

action was two hours old, and when she was
engaged in knocking your craft into matchwood.
How did it happen, and who did it? Bend down
lower. I'll tell you.”

Casting his eyes around to see that no one was
within earshot, he whispered, “I set her on fire—
I, Stephen Croucher. The painters had been at
work about the Orient’s poop, and had left their
oil-cans and other imflammable material about near
a pile of carcases that were lying ready for use. I
kindled the fire at imminent risk to my own life,
for if the Crapauds had seen me, I should have
been shot down like a dog. Go and tell this to
those two butchers, Thompson and Berry, and see
what they'll say then about hanging me to-morrow
morning. By Heaven!” he cried, with an indigna-
tion in his tone which was admirable, if simulated,
“I ought to be walking the quarter-deck of the
Leander with a pair of epaulettes on my shoulders
and a captain’s commission in my pocket, instead
of being cribbed up in the darbies between two
guns like a pig ready for slaughter.”

Involuntarily I shrank away as the arch-traitor
confessed to this awful crime, and shook off the
hand which, in his excitement, he had laid upon
my arm. The smallest contact with so base a
rascal seemed horrible.

“Go and tell.them what you have heard, and
bring me back their answer. If it is not favourable,
142 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

I shall put the whole thing in writing, and they
dare not suppress the document, for I will hand it
to them in the presence of the whole ship’s com-
pany. Be off, and don’t linger on your way!”

I needed no second bidding, for my. repugnance
to this ruffian had grown to abhorrence, and I fled
to the quarter-deck, whereupon the marine sentry
crossed over andresumed his walk before the prisoner.

I was pale and trembling, and the officer of the
watch noticed it when I told him that I wished
to see Captain Thompson immediately.

“ What has happened, lad?” he said kindly, but
of course I could explain nothing, and could only
repeat that I wished to see the captain concerning
the prisoner, Stephen Croucher.

On hearing my story, Thompson at once sent for
Captain Berry and the two senior lieutenants who
had composed the court, and desired me to repeat
the prisoner’s statement in their hearing.

“What is your opinion, gentlemen?” he asked
when I had finished, looking pointedly at the junior
of the two lieutenants, for in these cases the officer
of lowest rank always speaks first.

“T think, sir, that it is a lie from beginning to
end, trumped up by this scoundrel to save his
worthless neck.”

“Tam of the same opinion,” said the other lieu-
tenant, “and think that he deserves hanging more
richly than before.”
‘TRIAL OF A TRAITOR 143

“And you, Berry?”

“T agree with these gentlemen that the capital
punishment should be carried out to-morrow, and
I am willing to bear a the responsibility that
may devolve upon me.’

“Then we are unanimous,” said Captain Tisineee
“Youngster, you can tell the prisoner that we have
considered his confession but see no reason to alter
the decision of the court or to defer the execution
of the sentence. He shall be furnished with writ-
ing materials, and the document shall be delivered
to the proper authorities. Steward, bring some
wine. Here, my lad, toss this off,” he added kindly,
handing me a glass of sherry. “ You are young to
have such trying work put upon your shoulders.”

I hurried below, anxious to end my hateful
mission. Croucher was seated on the deck with
an air of sullen indifference, but his features be-
trayed anxiety as I approached.

“Well, young Parson Jack,” he cried, when I was
still several yards from him, “what message do you
bring ? I reckon there'll be no raree-show to-
morrow morning.’

“Qn the contrary,” I replied, with all the self-
command I could summon, “the court has re-
assembled to consider your communication, and
has unanimously agreed that the sentence shall
be carried into execution.”

With wonderful agility and a hoarse ery of rage
144 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

he sprang upright, and launched himself forward to
seize me, but he had apparently forgotten the fetters
on his feet, and fell heavily to the ground, from
which position he endeavoured to grasp my legs,
but I had sprung backwards and was out of his
reach,

There was murder in Stephen Croucher’s eyes at
that moment, and had I fallen within the grip of
his powerful arms he would have killed me before
the astonished sentry could interfere, and these
memoirs would never have been written.
CHAPTER IX
THE LEANDER AND GiNLREUX

THE weather was very hot, and the frigate made
her way slowly to the westward by the aid of the
light airs which alternated with hours of calm,
during which the sea was as smooth as a mill-pond.
In the cockpit it was stifling, so Will Barrett and
I remained on deck until nearly midnight, lounging
on the booms and talking over the one subject
which engrossed our minds—the execution which
was to take place on the following morning. As
we went below to turn in, we saw Stephen Croucher
hard at work writing by the light of a purser’s.
lantern. His quick eye caught sight of us, and he
shook his fist in our direction, whilst hurling after
us a volley of abuse and threats of vengeance. It
was terrible to see a man on the point of death in
this frame of mind, and it plainly showed that he
‘was bad to the core. ‘He had refused to see the
chaplain, and when that gentleman, disregarding
his prohibition, had spoken to the prisoner, the
latter had driven him away with foul epithets.
Nothing could be don* with this hardened rascal.
K
146 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

who mocked at everything holy and seemed de-
termined to maintain the spirit of reckless bravado
to the last.

I found it impossible to sleep, and went on deck
just as dawn was breaking and the watch was
washing down the deck. The lookout men were
taken off their post and a masthead man sent aloft
to the fore top-mast cross-trees. On reaching this
lofty perch the man swept the horizon round with
his eye, paused for a moment to make sure, and
then cried out, “Sail on the larboard beam.”

The officer in charge of the deck sent a midship-
man aloft with his glass to examine the stranger,
and, as the daylight grew stronger, the youngster
hailed the deck that she was a large vessel stand-
ing to the northward, and carrying a fair breeze,
which filled her upper canvas and brought her to-
wards us at a certain speed. This breeze had not
reached the Leander, which lay with her head to
the westward and her sails flapping against the
mast in the dead calm, except when cat’s-paws filled
the lighter sails and drew her slowly ahead.

The lieutenant immediately went below and re-
ported the strange sail to Captain Thompson, and
then went aloft himself with his glass.

“She’s a large ship, sir,’ he hailed, addressing
the captain, who had come on deck, “ her courses are
just rising, and she has got hold of a good breeze.
If it lasts we shall see her hull in half-an-hour.”
THE LEANDER AND GENEREUX 147

I think that from the beginning Captain Thomp-
son formed a very good idea of the stranger’s
nationality and also of her name, though he said
nothing at the time, but went below to dress, order-
ing the lieutenant to set every stitch of canvas
that would draw, and let him know when the
strange sail could be made out more plainly.

My own glass was left on board the Vanugard,
but I borrowed one, which I slung round my
_ shoulder, and went aloft to have a look for myself.
The stranger still carried a southerly wind and
soon the lower part of her courses rose into sight,
then the hammock-nettings, then a white streak
with a tier of guns, followed shortly afterwards
by a second white streak with a second tier of
guns—she was a line-of-battle ship.

Most of the officers were on deck now, but no
orders had been given to the ship’s company beyond
hurrying forward breakfast by half-an-hour.

I forgot to mention that when Stephen Croucher
was arrested the remaining French prisoners had
been ordered down to the fore part of the lower
deck and kept there, so that they were in ignorance
as to what had happened to their officer. Chanc-
ing to go down on the main deck, I saw the
prisoner staring through a port at the advancing
ship, and a smile of triumph was on his face.

“Look there, young parson’s brat!” he cried.
“Do you see that ship? Well, instead of hanging
148 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

me at eight bells you'll all be on board of her as
prisoners by that time, and then it will be my
turn. That is Le Généreux, and she'll have you
under her lee in an hour’s time. The witch-woman
at Norwich said that Steve Croucher should never
die by bullet, hemp, or water, and I shall live to
stretch the ears of you youngsters yet.”

Although I could not help the words of the ruffian
from reaching my ears, I would not gratify him
by taking outward notice of them, but hurried on
deck to tell Captain Thompson what the prisoner
had said concerning the name and nationality of
the approaching ship. He and Captain Berry
were both looking at her with their glasses, and
as I came up the latter shut up his telescope with
a slam, saying, “She’s no Neapolitan, Thompson,
but Le Généreux. I know her by the new cloth
on her fore top-sail. I noticed it when she was
escaping out of the bay.”

“Tf you please, sir, the prisoner, Stephen
- Croucher, says that ship is the Généreua,” I said,
touching my cap.

“All right, my lad,” replied the captain, “I only
wish it was eight bells, so that we could hang him
for this last bit of information. Tell the sergeant
of marines to have the fellow removed below.
We'll attend to him after we’ve done with the
Frenchman.”

“You'll fight, of course,” said Berry.
THE LEANDER AND GENEREUX © 149

Captain Thompson glanced aloft, where the sails
hung idly from the yards, and smiled as he turned
to the first lieutenant and said, “Have the men
finished their breakfast, Martin? Then beat to
quarters.”

In a moment’s time the drum rattled out, and
all became a scene of activity. Ifthe ship approach-
ing us was Le Généreux, it would have been wiser
to seek safety in flight, more particularly as the
Leander was eighty men short of her proper
complement, and was the bearer of important
despatches. But there was no wind, and therefore
no alternative. The little frigate must either fight
her huge adversary and trust to crippling her spars
or be captured as she lay idly in the doldrums.
Our whole fighting force amounted to only two
hundred and eighty-eight officers and men, whilst
one of the frigate’s carronades had been dismounted
at the battle of the Nile, thus leaving only fifty
guns available, the largest of which were twenty-
four pounders, but the men standing by those
guns were British seamen, commanded by officers
second to none in His Majesty’s navy.

On came the great line-of-battle ship, carrying
the wind steadily with her, and looking very beauti-
ful under her cloud of canvas. Little more than
two miles now separated us, and each port, with its
protruding gun, could be plainly seen, whilst the Nea-
politan flag fluttered from her peak as a ruse to lull
150 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

us into security. Suddenly the Sicilian colours were
hauled down and the Turkish ensign hoisted in
its place, and our answer was to run up the
British flag whilst shortening sail to await the
enemy

“Confound them!” I heard Captain Thomson
growl,. “they're afraid to show their own Re-
publican rag;” but even as he spoke, the crescent
fluttered down and the tricolour flew aloft at
the enemy’s peak and mast-head.

The Leander was now under easy sail, the guns
had been double-shotted and run out, their crews
were gathered around them, mostly stripped to the
waist, and many of them with handkerchiefs knotted
round their heads, which gave them a grim aspect
and showed that they knew the work which lay
before them. As is ever the wont with British
sailors, they laughed and jested in undertones
amongst themselves, but otherwise there was dead
silence on board, save for the flapping of the useless
canvas against the masts.

Theenemy held steadily on until withinhalf a mile
of our larboard beam, when she luffed and fired a
shot across our bows, in the full anticipation that
her puny adversary would strike her colours with-
out returning a blow. By this time a light air had
reached us, and the Leander was gathering steerage
way. ‘

“ Aim for her rigging,” cried the captain. “Ten
THE ZEANDER AND GENEREUX 181

guineas to the first gun’s crew that knocks away a
stick. Are you ready? Then—fire!”

Every gun on our larboard side thundered out in
answer to the challenge, and a cheer arose as the
Frenchman’s mizzen topmast went over the side,
whilst the splinters flew from several of her spars.

Then the great ship poured her whole starboard
broadside into us with terrible effect. Many of our
men were killed or wounded, and our sails and
rigging cut to pieces. Our mizzen topmast fell
over the starboard quarter, whilst the fore topmast,
after tottering for a moment, fell to windward in
the weather-roll, the wreckage wounding several
men and blocking the guns on the larboard bow.-

Still the frigate fought on obstinately, discharg-
ing every gun that would bear into the Frenchman
as she held on with the evident intention of
running us on board. So shattered was the
Leander that she was unable to avoid this, and
with a great shock which made her tremble from
stem to stern, causing the main topmast to go over
the side, and bringing down upon the nettings the
fore and main yards, both of which had been shot
away in the slings, the Généreu« fell alongside of
her, and both ships lay in this position for over
half-an-hour, for the noise of the firing had killed
the wind, and it was a dead calm.

So close did we lie together that many of our
ports were doubled up by the huge bulk of the foe,
152 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

and some of our men, stretching out their arms,
wrenched the sponges and rammers out of the
hands of the Frenchmen.

Four several times they attempted to board us,
but were on every occasion driven back by the
steady fire of the marines from our poop, and the
small-arm men on our quarter-deck. Captain
Thompson received a musket ball in the arm, but
refused to quit his post, merely supporting the
wounded limb in a handkerchief knotted around
his neck, and during the whole time that we lay
thus side by side the cannonading continued.

Then a light air sprang up, which was caught by
the upper canvas of the Généreus, and she ground
past us, going round on the starboard tack when
well ahead of the frigate. We were almost help-
less, but by the aid of the sprit-sail managed to
wear round, and luffing up under the Frenchman’s
stern, we gave him our starboard broadside with
deadly effect.

Again the wind died away, and the two ships
lay in a dead calm, pounding away at each other
until three o’clock in the afternoon, when the
unequal contest had lasted for fully six hours.
At that time a light air sprang up again, and the
Généreux, wearing round on her heel, took up a
position on our larboard bow, which was the frigate’s
weakest point, for the wreck of the fore topmast
hampered her bow guns, and the broadside guns
THE LEANDER AND GENEREUX 153

could not be trained sufficiently forward to bear on
the enemy, so we were unable to return her fire,
but lay there a helpless wreck at the mercy of the
foe.

This lull in our fire enabled the Frenchman to
hail and ask if we surrendered, and as further
resistance was in vain, Captain Thompson signalled
in the affirmative by showing the French colours
on a boarding-pike.

At that time the Leander was absolutely un-
manageable, only the stumps of her lower masts
remained standing. She was riddled with shot
and had lost thirty-five men killed, and fifty-seven
wounded, amongst them both Captains Thompson
and Berry. The latter officer's wound was of a
peculiar nature; a round shot took off the upper
part of a marine’s head, and a piece of the poor
fellow’s skull was forced through Captain Berry’s
arm. Of my personal share in this long engage-
ment there is nothing to be said. I was only a
passenger on board the Leander, and, consequently
was not quartered in any particular part of the
ship, so I remained near Captain Berry, and was
often employed by Captain Thompson in running
messages. Both Will Barrett and I escaped un-
hurt, but two of the French prisoners, although
they were kept in confinement below the water-
line, were killed during the action by shot from the
Généreun.
154 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

A considerable time elapsed after the frigate’s
‘surrender before she was taken possession of by
the victors. This was owing to the fact that our
shot had so peppered the Frenchman as to leave
him no single boat in a fit condition to take the
water, but two French officers jumped overboard
and struck out in the direction of the Leander.
When alongside, ropes were thrown overboard
and the swimmers hauled on board, when they
proved to be a midshipman and the boatswain
of Le Généreun.

I had always heard it asserted that the French
were a most polite nation, and that under no con-
ceivable circumstances were they ever known to
lose their good manners and their courteous bearing
towards all with whom they were brought into con-
tact. Either this received opinion was founded on
an insufficient basis, or the two officers now on
board the Leander were the exceptions that proved
the rule. Having shaken the water from their
clothes, they at once proceeded to help themselves
to every article of value, such as watches, seals,
rings, etc. on which they could lay their hands, tak-
ing this portable property unblushingly from the
persons of the British officers, who protested, but
in vain, against this daylight robbery. Having
exhausted the upper deck, these Gallic marauders
went below in quest of further plunder, and were
then seen and hailed by Stephen Croucher, who had
THE LEANDER AND GENEREUX 1585

been kept in irons during the action. After ex-
changing a few words with the prisoner, the French
midshipman came on deck and in violent language
ordered that the ruffian should at once be set at
liberty, whilst threatening Captain Thompson with
pains and penalties for this indignity offered to a
French officer. The sergeant of marines had been
killed, but orders were at once given to the corporal
to release all the prisoners, and, a few minutes later,
Croucher appeared on deck, triumphant and vin-
dictive. JI think the French midshipman and
boatswain were both a little sorry that they had
employed such expedition in freeing their ill-used
comrade, for the first use Stephen Croucher made
of his liberty, after loading Captains Thompson and
Berry with every foul epithet that the language
afforded, was to descend into the cabin and possess
himself of many valuables which had escaped the
eye of his pillaging friends. It was a wonder how
the British stood the insolence and rapacity of
these three ruffians. From Stephen Croucher no-
thing better was to be expected, but from the others
we had a distinct claim to civil treatment and a
generous consideration, but neither of these was
forthcoming, and the carpenter's crew were at once
set to work to patch up a boat in order that an
officer of superior rank might be brought from
the Généreux to assume the command of the prize
and stop the pillage.
156 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

When one of the cutters had been cobbled up,
Captains Thompson and Berry and the senior officers
of the Leander went on board the Généreux, and,
before going, Captain Berry desired me to keep an
eye upon his cabin, with a view to saving certain
articles which he valued from the hands of the
French marauders. Captain Thompson had given
his guest a share of his own cabin, and on entering
this I observed a packet of paper lying on the deck,
having evidently been swept off the writing-desk
in the confusion. Picking the parcel up, I found it
was docketed outside “Stephen Croucher’s Confes-
sion.” I slipped the packet into my pocket, and
had scarcely done so when a fresh gang of French-
men from the Généreux burst into the cabin, when
each man appropriated what most struck his fancy.
They were thus engaged when Monsieur Lejoille,
captain of Le Génereux, boarded his prize, and
peremptorily forbade further plundering. Captain
Thompson’s cabin having been cleared of thieves,
this gallant French officer himself proceeded to
draft out the British captain’s wardrobe for his
own special use and benefit. The Englishman owned
a large stock of shirts, and possessed an exten-
sive wardrobe, for he was particularly neat in his
personal appearance. The bold Lejoille having tried
on several articles of Captain Thompson’s apparel
and found that they fitted him well, since both men
were much of the same size, proceeded to annex the
THE LEANDER AND GENEREUX 157

entire stock of clothing belonging to the English-
man, leaving the latter only three shirts, together
with such odds-and-ends as could be tied up in a
pocket-handkerchief. The midshipman and boat-
swain were bad enough, but the French captain
was a better thief than even his accomplished
subordinates.*

It is very painful to me to record these details
of a Frenchman’s meanness, rapacity and oppression,
for I think that few of that nation would have
acted in the manner above described, and we were
particularly unfortunate to have fallen into the
power of a man like Lejoille, who was of plebeian
origin, and as devoid of chivalry and generous
impulses as his master, General Buonaparte.

Associated with the French captain in his work
of plunder was Stephen Croucher, who appeared
to act the part of jackal to this Gallic lion, direct-
ing his superior to those parts of the ship where
booty was most likely to be found. I am now
inclined to think that this precious rascal was
animated more by a desire to serve his own ends
than to aid his superior officer.

When first released, Stephen had called me on
one side and had tried to adopt a conciliatory
tone as he questioned me as to the whereabouts of

* This treatment of the Leander’s crew is historical and under-
drawn rather than exaggerated. See James’s Naval History, Vol.
IL, page 234,
158 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

the written packet which he had sent to Captain
Thompson by the hands of the sergeant of marines.
This poor fellow was dead, and, later on, I saw
Croucher kneeling beside his body and searching
the pockets. It did not strike me for some time
why this scoundrel was so anxious to regain
possession of the confession which he had so
laboriously written on the previous night, with
the purpose of injuring the officers who had
sentenced him to death. As I saw him poking
about anxiously in Captain Thompson’s desk and
turning over all the papers he could discover, it
struck me like a flash what an instrument against
this ruffian I held in the pocket of my jacket.
Even supposing Croucher’s account of the firing
of the Orient to be a lie, it would not appear in
that light to the angry Frenchmen if they dis-
covered the document. Their national vanity
- would prompt them to grasp at any theory which
could explain away their defeat, and evidence of
internal treachery would serve this purpose com-
pletely. If Stephen Croucher’s confession fell into
their hands, they would not stop to inquire whether
it was a false statement wrung from the fellow
under fear of death, but would adopt it unques-
tioningly, and then the traitor would meet the
same fate at their hands as he was about to find
with us when the appearance of the Généreua
gained him a respite and ultimate freedom.
THE LEANDER AND GENEREUX 159

It was small wonder then that he should
endeavour to regain possession of a packet so
precious to him, and his temper grew more and
more savage as the search proved unavailing ;
whilst the knowledge that he had with his own
hand forged a weapon which would now be used
against him with such deadly effect must have
added to the bitterness of his feeling and awakened
all the brutality of his nature.

It was at his suggestion that such of the
Leander’s crew as were left on board her were
ordered by Lejoille to jury-rig the frigate under
the superintendence of their captors, and the
French captain improved even upon this by
causing our poor fellows on board the Généreux
to splice the rigging and repair all the damage
which had been done to that ship before allowing
them any better food than bread and water. At
sunset the Leander was taken in tow by the
Généreux, and both ships steered towards the
north-east, bound for Corfu, which was then in
the hands of the French. Most of the frigate’s
crew, and nearly all her officers, were sent on
board the Frenchman, but both Will Barrett and
I. were kept on board the Leander, a circumstance
which did not strike us as curious at the time,
though I now know it was due to the machinations
of Stephen Croucher who, for purposes of his own,
sought to separate us from our brother officers,
160 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

We two lads had turned up in the Mediterranean
as living witnesses of his treason and treachery, and
now, with a little management, we should be entirely
in his power, when it would go hard with him if he
could not get rid of us altogether or place us in such
a position that we should be powerless to do him
harm. So he manceuvred with such good effect as
to remain on board the frigate himself and keep us
with him, and by so doing he served two ends;
firstly, he kept out of sight of Captains Thompson
and Berry, who, he shrewdly conjectured, would be
too much wrapped up in. their own business to
think of him unless he crossed their path; and
secondly, he held us in his immediate power, and
could thus indulge his revengeful nature by in-
creasing the misery of our lot as prisoners.

The one bright circumstance attendant on the
Leander’s capture was the gratitude shown by the
survivors of the six French prisoners who were on
board her. These poor fellows had been kindly
treated by our seamen, and they exhibited great in-
dignation at the conduct adopted by their country-
men towards us. One of them even ventured to
remonstrate with Croucher, who plundered the
main-top man of his entire kit, but the only effect
of this well-meant interference was that they
were transferred from the frigate to the Généreua,
leaving the ground more clear for Croucher to
work out his designs.
THE LEANDER AND GENEREUX 161

We found that the Frenchman had sustained
great loss during the action. Besides her own
crew, she had taken on board some of the Timoléon’s
men at Aboukir Bay, and had also received a draft
from the Guillaume Tell before parting company
with that ship, so that she numbered in all nine
hundred and thirty-six hands. Of these one hun-
dred were killed and one hundred and eighty-eight
wounded, making a total number of casualties ex-
ceeding the frigate’s entire crew.

If there had been anything of a breeze, the
Frenchman’s foremast’ must have gone by the
board, for it had received twenty-three shot and
was held up only by a single shroud on each side.
Our poor fellows had the privilege of scarping and
fishing the spar, and re-splicing the rigging under
the jeers and abuse of their brutal captors. .

During the whole of this time the Leander’s
wounded were untended, and no operations could
be performed by the English surgeons, for the
Frenchmen robbed them of their instruments; thus
the wounds of both Captains Thompson and Berry
remained undressed until after Corfu was reached,
early in September.
CHAPTER X

STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE

ALTHOUGH, even after the lapse of many years, my
blood stills boils at the memory of the indignities
and insults showered upon the officers and crew of
the Leander by her captors on board the Généreuz,
and equally by the Republican authorities at Corfu,
‘shall enter into no further detail. The pirates on
the Riff Coast could not have treated their captives
with greater inhumanity, and their conduct on
this occasion will always remain a blot upon the
escutcheon of the French nation.

Upon arrival at Corfu there was as much
rejoicing amongst the garrison and residents over
the capture of the little Leander as if she had
been a ship three times the size of the Généreua.
The officers and men of the latter vessel were
feasted and made much of to such an extent that
I am sure they were finally convinced that the
deed of valour they had performed effaced the
memory of Aboukir Bay. In their cups they
were loud in their desire to meet Nelson and

besom the British off the waters of the Medi-
162
STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE 163

terranean. A braggart spirit is always contempt-
ible, but it is more offensive in a Frenchman than
in any other nationality that I know of, for Gallic
swagger is unrestrained by reason, and accounts
facts of too small importance to be noticed. When
these gentlemen, later on, found their wish grati-
fied, and did meet Nelson, the rencontre was not so
agreeable as they had anticipated—for them.

Will Barrett and I remained on board the
Leander, and, under the eye of Monsieur Legros—
as Stephen Croucher was now called—we were set
to work with the other men to rig the frigate,
notwithstanding that we were both officers and
should have been exempted from manual labour.
Captains Thompson and Berry protested against
this treatment but in vain, and we were marked
out for degradation by this renegade scoundrel
who had become our enemy, and whose power
over us was unquestionable. I do not think that
we contributed much towards the re-equipment of
the frigate, being boys and incapable of heavy
work, but I do know that, quite unintentionally,
Croucher did us a good turn by an enforced lesson
in practical seamanship which otherwise would
never have fallen to our lot. During those weeks
we were compelled to dip our hands in the tar-
bucket, and the trainmg was of value to us both
through life.

After a time the greater portion of the Leander’s
164 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

officers and crew were released on parole and sent
to Gibraltar, but with astounding audacity
Lejoille retained some of our best seamen to assist
in rigging the Généreux, and even demanded
their assistance in working the French ship out of
port. With their departure our lot became harder
than ever, and there appeared, as far as we could
see, no prospect of this life of misery ever coming
to an end; but one afternoon, Stephen Croucher,
who had been on shore, returned, ordering us both
to collect such traps as he and his brother thieves
had left to us, and accompany him. We went
down the side into the boat, and were pulled on
board a deeply-laden merchant brig which I had
observed lying in the harbour when we first
arrived.

“Now, you young scoundrels,” cried Stephen
when we had reached her deck, “I command this
brig, and you will always call me Captain Legros.
You will have to attend to my personal wants, and
whenever I catch you tripping I shall thrash you.
We sail for Toulon, and if you both do as I tell you
in case of an emergency, you shall.be released on
parole on reaching port. If you refuse, Pll chuck
you both overboard and drown you like a couple of
young rats. Here is a bundle of clothes for each
of you. Lay aside your uniform and put on the
things J have given you. You are now two boys
belonging to the good brig Jacqueline. Be off, now,
STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE 165

or I'll freshen your way with a rope’s end!” and
the rascal descended the hatchway to disappear in
his cabin. We went down to the forecastle, where
we found about a dozen French sailors who com-
posed the crew of the brig. With these men. we
had very little to do, for on the same afternoon we
were given the use of a spare cabin further att,
where we should be within hail of Captain Legros,
and also within reach of the colt he had laid up
for our backs. I had acquired a smattering of
French when at home, and this had rapidly de-
veloped from hearing the language so much spoken
on board the Leander, so that I could understand
most of what was said around me, although unable
as yet to express myself with any great fluency or
purity of accent. The lubberly Frenchmen jeered
at us when we entered the forecastle, and would
have played us many a scurvy trick had we re-
mained amongst them—for if tigers in nature they
are very apes for malice. And as it was, they
rarely passed one of us without administering a sly
pinch or a pull of the hair instead- of an honest
cuff on the head in our English fashion.

It will be remembered that the sole reason for
' my joining the Leander was to convey, personally,
a letter from the admiral to Lady Nelson, and this
letter I had always carried about with me, wrapped
up and sewn inside the lining of my waistcoat, and
I had also secreted Stephen Croucher’s confession
166 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

in the same manner. When that scoundrel was
searching for the document on board the Leander,
breaking open the captain’s desk and turning over
his papers, he little thought that the object he
sought was in the pocket of the youngster who
stood watching him.

Before Captain Berry left for Gibraltar I had
consulted him as to what I should do with the
admiral’s letter, as I was not allowed to accompany
the other officers and might be detained for an
unknown period. Since the missive was of a
purely personal nature, and was confided to me
as a friend of the family, Captain Berry thought
it best that I should retain it, and to this advice,
I may here say, both Will Barrett and I owed
our lives, as the sequel will show.

Opening the bundles given to us by Croucher,
we found them to contain the ordinary dress
of a ship's boy—a pair of trousers, jersey and
cap apiece. The latter article was one of those
abominable red woollen bags with a small ball at
the end, much affected by the French Republicans,
and known by them as the “cap of liberty,”
~ although, to my mind, it covered the heads of
slaves rather than of freemen. Despite our misery,
Will Barrett and I could not refrain from laughing
as we drew on these hideous pudding-bags, but
our donning them seemed to delight the French-
men, who, for once in their lives, patted us
STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE 167

on the back instead of tweaking our ears. We
laid aside our uniform jackets, but retained our
waistcoats, which were completely covered by the
jerseys. This trivial circumstance I should not
record, had it not been of great importance to us
in the future.

Having thus arrayed ourselves, we went aft to
the main cabin, in obedience to the orders of
Captain Legros, who was coarsely jocose on the
subject of our transformation, and made us drink
a glass of claret each to wet our entry into the
Republican ranks.

This rascal dearly loved the sound of his own
voice, and his tongue ran on like a cherry-clapper
in a stiff breeze. I fully believe that it caused
him a certain pleasure to show us boys, who were
completely in his power, what a scoundrel he was,
more particularly as the English he spoke could
be understood by no one else on board. He told
us that the Jacqueline had been captured some
weeks before by a French corvette, who brought
her prize into Corfu. The brig’s cargo was very
valuable, consisting of wine and olive-oil, but the
Frenchman had not dared to send her to Toulon
whilst the British fleet was ranging the Mediter-
ranean. “Now I have volunteered to take her
there,” he continued, looking at us both sharply,
“and I intend to do so, although Nelson with all.
his squadron stand in the way. I don’t care a
168 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

button if I fall in with them an hour after we
sail, for I know a dodge that will put them off
the scent. If you help me you shall be well
treated, but if you don’t you shall neither of you
see Silversands again, and both the parson and
Joe Barrett will have to look after new heirs for
their property. This is the cabin you may use,”
he continued, rising and showing us a small den
containing two bunks, “and you'll bring me my
supper from the galley at eight bells sharp. After
that I shall weigh if the wind holds fair.”

“ What does he mean by asking us to help him ?”
said Will Barrett, when we were on deck.

“Some fresh rascality, you may be sure,” I
replied. “Goodness knows what! Probably he
wants us to turn traitors like himself.”

“Then he may go on wanting, as far as I’m
concerned,” said Will, doggedly. “He may kill
me, but he shall never force me to do his dirty
work.”

“Nor me either,” Icried. “Perhaps the necessity
will not arrive.”

A Frenchman named Ducrow, who had been the
boatswain’s mate on board the Généreua, did duty
as mate of the Jacqueline, and this man messed
in the cabin with Captain Legros. Unlike the
latter, who was very temperate, Ducrow was ad-
dicted to drinking, and as the brig was partly
laden with wine, there was abundant opportunity
STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE 169

for indulging in his propensity. Croucher seemed
to care little whether his chief officer was drunk
or sober, and took no steps to check the supply
of liquor which the mate ordered us to bring him.
A greater scoundrel than Stephen Croucher never
lived, but I must give him credit for being a
thorough seaman, full of resource, and with a
daring in all emergencies such as I have rarely
seen equalled. His nature was bad to the core,
and under no conjunction of circumstances could
he have run straight ; otherwise, he would surely
have gained a position of credit to himself and
to his country.

At ten o’clock, with a light wind blowing off the
land, we weighed and stood out to sea, heading to
the southward and westward.

On the fourth morning after leaving Corfu we
sighted the high land of Cape di Leuca and then
kept away, skirting the Gulf of Taranto, where
Captain Legros thought it unlikely that we should
fall in with any English ship, for I noticed that,
notwithstanding his avowed contempt for the
British, he took every precaution to avoid them.

But shrewd as his calculations were, the rene-
~gade was reckoning without his host, for about
noon a sail was reported on the larboard bow
heading for the brig, and carrying a leading
wind, so that she rapidly neared us.

There was much excitement now on board the
170 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

Jacqueline. Croucher scanned the approaching
vessel through his glass, and soon made out that
“she was a frigate, although her nationality was
unknown. It seemed unlikely that she could be
other than an English ship, so Captain Legros
at once gave orders for the carrying out of the
plan which he had prepared beforehand. Half
the crew of the Jacqueline went below to re-
appear shortly afterwards in the dress of English
sailors, whilst Stephen Croucher himself assumed
the uniform of an English lieutenant, the means
for this disguise being provided by pillage of the
Leander. British colours were bent on to the
halliards ready for hoisting when the stranger
should show hers, and, thus prepared, the brig
stood on boldly.

Legros took very little notice of us at this time,
beyond saying sternly, “I shall want you young-
sters later, and remember your lives are at stake
if you disobey me.” At this juncture he was
unassisted by Ducrow, who remained below in
a state of semi-intoxication, and I think his
absence from the deck was pleasing to the captain
' At length only three miles separated the ships,
when the frigate ran up Portuguese colours, in reply
to which we showed the English ensign. A long
whistle of surprise issued from Stephen Croucher’s
lips when the stranger revealed her nationality,
which was confirmed by certain peculiarities in
STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE 171

her build and rig which could be detected only by
a seaman.

“Portuguese!” he muttered. “Then some of
those garlic-eating niggers have got up the Straits.
Tt doesn’t take much cleverness to throw dust in
their eyes,” he continued, with a tone of scorn in
his voice. :

When we had drawn within half a mile of each
other, the frigate fired blank cartridge as a signal
for the Jacqueline to heave-to, an order to which
Legros immediately replied by bringing the brig
to the wind and laying the maintopsail to the
‘mast. The frigate did the same, but more slowly,
and whilst she was getting into position on our
weather beam, Stephen Croucher thought the time
had arrived for Will Barrett and myself to take
our part in the drama.

“Go below, you two youngsters,” he cried; “take
off that red headgear and put on your own uni
form jackets and caps. Then come on deck.”

We glanced at each other, and Stephen caught
the look. .

“You young whelps!” he growled, with concen-
trated ferocity. “Look alive and obey me, or I'll
break every bone in your shrivelled carcases.”

We went down the hatchway and into our cabin
before speaking, then I said, “Now we know the
part he wants us to play. Shall you help him,
Will 2”
172 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“Tl see him hanged first!” was the undaunted
reply.

Meanwhile we could hear a voice from the
frigate hailing the brig in English.

“What ship is that?” asked the Portuguese.

“The French brig Jacqueline, prize to His
Brittanie Majesty’s ship Bellerophon,” answered
Croucher, with coolest audacity.

“ Where do you come from ?”

“ Aboukir Bay, bound for Gibraltar.”

“Then you shall take a mail for us. Ill send
a boat.”

“Ay, ay! sir,” Stephen replied, and a moment
afterwards his head was down the hatchway, calling
to us to come up, but we both remained immovable.

Then we heard him ordering Ducrow to drive
us on deck, but the mate was too drunk to under-_
stand what his captain said, or to obey him had
he done so.

“ Will,” I whispered to my companion, “as soon
as the Portuguese boat is alongside, we'll make
a dash for it and jump into her.”

“Oh! no you won't,” said the voice of Stephen
Croucher. “I'll settle with you for this presently,”
and at the same moment the door of the cabin
was slid to, the key turned, and we were prisoners.
It was entirely owing to my want of caution that
this happened. I had underrated the cunning of
our taskmaster when I spoke aloud and thus be-
STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE 173

trayed our plan of action. Feeling sure that we
were plotting, Legros had slipped off his shoes and
crept noiselessly down in time to hear my whispered
words. Now we were in peril indeed, and our
only chance lay in the Portuguese detecting the
trick which Legros was playing, and this chance
was a very small one.

After locking the door, Croucher called out to
us, “If you speak a word whilst that boat is along-
side, Pl cut both your throats,” and there was a
ferocity and determination in the ruffian’s tones
which curdled the blood in our veins, for we knew
that in pursuit of revenge he recked nothing of the
consequences to himself. Besides, we were shut up
like rats in a trap and could not have drawn the
attention of the men in the boat had we shouted
with all our might, so we were forced to remain
quiet and abide the course of events.

We heard the boat come alongside, heard
Croucher’s voice as he received the canvas
bag of letters, even heard the thanks of the
Portuguese officer, delivered in execrable English,
for the present of wine which Legros had
passed down to them. Then came an _inter-
change of parting courtesies and the sound of
the oars in the rowlocks as the boat returned to
the frigate. All hope of deliverance was at an
end, and we were helplessly at the mercy of a
revengeful and unforgiving scoundrel.
174 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

The trampling of feet overhead and the change
in the motion of the brig told us that she had
filled and was standing on her way, so we braced
ourselves to meet the wrath of Stephen Croucher
on his visit to our prison, which we momentarily
expected, but two anxious hours passed away with-
out our seeing him.

Then there arose overhead a sound as though
some heavy object was being moved. It puzzled
me, but Will Barrett whispered, “They are getting
a boat out. What the deuce can that be for?”

It was a very natural question under the circum-
stances, and an answer to it was soon furnished.

Ten minutes later we heard the sound of foot-
steps outside our cabin, followed by the turning of
the key and the opening of the door.

“Be kind enough to step this way, my dainty
young gentlemen,” cried Stephen Croucher, with
sarcastic courtesy, beneath which we could detect
the deadly rage which had possession of him.

“Since you refuse to obey the orders of her
captain, there is no further room for you on board
the Jacqueline. Your boat is alongside, my pretty
little English midshipmen, and I'll trouble you to
step into it. I tell you candidly,” he continued,
altering his tone suddenly from sarcasm to
brutality, “I tell you candidly that if I had my
way you should step over the gangway, but
without a boat underneath to receive you. That
HE MANAGED TO DROP IT AT THE RIGHT MOMENT,

Page 175


STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE § 175

fool Ducrow is just sober enough to intercede on
your behalf, and the crew seem to think that it
would be hard measure if I threw you straight
overboard to feed the fishes. So we've given you a
boat, and you can go to the devil in her as seems
best to yourselves. That is the Calabrian coast
under our lee, and if you drift there they’ll save
me all further trouble by cutting your throats as
French spies. Sorry if you should feel hungry on
‘the journey,” he added, returning to sarcasm, as
we stepped over into the boat which was towing
alongside. “We have not time to cook a meal
before you leave. Good-bye! I'l let the parson
and old Joe Barrett know how much it grieves
me to take leave of you in this abrupt fashion.
Cast off the rope,” he continued, in French, hail-
ing the men on the forecastle, and immediately
the tow-line was slacked and we were adrift.
As. we passed under the brig’s quarter, a voice
above cried out, “Tiens, mon enfant!” and looking
up we saw the face of poor drunken Ducrow lean-
ing over the rail with a bundle in his hand, which
by some miracle he managed to drop at the right
moment, so that it fell into our boat. Standing up
in the stern-sheets, we saw the Jacqueline fill and
stand on, and could distinguish the form of the
arch-scoundrel, Stephen Croucher, as he waved us a
derisive farewell. At this sight rage and indig-
nation got the mastery over every other feeling
176 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

and we shouted out the words “Traitor!” and
“Murderer!” until the brig had drawn out of
hearing. Then we looked into each other’s faces,
and a great gloom fell upon us as the receding
hull of the Jacqueline brought fully home to us
our miserable position.

It was now four o’clock in the afternoon, and
it behoved us to arrive at some immediate decision
regarding the best course to be adopted for the
preservation of our lives. We glanced around the
boat to see what she contained, but found her to be
empty except for a pair of oars and a stone jar
of water, which some charitable hand had stowed
away in the bows without the knowledge of
Captain Legros. This in itself was an inestim-
able treasure, and, in addition, there was Ducrow’s
bundle. This, to our exceeding joy, was found
to contain a good parcel of biscuit, an almost
untouched leg of mutton, a couple of bottles of
wine, and a loaf and a half of bread. We recog-
nised these provisions as having formed the chief
part of that day’s dinner in the cabin of the
Jacqueline. Poor old Ducrow had evidently
gone into the pantry, swept everything he could
lay his hands on into a tablecloth, and dropped
the bundle into our boat. It was a good deed,
and we both felt very grateful to the rough,
French sailors whose action had saved us from
the death, by thirst and starvation, to which
STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE 177

we were destined by the fiendish malice of their
captain.

Meanwhile the boat was rocking about help-
lessly, and the day was far advanced; the wind
blew steadily from the southward, but a bank of
black clouds was massing in that direction, and
it was evident, even to our inexperienced eyes,
that heavy wind was likely to come from this
quarter. Some six leagues to leeward lay the
coast of Southern Italy, and there was no alter-
native left to us but to reach this, whatever might
be the danger on landing. Had the boat possessed
a mast and sail we might have stood to the south-
ward and westward until we had rounded Cape
Spartivento, and so entered the Straits of Messina,
where we should have received succour from the
Sicilians; but without either spar or canvas we
could only run dead before the wind and take
the ground wherever it pleased Providence to
direct us. At present the breeze was moderate,
and the sea smooth, so, after a short consulta-
tion, we set to work to improvise a sail. This
we effected by means of the oars, one of which
we shipped upright as a mast, with the other
secured across it as a yard, and to the latter we
bent the tablecloth which poor Ducrow had thrown
to us. Most luckily someone on board the Jac-
queline had shipped the boat’s rudder, so that
she was perfectly manageable, and was soon

M
178 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

gliding comfortably along under the influence of
the scanty sail.

Far away to the eastward we could make out
a distant sail, which we put down as being the
Portuguese frigate so thoroughly hoodwinked by
Stephen Croucher. To the south-west lay the
rapidly-diminishing hull of the Jacqueline. Ahead
could be seen the blue outline of the Southern
Apennines, and beyond these objects we were
alone on the water.

It was not an inspiriting prospect, but the work
of rigging the sail and the motion of the boat as
she stole through the waves seemed to give us
fresh heart, and with it came the knowledge that
no food had passed our lips for many hours, so we |
made a hearty meal off bread and mutton, wash-
ing it down with half a bottle of wine, after which
we became almost cheerful, and viewed the night
closing in around us without dismay, for the
weather was warm and we suffered little incon-
venience from the scantiness of our clothing.

The sun set red and fiery, and when, an hour
later, the darkness fell, we were unable to
distinguish the land, but steered by the wind,
which we kept well off on the larboard quarter.
At the rate the boat was going we calculated on
reaching the shore about daylight, which would
give us a whole day to look around and decide
what was the best course for us to pursue. Both
STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE 179

Will Barrett and I were thoroughly accustomed
to the management of a boat, from frequent fish-
ing excursions at Silversands, and therefore being
out on the open sea in this small skiff had none
of the dread for us which other lads might have -
felt, and, since only one of us was required to
steer, we took it in turns to lie down on the
bottom-boards and take a nap, although I may
add that for my part I never closed my eyes;
how it fared with Will Barrett I cannot tell, but
he certainly snored, so I suppose that slumber
came to him.

So we stood on till about midnight, when the wind
began to freshen considerably, so that a couple of
hours later it required all our management to pre-
vent the boat from being swamped, and at each
mile that we made the danger became greater.
Owing to the mere rag of sail we possessed and the
small height at which it stood above the gunwale,
the boat was becalmed when she descended into the
trough of the sea, and there was every chance that
the crest of a wave would overwhelm her before
she rose sufficiently to catch the wind afresh and
rush onward. I now relinquished the helm entirely
to Will Barrett, who was an excellent boat-sailer,
and as cool in this perilous position as though we
had been upon the Silversands duck-pond. For my-
self, I went forward into the eyes of the boat to get
as much weight out of the stern as possible, and
180 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

there I crouched, unable to be of any possible use,
but compelled by some fascination to watch the
great hungry waves gathering in our wake and
thundering over in a line of foam, which rushed
past the boat as though greedy to swallow it up.

Suddenly Will Barrett called to me to look ahead
and see if I could make out anything in the black-
ness of the night. I did so and could plainly see
a long line of breakers ahead and on either bow,
their white wall showing out against the blackness
of the mountainous background.

“We are close in,” I cried, “and shall be dashed
to pieces in five minutes.”

“Tt can’t be helped,” shouted back Will. “It is
impossible to bring her to, for the heavy sea would
swamp her the moment she showed her broadside
to it. I can alter her course about four points
either way. Look ahead for an opening or for a
soft place.”

I did so, but could distinguish nothing beyond the
line of surf towards which the boat seemed hurry-
ing at terrific speed. Suddenly it seemed to me that
the breakers a little on our starboard bow were
nearer to us than the rest, as though a point of rock
jutted out into the sea at that place. I could not
tell for certain, but it seemed our only chance, so I
shouted to Will to put the helm to larboard, and
endeavoured to make him understand my reason,
but the roar of the surf must have drowned my
STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE 181

voice. I saw, however, that he understood me and
was turning the boat’s head in the desired direction,
so I sat still and waited for what looked very like
a painful death amongst the jagged rocks, with what
thoughts at my heart I must leave you to imagine,
but amidst them all was a feeling of intense ad-
miration for my companion, whose hand never
slackened its hold upon the tiller at that trying
juncture, and whose nerves remained as firm as
the rocks towards which we were speeding.

The thunder of the waves was terrible, and the
land behind them dark as pitch. At each second
the wall of fleece, towards which we were being
hurried, grew nearer and nearer, until at last I
could feel the rebounding spray moisten my
cheek, and then I involuntarily closed my eyes,
for the end was at hand.

I felt the boat lifted high by a huge breaker,
heard the grinding of the keel and the wrenching
of the rudder from the gudgeons as she was borne
over a rock, and I drew in a long breath, whilst
a last prayer rose to my lips....

But, wonder of wonders, the boat ‘remained
whole, whilst her tossing motion ceased, although
I felt she was still being borne onward. I opened
my eyes. The wind was still blowing fiercely,
but it could raise nothing greater than a ripple
in the little cove on which we now floated. I
was lost in astonishment and filled with deep
182 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

thankfulness at this miraculous escape—the cause
for which I could not then divine — but Will
Barrett’s voice crying out sharply, “ Down sail,
Jack! be quick!” roused me from my meditation
to the necessity for immediate action. Cutting the
lashing recklessly with my knife, the oar to which
the tablecloth was bent fell across the gunwale,
and, a moment after, the stem of the boat brought
up with such violence against the face of a rock
as almost to start the butts, and the sudden shock
threw both my companion and myself off our
feet, and we lay sprawling in the bottom of the
boat.

Will was the first to recover himself, and to
put out his hands to feel the object against which
the side of the boat was gently grinding, held
in that position by the force of the wind. It
was dark as pitch, and we could not tell whither
we were going, except that by pushing the boat
ahead by means of the rock we were getting
more and more under shelter from the force of
the wind. After proceeding some thirty yards,
as well as we could guess, in this fashion, the
boat’s bow grounded and Will Barrett, jumping
out, pulled her nose a foot or two up on a shingly
beach, where she lay motionless and safe.

I jumped out and joined him, only too thankful
to feel dry land once more beneath my feet, and
still too much astonished at this sudden deliver-
STEPHEN CROUCHER’S REVENGE 183

ance from a painful death to grasp fully what
had happened.

Meanwhile, my companion was feeling along
the rock which had guided us to this haven, and
found that it terminated within a few feet in
an over-hanging brow, beneath which we were
sheltered from the full strength of the wind.

“Let us lie down here till daylight comes, and
we can see where we are. By Jove, that was a
narrow shave, Jack!”

“ How did it happen?” I asked.

“T hardly know myself; but let us rest. We
may want all our strength by-and-by,” and
practical Will Barrett sank down upon the sand—
a movement which I immediately imitated—but
I did not hear him snore on this occasion, and
I felt sure that he was occupied, as I was, in
thanking God for His great mercy in thus
delivering us.
CHAPTER XI
BEPPO THE BANDIT

AT dawn we were afoot, and the first thing we did
was to exchange a hearty handgrasp. I suppose
we thought it manly to suppress any other sign
of the feelings which filled our hearts, and Will
Barrett put an end to the strangeness of the situa-
tion by saying quietly, “Now we'll breakfast.
Stop here, Jack, whilst I get the grub.”

I did not think I could eat much, for, despite my |
outward stoicism, my heart was very full, but I
was surprised to find that my appetite increased
as I went on, so that by the time it was light
enough to distinguish the objects around, I found
Thad made a very hearty meal, washed down by
water slightly tinged with wine.

From our position we saw that we were in a
place abounding with huge boulders of rock, some
of them of enormous size, and looming up in the
half-light like dark grey ruins. Trees grew in
their interstices, wild creepers and mosses clothed
their sides beyond the reach of the salt sea spray.

With our united strength we hauled the boat a few
: 184
BEPPO THE BANDIT 185

feet further on to the beach, and the day having
now fairly broken, we determined to ascend the
rampart of rocks and survey the surrounding
country.

Will Barrett cut the tablecloth adrift from the
oar, packed the remainder of our provisions in it,
and slung the bundle over his shoulder.

“Why do you do that?” I asked; “we shall
surely return to the boat after taking a look round.”

“I hope we shall,” replied Will, “but my father
taught me that the first duty of a good soldier was
to look after the commissariat, and I suppose the
same rule applies to a good sailor. With the grub
at our backs we are ready for all emergencies,
Jack.”

His words brought back to me the picture of
honest Joe Barrett standing behind his bar at
“The Toothsome Herring,” serving out drams to
the fishermen, and I seemed to hear buxom Bess
Wilson bantering the men, and giving a sly thrust
at each of them with her shrewd tongue. Then
my thoughts wandered up to the Parsonage, where
my father and mother, and my little sister, Emily,
were sleeping peacefully in their beds, little dream-
ing that their only son and brother was a miserable
castaway on the wild Calabrian shore, half-clad
and penniless, and with a hundred dangers to
encounter before he could ever again set.eyes on
peaceful Silversands, and the homefolk he loved so
186 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

dearly. Will Barrett must have read my thoughts,
for he clapped me on the back, saying cheerily,
“Rouse up, lad, and don’t get down in the dumps.
Never fear, but we'll get out of this as we have out
of many a scrape before, and we'll see Stephen
Croucher hung yet, as sure as herrings swim in
shoals. Come on, Jack!” and we started.
Immediately to landward of the little haven into
which Providence had guided our boat, the boulders
rose too precipitously to permit of our scaling them,
but skirting their base for a hundred yards or so,
we came upon a small, clear stream which fell in a
fall some fifty feet high from a ravine and flowed
into the sea at the head of our creek. We were in
a kind of diminutive amphitheatre, the sides of
which were bounded by huge rocks, whilst its back
was formed by the foot of the Apennines or a spur
of that great range. If we could scale one of these
flanks, a good view of the sea and of the coastline
on either side could be obtained. The ground on
which we stood was composed of loose stones inter-
spersed with bushes, and we stepped from one to
another of these, so that our passage left no foot-
prints behind to mark the road we took. Our
sailor-training and the slightness of our figures
made the task of climbing the rocks easier for us
than it would have been for full-grown men,
however active. As it was, all our agility was
called into play, for as we mounted, unseen chasms
BEPPO THE BANDIT 187

revealed themselves, across which we swung by
the aid of creepers, which were none too strong
even for our light weights. At length we reached
a small plateau and flung ourselves upon the
ground to regain breath before looking round.
The sun was now above the horizon, and the day
promised to be bright and fair, although a gale
from the southward was blowing and the beat of
the surf seemed to shake the solid ground on which
we rested.

After a few minutes I should have risen to my
feet, but a low exclamation from Will Barrett
stopped me. He had flung himself down at the
edge of the cliff, from whence he could look into
the amphitheatre we had left, and on to the ridge
of rocks which formed its-opposite boundary.

“Lie still for your life,” he whispered, “there’s
a man coming down the descent. Let’s see the
cut of his jib and what kind of a game he’s up to.”
We remained crouched like hares in our forms,
with our eyes riveted on the stranger, whose
figure stood out plainly against the sky-line, whilst
the sun flashed from the barrel of the gun slung
over his shoulder. Shading his eyes with one
hand, he looked round in all directions, and a
moment later we saw him peering at the place
where our boat lay with its bow on the shingle.
Immediately on observing this, the man dropped
under cover of the bushes and remained so motion-
188 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

less that, had we not known him to be there, we
should never have suspected his presence. After
an interval which seemed to us long, but which
was in reality only a few minutes, the man rose
into a crouching position and made his way down
the rocky declivity with the swiftness of a hare
and the sure-footedness of a goat, and on reaching
the bottom he first unslung and cocked his gun
and then advanced warily over the shingle, glanc-
ing around in every direction in quest of a con-
cealed enemy. We lay absolutely motionless, but
following the man’s every movement with our
eyes. So cautiously did he approach that no
shingle was displaced to give a warning by its
clatter, and with the cocked musket at his hip he
peered round the rock and found the boat empty.
He stood for a moment gazing at her, then his
eye lighted upon the name painted across her
stern, “Jacqueline, Marseilles,’ on reading which
he shook his fist furiously, spitting thrice upon-
the ground, and muttering angry imprecations
which reached us although we could not dis-
tinguish the words. Then he bent towards the
ground and closely scrutinised the shingle, but
the wave-worn pebbles told no tale of a passing
foot. Again he looked landward in every direc-
tion, his eyes seeming actually to meet ours as we
followed his movements with a species of fascina-
tion, and for a moment we thought we were dis-
BEPPO THE BANDIT 189

covered, but it was only imagination, for he again
turned towards the boat, apparently satisfied, took
the oars from off the thwarts, laid them across his
shoulder, and then—horror of horrors—passed out
of sight to reappear in a few seconds scaling the
rocks in the direction of our hiding-place.

Certainly when the first French cannon-shot
whizzed past my head it did not occasion me half
the alarm which I felt at the approach of this
armed stranger, and my heart thumped against
my ribs so that I thought that it must be audible
to less keen ears than this mountaineer must
possess. We could hear him muttering as he
swung himself lightly upwards by a route easier
than the one we had pursued, and he came into
full sight as he stepped upon a flat patch of rock
some thirty feet below us. Here he again looked
carefully around, but on this occasion his search
was bent more towards the sea than the land, and
an exclamation fell from his lips as his eye caught
some object—it was a sail.

For full ten minutes he stood watching the speck
of canvas, then another exclamation broke from
him as a second sail became visible, and again he
remained immovable as though carved in stone
but intently eyeing the two vessels.

An hour or more must have passed before the
stranger paused in his observation—a miserable
period, during which my limbs felt cramped and
190 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

my position so constrained that I would have given
a king’s ransom had it been mine to stretch my
legs and change my posture.

During this time the two sails had been swiftly
approaching the shore, borne onward by the
southerly gale, and it was evident that the ship
in the rear was chasing the one nearest to us.

Then. Will Barrett’s hand stole silently out and
touched my shoulder. Following his gaze I saw,
standing on the ridge, where we had discovered the
man beneath us, two other figures, armed in the
same manner, and also looking to seaward. The
first-comer, on perceiving them, put his fingers
to his lips and gave a long whistle, which was
followed by three others in rapid succession when
the first had attracted the attention of the new
arrivals. We could hear faintly the sounds as
these repeated the signal and then waved their
hats for some object unknown to us; but its mean-
ing soon became apparent, for in less than a
quarter of an hour full thirty men stood beside
them, when the whole band swung themselves
down into the amphitheatre and ran across to join
the man beneath, who was evidently their
leader.

On their way the boat had to be passed, and we
noticed that they all manifested the same gestures
of frenzied hatred on learning her nationality.
Joining their captain, who remained immovable on
BEPPO THE BANDIT IQI

the flat rock, they disposed themselves in picturesque
postures, gazing to seaward and talking volubly.

I knew no Italian at that time, and it may appear
strange that I am able to recall the conversation
which took place in that language. But every word
that was spoken during the wanderings of Will
Barrett and myself in wild Calabria was eagerly
collected and later on poured into my ear a hundred
times by loving lips held close to my face, whilst
loving black eyes—now dilating with fear, now
overflowing with drops of pity—gazed into mine.
But I must not at this point disclose to whom they
belonged, or such small interest as these memoirs
may possess will be prematurely destroyed.

Meanwhile, several other sails appeared on the
horizon, but at a great distance to seaward from
the two ships which were advancing towards the
shore. As the latter drew nearer we were filled
with astonishment to recognise that the vessel
fleeing from her pursuer was the Jacqueline, and
the bloodhound hanging on her trail an English
frigate under jury masts, which accounted for her
not more speedily overhauling the deeply-laden
brig. Both were running directly before the gale,
whilst now and again a cloud of white fleece from
the bows of the pursuer showed that she was trying
the range of her foremost guns on the Frenchman,
Young as I was, I could see at a glance how this
state of affairs had come about. The Jacqueline
192 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

had fallen in with an enemy’s squadron, and an
outlying frigate had immediately chased her. Un-
able to get past the extended line of ships, she had
put her helm up and run for it, hoping that the
water of the bay would shallow too much to admit
of her enemies approaching so near the shore as she
could without serious risk of being lost. Although
the capture of the Jacqueline would only result in
the imprisonment of her crew, it meant death by
hanging to Jean Legros, who would certainly be
recognised by some of the Leander’s people when
the prize was sent to Gibraltar. So, with his
habitual audacity, he adopted this perilous course
to save his vessel and his own neck.

And the daring plan scemed likely to succeed,
for, when the brig was within a mile of the shore,
the pursuing frigate came to the wind, firing her
whole broadside as she did so, and bringing down
the chase’s main top-mast, besides otherwise damag-
ing her rigging and spars. The frigate, reducing
her canvas, stood to the eastward, and after
- running a sufficient distance to get out of gun-shot,
the Jacqueline did the same; but as she came to
the wind a gust of unusual violence swept down,
taking the sticks out of her by the board, so that
she lay a helpless, dismasted hulk within half a
mile of a dangerous lee-shore.

Whilst this scene was being enacted within full
view of them, the Calabrian mountaineers ceased
BEPPO THE BANDIT 193

to talk, and a look of cruel expectation could be
read on their swarthy faces. Convinced that the
prey could not escape, the leader gave an order in
sharp tones, and in another moment the little patch
of rock was clear, the men bounding down to the
beach with the agility of chamois. We were alone,
the unseen and unsuspected spectators of a tragic
scene, and we could now communicate with each
other in whispers without much fear of being
discovered.

Still for a little while we remained motionless,
and saw that the band, on reaching the base of the
ridge, had scattered themselves behind the boulders,
from the shelter of which they protruded their
heads to watch every movement on board of the
doomed brig.

“ Who can these fellows be?” I whispered to
Will. “Shepherds or goat-herds would not go
about with guns slung at their backs and their
sashes stuck full of knives and pistols.”

“Robbers, Jack, you take my word for it—
fellows who would cut our throats as if we were
sheep. Let us make a move out of this, Jack,
whilst their attention is engaged with the brig.
We can creep round till we get to the top of the
water-fall, where the bushes are thick, We can get
a drink there, for I am half dead with thirst.”

The wisdom of this proposal was evident, and we
at once proceeded to put it into execution. Will

N
194 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

Barrett led the way, crawling from rock to bush on
hands and knees, until we were sufficiently hidden
from view to assume an upright position. Then
we ran as noiselessly as possible; but suddenly
Will Barrett gave a smothered cry and started
backwards so unexpectedly that he would have
fallen had I not caught him in my arms.

“Hush!” I whispered. “Whatis it?” But as I
spoke I saw the retreating form of a large snake
which was slowly gliding into the bushes with
head raised a foot from the ground and tongue
darting out venomously.

“T almost trod on it,” whispered Will, whose
sunburnt face was deadly white. “Did they hear
my cry, Jack, do you think ?”

“Tt can’t be helped if they did,” I answered—
rather angrily, I am afraid—“ but there’s no use
wasting time; come along.”

The ground on which we now found ourselves
was covered with bushes, amongst which a few trees
grew, and these became more plentiful as we ad-
vanced, until at length we reached the bank of the
stream close to the lip of the fall, and, after a long
drink, hid ourselves on a convenient ledge, well
concealed by undergrowth, from whence we could
see the little amphitheatre spread out like a fan
beneath us, and could view everything that passed
without fear of detection.

“What are you looking for?” I asked, as I saw
BEPPO THE BANDIT 195

Will poking about the bushes and in the fissures
of the rocks before sitting down.

“Seeing that there are no more snakes,” faltered
my companion; “I’m mortally afraid of such
vermin as that, Jack.”

“They are preferable to Stephen Croucher, any-
how, or to that nest of bandits on the beach,” I
replied, and there was truth in the remark.

But the scene below was so exciting as to en-
gross all our attention, even to the forgetfulness
of Will Barrett’s aversion. —

In a last endeavour to keep herself off the rocks,
the Jacqueline had anchored, but the bottom was
bad holding-ground, so that she was slowly dragging
towards the shore, and we saw that her crew were
occupied in launching the long boat over the side.
The Calabrians observed this also, and their leader,
unslinging his gun, and laying aside the weapons
with which his sash was garnished, so that he
appeared like a simple mountaineer or shepherd,
climbed out along the ledge of rocks which pro-
tected the little haven from the fury of the waves
and motioned with pantomimic southern gesticula-
tions for the boat to round the point, on the land-
ward part of which he stood. We could see the
men on board the Jacqueline wave back in reply,
_ then scramble over the quarter, drop into the boat,
and pull in the direction indicated, leaving the
vessel to her fate.
196 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

Owing to the back wash of the surf, which could
be felt even where the brig lay, the boat had to
make a considerable détowr before rounding the
rocky point, and this occupied some time, during
which we could observe the Calabrians preparing
themselves to seize upon the unsuspecting men the
moment they set foot on shore. As the clumsy
long boat glided into the little cove after her battle
with the waves, we could distinguish the forms of
those on board her, and were surprised to see that
the helm was held by Ducrow, and that Stephen
Croucher was seated in the stern-sheets, once more
attired in the stolen uniform of a British naval
officer.

“Some new trick,’ muttered Will Barrett;
but we were too much excited to talk, and could
only watch with breathless anxiety the tragedy
which we felt sure was about to be enacted in
our presence.

The leader of the band was standing to receive
the new-comers, by whom the presence of his
comrades was unsuspected. Directly the bow of
the boat touched the shingle, Stephen Croucher
made his way forward, and, springing ashore,
seized the Calabrian by the hand, whilst address-
ing him in fluent Italian.

“You are my saviour,” cried this double-dyed
rascal, “and have not only preserved me from
shipwreck, but have released me from the hands
BEPPO THE BANDIT 197

of these Frenchmen, whose prisoner I was, and
who are taking me to Toulon, for I was the
great Nelson’s chief adviser when he destroyed
their fleet at Aboukir Bay. Take me to the
most notable person in this neighbourhood, that
I may explain who I am. If you do this your
reward shall be great, both from me and from
the British Government. As for what becomes
of these miserable Frenchmen I care not, for
their conduct to me has destroyed any pity I
might have felt for them. Best deliver them
up to the authorities at the nearest town.”

Whilst this speech was in progress, the French-
men were gathered together in a group, some
of them wondering at the presence of our boat
which lay alongside their own, others listening
to the interview between Stephen and the
mountaineer, which, as they could not speak
a word of Italian, they imagined to be an inter-
cession in their favour by the crafty Stephen,
who had assured them that he could gain a
safe-conduct for the whole party under the
guise of a British officer, for the English were
regarded in as favourable a nent a as the French
were execrated.

Doubtless this Calabrian mountaineer was a
robber, a wrecker and a cut-throat; but he
possessed all the graceful dignity of his country
and of the wild race to which he belonged, and
198 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

it was pitiful to behold him drop on one knee,
uncover his head, and kiss the hand of the arch-
rascal Stephen, whom he then drew aside and
conversed with in a low tone.

“ Signor,” said’ the bandit, “it is enough that
you are British, for that makes Beppo di Squillace
your slave, and whatsoever you desire, that lies
in my power, shall be done. But for these
vermin French there is but one end. They
must die, though the robber Buonaparte sued
for their lives in person. My men await the
signal to take them prisoners. If your Excellency
would avoid witnessing their capture, please to
step round yonder spur and await my coming.
We do not hand over wolves to the authorities
in this country, signor, where Beppo di Squillace
is a law unto himself.”

Still bare-headed, the bandit led the supposed
British officer behind some boulders, where he was
no longer visible to us; then, returning towards
the group of Frenchmen, he gave a shrill whistle,
when from behind each rock there bounded forth
the lithe forms of the mountain robbers, who
threw themselves with horrible ferocity upon the
unarmed victims.

The hapless crew of the Jacqueline were ab-
solutely unprepared for attack, and unsuspicious
of coming evil, for the attitude of humility
assumed by the bandit chief towards their cap-
BEPPO RECEIVES CROUCHER AND HIS COMRADES,

Page 198


BEPPO THE BANDIT 199

tain, Jean Legros, had filled them with satisfac- |
tion, together with admiration for the man whose
wily brain could devise such a means of safety
and carry it into execution single-handed. Un-
happy Frenchmen, they had plundered us on
board the Leander, and pulled our hair and
pinched us later on; but they were sailors, if
not countrymen, and the tears rushed into my
eyes at the spectacle I was compelled to witness,
without a possibility of affording the slightest
help, or even of raising one warning cry.

The conflict, if such it could be called, was brief,
and in less than a minute the Frenchmen lay
stretched upon the shingle, either felled by the
‘butts of muskets, or struck down with the hafts
of their assailants’ daggers. One man only offered
any resistance — it was poor, be- muddled, old
Ducrow, who struck out fiercely with his fist, but
the arm dropped helplessly to the side as a stiletto
was passed through the shoulder, and immediately
after he fell there arose a horrible, gurgling ery,
accompanied by a groan of despair from his com=
panions as a keen, flashing blade swept across
the mate’s throat, nearly severing his head from
his body.

Picture what it was for us, the helpless witnesses
of this barbarous deed committed upon the one
man whose rough kindness had saved our lives.
I glanced into Will Barrett’s face; it was blanched
200 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

with terror, and for myself I must have been near
to fainting, for all objects swam before my eyes,
and then for a space a blackness fell, during which
I could see nothing.

With a marvellous celerity which betokened how
accustomed they were to this kind of work, the
bandits had secured the wrists of the prisoners
behind their backs, and forced them by dagger-
pricks to walk up from the beach towards the
head of the amphitheatre. On reaching what
their captors thought to be a convenient spot, the
wretched men were thrown heavily to the ground
and their ankles tightly bound by thongs so that
they lay helpless with limbs swelling from the
tightness of the ligatures, and unable to brush
away the tormenting flies which assailed their
eyes and lighted upon their wounds in black
masses. These wretched creatures could see the
water - fall close at hand, and could hear the
murmur of the stream within a few paces of the
spot they occupied, and yet no drop of water was
permitted to pass their lips by their merciless
captors, four of whom, seated upon rocks with
their carbines at full cock, remained as guards
over the prisoners and viewed their sufferings
without one grain of pity. The remainder of
the band hurried to join their leader at a signal
from him, and, soon afterwards, we marked one
of them—a mere lad in years—run swiftly across
BEPPO THE BANDIT 201

the shingle, mount the ridge of rock and disap-
pear, evidently despatched on some message by the
chief. .

Now @ crash reached our ears, followed by a
ery of exultant triumph from the bandits—the
Jacqueline had struck upon the rocky ridge at
almost the same place over which our light boat
had been washed in the darkness,

There was no lurking foe to be dreaded now,
and the fellows laid aside their muskets and lined
the rocks, regardless of the spray, to secure such
booty as the breaking up of the brig might free
from her hold. Scores of casks of wine and oil
were dashed to pieces by the surf, and the contents
of the latter, spreading over the sea, produced ex-
traordinary effect by preventing the waves from
curling over and breaking, until they thundered
against the rocks themselves. But many barrels
were saved by the hardihood of the banditti, and
the first cask of wine recovered was rolled up upon
the beach and broached amidst wild cries of re-
joicing from the robbers. Stephen Croucher had
come into view again and stood watching the pro-
ceedings with an aspect of haughty indifference.
It made our blood boil to see the leader advance
towards this villain with the first draught of wine,
and proffer it to him, standing bare-headed as he
did so, and to hear the loud shout of acclamation
which arose when Stephen raised the cup to his
202 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

lips with the toast, “Long live their Majesties of
the Two Sicilies.”

“By Heaven,” whispered Will, “here come
women to assist in this awful scene!”

It was true. Headed by the messenger whom
we had seen despatched, there appeared on the
ridge a group of girls, some twenty in number,
picturesquely attired and evidently in a state of
joyous excitement. They descended the rocks
with graceful swiftness, sped across the shingle,
and flung themselves into the extended arms of
their husbands or lovers with shrill cries of joyful
expectation at the booty from the wreck which
would be theirs. Foremost amongst them—tallest
in stature, swiftest of foot—was a beautiful young
creature, who flung her arms around the neck of
the chief, from whose face all ferocity fled as
he gazed fondly at her, murmuring “Tessa, my
Tessa.” A few whispered words passed between
them, then the girl disengaged herself from her
lover’s grasp and called to her companions, where-
upon the whole of them advanced towards
Stephen Croucher, and, falling upon their knees,
kissed his hands humbly and reverently. The
scoundrel received this tribute of respect with
admirable nonchalance, as though he had been
accustomed to the adoration of pretty girls from
his youth up until now; and even then, heart-
sick as I felt, I could not help thinking of the
BEPPO THE BANDIT 203

last mark of affection I had seen bestowed upon
the rogue by the broom-stick of stout Bess
Wilson.

Then the work of pillage recommenced, the men
made more daring by the bright eyes flashing upon
them and by the wine which they freely drank.
Beppo and Tessa alone did not share personally in
the proceedings, but stood aloof, honoured by the
companionship of Stephen Croucher, who, puffed up
by the estimation in which he was held, exchanged
many repartees with pretty Tessa, and would doubt-
less have’ exhibited further tokens of his admira-
tion had he not detected the hand of Beppo stealing
ominously to the haft of his stiletto at the first
approach towards familiarity.

The sun was now sinking, and the gale, which
had begun to moderate immediately after the strik-
ing of the brig, was diminishing in force at every
moment. Little more could be done that night, and
the work would be easier in the morning, when the
sea was smooth, so the band busied themselves in
collecting a great heap of timber from the wreck, of
which they made a huge bonfire. The lad who had
summoned the girls and had again departed now
reappeared, driving before him a small herd of
goats, four of which were immediately killed, and
the whole band dispersed themselves in picturesque
groups round the blaze to feast and carouse, after
which arose wild strains of song, and later on, as
204 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

the strong Greek wine mounted into their heads,
more than one quarrel amongst the bandits them-
selves, in the settlement of which stilettoes were
drawn and freely used.

Anything more weird than the spectacle upon
which we gazed it is impossible to imagine. No
scenic effect ever produced upon the stage was
more picturesque in its surroundings, its colouring,
and the attire of the actors in this real drama.
How, about midnight, the orgie culminated in a
fearful tragedy I shall not record, for it is too
horrible to be given in detail, and the bare
remembrance of it still haunts me in my dreams.
It is sufficient to say that when the eastern sun
announced the arrival of another day, its rays
fell upon a heap of corpses, stripped of their
clothing and left as prey to the wolves and ravens
of the Apennines.

Of the sixteen souls who had sailed from Corfu
in the ill-fated Jacqueline, only Stephen Croucher,
Will Barrett and I remained alive.
CHAPTER XII
TESSA

Lone before the sun arose and threw its light
upon that scene of horror—upon the smouldering
embers of the fire, upon the picturesque groups
recumbent amidst the scattered shrubs, upon those
still white forms with upturned faces and glazed
eyes—we would have fled, but behind lay a
rugged, barren country totally unknown to us,
and abounding with cliffs, chasms and other
dangers which could with difficulty be averted in
the broad daylight. With a feeling of hopeless
misery at our hearts we crept backward from
the post of observation which we had occupied
throughout that dreary vigil, taking every
precaution that our presence was not discovered.
This was quite needless, for the entire band were
buried in slumber, overcome by wine or drunken
with the blood so cruelly spilled. Not even a
sentinel was posted to give an alarm should any
intruder approach. The men who had guarded
the prisoners had hastened to join the revellers—

their services were needless now, for there re-
205
206 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

mained no one to guard. We might have stood
up and walked away without any attempt at
concealment, but as it was, we crawled cautiously
until the hateful amphitheatre was hidden from
sight, and then pressed onward, following the
course of the little stream, and rising ever towards
higher ground, where the scenery grew wilder and
the soil more sterile, but caring for nothing, heed-
ing nothing, ignorant and unmindful of the direc-
tion we took, possessed only by the one absorb-
ing desire to place the greatest distance possible
between the murderous banditti and ourselves.

By instinct we avoided treading on such ground
as would retain the impress of our feet, and
journeyed on in Indian file, Will Barrett leading
the way with the bundle of provisions slung over
his shoulder, whilst I followed in the rear, plant-
ing my feet mechanically in the spots where my
companion had trodden, but neither of us speak-
ing one word, for speech seemed frozen within us
and our lips padlocked by an unutterable horror.

Suddenly a sense of dizziness came over me,
the bushes and rocks seemed to dance and
waver, then the light became slowly extinguished
and a great darkness swam before my eyes as I
uttered a low cry and sank forward—for more
than twenty-four hours no morsel of food had
passed my lips, and the human machinery had
come to a standstill for want of fuel.
TESSA 207

The first thing I saw, on recovering conscious-
ness, was Will Barrett in the act of pouring some
wine down my throat, whilst my head rested upon
his knee. From this position I could look up-
wards and gain a good view of my companion’s ©
face. How stern and set the features had become,
how hollow the cheek, how sunken the eye; the
shadow of a great dread seemed to lie heavy on
the once merry face and to change it from the
smoothness of youth to the careworn watchfulness
of old age. Was this change visible in me also?
I wondered. Had that awful night dried up the
well-spring of enjoyment for ever? _

Clearly we must summon our courage, set our
wits to work, and think out what was best to be
done under these trying circumstances. Food also
must be taken immediately—alas for poor old
Ducrow who had given it to us!—for hunger and
mental anguish together would soon prostrate the
stoutest man alive, and we were mere striplings.

“Feeling better now, Jack?” asked Will, paus-
ing in his task of drenching me with the bottle.

“This random work won’t do,’ I replied. “Let
us eat first, and then hold a consultation as to the
best way of getting out of this horrible wilderness.”

However gloomy matters may be, a slack waist-
belt invariably imparts to them a blacker aspect.
Heaven knows our prospects were dark enough,
but with each mouthful of food our spirits rose,
208 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

our courage returned, and the great dread which
had taken possession of us seemed less appalling.
We both felt that it was no time to husband our
provisions. Precious as these were, they could
never be put to a better use than in giving us
strength to place as many miles as possible be-
tween us andthe amphitheatre. So we ate freely,
and then deliberated over our future movements.

“Tt seems to me, Will,” I began, that the only
chance for us is to reach the coast opposite
Messina, and trust to our luck for a ferry across
the Straits.”

“Why, that must be a hundred miles at least,
and through such a wilderness as this,” exclaimed
Will, ruefully, as he cast his eyes around.

“Tt will be rough travelling, but it is our only
chance. Stephen Croucher has seen our boat, and
must know from the bandit chief that we have
escaped, although in what direction no one knows.
He will surely cook up some lie about us, and set
the robbers on our track. This much we may be
sure of, but we need not fear immediate pursuit,
for those fellows are not the sort of men who
would leave the plunder of the Jacqueline for
the sake of capturing two youngsters.”

“T’m not so sure of that,” said Will, whose head
was screwed upon his shoulders very firmly.
“That rascal Steve Croucher’s safety depends
upon our destruction, and he would invent a yarn
TESSA 209

which might cause the et to detach a portion of
his fellows in chase of us.”

“J don’t think they would go,” I snore: ‘for
they would make sure that we should be starved —
to death, or driven to ask for food at the first
shepherd’s hut we came to, when our mountain
host would either secure us or knock us on the
head. No, Will, our only chance is to push for
the Straits, choosing the roughest country, and
avoiding every human being we may see. With
care, our grub will last out for a couple of days,
and after that we must trust in Providence. At
all events, forty-eight hours ought to carry us
clear of the track of country infested by that
particular band of robbers. Do you agree, Will?”

“It’s a forlorn hope, but we'll try it. Come
along.”

Steering by the sun, we started off, trying to
shape a north-westerly course, and keeping a
bright lookout in every direction. But the
country was wild and rugged beyond all descrip-
tion. Sometimes we came upon ravines so steep
that we were compelled to deviate for a great
distance to right or left before finding a spot
where we could descend in safety; sometimes we
became entangled in forests where the under-
growth was so thick as to be impenetrable; often
the gloom cast by the trees was so dense that we
lost sight of our guide, the sun, and wandered on

0
210 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

stubbornly but uncertain as to the direction we
were taking. Our clothes were torn by the
brambles, our skins lacerated by the thorns, and
our feet bruised by the unwonted toil. Luckily
mountain-rills were frequent, so that the pangs of
thirst were not added to our other sufferings, and
beside one of these we camped at night, keeping
no watch, but sleeping heavily from sheer exhaus-
tion, and unmindful of the wolves whose howling
we often heard in the distance.

For five days and nights we wandered on thus,
suffering terribly from hunger towards the end of
this time, and obliged reluctantly to confess to
ourselves that we were lost amidst the spurs and
ravines of the Apennines, and that the endeavour
to reach the Straits of Messina was beyond our
strength or power.

On the morning of the sixth day we came upon
a beaten track and resolved to follow it, careless
of where it might lead us. After pursuing it for
ten minutes im a downward direction, the path
turned abruptly to the left beside a mass of high
rock, and on rounding this we found ourselves face
to face with a girl who was advancing in a contrary
direction, I recognised her at once; it was Tessa.
On seeing us, the girl came to a standstill, whilst
her hand flew to the dagger she carried in her
bosom, but a glance at the wretched scarecrows
who stood before her, unarmed, ragged, and half
TESSA 211

fainting with hunger, showed her that she had
nothing to fear, so she replaced the weapon and
addressed us in tones which seemed almost kind,
although from our ignorance of Italian we could
not understand what she said. The words, how-
ever, which she repeated several times, I caught
the meaning of; they were “Francesi” and
“ Spioni.”

“No, no,” I cried, seizing the skirt of her dress
in my extremity. “No, no, Inghlesi—officiali
Inghlesi.”

I could see her lustrous black eyes gazing down
at me in perplexed wonder, and I endeavoured to
seize her hand, but the awful anxiety from which I
was suffering, added to weakness from starvation,
made the effort too much for me, and I fell uncon-
scious at her feet.

When I came to myself every object on which
my eye rested was new, and it required a great
effort on my part to recall the incidents prior to
my swoon. I was lying on a rude pallet covered.
with goat-skins, and upon a similar article within
a few feet of mine was stretched Will Barrett.
Two people were in the apartment, and in the
one bending over me and moistening my lips with
wine I recognised Tessa, upon whose face came a
smile of pleasure as my eyes slowly opened and
rested upon hers.

“See, Luisa,” she cried, “now the colour is coming
"212 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

back to his poor cheeks, he is more like our little
Gian than ever.”

A girl younger than Tessa, although singularly
like her in features, and unmistakably her sister
left Will Barrett’s side and approached my couch,
where both stood looking down upon me with pity
and interest.

“Yes, it is our little Gian restored to life, though
the eyes are of lighter hue and the skin whiter
where the sun has not touched it.”

“Poor little stranger!” exclaimed the elder girl,
as, moved by a sudden compassion, she bent down
and kissed me tenderly, while Luisa smiled at the
vivid scarlet which overspread my face at this
affectionate act. Then they bustled about prepar-
ing food, and presently presented each of us with
a coarse earthenware bow] filled with soup.

Whilst this was preparing I had time to take
note of the apartment in which we found our-
selves. It was a natural cavern, the opening to
which was enclosed by a small roof and walls,
the latter built of the same stone as the rock and
assimilating with it in colour, so that, until within
a few paces of it, no one would imagine the ex-
istence of this unique dwelling. A heavy curtain
of goat skins divided the cave into two compart-
ments, and it was in the outer of these that we
lay, the inner one being the chamber of the girls.
Of furniture there was none in the proper accep-
TESSA 213

tation of the term, beyond a table, a few rough
stools, evidently home-made, and the pallets on
which we were stretched. In strange contrast to
the desolate aspect of the walls was a mirror in
a gilt frame which I recognised as having hung
in the cabin of the Jacqueline, whilst several other
articles lying about reminded me of the ill-fated -
brig.

I could bestow but small time on this inspection,
and rough though the surroundings were, they
filled me with an infinite sense of well-being and
comfort which was heightened by the graceful
figures of the two girls hovering around us and
attending to our wants. It was daylight, though
what the hour might be I neither knew nor
heeded, for it seemed a trouble to think, and I
lay dreamily watching our nurses, mindful only
of a great present comfort, mingled with an over-
powering weariness which shut out all concern for
the past or the future.

Will Barrett was awake, and we stared wonder-
ingly at each other, but exchanged few words,
for the. girls, with fingers laid on their lips, en-
joined silence; so, after swallowing the broth, I
sunk back upon my pallet, and again closing my
eyes fell sound asleep.

As far as we could make out, four days must
have elapsed between our first meeting with Tessa
and the time when our strength was sufliciently
214 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

restored to enable us to leave our couches, and
we now noticed that the girls showed signs of
anxiety, one or other of them constantly leaving
the cave and mounting a rock, from which the
approach of the valley could be seen. Our efforts
at making ourselves understood were clumsy in
the extreme, but we had no difficulty in gathering
what the girls wished to convey, and it. was
evident that they were expecting someone, before
whose arrival they wished to remove us elsewhere.
’ When, on perceiving this, we left our beds, we
found that our tattered outer clothing had been
replaced by rough goatskin jerkins and breeches,
probably once the property of dead Gian. The
former of these articles I slipped over my waist-
coat, which contained Nelson’s letter and Croucher’s
confession, and it was with great satisfaction that
I felt the little packet still in its place safe and
untouched. Instead of the odious Republican head-
gear we were each provided with a skin cap, whilst
a rough kind of shoe sandal, laced up the leg with
thongs, took the place of boots, an attire more
picturesque than comfortable, but in better keep-
ing with our wild surroundings than our sailor’s
jerseys.

The girls seemed pleased at our appearance,
which testified to their skill as nurses, and whilst
Luisa busied herself in collecting sundry articles
of food, and placing them in a wallet, Tessa tried
TESSA 215

to explain to us, by means of pantomimic action,
that she expected Beppo back at every hour, and
that it would be best that we should remain in
a hiding-place which would be shown us until
he had again departed. As may be imagined,
we had no wish to meet the bandit chief, and
expressed our willingness to start immediately,
whereupon Luisa slung the wallet round Will
Barrett’s shoulder, whilst Tessa took me by the
hand, and we advanced towards the door, but,
before reaching it, a man’s form blocked the
entrance, and Beppo stood on the threshold, pre-
venting our exit.

Luisa gave a little scream of surprise, whilst
Will and I remained motionless, staring at the
new-comer with cheeks from which the blood had
fled; but pretty Tessa stepped forward and flung
her arms around the neck of her lover, who
received the caress ungraciously, for he was out
of temper and his suspicions were evidently
aroused at the sight of two strange boys.

“Who are these?” he asked briefly, trying to
push the girl aside, but she clung to him more
closely, as though dreading some act of violence
on his part, whilst she explained how she had
met us, and being touched by our helplessness,
the more so owing to the extraordinary likeness
which I bore to young Gian.

“Look at him,” she continued, pointing to me.
216 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“It is as though the Blessed Virgin had sent me
my brother back; and, Beppo, they are not French
spies, I swear it by the saints, but British officers
who deserve well at our hands. We will take
them to the castle to-morrow, and the English
lady who is there will hear their story. We
have listened to ‘their speech and it is not that
of the French, who say ‘ Wee-wee, whereas these
boys hiss like serpents, so they must be English.
Ah! I see that you are not angry, and a great
reward will be ours for saving these young
Englishmen.”

I think that both the ele were greatly sur-
prised that the robber allowed Tessa to finish
her speech without an outbreak. Passionately
attached to her as he was, the feeling of love
was equalled by the abiding hatred which he bore
towards the French nation, and his most tender
mood could be hardened into ferocity by the
mention of Buonaparte’s name. There were
wheels within wheels unknown to the girls or
to us which worked in our favour. Sullen as he
appeared glaring at us from the doorway, Beppo
was, in reality, more than half inclined to credit
Tessa’s assertion that we were British. How this
came about I did not learn until afterwards, but
matters will be made clearer if I set it down here.

Beppo di Squillace had conducted Stephen
Croucher to the Castle of Taranto, where the rascal
TESSA 217

had so successfully played the part of a British
officer that, not only was he warmly welcomed, but
furnished with every necessary, together with a
considerable sum of money, for which he unhesi-
tatingly drew a bill payable in London. Part of
this money was to be the reward of Beppo, who
accompanied him to the coast, and from thence in
a fishing-boat across the Straits to Messina. Here
in some unaccountable fashion the British officer
had disappeared, not only leaving his guide un-
rewarded, but absolutely out of pocket by the
hire of the boat, not to speak of time wasted
and attention unworthily bestowed. Stephen had
warned Beppo that two French spies, one of them
a nephew of General Buonaparte himself, had
landed in the Jacqueline’s boat and they would
make themselves acquainted with the country
under the disguise of shipwrecked British officers.
The rascal had pointed out what a service the
bandit would be rendering his country by hunting ©
these intruders down and knocking them on the
head, and had impressed Beppo so greatly that he
determined on effecting this capture immediately on
his return. But when the supposed British officer
disappeared entirely at Messina, the bandit had a
suspicion that he had been duped, and a thousand
trivial circumstances, until then unnoticed, made
this a certainty. His rage and mortification were
extreme. That he, Beppo de Squillace, the chief of
218 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

a band known and dreaded throughout all southern
Calabria, should be outwitted and actually turned
into an instrument to effect the escape of a French
rascal was galling to the pride of one more ac-
customed to deceive others than to be deceived
himself, If his followers found this out, they would
laugh, and his authority over them would be
loosened. The knowledge that this man had out-
manceuvred their chief must never come to the ears
of the band. Meanwhile, there were the two men
from the Jacqueline’s boat who were said by
Stephen to be French spies, but who were very
likely nothing of the kind, since every word spoken
by that rogue had proved to be a lie. If Beppo
could capture these, his honour might still be pre-
served and his self-respect re-established. Having
visited his beloved Tessa in the retreat where he
had established her, he would set his men to scour
the mountains in quest of the fugitives.

Such was his plan when he stole quietly up to
the cave, intending to give a joyful surprise to
his betrothed and her sister, and found that the -
scheme would need no further working out, for
these dangerous French emissaries stood before
him, captured by Tessa herself, and nothing more
formidable than two half-starved boys.

But although greatly pleased at being relieved
from the necessity of further search, more particu-
larly as it must involve taking. some of the band
TESSA 219

into his confidence, Beppo’s habits of life had
rendered him wary and secreting, so that he was
not likely to make known his inmost thoughts, even
to his betrothed. His hatred of the French was
very deep and real, in so much that he thought no ~
more of killing a Frenchman than he would of
slaughtering a kid, and there still remained a chance
that these emaciated youngsters standing before
him were what Stephen Croucher had described
them to be—one actually the nephew of Corsican
Buonaparte. Like all men of his temperament and
calling, there was a great mixture of vanity in his
nature, and as he had won the heart of the most
beautiful peasant girl in Calabria by deeds of ruth-
less ferocity against the enemies of their country,
he imagined that he would betray weakness, and
perhaps lower himself in her eyes, if he instantly
approved of her action in sheltering and protecting
us, more particularly as she had done so entirely on
her own initiative and without consulting him,

So as his handsome, athletic form remained erect
in the clasp of Tessa without response to her
appealing caresses, his face was fixed and sullen,
and. the glance that fell upon us from his keen
eyes was the reverse of friendly. Disengaging
himself somewhat rudely from Tessa, who still
retained possession of his right arm, he advanced
towards me, seized me by the shoulder with his
left hand and lifted me up on a stool as easily as
220 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

if I had been a kitten. Then knocking the cap
off my head with no gentle hand, he gazed into
my face whilst Tessa cried,“Is he not the image
of our Gian, Beppo? WasI not right to shelter
one in his likeness ?”

But the bandit judged it best to show some
measure of authority before yielding to the wishes
of the girl. Like many other men, he had a
character to keep up.

“You were wrong in acting as you have done.
Who knows that you are not harbouring wolves
and vermin under your roof—graceless rascals
who will lead the invaders to your secret retreat.
They have eaten your salt,so they shall not die
at this hour, nor in your dwelling, but they must
be secured. I will not have French spies running
loose about this neighbourhood. Lie down, young
whelp of a Gallic wolf!” and he pushed me off
the stool, probably with much more force than he
intended, so that my feeble strength gave way,
and I reeled against the wall of the cavern and
should have fallen to the ground had not Will -
Barrett, who was watching the proceedings. with
speechless wonder, caught me in his arms.

We were as rabbits in the fangs of hounds. By
a single blow this muscular mountaineer could have
dashed the breath out of our weakened bodies,
and the knowledge of this roused all the womanly
pity in the breasts of pretty Tessa and her sister.
TESSA DEFENDS THE BOYS FROM BEPPO,


TESSA 221

Luisa came hastily forward and placed herself
beside Will Barrett, but at the sight of my face,
which-she imagined to resemble her lost brother’s,
‘Tessa’s pity turned suddenly into indignation, for
the changes of mood in these hot southern natures —
are sudden as the dangerous white squall which
sweeps down from their own Apennines. Spring-
ing before me, with her tall, graceful form erect,
and her black eyes turned in an instant from the
softness of velvet to the cold hardness of steel, she
cried, “Lay a finger on these boys, Beppo, and arm
of yours shall never encircle my waist again.
Coward!” as the bandit stepped haughtily forward.
“ Advance another step and I will slay thee,” and,
swift as lightning, the blade of her ‘stiletto flashed
forth, whilst she faced her lover undauntedly, her
supple figure swaying slightly from the hips up-
ward, so that its rounded curves stood revealed
in all their beauty.

“Coward!” hissed back Beppo, stung to mad-
ness by the epithet. “Stand aside, wench, and put
up that hairpin, or I shall do thee a mischief in
earnest.” But she moved not an inch, facing him
dauntlessly as a tigress defending her cubs, and
flashes of anger seeming to dart from her fierce eyes.

This was something more than an ordinary
lover’s quarrel, and evidently Luisa thought so,
for seizing Will by the collar -of his jerkin, she
pushed him behind the curtain into the inner com-
222 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

partment and would have done the same to me
had I not suddenly thought of a golden bridge
which could be opened for Beppo’s retreat without
loss of dignity. Hastily extracting the packet
from the lining of my waistcoat, I tore it open,
and taking out the letter, advanced towards the
brigand with it in my hand, repeating the word,
“Nelson, Nelson.”

In the full flush of his anger he would have
dashed me aside, but apparently there was a
magic in the name which diverted his attention,
and it is to be supposed that he understood the
ways of women, more particularly of his hot-
blooded betrothed, and saw the prospect of a
reconciliation as prompt as the outbreak had been,
for the gusty passion of these Calabrians is never
lasting, and if damage does not follow the imme-
diate outbreak the after-danger is comparatively
slight,

Stepping backwards towards the door, as though
for the purpose of gaining more light, Beppo took
the letter from my hand and looked at the super-
scription, but before he could decipher the address,
a sob burst forth from the lips of Tessa, who had
sheathed her dagger, and in an instant, with her
arms flung round his neck, she was weeping on
her lover’s breast, whilst he tenderly smoothed her
raven tresses and strained her to his heart with
words of passionate love.
TESSA 223

Further back in these memoirs I said that my
retention of Nelson’s letter saved my life, and I
truly believe that it did so on this occasion. In
another moment one of those fierce natures might
have committed a deed which no repentance could ~
have wiped away, and no after remorse atoned for.
As it was, the storm passed as suddenly as it had
arisen, and the calm was the more enduring from
this violent outbreak having cleared the air.
There was no further question of binding us;
indeed, for the next ten minutes Beppo and his
betrothed were entirely busied with each other,
and bright little Luisa took advantage of the lull
to spread the table and draw a flagon of wine,
and by the time we had finished the meal a
friendly truce seemed established between the
robber-chief and ourselves.

Then Beppo once more turned to the letter, and
silently. read the address, after which he held a
consultation with the two girls, which ended in
Luisa retiring to don her best kirtle and head-gear,
and then starting forth upon an errand, the object
of which was unknown to us, although we guessed
that it was in some way connected with a priest,
for the word “padre” had been repeated by all of
them a score of times. We learnt afterwards that
the spot for which Luisa was bound stood a full
league and a half from our present position, but
the girl tripped lightly down the descent as though
224 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

the goal she wished to reach was within a hundred
yards, and we stood at the door watching her
active figure bounding along until it was out of
sight, then, motioning to us to remain within the
cavern, the lovers closed the door behind them,
and left us alone.

Under ordinary circumstances, Will Barrett and
I would have talked long and eagerly over the
strange scene which we had just witnessed and
the ignominious plight from which brave Tessa’s
dauntless courage had delivered us, but we were
too much worn out, both bodily and mentally, to do
more than exchange a few words of thankfulness
before creeping back on to our pallets and falling
into a profound sleep—a slumber more tranquil
than any which had visited us since we landed in
Calabria, for we both felt instinctively that our
dangers were past, though our hosts were, as the
Scotch say, “Kittle cattle to shoe.”

The sun was sinking when we were awakened
by the sound of a horse’s hoofs approaching the
cavern, mingled with voices which we recognised
as those of Beppo and the girls in conversation
with a stranger who was unknown to us. We
rose from our couches, but did not approach the
_ door, being afraid that any curiosity on our part
might be misconstrued. Tessa and Luisa entered,
ushering in a man clad in a cassock and wearing
the peculiar hat of an Italian priest, whilst Beppo
TESSA 225

followed bare-headed behind this clerical dignitary
The new-comer paused within the threshold to
scan us attentively, and queer objects we must
have looked, with our forms emaciated, our cheeks
sunken, and our eyes aglow with anxiety and
excitement.

“Who in the divvle’s name—in the saint’s name,
I mane—are ye?” asked the priest, with a strong
Hibernian brogue. “It’s miserable enough you
look, anyway, and more fit for an hospital than
for the hut of this big thief of a Beppo.”

“We are English,” we both cried out together,
“English officers who have been driven ashore on
this coast, and have been wandering for days
about the mountains.”

“You poor little chaps,” said the priest, com-
passionately. “Have you anything to prove your
identity ?”

“Tam the bearer of a letter from Sir Horatio |
Nelson to his wife, sir,’ I cried, fumbling in my
waistcoat and producing the letter, of which I
had repossessed myself.

He took it up, examined it carefully, and then
returned it to me with a courteous bow.

“Ye poor little chaps,” he murmured again.
“Tt’s a long story ye'll have to tell, I’m thinking,
and not one word shall I trouble ye with this
night. Jl just away back to the castle and tell
my lady all about ye, and we'll send up mules

P
226 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

in the morning to take ye there, and we'll nurse
ye and blow your little kites out with victuals
' till we get ye on your legs again. Tessa,” he
continued, now speaking in Italian, with which
language he seemed far more familiar than his
own, “you've done a good deed, my daughter,
in rescuing these poor boys, and it shall be re-
membered if you and Beppo ever get into trouble.
Make them comfortable for the night, and treat
them with all respect, for they are English officers
who have helped to save your country.”

There was no need for the good priest to enjoin
the duties of hospitality upon our hostesses, for
both girls were already upon their knees, kissing
our hands after the fashion of their emotional
nation, whilst Beppo stood uncovered, his head
sunk forward on -his chest, a very picture of
humility and contrition. As for us, the tears of
joy ran down our cheeks at the kindly words,
and we grasped the hand which Father Tomaso
O'Sullivan extended to us.

“Not a word—not a word,” he cried, visibly
touched at the scene, and perhaps fearing that
the sudden reaction from despair to joy would
be injurious to us in our weak state. “We'll
hear all your story later on. Good-night, lads,
and Heaven bless ye! Ye are both Protestants,
I suppose, but the blessing of an old man can do
ye no harm.”
TESSA | 227

Will and I looked stupidly at each other as
the sounds of the horse’s hoofs died away, then

we exchanged a long hand-grasp and both mut-
tered, “Thank God!”
CHAPTER XIII
THE CASTLE OF TARANTO

Ir the previous fortnight had been the most miser-
able period through which I had ever passed, the
six weeks which succeeded it were certainly to
be reckoned as amongst the happiest through
which I have lived. Providence shapes our
destiny in a curious fashion. No one would
have supposed that when Stephen Croucher set
us hopelessly adrift in the Jacqueline’s boat his
cowardly action would prove conducive to the
welfare and happiness of both Will Barrett and
myself, and yet it was so.

Notwithstanding my exhausted condition, sleep
visited me little that night, for my brain was
whirling with the exciting events of the previous
day. Every comfort that the girls could provide
was lavished upon us, and we were smartened up
by their womanly taste until we wore quite a
presentable appearance when the mules arrived
which were to convey us to the castle under the

escort of Father Tomaso. I do not mean that
228
THE CASTLE OF TARANTO 229

our rough garments were exchanged for any finer
material, but that abundant soap and water was
placed within our reach, of which we availed our-
selves freely, to the manifest improvement of our
personal appearance.

The girls and Beppo accompanied us on our
way, Tessa walking beside my saddle and Luisa
taking charge of Will Barrett, whilst Beppo
strode along in earnest conversation with the
priest. After travelling a mile or so, we entered
into a broad valley through which ran a small
river, and beside it the first real road which I had
ever seen in Calabria. Following this, we came to
a rude bridge over the stream, and from the centre
of this Tessa directed my attention upwards, when
I saw a spacious, castellated building perched high
up on aspur of the mountain and evidently com-
manding a most extensive view. This proved to
be the Castle of Taranto, the spot for which we
were bound.

I would have made inquiry of Father Tomaso
concerning the inhabitants of this stately pile, but
he refused to enter into conversation, so for the
present my curiosity remained unsatisfied. In
the valley the scenery was peaceful, and there
were some evidences here and there of cultiva-
tion, but as we ascended the zig-zag road leading
to the castle the wilderness increased and the
grim old building itself seemed to lend additional
230 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

sternness to the grey rocks amongst which it
stood.

Higher and higher we ascended, the road lead-
ing at times beside a precipice which it made one
giddy to look down, until at length we reached
a comparatively level plateau and clattered over
a stout drawbridge, which spanned a chasm of
great depth, for the ancient architect who reared
the pile had selected for its site the summit of
an isolated crag, absolutely inaccessible except at
the spot where we obtained entrance, and then
only by the drawbridge which spanned the gulf.
No place more secure from molestation could
possibly have been selected, and the castle
frowned over the country around, a fortress
made impregnable by the hand of Nature.

Crossing the drawbridge, we passed beneath an
archway of great depth and solidity, to emerge
upon a courtyard around which the castle was
built. Here several lackeys in livery hastened to
help us from our saddles, and under the priest’s
guidance we ascended a flight of steps which led
into a spacious apartment, in which were seated
a lady and a little girl about ten years of age.

Both rose as we approached, and, in response
to the priest’s introduction, the lady said, in
perfect English, “Welcome, young gentlemen.
My daughter and I bid you a hearty welcome
to the Castle of Taranto.”
THE CASTLE OF TARANTO 231

There was a quiet dignity in her speech and
bearing, which was the more remarkable when
the age and present circumstances of the persons
whom she was addressing were considered. She
was the chatelaine of a great historical castle,
accustomed to unquestioning obedience and the
deepest respect from all who approached her.
But the somewhat exaggerated formality of her
greeting was softened by the friendliness of the
hand-clasp she bestowed on each of us, and all
the hauteur of her manner melted away, and the
generous Irish nature broke through the barrier
of reserve as she looked into our sunken feat-
ures and became aware of our emaciated
condition.

“ Poor lads,” she said feelingly, “it’s bed that'll
be the best place for you. Father Tomaso, take
these young gentlemen to their room. Perhaps
to-morrow morning you'll feel strong enough to
come down and make the acquaintance of my
little daughter here. Good-bye for to-day,” and
with another hand-clasp and many kindly nods
she dismissed us, the little girl, her companion,
following our retreating forms with grave, wist-
ful eyes, in which pity and sorrow could both be
plainly read.

“Father,” I said, when we had left the apart-
ment, “who is that lady? Is she the mistress of
the castle ?”
232 AFLOAT WITH. NELSON

“ Bedad, she is, then, and ye little reckoned that
ye’d find one of the ould stock of Kilshane lording
it over a whole province in Southern Italy. It’s
rest and quiet ye want and not a long family
history, but it’s best ye should know at once where
ye are, and whom ye are with. My lady, that
we've just left, is the Princess Di Brancanova—not
an Italian, mind ye, but one of the right sort from
County Clare. She was Lady Kathleen Kilshane,
daughter to the Earl of Kilmallow—Heaven rest
his sowl! a better sportsman never threw leg over
pig-skin—until she married the prince, who went
to join the saints nine years ago come Candlemas,
sent there by the rapier of a Neapolitan blaggard
after a quarrel over cards and dice. The little girl
ye saw is her only child, and the heiress of this
vast property. She has inherited her father’s title
and is the Princess Leanora Di Brancanova, whilst
her mother is the dowager. Now ye know as
much as is good for ye for the present, so tumble
into bed, and eat and drink everything that’s
brought to ye.”

“And you, sir?” I asked a little timidly. “You
are the clergyman of the castle?”

“Faith, I am confessor to her ladyship, and, for
the matter of that, to everybody else within the
castle walls, from major-domo to scullion. I’m Tom
O'Sullivan from Ballybeg in County Clare, and my
people have served the Kilshanes for generations
THE CASTLE OF TARANTO 233

past. It’s little of my services that such young
heretics as ye will want, I’m thinking,” he con-
cluded, with a twinkle in his eye, and a good-
humoured smile upon his jolly face.

But the next morning found us unfit to rise from
our beds, nor was it until a full week had passed
that we were able to leave our room, for, with the
comfort and security of the castle, a reaction had
set in which prostrated us for a while. We were
both feverish, and often light-headed, and during
these periods we talked incoherently of the scenes
of horror we had witnessed, and the trials through
which we had come, so that Lady Kathleen, as I
shall call her, who in kind, motherly fashion came
to watch beside our beds, became acquainted with
the main incidents of our story before we were
able to tell it in detail. I know now that I talked
much of the child with the grave, earnest eyes,
and the little Princess Leonora. I had seen her on
one occasion only, but I suppose the mind was
then plastic to receive impressions, and those
large, thoughtful orbs, looking pityingly from
the beautiful young face, must have stamped
themselves deeply on my memory, and the feverish
working of the brain kept the image fresh and
reproduced it before my mental vision.

But gradually the strength of our constitutions
put to flight all imaginings both good and evil, our
blood became cool, our vision clear, our senses calm,
234 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

our nights dreamless and restorative in their tran-
quillity..

So at length we left our beds for good, and then
I obtained my first real knowledge of the kind-
hearted Irish lady to whom we owed so much. ©
When ushered into her presence on this occasion
we-were not such scarecrows as before, thanks to
her generous foresight, which had provided us each
with a wardrobe during our illness. On first meet-
ing her we were bashful and constrained, but this
feeling completely passed away after a few hours,
by which time the charm of her manner had made
itself felt, and the reserve which had grown up
through force of habit had quite disappeared. -

We were shown round the castle, and taken to
. the southern terrace, from whence a magnificent
view of the sea, and a portion of the coast, was
obtainable. From this position, to our great
surprise, we recognised, at a distance of perhaps
six miles, the little haven into which our boat had
been driven, although the amphitheatre, with its
hateful memories, was completely hidden. This
discovery showed how aimlessly we must have
-wandered within the labyrinth of the Apennine
gorges, and how we must have trodden the same
ground again and again without knowing it. For
many days we had trudged on from daylight until
darkness, thinking that we were shaping a direct
course, but all the while stumbling along in a
THE CASTLE OF TARANTO 235

series of narrowing circles, so that at the termina-
tion of our pilgrimage we were less than seven
miles distant from the spot from whence we started.

The castle was a magnificent building of great
antiquity and interest, built in the old days when
each petty priest or baron possessed a sovereign
right, with unlimited jurisdiction, over as much
country as he could lay his hands on. Feuds between
these magnates were frequent, and often kept alive
for many generations, so that it behoved a man to
sleep within solid walls if he would wake up sound
and scathless in the morning. The traditions of
the house of Brancanova were more than usually
replete with tales of horror, of ruthless betrayals,
indiscriminate slaughterings, treacherous poison-
ings by bowl or envenomed ring, of arson, pillage
and murder,

We looked with awe at the dungeons excavated
in the solid rock, where the fetters still rusted on
their staples, and where the bright light of Heaven
never gained access. They were untenanted now,
but the very sight of them, in their still, gloomy
desolation, struck horror into our hearts.

-For two days we wandered about at will, usually
accompanied by little Leonora, who took a childish
delight in showing us all the secret recesses of the
old pile, which was hers by direct descent from a —
hundred ancestors, all, I suspect, of more or less
doubtful reputation, according to our standard.
236 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

Will Barrett showed much awkwardness and
shyness when with Lady Kathleen, and I have no
doubt that I did the same, though in a lesser
degree, but little Leonora—or Nora, as her mother
called her—delighted in my companion’s merry
laugh, and in the thousand monkey tricks which
his elevation to the rank of an officer had not made
him forget, so that, at first, I was a little jealous of
the preference thus shown; but this feeling soon
passed away on noticing that the child, when in
the grave moods which became her best, left Will
to come to my side. With much tact and delicacy
the elder lady drew from us the history of our
lives, and of our recent adventures, and at the
recital of our sufferings the eyes of her daughter
would overflow with sympathy, and she would steal
from her mother’s side to whisper words of pity.

Then we learnt the further history of Stephen
Croucher, and Lady Kathleen’s indignation was
deep when she discovered the serpent that had
crept into the Calabrian castle.

The fellow had been conducted by Beppo di
Squillace to the princess, and had been received by
that lady with boundless enthusiasm and _ hospi-
tality. He had the audacity to introduce himself
as Captain Berry, and had delighted his audience
by the very graphic description he had given them
of the battle of the Nile, making himself out to
have been Nelson’s right hand man—as the real
THE CASTLE OF TARANTO 237

Captain Berry unquestionably was. The man’s
knowledge of languages filled them with admira-
tion, and in the few days he was at the castle he
gained the esteem of all the retainers, as well as of
the ladies themselves. Poor old Father Tomaso he
had fairly duped by professing to be a Roman
Catholic, and had wound up his roguery by taking
a considerable sum of money in gold, for which he
gave a bill with Captain Berry’s name attached to
it. Provided with horses, and under the guidance
of Beppo, who viewed this rascal with as much
respect as his wild nature was capable of showing,
Stephen had travelled luxuriously to the sea-coast
and been carried over the Straits to Messina, where,
as before said, he disappeared from the ken of his
guide. How he effected this will never be precisely
known, but when inquiries were instituted later on,
enough evidence was forthcoming to show that his
concealment and ultimate escape were arranged by
French emissaries, for that nation had its agents in
every town of consequence in Sicily, although it
would have fared hard with them had their political
leanings been known to the general populace, which
was enthusiastically loyal to the king.

“ Bad cess to the villain!” groaned Father Tomaso
when Lady Kathleen had finished ; “it’s no worse
harm I wish him than to meet that big thief Beppo
in the dark, with nobody nigh at hand to drag
them asunder.”
238 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

“Please tell me about Beppo,” I said, burning
with curiosity to learn the real avocation of that
very doubtful character.

“Beppo,” said Lady Kathleen, “is a product
peculiar to this country—although we could show
a few in old Ireland that are a bit like him in some
things, eh, Father Tom?” and she smiled at the
priest. “Ina lawless land there is always some one
individual who comes to the front and, making a
mark for himself, becomes a leader amongst the
common throng. Such aman is Beppo, whose real
name is Guiseppe Larni, the son of a goatherd
living near Squillace from which little town he
derives the high-sounding designation by which
he is known throughout the countryside. All our
peasantry regard the French with an instinctive
and undying hatred, and it so happened that a
favourite sister of Beppo’s, who had left her
mountain home for Northern Italy, was basely
betrayed, cruelly treated, and ultimately deserted
by a French officer. The poor girl, in miserable
want, died broken-hearted at the contempt with
which she was treated by her countrymen. Beppo
was a lad at the time, and was designed for the
priesthood, which accounts for the power of reading
and writing he possesses—a rare gift amongst his
class. Giulia—I remember her as a pretty child,
and so do you, Father Tom”—the priest nodded
assent—“ found means to let her brother know her
THE CASTLE OF TARANTO 239

story and the name of her betrayer. The lad re-
nounced cowl and gown, travelled on foot through-
out the length of our peninsula, encountering many
dangers and much privation, and actually succeeded,
after months of watching, in meeting poor Giulia’s
false lover and stabbing him to the heart. This
mission accomplished, he returned here, but with
no further thought of the tonsure, for which his
violent and daring disposition quite unfitted him.
He found himself looked upon in the light of a hero
by the peasantry, so he ‘took to the mountains,’
as they call it here; that is to say, when put in
plain English, he became a bandit and waged war
against the fat Neapolitan merchants and Roman
Jews who ventured into these parts with their
wares. His skill and audacity made his name a
terror to all peaceable folk, and a reward was
placed upon his head, but when the French troubles
again broke out he gained a free pardon by offering
to raise and command a body of men in the service
of the king, should the enemy invade our coasts.
This was the band that you encountered, and how
merciless they are where the French are concerned
you already know. Beppo’s calling as a robber
carries with it no more discredit than was attached
toa Highland cateran or a Border moss-trooper, and
in the course of years, unless he comes to a violent
end in the meanwhile, Beppo will retire from public
life and settle down as a peaceable citizen, but
240 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

someone else will start up to take his place, for
Calabria is never without some noted bandit chief.
For the rest, he is brave and trustworthy—in short,
I like him,” concluded Lady Kathleen.

For a fortnight we lingered on at the Castle of
Taranto, becoming daily on terms of greater in-
timacy with our hostess and her little daughter.
The latter, who spoke broken English with an Irish
accent, kindly volunteered to teach me Italian, and
I made considerable progress in the soft southern
tongue, being soon able to ask for anything I wanted,
and even to follow a conversation ; but more than
this, the close contact into which I was thrown with
my little companion gave rise to a deep attach-
ment, which caused her to weep bitterly when I
suggested that the time had now arrived when, our
strength being quite restored, we should leave the
castle and go to Palermo, where the British fleet
under Nelson was then lying. On broaching this
to Lady Kathleen, she surprised me by announcing
that she herself was going to Sicily in a few days
to join the court and testify to the loyalty borne by
the people of Southern Calabria tv the king and
queen.

“We'll start in.about a week, and then I can
hand you lads over to the admiral myself.”

So it was arranged, and much to my satisfaction,
for the thought of leaving these kind people for
ever had begun to weigh very heavily upon me.
THE CASTLE OF TARANTO 241

During this time, whilst little Nora and I were
inseparable, Will Barrett had found a chum after
his own heart’s desire in the redoubtable Beppo
and was also picking up Italian at the feet of pretty
Luisa. So greatly interested had Will become in
the profession of a bandit that I verily believe it
would have required little persuasion to make him
exchange the blue jacket for a slouched hat, goat-
skin breeches, and a sash full of daggers. But his
friendship for the chief did not prevent him from
playing that worthy a practical joke which might
have had serious consequences.

Although brave as a lion, Beppo was exceedingly
superstitious, and, above all things, held the super-
natural in awe. Having found this out, Master
Will provided himself with a large pumpkin, the
inside of which he scooped out and then divested it
of the rind. He next made slits for the eyes, nose
and mouth, turning out a huge, grotesque face such
as we boys in Norfolk had often done with a
Swede turnip. This he rigged up upon a stick
with a cross-piece, round which he arranged a
heavy cloak which had belonged to the late prince,
surmounting the pumpkin with one of the “caps
of liberty” we had worn on our wanderings. This
simple apparatus, which would only have made a
Norfolk schoolgirl laugh, he fixed up in the darkest
corner of one of the dungeons, and when the time
for action arrived, he placed a lighted taper inside

Q
242 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

the pumpkin, and surveyed his artistic creation with
immense satisfaction.

The gloaming was settling down when he lured
Beppo, who was accompanied by Tessa and Luisa—
the latter of whom I believe was in the plot—to
the spot, and mysteriously whispered to the bandit
that if he opened the door he would find a French-

_maninside. Poor Beppo, who had never even heard
of a practical joke in his life, did so, and the result
exceeded the youthful conspirator’s wildest antici-
pation. It must have been a sufficiently startling
sight, for the strong man’s jaw dropped, his hair
bristled, and he stood like one transfixed, with ‘his
eyes starting out of his head; then he fled with the
swiftness of a roe deer, followed by a ringing laugh
of mockery from Luisa. Tessa was nearly equally
startled, but the sight acted in a different way upon
her. Plucking the dagger from her bosom, she
rushed into the dungeon and pierced the cloak
with repeated stabs, till the whole apparatus fell
to the ground, when the light was extinguished
and the trick which had been played upon them
discovered. Master Will and Luisa had wisely
stolen away, or else the infuriated girl would
certainly have given one of them a taste of her
steel. As it was, the practical joker kept out of
Beppo’s way for the next forty-eight hours, when
the peace was restored through the good offices of
Luisa, but my young friend never referred to the
THE CASTLE OF TARANTO 243

subject in the presence of the chief, and in this he
showed much wisdom, for it is about as dangerous
to play tricks with an angry rattlesnake as with a
Calabrian outlaw.

Lady Kathleen, too, had all an Irishwoman’s
sense of humour. Having remarked Will Barrett's
fondness of Beppo’s society and having heard me
banter him upon the joys of a brigand’s life, she
played a mild practical joke upon usin her good-
natured, kindly fashion. On leaving our beds one
morning we found that our usual clothing had dis-
appeared, to be replaced by the complete equipment
of a Calabrian mountaineer—slouched hat, goat-
skin jerkin and breeches, woollen stockings, and
a crimson sash, the latter provided with a brace
of murderous-looking daggers. On discovering
these costumes we stared at each other wonder.
ingly, and at once instituted a search for our
missing garments, but it was in vain. We both
slept like dormice, and during our slumbers every
article of our customary wardrobe had been re-
moved and the more picturesque attire substituted.
It was Hobson’s choice—we must either remain in
bed all day or turn ourselves into juvenile bandits.
We adopted the latter course, and went down to
breakfast, in a shame-faced way which amused our
hostess and her little daughter greatly. Will
Barrett, I think, was secretly pleased at being
able to appear before his friends in the national
244 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

costume; but to me it was another matter, for I
was keenly sensitive to ridicule, and greatly feared
the laugh that would certainly be raised at our
expense, but the whole affair was so pleasing to
Lady Kathleen and little Nora, and their remarks
upon our appearance were so complimentary, that
it would have been churlish to show any resent-
ment. Will Barrett had thrust the daggers into
his sash, with the hafts protruding in the orthodox
fashion, as followed by Beppo, but I had left mine
upstairs. When little Nora noticed the omission,
she insisted upon my wearing the weapons, vowing
that she would not go outside the castle gate with
me unless I carried them in my sash. I obeyed,

as I always did—and do now—where Nora is



concerned.

She and I had resolved upon taking a somewhat
long excursion on the mountains that day for the
avowed purpose of gathering wildflowers, but, in
reality, that we might enjoy a good long outing
uncontrolled by the presence of our seniors. When
together we usually avoided all allusion to my
departure, but the time was now so close at hand
when we must turn our backs upon Calabria that
it was impossible to ignore the subject, and when
we had reached a convenient resting-place we
indulged in a thousand fanciful wonderings as to
what the future had in store for us both, and as to
whether we should ever meet again.
THE CASTLE OF TARANTO 245

“You will soon forget me, Jack, after we have
parted at Palermo,” she said, with a tinge of sorrow
in her voice which I could not fail to perceive.
“You have your ship and love to sail about on the
great sea. New adventures will happen, and you'll
soon forget all about Calabria and the Castle of
Taranto.”

“Nonsense!” I cried warmly. “I shall never
forget the castle nor the kind friends whom I
left within it—particularly you, little Nora. By
Jove!” I exclaimed, waxing eloquent, “I intend to
become a great admiral like Nelson, then I shall
bring my ship into the bay and come ashore, and
ask you, little Nora, to be my wife, and share all
the prize-money I shall have made—hundreds of
thousands of pounds.”

We were seated upon a mossy ledge, and, whilst
speaking, I had passed my arm round her waist
and drawn her towards me, and it was the little
ery breaking from her trembling lips which first
brought home to me that my boyish avowal was
regarded as a pledge by the impulsive southern
heart to which it was made. Her little head was
laid upon my shoulder, and. her soft black eyes
looked lovingly into my face as she answered,
“Yes, Jack, [ll be your wife, and then we will
spend half our time in England and half our time
here.”

We both know now that there was nothing that
246 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

resembled real love in the feelings which we enter-
tained for each other, but if the true fashion was
kindled it was rather on the altar of the child’s
heart than on mine, although I was three yéars
her senior. Genuine affection existed between us.
She regarded me in the light of a friend and pro-
tector, whilst I looked upon her as a sweet, con-
fiding, lovable little companion; but there was no
true love, for we were both too young to under-
stand anything about a passion which comes with
riper years. But we were both vastly contented
with the present and wholly confident in the veiled
future. My wooing—if wooing it can be called
—was matter of fact and. prosaic in conception
and expression, but it satisfied her, as certainly it
satisfied me. That we neither of us had any idea
of what the condition of betrothal meant, and the
obligations it carried with it, was evident by the
manner in which we discussed our plans and the
utter absence of probability which marked the
career which we sketched out.

“ Are you very rich, Jack?” asked Nora, timidly.

“No, Iam very poor,’ I replied. “My father is
only a country parson.”

“But youll be very rich when you are an
admiral like Nelson,” she said, “and, after all, it
doesn’t matter, for I have plenty.”

“Oh, I don’t want a girl’s money,” I answered.
“T am a man, and can become rich by thrashing
THE CASTLE OF TARANTO 247

the French. There will be prize-money from the
Nile—at least twenty pounds, I should think, and
we can begin on that. It’ll last ever so long, and
you shall have a carriage and a, pair of horses, like
my Uncle Athelstan, much better beasts than your
ponies and mules in Calabria.”

“Tell me about your family, Jack. I have only
heard of your parents and little Emily.”

“T have no near relations except Uncle Athelstan,
who is my father’s half-brother, and his only son,
Vortigern, who is ten years older than I am. I
have only seen my uncle once. He is a baronet,
and has a very fine place, as big as your Castle of
Taranto, I believe. He and my father are not on
very good terms—some family quarrel, which I
don’t rightly understand. What will your mother
say, Nora, when I tell her that we are going to
be married ?”

So we chattered on, supremely happy in the
thought that we were to wander through life
together, although this settlement of our future
in no way affected our appetites, for we finished
- the small basketful of provisions we had brought
with us. Then we strolled into the forest, picking
the wildflowers, when suddenly I heard a cry of
terror from little Nora, who, for the moment, was
hidden from my view by a mass of rock. Rushing
forward, I found her confronted by an old she-
wolf with three half-grown cubs at her heels,
248 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

The animal, with lips drawn back, was showing
all its fangs and growling fiercely at the little
intruder. I sprang forward and placed myself
between them, whilst drawing my bandit’s dagger,
and uttering as loud a shout as my lungs could
compass. The cubs slunk away and disappeared,
and, upon my giving another shout, the old wolf
did the same, and the danger was over—if danger
there was, for I think the dam was only solicitous
for the safety of her young, and had no intention
of attacking.

The whole affair was hardly worthy of mention,
but, from that time forth, Nora persisted in saying
that I had saved her life, and soon brought her
mother to entertain the same belief. Encouraged
by this circumstance, we made known to Lady
Kathleen the unalterable love that we bore each
other and our heroic intention of remaining con-
stant until such time as I became an admiral,
whereupon the lady laughed very heartily and |
recommended me to gain the required rank as
speedily as possible. I think I was a little morti-
fied in my inmost heart that she did not take the
matter more seriously.

We journeyed to the sea-coast opposite Messina
in a lumbering old carriage drawn by four mules
over as execrable a road as wheels ever travelled.
Poor Will Barrett was desperately depressed at
leaving his bandit friends, and, I think, found
RUSHING FORWARD, I FOUND HER CONFRONTED BY AN OLD SHE-WOLF,
WITH THREE HALF-GROWN CUBS AT HER HEELS.



Page 248.
THE CASTLE OF TARANTO 249

great difficulty in refraining from unmanly tears,
whether for Beppo or Luisa I am unable to say.

Crossing to Messina, Lady Kathleen chartered a
small craft which took us to Palermo in a couple
of days. My heart leapt with joy as we passed
under the stern of the old Vanguard, then lying
at that port, but Lady Kathleen would not allow
us to go on board, insisting on her right to restore
us to the admiral in person.

This took place on the evening following our
arrival. We were both desired to assume our
bandit’s costume, and were driven to a large
house which I afterwards found was the resi-
dence of Sir William and Lady Hamilton. Here
we were stowed away in a small ante-room whilst
Lady Kathleen went in search of the admiral,
now Lord Nelson. Presently she returned with,
I think, one of the most beautiful women I have
ever seen, and between these ladies we were led
into a brilliantly-lighted room filled with people,
all of whom gazed at us with undisguised wonder
and surprise. My head swam so at the novelty
of the position that I walked forward like one in
a dream until I heard Lady Hamilton say, “My
lord, here is the Princess Di Brancanova, who has
brought you two of your officers.”

Nelson stared at us in astonishment for a
minute, and then a look of genuine pleasure
passed over his face as he said kindly, “Thank
250 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

* God you are safe, lads! I should never have had
the heart to face my old friend, John Brandon, if
I had left you behind, Master Jack.”

“T have got the letter, sir,’ I blurted out. “I
kept it safely, and it saved our lives.”

“Well, you shall deliver it in person still,” he
said, for you shall go to England by the first ship
that sails.”

Two months later both Will Barrett and I were
at Silversands.
CHAPTER XIV
AT HOME AGAIN

IT was a fortnight before an opportunity occurred
for our leaving Palermo. Then the frigate Naiad
called in on her way to England, and Will Barrett
and I were directed to take a passage in her.
During this time we remained the guests of Lady
Kathleen, and, under her auspices, were present at
several State ceremonies, with which we were duly
impressed. It was a time of merry-making and
feasting in honour of Nelson’s great victory and
the deliverance of Sicily from the Corsican’s yoke.
The King and Queen of Naples held their Court at
Palermo, and we were in time.to witness some of
the rejoicings in honour of the victor of Aboukir.
Then I found out, for the first time, what a high
position in her own country was held by little
Nora, and became acutely conscious of the great
gulf which divided us socially. The chatelaine of
a great castle in an isolated portion of the kingdom,
the little girl and her mother were almost inde-
pendent princesses, and both received many signal

marks of favcur from the royal hands... At first I
251
252 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

feared that the attentions which little Nora re-
ceived, and the caresses lavished upon her, would
turn her head and loosen the ties of affection which
bound us, but in this I was wholly mistaken, for in
the quiet of her own house she was ever the same
sweet, loving child, and her conduct towards me
seemed to show that she had marked my fears, and
was anxious to dispel them by the exhibition of
more than her customary affection. There was a
large garden attached to the house, and in this we
would sit for hours, with hands locked together,
talking over the past, the present and the future.
My approaching departure tinged these hours with
a certain melancholy which we endeavoured to
dissipate by reiterated vows of constancy, and Lady
Kathleen, like a wise woman, imposed no hindrance
upon our intercourse, regarding us as a couple of
children who would forget each other after a few
months of separation, but I thank God that this
was not the case, as the sequel will show.

Nor was Will Barrett left without the com-
panionship which he loved, for the king, upon
hearing of Beppo’s service in his cause, had ex-
pressed a wish to see the bandit, and had given him
a colonel’s commission in the Neapolitan army,
with authority to enrol his followers into a regi-
ment, to be known as the Calabrian Irregulars.
If loyal before, Beppo now became ten times more
devoted to his sovereign, and he was a proud man
AT HOME AGAIN 253

as he stalked along in the picturesque uniform
which had been devised for the new corps. Any
reference to the pumpkin lantern might have led to
serious consequences, and Will Barrett possessed
discretion enough to recognise this and avoid so
painful a subject. -

The beautiful Lady Hamilton was kind enough
to evince a great partiality for me, and I was
present at several of her parties, where she
favoured the company with many of the persona-
tions which showed her graceful form and lovely
face to such advantage. I am glad to have wit-
nessed these, for they have now become historical.

Before leaving, Nelson handed “me a second
letter, with renewed instructions as to seeing his
wife, together with many kind messages to my
father and other Norfolk friends. He also pro-
mised that a vacancy should be kept for me on
board whatever ship his flag was hoisted, and
reiterated the assurance that he would always
concern himself with my welfare.

The parting with Lady Kathleen and little Nora
was very painful, but we were consoled by the
prospect of meeting again in a few months. Beppo
insisted on accompanying us to the frigate in all
the majesty of his colonel’s uniform, and somewhat
surprised the honest bluejackeis by kissing us
effusively on both cheeks before stepping over the
side, and we could see him standing in his boat,
254 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

waving his plumed hat until the frigate rounded
the mole and shut him out from view. Our
destination was Spithead, and nothing of import-
ance occurred during the voyage. Indeed all that
transpired during my visit to England was of
so unimportant a nature as scarcely to need
record.

My first visit on landing was to Lady Nelson,
who received me with every mark of kindness, and
was pleased to listen with great attention to my
description of the battle of the Nile, about which I
could relate much concerning her husband, which
must have been of great interest to the lady. She
also heard the account of our wanderings in
Calabria with close attention, and with a woman’s
tact led me to speak much of little Nora, seeming,
intuitively, to guess the affection we bore each
other. Then she questioned me eagerly concerning
the Court at Palermo and Lady Hamilton, to which
I replied to the best of my ability, and I fancied
she was a little disappointed at the few details
which I was able to give her. It also struck me
that, although her manner towards me was as kind
as ever, her happiness had not been increased by
the world-wide fame her husband had achieved, or
the high rank which his deeds had brought to her, ~

After this I went down to the village of Hamp-
ton on a painful errand, for I wished to see Mrs
Hammond in fulfilment of my promise to poor
AT HOME AGAIN 255

Tommy. Upon such interviews as these 1t is best
not to dwell. It is not amidst the thunder of the
guns and in the heat of action that the sorrow
caused by war is felt or appreciated, but upon such
a visit as I then paid. The glories of Aboukir Bay
left blanks which would never be filled up in many
an English home, but in none was the grief more
deep and lasting than that which abode with this
stricken lady in the quiet riverside village, for poor
Tommy was “the only son of his mother, and she
was a widow.”

Neither shall I inflict upon my readers any
account of the welcome which awaited me at the
Rectory and from the honest fisherfolk at Silver-
sands. Will Barrett had preceded me thither by
several days, and his tongue had been wagging in-
cessantly from the moment of his arrival, so that
every man, woman and child in the place knew of
our adventures, and, to my chagrin, I found myself
regarded as the future husband of a great princess,
whose father, the king, had been temporarily
driven from his throne through the machinations
of General Buonaparte. This monarch I was
credited with having saved from the fangs of
a pack of famished wolves as he was stealing
through the forest with his plate chest on his back
and the jewelled crown and sceptre sticking out
of his breeches’ pocket. Such is history. Will
Barrett had received a few days’ start of me, and
256 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

had interwoven fiction with fact till the original
tissue was almost unrecognisable.

After the first warmth of my welcome at the
Rectory had subsided, and I had settled down into
my old place, I observed an air of suppressed ex-
citement in both my parents which could hardly
be wholly accounted for by my arrival. Upon
questioning my mother, she admitted that a family
event of great importance had happened, the news
of which had reached them that very morning, but
she declined to say anything further, leaving the
task to my father. Needless to say I questioned
my little sister Emily—who never left my side—
but she was equally in the dark with myself; but
on the following morning my father called me into
his study and informed me that my cousin Vorti-
gern had been killed in a duel brought about by a
racing quarrel with a brother officer in the Guards.

“T hardly knew my nephew,” said my father,
speaking very gravely, “but it will be asad blow
for your Uncle Athelstan, who is left to face old
age without chick or child. You are old enough
now, Jack, to understand what a difference this sad
event must make in our position, for my brother
is never likely to marry again and have an heir, so
that, upon his death, the baronetcy and the estate
must devolve upon me, if I survive, or upon you.
Your uncle and I have been estranged for years—
indeed through life—but it was through no fault
AT HOME AGAIN 257

of mine. He took umbrage at my father marrying
a second time, and always regarded me, the off-
spring of that union, with aversion. I have done
all that lies within my power to conquer this, and
have never asked him for assistance in my life,
although, God knows! our circumstances were
straitened enough at times. I have written to
Athelstan expressing my deep sorrow at this
terrible calamity, and it is my sincere hope that a
reconciliation will speedily follow. He is a proud
man, and the loss of his only child must be a terrible
affliction, which, Heaven knows! I never counted
upon, and would even now give my right hand to
repair. For Vortigern himself I can affect no grief,
for I scarcely knew him, but I sorrow greatly for
his poor father. You are the only hope of the
Brandons now, Jack, and, thank God! your con-
duct in the past promises well for the future, and
shows that the honour of our ole family is in
safe keeping.”

My father was visibly affected, and had paced
the room to and fro during these remarks, whilst
at the concluding words he laid his hand upon my
shoulder with an affectionate gesture which made
me very proud, for I am old-fashioned enough to
value the good opinion of my parents above that
of any beings on the face of the earth.

I do not think that I fully took in the full
import of this unexpected catastrophe for several

R
258 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

days, nor did it become clear to me until I had
visited Tunstall Hall, whither we were summoned
by Sir Athelstan Brandon.

The estate lay in Northamptonshire, and I was
greatly struck by the size of the park surrounding
the noble old pile. Many servants, clad in deepest
black, received us in the hall, and I was left alone
in a large morning-room whilst my father was
ushered in to his brother. For above an. hour I
waited, and had begun to think that I was for-
gotten when the door opened and the two brothers
entered arm-in-arm, the elder man leaning affection-
ately upon the younger. I had only seen my
Uncle Athelstan once before, when I was quite a
child, and my memory retained a deeper impression
of the horses he drove than of the man himself. I
was now struck by the great resemblance which
my father bore to him, although the younger
brother’s features had none of the sternness which
sorrow and suffering had not entirely effaced from
the features of the elder. Some ten years separated
them, but my father might have been the son of
the bowed figure leaning heavily on his arm whilst
seeking the support of a crutched ebony stick with
the other hand, over which the lace ruffles fell in
yraceful folds.

I stood up respectfully as they advanced and
came to a halt before me.

“This is my son Jack, Athelstan, who served
AT HOME AGAIN 250

under Nelson at the battle of the Nile, and won
marks of personal affection and approval from
the great admiral.”

“Hold your head up and let me look at you,
nephew,” said Sir Athelstan. “Ah, he is like
you, John, and has our father's eyes. Well,
Jack,” he continued, after sinking heavily into
a large chair, “I want you to regard me as a
second father. Will you give up the sea to
live here and look after your old uncle — to re-
place the son whom I have lost?”

There was something inexpressibly sad in the
speaker’s voice, although the tones closely
resembled my father’s, and, looking at him, J
saw that his eyes were fixed upon me with a
hungry expression, as though craving for trust
and love. '

This touched me greatly, and I glanced at
my father to gain assistance from him before
replying, but his face was turned from mine
and gave me no clue as to his wishes.

For at least half a minute I paused, and then
answered, “I will do my best to win your love,
sir, but I cannot give up the sea and my
profession.”

“Consider again,” continued my uncle. “There
is nothing to be gained in the navy but hard
fare and hard knocks. Here you shall have
every comfort, horses to ride, good shooting,
260 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

and a liberal allowance. Will not these make
you alter your resolution, nephew ?”

It was a tempting offer and hard to withstand,
more particularly with those wistful eyes bent
anxiously upon mine, but the glamour of my
great profession had full possession of my heart
—I had sipped the cup of glory, and could not
dash the bowl from my lips. Before my eyes
arose the face of the great sailor, lighted up
with the joy of battle, or overspread with the
kindly smile which was never absent, and I
felt that no earthly inducement could turn me
from following in the path which he had trodden
so nobly—the path of duty to king and country.

“JT cannot give up Nelson,” I faltered. “Ask
me anything but that, and I will do it.”

The old man gave an audible sigh, saying,
“Well, well, if it must be so it must. After
all, it is only natural; but if anything happens
to you, youngster, the old house of Brandon is
extinct. You warned me that it would be so,
John, and you were right.”

My father said nothing, but I could read
approval of my determination in his face, and
my uncle concealed his disappointment, and even
displayed considerable interest in the history of
my adventures in Calabria, which I was com-
pelled to relate from beginning to end. His
worn face even flickered into a smile as I
AT HOME AGAIN 261

spoke of little Nora and the affection we bore
each other, and I heard him mutter, “ Kilmallow
—I remember him—the wild Irishman who shot
Stansfield of the Blues through the lungs.”

But it was an unlucky reminiscence, for it
recalled the recent duel which had resulted so
fatally for the speaker, and a deep gloom settled
upon the old man’s face as my father led him
from the room.

We stayed for several days at Tunstall Hall,
and I feel sure that our presence was of benefit to
Sir Athelstan by awakening new interests in his
breast and causing him to dwell less continually
upon his recent bereavement. During this time
the two brothers and the family lawyer were
frequently closeted together, whilst I found amuse-
ment in ranging through the woods under the
guidance of the head gamekeeper, a functionary
who treated me with extraordinary respect, con-
sidering my age and absolute ignorance of sport.
On the occasions when we were together, my uncle
was exceedingly kind and generous, for he seemed
to derive pleasure from finding out what little
things I was in need of and in supplying the
deficiency. By this means I became the happy
possessor of a massive gold watch with seals
attached, inside the cover of which was engraved
my name and the date of the battle of the Nile,
Ist August, 1798; of a double-barrelled fowling-
262 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

piece, and of various other articles of value to a
youngster. He never reverted again to my leav-
ing the Service, but it was arranged that before
I went to sea I should spend at least a month with
him at Tunstall Hall. Two rooms were set apart
for my entire use, and it was understood that they
should remain undisturbed except when I occupied
them. On parting, the old man kissed me on the
forehead and pressed into my hand a purse, which,
on examination, proved to contain fifty guineas.
I had never even seen so much gold before, and my
first thought was that I had now wealth sufficient
to marry little Nora offhand, but was obliged to
content myself with the purchase of a handsome
locket which I sent to her, together with a long
letter explaining my altered circumstances.

My dear wife has that faded old sheet still, and
turning over some papers the other day, she put it
into my hand, when I read it through with a
strange feeling of standing outside the matter
altogether—a feeling as though those jumbled
sentences of endearment and self-glorification had
been penned by other hands and not by mine.
And with the perusal, I was carried back at a
bound through fifty long years gone past to a
time when the wrinkled face was smooth and the
trembling hand firm and brown, then I drew the
still graceful figure that was standing by my side
nearer to me and smoothed the snow-white hair
AT HOME AGAIN 263

which was once of ebon black, and we both went
back in memory to the days long past, but with no
sorrow for the years which had glided over us
since it had pleased God that we should walk
through life together.

As we posted home, my father explained to me
all that had occurred between my uncle and him-
self, and of the alteration for the better in our
worldly position. A perfect reconciliation between
the brothers had followed immediately upon their
meeting, and a life-long estrangement, the out-
come of pride and jealousy on the part of the elder
man, was atan end. With the sweeping away of
all misunderstandings, natural affection reasserted
itself, and my uncle could not do enough in the
present to atone for his neglect in the past. My
father was now the heir to the family honours,
and Sir Athelstan insisted upon providing him
with an allowance so ample that there was no need
of his retaining the living of Silversands with its
slender stipend and fatiguing duties. My uncle
had suggested that we should all take up our
abode at Tunstall Hall, but to this my father
would not consent, so it was settled that when a
successor could be found for the living, our family
should remove to the Dower House, which was
situated at a corner of the property and then
untenanted. Meanwhile Sir Athelstan would use
his influence to have my name placed upon the
264 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

books of a guardship in England where the duties
were merely nominal, so that much of my time
could be spent at home.

This was the only part of the arrangement
which did not completely fall in with my views,
for I longed to be with Nelson and in the thick
of that history-making epoch, but my father
pointed out that I could at any time be ap-
pointed to a sea-going ship for active service
through the influence of my uncle, and seemed
to think that no harm would arise from my
being apart from the great admiral during his
stay in the Two Sicilies. I did not understand
his meaning then, but I know it now too well.

On first arriving at Silversands, my father had
driven me over to Burnham Thorpe to visit Mr
Nelson. I found the old rector quite unaltered
by his son’s greatness, except that he was more
abstracted in manner than before and appeared
nervous when I told him little anecdotes about
the Court at Palermo, in which Lord Nelson was
the most prominent figure. His worldly position
had visibly improved, for the admiral was a good
son and had provided generously for the comfort
of his only-surviving parent. But, young as I
was, I felt conscious that something was going
wrong, and the embarrassment caused by this
made me glad when the visit came to an end
and my father drove me away.
AT HOME AGAIN 265

Immediately on my return from Tunstall Hall,
I sought out Will Barrett to acquaint him with
the good luck which had befallen me, but, greatly
to my surprise, I found my messmate thoughtful
and gloomy instead of being in his usual cheerful
spirits.

“What's in the wind, old buck?” I asked with
nautical familiarity.

“Come out on the beach and I'll tell you,” was
the reply. “Jack,” he said, when we had gained
the shelter of the little cave which was the scene
of our midnight adventure, “Jack, I have reason
to believe that that cable-laid scoundrel, Steve
Croucher, is about, and, if so, you and I had
better look out for squalls.”

“Steve Croucher here!” I eried in amazement,
. “and you've not set the runners on his track, or
told our fellows, who would man-handle him as
though he were a kippered herring ?”

“T only heard of it this morning, and they told
me at the Rectory that you would be back to-day,
so I waited to consult-you. Perhaps it is a mis-
take, but this is what happened. Last night Bess
Wilson went up to old Croucher’s house’ with a
bottle of brandy, and she was -surprised to find
the room smelling of fresh smoke, and to observe
a pipe lying on the mantelpiece. Now everyone
in Silversands knows that the old chap hates
tobacco and never allows anyone to smoke in his
266 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

house except Steve. This morning a girl came
down for a second bottle of brandy, and the old
man could hardly have drunk an entire bottle in
one night, for he is desperately ill, almost at the
point of death, I believe. Now, as old Croucher
never gives away a thimbleful to a neighbour,
who can all this grog be for except for Steve?”

“But when Steve got away from Messina he
most probably went to Toulon. How can he have
found his way here, where everyone knows him,
and where his life would not be worth five minutes’
purchase ?”

“T can’t tell,” replied Will, doggedly, “but I
know he is here—I feel it.”

“Does Bess Wilson suspect his presence ?”

“T don’t think so, but she suspects that there
is someone staying at old Croucher’s house, for
two lads who were out last night snaring rabbits
mentioned that they had seen a strange man in
the road outside the cottage. What had we
better do, Jack ?”

“Warn Bess Wilson to hold her tongue and
we'll watch the house to-night, Will. “Twill re-
mind us of old times. Cheer up, my hearty! don’t
get down in the dumps; if it is that rascal Steve,
we'll see him hung as high as Haman at the next
Assizes.” But Will Barrett refused to be com-
forted, seeming to be filled with gloomy fore-_
bodings.
AT HOME AGAIN 267

The house inhabited by old Mr Croucher stood
a little off the road in a small garden, and at ten
o'clock that night we took up a position under a
hedge, from whence we could watch the gate and
the front door of the house. There was no exit
from the back. Even before we reached our
hiding-place the inhabitants of Silversands were
all in bed, but we observed a light burning in the
front room of old Croucher’s cottage, which in
itself was a curious circumstance, for he was
niggardly in all matters except the purchase of
strong waters, and never allowed himself the
luxury of a lamp at so late an hour.

“Look, Jack!” whispered my companion, whilst
clutching my arm, “there is a man’s shadow out-
lined against the blind, and it does not belong to
old Mr Croucher, who is almost bed-ridden.”

Whether it was imagination or not I cannot
tell, but, looking at the object indicated, I fancied
that I could distinguish in the imperfect silhouette
the form and features of the arch-traitor Stephen,
and my blood boiled at the thought that this
rascal should have the audacity to re-visit Silver-
sands, even though eighteen months had elapsed
since his base attempt to enrich himself by the
betrayal of the smugglers. The same thoughts
seemed to fill Will Barrett’s mind, for as I laid my
hand upon his arm I could feel the muscles harden
and the nervous clenching of the fist. But, as we
268 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

looked, the shadow disappeared, the front door
opened, and a man walked slowly to the gate
where he halted, looking up and down on either
side, after which he unclosed the wicket and
stepped forward into the road, where he paused
within half-a-dozen yards of our place of conceal-
ment. There was no moon, but the night was
light enough for us to recognise one whose
every attitude we knew so well—it was Stephen
Croucher.

I can only record what took place within my
own breast, but imagine that much the same
feelings animated my companion. All that we
had suffered at the hands of this scoundrel—his
cruel treatment, his attempt to drown us in the
Jacqueline’s boat, his betrayal of the brig’s crew,
and the ruthless murder of these poor fellows by
the bandits whilst he stood by smiling cynically—
all these occurrences rushed through my brain
and filled me with an uncontrollable fury, so that
I sprang up with a loud shout and threw myself
upon him. So sudden and unexpected was the
onslaught that Steve recoiled, and a look of terror
came into his face, for we must have appeared to
him as those risen from the dead, since he had
doubtless put us down as starved to death in the
Calabrian wilds and not to be reckoned with again
on this earth.

“Jack Brandon!” he cried in amazement, but,
AT HOME AGAIN 269

with the touch of my hand upon his collar, his
courage returned—for he was no coward, what-
ever his other faults might be—and he shook
himself free from our grip, a feat which his
superior strength rendered easy.

“Silence! you young whelps!” he hissed out,
for we both continued shouting for assistance.
“Silence! or I will quiet you for good and all.
You won't?” he added as we raised our voices
afresh, for our blood was up and we had no inten-
tion that he should escape us this time. “Then
take that.”

There was a flash and a twinge of pain as a bullet
grazed my shoulder, followed by a low moan from
Will Barrett, who staggered back towards the hedge,
against which he fell heavily. I turned for a
moment, attracted by my companion’s cry, when a
heavy blow, partially broken by my instinctively
raising my arm, descended on my head and I sank
down senseless beside him.
CHAPTER XV
THE BATTLE OF THE BALTIC

SEVERAL hours must have elapsed before I regained
consciousness, and my first sensation was one of in-
tolerable sickness and pain in the head. My clothes
were damp, with the heavy dew, as I thought, but
passing my hand over the left shoulder, I felt the
fingers'sticky and could distinguish that they were
stained with some dark substance—it was_ blood.
At first I had no idea of where I was or of what
had happened, but gradually a low moaning by my
side recalled past events, and I cried feebly, “ Will,
is that you?” but there was no reply. Then I
raised myself into a sitting posture and found that
my head had been resting upon the legs of Will
Barrett, who continued to moan piteously, although
he was unable to answer my oft-repeated inquiries
as to his condition. Filled with anxiety on his
account and my own, and dreading another attack
at any moment, I rose slowly to my feet and looked
towards old Croucher’s cottage, within which the

light was extinguished and no sound of movement
270
THE BATTLE OF THE BALTIC 271

was audible. I then felt for my watch to ascertain
the time, but it was gone, together with my purse
—Stephen Croucher was a common thief as well as
a scoundrel. With each moment my strength re-
turned, and my first care was to place poor Will
Barrett in a more comfortable position by propping
up his head with my coat. Then I made my way
slowly down the hill towards the village in quest
of aid. Although “The Toothsome Herring” lay
at the further end of the place I resolved to go
there, feeling confidence in the quick wits of stout
Bess Wilson. The distance was little above a
third of a mile, but I had to sit down several times
by the way to rest, for my head throbbed so in-
tolerably that I feared my senses would again desert
me. The village was buried in slumber, not even
a prowling cat crossed my path, and when I
hammered at the door of the little inn, the sounds
seemed to reverberate far and wide, and filled me
with a strange dread such as I had not felt before.
For full ten minutes I continued knocking before
any response came, then a light was visible in an
- upper room, the window of which was shortly after
opened and a voice cried angrily, “ Who is there?”
Thank God, it was Bess Wilson.

Half-a-dozen words from me and the girl was
at the door surveying me with looks of wonder
and many exclamations of pity, for I appeared a
miserable object, my hair clotted from the blow
272 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

on my head, and my shirt drenched with blood
from the fresh wound on my left shoulder.

“Don’t mind me, Bess,” I cried, “let us get
Will home or he may die under that hedge before
help comes.”

I had done right in relying upon Bess Wilson
in any case of emergency, and she proved her-
self quite equal to the present occasion. First
she hurried to the bar and brought a glass: of
brandy, which she compelled me to swallow, and
then bustled off to wake old Joe Barrett, after
which she went to the stable and put the pony
between the shafts of the gig with her own
hands.

“You go upstairs and get into bed, Master Jack.
You can never go to the Rectory looking like that.
Pll wash ’ee up a bit directly I come back. Master
and I will go along and fetch Will home. You get
to bed, there’s a dearie.”

But this I absolutely refused to do, so stretched
myself upon a sofa in the parlour to await their
return. Here I lay with a throbbing head en-
deavouring to recall every incident of the struggle
with Stephen Croucher, and filled with mortifica-
tion that the fellow should have eluded the grasp
of justice once more, for that he had escaped was
pretty evident from the loss of my watch and
purse, for he would never have added robbery to
his other crime, had he not seen the way clear
THE BATTLE OF THE BALTIC 273

before him. But my meditations were inter-
rupted by the hasty entrance of my old friend
Dr Mansell, whom clever Bess had found time to
summon. ;

“ Another midnight adventure, Jack?” he said
whilst examining me. “We shall have to lock
you up in your bedroom at night to keep you
out of such scrapes as these. Go out of the room,
you good people,” he added, for the news that
something unusual was happening had reached
the villagers, many of whom thronged the pas-
sage outside in various stages of undress. “It is
nothing much,” he continued, after a close exam-
ination; “only a rap on the head and the skin
grazed on the shoulder, but the small bone of
your left fore-arm is broken, and this probably
saved your life, for if the butt of the pistol had
caught you fairly on the head it would have
fractured the skull. Now, come up with me and
get into bed. Tl come and put the arm into
splints later on. I hear the sound of wheels and
must see to your companion.”

In ten days’ time I was up and about again,
with my arm in a sling, little the worse for my
second midnight adventure, but it was different
with poor Will Barrett, who for several weeks
lay hovering between life and death. The bullet,
after grazing my shoulder, had entered his lung,
inflicting a dangerous, though happily not a

s
274 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

mortal, wound. An inch to the right or left
would have been fatal, but, thanks to his youth
and the strength of his constitution, he ulti-
mately recovered, although the mischief wrought
closed his career in the navy, for the doctors
pronounced that he could never serve afloat again,
and that removal to a warmer climate was neces-
sary to re-establish his health.

The authorities were immediately informed of
Stephen Croucher’s murderous attempt, but Justice
moved slowly in those days and the criminal was
never apprehended.

On the morning following the assault, when the
house was entered, old Croucher was found dead
in his bed with a half-empty brandy bottle beside
him. Nothing of any value was left in the
house, and it was conjectured that Stephen had
carried off the old man’s hoard of money, if he
had one.

I wrote a full account of this night’s doings to
little Nora, and in due course was much gratified
by receiving a letter from Lady Kathleen, offering
Will Barrett a home at the Castle of Taranto, to-
gether with the stewardship of the estate when
he should be of age and qualified by residence in
the country to fill it. “Old Giacomo Basquino,
my present factor,” she wrote, “is advanced in
years, and I must pension him off before long.
For some time past I have resolved to replace
THE BATTLE OF THE BALTIC “275

him by an Englishman, and if Mr Barrett thinks
the post worth his acceptance it will give us
great pleasure. In any case, we shall be de-
lighted to see him here as our guest, and he can
then determine for himself. The Calabrian ‘air
is the best in the world for any affection of the
lungs.”

“Now, you'll see Beppo again,” I said to Will
after reading him this extract—“and Luisa,” I
added, whereupon the invalid’s pale face flushed
scarlet, and he turned his head on the pillow to
hide his confusion. Certain it is that from that
hour he grew better and his good spirits returned,
so that it may safely be inferred. that, in certain
cases, the air of Southern Italy is as good for
the heart as it is reputed to be for the lungs.

Through my uncle’s interest Will Barrett was,
later on, placed upon the books of a frigate going
to the Mediterranean, and invalided at Palermo
when the vessel arrived there: At the same time
I was appointed as midshipman to the guardship
at Chatham, and, some months later on, was trans-
ferred, at my own earnest request, to the thirty-two
gun frigate Alert, and saw some active service in
the West Indies, mainly cutting-out expeditions,
whilst we also captured several deeply-laden vessels
at sea, so that the prize-money gained was consider-
able. But the Alert, owing to the ignorance ex-
isting at the Admiralty and the carelessness or
276 AFLOA’ WITH NELSON

incompetence of the dockyard officials, had been
leaky and rotten from the hour we sailed, so that
a real West Indian hurricane finished her for
the purposes of active service, and we had much
difficulty in bringing the crazy old craft to
England, where she was paid off and broken up
for firewood—a fate which should have befallen
her years before.

By this time Lord Nelson had returned to
England and was the popular hero of the day. I
called on him to pay my respects, and was most
kindly received. When I expressed my intention
of sticking to the sea, notwithstanding the change
in my father’s worldly position, he approved of my
resolution in warm language and offered me a
vacancy in the first ship on which he should hoist
his flag. Thus it came about that early in the year
1801 I was appointed to the St George—a vessel
nearly as crazy as the poor old Alert. In March of
that year the fleet, under Sir Hyde Parker, with
Nelson as his second in command, sailed from
Yarmouth bound for the Baltic, and, after much
delay, owing to the difficulty of the pilotage, passed
through the Sound in single line, with a leading
wind, under a heavy fire from the guns of Elsinore.
By this, however, little or no damage was sus-
tained, and the fleet brought up that night within
fifteen miles of Copenhagen.

Finding the St George far too cumbrous,
THE BATTLE OF THE BALTIC 277

Nelson shifted his flag to the Elephant, a smaller
ship but far better adapted for the plan of attack
which he had formed in his head before even
leaving England, and I had the good fortune to
accompany him in the capacity of atde-de-camp,
a mark of confidence of which I shall ever feel
proud.

Owing to the tardiness of the British in prepar-
ing this expedition, and the tedious delay which
occurred before the fleet assembled and put to
sea, the Danes were allowed time to make ample
preparations against attack.

Nelson took me with him on board a small
craft when he stood in to reconnoitre the defences,
and the formidable nature of the works would
surely have appalled a heart less stout than his.
Eighteen Danish ships were moored inshore in
a line, their sides bristling with cannon. Many
of them were dismasted hulks, and were rather
floating batteries than ships, for they lay so
close to the shore that fresh crews could be
marched on board them over the gangway, and
any loss in fighting men immediately supplied.
‘To the north was constructed a very heavy
battery mounting over sixty guns, whilst the
total line of defence extended to nearly four
miles. All this was sufficiently formidable; but
the Danes had a more powerful auxiliary than
ships and batteries in the intricacies of the
278 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

channel by which alone the town could be
approached. All sailing-marks had been removed,
and the buoys either taken up or purposely
laid down in such positions that any ship
following their guidance would run ashore. I
observed that’ the faces of many of the officers
became clouded upon viewing the preparations
made by the enemy for our reception, and that
in Nelson alone was no anxiety visible, but, on
the contrary, a perfect trust in his own genius
and in the courage of the men he led.

“Had we sailed, gentlemen, ship by ship as
it was ready,” he cried, “the task before us
would have been easy. It is more difficult now,
but, please God, we'll do it.”

The whole annals of naval history do not afford
a parallel to the feat performed by Nelson himself
that evening. From his boyhood he had been
accustomed to the navigation of the dangerous
shoals lying about the mouth of the Thames,
and the knowledge thus early acquired was now
to bear fruit. Incredible as it may seem, the
great admiral, the second in command of the
fleet, entered a small boat when darkness fell,
and actually groped his way along, sounding
as he went and buoying a channel by which his
ships might approach the enemy. This man,
fragile in body and maimed in battle, in place
of deputing this important work to the sub-
THE BATTLE OF THE BALTIC 279

ordinates, whose real duty it was, in his over-
powering anxiety for his king and his country,
faced the darkness, the danger and the biting
cold of a Scandinavian night, and marked a
path by following which victory should again
descend upon the flag he loved so dearly. Of
all the heroic deeds performed by Nelson, I
consider this patient plotting out of a channel,
under the very guns of a powerful enemy, to
be by far the greatest and the worthiest of
imitation by all who would fain tread in his
footsteps. Taking Englishmen all round, there
is no lack of courage or endurance to be found
amongst them, but this was a ‘deed demanding
far greater qualities than mere bravery, and as
an example of personal devotion and unflagging
zeal it has rarely been equalled and never
excelled. I saw him as, in the grey of the
morning, pale, exhausted and drenched, he stepped
over the gangway of the Elephant and went to
rest with the consciousness of duty done, and
if I honoured him before, I learnt to revere
him then.

The whole fleet now dropped down to within
six miles of the town and anchored, when Nelson
went to Sir Hyde Parker with his plan for
attack, for which he asked ten of the smaller
line-of-battle ships, together with all the frigates
and smaller craft. The commander - in - chief
280 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

approved the scheme, and added two line-ot-
battle ships to the number required.

With this squadron — thirty-six sail in all,
including bomb-ketches — Nelson weighed on the
first day of April, and came to in the evening
within two miles of the town, in readiness to
begin the attack at daybreak. Notwithstanding
his fatigue, both mental and bodily, he was in
excellent spirits, joking and laughing with Admiral
Graves and the captains of his ships, who dined
with him on board the Elephant. Then, instead
of retiring to rest, he passed the night in dictat-
ing minute directions as to the particular position
which each separate vessel was to occupy, and
the orders then given were so precise and lucid
that no mistake could arise by any possibility.
This accomplished, he fell asleep, but arose and
breakfasted at six in the morning.

It has always been a matter of surprise that the
Danes did not shell the squadron during the night,
when their fire must have seriously damaged the
ships, but it is to be supposed that they were too
busy with preparations to resist the coming attack
to think of this; in any case, not a gun opened
fire upon us.

At half-past nine the squadron weighed and
stood in towards the batteries, following the marks
which Nelson had laid down. Two of the leading
ships unfortunately took the ground, but served as
THE BATTLE OF THE BALTIC 281

beacons by which the remainder steered a safer
course. As we drew near, the Danish ships and
batteries opened a terrific fire, but not a gun was
returned by the British until each ship had taken
up the station previously allotted to her, which was
ata distance of about two hundred and forty yards
from the enemy. Then our broadsides opened and
the battle became general.

The bare fact of taking up a position accurately
under a galling fire was a splendid exhibition of
seamanship, and showed a perfection in discipline
of which we may well be proud. In an action
such as this, where no manceuvring was required
after the anchors were once dropped, there is little
room or necessity for minute detail. The scene
on board the Elephant was much the same as I
have already described at the battle of the Nile,
except that the fight was now by daylight and not
in the night time. Between decks the men worked
the guns with untiring courage and the same dis-
regard of the shot which thinned their numbers.
From a, little after ten until past one the combat
raged and the fire of the Danes rather quickened
than slackened as fresh reinforcements from the
shore were drafted on board to take the place
of the killed and disabled.

During this time Nelson paced the quarter-deck
to and fro continually, and I stood near at hand
ready to convey any orders, but there were none to
282 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

give. It wasa sheer hammer-and-tongs fight, and
the men needed no encouragement in the perform-
ance of their duty.

It must have been a time of terrible anxiety for
Sir Hyde Parker, who, from the deck of the London,
was watching the progress of the fight, and when
at. half-past one the enemy showed no signs of
yielding, the commander-in-chief made the signal
to discontinue the action. I was close to Nelson
when the flag-lieutenant reported this and asked if
he should repeat it. Then it was that Nelson put
the glass up to his blind eye and replied with grim
humour, “Certainly not. I havea right to be blind
sometimes and I can’t see the signal. Keep mine
for ‘closer action’ flying at the fore.”

But such a deadly cannonade at so short a
distance could not continue longer without its
effect becoming visible, and gradually the enemy’s
fire slackened and several of his ships hauled down
their colours. But matters were complicated by
the batteries on shore firing on the boats sent to
take possession of the prizes, whilst in several
instances these vessels renewed the combat them-
selves, the fresh crews sent on board them not
knowing that they had struck their colours. This
exasperated Nelson greatly, and at half-past two
he sent a letter under a flag of truce to the Crown
Prince of Denmark, threatening to burn all the
prizes if hostilities did not immediately cease.
NELSON SPREAD THE WAX AND IMPRESSED IT CAREFULLY WITH THE
SEAL HANGING TO HIS WATCH.

Page 283.


THE BATTLE OF THE BALTIC 283

I steadied the paper on the rudder-head casing
whilst Nelson penned the missive and sent a
man below for a stick of sealing-wax, declining to
use the wafer which was offered to him. The
messenger was killed, whereupon a wafer was
again extended to the admiral, who rejected it
angrily, stamping his foot and working the stump
of his right arm as he cried, “No, sealing-wax.
Brandon, fetch me sealing-wax !’

I darted below, and brought the desired article,
when Nelson spread the wax and impressed it care-
fully with the seal hanging to his watch. Then he
handed the letter to the officer deputed to take it,
with a smile of satisfaction, and this was the last
incident in the battle of Copenhagen which I am
enabled to record from personal knowledge, for
a moment later I was struck down and became
unconscious of all that passed around me.

There seemed a fatality attached to the bearers
of that ill-omened stick of sealing-was.
CHAPTER XVI

2

“TWAS IN TRAFALGAR’S BAY

WHEN I recovered consciousness, I was lying in a
cot in the cockpit of the Elephant, with surgical
bandages round my head, and a strange feeling of
numbness in my left leg and side. I found that 1
had been knocked down by splinters, one of which
had inflicted an ugly scalp wound, whilst others
had bruised me severely down the left side. It
was evening, and all sound of firing had ceased.
Complete success rested with the British, with
another glorious victory to be inscribed upon the
scroll of Nelson’s fame. By his orders I was re-
moved to my own ship, the St George, and sent
home in the first small craft that sailed for
England. During the next twelve months I
passed my time chiefly at Tunstall Hall, for my
father had now taken up his abode in the Dower
House, and the shaking which I had received
was so severe that it was several months before
I could walk about, and a good deal longer before
I could sit a horse. Nelson had failed in his

attack upon the Boulogne flotilla, and I was
284
TWAS IN TRAFALGAR’S BAY’ 285

impatient to be again with him and my old
messmates, but the doctors peremptorily forbade
my serving afloat until my health was completely
restored.

During this period of idleness I was, again
through my uncle’s interest, kept upon the books of
a guardship, so that I lost no seniority, and it may
easily be believed that I passed a great deal of the
spare time on my hands in writing to little Nora
or her mother. From both of these I received
letters full of sympathy and affection, together with
news of Will Barrett’s arrival at the Castle of
Taranto, and the earnest fashion in which he set
about qualifying himself for the post of factor.
My comrade was never much of a hand with the
pen, but he wrote me one long letter, the larger part
of which was taken up with wonderful accounts of
the festivities at the marriage of Colonel Beppo
and Tessa, whilst the remainder dealt in a desul-
tory fashion with Lady Kathleen and little Nora,
but there was no mention made of Luisa from
beginning to end, which astonished me at first,
although I have ceased to wonder now.

About this time my father received a very
friendly letter from Nelson, acquainting him with
the death of the old Rector of Burnham Thorpe
and expressing the wish to take me with him when
he should again hoist his flag. This happened in
the early summer of 1803, when I was appointed
286 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

to the Victory, in which ship I sailed for the
Mediterranean.

Two years ashore and on service in the Channel,
into the particulars of which I need not enter, had
quite re-established my health, and I was now a
stout lad of eighteen, looking forward eagerly to
my lieutenant’s epaulette which Sir Athelstan was
pressing the Admiralty to confer upon me. This
request, however, the authorities were in no hurry
to grant, and when I left England again it was still
as the wearer of a midshipman’s jacket. But the
coveted honour came in the following year, when
one of the Victory’s lieutenants was accidentally
drowned and I was promoted by Lord Nelson to
fill the vacancy, and that I felt very proud of my-
self in this new position may be easily imagined.

For eighteen weary months we blockaded Toulon,
and it needed all the genius of the great admiral
to maintain the health and keep up the spirits of
his men during that trying time. Once, early in
1805, the French fleet, under Villeneuve, slipped
out owing to a combination of wind and weather
in their favour, and then, as before the battle of ~
the Nile, we scoured the eastern Mediterranean in
search of them, but without success, for they had
returned to port greatly damaged by stress of
weather. But at the end of March they slipped to
sea in good earnest whilst our frigates were nap-
ping, passed through the Straits of Gibraltar, and
TWAS IN TRAFALGAR’S BAY’ 287

steered for Martinique in the West Indies after
being joined by several Spanish ships.

The hunt was up now, and the tedious blockade at
anend. Nelson and his captains had been straining
at the leash for a year and a half. Now the sea-
dogs of Britain were slipped, and the pack swept
westward in pursuit of their quarry. Over the
broad Atlantic, between the beautiful islands of the
Antilles, across the Caribbean Sea and past Trinidad,
sailed our fleet, hoping hourly to overtakethe enemy,
but doomed to disappointment as day after day the
sun set without bringing the foe in sight. Then
news reached us that Villeneuve with his com-
bined fleet had doubled back on Europe, and once
again, in unwearying pursuit, the bows of our ships
were headed eastward. It was a long chase and a
weary chase, but weariness and disappointment
were all forgotten when daylight broke on the
_ morning of the twenty-first of October, showing
the combined fleets of France and Spain on the
eastern horizon, standing to the southward. A great
joy filled the heart of every man and boy in the
British fleet. For long weeks we had hungered to
sight. the enemy; now he lay before us, and it
remained with us to deal with him as British
oak manned by British seamen ever dealt with
the foe under Horatio Nelson.

Again I must impress upon the reader that I am
no historian, and have no intention of describing
288 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

the battle of Trafalgar in these pages. The broad
outlines of this memorable fight are known, or
should be known, to every schoolboy. It is my
province to describe only what passed immediately
around me, and within my personal knowledge,
and if these circumscribed details should awaken a
desire to learn the history of the battle as a whole,
a dozen able writers have set it down in truthful,
graphic and heart-stirring language. Let those
who desire fuller information turn to these records,
and I venture to think that they will rise from
their perusal prouder men — prouder of their
country, of their ships, of their sailors, and of
that great admiral whose motto was the one word
“Duty,” and who yielded up his life in obedience
to its mandates.

The morning was fine and the sca smooth except
for a heavy swell which ran in from the westward.
From the position occupied by the combined fleet,
the wind was absolutely fair for the British, who
bore up and headed towards them with every
stitch of canvas that the ships could carry, in-
cluding studding-sails and such-like flying kites,
Our fleet formed in two divisions, Nelson in the
old Victory leading the weather division, whilst
Collingwood, in the Royal Sovereign, headed the
lee division, which was separated from us by about
two miles. Meanwhile the French and Spanish
fleet, seeing that an engagement was unavoidable,
TWAS IN TRAFALGAR’S BAY’ 289

had gone on the other tack, and now lay with
their heads to the northward, endeavouring to
form line of battle, but accomplishing this so
awkwardly that they were in reality a huddled
mass, sometimes three deep, with the ships of both
nations mixed up indiscriminately. Our admiral’s
plan was to cut through the enemy’s line at about
the twelfth ship from their van, whilst Colling-
wood performed the same manceuvre with the
centre and rear, but at the point where the Victory
was designed to penetrate the enemy lay crowded
together, and it was towards this mass of ship-
ping that we steered.

Nelson had assigned me the station on the poop
and quarter-deck as his azde-de-camp, so that I
was within a short distance of him from the
moment the action began until he received his
mortal wound. I had served with him in two
general actions already and was well aware how
the prospect of a battle raised his spirits and called
forth all that was most genial in his kindly nature,
but never before had I seen him so exhilarated as
on this occasion. As he paced the quarter-deck to
and fro, he had a word and a jest for everyone.
Turning towards a group of youngsters with whom
I was talking, he said laughingly, “This will be a
glorious day for you young gentlemen, for some
of you will knock your epaulette out of the enemy,
and perhaps you may get a pair of swabs, Brandon

T
290 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

Then, accompanied by Captain Hardy and my-
self, he went the round of the several decks,
addressing a few words of encouragement to the
men at their quarters, which were received with
enthusiastic cheers. After this, he returned on
deck and continued his walk to and fro until
eleven o’clock, when he went to his cabin for a
short time to pray for the Almighty help at this
supreme hour. This done, he again went on the
quarter-deck, which he never quitted until carried
below.

Meanwhile, as the sun rose higher the wind
decreased in strength, so that the speed of the fleet
gradually diminished from three to one and a half
knots, and later on, even this light air was killed
by the heavy cannonading.

A little before noon, when we were slowly near-
ing the enemy, Nelson called the flag-lieutenant
from the poop and said that he wished to make
this signal to the fleet—“ Nelson confides that
every man will do his duty.”

“Tf your lordship will substitute ‘expects’ for
‘confides’ it can be made at once. The word
‘confides’ is not in the signal-book and will have
to be spelt, which will take some time.”

Then an officer suggested “ England” in place of
“Nelson,” and the admiral jumped at the change
with avidity.

“Excellent!” he cried, slapping his thigh with
@TWAS IN TRAFALGAR’S BAY’ 2g1

delight, “excellent, ‘England expects that every
man will do his duty.’ Make it at once, Pascoe,”
and he resumed his walk in high glee.

Then the bunting flew aloft and broke, giving
to the world the most soul-stirring words of which
our language is capable, and how deeply it struck
home to the hearts of the English seamen to whom
it was addressed was evidenced by the deep and
prolonged cheers which floated over the water as
in ship after ship its import was made known to
them. Those cheers of confidence in their leader,
‘in themselves, in their king, and in their country,
reached even to the combined fleet, paling the
cheek of many a godless Frenchman, and causing
the sallow Spanish friars to tell their beads afresh
as they slung the wooden crosses from the spanker-
booms of their high-pooped vessels. A strange
sight in itself this union between two nations
differing so greatly—the French governed by an
Imperial military despot and devoid of religion ;
the Spaniards monarchical, priest-ridden, and
steeped to the lips in superstition.

From the quarter-deck we could obtain a good
-view of all that passed around, for Nelson had
forbidden the hammocks, which served as a shield
from grape and musket-shot, to be stowed one
inch higher than usual, and as we ploughed slowly
onward, borne forward more by the swell than by
the wind, all eyes were directed towards the Royal
292 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

Sovereign, which was a mile ahead of the remainder
of the lee division, and fast nearing the enemy.
Suddenly flame and smoke belched forth from the
sides of half-a-dozen French and Spanish ships,
and we could see the shot striking round the
Royal Sovereign, whilst splinters flying, spars
falling, rent sails drooping, and the roar of cannon
told that the battle of Trafalgar had begun; and
again a cheer rose from the British fleet as Colling-
wood’s three-decker stood calmly on without firing
a gun in reply to the enemy’s salvoes. When a
little later the pent-up broadside of the British
ship was poured into the stern of the Santa Ana
that single discharge dismounted twenty of the
enemy’s guns and cost the Spaniard four hundred
men in killed and wounded.

“ Look at that noble fellow Collingwood, how he
takes his ship into action,” cried Nelson, in delighted
tones, and at that same moment it is reported that
Collingwood, turning to his flag-captain on the
deck of the Royal Sovereign, exclaimed, “What
would Nelson give to be here!”

They were more than brothers-in-arms, those
leaders at Trafalgar—they were brothers at heart,
not jealous of each other but jealous only for their
country’s honour.

Slowly but surely the weather division, headed
by the Victory, moved onward, and now a French
ship, the Bucentaure, tried the range with a single
@TWAS IN TRAFALGAR’S BAY’ 293

gun, but the shot fell short. A few minutes later
she tried again and the shot fell alongside of us. A
third time she fired, and the ball passed through
our main topgallant-sail, showing that we were
within range. With our men lying down at their
quarters between the guns, we forged ahead, a
grim silence reigning throughout the ship. Then
a deafening roar arose as eight ships of the enemy’s
fleet poured their concentrated broadside into the
Victory’s bows. ‘Now followed the crashing of
timber, the falling of spars, and the cries of the
wounded, but we fired no shot in return, standing
sullenly on until we could reach the close quarters
which Nelson loved. Our men were falling rapidly
—a double-headed shot killed eight marines on
the poop, besides wounding several others—and
our mizzen topmast was hanging over the side,
shot away between the cap and the cross-trees
But soon our turn came as we passed so closely
under the stern of the Bucentawre that only three
or four yards separated the ships. Then the bow
earronade of the Victory, loaded with shot and a
keg containing five hundred bullets, was slapped
‘into the Frenchman’s stern cabin windows; and
as we forged slowly ahead, each gun on the lar-
board broadside was discharged into the enemy’s
stern at such close quarters that her woodwork
was burnt and crumbled, whilst the black smoke
from the charred fabric rolled in dense clouds
204 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

through our open ports, almost suffocating the
men below and covering those on deck with black
grime. This terrible broadside inflicted the same
damage upon our adversary as Collingwood’s had
wrought upon the Santa Ana, and by this single
discharge the Bucentaure was virtually disabled.
This happened at about half-past twelve, and, as
we slowly floated onward, it became evident that
the enemy’s ships were so closely massed that it
was impossible for the Victory to pass between
them, so Nelson directed Captain Hardy to fall on
board anyone of them, and the Redoubtabdle, then
lying on the Bucentaure’s lee quarter, was selected.
As we drew near, the Frenchman closed his lower-
deck ports and in a few seconds the two ships lay
alongside of each other and were prevented from
drifting apart by our topmast studding-sail boom-
iron hooking into the gear of the Frenchman’s
foremast. We continued firing into this new an-
tagonist, and at this time the smoke lay so thick
around that it was impossible to see what was
happening at a hundred yards distant. The
fore and main-tops of the Redoubtable were
armed with small brass cohorns, and several sharp-
shooters were in her mizzen-top, which, from the
position of the two ships, was not more than
fifteen yards from the Victory’s quarter-deck.
Overlooking our upper deck, the Frenchmen in
the tops were able to take deliberate aim, and
@TWAS IN TRAFALGAR’S BAY’ 205

inflicted serious loss upon our men, who were fight-
ing without cover of any kind. Observing the cool
way in which the fellows in the Frenchman’s
mizzen-top came forward, fired, and then retired
to load afresh, I got two or three marines together
and, with muskets, we managed to thin their
numbers considerably, but there were two French-
men especially who fired methodically and _per-
tinaciously, and one of these particularly attracted
my attention, for something in his appearance and
carriage seemed familiar to me. He was dressed
in the uniform of an officer, and was evidently in
command of the party, whilst the other was,
apparently, a sergeant, though whether a marine
or a soldier I could not tell. The latter fellow
came forward and fired, and,-looking round a
moment later, I saw Nelson lying on the deck,
with Captain Hardy endeavouring to raise him,
Then the French officer advanced in such a manner
that I could sev his face clearly—a strong beard and
whiskers planted out the cheeks and chin, but I
recognised him in a moment—it was my old enemy,
Stephen Croucher.

I had armed myself with the musket and cart-
ridge-box of a wounded marine, and a midshipman
who stood near me had done the same.

“ Johnstone,” I said to him hurriedly, “do you
see that French scoundrel who is just going to fire ?
Shoot him. I'll give you achance,” and at the same
296 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

moment I cried at the top of my voice, “ Mizzen-
top there—Stephen Croucher.”

The effect was magical. The man paused in
taking aim and stared wildly round in search of
the spot from whence the voice proceeded, but I
was standing on the poop, nearly hidden by the
mizzen-mast, and he could not see me.

“Stephen Croucher,’ I roared again, stepping
forward from my shelter into full view, and then
_ our eyes met. At the same instant I heard the
discharge of Johnstone’s weapon, saw Croucher
drop his musket, fling his arms up, and stagger
backwards against the mast for support, but his -
heel caught in a coil of rope and he fell back-
wards over the fore part of the top, struck the
collar of the mizzen-stay, and came heavily on to
the deck beneath; where he lay motionless and
apparently dead.

“Now for the sergeant, sir,” cried Johnstone ;
“he’s the chap that shot the admiral. He'll come
forward in a minute to fire again.”

Two marines who had heard these words were
on the lookout also, and when the Frenchman
appeared again, all three fired, and he sank into
the top, a motionless heap, although whether he
was killed or only wounded I do not know and
never found out, for at that moment I heard
Captain Hardy calling my name.

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“TWAS IN TRAFALGAR’S BAY’ 207

me news of the admiral. He is wounded, and
they have taken him below.”

I was so much excited by this unexpected
meeting with Stephen Croucher, and the fate
which had befallen him, that I scarcely realised
all that was contained in Captain Hardy’s words
until I had reached. the orlop deck and found
the surgeon and chaplain bending over my patron
and benefactor, examining the wound which was
caused by the French sergeant’s bullet entering
the left shoulder and striking downwards to the
spine. They had stripped him of his clothes and
laid him upon a mattress, and he was speaking
in feeble tones to those nearest. to him, but I
could not distinguish the words he said.

The scene in the cockpit resembled a slaughter-
house, for the dead and dying were lying all
around ; freshly wounded men were brought below
every minute, and the assistant surgeons, with
sleeves tucked up and blood-stained arms, were
performing their gruesome task with unremitting
energy. The atmosphere was suffocating and
smoke-laden, the thunder of the guns above was
. deafening, and the shrieks of the wounded under
the knife completed the horror of the scene.

It was nearly a quarter-of an hour before I
could find an opportunity of asking Dr Beatty
for his report, and it needed no words of his to
tell me that the hero had received his death
298 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

wound, for I read the dread tidings too plainly
in the surgeon’s face. Then, grief-stricken and
with numbed faculties, I stood gazing at the
slender form of the chief who was so dear to me
before turning to ascend the ladder. But in that
moment Nelson’s eyes had fallen upon me, and
he beckoned me to his side.

“Are you hurt?” he asked, for then, as ever,
he was mindful of others.

“No,” I stammered; “Captain Hardy sent me
down to ask after your lordship.”

“Tell Hardy to come to me at once.... Re-
member me to your father, Brandon.... Send
Hardy to me.”

Scarcely was my head above the combings of
the quarter-deck hatchway than Captain Hardy’s
voice reached me, sharp and incisive, “Call the
men up from the main-deck quarters, Brandon.
Hurry them up quickly, for those rascals are
going to board us.”

With a cheer the men obeyed the order and
rushed: on the upper deck, which was now nearly
deserted owing to the fire of the French sharp-
shooters in the tops, and the absence of many
of our fellows who were carrying their wounded
comrades below. The Frenchmen aloft had made
this condition of things known, and the Redoubt-
able’s crew were preparing to throw themselves
on board the Victory. Captain Adair mustered
@TWAS IN TRAFALGAR’S BAY’ 209

his marines to assist in repelling the attack, but
we were few in number when compared with the
foe, and the fight was a desperate one. With
pike and cutlass we thrust and cut at the invaders
as they swarmed into our channels, whilst every
now and then a musket or pistol cracked, but
the work was mainly done with the cold steel,
and within five minutes we had tumbled the
Frenchmen back upon their own decks, where
the wounded and dying lay in heaps. They were
brave fellows and the attempt was a gallant one,
whilst our success cost us dearly, for in this
affair alone we lost eighteen killed, including
Lieutenant Ram and Captain Adair of the marines,
besides more than that number wounded. With
this attempt the resistance on board the Redoubt-
able may be said to have ended.

Directly it was possible, I delivered my report
to Captain Hardy, together with the message from
the admiral, and the change that came over that
officer's face when he heard the sad tidings will
ever remain in my memory. He turned away
from me and walked under the poop, where he
-remained for several minutes endeavouring to
conquer his emotion. Then he rejoined me and
bade me descend again to the cockpit to ascertain
if no hope remained, and to tell Nelson that he
would come below the moment the safety of the
ship permitted him to leave the deck.
300 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

The wounded in the boarding affair were being
treated -when I arrived. at the cockpit, and the
scene was even more ghastly than before, but it
is needless to dwell on such details. Even during
my short absence the admiral had grown weaker
and was supported in a recumbent position by
the chaplain and another. He saw me and
murmured, “Where is Hardy?” Whereupon I
delivered the captain’s message, and he then
asked eagerly, “How goes the battle?”

I knew nothing of what was passing outside
our own ship, and could only answer vaguely that
our men were behaving nobly, but ‘shortly after-
wards Captain Hardy came below, and the meet-
ing between the dying chief and the man whom
he loved was most affecting. Of course I drew
out of earshot, but saw Hardy bend over the
admiral and kiss him on the forehead. Then I
heard Nelson say in a stronger voice, “How
many of the enemy have struck?”

“Fourteen, my lord.”

“None of our ships, I hope, Hardy?”

“There's no fear of that, my lord,” was the
reply, at which the admiral’s head sank back
whilst a gratified smile played upon his lips.

Having disposed of the Redoubtable, our guns
were turned upon other ships of the French and
Spanish fleet, but the heaviest part of the fight-
ing was already over. Once again I descended
TWAS IN TRAFALGAR’S BAY’ 301

to the cockpit, at about half-past four, and found
Nelson still alive, but evidently sinking fast.
From time to time he muttered in broken
sentences, and the last words I heard from his
lips were, “Thank God, I have done my duty!”

Then the heroic spirit passed away so gently
that even those who were supporting and aiding
him were unconscious of its flight, and the greatest
sea-captain that the world has ever seen lay
dead in his own ship, his requiem the roar of
the cannon, and the crown of victory lying on
that chilled brow now powerless to support it.
Could his country or those who loved him best
wish for a better ending to the career of Horatio
Nelson ?
CHAPTER XVII
MY FIRST COMMAND

In all books dealing with the sea which it has
been my lot to read, the author terminates his
account of a battle with the last shot fired and
the certainty of victory resting with one side or
the other. He enumerates the casualties and the
number of prizes taken, and leaves the general
reader to infer that the victors have nothing
further to do but to lug the captured vessels into
port, draw the prize-money forthwith, and enter
upon a round of jollifications in which girls and
fiddles bear a prominent part, whilst grog is
swallowed by the hogshead, and tobacco smoked
by the ton.

There is a story that some benign fairy told
an old seaman that any three wishes he could
formulate would be granted. The first wish was
soon disposed of—* All the grog in the world.”
The second was equally easy—“ All the "baccy in
the world.” But the third was a complex and
harassing business which occasioned the old shell-
back grave and anxious thought, and he solved

302
MY FIRST COMMAND 303

the question by desiring—‘ More ’baccy and more
grog.”

Now “’baccy. and grog” are all very well in
their way and at the proper time, but, as a matter
of fact, there is no room for either after a general
action in which the ships engaged have suffered
damage. Indeed, it may almost be said that with
the close of the battle the hardest part of the
work begins. Certainly this was the case after
the battle of Trafalgar. Then ships, which a few
hours before had been clothed in canvas from
truck to water-line, lay wallowing in the heavy
swell, dismasted and helpless, with sides rent by
cannon-shot and water pouring into their holds
through a dozen orifices. Some, as was the case
with the Victory, had lost their steering-gear; in
others the rudders were knocked clean away ;
whilst all had suffered damage which it required
the most strenuous efforts of their crew to repair,
more particularly as night was falling, the wind
freshening, and a rock-bound coast, not to mention
shoals, lay under the lee. Before Lord Nelson’s
death, he had impressed upon Captain Hardy the
-necessity of anchoring, but when this was told
to Collingwood, now the commander-in-chief, he
rejected the advice, and in so doing that great
officer showed, I venture to think, an error of
judgment. He ordered the fleet, together with
the captured vessels, to stand out to sea, but their
304 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

crippled condition rendered many of the prizes
unable to do this, nor were our ships able to tow
them, having quite enough on their hands in keep-
ing themselves off the rocks. Thus it happened
that the fruits of this great victory were snatched
from us by wind and weather, and many prizes
which would have proved valuable additions to
the British navy were burnt, scuttled, or driven
ashore, where they became total wrecks, in some
instances with great loss of life. Certain it is
that such ships as anchored according to Nelson’s
advice rode out the gale and were saved, and this, I
think, affords a last instance of the great admiral’s
unerring judgment.

On board the Victory all hands were engaged
in repairing damages, but the old ship was too
much knocked about to do any good by herself,
and she was taken in tow by the Neptune, which
had suffered far less severely in every respect.

Captain Hardy ordered me to take charge of
our late enemy, the Redoubtable, giving me a
prize crew of fifty hands from the Téméraire
and Swiftsure, and a couple of midshipmen. I
gathered a few traps together and went on board
with my men, wondering at the strange train of
circumstances which led to my being placed in
command of the vessel in which Stephen Croucher
had served, and this thought prompted me to take
with me that rascal’s written confession concerning
MY FIRST COMMAND 305

the burning of L’Orient, which had remained in
my possession ever since I picked it up in the
cabin of the Leander, for some instinct had warned
me that this man and I were destined to meet
again,

Accustomed as I was to scenes of the kind, the
sight presented to my view when I stepped over
the gangway of the Redoubtable far exceeded
in horror anything that I had ever witnessed.
On mustering the crew, I found that out of her
complement of six hundred and forty men nearly
two-thirds were killed or wounded, whilst her
hull was riddled like a colander with shot, and
the water was pouring in so rapidly that the
chain-pumps had immediately to be set to work
or she would have foundered under us. This task
I allotted to the prisoners, dividing them into
three gangs for the purpose, and during the whole
time that we were on board her, whether by night
or by day, the clank of the chain-pumps never
once ceased. The Frenchmen knew that they
were working for their lives, so needed no incen-
tive to perform the task. ‘Two of the carpenter's
crew had been sent with me, and these men
plugged some of the most dangerous shot-holes-
between wind and water, but many could not
be reached, and the ship was rolling too heavily
to permit of men being lowered over the side
to nail lead over the apertures. After the first

U
306 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

cursory inspection, I felt convinced that only a
miracle could keep her afloat, but I did my best,
and was ably seconded by my officers and men.
Our first duty was to clear the decks of the
wounded and the dead which still cumbered them
the former were carried below and placed under
the care of the French surgeons, whilst the latter
were thrown overboard without distinction of
rank. This may seem inhuman, but it was not
so in reality, for the case was a desperate one at
best, and our duty lay towards the living rather
than the dead. This done, we searched about for
material to rig jury-masts, but found there was
no spar left on board capable of serving this
purpose, every stick on the booms being cut to
pieces by shot.

Meanwhile we were rolling like a log on the
water, whilst drifting slowly to the southward and
eastward, and no ground-tackle remained with
which I could anchor, so I sent one of my midship-
men to the Royal Sovereign to represent my help-
less condition to the admiral, who at once ordered
the Swiftsure to take the Redoubtable in tow.
When this was done, and we were ploughing
along sullenly in her wake, I felt that I had
accomplished all that lay within my power for the
preservation of the prize, and I was by this time so
thoroughly exhausted with fatigue, anxiety and
mental distress for the irreparable loss which I
MY FIRST COMMAND 307

had sustained in the death of my patron that,
after swallowing a few mouthfuls of biscuit and
wine, I flung myself, dressed as I was, into a cot
and slept heavily for several hours. When I
awoke and went on deck I found that the wind
had freshened almost to a gale, and when day-,
light broke the scene was one of indescribable
melancholy. In every direction were to be seen
ships partially disabled themselves, yet endeavour-
ing to tow others in a worse condition from the
destruction that awaited them on a rocky coast.
To the eastward could be seen some less fortunate
driven onward to their doom, and from the ship I
commanded came the dull clank of the pumps
which showed that we ourselves were engaged in a
fierce fight with the elements, and it seemed to me
that the Redoubtuble had settled deeper in the
water than on the previous evening. I sent for
one of the carpenter’s crew and ordered him to
sound the well. The man returned with a grave
face and reported five feet of water in the hold—
the leak had gained a foot on us during the night,
although the labour at the pumps had been in-
-cessant. Unless the wind died away or shifted so
as to make it possible to hold our course for
Gibraltar, my first command was doomed.

I descended to perform my toilet, and hardly
recognised the smoke-blackened image that gazed
at me out of the mirror, but a tub and a change
308 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

of clothes soon altered this, and I sat down to
breakfast with several of the French officers.
My Leander experiences had not given me a very
exalted opinion of the naval gentlemen of that
nation, but I immediately found that these were
a widely different set of men. It might have been
the common danger which threatened us all, both
victors and vanquished, which conduced to this,
but, in any case, they were dignified amidst their
misfortunes, and courteous in bearing, a fact which
‘in a measure lightened the onerous duties imposed
upon me. Captain Lucas, who commanded the
Redoubtable during the battle, had been removed,
wounded, to the Téméraire, but her first lieutenant,
who remained on board, proved a gentlemanly
fellow, who spoke English with tolerable fluency.
He promised me all the aid that he and his men
could afford in fighting the gale, but frankly
avowed that, if an opportunity occurred later
on, they would try to recapture the ship.

“Forewarned, forearmed,” I replied, “and don’t
forget that we are under the guns of the
Swiftsure.”

He smiled, and then this delicate subject was
dropped, but I conceived an immediate liking for
this outspoken fellow, and felt instinctively that
he was one who might be trusted. Then, after a
few general remarks, I turned the subject to the
Redoubtables sharpshooters aloft, and questioned
MY FIRST COMMAND 309

my companion as to the bearded officer who had
fallen from the mizzen-top.

“Oh, yes,” he replied, “that was Monsieur
Legros, who served on board L’Orient at the battle
of the Nile. He was a troublesome fellow, and
would never have risen in the service. By the
way, he speaks English perfectly—so perfectly
that many of us thought he must be one of your
countrymen. His fighting days are over now,
poor fellow! for his leg was amputated yesterday,
and he was struck in the shoulder as well. He
is lying below with the wounded now, unless he
died during the night. You seem interested in
this man, monsieur. Can you’ever have met
him ?”

“Met him?” I repeated bitterly. “Yes, I have,
and to my cost. That fellow, whom you call
Legros, is an Englishman named Stephen Croucher,
and, perhaps, the greatest scoundrel that ever trod
a plank or deceived honourable men.”

The lieutenant rose to his feet and replied with
much dignity, ‘ Monsieur, the fortune of war has
made us your prisoners, but it does not compel us
-to listen to calumnies concerning a brave man who
wears the French uniform. When the proper time
arrives I shall hold you answerable for these
words. ‘Monsieur, I wish you good-morning,” and
he bowed, preparatory to leaving the table,
followed by the other Frenchmen who, although
310 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

they did not understand what was said, saw that
something disagreeable had happened.

“Stay, gentlemen,” I cried, “it is not the
custom with British officers to advance charges
which they are unable to prove. Grant me your
attention for a few minutes, and I will show you
what manner of man this Legros is.”

They all re-seated themselves, whereupon I
briefly related to the lieutenant every incident
of Stephen Croucher’s life which lay within my
knowledge, and, as I piled fact upon fact, I could
see from his face that he believed me and that
his opinion was changed.

“Mon Diew /” he cried when I came to the in-
cident of the poor Frenchmen so basely murdered
in Calabria. “Mon Diew! this is horrible.”

“There is more to come,” I added, and proceeded
with my narrative down to the time when he had
stretched me senseless in the road and robbed me
of my watch and purse.

“ He has the watch still,” broke in the lieutenant,
excitedly ; “describe it.”

I did so, whereupon he spoke rapidly to his
brother officers, and then said to me, in English,
“We have all seen it, but he would never let us
look inside the cover. Now we can prove it, and
you will recover your property.”

Although I am no lawyer and still less an orator,
Thad reserved the most convincing proof for the last.
MY FIRST COMMAND Bit

“Tixcuse me for a moment, gentlemen,” and I
left the cabin to return immediately, holding in
my hand the packet which I had so carefully
preserved through seven long years without any
certainty that it could ever be of service to
me.

I found the lieutenant talking rapidly to his
brother officers, evidently relating to them the
main features of the case, but, excited though all
were, they immediately became silent on my entry,
and fixed their eyes upon me with eager curiosity.

“Now, monsieur,” I continued, “it may seem a
wonderful thing that I should have preserved this
document, and almost a miraculous circumstance
that I should find myself once again on board a
ship with the man who wrote it. These pages,
gentlemen, were penned on board His Britannic
Majesty’s frigate Leander by a traitor then under
sentence of death for serving in arms against his
country. To prove his innocence he made the
confession which I now hold in my hand. Read
it, monsieur, and translate it to your countrymen.
Let them form the tribunal by whom this man
- shall be judged and-the accuracy of my story
substantiated, for the writer is— Monsieur Legros,
otherwise Stephen Croucher,’ and I handed the
paper to the lieutenant, whose arm was already —
outstretched to receive it.

The French are an excitable nation, and the
312 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

various emotions aroused in their breasts are
easily to be read in their faces.

It was a strange scene which I witnessed, and
was instrumental in creating, on board that
doomed ship—a scene heightened in impressive-
ness by the dull clank of the pumps rising from
below, and the heavy thud of the seas as they
broke against the shot-torn timbers. These were
ever-present reminders of the peril in which we
stood, but all this was forgotten by the excited
Frenchmen as they clustered round their leader
and listened to the words he read. Two of their
number had served on board L‘Orient, and, when
the lieutenant reached Croucher’s callous avowal
that the great ship had been fired by his hand,
these men became almost frenzied, and were with
difficulty restrained from rushing below to wreak
their vengeance on the arch-traitor.

“Monsieur,” said the lieutenant, handing me
back the paper, “I withdraw every word that I
said, and I blush that such a rascal should have
found harbour under the tricolour.”

I grasped the hand which he extended to me,
and said, “If you will accompany me, monsieur,
we will go below together, and you shall witness
the meeting between this man and myself. Please
request these gentlemen to remain here until our
return.” ;

The cockpit in which the wounded Frenchmen .
MY FIRST COMMAND 313

lay was horribly foul from bad air and the wreak
of bilge-water, and filled with the groans and
cries for drink of the many sufferers. Stretched
on a mattress, we found Stephen Croucher lying
with closed eyes, which opened on our approach
and fixed themselves upon me with a look of bitter
hatred, and this in itself was sufficient to have
convinced my companion had he needed further
evidence. But the wounded man, in his fury,
threw aside all disguise, and assailed me with a
torrent of foul language and imprecations in his
native English. Then he turned upon my com-
panion, the lieutenant, and, speaking in French,
poured forth a string of invective against the
Empire, the Republic and the nation in general.

“But Stephen Croucher will die game, you
young parson’s whelp!” he yelled, “and glories
that he dies under the Union Jack, and not under
the miserable tricolour. Take your watch, Jack
Brandon, and clear off out of my sight. Leave
me alone. “Tis the first and last favour I shall
ever ask of you.”

Disgusted and inexpressibly shocked, I seized
‘my companion’s arm and hurried him away, only
too glad to escape from the horrors of that noisome
place and the presence of the impenitent ruffian ,
but scarcely had we set our foot upon the ladder
when cries of terror and astonishment from the
wounded men around caused us to turn back and
314 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

look in the direction towards which their eyes
were riveted. Then we saw that Stephen
Croucher had torn the ligatures from his wounded
stump and was bleeding to death. We fled from
the spot sick with horror, and filled with a great
pity for this hardened sinner who, under better
guidance, might have proved a man as honourable
and good as he was undoubtedly brave.
Reaching the deck, I found that the gale had
increased in violence, and that the Redoubtable
was straining so heavily on the towing-hawsers
that I feared they would part at every plunge.
On sounding the well, five and a half feet of
water was reported, so that the leak was gain-
ing upon us with great rapidity. The French
lieutenant looked very grave and went below
with his officers to urge the men to further
exertions at the pumps, and so throughout that
weary day we continued fighting, but without
success, for, as the ship sank deeper in the water,
the leak gained to such a degree that further
resistance became manifestly useless. That she
could not remain afloat for many hours was now
so evident that, with bitter regret, I ordered a
signal of distress to be hoisted on the stump of
the foremast—all that it cost me to do this in
my first command may be well imagined.
Although the sea was running high, the Swift-
sure responded nobly to our appeal, and immedi-
MY FIRST COMMAND 315

ately sent her boats to our assistance. With the
greatest difficulty the wounded were got up from
below and lowered over the side. Then a number
of the prisoners followed, together with the two
midshipmen and some of the prize crew. But,
rightly or wrongly, I could not make up my
mind to abandon the ship whilst the Swiftsure
still held her in tow. When the boats had carried
off their freight, the Swiftsure stood on again,
whilst I and the few who were left with me set
to work in the construction of rafts in the hope
of saving our lives by them should the boats be
unable to return when the vessel foundered. By
ten o'clock that night the Redoubtuble’s stern had
settled so deeply in the water that she might be
expected to sink at any moment, and not until
then did the gallant Swiftsure cut the hawsers
which attached us to her. Then in the darkness,
amidst a storm of rain with the lightning flash-
ing and the thunder pealing, we launched the rafts
and scrambled upon them, leaving the Redoubtable
to her fate with several hands still on-board who
refused to trust themselves to the rafts. Many
‘were drowned in leaving the ship and others
maimed by being jammed between the side and
the floating spars, but eventually the raft on
which I had taken refuge, with the French
lieutenant and some twenty others, floated clear
of the ship, and we saw her no more.
316 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

For five hours we lay knocking about in the
open sea with the waves breaking over us and
in as great misery as it is possible for the human
mind to conceive of. Several of our number were
washed off the frail support, and we could only
listen to their drowning cries without the power
to extend a hand to help them. Those who re-
mained lashed themselves to the spars with ropes,
but the structure was so heavily laden that it only
rose slowly when a wave had swept over it so
that we were all cruelly bruised and half-drowned,
besides suffering greatly from thirst.

But at about three o'clock in the morning a
large ship was discovered close to us and our cries
for help attracted the attention of those on board.
It proved to be the Swiftsure, and again she
lowered her boats and sent them to our assistance.
With infinite trouble we were rescued and taken
on board, and the occupants of two other rafts, of
whose proximity we had no idea, were picked up
also.

I was so stiffened by cramp and so completely
exhausted by fatigue and exposure that I had to
be hoisted on board more dead than alive, and was
at once put to bed in a cot slung between the guns
on the main deck. But, weary as I was, the day
broke before the sleep which I so greatly needed
came to me, and when, later on, I awoke, I was
in a burning fever. For days, I am told, I re-
MY FIRST COMMAND 317

mained unconscious, raving incoherently of Nelson,
of Stephen Croucher and of the miseries of the
raft, and when I regained my senses I found
myself on board a frigate already in the Bay of
Biscay on the way to England.

You'll get on all right now,” said the doctor,
after feeling my pulse and answering the ques-
tions which I put to him as to my whereabouts.
“We've only to put a little strength into you now,
Captain Brandon.”

“Captain Brandon?” I cried in astonishment.

“Yes, Captain Brandon. The admiral signed
your commander’s commission before we left Gib-
raltar. Ah,” he continued chuckling, and rubbing
his hands with satisfaction, “I told them that the
news would do you more good than all my drugs.”

And he was right, for in a week I could sit on
deck, and was able to go down the gangway
unaided when the frigate arrived at Spithead.
CHAPTER XVIII
LEONORA DI BRANCANOVA

THE frigate in which I found myself was crowded
with wounded men from the battle of Trafalgar,
for whom no proper accommodation could be
found in Gibraltar, and her arrival caused great
excitement throughout the town, more particu-
larly amongst the many families who had rela-
tives serving in Nelson’s fleet. There was no
telegraph in those days, and the despatches sent
home were meagre in detail, so friends remained
in anxiety until they could learn by word of
mouth whether or not those they loved were
amongst the sufferers,

Directly our number had been made, after enter-
ing the Needles, the news of our approach had been
noised abroad, and by the time we dropped our
anchor at Spithead a hundred wherries were
clustered round the ship, their occupants begging
permission to come on board even before the sails
were furled. It was a most affecting sight—one
that brought home in full force all the horrors of

war and the desolation which it creates on many
318
LEONORA DI BRANCANOVA 319

a humble hearthstone. Mothers, daughters and
sisters sat in those boats, with eyes straining at the
ship in quest of a familiar form ; sometimes a pale
face was recognised peeping through a main deck
port, and then cries of joy arose from those to whom
the wounded man belonged, and questions were
eagerly put by a hundred anxious hearts, the replies
to which brought comfort to some, whilst a low
wailing, accompanied by bitter tears, arose from
others when a sorrowful shake of the head showed
that their worst forebodings were fulfilled. These
scenes were multiplied when the boats were allowed
alongside and the women in them came on board.
Some laughed hysterically as they threw their arms
around a maimed husband or son, but, for the most
part, they wept silently, retiring into secluded
places and talking in whispers, for rigid discipline
was relaxed on this occasion, and these poor
mourners were allowed the run of the whole ship.

In virtue of my newly-acquired rank, I was
taken ashore in the frigate’s gig and then drove to
the George Hotel, where I was received with every
mark of respect when it became known that I had
not only fought in the Victory but had been one
of Nelson’s favourite officers. Then it was that
I perceived how greatly sorrow predominated over
joy in the hearts of the English when the battle of
Trafalgar was considered as a whole. That it was
a glorious victory all acknowledged, but pride was
320 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

swallowed up in deep regret at the great cost at
which it was bought.

The body of the dead hero lay in the painted
hall at Greenwich awaiting removal on the follow-
ing day to its final resting-place in St Paul’s
Cathedral, and a look of gloom was visible on every
face, for all knew—particularly the inhabitants of
this seaport town—that the great man whom
England had lost left a blank which would never
again be filled.

I remember how strange it appeotell to me, when
seated in the coffee-room of the George, that none
of the furniture moved and that the floor was
steady under my feet. It created a feeling akin to
that experienced by others on finding themselves
afloat. For twenty months on end I had been at
sea without once setting foot on shore, and had
become so habituated to unconsciously adapting
myself to the movements of the vessel that the
absence of motion in the floor I trod seemed strange
and bewildering, and this curious sensation lasted
for several days.

I slept that night at the hotel, having written
to inform my father of my arrival and despatched
another letter to little Nora with the news of my
safety. On the following morning I posted to
Guildford, for I was too weak to perform the
entire journey without a break, and on the second
day reached London, where I put up at the hotel
LEONORA DI BRANCANOVA 321

in Covent Garden which I had ‘notified to my
father. Communication was not rapid at that.
time, and four days elapsed before my father’s
arrival. On his appearance I noticed that he was
in deep mourning, and on my anxiously inquiring
the reason for this he informed me that my Uncle
Athelstan had died unexpectedly five weeks before,
after a short illness.

This came as a relief, for my thoughts had
immediately turned to my mother or little Emily,
but when my father added, “He spoke often and
_ kindly of you, Jack, and bade me tell you that he
was proud of the way in which you were keeping
up the honour of the family,” then the memory of
all that this stern, sorrow-stricken, old man had
done for me—his generosity and kindness shown
in a hundred ways—came back to me and touched
my heart although it had small room for fresh
sorrow with Nelson so newly laid to rest.

After this I reported myself at the Admiralty,
where I had a pleasant interview with Lord St
Vincent, who asked me many questions concerning
my patron’s last moments, and he was pleased to
say that the reports received of my conduct were
very satisfactory, and that my promotion by Col-
lingwood to the rank of commander was confirmed,
concluding with a pretty broad hint that another
step would soon be conferred upon me.

“Your uncle, poor Sir Athelstan Brandon, used

x
322 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

to worry us a good deal to push you on, young
gentleman,” he added with a smile, as I blushed
and bowed my acknowledgments, “and I only
wish that all those we are asked to advance had
such a record and such claims as you,” with which
words the little man shook me kindly by the hand
and I retired from the room full of gratification
at this gracious reception.

We posted to Tunstall Hall, where my dear
mother stood on the broad flight of steps leading
to the hall ready to receive us, and it pleased me
to see how easily and naturally the country
parson’s quiet wife had assumed the position of a
county lady and the chatelaine of a stately house.
As for little Emily, she was little no longer, and I
could scarcely believe that the tall, pretty girl of
eighteen, who clung fondly round my neck, was
once the child that I had so often led into mischief
in the old days at Silversands.

After I had been a week at home, my mother
observed a letter addressed in my hand to little
Nora which I had dropped into the post-box in the
hall, and she forthwith began to question me—as
is the way with mothers—concerning that young
lady, for I was now the heir to a large property
and great wealth, so that it was of importance to
my parents to know whether my affections were
really fixed or whether this correspondence with the
Calabrian princess was only the continuation of a
LEONORA DI BRANCANOVA 323

boyish romance. I told her frankly that my love
had grown rather than lessened during the eight
years which had elapsed since I saw little Nora.
But, as in Emily’s case, the child had now de-
veloped into a young woman, and although her
letters indicated the same constancy to me that
I bore to her, still, in fairness, the youthful plight-
ing of our troth could not be held binding on her
until she. had seen me at man’s estate and had
learnt to know me in that condition.

“T do not think that anything will alter either
of us,” I said, “but she is a great heiress in her
own country, with large estates and an ancient
name, so of course I should like to see her as
soon as possible, and find out how matters stand
for myself.”

To this my mother assented, but it was not easy
to know how a journey to Calabria could be
effected at a time when a British and French army
were actually confronting each other in Southern
Italy, and when the whole of that country was in
aturmoil. But all plans to surmount this difficulty
were suspended for a while at the urgent request
of my father, to whom my desire had been made
known by my mother. I do not think that at
this time either of my parents were greatly pleased
at the alliance I proposed to form, and I know
now that both thought a visit to Calabria would
be the best chance of dispelling from my mind the
324 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

romance of my boyhood and the vision of the
enchanted princess.

The two Sicilies had few nobles of great wealth,
and it seemed most unlikely to them that the Court
would permit their greatest heiress to be carried
off by an enterprising young sea-captain. In
addition, there was every chance that the girl
would have altered her mind by the time I met
her, so that altogether the chances against me were
great, and the dream of my youth would be broken
through the natural course of events and not by
undue opposition on the part of my parents.

But to leave at present was quite impossible, and
for this reason. The Brandons had represented a
division of Northamptonshire in Parliament for
generations. Sir Athelstan had sat for many
years, and had only retired to give place to his son,
Vortigern, who was a member of the House at the
time he was killed in the duel. Then my uncle
had put in a locwm tenens, with the understanding
that this gentleman should resign on my attaining
my majority. This important event would take
place in a couple of months, and it was Sir
Athelstan’s expressed desire that I should then
immediately occupy the seat rendered vacant by
the resignation of its present occupier. Individu-
ally I chafed at the delay, neither caring for
parliamentary honours nor feeling the slightest
wish to be a member of that august body, and I
LEONORA DI BRANCANOVA 325

was only reconciled when my father pointed out
that as a Member of Parliament I should fill a
higher position in a foreign court than if I pre-
sented myself as a simple naval officer. I con-
sidered that a British officer ranked higher than
any statesman or legislator at Westminster, but
they told me that I was wrong, and so I yielded
with the best grace I could muster.

I think that I would far sooner have faced the
Redoubtable’s boarders single-handed than have
stood up on the hustings to be plied with questions
and pelted with dead cats by the independent
voters of my division of the county, but matters
were managed differently in those days, and money
freely spent spared me this ordeal. I was un-
opposed, and when my return was declared, and
I stepped into the carriage-and-four as a Knight
of the Shire I was greeted with loud cheers, for
I was not only a Brandon, but one of Nelson’s
officers, and the name of the great admiral was
a potent spell even in that midland county.

A week after my election I took my seat, being
the youngest member of the House of Commons,
and shortly afterwards I met Lord St Vincent, who
requested me to call on him at the Admiralty on
the following day. I did so, and when I regained
the street a post-captain’s commission was in my
pocket.

When, two months later, Parliament was pro-
326 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

rogued I saw my opportunity, and again visited the
First Lord.

It has never been my custom to beat about the
bush, for frankness was one of the first rules taught
by Nelson, so I made a clean breast of it to the old
Earl, giving him an account of my adventures in
Calabria, and of my object in wishing to return
there during the recess. The narrative seemed to
interest him greatly, and perhaps there was still a
spice of romance lingering at the bottom of his
brave old heart, and as it happened that the
thirty-two gun frigate Antelope was about to
be commissioned for the Mediterranean, he most
kindly offered me the temporary command of her,
adding that he would send orders to the senior
officer at Palermo that the ship should be told off
for service on the coast of Calabria, “ and we won't
inquire too closely at home whether you anchor
for a week or two in the Gulf of Taranto. But
don’t turn His Majesty’s frigate into a love-cage
for two young fools, and be back again in time to
vote with the Government,” he concluded with a
twinkle in his eye and a kindly smile, whilst
shaking me by the hand perhaps a little more
warmly since I had become a legislator than if I
had been a simple post-captain.

The Antelope was fitting out at Chatham, and
I assumed my command in the early summer
of 1806. In those days a smart frigate had no
LEONORA DI BRANCANOVA 327

difficulty in getting together a good crew, more
particularly if the captain was popular. I was
unknown as a commander, but all the Victory’s
men had served with me, and I obtained a good
sprinkling of these, and others followed their lead,
so that my ship’s company was soon made up of men
longing for active service and the chances of prize-
money that lay in the way of a fast-sailing frigate.

Good luck attended us from the very first.
When off the Cornish coast we fell in with a
Preventive cutter in chase of a French smuggling
fugger. The latter was a fast-sailing craft and
would have shown a clean pair of heels to the
Revenue boat had we not appeared on the scene
and cut off her retreat. She made a desperate
effort to escape notwithstanding, standing on across
the Antelope’s bows with a coolness and audacity
that excited our admiration, and I was obliged to
bring our guns into play and knock away some of
her sticks before she hove to and surrendered.
She proved to be the Marie of St Malo, laden with
a valuable cargo of French brandy, lace and silks,
which she intended to run, I believe, at Mevagissey,
then one of the most notorious smuggling places
on the south-western coast of England. We
handed her over to the Preventive cutter and
stood on our way, having thus accidentally done
a good day’s work, for of course we shared in the
proceeds of this rich capture.
328 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

It was a good beginning, nor was Fortune tired
of favouring us, for between the Spanish coast
and Sicily we picked up a large xebecque laden
with wine, which we carried with us into Palermo.
These two prizes delighted the men and made me
regard the command of a smart frigate as a pleasant
and lucrative appointment.

Lord St Vincent had kept his word, and the
senior officer of the British squadron at Palermo
ordered the Antelope to proceed to the coast of
Calabria immediately we had re-victualled, and I
took good care not to inquire too closely what
port I was to visit.

During the whole passage I had been impatient
to reach my destination, but with the sight of the
familiar Sicilian coast my anxiety to arrive in-
creased, and each contrary wind or spell of calm
threw me into a fever, but when we had drifted
past the Lipari Islands, through the Straits of
Messina, and rounded Cape Spartivento, a good
breeze from the southwest sprang up and carried
us rapidly to the Gulf of Taranto, into which I
sounded my way with the lead and anchored the
frigate as close to the castle as safety would permit.

Of course I had written immediately after my
interview with Lord St Vincent to acquaint Lady
Kathleen and Will Barrett with my intended visit,
and had arranged that I would fly a Union Jack
at the mast-head as a signal of my arrival.
LEONORA DI BRANCANOVA 329

We anchored about ten o’clock in the morning,
and an hour later I was ashore and shaking hands
with my old messmate, who had ridden down to
meet me with a couple of spare ponies. It is
needless to record the eager questions and. answers
on either side during the ride to the castle. Mine
were principally concerning little Nora, and I
thought poor Will a dull fellow when the replies
he gave did not come up to my expectation. The
truth was that I was in love with one girl, whilst
Will Barrett’s whole mind was engrossed by
another. Hence the perfunctory answers, for
there was not much to be gained by such a
reply as, “Oh, she’s all right—grown a bit
since you saw her, Jack.”

Could my old messmate be paying me out for
not asking more about Luisa?”

When we crossed the drawbridge I noticed that
there were a good many armed men lounging about
the courtyard, who all uncovered their heads and
saluted, in the courteous fashion peculiar to these
mountaineers, at’ the sight of my uniform. Pro-
bably the worthy fellows knew more of my errand
than I imagined, for many bearded lips wreathed
themselves into smiles, disclosing rows of strong,
white teeth, which stood out in marked contrast to
the bronzed complexions, whilst whispering to one
another in the soft utterances of Southern Italy
what were most likely quiet jokes at my expense.
330 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

My impatience was strongly tinged with timidity
now that the goal was reached, and I felt that all
the colour left my cheeks as I ascended the steps
at the head of which Lady Kathleen — more
matronly than of yore, and with threads of silver
in her hair — stood waiting to receive me. As
I bent forward to kiss the hand she extended
towards me, a queer lump arose in my throat
and a mist swam before my eyes, for I saw that
she was not alone, but that the tall, willowy figure
of a girl stood behind her, and my heart told me
that it was little Nora, my playmate and sweet-
heart of eight long years agone. The elder lady
led me into the room in which she had first re-
ceived me, and there was all the old Irish fun
sparkling in her eyes as she pointed to a chair on
which sundry diminutive goatskin garments were
displayed, and said, “Do you recognise those,
Jack? My little Nora looks on them as her
greatest treasures.”

They were poor little Gian’s jacket and breeches
which I had worn on my first entry into the
castle, and whilst I gazed at the mementoes of the
past, a flood of memories swept through my brain,
and I could see again the two wretched, starved
lads who stood tremblingly imploring the protec-
tion of the great lady, but the sound of a closing
door aroused me from my reverie, and, turning
round, I found myself—alone with Nora.
LEONORA DI BRANCANOVA 331

At dinner that evening there was much to be
said on either side—much to be imparted by me,
and much to be learnt. But the great joy which
filled my heart was destined to be mingled with
sorrow before the close of that eventful day, for
as we stood upon the ramparts gazing at the set-
ting sun, at the beautiful landscape, at the sapphire
sea, at the spars of the graceful frigate riding at
her anchor, and drinking in the beauties of Nature
enhanced by the silent communion of souls, there
came a babel of voices from the courtyard behind,
followed by loud “ Vivas” and sounds of rejoicing,
but amidst them there arose a piercing shriek,
succeeded by a moaning wail,as a woman rushed
towards us with dishevelled hair streaming over
her shoulders and tightly clasping a baby to her
breast.

“Oh, Beppo — my Beppo—my husband — the
father of my babe,” wailed poor Tessa, as Nora,
with sweet, womanly sympathy, received her with
extended arms.

“Dead—dead,” cried the girl. “Killed by the
French. But I will avenge him,” she added, with
sudden change of mood from softness to ferocity,
“will seek these miscreants out and stab them to
the heart.”

She had wrenched herself free from Nora, leaving
the babe in the latter’s arms, and now stood before
332 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

us like an avenging fury, a bright stiletto gleaming
in her hand.

“Remember your child—your second Beppo, dear
Tessa,” murmured Nora through her tears, and again
in an instant there was a change of mood, and the
young widow, clutching the infant to her breast,
wept over it as though her heart would break,
whilst Nora led her slowly and unresistingly away.

In the courtyard all was excitement and joy,
for a mounted messenger had just arrived with
the news of Stuart’s victory at Maida over the
French under Regnier, and in their delight the
grief of one stricken sufferer was overlooked.
What cared they at such a moment as this,
with the knowledge that their mountains were
free from the presence of the hateful invaders—
what cared they that Beppo di Squillace had
fallen at the head of his gallant Irregulars? for
there was no man present who would not gladly
have shared the ex-bandit’s fate to gain such
an end.

I had arranged with Will Barrett that he
should visit me in my room that night, for I
was too much excited to sleep, and I knew that
my old messmate was anxious to hear many
things of Norfolk and of Silversands; but he
never came, and I learnt that he had passed
the night in endeavouring to assuage the grief
of poor Tessa and Luisa.
LEONORA DI BRANCANOVA 333

The weather continued fine, so that the Antelope
could remain at her anchorage, and I took the
liberty of keeping her there for ten days, doing
so with a lighter heart now that I knew that
the French were defeated in that part.
Lady Kathleen invited the frigate’s officers
up to the castle, and gladdened the hearts of
the crew with boat-loads of fresh provisions
and wine such as they had never seen before.
I landed the men, a watch at a time, when
they were entertained with a huge pic-nic,
followed by rides on the shaggy little Calabrian
ponies, which generally managed to unshift the
honest seamen. It was amusing to see our
bluejackets walking arm-in-arm with the moun-
taineers, and to view the respect with which
the latter regarded them.

But all things, whether good or bad, must
have an end, and on the eleventh day after my
arrival I wrung Will Barrett’s hand on the
beach, and then got the frigate under way.

All hands had by this time guessed the relation-
ship which existed between Nora and myself,
and I believe that, on the forecastle, I was
popularly alluded to as “the prince.”

And with that visit to the Castle of Taranto
my story comes to an end. On arrival at
Palermo I found that another officer was waiting
to supersede me in the command of the Antelope
334 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

and I returned to England as a passénger in
a homeward-bound line-of-battle ship, landing in
time to record my vote for the Government on
a division, as I had promised Lord St Vincent.

When I called at the Admiralty, the Earl asked
me how I had fared on my love-errand, and
observed drily, “You took the Antelope into
the Gulf of Taranto to repair damages caused
by stress of weather, I presume.”

“Yes, my lord,” I replied; “we had to arrange
a splice which couldn’t be done anywhere else.”

In the following spring, Lady Kathleen and
her daughter came to England, when Nora and
I were married. Like a sensible girl, she dropped
her title, and was known as plain Mrs John
Brandon until my father’s death, when I succeeded
to the baronetcy. But in Calabria, where we
pass every winter, she becomes again a princess
whose sway is undisputed over a large tract of
country. Will Barrett manages the property,
assisted in a great measure by the tact and
cleverness of his pretty little wife, Luisa. Poor
Tessa lives with them, and her chief delight
is in relating stories of her Beppo to his son,
now grown into a fine, stalwart man, himself
the father of a still younger Beppo.

My father continued to ‘take great interest in
Silversands up to the hour of his death, and
when old Joe Barrett departed this life it was
LEONORA DI BRANCANOVA 335

through his interest that Bess Wilson became
the proprietress of “The ‘oothsome Herring,”
over which she reigned for many years, exercis-
ing a healthy influence upon the simple fisher-
folk, and remaining single to the end of her days.

I never again sought employment afloat, and
with the resignation of my command at Palermo
my career in His Majesty’s Service came to an
end, although my name remains on the Navy
List and I have attained the honorary rank of
admiral. My son, Horatio, sueceeded me in
the representation of the county when he came
of age, and bids fair to become a better legislator
than his father ever was. My sister Emily
married a neighbouring squire and lives within
half a dozen. miles of Tunstall Hall.

Now I have brought together and knotted
for a full view the several yarns of this narrative.
As I said before, my wife and I pass our winters
at the Castle of Taranto, and perhaps the happiest
time of our lives is when we are within the
shelter of its old grey ramparts. I love to see
the tender care with which Nora watches over
the interests of her peasantry, weaning them
gradually from a lawlessness which had existed
from time immemorial, and with such good effect
that a traveller may now pass from end to end
of her property without fear of being stopped
and pillaged. Lady Kathleen accompanied us
336 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

annually to the castle until her death, and good
old Father Tomaso assisted Nora in the work of
making the mountaineers law-abiding, until the
time arrived when he laid down his task and
his life together.

All this it pleases me to see, but chiefly I love
the long winter evenings when Will Barrett and
I sit cosily on opposite sides of the roaring wood
fire and talk over the good old days with all
the freedom of those who have been boys together.
A listener would put us down as narrow-minded
old men and inveterate grumblers, and would laugh
at the tenacity with which we both cling to the
traditions of a past age. We two white-headed
old fogies have lived to witness stupendous
changes. We have seen the steam-kettle super-
sede the canvas on which we had been taught
to rely, and we together lament the loss of real
seamanship brought about by this change. We
have seen the introduction of railways, and the
linking together of place to place by means of
the telegraph wire. All this seems to us very
strange and very wonderful, but perhaps the
strangest event of all was when the British and
French fought side by side in the Crimea, for
it seemed to us unnatural that we should link
hands with our hereditary foes.

So we grumble on, but however varied the
topics of our conversation may be, before the
LEONORA DI BRANCANOVA 337

evening is spent, one name always crops up and
is ever mentioned with love and reverence. To
the present generation the mighty deeds of Nelson
are mere matters of history to be marvelled at
and admired, but we two old fellows still feel the
glamour of the hero’s personality, and we love
to recall little incidents in the life of the great
admiral under whom it is our chief glory to
have served.

And as we ramble on the door opens and a
white-haired lady, graceful still in figure, despite
the three-score years and ten that have snowed
her head, enters the room and lays a hand
caressingly on my shoulder, and as I look up
lovingly into her dear old face I am filled with
gratitude to Him who gave me Nora and has
permitted us to pass through fifty years of life
together in uninterrupted trust and happiness.
POSTSCRIPT

BY

Vicr-ADMIRAL SIR Horatio NELSON BRANDON,
Bart., K.C.B.

THE foregoing narrative was written by the late
Sir John Brandon in the year 1856, at the close
of the Crimean War in response to the oft-
repeated entreaties of his grandchildren, of whom
I am the eldest. In my younger days I spent
many months of each year at Tunstall Hall,
and shall always retain a deep affection for the
memory of the old sailor, although he was a
rigid disciplinarian, and those who knew him
little frequently mistook his demands for im-
plicit obedience for harshness. But we children
had no fear of him, and our greatest delight
was to assemble under his roof at Christmas in
the Castle of Taranto, to which place he always
took some of us. Then, in the evenings, we
were allowed to sit round the great open fire-
place and listen to the yarns spun by my grand-

father and gruff old Mr Barrett, his chum and
338
POSTSCRIPT ~ 339

former messmate. With open mouths we listened
to reminiscences of the men who made the name
of England great upon the sea at the close of
the last and the beginning of the present century.
- And it was then that I formed the resolution to
become a sailor, and endeavour to emulate the
great deeds of which I then heard, but the
opportunity has never arisen, and the death of
Nelson remains unavenged as far as I am con-
cerned.
_ My grandfather was quick-tempered, and Mr
Barrett was obstinate, so that great wrangles
often arose between them, when somewhat un-
parliamentary language was used by both, but
these differences never lasted for more than a
few minutes, and seemed part of the programme
in their nightly intercourse. On looking back I
recognise that Sir John’s life was an ideal one
in respect of the unbroken affection and trust
existing between himself and my grandmother.
It was a beautiful sight to see the old couple
together, each one striving to forestall the wishes
of the other. ‘Their existence was one of un-
broken unity, and they may be said to have -
descended into the grave together, for when my
grandfather died in the year 1870, at the ripe
age of eighty-four, his widow only survived him
for two months. |

Mr Barrett died four years earlier, and a great-
340 AFLOAT WITH NELSON

grandson of Beppo the bandit is now my factor
at Taranto. After much persuasion, old Sir John
was induced to put his early adventures on paper,
and I think they proved as interesting to the
elder members of his family as to the youngsters.

Within the last year the memory of Nelson
and the “band of brothers” who fought with him
has been revived in England. Last Valentine’s
Day was the centenary of the battle of Cape
St Vincent; on the first of August 1898 the
glorious victory of the Nile will be a hundred
years old, and since there is nothing in my
grandfather’s narrative which can possibly wound
the feelings of any living man, or his descendants,
Iam making the volume public in the hope that
it may direct the gaze of Englishmen to those
grand old days when our navy swept the seas
of every foe.

HN. B.

TunsTaLL Haut, March 1897.

THE END

\\

Colston & Coy. Limited, Printers, Edinburgh.





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'2012-01-21T19:50:04-05:00'
describe
'7888732' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUH' 'sip-files00003.tif'
8c0c2b14aa77593a2569bfa609a3cc09
3fa7235a64c8a489025877c2db9cd2f00788dd2b
'2012-01-21T19:53:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUI' 'sip-files00003.txt'
33c6b31acfebc35e746f53992e9e20d9
4402a8b0e04b146b184ec3091b43f828ed6934ef
'2012-01-21T19:48:16-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'21706' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUJ' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
d5609d1f15f7298079f4cc3735e78b62
94397528cec752359ce8fcc1675b52d93d48245b
'2012-01-21T19:50:20-05:00'
describe
'328279' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUK' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
999c6e6f6fb68a662f33aef0395e21e3
6f16a46cc21adcf168299c40e5618ce39f59c7ac
'2012-01-21T19:54:27-05:00'
describe
'30762' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUL' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
ce9f327025852ccf19a65c10ee096310
3f24115eaa2d808e7d91af0115defe87a30a40a0
'2012-01-21T19:53:24-05:00'
describe
'736' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUM' 'sip-files00005.pro'
d3d1e2fa63be76ff8a382947ea7d71fe
0bbd7997945b7ca08fc4a013f3a6eba42de02e81
'2012-01-21T19:59:02-05:00'
describe
'14499' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUN' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
967e7defa04ef1d6c302025ea5e82654
ff366b4c2fad20467561be247ad46bee1e0ecaa7
'2012-01-21T19:51:32-05:00'
describe
'2634680' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUO' 'sip-files00005.tif'
a70312ae6dfb3fbee84f818ad37cb7d8
77c7f527ea10f2e0d4a1e1fce805f5d10ad16dc8
'2012-01-21T19:53:47-05:00'
describe
'59' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUP' 'sip-files00005.txt'
4039b86e840ec64a03acdcfa94258775
a68da997c5e9d7bbcfea0b355abf4349b86879ec
'2012-01-21T19:54:02-05:00'
describe
'10620' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUQ' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
d9c22a7bb31b5b40cb7e54b006ccd422
27b7d7495e3cbcf8117efcdc76689b2925846ba7
'2012-01-21T19:49:58-05:00'
describe
'341189' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUR' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
9abcba9c7693ee1b423eb2c97893acdd
95c601a05d2ceda3a0643fda571483cdccd1a356
'2012-01-21T19:53:37-05:00'
describe
'179307' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUS' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
119cafaa9381a09d37692b9ea52d3608
85c30f311a41d7af61e009b2b1df0fcc4cda1273
'2012-01-21T19:48:01-05:00'
describe
'3319' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUT' 'sip-files00008.pro'
585ebbc50c5deaf5a778eeed334c5ee1
2e0b0493f663816df84812c64251d10d61500984
'2012-01-21T19:46:20-05:00'
describe
'55634' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUU' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
92872eab7d36806bcbb5d762ac91f61e
5c3aa25e3fe6fb74ebc287e094eca7a9cf132bf9
'2012-01-21T19:46:06-05:00'
describe
'2744352' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUV' 'sip-files00008.tif'
dfb7613a9ceb3a9c9498d081d5fced08
a92b73db56597fc07a556a05d6e86ef464bd8c6d
'2012-01-21T19:51:34-05:00'
describe
'190' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUW' 'sip-files00008.txt'
8de8a7490eb0e496ef1bfb60e54bd7a9
6abc97248dcb808a409116aa40fe202d5b8dd270
'2012-01-21T19:53:31-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'24630' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUX' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
851a9b36d52196a3a37e8a8e0b36ad9b
9f823bdac010ddaa15507c291e3207d19886a744
'2012-01-21T19:54:15-05:00'
describe
'328227' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUY' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
e1108714a2c71185433298717c67a531
240936124b9701e6a7e60e28ac871a3ce19c64f7
'2012-01-21T19:59:00-05:00'
describe
'54528' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQUZ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
b583a6fe7f9dc4855dba23aed31fa613
901500c54861ea42589f9d17d9993c257ebf573f
'2012-01-21T19:50:01-05:00'
describe
'6006' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVA' 'sip-files00009.pro'
09b926c4a931bd6678530933b9c3d2c8
3f2f915eaacbea2005519ed1f95782b6c8367987
'2012-01-21T19:50:27-05:00'
describe
'24621' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVB' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
1adc07458c49f9655356aeee9165bb92
ea490946f882dc8a846a023910d32ce63588698f
'2012-01-21T19:46:40-05:00'
describe
'2635972' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVC' 'sip-files00009.tif'
e003511da78b1d5a96d2a3548671e96b
c890d40dc3618aeff747ca053d6e84490f3417a9
'2012-01-21T19:51:55-05:00'
describe
'383' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVD' 'sip-files00009.txt'
54e35acc52349e05619ceee63ac57fd5
58c21a41d19cf0a22e17dd441d39e7712321103c
'2012-01-21T19:55:32-05:00'
describe
'15083' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVE' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
6fc3c34d2b3a0b142f9248756419834e
a4c0dcbd2146f0c3f0417b87d8bca155b50cf1e2
'2012-01-21T19:56:26-05:00'
describe
'328285' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVF' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
90df071da669786f5cc80ad170f31c2d
2246952b6967b5481227535088c1d20529cb743b
'2012-01-21T19:55:36-05:00'
describe
'104589' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVG' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
b5f8543316a9509f99dfb4c8e4f52926
9fb190fd8a440993e2560fe933fea8c5650ce7ed
'2012-01-21T19:57:42-05:00'
describe
'21354' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVH' 'sip-files00011.pro'
f28a85f4a547da7690f87b4f628cf834
ea81e6aa37acd3d1a4146777965332f6f0f2cb09
'2012-01-21T19:58:13-05:00'
describe
'43771' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVI' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
14b68ae89acd3c84e87f2580bc2db8f5
0edb61a2e0990fdf937669860d19ae3a4b4b3771
'2012-01-21T19:59:16-05:00'
describe
'2637392' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVJ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
fdf60ba67db3287bdd263d58c52a31cd
81ae971686152bf26a6c98193943c0f8798464b1
'2012-01-21T19:54:44-05:00'
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVK' 'sip-files00011.txt'
df8aaa8a28a4c7785caf1ae031e76da2
7f64c1420cbe621d74ef3fdf698fdb982f2ee2e5
'2012-01-21T19:59:56-05:00'
describe
'20740' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVL' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
4f684106de7f8f33256071898704d581
49dd8e5530449d47a899da45863c6cdd7ea9421b
'2012-01-21T19:51:49-05:00'
describe
'324345' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVM' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
6b853b4da1ba83d2045f155b1821553b
86681837e54ccf69e6e39b7db2a367150ac9bc60
'2012-01-21T19:58:37-05:00'
describe
'48565' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVN' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
fc92a8ae7f05d9256f95318ad2e82fae
d4d751844780cd6009bab9b733d78a1126157951
'2012-01-21T19:58:59-05:00'
describe
'7207' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVO' 'sip-files00012.pro'
20b780e46c2f8e88f5076e309a7fb2eb
dcef8abf528d394aa15dc7ba59cf6fade6a3d3d4
'2012-01-21T19:54:40-05:00'
describe
'22911' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVP' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
7aaa023ab54fabb43fd8fc8da3e46cd1
807144941f32fda67a6114e1c99a28f2021e65ab
'2012-01-21T19:59:21-05:00'
describe
'2637544' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVQ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
bd4288e649a9e0282f851fc686ecda49
62a41ab7067e6a273675990384adc2e5df875b51
'2012-01-21T19:57:49-05:00'
describe
'334' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVR' 'sip-files00012.txt'
d6e3f37ec0f294ed2a42594ec1fcac6e
d77e42ba88bfd16a33591e969cbc9b4c7bdb845e
'2012-01-21T19:51:23-05:00'
describe
'13188' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVS' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
0ba98f49918930271b0e4d2c301b1bd5
1a1d4c5abcb0413b0674946c3515de8e370f3f63
'2012-01-21T19:48:05-05:00'
describe
'328275' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVT' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
3ce4efe9874f6f32703a5562752f6e86
14dc7451915fcb2b61cd44a0a0213af494134b13
'2012-01-21T19:50:31-05:00'
describe
'53884' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVU' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
64a770b7d90dfcd451b4203b2ff9bc68
809a0621328e3866f0f7d11618d5de31d45f6b2b
'2012-01-21T19:54:56-05:00'
describe
'12420' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVV' 'sip-files00013.pro'
69933f71e61eac7f9ef5b4615ebae76a
0c50d5ea8bea294e8e92c88d51ce21e11b106969
'2012-01-21T19:59:15-05:00'
describe
'25663' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVW' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
964dfa4d4f571acaa9b92b6167b855b1
00f6246e55a757fadf9e9dd13553e89a5c6014e7
'2012-01-21T19:55:12-05:00'
describe
'2636164' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVX' 'sip-files00013.tif'
eb7afaaf91d91d083083b4fb44f15b2e
b12d838d779dd9724fb5140fe8287e15fcf6b134
'2012-01-21T19:54:42-05:00'
describe
'719' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVY' 'sip-files00013.txt'
7fd8f5009f18d756e88276cddea98ff9
f2cd411b07d1a8d6f619d80d051fad21226b26a2
'2012-01-21T19:51:48-05:00'
describe
'15261' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQVZ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
430bc5f66e86761b16e1393fb9e180a8
17b992c9f9594ac9f7f1252193db3a6933c6e465
'2012-01-21T19:58:51-05:00'
describe
'328488' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWA' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
422204f49bb85248488588c423f64405
9391f172a949c3c00dc62bf8abe5758fd5a939aa
'2012-01-21T19:48:45-05:00'
describe
'66176' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWB' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
62b83594e00d1e3587b5225efcb43ed3
8f64a94a4ff4eb1bf8ade0c6e7b61f723f6c9fef
'2012-01-21T19:54:19-05:00'
describe
'14648' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWC' 'sip-files00014.pro'
0c3a375f3d9fba4f1858619435e50d83
744f107dd20454f1ed04bdda5e3bce92ec1b057f
'2012-01-21T19:56:49-05:00'
describe
'29607' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWD' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
955c7e51116b7db1c0b2e493c65e8b00
b6005c31fca396e5fd9b41be5d9cf0f3c1dcdd6a
'2012-01-21T19:50:15-05:00'
describe
'2638688' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWE' 'sip-files00014.tif'
8f1bfd6b456d68f9ef5a9e15686d496c
941b522ea0cda905bf2f94566e90de73d6d51e89
'2012-01-21T19:55:34-05:00'
describe
'858' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWF' 'sip-files00014.txt'
47311f43f4ebdaf15d28775d775fa96e
02d8d49dbcc551d4f5550d9f2cd2e37cf914e22a
'2012-01-21T19:55:18-05:00'
describe
'16643' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWG' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
c8dbf3f85c3907644a618d33ee6bf03b
8e14a29d92efdce9ff6d93a6aea1109a8231cfc7
'2012-01-21T19:57:30-05:00'
describe
'328237' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWH' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
9802ffcf5510264c71a15b8fd77646ec
48ea8ec2876f006ce8eebae9b9f6910cda2e1b8b
'2012-01-21T19:58:52-05:00'
describe
'79808' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWI' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
20aa313c0467b2349833009d4d8d923f
2d08bfedb6072feeac6153e5338d357d3dea31df
'2012-01-21T19:58:57-05:00'
describe
'19575' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWJ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
c53896ee60094defcd7819f61702275a
bfd050489dc442736288412fd54163000be9e74b
'2012-01-21T19:46:09-05:00'
describe
'34427' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWK' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
793258c115488ed3e43ce64481609662
6bb58f0dd8f08bcc75f8bd55e62fb1b96127110a
'2012-01-21T19:54:28-05:00'
describe
'2637008' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWL' 'sip-files00015.tif'
b78fbdbb471ffc255dab966bc0acda6c
192af6ec3cf60087fd263cbdced309acc97ed3f6
'2012-01-21T19:56:52-05:00'
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWM' 'sip-files00015.txt'
e835499a16169f105a63f8735fc229e7
2022aeb2862ccad710ece51e44178cf299d9eed3
'2012-01-21T19:46:47-05:00'
describe
'18433' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWN' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
940f45b01ecf3ef48b5a63b3ca44114c
71e56c50dbbbca9ae29818cb26c9ec1ec203fa87
'2012-01-21T19:52:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWO' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
9641f6349b089de7b7777590b42963c9
4a8f520a2408ffe1ea5ed04686165cf6a4a1fbf1
'2012-01-21T19:50:06-05:00'
describe
'103584' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWP' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
eb149711c808500ef9de913e3cc381b7
0ae1b966d6659fd5cadf6c555b9b9b61885423c7
'2012-01-21T19:50:51-05:00'
describe
'20028' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWQ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
aef7e1db1c83ec573a382948d0a1b951
fd63afe6f2ccc74fe0dab6391058324c79288b21
'2012-01-21T19:51:27-05:00'
describe
'43112' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWR' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
da7825c8d0771d0b11ca887157e3f441
471032258c94d4c075d85f4f710a3dcc453ee16d
'2012-01-21T19:55:35-05:00'
describe
'2637448' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWS' 'sip-files00017.tif'
884c678eccacd7a29955303fc004a65d
8cbaa04705e08c379f1f6235a5f34a1c4d703d9e
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWT' 'sip-files00017.txt'
ba93acb62d551772a23f885590c046b1
062bf2475041484949ddf44ef74d3a0435f87aad
'2012-01-21T19:55:39-05:00'
describe
'20261' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWU' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
4431954d976f9361e64c6f02bc413d62
3ce0fa632a8b147e2d8ef423f5a91c812e5fda02
'2012-01-21T19:53:19-05:00'
describe
'328282' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWV' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
1ad818b38e3a199007f9af62160d0b80
680f4bf83c8eb9556b9a01fedca987a2fa4b956f
'2012-01-21T19:52:06-05:00'
describe
'157110' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWW' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
ac1776667154e6ad4fc4563e6b909539
5e93032522d1f1602627620146619d7488c02c75
'2012-01-21T19:53:08-05:00'
describe
'35629' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWX' 'sip-files00018.pro'
1f6ff28633586ccec2add55c309fcc22
db79f93d115ab4040a382e5bdf97e2baf4994a57
'2012-01-21T19:46:51-05:00'
describe
'62077' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWY' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
20921e838fcaeb9b9b122e26e231a2d4
b3636440796bf3274a20f85b8a576a90ee39775f
'2012-01-21T19:55:53-05:00'
describe
'2638876' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQWZ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
8d82734a1e966cd7840ff4aa9cecfbbd
7a2a6ed80edd0b5daa9dc2e168b94562f23d21d2
'2012-01-21T19:53:50-05:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXA' 'sip-files00018.txt'
4ec0cacaa44cda17401fe331c24e3250
82adab683197e1f490586c78524f3046988ea25e
'2012-01-21T19:54:21-05:00'
describe
'25718' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXB' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
6376bff3149ab8f56ef3a0e72badb80a
4729728ee3e24142253dfd3d307042f4b45b2330
'2012-01-21T19:55:00-05:00'
describe
'328188' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXC' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
d96fddfda045dc99cd56569e2e9670e2
e3b756319d9f3fce8c3f4d8bd867bee8b6bda46a
describe
'150152' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXD' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
c24affd6d31c63d9c9531ee4781240f6
1a0e778551dd64868ea1a2de2809df996ca85f88
'2012-01-21T19:50:08-05:00'
describe
'32366' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXE' 'sip-files00019.pro'
abd9191e154fdef6adb63051417b0e94
77f0af6dd1733b7c4aa44dda3b46647a676c70bb
'2012-01-21T19:51:25-05:00'
describe
'60729' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXF' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
a4369e13867dce85e9d4c754b006959e
0217e80eb9e358fa8006f2126e38a7e9a4905916
'2012-01-21T19:46:16-05:00'
describe
'2639036' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXG' 'sip-files00019.tif'
e85ff27ef3c7d69a432329cd064bc8f5
427bcdff62b014461114e8aba9932a7d91c9fedf
'2012-01-21T19:49:10-05:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXH' 'sip-files00019.txt'
ee192c8bd73f3568529d27ab221112ea
206ae8963c0c6eedfe4287435bef158a9161fa89
'2012-01-21T19:50:05-05:00'
describe
'25491' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXI' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
e7f79b2babbef83c169dfd843e544f6e
60cea31a23569969083f6888206fdf074969be0b
'2012-01-21T19:53:11-05:00'
describe
'328201' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXJ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
b92f82570041f16226b9ef03ef8d3ecc
39a1cae294ca4c9f589c7665c0aa9cdc3cfb3f08
describe
'148713' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXK' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
c6b2c606412b3c53925478ab1099ed6b
ee18609d0ac219c1d14d5784fb3dee74fc2fa7b3
'2012-01-21T19:51:51-05:00'
describe
'33394' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXL' 'sip-files00020.pro'
c7b227ce6d82a68685b496adeb12797c
89c4d3cb9b9177ab33afedd2387382c7482dc56d
'2012-01-21T19:53:38-05:00'
describe
'59175' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXM' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
e95e26680f48ee1296e90aa9caac7a54
2d0deab5f1ac66cf7a045137921dca35e6254d4f
'2012-01-21T19:57:56-05:00'
describe
'2638828' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXN' 'sip-files00020.tif'
2e8fb42f1062b77d4df566fd6f3a418d
5ec902a7f2073938e97bdeda7ce085cf22ab265f
'2012-01-21T19:46:57-05:00'
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXO' 'sip-files00020.txt'
e065265f8025feade08c4480f4d02f00
852aded7573207dddc2c4648c972bf855f788825
'2012-01-21T19:52:58-05:00'
describe
'25097' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXP' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
3ab9fa8c404671a4eeafef5352e7556f
cd18f1568ba599c3494172c89ef479b5e2bcda38
'2012-01-21T19:46:04-05:00'
describe
'328269' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXQ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
a64774f6133cc9938af3cc6b20782abf
1ff7593fa1042b2f32fb5c69ce585eb1c5a29893
'2012-01-21T19:46:48-05:00'
describe
'156585' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXR' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
15669022d487f230b0b7359f08c74246
c4333dbbba5c0d1b3deed6e9b5fb997965096fe1
describe
'33961' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXS' 'sip-files00021.pro'
26a5441ac3f7a83c0b7be82ee79f5b14
b8f138e53201ebfab595a6ca07705bd00a1716c5
describe
'62399' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXT' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
5010116773c470d353c9cd6126edc3d9
98e66338c7171a1ce32b58b6d4cb35a34b95606f
'2012-01-21T19:59:18-05:00'
describe
'2639080' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXU' 'sip-files00021.tif'
8d2d0bbac55761e3f16969564e275b7e
9c0277e55efd680f73f379b7aa1d36b674483c13
'2012-01-21T19:54:16-05:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXV' 'sip-files00021.txt'
032fcd2d4767910a56cbbc7357b0d7e6
c0f4c68af753acad6023432c50b7f375cc4c47ea
describe
'25907' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXW' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
2af664e32754039473ddbb9703e14b61
111f9f4a71021246870c7b92acfd9e157c96af2b
'2012-01-21T19:59:41-05:00'
describe
'328249' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXX' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
959c0005597f5a6d3db86c5607826fc0
197cfadb1b7aa117939a7157aa3b9ec5e0c36ff0
'2012-01-21T19:52:16-05:00'
describe
'163043' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXY' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
c62a436200b1b182798c4f10d6e5a778
f9edb4198a2b2be767e71774de06695d39ca9e8a
describe
'36445' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQXZ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
cbd6824b12ab1b83cd8225b5d1da4600
3f175cfb3c4342b919f0c2c5a373e523e28770fa
'2012-01-21T19:54:26-05:00'
describe
'64273' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYA' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
845260ada746c0e7ebddc48ffebf2d81
da0366cd5fcdd946b2c37caaef4c4b72dc909402
'2012-01-21T19:57:01-05:00'
describe
'2639104' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYB' 'sip-files00022.tif'
7b56835cf2633947b0d47ca322331a97
860f2fe86b94e25fbcb820041f89ef461df65aff
'2012-01-21T19:49:56-05:00'
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYC' 'sip-files00022.txt'
ce9e69cefc3b1be3d73b3e803916f2ce
1d6cd8b376acef1b0b810034e16727930d7182d2
'2012-01-21T19:52:11-05:00'
describe
'26431' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYD' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
cfd30be0be2bbb69de1d22f6b26c320d
7340c09987a7e12ed642675dfe0d43d38fac35de
'2012-01-21T19:55:08-05:00'
describe
'334960' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYE' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
f9f6304764e73b44b11d3c090fb9b930
67819e1857bb82a6f607e4f683cea7aed64261d2
'2012-01-21T19:46:45-05:00'
describe
'161238' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYF' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
a47573255b7c6386c4480b384bedb2af
3c77d54414eaa4699a4a6be4356ae223af9c0db5
'2012-01-21T19:56:22-05:00'
describe
'36545' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYG' 'sip-files00023.pro'
c75df1e47b1678562590c6fa4b78085c
943671328a10ee83ed5557d7314fff75a5a52809
'2012-01-21T19:45:56-05:00'
describe
'63907' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYH' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
6af1785a91c701c35c4f1615d3341c9b
1c53039d3012f3f1b12d979905347c805afc27fe
'2012-01-21T19:53:06-05:00'
describe
'2692988' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYI' 'sip-files00023.tif'
2b81adc7cda295132dec6e7c6c6cc1dc
6fc8aaf247644ebe9c3f4eadb171fd544d3a45d2
'2012-01-21T19:47:35-05:00'
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYJ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
919086bf5ce612019b76c0db1991e010
0ff5c84e93c9b9f7b77a3bc9b1081cad06d42200
'2012-01-21T19:56:33-05:00'
describe
'25550' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYK' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
8be3129e9392ac43fab65c41bc359404
285afbae624929a3c5ae92465438ed5d64d4b94b
'2012-01-21T19:50:22-05:00'
describe
'328253' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYL' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
2845f472c0266bbdd859a9d1aa15b606
120e4de936289570b57c5dd657a5134e888959d4
'2012-01-21T19:57:59-05:00'
describe
'166369' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYM' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
9f17e9ff6103be417b662bd17ed55d2e
f69ec60cd30b887cf2721d1a5c4f55b370651e34
'2012-01-21T19:51:52-05:00'
describe
'36957' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYN' 'sip-files00024.pro'
ae7397ce4ed4ffd0baee8dcded61f2da
4fc9d3992f862fda49560c430fd92aca2124937c
'2012-01-21T19:59:52-05:00'
describe
'64838' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYO' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
8223da3ea349c4bcd50bf75a089050c4
76dd8b975b21d44835d304f455bacbb180ce0ee6
'2012-01-21T19:51:58-05:00'
describe
'2639048' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYP' 'sip-files00024.tif'
99a24adb5d1453dbce0ee60f4f51b953
449bd10a32e2be848918c3eafe607bb3ba311211
'2012-01-21T19:58:30-05:00'
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYQ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
67381c8cbecaeef3dc1a0316e54cbf8e
ca40f181313834890004828645fc200cde068cf1
'2012-01-21T19:51:33-05:00'
describe
'26053' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYR' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
f35b9046e13f354ce80d9dd6833e7d0d
2420fab73893170e0a2a25ae3c473066e725b7df
'2012-01-21T19:57:32-05:00'
describe
'328543' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYS' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
2f9ef2a612f6ef977cc6f0c50c741af4
ee39302b37d5329b7bdcdc6d91a6ee389a45a806
'2012-01-21T19:50:46-05:00'
describe
'161622' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYT' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
86aca30f21d8dd936d265b5b9c4a0c82
547b8f35a791ea84a262de26772f4c5f129665b9
describe
'34831' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYU' 'sip-files00025.pro'
a53286e9455f16a6a214a2b36aa43e48
4a18ba130d95ebf4cf40234dc604e34bea34115b
'2012-01-21T19:52:37-05:00'
describe
'62142' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYV' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
009f4dfadfe8e7387046c65a2f732132
efe53813173a6cace272d7b4db44edceea53eae3
'2012-01-21T19:55:10-05:00'
describe
'2641024' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYW' 'sip-files00025.tif'
663dbd907770172c79580e887fac5f34
fe25952ec662bc7bcaa0ef4a88c20efe94edb03c
'2012-01-21T19:51:53-05:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYX' 'sip-files00025.txt'
0835f87baa6cdd598d570b1182688758
4e3d1bf84250b10bedf50496b518e7a57e1664f6
'2012-01-21T19:49:43-05:00'
describe
'25977' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYY' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
2a4dfc08c0686f3e1c38f225acf847b9
91b634d3757bd542ca69fc0f69a91f84b263f4cd
'2012-01-21T19:51:37-05:00'
describe
'328284' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQYZ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
4ae9dff5f369439003d51032a8da77cd
381f2873f51d4a2f9ccb9cd1ec6994e89ced637f
'2012-01-21T19:54:08-05:00'
describe
'158964' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZA' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
cba4a00126203bf49cb9b8fd792f6d52
98129665654a24284ac2b8d33b47b0f6506d16d5
'2012-01-21T19:54:03-05:00'
describe
'34621' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZB' 'sip-files00026.pro'
8096179fc3c1a2350a8654a84b223e8f
72bf528bb9ffee99ca2d4ff084123fa5ba17c4a7
'2012-01-21T19:52:41-05:00'
describe
'62540' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZC' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
f1cb99c96af48c679f217be81f2aba35
a948c49fc0bfd2890ead2c4614a914c08457442d
'2012-01-21T19:53:32-05:00'
describe
'2639228' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZD' 'sip-files00026.tif'
1224c26d8c49220ce014fa31a9a04e3c
ec08ed27bb6608c48ceba778e96c360c885632c2
'2012-01-21T19:49:54-05:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZE' 'sip-files00026.txt'
432967269a79078b7740f906b141321d
9f4457dd86124fb640fb617c783632fdd2725bb8
'2012-01-21T19:54:39-05:00'
describe
'25604' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZF' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
3181067e456f9a545ab76f8c5c59ddb5
a4f6b1a9d033619e9128ef21fbf2dd626657d79b
'2012-01-21T19:58:56-05:00'
describe
'328236' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZG' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
735be038fe74868b40003421eaf4049b
59a2f3ce788b99578df071e26b7ff3ae71d145a4
'2012-01-21T19:53:52-05:00'
describe
'158195' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZH' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
3a12f9211b9dcb0785745d85b9a91dac
e42a2088ea033a16e0308184a8976ee17e584771
'2012-01-21T19:46:23-05:00'
describe
'33114' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZI' 'sip-files00027.pro'
7c3c8ffd834ab3a14a8774b33d92af10
6e059b8bf4b18183d8a4483dc29e58ad46c5e401
describe
'62702' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZJ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
ed7d8f65cc385bc3c2857653a0a51087
979414b0f092b2b082b21dfc52f59d7a7fb9082f
'2012-01-21T19:57:47-05:00'
describe
'2639072' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZK' 'sip-files00027.tif'
1e9dda2453354feb22439ba5ac57319c
71b2a5fbe7198c93170b314a1c78c797fbb4e544
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZL' 'sip-files00027.txt'
bcb731d81a6618cfe86c1872e748f31b
d1e33f5a070cc7b3caf45b3399e9c709718889b9
'2012-01-21T19:46:27-05:00'
describe
'26567' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZM' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
0e37e3d03f888608dcca453052aff189
28dd30b9288b297f9df3a05d518ffac9f752a120
'2012-01-21T19:49:11-05:00'
describe
'328239' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZN' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
3baeff84db80f94e42db04bf8479881b
b115c1017e51debdf3112106a1bf02e3fed544b7
'2012-01-21T19:59:05-05:00'
describe
'160271' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZO' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
0014518e8b0b88339c8808d7c09a1d22
d512300f89c20f60ef79a219b6461c95f9d9bef6
'2012-01-21T19:48:57-05:00'
describe
'34734' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZP' 'sip-files00028.pro'
b542439b6d9b2a074476246caba20b96
fad03877c586eb03b1360f4c1f898d33dd139afe
'2012-01-21T19:50:35-05:00'
describe
'63036' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZQ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
b14131e4c0b78964f94453053b5f104d
737c270730df731a4f168cc75ed6cc1db85cecc8
'2012-01-21T19:50:53-05:00'
describe
'2638996' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZR' 'sip-files00028.tif'
d7d933a8f62de7a756364869b81b96e5
b93ef3b13291b74c0688e374d20efa3ac3202230
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZS' 'sip-files00028.txt'
2a6530a4615d18e0a2cdaebf79dc0dcd
d1e0b3e2197a22d7874ac3a71b4ff5e75c39269b
'2012-01-21T19:57:00-05:00'
describe
'25572' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZT' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
cb8c2b35c65fbf7f7e961299cf993eee
9f1408b75dabeeadd59814684c1b84cdd5e9c815
'2012-01-21T19:48:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZU' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
764a200fa2ccaead9bc889111acde7a3
e96ff85a055b5cce4526af1e2ad99f85d646b8e2
'2012-01-21T19:55:07-05:00'
describe
'141779' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZV' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
f2eeb01b860ca9ac4b8b2e18c61a407c
517edb95c1fd8639eccec28bcf8acabfb329defa
'2012-01-21T19:47:21-05:00'
describe
'30341' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZW' 'sip-files00029.pro'
0ef6158c397b499e8daea4e1f17688fe
a51ddddd5a632cffb992039b4db5509ce16775ba
describe
'56904' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
0a411fb4385ec9575d97390ec567b144
478ce7b4413569f5343f63c898c2fecfe43f7cdb
'2012-01-21T19:48:32-05:00'
describe
'2638704' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZY' 'sip-files00029.tif'
2ca630a4a422dfc7bd17180505ce97b6
9cf8fac091663b313e66c84033d8aa0e43331ecc
'2012-01-21T19:55:02-05:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAQZZ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
55b793ff90a8b6452845b7146f195151
d15bf9f5662a23821efa2fecbf929b4dc06419c0
'2012-01-21T19:54:31-05:00'
describe
'24535' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAA' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
2bec0771d6ebde9faa3bc3096aa568a2
8053ce9c38a61031d9073955374fc7f38d316689
'2012-01-21T19:53:30-05:00'
describe
'328280' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAB' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
40c944bf8db0cf0df0d39d22093de7ad
fc3437f194278c0d408375f02cbc0ff98e913aac
'2012-01-21T19:50:23-05:00'
describe
'153066' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAC' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
c5d42ee731603a56efea69b57bffb7cd
97ed03be5ae6606d393d0e61a8ab96884d8979b4
'2012-01-21T19:56:40-05:00'
describe
'33613' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAD' 'sip-files00030.pro'
0131a27316bc4912f88827e122d55107
873ef9aac8c517be2d1d9e593d4ff9e170d6c017
'2012-01-21T19:53:48-05:00'
describe
'61881' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAE' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
ac5bccb1bebd8828d23b9db76ecd87c8
95650322011d1d0e2869846ebdffa94921c88dca
'2012-01-21T19:59:31-05:00'
describe
'2638944' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAF' 'sip-files00030.tif'
b6eeefbe5e92d996a8eb93f35f7cc0a1
de966fa302dd5d663719fc5a00126d7fae6c5c60
'2012-01-21T19:58:20-05:00'
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAG' 'sip-files00030.txt'
4d49a5e8daa4e20556183c8eca9b0a87
35f55e4e45d33869c295696ded9a0daf46ce95c6
'2012-01-21T19:52:39-05:00'
describe
'25194' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAH' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
37aee9add6c03b95b2cc7acc971a4bf0
63f6886dde0aae8e117d6c4fdc5ddaca51e56998
'2012-01-21T19:52:25-05:00'
describe
'328252' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAI' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
827d2fdbbb1751393ab36b9538d80376
c32382b662b9524b1d6cbfdfafe5045ae7a5d886
'2012-01-21T19:50:11-05:00'
describe
'163252' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAJ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
2e33ca1d2b5175c14eb83e95a5376e9a
bd7e9ed892b40bcc90db9a17e24ab9b234c3e452
'2012-01-21T19:57:21-05:00'
describe
'35938' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAK' 'sip-files00031.pro'
4916ee74073f5783954491afd374310c
68c66fed766748063a6936e1b38fae7b790d6a34
'2012-01-21T19:58:46-05:00'
describe
'64630' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAL' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
ffb0654e0e42bd56dd31f1fe6845fa4c
ee60d22912d036f14714f137f6bbe52263eb9f61
'2012-01-21T19:46:37-05:00'
describe
'2639148' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAM' 'sip-files00031.tif'
bff3aa6c9ff8ce69f9b5d11a7c012775
0ae85bd9ea64419fb2e2f297ee919473f1755a59
'2012-01-21T19:45:54-05:00'
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAN' 'sip-files00031.txt'
21dff6bfbc6a1914ad94b045361211e4
b5878f88a2467b26123c9083f684cfb214e65d4e
'2012-01-21T19:48:15-05:00'
describe
'26337' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAO' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
d8f877a5b410ec6512a5a6a36f372709
41926b87ad96c0e172e502a9b3bdf3b70c89c0fe
'2012-01-21T19:47:17-05:00'
describe
'328229' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAP' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
e0d84ac39e312262c8defad28ca70b45
a89e07af2d97ce94b1105c4f501a1f40b8120a78
'2012-01-21T19:55:38-05:00'
describe
'157107' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAQ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
c3a09268e8e4270b7097473fab130d58
5dfc9a8fad95abc8a49af73cd1fa42b1f3fac6f3
describe
'34963' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAR' 'sip-files00032.pro'
53fa0b8502e7a7bde1b434c2d926236f
86692b778537039b5ec75beec52929dbd7e061df
'2012-01-21T19:59:39-05:00'
describe
'61255' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAS' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
c079f21b24dd70ebfcb194364f751453
259a905d64b0a5e6b6ff1cf25b2aaecd3512d244
'2012-01-21T19:55:03-05:00'
describe
'2638912' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAT' 'sip-files00032.tif'
3ba7b72783f29f3f8caab8cced511eed
fafea85d25ec7c60b0c598b08800c0af07f9ff3a
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAU' 'sip-files00032.txt'
bb5edbd30365b8405625f6d73cd71e34
95eba055095d4e22656923dd20ed52e3963950bd
'2012-01-21T19:49:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAV' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
eecfe192c84501c9e1e548cb698ce559
fac7f96927f7d023c7089e935a30321b9850f5db
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAW' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
a5ea8ba235141cbc208bafc776ecd7af
68747793d07f23b66b675fbbc00af718dae426b5
'2012-01-21T19:53:03-05:00'
describe
'161590' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAX' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
3e02247612246f71aef75db04af675ad
7ac4fb2d0ebab7c8c03b498ff46bffd9101c2be3
'2012-01-21T19:51:15-05:00'
describe
'34346' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAY' 'sip-files00033.pro'
4c31c78d00d770ff202fdfbe943b29b7
7616fcfe29d373820041719cb20cedad5f18818a
'2012-01-21T19:45:53-05:00'
describe
'64953' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARAZ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
fc98fe15f682235e9c35e883bbd40148
cbdc5e77a9b427676e9085a28af9685a60f0182b
'2012-01-21T19:50:58-05:00'
describe
'2639248' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBA' 'sip-files00033.tif'
47ae9198bdec8599ea8399ca920e5fce
94ff4f67679b341f6040a3d4eb73789ec4c64eb2
'2012-01-21T19:47:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBB' 'sip-files00033.txt'
a02f6e440a002984b280d504fd9b1bbf
de45eb17f2be52b4cf858d5693778e3783520e2d
describe
'26832' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBC' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
6bc367b13c7f5b808006cbe25656d22b
8735f28e9e22d4c6f329507039a775bd413c8599
'2012-01-21T19:59:19-05:00'
describe
'328278' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBD' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
9e53f34fd1ccf9e661df065e0c50f8ee
c52f7e75fba16a3e99739a18929ea97ba582a8de
'2012-01-21T19:51:14-05:00'
describe
'74117' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBE' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
9e7929bee39e05b533a232ad54c6ae82
c07851896ba398291c4f41f2dc6488f96e774c98
'2012-01-21T19:57:10-05:00'
describe
'13177' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBF' 'sip-files00034.pro'
96f8387000be58930f491eb56ee4b418
5ffa5dbb22a6c9e3af006cc14e30f26998b7f9e9
'2012-01-21T19:52:40-05:00'
describe
'31839' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
19081c7f6b8aa34ad38fffd3a1dadfb6
b65512822b25a1dec3e8156c0a14b02f6a6fd6de
'2012-01-21T19:58:06-05:00'
describe
'2636320' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBH' 'sip-files00034.tif'
efc6f9e94fb2cfbb1346c5d7dcb6cc18
941ef7e8b0b7be56eab1af729a14a72f7b226b9d
'2012-01-21T19:57:53-05:00'
describe
'534' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBI' 'sip-files00034.txt'
2810f79646a7f790d2fe285ca5206847
b980c7925bfc69ff5a94cd56a033e9ac7b8f5b9b
'2012-01-21T19:58:39-05:00'
describe
'16069' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBJ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
3f71336634226c20ba9df8a0c6e00dd7
fd0ccdd7976f29f70fdc069a112a1a3b96ef86e4
describe
'328222' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBK' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
05049c4dbe2de7591ccc65ba205ac81a
8cbf7153d8fb65198dc556369f6110ce2db7cb56
'2012-01-21T19:51:19-05:00'
describe
'120648' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
4b941e58484e1fce8cb22ad61493851e
beac65e0bb260f0cfc826402bf5fdff5b15c4540
'2012-01-21T19:58:01-05:00'
describe
'24503' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBM' 'sip-files00035.pro'
5df642c4f1a6d301ab9f69069be49217
c2e6e68013d4ce51f2cb6ed5b29637c326edcb88
'2012-01-21T19:56:41-05:00'
describe
'48358' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBN' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
17621721d4a4725eb5476b09f098d458
91ee234b6d9e620feb9cee71627fab997831d01a
'2012-01-21T19:53:20-05:00'
describe
'2637844' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBO' 'sip-files00035.tif'
51c6165bd8ae7803536b5daf0cc3e845
b722fcdaaa48d49a333ca114367013d169c7474d
'2012-01-21T19:55:23-05:00'
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBP' 'sip-files00035.txt'
44b26bda291b644a421e234826ec52f5
58a30751488f5f6baf6415a5b3a0d4e54acdab65
describe
'21383' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBQ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
65f86784a1e5f35504c36c234fcc69db
3394890acc5de659690cb1f3dd2fa7b9dac10a2e
'2012-01-21T19:52:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
9086b22781f3d04e8ee290ff646e264c
3305c1b638b56433f49594842b557a5b8a5284b8
'2012-01-21T19:54:00-05:00'
describe
'156811' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBS' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
c72b53f0d2ecb3096dffb4e2f1a49043
670a7ff809b3ba33d22fc85278058b7fec682540
'2012-01-21T19:57:24-05:00'
describe
'33642' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBT' 'sip-files00036.pro'
6d5ebc06c3020d27c1c0b1da2be439bd
5194b05a1c1e4d3fd92928956811959d0b98ab55
'2012-01-21T19:47:59-05:00'
describe
'62594' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBU' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
3766da2895559c059faa21377fd514e4
4011cc060f978d2c3381acafea722fc8e9011981
'2012-01-21T19:49:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBV' 'sip-files00036.tif'
6e1bf313f437f84e26341c406f6dc9f0
b551795b6efbefb1a82a2d540af7e1c5a2bbd554
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBW' 'sip-files00036.txt'
61c30df86239e554545c487cbca68f3e
88deb32d83665c6e547c387822328047fb310402
'2012-01-21T19:57:35-05:00'
describe
'25253' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBX' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
f21f5033507aed5adca0afc07257f699
e35f2a51eafc13fb7e2f836ae67912c9fa16dde3
describe
'328134' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBY' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
8a9b5a997faf1fa03d113405611396f2
104895af0bffca3653d629b84398fa7cc644371d
'2012-01-21T19:56:39-05:00'
describe
'137373' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARBZ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
fa6c39b26ee41fbf7010cae3f7ee88c5
768ec8371613ecd2f67bbe6533cf2ec0eba20ab8
'2012-01-21T19:49:52-05:00'
describe
'29802' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCA' 'sip-files00037.pro'
9fc8766e94ae5600db63e9ecd168dc62
e17a5ff83a3a16bf2ea592ed1cb06731fc73b3dc
'2012-01-21T19:51:57-05:00'
describe
'54519' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCB' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
48e3bfbebf349492ce00ef4aef5a1587
9bb9953fb435b4f17a6582aaeee8030f59ee5174
describe
'2638576' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCC' 'sip-files00037.tif'
7b3c45001e119a4d8439ebaf244c6025
8850e649c2f8dda0d4376b9584991635a1b2d73d
'2012-01-21T19:54:04-05:00'
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCD' 'sip-files00037.txt'
9056f9a2ceec01fe47c0be95d77ac388
6afd926e6ca6e73486d1925bdd3b6a9a01fd1946
'2012-01-21T19:47:08-05:00'
describe
'23640' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCE' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
c19e5200b862eeb4ba12fed929db87e6
9744b31ee36a74ce4e95e6b00df73821070546be
'2012-01-21T19:53:13-05:00'
describe
'328268' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCF' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
1e514d2da6966fcba564a9c9914053d5
4bd366288527ee200136d5c831d6ea71d788dc02
'2012-01-21T19:56:02-05:00'
describe
'146602' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCG' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
2ea3bb000721740d467b0db568e10efa
307f0d035eaaae04beadceeb1e99cdb632f54e89
'2012-01-21T19:59:54-05:00'
describe
'32200' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCH' 'sip-files00038.pro'
15867198be7f51906228b9334ead6ce2
f5fb288bc3479d83e0b920d3f192efda07400d53
'2012-01-21T19:50:25-05:00'
describe
'58682' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCI' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
b82b67ac8f9ff4d6554e74bdbd1152f1
1e7d1b2f271635af814a6810e069101a499adb56
describe
'2638784' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCJ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
eba6bb8a47e0dc9e563dd75c00ab1b2b
7fad57214d9975aca619607972067e14a35e05a5
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCK' 'sip-files00038.txt'
659e208c5304df83fe1dcbfd6f1b66f3
4b58a5e3d96a6fea8b247104548ee76bde422e14
'2012-01-21T19:57:40-05:00'
describe
'24888' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCL' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
1abca373c795a201c77b4bec1bc0616b
40b6f0e4f6261bc68feaeea3a1ca7a6ad48f68d2
'2012-01-21T19:56:24-05:00'
describe
'328261' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCM' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
a8ab746d758a7f4a2a0c819772cc2293
7f1dd1c3dd4e4f8cc9a8b7c4f39d9065041fe63d
'2012-01-21T19:48:27-05:00'
describe
'152712' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCN' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
756c4db79f6bdc55873ae33c3ec1ba40
a2069c5e240b210a71ad4de3d4d79d1eff009d4a
'2012-01-21T19:54:52-05:00'
describe
'33866' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCO' 'sip-files00039.pro'
a6e904458e699a5f0f7018e6636c22e8
a0c6cf019ca1fce4130680c68a019c974d56eb75
'2012-01-21T19:59:46-05:00'
describe
'60200' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCP' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
ff0f9a0781f2bf5a4944c8c9c3b2f697
4d727fa1909db8492164fdce760e77c2df2e052e
'2012-01-21T19:59:59-05:00'
describe
'2638768' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCQ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
cd607d0cf6cebb7b8b8775fa11912fb6
9dfd813e9a44f185bfec3b8169526db500f26c69
'2012-01-21T19:58:55-05:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCR' 'sip-files00039.txt'
161da519753c34a7bc6da1e4457af58d
3dedeb8399526b34b4b5a7480c7d4d89631c16b0
'2012-01-21T19:57:52-05:00'
describe
'25172' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCS' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
7426f1c59075a928c5b8c9ce2e753ddd
78fe384c28eedf94c600ca5572e8a9fb19740318
'2012-01-21T19:53:35-05:00'
describe
'328264' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCT' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
f87d3dee10b31f506e3b5fb05969ad5f
dc34b04f6ec9b07823f21e600ad1b9e5c03ed834
'2012-01-21T19:45:57-05:00'
describe
'155427' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCU' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
b7d3da3e223a3e939fbb8000f0b6f0fb
5dd263735c4ea6b6a69518f1f50c461fe643c18b
'2012-01-21T19:59:28-05:00'
describe
'34207' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCV' 'sip-files00040.pro'
816f044cf8151c2927e4ba46d746062b
2843791e82b24bd9bc11ecf12201372739b9e4c4
describe
'62490' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCW' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
f10bf9390b9ffd02296e9cf203ff6c71
baf41d54e88c921e97c38b394ab1a429893bf6d6
'2012-01-21T19:57:33-05:00'
describe
'2638988' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCX' 'sip-files00040.tif'
5fee50f336bf1e5f56f648d0d7118482
13592c08059e9386d2d20b7d2c021c79bfb8250c
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCY' 'sip-files00040.txt'
6c09057ca96d56c600ac1f19c6ae639b
d878e7f5419c54c8c9f496f0ef6ffae5d0ee3724
'2012-01-21T19:57:13-05:00'
describe
'25502' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARCZ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
5b2bbd9652c502f5306cb58f889d18a3
402cf9c364bbcdbd8a4318c7f1c2b44ebbabad26
'2012-01-21T19:58:05-05:00'
describe
'326760' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDA' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
ed8adeb0a589f38e6b3e37df34214afc
c0d4b8c90cfcfde5ec25842b166fd3c3494d7b7e
describe
'172685' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDB' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
e47fc2e50c1191f70659951d87de4e34
6fc053bc2cd847676317557ab0f60637c9687e3f
describe
'1681' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDC' 'sip-files00042.pro'
577319a02ca2e7fc3f025ebb7985460c
a9ef1f6f8a796939b34b61126ec26b3db17f2cce
describe
'52085' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDD' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
ca452da89580baafd361a149aeca4f35
badac978526da7be4ee38b04711581ffd908eec4
'2012-01-21T19:59:11-05:00'
describe
'2627900' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDE' 'sip-files00042.tif'
c135a93159f4b0f0a0b0ae46191700b4
085f06c11cea914e70f2edd5e460a692ea759d80
'2012-01-21T19:54:34-05:00'
describe
'178' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDF' 'sip-files00042.txt'
f53ac8ae056fd4e69be9e78babda0126
98369d0e8b4678055bb22668301d5b07a04b9cf9
'2012-01-21T19:57:16-05:00'
describe
'23565' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDG' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
da20ac794f29f0918b158deeaa648d1d
f305536bb9da09ceff4556261623204a93a02fb7
'2012-01-21T19:55:09-05:00'
describe
'328210' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDH' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
c10d7dfe8dff4620adcebed2c782a37d
f64ab387cc25100d7c05168fe6374f58819845d3
'2012-01-21T19:58:17-05:00'
describe
'160799' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDI' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
d414895e0143c04b9a2bb93c4b93e7e3
b901c3b8d8eda9399c4285257e31d62f24aa1d85
'2012-01-21T19:56:05-05:00'
describe
'35608' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDJ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
bfa09328f0dfcbed87e1ce5012a95a7d
c2abd6d0ea8796a57dbdb50c00871c71a8e31c44
'2012-01-21T19:48:31-05:00'
describe
'64590' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDK' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
362236164c1e21f4012cd31fb44ef1a2
9fffde0abc244e938db3ebb2ec4d8a2e277f6939
'2012-01-21T19:51:21-05:00'
describe
'2639140' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDL' 'sip-files00043.tif'
7e883a191ba9ccd83e81bfa93ee830b8
9b6fefa68e7525b14436f071ecbe19b4200505f8
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDM' 'sip-files00043.txt'
e9bdbaf6dd334f0566840329b0f91127
aaba2b58c10bdd1af687d9a308497c205009cc80
'2012-01-21T19:46:24-05:00'
describe
'25915' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDN' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
6f35cd8de4189bbf277be5f4f33089a8
b517343f771cba6c231cdac53c3117e3c8ca666f
'2012-01-21T19:57:48-05:00'
describe
'328477' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDO' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
c82d966a163a41530b5284172491d3bb
0975f1b05b884a00a3cea4e0eb20360f2933d79c
describe
'170648' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDP' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
008aa0d4cc8efb5c8a09639016215cbb
757213b13e5a04a47b7ba67a0c5866b21ae4577e
describe
'35907' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDQ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
106ae34ecf96d9481d2e4eb7617c507c
a6000d663d4671ee0570372383f6bd7351e7b49d
'2012-01-21T19:51:01-05:00'
describe
'64510' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDR' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
6673a17187ec0ec8d6b9f247260398d1
c95a2ab448a8f38023a2be6322f197cfff72d5d3
'2012-01-21T19:58:32-05:00'
describe
'2641304' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDS' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9d424a7685c2cef608fcadcb60e8d6c3
6ae91cf4995b687750a41531523eb32c8ce70188
'2012-01-21T19:55:33-05:00'
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDT' 'sip-files00044.txt'
b1f55608fe2194a3e070fc659402eb95
bd21ed6bed81a2e9e677964c6670788c8747e0a2
describe
'26007' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDU' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
7c92894b8596231ae87461abb954c14b
28a95e0f4ec49056d1db7657258be64c433fcdef
'2012-01-21T19:57:17-05:00'
describe
'328223' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
5f69ae31f897ac0c7c0733aa95bfa3d7
7ddd7ae1b3db046c8127032c02ee949b071db0ae
'2012-01-21T19:57:15-05:00'
describe
'162536' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDW' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
4df2aa0e806655c36a5b9b656ce50627
c464a1db43a6b3526378e48e1ca0b7511ede5a5a
'2012-01-21T19:58:14-05:00'
describe
'34075' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDX' 'sip-files00045.pro'
f7aca8302f2a4cc6ed4429c743a328d8
ab51e9b4da91fc62257b206fb8767aa09536e0aa
'2012-01-21T19:57:26-05:00'
describe
'64064' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDY' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
0034b7754652e068c807629db32603a7
d5ea207b39b0a0d99a82f35d99465de064e44b3c
describe
'2639120' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARDZ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
60f0c77ec294389775085f64c34895f9
bea7b8c606d8763f84fa143ba0dfed387c604152
'2012-01-21T19:46:44-05:00'
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREA' 'sip-files00045.txt'
385792045781cb9ad75f62e2411b0fb6
7b5ab995f1683d860285205c4c7565473c50ba8b
'2012-01-21T19:56:28-05:00'
describe
'25939' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREB' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
ab5b9ad8a47dc33f59bf73494fb89c05
8687e38550c28cf0af11347cfe9fa242592e7023
'2012-01-21T19:52:42-05:00'
describe
'328274' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREC' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
9adc50821a1a6f6935b4eb31ffc317b3
31426928db6397728e1b27707eb3b9c626136518
describe
'148444' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARED' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
652106dd29f41ba742d8f62b36aec04b
50d19d3c979e1516c9ddd182863fc00cf6a722be
'2012-01-21T19:59:07-05:00'
describe
'32023' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREE' 'sip-files00046.pro'
c4a6db923031598a6dde4a05e7e93a52
c5832494d6fdc949d544986b9fdf70056e3677c0
'2012-01-21T19:48:03-05:00'
describe
'58759' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREF' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
6515b2620f92bcfcc1d82aa774f0d498
2d5b9e7dc37e3d284e3427977e9f037a4b6f30c6
'2012-01-21T19:51:07-05:00'
describe
'2638860' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREG' 'sip-files00046.tif'
2d35b0639ec3f3f2a65a7c5edd955780
0570ece9cc67c962eccc74c882e047c7709e86a0
'2012-01-21T19:56:03-05:00'
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREH' 'sip-files00046.txt'
dbb57842a0556bd0a8f7f329ab5b12fd
8e5d00242ceb950af66501e450b4819999f34feb
'2012-01-21T19:49:41-05:00'
describe
'25001' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREI' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
552bf6dd0e74f9d70c49efba6619179f
ce3be2d905aa8d80f0690de765aee74a7b8e04ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREJ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
b30e90fabc489adf56f96869a8256754
0b49567c4a06967152f8c17df329bdaa312f8aeb
'2012-01-21T19:49:12-05:00'
describe
'166582' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREK' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
432e7c7e2188a31104cd79fd97b83af1
c46dbf49230826c35df93c80b1a7524f1854a44b
'2012-01-21T19:51:35-05:00'
describe
'35627' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREL' 'sip-files00047.pro'
8643433095373f838fb17153bc1b9e08
c8a185924cf1095d7afbbb05a1d10743b8aff923
'2012-01-21T19:56:08-05:00'
describe
'64753' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREM' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
ffeae336acb38f06a1b9ff057d329bdc
5ba33918cc1e69f1c347802920398a446e39d292
'2012-01-21T19:55:30-05:00'
describe
'2639188' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREN' 'sip-files00047.tif'
28a0d368f1ddd78e2fc535c0953883b5
b67043a7ce9adedd23e79ebcfccc5ee7d9efb9d8
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREO' 'sip-files00047.txt'
861f44a5e9266350b30f9d33b1a6ccb3
6b21694dc8de644769f7d5650046728e13ae401f
'2012-01-21T19:51:09-05:00'
describe
'26622' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREP' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
76ad44fecdb9b2aed555175fbbfba3af
ce9158c0055075884c434c2c8848897e6fb8bf00
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREQ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
98ea1be8251a507750968ffa14b3dc0f
491ac9627800cac316ff6950f6e43c43799f6624
'2012-01-21T19:48:42-05:00'
describe
'154894' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARER' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
143825295919464283f15f68be4b3292
e55f0ea832c7f48477cde49256c69b4cb9496a8b
describe
'33264' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARES' 'sip-files00048.pro'
431ff284dadb5697595f1b9c2700705a
3aefbc694cfe6f160fbaaeacfd0b436052abda6b
'2012-01-21T19:51:44-05:00'
describe
'61737' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARET' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
7b85dccd2763a67f45b1e14df8fa7591
2bdd8472d8f2c88254c1226da33db030b2e92a67
'2012-01-21T19:59:23-05:00'
describe
'2639108' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREU' 'sip-files00048.tif'
7dea3305c584862c99add4f3ba0db63a
0faf297b30eff3c53029d744f55df5de22e929ec
'2012-01-21T19:55:48-05:00'
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREV' 'sip-files00048.txt'
19d40d34a48f2904af6782ada11ba559
cf523007fc3d55d35f4a51b2affc2ed3202545c7
describe
'25533' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREW' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
ec1b89701729a7989750b7565199bca5
5976e639033a825ffc735b51b9c9dd8297dc20b9
'2012-01-21T19:49:57-05:00'
describe
'328240' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREX' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
24897b5f0e437b54f8f0d3366f5c44fc
d5d5fcf2a69360a89ac57f8517633b12028c7b2a
'2012-01-21T19:49:49-05:00'
describe
'152217' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREY' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
8ed913a42c275bb6ca7542150aaa6fc1
4ef9596ec80ade7e609154aa4aef71d85162e9f3
describe
'33250' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAREZ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
8cddef04e82c5c4c7bcf2396195e9a78
311fac919990c4ec74711af99a4977623cf3695d
'2012-01-21T19:56:07-05:00'
describe
'60485' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFA' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
8a6446e29abe301564352eaee1ff6f8d
4cac11f1b070395b90fde546a06138ca5567ce2b
describe
'2638868' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFB' 'sip-files00049.tif'
c95f8b05c339b1b010db981a52505f87
1c1de3c8c462412a4667be48440f7facc46d3edb
'2012-01-21T19:54:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
288a25d3c1f994e55ee0ae560cdb1904
9c9101fc15c9358d3d7b176149f438f9fb0b8d18
'2012-01-21T19:52:01-05:00'
describe
'24900' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFD' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
b9c53a6b04d7ec09c8dc9d18ce00c517
99828fba33dd1bab80a9a48ef8cae6237a28d4ed
'2012-01-21T19:49:36-05:00'
describe
'328283' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFE' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
9597c6934ddcf9f9566bed0c6794bbfa
9acd7f027e6a6136e7afb83258f39608962c6185
describe
'156637' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFF' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
8571f20b36203694a0d31f99a3468e52
cbe04fb4bb7a12c22eeca0482b3ea698aa2e3fd8
describe
'35204' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFG' 'sip-files00050.pro'
385b066967c56f67b6fcae93e6f3966e
2c98355f67aa0693ea09cdbe540c7da3d1111a63
'2012-01-21T19:54:12-05:00'
describe
'62079' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFH' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
1e225b35a4b433b3b8446f7012f3f48c
567ba88d3f5bb5c1a8ef22c28688388496178ab3
'2012-01-21T19:59:01-05:00'
describe
'2639212' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFI' 'sip-files00050.tif'
df25b5761c44d03ddad908bca369e658
1071c7eb9ff67b09280b1cf99cce26aaf668ec7f
'2012-01-21T19:52:50-05:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFJ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
6b978be5c8e968a6feaf11b5a04559c9
a1ab86298ac7e56d9b0e200671e29bfda7fc15b6
'2012-01-21T19:58:34-05:00'
describe
'25544' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFK' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
44232b741ec893d8553420b4822e1b03
ca68d69fbddb0a81014c4b16f70761fb83262df7
'2012-01-21T19:54:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFL' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
5d3329e7e06a68d5bd86f4511ee59257
d88fa15433868419e6365ffdf2ef5746c6597f54
'2012-01-21T19:54:25-05:00'
describe
'153666' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFM' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
1beee360b0596f24aea39a97d5a41d50
93197475c05f2dde320cf8e21dfcfe174c0ab0c4
'2012-01-21T19:53:26-05:00'
describe
'34523' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFN' 'sip-files00051.pro'
43a69d7736b9a2cb1e964c1080ba8060
ffacb7aeaa8ce1f05277f24e42a1dc593987de83
'2012-01-21T19:49:47-05:00'
describe
'61582' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFO' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
e938b0f95132534262b2e254e4ab572a
a063f504847557f9f29fa6b2b01047d01410dd7b
'2012-01-21T19:46:46-05:00'
describe
'2638748' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFP' 'sip-files00051.tif'
7342e1df20f4a869d5e525b44cc9687a
0800c3f5433baeda940a35417f22ce14d4ef48a6
'2012-01-21T19:52:05-05:00'
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFQ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
33655df9c20fcf61a8b99a94a48734f8
ae296ed4ad623b6a401b808ba118236d6547ed91
describe
'24754' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFR' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
23c8101eaeb0cd9f44c968bbcda02f90
fcdcfde1dac2b24a5d463cee8897f685e0a86a59
'2012-01-21T19:46:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFS' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
9a544d0c5d2d1be75f4990855a17cf47
304725cec487a6c05a2bb4e29be2bcb9cb8401d5
'2012-01-21T19:45:59-05:00'
describe
'150689' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFT' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
db8898d891a94030d95c772d42afb24f
baccff65b2cdd379f478c93a80b5e823ce531239
'2012-01-21T19:50:34-05:00'
describe
'33497' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFU' 'sip-files00052.pro'
55d17a9107ee077c55ac193aefd78726
55d47e3897c765218a7e257db0af22b0e41661e2
'2012-01-21T19:47:00-05:00'
describe
'59465' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFV' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
8b90fdc6262f3b5d5a221e147c784e44
846d4f2f7a6ab4580bc29b9170a9e6c98393808d
'2012-01-21T19:54:10-05:00'
describe
'2638712' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFW' 'sip-files00052.tif'
931c533a2337f565b5641d911a3bcda3
4d6d3f3747c1caa4ce681cfda9b4cad015797798
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFX' 'sip-files00052.txt'
3e9dc3d26e3dcdefc323b8a7a6d060e5
b619ecf418b38620bffc764283eee70ff88e7988
'2012-01-21T19:54:43-05:00'
describe
'24720' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFY' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
a5e0c6bcbaed015c13dad92052ab9e3b
5f1cc55cc175e55268a73b656ffa861255aa3c26
'2012-01-21T19:54:46-05:00'
describe
'328228' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARFZ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
65499f942b5e3193de37a562499663be
95187872fd0c60ab87bb60c70b4d29ded3cb9dd0
describe
'157842' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGA' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
b4e1fb289620a2cda09fb1a322b3b355
95f312c295a48715e9eaee6bc1004f3f713833b8
'2012-01-21T19:49:45-05:00'
describe
'34257' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGB' 'sip-files00053.pro'
b6316fa469ec029193cf5fa50bd4cbb5
0f07de989e6ecd62236cbceb37970bfaaf036f77
'2012-01-21T19:53:36-05:00'
describe
'62652' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGC' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
71c5ea0df46db3b93b38b963136ca49c
357751ed5b543b32206e87d391913d660d86af07
describe
'2638992' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGD' 'sip-files00053.tif'
deda136c523d9561b43451bab555b7ff
72edd8df41bbbcb6cfc89b101d6d5a290be026ae
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGE' 'sip-files00053.txt'
6974b1cdbdead721370c321b7470faf9
fd3ad9f210c560c7cf5adfd976d20d8fd430777e
'2012-01-21T19:53:22-05:00'
describe
'25581' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGF' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
13194939a11d462ca0770db3f315351a
9803ec5819ff1323a3ce64502ba5e47fd83f8083
'2012-01-21T19:56:32-05:00'
describe
'309064' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGG' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
0213d22e9adb825dcfc06f81b5fe61c3
8c37e2df45a18805bb3450126b9dedafbb436705
'2012-01-21T19:46:02-05:00'
describe
'63659' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGH' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
b5199a384d89a8f63cf9f32f1d93f04d
24942fda89cf147592093165ce73d3047d0739cc
describe
'11892' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGI' 'sip-files00054.pro'
c227f1a1004cdcb2a099c5ca77ec4403
19b4d2dfa9f7240bc27b544c00ef383fab4a9391
'2012-01-21T19:48:18-05:00'
describe
'28493' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGJ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
979aff2c1ef06837767f2a8331d83951
71f64b781bd0e2f5faada9e25728bfadef0eff7b
'2012-01-21T19:59:50-05:00'
describe
'2635928' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGK' 'sip-files00054.tif'
d6b6fbb0636ba791c9a0d94afe07bb8b
b0dd7da799f77cda2b8afc62c651272f7525e406
'2012-01-21T19:55:43-05:00'
describe
'477' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGL' 'sip-files00054.txt'
ebafe5c4e55038fa41b65efe9956a0ae
42362d0122366a9ff8842f6b9003170f6ad7e994
describe
'14954' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGM' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
ae643b8b305e6c523e343c5921559fd1
323f2ce1de85a704d4c28cc36f34b5744dff3c16
'2012-01-21T19:46:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGN' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
7a1e67eead280dcd9b2e0ddf1e4d2d36
0251c1499bac6f9c66862e7b49e67399374f0b96
'2012-01-21T19:51:20-05:00'
describe
'111835' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGO' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
530a976521f9176b9e1bf2801b616b4d
b84dd20dafd8d5306f212a3e745fc374b5094e02
'2012-01-21T19:56:58-05:00'
describe
'25335' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGP' 'sip-files00055.pro'
e67f32ebf22f1a2e7975759a4464556a
3a649aafb03b58359aedc3e8ea615d65416f76fc
'2012-01-21T19:58:54-05:00'
describe
'46254' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGQ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
f75f13a43d28d0b3ba3865f26dc2b3a2
f319a9a73c5a858ead16ce868f54d081eec13f62
'2012-01-21T19:51:41-05:00'
describe
'2637560' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGR' 'sip-files00055.tif'
7018cc91679c9cfb22dcc3e7c2e17535
97d03904c4a9635517167ded2635e1bee0aae207
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGS' 'sip-files00055.txt'
5277a6f2a10c5a4d822650c795b68acb
c786aa4579f511241292f6e11d1675f69ac4689c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGT' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
c3b6fc6323d00e673343f15946ee9784
47fdb3c2e07a7f139c9814033a629aaef380dd66
'2012-01-21T19:59:49-05:00'
describe
'328254' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGU' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
0de78cdda908f0e5243deead512b401f
dae804febf2e77cbe16185dc99e54e02fbebb11d
'2012-01-21T19:49:35-05:00'
describe
'143975' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGV' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
a3e912f6229f28acc09c5d62fc41c094
576131a1fffe5f515a86bdb571232614602fa272
'2012-01-21T19:52:27-05:00'
describe
'31483' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGW' 'sip-files00056.pro'
1a697b25210ccbf396f13fefd406380c
11bc3d221d0be8fd261ef1b664f21ba8c0814042
describe
'57681' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGX' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
406706f59fbba062538899c149f27913
e95c8bed8deef7da62b8b906638571139806cde4
'2012-01-21T19:53:59-05:00'
describe
'2638780' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGY' 'sip-files00056.tif'
25a42e22b7fe41c4dfb4d813fe5fb21c
a2a84908b2cdf41150da6b4ac644a0d30527644e
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARGZ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
e830743ad3a8b24c5bfd9b0936757666
180f0236f8345be7e18e0e2e9a51a2e2793e168c
'2012-01-21T19:50:44-05:00'
describe
'24966' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHA' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
62621e1a7cd23f539e45ff5ea0b2e0ce
de4d47342f73342c07e64949b98a5658669470a8
describe
'328215' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHB' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
bb80569a96bdae968d007d9d31d2a187
987e094b8e2704702dd4d6c709a41c4e988ee098
'2012-01-21T19:58:49-05:00'
describe
'156091' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHC' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
54c6c5afbcfe819a7d0032bfd755561c
33a371be242423cb797aa45d5c74465130894351
describe
'34344' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHD' 'sip-files00057.pro'
1443188c5563edddc09a34906bc493da
369482f1f2bb6d434f13aa93de5c69ee81fa40e4
describe
'61939' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHE' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
db0d5f4311d2e748bff0ed53b5632212
53362421a8cf49d2a973c7734fa6995b5ca54307
describe
'2639032' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHF' 'sip-files00057.tif'
12abcf5d935fb8dea3f016d78f1fd4cd
7582ba86850523f3ec800231b399dd69571b2032
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHG' 'sip-files00057.txt'
f07b6ffae6c3bd5b4e75d7cec7f7ff71
935cd3422c8c6332f80ed81a2905c3bf135154fa
'2012-01-21T19:59:48-05:00'
describe
'25582' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHH' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
b66aab86bed9218393a8a9ab38cd311d
c98d46dbf34ec56b3d1f69cea39122a0e83884f6
'2012-01-21T19:52:08-05:00'
describe
'328214' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHI' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
e3402784c2322830edf362fb23fbb0cc
d14bdf0ff46620b49d9c3cfc81dd892c6e12a641
'2012-01-21T19:50:00-05:00'
describe
'155829' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHJ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
e6a92c67dd5a73945b32efd40368a379
5015f5b73738eed7e88558cc66cb2d3f4d0a1bb5
'2012-01-21T19:52:24-05:00'
describe
'34094' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHK' 'sip-files00058.pro'
045b0f5b63bc7bb99df98f03c06069fa
3a76b84d4af3047be436aa1e9487d0494f52155e
describe
'62442' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHL' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
63807f28a3c4a245a036a91cc2a999ee
4574a602cc9101342393cd4973a433eb93008241
describe
'2638884' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHM' 'sip-files00058.tif'
eef0c41a639784ccc16894d19ebf2be8
f5aaebf95a0242681644dfeddff43d2eee39a9bd
'2012-01-21T19:46:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHN' 'sip-files00058.txt'
c8877fd1b617e55d0e6b45e32904f6bd
827348b4de049284ce0bb3b384ba418958a60944
'2012-01-21T19:50:12-05:00'
describe
'25482' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHO' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
9dfef447a62c6b27c56bc476fa2f1120
f00b82798db71d4564cb12d3035b27aa31d771ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHP' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
35232c8c9c25eaa87de742fb1580f24b
ac01984c3f4d99ce2c4b474ad33904d0fc08919d
describe
'155942' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHQ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
8350222d2f1a6e9ccfe56510d8fc9545
9ce1edaf4e1a013510de3cf8a4c58b9388ac5184
describe
'34597' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHR' 'sip-files00059.pro'
12ece05dbca4f564e3b96243f3c08746
c3086cda04b94f5cdf0afb6ad38f4c539f2ed8fe
'2012-01-21T19:56:16-05:00'
describe
'60877' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHS' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
e994b27788cab43f412367daaa9d4f55
5cb0a978d78a382c1ee3079c415c1c71c3e5c454
'2012-01-21T19:54:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHT' 'sip-files00059.tif'
ce288ff252f18a4f329bb0e4c6322a45
9baa3633f8d85c1fe10054e739e5aaef1ac1c386
'2012-01-21T19:47:41-05:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHU' 'sip-files00059.txt'
d8846274f2153e7272c3ec51716e6ed1
3194992d65aa60d98c5f73e5720476b6a1d89442
describe
'24936' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHV' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
c7e4d4b7ab338fac6bfff0218894ccf6
4eda3062a2c40bc772be9507c7b0bfda3b214c26
'2012-01-21T19:53:39-05:00'
describe
'328197' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHW' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
ccb5c48d2257bd51e9775b51696135e9
e2a21c3fdf5d277acbea97d89cb7fe4e94d61dcb
describe
'153729' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHX' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
b5433b709209c482103cb0508c3fb145
1bd968eba492f1bfda546c6a0174585468fee7b4
describe
'34870' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHY' 'sip-files00060.pro'
79fa060826603edfa2bcf4d07735695f
c0dd6e3e922d561b535a883034ab0dd512143df4
'2012-01-21T19:57:25-05:00'
describe
'60235' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARHZ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
6031d48d0611a053935311288b31d3cd
b252d04d934bec577fe9bfe7c5c13a3f84032395
'2012-01-21T19:46:08-05:00'
describe
'2638796' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIA' 'sip-files00060.tif'
a4db2a04adda24eae00da8a926bf2b57
d27065148e421682d0b9ee5568ecb3fdd8925ecc
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIB' 'sip-files00060.txt'
86a2b1f1c0c520ae392e841adff87af7
fc4a1a9c0130cdaf713057beb2e96fe0e527e498
describe
'24902' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIC' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
24b009379adacc41edac95e18a618a22
c5a2fd78ab9b23b1f0f9922e17cb739b54a6eb95
'2012-01-21T19:51:11-05:00'
describe
'328213' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARID' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
bcda7cb62e589a84b09b8463bf6aa3e7
539e14f3d1343998462c868f5b2b2e3c7a0fe8da
'2012-01-21T19:55:11-05:00'
describe
'157068' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIE' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
87d3b5417d3431f6d31ec39ff3a2451d
e8440ebd589b212b770b0f3df5b0be3aeb451e95
describe
'34216' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIF' 'sip-files00061.pro'
0f7915f5d414087bb9eb6847c36108b8
33ed9b10e34767747f6ab7fa068849d0fef5232e
'2012-01-21T19:50:37-05:00'
describe
'60632' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIG' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
0a0854dd7c02d43f93be374139dabc67
9fc24acf35e1a6652f4b7010428bba27e1cb560b
'2012-01-21T19:50:47-05:00'
describe
'2638888' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIH' 'sip-files00061.tif'
84626f45aa81e4ef6baf973aca328e70
1698311aaab8bbd9f96380444712cfd556dc4c2b
'2012-01-21T19:51:08-05:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARII' 'sip-files00061.txt'
6fae92ca56d883a7d6f8700de2e9df02
299d3cea6f6ea0971eb8ccaefb0ddfc13cdf7e4b
'2012-01-21T19:50:48-05:00'
describe
'25620' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIJ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
ea7b16b10daebc914ec17b6950395cec
47a477810f0e0e22d8328d52485c98a608afd100
describe
'328440' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIK' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
afa1f79d8cc3ec0077bac732eb7eae2f
5592c824beb26bcdb41a01c602d50ba1726c01d6
'2012-01-21T19:54:36-05:00'
describe
'167205' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIL' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
6720e20cc14e5d35efcde5ac4ab095cc
cfec77aa3130871d5830fda28b739f6f7ee2a241
describe
'37162' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIM' 'sip-files00062.pro'
8bb5870fbdc2a5e07bb09cb0a051c63d
f392387902b5eb179e0ca8bd9d5598e62329695a
describe
'65232' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIN' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
f3b576eeccc03c8edddf00d0d2d45721
0e6e10ad59c761847f6d792c45386ec3180a8a49
'2012-01-21T19:52:18-05:00'
describe
'2641248' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIO' 'sip-files00062.tif'
5ba9d052ec549f075c3b4335e2c96793
8459f82bf98c5d867ad71d851eb501923a9a43a9
'2012-01-21T19:59:06-05:00'
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIP' 'sip-files00062.txt'
57c45fa82ef911e0981f40e50d808300
b87af3c8f030ba5957eb8283589143989316008e
'2012-01-21T19:50:32-05:00'
describe
'26074' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIQ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
c960bd7e02b97e95a94c4b13ae8757fd
e35409e813841a59ccbaaa662641bc5a015fd225
'2012-01-21T19:52:48-05:00'
describe
'328273' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIR' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
81e5c2e504f814366757fa983c99688f
3838cc274456fd7e92948fb7246b1d1bc8e2744a
describe
'164415' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIS' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
2dcbf80584095ae3483290004d49ba9a
3b54e7b025ca0bca3899eb5a4f7837df172e14c4
'2012-01-21T19:56:54-05:00'
describe
'35873' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIT' 'sip-files00063.pro'
0efd185d9839e1855a7e1c7dd11dec8c
4dc24e1f3565bf21fdb4270c9fd12d4b09431539
describe
'64022' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIU' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
2c2898b07fb04faaf6b93b7839ef5bfd
774a79774db0da81d89f787c0834d81c047a340a
'2012-01-21T19:53:25-05:00'
describe
'2639160' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIV' 'sip-files00063.tif'
847966fbcde378ba6928175bb932e820
f7f1199a2c0f47b59325dfc5ec1e05192b5c1bc9
'2012-01-21T19:54:14-05:00'
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIW' 'sip-files00063.txt'
eb14985dc48c9e607ad52d2817dc69fe
7d1f3d4f5b00239f7728c8038d49096875f611c5
'2012-01-21T19:50:33-05:00'
describe
'26198' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIX' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
83cfd123cdd9683e8a15fda9b09361e1
f4317a773711e0f6e0915f4c216f071dc2ea608d
'2012-01-21T19:57:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIY' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
bd6da2d855e317871614795c9403741b
3cc39f2a111049cb8b8574424f3ccd791e072a71
describe
'145561' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARIZ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
741ed18351a29c4f9f84f9bc642bb694
3fb4c7ce0cb62168c7474f182d5ddceff69f78c5
'2012-01-21T19:55:56-05:00'
describe
'32338' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJA' 'sip-files00064.pro'
4b92ea0e99f49d265b7dca1df2071865
c74c82e634300ef4d31a8af44e58fb0a43a0b433
'2012-01-21T19:52:13-05:00'
describe
'58041' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJB' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
85d112f4b2060967b615a4bb4a0eaf90
0329327e276c7dc584a3b37abe272e4e4b34d29b
describe
'2638696' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJC' 'sip-files00064.tif'
a7c4fe73fe415c3b44982a182739aebc
5fb02b119673cbf88f9865215006e042e5f6bc01
'2012-01-21T19:57:44-05:00'
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJD' 'sip-files00064.txt'
cc13e974bd600dcd462ba4e54f9928c4
e407af1442905bf6103539e2babf65311f230cf3
'2012-01-21T19:50:42-05:00'
describe
'24762' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJE' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
ba2a9cc2a16fd9c829717a17c2c11540
615242c29275d11c6a6d536de916888285cac9e5
'2012-01-21T19:58:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJF' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
8b0d63881eef293e74f0616a4e7e44ce
bb3070d9c98607252b7660fc3099a419bc1547c0
'2012-01-21T19:46:18-05:00'
describe
'141190' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJG' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
de560d4d0c312826d483ad088805ded8
239a67d2c069aefe46f0237664a3a7c346a09696
describe
'29905' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJH' 'sip-files00065.pro'
0cc7e2cc81e3b27b50ae5a984ba8af15
3ad9581a2d25153cb72697e6062e840a53531891
'2012-01-21T19:57:19-05:00'
describe
'55202' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJI' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
929b3274c30f80bb6464beae93576116
4c0b13899786358bbfacc6466121d80428f377d9
'2012-01-21T19:46:36-05:00'
describe
'2638116' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJJ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
9f9e3255eef35394298704787d4cecad
62a2ca931fcab4085e4478085e87f05f18e977fd
'2012-01-21T19:53:04-05:00'
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJK' 'sip-files00065.txt'
dd473ce0fb1ad8cd04eed6b2d87b096f
00a6dc250480613a19cc2c56801420761c55807f
'2012-01-21T19:53:10-05:00'
describe
'22982' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJL' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
2b841a64e7a24ed3f1404522e8a85547
8688df19193a62fff4f163a10937745d7a4e09d8
'2012-01-21T19:45:55-05:00'
describe
'328265' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJM' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
c6e9a3071ed68d4341ca33efe85b967c
445efd8edf1941d3552681803e9be9433b3ee130
'2012-01-21T19:50:36-05:00'
describe
'122263' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJN' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
1cbd37a2e5c3fdb26b58aae1ca181c00
e3ecff046e5423edf920090a94aac3dd02e90fdb
'2012-01-21T19:46:07-05:00'
describe
'24716' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJO' 'sip-files00066.pro'
56a3d1256d71e873386d33c5a8f3cd7b
a359f5051ecbb3831b8c4ac688ed0627faa3aa1f
'2012-01-21T19:47:25-05:00'
describe
'49242' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJP' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
b7ed46928fc9597d9a07f4f15f0aad30
717cd9049a55d71f3319370ce85c2f7f1a1e54ba
describe
'2637832' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJQ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
3451f47631f8588a8ce1c486b3f6170f
a42852e02aba7209cc90f223df592ccaa91302f2
'2012-01-21T19:55:01-05:00'
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJR' 'sip-files00066.txt'
f285d2296bddcf8e293118388536958c
b33907a9515bd9eb04fbea6b5eda9770a4311544
'2012-01-21T19:52:44-05:00'
describe
'21676' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJS' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
ceb63047c05fe58299d230c6918a1582
72b787117d6f0a8e9e7f881f268bf844299520ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJT' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
330b42a5bf125ea4d2645aec23bc60ba
4b1937181d139e15c0c403da43613ad6462afba4
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJU' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
9117355e9fbdd2e36dba1bb9012f3dbc
20b7ec7aac2f5ca6bdfe2c08c0f8d855ee129d75
'2012-01-21T19:54:17-05:00'
describe
'31381' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJV' 'sip-files00067.pro'
d02d5164e698d90e986235cf34d727c3
5ae4af9fb17cde819824d654711f3373cae6bb20
'2012-01-21T19:54:06-05:00'
describe
'59976' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJW' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
912e28b5804c229848de3606871563eb
9bb984f18b6335437d1a451f551a386efe6d751d
describe
'2638928' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJX' 'sip-files00067.tif'
9643a02a458c15643206e64af6e64266
02e978558345eae7e72612c71cbd967b173e88e9
'2012-01-21T19:51:04-05:00'
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJY' 'sip-files00067.txt'
454ab28084acaef3e14de4fbdae87723
1d4027a5e75d706a42fb1addec301450beb9e7b1
'2012-01-21T19:50:17-05:00'
describe
'25256' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARJZ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
8f92bbdaa809bafc9e34cfb1f33a68c1
b232f4473765289e4455d6d34d4e252b4f18bfea
'2012-01-21T19:55:17-05:00'
describe
'328241' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKA' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
067465e0158b10ac1a4356b717cfeadc
3d036181e847df067d0c13187d853476a968dd91
'2012-01-21T19:48:44-05:00'
describe
'147755' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKB' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
ca0da4832140513e77bcf715137336f1
4d934f42ca1ed50a625ad0b678d791a55628008b
'2012-01-21T19:47:06-05:00'
describe
'32634' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKC' 'sip-files00068.pro'
2a9dc3e3a299b857bbe5b62c0920facb
415aa1ba2c19b57f67b70653a4b07067119ff448
describe
'59018' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKD' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
f4d9b123d3bf0cdd65e035c35ef5f9b4
b7386fb6a4c7d6d498572e92bd455572e3fe0b23
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKE' 'sip-files00068.tif'
818aaba106544d443db608f765bbb7a9
dac4ec8bbc9d00009e20aac8dfa442e00be48d50
'2012-01-21T19:54:11-05:00'
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKF' 'sip-files00068.txt'
19589581187f039340dce156c0012d43
89af3bbc984d8c9e8d65e2998b2b0c39ee7576e3
'2012-01-21T19:57:31-05:00'
describe
'25137' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKG' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
883c78471ca38548656f44be93eb198e
dfafba3ae50b08bc1ac3849b2a740897cdeda31b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKH' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
9a0a3b0f2ef1325889d08b1fd208f867
99a2f4a5907584844129521b68607345aea884e0
'2012-01-21T19:59:34-05:00'
describe
'154369' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKI' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
9bf849eee05552d9a220028fb76751f5
a1b93abb243125e018c06a49045f2656c451ae75
'2012-01-21T19:47:48-05:00'
describe
'33294' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKJ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
a80dbb6b9069a966cdb3c92b5a98d9b6
600a7a5f368a7e39630871b752a62a7299e97075
'2012-01-21T19:54:55-05:00'
describe
'59890' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKK' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
8ef028e8ab382ec75e4796a254326355
52a85777291c35fcee56a59fce32fabd8a79409c
describe
'2639056' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKL' 'sip-files00069.tif'
b95d4fb5dd4187596365ce2304c31ac0
d66d5cdd948df5f71a7ceef515b0c86e19df8a4d
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKM' 'sip-files00069.txt'
44370b89f2142aa4ff2efebfd40ba090
7593de7a30a7171cff045c02fe84ff785ace97a8
describe
'25669' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKN' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
3b7f9c46f45babc977713b0e904eb63b
b17110a383458bfc5fac10cfcfe70ab6482aaa5c
'2012-01-21T19:46:59-05:00'
describe
'328247' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKO' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
e5e3103623c04ae469f18e299a9944d9
5067b8eef4cfab021a0cf43b3bf42d1c73ef7d93
'2012-01-21T19:53:34-05:00'
describe
'157542' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKP' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
33e17224686506febb21b405071b40d3
abe406e21962aeea7ba9bd1ba3ad5c68c1c1b355
'2012-01-21T19:47:52-05:00'
describe
'34481' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKQ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
993e2b5334542a4641e03d92a0c2ed48
b2f6d11aacdd0f0cd9c5c18a637c321265377bb6
'2012-01-21T19:56:00-05:00'
describe
'61756' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKR' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
6b2539416f0963421bea954c978fc8ed
8f2ff667009de4b5448345cc41ab06da06c5a960
'2012-01-21T19:51:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKS' 'sip-files00070.tif'
574d6580fb210d0faf3f3d73d43719d6
6749547b6df054371f3a3ad108b8dbb75f33bb55
'2012-01-21T19:54:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKT' 'sip-files00070.txt'
49c1edb4aa55c7e1de1e089e6eb6180f
a9fdbdd7e280b0316943b9c2b3434435ed0e0fcf
'2012-01-21T19:54:01-05:00'
describe
'25184' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKU' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
11cc227e8568fc73857a177bac319ebc
36515b11027670d425f2a146c5b099b69f6a4970
'2012-01-21T19:50:03-05:00'
describe
'328260' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKV' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
88b4b4de792d1cbc613d5f08ab44a165
1730a5dcc988ea96de1d653a1a555c442a2eabcb
describe
'154762' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKW' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
63c19c2d12e5346619ac85d65565e277
e802b2b9a4e6e2a4246481ed811955a1d13754dc
'2012-01-21T19:53:33-05:00'
describe
'34129' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKX' 'sip-files00071.pro'
4154212f083f04e300d2a700559cbe4d
f1557310c84e8692d2be8baa4feeea5710216bdb
describe
'61948' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKY' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
83ebb8d26954d195fe67bdf5d459d18c
3f5ca4744e1c24ad49eb3574c8db1f2d6ac81b41
describe
'2638980' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARKZ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
d31f89f50c10a25116c7a92d08510f05
2c46695cdde408b74ed88d962584b436dfeaddf1
'2012-01-21T19:56:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLA' 'sip-files00071.txt'
9b6ffe04ecd835b723e6d0f40aa67b2a
7b5f11a33b3d1b5691dfdc6f6813f1a1edd9e486
describe
'25535' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLB' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
357c383378deba47528d6ff1b3b400db
2128862637f27b77035a8debe8af43da7ff1bc3b
describe
'328218' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLC' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
de8c9aa9bc9063055be9f17be13b36e6
65b89bbc7c758f6bb9e2ba7bda9a121b6b967468
'2012-01-21T19:49:16-05:00'
describe
'153478' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLD' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
a3775689a40a3a7b3a44a257a2b63100
a51040c5c4005fc3e9b298e1d859c88419c357c2
describe
'33867' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLE' 'sip-files00072.pro'
d377b48726761ab86e080962dcb34078
370db4f75896ba8d5d2849015ebe99a3e91e0d2d
describe
'61635' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLF' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
feeed7b3d5df10fb5fc6ffaeca0254e1
77874d17a5da09f4095bed106cacac49597b76fe
'2012-01-21T19:58:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLG' 'sip-files00072.tif'
e15ba513f7a913ca8255ce56223c851d
f249a1be3736144b071e8df0be68bd332304ec3a
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLH' 'sip-files00072.txt'
b53afe8d196f331e47682ccd0cb65964
2ea5afcba9e05b073272f12d6be2ce4fbd0ae5da
'2012-01-21T19:51:38-05:00'
describe
'25469' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLI' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
c94d20d5365aa56e588ea764017a585b
74a10e734346bcf6e98df63dc931cdf07fe1bc0b
describe
'328277' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLJ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
3641fc4083818dbd5c5971d1450e2859
b22805351635ea82f0e27e59e44c8e6cbdd92839
'2012-01-21T19:51:10-05:00'
describe
'150293' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLK' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
24b4ef2f8fa496c15fc60faaec5c348a
24eb8a980990ce8048574936c2cbd271fab457b3
'2012-01-21T19:50:59-05:00'
describe
'32678' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLL' 'sip-files00073.pro'
887ef17a06574cc4c3d5315f23e08da2
1d000b91765dfb3e2f18cf8e1b65181e94b88fdf
'2012-01-21T19:51:59-05:00'
describe
'59323' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLM' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
1b8dd93d2183b3e9d68513e51a1e4c69
361c4a5f298c22d26e16c77fad069645fe4863fa
'2012-01-21T19:59:17-05:00'
describe
'2638816' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLN' 'sip-files00073.tif'
322eecb22c07ed29129d68204b319837
8edeb0014fe448b1c31778774d3ea6fd6d8998ff
'2012-01-21T19:59:27-05:00'
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLO' 'sip-files00073.txt'
607c93334684000f9eb1fb659fd7fd4a
011a5a3bafcdcf4eb464b8867ece23eb46b9884f
'2012-01-21T19:52:15-05:00'
describe
'24925' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLP' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
80b799311494f89ee4585b865b0ce51c
f5f0845407de07510821e80c5c0cf43b5de3d593
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLQ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
5b9b45653446315a2027929d173de177
378e0b60a0ed338ae5d7b9c01c93c5fa681433ae
describe
'157590' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLR' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
13afecc0948489faf323d1a17b5efc72
a2bbbecd427cce587af94ddb4de757fd78e21dd1
describe
'34754' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLS' 'sip-files00074.pro'
e6e9d8a2ee7600e591a1f96d2074238f
0df9b657c2562a85ae6c3689807ac50b50eda06f
describe
'62336' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLT' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
6a3cf5edb49d6dc94d67edb52da438e2
f069a55198404b271cc7c97aed69ddc49cb2c842
'2012-01-21T19:57:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLU' 'sip-files00074.tif'
a1a059ca057f801735f661adbbcaaf98
fb7e5258aad4dbcf85bdd22f3d72d82bfc7c9b28
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLV' 'sip-files00074.txt'
f0de824ea53c9de22a0629993d4fa871
761a95797e0e4d0ee1c07e927372bb8ab8601dbb
describe
'25408' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLW' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
39fcdb57e74436d74c989c9a12dd483c
85e8918229d15e10bd4b881acfe0a34e07039cc3
'2012-01-21T19:54:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLX' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
770d5842fd29df6d1ede2ce4ab6a3cff
bfe765342f76b9ee5f96597fd496aeb258efb827
'2012-01-21T19:56:47-05:00'
describe
'157182' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLY' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
9b29bedf96657efc3dd4093cfb13bdb4
cf46c6aaa104d923881fd56ef0724a4b5e3e3ce0
describe
'35038' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARLZ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
e9d04d18a9dedf156f8d435266a183da
ed122312d04a51e0cb00ab33f2b53078265e3f5e
'2012-01-21T19:59:22-05:00'
describe
'62694' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMA' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
8c47e1f6ca8d758ae6a9b3dba9039bc5
a8178fa76dddfe05c85c8f3ac08bb9e6a3cb237d
describe
'2638896' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMB' 'sip-files00075.tif'
49e66fd35968a8db8cb4da50fc983e66
d05df5dd3dabc2647d9ed9b2c4dde2594ae46e69
'2012-01-21T19:58:23-05:00'
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMC' 'sip-files00075.txt'
fd61b5fa39c52cb6e715896fba4260ae
b3df1c801f53ddeaf19e2cf5ae9d67f80e5ae0f4
'2012-01-21T19:57:50-05:00'
describe
'25468' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMD' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
8caf320b62afc84f64410ff628d23056
0352670462a74357d1298fd48ea44983a11a77cb
'2012-01-21T19:52:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARME' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
fddd34915b16151c0f4538d9216cb0cc
0ceb858476ade91837c2349c874cd34407320ee7
'2012-01-21T19:57:43-05:00'
describe
'158851' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMF' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
0cd1c26528e7c23455f43b654ae905f1
fa69be0c6369cd9ed0d4269ebbb965a84d79bc16
'2012-01-21T19:52:10-05:00'
describe
'34637' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMG' 'sip-files00076.pro'
b31411d2bf3ff56ca997c6179322871b
b36b6c7d48dfabacd6054c4b37957e512e52cf9c
describe
'61244' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMH' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
b7f76ca43ac674f660d6cee914465ad7
bbd1e158d444e078a2eceb6e94a4a8c31aa545fc
describe
'2639116' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMI' 'sip-files00076.tif'
5672f0fbdcef994eadaac50f9bc4b97a
05525b751c5ad55aa23c5e68645d2967e231a370
'2012-01-21T19:59:53-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMJ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
96107226e4bbd11f6247d01de8431ff0
4b9445bcdf6d658ea16fce077764b93029d72203
describe
'26177' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMK' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
b2f444898c65821301610f2acd240b6e
0ab43a2254f8a94803f546dfd60da20ada71d70d
'2012-01-21T19:49:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARML' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
b90077ff9bf3aacb044a7edc6d212501
3fafb3d63174c7b0e3d6c3cf218c4190b012dc6b
'2012-01-21T19:58:22-05:00'
describe
'165723' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMM' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
de4f981a64199f9eb6a1820fa36ef35a
31e824ce6134ae4ccfe137e6e30208a0f7dd1650
describe
'36021' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMN' 'sip-files00077.pro'
ff45161f3f3c1e3916a7d6470cd99b0e
8c9c2bf2e482e46ad3e44ab9dbaf14a21d9d2068
'2012-01-21T19:56:35-05:00'
describe
'65294' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMO' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
d3aa7176db15ef75737e5bda5ee25d5c
986e0d1af40f99a4ea6b8e8af070466ae6edd97b
'2012-01-21T19:59:44-05:00'
describe
'2639068' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMP' 'sip-files00077.tif'
942a24d17b727df32a8363a6e53b78ef
48b937499bcc3ba0c0c70b6294849e5c36d6428d
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMQ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
aeaae9955e21ea5b6f65503c39b64ff8
0cc08b565a95f75431f804eccf011c97b2f1b024
'2012-01-21T19:57:18-05:00'
describe
'25941' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMR' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
bb2d299626fae88e38d96df929476270
0d72c3a6549c015055efb282defa17a7396bf964
'2012-01-21T19:59:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMS' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
5c6288727e61b1e3a181d05b68245413
ac9b01f604ac3971445e802d2d3e32a6ba1859cc
'2012-01-21T19:58:21-05:00'
describe
'159941' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMT' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
b35802ac8fd57c11ef06cf016e9742ab
36a658534412902ca67c6b6d86867614d0b3e7b4
'2012-01-21T19:49:42-05:00'
describe
'35961' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMU' 'sip-files00078.pro'
3267f082b229e41a8c142091a91a64e7
0c9b5d6db154a26b7a109d0fe3078d929ceef7ae
describe
'63361' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMV' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
9601267b9cd42d56f6ada8de26122030
c31e7b4acb45788dd6358da21805cbe83a5a3657
'2012-01-21T19:50:57-05:00'
describe
'2639008' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMW' 'sip-files00078.tif'
4858f1c0805c1c9a3bd23484b16bd2d1
5e353f2acedbb33b1072a90f4ea3a76635843e1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMX' 'sip-files00078.txt'
e739f03a28186710c98462910f7954de
05d8859d47b9650b46201c70dd08ebd86753d338
'2012-01-21T19:49:19-05:00'
describe
'25628' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMY' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
b5f0ad7c8cefe11605cac7f42e786e3b
8552a837e68be174af2d83b58f663e480b8d7493
'2012-01-21T19:50:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARMZ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
dcc398af386ea1467329016ef64459a1
1b1e9661573b534e92e4e5a1f35e879d13038eaf
describe
'156085' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNA' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
9adfba24b99dce08e81aa13dfe9bbff8
18be5a4a18425178b940999538fa916410a2634e
'2012-01-21T19:57:12-05:00'
describe
'35403' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNB' 'sip-files00079.pro'
d785aa8687cd062c4dbf474ec57b77ae
40ba270535da76cb9ae2977f77b674515f92b34e
'2012-01-21T19:49:14-05:00'
describe
'62262' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNC' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
c193fefbb1b82aaed55d8c5cf58ec850
cb29e1a0d07b2be2a302a9fa368573a4bc1b0d36
describe
'2639040' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARND' 'sip-files00079.tif'
8eb50dd269308fab61cab3d33f8e8e5a
e493a95d7990cee9f9252dfc72049bda78af3c3d
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNE' 'sip-files00079.txt'
5e5e2b6446dd22a2c291c1712ffb1354
ad6ffc0abfaa2aff196075518dca982c4f605c71
'2012-01-21T19:59:37-05:00'
describe
'25391' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNF' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
94760f77ebf45d68079021b499579f2f
5d4a4da16789feda44d767d4966f70e8e90219de
'2012-01-21T19:55:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNG' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
083ba5dd7f1a399a1589a365600e16bd
f8a173b5c592bcfce8b68066034c4cfb6ebf914f
'2012-01-21T19:55:13-05:00'
describe
'156533' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNH' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
70a0224065b11c374a2b871a06114c98
253d1371611cc3ac4eff3eab6ff858e89aa3296c
describe
'35014' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNI' 'sip-files00080.pro'
652ff2e7b1eb8e42eecdad04cdbc7417
e0d3fc9f90ce2578c7cf95cb73782ef14c93cd5b
describe
'62690' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNJ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
c23629db957028a640dd856167b5da65
705a24cf44d8cae15c103a549d71355c1e9aac3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNK' 'sip-files00080.tif'
db469ae82d5214b86d968fdfc39776fd
44dee5623432cdc7506094be3e66d4b34790e642
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNL' 'sip-files00080.txt'
53a1024045c2d781538e0785f1331ea1
e5375af84ea8fe4fb3f8ba9ce9d7821dbdbbb5f3
describe
'25467' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNM' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
55f006c0c087a3cc1865d158cb3c37e3
864961277215b75bb52eec1e06311eb38a164989
'2012-01-21T19:47:23-05:00'
describe
'328248' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNN' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
640b99164136b8688318c7bef933395c
e7a34bb7be20c6965c3658b1c00dc6295143ba56
'2012-01-21T19:58:45-05:00'
describe
'162455' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNO' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
94157d2af8999a8b4fe0bc2dba97bb3b
0b835a48938539c1a0747aac323bfd273f60517d
'2012-01-21T19:51:26-05:00'
describe
'35916' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNP' 'sip-files00081.pro'
4f814e2cd93a68d0b6438c5f8e7c2349
85ad70905c48d8633e255326a64faff591ce605b
'2012-01-21T19:47:29-05:00'
describe
'63977' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNQ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
98927a8ac30b605f36818a835b84a225
2f937375fd10dd11c28b062012af837d18823dea
'2012-01-21T19:56:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNR' 'sip-files00081.tif'
5c0ee9b44c5a88b5f67003fef431076f
02351e42bc1c5d9571e4ef4fa79c87bc9f276742
'2012-01-21T19:55:51-05:00'
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNS' 'sip-files00081.txt'
c70d8c349c9b3a171e21864a94ba531d
f34b011feccab43d864de1cb1a2e79c79cec932b
describe
'25823' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNT' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
5623dd078d7145e4dfa425e2609f3e64
2b2db6cb840fd3cf52e79e8de862bd5438da19aa
'2012-01-21T19:46:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNU' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
ce19627d7f991fac2cea95ecc3b6c5a0
0c9ed2ed9abc776758390f674773388ff69f7859
'2012-01-21T19:58:29-05:00'
describe
'161562' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNV' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
531827ace0b04aaa09dcce2c2cee9f2f
202492bdc1f267430a8a997be754390e4fcd2669
describe
'35881' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNW' 'sip-files00082.pro'
ed1797cfd7d5eb45612e9b04483f2095
e85f13c526c812f883e56959c9b607817b541070
'2012-01-21T19:55:26-05:00'
describe
'64173' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNX' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
640656eb5bd3f089f9a7d0fed69b7a87
bcf5f10800ae0431a22de3ba45d350f60b0f2571
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNY' 'sip-files00082.tif'
1f02ed5f76219130d4942770d490c5be
9a7ee77e6af8ce49054801b4341a19c56581d678
'2012-01-21T19:54:22-05:00'
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARNZ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
333f833f33e1f18ba02084b3791225fb
3e7b41e261e00d61254ff85e494d62a5faa39097
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROA' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
44a1d10e96354a36383d2d68a7201efa
60e6d3ffa4b787bd40739dc07682a2ac175caaa6
'2012-01-21T19:59:25-05:00'
describe
'328231' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROB' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
4c60d178919267e4362984dfaacd7f83
8cd59ec8cdc8c9698317b2c657965d5f23648727
describe
'154646' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROC' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
380fb969c1eb8202516759fd5e516072
7cbab21a409394d7e40959909416467496f2c037
describe
'34736' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROD' 'sip-files00083.pro'
0ea62331687961ace93e34941e2b521c
421e3f36531a3a17551fbdc6c152f9448ba416e1
describe
'62684' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROE' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
3493813470d0de62e98315e2eb651a88
4dde30a98b21bb7802840feada5085c8adfd22de
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROF' 'sip-files00083.tif'
eee569cc6d9e2c22c6a74606b441d62d
f001306f78ff1170d0c817f5502b72158a5247a5
'2012-01-21T19:54:58-05:00'
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROG' 'sip-files00083.txt'
3c2b46499106f4e840edde3d0b082052
91a4be5cbc5d6c7f9e95a685bcdd3eef3bbce88b
describe
'25229' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROH' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
ca437fc8672a65e78b5da8194908cb89
1f314f8bfbfb60afc08c895e3b006b8d0ec0000d
describe
'328540' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROI' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
0684a36ca877c5d90166fc113a581c08
b2ae35444c692359a4771f37967fcf31ddddfff0
'2012-01-21T19:49:50-05:00'
describe
'149356' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROJ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
5c32a0d54ded27799300dec3fd5daaf3
81ea8b352b7ab387570b0c62696476ca5f49fca1
'2012-01-21T19:58:02-05:00'
describe
'33792' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROK' 'sip-files00084.pro'
01f23640209c03287b3dbe93b0ee005d
d77025f0049c5e8c576c07228a2c38121309e589
describe
'61037' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROL' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
4dc8c9192293031e3d2ad5a25663bc03
8cb4f74182022cf8c252e9b46b754c42033b147f
'2012-01-21T19:56:04-05:00'
describe
'2640976' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROM' 'sip-files00084.tif'
75d5e1d3809744102b7fa7beb8362672
e1bac922e36fec06a708cd332e379c6136f21ca8
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARON' 'sip-files00084.txt'
00124f0d6e9d09a0304669cd7c2b29bb
9a3b26241e6b1ae6e107d1f5da16e75147f0bc64
'2012-01-21T19:58:19-05:00'
describe
'25101' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROO' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
9cdc20182492167f4bbd1e8e55a8618d
8c1eabd813c2132ef43caacba2b75b1c5e81f1e6
'2012-01-21T19:48:28-05:00'
describe
'328276' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROP' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
a0cd82e3f58b99c196957ad6bbee42f3
337e9e2dcb186f88a4afdd2d99fd7e23fa5277f6
describe
'151970' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROQ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
a314ad374e38bb446426d57ce5c99a9a
c8b7797aeea63f68c66ac665f2aeecc95f40954e
describe
'34619' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROR' 'sip-files00085.pro'
dfd4e0904d646d0031683de4c6679374
6ee7f45b798058521e1045c6031e13733d713b29
'2012-01-21T19:46:55-05:00'
describe
'61895' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROS' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
00587a5375fb1c657ee1e255b21eeef5
a964025e7ed61851ca4fc7563968e174f3620c3b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROT' 'sip-files00085.tif'
4e48deae31f0f08f99c9100d78cd0725
97df5fab4c595fa440ce400d66cad80bd1debc7e
'2012-01-21T19:56:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROU' 'sip-files00085.txt'
a3490bd7b912df58cc78e6821324b960
acfce796cb9cfe9e0287360d9ab05eb4d29fcb22
describe
'25460' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROV' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
e3a9c73c4527c547d8ef4f9f148188e2
6fafabb9aa124b546bad571a3c82a6fe16ccb5f9
'2012-01-21T19:54:51-05:00'
describe
'328250' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROW' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
0dc7361f8f871af9184bdaa523a75c48
98adb144b6e12a99dc34a2fe5fe66c94b5ebf6d0
'2012-01-21T19:55:25-05:00'
describe
'131338' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROX' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
b2b0c57066a74e30024e3ce9f30d34ac
8746abcce6f7d9d370274f9a4413a2863284b95b
describe
'28975' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROY' 'sip-files00086.pro'
848414305b265013a526c261d7c87679
1819fd4db23b85258c56638ba9d97ee00452059c
'2012-01-21T19:46:11-05:00'
describe
'53106' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAAROZ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
edb5ae67accc0cb4233def4b8cc1d912
f1f22230b811342a6afe7ea5fdcd03c1eb676450
describe
'2638288' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPA' 'sip-files00086.tif'
aa9a248be5bd403c6607a7b610f1aeb7
a08df9baae053dbc8e6a1c58891ee1738212e0e5
'2012-01-21T19:58:26-05:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPB' 'sip-files00086.txt'
4f9883a6ce9cdb1826eec8b3c6aa15d5
fbc2d6f517eb1b208ce15b37222229fb4d72426a
describe
'23317' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPC' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
35033be8e5daa78432bf11517da07e2d
6aab759c0af9db1660cc837a5df17a9b1486fa8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPD' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
de6bd5a9350f36596e27ff0d4c167a0e
925a6999902bfba2de616feb20e4543440eb367d
'2012-01-21T19:46:00-05:00'
describe
'126318' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPE' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
e744fcbe553e852056bc63e6934c6fbc
8ddce411dd812fd20d68636eea09741efda67dce
describe
'26752' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPF' 'sip-files00087.pro'
8a3e2553875a4da8bec90d0464c65cab
c8af18b308be554ff980a5e67d40c826a4e74d08
'2012-01-21T19:46:19-05:00'
describe
'50944' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPG' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
691282f158f0536547788d724661eda7
e68515dca72225ebbbef9fc6a032a83e3209162b
describe
'2637840' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPH' 'sip-files00087.tif'
4a28a58e5627d63df47e09f6b48d0c59
a94241d704e3db8f5a7b3e44f3b74d303b79104a
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPI' 'sip-files00087.txt'
00f18978824022b496625695da472b30
1539f24e2e523adbeb48166da6bad6c8c37fb01a
describe
'21681' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPJ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
b5f837f00de7f3e8770580f4a6e1bec1
afea71fe1d9c88afe0abfeff5b1d975e8b40b491
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPK' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
fb2369db1cce8c0bff58ded5eac030a9
727d16e89e8cb23a6d6ba62f3f5b37acefbff210
'2012-01-21T19:57:08-05:00'
describe
'170120' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPL' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
085d3ed80c8088afebee9307d479ffd7
3e0bd0c2684c7eee54d25e8a44152f65d60da27f
describe
'36244' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPM' 'sip-files00088.pro'
0546d222ddb12fae5b7af5e8fa6134c6
1e86e9f96a4ff4047d31a3ccd1ae205f501896a1
'2012-01-21T19:55:47-05:00'
describe
'66328' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPN' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
a8de69f653739ba69885313af452a093
bda580a49a5f7559b0589a186d42812f869fb510
'2012-01-21T19:52:07-05:00'
describe
'2639340' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPO' 'sip-files00088.tif'
12ac67bfcf97d81d334232f69c8f2bab
5f29954192bb97721c3ebb7bfe3bee6ba46a0903
'2012-01-21T19:55:29-05:00'
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPP' 'sip-files00088.txt'
3b170a376c785dafbb270ea5ff05bf56
2f523de138dc29a7db789881affdccd27d6b0e4d
describe
'26326' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPQ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
5e1f4dc5e036d996f6de2a2bd311c447
fb24a7cd9465e7efe11daea07dbee42a9cf7225a
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPR' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
281024813ace15783f9dcd85e871c4ad
1b3b194cfb1b184d32d644cf10cfcd2c1a5d6cea
'2012-01-21T19:55:27-05:00'
describe
'177762' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPS' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
658f299fcab3729014e4d1e9455f8f4a
582930610f623d2ce8e264776ca3200bc50e7704
'2012-01-21T19:46:01-05:00'
describe
'36812' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPT' 'sip-files00089.pro'
7a224badc6cd770c785764e6813bb064
fdaad1a883c2f5d27a3a372d71dfa4e79334f767
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPU' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
d18bddc5b02efc576475c5aa86f7bb75
344310ea36ade0fad3c193c2eef6ac3f0ae01428
'2012-01-21T19:56:38-05:00'
describe
'2639128' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPV' 'sip-files00089.tif'
437f33b595b432293b73d1027e67cb91
0d71418ce2e198bce6099c5734bc619a2f288661
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPW' 'sip-files00089.txt'
5aa96b4f1a2ff889b69051b7077b5e65
a8da296bb5618f931334f4888196dcef4b962651
'2012-01-21T19:53:58-05:00'
describe
'26553' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPX' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
e2901ae82be95e5af914dcfc5c91e410
03d885edeaa56fdc618e6466abe040f5d3926544
describe
'328244' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPY' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
44bc1494ab24b77c188c7c7b6a11412a
623bc41a5a72d709826b33a08fa08739b4a232c2
describe
'149957' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARPZ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
c170f497aa38896cb70281c7cb0b6ed3
57eba56284ff457f6c377af5f14438aab717ca91
describe
'33728' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQA' 'sip-files00090.pro'
accb461487efc80e6e1cc6a303d4acf2
7f2cdbd516aa8fe3642b019ea2cbf5884e3b6775
'2012-01-21T19:55:05-05:00'
describe
'60360' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQB' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
d02f12b9160418477178d262ab8eae81
9acd0d5c7a0cf6be2cd30aa3495df1186bd4668f
'2012-01-21T19:50:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQC' 'sip-files00090.tif'
d4a6006c68241fc10b6a6af914c452f3
c02503b14b2cf6c2c925abd76b4b2b44a8517767
'2012-01-21T19:55:52-05:00'
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQD' 'sip-files00090.txt'
e035dd53823854f9dd8791ff42ad1788
d304ade78520458a304e49bea21b53c063520ede
'2012-01-21T19:50:09-05:00'
describe
'25286' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQE' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
4e6793f28042b1a7dac6dcec63a47279
dbdff43974699b5edb06f6a5b543ce8c249bdf40
'2012-01-21T19:54:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQF' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
974c9ea6b16bf32023f0edc3f2f15b62
0a61afab95f9cb79e0b9f99cc000f370a4f0cf0d
describe
'150525' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQG' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
f237ae039ffb9edd5b46bd714adbc3a7
999d6bb57ade8adc2b50c2efebe0b0d92ee7c0ef
'2012-01-21T19:56:46-05:00'
describe
'34472' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQH' 'sip-files00091.pro'
e645df78909190833b00673825ba7a1f
0bd89e6d350388c689c4e37badf06015a36c0ca6
'2012-01-21T19:57:07-05:00'
describe
'61171' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQI' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
fc2e1a16d2f2e0698c7ec760df75e715
56f9a2aa11d4ddfe637df7c15553485e8a5a2bb5
describe
'2638732' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQJ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
77eebfb39a5a8d3d61f34e0c9e16161f
bec16a7f860612bdc000671c8fb7b76c93908802
'2012-01-21T19:53:40-05:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQK' 'sip-files00091.txt'
00c2d2f56830886f8fd9b7271184487d
0b9c8be84d9fa5244bcb6fb42e2069b07c6b7d3d
'2012-01-21T19:54:57-05:00'
describe
'25354' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQL' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
a808dc867983e03790b6833a10de7c43
a051fa900fd02d94d598dcecc55ffb8f98fe1ec4
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQM' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
bde8563004a0da1d9786b2d944c14c42
35908c1a3ddf7ce750a06b93aeaf456cb6c4623d
describe
'144459' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQN' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
8efc71067e465f8bc276862c19b33688
22446322922f469a9f4f4baa8f5d995773f5debe
'2012-01-21T19:53:41-05:00'
describe
'32841' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQO' 'sip-files00092.pro'
878b21c8ad31508938daae23f605d22e
b6c56816fcddc7f5b567c412456b3d494fe1ad4f
'2012-01-21T19:59:13-05:00'
describe
'58667' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQP' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
5cb5b818a924aff0b0d58e4bc43c46cf
fbf4347d08a39116f7568d68831daf37a8723602
'2012-01-21T19:56:42-05:00'
describe
'2638660' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQQ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
d3bad62786e4d7b8ab43711c99fe8d26
9c5825e41bdecaa111b551e54e64cf314e823fce
'2012-01-21T19:46:25-05:00'
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQR' 'sip-files00092.txt'
f2347b0d9ea9429b871810f25444e8a9
59c81474b40fd472bea80d2e1926bb9c216a7b67
describe
'24561' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQS' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
d1bba1d2698f0e2abbd2b90289597228
ffdcce80fe2fad14ced19074f160dc6a3ed39828
describe
'328221' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQT' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
2dcb44ff20c7b35fa24e603d69f3280c
d4432f7d5b54a97e67349705e4cca06c2ffe719a
describe
'152156' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQU' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
c822ae63109f46e366386fa6ad76535c
b4b51c240834822f8cbf63c6019eaaa1e54629c2
'2012-01-21T19:59:33-05:00'
describe
'34356' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQV' 'sip-files00093.pro'
bd1f2104c7884dc1853fd42b68136c88
b5c2b558246139d95c5ef126bee99bcabd6b7df5
'2012-01-21T19:48:39-05:00'
describe
'61596' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQW' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
380bed52c85023b12e5ba624b14d25d0
944aa651c5fd39b8a3705acaf7f1104519d2f03b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQX' 'sip-files00093.tif'
e5e42d9968c62185fae80db55e272faa
2d585e296a9c1f8faa8e88b89adb5a6d411159da
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQY' 'sip-files00093.txt'
c2d235a516f0fa5cf014110e2ea72388
671be661d73008f80ecf68249cbfe3d4d673ec1f
'2012-01-21T19:46:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARQZ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
32883f5a91788d717b133550fa6a7bc7
cc9b840f7c95abeebccdccf576547e7ad03c4eb9
describe
'328198' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRA' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
6a62a46539811ada07bcdd6c6ceae371
ee848365c08ac0cbd58592e1ecddb87e3f1dada8
describe
'158006' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRB' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
565c5b350d45b94b779aef14e9934658
d905a8371d6ad5084d8647e8e0f9a7ce56c695c2
'2012-01-21T19:55:46-05:00'
describe
'35698' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRC' 'sip-files00094.pro'
160143a7169e621f6b1a6371ca43a90e
f0e7ca848fc2a59849ce11906a6e3ae101484e48
describe
'61963' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRD' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
5792c4b66e5ee8d55dcda23a967084bc
c0a688af611eb41a0797cd3b13218a54c9c40b62
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRE' 'sip-files00094.tif'
67a13947eef6626feba7b4172dc92da8
05423b26a0cf4b2cb8ce28fec3a96a7da261f0f8
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRF' 'sip-files00094.txt'
be62f7492197182126000bf867b54653
28ec7bf715dd2518a0cef7ea48a3ccc8866ff9f7
describe
'25707' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRG' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
f09bc2190b1801b29b83e2ba3359cc45
8b21851e474889523deb0e403cf7ff0bc642b6ac
'2012-01-21T19:58:43-05:00'
describe
'328256' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRH' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
6ac1dc4c1a3961b601f6662d157131c6
d9e9277b130bf8b990b28c79842cdb9d5ec19b79
describe
'153082' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRI' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
bacbe01fa090066be55da47bbbc32714
8ede51aa7b8a74b8d94c0d714bc073207968e018
describe
'34114' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRJ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
cb1639d357d89b558f4c70a67d93d435
d3282572f4eced9e1b36e03e2bd47e444d6fb3bd
'2012-01-21T19:56:17-05:00'
describe
'61271' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRK' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
f014eeb3ad96bd95ee30146fd5085656
f6164ab70b9f5244fca6451f795140d7de7181be
describe
'2638900' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRL' 'sip-files00095.tif'
ca4ea6f42cd7d9a7519719d01f35a084
5e1efc0d406ba2559eff08a1eedfb5af83a8c050
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRM' 'sip-files00095.txt'
7ffb20da79c98f7e0dddce1ace1be805
6bdc485f248c2e0206f7c2c8a92c8cb70be6b2ce
'2012-01-21T19:51:18-05:00'
describe
'25244' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRN' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
b15cfe03d11b642277c09f961fb2593e
914de4cd1055ca33bb0774bb3474abbca5f77672
'2012-01-21T19:56:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRO' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
2a75ce8f87ffd761edb7e049e48f90e6
24c0769407ff3b3a787abcd9eb2a399fb76f31f4
'2012-01-21T19:49:09-05:00'
describe
'138124' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRP' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
e9a1611b32c5f8f9dda74d5f490136e1
58e36f56208f2b250bb82652c6729b5d30147c92
describe
'31539' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRQ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
9819ab223079207b5c7ad11c4a91ac53
bfffbb5979d8bec011691a0579906ea544add8e0
describe
'56574' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRR' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
35c3811ecf54cf05c2b5418cfa224cc4
58eaa99e6d9b1e30d5c82642b39fa9df8d1a7ab4
describe
'2638500' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRS' 'sip-files00096.tif'
5d0a9d776482c086fa10ea8274881740
7b13df2805daa254ed184d7d227597786de273ea
'2012-01-21T19:59:26-05:00'
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRT' 'sip-files00096.txt'
eaa0a59f931f2c92ad2aa84533ac1665
c298e6126b671b4dfe71938edec15ab826518e18
describe
'24037' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRU' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
c38a43d5245160501158741c38d60622
df1b3c0d4efe125c36e615ceb6da0a2b6fd5fc01
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRV' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
c9902e9656f64b5c170cb781acecb7ca
2d78e9eb095d443c5bc29c79af1f089113622c4c
describe
'148655' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRW' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
9f7c3c82a50b30129193bf2feba16cc7
d3f3927eb496553d41a24d0bd1be66351fe809b6
'2012-01-21T19:52:14-05:00'
describe
'34135' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRX' 'sip-files00097.pro'
b9b4ec4366c5f2d3615c7c45242ea10c
e06e32090c73bc7accaf60271cc32aa33ad52065
'2012-01-21T19:57:05-05:00'
describe
'59854' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRY' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
aa2d890c3aeb0bda67db3743c140969f
388ae4dd9d8471fdd3991323fa10876119a7672a
describe
'2638560' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARRZ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
ebb2947801b5daf2d98a026ff1e5d091
63d45df2fd498eb04dc59951fb54ede7a25e02e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSA' 'sip-files00097.txt'
25393d78a008f5e496234c81e2e95d60
7910aa8800835e0caa2a2676022e658b6a40f06c
describe
'24560' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSB' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
b30be7e645e2b2e6b5b7416c1f2e09a9
8a4100ed9e23a6e3103b60f2b2c5acccadb7fc36
'2012-01-21T19:54:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSC' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
54941de01db29cb27b7fc63b01cf1869
14545b02e00cd79c4d120cd06e98c038848fb6fd
describe
'149147' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSD' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
ef09f2d4d34cf5dff2be824abfdc1d03
743509d10f8968c8f1b20a30f78f7b0c35702fcc
'2012-01-21T19:52:04-05:00'
describe
'34422' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSE' 'sip-files00098.pro'
d45e97aa7c4a21f4786e229adbfe02fe
ba4018a2ce16dc0949635dbb95d13c659db3866e
describe
'60375' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSF' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
68a6d0278d1b7f3adafe6f852f489569
ffb357703368d4b64230a7ad08ee1a259af4513a
'2012-01-21T19:51:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSG' 'sip-files00098.tif'
48ecd6992720ac9319779cea9c021637
da139b24432b7cf9e5a558ca8fc6e6f2cd7513e0
'2012-01-21T19:58:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSH' 'sip-files00098.txt'
942937f1878cbb6ff0897ebe60c69789
ea8bfe0f3450d33a5025936430518f547eb336b8
describe
'24734' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSI' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
681e3ba3a39400f7e5a746f3e6c8ec1f
1b6dcf1c1dd755555a7c9654a3a31d73ab7f0751
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSJ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
522e05e29183f8d917a4f081fcd186a3
9d5111c88b3f77218d2e6390d0bec38b42cb2c48
describe
'150837' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSK' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
11022f1b21937a49352def2ca88f211d
09b7f2c1e0782db696a6c8fc6f143b1ee66b22fd
'2012-01-21T19:46:39-05:00'
describe
'33510' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSL' 'sip-files00099.pro'
d709b3834b70223f37f8ab3ecca0ac6a
f549d8ba0126d98fad1343b4c2caa57965d86872
describe
'60480' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSM' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
0faae953fb02c44a57a5f50b1befc063
1610b977effbaaa9b0cf2087c09f2ae802b26727
'2012-01-21T19:50:02-05:00'
describe
'2638856' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSN' 'sip-files00099.tif'
faee94382492d6b1d6b9c08d88d2fd74
96e111e144238f09e2175f76d4094e7cc6cd8d14
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSO' 'sip-files00099.txt'
eea052797e84476a46e70d30f80eeb1a
7e820b8d3061387815e5cacbdb48d692a14db0ab
describe
'24938' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSP' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
51fa2d5b4c02dff15a6bef98d15adb41
26f2892982e3a05b470f140cfefebdf988faa1d0
'2012-01-21T19:57:14-05:00'
describe
'328513' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSQ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
14e39cca009dc3913336b63f91792919
6b7c652dd420464eb3bca1938fa62c8d91b64667
describe
'155810' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSR' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
8870156abb085723c64d7ec96a470aaf
00032f37ff73b646ddf45c0334a988e35bb75672
'2012-01-21T19:59:42-05:00'
describe
'34654' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSS' 'sip-files00100.pro'
932f436813165c29a10a830fdbea15b7
c67c2df33414857ba6a2890824e9e3278ccf4b21
'2012-01-21T19:55:55-05:00'
describe
'61892' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARST' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
95b475510c46a87ec54bda8af114ec96
45e802913d29b0b5c8a0649c955adcbd500f0467
'2012-01-21T19:50:50-05:00'
describe
'2640924' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSU' 'sip-files00100.tif'
c87cac82c418f7a9e32d3a5d4578155f
bbbb6b6a2e90a8683d597b08ea166bac3a54cb7b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSV' 'sip-files00100.txt'
25939d24099df0e31772d03951a9624e
2023e1e67da9d949c8e53402d0d4611754fa50c6
'2012-01-21T19:57:41-05:00'
describe
'25059' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSW' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
1420ceb67500df0f1bfb1b85112c54e1
d979c9e4f30327f40e632066ade3a06e88f9eb08
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSX' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
e3673fcd106b04ff77b7dbd8e1a320da
4abf120fc1f74b345889d93474c656ce4a0d2a42
'2012-01-21T19:52:54-05:00'
describe
'153326' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSY' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
506ad8ec6b4de11c0e13b594444a4b25
c09e50f4394d68a6d95312e68a01f74115402e3b
describe
'32804' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARSZ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
bda305a8cd545a4145bc3269795d92ec
754b7fd67426b59ee29359223ce15370b4433932
describe
'60005' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTA' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
5defaf3335636e237f71a41033d340f4
9ac63f9d8e73388f2713c2be24a3893033f58137
'2012-01-21T19:53:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTB' 'sip-files00101.tif'
2c98a75fedc0f2ad111998dec9b4c7ad
3c1d1f205113dba0c1ccf1e2186d681a15a1507a
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTC' 'sip-files00101.txt'
621519b3b3e8b058055d866d6dbe5702
b244806c3c3b6aa607d83be0f451101a68a1756d
describe
'25087' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTD' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
22bb509a0b76b4547e7e0d60537f813d
c0c490491f6d5d621b90d67f6e5913937557c69a
describe
'328547' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTE' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
ad6a10deef4c05404b39b91bfb090f40
c20f911a16fa1a7ae2e948ae13fe9c41e8141dcb
'2012-01-21T19:58:04-05:00'
describe
'159363' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTF' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
45c26e2f45a515a12a4554b693091279
e17050ef68bac004fb08aa15d8f9eabcd4b16b5b
'2012-01-21T19:59:29-05:00'
describe
'35230' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTG' 'sip-files00102.pro'
3ff257f56c0149c152f83203e7c97270
f1539984b845338fdf733be9ef87e0e15cb18c9f
describe
'63049' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTH' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
afd9f6f4d7757d45d7e83ce8ac5aca61
9bd303a70e4d49684de978273b1c22324409ddd9
'2012-01-21T19:54:49-05:00'
describe
'2641156' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTI' 'sip-files00102.tif'
2a4fd24a276a39d672ff4e62176787fe
724f8fbb6e9cc0d91111c00e78bba929f589534f
'2012-01-21T19:51:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTJ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
97cbf15d6a60f6d0ccdfc71ae473177f
9aa50438faca9e98bbf4fb0bf24a55919b81b44c
describe
'25695' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTK' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
dc0d8e214466a60152356cc6e0f87b6b
819b6818f5916d19f3242b48986b6785307f2765
'2012-01-21T19:54:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTL' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
aa9d649633f5640efab73c04e972daa0
463b5d50c235a0b3567e814bc49a3eee3a837d48
describe
'158931' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTM' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
b34c4353ba045a3e4a41e66efc7fd792
3f1049d0b0c3377ba8532e23a09d77d2c5996c1e
describe
'33695' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTN' 'sip-files00103.pro'
b24f7de91f3fbe6ee8de19fae8f72387
b27d223235206c2b421497a007459f1638277904
describe
'63529' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTO' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
b1314e68d4bd6acac639ca16e0a66b97
3cebd2a722adf4af08aedad67346aefbc4afc6ee
describe
'2639136' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTP' 'sip-files00103.tif'
a9e0702e2c59355edf7c942ce87dc787
b1743762e3b384d092298ffe8499c1c1470c95fa
'2012-01-21T19:52:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTQ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
24c8192ac776eccd83c80d0916cf7be3
f97952d183677ec13bf9163f2f05bc02827343d0
describe
'26127' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTR' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
48d108f3b45c04b04d7f6f19ba050d20
ae5e4c6f42ac385fcbaec11ef8442aaa3018030f
'2012-01-21T19:56:09-05:00'
describe
'328517' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTS' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
1fee4e00ad61e9974bc9038fb5ff6976
6133543d770d200b75629b3deb257d0197bcbb67
describe
'167346' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTT' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
40d3b3877c3744fc125bc0799dc08780
14eba4e7b4674e9cca46456b45d78058ad4cf921
describe
'36942' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTU' 'sip-files00104.pro'
554ac505508d5154ce3f7253949ce46f
cf09c5f958218548a66f684e56161f1b656d091c
describe
'64577' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTV' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
433e089f11a5b5edf9de829aff132a6d
33cc41973b223e9654ce59340555d32042802c22
describe
'2641092' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTW' 'sip-files00104.tif'
26903e70ecb8c66209336a4366aeff55
21aaf849c0a948ae849d614e9f92bc6fc1d89a48
'2012-01-21T19:58:25-05:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTX' 'sip-files00104.txt'
379e3889d24b2ca0b1cca2658389ca11
b7bf62b008997a3197ceec83b133db61f4aface2
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTY' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
e49e681d45b53ed9d7b31b7821c62d40
b868fdd7b38e24875da33341087aefd143dddc95
describe
'315801' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARTZ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
2e184eaeb31089f5d7045149b4a5c846
569c4a1b0d8c1167da1540562e998725635e9353
describe
'163302' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUA' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
6ef4371ade4b0249425ba86f7ccc887c
f02d981291081ef02113b9ecdbd378cc2e512552
'2012-01-21T19:54:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUB' 'sip-files00106.pro'
25e4b3ecf07feb1ab73972a4de5ff835
ce3ae4ac3bb068fd04a200085e9667ca00c37b7c
describe
'51051' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUC' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
e1dc830e6c9d34df65b28cb713bd90d1
f39c16e41df4db7da0ab12c9baadedd64a0e7419
'2012-01-21T19:59:14-05:00'
describe
'2540844' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUD' 'sip-files00106.tif'
b2dffccce98ddd2fb62a7db19e7561a2
70eaf919b7ad6fb9382f4a2fb3dca378fd3bf626
'2012-01-21T19:57:22-05:00'
describe
'222' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUE' 'sip-files00106.txt'
5f603e0193ecf632c88319c4a5fb3d2c
5dbe0bfb1b98ff0a9a73e097d018692cb5f3f8cd
'2012-01-21T19:57:34-05:00'
describe
'22943' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUF' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
9a83d5871e2d836c1e44be676ddac192
7cb72afa7fa687a2614d0c2aba48ab8be9052719
'2012-01-21T19:51:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUG' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
4c88487263d1364be4b64c7b650f322d
a03d06fd3bc7d4be4e7681c8e16c71fd559a862e
'2012-01-21T19:47:22-05:00'
describe
'150364' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUH' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
86b90c931d24c1bad8171399766299bc
3dc14984fcedd4c1c79c7d3cf3f0d9dd553c9e60
describe
'33283' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUI' 'sip-files00107.pro'
766bbd09477161b170dfcf6f39cdb5b4
0cce5186b993ca38c21daed3782271ecf64cf7e0
describe
'60474' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUJ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
babf3a2170181c9c6f68d5e399a9fc18
d35f20cf868774f9576c081b70435b8a11b8df85
describe
'2638880' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUK' 'sip-files00107.tif'
b90f150a9dbd508196218b19da6f5f31
67c9905a77df2d3af9c18abcbf277a330b1959d0
'2012-01-21T19:46:26-05:00'
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUL' 'sip-files00107.txt'
87bd38befce5a3dccdea0805571dfdc1
2c4ddd7ba76fa926099f49c665b02a62a69cac2f
describe
'25374' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUM' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
de2f76d6b854ddff78ced075f95fa7c7
211194a5df58d1a1c71c1aaa6399c948e3ff672d
'2012-01-21T19:55:21-05:00'
describe
'328545' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUN' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
cbefafbf8a51f49fcdd0ffc78c07b6dd
5545952df323a515ed7bbf3fbc4a183345890dba
describe
'156912' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUO' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
90d63240aafd3d622a3d2f6af808db5c
f3b3d7876dabb021124f373868d4405e6d74bc8d
'2012-01-21T19:48:55-05:00'
describe
'35012' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUP' 'sip-files00108.pro'
75d8d10243f4b480118fb6e29bdd918d
785dfc98b88df70fdce3393b01abc383e9bcefd3
describe
'63491' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUQ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
e0c66647bbbb7c41b78d83f3d1558787
d4710489f6be86723a0cd94d4fdbb62541192d35
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUR' 'sip-files00108.tif'
9335f8d2d341cf5e237435bd1ec8b6cd
cf2a056657e7f05203c3513c59b23a25cdfc8921
'2012-01-21T19:49:18-05:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUS' 'sip-files00108.txt'
8d5fe0bc6bc5f3c8e3a1d33ab222f84c
f84ab683386fb2b4c5f13eebd82f35ca04c3f6f6
describe
'25536' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUT' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
840a41f595db578fa19b71f948c75d81
0889d3f1fc0a83ac8c3e5f6838787ac33fb7997f
'2012-01-21T19:53:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUU' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
20a42db2bbed5ced99bf1b05b2a214da
4f3651093662f52aa5f73e930773f2ce345c7fe5
'2012-01-21T19:59:03-05:00'
describe
'124687' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUV' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
4b5d76db9c8ee3ab14cbbd93b4aabd23
eb7e1bf9f525055f6749974ec01502e7e815baa3
'2012-01-21T19:50:10-05:00'
describe
'26835' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUW' 'sip-files00109.pro'
1d1e7649f6a0d6561a7dc1b33ae9110d
bb938136b273c78860ec912a536686a068162aba
describe
'50147' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUX' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
63b483b3ab2b3845957ddbbf9c67a177
d740ba7ebf1d6f725799e68319eecf333363acb8
'2012-01-21T19:48:33-05:00'
describe
'2637720' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUY' 'sip-files00109.tif'
d7d16807f8f1fb9d0a32319a3be9ec6d
3aeca25d51ac39882d5c2684507ab51d0c68a64c
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARUZ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
9978e8fc5c4814c2325b9480ad114707
5630858c0d8b147691c36300d486d72a071e24a1
'2012-01-21T19:58:50-05:00'
describe
'21523' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVA' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
2852e935d6d25f3a5cba98d09721ae9e
041e1ac43c33a91bb6860b656589ce2ffdc1925f
'2012-01-21T19:57:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVB' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
d621ef0571dffd910881ef84f613b0bb
c8c1e7168604f3dcb809e12d3e4dcbcc59ee51fd
'2012-01-21T19:58:08-05:00'
describe
'127350' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVC' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
5168ee36be417a3c8efe564c9359a740
9accba471971fbf07b1c0f0bbc20d40313f8f990
describe
'27042' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVD' 'sip-files00110.pro'
a910ce6a7acdc2d0d8d37b34b42140a4
0808512328cbf639fce9d96a1ce51f4e1646a147
'2012-01-21T19:50:43-05:00'
describe
'50631' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVE' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
d1108ff4952a83d77884934f29dac616
23cd0a592918bcba2f7d9fe478840b0f6b91dc55
'2012-01-21T19:51:31-05:00'
describe
'2637744' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVF' 'sip-files00110.tif'
0e98c775df3a547ecafede9a2a572073
0cc122fe031068c37c8619753e9755ae610f5fa5
'2012-01-21T19:46:30-05:00'
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVG' 'sip-files00110.txt'
0848086b51073d303b9d760fc3401f15
f101154ea04d3f81e011c5c41573c590ecc8ce08
'2012-01-21T19:58:41-05:00'
describe
'21419' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVH' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
9693ca1ef1521735d13e19bfb8cd2b8c
6bf8e476e2666611f52356f164dd0d7a066bbab9
describe
'328067' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVI' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
2bcce642471a2d8110593baf6eff0274
2e5966bac679fd2955835f85839bbcf81fe79d06
'2012-01-21T19:59:09-05:00'
describe
'159648' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVJ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
fb466af9b543e81d78b13327cbd2f510
9338f53b5b080ba9c61ffe0f9b71ab5d8a1bfaff
describe
'34227' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVK' 'sip-files00111.pro'
52d4973b8a8d5a36e74cbc5a6730c283
27464c9e65b0ec16027846a2053d5b13968e56f9
describe
'62242' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVL' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
459c3d985a6a1ea55d63bf7a5c73f12c
c820d4ca6eb0377ebcdd11cee8367eb93d85f5f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVM' 'sip-files00111.tif'
d9b6755fb65a8a998e570a262c71ee2b
8d709a8bcb4fc05a655b757641f32f0c4325494e
'2012-01-21T19:52:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVN' 'sip-files00111.txt'
3413738a47dd13c539d3333ef17aea07
c43bf8684905eb3d883c81e2d9c5c0c45bba319e
'2012-01-21T19:45:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVO' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
b46f3c8326191f9d44e836a3b88b6001
451102ce0507cb8fc559ecefaed4acc2178a5306
describe
'328464' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVP' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
618e1cc45687b99bed23c2994015e5ca
57a30bcadadcbc3de45d06d3b90354866167e659
describe
'155946' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVQ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
94eb93c66febff5bcac58bf126bc75ef
2876828d727999bd4874f84c2e8f1cb2c55b5651
'2012-01-21T19:49:20-05:00'
describe
'35337' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVR' 'sip-files00112.pro'
22b23880c7409ca452d33ed6d9fe975d
f8179b35ae208dfca2a16fddb39d89a9681d5d17
describe
'62951' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVS' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
54da0954198f6a23a69a85073b6ca982
3e3fe8478e4db74a8dbcd5505b24b81842d22a95
'2012-01-21T19:54:45-05:00'
describe
'2640984' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVT' 'sip-files00112.tif'
e211e12d95b517cc839265ad5686b4a7
d5df1c732085d0eef64dea71ba4902e7b6a98dca
'2012-01-21T19:51:40-05:00'
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVU' 'sip-files00112.txt'
dbf07210eede4226fa4602e861ec0dd3
cc435ca5f0a80bfffcc10e7d5ebb919eecbc1a02
'2012-01-21T19:47:13-05:00'
describe
'25114' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVV' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
364d63457645fdbb1529e29dec952e72
1343330aeeb777bd9171c721c0d0716d984dbed6
'2012-01-21T19:57:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVW' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
5daf4f397b6746be40e7b6e74bfc3c21
45047580fa6d0ad8e58b4d827768ab82c034f97b
'2012-01-21T19:56:15-05:00'
describe
'159120' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVX' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
205dbebda0b14dabf20014e35ce1f4a8
7d780d166afaf0306b5c1941f59798919ede476b
describe
'36094' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVY' 'sip-files00113.pro'
bdf12f12ad12732ec532db6fbce1be8b
e14bca13ca1864c729e3598f549279271234efdb
'2012-01-21T19:54:59-05:00'
describe
'63013' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARVZ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
566232f873e5ddcc46a974bc6ee1f48e
22c24cd0b59048ee6b8df9b4f0749b37a5b2fe1d
describe
'2638984' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWA' 'sip-files00113.tif'
9967fee8653573ba43f475e1532f127e
c2e21a22917447816a6f13ac972a703a0cd468aa
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWB' 'sip-files00113.txt'
e159fb6e769bc4fcb1645baab7b50b7b
4e66c0b419314a4ca06d53d1fd8832d868f550d0
'2012-01-21T19:55:16-05:00'
describe
'25474' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWC' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
3078920701de3221f69661203aeb2105
a71b3a7259f5642fbd221ea57aa824c92506058c
'2012-01-21T19:57:03-05:00'
describe
'328191' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWD' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
19761ed9688a9ac845f8f7693364f386
71556039f6f3779b12bf5f6adcf3076d7d3b0b29
'2012-01-21T19:58:47-05:00'
describe
'160964' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWE' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
1ec998ebb756ffdb8179ed6f10c08702
fedda2cffaacf01279da3f89e2d682a167dca40e
describe
'36602' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWF' 'sip-files00114.pro'
c47a1c1f9eb017e14f4d5b2e3c1738ce
bd7e486024991a672495b3a0c856f53d254a5e20
describe
'63759' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWG' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
778ff736f3f20c049a6539a1e30a6a3e
0e63589b16e79847af456f6eb9859c81d1a61d36
'2012-01-21T19:52:00-05:00'
describe
'2638788' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWH' 'sip-files00114.tif'
8013efcfdd2c4a0a440a43112ab0f625
522d52135cea4ec7c1ed083dfda9863e5cc1707d
'2012-01-21T19:55:58-05:00'
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWI' 'sip-files00114.txt'
878654c68661c42b41cec5b006c58ddc
e9a2cdafe492eb390b16ad931e89690481515521
describe
'25817' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWJ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
531c25f84cb419a659e9d6e5d379632c
032bb944bcae94f6eb41212cda358ac024af732f
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWK' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
02a725be53e9e9917727fe0e3af9116c
122ff24b8a7bdf2e5c6d73a1273a8dfce87cc4b3
'2012-01-21T19:52:35-05:00'
describe
'159378' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWL' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
0e2367176053c3923ce626d533708fa9
00f61ead0b818f267a4f5c3ed5b77a4727d873c6
'2012-01-21T19:57:20-05:00'
describe
'35922' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWM' 'sip-files00115.pro'
b28606e1f9b9060ca9d0b6a7d11e5972
95e4bac313c5f2fc2bb6185f81cdf7e994733037
'2012-01-21T19:48:37-05:00'
describe
'62236' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWN' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
0147f446bce713dbaede76545a129b22
33e2c40d030e798c7202f26978b2dc66d3c9c0d8
'2012-01-21T19:49:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWO' 'sip-files00115.tif'
e1f8497d9d3271433cdb3e498b84ed34
fe055d6c8a686807ee63759f6b65f2f5b482d922
'2012-01-21T19:52:17-05:00'
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWP' 'sip-files00115.txt'
2751fd7769fa841ad8ea0db0aeae2a9e
eb3e882e9c24400070ea2e5313947f13561af7af
describe
'25307' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWQ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
8c2c4037db3f0c54f47e7461aaa626cd
28e266fdc73e3f25960084608ed8be52ac349300
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWR' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
16e68d7a2798e690b011bd3d6fd21562
d4ae251caefc020c18ca2bb11a81d3fe05c9dda4
describe
'161969' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWS' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
80ca21cb01b1dd229845048d2c07c386
4ab5f33656c52ce76405bf4c9eb0763a3b4d350f
describe
'36595' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWT' 'sip-files00116.pro'
d7faa8a33a705ef2bbee011f44069ab0
bfff6a456f3ac12c34d22b900b90747afe84602a
'2012-01-21T19:55:54-05:00'
describe
'64068' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWU' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
3dba26d49eb9e4561b7c2210148b7100
ced6b545490089c9a44af6de2cad7499dd35ef0f
describe
'2638852' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWV' 'sip-files00116.tif'
7171d436d4a7734a77826ba74c77afb7
25facc851246560f1df9ee30fa282e2d6358785e
'2012-01-21T19:47:15-05:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWW' 'sip-files00116.txt'
24a73d22a4c233cb40037912f3c4bf68
ed25699bf14e9ea2bf24a35ad38aa11bb3709a29
'2012-01-21T19:53:54-05:00'
describe
'26013' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWX' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
60076fb7a0bcfdae0918bf22046e184e
4133967b4add9fab5a12b71dc76f68116bef3282
'2012-01-21T19:54:09-05:00'
describe
'328557' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWY' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
feb25fb81e6e5535bdf6ddc03edc5191
009cc3f14a31e11b2acd857424c70af0566ed05c
describe
'188897' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARWZ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
095a56937c1db6091cace6e2b6f99248
a79586aebf23ccc773d1936b99134b4358c230eb
describe
'2309' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXA' 'sip-files00118.pro'
f4d85a587808e5887c3bf03f3b355213
f89f86b8b3d5ef95310d87fa722ec1e306653086
'2012-01-21T19:50:14-05:00'
describe
'60257' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXB' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
6215ddcd706d7535c6af28fdda581deb
56144cbf11a86097f3391641f4ea7409c7b6650c
describe
'2643156' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXC' 'sip-files00118.tif'
600ffd50462161a2e0f1c900447cf980
11062fc44b20d1fdb7870600cd16d93e851bff22
'2012-01-21T19:50:52-05:00'
describe
'297' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXD' 'sip-files00118.txt'
8c844410a66bc3b182831b27c4a2fd35
f80f3e8e8a9860553d2cbe15e2367fd9a597be31
'2012-01-21T19:50:54-05:00'
describe
'26320' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXE' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
11f8684f47214db68c3191aed59d550f
b62c6bd93f8b2acefbadb5223ec21d521e343709
describe
'328175' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXF' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
a87c68caa0b6d7016c6f6ddf12520f74
eafa346108422e6baedfbb3e4585f44e985760dc
describe
'161038' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXG' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
5de6580bfcf30e4b6bc7ef9c06028636
9cd7795f0fec923de074d8d995b43c7175624ed3
describe
'36318' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXH' 'sip-files00119.pro'
a1d729e2e2d8a5283649c40989e963c7
fecbce524df56e74f33ebddc39644993d5c506c1
describe
'63197' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXI' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
3b888e83d971abc15a7a1f943cc1c17b
176c121c4f7857b3e4b608e7c60ae97240ef9232
describe
'2638952' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXJ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
1b2dd3b712a9d31e3f1eb197b3e91293
e6f76bb09654dafa9094aee5e981983ee5eda682
'2012-01-21T19:53:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXK' 'sip-files00119.txt'
36dadcba4afc9296573cfc62c9cdc9f1
0d00ac84b7b273a8048d58d810a0f7c7a557d159
'2012-01-21T19:55:59-05:00'
describe
'25401' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXL' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
769024873bd5c1c3df56340e98496658
07c232e024866d70be534dbceb04e0c70d9b52fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXM' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
fd8f0f2959411c4acbf7768c655f9892
89b379dfb0afa8fac4abc7c127e051d6959dd15e
'2012-01-21T19:52:26-05:00'
describe
'151385' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXN' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
7d34e908bf5aba0918bf85ac06f4e6bc
f8a7c691e42d0ee87fab4a16878b8c169235ccd1
describe
'34903' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXO' 'sip-files00120.pro'
9db31c65f82c319d3357c3e29fb20a07
bf79efa1522deed048a1ffa464a61418ab8d1758
'2012-01-21T19:46:12-05:00'
describe
'60504' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXP' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
dc2f150728edab7dc90650d19108caaf
643c1f071d3ac8c8f1189fd6d48bf9382f6c6723
'2012-01-21T19:54:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXQ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
7c9c89dec1a7dd0be4e6aae4a07b7570
e63220f6481aeaf837100b67926c71f1a2f38506
'2012-01-21T19:47:05-05:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXR' 'sip-files00120.txt'
1d4c7ecdd1933752fd41030340a73398
ff1aa6898a110dcae685de11ec8a7b4be4b8200a
'2012-01-21T19:57:45-05:00'
describe
'24865' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXS' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
955ef00bba2e23af79fd8857c7cf7dc0
ffdc14cb26cb7780bfcebe17444f8bae5c5c82f9
describe
'328192' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXT' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
b508eee3e368b36d7fbed92556e02d1d
a312f20657c3fbc6c95e51a80627f0488dd0338f
describe
'161737' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXU' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
b08b2c1f21c2afa17669dd5e1b38d704
282c0da648cce08763e9b6284aad8d26454b4414
describe
'36807' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXV' 'sip-files00121.pro'
1075f6f0714b17176085828bd5c405ad
95310216c116480c3838894c6dc080a73ec84238
'2012-01-21T19:49:34-05:00'
describe
'63458' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXW' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
ab39c16e1d628b26a01b881ce55ed287
c292a7dfbff7ad5bc6f89fc965780c22eeed4c8f
describe
'2639092' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXX' 'sip-files00121.tif'
e0ec3e97cdc05ffcebfd5e651206bf84
9b33d4cde1734f52a8378635d12fb2d8f63c4a1d
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXY' 'sip-files00121.txt'
7f663f7aba7ccdf0d359e1a1fcd4658b
6dec94cfb98502add6bb533543971da37d48462f
describe
'25724' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARXZ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
dea96e6fd7714b71d448a36423bc1023
b5230adaec9b26353047746f7863cf7252035318
'2012-01-21T19:54:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYA' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
8ccdced6b8f37e78d6a2bb1997852582
21ecc240a91565fe1c61788bba6266a9c10d2594
describe
'157357' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYB' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
32eadcb274dc40c859aa481bec7c0a24
e4246e992d77de8583b9a543be8969b6e0333f52
describe
'35506' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYC' 'sip-files00122.pro'
3dcbc6deb6333295d49133fd725d0b87
a09c611a82e2999b7ee28a618ea3791cefa05236
describe
'62952' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYD' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
c841b7526c04b282c55d57c04a4251f7
66aaeca5e66b64a200c7559bcd7f2b91b741c460
'2012-01-21T19:50:30-05:00'
describe
'2638908' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYE' 'sip-files00122.tif'
3e781a1473b66cab43e5c76f5ae8eb0e
ab6365174a3c09d2b56e7b462e811a635f62f5a7
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYF' 'sip-files00122.txt'
56ab15dfecd2400589ea3b2384f978d8
52d4aedde9cab2e0d0923cde95f5942c44da87fb
'2012-01-21T19:55:06-05:00'
describe
'25263' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYG' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
cb816772cee840c1bdf798bbc8630a92
5fec43bb48edbc17a49e50a7fea4df7689746e26
'2012-01-21T19:51:54-05:00'
describe
'328266' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYH' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
520e2d5cbaf963c5349d9bc9dc1afdaa
a503edd2d473ad72b3b11285a960336cd1ae5783
describe
'162304' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYI' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
87d0258cc17f85c1a8cc7a9f2670f890
955ceabc2520d77bdd6af39639be4d7149283f3b
describe
'36042' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYJ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
bcec41396fbf4679f2c2f4d45b1e9966
4b25b0c9107b81e8e4d79d6ff79562e4fe823f9a
'2012-01-21T19:50:38-05:00'
describe
'63833' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYK' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
94fc752cec35debf224e39c05f41187e
92a22b4e831f8e43d15221f220453873bafa7507
describe
'2639164' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYL' 'sip-files00123.tif'
6ef0dd848cb3157695b4b23bd724e6d9
3bfa8534d57d00613ffe51c2842aef46aa98fd9c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYM' 'sip-files00123.txt'
212087fe6f1647513e059c068e651287
07faffdc33bc5a962c8440f811388b397021824b
'2012-01-21T19:52:43-05:00'
describe
'26203' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYN' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
4ab08285a200f6af72961858c48be1bc
254ed84bb7b3fdd3345988d4071fbdfbec772eef
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYO' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
1e65386b814ab87aa3b15f5c0bd2608f
521cfb743388c54b3546da9171f7306736f46d73
describe
'162642' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYP' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
0a2acd2786ad9e13824323be2490f4d5
0ca779278a916e66535247c078200abefcc97f3d
describe
'36761' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYQ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
7efaff3e007e3a6410ca658c8a439ad1
e46fae503dc84638d2bf433273eb0bc483df2b1b
describe
'64317' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYR' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
7fdfc1320096a390ef5451ccb7b5ad72
9642fbadd3a3519742da7f9993e36c5c88b71762
'2012-01-21T19:53:28-05:00'
describe
'2638976' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYS' 'sip-files00124.tif'
09e51b1a2d1b00143fff922323d4e824
894b170c2377d6b03183525ebce1f6d9abac3ff1
'2012-01-21T19:50:18-05:00'
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYT' 'sip-files00124.txt'
a7f24068930e10ca6dd7afabd298f224
074468c0825a891e084f11ffca81294460f1c745
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYU' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
ccef205de5325e919a6c6057c340ca78
dee88bc4d7215dfdc1fc6987da5b4315eade1185
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYV' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
046481b56168ff4ab722ba5335079953
fcd616ed68c1196de92793ae88d8735d7f0fc78b
describe
'166630' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYW' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
27bba5fc00584fbe966e5216994d7bfc
30c9cded0ac67d7bc56e028f2a39d6625c4916be
'2012-01-21T19:51:43-05:00'
describe
'37041' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYX' 'sip-files00125.pro'
9536dd9b9b2f1724d990bdd549cf17d7
7762280c3de53f8af2da5ab05586a87a42e18a28
'2012-01-21T19:58:24-05:00'
describe
'65054' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYY' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
863da173bcbd40113b28182efaceb37a
b47073b5f0e95a00532d8baf48687e8a26a08a2c
'2012-01-21T19:52:52-05:00'
describe
'2639112' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARYZ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
fbd27325314e6cee05153e13b69db8b5
2772b8a4d3d7baf67df1d08d6e93c77bd11c29ec
'2012-01-21T19:48:53-05:00'
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZA' 'sip-files00125.txt'
259328c7342aded6dd1d58cd715875d2
35480de88bcce1f953b2538f30733782daac6469
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZB' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
a4c4ee650c6b4599a10cd41a171e8de4
c4afc550033d97c46909292b5af3b3204e42331d
describe
'328473' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZC' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
3662eee826f5aedf60aed3c758e07e10
a1e3f56c94decd94c9aec4539dd2cb5560e289f9
describe
'155142' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZD' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
4f3e3cabd1818440c8c7b222ff3bdc38
20ed926bafc3e788a4a9af69b03017f93deafefe
'2012-01-21T19:59:20-05:00'
describe
'34733' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZE' 'sip-files00126.pro'
29153868a46c98859adea491262ffc8d
e8184deb97f1c0fce362977c4d0af0f78b9856c9
describe
'60588' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZF' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
839278c2077db84eef11564deccf68a7
533abb036b8098328378c6c84707f1a74bd69db6
'2012-01-21T19:51:00-05:00'
describe
'2640944' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZG' 'sip-files00126.tif'
6231c597cba334b146f128ee9f2e31c4
d171d9ddae88dd31b457b856901e672b9654de1d
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZH' 'sip-files00126.txt'
e16bf6da103ce2dfd110cd4fc66f7268
6d0583a52eaefb860403e5e91a69ddc50b237975
describe
'25060' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZI' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
e4104701a7d3ddb0ae21f714162a76e0
4fb65c390c39136fd0a0dae16c3fa970181b08c7
describe
'328100' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZJ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
6ec60f4fde34661fd175c0d11e1481e6
0c3e8867fbeddb80bdd2bc9bb0baaf81580ac3ef
'2012-01-21T19:53:14-05:00'
describe
'122809' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZK' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
9baaae3353dfa14351ae18c90c6f4efe
b08f668aef3ef1df279ae6e46f7daf97baf55505
'2012-01-21T19:49:07-05:00'
describe
'26190' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZL' 'sip-files00127.pro'
ba988964e8818bbcc15cf714507eebed
b8d83570ab19e48492ea536a7fb5c60e94e040a0
describe
'49823' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZM' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
e2a426c9c119c3f0a0306552bca5f5c3
20933189f23cd563295e16211f353a784850e4a1
describe
'2637768' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZN' 'sip-files00127.tif'
63e813d0cd118b5e68ecaa3773101522
3ec4684abe4b4912f32868840c0e86c377665f3e
'2012-01-21T19:46:50-05:00'
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZO' 'sip-files00127.txt'
ff7cf04471b08f7203a71f4c7e54936c
d7bc4d1b0e7ee8c50e778f3e50c2af9aa769fdc2
describe
'21620' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZP' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
de1bfa81e9fc259e6ccd9c0dc5411930
edc7bf640db3431ed744c4638252711fb587b07e
'2012-01-21T19:52:12-05:00'
describe
'328504' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZQ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
c39bfae4e230cdf717295c1f1e573f2a
50d0a738476711316f3ffe67e024560465f8c9bf
describe
'165675' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZR' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
5a01f0be93a0262462e4dcb10bdfd60e
0193cfef432cd44ec7b1ada80e651c8f3427c102
describe
'35569' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZS' 'sip-files00128.pro'
2d7c70931b33e4142171a82738e8f597
201c25f7dd9998fbfbd922d30614e0a1d22f91d7
describe
'63589' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZT' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
1fe534295edb4691a6a55351dd349260
73948a87a615fa9a88413ab846965d80a792bef2
describe
'2641192' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZU' 'sip-files00128.tif'
680b894ac420ae4eba377f572efa036b
f44435861d18d112097171ef0d87edccf01ae3d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZV' 'sip-files00128.txt'
1679ddf162831ee9ffaa535c7678e092
8d5a2f481d73b535a8dca3fbef3ea258a68b71a2
'2012-01-21T19:50:45-05:00'
describe
'26020' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZW' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
947f0213179b2207b3c96348d881e4c4
20786ae68252d529e7fa5a9821e4e9b8ea15295b
describe
'328189' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZX' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
7f3a6729acb5b8de7d94baca6fb07db7
3c0dea8b021b5414855bf166564176fe59fa2d3f
describe
'169189' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZY' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
3f9c922830da97a421b7f2e33b3cb69d
04ac745058b3f2187e0f1c8ff0ca6c76356b524a
describe
'35596' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAARZZ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
098f9d0714c753521ec16afb1123bdaa
e083430245bc1c3112a7dd0b58e2558065ea4168
describe
'65168' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAA' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
016d3c32d61e50afe55108d1ba409d9c
7758a633340ed1cd28c96d3c9030531b819c96c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAB' 'sip-files00129.tif'
7683650e5753bff7de05104cd546b1da
0378c3fe2cfbcad61f7b3dc6f69168848c955e6f
'2012-01-21T19:53:05-05:00'
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAC' 'sip-files00129.txt'
7d41d719cb14b27568f9fd9567a54bbf
eb13844340288d87223fe4a946e74248f3afe235
'2012-01-21T19:55:37-05:00'
describe
'26394' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAD' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
21008a1cca930b1cb373066a61631998
38cdb926080cbb2b7fffd5bf82117d98e4e62a4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAE' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
41e8d25467aca2345f13807ff6c946ab
037203ff1a7fb97148c570346ea16aaa29c5b752
describe
'158180' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAF' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
fa63d66791a66cadfc85fc189460ad6f
112cf808b941cb29b07e045cb9ad72221bc0eb02
describe
'34286' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAG' 'sip-files00130.pro'
ac925d0b815940ed106c1c1c03cef77c
1ae9cb9ef8e62c48e8f6440d92cb7f257b3d5a7f
describe
'61605' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAH' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
9728efc97b8a085b10cdb35a3f0e0856
fc3c75eb81854091680f4a40aa7c8152415b0484
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAI' 'sip-files00130.tif'
46d253ad0bd03832d33e26caf3bb1f41
de60781c84054de3c536f8539e5eebb13d7d7b34
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAJ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
a1a157607ba750e73134d0d128c5cf11
bde22ad4f3caa63e861efbc6403d45dd520953ac
describe
'25117' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAK' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
efd04c1d1f0f074b1ecae626d4aa98f8
e339450f0456251fb83187fc337315af2351742f
'2012-01-21T19:46:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAL' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
b10231261254467e47949aee2b26932b
32d4d79b1ad4053ed0c44b9b30e0499301a4fd14
describe
'162489' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAM' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
633c8d2ad778d07b388fba478c590f61
29f6b372b18d9811397080eef88ba79ef6433456
'2012-01-21T19:49:25-05:00'
describe
'35264' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAN' 'sip-files00131.pro'
2171d23d7bafb22002574833a07315f4
1e3af4530f096bd6b5ae34c4d51bf287827ceef7
describe
'63460' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAO' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
b9e73c6deb2d74d5530dc579fa61ebea
583f52db35121c8d4198415a11e5cddc030dad05
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAP' 'sip-files00131.tif'
1ba4baf1c119025ea61dc91db5ef1206
3659794747075c5301ac46e830f09068353354cb
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAQ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
bb7ac003326e4648c6dfcb3e9ad3872b
9c3a5ea8bd272d56ca40c6e4a9a3b350ce0ec800
'2012-01-21T19:59:58-05:00'
describe
'25694' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAR' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
f847c49382479f1409143780f1124057
fc2251fb1df3738b435c5e5f13af67824277ee94
describe
'328516' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAS' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
26a237cf72148ab6b8a7f2454cea1642
879b0106656b23096a1b319798c881387eb76f2a
'2012-01-21T19:53:49-05:00'
describe
'155720' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAT' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
a0653f7e24548c0abb908b26cd54a4a1
b152e7b510f4e28d1ee39f1ab21665406afaa157
'2012-01-21T19:50:16-05:00'
describe
'35677' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAU' 'sip-files00132.pro'
37c6b3a17c1c353b8ee02b5318349f9b
40d00ea8fdd6815cb7e5c7ffb114f178a6d0c731
describe
'63265' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAV' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
39a684ba6fcca446c872b86d5287e544
1b4a1ae06fdc77b8f7d1c45d9906dce8c63ae0b9
describe
'2641188' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAW' 'sip-files00132.tif'
5d65bb36804a1f0d5a8c6924aadcbf11
1678830a7c7dda1c051a8cb2f2492a8874b0fdae
'2012-01-21T19:58:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAX' 'sip-files00132.txt'
6417a6730ca53224e2c4181397c7655b
bf167429960c4bc84a4fd2941ad30e0fec447015
describe
'26161' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAY' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
feeccfb6c68c665b192c2424e1978cfb
4d093afc33277385b0e40edf360a10dbb623cab1
describe
'328195' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASAZ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
ab590cdfcb8f9f933fae0385db97c10f
b2d7593e82da2b44c40ebed3a63cb72b3d1f2b6c
describe
'154883' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBA' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
e11b576b5147dadc9a50f6a2b557ce6a
b604ad805aaf816ea2dd8ef374a5e7b7981cd5c8
describe
'35215' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBB' 'sip-files00133.pro'
9348ea99e42603c7a64c78cb10cb2e92
5ff4d73a8831389b4cd0ee8e6bda3c63a2d9612e
describe
'62836' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBC' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
9b07e661f761ac24fc61241e93cee952
b8b54794cfeb9d21acef5aaecad7d5718f75b7e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBD' 'sip-files00133.tif'
191e91117b75cb19f3b6883ff7c72b47
ebfd99e58b1817dd6be10281f8ad839742580edb
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBE' 'sip-files00133.txt'
0a0d261803b1fe93845b8a8c2089f456
859538ff35d72ff6dd64ddf49e924e47072ee347
'2012-01-21T19:56:18-05:00'
describe
'25127' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBF' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
a4e2eab711091cf90ee7e1dcee97f102
8a34f7da6441209c5af1fe2d8cc0e08edf9d6271
describe
'328281' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBG' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
6b9f5b083df24d74df3d8b5e11af3eae
4bb8a079da5ac2f94ee9c70d5042767bd5260a76
'2012-01-21T19:46:29-05:00'
describe
'163052' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBH' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
fa2588141f5a48989f820ed7488b546f
e4c8cc603fce5c6bd8e579f176414c689f03b83a
describe
'35573' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBI' 'sip-files00134.pro'
f74813945891c6cb22a160a3bcec38f4
af18e1bc938824fb49b9bcf6da755e3e2d4a6e14
describe
'63251' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBJ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
44022136e4127c11fb124add22f1305b
b2cf98f76cce381ef056096887287824e7d42c9e
'2012-01-21T19:46:35-05:00'
describe
'2638948' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBK' 'sip-files00134.tif'
8967c5848858ffc98d636e35ea55a7cf
50acbef625ea68789815cb8a0cc714b61df05c5d
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBL' 'sip-files00134.txt'
273987b9d7a2f1e4f5301629c7d797ae
19bdd6bb2ab74584356b652616cd30e113efbecc
'2012-01-21T19:53:27-05:00'
describe
'25457' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBM' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
db7f15a2acfb8faaf727228ddd38a6ff
2c8843ae1a5a1a84595343832af072c4c64bad65
describe
'328246' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBN' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
623eb4770c4e4e4af9a5b105a08bb079
27962e65ce2c37bcf6e176c5236127c12dfd4374
describe
'159086' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBO' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
bf7ebefd469a818e82e5082831bea223
0ab0b55d7bcb66ed98a4c4f815f92e21bad0c721
describe
'35068' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBP' 'sip-files00135.pro'
26ffef8844169d25e53e8a44275d5774
6b01e17233586133af5da977f31595b81ef9b0db
'2012-01-21T19:49:17-05:00'
describe
'63948' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBQ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
64d34b4315d0d8ae0caf16476295047a
1ea23a39455c872f81902d797249900a8d738b04
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBR' 'sip-files00135.tif'
2fb3e768e37f392a951268dba38b432e
0e3496e368769328260bf4a25768182b269d871e
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBS' 'sip-files00135.txt'
3363b551a040d15f13bbf66bf97a592f
c7c495ba83e51d3954704dbc6d4a28dc5d961cbf
describe
'25308' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBT' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
17ff0a173996eb885ef261180c609037
528c389dadf2056f4161a379ae2087f33b2c4994
'2012-01-21T19:54:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBU' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
e84d4c2aa16e35ff746e50c08f1e06d7
9437d148d049f0c8d93ead31564f247196fb0ef1
describe
'162245' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBV' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
43c67f58ac5bf9be73731a62f1687542
cc228768a37c8a310b4c1fcaad818059de354cb6
describe
'36136' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBW' 'sip-files00136.pro'
2a1908c4945c70fb1b1f7527b90cfeee
72b84971b4f18f53130a6e84203fe8a883f59957
'2012-01-21T19:48:12-05:00'
describe
'63000' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBX' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
bde18ec8120208be90e4d15cd8ae2524
00433e4729b8bb59f08e1095a445e2e6cb69cd80
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBY' 'sip-files00136.tif'
6329250fe9a6712a5f6f29cedeaa881e
c3d8ff8239d383eaf4699bb4cbf4e62c6b6c42ea
'2012-01-21T19:50:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASBZ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
97d3d893eb26107a563b68b7a6ad9c0b
44f874ce1e4e483967e24eaa01d3c696b44575c8
'2012-01-21T19:59:30-05:00'
describe
'25386' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCA' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
543cd5e010f89f008ad1082cf9e21fcf
aa501e741e7620b54d254ff6503881a8486393ad
'2012-01-21T19:48:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCB' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
487e4cd794b367599e7cd0f4588778d7
a1bb83d1838a835aba9151c99970fc1196eb2251
'2012-01-21T19:58:33-05:00'
describe
'165228' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCC' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
741cb6fdfd406f563f44868340a7dd35
241fdc868e01ae7821ada5933b193104ed3f18f3
'2012-01-21T19:54:48-05:00'
describe
'36708' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCD' 'sip-files00137.pro'
1d0811972f94a9635b26bbff0a97ddd8
767186879e42b1a1d7c216c11c522d04591a5e82
'2012-01-21T19:47:20-05:00'
describe
'63837' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCE' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
1a4c329bd6e5595a7b26e993923f1c6d
331258fa362b8145653d251b732d7c546a16fbbb
describe
'2638804' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCF' 'sip-files00137.tif'
52a3e29b9b2dd6eef2a89dd1fbe9b528
e8e615be5d7048befe9fa0c7cab0f8fc2a992ce9
'2012-01-21T19:54:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCG' 'sip-files00137.txt'
c27f1f58c45a89966b274d8331981d1c
38c20e81c5dcaaf44c0b5108fad8da447b2f51b2
describe
'25133' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCH' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
c1d02e8d60613f69a7538f8cba8ae367
adde6317e51f354cbefd6d3885274c7c1a19eab5
describe
'328531' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCI' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
addec22e12c8d5c43c16a66920e6e7eb
4f89504f44b6459a62e94ddace42c9ba60372b9d
describe
'160030' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCJ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
9df29cb944393b1c9d5ce292df9833d7
dcf202b559389dab27d4fd8a101db60c01ce0628
describe
'35546' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCK' 'sip-files00138.pro'
74e7de51a2b951a472c3ba7f2e8aa81f
ff17560f279fc989857dbac9c530808cb3f3e394
describe
'63131' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCL' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
df67f4a60d94f80f4b0c4d8d45a519c2
74d32e40313bbcf94649d34bee88703c275c87d6
'2012-01-21T19:47:42-05:00'
describe
'2641020' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCM' 'sip-files00138.tif'
b78937c67d04715b332d496a44350b32
07110d96a2192489484100fb08d27523a58c0ac5
'2012-01-21T19:55:44-05:00'
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCN' 'sip-files00138.txt'
497958e2376770416b4cbeadbf6ef9c0
03f886bbc69abae1b36ee34183e3e1125f25e7ad
describe
'25192' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCO' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
8e79f7b19697c5506f8b8d5cefa348cc
b74eda135e63d00df54060cba891f22cc1d2fd91
'2012-01-21T19:50:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCP' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
fbee82e51ae4c89416af713481b2c94d
51b219ae6b51f5c63dee078d88fe1980b371c6da
'2012-01-21T19:53:18-05:00'
describe
'154903' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCQ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
66beda9647a34e447db48ea8cd4e42bc
f637f9dc029a7493be052620ad26479281ee763d
describe
'35582' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCR' 'sip-files00139.pro'
2ee7b88c7f1f5f704bfd3aa178fa21a5
5fc880b8596d499591329698d91350c944e21aaa
describe
'61158' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCS' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
dd455957c09c600c706780c21e8587b4
0a660e570c0731945133f7f464aff76f8ddd6fda
describe
'2638872' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCT' 'sip-files00139.tif'
c3ca770de164346ae632ed9870f79a58
6f31ada831f192fcf1a6a2ba9252885b7bdea967
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCU' 'sip-files00139.txt'
6cd7ddf1876395813b10e74caace919a
2c255845071a648a3e5dbbd600b599bde5546320
describe
'24933' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCV' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
b5b1cb0f66cfbfebbafad0af9675a4be
5e47eeda01ceb669578b5219aba4e68b2be149a5
describe
'328546' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCW' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
1463bd11b3f1314b528817bd0fc98ff1
8989846902ce54125da5faca2a64fdc8d5a4c83c
describe
'161498' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCX' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
ecd5e90354c7d53b10dcec5d0b9966a1
1fba3bbb926f979c56d2bb01f18021c27d4e696d
'2012-01-21T19:51:05-05:00'
describe
'36774' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCY' 'sip-files00140.pro'
11d4f9381945e5a109240a3850b50db8
42cdca55810d0c74a88c01795513907259e61ae4
'2012-01-21T19:53:23-05:00'
describe
'63372' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASCZ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
280d9febdb49fc44f1c42c3af3adb6f9
affc704b9b3cc0e3b4bd9c7146f7f42e003b104b
describe
'2640964' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDA' 'sip-files00140.tif'
353380b18d3911fd06ea28efac2fa0e6
1f0d60b42843ff20682ff4f663e1633d9705cb67
'2012-01-21T19:59:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDB' 'sip-files00140.txt'
5041c2b8aed554273d1ee0731f5d3a38
b1a0fae538fdb518dc919d2fa8338f5b476e90df
'2012-01-21T19:47:32-05:00'
describe
'25268' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDC' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
6c2e49401fe4a81bed824a8f103d6475
19190fd816e13fe4aa44f8fcbe28b414f596bfc9
describe
'328209' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDD' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
28ea658bc9c9a6ddcee63c6bc9428e94
15bbd272ca2c1bacb326c971ffce9706230615de
describe
'158960' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDE' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
a393051e9c57faabf7784061533d52b7
b43de4849d33e4484da60d8a37faf4887eccd48f
describe
'36120' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDF' 'sip-files00141.pro'
6c2d6e3a24280ff01406211e8d208db5
28bf9c5625e0003bd20bc21d1d68afece4ce6d73
describe
'63069' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDG' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
de546afc9af328859a1a18deec4baf1f
635afa3d9c51279dc592a7189cccec2389b058d1
describe
'2638812' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDH' 'sip-files00141.tif'
594d6faed467efd766fafaecc564767a
0fa5d7d5e060599118522b699d3be90ac1f64acf
'2012-01-21T19:58:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDI' 'sip-files00141.txt'
519808bdf5db40f1eeb42ba9262d6328
6a0850e8f1503636d463b183323f1afaf6184669
describe
'24980' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDJ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
7c27e857e1c661f2c83ba0df94763f54
18c9703747df74c1b0054a9b63dadb82e6f0a0df
'2012-01-21T19:55:49-05:00'
describe
'328233' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDK' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
cd6b33656c220e9f3cc9f6df22df0050
2a56ecffcdc9984113b17ecf8eb664327eebe989
'2012-01-21T19:58:15-05:00'
describe
'162015' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDL' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
954a6eb130e334bf803977dbec37766e
1d0b2c26c642e745ae2861d7fc8997a80bbf1799
describe
'36150' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDM' 'sip-files00142.pro'
3395a370ad7ba6c0e77bd15074d14acd
9888e123436180914a987b87b7ad57ee2c834adb
describe
'62602' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDN' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
c1745cb58d704c549590e34c0e3fc9f3
1c04c1267c46dd42a0345969913e3a9f9fedc487
'2012-01-21T19:51:46-05:00'
describe
'2638972' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDO' 'sip-files00142.tif'
94bfb6b4634fb2fe53537f67cad648e5
bbc5f86a693f9b019e38dd2e0d12e1bd33632960
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDP' 'sip-files00142.txt'
c9485055b76b1c0741be05e68f6651fd
c992f600a5102cb82fcdb654c031e499dd965332
'2012-01-21T19:53:17-05:00'
describe
'25489' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDQ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
0a193f8fc00f07c946266a2cabf872ec
1e6ca6c38b8c688c33519618510dd1a61089d5b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDR' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
90adac96e1d20c019fec657a7836c275
96b590939c432012118b343ecff1a1192e3f553e
describe
'168112' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDS' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
ba425fe0c85af11422e4ce668abba36a
91aff628debcfe40e9693da5ea113ad43a3897f4
describe
'37251' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDT' 'sip-files00143.pro'
8b32dda7068c798c84b1fd94596c3d5c
bc79e233ef8e2ef23f5959e0537a74ad9e5d74cd
describe
'64913' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDU' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
d6f83c294e3aa913cd6ca8063ddab65e
8914af90c29d11b4400217e1edf9848d308b2b07
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDV' 'sip-files00143.tif'
d91fd6809d19b9e4c2559df644cc31d5
598e7b6bd42df14d9ee11815d055f83ccfca4721
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDW' 'sip-files00143.txt'
82eaee916bf8be9ff8986b2d643e3cee
864b5b83645e7f22c21728e8516ea1ea57897d61
describe
'25674' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDX' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
af8e72cc2a43a255fcfe906b5a0274df
40b962bd880017de36444aa3e9e36c517a7757b7
describe
'328512' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDY' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
152add3263816b32cd118502203a7bbc
320afd50617e0f52a1f78de3c71786daf3a13e35
'2012-01-21T19:49:53-05:00'
describe
'125294' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASDZ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
bfc629a5632449011f9336c93528291e
4bb1665194be33c3d6a31588519ff16757849eee
'2012-01-21T19:49:00-05:00'
describe
'26349' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEA' 'sip-files00144.pro'
0b3a7846778eebe2f8c2cd688ac91b21
b0d1470101306ef04277318ceda53c4729a1120c
'2012-01-21T19:51:45-05:00'
describe
'49079' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEB' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
f921bdf2c0d245097a28a2193ecd8a56
f313e615f8d3c513e67b38713da4c26b8f655eda
describe
'2639692' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEC' 'sip-files00144.tif'
8f024e69105c6148363d7f95e0af5834
bc54aed794b0460d2f330108cc889f0f48b06fdd
'2012-01-21T19:59:45-05:00'
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASED' 'sip-files00144.txt'
6d80b976aaf3f0b62678fee13c1b3464
810124cad9d37e48015dc3d245879cc918b0e7e6
describe
'20928' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEE' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
861a19b36a23cfd33ea8af655698261f
06b35f48272375859f93bfafade09ab30d383a85
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEF' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
a06895696c69e3575751dc0e9c91fc78
2b45ffff73dac9447b61131e8dfa00f18201ab62
describe
'161022' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEG' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
870fbb39019ab6e4605a5ce5e0067576
5f5825fde67b92661dc22c060be665d9d57763fd
describe
'35945' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEH' 'sip-files00145.pro'
8c62f90e4be26f1f956e723b0dcba597
83660ab2c4d0773f95cb39fba5111ff0a851ddc6
'2012-01-21T19:48:02-05:00'
describe
'63339' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEI' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
41ecde6d719c075cf41dc7aecd5a3226
527cead2068d19b02a417eff750f23868a6f7923
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEJ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
a3e016a8cc77f05718dd8a3fa6266bdf
2ffad75d99d9e15c050268f7458e4e6a1e759b44
'2012-01-21T19:46:41-05:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEK' 'sip-files00145.txt'
a565e3e17e567a46c861d916b587b2b7
f07c10552d8fb7c616e9dcd260de45974c655aef
describe
'24995' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEL' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
3fd9db69b0c3ebd9985834dfc4066c72
1c4115809896c270462838ff25db981de6c340cb
describe
'328484' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEM' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
72a9070f1650afd880c97eb33b2fac94
370527621842f46c59734ccca2febc6b4cdc805d
describe
'157419' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEN' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
9c62af66066ece9477cc67bd54085b70
13e7a116cd01bd61576287752f6797ba80de4d26
describe
'36495' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEO' 'sip-files00146.pro'
ff4c6acf360a577e0521abf834c45e10
796f42829c8a7de4ab96cdc42a56642a485784f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEP' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
73c76bbdd2bcd3f98e53b1e023026011
229bdcbacc4b948f4d37890d09fe532b69cdb5ea
describe
'2640928' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEQ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
9d147cc149ca5efd67323f96e23de372
3c0e0ea03e9f7e222c00f9f4db03cf15dc6d06ed
'2012-01-21T19:54:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASER' 'sip-files00146.txt'
a3aa4c34a4820ba6067d201479346fcb
68f71bf6fbb2f9a8b8ce8ace97b9eb46ebc737b4
'2012-01-21T19:56:10-05:00'
describe
'25016' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASES' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
4ea9530fd305fa3c508f680850f2cad2
392410e908a306882df307989b1b01ddfcfd86af
describe
'328243' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASET' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
25ad5a4b262c51115217a688ebe0cef2
edc846912ac41f42d0b1da26668a19e8e684f765
describe
'159176' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEU' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
d78a3524b16000b7678d2c4c067d2d0f
dcd941d881211140e457e6faf415c79eb42cf821
describe
'36267' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEV' 'sip-files00147.pro'
096a0dcce1cf378dfd5759e6af19b713
740363ddd3de6ea4b4665c45cf5d8c426457173c
'2012-01-21T19:59:47-05:00'
describe
'61467' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEW' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
4ed690255072fbd23d79b6c7f157a761
45643005ce6d13cef922f21c1f746aebf762138e
'2012-01-21T19:46:10-05:00'
describe
'2638964' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEX' 'sip-files00147.tif'
2a437d3d499231c20d52442cb2e8b0d9
e83f25ef1ad6af0bc676e8b032acb836b49e65be
'2012-01-21T19:57:38-05:00'
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEY' 'sip-files00147.txt'
b14616828314e71f3824e1b791eb43a2
6597a4024d2b05db9952bf4e70c8e86d6169b85e
describe
'25280' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASEZ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
6ce7e5838e8b279ab22566c23e747181
27781b3573fb01e81d5d4080e44782ebc6bffe44
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFA' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
a8a21cc7b0cc66bd0793e7a6bdb78e2a
0c39ba556e3205940ea832b8e7db5f866834d892
describe
'164536' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFB' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
c0ec41fc8cea248fe3a76c0fa936634c
1077ba72cc1040388bed89ed12c3c0182d8eca36
describe
'36735' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFC' 'sip-files00148.pro'
926000772bf7f47f617471da1df0fbf3
800417ac9744588c5113fd20cc40a9f055873c0d
describe
'63567' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFD' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
bb4532f45b8b14497e1e2185f86acf13
ad79831f502fc8615d84f066be9dcb7931905a2a
describe
'2638940' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFE' 'sip-files00148.tif'
999018406fcb4ce8ae68c17311536c15
883b335279c22884e5438581f12fa32f1b267d76
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFF' 'sip-files00148.txt'
a58e867a7972435947bee22da8d068d0
dc96b0e14202e08c8a74ee64ad6c4bd8054d2a3a
describe
'25770' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFG' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
18e20464809a7305ff3c1d8ac5ff52cd
d80dbfc3045a2dce928acaa943a1d4762c447594
'2012-01-21T19:46:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFH' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
0a1b284e7767cf25940b43089acb3723
8a985ca5325dbd525ba2588c2e79f2dde5575123
describe
'164964' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFI' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
8abfdc62146b2e9392483b926fc24f6e
8550625baf911ee0e177be15f1cb2e7182c51547
'2012-01-21T19:57:51-05:00'
describe
'36932' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFJ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
76646f918b7bb60b505328d4bde544ee
a29dd8e7ab0761ceb83771c4a9565ad2bdfd4582
'2012-01-21T19:49:21-05:00'
describe
'62840' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFK' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
d64e55c4343d8d9aa51603d524950263
98711cd9636569f7656d0a7bd4327a3759a3e03d
describe
'2638864' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFL' 'sip-files00149.tif'
601a0668eec25d582de3c701c4f464d7
75d0106bc2d2f29f4e2d409c0028980a616458da
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFM' 'sip-files00149.txt'
dfed31c9f046568df7267c81f197d319
4a323e8f595c2e54e45487af348a661d3dd90beb
describe
'25167' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFN' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
76f41ef76e10adc6d7094558ac6b272d
6dcdc652d9ced8b43266bdcce47aeefebedd3e6b
describe
'328523' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFO' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
b47ac614ea910b6f355335f836d47df6
76145a3546d68d1ea3c7a2c281a4c67ab674bb6c
describe
'164243' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFP' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
b9490998ddc7d942c3211adc0f33e43e
605f113f1f3f924397f9ee78912d538976a6354f
'2012-01-21T19:53:21-05:00'
describe
'36677' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFQ' 'sip-files00150.pro'
44c119a5baf312a9fdcc8c0835b053bb
e379e0d15a1441ed7fa032ab88a68b8200ba72fe
describe
'63438' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFR' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
a25398a7d7056dbb9b3a887e31b605fe
e868ea95b2eaca90aae46c131dec548c6faca3d2
describe
'2640920' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFS' 'sip-files00150.tif'
7e7522a80115a2d003115f13710e4eda
a6b265eebda1082b2d35dbd74e8f017805b2af24
'2012-01-21T19:55:40-05:00'
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFT' 'sip-files00150.txt'
fdf754726cd8914244bde20bdde40b18
c0913eacdc183873630ed8f651bf91844a193ca7
describe
'25676' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFU' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
8b66e24f02d3ee6424acfd7e0e27f039
04cb1777ede17aca9a7ee49637bea884da401fcd
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFV' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
4d138b0c9b4553d4ba6806edf11f63ae
bf5c21d445327d61cd26d7a89d86a65803fb60d9
describe
'173425' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFW' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
9e58eb3014c87a5c4f0e56dc6973b6ee
72b29ddf350934a736bcabb77827a4bd3ef6b364
describe
'37851' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFX' 'sip-files00151.pro'
02eca2466c18e39d0214b7a8af5156c3
718034fa2ddb5a7984a9758071766d1e3865c8da
describe
'65278' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFY' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
d58a4114a5e1c2cbf4e897977fb68984
1d1998afc2db21b221ea7085d5e8434982672430
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASFZ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
bb942a2f467396acc4e06424a8c9106e
e91998c62a05d2144a3ed25c44567de0a085ba30
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGA' 'sip-files00151.txt'
e5ebe6329c6e0509b67eca8f9c81b0a6
b2fd16be4516ec03b786200c955a2e1cab853a78
'2012-01-21T19:59:57-05:00'
describe
'25660' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGB' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
250cbfede4c23926e359e46c2cbf2d40
3d1c032eea66f374fde9c704b2fb96cee4e879f5
describe
'328535' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGC' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
5797dde3d22137924a2fca0d63b3d6c5
c21d4533874eca9e296d6f7b96df8b398f21d764
'2012-01-21T19:55:22-05:00'
describe
'156960' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGD' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
00c8b3333f4ee4cbe3b0f8bf8cea701c
1b908453870f5dd4e1132e9b0e633388fe180bf2
describe
'36135' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGE' 'sip-files00152.pro'
1d341269f55b31748da41d8458cba225
5e9d6749fba301c158b252b7f257e61a192cee43
'2012-01-21T19:58:58-05:00'
describe
'61299' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGF' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
f0a2132b5617cc7ef041b55b2e126519
432dfdd78cce646c5e21a61857ced1024850cefa
describe
'2640844' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGG' 'sip-files00152.tif'
7ea73b69441e122a0e259bf42995985f
f4614ee2f769db5adf7e19bef9c0c97ab4bc7ce0
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGH' 'sip-files00152.txt'
4a754b156e8bb8146289a3c0ec251693
c502f81c94a7d9f4dc0d9ad10984d28dcf73d60e
describe
'24967' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGI' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
6d6024a8047f1c93afb453518284354f
0db943b8990098151ff40fce8cbb59b0f83a3e0f
describe
'328224' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGJ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
3f341004fc37246242e0f4e0d6e17d67
491a8f3c857845ee46668b069cd6ff086d23c32f
describe
'167839' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGK' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
9bfc44feeefeae7ba36f7423ac894185
dfe1c0903739228cad4f49b35dc94818d6c4d4ed
describe
'37008' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGL' 'sip-files00153.pro'
a9eb64a784f16d57235176ca3c11f688
74ac344a79f0ebe83813a8dee1b6a72b98280a82
describe
'64012' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGM' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
103f5658f89bd274e15536026d1aaaca
9a8a3ddc2f9633756926aa5cf3a7fc4b3612de3c
describe
'2638808' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGN' 'sip-files00153.tif'
d3c51ff7f3eb572f0677786e68625bce
93915399349e76fdd38f803de528188d93da2fa0
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGO' 'sip-files00153.txt'
a2f3cf8dcc7f10740f9fd0bcff57c026
2ccb03e152d368c6b1ea4e7788081cd895834f4e
'2012-01-21T19:58:16-05:00'
describe
'25240' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGP' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
76d732de5ef7d3d11952d0c128367e46
4de5c33fa044ba12f6b3f985b834e571244363fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGQ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
9f1f16b54bbddad6266d9a2638a85874
819fdee65ad7214112ad50bb8e84edc24d37f860
describe
'148883' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGR' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
dc36bd7d52d321f850880517296f1be4
4be4ef0ebc21e007cd4c0a5a802249a099ec510c
describe
'34026' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGS' 'sip-files00154.pro'
fdcaa437a828695106813ec5ed29b24c
e4733674324b9526bfb2a562b6154cb67ac558ed
'2012-01-21T19:51:06-05:00'
describe
'59219' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGT' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
e5a13b862c776bb1443c18146c5de8f1
34622a1efb89ba06c6b207797eb7ece7698f0ca9
'2012-01-21T19:50:56-05:00'
describe
'2638680' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGU' 'sip-files00154.tif'
b1e515eb948406a12df266efae081c19
4ea2d3ce1c393aac2f73b20cffb3ea35c4fb17ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGV' 'sip-files00154.txt'
29af205d8702372080a71c4664b6db5e
490c0aa8b7962978596e43f8bdf32fd617b4b3fd
describe
'24513' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGW' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
a05584edffc86c1e3603ee34d25245b8
38606855c268e6f0ff7dc66b927966d6d19c6d01
'2012-01-21T19:59:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGX' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
d83b6f0231e1b15a13663f759bbe3f03
73e306c9a7216bf06c206b81c48850fd6e2f36aa
describe
'149112' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGY' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
2a1e6b4490f0c2df4c1d49b536325cf4
7af7da150ccaedb46051d065631532dec97ea9a2
'2012-01-21T19:57:58-05:00'
describe
'33652' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASGZ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
ef4c5980403043e32458197faeae7dd9
fef9f1ff7e4f8dfa1a1af449a388d4a1374d7df2
describe
'60708' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHA' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
665ed353de87852a42f98207421835b7
88113b9adb95bb0eb0eb8551ee209e0c15c086f3
describe
'2638672' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHB' 'sip-files00155.tif'
89188412445415c17d1edbcf7899656b
66d9ba75c7f729d1e74461ce423fccbef11ece1c
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHC' 'sip-files00155.txt'
eb3fec4b66802fd6f437ddccd2657422
a1cfd244f58edad81d2fd93b5623ebee37c4cbf8
describe
'24751' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHD' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
58cc8eb27f2d09b06e0eb2d0d8cb6389
724ecd8e799bd83a006dfefe610bf07a954601d5
'2012-01-21T19:46:14-05:00'
describe
'328225' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHE' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
2e901b8a151e5bcdfabe5243b8d95bb9
0d518b81e6411d7d13830079a549c4a150e5d10e
describe
'152575' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHF' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
30fc1e3e93a9c33d930fbff61794a23f
5cf2410749959e324f84ce3744fb4bfb88cbed86
describe
'34705' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHG' 'sip-files00156.pro'
f85b5be7c4b024ef869379059a8242f9
107e223a911c13def8ce3f5af2011694e93c3d51
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHH' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
e27583d1042b280f4006214172756f61
8a392582b2a4e00c57968155542c785cbbcd8698
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHI' 'sip-files00156.tif'
ebbe69e220b608a38f45483ff9d95c2a
cd5b2e8a9f7acf1b85db69ce1a77e1ba846b7c55
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHJ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
934f6b63e8492121dabd8117d2e322d1
cff546bcbbe2f570cdf46191b6683978b2fbfff3
describe
'25211' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHK' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
517496fba7947144b1cd57b0e6a35869
e36982635a2af99e51ada5c635a1f06c43cd8052
describe
'328270' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHL' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
4cbf562d54997e99dc274051cd420748
e28c04178b062fb2f722d3bee71fe4f85a5ae65c
describe
'161921' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHM' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
e3fe5d8f1b2dbc62c06d69fe85742a5d
ee54dfba3cd982f604e5f1b65621afecdb212283
describe
'36561' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHN' 'sip-files00157.pro'
3dc14a716b9afaf99a53f39788778f3f
2fe44acb5ccefce938df328a015fe12f5c973cb2
describe
'64014' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHO' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
89d813f82db32ce6bb3aad9a8263e939
d5fbf6f75946da5e705531e16ba269ac6a500431
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHP' 'sip-files00157.tif'
1c4d69c960c895aa68795ecfdaf35968
b72c6acfcc6c6a0e6bd6e66960b0526f8986b802
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHQ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
fed064cb0c4d313f5a03b6864a5be0f3
b396b9d96ae410ba44ecdfed8d65a645cfe41825
'2012-01-21T19:57:23-05:00'
describe
'25429' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHR' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
47c1b95601f171dfd94943457ab2375f
e6608ba7ec302eb0c7d118b17a424396f597271b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHS' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
ded1575a9e0a6193a34e5c53bd5ff9cf
1331d98ddf0d161bf29a879f12740390f88a65e7
describe
'164106' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHT' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
507e4f2b8fc9024d5404308e4c9b78c0
7599023770028d301574c026b28fdc3b11a32cbb
describe
'37052' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHU' 'sip-files00158.pro'
fb5b470c026d55b23c17c51391cae823
8c4cc6c050763eb5b469cf9851df7120f74cce70
'2012-01-21T19:48:14-05:00'
describe
'64067' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHV' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
335425db4e7ca89244fcb972765b1ea4
8ab99343d7fdad8403759766abde2bf83b631d83
describe
'2639004' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHW' 'sip-files00158.tif'
7d92b35f137d81f1ad15e943c87b4ec2
43abb2588e0884139e876035dc45bdade8ac43e3
'2012-01-21T19:56:37-05:00'
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHX' 'sip-files00158.txt'
b13619a8535ec8b87980d88339a51dd1
8b1a0374f6f52a55d0adfba77ee4f5137fdc24b2
describe
'25788' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHY' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
dc5f290724c6bfd4b4b1da503f3f9ca8
9188ee552cd2016c0eda84d417155841023d8a09
describe
'328242' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASHZ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
4c7298993f444984063189b4b2074046
b5ca31d5d5419091d20771f07d5ff90a765236ef
describe
'159523' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIA' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
3b9aeefb17d188b7857bc464729a0bc3
d2fc14fad0907b8f1c608bb2b086f47fbf68ae70
describe
'35011' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIB' 'sip-files00159.pro'
a318ea21f6a1d239d5a6f0a7babcc0ba
b7a0ef46d6a3b6094ca6f6d8026806d4c32dcc8e
describe
'64000' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIC' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
1a396171ab38f99d61b2074dc1e27826
1b3b6319da57408c24711df00672b63503537bc8
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASID' 'sip-files00159.tif'
4ddd09a1d9f5326752165c96ef52c42b
606d6d51f6c447c3977629aea37b0f94e559887a
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIE' 'sip-files00159.txt'
59a31fa8e9d12337dc949d538227f332
9161cd36d973119b4e12aefaf3b586027e46ec33
describe
'25495' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIF' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
0796427339617ceb55277aec72f40cdc
741529ed26b7408c0b330d6319dccb5d6e2c563b
'2012-01-21T19:57:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIG' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
8445a11d419436272337abf323da1529
f4695560a62f950914f21c66415f5a9f1812c359
'2012-01-21T19:48:30-05:00'
describe
'162214' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIH' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
9b70b4dd7f9009ae4cdb77c7fd6b2c6e
8b263191619e0c0896c412a7a18c9d1e7bc94747
describe
'37438' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASII' 'sip-files00160.pro'
ba3e64677b69b8309543fe2b28a5ce8e
12c0b239a671d73e6adb3e79ac61abf5acbb5fc2
'2012-01-21T19:51:42-05:00'
describe
'63856' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIJ' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
a0b50045e83fb04d9b94df17810451ce
47fa003ea3c18c3b5693c107f3ac04d5fdf1534c
'2012-01-21T19:48:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIK' 'sip-files00160.tif'
c0f2b6a22e5b481cd09890bef286dd73
191faf1786011288f594b36a64ed14e002d0c427
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIL' 'sip-files00160.txt'
d9684143e0670f26c2bf2047736baece
6da6484dce0744414f26f8f5a14fd1868826c2f5
describe
'25226' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIM' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
60516c31a98546d02fb452e0daff78a7
d1a8ea7142e97af3bea896d2cb409817427fa073
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIN' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
07e7bc94e0aff9ca0b007be831819bdf
785c40445443d7d6d7020390f6b678b95fa26bd2
'2012-01-21T19:47:49-05:00'
describe
'155275' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIO' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
cf90f360e238ccae74f0ea15f87e4a27
05a00add9cbc54e94e19022c5cb422475154928a
describe
'35662' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIP' 'sip-files00161.pro'
75533891f14573be9ea1d6ff3eb32fcc
69a418c8f455f863d24d4d8f17e67df2df372c60
describe
'60773' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIQ' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
41fe2ea6faf8972633273da9afaa6782
f97c872eac7f84b17bd47de355892b610a737893
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIR' 'sip-files00161.tif'
b91367d274919cf3f04b0d8c86d9a776
e0b7167f364ae2e8303bd484766e717526ea9ffc
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIS' 'sip-files00161.txt'
c91bbca5d5b5005a58e347841e85ef7c
9a312ba4ab4a32c332c845f8c5609c79cdd85391
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIT' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
545a2dbaeeecd141b664580ea4ad7954
d761d9b89ab85195748068ef388947a088a6839e
describe
'328180' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIU' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
1e148b802221a71e14c8134222800bc2
b16ef055e06a07541e35691929b7de30a4cc9bcd
describe
'161945' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIV' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
15b98d5d11d8884aa87570a495277b88
bb5aefe3a1368e417bac540d9b89d5e7446a99fb
describe
'36050' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIW' 'sip-files00162.pro'
246cbd283187e0b138328f547a5dbcd3
a6d5decfa17720e0f57b1c1a5de10e7348047204
'2012-01-21T19:58:00-05:00'
describe
'63572' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIX' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
b09ff4d24a39ebcf2a3b0947e7bed1c8
1843a7926c19c1a82b6250b441705c54f0386e0c
describe
'2639348' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIY' 'sip-files00162.tif'
9020f492fbd341f23ac7aefba91c2d59
a1f37321716bcd743413a4cd413d8ad6918e0a77
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASIZ' 'sip-files00162.txt'
f8426c1efa9eb339c515e0c65d26b9ac
8cd173d10ffc06bfc5d6500962a6a865c556c6d4
'2012-01-21T19:47:07-05:00'
describe
'26282' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJA' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
9589cc0ce68f90d977eeebc7d45307ec
f309e319429ce8693f0b79724a3d7874b93914d2
'2012-01-21T19:51:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJB' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
4d395b2e6a2ee789db438bdb31c5ad9a
2919738ec33dfdc2261cc88431a17a892c67d738
describe
'161747' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJC' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
1c7c0ca297ee3e8cf488aae0fcdfe484
090c26ce4a68625cc9ffef8c9b40a234e5457b32
'2012-01-21T19:58:10-05:00'
describe
'35625' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJD' 'sip-files00163.pro'
815ea6bc9ac1203ca5a4819239234c40
b7236a70af77e8529baf111af1491ba79e1735b7
describe
'64107' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJE' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
20e618f389f64c8f71ceaacb332e0e13
0820a21e3d8d74ead44fdc95397069ccd5059f72
'2012-01-21T19:59:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJF' 'sip-files00163.tif'
2fda6a88f43e24b1aa7d4c848a31a326
5a5b60955c2d202a97d6785e0f355ffc4b59742f
'2012-01-21T19:50:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJG' 'sip-files00163.txt'
a9dbe96be3d7e09aa6c9d1a6a1c5d858
86ef12c8e3ccb8489543df9653b13dbca1776e9d
describe
'25631' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJH' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
96adc81debcf4151194407209370d68d
a0ea0192f37dfa277496a4b2a6acae500ef58ed6
'2012-01-21T19:53:44-05:00'
describe
'328378' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJI' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
016e60fafa23345003ac645fe4deffd9
f36fd38b4116b78ef4949cd2d6948071b058b984
describe
'152623' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJJ' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
ebe1bd1ac28c1191ad9fee6769e7feff
53fbdc8b8478c54a7cabb327d921154e0c2b7bac
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJK' 'sip-files00164.pro'
56f61b006a271c108488e30605237a67
ebf67fc84c2d09c3c8ae0a2cbc882919554e61e9
'2012-01-21T19:52:55-05:00'
describe
'59732' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJL' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
5a00c2554a4a4aa670625f3330638895
f30fe3bd815f6a43999b4c2c854cae7660df6a5c
'2012-01-21T19:54:50-05:00'
describe
'2639908' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJM' 'sip-files00164.tif'
926794af6ac421aa0b03df7a0c946ce1
0022553a9c2544fc0049b463f1156e90cee9cb7b
'2012-01-21T19:59:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJN' 'sip-files00164.txt'
8e2a021f80de4b0b3da908a9440397f1
165b095ba61006a55cb05e979c77fe1f58fbaebf
describe
'24313' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJO' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
2d4ff71e5365d31b800e2a87632bb272
60ef82b12892e00113ebcb566d68f8ce5e68ada5
describe
'328271' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJP' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
6dd2727199d06d38155368b4335790a5
a5ecb2a29dba73b8d0d6fbafa9885b48dffebe36
describe
'151450' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJQ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
aec40367362e98fd2a30bcdfec10b3a0
1e56082659f01c163ceb360ce6968806ffad1a99
describe
'34296' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJR' 'sip-files00165.pro'
1b5b5b8e11e623f0c6c5b0ca0cd45c64
8bf6fa213b23bd1d0a55d3ba603f0ea114be2120
describe
'59857' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJS' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
7dee193fc84fd74d61ff303fc8577817
c479fe6a80e6442f4ab5b0c79ef9fa9d734e34ed
describe
'2638580' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJT' 'sip-files00165.tif'
15fc3c74921e3434bb83cfd7c4ae5a0b
934aca687a8ba00482fe24b2ee5f14e9dd1a9229
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJU' 'sip-files00165.txt'
3b30e64e5469488ace0865a29c4836d2
d2086c40ee6bebda93e0149cd8dde3521dd362ac
describe
'24380' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJV' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
5fa2b11737019ddc1f49c90f24d949d6
d8b2f2f374c330dd45e12b212160fbde949d10ea
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJW' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
c2b5d0b7a96aa70a4580ad920737ddcf
f20f49cb8d811d7cea8bc0010569ec3eee553d0e
describe
'76307' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJX' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
2871d9281b22d2dcb93d752da188c32e
6c12d183d721d4e17da52e85e2409f551bdcd9eb
'2012-01-21T19:46:43-05:00'
describe
'13658' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJY' 'sip-files00166.pro'
3754f7199ba5e0df2072f9a851470019
9468c2597a5cb102db051a0e33b425c857855f63
describe
'31195' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASJZ' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
2ee2a03c259bee8c9ba0c0f0e776bef3
14ae726a4b1c5191eca7246fde7dbce55b7ff4aa
describe
'2636260' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKA' 'sip-files00166.tif'
9e9d0c250ed12ca36ce648d28c190a08
d96337aca64c0ccff415e2776d1c722f87496b05
'2012-01-21T19:59:04-05:00'
describe
'546' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKB' 'sip-files00166.txt'
83e7ddb2a4294a9c4fabccc89a42419e
c522a7d8261a4f01c09a28e34b83ccc301cf87c6
'2012-01-21T19:58:31-05:00'
describe
'15752' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKC' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
2abf492d2f4806d3cfbcdcef01106d8a
0ba2532467a47796925711cd6a2990b91a458432
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKD' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
6c82211f9f5227413a153b25793727d7
80257d3e98dcd053f6922791c86d64d592117bb8
describe
'135673' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKE' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
11f96d8a22d58b16468bf2bbadb72c6b
52202161a6da84c21d650ed8aab32907a2446580
'2012-01-21T19:54:29-05:00'
describe
'28121' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKF' 'sip-files00167.pro'
cf52ffc1592e473b01a7e7ddd61300ba
12e08aca0edb9aff31933011cfba8bb85f471878
describe
'53045' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKG' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
201c4542ca64dd889f0cbcafe3f8d649
ef105987e20c915735df2e1d20676e39fddacf33
describe
'2637900' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKH' 'sip-files00167.tif'
1c28d90e0759a229d0d2c743f28aadd8
a7c8493c0fc3d68b406f267e8013139b43b44a27
'2012-01-21T19:49:40-05:00'
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKI' 'sip-files00167.txt'
489f898ccdbeb6d5dd0eb20d5d856aaa
7f91fd75f01d1107815ad95372515934ac9415c8
describe
'22393' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKJ' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
575ad8337ce6a0f999020c9be0148cd2
753b57981d7b8f90120c3ffdf00a2a9cbe058976
describe
'328541' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKK' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
b6d25101dd0cfd7186d048aa1226cea5
104845c851378a82fd47bd0a30b1705a8a358b50
'2012-01-21T19:56:06-05:00'
describe
'162018' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKL' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
ccca6ea2cc44b51260657f202012739a
3b01d0b00adb596f429db4cbf45d3e8df20ce50d
describe
'36567' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKM' 'sip-files00168.pro'
4b91797e18eced9d2922ff262a7ec78d
2f3661bef7ffe188cf3398ed52474b738ec7006d
describe
'61942' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKN' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
e360b78fa116f10ca1ca9ac67bc54a1c
e33d1b1e6e6505edaecf0dfd792af89b58238d29
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKO' 'sip-files00168.tif'
c2d2b18f2a81624776c2f2314d68e90f
c8e99a8254c892ee09e01adb757c4342e4c3309a
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKP' 'sip-files00168.txt'
12edee2a4bb6fb92a2647e1a09eb41fa
990f6a22b5b62b08462a19a2c2e00542a0ba4a66
'2012-01-21T19:52:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKQ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
4b7114f2b6be8a9ae03d6cb78b1bed02
6684c6ac8686d3e87acc71195480866465d6bcb8
'2012-01-21T19:55:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKR' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
7b025fdf1d1a5b62e76c3cd1d7ed555d
203dd4a03120362d209d4573007c7ea58419202f
'2012-01-21T19:47:33-05:00'
describe
'164472' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKS' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
eb5fb99303b9954ec08ca7c9a2630266
7609b9c76505aa0063e3bb38c2869ec8a05bec12
describe
'36821' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKT' 'sip-files00169.pro'
a6116af104c5edb0e45a885da98af932
adcd766ca5887f36a15bd2f3185fd78000cf96e5
describe
'64070' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKU' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
a45381cae34dda850443590054b68051
252b79a0960176f095d3d0d354b5dc2778e56a34
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKV' 'sip-files00169.tif'
3fe09e15b9c287f8fc7f6f3f2c5ff0fe
63009064d7cfd6248209300212e925a06c1af838
'2012-01-21T19:51:03-05:00'
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKW' 'sip-files00169.txt'
02c119f2698b13bf13b6ee0aeb91b75b
e17f28484c0335f977d3a3ce284f682bbc290893
describe
'25638' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKX' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
7e8770a7fb7a6ad07b569f2dadcff37d
93342ec6c0369dec8f89df940085f5f078c5b95a
'2012-01-21T19:46:17-05:00'
describe
'328510' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKY' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
66d32501350b28d5a5b659d4f060657e
5466143d64abfe48ce1f87e5c36d9f3198c49428
describe
'159201' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASKZ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
ea14966fe270a5e038880f18b9d2ad2b
f87326bb205baa7974dcb36bd9565b3bced621b8
describe
'34640' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLA' 'sip-files00170.pro'
89428f1e17c44d70681811fcd05019ba
0441704d93a9034affd553d8bf76bfbedeee1e70
describe
'61935' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLB' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
40e07bac328a7676cc9cb591dbe416cc
f05627fe7776138c96488454623f162a10ada5a6
describe
'2641200' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLC' 'sip-files00170.tif'
5d4a040ea8567f3d897b3a7fe5e4e4a9
069600ea00edc53feaf3191d63b55aed93b3c644
'2012-01-21T19:54:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLD' 'sip-files00170.txt'
c4e7ce03a7d9d0d35e69435f895c77b9
62d22f8fcaa73d0245105c54bf62dddd1d6fe18d
describe
'25461' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLE' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
57d5c7fa6bec134b71833918100dc660
8c16219f27443f2d6b1e11f0888a968cbd487349
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLF' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
4eb2e3363fc477d22c889ed7b1a09106
8481e7d1fc1a6b74b0675749993cef08693eb720
describe
'173192' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLG' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
3d3a647f6ea3e22be03a9f7f74cc9faf
9e22768b1807b2d7233a180f8f4234eb226000cd
describe
'37208' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLH' 'sip-files00171.pro'
489cd08e9bd1414f38e81e7d7c72c2db
32f352f29c35215d50a4df248b52f785a97ef0c6
describe
'65200' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLI' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
e8e09112232ccca589853d2270016a47
24c17aedac6559c3debba540ddd13be196618d4e
describe
'2639220' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLJ' 'sip-files00171.tif'
5ce5d6f224dbf4e72ab069e069075ce7
c517c39f2c6d7bfed4befb7e250b806c96b1bd4d
'2012-01-21T19:47:27-05:00'
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLK' 'sip-files00171.txt'
1c826da2dfb38e92ad3b817fa83eb3b0
caa92040ec373d7224e636130fb881c5418dfb8d
describe
'26256' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLL' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
a9cd58a386aab1242cc17ab2b9800b54
3584cea9149cc6fd7be40fdf0e7a3511b101276b
'2012-01-21T19:56:21-05:00'
describe
'328238' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLM' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
ee65831240fe4e1fecb6b8d988e05bb8
029c85796871c853a0ba04421a5c3edaf51fb945
describe
'155879' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLN' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
5c13af2056e8aaf394edd81da55ac80b
49018e9e9673c33914b95da5a1007628fd5b55cc
describe
'34300' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLO' 'sip-files00172.pro'
47b1accaef3079c957f8b08dc3c6dd75
614be78c5b3e9299ea0a3dbc79e5841837ed87a2
describe
'61435' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLP' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
28ab7d52b8c286817b8eb31cead880fd
59968b524b708d3ec662c5ede59658186aedf3bc
describe
'2638848' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLQ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
73297df47f238e06b81493709a55481c
e1b63fc6d028e4fda98a8b1b19192371d2cc1913
'2012-01-21T19:56:44-05:00'
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLR' 'sip-files00172.txt'
e9f3048cc4d95b27f7aba47c75c6a342
8122e32e87d849ee81df216a2f7acfa3d657fff5
describe
'24968' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLS' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
4db69f8b976b19ec72158102f9dc1af8
1e97960f27e239f00a97b256cc3039a4a93ebf1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLT' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
fb79e3a92ae90577f5839e6047bfadfe
a5262dc951ac01058246de8d9498fbde907b8360
describe
'167480' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLU' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
c6c75d246e85d58978db1d84a32882eb
813b0590b4b50e72f78f0e2acfcdfb68e584f1f3
describe
'37464' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLV' 'sip-files00173.pro'
3a643166bb1d58925e3cc5fe632fdc65
926d4f57d67d36dac2a8e8f1d852f11f33153f9f
describe
'65046' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLW' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
57df8b4631443260d2daa99d8820f56f
d65eb2766381e2ff2e1a3cdc32ab5ac4ef03eb72
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLX' 'sip-files00173.tif'
f6b98ee62db0cbfead4dd69713ac2f3c
19ee311ab3e0e7ad83057f6654b1d2b4ec3e9593
'2012-01-21T19:57:55-05:00'
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLY' 'sip-files00173.txt'
c0f409c6485bfb7bb4e0785c18f66f16
0836a531357218aa93d99c62b256789f132b8819
'2012-01-21T19:57:57-05:00'
describe
'25909' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASLZ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
61a9191cd90d6b1b20a919cbbf776c73
91d8b8c187f2e57e7072449b54a32d6f29523384
'2012-01-21T19:52:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMA' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
8b0b88c84b30e9b069171b5d9f062486
50f6c5d970820687a9b07b385c48c87cb1ba662d
describe
'157753' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMB' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
b477419c368f46581938f4e621d534c4
893f31f7b6604904038a89b2e8b97dbacef91f14
describe
'35372' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMC' 'sip-files00174.pro'
5aa56df1cc3bf7521a04f122df162648
c46a981b2923da1ced6bb0152ab70dbf789921ad
describe
'61400' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMD' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
9e5b2a3eedbf6d7e11dd192cbc097c39
56f1eaf504085b391eef1b17a2193815c3c03215
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASME' 'sip-files00174.tif'
cf5b04418c2006d7e0971bd368928a84
f590ee2da0ebacb0e5716b579ea1053612ef228a
'2012-01-21T19:48:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMF' 'sip-files00174.txt'
7e50aa5d2a3647b3cd39d842897679f7
45b04251c7494c443a00c6f5adce2e4ba9e13080
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMG' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
b59b4e2b4457aa06844115abe3c76b83
9721bd7fd874c25bf0817ac77b0415eeee847750
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMH' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
e8afc06462286b29c98be348b878e72d
6fd59a548304b8c13b99d141902d18d849c82150
describe
'156536' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMI' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
aab1e01ac243313cda93ae71528e352d
d3b5e1c01d11c5bc2aa0fb5507480fa1a52d0a9a
'2012-01-21T19:58:18-05:00'
describe
'34815' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMJ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
272c712cbc85d1278114a7de72572d75
20b7ba94ff64343222f7ee84837174939189acc3
describe
'62275' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMK' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
9184ad803c981c69c376e39730e2136a
70256c3ba98aadd5099c00b3646e7c754951c63d
describe
'2638936' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASML' 'sip-files00175.tif'
9f875608e46ebde0a03b59e681283315
d39c81586bc7e14b3839a45a2eb3ebee9e97e3ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMM' 'sip-files00175.txt'
7b56ba9a4ddbb7a9188635ef6eb464d7
24e230997a0b7ca479136d5618418a01a4553c06
describe
'25337' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMN' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
019e11eeb4cc9ce6315dba78ec1474f5
fb4820be32ce26b6044cfabfbcd63dc88851dc2b
describe
'328462' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMO' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
50eace27ef46684ad2195bcb96cab3ee
237db51653e7f2dcf58bbea500972ff88bc08860
'2012-01-21T19:47:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMP' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
ef6f164649f407f087eeb17a1ac6a098
74e0bf0b2347430efe22f7be15786b37b1adc4db
describe
'36715' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMQ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
10ff74d6ac1e243c618e41f2ade727e0
496c0539b24e975c7634bbe3e58abd360c24b32c
describe
'62933' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMR' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
b0cc053b0ebc0731da1e4faf6821b102
4a718235f60d14fc90604d5205b0007fa7c685c9
describe
'2641104' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMS' 'sip-files00176.tif'
5102bf63dcf5786d38e0d1124d320aad
331d0b1326dd6b4e4e776d4472d6fe9459ebd3f6
'2012-01-21T19:48:51-05:00'
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMT' 'sip-files00176.txt'
51ee5b1923d16dc0f6e321d86ffa87d1
1bd41261af6271f142c8dd3f6bb69b2a1473155e
describe
'25437' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMU' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
6796e970999825222302e74add0ea523
107bb7498ae3e9e4b47be8e5be853837b92b4486
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMV' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
83696e6303cb056976e0ab9a9fcb14d9
02436a58a256e0b7670797eb0110dee95290a24f
describe
'166143' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMW' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
052decbc436bc357b2918e92ee1400a2
a3a9fec397d5d9df1f6ac4a8002d4f089b87f991
describe
'37981' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMX' 'sip-files00177.pro'
4769dbdd26e3aba5d2ce26189628fd7f
e8722aaadbed0608f3d39883b810aea4fd252b82
describe
'63822' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMY' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
bb53b89bb934e3e2ceb6dc320b0291f7
b844f33c6c79003c82755bff6346a466df22d62a
describe
'2638824' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASMZ' 'sip-files00177.tif'
62969d90672a6e70cf163bdf4af9f71a
4366181a0a20f70473c54c1c354389d597219e2e
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNA' 'sip-files00177.txt'
4f57d0a898059e1b1a84dab357e3ed90
1433f39fc4aa83dfd5c46579434d7212ff1e1b5c
describe
'25359' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNB' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
ea9770deaf6c1880c678514c72e16a2e
0bf4376fa8f4b35cd5dbf775cdf08d3e056204f0
describe
'328139' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNC' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
3c3ddb29bd8ba919c4b33859474aac96
1ea34dca77c1f45d19be59d7950d63908a4edf13
describe
'168417' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASND' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
90c0cf9746e9d038b327f7072e8da773
b817219331c75b27ccee2319153e5db11b97a008
describe
'38123' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNE' 'sip-files00178.pro'
bdd03022a48887c460565bf068e71b7d
d66a6e29db7f54836cd4026e9a93526586476b2c
describe
'64286' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNF' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
5dd6c4abb5cf5a33b8a5d4c475769242
64148801cb9424e491e4c120c06f5e9995bb21b8
'2012-01-21T19:51:28-05:00'
describe
'2639076' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNG' 'sip-files00178.tif'
98a4e41ba9386cee9d227fb3fcca51e9
a037ff438b74527b8cbcaf1807f48237209a8ef5
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNH' 'sip-files00178.txt'
5eb202c487e535460775f55ecaf6673c
5d8f8a24338644c79bd3d6e3ebcdc9c83be6d4b6
describe
'25755' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNI' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
202b477dad73e4b360f8eada92c01e11
30c079ab0eab673be8c266b0f5a33b09426fb3bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNJ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
38c35edd59d9df543ea4050c61b22205
b22bcb311ef053422c837efe4af009380c158230
describe
'155038' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNK' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
cc61ce080f3b7524d8e7b0c6323cdc1a
aa3d2671f0ebea5711a80a35b991e02f3a0a86ac
describe
'36209' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNL' 'sip-files00179.pro'
025098f9c7ace4e755a689a3f054befa
00bbbb4ed5ef00624c27fc8d0e9f88857e4a88f3
describe
'61410' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNM' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
520983c65d7cd4b6edeb049e5b47c7d9
63bf4e9f7c678379a716b9e786f0464a88f65800
describe
'2638760' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNN' 'sip-files00179.tif'
811cffa794e8edd63aa43fff2cf86199
0dd2a0d66425aaed120b1aa6f788e64453bf3400
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNO' 'sip-files00179.txt'
cb5eae39a6fd3a99974927e45d649c21
2fd7fbcb66dda88d7bdc8b3124bb285bed684da1
describe
'24893' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNP' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
701dceb69d609ffdd828340bb346f218
8bcaf357a3cc48063d6599abf328ddcadc72bf0a
describe
'328267' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNQ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
48dc3b3159428ae441836d5c77a78f6c
a6b6184441fd654319d37c7940c819e8d9e50178
describe
'163446' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNR' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
459e552a15e17532f681a440b47d299d
abaaeb8d3ae84f3ec76a64c857cbad4fef2cc5c1
'2012-01-21T19:58:48-05:00'
describe
'36732' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNS' 'sip-files00180.pro'
7acb3b15e8636d7aae28c7ed8d8e22db
a61b4d99ddd491f0cef1019460b975c7e409a12f
describe
'64426' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNT' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
3e0f9be1e5d29458ac99b9fe668cf35d
287e9c7f248f16827cbb206ed395bf3370c47679
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNU' 'sip-files00180.tif'
b428c0eb499c690f77f35a2434857b00
90a913b5fc955317b0521b82bdf959a8bd63c033
'2012-01-21T19:48:59-05:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNV' 'sip-files00180.txt'
0e208a27dc9a3907f4cda58ef084772e
2f2f579afa7b5417ef88ddb77b3e3593beb756ab
describe
'25675' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNW' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
a3724bcb5154f1a1ae91695979f1bbc9
3f1afea189c89f5bcab9c80040939859698ad786
'2012-01-21T19:55:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNX' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
135451e4fce9431d142b729847f8936b
c1ca965eaf814f3f83874471082f7f77bc3a14bb
describe
'162453' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNY' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
0d6bd14c9632e8e9baabf20bd99523b6
33a4795b41b3ef94d0de40fd9347eb2783d5f0c5
describe
'36067' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASNZ' 'sip-files00181.pro'
8056a224676cb54d9d6cc6232ae518b4
272a2d046b6a583a2e2a3e3a492ae0c17c705109
'2012-01-21T19:58:07-05:00'
describe
'65399' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOA' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
1dfe427019f19d33aa0c2dc3f5dc3a7c
2b38ef8d28ae1c16a97a2656073c75fb9d517de2
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOB' 'sip-files00181.tif'
7bb957ff7e15cf9e3f34fa77b916c75c
a1e5d545b010f85f01422a985eef783584a1d182
'2012-01-21T19:48:04-05:00'
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOC' 'sip-files00181.txt'
c32f943ad0eadcbf171191eed3f75747
f6bbbfd0a93ddaeec6f7b61fe02dbe00756bc31d
describe
'25951' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOD' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
98d3c3884f20e530ebdfe3f2c518833d
69cf4cc5cacfc052c3ffd2fcc626329e9673f1ee
describe
'328501' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOE' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
c29541cadc963ab99ca385ed50c7e040
9cc78759872b1039b7a22896fca3bb964e23d313
describe
'164080' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOF' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
2f3b48f0fd3e1cdff7727f7e706a2355
c70e8daa486cff61c2814959dd47a2baedb7ed3c
'2012-01-21T19:46:15-05:00'
describe
'37013' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOG' 'sip-files00182.pro'
8519b57c9ffc83eb7a9da0fd3bd618df
ea116001eef2dc04ac142de00dc3ae32ad6f5bac
describe
'64101' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOH' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
ba66ec4293f4acd2922545f7528805eb
b2e53f6afa9677abb83741206176f3eb6eb6e865
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOI' 'sip-files00182.tif'
dd0c8623702e395f40a6460d35697c35
efe2b9ce9b8bf28e0ac47ba932938f7edd1d1610
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOJ' 'sip-files00182.txt'
79cb07ce68f5373056a3552f09a0db25
5cb94812d5dd8c9196613ee6c9f63330b50b7e69
'2012-01-21T19:52:57-05:00'
describe
'25234' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOK' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
3de592aa3c58f5b2d1ca0150f2b89ed0
a80a1c45c788ee19a08c0bfd8669b50666698a54
describe
'328226' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOL' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
a3fe257dd6c3479bd4901db400ab30f2
dad2338acf7618bf46820e03d61fb6244062da56
describe
'140608' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOM' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
5f4dbbf3171e1ed14b98dbde36b32f45
d7e36e9cd35b5dbd0543bf2ab4227c38658f2dba
describe
'29971' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASON' 'sip-files00183.pro'
989779a4dad1528aab2066e398edc8c4
be7b1523f5932faee4ccc57a5da15b1490da16b4
describe
'54950' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOO' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
71ae15a5fd98eefd6293b737431cf6ff
8ca9b484c0e877eec94b8b5aaac351333d5071ad
describe
'2638240' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOP' 'sip-files00183.tif'
6f5f03848cc0dbf2bb41cc4dd3275970
1fec654b39c51815c488ccdbee041eb539a63115
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOQ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
7db1ab43c165b4592b65759cf5cbcaa6
750edc7f029968355c99638c3c065a28036ce57f
describe
'23020' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOR' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
f52453bbd787d13855b5109ce5cf3410
3f6a790fb5d3d7bfeff985fc36489b6205edd64f
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOS' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
d7f85a0f802cd8db946b61561aea21ab
4518bc6acdcc99c760bd195cd17a477b66625877
describe
'128964' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOT' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
8922873adf426e3487e7aa00691fab42
79d85862142e0eef61a06d2012a5dada73e3681f
describe
'27456' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOU' 'sip-files00184.pro'
acfc116d63847da82e3765ce48183173
9052468bf612884d9ff2fbdee496103a1ea74315
'2012-01-21T19:48:26-05:00'
describe
'51232' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOV' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
18b106a245829abdafea95b5ff55dd88
3f0a1cad0aad1f1d78efbfd2225f6aed316b0efd
'2012-01-21T20:00:00-05:00'
describe
'2640004' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOW' 'sip-files00184.tif'
4b03d069b88cbbfacee769293e6e17aa
5e287838d676b97bfb3dbf2f5404cdb4f3de323b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOX' 'sip-files00184.txt'
8d9277ad48e4d18f63da13e4328aabe8
d11d5c56edf480e54b0457abda82bc25220fa5fe
'2012-01-21T19:59:35-05:00'
describe
'21906' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOY' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
b8858891cf1b6d8e8c2541d2d890bb9a
1085c36abbb394630cd8bcf467360eb7e6352d2f
describe
'328262' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASOZ' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
89e1fa8f8e5a37c9340242c96d6ea92a
ead4dc18f77adb3c18e0011a69e52a6015be2fdd
describe
'163686' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPA' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
edf72f2a3c43be1189c8f37a7fb29923
5eb47970a752cb67db82a216b099735c9196aaac
describe
'36427' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPB' 'sip-files00185.pro'
98c2b98c1f6079a1cffc6dbc4e640e30
e712ba5ec66eb2f33f2f0046c78e0024f4e12366
describe
'63675' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPC' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
3a7a1e8049eba8391e41ee01a6c438ec
717ab7bea3d00d56b832e113d7c0b80f5748e216
describe
'2638832' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPD' 'sip-files00185.tif'
737be85b815d927053abf5ded12c96a3
05451657a141537276b5d67c6fbad2645cd76393
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPE' 'sip-files00185.txt'
dfa430ab3448d26ce7b1ed8e5c7cf01c
fe8387f23c3798f221d5d5c5362b569e1dfcda4d
describe
'25245' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPF' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
b8df765924e57814b15ee7aa0d201ac6
22e8881f10246527fc86d1e4e72957dc7ab39e8f
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPG' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
623dd8ed0b7ee6dab723d9c88696065a
0f2394aa6a88a76a6b207eb5afefa40aeccece20
describe
'164399' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPH' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
667796413a5109f21555b4ad7700bd84
65e8bf0995624733019cc648b5cdb588efc29900
describe
'36500' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPI' 'sip-files00186.pro'
2f6af67cb2731484c26e7793c918ea33
39e44962eea259bc253a6f1aaa33673017772a78
'2012-01-21T19:58:12-05:00'
describe
'64528' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPJ' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
db99cadfbf92f4152d2b3f06c25f3b32
ce7e795d54b4b004475989494e6c77db8bba05c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPK' 'sip-files00186.tif'
16f5ad2c005c09306d931439b4497b76
d9d3d03178603620e9cdc0d9b6c283fe51ffc98e
'2012-01-21T19:49:22-05:00'
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPL' 'sip-files00186.txt'
1aee1078e4b4b68364c9939b73e7a136
6277d128176da05d28b3090e2f958c403e2b996e
describe
'25783' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPM' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
f6047d22b775212a01edd76c51ea7de2
40b5e8b9ca94ba686b7ada230593ca73507c835b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPN' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
541331aa96f09fed4c746e683fee3c18
f249f068d1cb06de214078d06943ecebc90e3424
'2012-01-21T19:56:19-05:00'
describe
'170130' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPO' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
dbca8e315098819bc21ae16fde82ff4c
05880e2152c980fe235a800774c316a7bc52b013
describe
'38020' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPP' 'sip-files00187.pro'
e52f1bdc12139c92559056e84b0ac980
06bb88948253e620d10638364359bc4f95870c74
describe
'66293' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPQ' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
9fc63b8038cce1f06af6048378f5e9e6
27305f69a563f485cf0cbf407d800d377003efa3
'2012-01-21T19:49:59-05:00'
describe
'2639176' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPR' 'sip-files00187.tif'
22a15f6c9ea6438eef72ce3b9b3513ac
70e4ebd20636001ce2e021001b0e08bae2d439ca
'2012-01-21T19:53:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPS' 'sip-files00187.txt'
39dc01806d6bdde7004d1ae12912914f
4ca3b25125929cfdf773a3af4ebd87666d4fba50
describe
'26170' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPT' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
2f0fda3b0daf7b63550c96129d3494c0
544e7ace2659fdf6d7611acdbfae9a36ec0af321
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPU' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
6dafbd8caa721f6a6b8dc4f1e9e91bec
81ba454a378b0164ca0b3deb1e4918146cf70819
describe
'160008' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPV' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
a4a595eabb72a7b2197b00b27e67acf3
d9a9d965ba7bc796955f505963fda44cd157aa61
describe
'35588' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPW' 'sip-files00188.pro'
05d55ca658adefc8984cf8f624b8cf59
605d1b00a274146c08218c41b4456e93bf55c6e1
'2012-01-21T19:56:29-05:00'
describe
'62266' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPX' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
1813d36ac3102aa5d1f282a804a6170e
87ad8a700fb5b08b9ec769bdf844bd401dec0274
'2012-01-21T19:51:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPY' 'sip-files00188.tif'
aeb0826c0e6b5f87101ae1f79cca0917
073ac4db6a8964cd903fee9d7c2311218b0b97e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASPZ' 'sip-files00188.txt'
11b91f6574697e70520198e0d57ae0f9
cd7b8fbe7fd809b2f872d958558219676755f3a0
describe
'25501' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQA' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
9aaf9e2f3a469f5fde424372ef675846
981abf230045067cb38c198f2af686d8c95dd2e3
'2012-01-21T19:57:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQB' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
62d818b425fbe26e6b623dc4d205b7de
3eaef41179162791539afe0882ed081a3c1b5b04
describe
'163162' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQC' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
4136004355638b8b2df407411eed76e4
601bdbd301dc1ea564c2b5a9419ea55c0d8958c2
describe
'35879' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQD' 'sip-files00189.pro'
5734d3bb7fc32c2e6a66b1f68a096839
f6c5e47fb1d37f82452e61ec1c4138a5726cabea
describe
'64445' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQE' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
c5622baed15deac964493e42532c147f
e1b2a7a2e57f6a4db22402c851fb8546ffc3c1a8
'2012-01-21T19:55:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQF' 'sip-files00189.tif'
f824a2b07570e319ffd378640de2c07e
ae450ab6a5974949a10b7fed91da20d9c2fed6c8
'2012-01-21T19:51:36-05:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQG' 'sip-files00189.txt'
e8bb8483907a044a1f25c5b087750eff
6a226e03314f6287aaa5bbae29bc596eea6483c3
'2012-01-21T19:55:31-05:00'
describe
'26197' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQH' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
50f8a7c0a616f99a66d05f8897824612
c5a28aa2d8dfb29c4ec917b2608c169e91d827d3
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQI' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
9d491df038527ab7ef13bcec658233f1
b7a0519a54c5b015f1e5383b9b34b2e5d08e261c
describe
'154075' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQJ' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
1a4da0624e1e714721be119de51fadb3
110ca04bd80f27f7ab0590052c51e08e979952a2
describe
'34166' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQK' 'sip-files00190.pro'
6b3e8efffb3919114334a702799a2e25
dddb3b00949d4314aa25606a9e0270873b78146f
describe
'61254' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQL' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
725df0bf33dddb20bdc476c8a8b99aaf
7bac1dcaeec05d634a3e6e24f19c00b4c52f8ce4
describe
'2641080' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQM' 'sip-files00190.tif'
08da2e912aa5e5eaa47816ef9dcdc535
2e7772549e0b21c85bc6c4fea7fe77a5529544df
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQN' 'sip-files00190.txt'
00a0c1912a3263adcf3adf0afff433ce
3e8bd6989ac0a631005a3434e364bfa4605efcb6
describe
'25439' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQO' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
f6416850872c3a92cdee359a282903f4
a61bca09784a0dedfba7104e25f24bcf36abe5ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQP' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
8988ba6580e83d48bcaa1d3aede736de
dc63b8416300d54bf922cc74350570b71422521b
describe
'163843' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQQ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
517a85d0736ac7737829a15e30c730a1
36ca71dd743aba4b6e8e4175ff0f92a588b8f8a4
describe
'35590' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQR' 'sip-files00191.pro'
032a0f9756e2bdf57207ab4648e76cc5
d17d61c3e6940c2feb1c7616d98716348347317a
describe
'63005' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQS' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
288d45a25235a8de9746a0acfd105934
2a9174b7a96baae17ca9c65e9856855463ebf6d9
describe
'2639052' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQT' 'sip-files00191.tif'
d05f6be7736fce166902728ae46834d7
352bfd16aa470e162459e057a17accfd307c460a
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQU' 'sip-files00191.txt'
fd73aa03cb94845a589ef3f691fedea4
97ee5bd609f9f77e059abab04ce6577aea818a1f
describe
'25518' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQV' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
357e146c8459c54d9cebfb1ca3ff4843
24d25f2712a0d10c85aa3b8f45ce806b4cc86379
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQW' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
b049867fb3d26ce14c2cb5d8ae8359c8
67817c559d71ceafac9c24619530073e8224ba1e
describe
'163206' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQX' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
76c8c4d3c330fdd99260533422d4c784
81d70866ba820e89da8758dd2027f47334f9c41d
describe
'36381' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQY' 'sip-files00192.pro'
d5923878f84bf74c6e604b67624ee6d2
ca6006c65c9ce0ca89df5f513cb8645f562baac3
describe
'63405' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASQZ' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
95ca780440efa05e07ffcedb4790dbfc
1951cbaa6d6f41691bf32d4f0029b18f2bd2f3a2
'2012-01-21T19:56:11-05:00'
describe
'2641044' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRA' 'sip-files00192.tif'
e1f36790836152503258907f68f075db
778683cd28a392467d163fba2989b3d536ce5783
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRB' 'sip-files00192.txt'
375fd3a78f3c0e19ae8dfd97e679111c
abe0fbce40845ca0c9fd5f3d6d7eb426bd7df70e
describe
'25800' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRC' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
f86bcc43229a8d6b480560e49f63ebcc
ac2e136620fc5fbac4618ecefa4f9f95768224b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRD' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
1a95f0793bc780ea093f4b4a64dd2e32
1351967d33e8b518c213c4c9f3ad79224619fd5d
describe
'150817' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRE' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
0ff145a5f88f94034ccd856e461f36af
18fa78e21d5d2fe84f900de5ed4adcdfa2e5ac32
describe
'32701' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRF' 'sip-files00193.pro'
21e9deb554a652887a76f9ee8f5633a7
f20fb1d4b29334cb1901d4f72865f8eeadd72895
describe
'59083' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRG' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
2fbffeb21a5887d0c7db9dc09c6d1ca9
1f83439faf86421645310edf995df6e77d87b706
'2012-01-21T19:58:11-05:00'
describe
'2638772' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRH' 'sip-files00193.tif'
519333754b35f99e4ffa7672c9d33b4a
6f6e8561a7c05d98835e3b94337e186516a560d0
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRI' 'sip-files00193.txt'
79bfb32f18e85d206844fd53eef4cd25
16800e7cd3088df158cf2a2aa9b483a974e7e542
describe
'24517' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRJ' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
5168079b27f75ce25cb1cf291b6cb751
71c62ff7c7a1c654525c85e1380b94d3c64363a3
describe
'328486' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRK' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
481a22ab5d9c1b24ee2ac1701fc7dfda
304640b52fff67bc2ed45644d3381e7d3ad54da7
describe
'144998' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRL' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
5c4022661b1762b853d689c5e73d87b0
52eed8b7fa82f77531a25b965ab215a8954ce82f
describe
'31819' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRM' 'sip-files00194.pro'
84867af42b48f0c303727009cb914aaf
14a05903168c30d221c0e660bc6c343e594db542
describe
'56490' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRN' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
c1f680bea2daed74e3ffd89c1131c346
df70ca99d40b015e2d16bbb0033589674d9b1906
describe
'2640972' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRO' 'sip-files00194.tif'
b1b63e59a600c2f73bd0b035e90b8df6
780d61d23ac6437fceeb06690685261b2955f807
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRP' 'sip-files00194.txt'
0189a2d8e9177248b333a78f1b3cfa5f
2a1f1c11579ec10f573e50983f0db334af94ffc4
describe
'24913' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRQ' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
51966d1b409e750f4d6293636d8ee5b1
1b4bfd3fad1039038cb43ff198aa683d9ec138b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRR' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
871d7865e322959b092e6556592660ca
877084750cc326ed9d134521c927a89146acb40f
describe
'163356' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRS' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
97791b665c4c0501b02610c857607e0b
f8d97fb77b61b6e172a2cc3506e9caef86b724ae
describe
'36454' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRT' 'sip-files00195.pro'
caa4329d722b2c00fc8b23eb6cfeda31
b9318603207bbee3b77f92519ce0c65bb90166d9
'2012-01-21T19:49:33-05:00'
describe
'64149' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRU' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
62244df2643c0464b43320e12afaf2c8
6a1f27f9896586dedc0afb87ca50889a47e3c96b
describe
'2639208' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRV' 'sip-files00195.tif'
219805af3c5b687af4c64357f89de893
2d451fe37380ee69255073869c5351b4e494b196
'2012-01-21T19:47:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRW' 'sip-files00195.txt'
56c43ccceb33281f8072006e5ebb6601
a5ded590e2e2dfde387f9f5de12ceaeef273206d
'2012-01-21T19:59:55-05:00'
describe
'25996' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRX' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
b304e07720a296098dc4e6b379cbd7bd
8c32e214707d2da0ad14f89e518aed7aecd4f89b
describe
'328506' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRY' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
79d2b7c1bb8a5d191b400de5a1554add
68ced7c9b561238ad4d98c3607b9f180610770c4
describe
'161930' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASRZ' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
cb1e8736297478685d28e51fe48d5923
f9ee694ad3b8ce21849f653b1b0e740c38f125f5
describe
'35804' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSA' 'sip-files00196.pro'
d64a082d2cbc8509f93b99d3c171d3cc
805d3fd44b1888dd27fc4ae04b55c13781f76376
describe
'63181' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSB' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
98156946054688c84bd1337bdfe35533
540165f319c23a66138eb16cd00aac999b2f62ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSC' 'sip-files00196.tif'
96855b1a5be45e16faa7401708b63339
9efd44885054c8cd5ad895bdd859cf73d98bad78
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSD' 'sip-files00196.txt'
9c2cfed51044fd949bc014722d4f20c1
7ab940b2320b2edd06570141432068be1e4a0aae
'2012-01-21T19:53:46-05:00'
describe
'25249' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSE' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
88156017e9bc5134bf6fc5320fbb0d87
a597332d1cad183410ac7722fd80a0c2c4ae5412
describe
'341636' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSF' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
3508a8564a546e959ce985f530d62cf4
11d47875e1555ed1946561709507d9819000dbd5
describe
'171653' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSG' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
b80f0eae25b382cb0d7cad86fbc68bac
a8aadaa9460df22ad540cfb2bdbfe8ecd725e37e
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSH' 'sip-files00198.pro'
12589da0490a8ae2c9e6a2901506ac3f
89243d04114d1e83610d5d64cb20311b6d93ab9e
describe
'56342' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSI' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
203aec7eeb23b9c8b87cfa1f1d56458f
c6b75b49e4194873ef20a919f7455a0b93ec8af2
describe
'2747612' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSJ' 'sip-files00198.tif'
0e04e9f5b43c0cff4d01443e9e38a8f1
5db76a5fa32f36d6707f6f72713a622c883f2fb7
describe
'235' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSK' 'sip-files00198.txt'
f03cf2e657e14b096dd70c174bb417c7
02ae36662d82d96a91fd8d3f49afc8650c780197
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSL' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
c40c7d7ac3e90c97dcdd98344844052d
0dff7d08a9ec16f6bdd2e04efe342ec74756d05d
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSM' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
e31f4fa350ab873afb9707496d24171e
67ee7341d489a5a16f5861849848f55502a87eec
describe
'172194' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSN' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
73ece3ae9e52203514e081ea8802c42f
04ed3ffaa75a6fef4c3418d677681a675892bdaf
describe
'37940' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSO' 'sip-files00199.pro'
699094249ef016167cddac4f31af35b1
56860ecea90fd4a78059128be1a57eff3d1ff0d8
'2012-01-21T19:47:04-05:00'
describe
'65265' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSP' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
0f8746ad732fe1da2255b0fd6c821052
b8a5b1b5a83028a92c9e9634dfe04556d501705f
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSQ' 'sip-files00199.tif'
e56dd87e4b44296f3e33f6bb930f51c3
58106c7719f5ab68cd0fc713a4c302fa3d6b669b
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSR' 'sip-files00199.txt'
b646e7fed12e559d78a8083e7107d4ae
62e7c16d11a645f5c25f5d46d7cb4d4b6cf13709
describe
'26334' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSS' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
0de9fa0b96be21eb157dcb5741d71fa8
f82009b8c45ec82b34023c5e9277514ce26be624
describe
'328498' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASST' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
f2804daaabb7ea586332e5f1a501bdcc
e2bb0aa220c672c6bf37abc4112e54287a1fb1fc
describe
'157133' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSU' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
291b29488d95a7fded677e2b971073fb
d3ec8b423baaaad718b1833540defde4dbdbc37f
describe
'35991' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSV' 'sip-files00200.pro'
b21acf79d06b5983fc4033629b627f2a
99716189be0f0170d308388ca73c19c4f5fc41ef
describe
'63312' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSW' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
5d5a1092b4dbae7c346eb78f48d5d9b7
7ad30ee44b1d5d7967f58ebc23b6320499203a3f
describe
'2641056' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSX' 'sip-files00200.tif'
7dd397a9ea7782ad1c1fc2903d191114
9f523daac9792bb59fec0d67a32d32552ce3b9dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSY' 'sip-files00200.txt'
6fe9be76e2e90f64d66b11f4320bca85
c1bcc337b4cbf1034ce81772dc8b18ed14afca9c
describe
'25505' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASSZ' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
ed8913cc54b49fa97ce62b25cbce21bd
3fb05579858784efef227f07d989a053b387771e
'2012-01-21T19:50:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTA' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
473b33434b159fa22fd08fd86067153f
feb4dc7e59df358430a3f1e85adddc7cab257135
describe
'160598' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTB' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
311e9c24df09fbf6343516e3aeacbc02
4bcc4ab1889b394d9e4c4dee50dc9efdf2a87795
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTC' 'sip-files00201.pro'
fb1f07997cb1aa56ee66472f81c7e6b0
7baff2b734cd51e23dbafbcfd62a9bc0152c6b1b
describe
'63001' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTD' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
1f42f85a1bc0ce73b6b2f3d1b32856b5
bf38330047d1bb67ea89348e858ba08667e7e4c5
describe
'2639016' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTE' 'sip-files00201.tif'
7081dd89a14e3fdad05ec2639220b4c6
aa3cb7a4891586c6823af04899b6c1bdd9d3237a
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTF' 'sip-files00201.txt'
9a82822011504bdc7269a76426a6a780
8eb740cf1a37c1235855defcfd743b41c3b7b12a
describe
'25424' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTG' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
8702b705de539298deec64cead42d5fd
5413af485bd8c8dbfe33990091e49511efe027ed
'2012-01-21T19:56:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTH' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
6fd058f1c9e33beb7806ebd91e732fb3
257d00d71750dd24ad5a84458916713a4ae226b7
describe
'156209' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTI' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
497fa2202077dc5751f4c7620863066b
d93401af6d4c253e29f2a4adb3e1f2d088f8fa22
describe
'34994' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTJ' 'sip-files00202.pro'
9ce8cea2ff1b9b22a0b0c43b6b886845
f13aece1df904922f045d22b1b5f0126d95713c0
describe
'61798' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTK' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
f328577c0ab14fb55b016c7ecd1c3135
46a22226394bc8ec166315b28a98bfe04bb48e50
'2012-01-21T19:58:38-05:00'
describe
'2639024' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTL' 'sip-files00202.tif'
c5c1a484b72363967f53bb0d60455b22
9719181447d3a1d91d198d05c6f0a5a9be8eedf7
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTM' 'sip-files00202.txt'
dc7e84391f9ccf9c44c853be60e6aa98
7b1cf0a6828b1debe1d5bb6c2c6aa2c1c161e81a
describe
'25441' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTN' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
51ce41a765fa89a08bca55b09597eceb
35f06a69dcad79bf89323d03a631440bbe71089d
describe
'328182' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTO' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
b0d97eac9ac56b60b6742d816b7fb399
40e134c79c3347b30b8e2cc9def4b35a6006b269
describe
'164533' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTP' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
ac36866a9aa683594bfefb77b30e865b
005c0b50dacff12afc0405552180e5008fc2ff6b
describe
'37210' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTQ' 'sip-files00203.pro'
2630a6459d745a1f6aa70350ce7fcc85
e627aaa925335e43832349855a3b0817048482c0
describe
'64168' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTR' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
1220b0ba51fe84e634514fb62e5ff90b
dc3f89bc8f938195439ec83b5f67a9b1f0ce7c5f
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTS' 'sip-files00203.tif'
486d409eba437d3d648dd58ccfdfb0df
57af3e5b8361fd231c150c14d3eb77ee6a152e80
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTT' 'sip-files00203.txt'
5416cd1defb163d99d89a98c64bd2fe3
f5d4731eaf0b788f670e36801a3bc37ae1c1e736
describe
'25837' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTU' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
a97dc00ecf72eb7b96637fdb8e92ab21
d0f45c12bf6306010a42844ac2a64b8a827d9f7c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTV' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
b5bbb66ece8af3a0192b9df25e9ebae1
698818b7e11b93d95c97397868c46534b4136fff
describe
'157486' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTW' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
38007f467b3e21358130abc2aea48bc4
780f0937f2d84ef6386c54334416a2b2783c8868
describe
'36130' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTX' 'sip-files00204.pro'
bb1bb3297bb7dad3216397d9db225d8c
529274ae3140956e08c01b0775091698339591ae
'2012-01-21T19:52:29-05:00'
describe
'61584' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTY' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
6bebd17631da82302fb985859181c09e
a3e878b1be7b2c176d8aa23f0aff0fe8fc079ffd
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASTZ' 'sip-files00204.tif'
05add52339a525c17d65dbe873d25420
028697f2c90f047ad8bb153bcf95b12be0e1c654
'2012-01-21T19:58:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUA' 'sip-files00204.txt'
4b30d69ef3b5fa33c023d59dd8827b69
9c93372751f43c6223282e235daf479fbbf6bc8f
'2012-01-21T19:58:36-05:00'
describe
'24856' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUB' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
8ea81fd753a271cf0d66623c15da3300
52d8598139080c9dc47ed748eea5aea159fdb0ad
'2012-01-21T19:50:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUC' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
3697c7b9d0ae8699efc1d3d3032fbf4e
492a71fa5eb35f2ec1b4d5fc44b78006a9901089
describe
'159322' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUD' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
fe1cbba60c5fbbf0050419c6b29ea62e
9b41a75188daa26488396509d69a4d867b675e3d
describe
'36548' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUE' 'sip-files00205.pro'
76b1001377599fa972dfbd02ce47cbb7
eb4cf38ef13adf2ff63027e63849fc4ee9060a60
describe
'62778' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUF' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
03a7e1d56a5c90f14dda2968050668f7
442ca1bcd89fc38e9032b4af60760bfa80ec1079
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUG' 'sip-files00205.tif'
7015c4356501ff60e0d28c1fadd00949
0e66d968e9561114fe9c4335770045c46ae6cc43
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUH' 'sip-files00205.txt'
4b4bd76dc7caed6bf117c6b37f4a6f08
7c9cbfb57fd19fc4a77c084bdfec29ce4379aaa6
'2012-01-21T19:50:41-05:00'
describe
'25449' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUI' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
dcd444c111a2f05630f8b55a61569de3
206fd730dd27125529c7347118cc7cd4fb2b356a
describe
'328514' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUJ' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
13710c7f4d89d5b6fc215ae368057a2e
33a30cceab20c661d6f38eeac7755a556c816bba
describe
'157888' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUK' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
c78f2dc9b845906f8f752d2ee2b85bf2
a2fad8a2ff0e7fb5436fff35e0335580daedbda1
describe
'35706' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUL' 'sip-files00206.pro'
5e9451ec3a9bd5fa5f2bb7106c1a0ccd
b108b18f89c14316a1cf283d1f795e4d8980672d
describe
'61487' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUM' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
4464eb6e90122c744b863acd03be34ee
ca976d82a9ccd551d3c0d250897d3c389f33771e
describe
'2641060' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUN' 'sip-files00206.tif'
320d2f9f8199f53262edcfbe12095d4b
051cc9980e4cc709f4ddfab4aff2a142bbf29fb0
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUO' 'sip-files00206.txt'
7acb39292a9a0adae66e499ff17bce4b
257691b649c4964e9ba6b5283dabd015dbe9ba3c
describe
'25350' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUP' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
281a9fef8f4723b49b7d9abd5120aa73
805848b07cad9f2761ca200d1ea12bb956cb1dfc
'2012-01-21T19:58:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUQ' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
d5a33617d73afb518ca0968ed1bfdcf9
d24195b0396fe711c9ec01574706aa151244fe81
describe
'102622' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUR' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
72abf763d76592f86bdd31c17272cb97
2d68c83671ff7e8b70edaef44d9ffd5c0a14555d
describe
'21015' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUS' 'sip-files00207.pro'
2a2c1eb6702d7b6bddb155b419083723
fc99bb39ef5071d8b51da909928ecaaaafe83f52
'2012-01-21T19:49:38-05:00'
describe
'42283' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUT' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
3e85236d862cd61f98b4f45bf51f7fbf
178824363f49b886ee2de1eb6139650411154cff
'2012-01-21T19:57:54-05:00'
describe
'2637260' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUU' 'sip-files00207.tif'
c174efe51fdcba612c01352989a60ca8
d1f652d8d198a4ee7d1a147b5cc2b1b441237609
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUV' 'sip-files00207.txt'
38cf031818a5052bacac2e2aa723162a
a32bcfea27ecfd26b59d3dcab6bfb8ad776e6d61
'2012-01-21T19:51:47-05:00'
describe
'19672' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUW' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
756e726af9cbc9c2ebc7b6cb34f02093
fe4d21b4e61684306a8a0dc73ab038a7d0f2fc6d
describe
'328544' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUX' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
674639d10d09ab548b428704f1258a4f
e1abd7988b1f35af561ccf9ff03e22e022c4e48d
describe
'129703' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUY' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
e2fe5de545f9ee089f5725844419764f
1d166ea206a727a40cc7ad06d04f579bc0eea8ee
describe
'27103' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASUZ' 'sip-files00208.pro'
a153832c64f871129f94432d27938f51
462f5c090e900f2784233f97ce05111e220bbb96
describe
'50664' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVA' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
3a632dfc561cfcf2c0d233f59268d967
c4e7b18282b90dc49ab1b01468000b494b5f7b9c
'2012-01-21T19:53:55-05:00'
describe
'2640040' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVB' 'sip-files00208.tif'
5559b833299c05073c1b423556f2de8b
e6b55fdb7aaf2eff611761e65e4c299e1288d277
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVC' 'sip-files00208.txt'
7521fa9a4ecff9a330a8bbdfc3a41e27
8dcde4d6e7e627e4e9d52a5d0f3837600e77ed9d
'2012-01-21T19:58:42-05:00'
describe
'21804' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVD' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
ea25706e893ff616ce7115d601994916
0c8b122f3500a8a440c3974fe4acb4aaaf2eaa30
'2012-01-21T19:46:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVE' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
cb7e2b206a74ac053f592286d46ef5fe
d33de49df5b5887b3102679969d70f1d4be7095d
describe
'160758' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVF' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
1340256fc46fc51c299edab1be157890
3ecce48280b38ccb4bc0c7d4c0d43e70fff23d4d
describe
'34989' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVG' 'sip-files00209.pro'
1f555dfab96bf8437e405fa7e43e8503
5c50010d1a5331d48a00c32f6e08396323607c2a
describe
'61530' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVH' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
7b312102dd26a33b562f1cf64b8aee08
b28c187a76e3c593f6fc2b66e90058846904ad48
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVI' 'sip-files00209.tif'
04e536fe6d52e8a93e2820ec68ac9c05
c9fbfdc620f6235e27d8b824e27b38085f477e43
'2012-01-21T19:52:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVJ' 'sip-files00209.txt'
d5803823d207ac16e94b73cc5ac821d6
aa8a4cbd400d9910c880f62f0c1b90355bce82c9
'2012-01-21T19:48:21-05:00'
describe
'25399' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVK' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
4d94459017ef815c74270f9c95b7cde1
dafcc33f8b76c3f12123501e90843f3685996d67
describe
'328497' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVL' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
d97225efaa75a7ede1f78d66d3a47c81
ac6b962fdbda947d770e6f675c5ebf8c89239b1e
describe
'166728' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVM' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
ad0ae223035e0f89a2c6d904d4f29462
c7d8409625d29486bc25abd39c0ea4206c3e13f1
describe
'37993' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVN' 'sip-files00210.pro'
f04061ed1c3862eaa0d8e3c9ecb8a8c9
8d95d4a75a20fd5452d33bcb13bb8a2e3f2524cb
describe
'63820' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVO' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
7c230b463fac3eea9bb2382841b96e1b
29f0967d914c60d68c5293418b8821e7c4b1b9d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVP' 'sip-files00210.tif'
09cea9b8205a6e97fb3230ec1773f860
e759a49117e26ad347b045fea544589a4e7eb86c
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVQ' 'sip-files00210.txt'
3c24257c38490dd804dd0b2034b03564
dbbf5b8b3ea5f4dfe36987972f13276c3a2830b1
describe
'25641' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVR' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
6595753c9dd0338f8fb9883330887284
0aa0f6034d97bd91b6f81ef094114f559ea9cb47
describe
'328263' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVS' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
f8f99df8d9515ee95b162306234db7f8
e60628f3dea46b19a0c4f482d001f49178760b52
describe
'162555' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVT' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
6aac347207cd0c3cb3685971ffe3d9c5
116c3b06a5cb6f0f656054228f73fd9764fa597c
describe
'35737' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVU' 'sip-files00211.pro'
9f0a6f9bfa470f8344b5e26a0f9d9c0f
4a7dd7046dd12137690c8690eb6ad8ef563a5465
describe
'64532' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVV' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
d1b8aed0181ae11a5e4e20b4491612b6
c5eceab2e2fb4f43b71f2376fb8db546fbb54b56
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVW' 'sip-files00211.tif'
6c261b047066387324e00963c38519c4
f437f280a03a88e22413afc824bd0a2d994fe399
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVX' 'sip-files00211.txt'
0f615e912bf4a8212bffeb9efabadb3b
1ecc29dbade6253378d07dc6855bf05839b97f42
describe
'25568' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVY' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
4595129b64dd507d2712ec9195ce522f
50e8d8e5b01cbdef08438d57edd862dea8b807db
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASVZ' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
37ec43ce4eaa03bee059b19d95ff9880
a235c1c2da230990a9ebf795ee0ecf937afda689
describe
'160505' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWA' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
6d0e66ae6e7c49c0044421e5dd7fead1
762a8faef63467845f4f779fc0299b494c4f69ab
describe
'36806' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWB' 'sip-files00212.pro'
fb9039f9124ee7d25f5235c11855a58c
78bbf9a949c73425cbf09dc63db8aeb19bcd250f
describe
'63462' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWC' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
947dd0f793f4e0a9314bab2eb2e357a8
3f6bfac92117507dc98ead6b1e5af195e4fe6f6e
'2012-01-21T19:53:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWD' 'sip-files00212.tif'
6cf45a564d71af7dc67ce95e9acb4ca6
2c2946749073a6a5287ce351dd52f5520ce8c757
'2012-01-21T19:46:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWE' 'sip-files00212.txt'
ef45259a29dc3f523229c14b271ec96b
6cec0cfbbf588bf6df90333ff0298813180cfa15
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWF' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
ac4bb5df6f47682d7d2f39e9399428e9
1ac61aa60b59efacf0d85400e126919a7afd22ef
describe
'328178' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWG' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
fbc679db113f7f5b02cc7ff732d56464
0f55aae01fc23a82b06b025d7b14bd3061e87bfa
describe
'158885' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWH' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
5f5f37b8af494c2ce4c13965987c6d7b
277627cca3eb714452bd72570596c29ba0951a72
'2012-01-21T19:52:59-05:00'
describe
'36178' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWI' 'sip-files00213.pro'
a7950cd631a1a4cf26acd1fd18fad799
5938cf473d59de3a05bd1ba64c82b6c33b636ae8
describe
'61673' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWJ' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
285e31961131b85e96814f29ea2b726a
67688114283796f3f059121ea45bc4cd3a95fde7
'2012-01-21T19:55:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWK' 'sip-files00213.tif'
4b4e37bb5309c6fcf74e82a5020b47f2
a38ea68f06a212c18e533467fe9523d3e6590e6e
'2012-01-21T19:48:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWL' 'sip-files00213.txt'
2877162347788c37e30b887daa956918
4cc0b86543e80ce7f7d5004fdaeb4d0781018351
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWM' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
b4f8c79fa4409339fe9147a44d722406
403366fb5596f16abfa64f3db03027b032c151d9
describe
'328530' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWN' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
42e276140263e1b59b3cefb83b80004b
1037ec6582bb3bf6f3977f01e362f3704b9cceeb
describe
'159013' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAALfileF20090328_AAASWO' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
c4d2ff575d8f1c93d26fa5421cbaaf5b
d7e55acee3dd30691c8d6c2d79f899e46ea918ff
describe<