Citation
Fairy tales from the far North

Material Information

Title:
Fairy tales from the far North
Creator:
Asbjørnsen, Peter Christen, 1812-1885
Brækstad, H. L ( Hans Lien ), 1845-1915 ( Translator )
Werenskiold, Erik Theodor, 1855-1938 ( Illustrator )
Kittelsen, Theodor, 1857-1914 ( Illustrator )
Sinding, Otto Ludvig, 1842-1909 ( Illustrator )
Nutt, David ( Publisher )
Ballantyne, Hanson and Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
David Nutt
Manufacturer:
Ballantyne, Hanson & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
Authorised ed.
Physical Description:
viii, 303, 12 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fairy tales -- Juvenile fiction -- Norway ( lcsh )
Folklore -- Juvenile fiction -- Norway ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Folk tales -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1897 ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Folk tales ( rbgenr )
Children's stories
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title page printed in red and black.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by P.C. Asbjörnsen ; translated from the Norwegian by H.L. Brækstad ; with ninety-five illustrations by E. Werenskiold, T. Kittelsen and O. Sinding.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026570171 ( ALEPH )
ALG1565 ( NOTIS )
07055129 ( OCLC )
04012403 ( LCCN )

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Fairy Tales from the Far North



Fairy Tales from the
Far North

by
P. C. Asbjérnsen

Translated from the Norwegian by

Be LL. Brekstad



With Ninety-Five Illustrations by
E. WERENSKIOLD, T. KITTELSEN anp O. SINDING

AUTHORISED EDITION
LONDON

DAVID NUTT, 270-271, STRAND
5 1897 .



Piinted by BALLANTYNE, Hanson & Co.
At the Ballantyne Press



TRANSLATOR’S NOTE

SLOWLY but surely the name of Asbjérnsen has been gaining
ground in popularity as one of the most fascinating and delightful
writers of Fairy Tales, not only among the young folks in this
country, but also among adult readers and students of Folk Lore.
Asbjérnsen was first introduced to the English public through the
late Sir George Dasent’s translations, published in 1858 and 1874.
In 1881 appeared my translation of a selection of his Norske
Folke-Eventyr (Norwegian Folk and Fairy Tales), and his Huldre-
Eventyr (Tales and Legends about the wood-fairy and other
supernatural beings), with the original illustrations, which a
number of Norwegian artists, all friends and admirers of the
genial author, had for some time been preparing for the first
illustrated edition of his Tales. The English edition was
published under the title of Round the Yule Log,” and met
with a most favourable reception both in this country and in
America. ,

A second volume, containing a further selection of his most
popular Tales, with illustrations by the well-known Norwegian

artists, E. Werenskiold, T. Kittelsen and O. Sinding was in course



vi TRANSLATOR’S NOTE

of publication when, in 1885, death overtook the author, and
Norway lost one of her most celebrated sons. But the arrange-
ments for the publication of this new volume of the illustrated
edition were so far advanced, that the final part was able to
appear about two years after Asbjérnsen’s death. It is these
illustrations which appear in the pages of the present English
edition of the new selection of his Tales. With regard to the
translation, I have in this, as in my former volume, “ Round the
Yule Log,” attempted to retain as far as possible the racy,
colloquial flavour of the original.
H. L. B.
Lonpon, September, 1897.





CONTENTS

The Ram and the Pig who went into the Woods to live by Themselves
The Golden Bird

The Fox as Herdsboy

Ashiepattle, who ate with the Troll ay a “Wager
The Quern at the Bottom of the Sea

Little Butterkin .

The Contrary-minded Woman

The Woodpecker :
The Man’s Daughter and the Woman's s Davee .
The Hare who had been Marvied

The Squive’s Bride

All Women ave alike ; :

One’s own Children are always the Prettiest

Old Father Bruin in the Wolfpit

The Doll in the Grass

The Hen who went to Dovrefjeld to save the World
Squive Peter .

Bird Dauntless

The Town Mouse and the Canin M ouse

Soria Maria’s Castle

Well Done, Ill Paid

Ashiepattle and his Goodly Crew

Gudbrand on the Hill-side

The Twelve Wild Ducks

Page

20
22
27
34
39
45
47
58
61
69
77
79
82
87
gI
100
116
122
138
142
155
162



Vili CONTENTS

The Bear and the Fox:
1. Slip Pine-Root, Grip Fox-Foot .
2. The Bear and the Fox make a Wager.
3. The Bear and the Fox go into Partnership .
4. Reynard wants to taste Horseflesh

The Cock who fell into the Brewing Vat.

The Cock and the Fox . .

The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain

The World’s Reward

The Companion

Nanny who wouldn't go Home to Supper

The Lad with the Beer Keg

Little Fred and his Fiddle

The Storehouse Key in the Distaff .

The Lad who went wooing the Daughter of old Mother Conte

The Princess whom nobody could silence .
Farmer Weatherbeard .

Page

174
175
176
180
182
189
192
220
226
246
253
259
269
272
283
289







THE RAM

AND THE PIG

WHO WENT

INTO THE WOODS
TO LIVE

BY THEMSELVES

THERE was once upon a time a
ram, who was being fattened up
for killing. He had therefore
plenty to eat, and he soon be-
came round and fat with all the

good things he got. One day -

the dairy-maid came, and gave
him some more food.

“You must eat, ram,”

she



2. THE RAM AND THE PIG

said; “ you’ll not be long here now, for to-morrow we are going to
kill you.”

“There’s an old saying, that no one should sneer at old
women’s advice, and that advice and physic can be had for every-
thing except death,” thought the ram to himself; ‘‘ but perhaps
I might manage to escape it this time.”

And so he went on eating till he was full, and when he was
quite satisfied he ran his horns against the door, burst it open,
and set off to the neighbouring farm. There he made straight for
the pig-sty, to look for a pig with whom he had struck up an
acquaintance on the common, since when they had always been
good friends and got on well together.

“Good day, and thanks for your kindness last time we met,”
said the ram to the pig.

“Good day, and thanks to you,” said the pig.

“Do you know why they make you so comfortable, and why
they feed you and look after you so well?” said the ram.

“No,” said the pig.

“There are many mouths to feed on this farm, you must know,”
said the ram; “ they are going to kill you and eat you.”

“Are they?” said the pig. ‘‘ Well, much good may it do
them !”

“Tf you are of the same mind as I, we will go into the woods
and build a house and live by ourselves; there is nothing like
having a home of your own, you know,” said the ram.

Yes, the pig was quite willing. “It’s nice to be in fine
company,” said he, and off they started.

When they had got a bit on the way they met a goose.

“Good day, my good people, and thanks for your kindness last
time we met,” said the goose. ‘‘ Where are you off to?”

“Good day, and thanks to you,” said the ram. ‘We had it
altogether too comfortable at our place, so we are off to the woods
to live by ourselves. In your own house you are your own
master, you know,” said he.

“Well, I'm very comfortable where I am,” said the goose;



THE RAM AND THE PIG 3

“but why shouldn’t I join you? Good company makes the day
shorter,” said she.

“But neither hut nor house can be built by gabbling and
quacking,” said the pig. ‘ What do you think you can do?”

“Good counsel and skill may do as much as a giant’s will,”
said the goose. ‘I can pluck moss and stuff it into the crevices,
so that the house will be warm and comfortable.”

Well, she might come with them, thought the pig, for he liked
the place to be warm and cosy.

When they had gone a bit on the way—the goose was not
getting along very fast—they met a hare, who came scampering
out of the wood.

“Good day, my good people, and thanks for your kindness the
last time we met,” said the hare. “ How far are you going to-day ?”
said he.

‘Good day, and thanks to you,” said the ram ; “ we had it alto- _
gether too comfortable at our place, so we are off to the woods to
build a house and live by ourselves. When you have tried both
East and West, you'll find that a home of your own is after all
the best,” said he.

‘Well, I have, of course, a home in every bush,” said the hare ;
“but I have often said to myself in the winter, that if I lived till
the summer I would build a house, so I have a good mind to go
with you and build one after-all,” said he.

“Well, if the worst comes to the worst, we might take you
with us to frighten the dogs away,” said the pig, “ for you couldn't
help us to build the house, I should say.”

“There is always something for willing hands to do in this
world,” said the hare. ‘I have teeth to gnaw pegs with, and I
have paws to knock them into the walls, so I'll do very well for a
carpenter ; for ‘good tools make good work,’ as the man said,
when he skinned his mare with an auger,” said the hare.

Well, he might come with them and help to build the house ;
there could be no harm in that.

When they had got a bit further on the way, they met a cock.



4 THE RAM AND THE PIG

“Good day, my good people, and thanks for your kindness
last time we met,” said the cock; “where are you all going to-
day ?” he-said.

“Good day and thanks to you,” said the ram; ‘we had it
altogether too comfortable at our place, so we are off to the woods
to build a house and live by ourselves. ‘For unless at home you
bake, you'll lose both fuel and cake,’” said he.

“Well, I am comfortable enough, where I am,” said the cock,
“but it’s better to have your own roost than to sit on a stranger’s
perch and crow; and that cock is best off who has a home of his
own,” said he. ‘‘If I could join such fine company as yours, I too
would like to go to the woods and build a house.”

“Well, flapping and crowing is all very well for noise, but it
won’t cut joists,” said the pig. ‘‘ You can’t help us to build a
house,” he said.

“Tt is not well to live in a house where there is neither dog
nor cock,” said the cock ; ‘I am early to rise and early to crow.”

“Yes, ‘early to rise, makes one wealthy and wise,’ so let him
come with us!” said the pig. He was always the heaviest sleeper.
“ Sleep is a big thief, and steals half one’s life,” he said.

So they all set off to the woods and built the house. The pig
felled the trees and the ram dragged them home; the hare was
the carpenter, and gnawed pegs and hammered them into walls
and roof; the goose plucked moss and stuffed it into the crevices
between the logs; the cock crew and took care that they did not
oversleep themselves in the mornings, and when the house was
ready and the roof covered with birch-bark and thatched with turf,
they could at least live by themselves, and they were all both
happy and contented.

“Tt’s pleasant to travel both East and West, but home is, after
all, the best,” said the ram.

But a bit further into the wood two wolves had their lair, and
when they saw that a new house had been built hard by they
wanted to know what sort of folks they had got for neighbours.
For they thought, ‘‘a good neighbour is better than a brother in a

































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‘“SUCH TREATMENT I NEVER MET WITH BEFORE," SAID THE WOLF






THE RAM AND THE PIG 7

foreign land, and it is better to live among ens neighbours than
to be known far and wide.”

So one of them made it his business to call there and ask for a
light for his pipe. The moment he came inside the door the ram
rushed at him, and gave him such a butt with his horns that the
wolf fell on his head into the hearth; the pig snapped and bit, the
goose nipped and pecked, the cock flew up on a rafter and began
to crow and cackle, and the hare became so frightened that he
scampered and jumped about, both high and low, and knocked and
scrambled about from one corner of the room to the other.

At last the wolf managed to get out of the house.

“Well, to know one’s neighbours is to add to one’s wisdom,”
said the wolf, who was waiting outside; ‘I suppose you had a
grand reception, since you stayed so:long. But what about the
light? I don’t see either pipe or smoke,” said he.

“Yes, that was a nice light I got, and a nice lot of people they
were,” said he who had been inside. ‘Such treatment I never
met with before, but ‘as you make your bed so you must lie,’
and ‘an unexpected guest must put up with what he gets,’” said
the wolf. ‘No sooner had I got inside the door, than the shoe-
maker threw his last at me, and I fell on my head in the middle
of the forge; there sat two smiths, blowing bellows and pinching
and snipping bits of flesh off me with red-hot tongs and pincers ;
the hunter rushed about the room looking for his gun, but as luck
would have it, he couldn’t find it. And up on the rafters sat
some one beating his arms about and shouting: ‘Let’s hook him!
let’s hook him! Sling him up! sling him up!’ and if he had only
got hold of me I should never have got out alive.”



THE GOLDEN BIRD






THERE was once upon a
time a king who had a
garden ; in that garden there was an
apple-tree, and on that apple-tree there
grew a golden apple every year ; but
when the time came to pluck the apple, it
was gone, and no one knew who took it or
what became of it ; but gone it was.
The king had three sons, and one day he
told them that he who could bring him the
apple, or get hold of the thief, should have the
kingdom after him, no matter whether he was
the eldest, the second or the younger son.
The eldest set out first and sat down under the tree to keep
watch for the thief. Soon after dark a golden bird came flying,



THE GOLDEN BIRD 9

and the light from it was so strong and dazzling, that it could be
seen a long way off.. When the prince saw the bird and the
dazzling light, he became so frightened, that he dared not stay
any longer, but rushed indoors as fast as he could.

Next morning the apple was gone ; the prince had then, how-
ever, recovered his courage and began to get ready for his journey
and wanted to set off to find the bird. The king fitted him out in
grand style and spared neither money nor fine raiment. When
the prince had gone a bit on the way he became hungry, opened
his scrip and sat down to his breakfast by the road side. A fox
then came out of the wood and sat down and looked at him.

“Do give me a little to eat,” said the fox.

“Il give you some powder and shot,” said the prince; ‘“‘ my
food I shall want myself; nobody can tell how far and how long I
may have to travel,” said he.

“Just so,” said the fox, and so he went back into the wood
again.

When the prince had finished his meal and rested awhile he
set out on his way again. After a long time he came to a big city,
and in that city there was an inn, where there was always joy and
never any sorrow ; he thought that would be a nice place to stop
at, and so he remained. And there'was such dancing and drinking
and joy and merry-making, that he forgot the bird and his father
and his journey and the whole kingdom.

Away he was and away he stopped.

The next year the second prince was to watch for the thief in
the garden ; he also sat down under the tree when the apple began
to ripen. But one night, all of a sudden, the golden bird came
flying, shining like the sun; the prince became so afraid that he
took to his heels and ran indoors as fast as he could.

In the morning the apple was gone, but the prince had then
recovered his courage and wanted to set out and find the bird.
He began to get ready and the king fitted him out in grand style
and spared neither money nor fine raiment. But the same thing
happened to him as to his brother; when he had got a bit on the



IO THE GOLDEN BIRD

way he became hungry, opened: his scrip and sat down to his
breakfast by the roadside. A fox then came out from the pine
wood and sat down and looked at him.

“Do give me a little to eat,” said the fox.

“T’ll give you some powder and shot,” said the prince; “ my
food I shall want myself; nobody can tell how far and how long I
may have to travel,” said he.

“Just so,” said the fox, and so he went back into the wood
again.

When the prince had finished his meal and rested awhile, he
set out on his way again. After a long time he came to the
same city and the same inn, where there was always joy and
never any sorrow; and there he also thought it would be nice
to stop, and the first he met was his brother, and so he remained.
The brother had been leading a gay and reckless life and had
scarcely any clothes left on his back ; but now he began afresh,
and there was such dancing and drinking and joy and merriment
that the second prince also forgot the bird and his father and
his journey and the whole kingdom. Away he was and away he
stopped.

When the time came for the apple to ripen again the youngest
prince was to go into the garden and watch for the thief. He
took a companion with him who was to help him up into the tree,
and he also took with him a keg of beer and a pack of cards to
pass away the time with so that he should not fall asleep. All
of a sudden they saw a bright light, as if from the sun; every
feather of the bird could be seen long before it came to the tree.
The prince climbed up into the tree and at the same time the
golden bird swooped down and took the apple; the prince tried to
seize the bird, but he only caught a feather out of its tail.

So he went to the king’s bedroom, and as he came in with the
feather, it became as light as day.

He also wanted to try if he could find his brothers and catch
the bird, for he had been so near to it that he had got a feather
from its tail and would know it again anywhere, he said.



THE GOLDEN BIRD Ir

Well, the king went and pondered long whether he should let
him go, for he thought the youngest would not fare any better than
the two eldest, who ought to have more knowledge of the world,
and he was afraid he should lose him also. But the prince begged
so earnestly that at last he got permission to go.

He then began to get ready and the king fitted him out in
grand style, both with clothes and money, and so he set off.

When he had travelled for some time he became hungry and
took his scrip and sat down to have his breakfast, but just as he
was in the midst of it, a fox came out of the wood and sat down
close by his side and looked at him.

“Do give me a little to eat,” said the fox.

“T shall want the food myself,” said the prince, “ for I cannot
tell how far I shall have to travel, but I have enough to give you a
little.”

When the fox had got the piece of meat he asked the prince
where he was going.

Yes, that he would tell him.

“Tf you will listen to me, I will help you, and you will have
good luck,” said the fox.

The prince promised he would, and so they set off together.
They travelled a while till they came to the same city and the
same inn, where there was always joy, but no sorrow.

“T must keep outside here; the dogs are rather a nuisance,”
said the fox, and so he told the prince where his brothers were
to be found and what they were doing; ‘‘and if you go in there
you will not get any further either,” said he.

The prince promised he would not go-in there, and gave
him his hand on it, and so each went his way. But when the
prince came to the inn and heard the noise and merriment
going on he felt he must go in; there was no help for it,
and when he met his brothers there was such rejoicing that
he forgot both the fox and the journey and the bird, and his
father. But when he had been there a while the fox came—
he had ventured into the city after all—and opened the door a



I2 THE GOLDEN BIRD

little and made a sign to the prince, saying that now they must be
off. So the prince bethought himself, and they went their way.

When they had travelled a while they saw a big mountain far
away. ‘The fox said:

“Three hundred miles at the back of that mountain there is
a gilded linden-tree with golden leaves, and in that tree sits the
golden bird from which you took the feather.”

Thither they travelled together. When the prince was going
to catch the bird the fox gave him some bright feathers which he
was to wave in his hands, and so attract the bird, which would
then fly down and sit on his hand.

But the fox said he must not touch the linden-tree, for inside
it was a big troll, who owned it, and if the prince only touched
the smallest twig the troll would come out and kill him on the
spot.

No, he would not touch it, said the prince; but when he
had got the bird on his hand, he thought he must have a
twig of the tree; there was no help for it, it was so bright
and beautiful. So he took a tiny little sprig, but the same
moment the troll came out.

“Who is that stealing my tree and my bird?” roared the
troll, and he was so angry that he spurted sparks of fire.

“Thieves believe that all men steal,” said the prince; “ but
only those get hanged who do not steal properly,” said he.

The troll said that made no difference, and was going to kill
him, but the prince begged him ‘to spare his life.

“Well,” said the troll, “if you can bring me back the horse
which my nearest neighbour has taken from me, you will get off
with your life.”

“Where shall I find it, then ?” said the prince.

“Oh, he lives three hundred miles at the back of that big blue
mountain against the horizon yonder,” said the troll.

The prince promised he would do his best. But when he came
back to the fox he found him in rather a bad temper.

“ Now you have got yourself into trouble,” said the fox; “if



THE GOLDEN BIRD 13

you had listened to me we could have been on our way home by
this,” said he.

So they had to make a fresh start, for the prince had pledged
his word, and his life depended on his finding the horse.

At last they got there, but as the prince was going to take the
horse the fox said:

“When you come into the stable you will find all sorts of
bridles hanging on the wall, both of gold and silver; you must
not touch them, for then the troll will come and kill you right
away; you must take the ugliest and shabbiest you see.”

Yes, the prince promised he would; but when he came into
the stable he thought it was quite unreasonable not to take a fine
bridle, for there were plenty of them, and so he took the brightest
he could find. It was as bright as gold, but just then the troll
came and was so angry that sparks flew from him.

“Who is that stealing my horse and my bridle?” he
shrieked.

‘““Thieves believe that all men steal,” said the prince; ‘ but
only those get hanged who do not steal properly,” said he.

“Well, that makes no difference. I'll kill you on the spot,”
shouted the troll.

But the prince begged him to spare his life.

“Well,” said the troll, “if you can bring me back the fair
damsel which my nearest neighbour has taken from me I will spare
you.”

‘“‘Whereabouts does he live, then ?” asked the prince.

“‘Oh, he lives three hundred miles at the back of that big blue
mountain against the horizon yonder,” said the troll.

The prince promised he would fetch the damsel, and was
allowed to go, and so he escaped with his life.

But when he came out you may imagine how angry the fox
was.

‘Now you've got yourself into trouble again,” said he ; ‘if you
had listened to me we could have been on our way home long ago.
I almost think I will not go with you any further.”



14, THE GOLDEN BIRD

But the prince begged and prayed and promised he would
never do anything else but what the fox told him, if he would
only remain with him. At last the fox gave in, and they
became firm friends again; so they set off once more and came at
last to where the fair damsel was.

“ Well,” said the fox, ‘“‘I have your promise, but I dare not let
you in to the troll, after all; this time I must go myself.” So he
went in, and after a while he came out with the damsel, and so
they went back the same way they had come.

When they got to the troll, who had the horse, they took both
the horse and the brightest bridle; and when they got to the troll,
who had the linden tree and the bird, they took both the tree and
the bird and started off with them.

When they had got a bit on the way, they came to a field of
rye, and the fox then said :

“J hear a thundering noise; you had better go on ahead; I
will remain here a while,” he said. He then plaited himself a
gown of rye-straw, in which he looked like a preacher. All at
once the three trolls came rushing along, hoping to overtake the
prince.

“ Have you seen any one passing here with a fair damsel, a
horse with a golden bridle, a golden bird, and a gilded linden-
tree?” they shouted to the fox, as he stood there preaching.

“Well, I've heard from my grandmother’s grandmother, that
something of the kind passed this way, but that was in the good
old times, when my grandmother’s grandmother baked halfpenny
cakes and gave back the halfpenny.”

Then all the trolls burst out laughing: “Ha, ha, ha!” they
laughed and held on to one another.

“Tf we have slept so long, we may as well turn our noses home-
wards, and go to sleep again,” they said, and so they went back
the way they came.

The fox then set off after the prince, but when they came to
the city, where the inn and his brothers were, he said :

“T dare not go through the town on account of the dogs; I must



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THE GOLDEN BIRD 17

go my own way just above here, but you must take good care your
brothers do not get hold of you.”

But when the prince came into the city, he thought it would
be too bad if he did not look in upon his brothers and have a word
with them, and so he tarried there for a while.

When the brothers saw him, they came out and took both the
damsel, and the horse, and the bird, and the linden-tree, and every-
thing from him, and they put him in a barrel, and threw him into
the sea; and so they set off home to the king’s palace, with the
damsel, and the horse, and the bird, and the linden-tree, and every-
thing. But the damsel would not speak, and she became pale and
wretched to look upon; the horse got so thin and miserable that
it could hardly hang together; the bird became silent and shone
no more, and the linden-tree withered.

In the meantime: the fox was sneaking about outside the
city, where the inn and the merriment were, and was waiting
for the prince and the damsel, and wondered why they did not
return.

He went hither and thither, waiting and watching for them,
and at last he came down to the shore, and when he saw the
barrel, which was lying out at sea drifting, he shouted: ‘‘ Why are
you drifting about there, you empty barrel?”

‘Oh, it is I,” said the prince in the barrel.

The fox them swam out to sea as fast as he could, got hold of
the barrel, and towed it to land; then he began to gnaw the hoops,
and when he had got some off the barrel, he said to the prince:
“ Stamp and kick.”

The prince stamped and kicked till all the staves flew about,
and out he jumped from the barrel.

So they went together to the king’s palace, and when they got
there the damsel regained her beauty and began to talk, the horse
became so fat and sleek that every hair glistened; the light shone
from the bird and it began to sing; the linden-tree began to blossom
and its leaves to sparkle, and the damsel said, ‘‘ He is the one who
has saved us.”

B



18 THE GOLDEN BIRD

They planted the linden-tree in the garden, and the youngest
prince was to marry the princess, for such the damsel really was ;
but the two eldest brothers were put each in a spiked barrel and

rolled down a high mountain.
Then they began to prepare for the wedding, but the fox first



THE TWO ELDEST BROTHERS WERE PUT EACH IN A SPIKED BARREL
AND ROLLED DOWN A MOUNTAIN

asked the prince to put him on the block and cut his head off, and
although the prince both prayed and cried, there was no help for
it; he would have to doit. But as he cut the head off, the fox



THE GOLDEN BIRD 19

turned into a handsome prince, and he was the brother of the
princess, whom they had rescued from the troll.
So the wedding came off and everything was so grand and

splendid, that the news of the festivities reached all the way
here.









> ¢
sae

THE FOX AS HERDSBOY

THERE was once upon a time a woman, who went out to look for
a herdsboy, and so she met a bear.

“Where are you going?” said the bear.

‘Oh, I’m looking for a herdsboy,” answered the woman.

“Won't you take me?” asked the bear.

“Well, if you only knew how to call the flock,” said the
wife. ‘‘Ho-y!” shouted the bear.

“No, I won’t have you!” said the woman, when she heard
this, and went on her way.

When she had gone on a while, she met a wolf.

“Where are you going?” said the wolf.

“T am looking for a herdsboy,” said the woman.

“Won't you take me?” said the wolf.



THE Fox As HERDSBOY 21

“Well, if you only knew how to call the flock,” said the
woman. ‘ U-g-h!” howled the wolf.

“No, I won’t have you,” said the woman.

When she had gone a bit further, she met a fox.

‘Where are you going?” said the fox.

‘Oh, I’m looking for a herdsboy,” said the woman.

‘“Won’t you take me?” asked the fox.

‘* Well, if you only knew how to call the flock,” said the woman.

“Dil-dal-holom !” called the fox in a thin, squeaky voice.

“Yes, I'll take you for a herdsboy,” said the woman ; and so she
put the fox to look after her flocks. On the first day he ate up all
the goats belonging to the woman; the second day he finished all
her sheep, and the third day he ate all the cows. When he came
home in the evening, the woman asked what he had done with all
the flocks.

“The skulls are in the brook and the bones in the wood,”
said the fox.

The woman was busy churning, but she thought she might as
well go and look for her flocks. While she was away, the fox
slipped into the churn and ate all the cream. When the woman
came back and saw this, she became so angry, that she took a
small clot of cream, which was left, and threw it after the fox,
splashing the end of his tail with it, and that’s the reason why
the fox has a white tip to his tail!





ASHIEPATTLE* WHO ATE WITH
THE TROLL FOR A WAGER

THERE was once upon a time a peasant who had three sons. He
was badly off, and old and feeble, and the sons would not do any
work. .

To the farm belonged a large pine forest, and the father
wanted his sons to cut timber in it, and try to get some of his
debts paid off. At last he got them to listen to him, and the
eldest one was to go out first and fell trees. When he got into
the forest and began felling an old bearded pine, a great big troll
came up to him.

“Tf you cut down my trees, I’ll kill you!” said the troll.

When the lad heard this, he threw down the axe and set off
home as fast as he could. He got there quite out of breath, and
told what had happened to him, but the father said he was chicken-
hearted ; the trolls had never frightened him from felling trees
when he was young, he said.

The next day the second son was to go, and the same thing
happened to him. He had no sooner struck some blows at the
pine than the troll came and said:

“Tf you cut down my trees, I'll kill you!”

The lad hardly dared to look at him; he threw down the axe
and took to his heels, just like his brother, only rather quicker.

* The favourite hero of most Norwegian fairy tales is called Askeladen, a sort
of male Cinderella, and is always the youngest son of the family,



‘TLL SQUE
E

E TROLL
THIS STON

H
F

AD TO T
ER OUT O

EL.
THE WAT.

ED TH

SHOUT:
EEZE

JUST AS I SQU



T BE QUIE

Se

QS OCT SS

‘‘Ik YOU DON










ASHIEPATTLE WHO ATE WITH THE TROLL 25

-’ When he came home the father became angry, and said that
the trolls had never frightened him when he was young.

On the third day Ashiepattle wanted to set out.

“You indeed!” said the two eldest; “you'll never be able to
do anything, you who have never been outside the door!”

Ashiepattle did not answer, but only asked for plenty of food
to take with him. His mother had nothing ready, and so she put
on the pot and made a cheese for him, which he placed in his
scrip, and then set out from home. When he had been felling
trees awhile, the troll came to him and said:

“Tf you cut down my trees, I'll kill you!”

But the lad was not slow; he ran into the forest for the cheese
and squeezed it, so that the whey spurted from it.

“Tf you don’t be quiet,” he shouted to the troll, “I'll squeeze
you just as I squeeze the water out of this white stone.”

“Qh dear, oh dear! do spare me!” said the troll, “and [ll
help you.”

Well, on that condition the lad would spare him, and as the
troll was clever at felling trees, they cut them down by the dozen
during the day. Towards evening the troll said :

“You had better come home with me; it is nearer than to

your place.”
_ Well, the boy went home with him, and when they got there
the troll was to light the fire on the hearth, while the boy fetched
the water for the porridge. But the two iron buckets that were
there were so big and heavy he was not even able to move them.
So the boy said :

“Tt is hardly worth while to take these thimbles with me; I'll
go and fetch the whole well.”

“Oh dear, no!” said the troll, “I cannot lose my well; you
make the fire, and I'll fetch the water.”

When he came back with the water, they boiled a great big
cauldron of porridge.

“Tf it’s all the same to you,” said the lad, “I'll lay a wager I'll
eat more than you.”



26 ASHIEPATTLE WHO ATE WITH THE TROLL

‘All right,” said the troll, for he thought he could easily
manage that ; but the boy took his scrip without the troll seeing
it, and tied it in front of him, and managed to put more porridge
in the scrip than he ate himself. When the scrip was full he took
his. knife and cut a slit in it.

- The troll looked at him, but didn’t say anything. When they
had been eating a good while the troll put away his spoon, and
said:

“T can’t eat any more.”

“You must eat,” answered the lad. “I’m scarcely half-way
through. Do as I did, and cut a hole in your stomach, and then
you can eat as much as you like.”

“But I suppose it hurts one dreadfully ? ” asked the troll.

“Oh, nothing worth talking about,” answered the lad.

So the troll did as the lad told him, and as you will easily
understand, that was the end of him. But the lad took all the
silver and gold which was in the mountain, and went home. With
that he would be able to pay off something of his father’s debt.



THE QUERN AT THE BOTTOM
OF THE SEA




OncE upon a time in the old, old days
there were two brothers, one of whom
was rich and the other poor. When
Christmas Eve came the poor brother
had not a morsel in the house, neither
of meat nor bread; and so he went to
his rich brother, and asked for a trifle
for Christmas, in heaven’s name. It
was not the first time the brother had
helped him, but he was always very
close-fisted, and was not particularly
glad to see him this time.

“Tf you'll do what I tell you, you
shall have a whole ham,” he said. The

Mi

ttt
i Wie
i



28 THE QUERN AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA

poor brother promised he would, and was very grateful into the
bargain. 22

“There it is, and now go to the devil!” said the rich brother,
and threw the ham across to him.

“Well, what I have promised I must keep,” said the other one.
‘He took the ham, and set out. He walked and walked the whole
day, and as it was getting dark he came to a place where the
lights were shining brightly. “This is most likely the place,”
thought the man with the ham.

In the wood-shed stood an old man witha long white beard,
cutting firewood for Christmas.

“Good evening,” said he with the ham.

‘‘Good evening to you,” said the man. “Where are you
going so late?”

‘Tam going to the devil—that is to say, if I am on the right
way,” answered the poor man.

“Yes, you are quite right ; this is his place,” said the old man.
“When you get in, they will all want to buy your ham, for ham
is scarce food here; but you must not sell it unless you get the
hand-quern, which stands just behind the door. When you come
out again, I'll teach you how to use it. You will find it useful
in many ways.”

The man with the ham thanked him for all the information, '
and knocked at the door. fo in og a

When he got in, it happened just as the old man had said. ‘All
the imps, both big and small, flocked around him like ants in a
field, and the one outbid the other for the ham.: nin se

“Well,” said the man, “ my good woman and I were to have
it for Christmas Eve, but since you want it so badly I will let you
have it. But if I am going to part with it, I want that hand-quern
which stands behind the door.”

The devil did not like to part with it, and higgled and
haggled with the man, but he stuck to what he had said, and in
the end the devil had to part with the quern.

When the man came out, he asked the old wood-cutter how



THE QUERN AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA 29

he was to use the quern, and when he had learned this, he thanked
the old man and set out homewards as quickly as he could; but
after all he did not get home till the clock struck twelve on Christ-
mas Eve.

“Where in all the world have you been?” said his wife.
‘Here have I been sitting, hour after hour, waiting and watching
for you, and have not had as much as two chips to lay under the
porridge pot.”

“Well, I couldn’t get back before ;” said the man. “I have had
a good many things to look after, and I’ve had a long way to walk
as well; but now I'll show you something,” said he and put the quern
on the table. He asked it first to grind candles, then a cloth, and
then food and beer, and everything else that was good for Christmas
cheer ; and as he spoke the quern brought them forth. The woman
crossed herself time after time and wanted to know where her
husband had got the quern from; but this he would not tell her.

“Tt does not matter where I got it from; you see the quern is
good and the mill stream is not likely to freeze,” said the man. So he
ground food and drink and all good things during Christmas; and the
third day he invited his friends, as he wanted to give them a feast.
When the rich brother saw all that was in the house, he became
both angry and furious, for he begrudged his brother everything.

“On Christmas Eve he was so needy that he came to me
and asked for a trifle in heaven’s name; and now he gives a
feast, as if he were both a count and a king,” said the brother.
“Where did you get all your riches from ?” he said to his brother.

“From just behind the door,” he answered, for he did not care
to tell his brother much about it. But later in the evening, when
he had drank a little freely, he could no longer resist, but brought
out the quern.

“There you see that which has brought me all my riches,” he
said, and so he let the quern grind first one thing and then another.

When the brother saw this, he was determined to have the
quern at all cost, and at last it was settled he should have it, but
three hundred dollars was to be the price of it. The brother was



30 THE QUERN AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA

however, to keep it till the harvest began; “for if I keep it so -
long, I can grind out food for many years to come,” he thought.

During that time you may be sure the quern did not rust, and
when the harvest began the rich brother got it; but the other had
taken great care not to show him how to use it.

It was evening when the rich brother got the quern home, and
in the morning he asked his wife to go out and help the hay-
makers ; he would get the breakfast ready himself to-day, he said.

When it was near breakfast time he put the quern on the
breakfast table.

“Grind herrings and broth, and do it quickly and well,” said
the man, and the quern began to bring forth herrings and broth,
and filled first all the dishes and tubs, and afterwards began flood-
ing the whole kitchen.

The man fiddled and fumbled and tried to stop the quern, but
however much he twisted and fingered it, the quern went on
grinding, and in a little while the broth reached so high that the
man was very near drowning. He then pulled open the parlour
door, but it was not long before the quern had filled the parlour
also, and it was just in the very nick of time that the man put his
hand down into the broth and got hold of the latch, and when he
had got the door open, he was soon out of the parlour, you may be
sure. He rushed out, and the herrings and the broth came pouring
out after him, like a stream, down the fields and meadows.

The wife, who was out haymaking, now thought it took too
long a time to get the breakfast ready.

“If my husband doesn’t call us soon, we must go home whether
or no: I don’t suppose he knows much about making broth, so I
must go and help him,” said the wife to the haymakers.

They began walking homewards, but when they had got a bit
up the hill they met the stream of broth with the herrings tossing
about in it and the man himself running in front of it ail.

“J wish all of you had a hundred stomachs each!” shouted
the man; ‘‘but take care you don’t get drowned.” And he rushed
past them as if the Evil One was at his heels, down to where his

































ed i a

Zee





















































































































































































































































































































































THE MAN RUSHED OUT OF THE HOUSE, AND THE HERRINGS AND THE BROTH CAME POURING OUT
AFTER HIM LIKE A STREAM






THE QUERN AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA 33

brother lived. He asked him for heaven's sake to take back the
quern, and that at once; ‘If it goes on grinding another hour the
whole parish will perish in broth and herrings,” he said. But the
brother would not take it back on any account before his brother
had paid him three hundred dollars more, and this he had to do.
The poor brother now had plenty of money, and before long he
bought a farm much grander than the one on which his rich
brother lived, and with the quern he ground so much gold that he
covered the farmstead with gold plates and, as it lay close to the
shore, it glittered and shone far out at sea. All those who sailed
past wanted to call and visit the rich man in the golden house, and
everybody wanted to see the wonderful quern, for its fame had
spread both far and wide, and there was no one who had not
heard it spoken of.

After along while there came a skipper who wanted to see the
quern; he asked if it could grind salt. Yes, that it could, said he who
owned it; and when the skipper heard this he wanted the quern
by hook or by crook, cost what it might, for if he had it he thought
he need not sail far away across dangerous seas for cargoes of salt.

At first the man did not want to part with it, but the skipper
both begged and prayed, and at. last he sold it and got many,
many thousand dollars for it.

As soon as the skipper had got the quern on his back he did
not stop long, for he was afraid the man would change his mind,
and as for asking how to use it he had no time to do that ; he made
for his ship as quickly as he could, and when he had got out to sea
a bit he had the quern brought up on deck.

“Grind salt, and that both quickly and well,” said the skipper,
and the quern began to grind out salt so that it spurted to all sides.

When the skipper had got the ship filled he wanted to stop the
quern, but however much he tried and whatever he did the quern
went on grinding, and the mound of salt grew higher and higher,
and at last the ship sank.

There at the bottom of the sea stands the quern grinding till
this very day, and that is the reason why the sea is salt.

c





LITTLE BUTTERKIN

ONcE upon a time there was'a woman who was sitting baking.
She had a little boy who was so fat and plump and who was so
fond of good food that she called him Butterkin. She also had a
dog called Goldtooth.

One day, all of a sudden, the dog began to bark.

“Run out, Butterkin!” said the woman, “and see what
Goldtooth is barking at.”

So the boy ran out and came back, saying :

‘‘Oh, mother, mother! There’s a great big troll-wife coming
here, with her head under her arm and a bag on her back.”



LITTLE BUTTERKIN . 35

“Run under the table and hide yourself,” said his mother.

The big troll-wife then came in.

“Good day!” she said.

“Good day to you!” said Butterkin’s mother.

“Ts Butterkin at home to-day?” asked the troll-wife.

“No, he is in the forest with his father, after the ptarmigan,”
answered the woman.

“That's a pity,” said the troll; “for I have such a nice little
silver knife I wanted to give him.”

“Peep, peep, here I am,” said Butterkin under the table, and
crept out.

“Tam so old and stiff in my back,” said the troll, “you must
get into the bag and find it yourself.”

No sooner was Butterkin in the bag than the troll threw it across
her back and walked off with him. When they had gone a bit on
the way the troll got tired and asked :

“How far have I to go before I can lie down and sleep?”

“ About a mile,” answered Butterkin. The troll then put
down the bag by the roadside and went in among the bushes by
herself and lay down to sleep. In the meantime Butterkin took
the opportunity, pulled out his knife, cut a hole in the bag and
jumped out; he then put a big root of a fir-tree in his place
and ran home to his mother. When the troll-wife reached
home and saw what she had in the bag she flew into a great
rage.

The next day the woman sat baking again. All at once the
dog began to bark. :

“ Run out, Butterkin,” said she, ‘and see what Goldtooth is
barking at.”

“Oh, mother, mother! It’s that terrible old troll!” said
Butterkin. ‘‘ Here she is again, with her head under her arm and
a big bag on her back.”

‘Run under the table and hide yourself,” said his mother.

““Good-day !” said the troll-wife. ‘“Is Butterkin at home
to-day ?”



36 LITTLE BUTTERKIN

“No, indeed he is not,” said his mother; ‘he is out in the
forest with his father, after the ptarmigan.”

“That's a pity!” said the troll; ‘ for I have such a nice little
silver fork I wanted to give him.”

“Peep, peep! Here I am!” said Butterkin, and crept out.

‘‘T am so stiff in my back,” said the troll, “ you must get into
the bag and find it yourself.”

No sooner was Butterkin in the bag than the troll threw it
across her back and walked off with him. When they had gone
a good bit on the way the troll got tired and asked:

“‘ How far have I to go before I can lie down and sleep?”

“ About two miles,” answered Butterkin. The troll then put
down the bag by the roadside and went into the wood and lay
down to sleep. While the troll-wife took her nap, Butterkin cut
a hole in the bag, and when he had got out he put a big stone in
his place. As soon as the troll-wife reached home she lighted a
great fire in the hearth and put on a large cauldron in which to
boil Butterkin, but when she took the bag to empty Butterkin into
the cauldron, the stone fell out, and knocked a hole in the bottom
of the cauldron, so the water rushed out and put out the fire. The
troll then became very angry and said :

“Let him make himself ever so heavy, I'll be even with him
yet.”

The third time it happened just as before; Goldtooth began to
bark and so the mother said to Butterkin :

“Run out, Butterkin, and see what Goldtooth is barking
at.”

Butterkin then ran out and came back saying:

“Oh, mother, mother! It’s that troll again, with her head
under her arm and a bag on her back.”

“Run under the table and hide yourself,” said the mother.

“Good day!” said the troll, as she came in through the door.
“Ts Butterkin home to-day ?”

“No, indeed he is not,” said his mother; “he is in the forest
with his father, after the ptarmigan.”



LITTLE BUTTERKIN 37

“That’s a pity!” said the troll-wife, ‘for I have such a nice
little silver spoon I wanted to give him.”

“Peep, peep! Here 1am!” said Butterkin and crept out from
under the table.

“Tam so stiff in my back,” said the troll, “you must get into
the bag and find it yourself.”

No sooner had Butterkin got into the bag than the troll threw
it across her back and walked away with it.

This time the troll-wife did not lie down and sleep, but went
straight home with Butterkin in the bag. It was a Sunday when
they got home, and so the troll said to her daughter :

“Now you must take Butterkin and kill him and make broth of
him, till I come back again, for I am going to church, and shall ask
some friends for dinner.”

When she was gone, the daughter went to take Butterkin to
kill him, but she did not quite know how to set about it.

“Wait a bit! I'll show you how to do it!” said Butterkin ;
‘just put your head on the block and see how it’s done.”

She did so, poor silly thing, and Butterkin took the axe and
cut off her head, just as if it had been that of a chicken; he then
put the head in the bed and the body in the cauldron, and made
broth of the daughter, and when he had done this he climbed up
on the roof, just over the door, taking with him the fir-root and
the stone, and put the first over the door and the other across the
top of the chimney.

When the people came home from church and saw the head in
the bed, they thought that the daughter had lain down and was
asleep, so they thought they would taste the broth.

“This Butterkin-broth tastes nice!” said the troll-wife.

“This daughter-broth tastes nice!” said Butterkin, but they
took no heed.

The troll-wife then took the spoon to taste the broth.

“This Butterkin-broth tastes nice,” she said.

“This daughter-broth tastes nice,” said Butterkin down the
chimney.



38 LITTLE BUTTERKIN

They then began to wonder who it could be, and went out to
see. But when they came outside the door, Butterkin threw the
fir-root and stone at their heads and killed them all on the spot.
He then took all the gold and silver that was in the house, and
you may imagine how rich he became; and so he went home to
his mother.



THE CONTRARY WOMAN

THERE was once upon a time a man who had a wife, and she was
so contrary and cross-grained that it was not an easy thing at all
to get on with her. The husband fared worst of all ; whatever he
was for, she was always against.
So it happened one Sunday in summer that the man and the
woman went out to see how the crops looked.
When they came to a corn-field on the other side of the river
the man said:
“It’s ready for reaping ; to-morrow we must begin.”
“Yes, to-morrow we can begin and clip it,”
woman.
“What is it you say? Are we going to clip it? Are we
supposed not to reap corn any longer ?” said the man.
“No, it must be clipped,” said the woman.
“There is nothing so dangerous as a little knowledge,” said
the man ; ‘one would think you had lost what little sense you had!
Have you ever seen anybody clipping corn ?” said he.

said the



40 THE CONTRARY WOMAN

“Little I know, and less I want to know,” said the woman ;
“but this I do know, that the corn shall be clipped and not
reaped.” There was no use talking any more about that; clipped
it should be.

So they walked on wrangling and quarrelling, till they came to
the bridge across the river, close to a deep pool.

“There’s an old saying,” said the man, “that good tools make
good work; | fancy that’ll be a queer harvest which is cut with a
pair of shears,” said he. ‘Shall we not settle to reap the corn,
after all?”

“No, no! it must be clipped, clipped, clipped!” shouted the
woman jumping up and clipping her fingers under the man’s
nose.

In her passion she forgot to look where she was going, and
all at once she stumbied over one of the beams on the bridge and
fell into the river.

“Old habits are hard to change,” thought the man, “ but it
would be a wonder if J, for once, got my way.”

He waded out into the pool and got hold of her by the hair,
till her head was just out of the water.

“Shall we reap the corn then?” he said.

“Clip, clip, clip!” screamed the woman.

“Tl teach you to clip,” thought the man, and ducked her
under the water. But that wasn’t of much use; ‘they must clip
it,” she said, ashe brought her to the surface again.

“T do believe the woman is crazy,” said the man to himself;
“many are mad and don’t know it, and many have. sense
and don’t use it; but I must try once more, anyhow,” said
he. But no sooner had he ducked her under again than she
held her hand above the water and began to clip with her
fingers, like a pair of shears. Then the man got furious and
kept her under so long that her hand all of a sudden feil under
water, and the woman became so heavy that he had to let go
his hold.





= =

“NO, NO! IT MUST BE CLIPPED, CLIPPED, CLIPPED!"’ SHOUTED THE
WOMAN, CLIPPING HER FINGERS UNDER THE MAN'S NOSE






THE CONTRARY WOMAN 43

“If you want to drag me down into the pool with you, you
may lie there, you wretch!” said the man. And so the woman
was drowned.

But after a while he thought it wasn’t right that she should lie
there and not be buried in Christian soil, so he went along the
river and searched and dragged for her; but for all his searching























SHE HELD HER HAND ABOVE THE WATER AND BEGAN TO CLIP WITH HER
FINGERS, LIKE A PAIR OF SHEARS

and all his dragging he could not find her. He took the people on
the farm and others in the neighbourhood with him, and they
began dragging the river all the way down; but for all the search-
ing they could not find the woman.

“Well,” said the man, ‘‘this is not much use! This woman
was a sort by herself; while she was alive she was altogether a
contrary one, and it is not likely she’ll be different now,” he said,



THE CONTRARY WOMAN

“we must search up the river for her, and try above the fall;

perhaps she has floated upwards.”

So they went up the river and searched and dragged for her

That shows what

above the fall, and there, sure enough, she lay.

a contrary woman she was !



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TAB WOODPECKER




TWA

In those days when the saints used to wander
about on earth, St. Peter once came to a woman
who was sitting baking oatcakes. Her name
was Gertrude, and she had a red cap on her
head.

As St. Peter had been walking a long dis-
tance and was hungry, he asked her for a bit of
her cake. Yes, he might have some, and she took a tiny lump of
dough and began to roll it out; but it became so big that it filled
the whole of the board. No, that cake was too big, he shouldn't
have that one.

She then took a still smaller lump of dough, but when she had
rolled it out and put it on the slab to bake, that one also became
too big. He shouldn’t have that one either.

The third time she took a still smaller lump, a tiny little one ;
but this time also the cake became too big.



46 THE WOODPECKER

“T have nothing to give you,” said the woman; “you may as
well go without your bit, for all the cakes are too big.”

Then St. Peter became angry and said: ‘Because you be-
grudge me such a trifle you shall be punished, and you shall
become a bird and seek your food between the bark and the wood
and have nothing to drink except when it rains.”

He had no sooner said the last word than she became a wood-
pecker and flew from the hearth up the chimney. To this day
you can see her flying about with her red cap on and her body all
over black from the chimney. She is always tapping and pecking
at the trees for food, and piping when it is going to rain, for she is
always thirsty and is then waiting for water.



THE MAN’S DAUGHTER AND THE
WOMAN’S DAUGHTER

Once upon a time there were a man and a woman who got married ;
they had each a daughter. The woman’s daughter was lazy and
idle and would never do any work, and the man’s daughter was
active and willing, but for all that, she could never please the step-
mother, and both the woman and her daughter would have liked
to get rid of her.

One day they were sitting by the well spinning ; the woman’s
daughter had flax to spin, but the man’s daughter had nothing else
but bristles.

“You are always so clever and smart,” said the woman’s
daughter, “ but still I’m not afraid to try and see who can spin the
most.”

They agreed, that the one whose thread first broke, should be
put into the well.

All at once the man’s daughter’s thread broke, so she was put
into the well. But when she came to the bottom she found she
was not hurt; and far and wide around she saw nothing but a
beautiful green meadow.

She walked for some time in the meadow, till she came to a
hedge which she had to climb over.

“Do not step heavily on me,” said the hedge, “and I'll help you



48 THE MAN’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER

another time.” She made herself as light as a feather and stepped
over so carefully that she scarcely touched it.

So she went on a bit farther, till she came to a brindled cow,
which had a milk pail on her horns ; it was a fine large cow, and
her udder was round and full of milk.

‘Please do milk me,” said the cow, “ for I am so full of milk;
drink as much as you like and pour the rest over my hoofs, and I’ll
help you some other time.”

The man’s daughter did as the cow had asked her; the moment
she took hold of the teats the milk squirted into the pail, then she
drank as much as she could and the rest she poured over the cow’s
hoofs, and the pail she hung on the horns again.

When she had gone a bit further she met a large ram, which
had such long thick wool that it trailed along the ground, and on
one of his horns hung a large pair of shears.

“Please do shear me,” said the ram, “ for here I have to go
about panting with all this wool, and it is so warm I am almost
stifled. Take as much wool as you like and twist the rest round
my neck, and I'll help you another time.”

She was quite willing, and the ram lay down in her lap; he was
so quiet and she sheared him so neatly, that she did not make a
single scratch in his skin. She then took as much as she wanted
of the wool, and the rest she twisted round the ram’s neck.

A little further on she came to an apple-tree, which was so
laden with apples that all the branches were bent to the ground.
Close to the trunk stood a small pole.

“Please do pluck some of my apples,” said the tree, ‘so that
my branches can straighten themselves, for it is quite painful to
stand so crooked, but be sure and strike me gently and lightly, so
that you do not injure me. Eat as many as you like and place the
rest around my root, and I’ll help you some other time.”

So she plucked all she could reach, and then she took the pole
and carefully knocked down all the other apples ; she ate till she
was satisfied, and the rest she placed neatly round the root.

Then she walked on a long, long way, till she came to a large



—

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SHE WE

ANT MAID

A SERV






THE MAN’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER 51

farm, where a troll-wife and her daughter lived. She went in and
asked if they wanted a serving maid.

“Oh, it’s no use,” said the troll-wife, “we have tried many,
but none of them were good for anything.” But she begged so
hard, that at last they took her into service; and the troll-wife
gave her a sieve and told her to fetch some water in it. She
thought it was rather unreasonable that they should ask her to
fetch water in a sieve, but she went all the same, and when she
came to the well the little birds were singing:

“ Rub in clay!
Put in hay !
Rub in clay!
Put in hay!"

She did so and was then able to carry the water in the sieve
easily enough, but when she came home with the water and the
troll-wife saw the sieve, she said:

“You have not done that by yourself.”

The troll-wife then told her to go into the cow-house and clean
it out and then milk the cows; but when she came there she found
that the shovel was so big and heavy she could not use it, she
could not even lift it. She did not know what to do, but the birds
sang to her that she should take the handle of the besom and
throw a little out with it and then all the rest would follow.

She did this and no sooner had she done it than the cow-
house was as clean as if it had been cleaned and swept. She had
next to milk the cows, but they were so restless and kicked and
plunged so that she could not get any milking done at all. Then
she heard the birds singing outside :

‘CA little squirt !

A little sip!
To little birds!"

She squirted a little milk out to the birds and then all the cows
stood still and let her milk them; they neither kicked nor plunged,
they did not even lift a leg.



52 THE MAn’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER

When the troll-wife saw her coming in with the milk she
said :

“You have not done this by yourself. Now you must take
this black wool and wash it white.”

The girl did not know how she should get this done, for she
had never seen any one who could wash black wool white. But
she said nothing, she took the wool and went to the well with it.
The little birds sang to her that she should take the wool and put
it in the big bucket that was standing near the well, and it would
become white.

“Oh dear, oh dear!” said the troll-wife, when the girl came in
with the wool. ‘It’s no use keeping you, you can do everything ;
you will worry the life out of me in the end, it is better you should
go your way.”

The troll-wife then brought out three caskets, a red, a green,
and a blue one, and the girl might take whichever she liked, and
that was to be her wages. She did not know which one to take,
but the little birds sang:

“Take not the green !
Take not the red !
But take the blue !

On which we’ve put
Three little crosses!”

She then took the blue one, as the birds had told her.

“A curse upon you,” said the troll-wife, “you will be sure to
suffer for this.” .

When the man’s daughter was going the troll-wife threw a
red-hot iron bar after her, but the girl ran behind the door and
hid herself, so the bar missed her, for the little birds had told her
what to do.

She set off as quickly as she could; but when she came to the
apple tree she heard a rumbling noise behind her on the road; it
was the troll-wife and her daughter, who were after her. The
girl got so frightened she did not know what to do with herself.

‘Come here to me,” said the apple-tree, ‘and I’ll help you.



THE MAN’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER 53

Hide yourself under my branches, for if they get hold of you,
they will take the casket from you and tear you to pieces.” The
girl did so, and just then up came the troll-wife and her daughter.

“Have you seen any girl go past here?” said the troll-wife.

“Oh, yes,” said the tree, ‘fone ran past awhile ago; but she
is now so far away you'll never overtake her.”

The troll-wife then turned about and set off home.

The girl walked on a bit; but when she came to the ram, she
heard the rumbling noise again on the road, and she became so
frightened and terrified, that she did not know what to do with
herself; for she knew it was the troll-wife who had changed her
mind.

“Come here and I'll help you,” said the ram. ‘ Hide yourself
under my wool and they won’t see you; or else they'll take the
casket from you and tear you to pieces.”

All at once the troll-wife came rushing up.

“Have you seen a girl go past here ?” she asked the ram.

‘Oh, yes,” said the ram, ‘I saw one a while ago, but she ran
so fast that you will never overtake her.” So the troll-wife turned
round and went home.

When the girl had got as far as the cow, she heard the
rumbling noise again on the road.

“Come here,” said the cow, “and I'll help you; hide yourself
under my udder, or else the troll-wife will take the casket from
you, and tear you to pieces.” Before long she came.

‘Have you seen any girl go past here?” said the troll-wife to
the cow.

“Yes, I saw one a while ago, but she is far away now, for she
was running so fast that you will never overtake her,” said the
cow. The troll-wife then turned round and went home again.

When the girl had got a long long bit on the way and was not
far from the hedge, she heard the noise again on the road; she
became terribly frightened, for she knew it was the troll-wife who
had come back again.

“Come here and I'll help you,” said the hedge, “creep in



54 THE MAN’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER

among my twigs, and they won’t see you; or else they will take
the casket from you and tear you to pieces.” She made haste to
hide herself among the twigs of the hedge.

“Have you seen any girl go past here?” said the troll-wife to
the hedge. :

“No, I have not seen any girl,” said the hedge, and it became
so angry you could hear it crackle. Then it made itself so big, it
was no use trying to get over it. There was no help for it; the
troll-wife had to turn round and go home again.

When the man’s daughter got home both the woman and her
daughter were still more spiteful than they had been before; for
now she was still more beautiful, and so grand, that it was a
pleasure to look at her. She was not allowed to stop with them,
but they sent her to the pig-sty, where she was to live. She
then began to wash and clean out the place, and then she opened
her casket to see what she had got for wages; when she opened
it she found there was so much gold and silver, and so many
beautiful things in it, that both the walls and roof were covered,
and the pig-sty became more magnificent than the finest palace.

When the step-mother and the daughter saw this they were
quite beside themselves, and began to ask her what sort of service
she had been in.

“Qh,” she said, “ you can easily guess since I have had such
wages. Such a mistress to work for, and such people you will
not easily find!”

The woman’s daughter then wanted to set out and go into
service, so that she also might get such a golden casket.

They then sat down to spin again; but this time the woman’s
daughter was to spin bristles, and the man’s daughter flax, and
the one who first broke the thread would be put into the well.

Before long the woman’s daughter broke her thread, as you
may guess, and so they threw her into the well.

Everything happened as before; she fell to the bottom, but
did not hurt herself, and then she came to a beautiful green
meadow. When she had walked a bit she came to the hedga



THE MAN’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER 55

‘‘Do not step heavily on me, and I will help you another time,”
said the hedge.

“Oh, what do I care about a lot of twigs,” she said, and trod
heavily on the hedge, so that it groaned.

In a little while she came to the cow, which wanted milking
again.

“Please do milk me,” said the cow, “and 1 will help you
another time; drink as much as you like, and pour the rest over
my hoofs.”

This she did ; she milked the cow, and drank as long as she
was able, till there was nothing left to pour over the hoofs. She
then threw the pail down the hill and went her way. When she
had gone a bit further she came to the ram, which was going
about trailing his wool along the ground.

“Do shear me, and I'll help you another time,” said the ram ;
“take as much of the wool as you like, but twist the rest around
my neck.” She did this, but sheared the ram so roughly that she
made big gashes in his skin; and then she took all the wool away
with her.

In a little while she came to the apple-tree, which was quite
bent down under the weight of its apples.

“Please do pluck my apples, so that my branches can straighten
themselves, for it is painful to stand so crooked,” said the apple-
tree, ‘‘ but be careful not to injure me; eat as many as you like,
but place the rest at my root, and I'll help you another time.”

She plucked some of the nearest, and those she could not
reach she knocked down with the pole ; but she did not care how
she did it. She tore down large branches, and ate till she was
unable to eat any more; and then she threw the rest under the
tree.

When she had walked a little way she came to the farm, where
the troll-wife lived, and asked to be taken into service. The troll-
wife said she would not have any servant girl, for either they
were good for nothing or else they were far too clever, and cheated
her of what she had. The woman’s daughter did not give in, but



56 THE MAn’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER

said she must have a place; and then the troll-wife said she would
take her, if she was good for anything.

The first thing she got to do was to fetch water in the sieve.
She went to the well and poured water into the sieve, but as fast
as she poured it in it ran out. ‘The birds then sang:

“ Rub in clay !
Put in hay!
Rub in clay!
Put in hay!”

But she didn’t take any notice of what the bird’s sang; she
threw the clay at them, so that they flew away, and she had to go
back with an empty sieve, and got scolded by the troll-wife. She
was then to clean out the cow-house and milk the cows, but she
thought she was too good for that. She went into the cow-house,
however ; and when she got there she found she could not use the
shovel; it was so big. The birds said the same to her as to the
man’s daughter-—that she should take the besom and sweep out
the litter, and all the rest would follow; but she took the besom
and threw it at the birds. When she was going to milk the
cows they were so restless that they kicked and plunged, and
every time she had got a little in the pail they kicked it over.
The birds sang:

‘A little squirt !

A little sip !

For little birds!”
But she struck and beat the cows, flung and threw everything
she could get hold of at the birds, and carried on in a way that
was never heard of. She had not, of course, cleaned the cow-
house or milked the cows, so when she came in she got both blows
and scolding from the troll-wife. She was then to wash the
black wool white, but she did not fare any better with that.
The troll-wife thought this was too bad, and so she brought out
three caskets—one red, one green, and one blue—and told her
she had no use for her, as she was fit for nothing; but she
should have a casket all the same for her wages, and could
choose which she liked best. Then the birds sang:



THE MAN’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER 57

“ Take not the green!
Take not the red!
But take the blue!
Which we have put
Three crosses on!”

She did not take any notice of what the birds sang, but took
the red one, which was the gaudiest. So she set out on her
way home, and got there without any trouble, for there was no
one in pursuit of her.

When she got home the mother was greatly rejoiced to see
her, and they went at once into the parlour and placed the
casket there, for they thought there was nothing but gold and
silver in it, and they believed that both the walls and the roof
would be covered with gold. But as soon as they opened the
casket there swarmed out of it vipers and toads, and when the
daughter opened her mouth it was just the same; vipers and
toads and all sorts of vermin fell out, till at last it was impos-
sible to live in the same house with her. And that was all she
got for serving the troll-wife!

‘“TAKE NOT THE GREEN!

TAKE NOT THE RED!
BUT TAKE THE BLUE!
WHICH WE HAVE PUT
THREE CROSSES ON!”



OS)

FY MERYENGSE



THE HARE WHO HAD BEEN
MARRIED

Once upon a time a hare was running and frisking about in a
cornfield.

“ Hurray! hurrah! hurray!” he shouted, as he jumped and
skipped along.

All of a sudden he turned a somersault, and found himself
standing on his hind legs in a new-sown cornfield.

Just then a fox came slinking by.

“Good day, good day to you!” said the hare. ‘TI feel so jolly
to-day, for I have been married, you must know!”

“That’s a good thing for you,” said the fox.

“Oh, I don’t know so much about that,” said the hare, “ for
she was rather a cross-grained creature, and she turned out a
regular scold of a wife, she did.”

“That was a bad thing for you,” said the fox.

“Oh, it wasn’t so bad,” said the hare, “for I got a lot of money
with her, and she had a house of her own besides.”

“That was a very good thing indeed,” said the fox.

“Qh, I don’t know so much about that,” said the hare, “ for
the house got burnt down, and everything we had along with it.”

“That was really too bad,” said the fox.

“Oh, not so very bad after all,” said the hare, “for that cross-
grained wife of mine was burnt as well.”






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‘'44URRAY | HURRAH! HURRAY!" SHOUTED THE HARE, AS HE JUMPED AND SKIPPED ALONG








THE SOUIRE Se BRIDE

Once upon atime there was a rich squire who owned a large
farm, and had plenty of silver at the bottom of his chest and
money in the bank besides; but he felt there was something
wanting, for he was a widower.

One day the daughter of a neighbouring farmer was working
for him in the hayfield. The squire saw her and liked her very
much, and as she was the child of poor parents he thought, if
he only hinted that he wanted her, she would be ready to marry
him at once.

So he told her he had been thinking of getting married again.



62 THE SQUIRE'S BRIDE

“Ay! one may think of many things,” said the girl, laughing
slyly. In her opinion the old fellow ought to be thinking of
something that behoved him better than getting married.

“Well, you see, I thought that you should be my wife!”

“No, thank you all the same,” said she, “that’s not at all
likely.”

The squire was not accustomed to be gainsaid, and the more
she refused him the more determined he was to get her.

But as he made no progress in her favour, he sent for her
father and told him that if he could arrange the matter with his
daughter he would forgive him the money he had lent him, and
he would also give him the piece of land which lay close to his
meadow into the bargain.

““Yes, you may be sure I'll bring my daughter to her senses,”
said the father. ‘She is only a child, and she doesn’t know
what’s best for her.” But all his coaxing and talking did not
help matters. She would not have the squire, she said, if he
sat buried in gold up to his ears.

The squire waited day after day, but at last he became so
angry and impatient that he told the father, if he expected him to
stand bv his promise, he would have to put his foot down and
settle the matter now, for he would not wait any longer.

The man knew no other way out of it, but to let the squire get
everything ready for the wedding ; and when the parson and the
wedding guests had arrived the squire should send for the girl as if
she were wanted for some work on the farm. When she arrived
she would have to be married right away, so that she would have
no time to think it over.

The squire thought this was well and good and so he began
brewing and baking and getting ready for the wedding in grand
style. When the guests had arrived the squire called one of his
farm lads and told him to run down to his neighbour and ask him
to send him what he had promised.

“But if you are not back in a twinkling,” he said shaking his
fist at him, “ I’l]—— ”



THE SQUIRE’S BRIDE 63

He did not say more, for the lad ran off as if he had been
shot at.

‘“My master has sent me to ask for that you promised him,”
said the lad, when he got to the neighbour, “ but there is no time
to be lost, for he is terribly busy to-day.”

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THE BOY RODE HOME ON THE BAY MARE AT FULL GALLOP

‘Yes, yes! Run down into the meadow and take her with you.
There she goes!” answered the neighbour.

The lad ran off and when he came to the meadow he found
the daughter there raking the hay.

‘“‘T am to fetch what your father has promised my master,” said
the lad.



64. THE SQUIRE’S BRIDE

“Ah, ha!” thought she. ‘Is that what they are up to?”
“Ah, indeed!” she said. ‘I suppose it’s that little bay mare



























































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SOME PULLED AT THE HEAD AND THE FORE LEGS OF THE MARE AND
OTHERS PUSHED BEHIND

of ours. Youhad better go and take lier. She stands there tethered
on the other side of the pease-field,” said the girl.



THE SQUIRE’S BRIDE 65

The boy jumped on the back of the bay mare and rode home at
full gallop.

“Have you got her with you?” asked the squire.

“She is down at the door,” said the lad.

“Take her up to the room my mother had,” said the
squire.

“ But, master, how can that be managed?” said the lad.

“You must just do as I tell you,” said the squire. “If you
cannot manage her alone you must get the men to help you,” for
he thought the girl might turn obstreperous.

When the lad saw his master’s face he knew it would be no
use to gainsay him. So he went and got all the farm-tenants who
were there to helphim. Some pulled at the head and the fore legs
of the mare and others pushed from behind, and at last they got
her up the stairs and into the room. There lay all the wedding
finery ready.

“Now, that’s done, master!” said the lad; “but it was a
terrible job. It was the worst I have ever had here on the
farm.”

“Never mind, you shall not have done it for nothing,” said
his master. ‘Now send the women up to dress her.”

“But I say, master 1!” said the lad.

“ None of your talk!” said thesquire. ‘Tell them they must
dress her and mind and not forget either wreath or crown.”

The lad ran into the kitchen.

“Look here, lasses,” he said; “you must go upstairs and
dress up the bay mare as bride. I expect the master wants to
give the guests a laugh.”

The women dressed the bay mare in everything that was there,
and then the lad went and told his master that now she was ready
dressed, with wreath and crown and all.

“Very well, bring her down!” said the squire. “I will
receive her myself atthe door,” said he.

There was a terrible clatter on the stairs; for that bride, you
know, had no silken shoes on.





66 THE SQUIRE’S BRIDE

When the door was opened and the squire’s bride entered the
parlour you can imagine there was a good deal of tittering and
grinning.

And as for the squire you may be sure he had had enough of
that bride, and they say he never went courting again.





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THE DOOR OPENED AND THE SQUIRE'S BRIDE ENTERED THE PARLOUR






ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE

ONCE upon a time a man and a woman were going to sow, but they
had no seed-corn and no money to buy any with either. They
had only one cow and this the man was to go to town with and sell
to get money for the seed-corn.

But when the time came the wife would not let the man go, for
she was afraid he would spend the money on drink. So she set
off herself with the cow and took with her a hen as well.

Close to the town she met a butcher.

“‘ Are you going to sell that cow, mother ?” he asked.

“Yes, that I am,” she said.

“ How much do you want for it then ?”

“T suppose I must have a shilling for the cow, but the hen you
can have for two pounds,” she said.

“ Well,” said the butcher, ‘I haven’t any use for the hen, and
you can easily get rid of that when you get to the town, but I'll
give you a shilling for the cow.”

She sold the cow and got her shilling, but nobody in the town
would give two pounds fora tough, old hen. So she went back to
the butcher and said:

‘‘T can’t get rid of this hen, father. You'll have to take that
as well since you took the cow.”



70 ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE

“We'll soon settle that,” said the butcher, and asked her to sit
down. He gave her something to eat and so much brandy to
drink that she became tipsy and lost her wits. While she slept it
off the butcher dipped her into a barrel of tar and then put her in
a heap of feathers.

When she woke up she found that she was feathered all over
and she began to wonder: “Isitme?orisitnotme? It must be
a strange bird! But what shall I do to find out whether it is me,
or whether it is’nt me? Now I know—if the calves will lick me
and the dog doesn’t bark at me, when I get home, then it is me.”

The dog no sooner saw such a monster than it began barking
with all its might as if there were thieves and vagabonds about
the place.

“No, surely, it cannot be me,” she said.

When she came to the cowhouse the calves would not lick her,
because they smelt the tar.

“No, it cannot be me; it must bea strange bird,” she said ; and
then she climbed up on top of the storehouse and began to flap
with her arms as if she had wings and wanted to fly. When the
man saw this he came out with his rifle and took aim at her.

“Don’t shoot, don’t shoot,” cried his wife ; ‘it is me.”

“Ts it you?” said the man. ‘Then don’t stand there like a
goat, but come down and tell me what you have been about.”

She climbed down again, but found she had not a single penny
left, for the shilling she got from the butcher she had lost while
she was tipsy.

When the man heard this he said: ‘‘ You are more mad than
ever you were,” and he became so angry that he said he would
go away from everything and never come back if he did not find
three women who were just as mad.

He set out and when he had got a bit on the way he sawa
woman running in and out of a newly-built hut with an empty
sieve. Every time she ran in she threw her apron over the sieve,
as if she had something it, and then she turned it over on the
floor.













iw ps
AM lag =
1 RAPA

















T MEXDRKSEN

WHEN THE MAN SAW THE STRANGE FIGURE ON THE ROOF HE CAME OUT
WITH HIS RIFLE AND TOOK AIM AT IT






ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE 73

“What are you doing that for, mother ?” asked he.

“Oh, I only want to carry in a little sun,” she answered ; “ but
I don’t know how it is—when I am outside I have the sun in the
sieve, but when I get inside I have lost it. When I was in my old
hut I had plenty of sun, although I never carried in any. If any
one could get me some sun I'd willingly give him three hundred
dollars.”

“Have you an axe?” said the man, “and I'll soon get you
some sun.”

He got an axe and cut out the openings for the windows which
the carpenters had forgotten to do. The sun shone into the room
at once and he got his three hundred dollars.

‘That was one of them!” thought the man, and set out again.

In a while he came to a house where there was a terrible
screaming and shouting going on. He went in and saw a woman,
who was beating her husband on the head with a bat; and over
his head she had pulled a shirt in which there was no hole for the
neck.

“Do you want to kill your husband, mother?” he asked.

“No,” she said, “I only want to make a hole for the neck in
his shirt.”

The man moaned and groaned and said: ‘Oh dear, oh dear!
I pity those who have to try on new shirts. If any one could
teach my wife how to make the hole for the neck in a different way,
I'd willingly give him three hundred dollars.”

“T’ll soon do that,” said the man; “only let me have a pair of °
scissors.”

He got a pair and cut the hole, and then he took his money
and went his way.

“That was the second of them!” he said to himself.

After a long while he came to a farm, where he thought he
would rest awhile, so he went in.

‘Where do you come from ?” asked the woman.

‘“‘T come from Ringerige,” * answered the man.

* A district in the south of Norway.



74 ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE

“Oh dear, oh dear! are you from Himmerige ?* Then you
must know Peter, my second husband, poor soul!” said the
woman. She had been married three times; the first and the
last husbands were bad men, so she thought that the second, who
had been a good husband, was the only one likely to go to heaven.

“Yes, I know him well,” said the man.

“ How is it with him there ?” asked the woman.

“Oh, things are rather bad with him,” said the man. ‘He
knocks about from place to place, and has neither food nor clothes
to his back, and as for money

“Goodness gracious!” cried the woman,” there’s no need that
he should go about in such a plight—he that left so much behind
him. Here is a large loft full of clothes, which belonged to him, as
well as a big chest of money. If you'll take it all with you you
shall have the horse and trap to take it in; and he can keep both
horse and trap, so that he can drive about from place to place; for
he has no need to walk, I’m sure.”

The man got a whole cartload of clothes anda chest full of
bright silver dollars, and as much food and drink as he wanted.
When he had finished he got into the trap and drove off.

‘‘That’s the third of them!” he said to himself.

But the woman’s third husband was over in a field ploughing,
and when he saw a stranger driving off with the horse and trap,
he went home and asked his wife who it was who drove away with
the horse.

“Oh,” she said, ‘that was a man from heaven; he said that
Peter, my second, poor dear soul, is so badly off that he walks
about there from place to place, and has neither clothes nor money ;
so I sent him all his old clothes, which have been hanging here
ever since, and the old money chest with the silver dollars.”

The man understood at once what all this meant, and saddled
a horse and set off at full gallop.



* “ Himmerige,” the Norwegian word for ‘‘ heaven.’’ The similarity between
the two words ‘‘ Himmerige"’ and “‘ Ringerige”’ will easily explain the mistake
made by the woman.



ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE 75

Before long he was close behind the man in the trap; who
when he discovered he was pursued, drove the horse and trap
into a thick part of the wood, pulled a handful of hair out of the
horse’s tail, and sprang up a hill, where he tied the horse’s hair to
a birch-tree, and lay down onhis back under it, gaping and staring
up into the clouds.

“Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear!” he said, as if talking to himself,
when the woman’s third husband came riding up; “well, I’ve
never seen anything so wonderful! I’ve never seen the like
of it!”

The husband stopped and looked at him for a while and
wondered if the man was crazy, or what he was upto. At last
he asked him :

“What are you staring at?”

“Well, I never saw the like!” exclaimed the man. “I’ve just
seen some one driving straight into heaven, horse and all! There,
you see part of the horse’s tail hanging on the birch tree, and up
among the clouds you can see the horse.”

The husband looked up at the clouds and then at him and said:

“T don’t see anything but the horse-hair on the birch-tree.”

“No, of course you can’t see it, where you stand,” said the
man, “but come and lie down here and look straight up; you
must not take your eyes away from the clouds.”

While the husband lay staring into the sky till the water ran
from his eyes, the man jumped on the horse and set off, both with
that and the horse and trap.

When the husband heard the rumbling noise on the road, he
jumped up, but was so bewildered because the man had gone off
with his horses that he did not think of setting after him till it was
too late. He did not feel very proud, as you can imagine, when he
came home to his wife, and when she asked him what he had done
with the horse he said:

“Oh, I told the man he could take that with him as well to
Peter, for I did not think it was right that he should jolt about
in a trap up there ; now he can sell the trap and buy a carriage.”



76 ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE

“Oh, thank you for that! never did I think you were such a
kind husband,” said the woman.

When the man who had got the six hundred dollars and the
cartload of clothes and money, came home, he saw that all the
fields were ploughed and sown. The first thing he asked his wife
was, where she had got the seed-corn from.

“Oh,” said she, ‘I have always heard, that he who sows
something gets something. So I sowed the salt which the carrier
left here the other day, and if we only get rain soon, I think it
will grow up nicely.”

““Mad you are, and mad you'll be as long as you live,” said the
man; “but it doesn’t much matter, for the others are no better
than you.”



ONE’S OWN CHILDREN ARE ALWAYS
THE PRE PES








OncE upon a time a
man went out shoot-
ing in a forest, and
there he met a wood-
cock.

“Pray, don’t shoot
my children,” said
the woodcock.

“What are your
children like?” asked
the man.

“Mine are the
prettiest children in
the forest,” answered
the woodcock.



78 ONE’S OWN CHILDREN ARE ALWAYS THE PRETTIEST

‘IT suppose I mustn’t shoot them then,” said the man.

When he came back he carried in his hand a whole string of
young woodcocks which he had shot.

“Oh dear, oh dear! Why, you have shot my children after
all!” said the woodcock.

‘Are these yours?” said the man. ‘Why, I shot the
ugliest I could find.”
‘Yes, yes,” answered the woodcock; “but don’t you know

that every one thinks one’s own children the prettiest ?”





OLD FATHER BRUIN IN THE
WOLF-PIT

THERE was once upon a time a man who lived far away in the
wood. He had many sheep and goats, but he could never keep
the wolf away from them.

“Il be even with you yet, Master Greylegs,” he said at last,
and began to dig a pit for the wolf. When he had dug it deep
enough he placed a pole in the middle of the pit and on the top of
the pole he fixed a board, and on the board he put a little dog.
He then placed some twigs and branches across the pit, and on
top of all he sprinkled some snow, so that the wolf should not see
there was a trap underneath. When the night came the little dog
got tired of being there.

“‘ Bow-wow-wow !” it barked at the moon.

A fox just then came slinking along, and thought here was a
fine chance.- He made a spring and fell plump into the pit.

As the night wore on the little dog became so weary and
hungry that it began to whine and bark.



80 OLD FATHER BRUIN IN THE WOLF-PIT

“ Bow-wow-wow,” it barked.

All at once a wolf came slouching along. He thought here is
a fat little morsel, and sprang plump into the pit.

Early in the grey morning the North wind began to blow and
it became ‘so cold that the little dog shivered and trembled, and
was so weary and hungry.

“ Bow-wow-wow-wow,” it went on barking all the time.

A bear then came trudging along, and thought here was a nice
tit-bit early in the morning ; so he stepped out on the branches
and fell plump into the pit. ,

As the morning wore on there came an old beggarwoman who
was tramping about from place to place with a bag on her back.
When she saw the little dog standing there barking she thought
she would go and see if any animals had been caught in the trap
during the night. She went down on her knees and peered into
the pit.

“So you have been caught, Master Reynard, have you ?” she
said to the fox, for she saw him first; “serve you right, you old
hen-thief. And you are there too, are you, Master Greylegs ?” said
she to the wolf. ‘ Well, you have killed goats and sheep enough in
your time, and now you'll suffer for it and get what you deserve.
Hulloa, Father Bruin, are you in this nice little parlour too, you
old horse-thief ? We will cut you up and flay you, we will, and
your skull we will nail up on the cow-house,” shouted the woman
excitedly, and shook her fists at the bear; but just then her
bag slipped forward over her head, and the woman tumbled
plump into the pit. There they sat staring at one another, all
four of them, each in their corner—the fox in one, the wolf
in the other, the bear in the third, and the old woman in the
fourth.

When it became full daylight Reynard began to shake himself
and whisk about, for he thought he might as well try to get out;
but the old woman said:

“Can’t you sit quiet, you old roost-robber, and not go frisking
and trailing about in this way? Look at old Father Bruin; he



OLD FATHER BRUIN IN THE WOLF-PIT 81

sits as quiet as a parson in his study ;” for she thought she had
better make friends with the bear.

Then came the man who had set the trap for the wolf. First
of all he dragged up the old woman, and then he killed all the
animals ; he spared neither old Father Bruin, nor Greylegs, nor
Reynard, the hen-thief. The man thought he had made a good
haul that night.



THE DOLL IN THE GRASS

ONcE upon a time there was a king who had twelve sons. When
they were grown up he told them they must go out into the
world and find themselves wives, who must all be able to spin
and weave and make a shirt in one day, else he would not have
them for daughters-in-law. He gave each of his sons a horse
and a new suit of armour, and so they set out in the world to
look for wives.

‘When they had travelled a bit on the way they said they
would not take Ashiepattle with them, for he was good for
nothing. Ashiepattle must stop behind ; there was no help for
it. He did not know what he should do or which way he should
turn; he became so sad that he got off the horse and sat down on
the grass and began to cry.

When he had sat awhile, one of the tussocks among the grass
began to move, and out of it came a small white figure ; as it came
nearer, Ashiepattle saw that it was a beautiful little girl, but she
was so tiny, so very, very tiny.

She went up to him and asked him if he would come below
and pay a visit to the doll in the grass.

Yes, that he would; and so he did. When he came down
below, the doll in the grass was sitting in a chair dressed very
finely and looking still more beautiful. She asked Ashiepattle
where he was going and what was his errand.





Hine LE RCE TE in
Hh : Ae Ht) iy thy WAAL

Fae)



N

\ i
N

iN WW

4 AY
SO \X WX



A SMALL WHITE FIGURE CAME OUT OF ONE OF THE TUSSOCKS AMONG THE GRASS






THE DOLL IN THE GRASS 85

He told her they were twelve brothers, and that the king had
given them each a horse and a suit of armour, and told them to go
out in the world and find themselves wives, but that they must all
be able to spin and weave and make a shirt in a day.

“If you can do that and will become my wife, I will not travel
any further,” said Ashiepattle to the doll in the grass.

Yes, that she would, and she set to work at once to get the
shirt spun, woven and made; but it was so tiny, so very, very
tiny, no bigger than—so !

Ashiepattle then returned home, taking the shirt with him;
but when he brought it out, he felt very shy because it was so
small. But the king said he could have her for all that, and you
can imagine how happy and joyful Ashiepattle became.

The road did not seem long to him, as he set out to fetch his
little sweetheart. When he came to the doll in the grass, he
wanted her to sit with him on his horse, but no, that she wouldn't ;
she said she would sit and drive in a silver spoon, and she had two
small white horses which would draw her. So they set out, he
on his horse and she in the silver spoon; and the horses which
drew her were two small white mice.

Ashiepattle always kept to one side of the road, for he was so
afraid he should ride over her; she was so very, very tiny.

When they had travelled a bit on the way, they came to a large
lake; there Ashiepattle’s horse took fright and shied over to the
other side of the road, and upset the spoon, so that the doll in the
grass fell into the water. Ashiepattle became very sad, for he did
not know how he should get her out again; but after a while a
merman brought her up. But now she had become just as big as
any other grown up being and was much more beautiful than she
was before. So he placed her in front of him on the horse and
rode home.

When Ashiepattle got there, all his brothers had also returned,
‘each with a sweetheart ; but they were so ugly and ill-favoured
and bad-tempered, that they had come to blows with their sweet-
hearts on their way home. On their heads they had hats which



86 THE DOLL IN THE GRASS

were painted with tar and soot, and this had run from their hats
down their faces, so that they were still uglier and more ill-
favoured to behold. _

When the brothers saw Ashiepattle’s sweetheart, they all
became envious of him, but the king was
so pleased with Ashiepattle and his
sweetheart, that he drove all the others
away, and so Ashiepattle was married
to the doll in the grass; and afterwards
they lived happy and comfortable for a
long, long while; and if they are not
dead, they must be still alive.










ARETE evr WWVELO «WBN TO DOV RE-
Pew DO: SAV EEE WiORED

\
\




/ \ THERE was once upon a time

a hen, which flew up in an
oak-tree and perched there for
the night. Before long she
dreamt, that if she did not go
to Dovrefjeld, the world would
All of a
sudden she jumped down and
set out on the road.

When she had gone a bit
she met a cock.

“ Good-day, Cocky Locky !”
said the hen.

come to an end.



88 THE HEN WHICH WENT TO DOVREFJELD

“Good-day, Henny Penny! where are you going so early?”
said the cock.

‘Oh, I am going to Dovrefjeld, so that the world shan’t come
to an end,” said the hen.

‘“Who told you that, Henny Penny?” said the cock.

“T sat in the oak and dreamt it last night,” said the hen.

“T’ll go with you,” said the cock. So they went a long way,
till they met a duck.

“Good-day, Ducky Lucky!” said the cock.

“Good-day, Cocky Locky! where are you going so early?”
said the duck.

“Tam going to Dovrefjeld, so that the world shan’t come to
an end,” said the cock.

“Who told you that, Cocky Locky ? ”

“Henny Penny!” said the cock.

“Who told you that, Henny Penny ?” said the duck.

“T sat in the oak and dreamt it last night,” said the hen.

“Tl go with you!” said the duck. Sothey set off and walked
a bit, till they met a gander.

“ Good-day, Gandy Pandy!” said the duck.

“‘Good-day, Ducky Lucky!” said the gander. ‘Where are
you going so early?”

“Tam going to Dovrefjeld, so that the world shan’t come to
an end,” said the duck.

“Who told you that, Ducky Lucky ?” said the gander.

“Cocky Locky !”

““Who told you that, Cocky Locky?”

“Henny Penny!”

“ How do you know that, Henny Penny ?” said the gander.

“T sat in the oak and dreamt it last night, Gandy Pandy,”
said the hen.

“Tl go with you!” said the gander. When they had gone
on a bit, they met a fox.

“‘Good-day, Foxy Woxy!” said the gander.

“Good-day, Gandy Pandy!”



THE HEN WHICH WENT TO DOVREFJELD 89

“Where are you going, Foxy Woxy?”

‘Where are you going, Gandy Pandy?”

“Tm going to Dovrefjeld, so that the world shan’t come to an
end,” said the gander.

“Who told you that, Gandy Pandy ?” said the fox.

“ Ducky Lucky!”

“Who told you that, Ducky Lucky?”

“Cocky Locky!”

“Who told you that, Cocky Locky ?”

“Henny Penny!”

“How do you know that, Henny Penny?”

“T sat in the oak and dreamt last night that if we don’t
go to Dovrefjeld the world will come to an end,” said the
hen.

““Oh, nonsense!” said the fox, ‘the world won’t come to an
end if you don’t get there. No, come home with me to my den;
that’s much better, for there it is cosy and comfortable.”

So they followed the fox home to his den, and when they came
there, the fox put so much wood on the fire that they all became
sleepy ; the duck and the gander settled in a corner, but the cock
and the hen perched on a pole. As soon as the gander and the
duck were asleep the fox seized the gander and put it on the fire
and roasted it. The hen thought she smelt something burning,
she jumped up to a higher perch and said half asleep:

“Faugh! How it stinks here!”

“Oh, nonsense,” said the fox, “it is only the smoke coming
down the chimney; go to sleep and shut your mouth.” So the
hen went to sleep. No sooner had the fox eaten the gander than
he seized the duck ; he took it and put it on the fire and roasted
it and then set about to eat it. The hen then woke up again and
flew up to a still higher perch.

“Faugh! Howit stinks here,” she said, and when she opened
her eyes and saw that the fox had eaten both the gander and the
duck, she flew up to the highest perch and settled there and
looked up through the chimney.



go THE HEN WHICH WENT TO DOVREFIJELD

“Just look at all the fine geese flying over there!” she said to
the fox.

Reynard ran out, thinking to find another fat roast. In the
meantime the hen woke up the cock and told him what had
happened to Gandy Pandy and Ducky Lucky.

So Cocky Locky and Henny Penny flew up through the
chimney, and if they hadn’t got to Dovrefjeld the world would
surely have come to an end!



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'32772' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHF' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
8448e76349b2393de065655ac01cca5e
5f6b75f4fd544b9682fd6574ed88df2259ae26e5
'2012-01-22T23:40:15-05:00'
describe
'3707100' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHG' 'sip-files00003.tif'
f6f45c13d24648c27645ae93c07b9714
bebae8af3b89624b86fb49da034738e4556c4390
'2012-01-22T23:39:13-05:00'
describe
'83' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHH' 'sip-files00003.txt'
533026e8d18b97a926591a918a138849
184a7da2acb907c8d2a160396d776356d56a11a2
'2012-01-22T23:42:03-05:00'
describe
'15001' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHI' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
491c2ec21dd2250aac0f02033c63cb9a
c5f450e2330fed52c3850a3610b770eb886853d2
'2012-01-22T23:38:03-05:00'
describe
'271865' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHJ' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
1e9b4de0dbd24a29c3eb9c061fadb833
c3f3222de080481c08130dcd5d517b31bb52e726
'2012-01-22T23:40:44-05:00'
describe
'24625' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHK' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
1dd96c2b55b2f66587984f0a32fb4b6b
5c2b99957a2ce4148acbdf0551f572389cfb5ef3
'2012-01-22T23:38:41-05:00'
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHL' 'sip-files00005.pro'
d3958ef5283598f398cd2128301d4260
c6346938471554ad5368b41351419a24c3213de0
'2012-01-22T23:41:09-05:00'
describe
'13334' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHM' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
c21428af75e5d75cbeed272d60a6cb8c
0828e49dcb2a5e980026addae34702b3f6770cbc
'2012-01-22T23:43:09-05:00'
describe
'3707520' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHN' 'sip-files00005.tif'
2d168de4b76f0a7df6aa1806a3998954
15434b1015f3e01a3b4f2bede629d6e7146247c3
describe
'57' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHO' 'sip-files00005.txt'
a92829918fc20c4dec7989aa7f58d279
16b6491f79f79a41281d16704be4e8e99b82cd0b
'2012-01-22T23:31:23-05:00'
describe
'10205' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHP' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
421dc47e53df180a580d0afa209cf1cb
0ff46d6c4003deec5f021e4bcef799f0ae04a0ad
'2012-01-22T23:37:32-05:00'
describe
'462309' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHQ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
088d99593b80bbed39608b3403434410
143c1b261fca9061aa0cf2d6f88d4b7865458533
'2012-01-22T23:39:21-05:00'
describe
'95768' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHR' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
8d5c9c2f7b67f2f1ac5c4ead5ef71362
5153f672b55975602faa295683ebb8c3c88fd850
'2012-01-22T23:44:02-05:00'
describe
'6638' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHS' 'sip-files00007.pro'
a7e19876d1759f454edc41664801b463
87f32c91df271e1f8da0386927580ef376c67f9a
'2012-01-22T23:41:27-05:00'
describe
'33484' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHT' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
c11ab2dd02fb5d8c3a468eec5ab20686
0f90c2461c130f87fdf98ff7fee079e287b0376c
'2012-01-22T23:37:35-05:00'
describe
'11106252' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHU' 'sip-files00007.tif'
6e07e895a5c13e100181241150fa8ebd
88d8bb4ea1ad4754b24fe38b5278effd0d5f2b31
'2012-01-22T23:41:21-05:00'
describe
'376' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHV' 'sip-files00007.txt'
f045b678baf6b91323be24afae1ab913
94d114fb20b41bd966e1549522cad30824fdc0bf
'2012-01-22T23:36:36-05:00'
describe
'17693' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHW' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
bcabc9fe77710c4fc67a6e5be1b64eb4
d96b70b4f2dad55a1729da67f7fcd18c98a1f263
'2012-01-22T23:29:45-05:00'
describe
'462315' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHX' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
e6928daee64f589bfdf13dc20c9a7928
9801b4e167019efb9b7f0fd1bd14628153b71dff
'2012-01-22T23:38:04-05:00'
describe
'25203' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHY' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
30dfb6c422456b9844b58dfa8c1b741b
d75724c47fc7e0a150f85aff8943b8641a1b2791
'2012-01-22T23:39:59-05:00'
describe
'1732' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALHZ' 'sip-files00008.pro'
8f5b2176f99e78ed9a75c6a4e5b86a9d
2286a5a8ab4d5deb26798db96c668ace9ba04ae6
'2012-01-22T23:32:19-05:00'
describe
'12008' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIA' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
04abe8c2b5b3c18b4293e9ff3ad524b2
b0f38be553aacc0ad93a3754fc8e779a4278e93e
'2012-01-22T23:33:39-05:00'
describe
'3707920' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIB' 'sip-files00008.tif'
9151b21d0556a03f8cbc8bfec4253bcb
a92e517bea0caeffc5a5215c1836d819ee452643
'2012-01-22T23:43:59-05:00'
describe
'201' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIC' 'sip-files00008.txt'
05e9c90139dfba3f30d8cd1becd17485
944ca031c157a505d503938ea2b2ca7eac7fab57
'2012-01-22T23:40:26-05:00'
describe
'9460' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALID' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
cedea1a23980162b556e87d4b3ba7cf9
fc0932f359b1ead92703f18f32ce308f2dd0cb6b
describe
'462433' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIE' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
6ec7b45a57ed4c6b90e2c66cd262a460
1e5a127096a9414dbbc0a1504f7b8cc32272ac40
'2012-01-22T23:41:06-05:00'
describe
'120569' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIF' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
6ddd20750cb45a9038065c80b5c6e985
b2fde167ef37851b93add9626ccf4358e2b56b06
describe
'30303' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIG' 'sip-files00009.pro'
2305e5ffbc48fd597454ab19f2065b1e
a039c7ffc4ffcc4a4b74a56ff28b201d5d9cf31a
'2012-01-22T23:39:44-05:00'
describe
'48137' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIH' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
19cce310ce53f757352b60026b4a42a4
7ad7df08059273f8cb7dbff5236f71c2df65a362
'2012-01-22T23:34:39-05:00'
describe
'3711660' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALII' 'sip-files00009.tif'
c806d26e44113929310972eacf1d9141
3ffa088868c745b1d098400053e0d21c97b4d317
'2012-01-22T23:37:59-05:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIJ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
0341cc6e16dcb9ff8f94ef823481dca1
4342bdf7839bcd34c4145dde9766833b399ff6bb
'2012-01-22T23:41:23-05:00'
describe
'20221' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIK' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
b669f42a96b5d411ee4546477731f14e
600cca12e47cbd112ffa020d8a6a3c3d33e80969
'2012-01-22T23:32:35-05:00'
describe
'462441' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIL' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
975f5446103bb8ad675de758a0f1c68e
6781c42aacfc1df0a022ea11403348e1aecbb31d
'2012-01-22T23:35:47-05:00'
describe
'77604' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIM' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
8086688b7a6b1c4a7746e3fe309c958f
654aa7f1ff75c8b59ac00f7649f668c116277475
'2012-01-22T23:40:24-05:00'
describe
'17418' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIN' 'sip-files00010.pro'
8810227f12e7d3463e814d4bd3b01e9e
789b94dbf01d1db56efb9c8999fb8ac89b820e6c
'2012-01-22T23:43:55-05:00'
describe
'31809' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIO' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
52f3905fa141a08496ddc848cc91c75c
e838adbd2311b0b77a25d5385912a58c1f7f7b77
'2012-01-22T23:43:30-05:00'
describe
'3710044' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIP' 'sip-files00010.tif'
b4a54514d20d8e2cd8f83900d18c743a
960980c47806d70c7acbdd471c9468711cd051b8
'2012-01-22T23:42:23-05:00'
describe
'754' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIQ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
c004857a5d9d58bd7414cd450579f851
a0a31f62ba9357a971cc4bd1ad85228cbbb0698f
'2012-01-22T23:42:57-05:00'
describe
'15523' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIR' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
94932bf5e3847aa5cbecdc24670d1c57
149286b07c2a9b629dbc3ea020a57de7cbd5563d
'2012-01-22T23:40:54-05:00'
describe
'462025' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIS' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
0c3e30a7a7ee7aa34a45822cc15c8ffa
5e034db48ab1bd1e1fb095d8d5707b0f43447afe
'2012-01-22T23:41:44-05:00'
describe
'101615' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIT' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
051aaa4a754a8aa0769c585cf6ecefa8
ad52bd92d24293fca3ef24837609693391d6c769
'2012-01-22T23:30:26-05:00'
describe
'33671' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIU' 'sip-files00011.pro'
27bab98172045c4a719f3d14cd722d2c
0c68f057df4e933dc4ae658fbf969f99e46181eb
'2012-01-22T23:30:03-05:00'
describe
'42143' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIV' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
75e942ed3643c073ee7148180c862369
dbbe59540b4887ba32f69bedd2d14d0d380550c3
'2012-01-22T23:42:09-05:00'
describe
'3708776' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIW' 'sip-files00011.tif'
e070f16ea55ec33757a3274325838da6
419dc0ebdd9a52ba026ad2dd73e84dcf235c66bf
'2012-01-22T23:38:58-05:00'
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIX' 'sip-files00011.txt'
3011813c5095821a0edeb6e65543ece0
f1007c102e166c77ebac53890f826801c7b6b47e
'2012-01-22T23:39:03-05:00'
describe
'19252' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIY' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
a3976b379d95b3b50596c1bf7a6b1bd9
9c01b45947b9373915d1a26d7fa8c636db74ccf1
'2012-01-22T23:40:07-05:00'
describe
'462435' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALIZ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
67ba7944c00f1b0992793770342d1775
70d24d69bcc4dca48087367f7a2e0d6497205fab
'2012-01-22T23:37:56-05:00'
describe
'68651' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJA' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
7405c7128054032960b5f9eabe5f02c4
209864f79758a3240630f4af31d2aa5a6a51a3ff
'2012-01-22T23:42:35-05:00'
describe
'27617' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJB' 'sip-files00012.pro'
99786fecad087025400bb2f7d0cded94
cbe9af4afd972fb690d752dc29649319b4bb297c
'2012-01-22T23:42:15-05:00'
describe
'28980' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJC' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
17dac773008ff665bc3413af49873fe2
572abed2d5c9b1197be87a9085f6cf890b415233
'2012-01-22T23:38:13-05:00'
describe
'3709748' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJD' 'sip-files00012.tif'
5412be103691859ac4b78a36c43bff48
f807df350ffa08be987b7a24bfa4bd83d6213bee
'2012-01-22T23:40:38-05:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJE' 'sip-files00012.txt'
c7d390b33c1649b61f2321437036370b
7bb259f3805fceef0abaa37189cb145830f33db0
'2012-01-22T23:36:47-05:00'
describe
'14898' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJF' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
a3b8fb949b7ad3c48b343150898e81da
d6f85c51fcdb007f8614ea89a624a6dff6005a64
'2012-01-22T23:35:26-05:00'
describe
'462645' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJG' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
f75d917520ad05f446d668cf1f313f83
40bda5e4b906fb48c8411e4562eb292c5069b9a4
'2012-01-22T23:41:20-05:00'
describe
'181312' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJH' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
2323401a631b27d0238a730568d15131
3cd725538103f75771d2cf1601b272a6dda0feec
'2012-01-22T23:44:14-05:00'
describe
'9699' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJI' 'sip-files00013.pro'
d6d34a6a73222b3bbcfdf26502ed8736
3fb19b0eb2776055a358ae56f3bfbbf6c9f6fb97
'2012-01-22T23:33:15-05:00'
describe
'55606' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJJ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
cc4dadc3659eb6660baa81f53ac0a544
de5efd996389dd313fde0971d308341fa6394888
'2012-01-22T23:36:05-05:00'
describe
'3714376' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJK' 'sip-files00013.tif'
1e5c3321b5ba3c9b3c75ccc779cdef65
702f4cefccae47f1d8a8c9c711340819a25078ad
'2012-01-22T23:37:34-05:00'
describe
'431' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJL' 'sip-files00013.txt'
d81fa357ac88008bb1e7760eb3368943
266777905f0b0fe89fc7f0c7724bfb0cad202ae9
'2012-01-22T23:37:46-05:00'
describe
'23415' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJM' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
e94efa6d87a218972b5ac0f8e8d823af
41a589aa489410455492e418fc2706e1169c1ec1
'2012-01-22T23:42:04-05:00'
describe
'462436' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJN' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
dd3707e7fda906c96cef6215f34028b1
73aa43b7f622c8f0fc7c9b53254760c39b436a7f
'2012-01-22T23:41:36-05:00'
describe
'157548' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJO' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
bc1717f3632d7ec7eca901b37ea33c9b
eb4276c1e56cfb0414c6b43460f7eadac3ab5935
'2012-01-22T23:43:57-05:00'
describe
'48305' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJP' 'sip-files00014.pro'
a85f178cf07091da274926192f3f41e7
94c30a1e231ca71d4e68337b81998bc303d7b3de
'2012-01-22T23:42:46-05:00'
describe
'56595' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJQ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
bb30bfccf5cd6f824bdd5cd7e244089e
3465bfa9ada4f36945bdc4ab16c5a157956ffddb
'2012-01-22T23:39:49-05:00'
describe
'3712556' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJR' 'sip-files00014.tif'
c7441ed277e07c97e75e847b39b45080
e321621486af69e1c0a3ac40d1399bb57f387e00
'2012-01-22T23:40:40-05:00'
describe
'1951' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJS' 'sip-files00014.txt'
aad9c4d5f4119ca3c915bfd90d974510
67630f9b24faad5a476ee3ab1c9c2a0255b29113
describe
'23006' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJT' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
d91ca26d0c382a435305ae929e7bf727
9419988b3cb8b74501ebd582bc5ec2c1f58e876d
'2012-01-22T23:36:25-05:00'
describe
'462145' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJU' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
0546d0ea0d20394cd2c3227874c9036e
1a794930073a9ab07ab06a14a42aa87ca6d5d12e
'2012-01-22T23:38:26-05:00'
describe
'159083' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJV' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
347c1d341c5788cfa0f5bd215fcb53ff
e1876252515cff604d166023c0a26c42de9ce47a
describe
'49827' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJW' 'sip-files00015.pro'
4f380668dd9f69d132bed144957ce775
f2ac50972af07bd424b9cfcf51bd6ef2ad52c0a9
describe
'57666' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJX' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
872663e96fbdbbf6416234fa27a51ac2
c9bb62bbb706470a0956583aa90578b1e20cfbc1
'2012-01-22T23:35:52-05:00'
describe
'3710208' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJY' 'sip-files00015.tif'
525ee2e11f02e32bf64a59d93a44dc92
69ce7520363d864cd8d8c129803f2e77f6f519cc
'2012-01-22T23:36:24-05:00'
describe
'1989' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALJZ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
59f669969999cab7d58dca0d3ea7cf3d
618926463592cc193cd20313a38269144a9bcbcc
'2012-01-22T23:36:02-05:00'
describe
'23228' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKA' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
42ce107fe33bd5e495372a3d5149545b
599b474f7a6657295c4c0fd1e424d66deb80c424
'2012-01-22T23:39:07-05:00'
describe
'462167' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKB' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
b65430d5538b957086d7f18f67b560aa
ebde0ee2c8631288cdb515230c022fa3d54c3dc5
'2012-01-22T23:41:49-05:00'
describe
'170210' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKC' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
c05b01cd2581d06040171fc6192aa06f
8c56107bbcd1b26b086e996099ad2bb502dc8f4f
'2012-01-22T23:41:30-05:00'
describe
'52073' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKD' 'sip-files00016.pro'
63b4d62258d75215fb4a4c27ae98e94e
2dcaa349fda2ca9876bc12c0b94882e46f2b9648
'2012-01-22T23:36:26-05:00'
describe
'62000' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKE' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
1313cc4898c1bdae207f2db340bc3290
35da147655008a499229b171c55c0e78f24581a5
'2012-01-22T23:43:53-05:00'
describe
'3710492' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKF' 'sip-files00016.tif'
a09ea9572acc2834fa2cdbc3d6610511
60414b8db606b1dff9d57b2217bd5dc99b257619
'2012-01-22T23:38:34-05:00'
describe
'2156' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKG' 'sip-files00016.txt'
3c85734eb574320390b6b5c8cb419371
13e9ca4b58d94c49baab459c51b526a5f1485b76
'2012-01-22T23:37:02-05:00'
describe
'23632' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKH' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
b82216314abeb03d56fb2b294bc6efee
e326040e2f59e394a88bc313b14f608ff2024295
'2012-01-22T23:40:04-05:00'
describe
'344312' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKI' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
08813a2853145f0a5c2a60ea599f2dc0
454782534f2dbea296dd3052bd51c71eff3f4772
'2012-01-22T23:43:11-05:00'
describe
'138019' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKJ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
aada47fe76b8b0d49d0455cb7c010f36
fb6809f891068708172bf3f85c2f53870606aa0d
'2012-01-22T23:33:55-05:00'
describe
'3589' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKK' 'sip-files00017.pro'
aac8712e49a39603032b82991e9a85bd
55e2f942716b0458478f7565b2aeee0b45ef6616
'2012-01-22T23:37:51-05:00'
describe
'43694' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKL' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
b58486c7bf7e0fc9a394549626bbcc5b
7138dfe1704479e8324c73de0660cfbdd3a22126
'2012-01-22T23:36:29-05:00'
describe
'2770776' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKM' 'sip-files00017.tif'
dcfaa2bd3138147166b81d1a25c81307
0a17d1b8993baea75c3e5288ca333c4db50f0ca7
'2012-01-22T23:30:25-05:00'
describe
'173' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKN' 'sip-files00017.txt'
cd9d2d9030d3ad4929d4789c29dd969b
228b111bbd1f1f1b1fd2f060939fbfbb53ebcdca
'2012-01-22T23:44:07-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'22237' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKO' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
ea7e47f362bc86e0e4e30ce4664f6441
ad94024b7b2d0effc52eba215a9ae8be755da4ed
'2012-01-22T23:40:58-05:00'
describe
'5085' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKP' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
51b73361a7ac6e00c01a351bf6361b06
462473366357b36dc96c062eb7a496c74fc70766
'2012-01-22T23:39:23-05:00'
describe
'11162' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKQ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
f59153cb11b76a62e1b3d710ea42b95d
988423298c19c0fa43fdfab68526b718a4c5177b
'2012-01-22T23:42:34-05:00'
describe
'9290' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKR' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
1b161a6a5758c4fe3a1bb7fbf4f386a1
31083025b93be5368ae4018aa132184c1534fae9
'2012-01-22T23:34:24-05:00'
describe
'3705388' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKS' 'sip-files00018.tif'
b8a8e81029cd7a5c41751851666992c7
436a5346ab755f7eff10ee93cea5bf0181840b17
describe
'8776' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKT' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
75f7599a29437f227e18c64c8fce945b
a036ec4058743569d833acdeedd65dd3a1d0fe27
'2012-01-22T23:39:58-05:00'
describe
'462170' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKU' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
8162c8f5008f44a45f24aa82c3d40e36
60b01cc0c4b8fdc10f5a47adc068f63773b44ebc
describe
'149557' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKV' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
a697c5bb1d434f8bb9c786eaa740e208
f8bf8c1e33c38faa2ff92797a3ca06d8db2f7d09
describe
'45226' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKW' 'sip-files00019.pro'
72cdbaf216f3c893f74e03536a2063f5
19ba1b9f89cdff1be48d0ca2dd2d3de279705ccb
'2012-01-22T23:32:16-05:00'
describe
'53017' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKX' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
c7c62ad82203312affbaeaebd702f4a0
9c91c0804db33bb4d815a2da82da233d499884ec
describe
'3709548' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKY' 'sip-files00019.tif'
60b4bbf3535e3002334c91b0f0ab2393
ceae98910294a632a4a15d075537c2114a5f3689
'2012-01-22T23:44:05-05:00'
describe
'1782' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
0a782ba57e6f28727648078684ba16c6
37b7f258efe760f564b21e44b8f40046b7b4351e
'2012-01-22T23:42:13-05:00'
describe
'21256' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLA' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
5f83f723caeb3bbe98ef3f47c548489a
1ba21373bf0c250ba02fa41e8ca1eab5b5a1ba25
'2012-01-22T23:36:03-05:00'
describe
'462281' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLB' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
fa7c40cad32002dbb86759ad2e432413
dfb64a48dcac0286fcce681e47d47de46eacd68d
'2012-01-22T23:40:53-05:00'
describe
'197037' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLC' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
5cfb19ecbda26b01c0f92f4fefa3e037
89befea2c4fa927a265457da99fb24b460094c46
'2012-01-22T23:41:02-05:00'
describe
'17087' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLD' 'sip-files00020.pro'
dcdf06b8eae9219002b988f2bf92cb0b
f37d15d227a389cbf952d5a94058b3c820c22d33
'2012-01-22T23:39:01-05:00'
describe
'54697' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLE' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
d49ed3851e5236e097bc136b9778f4f5
37830f5c06f6213f5077cbbe2d35c7ea0714c4d7
'2012-01-22T23:42:45-05:00'
describe
'3711992' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLF' 'sip-files00020.tif'
1c9f27ee7bcc4867170838e3e8472bcd
06e28d5be86f737784019c5730b9c0b75502ef70
'2012-01-22T23:38:05-05:00'
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLG' 'sip-files00020.txt'
0f0fa884e0ae093cdf645aa5f834f492
3925e76105c2693c85d15a9a1cb4bbc951e2d8a6
describe
'21534' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLH' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
38bec68950edb78032c4c7e9b0dc3e5f
e0491b30583dce794aee36d907007f70b965edb8
'2012-01-22T23:42:16-05:00'
describe
'462138' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLI' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
79c530cb8cd8c85a18e890267122706e
cf22973af971eed54ff26ee5a3ff2c3169c39bf7
'2012-01-22T23:31:03-05:00'
describe
'173823' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
9bc47fc4a1a86f5569f7034697f57953
a17a4042a3f9fdc97cb554b1b6d4de0bc62a833e
describe
'52403' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLK' 'sip-files00021.pro'
7a60c8d7862dbbccdcff069cf2051b1b
65925101a71b45030571a963c50e11835aa9b292
describe
'61072' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLL' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
3781dcfccb651ac55845a1906a9203d7
6ed02f7156529b0c88bb7ff5d62fdc33ecd01303
'2012-01-22T23:41:50-05:00'
describe
'3710152' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLM' 'sip-files00021.tif'
c382a381cca6571dcbe5bf10e463d868
58cdc123b642eb705564c11551f101ba199cf9d8
'2012-01-22T23:31:59-05:00'
describe
'2124' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLN' 'sip-files00021.txt'
ac4c9708d4856f4b740a27ea4b7e977e
144c4ea18caef6a0dd50e184f6eec73f81612914
describe
'23125' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLO' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
92fdd9474245563adaf459061fcdf6c3
6287bffddd43239bef8638e96da501e0c8a2ab3e
'2012-01-22T23:37:57-05:00'
describe
'462471' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLP' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
cab9f40f11f2cee3b3e84ba2577f8f51
0e706096adebaff77b1f38b7197716ea75d24066
'2012-01-22T23:42:37-05:00'
describe
'167186' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLQ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
9034eaa9150203bc3bec451d80b10cfa
d20597853166cc2c307dcd10b4946ae3cf907f25
'2012-01-22T23:38:24-05:00'
describe
'51427' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLR' 'sip-files00022.pro'
242b3ce6c9a3ad3fbebcbb222106aba5
df3142ccd6348105ba1a07d8ccf4d0e3099d4f4f
'2012-01-22T23:43:51-05:00'
describe
'60533' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLS' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
5888a753ce11ba86964a02dac71312ad
55fb764e4844e39f90995b4b01b98e93bcea3adc
'2012-01-22T23:38:10-05:00'
describe
'3712896' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLT' 'sip-files00022.tif'
7b365c02fc18d70f1af0b18e5554208e
4df9cde493a1baf575cc2be92f2c434c999e0a80
describe
'2072' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLU' 'sip-files00022.txt'
22f19cc2e8159ff4933a708b9e8d7b6a
82d639850584828f5aef5ab8f0c24be6f67fba3c
'2012-01-22T23:41:41-05:00'
describe
'23740' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLV' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
bc3bdd53abed15dc15657a06eca39ae8
4458e28c4f339733b2a9731e388454e7ca91f932
'2012-01-22T23:36:22-05:00'
describe
'462172' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLW' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
e609424a20432d319e79e08ccbbe1c9f
cdffc9cb99aa67ccd6a2e3d8d8115d4e3c08a6f7
'2012-01-22T23:39:57-05:00'
describe
'165766' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLX' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
f96deb993335e6200df94f6d5c5ca6ff
c74275ea4d78bb8fe76607b9faf4af563dedf3b7
'2012-01-22T23:43:22-05:00'
describe
'48728' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLY' 'sip-files00023.pro'
7513891f0f16a541b3a54b9c8d6d6955
70e72a38a174c5d602fc14eb4ac08265ef111cca
describe
'60926' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALLZ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
bf81e1d4b4dc25a9a6f6a23530344ea5
205bdf10c6478dee5c9ff7e761e2122677f3a960
'2012-01-22T23:29:52-05:00'
describe
'3710536' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMA' 'sip-files00023.tif'
120ed191744fd0bb619bd5036c8f2639
80bd771f35e0cc8a370326b5f5ec893107f1280c
'2012-01-22T23:41:03-05:00'
describe
'2034' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMB' 'sip-files00023.txt'
17da2ac1801a03f57145e5b8fec08361
8267495ca1d14d3086c5e3a6684ac885823e304a
'2012-01-22T23:42:27-05:00'
describe
'23477' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMC' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
760eb155f7b11e8f827517d6bdbffd42
f16148c44c5057e687b2417f7050367b62502b5f
'2012-01-22T23:39:37-05:00'
describe
'462467' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMD' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
294328d9757c6251206d2f664c4ce6a3
22f8276f43adc9a50d1bb3133f87e77dbd3cdaae
'2012-01-22T23:40:56-05:00'
describe
'164017' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALME' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
34eb10e421b353a3bbdb3bc780afd0e1
2f161383b7192ce78649b25c1466806067f192fe
'2012-01-22T23:29:51-05:00'
describe
'50113' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMF' 'sip-files00024.pro'
3ebd2dc775c7c73bf241cab861eaf00b
93a8708b020edae117f794e1e6f809cb388134a8
'2012-01-22T23:35:43-05:00'
describe
'59296' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMG' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
71dfd63495c57e602af1394f7a559c53
221feecffc0a3013b13ca8d10f513a4d881ce185
'2012-01-22T23:33:07-05:00'
describe
'3712828' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMH' 'sip-files00024.tif'
191d7268f63c95f26839bd3e30ae0c77
5babfc58af5acb60134ff2469bf623ac857b8e62
'2012-01-22T23:39:02-05:00'
describe
'2011' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMI' 'sip-files00024.txt'
bc1aa47a678a879621efd707e6a0e290
373dfb8c7e6f8a5075b909c05c405e1d372cb691
'2012-01-22T23:40:13-05:00'
describe
'23283' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMJ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
90b0adf22f0a41a9dd5cb81ceb4b00fb
cdeeaee7e2bbe695144cd76665f95d437c93fc41
'2012-01-22T23:39:05-05:00'
describe
'462472' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMK' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a66c7fe7916fd8d93c410e71b3acf843
40e5281b158417e410e2c41f406ae859f102998e
'2012-01-22T23:42:26-05:00'
describe
'155709' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALML' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
143146df17a67b3d2b12467dba79507f
8f713f1b0b85b9dbe806c0be15e861f9fbd272dd
'2012-01-22T23:30:43-05:00'
describe
'47213' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMM' 'sip-files00025.pro'
b76273ad60f7627d44548ce4bc76a5c5
a1489f33d9a8e45daef51533e03d32893648b625
'2012-01-22T23:37:16-05:00'
describe
'57513' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMN' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
18a0f76769466c52cad23a0f0582b71b
7a93a39bfd6951664cd6acb373312d420e120a21
'2012-01-22T23:41:07-05:00'
describe
'3712656' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMO' 'sip-files00025.tif'
a7da98744f51515cadc108c1d6e07b07
b8fa9e0b97332af7c557c1eeddd1e31b1e629a95
'2012-01-22T23:36:46-05:00'
describe
'1918' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMP' 'sip-files00025.txt'
ead46ff1f8a03f74ac798e85d084ea4c
0ddf354610183bfbd1d3bc56b11cd00d7445cbcf
'2012-01-22T23:35:44-05:00'
describe
'22801' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMQ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
431bf7cb13f18c5dac236fd6fe5cabbe
546f62922bc3bc95015278f8204c9728d001d94b
'2012-01-22T23:39:47-05:00'
describe
'462181' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMR' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
301c8b0b03b742efaab445f1489333a2
3cd06a73adc83877fce3a0d75b41b62875b53dff
'2012-01-22T23:32:55-05:00'
describe
'166992' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMS' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
25101aced903f7bde5630c6acd3c07a1
c444105ba7a672c4dcbad95eb6fb44ce089ebaff
'2012-01-22T23:43:03-05:00'
describe
'49033' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMT' 'sip-files00026.pro'
a8386c785b7c3f457576f5ce541354f7
1677968e408d9cbd6f45cffb89b060b88263c37c
'2012-01-22T23:39:12-05:00'
describe
'60360' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMU' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
c64922d861524dea429cecf3926b9c13
bd8fda0f7065ab540953223b21e374734158923b
describe
'3710572' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMV' 'sip-files00026.tif'
81862c263c53a5f398d5077f4e3c04ee
80541ac9918ad58b0e64a8f855996472862ff304
describe
'2025' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMW' 'sip-files00026.txt'
adefcf5bcd9f7114c9bf90bca257430a
168574ac179c38c451d6040944bfcca6da6b403c
'2012-01-22T23:42:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMX' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
98be8fa319384afcaf50186330453db8
1156da3cba3ba0500361d3f43dd78dfda1aabe83
'2012-01-22T23:35:48-05:00'
describe
'462236' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMY' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
104400a65db5a8ccf96f7ff7976624a0
d22cfa0f187b345f8b5470d645b177d7288ca18c
'2012-01-22T23:38:09-05:00'
describe
'238577' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALMZ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
79bffb6e809a5b6b849de20c142f05b7
32f6e818ada94d580d723ad34776471ea205a5bc
describe
'2108' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNA' 'sip-files00027.pro'
05018042f8745de96bbbd5d0a049fe91
53bd85c82cee6dc0db2ba7ff4e1e9ecd8afc4799
'2012-01-22T23:42:05-05:00'
describe
'59420' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNB' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
cb7dce322acd7a2a6ea9eca78480f23e
7362110b48da1ffd67fc82d726b8f3a6fc8d1dde
describe
'3712568' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNC' 'sip-files00027.tif'
c769c4c149b60776b5afe58bc70398f8
9805770eede6b44b3874a23e4213007e8692d293
describe
'255' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALND' 'sip-files00027.txt'
1ec66c0abeb958291214dc8211275931
b1d0aad3e5d987d5f6b156ab0d4612d5acdaa153
'2012-01-22T23:39:38-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'23092' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNE' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
eb3443f9b12f3a8e11267245a8d9a2f2
adc261ce6a7733fe50a7a3ff56a9eadd269437b9
'2012-01-22T23:37:31-05:00'
describe
'5003' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNF' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
776069818f2d8f9936186fedc736617d
e0b0c6147e888c475bf862513e5a9daa3c6b8371
'2012-01-22T23:37:25-05:00'
describe
'11105' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNG' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
070caefff0972957b8788ff72f5921b5
ee361ab3b889231b42e6b6bd7e81ddf0354740cb
describe
'9273' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNH' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
fbd6d2992c792d58e115289cbe87c64c
563a6486e18dbfee4d51b8e0dd77fcbcb248981c
'2012-01-22T23:39:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNI' 'sip-files00028.tif'
33462a93fe0d94e04ccd36925ac21cad
98a92a77159f6d2018b86caa6e2d24c53128f4e1
'2012-01-22T23:41:48-05:00'
describe
'8772' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNJ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
a6c10cbc27bada2fbd4fd627faa029f8
9ca91d60234d5ecf821f108362068b762ef83099
'2012-01-22T23:35:03-05:00'
describe
'462465' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNK' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
ef03b34a4008deb5faf048c8e8ee889c
b820abe2e1a8b4ab54073db016b498dac61f2f8a
describe
'167926' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNL' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
2b0c59f9ed88b4a17b5b092a6aa5605e
c11a9ebfb2f46bfffba36af8669727092915e99d
'2012-01-22T23:39:56-05:00'
describe
'51535' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNM' 'sip-files00029.pro'
5244914662c737f373950179f2b0f65b
cc7660081978830ca7d3cc2864d43b0267ba52c1
'2012-01-22T23:40:42-05:00'
describe
'59593' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNN' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
6b8fe384a4107aad2e54f44e0dc5e765
cb6ed6790d0a9416790435088ddee51da9a740ab
describe
'3712744' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNO' 'sip-files00029.tif'
6cea35706226dd7fb2d81b7edb4636a1
e621e4dbd669ee1f75acb3dd832c958597d0245e
'2012-01-22T23:38:07-05:00'
describe
'2060' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNP' 'sip-files00029.txt'
0f48e88701ab82820b99e58f81ff20f7
b1e1185d895c0505f7d788b9685658cbf3e1d6dd
'2012-01-22T23:41:59-05:00'
describe
'23260' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNQ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
6fb8678e01fa35a375b70740047bd17b
2c58313a7644b176dc764bcfb08c7529c18ae924
'2012-01-22T23:34:47-05:00'
describe
'462669' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNR' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
e5a507d919512aa56a15d0e0f8ff5eb5
2b20d8a812f4d8846391c2e02f5b6dce9664682c
describe
'125170' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNS' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
821bdbe6e0fd8baa6b93b4d6b90942c8
8a82a81d4a04fddcb566915d029ddf2bccdac41f
describe
'14861' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNT' 'sip-files00030.pro'
ff7f91e8ed05bf4fc93fb9075bd1c62c
69b92d4057c21889c40b6dea1b09e8316e35fe50
'2012-01-22T23:42:41-05:00'
describe
'41269' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNU' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
53411b878a0632589c20456bf66f7e8d
309552e32f9d143325366404354a1eb2d5722ff0
'2012-01-22T23:37:43-05:00'
describe
'3712904' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNV' 'sip-files00030.tif'
88e82ccd203d0fa0eb5c9a503c32a895
322a9aac919cad14034646e4b1058f279ad24ff0
'2012-01-22T23:40:20-05:00'
describe
'702' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNW' 'sip-files00030.txt'
01e7d2391c81e7baccbd938c9d16cce8
d9da8479f2b7d4eb4087fb960228c5d701a942ce
'2012-01-22T23:38:28-05:00'
describe
'19346' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNX' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
be1dfd90cbd62a1a2ea49b4d762a8534
43866741e175ad8fa5c890363048d2b460ef4f2a
'2012-01-22T23:43:24-05:00'
describe
'295294' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNY' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
8bda46873a5b02f8ce9bbc5b248dfc02
72f67269213314c37c2005be8e2b2e8845ecd9c1
'2012-01-22T23:39:18-05:00'
describe
'36592' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALNZ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
3e2da668cb74d7f944f82077f5260162
d2c2b8d10b4c90bc882aaafc36b49aae952c9600
'2012-01-22T23:40:36-05:00'
describe
'6825' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOA' 'sip-files00031.pro'
17066f0fdfd5e0ba4be13c267266c33a
c3e0c4f798ae512a5d769258daa7db76714c22be
'2012-01-22T23:39:11-05:00'
describe
'17819' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOB' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
2d3a2a4fb56854c6d52b7725a9f3e77b
262d4d1a5d5e5c02ddbdd676bfe8aa1423e9e1de
'2012-01-22T23:39:40-05:00'
describe
'3706224' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOC' 'sip-files00031.tif'
6243ef58b4ea998bd3a2681c7f4deab8
9cdded1009378662de9f9635aaf660595745969d
'2012-01-22T23:42:52-05:00'
describe
'320' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOD' 'sip-files00031.txt'
a1ff13ecb554bbbff28a21bc06e6bca4
a692e2f64997536be5d306c568011792c3114444
'2012-01-22T23:35:30-05:00'
describe
'11314' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOE' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
fabc5f6fcda18877575062c4f4d225e8
5da65dee444eaa5f033cfe0ac830fe262293ce6a
'2012-01-22T23:37:52-05:00'
describe
'462608' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOF' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
3d2de4ec758e3ced3b864cd67481cc7a
60af6301ca88969154982d5e5cde681589d6fb2f
'2012-01-22T23:36:30-05:00'
describe
'178785' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOG' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
d15ba89930dccaec2714776615905c31
26dabd447be7dfcba2d7b63e78df34f864b4048b
describe
'16331' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOH' 'sip-files00032.pro'
70ea3e956876b0ad7112c51160f4919a
c691cb64988d925399cacf3296449e13d881424a
'2012-01-22T23:33:35-05:00'
describe
'55107' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOI' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
ea77cc4fe3b1787c51c9061455e4fba7
2e0db5defdc89c692d1dcb366e84e2127c285e4d
'2012-01-22T23:36:45-05:00'
describe
'3714232' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOJ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
af01e318fb8d1ed7756de31c99df6c9f
1b22b44c29121ef2dec73fa37d1822117d748b60
'2012-01-22T23:33:09-05:00'
describe
'691' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOK' 'sip-files00032.txt'
e84fc76589df15d75fb735c36d6159ac
8e1440eb13590b18c0034ff380ac857456328539
'2012-01-22T23:39:20-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'22821' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOL' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
7ec5df16ae031ebd136324e3c3804cb2
0df8bb689bc04841fed87df6507bd33cfd9b992c
'2012-01-22T23:30:47-05:00'
describe
'462636' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOM' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
0728e4fdf620f479674cdf0b93956e37
a25f324474857849b97ad8e4292cf7ea996aa49f
describe
'130888' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALON' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
b4023531418cda26a10556d7d80851e6
8f5f468cd9c2f5c7a27a7d8d12a236066f055f5d
'2012-01-22T23:35:06-05:00'
describe
'32472' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOO' 'sip-files00033.pro'
c192f1f953564dff4a7ec4275349c86c
47a7ea8ce36badb43fd73f180f553cefc6c9cf5d
'2012-01-22T23:41:38-05:00'
describe
'48519' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOP' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
96ba2bf8b62283995345598ed0cac2ec
c97cb47c2b1b249d72f0689c3d390597ee67ad46
describe
'3713392' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOQ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
a43203e21d138c698276622645c47d70
6c9a37c70f680d4821b7a6ad35e5b18630682d88
'2012-01-22T23:40:25-05:00'
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOR' 'sip-files00033.txt'
0669ea720e15240da7e6e870dc5ce0c6
7761e542be0e9bb7d7679d84a966f978850fa621
'2012-01-22T23:39:41-05:00'
describe
'20756' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOS' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
1d9547607ca6763d964d8c5a5ab87750
ae270c6751b3159833d082c0188c1fe440e8a071
describe
'462394' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOT' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
988f713f1cd502a47cd1250131d69803
55922a2dd80f2128fde0829c432630250a10f2a5
'2012-01-22T23:33:20-05:00'
describe
'118772' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOU' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
63afd65a48c996cb4cb06496606a9fa4
067c59e9709990812a53113ffe7448b439a45622
'2012-01-22T23:35:46-05:00'
describe
'34638' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOV' 'sip-files00034.pro'
03c072826e2ac327eafa7fa6d122a246
3300d5061324748644257546ad5835d2177a02ef
'2012-01-22T23:36:32-05:00'
describe
'46718' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOW' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a971d26afe4e961535941502a856a11a
bef765bc5ea1f1d8172250eb3816f3573ab443a5
'2012-01-22T23:30:58-05:00'
describe
'3711528' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOX' 'sip-files00034.tif'
de0c40de8fe7a09896bfcc0e71c69c84
37385f58fbe9bedd252f5a2e8bff6bf4547ffdf0
'2012-01-22T23:35:05-05:00'
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOY' 'sip-files00034.txt'
9d9f63af2f67a19bb90d5f331d73c242
8345fc0e2ecbd4effc52010f3bdaa9ea436ec1a1
'2012-01-22T23:35:49-05:00'
describe
'19541' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
126408cefbc0ee3cca7e0af2a0f6ea74
45a38d8fd4b2e63339384db398e58f1b58012be1
describe
'336230' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPA' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
2451979d31bfa778781ef3aed9747eea
ff87f3ef3117e3e5d1228147fd157d2bbfc907ba
describe
'281898' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPB' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
0242912e3517ce0066506c483aa80cf1
ebc7d69ce1c513df52e8bba227b8b751e4bc7fdc
'2012-01-22T23:32:20-05:00'
describe
'3235' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPC' 'sip-files00035.pro'
fd4fd092a58bcb57084e46b3b58a7a7c
37f79488e6067efb98ac367ac4a9749dffcbf9d2
'2012-01-22T23:41:34-05:00'
describe
'78951' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPD' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
7d1c88d0e765c4b46734a9efd98a15c1
a95fb0328f582f20cf6637e6d9f4f92e866f548b
'2012-01-22T23:41:46-05:00'
describe
'2706152' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPE' 'sip-files00035.tif'
9a90f635515d8b90ab16dc8bff48b5ea
7acc876b8c92e7192468364505f04a7f32f8909a
describe
'260' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPF' 'sip-files00035.txt'
e74224bfb4b9c7838c8ddde83441209d
c9fcc46a0f26cf0679a0a21bfd781efd22ea3425
'2012-01-22T23:40:33-05:00'
describe
'30160' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPG' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
abaf95d40b5204cc4a4792f17c4e5bc4
5cbd93df409f5cdca0a5ea43f3c41ee1adb6a41b
'2012-01-22T23:42:55-05:00'
describe
'4106' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPH' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
1eb13a146ff08fb810b0dabfbaa091bd
b89e8796d484e865fcba0dbac625b4c94a3415e5
describe
'11054' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPI' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
2120a9a76d4d03b08bc413c4856b6c31
9c771b38a728d113a95fa2df261427225e12d3e2
describe
'9267' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
92a09403490197397b2a78026ec24405
523d4ce8a0638a5a410deec0340ca77fd1f39e73
'2012-01-22T23:37:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPK' 'sip-files00036.tif'
e44a8b01cfd7bb4971d0045812f793c0
ddd73a4de844ecd57cd6e10a5dde1dd08ab8db84
'2012-01-22T23:41:15-05:00'
describe
'8779' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
07363a198f5e5bf5122f87c03f999de8
56d115f0717b0aa997fdd389c6ace8fd8d96b7b3
'2012-01-22T23:41:08-05:00'
describe
'462082' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPM' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
a91c01db3ddab16d89e63512fffdc46d
20af20a5d5cffebc0b9f35a3b825d1bb7e265ca5
'2012-01-22T23:37:18-05:00'
describe
'163485' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPN' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
191a099e0c9fb0d1e3dd3e0303919965
691184ad3dd53648ff9a92049ae577c9dae6a12c
'2012-01-22T23:43:41-05:00'
describe
'48441' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPO' 'sip-files00037.pro'
d8fe67c499eac7762be33c0b49d2d77a
ccbfca7282a0b5fea6f7b1d71696c395cbbb4788
'2012-01-22T23:39:31-05:00'
describe
'58571' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPP' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
4c1480039a45ddbf88e7525dfdb91f4f
caec66a740bfdf83f21c2379f642a6469ed7607a
describe
'3710392' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
995bf28c954f976ff29c3fbc802c8802
3a12c5818361f4e265b6649045e8454ee065458c
'2012-01-22T23:39:34-05:00'
describe
'1969' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPR' 'sip-files00037.txt'
5122db98b8b06bace8b84f4c7ec6b579
171d6d03f7fa1f224636f24e7b8349265decdf62
'2012-01-22T23:42:50-05:00'
describe
'23517' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPS' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1c443ef02553110c3fdb614dafc0b574
deb055290120bb2bfa2c94af3fee64b37901bfe7
'2012-01-22T23:43:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
1d6d3c7982d88ef8bf38031ce244b1bc
2c6253a960cab5e782f87ed2f3658e16eac13a12
'2012-01-22T23:38:56-05:00'
describe
'104957' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
b7b58f569eb307b262ca87944b58891d
13f2dfc8f37046b835a012ccfb3a7131cde553b9
'2012-01-22T23:39:27-05:00'
describe
'26469' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPV' 'sip-files00038.pro'
4d41116cfa3491b16352f2384dad901c
8b79aea80ef2f11c2da4f6bd176141ee467ca8c2
describe
'37847' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPW' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
6e44eb995abf0c89d5738b478f6f2621
ba78395ac86571f59415840cfd1eff24dd4bfa30
describe
'3708120' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPX' 'sip-files00038.tif'
fd8d8d6cffc144515db1902158602b06
8c78423f854da25006768e10c8a72bcdedb0d643
'2012-01-22T23:35:37-05:00'
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPY' 'sip-files00038.txt'
fc812bbaa0450740e61da5fac89ca605
ba5f6f6a53bb13c7e6ff45de71d5f7a315f61263
describe
'16937' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
94cf28b8bc86109599297067a5752f27
8994716aa2711b78b5e397a79662fbf3daf598e9
describe
'462457' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQA' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
347f804a96569b7c41203d7d5ba7d185
8a3c4c0d57e66c198cabac22ae060c0117ff15de
'2012-01-22T23:41:43-05:00'
describe
'198022' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQB' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
c5fff02c306bc70249eca8212f5be4f6
338c0132d9d1ae2e8235f9a6c75558f7ac649eda
describe
'14573' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQC' 'sip-files00039.pro'
dc8ac00f992176d33a2a721a14b6367e
a924839986548552ba2e85e42969bb2139cab0e4
describe
'56738' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQD' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
89288e74c4e1bfe84643b756791a95db
9859312003c8d801a67ecdc55abebfa6bb103c20
'2012-01-22T23:44:15-05:00'
describe
'3712300' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQE' 'sip-files00039.tif'
7dca8cfb6fc5277ec3d560cb61df15bb
eea14fbd49f165ce9a641e0ad89a61850458c863
describe
'599' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQF' 'sip-files00039.txt'
0016d6cf1149b5ba06311a800277e97b
429ce5a52d07abfd4d9621a27f09ff2e9e0b3170
describe
'22265' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQG' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
934a211c4acb3416d19dd1f15c5a58b4
632f19d305932c55c977a88e6b0c6644596016e8
describe
'462171' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQH' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
48174f966fe31a3c868f44a50361364f
c05397ec1380ac04f4d8ef033013cc662972028c
'2012-01-22T23:40:37-05:00'
describe
'161989' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQI' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
f4fe3691099a4d315de5a17be78c0d74
29d4ebed10aebd688eb2fbaf001832a7ca9cfa11
'2012-01-22T23:40:02-05:00'
describe
'47809' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00040.pro'
cc61fd435d78605bba3021746af38198
0ca2bd661c3fed41158eec495bf3863ce1d36a3c
'2012-01-22T23:39:42-05:00'
describe
'58485' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
69ecba99802d7ac67b1e7f883eb60428
5c607ac9f7f085fc6633efc0efd37ab923d320e6
'2012-01-22T23:39:26-05:00'
describe
'3710668' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQL' 'sip-files00040.tif'
7bf87a55f9eb156a732b414a55203b9d
f23d88a843806d5f9e1a770e937d9613c5eb192c
'2012-01-22T23:42:28-05:00'
describe
'1916' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQM' 'sip-files00040.txt'
01940ea32eccba9473ef743dbd205543
355bff5d4c331a99c73742d0b19a8b7dc75cea7c
'2012-01-22T23:43:01-05:00'
describe
'23659' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQN' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
2fb8f2954ea0d57d811f2fd9c83ab484
8846ed6714262a5d0715ee0debdff26e5e16a237
describe
'462464' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQO' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
a43dc9398234f759935cf9f6b32f2186
6deb71a32f427c2423c9ce873e7ab48c5c3ba0f3
describe
'178678' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQP' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
b517003cd0a375022bda936420465804
868cc35f98082715e5b621a68a1c614c4fec130e
describe
'54393' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
b91982b23bac617141ca57b700e834af
2d541317cd17ee8d913bd939c079db408155d3f7
'2012-01-22T23:40:50-05:00'
describe
'62923' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQR' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
d2a13ebdbd643d0affbb2109243e166b
5249a23bd957e5cb4422084ff37d344a4346f0b1
'2012-01-22T23:43:36-05:00'
describe
'3712984' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQS' 'sip-files00041.tif'
e57ce89d6996cf69fb9d84abddc21322
91cba88bc5ff4a74c2df402beab66bc8ba66bb00
'2012-01-22T23:36:38-05:00'
describe
'2260' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQT' 'sip-files00041.txt'
26a90487d7ab58628c159c12764e3d63
9e25a880b3ea41172b382dc024082397331e026f
describe
'23595' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQU' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
31510c6e00c01255c3358a26f7e552bb
07eb0bba673d00465dd1fafaf7e28cdfde8a67f3
'2012-01-22T23:38:00-05:00'
describe
'462153' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQV' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
cb0967560f062017902d164757f73426
1de68703ed9c70937393c8170fa8023e6d8bf3aa
'2012-01-22T23:35:20-05:00'
describe
'173849' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQW' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
629e7f3f849736f813394502f5a69c91
55e6ad73ba97fb220e977ab35a9e74eb8d50bb42
describe
'53314' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQX' 'sip-files00042.pro'
e0fccf61d3318e7686ba08d40bd10799
b490dfde3ec9ea0a3ccf0e85bb6ba6960ad2c81e
'2012-01-22T23:35:04-05:00'
describe
'62583' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQY' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
3a76c49504910afd022f2ae0e973e023
5d376cd83d181cee90b77b810300d379ae69cc27
'2012-01-22T23:40:17-05:00'
describe
'3710612' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALQZ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
98f10cd8c323c8e5f56962ad591be275
4f1da34dd1aaab2544053783e874bee8a90c2979
'2012-01-22T23:33:51-05:00'
describe
'2196' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRA' 'sip-files00042.txt'
714716dd0106e84e29cc204d1ec430f7
e534cbe630c56a096ac64dbf226ab95c09148b5e
describe
'23587' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRB' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
c1231862f49e7d680445872d4279f87d
a0373eb008f26baeb76ed587b823f972f1574c2f
'2012-01-22T23:40:49-05:00'
describe
'348190' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRC' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
418c9aff6874e2b3375a841e383e3e89
d0b577bf31feb9fcc21f020d7a0da79f70de2a3a
'2012-01-22T23:42:48-05:00'
describe
'114387' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRD' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
ee004f81111046480e5afea311943fc5
81999a94c0d7ba5c89d403773d7cd393a90a3540
describe
'4689' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRE' 'sip-files00043.pro'
84aea10bff6c78f7d5ce3f94c74a9bad
904c69790664864ead855931289a9c7dfcae42ac
describe
'38199' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRF' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
cb5b9028cf62871a145e338c3cd18266
5b68037feb168ed8cf6b13433022943c6204fede
describe
'2800388' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRG' 'sip-files00043.tif'
08c0f070d2d5a345bd968bd04c84a2ee
51bdb62825be7b53273d4469548c6d8bcff31caa
'2012-01-22T23:40:27-05:00'
describe
'525' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRH' 'sip-files00043.txt'
f87b8d24472b57d62ea2b1195139bccf
316bc83bdcf9b247bbb1b36bf77bc8b5d2196206
'2012-01-22T23:30:59-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'20494' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRI' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
d8ab285505630ccac621dd7c43116f11
3c004e2c7dc08af5062bf6143b7383ff0bae9b02
'2012-01-22T23:43:46-05:00'
describe
'4729' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRJ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
0d082502192916d6ca3db027eb9c3050
a515b3e522d3494891b94aea831a096d45d2fc4b
describe
'11109' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRK' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
92865be9b438a76e1047f013a7c96ccb
c21001f12f3e3a9d05a7daf2cdc6f7c35b16df4f
'2012-01-22T23:43:02-05:00'
describe
'9268' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRL' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
820191bc7df17535a338c9497f8bd577
d506ca1aacfa7051689bc146b108625de56d974f
'2012-01-22T23:43:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRM' 'sip-files00044.tif'
2db388e6e345e0005ca33f3cdd8de02b
2117952d9c7e2e0fe473b936aea1450a58457213
'2012-01-22T23:30:44-05:00'
describe
'8768' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRN' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
529bd8221b1f8f272cdfcc97d5b5b7fa
ba76b74f4c4f0f25be9999bf0449a99f0c74eed3
'2012-01-22T23:39:19-05:00'
describe
'462338' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRO' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
eb9993d273adb3ad3c4ad70a9b731807
17c06f6bd8c86e6f069e3a136ff953d9e6a00f58
'2012-01-22T23:32:32-05:00'
describe
'177016' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRP' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
c1f2d070dbdfe6c7dc3fd5dc72b0cf6b
dc09e6de41c939a23fd2e6158d7583be94b19249
'2012-01-22T23:31:13-05:00'
describe
'54790' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRQ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
b995e36eaf1d2607c51df3c41f1b9cc2
c1a2aa566c9bd02d3853bb2e8f4e126054e37559
'2012-01-22T23:36:43-05:00'
describe
'60664' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRR' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
4958535477c08c0e4e49d643e927f747
d7f7c44405ca7aa609c2627c230f56845024b638
describe
'3711772' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRS' 'sip-files00045.tif'
7609da1d54b688db437c8fec2d0cd5a5
dde8f6678d474d1f87563a2c9605f4efe7689df1
'2012-01-22T23:39:28-05:00'
describe
'2250' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRT' 'sip-files00045.txt'
781d937eb8ea5590c17343154e2259ba
4d738105c88296a14a4b40899a6f65eb4379dab7
'2012-01-22T23:35:50-05:00'
describe
'23196' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRU' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
f5cfe9a4f47a130ce4584ce118ee8b8b
8bcd422be3da83ce34abbbf57b439f20fceb45be
describe
'462149' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRV' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
c66ed8ce3ebf5b295b50a6a14e271f52
d7da8ab44cbf9ae41ab859e99bedf91ddeaea473
'2012-01-22T23:39:08-05:00'
describe
'123044' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
87e1ab629d767aa8007f425e428399ce
8ca894ee73ca732d58734a8a55e8fff907231304
'2012-01-22T23:36:44-05:00'
describe
'13650' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRX' 'sip-files00046.pro'
a2326ab1f3f10d3c91542a7384e43892
be40625a8c91755e8ff66c175db2f4313bc0eff7
describe
'38570' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRY' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
8123ff538baa6902c68e870602027690
d7675440c09c7ea2959580a12fe74a461d93d158
'2012-01-22T23:41:47-05:00'
describe
'3708304' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALRZ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
024577c3b940471e27f14f8eec0f3327
27c1cc180a25563ee4f71d376ad3fcead2860078
'2012-01-22T23:32:25-05:00'
describe
'621' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSA' 'sip-files00046.txt'
0333e2607814e90fd76223741fbebb9f
b904d4416af6a2ff78903c330164acdcebdbca32
'2012-01-22T23:39:54-05:00'
describe
'17339' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSB' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
4891cfc9d0916c0fb4540f5b78093f62
76aede6c34b6398f849e0c12f6c6cbce05310889
'2012-01-22T23:42:42-05:00'
describe
'462668' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSC' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
e0c3baf92bc875d7b5c7310d29584ca5
7732cdfd5484af5842a933c3b82433433baaa4c8
describe
'141093' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSD' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
414a15c58f65524b35f6277beed87e13
6993f8886824eeae4ae1473181984eb6d7b629a8
'2012-01-22T23:42:49-05:00'
describe
'44121' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSE' 'sip-files00047.pro'
39ea487a51fa211c2e2888723de5ec46
a504db4439c8a3255c2d9838f3ba1b1973d66da7
'2012-01-22T23:31:40-05:00'
describe
'52405' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSF' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
6c1038985dc09f66a1bfb4dd2273a926
4d40a47b0c0d5dd54536d9e063a8cf5b690a61f6
describe
'3713808' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSG' 'sip-files00047.tif'
8938ca87cc687565bfcf84d02e7eeaf1
dd7b388425a4b5f40a69c1a26abac1c30b87ebd6
'2012-01-22T23:38:50-05:00'
describe
'1799' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSH' 'sip-files00047.txt'
ef97d44b0ec58a424d727e3004b562bb
6af568eba93dc66379e9e4a26ba5f23fd974718c
describe
'22012' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSI' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
a2367dd0aa311385101a135cbc12234f
8d365c5b29eebbc6a53feb21ef14aaadb75cabcb
'2012-01-22T23:38:19-05:00'
describe
'462635' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSJ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
b14c4595cfd35345eaa3026bbd505b63
8b94b7522c85b8e0efc5191d9fb442d631c2461c
'2012-01-22T23:34:46-05:00'
describe
'153883' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSK' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
fadd22cf193497b8242274dd3d48a4d9
aef1c082019c548c2710a1dc3ad702c179c51a77
'2012-01-22T23:38:08-05:00'
describe
'47772' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSL' 'sip-files00048.pro'
8694e83d76013e967b2de87cb8961367
1630c8c32d7ed84f17459055e69f1a023ce26e56
'2012-01-22T23:38:01-05:00'
describe
'56479' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSM' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f39cb8cb7b9f31efa8447e340e45f2cb
149ae2a411989aa419ddc3c171aac7027429d419
'2012-01-22T23:38:57-05:00'
describe
'3714080' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSN' 'sip-files00048.tif'
fc7e756322d0028259efeff1eaa40747
17ce2d639d285bc3b2c20673bae5b2f6399db08f
'2012-01-22T23:34:37-05:00'
describe
'1965' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSO' 'sip-files00048.txt'
e7a1637c6e8fca6a1963ea2054d6bf48
b9050ec376e02dc6049e2bf2d679043fe65917a9
'2012-01-22T23:42:47-05:00'
describe
'22513' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSP' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
c8a7b0ec9d1dc98ec37a1ceae5c38068
01be131a54b6afebb784df682cc055d924b41d3c
describe
'462458' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSQ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
972dd2012a3661abcb916e81e9802b4e
5ac691011e812a5db64f3cf5992f52557abf2b16
'2012-01-22T23:40:51-05:00'
describe
'152357' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSR' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
bfce9ae1d95307121aac010f2df9241a
9dd3f0a463f16dabc9779a55718212eae172c439
describe
'48672' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSS' 'sip-files00049.pro'
c3ea58b447298ce4c2c8412bacf07415
cdc71b087640ca0be18ac63b108d9d9fc2b99f6b
'2012-01-22T23:43:12-05:00'
describe
'55933' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALST' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ee2fcd640918d38df53ff7788c9384c7
241ff9c1fbc24f394740bdb9e16e7198d4e06d43
describe
'3712244' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSU' 'sip-files00049.tif'
155f4e6f8b06c3c2ff51bdb21bcb2b2c
904ac411eafffb8c4c0d48c3fa9178f14cb014cf
'2012-01-22T23:38:06-05:00'
describe
'1959' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSV' 'sip-files00049.txt'
26d838fd7b9fa32a98595c57036bb1b2
c4f152d06ad1b2a6963df3e35f25ca1affb6b8dd
'2012-01-22T23:39:29-05:00'
describe
'22548' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSW' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
81240ad9ccf555e33cfebd10bd20d152
6a0d5e015da1970c96e625026db08b36e6cdfe70
'2012-01-22T23:43:40-05:00'
describe
'462621' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSX' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
edb60beb6082efce5836753534ea57bf
47cb879ed90a46dbe11ccb8944f46f36cc1e2aa2
'2012-01-22T23:36:31-05:00'
describe
'50341' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSY' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
8be857090103171d96936741d24801d5
202a3f43224fbedf058345e1b8547cb8009d16b2
'2012-01-22T23:37:24-05:00'
describe
'9346' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
684014a3761c91b6aef1d6659fd136af
0bb681917de64c060a43d870517071c5f6de5634
'2012-01-22T23:37:05-05:00'
describe
'20217' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTA' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
5dd4be16fb50cba0bfe6f89f9d517a47
0cbdc643c3c07ceefbe2c9c832f3826d431e78e4
'2012-01-22T23:42:10-05:00'
describe
'3710336' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTB' 'sip-files00050.tif'
da980cbf65697c8b24f22d41b00225e8
56dac2d939c52fca0f4501b1d8224ea6f1c22067
'2012-01-22T23:44:10-05:00'
describe
'385' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTC' 'sip-files00050.txt'
810cd8fe50ec29fb8c956be280dadc8a
ee4a084b297534afa10241b09b39f37e188e5c46
'2012-01-22T23:36:41-05:00'
describe
'12131' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTD' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
1cebcc6d5e9c0f8ec05277049af22d01
d21260e8cd0e0c3ec64b5f73daad0ec72f328752
'2012-01-22T23:36:21-05:00'
describe
'462180' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTE' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
4352529b2690294911f553a367de0d37
0918741cf8ca05da87259b7695c45273f9729291
'2012-01-22T23:44:17-05:00'
describe
'88774' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTF' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
8adec14439219e38163ca8a32215a02b
0c3b9af28bad006f3a60c92611bee02d0f4fcbdf
describe
'22922' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTG' 'sip-files00051.pro'
a36041c08f2305b5ae882b85a0ad2414
6e9127f811d51223d9469bd0f085f3ce8bd33bf6
describe
'34492' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTH' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
09d301d98e3ab24d2d23d039fe618541
ac4ad391cd03fe55ee993f6a90a49101a43074f8
describe
'3707956' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTI' 'sip-files00051.tif'
09e5e6215741bad4a9c999fa7706c63f
9579050cfb87a90b239744d2ffbf3c8ae2ed6507
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
81a31fa63c5497c40a2ee3c91948abcb
6b892cde8875a3d08d7842c0370cdb832e3e9811
'2012-01-22T23:39:04-05:00'
describe
'16698' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTK' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
10d8a49e29721b59a74a472ae844675c
75a6b7b8719e117f91bcfe192c763dfee98d412a
'2012-01-22T23:38:35-05:00'
describe
'462469' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTL' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
a3db7fdf596a94e328f7098cf2436d68
57267a4445584bb4d0b41d252dc12971049a4071
'2012-01-22T23:43:07-05:00'
describe
'153575' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTM' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
dda34e4409196257af850858a75badf8
a3eeb2319a6bb69635de041262ce17258e800dfd
describe
'46103' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTN' 'sip-files00052.pro'
785261d7e88acd52b3c3c977297f2199
05532ebb4681ea0d0246d62ce037e5791997e565
describe
'55623' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTO' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
63aa9e945b4d49eccd202b8f14d625d7
f9c8f9ec76c13dfc3b157f772f14e277f4440fad
describe
'3712592' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTP' 'sip-files00052.tif'
bcea80f2a086be5b2f7efe0f0e1fc3dc
8887b7e514cd169158a1b1fade59ead40987969a
'2012-01-22T23:44:00-05:00'
describe
'1857' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
0c84ab1d9d77e41841e65778b9b25c33
4e71086205ef03911204ca6a41cb01518efe3fca
describe
'22813' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTR' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
793f296b7b5442c19ea2cbb09bb1f4e6
325032ee1bc513bf5dedf004f5c2aae1152e987f
describe
'462417' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTS' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
702f198ad6278f013a7c584ec808b703
2a26d18db7777a500d7eb7e50812b9462227cbf9
'2012-01-22T23:31:35-05:00'
describe
'143423' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
3999cdb92d184625453f6c38fdfa6787
f6468f7a463047f12a86e713dba7bb749fe41635
describe
'3973' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTU' 'sip-files00053.pro'
851ed60c8e10ad32b89ac27082bfe829
2d3ef8cdadea1496e9826e5965d57a517f58ebdf
'2012-01-22T23:37:45-05:00'
describe
'41818' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTV' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
1fdbebd085172bfb1429ccddca737525
d5cc0294044362b60d40e8a8e4be09fda217bc6b
describe
'3711164' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
2da21da0a00b7db769e9a8eeea88d07a
f042695b847edd25bc4dd0fc444f9cd47a672d20
'2012-01-22T23:30:27-05:00'
describe
'196' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
976cf264178b65c7257c7c23635e587c
cd51e88bea7485882810fb68ef957a6bfd0e3987
'2012-01-22T23:39:24-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'18955' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTY' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
9d43171ce8f5773f1e6aedcb117fd5ac
cf734bdc9926b5ac58bd8facbcbfd62608b56126
'2012-01-22T23:42:40-05:00'
describe
'5674' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
d40a7425ad6f6d77ca9f1fc3dd471221
cdccd12634791c8a4ef75ac29f2a76994a4d9dcb
describe
'11121' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUA' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
9861b1ed5d39f12f768ba686b055cda8
f6e5e43c25dc9ec5ee02503bda1ecf88ce2d726c
'2012-01-22T23:31:09-05:00'
describe
'9257' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUB' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
bf8dfe65e970cee97771212b3c35a731
9adfbcb0b60b02b58b426463f8bc69186b821c8c
'2012-01-22T23:39:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUC' 'sip-files00054.tif'
73db47d6d0a03dd99d916f2bb2370a87
fc3ab409a378a92c62025595fe053dbf736327e0
'2012-01-22T23:38:38-05:00'
describe
'8770' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUD' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
a8161f2df1f3d981b24857d6d8e9dd4e
677ed45a3ff3a5e5d96ee492bc05cdcd59a16d7b
describe
'462391' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUE' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
828e10d1d69afc66a767ed202653d23b
9a95ce82988eaa832d3097c7a2e4efef960b32e1
'2012-01-22T23:39:22-05:00'
describe
'172983' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUF' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
50927cbd536b50afe1dd068ece168a9a
d7f8e83c881e53fee9f9b72bbf74d5569effe6f5
'2012-01-22T23:42:53-05:00'
describe
'24381' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUG' 'sip-files00055.pro'
2b38557be4408f206124d0767fb1f454
067c0d13eebbc733b521890b2d30a9e587206174
describe
'52314' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUH' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
d71ed08efac27ea56f578b63da562ae6
4993a2da8765d52e1141aeb3dab475d1aeaabf08
'2012-01-22T23:30:14-05:00'
describe
'3712180' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUI' 'sip-files00055.tif'
7ac5999062756694fb57e10a7637bb05
6d43a3a551dcbf33d014cb58e59e4b5ba4a81146
'2012-01-22T23:41:40-05:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
d3e3893c21b91af422d8b6a813ad8c44
a6e439e3fb01efd44fd2e755f3e7f253df7fab88
describe
'22018' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUK' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
976241071a322343a05252b203c01592
cb99680a129f6aaeeace4ee19ee3e546e0c3d616
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUL' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
d76fd11922bb7c37aeca183f2fe9e9be
460001e5943f7ea17cbe20bc200ee9ca3e708c9f
'2012-01-22T23:42:20-05:00'
describe
'116658' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUM' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
988a2671bd8f90a75b4868715580d3fc
5c14073e70f5798a073b7a0203907e956a1d9a9c
describe
'7279' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUN' 'sip-files00056.pro'
37f821b0f9f454dcf517f1d645bbb341
6d29db96b7ffaa06823241e6886b700d08ce38a6
describe
'35956' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUO' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
ef212e97752c76d8f7c2a0763588eaaf
40daa29e23f3caff9f1b9a95d81b68bcdd710df1
describe
'3710232' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUP' 'sip-files00056.tif'
27e65d86df564665635b35a55a290eab
5ba5a8dae91cb0486f843aadfc140e11e2aa5b9c
'2012-01-22T23:30:31-05:00'
describe
'306' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
4546aaa90985a5e5e54cae10f9d8ed5f
ef51230c8cb7826258da7e40fca4eb2cab0e3ae9
describe
'16437' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUR' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
546ff1ceb1ee5fc7657721c7e645e15b
195ba36a97333e995e3176ee34d42b08b75da5f0
describe
'462475' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUS' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
4f9c78d20f39316e25c10208d6817112
88f4aca3e408b0e0d4ae35b3996b5e8a8066720f
'2012-01-22T23:40:59-05:00'
describe
'127589' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUT' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
615f142b73fe5fa6ea6879d6dad8606e
966c5c128cfe1e8bb0c38159bd7ddbd6094aab0e
'2012-01-22T23:41:16-05:00'
describe
'20870' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUU' 'sip-files00057.pro'
e1f6aeaf2eb1919819dd2feb441eec21
373303c79c9f5b3ab7536fcb250b016af7da7cc2
describe
'42364' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUV' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
909306c17d2aa33b7cd69d779dd59b03
01d5c3b4f5b516c9a08a24e3dc6557d6d1348ae6
'2012-01-22T23:43:20-05:00'
describe
'3711428' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUW' 'sip-files00057.tif'
0c7ede6d865b25501546e5b52b6d48e9
d881039f120d28c431e4cb42e06e1f0d7a306fd8
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUX' 'sip-files00057.txt'
1efbac7222358ec2f7d5ddc2d1f4f3bf
c1ca182aaaa25c7cb89a158b6b387c37031816b9
'2012-01-22T23:30:20-05:00'
describe
'19454' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUY' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
651bb39c355e4ffb38c8a59dbb10c9bc
ea0a3ba3750df4d419131a2fe750b5b339b37d6e
'2012-01-22T23:38:45-05:00'
describe
'462634' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
4f22f981287a501e979f7a08de05f5f6
47b853caf37fc0a750b67ec73f2a27d1d37ab7f5
'2012-01-22T23:44:08-05:00'
describe
'79391' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVA' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
e74d7937566009aa00807d69397e8123
5692c37a0096b88afbb23e05aacf326de03e8bed
'2012-01-22T23:43:19-05:00'
describe
'18798' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVB' 'sip-files00058.pro'
72c696113d72478145a997c91748d251
3d80763cfb1e8a2e9dfab42e4711aa4d18aee4af
describe
'30011' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVC' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
db9f6541a0b6050ee0c29d99cd4ceaab
594d95794f63899cd6dc573014f48d67d9b30be9
'2012-01-22T23:42:08-05:00'
describe
'3711272' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVD' 'sip-files00058.tif'
42594a4d53c2a805494092f5dce145d9
54cd79787913bf0b956a30a64bde337810c7b5ff
'2012-01-22T23:43:50-05:00'
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVE' 'sip-files00058.txt'
db0d8d15a4f16f16ebc42ab232566768
c3aaa951c0897434cf6b71f5aafe25cd8d72328a
describe
'14767' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVF' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
142133f5e1ab4324562a5a1140510fb4
874acc7e844a40bbbaa01ceaf4df1139eaa33d1b
describe
'462140' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVG' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
6d742ae67b0dfe1e066f454288569297
e233eae3326e849cc417aec64edf8aaf8b793f5c
'2012-01-22T23:37:49-05:00'
describe
'107618' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVH' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
d078281509e1aee0a12a0e5576cfc7e2
38f93d5606ba3b430930db281129d88adad96a77
describe
'28984' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVI' 'sip-files00059.pro'
a334c4f75bdcc91750d63e9f015fcf03
dbf3f3eea04192a9d2ad0cd0fe04448e2c49d581
'2012-01-22T23:34:48-05:00'
describe
'40515' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
fba5f6ff88cd4436f7bad3d6e610246f
f2c69a31fd908ca28f1c33651fbb4cf91cae2db7
'2012-01-22T23:33:49-05:00'
describe
'3708652' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVK' 'sip-files00059.tif'
4639217ed0812cb1d9958d2dc207d7d2
2d447e563f59198a55aa65b4e16a1970538bd922
'2012-01-22T23:41:28-05:00'
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVL' 'sip-files00059.txt'
f0688c4b889a562383a1ae9845c752db
18ad41989cd36885b9be0f17996979c893f97865
'2012-01-22T23:43:29-05:00'
describe
'18699' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVM' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
551eb0f752afb50696a0c0b0d058a407
c1787e2a7b13d90fdad8275e69ab8031e605230b
'2012-01-22T23:32:04-05:00'
describe
'462424' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVN' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
59d2b3f2b3b021a07057de50aa9b22df
e50973265edeefe42880cee9692193735c7fc63a
describe
'173769' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVO' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
d0376c3e9449b5977898b82ad0cfeef5
a3f6952eabd57f9ee98cce56979f9780d22222b1
describe
'53498' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVP' 'sip-files00060.pro'
d61c3856d07074207ab5ff245e0d3d6f
8d68a441fa04a32aa944db3589cd0fba0c74ae02
describe
'62214' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
50fdbf114f888591b91c5e4f607f6631
cbf104c6615da3928558a93f51f6c0ddffd99328
describe
'3712724' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVR' 'sip-files00060.tif'
b316492864327574f1c6579eb84b18e8
1cac5e6a78b383eb4553e7c67d500f9e1ea7e59e
'2012-01-22T23:41:19-05:00'
describe
'2213' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVS' 'sip-files00060.txt'
b2636fe9fdd04bf45cd1fe9df7b0b783
4288a7855b8bb89225702ae30ce9768651ebc9f9
'2012-01-22T23:40:08-05:00'
describe
'23398' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVT' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
e7c5018827e1d5f123ab0a65f70cc9c8
39335bf7a4677bcb793dfb4db85f8a3357d483b0
'2012-01-22T23:35:41-05:00'
describe
'462097' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVU' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
24d46ee51ef9bc0fe3d0fa127efe6041
5d713320bff9655dec36e214be061c1e27618a41
describe
'209516' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVV' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
b649789fcea6b625e1290876ce74eb11
e5ac14169aad52f45ea2c533cfb7ebd513e42f78
'2012-01-22T23:41:22-05:00'
describe
'2707' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVW' 'sip-files00061.pro'
a3fedbed6a9d2743e72fbaef6fad9284
0fc52fc859c5d7c95ed3f5e3d7a5338a64327cd8
describe
'59071' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVX' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
4887b2ca12bb92ab87153ca24a4a5063
be421d409f69b883ead05ee8e728a3f434b64563
describe
'3710552' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVY' 'sip-files00061.tif'
46c8c0a5f10015f61cbe3f3c64a948df
2531366b60fd0fd8bbf43aaac52fbbd6e66fb627
'2012-01-22T23:30:30-05:00'
describe
'296' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
e41c6b6e818c4a340f2a68c48da542d3
4ab89e163cf711323965ab440d7025d08d7ca378
'2012-01-22T23:44:13-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'23597' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWA' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
4888ff61e0c67b7905e01c9249c8ecd8
fb12202c59deebabd96306e7c84b49f16a4960a6
describe
'4258' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWB' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
53d1415415ab2329ced016d683e3f588
46363c972945a9e72cadbbaaba165d2ee53c0e4b
'2012-01-22T23:38:21-05:00'
describe
'11037' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWC' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
b20b1b339abbd86af302de892d50b7f3
d3433c5dcfbf33ac1c0629be6b2cd679e23dc384
describe
'9249' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWD' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
59a20b20d84dc7011830bbb0b45368f1
3b250b7094b36c6e0b4544f551782c659c25ba53
'2012-01-22T23:36:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWE' 'sip-files00062.tif'
bae046e773925cc93f26ccb66b381681
463b32bac66ed873a1f4e2e8922d7d1fb7d02e8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWF' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
59cbfbf0d8d08b1e3872f29611aa5ea1
3706db93ee4b0047f76c2182930dd8cf7342ab9c
'2012-01-22T23:40:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWG' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
9ef0bd928af1b17b6b54e3d7ae87e1aa
67baccb36dccafe9e256a8e924d7dadbbc599797
'2012-01-22T23:34:05-05:00'
describe
'137425' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWH' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
c764b332b0e9e1e137c144241d5602b0
346bbf539ac2452ac17422593d76cc9fb1745697
'2012-01-22T23:44:16-05:00'
describe
'44794' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWI' 'sip-files00063.pro'
920543cd818a03bd5d50959b35914f20
654c3940a730ecf2105bc865bc700ccdc4874f14
describe
'50874' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
bc0caca79882b0100cf4da4deaf72e1a
c8bc4f5c807db8a74a05a654367e42b77ce2630c
describe
'3709276' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWK' 'sip-files00063.tif'
9986075b145a0f6c4d2a3632ab01bb85
66b11739dc9d61ec1f9f73df4fc83c497ddf70d9
'2012-01-22T23:41:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWL' 'sip-files00063.txt'
de8c1ed95fa2d02dc7f7e8387a130825
31236b8ceb117f90077bce309862dd04e6251b75
'2012-01-22T23:35:34-05:00'
describe
'20406' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWM' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
1026386e2c0168f40d03680d2e425af7
e945c46bee362a858ea7345a6a01a2c54457f129
describe
'462380' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWN' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
e7079ce15c90921579dc5657ae99af16
9da5d716e77cc0c4801790fc3c64faa5df5adc15
describe
'139218' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWO' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
233d9ab38d8ad6ba1060d1cbd51a75b9
57189dbdcbc6ca56eff6f81b0692bcdf4b4c48f8
'2012-01-22T23:35:18-05:00'
describe
'45251' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWP' 'sip-files00064.pro'
7a7def525127a5ba35c778bfb25c9e26
97b66f83765bee390365edc2efc73e6cb3fcd2bf
describe
'52595' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
78d95889587e83b9b0b2e4a9f607c026
232b0729ea03ec341a71df0432aea42ba5ae0672
'2012-01-22T23:37:41-05:00'
describe
'3712052' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWR' 'sip-files00064.tif'
2d4200877261e300fe8fb807717c8272
153289ca5ca6a57dfea9c2c2f08b96c555d16af0
describe
'1922' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWS' 'sip-files00064.txt'
6f46dc443f62d2ac901a0961a09132f4
b4f6062743c2d1040343ab5108e0e4abda902576
'2012-01-22T23:42:32-05:00'
describe
'21310' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWT' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
4812b3433ce6c2df1e358311a5305a96
3ce26ee3b944ae0dd952f9f74913acb8cd896afa
'2012-01-22T23:31:10-05:00'
describe
'462118' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWU' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
5ac6f468153c59b4359c944fd5c25272
e6ff320fb20a5bb79fada9603b4315b6fa2986a5
'2012-01-22T23:41:10-05:00'
describe
'156391' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWV' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
7b24d52bb35e9f40fe6923b44a2b0ee0
25a5d50e0fa2f4016d213bd237f9689d4124a502
describe
'48956' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWW' 'sip-files00065.pro'
5e8950a43a2e4f50c5fb66c9a6f5335b
828dfd056b586e3d8e29f98fc0b4f59003bfa146
'2012-01-22T23:37:29-05:00'
describe
'57412' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWX' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
1003412bae3042f280756443cceb48ce
b96b3b0aff0d9a5b4fa19dcb1c5814defc1f4226
'2012-01-22T23:37:48-05:00'
describe
'3709956' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWY' 'sip-files00065.tif'
3b964820bb98dec7f2e5826c803885a3
907b05bc3d12ad6f48877279ebb844df54ac45d7
'2012-01-22T23:37:19-05:00'
describe
'2042' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
00286541f2859441da6b732866b6f4ba
e9925267c71b64b39bf006563cfb5abb91254ef4
describe
'22791' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXA' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
d929215617049ce9729a8665174d1d79
420ec0241c6b9cf8bf479a6ef68c6ec3c68d2b52
'2012-01-22T23:36:42-05:00'
describe
'462178' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXB' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
0cfc1564e27c5fe70e09c9c60dcea6c2
aa8b0ec281a23f07c5e0a2eb6887868b356452eb
'2012-01-22T23:43:10-05:00'
describe
'164972' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXC' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
32541e10170d47a0c893e315d04fc59a
720fa333016189d4fe22d1ba23389c4eb829b536
'2012-01-22T23:30:28-05:00'
describe
'51297' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXD' 'sip-files00068.pro'
5cfb41b2b685fafc17d5c4f4cd94892a
2d74b44da13b1f9123ac5579d8a6955a91a50022
'2012-01-22T23:37:44-05:00'
describe
'59777' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXE' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
806ce89ea77f080a6916ed4fdd14679f
3d29a55dd9c305a3353d4ddb2675cfb0aa894dbb
'2012-01-22T23:38:54-05:00'
describe
'3710452' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
4ea405d7b4790781451d5d61c3b35141
69d5a244e5208fd4ec04b8bed6c63cf9b2c46a85
describe
'2099' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXG' 'sip-files00068.txt'
61d6ddf43a4826d8cd21a24cbdc554d6
82ee72b880ea2cde35b265d2e19ddd2bb14f58e1
'2012-01-22T23:38:20-05:00'
describe
'23540' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXH' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
daf6d99dfd7948fcc96f489415848667
c467ce9463a4b7c4a11c771fb0c9d315e9a72c66
'2012-01-22T23:43:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXI' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
dac1956408915d59e7925d1994dde89a
3e4fd85d906a4dbf9442363bdb9638b0ae6619a4
'2012-01-22T23:41:58-05:00'
describe
'156383' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
36a98bc63a6054d9628e2031369ed607
a7fea1f72e96dc17551ff41c02fb10dfe5ba7cd5
'2012-01-22T23:43:48-05:00'
describe
'50451' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXK' 'sip-files00069.pro'
2d228a5d9e1bded42e9deb9fdec5c6d2
45e3f95cdeb038fbede377006a6ac7b6216681b6
describe
'58241' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXL' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
2500d42cbaa571af09423bc9e69a6bd1
d5b024d5db7efe4889592d8b1c905f517c3df4e7
describe
'3713996' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXM' 'sip-files00069.tif'
8968a256eeafff6dc2863a9fd52f5c20
1d61f3a4c808d2ff2f4e7bd6313805571b474e1d
describe
'2016' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXN' 'sip-files00069.txt'
5f898ad1106b6c3a91cc296372bc9351
4979e5cc9ae772745976381dcf73902b2084f9e3
describe
'22881' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXO' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
ec90b4bf2a57b9068df86431bc6e5411
76bf83b14b3e27c5222cf97c7b18242ba206a6ab
describe
'462453' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXP' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
c474896ed5438041d20b64051e057ba8
fe974c36d6531b9f0d20bc21f6a918891501328f
describe
'150191' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
712ec7f6d5b957ecac89e0e383614c76
b740b0fb1c84499be14cedc6afbb01c255f53af8
'2012-01-22T23:39:30-05:00'
describe
'49441' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXR' 'sip-files00070.pro'
5d61289ebfb2a5ec669e102525f647a2
c390ac6842d4fa2bed624e03e16ead89c3ff3dca
describe
'54553' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXS' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
f3e77147d503158973deda251497c489
8b3c819cadf945a32ea73cff15b5aa4f45cd60be
'2012-01-22T23:41:05-05:00'
describe
'3712248' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXT' 'sip-files00070.tif'
d40f5b016c18903b2899af185cd7911f
a91c4c528d66f2f0563a0b307156a411eb6801a7
'2012-01-22T23:36:28-05:00'
describe
'2120' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXU' 'sip-files00070.txt'
d390b5f1e2d6639b98239ba4f812211d
170a1c2d9b3eca39991454759559c1e123f23a5a
describe
'21611' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXV' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
2479366e19fe429b3345e0835f13f346
8e22ecf1ca45e6ba842ad61954796a453ac83ace
'2012-01-22T23:38:49-05:00'
describe
'462129' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
196bc8725bd5773a8bf5fab643bfcf6b
2d11bfd1f35e545113e5e7ea7a538c0880ecb18f
'2012-01-22T23:39:53-05:00'
describe
'157422' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXX' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
232ffe9b842db65c59dde6203e1cbb34
0410bb89ee08ba2c6be4df2ec2068d09575216ee
describe
'23933' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXY' 'sip-files00071.pro'
430465ee08e636bb0ca8135a87efd266
dbe00f0601513152f8b68ef68f640f01775f6754
'2012-01-22T23:33:21-05:00'
describe
'54932' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
f49bd5001ee076b2207aa1c1ee59b8d1
c2aa9f21c984c0f1c1e886b3f1815099eddcbad2
'2012-01-22T23:42:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYA' 'sip-files00071.tif'
649ea93584a272014e01f0f367a58719
1754caa92567d762f7a2d49f014b95ed34c3fd39
'2012-01-22T23:38:30-05:00'
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYB' 'sip-files00071.txt'
cdee84114a1e06d125c68ec9dd91be52
38b7d2db9f6afb1bbbd57869e11eeaa532567322
'2012-01-22T23:41:00-05:00'
describe
'23435' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYC' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
d594fc80875e5d9661b3e5e6fd2ca65d
f563dd49a0cdfd39606a2995d415f3090857b61c
describe
'462370' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYD' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
86230189eb14c35e461da10e7ecea898
5cc723e0fa91eb969d4821922e662412e3072943
describe
'110358' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYE' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
1d6dcfd9c234dee12bc87b3144b8ee61
b3e722e3f70306619c0d31d005a533301c299854
'2012-01-22T23:31:58-05:00'
describe
'29665' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYF' 'sip-files00072.pro'
b9017ba24720522fc98d2697e038718c
b267d345940a4d92559e6ca60b453f9642a17585
'2012-01-22T23:34:17-05:00'
describe
'41040' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYG' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
547c0e87e4adb2aa70777b4575980675
0d7b3bea13c7df999ee9105b4fc154b58192982f
'2012-01-22T23:41:45-05:00'
describe
'3710316' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYH' 'sip-files00072.tif'
2512808888f538551c8acd37b27e3aae
45839171c307bc1d8fe727791c8436a7cd225e66
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYI' 'sip-files00072.txt'
c0034c99286a8e4df4804fc46b03ad92
362f0103724b6548b8cc13f1e6109a01aaad162d
describe
'18313' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
254f6361d700fd34699579867d998435
76a4981cc5273ba1285cdbef33ff84da7357e93b
'2012-01-22T23:38:02-05:00'
describe
'462376' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYK' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
24de32ef253a57a25c43247b9eeac742
de61e26be9f4f530aab1141f6e34527e477b482a
describe
'74379' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYL' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
ca7f48fc468ce97b8327e9d328ecf3a8
369be07b61034a3b0012c938df4d1b892aeeda23
'2012-01-22T23:36:34-05:00'
describe
'4199' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYM' 'sip-files00073.pro'
7e8d36ef57ce6c6ff311cb12ec0ba5f0
734ad7f0ba207157202c82fb2fa1d6f2d4bfe04b
describe
'28360' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYN' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
56dea90a3e0c36d4077c32827091945c
3fa547f6908675df0d4434374d856bcad1f5e634
'2012-01-22T23:35:35-05:00'
describe
'3710920' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
59fb2a7309d9e810c493a9d26520b89b
26c53e1b3b56414027269d16ef8ed5ba962b7f52
'2012-01-22T23:37:04-05:00'
describe
'228' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
de965bc706bdb7f15044dab0c30d749d
ede2030bed6a0aa0fc4a4815c53d083317ac9f71
'2012-01-22T23:36:33-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'16280' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYQ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
21917fdd82b04dcd93da21af54623319
458ebbe525ca62d00539cc6edde8b5adabcfda93
'2012-01-22T23:30:57-05:00'
describe
'5190' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYR' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
90ece63ee1eae86c1869ec55b561bc44
1a899cada0aa7f93d55777e667e30efaaf8ce946
describe
'11055' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYS' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
5a31b82b53cba5540e78da116f19c861
d4bf0624eaca98c5f5241ccc70fc66fd7066047c
'2012-01-22T23:38:51-05:00'
describe
'9255' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYT' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
51633049954b3d1f0fcde83af6f76624
8afaa392069e4c499ba92a01dd0674679e59ca95
'2012-01-22T23:35:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYU' 'sip-files00074.tif'
431590108cc365321dd6ff898e8b3b3e
565d2a51531b1d7a6ae4c227974e2453920e5979
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYV' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
20423d3d6d712d1b2edef960764dcfa7
f9e3d5fdb86d843eb445354c412d47a5fb4a6bed
describe
'462369' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYW' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
d1f03c7bf0a9efe64c7538dec54bb598
722e861c67623e9b12a74c4f67d95722e0b8a910
describe
'136782' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYX' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
70e53c632117b33c386b29ad22ed1d36
769624153bfb50689a3399681ce4c9d747e257ad
describe
'15176' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYY' 'sip-files00075.pro'
addc6655b999de675cce8e9bc4a26a5b
1e54c9adac861be74884685e5f1788ca80841569
'2012-01-22T23:41:29-05:00'
describe
'42697' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALYZ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
e9195fd197771a0509563c8c18226fdb
95a950034a3a0b011d58a4a75797531fcfb43c58
describe
'3711076' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZA' 'sip-files00075.tif'
79b529d5300e3500c1d668f3978b3477
f92657feb55c313320ebb1c721d301c444455c2c
'2012-01-22T23:31:21-05:00'
describe
'729' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZB' 'sip-files00075.txt'
6a81725770267a91cfb78c49661b703e
f3cc6e57bc0834a6b6e7fb680e516377cc5a9915
describe
'18726' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZC' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
71e153e3dab203c0dae45f63dc37387a
d019f5a31f5e3f4baceb8c6a051962336435b663
'2012-01-22T23:32:40-05:00'
describe
'462432' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZD' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
8d18ba7c879746dbf0a077fb26c8c9f9
86de08d63e84f2565dafc0fdd571c1deedcf194e
describe
'168320' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZE' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
0c008afedc1bc3a18ad955dcc389aefe
87471f1ead35a6f30854d546ae5e15d96a8ef1ec
'2012-01-22T23:36:20-05:00'
describe
'51238' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZF' 'sip-files00076.pro'
4b992554792ae2a978e142261bcc5bef
eebbc3d41541dd64299a5c2c0443671f33a7f1ce
'2012-01-22T23:39:17-05:00'
describe
'59884' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZG' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
6dcd1760516b36366133d87659de6102
a51667695df09ea51bf38569e6925bd4966b8245
describe
'3712580' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZH' 'sip-files00076.tif'
7537b48a14e81ea6ae0536ae3e95abb1
599cfb2bf19162b951d8ed615ad21063bb9a48cc
'2012-01-22T23:31:17-05:00'
describe
'2061' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZI' 'sip-files00076.txt'
65773983200b027f4efc5796a3b4aca9
c7bee33d8b4f4bbbc8111155ef6035c5958cb45c
describe
'23431' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZJ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
5edbdf40ecdc574825308cf3fb6c586f
f2b01455cff367d7f4f86a9ca5f9eed8af6de46d
'2012-01-22T23:36:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZK' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
97dad25ab99d61c1ca569e00e3361821
31d142a83d8a992a9a5e30d5f160d56d48c6fcc1
describe
'172320' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZL' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
7ee8df8972dfc32724c360e0d4593b33
295f2d0284a30ddb96c0111e898c1b83c6025016
describe
'15494' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZM' 'sip-files00077.pro'
5aa97551d0f3fd020db5d81a89130f2f
df0a55bd0aa91b9fe42c72efcd8acbcb982c80eb
describe
'51733' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZN' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
aa765bbc0fdd43fd29f9dde505062db7
deba9d530346cb51732f8acacb84e7f5411227cd
describe
'3712252' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZO' 'sip-files00077.tif'
8c1ebba2b467c7d04a5b4de074fe4181
cbfe77451bd2da1b1146ba0843dcda8f3f1fddd3
'2012-01-22T23:30:32-05:00'
describe
'668' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZP' 'sip-files00077.txt'
efa5ad5898e1481119714bb09bebadfe
56e098e50fdfa13cc31aa43dd7dcb24013c626dc
describe
'22038' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZQ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
8affb6d1f04d506a49d1902d698c5cf3
2234618125b287db07046034ed1ef560e1e487ab
'2012-01-22T23:35:19-05:00'
describe
'462336' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZR' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
3bf4e3d0e785eefd1cae4716bed27177
e04f5cafd76df032b80fb5c046f8f1692c2cb19a
'2012-01-22T23:42:14-05:00'
describe
'198633' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZS' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
5afe9a92058aad9b5d17c326403e056b
001503b07d9b47b1f6a648275464ddb658cfaef6
describe
'9080' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZT' 'sip-files00078.pro'
d0ef6c6f5187f55654e7c38c9c95eea6
d5690f977517d6c5ad1f1a6260069ae83061cc02
'2012-01-22T23:41:39-05:00'
describe
'56029' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZU' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
283cde7dbebb94d3b4483edb84184c4b
8b789dd3c59954f61331346ef69812b24294b6ad
'2012-01-22T23:39:06-05:00'
describe
'3712596' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZV' 'sip-files00078.tif'
ad27ddd7ca887a68641427e4745b4e9b
db49426ab1e145948102f2cad3790288f550a39d
'2012-01-22T23:41:57-05:00'
describe
'425' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZW' 'sip-files00078.txt'
6261760311afc3f64bd496f08cfb8384
205f4b57fde951eaa5ce3f9576e7deec093bdcb9
'2012-01-22T23:42:00-05:00'
describe
'22810' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZX' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
c4b0360ab2b028f243ddb46b8e4b5c4e
fdfdcf302a84f424f6dbafff6bd4d2395b86a44e
describe
'462275' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZY' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
966fdae8a06b64d8935300f9096ecdb6
ee2097b8127c4500e436c87cd6f8131c8b9e5299
'2012-01-22T23:39:33-05:00'
describe
'157174' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAALZZ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
981b32e441a51cbedd0d92d15fdef5cd
e4b811b8d4f895d3c2f3a37c23c6c1daac944b85
describe
'43815' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAA' 'sip-files00079.pro'
bec303991fde763013d2af2110c64ad3
2768569740e0cd2cf6a3b6d927bced59385bd8d2
'2012-01-22T23:44:01-05:00'
describe
'56205' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAB' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
f667914fc23a8ab1ea423f6e7885a04f
2041efda51ec41e465964346d381a9f2239f0bcb
describe
'3712628' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAC' 'sip-files00079.tif'
ead710c6cc8f52688f3912406983a060
45da0ef5511cd1a49b23f890c25b93c49e3ed0f3
'2012-01-22T23:41:01-05:00'
describe
'1868' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAD' 'sip-files00079.txt'
acf79d7ca24e438557b7595d75e1bec3
dd469469b37b1709bfcb304d91ecdbb7110a8c3d
'2012-01-22T23:32:56-05:00'
describe
'23127' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAE' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
e1f10af04381986b0c1d0bc3ba8158bf
ea38b59cb0905656a757b48caeef435e1d37a639
describe
'462196' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAF' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
8ad58b010e31e67958f049e12efce6e8
c41cd3b94757f5487426c58a92019106c9dd86dc
'2012-01-22T23:32:10-05:00'
describe
'47154' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAG' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
9232b281c9aa70244ddfa309f4b73a91
232d572841ab0d14b533ce957e7bf455119289cc
'2012-01-22T23:29:57-05:00'
describe
'7195' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAH' 'sip-files00080.pro'
e888c19128a1919db6e9866e6d0daa34
417ccb43209eba33c937b9c476425b10c2bcd959
'2012-01-22T23:40:03-05:00'
describe
'19594' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAI' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
0423b379322361e1afa1b79f2a653c6b
15c0fea0320c87b96918f5d338c80c6204bfbfcb
describe
'3708712' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAJ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
7b157f396b3ee77b97ae4e4ac6501216
545a0f5d0ce33b767e63b016a390b6ab65122504
describe
'313' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAK' 'sip-files00080.txt'
708015424aeef5f3a30714de98509939
ed8e140c229b764bfc71db618aec2d07cbd96082
describe
'11927' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAL' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
c35836fe9e9c290d893c7160cc086d96
afa9d562717d7d08cb8b501254b00716624e0863
'2012-01-22T23:41:51-05:00'
describe
'323562' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAM' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
53d994d9ac4671029b050a19bd26fcc0
e489449ead7f530cee974efa7cf865bd4f6277ad
describe
'135411' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAN' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
0ae00c1990966fc0b5c1b26e493ff2f1
61dd51fa94d56a9f02362ba400e1ca40ad915de2
'2012-01-22T23:39:45-05:00'
describe
'2047' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAO' 'sip-files00081.pro'
c7e1249365be0a12c001de8d99425f21
b6b3ca7274ea193e38efa5652af36edc61fb3a20
'2012-01-22T23:30:33-05:00'
describe
'43961' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAP' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
c2b66c1bc143498a6d8e77a60c0a7310
d95d48d3b4d4dd98a21555b8450ce0bed2b7399b
describe
'2604168' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAQ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
678209a45c58af8a9a106d99d0dfbd40
2ce899f68c5a33bf02b5279e44f151af9477d1bc
describe
'110' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAR' 'sip-files00081.txt'
9f0883efc2b2f889ff336dabc4f9241a
1876f1b705de59b615762a103df7c072a385c5e9
'2012-01-22T23:29:42-05:00'
describe
'22781' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAS' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
e515bd96963e0260c825eb5b7f193ee5
b2b0c786cb5409630e4694b1a3a51b62b7615fdd
describe
'5582' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAT' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
b3697f893238bd6281169598048de85e
f9f22c08edd166a067b6b8f84ba31fbf0f5edd76
'2012-01-22T23:38:55-05:00'
describe
'11147' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAU' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
6f5ffdc6301ad4f6a7bf9df6edb2def5
dca2eed4d423133557a8896b8ea6298b4e430481
describe
'9307' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAV' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
a9a952c41d3a824cb7e3eaf6df19bf1e
f14682a8a6e0146713451a7ec660ef630034dbdc
'2012-01-22T23:35:28-05:00'
describe
'3705392' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAW' 'sip-files00082.tif'
69b149591b58ae28a9a2961010df08e1
144fc693b92a2a49661b3efe1e7b74da905499c8
'2012-01-22T23:43:42-05:00'
describe
'8789' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAX' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
45dab902f41beb0dc27957b705fbfe3e
6b54e6564ba9dd04ccec2e08b6bd9c866fc5cb07
'2012-01-22T23:32:57-05:00'
describe
'461803' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAY' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
d744e68494402bc3ad296dca5e0b3e61
5029fca6a58960143e06b76181dd321a6cd257db
'2012-01-22T23:39:55-05:00'
describe
'107169' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMAZ' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
5076a88a2248ad309d806f6f2c017f15
885689407f251df0c811872e00624c848b102313
'2012-01-22T23:41:12-05:00'
describe
'28628' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBA' 'sip-files00083.pro'
3b0476e873af1f9cd9c417e7ca0c203f
f279c64d56ee87dbe709cdbd6e59ddcdcc1ee6df
describe
'39814' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBB' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
95813c344a38c78ada02a6d2b6086bf9
5d6736a008e72bb7a39d083524850622f37b67e1
describe
'3708416' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBC' 'sip-files00083.tif'
b0bd0d6e96c2a319a28ea874cc6aa760
5f01277bb3abd85ce0af3e43017873b229a129f7
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBD' 'sip-files00083.txt'
a5604ceb022e6706e8383070eea6b8cf
810149fd725fdf0c4d89945f482135a5555bf25c
describe
'17851' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBE' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
6c4c87fbfe270b965d7bc2e0ac4fe3c9
6fe4aeb982f76e2add7135a43e036244de0e77b9
describe
'462667' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBF' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
1fe9dfbfcea406cf47e208f0e6c6fcdd
d854fbd0a88ec4a3c485ae56149773436f598f25
'2012-01-22T23:38:48-05:00'
describe
'157797' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBG' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
07a1a00a4ea71b37cc729b41c4de82a6
b69321fc3aadc4288f8d183a1c027f903215028e
'2012-01-22T23:40:57-05:00'
describe
'50506' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBH' 'sip-files00084.pro'
6d6e1b2d50e1b7e2abcf6a93d9461c9f
ac554175f38485f23404138569bbcdea32d33ff3
'2012-01-22T23:37:36-05:00'
describe
'56698' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBI' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
40c2a871e1b573f95496cb12981343f5
d82536396b877f7dbe21b3e7612878efbe05f34b
describe
'3714032' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBJ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
d42aef5a7370e96be3484b9450e5c482
d33e679d48acc556a1cf2ecdecc57eaeb30567c9
describe
'2017' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBK' 'sip-files00084.txt'
1e44c14349e963c3bd3148f0a4b6e97c
c3d1e308aec7b92169ef0bb05123cc31b076f7a3
describe
'22748' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBL' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
c5e4419dde8a1375c437c7c41f4fd4b1
3f8955e76e761d6e72144cbc30a4ceb564d54910
'2012-01-22T23:40:28-05:00'
describe
'341406' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBM' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
f5ef7ae73fef4fcc70ae657687885867
3db1fc80b587c1a346bf44fc5080b8a339df2794
'2012-01-22T23:29:43-05:00'
describe
'185321' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBN' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
f1e87fc28ee87a4b2ef147b89b23598e
f0d6ed2c9f713370f8dc92c5e32bc20543a2aaad
describe
'6428' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBO' 'sip-files00085.pro'
b1ea5151bf006370bc7999e5d6078d4c
5d84ae34e09fc3fc6e71b5026853c7ac711a13dc
describe
'55627' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBP' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
75b4753e8b052cb6746ebdaa78aa0f7f
9b85d8ecacbdf2bf58a29a775f463ce5a798d0b5
'2012-01-22T23:43:45-05:00'
describe
'2745772' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBQ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
ccaacb5b3491c4c23a46203e94bc10fa
23e5f72be6f8eec13e3173412c55e5c5adc04d7a
describe
'596' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBR' 'sip-files00085.txt'
f1e4b6d58e0a075bc6d53b37e5b21fe3
affe3682978e64bc8d80aaceb830ba7dd933b6f5
describe
Invalid character
'23781' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBS' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
58313ffb4accd2a860dd97cee6bca559
fb30be3db96efa2b22bd4c287131c91dc6c3a7f1
describe
'4608' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBT' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
518a0ef012d19d1cb2575fd90e8d5466
ada93523058b1b007c66f0019a7e9a5556e47bbf
describe
'11110' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBU' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
3b800dc68bc1594420382ac30debe7b1
5a23ff38a8521cba2eef73051183ee16f6b75e4d
'2012-01-22T23:43:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBV' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
25cae9684c7ebe737117c3b23213ccfa
645e1a37476551cd47bf0925e904ba18d399c38b
describe
'3707744' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBW' 'sip-files00086.tif'
3fc9a4f3b8276371691e610895cc4cb6
ff435462be2e603923f36c625dde069e284ae12a
'2012-01-22T23:37:53-05:00'
describe
'8791' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBX' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
5a35ccfaba99d67d8cf7afd28492a38e
abd1e5dd48638336d4cefc1c58d8c1f657db6e79
'2012-01-22T23:35:13-05:00'
describe
'462117' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBY' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
6b5ad4453ceaf055dca122050957c4b6
36da3ea4ac961067b6fec3f5323b07a374f42477
describe
'148691' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMBZ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
a2c2bdda20ec8a144180c14e23958c33
a114023996f8359a98d642734d39db2c7f1f40dc
'2012-01-22T23:43:38-05:00'
describe
'45903' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCA' 'sip-files00087.pro'
d2a2e5ded8f1c9275e67c81bb949571e
65f60c9ca7be0223deb37c824a1d372843a184b2
describe
'54863' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCB' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
b21ba806f95bd7ed282af0573b642b20
76627d928ffb3b515b53c7a01e28b98fe7baa120
'2012-01-22T23:40:16-05:00'
describe
'3709920' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCC' 'sip-files00087.tif'
2846322e10c1d1aaf3e6945991d95a34
2c9633a350422df9f36efcf6978ccdb618418ec4
describe
'1873' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCD' 'sip-files00087.txt'
922c4256dd1a37d9f9da37ec52cbaba9
f85c69119718df763042a0e9f152ffd979d78ddb
'2012-01-22T23:38:53-05:00'
describe
'22175' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCE' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
1a2f48a22c051d84c2235794e736551d
294145cd0620ba4850f21171531b3a3b6a33f7b0
'2012-01-22T23:40:45-05:00'
describe
'462447' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCF' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
a1b6a91381122305a2bce3af94f0e0a4
d6e52cee4cfabf59a038a92fbee93bd21475e4d6
describe
'164150' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCG' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
8c83af73d98d187a3dfe0de2ed4d9c08
c263d104b905750f3022475145b2523120ddce81
describe
'52598' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCH' 'sip-files00088.pro'
d418a52d76122dbddc73580a2534aeaf
c0236ae37a276890d324e80022d561a3951f4652
'2012-01-22T23:44:11-05:00'
describe
'58541' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCI' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
ecab680591172d75e59bbee90f4dccae
5eae9e5f9daa845d00037bd095952380c0788bda
'2012-01-22T23:38:18-05:00'
describe
'3712664' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCJ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
056432f0bdc6d098f71cbe222e3ef967
b39372f87fb37499d4e7e99c8ec4c4ee52642d74
'2012-01-22T23:34:45-05:00'
describe
'2103' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCK' 'sip-files00088.txt'
3cb0454a905a0cf293fbd9ef988e487b
f1f41e0b88178b712bd0dc415d81a22bd7ff8e44
'2012-01-22T23:37:50-05:00'
describe
'23011' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCL' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
09af39e8e016cee0e10e5febfcd7ffbc
bbe96f9c347cd5b88ea7cbdae5ee85189d82c792
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCM' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
7d4d7c83c6f40d65c157f98a6e75b2f4
fb6630e06eac323b8d2b1bac8c4e77807feeec7b
describe
'160984' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCN' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
747c9a59a78f013d8976bb127c78ec7d
ffa64ae405e99029a81664fc82ae88dd5067b3ef
'2012-01-22T23:44:03-05:00'
describe
'51101' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCO' 'sip-files00089.pro'
21f86472ec97cfaf0899238b25573ad8
628da3be5fd7cee7f614ed6ed77f9b60966f361d
describe
'58711' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCP' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
8dbd360141c8e369f70195c920f52969
449fe86afb2f3f353639cf12834c422e7b7a7b81
describe
'3712648' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCQ' 'sip-files00089.tif'
e4104a69b83da6edaf3ee72dfd2fc6b0
d7f3ca9d215ce4159a1063079222b57c7301ef66
describe
'2074' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCR' 'sip-files00089.txt'
b4c26b0ac46df31481ac9fa05f72e701
802f46a660b2f83aca0d15ef68e105b8c946e9da
describe
'22894' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCS' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
0b5afb93cd3403b6de1b5c39622c6dd7
57414b6ac1b15620dc43d628acfbb820316649fa
describe
'462125' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCT' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
69d68429ff1e16df4d82f255eacaaba8
5b15618d2a86f841f1cbbb4a7088b216186f8a8f
'2012-01-22T23:30:02-05:00'
describe
'72593' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCU' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
33d492c516b7adefa0283f0ea13e6012
f2cf9c14d0bcbb90e23509710f06e620c22bddae
describe
'17810' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCV' 'sip-files00090.pro'
2f53a849e6c2241bfba343cb8323505b
72e15bd677d48adf8789091d733b39797a83465b
describe
'29115' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCW' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
3d188241cb46aca3f18d4a2f2f3038ac
bd99439fccaed3ef47df5bf1402db0e294b04f9b
'2012-01-22T23:44:09-05:00'
describe
'3707324' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCX' 'sip-files00090.tif'
64df1bb128fbad0213ca2f1993cebcb7
ba487b83e498397a9fea2a1d28a5a4c08a6f6c43
describe
'741' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCY' 'sip-files00090.txt'
d22077e877c692b15075057a1d58dcd7
623084b941024d48da8b0036406e48ff42f7bf1e
'2012-01-22T23:37:30-05:00'
describe
'14497' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMCZ' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
26ac571bcb64139b3bc0af57cfa5c04f
d91d3705108da21b3c1c20ffde919893e02e32b9
describe
'462425' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDA' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
edc385c914c8545260b4add55f0c6a09
689ae12f00fcb536d9e7c7c30193c49972aca2e2
'2012-01-22T23:36:00-05:00'
describe
'182337' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDB' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
bd91aa1ff948893ece3539f2c0c5b203
8c7cbe9996fd9668ff7549ad23b6654eedfddf6b
describe
'8908' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDC' 'sip-files00091.pro'
ec21cd4f7097f883135808b247cb12db
179930cc9f3a5ae8cf1fa70a6f20cddfc36368e2
'2012-01-22T23:43:15-05:00'
describe
'52822' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDD' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
f8a180848217c411a4763ba06246cea4
1b65738ec34fabca6cd4e1a784132043a45d819d
'2012-01-22T23:41:25-05:00'
describe
'3712288' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDE' 'sip-files00091.tif'
d3bfa5e94203504e803955d057f3cf17
7a2b2b7e63c412eb47f692713160d24763eae691
'2012-01-22T23:35:45-05:00'
describe
'466' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDF' 'sip-files00091.txt'
1ca50b437a0aae2f8f27ad6fb54722ec
62181a16b4326057e43f487fbdd2fd7ed4dd55a6
'2012-01-22T23:43:18-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'22247' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDG' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
bfbf9c5572c6d612c3c041837342c085
1579c4b0d474caee52aa600261831a7307adb642
describe
'462459' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDH' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
804b02a1a9ea5efec12a98d86b07761e
05d1b2804bdf5840615367e86e310af5909c30f1
describe
'56294' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDI' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
76e0459d6cd3b1580e03c75dce5feb44
c2aef74d52e5f07c6dc3899d46a5ff0657afa607
describe
'12376' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDJ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
2df6a888de6711c57988773cd0a5c493
ad273a549f9e6d20beecccc2bf7dcd87fe15e555
'2012-01-22T23:35:38-05:00'
describe
'23304' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDK' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
8847b07488c986bdc9952d8e1e21268c
eb9870f158cb3fff857f6f82ed6b6dc5ac5f6e6a
'2012-01-22T23:33:29-05:00'
describe
'3709208' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDL' 'sip-files00092.tif'
c2506050f06ff667d4c97d88e9479c9d
9fa44459a18e966bcba4e29e281fca28845d8f38
describe
'509' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDM' 'sip-files00092.txt'
e6d706b2a81e9b222ccc779f70d00b22
31fdbf275d03655377f9ea669dcfcd13fd555cd8
'2012-01-22T23:42:07-05:00'
describe
'13147' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDN' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
d052ad3374fb1f9f0de45990fc88301c
9c6fadb985a727ba17eb774c5bcb9077fccb2c65
describe
'471437' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDO' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
09af313bfe65ed4a9748c162d28174ff
8a35119cd3b6ec409a8fbaccdf428e535b4a817b
describe
'163794' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDP' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
681ea58acd28b4ab7937ae64555bfbe8
c4d2613853c0ff196246421d8f7f86522e3bc343
describe
'23973' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDQ' 'sip-files00093.pro'
846c35dfbfe7927301199e7c3948d529
449eab892d8c66f5d6311e57c5d802211dadd320
'2012-01-22T23:34:10-05:00'
describe
'51771' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDR' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
72dc26d1697fa1c9faf6bac6b04b5b81
1d14411154b535768b054678fd61e6577ed88af0
'2012-01-22T23:34:51-05:00'
describe
'3783760' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDS' 'sip-files00093.tif'
7d54f93c11950e85593436c4fdba3673
523b6f3401c5d79e8207c91c142269c3e363900a
'2012-01-22T23:36:49-05:00'
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDT' 'sip-files00093.txt'
2f98d7ccdd0e8fc827c8e38f123120dd
1ffd631af24b0e2d351fda0c53740a99e469f6f2
'2012-01-22T23:33:32-05:00'
describe
'21749' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDU' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
b51c01fb98afd7a7763dc7ad657b2853
405548b40a9e3d28021121df50027966598ddfd2
describe
'462466' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDV' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
656b99338ab4910a618ef8246fd77584
bc71dc5176ab3b571429a398c34ddd5b7aafe8cf
describe
'162344' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDW' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
d7700ddadd192d8eb84f3bb9ec94aa7a
5a8a4b775cd5120eb273d6c7c64944fd09dd4511
describe
'51404' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDX' 'sip-files00094.pro'
272b212d7456f82d16b70f35a61cb78e
970687e99a59b071958dda1bf36f0853f55ec0fa
describe
'60427' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDY' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
5e5c5157a047a6a73ac7fb351c09c509
c1333671b03d18c16bfd77ac292e4748f2f217b8
describe
'3712776' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMDZ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
8b790fbc45282cfaecf7068cfa446461
970329b4f14687496ab01ebf67fe7746714c3afa
'2012-01-22T23:36:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEA' 'sip-files00094.txt'
3ab9f6e7015b7648930d8e4c007cead7
03f2c5f6212bf23c9c66832a01afcb9a7b82ceed
'2012-01-22T23:41:33-05:00'
describe
'22973' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEB' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
9d3fef8a06a7f247aa0eaf2469c914ee
44bc7662967732506168d90109419c29777464ed
describe
'341999' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEC' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
b5bacce696630631c6b2b9b6dea3e9e5
18a42921a801cac98a1c9cb22e8aae66a020f477
describe
'48580' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMED' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
46f70824a1a79043c06f48910895bf84
3804f9b489699727992128cd2c202683c1b4de5c
'2012-01-22T23:43:28-05:00'
describe
'10476' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEE' 'sip-files00095.pro'
c9fde2f5a506a08b0a814ec4aef1e75a
1bb96094f1cff2a1c360ac4d96544e1580bf907d
describe
'20673' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEF' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
83b02784d22881c6953861981d325818
523c170e5f32f60e870791aab5c81ef6ab82418d
describe
'3708856' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEG' 'sip-files00095.tif'
5cd7460755ebc49c74c842d5672af64a
a206951f8bf408a74efc0f297dacff5b9ed72387
'2012-01-22T23:44:18-05:00'
describe
'422' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEH' 'sip-files00095.txt'
09833aa8fe23728aaaff49d8b711a8f0
ea68e123286e24e1ae419b0fe987248a3a98ec4d
'2012-01-22T23:38:14-05:00'
describe
'12218' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEI' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
867dc9c3834b2afa71b01e0d82e824cd
2368b7fd060b20c12b195aaa48e046adc918040c
'2012-01-22T23:29:53-05:00'
describe
'462367' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEJ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
46e5996401c60a88922f81b645e46c81
f2c5bac87dc92be565766bbaee1253004276d96d
describe
'117131' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEK' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
d4d3ae7d1973f711f10fbafd7d82abd5
9a30fe37a5ba351c44077f9c6e1449a0c0864ae8
'2012-01-22T23:39:16-05:00'
describe
'33815' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEL' 'sip-files00096.pro'
ac62935d1c6faca71acc62c7fcd68ad3
de7dec0cfd2d58622b779e248eb05905a8cefec3
'2012-01-22T23:38:31-05:00'
describe
'43765' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEM' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
aeb229fddf19d87ab8387c2ce325f3e3
93678752b855c4853005eb73d7d670c441b271f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEN' 'sip-files00096.tif'
99316308cb2217acc2e435e5968d2c52
0b5774ba91d7e74c641e2b5300620f20a4d38cac
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEO' 'sip-files00096.txt'
1a82445c11d966a512de4d058f499c82
11ed3f2ab311252fb4fcb2cc2e6097ba9f75bbda
'2012-01-22T23:33:56-05:00'
describe
'18789' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEP' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
8d3b228b428a30eb233356db56b86067
1e24cc9ca16426974a9109ca9726e1b288a49149
'2012-01-22T23:34:02-05:00'
describe
'330858' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEQ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
57457d9749d5ed19392e4a6b24ff0bcf
507d7291c19f603fd3f0bdfb0484dfac5eece7a8
describe
'263447' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMER' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
2ca43af023bc62b019768a9b5d5faff6
9bf3ebaaf83972fa7ff7b4bedec27ddce540153b
describe
'1948' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMES' 'sip-files00097.pro'
1e27660f36b3e7380abb4598d31486bb
7bf81ad38111de4878a8eac4644be89e46f85ad0
describe
'70011' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMET' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
2820444ea6b4ff413e227128bcfe389f
22943280b9084094c1d2fc60d0fa742b3e193287
'2012-01-22T23:35:42-05:00'
describe
'2661620' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEU' 'sip-files00097.tif'
b19638666affbc60d6dde3f07a547a12
5c49381bfac0b3d59b333781831f30021b4d2667
'2012-01-22T23:34:50-05:00'
describe
'207' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEV' 'sip-files00097.txt'
83fac411b74b89936706467b6ceef849
c3b155b959c959cdc896b745aac174c04097098f
describe
'26662' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEW' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
c1eda238146b41f12988f71644318502
0bde1030cd1309ec87b4c50fd9fe365a7c321145
'2012-01-22T23:43:33-05:00'
describe
'3265' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEX' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
f3c37d417d757eb7458d713ed3220b27
80ae691910455e9d8f4485199a48211bd0703a05
describe
'11030' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEY' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
ca7030ef9899a079984d8d38b2e24b83
0bdf248d2894bb20a046a128184b0be4fe363c6f
'2012-01-22T23:41:54-05:00'
describe
'9248' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMEZ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
3588c87a9baaa8931d4301a3580c65f9
e9c58c208b83b9664cc303dc0b4c2099ac4498a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFA' 'sip-files00098.tif'
5c6bbb49a0aa59d1738d01c449bbb035
11664873ef2f71d4d57e3b9aa537cff66b110553
'2012-01-22T23:41:42-05:00'
describe
'8767' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFB' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
62c2361ad1688a12024f0828dd49e17a
c9efcec5ab1260594e95cebbd2c84114114a0cb5
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFC' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
ec66e96b372c3fad6d2e6377832dc40f
2c32cd4538d00c1f35c94527df04375fe34ead04
'2012-01-22T23:41:14-05:00'
describe
'168824' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFD' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
330d8c6c93f644b4cf68848fdcad7501
552cb1a02294950e6a00d65deee75260b2ac0c9b
'2012-01-22T23:36:40-05:00'
describe
'54806' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFE' 'sip-files00099.pro'
457f60445b1dff4fb2f474d29590eb15
de5bc49738def3b6c13dfcd57c3dafca180d7f97
'2012-01-22T23:43:34-05:00'
describe
'61041' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFF' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
66e505fa9334b7f600121c7ddf9e5167
86c054b2c781e9a56d8f885a90848b655ef43f05
'2012-01-22T23:30:46-05:00'
describe
'3712572' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFG' 'sip-files00099.tif'
09b4f3d7ba70ba1bb25e7af2bae725cd
3761c9e343b8693a709b5fc6832fa0e6ef86470b
describe
'2173' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFH' 'sip-files00099.txt'
e3563f3280703eac18dfefe02f42db7c
e7b1079510693bc1d8f79f22befd4cd15293111e
'2012-01-22T23:40:01-05:00'
describe
'23370' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFI' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
f0f826b29ce0f29cfa34fff8ac05763d
f30937233b0fd8dc99ac3b8a0638d4b8b2245372
describe
'462401' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFJ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
3d5d2abb6b95491d96d6532581f96708
20453243759edb71394292a015147a2b4370514a
describe
'170441' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFK' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
d0fdb52cbdf1158bbe26a0dca1d02794
a013f4a51bd254e2116864a4bed8251bcf9baeb2
'2012-01-22T23:42:31-05:00'
describe
'15043' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFL' 'sip-files00100.pro'
97857809fad60e79108b0b002a21e0b5
de6224d461fcc65b36dfce2bc7d41b4a5a50d29c
'2012-01-22T23:40:52-05:00'
describe
'50246' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFM' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
41b19df6e6d8371f759c24b8727c6ec2
42a5b2034620d2f1ad1a4bc98fcbeaaf4b7de5df
describe
'3711516' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFN' 'sip-files00100.tif'
4917b266241b723455ce1e6c468bac87
20517a81f29a0998dc1349bb34bcb6910325fc8e
'2012-01-22T23:43:47-05:00'
describe
'653' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFO' 'sip-files00100.txt'
d25f3b56179069a1bbe4122f102efbf5
a812079069579c3fc4c4dcdf247626d1345f30f9
'2012-01-22T23:38:36-05:00'
describe
'20393' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFP' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
b446fb2a10866774bc50e6097de8f5f3
87099f6ee3f3b10ddf0d9e87d9edc41b8d4b6088
'2012-01-22T23:29:44-05:00'
describe
'462089' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFQ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
bcc7fe42515a4e3eeb4cb5b2aa32fbfb
0de18b4231ef5c3c6ef3227fbbc8c3b8eb216514
'2012-01-22T23:36:39-05:00'
describe
'162342' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFR' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
68e1a47c4d0994ab1c33a81435e3fca7
85a370b9a7dcfbfe8d0e7d61bc92476bd433737f
'2012-01-22T23:40:29-05:00'
describe
'12280' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFS' 'sip-files00101.pro'
e7bc42e6adc54a176a3886a233b4c3f5
ffb8e2d8a11238c3a4bf845a47b875d86f1d89b1
describe
'48655' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFT' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
022209ed3cf56483971e5991856ba51d
b86845cd59ed69f931a436e538db2c2063afc53c
'2012-01-22T23:37:39-05:00'
describe
'3709428' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFU' 'sip-files00101.tif'
2d39400c5cc3dc82b599f834d267aad1
1eee080bb37094157dd8510a3c97ffb347aba00d
'2012-01-22T23:30:39-05:00'
describe
'552' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFV' 'sip-files00101.txt'
098505612dc8f846cb686c76fa9aaa6c
aa8118997ef3fe3f71025452cbf3fd9aa62f2fc4
describe
'20819' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFW' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
7211107807662316c618ac9796a8cf1f
b05bddbf6bfc95d11a34cfc2d16fbe539e10426f
describe
'462662' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFX' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
9ae1184f1bbbae1d093465c5e69dea96
f2091bde3b3274cb66e04b0e6d77759d33829751
describe
'138183' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFY' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
6b666b2974aafc52df8b32c7e27d244f
b9e98da8123e264f56405629ca243d291d402278
describe
'38831' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMFZ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
f2a57bc3227d00c85ee0d64adfc96648
0899ee574de1af077c4cef6c33b767d1ef4f59b8
'2012-01-22T23:41:17-05:00'
describe
'50930' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGA' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
5f3343ab404e1fa09f4437607c776f70
37268ddca473a47761176a9015bc6fc43a07adf5
describe
'3713704' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGB' 'sip-files00102.tif'
1f31d1ca177421d1cbc371a5ab87f6c4
2b5378539cc3064effe434da51e066211006ce9b
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGC' 'sip-files00102.txt'
532d10f545436c5b9414baa7aad6758e
79eec9541a4d01299fe84f4ac648ef7d3d4dc61e
'2012-01-22T23:34:15-05:00'
describe
'21765' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGD' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
a4d651045d52ed99334ed5bd475747a9
3b0741d1e309e7d29006269e1858c232d98a01d8
'2012-01-22T23:39:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGE' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
e1aecae715d9bfea34059c2c7380e2ae
1d685f2c4d50db1d61cc1763eecd269fee53c3c7
describe
'155538' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGF' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
a05dca85a2f8488461b2956863994554
ff93066c7e60ab01f69336d5d7dadee743045de6
describe
'45407' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGG' 'sip-files00103.pro'
fdbcb253b601f96689ba0b1282afd652
b7ee5458dc80ee7f95f29e6fc0df8bede677c58a
'2012-01-22T23:43:37-05:00'
describe
'55227' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGH' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
8545b55afc0d52e08c8a0409a4e8bebc
dc18d154e5cbc017da2d4946651120e956fbc691
describe
'3709792' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGI' 'sip-files00103.tif'
3ddb1be370600a98da0260829a618c5b
0e36b70b5cdbdca2102f9499a4c60768b73ff9d1
'2012-01-22T23:38:59-05:00'
describe
'1837' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGJ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
2075b555741e65b85d3a3cb1ff541a18
82eb607660e6ef1ac0aa0458972e41b702700826
describe
'22113' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGK' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
50c4da9667a13130abdb0aeac4845b5e
5ec37c509db8f982b2f49f065a407f45a4c746dd
'2012-01-22T23:38:12-05:00'
describe
'462146' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGL' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
408b926c28af6b5ace76a59c3b19fd30
3478d4b0a25be389b09bfd89e994f2580a0c377a
describe
'59090' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGM' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
054de84f5f11c721523df8d82a646063
1cfea1ad900a6739047253a448c7b73d6f39a619
describe
'10575' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGN' 'sip-files00104.pro'
380c325af042aef39f83eda7b48864cc
2f65297cb99d662c20d0f01f7cedbc01fa067b68
describe
'22606' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGO' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
a7b21c995e8c34124aa1a8440da65c57
64ff18a008ee8faaf828b64783a370b8f0e8e2ec
describe
'3706732' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGP' 'sip-files00104.tif'
3ac63325e19bdce6b8808f6c31aa60bd
b135fd4d605fe53ad54706e78ce5f91f08c0ba0f
'2012-01-22T23:39:25-05:00'
describe
'449' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGQ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
a9cdb5068d87585e902b189ff2c6e374
e13dc78f61d95ecca808abc13b25868a7eb02a6b
'2012-01-22T23:37:47-05:00'
describe
'12968' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGR' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
0b82068e61128e05c94d8e9443da78df
9139f0cdd200b88863571bad47fa0d6b3ddc29a4
'2012-01-22T23:31:52-05:00'
describe
'471423' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGS' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
9207558e0c940e03adb6bcecccbc34a5
75b248b4c2b51f951e2f5c89c39cfaf8daf4dc97
describe
'147894' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGT' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
b4df706f264f910d3e56e489fd6030eb
09422bbc106c212beee9c00017251f54a7a2f89b
describe
'12599' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGU' 'sip-files00105.pro'
a979cf2b140d3ec0e6b9a77c0c43bb7e
01673efe220630a4250b87c89366c94c6a616d1b
describe
'43031' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGV' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
2efff33b4a5c3d265e85752bc72f0581
ad6d847cb6669b809b904c6755b1c6787ff34c92
describe
'3782644' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGW' 'sip-files00105.tif'
6a8bf9e1c6af40a890dd786a287d4859
ef640e2306cd3ecaafe47630d3396d0dcfd796e2
'2012-01-22T23:29:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGX' 'sip-files00105.txt'
9823fd0f52286b052abbb8c3048d118f
ac3d041cc882f2f365e26277091a489dbd8d7b5e
describe
'18584' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGY' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
7941cae972ed1069196b7dadaad2fdc9
dd5281ca0d4f0e36d110da3775c9488122ab1bad
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMGZ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
ca7136bc2344b7649832fa1052d906de
f3f06682ab98199e022018fda92eec9e58a5121b
describe
'156204' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHA' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
8963a0951f6fc5fc433b25bbf4d36aed
0fd1c766465f97f8ab233e50108c8bb1703e6ed4
describe
'47723' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHB' 'sip-files00106.pro'
e40cff59eb8982998d1e6ae2388f07e6
6ca9b46f6044c02cc1aca8f69b1134267acc3c1b
describe
'55826' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHC' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
c2492e62cc02b10d554b4fcb09718733
2bde7462c9890c52c634ea484f22f9d2d157688d
describe
'3712544' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHD' 'sip-files00106.tif'
fe8fbcb146931fdf8307b88b8d77377b
1874e3a4802b88ca82e5b0303e84c555e52092aa
'2012-01-22T23:32:23-05:00'
describe
'1925' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHE' 'sip-files00106.txt'
acb218261c55fc80164729530a2bce39
748c187d95bf91351c1ce7bc015ff1dba38245bf
'2012-01-22T23:35:39-05:00'
describe
'22974' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHF' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
4b61ce7ea22cc04c9923f1c9a358e4a7
95830ac722bf97a20495f090aeb061c9e66d5d7f
describe
'334769' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHG' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
ab86f0b908dcf4a2e31a796f68499130
3047e33429c7a773301b1b8c6f5fa3eb8292db47
describe
'151375' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHH' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
f599319d3ca1eea945ff215934fdbfbd
49eebca46dc65e55387dc3eaa9f0ae44a7ebdba5
describe
'4951' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHI' 'sip-files00107.pro'
55d8678921c70bb8f70a7215612e4610
afc02d2e157a6e5fd26fe38f093b6474927486e1
describe
'47617' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHJ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
451717b380b5188a0a5bc7f465e7c96a
3997e450e42fd0694c2bc91bb5d0b0c3fe19b35f
'2012-01-22T23:37:38-05:00'
describe
'2694232' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHK' 'sip-files00107.tif'
7d2618fbbbd5a85d7034e869b1f6fb38
d4ac7a567cd0292a35ef230d2a4d81e710791f9f
'2012-01-22T23:36:27-05:00'
describe
'291' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHL' 'sip-files00107.txt'
1d4f7072efa9d541ae434843887875ab
1341c5f6adc281d258565c90a41003c104b6341c
describe
'23537' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHM' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
6bbdc4ebaa40c31a41403e3f49792fce
a985818dccd33f021e009a9722da5c412165d78f
'2012-01-22T23:37:33-05:00'
describe
'6441' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHN' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
b887004dcb42968d157311fbaa1e2ab5
258a22bcd6729c9da89ae8547c1e0303d21cd8a1
'2012-01-22T23:33:11-05:00'
describe
'11251' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHO' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
0c52aba9752816a2a8cf220c128059ce
53d051545dafc50339a8cb22fed3abd228e48a00
describe
'9351' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHP' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
54a5ec49449bfaa9f9312764183ce562
f5b197eefc84fcd9472d88baa5653fb4a8c86742
'2012-01-22T23:37:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHQ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
b4506a353c82aeeda311e04891d3c9d7
f1205e3a8bfbe49cd29ee680158950b6a0448bd2
describe
'8795' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHR' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
1005c9b3dc08c892bc6fe320e8743398
873275632e6c1c408ac3b1f5af4b63cca08e3f39
'2012-01-22T23:37:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHS' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
f8880dec56c1ecfad36d4c59771478c5
ec2776c6b1a1548b38e5533cf587fab8dd95e6ad
describe
'163702' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHT' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
ca484787f38bcd359fafd180ce3d9d99
b40b66b49ee0d1ee13ab3181bdf9b2c2418876ad
'2012-01-22T23:31:02-05:00'
describe
'51601' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHU' 'sip-files00109.pro'
ea42b9ef0522ca8c92819a6cc9bf1e67
b5dadd3905c6a29e87a7f24b2fccdff4240f1496
describe
'57268' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHV' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
c80d730ea1af09cadd166c541efdaeb1
42a1f5f46e5e0bdaea90178255cf8918d832136a
'2012-01-22T23:32:50-05:00'
describe
'3709812' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHW' 'sip-files00109.tif'
d3715113cf6b5782f9b03f78eeff5273
0797ff1d3cf37745650fc8d1ef80ccfd20b0f3eb
describe
'2092' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHX' 'sip-files00109.txt'
703933e975362f7c12b1acfcf8aff7b7
179701047488996cb7f56e2c6e58e0b11aa2bfbb
describe
'22491' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHY' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
ed66a70eb4e7b80b76bf4e80a24751b7
a94a0e15d91d48f63ce7961c375818d97c2b031b
describe
'462360' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMHZ' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
5b9ce02b18b6ae763f4112ec368a023c
86085f01538dfa9f1d6e32d8dbb203a6ba57f5e3
describe
'167870' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIA' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
640d298306126946866a66ee782cbb96
84bdf1d9da033172b91c53d1f982d4e31dece84c
describe
'51270' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIB' 'sip-files00110.pro'
92e5eeb33e23a17fc11c8e0cde8f46df
34d1bdedc1b1e3deb6b468e7a3e94308b5d3c6e3
describe
'59551' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIC' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
a3f906c555ecf2df9b6a0113180f40ac
83342170206034af733311902f77f763988d2224
describe
'3712128' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMID' 'sip-files00110.tif'
097937637e82ae8c053f9ee87c89d08b
086e1d243012a57ade5a75488226fd383a12e2a5
'2012-01-22T23:40:30-05:00'
describe
'2069' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIE' 'sip-files00110.txt'
5897834511062f9d2f9b25f89459eb1c
fc53f8c8e40b128b582dfcb340a6852f8ba735c3
describe
'23608' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIF' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
8b8f546b50aff4b94f576bed447e5426
b42538c72e9dafc99f5415b4a045d47f3b317a4d
describe
'462104' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIG' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
5f37ce206e1612835eea982ae673809d
0bf2c38073e542ad70a800b041514a04fea0bb33
describe
'178324' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIH' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
77b19acd9a20ce47ba0264e70c94da11
c94fbdc5dcc131d3a2385fddda1ac1cbb1cc0af8
describe
'27816' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMII' 'sip-files00111.pro'
74c689659f3362d38fc74d4d9fbf7ef0
3d44f2052371d6e91605b6f91669b6690755bc0d
'2012-01-22T23:33:26-05:00'
describe
'56166' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIJ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
37b79266a763ff2d9a899218d3f051c0
5a472b4d1d0c99db0b5f489890168acfbf199646
describe
'3710220' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIK' 'sip-files00111.tif'
181ba2240f74a923da3f1888e2325365
5fdfb429af80bf9b313e3a96360295c335d06758
'2012-01-22T23:40:14-05:00'
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIL' 'sip-files00111.txt'
e76c80e2c4ace33452f99ba1ceae730a
416c93996e58800b5455ad8ccc71661aaa01c063
describe
'22762' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIM' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
467bd7a2f7e99c3831ef0cdf0e80a6c7
fe35415c77280386f11faec26537f51c76725384
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIN' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
ef7cceffe2ea952dbf8c0fc718a0aaf1
314b5bfb803c19b109b1922b2a30d0b1f718a0eb
describe
'160693' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIO' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
fdf5d2f4b556835bfb3eeed20354845b
55455a6581b6240c9c2fcd0b7f6d29adc7a2d466
'2012-01-22T23:39:14-05:00'
describe
'48967' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIP' 'sip-files00112.pro'
9e7b476b4e823a12cf3ddca3461be7d6
765e59154e26cc481ebb95b060d610d67a04eec8
'2012-01-22T23:30:22-05:00'
describe
'59508' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIQ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
61553053f1a43296ac41b3814597f14f
20c021d6cf10fdda524b3d011d9cd6722b75717f
describe
'3712940' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIR' 'sip-files00112.tif'
041c02d29d7726582809e12a9278faad
81a9156d8e2b0a134b9b81915e28055c62dc3df9
describe
'1962' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIS' 'sip-files00112.txt'
c914042d5f54f96c453daf3241817d8a
0b4def9ff56be704968eedf21fa330422cd977df
'2012-01-22T23:34:03-05:00'
describe
'23627' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIT' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
b932b78d179c06df41d9eddc573dcdc4
21ff19e7e2f238b36b95186ad8a0617110411de9
describe
'462100' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIU' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
abb49a50e28a6baccee89860d415d54c
96edca1543056520fc23be54fb4ff698c2fc1c3a
describe
'56313' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIV' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
29b96545e84126fdea957f373475f3dc
e18b16453e8e54508e352013fd84203a67ca32bd
describe
'10704' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIW' 'sip-files00113.pro'
5105e2f581616bad150019db501bb679
4cf0edcd6fd4d042da4f4f7c6ae8805b3a87368a
'2012-01-22T23:44:12-05:00'
describe
'22849' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIX' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
8c71d0b37c4ec2cb8cb77cf7cddb1222
fcbadc2ad8f5a41e45660a0f7273ace77e029e79
'2012-01-22T23:39:10-05:00'
describe
'3706608' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIY' 'sip-files00113.tif'
f36ed7828c00e3ef1d1807fe4ec42e73
13dddb723c90eb633d386be59f0f3028c0883345
describe
'477' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMIZ' 'sip-files00113.txt'
7a6192779cda7b7c5aa6f96fcd3a6d56
75e28c7c301d708b21456f98ed14ed7b0357da5e
describe
'12619' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJA' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
f9c384a7925c867813e35bc555546853
2d42be5503211bc9f2e843898ea507459e676810
describe
'363931' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJB' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
27249c24d58ec9cb6f2fb1ba8ba44d0a
b2b3575bda1db7845803bd41603dfc7dbc3bfa75
describe
'183903' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJC' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
f03c355b194227d6b780da911bb094d1
f793ef533554699d2debece2f20da46ea2413124
describe
'14967' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJD' 'sip-files00114.pro'
cc5b28aa09af728ff31ef73caa1d0316
df1a8aea475b5f036de4a9eb4de02be62f6d0a12
describe
'54235' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJE' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
3190ce87f73152b3a880050838f1a149
3a6840b6f306e7d90bf357a8a26c52b4d9a09340
'2012-01-22T23:40:23-05:00'
describe
'2924424' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJF' 'sip-files00114.tif'
cb1f6c533e152b20244e963c881a275a
ca520c7a34b724e5bd95e06e904afdf6684fd301
describe
'671' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJG' 'sip-files00114.txt'
3ab7d56e6c397e68e0d641e74ec50666
25f7cb4dab5054787293b199e7fe37297cae90d1
'2012-01-22T23:41:55-05:00'
describe
'21526' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJH' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
88f4f8252260bfbe7bab61d9cf829e9f
81402956a412c20eb0d7bacd5e24a305889223ff
describe
'462462' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJI' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
0a7bba28d98496305c77ba4d85d8f8be
5d45e801591f5e3c8ced31fbc5c1d38c2e4b49c4
describe
'161843' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJJ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
d9a6a9d070baa98a5902d2f94b9985ad
68a02a4453c2e87d81094f4154b2d9ea63f74434
'2012-01-22T23:37:01-05:00'
describe
'49120' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJK' 'sip-files00115.pro'
5b6bda8ede25b2816403e034c6d00e40
6f33153663ff235e468f0f7e8c2cc89d2f396cec
describe
'57432' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJL' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
ab6218a0376a2e6e6750a34f04611d4c
6cc4d02fa3ac4e075a26bc4c197f5edb4d486939
describe
'3712388' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJM' 'sip-files00115.tif'
888ba5997267e5a6cc88982fb8dd94e7
26b1fef4b071004a73417346d18f27e45816bf28
'2012-01-22T23:35:36-05:00'
describe
'2020' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJN' 'sip-files00115.txt'
8cce5e80f9ad48d4b9af6900f26b5bf9
bf2b0f65668344a222a1eb56c16b8389de47cc80
describe
'23080' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJO' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
15b4bf6533fa9f28eea8f854d976b934
fabd2644ecbcd9db48f6b2dbc35923e015ab8306
describe
'462065' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJP' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
9b127b8efe040e192b50b58d4190f783
456027b597bb76ba9abf051b4c1a5667a3b7910d
describe
'160318' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJQ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
3df0a3606a25b5ee84456c4a119a897b
296bf5efa6d6f3618137099d49a8ef728ccc1d93
'2012-01-22T23:35:08-05:00'
describe
'49145' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJR' 'sip-files00116.pro'
d01730c30152eb821d618e36e3e598e7
698c1bafe8da042feade11399358836e199baf4b
describe
'58727' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJS' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
3f567bc7cc699f7cdc55aee7f3effd18
56449e5c168ed9fb19c263d29de931754da5d2d8
describe
'3710436' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJT' 'sip-files00116.tif'
f59577a8213440991694e4f1e2877aff
04ff90f26201b2618f340765d68602f15e48fad2
'2012-01-22T23:33:54-05:00'
describe
'2046' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJU' 'sip-files00116.txt'
fc6d10e3307d3207b12a40e7ec08f16c
4d98d5161407b0476025b6712556e0ce300c7f71
'2012-01-22T23:32:05-05:00'
describe
'23247' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJV' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
03db2c36a5eafe789dccce89abf86623
1d0175cd1c261d887335f5e2be0cc524650dd743
describe
'462121' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJW' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
6c54f5d11801e8b9bbfcda77fe436c92
e748ec54cce27e7b18220d7d1bcb65337fc50589
describe
'172681' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJX' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
366444b2615cc8989e546791da8d5c2d
ec63215cec398eaaf0af67ffe55cda53227f1b9e
describe
'53179' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJY' 'sip-files00117.pro'
1ec9bc33a33b16436ac4e26e3011c1a2
8d9611966c78d7f129aba49f50985357692d7adb
describe
'62211' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMJZ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
2d265ba2d4afee7fe3d9326e9dddba2b
89a46ecaf6d4d1a866c9b1d73b5e0e80070de5b8
describe
'3710280' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKA' 'sip-files00117.tif'
b018707c1c4afc87dc09b13b91d2faaa
889833506a1283601577b0535b1107c4b45ac50e
describe
'2211' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKB' 'sip-files00117.txt'
1c6625ddedb60e61e7133cfdaaef8cbe
74958012677235ed1d03b50a8a6c6de2cd27fde5
describe
'23630' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKC' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
45d8939f4046d2061964d052424e594f
3a94892fecd6b2732ee438dbc901552824c9d508
'2012-01-22T23:42:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKD' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
48bd0f42d046244c993c0e0db47bc6f1
dc2a44e00eac35ec6f7813c06a9f1cfd8a5dbb0e
'2012-01-22T23:43:49-05:00'
describe
'163752' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKE' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
c33d7d9694d0cf2a665873079719b8bf
3938d4e40331e65c489cb9c35a4c0e0b7b795cf3
describe
'49346' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKF' 'sip-files00118.pro'
224126efd121fea2fc344c4e0918a035
19b1aefc475bfb3a3890e85cbac709e8218f1bcc
describe
'58233' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKG' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
71e6b36ec13155d8032ff8ce3620676b
f0cff1dfb200ef8ac97f1137125f9720fa59242f
describe
'3712320' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKH' 'sip-files00118.tif'
999c1f306cc6b4c45584c4f29b3279b9
fe6f4da07d4bbb6755fa5c1aa5630bf26288cfcd
'2012-01-22T23:42:12-05:00'
describe
'2040' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKI' 'sip-files00118.txt'
6df786ccaebb47a0c6f1494c104342ea
3557c585618314a121594fc7a430e737e981e870
describe
'22750' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKJ' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
9e4a6bf594c58910b105cf4e91f61bbc
a06db2704711c5eb55fb9f51d3db738f1812112a
'2012-01-22T23:43:14-05:00'
describe
'335980' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKK' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
b369405a94ba63d63e6d9b6741a5b61c
38c9070aa2a161424996bea49fdb2671f649253a
'2012-01-22T23:35:31-05:00'
describe
'249093' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKL' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
e65539b223aa87691107b95d8ee2faaf
1d7484a4cb6c764d5625632d52d713c1103baebf
'2012-01-22T23:38:29-05:00'
describe
'2125' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKM' 'sip-files00119.pro'
7c08f991f6e0bd40e92dd98500c3cef4
0bc5b7646cbdbe1c08947c75704af186b752bee7
describe
'61198' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKN' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
eca3017d2057bd6625a5dc28d8eee479
8745abac03ef801ba456d28d1b0613b6f7fb1ec3
describe
'2701620' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKO' 'sip-files00119.tif'
c1580251d67128031e703454482b6987
db8024a41c042c944232fd6c26cc7afead4ecd63
describe
'233' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKP' 'sip-files00119.txt'
2583321bd74d471cdbece729db39230f
42d94a84e65a4b0bf60897697a36793f7037a2c5
describe
'22358' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKQ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
65a4ae84c81b324aa9a588af45ad719c
3ded5c8a0df214bc7333511c1277c52b63bea1d0
'2012-01-22T23:43:13-05:00'
describe
'3871' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKR' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
5f471f4df37d5aba44ed216541483d73
21d42294d73154a36f67d0601847fe8a8e5dae04
'2012-01-22T23:33:34-05:00'
describe
'11043' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKS' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
cf8dc3504d7c0d162802f61eda38462b
ae5c3bf6b920bb204c5594448427fdabf47656b5
describe
'9251' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKT' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
fb357b8b2e71519b30b3b0abce028290
1c9f341d9796c5f352b1308d136d80be8be6edf0
'2012-01-22T23:37:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKU' 'sip-files00120.tif'
de111d8f4bce0f45712d103f0f6deb80
23b41e249481d9558a12e14c8c4df5eaadf9ac87
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKV' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
4b072b64009d7d19fc21270f41761fcf
cf5e56ae954aa8ac8e8518c5fe632f9ecd9d535c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKW' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
49a6cb3ed4b43bfe641085005975816d
1218cc2533848a5669243b529949ce2533ce28d4
'2012-01-22T23:33:08-05:00'
describe
'147066' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKX' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
7c5c9f9d9774521d093b18a3901e5607
007bc2e81918352411041559c173a20c1b312249
describe
'46464' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKY' 'sip-files00121.pro'
7ad760c095db188b627d2f31aa60fd8e
437b4725a7f88f7822c3f256a72082bb712e1d04
describe
'53686' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMKZ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
713c70353f31be0197f9f6f7d58bdb81
8897b3c1686c5ccdf327e056300b685e36cc9fa6
describe
'3712044' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLA' 'sip-files00121.tif'
e166ed10b0ad8034fc168ea1bb1c03ed
c72de8eb534735fd7b68d76142e1b74be2275703
'2012-01-22T23:39:39-05:00'
describe
'1917' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLB' 'sip-files00121.txt'
71de65ced290fad8c45679adfde26c8c
58c5e103c8035ccca13a2e3ef1d9f1a2723a4ba8
describe
'21952' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLC' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
75e0467474e2626dc3a8c3710c282058
b77a6905a4c15c9b7463473f9b7a14bd301ae3b4
'2012-01-22T23:44:19-05:00'
describe
'462454' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLD' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
0975586a43cfe4954400f20880e277c3
5716f7e1cd277de174b9c412cfced17f6f313d55
describe
'160261' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLE' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
01fe3b29b486025ba1628249d08971e6
65a7faf1006dc64df3f3be5f36e7ded20a19e083
'2012-01-22T23:43:23-05:00'
describe
'50641' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLF' 'sip-files00122.pro'
5733d9fcd64c4236ad5981bd62166fb6
db22a8b6f811f3826c114a2c53a5492897fd8f67
'2012-01-22T23:40:39-05:00'
describe
'57890' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLG' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
bb03b99e49c882c61af6d9acf528bbe7
53d289e276442c5df592cbacfdfd5b5c15ff0c96
describe
'3712360' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLH' 'sip-files00122.tif'
95b630c4239a557c09236fa7f944a505
e203eee039b46be36ad75d48b6958e9c4d0cd843
'2012-01-22T23:35:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLI' 'sip-files00122.txt'
a568117a140dfaf9e9381cbd6e39a97e
068ce04375fe44350d7b256c2af7193cbff1f1cc
describe
'22500' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLJ' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
d67747526d4dfd4780714214c777dca6
39e6cf88d567734a2f655c7d035e2b04276f262d
describe
'328742' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLK' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
8c32113b65feca53af26e179c2145e5e
3392c1e5f77540557ae1760b11691a1829f9db25
describe
'209020' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLL' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
a4015a23d19ae9360234dfff3ca3e0c6
a517ada2f4d16f5f761c2bf5469d7387888f5665
describe
'2611' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLM' 'sip-files00123.pro'
90b9763360221d8488a8b17602242596
74872738bd862072c42cf7382d945d45a725dae4
describe
'57956' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLN' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
8c73d8c56ef8d1ddc7603e3a409d43a8
053bef6530653339c65babe80dcaab3013e6e7e3
'2012-01-22T23:38:52-05:00'
describe
'2644664' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLO' 'sip-files00123.tif'
2eba15f09ee629ac846680723aa041ee
924d15931e75fbd6467a56ace916bd31c810abca
describe
'117' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLP' 'sip-files00123.txt'
7846ec98ca754665746fa772559818ce
ac50a37cae1d392a990bec11a5d82aacb1d648ab
'2012-01-22T23:39:52-05:00'
describe
'24008' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLQ' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
1bf3655ea223d426db210a56ef87006b
1f1fdbc08965450ff33c896758dc77c84394d8f2
'2012-01-22T23:40:35-05:00'
describe
'2928' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLR' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
e73fccb4a91465adfe1946ea5499fe5b
8f74f35560773493e713091ff5363052b1f35fa0
describe
'11009' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLS' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
fe654aa32c02b7ad3ad429c30e227afb
cc618f72fd6503dde56c05da2e17c4b967036af4
'2012-01-22T23:42:33-05:00'
describe
'9232' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLT' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
51c1e027699785f8ba44d1f6ffe42454
856061faa60660de510912ce61712b1a22e27238
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLU' 'sip-files00124.tif'
a971def9a463896f90ac140c5567974e
9a1563722854f83d30d35d587ab6100ee06465fd
describe
'8769' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLV' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
f8aa88a854fe78884ad49ebb0af23f37
c29ad110c40ee1735e5038a5970ef8cae206549b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLW' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
8fd190ffd33d21ae2bf84d50cb142766
6b4326f56f677bf3ef61046d42106351f66501ea
'2012-01-22T23:43:52-05:00'
describe
'166391' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLX' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
8c6811eb759f95fd919d61775e7cb4fa
6cfb9fb8df5626c2c72402704cfb82802f987573
'2012-01-22T23:35:12-05:00'
describe
'51090' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLY' 'sip-files00125.pro'
ed17e0f618ca02ea7955166197fff99f
96a0dec7858991712c68d4cdc46381916d5c0030
'2012-01-22T23:42:17-05:00'
describe
'59031' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMLZ' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
1324bb46dcbce4a53783ace8d21ff4a5
056d8e78a6924d3e6edae04120c122438956e830
describe
'3710052' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMA' 'sip-files00125.tif'
b2470739bc3aa0e084b2ac93e75ec02e
c5b2c9496b538a2e85b75d96a9955807716ea8fd
describe
'2129' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMB' 'sip-files00125.txt'
6887a6b9134030576316cd402b27a488
dc90942c34667dc72a52b8c977232b461e9a67ed
describe
'22945' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMC' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
617a997c51a3364fa3b4c9a6454e276d
a1306356ae02d1ea4b29e012e50973a66a5d5274
describe
'462174' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMD' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
0992f17ed39912415dccf364c10f1b30
7c1e44d71471e2c6fff574d0d13e5044afb95de4
describe
'169238' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMME' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
d58282420d179512fb15447c148d2e2c
ecb80499571756038556e25cc266f65e05920118
describe
'52678' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMF' 'sip-files00126.pro'
125f1108ac32c22f83407a5c0c62033f
b59d60e409c7b5678932e8e2540b7ff73cb4b985
describe
'60587' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMG' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
ef425e86bd1719cd4e8c7315401dda36
228f982e10e3247e72457d92ebaf1ea837a541dd
describe
'3710284' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMH' 'sip-files00126.tif'
37a2c3d25661e8216fd40d420fa9b923
ef0cc9b757b25a9b77255490a69057582cee6e77
describe
'2077' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMI' 'sip-files00126.txt'
4db77a7a6065ade8521336dbd193e047
a1ecc9c3ba7ad3d231669da6a03da47030c47329
describe
'22789' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMJ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
5da30e444b2c02ddfaf64d6a38a004e6
118a62ba48410461f2877255787231147ddee8c4
'2012-01-22T23:40:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMK' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
c0672541038508ae7b3fdc6de173f5a1
53a318ae22f5f16870d7cf18e6ed9299ac400d25
describe
'166362' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMML' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
ecda3e11b2d5df63c582ef86de1da139
32a995fd8bb7f49aa1a7ec191202ce5793b09a2a
describe
'50441' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMM' 'sip-files00127.pro'
3160d68f9204bb03f995f68fee4b252d
f0dfba2a8f7bcd581f79330aba6437ec0cd121ed
'2012-01-22T23:38:22-05:00'
describe
'59900' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMN' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
b96e2b15dbde70cf06fac3ad166b18c0
630e318bd520e3b401b18b7093d8efb89f564a1f
'2012-01-22T23:38:40-05:00'
describe
'3710192' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMO' 'sip-files00127.tif'
8aa163f5ee7ccbd43f5d99815cd4c5ae
0b6b854fd5377b1bb70344bd05acb544895ac231
describe
'2104' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMP' 'sip-files00127.txt'
4277ee206f3bfed564e591547e56d3bd
9ccf5a95ca7a4eab4f249df9edaeb7febd4048ec
describe
'23301' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMQ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
29639ac0ff9bc8bcba6e3a016cd1c6b6
3d06c83fc18b65d91f7f3d7ceb46cb01c559fa41
describe
'462463' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMR' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
1f258b64bc2b33a4a202c7e1c6b8bf8d
699d1dbeb6e57b1fd42ed24a822f213e5c0815a8
describe
'167995' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMS' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
f5938c1825052945211d34949acc968e
96a92536e63a4ab6505288dcb553c625a344ba81
describe
'49314' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMT' 'sip-files00128.pro'
342ee235d76d220d1d3dd14a78bf4dc3
f396b3d6e7f24108ebcce51a88a8d3aa39ab642e
'2012-01-22T23:41:24-05:00'
describe
'60127' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMU' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
3df8194b869c3e444201b67bdac4834f
90fa643ac1d846ae9ac9661bacd160c2d4378f0a
'2012-01-22T23:40:10-05:00'
describe
'3712872' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMV' 'sip-files00128.tif'
bc690fdf623e80c67cb1ab441ef1bd06
5c5868850cf8e2786d08a87576abc6e6bbbde254
describe
'2026' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMW' 'sip-files00128.txt'
ca00f8bca93cacc095b46a8e4eaa1d33
3fde9db0990e0c078f501ace462555889ec2cf46
describe
'23679' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMX' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
354d31dea8d1ca5d518bda45259c25be
5e7d2de7b2e823c699d3af3459bf3f5f11e4d606
describe
'393607' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMY' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
379f95da6ae0606f30993823fdd5b865
98ff88296c54ca742a3d77639b7e39b6601041e5
describe
'65810' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMMZ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
617ad3aca77f3d10edf6da815394d418
4a4e607d6ac08bb872d778991c815bf05057bfdc
'2012-01-22T23:38:25-05:00'
describe
'11196' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNA' 'sip-files00129.pro'
836cebc76a0bbc3fb8d21ba1d347890c
9a4503941b8ca81bf775254358835e2762b87a44
'2012-01-22T23:32:27-05:00'
describe
'26788' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNB' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
882eb3a05adb1fa29500e3e8b2aa2c23
50bb8e923946dc1ba5b330ab14eb0515e4924f2e
describe
'3707256' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNC' 'sip-files00129.tif'
9052f31244d1a0febe0e595045368a22
de9226cc0fd48f9168adf21eec9734c92461cfe6
describe
'493' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMND' 'sip-files00129.txt'
34d9dceda0a86c98dbb1ed07c14c3c86
3fb05f6410524980b755019c0b592efdd84857d9
describe
'14391' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNE' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
c783b68155cb63b5ee5504a9c30666a6
072fe464f05596a3fc8fbad71362f475c85841a8
describe
'471348' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNF' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
1f0245c572384f2f7d3c19c5649282ef
29c8a01a33e43b7835726922e25b4fb30528c02d
describe
'145198' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNG' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
329fc88e286027eaa1e07a9951f00e4c
708e448c8c9f33b712b86452e5547cc2145d4d5f
'2012-01-22T23:40:00-05:00'
describe
'19679' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNH' 'sip-files00130.pro'
64c4b4977ce39047be28764ef0d81afc
e0254b4ceee49f1f2e160f7e675a0221d6f65953
describe
'48531' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNI' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
d69b553857c1ba334b4542b8396a6362
3173988bdb5040fd9176765bea9150dc24c38297
describe
'3783636' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNJ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
033b460a8d558913725a3bb91f6cbedb
c9359e9a58ffcbda99d25cae8e19c8b87e76bd4e
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNK' 'sip-files00130.txt'
4286666015a61eb90f313f1a04e74e13
9376380d7c6bed6b2a5643f1a6dccd55cbe69f09
'2012-01-22T23:32:17-05:00'
describe
'21129' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNL' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
988c2126279539c6f694b5e6eccbdecb
df696883635436b9e9fea995952abc123a6886c9
describe
'462133' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNM' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
267e2d17104c503f6e96d439f609bf93
a6e0622416cee6c260c16f7f3d41a8edb5566864
describe
'175768' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNN' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
0d788c25a0f3bde82869e517f4c5b5f7
260faf6b29319a8fde10fe7a5b2a2f33fcea1836
'2012-01-22T23:38:17-05:00'
describe
'53175' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNO' 'sip-files00131.pro'
ffd25c35f59a43b3c8d4f2c723188b2b
98cc5e0a95d076e64396d53355bc2d9b25487bc0
'2012-01-22T23:32:46-05:00'
describe
'63700' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNP' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
3cf45870ab6582d837ea8f6d4505a662
ecc8e950cb84f73c3e7cec81b27e43b7973a1aca
'2012-01-22T23:42:29-05:00'
describe
'3710556' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNQ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
484175fa14e51cc9377b479321020731
b639d8bda809f9d6f630eddf543e5fb7c77c89c6
'2012-01-22T23:42:22-05:00'
describe
'2197' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNR' 'sip-files00131.txt'
e19e4c66bd7113f8802ef6482f3a5319
98a5782292268cafb1b3f72f2ad05fdf77f92df0
describe
'23707' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNS' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
30acd55f4caf044477649858b75c2cdc
539c27014127cdba1b4b691daa8354c6e574d14a
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNT' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
91bd3f7acc38df5b8560f032beb1c4b6
aa9a5f3625b7e84292c34a49c695924a8a08dbea
describe
'164397' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNU' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
ef27ff2a72c76b4f319904df5d1ed2e1
15aa624020bb1aeee6fb72176f7463e842cd59d8
'2012-01-22T23:38:16-05:00'
describe
'49712' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNV' 'sip-files00132.pro'
f72b3cbdd8856f363b19f82f73b2d4a8
9b87cda400298bcc65fd17f9c62fd6e104c9932a
describe
'59507' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNW' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
2bae32533de8543d185d8fd5be48be85
5ed8c8ca1ea770cd3f672ff04a7d55be4f8464c5
describe
'3710432' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNX' 'sip-files00132.tif'
c216b600c29a7567743d374e23941214
7aaa4a3c301de9999113b64932b9e185357cc26c
describe
'2065' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNY' 'sip-files00132.txt'
dfe8177e6e8c4e52e7ae811e35e674c4
3dfa9bc111681a2091756f98bcf424d8b4f6a8ea
describe
'23413' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMNZ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
ffff494e4082d8ae35f1cbe8c7774a8c
28506c5310dcfc4d71080b15ec00d40af43f1d03
describe
'329089' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOA' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
9e1a41f19d8ecb5d5513276b273ed76d
f2e2991e6147b9fb5682af1c95bb65f50d54c689
'2012-01-22T23:43:17-05:00'
describe
'116175' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOB' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
8b7a3f1868241e16d4b87c6ef1fa1d8d
53ce6f0794a2f06e54cab9ff3cd0a57309a39ff6
describe
'3178' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOC' 'sip-files00133.pro'
cda5458f94359d8cf5e5bce87f12c1bd
8f0b1f256eeb768f8fde232905a2e27e1cfcae1a
describe
'38368' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOD' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
cf1c9255842d34e23c4c764087296d18
9feb17066dbaeaffbc173b712a0d03dc054acaf6
describe
'2647388' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOE' 'sip-files00133.tif'
78624f66ce29dbbcfdccff5c5658f9cf
a1d67391047b965e34bf3382b7c1578deebb170c
describe
'171' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOF' 'sip-files00133.txt'
e71d7198223bb3db243d91629b0b855d
209c0217ae75a7eeba8736f3a4a97603dc36d2c7
describe
Invalid character
'20161' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOG' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
3447238a8837f56c82240e53ac2002c4
b352015e402f42b482beb756ea6f9a906929172e
describe
'3988' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOH' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
5eb4e48ae54d3f958b37f1526627e1fe
383549de9aa1b823aee3f7f8aecb00021f1e5765
describe
'11051' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOI' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
ddbf3d848b182acebef3c8e872740c89
25cca70dd92ec5a4b001ce92ae2320df881ffb83
describe
'9236' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOJ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
dd90872c0c8c269447f00d3127548a2d
5ce4d49f2558eeaba8d7511bc9b87e140f991a8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOK' 'sip-files00134.tif'
ec79f8b05f7305916ba430a7b35cc706
3ed0a2220ecd742a950180986cf015ffc05c6a63
describe
'8771' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOL' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
8deb307b7a3450d181055d64f31af66d
ef7dee2776d8432d2b9c149aa9a66a2dd219db75
describe
'462076' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOM' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
f611fa993f99acf163ccf72c270891e8
c67616bf41c293d60b612ca8c09cbd89332136ad
describe
'140760' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMON' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
91b7cb2b62b0a89d364c3abf02340784
6a2bf1f8499379c2bdb9ff6f15c858b23c3140a2
'2012-01-22T23:38:43-05:00'
describe
'22180' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOO' 'sip-files00135.pro'
3d27c90c7da2ad43cb9783d795aeb20a
eda66568caedec59f2e5681b9208a01d6120f778
'2012-01-22T23:33:36-05:00'
describe
'46620' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOP' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
cb0b1ba01b5c45a34f431dc24354d6fb
aa805b613a4c83fac69809299339b044f17cc491
describe
'3709528' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOQ' 'sip-files00135.tif'
276abe913f0062375304feb8dcb187e7
ffa9254915ef963eb97da0a7cd835aab9485331e
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOR' 'sip-files00135.txt'
d9e91fcff59ef0bbdaf8a48950e9cbd5
dbeb56c8eb71afb2071488e40f44cee570df7bdb
describe
'20918' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOS' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
91d07df6f38134e263bbce6619f65f1b
4955cf5288c9e419567bc29b9352eb4d209dac86
'2012-01-22T23:30:13-05:00'
describe
'348198' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOT' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
ffa813e5bac92bf58d7e74fd91881b0a
b56de3aa66390ca7640373ad29dc2d5c5e1ea9e8
'2012-01-22T23:36:23-05:00'
describe
'195489' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOU' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
7fbf249301bddc9a89bc95422dca94a0
d7624e7649609521e61af49096d409b7f631407e
describe
'6984' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOV' 'sip-files00136.pro'
8f34a53abbcdfb287707bacb9df67cfb
92cf6a02b02488a60cf3a27fc23a960fa080f216
describe
'55462' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOW' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
be64b21f223900812be691171dad7efd
42e30831ebb5c1ba8ed42e014bd59d2fd60d2e6e
describe
'2798612' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOX' 'sip-files00136.tif'
0b581e11c8c50c4b1a3671d09bb73d69
cdbee35df631899e17670be22afee1b084bd348f
describe
'343' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOY' 'sip-files00136.txt'
df8cac1586fd79566bb0505049b32bb5
ddf07fb0fb35a0ba8f2334bb4ede68abe6b9cc96
describe
'22167' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMOZ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
bb2f2bb2ec3f3d48981e1409b837b75b
d39fa6b0b56485566e19f64c02269f1cc1decac7
'2012-01-22T23:42:21-05:00'
describe
'462159' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPA' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
afeceda7589039cb7042969cbd344d96
06133c918048e24ed83c1bf0fe3f196d0a955097
describe
'165067' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPB' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
1a4973c73b4b5cda1ac80dc54d55106b
6600be0d041f23c1f55337b1722cb6c366fe68bb
'2012-01-22T23:38:37-05:00'
describe
'51049' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPC' 'sip-files00137.pro'
39e8a20666502bb853a314839912360e
f405ca69d346d2398e4261e51e832044971212ab
describe
'59852' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPD' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
0ad86f1b61e64bfda218cd387a2e4e75
d42231cd81c1d55a4fe4e46ae13c32f5720fe3e6
'2012-01-22T23:41:26-05:00'
describe
'3710328' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPE' 'sip-files00137.tif'
bf9265abdf3fb9c388fd15e151c61eb5
de5b6ba6075a6d0d0673034263323f3bc5893b66
describe
'2038' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPF' 'sip-files00137.txt'
884928755d0f8bfb53f14161c53d13ee
ed7c8cc36926fac0569fbca3f3f09551af7314bb
describe
'23742' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPG' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
49bdb46e68ecc6f957e9dbfce963f61a
399de3061a71b4b2074ba58143edb4a4d66c991d
describe
'462177' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPH' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
32bf8aa7ec48f15b3c8797b4650ee3ab
64f2a8b5dd59b25f3257f2301387ad9d55bf209a
'2012-01-22T23:30:34-05:00'
describe
'153548' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPI' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
e19a33051cf1799affe2c50c5abcb007
0ce1dc39a6928fb73c19bb6571a461a07750044f
describe
'47587' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPJ' 'sip-files00138.pro'
fc45c93ea6aa02c1e533d661a122adf6
d124c00f2142f90e3e763011e265547b46487543
describe
'57266' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPK' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
c40198c6249509a341ce7e8391d0bed2
2d11e395149fafe7941027acc04378b07ad9a3aa
'2012-01-22T23:31:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPL' 'sip-files00138.tif'
4338675618e94ee2f96487e44d64b072
6e16877ee6c784198320056488b6e843306c126c
describe
'1904' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPM' 'sip-files00138.txt'
090fd07b5b69fa623c1e8ba5b29e5fe4
4078238592a222d3bd4d0983212f287ab64d4fe6
describe
'23166' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPN' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
94abba1da9ea47d72ed43bb4bf55c389
de8ece1673d38975c77623ae9e08e94257d4e367
describe
'332141' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPO' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
08c1ff670984971eb6dba9bdd1ee0710
c5cd6bfe50a56803cda6d82fe24d0a625219de70
describe
'231437' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPP' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
b8e7fb40f5abd1e3cb8ab6acfa14dd21
e31eb6286414a37af2e02f5613875d3f272828eb
describe
'2840' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPQ' 'sip-files00139.pro'
701e07ea92bf33da9b39833441a85466
34da6aeb24945b53b67e8e14f4a0b74c8c84fefd
describe
'63467' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPR' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
1be74d497e14950bc7045b67605584dd
48ccb87c8c06c40b71beec910b3f79378e102b37
describe
'2672020' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPS' 'sip-files00139.tif'
f7f181c43d8efd83719573ffa2727be5
160847f805db557c0d491a15d5f80537428f89bf
describe
'252' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPT' 'sip-files00139.txt'
1bf07179d2a9a20c559efda5e28cfd95
8e54de1eb662f7b5fbbfde0fa766fbdbbf8dd5a2
'2012-01-22T23:40:55-05:00'
describe
'24848' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPU' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
87c7396b57b4034ef0f6136790a4b3d1
dcf5c7496a9f1fe50fbfbfa22e18e3eb6929a2db
'2012-01-22T23:41:32-05:00'
describe
'3705' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPV' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
5516881fefc516b33834afe115c908a6
37f05fd93cc08bd36024dd339c2f74f8ca31b859
describe
'11057' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPW' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
e8c7542e80140dce2bd754872353bea4
487c9cc49ea0b02a97b24921b2cd8f30dce8d92d
describe
'9253' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPX' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
85aae465385e9f602d53d375a0974b3a
e61941f05113c0d726f11d24f35850e05e110f4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPY' 'sip-files00140.tif'
09de8680140132640cf6eed26e35b70b
f04823e0515b2fae34814a42436311d470f38617
'2012-01-22T23:42:02-05:00'
describe
'8773' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMPZ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
4f5f99b9edaa2222d34673ec63255cc2
83b085d3afa4c42af297c42e171c307cca060c12
describe
'462168' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQA' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
0ff80526aa04edf28a7cf444c4d255aa
c9e9e077421e0170cd24fe258977514e56c05757
describe
'170218' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQB' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
9a081bf83ddfb2ff5278dab1654c310b
e88e0e4acbd25f0e6d098aad8032c7e925cf166d
describe
'53226' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQC' 'sip-files00141.pro'
538caf2837586314af5cbd1f03d06ee5
a048942decd306649818f76ba5862fd23e170223
describe
'61415' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQD' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
60e5180fd20756ca0d8ed9a70161cafa
eb93707cf5b39f03023d8ffa58325f3b40c165de
'2012-01-22T23:39:36-05:00'
describe
'3710352' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQE' 'sip-files00141.tif'
4e8c486dbf30f572b227db2108a0ee8c
e86366e518cd1c6be8fdbc1ad1c2ddcc84ce203f
'2012-01-22T23:35:51-05:00'
describe
'2137' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQF' 'sip-files00141.txt'
ebf1d0c35e613d16e540e116c421afe2
b908ca379d0d3b38b9137d9fe71c348cbd1888e2
describe
'23881' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQG' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
8e97ca1b0482a137fdd0ba49fb4c9e59
5a0df92a70c4a303daec4992e586166c58b5326b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQH' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
8dad30b6c4aeb6e8ebaf09eb66baec51
6a19edf0f0f2a2d032fd97c40b81bd9850789b1b
describe
'176556' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQI' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
e8554f3a3653932f733292feedbaf7df
27ffa994cda6d9cfb06ac20f835b09e92bebc0ef
'2012-01-22T23:32:26-05:00'
describe
'56482' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQJ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
81ef3484d0718e0b5e817899bc50eedb
3c16fcf88ea3fd5d82570071775eadaf39b42f15
describe
'63741' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQK' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
c7e390ab6487eaeeba5f96e43e0649f7
f3b29d60a2caad79b808c79382fa12ad15fac00a
describe
'3710576' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQL' 'sip-files00142.tif'
07ff951756dbceddb8e310f3511374a8
89484dc43c23afd44941068884c7f355281f8e65
describe
'2230' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQM' 'sip-files00142.txt'
d234740275758a62549895771c8d1d96
1fcf84a8ca72a64689fae57c9461fef7cbc385af
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQN' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
9d4d1d6651fc9c7f99c0baad3ec951ec
c37c1f1400492a0831b6f43401ec38a2d6af93d3
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQO' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
9ed6f1168600b9596b7324ae77c33f21
87c644479501980a93547e5df4726ac20cd65439
describe
'167020' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQP' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
d7a82fabf8cbb0d37bd7514e73799ecf
93667d06bfde01192f1f4cc6843b05f2de10f42c
describe
'50459' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQQ' 'sip-files00143.pro'
434edfe6a57449252d6767b5394b62a2
fa0a97ce812c814e57abb8f18a6f4ff5f8d2a095
'2012-01-22T23:42:54-05:00'
describe
'60062' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQR' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
0d99b5c38b31652393ce3cef44cbc767
309cc5649137ded95abf9713310421718a87dc23
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQS' 'sip-files00143.tif'
1783ad78b6533c855fdd8257edf5754a
9568d227615fed63f0402e6771b02d514eed82d8
'2012-01-22T23:35:15-05:00'
describe
'2010' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQT' 'sip-files00143.txt'
e9b0889903cd67ace27e5a1db5106bf9
4a21473e516ba5e01f9a3f0b8aa929f08a042c34
describe
'23437' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQU' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
bfa751910702bb86e2fc9ebc3d7bcdd3
d6d7363a039b8cf167e76714c68ffc621c685d13
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQV' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
bb793a9613db01991ef10c81515e0277
4f1cf7233af4539b7c8789194e8fe7b27eb679bc
describe
'170818' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQW' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
a465847e57200a3ee65aff4459798f04
3913e05cbc1b4ee75b1bcd69e8b8e775577bae63
describe
'54130' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQX' 'sip-files00144.pro'
c9a024575b64b345eb4c9da8d7b1f94e
894795b3bc287aeecf9a9a6519595e9d7b05ce2a
'2012-01-22T23:37:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQY' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
2b3b8c3ad21fe1dd1d70527bac220806
a8570b0dfa494a86797443eb4b9ec9c997c1cf2e
describe
'3712772' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMQZ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
607727945394a41264bee01a0c5aa77f
57218a662133ce7e0b6626d24c667f95878fd730
'2012-01-22T23:42:30-05:00'
describe
'2155' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRA' 'sip-files00144.txt'
66074740a19f09b6e8e0485a35912f40
7c685c05b614d9aa978229ace551e9de89e6024c
'2012-01-22T23:36:19-05:00'
describe
'23251' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRB' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
e8cd9d4354b083de9d8bd9803f3ab34d
3dc604b10b11aaf2c101f46429b24fa4bc1942d0
describe
'334740' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRC' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
12f0bebf39d6008bd3e37651ec4503a8
cc46274a5c4aa1c86867dfd969ae473c692a8a04
describe
'121382' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRD' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
2869c0062371d68e8287a8c0992f22e1
548b68abb7862ecf7bc14d08c32f49ba53327f70
describe
'5908' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRE' 'sip-files00145.pro'
edc61838d7adcd6a15b3c6f514457ebc
5e36ff00f2d947e471b66b206e4ee085ac7e259c
describe
'38591' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRF' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
754d8a99713c1324f6060c0fba2c72ea
f5905d32d7f8c1724b04fccb96d2cd1a18689ef6
describe
'2692924' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRG' 'sip-files00145.tif'
f2cfa21c9f2e07555bde1e460343718e
6b3fedb6f8c2538ad9c1230dea5cceed6229ae32
describe
'432' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRH' 'sip-files00145.txt'
e15b28a7049d62fbcdf77320d6255157
a231d1a72cc5394516ed31856f8806a02acb8ebf
describe
'19825' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRI' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
2b79cbda023a3a20348af56af7fdc0eb
79fdddaacdb5257497daa5e0c597ddfad2b3ea47
describe
'6087' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRJ' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
d9bce84916328a37e9287d119e1614dd
989abcdcb6ae55eeff20997cb67f04ee3b120da6
'2012-01-22T23:42:56-05:00'
describe
'11150' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRK' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
6d09a2c7f1bba6d75ae671811fab3bde
de7db2f1c4b9a127ed7cff8599671353b084c7be
'2012-01-22T23:39:32-05:00'
describe
'9272' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRL' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
7a7ea5e749b2cbf332734ee8efa1fbc4
fec2716c2353c51367f5686a4901f9a353bfb2a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRM' 'sip-files00146.tif'
af266b3ca729c22c34d3abb74938f5d3
9d4caa61650031f2555b2ea20274e1d6ddf82043
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRN' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
415576d2ca2ab44cf8c028765ec20790
de181d48a1e1bfac16b98699260dcab6e18e2fc8
describe
'462377' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRO' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
b98426fa1e792decba44d78c38f4b20c
f241692d272e8f2888517b52e46dc754fc627b8e
describe
'163863' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRP' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
bce67d542ee50c4dbdf4a153486ebbb0
9844575813fc97d20a887beec8f81d8645638509
describe
'50123' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRQ' 'sip-files00147.pro'
7d6d59e479a08d2b98c01db05b70b10f
dd949c872854f3741195d602168349d73782a630
'2012-01-22T23:32:22-05:00'
describe
'59330' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRR' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
a6ed23d0ea2154fa1dc91fb0d32cacd3
180f85d0fe6156232bbc46c88f07d20cefc55592
describe
'3711700' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRS' 'sip-files00147.tif'
ea5b194ff15480cfc91bdc16161509f6
99760f252ac8c44d5b734e07378a978d7ef8a20f
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRT' 'sip-files00147.txt'
a4e22fb18f095b5a1454a5c0078c48f0
c87daa275e2a70abb0e46d4ffd92dbfe68892f6b
describe
'23068' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRU' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
01dc94075e855d965310880d6f71bb59
4cccd312bdef0062cde565651433f89b29478b21
'2012-01-22T23:42:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRV' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
4f4dd8895077876c848c78b10b32df99
9b6cc4b65784ce8ed390c4179fdae80a6c1e9efb
describe
'158662' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRW' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
d63e34d6e6df4686cf21c00aebc13dfc
f9b8eabb2be9a7e760261d7d73c718aaeb9e9cd0
describe
'49763' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRX' 'sip-files00148.pro'
5ae1a1fed98b84de394091a539108a30
1a0632f3766617266a86ef031277e081834a64b8
describe
'57976' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRY' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
73eefc65bccea26dde6fa2d6aca3e8c2
e5203b6b26b822bfccf902c9884adb3fa27f454e
describe
'3712672' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMRZ' 'sip-files00148.tif'
84e83c772d49fad478b54463591ec86b
1f6f08a2bdba3c332f103867c604a291030c5588
'2012-01-22T23:43:26-05:00'
describe
'1985' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSA' 'sip-files00148.txt'
6d2c8afff45f83b2a8ccd660f4b8c6a3
5ac90246e4047901f5dfd9e485bfc7e849e6a9fb
'2012-01-22T23:44:06-05:00'
describe
'22963' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSB' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
f8a237859041654b3f5c5be5e9d5807e
be1028d9d05341a5986de27d2f0eb7e7402e8641
'2012-01-22T23:39:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSC' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
fe6425221dcf33f3fe64c3d00e07ab5c
94ca7af6fb584e3174d19501808d2273a4e695f7
describe
'174811' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSD' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
f56d87e2ded9049b1e5f9f072118f455
271c0092e61fcdd9532e346a6faf543f2aaae6ee
describe
'14612' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSE' 'sip-files00149.pro'
6150d6da73d8dc853a07262bec67f9f1
ed78271aaaeedaff03033ea69fdb865aab3b5d61
describe
'51137' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSF' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
50cdc7eb630406aa68a19446f8de0660
51dd83e204d315c43ff8aad09b526431295e4283
'2012-01-22T23:39:09-05:00'
describe
'3711928' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSG' 'sip-files00149.tif'
88f88830d77c7c49d92209b2fc6be4b6
0d4e9035f34ba7714fedd375356aabf62bbdaf4c
describe
'632' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSH' 'sip-files00149.txt'
348de0644328fec59127aecafbf71a23
234ccfb841b035afaed0911677c806edda16517a
describe
'21159' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSI' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
fbfdbc0edeb5084a9ae92ee4c22a2c9c
dd1c2d4bff5fd58f023334fe7dc7dc0e336007c4
'2012-01-22T23:41:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSJ' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
6dc3b4e70d2c5329256186bd6f320a85
ce7f36a8b9023d5d3ac2d630523c710cfdad95ed
'2012-01-22T23:35:21-05:00'
describe
'163780' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSK' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
ca6da3ced231724c6fe0db0b41c91e15
a7e146d41cd05747993da9b85566f12cc3e1bf2f
describe
'50382' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSL' 'sip-files00150.pro'
a40f042a08235b197e98695a4d49ade3
c7aa72fa08e49be80e98886c5c6138fc282a1569
'2012-01-22T23:41:37-05:00'
describe
'58532' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSM' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
6e181dd2b1a1632f4b333b9fe4e4ff48
a5ba8d9ff9fd890042f38397cd4a3c2eba5165b6
describe
'3710368' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSN' 'sip-files00150.tif'
94ad3a8b82cbe1860e43b17e6e652664
8995c0ffed082bb0dbbae0fb0e8f8e8ef15c4d54
'2012-01-22T23:43:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSO' 'sip-files00150.txt'
b53fab1923f879dcf696be491f28b9d3
9669e5a720d0c960a330a7ef4e4a001225e95a8c
'2012-01-22T23:37:54-05:00'
describe
'23355' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSP' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
bec8153e29de876d029f93881c0f2838
ea0841254e760c4685238890f82e55e1926d8b32
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSQ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
1b5cd226adc72aa377061afaa2cc364f
452c1a108a05934023f8b45738cf68ba3b211dc2
describe
'57005' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSR' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
0b36663747a57205a0d88a2645c0a15c
d2f28081794d1fb357347dd312ebf39cbc105750
describe
'12779' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSS' 'sip-files00151.pro'
f4a8efd7eca6d7ab4d31d5ab82874936
44b9715251f265be1b23a2262f573b2ec5843efc
describe
'23105' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMST' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
ca94405bc186037efcb6751e0cda9804
5e1bd7a82b20b38e171278a291134cd3b6b74e2f
describe
'3709072' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSU' 'sip-files00151.tif'
2083d9d25b9dd0e4389ad8a433451b6f
ba43789537b45f79fb580858738fa8cf23cea643
describe
'547' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSV' 'sip-files00151.txt'
7cf39bdfce70b0f10fb754ddb0740260
9c5675f8cae17852c8d9035594fde6d483535ece
describe
'13113' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSW' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
f9132b2f2a74f6cffe25746db022b3ef
8eb68c7e1b8382212aad42663fb8563fd7695b1f
describe
'462246' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSX' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
7a3ef0b27d78aa57a8ae02b97f82923e
47ee59e4c2f15f81b98fa72ba22a92dfdda46a18
describe
'154632' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSY' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
03866c08d7b2bb1b284f311fdcab88a8
2682b6e13b0975c3dff4cc4355cd92a8425c18ef
describe
'11653' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMSZ' 'sip-files00152.pro'
f49f226daebca8a74f0f13bf70748891
4126066e239ac02742da70f5e20caf9dc2e4789c
'2012-01-22T23:39:51-05:00'
describe
'46322' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTA' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
c8127ac22a5d2d56951d06ca90ddc75d
1c0216a492c2e8ca40c853f1b85b0e6ad6b49473
describe
'3711432' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTB' 'sip-files00152.tif'
708bc62404be54b2d45993446bc6efec
84a13d6be332ceeb1fcd4e79768f424eca8dceba
'2012-01-22T23:35:40-05:00'
describe
'569' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTC' 'sip-files00152.txt'
010ed6fad96541a8691411e7876f87da
0b99e3ae49a85940759155f5ac6bcf637cdda654
'2012-01-22T23:37:26-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'20303' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTD' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
2fafdd8079e49894b184504f154a6371
3efadf215a46552c8ce6795571139038404c533e
'2012-01-22T23:31:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTE' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
635cea975e4fa59c67bbe1a6c782684e
c86e26f79a87f54b8db0c4db38c1fd2899c4dc57
describe
'145653' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTF' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
32a0690d43b20eba5aa0765f70699bd6
3d0e2b09cb3a504717ed89e72d7bcd39e67571f9
describe
'42584' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTG' 'sip-files00153.pro'
323c76fdd3ef143944b328c93285b547
aafb64aa670cf4358eb34ff2a670cd4e5fa2d99c
describe
'53993' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTH' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
290431b169566ab88caa135d27533a2b
29e2b45b6e26c2023db1507388157a4546e1c448
'2012-01-22T23:33:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTI' 'sip-files00153.tif'
fcdb39849997ae648d8c5a38c0dcbca2
d00a7c39e3384d39fc979be8ead16bc92b184c32
describe
'1829' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTJ' 'sip-files00153.txt'
1b803ddf925d7ea7457c0bebf7961b3f
2f2b4f612a29b21e33a9dcb17b70a90b7a7a4f66
describe
'22173' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTK' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
efbdc3880d618f4b9162963fd4a10785
54056bdf4d12da956e62360f33c866a90d7a9722
'2012-01-22T23:40:05-05:00'
describe
'462473' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTL' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
3dad7239151ff6adce5ccf5f70a3f66b
e3fb55944dc1515d466780fb29e62796ff99e7de
describe
'153127' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTM' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
3f7723fbcff066fcc56d5657fab4372f
631aae54912b48a4c78e2c757e05d3430a3507c1
'2012-01-22T23:32:15-05:00'
describe
'45840' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTN' 'sip-files00154.pro'
c7aeeec99ae29f1bbf65738020325026
3a4128bd39823dc7a49178e90fc0d050a20f47f8
describe
'55779' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTO' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
e79aa3cb2fb94c0fde97510278c4c66e
d9d2daf29ce854c7bf4dcd67076a82d4daad2f54
'2012-01-22T23:39:43-05:00'
describe
'3712532' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTP' 'sip-files00154.tif'
1a2c787daa05ef3a1113c0f6705a1cc7
87ed58a5553964b3a443b0cbf76bcbd0ed4c7c0f
'2012-01-22T23:40:19-05:00'
describe
'1919' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTQ' 'sip-files00154.txt'
70692dee18d0c0bc906c46f630a29ba0
d1d24be7c439d38e2380ad336ee2a5a85d7905cd
describe
'22669' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTR' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
6f659339adbfb7fc2a752009f431ba53
fc7267f47b287a011b39682986ccd40cff42270b
describe
'462658' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTS' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
b89c4686bf49ea9bdac3143bef654eec
ea07f849d98a51eef95209dd403e674b2a62e3f1
describe
'123046' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTT' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
141db7c8871c71acb6d28678f79f1d13
61ab2d878a3939a04f9b063064f20312ec924234
describe
'15953' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTU' 'sip-files00155.pro'
a3b1277c6aa98dd2228a5fc43f9013f0
720f59af8c12f1c4d30bfd10e826756c0a4d3f5a
describe
'38873' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTV' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
0869faf7c7f1d74cb839950d011f8a28
c2c91d75ae3c0416d4b20db472a1a48226c28e46
describe
'3712220' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTW' 'sip-files00155.tif'
2c7c5b0fa51493c4636bed82dfee7bf9
aa8b42768a3d099ef1463b9022ff08f6b0e3b662
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTX' 'sip-files00155.txt'
b83e63626b35db41e42240b841cd892d
d9eeb8faba983906f6f12ffaadd8d6bd1dc81fa1
describe
'17447' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTY' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
f4d202371350f9fec3c19ee42cfe7c27
25dbab53255ac9f6eea9164ff94dea88cfbc2c84
describe
'462663' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMTZ' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
8ca2ecd30ba030489a29caf7c4a07894
f72c706334c25c21736b1a26326a25602fd4b55f
describe
'179723' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUA' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
9ae94354a4d3810097dd6c924092764d
4a0cb1ab4dd2fbb91792d8ce172cccabe5e882a0
'2012-01-22T23:42:18-05:00'
describe
'20088' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUB' 'sip-files00156.pro'
79d3d3f3c147fe8b3a5d12289a719b09
d2d16aaa74e552fafa01f1360174c64ac9d1a9f0
describe
'54705' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUC' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
5e409746edbe99e52d8369d9533eae89
483ea578e64222d75ed9f2c5f341abf848c3f846
describe
'3713964' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUD' 'sip-files00156.tif'
ddcf5c48a28aed4f64dd7c61faba9cea
93b778fe58e56744a9336c0dc128bb4bec37ab86
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUE' 'sip-files00156.txt'
f8b69bc351649e668363deff8c5604af
683d1c99b5770435424b39dc9c32d0d2183f4f37
'2012-01-22T23:34:23-05:00'
describe
'22288' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUF' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
8f032f5f34d6b3b68f340cc8fff29ec4
6e094f8fce5c28624b18d2ceef7aff80c7b45305
describe
'462386' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUG' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
1f79008aa06241e169ade23d12b46be5
4639406f0fb79bd64159fab8ba52ca50eefa73f2
describe
'156777' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUH' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
2eae5f8d68742c5f46be18b5156620fe
f22ff2c17e4daf063546a4cee73b0fdeee66ff8b
describe
'48117' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUI' 'sip-files00157.pro'
0799da4e91d90d3856090e54d3f2d524
a3182bc5dd623f464b4a93eea4a39ce448c26ac7
describe
'57928' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUJ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
b06fb718081b228439e1fa8e2a3f9820
2660c4a2ad6fbf7520b8ed2b260e742e62482f05
'2012-01-22T23:32:09-05:00'
describe
'3712696' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUK' 'sip-files00157.tif'
4467445d8413f2a951706dfe79574f1a
51496b03e29ccbba9abd12ccd0d32e2db9ef13f3
describe
'1935' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUL' 'sip-files00157.txt'
7b76c2d250e095b101f8b5406fb2be71
6e6689882b2567daee3446def0fbcd1af13a8668
describe
'22728' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUM' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
a28e01d7051380a4d96c2929532ebb5d
c727cfbef23725d7f8c1cb2eeb6ed4eeca434b45
describe
'462412' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUN' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
d477c812092c5a32657905a6d9b867e8
8fda94d872c9f449d29fa2da9cd21afda4327e40
describe
'176041' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUO' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
e184fa76d5f482e70590509ee2559226
c28d6d9d360c80494bc50e72e8fa4b5d176e0527
describe
'53449' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUP' 'sip-files00158.pro'
438cb7138e190fd6075ed281f3ea616d
2715d1f6ba105d88d1bd1e873c6a181380af9623
describe
'62015' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUQ' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
60282020bf5ef0a2999289e0da5a563a
ca632f460c94d7b623e571d3043ecd6105a1775e
describe
'3712988' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUR' 'sip-files00158.tif'
b6100a8a0d155d82ce51a919c240ad16
2df971a974d9c2615bbe826b72ae6f8fbfe742d0
describe
'2167' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUS' 'sip-files00158.txt'
ba7f343fad348e08325d0f4fe14b9a59
410df627f00e5b6e6546786608f9ba2824c86516
describe
'23649' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUT' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
20f772cc8c2bd6c2da582dc6e598ef76
e0dadf604e94fe35d7a66917d4adb2e356dbb763
describe
'349166' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUU' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
5ffd0338354712486c3e0854805d9480
676827fc686071ded87d70c38e4cdf67ab3d9afc
'2012-01-22T23:42:25-05:00'
describe
'260115' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUV' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
63508eda45d54476bcc236d0fd6d6562
075541360312d699a140156eeda48cb0d8d996a3
describe
'2988' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUW' 'sip-files00159.pro'
b89cb6074ad6c5d5992d41ecc7f3e066
1ea4da04d6daeb8cbef993397d187dec62382688
'2012-01-22T23:35:22-05:00'
describe
'69280' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUX' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
ce37dd609710b74e00ba525a0eb88a44
92099bd0303437dc11e6132be23227e4dfa67f41
describe
'2809668' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUY' 'sip-files00159.tif'
1dbc2f69e4de65798004fc56984219c5
5aa4f22e2cdaa9f0c4e46817c1b23205f0f335df
'2012-01-22T23:40:12-05:00'
describe
'235' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMUZ' 'sip-files00159.txt'
af17807b941d74db356c89306ce6279b
1e148defc192891dadf057d0f3940e5ccb7f005f
describe
Invalid character
'26910' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVA' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
0bbbdd732786422dd507ada2840f4caa
5a2c09015900aebe69143c50454982c02c61f839
describe
'5233' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVB' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
449d211b53a5c167cf537abe604bbb52
ae67a520d039284fd397d953215cae3c9a3573eb
describe
'11134' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVC' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
0423c1b9fe65b459b20eb0dcb722252d
e6dd4f4faa97dd45a0ae12a731bb3fc360c84583
'2012-01-22T23:32:11-05:00'
describe
'9265' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVD' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
16cfda69588663e41feec9ddac3347cb
840aca62d0cf1cda0bd6e9def4bed143c105c0e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVE' 'sip-files00160.tif'
4473b091b748365688626eec11b01c31
7fecb6b396d0eb11c5574f2e40ed1b5b6244585f
describe
'8777' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVF' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
6246f8be153f8237ae34fb6395a3d90f
e7f7396e4517c56b917ef7f6291c45581cdf03b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVG' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
d624eb1895cf313c4d01efcf0bc8ea2a
1d0410e071fb453a146da196f47b4aa7c3f823df
describe
'162415' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVH' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
fd458754992a501422c3f90c8e2093ab
3e89e002693304d73a90cc388a976b4ff858d62d
describe
'47465' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVI' 'sip-files00161.pro'
9f97c791305c299a5e4f038f903fdfba
fbbe4e53998e39bf2da78d45d645c58fab6b0ca4
describe
'59176' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVJ' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
b5b53cbb948e84043247fb0eb3904dcf
a4b5fcc1e0388dea42ca8b0071d266a976ef1c80
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVK' 'sip-files00161.tif'
c9b34468987acab832c5e86af8a7bebb
acd020d36d78ebbcfd4ef2e6ee0c535a02ccf342
describe
'1974' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVL' 'sip-files00161.txt'
f2315305ad54cc6c6b29003e46cb6837
4dc67179e19e9651aaf7a7eeb3e346b462600445
describe
'23422' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVM' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
ef31c1e9fc54f343342b550e1e3fa390
9990b333d85fe735f3319fa15bb9e0577c312550
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVN' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
00802aaebdd841a9bd2ad0cc4c30dcf2
b15f8e67e6d7205620e5bc9c9243fef501b7dc57
describe
'150998' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVO' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
c5e892403b70b6cd89e01ceafa292375
5a2fb146f46708c46ad8ebe78e3c2dabd1f95376
'2012-01-22T23:41:18-05:00'
describe
'44039' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVP' 'sip-files00162.pro'
3dcfe933277de9ac09f51a1ed088ed33
0fccecce1593bebc72e1c3d01c537fd52ba5c02b
describe
'55541' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVQ' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
b8ce7cb9495e81b9aef0e9ac2f68e64e
cee86c4977559a84e64db8b5e00c2bca8a5f53fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVR' 'sip-files00162.tif'
ffe1a866246ab9a4631a1f54ba78e6b9
1133dce92779d1ed354382a7db12ed9e3c3e46be
describe
'1775' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVS' 'sip-files00162.txt'
b099466fbc02b6c7c57aa45cf478ab13
66c02f64f28fd32afd6d7c02ad511db165f7a19d
'2012-01-22T23:43:21-05:00'
describe
'22951' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVT' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
32ab472ab3c00f170508f2d4424662b5
5344209b023ab29d82fbdbfc75338ddef05e6308
describe
'342572' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVU' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
a83ec4851d743527cf1b01a22bac0b96
f4b648578a867e47d93b786940e9fdbd43272014
describe
'205310' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVV' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
bd3978b335de01594ca93c1e0309a322
90e8f04c4f10a820801685ca7ababec20ddb445c
describe
'2987' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVW' 'sip-files00163.pro'
27c6403aa6c8ef83687defc737067b11
ad82e0d3e5ae2c670a0fbfd4c1762e5e5c13244c
describe
'56412' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVX' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
64a8c5a2bc1904701eaf821b37a7c535
a8960a7874c4558848b3df6a127dd5f31a6bd1d8
describe
'2754768' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVY' 'sip-files00163.tif'
d4fbff81efc54865eedeb48f83a2c715
e58dfa55495db29c8abd87e32522599d24d0337e
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMVZ' 'sip-files00163.txt'
4cf63ee0a971f04f9424f9630274118f
7b316a9823a6a8954b2b799e90d2c40f03a0c7f6
describe
Invalid character
'23642' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWA' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
9d54a2203e919bec12264db0fba24551
30b5457de92ab47f84f52bd5510b4a12c96c1409
describe
'3474' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWB' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
f9e1c9a9186658cc5dd9b6d09c32c63b
b1e376a60a3cbe0d941e4ecdb29df764a146a7e7
'2012-01-22T23:30:15-05:00'
describe
'11013' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWC' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
c8fc48e2ddfe1b32b4c09b940d8e3a5d
3aa11dabd5bef870d11a834a5c7e018fb473b4de
'2012-01-22T23:30:56-05:00'
describe
'9246' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWD' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
e9effb9c21597f09f7bddab96a7ce613
fb8607b4c0a3f8b12ee2f7cecbd950addf4f51e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWE' 'sip-files00164.tif'
26e6ea7d8336ec809c40dc82de3a7c9b
e8fa6c7538ed36a5de234f0f07be979d23d8a4ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWF' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
7b2c9f5f341dc4524713315995468083
88cd2e5f3bc5c95322e9cfbe830620c84f85bd1f
'2012-01-22T23:41:56-05:00'
describe
'462449' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWG' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
02324bc8b11ed5100ca3c97e0518da87
9e94b5507ce06108a925c7cc033832877c01bd61
describe
'161327' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWH' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
a6e118aa0907ce617a09ef47e02e9065
cb54a19f1a41847e1ab027ddee5683c4e88e2230
describe
'50413' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWI' 'sip-files00165.pro'
ab3445d0856b8be9572a9ee0c8b56e47
f3609a77c4bc934d13ce2212ff587b1bf08df983
describe
'58952' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWJ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
3f1f6519dd25c3e8e582de01b99317bf
1fb8eba426b5359b87d46a3b6970bd62ecbf646f
describe
'3712480' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWK' 'sip-files00165.tif'
d9b58ed60f2341734c69024081f8eb2f
f410053121c50007268657d05ae73eb3c1059d21
describe
'2014' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWL' 'sip-files00165.txt'
c8df87a982135475cc3e9ee3fa8f556a
18a9003a1762ee9450a37e3c396e4df12f7b7112
describe
'23273' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWM' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
9213b21bfe4f042ab89abf12d1c1150b
a3079c33381d0660ed2b1486b7b4782641ad3437
describe
'462452' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWN' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
0c918a21d4a30c2ed0fd68162b963451
4b6aefe41835476e3069ccc518293a2c309c8397
'2012-01-22T23:32:42-05:00'
describe
'176782' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWO' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
8dc61d4d07d97b1e785a2045c2e28813
107685a865e231c2960b2c1fc063a2ec9cd43137
describe
'53363' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWP' 'sip-files00166.pro'
add19426530568b2f249cbc349334e81
0d14dbb91f67ce92ef1dbe8d906db160322b2d91
describe
'63063' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWQ' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
fc21b6dd034bb1b3160c7547f2d1afcd
8661b268fcb72d4b40a20fed1d00c8c0b000addd
describe
'3712884' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWR' 'sip-files00166.tif'
1cb14f21140ca784672520ac0860e261
848fda74fdc0d0b98b43ab82f5d8a9139ff73764
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWS' 'sip-files00166.txt'
fd9297d59285a7e0ce95b62291ee6f6d
e2c7bc21f3a86c97f4483eaa3904252ab6f575d2
'2012-01-22T23:37:00-05:00'
describe
'24032' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWT' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
368bdefc96d7201abe2631ba76caf51f
3f8b99f4b320ab8d3307718841aa98b51a0e742f
describe
'462410' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWU' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
d968dfb64adcc98cb42859cafbc1f9e1
a72328ce6da18cb9bf2cba5650732b79680fcf65
describe
'186293' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWV' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
b77be2c2602581c1aada95d81b42db18
48a82dd105395a0a98ae9d9c6c6c35fea12e3b3f
describe
'56457' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWW' 'sip-files00167.pro'
a5fcaf1462aed25e7d78735bdb2717b2
c7efc252dbb9f0d58e543d2f2be4b44bcccfa6dc
describe
'64167' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWX' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
a834e6591ab244d5bded363875662cbb
37a65d2e26cb7caf54c6dcb1cab4530ca5539db2
'2012-01-22T23:30:12-05:00'
describe
'3713092' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWY' 'sip-files00167.tif'
396708e64272db73c20981e49be980bf
7ee7609b4dda88ac1802fcbdad1512ba1b69da13
'2012-01-22T23:38:46-05:00'
describe
'2239' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMWZ' 'sip-files00167.txt'
cd049e059939ef8910ab8faeed4e4eee
eb8e592098c6f1446808caadacdd8d6b33e42504
describe
'24083' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXA' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
a6d19911252ee85b7639084708c6ce86
abab60fa3678670ec04e39da9184012eb4ab572d
'2012-01-22T23:34:12-05:00'
describe
'462442' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXB' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
4673e9585e33d845c1f29354d0be5960
fde745d64d37977f993f2d9183802c336d0251e1
describe
'166343' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXC' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
26d35b304e729618ba38db3e3f1e0a1d
83e8c333c6e0ef6477729da0ad69f091f7f6a3ad
describe
'27710' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXD' 'sip-files00168.pro'
ec04d372f862d431e3f32577072a1966
fefb0a6a85c1666caaec9480693fef3c29c26ab4
describe
'49756' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXE' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
2faa14ea77a7e0da21e946a45fc28901
76896d70febac241373760c99410f27de6590983
describe
'3711552' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXF' 'sip-files00168.tif'
58d87b50e66a2c7b58c8868ade971041
c565a4b8cbe5c71302e0419459e0f07c61f47e7c
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXG' 'sip-files00168.txt'
bac61fc830c3e460ac05be991b17067a
d24312997628803d9df174a7ea97514508e57c4e
describe
Invalid character
'20355' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXH' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
c1cc7835ca24a73ece05a814ee9d83e6
997794990497ed35994364e1b10089b115402b25
'2012-01-22T23:32:33-05:00'
describe
'395069' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXI' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
afd7971b34d11d6316530d6a17634fc2
1558cd28199cc69ba135a234c2af5ba7e0bbcc73
describe
'200118' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXJ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
3357b81a03709993de39c61f28869b62
c92d9f789c888fabb5374f294848b64791fbbd0d
describe
'17242' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXK' 'sip-files00169.pro'
8e40ce1436cb3fe05760b248daab0415
8ef461974fb44c9cdbcc4554bf42c6a604b96f7b
'2012-01-22T23:31:12-05:00'
describe
'61547' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXL' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
17d6ecd1083d080a120c233c324be0a2
78cd3b257b681f2f49ae4e4e2f6a7ce81be7c428
'2012-01-22T23:40:46-05:00'
describe
'3175968' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXM' 'sip-files00169.tif'
a23b8ac8964dab33891262412a615602
19f67c2c55d6702c0858f23264b9e1cb1d3b7bfb
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXN' 'sip-files00169.txt'
fb62b637dfb57e8bbb24e15615430e3f
619e71510dc7c7b07c5552ec49dd742fa2753f90
describe
'25273' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXO' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
091e8312c379761c15090a40489c1bb3
41eea69354e8ea3f1c38a355b9274446f79bdd76
'2012-01-22T23:41:11-05:00'
describe
'462169' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXP' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
66db5a765d68c73de86d8fcd4a1bb7fe
3a3e6f7bae78db0ebbc92380a3d2e77fd4d50b20
describe
'168289' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXQ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
e37d3d0a6a06ad1016dc959da94701a0
780450c4ebfb246cb1703f987c50c76158eb91ed
describe
'50845' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXR' 'sip-files00170.pro'
3d410501c1916281ac269559ff6b4fdb
591cfe092736943560fc41da18232e58c4140e6c
describe
'58965' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXS' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
54416511df5d8ace4ed54c44066b86b2
0756148d930083933001d057b23db9296bfc4881
describe
'3710252' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXT' 'sip-files00170.tif'
ea57661515e9c01fffcf16f988c616a1
fb03cb442caed96c772bf8a0471f8760faadbcd0
'2012-01-22T23:42:19-05:00'
describe
'2008' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXU' 'sip-files00170.txt'
15c736f1e1f5742f4d561a5488ebcb6e
2bad8c426e921d1229013d4d16bf1f29e39c393e
describe
'23275' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXV' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
ad4247c03599d9dab0a3d5c1e2dbd471
1b99add662e9014ac18067a8595186f0c66055c1
describe
'462061' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXW' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
4e64ef1914aea05efdd263d0b593f16e
341ecbd1aee8675e85adc8b46c90a28e7b2fb5fb
describe
'158606' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXX' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
300ce914a5032c198a345f3418de90db
f2a52e9d6429560c4850c51fbba8a61916ac6d6c
describe
'45465' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXY' 'sip-files00171.pro'
b5a28514192482ea7eac03aeb5035385
9bf28b2b99877e91c3c233b10ea6a59d522e51b7
describe
'56008' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMXZ' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
67ec55fc4aa9c4272653c5714c9dd891
dc41bc9ebb224ec53a37e0cd66f33696be5f3c84
describe
'3710344' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYA' 'sip-files00171.tif'
afc21794658ca07131e66187087a898e
b030aa27fde523c22519ae5a0df0522a39535d21
'2012-01-22T23:33:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYB' 'sip-files00171.txt'
2d9660eb1047ed207c7545e20b7f615d
944cf59986c95ab701f292b40576896098db3ad5
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYC' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
9cdccde2dd77fa2dc893048c598983fd
9d2b1eb664bb2f3aee8b4023b300427d88c72150
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYD' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
c51109e6b91b790d068e0567e588807a
0a6da61536fcfbc2bba8b7339f3fc255d98f14b4
describe
'167188' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYE' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
09f3fa6edfb840c448391e0329ff9e7a
433c1877e363c9b9e0a976e4c52c299332423c8b
'2012-01-22T23:37:28-05:00'
describe
'50521' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYF' 'sip-files00172.pro'
09a18fe1fefd0e562d453919b7195a01
7b27fe4d2c6474f469684d9d0ca6f226cd350adc
describe
'58730' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYG' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
ebcdab2c896b9e07e9f0758415ff486f
12e50e3854b0bbc8bc4a325a6e01b276e1a5cc9a
describe
'3712740' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYH' 'sip-files00172.tif'
09908e18d6c32b31357e89c142651591
29fd5d043bb572de3032165b329f04ab5fb00390
'2012-01-22T23:38:42-05:00'
describe
'2015' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYI' 'sip-files00172.txt'
98e7e6162441a03d2a563f4f2965481f
5b6dff09a02aa89ab2b7724944883dace6eca7be
describe
'23709' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYJ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
54d8b1ef89c87198899293cf2d636309
4e49eadd42b7c5e6c3508c0936604cbe1d68a0cd
describe
'332853' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYK' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
21572e4451759b865dbb508c282a72cc
a2e722d875e436080f90403a69ca1e1fa5f19451
'2012-01-22T23:40:22-05:00'
describe
'215016' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYL' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
9fd866d4ce3c2d06dd1940614e046967
3be21e1ae774b0e527014b16cc9039f4d5786c09
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYM' 'sip-files00173.pro'
8a06a963aa5b565dbebb41c56be27f80
53a386af15d176ba5b896761c0254443147bbf39
'2012-01-22T23:42:59-05:00'
describe
'54699' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYN' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
d521ef523c64237ac6e1b1807445ca84
5e2ed744ca567514d63eacf00a1d09a8ace1bcdf
describe
'2675600' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYO' 'sip-files00173.tif'
13cdb3da2e3b5759331e8789363206b2
ff19e89c05f035bc12ec8465c4ba183bf911264a
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYP' 'sip-files00173.txt'
618fe47bc8f49519ea83de57f41159af
e22858decea85ca42bd9bc72b5550ee3474fdc73
describe
'21595' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYQ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
5c6dcca47cca0a4dab8365f70bab302c
d1272e7329ceb7b40d24a8bb4c70b4d85794a910
describe
'3981' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYR' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
6abecc34f954bb0b770a81352db963b8
0bc2120041620a555f76277fe413cb82c2b08ca8
describe
'11095' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYS' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
2a4536409d0a258e93fe76cd9b13586f
f6962b4b0bfa1274e71d5686e91fb87a39e805f7
describe
'9281' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYT' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
a42805061e685fcd5a481ef1591d32fa
44fa139719a5d6f739ca7282d722fa9c4794de07
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYU' 'sip-files00174.tif'
30b620bff726aad4589b2ad804c52d30
3cce709e6666a0e97724fe6ee6366b709513fc59
describe
'8787' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYV' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
41c9ee255dd64cff4649e83c7ae65e63
4a298b700a72e6abbddf245f3bc600ca1df87d03
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYW' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
0e8729f0392dd9eaeb2b01072eac204a
086e4fb5b198e977ca0e010e4477c0f683f06db1
describe
'113497' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYX' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
ea0f7d1cce615884fe4461bcddc5f950
ace76aa01e149dd00b0adc8528a8bb0f74e7454b
describe
'30285' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYY' 'sip-files00175.pro'
1cc31e587436afcec14fc36b76b5d07d
be20fd04ab975a97ec938a18491ac39571fccd4e
describe
'41224' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMYZ' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
243fe8402a421165b2aa4e78bfb97902
3c919dd759c676a66bb5eacaa31d12808b28ee08
describe
'3708408' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZA' 'sip-files00175.tif'
0a2b9feed6fd9bd91f3bd36ea00f964f
f3805470f6004338ee3ffcc0c794c4b24b8a7ab3
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZB' 'sip-files00175.txt'
4df453fbcd8faeb11b24972709454c2c
dd573cf8b0fb1fdc516d86f949379b3d4cf0a3dc
describe
'17982' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZC' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
9579b7822ef5fcb62ea5163539d1f73c
4f325e003f1c1bf0ad1122eac4c8ad838c75efd9
'2012-01-22T23:29:46-05:00'
describe
'373782' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZD' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
342954c116d56053a2570b62e36cd80a
fa8800f4c46eb8f5cc5e4316745d21ab714c1267
describe
'168073' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZE' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
5c4c94d9fbb14492fe240525368fbf5b
91d54b0d461740925c5a85f6afeea6ce019a00e9
describe
'18836' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZF' 'sip-files00176.pro'
90d2992366ee1684d7313bea5f43390c
7a1cb24acdf2e5d0a06aa351e353d43eed31bc5f
'2012-01-22T23:30:38-05:00'
describe
'51874' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZG' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
ae17108a88159646a8edb967f66ab211
fc06efe69e96b4212e82402871a5ed3516429342
describe
'3003416' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZH' 'sip-files00176.tif'
7c5b8afc42f049af0c0c9673b46cc9a9
5a01ae57b58ebe81cf7d60fc00e9d30dc9e4d70d
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZI' 'sip-files00176.txt'
8ae5263c6627b1a41bd3730ffb546312
042c3c5b5ff29987df765d5bc408cd555ebe2b25
describe
Invalid character
'21760' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZJ' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
18e6bc20971e0c9d9b64bfff6fc93cd0
cf102b56745aeb42758db3e66ceecb4ff294776c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZK' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
74d6f50080f9563b0f589d49ec9a322b
96b17e9989f0c82b4e3cbf9cecc898c4cac33548
describe
'161752' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZL' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
31a1005d99f8dbafed750519dbb5a7c8
8fd230d96afffcfbb2ea6926ec593bf5863964b8
'2012-01-22T23:43:56-05:00'
describe
'45944' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZM' 'sip-files00177.pro'
9aea80f16fffd89977b4e73bcb19813b
559ea36ec6c4f958975e74cf4623dfcd9eeb31f8
describe
'57442' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZN' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
4329be6cfe3779cbf50195647efd6fbe
43b22decbec3a4446cf0e348ca3e4dc3bf479892
describe
'3710172' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZO' 'sip-files00177.tif'
4242d870fcf8451e197cd1410501bc5f
434914a67559d6fa2f32733421c06a6a2043f8a1
describe
'1927' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZP' 'sip-files00177.txt'
ae1506705d9a004cea3b7511ac6f8de3
293f2c89cff24bec08f8deb737e3b34ea13cbb5f
describe
'23446' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZQ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
5a00a372bd2b0431a866e55b750ced84
59fa26d5d9f31413657f115151febbc882e2d22d
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZR' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
45ebb9b427e49bd273c14afabc110e18
73d51f7576021c8eb332a7eea2957db1a6899837
describe
'159833' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZS' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
0fc39a4c848b102f7281645416221834
46a4d725f2731067923fc955abea6ed3e37bc48b
describe
'50114' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZT' 'sip-files00178.pro'
bf70d70680d314f91f71a74e518635f6
f26dcc03f0aacce1028ba2036ef91afb263ea6f4
describe
'58634' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZU' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
b1115289fb278bbd832c8828f4d5e62b
f9811b42c9aff8566b6525e1aad0b90dfd6ed2c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZV' 'sip-files00178.tif'
4c6959c71bc79a2e376bd376e2dbea5c
12c4ed46333b53fe5a092058a15d81530c70d42e
describe
'2083' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZW' 'sip-files00178.txt'
0e64281139cbce53ea24cfb6ce9e869e
6521c5a3ab51588a1a894c4db0b484180da5318f
describe
'22654' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZX' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
364cb1175487bf3f8e185b46b33d906e
1fac2a9e04f3715e903019518030588e6d7faca9
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZY' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
6c5a109b6090351526f4b25dd2614d33
4d8c97a6433163858023dc3da751d96b2553045a
describe
'154249' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAMZZ' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
80c8354f5f38e429f67b29a320fa463f
6cf7ca1c5d76a55ad89c880511984e8c34d0e8ba
describe
'49887' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAA' 'sip-files00179.pro'
2828250e26bd11d7d619840ba016c890
312b5e786052f93e328870e5bfa7999e2abdc29a
describe
'56265' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAB' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
65dd4b42fce61a552bbb6bc630ec48a7
a23f80e3ece1d9d8c6d2282a0053fef2ea3a0307
describe
'3712468' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAC' 'sip-files00179.tif'
77db851f9814798fafdc018864b044b6
e32db5cc924e267970800fe367526880eafecef9
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAD' 'sip-files00179.txt'
54a44cbcb11686fc4c2d5bf364ed5c91
e11693b20d11391318ff59ad5ac3322dbd6e551f
describe
'22990' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAE' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
1dd3dbbd2cc01201a93737dc6b5d3f9a
3450350d2c33a6e302f872234a58e2d146c78da2
'2012-01-22T23:43:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAF' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
3b159d2c2ce158ae14c2a09958a6b308
d5f2f11b914a86e478e60fa62ddeb1f4bae3d7f0
'2012-01-22T23:37:58-05:00'
describe
'164827' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAG' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
816bf3264d169c03608fb69206e4e24d
5cd74c58147a39916d2dd92e1a292c20658fc68b
'2012-01-22T23:33:38-05:00'
describe
'50569' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAH' 'sip-files00180.pro'
9ff3625e7d970bca25107004f2d458d7
b79c9a854abb3909f53f80e7dfd6d7f05c62dee2
describe
'59334' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAI' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
d97c8363fbf9ef9ee6e7a7a1932bd796
d08d058f66b9c47e6a28e2416009a893a1f19d8e
describe
'3712640' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAJ' 'sip-files00180.tif'
c8b9da0450221f2987d04228931b8006
0376e3e3e9ce2449437e8c5197368b305b481879
describe
'2049' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAK' 'sip-files00180.txt'
a1bd47b38940baca627eac229501dbba
b0d532e21c00b77dc780965bf5f125d44feaedb5
'2012-01-22T23:40:18-05:00'
describe
'23164' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAL' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
2d4d2eeeb78120cd597f2d3689d27dd7
8fb0ed8a138557c664b4f72d220879fdc2be69f0
describe
'310188' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAM' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
5ff6a4aef7cc1442f3792884f9641052
e979da807fdb14bbc392137442a62bf1806f7472
'2012-01-22T23:31:36-05:00'
describe
'229034' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAN' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
0a57163e9b28ef582194c62253159056
1549626e34b3e02a9ddc222f191da41ad9ff1dc9
'2012-01-22T23:30:55-05:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAO' 'sip-files00181.pro'
3332243acfa40632a0a54bdce8085dbd
88e05f48f3e4a15b39466701a5ae26952efc2097
describe
'62099' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAP' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
49bf40b9a9600b5450c7a32eeff1557e
c237cad621cd8192d748802b25b2f8a3da576f08
'2012-01-22T23:36:04-05:00'
describe
'2496920' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAQ' 'sip-files00181.tif'
b342cc8822bbf119a9efdc68f5203914
ee7307f228887f3b532c9eca89da7fe4ba8f5fee
describe
'183' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAR' 'sip-files00181.txt'
fc5f494b6545dd02a84ad5e7e7b6e877
95007eaf985a765cb34a65bd1030cfa7037bb05b
describe
'24238' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAS' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
6df492ada13a93ed719240a528fe8a5a
91370342f436aac9127e6b730e50d14c00ba1591
describe
'4521' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAT' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
0b5aad1a7a2f0183128b21098f48aeef
447eb111d35cb0b48e32addb6d59ae242cbc0026
describe
'11038' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAU' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
ac0687f4084801ca41395fdef9814022
9837d0a776e248f29ff7c5c22cb65b9431825304
describe
'9240' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAV' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
8c301d38d1409ada092384fcb19efa78
fef77a94a1ee6127b35e7f12143439be796a478b
'2012-01-22T23:38:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAW' 'sip-files00182.tif'
a5a1a1daaa35931594b985dc351b8aa5
8336b3fab8797ffb2af2cb7066344e73f3cd64aa
'2012-01-22T23:39:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAX' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
82b8b4ac2c8686985d986ba419cff7a2
680f6e8d72ab1db9565bf8f19ba6c044ccccecc0
describe
'462262' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAY' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
64f8349ddcc9a4882b76157f9f2faa24
1070e9001a1942fe8858fbfc7b6108c9cfa653d7
'2012-01-22T23:40:43-05:00'
describe
'156424' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANAZ' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
866610783fefb41fd4e6c63479c2506b
d52185a05d07e4a7f6872f615380a06df84eb0ac
describe
'46875' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBA' 'sip-files00183.pro'
2db3a3ce5f2f41a941f4f543f8d081bf
c6aab2267f9166cc5df93e596ab56aedbf48dbbc
describe
'56999' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBB' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
51431e059defa10be69f7953b70644e5
04f59ad5b17e874ec211b0655958bdf6b5ed6d0a
describe
'3712584' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBC' 'sip-files00183.tif'
d4a1e961a8011a93b8313d9e9dd31176
f365295ad6f765e8a9321a501c2b24d73722f6d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBD' 'sip-files00183.txt'
f9da0568eaa396a6d0ee8aaee337c2cd
993cddd3f87ecf88f6d89101b5943ff491bde3bc
describe
'23433' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBE' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
135f7214aab1d3e6b0286d154c070127
1da703c77616d3ed125b2e72c8421ce92d62b418
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBF' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
35b392c362280c2366d8d8dea11f44c5
f28fe7a06b3e94d8763707d32ff1142b34b488c3
'2012-01-22T23:30:54-05:00'
describe
'161157' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBG' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
c9fcf9fe43dc32b3d28da39836d64a8a
a0885a8fc027869cff5c0786ed93af4715cb6997
describe
'49423' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBH' 'sip-files00184.pro'
5483a57ab15d4cd0aa7f2057141210ab
cc5ea3b986b8f1b4131c33c6f419bb2e42043084
describe
'59179' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBI' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
9e2928ab633965067a20ef34b1690ef3
27d4d689b14837eb12f0b8d87633eced34230754
describe
'3710396' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBJ' 'sip-files00184.tif'
4e008a363dfcadc8d9dfc04496a9ab2f
4ac9882b0da4bdcbbc87d4186780f3dc77a4992b
describe
'1980' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBK' 'sip-files00184.txt'
e12f22e640a5a2d89d92c7388b357e38
1575fa63bbb5093cdd600dbdab286a84cf10e9a1
describe
'23559' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBL' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
f0c8fd41529bf3c19512d0bfa69011d0
9cd16c0c4efee5f734c271b4d09835f9522c1e74
describe
'311741' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBM' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
723e61bc6e64e181d30c491567125aa6
8982c7066498300307c5b4757cc8b940f6d42207
'2012-01-22T23:38:44-05:00'
describe
'272464' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBN' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
e1de63e4aa272a83cb86a106348c6576
0bf1bff7e5f9168366ec0f844ede709b30466602
describe
'2925' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBO' 'sip-files00185.pro'
a954ee1c61a2ca8a24fc1ffb22c053de
0f3fcac6c53bb2d73b294297f7082aa2f7a78e81
describe
'69000' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBP' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
cbb32cd4804af0fd165252370b89500e
8ba5bfd160b08e848ae8bd5829e9afe27b8b2ffe
describe
'2508520' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBQ' 'sip-files00185.tif'
ba3b2f9af9141e5dbb38e2ac08db3572
b301d18c52d0d0b5049ec04a338fd92f362e3af4
'2012-01-22T23:30:48-05:00'
describe
'337' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBR' 'sip-files00185.txt'
09674525f87015c7fc7814c800d69688
9a408e1bf49a2a74c3488fb325fdc304068cdd32
describe
'26367' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBS' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
ba8f041e7de81240b7bc20e3bef2838b
ddba5ad917f58844b1c4d93a8128d90586883e18
describe
'4625' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBT' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
b06ae4af807b609aff8c3f53f4836127
d38355e290144972c4e56491eb2dc10295c9d4ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBU' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
6a6edbb8fbbdda8a6ec62e2225337352
1ee705d4296f6b3f5e472fbfd1e07d233f735c1a
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBV' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
53517ec3bc2e3b19404670fcd1a1823b
ec03402f81fab129c6a804fb16f60655fcd77a5b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBW' 'sip-files00186.tif'
0b3ec66415bfa72a62a2159af6aacb71
39bc9961c8f5a19da21368a58fc13b0fee510d3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBX' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
714732541b3db9d48773d1678b587bae
1da64163fdd6fce01cccc0ce46463b54bfc53c8a
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBY' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
da28aa301fc26b59691eb433f9068628
b84de28854c5d812cd9f28385b9a03325a79c5e4
describe
'53744' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANBZ' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
d78105e911d9a4fb728349b2a456661b
d1aa83c8925fb1547e7d4ed587b2d82a4c6208f6
describe
'11243' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCA' 'sip-files00187.pro'
16c32ab05faee4834969e5b8700c41a6
e460379fdd5071a5507745f6f22a9ea96ae51ba5
describe
'21577' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCB' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
2a3c2db61b7859c746b0cb513a94f898
ae180f68972d7ad9bef00ce0e36c080479880196
describe
'3708848' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCC' 'sip-files00187.tif'
4e301e57b77fd44566661a918731bff5
e4112b1bbd34df1de27ec2c6097cae69ca9a56d5
describe
'492' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCD' 'sip-files00187.txt'
e4178e837881c73aa1b180c3b37ee53c
b25ad3d70ed96d5ef06346e4ee79b05160e71607
describe
'12484' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCE' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
e936312a7273febb8b938c4f87426c49
b68b9a14330532443e12e07c3e2f734c09f37132
describe
'462474' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCF' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
5d5549c964213146a6f8fa45838040e0
b469cdf279a3057feb3a3f6797c984fadc92819c
describe
'141189' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCG' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
4190e27606788c351d5b5cadfa44c071
0d154124cff0377608553fc06e06507c6e339019
describe
'18982' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCH' 'sip-files00188.pro'
247fdae60c6c867ea76df30bc80e7bc7
09877c87c5b0226620ba365bfe7304aec72265c0
describe
'45086' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCI' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
65c1379fd9959be28edd6d2a396f7ec3
204944b16db812f52ceb33c0232632f41847833f
describe
'3711500' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCJ' 'sip-files00188.tif'
67671c3f58e4695a1bbbb41545813f03
577cd169bb677f8cc15d29449df581a84e11b7be
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCK' 'sip-files00188.txt'
80312a476d7c03e4150ea0714aeadd4c
cafe0a4d5637fa894328c6f658040b4d05704e97
describe
Invalid character
'19747' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCL' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
39ddc08fbb6cf478f4446049748b4447
c80dbd0ed275e37a4664f0fb0aeff74df942d664
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCM' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
d920106865eca654d14599d54b3786be
630a6dde6d6fd8a8a133c46b1f5f8be6aa61df07
describe
'131350' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCN' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
d55c7230eda21e6d13e3a990f2982562
149a140b87fc741c771045a885e8e6ec232fc8b7
describe
'38078' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCO' 'sip-files00189.pro'
2f0ea4efb5fb16bbad30dc4337821cf5
4be8222c4ad431d4835ca5e4270108805c9809c7
describe
'49820' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCP' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
dd6b87bd28be8b236a8e0f06d56091c0
9f31547497c2adcf340ee9fb3a9fb50d664b1de8
describe
'3711892' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCQ' 'sip-files00189.tif'
e7d01981b0315b9866605dab263c1e64
bf8482ed50ae0c20199696cc636313bdac99ad27
describe
'1644' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCR' 'sip-files00189.txt'
a908fd135d59a370fdd184f76d582173
12a55c63496a541b768b19697c2f52b8090aa374
describe
'21268' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCS' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
d4d719d5a222fbdebfabf938bff7873f
ea42cda37a9794d5dd3c9094d00bd9c1649d2016
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCT' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
3c248bbe186c6934e8048740ac6f72ba
137d29d8aca26ceedebf9d6bc4be800c53776609
describe
'152482' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCU' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
b6548d57ebf7e3c8a675676d4690e30f
85a2d7a046f13760fad00c17dc1f4ca96061d98d
describe
'44722' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCV' 'sip-files00190.pro'
d1be0bf1cebe8fbd9aa52e738169df10
55da6cb8819a5bcde088603cbbf36e8cd8d2e8e0
describe
'54977' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCW' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
368b96ce9dbe1e89498f4daa62993539
940f577d42a90adbff22c5b0091ea344890b2140
describe
'3712432' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCX' 'sip-files00190.tif'
0e2cc024c5545a08e192d8cb99e5e7d2
8a93c178f5967bf3e7f2f55a4b3cb2a9090632eb
describe
'1854' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCY' 'sip-files00190.txt'
363160b75b6e7514ce2eab89c02f8216
8168c54668b96434513fd3f8b5db15332646b313
describe
'22503' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANCZ' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
f0295f551beceb7da39d4e5771a0aa1d
a5bafbe21acee476c40f7a9b223814c1c4a7ba85
describe
'358592' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDA' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
dfe0f7e79a4076179ccb7e3143fe17f1
06da6a14ce1dc6fbc41d1d8369fe1eeb23e076ce
describe
'82284' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDB' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
e34f7e4a38739de57792b578d3aeccee
cdfe6ba646fb14558ea33a0714cce83c97526213
describe
'2855' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDC' 'sip-files00191.pro'
7ab20f7a44f7a0fac9219f23933abae6
8d704c8fab42cfcc676627665da13c741ee88079
'2012-01-22T23:38:47-05:00'
describe
'31289' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDD' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
0b52b2df23b667cb1b8a2cc477c11fa6
da3a78972cd39e5f93ed483b5fdea36dc03c8071
'2012-01-22T23:29:48-05:00'
describe
'2881612' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDE' 'sip-files00191.tif'
f5f195f2c0bbe14307ced3acc1e09d08
9dea8f36a5a889a5081f952be48475784f80e0bd
describe
'137' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDF' 'sip-files00191.txt'
b41d11353d3c7d9517458fec9845327a
fdd8e95cb99e4b4fd8cc6ff59c4896a22c068391
describe
'18035' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDG' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
1635e2cd070b1395ef61e2e31e145300
3840d5a9d7e1d3dd0df7c0fed370ece15bb37609
describe
'5532' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDH' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
8a2966747bbb8a62b846d182517aa541
af8333ed3bd85644ba5985abec181a2e5b1dfacd
describe
'11129' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDI' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
8901c8d02baeeb44956d8993991615cb
b097e02e975a554b050d43ac315ef87d26b371a6
describe
'9266' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDJ' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
0944303e26b6bfa275f962f3e6873175
9f9e7b3a0c182ef1e40e6d54e03d80bb92c55855
'2012-01-22T23:41:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDK' 'sip-files00192.tif'
a50a5f65504c13e017fca82cedb9db74
926c56710f1a89ae4ad3495738859d7bfacebfd2
'2012-01-22T23:34:11-05:00'
describe
'8774' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDL' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
f2f31defb7bdbb61ca3cc5e79dbd4668
06e542e73635f78329ab17b25176b81c64e0c798
describe
'462402' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDM' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
60c2fe9b74ae9f7fc9dce607ff5e36d6
84df5bb3c4cf938251bd8ed167019647fcbe5309
describe
'170647' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDN' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
01e7983b229cb7c509310913bee2834b
73062f865537c17fd6ecbf72e0227996b70640cc
describe
'22616' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDO' 'sip-files00193.pro'
78fde4de689850c8cf8e7844f8a3c018
4bd63d4fbaf99c4ef85d2350f1f8a941cb58cc4c
describe
'53557' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDP' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
95456dcb55c40200a03294b6938e985f
0c23ef1fc5211436e7c58a51a84c3c5c4996bddd
describe
'3712412' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDQ' 'sip-files00193.tif'
11e82a3d57a1d5baabd6d4f5375f5c43
bf5e62433f15931e480edc18af44ea5cdb3234ad
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDR' 'sip-files00193.txt'
551346304125773fdd160dc3d656f0c7
640a41a6fa39ba74950bfb051dc8659dcc40e053
describe
'22591' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDS' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
723ec72a04710aa74d83ea7d46dbb489
7335407bc47a37474379b8ea4010f42dd9523995
describe
'462483' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDT' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
6f948d371ee4ac930121f42ff1cf84e3
b605842a577fb4e56cbb36431ac853c8f2a274e8
'2012-01-22T23:42:43-05:00'
describe
'136633' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDU' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
2ccb86e7bd578cb70bcbf747a16c131b
c8c9116e6daa47e9267a6389fb9c563fa37b89f6
describe
'39088' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDV' 'sip-files00194.pro'
e8e14796c18fcca5e9fbe4104e9f8e85
f96ed83672e8943073e558f4dddc04263dff7e78
describe
'50980' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDW' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
718a9001892000160616c7ccb8e19b08
7f647133501dc28bcb1f32f35167bf1107cb1f51
describe
'3713716' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDX' 'sip-files00194.tif'
242c439f88a76d86385dd80193d9b1ca
cef868a3ac8947a65fdf491cc2ca0ef1fe7eb1f1
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDY' 'sip-files00194.txt'
c9c3a12739473049c76b87873ca12b4c
3b493b73f690228494d876f02ae5b99b92c08245
describe
'21800' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANDZ' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
c8d006aafa5e1d41272f944a82b87020
4db34a27d92d4ddc4a86f85cdedfb26978ec866d
describe
'462091' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEA' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
edf978ea8a893f17d9fee0384ce03d7a
216d843828b079dd7a0ffa33444a3ccd6de8aa3f
describe
'101893' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEB' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
b33f3e04317f47b7affd594f4d122b21
b044e90bb0255bf45e8cebd345b2edd6bd8bb1f1
describe
'8188' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEC' 'sip-files00195.pro'
a7e5ff4d768166e9c38a7d69496dd2d0
7860474911a36bb1a6a74884c5581de9b570bcd2
describe
'32452' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANED' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
24a10190b2f729fba50373167ece2448
0671ee26ed42fd1595759d51974e7ed3651ff88c
describe
'3707692' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEE' 'sip-files00195.tif'
7a1512670e9ec02eb2c1e3fe547b2fc9
08b6df74dcf1446154e7b684cff480384e0285d0
describe
'365' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEF' 'sip-files00195.txt'
4da9b4cb3c175798582871fc3b8c8afa
1976868b80e7c92a20387f04010b9d958ddcfe95
describe
'15558' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEG' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
33b04be9e57fb4ce6c0534b085edf314
8129c7b21bf82356f24d1e7deb660916fc8a65af
describe
'462157' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEH' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
55db3ffc76e6a0479fe3ba04270f51d7
7b4ce32f624da42974f636e87dab6b6bd54d5212
describe
'147879' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEI' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
097d1e75aa4336c31227a082a791cc93
92eeaaf4cb2a9b684d9bb65cc15ad70545cded91
describe
'16667' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEJ' 'sip-files00196.pro'
8b4b33f35a485c4b8deaa4bb398b8f18
b9303c31a0784fd4c0b79a5bcf2667419773e506
describe
'46339' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEK' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
da41103c8bdd4d555aee94b72fb90300
d26aa16c97bf4af62563e95024d5039787b95748
describe
'3709092' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEL' 'sip-files00196.tif'
aafd8981d936db03422ec76c6e94b11d
affac6f8ccd1f7017847b0304c45f517121d6786
'2012-01-22T23:41:31-05:00'
describe
'734' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEM' 'sip-files00196.txt'
03269eec536ab459a940bbb74841ba2a
d932c7582b18f3b9ac5e9eec333e2c6775dd5de5
'2012-01-22T23:33:53-05:00'
describe
'20002' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEN' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
4279a62f2f88e4e5ef2f9d8c78d01c39
aa0378019f98f284c925fc18b8a64ebc98d3226d
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEO' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
92449b8afd4cfa6daff832ebad72b934
2f50a4dc8557be6da0a3eab3d5391d6181629c73
describe
'155286' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEP' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
d819549e08180e7a30173e2a403ea5a6
02d5da151191bd59e4ebaa84d0ddfc2da626a8aa
describe
'44154' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEQ' 'sip-files00197.pro'
5ab1572290caf57465634a3696fcac9a
aa4e773582c302cadd16a70b82e27074dbda6fd7
describe
'55956' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANER' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
f89c9492115e071cd88df498a8dc3786
5b505c868a8508b1afeac778ccb2904e95cdf569
'2012-01-22T23:34:28-05:00'
describe
'3712496' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANES' 'sip-files00197.tif'
b0ebf2ca8cef31376a1fe4b2d24ec716
828f0c11f0448282b32cc9c47239765f87a517ed
describe
'1826' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANET' 'sip-files00197.txt'
82a7555ef684b1fde4b514eadb9e53ac
64bd4bb8b28248961cce496497b661d85a072b79
describe
'23147' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEU' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
770c6563ddf59c6d877f9ed875e8e512
b1490eee81333bb728b6412404c149eda84e8bff
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEV' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
3a21ce2358ea573e3cc25c7afbdd87d7
2d74c26c0120ac7a35b26ed4869efac3eeb38a9a
describe
'154381' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEW' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
128212c4a7160f070f4f9eea5dd293a1
088c1c4fb53c3d83347060cebac9f43211c1a1ab
'2012-01-22T23:42:36-05:00'
describe
'43022' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEX' 'sip-files00198.pro'
f2f1b7b474e92dcae3f972158ce67189
c21416683fcfe465a10bf66a23f6a3bbf292a895
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEY' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
2a6ea591f9f8bdd69041461ef9a6cfd6
07d936a29a4a880425c07a9694b9a1d72cc81cdf
describe
'3712688' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANEZ' 'sip-files00198.tif'
fef23f448a8d4d0444cc3285d4587b80
d339fe13933cbf02d18935f7c4001833ef2098a7
describe
'1808' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFA' 'sip-files00198.txt'
c05649abacbfd4519f7cc83169767681
cf67b97c8f35a8f9908501ed08d20e95e889fda3
describe
'23506' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFB' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
98ea48c8a0a60defbce104166b636d33
c8748c2af8b66267a1de19a973be0fca969199f8
describe
'362436' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFC' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
c6fdba2bf137e63fe181db565ec0a80d
e0fc8f3b029dcac485a73c776200b29557fd5860
describe
'167750' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFD' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
cefa9d0cbd8af0150d2f9fee92c1e3b9
0eb579a14a5d9f28afdb910fb2c511eb3787491d
describe
'4256' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFE' 'sip-files00199.pro'
c9ae9aaf403b90d837859d545bc2c65a
b5e2decc490cf5ef016c5258fee89fb081b9de73
describe
'49747' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFF' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
ab54b0ddf34409d633cf680b18d4e021
243048842742554cd7e8e6e3c4cf281ca04930b9
describe
'2911780' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFG' 'sip-files00199.tif'
b0e45565c2d6d80c1df7124755514a6d
1721b13e385f64c4322155147d96c2d1cb8c4c40
describe
'258' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFH' 'sip-files00199.txt'
f41bee823b3660db4178da9ad46abfba
1da2a8e17512b4ebf321efff0817c4f8b713b65f
describe
'21051' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFI' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
65b11b99135264e8a0873b33542616d5
cea602fbc3f89fc3528bf25ebabe36dd5a888b6f
describe
'3808' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFJ' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
afaab866ced1a4a179a45611a5cf30a0
bc5df53d26346a9e81c38d2c361bd8fdcb808985
describe
'11075' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFK' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
d00865bd1397284ceb3f7eba904c7f11
e562897fb9fa8160daaebd69c603febe85ff8264
describe
'9264' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFL' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
e0ba77345b46409d20ea204600108fd9
4c2066f6010d4db56dd5f24368c901ba35eb2845
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFM' 'sip-files00200.tif'
4182fef4a4faf0de0a3c705efa99f7af
d12b7f65c0bc054d5e6d02771ce84e03d0162821
'2012-01-22T23:30:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFN' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
8db2a2bb664f7dd43dafd1682d15cb03
65338269c042dc010dbe39a15f09f720b55389ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFO' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
a83af3f6c676024a273313d4ec7caaab
248f60a21310a0a0fea6a18c1b343217f4cbb991
'2012-01-22T23:34:31-05:00'
describe
'153456' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFP' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
9b3cf466c6b78c0e9dd7f2a6f64dc5b6
168cd4eed683c275014af71a9ab52aa62c2cac5f
describe
'45846' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFQ' 'sip-files00201.pro'
5b1f566f3985a0590d31314605b6eec0
104bcb786e0d9ad57a2d82e44159367e368ede53
'2012-01-22T23:44:04-05:00'
describe
'56375' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFR' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
c3cfd963a16a3a75a2be26789f8b5e97
a7296e2b6551cd9c3a15dc6b5986f05d64f2c5ac
describe
'3712440' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFS' 'sip-files00201.tif'
592d5c1863cda71eb2f65bb6c1f3cd2d
6d6ed9c4608255b836992a8540f9baf8e82f26c4
describe
'1907' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFT' 'sip-files00201.txt'
6a6b4a657677fbfa697bd017ee007077
24a69cb545ddeedbebe12247c96bd669715faa05
describe
'22592' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFU' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
a51f9d083e81a9f06986e072ec3d419e
721840e67d0e952a828f20773043be04a0bdb0c4
describe
'462443' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFV' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
c6d6626d3e4748062bbb9eb3433b64d2
a5ffeae383530229a509e35f44dd69153c4d8b47
describe
'109066' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFW' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
9d7c48bb175c2b979ea7699cd0e21816
34f7b2bc722aceecaf4e7cbdf2100bb5fb7aee98
describe
'8261' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFX' 'sip-files00202.pro'
aa01448e5d2c72098dd6033eb8b1a44f
e4cf7b20b78811e398e349f54b3936b136fa7748
describe
'30487' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFY' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
b7f445fdac61973ff5ac8332eb48b752
7be5077a7712ade858aebf1fbebc122cc92e45e3
describe
'3707556' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANFZ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
01b8debe6d8c5b7a764458ac81bd8884
94f0019cfff50f3b72839361e5a979d84af592e9
'2012-01-22T23:33:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGA' 'sip-files00202.txt'
c99fa2418a074dbdd8714170c011d980
81b102fed2959d3db541225a69628715ac3bd4a7
describe
'13425' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGB' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
773939cbd21f0e981f863228abae1122
ccaa0aab54b7bba78b48ad105b0dd316e6d09f54
describe
'374725' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGC' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
5b5f5fc47ebcac22b68d2a8ee0bb2a29
e4132e81f7df9a8c29209d07b919d3bb16f2e1d0
describe
'175766' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGD' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
e0c93ad6128008c2dcec34eee28427de
cdcbb43d67110fe677ce57989b43a72409f25dee
describe
'8054' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGE' 'sip-files00203.pro'
630eb8685f70466511b88e2060c0ce52
6897c06655c151f47fec3520762353178edaebd0
'2012-01-22T23:33:06-05:00'
describe
'55654' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGF' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
a454cbd53f5f2390a4258ba18b745d3d
d9d536c181b33e0abb209fa670cc4d30ea1281c9
describe
'3011212' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGG' 'sip-files00203.tif'
2372c1a6c3836f88c6a8de7760b2483b
cfec4d055acc0893586913536371c66b2bfb8686
'2012-01-22T23:32:21-05:00'
describe
'387' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGH' 'sip-files00203.txt'
4ff4f087aeb4b50624e27416ce2de04d
40fdca441c56e6f73ff463c1d9276aece6bf0229
'2012-01-22T23:43:08-05:00'
describe
'24011' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGI' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
8174121dad13a9438b850c46a2488e5e
1974820bc7631a20d812c692d7e44aaf0f50a2a4
'2012-01-22T23:42:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGJ' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
7989bc34c565769d4a6ed484eaa7b3c2
a3a6feefd0c2b4da49482f26083ad123c33e042a
describe
'142358' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGK' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
74dcc0bf05fbf52fcbfcef38a25cc636
2178fcd3c9fe277d0dbe325549224fb0759157bd
describe
'42177' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGL' 'sip-files00204.pro'
c2952c293af8b4c39767b1d71f98db4e
5ff412116b7ab2558c205a4735459f7d130b5f1a
describe
'54054' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGM' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
ddb389f766c39b99d86e41d7da5c04f1
ebbf27b81d2ec6f0508d44adf42786f17b85ce66
describe
'3713948' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGN' 'sip-files00204.tif'
67e9e298391a5b15de5214c067fcd9b6
13299c047dc601b0d81339db43956a06b3db52ba
'2012-01-22T23:42:38-05:00'
describe
'1760' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGO' 'sip-files00204.txt'
2acb362ab9728339273fb592e9bdc21b
38e4d0fc8b35c14f638353c26a4f1bfd202f54cc
describe
'22545' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGP' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
6d52e3cdfb07c3f8708102c028245361
364f69d8129cded1e8d7e49853e90230ddb9e3bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGQ' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
aa4bd6f5cbb211700c3b1770ac39ae2d
ea8a160cb57ff332e5692a1519cbcd9564a200d1
describe
'107516' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGR' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
8a5ceb05bb796ad98b4226ec5d7f2bda
4a864f6ca1d4dd578219c4f82aa4aa76d28b8260
describe
'7266' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGS' 'sip-files00205.pro'
8c9d90eab0a730ef1aa12092c6e5e4fa
1cfdfeb13f2a413710bf1b67a8396796ab74aefb
describe
'35607' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGT' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
07541447e9de66a5b6e73da343db5808
64a654cf722ecd2c6d6aa7d58c334de4b78a65c3
describe
'3708292' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGU' 'sip-files00205.tif'
ff4e46c983d3bc97590ba53b5ca7693e
206e30830e0a693b5430027a649e7588dc23251e
describe
'378' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGV' 'sip-files00205.txt'
18708e363d5eacab20eb6fa605bfac99
0664090ca45e1f9679e96006e8c54a61ffa174d1
describe
'17399' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGW' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
084a2bcb9345bc92b73c5123a08b655f
1520dbf70fdedb647b528c99426b5b96c4027c6a
describe
'394002' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGX' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
3a5b0d1f025cd2c7e4b5ef72cda73b70
39da4774767093738a68d06d2c5cb34c8bc9fa11
describe
'202159' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGY' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
b7aa32391e379bf4af41966b9bda5b57
d4b6c010fc3947702c1d8822135e5dcb4895244d
describe
'9563' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANGZ' 'sip-files00206.pro'
93a78091052de74614f755feb7921955
3ac7b2eef4bf28e754ad3b2ce8271214abc66aa7
describe
'62857' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHA' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
87cd647d06cc2c31dd1a1954c1bd2bb4
32a35bc242a2dfe93f3221c112c9ac154956cc6c
describe
'3165560' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHB' 'sip-files00206.tif'
5818c01ef645c9af8c0dca1e777aaca5
e6c9797f648259e634105a3d3fff82cd8f7280a1
describe
'446' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHC' 'sip-files00206.txt'
6fd1389625f72fb48bc59de54759d18b
dedcaf0a8bb5e3c5a47bb048c610463befc7a692
describe
'25084' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHD' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
d266e8486d19e9174488dc212c06993f
98c447ab869c2adf90a7e5b2043e817997e57a53
describe
'462347' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHE' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
3bb4e601b7232dda3d6b9d3cc0d6ab60
d63f278c486cfac3db7616631742165d89a29343
describe
'164083' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHF' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
3d93e8f5d1d0672bc981ace1e5db2ca7
b089bcb7e08e5d1bf5b0ebb1f2f45acf539eb786
describe
'21024' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHG' 'sip-files00207.pro'
89a262298214868ef961d2ae9eed67c5
1b6d72fcd7b75ef0e720656d44ce0bda5c15af8c
'2012-01-22T23:31:15-05:00'
describe
'50170' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHH' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
0e0c1ff0865db353714e277eb8b46ac2
d3a53bf3ee8e3b41f4a44b61fbdd6ebdd7eef5f6
describe
'3710932' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHI' 'sip-files00207.tif'
12da5106df848fc4e62abe11aba4bed3
92bb3e43eb07a7bcf5c4e3a8bf028a61b4eca724
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHJ' 'sip-files00207.txt'
0bd6c7782d5669f010bd36d24eac5a9f
d8a6ceb105e819bb01e0b88100eda72db28490d4
describe
'20932' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHK' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
3f208d8c4d23e88fe3a745b06e2f18d6
210ad82113794b9b1a08faeeb3273c578443f225
describe
'462389' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHL' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
4de758cee2a8a2ac6c02983816760e1a
ab535f5ed12a073a5c78ca00fb3b0a181a0a59cf
describe
'132897' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHM' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
7491a9c8e088bbac66ef68752f52b74d
5fe3e3a024219eb1209fce8ee5d832b82c94a0c5
describe
'23557' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHN' 'sip-files00208.pro'
572a0c1cc4ce9e8b9d54554a5bf5f976
779d14459a676b2e06d0dcf4861c82d2773ecab5
describe
'42742' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHO' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
b5fc0e63283ef82c52e517158e17c667
a2b74a13a2e0a86c53a63ab50d0e01711113d2d7
describe
'3711136' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHP' 'sip-files00208.tif'
ad7b4fa197ae6533b60c7dd9396d79cd
c98d928e23133c5d5d5fce915a956cafce1248ef
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHQ' 'sip-files00208.txt'
71eb6f023e24f7bced979cc4484be280
5743341a1ec4829b5d3b106876297fd8ddd95068
describe
'19126' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHR' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
2edfdb926f56e281339b34f0c5eb151d
ba6f0f9cb9649a76df9063377eed3b74921a57dc
describe
'462141' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHS' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
c2e49416ff8a0e7cac2c78a4c95d3730
1e98dc38fe15cc92e357674070f7b10f3ada11ab
describe
'174912' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHT' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
74c03763252159b6ff7094e93e69a6ed
f52324e88669dea90cc6d6e00bb578a8a2ea6c23
describe
'52537' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHU' 'sip-files00209.pro'
40ee475aff8295e475b03a0d88cadb1e
fa979f53a399004b8abbecee2609d1704bc3eca5
describe
'61772' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHV' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
831b39d4dafc9afa7933fa63c3a032ad
bdc87d88baef66d8a2b85e1dfe82df7492913fc8
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHW' 'sip-files00209.tif'
ec76e8d308f7267856357ba0b647756b
c3d932077e0353727055fb87bfc777865104b43f
describe
'2133' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHX' 'sip-files00209.txt'
4f262c14890f0b5458387e4718bfe49c
4eeb05569c3ac0d6d38d993f3fa83c773d8f1eeb
describe
'23438' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHY' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
42741dbfc23233e9b727ea6b099f1425
a98760bb87086839c698fa9759b18e860a7d85d3
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANHZ' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
46073f66dd516faa68f434af2cd4b64e
65ad67d0457f0be26f8a0d97e857389ce031ee2b
'2012-01-22T23:33:31-05:00'
describe
'172104' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIA' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
e3a698f750823e51106bb07082a9a9d5
0f75ed9cc499e7de28537a3f73229cdd69af5ab4
describe
'33744' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIB' 'sip-files00210.pro'
88335a74742b69b649849b46f4ddff0a
f51ea47a6475ec5dedd19bb23a72681213f41d80
describe
'54754' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIC' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
640e6037549b88620e02c6596559349b
ae20508b17a9a815c2e8d0d2063889aeacbf71f5
describe
'3709808' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANID' 'sip-files00210.tif'
31b1112bf7fb51753b0a53418a7a28be
8e73b74f2589fee7da21e0f4d3405fc4fa503614
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIE' 'sip-files00210.txt'
9d61f530d31b41bf2be217670acdd90c
33f46b38ddbdb4f37587a12d8fbfcbb10ac0acb9
describe
Invalid character
'21975' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIF' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
dab3e620def6a996cbbd0a77eb5ededd
e4edd92f69b5242e62ea353f166ae0c54b8b271a
describe
'352060' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIG' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
5ba0dcc82127589018b5b1f6369acb02
2f50699bfdc64048f36cd68be5442c747f8a3e74
describe
'262113' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIH' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
66266270b8f18830ec32c8e48ef0dad5
cd66a8176d92885c08de8279c6f9486f96ce717c
describe
'3100' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANII' 'sip-files00211.pro'
586b1273f0b9ee3bbb9894b6a805d135
d3558cdc56163f9569f13c26bb2e5f01d3e5f000
describe
'69717' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIJ' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
8c87fc08dbeab093a2d93373a5262f47
8cf72a4d495897674296b39493f893586bc7470d
describe
'2830636' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIK' 'sip-files00211.tif'
e7c512d90418f2f367af0b6f74cc7db7
96a0d791fd83f2137bdd25f69c9dcc5cfce299ce
describe
'175' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIL' 'sip-files00211.txt'
5d771e2ee3470c613ef884d350c8561f
803c597c91c7237c18a3014cef52c49522dd5866
describe
Invalid character
'25011' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIM' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
6d3e33e40d052d8bc71ae04e6b67269a
eafe3e0326446dcb5962eb18aea5aa9f60c29c05
'2012-01-22T23:37:03-05:00'
describe
'5489' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIN' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
3685a070cd5813b288fd1dce09417169
a7d28e4ec72d0a7955a6726b1aadb04e5e4fe518
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIO' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
406c7b2693f71095f37d17fc40248b77
115789d7c12e17e411628d17f33ccdefb654a6be
describe
'9326' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIP' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
8e413f869333ee87bd0db3ada43cedba
27b9eeeb11558edcd77ca97a7a41e90395cdf575
describe
'3707752' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIQ' 'sip-files00212.tif'
54350f869bc9d82726f0ce3cc4b22e33
56b9c3b47843b70e4c2a1a2726ba0c43c11f7d2b
describe
'8806' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIR' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
4ca349b930ef3c3fdf9da32a3c7bded5
84fec78eb113387b1e8f97f6a3da2416734b7492
'2012-01-22T23:33:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIS' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
ceba2a7782fbcee136a17de249a04306
4c46bb1ffdf1096c74e3ba5ab18b99a13adb4009
describe
'167581' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIT' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
37c53a935246f9c59d84d626e78b980d
bddbc27bfcd1839d65f6cc84531281c4c628ac80
'2012-01-22T23:30:37-05:00'
describe
'49103' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIU' 'sip-files00213.pro'
37170b1a77b650a2b571db907f154f2c
d15f9cd6a20c45d454067d650ae267ecec708e90
describe
'60730' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIV' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
b6b4254ac694075d3d112e3020fde52e
9e28f721d750ac12e15cdaa292e3571180927870
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIW' 'sip-files00213.tif'
8ba443abec7a570b2bb2b3bf1265d79e
c510a300f41b9fd5e5bec06d40280dc6c1c3c27d
describe
'2048' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIX' 'sip-files00213.txt'
aa663db4f986bc00ec23019b44b68b55
18b438f056719e48c47c8eb3fe0d76f7e55e15f5
'2012-01-22T23:38:33-05:00'
describe
'23893' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIY' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
3f0b6122b89ae182b57d5a8351d295bb
3b7f9addfd66be2772856952bcd7740348be5074
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANIZ' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
b128c18dd567e103ec5458c3a22b85e3
d41c7280ea20977585f59ca1f19e524506fcbeaf
describe
'182434' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJA' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
03108f2eac0c7eb0dce61672f55b958e
d3309d73a5958145621ac033c82f194709604d4a
describe
'39455' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJB' 'sip-files00214.pro'
9358480c983d37327d0b9571c70a968c
8d79dfc88b4e2ec43ee02d7fa8a6609b6994db88
describe
'58278' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJC' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
1f4d151b54310f89d4ddcc501dab6926
f764af69ec801a9447212561ebe3098a1aeceda4
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJD' 'sip-files00214.tif'
39652579d4e6b9c48515ae56f4d687fc
7cff8cfbc236ad0d370e9815bff6f93d4aa0a80e
describe
'1639' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJE' 'sip-files00214.txt'
7b568ba97ec51eaac5d8815b037e46db
ec37fec7ac6806a16d3a2e20a0fd0cbb626342ea
describe
'23197' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJF' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
6ccb9ef14e7a33442e626bb890fd644d
f98b6ac5c77222643147948eb8edcfc4684a8872
describe
'462128' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJG' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
93fb402a5d08bd4326c3f45f492fe003
9b435ef815800166a4a27cdfa6eb0f43a17a7398
'2012-01-22T23:40:47-05:00'
describe
'168675' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJH' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
74dfde62102b8ca5704244a1760e1077
885bccf6decc3889438825e486187a32e1a140fa
describe
'52677' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJI' 'sip-files00215.pro'
b808be864f2f113f967d1c4e199f95ce
a4918bdba064da496551fd0a365e2721f1034381
describe
'61582' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJJ' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
51142fe703c06aeb2a1af0b658339c4c
4874a58073010d85eab399763d38a4b97808c094
describe
'3710440' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJK' 'sip-files00215.tif'
8611deebdfe7b5c2e71e6afac6542db0
a0e646a6227507d71c4894da2efb9402cb38970a
describe
'2112' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJL' 'sip-files00215.txt'
ea715069b83047223ee36cdc2049cd1a
dd6ce254fad8e5af7b298931237d0ec0ef5ff1d1
describe
'23527' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJM' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
f8bbc7d19b9530ee6617cf45ef3835c9
b63f6f3d047c446b951fdc164228ccd0d7b92c84
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJN' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
169e6c53458629758e56fcb8b5303f1b
3b9cd2141184e5bfbb4d8f1b27db82cfd4d0c778
describe
'183454' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJO' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
cb0b2f11e99ae089eff34500a0d19712
0e7d4eacfa212556504440f13f2f9a646884ba37
describe
'57143' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJP' 'sip-files00216.pro'
7437a8939da490a8039c2e935613ec53
8dbbb802abea389f74063e2d740734084d314fb3
describe
'63640' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJQ' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
7cc3af8f492c60e4b1c5356e2215ad07
81ad42476b734df5f0ef2c97d96efc6d31080df6
describe
'3713128' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJR' 'sip-files00216.tif'
1a627077efc9dc49bb934bc92d8ae5c1
56f7f91469ce5ba431f188bf8da7f28f81549b98
describe
'2246' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJS' 'sip-files00216.txt'
e3f9908bde138c9d5ee0b49e63952ee9
d309dc98239e1cac0bd14590ade2b7fc63b31b93
describe
'24201' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJT' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
b5c6b03b1982dc25bfac09eedcd22066
30edca6319c635cd44011787cfcd0f1c4484fc2e
describe
'462344' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJU' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
edafdb13c98478255c30759e25399f20
caab09667d30b6abb650395b31ae4bdea6592e61
'2012-01-22T23:32:03-05:00'
describe
'82699' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJV' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
7a27e6167831f561928d073051e7b705
fd0e57cb178d9925f8c92924db541ba26d2db577
describe
'2857' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJW' 'sip-files00217.pro'
550a3efd6e32f0d49ba01c91a5ff2b7f
27e210a644f29c1198f64861589002affad6e70c
describe
'24684' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJX' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
b25c44ffbc87010d697b6ee14e811370
40904669a9ab277ea0654ad761d82c8dbe0a73c6
describe
'3707560' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJY' 'sip-files00217.tif'
0f0724b91e71c4cb5807e9521eb60e44
8f73c35c966323892c109e1da008f73c182c356f
describe
'229' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANJZ' 'sip-files00217.txt'
ededa27bfb695aa9e8849a16585f3914
fb1cdbe00d5a49195c89a81822343625d89b58d8
describe
'12473' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKA' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
3db8a763ba9935dbbb19b6878cb83396
592c353d54b4d0f114ffb7256aa7b5894d627dc3
describe
'7103' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKB' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
0cc5a80eedc9bf1908ca2213e003d464
2576375883a20f0fe269fdb180d0f0d94591867c
describe
'11190' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKC' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
b6575b8a177ccfa70eed3265459269b3
dc9607849ea06a606e19e26d24e3245af6ccf38a
describe
'9295' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKD' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
e73ec448c56909929e9112394c3656b4
b94d5bf3deac41f66827b1a59e3d2cde3248dcaa
describe
'3707740' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKE' 'sip-files00218.tif'
74df86de5b4366e563b1bd23d6153e37
7153115f1d8e294c56209c118a210f46ecd150e8
'2012-01-22T23:43:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKF' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
1fb223abf9a9ba85e967a6f88d09892d
cb1f6abe6e02aa7ef71d0efa38c281ecb197c15c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKG' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
b6127a69e9aad32f3203b25a8011c0e7
b83c8484e672d485079da6562541d2ae9da3c75d
describe
'164794' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKH' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
fa907c0ccfcb7b685689edc430250255
88ec793e55e78fc04bf9103687da7bab03ac7f9e
'2012-01-22T23:32:38-05:00'
describe
'48171' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKI' 'sip-files00219.pro'
7cc8e4518506125a8a2b095a794af18e
3c2601402cdc36f15371585f593d90ff925ccad6
describe
'58448' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKJ' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
b9ee13fe9e86797a8e0551c8d9912d1e
711a6f0ee01455d33b4ae72c8e9bacc3a8d06676
describe
'3712728' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKK' 'sip-files00219.tif'
cd300025358b507eb77e84647eb6aaca
f6c8b073895555d5cda59bbda1d1bd12ac47c90b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKL' 'sip-files00219.txt'
88c7ab0082aa22c33e2d94bd91073760
720c4b748a30028565564cd95f9dc91f5e10eba1
describe
'23406' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKM' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
517b94ef760c41705bdd5884a9a69d32
f843c02285695d49e5e9617dcc080daf3247c4f6
describe
'462470' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKN' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
c1e2eee1932679fac9d2f034bd11548d
5a9f67335ee448860e2d4a394c17834551bf2383
describe
'159804' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKO' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
a5f99cc2082a45734bfab4df86294ff6
056fae9779292b014c1900b5318c834a3c80a730
describe
'49480' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKP' 'sip-files00220.pro'
60b6bca6bfe8a6d87540e31ef9d5cd55
6ee73e6b8d2b0fa1227d73b5c15198287259b075
'2012-01-22T23:30:36-05:00'
describe
'57606' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKQ' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
c127dbeb856987e6197377a30a5f7bb1
ae399fb42ddc96e963ed6f2aab675f7317c9be48
describe
'3712452' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKR' 'sip-files00220.tif'
cb7886b7f2ca7ca46936b365a7d6f29c
0cf6d172578d085274b9726040f1635ef08f166f
describe
'1990' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKS' 'sip-files00220.txt'
804887b242f38d3bf66adb703ac787a3
1af99e2c800806e7eb8ad7abb85ac11b337c2b6c
describe
'23079' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKT' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
d9f6e6b4a2129c999420476ae8968f04
26c4246756f170825c8bf773526e7aa179e71f9f
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKU' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
9eeca424f5e9ce94f2b87bd3122d1f6c
cee321209a68a2cf09e6c04982c6fda72884cb54
'2012-01-22T23:31:00-05:00'
describe
'162567' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKV' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
97cc368d096dbd1d52bc0b96dc54baa9
9216c2507dd96c15bb702cd4481d4c4c95b4503f
describe
'50538' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKW' 'sip-files00221.pro'
8b332dd1f9eef25aae21bc5004375420
c24da33261a9497223056e25e18d1e8bd10fd7d8
describe
'59760' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKX' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
118246c7b8258dad5e430547994425ad
2c708968e6a3c1f5e8d77472591b0c8d6e0c956d
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKY' 'sip-files00221.tif'
a554f89835bb9edf60d6b7a78619d0f5
28ae1f251c8551a88e0bba963def93dedd01f95b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANKZ' 'sip-files00221.txt'
e6aea3ab95fc3b85660e435da35d79b9
b2130a00667ce1dd92cde2f09912e304323315a1
describe
'23470' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLA' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
6e362e09e4b52eefb4eab6f5c41c44a0
c2e20e41c111dd8fc6c210118710e7c8d339badc
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLB' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
775900fcf277d28c7484891fbbe84cbd
c14398d21e169a806fcd8c05fc0e56e940f5631a
'2012-01-22T23:41:35-05:00'
describe
'160223' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLC' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
e46f38b328b48683a1228183c3f7821f
efc45396b725f9ba5847fa248bab3d6286cd1ed2
describe
'50333' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLD' 'sip-files00222.pro'
baa87ad1a9a8abaa1eff9fa4a387efbd
1e5c53e679b1f683bab60c7ffa21daf5e612ab6c
describe
'58419' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLE' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
5750e633cdeb025786df5280b40c4dc1
58299d940be76fe8fd9fb0741e23f96d876e6954
describe
'3712792' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLF' 'sip-files00222.tif'
7f0cdde431b4b40b43403c4b7b76be6e
53ceb9beaf83947dedb1ea70b16085d9b120e22b
describe
'2006' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLG' 'sip-files00222.txt'
4266a8d541b2a2be6091813e1d2bcf4b
bad6958af4ec0e00716848c70754e6c64c0bffab
describe
'23574' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLH' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
4994fa6c32be8386b4d09661235825d4
5dc62f2a4353a564cea869b7716eed6a8533fc14
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLI' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
b6afcfc0bd937ab7797549c0acdcfcdb
d274632e2ddb9d9d648fe56307ba50ad4d547b25
describe
'179582' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLJ' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
3bc4cb41aab252e6fb508dff9823d3ab
ebe75e53fc78dea286acd7e5152fa860d1e6d493
describe
'54233' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLK' 'sip-files00223.pro'
6cc5be3e4fdea160402848aa71398b15
6fabc409a027bc8ed8cf6cba3ad2b0c7cf901fe8
describe
'63080' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLL' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
3d41b56fd364e6949b7ae34399734c65
1b5b9a1b18e1fee3abc437cc67e3ccc564dbc7c6
describe
'3710516' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLM' 'sip-files00223.tif'
fd6389542bbe763b2caa79727f54e604
967208617fdc3eafb5cd41c6151a8a32f23f8c11
describe
'2177' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLN' 'sip-files00223.txt'
bbf072c134ce1581cd4115477065b487
a1d4b7a1f0369f7cd9cce8c89af5877e14470762
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLO' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
5d50150413915a0e5fb7b6f7c22a2931
b1c2e0040b0d7deeb66461c6f35eda805acc88d7
describe
'462176' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLP' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
16329f8ab6dc1172d77aae05d9797551
a476ba1edc6ca5344795a1eb5944a61391899aa5
describe
'165891' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLQ' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
d4edfb8b54fa3ecd4f64040f7fc75550
6a2f646d88a0fa4bde7df7d415d4760c2d051336
describe
'52290' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLR' 'sip-files00224.pro'
2a0a09efe8e0d50258e3fc269f0e9845
dd7df0fef4d32fa9ca67b5c5680e105c6e3b15e4
describe
'59075' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLS' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
f05d2d7d1963322d72fd20ee4da3ee0b
db7a8cea61328223cdc6c1c8bbbe2bfd46f9698f
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLT' 'sip-files00224.tif'
c50a3c267ff1384813bfb4f7085a59eb
3a7a13c3000220b1bd8d5b8b9dc9fcea1fcdf1be
describe
'2071' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLU' 'sip-files00224.txt'
0240ef4977185d5902102407c76eb6d5
eeddf4e07068a39c5adbf5980778f2dea44c1e6b
describe
'23121' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLV' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
1340d9330d9fa8cc272e823db474bdb8
6647ae00bf4b03677175a76d0fd7219e5d23e67c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLW' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
dc794d7729216c83379505ceaaf1a9bf
7a26c153cb42a48423513014508f63684ba0f584
describe
'166155' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLX' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
c15599f82115f9afff613066fe7933f4
8f970a4a3b585a4a6c35277af011f6a26b4b8d13
describe
'50147' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLY' 'sip-files00225.pro'
45514502261119393b8246af07fb0042
1d2e708bfcb1957cae34f53886e484c8c3b02d63
describe
'61741' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANLZ' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
d9acb62a7cb6d0347e13c286bf0c190e
f0d9f7db22eb90c4ad330407703ac8593b05f2ce
describe
'3710648' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMA' 'sip-files00225.tif'
e5c4f198aa3d00bcd57a91fb79970f14
7b276d218da0abfcfa7589e5377118acbb35fda6
describe
'2082' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMB' 'sip-files00225.txt'
558884d47f7c996cb818e49547a8b4e4
b5e8be9bfa3050f948108b0411254597535d4447
describe
'23739' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMC' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
3ebbf5f03eca58f8330729f3eec6cabe
30edb36df68aa59541c82bc5fa5812a5e2d1e80c
describe
'462148' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMD' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
62408c0b30d7a84fa272319b90fbf521
23616b6e64f61c57f921e734d0b51ff255c95e6c
describe
'172599' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANME' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
7804d424f4a0364d8b2f799ed747bf15
b5fbee9588a2b96d768535f77fea31eccbfde5b6
describe
'53204' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMF' 'sip-files00226.pro'
94d782d3be7c62eea18d491cc1d87c7b
2f576de84133c6aa828e5d19e21b7a90107cacfc
describe
'62481' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMG' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
c6eacece29797fef220c534f29a5045a
ff26d52a74a4d0d9a75016bfc46a8bd787818471
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMH' 'sip-files00226.tif'
2faed34323bd9281c98daa78f4a709cf
f11ae10511e09dc09125ef79a05411655e640536
describe
'2126' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMI' 'sip-files00226.txt'
9f850178a7393f7f312b84f89f91bc19
8c7414cd68fac09d476f7f33c3a62fdcb6cbbe4c
'2012-01-22T23:31:45-05:00'
describe
'23783' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMJ' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
6dc573d0b18f4a3028028d1de03ee77b
0df55883311632269885b431bc1f7522d4d508e8
describe
'358658' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMK' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
047f0d2a5cc2dedc47ef1915987b7343
eb7aae8f3eaa5eff36cfd5c7a5b329d64914eea8
describe
'218165' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANML' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
2b56704c5feeb8cd0959b485b83e6296
cfbef19743d735472005f506d7472e97edfec3cf
describe
'4779' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMM' 'sip-files00227.pro'
e3eed18c54bcf60eaa49c3892cfbbf92
842ca11c465891bff6a9f818fd5a12244378a18d
describe
'64760' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMN' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
7d1147b231bca610eb07a9343df685df
c40c99f1908c03f3a0db155f4e8e98a35e8a5c39
describe
'2885220' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMO' 'sip-files00227.tif'
cf8a5fb1e5685085306dc8e699497efe
57b24253d581ebcb842f82c28560a5fd81a97082
describe
'224' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMP' 'sip-files00227.txt'
271f9038572e4dd40ba4be295a765679
6343793ecc5b93967f3f38ba17d3b25265825cec
describe
'25870' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMQ' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
7bc861dffa812c6f97267f1d6c47ccd5
2e19ba5a3b80db3a05edec346870bb0ee58fb3a3
describe
'5330' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMR' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
bba72465bd1fad26a32c627348c6977c
8a664fd0ca8b97658e337b5a8de9688500466e34
describe
'11161' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMS' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
feb4338a0ccbefb25947c1a094c16dcf
cfd16b0de1cd9a9615b211cec455f566dd10b7e4
describe
'9327' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMT' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
ea7c7f39c1c04d6b3cc9bf62559fc6a9
ed51710148715c62d242816831c22c965bb1c88d
'2012-01-22T23:32:28-05:00'
describe
'3707748' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMU' 'sip-files00228.tif'
6dedf899a95f6a62fb3b29418befb9be
9699cd67102e5e340c2092abdb508428c8a26f45
'2012-01-22T23:43:54-05:00'
describe
'8814' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMV' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
84b76b2a95b8a154d185239606ab6a6f
0146e9511abc2fb312824f67d51cedac66a29078
describe
'462162' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMW' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
b9f868fe7bfd99f43feaa3c75b982455
e9b760141ec6e07d6ddf2a470606ee6de20cd164
describe
'161852' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMX' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
d3b9f204030a6b27c4724bca902837b1
b65a3c7263d3e36879a9a980e3c0e0e558dae88a
describe
'49709' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMY' 'sip-files00229.pro'
e675c19ce3698b7d2210d1b1c95c536e
53551b5f2cb2b739e0cfbc430eb7c71f73aeb34d
describe
'59707' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANMZ' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
fc0a5440a046d2519a6d3e9fe8aba848
41b14ab34a4baca567d82793ded17e414e8ddeb5
describe
'3710388' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNA' 'sip-files00229.tif'
9dbe3983d4170560c7d322397de7d3d3
77a845f1f1beaa0767fdee4b428c77fbb733d72f
describe
'1996' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNB' 'sip-files00229.txt'
585b35e368c5e0e8d6822e55136cd85a
4f931a7e491a20073887c3129ff6b37d3bb54ecc
describe
'23386' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNC' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
87ad0a39d9338010950118694a09b0cc
216fa389591dc7fec640ad9a75b644a397d50c22
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANND' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
7e9e90c7ea98da969d857722c9a58863
1ed2f233630ed4df1adafca2f7344f8ca817857f
describe
'154719' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNE' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
614bd0402e6ab7856b0ae136d49de37a
094ca17b3d4035ca7d520a0872109829407da2d6
describe
'47970' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNF' 'sip-files00230.pro'
ce9b2b7427253552cd3df56084ac7675
9f4f8a3daf0ad76c08d801a5d544631a580bdcf1
describe
'57126' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNG' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
104b34948a0b6de894895dacdfbca3b8
c76322cec6708f9e92126d2b4106c54964914510
describe
'3712652' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNH' 'sip-files00230.tif'
6798b7cb940663fcc291ac640ddd608e
f08e68887e0d5e7324423e4e5edb719bfe49ceb5
describe
'2003' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNI' 'sip-files00230.txt'
e9894b735cc20daa502303b30b3b4b47
aac936d528c1d59a71ef6373743e963aa33dd5a1
describe
'23298' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNJ' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
955d0331f5835d6313cb05246bcfe092
6205df3b1cf8c8159289e2777a04624018ccd06c
'2012-01-22T23:30:40-05:00'
describe
'301894' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNK' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
8c24714693a2879906327d57508cee99
403c052b2ad028f2b4ecf66e0be82c3c5b38324b
describe
'137469' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNL' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
2f9fa27e1a3e22c1a1471d0112a475eb
35ef804c8069a0dffd61733e199133933c4489ff
describe
'7241' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNM' 'sip-files00231.pro'
9300ac756db31f02a382565e9f7f4657
76f76128ad67cbd2097bc08381feddcdcfc35aab
describe
'42145' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNN' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
dc945b5930db4ec9f4f6cf2fe30faed9
9db22c763fc1465697c09d033fa4c1288ae56feb
describe
'2429824' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNO' 'sip-files00231.tif'
f0dc4ad97263d2cc814f847cd251b027
8af395d1a8a31bfb03ed38d72f2a0f615f6f61e2
describe
'917' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNP' 'sip-files00231.txt'
4366f59c2f248975f12e9a8012dcad99
302bbc46f91400d2f1d5f9e5feb9f724ae14a3ba
describe
Invalid character
'20434' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNQ' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
b1bab9761d17c85ef38afca1e80f5b16
369561641eb493dabefb8ff1238cb6d6eac28c1d
describe
'6404' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNR' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
1faf184bd6102a9392093a87feea64f3
a88122b2f8046aaefe41501b18ec51b7bedb334c
describe
'11152' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNS' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
b9e1d5a8dfb287920a6049f597b474a7
9a297a6927ee1b1020bfae6fe40d480d837296ee
describe
'9258' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNT' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
a90f81bba5e2eadcbe29733959350981
59e9314da51b73929036d32b19253c28cc1cef1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNU' 'sip-files00232.tif'
71f9bf8fe2345004e63ff2b08cdaa934
01b91500d154f5de8d842bcaec2fd681e42d8cdc
'2012-01-22T23:37:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNV' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
b734fad85e11554ce19d01a87ff337c6
c7f015951733e2b4840cef312935efe71a9b53c9
describe
'462354' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNW' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
67401d5e1625673a1d1f473b6a6806f0
69ef8ddc3caa9eadb148386f6fe8695a9bf80709
describe
'135085' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNX' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
f346bf12e8fa720bba9a4fe23dfd3451
ded8b44c6c17de3de9e0669d83b05ee6b3e40fa9
describe
'11970' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNY' 'sip-files00233.pro'
6d4da834a26bad9f2500cc21f2a12da3
89b344eb932df8b61397633649a7e8c4c1c69b1f
describe
'43849' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANNZ' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
ebaec99e3bec7b6914465c9c129b4cc6
72c5985ed4d47f7c79848428a5bfc0ab9a8d768d
describe
'3710420' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOA' 'sip-files00233.tif'
96c102c6c0098bb3afe53d5bc34756c4
7e37519a81030b71d191390657202a0418afd74f
'2012-01-22T23:38:11-05:00'
describe
'603' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOB' 'sip-files00233.txt'
ac865214432dcfa129a224e5f225c476
39bed86419072593d627ea4ed28ea973588949e1
describe
'19072' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOC' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
4a5137f72e42ae553b746b1a56557a5e
dc88babffa3a4664cca8a2f42ead3ca8cdf4479c
describe
'462102' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOD' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
c97b1508855051097a463de2627b4082
68b3f9aaff00228e5840d7d113d9efe4f3fefc0f
describe
'114543' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOE' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
d45ac69dd9abe4bfadce2a7596a68ece
a944d6501520d6f9bb128587372290325c0c8cb8
describe
'34405' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOF' 'sip-files00234.pro'
1633b867eebd2cc00304d72cd9a35d02
54a0aae5c1828ff18d059b072b4fb3f1bd1bf79c
describe
'43032' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOG' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
c71544eb872ae390dab48c5e819e6a5f
6fc9e0e10fd0a583120f8bcdf9bdd38c653b5e2e
describe
'3708688' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOH' 'sip-files00234.tif'
e77aed4291feeea99e3fdcb882b36a9b
429414fc31bdb8d8e8cd6fec36eb48544aca20aa
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOI' 'sip-files00234.txt'
d8edafba30473a741d9c68b33d2b7f67
c833e0addc4c725444204e86cdb2da45bd3ece9d
describe
'18270' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOJ' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
f7b4f4ae881dad904ee36cc28be1a83a
2a93c5d4494e0c04df0522e30b699885f39422ff
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOK' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
84a1b68d7d646c4f8514ec32ba6eea99
4ca4d37f7d0fc5310d50956de2e9563cc32f5b6f
describe
'171222' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOL' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
c7c592187f377435b0b5a27136aaae62
3815ca16fa994256afa54eeee014b8f7a3696c0b
describe
'52655' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOM' 'sip-files00235.pro'
a854e2f53eaf771389964381113e501b
435d98f9fd9271adf75a62fa7eb387c625722276
'2012-01-22T23:32:45-05:00'
describe
'60880' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANON' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
8be2d0ff6ad1b50524c7eedf15d45bcf
d457a0f7608ef7c42f2df9529d7c78abfce5787d
describe
'3712516' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOO' 'sip-files00235.tif'
dc82e9d1132b4db402fca7ebc12ef570
2814f7563c4f943ba2ed62a975145117e0bb261f
describe
'2188' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOP' 'sip-files00235.txt'
6996e90b328f13d6f32e7bbf52f3a6d2
5e298404ee1cb5e7424e2fb2150172a612708363
describe
'23478' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOQ' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
8a03d58a8764dd4626bd5417a87f014d
3b0db9b747f6e12be4cea590266c18e61036b052
describe
'462644' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOR' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
6611d4b59dc2a7e24b04bc165a2c2d4e
63797201b79bb4c5682884f85512f23341d19c2a
describe
'162668' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOS' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
4ff623829725b74301eee51c25516613
fb0543c187bbc2d7439ff64f4a372b801bae46f0
describe
'47915' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOT' 'sip-files00236.pro'
8c8ea4fe414b1485bfe86e35597d7fa0
685a2cea1bb26e47afac98192915bcdceeec3060
describe
'57378' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOU' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
b3b7d48ef8604893b4b4c9555a981d94
ff6819246d776b0b9309fffb9fa24f7005ab55bc
describe
'3714332' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOV' 'sip-files00236.tif'
1e6749324289e2eacc42cefcb5c9e76a
30339d8763c2612cd0f9bddb98eeec043d1c30a5
describe
'1986' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOW' 'sip-files00236.txt'
d685497588c783e8fea1cf49a28ef752
c06a2118857c95450e58aeca6a28385c1aab9b41
'2012-01-22T23:29:47-05:00'
describe
'23284' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOX' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
40bb1cbf9c0261b349dd9278dbf980ba
93d312f72d00f32957aee7093eb6a9c3444d0de5
describe
'319397' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOY' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
55cad7f8ab6effbcecca6b1b5d8849fb
2e2045816906c6c042aa5ade707692b4508288ed
describe
'213340' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANOZ' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
2f6ed55a00273f24b7c9b447eb9dd649
713d77d94af51f4338ae2779241da54b71bbfd37
describe
'3101' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPA' 'sip-files00237.pro'
d43c4c09e2f8d5994d927eea77a9fd58
044fcd61667083227e5c6788524e308674797878
describe
'65669' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPB' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
5e2e77c032e74c7e3f1644cd03e35ab5
ca10ce214d0bbbaef09ca2313c4077ab92e535ec
describe
'2572116' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPC' 'sip-files00237.tif'
08aa7e739d96410085b0a761db7dd1a2
9e99a888555aa3f2eb083045855ad9b3741609ea
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPD' 'sip-files00237.txt'
dda82c5f22b36d1c42393cd8ac0d0597
340c234d1d5f20607182e440de491a356c2ab859
describe
'27240' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPE' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
7500b603d30f4e9f179b29063a002d59
2e013735dea45896dc5a38110c3544997bee869c
describe
'4958' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPF' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
1c3fbeb90bd5dd9c60be5f4d9996720e
669c61001cdbf42b4560f685161203133bdcdbb9
describe
'11069' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPG' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
a46c5b306e3f01c6a4da51b28fc9219a
5b557870b1bb2120511307e2f10696e830dbf144
'2012-01-22T23:30:24-05:00'
describe
'9262' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPH' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
52870dee40cd2c6b0aff7914aaab59e8
9a0f7a33e4d60b8e10265975e56be1ce97e37453
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPI' 'sip-files00238.tif'
d0f01e70953f9e1ea7cc6b86c8ce1ff4
69ffaf0f93d9423a0bf9fb7f9850321b42edf197
describe
'8783' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPJ' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
006d94b199faf8416dc338418ca39c04
215a28ca68412519a2937532b1f56d4861befbc2
describe
'461778' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPK' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
869a8aec7993a15cd710f59a52523b14
30e46011350dfeaf6d9934712479da039a1eff91
describe
'83846' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPL' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
945ef5994828e967d413ebcfb5c7410f
5c4ff3b592cf9d424da5233236d13b91021b7054
describe
'7615' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPM' 'sip-files00239.pro'
e727ea7348efc0899755d8b97d96bea9
9f96b726983197ac6d73717ec779f5d7e92b461b
describe
'28458' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPN' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
41280f9271903651f4a42244d8355975
bbf248c31810d43593d74379a15a6833bf40ba46
describe
'3707200' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPO' 'sip-files00239.tif'
154c157cd37a8407e6dff1782e02f056
99b48d83db4d9e59dd875147dfb7178159611767
'2012-01-22T23:32:58-05:00'
describe
'317' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPP' 'sip-files00239.txt'
8f336675b5b2d9c993ff81b6092c41c9
3b9c9afed398cae0f92c191899ec7cb113054120
describe
'14400' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPQ' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
26aaed1c02b386c1701aee2c041e9902
815506bf490b1d013b7744d24852ba92a82f36e7
'2012-01-22T23:34:18-05:00'
describe
'462431' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPR' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
9766bd52aeeef347955d003d5f999911
943034b4a07f03511d647f0527da74cefeaced16
describe
'112730' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPS' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
23cc0387d598c1d3cbad8d388f80a233
dfb7fac1a7bfc540b0d51574f67542e392b6af30
describe
'32523' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPT' 'sip-files00240.pro'
eb1365f76aa9f7304de953414ddfc71a
aec3fad705f827e7c0f02f00920010531b23d281
describe
'43093' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPU' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
ad6a2968863cf1c5785bd8e49300abe5
dfc4294c9723afc2c47fadc27c95e31a51fd066c
'2012-01-22T23:43:25-05:00'
describe
'3711004' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPV' 'sip-files00240.tif'
cb9f893e628710a967a073054f487cbe
92f9ee781e6121f7904fa4a136727f67d1a2e930
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPW' 'sip-files00240.txt'
de0505ad8e2ed36ab3b0a22def1b499c
693c7fa776583d66854e779127282e792e58e4af
describe
'18724' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPX' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
5f33dcc21860d46741eb394d2effec4d
a1a6dbd05cec6e2597abaa0f638ddbb7e9f895d1
describe
'385538' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPY' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
c47d0524c2d2b29394f7f4b22539c695
38e1c1a9332c65d89891a88a74b4258de3580c02
describe
'175399' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANPZ' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
32ebfad4974c508f5dabb83022f11660
4e2e008fd64b50a3c951510429b771c74c53e382
describe
'3978' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQA' 'sip-files00241.pro'
7d92d4d246212b0b7399f660ed8fb93b
0108b94dd334fd1bc7ef71fe2bdb6a374d7e083e
describe
'53491' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQB' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
1c1bef605c9acd9234dae76370a95ad3
9e207159f6e652702ed4c3847a99d783f63d5181
describe
'3098520' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQC' 'sip-files00241.tif'
1cffc6121ed619708a440447332bad89
7cd26e54183bb2e14f87d53ca289ad16e553b3bc
describe
'292' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQD' 'sip-files00241.txt'
fb0638431b8718325b5054dcf3ec162b
81eef83e20db65f889516901632b6e73776a35ff
describe
Invalid character
'22501' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQE' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
20ef36bfbb3a93bbe1ebfef8e5ad1121
1456716ee14acd7529905670b50169f74a2fec70
'2012-01-22T23:34:01-05:00'
describe
'3386' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQF' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
ea1754fd943140649d8429341fc7ffac
936384406f63e749cec3f21241305d199d3a22a7
describe
'11017' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQG' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
ba5cd862c5c46bb2d2a34aa4ad9cbbf8
f53a3591265c3095365f19f74d6f25967a8b52d4
describe
'9234' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQH' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
53f10c8c1aea3b9f5a67ea597dc9e90f
78e5b28bbf10989c227493ec5efe24605789b64e
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQI' 'sip-files00242.tif'
fe8b832231c7e5838461a6df9cad1db3
76bb5d0982b1ea9dda64ff29731ad9018af59741
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQJ' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
99fa475d796e730bad6ca02b881ae144
9005cd13a801e79fbcdf7b3f516b6e0fc9cdaf10
'2012-01-22T23:43:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQK' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
de5ca8d1869f47be2cf3914579e61f28
7fa743fcb29a05ae6ed32e1f3a32285c619ce4e1
describe
'159152' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQL' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
5539a8205f9bd0ecd7fdc449ce7eb46e
eec175b2d8b68f3083eec30b4f76cae7e4e3821b
describe
'50753' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQM' 'sip-files00243.pro'
2c981285305b5cebd129fdcbf4f16768
4ec915eb2b87d1b9a54c238ca376af4fe049aabb
describe
'58963' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQN' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
0ac61f776ba4ec0ad02535314a9c73d5
755735afa43f7b977fe949aecfe89a6de187e245
describe
'3712588' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQO' 'sip-files00243.tif'
05b3ab8614b943603d8cfa9b77d7c403
5712474a17732fc7c997c70bf9c6b5ac828247f5
describe
'2019' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQP' 'sip-files00243.txt'
90d41d0645533b367200c64b9c4f4972
03420d60ef03e65282f3c296b6ae5bdbba9382b1
describe
'22978' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQQ' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
a7d14a080a58523ed5b90d3e6dbd160a
8376339c24b1903288955408a12e90c75cacab7e
'2012-01-22T23:34:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQR' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
85a38df7f6c783fc19fc27f22628b65a
993c8539ac975488da6daa15c59de341bc13692a
describe
'166498' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQS' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
f8709eb2397153f5f5ccd6ad3345a349
53404796482337b05cfdc50e2daa0b4e6442371b
describe
'53342' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQT' 'sip-files00244.pro'
c4ec448221cfa17478123dee0d3d6f81
0a8cd19ec09e5f8f67167a8e51ea7b7d56981d7a
describe
'60778' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQU' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
8459516c0087456a7056c887ee865357
2e5724758d502581da8260bd16f50458299b680c
describe
'3710288' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQV' 'sip-files00244.tif'
1e39b67b77fca5398dc313f9a256cef8
31be2d88fc3232c1160b03f9d554fb050cb3d1dc
describe
'2131' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQW' 'sip-files00244.txt'
fe3b39124e40f1de2ded66917fb48946
a35565cea59787d1255972b848b1fd810aeffa77
describe
'23660' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQX' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
a4e8284173e325ffb23fa655fcfeafc4
6cf67becbf375ba708649a01f994467257ea2fa5
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQY' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
79a2c9b128c081b5bd01b43ea9be92d4
7e099504a6da8e89a49ad18e80f098c880b77d4c
describe
'176215' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANQZ' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
c1cccce3cde3e2edb7f1787ec06e0033
616483b7093d594dbaaa8c774b3a08b063740cd3
describe
'55901' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRA' 'sip-files00245.pro'
336a45d445c6760b25399e0c9069a768
d65af2043c729a65d40cf13f87ee24874fb9dbdd
describe
'63976' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRB' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
da5bc30a34a61e90186456a529f911b2
c3f8b4e6faa4cad89b99023b587f03c9c992e11b
describe
'3710448' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRC' 'sip-files00245.tif'
38b8c19aeb1967da17a21b1fa2af6dfa
5e6a42400e9642d2befe74e64481584aca0c30f7
describe
'2232' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRD' 'sip-files00245.txt'
ba2bf3c1b47d6d6da482aff9638fcc37
2a25f5dda14ce49ca0153c583769c50ac95a6967
describe
'23586' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRE' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
423d9dfbc252f73f8c07bb8e6cc90f14
8b84bc81b60f61b723e6673701fa800487c9f8a4
'2012-01-22T23:32:54-05:00'
describe
'462434' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRF' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
bb31b745e2fa40d9b1c92711c2ad9263
f901e48b2edf7f49acc3a3e2ef5085a91389643c
describe
'171075' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRG' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
9099ecc504a3981c113049b780448feb
dfdc9e3122cf88f953ac753061d29f9526b502a7
describe
'54370' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRH' 'sip-files00246.pro'
54146e23cdd2ef3cb8dec0d14565aa50
67c887f620f496bd0a48bbbf58a61bc039d5c720
describe
'60807' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRI' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
e9e188cbf3644a95a06e3b98b3bfbafa
0f9ec59ae055c017b80ce45946dff66386cc4543
describe
'3712836' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRJ' 'sip-files00246.tif'
595962030637ac3126e420fa8fd5c826
1d722901e7039768fef95aa01468bab77ec1923a
describe
'2153' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRK' 'sip-files00246.txt'
570c75961b7628f49b63d27325926a22
6a0fb5952bb0bba653d17cbbf072602d815fa0be
describe
'23670' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRL' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
2d71c652fca2d610ee0c49d3ab5bde91
9e8f5261dd0247a6a2e9307722e328b329c2ceed
describe
'312493' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRM' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
4789e0c77cd18e420f2b57b69aa8de3a
2160ba95989ac18abe9b4f4b6f0ff35cef111d40
describe
'140325' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRN' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
989692b360e76ec5869f332fd1f8cea0
60ce3eba730156ac61319c878ebf937405141864
describe
'3121' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRO' 'sip-files00247.pro'
f2cd208892210e85cb1152d064c7e22e
b3521768a6301c5a72d8181dfc9e412cd4838d0f
describe
'43477' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRP' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
ae8035ba661928e992062113a5c3342c
7f13bdd86e237213f9a4c5cb50ae7aae4331a17e
describe
'2514936' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRQ' 'sip-files00247.tif'
13f50d676463bdd9eb1cce0dd17f64f2
a2544b8347e3e0b19923b32e756d013e9ef6d108
describe
'232' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRR' 'sip-files00247.txt'
c73cabfc9630699517ab794d6c9bdb84
3f0464b6356374331d62e31387175dcc10615e09
describe
'21552' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRS' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
a17db5f3632a5b83b1e749935c2acdee
4c6a3c12e25c6a82fd796c6d880c5fe157873990
describe
'4981' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRT' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
4f7e359deb101947a45998510786f427
2710b23d1bfe46acd19b37c3630455ab4951f4d5
describe
'11080' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRU' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
8ba905e25490b99dd31c1af5208bd119
8c67984859f83f1d87d42fac2b3346bb98bc8e27
describe
'9259' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRV' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
9366f070730b5eb91c9d55d9c41ed1da
2a6e7c047063e4fdbc6e21ca03b62fcefa792726
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRW' 'sip-files00248.tif'
72a39e1134a623977e71ab3b8cb0ddb4
54735cf3df8beef2efa21e5d7fa48a1e18a10855
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRX' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
9d678d5998166a1168d3b2223c4e218f
26827b672480f37c49ac2ebbfc44912db208228c
describe
'462368' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRY' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
d2ce8eb9b701790f780fd226e15ad77d
23f3213d5133a7b7e2c6739abcd834763b190d81
'2012-01-22T23:38:15-05:00'
describe
'164161' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANRZ' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
e07ac017fdd930d5fa7276bca5cd6e9d
f4ef94a80d6d0acb92d20aac662ab7f41368bb5f
describe
'49357' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSA' 'sip-files00249.pro'
aab317198a2627e687f9ed8b4362d622
fdfba79f986094f494917f583e3488a9b24209f6
describe
'59270' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSB' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
82aaf9e38cfeefc09fe7dcee51a7604e
27b63867ddc5b0a0e0049235b6417f9d7826ebbf
describe
'3711784' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSC' 'sip-files00249.tif'
fc66d8e61b9469e149102bf5e78ee786
8793a9adbf381ed0456af1e0a103f59d902b31f9
describe
'2041' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSD' 'sip-files00249.txt'
44493050fbc009cde7107f64bcaa0414
8de1d811906cc67b5718c3dd7fb4bc70aa12c21c
describe
'23388' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSE' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
4ea4c5b8b6761a23e04739d4fdca2687
1a0dc56bac88c6ed76be87304fe72e033b2250e6
describe
'462460' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSF' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
7aa92fa17a38a6738afeaebf6b3b1eb5
4826a73a9ce869dcb63ef52744effc060807e60f
describe
'152335' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSG' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
e20558da9458db0a7ff153377071bd18
11ba3a54091c6704178fe5d8bf17ba9d710a3dc0
describe
'48801' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSH' 'sip-files00250.pro'
b600c7c8d13f108ad8e6b9c94958c386
f3459a11efa42886aed0b32eda8721caf7968c5f
describe
'55723' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSI' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
383fcf4fb0f426acdf9deeb8f6cc334a
f5d6c188390bf69448eeaacf377f40d0bcfe5eef
describe
'3712552' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSJ' 'sip-files00250.tif'
789d213dbe9b0b466e16da76832fc0d5
cef856585482cd06c40e99ea44dfbcfe8b27f248
describe
'1967' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSK' 'sip-files00250.txt'
404606b843823a1402c7e22b5537dd19
e76278936670893d1d3f5c723bfa9b27be7bf4c9
describe
'22999' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSL' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
85bd34b53d65a77599ebbd199973feb5
1b29028aafe28ad4e035070751266b0c3f7e6cd1
describe
'471598' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSM' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
4ecad21955cd95358307497e7f5732d1
61e83dfc435a3524c7706fdef1fd510a9928f3ea
describe
'158623' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSN' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
f6120dd19375d43db19c74afe4922c19
7c77a4a3b5693a4005ac8d4ed22ba66c969b1ae3
describe
'22778' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSO' 'sip-files00251.pro'
e080d623ac6333fd70078636b6e13e6c
85515b73f741a80019bbff57ed2813639611e76c
describe
'49005' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSP' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
dc412e1a238f16241d56aee110bb02bc
0b0b5c0e8ca1a1de842d1041660ef84789295f20
describe
'3784960' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSQ' 'sip-files00251.tif'
920e11e6bf26339902a716ba8087fca7
3f13203012d2b87c662145eafcf2e6679c4bbdcd
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSR' 'sip-files00251.txt'
3d2aa806c345cda582e0da144fbc5468
22ef58c06917350d0bdeb8577d02ddb526c8a125
describe
'20493' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSS' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
ff7657a639503b93b19a5dcc35c003ec
286dd2a4999c76b281213e71b55f8ebf718f672b
describe
'462455' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANST' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
b0f1615e5904041c8833bdb9d16300d2
f22b51fc0285507b02cacac1545c73e19f7c0e12
describe
'154402' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSU' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
b6fd705c55e1cc8a1cf983a28672e6d4
e6f2ecfc0d498ddba2a79a8aa6214398731d3344
describe
'48859' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSV' 'sip-files00252.pro'
0acc72e344178362f2de9180f5e431fe
8c4a7d64ae1d93d8f6cd5543c7af12990204f5d4
describe
'56829' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSW' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
f2d4546f7a9a3ca916a952673f323094
5fd84fa2915465e5e4c172e4db524ed1693dad89
describe
'3712736' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSX' 'sip-files00252.tif'
d1863ccce0c72168f99623119978f720
67fd526b216068c8ba55d22c91e64dd9e0e4e87f
describe
'1961' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSY' 'sip-files00252.txt'
09e5c4a7e55f6457adeb84c150c350fb
7905f69bc5e8dc564b5aad52fa8d7ada96e4199b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANSZ' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
05b8ea6a158d8e869fc71e292c08506d
453ee72f4a4ef19c2838ffafe7b7fb7bf2312b15
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTA' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
a5166b52ff2e66c3680989c034ce278c
c2ba206093fcc0c5daa7af0f15219d22e8b9e19f
describe
'168892' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTB' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
493e3ddf4fdab826d685aacbb66c276a
26970bbcd4a5c8ce46fdd091df61b77a47661e55
describe
'52200' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTC' 'sip-files00253.pro'
01d36372dc9469e2f2e1f413f3555f82
677cc47228293b4607b08260f56034696d2e3a2d
describe
'60671' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTD' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
71e6d409518e044a99c29c2d3e1ba53f
ff3f5b5e227d3dd8144d93668b0f5b12a99b3455
describe
'3710520' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTE' 'sip-files00253.tif'
38bb9353384c04d108f1fda49b0259e2
b5267d5773551f72255c6aebb0f50dce5a1a6fc7
describe
'2084' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTF' 'sip-files00253.txt'
8bfe15f653ef8790fc57654119568180
e6e862c64dee50c548efa6c11b9f70da80133e07
describe
'23218' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTG' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
64c9729af106c17135320958f1514173
e56de8845840d6f7f3dae7140966243a5160d93a
'2012-01-22T23:31:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTH' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
4c57a5d25f284f5bb74a9163e8812272
8dfd297a287c6d8b2f594a346e586ebaba5f413f
describe
'172243' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTI' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
06ac5aea51226436b527015652010299
ad93e49b55e2b437a678202c70adb88fa7a9ca24
describe
'53883' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTJ' 'sip-files00254.pro'
217f74f6a762227e31e2c8d1f235f9ee
b00bb25febf2f45bd002d842d503923069c9a9b3
describe
'62220' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTK' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
9bcc0d23e89205e3cd1535026e941a64
3f31c018c64b456ba8c9fb10d3a5b1be878b6260
describe
'3710544' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTL' 'sip-files00254.tif'
d67d3d0f04876afea519a5836817306e
c6e5b8445f326ac661d7b6e28ee244bb11584e56
describe
'2141' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTM' 'sip-files00254.txt'
29c3762a8f679eae5f6bde9157754cab
47619fbdb7c9572f317a1ea2f31fc033fa4626ec
describe
'23351' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTN' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
c6487ffc28139f3be60cfbeb2fd8c8d6
12d2362c34f4e3cfc92c6e5ae02022694fb371b9
describe
'462131' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTO' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
ce2707606325371365cdf49d4b693f81
2d302284ac64d993a5e9e831d03c35ca5773213e
describe
'182476' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTP' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
44f6da8f9b11502b2e01c5b66cab6b29
1f039021d4e3d827f014d977b555f9c60bbb2486
describe
'57032' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTQ' 'sip-files00255.pro'
e43cb8c1283411900cfc1ff1f5b3badc
22d3e6a52ac73f4f10cbeed537baf6545a649775
describe
'64971' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTR' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
647d7cefbc9ada5dde01c12d62b76963
558bc54c1785a1219c788a9713955f874cbc0a5f
describe
'3710628' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTS' 'sip-files00255.tif'
b97ba0d331e2814d77d8912e7ebb87a0
f02c0f28fe0a92e3a6e04f6ea52f5d1c3019254d
describe
'2330' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTT' 'sip-files00255.txt'
f4b9da0fdf6123513d6fe0cabbf0b6b9
51c54af0fc398158655eb0258f8d8010512f5a17
describe
'23927' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTU' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
850e4cda758d555bed73f3458e60fa12
3d3252acc74fa062da4a4dad4add4965f69a227a
describe
'462422' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTV' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
6a15daa275485989e61658cabcd1ea38
8ff5c784ab41a75820e4e35ddc19cfc5c906df14
describe
'159680' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTW' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
94d4518924f348dbb1e42ff4ded53a2b
081aaadcf511163c0a7661570677809e2080f92d
describe
'50872' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTX' 'sip-files00256.pro'
f42356ef8aef50fdb1af860052c0a1dd
cf63a8e37cfa517df80ac07ba440ee3ed4d89059
describe
'57905' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTY' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
392eb8bfc76f19a7b47948606f972da3
8042a706a4809a45d434495a81fef76872feffe4
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANTZ' 'sip-files00256.tif'
3752d9ea9691f5d0e530a3e1037965e6
21b5f8376db5762929ae5cfc13632e60102b95d1
describe
'2032' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUA' 'sip-files00256.txt'
bb434770a5853a139f9971ebc10696fc
7151ba220de6fcb610ac1fef966bfd4e3169eb08
describe
'22497' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUB' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
68fa618cac251ade4bfc8350525e85c1
98ca3279d56ed157f9ec0bd55c8301431149bc0f
describe
'400054' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUC' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
59b5914615732b9e1a55a17a7078f74b
ea3baf6e401993e97968bf3b15f6fa670edc0be6
describe
'123132' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUD' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
0842b5b97a166e98ce81d974fa601178
841eb98c930ef6d962adc452c5e7c58cb9beb61b
describe
'2021' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUE' 'sip-files00257.pro'
43c03a69987872c516a31f8db454c360
0c54ab5e1c64b3ad53e157123cbefd9a75aedc3f
describe
'38847' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUF' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
f1ef8bfa60ca6e2c4b3ef92dad53f173
3e00d413ff256d0d908a65577966e7830972421d
describe
'3212316' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUG' 'sip-files00257.tif'
68bfbab77a22d469de6e69c2d36eb879
9b0cf693742700c3cc1b92518fd88302da587e7a
describe
'87' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUH' 'sip-files00257.txt'
94589182e280bfa8265dc6a7bb715265
4d85b120d1a38b8744ba22ff0ec5333d4a8aa459
describe
'18471' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUI' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
be40c338c478e2622e1d8f46b0158758
cd94423dcddb4bb7fad8f922389dec73001a8a9c
describe
'3366' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUJ' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
cef6d29fabed2670b02f0ba715afb5f9
45f62c28fd1fcff6e6af5a0784d11e0fa0922c4e
describe
'11016' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUK' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
1ea3e82d723ea6c2dd75aaf612033bbc
a15153ac69df24fb77b14f35fb9be8b2712fe552
describe
'9235' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUL' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
f09c5d59fd1a7b8322c2a3f12ed2ad3c
8cc65fb8cb6ba46450a314bd7eda714773deff5d
'2012-01-22T23:31:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUM' 'sip-files00258.tif'
9a5519cfd2fe9b75f6a42e6a3f636e38
7ee6669df9d5f66b7ded006e9021c64c5bacad56
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUN' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
011695c26826c4d4a2bb64c460d0853a
dcbe532ddf07101d437f6564b6c3e1eee198d674
'2012-01-22T23:30:35-05:00'
describe
'462503' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUO' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
a3978856cc92870bee1b891c4caa7b82
245a4d2d533ccbbd8ada6f78078476296a3f7809
'2012-01-22T23:34:38-05:00'
describe
'163156' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUP' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
1a315bd45f6ca18f32232d35e1287819
4bb44c72e7c2f8e9218e35b1346ad4e2da09b42b
describe
'26812' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUQ' 'sip-files00259.pro'
7abe7322c8f9d8822164617f1fdbc958
03b8f9a2dcb9580f7a176b98a0aeb1e7f2f1288e
describe
'53975' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUR' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
bff62cf214d672e17d42eda6dd9c5c26
aa747af0610a4f22b83deb025746d0b898bfc91c
describe
'3713472' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUS' 'sip-files00259.tif'
cf4d11ddb29a482de88841bbc44b7990
9dfb25f8f0d166d8395a649858f897fb37cfa7fe
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUT' 'sip-files00259.txt'
20589f0372af8cf830718c7f2138ddec
de860f5dffa721a4b63ebab7f6918ff12068a3c4
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUU' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
2f1ea4092ced156fbbd3ca1d970f893c
0788bd8504c62456d153e3b0f75d2c96fd8bb8ba
describe
'422112' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUV' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
840e72ed0834511284fd877d2086263c
1d61887b1fde29c950c358237d011a8d2906d191
describe
'168384' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUW' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
c11c95f330fc2f9d58456c7e13cc7823
f810b0c36a8cf54402e3a183bfacce0564a086c0
describe
'16898' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUX' 'sip-files00260.pro'
4b34b9b697175d03169f4eef7f746b5b
4817f8c26b785fbe99cd7100d31d3cd590489c33
describe
'54159' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUY' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
b74b58a215dda83c38c7dbc858314b99
9c0cb9e8f198cbfd9a136e3176ba4b031c402c9e
describe
'3391256' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANUZ' 'sip-files00260.tif'
0463bccb8d2f26885f3e93a6293dba70
7aa285e1cbaeeb96efcaaa8f80ca2280ece6ebf6
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVA' 'sip-files00260.txt'
6f2dae947bee565edd5f5ffa29a42e06
8288d88d4508bbeca37b7622e17ab1badc5b2e6e
'2012-01-22T23:40:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVB' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
59aaa294a73158f397c108f4f16d87ef
051a7f06277aff5e4f2572552246ea46fef6ba02
'2012-01-22T23:34:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVC' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
120ada4514e548adc2d2ff1b3c97d63a
630b923ed3b01f1df05809fde207ca04906e3451
describe
'144113' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVD' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
e6a2294931eaba74ec823da9995f67b3
28c4c8f59fd5d3951090c5142640694a9ec0e491
describe
'40716' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVE' 'sip-files00261.pro'
94507429dd5b66760df51005bf9ba9dc
b51cc74a927cd301fb2a5ee42c8566f33a28dd2f
'2012-01-22T23:36:48-05:00'
describe
'53453' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVF' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
d882be1acf94955785eb8f8f5abe6807
12552b933e6656ee9aa29c0f4ca6be1d3e4f3671
describe
'3712408' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVG' 'sip-files00261.tif'
bccb2f1be0a10d07f512b5f90b7d4d99
6ee4d7b385385e806087e060d84bba335623c5c5
describe
'1737' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVH' 'sip-files00261.txt'
bf99136a47c2a1c79999df2fa490de9b
fcce0997dccf65a31e86117bf8211c6fd83de557
describe
'22696' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVI' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
b14b6a8e36ab761b36f168b00f62d4a5
0a5d4b7e94e07409c5f7a9bc66bd41ffc13328e0
describe
'462630' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVJ' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
26ff89785d5bde7a615aa2bac0a048c0
5fa02d921402d9ca226697cc04593087ae13f036
describe
'140032' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVK' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
3a6173e9b66553c33317dd94774699d0
b658043b2e3d4783ed6a8c9f3a45a9fcb7f9ba7d
describe
'43011' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVL' 'sip-files00262.pro'
c21690d463526bda961621f9580e58e5
95fe9f31bf1dd78853621efcc96f5b2f75d8932b
describe
'53725' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVM' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
d0ba3c36514ad03801baaa856322c229
17e90c856e6d3894e30c1eb01c15eec1f6e00a1c
describe
'3714104' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVN' 'sip-files00262.tif'
76fc5567ee3f0c15e6d373a6260920e9
4805e7eb85c616a65ceab667b21dff5de3af2fd0
describe
'1754' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVO' 'sip-files00262.txt'
60746b2e8ed5b920ec6f604c797dcd7f
cd7337a74579ccce4e4998d18a8e79635a3eab36
describe
'22631' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVP' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
988bc2623c7681ddf01ebdaeedda4434
70d2e114ea2ea27906851cde1b741bfa1a520a07
'2012-01-22T23:29:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVQ' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
19993c576afd9f1cc2556cca6d39bb22
e7f6e03ecbabc0fda76f0c9a433495241b0ce239
describe
'148328' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVR' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
6eff8cc6dae1a0917b10ff93fcbd01b7
7544cd2a37c90d9dfef1969479cb9a76715382d3
describe
'44599' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVS' 'sip-files00263.pro'
148563cff6b2d055b7d04c8402716c34
3966f55c2aae73e74e4917f711d09f7759d1aeeb
'2012-01-22T23:34:14-05:00'
describe
'56077' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVT' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
4042d0b7dffe3a42780b52d52e33b374
65aba25106c433be82edb7a76943139ab8d584e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVU' 'sip-files00263.tif'
a2def828ad589d6b23c4cbfe23351c6d
1ab2369f2115b91478f535b7d92c309380ae0223
describe
'1896' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVV' 'sip-files00263.txt'
dc4e98a9312ac1e356e6fa4c963ad2e3
f2f26df3e601ceb3601ee5f322aa1a81753f457e
describe
'23518' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVW' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
c6e9849b81a03abc840b64588827c12c
b05417b067652b37b751ad4fb8596d3f711de4ab
describe
'462113' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVX' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
e69c5591b5c354bedd869a55ef56ddd1
8a556f27833a2ccb10724429d6f5d8adfcea7467
describe
'154011' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVY' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
b73b008bdef2115ceac6475ca37283d5
9538c15aa28ef845483854f22139a18eb742dca2
describe
'49525' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANVZ' 'sip-files00264.pro'
1c2b5a6d7c9bdc09991af2976eea7bf1
785b0aaa81317a0e75cd27a4823e7dd47e760e8e
describe
'56899' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWA' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
d138d3352d74464b63e4dbf0bb89cac2
c2a0c3616f36743ff70d65d78dc5fd9712e5bb4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWB' 'sip-files00264.tif'
1b51a21f22e8e44f4d7d09ea2080645c
91a012fd8158c1e4bf50d30108adfdd5b35e6bdc
describe
'1971' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWC' 'sip-files00264.txt'
742f8d9fb6bac74cace28b4cd66088c6
6dccaf731eeb87666be9e8680d826b68b43ab905
describe
'23126' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWD' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
8de11a96e9da95372f0d4bc46b695a0f
68052018560b3862aaa32276cdcd9f86e8a78f89
describe
'462373' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWE' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
7fcd409c6140f46cd480aca88c5bf334
b0546f4889b09e4032da3a3d8c5cce6924e2c21f
describe
'147753' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWF' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
51e581d1f74da7837c602e09d41fcda2
803dfb503809d989c2b0ad04f0c5a209b0c682b5
describe
'16804' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWG' 'sip-files00265.pro'
148411d74084e3694bfacd263ddb10bc
f8bcb799fee18a6ba1afb6d6dae75eb45dc6c82f
describe
'50321' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWH' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
62ee318abbf638c1582a01e84b1cbb5f
c92db05e856f2b9b3f5b23d31430e5a55b5c3c12
describe
'3711532' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWI' 'sip-files00265.tif'
ba190bb2e45d77106501682033b7e431
803bf78512d1ce7324d3954e2b2d222d31135e9a
describe
'690' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWJ' 'sip-files00265.txt'
5f35d59872606ebe101ff6f64eb61c90
2f91c1e2e9d955836cc3dfa1a854d3f5e2195186
describe
'22029' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWK' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
a66e5dc08ad7b4062c1e025594e14efb
acb606e4ac93bf1963d20def621216eb196c1226
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWL' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
88ec94bc379db81bd6fab8e072e0b811
c2c73c19cd65d212d8816f24f0e10012c335ec8b
describe
'83713' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWM' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
0e82403d9604700989b8efe1a97d7dbc
9e23fd1bbeaff3e3b5c9b0c43c410c316049074d
'2012-01-22T23:33:25-05:00'
describe
'21949' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWN' 'sip-files00266.pro'
d9752c81fc538b7bfefdf633d7c5d853
a44b19d8ef6d9306dec48f816672fdac19caadc9
describe
'32783' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWO' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
e96249903c10b3f8e3ec0cf599566100
1539ad43a826aea2ee1ca2deb2b074eb82cab24b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWP' 'sip-files00266.tif'
d384d4f536b5c46bbcc5ed61be8229f8
466ba3f54a16f487c1bf2943ea57e88572313feb
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWQ' 'sip-files00266.txt'
ab9af63fa24efcd43f86369284f1c597
84a7b1e93b823472e8d4aab4c09e7c4119d28f87
describe
'15861' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWR' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
c28fb5775cdbaf27d0caea8ac98aadf0
4b3f5f1676fb1ef88feaeb6a87b1968daf7ff65c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWS' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
5ea871a608a211e899d59d78c52d2ad2
7a9377a6a33c95a532c15bcd9d2d8e8556cbd2d3
describe
'105561' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWT' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
4164004150ae512a869656f10ae9dbb5
61661a733238a5cbd6642d0afd1655c0f7fa42d0
describe
'29817' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWU' 'sip-files00267.pro'
e4ac2a93ff4ab796d2cd06a8fe88b527
1ed72e07369a45dcf476fa79887fed29344f4c26
describe
'40459' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWV' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
6890a18796184742378330cdbd597b8a
8238342fb578b62319421f0aa96a2cc400c849ca
describe
'3710884' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWW' 'sip-files00267.tif'
c335be96f57202cdc7879a37b05ddaa7
c7bbf15fb5f66a3d25446e1a21daa8d161c070dc
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWX' 'sip-files00267.txt'
a1ca074fdc22865588a0608b63f88247
841ded817f2fa3775d624fd45a349b82b6f9a203
describe
'18462' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWY' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
1357e25b607a87645ca00741bd670820
8d9555974772c7e9a3682cd44b5fe7b88b70f7e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANWZ' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
a0bf0ef0292366ab3fde237b605e82d7
abf98323f1ac15cf73dd82ac9322bd8360675e97
describe
'146905' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXA' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
eb198490876b3f0fb97effb892dcbcae
4f8bbeb0ee46d9ac7aa14b8de27c7de541039b19
describe
'46789' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXB' 'sip-files00268.pro'
9c5d5775da78f614432e6b7d9483e29b
9a19af21d66ec40343424fe2cde6777ba922ad03
describe
'54053' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXC' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
358e7481871995b552768f7324393868
03a0ddd60df16b2c742afbab44976b06f33d73ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXD' 'sip-files00268.tif'
8446c7f9bc5f642ab1633eb4cca8b4bc
cd245589ad497a806b070907698ef14ba7d37bb6
describe
'1889' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXE' 'sip-files00268.txt'
82f30def79b5b341bcac255e4f15765a
11d39e542e7bb659e0b25168e63166731fbf0c19
describe
'22296' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXF' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
cbc0afce1b69f6c43cfcb9b62e8bdc59
5d75c4658bd5fda9b76312db33a232cf6327a4b3
describe
'462152' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXG' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
31140d0d97be37e09e53e25130bd875e
31ace92cc033dc53eb59cbd833945dcff021fb86
'2012-01-22T23:30:17-05:00'
describe
'169390' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXH' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
680326e444ae62322bfe99c723856adf
223a1a36f076a8a8068b2e6e6910653955057d6c
describe
'20155' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXI' 'sip-files00269.pro'
dde4f2ebfc481be8aa7ba1eaa7f03887
ff8e044f3119a4e3d191f48890e56b46fe3bc486
describe
'53583' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXJ' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
0a25a445be6b7c076fc7a085b2d3ddd4
a739f93898ee9569c8e941b4c41c431661fa838a
describe
'3710120' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXK' 'sip-files00269.tif'
e1d6642f9e2329f2aa993eb3aaab249b
5c458e26c641e9a92fd77c0710c95bf1ec464214
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXL' 'sip-files00269.txt'
aeba62abfc3374585293586a9efe7361
c09eb2472a6ae3d3f14357136fbf0555013f6690
describe
Invalid character
'22587' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXM' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
bcefce8af74d17bbaa4ebdd3733caec1
9e83a0694d51654b811d4eda18906e8d7f4c2ac8
describe
'462419' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXN' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
a60573b2a4291574dcef3880040309b1
6d17c49ea0962a3929132c0ad7eaa20a2d2ba27a
describe
'172363' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXO' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
4061ab04a5edcd64f113213f2754a545
d5a18f7049af6de89aee76cbccdbf61595adb9e5
describe
'51675' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXP' 'sip-files00270.pro'
7fb5d737d822fee12182e6d0a2c64735
ff4450bb4414f9564e403f1377a6f306a2305592
describe
'62029' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXQ' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
9be9311af1347717d0d113025661066a
5521087ad3541107a4689042b75579f608ff6478
describe
'3713132' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXR' 'sip-files00270.tif'
c9df9c50b61e8ff12cb38817c2eef3c5
3527baf4f0b95661eb3c418e08f9337e3bc31837
'2012-01-22T23:33:27-05:00'
describe
'2056' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXS' 'sip-files00270.txt'
a38dd03cd6897bdc690d55a3f175beed
948adde66a6a6e5d62d4e78423886e85301b8453
describe
'24324' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXT' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
116c5aab0f5ee6960a451fa10a33b507
ad41388461b9e3dcd428c2388044f2694b6dfd93
describe
'432077' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXU' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
da24d91b0622849bb8fa7609bc253f89
e9ee8da09121caf05ac1099910b39a47bbc02781
describe
'187826' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXV' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
24ff8f6a04a755a6dd8efc64b28b5aaf
c457e34671113fb8e0f4de18675c3078e1e2069c
describe
'12959' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXW' 'sip-files00271.pro'
9728f2d3f81648e0a9f437ab4f47ce01
11ad19704b4e2f8a228670eb43e283282f98ed69
describe
'57468' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXX' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
b8f4ef4195def668238af38e1f24494e
b9a1be05d23886c92cc55b4b0958201b97d25cbb
describe
'3470076' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXY' 'sip-files00271.tif'
915b89d83f044fec0bd7fe446f88ea35
998bb64131f956b21d60d3517206a514f481c052
describe
'625' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANXZ' 'sip-files00271.txt'
5cedeba0cc6a7737e543037954de1af4
613fff0e3e6518fcedf9a452df0052741da2f5f0
describe
'23745' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYA' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
eb8066a861e73d7c1f2b2cc7685418de
154be846eb4de1a5e0f418d419301aa7d590b5ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYB' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
434020d48d392109fbc0683701c5e42f
2586a86b8dc0b646e5cad9587a841aae7d3c7605
describe
'63817' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYC' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
d63b7d72fbfbf29422df2223fcc1ea2a
b0128ec78d9d4b65f4a6c3bcb297f65edb937c49
describe
'10801' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYD' 'sip-files00272.pro'
0f15260b8f73baa7836044c4befbb8eb
a6faa73edca8688b79d77048636467b87919a69a
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYE' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
8bd7974979c409bd59a0043d5e259e5c
b6e7cc65da1157103932ef25ec75871d97ea81dc
describe
'3709056' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYF' 'sip-files00272.tif'
bac2a41b93fbecf0bfbe431ee9d95c6a
d7ef35faff1a64177c2128475a3efe6b1dbf289b
describe
'451' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYG' 'sip-files00272.txt'
daef797cb349a9bb9b70be6bfcc1a1ff
3847feb3b5dd1ce259e66fc5b094be31f39f09a0
describe
'12807' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYH' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
dda4c2e82d81916854fdfccea9c44ac1
5bdb091785554279c484fc5664834829f079c09a
describe
'462626' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYI' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
f4680a16f0d09e15441432eda93fa7ce
ddce8b293c4c62058fdbf834acdae603ca12e579
describe
'124701' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYJ' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
697aa602eaa68ef6cafd8289c7cd2bc8
e143e09cf5b06b0dec7cab7a325ed3bbeac89599
describe
'32954' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYK' 'sip-files00273.pro'
aa1a2f7490be1b37166c31c2ca18c12a
2da203e83186dddfe17dfab850b911dfc4585428
describe
'44778' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYL' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
7ff443a08dbd26f2f3e6457580b60df1
53e7d3f655d04db3e89d516f4c33f0d73c0785a1
describe
'3712712' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYM' 'sip-files00273.tif'
bdddcaaa8cd47dfc34f46064c3d8f53c
503a6645e54856914e40753c544ea48a4866c97f
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYN' 'sip-files00273.txt'
c89b9027b723867ff36d4a606e040f1b
4604ec90f1ec5a7b156d3f294bec9ea00ac07c1e
describe
'19229' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYO' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
025a4a31aa637281a2af4623acf2e38d
3e905c76fba807ddfe9f4d01e97220166bcf97e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYP' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
0cec43d6a8aeb6a9bbd8d7b2de1943bc
62144f0203b15399a7ba9ec54aa7de32a45bf9df
'2012-01-22T23:31:27-05:00'
describe
'169402' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYQ' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
3df3b5a0b2af5bd9c21fedc01409a24e
f1e1b19ac154b09faa15613c5a3c3e067c0d06ca
describe
'53383' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYR' 'sip-files00274.pro'
41f58019a65a656b0dc03554d30e94f2
ee1155da9c477794055b762d8a44af28de3f4e18
describe
'60799' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYS' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
341768dc4c719cbabc9c72cd680bf2c7
2ad0d3890a68b973ffc77ecf48a7d948696ea7e3
describe
'3714592' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYT' 'sip-files00274.tif'
f2c720da792be02607ad8e01e527c516
239ecd32ff9f4384e7879e7d2f3a7383be51dd5d
describe
'2118' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYU' 'sip-files00274.txt'
a98c9db57c2f971a91754cef39010e20
1d8c8888ddbbee5cf14da0b3a51f14f8a6320b09
describe
'23882' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYV' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
f130067f817e8023190c8d7cfc3b245b
cae0b55deff29f3ba55ea1a7f20b8180991c73cf
describe
'405459' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYW' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
a55f3e3c71cd52720ae505c645b1e887
d8747382487163b62a93536c57130d8bbb736590
describe
'186157' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYX' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
2cd8359ac5d8b2437e6f90c19daa4161
b3b896fd528ae6eab128a91dba9e8cfc05d8365d
describe
'2824' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYY' 'sip-files00275.pro'
9dae07b3aef267172e7acfc7894f95ff
2889be50b0e8bd3991e6aef08fcaeac18c5246aa
describe
'49105' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANYZ' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
c1c8b42749686080cdd9626c9ca20adf
fba6bafdea12775664bada824b86fe13ef510d7f
'2012-01-22T23:30:41-05:00'
describe
'3256940' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZA' 'sip-files00275.tif'
1b6ebe586d0c117b3a685fe937e5a778
3bf305f9ecffacddfb58a4c8e1a48766f0678c0f
describe
'210' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZB' 'sip-files00275.txt'
afe16f1883a754de3d353cfed92e2bd4
3746317c7cf5c8789705771bd869d618ce0a6e2d
describe
Invalid character
'21330' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZC' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
58c35b90f74ff5133d6eb5a33c8d7e7e
9a9ff4aedea41556b5f8caf994ffcc8ea8ad104f
describe
'5116' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZD' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
ce1aacb36e142d29ea99d88212060f73
597d25bf1f3898bcc0957e11b3ff8a554fedfb36
describe
'11139' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZE' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
8b161c55be74da10c01174fc8360b12d
dea490fbd8b73cf1e18eda6bc3ce4574704380d4
describe
'9284' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZF' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
aaa9b39274a777216d145d23203033e2
afbbfbb256d81b654ff091710257f946468cc53c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZG' 'sip-files00276.tif'
7e0844d3154c7ec463e1478b0c5bff0c
6a20490515e06d0d6e0090a900dc8b0af1f3d716
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZH' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
44c97a8028c62984dd566e0dd46e8e31
0015c8838c0a1a97eff1909771729ce933655c1b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZI' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
5874355f7634c72660de98bfe799b464
bc60c19089d368d871bd69c89e951cf2406c5155
describe
'164173' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZJ' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
988a944f39e5cd05b1adfff917a78b56
0a94f3e64c7a63b2ec0216f96f4d9e38f073e039
describe
'51681' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZK' 'sip-files00277.pro'
e267aa40110455225e5cae6d47e51b7a
cead1fa80ddfaae3e63ab6a60122565fccb624f1
describe
'60072' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZL' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
aa4131ea56f81480d65842c8d251f0e9
6b4d8ef9506f1097386a1860991333319847a093
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZM' 'sip-files00277.tif'
49e293ceba05a85868e3c33f6073e97b
88ecbe697ca6c36e85daf54358d7418b8d19c39c
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZN' 'sip-files00277.txt'
81a19aa5a174df2d3c2cb576bd7dd3a1
ec3e31bfdd9b2fb0dde8c12fe169fab3a7fa1589
describe
'23721' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZO' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
88213e73856fafe25e831b5fc46cb21e
fb5ddf8cddc09c007bc4834e5628e8b8d7b42f24
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZP' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
0221acd68a49e70ef5014ca21817923b
96c3bc9da7e9a5c61f9a1e1655f6148aeb54ed78
describe
'166806' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZQ' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
b4cbb516098aa6454b8b062c962bbf94
5224f800e5b23eee45b38877c9a40958ca013e74
describe
'52538' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZR' 'sip-files00278.pro'
dc60d942e3117b3d1c87977196038d1d
7d08d6eadcec4580cdf067acf39c7c3c83ba6637
describe
'60245' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZS' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
954c8ee92be845a129135c135397f318
a90a6465848b8baebfc8b541e7a0b15d62b6df64
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZT' 'sip-files00278.tif'
bacd353e6cb17e7361d2782867672c40
21b7003740eb82b52f0af030178fad00aa8c1fdb
describe
'2107' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZU' 'sip-files00278.txt'
0fd56932a837bc4583b27a725ac40080
8cbf10cca5a1fef239d4f61da7e813f25d20fcdb
describe
'23755' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZV' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
4c4c4aa3a0bc7f1ab3a3d8d54d09f588
f8fb3b51767c35b7a3133babbcd6be8eb4d29479
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZW' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
93e33360bce73d776fd554228408d98f
4c672dd320d2bd9d46f46acd1abb1f3138380ca2
describe
'175932' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZX' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
498fbe9837732cb373601555b6153127
46bcf8d76e0daaa49c03365d54ad453b0da7cc10
describe
'54228' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZY' 'sip-files00279.pro'
2a116670cb71cccbb78cc90caa23a2bd
63f85f478ddc62fba34a6eb095aa8a61e624e9c3
describe
'62529' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAANZZ' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
ed032ca8702351a9450aa0d3e5edcc47
a73a1ecdca39d481d1e6086716d5b5865c95c295
describe
'3713080' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAA' 'sip-files00279.tif'
9c4db852e68aec084394ac3f964f1f1e
75c7143623d32f0bab690e8ecc5254a86f6937e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAB' 'sip-files00279.txt'
2182d216494093c4533cbbda20a49050
5aaf1b10e4c79755e4e335562166ca788cb112bb
describe
'24100' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAC' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
e103aa4c75f0dd03a6d89287f6fb4926
7e3e5144a0b02ccbb7d3447f7c92ea161249edf8
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAD' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
0b356dfb444b927072dded71f0a63406
3da9798a8631547b0900ba74c3faf46c6c487d6c
describe
'189645' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAE' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
e6be4c212cca0c08c7ad40f2cd9204a9
5401201fa326ba590e10bee58f90d39f4a15b97e
describe
'58557' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAF' 'sip-files00280.pro'
ead29127bcf7436d39d31ef37ef3b442
602854819cb4352964fd352a6706d35a9767a572
describe
'66749' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAG' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
d3851be1e81ac71c77465d8e22ba3de3
554a6be0154c1ac13f312c76e6107337864de05b
describe
'3713176' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAH' 'sip-files00280.tif'
ecd795c925df0f46fb8beff0959a47c8
99fffb6be0adecc5730a655ce1b6433ba9b6cc2a
describe
'2358' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAI' 'sip-files00280.txt'
52494a3a29ca82524ba2ac86bd96e40c
1cd6e57fccf238b1b2f5e5b2e5984477b7f638d1
describe
'24325' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAJ' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
075b28f6c46e501e86bcec51f4a7cc12
2a318adf78f54f22daf09d199d2442c338e2b218
describe
'404226' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAK' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
5333f5927f2c3c3cb29e86c083bdeed6
7cf76abb9dc07742e45ce0120799f6195656efa0
describe
'140362' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAL' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
8cbff47d08ac4e12973a47a53bfa1e0d
bfb6981934fbaf12616f22f8f33585b40b1e3b18
describe
'4710' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAM' 'sip-files00281.pro'
757decebd77b5b41ddb7fe0e9c70b2c8
e5f2f941af733f828e122537592c8c52ec61399d
describe
'44319' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAN' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
c2e85346d8015e972a0aec99fbc3a74e
628329a905d625402e0b88f73bf9d236fa5ba03c
describe
'3248584' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAO' 'sip-files00281.tif'
c8517b50c510882a7aa5dca0a54ac906
6dd1aa984d36907849e9bd378f9c7514dceb1f73
describe
'354' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAP' 'sip-files00281.txt'
9c117a66eb6373b79d99f1e4a0e5a0ca
1e870680782e2e50223b4cc9ce4ef88ed06ddcc2
describe
Invalid character
'21076' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAQ' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
fbdd50a6b915d6d8870cc603ada0c654
1027b6a21fdb9d15e86278d629e5368d9e7e889e
'2012-01-22T23:30:53-05:00'
describe
'3764' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAR' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
aac875636e2e6ca27a2b4711bcc8a49d
5e4d47fdc8ab40f330a62b01f8b2322c2863633c
describe
'11007' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAS' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
daccc96d2c8fa63d84942eafda489f4d
1ec8b84de5ad3854d2819a0e813339e7b1f66119
describe
'9230' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAT' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
05874697dcd3e84eec3d9b2d23d9e738
37925c3d95aa8d06aa017b300a126c55634abcc9
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAU' 'sip-files00282.tif'
5aee15cb09e2c6b1a6084710bdb9886c
0423fe0f1e5d17d91240fe4027681aba96097049
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAV' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
0cd06d0d9b1e169348371837b48bfef5
9d036e6f3304a57cb51ed3298b1df3917cd5facc
describe
'429612' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAW' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
fe6bee2783985813f847d2643199a5de
27d415474447cb6a589a8bcd977057e24da42de5
describe
'113685' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAX' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
6f15dc774cb26700aacfb8ff6be7df13
d03d25b8db3b99c75e10a7941a38e759af9d1a3e
describe
'5361' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAY' 'sip-files00283.pro'
912cbfdff3343f4a81038d03761fa6f5
1b35967f49daec5606287472998fcbcaf90441ea
describe
'37771' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOAZ' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
5750f9b2fa7250c0e2b76b1b22d03a88
feb0091759a417a6f0c45f2b4e70e1c40aedf6c8
describe
'3448712' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBA' 'sip-files00283.tif'
25fb259ee54337e6d2a0dbe132ce26ad
2fd5eb8dd0e978f829aee1edcf2cba8a5b5078ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBB' 'sip-files00283.txt'
19e006b1eca4e3b3a26cb7fcd9142bae
947e6793b1ce6bc6663adc820ad53d8b70abab3f
describe
'18320' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBC' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
02b222673cea58b3f7623e2d1a272d55
38bd79abfa10e9014b1c8a476524f99b6a3bf32a
describe
'462664' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBD' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
ab3f853aaafda7874a980243c853abf6
19258a5037e45dae13c96d3974cb10044a5ea9ea
describe
'199055' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBE' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
0a6a2ecd2bdecb1e34793a987bcb05c2
82e80fd32592df379eb4f9e3508e1c0b63169f02
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBF' 'sip-files00284.pro'
9ac9e86db2dc9b44fde4d3a96c94133a
13002564c95314acaee3256484e0398909db37fa
describe
'59036' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBG' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
4f43bd488209cecc7b55c502df7f4679
590f74f74c4925633da4f8612a4b118f8db2e274
'2012-01-22T23:34:41-05:00'
describe
'3714360' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBH' 'sip-files00284.tif'
34d4cdb37ecd6a870040f44d3fa80edb
f846455742f591b13290497f2e46c0881974a6fe
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBI' 'sip-files00284.txt'
5c793f3d13b820299ecdb8d5f463044c
b8c82219e63fa2a3af08c37a79ee03ff2dc6c298
describe
'23489' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBJ' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
319d151941059839c5ec4c522d817149
6d63f7c091566b3285715e52b5f820b9cc584aa0
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBK' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
d4f558a5e523756e3c78a24274e9648a
f4619c1a15cb39a81d51294e184d08c1c5243360
describe
'115000' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBL' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
7aef86c3c61ea86e66f73711f200c687
360c1ae017d930c413a03ac1947694e23c80a71c
describe
'31108' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBM' 'sip-files00285.pro'
75a32baa94969bd3a014191f60ebe01f
a1719c9bf0e40a47bd9f06039c173280b6d4c59c
describe
'42853' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBN' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
0685d2756597401d60c2a1d69853c6fc
3fd7d90bfff63c4092abd4a3862475cc0e34bf52
describe
'3710892' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBO' 'sip-files00285.tif'
241531389a1fa2af72ab3e88f7e40459
92f382758e9c907600caa7e12f8d6af0d26f55cb
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBP' 'sip-files00285.txt'
8bf59ceef6fa4a97106334b32bf708f3
f459d0cd17fb8db593a5ec272c91c7c6762137b3
describe
'18337' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBQ' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
f210ed7101639e802c7830f256fa6617
02828300cb1c6f0d7382bf857ce4ab3c03b0d9b1
describe
'421111' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBR' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
93619d49888714d9d7e0f9812bbf26a1
47692ca6796ca94363bf58c1a2d77d8fc704dbc8
describe
'174967' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBS' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
b3f5e48a04d4a15baa502dfd61cc8b16
0adf269cdb6926c6b17b9092abbed1cebc3aba11
describe
'22734' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBT' 'sip-files00286.pro'
d915e590e9c5d433f8ff510af02028a7
ad3406e8e4c4d120879c8d221c17c68f05ac693b
describe
'54970' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBU' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
00eeea9e16bfe4a36f2247ffd12f94ae
b7e34e987c5e6a72afef83f27d14b46f248624a0
'2012-01-22T23:34:53-05:00'
describe
'3382864' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBV' 'sip-files00286.tif'
11c935235388a3e493a4e8b148ae641e
7e804fe6287f9214c0f8ed18c8b989bed13cce64
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBW' 'sip-files00286.txt'
33ae4c1af52227582cc46c6f77f1bf39
fe610f0a9a6d817567bc66d7d67d8acbf00fcc99
describe
Invalid character
'22434' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBX' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
1a0652a9451b2a490681060cfa10a9d8
fe04f426ef1e411ce4a75f576b46bd952a2705ab
'2012-01-22T23:34:52-05:00'
describe
'462428' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBY' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
8bd43d221e35a6d9523b695580689f2b
9f63a395284205b9a1f0bed6fe058c3a54aeb6e8
describe
'174336' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOBZ' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
05f45015b2e88d47c8841f4d9a7e98d0
e643745617c600237126878d5a73c60150c94a75
describe
'53540' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCA' 'sip-files00287.pro'
804ff1afc9e8ec3f8a463c2bdd5534ac
e7f451fd2d39e07f93d1096bc7254f580d301616
describe
'62855' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCB' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
21932b005f786f38e69400215d903475
f2cd003f5b84f7191e51b470b6723ed6a9c050b6
describe
'3713008' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCC' 'sip-files00287.tif'
42a921f2b223c2d6407dcc67e3aa2388
50e47bb1d8611cb3b3b2e7d4ee53a9eaa4ddc1af
'2012-01-22T23:32:43-05:00'
describe
'2190' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCD' 'sip-files00287.txt'
30082456193102d33ebbedc6bfc99e5d
27ec9a2ed0dbeb57b65e885d7880589bc92b96a7
describe
'23784' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCE' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
62b453607ba7c847a9ddc2e146cdbc7c
16dea1b20a2a76696cac3b3cbc6f947154b3e12b
describe
'462151' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCF' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
34c5ed5c94ddc6127cf89f51cb024558
da13f6c19dfe1c0d4851db843c8d73f063203dbb
'2012-01-22T23:32:36-05:00'
describe
'162705' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCG' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
c71f8912b15b1800724413121a181442
b171e17ab7d981ff6e9bc34cb62a018cac959bdb
describe
'49961' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCH' 'sip-files00288.pro'
208d6afc8add39296177985878ec68fb
5ba07b96e4aff10fa55b8ef3b80b3b80704b38ee
describe
'59791' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCI' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
30913dedfa12bb46396db1bafa9e111a
f87d77771f61f6067e0ab931af1e911a96cd1a82
'2012-01-22T23:32:30-05:00'
describe
'3710464' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCJ' 'sip-files00288.tif'
33d69f1c65cc95f97d910f56988fc3ae
844a809653633543f6aa69444b344a4a47e368cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCK' 'sip-files00288.txt'
88b1f76b3011098cd936e4ef4e2b45ba
56271ed15d4e5e5e622146ebf4e4d460e315aff5
describe
'22992' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCL' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
38abb20ac264752e98856a3a20c54f2e
d2c9fafc25371ca2369af1682fdba0a1551899ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCM' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
8cff32ed84cc23f7f674a520773247fb
adb3b5b4cd1ad978babe35e39d223312c6efd0ed
describe
'171736' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCN' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
95ec24db5633441ed28b38c3e1cb7f62
461b797afeeab339a2b5b379d3a6899143dcbb86
describe
'51940' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCO' 'sip-files00289.pro'
d07f0c36834b1c276df62a184c362938
4616d6091b6db044708fd155c0c4971ac71b5323
describe
'62446' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCP' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
e7536416607bd38f1ee888a3cb2b09cf
6efd30580ea50813e0bde43e08e367b9f804a275
describe
'3713084' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCQ' 'sip-files00289.tif'
53a61f471b31be6fa1d53b4037e9bf1b
a045ad58a5a45dc3e414ec6bb0df15dca8936dba
describe
'2073' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCR' 'sip-files00289.txt'
1c1ebac0c1648f16d0c4ef8544d28a21
bf417285382d2b8e0cec496d5a280aec6b52bb0b
describe
'23982' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCS' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
910709ac3bb5adddb925224a5376621d
8b2f12d27564c6a722a4b931310988053f873d51
'2012-01-22T23:38:27-05:00'
describe
'462468' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCT' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
422e93f4ac98f13868813091b773bc10
9abe46d230a7e1f6c4b343b9d703b7c6ef0890a3
describe
'165365' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCU' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
df1832a983cfcc420c4e3f333c724f53
a5930c55498456c60ab982cf3046900d35465e40
describe
'49636' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCV' 'sip-files00290.pro'
c3d3b0d13a37411171a4cdedd4579bf9
5469a09dc9d4cfcd984b66e75c5d06bc58f1a3b0
describe
'60484' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCW' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
5c4183179553886ed2f34dcd92529ab5
7fe3a1162a1380a99c5366f5937b6a522823acec
'2012-01-22T23:37:27-05:00'
describe
'3712908' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCX' 'sip-files00290.tif'
57b2c71e58e543161d7af9a14c2b7382
ac9398d1d261e26a6a8e1b555096839359b8e76b
describe
'2059' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCY' 'sip-files00290.txt'
76f5c1b28be88819f00dc74924c1d91c
45fa654777ea2238c65d66be502653d05141d22e
describe
'23465' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOCZ' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
4a4fe5b9daa895f67e4472f94a28f8bf
7db17dc4558e56ea832bc409a70f68fd477f8757
describe
'345859' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODA' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
ed1710c456695f18ace4375faafd1356
b76c62e0ddc0b6fadb3439eccddb948d666ffe7e
'2012-01-22T23:31:31-05:00'
describe
'119511' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODB' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
c0e45388ef05583736cc2fc87b74185c
59da8fdd61458e5359205d34fdcf540972704eb0
describe
'3282' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODC' 'sip-files00291.pro'
61bd951f7f3c874ea69f5fa6c730e21e
8edfd9a9f00114bb19370e1536fb8bba4730ac7f
describe
'40111' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODD' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
0f0797ae854f12b8c531ac88d897ce0a
3349c7385dac88ed39ff97b572cdb04378e22e6e
describe
'2783876' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODE' 'sip-files00291.tif'
180fdf3784715ee25a8b470b45690bc7
cca28d314b8239afb825fd13115b985f545ab96f
describe
'227' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODF' 'sip-files00291.txt'
89b826e88a74c8b8967612bfec2b6a6f
a715b56176e98173eb19605a3380ba0c9feecdc2
describe
'20987' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODG' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
f3d9975eebb0032c263b8aaef42f598a
b497858aafada2fb35d2eb773aaac796d27d4ad0
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODH' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
93ec36eec5b1ed6f95f27f47e05ed4a3
5ae6355fb4559b4dd62158daba92f1fcda63c5cb
describe
'11050' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODI' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
c5156fbe3179884c7479ec33f6756836
e08d919d840d6c2b213c1d61adcbb25889be835a
describe
'9245' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODJ' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
61ba29239ccf0f27b48b2e93cc942a84
535123629d0b3718dfbcc2c5d03d91b1a7b6fa2d
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODK' 'sip-files00292.tif'
c6f0004f1dbaa47c708aceae1e8e6da8
06ab5497f7741221f1f1879caff5ec5fb6f56766
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODL' 'sip-files00292thm.jpg'
d1767d989a1668006532a0273789dd07
d1b6888f1d60c57d12b1ae2faf6336e726123b9a
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODM' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
c0229395d6304e304add62cfc4283c5a
74a35a167d78d810557335ac3e14e1c13281ecf0
'2012-01-22T23:31:44-05:00'
describe
'168235' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODN' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
7a148c9b556aabd35b16212a73e6efa0
872eb35e0ec7da04f4e57afca0924ba6eb13504f
describe
'50750' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODO' 'sip-files00293.pro'
92a90e108765e0a8caa85bbb64739cd3
263aab435adc6d07f776dec4a415854e4a1ff4de
describe
'62405' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODP' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
62ec16649f1b1dbcec08d20d03cf5442
f7ba35ac474b3ffd02fe95c66c6892cd30fabaac
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODQ' 'sip-files00293.tif'
59226fa69ce1be0f08f6974fe9ad4ddc
a32dfa1544ccf5b51bd6a3212d538a7cf0479764
describe
'2127' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODR' 'sip-files00293.txt'
39cd6f12415f6045afdebe5cd05b2ae1
1c6564271a4591f91dd0adf18b0e3a6608abc380
describe
'24161' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODS' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
c6e3cef2c7e033cf81e08ca7fb79a9eb
0ea5edc56d242ed81c8ae3556072ee6e002b14f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODT' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
83458c85a5ee7e2289ffb58b86ee691a
d1aa947e914f2b5415207987d93eea1111e6964b
describe
'107798' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODU' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
b44399de6c1f49527793ad5851d14155
c421db119e7252f967ce20d1186d4254572c20fa
describe
'30409' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODV' 'sip-files00294.pro'
75dc722f4af6c143d2fcf12818e6bbfa
14a59e9b2a206ea24cfcd2aad8e44c982dc3c109
describe
'40375' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODW' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
7b82c41a3cd28ecc7bd16c1fc747e8c8
77966027bb2f91efb9e4b5c3077bfd138852c3dc
describe
'3708576' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODX' 'sip-files00294.tif'
e4101b27012f7f220ceec6f2ffd45fa0
d0dae701d9bf3a54b244ebbe2e648b673acb59fe
'2012-01-22T23:33:28-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODY' 'sip-files00294.txt'
7c0d124648013789ac889316acee930f
c491af39c54663ffb644b326a1c9c66dee4b939f
describe
'17824' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAODZ' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
44b353d3a530c68a14fea3a2c68fdf86
dadf743d68f44d5065ec50376c3f4d00af9d4717
describe
'326344' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEA' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
a0ab53e1d81f0030b87fce1f949eb01a
64f0efadc864051be37ee9acfa0dc308c80e84ff
describe
'82134' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEB' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
9eb9707a9792eb59aad44b7303d69fbd
3affa38a1945c3ae1636d90d7b52d7f3b1f4793e
describe
'2866' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEC' 'sip-files00295.pro'
07260ef8e5cccffe0213de8abc1f889e
1efc9b031005b2a62614f4e22b00899a02d1691b
describe
'31053' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOED' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
072ad48ed4f510fdcd8a548bed631fc2
2789d07a7ae95ee2fea2824d93e4aee1dad5f5af
describe
'2623532' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEE' 'sip-files00295.tif'
f18159606da224e056d1e9e6a3fdbaf1
3c6388de153460aa846f1330d06bd9939a668d15
describe
'184' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEF' 'sip-files00295.txt'
ceec1a4dc040d57856b8fba9180d3aa9
6e4cb3a674bc1d9a1653303d8d86337cf204e407
describe
'17754' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEG' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
3e646fb42d9c0a67d5baee6193e621f4
661f1cb8cbc607817a202c0cde2d06291fa263cd
describe
'4120' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEH' 'sip-files00296.jp2'
854bd9b8991aea17b397122cb8787682
4b85fcfd3b544510e526037ed1d1ea00a42745ea
describe
'11011' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEI' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
798d44fce2b31e9f8c9136a67f46dc7a
4fad3a3b0355700fbeb56260b0f43d2a0a327689
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEJ' 'sip-files00296.QC.jpg'
c15d15351bd5b100d7739ca0a8d887df
f1e58e8822db04c7299206da85bb415a5aee9c89
'2012-01-22T23:33:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEK' 'sip-files00296.tif'
f63f46f61493c4261171f934a3c240d9
eb086420b3a52728c7436c819296f9fd332aaf07
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEL' 'sip-files00296thm.jpg'
7b06a3fce9eb089cb52518d90542e1a5
0e84188ce5189fe5d97da6b135b6d5b325918860
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEM' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
34d58ed47ef35457ee050cca03e13a44
92bcaf93bf76a96d267cdcc50bb34e5ed3166617
describe
'121727' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEN' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
1b4d6d02f246e79338aa879b03ab9e0d
e7e78e129dbd7b58e708115322d32b3adefb453e
describe
'33975' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEO' 'sip-files00297.pro'
4fbee8eb5e446d3c121991497cf74611
55fb964d7835eaf893f1332af8316d67c88ef437
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEP' 'sip-files00297.QC.jpg'
6231a74a2ff143937caeecd65e2b12a9
02a549c541b941a2a5baab8daca97faa7772fef6
describe
'3710484' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEQ' 'sip-files00297.tif'
2f279330b8044e5cdb72fce12f972e59
1b5160333ea23add20ca2f2c9ead19e16a259a0b
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOER' 'sip-files00297.txt'
2897b6a10bd4c20e5c6978b4b6218e24
7883b6f988c4cd73c2462eb6265f0f7d1402b887
describe
'19461' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOES' 'sip-files00297thm.jpg'
c66959c53d1b866597dbfd65d7b04d77
3094bd7375209dd51f1579999142e74ca4a88cca
'2012-01-22T23:31:46-05:00'
describe
'462653' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOET' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
db8e98584c1d2b60ea6f5ac4376d3896
fecbbe592100b07896207cacfc55e1e48c77a22a
describe
'134593' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEU' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
7fd7d8e58055fc65dad3f3d7a1874226
287f0e9435b2ca644e97b73801ea01973e577c3c
describe
'39222' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEV' 'sip-files00298.pro'
f9735f168b7246fa4f6eed34916dfc27
08ebddd579e74252b2a49d87d2e7bc7640e99008
describe
'51868' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEW' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
85449a7e366d1fdb53571f3430692af8
f31974c03da46d92e833c58ac002576036c7e226
describe
'3713880' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEX' 'sip-files00298.tif'
93ef469cedd4732c0fff50f176497e39
16f6ae3fa25da7fc6150f16969327831082d47f5
describe
'1683' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEY' 'sip-files00298.txt'
5976cf9524368debb9619c89a516324b
b6d65367daf4dcb88ce3c070b852e2392fd3294c
describe
'22287' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOEZ' 'sip-files00298thm.jpg'
5734cafe20daec134c73e7111fc85485
e7360229f3b435759995df078e6342ad19dfe6a0
describe
'462438' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFA' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
d922a2fcd328143c283a71ed285fce33
8651db14a61256f7f5e57e73ac190dcb10529189
describe
'133684' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFB' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
d1036b26eda54a5dd7ec2db118fc8980
bf249cf3a75646d355aed58d07f545e6bad3146b
describe
'39109' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFC' 'sip-files00299.pro'
fa99000d4287613ddea6f9d15b225612
d355c50f90af7b78dd2e2da13be7bb12ff18f296
describe
'50485' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFD' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
2aee51f7f3b75a772f322a86f723b552
99a943ed62f505fca7bfd0a53945498eb98bea17
describe
'3712048' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFE' 'sip-files00299.tif'
1bd9dedcd3fcc48eafdb177a86817aba
912afe09192c0feceb5d8b741a60108c535a5cb2
describe
'1687' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFF' 'sip-files00299.txt'
353a0f57a1a358f5b9becd03bc06d983
344b0f39181db1675ce6d3d4c4ff5884e0eabb02
describe
'21982' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFG' 'sip-files00299thm.jpg'
1333482236580837e434213d4dc98f25
72ea7cecf2da7d2c08106372cbe4b3b2680f7c55
describe
'462421' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFH' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
fe999426dab6862185d6d23b09257fc0
6aa48fbb6cc020d27d9716bfd31c3a7573cbbfc3
describe
'143124' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFI' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
fea1c7d594b1ac193be9a7b1cb63ee0f
8627ed29c4415dae29f24fa5a48dfe482df6b798
describe
'40625' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFJ' 'sip-files00300.pro'
059a07c2a5de209be76b389a67e51262
e96b32e7123137bfa275847e3fade1702aa6e5a9
describe
'52819' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFK' 'sip-files00300.QC.jpg'
e74114441315f214cec50aef41a517a7
c1bba206fe6419dea0a5cea5cf2cb81a3f7cfbaf
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFL' 'sip-files00300.tif'
cf100c5bd82c2ceec843637ce086a147
ee84a35ecbdc373ae07d7ee12cfa85bd0c9e9e02
describe
'1680' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFM' 'sip-files00300.txt'
c5af625bd98a7f1ee4a2ef2db46a0d9e
57033ac23a2c1200939e9f264b3da138f61596cc
describe
'22377' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFN' 'sip-files00300thm.jpg'
8ce1d24998ceb7679771f4febd07e459
59a57aac3f9dddb8c513418438a47d15adf9d87b
describe
'330450' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFO' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
41532b7e6d72bec5072bcf9551be652f
eff686f733836e2d8ca1282fcd7bbb0e5dc240d8
describe
'139574' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFP' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
b3757177069599dd7593a35ceed0467f
dc8f1eb5dc67b33b191b0963677b6f508a635cad
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFQ' 'sip-files00301.pro'
daeead105c8c6de5b5ba4b3b0aff3f7e
ef3fd19bddb0bb6ccf4b39a2720be2ed5016c09f
describe
'44689' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFR' 'sip-files00301.QC.jpg'
09c4f98d29247cec8894a877e32708f5
d0fad03a2c8191fddb7a05ca9ba62371717bb637
describe
'2659384' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFS' 'sip-files00301.tif'
d337c847e949742c3726dd1f88f244b9
2cb491e8edd6e2476961908ddf53c047d838c70c
describe
'240' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFT' 'sip-files00301.txt'
7ba2bba0dd6dee88ca6631aec7dccfc5
cfb77b197a5e79c20cc02fe3a42c39f30e8b5c88
describe
'22708' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFU' 'sip-files00301thm.jpg'
df71410302bfe42bc63708685c4c3ecb
1c9ef79f6c92dcc66ea66473f15e75c1d5f053ca
describe
'5060' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFV' 'sip-files00302.jp2'
b5aa281b0240cdffe7e5648f863299a6
6887f7df4ed151d468c7ea46bc98d4782ab8e211
describe
'11028' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFW' 'sip-files00302.jpg'
5ba6782845af7b3c7b3f707af08a7c98
1849293672805b395dbaa3d64ea738c9c6969c41
describe
'9243' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFX' 'sip-files00302.QC.jpg'
49742be9af4a571518adb3b85617b452
7354423a2201e59b5ce7a9f03478aff9fe15d29b
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFY' 'sip-files00302.tif'
a9e05a6f54e0c177c8be392e34a8f990
45b3053919537685e5226f4efe8855b100bef5ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOFZ' 'sip-files00302thm.jpg'
3c67d3224d384e970e33d8bdd4ca8d78
4e93e86d72b26a108d190bd53bd6b0021895bcf1
describe
'462429' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGA' 'sip-files00303.jp2'
ca7d272b389c30df6d2d22c3e002a006
6067f2d287d44a4b665432629ddf355d9c96ce7c
describe
'120265' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGB' 'sip-files00303.jpg'
f90530a8f770eb8fce6138ee14e2a2e4
8fa3f2ff8bc1bd4a9190f66e3bc4c81f056b60f8
describe
'29708' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGC' 'sip-files00303.pro'
0f0f9228f456cef59f5497a330c6b57e
a4e29e56b5ccf6ee8e3baac3862b09e5b58fbe9e
describe
'42540' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGD' 'sip-files00303.QC.jpg'
e8533713d5dd5f523c185d2bc1e130de
461a39b56a528e1f2ffc3af5426ae5e15eb7c159
describe
'3710876' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGE' 'sip-files00303.tif'
893e788486990c0e3ff2a8fdefc63627
effdf2ceaa7948e16ffcd0b5e3e454d1b086dc86
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGF' 'sip-files00303.txt'
e35072d2919ae6edb4cd965c06d8c877
50011a863c85b0a8ac05706a9303384b9a680157
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGG' 'sip-files00303thm.jpg'
3a9c48611b13d1fc7b30c887a8914958
2871d2387ffeb823d1f9198683a82a6549562f94
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGH' 'sip-files00304.jp2'
2a1810319dc844fa23df560d37ba7390
362c82acd246900f7dbec94fdec5f536a1372980
'2012-01-22T23:35:53-05:00'
describe
'173509' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGI' 'sip-files00304.jpg'
a54dce0345a907d2a85c6e892cfee149
2f9446e34aa5c2273613807aa71e1fb8a51b8172
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGJ' 'sip-files00304.pro'
60cf6495cddb0f68586e073738ba42f9
46c4d25b1f772944f44608f60d10b0c8e670cf5d
describe
'61648' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGK' 'sip-files00304.QC.jpg'
386bc694d5f1528bc7e276c6959539fc
228a77359e4084e35f1913944b2b82b4161cfed1
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGL' 'sip-files00304.tif'
9d9f2c467c568dda7e6b79739b1582dc
85dfd2364d4949ffa04ca4b6f1fc130047822f21
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGM' 'sip-files00304.txt'
9be4ed3331498121ac768e2ffa4fe1c2
4c6233ebd3f4c6e863dc51703f3a29e2393814cb
describe
'23668' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGN' 'sip-files00304thm.jpg'
f90f1860d2a6bd25603fc90b419bc328
7fcafebe193788e22e265b9eecc87454f2c4f486
describe
'348942' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGO' 'sip-files00305.jp2'
c4e5e2a9d4725af552cd24e6c6f26fae
d992b70a61f440c17199c6d304d1ff92b727711d
describe
'188916' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGP' 'sip-files00305.jpg'
ea5bfc9b28aa1f52a0c81da9d8ff4e2d
291f97c60fe80a072dc0071f67368da07bc2f490
describe
'2277' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGQ' 'sip-files00305.pro'
61c7166153c4abf1b305b81d36857a99
d8abf7721a6bf1ebc036beb95a4e73c7069cb409
describe
'54362' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGR' 'sip-files00305.QC.jpg'
f01b8626353103e22da5e95dc9648a51
3f58d37fbe8ec3540faca78d4b2ffcc6bba39d49
describe
'2805940' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGS' 'sip-files00305.tif'
a44117bcc060987494f1091362961954
2cc2b33633f45345f4e0a17d4754c6d84ab2e1b2
describe
'195' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGT' 'sip-files00305.txt'
675beb65a6e10a7a9f1bd8d7f2e800ab
39ed15e59a20eef8141c988f569d9d8ccd2481b4
describe
'23341' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGU' 'sip-files00305thm.jpg'
4e0ff280e2632e6fbfc94742ef17b324
bdfea5b5610e23c3f7193937477940e51bb152d5
describe
'5373' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGV' 'sip-files00306.jp2'
8b647d15ca9fd2ae924d294018f2cafb
f3bc05735a522442c02f13cabcb30fc5a7ba63e3
describe
'11125' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGW' 'sip-files00306.jpg'
e7f8f6e9f55545b5be520d30fcece235
96f67133d7cb0079e51fcd948cc0f0e1040a7448
describe
'9280' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGX' 'sip-files00306.QC.jpg'
e4be3aea8ba496d9b33578bb411644ac
513322903f8533ebcc39ec11e9c1f2d5c0546fad
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGY' 'sip-files00306.tif'
4cbfccdc960bce13bf9ebb0e30379052
0a49e7906a9885e3914a612d44e45dc1c7ee6c6f
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOGZ' 'sip-files00306thm.jpg'
dbc66f882562889856f80ef8a1245b60
20223cea0d8e5ad70968b8a60d1f8ab5c606aded
describe
'462413' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHA' 'sip-files00307.jp2'
1cad3e2df408a36a1f173f0af52d3a3a
e13ca46320c0284a5b63f00de348f9eb21258dd0
describe
'158064' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHB' 'sip-files00307.jpg'
15ed231d7cdd537cce8767d1af769b56
b1ba38b50a0eb6704a075ddad6e7ea78b970a22b
describe
'47368' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHC' 'sip-files00307.pro'
b12ddd4471ed5c6524f9a254dcb235eb
3cc991838a2aa0f99610c9f5e1e2d817c5a3832d
describe
'58738' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHD' 'sip-files00307.QC.jpg'
079a03c422a1dbc6cdf40ecc7714f09d
4c2581fdb57937269c1948cba5dc6ece80a5e31a
describe
'3712800' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHE' 'sip-files00307.tif'
66b7075995183ba516c4892e315255ee
985883ef985af62b129efa082e26af6f395e4983
describe
'1903' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHF' 'sip-files00307.txt'
ce7b5fb1ba835d057eefa1af84e54451
c05dfeb29b41fb0a1bae51088cb7619d0ff4fe7f
describe
'23754' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHG' 'sip-files00307thm.jpg'
5b7d375e7f4e67bce1ece2424460adba
84b4b5a914d76ec0075cb85aa62d76a231b2a9e7
describe
'462173' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHH' 'sip-files00308.jp2'
ffcf631d57412bded03ee3304563d530
edc17b28bfe20bf4e5c445904333934cf1cb07ac
describe
'164202' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHI' 'sip-files00308.jpg'
392ff12b10a800074ecc98e277993cbc
f56ad78909e0e4b62030dea4c6dafd1f75cefd24
describe
'49843' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHJ' 'sip-files00308.pro'
3796ac6d75feb7225baa07b4548b179f
403735cb87d4793090887b6c1e9ee9f821c3fa28
describe
'59030' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHK' 'sip-files00308.QC.jpg'
526d0c75a58a94d651a3ddb853baa599
e9c4018bf43699a64e35be71e0df1b47aacfac53
'2012-01-22T23:43:05-05:00'
describe
'3710496' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHL' 'sip-files00308.tif'
b25bec3e52cf524925731210fb592433
ea7c3c876dc721ddd801bd2d0c2ef0ec1fa8e7ec
'2012-01-22T23:31:14-05:00'
describe
'1978' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHM' 'sip-files00308.txt'
ba16201bd486e3cbf330cd0bda5f209f
fd23423de6239692ab6a65b89ae137fa051bd1ac
describe
'23839' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHN' 'sip-files00308thm.jpg'
9dbd0ff3309bc399093668e0f697fc9d
fbe8e55249b2e2b21b602fa80f9c9fb5fd049bd0
describe
'316124' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHO' 'sip-files00309.jp2'
6eb3a5e934d171d186dea6469c87309d
2a4ede2f2ea17c5241a5d9015861766347ea9812
describe
'136001' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHP' 'sip-files00309.jpg'
fc36c211a60a5c8b707a1406309473a6
82cb426c9a86a8fce6fbe35fc73b88daf48e3de8
describe
'2285' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHQ' 'sip-files00309.pro'
226687dccbe3dc4c9dd7172aff73e8e6
7888efd9defca43dd2944a54f8d216671ab21289
describe
'44388' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHR' 'sip-files00309.QC.jpg'
9cc013b61226b09a0dfcc9a4a3e05d6e
b64e43662a8d38ed23f4df13973f5b3302e4a10f
describe
'2544964' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHS' 'sip-files00309.tif'
6e5d11a661244f4fe0683122660f6e34
82ae024edc5dc03ccfd7cfec442338978812df29
describe
'166' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHT' 'sip-files00309.txt'
e3948c78bb7fb6b2eb4751fc3da6ffa4
3b63f87977783d170853a44224a2d1ad95ae1132
describe
'22162' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHU' 'sip-files00309thm.jpg'
d2e3c070e25b22de015ceac3bd8dac66
4c4fec68ca1abb83922f96afd1a3e690a269ddf9
describe
'4935' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHV' 'sip-files00310.jp2'
7eb18e52ee203042aa1c025095d9ba14
b501571e1c219dbf946ecc787fa1eb3db409fcb6
describe
'11047' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHW' 'sip-files00310.jpg'
c8c061f3e5e516b4440be0cb779186a2
80f8dcf93ae14ef127672149533a5a55b9746852
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHX' 'sip-files00310.QC.jpg'
46b0672f6f21ec44e6603798a00e6770
f54d539cd9863f0dfe1f082bfda5a9aa17d4eaf4
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHY' 'sip-files00310.tif'
9d6c0e60a2a19aeb203d16e26a783dd0
672c684327a2ffc07c96c4595860ef4a943a9ea2
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOHZ' 'sip-files00310thm.jpg'
b6999d8c4d37723be360da18e11a53d0
3adfcc5aa7ac14e4f6f51e1add0225bb118d48c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIA' 'sip-files00311.jp2'
5f48caddc250bf241b5216e1dc9be126
d997b2fa0e49ca2a743a0d18c28a472679bad2ed
describe
'161391' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIB' 'sip-files00311.jpg'
b623d4be071566dfe0a6f838b7a1eaa7
2cb8fb925c616c9243fe529f09e8a44d6c3b8a5d
describe
'46861' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIC' 'sip-files00311.pro'
35dd4c343c454db22c3641027b6985ac
2decb2f0b3903e0c1acb547f2f4e76bdc9be179f
describe
'58924' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOID' 'sip-files00311.QC.jpg'
74b6f68176b23807889d6fa6c8312849
cb29bf686df6a774509ce1f4eacf406f42008694
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIE' 'sip-files00311.tif'
bc0cc198c2cafb58fdf6f0894d6edaa7
e59838bd3a57b4c36eb6d77bd49d7615e7d768af
describe
'1987' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIF' 'sip-files00311.txt'
d573ca242080b9ae9eb9d63d1e55c283
ddfddffd46ad5b2692aad5ed613b84940f4ebc5f
describe
'23675' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIG' 'sip-files00311thm.jpg'
8c5624ccb0d4ef5f2caefe9b7ff72625
efd12d7fd4d20cb37e5d0affee9a7c6ac4e228c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIH' 'sip-files00312.jp2'
3193e427b257cb3838128cc74511a7bb
016d2ae9477b8de92399fa619b4385302a73fd5f
describe
'150136' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOII' 'sip-files00312.jpg'
046549a32eeb58dc9d5be21aa9511a89
cc188cf9f73f5ce67ec14b012f77b66d21100d9e
describe
'45873' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIJ' 'sip-files00312.pro'
a68b3e4b7baca730cb8a1e320cdb7574
742544d4631048ef006adde8fec7337f9796ccbd
describe
'55131' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIK' 'sip-files00312.QC.jpg'
eadb2c70d31093eca5f2524bda6ab623
511dd5a051533d033d8c38f1c37d6a4acb498e9b
describe
'3710296' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIL' 'sip-files00312.tif'
037d6953d1ce535838eec8331bb4e468
d65dc8083603b7821c109d4f0da27a001be0d1d1
describe
'1888' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIM' 'sip-files00312.txt'
336f6d4a84631965d63f1e94b238185e
c0a5b01bf79d9b14aaaf4502520b2c2604dd1be6
describe
'23152' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIN' 'sip-files00312thm.jpg'
34c5cdea0e78e4f9641e18e340e197e9
2ee6f5562143124c5f3328b5f1a763504b8fd11f
'2012-01-22T23:31:08-05:00'
describe
'462349' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIO' 'sip-files00313.jp2'
bf66ed06c47175e9f0ac88a5e14756b3
aad640d214ed68c2487ab8733cfcdd67c7b64eab
describe
'173932' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIP' 'sip-files00313.jpg'
dd75009802a2b1c2b41b87ff0d6e93ee
588eaf73e958128f7ef90cb27e726acb441dac3f
describe
'3507' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIQ' 'sip-files00313.pro'
0ed6814de8c2fabe01d41af05f359614
b2b889d541b6c0ee7d552ee84eaac49360ee0ff5
describe
'51783' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIR' 'sip-files00313.QC.jpg'
01cb3a78947d3735b17102b78d469948
0f14ee423ed0a3664ada901914ebeddbe6c5274d
describe
'3712400' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIS' 'sip-files00313.tif'
30d82be18005816e72db54303094601d
a9db6dead7af7e57c848b0df2c2b665bedd5a27d
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIT' 'sip-files00313.txt'
c0a244816b137b36a357d2d25d6e4742
b200b28c5a30aaeb051c8d24c9b3029ca44c1da5
describe
Invalid character
'21849' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIU' 'sip-files00313thm.jpg'
9e1970cde6e2772db6092906b593ca9a
afad628ca39fba4e6e8b651466b8a1982e24c2e7
describe
'5265' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIV' 'sip-files00314.jp2'
ca48cf61864aa40e501225ff79140a64
673ffb3e18dc82e5cf53e46c9a4fffa14be3cef4
describe
'11093' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIW' 'sip-files00314.jpg'
b47a3c4d08390954e05bb05f835c20ed
2656c4c0e904364756a183d05d81e0ce8b68f2b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIX' 'sip-files00314.QC.jpg'
27e9a81f772ff2ac8ac590deb90b4c57
4e4de4e8a5e90ac1da4b29dc53e63dccea8c5184
describe
'3709312' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIY' 'sip-files00314.tif'
b5fc8ed17122d173ecd6c0e258a166dc
312f04d603fd54327d91efbe0758189228fbeb51
'2012-01-22T23:30:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOIZ' 'sip-files00314thm.jpg'
54eac4955e42f2d3b4ec4a49b86c4bfc
82dafb0dd8b63abdbefe44d5178b29b43187fc50
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJA' 'sip-files00315.jp2'
b107b621143ce433426825ee7192615f
ff215b237c27db145697f65e9b7b218c5b270090
describe
'169309' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJB' 'sip-files00315.jpg'
3c12c9ec1ff85b0234def2782a1c1121
0af7463456520518380643cfa3a9216e67c52ee6
describe
'50575' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJC' 'sip-files00315.pro'
e79289050aa0ff31506996242eb1988a
4dabc7c932ac07c6c3d15480c1d25d6b9ad19636
describe
'61354' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJD' 'sip-files00315.QC.jpg'
388131826040540b9d58964311f266df
aca15c3257ac9a6848f62c0f53ed6ac176e0b6a8
describe
'3714296' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJE' 'sip-files00315.tif'
e9f9dee002449c32da9fcd5ce4e54eeb
a800b69177c8f1cd1f660b0fa5d45f9c1397a601
describe
'2091' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJF' 'sip-files00315.txt'
45b5ee5cc1ab48b2db1617155eb176b0
441b47441ccf225cd582993586731afd01f24ff4
describe
'23945' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJG' 'sip-files00315thm.jpg'
57014e3117fe1b9ee6e11a6d33a2d114
8f006dc9607a486c302e88eedb53f43137c79cdc
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJH' 'sip-files00316.jp2'
bd1f4b50497046bab5ba4eb9be22badc
7a1d242380e7eb932050d9f4126ff3cccd3719e1
describe
'167215' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJI' 'sip-files00316.jpg'
7d7bf203fbce6672fcf7ac1504021298
6c9efac0ceb66598729099cddf76b892221b4892
'2012-01-22T23:33:02-05:00'
describe
'50906' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJJ' 'sip-files00316.pro'
00c559572a7f0ab39ea04c0d6d4ca8e9
1f4fbe34ed76f52ed2db177aba7e7eb43672f4c2
describe
'60297' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJK' 'sip-files00316.QC.jpg'
c102fcae6eaa4cebf064bbaad317d2bf
a3b724bd74be15bfd86ca0809e757ebff370ace4
describe
'3711920' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJL' 'sip-files00316.tif'
9d9f647cc865faec834c0c2723e7ec46
aadfaaed6ae1b5e8859feeb9a9b464442607c778
describe
'2033' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJM' 'sip-files00316.txt'
a30b95b9f84c845746adfec78e20e5b1
6e7a311fd244e68828e3e0234d72799e332708be
describe
'23556' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJN' 'sip-files00316thm.jpg'
85194e4ac1bd86d0f290f703cc540448
7de7e9a60d0a70b4f755054408863b4929ef0968
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJO' 'sip-files00317.jp2'
48ab6084edcca6767e2060c3a4896094
c946e3305eafd020d9bd2f2b2373fffaec0b7b24
describe
'95711' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJP' 'sip-files00317.jpg'
cba38ee777dd18ada82f76886c41a09f
a83c0dc3886dce18b645c9cc9599855d017115e8
describe
'28040' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJQ' 'sip-files00317.pro'
1f9a4724e23829dae9de9100ddf94a7d
124bbcac6089ca31b84fe67cdb7d527d54461c79
describe
'37802' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJR' 'sip-files00317.QC.jpg'
2f2272908594ff3e08451982e553abf7
081ec238697274992f3959181ca7d04522b94e4a
describe
'3710652' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJS' 'sip-files00317.tif'
ce0ee1b8914158d0897a2cf0359281cf
9c004c3079a1482003025dd075fe2ae738f27d29
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJT' 'sip-files00317.txt'
f316fd448c7f143658341dcdc159c192
824c438f743707c49fe7a6ff4a2973345ef795ac
describe
'17106' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJU' 'sip-files00317thm.jpg'
4829f2b505a171f09eefaed469165578
392d2656caaa109dae2fa03be51f579930627a30
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJV' 'sip-files00319.jp2'
0cba89e9cb502a64eb63c43cedbcc5d9
19a1a50e9deecb5057ede5257f57b197f533622c
describe
'154822' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJW' 'sip-files00319.jpg'
b1d2cfe95c1580491a197456fb803932
fba2ab43d420ea705d14bcd0e5cf23fc85b4d4c7
describe
'18659' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJX' 'sip-files00319.pro'
4a828b7375319da118315b79eb9048a3
2a01348d5859903abdb168df974b9444bc1acc80
describe
'50354' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJY' 'sip-files00319.QC.jpg'
2efb9964740838a4ae2b9f4b2641f85b
8ce83852bf9146f9c3d64ac60a8f6cf83a9587b6
describe
'3709752' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOJZ' 'sip-files00319.tif'
3f6e486a9274622088284d0dc7e1dcf7
d0a187e3103123ab82f876cef851704df7b82a04
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKA' 'sip-files00319.txt'
804173b8b0bef0c21df2f8e9e45dbb19
56872a2024b7b97a6c9fb7aced87ca918bd74657
'2012-01-22T23:33:44-05:00'
describe
'21491' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKB' 'sip-files00319thm.jpg'
63b99fe2f6feabc382d79a524cb30a8f
2192f42683695715146c1ec3afd55eaf9ed0e89e
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKC' 'sip-files00320.jp2'
c0ad535110550fe3e0ae5f09d754e127
b3efa56673c61d41467367f61b417dda412cafd2
describe
'113164' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKD' 'sip-files00320.jpg'
3378dd00f7c3b2b9768bb5ea4ccd68d5
1ed3bd5f49fe8e2cf9cad38858b9c44da0c8f5ca
'2012-01-22T23:34:58-05:00'
describe
'31770' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKE' 'sip-files00320.pro'
18be9f96e53291632ee3865c16fa4dee
0351aa0df9fc0e1a6995cc69d256eeed5270068a
describe
'44904' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKF' 'sip-files00320.QC.jpg'
86efc8398df02e25227fbb9633f6587a
127251b5572c9fb514608823aeb4d50bbf43919b
describe
'3711816' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKG' 'sip-files00320.tif'
6119f3bea9e3b2233881cbf8e5fae41a
f47d354d47cf0ee9ab13b2552c20bc5033cde45a
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKH' 'sip-files00320.txt'
bdee6c3b0cfc74458ffd17124d0aea99
fa026d9c607a80dbe1e138406b22316ddac0b015
describe
'20588' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKI' 'sip-files00320thm.jpg'
964d4aa95528276ba2739d40e063b75a
2a20bca546c4401fda1e4d2d2e13b1d53ee75b84
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKJ' 'sip-files00321.jp2'
613e75be11bc63682c1e344e772b08a1
6f933f17b6b3d929efe2fc83513d50192c8de4a6
'2012-01-22T23:33:50-05:00'
describe
'142461' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKK' 'sip-files00321.jpg'
766685f166a1bbdc07b61e1b4dda083c
f9c5d07d0fc053e17ea32305b8f740555e815a10
describe
'45303' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKL' 'sip-files00321.pro'
7f27ab6d197ce90b20fb448d00696ded
07e465f9717a18749a425d8354bb766f9240f2dd
describe
'52079' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKM' 'sip-files00321.QC.jpg'
98ee1bcdd4175e57a54bb1900e2b39c3
a55b7d374a331421fea7d8a26b26dbbc8c9c84a2
describe
'3710024' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKN' 'sip-files00321.tif'
a0ee5f1552e61b1eccd29472d6f79483
a695a9f5be82a7ce4098fbf5ccf817f9c253fddf
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKO' 'sip-files00321.txt'
d3064b2b00dbd719be8437c64a24afac
032f38297fcefaf1dd8c63fe30fdfc09ffba9505
describe
'22257' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKP' 'sip-files00321thm.jpg'
c96704787778f737d3563105c498cd3a
a2a1a98bc3b5d436db7e31cac14e2f531301a0c7
describe
'462166' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKQ' 'sip-files00322.jp2'
8700d1b97bd603fd815fbd8d4ff303d0
d8377e3b3f89985efe3dfae197601e79ab38e1e3
describe
'223959' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKR' 'sip-files00322.jpg'
1479f54d22a3fadca87170b7b3b70713
75eaadf34664faefe9c4f9bfcaf58196abfbed86
describe
'4644' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKS' 'sip-files00322.pro'
fa04b19d13009d18efc7d38f8f4cbedb
32d901bfeaf8df789efee2596f7db67fa8bd92a5
describe
'66389' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKT' 'sip-files00322.QC.jpg'
49ab3c45db617ee9af7d95b19cc09ab0
34b34ccd496df6bd8b70c3380910dd2f18a514d3
describe
'3711848' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKU' 'sip-files00322.tif'
e4ee81a146cf90ce99227a75f55905ac
a06af9353650d95897d23b27cae167b320712064
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKV' 'sip-files00322.txt'
b7310f466d74af8145e335b98379d54b
b536706965d4f9a131dba174636bf081ea30022c
describe
Invalid character
'27147' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKW' 'sip-files00322thm.jpg'
909ade5734f5cb332d1542025c4cc1f8
3a268cc8fa1b8166767975a5a0deacc058ef9de9
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKX' 'sip-files00323.jp2'
af75ca8884bdcc06d9514942e6960e21
71fd6d5774b2b625d7ea6a3c503eb2b3a90d8992
describe
'158610' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKY' 'sip-files00323.jpg'
6e7765786948f666f3b034c470e1bb76
50d6987900e0c4604f4665fa5781bc817e87aa27
describe
'68125' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOKZ' 'sip-files00323.pro'
661ddf83ecb5c3fae5885bc2764c024b
29f98f471b05b993ab1c54a1e9f4356266a622d7
describe
'50168' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLA' 'sip-files00323.QC.jpg'
396fc712eedc48012a6064d04a543923
fcd9bd0b20e7e7e8470f51ef4617b398615b9154
describe
'3709500' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLB' 'sip-files00323.tif'
3ea5d17de506a41f96639247d6b94a67
8807c7f6e517f313eb9c7914168516801665ead1
describe
'2960' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLC' 'sip-files00323.txt'
4af0b2168f7d29b0224725f6028692ed
63fcbf3e145df035ad3c0e334086723da6694fca
describe
'21311' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLD' 'sip-files00323thm.jpg'
66c3b5e98c31bc126a2e0c4b472369d2
8d18ab3eb750e648ab9033b0a74c917dbbb5c463
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLE' 'sip-files00324.jp2'
1ea97e4f7f8450ee9a6f4791ab98b8aa
8be760d7b60d5dd856bf8398c6509af602dc83dc
'2012-01-22T23:34:22-05:00'
describe
'120852' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLF' 'sip-files00324.jpg'
0bc700a4571a87c7a4a59f21c90f56bd
3be1e2ca81ead4d8e8714740e7039046e535eac6
describe
'34477' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLG' 'sip-files00324.pro'
d4dd55a90588de7777bc853bcc8b608f
df74fc6287abd982cf6d6da17feb51e6b9a380f2
describe
'47529' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLH' 'sip-files00324.QC.jpg'
b318e44003cd53053086610d9dcfdcc1
7c529ee412bd928940eda21c4b7df0f56ecac019
describe
'3709480' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLI' 'sip-files00324.tif'
1527350e66ec682533406d52df30afb4
0a3ad1532d7df01ac9236285f15a27e98c889b53
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLJ' 'sip-files00324.txt'
823702719a1d303819ae348024a645fc
4624374c97f4ed6e445f20d07703115d14f762d3
describe
'21180' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLK' 'sip-files00324thm.jpg'
626175d3abc5f7497a825fc6b0bed324
66fad5f8d9ad8f1fdee33e5072a82ea3bfe0b724
describe
'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLL' 'sip-files00325.jp2'
11a25d8a2030c5efdfe289f5e6fe0c51
7235430b28be3c71c1b0d3193c5c4c4735340907
describe
'144142' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLM' 'sip-files00325.jpg'
ce7a3cec9783284896ffa7bfee75476d
c5277c65dbb67036c3f041535f0ded21c32c1451
describe
'26953' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLN' 'sip-files00325.pro'
9cad4efd9e49ae45a47eb154bc2095d5
840308f4d0c824cdebc1397745cc5e28290f4f06
describe
'50479' 'info:fdaE20090328_AAAAAHfileF20090328_AAAOLO' 'sip-files00325.QC.jpg'
c380c0b8365a8c03abff8d47aa23150c
33e6170a77e3a2a8b8c6658de9825ff07d22fb2f
describe
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Fairy Tales from the Far North
Fairy Tales from the
Far North

by
P. C. Asbjérnsen

Translated from the Norwegian by

Be LL. Brekstad



With Ninety-Five Illustrations by
E. WERENSKIOLD, T. KITTELSEN anp O. SINDING

AUTHORISED EDITION
LONDON

DAVID NUTT, 270-271, STRAND
5 1897 .
Piinted by BALLANTYNE, Hanson & Co.
At the Ballantyne Press
TRANSLATOR’S NOTE

SLOWLY but surely the name of Asbjérnsen has been gaining
ground in popularity as one of the most fascinating and delightful
writers of Fairy Tales, not only among the young folks in this
country, but also among adult readers and students of Folk Lore.
Asbjérnsen was first introduced to the English public through the
late Sir George Dasent’s translations, published in 1858 and 1874.
In 1881 appeared my translation of a selection of his Norske
Folke-Eventyr (Norwegian Folk and Fairy Tales), and his Huldre-
Eventyr (Tales and Legends about the wood-fairy and other
supernatural beings), with the original illustrations, which a
number of Norwegian artists, all friends and admirers of the
genial author, had for some time been preparing for the first
illustrated edition of his Tales. The English edition was
published under the title of Round the Yule Log,” and met
with a most favourable reception both in this country and in
America. ,

A second volume, containing a further selection of his most
popular Tales, with illustrations by the well-known Norwegian

artists, E. Werenskiold, T. Kittelsen and O. Sinding was in course
vi TRANSLATOR’S NOTE

of publication when, in 1885, death overtook the author, and
Norway lost one of her most celebrated sons. But the arrange-
ments for the publication of this new volume of the illustrated
edition were so far advanced, that the final part was able to
appear about two years after Asbjérnsen’s death. It is these
illustrations which appear in the pages of the present English
edition of the new selection of his Tales. With regard to the
translation, I have in this, as in my former volume, “ Round the
Yule Log,” attempted to retain as far as possible the racy,
colloquial flavour of the original.
H. L. B.
Lonpon, September, 1897.


CONTENTS

The Ram and the Pig who went into the Woods to live by Themselves
The Golden Bird

The Fox as Herdsboy

Ashiepattle, who ate with the Troll ay a “Wager
The Quern at the Bottom of the Sea

Little Butterkin .

The Contrary-minded Woman

The Woodpecker :
The Man’s Daughter and the Woman's s Davee .
The Hare who had been Marvied

The Squive’s Bride

All Women ave alike ; :

One’s own Children are always the Prettiest

Old Father Bruin in the Wolfpit

The Doll in the Grass

The Hen who went to Dovrefjeld to save the World
Squive Peter .

Bird Dauntless

The Town Mouse and the Canin M ouse

Soria Maria’s Castle

Well Done, Ill Paid

Ashiepattle and his Goodly Crew

Gudbrand on the Hill-side

The Twelve Wild Ducks

Page

20
22
27
34
39
45
47
58
61
69
77
79
82
87
gI
100
116
122
138
142
155
162
Vili CONTENTS

The Bear and the Fox:
1. Slip Pine-Root, Grip Fox-Foot .
2. The Bear and the Fox make a Wager.
3. The Bear and the Fox go into Partnership .
4. Reynard wants to taste Horseflesh

The Cock who fell into the Brewing Vat.

The Cock and the Fox . .

The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain

The World’s Reward

The Companion

Nanny who wouldn't go Home to Supper

The Lad with the Beer Keg

Little Fred and his Fiddle

The Storehouse Key in the Distaff .

The Lad who went wooing the Daughter of old Mother Conte

The Princess whom nobody could silence .
Farmer Weatherbeard .

Page

174
175
176
180
182
189
192
220
226
246
253
259
269
272
283
289




THE RAM

AND THE PIG

WHO WENT

INTO THE WOODS
TO LIVE

BY THEMSELVES

THERE was once upon a time a
ram, who was being fattened up
for killing. He had therefore
plenty to eat, and he soon be-
came round and fat with all the

good things he got. One day -

the dairy-maid came, and gave
him some more food.

“You must eat, ram,”

she
2. THE RAM AND THE PIG

said; “ you’ll not be long here now, for to-morrow we are going to
kill you.”

“There’s an old saying, that no one should sneer at old
women’s advice, and that advice and physic can be had for every-
thing except death,” thought the ram to himself; ‘‘ but perhaps
I might manage to escape it this time.”

And so he went on eating till he was full, and when he was
quite satisfied he ran his horns against the door, burst it open,
and set off to the neighbouring farm. There he made straight for
the pig-sty, to look for a pig with whom he had struck up an
acquaintance on the common, since when they had always been
good friends and got on well together.

“Good day, and thanks for your kindness last time we met,”
said the ram to the pig.

“Good day, and thanks to you,” said the pig.

“Do you know why they make you so comfortable, and why
they feed you and look after you so well?” said the ram.

“No,” said the pig.

“There are many mouths to feed on this farm, you must know,”
said the ram; “ they are going to kill you and eat you.”

“Are they?” said the pig. ‘‘ Well, much good may it do
them !”

“Tf you are of the same mind as I, we will go into the woods
and build a house and live by ourselves; there is nothing like
having a home of your own, you know,” said the ram.

Yes, the pig was quite willing. “It’s nice to be in fine
company,” said he, and off they started.

When they had got a bit on the way they met a goose.

“Good day, my good people, and thanks for your kindness last
time we met,” said the goose. ‘‘ Where are you off to?”

“Good day, and thanks to you,” said the ram. ‘We had it
altogether too comfortable at our place, so we are off to the woods
to live by ourselves. In your own house you are your own
master, you know,” said he.

“Well, I'm very comfortable where I am,” said the goose;
THE RAM AND THE PIG 3

“but why shouldn’t I join you? Good company makes the day
shorter,” said she.

“But neither hut nor house can be built by gabbling and
quacking,” said the pig. ‘ What do you think you can do?”

“Good counsel and skill may do as much as a giant’s will,”
said the goose. ‘I can pluck moss and stuff it into the crevices,
so that the house will be warm and comfortable.”

Well, she might come with them, thought the pig, for he liked
the place to be warm and cosy.

When they had gone a bit on the way—the goose was not
getting along very fast—they met a hare, who came scampering
out of the wood.

“Good day, my good people, and thanks for your kindness the
last time we met,” said the hare. “ How far are you going to-day ?”
said he.

‘Good day, and thanks to you,” said the ram ; “ we had it alto- _
gether too comfortable at our place, so we are off to the woods to
build a house and live by ourselves. When you have tried both
East and West, you'll find that a home of your own is after all
the best,” said he.

‘Well, I have, of course, a home in every bush,” said the hare ;
“but I have often said to myself in the winter, that if I lived till
the summer I would build a house, so I have a good mind to go
with you and build one after-all,” said he.

“Well, if the worst comes to the worst, we might take you
with us to frighten the dogs away,” said the pig, “ for you couldn't
help us to build the house, I should say.”

“There is always something for willing hands to do in this
world,” said the hare. ‘I have teeth to gnaw pegs with, and I
have paws to knock them into the walls, so I'll do very well for a
carpenter ; for ‘good tools make good work,’ as the man said,
when he skinned his mare with an auger,” said the hare.

Well, he might come with them and help to build the house ;
there could be no harm in that.

When they had got a bit further on the way, they met a cock.
4 THE RAM AND THE PIG

“Good day, my good people, and thanks for your kindness
last time we met,” said the cock; “where are you all going to-
day ?” he-said.

“Good day and thanks to you,” said the ram; ‘we had it
altogether too comfortable at our place, so we are off to the woods
to build a house and live by ourselves. ‘For unless at home you
bake, you'll lose both fuel and cake,’” said he.

“Well, I am comfortable enough, where I am,” said the cock,
“but it’s better to have your own roost than to sit on a stranger’s
perch and crow; and that cock is best off who has a home of his
own,” said he. ‘‘If I could join such fine company as yours, I too
would like to go to the woods and build a house.”

“Well, flapping and crowing is all very well for noise, but it
won’t cut joists,” said the pig. ‘‘ You can’t help us to build a
house,” he said.

“Tt is not well to live in a house where there is neither dog
nor cock,” said the cock ; ‘I am early to rise and early to crow.”

“Yes, ‘early to rise, makes one wealthy and wise,’ so let him
come with us!” said the pig. He was always the heaviest sleeper.
“ Sleep is a big thief, and steals half one’s life,” he said.

So they all set off to the woods and built the house. The pig
felled the trees and the ram dragged them home; the hare was
the carpenter, and gnawed pegs and hammered them into walls
and roof; the goose plucked moss and stuffed it into the crevices
between the logs; the cock crew and took care that they did not
oversleep themselves in the mornings, and when the house was
ready and the roof covered with birch-bark and thatched with turf,
they could at least live by themselves, and they were all both
happy and contented.

“Tt’s pleasant to travel both East and West, but home is, after
all, the best,” said the ram.

But a bit further into the wood two wolves had their lair, and
when they saw that a new house had been built hard by they
wanted to know what sort of folks they had got for neighbours.
For they thought, ‘‘a good neighbour is better than a brother in a






























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‘“SUCH TREATMENT I NEVER MET WITH BEFORE," SAID THE WOLF
THE RAM AND THE PIG 7

foreign land, and it is better to live among ens neighbours than
to be known far and wide.”

So one of them made it his business to call there and ask for a
light for his pipe. The moment he came inside the door the ram
rushed at him, and gave him such a butt with his horns that the
wolf fell on his head into the hearth; the pig snapped and bit, the
goose nipped and pecked, the cock flew up on a rafter and began
to crow and cackle, and the hare became so frightened that he
scampered and jumped about, both high and low, and knocked and
scrambled about from one corner of the room to the other.

At last the wolf managed to get out of the house.

“Well, to know one’s neighbours is to add to one’s wisdom,”
said the wolf, who was waiting outside; ‘I suppose you had a
grand reception, since you stayed so:long. But what about the
light? I don’t see either pipe or smoke,” said he.

“Yes, that was a nice light I got, and a nice lot of people they
were,” said he who had been inside. ‘Such treatment I never
met with before, but ‘as you make your bed so you must lie,’
and ‘an unexpected guest must put up with what he gets,’” said
the wolf. ‘No sooner had I got inside the door, than the shoe-
maker threw his last at me, and I fell on my head in the middle
of the forge; there sat two smiths, blowing bellows and pinching
and snipping bits of flesh off me with red-hot tongs and pincers ;
the hunter rushed about the room looking for his gun, but as luck
would have it, he couldn’t find it. And up on the rafters sat
some one beating his arms about and shouting: ‘Let’s hook him!
let’s hook him! Sling him up! sling him up!’ and if he had only
got hold of me I should never have got out alive.”
THE GOLDEN BIRD






THERE was once upon a
time a king who had a
garden ; in that garden there was an
apple-tree, and on that apple-tree there
grew a golden apple every year ; but
when the time came to pluck the apple, it
was gone, and no one knew who took it or
what became of it ; but gone it was.
The king had three sons, and one day he
told them that he who could bring him the
apple, or get hold of the thief, should have the
kingdom after him, no matter whether he was
the eldest, the second or the younger son.
The eldest set out first and sat down under the tree to keep
watch for the thief. Soon after dark a golden bird came flying,
THE GOLDEN BIRD 9

and the light from it was so strong and dazzling, that it could be
seen a long way off.. When the prince saw the bird and the
dazzling light, he became so frightened, that he dared not stay
any longer, but rushed indoors as fast as he could.

Next morning the apple was gone ; the prince had then, how-
ever, recovered his courage and began to get ready for his journey
and wanted to set off to find the bird. The king fitted him out in
grand style and spared neither money nor fine raiment. When
the prince had gone a bit on the way he became hungry, opened
his scrip and sat down to his breakfast by the road side. A fox
then came out of the wood and sat down and looked at him.

“Do give me a little to eat,” said the fox.

“Il give you some powder and shot,” said the prince; ‘“‘ my
food I shall want myself; nobody can tell how far and how long I
may have to travel,” said he.

“Just so,” said the fox, and so he went back into the wood
again.

When the prince had finished his meal and rested awhile he
set out on his way again. After a long time he came to a big city,
and in that city there was an inn, where there was always joy and
never any sorrow ; he thought that would be a nice place to stop
at, and so he remained. And there'was such dancing and drinking
and joy and merry-making, that he forgot the bird and his father
and his journey and the whole kingdom.

Away he was and away he stopped.

The next year the second prince was to watch for the thief in
the garden ; he also sat down under the tree when the apple began
to ripen. But one night, all of a sudden, the golden bird came
flying, shining like the sun; the prince became so afraid that he
took to his heels and ran indoors as fast as he could.

In the morning the apple was gone, but the prince had then
recovered his courage and wanted to set out and find the bird.
He began to get ready and the king fitted him out in grand style
and spared neither money nor fine raiment. But the same thing
happened to him as to his brother; when he had got a bit on the
IO THE GOLDEN BIRD

way he became hungry, opened: his scrip and sat down to his
breakfast by the roadside. A fox then came out from the pine
wood and sat down and looked at him.

“Do give me a little to eat,” said the fox.

“T’ll give you some powder and shot,” said the prince; “ my
food I shall want myself; nobody can tell how far and how long I
may have to travel,” said he.

“Just so,” said the fox, and so he went back into the wood
again.

When the prince had finished his meal and rested awhile, he
set out on his way again. After a long time he came to the
same city and the same inn, where there was always joy and
never any sorrow; and there he also thought it would be nice
to stop, and the first he met was his brother, and so he remained.
The brother had been leading a gay and reckless life and had
scarcely any clothes left on his back ; but now he began afresh,
and there was such dancing and drinking and joy and merriment
that the second prince also forgot the bird and his father and
his journey and the whole kingdom. Away he was and away he
stopped.

When the time came for the apple to ripen again the youngest
prince was to go into the garden and watch for the thief. He
took a companion with him who was to help him up into the tree,
and he also took with him a keg of beer and a pack of cards to
pass away the time with so that he should not fall asleep. All
of a sudden they saw a bright light, as if from the sun; every
feather of the bird could be seen long before it came to the tree.
The prince climbed up into the tree and at the same time the
golden bird swooped down and took the apple; the prince tried to
seize the bird, but he only caught a feather out of its tail.

So he went to the king’s bedroom, and as he came in with the
feather, it became as light as day.

He also wanted to try if he could find his brothers and catch
the bird, for he had been so near to it that he had got a feather
from its tail and would know it again anywhere, he said.
THE GOLDEN BIRD Ir

Well, the king went and pondered long whether he should let
him go, for he thought the youngest would not fare any better than
the two eldest, who ought to have more knowledge of the world,
and he was afraid he should lose him also. But the prince begged
so earnestly that at last he got permission to go.

He then began to get ready and the king fitted him out in
grand style, both with clothes and money, and so he set off.

When he had travelled for some time he became hungry and
took his scrip and sat down to have his breakfast, but just as he
was in the midst of it, a fox came out of the wood and sat down
close by his side and looked at him.

“Do give me a little to eat,” said the fox.

“T shall want the food myself,” said the prince, “ for I cannot
tell how far I shall have to travel, but I have enough to give you a
little.”

When the fox had got the piece of meat he asked the prince
where he was going.

Yes, that he would tell him.

“Tf you will listen to me, I will help you, and you will have
good luck,” said the fox.

The prince promised he would, and so they set off together.
They travelled a while till they came to the same city and the
same inn, where there was always joy, but no sorrow.

“T must keep outside here; the dogs are rather a nuisance,”
said the fox, and so he told the prince where his brothers were
to be found and what they were doing; ‘‘and if you go in there
you will not get any further either,” said he.

The prince promised he would not go-in there, and gave
him his hand on it, and so each went his way. But when the
prince came to the inn and heard the noise and merriment
going on he felt he must go in; there was no help for it,
and when he met his brothers there was such rejoicing that
he forgot both the fox and the journey and the bird, and his
father. But when he had been there a while the fox came—
he had ventured into the city after all—and opened the door a
I2 THE GOLDEN BIRD

little and made a sign to the prince, saying that now they must be
off. So the prince bethought himself, and they went their way.

When they had travelled a while they saw a big mountain far
away. ‘The fox said:

“Three hundred miles at the back of that mountain there is
a gilded linden-tree with golden leaves, and in that tree sits the
golden bird from which you took the feather.”

Thither they travelled together. When the prince was going
to catch the bird the fox gave him some bright feathers which he
was to wave in his hands, and so attract the bird, which would
then fly down and sit on his hand.

But the fox said he must not touch the linden-tree, for inside
it was a big troll, who owned it, and if the prince only touched
the smallest twig the troll would come out and kill him on the
spot.

No, he would not touch it, said the prince; but when he
had got the bird on his hand, he thought he must have a
twig of the tree; there was no help for it, it was so bright
and beautiful. So he took a tiny little sprig, but the same
moment the troll came out.

“Who is that stealing my tree and my bird?” roared the
troll, and he was so angry that he spurted sparks of fire.

“Thieves believe that all men steal,” said the prince; “ but
only those get hanged who do not steal properly,” said he.

The troll said that made no difference, and was going to kill
him, but the prince begged him ‘to spare his life.

“Well,” said the troll, “if you can bring me back the horse
which my nearest neighbour has taken from me, you will get off
with your life.”

“Where shall I find it, then ?” said the prince.

“Oh, he lives three hundred miles at the back of that big blue
mountain against the horizon yonder,” said the troll.

The prince promised he would do his best. But when he came
back to the fox he found him in rather a bad temper.

“ Now you have got yourself into trouble,” said the fox; “if
THE GOLDEN BIRD 13

you had listened to me we could have been on our way home by
this,” said he.

So they had to make a fresh start, for the prince had pledged
his word, and his life depended on his finding the horse.

At last they got there, but as the prince was going to take the
horse the fox said:

“When you come into the stable you will find all sorts of
bridles hanging on the wall, both of gold and silver; you must
not touch them, for then the troll will come and kill you right
away; you must take the ugliest and shabbiest you see.”

Yes, the prince promised he would; but when he came into
the stable he thought it was quite unreasonable not to take a fine
bridle, for there were plenty of them, and so he took the brightest
he could find. It was as bright as gold, but just then the troll
came and was so angry that sparks flew from him.

“Who is that stealing my horse and my bridle?” he
shrieked.

‘““Thieves believe that all men steal,” said the prince; ‘ but
only those get hanged who do not steal properly,” said he.

“Well, that makes no difference. I'll kill you on the spot,”
shouted the troll.

But the prince begged him to spare his life.

“Well,” said the troll, “if you can bring me back the fair
damsel which my nearest neighbour has taken from me I will spare
you.”

‘“‘Whereabouts does he live, then ?” asked the prince.

“‘Oh, he lives three hundred miles at the back of that big blue
mountain against the horizon yonder,” said the troll.

The prince promised he would fetch the damsel, and was
allowed to go, and so he escaped with his life.

But when he came out you may imagine how angry the fox
was.

‘Now you've got yourself into trouble again,” said he ; ‘if you
had listened to me we could have been on our way home long ago.
I almost think I will not go with you any further.”
14, THE GOLDEN BIRD

But the prince begged and prayed and promised he would
never do anything else but what the fox told him, if he would
only remain with him. At last the fox gave in, and they
became firm friends again; so they set off once more and came at
last to where the fair damsel was.

“ Well,” said the fox, ‘“‘I have your promise, but I dare not let
you in to the troll, after all; this time I must go myself.” So he
went in, and after a while he came out with the damsel, and so
they went back the same way they had come.

When they got to the troll, who had the horse, they took both
the horse and the brightest bridle; and when they got to the troll,
who had the linden tree and the bird, they took both the tree and
the bird and started off with them.

When they had got a bit on the way, they came to a field of
rye, and the fox then said :

“J hear a thundering noise; you had better go on ahead; I
will remain here a while,” he said. He then plaited himself a
gown of rye-straw, in which he looked like a preacher. All at
once the three trolls came rushing along, hoping to overtake the
prince.

“ Have you seen any one passing here with a fair damsel, a
horse with a golden bridle, a golden bird, and a gilded linden-
tree?” they shouted to the fox, as he stood there preaching.

“Well, I've heard from my grandmother’s grandmother, that
something of the kind passed this way, but that was in the good
old times, when my grandmother’s grandmother baked halfpenny
cakes and gave back the halfpenny.”

Then all the trolls burst out laughing: “Ha, ha, ha!” they
laughed and held on to one another.

“Tf we have slept so long, we may as well turn our noses home-
wards, and go to sleep again,” they said, and so they went back
the way they came.

The fox then set off after the prince, but when they came to
the city, where the inn and his brothers were, he said :

“T dare not go through the town on account of the dogs; I must
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‘HA, HA, HA!” THE TROLLS LAUGHED, AND HELD ON TO ONE ANOTHER
THE GOLDEN BIRD 17

go my own way just above here, but you must take good care your
brothers do not get hold of you.”

But when the prince came into the city, he thought it would
be too bad if he did not look in upon his brothers and have a word
with them, and so he tarried there for a while.

When the brothers saw him, they came out and took both the
damsel, and the horse, and the bird, and the linden-tree, and every-
thing from him, and they put him in a barrel, and threw him into
the sea; and so they set off home to the king’s palace, with the
damsel, and the horse, and the bird, and the linden-tree, and every-
thing. But the damsel would not speak, and she became pale and
wretched to look upon; the horse got so thin and miserable that
it could hardly hang together; the bird became silent and shone
no more, and the linden-tree withered.

In the meantime: the fox was sneaking about outside the
city, where the inn and the merriment were, and was waiting
for the prince and the damsel, and wondered why they did not
return.

He went hither and thither, waiting and watching for them,
and at last he came down to the shore, and when he saw the
barrel, which was lying out at sea drifting, he shouted: ‘‘ Why are
you drifting about there, you empty barrel?”

‘Oh, it is I,” said the prince in the barrel.

The fox them swam out to sea as fast as he could, got hold of
the barrel, and towed it to land; then he began to gnaw the hoops,
and when he had got some off the barrel, he said to the prince:
“ Stamp and kick.”

The prince stamped and kicked till all the staves flew about,
and out he jumped from the barrel.

So they went together to the king’s palace, and when they got
there the damsel regained her beauty and began to talk, the horse
became so fat and sleek that every hair glistened; the light shone
from the bird and it began to sing; the linden-tree began to blossom
and its leaves to sparkle, and the damsel said, ‘‘ He is the one who
has saved us.”

B
18 THE GOLDEN BIRD

They planted the linden-tree in the garden, and the youngest
prince was to marry the princess, for such the damsel really was ;
but the two eldest brothers were put each in a spiked barrel and

rolled down a high mountain.
Then they began to prepare for the wedding, but the fox first



THE TWO ELDEST BROTHERS WERE PUT EACH IN A SPIKED BARREL
AND ROLLED DOWN A MOUNTAIN

asked the prince to put him on the block and cut his head off, and
although the prince both prayed and cried, there was no help for
it; he would have to doit. But as he cut the head off, the fox
THE GOLDEN BIRD 19

turned into a handsome prince, and he was the brother of the
princess, whom they had rescued from the troll.
So the wedding came off and everything was so grand and

splendid, that the news of the festivities reached all the way
here.






> ¢
sae

THE FOX AS HERDSBOY

THERE was once upon a time a woman, who went out to look for
a herdsboy, and so she met a bear.

“Where are you going?” said the bear.

‘Oh, I’m looking for a herdsboy,” answered the woman.

“Won't you take me?” asked the bear.

“Well, if you only knew how to call the flock,” said the
wife. ‘‘Ho-y!” shouted the bear.

“No, I won’t have you!” said the woman, when she heard
this, and went on her way.

When she had gone on a while, she met a wolf.

“Where are you going?” said the wolf.

“T am looking for a herdsboy,” said the woman.

“Won't you take me?” said the wolf.
THE Fox As HERDSBOY 21

“Well, if you only knew how to call the flock,” said the
woman. ‘ U-g-h!” howled the wolf.

“No, I won’t have you,” said the woman.

When she had gone a bit further, she met a fox.

‘Where are you going?” said the fox.

‘Oh, I’m looking for a herdsboy,” said the woman.

‘“Won’t you take me?” asked the fox.

‘* Well, if you only knew how to call the flock,” said the woman.

“Dil-dal-holom !” called the fox in a thin, squeaky voice.

“Yes, I'll take you for a herdsboy,” said the woman ; and so she
put the fox to look after her flocks. On the first day he ate up all
the goats belonging to the woman; the second day he finished all
her sheep, and the third day he ate all the cows. When he came
home in the evening, the woman asked what he had done with all
the flocks.

“The skulls are in the brook and the bones in the wood,”
said the fox.

The woman was busy churning, but she thought she might as
well go and look for her flocks. While she was away, the fox
slipped into the churn and ate all the cream. When the woman
came back and saw this, she became so angry, that she took a
small clot of cream, which was left, and threw it after the fox,
splashing the end of his tail with it, and that’s the reason why
the fox has a white tip to his tail!


ASHIEPATTLE* WHO ATE WITH
THE TROLL FOR A WAGER

THERE was once upon a time a peasant who had three sons. He
was badly off, and old and feeble, and the sons would not do any
work. .

To the farm belonged a large pine forest, and the father
wanted his sons to cut timber in it, and try to get some of his
debts paid off. At last he got them to listen to him, and the
eldest one was to go out first and fell trees. When he got into
the forest and began felling an old bearded pine, a great big troll
came up to him.

“Tf you cut down my trees, I’ll kill you!” said the troll.

When the lad heard this, he threw down the axe and set off
home as fast as he could. He got there quite out of breath, and
told what had happened to him, but the father said he was chicken-
hearted ; the trolls had never frightened him from felling trees
when he was young, he said.

The next day the second son was to go, and the same thing
happened to him. He had no sooner struck some blows at the
pine than the troll came and said:

“Tf you cut down my trees, I'll kill you!”

The lad hardly dared to look at him; he threw down the axe
and took to his heels, just like his brother, only rather quicker.

* The favourite hero of most Norwegian fairy tales is called Askeladen, a sort
of male Cinderella, and is always the youngest son of the family,
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ASHIEPATTLE WHO ATE WITH THE TROLL 25

-’ When he came home the father became angry, and said that
the trolls had never frightened him when he was young.

On the third day Ashiepattle wanted to set out.

“You indeed!” said the two eldest; “you'll never be able to
do anything, you who have never been outside the door!”

Ashiepattle did not answer, but only asked for plenty of food
to take with him. His mother had nothing ready, and so she put
on the pot and made a cheese for him, which he placed in his
scrip, and then set out from home. When he had been felling
trees awhile, the troll came to him and said:

“Tf you cut down my trees, I'll kill you!”

But the lad was not slow; he ran into the forest for the cheese
and squeezed it, so that the whey spurted from it.

“Tf you don’t be quiet,” he shouted to the troll, “I'll squeeze
you just as I squeeze the water out of this white stone.”

“Qh dear, oh dear! do spare me!” said the troll, “and [ll
help you.”

Well, on that condition the lad would spare him, and as the
troll was clever at felling trees, they cut them down by the dozen
during the day. Towards evening the troll said :

“You had better come home with me; it is nearer than to

your place.”
_ Well, the boy went home with him, and when they got there
the troll was to light the fire on the hearth, while the boy fetched
the water for the porridge. But the two iron buckets that were
there were so big and heavy he was not even able to move them.
So the boy said :

“Tt is hardly worth while to take these thimbles with me; I'll
go and fetch the whole well.”

“Oh dear, no!” said the troll, “I cannot lose my well; you
make the fire, and I'll fetch the water.”

When he came back with the water, they boiled a great big
cauldron of porridge.

“Tf it’s all the same to you,” said the lad, “I'll lay a wager I'll
eat more than you.”
26 ASHIEPATTLE WHO ATE WITH THE TROLL

‘All right,” said the troll, for he thought he could easily
manage that ; but the boy took his scrip without the troll seeing
it, and tied it in front of him, and managed to put more porridge
in the scrip than he ate himself. When the scrip was full he took
his. knife and cut a slit in it.

- The troll looked at him, but didn’t say anything. When they
had been eating a good while the troll put away his spoon, and
said:

“T can’t eat any more.”

“You must eat,” answered the lad. “I’m scarcely half-way
through. Do as I did, and cut a hole in your stomach, and then
you can eat as much as you like.”

“But I suppose it hurts one dreadfully ? ” asked the troll.

“Oh, nothing worth talking about,” answered the lad.

So the troll did as the lad told him, and as you will easily
understand, that was the end of him. But the lad took all the
silver and gold which was in the mountain, and went home. With
that he would be able to pay off something of his father’s debt.
THE QUERN AT THE BOTTOM
OF THE SEA




OncE upon a time in the old, old days
there were two brothers, one of whom
was rich and the other poor. When
Christmas Eve came the poor brother
had not a morsel in the house, neither
of meat nor bread; and so he went to
his rich brother, and asked for a trifle
for Christmas, in heaven’s name. It
was not the first time the brother had
helped him, but he was always very
close-fisted, and was not particularly
glad to see him this time.

“Tf you'll do what I tell you, you
shall have a whole ham,” he said. The

Mi

ttt
i Wie
i
28 THE QUERN AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA

poor brother promised he would, and was very grateful into the
bargain. 22

“There it is, and now go to the devil!” said the rich brother,
and threw the ham across to him.

“Well, what I have promised I must keep,” said the other one.
‘He took the ham, and set out. He walked and walked the whole
day, and as it was getting dark he came to a place where the
lights were shining brightly. “This is most likely the place,”
thought the man with the ham.

In the wood-shed stood an old man witha long white beard,
cutting firewood for Christmas.

“Good evening,” said he with the ham.

‘‘Good evening to you,” said the man. “Where are you
going so late?”

‘Tam going to the devil—that is to say, if I am on the right
way,” answered the poor man.

“Yes, you are quite right ; this is his place,” said the old man.
“When you get in, they will all want to buy your ham, for ham
is scarce food here; but you must not sell it unless you get the
hand-quern, which stands just behind the door. When you come
out again, I'll teach you how to use it. You will find it useful
in many ways.”

The man with the ham thanked him for all the information, '
and knocked at the door. fo in og a

When he got in, it happened just as the old man had said. ‘All
the imps, both big and small, flocked around him like ants in a
field, and the one outbid the other for the ham.: nin se

“Well,” said the man, “ my good woman and I were to have
it for Christmas Eve, but since you want it so badly I will let you
have it. But if I am going to part with it, I want that hand-quern
which stands behind the door.”

The devil did not like to part with it, and higgled and
haggled with the man, but he stuck to what he had said, and in
the end the devil had to part with the quern.

When the man came out, he asked the old wood-cutter how
THE QUERN AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA 29

he was to use the quern, and when he had learned this, he thanked
the old man and set out homewards as quickly as he could; but
after all he did not get home till the clock struck twelve on Christ-
mas Eve.

“Where in all the world have you been?” said his wife.
‘Here have I been sitting, hour after hour, waiting and watching
for you, and have not had as much as two chips to lay under the
porridge pot.”

“Well, I couldn’t get back before ;” said the man. “I have had
a good many things to look after, and I’ve had a long way to walk
as well; but now I'll show you something,” said he and put the quern
on the table. He asked it first to grind candles, then a cloth, and
then food and beer, and everything else that was good for Christmas
cheer ; and as he spoke the quern brought them forth. The woman
crossed herself time after time and wanted to know where her
husband had got the quern from; but this he would not tell her.

“Tt does not matter where I got it from; you see the quern is
good and the mill stream is not likely to freeze,” said the man. So he
ground food and drink and all good things during Christmas; and the
third day he invited his friends, as he wanted to give them a feast.
When the rich brother saw all that was in the house, he became
both angry and furious, for he begrudged his brother everything.

“On Christmas Eve he was so needy that he came to me
and asked for a trifle in heaven’s name; and now he gives a
feast, as if he were both a count and a king,” said the brother.
“Where did you get all your riches from ?” he said to his brother.

“From just behind the door,” he answered, for he did not care
to tell his brother much about it. But later in the evening, when
he had drank a little freely, he could no longer resist, but brought
out the quern.

“There you see that which has brought me all my riches,” he
said, and so he let the quern grind first one thing and then another.

When the brother saw this, he was determined to have the
quern at all cost, and at last it was settled he should have it, but
three hundred dollars was to be the price of it. The brother was
30 THE QUERN AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA

however, to keep it till the harvest began; “for if I keep it so -
long, I can grind out food for many years to come,” he thought.

During that time you may be sure the quern did not rust, and
when the harvest began the rich brother got it; but the other had
taken great care not to show him how to use it.

It was evening when the rich brother got the quern home, and
in the morning he asked his wife to go out and help the hay-
makers ; he would get the breakfast ready himself to-day, he said.

When it was near breakfast time he put the quern on the
breakfast table.

“Grind herrings and broth, and do it quickly and well,” said
the man, and the quern began to bring forth herrings and broth,
and filled first all the dishes and tubs, and afterwards began flood-
ing the whole kitchen.

The man fiddled and fumbled and tried to stop the quern, but
however much he twisted and fingered it, the quern went on
grinding, and in a little while the broth reached so high that the
man was very near drowning. He then pulled open the parlour
door, but it was not long before the quern had filled the parlour
also, and it was just in the very nick of time that the man put his
hand down into the broth and got hold of the latch, and when he
had got the door open, he was soon out of the parlour, you may be
sure. He rushed out, and the herrings and the broth came pouring
out after him, like a stream, down the fields and meadows.

The wife, who was out haymaking, now thought it took too
long a time to get the breakfast ready.

“If my husband doesn’t call us soon, we must go home whether
or no: I don’t suppose he knows much about making broth, so I
must go and help him,” said the wife to the haymakers.

They began walking homewards, but when they had got a bit
up the hill they met the stream of broth with the herrings tossing
about in it and the man himself running in front of it ail.

“J wish all of you had a hundred stomachs each!” shouted
the man; ‘‘but take care you don’t get drowned.” And he rushed
past them as if the Evil One was at his heels, down to where his






























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Zee





















































































































































































































































































































































THE MAN RUSHED OUT OF THE HOUSE, AND THE HERRINGS AND THE BROTH CAME POURING OUT
AFTER HIM LIKE A STREAM
THE QUERN AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA 33

brother lived. He asked him for heaven's sake to take back the
quern, and that at once; ‘If it goes on grinding another hour the
whole parish will perish in broth and herrings,” he said. But the
brother would not take it back on any account before his brother
had paid him three hundred dollars more, and this he had to do.
The poor brother now had plenty of money, and before long he
bought a farm much grander than the one on which his rich
brother lived, and with the quern he ground so much gold that he
covered the farmstead with gold plates and, as it lay close to the
shore, it glittered and shone far out at sea. All those who sailed
past wanted to call and visit the rich man in the golden house, and
everybody wanted to see the wonderful quern, for its fame had
spread both far and wide, and there was no one who had not
heard it spoken of.

After along while there came a skipper who wanted to see the
quern; he asked if it could grind salt. Yes, that it could, said he who
owned it; and when the skipper heard this he wanted the quern
by hook or by crook, cost what it might, for if he had it he thought
he need not sail far away across dangerous seas for cargoes of salt.

At first the man did not want to part with it, but the skipper
both begged and prayed, and at. last he sold it and got many,
many thousand dollars for it.

As soon as the skipper had got the quern on his back he did
not stop long, for he was afraid the man would change his mind,
and as for asking how to use it he had no time to do that ; he made
for his ship as quickly as he could, and when he had got out to sea
a bit he had the quern brought up on deck.

“Grind salt, and that both quickly and well,” said the skipper,
and the quern began to grind out salt so that it spurted to all sides.

When the skipper had got the ship filled he wanted to stop the
quern, but however much he tried and whatever he did the quern
went on grinding, and the mound of salt grew higher and higher,
and at last the ship sank.

There at the bottom of the sea stands the quern grinding till
this very day, and that is the reason why the sea is salt.

c


LITTLE BUTTERKIN

ONcE upon a time there was'a woman who was sitting baking.
She had a little boy who was so fat and plump and who was so
fond of good food that she called him Butterkin. She also had a
dog called Goldtooth.

One day, all of a sudden, the dog began to bark.

“Run out, Butterkin!” said the woman, “and see what
Goldtooth is barking at.”

So the boy ran out and came back, saying :

‘‘Oh, mother, mother! There’s a great big troll-wife coming
here, with her head under her arm and a bag on her back.”
LITTLE BUTTERKIN . 35

“Run under the table and hide yourself,” said his mother.

The big troll-wife then came in.

“Good day!” she said.

“Good day to you!” said Butterkin’s mother.

“Ts Butterkin at home to-day?” asked the troll-wife.

“No, he is in the forest with his father, after the ptarmigan,”
answered the woman.

“That's a pity,” said the troll; “for I have such a nice little
silver knife I wanted to give him.”

“Peep, peep, here I am,” said Butterkin under the table, and
crept out.

“Tam so old and stiff in my back,” said the troll, “you must
get into the bag and find it yourself.”

No sooner was Butterkin in the bag than the troll threw it across
her back and walked off with him. When they had gone a bit on
the way the troll got tired and asked :

“How far have I to go before I can lie down and sleep?”

“ About a mile,” answered Butterkin. The troll then put
down the bag by the roadside and went in among the bushes by
herself and lay down to sleep. In the meantime Butterkin took
the opportunity, pulled out his knife, cut a hole in the bag and
jumped out; he then put a big root of a fir-tree in his place
and ran home to his mother. When the troll-wife reached
home and saw what she had in the bag she flew into a great
rage.

The next day the woman sat baking again. All at once the
dog began to bark. :

“ Run out, Butterkin,” said she, ‘and see what Goldtooth is
barking at.”

“Oh, mother, mother! It’s that terrible old troll!” said
Butterkin. ‘‘ Here she is again, with her head under her arm and
a big bag on her back.”

‘Run under the table and hide yourself,” said his mother.

““Good-day !” said the troll-wife. ‘“Is Butterkin at home
to-day ?”
36 LITTLE BUTTERKIN

“No, indeed he is not,” said his mother; ‘he is out in the
forest with his father, after the ptarmigan.”

“That's a pity!” said the troll; ‘ for I have such a nice little
silver fork I wanted to give him.”

“Peep, peep! Here I am!” said Butterkin, and crept out.

‘‘T am so stiff in my back,” said the troll, “ you must get into
the bag and find it yourself.”

No sooner was Butterkin in the bag than the troll threw it
across her back and walked off with him. When they had gone
a good bit on the way the troll got tired and asked:

“‘ How far have I to go before I can lie down and sleep?”

“ About two miles,” answered Butterkin. The troll then put
down the bag by the roadside and went into the wood and lay
down to sleep. While the troll-wife took her nap, Butterkin cut
a hole in the bag, and when he had got out he put a big stone in
his place. As soon as the troll-wife reached home she lighted a
great fire in the hearth and put on a large cauldron in which to
boil Butterkin, but when she took the bag to empty Butterkin into
the cauldron, the stone fell out, and knocked a hole in the bottom
of the cauldron, so the water rushed out and put out the fire. The
troll then became very angry and said :

“Let him make himself ever so heavy, I'll be even with him
yet.”

The third time it happened just as before; Goldtooth began to
bark and so the mother said to Butterkin :

“Run out, Butterkin, and see what Goldtooth is barking
at.”

Butterkin then ran out and came back saying:

“Oh, mother, mother! It’s that troll again, with her head
under her arm and a bag on her back.”

“Run under the table and hide yourself,” said the mother.

“Good day!” said the troll, as she came in through the door.
“Ts Butterkin home to-day ?”

“No, indeed he is not,” said his mother; “he is in the forest
with his father, after the ptarmigan.”
LITTLE BUTTERKIN 37

“That’s a pity!” said the troll-wife, ‘for I have such a nice
little silver spoon I wanted to give him.”

“Peep, peep! Here 1am!” said Butterkin and crept out from
under the table.

“Tam so stiff in my back,” said the troll, “you must get into
the bag and find it yourself.”

No sooner had Butterkin got into the bag than the troll threw
it across her back and walked away with it.

This time the troll-wife did not lie down and sleep, but went
straight home with Butterkin in the bag. It was a Sunday when
they got home, and so the troll said to her daughter :

“Now you must take Butterkin and kill him and make broth of
him, till I come back again, for I am going to church, and shall ask
some friends for dinner.”

When she was gone, the daughter went to take Butterkin to
kill him, but she did not quite know how to set about it.

“Wait a bit! I'll show you how to do it!” said Butterkin ;
‘just put your head on the block and see how it’s done.”

She did so, poor silly thing, and Butterkin took the axe and
cut off her head, just as if it had been that of a chicken; he then
put the head in the bed and the body in the cauldron, and made
broth of the daughter, and when he had done this he climbed up
on the roof, just over the door, taking with him the fir-root and
the stone, and put the first over the door and the other across the
top of the chimney.

When the people came home from church and saw the head in
the bed, they thought that the daughter had lain down and was
asleep, so they thought they would taste the broth.

“This Butterkin-broth tastes nice!” said the troll-wife.

“This daughter-broth tastes nice!” said Butterkin, but they
took no heed.

The troll-wife then took the spoon to taste the broth.

“This Butterkin-broth tastes nice,” she said.

“This daughter-broth tastes nice,” said Butterkin down the
chimney.
38 LITTLE BUTTERKIN

They then began to wonder who it could be, and went out to
see. But when they came outside the door, Butterkin threw the
fir-root and stone at their heads and killed them all on the spot.
He then took all the gold and silver that was in the house, and
you may imagine how rich he became; and so he went home to
his mother.
THE CONTRARY WOMAN

THERE was once upon a time a man who had a wife, and she was
so contrary and cross-grained that it was not an easy thing at all
to get on with her. The husband fared worst of all ; whatever he
was for, she was always against.
So it happened one Sunday in summer that the man and the
woman went out to see how the crops looked.
When they came to a corn-field on the other side of the river
the man said:
“It’s ready for reaping ; to-morrow we must begin.”
“Yes, to-morrow we can begin and clip it,”
woman.
“What is it you say? Are we going to clip it? Are we
supposed not to reap corn any longer ?” said the man.
“No, it must be clipped,” said the woman.
“There is nothing so dangerous as a little knowledge,” said
the man ; ‘one would think you had lost what little sense you had!
Have you ever seen anybody clipping corn ?” said he.

said the
40 THE CONTRARY WOMAN

“Little I know, and less I want to know,” said the woman ;
“but this I do know, that the corn shall be clipped and not
reaped.” There was no use talking any more about that; clipped
it should be.

So they walked on wrangling and quarrelling, till they came to
the bridge across the river, close to a deep pool.

“There’s an old saying,” said the man, “that good tools make
good work; | fancy that’ll be a queer harvest which is cut with a
pair of shears,” said he. ‘Shall we not settle to reap the corn,
after all?”

“No, no! it must be clipped, clipped, clipped!” shouted the
woman jumping up and clipping her fingers under the man’s
nose.

In her passion she forgot to look where she was going, and
all at once she stumbied over one of the beams on the bridge and
fell into the river.

“Old habits are hard to change,” thought the man, “ but it
would be a wonder if J, for once, got my way.”

He waded out into the pool and got hold of her by the hair,
till her head was just out of the water.

“Shall we reap the corn then?” he said.

“Clip, clip, clip!” screamed the woman.

“Tl teach you to clip,” thought the man, and ducked her
under the water. But that wasn’t of much use; ‘they must clip
it,” she said, ashe brought her to the surface again.

“T do believe the woman is crazy,” said the man to himself;
“many are mad and don’t know it, and many have. sense
and don’t use it; but I must try once more, anyhow,” said
he. But no sooner had he ducked her under again than she
held her hand above the water and began to clip with her
fingers, like a pair of shears. Then the man got furious and
kept her under so long that her hand all of a sudden feil under
water, and the woman became so heavy that he had to let go
his hold.


= =

“NO, NO! IT MUST BE CLIPPED, CLIPPED, CLIPPED!"’ SHOUTED THE
WOMAN, CLIPPING HER FINGERS UNDER THE MAN'S NOSE
THE CONTRARY WOMAN 43

“If you want to drag me down into the pool with you, you
may lie there, you wretch!” said the man. And so the woman
was drowned.

But after a while he thought it wasn’t right that she should lie
there and not be buried in Christian soil, so he went along the
river and searched and dragged for her; but for all his searching























SHE HELD HER HAND ABOVE THE WATER AND BEGAN TO CLIP WITH HER
FINGERS, LIKE A PAIR OF SHEARS

and all his dragging he could not find her. He took the people on
the farm and others in the neighbourhood with him, and they
began dragging the river all the way down; but for all the search-
ing they could not find the woman.

“Well,” said the man, ‘‘this is not much use! This woman
was a sort by herself; while she was alive she was altogether a
contrary one, and it is not likely she’ll be different now,” he said,
THE CONTRARY WOMAN

“we must search up the river for her, and try above the fall;

perhaps she has floated upwards.”

So they went up the river and searched and dragged for her

That shows what

above the fall, and there, sure enough, she lay.

a contrary woman she was !



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TAB WOODPECKER




TWA

In those days when the saints used to wander
about on earth, St. Peter once came to a woman
who was sitting baking oatcakes. Her name
was Gertrude, and she had a red cap on her
head.

As St. Peter had been walking a long dis-
tance and was hungry, he asked her for a bit of
her cake. Yes, he might have some, and she took a tiny lump of
dough and began to roll it out; but it became so big that it filled
the whole of the board. No, that cake was too big, he shouldn't
have that one.

She then took a still smaller lump of dough, but when she had
rolled it out and put it on the slab to bake, that one also became
too big. He shouldn’t have that one either.

The third time she took a still smaller lump, a tiny little one ;
but this time also the cake became too big.
46 THE WOODPECKER

“T have nothing to give you,” said the woman; “you may as
well go without your bit, for all the cakes are too big.”

Then St. Peter became angry and said: ‘Because you be-
grudge me such a trifle you shall be punished, and you shall
become a bird and seek your food between the bark and the wood
and have nothing to drink except when it rains.”

He had no sooner said the last word than she became a wood-
pecker and flew from the hearth up the chimney. To this day
you can see her flying about with her red cap on and her body all
over black from the chimney. She is always tapping and pecking
at the trees for food, and piping when it is going to rain, for she is
always thirsty and is then waiting for water.
THE MAN’S DAUGHTER AND THE
WOMAN’S DAUGHTER

Once upon a time there were a man and a woman who got married ;
they had each a daughter. The woman’s daughter was lazy and
idle and would never do any work, and the man’s daughter was
active and willing, but for all that, she could never please the step-
mother, and both the woman and her daughter would have liked
to get rid of her.

One day they were sitting by the well spinning ; the woman’s
daughter had flax to spin, but the man’s daughter had nothing else
but bristles.

“You are always so clever and smart,” said the woman’s
daughter, “ but still I’m not afraid to try and see who can spin the
most.”

They agreed, that the one whose thread first broke, should be
put into the well.

All at once the man’s daughter’s thread broke, so she was put
into the well. But when she came to the bottom she found she
was not hurt; and far and wide around she saw nothing but a
beautiful green meadow.

She walked for some time in the meadow, till she came to a
hedge which she had to climb over.

“Do not step heavily on me,” said the hedge, “and I'll help you
48 THE MAN’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER

another time.” She made herself as light as a feather and stepped
over so carefully that she scarcely touched it.

So she went on a bit farther, till she came to a brindled cow,
which had a milk pail on her horns ; it was a fine large cow, and
her udder was round and full of milk.

‘Please do milk me,” said the cow, “ for I am so full of milk;
drink as much as you like and pour the rest over my hoofs, and I’ll
help you some other time.”

The man’s daughter did as the cow had asked her; the moment
she took hold of the teats the milk squirted into the pail, then she
drank as much as she could and the rest she poured over the cow’s
hoofs, and the pail she hung on the horns again.

When she had gone a bit further she met a large ram, which
had such long thick wool that it trailed along the ground, and on
one of his horns hung a large pair of shears.

“Please do shear me,” said the ram, “ for here I have to go
about panting with all this wool, and it is so warm I am almost
stifled. Take as much wool as you like and twist the rest round
my neck, and I'll help you another time.”

She was quite willing, and the ram lay down in her lap; he was
so quiet and she sheared him so neatly, that she did not make a
single scratch in his skin. She then took as much as she wanted
of the wool, and the rest she twisted round the ram’s neck.

A little further on she came to an apple-tree, which was so
laden with apples that all the branches were bent to the ground.
Close to the trunk stood a small pole.

“Please do pluck some of my apples,” said the tree, ‘so that
my branches can straighten themselves, for it is quite painful to
stand so crooked, but be sure and strike me gently and lightly, so
that you do not injure me. Eat as many as you like and place the
rest around my root, and I’ll help you some other time.”

So she plucked all she could reach, and then she took the pole
and carefully knocked down all the other apples ; she ate till she
was satisfied, and the rest she placed neatly round the root.

Then she walked on a long, long way, till she came to a large
—

SS
SS:

NTED























N TO THE TROLL-WIFE AND ASKED IF THEY WA

NT I

SHE WE

ANT MAID

A SERV
THE MAN’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER 51

farm, where a troll-wife and her daughter lived. She went in and
asked if they wanted a serving maid.

“Oh, it’s no use,” said the troll-wife, “we have tried many,
but none of them were good for anything.” But she begged so
hard, that at last they took her into service; and the troll-wife
gave her a sieve and told her to fetch some water in it. She
thought it was rather unreasonable that they should ask her to
fetch water in a sieve, but she went all the same, and when she
came to the well the little birds were singing:

“ Rub in clay!
Put in hay !
Rub in clay!
Put in hay!"

She did so and was then able to carry the water in the sieve
easily enough, but when she came home with the water and the
troll-wife saw the sieve, she said:

“You have not done that by yourself.”

The troll-wife then told her to go into the cow-house and clean
it out and then milk the cows; but when she came there she found
that the shovel was so big and heavy she could not use it, she
could not even lift it. She did not know what to do, but the birds
sang to her that she should take the handle of the besom and
throw a little out with it and then all the rest would follow.

She did this and no sooner had she done it than the cow-
house was as clean as if it had been cleaned and swept. She had
next to milk the cows, but they were so restless and kicked and
plunged so that she could not get any milking done at all. Then
she heard the birds singing outside :

‘CA little squirt !

A little sip!
To little birds!"

She squirted a little milk out to the birds and then all the cows
stood still and let her milk them; they neither kicked nor plunged,
they did not even lift a leg.
52 THE MAn’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER

When the troll-wife saw her coming in with the milk she
said :

“You have not done this by yourself. Now you must take
this black wool and wash it white.”

The girl did not know how she should get this done, for she
had never seen any one who could wash black wool white. But
she said nothing, she took the wool and went to the well with it.
The little birds sang to her that she should take the wool and put
it in the big bucket that was standing near the well, and it would
become white.

“Oh dear, oh dear!” said the troll-wife, when the girl came in
with the wool. ‘It’s no use keeping you, you can do everything ;
you will worry the life out of me in the end, it is better you should
go your way.”

The troll-wife then brought out three caskets, a red, a green,
and a blue one, and the girl might take whichever she liked, and
that was to be her wages. She did not know which one to take,
but the little birds sang:

“Take not the green !
Take not the red !
But take the blue !

On which we’ve put
Three little crosses!”

She then took the blue one, as the birds had told her.

“A curse upon you,” said the troll-wife, “you will be sure to
suffer for this.” .

When the man’s daughter was going the troll-wife threw a
red-hot iron bar after her, but the girl ran behind the door and
hid herself, so the bar missed her, for the little birds had told her
what to do.

She set off as quickly as she could; but when she came to the
apple tree she heard a rumbling noise behind her on the road; it
was the troll-wife and her daughter, who were after her. The
girl got so frightened she did not know what to do with herself.

‘Come here to me,” said the apple-tree, ‘and I’ll help you.
THE MAN’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER 53

Hide yourself under my branches, for if they get hold of you,
they will take the casket from you and tear you to pieces.” The
girl did so, and just then up came the troll-wife and her daughter.

“Have you seen any girl go past here?” said the troll-wife.

“Oh, yes,” said the tree, ‘fone ran past awhile ago; but she
is now so far away you'll never overtake her.”

The troll-wife then turned about and set off home.

The girl walked on a bit; but when she came to the ram, she
heard the rumbling noise again on the road, and she became so
frightened and terrified, that she did not know what to do with
herself; for she knew it was the troll-wife who had changed her
mind.

“Come here and I'll help you,” said the ram. ‘ Hide yourself
under my wool and they won’t see you; or else they'll take the
casket from you and tear you to pieces.”

All at once the troll-wife came rushing up.

“Have you seen a girl go past here ?” she asked the ram.

‘Oh, yes,” said the ram, ‘I saw one a while ago, but she ran
so fast that you will never overtake her.” So the troll-wife turned
round and went home.

When the girl had got as far as the cow, she heard the
rumbling noise again on the road.

“Come here,” said the cow, “and I'll help you; hide yourself
under my udder, or else the troll-wife will take the casket from
you, and tear you to pieces.” Before long she came.

‘Have you seen any girl go past here?” said the troll-wife to
the cow.

“Yes, I saw one a while ago, but she is far away now, for she
was running so fast that you will never overtake her,” said the
cow. The troll-wife then turned round and went home again.

When the girl had got a long long bit on the way and was not
far from the hedge, she heard the noise again on the road; she
became terribly frightened, for she knew it was the troll-wife who
had come back again.

“Come here and I'll help you,” said the hedge, “creep in
54 THE MAN’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER

among my twigs, and they won’t see you; or else they will take
the casket from you and tear you to pieces.” She made haste to
hide herself among the twigs of the hedge.

“Have you seen any girl go past here?” said the troll-wife to
the hedge. :

“No, I have not seen any girl,” said the hedge, and it became
so angry you could hear it crackle. Then it made itself so big, it
was no use trying to get over it. There was no help for it; the
troll-wife had to turn round and go home again.

When the man’s daughter got home both the woman and her
daughter were still more spiteful than they had been before; for
now she was still more beautiful, and so grand, that it was a
pleasure to look at her. She was not allowed to stop with them,
but they sent her to the pig-sty, where she was to live. She
then began to wash and clean out the place, and then she opened
her casket to see what she had got for wages; when she opened
it she found there was so much gold and silver, and so many
beautiful things in it, that both the walls and roof were covered,
and the pig-sty became more magnificent than the finest palace.

When the step-mother and the daughter saw this they were
quite beside themselves, and began to ask her what sort of service
she had been in.

“Qh,” she said, “ you can easily guess since I have had such
wages. Such a mistress to work for, and such people you will
not easily find!”

The woman’s daughter then wanted to set out and go into
service, so that she also might get such a golden casket.

They then sat down to spin again; but this time the woman’s
daughter was to spin bristles, and the man’s daughter flax, and
the one who first broke the thread would be put into the well.

Before long the woman’s daughter broke her thread, as you
may guess, and so they threw her into the well.

Everything happened as before; she fell to the bottom, but
did not hurt herself, and then she came to a beautiful green
meadow. When she had walked a bit she came to the hedga
THE MAN’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER 55

‘‘Do not step heavily on me, and I will help you another time,”
said the hedge.

“Oh, what do I care about a lot of twigs,” she said, and trod
heavily on the hedge, so that it groaned.

In a little while she came to the cow, which wanted milking
again.

“Please do milk me,” said the cow, “and 1 will help you
another time; drink as much as you like, and pour the rest over
my hoofs.”

This she did ; she milked the cow, and drank as long as she
was able, till there was nothing left to pour over the hoofs. She
then threw the pail down the hill and went her way. When she
had gone a bit further she came to the ram, which was going
about trailing his wool along the ground.

“Do shear me, and I'll help you another time,” said the ram ;
“take as much of the wool as you like, but twist the rest around
my neck.” She did this, but sheared the ram so roughly that she
made big gashes in his skin; and then she took all the wool away
with her.

In a little while she came to the apple-tree, which was quite
bent down under the weight of its apples.

“Please do pluck my apples, so that my branches can straighten
themselves, for it is painful to stand so crooked,” said the apple-
tree, ‘‘ but be careful not to injure me; eat as many as you like,
but place the rest at my root, and I'll help you another time.”

She plucked some of the nearest, and those she could not
reach she knocked down with the pole ; but she did not care how
she did it. She tore down large branches, and ate till she was
unable to eat any more; and then she threw the rest under the
tree.

When she had walked a little way she came to the farm, where
the troll-wife lived, and asked to be taken into service. The troll-
wife said she would not have any servant girl, for either they
were good for nothing or else they were far too clever, and cheated
her of what she had. The woman’s daughter did not give in, but
56 THE MAn’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER

said she must have a place; and then the troll-wife said she would
take her, if she was good for anything.

The first thing she got to do was to fetch water in the sieve.
She went to the well and poured water into the sieve, but as fast
as she poured it in it ran out. ‘The birds then sang:

“ Rub in clay !
Put in hay!
Rub in clay!
Put in hay!”

But she didn’t take any notice of what the bird’s sang; she
threw the clay at them, so that they flew away, and she had to go
back with an empty sieve, and got scolded by the troll-wife. She
was then to clean out the cow-house and milk the cows, but she
thought she was too good for that. She went into the cow-house,
however ; and when she got there she found she could not use the
shovel; it was so big. The birds said the same to her as to the
man’s daughter-—that she should take the besom and sweep out
the litter, and all the rest would follow; but she took the besom
and threw it at the birds. When she was going to milk the
cows they were so restless that they kicked and plunged, and
every time she had got a little in the pail they kicked it over.
The birds sang:

‘A little squirt !

A little sip !

For little birds!”
But she struck and beat the cows, flung and threw everything
she could get hold of at the birds, and carried on in a way that
was never heard of. She had not, of course, cleaned the cow-
house or milked the cows, so when she came in she got both blows
and scolding from the troll-wife. She was then to wash the
black wool white, but she did not fare any better with that.
The troll-wife thought this was too bad, and so she brought out
three caskets—one red, one green, and one blue—and told her
she had no use for her, as she was fit for nothing; but she
should have a casket all the same for her wages, and could
choose which she liked best. Then the birds sang:
THE MAN’s DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN’S DAUGHTER 57

“ Take not the green!
Take not the red!
But take the blue!
Which we have put
Three crosses on!”

She did not take any notice of what the birds sang, but took
the red one, which was the gaudiest. So she set out on her
way home, and got there without any trouble, for there was no
one in pursuit of her.

When she got home the mother was greatly rejoiced to see
her, and they went at once into the parlour and placed the
casket there, for they thought there was nothing but gold and
silver in it, and they believed that both the walls and the roof
would be covered with gold. But as soon as they opened the
casket there swarmed out of it vipers and toads, and when the
daughter opened her mouth it was just the same; vipers and
toads and all sorts of vermin fell out, till at last it was impos-
sible to live in the same house with her. And that was all she
got for serving the troll-wife!

‘“TAKE NOT THE GREEN!

TAKE NOT THE RED!
BUT TAKE THE BLUE!
WHICH WE HAVE PUT
THREE CROSSES ON!”



OS)

FY MERYENGSE
THE HARE WHO HAD BEEN
MARRIED

Once upon a time a hare was running and frisking about in a
cornfield.

“ Hurray! hurrah! hurray!” he shouted, as he jumped and
skipped along.

All of a sudden he turned a somersault, and found himself
standing on his hind legs in a new-sown cornfield.

Just then a fox came slinking by.

“Good day, good day to you!” said the hare. ‘TI feel so jolly
to-day, for I have been married, you must know!”

“That’s a good thing for you,” said the fox.

“Oh, I don’t know so much about that,” said the hare, “ for
she was rather a cross-grained creature, and she turned out a
regular scold of a wife, she did.”

“That was a bad thing for you,” said the fox.

“Oh, it wasn’t so bad,” said the hare, “for I got a lot of money
with her, and she had a house of her own besides.”

“That was a very good thing indeed,” said the fox.

“Qh, I don’t know so much about that,” said the hare, “ for
the house got burnt down, and everything we had along with it.”

“That was really too bad,” said the fox.

“Oh, not so very bad after all,” said the hare, “for that cross-
grained wife of mine was burnt as well.”



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‘'44URRAY | HURRAH! HURRAY!" SHOUTED THE HARE, AS HE JUMPED AND SKIPPED ALONG


THE SOUIRE Se BRIDE

Once upon atime there was a rich squire who owned a large
farm, and had plenty of silver at the bottom of his chest and
money in the bank besides; but he felt there was something
wanting, for he was a widower.

One day the daughter of a neighbouring farmer was working
for him in the hayfield. The squire saw her and liked her very
much, and as she was the child of poor parents he thought, if
he only hinted that he wanted her, she would be ready to marry
him at once.

So he told her he had been thinking of getting married again.
62 THE SQUIRE'S BRIDE

“Ay! one may think of many things,” said the girl, laughing
slyly. In her opinion the old fellow ought to be thinking of
something that behoved him better than getting married.

“Well, you see, I thought that you should be my wife!”

“No, thank you all the same,” said she, “that’s not at all
likely.”

The squire was not accustomed to be gainsaid, and the more
she refused him the more determined he was to get her.

But as he made no progress in her favour, he sent for her
father and told him that if he could arrange the matter with his
daughter he would forgive him the money he had lent him, and
he would also give him the piece of land which lay close to his
meadow into the bargain.

““Yes, you may be sure I'll bring my daughter to her senses,”
said the father. ‘She is only a child, and she doesn’t know
what’s best for her.” But all his coaxing and talking did not
help matters. She would not have the squire, she said, if he
sat buried in gold up to his ears.

The squire waited day after day, but at last he became so
angry and impatient that he told the father, if he expected him to
stand bv his promise, he would have to put his foot down and
settle the matter now, for he would not wait any longer.

The man knew no other way out of it, but to let the squire get
everything ready for the wedding ; and when the parson and the
wedding guests had arrived the squire should send for the girl as if
she were wanted for some work on the farm. When she arrived
she would have to be married right away, so that she would have
no time to think it over.

The squire thought this was well and good and so he began
brewing and baking and getting ready for the wedding in grand
style. When the guests had arrived the squire called one of his
farm lads and told him to run down to his neighbour and ask him
to send him what he had promised.

“But if you are not back in a twinkling,” he said shaking his
fist at him, “ I’l]—— ”
THE SQUIRE’S BRIDE 63

He did not say more, for the lad ran off as if he had been
shot at.

‘“My master has sent me to ask for that you promised him,”
said the lad, when he got to the neighbour, “ but there is no time
to be lost, for he is terribly busy to-day.”

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THE BOY RODE HOME ON THE BAY MARE AT FULL GALLOP

‘Yes, yes! Run down into the meadow and take her with you.
There she goes!” answered the neighbour.

The lad ran off and when he came to the meadow he found
the daughter there raking the hay.

‘“‘T am to fetch what your father has promised my master,” said
the lad.
64. THE SQUIRE’S BRIDE

“Ah, ha!” thought she. ‘Is that what they are up to?”
“Ah, indeed!” she said. ‘I suppose it’s that little bay mare



























































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SOME PULLED AT THE HEAD AND THE FORE LEGS OF THE MARE AND
OTHERS PUSHED BEHIND

of ours. Youhad better go and take lier. She stands there tethered
on the other side of the pease-field,” said the girl.
THE SQUIRE’S BRIDE 65

The boy jumped on the back of the bay mare and rode home at
full gallop.

“Have you got her with you?” asked the squire.

“She is down at the door,” said the lad.

“Take her up to the room my mother had,” said the
squire.

“ But, master, how can that be managed?” said the lad.

“You must just do as I tell you,” said the squire. “If you
cannot manage her alone you must get the men to help you,” for
he thought the girl might turn obstreperous.

When the lad saw his master’s face he knew it would be no
use to gainsay him. So he went and got all the farm-tenants who
were there to helphim. Some pulled at the head and the fore legs
of the mare and others pushed from behind, and at last they got
her up the stairs and into the room. There lay all the wedding
finery ready.

“Now, that’s done, master!” said the lad; “but it was a
terrible job. It was the worst I have ever had here on the
farm.”

“Never mind, you shall not have done it for nothing,” said
his master. ‘Now send the women up to dress her.”

“But I say, master 1!” said the lad.

“ None of your talk!” said thesquire. ‘Tell them they must
dress her and mind and not forget either wreath or crown.”

The lad ran into the kitchen.

“Look here, lasses,” he said; “you must go upstairs and
dress up the bay mare as bride. I expect the master wants to
give the guests a laugh.”

The women dressed the bay mare in everything that was there,
and then the lad went and told his master that now she was ready
dressed, with wreath and crown and all.

“Very well, bring her down!” said the squire. “I will
receive her myself atthe door,” said he.

There was a terrible clatter on the stairs; for that bride, you
know, had no silken shoes on.


66 THE SQUIRE’S BRIDE

When the door was opened and the squire’s bride entered the
parlour you can imagine there was a good deal of tittering and
grinning.

And as for the squire you may be sure he had had enough of
that bride, and they say he never went courting again.


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THE DOOR OPENED AND THE SQUIRE'S BRIDE ENTERED THE PARLOUR
ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE

ONCE upon a time a man and a woman were going to sow, but they
had no seed-corn and no money to buy any with either. They
had only one cow and this the man was to go to town with and sell
to get money for the seed-corn.

But when the time came the wife would not let the man go, for
she was afraid he would spend the money on drink. So she set
off herself with the cow and took with her a hen as well.

Close to the town she met a butcher.

“‘ Are you going to sell that cow, mother ?” he asked.

“Yes, that I am,” she said.

“ How much do you want for it then ?”

“T suppose I must have a shilling for the cow, but the hen you
can have for two pounds,” she said.

“ Well,” said the butcher, ‘I haven’t any use for the hen, and
you can easily get rid of that when you get to the town, but I'll
give you a shilling for the cow.”

She sold the cow and got her shilling, but nobody in the town
would give two pounds fora tough, old hen. So she went back to
the butcher and said:

‘‘T can’t get rid of this hen, father. You'll have to take that
as well since you took the cow.”
70 ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE

“We'll soon settle that,” said the butcher, and asked her to sit
down. He gave her something to eat and so much brandy to
drink that she became tipsy and lost her wits. While she slept it
off the butcher dipped her into a barrel of tar and then put her in
a heap of feathers.

When she woke up she found that she was feathered all over
and she began to wonder: “Isitme?orisitnotme? It must be
a strange bird! But what shall I do to find out whether it is me,
or whether it is’nt me? Now I know—if the calves will lick me
and the dog doesn’t bark at me, when I get home, then it is me.”

The dog no sooner saw such a monster than it began barking
with all its might as if there were thieves and vagabonds about
the place.

“No, surely, it cannot be me,” she said.

When she came to the cowhouse the calves would not lick her,
because they smelt the tar.

“No, it cannot be me; it must bea strange bird,” she said ; and
then she climbed up on top of the storehouse and began to flap
with her arms as if she had wings and wanted to fly. When the
man saw this he came out with his rifle and took aim at her.

“Don’t shoot, don’t shoot,” cried his wife ; ‘it is me.”

“Ts it you?” said the man. ‘Then don’t stand there like a
goat, but come down and tell me what you have been about.”

She climbed down again, but found she had not a single penny
left, for the shilling she got from the butcher she had lost while
she was tipsy.

When the man heard this he said: ‘‘ You are more mad than
ever you were,” and he became so angry that he said he would
go away from everything and never come back if he did not find
three women who were just as mad.

He set out and when he had got a bit on the way he sawa
woman running in and out of a newly-built hut with an empty
sieve. Every time she ran in she threw her apron over the sieve,
as if she had something it, and then she turned it over on the
floor.










iw ps
AM lag =
1 RAPA

















T MEXDRKSEN

WHEN THE MAN SAW THE STRANGE FIGURE ON THE ROOF HE CAME OUT
WITH HIS RIFLE AND TOOK AIM AT IT
ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE 73

“What are you doing that for, mother ?” asked he.

“Oh, I only want to carry in a little sun,” she answered ; “ but
I don’t know how it is—when I am outside I have the sun in the
sieve, but when I get inside I have lost it. When I was in my old
hut I had plenty of sun, although I never carried in any. If any
one could get me some sun I'd willingly give him three hundred
dollars.”

“Have you an axe?” said the man, “and I'll soon get you
some sun.”

He got an axe and cut out the openings for the windows which
the carpenters had forgotten to do. The sun shone into the room
at once and he got his three hundred dollars.

‘That was one of them!” thought the man, and set out again.

In a while he came to a house where there was a terrible
screaming and shouting going on. He went in and saw a woman,
who was beating her husband on the head with a bat; and over
his head she had pulled a shirt in which there was no hole for the
neck.

“Do you want to kill your husband, mother?” he asked.

“No,” she said, “I only want to make a hole for the neck in
his shirt.”

The man moaned and groaned and said: ‘Oh dear, oh dear!
I pity those who have to try on new shirts. If any one could
teach my wife how to make the hole for the neck in a different way,
I'd willingly give him three hundred dollars.”

“T’ll soon do that,” said the man; “only let me have a pair of °
scissors.”

He got a pair and cut the hole, and then he took his money
and went his way.

“That was the second of them!” he said to himself.

After a long while he came to a farm, where he thought he
would rest awhile, so he went in.

‘Where do you come from ?” asked the woman.

‘“‘T come from Ringerige,” * answered the man.

* A district in the south of Norway.
74 ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE

“Oh dear, oh dear! are you from Himmerige ?* Then you
must know Peter, my second husband, poor soul!” said the
woman. She had been married three times; the first and the
last husbands were bad men, so she thought that the second, who
had been a good husband, was the only one likely to go to heaven.

“Yes, I know him well,” said the man.

“ How is it with him there ?” asked the woman.

“Oh, things are rather bad with him,” said the man. ‘He
knocks about from place to place, and has neither food nor clothes
to his back, and as for money

“Goodness gracious!” cried the woman,” there’s no need that
he should go about in such a plight—he that left so much behind
him. Here is a large loft full of clothes, which belonged to him, as
well as a big chest of money. If you'll take it all with you you
shall have the horse and trap to take it in; and he can keep both
horse and trap, so that he can drive about from place to place; for
he has no need to walk, I’m sure.”

The man got a whole cartload of clothes anda chest full of
bright silver dollars, and as much food and drink as he wanted.
When he had finished he got into the trap and drove off.

‘‘That’s the third of them!” he said to himself.

But the woman’s third husband was over in a field ploughing,
and when he saw a stranger driving off with the horse and trap,
he went home and asked his wife who it was who drove away with
the horse.

“Oh,” she said, ‘that was a man from heaven; he said that
Peter, my second, poor dear soul, is so badly off that he walks
about there from place to place, and has neither clothes nor money ;
so I sent him all his old clothes, which have been hanging here
ever since, and the old money chest with the silver dollars.”

The man understood at once what all this meant, and saddled
a horse and set off at full gallop.



* “ Himmerige,” the Norwegian word for ‘‘ heaven.’’ The similarity between
the two words ‘‘ Himmerige"’ and “‘ Ringerige”’ will easily explain the mistake
made by the woman.
ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE 75

Before long he was close behind the man in the trap; who
when he discovered he was pursued, drove the horse and trap
into a thick part of the wood, pulled a handful of hair out of the
horse’s tail, and sprang up a hill, where he tied the horse’s hair to
a birch-tree, and lay down onhis back under it, gaping and staring
up into the clouds.

“Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear!” he said, as if talking to himself,
when the woman’s third husband came riding up; “well, I’ve
never seen anything so wonderful! I’ve never seen the like
of it!”

The husband stopped and looked at him for a while and
wondered if the man was crazy, or what he was upto. At last
he asked him :

“What are you staring at?”

“Well, I never saw the like!” exclaimed the man. “I’ve just
seen some one driving straight into heaven, horse and all! There,
you see part of the horse’s tail hanging on the birch tree, and up
among the clouds you can see the horse.”

The husband looked up at the clouds and then at him and said:

“T don’t see anything but the horse-hair on the birch-tree.”

“No, of course you can’t see it, where you stand,” said the
man, “but come and lie down here and look straight up; you
must not take your eyes away from the clouds.”

While the husband lay staring into the sky till the water ran
from his eyes, the man jumped on the horse and set off, both with
that and the horse and trap.

When the husband heard the rumbling noise on the road, he
jumped up, but was so bewildered because the man had gone off
with his horses that he did not think of setting after him till it was
too late. He did not feel very proud, as you can imagine, when he
came home to his wife, and when she asked him what he had done
with the horse he said:

“Oh, I told the man he could take that with him as well to
Peter, for I did not think it was right that he should jolt about
in a trap up there ; now he can sell the trap and buy a carriage.”
76 ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE

“Oh, thank you for that! never did I think you were such a
kind husband,” said the woman.

When the man who had got the six hundred dollars and the
cartload of clothes and money, came home, he saw that all the
fields were ploughed and sown. The first thing he asked his wife
was, where she had got the seed-corn from.

“Oh,” said she, ‘I have always heard, that he who sows
something gets something. So I sowed the salt which the carrier
left here the other day, and if we only get rain soon, I think it
will grow up nicely.”

““Mad you are, and mad you'll be as long as you live,” said the
man; “but it doesn’t much matter, for the others are no better
than you.”
ONE’S OWN CHILDREN ARE ALWAYS
THE PRE PES








OncE upon a time a
man went out shoot-
ing in a forest, and
there he met a wood-
cock.

“Pray, don’t shoot
my children,” said
the woodcock.

“What are your
children like?” asked
the man.

“Mine are the
prettiest children in
the forest,” answered
the woodcock.
78 ONE’S OWN CHILDREN ARE ALWAYS THE PRETTIEST

‘IT suppose I mustn’t shoot them then,” said the man.

When he came back he carried in his hand a whole string of
young woodcocks which he had shot.

“Oh dear, oh dear! Why, you have shot my children after
all!” said the woodcock.

‘Are these yours?” said the man. ‘Why, I shot the
ugliest I could find.”
‘Yes, yes,” answered the woodcock; “but don’t you know

that every one thinks one’s own children the prettiest ?”


OLD FATHER BRUIN IN THE
WOLF-PIT

THERE was once upon a time a man who lived far away in the
wood. He had many sheep and goats, but he could never keep
the wolf away from them.

“Il be even with you yet, Master Greylegs,” he said at last,
and began to dig a pit for the wolf. When he had dug it deep
enough he placed a pole in the middle of the pit and on the top of
the pole he fixed a board, and on the board he put a little dog.
He then placed some twigs and branches across the pit, and on
top of all he sprinkled some snow, so that the wolf should not see
there was a trap underneath. When the night came the little dog
got tired of being there.

“‘ Bow-wow-wow !” it barked at the moon.

A fox just then came slinking along, and thought here was a
fine chance.- He made a spring and fell plump into the pit.

As the night wore on the little dog became so weary and
hungry that it began to whine and bark.
80 OLD FATHER BRUIN IN THE WOLF-PIT

“ Bow-wow-wow,” it barked.

All at once a wolf came slouching along. He thought here is
a fat little morsel, and sprang plump into the pit.

Early in the grey morning the North wind began to blow and
it became ‘so cold that the little dog shivered and trembled, and
was so weary and hungry.

“ Bow-wow-wow-wow,” it went on barking all the time.

A bear then came trudging along, and thought here was a nice
tit-bit early in the morning ; so he stepped out on the branches
and fell plump into the pit. ,

As the morning wore on there came an old beggarwoman who
was tramping about from place to place with a bag on her back.
When she saw the little dog standing there barking she thought
she would go and see if any animals had been caught in the trap
during the night. She went down on her knees and peered into
the pit.

“So you have been caught, Master Reynard, have you ?” she
said to the fox, for she saw him first; “serve you right, you old
hen-thief. And you are there too, are you, Master Greylegs ?” said
she to the wolf. ‘ Well, you have killed goats and sheep enough in
your time, and now you'll suffer for it and get what you deserve.
Hulloa, Father Bruin, are you in this nice little parlour too, you
old horse-thief ? We will cut you up and flay you, we will, and
your skull we will nail up on the cow-house,” shouted the woman
excitedly, and shook her fists at the bear; but just then her
bag slipped forward over her head, and the woman tumbled
plump into the pit. There they sat staring at one another, all
four of them, each in their corner—the fox in one, the wolf
in the other, the bear in the third, and the old woman in the
fourth.

When it became full daylight Reynard began to shake himself
and whisk about, for he thought he might as well try to get out;
but the old woman said:

“Can’t you sit quiet, you old roost-robber, and not go frisking
and trailing about in this way? Look at old Father Bruin; he
OLD FATHER BRUIN IN THE WOLF-PIT 81

sits as quiet as a parson in his study ;” for she thought she had
better make friends with the bear.

Then came the man who had set the trap for the wolf. First
of all he dragged up the old woman, and then he killed all the
animals ; he spared neither old Father Bruin, nor Greylegs, nor
Reynard, the hen-thief. The man thought he had made a good
haul that night.
THE DOLL IN THE GRASS

ONcE upon a time there was a king who had twelve sons. When
they were grown up he told them they must go out into the
world and find themselves wives, who must all be able to spin
and weave and make a shirt in one day, else he would not have
them for daughters-in-law. He gave each of his sons a horse
and a new suit of armour, and so they set out in the world to
look for wives.

‘When they had travelled a bit on the way they said they
would not take Ashiepattle with them, for he was good for
nothing. Ashiepattle must stop behind ; there was no help for
it. He did not know what he should do or which way he should
turn; he became so sad that he got off the horse and sat down on
the grass and began to cry.

When he had sat awhile, one of the tussocks among the grass
began to move, and out of it came a small white figure ; as it came
nearer, Ashiepattle saw that it was a beautiful little girl, but she
was so tiny, so very, very tiny.

She went up to him and asked him if he would come below
and pay a visit to the doll in the grass.

Yes, that he would; and so he did. When he came down
below, the doll in the grass was sitting in a chair dressed very
finely and looking still more beautiful. She asked Ashiepattle
where he was going and what was his errand.


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A SMALL WHITE FIGURE CAME OUT OF ONE OF THE TUSSOCKS AMONG THE GRASS
THE DOLL IN THE GRASS 85

He told her they were twelve brothers, and that the king had
given them each a horse and a suit of armour, and told them to go
out in the world and find themselves wives, but that they must all
be able to spin and weave and make a shirt in a day.

“If you can do that and will become my wife, I will not travel
any further,” said Ashiepattle to the doll in the grass.

Yes, that she would, and she set to work at once to get the
shirt spun, woven and made; but it was so tiny, so very, very
tiny, no bigger than—so !

Ashiepattle then returned home, taking the shirt with him;
but when he brought it out, he felt very shy because it was so
small. But the king said he could have her for all that, and you
can imagine how happy and joyful Ashiepattle became.

The road did not seem long to him, as he set out to fetch his
little sweetheart. When he came to the doll in the grass, he
wanted her to sit with him on his horse, but no, that she wouldn't ;
she said she would sit and drive in a silver spoon, and she had two
small white horses which would draw her. So they set out, he
on his horse and she in the silver spoon; and the horses which
drew her were two small white mice.

Ashiepattle always kept to one side of the road, for he was so
afraid he should ride over her; she was so very, very tiny.

When they had travelled a bit on the way, they came to a large
lake; there Ashiepattle’s horse took fright and shied over to the
other side of the road, and upset the spoon, so that the doll in the
grass fell into the water. Ashiepattle became very sad, for he did
not know how he should get her out again; but after a while a
merman brought her up. But now she had become just as big as
any other grown up being and was much more beautiful than she
was before. So he placed her in front of him on the horse and
rode home.

When Ashiepattle got there, all his brothers had also returned,
‘each with a sweetheart ; but they were so ugly and ill-favoured
and bad-tempered, that they had come to blows with their sweet-
hearts on their way home. On their heads they had hats which
86 THE DOLL IN THE GRASS

were painted with tar and soot, and this had run from their hats
down their faces, so that they were still uglier and more ill-
favoured to behold. _

When the brothers saw Ashiepattle’s sweetheart, they all
became envious of him, but the king was
so pleased with Ashiepattle and his
sweetheart, that he drove all the others
away, and so Ashiepattle was married
to the doll in the grass; and afterwards
they lived happy and comfortable for a
long, long while; and if they are not
dead, they must be still alive.







ARETE evr WWVELO «WBN TO DOV RE-
Pew DO: SAV EEE WiORED

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/ \ THERE was once upon a time

a hen, which flew up in an
oak-tree and perched there for
the night. Before long she
dreamt, that if she did not go
to Dovrefjeld, the world would
All of a
sudden she jumped down and
set out on the road.

When she had gone a bit
she met a cock.

“ Good-day, Cocky Locky !”
said the hen.

come to an end.
88 THE HEN WHICH WENT TO DOVREFJELD

“Good-day, Henny Penny! where are you going so early?”
said the cock.

‘Oh, I am going to Dovrefjeld, so that the world shan’t come
to an end,” said the hen.

‘“Who told you that, Henny Penny?” said the cock.

“T sat in the oak and dreamt it last night,” said the hen.

“T’ll go with you,” said the cock. So they went a long way,
till they met a duck.

“Good-day, Ducky Lucky!” said the cock.

“Good-day, Cocky Locky! where are you going so early?”
said the duck.

“Tam going to Dovrefjeld, so that the world shan’t come to
an end,” said the cock.

“Who told you that, Cocky Locky ? ”

“Henny Penny!” said the cock.

“Who told you that, Henny Penny ?” said the duck.

“T sat in the oak and dreamt it last night,” said the hen.

“Tl go with you!” said the duck. Sothey set off and walked
a bit, till they met a gander.

“ Good-day, Gandy Pandy!” said the duck.

“‘Good-day, Ducky Lucky!” said the gander. ‘Where are
you going so early?”

“Tam going to Dovrefjeld, so that the world shan’t come to
an end,” said the duck.

“Who told you that, Ducky Lucky ?” said the gander.

“Cocky Locky !”

““Who told you that, Cocky Locky?”

“Henny Penny!”

“ How do you know that, Henny Penny ?” said the gander.

“T sat in the oak and dreamt it last night, Gandy Pandy,”
said the hen.

“Tl go with you!” said the gander. When they had gone
on a bit, they met a fox.

“‘Good-day, Foxy Woxy!” said the gander.

“Good-day, Gandy Pandy!”
THE HEN WHICH WENT TO DOVREFJELD 89

“Where are you going, Foxy Woxy?”

‘Where are you going, Gandy Pandy?”

“Tm going to Dovrefjeld, so that the world shan’t come to an
end,” said the gander.

“Who told you that, Gandy Pandy ?” said the fox.

“ Ducky Lucky!”

“Who told you that, Ducky Lucky?”

“Cocky Locky!”

“Who told you that, Cocky Locky ?”

“Henny Penny!”

“How do you know that, Henny Penny?”

“T sat in the oak and dreamt last night that if we don’t
go to Dovrefjeld the world will come to an end,” said the
hen.

““Oh, nonsense!” said the fox, ‘the world won’t come to an
end if you don’t get there. No, come home with me to my den;
that’s much better, for there it is cosy and comfortable.”

So they followed the fox home to his den, and when they came
there, the fox put so much wood on the fire that they all became
sleepy ; the duck and the gander settled in a corner, but the cock
and the hen perched on a pole. As soon as the gander and the
duck were asleep the fox seized the gander and put it on the fire
and roasted it. The hen thought she smelt something burning,
she jumped up to a higher perch and said half asleep:

“Faugh! How it stinks here!”

“Oh, nonsense,” said the fox, “it is only the smoke coming
down the chimney; go to sleep and shut your mouth.” So the
hen went to sleep. No sooner had the fox eaten the gander than
he seized the duck ; he took it and put it on the fire and roasted
it and then set about to eat it. The hen then woke up again and
flew up to a still higher perch.

“Faugh! Howit stinks here,” she said, and when she opened
her eyes and saw that the fox had eaten both the gander and the
duck, she flew up to the highest perch and settled there and
looked up through the chimney.
go THE HEN WHICH WENT TO DOVREFIJELD

“Just look at all the fine geese flying over there!” she said to
the fox.

Reynard ran out, thinking to find another fat roast. In the
meantime the hen woke up the cock and told him what had
happened to Gandy Pandy and Ducky Lucky.

So Cocky Locky and Henny Penny flew up through the
chimney, and if they hadn’t got to Dovrefjeld the world would
surely have come to an end!
SOU Riss Pid

THERE was once upon a
time a poor couple who
had nothing in the world
but three sons. What
the two eldest were called
I don’t know, but the
youngest was called
Peter.

When the parents
died the children were
to have all they left
behind ; but there was
nothing but a porridge
pot, a gridiron and a
cat. The eldest, who
was to have the best,
took the pot.

‘Every time I lend the
pot I shall get the scrap-
ings,” he said.

The second took the
gridiron.















































































i i i


92 SQUIRE PETER

“For when I lend it I shall get a bit to taste,” said he.

But there was no choice for the youngest ; if he wanted any-
thing he would have to take the cat.

“If I lend the cat to any one I shall get nothing for it,” he
said; ‘if the cat gets a little milk she'll want it herself, but I'll take
her with me any how; it’s a pity she should be left behind to pine.”

So the brothers set out into the world to try their fortune, and
each went his own way. When the youngest had gone awhile
the cat said:

“You'll not be sorry you didn’t leave me behind. I'll now go
into the forest and fetch some fine animal which you must take to
the king’s palace you see yonder, and say to the king you have
come with a small present for him. When he asks who it is from
you must say it is from Squire Peter.”

Peter had not long to wait before the cat came back with a
reindeer from the forest ; she had jumped upon its head and when
she had settled herself between its horns she said: “If you don’t
go straight to the king’s palace I shall scratch your eyes out.”
The reindeer dared not do otherwise.

When Peter came to the palace he went into the kitchen with
the reindeer and said:

““T have come with a small present for the king, which I hope
he will accept.”

The king came out into the kitchen and when he saw the fine
big reindeer he was much pleased.

“But, dear friend! who is it that sends me such a fine
present?” said the king.

“Oh, it’s Squire Peter!” said the lad.

“Squire Peter!” said the king. ‘Ah, let me see, where is it
he lives?” for he thought it was a shame he should not know
such a worthy man.

But the lad would not tell him. He dared not for his master,
he said.

‘So the king gave Peter some money and asked him to give
his master his greetings and many thanks for the present.




















































































THE KING CAME OUT INTO THE KITCHEN AND WHEN HE SAW THE FINE BIG REINDEER HE WAS MUCH PLEASED
SQUIRE PETER 95

The next day the cat went into the forest again and jumped up
on the head of a stag, settled herself between its eyes and com-
pelled it to go to the palace. Peter again went into the kitchen
with it and said he came with a small present for the king if he
would accept it. The king was still more pleased with the stag
than with the reindeer, and asked again who it was that had sent
him such a fine present.

“Oh, it’s Squire Peter,” said the lad; but when the king
wanted to know where Squire Peter lived he got the same answer
as the day before. This time he gave Peter still more money.

The third day the cat brought an elk. When Peter came into
the kitchen at the palace, he said that he had a small present for
the king if he would accepi it. The king came out at once into
the kitchen, and when he saw the fine, big elk he became so
pleased he did not know which leg to stand upon. That time
he gave Peter much more money; it must have been a hundred
dollars.

The king was now most anxious to know where Squire Peter
lived and began questioning him backwards and forwards, but the
lad said he dared not tell him, for his master had given him strict
orders not to disclose it.

“Well, ask Squire Peter to pay me a visit then,” said the
king.

Yes, he would do that, said the lad, but when he came out
of the palace and met the cat, Peter said:

“You have got me into a fine scrape; the king now says I
must visit him and I have nothing but the rags I walk in.”

“Oh, don’t trouble about that,” said the cat. ‘In three days
you shall have coach and horses, and fine clothes with gold
trimmings and hangings, and then you can surely visit the king.
But whatever you see’at the palace you must say you have grander
and finer things at home ; you must not forget that.”

No, he would be sure to remember, said Peter.

When the three days were over the cat came with the coach
and horses and clothes and everything that Peter wanted ; all was
96 SQUIRE PETER

so grand that no one had seen anything like it before. So Peter
set out for the palace and the cat ran alongside him.

The king received him well, but whatever he offered him and
whatever he showed him Peter said it was all very well, but he
had everything finer and grander at home. The king was not
over pleased at this; but Peter went on just the same and at last
the king became so angry that he could no longer contain himself.

“Tl go home with you,” said the king, “and see if it is true
that you have everything so much grander and finer ; but if you
have not told the truth it will be the worse for you. I'll say no
more!”

“You have got me into a fine scrape this time,” said Peter to
the cat; “the king now wants to go home with me, but it will not
be an easy thing to find my home.”

“Oh, don’t trouble about that,” said the cat, ‘I will run on in
front, and you need only follow me.”

So they set off. Peter followed the cat, who ran on in front,
and then came the king with all his suite. When they had driven
a good bit on the way, they came to a large flock of fine sheep ;
the wool was so long it almost reached to the ground.

“If you will say that the sheep belong to Squire Peter when
the king asks, you shall have this silver spoon,” said the cat to the
herdsboy. She had taken the spoon with her from the palace.
Yes, he would willingly do that, said the herdsboy.

When the king came by, he said:

“T’ve never seen such a fine flock of sheep! To whom do
they belong, my little boy ?”

“Oh, they belong to Squire Peter,” said the boy.

In a little while they came to a great big herd of fine brindled
cows ; they were so fat that their hides glistened.

“Tf you will say the cattle belong to Squire Peter when the
king asks, you shall have this silver ladle,” said the cat to the
cow-girl. The silver ladle she had also taken with her from the
palace.

“Yes, that I will,” said the girl When the king came up, he
SQUIRE PETER 97

was quite surprised at the fine big cattle, for such a herd he
thought he had never seen before; and so he asked the girl to
whom those brindled cows belonged.

“Oh, they are Squire Peter’s!” said the girl.

So they travelled on again, and then they came to a great big
drove of horses. They were the finest one could see, big and
sleek, and six of each colour, both brown and red, and cream-
coloured.

“If you will say those horses belong to Squire Peter when
the king asks, I'll give you this silver goblet,” said the cat to
the boy. The goblet she had also taken from the palace.

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THEY THEN CAME TO A GREAT BIG DROVE OF HORSES

“Yes, that I will,” said the boy. When the king came by,
he became quite dazed at the fine drove of horses, for he had
never seen the like of such horses, he said. He then asked
the boy to whom those brown, red, and cream-coloured horses
belonged.

“Oh, they are Squire Peter’s!” said the boy.

When they had travelled a long, long way, they came to a
castle. First there was a gateway of brass, then one of silver,

G
98 | SQUIRE PETER

and then one of gold. The castle itself was of silver, and
glistened so brightly that it made one’s eyes smart, for the sun
was shining full upon it when they arrived.

They entered, and the cat told Peter to say he lived there.
Inside the castle was still more splendid than outside; every-
thing was of gold, both chairs and tables and benches. When

‘the king had been round and seen it all from top to bottom,
he became quite confounded.

“Yes, Squire Peter is much grander than I; there is no use
denying that,” he said; and then he wanted to return home.
But Peter asked him to stop and sup with him, which the king
agreed to; but he was cross and peevish the whole time. While
they sat at table the troll, who owned the castle, came and
knocked at the gate.

“Who eats my food and drinks my mead in there ?” he cried.
As soon as the cat heard him, she ran to the gate.

“Wait a little, and I'll tell you how the farmer gets his winter
rye,” said the cat. ‘First he ploughs his field, and then he
manures it, and then he ploughs it again”; and so the cat went
on till the sun rose.

“Just look behind at that beautiful damsel!” said the cat
to the troll. The troll then turned round, and when he saw the
sun he burst.

“All this is now yours,” said the cat to Squire Peter. “And
now you must cut my head off; it is the only thing IJ ask for all I
have done for you.”

“No,” said Squire Peter, “that I will not do.”

“You must,” said the cat, “or I'll scratch your eyes

out.”
Squire Peter was then obliged to do it, although he was very
loath. He cut the cat’s head off, and the same moment she became
the most beautiful princess any one could set eyes on, and Squire
Peter fell in love with her then and there.

‘All this splendour has formerly been mine,” said the princess,
“but the troll got me into his power and turned me into a cat, and
SQUIRE PETER 99

ever since I have been at your parents’. You must now do as
you like about making me your queen, for you are king over the
whole realm,” said the princess.

Squire Peter was, of course, only too glad to make her his
queen. So the wedding took place, and the feasting lasted for
eight days. And as I did not stay any longer with the squire and
his queen I cannot tell you any more about them.




BIRD DAUNTLESS



ONcE upon a time there was a
king who had twelve daughters,
and he loved them so much that
he never allowed them out of his sight; but every day after
dinner, while the king slept, the princesses went out for a walk.
Once, when the king was having his afternoon nap, the princesses
went out as usual; but they never returned.

The whole country mourned, but the king was the one who
sorrowed most. Messengers were sent out to search for them,
both in his own and in foreign countries; proclamations were

UA te
BIRD DAUNTLESS IOI

read out in all the churches, and the bells were rung all over
the country. But they had disappeared and left no trace behind,
so the people at last guessed that they had been spirited away
into the mountains.

It did not take long before this was known far and wide, in
town and country; yea, even in the very depth of the country
and in foreign lands. And so the report reached the ears of a
king in a far away country, who had twelve sons.

When they heard about the twelve princesses, they asked for
leave to set out and find them. The king did not much like
them to go; he was afraid he should never see them again. But
they went on their knees before him, and prayed so long that the
king at last gave his consent.

He fitted out a ship for them and gave them a knight called
Redbeard as steersman, for he was a good seaman. They sailed
about for a very long time and visited all the countries they came
near, and asked and searched for the princesses, but they got no
tidings whatever.

But a few more days and they would have been gone seven
years. Then one day there blew such a gale and the weather
was so bad that they believed they would never reach land any
more. While the stormy weather lasted they were all obliged to
work, so they got no rest. On the third day the wind went down
and there came a calm.

Now they were all so tired after the hard work and rough
weather that they fell asleep at once, but the youngest prince felt
uneasy and could get no sleep.

While he paced backwards and forwards on deck the ship
neared a small island, and on the shore was a little dog running
about, barking and whining at the ship, just as if it wanted to be
taken on board. The prince walked up and down on the deck,
whistling and calling the dog, but the little creature only barked
and whined the more.

The prince thought it was a great pity to leave it there to
starve; he fancied it must have belonged to a ship which had
I02 BIRD DAUNTLESS

been wrecked during the storm, but he did not think he could
help it either, for he thought he would not be able to put the boat
out without help, and all the crew slept so soundly he would not
awake them for the sake of a dog.

But the weather was bright and calm, so he said to himself:
““T had better go ashore and save the dog,” and tried to lower
the boat and found it was easily managed.

He rowed ashore and went up to the dog, but every time he
tried to seize it the dog ran away from him, and this went on
until before he knew a word about it he found himself in a large
gilded castle. There the dog changed into a beautiful princess, and
on the bench sat a man so big and ugly that the prince became quite
terrified.

‘You need not be frightened,” said the man, but the prince
became still more frightened when he heard his voice; “for I
know very well what you want; you are the twelve princes
who are looking for the twelve princesses that were lost. I know
where they are; they are in my master’s castle; there they sit
on golden stools, each scratching a head, for he has twelve of
them. Now you have been sailing about for seven years, but
you will have to sail for seven more years before you find them.
You might as well stay here,” he said, ‘and wed my daughter ;
but first of all you must kill my master, for he is very hard
onus. We are tired of him, and when he is dead-I shall be
king in his place. Try first if you can lift this sword,” said the
troll.

The prince took hold of an old rusty sword which hung on the
wall, but he could scarcely stir it.

“Well then, you will have to take a drink from this bottle,”
said the troll.

When he had taken one sip he was just able to move the
sword, and when he had taken another he could lift it, and when
he had taken still another he could flourish the sword as easily as
a rolling-pin.

‘“When you return on board,” said the troll, “ you must hide
BIRD DAUNTLESS 103

the sword well in your berth, so that Knight Redbeard does not
see it; he would not be able to use it, of coursé, but he hates you,
and will try to take your life.”

“Three days before the seven years are up,” he said further,
“all that has happened now will happen again; you will have bad
and stormy weather, and when it is over you will all become
sleepy ; then you must take the sword and go ashore. You will
then come to a castle where there are all sorts of sentinels—wolves,
bears, and lions ; but you must not be afraid of them, for they will
all fall down before your feet. When you get into the castle you
will see the troll-king sitting in a gorgeous chamber, magnificently
dressed ; he has twelve heads, and the princesses will be sitting
on their golden stools, each of them scratching one of his heads.
This kind of work, you know, they don’t like, so you must make
haste and cut off one head after the other; if the troll wakes up
and sees you he will swallow you alive.”

The prince went on board with the sword, and he remembered
well what he had been told. All on board were still asleep, and
he hid the sword in his berth, so that Knight Redbeard and the
other could not see it. It then began to blow again, so the prince
called the others and said he thought it would not do to sleep any
longer since they had such a fair wind. Nobody guessed he had
been away from the ship.

Now when the seven years all but three days had passed it
happened just as the troll had said. There came bad and stormy
weather which lasted for three days, and when it was over they
all became sleepy after their hard work and lay down; but the
youngest prince rowed ashore and the sentinels fell down before
him, and so he came to the castle. When he entered the
chamber the king-troll sat and slept just as the other troll had
foretold, and the twelve princesses sat on their stools, each
scratching one of his heads. The prince made signs to the
princesses to move away, but they pointed at the troll and
motioned to the prince to go.

He continued to make signs to them, and then they under-
104 BIRD DAUNTLESS

stood that he wanted to save them. They moved quietly away,
one after the other, and immediately he cut off the heads of the
troll-king, till the blood flowed like a.great brook.

When the troll was killed, the prince rowed out to the ship
again and hid the sword ; he thought he had done his share, and
as he could not get the body away by himself, he thought the
others ought to help him a little. He therefore called them,
and said it was a shame they should be lying asleep while he
had been finding the princesses and had saved them from the
troll-king. :

The others laughed at him and said that, no doubt, he had
been sleeping as well, if not better, than they, and had dreamt that
he was such a clever fellow. If any one had saved the princesses,
it was far more likely to be one of them.

But the youngest prince told them how it had all happened,
and when they went ashore with him and saw the brook of blood,
the castle, the troll, the twelve heads and the princesses, they saw
he had told the truth ; and so they helped him to throw the heads
and the body into the sea.

They were now all quite happy, but none more so than the
princesses, who after this, had no longer to sit all day and scratch
the troll-king’s heads. They took with them of all the gold and
silver and valuable things which were there, as much as they could
carry; and so they went on board, both the princes and the
princesses.

When they had got a good way out to sea, the princesses said
that in their joy they had forgotten their golden crowns; they lay
in a chest, and they would so much like to take them with them.
As none of the others offered to go for them, the youngest prince
said:

“‘T have ventured as much before, so now I may as well fetch
the crowns, if you will let down the sails and wait till I come
back again.”

Yes, that they would ; but when he had got so far away that
they could not see anything more of him, Knight Redbeard, who
THEN SUDDENLY SOMETHING CAME FLOPPING DOWN BY THE SIDE OF
THE PRINCE'S BED


BIRD DAUNTLESS 107

himself wanted to be foremost and have the youngest princess,
said that it was of no use to lie and wait for him, for they must
surely know he would never come back.

They knew, he said, that the king had given him, Knight Red-
beard, power and authority to do just as he thought right; and
they could say that he had saved the princesses, and if any one
dared to say otherwise he should lose his life.

The princes therefore dared not do anything else but what
Knight Redbeard told them, and so they set sail.

In the meantime, the youngest prince rowed ashore and
went into the castle, found the chest, in which were the golden
crowns, and tugged and dragged till he got it down to the boat;
but when he came to the place where he expected to find the
ship, it was gone. As he could not see it in any direction,
he soon guessed what had happened, and there was therefore
nothing else for him to do but to turn round and row to land
again.

He was, of course, afraid to be alone the whole night in
the castle, but there was no other shelter, so he took courage,
locked all the doors and gates, and lay himself down in a room
where there was a ready made bed. But he felt afraid, and
became still more so, when, after he had been in bed awhile, the
walls and roof began to creak and groan as if the whole castle
was falling to pieces. Then, all of a sudden, something, which
sounded like a load of hay, came flopping down by the side of his
bed, and all became quiet again ; but he heard a voice, which told
him not to be afraid, and said:

“T am bird Dauntless,
All that I do is faultless ;
Be not afraid of me,
For I will help you o’er the sea!”’

“The first thing you-must do in the morning, when you
awake, is to go to the storehouse and fetch four barrels of
108 BIRD DAUNTLESS

rye for me; I must have that for breakfast, otherwise I can do
nothing.”

When the prince awoke in the morning, he saw an enormous
bird with a feather at the back of its neck as thick as a small
pine-tree. The prince went to the storehouse for the four barrels
of rye, and when the bird had eaten it, he told the prince to hang
the chest with the golden crowns on one side of his neck and
to take as much gold and silver as would balance it and hang it
on the other; then he asked the prince to get on his back and
to hold on to the big feather on his neck. Off they started,
whisking through the air at such a speed that it did not take
long before they overtook the ship. The prince wanted to
go on board and fetch the sword, because he was afraid some-
body might see it, for the troll had told him it must not be
seen by anybody; but bird Dauntless said they could not trouble
about it now.

“Knight Redbeard is not likely to see it,” said the bird ; “‘butif
you go on board he will try and take your life, as he wants to have
the youngest princess; but you may rest easy about her for she
puts a naked sword by her side every night, when she goes to
bed.”

After some time they reached the island, where the troll, whom
the prince had first met, lived. There the ‘prince was so well
received that there was no end of festivities. The troll did not
know how to treat him well enough, for he had killed his master
and made him the king; he would gladly give him his daughter
and half of his kingdom. But the prince had taken such a fancy
to the youngest princess, that he could not rest and wanted every
moment to set out again.

The troll asked him to take a rest and remain with him for a
time, and told him the princesses had seven years to sail yet
before they would get home. MHealso told him the same about the
princess as bird Dauntless had done.

“You can rest easy about her; she places a naked sword by






















































































E CLUB

NT OF HIM, HE LIFTED TH

FRO

E SAW THE SHIP RIGHT IN

WHEN H
BIRD DAUNTLESS TIL

her side in bed. If you don’t believe me,” said the troll, ‘you
can go on board, when the ship passes here, and see for
yourself, and fetch the sword. I must have that back in any
case.”

When the ship came sailing past the weather had been
bad again, and when the prince went on board he found everybody
asleep, the princesses each with a prince by her side; but the
youngest lay alone with a naked sword beside her, and on the
floor, in front of the bed, lay Knight Redbeard.

The prince found his sword and went ashore, without any one
having discovered he had been on board; but still he was uneasy
and wanted to be off, and when at last the seven years were nearly
over, all but about three weeks, the troll said:

“ Now you had better get ready to sail, since you will not remain
with us. I will lend you my iron-boat, which goes of itself, if only
you say ‘Boat, sail on.’ In the boat you will find an iron club,
and that club you must lift, when you see the ship right in front of
you; they will then have such a gale of wind, they will not think
of looking for you. When you come alongside the ship, you must
lift the club again, and they will then have such a hurricane, that
they will have something else to do than be spying after you; when
you haye passed them, you must lift the club for the third time,
taking care always to lay it down carefully, otherwise you will
get such weather that both you and they will perish. When you
reach land you need not trouble yourself about the boat ; you need
only give it a push, turn it round and say, ‘ Boat, go home the same
way you came.’”

When the prince started he had much gold and silver and lots
of fine things, and clothes and linen, which the troll-princess had
made for him during his long stay there, so he was much richer
than any of his brothers.

He had no sooner sat himself down in the boat and said:
“ Boat, sail on,” than the boat set off, and when he saw the ship
right in front of him he lifted the club; they then got such a gale
I12 BIRD DAUNTLESS

of wind that they could not look his way. When he got alongside
the ship he lifted the iron club again, and the weather became so
bad and stormy that the white foam splashed up on all sides, and
the waves washed over the deck, so that the people on board had
something else to do than be spying after him ; and when he was
passing them he lifted the club for the third time, and then they
had so much to look after that they had no time to find out who he
could be. He reached land long before the ship, and when he
had taken all his things out of the boat he shoved it out again,
turned it round and said: “Boat, go home the same way you
came!” and off the boat started.

He disguised himself as a sailor, and went to an old woman
who lived in a wretched hut hard by; he told her he was a poor
sailor and belonged to a big ship, which had been wrecked, and
that he was the only one who had been saved. He then asked
her if she would give him shelter for himself and the things he
had saved.

“ Bless me!” said the woman, “I don’t think I can give any one
lodgings; you see how it is here, I have nothing to lie upon
myself, still less anything for others to lie upon.”

The sailor said that did not matter; if he could only get a roof
over his head he did not mind how he lay. She could not deny
him that, if he would take things as he found them; so in the
evening he brought his things to the hut.

No sooner were they in, than the woman, who was very fond
of some new gossip to run about with, began to ask him who he
was, where he came from, where he had been, where he was
going, what he had with him, on what errand he was travelling,
and if he had heard anything about the twelve princesses, who
had disappeared so many years ago, and about many other things
which she wanted to know and talk about.

But he said he felt poorly, and his head ached so much after
the terrible weather, he could not give an account of anything;
she would have to leave him in peace for some days, till
BIRD DAUNTLESS 113

he had taken a rest after all the work he had had to do; then she
should know everything, and more besides.

The following day the old woman began again to question him,
but the sailor had still such pains in his head he could not give an
account of anything. But all at once he dropped a hint that perhaps
he knew something about the princesses after all. The old woman
ran at once with what she had heard to all the gossips in the
neighbourhood, and one after the other came running and asking
for news of the princesses, if he had seen them, if they were soon
coming home, if they were on the way, and more of that kind.
But he still complained that his head ached, so he could not answer
them ; but he could tell them this much, that if they had not been
drowned in the storm they would arrive in a fortnight’s time, or
perhaps before ; but he could not tell for certain if they were alive.
He had seen them, but they might easily have gone to the bottom
since then.

One of the old women ran to the palace with this news, and
said there was a sailor in the hut of a certain old woman, that he
had seen the princesses, and that they might be expected in a
fortnight’s time, or perhaps in a week.

When the king heard this he sent a messenger to fetch the
sailor that he might come and tell the news himself.

“‘T am not in a fit state to go,” said the sailor, “for I have no
clothes good enough in which to appear before the King.” But
the King’s messenger said he must come; the King would and
must speak with him, no matter how he was dressed, for no
one had as yet been able to tell the King anything about the
princesses.

“Yes, I can,” said the sailor. ‘But I cannot tell if they are
still alive. When I saw them the weather was so bad that we were
wrecked ; but if they are still alive they will be here in a fort-
night’s time, or perhaps before.”

When the King heard this he almost went out of his mind
with joy; and as the time when the sailor had said they would

H
114 BIRD DAUNTLESS

return drew near, the King proceeded to the shore in great pomp
to meet them.

There was great joy all over the country when the ship arrived
with the princesses, the princes and Knight Redbeard; but no
one was more glad than the old King, who now had got his
daughters back again. The eleven elder princesses were very
happy and merry, but the youngest, who was to have Knight
Redbeard, was always weeping and sorrowful.

The King did not like this, and asked her why she was not
merry and happy like her sisters; there was no reason why she
should be so sad, now that she had escaped from the troll and was
going to marry such a brave man as Knight Redbeard. But she
dared not say anything, for Knight Redbeard had vowed he would
take the life of any one who told how all had happened. One day
when the princesses were busy making fine clothes for the
weddings, a person dressed like a sailor, with a pack on his back,
came into the palace, and asked if they would buy some pretty
things from him for their wedding; he had many rare and costly
articles both in gold and silver. Yes, they would look at his
wares. Then they glanced at him and thought they recognised both
him and many of the things he had.

“You, who have so many fine things,” said the youngest
princess, “‘must surely have many things which are still finer,
and which would suit us still better.”

“That may be,” said the pedlar ; but her sisters told her to be
quiet, and reminded her what Knight Redbeard had threatened
them with.

Some time afterwards the princesses were sitting one day by
the window, when the youngest prince came by with the chest
containing the golden crowns on his back.

When he came into the great hall of the palace he opened the
chest for the princesses, and they all recognised their crowns.
The youngest then said:

“T think it is only right that the one who saved us should
have the reward he deserves. It is not Knight Redbeard, but he
BIRD DAUNTLESS 115

who has brought us our crowns—that has saved us.” And then
the prince threw off his sailor attire and stood before them more
finely dressed than all the other princes, and the old King then
ordered that Knight Redbeard should be put to death.

Now there was great joy in the palace. Each prince took his
bride, and they kept such a wedding that it was heard of and
talked about throughout twelve kingdoms.


THE “TOWN MOUSE*AND THE
COUNTRY. MOUSE



ONcE upon a time a town mouse met a country
mouse on the outskirts of awood. The country
mouse was sitting under a hazel thicket pluck-

ing nuts.
‘Busy harvesting, I see,” said the town
mouse. ‘“ Who would think of our meeting in this out-of-the-way

part of the world?”

“« Just so,” said the country mouse.

“You are gathering nuts for your winter store?” said the
town mouse.

“T am obliged to do so if we intend having anything to live
upon during the winter,” said the country mouse.

‘‘The husk is big and the nut full this year, enough to satisfy
any hungry body,” said the town mouse.

“Yes, you are right there,” said the country mouse; and then
she related how well she lived and how comfortable she was at
home.
THE TOWN MOUSE AND THE COUNTRY MOUSE 117

The town mouse maintained that she was the better off, but
the country mouse said that nowhere could one be so well off as
in the woods and hills. The town mouse, however, declared she
was best off; and as they could not agree on this point they
promised to visit one another at Christmas, then they could see
for themselves which was really the most comfortable.

The first visit was to be paid by the town mouse.

Now, although the country mouse had moved down from the
mountains for the winter, the road was long and tiring and one
had to travel up hill and down dale ; the snow lay thick and deep,
so the town mouse found it hard work to get on and she became
both tired and hungry before she reached the end of her journey.

How nice it will be to get some food, she thought.

The country mouse had scraped together the best she had.
There were nut kernels, polypoly and other sorts of roots, and
many other good things which grow in woods and fields. She
kept it allin a hole far under the ground, so the frost could not
reach it, and close by was a running spring,’ open all the winter,
so she could drink as much water as she liked. There was an
abundance of all she had, and they ate both well and heartily; but
the town mouse thought it was very poor fare indeed.

“One can, of course, keep body and soul together on this,”
said she; ‘but I don’t think much of it. Now you must be good
enough to visit me and taste what we have.”

Yes, that she would, and before long she set out. The town
mouse had gathered together all the scraps from the Christmas
fare which the woman of the house had dropped on the floor
during the holidays—bits of cheese, butter and tallow ends, cake-
crumbs, pastry and many other good things. In the dish under
the ale-tap she had drink enough; in fact, the place was full of all
kinds of dainties.

They ate and fared well ; the country mouse seemed never to
have had enough; she had never tasted such delicacies. But then
she became thirsty, for she found the food both strong and rich,
and now she wanted something to drink.
118 THE Town MOUSE AND THE COUNTRY MOUSE

“We haven’t far to go for the beer we shall drink,” said the
town mouse, and jumped upon the edge of the dish and drank till
she was no longer thirsty; she did not drink too much, for she
knew the Christmas beer was strong. The country mouse, how-
ever, thought the beer a splendid drink; she had never tasted
anything but water, so she took one sip after another, but as she
could not stand strong drink she became tipsy before she left the
dish.

The drink got into ber head and down into her toes and she
began running and jumping about from one beer barrel to the
other, and to dance and tumble about on the shelves amongst the
cups and mugs; she squeaked and screeched as if she-were both
drunk and mad. About her being drunk there was very little
doubt.

“You must not carry on as if you had just come from the
backwoods and make such a row and noise,” said the town mouse ;
“the master of the house is a bailiff and he is very strict indeed,”
she added.

The country mouse said she didn’t care either for bailiffs or
beggars. But the cat sat at the top of the cellar steps, lying in
wait, and heard all the chatter and noise. When the woman of
the house went down to draw some beer and lifted the trap door
the cat slipped by into the cellar and struck its claws into the
country mouse. Then there was quite another sort of dance.

The town mouse slid back into her hole and sat in safety looking
on, while the country mouse suddenly became sober when she
felt the claws of the cat in her back.

“Oh, my dear bailiff, oh, dearest bailiff, be merciful and spare
my life and I will tell you a fairy tale,” she said.

“Well, go on,” said the cat.

“Once upon a time there were two little mice,” said the
country mouse, squeaking slowly and pitifully, for she wanted to
make the story last as long as she could.

“Then they were not lonely,” said the cat dryly and curtly.

“And they had a steak which they were going to fry.”




Ty

~

Lyi, na
THN

THE COUNTRY MOUSE BEGAN TO JUMP ABOUT AND DANCE, SQUEAKING AND SCREECHING
AS IF SHE WERE DRUNK




THE TOWN MOUSE AND THE COUNTRY MOUSE 121

“Then they could not starve,” said the cat.

“ And they put it out on the roof to cool,” said the country
mouse.

“ Then they did not burn themselves,” said the cat.

“ But there came a fox and a crow and ate it all up,” said the
country mouse.

“Then I'll eat you,” said the cat. But just at that moment the
woman shut the trap door with a slam, which so startled the cat
that she let go her hold of the mouse. One bound, and the country
mouse found herself in the hole with the town mouse.

From there a passage led out into the snow, and you may be
sure the country mouse did not wait long before she set out
homewards.

“ And this is what you call living well and being best off,” she
said to the town mouse. ‘‘ Heaven preserve me from having such
a fine place and such a master! Why, I only just got away with
my life!”












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SORTA MARIA'S (CASTLE

THERE was once upon a time a couple who had a son, and his
name was Halvor. Since he was quite a small boy he never
cared to do any work; he would only sit in the hearth and rake
together the ashes. The parents had many times apprenticed
SORIA Marta’s CASTLE 123

him to learn some trade, but Halvor never stopped long anywhere;
—when he had been at a place for some days he always ran off
home again, sat himself down in the hearth, and began digging in
the ashes.

But one day a skipper came to the house and asked Halvor if
had a mind to go to sea with him and visit foreign countries.
Yes, Halvor had a mind for that, and this time he was not long in
getting ready.

How long they sailed I do not know, but after some time a
storm overtook them and when it was over and the sea became
calm they did not know where they were ; they had drifted to a
foreign coast-which was quite unknown to them.

As there was no wind at all they had to remain there and
Halvor asked the skipper for permission to go ashore and look
about a bit, for he would rather do that than lie and sleep.

“Do you think you are fit toshow yourself?” said the skipper.
“Why you have no other clothes but the rags you have on your
back.” But Halvor would not give in, and at last he got
permission ; but he must come back on board when it began to
blow.

He started off and found the country most beautiful; all
around he saw large plains with cornfields and meadows, but he
did not see any people. Soon it began to blow, but Halvor did
not think he had seen enough yet, so he thought he would go on
a little further and see if he could find any people.

In a while he came to a big road, which was so even one could
roll an egg along it. Halvor followed the road, and towards even-
ing he saw a great castle far away all lighted up.

As he had been walking all day almost without any food, he
was very hungry; but the nearer he came to the castle the more
afraid he felt.

In the castle the fires were still burning in the hearths.
Halvor went into the kitchen, which was the most splendid he had
ever seen ; there were pots and pans both of gold and silver, but
no people. When Halvor had stood there awhile and no one
124 SORIA Maria’s CASTLE

came, he went to a door and opened it and inside sat a princess at
her spinning wheel.

“Oh dear! Oh dear!” she cried, ‘how dare any Christian
person come here! You had better go away, if you don’t want
the troll to swallow you alive, for here lives a troll with three
heads.”

“Tt would be all one to me, even if he had four,” said the lad.
‘‘T should much like to see him! I am not going away, for I have
done nothing wrong ; you must give me something to eat as lam
terribly hungry.”

When Halvor had finished his meal, the princess told him he
had better try if he could swing the sword which hung on the
wall. No, he could not even lift it.

“You had better take a drink from that bottle, which hangs by
the side of it,” said the princess, ‘for the troll does so, when he is
going to use the sword.”

Halvor took a drink, and immediately he was able to swing
the sword as if it had been nothing. Now, thought he, the troll
might come any time. All at once they heard the troll coming,
and Halvor hid behind the door.

“ Ugh! I smell Christian blood here,” said the troll, putting
one head in through the door.

“You'll soon find that is so,” said Halvor, and cut off all his
heads. The princess was so glad at being saved that she both
sang and danced. Then she began to think about her sisters and
said :

“‘T wish my sisters were saved also.”

‘Where are they?” asked Halvor; and so she told him one
was shut up by a troll in a castle fifty miles away, and the other
was shut up in a castle another fifty miles away.

“ First you must help me to get this carcase away,” said she.
Halvor was so strong he swept everything before him, and cleared
all away in no time; he then ate and enjoyed himself for the rest
of the day.

Next morning he set out at daybreak, and so eager was he to












































































































































































WHEN THE TROLL WITH THE THREE HEADS CAME INTO THE ROOM, HALVOR TOOK
THE SWORD AND CUT OFF ALL THE HEADS
SORIA MARIa’s CASTLE 127

reach the castle, that he ran the whole day. When at last he saw
it he became frightened again; it was more gorgeous even than
the first one, but here also he could see no one. He went into the
kitchen and straight on into the room without stopping.

‘‘Oh, dear! how dare any Christian person come here!” cried
the princess. “I don’t know how long I have been here, but
during all that time I have not seen a Christian. You had better
go away, for here lives a troll who has six heads.”

“No, I won’t go,” said Halvor, “even if he had twelve.”

“He will swallow you alive,” said the princess. But it was of
no use, Halvor would not go; he was not afraid of the troll, but
he wanted meat and drink, for he was hungry after the journey.
He got as much as he wanted and then the princess again begged
him to go.

“No,” said Halvor, ‘I won't go, for I have done nothing wrong
and I have nothing to be afraid of.”

“That makes no difference,” said the princess, ‘‘ for he will
take you, whether or no; but since you will not go, try if you can
swing this sword, which the troll uses when he goes to war.”

He could not swing the sword, so the princess told him to
take a drink from the bottle which hung by the side. When he had
done so, he found himself able to swing the sword. All of a
sudden the troll came home; he was so fat and big he had to go
sideways to get through the door. When he had got one of his
heads inside he cried :

“Ugh! what a smell of Christian blood!” but at the same
moment Halvor cut off one head and then all the others.

The princess was very glad, but she soon began to think of
her sisters and wish that they also were saved. Halvor thought
that could be done, and wanted to set off at once; but first he had
to help the princess to get rid of the body of the troll, and next
morning he set out.

It was a long way to the castle, and he walked and ran as fast
as he could to get there in good time. Towards evening he came
in sight of the castle, and found it even more splendid than the
128 SORIA Martad’s CASTLE

others. He was not the least afraid this time, but went straight
through the kitchen and into the room. There sat the princess,
who was so pretty that no words can tell. She said just the same
as the other princesses, that no Christian person had been there
since she came, and asked him to go away, or else the troll would
swallow him alive. This troll had nine heads, she said.

“Well, even if he has twice nine and still another nine I shall
not go,” said Halvor, going up to the fire.

The princess entreated him to go, so that the troll should not
eat him ; but Halvor said: ‘ Let him come when he likes;” then
she gave him the sword and asked him to take a sip from the
bottle, so that he could use the sword.

All of a sudden the troll came in with a great noise. He was
still fatter and bigger than the other two, and he had also to go
sideways to get through the door.

“Ugh! what a smell of Christian blood!” he said; but at the
same moment Halvor cut off his first head and then all the others ;
but the last one was very tough and gave Halvor more work than
anything he had yet had to do, although he felt so very strong.

All the princesses were now together at this castle, and they
were happier than they had ever been inall their lives. They were
very fond of Halvor and he of them. He could choose the one he
liked best of them to wed, but the youngest was most fond of him
of all three. He, however, went about looking so sad, and he was
so sullen and quiet, that the princesses asked him what he was
longing for and whether he did not like staying with them. Yes,
that he liked well enough, for they had plenty to live on and he
was very comfortable; but he longed so much for home, his
parents were still alive, and he had a great mind to see them again.
That could easily be arranged, they said :

“You can go there and back without any danger, if you follow
our advice.” Yes, he would do everything they told him. Then
they dressed him up till he looked as fine as a prince, and they
put a magic ring on his finger, so that he had only to wish himself
anywhere and his wish would be fulfilled; but they said he must
SORIA MArRIA’sS CASTLE 129

not lose the ring or mention their names, for then there would be
an end to all their happiness and he would never see them any
more.

““T wish I were home,” said Halvor, and as he wished so it
happened. He stood outside his parents’ house in less than
no time. It was just in the dusk of the evening, and when his
parents saw what a fine and noble stranger was coming they lost
their wits, and began to bow and curtsy. Halvor asked if he
could stop there and get lodgings for the night.

No, that he couldn’t. ‘Our place is not good enough,” they
said ; ‘‘we have nothing here that would do for so grand a tra-
veller.” He had better go up to the farm, which was not far away ;
he could see the chimney-pots from where they stood, and there
he would find plenty of everything. Halvor did not like that at
all; he wanted to remain where he was, but the parents stuck
to what they had said, that he should go up to the farm, for there
he could get both meat and drink, while they had not even a
chair to offer him.

“No,” said Halvor, ‘I won’t go there till the morning; let me
remain here to-night; I can sit in the hearth.” They could not
refuse him that, so Halvor sat down in the hearth and began
digging in the ashes, just as he had done when he was at home
and idled away his time.

They spoke about a good many things, and told Halvor one
thing and another till at last he asked them if they ever had had
any children. Yes, they had a boy whose name was Halvor, but
they did not know whereabouts he was wandering, or whether he
was alive or dead.

“‘Could I be he ?” said Halvor.

“No, not likely,” said the woman ; “ Halvor was such a lazy,
idle boy, he would never do anything, and he was so ragged his
rags would hardly keep together; he could never become as grand
as you.”

In a little while the woman went over to the chimney to rake
the fire, and just then the light from the ashes shone upon Halvor

I
130 SORIA MARIA’S CASTLE

the same as when he used to sit at home raking in the ashes, and
then the woman knew him again.

“Of course it is you, Halvor!” she said, and the old couple
became so glad they did not know what to do. He had then to
tell them all that had happened to him, and his mother was so
proud of him that she wanted to take him up with her to the farm
and show him off to the girls, who had always put on such airs.
She went first and Halvor came after. When she got up there she
told the people Halvor had come home again, and they should soon
see what a fine fellow he was; he looked like a prince, she said.

“Oh, indeed!” said the girls, turning up their noses; “ we
expect he is the same ragged fellow as ever.” Just at that
moment Halvor came in, and so startled the girls, who were busy
dressing themselves, that they took to their heels with nothing on
but their petticoats.

When they came in again they were so shy they hardly dared
to look at Halvor, to whom they had formerly always been so
proud and short-spoken.

‘Well, you have always thought yourselves so fine and hand-
some that there were none like you, but you should just see the
eldest of the princesses I have saved,” said Halvor; ‘by her side
you would look like scullery-maids, and the second sister is still
prettier ; but the youngest, who is my sweetheart, is prettier than
both the sun and the moon. I wish they were here, and then you
would see,” said Halvor.

He had no sooner spoken the words than the princesses stood
there. This vexed him very much, for now he remembered his
promise to them. Much rejoicing now began on the farm in
honour of the princesses, but they did not care to remain there.

“We want to visit your parents,” they said to Halvor, “and
then we'll travel about and look around us.” He said he would
go with them, and soon they came to a large lake some distance
from the farm. Close to the lake was a green hillside, where the
princesses wanted to rest a while, for they thought it would be so
nice to sit there and look out over the water. :
















ERE

E TO SIT TH

A WHILE, FOR THEY THOUGHT IT WOULD BE SO NIC
AND LOOK OUT OVER THE WATER

ST

ED TO RE

ESSES WANT

THE PRINC
SORIA MARIA’S CASTLE 133

They sat down, and after a while the youngest princess said
to Halvor: ‘Won't you lie down and rest your head in my lap?”
Yes, he would do so, and before long he fell asleep. Then she
took the ring from his finger and put another in its place, and said
to her sisters :

“Take hold of me as I take hold of you. I wish we were back
in Soria Maria’s castle.”

When Halvor awoke he soon guessed he had lost the prin-
cesses and began to cry and lament, and was so disconsolate no
one could get a word out of him. Though his parents begged and
prayed him to stop with them he would not, but bid them farewell,
and said he was not ever likely to see them again, for if he did not
find the princesses life would not be worth living. He had three
hundred dollars left which he put in his pocket, and then set
out. -
When he had got a bit on the way he met a man with ahorse,
which he wanted to buy, so he began bargaining.

“Well, I have not exactly been thinking of selling it,” said the
man, “‘ but if we can come to some agreement, well ” Halvor
asked how much he wanted for it.

“T did not pay much for it, and it isn’t worth much,” said the
man; “it is a good horse to ride on, but no good as a cart-
horse. Inany case he could manage to get along with your scrip-
bag and you as well, if you will walk a bit now and then.”

At last they agreed about the price, and Halvor put his bag on
the horse, and sometimes walked and sometimes rode, till towards
evening he came to a green field, and there stood a great tree,
under which he sat down. He let the horse loose, and then
opened his bag and had some food, but did not lie down to
sleep.

At daylight he set out, for he had no peace of mind till he was
on his way again; so he rode and walked by turns all day through
a large forest with many beautiful green openings gleaming here
and there among the trees. He did not know where he was, nor
in which direction he was going; he only gave himself time to


134 SORIA MARIA’s CASTLE

rest when he came to one of the green spots; he then foddered
the horse and had some food himself.

On he walked and on he rode, and it seemed as if there never
would be an end to the forest. But towards evening on the
second day he saw a light shining between the trees. “I hope
the folks are not gone to bed, so that I can warm myself and get
something to eat,” said Halvor to himself. When he came nearer
he found only a poor little hut, and through the window he saw an
old couple. They were very old and grey, and the woman had
such a long nose that she could use it to rake the ashes together
with when she sat by the fire.

“Good evening, good evening,” said the woman. ‘ But what
business can you have here, I wonder? No Christian people
have been this way for over a hundred years.”

Halvor told her he was going to Soria Maria’s castle, and
asked her if she knew the way.

“No,” said the old woman, ‘I don’t know, but the moon will
be out soon, and J’ll ask her; she is sure to know, for she shines
over every place.”

As soon as the moon appeared bright and clear above the tree-
tops, the woman went out.

“You moon! you moon!” she shouted, ‘‘can you tell me the
way to Soria Maria’s castle ?”

“No,” said the moon, “I cannot, for when I passed that way
a cloud stood before me.”

Wait a while yet,’ said the woman to Halvor, ‘the west
wind will be here directly ; he is sure to know, for he whistles
and blows in every corner. Dear, dear, you have a horse, I see,”
continued the old woman, as she came into the room. ‘Let the
poor creature into the meadow ; don't let it remain here at the
door to starve. Will you exchange it with me for something ?”
said she. ‘ We have a pair of old boots here, and when you have
them on you can take twenty miles at every step. You can have
them instead of the horse, and then you can get sooner to Soria
Maria’s castle.”
SORIA MARIA’s CASTLE 135

Halvor agreed at once, and the woman took such a fancy to
the horse she was ready to dance for joy, “‘ For now I can ride to
church like other people,” she said.

Halvor became impatient to start, but the woman said there
was no hurry.



















FRENOWISENL

THE OLD WOMAN WENT OUT TO ASK THE MOON THE WAY TO
SORIA MARIA’S CASTLE

“Lie down on the bench and take a nap, for we have no bed,”
said she, “and I will look out for the west wind when he comes.”

All of a sudden the west wind came rushing along, making the
walls creak and groan. The woman ran out.
136 SORIA MARIA’sS CASTLE

“You west wind! you west wind! can you tell me the way to
Soria Maria’s castle? There is somebody here who wants to go
that way.” ,

“Yes, I know it well,” said the west wind. ‘Iam just going
there to dry clothes for a wedding which is to be. If he is quick
on his legs he can come with me.”

Halvor just then came out.

“You will have to make haste if you want company,” said the
west wind ; and away they went far over hills and dales and seas, .

‘while Halvor had as much as he could do to keep up.

“T haven’t time to go with you any further,” said the west
wind, “for I have to tear up a pine forest first before I go to
the bleaching ground to dry the clothes; but if you keep along
the ridge of the mountain you will come to some lasses who
are washing clothes, and then you have not far to go to Soria
Maria’s castle.”

Before long Halvor came to the lasses who were busy washing
clothes. They asked if he had seen anything of the west wind.

“He was coming here to dry clothes for the wedding,” said

they.
“Yes,” said Halvor, “he has only gone to tear up-a pine
forest ; it will not be long before he is here.” And then he

asked them the way to Soria Maria’s castle.

They put him in the way, and when he came to the castle he
found quite a crowd of horses and people there. But Halvor was
so ragged and dirty from having followed the west wind through
bush and bog that he kept out of sight, and would not go to the
castle till the last day, when they were going to have a grand
dinner. And when the time came, as was the custom, for drinking
the health of the bride, and the servant was filling every one’s
cup—that of the bride and bridegroom, the knights’ and yeomen’s
—he came at length to Halvor.

He drank the toast, and let the ring which the princess had
put on his finger at the lake fall into the cup. He then asked the
servant to carry the cup to the bride, with his compliments.
SORIA MARIA’S CASTLE 137

The princess at once got up from the table.

‘Who has most right to wed one of us,” she said ; “he who
saved us or he who sits here as bridegroom ?”

All thought there could be but one opinion about that; so
when Halvor heard it, he was not long in getting off his rags and
in dressing himself as a bridegroom.

“Yes, he is the right one!” cried the youngest princess when
she saw him; and so she threw the other one over, and was
married to Halvor.
Mh
(ie

| >>



WELE-DONE; ILE PATD

ONcE upon a time there was a man who was going to the forest
for firewood. On his way he met a bear.

“Give: me your horse, or I will kill all your sheep next
summer !” said the bear.

“Oh dear! oh dear!” said the man, ‘‘there is not a chip of
wood in the house. You must let me drive home a cartload of
WELL DONE, ILL PAID 139

wood, or we shall be frozen to death; but I will come back with
the horse to-morrow for you.”

Well, that would do; but it was understood that if he did not
return he would lose all his sheep during the summer. The man
loaded his sledge with wood, and drove homewards; but he was
not very pleased with the arrangement he had made, you can
imagine. On the way he met a fox.

“Why do you look so sad?” asked the fox.

“Oh, I met a bear up yonder,” said the man, “and I had to
promise that at this time to-morrow he should have my horse.
If he does not get it, he said he would tear all my sheep to
pieces next summer.”

“Oh, nothing worse than that?” said the fox. “If you will
give me your fattest ram I will soon get you out of your
difficulty.”

The man promised this, and said he would be sure to keep
his word.

‘When you come to the bear to-morrow with the horse,” said
the fox, “I will be up in the mountain, and will shout out to you.
When the bear asks who it is, you must say it is Peter, the hunts-
man, who is the finest shot in the world. Afterwards you must
use your own wits,”

The next day the man set out, and when he met the bear
some one up in the mountain began shouting.

““Whst ! what’s that ?” said the bear.

‘Oh, that’s Peter, the huntsman. He is the finest shot in the
world,” said the man. “TI know him by his voice.”

‘‘Have you seen any bear about here, Erik?” came from the
wood.

“Say no!” said the bear.

“No, I have not seen any bear,” said Erik.

‘‘'What’s that standing by your sledge then?” came from the
wood.

“Say it is the root of an old tree,” whispered the bear.

‘Oh, it’s only the root of an old tree,” said Erik.
140 WELL DONE, ILL PaID

‘Such roots we generally load our sledges with,” came from
the wood ; “if you are not able to do so, I will come and help
you.”

“Say you can do it yourself, and put me on the sledge.”

“No, thanks, I can manage by myself,” said the man, and
rolled the bear on to the sledge.

“Such roots we generally tie down,’
“do you want any help ?”

“Say you can do it yourself, and tie me down,” said the
bear.

“No, thanks, I can do it,” said Erik, and began tying down the
bear with all the ropes he had, till the bear could not move a paw.

“Such roots we generally strike an axe into, when we have
tied it down,” come from the wood, ‘for then one can steer the
sledge better down the big hills.”

‘Pretend to strike the axe into me,” whispered the bear.

But the man took the axe and split the skull of the bear, who
was killed on the spot. So Erik and the fox became good friends
and got on well together, but when they came to the farm, the
fox said:

“T should like to go in with you, but I don’t like your dogs. I
will wait here till you come with the ram. But remember to pick
me out one that is very fat.”

Yes, the man would do so, and thanked the fox besides: for his
help. When he had put the horse into the stable he went across
to the sheep-pen.

“Where are you going?” asked his wife.

“Oh, I am only going over to the sheep-pen to fetch a fat ram
for that good fox who saved our horse,” said the man, “as I have
promised him one.”

““Why on earth give that thief of a fox any ram?” said the
woman. “ We have got the horse quite safe and the bear besides,
and the fox has stolen more geese from us than the ram is worth ;
or, if he hasn’t already taken them, he is sure to do so sometime.
No, take the most savage pair of those dogs of yours and let loose

* came from the wood ;
WELL DONE, ILL PAID I41

on him, then perhaps we'll get rid of that thieving old rascal,”
said the woman.

The man thought this was sensible advice and took two of his
savage red dogs, put them in a bag and set out with them.

“Have you got the ram?” said the fox.

“Yes, come and fetch it,” said the man, undoing the string
round the bag and setting the dogs at the fox.

“Ugh!” said the fox bounding away, “the old saying, ‘ Well
done, ill paid’ is only too true; and now I find it is also true that
one’s relations are one’s worst enemies,” said he, as he saw the
red dogs at his heels.






fl
sed
dy

ace atcha \
SSS ASS




ASHIEPATTLE AND HIS GOODLY
CREW

ONcE upon a time there was a king, and this king had heard about
a ship which went just as fast by land as by water; and as he
wished to have one like it, he promised any one who could build
one for him, his daughter and half the kingdom. And this was
given out at every church all over the country. There were many
who tried, as you can imagine; for they thought it would be a nice
thing to have half the kingdom, and the princess wouldn’t be a bad
thing into the bargain. But they all fared badly.

Now there were three brothers, who lived far away on the
borders of a forest ; the eldest was called Peter, the second Paul,
and the youngest Espen Ashiepattle, because he always sat in the
hearth, raking and digging in the ashes.
ASHIEPATTLE AND HIS GOODLY CREW 143

It so happened that Ashiepattle was at church on the Sunday
when the proclamation about the ship, which the king wanted,
was read. When he came home and told his family, Peter the
eldest asked his mother to get some food ready for him, for now
he was going away to try if he could build the ship and win the
princess and half the kingdom. When the bag was ready he set
out. On the way he met an old man who was very crooked and
decrepit.

‘Where are you going ?”’ said the man.

“I’m going into the forest to make a trough for my father. He
doesn’t like to eat at table in our company,” said Peter.

“Trough it shall be!” said the man. ‘What have you got in
that bag of yours?” he added.

“ Dung,” said Peter.

“ Dung it shall be,” said the man. Peter then went into the
forest and began to cut and chop away at the trees and work
away as hard as he could, but in spite of all his cutting and
chopping he could only turn out troughs. Towards dinner time

he wanted something to eat and opened his bag. But there was

not a crumb of food in it. As he had nothing to live upon and as
he did not turn out anything but troughs, he became tired of the
work, took his axe and bag on his shoulder and went home to his
mother. .

Paul then wanted to set out to try his luck at building the ship
and winning the princess and half the kingdom. He asked his
mother for provisions, and when the bag was ready he threw it
over his shoulder and went on his way to the forest. On the road
he met the old man, who was very crooked and decrepit.

‘Where are you going?” said the man.

‘“‘Oh, I am going into the forest to make a trough for our
sucking pig,” said Paul.

“ Pig-trough it shall be,” said the man. ‘‘ What have you got
in that bag of yours ?” added the man.

“Dung,” said Paul.

“ Dung it shall be,” said the man.
144 ASHIEPATTLE AND His GOODLY CREW

Paul then began felling trees and working away as hard as he
could, but no matter how he cut and how he worked he could only
turn out pig-troughs. He did not give in, however, but worked
away till far into the afternoon before he thought of taking any
food ; then all at once he became hungry and opened his bag, but
not a crumb could he find. Paul became so angry he turned the
bag inside out and struck it against the stump of a tree; then he
took his axe, went out of the forest and set off homewards.

As soon as Paul returned, Ashiepattle wanted to set out and
asked his mother for a bag of food.

“Perhaps I can manage to build the ship and win the princess
and half the kingdom,” said he.

“Well, I never heard the like,” said his mother. “ Are you
likely to win the princess, you, who never do anything but root
and dig in the ashes? No, you shan’t have any bag with food!”

Ashiepattle did not give in, however, but he prayed and begged
till he got leave to go. He did not get any food, not he; but he
stole a couple of oatmeal cakes and some flat beer and set out.

When he had walked awhile he met the same old man, who
was so crooked and tattered and decrepit.

“Where are you going?” said the man.

“Oh, I was going into the forest to try if it were possible to
build a ship which can go as fast by land as by water,” said
Ashiepattle, ‘‘for the king has given out that any one who can
build such a ship shall have the princess and half the kingdom.”

“What have you got in that bag of yours?” said the man.

“Not much worth talking about; there ought to be a little
food in it,” answered Ashiepattle.

“Tf you'll give me a little of it ll help you,” said the man.

“With all my heart,” said Ashiepattle, “but there is nothing
but some oatmeal cakes and a drop of flat beer.”

It didn’t matter what it was, the man said; if he only got
some of it he would be sure to help Ashiepattle.

When they came up to an old oak in the wood the man said
to the lad, “Now you must cut off a chip and then put it back


AS BY WATER

ND

NT JUST AS FAST BY LA

E

THE SHIP WHICH W
ASHIEPATTLE AND HIS GOODLY CREW 147

again in exactly the same place, and when you have done that you
can lie down and go to sleep.” Ashiepattle did as he was told and
then lay down to sleep, and in his sleep he thought he heard some-
body cutting and hammering and sawing and carpentering, but he
could not wake up till the man called him; then the ship stood
quite finished by the side of the oak.

“Now you must go on board and every one you meet you must
take with you,” said the man. Espen Ashiepattle thanked
him for the ship, said he would do so, and then sailed away.

When he had sailed some distance, he came to a long, thin
tramp, who was lying near some rocks, eating stones.

“What sort of a fellow are you, that you lie there eating
stones?” asked Ashiepattle. The tramp said he was so fond of
meat he could never get enough, therefore he was obliged to eat
stones. And then he asked if he might go with him in the ship.

“Tf you want to go with us, you must make haste and get
on board,” said Ashiepattle.

Yes, that he would, but he must take with him some large
stones for food.

When they had sailed some distance, they met one who was
lying on the side of a sunny hill, sucking at a bung.

“Who are you,” said Ashiepattle, ‘‘and what is the good
of lying there sucking that bung?”

“Oh, when one hasn’t got the barrel, one must be satisfied with
the bung,” said the man. “I’m always so thirsty, I can never get
enough beer and wine.” And then he asked for leave to go with him
in the ship.

“Tf you want to go with me you must make haste and get
on board,” said Ashiepattle.

Yes, that he would. And so he went on board and took the bung
with him to allay his thirst.

When they had sailed awhile again, they met one who was
lying with his ear to the ground, listening.

““Who are you, and what is the good of lying there on the
ground listening ?” said Ashiepattle.
148 ASHIEPATTLE AND HIs GOODLY CREW

“I'm listening to the grass, for I have such good ears that I
can hear the grass growing,” said the man. And then he asked for
leave to go with him in the ship. Ashiepattle could not say nay
to that, so he said:

“Tf you want to go with me, you must make haste and get on
board.”

Yes, that the man would. And he also went on board.

When they had sailed some distance, they came to one who was
standing taking aim with a gun.

““Who are you, and what is the good of standing there aiming
like that?” asked Ashiepattle.

So the man said:

““T have such good eyes that I can hit anything, right to the
end of the world.” And then he asked for leave to go with him
in the ship.

“Tf you want to go with me, you must make haste and get on
board,” said Ashiepattle.

Yes, that he would. And he went on board.

When they had sailed some distance again, they came to one
who was hopping and limping about on one leg, and on the other
he had seven ton weights.

“Who are you,” said Ashiepattle, ‘and what is the good
of hopping and limping about on one leg with seven ton weights
on the other ?”

“T am so light,” said the man, “that if I walked on both my
legs I should get to the end of the world in less than five minutes.”
And then he asked for leave to go with him in the ship.

“If you want to go with us, you must make haste and get on
board,” said Ashiepattle.

Yes, that he would. And so he joined me and his
crew on the ship.

When they had sailed on some distance, they met one who
was standing holding his hand to his mouth.

““Who are you?” said Ashiepattle, ‘‘and what is the good of
standing there, holding your mouth like that?”




3
=

TO THE END OF THE WORLD IN LESS THAN FIVE MINUTES
ASHIEPATTLE AND His GOODLY CREW I51

‘‘Oh, I have seven summers and fifteen winters in my body,”
said the man; “so I think I ought to keep my mouth shut, for if
they get out all at the same time they would finish off the world
altogether.” And then he asked for leave to go with him in the ship.
“Tf you want to go with us, you must make haste and get on
board,” said Ashiepattle.

Yes, that he would, and then he joined the others on the ship.

When they had sailed a long time, they came to the king’s
palace.

Ashiepattle went straight in to the king and said the ship
stood ready in the courtyard outside; and now he wanted the
princess, as the king had promised.

The king did not like this very much, for Ashiepattle did not cut
avery fine figure; he was black and sooty, and the king did not care
to give his daughter to such a tramp, so he told Ashiepattle that he
would have to wait a little.

“But you can have her all the same, if by this time to-morrow
you can empty my storehouse of three hundred barrels of meat,”
said the king.

“T suppose I must try,” said Ashiepattle ;” but perhaps you
don’t mind my taking one of my crew with me?”

“Yes, you can do that, and take all six if you like,” said the
king, for he was quite sure that even if Ashiepattle took six
hundred with him, it would be impossible. So Ashiepattle took
with him the one who ate stones and always hungered after
meat.

When they came next morning and opened the storehouse,
they found he had eaten all the meat, except six small legs
of mutton, one for each of his companions. Ashiepattle then went
to the king and said the storehouse was empty, and he supposed
he could now have the princess.

The king went into the storehouse, and, sure enough, it was
quite empty; but Ashiepattle was still black and sooty and the
king thought it was really too bad that such a tramp should have
his daughter. So he said he had a cellar full of beer and old wine,
152 ASHIEPATTLE AND HIS GOODLY CREW

three hundred barrels of each kind, which he would have him
drink first.

“T don’t mind your having my daughter if you can drink them
up by this time to-morrow,” said the king.

“IT suppose I must try,” said Ashiepattle, “(but perhaps you
don’t‘ mind my taking one of my crew with me?”

“Yes, you may do that,” said the king, for he was quite sure
there was too much beer and wine even for all seven of them.
Ashiepattle took with him the one who was always sucking the
bung, and was always thirsty; and the king then shut them down
in the cellar.

There the thirsty one drank barrel after barrel, as long as there
was any left, but in the last barrel he left a couple of pints to
each of his companions.

In the morning the cellar was opened and Ashiepattle went at
once to the king and said he had finished the beer and wine, and now
he supposed he could have the princess as the king had promised.

“Well, I must first go down to the cellar and see,” said
the king, for he could not believe it; but when he got there
he found nothing but empty barrels.

But Ashiepattle was both black and sooty, and the king thought
it wouldn’t do for him to have such a son-in-law. So he said,
that if Ashiepattle could get water from the end of the world in
ten minutes for the princess’s tea, he could have both her and half
the kingdom ; for he thought that task would be quite impossible.

“T suppose I must try,” said Ashiepattle, and sent for the one
of his crew who limped about on one leg, and had seven ton
weights on the other, and told him he must take off the weights
and use his legs as quickly as he could, for he must have water
from the end of the world for the princess’s tea in ten minutes.

So he took off the weights, got a bucket and set off, and
the next moment he was out of sight. But they waited ‘and
waited and still he did not return. At last it wanted but" three
minutes to the time, and the king became as pleased as if he had
won abig wager. Then Ashiepattle called the one who could hear
ASHIEPATTLE AND His GOODLY CREW 153

the grass grow and told him to listen and find out what had become
of their companion.

“He has fallen asleep at the well,” said he who could hear the
grass grow ; “I can hear him snoring, and a troll is scratching his
head.” Ashiepattle then called the one who could shoot to the end
of the world, and told him to send a bullet into the troll; he did so
and hit the troll right in the eye. The troll gave such a yell that he
woke the man who had come to fetch the water for the tea, and when
he returned to the palace there was still one minute left out of the ten.

Ashiepattle went straight to the king and said: “ Here is the
water”; and now he supposed he could have the princess, for surely
the king would not make any more fuss aboutit now. But the king
thought that Ashiepattle was just as black and sooty as ever, and
did not like to have him for a son-in-law ; so he said he had three
hundred fathoms of wood with which he was going to dry corn in
the bakehouse, and he wouldn’t mind Ashiepattle having his
daughter if he would first sit in the bakehouse and burn all the
wood; he should then have the princess, and that without fail.
“‘T suppose I must try,” said Ashiepattle ; “but perhaps you don’t
mind my taking one of my crew with me?”

“ Ohno, you can take all six,” said the king, for he thought it
would be warm enough for all of them.

Ashiepattle took with him the one who had fifteen winters and
seven summers in his body, and in the evening he went across to
the bakehouse ; but the king had piled up so much wood on the
fire that you might almost have melted iron in the room. They
could not get out of it, for no sooner were they inside than the
king fastened the bolt and put a couple of padlocks on the door
besides. Ashiepattle then said to his companion :

“You had better let out six or seven winters, so that we may
get something like summer weather here.”

They were then just able to exist, but during the night it. got
cold again and Ashiepattle then told the man to let out a couple of
summers, and so they slept far into the next day. But when
they heard the king outside, Ashiepattle said :

x
154 ASHIEPATTLE AND His GOODLY CREW

“You must let out a couple more winters, but you must manage
it so that the last winter you let out strikes the king right in the
face.”

He did so, and when the king opened the door, expecting to
find Ashiepattle and his companion burnt to cinders, he saw them
huddling together and shivering with cold till their teeth chattered.
The same instant Ashiepattle’s companion with the fifteen winters
in his body let loose the last one right in the king’s face, which
swelled up into a big chilblain.

“Can I have the princess now?” asked Ashiepattle.

““Yes, take her and keep her and the kingdom into the bargain,”
said the king, who dared not refuse any longer. And so the
wedding took place and they feasted and made merry and fired off
guns and powder.

Whiie the people were running about searching for wadding for
their guns, they took me instead, gave me some porridge ina
bottle and some milk in a basket, and fired me right across here,
so that I could tell you how it all happened.





GUDBRAND ON
EE eeiee-Ssr DE

THERE was once upon a time a
man whose name was Gudbrand.
He had a farm which lay far
away up on the side of a hill, and
therefore they called him Gud-
brand on the hill-side.

He and his wife lived so
happily together, and agreed so
well, that whatever the man did
the wife thought it so well done
that no one could do it better.
No matter what he did, she
thought it was always the right
thing.

‘They lived on their own farm, and had a hundred dollars at
the bottom of their chest and two cows in their cowshed. One
day the woman said to Gudbrand:

‘“‘T think we ought to go to town with one of the cows and sell
156 GUDBRAND ON THE HILL-SIDE

it, so that we may have some ready money by us. We are pretty
well off, and ought to have a few shillings in our pocket like other
people ; the hundred dollars in the chest we mustn’t touch, but I
can’t see what we want with more than one cow, and it will be
much better for us, as I shall have only one to look after instead
of the two I have now to mind and feed.”

Yes, Gudbrand thought, that was well and sensibly spoken. He
took the cow at once and went to town to sell it; but when he got
there no one would buy the cow.

“ Ah, well!” thought Gudbrand, “I may as well take the cow
home again. I know I have both stall and food for it, and the way
home is no longer than it was here.” So he strolled homewards
again with the cow.

When he had got a bit on the way he met a man who had a
horse to sell, and Gudbrand thought it was better to have a horse
than a cow, and so he changed the cow for the horse.

When he had gone a bit further he met a man who was driving
a fat pig before him, and then he thought it would be better
to have a fat pig than a horse, and so he changed with the
man.

He now went a bit further, and then he met a man with a goat,
and so he thought it was surely better to have a goat than a pig,
and changed with the man who had the goat.

Then he went a long way, till he met a man who had a sheep;
he changed with him, for he thought it was always better to have
a sheep than a goat.

When he had got a bit further he met a man with a goose, and
so he changed the sheep for the goose. And when he had gone a
long, long way he met a man with a cock; he changed the goose
with him, for he thought this wise: ‘It is surely better to have a
cock than a goose.”

He walked on till late in the day, when he began to feel hungry.
So he sold the cock for sixpence and bought some food for himself;
“for it is always better to keep body and soul together than to
have a cock,” thought Gudbrand.
GUDBRAND ON THE HILL-SIDE 157

He then set off again homewards till he came to his neighbour’s
farm and there he went in.
“ How did you get on in town ?” asked the people.

“Oh, only so-so,” said the man, “I can’t boast of my luck,
nor can I grumble at it either.” And then he told them how it had
gone with him from first to last.

“Well, you'll have a fine reception when you get home to your
wife,” said the man. “ Heaven help you! I should not like to be
in your place.” .

“T think I might have fared much worse,” said Gudbrand; “ but
whether I have fared well or ill, I have such a kind wife that she
never says anything, no matter what I do.”

“Aye, so you say; but you won't get me to believe it,” said
the neighbour.

“Shall we have a wager on it?” said Gudbrand. “I have a
hundred dollars in my chest at home ; will you lay the same?”

So they made the wager and Gudbrand remained there till the
evening, when it began to get dark, and then they went together to
the farm.

The neighbour was to remain outside the door and listen,
while Gudbrand went in to his wife.

“Good evening!” said Gudbrand when he came in.

“Good evening!” said the wife. ‘Heaven be praised you
are back again.”

“Yes, herel am!” saidthe man. And then the wife asked him
how he had got on in town.

“Oh, so-so,” answered Gudbrand; ‘‘not much to brag of.
When I came to town no one would buy the cow, so I changed it
for a horse.”

“Oh, ’m so glad of that,” said the woman ; “we are pretty
well off and we ought to drive to church like other people, and
when we can afford to keep a horse I don’t see why we should
not have one. Run out, children, and put the horse in the stable.”

“Well, I haven’t got the horse after all,” said Gudbrand ; “ for
when I had got a bit on the way I changed it for a pig.”
158 GUDBRAND ON THE HILL-SIDE

“Dear me!” cried the woman, “‘that’s the very thing I’ should
have done myself. I’m so glad of that, for now we can have some
bacon in the house and something to offer people when they come
to see us. What do we want with a horse? People would only
say we had become so grand that we could no longer walk to
church. Run out, children, and let the pig in.”

“ But I haven’t got the pig either,” said Gudbrand, “ for when
I had got a bit further on the road I changed it into a milch
goat.”

“Dear! dear! how well you manage everything!” cried the
wife. ‘When I really come to think of it, what do I want with the
pig? People would only say, ‘over yonder they eat up every-
thing they have.’ No, now I have a goat I can have both milk
and cheese and keep the goat into the bargain. Let in the goat,
children.”

“But I haven't got the goat either,” said Gudbrand ; ‘‘ when I
got a bit on the way I changed the goat and got a fine sheep
for it.”

“Well!” shouted the woman, ‘“‘ you do everything just as I
should wish it—just as if I had been there myself. What do we
want with a goat? I should have to climb up hill and down dale
to get it home at night. No, when I have a sheep I can have wool
and clothes in the house, and food as well. Run out, children, and
let in the sheep.”

“But I haven’t got the sheep any longer,” said Gudbrand,
“for when I had got a bit on the way I changed it for a goose.”

“Well, thank you for that!” said the woman; ‘and many
thanks too! What do I want with a sheep? I have neither
wheel nor spindle, and I do not care either to toil and drudge
making clothes ; we can buy clothes now as before. Now I can
have goose-fat, which I have so long been wishing for, and some
feathers to stuff that little pillow of mine. Run, children, and let
in the goose.”

“Well, I haven't got the goose either,” said Gudbrand. ‘“ When
I had got a bit further on the way I changed it for a cock.”


“HAVE I WON THE HUNDRED DOLLARS NOW?” ASKED GUDBRAND
GUDBRAND ON THE HILL-SIDE IOI

“Well, I don’t know how you can think of it all!” cried the
woman. ‘It’s just as if I had done it all myselfi—A cock! Why,
it’s just the same as if you’d bought an eight-day clock, for every
morning the cock will crow at four, so we can be up in good time.
What do we want with a goose? I can’t make goose-fat and I
can easily fill my pillow with some soft grass. Run, children, and
let in the cock.”

“ But I haven’t got a cock either,” said Gudbrand, “ for when
I had got a bit further I became so terribly hungry I had to sell
the cock for sixpence and get some food to keep body and soul
together.”

“Heaven be praised you did that!” cried the woman. ‘‘ What-
ever you do, you always do the very thing I could have wished.
Besides, what did we want with the cock? We are our own
masters and can lie as long as we like in the mornings. Heaven
be praised! As long as I have got you back again, who manage
everything so well, I shall neither want cock, nor goose, nor pig,
nor cows.”

Gudbrand then opened the door. ‘‘ Have I won the hundred
dollars now?” he asked. And the neighbour was obliged to confess
that he had.
TEE DVI VE Wile De DUCKS



THERE was once upon a time a queen
who was out driving one winter after a fresh
fall of snow. When she had been driving some
time her nose began to bleed and she got out of
the sledge. While she was standing by the fence looking at the
red blood on the white snow she began thinking that she had
twelve sons, but no daughters ; so she said to herself: “If I had
a daughter as white as snow and as red as blood I should not care
what became of my sons.” The words were scarcely out of her
mouth when a witch came up to her.

“You shall have a daughter,” said she, ‘‘and she shall be as
white as snow and as red as blood. Your sons shall then be





THE TWELVE WILD Ducks 163

mine, but you can keep them with you until the child is
christened.”

When the time came the queen had a daughter, and she
was as white as snow and as red as blood, just as the witch
had promised, and they therefore called her Snow-white-and-
rosy-red.

There was great joy in the king’s palace and the queen was
happy beyond description, but when she remembered what she
had promised the witch she ordered a silversmith to make twelve
silver spoons, one for each prince; she also let him make one
more, which she gave to Snow-white-and-rosy-red. As soon as
the princess was christened the princes were changed into twelve
wild ducks which flew away and no ‘more was seen of them.
Away they were and away they remained.

The princess grew up tall and fair, but she was often strange
and sad and no one knew what ailed her. One evening
the queen also felt very sad, for she was no doubt troubled
whenever she thought of her sons, so she said to Snow-white-and-
rosy-red :

““Why are you sosad, my daughter? If there is anything you
want you shall have it.”

“Oh, I think it is so lonely here,” said the princess. ‘‘ Every
one has brothers and sisters, but IJ am all alone and have none.
It is that which makes me so sad.”

“You have had some brothers, my daughter,” said the queen.
“T had twelve sons, who were your brothers, but I gave them all
away to get you,” she said, and then she told her the whole
story.

When the princess heard this she had no peace. She must
and would set out to find her brothers. The queen cried and
wept, but it was of no avail, for the princess thought she was the
cause of it all, and at last she left the palace and set out on her
’ search.

She walked and walked so far out in the wide world that no
one would believe such a frail maiden could walk so far.
164 THE TWELVE WILD DUCKS

One day when she had been walking a long, long while in a
great, big forest she became tired and sat down on a tussock and
there she fell asleep. She dreamt she went further into the
forest and came to a small log hut and there she found her
brothers. Just then she awoke and straight in front of her she
saw a path in the greensward leading further into the forest.
She followed this, and after a long while she came to just such a
little log hut as she had dreamt about.

When she got inside she found no one there, but there were
twelve beds, and twelve stools, and twelve spoons, and twelve
of everything that was in the place. When she saw this she
became so glad, she had not felt so glad for many years;
for she knew at once that her brothers lived there and that
it was they who owned the beds, the stools, and the spoons.
She began to make the fire and the beds, and to sweep out
the room, and cook the food, and to tidy everything as best
she could. ;

After she had done the cooking she had some food herself, but
she forgot to take her spoon from the table. She then crept under
the youngest brother’s bed and lay down there.

No sooner had she done this than she heard a whizzing sound
in the air and all the twelve wild ducks came flying in, but as soon
as they had passed the threshold they at once became princes
again.

“How nice and warm it is here!” they said. “ Heaven bless
the one who has made our fire and cooked such good food for us.”
And so they each took their silver spoon and sat down to eat.
But when each had taken his own there was still one left lying
on the table and it was so like the others that they could not
tell the difference. They then looked at one another in great
wonder.

“It is our sister’s spoon,” they said, ‘and if the spoon is here,
she cannot be far away herself.”

“Tf it is our sister’s spoon and we find her here, she ought to
be killed ; for she is the cause of all our sufferings,” said the eldest
THE TWELVE WILD Ducks 165

of the princes, and this the sister heard as she lay under the
bed.

“No,” said the youngest,” it would be a shame to kill her for
it ; she cannot be blamed that we suffer. If any one is the cause
of it, it is our own mother.” They then began to search for her,
high and low, and at last they searched under all the beds, and
when they came to that of the youngest prince they found her and
dragged her out.

The eldest prince again said she ought to be killed, but she
cried and prayed so pitifully for herself :

‘Oh, pray do not kill me,” she said; “I have been wandering
about for many years searching for you. If I could save you, I
would willingly give my life!”

“If you'll set us free, you shall live ; for if you will, you can,”
said they.

“Only tell me how it can be done, and I'll do it, whatever it
may be,” said the princess.

“You must gather cotton-grass,” said the princes, ‘and this
you must card and spin and weave; when you have done that,
you must cut out and make twelve caps, twelve shirts, and twelve
handkerchiefs with the cloth, one for each of us; and while you
do that, you must neither speak, nor laugh, nor weep. If you can
do all that, we are saved.”

‘‘ But where shall I get the cotton-grass for so many handker-
chiefs and caps and shirts ?” said their sister.

“That we will show you,” said the princes ; and so they took
her with them to a great, big moor, which was covered with cotton-
grass, waving in the wind and glistening in the sun, so that it
shone like snow a long way off.

The princess had never seen so much before. She set to work
at once to pluck and gather the best, as fast as she could, and in
the evening when she came home, she began carding and spinning
yarn from the down of the cotton-grass.

Thus all went well for a long time. She gathered the grass
and carded it, and in the meantime she looked after the house for
166 THE TWELVE WILD DUCKS

her brothers. She cooked their food and made their beds for
them. In the evening they came flying home as wild ducks, and at
night they were princes; but in the morning they flew away
again, and were wild ducks the whole of the day.

But then it happened while she was on the moor gathering
cotton-grass one day—and if I don’t make a mistake it was the
last time she had to go there—that a young king, who governed
that country, was out shooting and came riding across the moor.
When he saw her, he stopped and wondered who the beautiful
maiden could be who was wandering about gathering cotton-grass.
He asked her, but got no answer, and he then asked her again
and wondered still more who she could be. ;

He took such a fancy to her that he wanted to take her home
with him to the palace and marry her. He told his servants to
take her and place her next him on his horse.

The princess wrung her hands, and made signs to them, point-
ing to the bags in which she had all her work ; and when the king
understood that she wanted these with her, he told his servants to
take the bags with them.

When the princess saw this, she became contented, for the
king was both good and handsome, and he was as kind and gentle
to her as a child to a doll.

When they came home to the palace, and the old queen, who
was the king’s stepmother, saw Snow-white-and-rosy-red, she
became so angry and jealous because she was so beautiful, that
she said to the king:

“Can’t you see that this woman whom you have taken with
you and want to marry is a witch; she neither speaks, nor laughs,
nor weeps.”

The king did not listen to what she said, but married Snow-
white-and-rosy-red, and they lived in great joy and splendour ;
but for all that she did not forget she had to make the shirts and
caps for her brothers.

Before the year was over the young queen had a little prince,
and this made the old queen still more angry. and jealous. In the
ti

i,



SNE WAS ON THE MOOR GATHERING COTTON-GRASS
THE TWELVE WILD Ducks 169

night she stole into the room where the queen slept, took the child
and threw it into the snake-pit ; she then cut the young queen’s
finger and smeared the blood on her mouth and went to the
king.

“Come and see,” she said, ‘‘whom you have taken for your
queen ; she has eaten her own child!”

The king then became so distressed that he nearly wept, and
said:

“‘T suppose it must be true, since I have seen it with my own
eyes, but surely she will not do it again. This time I will spare
her life.”

Before the next year was out she had another son, and the same
thing happened again. The king’s stepmother became still more
jealous and angry ; she stole into the queen’s bedroom while she
slept, took her child and threw it into the snake pit, cut the queen’s
finger, smeared the blood round her mouth, and then told the king
that she had eaten this child also.

‘You can hardly imagine how distressed the king became, and
then he said:

““T suppose it must be true, since I have seen it with my own
eyes ; but surely she will not do it again, and I’ll spare her life this
time also.”

Before the following year was over the queen had a daughter,
whom the old queen also took and threw into the snake-pit.
While the young queen slept she cut her finger and smeared the
blood around her mouth, and then went to the king and said:

“Now come and see if it isn’t true what I have said, that
she is a witch; for now she has eaten her third child
also.”

The king’s sorrow was so great there was no end to it. He
could not spare her life any longer, but was obliged to give orders
that she should be burnt alive.

When the pile was lighted, and she was about to be placed on
it, she made signs to the people to take twelve boards and place
them round the pile. On these she laid all the handkerchiefs, and
170 THE TWELVE WILD DUCKS

caps, and shirts for her brothers; but the left sleeve was wanting
in the youngest brother’s shirt, for she had not been able to get it
ready. No sooner was this done, than they heard a whiz anda
whirr in the air, and the twelve wild ducks came flying across
from the forest. Each one took his clothes in his bill and
flew off.

“You can see now,” said the wicked queen to the king, “she
is really a witch; make haste and burn her before the pile is
burnt out.”

“Oh,” said the king, ‘‘we have plenty of wood; the forest is
close at hand. I want to wait a bit, for J should like to see what
the end of all this will be.”

Just then the twelve princes came riding along the road, all as
handsome and well-made as one could wish to see; but the
youngest prince had a duck’s wing instead of a left arm.

“What does all this mean?” asked the princes.

“My queen is to be burnt because she is a witch, and has
eaten her own children ;” answered the king.

“She has not eaten her children,” said the prince. ‘ Speak
sister! Now that you have saved us, save yourself!”

Then Snow-white-and-rosy-red spoke and told them how all
had happened, that every time a child was born the old queen,
the king’s stepmother, had stolen into her room in the night,
taken the child from her, and cut her finger, and smeared the
blood around her mouth.

The princes then took the king and led him to the snake-pit.
There lay the three children playing with snakes and toads, and
finer children you could not see anywhere. The king took them
with him, and carried them to his stepmother, and asked her what
punishment she thought ought to be given to any one who could
be wicked enough to betray an innocent queen and three innocent
children.

“He ought to be tied between twelve wild horses, and torn to
pieces,” said the old queen.

“You have pronounced your own doom, and now you will








THERE LAY THE THREE CHILDREN PLAYING WITH SNAKES AND TOADS
THE TWELVE WILD DUCKS 173

have to submit to it,” said the king. And so the wicked old queen
was tied between twelve wild horses and torn to pieces.

But Snow-white-and-rosy-red took the king and her children
and the twelve princes to her parents, and told them all that had
happened. There was now great joy and gladness over the whole
kingdom, because the princess was saved, and because she had
also set free her twelve brothers.


THE BEAR ANDERE FOX

1. SLIP PINE-ROOT, GRIP FOX-FOOT

ONncE upon a time there was a bear, who sat on a sunny hill-side
taking a nap. Just then a fox came slinking by and saw him.

“Aha! Have I caught you napping, grandfather? See if I
don’t play you a trick this time!” said Reynard to himself.

He then found three wood-mice and laid them on a stump of a
tree just under the bear’s nose.

“Boo! Bruin! Peter the hunter is just behind that stump!”
shouted the fox right into the bear’s ear, and then took to his
heels and made off into the wood.

The bear woke at once, and when he saw the three mice he
became so angry that he lifted his paw and was just going to
strike them, for he thought it was they who had shouted in his ear.
THE BEAR AND THE Fox 175

But just then he saw Reynard’s tail between the bushes, and he
set off at such a speed that the branches crackled under him,
and Bruin was soon so close upon Reynard that he caught him
by the right hind leg just as he was running into a hole under a
pine-tree.

Reynard was now in a fix; but he was not to be outwitted, and
he cried :

“Slip pine-root, grip fox-foot,” and so the bear let go his hold;
but the fox laughed far down in the hole, and said:

“T sold you that time, also, grandfather !”

“ Out of sight is not out of mind!” said the bear, who was in
a fine fury.

2. THE BEAR AND THE FOX MAKE A WAGER

Tue other morning, when Bruin came trudging across the moor
with a fat pig, Master Reynard was lying on a stone by the moor-
side.

“Good day, grandfather!” said the fox. ‘ What nice thing
have you got there?”

“ Pork,” said the bear.

“T have got something tasty as well,” said the fox.

“What's that ?” said the bear.

“It’s the biggest bees’ nest I ever found,” said Reynard.

“ Ah, indeed,” said the bear grinning, and his mouth began to
water; he thought a little honey would be so nice. ‘Shall we
change victuals ?” he said.

“No, I won't do that,” said Reynard. But they made a wager
about naming three kinds of trees. If the fox could say them
quicker than the bear, he was to have one bite at the pig; but if
the bear could say them quicker, he was to have one suck at the
’ bees’ nest. The bear thought he would be able to suck all the
honey up at one gulp.
176 THE BEAR AND THE FOX

“Well,” said the fox, ‘that’s all well and good, but if I win
you must promise to tear off the bristles where I want to have a
bite,” he said.

“Well I suppose I must, since you are too lazy yourself ;”
said the bear.

Then they began to name the trees:

“« Spruce, fir, pine,” growled the bear. His voice was very gruff.
But all these were only different names of one kind of tree. é

“Ash, aspen, oak,” screeched the fox, so that the forest
resounded. He had thus won the bet, and so he jumped down,
took the heart out of the pig at one bite and tried to run off. But
the bear was angry, because he had taken the best bit of the whole

pig, and seized hold of him by his tail and held him fast.
, “‘ Just wait a bit,” said the bear, who was furious.

“Never mind, grandfather ; if you'll let me go, you shall have
a taste of my honey,” said the fox.

When the bear heard this, he let go his hold and the fox
jumped up on the stone after the honey.

“Over this nest,” said Reynard, ‘“T’'ll put a leaf, and in the
leaf there is a hole, through which you can suck the honey.” He
then put the nest right up under the bear’s nose, pulled away the
leaf, jumped on to the stone, and began grinning and laughing ; for
there was neither honey nor honeycomb in the nest. It was a
wasps’ nest, as big as a man’s head, full of wasps, and out they
swarmed and stung the bear in his eyes and ears and on his mouth
and snout. He had so much to do with scratching them off him,
that he had no time to think of Reynard. ,

Ever since the bear has been afraid of wasps.

3. THE BEAR AND THE FOX GO INTO PARTNERSHIP

Once the fox and the bear made up their minds to have a field in
common. They found a small clearing far away in the forest,
where they sowed rye the first year.


Ih tel





“WHAT NICE THING HAVE YOU GOT THERE?" ASKED THE FOX,

‘© PORK," SAID THE BEAR.


THE BEAR AND THE Fox 179

“Now we must share and share alike,” said Reynard ; “if you
will have the roots, I will have the tops,” he said.

Yes, Bruin was quite willing ; but when they had thrashed the
crop, the fox got all the corn, while the bear got nothing but the
roots and tares.

Bruin didn’t like this, but the fox said it was only as they had
agreed.

“This year I am the gainer,” said the fox ; “ another year it will
be your turn; you can then have the tops and I will be satisfied
with the roots.”

Next spring the fox asked the bear if he didn’t think turnips
would be the right thing for that year.

“Yes, that’s better food than corn,” said the bear ; and the fox
thought the same.

When the autumn came the fox took the turnips, but the bear
only got the tops.

The bear then became so angry that he parted company then
and there with Reynard.


180 THE BEAR AND THE FOX

4. REYNARD WANTS TO TASTE HORSEFLESH

One day the bear was lying eating a horse, which he had killed.
Reynard was about again and came slinking along, his mouth
watering for a tasty bit of the horse-flesh.

He sneaked in and out and round about till he came up
behind the bear, when he made a spring to the other side of the
carcase, snatching a piece as he jumped across.

The bear was not slow either; he made a dash after Reynard
and caught the tip of his red tail in his paw. Since that time the
fox has always had a white tip to his tail.

“Wait a bit, Reynard, and come here,” said the bear, “and I'll
teach you how to catch horses.”

Yes, Reynard was quite willing to learn that, but he didn’t
trust himself too near the bear.

‘“When you see a horse lying asleep in a sunny place,” said
the bear, “ you must tie yourself fast with the hair of his tail to
your brush, and then fasten your teeth in his thigh,” he said.

Before long the fox found a horse lying asleep on a sunny hill-
side; and so he did as the bear had told him; he knotted and tied
himself well to the horse with the hair of the tail and then fastened
his teeth into his thigh.

Up jumped the horse and began to kick and gallop, so that
Reynard was dashed against stock and stone, and was so bruised
and battered, that he nearly lost his senses.

All at once a hare rushed by. ‘ Where are you off to in such
a hurry, Reynard ?” said the hare.

“T’m having a ride, Bunny!” said the fox.

The hare sat up on his hind legs and laughed till the sides of’
THE BEAR AND THE FOX 181

his mouth split right up to his ears, at the thought of Reynard
having such a grand ride; but since then the fox has never
thought of catching horses again.

That time it was Bruin who for once had the better of Reynard ;
otherwise they say the bear is as simple-minded as the trolls.




TEE COCK WHO) PEUESINTO THE
BREWING-VAT

Once upon a time there was a cock and a hen, who were out in a
field scratching and scraping and pecking.

All at once the hen found a barleycorn, and the cock found a
bur of hops, and so they made up their minds they would make
some malt and brew beer for Christmas.

“‘T plucked the barley and I malted the corn and brewed the
beer, and the beer is good,” cackled the hen.

‘“‘Ts the wort strong enough?” said the cock, and flew up to
the edge of the vat to taste it ; but when he stooped down to take a
sip, he began flapping with his wings and fell on his head into the
vat and was drowned.
THE COCK WHO FELL INTO THE BREWING VaT 183

When the hen saw this, she was quite beside herself; she
flew on to the hearth and began to scream and cry:

“Got, got, got, drowned! got, got, got, drowned!” and this
she went on crying all the time and would not stop.

“What is the matter with you, Mother Tup, since you are
crying and grieving so?” asked the hand-quern.

“Oh, Father Tup has fallen into the brewing-vat and got
drowned and there he lies dead!” said the hen ; “ that’s the reason
I cry and grieve.”

“Well, if I can’t do any thing else, I will grind and groan,”
said the hand-quern, and began grinding as fast as it could.

When the stool heard this, it said:

“What’s the matter with you, quern, since you groan and
grind so fast?”

“Oh, Father Tup has fallen into the brewing-vat and got
drowned ; Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth, crying and griev-
ing ; therefore I grind and groan,” said the hand-quern.

“ Well, if I can’t do anything else I shall creak,” said the stool,
and began creaking and cracking.

This the door heard, so it said :

“What’s the matter with you? Why are you creaking,
stool?”

“Oh, Father Tup has fallen into the brewing-vat and got
drowned ; Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and griev-
ing, and the hand-quern is grinding and groaning; therefore I
creak and crack and crackle,” said the stool.

“Well, if I can’t do anything else, I'll bang and slam and
whine and whistle,” said the door, and began opening and shutting
and slamming and banging till it went through one’s bones and
marrow to hear it.

This the dust-bin heard.

“Why are you slamming and banging like that, door ?” said
the bin.

“Oh, Father Tup fell into the brewing-vat and got drowned ;
184 THE COCK WHO FELL INTO THE BREWING VAT

Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and grieving; the
hand-quern is grinding and groaning; the stool is creaking and
cracking; therefore I keep slamming and banging,” said the
door.

“Well, if I can’t do anything else, I’ll fume and smoke,” said
the dust-bin, and began fuming and smoking, and sending the dust
up in clouds all over the room.

This the hay-rake saw, as it stood peeping in through the
window.

““Why are you raising the dust like that, dust-bin ?” asked
the rake.

‘Oh, Father Tup fell into the brewing-vat and got drowned ;
Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and grieving, the hand-
quern is grinding and groaning, the stool is creaking and crack-
ing; the door is slamming and banging; therefore I keep fuming
and smoking,” said the dust-bin.

“Well, if I can’t do anything else, P’ll rake and rend,” said the
rake, and began rending and raking.

This the aspen-tree saw, as it looked on.

“Why do you rend and rake like that, rake?” said the
tree.

“Oh, Father Tup fell into the brewing-vat and got drowned ;
Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and grieving; the
hand-quern is grinding and groaning; the stool is creaking and
cracking ; the door is slamming and banging ; the dust-bin is fuming
and smoking ; therefore I keep rending and raking,” said the
rake.

“Well, if I can’t do anything else,” said the aspen, “I will
quiver and quake.”

This the birds noticed. ‘Why do you quiver and quake like
that ?” said the birds to the tree.

“Oh, Father Tup fell into the brewing-vat and got drowned ;
Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and grieving; the
hand-quern is grinding and groaning; the stool is creaking and
-
a

y =

NG Al lt i Ne
i i i Ns

‘ WE
: NA ~ iq ee r :
We

Ay



THE MAN BEGAN PULLING THE BESOM TO PIECES, AND HIS WIFE TOOK ONE
LADLEFUL OF PORRIDGE AFTER ANOTHER AND DAUBED IT ALL
OVER THE PLACE,
THE COCK WHO FELL INTO THE BREWING VaT_ 187

cracking; the door is slamming and banging; the dust-bin is fuming
and smoking; the rake is rending and raking; therefore I quiver
and quake,” said the aspen.

“Well, if we can’t do anything else we will pluck off our
feathers,” said the birds, and began pecking and plucking till
the feathers flew about the farm like snow.

The farmer stood looking on, and when he saw the feathers
flying about he asked the birds :

“Why are you plucking off your feathers like that, birds ?”

“Oh, Father Tup fell into the brewing-vat and got drowned;
Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and grieving; the
hand-quern is grinding and groaning; the stool is creaking and
cracking; the door is slamming and banging; the dust-bin is
fuming and smoking; the rake is rending and raking; the aspen
is quivering and quaking: therefore we keep pecking and pluck-
ing,” said the birds.

“Well, if I can’t do anything else I will pull the besoms
to pieces,” said the farmer, and began tugging and pulling the
besoms to pieces, so that the twigs flew about, both east and
west. .

His wife was boiling the porridge for supper when she saw
this.

‘“Why are you pulling the besoms to pieces, husband?” said
she.

“Oh, Father Tup fell into the brewing-vat and got drowned ;
Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and grieving; the
hand-quern is grinding and groaning; the stool is creaking and
creaking; the door is slamming and banging; the dust-bin is
fuming and smoking; the rake is rending and raking; the aspen
is quivering and quaking; the birds are pecking and plucking off
their feathers: therefore I am pulling the besom to pieces,” said
the man.

“Well, then, I’ll daub the walls all over with porridge,” she
said. And she set about it there and then, and took one ladleful
188 THE COCK WHO FELL INTO THE BREWING VAT

after another and smeared the porridge all over the walls, so that
no one could see what they were made of.

Then they kept the burial feast of the cock who fell into the
brewing-vat. And if you don’t believe it, you had better go there
and taste both the beer and the porridge.





AND
DEE SOx

THERE was once a cock who
stood on a dunghill, crowing and flapping
his wings.

A fox just then came strolling by.

“Good-day,” said the fox; ‘that’s
a very fine crow, but can you stand on
one leg and crow with your eyes shut,
as your father did?”
190 THE COCK AND THE FOx

“T can easily do that,” said the cock, and stood on one
leg and crowed. But he only shut one eye, and then he
strutted about flapping his wings as if he had done something
grand.

“That was very nice,” said the fox; “almost as nice as when
the parson chants in church; but can you stand on one leg and
crow with both your eyes shut at the same time? I scarcely
think you can,” said Reynard. ‘No; that father of yours, he was
really wonderful.”

“Oh, I can do that as well,” said the cock, and began to crow
standing on one leg and closing both his eyes, when all of a
sudden the fox made a dash at him, caught him by the neck, and
slung him across his back, and before he had finished his crow
Reynard had set off with him for the forest as quickly as he
could.

When they got under an old pine-tree Reynard threw the
cock down, put his paw on his breast, and was going to help himself
to a tasty bit.

“You are not so pious as your father, Reynard,” said the
cock; ‘he always crossed himself and said grace before his
meals.”

Reynard thought he ought to show a little piety, so he let go
his hold and was just going to say grace when up flew the cock
and settled in the tree above.

“Tl be even with you yet,” said the fox to himself and went
off. He soon returned with a couple of chippings which the
woodcutters had left behind.

The cock kept peeping and peering to see what it could
be.

“What have you got there?” he said.

‘‘Oh, some letters I have got from the Pope in Rome,” said
the fox. ‘Won't you help me to read them, for I am getting rather
shortsighted myself?”

““T would with pleasure, but I dare not just now,” said the
THE COCK AND THE Fox 191

cock ; “there is a man coming along with a gun; I see him from
behind the tree—I see him!”

When the fox heard the cock prating about a man with a gun
he took to his heels as fast as he could.

That time it was the cock who outwitted Reynard.




Li

~ Sh, oy, f
y oS XK ener oo ; Go yy
d Yi, ama a VAL

Mitt py lh,


i ‘ K Soe
ve \
\

y NN

Rs)



THE, THREE. PRINCESSES IN THE;
BLUE MOUNTAIN

THERE were once upon a time a king and queen who had no
children, and they took it so much to heart that they hardly ever
had a happy moment. One day the king stood in the portico and
looked out over the big meadows and all that was his. Buthe felt
he could have no enjoyment out of it all, since he did not know
THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN 193

what would become of it after his time. As he stood there ponder-
ing, an old beggar woman came up to him and asked him for a trifle
in heaven’s name. She greeted him and curtsied, and asked what
ailed the king, since he looked so sad.

“You can’t do anything to help me, my good woman,” said the
king; ‘it’s no use telling you.”



‘I am not so sure about that,” said the beggar woman. “ Very
little is wanted when luck is in the way. The king is thinking
that he has no heir to his crown and kingdom, but he need not
mourn on that account,” she said. ‘The queen shall have three
daughters, but great care must be taken that they do not come
out under the open heavens before they are all fifteen years old;
otherwise a snowdrift will come and carry them away.”

N
194 THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN

When the time came the queen had a beautiful baby girl; the
year after she had another, and the third year she also had a girl.



The king and queen were glad beyond all measure; but
although the king was very happy, he did not forget to set a
watch at the palace door, so that the princesses should not get out.



As they grew up they became both fair and beautiful, and all
went well with them in every way. Their only sorrow was that
they were not allowed to go out and play like other children.
For all they begged and prayed their parents, and for all they
besought the sentinel, it was of no avail; go out they must not
before they were fifteen years old, all of them.

So one day, not long before the fifteenth birthday of the
youngest princess, the king and the queen were out driving, and
the princesses were standing at the window and looking out. The
THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN 195

sun was shining, and everything looked so green and beautiful that
they felt they must go out, happen what might. So they begged
and entreated and urged the sentinel, all three of them, that he
should let them down into the garden. ‘ He could see for himself
how warm and pleasant it was; no snowy weather could come on
such a day.” Well, he didn’t think it looked much like it either,
and if they must go they had better go, the soldier said; but it
must only be for a minute, and he himself would go with them
and look after them.

When they got down into the garden they ran up and
down, and filled their laps with flowers and green leaves, the
prettiest they could find. At last they could manage no more,
but just as they were going indoors they caught sight of a large
rose at the other end of the garden. It was many times prettier
than any they had gathered, so they must have that also. But
just as they bent down to take the rose a big dense snowdrift
came and carried them away.

There was great mourning over the whole country, and the
king made known from all the churches that any one who could
save the princesses should have half the kingdom and his golden
crown and whichever princess he liked to choose.

You can well understand there were plenty who wanted to
gain half the kingdom, and a princess into the bargain; so there
were people of both high and low degree who set out for all
parts of the country. But there was no one who could find the
princesses, or even get any tidings of them.

When all the grand and rich people in the country had had
their turn, a captain and a lieutenant came to the palace, and
wanted to try their luck. The king fitted them out both with
silver and gold, and wished them success on their journey.

Then came a soldier, who lived with his mother in a little
cottage some way from the palace. He had dreamt one night that
he also was trying to find the princesses. When the morning
came he still remembered what he had dreamt, and told his mother
about it.
196 THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN

“Some witchery must have got hold of you,” said the woman,
“but you must dream the same thing three nights running, else
there is nothing in it.” And the next two nights the same thing
happened ; he had the same dream, and he felt he must go. So
he washed himself and put on his uniform, and went into the
kitchen at the palace. It was the day after the captain and the
lieutenant had set out.

“You had better go home again,” said the king, ‘the prin-
cesses are beyond your reach, I should say; and besides I have









THE SOLDIER'S MOTHER LIVED IN A LITTLE COTTAGE.

spent so much money on outfits that I have nothing left to-day.
You had better come back another time.”

“If I go, I must go to-day,” said the soldier. ‘Money I do
not want; I only need a drop in my flask and some food in my
wallet,” he said; ‘but it must be a good walletful—as much
meat and bacon as I can carry.”

Yes, that he might have if that was all he wanted.

So he set off, and he had not gone many miles before he over-
took the captain and the lieutenant.

“Where are you going?” asked the captain, when he saw the
man in uniform.


TINEL TO LET THEM

D ENTREATED THE SEN
N INTO THE GARDEN

CESSES BEGGED AN

N

\THE PRI

DOW:
THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN 199

“T am going to try if I can find the princesses,” answered the
soldier.

““So are we,” said the captain, “and since your errand is the
same you may keep company with us, for if we don’t find them,
you are not likely to find them either, my lad,” said he.

When they had gone awhile the soldier left the high road, and
took a path into the forest.

“Where are you going?” said the captain; ‘“‘itis best to follow
the high road.”

“That may be,” said the soldier, “but this is my way.”

He kept to the path, and when the others saw this they turned
round and followed him. Away they went further and further,
far across big moors and along narrow valleys.

At last it became lighter, and when they had got out of the
forest altogether they came to a long bridge, which they had to
cross. But on that bridge a bear stood on guard. He rose on
his hind legs and came towards them, as if he wanted to eat
them.

“What shall we do now?” said the captain.

“They say that the bear is fond of meat,” said the soldier, and
then he threw a fore quarter to him, and so they got past. But
when they reached the other end of the bridge, they saw a lion
which came roaring towards them with open jaws as if he wanted
to swallow them.

‘I think we had better turn to right-about, we shall never be
able to get past him alive,” said the captain.

‘Oh, I don’t think he is so very dangerous,” said the soldier ;
“‘T have heard that lions are very fond of bacon, and I have half a
pig in my wallet:” and then he threw a ham to the lion, who began
eating and gnawing, and thus they got past him also.

In the evening they came toafine big house. Eachroom wasmore
gorgeous than the other; all was glitter and splendour wherever
they looked ; but that did not satisfy their hunger. The captain
and the lieutenant went round rattling their money, and wanted to
buy some food; but they saw no people nor could they find
200 THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN

a crumb of anything in the house, so the soldier offered them some
food from his wallet, which they were not too proud to accept, nor
did they want any pressing. They helped themselves of what he
had as if they had never tasted food before.

The next day the captain said they would have to go out
shooting and try to get something to live upon. Close to the
house was a large forest where there were plenty of hares and
birds. The lieutenant was to remain at home and cook the re-
mainder of the food in the soldier’s wallet. In the meantime the



IN THE EVENING THEY CAME TO A BIG FINE HOUSE

captain and the soldier shot so much game that they were hardly
able to carry it home. When they came to the door they found
the lieutenant in such a terrible plight that he was scarcely able to:
open the door to them.

“What is the matter with you?” said the captain. The
lieutenant then told them that as soon as they were gone, a tiny,
little man with a long beard, who went on crutches, came in and
asked so plaintively for a penny; but no sooner had he got
it than he let it fall on the floor, and for all he-raked and scraped
with his crutch he was not able to get hold of it, so stiff and stark
was he.

“T pitied the poor, old body,” said the lieutenant, “and so I bent
down to pick up the penny, but then he was neither stiff nor stark
any longer. He began to belabour me with his crutches till very
soon I was unable to move a limb.”

“You ought to be ashamed of yourself! you, one of the king’s.
THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN 201

officers, to let an old cripple give you a thrashing, and then tell
people of it into the bargain!” said the captain. ‘“ Pshaw! to-
morrow I'll stop at home and then you'll hear another story.”

The next day the lieutenant and the soldier went out shooting
and the captain remained at home to do the cooking and look after
the house. But if he fared no worse, he certainly fared no better
than the lieutenant. In a little while the old man came in and
asked for a penny. He let it fall as soon as he got it; gone
it was and could not be found. So he asked the captain to help
him to find it, and the captain, without giving a thought, bent
down to look for it. But no sooner was he on his knees than the
cripple began belabouring him with his crutches, and every time
the captain tried to rise, he got a blow which sent him reeling.
When the others came home in the evening, he still lay on
the same spot and could neither see nor speak.

The third day the soldier was to remain at home, while the other
two went out shooting. The captain said he must take care of
himself, “For the old fellow will soon put an end to you, my lad,”
said he.

“Oh, there can’t be much life in one if such an old crook can
take it,” said the soldier.

They were no sooner outside the door, than the old man
came in and asked for a penny again.

“Money I have never owned,” said the soldier, ‘‘but food I'll
give you, as soon as it is ready,” said he, ‘‘ but if we are to get it
cooked, you must go and cut the wood.”

“That I can’t,” said the old man.

“Tf you can’t, you must learn,” said the soldier. “I will soon
show you. Come along with me down to the wood-shed.” There
he dragged out a heavy log and cut a cleft in it, and drove
in a wedge till the cleft deepened.

“Now you must lie down and look right along the cleft, and
you'll soon learn how to cut wood,” said the soldier. “ In the mean-
time I’ll show you how to use the axe.”

The old man was not sufficiently cunning and did as he was
202 THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN

told; he lay down and looked steadily along the log. When the
soldier saw that the old man’s beard had got well into the cleft, he
struck out the wedge ; the cleft closed and the old man was caught
by the beard. ‘The soldier began to beat him with the axe handle,
and then swung the axe round his head, and vowed that he would
split his skull if he did not tell him, there and then, where the
princesses were.

“Spare my life, spare my life, and J’ll tell you!” said the
old man. ‘To the east of the house there is a big mound; on top
of the mound you must dig out a square piece of turf, and then you
will see a big stone slab. Under that there is a deep hole through
which you must let yourself down, and you'll then come to another
world where you will find the princesses. But the way is long and
dark and it goes both through fire and water.”

When the soldier got to know this, he released the old man,
who was not long in making off.

When the captain and lieutenant came home they were sur-
prised to find the soldier alive. He told them what had happened
from first to last, where the princesses were and how they should
find them. They became as pleased as if they had already found
them, and when they had had some food, they took with them a
basket and as much rope as they could find, and all three set off to
the mound. There they first dug out the turf just as the old man
had told them, and underneath they found a big stone slab, which it
took all their strength to turn over. They then began to measure
how deep it was; they joined on ropes both two and three times,
but they were no nearer the bottom the last time than the first.
At last they had to join all the ropes they had, both the coarse and
fine, and then they found it reached the bottom.

The captain was, of course, the first who wanted to descend ;
“But when I tug at the rope you must make haste to drag me up
again,” he said. He found the way both dark and unpleasant, but
he thought he would go on as long as it became no worse. But
allat once he felt ice cold water spouting about his ears ; he became
frightened to death and began tugging at the rope.


THE LITTLE OLD MAN BEGAN BELABOURING THE LIEUTENANT WITH HIS CRUTCHES TILL HE
WAS UNABLE TO MOVE A LIMB
THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN 205

The lieutenant was the next to try, but it fared no better with
him. No sooner had he got through the flood of water than
he saw a blazing fire yawning beneath him, which so frightened
him that he also turned back.

The soldier then got into the bucket, and down he went
through fire and water, right on till he came to the bottom, where
it was so pitch dark that he could not see his hand before
him. He dared not let go the basket, but went round in a circle,
feeling and fumbling about him. At last he discovered a gleam
of light far, far away like the dawn of day, and he went on in that
direction.

When he had gone a bit it began to grow light around him,
and before long he saw a golden sun rising in the sky and every-
thing around him became as bright and beautiful as if in a fairy
world.

First he came to some cattle, which were so fat that their hides
glistened a long way off, and when he had got past them he came
to a fine, big palace. He walked through many rooms without
meeting anybody. At last he heard the hum of a spinning wheel,
and when he entered the room he found the eldest princess sitting
there spinning copper yarn; the room and everything in it was
of brightly polished copper.

“Oh dear, oh dear! what are Christian people doing here?”
said the princess. “ Heaven preserve you! what do you want?”

““T want to set you free and get you out of the mountain,” said
the soldier.

“Pray donot stay. If the troll comes home he will put an end
to you at once; he has three heads,” said she.

“T do not care if he has four,” said the soldier.
and here I shall remain.”

‘Well, if you will be so headstrong, I must see if I can help
you,” said the princess.

She then told him to creep behind the big brewing-vat which
stood in the front hall ; meanwhile she would receive the troll and
scratch his heads till he went to sleep.

“T am here,
206 THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN

“And when I go out and call the hens you must make haste
and come in,” she said. “ But you must first try if you can swing
the sword which is lying on the table.” No, it was too heavy, he
could not even move it. He had then to take a strengthening
draught from the horn, which hung behind the door ; after that he
was just able to stir it, so he took another draught and then he
could lift it. At last he took a right, big draught and he could
swing the sword as easily as anything.

All at once the troll came home; he walked so heavily that
the palace shook.

“Ugh, ugh! Ismell Christian flesh and blood in my house,”
said he.

“Yes,” answered the princess, ‘(a raven flew past here just
now and in his beak he had a human bone, which he dropped down
the chimney ; I threw it out and swept and cleaned up after it, but
I suppose it still smells.”

“So it does,” said the troll.

‘But come and lie down and Ill scratch your heads,” said the
princess ; “the smell will be gone by the time you wake.”

The troll was quite willing, and before long he fell asleep and
began snoring. When she saw he was sleeping soundly she
placed some stools and cushions under his heads and went to call
the hens. The soldier then stole into the room with the sword
and with one blow cut all the three heads off the troll.

The princess was as pleased as a fiddler, and went with the
soldier to her sisters, so that he could also set them free. First of
all they went across a courtyard and then through many long
rooms till they came to a big door.

‘“Here you must enter; here she is,” said the princess.
When he opened the door he found himself in a large hall, where
everything was of pure silver; there sat the second sister at a
silver spinning-wheel.

“Oh, dear; oh, 'dear!” she said. ‘What do you want
here?”

“‘T want to set you free from the troll,” said the soldier.
THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN 207

“Pray do not stay, but go,” said the princess. ‘If he finds
you here he will take your life on the spot.”

“That would be awkward—that is if I don’t take his first,” said
the soldier.

‘Well, since you will stay,” she said; “you will have to
creep behind the big brewing-vat in the front hall. But you
must make haste and come as soon as you hear me calling the
hens.”

First of all he had to try if he was able to swing the troll’s
sword, which lay on the table; it was much larger and heavier
than the first one; he was hardly able to move it. He then took
three draughts from the horn and he could then lift it, and when
he had taken three more he could handle it as if it were a rolling-
pin.

Shortly afterwards he heard a heavy, rumbling noise that was
quite terrible, and directly afterwards a troll with six heads
came in.

“Ugh, ugh!” he said as soon as he got his noses inside the
door. ‘I smell Christian blood and bone in my house.”

“Yes, just think! Araven came flying past here with a thigh-
bone, which he dropped down the chimney,” said the princess.
“T threw it out, but the raven brought it back again. At last I got
rid of it and made haste to clean the room, but I suppose the smell
is not quite gone,” she said.

“No, I can smell it well,” said the troll; but he was tired and put
his heads in the princess’s lap and she went on scratching them till
they all fell a-snoring. Then she called the hens, and the soldier
came and cut off all the six heads as if they were set on cabbage
stalks.

She was no less glad than her eldest sister, as you may
imagine, and danced and sang ; but in the midst of their joy they
remembered their youngest sister. They went with the soldier
across a large courtyard and after walking through many, many
rooms he came to the hall of gold, where the third sister was.

She sat at a golden spinning-wheel spinning gold yarn, and
208 THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN

the room from ceiling to floor glistened and glittered till it hurt

one’s eyes.
“Heaven preserve both you and me, what do you want here ?”
said the princess. ‘Go, go, else the troll will kill us both.”

Just as well two as one,” answered the soldier. The princess
cried and wept; but it was all of no use, he must and would
remain. Since there was no help for it he would have to try if he
could use the troll’s sword on the table in the front hall. But he
was only just able to move it ; it was still larger and heavier than
the other two swords.

He then had to take the horn down from the wall and take three
draughts from it, but was only just able to stir the sword. When
he had taken three more draughts he could lift it, and when he had
taken another three he swung it as easily as if it had been a
feather.

The princess then settled with the soldier to do the same as
her sisters had done. As soon as the troll was well asleep she
would call the hens, and he must then make haste and come in and
put an end to the troll.

All of a sudden they heard such at hundering, rambling noise,
as if the walls and roof were tumbling in.

“Ugh! Ugh! I smell Christian blood and bone in my
house,” said the troll sniffing with all his nine noses.

“Yes, you never saw the like! Just now a raven flew past
here and dropped a human bone down the chimney. I threw it
out, but the raven brought it back and this went on for some
time,” said the princess; but she got it buried at last, she said,
and she had both swept and cleaned the place, but she supposed
it still smelt.

“Yes, I can smell it well,” said the troll.

“Come here and lie down in my lap and I will scratch your
heads,” said the princess. ‘The smell will be all gone when you
awake.”

He did so, and when he was snoring at his best she put stools
and cushions under the heads so that she could get away to call the
THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN 209

hens. The soldier then came in in his stockinged feet and struck
at the troll, so that eight of the heads fell off at one blow. But
the sword was too short and did not reach far enough ; the ninth
head woke up and began to roar.

“Ugh! Ugh! I smell a Christian.”

“Yes, here he is,” answered the soldier, and before the troll
could get up and seize hold of him the soldier struck him another
blow and the last head rolled along the floor.

You can well imagine how glad the princesses became now
that they no longer had to sit and scratch the trolls’ heads ; they
did not know how they could do enough for him who had saved
them. The youngest princess took off her gold ring and knotted it in
his hair. They then took with them as much gold and silver as
they thought they could carry and set off on their way home.

As soon as they tugged at the rope the captain and the
lieutenant pulled up the princesses, the one after the other. But
when they were safely up the soldier thought it was foolish of
him not to have gone up before the princesses, for he had not very
much belief in his comrades. He thought he would first try them,
so he put a heavy lump of gold in the basket and got out of the
way. When the basket was half-way up they cut the rope and
the lump of gold fell to the bottom with such a crash that the
pieces flew about his ears.

“Now we are rid of him,” they said, and threatened the
princesses with their life if they did not say that it was they who
had saved them from the trolls. They were forced to agree to
this, much against their will, and especially the youngest princess ;
but life was precious, and so the two who were strongest had their
way.

When the captain and lieutenant got home with the princesses
you may be sure there were great rejoicings at the palace. The
king was so glad he didn’t know which leg to stand on ; he brought
out his best wine from his cupboard and wished the two officers
welcome. If they had never been honoured before they were
honoured now in full measure, and no mistake. They walked and

Oo
210 THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN

strutted about the whole of the day, as if they were the cocks of
the walk, since they were now going to have the king for father-
in-law. For it was understood they should each have whichever
of the princesses they liked and half the kingdom between them.
They both wanted the youngest princess, but for all they prayed
and threatened her it was of no use; she would not hear or listen
to either.

They then asked the king if they might have twelve men to
watch over her; she was so sad and melancholy since she had
been in the mountain that they were afraid she might do some-
thing to herself.

Yes, that they might have, and the king himself told the watch
they must look well after her and follow her wherever she went
and stood.

They then began to prepare for the wedding of the two eldest
sisters; it should be such a wedding as never was heard or
spoken of before, and there was no end to the brewing and
the baking and the slaughtering.

In the meantime the soldier walked and strolled about down
in the other world. He thought it was hard that he should see
neither people nor daylight any more; but he would have to do
something, he thought, and so for many days he went about
from room to room and opened all the drawers and cupboards
and searched about on the shelves and looked at all the fine things
that were there. At last he came to a drawer in a table, in
which there lay a golden key; he tried this key to all the locks
he could find, but there was none it fitted till he came to a little
cupboard over the bed, and in that he found an old rusty whistle.
“T wonder if there is any sound in it,” he thought, and put it to
his mouth. No sooner had he whistled than he heard a
whizzing and a whirring from all quarters, and such a large
flock of birds swept down, that they blackened all the field in
which they settled.

‘“What does our master want to-day ?” they asked.

If he were their master, the soldier said, he would like to know
THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN | 211

if they could tell him how to get up to the earth again. No, none
of them knew anything about that ; ‘‘ But our mother has not yet
arrived,” they said; “if she can’t help you, no one can.”

So he whistled once more, and shortly heard something
flapping its wings far away, and then it began to blow so hard
that he was carried away between the houses like a wisp of hay
across the courtyard, and if he had not caught hold of the fence
he would no doubt have been blown away altogether.

A big eagle—bigger than you can imagine—then swooped
down in front of him.

“You come rather sharply,” said the soldier.

“ As you whistle so I come,” answered the eagle. So he asked
her if she knew any means by which he could get away from the
world in which they were.

“You can’t get away from here unless you can fly,” said the
eagle, “ but if you will slaughter twelve oxen for me, so that I can
have a really good meal, I will try and help you. Have you got
a knife ?”

“No, but I have a sword,” he said. When the eagle had
swallowed the twelve oxen she asked the soldier to kill one more
for victuals on the journey. ‘Every time I gape you must be
quick and fling a piece into my mouth,” she said, ‘else I shall
not be able to carry you up to earth.”

He did as she asked him and hung two large bags of meat
round her neck and seated himself among her feathers. The
eagle then began to flap her wings and off they went through the
air like the wind. It was as much as the soldier could do to hold
on, and it was with the greatest difficulty he managed to throw
the pieces of flesh into the eagle’s mouth every time she
opened it.

At last the day began to dawn, and the eagle was then almost
exhausted and began flapping with her wings, but the soldier was
prepared and seized the last hind quarter and flung it to her.
Then she gained strength and brought him up to earth. When
she had sat and rested a while at the top of a large pine-tree she
212 THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN

set off with him again at such a pace that flashes of lightning
were seen both by sea and land wherever they went.

Close to the palace the soldier got off and the eagle flew home
again, but first she told him that if he at any time should want
her he need only blow the whistle and she would be there at
once.

In the meantime everything was ready at the palace, and the
time approached when the captain and lieutenant were to be
married with the two eldest princesses, who, however, were not
much happier than their youngest sister; scarcely a day passed
without weeping and mourning, and the nearer the wedding-day
approached the more sorrowful did they become.

At last the king asked what was the matter with them; he
thought it was very strange that they were not merry and happy
now that they were saved and had been set free and were going
to be married. They had to give some answer, and so the
eldest sister said they never would be happy any more unless
they could get such checkers as they had played with in the blue
mountain.

That, thought the king, could be easily managed, and so he
sent word to all the best and cleverest goldsmiths in the country
that they should make these checkers for the princesses. For all
they tried there was no one who could make them. At last all
the goldsmiths had been to the palace except one, and he was an
old, infirm man who had not done any work for many years
except odd jobs, by which he was just able to keep himself
alive. To him the soldier went and asked to be apprenticed.
The old man was so glad to get him, for he had not had an
apprentice for many a day, that he brought out a flask from his
chest and sat down to drink with the soldier. Before long the
drink got into his head, and when the soldier saw this he
persuaded him to go up to the palace and tell the king that he
would undertake to make the checkers for the princesses.

He was ready to do that on the spot; he had made finer and
grander things in his day, he said. When the king heard there










THE OLD GOLDSMITH WENT TO THE PALACE AND TOLD THE KING HE WOULD
UNDERTAKE TO MAKE THE CHECKERS FOR THE PRINCESSES
THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN 215

was some one outside who could make the checkers he was not
long in coming out.

“Ts it true what you say, that you can make such checkers as
my daughters want ?” he asked.

“Yes, it is no lie,” said the goldsmith ; that he would answer
for.

“That’s well!” said the king. “Here is the gold to make
them with; but if you do not succeed you will lose your life, since
you have come and offered yourself, and they must be finished in
three days.”

The next morning when the goldsmith had slept off the effects
of the drink, he was not quite so confident about the job. He
wailed and wept and blew up his apprentice, who had got him
into such a scrape while he was drunk. The best thing would be
to make short work of himself at once, he said, for there could be
no hope for his life; when the best and grandest goldsmiths could
not make such checkers, was it likely that he could do it ?

“Don’t fret on that account,” said the soldier, “but let me
have the gold and I'll get the checkers ready in time; but I must
have a room to myself to work in,” he said. This he got, and
thanks into the bargain.

The time wore on, and the soldier did nothing but lounge
about, and the goldsmith began to grumble, because he would not
begin with the work.

“Don’t worry yourself about it,” said the soldier, “there is
plenty of time! If you are not satisfied with what I have promised
you had better make them yourself.” The same thing went on
both that day and the next; and when the smith heard neither
hammer nor file from the soldier’s room the whole of the last day,
he quite gave himself up for lost ; it was now no use to think any
longer about saving his life, he thought.

But when the night came on the soldier opened the window
and blew his whistle. The eagle then came and asked what he
wanted.

‘“Those gold checkers, which the princesses had in the blue
216 THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN

mountain,” said the soldier; “but you'll want something to eat
first, I suppose? I have two ox carcases lying ready for you in
the hay-loft yonder; you had better finish them,” he said. When
the eagle had done she did not tarry, and long before the sun rose
she was back again with the checkers. The soldier then put them
under his bed and lay down to sleep.

Early next morning the goldsmith came and knocked at his
door.

“What are you after now again?” asked the soldier. ‘You
rush about enough in the day, goodness knows! If one can-
not have peace when one is in bed, whoever would be an
apprentice here ?” said he.

Neither praying nor begging helped that time; the goldsmith
must and would come in, and at last he was let in.

And then you may be sure, there was soon an end to his
wailing.

But still more glad than the goldsmith were the princesses,
when he came up to the palace with the checkers, and gladdest of
all was the youngest princess..

“Have you made them yourself?” she asked.

““No, if I must speak the truth, it is not I,” he said, “but my
apprentice, who has made them.”

“T should like to see that apprentice,” said the princess. In
fact all three wanted to see him, and if he valued his life, he
would have to come.

He was not afraid, either of women-folk or grand-folk, said the
soldier, and if it could be any amusement to them to look at his
rags, they should soon have that pleasure.

The youngest princess recognised him at once; she pushed
the soldiers aside and ran up to him, gave him her hand, and said:

“Good dav, and many thanks for all you have done for us.
It is he who freed us from the trolls in- the mountain,” she said
to the king. ‘He is the one J will have!” and then she pulled
off his cap and showed them the ring she had tied in his hair.

It soon came out how the captain and lieutenant had behaved,


‘©] HAVE TWO OX CARCASES LYING READY FOR YOU IN THE HAY-LOFT YONDER,” SAID THE
SOLDIER TO THE EAGLE
THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE BLUE MOUNTAIN 219

and so they had to pay the penalty of their treachery with their
lives, and that was the end of their grandeur. But the soldier got
the golden crown and half the kingdom, and married the youngest
princess.

At the wedding they drank and feasted both well and long;
for feast they all could, even if they could not find the princesses,

and if they have not yet done feasting and drinking they must be
at it still.


THE WORLD’S REWARD

THERE was once a man who went into the wood to cut trees for
hurdles. But he did not find any which were as long and straight
as he wanted them to be, till he got to a rocky place, where he
heard groans and moans, as of some one in the pangs of death.
So he went to see who it was that wanted help. He found that
the groans came from under a big slab among the boulders. It
was so heavy that it would take many men to lift it. But the man
went into the wood and cut down a tree, which he used as a lever
to lift the slab with. From under it there crawled a dragon, who
then wanted to eat the man. But the man said he had saved the
‘ dragon’s life, and it was base ingratitude to want to eat him.

“May be!” said the dragon. ‘‘ But you can easily understand
that I am hungry, having lain here a hundred years and tasted no
food; besides, that is the reward one gets in the world.”

The man begged and prayed for his life, and so they agreed
that the first being they met should decide between them. If he
was of a different opinion to the dragon the man should not lose
his life, but if he thought the same as the dragon, the dragon
should eat the man.

The first they met was an old dog, who was walking along the
road under the hillside. They spoke to him and asked him to be
their judge.
THE WORLD'S REWARD 221

“Goodness only knows! I have served my master faithfully
since I was a pup,” said the dog; “I have watched many a night
and many a time while he has been sound asleep, and I have
saved the house and chattels from fire and thieves more than once ;
but now, when I can neither see nor hear any longer, he wants to
shoot me; so I ran away, and I knock about from place to place,
sniffing and begging my way till one day I shall die of hunger.
No, that is the reward one gets in this world,” said the dog.

“Then I'll eat you!” said the dragon, and was going to
swallow the man; but the man spoke so well for himself, and
begged so hard for his life, that the dragon agreed that the next
being they met should decide between them; and if he said the
same as the dragon and the dog, the dragon should eat him, and
have a good meal of human flesh, but if not, the man should get
off with his life.

An old horse then came dragging himself along the road just
under the hillside. They spoke to him, and asked him to judge
between them. Yes, that he would.

“Well, I have served my master as long as I was able to draw
and carry,” said the horse. ‘I have slaved and worked for him
till the sweat streamed from every hair, and ] have worked faith-
fully till I have become stiff and stark, and worn-out with work
and age; now I am fit for nothing, and am not worth my keep,
and sol am to have a bullet, says my master. No, that is the
reward one gets in this world,” said the horse.

“Then I'll eat you!” said the dragon, and opened its jaws wide
to swallow the man. He again begged and prayed hard for his
life, but the dragon said he wanted a mouthful of human flesh
and was so hungry that he could not wait any longer.

‘Look, there is some one coming, just as if he were sent to be
our judge,” said the man, as Reynard came slinking towards them
between the boulders. ‘‘ Good things come in threes,” said the man ;
‘let us ask him also, and if he judges like the others, you shall
eat me on the spot.”

“Very well,” said the dragon. He had also heard that all good
222 THE WORLD’S REWARD

things came in threes, and so he would agree to that. The man
spoke to the fox as he had done to the others.

“Yes, yes,” said the fox ; but he took the man aside.

‘“What will you give me, if I free you from the dragon ?” he
whispered in the man’s ear.

“You shall come home with me and be lord and master over
my fowls and geese every Thursday night,” said the man.

“This is a case which can only be settled on the spot itself,
my dear dragon,” said the fox. ‘I cannot get into my head how
such a large and mighty animal as yourself could find room under
that slab.”

“Well, I was lying up here sunning myself,” said the dragon,
“when an avalanche came down the mountain and turned the slab
over me.”

“That is very possible,” said Reynard; “but I cannot under-
stand it, nor will I believe it, till I see it,” said he.

So the man said they had better try it, and the dragon slipped
into the hole again, and just at that moment the man pulled away
the lever, and the slab shut down the dragon again with a
bang. ©

“You may now lie there till doomsday,” said the fox, ‘since
you had no pity on the man who saved you.” The dragon yelled
and groaned and prayed for himself, but the other two went their
way.

The next Thursday evening the fox set out for the farm to help
himself from the hen-roost, and hid himself behind a heap of poles,
which were standing there. When the girl went to give the fowls
their food, Reynard sneaked in, so that she did not notice him ;
and no sooner was she gone than he killed enough for eight days,
and ate till he could not move. When the girl came back in the
morning, the fox lay sleeping and snoring in the morning sunshine,
with all his four legs stretched out ; he was as sleek and round as
a big sausage.

The girl ran to fetch her mistress, and she and all the others
came back with sticks and poles, and began thrashing Reynard till


‘THIS IS A CASE WHICH CAN ONLY BFE SETTLED ON THE SPOT ITSELF,
MY DEAR DRAGON,” SAID THE FOX
THE WORLD’S REWARD 225

they almost killed him ; but at last when they thought they had
done for him, Reynard found a hole in the floor, through which he
slipped out and set off limping towards the wood.

“‘ Oh dear, oh dear!” said Reynard ;” but 1 suppose that is the
reward one gets in this world!”


THE COMPANION

THERE was once upon a time a peasant lad, who dreamt he was
going to marry a princess far away in a strange country, and she
was as red and white as milk and blood, and so rich that there
was no end to her riches. When he awoke, he thought she still
stood alive before him, and she was so sweet and beautiful that he
felt he could not exist if he did not get her; so he sold what he
had and set out in the world to find her.

He went far and further than far, and in the winter he came to
a country where all the high roads were straight and had no turn-
ings. When he had walked straight on for a quarter of a year, he
came to a town, and outside the church door there lay a large
block of ice in which stood a dead body ; and all the people who
were on their way to church spat on it as they passed it. The
lad wondered at this, and when the parson came out of the church,
he asked him what it all meant.

“He was a great evil-doer,” said the parson, “and was
punished for his ungodliness, and has been set up there to be
mocked and scoffed at.”

“What did he do?” asked the lad.

‘“When he was alive, he was a vintner,” said the parson,
“and he mixed his wine with water.” The lad did not think this
a very wicked deed ; “and when he has paid for it with his life,”


WHE

N THE PARSON CAME OUT OF THE CHURCH, THE LAD

ASKED HIM WHAT IT ALL MEANT
THE COMPANION 229

said he, “they might as well let him lie in Christian ground and
leave him in peace after death.” But the parson said that could
not be permitted on any account, for they would have to get
people to break him out of the ice ; and money would be wanted
to buy burial ground from the church, the grave-digger would
want payment for the grave, the owner of the church for the bells,
the clerk for the singing, and the parson for casting earth on the
coffin, —

“Do you think there is anybody who will pay all this for an
executed sinner ?” he asked.

“Yes,” said the lad. If he could only get him underground,
he would pay all the funeral expenses out of the little he
had.

The parson was still unwilling to bury him; but when the lad
came with two men, and asked him in their presence to perform
the ceremony, he answered that he dared not refuse. So they
broke the vintner out of his block of ice and put him in Christian
ground ; they tolled the bells, and sang over him, and the parson
cast the earth upon the coffin, and they drank of the funeral ale
till they both cried and laughed. When the lad had paid all the
expenses he had not many pennies left in his pocket.

He set out on the road again. But he had not gone far, before
a man came after him and asked him if he did not think it was
lonely to be travelling by himself.

No, the lad did not find it lonely for he had always something
to think about, he said.

The man then asked if he did not want a servant.

“No,” said the lad, ““I am accustomed to be my own servant,
and therefore I do not want any; but if I wanted one ever so
much, I could not afford to have one, for I have no money to pay
for his food or wages.”

“You want a servant; that I know better than you,” said the
man, ‘‘and you will want one you can rely upon in life and death.
If you will not have me as your servant you can take me as a
companion. I promise you, that you will find me useful and it
230 THE COMPANION

shall not cost you a penny. I'll pay my own way, and food and
clothing you need not trouble about.”

Well, on those terms he would willingly have him for a com~
panion, and after that they travelled together, the man mostly
going on in front and showing him the way. When they had
travelled a long way over hills and dales through many countries
they came to a mountain that lay across the road.

There the companion knocked and asked them to open. The
rock opened for them, and when they came far into the mountain a
troll woman came and offered them a stool. .

“Won't you take a seat? You must be tired,” she said.

“Take a seat yourself,” said the man. So she had to sit
down ; but when she had done so, she stuck fast to the stool, for it
was such that it did not let go anything that came near it. In
the meantime they walked about inside the mountain and the
companion looked around him till he saw a sword which hung
over the door.

He wanted this very much, and if he could have it he promised
the troll woman that he would let her loose.

“No,” she cried, “ask me for anything else! You can have
everything but that, for it is my Three-Sister-Sword!’’ There
were three sisters who owned it together.

“Well, then you must sit there till the end of the world,” said
the man ; but when she heard this she said that he could have it
if he would set her free. So he took the sword and went away
with it, but he left her sitting on the stool all the same.

When they had gone far across some bare mountains and
broad hills, they came to another mountain that lay across the
road. There the companion knocked and asked them to open. It
happened as before ; the rock opened for them and when they got
far into the mountain there came a troll woman with a stool and
asked them to sit down; they might be tired, she said.

“Sit down yourself,” said the companion ; and she fared just as
her sister had fared. When she sat down on the stool, she stuck
fast to it. In the meantime the lad and the companion walked
THE COMPANION 231

about inside the mountain and the companion opened all the cup-
boards and drawers till he found what he searched for. It was a
ball of gold yarn. He wanted this very much, and he promised
the troll woman that if she would give it him he would let her
loose. She said he could have all she possessed, but she would
not part with that for it was her Three-Sister-Ball. But when she
heard that she would have to sit there till the day of judgment if
he did not get it, she said he might take it after all if only he
would set her free. The companion took the ball, but he let her
sit where she was.

So they went for many days over hills and through forests, till
they came to a mountain that lay across the road. The same
thing happened as before; the companion knocked, the rock
opened, and inside the mountain a troll woman came with a
stool and asked them to sit down, for they might be tired.

But the companion said, “Sit down yourself!” and there she
sat. They had not gone through many rooms before the com-
panion saw an old hat, which hung on a peg behind the door.
He wanted that very much, but the troll woman did not want
to part with it, for it was her Three-Sister-Hat, and if she gave
it away she would be most unhappy. But when she heard that
she would have to sit there till the end of the world if he did
not get it, she said he might take it if he only let her loose,
No sooner had the companion got the hat than he told her to
remain sitting where she was, just like her sisters.

After a long time they came to a fjord. Then the companion
took the ball of gold yarn, and threw it so hard against the
mountain on the other side of the fjord that it came back to
him again; and when he had thrown it across a few times it
became a bridge. They went across the fjord on this bridge,
and when they got to the other side the man asked the lad to
wind up the yarn again as fast as he could. “For if we do not
wind it up quickly the troll women will be upon us and tear us
to pieces.” The lad wound up the yarn as quickly as he could,
and just as he got to the end the troll women came rushing along.
232 THE COMPANION

They dashed into the water so that the foam surged round them,
and tried to snatch the end; but they could not manage to get
hold of it, and so they were drowned in the fjord.

When they had walked on for some days, the companion said :

““We shall soon come to the castle where the princess lives
about whom you dreamt, and when we get there you must go
in and tell the king your dream, and whom it is you seek.”

When they got there the lad did so, and he was well received
by the king. He got a room for himself and one for his com-
panion, and when the time for dinner came he was invited to the
king’s own table. When he saw the princess he recognised her at
once, and saw that she was the one about whom he had dreamt,
and whom he should have. He told her his errand, and she
answered she liked him and would willingly have him, but first he
must go through three trials. So when they had dined she gave
him a pair of gold scissors, and said:

“ The first trial is that you take these and keep them, and give
me them back to-morrow at dinner-time. It is not a difficult trial,
I should think,” she said, with a grin, “but if you cannot do that
you will lose your life. That is the law here, and you will be
broken on the wheel and your head stuck on a stake, just like the
suitors whose skulls you see outside the windows,” for there hung
human skulls round about the palace, like crows on the fences in
the autumn.

“There’s not much difficulty in that,” thought the lad. But
the princess was so merry and boisterous and romped so much
with him that he forgot both the scissors and himself; and while
they were in the midst of the romping she stole the scissors from
him without his knowing it. When he got up to his room in the
evening and told his companion what had happened, and what the
princess had said about the scissors which she gave him to keep,
the companion said :

“Of course, you have the scissors she gave you ?”

He felt in all his pockets, but there were no scissors, and the
lad became greatly troubled when he found they were gone.






































THE TROLL WOMEN DASHED INTO THE WATER, SO THAT THE FOAM SURGED ROUND THEM, AND
TRIED TO SNATCH THE END OF THE YARN
THE COMPANION 235

“Well, well, you must be patient, and I'll try and get them
back for you,” said the companion. He then went down to the
stable, where there was a big, fat goat whieh belonged to the
princess, and which could fly many times more quickly through
the air than it could run over the ground.

Then he took the Three-Sister-Sword, and gave the goat a blow
between the horns with it, and said:

““When does the princess ride to her sweetheart to-night ?”

The goat bleated and said he dared not tell, but when he got
another blow he said the princess would be there at eleven
o’clock. The companion put on the Three-Sister-Hat and became
invisible, and then waited till she came. The princess took some
salve which she had in a big horn, and rubbed the goat with
it, and said:

“Through air, through air, over roofs and spires, over land,
over water, over hills, over dales, to my sweetheart, who awaits
me in the mountain to-night !”

Just as the goat set off the companion jumped up behind, and
away they went like the wind through the air. They were not
long on the way. All of a sudden they came to a mountain;
there she knocked, and in they rushed to the troll, who was her
sweetheart.

“ Another suitor has arrived and wants to marry me, my dear.
He is young and handsome, but I will have none other than
you,” she said, making up to the troll. “So I put him on trial,
and here are the scissors he was to look after. Now you must
take care of them,” she said. Then they laughed heartily, as
if they already had the lad on wheel and stake.

“Yes, I shall mind them and look after them, and I shall
sleep in the arms of my bride when the raven is picking the
bones of the lad,” said the troll.

Then he placed the scissors in an iron chest with three locks
to it; but just as he dropped the scissors into the chest, the com-
panion took them. No one could see him, for he had on the
Three-Sister-Hat ; and the troll thus locked the chest on nothing.
230 THE COMPANION

The keys he hid in the hole of one of his back teeth, in which he
had the toothache. It would be a difficult job to find them there,
he thought.

Soon after midnight the princess set out for the palace again.
The companion sat behind her on the goat, and they were not
long in getting home.

Next day the lad was asked to dinner at the king’s table, but
the princess gave herself such mincing airs, and was so stuck up
and proud, she would scarcely iook at the lad. When they had
dined she put on her Sunday expression, and said with a simper :

“‘T suppose you have the scissors I gave you to keep yester-
day ?”

“Yes, [ have! Here they are!” said the lad, taking them out
and banging them on the table, so that it bounded from the
floor.

The princess could not have been more angry had he struck
her in the face with them; but, notwithstanding this, she made
herself pleasant and gentle, and said :

“Since you have looked after the scissors so well, it will not
be difficult for you to keep my ball of gold yarn. You can give it
me back to-morrow at dinner-time ; but if you haven’t got it you
will lose your life. That is the law here.”

“ There’s not much difficulty about that,” thought the lad, and
took the ball and put it in his pocket. But she began again to
romp and play with him, so that he forgot both himself and the
ball; and when they were in the midst of the romping, she stole
it from him and let him go.

When he got up to his reom and told all they had said and
done, the companion said:

‘‘Of course you have the ball she gave you?”

“Yes, that I have,” said the lad and felt in his pocket ; but no,
he had no ball, and he became so troubled again that he did not
know what to do with himself.

“Well, be patient! I must try and get it for you,” said the
companion. He then took the sword and the hat and set off to a
THE COMPANION 237

smith and got a hundredweight of iron welded on to the sword.
When he came to the stable he gave the goat such a blow between
the horns that it staggered, and then he asked it when the princess
would ride to her sweetheart that night.

“ At twelve o'clock,” bleated the goat.

The companion put on the Three-Sister-Hat again and waited







THEN THEY LAUGHED HEARTILY, AS IF THEY ALREADY
HAD THE LAD ON THE STAKE

till she came rushing in with the horn and rubbed the goat with
the salve. She then said the same as the first time.

‘Through air, through air, over roofs and spires, over land,
over water, over hills, over dales, to my sweetheart, who awaits
me in the mountain to-night.”

Just as they set off the companion jumped up behind on the
goat and away they went like the wind through the air.

As soon as they came to the troll mountain she knocked
238 THE COMPANION

three times and in they rushed to the troll, who was her sweet-
heart.

“Wherever did you put the scissors I gave you yesterday, my
dear ?” said the princess ; ‘‘my suitor had got them back and gave
them to me again.”

“That can’t be possible,” said the troll, for he had locked the
chest with three locks and hidden the keys in the hole in his back
tooth. But when they unlocked the chest they saw the troll had
no scissors there. The princess then told him she had given the
suitor her ball of gold yarn.

“Here it is,” she said, “for I took it from him again without
his knowing it. But what had we better think of since he can do
such tricks ?”

The troll did not quite know, but when they had thought it
over a bit they decided to make a big fire and burn the ball; they
would then be sure he would not get it.. Just as she threw the
ball into the fire the companion stood ready and caught it. Neither
of them saw it, for he had the Three-Sister-Hat on. When the
princess had been with the troll awhile and the day began to
dawn she set off to the palace again ; the companion sat behind
her on the goat and they got home both quickly and well.

When the lad was asked to dinner the companion gave him
the ball. The princess was still more stuck up and proud than on
the day before, and when they had finished she pouted and said :

“T suppose I may have back my ball which I gave you to keep
yesterday ? ”

“Yes,” said the lad, ‘that you may. Here it is!” and he
threw it down with such force that the table gave a jump and the
king leapt into the air.

The princess turned as white as a ghost, but she soon recovered
herself and said that was well done; and now there was only
‘one little trial left.

‘Tf you are so clever that you can bring me to-morrow at
dinner-time what I am now thinking about you shall have me and
keep me,” she said.
THE COMPANION 239

The lad felt as if he had been condemned to death, for he
thought it was impossible to know what she was thinking about
and still more impossible to get it. When he came to his room
he was so excited he could not keep still. The companion said if
he would be quiet he would find a way out of the difficulty as he
had done before, and at last the lad was pacified and lay down to
sleep.

In the meantime the companion rushed off to the smith and
had two hundredweight of iron welded to the sword ; when that
was done he went to the stable and struck the goat between the
horns with it so that it staggered from wall to wall.

‘“When is the princess going to her sweetheart to-night?”
said he.

‘“* At one o'clock,” bleated the goat.

When the time came the companion stood in the stable with
the Three-Sister-Hat on, and when the princess had rubbed the
goat with the salve and uttered the same words as before that they
should fly to her sweetheart, who was waiting for her in the
mountain, she set off through the air and wind with the companion
again behind her. But this time he was not so gentle with the
princess, for every now and then he thumped her so that he almost
maimed her. When they came to the mountain she knocked at
the gate, which opened and they rushed in to her sweetheart.

When she got there she began to moan and groan and said she
did not know if the weather could have been so bad, but both she
and the goat had been beaten by some one and she was sure she must
be black and blue all over, so badly had she fared on the way. She
then told him how her suitor had given her back the ball also, but
neither she nor the troll could make out how it had happened.

“ But do you know what I have thought of now ?” she said.

No, that the troll could not tell.

“Well, I have told him to bring me by dinner-time to-morrow
that which I was thinking of—and that was your head! Do you
think he can get that, my dear?” said the princess, and began
fondling the troll.
240 THE COMPANION

“T don’t think he can,” said the troll; that he would take
his oath on; so he laughed and roared worse than a bogie; and
both the troll and the princess thought the lad was more likely to
adorn the wheel and stake, with the ravens to peck his eyes out,
than to get hold of the troll’s head.

When it got towards morning she began to get ready to set
out for the palace; but she was afraid, she said. She thought
there was some one after her and she dared not go home alone ;
the troll must go with her. Yes, he would, so he brought out his
goat, for he had one just like the princess’s and he rubbed it well
between the horns with the salve. When he had seated himself
the companion got up behind him and off they went through the
air to the palace ; but on the way the companion struck the troll
and the goat time after time, and gave them blow after blow with
his sword, till at last they sank lower and lower and at last they
nearly sank into the ocean across which they were passing.
When the troll saw that things were going so badly he hastened
on to the palace with the princess, but stopped to see that she got
in well and safely. But just as she shut the door behind her the
companion cut off the troll’s head and ran up to the lad’s room
with it.

“ Here is that which the princess thought of,” said he.

The lad was, as you can imagine, in high spirits, and when
he was asked down to dinner next day and they had finished
eating, the princess became as blithe as a lark.

“T suppose you have that which I thought of,” said she.

“Indeed, I have,” said the lad, and pulled out the head from
under the tail of his coat and struck the table with it, so that the
table and everything on it fell over.

The princess became as pale as a corpse, but she could not
deny that that was what she had thought of, and now he might
have her for his wife as she had promised.

The wedding was then kept and there was great rejoicing over
the whole kingdom. The companion took the lad aside and told
him that he must shut his eyes and pretend to sleep on the
THE COMPANION 241

wedding night, but if he valued his life, and would obey him,
he must not have a wink of sleep before he had rid the princess of
the troll-skin, with which she was covered. He would have to
flog it off her with a rod made of nine new birch besoms and strip
her of it in three tubs of milk. First he was to scrub her in a tub
of last year’s whey, then he was to rub her in sour milk, and then
rinse her ina tubof new milk. The besoms lay under the bed, and
the tubs he had placed in the corner, so everything was ready for
him.

Yes, the lad promised that he would obey him, and do what he
had said. When they went to bed in the evening the lad pre-
tended to sleep. The princess raised herself on her elbow and
tickled him under the nose to see if he slept, but the lad seemed
to sleep soundly. She then pulled him by his hair and beard, but
he slept like a log, as she thought. Then she dragged out from
under her pillow a large butcher’s knife, and was going to cut his
head off, when the lad sprang up, struck the knife out of her
hand, and seized hold of her by the hair. He flogged her with
the birch rods till they were worn out and there was not a twig
left of them. When this was done, he threw her into the tub
of whey, and then he saw what sort of a creature she was.
She was as black as a raven all over her body, but when he
had scrubbed her in the whey and rubbed her with the sour milk,
and rinsed her in the new milk, the troll-skin was gone and she
was as gentle and beautiful as she had never been before.

The next day the companion said they must set off home.
The lad was quite willing and the princess also, for her dowry had
been ready a long time. During the night the companion had
brought all the gold and silver and valuables, which had belonged
to the troll in the mountain, to the palace; and when they were
ready to set out the next day, they found the courtyard so full of
things they could hardly move. That dowry was worth more
than the king’s realm, and they could not tell how they were
to take it with them. But the companion knew a way out of
every difficulty ; there were six goats belonging to the troll, which

Q
242 THE COMPANION

could all fly through the air; and these they loaded so heavily
with gold and silver, that they had to walk along the ground,
as they were unable to rise in the air and fly, and what the goats
could not carry they had to leave behind at the palace.

So they travelled far, and further than far, till the goats at last
became so tired and worn out that they were unable to go
any further. The lad and the princess did not know what to do,
but when the companion saw they could not get on, he took
the whole dowry on his back and the goats on the top, and carried
them all till there was only a mile left to the lad’s home. Then
the companion said, ‘‘ Now I must leave you, I cannot remain with
you any longer.” But the lad would not part with him ; he would
not lose him for little or much. So he went with them another half
mile, but further he could not go, and when the lad begged and
prayed him to stop with him, or at least be present at the home-
coming at his father’s, the companion said no, that he could not.
The lad then asked him what he owed him for all his help and
assistance. If it was to be anything, it must be the half of every-
thing he got during the next five years, said the companion.

Yes, that he should have.

When he was gone the lad left all his riches behind him
and went home empty handed.

They then had such a home-coming festival, that it was heard
and spoken of over seven kingdoms, and when it was at an end,
the winter had set in; and then they began to cart home all the
gold and silver, both with the goats and the twelve horses which
his father had.

In five years the companion came back for his share. The man
had then everything divided into two equal parts.

“ But there is one thing which you have not divided,” said the
companion.

“What is that?” said the man. “I thought I had divided
everything.”

“You have a child,” said the companion; “you must divide
that also in two.”






‘©NOW THEY MUST PART FOR EVER,” SAID THE COMPANION
THE COMPANION 245

Yes, that was true enough. So he took the sword ; but just as
he lifted it to cleave the child in two, the companion seized
the point of the sword from behind, so that he could not strike.

“Are you not glad that I stopped ;you from striking that
blow ?” he said.

“Yes, I have never been so glad,” said the man.

“Well, I was just as glad when you lifted me out of the block
of ice. Keep everything you have! I do not want anything, for I
am a floating spirit.” He was the vintner who had stood in the
block of ice outside the church door, and whom all had spat upon ;
and he had been his companion and helped him because he had
given all he had to provide him peace and get him buried in
Christian soil. He had been allowed to follow him for a year, and
that was over when they parted the last time. But he had been
allowed to see him again, and now they must part for ever, for he
heard the bells of heaven ringing for him.


—




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HOME TO SUPPER

THERE was once upon a time a
woman who had a son and a
goat. The son was called Espen
and the goat they called Nanny.
- But they were not good friends,
and did not get on together, for
the goat was perverse and way-
ward, as goats will be, and she
would never go home at the right
time for her supper. So it hap-
pened one evening that Espen
went out to fetch her home, and
when he had been looking for her
awhile he saw Nanny high, high up on a crag:

““My dear Nanny, you must not stay any longer up there;
you must come home now, it is just supper time. I am so hungry
and want my supper.”
NANNY WHO WOULDN’T GO HOME TO SUPPER 247

“No, I shan’t,” said Nanny, “not before I have finished the
grass on this tussock, and that tussock—and this and that
tussock.”

“Then I'll go and tell mother,” said the lad.

“That you may, and then I shall be left to eat in peace,” said
Nanny.

So Espen went and.told his mother.

“Go to the fox and ask him to bite Nanny,” said his mother.

The lad went to the fox. ‘My dear fox, bite Nanny, for
Nanny won't come homein time. I amso hungry, and I want my
supper,” said Espen.

“No, I don’t want. to spoil my snout on pig’s bristles and
goat’s beard,” said the fox.

So the lad went and told his mother.

‘Well, go to the wolf,” said his mother.

The lad went to the wolf: ‘“ My dear wolf, tear the fox, for
the fox won't bite Nanny, and Nanny won’t come home in time. I
am so hungry, and J want my supper.”

“No,” said the wolf, “I won’t wear out my paws and teeth on
a skinny fox.”

So the lad went and told his mother.

‘‘ Well, go to the bear and ask him to slay the wolf,” said the
mother.

The lad went to the bear. ‘My dear bear, slay the wolf, for
the wolf won’t tear the fox, and the fox won’t bite Nanny, and
Nanny won't come home in time. I am so hungry and want
my supper.”

“No, that I won't,” said the bear; ‘‘I don’t want to wear out
my claws for that.”

So the lad went and told his mother.

‘Well, go to the Finn and ask him to shoot the bear.”

The lad went to the Finn. ‘ My dear Finn, shoot the bear,
for the bear won't slay the wolf, the wolf won’t tear the fox,
the fox won’t bite Nanny, and Nanny won’t come home in time, I
am so hungry and want my supper.”
248 NANNY WHO WOULDN’T GO HOME TO SUPPER

“No, I will not,” said the Finn ; “I am not going to shoot away
my bullets for that.”

So the lad went and told his mother.

“Well go to the fir,” said his mother, ‘and ask it to crush
the Finn.”

The lad went to the fir-tree: “ My dear fir, crush the Finn,
for the Finn won’t shoot the bear, the bear won’t slay the wolf,
the wolf won’t tear the fox, the fox won't bite Nanny, and
Nanny won't come home in time. I am so hungry and want my
supper.”

“No, I will not,” said the fir, “I am not going to break my
boughs for that.”

So the lad went and told his mother.

“Well, go to the fire,” said his mother, “and ask it to burn
the fir.”

The lad went to the fire: ‘‘ My dear fire, burn the fir, for the
fir won’t crush the Finn, the Finn won’t shoot the bear, the bear
won't slay the wolf, the wolf won’t tear the fox, the fox won’t bite
Nanny, and Nanny won’t come home in time. I am so hungry and
want my supper.”

‘No, I will not,” said the fire, “I am not going to burn myself
out for that.”

So the lad went and told his mother.

“Well, go to the water, and ask it to quench the fire,” she
said.

The lad went to the water. ‘‘ My dear water, quench the fire,
for the fire won’t burn the fir, the fir won’t crush the Finn, the
Finn won’t shoot the bear, the bear won’t slay the wolf, the wolf
won't tear the fox, the fox won’t bite Nanny, and Nanny won’t
come home in time. I am so hungry and want my supper.”

“No, I will not,” said the water, “I am not going to waste my-
self for that.”

So the lad went and told his mother.

“Well, go to the ox,” said she, “and ask him to drink up the
water.”
NANNY WHO WOULDN’T GO HOME TO SUPPER = 249

The lad went to the ox: ‘‘ My dear ox, drink up the water,
for the water won’t quench the fire, the fire won’t burn the fir, the
fir won’t crush the Finn, the Finn won’t shoot the bear, the bear
won't slay the wolf, the wolf won’t tear the fox, the fox won’t bite
Nanny, and Nanny won’t come home in time. I am so hungry and
want my supper.”

“No, I will not,” said the ox. ‘I’m not going to burst myself
for that.”

So the lad went and told his mother.

“Well, go to the yoke,” said she, “and ask it to throttle the

ox.”

The lad went to the yoke. ‘‘ My dear yoke, throttle the ox,
for the ox won’t drink the water, the water won’t quench the fire,
the fire won’t burn the fir, the fir won’t crush the Finn, the Finn
won't shoot the bear, the bear won’t slay the wolf, the wolf won’t
tear the fox, the fox won’t bite Nanny, and Nanny won't come
home in time. I am so hungry and want my supper.”

“No, I will not,” said the yoke. ‘I’m not going to break
myself in two for that.”

So the lad went and told his mother.

“Well, go to the axe,” said she, ‘‘and tell it to split the
yoke.”

The lad went to the axe. ‘‘ My dear axe, split the yoke, for
the yoke won’t throttle the ox, the ox won’t drink the water, the
water won’t quench the fire, the fire won’t burn the fir, the fir
won't crush the Finn, the Finn won't shoot the bear, the bear
won't slay the wolf, the wolf won't tear the fox, the fox won't bite
Nanny, and Nanny won't come home in time. I am so hungry
and want my supper.”

‘‘No, I will not,” said the axe. ‘I am not going to blunt my
edge for that.”

So the lad went and told his mother.

“Well, go to the smith,” said she, “and ask him to hammer
the axe.”

The lad went to the smith. “My dear smith! hammer the
250 NANNY WHO WOULDN’T GO HOME TO SUPPER

axe, for the axe won't split the yoke, the yoke won't throttle the
ox, the ox won’t drink the water, the water won’t quench the fire,
the fire won't burn the fir, the fir won’t crush the Finn, the Finn
won’t shoot the bear, the bear won’t slay the wolf, the wolf won't
tear the fox, the fox won’t bite Nanny, and Nanny won’t come
home in time. J am so hungry and want my supper.”

“No, I will not,” said the smith. ‘Tl not burn my coals and
wear out my sledge-hammers for that.”

So the lad went and told his mother.

“Well, go to the rope,” said she, ‘and ask it to hang the
smith.”

The lad went to the rope. “My dear rope, hang the smith,
for the smith won’t hammer the axe, the axe won't split the yoke,
the yoke won't throttle the ox, the ox won't drink the water, the
water won’t quench the fire, the fire won’t burn the fir, the fir won't
crush the Finn, the Finn won’t shoot the bear, the bear won’t slay
the wolf, the wolf won't tear the fox, the fox won’t bite Nanny,
and Nanny won’t come home in time. I am so hungry and want
my supper.”

“No, I will not,” said the rope. “I’m not going to break in
two for that.”

So the lad went and told his mother.

“Well, go to the mouse,” said she, ‘‘and ask her to gnaw the
rope.”

The lad went to the mouse. ‘‘My dear mouse, gnaw the
rope, for the rope won’t hang the smith, the smith won’t hammer
the axe, the axe won't split the yoke, the yoke won't throttle the
ox, the ox won’t drink the water, the water won’t quench the fire,
the fire won’t burn the fir, the fir won’t crush the Finn, the Finn
won't shoot the bear, the bear won’t slay the wolf, the wolf won’t
tear the fox, the fox won’t bite Nanny, and Nanny won’t come home
in time. Iam so hungry and want my supper.”

“No, I will not,” said the mouse. “I’m not going to wear out
my teeth for that.”

So the lad went and told his mother.
NANNY WHO WOULDN’T GO HOME TO SUPPER 251

“Well, go to the cat,” said she, ‘and ask her to catch the
mouse.”

The lad went to the cat. ‘My dear cat, catch the mouse, for
the mouse won’t gnaw the rope, the rope won’t hang the smith, the
smith won’t hammer the axe, the axe won’t split the yoke, the



aN ;
Sy
WY
Ds

yoke won't throttle the ox, the ox won't drink the water, the
water won’t quench the fire, the fire won’t burn the fir, the fir
won’t crush the Finn, the Finn won’t shoot the bear, the bear
won't slay the wolf, the wolf won’t tear the fox, the fox won't bite
Nanny, and Nanny won’t come home in time. I am so hungry
and want my supper.”
252 NANNY WHO WOULDN’T GO HOME TO SUPPER



“Yes, but give me a drop of milk for my kittens, and then ”
said the cat.

Yes, that she should have. So the cat caught the mouse, and
the mouse gnawed the rope, and the rope hanged the smith, and
the smith hammered the axe, and the axe split the yoke, and the
yoke throttled the ox, and the ox drank the water, and the water
quenched the fire, and the fire burned the fir, and the fir crushed
the Finn, and the Finn shot the bear, and the bear slew the wolf,
and the wolf tore the fox, and the fox bit Nanny, and Nanny took
to her heels, scampered home, and ran against the barn wall and
broke one of her legs.

““M—a—h—a—h !” bleated the goat. There she lay, and if
she isn’t dead she is still limping about on three legs. But Espen
said it served her right, because she would not come home in time
for supper that day.
THE LAD WITH THE BEER KEG

ONcE upon a time there was a lad who had served a long time
with a man north of Dovrefjeld. This man was a master at
brewing beer, and it was so wonderfully good that the like of it was
not to be found anywhere. When the lad was going to leave and
the man was to pay him the wages he had earned he would not
have anything but a keg of the Christmas beer. That he got and
off he went with it, and he carried it both far and long. But the
longer he carried the keg the heavier it got, and so he began to
look round to see if any one were coming with whom he could
drink, so that the beer might get less and the keg lighter.

After a long time he met an old man with a long beard.

“Good day!” said the man.

“Good day!” said the lad.

“Where are you going ?”’ said the man.

“T’m looking for some one to drink with me, so that I can get
my keg lightened,” said the lad.

“Can’t you drink with me just as well as with any one else?”
said the man. ‘I have travelled far and wide, so I am both tired
and thirsty.” ,

“Well, why not?” said the lad. ‘ But where do you come
from, and who are you?” said he.
254 THE LAD WITH THE BEER KEG

‘‘T am the Lord and I come from heaven,” said the man.

“J will not drink with you,” said the lad, “ for you make such
a difference between people in this world, and divide everything
so unjustly, that some become rich and some poor. No, I will
not drink with you,” said he, and trudged off again with his
keg.

When he had gone a bit on the way the keg again became so
heavy that he could not carry it any longer unless some one came
to drink with him and lessen the beer in the keg. He then met
an ugly, bony man, who came rushing along.

“ Good day!” said the man.

“Good day!” said the lad.

“Where are you going?” said the man.

“Oh, I’m looking for some one to drink with me, so that I can
lighten my keg,” said the boy.

‘““Can’t you drink just as well with me as with any one else?”
said the man. ‘I have travelled far and wide and a drop of beer
will do an-old body good,” said he.

“Yes, why not?” said the lad ; ‘‘ but who are you and where do
you come from?” he asked.

“T? Oh, I am well known. I am the Devil, and I come from
hell,” said the man.

“No,” said the lad, ‘‘ you only torture and plague people, and
whenever there is a misfortune they always say it is your fault. No,
I will not drink with you,” said the lad. So he went far and further
than far with his beer keg, till he felt it growing so heavy he
could not carry it any further. He began to look round again if
some one were not coming with whom he could drink and so lighten
his keg.

After a long time there came a man who was so thin and
shrivelled it was a wonder his bones could hang together.

“Good day!” said the man.

“Good day!” said the lad.

“ Where are you going?” said the man.

‘‘T’m looking to see if I can find some one to drink with me,” said
THE LAD WITH THE BEER KEG 255

the lad, ‘‘so as to lighten my keg a little; it is getting so heavy to
carry,” said he.
“Can't you just as well drink with me as with any one else? ”
said the man.
“Yes; why not?” said the lad; ‘but who are you?”
; y 3 J
“They call me Death,” said the man.
“J will drink with you,” said the lad, and he put down the
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‘CTHEY CALL ME DEATH,” SAID THE MAN

keg and began to pour out the beer into a bowl. ‘You are a
trustworthy man, for you treat all alike, both rich and poor.”

So he drank his health, and Death thought it was a splendid
drink; and as the lad did not begrudge him, they drank in
turn, so the beer got less and the keg lighter. At last Death
said :
256 THE LAD WITH THE BEER KEG

“T have never known drink which tasted better and did me
so much good as the beer you have given me. I feel as if I
had been born anew. I don’t know what good I can do you
in return.” When he had bethought himself a while he said
that the keg should never get empty, no matter how much they
drank of it; and the beer that was in it should become a healing
draught, so that the lad should cure the sick better than any
doctor. Death also said that when the lad came into a sick
room he would always be there and show himself to him, and
it should be a sure sign to him that when Death sat at the
foot of the bed he would be able to cure the sick with a
draught from the keg, but if he sat at the head there was no
help or cure for the sick person.

The lad soon became renowned, and was sent for far and
wide, and he helped many to health again for whom there had
been no hope.

When he came into a room and saw Death beside the sick
he foretold either life or death, and he was always right in his
prediction. He became a rich and mighty man, and one day he
was fetched to a princess far away in another land. She was
so dangerously ill that the doctors thought they could do no
more for her, so they promised him anything he might wish for
if he only saved her life.

When he came into the princess’s room he found Death sitting
at the head of the bed, but he sat dozing and nodding, and while
he sat thus the princess felt better.

“This is a case of life or death,” said the doctor, “and there
is no hope, if I see rightly,” he said; but they told him he must
save her if it should cost even the whole kingdom. He then
looked at Death, and while he was sitting dozing he made a
sign to the servants that they should make haste and turn the
bed. So Death was left sitting at the foot of it, and as soon as”
that was done he gave the princess the healing draught, and she
was saved.

‘“‘ Now you've cheated me,” said Death, ‘and we are quits.”
THE LAD WITH THE BEER KEG 257

“T was obliged to do it if I were to win the kingdom,” said the
doctor.

“That will not. help you much,” said Death; ‘ your time is
up, and now you belong to me.”

“Tet that be as it may,” said the doctor; “ but I suppose

yh 7h
i : . ,

d



“NOW YOU'VE CHEATED ME,” SAID DEATH

you'll first give me leave to read the Lord’s Prayer to the end,”
said he.
Yes, that he would; but the doctor took great care not to
read the Lord’s Prayer. He read everything else, but the Lord’s
R
258 THE LAD WITH THE BEER KEG

Prayer never crossed his lips. At last he thought he had
cheated Death for good; but when Death thought this had gone
on too long, he went to the doctor’s room one night and hung up
a large tablet opposite his bed with the Lord’s Prayer on it.

When the doctor awoke he began reading it, and did not
oethink himself of what he was doing till he came to ‘‘ Amen.”
But then it was too late.
LITTLE FRED AND HIS FIDDLE

Once upon a time there was a cottager who had an only son, and
this lad was rather weak and always ailing, so he was not able to
go out to work. His name was Fred, but being rather small for
his age he was generally called Little Fred. At home there
‘wasn’t much to bite or to munch either, so his father went about
the parish to get a place for him as a cow-boy or an errand-
boy.

But nobody wanted a lad until he came to the bailiff of the
parish; he would take him as he had just turned away his
errand-boy, and there was no one who cared to go to him,
because every one said he was a stingy old miser. ‘Something
is better than nothing,” thought the father; in any case he would
get his food, for that was all he was going to have from the
bailiff. There wasn’t a word said about clothes or wages.

But when the lad had been there three years he wanted to
leave, and so the bailiff paid him his wages for the time he had
been with him. He was to have a pennya year. “It couldn’t
very well be less,” said the bailiff, so he paid the lad three pennies
altogether. Little Fred, however, thought it was a lot of money,
because he had never owned so much before ; but he asked if he
wasn’t going to have some more, for all that.
260 LITTLE FRED AND HIS FIDDLE

“You have got more than you ought to have,” said the
bailiff.

“Shan’t I have anything for clothes, then ?”’ said Little Fred.
“Those I had on when I came here are now all in rags, and I
haven’t had any new ones from you. I have only rags and
tatters flapping and dangling about me,” said he.

“When you have got what we agreed upon, and the three
pennies besides, I have nothing more to do with you,” said the
bailiff. But he might go out into the kitchen and get a little food
in his knapsack, and then he started off along the road to town to
buy clothes. He was both merry and glad, because he had never
seen a penny before, and he couldn’t help feeling in his pocket
now and then to see if they were all three there.

So when he had gone far, and further than far, he came to a
narrow valley with high mountains on all sides; so he didn’t
know which way to get on, and he began to wonder what there
could be on the other side of the mountains and how he should
get over them. But get over them he must, and so he started.
He wasn’t very strong, and had to rest now and then, and he
would then count over his money to see how much he had.

When he got to the top of the mountain he found there was
nothing but a great big moor. There he sat down, and was just
going to see if he had his pennies all right when a beggar came
up to him before he knew a thing about it; but the beggar was so
tall and big that the lad began to scream when he really saw what
a big and long fellow he was.

“Don’t you be afraid of me,” said the beggar; “I shan’t hurt
you. I only beg for a penny in heaven’s name.”

‘God help me,” said the lad ; “I have only three pennies, and
I was just going to town to buy some clothes with them.”

‘It is worse with me than with you,” said the beggar; “I
haven’t got a penny, and I am still more ragged than you.”

“Well, I suppose you must have it, then,” said the lad.

When he had walked on a bit he became tired and sat down
to take another rest. When he looked up there was a beggar


“(DON’T YOU BE AFRAID OF ME,” SAID THE BEGGAR
LITTLE FRED AND HIS FIDDLE 263

again, but thisone was much bigger and uglier than the first, and
when the lad saw how big and ugly he was he began to scream.

“Don’t be afraid of me ; I shan’t hurt you. I only beg for a
penny in heaven’s name,” said the beggar.

“Well, God help me!” said the lad, “‘as true as I am here, I
have only got two pennies, and I was just going to town to buy
some clothes with them. If only I had met you sooner, I x

“Tt is worse with me than with you,” said the beggar. “I
haven’t got a penny, and I have a much bigger body and less
clothes.”

“Well, I suppose you must have it then!” said the lad.

When he got a bit further he became tired, and sat down to
rest ; but he had no sooner sat down than another beggar came to
him ; and he was so tall and big and ugly, that when the lad was
going to look up at him he had to look up to the sky, and then he
could really see what a very big, ugly, ragged fellow he was. And
the lad began screaming and shouting.

“Don’t you be afraid of me, my lad;” said the beggar; ‘I
shan’t hurt you, for I am only a poor beggar, who begs a penny in
heaven’s name.”

“Well, God help me!” said the lad, ‘‘as true as I am here, I
have only one penny left, and I was just going to town to buy
some clothes with it. If I had only met you sooner, I——”

“Well, I haven’t got a penny and I have a bigger body and less
clothes, so it is worse with me than with you,” said the beggar.

“Well, I suppose you must have the penny, then,” said Little
Fred. There was no help for it; now they had all had one each
and he had none.

“Now since you have such a good heart, and have given away
all you had,” said the beggar, ‘I will give you a wish for each
penny.” It was the same beggar who had got all the three
pennies ; he had only changed each time, so that the lad should
not know him again.

_T have always been wishing to hear the fiddle playing, and see
people so merry and happy that they had to dance,” said the lad ;


264 LITTLE FRED AND HIS FIDDLE

“so if | may wish what I like I wish I had such a fiddle as would
make everything that is alive dance to its tune.”

“That you may have,” said the beggar; ‘but it is a poor
wish. You must wish something better for the other pennies.”

“T have always been fond of hunting and shooting,” said
Little Fred; ‘so if I may wish what I like, I wish I had a gun
that would hit everything I aim at, if it were ever so far off.”

“That you may have,” said the beggar ; “ but itis a poor wish.
You must wish something better for the last penny.”

“T have always liked to be in company with kind and good
people,” said Little Fred ; “‘so if I may wish what I like, I wish
that no one can refuse me the first thing I ask.”

“That wasn't such a bad wish,” said the beggar, and strolled
off among the hills till the lad couldn’t see him any more. So the
lad lay down to sleep, and the next day he came down from the
mountains with his fiddle and his gun.

First he went to the storekeeper and asked for clothes, and at
one farm ‘he asked for a horse, and at another for a sledge, and at
one place he asked for a fur coat, and no one could say “No” to
him ; even the most stingy people had to give him what he asked
for. At last he travelled through the parish like a fine gentleman
with his horse and sledge. When he had gone some distance he
met the bailiff he had served. :

“Good-day, master!” said Little Fred, as he stopped and
took off his cap.

‘““Good-day !”” said the bailiff; ‘have I been your master ? ”

“Yes, don’t you recollect that I served three years with you
for three pennies ?” said Little Fred.

“ Dear me!” said the bailiff, “how you have got on! How is
it you have become such a grand fellow ?”

“ Ah, you think so, do you?” said the youngster.

“And you seem to be so merry that you must have a fiddle
with you as well,” said the bailiff.

“Yes, I always liked to see people dance,” said the lad, “ but
the finest thing I have is this gun of mine. It hits everything I
LITTLE FRED AND HIS FIDDLE 265

aim at, if it is ever so far off. Do you see that magpie in the fir-
tree yonder? What will you wager I don’t hit it from where we
are now standing ?”

The bailiff would willingly have staked both his horse and
farm and a hundred dollars besides, that he couldn’t hit it. But
as it was he would stake all the money he had in his pocket, and
wouldn’t mind fetching the magpie when it fell down, because he
never believed it was possible a gun could reach so far. Off went
the gun and down fell the magpie right in the middle of a lot of
brambles. The bailiff ran right in among the brambles after the
magpie, picked it up and showed it to the lad. But just at that
moment Little Fred took his fiddle out and began playing, and the
bailiff began to dance, and danced away while the thorns were
tearing his clothes ; but the lad went on playing and the bailiff
danced and cried and begged for himself till the rags flew about
him and till he had scarcely a thread to his back.

“Well now, I think you are almost as ragged as I was when I
left your service,” said the lad, “so now you may go.” But first
the bailiff had to pay the wager he had lost, that the boy couldn’t
hit the magpie.

When the lad came to town, he went into an inn, and began
playing, and all who came there had to dance. And he lived on
merrily and well, for he had no cares, since no one could say
“No” to him when he asked for anything.

But just as they were in the middle of the fun the watchman
came to take the lad up before the magistrate, for the bailiff had
complained about him and charged him with having waylaid and
robbed him and nearly taken his life; and now the lad was going
to be hanged—there was no help for it.

But Little Fred had the means of getting out of all trouble, and
that was the fiddle. He began to play on it, and then you should
have seen how the watchmen danced away, till they fell down and
gasped for breath.

So they sent soldiers and the guard, but it fared no better with
them than the watchmen. When Little Fred took out his fiddle,
266 LITTLE FRED AND HIS FIDDLE

they had to dance as long as he was able to play on it, but they
were done for long before he was tired. At last they came
unawares upon him and took him while he was asleep at night, and
when he was brought up he was sentenced to be hanged at once,
and away they all went to the gallows. There was such a crowd
of people to see this wonderful lad, and the bailiff was there too;
he was so pleased, because he was to get amends both for his
money and his skin and see the lad hanged into the bargain ; but it
took a long time before they came to the gallows, because Little
Fred was always weak on his legs, and now he made himself still
worse. He had brought with him his fiddle and his gun, as they
could not get him to part with them, and when he came to the
gallows and was going to mount the ladder, he halted and rested
himself on each step. When he got to the top of the ladder he
sat down and asked, if they would not grant him one thing; he
had such a wish to play a tune—just a little bit of a tune—on his
fiddle before he was hanged. ‘ Well,” they said, “it were
both sin and shame to deny him that ;” for you see they could not
say “No” to what he asked for. But the bailiff asked in heaven’s
name that they would not let him touch a string, or else there
would not be much left of any of them. If the lad was to play
the bailiff wanted to be tied up to a birch tree that stood there.
But Little Fred was not long about getting out his fiddle and play-
ing on it, and then all that were there began dancing, both those
that went on two legs and those that went on four, both the
deacon and the parson, the judge and the sheriff, men and women,
dogs and swine ; they danced and screamed the one louder than
the other. Some danced till they dropped down dead, some
danced till they fell down in fits. All had a terrible time of it, but
worst of all the poor bailiff who was tied up to the birch-tree, and
was dancing away till he scraped great bits of skin off his back.
There was no one who thought of doing anything to Little Fred
after that, and they let him go with his gun and his fiddle where
he liked. He lived happy all his days,-for there was no one who
could say “‘ No” to the first thing he asked for.
aitt>

ee



EVERY ONE THAT WAS THERE BEGAN DANCING; THEY DANCED AND
SCREAMED THE ONE LOUDER THAN THE OTHER


THE: STOREHOUSE KEY IN “THE
DISTAPE

THERE was once a rich farmer’s son who went out to woo. He
had heard of a lass who was fair and gentle, and who was both
clever in the house and good at cooking.
270 THE STOREHOUSE KEY IN THE DISTAFF

Thither he went, for it was just such a wife he wanted. The
people on the farm knew, of course, on what errand he came, so
they asked him to take a seat near to them, and they talked and
chatted with him, as the custom is, and besides offered him a
drink and asked him to stop to dinner. They went in and out of
the room, so the lad had time to look about him, and over in a
corner he saw a spinning wheel with the distaff full of flax.

‘““Whose spinning wheel is that ?” asked the lad.

\
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‘Oh, that’s our daughter’s,” said the woman of the house.
““There’s a deal of flax on it,” said the lad; ‘I suppose she
takes more than a day’to spin that,” said he.
“No, not at all,” said the woman; ‘she does it easily in one
day and perhaps less than that.”
That was more than he had ever heard of any one being able to
spin in such a short time.
THE STOREHOUSE KEY IN THE DISTAFF 271

When they were going to carry in the dinner they all went
out of the room, and he was left alone. He then saw an old key
lying in the window, and this he took and stowed well away
among the flax on the distaff. So they ate and drank and got
on well together, and when the lad thought he had been there
long enough, he said good-bye, and went his way. They asked
him to come soon again, which he promised, but he did not speak
of the matter he had at heart, although he liked the lass very
well.

Some time after he came again to the farm, and they received
him still better than the first time. But just as they were chatting
at their best, the farmer’s wife said : :

“Last time you were here something very remarkable
happened; our storehouse key disappeared all at once, and we
have never been able to find it since.”

The lad went over to the spinning wheel, which stood in the
corner with just as much flax on it as when last he was there.
He put his hand in among the flax, and said:

“Here is the key! much cannot be made by the spinning,
when the spinning day lasts from Michaelmas to Easter!”

So he said good-bye, and did not speak of the matter he had
at heart that time either.













EEE -DAUGHITER _OF—OED
MOTHER CORNER

ONcE upon a time there was a woman who had a son,
and he was so lazy and happy-go-lucky he would never
do anything that was useful. His mind was only bent on
singing and dancing; and this he did all day long, and
even far into the night. The longer this went on the
harder it became for his mother; the lad grew bigger
and bigger, and he wanted no end of food, and of
clothes he wanted more and more as he grew up; and
they did not last long, I can assure you, for he danced
and ran about both in the woods and the fields.

At last the mother thought things
were getting too bad, so she told the
lad one day he must begin and go to
work and make himself useful, else

there was nothing but star-

Dy vation left for them both.
Le ~*~ But the lad had no mind
for that; he said he would
THE LAD WHO WENT WOOING 273.

rather go and woo the daughter of old Mother Corner, for if he got
her he could live happy and contented all his days, and sing and
dance, and never trouble himself about work. When the mother
heard this she thought that was not a bad thing after all; he might
try in any case, and so she dressed up the lad as best she could,
that he might look a little tidy when he came to old Mother Corner,
and then he set out on his way.

‘When he came out of the house the sun was shining warm
and bright; but it had rained during the night, so the ground
was soft, and the moors were filled with puddles. The lad took
the shortest way across the moors to old Mother Corner, and ran
and sang as he always did, but just as he was running and jump-
ing along he came to.a bridge of logs, across a marshy bit of the
path, and from this bridge he was going to make a jump across a
puddle on to a tussock, so as not to dirty his boots, but just as he
put his foot on the tussock—plump! down he went and did not
stop till he found himself in a nasty, dark hole. At first he could
not see anything, but when he had been there awhile he caught a
glimpse of a rat, widdling-waddling about with a bunch of keys on
her tail.

“Are you there, my dear?” said the rat. “Iam so glad you
have come to see me. I have been waiting a long time for you. I
expect you have come to woo me, and that you are in a great
hurry ; but you must be patient awhile yet, for I must have a big
dowry, and I am not ready for the wedding, but I'll do my best so
that it can come off soon.”

When she had said this, she brought out some egg-shells with
all kinds of dainties, such as rats eat, and put before him, and
said: ‘You must make yourself at home and have something to
eat ; you must be both tired and hungry.”

But the lad did not much fancy such food. ‘I wish I were
well out of this and above ground again,” he thought; but he said
nothing.

‘“‘T suppose you want to be off home,” said the rat. “I know
you are longing for the wedding, so I'll make all the haste I can.

s
274 THE LAD WHO WENT WOOING

You must take with you this linen thread, and when you get up
above ground you must not look back, but go straight home ; and
on the road you must not say anything but ‘Short in front and
long behind,’” and so she put into his hand a linen thread.

“‘ Heaven be praised!” said the lad when he got above ground ;
“T shall never go down there again.” But he had the thread in
his hand, and he ran and sang as usual. But although he did not
think any more about the rat-hole, the tune had got into his head,
and he sang:

“‘ Short in front and long behind!
Short in front and long behind!”

When he got home to the door he turned round, and there lay
many, many hundreds of yards of the whitest linen, so fine that
the cleverest weavers could not weave it finer.

“Mother, mother! come out, come out!” he shouted and
cried.

The woman came running out and asked what was the matter.
When she saw the linen, which reached as far as she could see
and a bit farther, she would not believe her own eyes until the lad
had told her how it had happened ; and when she had heard it all
and felt the linen with her fingers she became so glad that she too
began to dance and sing.

She then took the linen and cut it up, and made shirts both
for the son and herself. The rest she went to the town with and
sold, and got money for. Now they both lived happy and com-
fortable for awhile. But when it all came to an end the woman
had no more food in the house, and so she said to her son that
now he must really begin and go to work and make himself
useful, else there was nothing left but starvation for both of them,

But the lad had a greater mind to go to old Mother Corner’s
and woo her daughter. Well, the woman thought that was a
good thing, for he was now better dressed and did not look so bad
after all. So she dressed and tidied him the best she could,
and he brought out his new shoes and polished them until they
THE LAD WHO WENT WOOING 275

were so bright that he could see himself in them. After that
he set out, and it all happened as before.

When he came outside the sun shone so warm and bright,
but it had rained during the night and the ground was soft and
muddy, and the moors were filled with puddles.

The lad took the shortest way across the moors to old Mother
Corner, and ran and sang as he always did. He went by a
different path this time ; but just as he was running and jumping
along he came to the bridge of logs across the marshy bit of
the path, and from this bridge he was going to jump across a
puddle on to a tussock, so as not to dirty his boots, But just
as he put his foot on the tussock—plump! down he went, and
did not stop till he found himself in a nasty, dark hole. At first
he saw nothing, but when he had been there awhile he caught
sight of a rat, who widdled-waddled about with a bunch of keys
on her tail.

“ Are you there, my dear?” said the rat. ‘ Welcome again !
It was kind of you to come and see me so soon. I know you are
quite impatient, but you must really wait awhile; for there is
something still wanting for my dowry. But when you come again
next time everything shall be ready.”

When she had said this, she brought out many kinds of dainty
bits in egg-shells, such as rats like to eat; but the lad thought
they looked like leavings, and he said he had no appetite. “I
only wish I were well out of this,” he thought, but he said
nothing.

After a while the rat said:

‘‘T suppose you want to be off home again! Tl hurry on
with the wedding as quickly as I can, but this time you must
take this woollen yarn with you, and when you get above ground
you must not look back, but go straight home; and on the way
you must not say anything but ‘Short in front and long behind.’”
And then she gave the woollen yarn into his hand.

“ Heaven be praised that I am out of it!” said the lad to him-
self; “I shall never go there again.” And so he sang and leapt
276 THE LAD WHO WENT WOOING

as usual. He did not think any more about the rat-hole, but the
tune had got into his head, and he went on singing:

“ Short in front and long behind !
Short in front and long behind! ”

And this he kept up all the way home. When he got outside the
door he happened to look round, and there lay the finest cloth,
many hundreds of yards long, nearly a mile in all, and so fine
that the smartest man in town did not have finer cloth in his
coat.

“Mother, mother! come out, come out!” cried the lad.

The woman came to the door, held up her hands in astonish-
ment, and nearly fainted with joy when she saw all the beautiful
cloth. He then had to tell her how he had got it, and how it had
happened from first to last.

They were then well off, as you may imagine. The boy got fine
new clothes and the woman went to town and sold the cloth, piece
by piece, and got a lot of money. So she smartened up the house
and became so grand in her old days that she might have been a
great dame. They were both happy and comfortable, but at last
that money also came to an end, and one day when the woman had no
more food in the house, she said to her son that he would now
really have to go to work to make himself useful, else it would
come to starvation with both of them.

But the lad thought it would be better to go to old Mother
Corner’s and woo her daughter. The woman thought the same,
for the lad had now fine, new clothes and looked so well that she
thought it quite impossible such a fine lad should get “no.”

So she dressed him and tidied him as well as she could and
he brought out his new boots and polished them till he could see
himself in them, and after that he set out.

This time he did not take the shortest cut but went a long
way round, for he did not want to get down to the rat any more,
he was so tired of all the widdling-waddling and the eternal talk
about the wedding. The weather and the roads were just the


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SO YOU HAD BE

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MY DEAR,” SAID THE RAT TO THE LAD

ARROW H

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‘* THE ROAD IS A LITTLE

CARRIAGE,

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THE LAD WHO WENT WOOING 279

same as on the first and second occasion. The sun shone and
the water glistened in the puddles and the lad ran and sang, as he
always did; but as he was running and jumping along he found
himself all at once on the same bridge on the moor again. From
this he jumped across a puddle on to a tussock so as not to soil
his boots—plump ! and down the lad went and he did not stop till
he found himself in the same nasty, dark hole again. At first he
was glad, for he did not see anything, but when he had been
there awhile he caught a glimpse of the ugly rat—the nasty thing
—with a bunch of keys on her tail.

“Good-day, my dear!” said the rat; ‘‘ welcome again! I see
you cannot live long without me! I’m glad of that! But every-
thing is now ready for the wedding and we will set out for
church at once.”

We'll see about that, thought the lad, but he saidnothing. The
rat then gave a squeak and a swarm of rats and mice came rushing
in from all corners, and six big rats came harnessed to a frying-
pan; two mice got up behind as footmen and two sat in front
driving. Some of them got into the pan, while the rat with the
bunch of keys took her place in the middle of them. She then
said to the lad:

“The road is a little narrow here, so you had better walk by
the side of the carriage, my dear, till the road becomes wider, and
then you can sit up beside me.”

“How grand we want to be!” thought the lad. “T only wish I
was well out of this, and I would run away from the whole crew,”
he thought; but he said nothing. He followed as best he could.
Sometimes he had to creep and sometimes he had to stoop, for the
passage was often very low and narrow; but when it became
broader he went on in front and looked around to see how he
could best manage to give them the slip.

All at once he heard a clear and beautiful voice behind him :

‘““Now the road is good! Come, my dear, and get into the
carriage !” /

The lad turned quickly round and nearly lost his wits, for
280 THE LAD WHO WENT WOOING

there stood the most splendid carriage with six white horses ;
and in the carriage sat a maiden as fair and beautiful as the sun,
and around her sat other damsels as handsome and bright as the
stars. It was a princess and her playmates who had been
enchanted. But now they were freed, because he had gone down
to them and never gainsaid them in anything.

“Come now,” said the princess, and the lad then stepped into
the carriage and drove to church with her. On their way from
church the princess said:

“We will now drive to my place first and then we will send
for your mother.”

“That was all very well,” thought the lad; he said nothing
this time either, but he thought it would be better to go home to
his mother than down in the nasty rat-hole. But all at once they
came to a grand castle, where they drove in; and that was their
home. A splendid carriage with six horses was then sent to fetch
the lad’s mother, and when it came back the wedding festivities
began. They lasted fourteen days, and perhaps they are still
going on. If we make haste we may also be in time to drink with
the bridegroom and to dance with the bride.














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A SPLENDID CARRIAGE WAS SENT TO FETCH THE LAD’S MOTHER


THE PRINCESS WHOM NOBODY
COULD SILENCE

THERE was once upon a time a king, and he had a daughter —
who would always have the last word; she was so perverse and
contrary in her speech that no one could silence her. So the king
therefore promised that he who could outwit her should have the
princess in marriage and half the kingdom besides. There were
plenty of those who wanted to try, I can assure you; for it isn’t
every day that a princess and half a kingdom are to be had.

The gate to the palace hardly ever stood still. The suitors
came in swarms and flocks from east and west, both riding and
walking. But there was no one who could silence the princess.
At last the king announced that those who tried and did not
succeed should be branded on both ears with a large iron; he
would not have all this running about the palace for nothing.

So there were three brothers who had also heard about the
princess, and as they were rather badly off at home, they thought
they would try their luck and see if they could win the princess
and half the kingdom. They were good friends and so they
agreed to set out together.

When they had got a bit on the way, Ashiepattle found a dead
magpie.

“T have found something! I have found something!” cried he.

“What have you found ?” asked the brothers.
284 THE PRINCESS WHOM NOBODY COULD SILENCE

“‘T have found a dead magpie,” said he.

“Faugh! throw it away; what can you do with that ?” said
the other two, who always believed they were the wisest.

“Oh, I’ve nothing else to do. I can easily carry it,” said
Ashiepattle.

When they had gone on a bit further Ashiepattle found an old
willow-twig, which he picked up.

‘“‘T have found something! I have found something!” he cried.

“What have you found now ?” said the brothers.

“T have found a willow-twig,” said he.

“Pooh! what are you going to do with that ? Throw it away.”
said the two.

“‘T have nothing else to do, I can easily carry it with me,” said
Ashiepattle.

When they had gone still further he found a broken saucer,
which he also picked up.

“Here lads, I have found something! I have found something!”
said he.

“Well, what have you found now ?” asked the brothers.

‘A broken saucer,” said he.

“Pshaw! Is it worth while dragging that along with you too?
Throw it away!” said the brothers.

“Oh, I’ve nothing else to do, I can easily carry it with me,”
said Ashiepattle.

When they had gone a little bit further he found a crooked
goat-horn and soon after he found the fellow to it.

“T have found something! I have found something, lads!”
said he. ,

‘What have you found now ?” said the others.

“Two goat-horns,” answered Ashiepattle.

“Ugh! Throw them away! What are you going to do with
them ?” said they.

“Oh, I have nothing else to do. I can easily carry them
with me,” said Ashiepattle.

In a little while he found a wedge.
THE PRINCESS WHOM NOBODY COULD SILENCE 285

“T say, lads, I have found something! I have found some-
thing!” he cried.

“You are everlastingly finding something! What have you
found now ?” asked the two eldest.

“ T have found a wedge,” he answered.

“ Oh, throw it away! What are you going to do with it?”
said they.

‘‘Oh, I have nothing else todo. I caneasily carry it with me,”
said Ashiepattle.

As he went across the king’s fields, which had been freshly
manured, he stooped down and took up an old boot-sole.

“Hullo, lads! I have found something, I have found some-
thing !” said he.

“Heaven grant you may find a little sense before you
get to the palace!” said the two. ‘‘Whatis it you have found
now?”

“ An old boot-sole,” said he.

“Ts that anything worth picking up? Throw it away! What
are you going to do with it?” said the brothers.

‘‘Oh, I have nothing else to do. I can easily carry it with
me, and—who knows ?—it may help me to win the princess and
half the kingdom,” said Ashiepattle.

“Yes, you look a likely one, don’t you?” said the other two.
So they went in to the princess, the eldest first.

“Good day!” said he.

“Good day to you!” answered she, with a shrug. °

“It’s terribly hot here,” said he.

“It’s hotter in the fire,” said the princess. The branding iron
was lying waiting in the fire.

When he saw this he was struck speechless, and so it was
all over with him.

The second brother fared no better.

‘‘Good day!” said he.

“Good day to you,” said she, with a wriggle.

“It’s terribly hot here!” said he.
286 THE PRINCESS WHOM NOBODY COULD SILENCE

“Tt’s hotter in the fire,” said she. With that he lost both
speech and wits, and so the iron had to be brought out.

Then came Ashiepattle’s turn.

“Good day!” said he.

“Good day to you!” said she, with a shrug and a wriggle.

“It is very nice and warm here!” said Ashiepattle.

“It’s warmer in the fire,” she answered. She was in no better
humour now she saw the third suitor.

“Then there’s a chance for me to roast my magpie on it,”
said he, bringing it out.

“Tm afraid it will sputter,” sad the princess.

“No fear of that! I'll tie this willow-twig round it,” said the
lad.

“You can’t tie it tight enough,” said she.

“Then I'll drive in a wedge,” said the lad, and brought out the
wedge.

“The fat will be running off it,” said the princess.

“Then [ll hold this under it,” said the lad, and showed her
the broken saucer.

“You are so crooked in your speech,” said the princess.

‘‘No, I am not crooked,” answered the lad; “but this is
crooked ;” and he brought out one of the goat-horns.

‘Well, I’ve never seen the like!” cried the princess.

‘“‘ Here you see the like,” said he, and brought out the other
horn.

“Tt seems you have come here to wear out my soul!” she
said.

“No, I have not come here to wear out your soul, for I have
one here which is already worn-out,” answered the lad, and
brought out the old boot-sole.

The princess was so dumbfounded at this, that she was com-
pletely silenced.

“Now you are mine!” said Ashiepattle, and so he got her and
half the kingdom into the bargain.


‘‘NO, I HAVE NOT COME HERE TO WEAR OUT YOUR SOUL, FOR I HAVE ONE HERE WHICH
Is ALREADY WORN OUT,” SAID THE LAD, AND BROUGHT OUT THE OLD BOOT-SOLE
FARMER WEATHERBEARD

THERE were once upon a time a man and a woman, who had an
only son, and he was called Hans. The woman thought that he
ought to go out and look for work, and told her husband to go
with him. ‘“ You must find him such a good place, that he can
become master of all masters,” she said, and so she put some food
and a roll of tobacco in a bag for them.

Well, they went to many masters, but all replied that they
might make the lad as clever as they were themselves, but they
could not make him cleverer. When the man came home to his
wife with this answer, she said: ‘‘ Well, I don’t care what you do
with him, but this I tell you, that you will have to make him
master over all masters.” So she put some food and a roll of
tobacco in a bag, and the man and the son had to set out again.

When they had gone a bit on the way, they came out upon
the ice, where they met a man who was driving a black horse.

“Where are you going?” said he.

“T’m going to get my son apprenticed to some one who can
teach him well; for my wife comes of such good people, that she
wants him to become master of all masters.”

“That’s lucky,” said the man who was driving; “I am the

7
290 FARMER WEATHERBEARD

very man for that, and J am just looking for such an apprentice.
Get up behind,” he said to the boy, and off they went through
the air.

“Wait a bit!” shouted the lad’s father. ‘I ought to know
what’s your name and where you live?” said he.

“Oh, I’m at home both North and South and East and West,
and I am called Farmer Weatherbeard,” said the master. ‘In a
year you can come back again, and I will tell you if he’s good for
anything.” And off they went, and were lost to sight.

When the year was out, the man came to hear about his son.
“You can’t finish him in a year, you know,” said the master.
““As yet he has only found his legs, so to speak.” They then
agreed that Farmer Weatherbeard should keep him another year,
and teach him everything, and then the man was to come back
for him. When the year was over they met again at the same
place.
“Have you finished with him now ?” asked the father.

“Yes, he’s my master now, but you will never see him again,”
said Farmer Weatherbeard ; and before the man knew what had
become of them, they were gone, both the farmer and the lad.

When the man came home, the woman asked if the son was
not with him, or what had become of him.

“Oh, goodness knows what became of him,” said the man;
“he went off through the air.” And so he told her what had
happened. When the woman heard that her husband did not
know where her son was, she sent him off again.

“You must find the lad, even if you have to go to Old Nick
for him!” said she, and gave him a bag of food and a roll of
_ tobacco.

‘““When he had got a bit on the way, he came to a large
forest, and it took him the whole of the day to get through it; and
as it grew dark he saw a bright light and went towards it. After
a long while he came to a little cottage under a cliff, and outside it
a woman was standing, drawing water from the well with her
nose, it was so long.


NG

IT WAS SO LO

,

NOSE

AKING THE FIRE WITH HER

AS R

OMAN W

THE W
FARMER WEATHERBEARD 293

“Good evening, mother!”

“Good evening to you,” said the woman; “no one has called
me mother for a hundred years.”

“Can I get lodgings here to-night ? ” said the man.

“No,” said the woman. But then the man brought out the roll
of tobacco, dried a little of it and made some snuff, which he gave
the woman. She was so glad that she began to dance, and then
she said that he might stop the night.

All at once he asked after Farmer Weatherbeard. She knew
nothing about him, she said, but she ruled over all four-footed
animals, and perhaps some of them might know something about
him. She then called them together with a whistle, and questioned
them, but there was not one who knew anything about Farmer
Weatherbeard.

‘Well, we are three sisters,” said the woman; “ perhaps one of
the other two knows where he is. I'll lend you my carriage so
that you can get there to-night, but itis three hundred miles to the
nearest of them.”

The man set out and got there in the evening. When he
arrived, there also was a woman standing drawing water from the
well with her nose.

““Good evening, mother!” said the man.

“Good evening to you,” said the woman; “ no one has called
me mother for a hundred years,” said she.

“Can I get lodgings here to-night ?” said the man.

“No,” said the woman.

But then the man brought out the roll of tobacco, dried a
little of it and made some snuff, which he gave the woman on
the back of her hand. She was so pleased at this that she
began to dance, and then she said he might stop there the
night. ]

All at once he asked about Farmer Weatherbeard. She did not
know anything about him, but she ruled over all the fishes, she
said, and perhaps some of them might know something about him.
She then called them together with a whistle she had, and ques-
‘
204 FARMER WEATHERBEARD

tioned them all, but there was not one who knew anything about
Farmer Weatherbeard.

“Well, I have another sister ; perhaps she may know something
about him ; she lives six hundred miles from here, but you can have
my carriage and get there before night sets in.”

The man set out and got there in the evening, and found
a woman raking the fire with her nose, it was so long.

“Good evening, mother !”

“Good evening to you,” said the woman; “no one has called
me mother for a hundred years.”

“Can I get lodgings here to-night ?” said the man.

“No,” said the woman. —

But then the man brought out the tobacco roll again and
began to make some snuff. He gave the woman so much that
it covered the whole of the back of her hand. She was so pleased
at this that she began to dance,-and then she said he might stop
the night.

All at once he asked about Farmer Weatherbeard. She did not
know anything about him, she said ; but she ruled over all the birds
and called them all together with her whistle. When she had
questioned them all, she missed the eagle, but in a little while he
came; and when she asked him, he said he had come straight
from Farmer Weatherbeard. The woman then told him that he
must show the man the way there. But first the eagle wanted
something to eat, and next he wanted torest till the following day,
for he was so tired after the long way he had come, that he could
scarcely rise from the ground.

When the eagle had finished his meal and taken a rest, the
woman plucked a feather from his tail and put the man in its
place, and away flew the eagle with him; but they did not get to
Farmer Weatherbeard before midnight. When they arrived there,
the eagle said :

“There are bones and carcases lying about outside the door,
but you must not mind them. All the people in the house sleep so
soundly that they are hard to wake; you must go straight to the
THE MAN DID AS HE WAS TOLD AND PULLED A FEATHER OUT OF FARMER WEATHERBEARD'S HEAD


FARMER WEATHERBEARD 297

table drawer and take three bits of bread out of it, and if you hear
some one snoring you must pull three feathers out of his head;
that won’t wake him up.”

The man did as he was told, and when he had got the bits of
bread, he pulled out first one feather.

“Oh!” cried Farmer Weatherbeard.

Then the man pulled out one more and Farmer Weatherbeard
shouted “Oh” again; but when he pulled out the third one,
Farmer Weatherbeard shrieked so loudly that the man thought
both the walls and the roof would have burst asunder, but the farmer
went on sleeping just the same. The eagle then told the man what
he was to do next ; so he went to the door of the cow-house, and
there he stumbled against a big stone, which he took with him,
and under the stone lay three chips of wood, which he also took
with him. He then knocked at the door of the cow-house and it
opened at once. He dropped the three bits of bread, and a hare
came running out and ate them. He then caught the hare and
took it with him.

The eagle asked him to pluck three feathers out of his tail and
place the hare, the stone, the chips of wood and himself instead,
and he would then fly home with them. When the eagle had
flown a long, long away, he settled down on a stone.

“Do you see anything ?” said he.

“Yes, I see a flock of crows flying towards us,” said the man.

“We had better get on a bit then,” said the eagle, and on he
flew. In a while he asked again:

“Do you see anything now?”

“Yes, the crows are close upon us again,” said the man.

‘Drop the three feathers you plucked from his head,” said the
eagle.

The man did so, and the moment he dropped them the feathers
became a flock of ravens, which chased the crows home again.
The eagle then flew far away with the man. At last it settled
down on a stone to rest.

“Do you see anything ?” he said.
298 FARMER WEATHERBEARD

“I’m not sure,” said the man, “but I think I see something
coming far away.”

“We had better get on a bit then,” said the eagle.

“Do you see anything now?” he said in a while.

“Yes, now he is close upon us,” said the man.

“You must drop the chips which you took from under the
stone near the cow-house door,” said the eagle.

The man did so, and the same moment he dropped them
there grew up a great, thick forest; so Farmer Weatherbeard had
to go home for axes to cut his way through.

The eagle then flew on again a long way, till he became
tired and settled down in a fir-tree.

“Do you see anything ?” said he.

“Well, I’m not sure about it,” said the man, “ but I think I
catch a glimpse of something far away.”

“We had better get on a bit then,” said the eagle; and so he
flew on again.

“Do you see anything now?” he said in a while.

“Yes, now he is close upon us.”

“You must drop the stone you took from the cow-house door,”
said the eagle.

The man did so, and it became a big, lofty mountain, which
Farmer Weatherbeard had to break his way through. But when
he had got half-way through the mountain he broke one of his
legs, so that he had to go home and get it healed.

In the meantime the eagle flew home with the man and the
hare, and when they got there the man went to the churchyard
and put some consecrated soil on the hare, and it changed into
Hans, his own son.

When the time came round for the fair, the lad turned
himself into a cream-coloured horse, and asked his father to take
him with him to the fair.

‘(If some one comes up to you and wants to buy me, you must
say you want a hundred dollars for me; but you must not forget
to take off the halter, otherwise I shall never be able to get away


““YOU MUST DROP THE STONE YOU TOOK FROM THE COW-HOUSE

DOOR,” SAID THE EAGLE
FARMER WEATHERBEARD 301

from Farmer Weatherbeard ; for it is he who will come and want
to buy me,” said the lad.

And so it turned out. A horse-dealer came up and wanted
to buy the horse, and the man got his hundred dollars forit. But
when the bargain was made, and Hans’s father had got the money,
the horse-dealer wanted to keep the halter also.

“No, there was nothing about that in our agreement,” said
the man. ‘ You cannot have the halter, for I have more horses
to bring to town.”

So they went each his way. But they had not got far
before Hans resumed his own shape, and when the man came
home he found the son sitting by the stove.

The second day he turned himself into a brown horse, and
told his father to take him with him to the fair.

“Tf some one comes up to you and wants to buy me, you
must say you want two hundred dollars for me; for he will pay
you that and give you a drink besides ; but whatever you drink
or whatever you do, you must not forget to take the halter off
me, else you will not see me again,” said Hans.

It turned out just as before. The man got two hundred
dollars for the horse, and a drink into the bargain; and when
they parted, it was as much as the man could do to remember
to take off the halter. But they had not got far on the road
before the lad resumed his own shape, and when the man came
home Hans was already sitting by the stove.

The third day the same thing happened again. The lad turned
himself into a big, black horse and told his father that some one
would come up to him and offer him three hundred dollars and
treat him freely to drink; but whatever he did or however much
he drank he must not forget to take off the halter, otherwise he
would never get away from Farmer Weatherbeard in his life.

No, he would not forget that, said the man. When he
came to the fair he got the three hundred dollars, but Farmer
Weatherbeard treated him to so much drink that he forgot to take
off the halter and Farmer Weatherbeard set off with the horse.
302 FARMER WEATHERBEARD

When he had got a bit on the way he went into a place to get
some more drink, and so he put a barrel of red hot nails under the
horse’s nose and a trough of oats under his tail, hung the halter
across a hurdle and went in to the innkeeper. The horse stood
there stamping and kicking and snorting and scenting the air. A
girl then came by, who took pity on him.

“Poor creature! What sort of a master have you got, who
can treat you in this way?” said she, and pushed the halter off
the hurdle so that the horse could turn round and eat the oats.

“Tam his master!” shouted Farmer Weatherbeard, who came
rushing out through the door. But the horse had already shaken
off the halter and thrown himself into the horse pond,’where he
changed himself into a little fish.

Farmer Weatherbeard rushed after him and changed himself
into a big pike. Hans then turned himself into a pigeon and
Farmer Weatherbeard changed into a hawk and set off after the
pigeon. At that moment a princess was standing at a window in
the palace and watched this struggle.

“Tf you knew as much as I do you would come in through the
window to me,” said the princess to the pigeon.

The pigeon flew in through the window and then changed into
Hans, who told her what had happened.

“Change yourself into a gold ring and put yourself on my
finger,” said she.

“No, that is no use,” said Hans, “ for Farmer Weatherbeard
will then make the king ill; and there is no one who can make
him well till Farmer Weatherbeard comes to cure him, and he will
ask for the gold ring as payment.”

“T will say it is my mother’s and that I will not part with it
for anything,” said the princess.

So Hans changed himself into a gold ring and placed himself
on the princess’s finger and there Farmer Weatherbeard could not
get hold of him.

But it happened just as the lad had said. The king became ill
and there was no doctor who could cure him till Farmer Weather-
FARMER WEATHERBEARD 303

beard came, and he wanted the ring on the princess’s finger for
his fee.

The king then sent to the princess for the ring, but she would
not part with it, she said, for it had been left her by her mother.
When the king heard this he became angry and said he would
have the ring, no matter who had left it her.

“Well, it is no use getting angry,” said the princess, “ for I
cannot get it off my finger. If you want the ring you must take
the finger as well.”

“T will help you and I shall soon get the ring off,” said Farmer
Weatherbeard.

“No, thank you! I will try myself,” said the princess and
went to the hearth and put some ashes on it. The ring then
slipped off and was lost in the ashes.

Farmer Weatherbeard then turned himself into a cock, which
scratched and rooted about in the hearth after the ring so that the
ashes flew about their ears. But Hans changed into a fox and
bit the cock’s head off, and if the evil one was in Farmer Weather-
beard, it was now all over with him!

Printed by BALLANTYNE Hanson & Co.
London & Edinburgh.
MR: DAVID NUTT ’S LIST. OF
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CONTENTS.

FAIRY TALES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE.
WORKS BY HIS HONOUR JUDGE E. A. PARRY.
WORKS BY MRS. RADFORD.

WORKS ILLUSTRATED BY MISS WINIFRED SMITH.
WORKS BY MRS. LEIGHTON, ASBJORNSEN, ETC.

All works in the present list may be had post free from the
Publisher at the annexed prices, and are kept on sale by the leading
booksellers of the United Kingdom.

. 1
“The Ideal Gift-Books of the Season.”



FAIRY TALES OF THE
BRITISH EMPIRE.

Collected and Edited by JOSEPH JACOBS.

Illustrated by J. D. BATTEN.

R. JACOBS’ FAIRY TALES, which have been appear-
M ing since 1890, have won immediate and widespread
acceptance. The choice of matter, the simplicity and
‘suitable character of the language of the text, the beauty, humour,
and charm of Mr. BatTen’s illustrations, and the large and
legible type, have commended the series alike to children and to
lovers of art; whilst the prefaces and elaborate notes, parallels,
and references added by the Editor, have made them indispens-
able to the increasingly large portion of the public interested in
the history and archzeology of popular fiction.

“Fairy Tales of the British Empire” are to be had in two
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In so far as Tales and Illustrations are concerned, the 3s. 6d.
Edition will be the same as the original 6s.one. But the Editor’s
Prefaces, Notes, Parallels, and References are omitted.

A full list of the Series, a specimen of Mr. BaTren’s beautiful
Illustrations, and a very small selection from the numberless kindly
notices which the Press has bestowed upon the Series, will be
found on the following pages.
Fairy Tales of the British Empire.

English Fairy Tales. Complete Edition, xvi. 255 pages, 9
full-page Plates, and numerous Illustrations in the text.
Designed Cloth Cover, Uncut or Gilt Edges. 6s.

The same. Children’s Edition, viii, 227 pages, 7 full-
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35. 6d.

More English Fairy Tales. Complete Edition, xvi., 243 pages,
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Cloth Cover, Uncut or Gilt Edges. 6s.

The same. - Children’s Edition, viii, 214 pages, 7 full-
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38. 6d.

Celtic Fairy Tales. Complete Edition, xvi., 274 pages, 8 full-
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8 full-page Plates, numerous Illustrations in text. Designed
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The same. Children’s Edition, viii, 217 pages, 7 full-
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3s. 6d.

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Cloth Cover, Uncut or Gilt Edges. 6s.

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NV.B.—A few copies of the Japanese Vellum Issues, printed in
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Indian, More Celtic, and More English Fairy Tales. Prices may
be learnt on application to the Publisher. The special issues of
English and Celtic Fairy Tales, entirely out of print, command a

heavy premium.
3




AN SES We ae SSS
A \" SS ST = D ip — ==

—
ANON ns SFERnPF
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Specimen of Mr. Batten’s full-page Illustrations to ‘“ Fairy Tales
of the British Empire.”
4
Some Press Wotices

OF

JACOBS’ AND BATTEN’S FAIRY TALES.

English Fairy Tales.

Daily Graphic.—"' As a collection of fairy tales to delight children of all
ages, ranks second to none.”’ Globe.—‘'A delight alike to the young people
and their elders." England.—'‘ A most delightful volume of fairy tales.”
Daily News.—'' A more desirable child’s book . . . has not been seen for
many aday.” Atheneum.—‘ From first to last, almost without exception,
these stories are delightful.” E. S. Hartranp.—‘‘ The most delightful
book of fairy ta