Citation
The pilgrim's progress

Material Information

Title:
The pilgrim's progress
Creator:
Bunyan, John, 1628-1688
Gilbert H. McKibbin ( Publisher )
Manhattan Press ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Gilbert H. McKibbin
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
192 p. : col. ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1899
Genre:
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by John Bunyan.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
020991914 ( ALEPH )
08030767 ( OCLC )
AKL3958 ( NOTIS )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








. THE 7
PILGRIMS PROGRESS









The Baldwin Library

pny
RMB wk







AS I SLEPT, I DREAMED A DREAM.



THE

“PILGRIMS PROGRESS

BY

JOHN BUNYAN

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS IN COLORS

Soy

NEW YORK.
GILBERT H. McKIBBIN —
MDCCCXCIX
S|



CopyriGHT, 1899,

By G. H. McKIBBIN

Printed by the Manhattan Press,
474 W. Broadway, New York



THE AUTHOR’S APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK.

Wuen at the first I took my pen in hand,
Thus for to write, I did not understand
That I at all should make a little book

In such a mode; nay, I had undertook

To make another ; which, when almost done,
Before I was aware, I this begun.

And thus it was: I, writing of the way
And race of saints in this our gospel-day,
Fell suddenly into an allegory
About their journey and the way to glory,
In more than twenty things, which I set down:
This done, I twenty more had in my crown ;
And they again began to multiply,
Like sparks that from the coals of fire do fly.
Nay, then, thought I, if that you breed so fast,
I'll put you by yourselves, lest you at last
Should prove ad infinitum, and eat out
The book that I already am about.

Well, soI did; but yet I did not think
To show to all the world my pen and ink
In such a mode; I only thought to make
I knew not what; nor did I undertake
Thereby to please my neighbor; no, not I;
I did it mine own self to gratify.

Neither did I but vacant seasons spend
In this my scribble; nor did I intend
But to divert myself, in doing this,
From worser thoughts, which make me do amiss.



8 AUTHORS APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK.

Thus I set pen to paper with delight,
And quickly had my thoughts in black and white.
For having now my method by the end,
Still as I pull’d, it came; and so I penn’d
It down ; until at last it came to be,
For length and breadth, the bigness which you see.

Well, when I had thus put my ends together,
I showed them others, that I might see whether
They would condemn them, or them justify ;
And some said, Let them live; some, Let them die.
Some said, John, print it; others said, Not so:
Some said, It might do good; others said, No.

Now was I in a strait, and did not see
Which was the best thing to be done by me:
At last I thought, Since you are thus divided,
I print it will; and so the case decided.

For, thought I, some I see would have it done,
Though others in that channel do not run:
To prove, then, who advised for the best,
Thus I thought fit to put it to the test.

I further thought, if now I did deny
Those that would have it thus to gratify,
I did not know, but hinder them I might
Of that which would to them be great delight: °
For those which were not for its coming forth,
Isaid to them, Offend you I am loath;
Yet, since your brethren pleased with it be,
Forbear to judge, till you do further see.

If that thou wilt not read, let it alone;
Some love the meat, some love to pick the bone;
Yea, that I might them better moderate,
« did too with them thns expostulate :

May I not write in such a style as this?
In such a method, too, and yet not miss
My end, thy good? Why may it not be done?
Dark clouds bring waters, when the bright bring none.



AUTHORS APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK.

Yea, dark or bright, if they their silver drops
Cause to descend, the earth, by yielding crops,
Gives praise to both, and carpeth not at either,
But treasures up the fruit they yield together ;
Yea, so commixes both, that in their fruit

None can distinguish this from that; they suit
Her well when hungry; but if she be full,

She spews out both, and makes their blessing null.

You see the ways the fisherman doth take
To catch the fish ; what engines doth he make.
Behold! how he engageth all his wits;
Also his snares, lines, angles, hooks, and nets:
Yet fish there be that neither hook nor line,
Nor snare, nor net, nor engine, can make thine:
They must be groped for, and be tickled too,
Or they will not be catch’d, whate’er you do.
How does the fowler seek to catch his game?
By divers means, all which one cannot name:
His guns, his nets, his lime-twigs, light, and bell;
He creeps, he goes, he stands; yea, who can tell
Of all his postures? Yet there’s none of these
Will make him master of what fowls he please.
Yea, he must pipe and whistle to catcli this,
Yet, if he does so, that bird he will miss.

If that a pearl may in a toad’s head dwell,
And may be found, too, in an oyster shell:
If things that promise nothing do contain
What better is than gold, who will disdain,
That have an inkling of it there to look,
That they may find it? Now, my little book
(Though void of all these paintings that may make
It with this or the other man to take)
Is not without those things that do excel
What do in brave but empty notions dwell.

Well, yet I am not fully satisfied,
That this your book will stand when soundly tried.

Why, what’s the matter? Itisdark! What though?

But it is feigned. What of that, I trow?

9



10 AUTHORS APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK.

Some men, by feigned words, as dark as mine,
Make truth to spangle, and its rays to shine !

But they want solidness. Speak, man, thy mind!
They drown the weak; metaphors make us blind.

Solidity, indeed, becomes the pen
Of him that writeth things divine to men:
But must I needs want solidness, because
By metaphors I speak? Were not God’s laws,
His gospel laws, in olden time held forth
By shadows, types, and metaphors? Yet loath
Will any sober man be to find fault ;
With them, lest he be found for to assault
The Highest Wisdom. No; he rather stoops,
And seeks to find out what by pins and loops,
By calves and sheep, by heifers and by rams,
By birds and herbs, and by the blood of lambs
God speaketh to him; and happy is he
That finds the light and grace that in them be.

Be not too forward, therefore, to conclude
That I want solidness, that I am rude:
All things solid in show, not solid be:
All things in parable despise not we,
Lest things most hurtful lightly we receive,
And things that good are, of our souls bereave.
My dark and cloudy words, they do but hold
The truth, as cabinets enclose the gold.

The prophets used much by metaphors
To set forth truth ; yea whoso considers
Christ, His apostles too, shall plainly see
The truths to this day in such mantles be.

Am I afraid to say that Holy Writ,
Which for its style and phrase puts down all wit,
Is everywhere so full of all these things—
Dark figures, allegories—-yet there springs
From that same book that lustre, and those rays
Of light, that turn our darkest nights to days?



AUTHOR'S APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK. 11 -

Come, let my carper to his life now look,
And find there darker lines than in my book
He findeth any ; yea, and let him know,
That in his best things there are worse lines too.

May we but stand before impartial men,
To his poor one I dare adventure ten
That they will take my meaning in these lines
Far better than his lies in silver shrines.
Come, Truth, although in swaddling-clouts I find,
Informs the judgment, rectifies the mind ;
Pleases the understanding, makes the will
Submit; the memory, too, it doth fill
With what both our imagination please ;
Likewise it tends our troubles to appease.

Sound words, I know, Timothy is to use,
And old wives’ fables he is to refuse ;
But yet grave Paul him nowhere did forbid
The use of parables, in which lay hid
That gold, those pearls, and precious stones that were
Worth digging for, and that with greatest care.

Let me add one word more: Oh, man of God!
Art thou offended? Dost thou wish I had
Put forth my matter in another dress?
Or that I had in things been more express?
To those that are my betters, as is fit,
Three things let me propound, then I submit:

1. I find not that I am denied the use
Of this my method, so I no abuse
Put on the words, things, readers, or be rude
In handling figure or similitude
In application; but all that I may
Seek the advance of truth, this or that way.
Denied, didI say? Nay, I have leave
(Examples too, and that from them that have
God better pleased, by their words or ways,
Than any man that breatheth nowadays)
Thus to express my mind, thus to declare
Things unto thee that excellentest are.



12 AUTHOR’S APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK.

2. I find that men (as high as trees) will write
Dialogue-wise ; yet no man doth them slight
For writing so; indeed, if they abuse
Truth, cursed be they, and the craft they use
To that intent; but yet let truth be free
To make her sallies upon thee and me,

Which way it pleases God ; for who knows how
Better than He that taught us first to plough,
To guide our minds and pens for His design?
And He makes base things usher in Divine.

3. I find that Holy Writ, in many places,
Hath semblance with this method, where the cases
Do call for one thing to set forth another:
Use it I may then, and yet nothing smother
Truth’s golden beams: nay, by this method may
Make it cast forth its rays as light as day.

And now, before I do put up my pen,
I’ll show the profit of my book, and then
Commit both me and it unto that Hand
That pulls the strong down, and makes weak ones stand.

This book, it chalketh out before thine eyes
The man that seeks the everlasting prize:
It shows you whence he comes, whither he goes ;
What he leaves undone ; also what he does;
It also shows you how he runs and runs,
Till he unto the Gate of Glory comes.
It shows, too, who set out for life amain,
As if the lasting crown they would obtain.
Here also you may see the reason why
They lose their labor, and like fools do die.

This book will make a traveller of thee,
If by its counsel thou wilt ruled be;
It will direct thee to the Holy Land,
If thou wilt its direction understand ;
Yea, it will make the slothful active be;
The blind also delightful things to see.



AUTHORS APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK. 138

Art thou for something rare and profitable,
Or wouldst thou see a truth within a fable?
Art thou forgetful? Wouldst thou remember
From New-year’s day to the last of December?
Then read my fancies; they will stick like burs
And may be to the helpless comforters.

This book is writ in such a dialect
As may the minds of listless men affect ;
It seems a novelty, and yet contains
Nothing but sound and honest gospel strains.

Wouldst thou divert thyself from melancholy?
Wouldst thou be pleasant, yet be far from folly?
Wouldst thou read riddles and their explanation,

Or else be drowned in thy contemplation?
Dost thou love picking meat? Or wouldst thou see
A man i’ the clouds, and hear him speak to thee?
Wouldst thou be in a dream and yet not sleep?
Or wouldst thou in a moment laugh and weep?
Wouldst thou lose thyself and catch no harm,
And find thyself again without a charm?
Wouldst read thyself, and read thou knowest not what,
And yet know whether thou art blest or not,
By reading the same lines? Oh, then, come hither,
And lay my book, thy head, and heart together.

Joun Bunyan.






THE PILGRIMW’S PROGRESS.

AsI walked through the wilderness of this world,
I lighted on a certain place where was a Den, and
I laid me down in that place to sleep; and, as I
slept, [dreamed adream. I dreamed, and behold,
Isaw a man clothed with rags, standing in a cer-
tain place, with his face from his own house, a book
in his hand, and a great burden upon his back. I
looked, and saw him open the book, and read therein ;
and, as he read, he wept, and trembled; and, not
being able longer to contain, ho brake out with a
cry, saying, “‘ What shall I do?”

In this plight, therefore, he went home and re-
frained himself as long as he could, that his wife
and children should not perceive his distress; but
he could not be silent long, because: his trouble in-
creased. Wherefore he brake his mind to his wife
and children; and thus said to them: O my dear
wife, and you my children, I, your dear friend, am
in myself undone by reason of a burden that lieth
hard upon me; moreover, I am for certain informed
that this our city will be burned with fire from
heaven; in which fearful overthrow, both myself,
with thee, my wife, and you, my sweet babes, shall



16 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

miserably come to ruin, except (the which yet I sve
not) some way of escape can be found, whereby we
may be delivered. At this his relations were sore
amazed; not for that they believed that what he
said to them was true, but because they thought
that some distemper had got into his head; there-
fore, it drawing towards night, and they hoping
that sleep might settle his brain, with all haste they
got him to bed. But the night was as troublesome
to him as the day; and, instead of sleeping, he
spent it in sighs and tears. So, when the morning
was come, they would know how he did. He told
them, Worse and worse: he also set to talking to
them again; but they began to be hardened. They
also thought to drive away his distemper by harsh
and surly carriages to him; sometimes they would
deride, sometimes they would chide, and sometimes
they would quite neglect him. Wherefore he be-
gan to retire himself to his chamber, to pray for
and pity them, and also to condole his own misery ;
he would also walk solitarily in the fields, some-
times reading, and sometimes praying: and thus
for some days he spent his time.

Now, I saw, upon a time, when he was walking
in the fields, that he was, as he was wont, reading
in his book, and greatly distressed in his mind; and,
as he read, he burst out, as he had done before,
crying, “‘ What shall I do to be saved?”

I saw also that he looked this way and that way,
as if he would run; yet he stood still, because, as I
perceived, he could not tell which way to go.





A MAN CLOTHED WITH RAGS,



18 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

I looked then, and saw a man named Evangelist
coming to him, who asked, Wherefore dost thou cry?
He answered, Sir, I perceive by the book in my
hand, that I am condemned to die, and after that
to come to judgment, and I find that I am not will-
ing to do the first, nor able to do the second.
EVANGELIST. Why not willing to die, since this.

life is attended with so many evils? The man an- — :
swered, Because I fear that this burden that is upon =

my back will sink me lower than the grave, and J
shall fall into Tophet. And, Sir, if I be not fit to
go to prison, I am not fit, I am sure, to go to judg-

ment, and from thence to execution; and the —

thoughts of these things make me cry.

EVANGELIST. If this be thy condition, why
standest thou still? He answered, Because I know

not whither to go. Then he gave him a parchment
roll, and there was written within, “Flee from the —
wrath to come.”

The man read it, and looking upon Evangelist —
very carefully, said, Whither must I fly? Then
said Evangelist, pointing with his fingerover a very
wide field, Do you see yonder wicket-gate? The -

man said, No. Then said the other, Do you see ~—
yonder shining light? MHesaid,I thinkIdo. Then
said Evangelist, Keep that light in your eye, and
go up thereto; soshalt thousee the gate; at which,
when thou knockest, it shall be told thee what thou
shalt do. So I saw in my dream that the man be-
gan torun. Now, he had not run far from his own
door, but his wife and children, perceiving it, began





THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 19

to cry after him to return; but the man put his
fingers in his ears, and ran on, crying, Life! life!
eternal life! So he looked not behind him, but fled
towards the middle of the plain.

The neighbors also came out to see him run; and,
as he ran, some mocked, others threatened, and
some cried after him to return; and, among those
_ that did so, there were two that resolved to fetch
~ him back by force. The name of the one was Ob-
stinate, and the name of the other Pliable. Now,
- by this time, the man was got a good distance from
them; but, however, they were resolved to pursue
_ him, which they did, and in a little time they over-
took him. Then said the man, Neighbors, where-
fore are yecome? They said, To persuade you to
go back with us. But he said, That can by no
means be; you dwell, said he, in the City of De-
- struction, the place also where I was born: I see it
_to be so; and, dying there, sooner or later, you will
sink lower than the grave, into a place that burns
with fire and brimstone; be content, good neigh-
se bors, and go along with me.
~ OsstinaTeE. What! and leave our friends and
- our comforts behind us?
Yes, said Christian, for that was his name, be-

cause that ALL which you shall forsake is not worthy
to be compared with a little of that which I am
seeking to enjoy, and if you will go along with me,
and hold it, you shall fare as I myself; for there
where I go is enough and to spare. Come away,
and prove my words.



20 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

OBSTINATE. What are the things you seek, since
you leave all the world to find them?

CuRISTIAN. I seek an inheritance incorruptible,
undefiled, and that fadeth not away, and it is laid
up in heaven, and safe there to be bestowed, at the
time appointed, on them that diligently seek it.
Read it so, if you will, in my book.

OBsTINATE. Tush! away with your book; will
you go back with us or no?

CurisT1an. No, not I, because I have laid my
hand to the plough.

OBSTINATE. Come, then, neighbor Pliable, let us
turn again, and go home without him; there isa
company of these crazy-headed coxcombs, that,
when they take a fancy by the end, are wiser in
their own eyes than seven men that can render a
reason.

PLIABLE. Don’t revile; if what the good Christian
says is true, the things he looks after are better
than ours; my heart inclines to go with my neigh-
bor.

OpstinaTE. What! more fools still! Be ruled by
me, and go back; who knows whither such a brain-
sick fellow will lead you? Go back, go back, and
be wise.

Curistian. Nay, but do thou come with thy
neighbor Pliable; there are such things to be had
which I spoke of, and many more glories besides.
If you believe not me, read here in this book; and
for the truth of what is expressed therein, behold,
all is confirmed by the blood of him that made it.





THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 21

PuiaBLE. Well, neighbor Obstinate, I begin to
come to a point; Tintend to go along with this good
man, and to cast in my lot with him: but, my good
companion, do you know the way to this desired
place?

CHRISTIAN. I am directed by a man, whose name
is Evangelist, to speed me to a little gate that is
before us, where we shall receive instructions about
the way.

PLIABLE. Come, then, good neighbor, let us be
going. Then they went both together.

OxsstTInATE. And I will go back to my place; I
will be no companion of such misled fellows.

Now, I saw in my dream that, when Obstinate
was gone back, Christian and Pliable went talking
over the plain; and thus they began their discourse.

CurisTiAN. Neighbor Pliable, I am glad you are
persuaded to go along with me. Had Obstinate
but felt what I have felt of the powers and terrors
of what is yet unseen, he would not thus lightly
have given us the back.

PLIABLE. Come, neighbor Christian, since there
are none but us two here, tell me now, further what
the things are, and how to be enjoyed, whither we
are going.

CHRISTIAN. I can better conceive of them with
my mind, than speak of them with my tongue; but
yet, since you are desirous to know, I will read of
them in my book.

PLIABLE. And do you think that the words of
your book are certainly true?



22 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

CHRISTIAN. Yes, verily; for it was made by him
that cannot lie.

PLIABLE. Well said; what things are they?

CHRISTIAN. There is an endless kingdom to be
inhabited, and everlasting life to be given us, that
we may inhabit that kingdom forever.

PLIABLE. Well said; and what else?

CHRISTIAN. There are crowns of glory to be given
us, and garments that will make us shine like the
sun in the firmament of heaven.

PLIABLE. This is very pleasant; and what else?

CurIsTIAN. There shall be no more crying, nor
sorrow: for he that is owner of the place will wipe
all tears from our eyes.

PuiaBLeE. And: what company shall we have
there?

CHRISTIAN. There we shall be with seraphims and
cherubims, creatures that will dazzle your eyes to
look on them. There also you shall meet with
thousands and ten thousands that have gone before
us to that place; none of them are hurtful, but
loving and holy; every one walking in the sight of
God, and standing in his presence with acceptance
forever. In a word, there we shall see the elders
with their golden crowns; there we shall see the
holy virgins with their golden harps; there we shall
see men that by the world were cut in pieces, burnt
in flames, eaten of beasts, drowned in the seas, for
the love that they bare to the Lord of the place, all
clothed with immortality as with a garment.

PuraB.LeE. The hearing of this is enough to ravish



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 23

~ one’s heart. But are these things to be enjoyed?
How shall we get to be sharers thereof?

CHRISTIAN. The Lord, the Governor of the coun-
try, hath recorded that in this book; the substance
of which is, If we be truly willing to have it, he
will bestow it upon us freely.

PLIABLE. Well, glad am I to hear of these things:
come on, let us mend our pace.

CurIsTIAN. I cannot go so fast as I would, by
reason of this burden that is on my back.

Now, I saw in my dream, that just as they had
ended this talk they drew near to a very miry,.
slough, that was in the midst of the plain; and
they, being heedless, did both fall suddenly into the
bog. Thename of theslough was Despond. Here,
therefore, they wallowed for a time, being griev-
ously bedaubed with dirt; and Christian, . because
of the burden that was on his back, began to sink
in the mire. .

PuraBLe. Neighbor Christian, where are you
now?

CuRIsTIAN. Truly, I do not know.

At this Pliable began to be offended, and angrily
said to his fellow, Is this the happiness you have
told me all this while of? If we have such ill
speed at our first setting out, what may we expect
betwixt this and our journey’s end? May I get
out again with my life, you shall possess the brave
country alone forme. And, with that, he gave a
desperate struggle or two, and got out of the mire
on that side of the slough which was next. to his



24 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

own house: so away he went, and Christian saw
him no more.

Wherefore Christian was left to tumble in the
Slough of Despond alone: but still he endeavored
to struggle to that side of the slough that was still
further from his own house, and next to the wicket-
gate; the which he did, but could not get out be-
cause of the burden that was upon his back: but I
beheld in my dream that a man came to him, whose
name was Help, and asked him, What he did there?

CHRISTIAN. Sir, I was bid go this way by a man
called Evangelist, who directed me also to yonder
gate, that I might escape the wrath to come; and
as I was going thither I fell in here. —

Hep. But why did not you look for the steps ?

CHRISTIAN. Fear followed me so hard that I fled
the next way, and fell in.

HELP. Give me thy hand: so he gave him his
hand, and he drew him out, and set him upon
sound ground, and bid him go on his way.

Then I stepped to him that plucked him out, and
said, Sir, wherefore, since over this place is the way
from the City of Destruction to yonder gate, is it
that this plat is not mended, that poor travellers
might go thither with more security? And he said
unto me, This miry slough is such a place as cannot
be mended; it is the descent whither the scum and
filth that attends conviction for sin doth contiau-
ally run, and therefore it is called the Slough of
Despond; for still, as the sinner is awakened about
his lost condition, there ariseth in his soul many



HE BRAKE HIS MIND TO.HIS WIFE AND CHILDREN,





26 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

fears, and doubts and discouraging apprehensions,
which all of them get together, and settle in this
place. And this is the reason of the badness of
this ground.

It is not the pleasure of the King that this place
should remain so bad. His laborers also have, by
the direction of His Majesty’s surveyors, been for
above these sixteen hundred years employed about
this patch of ground, if perhaps it might have been
mended: yea, and to my knowledge, said he, here
have been swallowed up at least twenty thousand
cartloads, yea, millions of wholesome instructions,
that have at all seasons been brought from all places
of the King’s dominions, and they that can tell, say
they are the best materials to make good ground of
the place, if so be it might have been mended; but
it is the Slough of Despond still, and so will be
when they have done what they can. :

True, there are, by the direction of the Lawgiver,
certain good and substantial steps, placed even
through the very midst of this slough; but at such
time as this place doth much spew out its filth, as it
doth against change of weather, these steps are
hardly seen; or, if they be, men, through the dizzi-
ness of their heads, step beside, and then they are
bemired to purpose, notwithstanding the steps be
there; but the ground is good when they are once
got in at the gate. ae

Now, I saw in my dream, that by this time Pli-
able was got home to his house again, so that his
neighbors came to visit him; and some of them



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 27

called him wise man for coming back, and some
called him fool for hazarding himself with Chris-
tian: others again did mock at his cowardliness;
saying, Surely, since you began to venture, I would
not have been so base to have given out for a few
difficulties. So Pliable sat sneaking among them.
But at last he got more confidence, and then they
all turned their tales, and began to deride poor
Christian behind his back. And thus much con-
cerning Pliable.

Now, as Christian was walking by himself, he
espied one afar off, come crossing over the field to
meet him; and their hap was to meet just as they
were crossing the way of each other. The gentle-
man’s name that met him was Worldly Wiseman;
he dwelt in the town of Carnal Policy, a very great
town, and also hard-by, from whence .Christian
came. This man, then, meeting with Christian,
and having an inkling of him,—for Christian’s set-
ting forth from the City of Destruction was much
noised abroad, not only in the town where he dwelt,
but, also it began to be the town talk in some other
places, —Worldly Wiseman, therefore, having some
guess of him, by beholding his laborious going, by
observing his sighs and groans, and the like, began
thus to enter into some talk with Christian.

Wor pity. How now, good fellow, whither away
after this burdened manner?

CHRISTIAN. A burdened manner, indeed, as ever,
I think, poor creature had! And whereas you ask
me, Whither away? I tell you, Sir, Iam going to



28 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

yonder wicket-gate before me; for there, as I am
informed, I shall be put into a way to get rid of
my heavy burden.

WoRLDLY. Hast thou a wife and children?

Curistian. Yes; but I am so laden with this
burden, that I cannot take that pleasure in them
as formerly; methinks I am as if I had none.

WortpLy. Wilt thou hearken unto me if I give
thee counsel ?

CurIstian. If it be good, I will; for I stand in
need of good counsel.

Wor.LDLy. I would advise thee, then, that thou
with all speed get thyself rid of thy burden; for
thou wilt never be settled in thy mind till then;
nor canst thou enjoy the benefits of the blessing
which God has bestowed upon thee till then.

Curistian. That is that which I seek for, even
to be rid of this heavy burden; but get it off my-
self, I cannot; nor is there any man in our country
that can take it off my shoulders; therefore am I
going this way, as I told you, that I may be rid of
my burden.

Wor.tpiy. Who bid thee go this way to be rid of
thy burden?

CHRISTIAN. A man that appeared to me to bea
very great and honorable person; his name, as I
remember, is Evangelist.

Wor .piy. I beshrew him for his counsel! there
is not a more dangerous and troublesome way. in
the world than is that unto which he hath directed
thee; and that thou shalt find, if thou wilt be ruled



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 29

by his counsel. Thou hast met with something, as
I perceive already; for I see the dirt of the Slough
of Despond is upon thee; but that slough is the be-
ginning of the sorrows that do attend those that go
on in that way. Hear me, I am older than thou;
thou art like to meet with, in the way which thou
goest, wearisomeness, painfulness, hunger, perils,
nakedness, sword, lions, dragons, darkness, and, in
a word, death, and what not! These things are
certainly true, having been confirmed by many
testimonies. And why should a man so carelessly
cast away himself, by giving heed to a stranger?

CHRISTIAN. Why, Sir, this burden upon my back
is more terrible to me than are all these things
which you have mentioned; nay, methinks I care
not what I meet with in the way, if so be I can also
meet with deliverance from my burden.

WoRLDLY. How camest thou by the burden at
first?

CHRISTIAN. By reading this book in my hand.

Wor.Lpiy. I thought so; and it ishappened unto
thee as to other weak men, who, meddling with
things too high for them, do suddenly fall into thy
distractions; which not only unman men, as thine,
I perceive, has done thee, but they run them upon
desperate ventures to obtain they know not what.

Curistian. I know what I would obtain; it is
ease for my heavy burden.

WoRLDLY. But why wilt thou seek for ease this
way, seeing so many dangers attend it? especially
since, hadst thou but patience to hear me, I could



30 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

direct thee to the obtaining of what thou desirest,
without the dangers that thou in this way wilt run
thyself into; yea, and the remedy is at hand. Be-
sides, I will add, that, instead of those dangers,
thou shalt meet with much safety, friendship, and
content.

CurisTIAN. Pray, Sir, open this secret to me.

WortbLy. Why, in yonder village—the village
is named Morality—there dwells a gentleman whose
nams; is Legality, a very judicious man, and a man
of a very good name, that has skill to help men off
with such burdens as thine are from their shoul-
ders: yea, to my knowledge, he hath done a great
deal of good this way; ay, and besides, he hath
skill to cure those that are somewhat crazed in their
wits with their burdens. To him, thou mayest go,
and be helped presently. His house is not quite a
mile from this place, and if he should not be at
home himself, he hath a pretty young man to his
son, whose name is Civility, that can do it as well
as the old gentleman himself; there, I say, thou
mayest be eased of thy burden; and if thou art not
minded to go back to thy former habitation, as, in-
deed, I would not wish thee, thou mayest send for
thy wife and children to thee to this village, where
there are houses now stand empty, one of which
thou mayest have at reasonable rates; provision is
there also cheap and good; and that which will
make thy life the more happy is, to be sure, there
thou shalt live by honest neighbors, in credit and
good fashion.



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. aL

Now was Christian somewhat at a stand; but
presently he concluded, If this be true, which this
gentleman hath said, my wisest course is to take
his advice; and with that he spoke, Sir, which is
my way to this honest man’s house?

WoORLDLY. Do you see yonder hill? By that hill
you must go, and the first house you come at is
his.

So Christian turned out of his way to go to
Legality’s house for help;' but, behold, when he
was got now hard-by the hill, it seemed so high,
and also that side of it that was next the wayside
did hang so much over that Christian was afraid
to venture further, lest the hill should fall on his
head; wherefore there he stood still, and wotted
not what to do. Also his burden now seemed
heavier to him than while he was in his way.
There came also flashes of fire out of the hill, that
made Christian afraid that he should be burned.
Here, therefore, he did quake for fear.

And now he began to be sorry that he had taken
Worldly Wiseman’s counsel. And with that he
saw Evangelist coming to meet him; at the sight
also of whom he began to blush for shame. So
Evangelist drew nearer and coming up to him, he
looked upon him with a severe countenance, and
thus began to reason with Christian.

EVANGELIST. What dost thou here, Christian?
At which words Christian knew not what to an-
swer; so he stood speechless before him. Then said
Evangelist further, Art not thou the man that I



32 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

found crying without the walls of the City of De-
struction?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, Sir, I am the man.

EVANGELIST. Did not I direct thee the way to the
little wicket-gate?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, Sir.

EVANGELIST. How is it, then, that thou art so
quickly turned aside? for thou art now out of the
way.

Curisttan. I met with a gentleman so soon as I
had got over the Slough of Despond, who persuaded
me that I might, in the village before me, find a
man that could take off my burden.

EVANGELIST. What was he?

Curistian. He looked like a gentleman, and
talked much to me, and got me at last to yield; so
I came hither; but when I beheld this hill, and how
it hangs over the way, I suddenly made a stand lest
it should fall on my head.

EVANGELIST. What said that gentleman to
you?

CHRISTIAN. Why, he asked me whither I was go-
ing? And I told him.

EVANGELIST. And what said he then?

CHRISTIAN. He asked me if I hadafamily? And
I told him. But, said I, Iam so loaden with the
burden that is on my back, that I cannot take
pleasure in them as formerly.

EVANGELIST. And what said he then?

CuristiAn. He bid me with speed get rid of my
burden; and I told him it was ease that I sought.





DO YOU SEE YONDER WICKET-GATE?



34 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

And, said I, Iam therefore going to yonder gate,
to receive further direction how I may get to the
place of deliverance. So he said that he would
show me a better way, and short, not so attended
with difficulties as the way, Sir, that you set me in;
which way, said he, will direct you toa gentleman’s
house that hath skill to take off these burdens, so I
believed him, and turned out of that way into this,
if haply I might be soon eased of my burden. But
when I came. to this place, and beheld things as
they are, I stopped for fear of danger: but I now
know not what to do.

_Evanceuist. Then, stand still a little, that I may
show thee the wordsof God. Sohestood trembling.
Then said Evangelist, See that ye refuse not him
that speaketh. For if they escaped not who refused
him that spake on earth, much more shall not we
escape, if we turn away from him that speaketh
from heaven. He said, moreover, Now the just
shall live by faith: but if any man draw back, my
soul shall have no pleasure in him. He also did
thus apply them: Thou art the man that art run-
ning into this misery; thou hast begun to reject the
counsel of the Most High, and to draw back thy
foot from the way of peace, even almost to the
hazarding of thy perdition.

Christian fell down at his feet as dead, crying,
Woe is me, for I am undone! At the sight of
which, Evangelist caught him by the right hand,
saying, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be
forgiven unto men. Be not faithless, but believing.



‘

THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 35

Then did Christian revive, and stood up trembling,
as at first, before Evangelist.

EVANGELIST. Give more earnest heed to the
things that I shall tell thee of. I will now show
thee who it was that deluded thee, and who it was
also to whom he sent thee.—The man that met thee
is one Worldly Wiseman, and rightly is he so
called; partly, because he savoreth only the doc-
trine of this world (therefore he always goes to
the town of Morality to church): and partly because
he loveth that doctrine best, for it saveth him best
from the cross. And because he is of this carnal
temper, therefore he seeketh to prevent my ways,
though right. Now, there are three things in this
man’s counsel that thou must utterly abhor. (1)
His turning thee out of the way. (2) His laboring
to render the cross odious to thee. And (8) His
setting thy feet in that way that leadeth unto the
administration of death.

First, thou must abhor his turning thee out of
the way; and thine own consenting thereto: be-
cause this is to reject the counsel of God for the
sake of the counsel of a Worldly Wiseman. The
Lord says, Strive to enter in at the strait gate; the
gate to which I send thee; for strait is the gate
that leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.
From this little wicket-gate, and from the way
thereto, hath this wicked man turned thee, to the
bringing of thee almost to destruction; hate, there-
fore, his turning thee out of the way, and abhor
thyself for hearkening to him.



2

36 CO; THE PILGRIN’S PROGRESS.

Secondly, thou must abhor his laboring to render
the cross odious unto thee; for thou art to prefer it
before the treasures in Egypt. Besides, the King
of glory hath told thee, that he that will save his
life shall lose it. And, He that cometh after me,
and hateth not his father, and mother, and wife,
and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and
his own life also, he cannot be my disciple. I say,
therefore, for man to labor to persuade thee, that
that shall be thy death, without which, THE TRUTH
hath said, thou canst not have eternal life; this
doctrine thou must abhor.

Thirdly, thou must hate his setting of thy feet
in the way that leadeth to the ministration of death.
And for this thou must consider to whom he sent
thee, and also how unable that person was to de-
liver thee from thy burden.

He to whom thou wast sent for ease, being by
name Legality, is the son of the bondwoman which
now is, and is in bondage with her children; and
is, in a mystery, this Mount Sinai, which thou hast
feared will fall on thy head. Now, if she, with her
children, are in bondage, how canst thou expect by
them to be made free? This Legality, therefore, is
not able to set thee free from thy burden. Noman
was as yet ever rid of his burden by him; no, nor
ever is like to be: ye cannot be justified by the
works of the law; for by the deeds of the law no
man living can be rid of his burden: therefore,
Worldly Wiseman is an alien, and Legality is a
cheat; and for his son Civility, he is but a hypocrite





IN THE SLOUGH OF DESPOND.



38 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

and cannot help thee. Believe me, there is nothing
in all this noise, that thou hast heard of these sot-
tish men, but a design to beguile thee of thy salva-
tion, by turning thee from the way in which I had
set thee. After this, Evangelist called aloud to the
heavens for confirmation of what he had said: and
with that there came words and fire out of the
mountain under which poor Christian stood, that
made the hair of his flesh stand up. The words
were thus pronounced: As many as are of the
works of the law are under the curse; for it is writ-
ten, Cursed is every one that continueth not in all
things which are written in the book of the law to
do them. :

Now Christian looked for nothing but death, and
began to cry out; even cursing the’ time in which
he met with Worldly Wiseman; still calling him-
self a thousand fools for hearkening to his counsel:
he also was greatly ashamed to think that this
gentleman’s arguments, flowing only from the flesh,
should have the prevalency with him as to cause
him to forsake the right way. This done, he ap-
plied himself again to Evangelist in words and sense
as follow: Sir, what think you? Is there hope?
May I now go back and go up to the wicket-gate?
Shall I not be abandoned for this, and sent back
from thence ashamed? Iam sorrry I have heark-
ened to this man’s counsel. But may my sin be
forgiven?

EVANGELIST. Thy sin is very great, for by it thou
hast committed two evils: thou hast forsaken the



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 39

way that is good, to tread in forbidden paths; yet
will the man at the gate receive thee, for he has
good-will for men; only, said he, take heed that
thou turn not aside again, lest thou perish from the
way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Then
did Christian address himself to go back; and
Evangelist, after he had kissed him, gave him one
smile, and bid him God-speed. So he went on with
haste, neither spake he to any man by the way;
nor, if any asked him, would he vouchsafe them
an answer. He went on like one that was all the
while treading on forbidden ground, and could by
no means think himself safe, till again he was got
into the way which he left, to follow Worldly Wise-
man’s counsel. So, in process of time Christian
got up to the gate. Now, over the gate it was
written, Knock, and it shall be opened unto you.
He knocked, therefore, more than oncé or twice.
At last there came a grave person to the gate named
Good-will, who asked who was there? and whence
he came? and what he would have?

Cristian. Here is a poor burdened sinner. I
come from the City of Destruction, but am going
to Mount Zion, that I may be delivered from the
wrath to come. I would, therefore, Sir, since I am
informed that by this gate is the way thither,
know if you are willing to let me in?

Goop-wiLL. Lam willing with all my heart, said
he; and with that he opened the gate.

So when Christian was stepping in, the other
gave himapull. Then said Christian, What means



40 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

. that? The other told him. A little distance from
this gate, there is erected a strong castle, of which
Beelzebub is the captain; from thence both he and
them that are with him shoot arrows at those that
come up to this gate, if haply they may die before
they can enter in.

CHRISTIAN. I rejoice and tremble. So when he
was got in, the man of the gate asked him who
directed him thither?

CHRISTIAN. Evangelist bid me come hither, and
knock (as I did); and he said that you, Sir, would
tell me what I must do.

Goop-wiLL. An open door is set before thee, and
no man can shut it.

CurisTiAn. Now I begin to reap the benefits of
my hazards.

GoopD-WILL. But how is it that you came alone?

CHRISTIAN. Because none of my neighbors saw
their danger as I saw mine.

Goop-wituL. Did any know of your coming?

CHRISTIAN. Yes; my wife and children saw me
at the first, and called after me to turn again; also
some of my neighbors stood crying and calling after
me to return; but I put my fingers in my ears, and
so came on my way.

GoopD-WILL. But did none of them follow you to
persuade you to go back?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, both Obstinate and Pliable; but
when they saw that they could not prevail, Obsti-
nate went railing back, but Pliable came with mea
little way.





WORDLY WISEMAN.



42 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

Goop-wiLL. But why did he not come through?

CHRISTIAN. We, indeed, came both together, until
we came to the Slough of Despond, into the which
we suddenly fell. And then was my neighbor,
Pliable, discouraged, and would not venture further.
Wherefore, getting out again on that side next to
his own house, he told me I should possess the brave
country alone for him: so he went his way, and I
came mine—he after Obstinate, and I to this gate.

Goop-wILL. Alas, poor man! is.the celestial glory
of so small esteem with him that he counteth it
not worth running the hazards of a few difficulties
to obtain it?

CHRISTIAN. Truly, I have said the truth of Pliable,
and if I should also say all the truth of myself, it
will appear there is no betterment betwixt him and
myself. It is true, he went back to his own house,
but I also turned aside to go in the way of death,
being persuaded thereto by the carnal arguments
of one Worldly Wiseman.

Goop-wILL. Oh! did he light upon you? What!
he would have had you a sought for ease at the
hands of Legality. They are, both of them, a very
cheat. But did you take his counsel?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, as far as I durst; I went to find
out Legality, until I thought that the mountain
that stands by his house would have fallen upon
my head; wherefore, there I was forced to stop.

GoopD-WILL. That mountain has been the death
of many, and will be the death of many more; it is
well you escaped being by it dashed in pieces.



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 43

CHRISTIAN. Why, truly, I do not know what had
become of me there, had not Evangelist happily
met me again, as I was musing in the midst of my
dumps; but it was God’s mercy that he came to
me again, for else I had never come hither. But
now I am come, such a one asI am, more fit, in-
deed, for death, by that mountain, than thus to.
stand talking with my Lord; but, oh, what a favor
is this to me, that yet [ am admitted entrance here!

Goop-wiILL. We make no objections against any,
notwithstanding all that they have done before -
they came hither. They are in no wise cast out;
and therefore, good Christian, come a little way
with me, and I will teach thee about the way thou
must go. Look before thee; dost thou see this nar-
row way? THAT is the way thou must go; it was
cast up by patriarchs, prophets, Christ and his
apostles; and it is as straight as a rule can make it.
This is the way thou must go.

CHRISTIAN. But, are there no turnings or wind-
ings, by which a stranger may lose his way?

Goop-wiLL. Yes, there are many ways butt down
upon this, and they are crooked and wide. But
thus thou mayest distinguish the right from the
wrong, the right only being straight and narrow.

Then I saw in my dream that Christian asked
him further if he could not help him off with his
burden that was upon his back; for as yet he had
not got rid thereof, nor could he by any means get
it off without help. He told him, As to thy burden,
be content to bear it until thou comest to the place



df THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

of deliverance; for there it will fall from thy back
of itself.

Then Christian began to gird up his loins, and to
address himself to his journey. So the other told
him, That by that he was gone some distance from
the gate, he would come at the house of the In-
terpreter, at whose door he should knock, and he
‘would show him excellent things. Then Christian
took his leave of his friend, and he again bid him
God-speed. .

Then he went on till he came to the house of the
Interpreter, where he knocked over and over; at
last one came to the door, and asked who was there.

CHRISTIAN. Sir, here is a traveller, who was bid
by an acquaintance of the good man of this house
to call here for my profit; I would therefore speak
with the master of the house. So he called for the
master of the house, who, after a little time, came
to Christian, and asked him what he would have.

CuRIsTIAN. Sir, 1am a man that am come from
the City of Destruction, and am going to the Mount
Zion; and I was told by the man that stands at the
gate, at the head of this way, that if I called here,
you would show me excellent things, such as would
be a help to me in my journey.

INTERPRETER. Come in; I will show that which
will be profitable to thee. So he commanded his
man to light the candle, and bid Christian follow
him: so he had him into a private room, and bid
his man open a door; the which when he had done,
Christian saw the picture of a very grave person













&, Du:
HE GAVE HIM A PULL. .



46 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

hang up against the wall; and this was the fashion
of it. It had eyes lifted up to heaven, the best of
books in his hand, the law of truth was written
upon his lips, the world was behind his back. It
stood as if it pleaded with men, and a crown of gold
did hang over its head.

Curistian. What meaneth this?

INTERPRETER. The man whose picture this is, is
one of a thousand; he can beget children, travail.
in birth with children, and nurse them himself
when they are born. And whereas thou seest him
with his eyes lift up to heaven, the best of books in
his hand, and the law of truth writ on his lips, it is
to show thee that his work is to know and unfold
dark things to sinners; even as also thou seest him
stand as if he pleaded with men; and whereas thou
seest the world as cast behind him, and that a
crown hangs over his head, that is to show thee
that despising the things that are present, for the
love that he hath to his Master’s service, he is sure
in the world that comes next to have glory for his
reward. Now, said the Interpreter, I have showed
thee this picture first, because the man whose
picture this is, is the only man whom the Lord of
the place whither thou art going hath authorized
to be thy guide in all difficult places thou mayest
meet with in the way; wherefore take good heed
to what I have showed thee, and bear well in thy
mind what thou hast seen, lest in thy journey thou
meet with some that pretend to ad thee right, but
their way goes down to death.



THE PILGRIM'’S PROGRESS. 47

Then he took him by the hand, and led him into
a very large parlor that was full of dust, because
never swept; the which after he had reviewed a
little while, the Interpreter called for a man to
sweep. Now, when he began to sweep, the dust
began to fly about so that Christian had almost
therewith been choked. Then said the Interpreter
to a damsel that stood by, Bring hither the water,
and sprinkle the room: when she had done, it was
swept and cleansed with pleasure.

CHRISTIAN. What means this?

INTERPRETER. This parlor is the heart of a man
that was never sanctified by the sweet grace of the
gospel; the dust is his original sin and inward cor-
ruptions, that have defiled the whole man. He
that began to sweep at first, is the Law; but she
that brought water, and did sprinkle it, is the
Gospel. Now, whereas thou sawest, that so soon
as the first began to sweep, the dust did so fly about
that the room by him could not be cleansed, but
that thou wast almost choked therewith; this is to
show thee that the law, instead of cleansing the
heart (by its working) from sin, doth revive, put
strength into, and increase it in the soul, even as it
doth discover and forbid it, for it doth not give
power to subdue.

Again, as thou sawest the damsel sprinkle the
room with water, upon which it was cleansed with
pleasure; this is to show thee that when the gospel
comes, in the sweet and precious influences thereof,
to the heart, then, I say, even as thou sawest the



48 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

damsel lay the dust by sprinkling the floor with
water, so is sin vanquished and subdued, and the
soul made clean through the faith of it, and con-
sequently fit for the King of glory to inhabit.

I saw, moreover, in my dream, that the Inter-
preter took him by the hand, and had him into a -
little room, where sat two little children, each one
in his chair. The name of the eldest was Passion,
and the:name of the other Patience. Passion
seemed to be much discontented; but Patience was
very quiet. Then Christian asked, What is the
reason of the discontent of Passion? The Inter-
preter answered, The Governor of them would have
him stay for his best things till the beginning of the
next year; but he will have all now; but Patience
is willing to wait.

Then Isaw that one came to Passion, and brought
him a bag of treasure, and poured it down at his
feet, the which he took up and rejoiced therein, and
withal laughed Patience to scorn. But I beheld
but a while, and he had lavished all away, and had
nothing left him but rags.

CurisTiAN. Expound this matter more fully to
me.

INTERPRETER. These two lads are figures: Pas-
sion, of the men of this world; and Patience, of
the men of that which is to come; for as here
thou seest, Passion will have all now this year,
that is to say, in this world; so are the men of
this world: they must have all their good things
now, they cannot stay till next year, that is, until







THE MAN IN THE CAGE



50 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

the next world, for their portion of good. The
proverb, A bird in the hand is worth two in the
bush, is of more authority with them than are all
the Divine testimonies of the good of the world to
come. But as thou sawest that he had quickly
lavished all away, and had presently left him noth-
ing but rags; so will it be with all such men at the
end of this world.

Curistian. Now I see that Patience has the best
wisdom, and that upon many accounts. First, be-
cause he stays for the best things. Second, and
also because he will have the glory of his when the
other has nothing but rags.

INTERPRETER. Nay, you may add another, to wit,
the glory of the next world will never wear out;
but these are suddenly gone. Therefore Passion
had not so much reason to laugh at Patience, be-
cause he had his good things first, as Patience will
have to laugh at Passion, because he had his best
things last; for first must give place to last, because
last must have his time to come; but last gives
place to nothing; for there is not another to suc-
ceed. He, therefore, that hath his portion first,
must needs have a time to spend it; but he that
hath his portion last, must have it lastingly; there-
fore it is said of Dives: Thou in thy lifetime receiv-
ed thy good things, and Lazarus evil things; but
now he is comforted, and thou art tormented.

CHRISTIAN. Then I perceive it is not best to covet
things that are now, but to wait for things to
come.



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 51

INTERPRETER. You say the truth: For the things
which are seen are temporal; but the things which
are not seen are eternal.

Then Isaw in my dream that the Interpreter took
Christian by the hand, and led him into a place
where was a fire burning against the wall, and one
standing by it, always casting much water upon it,
to quench it: yet did the fire burn higher and hotter.

CuristiaAn. What means this?

INTERPRETER. This fire is the work of grace that
is wrought in the heart; he that casts water upon
it to extinguish and put it out, is the Devil; but in
that thou seest the fire notwithstanding burn higher
and hotter, thou shalt also see the reason of that.

So he had him about to the back side of the wall,
where he saw aman witha vessel of oil in his hand,
which he did cast, but secretly, into the fire.

CuristiAN. What means this?

INTERPRETER. This is Christ, who continually,
with the oil of his grace, maintains the work al-
ready begun in the heart; by the means of which,
notwithstanding what the Devil can do, the souls of
his people prove gracious still. And in that thou
sawest that the man stood behind the wall to main-
tain the fire, that is to teach thee that it is hard for
the tempted to see how this work of grace is main-
tained in the soul.

I saw also that the Interpreter took him again
by the hand, and led him into a pleasant place,
where was builded a stately palace, beautiful to be-
hold; at the sight of which Christian was greatly



52 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

delighted. He saw also upon the top thereof cer-
tain persons walking, who were clothed all in gold.

CuRISTIAN. May we go in thither?

Then the Interpreter took him, and led him up
towards the door of the palace; and behold at the
door stood a great company of men, as desirous to
goin, but durst not. There also sat a manata
little distance from the door, at a tableside, with a
book and his inkhorn before him, to take the name
of him that should enter therein: he saw also, that
in the doorway stood many men in armor to keep
it, being resolved to do the men that would enter
what hurt and mischief they could. Now was
Christian somewhat inamaze. At last, when every
man started back for fear of the armed men, Chris-
tian saw a man of a very stout countenance come
up to the man that sat there to write, saying, Set
down my name, Sir; the which when he had done,
he saw the man draw his sword, and put an helmet
upon his head, and rush toward the door upon the
armed men, who laid upon him with deadly force;
but the man, not at all discouraged, fell to cut-
ting and hacking most fiercely. So after he had
received and given many wounds to those that
attempted to keep him out, he cut his way through
them all and pressed forward into the palace, at
which there was a pleasant voice heard from those
that were within, even of those that walked upon
the top of the palace, saying,

Come in, come in;
Eternal glory thou shalt w



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 53

So he went in, and was clothed with such gar-
ments as they. Then Christian smiled and said, I
think I know the meaning of this.

CHRISTIAN. Let me go hence. Nay, stay, said
the Interpreter, till I have shown thee a little more,
and after that thou shalt go on thy way. So he
took him by the hand again, and led him into a
very dark room, where there sat a man in an iron
cage. *

Now the man, to look on, seemed very sad; he
sat with his eyes looking down to the ground, his
hands folded together, and he sighed as if he would
break his heart. Then said Christian, What means
this? At which the Interpreter bid him talk with
the man.

CHRISTIAN. Whatart thou? The man answered,
Iam what I was not once.

CHRISTIAN. What wast thou once?

Man. I was once a fair and flourishing professor,
both in mine own eyes and also in the eyes of others;
I once was, as I thought, fair for the Celestial City,
and had then even joy atthe thoughts that I should
get thither.

CHRISTIAN. Well, but what art thou now?

Man. Tam now a man of despair, and am shut
up in it, as in this iron cage. I cannot get out.
Oh, now I cannot!

CHRISTIAN. How came you in this condition?

Man. I left off to watch and be sober; I laid the
reins upon the neck of my lusts; I sinned against
the light of the Word and the goodness of God; I



54 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

have grieved the Spirit, and he is gone; I tempted
the devil, and he is come to me; I have provoked
God to anger, and he has left me: I have so hard-
ened my heart that I cannot repent.

Then said Christian to the Interpreter, Is there
no hope for such a man as this? Ask him, said the
Interpreter. Nay, said Christian, pray, do you.

INTERPRETER. Is there no hope, but you must be
kept in the iron cage of despair?

Man. No, none at all.

INTERPRETER. Why, the Son of the blessed is very
pitiful.

Man. I have crucified him to myself afresh; I
have despised his person; I have despised his right-
eousness; I have counted his blood an unholy thing;
I have done despite to the Spirit of grace. There-
fore I have shut myself out of all the promises, and
there now remains to me nothing but threatenings,
dreadful threatenings, fearful threatenings of cer-
tain judgment and fiery indignation, which shall
devour me as an adversary.

INTERPRETER. For what did you bring yourself
into this condition?

Man. For the lusts, pleasures, and profits of this
world; in the enjoyment of which I did then promise
myself much delight; but now every one of those
things also bite me, and gnaw me like a burning
worm.

INTERPRETER. But canst thou not now repent and
turn?

Man. God hath denied me repentance. His Word’



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 55

gives me no encouragement to believe; yea, himself
hath shut me up in this iron cage; nor can all the
men in the world let me out. O eternity, eternity !
how shall I grapple with the misery that I must
meet with in eternity!

INTERPRETER. Let this man’s misery be remem-
bered by thee, and be an everlasting caution to thee.

Curistian. Well, this is fearful! God help me
to watch and be sober, and to pray that I may shun
the cause of this man’s misery! Sir, is it not time
for me to go on my way now?

INTERPRETER. Tarry till I shall show thee one
thing more, and then thou shalt go on thy way.

So he took Christian by the hand again, and led
him into a chamber, where there was one rising out
of bed; and as he put on his raiment, he shook and
trembled. Thensaid Christian, Why doth this man
thus tremble? The Interpreter then bid him tell to
Christian the reason of his so doing. So he said,
This night, as I was in my sleep, I dreamed, and
behold the heavens grew exceedingly black; also it
thundered and lightened in most fearful wise, that
it put me into an agony; so I looked up in my
dream, and saw the clouds rack at an unusual rate,
upon which I heard a great sound of a trumpet,
and saw also a man sit upon a cloud, attended with
the thousands of heaven; they were all in flaming
fire: also the heavens were in a burning flame. I
heard then a voice, saying, Arise, ye dead, and
come to judgment; and with that the rocks rent,
the graves opened, and the dead that were therein



56 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

came forth. Some of them were exceeding glad,
and looked upward; and some sought to hide them-
selves under the mountains. Then I saw the man
that sat upon the cloud open the book, and bid the
world draw near. Yet there was, by reason of a
fierce flame which issued out and came from before
him, a convenient distance betwixt him and them,
as betwixt the judge and the prisoners at the bar.
I heard it also proclaimed to them that attended on
the man that sat on the cloud, Gather together
the tares, the chaff, and stubble, and cast them into
the burning lake. And with that, the bottomless
pit opened, just whereabout I stood; out of the
mouth of which there came, in an abundant man-
ner, smoke and coals of fire, with hideous noises.
It was also said to the same persons, Gather my
wheat into the garner. And with that I saw many
caught up and carried away into the clouds, but I
was left behind. I also sought to hide myself, but
I could not, for the man that sat upon the cloud
still kept his eye upon me; my sins also came into
my mind: and my conscience did accuse me on
every side. Upon this I awaked from my sleep.

CurisTian. But what was it that made you so
afraid of this sight?

Man. Why, I thought that the day of judgment
was coine, and that I was not ready for it; but this
frighted me most, that the angels gathered up sev-
eral and left me behind; also the pit of hell opened
her mouth just where I stood. My conscience, too,
afflicted me; and, as I thought, the Judge had al-





HIS BURDEN FELL OFF HIS BACK.



58 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

ways his eye upon me, showing indignation in his
countenance.

INTERPRETER. Hast thou considered all these
things?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, and they put me in hope and
fear.

INTERPRETER. Well, keep all things so in thy
mind that they may be as a goad in thy sides, to
prick thee forward in the way thou must go. Then
Christian began to gird up his loins, and to address
himself to his journey. Then said the Interpreter,
The Comforter be always with thee, good Christian,
to guide thee in the way that leads to the City. So
Christian went on his way.

Now I saw in my dream that the highway up
which Christian was to go, was fenced on either
side with a wall, and that wall was called Salvation.
Up this way, therefore, did burdened Christian run,
but not without great difficulty, because of the load
on his back.

He ran thus till he came to a place somewhat as-
cending, and upon that place stood a cross, and a
little below, in the bottom, a sepulchre. SoI saw
in my dream, that just as Christian came up with
the cross, his burden loosed from off his shoulders,
and fell from off his back, and began to tumble, and
so continued to do till it came to the mouth of the
sepulchre, where it fell in, and I saw it no more.

Then was Christian glad and lightsome, and said
with a merry heart, He hath given me rest by his
sorrow, and life by his death. Then he stood still



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 59

a while to look and wonder; for it was very surpris-

-ing to him, that the sight of the cross should thus
‘ease him of his burden. He looked, therefore, and
looked again, even till the springs that were in his
head sent the waters down his cheeks. Now, as he
stood looking and weeping, behold three Shining
Ones came to him and saluted him with, Peace be
to thee. So the first said to him, Thy sins be
forgiven thee; the second stripped him of his rags,
and clothed him with change of raiment; the
third also seta mark on his forehead, and gave him
a roll with a seal upon it, which he bade him look
on as he ran, and that he should give it in at the
Celestial Gate. So they went their way.

I saw then in my dream, that he went on thus,
even until he came at a bottom, where he saw, a
little out of the way, three men fast asleep, with
fetters upon their heels. The name of the one was
Simple, another Sloth, and the third Presumption.

Christian then seeing them lie in this case went
to them, if peradventure he might awake them, and
cried, You are like them that sleep on the top of a
mast, for the Dead Sea is under you—a gulf that
hath no bottom. Awake, therefore, and come
away; be willing also, and I will help you off with
your irons. He also told them, If he that goeth
about like a roaring lion comes by, you will cer-
tainly become a prey to his teeth. With that they
looked upon him, and began to reply in this sort:
Simple said, Isee no danger; Sloth said, Yet a little
more sleep; and Presumption said, Every tub must



60 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

stand upon its own bottom; what is the answer else
that I should give thee? And so they lay down to
sleep again, and Christian went on his way.

Yet was he troubled to think that men in that
danger should so little esteem the kindness of him
that so freely offered to help them, both by awaken-
ing of them, counselling of them, and proffering to
help them off with their irons. And as he was
troubled thereabout, he espied two men come
tumbling over the wall, on the left hand of the
narrow way; and they made up apaceto him. The
name of the one was Formalist, and the name of
the other Hypocrisy. So, as I said, they drew up
unto him, who thus entered with them into dis-
course.

CHRISTIAN. Gentleman, whence came you, and
whither go you?

ForMALIST and Hypocrisy. We were born in the
land of Vainglory, and are going for praise to
Mount Zion.

Curistian. Why came you not in at the gate
which standeth at the beginning of the way?
Know you not that it is written, that he that
cometh not in by the door, but climbeth up some
other way, the same is a thief and a robber?

FoRMALIST and Hypocrisy. That to go to the
gate for entrance was, by all their countrymen,
counted too far about; and that, therefore, their
usual way was to make a short cut of it, and to
climb over the wall, as they had done.

CHRISTIAN. But will it not be counted a trespass



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 61

against the Lord of the city whither we are bound,
thus to violate his revealed will?

ForRMALIST and Hypocrisy. They told him that,
as for that, he needed not to trouble his head there-
about; what they did they had custom for; and
could produce, if need were, testimony that would
witness it for more than a thousand years.

CHRISTIAN. But, will your practice stand a trial
at law?

FoRMALIST and Hypoorisy. They told him that
custom, it being of so long a standing as above a
thousand years, would, doubtless, now be admitted
as a thing legal by any impartial judge; .and besides,
said they, if we get into the way, what’s matter
which way we get in? if we are in, we are in; thou
art but in the way, who, as we perceive, came in at
the gate; and we are also in the way, that came
tumbling over the wall; wherein, now, is thy con-
dition better than ours?

CHRISTIAN. I walk by the rule of my Master; you
walk by the rude working of your fancies. You
are counted thieves already, by the Lord of the way;
therefore, I doubt you will not be found true men
at the endof the way. You come in by yourselves,
without his direction; and shall go out by your-
selves, without his mercy.

To this they made him but little answer; only
' they bid him look to himself. Then I saw that they
went on every man in his way, without much con
ference one with another; save that these two men
told Christian, that as to laws and ordinances, they



62 THE PILGRIMN’S PROGRESS.

doubted not but they should as conscientiously do
them ashe; therefore, said they, we see not wherein
thou differest from us but by the coat that is on thy
back, which was, as we trow, given thee by some
of thy neighbors, to hide the shame of thy naked-
ness.

CHRISTIAN. By laws and ordinances you will not
be saved, since you came not in by the door. And
as for this coat that is on my back, it was given me
by the Lord of the place whither I go; and that, as
you say, to cover my nakedness with. AndI take
it as a token of his kindness to me; for I had noth-
ing but rags before. And besides, thus I comfort
myself as I go: Surely, think I, when I come to
the gate of the city, the Lord thereof will know me
for good, since I have his coat on my back—a coat
that he gave me freely in the day that he stripped
me of my rags. I have, moreover, a mark in my
forehead, of which, perhaps, you have taken no
notice, which one of my Lord’s most intimate asso-
ciates fixed there in the day that my burden fell off
my shoulders. I will tell you, moreover, that I had
then given me a roll, sealed, to comfort me by read-
ing as I go on the way; I was also bid to give it in
at the Celestial Gate, in token of my certain going
in after it; all which things, I doubt, you want,
and want them because you came not in at the gate.
_ To these things they gave him no answer; only

they looked upon each other, and laughed. Then
I saw that they went on all, save that Christian
kept before, who had no more talk but with him-



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 63

self, and that sometimes sighingly and sometimes
comfortably; also he would be often reading in the
roll that one of the Shining Ones gave him, by
which he was refreshed.

I beheld, then, that they all went on till they
came to the foot of the hill Difficulty; at the bot-
tom of which was a spring. There were also in the
same place two other ways besides that which came
straight from the gate; one turned to the left hand,
and the other to the right, at the bottom of the hill;
but the narrow way lay right up the hill, and the
name of the going up the side of the hill is called
Difficulty. Christian now went to the spring, and
drank thereof, to refresh himself, and then began
to go up the hill.

The other two also came to the foot of the hill;
but when they saw that the hill was steep and high,
and that there were two other ways to go; and sup-
posing also that these two ways might meet again,
with that up which Christian went, on the other
side of the hill; therefore they were resolved to go
in those ways. -Now the nameof one of those ways
was Danger, and the name of the other Destruction.
So the one took the way which is called Danger,
which led him into a great wood, and the other took
directly up the way to Destruction, which led him
into a wide field, full of dark mountains, where he
stumbled and fell, and rose no more.

I looked, then, after Christian, to see him go up
the hill, where I perceived he fell from running to
going, and from going to clambering upon his



64 THE PILGRIMS PROGRESS.

hands and his knees, because of the steepness of the
place. Now, about the midway to the top of the hill
was a pleasant arbor, made by the Lord of the
hill for the refreshing of weary travellers; thither,
therefore, Christian got, where also he sat down to
rest him. Then he pulled his roll out of his bosom,
and read therein to his comfort; he also now began
afresh to take a review of the coat or garment that
was given him as he stood by the cross. Thus
pleasing himself a while, he at last fell into a slum-
ber, and thence into a fast sleep, which detained
him in that place until it was almost night; and in
his sleep his roll fell out of his hand. Now, as he
was sleeping, there came one to him, and awaked
him, saying, Go to the ant, thou sluggard; con-
sider her ways, and be wise. And with that Chris-
tian started up, and sped him on his way, and went
apace, till he came to the top of the hill.

Now, when he was got up to the top of the hill,
there came two men running to meet him amain;
the name of the one was Timorous, and of the other
Mistrust; to whom Christian said, Sirs, what’s the
matter? You run the wrong way. Timorous an-
_ swered that they were going to the City of Zion,
and had got up that difficult place; but, said he,
the farther we go, the more danger we meet with;
wherefore we turned, and are going back again.

Yes, said Mistrust, for just before us lie a couple
of lions in the way, whether sleeping or waking we
know not, and we could not think, if we came
within reach, but they would pull us in pieces.





THE THREE SHINING ONES.



66 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

CHRISTIAN. You make me afraid, but whither
shall I fly to be safe? If I go back to mine own
country, that is prepared for fire and brimstone,
and I shall certainly perish there. If I can get to |
the Celestial City, Iam sure to be in safety there.
I must venture. To go back is nothing but death;
to go forward is fear of death, and life everlasting
beyond it. I will yet go forward. So Mistrust and
Timorous ran down the hill, and Christian went on _
his way. But, thinking again of what he had heard
from the men, he felt in his bosom for his roll, that
he might read therein, and be comforted; but he
felt, and found it not. Then was Christian in great
distress, and knew not what to do; for he wanted
that which used to relieve him, and that which
should have been his pass into the Celestial City.
Here, therefore, he began to be much perplexed,
and knew not what todo. At last he bethought
himself that he had slept in the arbor that is on the
side of the hill; and, falling down upon his knees,
he asked God’s forgiveness for that his foolish act,
and then went back to look for his roll. But all
the way he went back, who can sufficiently set forth
the sorrow of Christian’s heart! Sometimes he
sighed, sometimes he wept, and oftentimes he chid
himself for being so foolish to fall asleep in that
place, which was erected only for a little refresh-
ment for his weariness. Thus, therefore, he went
back, carefully looking on this side and on that, all
the way as he went, if happily he might find his
roll, that had been his comfort so many times in



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 67

his journey. He went thus, till he came again
within sight of the arbor where he sat and slept;
but that sight renewed his sorrow the more, by
bringing again, even afresh, his evil of sleeping
into his mind. Thus, therefore, he now went on
bewailing his sinful sleep, saying, O wretched man
that Iam! that I should sleep in the daytime! that
I should sleep in the midst of difficulty! that I
should so indulge the flesh, as to use that rest for
ease to my flesh, which the Lord of the hill hath
erected only for the relief of the spirits of pilgrims!
How many steps have I took in vain! Thus it
happened to Israel, for their sin; they were sent
back again by the way of the Red Sea; and I am
made to tread those steps with sorrow, which I
might have trod with delight, had it not been for
this sinful sleep. How far might I have been on
my way by this time! I am made to tread those
steps thrice over, which I needed not to have trod
but once; yea I am like to be benighted, for the
day is almost spent. Oh, that I had not slept!
Now, by this time he was come to the arbor
again, where for a while he sat down and wept;
but at last, as Christian would have it, looking sor-
rowfully down under the settle, there he espied his
roll; which he, with trembling and haste, catched
up, and put it into his bosom. But who can tell
how joyful this man was when he had gotten his
roll again! for this roll was the assurance of his life
and acceptance at the desired haven. Therefore he
laid it up in his bosom, gave thanks to God for



68 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

directing his eye to the place where it lay, and with
joy and tears betook himself again to his journey.
But oh, how nimbly now did he go up the rest of
the hill! Yet, before he got up the sun went down
upon Christian; and this made him again recall the
vanity of his sleeping to his remembrance; and
thus he again began to condole with himself. O
thou sinful sleep: how, for thy sake am I like to be
benighted in my journey. I must walk without
the sun; darkness must cover the path of my feet;
and I must hear the noise of the doleful creatures,
because of my sinful sleep. Now also he remem-
bered the story that Mistrust and Timorous told
him of, how they were frighted with the sight of
the lions. Then said Christian to himself again,
These beasts range in the night for their prey; and
if they should meet with me in the dark, how
should I shift them? How should I escape being
by them torn in pieces? Thus he went on his way.
But while he was thus bewailing his unhappy mis-
carriage, he lift up his eyes, and behold there was
a very stately palace before him, the name of which
was Beautiful: and it stood by the highway side.
So I saw in my dream that he made haste and
went forward, that if possible he might get lodging
there. Now, before he had gone far, he entered
into a very narrow passage, which was about a fur-
long off of the porter’s lodge; and looking very
narrowly before him as he went, he espied two lions
in the way. Now, thought he, I see the dangers
that Mistrust and Timorous were driven back by.





THE HILL OF DIFFICULTY.



70 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

(The lions were chained, but he saw not the chains.)
Then he was afraid, and thought also himself to go
back after them, for he thought nothing but death
was before him. But the porter at the lodge,
whose name is Watchful, perceiving that Christian
made a halt as if he would go back, cried unto him,
saying, Is thy strength so small? Fear not the
lions, for they are chained, and are placed there for
trial of faith where it is, and for discovery of those
that havenone. Keep in the midst of the path, and
no hurt shall come unto thee.

Then I saw that he went on, trembling for fear
of the lions, but taking good heed to the directions
of the porter; he heard them roar, but they did him
no harm. Then he clapped his hands, and went on
till he came and stood before the gate where the
porter was. Then said Christian to the porter, Sir,
what house is this? And may I lodge here to-
night? The porter answered, This house was built
by the Lord of the hill, and he built it for the relief
and security of pilgrims. The porter also asked

whence he was, and whither he was going.

_ _ Curistran. I am come from the City of Destruc-
tion, and am going to Mount Zion; but because
the sun is now set, I desire, if I may, to lodge here
to-night.

Porter. What is your name?

My name is now Christian, but my name at the
first was Graceless; I came of the race of Japheth,
a God will persuade to dwell in the tents of

Shem.



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 71

Porter. But how doth it happen that you come
so late? The sun is set.

CHRISTIAN. I had been here sooner, but that—
wretched man that I am!—I slept in the arbor that
stands on the hill-side; nay, I had, notwithstanding
that, been here much sooner, but that, in my sleep,
I lost my evidence, and came without it to the brow
of the hill; and then feeling for it, and finding it
not, I was forced with sorrow of heart to go back
to the place where’ I slept my sleep, where I found
it, and now I am come.

Porter. Well, I will call out one of the virgins of
this place, who ‘will, if she likes your talk, bring
you in to the rest of the family, according to the
rules of the house. So Watchful, the porter, rang
a bell, at the sound of which came out at the door
of the house a grave and beautiful damsel, named
Discretion, and asked why she was called.

The porter answered, This man is on a journey
from the City of Destruction to Mount Zion, but
being weary and benighted, he asked me if he might
lodge here to-night; so I told him I would call for
thee, who, after a discourse had with him, mayest
do as seemeth thee good, even according to the law
of the house.

Then she asked him whence he was, and whither
he was going; and he told her. She asked him
also how he got into the way; and he told her.
Then she asked him what he had seen and met with
in the way; and he told her. And last she asked
his name; ‘so he said, It is Christian, and I have so



72 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

much the more a desire to lodge here to-night, be-
cause by what I perceive, this place was built by
the Lord of the hill, for the relief and security of
pilgrims. Soshe smiled, but the water stood in her
eyes; and after a little pause, she said, I will call
forth two or three more of the family. So she ran
to the door, and called out Prudence, Piety, and
Charity, who, after a little more discourse with
him, had him into the family; and many of them,
meeting him at the threshold of the house, said,
Come in, thou blessed of the Lord; this house was
built by the Lord of the hill, on purpose to enter-
tain such pilgrims in. Then he bowed his head,
and followed them into the house. So when he was
come in and sat down, they gave him something
to drink, and consented together, that until supper
was ready, some of them should have some particu-
lar discourse with Christian, for the best improve-
ment of time; and they appointed Piety and Pru-
dence and Charity to discourse with him; and thus
they began:

Piety. Come, good Christian, since we have been
so loving to you, to receive you in our house this
night, let us, if perhaps we may better ourselves
thereby, talk with you of all things that have hap-
pened to you in your pilgrimage.

CHRISTIAN. With a very good will, and I am glad
that you are so well disposed.

Piety. What moved you at first to betake your-
self to a pilgrim’s life?

CurisTIAN. I was driven out of my native coun-





BUT HE SAW NOT THE CHAINS,

ERE CHAINED,

THE LIONS W



74 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

try, by a dreadful sound that was in mine ears: to
wit, that unavoidable destruction did attend me, if
I abode in that place where I was.

Piety. But how did it happen that you came out
of your country this way?

Curistian. It was as God would have it; for
when I was under the fears of destruction, I did
not know whither to go; but by chance there came
aman, even to me, asI was trembling and weep-
ing, whose name is Evangelist, and he directed me
to the wicket-gate which else I should never have
found, and so set me into the way that hath led me
directly to this house.

Piety. But did you not come by the house of the
Interpreter ?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, and did: see such things there,
the remembrance of which will stick by me as long
as I live; especially three things; to wit, how
Christ, in despite of Satan, maintains his work of
grace in the heart; how the man had sinned him-
self quite out of hopes of God’s mercy: and also the
dream of him that thought in his sleep the day of
judgment was come.

Piety. Why, did you hear him tell his dream?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, and a dreadful one it was, I
thought; it made my heart ache as he was telling
of it; but yet I am glad I heard it.

Piety: Was that all that you saw?

CurisTran. No; he took me and had me where he
showed me a stately palace, and how the people
were clad in gold that were in it; and how there



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 75

came a venturous man, and cut his way through
the armed men that stood in the door to keep him
out; and how he was bid to come in and win
eternal glory. Methought those things did ravish
my heart! Iwould have stayed at that good man’s
house a twelvemonth, but that I had further to go.
Piety. And what saw you else in the way?
CHRISTIAN. Saw! why, I went but a little further,
and I saw one, as I thought in my mind, hang
bleeding upon the tree; and the very sight of him
made my burden fall off my back (for I groaned
under avery heavy burden), but then it fell down
from off me. It was a strange thing to me, for I
never saw such a thing before; yea, and while I
stood looking up, for then I could not forbear look-
ing, three Shining Ones came to me. One of them
testified that my sins were forgiven me; another
stripped me of my rags, and gave me this broidered
coat which you see; and the third set the mark
which you see in my forehead, and gave me this
sealed roll. (And with that he plucked it out of
his bosom.)
Piety. But you saw more than this, did you not?
CHRISTIAN. The things that I have told you were
the best; yet some other matters I saw, as, namely:
I saw three men, Simple, Sloth, and Presumption,
lie asleep a little out of the way, as I came, with
irons upon their heels; but do you think I could
awake them? I also saw Formality and Hypocrisy
come tumbling over the wall, to go, as they pre-
tended, to Zion, but they were quickly lost, even as



76 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

I myself did tell them; but they would not believe.
But above all, I found it hard work to get up this
hill, and as hard to come by the lions’ mouths; and
truly if it had not been for the good man, the porter
that stands at the gate, I do not know but that
after all I might have gone back again; but now,
I thank God I am here, and I thank you for receiv-
ing of me.

Then Prudence thought good to ask him a few
questions, and desired his answer to them.

PrupEnce. Do you not think sometimes of the
country from whence you came?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, but with much shame and detes-
tation: truly if I had been mindful of that country
from whence I came out, I might have had oppor-
tunity to have returned; but now I desire a better
country, that is, a heavenly.

PRUDENCE. Do you not yet bear away with you
some of the things that then you were conversant
withal?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, but greatly against my will;
especially my inward and carnal cogitations, with
which all my countrymen, as well as myself, were
delighted; but now all those things are my grief;
and might I but choose mine own things, I would
choose never to think of those things more; but
when I would be doing of that which is best, that
which is worst is with me.

PRUDENCE. Do you not find sometimes, as if those
things were vanquished, which at other times are
your perplexity?





sare
— Se

Set F ip. WH
pF MACAO |.
PVM GA

ee oN
oe SSS RGG iY

ce WPM AN Ae ce
SSS NI








\




THIS MAN IS FROM THE CITY OF DESTRUCTION TO MOUNT ZION,



78 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

CHRISTIAN. Yes, but that is seldom; they are to
me golden hours in which such things happen to me.

PRUDENCE. Can you remember by what means
you find your annoyances, at times, as if they were
vanquished ?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, when I think what I saw at the
cross, that will do it; and when I look upon my
broidered coat, that will do it; also when I look
into the roll that I carry in my bosom, that will do
it; and when my thoughts wax warm about whither
I am going, that will do it.

PruDENCE. And what is it that makes you so de-
sirous to go to Mount Zion?

CHRISTIAN. Why, there I hope to see him alive
that did hang dead on the cross; and there I hope
to be rid of all those things that to this day are in
me an annoyance to me; there, they say, there is
no death; and there I shall dwell with such com-
pany as I like best. For, to tell you truth, I love
him, because I was by him eased of my burden;
and I am weary of my inward sickness. I would
fain be where I shall die no more, and with the
company that shall always cry, Holy, Holy, Holy!

Then said Charity to Christian, Have you a
family? Are you a married man?

CurisTiAN. I havea wife and four small children.

Cuarity. And why did you not bring them along
with you?

Then Christian wept, and said, Oh, how willingly
would I have done it! but they were all of them
utterly averse to my going on pilgrimage.



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 79

CHarRITy. But you should have talked to them,
and endeavored to have shown them the danger of
being behind.

CurisT1an. SoI did; and told them also what God
had shown to me of the destruction of our city; but
I seemed to them as one that mocked, and they
believed me not.

Cuarity. And did you pray to God that he would
bless your counsel to them ?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, and that with much affection ;
for you must think that my wife and poor children
were very dear unto me.

CHaARiTy. But did you tell them of your own sor-
row, and fear of destruction? for I suppose that de-
struction was visible enough to you.

CHRISTIAN. Yes, over, and over, and over. They
might also see my fears in my countenance, in my
tears, and also in my trembling under the apprehen-
sion of the judgment that did hang over our heads;
but all was not sufficient to prevail with them to
come with me.

Cuarity. But what could they say for themselves,
why they came not?

CHRISTIAN. Why, my wife was afraid of losing
this world, and my children were given to the fool-
ish delights of youth; so what by one thing, and
what by another, they left me to wander in this
manner alone.

Cuarity. But did you not, with your vain life,
damp all that you by words used by way of persua-
sion to bring them away with you?



80 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

CHRISTIAN. Indeed, I cannot commend my life;
for I am conscious to myself of many failings
therein; I know also that a man by his conversa-
tion may soon overthrow, what by argument or
persuasion he doth labor to fasten upon others for
their good. Yet this I can say, I was very wary of -
giving them occasion, by any unseemly action, to
make them averse to going on pilgrimage. Yea,
for this very thing they would tell me I was too
precise, and that I denied myself of things, for their
sakes, in which they saw no evil. Nay, I think I
may say, that if what they saw in me did hinder
them, it was my great tenderness in sinning against
God, or of doing any wrong to my neighbor.

Cuarity. Indeed Cain hated his brother, because
his own works were evil, and his brother’s right-
eous; and if thy wife and children have been offended
with thee for this, they thereby show themselves to
be implacable to good, and thou hast delivered thy
soul from their blood.

Now I saw in my dream, that thus they sat talk-
ing together untilsupper wasready. So when they
had made ready, they sat down to meat. Now the
table was furnished with fat things, and with wine
that was well refined; and all their talk at the table
was about the Lord of the hill; as, namely, about
what he had done, wherefore he did what he did,
~ and why he had builded that house. And by what
they said, I perceived that he had been a great
warrior, and had fought with and slain him that
had the power of death, but not without great







THEY READ TO HIM.



82 © THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

danger to himself, which made me love him the
more.

For, as they said, and as I believe (said Chris
tian), he did it with the loss of much blood; but
that which put glory of grace into all he did was,
that he did it out of pure love to his country. And
besides, there were some of them of the household
that said they had been and spoke with him since
he did die on the cross; and they have attested that
they had. it from his own lips, that he is such a lover
of poor pilgrims, that the like is not to be found’
from the east to the west.

They, moreover, gave an instance of what they
affirmed, and that was, he had stripped himself of
his glory, that he might do this for the poor; and
that they heard him say and affirm that he would
not dwell in the mountain of Zion alone. They
said, moreover, that he had made many pilgrims
princes, though by nature they were beggars born,
and their original had been the dunghill.

Thus they discoursed together till late at night;
and after they had committed themselves to their
Lord for protection, they betook themselves to rest:
the pilgrim they laid in a large upper chamber,
whose window opened toward the sun-rising: the
name of the chamber was Peace; where he slept till
break of day.

So in the morning they all got up; and, after
some more discourse, they told him that he should
not depart till they had shown him the rarities of
that place. And first they had him into the study,



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 83

where they showed him records of the greatest an-
tiquity; in which, as I remember my dream, they
showed him first the pedigree of the Lord of the
hill, that he was the son of the Ancient of Days,
and came by that eternal generation. Here also
was more fully recorded the acts that he had done,
and the names of many hundreds that he had taken
into his service; and how he had placed them in
such habitations, that could neither by length of
days, nor decays of nature, be dissolved.

Then they read to him some of the worthy acts
that some of his servants had done: as, how they
had “subdued kingdoms, wrought righteousness,
obtained promises, stopped the mouths of lions,
quenched the violence of fire, escaped the edge of
the sword, out of weakness were made strong,
waxed valiant in fight, and turned to flight the
armies of the aliens.” They then read again, in
another part of the records of the house, where it
was showed how willing their Lord was to receive
into his favor any, even any, though they in time
past had offered great affronts to his person and
proceedings.

The next day they took him and had him into
the armory, where they showed him all manner of
furniture, which their Lord had provided for pil-
grims, as sword, shield, helmet, breastplate, adl-
prayer, and shoes that would not wear out. And
there was here enough of this to harness out as
many men for the service of their Lord as there be
stars in the heaven for multitude. They also



84 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

showed him some of the engines with which some
of his servants had done wonderful things. They
showed him Moses’ rod; the hammer and nail with
which Jael slew Sisera; the pitchers, trumpets, and
lamps too, with which Gideon put to flight the
armies of Midian. Then they showed him the ox’s
goad wherewith Shamgar slew six hundred men.
They showed him also the jaw-bone with which
Samson did such mighty feats. They showed him,
moreover, the sling and stone with which David
slew Goliath of Gath; and the sword, also, with
which their Lord will kill the Man of Sin, in the
day that he shall rise up to the prey. They showed
him, besides, many excellent things, with which
Christian was much delighted. This done, they
went to their rest again.

Then I saw in my dream, that on the morrow he
got up to go forward; but they desired him to stay
till the next day also; and then, said they, we will,
if the day be clear, show you the Delectable Moun-
tains, which, they said, would yet further add to
his comfort, because they were nearer the desired
haven than the place where at present he was; so
he consented and stayed. When the morning was
up, they had him to the top of the house, and bid
him look south; so he did: and behold, at a great
distance, he saw a most pleasant mountainous
country, beautiful with woods, vineyards, fruits of
all sorts, flowers also, with springs and fountains,
very delectable to behold. Then he asked the name
of the country. They said it was Immanuel’s



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 85

Land; and it is as common, said they, as this hill
is, to and for all the pilgrims. And when thou
comest there from thence, said they, thou mayest
see to the gate of the Celestial City, as the shep-
herds that live there will make appear.

Now he bethought himself of setting forward,
and they were willing he should. But first, said
they, let us go again into the armory.: So they did;
and when they came there, they harnessed him from
head to foot with what was of proof, lest, perhaps,
he should meet with assaults on the way. He be-
ing, therefore, thus accoutred, walketh out with his
friends to the gate; and there he asked the porter
if he saw any pilgrim pass by. Then the porter
answered, Yes.

CarIsTIAN. Pray, did you know him? said he.

Porter. I asked him his name, and he told me it
was Faithful.

CHRISTIAN. I know him; he is my townsman, my
near neighbor; he comes from the place where I
wasborn. How far do you think he may be before?

Porter. He is got by this time below the hill.

CHRISTIAN. Well, good Porter, the Lord be with
thee, and add to all thy blessings much increase,
for the kindness that thou hast showed to me.

Then he began to go forward; but Discretion,
Piety, Charity, and Prudence would accompany
him down to the foot of the hill. So they went on
together, reiterating their former discourses, till
they came to go down the hill. Then said Chris-
tian, As it was difficult coming up, so, so far as L



86 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

can see, it is dangerous going down. Yes, said
Prudence, so it is, for it is a hard matter for a man
to go down into the Valley of Humiliation, as thou
art now, and to catch no slip by the way; there-
fore, said they, are we come out to accompany thee
down the hill. So he began to go down, but very
warily; yet he caught a slip or two.

Then Isaw in my dream that these good com-
panions, when Christian was gone to the bottom of
the hill, gave him a loaf of bread, a bottle of wine,
and a cluster of raisins; and then he went on his
way.

But now, in this Valley of Humiliation, poor
Christian was hard put to it; for he had gone but
a little way, before he espied a foul fiend coming
over the field to meet him; his name is Apollyon.
Then did Christian begin to be afraid, and to cast
in his mind whether to go back or to stand his
ground. But he considered again that he had no
armor for his back; and therefore thought that to
turn the back to him might give him the greater
advantage with ease to pierce him with his darts.
Therefore he resolved to venture and stand his
ground; for, thought he, had I no more in mine
eye than the saving of my life, it would be the best
way to stand.

So he went on, and Apollyon met him. Now
the monster was hideous to behold; he was clothed
with scales, like a fish (and they are his pride), he
had wings like a dragon, teet like a bear, and out
of his belly came fire and smoke, and his mouth



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 87

was as the mouth of a lion. When he was come
up to Christian, he beheld him with a disdainful
countenance, and thus began to question with him.

APOLLYON. Whence came you? and whither are
you bound?

CHRISTIAN. I am come from the City of Destruc-
tion, which is the place of all evil, and am going to
the City of Zion.

APOLLYON. By this I perceive that thou art one of
my subjects, for all that country is mine, and I am
the prince and god of it. How is it, then, that
thou hast run away from thy king? Were it not
that I hope thou mayest do me more service, I
would strike thee now, at one blow to the ground.

CHRISTIAN. I was born, indeed, in your dominions,
but your service was hard, and your wages such as
a man could not live on, for the wages of sin 7s
death; therefore, when I was come to years, I did
as other considerate persons do, look out, if, per-
haps, I might mend myself.

APOLLYON. There is no prince that will thus
lightly lose his subjects, neither will I as yet lose
thee; but since thou complainest of thy service and
wages, be content to go back; what our country
will afford, I promise to give thee.

CHRISTIAN. But I have let myself to another, even
to the King of princes; and how can I, with fair-
ness, go back with thee?

APOLLYON. Thou hast done in this, according to
the proverb, Changed a bad for a worse; but those
that have professed themselves his servants, after

6



88 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

a while give him the slip, and return again to me.
Do thou so too, and all shall be well.

CHRISTIAN. I have given him my faith, and sworn
my allegiance to him; how, then, can I go back
from this, and not be hanged as a traitor?

APOLLYON. Thou didst the same to me, and yet I
am willing to pass by all, if now thou wilt yet turn
again and go back.

CHRISTIAN. What I promised thee was in my
nonage; and, besides, I count the Prince under
whose banner now I stand is able to absolve me;
yea, and to pardon also what I did with thee; and
besides, O thou destroying Apollyon! to speak truth,
I like his service, his wages, his servants, his gov-
ernment, his company and country, better than
thine; and, therefore, leave off to persuade me
further; I am his servant and I will follow him.

APOLLYON. Thou hast already been unfaithful in
thy service to him; and how dost thou think to
receive wages of him?

Curistian. Wherein, O Apollyon! have I been
unfaithful to him?

APOLLYON. Thou didst faint at first setting out
when thou wast almost choked in the Gulf of De-
spond; thou didst attempt wrong ways to be rid of
thy burden, whereas thou shouldst have stayed till
thy Prince had taken it off; thou didst sinfully
sleep and lose thy choice thing; thou wast, also,
almost persuaded to go back, at the sight of the
lions; and when thou talkest of thy journey, and of
what thou hast heard and seen, thou art inwardly





CHRISTIAN GIVES THANKS.



90 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

desirous of vainglory in all that thou sayest or
doest.

CHRISTIAN. All this is true, and much more which
thou hast left out; but the Prince whom I serve
and honor is merciful, and ready to forgive; but,
besides, these infirmities possessed me in thy coun-
try, for there I sucked them in; and I have groaned
under them, been sorrry for them, and have ob-
tained pardon of my Prince.

Then Apollyon broke out into a grievous rage,
saying, [am an enemy to this Prince; I hate his
person, his laws, and people; I am come out on
purpose to withstand thee.

CHRISTIAN. Apollyon, beware what you do; for I
am in the king’s highway, the way of holiness;
therefore take heed to yourself.

Then Apollyon straddled quite over the whole
breadth of the way, and said, I am void of fear in
this matter: prepare thyself to die; for I swear by
my infernal den, that thou shalt go ne further;
here will I spill thy soul. And with that he threw
a flaming dart at his breast; but Christian had a
shield in his hand, with which he caught it, and so
prevented the danger of that.

Then did Christian draw, for he saw it was time
to bestir him: and Apollyon as fast made at him,
throwing darts as thick as hail; by the which, not-
withstanding all that Christian could do to avoid
it, Apollyon wounded him in his head, his hand,
and foot. This made Christian give a little back;
Apollyon, therefore, followed his work amain, and



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 91

Christian again took courage, and resisted as man-
fully as he could. This sore combat lasted for
above half a day, till Christian was quite spent; for
you must know that Christian, by reason of his
wounds, must needs grow weaker and weaker.

Then Apollyon began to gather up close to Chris-
tian, and wrestling with him, gave him a dreadful
fall; and with that Christian’s sword flew out of
his hand. Then said Apollyon, Iam sure of thee
now. And with that he had almost pressed him to
death, so that Christian began to despair of life:
but as God would have it, while Apollyon was
fetching of his last blow, thereby to make a full
end of this good man, Christian nimbly stretched
out his hand for his sword, and caught it, saying,
Rejoice not against me, O mine enemy: when I fall
I shall arise; and with that gave him a deadly
thrust, which made him give back, as one that had
received his mortal wound. Christian perceiving
that, made at him again, saying, Nay, in all these
things we are more than conquerors through him
that loved us. And with that Apollyon spread
forth his dragon’s wings, and sped him away, that
Christian for a season saw him no more.

In this combat no man can imagine, unless he
had seen and heard as I did, what yelling and hid-
eous roaring Apollyon made all the time of the fight
—he spake like a dragon; and, on the other side,
what sighs and groans burst from Christian’s heart.
I never saw him all the while give so much as one
pleasant look, till he perceived he had wounded



92 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

Apollyon with his two-edged sword; then, indeed,
he did smile, and look upward; but it was the dread-
fulest sight that ever I saw. So when the battle
was over, Christian said, I will here give thanks to
him that delivered me out of the mouth of the lion,
to him that did help me against Apollyon.

Then there came to him a hand, with some of
the leaves of the tree of life, the which Christian
took, and applied to the wounds that he had re-
ceived in the battle, and was healed immediately.
He also sat down in that place to eat bread, and to
drink of the bottle that was given him a little be-
fore; so, being refreshed, he addressed himself to
his journey, with his sword drawn in his hand; for
he said, I know not but some other enemy may be
at hand. But he met with no other affront trom
Apollyon quite through this valley.

Now, at the end of this valley was another, called
the Valley of the Shadow of Death, and Christian
must needs go through it, because the way to the
Celestial City lay through the midst of it. Now,
this valley is a very solitary place. The prophet
Jeremiah thus describes it: A wilderness, a land of
deserts and of pits, a land of drought, and of the
shadow of death, a land that no man (but a Chris-
tian) passed through, and where no man dwelt.

Now here Christian was worse put to it than in
his fight with Apollyon: as you shall see.

I saw then in my dream, ‘that when Christian
was got to the borders of the Shadow of Death,
there met him two men, children of them that





ONE OF THE IMPS HISSED IN HIS EAR.



94 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

brought up an evil report of the good land, making
haste to go back; to whom Christian spake as
follows:

CHRISTIAN. Whither are you going?

Men. Back! back! and we would have you to do
so too, if life or peace is prized by you.

CurIsTIAN. Why, what’s the matter?

Men. Matter! we were going that way as you
are going, and went as far as we durst; and indeed
we were almost past coming back; for had we gone
a little farther we had not been here to bring the
news to thee.

CHRISTIAN. But what have you met with?

Men. Why, we were almost in the Valley of the
Shadow of Death; but that, by good hap, we looked
before us, and saw the danger before we came
to it.

CHRISTIAN. But what have you seen?

Men. Seen! Why, the Valley itself, which is as
dark as pitch; we also saw there the hobgoblins,
satyrs, and dragons of the pit; we heard also in
that Valley a continual howling and yelling, as of
a people.under unutterable misery, who there sat
bound in affliction and irons; and over that Valley
hang the discouraging clouds of confusion. Death
also doth always spread his wings over it. Ina
word, it is dreadful, being utterly without order.

CHRISTIAN. I perceive not yet, by what you have
said, but that this is my way to the desired haven.

Men. Be it thy way; we will not choose it for
ours. So they parted, and Christian went on his



THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 95

way, but still with his sword drawn in his hand,
for fear lest he should be assaulted.

J saw then in my dream so far as this valley
reached, there was on the right hand a very deep
ditch; that ditch is it into which the blind have
led the blind in all ages, and both have there miser-
ably perished. Again, behold, on the left hand,
there was a very dangerous quag, into which, if
even a good man falls, he can find no bottom for
his foot to stand on. Into that quag king David
once did fall, and had no doubt therein been smoth-
ered, had not HE that is able plucked him out.

The pathway was here also exceedingly narrow,
and therefore good Christian was the more put to
it; for when he sought, in the dark, to shun the
ditch on the one hand, he was ready to tip over
into the mire on the other; also when he sought
to escape the mire, without great carefulness he
would be ready to fall into the ditch. Thus he
went on, and I heard him here sigh bitterly; for,
besides the dangers mentioned above, the pathway
was here so dark, that ofttimes, when he lift up
his foot to set forward, he knew not where or upon
what he should set it next.

About the midst of this valley, I perceived the
mouth of hell to be, and it stood also hard by the
way-side. Now, thought Christian, what shall I
do? And ever and anon the flame and smoke
would come out in such abundance, with sparks
and hideous noises (things that cared not for Chris-
tian’s sword, as did Apollyon before), that he was



96 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

forced to put up his sword, and betake himself to
another weapon called All-prayer. So he cried in
my hearing, O Lord, I beseech thee, deliver my
‘soul! Thus he went on a great while, yet still the
flames would be reaching towards him. Also he
heard doleful voices, and rushings to and fro, so
that sometimes he thought he should be torn in
pieces, or trodden down like mire in the streets.
This frightful sight was seen and these dreadful
noises were heard by him for several miles together;
and, coming to a place where he thought he heard
a company of fiends coming forward to meet him,
he stopped, and began to muse what he had best to
do. Sometimes he had half a thought to go back;
then again he thought he might be half way
through the valley; he remembered also how he
had already vanquished many a danger, and that
the danger of going back might be much more than
for to go forward; so he resolved to goon. Yet
the fiends seemed to come nearer and nearer; but
when they were come even almost at him, he cried
out with a most vehement voice, I will walk in the
strength of the Lord God! so they gave back, and
came no further.

One thing I would not let slip; I took notice that
now poor Christian was so confounded, that he did
not know his own voice; and thus I perceived it.
Just when he was come over against the mouth of
the burning pit, one of the wicked ones got behind
him, and stepped up softly to him, and whisperingly
suggested many grievous blasphemies to him, which





FAITHFUL CAME TO HELP HIM.



98 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

he verily thought had proceeded from his own mind.
This put Christian more to it than anything that
he met with before, even to think that he should
now blaspheme him that he loved so much before;
yet if he could have helped it, he would not have
done it; but he had not the discretion either to stop
his ears, or to know from whence these blasphemies
came.

When Christian had travelled in this disconsolate
condition some considerable time, he thought he
heard the voice of a man, as going before him, say-
ing, Though I walk through the valley of the
shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for thou art
with me.

Then he was glad, and that for these reasons:
First, Because he gathered from thence, that some
who feared God were in this valley as well as him-
self. Secondly, For that he perceived God was
with them, though in that dark and dismal state;
and why not, thought he, with me? though, by
reason of the impediment that attends this place,
I cannot perceive it. Thirdly, For that he hoped,
could he overtake them, to have company by and
by. So he went on, and called to him that was be-
fore; but he knew not what to answer; for that he
also thought himself to be alone. And by and by
the day broke; then said Christian, He hath turned
the shadow of death into the morning.

In this light, therefore, he came to the end of the
valley. Now I saw in my dream, that at the end
of this valley lay blood, bones, ashes, and mangled



THE PILGRIN’S PROGRESS. 99

bodies of men, even of pilgrims that had gone this
way formerly; and while I was musing what should
be the reason, I espied a little before me a cave,
where two giants, Pope and Pagan, dwelt in old
time; by whose power and tyranny the men whose
bones, blood, ashes, etc., lay there, were cruelly put
todeath. But by this place Christian went without
much danger, whereat I somewhat wondered; but
Ihave learnt since, that Pagan has been dead many
a day; and as for the other, though he be yet alive,
he is, by reason of age, and also of the many shrewd
brushes that he met with in his younger days,
grown so crazy and stiff in his joints, that he can
now do little more than sit in his cave’s mouth
grinning at pilgrims as they go by, and biting his
nails because he cannot come at them.

So I saw that Christian went on his way; yet,
at the sight of the Old Man that sat in the mouth
of the cave, he could not tell what to think, espe-
cially because he spake to them, though he could
_ not go after him, saying, You will never mend till
more of you be burned. But he held his peace, and
so went by and caught no hurt.

As he went on his way, he came to a little ascent,
which was cast up on purpose that pilgrims might
see before them. Up there, therefore, Christian
went, and looking forward, he saw Faithful before
him, upon his journey. Then said Christian aloud,
Ho! ho! Soho! stay, and I will be your companion!
At that, Faithful looked behind him; to whom
Christian cried again, Stay, stay, till I come up to



Full Text


xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20081130_AAAABS' PACKAGE 'UF00086057_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-11-30T15:33:56-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:39:06-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299284; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-14T11:01:02-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '419453' DFID 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQG' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-filesUF00086057_00001.xml'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 39a75675ba9c0dfef35ca1d5474eb695
'SHA-1' ab990d0419ac14928bc09221bc54a1786bf64190
EVENT '2011-12-21T09:31:04-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2013-12-14T10:51:43-05:00'
xml resolution
'150' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQI' 'sip-files00001.txt'
b541020992ee3781b8151bb4987ce7d5
a5cb58f40409f4e14244a1f73ee9cf0a8b8b7c36
'2011-12-21T09:32:23-05:00'
describe
'23' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQJ' 'sip-files00002.txt'
97db1951abd618a2c6b2757905c4892f
4d875f27e02f7c9410fd1b38a14269d64281a338
'2011-12-21T09:33:54-05:00'
describe
'61' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQK' 'sip-files00003.txt'
8620a87e0eb9d49cec3ceb3dafeecd29
fa8468d55a06a1657fb4f97924495329ff9081cb
'2011-12-21T09:31:06-05:00'
describe
'227' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQL' 'sip-files00004.txt'
f2b17f96b0b773b676d1159a96513abf
965c75dd9c8d0f115b1c18918a3c77b6ea5f3c68
'2011-12-21T09:30:32-05:00'
describe
'158' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQM' 'sip-files00006.txt'
7a097f257db4b9e4afe776decb1a221e
f0d72da697e60ef8f4067faf447adef3afe7b84e
'2011-12-21T09:33:44-05:00'
describe
'206' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQN' 'sip-files00007.txt'
38de4db3ec2e78a0f4650856e786abed
430d252bbf40b20e92098be50d89ba3950c87aee
'2011-12-21T09:32:47-05:00'
describe
'257' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQO' 'sip-files00008.txt'
eefca3ebcfcb4c740bdf85e824c603f1
b54f3998f641df8d16a99bf8de80eee993a4b82c
'2011-12-21T09:34:24-05:00'
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQP' 'sip-files00009.txt'
39d11787343d318ed765e43e130cfe49
c6b59d81aa524278195318c95b073b84fc0ca74f
'2011-12-21T09:34:06-05:00'
describe
'1952' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQQ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
95f36af58c79a113fee0ea9abdfb636e
11cb7a3687c13a25a3000ae4d33c523ae7019a35
'2011-12-21T09:34:00-05:00'
describe
'1898' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQR' 'sip-files00011.txt'
511ad47619ed82d154718d68c611263b
0a98ba6b8133e08f87b556e5d2e577ab7f121242
'2011-12-21T09:30:36-05:00'
describe
'1935' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQS' 'sip-files00012.txt'
0c787fce825fb825e1260bbd08b7952b
588c7db30fab87ce61efcb215272fc643c343025
'2011-12-21T09:33:07-05:00'
describe
'1824' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQT' 'sip-files00013.txt'
76344e25a10fc1af7431a35c66d28d00
d858bfaaafa4187e5098ad7a18beb0b36532003f
'2011-12-21T09:30:22-05:00'
describe
'1920' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQU' 'sip-files00014.txt'
2495000ca0454e5b6d63220a412a5d6a
3e31599ee274339fec00e6f44591a5b8fc187075
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQV' 'sip-files00015.txt'
4968564b9e53ae95b56d4f030e3275ab
aac3a0c0fefb4f5387074dc6148fe04215f65393
'2011-12-21T09:33:47-05:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQW' 'sip-files00017.txt'
9110c41dcf306676560ee442296ce7d8
70aab8b58605aa15760035915c0ae97abb23bb05
'2011-12-21T09:31:10-05:00'
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQX' 'sip-files00018.txt'
b4fccd12b27fc5014b1acd139ff177d8
d14ec42312198d54404e7b04ce12b6c3d0f0f088
'2011-12-21T09:30:51-05:00'
describe
'91' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQY' 'sip-files00019.txt'
fa14fdf8957148b05ecf8e4412c65334
ca3c51dd8c67a4dacfb34319986084e199b9b238
'2011-12-21T09:33:10-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'1589' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTQZ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
b213e5a05f839434dbd0879edbea7558
2632c449720efec5c1183af8a04f2b72599c6cb9
'2011-12-22T09:12:23-05:00'
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRA' 'sip-files00021.txt'
7180507a6e51cf5194abb8f93c83b5f4
bf4cf34208f2c255e7eabfba4f325830902e4b0d
'2011-12-21T09:30:48-05:00'
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRB' 'sip-files00022.txt'
e865995a954632be911039ecff7057dc
c9f8f3fdf807e714d642a53062193df6118a7443
'2011-12-21T09:32:55-05:00'
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRC' 'sip-files00023.txt'
defce147c2d2369b89352c9948ade533
19d58c80d77f9380a1c4c5ed7b546fc21548dc46
'2011-12-21T09:31:08-05:00'
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRD' 'sip-files00024.txt'
950b1003674d8e29f315c55630344d0c
4cefaed81eb18ac9a9052a95f2836d968ef9094e
'2011-12-21T09:31:51-05:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRE' 'sip-files00025.txt'
bd07542cc7aad9cf46e255f78adf0a16
ab73f600bc5b5b52c60da2ca2601646059c4b6c1
'2011-12-21T09:30:21-05:00'
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRF' 'sip-files00026.txt'
c6a14145c99f3be87e5579c89235efe3
0ae45917623f8d0ff487bfbf919c74c8c3f4aac1
'2011-12-21T09:30:35-05:00'
describe
'101' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRG' 'sip-files00027.txt'
8f4b3e6619b73c99c1fbb6944fa19089
14348e5ed8d5a1ce6b732c2af33f8b5b4291b975
'2011-12-21T09:32:42-05:00'
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRH' 'sip-files00028.txt'
6dca74e899bfe890dcc102f72f68f1c6
58287f7dae67c8e37ca8d1ba2741711fe449c921
'2011-12-21T09:34:31-05:00'
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRI' 'sip-files00029.txt'
dd0638674c2ceb6f8d342d62f77559f3
34bdfdfd42e03b00524bde6bf6044a4271953fcb
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRJ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
71dd82a2414ecc7e821f2979dd1fa36e
c92a830886e22b600d26c7c47fc74be5effa8e0f
'2011-12-21T09:30:31-05:00'
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRK' 'sip-files00031.txt'
6c1c35e06add335cc11f30fed1a4f9ef
f21380f6a2bc0ad1ca1dbcd2259cac154096684c
'2011-12-21T09:30:55-05:00'
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRL' 'sip-files00032.txt'
08a0ae4014557e12aa90ca9b1596ce23
9476b7d18457dfc29bf57c1ff40b839b17610cd5
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRM' 'sip-files00033.txt'
17dffd70a63d66af5b26666abb7b2471
ef92a26401ccee1d8cbbdb5150ca42216b7f352b
'2011-12-21T09:33:46-05:00'
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRN' 'sip-files00034.txt'
f326631dd9512f75d1d048a56c02345a
886bfc903895bf86b3c83be5f73bc2d98fe93356
'2011-12-21T09:34:09-05:00'
describe
'237' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRO' 'sip-files00035.txt'
84f5215b415b11b787905a7ec942a2f9
9d7497a145d07c507b5e34daf7787316d0be5f39
'2011-12-21T09:30:41-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1568' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRP' 'sip-files00036.txt'
2b224608bfbf620ddd5518ee3eff844f
ce6618aa2873d7090bcfc18cb6db77963482f7a0
'2011-12-22T09:12:36-05:00'
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRQ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
1111c104522a7eb3d823692b82e08405
10c30a9ba0c82f94fce1cb797d0d5cf9bf8b846e
'2011-12-21T09:33:30-05:00'
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRR' 'sip-files00038.txt'
48cdaa009ce1121f16162bea129c3b59
dcc73a393aa830cfc56670df98b09221a8860b4b
'2011-12-21T09:31:03-05:00'
describe
'304' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRS' 'sip-files00039.txt'
41761d043af94bcab81176365d54f652
004c55b817ed2feeeef088f778523332384618f9
'2011-12-21T09:31:48-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1537' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRT' 'sip-files00040.txt'
2bd72043e1bee3f001343fe83e0939ca
60ce2e77cf4eec49f0fef11e063e2c92f5a0d59c
'2011-12-22T09:12:55-05:00'
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRU' 'sip-files00041.txt'
6e9b7e1199250c29d1ca21db9eed982f
09a14264f59fa76b508ae83c610694b99e2ec3b3
'2011-12-21T09:31:02-05:00'
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRV' 'sip-files00042.txt'
76e3dc8a723cc88fbf1afcf6132234b0
555149d3575c4e92a0107ad7d786814d079bbd5d
'2011-12-21T09:31:23-05:00'
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRW' 'sip-files00043.txt'
861bf68fc16960b200c2ab090906880f
654120792c4a79149de82c573ecc39f042acafe2
'2011-12-21T09:31:43-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1562' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRX' 'sip-files00044.txt'
aa2092eaf304b1378dc359d3a7d5e0ad
4917617b2a9abaa4ebc0b907daf59d453fe94e1d
'2011-12-21T09:31:45-05:00'
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRY' 'sip-files00045.txt'
979169251b5ed19d83a3191c2910f71b
765956e2e21ce28b287a792a15e917f0c4b36c97
'2011-12-21T09:32:29-05:00'
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTRZ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
684b7b56549520ba2a1343f1317ab841
60034bcb26c4757c29b396ded8b6abf255e6d8fe
'2011-12-21T09:32:36-05:00'
describe
'127' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSA' 'sip-files00047.txt'
a7f653f78a9674a2646798cfff665dc8
78b4640941c2ccf30f7cedab69f07a7c08a4a00d
'2011-12-21T09:31:44-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSB' 'sip-files00048.txt'
79a5c9eaccb66c465c7355ebeb8413af
f562aa42b900312594474e3fb32ce6a9a3130df5
'2011-12-21T09:34:38-05:00'
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
e33c28d3b9fd4718635b12746f3aaf2c
588944920276d7f55ee89d5e8c752ca9b5ac18e9
'2011-12-22T09:12:22-05:00'
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSD' 'sip-files00050.txt'
1ad7452b2a119fe4163add3bd511497d
1a7b0dac3dc256ac7d8153da1542535b4e28f77d
describe
'103' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSE' 'sip-files00051.txt'
37a2acddba58700e79720381e85a8777
ffee753731778557369b111598577cee5362d29c
'2011-12-21T09:33:58-05:00'
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSF' 'sip-files00052.txt'
b99317da884ccd38d5f5c1b9f51a5238
1146e0cea7bd8ad9d225a4ecda5edfe96ff4973c
'2011-12-21T09:31:37-05:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSG' 'sip-files00053.txt'
506494a75e44806fe9f1e6c0c9c8fb80
38cd3fde8109e8e8f4b410a416cdffb21ab9114f
'2011-12-21T09:31:11-05:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSH' 'sip-files00054.txt'
0a338ba4c8f9aa486877308b01c47e71
b8f92f4257452c721b2f69bc51e0a74fef39b577
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSI' 'sip-files00055.txt'
6f884c9a7257d606496adcfbfc4a3e45
251e1bee369d85f25de4dbdc618ef6ed6af4ecb6
'2011-12-21T09:33:13-05:00'
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSJ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
07cc5d557afcc316222c7b686e31da62
5383cc2bfc70ba5db481f0a810f026a9149f843f
'2011-12-21T09:31:18-05:00'
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSK' 'sip-files00057.txt'
2d0ded8071d0e4ac698b8a4e64d6d4f6
c6551dc0c6c808d8949472c2dd92f378ee488d98
'2011-12-22T09:12:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSL' 'sip-files00058.txt'
a4a0ac10d01730bf3edd4d11d97046dd
21715feda0e688fa5ab99f9ac4feff46df7f8626
'2011-12-21T09:32:05-05:00'
describe
'161' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSM' 'sip-files00059.txt'
b966423a32fd819eaa3275661352d272
1046562f37323359db028d0b7b38311dd137320d
'2011-12-21T09:30:15-05:00'
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSN' 'sip-files00060.txt'
f274e7fa7b88b33b24d8b68446b01042
003173401da1840fc4d6de52ebe3e715d11e3997
'2011-12-21T09:34:26-05:00'
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSO' 'sip-files00061.txt'
a3985b1fbb3ec61c8139016243b8c1ff
c10397fddc6f687d99a1c68f9cf71167394afeff
'2011-12-22T09:12:34-05:00'
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSP' 'sip-files00062.txt'
ce92e486d8c79b211fea346c956a481c
e1779019e24ad1ed3ab0705dd7bb10ed5bc82099
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSQ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
6a2189f18ede16075e41215d4efb09af
685c2fd96f355c123f912febd90bbdb2adccfaa5
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSR' 'sip-files00064.txt'
b35296cc72696d58f4b2cb35f4b0e8bb
f9253b46a922d125f08de417cdde4f11c053b499
'2011-12-21T09:32:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSS' 'sip-files00065.txt'
f7ed43deb4bc0066ff942234950a0ee6
8a405f3142b377bd28ca487bb68e321b90eeded0
'2011-12-21T09:31:39-05:00'
describe
'1621' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTST' 'sip-files00066.txt'
f8f0adc771094205532cc15e32b5131b
0355e40981966fe516d3c2f0b372a6e1e92eca12
describe
'130' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSU' 'sip-files00067.txt'
5150c6dfb4db573ebdb2a78367628b02
5f469baf3671b86d4b4ada3e1871450a8f549259
'2011-12-21T09:31:21-05:00'
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSV' 'sip-files00068.txt'
ecfe8250697046572291e2323db65a53
527c8b989771c909f13e0994f25ff160bcb1fa8a
'2011-12-21T09:32:00-05:00'
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSW' 'sip-files00069.txt'
6d1e4738dffcfc040cdc8f32b2db7c0a
7fda8c5bbce05781e8dd2ff140bd280447d6a0bd
'2011-12-21T09:30:27-05:00'
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSX' 'sip-files00070.txt'
8304762040b21eeb983ef33b294bbc78
1b520719c4672219c429971c7aefd280c3748f75
'2011-12-21T09:31:46-05:00'
describe
'139' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSY' 'sip-files00071.txt'
4db62236eab2d1c43dd4ebd13316f0c4
427ec008f6d7a340a965d5ca8dd101d59230eeb1
'2011-12-21T09:33:57-05:00'
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTSZ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
c8c96804c8e941b75da6921413c7dd87
36f0e35f30f399f9396c1e344476fbb858f357be
'2011-12-21T09:32:51-05:00'
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTA' 'sip-files00073.txt'
85bf73b1a6ac6753fbaf3f3a68a639a4
3cb1d1f3ef53ef90086331c819d83672f4735bb7
'2011-12-21T09:34:36-05:00'
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTB' 'sip-files00074.txt'
e114ee91b8195abab14726747bce50e1
30b60abdc41003cf10f59b571ff75c69d5037fbc
'2011-12-21T09:32:39-05:00'
describe
'79' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTC' 'sip-files00075.txt'
6c7ff3cfce4ff035f4eee6b7d7f38377
661dd92b4a8c050a44049450b3903dc3d0ac4078
'2011-12-21T09:33:26-05:00'
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTD' 'sip-files00076.txt'
0c63c7c5607b7d4403cfe01b2ef5c2e5
f0c9b42802afe473ba645149cbaa21e81653a957
'2011-12-21T09:31:55-05:00'
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTE' 'sip-files00077.txt'
131f16d305ba550c149c8b3cc257af34
99eb909ce426e7237296df37f605270bbaab2e23
'2011-12-21T09:31:53-05:00'
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTF' 'sip-files00078.txt'
7ea95e033998fc7fed48846c1614ca36
e0581e088e9aff2c1056746b9647d00c02ae047f
'2011-12-21T09:32:27-05:00'
describe
'377' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTG' 'sip-files00079.txt'
451b7aa75e35595ac9f673438fe3dfe0
a94a4dd58056089903791d764988567fb301ec66
describe
Invalid character
'1460' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTH' 'sip-files00080.txt'
89772171f6da5edeabf3fba109cc71b4
969c974ef93c123453c28c5bc1f824e9160ab093
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTI' 'sip-files00081.txt'
4a28138727ab34c7163f08ccb1130ba5
1d00a37f34fb259a5c1fd0d22834c4bb2ec18084
'2011-12-21T09:31:14-05:00'
describe
'1576' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTJ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
07e4a642ab70936962944426bce6c5e7
e15a05a47176036ed901ec41d3f2915e84d060f6
'2011-12-21T09:30:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTK' 'sip-files00083.txt'
3896fd6f1ad3b86a4831894fe0b0a344
29d41f61790e895ab6168c7cdae7fe8800c2f48c
'2011-12-21T09:33:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTL' 'sip-files00084.txt'
e030f4092d33899ee5ab62025db6a07a
a7e034bc169bc3597f233baaf544b0ca0d770772
'2011-12-21T09:30:20-05:00'
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTM' 'sip-files00085.txt'
12a39d7aab612fe7d705b8091ee4104d
4e1754b31eccf3e6d98e76dd3d07b872dde806c5
'2011-12-22T09:12:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTN' 'sip-files00086.txt'
807581d1c43760170e431acbc05956da
4befc319160a98a8dfa6c5b321215a4d0bb1cf9c
'2011-12-21T09:32:07-05:00'
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTO' 'sip-files00087.txt'
ec53558a976a7ea6bcda1a71836ec7be
ae0c7e11fb34d9976eafd5be5fbcd5d9ba8284a7
'2011-12-21T09:34:08-05:00'
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTP' 'sip-files00088.txt'
d58f09563c04ab70fc1d5b174b801394
4f3618234ea7630e29fc3e2c35f5bc648b4431f8
'2011-12-21T09:34:27-05:00'
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTQ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
925862d1bfdcb691ed58f85854eb94b8
812774c20889919370c7947f382495a3241c8e72
'2011-12-21T09:30:45-05:00'
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTR' 'sip-files00090.txt'
d1917242f550b7c0dec0e47f09a6bde3
3cd592e469391b9464a37edaef153204001f9c60
'2011-12-21T09:30:18-05:00'
describe
'146' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTS' 'sip-files00091.txt'
b3e7d51273c2e5199f2c1934e9a7ee8c
d8d949fa3c2121176f1cd18f983a8f24feafbb1c
'2011-12-21T09:31:31-05:00'
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTT' 'sip-files00092.txt'
2796d8c1bcd00b254e42b010d9409241
987f4b3d59d6ca7fec8db51c4c66e8bef95241d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTU' 'sip-files00093.txt'
0b84770a8182d5843c1561430fac5daf
17e5cbfc75bb90faf5b4c58f43551ec43069bbed
'2011-12-21T09:33:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTV' 'sip-files00094.txt'
f6e187cb207702340e9074c452cd12cc
12e7ecf0e90f187a8ec457586e30c32b598a049d
'2011-12-22T09:13:02-05:00'
describe
'59' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTW' 'sip-files00095.txt'
4135e4ea95a5b0574e590d6b143dbcbb
d723f08a33f6542ce27591149ff3cabcee1a6591
'2011-12-21T09:31:09-05:00'
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTX' 'sip-files00096.txt'
03fdca8fabb2d9614eef92fa6f2854fd
5d17a9529b89eb33a3a032c27c070b497117f19a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTY' 'sip-files00097.txt'
f5ef875596cba3e81394cd75bc59691e
d58851496868580a9aa3d77ab89e4c6c1e3300de
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTTZ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
3116cbd8c103fdae9b5b55af7a760dd7
7bfc185717acbe0cab8355556763f5c6be99a320
'2011-12-21T09:31:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUA' 'sip-files00099.txt'
adb123ca8ba3202bd6f5590512e99a79
72904c888f3a8cbd9f099ea29a0ea69ad06d1085
'2011-12-22T09:12:50-05:00'
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUB' 'sip-files00100.txt'
92a59527cf4443f71471889557f81be8
1daa2dd5e4133ffde08e9b3008df3f3763d5f91d
'2011-12-21T09:33:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUC' 'sip-files00101.txt'
946fc75ab9376f59cfc54d585ab6f09e
eb483da85cab96bf8da99a90b052d6b6d2530a2a
'2011-12-21T09:33:53-05:00'
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUD' 'sip-files00102.txt'
15eefa1483f815576b2d9f8e99ceaa07
4e597eb764eea244f1999ac78cd5f1dbc60423a5
'2011-12-21T09:34:45-05:00'
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUE' 'sip-files00103.txt'
ddcd0ea33eb7057623f38d04ccd7512c
c99c0aa86c8cd3a4c9139b6e3873f0ee17adb43b
'2011-12-22T09:13:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUF' 'sip-files00104.txt'
bc4d99fec2413403474322e613a8b353
c4aeff92a79baf5a3cccaa6e8f94d3b52fac1187
'2011-12-21T09:30:38-05:00'
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUG' 'sip-files00105.txt'
e1ebb7cb0881a4d21cbe2df85953f440
2ea70e642ecf8ac3ea040ffa9b407dc56430aca3
'2011-12-21T09:30:39-05:00'
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUH' 'sip-files00106.txt'
169e2ed37ca182d45c3867e54e581bfb
f13b9047ef00464ebb17b405bcdea5aee6a90895
describe
'170' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUI' 'sip-files00107.txt'
7d969c1494029dbc135d65fd0cd80823
369814616dc2b6f5b7e2d0ead4c25eb9e1c0dc11
'2011-12-21T09:34:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUJ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
af7a7303c7baa1abc3695d556ee11c83
9a825ed8b871261be321038c9ae918c5039429be
'2011-12-21T09:34:10-05:00'
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUK' 'sip-files00109.txt'
f1f277d66817897efd93cb1478a2e096
705fb0267a866fc42ab63be615fcdeb4096092d8
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUL' 'sip-files00110.txt'
131a0e6686cca9247479064439d13396
ef21405f1945d921504ebd51df79d312d9cb04eb
'2011-12-21T09:32:49-05:00'
describe
'107' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUM' 'sip-files00111.txt'
7deec9e413bfe25ee5006950db50059b
57fca0f954ef6f796e1f1e4a3f9724d8205f7ffb
'2011-12-21T09:31:32-05:00'
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUN' 'sip-files00112.txt'
833397310af65b5350a4bd94f66b6050
7a625fdd0553704e5057c3c932bf470598569cdc
'2011-12-21T09:31:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUO' 'sip-files00113.txt'
0c330feb8f3dd2a4f866bd7549710c5a
1ddd3fb64ddf4e43d6c91f9f72c422b12e1d341a
'2011-12-21T09:31:17-05:00'
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUP' 'sip-files00114.txt'
ccb17f9456f3025c8e0f6f113dc3e2fd
7d9e66729ac524202db6e3154471921a36a3d18f
'2011-12-21T09:30:29-05:00'
describe
'81' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUQ' 'sip-files00115.txt'
6d24d02a15fd096e459d3aa9fa769797
392e56d9c521a6bb9d74fccd07dcd274081c78b7
'2011-12-21T09:31:24-05:00'
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUR' 'sip-files00116.txt'
36ab6b783d528779016cd8288f0ee48b
a82fe7f61586b0699c628484ac77642a4ef66124
'2011-12-21T09:31:40-05:00'
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUS' 'sip-files00117.txt'
b5eb1bcb5df8a240449cf458be95720f
45e7e51fac4515d7d2466438a9aebd19ed6b3c84
'2011-12-21T09:34:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUT' 'sip-files00118.txt'
12009a44a125c120724fa8a7c5cb98e8
e539cad14d55c754d8fd2f44e087fa894980770a
describe
'121' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUU' 'sip-files00119.txt'
c1fc549c3e32d7dfecd5238c46c4f953
b8bb9d96584e4827fee0fb2ebfd19dbe3069bb66
describe
'1655' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUV' 'sip-files00120.txt'
340947bcb231892f4d618bdbc8c69d47
0349126b7ed637883b7eaac0107ec74d78eb254a
'2011-12-21T09:34:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUW' 'sip-files00121.txt'
a17ffb84401d89e9d80d938059712e3d
93d900c2cabf31f36de24af5ac397d667c3264bd
'2011-12-21T09:33:28-05:00'
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUX' 'sip-files00122.txt'
34b68f190eb721e7a4a3931b0adb9ada
237ee2384b791026586c289aa9ea8e514804c199
'2011-12-21T09:31:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUY' 'sip-files00123.txt'
b1006fb5ef7ec924207a8e56d6e04bd0
bb70a9735098ad05200d44864b281cea89b0a4f7
'2011-12-21T09:33:48-05:00'
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTUZ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
89515466b6527e52da571aa4fa370256
a2f21234095356f7bc2a006457f899422736e179
'2011-12-21T09:33:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVA' 'sip-files00125.txt'
303e2d0c0e7cf4b884f75970eef2114f
42e6ba48ab00f909e9b18fc601c183057a37d828
'2011-12-21T09:32:34-05:00'
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVB' 'sip-files00126.txt'
d2779237bd162ed31d9730a930eecbcc
91b604dd9d8220dbee1994f4f96cf7cd3d992b19
'2011-12-21T09:34:03-05:00'
describe
'230' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVC' 'sip-files00127.txt'
a801d161e3157abb941a85ed38421cf1
b9f69f502b7e5fd183029e3febd5865660cc52f8
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVD' 'sip-files00128.txt'
9792e5bb686e0ae0fc0e84842929b092
bf2f1b82ac103653f0c930fb6b89d4112d30f010
'2011-12-21T09:31:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVE' 'sip-files00129.txt'
71b761f399ef21480b0bf6d801b0329d
f9c4a2daf1656d3b79016c06f1ceb19273b53738
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVF' 'sip-files00130.txt'
2190b1f930d9bd4d558ee47db241ac58
d29c03ac2753b1c4d166dec4e16cf0d75f21aa39
'2011-12-21T09:33:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVG' 'sip-files00131.txt'
66f1edef54eaec07e35f50ad8c62f3df
73deedb38f600c174a189cd2b5f4d01cb3fea64b
describe
Invalid character
'1539' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVH' 'sip-files00132.txt'
bf87896e478c0d614add4e916123803c
ce92925e6bb32a1ad051417312d6b12693e58019
'2011-12-21T09:34:43-05:00'
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVI' 'sip-files00133.txt'
0a5354c99d8a066017492a062cb3b886
2ed6d8426517714aed480f169069493d8fbd11c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVJ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
c4228a4b6ca8a9cd02c5554730018823
b4067a58eeb6cf263e426083f56e383a0cffaffd
describe
'70' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVK' 'sip-files00135.txt'
d5a0d8b01e9be20fb71d8cf6e4fc9d09
4b2e901effd893a8e40f1627b8b0862e36630b90
'2011-12-21T09:30:40-05:00'
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVL' 'sip-files00136.txt'
4f0703e81c27ed4e201940c4e02617bc
93a1036de3707881c5875e242959a6b54188228c
'2011-12-21T09:31:34-05:00'
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVM' 'sip-files00137.txt'
312faa063134227d2b5f080cde76fdce
238c6153d545bba9564ef65caf48058ababd7bdb
'2011-12-21T09:33:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVN' 'sip-files00138.txt'
486fd1f983f15ea9d50266c32fa0cc74
b37ce714224ff070af7a36dcab11908f2bff2342
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVO' 'sip-files00139.txt'
cc3f84bc0e2206350689f31360d9c499
74de95e89076f6f93eb2edd7a2758e0263f0a7ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVP' 'sip-files00140.txt'
4600cfa97f63f27ec0c67da419314630
6c0041f70b3c9197c6eeda7e2224cfff7e5b893f
'2011-12-21T09:34:13-05:00'
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVQ' 'sip-files00141.txt'
6b12c6212afb333165569b91e8ab63e7
62daa523a9d193eb315be0f4c9b972d95d05407e
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVR' 'sip-files00142.txt'
c84d0a49151a6274cd81594392a04af3
42943488654b6165afd108e059b43cb04b51f634
describe
'222' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVS' 'sip-files00143.txt'
5a07247f39ff8f5015f905e37c38db0b
8ea9ff8f2c75e5b5306edcef07df110b8bfbe595
'2011-12-21T09:32:01-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVT' 'sip-files00144.txt'
90d515f9c74e43894494c6b460ddf268
f967ec993cc4ee69ad6ebe91dc566fd3ab38e43b
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVU' 'sip-files00145.txt'
90a5103fb0da1ba1d2f6228f4fafa943
5763b1551a84418ed5f1039793b6876f4a8cde30
'2011-12-21T09:33:38-05:00'
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVV' 'sip-files00146.txt'
f155c266379701983725fa9be4a959b8
a5253fe94654c9aaa89d2a00a3f1876eb2f8e010
'2011-12-21T09:30:42-05:00'
describe
'168' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVW' 'sip-files00147.txt'
a14146a157e2b2bd6403b45006109ca0
e010a4e78b9f281c437239c2c1f92064b9e7ae92
'2011-12-22T09:12:52-05:00'
describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVX' 'sip-files00148.txt'
6575c0c2d4c93c65e7b2e3c4f1d82a5b
d5246a8bc90e28567f447763c15833473d0bd8f3
'2011-12-22T09:12:38-05:00'
describe
'1624' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVY' 'sip-files00149.txt'
ab237fcedc20b9b4cd40570a23c5642e
c10ecde4b176abf33a155e9ea9ae7154b213cddb
describe
'1598' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTVZ' 'sip-files00150.txt'
2180290f7039ce897da1ad81eb3bbfd7
db00c05c2b219111fb374708f3bccab6afc2e9d9
'2011-12-21T09:32:17-05:00'
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWA' 'sip-files00151.txt'
e696539224074e41c7f16c103d92977c
b5e9b3e1c61dfd53faf032cdb78786c9be88f9a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWB' 'sip-files00152.txt'
474dea825a689aff4a202fafb5583a71
796f4c3d7194686dc93f9baa87e7fb355455a4b6
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWC' 'sip-files00153.txt'
2905f496d31e3acf14f1274fc33a3fa9
2415835b93bf785afe5f76b9d8bb9056a4eb1881
'2011-12-21T09:30:37-05:00'
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWD' 'sip-files00154.txt'
29b1de90b8db008b03ae08582cbb1858
20eeac5b1e8bfac7a96ece2d5866a8c35ac62849
describe
'136' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWE' 'sip-files00155.txt'
03e1a49d25df924156d8d9795ef04c01
5e14b4ba5cd09a654426124adfbf054a2fa66cbd
'2011-12-21T09:34:41-05:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWF' 'sip-files00156.txt'
cc1fa82da61801817d08b20c3420bfa4
d93ce52896c9d1b7f7c6c1843f7bcda45275385e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWG' 'sip-files00157.txt'
56331e026c79cb4804dd6dd8dc349c99
7552982b4c80be3cecc7523068c5e03026d08a47
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWH' 'sip-files00158.txt'
06298b579045dc78d05b6e71f1f1e8c4
4728aa573157df09bcd5df40d8f4380be7bbd7ec
'2011-12-21T09:34:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWI' 'sip-files00159.txt'
0c4fa50d5eea859629cdfe22225a0ffe
100a11afd462b9783b1c9ceb2eeb5633347efcdd
'2011-12-21T09:31:00-05:00'
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWJ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
6e6132dcbb6a421b184b847f666f95eb
3ef0f7ffd04f35a2396b5ec3d61cf87cfe48133e
'2011-12-22T09:12:58-05:00'
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWK' 'sip-files00161.txt'
832a3f2dffe27cc690a66ce867bb343d
716f079a97fa26ea64f0f2971048f15a0916bf00
'2011-12-21T09:33:15-05:00'
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWL' 'sip-files00162.txt'
a41212d3729746bb7caa4fe95d4b01d2
fd3cee06556748de173e1d0adc6ce643ef84c827
describe
'155' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWM' 'sip-files00163.txt'
04f26df631413e4cc65f39027f567743
7facc15d928f429d2b87fb852c67b0e00da41c64
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWN' 'sip-files00164.txt'
831573fc712610d0458e2d121c86f040
9f39b5177c84a1c944b9f7f74865ee717b8f1d06
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWO' 'sip-files00165.txt'
77846c0994c153fee5af031fb5e6b01c
d423faf5a5867fde0a425792cc824e44b57196b7
'2011-12-21T09:33:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWP' 'sip-files00166.txt'
0fbe014582b1338379d095ca1075e543
5d45012ea81837b4dcd64a5ad5b67fb3061f5545
'2011-12-21T09:32:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWQ' 'sip-files00167.txt'
5b58067c4d33041bedfa2d249646df62
dd096a564f3e9bc717e9c2ef2b05efdedd9a69ee
'2011-12-21T09:33:01-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1554' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWR' 'sip-files00168.txt'
244475fac045caec86a14726b63de74c
182b4bc807411b4b76865a4a20b0247b144b9ef5
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWS' 'sip-files00169.txt'
2a4da500b966a48157837b1acc3136d1
c503854683dc08b25b1624eebd2cc8c2c7ab371d
describe
'1563' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWT' 'sip-files00170.txt'
15a979dcf42b588a8a38fd5a501d360a
8b4552c6708b56466f214a2d12aad3ff799ca2d3
'2011-12-21T09:32:28-05:00'
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWU' 'sip-files00171.txt'
e66a2f30ed2b02c199f42455a5cbce60
1934654de3818bc9172062fe552cd0746446e10d
'2011-12-21T09:30:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWV' 'sip-files00172.txt'
384708bcc7b577af7af8cc7205ccfe9a
ec88b1cf7bc0b2dba622203aef2545a957142f5a
'2011-12-21T09:32:41-05:00'
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWW' 'sip-files00173.txt'
e51e557a845a4c547deafb2c017df741
0f466da724597b1f02e847290ef18f6134858c6d
'2011-12-22T09:12:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWX' 'sip-files00174.txt'
447dcfbc2cb37c5f77d6cd7ad0e44187
e63843bab0e85ab639b6cb58df3c143085b49142
'2011-12-21T09:32:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWY' 'sip-files00175.txt'
3b758ec7bf6c91c7ea8e99082cd7fe48
db7033e58d728632bf3d8b300256fdb11be5b6e6
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTWZ' 'sip-files00176.txt'
b1d51ea723189dff32ecbe2198a20a79
3e3924c1fc8ef373c9642de37c2d2cdb2bbde79d
'2011-12-21T09:32:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXA' 'sip-files00177.txt'
f8db7bf8a17f6cf686fbede56b3dc11b
b7dbda59ecacfc00dd450a8bb508d107a1d32177
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXB' 'sip-files00178.txt'
d132ea78294653360dee72756e095549
d1f9ca079be3cd651f9fcf90d6196dc5248f2dcb
'2011-12-21T09:31:52-05:00'
describe
'183' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXC' 'sip-files00179.txt'
4b51eee9e274ba1f4a0161fdf2f129a7
285704572db2a9aad2acf346ff6779e0a908f0b8
'2011-12-21T09:34:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXD' 'sip-files00180.txt'
810bb940b18fde2d79abc50791c1f7e7
839a108eb9318a995f624e7586e654a58e4dcef5
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXE' 'sip-files00181.txt'
fe5abf35096a139ee4a13a4d8b7e41d8
7991afc9e0e4365039a03ff8836cef960e4e9d12
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXF' 'sip-files00182.txt'
cb0693c5be8479432a0c45ada6fedd56
60d7b37a0bdad8cc7ed5a32e75e2f2bb42b9c710
'2011-12-21T09:34:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXG' 'sip-files00183.txt'
7d66631ed6d78d36e4871bd536db74d2
d730922e7020212dc3eabd0c1104242ab8e78e48
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXH' 'sip-files00184.txt'
ed214821cc2d7242fca66e51d0d83e9b
c33b25c79f681067f10f974f3cb9297a41ff68a7
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXI' 'sip-files00185.txt'
c7129877343e39e5864eb3e4b32e0297
10ce7ee566386ce89b84e70102529e5380aaa2b6
'2011-12-21T09:30:46-05:00'
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXJ' 'sip-files00186.txt'
06319bbeb87be5542c5c0651071625ca
c1026c4e54688f73183dd22f608da3a98166a20b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXK' 'sip-files00187.txt'
bc2ea942d8921e3a9b0ad8611a139e10
c879786df5ef19b2b714e8b19da770842a7a0328
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXL' 'sip-files00188.txt'
3bd1b2734628092c1b27e7bd83ea2923
10784de94a081eb26d69a8ab64b30f05f0738012
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXM' 'sip-files00189.txt'
a7fb1ff29c978ce239b9b05d15e7c5fc
e4ed796bd3cdaab08424b843863aad59c9be362f
describe
'1683' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXN' 'sip-files00190.txt'
e796ef955fd37f45d6cbcd2b97e52211
d370c1a5659947cbf0f92f34018779e044ba23cb
describe
'210' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXO' 'sip-files00191.txt'
46b9eac31c7dcf7782fe227712153e7a
d0f60bf1b119e2c43471757bf29685aae1bbc2eb
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXP' 'sip-files00192.txt'
2eac04047efbc2f58d9105f17846a54f
f425a08651b095d2a55cdc5af7166ff9ae50507e
'2011-12-21T09:32:35-05:00'
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXQ' 'sip-files00193.txt'
dabd5e97217189ab483abab4ee855004
58f663bc70df73774d7d5d4478f14ababfd75f9c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXR' 'sip-files00194.txt'
4e96f764a0fe4d443175fd655026a212
268f3d8f81f9638ba43f7a555cc5a485ae36908c
'2011-12-21T09:33:35-05:00'
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXS' 'sip-files00197.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-12-21T09:34:02-05:00'
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXT' 'sip-files00001.pro'
2f4aa111692e3cee2bdb89c3a057ac87
5b3d80ba34c1f74f3249cfe2ad4a39e0bad71402
describe
'622' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXU' 'sip-files00002.pro'
ea4e60f63803ccca779b9799ca3a4416
497a6ef39f3af96fefd5358e32af2c413720c909
describe
'851' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXV' 'sip-files00003.pro'
16b1207abd2045c5a6b16afebaa515cb
74ce2562c51bf2ae2860322e6b1f72e5b01a283a
'2011-12-22T09:12:56-05:00'
describe
'1740' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXW' 'sip-files00004.pro'
aa72e9710cc5352c4e2e7819ac167589
3d7e335f358ba8c4ee3f94c1b712f6c643acaadc
'2011-12-21T09:30:26-05:00'
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXX' 'sip-files00006.pro'
911065b91f08613aeda75fd75ea0200c
998f1060b97ec5810319927e348215acce988d6a
describe
'3351' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXY' 'sip-files00007.pro'
0636df8cca9bbc147f7e5e84c7ef7881
428e08f6580d66f4c75922c73d9c8bf08306c259
'2011-12-21T09:31:38-05:00'
describe
'2612' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTXZ' 'sip-files00008.pro'
12e1d35d335e5728c45022b296b8e33c
74268d48cd85884384f092d6984b3bd8bc6b4be7
describe
'29506' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYA' 'sip-files00009.pro'
836988467a96a6127cec48683109d3a4
2f09b32406f2fa7ec56aecdd4453c16ef87cc84d
describe
'40603' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYB' 'sip-files00010.pro'
efabe2fdacdb5b06ee1c82c66730aab1
3fed07c5b84fbdbff1f0ab7d6d958ebdfada91f5
describe
'44461' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYC' 'sip-files00011.pro'
45a508cc75df0db15d6ecc8dbb5a39c7
db694740056a52d5a634992f5835a727fbf43916
'2011-12-21T09:34:16-05:00'
describe
'40194' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYD' 'sip-files00012.pro'
c50a521b6633c1044340d8bafc6703ae
9dea0e2d609261eb43a4a47111ae3271eb88bf52
describe
'41147' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYE' 'sip-files00013.pro'
84a47c54981d075be7a6c8c564f5802f
15db80a53fbd983717afa4ef10c7712779e81b3a
'2011-12-21T09:31:47-05:00'
describe
'39947' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYF' 'sip-files00014.pro'
699a2f40e87aea9c6963260bd60b8ca6
011f69634dfaed48a07699e23e6818849e241c3f
'2011-12-21T09:30:24-05:00'
describe
'28477' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYG' 'sip-files00015.pro'
f20e6aea6533649b7e95241845471e7d
eae1492bd8da2cf634751b48c3bbf66529fbf539
'2011-12-21T09:34:11-05:00'
describe
'30370' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYH' 'sip-files00017.pro'
1b34c88990e9b04721dbb616c1337461
5c20706912773ecfd5aaa0315f149d6aaad59a1e
'2011-12-21T09:32:11-05:00'
describe
'40494' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYI' 'sip-files00018.pro'
3c644c73efa1de06da36cff7b28b1f47
657c7ab1b8e8e4331f353c4e43ae4a71f7867343
'2011-12-22T09:13:01-05:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYJ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
4a76d839313978004c9602dcd1895476
0e0524e6b1cc9f31c24bcd541139dbccd38c9848
describe
'40561' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYK' 'sip-files00020.pro'
b55dbb2fb9e1d2f6539b536b165b8132
de84bfd4e40b7e4313a0d40bdbc75a6e6ad5317a
'2011-12-21T09:30:23-05:00'
describe
'38598' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYL' 'sip-files00021.pro'
2102402cc783522270e474e59586a5b0
4776ca10314009a3b1ddf71722a6d4232a321a31
'2011-12-21T09:32:43-05:00'
describe
'35460' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYM' 'sip-files00022.pro'
1f3721f45b60ce31f268c00a10af76d6
4216be25111f7319525cdc6ee7ab4ba434671321
'2011-12-21T09:31:20-05:00'
describe
'34587' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYN' 'sip-files00023.pro'
0c32ff569c1089ab049d90056827163c
9741ce4de031eb338c0eb080007cbcf4d4d84422
'2011-12-22T09:12:41-05:00'
describe
'37009' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYO' 'sip-files00024.pro'
c2187c747f5fa294849d9b70e6d77458
d29d0577fd329d15e5be01018dc3ec021ef2b5ad
'2011-12-21T09:30:25-05:00'
describe
'36465' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYP' 'sip-files00025.pro'
abc3307a58d52db140e859aa465395ca
f2e5c59bba3b6a9c1899ad254b6f1a5df0e04721
describe
'38975' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYQ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
cd8a75fe275fe21a86a7935dd6d96ffd
7733c69d5803ff24bce786f3064f08991fb6749a
describe
'2613' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYR' 'sip-files00027.pro'
15bcae1d5dd3902545e174b974628a3b
95795c7493a884286853e4cbf7a1e4cdad513396
describe
'39455' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYS' 'sip-files00028.pro'
21ecdd5352493bff88d3b5b73d504caa
10e9b41cf508afaf9977268fc655547eea25a6ca
'2011-12-22T09:12:40-05:00'
describe
'38988' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYT' 'sip-files00029.pro'
3f277f9b1a81be9dc7bbd3b69a467542
523d74fb2a54fbf65543ea6743f622fba1099b7a
describe
'35000' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYU' 'sip-files00030.pro'
1fd24a18f3db149b8da2ae5dc029794b
7d6b73c3a82152ae9657f794fa304f517bd2b7e8
'2011-12-21T09:31:01-05:00'
describe
'38276' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYV' 'sip-files00031.pro'
3a59b017fdb5c47d34ad529cd89a0251
c70a8b11b8d88e8f04e9fa953e0f939b43d7e48b
'2011-12-21T09:34:29-05:00'
describe
'39231' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYW' 'sip-files00032.pro'
bfccb52fae4ae65e1ad64797c7e7c1ec
d48f1d932157eb89f5bfb9b4142c333886e05d54
describe
'37421' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYX' 'sip-files00033.pro'
86f71ea15b1acd5082e3f32d79a7c052
ade777b60ceae45c32494c2d90ea4eea6e424c1c
describe
'31623' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYY' 'sip-files00034.pro'
820af59ec30552e79084addff0c32a92
973a6e782c66a4af8c357aeb17c4dfb25fdb009f
'2011-12-21T09:32:03-05:00'
describe
'2314' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTYZ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
52b9603e57b63d322a02be6373cb5e47
3430b0c944a2a1ce4333d83dfb58f9d9cf27c12d
'2011-12-21T09:31:27-05:00'
describe
'39907' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZA' 'sip-files00036.pro'
0dc55c88301d11a4693197f0b941ef75
cec999901a059c9caf1af426b28d0d72cac39b40
'2011-12-21T09:32:24-05:00'
describe
'39289' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZB' 'sip-files00037.pro'
ce81ab0988fd56ec138f21debaf8ab15
be823b8b5b718013a5f41b91653bd03c404b0c32
'2011-12-21T09:32:58-05:00'
describe
'40507' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZC' 'sip-files00038.pro'
a8573e9afa43c06c4bc30c588b8c3b29
996f1d98fc3de51c4e85cff194e64945d13a6af7
'2011-12-21T09:32:33-05:00'
describe
'2755' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZD' 'sip-files00039.pro'
25908aca42dd1b442cf234d16b25b992
b7e67c5e02e6818c35b85590b13a4a2f0e8df449
'2011-12-22T09:12:28-05:00'
describe
'39241' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZE' 'sip-files00040.pro'
f47e35452d4b30832e5284802f1fb984
e29ffb8daeec606bc17507fea165cf51ff40a38e
describe
'39327' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZF' 'sip-files00041.pro'
8713db57473cf4187df9776949b540df
3863bdd6773405a2181952e9089d66c085de04f1
'2011-12-21T09:34:32-05:00'
describe
'33618' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZG' 'sip-files00042.pro'
b88f835b15e44e47feaa787d11937b3a
cf7fe3773941f48665adcbcbc9fbdd26cf333edd
describe
'954' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZH' 'sip-files00043.pro'
c75be19ab86be71974b7f826472fc9e0
0c1be822a50eac1752b5ef3e193dbb7f3d2e7019
'2011-12-21T09:30:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZI' 'sip-files00044.pro'
f2d19623c51ed22ba51317bf423bbb0d
5a5811f6ca3550e035eadfe308f064f4e717881e
'2011-12-21T09:32:53-05:00'
describe
'39620' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZJ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
38122076cee79b80fb50e1cadcfd47e1
35b70c7dcd31ab93774bf88065f73f9311c57b5e
describe
'38775' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
26caa4ca1226b02ff1ed5dbbf1f3032f
47a53e68d8ea22cdbc224994b6ff9a5958d86881
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZL' 'sip-files00047.pro'
ac69e8d34e4d3868af9d6f566f53f6d2
cdf442af6b2a1dcf1dd6eefc24ff4c07e9741733
describe
'39817' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZM' 'sip-files00048.pro'
0a5b777ec9a5a4372a188bff2ae7cf1b
41609a648825bacd004721fd5edc550561be62e5
describe
'39191' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZN' 'sip-files00049.pro'
8518391e836d517ed5fe03cd1220695d
4bc5d17c24f5603d6121f4169a4b623e81ea0074
'2011-12-21T09:33:32-05:00'
describe
'38193' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZO' 'sip-files00050.pro'
8906cece78362c82c922b1ec948c95b1
511c9fa3a3d134a0f4b8a45c08cfe5276a81bce3
'2011-12-21T09:34:05-05:00'
describe
'2014' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZP' 'sip-files00051.pro'
80d43ba48083789e5ec1c5a9f03cec93
8dd1f3899bacb65e4daffacf691f4f4008d55c52
'2011-12-22T09:12:37-05:00'
describe
'38826' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZQ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
3df9a45e1848de126aad5e924f7e3c53
c488797cad9284f52922a281c7bd5a90ff9df8b8
describe
'39182' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZR' 'sip-files00053.pro'
e7b680c40ca542deb57f52e8f78533af
6b5b88393c77e34f2286a19070077e06f02fcb64
'2011-12-21T09:33:04-05:00'
describe
'38600' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZS' 'sip-files00054.pro'
6ce968bc1e173a4d1bd070f76487c353
952887e210a791a9b0f4ba95614da53178703ae4
describe
'35104' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZT' 'sip-files00055.pro'
1aaa193c793531a6348d49563398389d
6605f315f24bfa4c4f9e37517c791b2f624a7bde
describe
'35033' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZU' 'sip-files00056.pro'
206a4a1a7b404f6a885dadb3fb6d952b
dbabc93fd7c8c908a165df1ed1ddcd9e1d1d8102
'2011-12-22T09:12:59-05:00'
describe
'39691' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZV' 'sip-files00057.pro'
f5c36b38cace02d36ca093548efc7209
87444b135ae6410dc61ac474235a2b1b9bd43d4b
describe
'40038' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZW' 'sip-files00058.pro'
764abb9d00206702c610e2aafe91c5fc
59e741902aa5730eebcfe06d07e6a4ec4e25f958
describe
'1936' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZX' 'sip-files00059.pro'
f6012a6e22515f7d025e53c2eb082198
d14504b0752390d799960624f923692c15379e1f
describe
'36675' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZY' 'sip-files00060.pro'
6151b99c6e1bb1ae82df7b650df6166c
2f777bd6b493c602f3fcd72f5373172b3275b908
'2011-12-21T09:34:14-05:00'
describe
'40790' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACTZZ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
d29e92e871f1e9b7e97e1db6f07fe4a4
8df39a62bec7cdfc4fbfda7da30b46bd7f6d60a7
describe
'36406' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAA' 'sip-files00062.pro'
37ce3ff1c1d23dbc8f183375749d9d18
7bf21d2db89aeac439faafb5997890f022093a6a
'2011-12-21T09:33:51-05:00'
describe
'38019' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAB' 'sip-files00063.pro'
1d768dd19883e5bab6da483c0fe5c5c2
78307d639f24d905acc8ff23de6914d984b9858f
'2011-12-21T09:30:50-05:00'
describe
'40703' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAC' 'sip-files00064.pro'
21c42b7c859e07d7a05dfdd332748139
75459b32ae1f8e8cb38a59d36c234915f02b71e5
'2011-12-21T09:30:19-05:00'
describe
'39769' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAD' 'sip-files00065.pro'
6b5eb6e7ccc278570441c99796e9ae3a
eb7d6f3b078881ae2ea73d355dfd2207dfc6002b
describe
'41309' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAE' 'sip-files00066.pro'
14869964f5f3f88b7efca37b0fcda3c2
ae0679cd98207707eae81dc39eb841c57327ef31
'2011-12-21T09:33:55-05:00'
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAF' 'sip-files00067.pro'
93dd587842ee50e5c3aa2d57a6fb1439
3c757d0beba092a6575f275e09b076c5d91f5223
describe
'41824' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAG' 'sip-files00068.pro'
9392dbaaa565b4b63ee6ca534e9a8698
22ff7bb1425d0686b22a6b3ee8471133a9bfb103
'2011-12-21T09:33:36-05:00'
describe
'40666' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAH' 'sip-files00069.pro'
9732f12b6ddbbff13eebba32027ea954
01ab0a74dd6368f5174fa9940ecf9958f697d8a7
'2011-12-21T09:30:16-05:00'
describe
'40992' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAI' 'sip-files00070.pro'
6f46d7759a9f66926d476a8808a9a1fb
602b32d79a2ecec8b82a8d209765d8d26401c8fe
'2011-12-22T09:12:49-05:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAJ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
6e94cc4f134207518c634ce386cb11ad
65bc353a43b23eaee0eb0bb5fdaee234b1893bc7
'2011-12-21T09:33:03-05:00'
describe
'38103' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAK' 'sip-files00072.pro'
94644ca970f82ad2e8a0e7ee2a25b8d7
d57c6d71bfdf1058ac7d6350bde5cb85b19fdf9d
describe
'38623' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAL' 'sip-files00073.pro'
8ab2018a3f891a47130d3ec31bdcb0d4
e050e4a7fecf84bd7d73f52f508de842b3412390
describe
'38964' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAM' 'sip-files00074.pro'
fc3fe6d419828037975b82e0df76a361
a70826e4b45936da8ed9f96e6127aae344beba59
describe
'1696' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAN' 'sip-files00075.pro'
de1058b7381cb9260a192a671a60e9f3
1a3ddc6ba466fe1dcbf700dfe53d82646ec944a5
describe
'36572' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAO' 'sip-files00076.pro'
1af02640b2f2c4770a70f27f3fc24a02
7194f741b9fb54197076802eab1e667127392418
describe
'39181' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAP' 'sip-files00077.pro'
ab458eeae86881d64cb8990f5860b6c9
0bf412bb81f33061464a185bad2e8eb0207899eb
'2011-12-21T09:34:04-05:00'
describe
'36161' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAQ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
fdba555358ac648baa6fdf7037dc05ed
6d01cf6298eddac9ddcbbd6bd0114340d8e331fd
'2011-12-21T09:33:40-05:00'
describe
'4084' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAR' 'sip-files00079.pro'
567920378de9745cb87a171a1ed45acd
3825e07534c1e5de5a66b7b82e87de0eae4eea5f
'2011-12-21T09:31:41-05:00'
describe
'36734' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAS' 'sip-files00080.pro'
c6071a548cc97c9f59516ef772814868
82ef7a48b09f3a411aeaf4c9ce4ddca6bfc20fbe
'2011-12-21T09:30:33-05:00'
describe
'34137' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAT' 'sip-files00081.pro'
b7584f221363a2c8797f8e009fcd4679
fa68ddf1cf65fe50e8ce2d01474adc21b1bb1c92
describe
'40146' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAU' 'sip-files00082.pro'
129a433e9cd96d6c9be35a48ea6afe8d
2774ed6e52d846612202387671c8a2ca9a42440a
'2011-12-21T09:34:23-05:00'
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAV' 'sip-files00083.pro'
c7c7864165ae2bd5cc26182cd6ced885
533446faace0e312290e111602602b2b336d103d
'2011-12-21T09:33:05-05:00'
describe
'38506' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAW' 'sip-files00084.pro'
58f83ec596e0387d9646b34b59ac97ed
dd355b0612df13d1b8531ab4c819d4430a8ef94c
'2011-12-21T09:34:39-05:00'
describe
'39035' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAX' 'sip-files00085.pro'
6be9b9a2c26fe1a0783ab41f3c432793
a7fe8a06f39155fce580d6a20b28baaafa6c7fbd
'2011-12-21T09:31:33-05:00'
describe
'39931' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAY' 'sip-files00086.pro'
0eba5ae5b1a97eb10e9ae70c773094b9
093e119080a6ad03db08a6a44b0a36740dcc3ec1
'2011-12-21T09:33:09-05:00'
describe
'38318' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUAZ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
0927076bc1fd1828f07c6ac447e77717
59160f502b451e9dcf74e905263693e463e500f8
'2011-12-21T09:33:43-05:00'
describe
'38582' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBA' 'sip-files00088.pro'
980e27b6eafa02515efc8f7b107b7030
1b861b658d5db2035f7c1ac904f51c8138b657c4
describe
'37309' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBB' 'sip-files00089.pro'
de7b421b8a638621754332ee4818deaa
c1d063c94af5b6cea7077f9e58c73a679d8c404f
describe
'38024' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBC' 'sip-files00090.pro'
0321460901eb7bab4053a6a3d8f327a2
b1824278751a89cebd38b63d3e2dd636f5852dba
'2011-12-21T09:33:22-05:00'
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBD' 'sip-files00091.pro'
c2c4cd193ec98b32fa69de73fd5d5d79
119a9448414c0da031b13d80f60e9b72730b88bb
'2011-12-22T09:12:44-05:00'
describe
'37805' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBE' 'sip-files00092.pro'
61593d11099b3cbe94f5b35a254370f4
99b1d2ba27b64023c3625948d0ea87965e49fb86
'2011-12-21T09:30:17-05:00'
describe
'40257' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBF' 'sip-files00093.pro'
676e1d4e8a90ce680ca38c1c6b20db18
4cb3e431e4b295f4e0023794a729a4e47d25a512
'2011-12-22T09:12:26-05:00'
describe
'40370' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBG' 'sip-files00094.pro'
1a6c41c3f09c6b15029e57f5bbb840c6
adf316acc2e2a1f6375e57f9a9be653b0804d951
'2011-12-21T09:32:02-05:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBH' 'sip-files00095.pro'
df3047713ebc6744916552f278602909
ef8fc60d59557c2792394b3244e6d81903e2b89a
describe
'35969' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBI' 'sip-files00096.pro'
4b2e19f3a2229f8df533b7f81116db09
2ffe2c57da0492f5b72182e3b481cbeca06a6395
'2011-12-21T09:31:30-05:00'
describe
'39442' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBJ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
ec67e2d307125b71c4d975ac2f615547
e2e8400da3480ccf934382db64052d74d7db66e9
describe
'39900' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBK' 'sip-files00098.pro'
51dae756d1c1bb7a728159f7e5544c3e
ce3fafc7c28434cc099ecfd046cbd77ead8ea79c
describe
'2289' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBL' 'sip-files00099.pro'
ee177deacfe3e5b835627f2165f12105
bbe69bf39a4205c0a3c464652597ccf2e08e3458
'2011-12-21T09:33:49-05:00'
describe
'38544' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBM' 'sip-files00100.pro'
efb91ab57d33ff533f8a5d521a1ec34c
50266444fac299dacb2b5348dfcd9a42545fc578
describe
'40368' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBN' 'sip-files00101.pro'
c17ee3d1660cb79e08405df4b24e0130
91b5e4cf934d4a63c5fab3867f3a9f43a4660a07
describe
'38161' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBO' 'sip-files00102.pro'
1d6261964f0a16c478575789563e3ab8
7cb1f2970df041af882742d3ce0eea3975ffaeed
describe
'38635' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBP' 'sip-files00103.pro'
2751cde89987b9249573f310d3999ba3
826ba10cedf8c75adeafc2ae6a958f4d71ec22c0
describe
'38795' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBQ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
8866b8ae18d603e7fb90865b09a56b5b
8413cf622eb11521116a8c942ecebb38c1e79683
describe
'38784' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBR' 'sip-files00105.pro'
f92120032d95604a5fd0740b9f3507e1
18d8555686c2118e7c00e565d839d81f9ebd5266
describe
'36814' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBS' 'sip-files00106.pro'
294c25be719305dda6e1d2ce63876934
8e589aff4faa6984bb2c1987fe5f4145df25c357
describe
'1720' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBT' 'sip-files00107.pro'
d1ba6880b6dee2657bf0a517e1c601f7
6566105fe435609e661bac0343c788cd310a88e1
'2011-12-21T09:32:37-05:00'
describe
'38078' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBU' 'sip-files00108.pro'
ba0c06a60aac571361a92a5d83a01b16
e54974e56075e76683e325c2f5254b3351d7a09e
describe
'38980' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBV' 'sip-files00109.pro'
066141b5212b24492e0eaf0c9e706b67
9ede3401b45276dff8da7f16953b09da007a69f5
'2011-12-21T09:33:23-05:00'
describe
'37149' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBW' 'sip-files00110.pro'
a6984d0778912bc0166e2286f592ee29
e7ffdf4d8a44d44182ae24af55eda5751d8fa2e5
describe
'567' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBX' 'sip-files00111.pro'
7b874af19b46c6e5d6b7e63c16745d72
c1ab6f30769094dcb30eca0f6ad6d2588a850fca
describe
'39299' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBY' 'sip-files00112.pro'
c4c0e96ca007c87a6ef9f6bdc8648669
844bfff6682fa326140582b3f5d32725677a1e89
describe
'37543' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUBZ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
bf4a6ee6951dd796e9d2bd50822e757b
81aa1865dd2a447d36c931daf63eed0b1465521f
describe
'33248' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCA' 'sip-files00114.pro'
6af10e0093e5b859308ce02ee4da6cec
6d9c94395ceed294e61774dc03319b1ceffd088e
'2011-12-21T09:30:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCB' 'sip-files00115.pro'
f63e33a5964817c3ea5013275dc2e7e5
8788c43af0959c257055883973dc5d846a859557
'2011-12-21T09:34:28-05:00'
describe
'39319' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCC' 'sip-files00116.pro'
c74445c3b2624dcfb0406a25bcbef242
a46e0748117b02d7e17e053ad3229fc2bcf1adda
'2011-12-22T09:12:32-05:00'
describe
'36077' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCD' 'sip-files00117.pro'
f84438ecf204a1b0aeae876ea551b686
f5b6acba93a7688d6e2179ae8df83c355312a4d2
'2011-12-21T09:32:09-05:00'
describe
'41071' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCE' 'sip-files00118.pro'
bf7ea6adf20e3e4c80445b56a2e90520
ed6ff8055f6f66cc4193b01b76a7ae3fa230b482
describe
'1826' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCF' 'sip-files00119.pro'
d71bc2f88a74db4d517904c53a7c91f3
bce43001dd8c85fceddae03d815b86bc8b703e58
describe
'41588' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCG' 'sip-files00120.pro'
f5ebac69aa7187a65d37829f70ff9664
97b24364e386b1d95280acbbaff91d014ac23b70
describe
'40048' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCH' 'sip-files00121.pro'
59c0e4e639d733212a15783c35626e35
15a2a3f7fb7eb948b7c04ddb4a6b4b794fee170a
describe
'40901' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCI' 'sip-files00122.pro'
991b7f46f65228eae6079ee68ee45504
d2a38fed835964e10c22cb69caed7287cb80c99b
describe
'1912' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCJ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
e159e5299463ada6a9f92fd939948024
0ac6764c52724278157264c69ee8dc3de5d27861
describe
'39157' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCK' 'sip-files00124.pro'
72f5ea6c3beceed578094ab0474003ad
d3ba7d7f8feeaa30e3a938f0d8c13b15039ed03a
describe
'38090' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCL' 'sip-files00125.pro'
22fa506493699665ed7de377d968108f
9c74b5c40019dcbee9b66d076434848f7a8a160e
'2011-12-21T09:33:11-05:00'
describe
'38523' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCM' 'sip-files00126.pro'
c77ef52775b1c99e886be26170d225c2
f9a946a74a71600728d1da546d3ed64160a6c448
describe
'2654' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCN' 'sip-files00127.pro'
173d6ed77bbce2a87f652fe53e70ec9b
a4e10e42ec8ee29c4625f2f2868e3758d0c4dc4f
describe
'37258' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCO' 'sip-files00128.pro'
b8a8d99b9726a99d90d8e8d4ff7dba49
b0cd5e4308ce5e94b00838294fab78c6e3f65bd2
describe
'38684' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCP' 'sip-files00129.pro'
5953d997c6c43b4dff8d78906b84ca4c
e1da41ebf9f0ce0bd687ba88b5bcc8298de7b809
describe
'39936' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCQ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
c03489dd0cddf2c1dddc479631bdc89b
c5c7fe8e780a24d052d925c29732a452d08c3d9a
describe
'2972' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCR' 'sip-files00131.pro'
d17975f794f380a9bfb06303280ceabf
65a7263a5157dcb6cdc46b75f0116a76217333c1
'2011-12-21T09:34:17-05:00'
describe
'39209' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCS' 'sip-files00132.pro'
336ece373d6f77ff22de180523c3ca86
398182c78c4968a9b16b3b4e213ab1166c2b3cf1
'2011-12-21T09:31:36-05:00'
describe
'36498' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCT' 'sip-files00133.pro'
7f4d73b14ce24081828698015174b29e
9f32bca11ecdd25dd956fd2587fc0745aea108b3
describe
'39322' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCU' 'sip-files00134.pro'
665a17fcdaadc94fa8d8667545561f09
05e4ce95b1d33c4a4d6dca70a2425906883dce9f
'2011-12-22T09:12:33-05:00'
describe
'795' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCV' 'sip-files00135.pro'
8adf79ace08694721b9f1b6a0d91a077
9408dfd7ff81445b9679e288e766a84cff4e74fd
describe
'37881' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCW' 'sip-files00136.pro'
8be75bf9f3e3ca243fd62bc435be64ca
09ed497508eaddd352ff4b1d4e61cd035c5a102c
describe
'38023' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCX' 'sip-files00137.pro'
2e5f4f0c9466eafae4f7fb9a91faf0e0
d339c6f9623e860dc3ebc6a9e79cc6411ec93073
describe
'39983' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCY' 'sip-files00138.pro'
e0871630d2b33a2aa0c4c81a3cd7bd06
c3ea23afe2e6e2cfdb9ef0dc98b832ce7c93ba8b
describe
'37739' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUCZ' 'sip-files00139.pro'
26dc3f45368d94fec57a981aba7af2c4
f125b7785ee03ea9b9498bf98d69bd6df7296192
'2011-12-21T09:31:25-05:00'
describe
'35713' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDA' 'sip-files00140.pro'
a2a3da3dae0c303b5b3477c1dbf09c29
8331e781ca138596e9881bd173be17ff24421614
describe
'37772' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDB' 'sip-files00141.pro'
023547d3d35f3a32935f167d61e4c3a1
b7eb0dc6bcdca485971ce82c584c56d877bd474a
describe
'41155' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDC' 'sip-files00142.pro'
dc3ae305023473519617076fe4d26e00
cba5f673856c6a7699b1151eac557b3c3c854d81
describe
'3367' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDD' 'sip-files00143.pro'
b76696764fe942403c3a298d77c02a4e
6669e220120d0b73dd5d16b8b5ae705776f35481
describe
'39370' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDE' 'sip-files00144.pro'
edf8978dc9fd5181f3386e580b9b0519
f53345efd377ff0909576d33b63e04b222c37347
describe
'39254' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDF' 'sip-files00145.pro'
5508c140d0344d38eb9be64b841f57cf
4cbd014c3ef7e75427b58d52328df1e318fd908d
'2011-12-21T09:32:54-05:00'
describe
'38201' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDG' 'sip-files00146.pro'
f7ed4d6f2550beb66da9236f917d894a
522b3fcd60eb87a24df7abcc4c8df4203dd37842
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDH' 'sip-files00147.pro'
dbdcd381a4c9a5cbba67df51083c5bb9
948053a180ea6da9da00901f1f022b8d98f3c4ba
describe
'41457' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDI' 'sip-files00148.pro'
dbb91cd154c5794429706dad349badd1
b7188f8d7f72735f350d6196e44ce38f15936943
describe
'41298' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDJ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
d1c9c8e2a0fd7df37e523535e6b970b5
71779f5853be3c65e6905f7efc29984dc860eb79
'2011-12-21T09:31:13-05:00'
describe
'40936' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDK' 'sip-files00150.pro'
b1df893dd46b5fe0f47f1cd02aa1694a
9c3939b54f241f126cfb8f639dc959b382badaeb
describe
'40341' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDL' 'sip-files00151.pro'
573953179322d0c631c9aa9a9db39ef9
7a0643ac0062efc7cd79fc5e652b9008bded39cf
'2011-12-22T09:12:57-05:00'
describe
'40128' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDM' 'sip-files00152.pro'
25f1fb64644a84ba7eaa3159b2097679
5d6bbd46892ab7f717cb6310f49a3b3fe593e743
describe
'39920' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDN' 'sip-files00153.pro'
ebaf0a7d68983a68771f6628f268530e
8af0fbc5574ed9949182b92ad5b92003d5337e0c
describe
'40968' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDO' 'sip-files00154.pro'
23f4a7cba97ddbac630fb78c6cde256f
2ea50f62b28d1cc704c61e04c686a49be16be83f
describe
'441' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDP' 'sip-files00155.pro'
5de5215741070b4f029a53f6e9258bac
0e75bfb14cb0f03ab3bbf31739845ea9961741cc
describe
'35159' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDQ' 'sip-files00156.pro'
d70f78d698c00c9824d8c56d160edcf7
d098b671dd9126802f682e54abdb710b5d46c6d4
describe
'38863' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDR' 'sip-files00157.pro'
4ef3536a36090124e906802bdb6ac6e2
ed87dd387e2656f7d9c985efdea827bd50cbd061
describe
'40324' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDS' 'sip-files00158.pro'
a80b496e9cc26b39272c47b0f51396e1
9e75da5425d7fdc6401c36a15e2941425732cbeb
describe
'36849' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDT' 'sip-files00159.pro'
3584a0664f82ea6d1d91dda1173a3785
03b4cf2f571d01d424c47371d8489110074756da
'2011-12-21T09:32:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDU' 'sip-files00160.pro'
191f32343200121b7db65ff89a96c93d
b35348e46610fb289d5492db5a448e8aafc37882
'2011-12-21T09:34:12-05:00'
describe
'40030' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDV' 'sip-files00161.pro'
b992303f9166cb036d2780b1d1ffcdb1
26359447398182fd7ddec9a56b56d933c25b8024
'2011-12-21T09:30:57-05:00'
describe
'40721' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDW' 'sip-files00162.pro'
8c388a752cd2a242718fbb327884619e
e3f3b4dfddd0084bbde92f7a9c23601d676e1046
'2011-12-22T09:12:39-05:00'
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDX' 'sip-files00163.pro'
d4c5c2d8ccc1be8fa36822c4a75056d6
9b084c910be3fc47307eb7b9850c62a427849154
'2011-12-21T09:31:22-05:00'
describe
'38856' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDY' 'sip-files00164.pro'
f9313e5d09ae5d7ac30d333396593f99
2829dc32f57e41020d440e3cb7a1655791971c09
describe
'40381' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUDZ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
0d1d97b786f8ccf91ec885dfa50dac71
89e6dd4d216e6d74da63cf7632eaeb56c3d64108
describe
'39962' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEA' 'sip-files00166.pro'
fc8fae6050d3346ea1f303bee3201686
8cc1d9f13a9bb4fdca51718da7a1ed3de7e7e2bd
describe
'2481' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEB' 'sip-files00167.pro'
033b4fc33cd25da74d587381c2915488
90f3546b08d6c77acd47ecfd5d1d6696973e729a
'2011-12-21T09:32:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEC' 'sip-files00168.pro'
02e96a5fe186f14e07beb5adbb8e4ff4
c1488695e0263d8c4d6696a2f79c7e2d3c4d7e32
describe
'34969' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUED' 'sip-files00169.pro'
f102fb1bbd89def52975a61e8ab835ce
fcd8ec1510ec8b94b668af843c60d5edbcb2473d
'2011-12-21T09:30:53-05:00'
describe
'39823' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEE' 'sip-files00170.pro'
02e4d87b282a262e8328cb5a6cd2cb3e
9aba55fe3e6cd62feb1656c4c4e72f682730d433
describe
'34405' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEF' 'sip-files00171.pro'
a3fc39613dcc91a7ad88ef9f633e4be6
dafaff95e7036a40f882a6d498cc7a83c42b47a8
describe
'37077' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEG' 'sip-files00172.pro'
da40cdc2461e6e15d276a1f857f67f99
2048dccb10915995bf8d2fbf24f0ad4fb6872c61
describe
'37851' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEH' 'sip-files00173.pro'
b4aa4d57b96d172852d4e4a51f054e44
f73030cab8d57d27287ccf4836df36e5f4965535
describe
'38776' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEI' 'sip-files00174.pro'
ab25ee6faf58c373746a77fb64664314
49654d3285fdb5017dca788555f2ef17996de542
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEJ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
da6ff17b27e177ed33346cd737f0ee85
cfe6b7e826573881371cb4a4dc0e724e33d6c715
'2011-12-21T09:30:47-05:00'
describe
'37475' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEK' 'sip-files00176.pro'
bd087742c7ea1729f2daed9ea8319aa9
9061fa323174cc52a9f7265d3268ce8f4491c6a9
describe
'38136' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEL' 'sip-files00177.pro'
a88ecc59ac4eb7298482f43ad8c6f6b1
7720bf0573b3f9578b88e66c7d2cd4acdd3dd3bf
describe
'36910' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEM' 'sip-files00178.pro'
4da0eae3a82dcd05a1c5233b3694cdc9
2a601eb6d87405650c002805c71cab447ee6c7c3
describe
'2840' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEN' 'sip-files00179.pro'
957b5a0a85778c13eda783d0533e4821
7c0d4b6b581fc5be7996b3b548fe5d9d67b1333d
describe
'40284' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEO' 'sip-files00180.pro'
89eb7bc1238a678a7c2150b8cdff685a
c49f0529e1362dc983986e92a5c6eee29fdaebf5
describe
'38754' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEP' 'sip-files00181.pro'
f7e034da22b493da40d78aa3defe0a6d
9bb0fa71e7a16d077705d2c0041635d431a5117b
describe
'34890' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEQ' 'sip-files00182.pro'
3517a2d8b9b2cbcdfe8a49fa896d1934
fe1a2491dab01c2c43966d0869cd0bbab99e2b3c
'2011-12-21T09:32:04-05:00'
describe
'38764' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUER' 'sip-files00183.pro'
d7502c3e3c288f3b5179d85e5b52ae02
4d0c9022b6efe143acf999914c33f333a5605a6e
describe
'40527' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUES' 'sip-files00184.pro'
b71aa637d078793e522164b5df767256
7e3887e68b9844ba958f0ccdb4a5f0f148ec0f5a
describe
'38107' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUET' 'sip-files00185.pro'
c0e871258fed7f6dd9ba9b3583a4cb24
6cc9b5d0a0c05a4af220c58ef8298752b23ff24d
'2011-12-21T09:30:30-05:00'
describe
'38134' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEU' 'sip-files00186.pro'
419c805b2e4196ac1ee5fe20c591f87f
2a29912489304e62846bae6f0df452cec9efb32a
'2011-12-21T09:33:34-05:00'
describe
'40593' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEV' 'sip-files00187.pro'
50ec13585429b7863b38167304f2d5f7
d2b9aebc0f7b91efbe109b74a11c7775a1f72ac1
describe
'41020' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEW' 'sip-files00188.pro'
4f908fdddbb36b2c9bf0f19301422d19
6b64d5c62d477e0be825fef0106f95a371ea844f
describe
'39752' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEX' 'sip-files00189.pro'
995c39e13e2958e4e906d90934fe0552
c9fbd37bc086bb1178f6d6360ffb030dd30398ca
describe
'41578' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEY' 'sip-files00190.pro'
748c32ef7e220d0d19a6414d7a4c8562
fc7963c7a493593edc947add142b608b4d70b014
'2011-12-21T09:31:12-05:00'
describe
'2535' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUEZ' 'sip-files00191.pro'
92975fa7a7e0110d79f1b566832e6c5f
dbfbcc899d68be8cd585b0f08bfa23be2a2ead79
describe
'39738' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFA' 'sip-files00192.pro'
b25d95d731ffa89078206447fde11461
39294bb9c3ebedc9187248d119019e82378e444c
'2011-12-22T09:12:29-05:00'
describe
'37051' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFB' 'sip-files00193.pro'
bfbc4f346062e5ba012dc4da9f093b8f
a56ffbb94da316f2eb99b182bf7613cfd4f0d926
'2011-12-22T09:12:25-05:00'
describe
'39827' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFC' 'sip-files00194.pro'
f51d998459c043316d29c46dd83af21c
90bf61ffe4f1388d40ccc690ee7ffb709b459775
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFD' 'sip-files00197.pro'
e53aa52ec51a28841cc6066df6bd4e25
4312620ab44f93ae13b822cfeb5fd93c64c99fc5
describe
'399403' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFE' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
a591a3198e57d9a24665af7932f8041a
3c16f5e8f29b98a4d1028d3bf46ba1c537270322
describe
'404476' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFF' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
a9498950a9db12b39000e2912d54d9b5
9d20767ab07aef50ed6eb2c0964a90d41165d0e6
'2011-12-22T09:12:54-05:00'
describe
'248172' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFG' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
a866e84919c28265cadfe0a9cde1e58b
b7417ef08a1e281a57d49b22fa6d0e145e387037
'2011-12-21T09:31:42-05:00'
describe
'322895' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFH' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
e8b7debb1346b35ab01f1836a98e3dea
e094de1264e55b878edfe23967b920949edfa5b1
'2011-12-21T09:32:25-05:00'
describe
'346124' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFI' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
c854f21182f82cec91d187b2d048f46c
ba1748ae07712e08c6f72ddce10413a7d59a369f
'2011-12-21T09:34:40-05:00'
describe
'338377' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFJ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
9dbc9cb989ec482ed6abd5058b0966d4
c2e28f1820a3efbc5631da6e6d1373b104e83b4d
describe
'255729' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFK' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
53247fb63ff73e5e319b47dd15df52c1
4d045af3d59a343059104eee2ed326e6951dda8b
describe
'334165' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFL' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
5ecab52391506a5e84917b772967fc67
c4ebe72c51485ad17e40f50cc5361c30eb78b0c7
describe
'338458' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFM' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
d7274cfc4e4de1455b74f49e7edead97
c0ed07e484529821d48294cec5142ff01571f24a
'2011-12-21T09:31:49-05:00'
describe
'331333' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFN' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
47eaf0e45e82f7d47a62cf6095df3a53
dfeb6d87c907e03915ef7e40efc6f9aacec09861
describe
'338433' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFO' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
0483a1888a24c76459e1513f74de6049
790fae1252518bf2fd4a5232ef3dbce643c4da4a
'2011-12-22T09:12:42-05:00'
describe
'325551' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFP' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
f9510f8ab303a8514a3293e21b4cab22
8d5882346fe992e275883025f8b5a526a53f81f3
'2011-12-21T09:33:31-05:00'
describe
'328464' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFQ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
b38a49f0d5568ccc8ae44c91f3f34568
d2e81cd4ec2e710b78960d8b760ba7658fef7d85
describe
'327036' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFR' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d1208588013be8fba004b99c58abcb31
723a1a8363efa2f85e5c869e4d14f3d495b4aebf
'2011-12-21T09:32:21-05:00'
describe
'338386' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFS' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
ebc51e3f83e7facaf01a4a6c5ff06b12
2ba665b61cad9e9e238648eb99e71956471f3b10
describe
'325625' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFT' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
a0e0f204720782c079f32acdbd840007
945082d52ea8675ace2fa1c313137f80aa35365d
describe
'319873' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFU' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
26fb0c55af2187b37b2a3c7f786c17ac
ea40fac31301b3230b7137b82976151125aebfde
'2011-12-21T09:31:59-05:00'
describe
'330868' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFV' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
675414ae4f84f3956cf802c1c0e251c4
6dbb252d954a2ac99434349cc235515358a1e627
describe
'338322' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFW' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
4fcb225af161453b120d4d180f84bb6f
0b692b9797ce4192ecf4830f36b4557de07ed710
describe
'324157' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFX' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
26b3442bdec2b86aa23d2b6bba579726
34cb9d1c5e460a9ad7768274638857174eb25923
describe
'338464' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFY' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
1347604f7dc0a74a49b7216f53d76d1e
7a1227304de1bf5415bff43d095ad0a9c08df113
describe
'328412' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUFZ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
ac66e57b49c727ec229a7d515808c361
eae5e979c24b3c1e377d8b6b1020a64f62f6a4c6
describe
'338459' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
a94a234b4c98f7fa596861de060d281d
3867e59f9ce7411c0d9a10e0492444bf6e1f006e
describe
'328463' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGB' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
ea0974e2161b7a234f4e34f125722e99
e8943ab8b6a3aad8e822a6abc2cfa7ce6a8e39bd
describe
'338457' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGC' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
130677758f258d60537871faf115bbc1
da8b0104fe7519379f002501ac02ba3edce7770e
describe
'338585' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGD' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
761665352f49cb0b27b4d7a89627a885
2894bb60c057edae6bcf59e977fe06ac089ae6d3
'2011-12-21T09:33:20-05:00'
describe
'338406' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
2d6c9621f1bc58849478773e0ff076dd
741e602fa7cbee168a3443d22083a15e3f9634cb
describe
'325507' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGF' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
fcfd5e3d7b6a1f1ab5ddf345c645e444
df1b24341b2b271b0752af7e1e1f597a08040bb6
describe
'338437' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGG' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
9ca46df9c420f57a62c6f6b16eb2fa22
243fc954cd355ded3cfd08cacfbd87fcd3a6185e
describe
'324082' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGH' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
6cbc40c07676e5d655f72327305482cc
786addd97a3192d2f21ca4776a63e953ca110749
describe
'324170' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGI' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
4b5de7a4f52c9b4272a153a34ec8b352
914911fda2eb769e662228ee5256ad6f6cd708b2
describe
'316936' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGJ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
bd8a4fb46d838a0496b089be0d3ea5b4
547d26c253ef5287bb6d1ca8b57546c44fca0ca5
'2011-12-22T09:12:45-05:00'
describe
'322648' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGK' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
6e954e083c6b535e49a4d8503e0864b4
d2e67034f59f4f64b99ed5e8b722f815fdb8010f
describe
'329233' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGL' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
fb3b03b802ec5a9f8a21c7f35ab274da
a5d532cedd1aa6d31265bde58547f41bcac33eec
describe
'331324' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGM' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
c897e1d6d3a93714bb0252c02f2cb41b
04e94ba68d2daa08ac6529f5391dfa6a2be2c5cf
describe
'317052' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
7223b82235e1e5a370a9bd44e31104c1
ce7e1c5d47574115ffc8ae4efff661460d09fb5e
describe
'338430' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGO' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
7912ba4501a0f241be77a9a68d5e3c7b
3d8e8b7a2028dcdd37a45c4359f68e91b49233f4
describe
'347137' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
40de27dbe56f2a4005b36f8e511af710
ee910c23baac71f6b6486f44ac0665b7bae18755
describe
'338388' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGQ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
64448cb7be47509b18089eaff920bb72
efef2a116ab0772d67ca92cb1afb7966d98f42e4
describe
'338461' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGR' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
7ea526fd35c4ac3a72c0df373eea6eb0
60f2bea5bc6b486f13be1c847ae29763ca8054a7
describe
'338456' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGS' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
1bf3be8fa213feee2d0eccddfd450960
17ed4aa91428685d31b12293099e0052d2dc1e47
describe
'342654' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGT' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
f88601477e64c91a7e4babd8a380550c
d5293e1da9c5c784b0af724b89462701231071b4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGU' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
885eeb2243df3bb460eb642a7868fa36
2b17e527f70c6c3df7ce54e5965d3b985701d201
describe
'338448' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
293910711638b8b8b28e0cc961415a4e
1c6ff80a56d608df7bcdc13398f1c9d4db532d35
describe
'338369' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGW' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
a4d702fbf7d12a2bd57824be4aa2ad9f
b7e265327a88b8171d189c0dad8ba02e1cd5256f
describe
'343171' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGX' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
bc96c2309ab665fc0733322231be6a3b
a9541980a2004663e168cacca3c32cf3328d3ff5
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGY' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
0aa102eea386b8340bdab76341f5c232
85e85108dfab358d28c8bcce2a8ea8757dcb5bcc
describe
'338379' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUGZ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
118844286e455c7c00e51d352245f9ee
23a01cbf55b5e952c95e020b06ea8df324b30810
describe
'338401' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
881d8aaa6f55d63fc10156aec85b43f4
d3f1b62591f8d40581eeea583d6eb0fc0cb7ec3a
describe
'346400' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHB' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
8fddf8480b6f640c3fbb5db8eac58969
e3dbc9f11edeea07fd328eaf9a0a5dcea030d78d
describe
'338474' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHC' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
ef2e68ae228b1198ea0f6577022fc689
38758337ebd1e8f8e46294a8133e3a7d846772df
describe
'338409' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHD' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
1816233a6d7ded1a88460384b391dd1d
a0b274bfc061a78fe9b079b085be4d692d029851
describe
'338483' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
ecd7ec94940cdb829e14c5c66ad5e55c
b1756a3e8d6f6b808437983532b843daa557ae2e
describe
'338431' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHF' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
c77eed61de6ae055320a92a97a4c0bb0
9883fa5754b304fcc38dcd91cd59398d37327763
describe
'338438' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHG' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
4b3948b7c2b7d7367c3dcb60d14301c1
c30c566e81fe98ea0d42e402e3214bb63c8f6921
describe
'338397' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHH' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
da1673f706a4a512604b024592c7a7f8
83fe75d32ed47deb047667bde43c1bc7acebbecb
describe
'338471' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHI' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
23df6a87f62e2372dd2fa4f2621ee9d1
c4abee201940d8340d55e65a1f3e36b1c2a0ca35
describe
'346680' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHJ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
f0e9cad5d775a670d03b52de6d5ec832
1550c7fc1bd0620bf526a27ca14bc71763b0dff4
'2011-12-21T09:32:14-05:00'
describe
'338469' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHK' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
4bcb244f17d4d320ae387b0c66866cc7
7732295b0fb4d04d33ff2c1a5cad0873e52c3a68
describe
'338413' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHL' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
4438c708788709e843a81300417767f1
b1e50663aef36ec45968db1f1b8d8f43e8676af8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHM' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
2d937487aa9687313d06a4d3cf766aca
d431fbc555a758077e8ea53da50d770c5f7ffb63
describe
'338384' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
b9d98ac50aacd050ab3480a00deeafc5
c3f647cfea7e44160647d31e82d65ffa9fd0e09f
describe
'338462' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHO' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
505b9d885cd93b73fc6070545a6f15da
96129050b8ef3a853c26276f978f97aca4358b3c
describe
'338419' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHP' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
6c1d5eda50be374b2250d519f1dad697
92089f21ff86d4b8011f94b6e3052b72d905268d
describe
'338484' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHQ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
89bd90fb3922fee89189757d51821a1b
b937f5ac8cba5b1d0b474b5589e2e21d3c4e91c5
describe
'348031' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHR' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
59a94ec3d63ffbcd45341767313f47d4
f639e98cd0bfdd9ffec5c7e3b33860a95a54ffb5
describe
'338381' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHS' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
20f30d78f296d6c92c003a8149323fed
ff97d03e839307e72355f3ac7c400f42d58d7701
describe
'338376' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHT' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
43e324a6c215068ef5298ebc7c89ef59
9280bce8ded496cba540a9c4f4dae1eb33c3218a
describe
'338453' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHU' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
316ee1c58be568fa3a818d3a90e5d2ef
2c1bad045129ac2d782470e4859c23f0a050598c
'2011-12-21T09:33:41-05:00'
describe
'341321' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHV' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
296898d9a27714c03b9d0ee1da11b001
342a728e10bdad2234fdbedfaa6f9100f1d938ff
describe
'338479' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHW' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
c32f3ae98a095679863530ecb2f9bbbc
44a2fb07b1f7a8bb85a3d59fe384cae0361f3682
describe
'338476' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHX' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
e4f7ddb7a79f704beabd912ef8203b02
55a57a1e25931169c35cb2fe74d705586a46cc13
describe
'338440' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHY' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
782169c546bf2f3a7df7708934b08d2f
31daa38645fabc28083b6e510b53f8ac86050b74
describe
'339165' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUHZ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
276eae5860e95ef8838d5a96ae1cc7b0
04a89857b491a995fbcdbc5111232a71ed277e3f
'2011-12-21T09:31:07-05:00'
describe
'338421' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIA' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
170195758c0650a9444a147771958303
7a19494049b80a8762431174c27df3a2cd7009ac
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIB' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
707e25ae220943e217c93529c3b4091d
4882beafa11e0b7b0c70511861cbb830b2a61ae9
'2011-12-21T09:32:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIC' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
2d78ff6f7cc63dc70c66d94e9b347af5
53bb25a2faf7e149bffa9a9d1f476fe0048a2959
describe
'343781' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUID' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
2360ca478883a2d6c718d1d79ac94ff2
4c764f4f9c761ac6469726721493c0b6df9bcffb
describe
'338467' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIE' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
571f8c7ed7dfa0375e133163aad28471
98a9fc7f23190ea8ef5b8812a8ab2c2ae5effd3a
'2011-12-21T09:33:17-05:00'
describe
'338480' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIF' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
5b6b9ffb19f0ed8211653cfecb794ca5
850ee3e66319c5527f51e15f92d03aec86845d62
describe
'338427' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIG' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
034ebcd5f4d803b4b7130db410317226
87b8fa2648c428c2f1a7efb14c21d5606331bf38
'2011-12-21T09:34:15-05:00'
describe
'350133' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIH' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
29beac0569ee075992cfa421d7902457
89f75cf96fb21e2199536efe1b061fae1c9e2ed1
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUII' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
38a0381e25ed369e9743073cc2a0f682
d1ee13e650cf8d937a593b63735b6e37d732bfa3
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIJ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
08229b424768d5d4847f83442d32cbe6
18fe20ed642547d948d5b67b7afafbc28ab42ea5
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIK' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
bef0d50b6434fdc5eae97f633c867365
0fb05ff9a01c386353698ba7b5d8d0e23fc59270
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIL' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
58cded9ce32fb1baf0b9383de3075838
ed35d233b9baa2f5532e090b829fe6e49b54c789
describe
'338452' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIM' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
126d2b3ce3f48f553da82ac5054b6475
ef823c4efea28c6c00e6548d8324e8ca505c675c
'2011-12-21T09:32:32-05:00'
describe
'338477' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIN' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
87fa603c94962146b023e781307527c4
272aa72023db30f23264656611bbdb0247802246
describe
'338460' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIO' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
fb4b89f985e1b8e68ac5d71b654f11e3
2044d85aed50a4464b19e957a636a7ab690a6b15
describe
'339442' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIP' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
1cb5d345cba047670e8fda1344270af6
7207d181bc39d66a7e015b9c1b25a50d9308b6a4
describe
'338446' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIQ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
13934859b35e65c445d60ceae6fc00bd
2a9d617588a21fee336ede50f57a520848015aba
describe
'338375' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIR' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
9ad89c10267d3e800080e3eb3146fc17
f8267acd7e809c0742ca3107821f45e6e06d36c8
describe
'338482' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIS' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
e31d2aaf90e154a898f44279e88e3279
84e69b42f9a925d341555764c1e60224619ceb65
describe
'344132' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIT' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
9b1cced23a6d935ad5ef597af2a7dc91
170914d3d0ff27add36fe450cf02b48dfabd69f0
'2011-12-22T09:12:24-05:00'
describe
'338454' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIU' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
9169e684b7d4e886b90bddb552dbb85f
987a0eefab331c4b1497417bebb8666a4c4d02d8
describe
'338443' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIV' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
01863fcba81f4205f433bb4907740e43
d87ffb1da9a4bb45a2fea9d37e0a19314c2abeab
describe
'338411' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIW' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
ac66dc2fe047cfe1b538aa3a60d3bfce
b0f76ece27d36c18c16743da15256fdeb687ea60
'2011-12-21T09:32:19-05:00'
describe
'330842' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIX' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
05e14d19fc99b4a048cb1f3d94cbb0dc
6d8c9efa634cd35d55892fcc698844bf57ca0bdd
describe
'338360' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIY' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
fc27589d139b7c0c02fd8527fba7d925
5b3ceecff85b90bce06cbfdec5f8e5a8a9af4ae7
describe
'338340' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUIZ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
a8482a3434c76d62b4a0aae9d363849d
46d7044410e22866894c5437e13f1b4ef7bd5b35
'2011-12-21T09:32:40-05:00'
describe
'338396' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJA' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
176836f4b09f6519eaeb5be6d016725e
51ac9e9231e7262e95bc4c8dc4121a10bb1fe801
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJB' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
5b8d4547fa2e97f7b377bfbe7570b92d
cce57a2f5c1a01d88dcf59a9e702b2791e40925d
describe
'338486' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJC' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
3bac2c1fffb11075fb2b1b4f8de57150
0d54a917e98acda63bbc848ba984a855f168af77
'2011-12-21T09:33:06-05:00'
describe
'338449' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJD' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
4c220f8939159f0cd3ac9a256484d1cd
16131b8f91b5f62fc29f90a8015097be49d5e0cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJE' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
6114baeff3caba0c4e77e025aa9f2602
d2ebc4446e60820d6699fc3dd31aea60c17da90d
'2011-12-21T09:31:57-05:00'
describe
'344974' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJF' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
e6d05173cd03fa6c2c79dead83680643
4c6456a2455c99169593f5a4cfa896592bdcd0bc
describe
'338445' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJG' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
bde8143f2f98beb0e641e69741bd0b6a
29bad0c60dc1c2d30531472f542569e62474edee
describe
'338395' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJH' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
18d649071e7063abbf41e82b6acbea72
20bce0189def3cc16100d284e3d3d92a19eb49a4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJI' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
935f1c5de0554be27907ed372e6b526c
b19d584f4044221ff464f459f6138fdb236e351c
describe
'335963' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJJ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
4977bed2b0c0f4159aa6150a8bc37937
d45c230365ad092b5b43e987284996bb48c70f01
describe
'338407' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJK' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
0f255b8080f17e81fb1d5e11b987fc7e
9479b976d2c17288543ccca206986a59d00ae899
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJL' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
69fd867fe82150db210cb3278af77c0c
c0cf149bf40fc0889532c369175c461462ed0b90
describe
'338432' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJM' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
7989804ca976c1b4111bfc65a60c4b30
a36a1f053d0653b6bb0429a55bd3146ef3760496
describe
'342367' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJN' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
ad17b2e9d2f7f06e1340ecf29a8ebc74
5a8a4e13d2983997361fff4d0b41626fabfc1729
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJO' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
71cb6a7f46f0178428e5a8f8d6a15cef
3b2dd27642e9e863825e18da0413d74ed62cbf87
describe
'338455' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJP' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
d2babdf1213f392370687e713d9a5449
53187557f81613ae8336d86a584a43994a30ba74
describe
'338408' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJQ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
339689a35a36fc60ca51f19e71e945e3
cb897c504585502afba144b73298e5eddf7d2cb7
describe
'337640' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJR' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
0b7fd4dceb9d35d926eba92d33c8c1ca
f900cdf1961e25b9a33c3c2abf4cc26d8bfcf7a1
'2011-12-21T09:33:14-05:00'
describe
'338354' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJS' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
831a9c09d051c0c556295abf61b014f0
fd1467054ee4efb493f6136e3aeb75809915488e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJT' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
e655310548e0bd35103e3bc7838401fb
f06f5064303564e7b8de4f83e27c3441d9b6c587
describe
'338343' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJU' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
7d6e8745bcb3b98e0064c1e1842b179d
40ba2f59bc1f5d5574e6e09be6420b6caf9c22c4
describe
'337965' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJV' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
67f16b6e20b8f56c5ef46cfb2c79e85f
6e376367afa4cad73e3523d70ff57c9e9f425e7a
describe
'338425' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJW' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
f7c207933deaa63e327919ef48531c3e
a6117f10aa3787d465bb347f7522ac65b7d281b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJX' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
2833073a07ae7f56b4dc21a871a2e54a
41cbc33ff7a9488c3242eb07e94e7ed660cd0d28
describe
'338472' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJY' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
becc1527a403b4a32a15c2d75f2a4810
e6bc9bad7fda88e03e6ff027d73f93b576e04c86
describe
'344727' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUJZ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
9d0d98c674e8be94b57d185e1a0b1acd
79379bc30ceac342ec7482cc00e4379c7c26a7ff
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKA' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
81f08378a9393eff1dbaa83682a73dea
37307c90eb4b36a3131e19aabfc5ab612b0dedfb
describe
'324168' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKB' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
a3eed2136c1c860bc4d787245470abd6
68d46265686acc4bc9852349772fb4b72388a847
describe
'338374' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKC' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
a32f4ac471d77b68a30d5c61eef29e86
265b7bae1212433363b0b6ab093d5c80976053b9
describe
'338507' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKD' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
b09815e78366e964352672028d26db33
36fad2338862780591dae7830fc582fe7f8777f4
describe
'338436' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKE' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
7e0f2d96c7e117a1e60548dbc406395f
49a167aa07af9a5f5937c2dbe6d03373fe168cbf
'2011-12-21T09:32:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKF' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
fdf2c347c2358b58e83470693d1c1cd3
faa3b433154da511a070957193c379501e845418
'2011-12-21T09:31:58-05:00'
describe
'338344' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKG' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
d5ab931574c5bf319a056e4f0fa25438
35c9fb6a71500f2b1c82562208e8aa081eb48589
describe
'333853' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKH' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
b349f8b845f916734d64cc90aea6099e
a98b762ca65612deb4ed92eb1abfc3ce520143f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKI' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
71836859e1f25f685083e21e4f6f72cf
619e32da89fe756e2ce094bdfed432b2d68d9397
describe
'338373' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKJ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
baa72c4753a45c16133b707c28cb677d
1ef1be64b6b0523898f6279f43cb02db407e1ac0
describe
'338390' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKK' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
9f116abb3c1731a668c3c592619dbd36
bc9c0dc743e93e9adba0f333f151b41b994c0a87
describe
'338385' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKL' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
a96bb704d8f99a63d5f3c9d73142e172
24eecc4d6234c98ace0545efa27b9356be888476
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKM' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
8ad1992fd9cae00c819501f1b8fa963d
184cd4173d9251e48d0f4db4d28feaab0f0d7e91
describe
'338420' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKN' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
df1969e3a465848565c565fede18a96a
46944092b94aed56617a5b5fb36adfee8212f37c
'2011-12-21T09:31:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKO' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
79cb16757a4c17d721081596771422f0
4dfefb92c49e3a7f2ab10bd800b3c876fe48d129
describe
'344923' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKP' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
23ce054edf4ee2e5fc6355840a2f609a
58874154939a638b8cf9e37292bc8ee441b16c61
'2011-12-21T09:33:29-05:00'
describe
'338470' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKQ' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
0e39ce0cb96f614e0a7d29305583c8b8
40bdc790eb7c3fb98043beb7875ab68d99e69d56
describe
'321308' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKR' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
4ec0ecb52d60684b11b614caf7d21cee
50345365b43744508f7c23c6412bec8bad810448
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKS' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
15362d0f7a7d03762b5495b547d98648
a322c50244c818abaa2a5b20589ed626b27fe3e0
describe
'346402' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKT' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
4900a99ab18604b3b91290dce67c657e
9274d386d1fb4d7d45eb7d90153b899806380f73
'2011-12-21T09:32:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKU' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
179dfbeaf7afa0c189cf5d9529ab4cb3
a346a905b78b4838c093c664bdac0b17d11c8539
describe
'338468' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKV' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
b29f24313d0962f3f9012c66fb0c4013
5c8259b3fc5254c6eef8495279ac5d9fae304ae0
describe
'338442' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKW' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
fd03feced50b49fc8d4bec7b61cb4548
5ae4958ba8d8564456326454a6cd3ba6ac333320
describe
'338423' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKX' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
1ba4363ff55582e79a6e4d7166eebce7
25bb8e1f6bbd4e5fbda7ad560103d6b7b666ff28
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKY' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
1a1ff74f7052fadde8adaa4d2e4c71ae
1aa1fa8f102e28df6cd58fe2ab2b486de23fd8a0
describe
'338353' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUKZ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
4345ec1d05e0672a1a935bce93fbee34
420119d409cd6a7e3ab69885ad9ab445d0813e40
describe
'338422' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULA' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
2c5eed59fabdcd30d7abe1f6987b93dc
0bc691c868e0717f42ebbe1caedd5f40427c0c33
'2011-12-22T09:12:46-05:00'
describe
'343518' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULB' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
10c6ee423310f67f39c1105ddc5034f5
3180e565c1fcf21673512fefde1067cfad5f9b81
describe
'338475' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULC' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
7da64a02b92c1bb24c45dc400061a7aa
92f5581084777a537a43371f4077b1979f701d63
'2011-12-21T09:32:31-05:00'
describe
'329891' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULD' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
3bdaabb2bd9a9d739d99003a737ce75f
089456dd87e3e5bc909d90fc3e066d24f781f264
describe
'338428' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULE' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
d50d2f0e781eebfb75b1c1b3258dbfb3
405d1a8a6da539ba808f2c052ac09ab9732e8e85
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULF' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
5b4bc31cddc0421ee5a4d745eda6ace1
0714097f0af8fa9d1ae6739b6a10c926bf3821ee
'2011-12-21T09:31:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULG' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
ee0d0cf6db80e3e913e20567847c20ad
bc7d99d67156d38578f8a4c6f90ba2ef79449def
describe
'328447' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULH' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
23b3b6471f9b0a7aecd7adb3476772de
2712313c3aef73b92799f681c5540da7c33e01c1
'2011-12-21T09:32:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULI' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
7495d92c4e43a0e8d635b967dfe1734e
46be20a6a1a731388615423be7ed7da68d6efdc2
describe
'332022' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULJ' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
07f137e52d27eb22a9d29c8777ee045d
5bd8e5815e7aa9a9f8d575f2b36394c80f7a9ccc
describe
'327012' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULK' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
e1b4df485b782f54c67abab6e52a07a9
a5d060b66cd8198cf8a5734ff9944f9ffd56d05a
'2011-12-21T09:33:19-05:00'
describe
'328391' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULL' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
7505c9ed4829857e5e8e0edc9df65195
44ac4cdc4b7a22fbcf16994e6819025507cda5d9
describe
'338345' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULM' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
b68c7df78461cd9af1c32cb9b9d6c7a3
c25ae53500dce76fd658713a55c97e03adb9b7e2
describe
'335918' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULN' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
64b5d5e12b35ec8aa649da840b7541af
2bab79dc617f19373e1eae6ce257000337ba8afe
describe
'338414' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULO' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
1cb74068ca3f48e3619d8cea210d6696
19d20a527136b37329e41214d71ad97ad7d50e17
describe
'338473' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULP' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
15e9673ef710d7539bbf86e98439030d
56756639178453971a0eb21fa328ecc3f2ec8dbb
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULQ' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
107d0ef704616b1385d01625e5574a4c
8084ea91fff0f2e1a984eaf1929d43540bf71011
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULR' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
103dfcc29ee8241afc63cc7b646796b4
ff36f7b96f07a952e51f8425ae297b3ad4c12c72
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULS' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
2e80d483b5823aa227eb238dea20cdd7
5178ae8b36ea8ddcbaa1f3c251ce50568fa5e512
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULT' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
9d0cd6891711b8ea8439b14c5f13a6fc
4985f5cc1396cf84e0b0086d06d0424eef9b90aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULU' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
fac2d3e5bbb2eb570ed3a2180d396df4
03d00fb04b4494646fd616f0fef6eba3fa1459aa
describe
'344122' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULV' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
5f59f6ee4258c14969edf8c841f4d00e
c2766fb0b0d40a0e22103cd2db7d7e3cb3a58680
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULW' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
4a97f5db5fc3932c2f91b8d2420874aa
dc4cdcb0a3fcc1858c702ccc83f94ace91a55898
describe
'338447' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULX' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
80d039b0a0642e93073c42295dd7b390
82a0f0e3208e4cfc85ecf282fe993842696140b7
describe
'327028' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULY' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
d77409903d3398a586c33f6b78e15f8c
8ebe2fe352f6f7813dd766d239e36881bd5fd3a2
describe
'320677' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACULZ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
d1de0ad16864c9ab0eb9ef4a0170d707
e3d060ea6e9a1579a9e7f0bf53db3774570acccf
'2011-12-21T09:31:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMA' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
b1062c1338389d08c3d60065a044aca4
4d237b43736a9d191f0b3e77f5dde92462b444f6
'2011-12-21T09:33:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMB' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
c254679d8d33fd3d5d4d2d87159b0aac
f3997f335c3ed87f6f3047dcad1c1b1916962f42
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMC' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
1dde7aab9ebd4326ee2839cfbe333d57
a38110b0a4f598ae1910615411d986a85e613e4c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMD' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
26d9bef6e02697357e5db66f05c97861
802024775ddbaac38e80eacdf2cb8120dfb95211
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUME' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
9923920334d755611439d839db11f675
27ac3e0bd656124330be34481efdba2c05fdedd9
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMF' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
353ced9b39d47dcdd940321affd03da2
176d1a2a76cc7aa6c0cbf5a79b91ba78a8823f25
describe
'338405' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMG' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
1a641d5fb1dcfbb902ca32f0ee5007d8
55fa50179b34cc70dba8852d37d90f7f2293c4cf
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMH' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
ce0c240ec9bf68df54f7b489cb1c8b1e
1f0907c48ce877840640d3f03af3e8d36ba42315
'2011-12-21T09:31:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMI' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
44944b498f2ebc04cc69834b29474f57
ee66dadec2d2cf68a5d25406cce0c204ee4a2631
'2011-12-21T09:32:18-05:00'
describe
'338451' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMJ' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
8565ff192bfd8367449dd723013c96af
3ce4fb98c85892ff9e46c5ccb911caba5de815cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMK' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
1d847df22e086f9caec3ec07872b4003
d081c867199d441f774b0aac8b61bf394691cea9
'2011-12-21T09:34:34-05:00'
describe
'337542' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUML' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
389c4e15edf0c8aad7d04d442a8f8918
116869eb1f99ed8764ea4c328861c291620c23d2
describe
'338368' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMM' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
00682cf836c6ae2a2d8eebcfc5b9af7a
7b15e0cb081baeb648571467e863a64086ab70ce
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMN' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
f8c6d546f8d595980ecb19d5f8fce197
bcd187247a41596be89770cf4301a9f65d184785
describe
'338439' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMO' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
e7396303dc881f022ed747b6555839a8
4f1dabdfc658956638c998dc0421b462d1988c31
describe
'392066' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMP' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
321ac5a817554c100d9ca4b791a655e4
eb2d01165dbefb9f2df36b532bd95b9c107d70e5
describe
'66858' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMQ' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
2152604d5a253ab08e7abb7f2e5167ba
69302ac11057c321ecb603b5d97193fab023012c
describe
'403247' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMR' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
d26b1867ade8d0041976d8a946093d84
77173f8fa96e8fe3242eac18c6e84eb4142ec59e
'2011-12-21T09:33:18-05:00'
describe
'9602240' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMS' 'sip-files00001.tif'
b2efbabbda99466d853310a174d545df
1ee5ac3f3385c0f0805d10f2c690d175831767fc
'2011-12-21T09:33:24-05:00'
describe
'9727332' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMT' 'sip-files00002.tif'
5e30472f8ba10a576a7acf4bb5a36847
4db843c94403b9621455a49a2024a3a30c822730
'2011-12-21T09:34:44-05:00'
describe
'2548980' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMU' 'sip-files00003.tif'
62eef2126a0810dba824e2fc6d56bea4
cdf49c73a500dc44ec58e1cd53b5ce6003caad72
describe
'2724688' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMV' 'sip-files00004.tif'
36f419d093cec160f8c495af309e9342
50049363c22eeb401f9b42627329ffba170279cd
describe
'8323408' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMW' 'sip-files00006.tif'
384ddb8f79e110bf51dee19e927796ce
dbc642cae2437e836b26752a61beb457f54e7a6a
'2011-12-22T09:12:18-05:00'
describe
'2725668' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMX' 'sip-files00007.tif'
0522cac66cd09f984294f11d0dc270cf
ee6e4274953e15af3d22d035caa88de87bb94a7d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMY' 'sip-files00008.tif'
dfde7d32024c36c40a6098c12c8646a3
b43dcf6840bfd81b64b0852cb61f2325726688d2
'2011-12-21T09:32:22-05:00'
describe
'2690400' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUMZ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
021ebfe1e4a5b5754b150ebbfb4022c2
221b1db8554b78bbdf14b958d24d3916cc85c439
'2011-12-21T09:34:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNA' 'sip-files00010.tif'
1c7bae5914a8d8b6654981a211f91ac9
e28f542163db8739898ed21d99515604ecfe55e1
describe
'2667540' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNB' 'sip-files00011.tif'
fc9b27cc8ed77564600f7f6679997e4e
fdca286cfa81c2734344392819797933b0875206
'2011-12-21T09:34:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNC' 'sip-files00012.tif'
bbd47fa60ab4c04bb32e50cd39b2b53f
a73bfeb7e5aa0b11350006144bc7c864b162db57
describe
'2621820' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUND' 'sip-files00013.tif'
ba7f83bdb2d601e0873507adbc4e958f
960842684a6f7599b2e2e4625ebbbd8b39f6f865
describe
'2644680' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNE' 'sip-files00014.tif'
76a89c5ed83ccb70b724956e9ae3eb97
89bb400b2e308794af7e97cb17e522e4d87a4f55
describe
'2633244' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNF' 'sip-files00015.tif'
0539afa18349f86f71463574e82f9042
e3d9eed6fa2277f98cf4edfce2c9e1853483f89a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNG' 'sip-files00016.tif'
8505819cf1bc26821d2800f75d5be5fd
a91ab615699dd3e93944371989be41feeed44e91
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNH' 'sip-files00017.tif'
bd76562591850fdfa0c5e1b8bdbca68f
73b04164bee42f19a521797b65c5ce94b499fd90
describe
'2577076' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNI' 'sip-files00018.tif'
e3204c01b782b403b1083dc2e18c2972
946b88d6e61302f5901ee9904fbec4e34ca90ec0
describe
'7956856' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
50441e76a0bf6ee03d1d9fa968700dae
6ca481db18646870cb201d3c46ad4acfe1e94319
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNK' 'sip-files00020.tif'
bb0732306e2787e4547a11f2100b558f
8d4035bdcd4f3d4208287f6b774870cd6500cc06
describe
'2610388' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNL' 'sip-files00021.tif'
c0a85780d7fa34d031fff76d2aabde4e
7bf6c6ea9b49c86e28ffdf4cf5c5a4b02236d134
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNM' 'sip-files00022.tif'
bc1ab0f11caa58ebe200e6f181bf1573
2bc93cc31ac13733c5aa01e8e9ba25ddd11e1b3d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNN' 'sip-files00023.tif'
8add0e6661d8eb87db934bf8f20274ac
18188f2956d43a8441e89939309624df420b1107
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNO' 'sip-files00024.tif'
01f7d94f285a0fab8629f05fd865cac5
6d2603a062e8350abc0c07044b5899aa59957fc2
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNP' 'sip-files00025.tif'
43b6a2264dea774a53ab5e6b2227cc78
8ed8604b3ce2af51fa4c074947b0bb28f65d40a5
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNQ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
44701dc306ccd6cb231def556e86982c
51a1ded6e27ee3ed73dc305a7ba13bb702745e03
describe
'8148556' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNR' 'sip-files00027.tif'
ade6ea6fc9781cb96013af093cdf56a5
5827249bbec309ddb5e534a41e67626c494893c4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNS' 'sip-files00028.tif'
34d81dc537a51bc875c549a4815e7f2a
0c39b60d1d6f50de905d8f501d2cec127854761a
describe
'2622796' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNT' 'sip-files00029.tif'
3fe31b1fdf746b60980593fbc8e01367
59703720ab71bf60e8471dc0ebbface5af03121f
'2011-12-21T09:32:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNU' 'sip-files00030.tif'
98e9164aaafe0e4730626b8e8c744cca
b7ec9506415c18b30e1260f55990c4d4e077c136
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNV' 'sip-files00031.tif'
ec43e4e08c8fe89fcf65fdea92d851ac
7384b57a9fcd6f466971e9e6e57a95eea98fb6ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNW' 'sip-files00032.tif'
002129631ceecfa9aab88ed7ad93917d
720bb4f68a9484331d14e1429bff64302d5f4333
describe
'2553240' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNX' 'sip-files00033.tif'
6ba2b8013fbe1313b1cd0069c7ea35f2
ae893c4a42678052535457078bb2ae0af51f5460
describe
'2599936' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNY' 'sip-files00034.tif'
c8586748dbc8a97503c956bed4ac8f18
8aeca89cae82126da537cda999bc037e7ab973e1
describe
'7917004' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUNZ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
5ee17d6db9632cf9816cbcb4128d7483
a65b7e2525bb0e4108337c32d3748e279fa6b2bc
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOA' 'sip-files00036.tif'
fa24ad1d4bf608e2be45bb8532b54bdf
3a012380575f217e20d41bc79bab8340bc225c9e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOB' 'sip-files00037.tif'
ff65ada5ee8309aa53ed6d515aee21c0
c4e5b6054c96dd141dcc1cc7aa32c8ca65f55e4f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOC' 'sip-files00038.tif'
06690834b0954f881b00428a1f027a14
87d21c4da964a6e181a05cd3242ab0ae40e41360
describe
'8346844' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOD' 'sip-files00039.tif'
f7b0a5b7c98fbfcdae17c5638e895d73
a3d33aa7db429927ffb2fc55eb425c4197931fda
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOE' 'sip-files00040.tif'
9cffd5be4b43bf67668657f79abde8d6
dd652c519bc2c2d3dbf1a2c4d925365ad082f663
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOF' 'sip-files00041.tif'
539d4b746755ea42a6e36c44fda1e10f
b0af032e45e75fd13d90769b897371d18462fb04
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOG' 'sip-files00042.tif'
9d4ee7e1e80bf3260bd925e992e000aa
d919b557e50362f19a5b2c2a700b7bbab9f2ecb7
describe
'8243164' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOH' 'sip-files00043.tif'
7a5084054a922455cf8ef1722d11c5b8
1a53c314d4df932609b218345b612c6f191eb49f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOI' 'sip-files00044.tif'
cfe4a64e37bd7add85394a5a773d4a91
f3cb11467c06c55c1d8d4213b4e450e44783e8d5
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOJ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
cbfe8d4209521f20d293bac02d6d9a7c
408e2c61384afac3b4049350427e9446d4d6b2b0
describe
'2725664' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOK' 'sip-files00046.tif'
7fd1343daeb128135a5bc3e80143e104
3974b4c4bc83f240940d272e685c0b8b2b8156fb
describe
'8251912' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOL' 'sip-files00047.tif'
811c7e0535de180951f5dad24b622fac
6f5daeec143d02c4c99522249c679339a68914b0
'2011-12-22T09:12:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOM' 'sip-files00048.tif'
e9359bf61e8edda6c6662db06ddfee1c
527abf6eadb91d28a3c0c9384016c15002f972f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUON' 'sip-files00049.tif'
f394fb90661e749fccdccc92f238af9e
6d9098d73ca87226a090a9583b78eca14b961292
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOO' 'sip-files00050.tif'
906b35e1d0833a3a458533157e0b1591
73088cd0bc6460258a97ec3c77153ce1dada555b
describe
'8329132' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOP' 'sip-files00051.tif'
b3eda659956bbfc7b60dfbc365bca8cc
0496534ba52153f932bf58ab17e12b356cbaf602
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOQ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
c376415b68083f2d51b2f5b21c96fa83
2248df0a0743e67abc0f2875f849f1b050ecaf8b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOR' 'sip-files00053.tif'
e37796410c24483161f8e437e1eb912f
799f6f4ca46aaacc55f87e2e6dadeea579990552
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOS' 'sip-files00054.tif'
dcd2cad780791fbef3174d818a479a5d
fe4d99ee85dafeafb71c567ed339c547bf167ca4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOT' 'sip-files00055.tif'
57240a0f9cc85d0ef5084fcfa33a8c30
4dc990ead5334fc487dee7cdb4588e567812b873
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
b224827f0804d87cf254cf07eba48b8f
8783cae58039959ba1c21d74888d6a1066b54dbd
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOV' 'sip-files00057.tif'
6e482f4a4aef4a1b81ea5d1e2b46fa1a
76a92969b4d9459c1afee592e2fb50b464a5a320
'2011-12-21T09:30:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOW' 'sip-files00058.tif'
2e3913102a0f6e814e2d84109fc3901f
5e8633947d784afd04813e3ec32dec0604208fdc
describe
'8338204' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOX' 'sip-files00059.tif'
dce369e3395a40c25afd3e453d237aa9
3053306eed4cbc52d69e05b2dfcb3c1ecfe30922
describe
'2724684' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOY' 'sip-files00060.tif'
31f61cb225ee9e6c2a61ce444c1450f9
e9cfd046be5d03015b979cc9b3ca1b1e4e468d68
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUOZ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
dc17a7289f69a713175277c90ff34e54
32a027d4f9d7b21f3429158493d013f07ffe3061
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPA' 'sip-files00062.tif'
fd79fc7f4f436431ce95a93aec934850
df2dfb74ea8a4bc64b261381d695a039b9a7f4ba
'2011-12-21T09:31:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPB' 'sip-files00063.tif'
cfa98c5d0f9b6893a23644293086a00b
7bb3e9d27796a6b08fe21c57ba25a974d34abf4b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPC' 'sip-files00064.tif'
e3b49b09cfacd253bb3e01844413dd57
bc9ca34f0c21eb895a6db1a26a0bf4dc4253cf9c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPD' 'sip-files00065.tif'
658542cfcf751cd296f07e01b3c51482
54704ee9425c0f42962f487e863193bb0d8c4adc
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPE' 'sip-files00066.tif'
a841f26b0c8d3533cdf5293c982da694
e7501bc795e7bb7af6aaf521614a36d0c1a0b6ee
describe
'8372872' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPF' 'sip-files00067.tif'
eca8ca09f88720b68ed4bad59849af49
c2bd970e063c3be3e5de5e832ba40633e9ba06fb
'2011-12-22T09:12:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPG' 'sip-files00068.tif'
7bdff1850bd6d02014cd6a81ad1ecccf
aa88c9b1f92a5b57006a24c989dc3e8672c7e01e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPH' 'sip-files00069.tif'
4f9f84ab8258fb56a09bdfd0a7b2e652
3be8f9151c66064f8d78c65c68a68aa7a309d4d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPI' 'sip-files00070.tif'
a5406cc65f94505a56cb491d58cc8f49
7e7d0f89ad724516771a2200c8644dd0bce5c717
describe
'8208604' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPJ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
66e5446c370d925a6c5c34636c7ab428
fc5b8a96e317ce54d85f95fd6c7f9561ef1dee3a
'2011-12-21T09:32:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPK' 'sip-files00072.tif'
ead85d869dbff918f7d9fe30ff8b71e1
5210cbe2b1550e10a2de4a68cb7803c38d9dbd40
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPL' 'sip-files00073.tif'
5f6da823685d85e9b9f7ae45c11fe110
095c48e8312e8e90afe1f71658e14a68f085cc11
describe
'2725660' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPM' 'sip-files00074.tif'
02fce65b1021e7dd2c7fba4b97d30bb7
22780cacd0f934f21c2e218c68157fb0afe23118
'2011-12-21T09:33:52-05:00'
describe
'8157484' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPN' 'sip-files00075.tif'
f27817f6c819fccaacdb978b0ffbf3ea
ef2e770f9fd91b421d4728eb0cf1eb2e4322c066
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPO' 'sip-files00076.tif'
3566f16d9adfcbbd81340fb39228396f
ec0f91986aa72f64a7bbbe9604533dc600fef906
'2011-12-21T09:30:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPP' 'sip-files00077.tif'
d169955852e9d3b6f80b9c9ff1ea2b84
0804357e4ed1236bd6235e656c0781edbcbabf22
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPQ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
9ae7f383b7ff6c62f0aefce5eeb18432
0eb1a16e273461cdefb4ea69a9c5b2ee4fe5a50d
describe
'8266384' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPR' 'sip-files00079.tif'
57add9034b797f00b1a398345a81de0b
717de2f99bd55b142a0f8b79eaf914a064ea2134
'2011-12-21T09:33:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPS' 'sip-files00080.tif'
fe081f4da67dd5d2746a4ad0e7ba6c05
24df589c88f45cf62546708171c0c86cd77855c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPT' 'sip-files00081.tif'
ed349e8a69b3d8890c0222937047fd49
ec5ad008a10a9daa27055ff4e91a80f1c4bb8f9b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPU' 'sip-files00082.tif'
24a69202d52af691b4870b02bcb9e3fa
ac1ce95c037cdb2d9d8766ce84c76c61b11839c5
describe
'8424172' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPV' 'sip-files00083.tif'
08d0cbe2c684566f41b3660d065ea364
639a358386761bbbfe1f860526e5817c45588919
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPW' 'sip-files00084.tif'
765185f15d8e4458e998d1bbc56b5876
9dcb5dba16b1093f5ced8d2df0a513da5fbd3378
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPX' 'sip-files00085.tif'
5bdb162585441f51320964f8cd01b60f
8117efb0be3987a05dcd3f047151c61b29b2e20e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPY' 'sip-files00086.tif'
ccdf8c097682e6e805570a3f35ac812f
be56ca2fc68a8b57550aaea9fa2aa6bcd9e9deeb
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUPZ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
00ba950ac470a1d66e0b3f6c43e13a5d
4b73bf6807be2009eaed4790e1a9c141590fe5e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQA' 'sip-files00088.tif'
50fc7dc6ba9cf516c67999ae287f552d
bbc333a5b1a78af25aa404619ca023bd0578862a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQB' 'sip-files00089.tif'
c1faeea0dfaf23f1a0311ed26cda8b02
8799e9a3053e56e04ab392bbdae139c448bd49b4
'2011-12-22T09:12:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQC' 'sip-files00090.tif'
990698db61a822d2bcfca76679bb0083
3ed93a10aca02f20e686f27dd34c9b6e4184920a
describe
'8166052' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQD' 'sip-files00091.tif'
f69830b36b0b92a80714878b849feec5
6c9ae5f108291cbb36950b3a26fbc20f35bd3f28
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQE' 'sip-files00092.tif'
7641d648b5e234968801caa84c86aa1f
f607e1a7b041160793a1730c21c788c3230164e9
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQF' 'sip-files00093.tif'
156e4850c1237bef2254e43cf6b69f39
4d81ee4ba55db024b825b64dca236971689fa88e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQG' 'sip-files00094.tif'
392d8c16bb0226eb61297ea2f901e623
ffa560fcde4de839be5b6f252fc911be3991d626
describe
'8277724' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQH' 'sip-files00095.tif'
fe9426d9bcb2921175fca85910181310
7da4da8e56d2c54b241f56020b803675bbe68349
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQI' 'sip-files00096.tif'
ef22926e5de83d71c396c0e524cbda97
889a72e1dfee1836e688bd7c94f62ae931898b55
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQJ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
9c67cabec0bb6aa004b0f22735d5c289
27bc9146cd23a56a18f898bdd3c9b731885d2462
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQK' 'sip-files00098.tif'
e40463d8dee61fcbafabee56e01a3b08
5bdafee4ff39d7db30ff0f8c490e0a0d6b53d2cf
describe
'7960636' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQL' 'sip-files00099.tif'
96cafc507b1d864b5fcb42494d0bb3ed
b40a32ad8c15a79d4a9a0f668acdaab54aae77e7
'2011-12-21T09:34:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQM' 'sip-files00100.tif'
e9ce1b13d56eb9b7a5d2e1bb1e676351
31397a6dc8f1c13c99f3454ebc74505b870cfe3a
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQN' 'sip-files00101.tif'
b871715c887b8438a1572b9d17fd842a
67cc2ae547802a3ca6d2333f694911332b8fec17
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQO' 'sip-files00102.tif'
37cf5027fb452edba8f48a04f83b0fb0
2c760c6177fa1b280f8e1f6ec3d3a99f54ffa80f
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQP' 'sip-files00103.tif'
cb54a6a5fd5b67e8b65de0d4ea082773
1d687a47f0fcd107a8d51faee178996f3fc06d29
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQQ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
9321a20c89028d09efd5f78d727515d4
69715764c75d0f2f986593a95c5eaa7a0e5f4037
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQR' 'sip-files00105.tif'
9f5f4f8707721c32365e0006bcb249e6
1f9d5dbff47deaf6a0ae46a69f0276565e972d18
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQS' 'sip-files00106.tif'
c1f4ce3356f7afddc750dba7de8a335d
a363972a390ee56acb603dddbada0865f09781e6
describe
'8294788' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQT' 'sip-files00107.tif'
61a5336f5fcab591e67033ecd8d45d2e
1b3325f916bec689eb5ff90b88b5a6210e3935e9
'2011-12-21T09:32:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQU' 'sip-files00108.tif'
67b0c8ec5198d71aec720f66782fe108
87019211f44c55fda1b5183491ec8b0d3281f7c3
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQV' 'sip-files00109.tif'
35d504ff67c8a14c03e55593cce1b7cb
e8f7650bcbc794e5a1287b4afa827da21c9282af
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQW' 'sip-files00110.tif'
caa0434c48c4dffcc3aa71bd3aa8da7b
8b68d754b73f560f20ff73b720db54394820bb06
describe
'8085600' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQX' 'sip-files00111.tif'
7bc5eea0adaacc6f7bc2b38b17ba9735
15ba288d3731420d0ee13388967b87232150983b
'2011-12-22T09:12:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQY' 'sip-files00112.tif'
45dc9337a7c305ffa02a32509bc25981
a4672ba530eae6c51e46aef95282ec51729a55b5
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUQZ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
d94dd2ec407ad4ff006b99001047044b
27b82bb0af1ba4c168e5ef949581275f15677b43
'2011-12-21T09:30:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURA' 'sip-files00114.tif'
47d1a803b9430148692160b22aca3713
d21b76b2122e5f0f34ccc6fc4f34317ec5c7cb06
describe
'8238780' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURB' 'sip-files00115.tif'
ea3e7485765ea45c77afa32cacb3951f
5f8b7c68ac585af8477ccf2860302500cd7dab6e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURC' 'sip-files00116.tif'
3796ca59e2b527feab2662abe3155453
b163050c93c84fa402d586cb1e1d6f9612741692
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURD' 'sip-files00117.tif'
588992e63244229f2dd1b64539795872
cfccf330282584c4d41a34fefacd41abcbe8f20d
'2011-12-21T09:31:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURE' 'sip-files00118.tif'
ea253aa3b739a198713dba0ce2cb6149
2ee251e771876f3910a43abb774e7356ee6adfb0
describe
'8119848' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURF' 'sip-files00119.tif'
55be45066b39ce5a2446ff32e960cd6e
123eefb622ce35d0b0a225b7fddb72816e097d3c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURG' 'sip-files00120.tif'
ac403419b05a5222aeb78c7792c3b92b
a81f05ea0e2ab36c8cf4f5e9a68fc17ac4a744d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURH' 'sip-files00121.tif'
86dc5126d658576db1ed5185ae14c71c
3210ebdb0566d3ed8ef70debe3f19e9e3802fcee
'2011-12-22T09:12:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURI' 'sip-files00122.tif'
0a38a70eb23f06ce14843560d2db085c
3e3c8fe3ac98389d65ecc0f9a8a2df6915ece6d4
'2011-12-21T09:34:25-05:00'
describe
'8126488' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURJ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
d1cf26021a13dd960ecaca36a64c119c
9c439b8b131d5c033f15138927058e5b5f714b15
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURK' 'sip-files00124.tif'
c68a6b963d59288bebefe722824b2898
b647bb0779b28ec0a54025582b2cfe5f8588b41c
'2011-12-22T09:12:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURL' 'sip-files00125.tif'
899a5af99bfefaa6d24bac3b450a07fa
a72afd4ecd2d7e6d2706d2ba636e0a9ecc8e789e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURM' 'sip-files00126.tif'
ad6adae38d58357222a2b135f99eb0ad
47c59a0d9518049694ef45a3708492a4f2714bff
'2011-12-22T09:13:03-05:00'
describe
'8289244' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURN' 'sip-files00127.tif'
323c335f046c340605c6d1c3b8146ade
b4271cc2971f241e1f4ccf75fc45e2c3da9b41fb
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURO' 'sip-files00128.tif'
9f75cfe7727d39af59381b0b64d1a782
8bbc05d0f434f1e0263a3f53173ec247e2a79304
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURP' 'sip-files00129.tif'
9d88ef767ee73578a90a961c6a4a004f
1d861670c02a1cc37ce56e52312ca73fadb0ac12
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURQ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
99e2529b459b5252ea3b4aa900b9eae7
38668643a4be241b52c34117c5af81beccab2d7c
describe
'8139484' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURR' 'sip-files00131.tif'
242779671ba2c419364d1ba033dda228
390ac14d73c86a941d59f2570ab6645e3bc588c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURS' 'sip-files00132.tif'
8956ae2b5e202cd714e5544cff3de079
d79446f00cb30e76665a8cb17cd8c243946f560a
'2011-12-21T09:32:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURT' 'sip-files00133.tif'
fd5a18db11b2fcbd19e65bf709f636f0
ba95cccb7e5d105ce5429e00e944239e71e0edbb
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURU' 'sip-files00134.tif'
d887a22ec9bf067313a3e55ab008a12f
932d408bd9d16f868dd03cb673fe95d23d68a75e
describe
'8029108' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURV' 'sip-files00135.tif'
dd3c42cd267abfc06404ce8cf5240137
e5be89e08e3d22332c25b2e8c89bfffc008311c7
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURW' 'sip-files00136.tif'
0419ef3413c283accb6acbbc4dac4efd
ee3e41256bca04c1a22bf11d850144ae3ac9a763
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURX' 'sip-files00137.tif'
877c956c900c208b97ca91ae1747324c
d624e0f4d83594fe13cace90dd9aa113fe7e32db
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURY' 'sip-files00138.tif'
a319b4491c3251fb415adcb86c13a778
db069fc6f9c42d0357c9bbf2b226e07813604c7f
'2011-12-22T09:12:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACURZ' 'sip-files00139.tif'
288a3413fcac3a1836d911ed59223595
a62c31fe26db2b78c981c383438fb6a09e03436d
'2011-12-21T09:33:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSA' 'sip-files00140.tif'
14b9b0f8f753a8fcf0741d698e0d97ca
5094f5cfd61f3d9862b905dad068add076cfc8e4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSB' 'sip-files00141.tif'
1e7e5cf428e5112653610cc0873a3774
2bfc423bec2f87fe4036c1440bacb6357cd564e2
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSC' 'sip-files00142.tif'
855bc267ab02830c7fd21eafb568bb4c
796b505ca5871e4015004f4020fba105ac420d42
describe
'8294572' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSD' 'sip-files00143.tif'
9488e52799e7bb6319d63229c047c950
92d561614684db79fadcc61a482e83b5e856558d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSE' 'sip-files00144.tif'
d83ddf568014dfb5bac7a30da2eafe15
724cad2be5c375b84bf8aca50fccc0060874263c
describe
'2587528' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSF' 'sip-files00145.tif'
a4164a66ec42536094a95803edb4a0b4
1990c8546b5562e2456a5b1154ba5ddf806f1c98
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSG' 'sip-files00146.tif'
071c6544e3f395feef0d43ff600e6d60
0b6008ea8739388a67415a9a8b84cef5f353f88a
describe
'8329348' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSH' 'sip-files00147.tif'
410accf98f31d8a47a3883a8ae275b9b
0af672d8ec10b74752a3d35d071bee51bd56ff46
'2011-12-21T09:31:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSI' 'sip-files00148.tif'
2fb6a70b717b0fabdac31135de09ed5c
71f2b802d93cc2d1314261092a6c2fe885e21903
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSJ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
6a57535bc112df708596167e042632f8
e2a57061e0125bdc2d86f3dcda47c67f232a8ae6
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSK' 'sip-files00150.tif'
862e345a8243f40684cf4bcd5ce91f4a
4191863d601cea59de84abc34e06bf6e57bd7940
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSL' 'sip-files00151.tif'
142cc5d682d5f17a206a841ff9402106
08813a88d08b72e4573e045fcc49660bd416d0bc
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSM' 'sip-files00152.tif'
6109749474b0a0df20d496c3b64209ad
9eb13d34d9652e47948811d2e555d8bbad3f7bd3
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSN' 'sip-files00153.tif'
4a78e909e1d8224b58d9f24765127ce1
4ee07803e70a3cbabb164750e79044c683f60be0
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSO' 'sip-files00154.tif'
2b8dfa5f1797484ae2f5cf9c609d26d8
834f25c76b108db290617432b1c1a219a30f5058
describe
'8259796' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSP' 'sip-files00155.tif'
f56d30f8ee8d1c4c840e53cd172f95de
f3fa26cb9fec2ae1b603e78e4ad7e7b973c166ef
'2011-12-21T09:32:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSQ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
5a43260822452f3adf50b60aec4b1fc9
98143d835b6a86503e179862bef56f3d2670082c
describe
'2656108' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSR' 'sip-files00157.tif'
22aa6afb3537076e6aef1dc19957e92f
61230ec5298e428429b80e876ffe06b2951ac352
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSS' 'sip-files00158.tif'
a6362bb15aa91db2c25a8d96b24d52bc
05f62adb8382de3ddfdef65a2df86eef469558b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUST' 'sip-files00159.tif'
c43b1536b786ad631c9c502b0be30214
4ff5f97b1aeafce03338f79cb34f76ba9f1e9de3
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSU' 'sip-files00160.tif'
e5d41489bce8a4e931a7c4a682de1b57
f053a17887ba7123e67e97f331350f2259d040e8
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSV' 'sip-files00161.tif'
080fafe2c7550a9041c693079c127b98
b844adbc6c7e1e762eb1ea994a3e7d9697c35874
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSW' 'sip-files00162.tif'
115a18700c6842056e2fa182aa7533ea
222e08e92b53f8eff71ef60f755876a214a30e3c
describe
'7985692' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSX' 'sip-files00163.tif'
fe01ba258873ac302888d1fb0b82258e
5b35754e0f960db817debe827479643f51929d4e
'2011-12-21T09:32:57-05:00'
describe
'2633248' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSY' 'sip-files00164.tif'
f0c4243b455bb60abf72632e1fa471b7
edc164e739782cb59a36760ef30aec0c40226aad
'2011-12-21T09:30:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUSZ' 'sip-files00165.tif'
8d98cd75fa5757efcd47e4f3d1239f2b
b5daa7aa89e180c53a5c09c66779bf379448c651
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTA' 'sip-files00166.tif'
c9a4448fc8fe644edf1f01c8b3fa5392
f96b76cbf791d5d70b95f8c8d223ed1b8ce8d6da
describe
'8079652' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTB' 'sip-files00167.tif'
c8e6bf16cff3ae9540e035fca44d2bd6
3e0f10c1e8d40efc4ba09adf51b1db4877f6358d
'2011-12-21T09:33:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTC' 'sip-files00168.tif'
ba8b9dbaef43781fff5b031847c73725
dd574caf928320523d8a50a9a2037529081de0fe
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTD' 'sip-files00169.tif'
34ff953c6e32199286d2e3b06ab80c88
5b882fd107af585ca0ef7782c231c8ec10f5d219
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTE' 'sip-files00170.tif'
d87cb23082347eb451ac9b7a389f9a81
ef2ce3849411b9d3fe8581fa45b472181cab8b71
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTF' 'sip-files00171.tif'
98f8b2b7c51607c2ca6e8a09ce136806
a2c287db94b5e7487921ebb0a86c805400100402
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTG' 'sip-files00172.tif'
6985f83aaf2c683f27393217429ac21d
64e081103344937e367fb14b3faf7ea3bb76a707
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTH' 'sip-files00173.tif'
f17da72a0a1be0bda05a1e3af699e253
088386a4d20dca80b3bea5806d6061c1283cd57d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTI' 'sip-files00174.tif'
7e820486423d85464fe1ad2a0d6a342f
2352845395f3b7dfd9a8522ac753dd08e76aad86
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTJ' 'sip-files00175.tif'
c2b43641b4be2978b57536c6400b24fc
13613757cd1c7673b73d3e8b2e5f30d5c17b66c4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTK' 'sip-files00176.tif'
4321da7bb85cbca0a47e6f67fa8e0b97
21ec27ee22334c972353a4c22c531dc1d087963d
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTL' 'sip-files00177.tif'
0de95e2f05608166291ee610da00e7d8
33a8c61ee54092c36f0945f9172c6aec963ead35
describe
'2634228' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTM' 'sip-files00178.tif'
ddad15535937074e033c526995a12439
af7795220df6346a29ae26909e54c3b0794076c5
describe
'7714180' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTN' 'sip-files00179.tif'
20b81920e7cf2dcf934f8f7a5e536be2
7c8551f90fdf0f5b0642dab67410844db8b54054
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTO' 'sip-files00180.tif'
c527f4b37c7b21a275265ee05fda5ea8
32685aaf51e6061cab1d14b55e4e76234653c053
'2011-12-21T09:34:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTP' 'sip-files00181.tif'
6692a35806bb54ac6b1a7b069b34730f
4bb25b639f9fb32cb9322d7d664fa44480550b7b
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTQ' 'sip-files00182.tif'
568e51ab8a776247e92f0ccd8d477e85
6161eff1c031560276a1c165cf33e06d2698e94c
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTR' 'sip-files00183.tif'
ecafa937c93db6be1191686b523b4d0d
29cda1c9bde5e59c60f002ba6708153148ba7854
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTS' 'sip-files00184.tif'
bc8a8f39f3339dd2f8130afddbe4b4b1
7e3261c94826fb7cdb90f6013447f379e78a23c1
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTT' 'sip-files00185.tif'
26779f5ec8f783730b2e13536b201e42
6644b2894fad30fe9ede9a912ec6382e1810dc93
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTU' 'sip-files00186.tif'
84394098b3e708943146166510fd964d
8bfd435d5c729a219a1efaf523827f7f6c31c880
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTV' 'sip-files00187.tif'
e3593cf02d678245c5c6e863ee1c7f1b
0ff1091604b7a689ed736ec1b384bca98f136b0f
'2011-12-21T09:34:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTW' 'sip-files00188.tif'
7ae469c2386e44856f92a9a01bd7c49c
37a98d1014e2422e230a1c861f078058288c2b83
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTX' 'sip-files00189.tif'
8ebd92e580c3f4e77ea2aca64c294947
4af2ab8f6276e7e6d93794e6557badaa5cc38394
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTY' 'sip-files00190.tif'
8a7038b5156e887c2c275de4bffd0eaf
e5670f98a1ce81bd2a2d4f3db15e45f2936d7b2e
describe
'8123068' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUTZ' 'sip-files00191.tif'
1e451f283ad37acfc775b687efad88c5
2c747c3719744a97e3ab9497e92c053c8d6cb186
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUA' 'sip-files00192.tif'
68e49e50f276dbacd15d8c1e1d3397af
2d007d3cc9ad84162748746601bc4af3d532d7d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUB' 'sip-files00193.tif'
5bf0d2181351b773e14524b4a7333756
eeae7072bf08318cd7bb082dc90b7ca75fb0d78e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUC' 'sip-files00194.tif'
fcc1ad4de0556ec39c4996d9f0d307d8
1f79aa891f9c71fef5cb0a54369b9ad06afa8dec
describe
'9427060' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUD' 'sip-files00195.tif'
404b16981c847058b35524a1daaf08db
1d356b3fcd526613e87ddf982fbda14796e3c1a3
'2011-12-21T09:32:12-05:00'
describe
'1619900' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUE' 'sip-files00197.tif'
7338977129ade9eed270b0d0d60ceda8
793b0a51a159baba5a10c7818b27e5a1605cde4d
describe
'9693676' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUF' 'sip-files00198.tif'
5dd0325ed4965f903a386877385df78d
6e0dd406c0cfbf2500792bf19152920e08ded5c9
'2011-12-21T09:33:50-05:00'
describe
'222762' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUG' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
835ace7d2fc06c61b59f0e15d74778a0
9e620e9a87e71062e70fc6c5ed02f592959e340b
'2011-12-21T09:32:10-05:00'
describe
'103406' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUH' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
85402c1cda4be8998dce223d48524a84
062cb6d2f6bb155862e007593fc1c7991b0894e8
describe
'34178' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUI' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
b64f6a65b3b8c849e8c4e52a59ff9130
13a303f8b039d4f813272c57f81a09a25fb7214e
describe
'29033' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUJ' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
28fc60294b22e56285f5005b02655e88
8a1149394d1501bf9f56cb26d364d7e863a3f429
describe
'143004' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUK' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
389e0948e6f63d5ba2bcc129b274f061
b4c39d7442724380149f9168801a0e91554c4883
'2011-12-21T09:33:59-05:00'
describe
'52083' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUL' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
7e5c59a892bd234e66779cdd378e9d71
5ae81830aed39a40ba6b54e50040065b15063755
describe
'27409' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUM' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
aafde5d87d70b9416071434a53b8bd33
5510266b4e4a182cdc77e35e3bc63f19c8bded44
describe
'100091' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUN' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
046c4241caa527f929ec025715729f87
74057b305984761c511a3eb21479a52ccc96653e
describe
'124199' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUO' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
a4484d06446cd512cb00f72dd1165cf2
abf570dfc65ae0d7432508bdd6b77b45ffb01313
describe
'138130' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUP' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
d052b46aa7babe76b21d99b8e3fc3079
1fb29e80a63de8edb0fa9eb157f9fb91a8befb2e
describe
'121717' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUQ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
75cc3cadf740f5b59d8b58365dd19a9f
90800ca2ccfbc12751b783ed15ae459197cbeab0
describe
'132916' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUR' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
7fe5b330560fe55fc7c97ffc2b923bc9
583d6c4821133fd4ce731e8ab78ddec30e7a2d3c
describe
'128099' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUS' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
06fca643d70ce15020f5068344797009
25b7fcd32cc659f996be5b1e51d1b435ccd081f8
describe
'103665' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUT' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
da612f3fc9a1d8151d9b40f90d5c1c51
3e1d6b6b40c026da1220e21f2c38bc7fa5ad282a
describe
'23039' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUU' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
da040b75526c0ff908071a1d479782a3
26567be4168759ae8c9da25fc9b29df6ab528230
describe
'142268' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUV' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
e96ae097cf4e0469c8553f594202ca2a
f24defa964f77eb7a4df1485b01992753c66561a
'2011-12-21T09:30:49-05:00'
describe
'186480' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUW' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
5ca80fb07c27ae1d8360f7486ead9b1e
f1d5230bc38f0472bd2002c72eb1948de7ea7d1a
describe
'198810' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUX' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
4651756013e33d37ad1251fbb66a2da6
eb80d7965a60ed7aa3421f8054a9b59b0627ea4d
describe
'177813' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUY' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
bfd17101983cfec8f006d4076d2aab6b
56584c12aee7975aa1dfd559201b905f6acee50c
describe
'178644' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUUZ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
bc20310aaf0dd7d5849da36798ab4898
8ff3d0f82ee5cc71e7d11771adf8c66f664b7fa4
describe
'152568' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVA' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
2005bd45dfa181f0e996b1e6a94bc81d
55900ba64111b1c3d44bc55a27037cf19aec3caf
describe
'159440' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVB' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
fe4c26792f95ca9f02d480451add5827
6622a40ebdd42fee0df94ca66ce80c4e53e2437e
describe
'157087' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVC' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
21b9f7a53b8be4fa8c982433e3fd640f
f2363c9e54fe371c4d4835b4be0befbcaca846f9
describe
'163140' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVD' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
a9da8c1b587ba73d5fee2ab75170f940
a36fcfda367dc98e706dd04900ab9a4a3416fc8c
describe
'171064' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVE' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
9a3d3117a76c35175babc23149c0e809
5cd5b3a2180e875f2e7a7b47ab658ba3f07437d1
describe
'178385' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVF' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
2ed99d843884173b5c8f3d0bdb43f50e
4f316e26e8da1b0a69d1878fdf6d378145ef18da
describe
'171090' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVG' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
ef19363cf89c4d2824e4038dde1708ef
0eaea088538a3644ab252d366adf9bc47d13d93a
describe
'179772' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVH' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
0b7be39307b3d96683e88a067526fc18
0bef4df0455756984dbb810d7ee04d90bc9a81e0
describe
'150591' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVI' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
2a475355e5a46d800eb5c2a38b322834
6d2181964ee169bc4da29eed87910966c2d7f1cc
describe
'173931' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVJ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
8df39d364fbce3d81ccb46261da1fd69
04edf4670fb5dfda1300fa73c0dc995ba1fe7790
describe
'174287' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVK' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
3cba0f0f4e2cf78428b5ce3b9984b015
d6a65155f72c4478b442f677fa83643ac078fe53
describe
'176180' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVL' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
2caf0ba1fc31dc1af522c59986286c21
5222be77e88dd4485a08b0a2be003a190cdde713
describe
'150638' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVM' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
9766b7dfad29c476846932abd2aca255
ab22ed3cbab2264184a32d7233307c91ef047bfd
describe
'217009' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVN' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
b4e66f49a605c7502a2af7b7c9afc49b
a488f6777e214cf3f0e624af24c80b41eba4471a
describe
'171786' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVO' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
d523f46f07b3ad74e7e71cde0dbabf55
c23f7c561e259ba5a1bb3e100607563a556d1a4f
describe
'180969' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVP' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
a50b621082c73bc91888764d4b17294a
fe9c850671f93ca2abae59d5d44b3fdf99929ea9
describe
'174312' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVQ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
77acb1a2622134fa9e2d1710dd6a75ea
4b004b4250adc2f234b0a3e3f22079c617880634
describe
'170566' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVR' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
3ec2b4129101cee3ce6ad24c837b5854
921f727b7c6dc040c20b3eae923ac3667c9b573b
describe
'166073' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVS' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
9ab0893956341310a302f8c15a8fa815
9d8413d383efd38452da0afcc421781d9f304804
describe
'166840' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVT' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
6c64fc26af8e78141c898878c8eb5490
6b3f2236442e71cfd85b32ed93ffc2186e3108b7
describe
'151036' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVU' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
13c6d7a5966211522a6edcfeeb34bdf0
2b6cfcc3d677441b3d2069251d2ce0b3371ffa4c
describe
'169680' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVV' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
6d8b8be768fd79801f79fb992294ccde
38aff2af8012df97ad3a444d4fcaba09d6d0af34
describe
'164930' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVW' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
178235b305fc052b1db55dfa3d946916
c11a81f06eb5eb03df74e8863c1fd6935c67a934
'2011-12-21T09:32:15-05:00'
describe
'168418' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVX' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
6517b10f0a1e0deab5aa91fa1bcea299
8346287f42b25ca7f74435b27dc57fb17b039348
describe
'171504' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVY' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
c5e2206be8dbe3f941670d706ceb986d
1451c56ea3fe52e8759486c6b9bb04e4be36993e
describe
'168334' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUVZ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
3bbcb977c18b87ed0e30a546ad2c2dcf
6f4bcc43f661a6a44d16bce988c9f2be85d267bf
describe
'166877' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWA' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
87d8f4b2097f6638979412d6eebb4f40
91809fc7f0613fc3a6d185d7635ad9aedb354a6f
describe
'165765' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWB' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
642b9bc38ec0a9ab8121e09c53651dc1
7cef3323b7622764890b53c8783768690e80a5e8
describe
'167262' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWC' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
ce4f4fcb866ec93df997d35866925eb2
78097e70f7e9f625bc5a980f8f5e2a4f88d6193a
describe
'171725' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWD' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
a027a4ab0c86e17dbd9347b44d0ecfb1
7ad33051676ec5c7576d30b18bc9a0670d269341
describe
'161797' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWE' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
bc42848ad71e2d7fad9d4da6d6d14dd2
ff410c88f50f18b57f08836f5450cfc722574bee
describe
'164358' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWF' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
c73821d2de65ecedc1e4505ebe43c722
f13a567027a7e45db9f1e650c11ad2521623557d
describe
'163165' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWG' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
472d260329b886733eaea52921ceb6d9
2d41819084714e8d4a8308ffc342e79f4ec2e166
'2011-12-21T09:34:18-05:00'
describe
'152512' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWH' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
c9c52ab93c25b765dd176acde8cf3d4f
003727bc136fa020245ee3014c07ffe74d388c08
'2011-12-21T09:32:48-05:00'
describe
'149785' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWI' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
dbffd82df808166dd11c84e3a7fb1ace
ba2178adfe27aed69fc9e5cf41f64584c9ea8217
describe
'167271' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWJ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
5fbc9dc4fee73001d9e78660c9cebd16
dae9947ef7a589210eaa5fd41a3604d07f62bd9b
describe
'174154' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWK' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
7e1a3ecd19ecef08a93f80029f64ec02
a45959efafa482d406129cfe6140d2abc92595ef
'2011-12-22T09:12:51-05:00'
describe
'168397' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWL' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
0397f1df89392e15dcf767f420d2455c
b613deade5316890baa5d0a7ce7748ad3c7062ae
describe
'152923' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWM' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
fc26bfcd2380b766f1a89821043bf39d
65a94020a3d413c30507da3c936b6fbfd885e49f
describe
'172684' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWN' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
63d1e5ae462e21e0f38a7cf0a3a0438f
1420cad27d8de83f4127da0262b32937779219e5
describe
'159428' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWO' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
11afaa6b185e19d7f9d0179ba40dadbd
a94b0c90cc74071271fe43166c1c5ed588b9fa87
describe
'163635' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWP' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
8d502804f6e7c0dd6963b66dd380bfea
66d1cf3b83540e9e2600aa0902fce7d4682a123f
describe
'167822' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWQ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
4bfb1eae0eca12f1c13c98e7281e1d8d
7fb7d9bee34e08e056ef53b96ae956eb013caf95
describe
'168000' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWR' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
07a85587ec39305e590ece725e6b3da2
2459e947c8f1f0b01ac7bdaafaa7133577d6fbfa
describe
'176513' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWS' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
7ce311fce6a2a66a8380cad993051be8
c91ec5cdf14d0b6533bd826beefba014616f9226
describe
'187981' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWT' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
5b0ebed8c011cc543dddf9f014f0974e
d32287e9933a1b36bc87b8a2d0ad34ba258ecfcd
describe
'173551' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWU' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
68d7fa8cbe5e10b323de117e587be495
7074523e6476fb75af973c3e759450d92a563dd4
describe
'169822' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWV' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
6a15c950fd376d47746784ec4478c4d1
025419b869ec5c1c34ec5cbb6bac83372f0a68ff
describe
'177754' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWW' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
0f808edffff803885d2800ef4f8c7dc1
9aaf232952598ce73cd35964bae1ea6681090d4b
describe
'218054' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWX' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
6d8a51604f733b4526e14fdfc110ef23
530990e397a6cdce0619e34cc099a062cdab60f5
describe
'162627' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWY' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
404d9b49d761db0092b7a106a930a0f8
cc980e9c1c40c13da6809b921a88397b02e4dee1
describe
'165355' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUWZ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
64c6aa1b11c09e4c055960a1fad15a5b
ad69477b5c9d1e1722fee376ca0bc06a47c12b38
'2011-12-21T09:33:25-05:00'
describe
'165569' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXA' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
01c9350626fe0db284c556c65c8f90e0
d01a2bb64fe22be475ae2ecf17726e71cfbfbf86
describe
'207084' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXB' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
6fe6c150ba712b63604732bb0722a27e
24ea4924462cf1e9cf9a3cd811f7e4114d641eae
describe
'158264' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXC' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
8fa9c363934d5325bd8c65491a3974bc
de7157bd38629f0613a525fe47320aaf4da71491
describe
'167016' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXD' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
6bb8852b4fd4bea89742aec3c9a452d2
529c31c7634cd43d28a24815f60c74a3dfe24048
describe
'158582' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXE' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
4323ede48d0c87e5aa15fb8853bd234a
e221d81b804d7449849803e6f3c9fe40e32fd647
describe
'179715' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXF' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
101be00544ea25f4524dccf19e862a2e
b341073d911c2979880be402b0352905f55207e6
describe
'155596' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXG' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
957d03e6af65750f2973ed1a482044d9
a0d25c9c7b7989714ff3524b5db6fe1d87a667d5
describe
'150564' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXH' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
cfe8c5f60abc424ac410dbc264da1113
66febeb71afe44d222db0a6aeb71ac3a693a6f14
describe
'174201' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXI' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
80adfdd0f1d5bac0eeb3e8d2ee6720c0
bb5883d1bdde0627e3d2d41d9722cc19ab8180df
describe
'185736' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXJ' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
84493a34f1798a9d8b55a4d172f45e96
769b1ca8ad200af65254fc63a76d554dab14546c
describe
'164975' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXK' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
a4ec951d2b423a4f67c568987bf2bd9b
5ed4a9e97cbf1b8f7e4c69de9326316eea08a800
describe
'166920' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXL' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
55911172088f0415f5d02c49e2a1d284
81771d764868f5fe2bc352cc9c2b5252f284a04b
describe
'171601' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXM' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
4062ef979ac0b15bfe8970da24385719
6ce3bef50a3e868affceb1b0f8fd597cc82a0e1f
describe
'162534' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXN' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
529c7e5985a95dedf9ce5e0331f07105
85eba2dcc83423cc759209c84986c4af737da91a
describe
'161983' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXO' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
2245c27925e2ded57ae1c03e89ea28be
5e264ad19dccd5cca31676790c4f963122aa15c2
describe
'156854' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXP' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
a2327260688eb99f19e60231c409c5df
f1d12f34ec683f4f2e71d91e7b8098c1369640d9
describe
'165828' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXQ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
c499d1fe723fb627b953f66866eafec8
249bdf6376ee86e9792c33172d0849392de26815
describe
'163995' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXR' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
270e8ec1fcb04b78a129835961a11ad8
a134a59caf772345cee6b2ca6cecc534fd8b856d
describe
'157694' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXS' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
30e01d38355a64fafc6c5926b18b88d9
3952395dc0de5a0f1b68e5792a1a3b745327a97e
'2011-12-21T09:33:39-05:00'
describe
'170148' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXT' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
486dc315cc597ac5dcc88f623964f4b6
d26b9bee5bc728c47b91637eb0dc303392f7b7ff
describe
'173698' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXU' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
fc1308af366256f25960d195e38b7f6e
33c8822ccaa9d9d3d5ca35f8adfbca9219c85e65
describe
'208810' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXV' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
41465969e07872a909df93c5172982ee
8ee57d58fc61672a201f6d7db698d58592b92b57
describe
'153575' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXW' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
78e7350336e450d85ca7108147af8681
c9d638de4168cd3e5916b402913416cc24ef1cb5
describe
'168351' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXX' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
ef46dc8a643b19e3f3bc7f95f3d52a21
af8baf163829373baff8d7061d46605fd90e43be
describe
'175743' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXY' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
fe2bbe41499fdd84429ff57933a97074
d8a3ba7974b4679927e0623d3974742a946f7f29
describe
'184255' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUXZ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
2d06ef081b0ead101413276379d129b1
cc08f6dd04f13f8b51e621cebaf16a1196103eba
describe
'163278' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYA' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
f5627e6abf6b6c33d160b5b664c5f355
0d7d1286f05b3c820d892143df17f9245a5f8a5b
describe
'170807' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYB' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
141e680ad77380ddac2ef19ee7d2eb5d
26d5c7d7fc74194938e4e041c8142b504bba9737
describe
'163765' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYC' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
2fea7a3eb2988145e24ad2bb9b1fa886
f6ab8c494e23e0e0a7fe7bec536cdc49635e7390
'2011-12-21T09:30:58-05:00'
describe
'165254' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYD' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
8579ae625d0492b7fff95597642f92bf
bb816212bb2795351d45fc9dac9a925d07b20bb6
describe
'164219' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYE' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
48de61738ca641d8588314818644267e
9f32712d914644a17b3422705f1ee65190c52d3d
describe
'164884' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYF' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
7d3ae348d5010a187f974c66eb0c0924
d0e6cbf26430a9a76b4b5d3435a6809ae2095f98
describe
'161700' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYG' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
216102a0391c0ee1d520691f7c33ba05
7dbb8f2d5e03bf3deed5d69614f5b4fbe3291f11
describe
'157754' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYH' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
4821c15d05dc5a5f70e11721d4f341e7
ae3c853e9cc4d9173d899bbe71adf455e31bb815
describe
'160476' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYI' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
fa3e23ea368aeb2cacbe6e2ca08ef96b
777a609d65b13780ca4e8afffd1b03a13ffefc8c
describe
'165803' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYJ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
e59389998453de9a09b577d337431487
8db7ec1945022b5fbe6f166bd0eb0ae7b3615b47
describe
'163274' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYK' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
762fae13af61476cec5956d3e21c9f57
620d4a33fb04f2cc70050b4aa0d9b6d779c7d9f5
describe
'123039' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYL' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
59bcce649144773182d620bfdc9d285c
76aa222855dea0deb7133154127d66043c5e8ef8
'2011-12-21T09:33:56-05:00'
describe
'163400' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYM' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
3f5138234b06b5bd882c12fe8f06e1e8
4e3b023d7434f383574afc6a0df596aa7c60696d
describe
'159937' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYN' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
6a2b63d14033866fab785d42f69b8f8d
6a459c514487a1b2df97e97df87510f74e6dee58
describe
'149857' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYO' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
8578c5e4931c4efc1514ca8ae303a83b
5e29dc50968236f89313a56532d1a818a54b7a22
describe
'106675' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYP' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
3b9fd0a50498f9b39e673a02a79f0e5b
595757e9809366ae71401947dbaf92fa24e5290b
describe
'167873' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYQ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
4ceaaaa1274996c210cda988a6e51999
b7f8fc4924ff44034fb5fb95820e40734b91b10e
describe
'156308' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYR' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
348e0cdbab4d418589a9c182450a25b5
6aac57e4c215b019340cfeca478295b161cae07a
describe
'175443' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYS' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
b2fb8e5159d24d068b341d0fab1b8006
3c3dd2185b2727c171fd971a29e9b511ddadf9bf
describe
'193131' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYT' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
f3bbeac85b0b41024948f53e6f3c9275
a2b87f30659351e82676dcdf6a4127193eb388c0
describe
'171072' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYU' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
b82d43f80af236e7db630c2978bf44bd
0e9e357ee9209fd6b6466cb3473f0bcc2cca963f
describe
'169231' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYV' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
f9b2b07e8b428739af89e213d296c7b3
f77baea61a44ae71d29900e248de28d36f8bc57d
describe
'177968' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYW' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
c612ee6f2de7c1ba37c7554cbd1a96b7
585fe067a4478d4bd83b4dbd7d76499371778feb
describe
'175860' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYX' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
266d5e29a9089aee5d2fd0060246db94
e607eb6c6dc13c7311f416ea38256851fc227d09
describe
'165970' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYY' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
9f6cfe4e06346b85e1eebf7675151fe4
f97fed4271d7ef49ef66027809dbcdf4738bc2cb
describe
'165961' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUYZ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
9c6f013461f8d2a622c14c8c48bf7753
07b958672ffacc08cdf6c7d9a6f29ede57fa32c9
describe
'165229' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZA' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
12741ebd17e70cf9f885853041582f8f
ab339de5056c0be74ac66cb9f903445f40ffc70a
describe
'192112' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZB' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
f114ed7fb17cb1aef3c8dfb20eda04af
9d93297f5fcb2742a791ce306d3eec56e5a235df
describe
'158177' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZC' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
ac8a4d95dd198e7ddc7cef4ded2b2f98
f15bd6ca08143076504c945433cbfd37debbf369
describe
'173308' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZD' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
e60ccd6614e5ada0330027d967ee122b
e66ac9182e8d817a060a06402461a3dd3ea2c17d
describe
'173171' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZE' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
4a9d69068ac1e9ea1f30604ed1f41800
eb0f4aed5d04409c8525f05b1eb9e9fde301664e
describe
'203843' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZF' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
be7aea39a869ac98b560c5cbc252681e
b563f3fb81a2d6ed26f46aa290d32f60daaa78bc
describe
'166996' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZG' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
873c1cd4924a00d8ea525754ac9b3cd1
2ec0a059069d06a8f833c1d6d88e847d89eb099e
describe
'158197' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZH' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
71a9f57b644b2a2e35691987a770f364
c17a5590d3815a377a15b236adb98a2e1c104918
describe
'176619' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZI' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
bbd0fee872eac7640a88dd50c2d15fa9
de8c52348d698d759cdb455d96dbcb4b5464ffb1
describe
'174771' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZJ' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
23c8a15d36fe5e415effe5aabc5516c5
9f93d39aee66ea287d9fa10b13a05a728c1f0ecf
describe
'158513' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZK' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
4346947cca65da49a6749ea6eb4c9d45
21704a0090cd065f1cc5a45371a2ad71e7bf6773
describe
'164851' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZL' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
4e3a30cbd0b970f7444d4b88dd83600b
232c937df7c2812951be87bdb09a44bed5e5edba
describe
'170201' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZM' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
2636976a7a7255483989b32f72dc6b02
66796bc8d5dfbf59021953c9c6f3a80951a1b569
describe
'163900' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZN' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
9683b1af2d01f176214c2ffa831b58bb
b154b12635fcfc857337f822d0d08650b3775040
describe
'151206' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZO' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
29d619dff39318193bd339e5a8da0746
c71c7d24621626484fd15a6b2cfda5a1d59e52b2
describe
'163756' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZP' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
fc71cbe6fad010cd7d18b0a2c5dd9b73
a13d017c0a6ac7ef5171ff9a6c00a92efc2f1712
describe
'176134' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZQ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
31ba6324430a38ed7ac6dc9fae87cb78
8da79cbf216107cc99bcbe087ca5a3e0ea8fabc3
describe
'210677' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZR' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
ce46e7b349db8e8195dcb91588d78d31
1144d15910cf7832b331ac41988359ab5a53865d
describe
'166207' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZS' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
123f5dad40abc72f43e32c42958bd20e
269a63ae9e61050c7805284410c3bef6d37ce5b2
describe
'178603' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZT' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
ab08d4cd0ebd2fc05fb62e1b0ff52a7a
ad637705d2cde23a729957120fca7f79b04ef0d0
describe
'168219' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZU' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
6410825821523c4651d3ada2a948ba0b
68f98c604f685643ec92fe496a4151010ca41569
describe
'197608' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZV' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
55c55a72f9649cf8069e85c893d688d4
4714289702e05bf4c61a11cb3989691a3c52b9fc
describe
'175498' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZW' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
1b83850dac26e0ddbdcc015b92c20439
8d862bfe491dbdd37dbcd033b8d4de1cbf3f2f77
describe
'172444' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZX' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
77eee4da0abfc03aeb16c66050217cb3
2fedacb062634c7375560ce3edf572e5ccc8c662
describe
'170174' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZY' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
7fe66191da654573f4f08a2d4e8a1d53
49e5a78b02ce5a8c9801b9e873cbb073fed64e8e
describe
'171159' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACUZZ' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
4ce61858a1e647220d519a9aaebc10a9
57f8688321276d17e21c61d753a4ccdea39a8e82
describe
'167952' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAA' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
b55925982ce5ae76210863c14c853ce6
141b7bb3868c0e2d4745fc0b3a341a54f21ee906
describe
'169796' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAB' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
15197a3768b6390f9d9cc1a0e6699df3
a1c8b8e8472b447120d3e2a6e542d5797a238d90
describe
'176623' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAC' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
bda950cc53683cd9a9526693863f7110
783deae7c6aab38e1fc6119792c55d2c06d4eb79
describe
'164541' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAD' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
1b874cae297272d48827910f52d0ae8f
d3a4f82129563c6204c8f55ab8b42242b8fdfe7f
describe
'154023' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAE' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
bfb938dbab032f74dc5d4a00dd52c4b5
9a2661d3300532bcdef595571c42d2d1273ef2a3
describe
'174328' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAF' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
6db42c082f8cd756f2f12dd7cd9d40d2
ce20b68432f09870a0fdad5e6c4ebebe504d4f15
describe
'171575' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAG' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
97c86c286b88ca87805041b4da23a389
77f4c9b54a29f340e06a96b3b3ee4fcc1bcde7ff
'2011-12-22T09:12:31-05:00'
describe
'163955' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAH' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
f120a1c8a155586a6c22aa45acd5d630
192d5be3294cfbf66dcaee8390575a44ecac1a8b
describe
'162050' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAI' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
3aaf219a1ba3dad3d3856f8a814c8dc5
a811813adb625ab3c94ae6c3fde7722a83882232
describe
'176730' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAJ' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
79f3fd9b04413be5ce35a52633b02313
2d5345c2340803627b6969bd8889183fb1085b5f
describe
'177890' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAK' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
1141ed6054f7403ca8bf4e62e62c8016
60b1dc5a215b30ffd1b25db356ffa4e6f5f926a1
describe
'179098' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAL' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
ee6901ac4b7771d5d15007f6931c19c7
ff8f318f69edfa2d0c19c196c978408ebc48fe0b
describe
'171257' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAM' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
e803a16dea4a3734ab79933707eff1b0
987d2a4080279fa62b37869c86003b1cd9d7c6bb
describe
'179125' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAN' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
599cafc49b0ebb69765585b6af48fe80
5ae9c0673ccda685e831de7bcb8c6ee8575f94c7
describe
'173939' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAO' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
af72c522ef64523fe8568ee6e385171d
c95a56c4e8661357fe333027956e843d4ae91d71
describe
'207489' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAP' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
c67c37a5296e4b9550ca391a19731a57
02c57399d9f044118ab7513eae93e1f8a610fd35
describe
'169726' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAQ' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
a9d65f8b579f794fb7cf2fe18c0f243f
a0c773498638d40aac8baa0204aa7c14616d0a51
describe
'152713' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAR' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
0d396ad272079f3c0c1c493d48d36774
71d10118b7b34e7758c615ec2dc11d9583c717d6
describe
'167366' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAS' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
bfd35c05cd74e194f7318c74032a418c
69686d61ea832d25ec39b71fdbdf2a8d53cb169c
describe
'150895' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAT' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
f7476d430bda0bbaee0e247f6bcc973c
278804d8c040df5122438473dd6e774b7d89f5bf
describe
'158924' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAU' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
d1e3c0c43583e2c2533f3811e7db39e4
3e42989f1ff1af8522136ef2431840a2091d92f2
describe
'163225' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAV' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
483399ced4373d9255a5dfbcae676c93
8f42fd5de7f6d5b0fad73ed797ece45452f5bd9c
describe
'168540' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAW' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
4253696b7da06a3358a3382df5d76c60
3f3bf9f7dba310eb96dbcd87462127f477ee3806
describe
'163628' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAX' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
719922aece13ee288632f5fe6d6c91f2
1407bbb51c83d310eb684a3392804e38c91a88f0
describe
'160265' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAY' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
af99856c214796789421202e3c3b2cf3
d3027d7dafe0eaa7a65c7e2de4303225b736f9c3
describe
'165565' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVAZ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
83e46cfabe5766a0331705486bff9bfd
06dcf3c8b99d630399922a058c1ada90b783f7e6
describe
'168632' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBA' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
d8918577102cac6da4c616fe35744759
e85e14fb10f8ade1a6ca34f8085ec2bd2b248fea
describe
'196308' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBB' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
feafd06aeccd4e28211e671ea05503d2
815addaffd7fdb160b00dc8c7bd4f664dafc9d55
describe
'169241' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBC' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
1ccee7402faa623d07ca83370b2f7e85
0bd96dddba656a17432f106bc62e479c9930de51
describe
'166670' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBD' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
bd3c229d4c9ca0f216baf930c3eb5caa
7446aa3517d4598542196c259218ffdc4d2092b0
describe
'152701' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBE' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
569490feb9c0c2d58fc647a1f78fb21f
a70a4855b01a4d28d6b5ad6a78c995e95d2a22fb
describe
'166110' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBF' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
e1c212f95a24e132f3fb4d6ee9ec6a94
7a39e35a58e8821e05d2d90017d648381394f8ba
describe
'170842' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBG' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
0f36dbf318536b545d51707999e4a5dc
aca90b6b65136a0cdd9abb772c187a90979aad3f
describe
'163810' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBH' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
622c8599aca040567082a0af0c25602c
f6e94e0fc9c042e0af254e8c00b07a2096f99d07
describe
'162556' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBI' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
5ee5419c5bbfbf97e1b4ee2c69846c0f
743d6b18f32cc18955770179d67ab36c422c139d
describe
'172158' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBJ' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
387d40c4f62d4e246b0b0bca7af955cf
812b0dcd1bbd16f1380d6de6a287295b33b9feec
describe
'171280' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBK' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
5c328eef6818ff83490fe642affb2a0e
1fe6055fe9208e77266c738c02163f1f06ffe456
describe
'170373' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBL' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
4f3abc9d70dab163f08b3715fd519517
6a13a56bfb89028f32109c6fc2a87812bdc04243
describe
'179994' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBM' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
1091e12063c904ad361667f4a95bb326
c627438d58c99bcd60e8fbdc3eddd5c5824ad619
describe
'185412' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBN' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
b7907dd99ea6488e53117d61d4106130
620d5cde649b941688ad0e7ae43d0710cec4b081
describe
'170529' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBO' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
a90136d6549c32fcf17b77316f892774
5a27364e82d7bf002e02449bc977bc0bf9003ac8
describe
'162259' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBP' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
9f517f39358ee7ef3bba16a326bae50e
6e2bdd5aa175431c6029bb234f7a75ed9b81f93b
describe
'179035' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBQ' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
c206f16177f548a0fc29d03c288c96ef
eef06e7ac2b208d733b6b0a7eb22da71d10c502e
describe
'113738' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBR' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
b53a380caa91077e39f166925beae8a5
1986cf9a03e61d8f47548aa839cad7c568fb1830
describe
'74041' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBS' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
b2d581d5d8491cc4d950ff341d52689e
62769e51a8e5dd4033d3f8b65dea278f1c4c4805
describe
'222499' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBT' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
14f31636d4c4a3dc18388d808a8926f4
f69152f60796e9f656d7c9c03fbae87fdc3d989c
describe
'27070' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBU' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
bf91566492896463dd1f0190c8bafc85
a70998cab3e71618bd7f84900f57d2fd550d815d
describe
'60575' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBV' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
aba38918131903c9fcc26116be1f1d2f
c02e581458efdc4504ca1d0f899981439c2cb95f
describe
'35977' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBW' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
5048ee838727cea3a9a958ff7c06e82a
62c81342f033c6071b702564334614455cde9148
describe
'21868' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBX' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
7951398c032a3410649ac27a1a75ce3f
9f4e986538aa7b23bf5b22a49dfa1dc5ec47c660
describe
'23259' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBY' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
713857c0587d733ff70bd9729bb5352e
aa5dada0b3d12d18c8f8d7310dac11eba41106b0
describe
'19558' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVBZ' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
e93fe2be380825924ee74686a1e08171
96a9b37c28cee105236c37dbb2bbfa9f57c069cc
describe
'20669' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCA' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
a02e49c1fee9c4a83b50269ddc89fd46
79131dc0b9682b41826622aa286ac03739bb7f72
describe
'18301' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCB' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
333ad5106cdd024447916e1e75d41092
e460638e34ac59095df338a6131265c19e193d2f
describe
'44772' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCC' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
a06741e65e7f5dadbf79a6f83e4d51f6
1a0e0bd118c4af6d930a9b5c25215e6a5f0992d0
describe
'23953' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCD' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
5760923d4598616597edfd37659a71d4
4858a78336f83d74c7fb775823bcb1bc570f6af8
describe
'30275' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCE' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
7eab3e2b99713678c76c1292c079bf8d
24b50206e95543e1470edbacdeb210d1c711efac
describe
'22009' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCF' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
2b235f8b06f8e203b15ec177c7acd657
f010502e63aab1a534ff4167dc71bf187d38beb3
describe
'20500' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCG' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
b297c8bb44a9ed183c7ea60aa75693b4
0a8bad79c455cafc80a8734b45af78153825505c
describe
'18166' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCH' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
f76ff89b4302298ec54a907a12d8f7ff
6aecf45ade437c0f2110db77c0a1461ff09c6150
describe
'40336' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCI' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
4777b210345667db1728474c8a189a98
a3a0c44c6b68fa56c0c4de31c11b8324847a4fee
describe
'22309' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCJ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
03bda9b88762062a3c20a23d12b60f92
c465461568609a27ddd321f3a1ed0f028152821a
describe
'47510' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
f6b6c0b42dd24b6a40692faa1ca56c9c
a7314d47005cc13ad34095d06892c619546393fe
describe
'24092' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCL' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
031683d7244d91b2c1a5def80f7067c7
efb1c44c9482d4ce757d760155d247698320b825
describe
'49500' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
c2039488f0f3bf9389ca31a7c88f9aec
bf1a6b1a4dfb74722f6c1bfbd0165cebdcb67fd4
describe
'24515' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
493d44b8f72995047abbad3641cc891c
92220cc574ae7ee9c5a6ca68488f05e3f1cfabea
describe
'44991' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCO' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
c3748c22aa8996db6bea25b8e8eba813
58259df7c29382364d2ab55f632849f719bd8926
describe
'23895' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCP' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
5d55a025b6adac438b0b7a25198e542d
ad55a5a92ef11efa02df0a48431d091aed58161a
describe
'47647' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCQ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
6be3930b25e54003f6601ba0cadbfa0a
fd69dfb9cda55af721d3587182af4914fabfe070
describe
'24234' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCR' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
e07b26e7fa8c8e44ad6179e7e051c667
96c98454ee69f91839374b349e0aba42ddfefce9
describe
'47444' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCS' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
51e47743be72f2dd414df899e79fc2b6
81f898e36e589418376c43c381ffc51aeef00418
describe
'24323' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCT' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
cf1ba7428f73fdb2cf8fc17dd9a57054
eaed55550ff7ef9c4992d8d4ee0241707758c2a8
describe
'38993' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCU' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
59b60f787e07ff7b160a32938299a16c
e939ac65db0547758fb22b04c62a22f7c9944d40
describe
'22416' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCV' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
66a9d705811215da775ba675b8594390
3a835f9e453647b26a4ecd498d63e4cb68816c7d
describe
'18506' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCW' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
550742be91b31c6caa4e1568eb0b636e
02a0ad74782b7e9aac656eb01e926d9b8fcd0e03
describe
'17704' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCX' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
b5758e1b15e1686962b77db115dd3eb5
c578c962f3b887881d04c864b67f93562707eae5
describe
'55910' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCY' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
49a9fb645e11e445e22beef0e7d6f50b
8ae3cf8df4c48899130d71ed700220af0bf4e6d3
describe
'25186' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVCZ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
3b6eb67eeaf8561af453d6279ba5f3cb
3d46123e1cc6f587846ce6ce9a70a7a697eba252
describe
'70889' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDA' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
73552bd264b613f833863aed5d2cec63
641afd21eae921c89b454295d4a87bafca30afb2
describe
'29430' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDB' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
3ec7544064f153508aeb6bf30469ce57
2b2d9fafadc49d1fd42562b563d9effd48a725f6
describe
'55913' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDC' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
2a99839c1d053571334110094472cd95
4bc391d81327f37f9e53f39f2c59626570fd6c31
describe
'25887' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDD' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
bdde52859fe59214d4a8eb457d3d5002
87d9ed1dd3b7ec44eb35d7005c79d4c100064836
describe
'64279' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDE' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
a9473ef5610e45c75e6f6db5931db84b
e35349d7995ef652e28d6fc5ea87554456ff879e
describe
'27082' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDF' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
c1f79096b7396ba084d3294243916315
9c62ee145022c02eb61fa215246ca299e8e56c13
describe
'65920' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDG' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
ffb8334013c8926ab9d5673e610c8552
dc483849d41de265b49f8e96369690d789323460
describe
'27633' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDH' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
05a429da78b1a257fb449ecef1a34151
5c1102641abc9b5c2d033cfe14cfb1cd630271ce
describe
'59287' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDI' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
ce87abb916abb014ea7ee6df06a2ee77
44fd1a401c5f0a82337a6764df968e87ba9b2a48
describe
'26688' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDJ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
7469688da4da8d5038e536d766830f94
3b0ea10f803196a62cd9444afefc7d7228323228
describe
'61478' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
a78139c4cdf93bba7f7a76a679375866
b9a7547ec9358e5234548412c8ac255f3daa967c
describe
'27152' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDL' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
0ad1bff500e9c32514a05cbc77ab0e92
6c831257b31f0caf096f69e4da603a6d6c4d16fa
describe
'59384' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDM' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
e6c9aad291a7ac568e39e355357e7d91
3565d8ccae70663e240d5a5a2ff687c5373afa7f
describe
'26307' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDN' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
aedccb9de66e3371df49cff689800603
475a62e1b9c43f2f16b601f76fb1afdf1579bbb4
describe
'61985' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDO' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
8908961c1738f0a323961dd23f47da0f
b6609b50160e5b32718c58533787c1b0d0c1717e
describe
'26985' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
60ef76023159ef5747eadade000ac2a7
883bed74138a37abc0aebd5d508297167f94e4aa
describe
'64861' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDQ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
f803dd7a50165543bb5275c6891e3ba9
7992dccb8b2519ff13e4800ae80e237e462d6f75
describe
'28440' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDR' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
96ac0cf76a8729a7bca0e2de248fce07
7c6077a465e25b32c816b8f9204694edf24d5047
describe
'52016' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDS' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
2d2a08715bc7945c3b1ef5d152fc4181
3d52e0a37393e2d47e242bf6642f9e9ce45861ec
describe
'25253' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDT' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
182346b6006ebf8f9d2935d6d67da2e0
61b434fc4fd5fed7bb6d9a84b0fd0dd3ff828a2a
describe
'63984' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDU' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
4ea9b4b0ca6855ae83f30d360f355d20
02279da654634fc88d15f1b0bc358127e29d1557
describe
'27986' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDV' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
475720afc8d8d4065d89c1797b804a6d
b335e0b1a1492c3372e57aeedbe8217b00b1a3a8
describe
'67553' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDW' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
5c4feefec4509186ea2c3c1bcdee0293
f2c9ef5abe7ef277c7e013cacff1260d2f69a7fa
describe
'28942' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDX' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
0b045d875f81cba966ccb6b00b27b605
f6f37a2275b938eb5b6ec4108ed5010767cc8740
describe
'58812' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDY' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
dd86fa7a9e735e547ba84e906248f75f
9fd74470968f459b37d3eb03d385a1d493e36284
describe
'26854' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVDZ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
3807ce975b34349aa9706d6bbbacf528
73ddf1995b24da9ea07c94b85ac8829edc50a954
describe
'65423' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEA' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
0ac4bebdcdfa3c5574079e4a4aca4926
3b99ca0a9c771b24a78e0cb33b31467f7ee7ef37
describe
'27767' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEB' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
cdb7e4927a5dd63dd8659e038712831a
74e1d7ed0ac597d10235a763631172d340734dbf
describe
'65027' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEC' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
8beed35ce8b448cc3a3f9c50d2f497e5
6cbe820152fe2cba7b925281d89d23020af9546a
describe
'27138' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVED' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
7dcb1ed80fcffa9cb171269c586c74e0
8fc6d8acf0fe3e742c45526e932056b57f637209
describe
'67471' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEE' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
2d6c15a331b7185c0e384bc9826883be
8b580eda3c6556befb92a2850529e4c4851fbc38
describe
'27919' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
644a067c629774c63ead0c3bfc2707a4
cfe79a1504cd0ca20a72da0821464df7d98143e4
describe
'60908' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
9cf3da2cac587d4c7ff24a650531a84e
86f2b164977f6610fa7e953c0107677a76fad10f
describe
'28049' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEH' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
cd2f1e5ed4a2cabd0e65b388fc721449
57a67a6354016e0291735a64d750203903913992
describe
'60314' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEI' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
662894846d29d5518f9b2b320f08f8b0
16ce0d71b94e58339c21c31518def1bcb3c7c759
describe
'26148' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEJ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
3862b07c49c126ae49379d2ff20683e2
a06f7d5ec6516e165176adebe547f3eeb5afa94f
describe
'63894' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEK' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
6a76fc4a764ca82b820bf6e6eb10e185
7f039d66c2d43987fb411179653235976c1006ad
describe
'27008' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
1f4747c56fae07a186432e5451c1719f
69b57115b4dd9594b64cf8cf6a1f96c3aeb20986
describe
'67848' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEM' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
171e3100a0d28d7ab5dcf0a5c358fc00
0b53fcee3737cbf2a11d757f56fae4918d8c056e
describe
'27903' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEN' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
e0b48a553a84c2073140ef1a059aab10
46fd966ad7064c5ff267680ed70d85b851ee241c
describe
'65671' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEO' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
384c394b035674a5ea2db5c02f8b2faf
36e7489f8ad62118a5836b1afc90bae96b49d394
describe
'28493' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEP' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
5834c50754ca0badf25b27cc1208eb15
4a89cfbdf16205f0d524dbad22f8aa8737eb5a2c
describe
'51033' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEQ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
3ee91907873b795bebaa11ba974f62d2
2227be10dab703b225400b845d7202d74282c109
describe
'24819' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVER' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
bb7672e9b4f9fb5763c2c6364cb6b65f
2c4e4625e6cd4c76fc296e1f097ef1b9ca0a4a96
describe
'61862' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVES' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
a74d865a022d8642e37630945e65209e
fa2784ca53dd5c13be8e7d06924a588aff047a17
describe
'26612' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVET' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
0c718fb4ae91a54c2adadd212f429c96
f1936e9a25a1567c3b55374121275594d4a287f8
describe
'62392' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEU' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
22d20d5243a63ad64a0c8281e85fb326
25506fe2f8ffeaa6bca99b47124dc181af7e0046
describe
'26799' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEV' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
e62591c93f9b60e8e725094fa977af8c
59dff6f5b9db6aa19d6b4cfe06f54983f090129a
describe
'60339' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
163eef1be18a1f8023646dbf2a5f90ee
e7f55184a322a8765a5359a85997c11f7e663005
describe
'27990' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEX' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
08779285c5948c408e87cb7f83f04dfd
dc6715408a99075527260d8a7f8a3e343607e464
describe
'50255' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEY' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
6965a2ada3dc5c0bab4e7bdc5aa06ebb
d356d23fdb8984dda3eb6d43f5756bb2860205d2
describe
'24913' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVEZ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
00a128296d9ea2682bb805c42021bfd9
64726665e1084a2dfd254c75f392a9145a75e5a5
describe
'61383' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFA' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
89e0fb92ba5f63de8790ac5d3f7110f3
8de8c850a042cbc6f1b0ece2b776cd0dac0405aa
describe
'26757' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFB' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
3b31bcaa808ffe30098a4fc58a5a6ba3
3983cd90cf0e82ce53727283febeae1bc4e2ca2b
describe
'63080' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFC' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
138259df92459314324c2ef78e446bfc
1775377370be6e77f9cd789fa81c5c45b997fcce
describe
'26800' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFD' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
8edd4496f4b47dccabd0b833ac64ca1a
7c1227566dfc430843c1a2dc71b657abdf491065
describe
'65293' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFE' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
a7894a0cc52e83dae308cfded380d209
3df3c635415cd0ab0694fe1368d55c7cf3b17140
describe
'28376' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFF' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
e66d3bbe0efea1747ce06b7b9b930a33
3c82fad67ba2c6975d826eefb0aac3f734825693
describe
'49718' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFG' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
65f221368e9008d507b17ef8fa02ec21
301b08fcbc0d5ef6c9fab2ac1375706c76d8ccc5
describe
'24613' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFH' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
3762d1686341433519311f358004965b
c7a72e9ab18cc370313d430f752f43bcc504bba8
describe
'61886' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFI' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
d68da08526169bf46950c1912f9d477d
a56137890686ff429672dd3e8f05f641394900c7
describe
'26798' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFJ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
b00d3d1c09d40ef4fbd7944645c45f64
1748f345183ce512d4a6d32713b191fe7d8d8ff4
describe
'61468' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFK' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
0ccf6cc50b6f8c5b3baac5774d61a235
cd536f9a505970c64942fa74e197fc115613b9fa
describe
'26764' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFL' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
b73f1852b1e011f1f4424ca8fbaac0fe
a8c4b11c23fa5479792021de49437adc370eaa2c
describe
'64423' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFM' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
82b279d6ef7e4661c3577573dbee0023
82a458077039a0ac234b0c7d6a52f1f8f51c9839
describe
'28430' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFN' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
63a925cd74d8842d6d4e960cd6aaa680
a73ab4e5cb7157cccddb7201187b6a655f81f831
describe
'50386' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFO' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
521025159bcf46aa7ff474f8ca475945
d66aa277bb43bc4c3544f8f279af02e4aa4de675
describe
'25173' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFP' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
ba988956b02cc77b87023208363001f7
43bfc822736b58eaf5ab1e674fbda143da132593
describe
'59928' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFQ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
80785f56e6461da341df2b29e8d79109
aa6bf874388832a0f4de0d0c80d194a91a4d03f9
describe
'26272' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFR' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
72b961306431c6dd8dc9f979335fb5b4
a07fbb0c7da9bc6c74ddd95806ba2a1a46411d61
describe
'60216' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFS' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
47f4f0d1361b14613818d46192701552
397c8a07bbbaf0bdbf4119c79f4a23c52750c91d
describe
'26433' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFT' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
f730e5d9308eff35933df5901be3979e
eb6211b29aa68b7821e780e984c67e31702f3023
describe
'60821' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFU' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
3c0b2c4a1962afdaa03ff62680243ccc
f820684f2bce29e7d0f381b82be0f4895af0f81c
describe
'26727' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFV' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
da2cfc523598fa8a8741fd8086ba9278
93cb3312655434f27b32b1e5bbcb6710787c4cfd
describe
'59349' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFW' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
8d9faa91cdaf84e19ec20e97896614d9
5e8a12889374c56249d2a970580e7f5dede473a2
describe
'26916' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFX' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
6709ac7e76d1ce12625c45b82583f93f
d2aaf8d97a92267b9213afd2cf48d78218768ac6
describe
'57745' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFY' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
90304d216a932e64e5051ef5df331034
a5425051db97384e3283e1f8408f94667d17ccdb
describe
'26117' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVFZ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
007570ba814c7c355321769218986b80
b790bdca261177fbf1f1c7ea097a9099b46e8411
describe
'61179' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGA' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
2326784f9dc0aaa2a5079df349065544
4f1ef9b2cb8d401421a4b7aea9219ce870c3102f
describe
'26520' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGB' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
7923fad1a017d2ad4bcae235a240e319
9b23e2451f421ff98ff24104fc344d69997ca032
describe
'64890' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGC' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
4807da4749589f6c6773c5a178dcf585
73746a2d8705d3a8ece948b0575a3d3fb9bdd32c
describe
'28343' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGD' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
f7caf164c2a4302c96135f801a2b5ec6
a46c21ed14031f237c9fab78e185d70f21dd7208
describe
'49818' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGE' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
e7a043fd3e562efa3f93158e1bf9f7f1
d078ff3d27ff7a7edbcef349276cfd11afd793b5
describe
'24841' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGF' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
f33b96157cf8801c10cb4edb55c1f057
918bd32cc41b76993fc89a46cd80b7311b0c60be
describe
'59005' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGG' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
77ca2958bee34268c086c3fd5de37093
e89e0fb0b9aed74d0ccec34c7bd5eb76b7adedc9
describe
'26375' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGH' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
d45a94f4d71aac6368a3b1db5d896f31
568f70f291b3d15c75720ef4ed5645089a5d0cf3
describe
'62908' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGI' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
ba42f6c75482d2454d99de76a106661b
7ea362eaecd856f3a552a2d2609315d60ff291fe
describe
'26815' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGJ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
2a86a6d6d41267d8c4aefba78a95109e
132d09788a3040286cfa0ec385fba9ae4fc31280
describe
'60802' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGK' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
3e330045e588aab0b46134ccdad34b13
8d316084b7438a1eb59a431e37bf93b916d26527
describe
'27063' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGL' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
2ee447bb96dfd33ab2b5ee63e959bf66
5fa08f2b346a2e9b3c75f81d153672d7f0d94598
describe
'61888' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGM' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
37f243b8ca2dc46f80bbee0819fbbda3
903679243b22d26eaf7e283e487e6918ebb5a452
describe
'27041' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGN' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
98ba362d8834900e73a8c6ff46ccf89b
08e188390e678f8f3ef930485c3a6506722ef9f2
describe
'61418' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGO' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
2a16799ac36bb1b91604e4741f8bb3b2
493b3a7e89e2edd5e041913cf9ad381053a5a080
describe
'26596' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGP' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
57beef947cb085d150d76ec36d5e2501
5fcf96bec8a7b4341dfa2707774489cf85800009
describe
'61921' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGQ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
94cdccd0d7af57a8964f2d218091cc55
982ccf9b0d2a2c7b9cf73229e564eb5822ac611d
describe
'26523' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGR' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
1e7a43d5f8720e6dfed4bca6b35d9fe6
8e59ec3582281894849b065b3e74f1ee72411aa5
describe
'66678' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGS' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
d1cdb0c392240984103fd78ebd17755a
b8f82b38532db13cd8e5abdb810b27fe2a52bf58
describe
'28385' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGT' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
5cbd9113929f0845008d731ad62331a0
4e9c315125204e093efca78f9ed13ef83a8e3ac7
describe
'55541' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGU' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
406bbaddd4018f9e5225c26c5be74423
a9f2df74819f7a7ec96d9558fb33ddb1236e4bc1
describe
'25934' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGV' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
5b648d2afd40f284f9cfb3b212eb6b6b
59a7f17763473d9b2911313c9dcfe2904fafcc23
describe
'63442' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGW' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
a8cfb4d156d855a8f3596d5f32a69885
bbf91e56cc7d0970aa765fc22bab5ca85547fc25
describe
'27009' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGX' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
0a413bd9656a8277208df5b34c4e5f56
3654d9401447f8114695065220d9a589a4eb5c50
describe
'62776' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGY' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
3ae18d58163eeaabdd634caee1b476b5
f8fb4c0b4ad03af44d3e58f46cc615ac3a00237a
describe
'26834' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVGZ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
778709f1ba6524ec0308efabf1422e6e
c4ec750fde17e7c4ffe567c655e943d39e472870
describe
'65525' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHA' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
dcf35b3a0f2ebfd95d3c856978e54fb5
d7eb66d7b57c1be0e74412ac616583872e3b66c3
describe
'28418' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHB' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
a5c82b007296bf02013b2bd770095cf9
bd31ef13a7f9c2e0df8165df3a0a4789ba83a74f
describe
'61089' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHC' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
469fe1100f1d103479d92295ad7cc6e2
79c919c3a5bbee131b1c5932ab623356ec0c835b
describe
'26505' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHD' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
d44ead8d67df83da5933b7141236316d
84b85fd729e9ab6f7c931475e419810d52c2aa5c
describe
'60810' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHE' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
b0879e5cad6723fb9475bdd12f00c58e
868c7823a3d3514e3fa0ec8850a606ea3f9c6de9
describe
'26549' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHF' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
ad96e2dc77ca37c70c3188357622ca6d
0cb3ffd96fb703b6c5a65f16fe229d57db453236
describe
'62359' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHG' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
861377ab1f2c3e06992da52fca9bbf18
85ba70bea0323d6484f54bfb56665a56ddc2b0a2
describe
'26983' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHH' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
6b89e0f00c313aada56281037248ecd7
f71b02b7f10083e36a282d9f7f982aac0b9148bd
describe
'63452' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHI' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
2191df12379183931106524468c64bb4
f9e0092b29d8475e0b46f697a9f1352d509c900e
describe
'28174' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHJ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
5685f61954920fcec02ab4ae09914fa3
7a8113a1480a83a058b5403431ebaebe0be1279b
describe
'59521' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHK' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
9b6e023a499a9d872f92e92f2e7843e3
db13679a495dbed3d814e2ba66a1ff80720ae6d6
describe
'26320' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHL' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
d24ce9d5165c2a920c6007527d7aef71
1a9a92b8fd821f418936290253ec8c96a67c2ad9
describe
'60481' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHM' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
fae4a557d67d4f20fb0db524de27d454
612587c416aa89a21e4513ffc59e7d1f46826e5e
describe
'26722' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHN' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
fa24529122ad118d2fa04867522e6b82
ecb0721c45c1cd83c27a46eb5ddac6cf977fe92d
describe
'62699' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHO' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
d5e4c72751317d1ef34defa91f179af8
eced216f40c94958d69167c73ebb5d8c5211d654
describe
'27040' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHP' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
2d0ff50e71d9dbdcf4856808a35f675c
396bca9d9c86e5d7d7064cb2725d6491e6443f15
describe
'61619' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHQ' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
29a3be8b860cdb47f4657e94e82a7db2
7b723a81d24c74d72d8dd7d54a478a3a8a3ea4a0
describe
'27839' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHR' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
3ae0f1527df32692d0d85b540487b468
72747835324321ab0b4a33c18628900bc2a7fac7
describe
'53732' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHS' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
494a00d11349312d1404e2c98aaef5b5
5dc840952f854064332c5380c48246202bc7bd02
describe
'25619' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHT' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
a55542d8b6920b4af8f46654f01a88aa
6a5e89c281d7f4f2f8a0ac29a1068f460ccdfdf9
describe
'60406' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHU' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
5b8a144a1a90d334b3e1c032e301d989
13651731c4a45d560ef95bc8c5ca6a449209d38f
describe
'26763' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHV' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
098fb9e6376071f6070c61d5182ba0a5
af47e6a65b4e493c6d41b063aa06006feea04bbd
describe
'58241' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHW' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
8e1ab088afad34c1a1e1cc21bd1313c2
cfccb68a21756fa1cdb8a74d9d5a051b9a5f4187
describe
'26538' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHX' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
9a9b7910626420014b75edb1025d9757
ab0713573dd05d6ef17cfca1db09984927038ffa
describe
'65152' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHY' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
8902293fd714a74e9d15ce5947e62b32
15e78c3b28551144c0dd7497a9755a590f72659e
describe
'28379' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVHZ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
06c7f46fdf1b26665407951ce3607475
0a9c4579ad43609345b13263da6ff80b234f043b
describe
'54883' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIA' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
a1f21002db733e9c4eff27ff9291958d
2193195e1c13e0753a16b7bef7b77c099a13f009
describe
'25977' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIB' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
d2b262f9f2577f5339093a5477814966
b4779a52fbabfffcdc001770a4d0df72443f635c
'2011-12-21T09:30:14-05:00'
describe
'62256' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIC' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
92299b2ef04297deacf696f48227e901
e4b16d2aa2b2523d854b948f684885f9f20d08d9
describe
'26821' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVID' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
ac46fb362411477a7a11e6040d69d010
cc5526548618fa4dec8190cbff75ea6266127978
describe
'62095' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIE' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
1afc019587e2ca1d4fb099dfa5c2e397
414f89102f6f167bfc853f1bbb751ae08fdabbd6
describe
'26896' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIF' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
5c5a34a08c4efa72ec625feefed3b7a0
9689016ef6958a96e47ca931fcdb6269aa11c72b
describe
'63827' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIG' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
83f37e952ebc6ea5f5ccc6b6c07cdea0
725b2fd33d58de14e40c165201ce0cb0f539cbec
describe
'27102' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIH' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
280ff9478ba88d2ea8989a4ad476ae86
5f4c2f2cd4b36b58d3309af91b87c2711c572c30
describe
'61239' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVII' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
e31e813b76db6693962dba301e256fa0
b3eb3c0add999556229638413874445cbd785eb7
describe
'26832' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIJ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
6185650067b4981f24ca4b37f4360b2d
b49ce21c1252f90cb64f777b7f7f333b5b2f5816
describe
'60683' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIK' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
f47bfa655fe05ae724204c0e8a881a86
c7e492bc69d4b04664229d14a42966f8368e42ac
describe
'26519' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIL' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
4c35f80ecdf6cde5fee27831a6b22a83
dc8030ba51398d03b23b39565de9af7043aed7b2
describe
'60653' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIM' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
02416d3f5430345d00a5e23a9b4b744b
413d4a6cdabd0005818a7f417a8f97ac717f6732
describe
'26725' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIN' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
d809fe37077458e7fecda8d8d21f9cd9
95134649c16a2cd8a4ab449e2e05abce7d76d376
describe
'63591' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIO' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
ca9a1ae7e91193f28be59d5213961a7b
6807b7381ab3ecb07ba6a8d2685db94e25744742
describe
'28327' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIP' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
c5f37b7280542a47a1d1f1cbfaf7f55f
8e64e7d93fe52842431aca404367698ba22f9bf1
describe
'49083' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIQ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
bd2b1634b80f0d628a56f37a5eaaa0b5
ad28fddedc20ec4cf319143bfe0d3c8b4ec56a97
describe
'24748' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIR' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
8ec0464fc65a7ebe88e6a931a95b7e27
609af821240f647183bffc91cbd930c8c444cc34
describe
'60127' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIS' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
2b0ba6b58fd702782473739a51e247f6
4fb9faea3e013888a5d18bcd80634618c78f7bc4
describe
'26601' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIT' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
33c587d399c0ed07fd135583cc995b14
92277adc4846b81e38e677ab64f67ce17d47b5dc
describe
'62112' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIU' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
dc84539eccdc1bad75506fe7211c8f75
a4cb5b37e9eb5f05258dd437fd79ef9407150d9c
describe
'26629' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIV' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
2db49d1628db1fa81a96efc999de6d97
84545256b60635e2905fd9ed50e16ae07b7711bb
describe
'65234' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIW' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
b70153aa18093eea3867158e6b6778eb
429021589a8e334cd3326ce41e4dea219b698434
describe
'28341' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIX' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
930d1e105a16cc3003e9a3c23813f7c1
7ea84af60e3df45b68b933fa8a0468dda9de9d5a
describe
'61248' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIY' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
23f178823aa731a261023ed044ab82be
be984e05c49ab2942f9a10be8953a6876f3aaef0
describe
'27029' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVIZ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
0a22be7165bfbe5b6feeec31bb571d9c
c6b759a2309eead03a4c8bf14a28c96ab2c01ec5
describe
'59492' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJA' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
6720461b45885fe50ee60d644f6bec0e
5d9b560a211d8b29ea66de416cfb69cf02094912
describe
'26649' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJB' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
bc2d47ae692c0f9f7e318510ff924afb
3d9b75f128976aef6ec52b8c8a23aefe6a616f1d
describe
'63026' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJC' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
fa3435569859b233d8f8d9506b2a623d
2aee3465bb0e2f81fa87cae5dc0e415de6061027
describe
'26872' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJD' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
d017e8f36477ac9abcff22281836d959
9cf59e25c8c5d964bc38d5c85b829c62e8472858
describe
'66118' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJE' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
050a4df4585a4bfc9a3a1754d0f8c56d
45fd903323fa8955f05b7ca41c7035408adc6760
describe
'28377' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJF' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
e13e3f03810fe15cd5c5a99215b0516f
fce11e0af1598db8f468c6d285bfa5222dfb1900
describe
'54059' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJG' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
50c35bf592035e13a7037047bab839d8
04820b0923382c4932c09808151d59a95463bde3
describe
'25502' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJH' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
e81e499175e00e9011435f6a102cf70f
5a00a26599b4ab2661f3a7bcb3400b014b28a873
describe
'60803' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJI' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
8322340b517344b5a8407a80087ea16e
a15802cb13ea403636902b9770d178fcf1856100
describe
'26650' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJJ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
b380aadd70895614b6f83608e2e09887
d58ae8fcaf1afab54c1149e2ba2bce90464d25f3
describe
'63525' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJK' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
19ba2f7175da93cf5c2a2a928faeea96
7f3d34d0fe61eea6a86907ca7270954bf36b569a
describe
'26911' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJL' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
f6891f5f095b58b1868d69f75ea12b4e
93a9a4e07a86fb70e06f5d25cf08c78ff7b74355
describe
'61806' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJM' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
d821c3372a040388a2293fc1009e291b
46f014dbedd3c8d43dcededdbd0ff00b8d9a15ff
describe
'27100' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJN' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
f30d111b093722adeff6c7159e9d7825
41ca4f96e7e7e383fb84d07750a62b0a21c75547
describe
'62159' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJO' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
d686dd3b8be9e2fc8e5ae1b0e12ad0fb
4cbc1a540ef48a1eb90d86ad88c2161500217a20
describe
'26928' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJP' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
f9fa6af048559f424731b6ccda5acf42
95b3d8903891a970b2785d5829ccdb209b273b38
describe
'62020' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJQ' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
e2486747a79fefe11e2e27d534e28e36
740463b5d4ad0dce371c69cd4ca98c1575832f0f
describe
'26882' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJR' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
394bafc291de02678b3fc66ce7d6c66f
6e10aafcc97458d6097b69672f7c845aa7a37a95
describe
'61393' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJS' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
f4c920603a774a475217d156298e9029
3b38d35b0aa2ecfe097f2151ebb580a585d6a312
describe
'26860' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJT' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
f564d7855d7248a6f65ad9ba36f08ac9
1b86092eddd883ad16d61339ed0dbcb07be3fe97
describe
'62529' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJU' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
3e05c11e9e605cfd120f66556ecc56a9
34a18f999be772c8a49375bcca4dee91a364fc02
describe
'28279' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJV' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
40316baa441182c018390b9d29ccc456
d4fb57ada5972da3cd2fb36bd1dfcf1adaadee5e
describe
'47873' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJW' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
0fa180c969b593c41944bd779cb7dee5
1974f79237bd53afaa6b3adc89b341bd3d174b1f
describe
'24194' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJX' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
0c68fac1ad1d7e76eb09c8de4dd48b06
31adab2db929f00b0dec3a4b9d96df339d3b7028
describe
'61103' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJY' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
f0a1f2334b3e3549e2b54bc4c0fd7f0d
68aba21a67e9156e933494ec14274f25ca5af95e
describe
'26975' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVJZ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
add8d5327fa0788718aaa01ffe64e5a0
cb21f6b95cdc02f5fb396e3f26debf24fd41384e
describe
'62967' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKA' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
53347eed4c430222b1b075cc5ee838e9
5e4d9393eba93e209141ba4232edd4f151216d73
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKB' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
97ab3f5eb638c8e06e72c99896aef535
76978d5f24616b2ffbe3091e239bfc318cc00ee6
describe
'62770' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKC' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
26bb74fa9c2572aa7c65b18fd73a76d0
bff10a1ad92b1ad4d03b6c1895eb7d903273bc0d
describe
'28271' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKD' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
351fbb95984f31114c62d6a4abb92213
c3636ca7b32e89263310b44c6da3b04321af52fa
describe
'46443' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKE' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
dcda386ed72fde0ac9503ce22c07f973
353ee9d217d7aa29a19fc5d5f168ab22323d40ec
describe
'28845' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKF' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
33814f6934298900589337bf2885215b
9da91d379efef24574b9514abb1a39b4298ee00f
describe
'61208' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKG' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
c6ffdeaf44a1fb10b15b2e4b956edc52
0b5b728988fef2c11018ea5be265cbb2671e4084
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKH' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
7c10aef38b261a6885eea793f05d4b5a
fcc5a2eaaef1370ca753374e446fe4a9cb25e7b3
describe
'60134' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKI' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
22755a471241cea1165500cbc05d0707
5db615c1b7d37c36e3639090d0069f932d057b66
describe
'26755' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKJ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
69befca50e5672be4beb0953002e7308
9a5772522839a9e0abf45167896db1d615140494
describe
'59907' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKK' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
29737ec562be70a83a3a5e89e2e0fea0
2f4c18d91e4479036457b6372af4691bebb75001
describe
'28068' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKL' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
197c39651b45127e33dc45d15640c053
687a017b5181a31dafca322a78b7ad24d9789cd2
describe
'40599' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKM' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
eff44c9173688064d935a17c5341e56e
d688f3910edb3a4a3744ab87b6081892f3cbbece
describe
'26512' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKN' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
811a8d716b4ba5eafca7066cba596a8c
054a8d1396b54557b0377ec8e66ecdc4b88521ac
describe
'62404' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKO' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
c8527b1608df8ff49f3842c2bfd0c119
c904c0062013627f0638cb1f82446cd1ff27c430
describe
'26960' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKP' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
408283b2de36a29623fa88bfb74c762a
dafff3492d6070c3f76c54703906e64e7506bace
describe
'59701' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKQ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
e45c9fe2acb8ec288153bb6d240d3ea4
71600cb57a88d7bf5a77f7c122f8b4b82924a6b3
describe
'26767' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKR' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
525e16960dce734db77ad63e38fe8913
625f2b41ebc9c84ed9f407fb9e864b6ce520f1ed
describe
'65816' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKS' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
8832859d1cc75f5c5c7eaaf3134e1627
3ff9f16a9d943b561dc68a327a5a94819c802b2c
describe
'28489' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKT' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
95127f57073d6cad72649adb3f0b1757
2cd098a457208f77c6e96fa2583d0259ed44c267
describe
'54777' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKU' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
f974fbf9332aa90025276ed676d3aa9e
859519ebf7748d320788fda1f5df9b02c7c17844
describe
'25255' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKV' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
a36862e03d4d759f197ba624b603ec0d
61efc73f0d8f13fcce747dd9ed6263db57228604
describe
'63025' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKW' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
6c32c9d00d8355365aa1cf707a9b6f75
762b349f58a4d2c8238cb65d25ea9a94d7da2dbd
describe
'26982' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKX' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
72af84cbfa46c911bc2c3af47a755237
ce30e71c0e0a70067496e9e62f6524b4786fee96
describe
'63231' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKY' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
4e38bc512993512ae70321d32212939b
35e5f4beafef0f9e467ff118592ac984342e90ba
describe
'27050' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVKZ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
6f8be8492d097c38c0d9205e040344c8
26c4e200305c5a78f37d8604da569b8bfa94c668
describe
'66520' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLA' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
c636235ee36e1d5da29ff70fa54bb158
94197e57b24d34422ad8dd8448a56029edb3cbb9
describe
'28404' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLB' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
4afdb123bd080cfe75519663f4188bd8
b270f1bdc71f7381b61463000471efaf0899a3ff
describe
'51349' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLC' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
9130c274124d8ed6750f482a88f3287a
75342b8a8ca56485f4e237003cac833b76cb8483
describe
'24903' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLD' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
cf2b04d25e9beadfbeb550666bf868a2
3aaf8ec1f441bbdac4cc6a721d107fae6755c5fe
describe
'62833' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLE' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
053e260d79e3734aa97873a3680b1095
99f183598ab2bcafcd1b3af82ad776eb30219d71
describe
'26884' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLF' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
70471fdc5aa7e36ef4ed8fd59f1dcdc9
2a569ccb6cb44a4195da6cbe7f79b8a014eb4509
describe
'62178' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLG' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
4b03de352b3ca8d89dda304e1ad29cd1
46446d45f241a8b33b58f77826d286c1adca7f54
describe
'26812' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLH' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
8391a7352197f84e6b6f7cb670c1c2c7
914b1fdc7a5953d59ce8e718a211133d217894d6
describe
'62975' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLI' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
b6ad1e66e84a7c4f40032152fceaec55
50f1adfcc501c351d851345d9a4bbc26a4858f6e
describe
'27988' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLJ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
fa6a58216ec3bedc8e2bb27050755761
8a5b9d5dd40171df1853d0ec59793d354fe525fa
describe
'57093' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLK' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
b1baffcfe1facafb61441ee307d96306
a23e21f3a4f32f33686366e52055fc904485918f
describe
'26269' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLL' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
3d3d801618f3e66e2d1e01eb7dd5ae36
e4c1b0cc6ce0430b1652d5e0c1c32de86be4f309
describe
'60853' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLM' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
4992ef105d40b1217ca698a4566002ec
6ecddf2f6cc43ee452144662d73dc7675b3d3389
describe
'26689' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLN' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
d2ea41d01f1ee1db11c68dc155e3c129
2010cddc3b1f755c0a80befeff3b52c27597a539
describe
'65323' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLO' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
c8c2346e38fec4b9bb44f7595a3dc49c
859238fc9527ddc10d4a7985a0817ddaaf6d7e4a
describe
'27749' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLP' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
cf73419dcf1145b460fb7d4aa8e9d23f
79ab179d9d51d37c0f432501d38f16dc461d4eeb
describe
'64892' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLQ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
c2fc20261cfa9679a011de4876c561b2
dcfd694b5eb2ef6954ff64052e42d11f6416b4d9
describe
'28053' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLR' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
adfbb52ffabeb5371faefd7ca7f1e53a
a1617a64e0b45b413d11c393f552cc5347d6995e
describe
'58070' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLS' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
8a07572150127c0a9bb5e7ccdd2e7b7d
c5390e69e51f261822efae3848788ea4bf3d0101
describe
'26341' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLT' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
507ff449d11546f02f09140f2795e762
9826edad862be74a7cedef36c2b6f9acbb7d8c79
describe
'62103' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLU' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
6eac562ca08849770286e489da192e69
4f9eac05fd0aade24ac6f3161b3b5bfa7e3eb4b0
describe
'26856' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLV' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
c5c913a4d183e7ddefc08d43ef64d994
59ae1704db8e818fc6838d36d9f710ca251d9410
describe
'59324' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLW' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
240f2ffad9a39fea2bfac505f22c67ee
9aec3056fe16eb988eebbfd3ae19020e73690c90
describe
'26414' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLX' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
008ade5334d79c6f7cd03e2266f38d35
a63a184e8dea20bd813a1b51eddacd0b9f74209e
describe
'66522' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLY' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
4bb6f08bcb20df1f3c6a3a293734ac22
69080394141ca25a6884a171da1a24ed5f661b05
describe
'28490' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVLZ' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
75470eb8eeb4f3d56f4bd7d7df21a05b
6f6c2c0486d0b5d9663346ad34f2cade676a6370
describe
'50131' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMA' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
90681ba6c1c1df37f87c9d8eac657fd1
72e470980d1be1a1976e6b09e1e515dc0425c750
describe
'24486' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMB' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
8584b515728f87e891392edcafea3a85
7ce3fdf1023f00d205fc4a17c19543ce13a3eba2
describe
'60375' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMC' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
05e76060e52e894b864d6c328772fd51
c00681b50514deeba08b0ebedd66ef99011611ee
describe
'26578' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMD' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
4d51e8fb9c73a503a53b6f12fa3f14ee
6d75fef9074804257e26438fcd82a61831dcb2c4
describe
'61264' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVME' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
f6bc93ae23e5e021d51f353df441027d
ce4d90ffb7f8976fb97658b9ea5dd3daecb8d60f
describe
'26987' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMF' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
ce19a1d3ca24c3c0fa74207f6112462e
a164d1a0f3302dd0886a2d030a550c4a7c72f5cb
describe
'62982' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMG' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
b07bfec53292b271c6ce608408fe4762
cecd55c7287aba7f9a2445786618ccfbc6144994
describe
'27148' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMH' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
a39ffed1d37e9dc3ca976383371214e1
5c6de8c02fbe3611ad4a5292e6b23355b68a062a
describe
'62203' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMI' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
887ffc7bde8d5d48d7ba400adee1c29f
f088cb8c6b9b9bb99e0b6deede48fb724d119e40
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMJ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
4cf616ad697703d15cba04080039146a
c2466acd2c7c1bc9cf83ae157994a86374a47609
describe
'59129' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMK' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
e9588410de6cbc78b9f9ddf33fdcb1fd
b5cea177ea6df81fc3a362b81e0be601d81a6075
describe
'26663' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVML' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
75d03046c7b1233b3685e28b2941e1a2
0d27cde3c091e446e428ac3db4aa29216eee3d52
describe
'61744' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMM' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
5e4f2f1b07b137e7e0ba8a60444e8eca
b43d5bc78b069e7a8ef56c2b3e3c03d8c49d0b19
describe
'26954' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMN' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
79d3074691bd33c28ee938c7a142ae14
acf4695e7841b3a4f6e961bc7c4449e4a08b50cb
describe
'65706' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMO' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
8800170e5d892b52fc8d290d942d0386
d998a6334405a7f7a004e9ace48b7ded491b933b
describe
'28654' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMP' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
bd3b2c6aa1618b5a406448687cf376bb
7967148cd7a529029a3a5f3fa98dd98cdec69f17
describe
'59377' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMQ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
f2163f1bff7a8be774e3b73394d918a5
2a44359c0aa3b42fbdc28296dd3fc26f0abb8c89
describe
'26302' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMR' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
fc22756fddddbcc010904c43f2702db9
e8857d7575b6757830c96d125f3e158f55d16a57
describe
'63071' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMS' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
d43a373ad376ddd4ba6735fb5fd8490d
e1d1040cf975c72e5b95676014009df35249ec8d
describe
'27091' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMT' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
85fe8184a923065e96af4f4c307433ab
e1c2972755c04efd147c45614b0b5876312151f5
describe
'67040' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMU' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
44ddc2533f1926a225d8cd620de090e6
38023ecf3241fec8cd60fc0a2fd1586dffac422a
describe
'28130' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMV' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
422edb6bf1d6fdf21c57074cea8140e5
11509cd94296ebcb8d3af15cac46e8d466d47711
describe
'63732' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMW' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
1b7187214cbf688dae2a50465234be0a
05e1d6c3c8eeb7cbc2c27427ef936c998734318a
describe
'28499' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMX' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
ff87206c0d2be17e63e3b4f4aacfe48d
1d7868f81fd8d61fb3242b92c13e60c6353bd111
describe
'56773' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMY' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
b17f6225e3f9f38cab6e4722f536d4d6
1f7787780a9bf1300d6507837742014d6c24b517
describe
'26019' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVMZ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
b9c6fbbca2aeb48acf44a1fd4fe72a04
306592aa4d208c0551044e771220098579efbe90
describe
'64369' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNA' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
927fcbad0ef1ab5cd3388cee07a3a4f7
bb85cb0eebe1b5c403fb718cc3d7509e254e0a9c
describe
'27021' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNB' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
7c5da5136dd395cd28ef8123a4679d03
b285e3f8e21319032f6eeb535b1163f3e1549b00
describe
'62637' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNC' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
b50c4e01e249a0e8dd2dca74de0abe26
2b8fde4a2c6c0b34e8bb3fd9254b61bf415c2da9
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVND' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
8c419c379afc881923d14265c7823c31
0831f599fc47e24a6cb03850dcae20cda5878d64
describe
'63319' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNE' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
f70d4518f86581efd46f63b3d3e3e643
361c535648020df0d96dffe1c68cfb93051e95bc
describe
'27054' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNF' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
ace66d8323c432456f3d43e2618beeec
cd61c3d40f81cab13b5140669bd63fe3cbfcd0c1
describe
'63797' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNG' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
5805757c9bfcc7d44defc6c3612431ff
a502bc32a6247d73d6d4d7b9e76a35954ba4009d
describe
'27156' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNH' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
7997155d7f2a83d0cff04710e42760a7
07d7f871827419572b9fb9bc71c60dcafc29d5af
describe
'62470' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNI' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
493eba5696f668e2f07b5ac19e8c9ffd
3895439737710aa6d9ff52f4ef2ff3aae8b06d5d
describe
'26863' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNJ' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
0d355d0a9f0cc10fbf8448c9616d9dce
ab79638aaaf69634439d39f5d478d15bda3cc47b
describe
'63665' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNK' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
67fe71f541480e2c752e60fb4b84d4f8
dacc24efdc0808c0f13324707aaddd3e915b8d77
describe
'27167' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNL' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
6cafc16de23be6da884b18a20d8d22a9
92653ea0d80c782436a2a0b28e2c45a7005414dd
describe
'64790' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNM' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
26549c1796817f6022af59d561d2bd01
f7c5196deea18c758e642933114156cf3f5e61bc
describe
'28311' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNN' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
9904a33a945fe551a4f55b7e6b273359
70e7b1d7a88943d4c9ca92dc333ca06f4929ac01
describe
'49011' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNO' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
a32f6f32b8e43db1b2707cee5d972de0
701f185a8d929cab93513d4f38bcb079f619bbf3
describe
'24585' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNP' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
a2fabbbe6cafd69a91f465e85c14392f
ad600c951b0177f81e8f03a586210ec0c3084b6a
describe
'59425' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNQ' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
13ab3f4bfa59d27feb1dcf47af973cdb
1453060f77c96ae0f0fdc51c66aa0536c9c8c00c
describe
'26687' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNR' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
d01908a3675556d9bba42733638f005e
e76ccaae84f5890209079b8f141d2b098cb05b9e
describe
'64402' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNS' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
2f3bcc456c9c857e178bea1b04711992
c552212a232b33608fd5e339144118e348a73349
describe
'27637' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNT' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
5ee7698a6e5b99559978d99ab1170da2
22aa5abe515bec8a0b3cb40c4d4fac252b8a74bc
describe
'63469' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNU' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
65391c75a1f279e4eafbbe10b5055ed1
7d3840da916905eaba41165e8567c3e2bfd38b54
describe
'27144' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNV' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
d400fb38a3e91be2c0d69fa8eaafd183
35be9311d55bfcb55791ff3a66154463706521fa
describe
'61774' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNW' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
dee43aea5691f057ac1b2c747cb36fb4
f17721bfebbf11c701e6e4efadfec80f355f3fe3
describe
'27249' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNX' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
8265d9989e9b099c5ddcb9643befa817
cddcbd96ff9772de30722713f77f6b63940c1a04
describe
'60850' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNY' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
472ded4cdf0f99d3e72a64fe23040d1f
16d44963c2deaadae9c7540376fd610daceb0efb
describe
'26682' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVNZ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
25301db5a6ca321751a383f6a7adc474
519a560abb441a9dee923a07caa470b243406ade
describe
'66096' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOA' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
f3993064a1419dc845555eb1cd5b63d2
8975f7adc5f1b5c29d76d6b31e7d07df17844c71
describe
'27220' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOB' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
2dcf951ce9ebb940fed202d578a11080
fa7e67466bdb4a13dabbe314dc51e32d2b85cd2e
describe
'65892' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOC' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
8ace97eb7c44b0362d32374ccce3587c
6f85e35c72115c5e3d1fb20979258585e27e3ea5
describe
'28361' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOD' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
427e49c63eb780d8ba974495ae53f0a6
4b43f50452c869413939753c54c291d8d49c8762
describe
'52798' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOE' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
bf3f560b8351c2d84d959e3332c3f44b
5d6b363aa5e4868d9948ef2ad1092e47c57c335c
describe
'25580' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOF' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
1afffd958931c97e231e4c0cd8b10c75
8b2048f027dbf2a2631a98af71b5e34ed3eec888
describe
'64758' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOG' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
21709392db126962a29aff8a35c1f36d
ca5979caa767834047a2ca1f6ff103cee71888fd
describe
'27695' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOH' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
1cf345663e6782aed24fbc1e84f56903
d0429b82a4919dfb9078391a6966db0fc0a928b3
describe
'66009' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOI' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
2f7f3037b962768a6996e52099a0a164
be301585adf4a71199c83c8fa8b2a7a117ae132e
describe
'27629' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOJ' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
a31dcca09b52e78dde98e47327751f78
2d5cc02f89d60b21732edcef3e3713d4a7f24901
describe
'65524' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOK' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
9e4e8ece56e25206810304c0c824d796
4a18e569b85f568584fe4763203ffa09788af9ce
describe
'28394' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOL' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
7a95d9af539049aaca63e60521936536
48ee4733b966e5f86c22c857e6d38a0361f17088
describe
'60521' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOM' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
75e341e3a0aea2d3ddae7774565378e7
6b0577ad2ff32d33b1dc0e320ebd133f31454cc3
describe
'26861' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVON' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
4eb3612bc216fe867e7535ac61ca60cd
48237793c19ff16cdaefa8ba763ac112dffb5ed0
describe
'63598' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOO' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
90c67484819291d6ab313303ac7e7fda
97e34d0945305b6221c2a8a9242cb7a43f664f35
describe
'27117' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOP' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
634a611dbff1c2e6b1d709f04a782a14
e1ebb98eff25559039cc791d7473e49dd785268a
describe
'58798' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOQ' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
0a3bba67206fc2061ac58f4c262cef49
be2c3c816742d5d18f4bdde71e7d05a49bed3b36
describe
'26464' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOR' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
e4b32d8f7040b1c28dacaa38793530ff
7a578f7afc38049b97e37dfef54ebfdd2e6627eb
describe
'63254' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOS' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
b64e0ddc42f80214c9559cfd02396ccf
df790853fd4ece818afd1ac38671d5bced816e1e
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOT' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
232ae9306596c12bb9332f17644bc761
40cbd4c898f7ae6a24db2fc7d64b7a9075d9af03
describe
'57738' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOU' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
02db3b873c56fea5fc0aef9f4e38527a
cdbd2e059c08706bace8fad5d6334b4c709a59d9
describe
'26439' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOV' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
f089676a9bbd5ab53570cde27b14b740
2757aaf27037b861036d7afbb6580c9769a9f9b9
describe
'60047' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOW' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
ab369d19a5c5cbdfed1e7ee6b2fdbda8
3407300747c5ed868e87941656a639621bfa79cd
describe
'26723' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOX' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
b3091a90b9b10810d9775b4da2440d78
b55ee948921d20c84c46c59b3a93c3205c88de2d
describe
'62047' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOY' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
6ef4a0b1f6a6ae6b41652942c3f77469
b5df2221ee28e5ca63d45b20c6da8202485c9420
describe
'26950' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVOZ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
9aa92cd90280bc06da3ca3fa6e3fa0e4
f77205ce3c3fb87520a33dd14bd3c04f18644afa
describe
'64828' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPA' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
bccbe6259c1286a581bc991d66a101e4
d6bb764dbca3764c091b640944436509968941ea
describe
'28342' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPB' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
5badc35be4d07a5473116b39cc18042c
47e2da2faa16e437e405124e3bd2057d0cd327e2
describe
'48002' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPC' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
b761b622c4915e55864bbe3397f7d523
87b74e8d7c1a74ffa38f6a8a1c98d9c50e52174f
describe
'24099' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPD' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
0722be4033d580e3ad77b2ab2406760d
a5ffc650ba817c9e92f2654e2c021d443341de05
describe
'60732' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPE' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
e18c0162bdff6fa4861d665258dea102
e785d546ffbd779a131b24326ed3b84a51813030
describe
'26786' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPF' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
975a32bb9fe6cc84dc25ca07c713e975
fa5ce4a021b3e9c2199141e3714679c824e34b3e
describe
'62275' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPG' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
d89d79193d0aeff18524a8fe3a7eef82
200f84ab59db2ad7d4ffafda5e1f453c4c345ef4
describe
'26922' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPH' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
4cfc6df00f5dcee9f4c34f4a52945887
51c39c4cd198dd924dd6f2e79cfcc5185104feef
describe
'64954' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPI' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
7859687d5fa0aa9404bed993f2904c68
ff03d99983bf6a66e4c2b7e76b151275250452b8
describe
'28539' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPJ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
154979e4281c77340d945ce7ec2325ca
cf18a9adcfc65d58f27db59e17baf5d6c4809471
describe
'55819' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPK' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
e979fa37d5650839cb37fd10af1e0b3d
fa3a9e65a66890738d24c3ad045c8cb7ec9714f2
describe
'25687' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPL' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
adde909616d3a7ab54ba54a2c2768b1e
eb6ff2037cb837860ad1e960bf9a87144b4c04f7
describe
'63234' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPM' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
1a61265c9b90d75c7d5bf644364ffbab
76e4887195d9dc89461751929ddac544fd24455e
describe
'26941' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPN' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
078a1451d4f01a698b5d79ae504359aa
763144a101d7453b729bf72aab556f393a30fd65
describe
'63077' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPO' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
3ecc552e9b3f6538d9bf877b39cd8515
ee1e96dc209131022a55f2dd918b25ae51e27a70
describe
'27106' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPP' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
5d217ecd7ef7635d7a46b6acfd47baf1
db6ef70aa41238d3b22e76ba13a85d0ef73d3bdd
describe
'59888' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPQ' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
4220053e8b3550d6ab30b5f72df8dca8
12d4ed8bb97793394cff55d48b1ec5beec0d00d5
describe
'26897' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPR' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
0d496d5b2e1f2e88270087bb7901dba9
431a1badd7a40c17d6ee2f85d2d54310147eca60
describe
'62202' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPS' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
25b1202c626d538bcf1d5607c2983fe1
3cf7418a68310734a4fdebb85771bd27d6410d11
describe
'27092' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPT' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
60d02340d273568ecdb33c8db6a8101f
46ebbc30a7ad0769c0cd759ebb720f6417c18894
describe
'64552' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPU' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
99b720c4c2e22675be674bb5daaeb777
382c5b8f771cd459b3537e054ae906794c76f563
describe
'27298' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPV' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
ff6c814f067bf5fbea137d1f0cd2b3f6
0c0fff65109fbb7b3a1409f7d1fa2d2c927156ee
describe
'62341' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPW' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
1a37a7c27375f31d72cf018186aae0ea
e08aa92584ac680c4c1f5d0dd5a28cd578e0ebd7
describe
'26902' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPX' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
d3dc386362a572c0d3638036e6fa8f96
66f6552ac549b4516964064981213d9142d6784e
describe
'61741' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPY' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
e9399c4593bac3c17a43fa3103a65f14
f58a2ea8224e4460c8afe4a5eda0d9bd8b4f2c3c
describe
'27098' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVPZ' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
c7e1d695c9e04586f944975143ae34c3
d42be1d60248f70c8494377e5b37b54337d8aa8e
describe
'62905' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQA' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
fe89dd49af41dda72bdd4e798dbf0dc6
91e903de7b2d848adc5684da87df5a990b66b73e
describe
'27113' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQB' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
6ccfa3dde5174f8b658452371b39f546
5d531b7d3062b2c6d9c555a6f3bad982e7d20751
describe
'63549' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQC' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
d2ccdb3c0632af6be691be3ef5f703e8
6c613df7e73e6b10364eca1084513eb7bc88353d
describe
'27035' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQD' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
fee31c07e86b6d9944842f32079fdbc1
8481a2ca229623d9dfe96c6abd2f483b0c758b48
describe
'63225' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQE' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
eb50b4208770c007e65def42ed7dcf3b
9c04b03b322e4db6fbc687c5f3ff133cbb19b01e
describe
'27190' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQF' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
27ad33cf1889bbf77b8bf5748812c067
c3c90c105003fd79cd700a6b2000513d98421448
describe
'66669' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQG' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
4bacc4140589b0c8f15c1cc4e14e61ae
fdf398e354a9b15eada18f289e20f0fd32ea3e2f
describe
'28688' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQH' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
df641b96c1210fa236bdff938ae8b283
a293f2de35bb2c713fddfc3bba3250aa53adab76
describe
'52918' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQI' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
8734a2e6f70339395f12775827aacf32
89f7db0893675938c386d926bdc96f7cbc35b216
describe
'24940' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQJ' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
1a7cc8d94b840f2882529e257b8d22de
bbb91b2cf0ff1807e6c968680dde460726a3952e
describe
'64122' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQK' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
6d607a62afc005befda95464f5096df9
e7b22ee08afe4b9b7b90c10fb6da333ced3a21f7
describe
'27218' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQL' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
67a092e36bc5843b96356585dba17008
c58e762531dfa22e79a060f8cc9c039a293d15d0
describe
'61287' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQM' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
04af350eaa43052d1b705d4addd10aa3
fc2af216b2643f071afa757699d9632112738b16
describe
'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQN' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
2c01905a43386837bf6884f3061ed9ac
ffaebf41a2d53936a4f1b31fb5dda2334911ebca
describe
'66815' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQO' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
dbc1ba904ecb7ea8030ff657faaa337f
6031b44e0ce41d4d265a67ce24a527ad6cabb21f
describe
'28450' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQP' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
84715796364199042c5f5d5c4ebfa5de
4e3b31e04320edbc560907a080af8aaff370c416
describe
'36600' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQQ' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
92c8905f73c9abaa525596afc538e573
b11cdd317d489eb5083cada970cb80ddea9e7d33
describe
'22013' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQR' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
5267a099a4a909294934fd27e46af465
cddc02093bf76f7099995d6eef81ebefc9298b02
describe
'29972' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQS' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
b2f5d180f2146c0939b0d3bc791e5641
dff17b2b677d8c67f01971cc8ac53862912efc51
describe
'21730' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQT' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
89ddc6450c293c4fcf05ceaf48214258
236643b0aaa0b09dcae279c388688bc1b126a9a4
describe
'54841' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQU' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
5bcf2aaa781111dd8a517e60a2014819
271ac9443f792b492c91d8c29e8c9e95425ef381
describe
'25343' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQV' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
ccbad925b533ec312e9497b7141fd335
1bb61583c5144273830d8e4f635c8ae3c7b8d31d
describe
'24' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQW' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
4aae8f1a316652caf464d9cab2f88322
f9ecaa18f3d2787185ec866bc790e51bd7dc86a0
describe
'323993' 'info:fdaE20081130_AAAABSfileF20081130_AACVQX' 'sip-filesUF00086057_00001.mets'
539434d7dac20d5a1d6e9181ce5f852a
2b52593093f4099c9df89fe151ba7c391a3bd313
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T10:51:47-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.




. THE 7
PILGRIMS PROGRESS






The Baldwin Library

pny
RMB wk




AS I SLEPT, I DREAMED A DREAM.
THE

“PILGRIMS PROGRESS

BY

JOHN BUNYAN

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS IN COLORS

Soy

NEW YORK.
GILBERT H. McKIBBIN —
MDCCCXCIX
S|
CopyriGHT, 1899,

By G. H. McKIBBIN

Printed by the Manhattan Press,
474 W. Broadway, New York
THE AUTHOR’S APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK.

Wuen at the first I took my pen in hand,
Thus for to write, I did not understand
That I at all should make a little book

In such a mode; nay, I had undertook

To make another ; which, when almost done,
Before I was aware, I this begun.

And thus it was: I, writing of the way
And race of saints in this our gospel-day,
Fell suddenly into an allegory
About their journey and the way to glory,
In more than twenty things, which I set down:
This done, I twenty more had in my crown ;
And they again began to multiply,
Like sparks that from the coals of fire do fly.
Nay, then, thought I, if that you breed so fast,
I'll put you by yourselves, lest you at last
Should prove ad infinitum, and eat out
The book that I already am about.

Well, soI did; but yet I did not think
To show to all the world my pen and ink
In such a mode; I only thought to make
I knew not what; nor did I undertake
Thereby to please my neighbor; no, not I;
I did it mine own self to gratify.

Neither did I but vacant seasons spend
In this my scribble; nor did I intend
But to divert myself, in doing this,
From worser thoughts, which make me do amiss.
8 AUTHORS APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK.

Thus I set pen to paper with delight,
And quickly had my thoughts in black and white.
For having now my method by the end,
Still as I pull’d, it came; and so I penn’d
It down ; until at last it came to be,
For length and breadth, the bigness which you see.

Well, when I had thus put my ends together,
I showed them others, that I might see whether
They would condemn them, or them justify ;
And some said, Let them live; some, Let them die.
Some said, John, print it; others said, Not so:
Some said, It might do good; others said, No.

Now was I in a strait, and did not see
Which was the best thing to be done by me:
At last I thought, Since you are thus divided,
I print it will; and so the case decided.

For, thought I, some I see would have it done,
Though others in that channel do not run:
To prove, then, who advised for the best,
Thus I thought fit to put it to the test.

I further thought, if now I did deny
Those that would have it thus to gratify,
I did not know, but hinder them I might
Of that which would to them be great delight: °
For those which were not for its coming forth,
Isaid to them, Offend you I am loath;
Yet, since your brethren pleased with it be,
Forbear to judge, till you do further see.

If that thou wilt not read, let it alone;
Some love the meat, some love to pick the bone;
Yea, that I might them better moderate,
« did too with them thns expostulate :

May I not write in such a style as this?
In such a method, too, and yet not miss
My end, thy good? Why may it not be done?
Dark clouds bring waters, when the bright bring none.
AUTHORS APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK.

Yea, dark or bright, if they their silver drops
Cause to descend, the earth, by yielding crops,
Gives praise to both, and carpeth not at either,
But treasures up the fruit they yield together ;
Yea, so commixes both, that in their fruit

None can distinguish this from that; they suit
Her well when hungry; but if she be full,

She spews out both, and makes their blessing null.

You see the ways the fisherman doth take
To catch the fish ; what engines doth he make.
Behold! how he engageth all his wits;
Also his snares, lines, angles, hooks, and nets:
Yet fish there be that neither hook nor line,
Nor snare, nor net, nor engine, can make thine:
They must be groped for, and be tickled too,
Or they will not be catch’d, whate’er you do.
How does the fowler seek to catch his game?
By divers means, all which one cannot name:
His guns, his nets, his lime-twigs, light, and bell;
He creeps, he goes, he stands; yea, who can tell
Of all his postures? Yet there’s none of these
Will make him master of what fowls he please.
Yea, he must pipe and whistle to catcli this,
Yet, if he does so, that bird he will miss.

If that a pearl may in a toad’s head dwell,
And may be found, too, in an oyster shell:
If things that promise nothing do contain
What better is than gold, who will disdain,
That have an inkling of it there to look,
That they may find it? Now, my little book
(Though void of all these paintings that may make
It with this or the other man to take)
Is not without those things that do excel
What do in brave but empty notions dwell.

Well, yet I am not fully satisfied,
That this your book will stand when soundly tried.

Why, what’s the matter? Itisdark! What though?

But it is feigned. What of that, I trow?

9
10 AUTHORS APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK.

Some men, by feigned words, as dark as mine,
Make truth to spangle, and its rays to shine !

But they want solidness. Speak, man, thy mind!
They drown the weak; metaphors make us blind.

Solidity, indeed, becomes the pen
Of him that writeth things divine to men:
But must I needs want solidness, because
By metaphors I speak? Were not God’s laws,
His gospel laws, in olden time held forth
By shadows, types, and metaphors? Yet loath
Will any sober man be to find fault ;
With them, lest he be found for to assault
The Highest Wisdom. No; he rather stoops,
And seeks to find out what by pins and loops,
By calves and sheep, by heifers and by rams,
By birds and herbs, and by the blood of lambs
God speaketh to him; and happy is he
That finds the light and grace that in them be.

Be not too forward, therefore, to conclude
That I want solidness, that I am rude:
All things solid in show, not solid be:
All things in parable despise not we,
Lest things most hurtful lightly we receive,
And things that good are, of our souls bereave.
My dark and cloudy words, they do but hold
The truth, as cabinets enclose the gold.

The prophets used much by metaphors
To set forth truth ; yea whoso considers
Christ, His apostles too, shall plainly see
The truths to this day in such mantles be.

Am I afraid to say that Holy Writ,
Which for its style and phrase puts down all wit,
Is everywhere so full of all these things—
Dark figures, allegories—-yet there springs
From that same book that lustre, and those rays
Of light, that turn our darkest nights to days?
AUTHOR'S APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK. 11 -

Come, let my carper to his life now look,
And find there darker lines than in my book
He findeth any ; yea, and let him know,
That in his best things there are worse lines too.

May we but stand before impartial men,
To his poor one I dare adventure ten
That they will take my meaning in these lines
Far better than his lies in silver shrines.
Come, Truth, although in swaddling-clouts I find,
Informs the judgment, rectifies the mind ;
Pleases the understanding, makes the will
Submit; the memory, too, it doth fill
With what both our imagination please ;
Likewise it tends our troubles to appease.

Sound words, I know, Timothy is to use,
And old wives’ fables he is to refuse ;
But yet grave Paul him nowhere did forbid
The use of parables, in which lay hid
That gold, those pearls, and precious stones that were
Worth digging for, and that with greatest care.

Let me add one word more: Oh, man of God!
Art thou offended? Dost thou wish I had
Put forth my matter in another dress?
Or that I had in things been more express?
To those that are my betters, as is fit,
Three things let me propound, then I submit:

1. I find not that I am denied the use
Of this my method, so I no abuse
Put on the words, things, readers, or be rude
In handling figure or similitude
In application; but all that I may
Seek the advance of truth, this or that way.
Denied, didI say? Nay, I have leave
(Examples too, and that from them that have
God better pleased, by their words or ways,
Than any man that breatheth nowadays)
Thus to express my mind, thus to declare
Things unto thee that excellentest are.
12 AUTHOR’S APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK.

2. I find that men (as high as trees) will write
Dialogue-wise ; yet no man doth them slight
For writing so; indeed, if they abuse
Truth, cursed be they, and the craft they use
To that intent; but yet let truth be free
To make her sallies upon thee and me,

Which way it pleases God ; for who knows how
Better than He that taught us first to plough,
To guide our minds and pens for His design?
And He makes base things usher in Divine.

3. I find that Holy Writ, in many places,
Hath semblance with this method, where the cases
Do call for one thing to set forth another:
Use it I may then, and yet nothing smother
Truth’s golden beams: nay, by this method may
Make it cast forth its rays as light as day.

And now, before I do put up my pen,
I’ll show the profit of my book, and then
Commit both me and it unto that Hand
That pulls the strong down, and makes weak ones stand.

This book, it chalketh out before thine eyes
The man that seeks the everlasting prize:
It shows you whence he comes, whither he goes ;
What he leaves undone ; also what he does;
It also shows you how he runs and runs,
Till he unto the Gate of Glory comes.
It shows, too, who set out for life amain,
As if the lasting crown they would obtain.
Here also you may see the reason why
They lose their labor, and like fools do die.

This book will make a traveller of thee,
If by its counsel thou wilt ruled be;
It will direct thee to the Holy Land,
If thou wilt its direction understand ;
Yea, it will make the slothful active be;
The blind also delightful things to see.
AUTHORS APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK. 138

Art thou for something rare and profitable,
Or wouldst thou see a truth within a fable?
Art thou forgetful? Wouldst thou remember
From New-year’s day to the last of December?
Then read my fancies; they will stick like burs
And may be to the helpless comforters.

This book is writ in such a dialect
As may the minds of listless men affect ;
It seems a novelty, and yet contains
Nothing but sound and honest gospel strains.

Wouldst thou divert thyself from melancholy?
Wouldst thou be pleasant, yet be far from folly?
Wouldst thou read riddles and their explanation,

Or else be drowned in thy contemplation?
Dost thou love picking meat? Or wouldst thou see
A man i’ the clouds, and hear him speak to thee?
Wouldst thou be in a dream and yet not sleep?
Or wouldst thou in a moment laugh and weep?
Wouldst thou lose thyself and catch no harm,
And find thyself again without a charm?
Wouldst read thyself, and read thou knowest not what,
And yet know whether thou art blest or not,
By reading the same lines? Oh, then, come hither,
And lay my book, thy head, and heart together.

Joun Bunyan.
THE PILGRIMW’S PROGRESS.

AsI walked through the wilderness of this world,
I lighted on a certain place where was a Den, and
I laid me down in that place to sleep; and, as I
slept, [dreamed adream. I dreamed, and behold,
Isaw a man clothed with rags, standing in a cer-
tain place, with his face from his own house, a book
in his hand, and a great burden upon his back. I
looked, and saw him open the book, and read therein ;
and, as he read, he wept, and trembled; and, not
being able longer to contain, ho brake out with a
cry, saying, “‘ What shall I do?”

In this plight, therefore, he went home and re-
frained himself as long as he could, that his wife
and children should not perceive his distress; but
he could not be silent long, because: his trouble in-
creased. Wherefore he brake his mind to his wife
and children; and thus said to them: O my dear
wife, and you my children, I, your dear friend, am
in myself undone by reason of a burden that lieth
hard upon me; moreover, I am for certain informed
that this our city will be burned with fire from
heaven; in which fearful overthrow, both myself,
with thee, my wife, and you, my sweet babes, shall
16 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

miserably come to ruin, except (the which yet I sve
not) some way of escape can be found, whereby we
may be delivered. At this his relations were sore
amazed; not for that they believed that what he
said to them was true, but because they thought
that some distemper had got into his head; there-
fore, it drawing towards night, and they hoping
that sleep might settle his brain, with all haste they
got him to bed. But the night was as troublesome
to him as the day; and, instead of sleeping, he
spent it in sighs and tears. So, when the morning
was come, they would know how he did. He told
them, Worse and worse: he also set to talking to
them again; but they began to be hardened. They
also thought to drive away his distemper by harsh
and surly carriages to him; sometimes they would
deride, sometimes they would chide, and sometimes
they would quite neglect him. Wherefore he be-
gan to retire himself to his chamber, to pray for
and pity them, and also to condole his own misery ;
he would also walk solitarily in the fields, some-
times reading, and sometimes praying: and thus
for some days he spent his time.

Now, I saw, upon a time, when he was walking
in the fields, that he was, as he was wont, reading
in his book, and greatly distressed in his mind; and,
as he read, he burst out, as he had done before,
crying, “‘ What shall I do to be saved?”

I saw also that he looked this way and that way,
as if he would run; yet he stood still, because, as I
perceived, he could not tell which way to go.


A MAN CLOTHED WITH RAGS,
18 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

I looked then, and saw a man named Evangelist
coming to him, who asked, Wherefore dost thou cry?
He answered, Sir, I perceive by the book in my
hand, that I am condemned to die, and after that
to come to judgment, and I find that I am not will-
ing to do the first, nor able to do the second.
EVANGELIST. Why not willing to die, since this.

life is attended with so many evils? The man an- — :
swered, Because I fear that this burden that is upon =

my back will sink me lower than the grave, and J
shall fall into Tophet. And, Sir, if I be not fit to
go to prison, I am not fit, I am sure, to go to judg-

ment, and from thence to execution; and the —

thoughts of these things make me cry.

EVANGELIST. If this be thy condition, why
standest thou still? He answered, Because I know

not whither to go. Then he gave him a parchment
roll, and there was written within, “Flee from the —
wrath to come.”

The man read it, and looking upon Evangelist —
very carefully, said, Whither must I fly? Then
said Evangelist, pointing with his fingerover a very
wide field, Do you see yonder wicket-gate? The -

man said, No. Then said the other, Do you see ~—
yonder shining light? MHesaid,I thinkIdo. Then
said Evangelist, Keep that light in your eye, and
go up thereto; soshalt thousee the gate; at which,
when thou knockest, it shall be told thee what thou
shalt do. So I saw in my dream that the man be-
gan torun. Now, he had not run far from his own
door, but his wife and children, perceiving it, began


THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 19

to cry after him to return; but the man put his
fingers in his ears, and ran on, crying, Life! life!
eternal life! So he looked not behind him, but fled
towards the middle of the plain.

The neighbors also came out to see him run; and,
as he ran, some mocked, others threatened, and
some cried after him to return; and, among those
_ that did so, there were two that resolved to fetch
~ him back by force. The name of the one was Ob-
stinate, and the name of the other Pliable. Now,
- by this time, the man was got a good distance from
them; but, however, they were resolved to pursue
_ him, which they did, and in a little time they over-
took him. Then said the man, Neighbors, where-
fore are yecome? They said, To persuade you to
go back with us. But he said, That can by no
means be; you dwell, said he, in the City of De-
- struction, the place also where I was born: I see it
_to be so; and, dying there, sooner or later, you will
sink lower than the grave, into a place that burns
with fire and brimstone; be content, good neigh-
se bors, and go along with me.
~ OsstinaTeE. What! and leave our friends and
- our comforts behind us?
Yes, said Christian, for that was his name, be-

cause that ALL which you shall forsake is not worthy
to be compared with a little of that which I am
seeking to enjoy, and if you will go along with me,
and hold it, you shall fare as I myself; for there
where I go is enough and to spare. Come away,
and prove my words.
20 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

OBSTINATE. What are the things you seek, since
you leave all the world to find them?

CuRISTIAN. I seek an inheritance incorruptible,
undefiled, and that fadeth not away, and it is laid
up in heaven, and safe there to be bestowed, at the
time appointed, on them that diligently seek it.
Read it so, if you will, in my book.

OBsTINATE. Tush! away with your book; will
you go back with us or no?

CurisT1an. No, not I, because I have laid my
hand to the plough.

OBSTINATE. Come, then, neighbor Pliable, let us
turn again, and go home without him; there isa
company of these crazy-headed coxcombs, that,
when they take a fancy by the end, are wiser in
their own eyes than seven men that can render a
reason.

PLIABLE. Don’t revile; if what the good Christian
says is true, the things he looks after are better
than ours; my heart inclines to go with my neigh-
bor.

OpstinaTE. What! more fools still! Be ruled by
me, and go back; who knows whither such a brain-
sick fellow will lead you? Go back, go back, and
be wise.

Curistian. Nay, but do thou come with thy
neighbor Pliable; there are such things to be had
which I spoke of, and many more glories besides.
If you believe not me, read here in this book; and
for the truth of what is expressed therein, behold,
all is confirmed by the blood of him that made it.


THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 21

PuiaBLE. Well, neighbor Obstinate, I begin to
come to a point; Tintend to go along with this good
man, and to cast in my lot with him: but, my good
companion, do you know the way to this desired
place?

CHRISTIAN. I am directed by a man, whose name
is Evangelist, to speed me to a little gate that is
before us, where we shall receive instructions about
the way.

PLIABLE. Come, then, good neighbor, let us be
going. Then they went both together.

OxsstTInATE. And I will go back to my place; I
will be no companion of such misled fellows.

Now, I saw in my dream that, when Obstinate
was gone back, Christian and Pliable went talking
over the plain; and thus they began their discourse.

CurisTiAN. Neighbor Pliable, I am glad you are
persuaded to go along with me. Had Obstinate
but felt what I have felt of the powers and terrors
of what is yet unseen, he would not thus lightly
have given us the back.

PLIABLE. Come, neighbor Christian, since there
are none but us two here, tell me now, further what
the things are, and how to be enjoyed, whither we
are going.

CHRISTIAN. I can better conceive of them with
my mind, than speak of them with my tongue; but
yet, since you are desirous to know, I will read of
them in my book.

PLIABLE. And do you think that the words of
your book are certainly true?
22 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

CHRISTIAN. Yes, verily; for it was made by him
that cannot lie.

PLIABLE. Well said; what things are they?

CHRISTIAN. There is an endless kingdom to be
inhabited, and everlasting life to be given us, that
we may inhabit that kingdom forever.

PLIABLE. Well said; and what else?

CHRISTIAN. There are crowns of glory to be given
us, and garments that will make us shine like the
sun in the firmament of heaven.

PLIABLE. This is very pleasant; and what else?

CurIsTIAN. There shall be no more crying, nor
sorrow: for he that is owner of the place will wipe
all tears from our eyes.

PuiaBLeE. And: what company shall we have
there?

CHRISTIAN. There we shall be with seraphims and
cherubims, creatures that will dazzle your eyes to
look on them. There also you shall meet with
thousands and ten thousands that have gone before
us to that place; none of them are hurtful, but
loving and holy; every one walking in the sight of
God, and standing in his presence with acceptance
forever. In a word, there we shall see the elders
with their golden crowns; there we shall see the
holy virgins with their golden harps; there we shall
see men that by the world were cut in pieces, burnt
in flames, eaten of beasts, drowned in the seas, for
the love that they bare to the Lord of the place, all
clothed with immortality as with a garment.

PuraB.LeE. The hearing of this is enough to ravish
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 23

~ one’s heart. But are these things to be enjoyed?
How shall we get to be sharers thereof?

CHRISTIAN. The Lord, the Governor of the coun-
try, hath recorded that in this book; the substance
of which is, If we be truly willing to have it, he
will bestow it upon us freely.

PLIABLE. Well, glad am I to hear of these things:
come on, let us mend our pace.

CurIsTIAN. I cannot go so fast as I would, by
reason of this burden that is on my back.

Now, I saw in my dream, that just as they had
ended this talk they drew near to a very miry,.
slough, that was in the midst of the plain; and
they, being heedless, did both fall suddenly into the
bog. Thename of theslough was Despond. Here,
therefore, they wallowed for a time, being griev-
ously bedaubed with dirt; and Christian, . because
of the burden that was on his back, began to sink
in the mire. .

PuraBLe. Neighbor Christian, where are you
now?

CuRIsTIAN. Truly, I do not know.

At this Pliable began to be offended, and angrily
said to his fellow, Is this the happiness you have
told me all this while of? If we have such ill
speed at our first setting out, what may we expect
betwixt this and our journey’s end? May I get
out again with my life, you shall possess the brave
country alone forme. And, with that, he gave a
desperate struggle or two, and got out of the mire
on that side of the slough which was next. to his
24 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

own house: so away he went, and Christian saw
him no more.

Wherefore Christian was left to tumble in the
Slough of Despond alone: but still he endeavored
to struggle to that side of the slough that was still
further from his own house, and next to the wicket-
gate; the which he did, but could not get out be-
cause of the burden that was upon his back: but I
beheld in my dream that a man came to him, whose
name was Help, and asked him, What he did there?

CHRISTIAN. Sir, I was bid go this way by a man
called Evangelist, who directed me also to yonder
gate, that I might escape the wrath to come; and
as I was going thither I fell in here. —

Hep. But why did not you look for the steps ?

CHRISTIAN. Fear followed me so hard that I fled
the next way, and fell in.

HELP. Give me thy hand: so he gave him his
hand, and he drew him out, and set him upon
sound ground, and bid him go on his way.

Then I stepped to him that plucked him out, and
said, Sir, wherefore, since over this place is the way
from the City of Destruction to yonder gate, is it
that this plat is not mended, that poor travellers
might go thither with more security? And he said
unto me, This miry slough is such a place as cannot
be mended; it is the descent whither the scum and
filth that attends conviction for sin doth contiau-
ally run, and therefore it is called the Slough of
Despond; for still, as the sinner is awakened about
his lost condition, there ariseth in his soul many
HE BRAKE HIS MIND TO.HIS WIFE AND CHILDREN,


26 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

fears, and doubts and discouraging apprehensions,
which all of them get together, and settle in this
place. And this is the reason of the badness of
this ground.

It is not the pleasure of the King that this place
should remain so bad. His laborers also have, by
the direction of His Majesty’s surveyors, been for
above these sixteen hundred years employed about
this patch of ground, if perhaps it might have been
mended: yea, and to my knowledge, said he, here
have been swallowed up at least twenty thousand
cartloads, yea, millions of wholesome instructions,
that have at all seasons been brought from all places
of the King’s dominions, and they that can tell, say
they are the best materials to make good ground of
the place, if so be it might have been mended; but
it is the Slough of Despond still, and so will be
when they have done what they can. :

True, there are, by the direction of the Lawgiver,
certain good and substantial steps, placed even
through the very midst of this slough; but at such
time as this place doth much spew out its filth, as it
doth against change of weather, these steps are
hardly seen; or, if they be, men, through the dizzi-
ness of their heads, step beside, and then they are
bemired to purpose, notwithstanding the steps be
there; but the ground is good when they are once
got in at the gate. ae

Now, I saw in my dream, that by this time Pli-
able was got home to his house again, so that his
neighbors came to visit him; and some of them
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 27

called him wise man for coming back, and some
called him fool for hazarding himself with Chris-
tian: others again did mock at his cowardliness;
saying, Surely, since you began to venture, I would
not have been so base to have given out for a few
difficulties. So Pliable sat sneaking among them.
But at last he got more confidence, and then they
all turned their tales, and began to deride poor
Christian behind his back. And thus much con-
cerning Pliable.

Now, as Christian was walking by himself, he
espied one afar off, come crossing over the field to
meet him; and their hap was to meet just as they
were crossing the way of each other. The gentle-
man’s name that met him was Worldly Wiseman;
he dwelt in the town of Carnal Policy, a very great
town, and also hard-by, from whence .Christian
came. This man, then, meeting with Christian,
and having an inkling of him,—for Christian’s set-
ting forth from the City of Destruction was much
noised abroad, not only in the town where he dwelt,
but, also it began to be the town talk in some other
places, —Worldly Wiseman, therefore, having some
guess of him, by beholding his laborious going, by
observing his sighs and groans, and the like, began
thus to enter into some talk with Christian.

Wor pity. How now, good fellow, whither away
after this burdened manner?

CHRISTIAN. A burdened manner, indeed, as ever,
I think, poor creature had! And whereas you ask
me, Whither away? I tell you, Sir, Iam going to
28 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

yonder wicket-gate before me; for there, as I am
informed, I shall be put into a way to get rid of
my heavy burden.

WoRLDLY. Hast thou a wife and children?

Curistian. Yes; but I am so laden with this
burden, that I cannot take that pleasure in them
as formerly; methinks I am as if I had none.

WortpLy. Wilt thou hearken unto me if I give
thee counsel ?

CurIstian. If it be good, I will; for I stand in
need of good counsel.

Wor.LDLy. I would advise thee, then, that thou
with all speed get thyself rid of thy burden; for
thou wilt never be settled in thy mind till then;
nor canst thou enjoy the benefits of the blessing
which God has bestowed upon thee till then.

Curistian. That is that which I seek for, even
to be rid of this heavy burden; but get it off my-
self, I cannot; nor is there any man in our country
that can take it off my shoulders; therefore am I
going this way, as I told you, that I may be rid of
my burden.

Wor.tpiy. Who bid thee go this way to be rid of
thy burden?

CHRISTIAN. A man that appeared to me to bea
very great and honorable person; his name, as I
remember, is Evangelist.

Wor .piy. I beshrew him for his counsel! there
is not a more dangerous and troublesome way. in
the world than is that unto which he hath directed
thee; and that thou shalt find, if thou wilt be ruled
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 29

by his counsel. Thou hast met with something, as
I perceive already; for I see the dirt of the Slough
of Despond is upon thee; but that slough is the be-
ginning of the sorrows that do attend those that go
on in that way. Hear me, I am older than thou;
thou art like to meet with, in the way which thou
goest, wearisomeness, painfulness, hunger, perils,
nakedness, sword, lions, dragons, darkness, and, in
a word, death, and what not! These things are
certainly true, having been confirmed by many
testimonies. And why should a man so carelessly
cast away himself, by giving heed to a stranger?

CHRISTIAN. Why, Sir, this burden upon my back
is more terrible to me than are all these things
which you have mentioned; nay, methinks I care
not what I meet with in the way, if so be I can also
meet with deliverance from my burden.

WoRLDLY. How camest thou by the burden at
first?

CHRISTIAN. By reading this book in my hand.

Wor.Lpiy. I thought so; and it ishappened unto
thee as to other weak men, who, meddling with
things too high for them, do suddenly fall into thy
distractions; which not only unman men, as thine,
I perceive, has done thee, but they run them upon
desperate ventures to obtain they know not what.

Curistian. I know what I would obtain; it is
ease for my heavy burden.

WoRLDLY. But why wilt thou seek for ease this
way, seeing so many dangers attend it? especially
since, hadst thou but patience to hear me, I could
30 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

direct thee to the obtaining of what thou desirest,
without the dangers that thou in this way wilt run
thyself into; yea, and the remedy is at hand. Be-
sides, I will add, that, instead of those dangers,
thou shalt meet with much safety, friendship, and
content.

CurisTIAN. Pray, Sir, open this secret to me.

WortbLy. Why, in yonder village—the village
is named Morality—there dwells a gentleman whose
nams; is Legality, a very judicious man, and a man
of a very good name, that has skill to help men off
with such burdens as thine are from their shoul-
ders: yea, to my knowledge, he hath done a great
deal of good this way; ay, and besides, he hath
skill to cure those that are somewhat crazed in their
wits with their burdens. To him, thou mayest go,
and be helped presently. His house is not quite a
mile from this place, and if he should not be at
home himself, he hath a pretty young man to his
son, whose name is Civility, that can do it as well
as the old gentleman himself; there, I say, thou
mayest be eased of thy burden; and if thou art not
minded to go back to thy former habitation, as, in-
deed, I would not wish thee, thou mayest send for
thy wife and children to thee to this village, where
there are houses now stand empty, one of which
thou mayest have at reasonable rates; provision is
there also cheap and good; and that which will
make thy life the more happy is, to be sure, there
thou shalt live by honest neighbors, in credit and
good fashion.
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. aL

Now was Christian somewhat at a stand; but
presently he concluded, If this be true, which this
gentleman hath said, my wisest course is to take
his advice; and with that he spoke, Sir, which is
my way to this honest man’s house?

WoORLDLY. Do you see yonder hill? By that hill
you must go, and the first house you come at is
his.

So Christian turned out of his way to go to
Legality’s house for help;' but, behold, when he
was got now hard-by the hill, it seemed so high,
and also that side of it that was next the wayside
did hang so much over that Christian was afraid
to venture further, lest the hill should fall on his
head; wherefore there he stood still, and wotted
not what to do. Also his burden now seemed
heavier to him than while he was in his way.
There came also flashes of fire out of the hill, that
made Christian afraid that he should be burned.
Here, therefore, he did quake for fear.

And now he began to be sorry that he had taken
Worldly Wiseman’s counsel. And with that he
saw Evangelist coming to meet him; at the sight
also of whom he began to blush for shame. So
Evangelist drew nearer and coming up to him, he
looked upon him with a severe countenance, and
thus began to reason with Christian.

EVANGELIST. What dost thou here, Christian?
At which words Christian knew not what to an-
swer; so he stood speechless before him. Then said
Evangelist further, Art not thou the man that I
32 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

found crying without the walls of the City of De-
struction?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, Sir, I am the man.

EVANGELIST. Did not I direct thee the way to the
little wicket-gate?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, Sir.

EVANGELIST. How is it, then, that thou art so
quickly turned aside? for thou art now out of the
way.

Curisttan. I met with a gentleman so soon as I
had got over the Slough of Despond, who persuaded
me that I might, in the village before me, find a
man that could take off my burden.

EVANGELIST. What was he?

Curistian. He looked like a gentleman, and
talked much to me, and got me at last to yield; so
I came hither; but when I beheld this hill, and how
it hangs over the way, I suddenly made a stand lest
it should fall on my head.

EVANGELIST. What said that gentleman to
you?

CHRISTIAN. Why, he asked me whither I was go-
ing? And I told him.

EVANGELIST. And what said he then?

CHRISTIAN. He asked me if I hadafamily? And
I told him. But, said I, Iam so loaden with the
burden that is on my back, that I cannot take
pleasure in them as formerly.

EVANGELIST. And what said he then?

CuristiAn. He bid me with speed get rid of my
burden; and I told him it was ease that I sought.


DO YOU SEE YONDER WICKET-GATE?
34 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

And, said I, Iam therefore going to yonder gate,
to receive further direction how I may get to the
place of deliverance. So he said that he would
show me a better way, and short, not so attended
with difficulties as the way, Sir, that you set me in;
which way, said he, will direct you toa gentleman’s
house that hath skill to take off these burdens, so I
believed him, and turned out of that way into this,
if haply I might be soon eased of my burden. But
when I came. to this place, and beheld things as
they are, I stopped for fear of danger: but I now
know not what to do.

_Evanceuist. Then, stand still a little, that I may
show thee the wordsof God. Sohestood trembling.
Then said Evangelist, See that ye refuse not him
that speaketh. For if they escaped not who refused
him that spake on earth, much more shall not we
escape, if we turn away from him that speaketh
from heaven. He said, moreover, Now the just
shall live by faith: but if any man draw back, my
soul shall have no pleasure in him. He also did
thus apply them: Thou art the man that art run-
ning into this misery; thou hast begun to reject the
counsel of the Most High, and to draw back thy
foot from the way of peace, even almost to the
hazarding of thy perdition.

Christian fell down at his feet as dead, crying,
Woe is me, for I am undone! At the sight of
which, Evangelist caught him by the right hand,
saying, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be
forgiven unto men. Be not faithless, but believing.
‘

THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 35

Then did Christian revive, and stood up trembling,
as at first, before Evangelist.

EVANGELIST. Give more earnest heed to the
things that I shall tell thee of. I will now show
thee who it was that deluded thee, and who it was
also to whom he sent thee.—The man that met thee
is one Worldly Wiseman, and rightly is he so
called; partly, because he savoreth only the doc-
trine of this world (therefore he always goes to
the town of Morality to church): and partly because
he loveth that doctrine best, for it saveth him best
from the cross. And because he is of this carnal
temper, therefore he seeketh to prevent my ways,
though right. Now, there are three things in this
man’s counsel that thou must utterly abhor. (1)
His turning thee out of the way. (2) His laboring
to render the cross odious to thee. And (8) His
setting thy feet in that way that leadeth unto the
administration of death.

First, thou must abhor his turning thee out of
the way; and thine own consenting thereto: be-
cause this is to reject the counsel of God for the
sake of the counsel of a Worldly Wiseman. The
Lord says, Strive to enter in at the strait gate; the
gate to which I send thee; for strait is the gate
that leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.
From this little wicket-gate, and from the way
thereto, hath this wicked man turned thee, to the
bringing of thee almost to destruction; hate, there-
fore, his turning thee out of the way, and abhor
thyself for hearkening to him.
2

36 CO; THE PILGRIN’S PROGRESS.

Secondly, thou must abhor his laboring to render
the cross odious unto thee; for thou art to prefer it
before the treasures in Egypt. Besides, the King
of glory hath told thee, that he that will save his
life shall lose it. And, He that cometh after me,
and hateth not his father, and mother, and wife,
and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and
his own life also, he cannot be my disciple. I say,
therefore, for man to labor to persuade thee, that
that shall be thy death, without which, THE TRUTH
hath said, thou canst not have eternal life; this
doctrine thou must abhor.

Thirdly, thou must hate his setting of thy feet
in the way that leadeth to the ministration of death.
And for this thou must consider to whom he sent
thee, and also how unable that person was to de-
liver thee from thy burden.

He to whom thou wast sent for ease, being by
name Legality, is the son of the bondwoman which
now is, and is in bondage with her children; and
is, in a mystery, this Mount Sinai, which thou hast
feared will fall on thy head. Now, if she, with her
children, are in bondage, how canst thou expect by
them to be made free? This Legality, therefore, is
not able to set thee free from thy burden. Noman
was as yet ever rid of his burden by him; no, nor
ever is like to be: ye cannot be justified by the
works of the law; for by the deeds of the law no
man living can be rid of his burden: therefore,
Worldly Wiseman is an alien, and Legality is a
cheat; and for his son Civility, he is but a hypocrite


IN THE SLOUGH OF DESPOND.
38 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

and cannot help thee. Believe me, there is nothing
in all this noise, that thou hast heard of these sot-
tish men, but a design to beguile thee of thy salva-
tion, by turning thee from the way in which I had
set thee. After this, Evangelist called aloud to the
heavens for confirmation of what he had said: and
with that there came words and fire out of the
mountain under which poor Christian stood, that
made the hair of his flesh stand up. The words
were thus pronounced: As many as are of the
works of the law are under the curse; for it is writ-
ten, Cursed is every one that continueth not in all
things which are written in the book of the law to
do them. :

Now Christian looked for nothing but death, and
began to cry out; even cursing the’ time in which
he met with Worldly Wiseman; still calling him-
self a thousand fools for hearkening to his counsel:
he also was greatly ashamed to think that this
gentleman’s arguments, flowing only from the flesh,
should have the prevalency with him as to cause
him to forsake the right way. This done, he ap-
plied himself again to Evangelist in words and sense
as follow: Sir, what think you? Is there hope?
May I now go back and go up to the wicket-gate?
Shall I not be abandoned for this, and sent back
from thence ashamed? Iam sorrry I have heark-
ened to this man’s counsel. But may my sin be
forgiven?

EVANGELIST. Thy sin is very great, for by it thou
hast committed two evils: thou hast forsaken the
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 39

way that is good, to tread in forbidden paths; yet
will the man at the gate receive thee, for he has
good-will for men; only, said he, take heed that
thou turn not aside again, lest thou perish from the
way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Then
did Christian address himself to go back; and
Evangelist, after he had kissed him, gave him one
smile, and bid him God-speed. So he went on with
haste, neither spake he to any man by the way;
nor, if any asked him, would he vouchsafe them
an answer. He went on like one that was all the
while treading on forbidden ground, and could by
no means think himself safe, till again he was got
into the way which he left, to follow Worldly Wise-
man’s counsel. So, in process of time Christian
got up to the gate. Now, over the gate it was
written, Knock, and it shall be opened unto you.
He knocked, therefore, more than oncé or twice.
At last there came a grave person to the gate named
Good-will, who asked who was there? and whence
he came? and what he would have?

Cristian. Here is a poor burdened sinner. I
come from the City of Destruction, but am going
to Mount Zion, that I may be delivered from the
wrath to come. I would, therefore, Sir, since I am
informed that by this gate is the way thither,
know if you are willing to let me in?

Goop-wiLL. Lam willing with all my heart, said
he; and with that he opened the gate.

So when Christian was stepping in, the other
gave himapull. Then said Christian, What means
40 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

. that? The other told him. A little distance from
this gate, there is erected a strong castle, of which
Beelzebub is the captain; from thence both he and
them that are with him shoot arrows at those that
come up to this gate, if haply they may die before
they can enter in.

CHRISTIAN. I rejoice and tremble. So when he
was got in, the man of the gate asked him who
directed him thither?

CHRISTIAN. Evangelist bid me come hither, and
knock (as I did); and he said that you, Sir, would
tell me what I must do.

Goop-wiLL. An open door is set before thee, and
no man can shut it.

CurisTiAn. Now I begin to reap the benefits of
my hazards.

GoopD-WILL. But how is it that you came alone?

CHRISTIAN. Because none of my neighbors saw
their danger as I saw mine.

Goop-wituL. Did any know of your coming?

CHRISTIAN. Yes; my wife and children saw me
at the first, and called after me to turn again; also
some of my neighbors stood crying and calling after
me to return; but I put my fingers in my ears, and
so came on my way.

GoopD-WILL. But did none of them follow you to
persuade you to go back?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, both Obstinate and Pliable; but
when they saw that they could not prevail, Obsti-
nate went railing back, but Pliable came with mea
little way.


WORDLY WISEMAN.
42 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

Goop-wiLL. But why did he not come through?

CHRISTIAN. We, indeed, came both together, until
we came to the Slough of Despond, into the which
we suddenly fell. And then was my neighbor,
Pliable, discouraged, and would not venture further.
Wherefore, getting out again on that side next to
his own house, he told me I should possess the brave
country alone for him: so he went his way, and I
came mine—he after Obstinate, and I to this gate.

Goop-wILL. Alas, poor man! is.the celestial glory
of so small esteem with him that he counteth it
not worth running the hazards of a few difficulties
to obtain it?

CHRISTIAN. Truly, I have said the truth of Pliable,
and if I should also say all the truth of myself, it
will appear there is no betterment betwixt him and
myself. It is true, he went back to his own house,
but I also turned aside to go in the way of death,
being persuaded thereto by the carnal arguments
of one Worldly Wiseman.

Goop-wILL. Oh! did he light upon you? What!
he would have had you a sought for ease at the
hands of Legality. They are, both of them, a very
cheat. But did you take his counsel?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, as far as I durst; I went to find
out Legality, until I thought that the mountain
that stands by his house would have fallen upon
my head; wherefore, there I was forced to stop.

GoopD-WILL. That mountain has been the death
of many, and will be the death of many more; it is
well you escaped being by it dashed in pieces.
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 43

CHRISTIAN. Why, truly, I do not know what had
become of me there, had not Evangelist happily
met me again, as I was musing in the midst of my
dumps; but it was God’s mercy that he came to
me again, for else I had never come hither. But
now I am come, such a one asI am, more fit, in-
deed, for death, by that mountain, than thus to.
stand talking with my Lord; but, oh, what a favor
is this to me, that yet [ am admitted entrance here!

Goop-wiILL. We make no objections against any,
notwithstanding all that they have done before -
they came hither. They are in no wise cast out;
and therefore, good Christian, come a little way
with me, and I will teach thee about the way thou
must go. Look before thee; dost thou see this nar-
row way? THAT is the way thou must go; it was
cast up by patriarchs, prophets, Christ and his
apostles; and it is as straight as a rule can make it.
This is the way thou must go.

CHRISTIAN. But, are there no turnings or wind-
ings, by which a stranger may lose his way?

Goop-wiLL. Yes, there are many ways butt down
upon this, and they are crooked and wide. But
thus thou mayest distinguish the right from the
wrong, the right only being straight and narrow.

Then I saw in my dream that Christian asked
him further if he could not help him off with his
burden that was upon his back; for as yet he had
not got rid thereof, nor could he by any means get
it off without help. He told him, As to thy burden,
be content to bear it until thou comest to the place
df THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

of deliverance; for there it will fall from thy back
of itself.

Then Christian began to gird up his loins, and to
address himself to his journey. So the other told
him, That by that he was gone some distance from
the gate, he would come at the house of the In-
terpreter, at whose door he should knock, and he
‘would show him excellent things. Then Christian
took his leave of his friend, and he again bid him
God-speed. .

Then he went on till he came to the house of the
Interpreter, where he knocked over and over; at
last one came to the door, and asked who was there.

CHRISTIAN. Sir, here is a traveller, who was bid
by an acquaintance of the good man of this house
to call here for my profit; I would therefore speak
with the master of the house. So he called for the
master of the house, who, after a little time, came
to Christian, and asked him what he would have.

CuRIsTIAN. Sir, 1am a man that am come from
the City of Destruction, and am going to the Mount
Zion; and I was told by the man that stands at the
gate, at the head of this way, that if I called here,
you would show me excellent things, such as would
be a help to me in my journey.

INTERPRETER. Come in; I will show that which
will be profitable to thee. So he commanded his
man to light the candle, and bid Christian follow
him: so he had him into a private room, and bid
his man open a door; the which when he had done,
Christian saw the picture of a very grave person










&, Du:
HE GAVE HIM A PULL. .
46 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

hang up against the wall; and this was the fashion
of it. It had eyes lifted up to heaven, the best of
books in his hand, the law of truth was written
upon his lips, the world was behind his back. It
stood as if it pleaded with men, and a crown of gold
did hang over its head.

Curistian. What meaneth this?

INTERPRETER. The man whose picture this is, is
one of a thousand; he can beget children, travail.
in birth with children, and nurse them himself
when they are born. And whereas thou seest him
with his eyes lift up to heaven, the best of books in
his hand, and the law of truth writ on his lips, it is
to show thee that his work is to know and unfold
dark things to sinners; even as also thou seest him
stand as if he pleaded with men; and whereas thou
seest the world as cast behind him, and that a
crown hangs over his head, that is to show thee
that despising the things that are present, for the
love that he hath to his Master’s service, he is sure
in the world that comes next to have glory for his
reward. Now, said the Interpreter, I have showed
thee this picture first, because the man whose
picture this is, is the only man whom the Lord of
the place whither thou art going hath authorized
to be thy guide in all difficult places thou mayest
meet with in the way; wherefore take good heed
to what I have showed thee, and bear well in thy
mind what thou hast seen, lest in thy journey thou
meet with some that pretend to ad thee right, but
their way goes down to death.
THE PILGRIM'’S PROGRESS. 47

Then he took him by the hand, and led him into
a very large parlor that was full of dust, because
never swept; the which after he had reviewed a
little while, the Interpreter called for a man to
sweep. Now, when he began to sweep, the dust
began to fly about so that Christian had almost
therewith been choked. Then said the Interpreter
to a damsel that stood by, Bring hither the water,
and sprinkle the room: when she had done, it was
swept and cleansed with pleasure.

CHRISTIAN. What means this?

INTERPRETER. This parlor is the heart of a man
that was never sanctified by the sweet grace of the
gospel; the dust is his original sin and inward cor-
ruptions, that have defiled the whole man. He
that began to sweep at first, is the Law; but she
that brought water, and did sprinkle it, is the
Gospel. Now, whereas thou sawest, that so soon
as the first began to sweep, the dust did so fly about
that the room by him could not be cleansed, but
that thou wast almost choked therewith; this is to
show thee that the law, instead of cleansing the
heart (by its working) from sin, doth revive, put
strength into, and increase it in the soul, even as it
doth discover and forbid it, for it doth not give
power to subdue.

Again, as thou sawest the damsel sprinkle the
room with water, upon which it was cleansed with
pleasure; this is to show thee that when the gospel
comes, in the sweet and precious influences thereof,
to the heart, then, I say, even as thou sawest the
48 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

damsel lay the dust by sprinkling the floor with
water, so is sin vanquished and subdued, and the
soul made clean through the faith of it, and con-
sequently fit for the King of glory to inhabit.

I saw, moreover, in my dream, that the Inter-
preter took him by the hand, and had him into a -
little room, where sat two little children, each one
in his chair. The name of the eldest was Passion,
and the:name of the other Patience. Passion
seemed to be much discontented; but Patience was
very quiet. Then Christian asked, What is the
reason of the discontent of Passion? The Inter-
preter answered, The Governor of them would have
him stay for his best things till the beginning of the
next year; but he will have all now; but Patience
is willing to wait.

Then Isaw that one came to Passion, and brought
him a bag of treasure, and poured it down at his
feet, the which he took up and rejoiced therein, and
withal laughed Patience to scorn. But I beheld
but a while, and he had lavished all away, and had
nothing left him but rags.

CurisTiAN. Expound this matter more fully to
me.

INTERPRETER. These two lads are figures: Pas-
sion, of the men of this world; and Patience, of
the men of that which is to come; for as here
thou seest, Passion will have all now this year,
that is to say, in this world; so are the men of
this world: they must have all their good things
now, they cannot stay till next year, that is, until




THE MAN IN THE CAGE
50 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

the next world, for their portion of good. The
proverb, A bird in the hand is worth two in the
bush, is of more authority with them than are all
the Divine testimonies of the good of the world to
come. But as thou sawest that he had quickly
lavished all away, and had presently left him noth-
ing but rags; so will it be with all such men at the
end of this world.

Curistian. Now I see that Patience has the best
wisdom, and that upon many accounts. First, be-
cause he stays for the best things. Second, and
also because he will have the glory of his when the
other has nothing but rags.

INTERPRETER. Nay, you may add another, to wit,
the glory of the next world will never wear out;
but these are suddenly gone. Therefore Passion
had not so much reason to laugh at Patience, be-
cause he had his good things first, as Patience will
have to laugh at Passion, because he had his best
things last; for first must give place to last, because
last must have his time to come; but last gives
place to nothing; for there is not another to suc-
ceed. He, therefore, that hath his portion first,
must needs have a time to spend it; but he that
hath his portion last, must have it lastingly; there-
fore it is said of Dives: Thou in thy lifetime receiv-
ed thy good things, and Lazarus evil things; but
now he is comforted, and thou art tormented.

CHRISTIAN. Then I perceive it is not best to covet
things that are now, but to wait for things to
come.
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 51

INTERPRETER. You say the truth: For the things
which are seen are temporal; but the things which
are not seen are eternal.

Then Isaw in my dream that the Interpreter took
Christian by the hand, and led him into a place
where was a fire burning against the wall, and one
standing by it, always casting much water upon it,
to quench it: yet did the fire burn higher and hotter.

CuristiaAn. What means this?

INTERPRETER. This fire is the work of grace that
is wrought in the heart; he that casts water upon
it to extinguish and put it out, is the Devil; but in
that thou seest the fire notwithstanding burn higher
and hotter, thou shalt also see the reason of that.

So he had him about to the back side of the wall,
where he saw aman witha vessel of oil in his hand,
which he did cast, but secretly, into the fire.

CuristiAN. What means this?

INTERPRETER. This is Christ, who continually,
with the oil of his grace, maintains the work al-
ready begun in the heart; by the means of which,
notwithstanding what the Devil can do, the souls of
his people prove gracious still. And in that thou
sawest that the man stood behind the wall to main-
tain the fire, that is to teach thee that it is hard for
the tempted to see how this work of grace is main-
tained in the soul.

I saw also that the Interpreter took him again
by the hand, and led him into a pleasant place,
where was builded a stately palace, beautiful to be-
hold; at the sight of which Christian was greatly
52 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

delighted. He saw also upon the top thereof cer-
tain persons walking, who were clothed all in gold.

CuRISTIAN. May we go in thither?

Then the Interpreter took him, and led him up
towards the door of the palace; and behold at the
door stood a great company of men, as desirous to
goin, but durst not. There also sat a manata
little distance from the door, at a tableside, with a
book and his inkhorn before him, to take the name
of him that should enter therein: he saw also, that
in the doorway stood many men in armor to keep
it, being resolved to do the men that would enter
what hurt and mischief they could. Now was
Christian somewhat inamaze. At last, when every
man started back for fear of the armed men, Chris-
tian saw a man of a very stout countenance come
up to the man that sat there to write, saying, Set
down my name, Sir; the which when he had done,
he saw the man draw his sword, and put an helmet
upon his head, and rush toward the door upon the
armed men, who laid upon him with deadly force;
but the man, not at all discouraged, fell to cut-
ting and hacking most fiercely. So after he had
received and given many wounds to those that
attempted to keep him out, he cut his way through
them all and pressed forward into the palace, at
which there was a pleasant voice heard from those
that were within, even of those that walked upon
the top of the palace, saying,

Come in, come in;
Eternal glory thou shalt w
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 53

So he went in, and was clothed with such gar-
ments as they. Then Christian smiled and said, I
think I know the meaning of this.

CHRISTIAN. Let me go hence. Nay, stay, said
the Interpreter, till I have shown thee a little more,
and after that thou shalt go on thy way. So he
took him by the hand again, and led him into a
very dark room, where there sat a man in an iron
cage. *

Now the man, to look on, seemed very sad; he
sat with his eyes looking down to the ground, his
hands folded together, and he sighed as if he would
break his heart. Then said Christian, What means
this? At which the Interpreter bid him talk with
the man.

CHRISTIAN. Whatart thou? The man answered,
Iam what I was not once.

CHRISTIAN. What wast thou once?

Man. I was once a fair and flourishing professor,
both in mine own eyes and also in the eyes of others;
I once was, as I thought, fair for the Celestial City,
and had then even joy atthe thoughts that I should
get thither.

CHRISTIAN. Well, but what art thou now?

Man. Tam now a man of despair, and am shut
up in it, as in this iron cage. I cannot get out.
Oh, now I cannot!

CHRISTIAN. How came you in this condition?

Man. I left off to watch and be sober; I laid the
reins upon the neck of my lusts; I sinned against
the light of the Word and the goodness of God; I
54 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

have grieved the Spirit, and he is gone; I tempted
the devil, and he is come to me; I have provoked
God to anger, and he has left me: I have so hard-
ened my heart that I cannot repent.

Then said Christian to the Interpreter, Is there
no hope for such a man as this? Ask him, said the
Interpreter. Nay, said Christian, pray, do you.

INTERPRETER. Is there no hope, but you must be
kept in the iron cage of despair?

Man. No, none at all.

INTERPRETER. Why, the Son of the blessed is very
pitiful.

Man. I have crucified him to myself afresh; I
have despised his person; I have despised his right-
eousness; I have counted his blood an unholy thing;
I have done despite to the Spirit of grace. There-
fore I have shut myself out of all the promises, and
there now remains to me nothing but threatenings,
dreadful threatenings, fearful threatenings of cer-
tain judgment and fiery indignation, which shall
devour me as an adversary.

INTERPRETER. For what did you bring yourself
into this condition?

Man. For the lusts, pleasures, and profits of this
world; in the enjoyment of which I did then promise
myself much delight; but now every one of those
things also bite me, and gnaw me like a burning
worm.

INTERPRETER. But canst thou not now repent and
turn?

Man. God hath denied me repentance. His Word’
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 55

gives me no encouragement to believe; yea, himself
hath shut me up in this iron cage; nor can all the
men in the world let me out. O eternity, eternity !
how shall I grapple with the misery that I must
meet with in eternity!

INTERPRETER. Let this man’s misery be remem-
bered by thee, and be an everlasting caution to thee.

Curistian. Well, this is fearful! God help me
to watch and be sober, and to pray that I may shun
the cause of this man’s misery! Sir, is it not time
for me to go on my way now?

INTERPRETER. Tarry till I shall show thee one
thing more, and then thou shalt go on thy way.

So he took Christian by the hand again, and led
him into a chamber, where there was one rising out
of bed; and as he put on his raiment, he shook and
trembled. Thensaid Christian, Why doth this man
thus tremble? The Interpreter then bid him tell to
Christian the reason of his so doing. So he said,
This night, as I was in my sleep, I dreamed, and
behold the heavens grew exceedingly black; also it
thundered and lightened in most fearful wise, that
it put me into an agony; so I looked up in my
dream, and saw the clouds rack at an unusual rate,
upon which I heard a great sound of a trumpet,
and saw also a man sit upon a cloud, attended with
the thousands of heaven; they were all in flaming
fire: also the heavens were in a burning flame. I
heard then a voice, saying, Arise, ye dead, and
come to judgment; and with that the rocks rent,
the graves opened, and the dead that were therein
56 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

came forth. Some of them were exceeding glad,
and looked upward; and some sought to hide them-
selves under the mountains. Then I saw the man
that sat upon the cloud open the book, and bid the
world draw near. Yet there was, by reason of a
fierce flame which issued out and came from before
him, a convenient distance betwixt him and them,
as betwixt the judge and the prisoners at the bar.
I heard it also proclaimed to them that attended on
the man that sat on the cloud, Gather together
the tares, the chaff, and stubble, and cast them into
the burning lake. And with that, the bottomless
pit opened, just whereabout I stood; out of the
mouth of which there came, in an abundant man-
ner, smoke and coals of fire, with hideous noises.
It was also said to the same persons, Gather my
wheat into the garner. And with that I saw many
caught up and carried away into the clouds, but I
was left behind. I also sought to hide myself, but
I could not, for the man that sat upon the cloud
still kept his eye upon me; my sins also came into
my mind: and my conscience did accuse me on
every side. Upon this I awaked from my sleep.

CurisTian. But what was it that made you so
afraid of this sight?

Man. Why, I thought that the day of judgment
was coine, and that I was not ready for it; but this
frighted me most, that the angels gathered up sev-
eral and left me behind; also the pit of hell opened
her mouth just where I stood. My conscience, too,
afflicted me; and, as I thought, the Judge had al-


HIS BURDEN FELL OFF HIS BACK.
58 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

ways his eye upon me, showing indignation in his
countenance.

INTERPRETER. Hast thou considered all these
things?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, and they put me in hope and
fear.

INTERPRETER. Well, keep all things so in thy
mind that they may be as a goad in thy sides, to
prick thee forward in the way thou must go. Then
Christian began to gird up his loins, and to address
himself to his journey. Then said the Interpreter,
The Comforter be always with thee, good Christian,
to guide thee in the way that leads to the City. So
Christian went on his way.

Now I saw in my dream that the highway up
which Christian was to go, was fenced on either
side with a wall, and that wall was called Salvation.
Up this way, therefore, did burdened Christian run,
but not without great difficulty, because of the load
on his back.

He ran thus till he came to a place somewhat as-
cending, and upon that place stood a cross, and a
little below, in the bottom, a sepulchre. SoI saw
in my dream, that just as Christian came up with
the cross, his burden loosed from off his shoulders,
and fell from off his back, and began to tumble, and
so continued to do till it came to the mouth of the
sepulchre, where it fell in, and I saw it no more.

Then was Christian glad and lightsome, and said
with a merry heart, He hath given me rest by his
sorrow, and life by his death. Then he stood still
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 59

a while to look and wonder; for it was very surpris-

-ing to him, that the sight of the cross should thus
‘ease him of his burden. He looked, therefore, and
looked again, even till the springs that were in his
head sent the waters down his cheeks. Now, as he
stood looking and weeping, behold three Shining
Ones came to him and saluted him with, Peace be
to thee. So the first said to him, Thy sins be
forgiven thee; the second stripped him of his rags,
and clothed him with change of raiment; the
third also seta mark on his forehead, and gave him
a roll with a seal upon it, which he bade him look
on as he ran, and that he should give it in at the
Celestial Gate. So they went their way.

I saw then in my dream, that he went on thus,
even until he came at a bottom, where he saw, a
little out of the way, three men fast asleep, with
fetters upon their heels. The name of the one was
Simple, another Sloth, and the third Presumption.

Christian then seeing them lie in this case went
to them, if peradventure he might awake them, and
cried, You are like them that sleep on the top of a
mast, for the Dead Sea is under you—a gulf that
hath no bottom. Awake, therefore, and come
away; be willing also, and I will help you off with
your irons. He also told them, If he that goeth
about like a roaring lion comes by, you will cer-
tainly become a prey to his teeth. With that they
looked upon him, and began to reply in this sort:
Simple said, Isee no danger; Sloth said, Yet a little
more sleep; and Presumption said, Every tub must
60 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

stand upon its own bottom; what is the answer else
that I should give thee? And so they lay down to
sleep again, and Christian went on his way.

Yet was he troubled to think that men in that
danger should so little esteem the kindness of him
that so freely offered to help them, both by awaken-
ing of them, counselling of them, and proffering to
help them off with their irons. And as he was
troubled thereabout, he espied two men come
tumbling over the wall, on the left hand of the
narrow way; and they made up apaceto him. The
name of the one was Formalist, and the name of
the other Hypocrisy. So, as I said, they drew up
unto him, who thus entered with them into dis-
course.

CHRISTIAN. Gentleman, whence came you, and
whither go you?

ForMALIST and Hypocrisy. We were born in the
land of Vainglory, and are going for praise to
Mount Zion.

Curistian. Why came you not in at the gate
which standeth at the beginning of the way?
Know you not that it is written, that he that
cometh not in by the door, but climbeth up some
other way, the same is a thief and a robber?

FoRMALIST and Hypocrisy. That to go to the
gate for entrance was, by all their countrymen,
counted too far about; and that, therefore, their
usual way was to make a short cut of it, and to
climb over the wall, as they had done.

CHRISTIAN. But will it not be counted a trespass
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 61

against the Lord of the city whither we are bound,
thus to violate his revealed will?

ForRMALIST and Hypocrisy. They told him that,
as for that, he needed not to trouble his head there-
about; what they did they had custom for; and
could produce, if need were, testimony that would
witness it for more than a thousand years.

CHRISTIAN. But, will your practice stand a trial
at law?

FoRMALIST and Hypoorisy. They told him that
custom, it being of so long a standing as above a
thousand years, would, doubtless, now be admitted
as a thing legal by any impartial judge; .and besides,
said they, if we get into the way, what’s matter
which way we get in? if we are in, we are in; thou
art but in the way, who, as we perceive, came in at
the gate; and we are also in the way, that came
tumbling over the wall; wherein, now, is thy con-
dition better than ours?

CHRISTIAN. I walk by the rule of my Master; you
walk by the rude working of your fancies. You
are counted thieves already, by the Lord of the way;
therefore, I doubt you will not be found true men
at the endof the way. You come in by yourselves,
without his direction; and shall go out by your-
selves, without his mercy.

To this they made him but little answer; only
' they bid him look to himself. Then I saw that they
went on every man in his way, without much con
ference one with another; save that these two men
told Christian, that as to laws and ordinances, they
62 THE PILGRIMN’S PROGRESS.

doubted not but they should as conscientiously do
them ashe; therefore, said they, we see not wherein
thou differest from us but by the coat that is on thy
back, which was, as we trow, given thee by some
of thy neighbors, to hide the shame of thy naked-
ness.

CHRISTIAN. By laws and ordinances you will not
be saved, since you came not in by the door. And
as for this coat that is on my back, it was given me
by the Lord of the place whither I go; and that, as
you say, to cover my nakedness with. AndI take
it as a token of his kindness to me; for I had noth-
ing but rags before. And besides, thus I comfort
myself as I go: Surely, think I, when I come to
the gate of the city, the Lord thereof will know me
for good, since I have his coat on my back—a coat
that he gave me freely in the day that he stripped
me of my rags. I have, moreover, a mark in my
forehead, of which, perhaps, you have taken no
notice, which one of my Lord’s most intimate asso-
ciates fixed there in the day that my burden fell off
my shoulders. I will tell you, moreover, that I had
then given me a roll, sealed, to comfort me by read-
ing as I go on the way; I was also bid to give it in
at the Celestial Gate, in token of my certain going
in after it; all which things, I doubt, you want,
and want them because you came not in at the gate.
_ To these things they gave him no answer; only

they looked upon each other, and laughed. Then
I saw that they went on all, save that Christian
kept before, who had no more talk but with him-
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 63

self, and that sometimes sighingly and sometimes
comfortably; also he would be often reading in the
roll that one of the Shining Ones gave him, by
which he was refreshed.

I beheld, then, that they all went on till they
came to the foot of the hill Difficulty; at the bot-
tom of which was a spring. There were also in the
same place two other ways besides that which came
straight from the gate; one turned to the left hand,
and the other to the right, at the bottom of the hill;
but the narrow way lay right up the hill, and the
name of the going up the side of the hill is called
Difficulty. Christian now went to the spring, and
drank thereof, to refresh himself, and then began
to go up the hill.

The other two also came to the foot of the hill;
but when they saw that the hill was steep and high,
and that there were two other ways to go; and sup-
posing also that these two ways might meet again,
with that up which Christian went, on the other
side of the hill; therefore they were resolved to go
in those ways. -Now the nameof one of those ways
was Danger, and the name of the other Destruction.
So the one took the way which is called Danger,
which led him into a great wood, and the other took
directly up the way to Destruction, which led him
into a wide field, full of dark mountains, where he
stumbled and fell, and rose no more.

I looked, then, after Christian, to see him go up
the hill, where I perceived he fell from running to
going, and from going to clambering upon his
64 THE PILGRIMS PROGRESS.

hands and his knees, because of the steepness of the
place. Now, about the midway to the top of the hill
was a pleasant arbor, made by the Lord of the
hill for the refreshing of weary travellers; thither,
therefore, Christian got, where also he sat down to
rest him. Then he pulled his roll out of his bosom,
and read therein to his comfort; he also now began
afresh to take a review of the coat or garment that
was given him as he stood by the cross. Thus
pleasing himself a while, he at last fell into a slum-
ber, and thence into a fast sleep, which detained
him in that place until it was almost night; and in
his sleep his roll fell out of his hand. Now, as he
was sleeping, there came one to him, and awaked
him, saying, Go to the ant, thou sluggard; con-
sider her ways, and be wise. And with that Chris-
tian started up, and sped him on his way, and went
apace, till he came to the top of the hill.

Now, when he was got up to the top of the hill,
there came two men running to meet him amain;
the name of the one was Timorous, and of the other
Mistrust; to whom Christian said, Sirs, what’s the
matter? You run the wrong way. Timorous an-
_ swered that they were going to the City of Zion,
and had got up that difficult place; but, said he,
the farther we go, the more danger we meet with;
wherefore we turned, and are going back again.

Yes, said Mistrust, for just before us lie a couple
of lions in the way, whether sleeping or waking we
know not, and we could not think, if we came
within reach, but they would pull us in pieces.


THE THREE SHINING ONES.
66 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

CHRISTIAN. You make me afraid, but whither
shall I fly to be safe? If I go back to mine own
country, that is prepared for fire and brimstone,
and I shall certainly perish there. If I can get to |
the Celestial City, Iam sure to be in safety there.
I must venture. To go back is nothing but death;
to go forward is fear of death, and life everlasting
beyond it. I will yet go forward. So Mistrust and
Timorous ran down the hill, and Christian went on _
his way. But, thinking again of what he had heard
from the men, he felt in his bosom for his roll, that
he might read therein, and be comforted; but he
felt, and found it not. Then was Christian in great
distress, and knew not what to do; for he wanted
that which used to relieve him, and that which
should have been his pass into the Celestial City.
Here, therefore, he began to be much perplexed,
and knew not what todo. At last he bethought
himself that he had slept in the arbor that is on the
side of the hill; and, falling down upon his knees,
he asked God’s forgiveness for that his foolish act,
and then went back to look for his roll. But all
the way he went back, who can sufficiently set forth
the sorrow of Christian’s heart! Sometimes he
sighed, sometimes he wept, and oftentimes he chid
himself for being so foolish to fall asleep in that
place, which was erected only for a little refresh-
ment for his weariness. Thus, therefore, he went
back, carefully looking on this side and on that, all
the way as he went, if happily he might find his
roll, that had been his comfort so many times in
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 67

his journey. He went thus, till he came again
within sight of the arbor where he sat and slept;
but that sight renewed his sorrow the more, by
bringing again, even afresh, his evil of sleeping
into his mind. Thus, therefore, he now went on
bewailing his sinful sleep, saying, O wretched man
that Iam! that I should sleep in the daytime! that
I should sleep in the midst of difficulty! that I
should so indulge the flesh, as to use that rest for
ease to my flesh, which the Lord of the hill hath
erected only for the relief of the spirits of pilgrims!
How many steps have I took in vain! Thus it
happened to Israel, for their sin; they were sent
back again by the way of the Red Sea; and I am
made to tread those steps with sorrow, which I
might have trod with delight, had it not been for
this sinful sleep. How far might I have been on
my way by this time! I am made to tread those
steps thrice over, which I needed not to have trod
but once; yea I am like to be benighted, for the
day is almost spent. Oh, that I had not slept!
Now, by this time he was come to the arbor
again, where for a while he sat down and wept;
but at last, as Christian would have it, looking sor-
rowfully down under the settle, there he espied his
roll; which he, with trembling and haste, catched
up, and put it into his bosom. But who can tell
how joyful this man was when he had gotten his
roll again! for this roll was the assurance of his life
and acceptance at the desired haven. Therefore he
laid it up in his bosom, gave thanks to God for
68 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

directing his eye to the place where it lay, and with
joy and tears betook himself again to his journey.
But oh, how nimbly now did he go up the rest of
the hill! Yet, before he got up the sun went down
upon Christian; and this made him again recall the
vanity of his sleeping to his remembrance; and
thus he again began to condole with himself. O
thou sinful sleep: how, for thy sake am I like to be
benighted in my journey. I must walk without
the sun; darkness must cover the path of my feet;
and I must hear the noise of the doleful creatures,
because of my sinful sleep. Now also he remem-
bered the story that Mistrust and Timorous told
him of, how they were frighted with the sight of
the lions. Then said Christian to himself again,
These beasts range in the night for their prey; and
if they should meet with me in the dark, how
should I shift them? How should I escape being
by them torn in pieces? Thus he went on his way.
But while he was thus bewailing his unhappy mis-
carriage, he lift up his eyes, and behold there was
a very stately palace before him, the name of which
was Beautiful: and it stood by the highway side.
So I saw in my dream that he made haste and
went forward, that if possible he might get lodging
there. Now, before he had gone far, he entered
into a very narrow passage, which was about a fur-
long off of the porter’s lodge; and looking very
narrowly before him as he went, he espied two lions
in the way. Now, thought he, I see the dangers
that Mistrust and Timorous were driven back by.


THE HILL OF DIFFICULTY.
70 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

(The lions were chained, but he saw not the chains.)
Then he was afraid, and thought also himself to go
back after them, for he thought nothing but death
was before him. But the porter at the lodge,
whose name is Watchful, perceiving that Christian
made a halt as if he would go back, cried unto him,
saying, Is thy strength so small? Fear not the
lions, for they are chained, and are placed there for
trial of faith where it is, and for discovery of those
that havenone. Keep in the midst of the path, and
no hurt shall come unto thee.

Then I saw that he went on, trembling for fear
of the lions, but taking good heed to the directions
of the porter; he heard them roar, but they did him
no harm. Then he clapped his hands, and went on
till he came and stood before the gate where the
porter was. Then said Christian to the porter, Sir,
what house is this? And may I lodge here to-
night? The porter answered, This house was built
by the Lord of the hill, and he built it for the relief
and security of pilgrims. The porter also asked

whence he was, and whither he was going.

_ _ Curistran. I am come from the City of Destruc-
tion, and am going to Mount Zion; but because
the sun is now set, I desire, if I may, to lodge here
to-night.

Porter. What is your name?

My name is now Christian, but my name at the
first was Graceless; I came of the race of Japheth,
a God will persuade to dwell in the tents of

Shem.
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 71

Porter. But how doth it happen that you come
so late? The sun is set.

CHRISTIAN. I had been here sooner, but that—
wretched man that I am!—I slept in the arbor that
stands on the hill-side; nay, I had, notwithstanding
that, been here much sooner, but that, in my sleep,
I lost my evidence, and came without it to the brow
of the hill; and then feeling for it, and finding it
not, I was forced with sorrow of heart to go back
to the place where’ I slept my sleep, where I found
it, and now I am come.

Porter. Well, I will call out one of the virgins of
this place, who ‘will, if she likes your talk, bring
you in to the rest of the family, according to the
rules of the house. So Watchful, the porter, rang
a bell, at the sound of which came out at the door
of the house a grave and beautiful damsel, named
Discretion, and asked why she was called.

The porter answered, This man is on a journey
from the City of Destruction to Mount Zion, but
being weary and benighted, he asked me if he might
lodge here to-night; so I told him I would call for
thee, who, after a discourse had with him, mayest
do as seemeth thee good, even according to the law
of the house.

Then she asked him whence he was, and whither
he was going; and he told her. She asked him
also how he got into the way; and he told her.
Then she asked him what he had seen and met with
in the way; and he told her. And last she asked
his name; ‘so he said, It is Christian, and I have so
72 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

much the more a desire to lodge here to-night, be-
cause by what I perceive, this place was built by
the Lord of the hill, for the relief and security of
pilgrims. Soshe smiled, but the water stood in her
eyes; and after a little pause, she said, I will call
forth two or three more of the family. So she ran
to the door, and called out Prudence, Piety, and
Charity, who, after a little more discourse with
him, had him into the family; and many of them,
meeting him at the threshold of the house, said,
Come in, thou blessed of the Lord; this house was
built by the Lord of the hill, on purpose to enter-
tain such pilgrims in. Then he bowed his head,
and followed them into the house. So when he was
come in and sat down, they gave him something
to drink, and consented together, that until supper
was ready, some of them should have some particu-
lar discourse with Christian, for the best improve-
ment of time; and they appointed Piety and Pru-
dence and Charity to discourse with him; and thus
they began:

Piety. Come, good Christian, since we have been
so loving to you, to receive you in our house this
night, let us, if perhaps we may better ourselves
thereby, talk with you of all things that have hap-
pened to you in your pilgrimage.

CHRISTIAN. With a very good will, and I am glad
that you are so well disposed.

Piety. What moved you at first to betake your-
self to a pilgrim’s life?

CurisTIAN. I was driven out of my native coun-


BUT HE SAW NOT THE CHAINS,

ERE CHAINED,

THE LIONS W
74 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

try, by a dreadful sound that was in mine ears: to
wit, that unavoidable destruction did attend me, if
I abode in that place where I was.

Piety. But how did it happen that you came out
of your country this way?

Curistian. It was as God would have it; for
when I was under the fears of destruction, I did
not know whither to go; but by chance there came
aman, even to me, asI was trembling and weep-
ing, whose name is Evangelist, and he directed me
to the wicket-gate which else I should never have
found, and so set me into the way that hath led me
directly to this house.

Piety. But did you not come by the house of the
Interpreter ?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, and did: see such things there,
the remembrance of which will stick by me as long
as I live; especially three things; to wit, how
Christ, in despite of Satan, maintains his work of
grace in the heart; how the man had sinned him-
self quite out of hopes of God’s mercy: and also the
dream of him that thought in his sleep the day of
judgment was come.

Piety. Why, did you hear him tell his dream?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, and a dreadful one it was, I
thought; it made my heart ache as he was telling
of it; but yet I am glad I heard it.

Piety: Was that all that you saw?

CurisTran. No; he took me and had me where he
showed me a stately palace, and how the people
were clad in gold that were in it; and how there
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 75

came a venturous man, and cut his way through
the armed men that stood in the door to keep him
out; and how he was bid to come in and win
eternal glory. Methought those things did ravish
my heart! Iwould have stayed at that good man’s
house a twelvemonth, but that I had further to go.
Piety. And what saw you else in the way?
CHRISTIAN. Saw! why, I went but a little further,
and I saw one, as I thought in my mind, hang
bleeding upon the tree; and the very sight of him
made my burden fall off my back (for I groaned
under avery heavy burden), but then it fell down
from off me. It was a strange thing to me, for I
never saw such a thing before; yea, and while I
stood looking up, for then I could not forbear look-
ing, three Shining Ones came to me. One of them
testified that my sins were forgiven me; another
stripped me of my rags, and gave me this broidered
coat which you see; and the third set the mark
which you see in my forehead, and gave me this
sealed roll. (And with that he plucked it out of
his bosom.)
Piety. But you saw more than this, did you not?
CHRISTIAN. The things that I have told you were
the best; yet some other matters I saw, as, namely:
I saw three men, Simple, Sloth, and Presumption,
lie asleep a little out of the way, as I came, with
irons upon their heels; but do you think I could
awake them? I also saw Formality and Hypocrisy
come tumbling over the wall, to go, as they pre-
tended, to Zion, but they were quickly lost, even as
76 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

I myself did tell them; but they would not believe.
But above all, I found it hard work to get up this
hill, and as hard to come by the lions’ mouths; and
truly if it had not been for the good man, the porter
that stands at the gate, I do not know but that
after all I might have gone back again; but now,
I thank God I am here, and I thank you for receiv-
ing of me.

Then Prudence thought good to ask him a few
questions, and desired his answer to them.

PrupEnce. Do you not think sometimes of the
country from whence you came?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, but with much shame and detes-
tation: truly if I had been mindful of that country
from whence I came out, I might have had oppor-
tunity to have returned; but now I desire a better
country, that is, a heavenly.

PRUDENCE. Do you not yet bear away with you
some of the things that then you were conversant
withal?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, but greatly against my will;
especially my inward and carnal cogitations, with
which all my countrymen, as well as myself, were
delighted; but now all those things are my grief;
and might I but choose mine own things, I would
choose never to think of those things more; but
when I would be doing of that which is best, that
which is worst is with me.

PRUDENCE. Do you not find sometimes, as if those
things were vanquished, which at other times are
your perplexity?


sare
— Se

Set F ip. WH
pF MACAO |.
PVM GA

ee oN
oe SSS RGG iY

ce WPM AN Ae ce
SSS NI








\




THIS MAN IS FROM THE CITY OF DESTRUCTION TO MOUNT ZION,
78 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

CHRISTIAN. Yes, but that is seldom; they are to
me golden hours in which such things happen to me.

PRUDENCE. Can you remember by what means
you find your annoyances, at times, as if they were
vanquished ?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, when I think what I saw at the
cross, that will do it; and when I look upon my
broidered coat, that will do it; also when I look
into the roll that I carry in my bosom, that will do
it; and when my thoughts wax warm about whither
I am going, that will do it.

PruDENCE. And what is it that makes you so de-
sirous to go to Mount Zion?

CHRISTIAN. Why, there I hope to see him alive
that did hang dead on the cross; and there I hope
to be rid of all those things that to this day are in
me an annoyance to me; there, they say, there is
no death; and there I shall dwell with such com-
pany as I like best. For, to tell you truth, I love
him, because I was by him eased of my burden;
and I am weary of my inward sickness. I would
fain be where I shall die no more, and with the
company that shall always cry, Holy, Holy, Holy!

Then said Charity to Christian, Have you a
family? Are you a married man?

CurisTiAN. I havea wife and four small children.

Cuarity. And why did you not bring them along
with you?

Then Christian wept, and said, Oh, how willingly
would I have done it! but they were all of them
utterly averse to my going on pilgrimage.
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 79

CHarRITy. But you should have talked to them,
and endeavored to have shown them the danger of
being behind.

CurisT1an. SoI did; and told them also what God
had shown to me of the destruction of our city; but
I seemed to them as one that mocked, and they
believed me not.

Cuarity. And did you pray to God that he would
bless your counsel to them ?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, and that with much affection ;
for you must think that my wife and poor children
were very dear unto me.

CHaARiTy. But did you tell them of your own sor-
row, and fear of destruction? for I suppose that de-
struction was visible enough to you.

CHRISTIAN. Yes, over, and over, and over. They
might also see my fears in my countenance, in my
tears, and also in my trembling under the apprehen-
sion of the judgment that did hang over our heads;
but all was not sufficient to prevail with them to
come with me.

Cuarity. But what could they say for themselves,
why they came not?

CHRISTIAN. Why, my wife was afraid of losing
this world, and my children were given to the fool-
ish delights of youth; so what by one thing, and
what by another, they left me to wander in this
manner alone.

Cuarity. But did you not, with your vain life,
damp all that you by words used by way of persua-
sion to bring them away with you?
80 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

CHRISTIAN. Indeed, I cannot commend my life;
for I am conscious to myself of many failings
therein; I know also that a man by his conversa-
tion may soon overthrow, what by argument or
persuasion he doth labor to fasten upon others for
their good. Yet this I can say, I was very wary of -
giving them occasion, by any unseemly action, to
make them averse to going on pilgrimage. Yea,
for this very thing they would tell me I was too
precise, and that I denied myself of things, for their
sakes, in which they saw no evil. Nay, I think I
may say, that if what they saw in me did hinder
them, it was my great tenderness in sinning against
God, or of doing any wrong to my neighbor.

Cuarity. Indeed Cain hated his brother, because
his own works were evil, and his brother’s right-
eous; and if thy wife and children have been offended
with thee for this, they thereby show themselves to
be implacable to good, and thou hast delivered thy
soul from their blood.

Now I saw in my dream, that thus they sat talk-
ing together untilsupper wasready. So when they
had made ready, they sat down to meat. Now the
table was furnished with fat things, and with wine
that was well refined; and all their talk at the table
was about the Lord of the hill; as, namely, about
what he had done, wherefore he did what he did,
~ and why he had builded that house. And by what
they said, I perceived that he had been a great
warrior, and had fought with and slain him that
had the power of death, but not without great




THEY READ TO HIM.
82 © THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

danger to himself, which made me love him the
more.

For, as they said, and as I believe (said Chris
tian), he did it with the loss of much blood; but
that which put glory of grace into all he did was,
that he did it out of pure love to his country. And
besides, there were some of them of the household
that said they had been and spoke with him since
he did die on the cross; and they have attested that
they had. it from his own lips, that he is such a lover
of poor pilgrims, that the like is not to be found’
from the east to the west.

They, moreover, gave an instance of what they
affirmed, and that was, he had stripped himself of
his glory, that he might do this for the poor; and
that they heard him say and affirm that he would
not dwell in the mountain of Zion alone. They
said, moreover, that he had made many pilgrims
princes, though by nature they were beggars born,
and their original had been the dunghill.

Thus they discoursed together till late at night;
and after they had committed themselves to their
Lord for protection, they betook themselves to rest:
the pilgrim they laid in a large upper chamber,
whose window opened toward the sun-rising: the
name of the chamber was Peace; where he slept till
break of day.

So in the morning they all got up; and, after
some more discourse, they told him that he should
not depart till they had shown him the rarities of
that place. And first they had him into the study,
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 83

where they showed him records of the greatest an-
tiquity; in which, as I remember my dream, they
showed him first the pedigree of the Lord of the
hill, that he was the son of the Ancient of Days,
and came by that eternal generation. Here also
was more fully recorded the acts that he had done,
and the names of many hundreds that he had taken
into his service; and how he had placed them in
such habitations, that could neither by length of
days, nor decays of nature, be dissolved.

Then they read to him some of the worthy acts
that some of his servants had done: as, how they
had “subdued kingdoms, wrought righteousness,
obtained promises, stopped the mouths of lions,
quenched the violence of fire, escaped the edge of
the sword, out of weakness were made strong,
waxed valiant in fight, and turned to flight the
armies of the aliens.” They then read again, in
another part of the records of the house, where it
was showed how willing their Lord was to receive
into his favor any, even any, though they in time
past had offered great affronts to his person and
proceedings.

The next day they took him and had him into
the armory, where they showed him all manner of
furniture, which their Lord had provided for pil-
grims, as sword, shield, helmet, breastplate, adl-
prayer, and shoes that would not wear out. And
there was here enough of this to harness out as
many men for the service of their Lord as there be
stars in the heaven for multitude. They also
84 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

showed him some of the engines with which some
of his servants had done wonderful things. They
showed him Moses’ rod; the hammer and nail with
which Jael slew Sisera; the pitchers, trumpets, and
lamps too, with which Gideon put to flight the
armies of Midian. Then they showed him the ox’s
goad wherewith Shamgar slew six hundred men.
They showed him also the jaw-bone with which
Samson did such mighty feats. They showed him,
moreover, the sling and stone with which David
slew Goliath of Gath; and the sword, also, with
which their Lord will kill the Man of Sin, in the
day that he shall rise up to the prey. They showed
him, besides, many excellent things, with which
Christian was much delighted. This done, they
went to their rest again.

Then I saw in my dream, that on the morrow he
got up to go forward; but they desired him to stay
till the next day also; and then, said they, we will,
if the day be clear, show you the Delectable Moun-
tains, which, they said, would yet further add to
his comfort, because they were nearer the desired
haven than the place where at present he was; so
he consented and stayed. When the morning was
up, they had him to the top of the house, and bid
him look south; so he did: and behold, at a great
distance, he saw a most pleasant mountainous
country, beautiful with woods, vineyards, fruits of
all sorts, flowers also, with springs and fountains,
very delectable to behold. Then he asked the name
of the country. They said it was Immanuel’s
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 85

Land; and it is as common, said they, as this hill
is, to and for all the pilgrims. And when thou
comest there from thence, said they, thou mayest
see to the gate of the Celestial City, as the shep-
herds that live there will make appear.

Now he bethought himself of setting forward,
and they were willing he should. But first, said
they, let us go again into the armory.: So they did;
and when they came there, they harnessed him from
head to foot with what was of proof, lest, perhaps,
he should meet with assaults on the way. He be-
ing, therefore, thus accoutred, walketh out with his
friends to the gate; and there he asked the porter
if he saw any pilgrim pass by. Then the porter
answered, Yes.

CarIsTIAN. Pray, did you know him? said he.

Porter. I asked him his name, and he told me it
was Faithful.

CHRISTIAN. I know him; he is my townsman, my
near neighbor; he comes from the place where I
wasborn. How far do you think he may be before?

Porter. He is got by this time below the hill.

CHRISTIAN. Well, good Porter, the Lord be with
thee, and add to all thy blessings much increase,
for the kindness that thou hast showed to me.

Then he began to go forward; but Discretion,
Piety, Charity, and Prudence would accompany
him down to the foot of the hill. So they went on
together, reiterating their former discourses, till
they came to go down the hill. Then said Chris-
tian, As it was difficult coming up, so, so far as L
86 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

can see, it is dangerous going down. Yes, said
Prudence, so it is, for it is a hard matter for a man
to go down into the Valley of Humiliation, as thou
art now, and to catch no slip by the way; there-
fore, said they, are we come out to accompany thee
down the hill. So he began to go down, but very
warily; yet he caught a slip or two.

Then Isaw in my dream that these good com-
panions, when Christian was gone to the bottom of
the hill, gave him a loaf of bread, a bottle of wine,
and a cluster of raisins; and then he went on his
way.

But now, in this Valley of Humiliation, poor
Christian was hard put to it; for he had gone but
a little way, before he espied a foul fiend coming
over the field to meet him; his name is Apollyon.
Then did Christian begin to be afraid, and to cast
in his mind whether to go back or to stand his
ground. But he considered again that he had no
armor for his back; and therefore thought that to
turn the back to him might give him the greater
advantage with ease to pierce him with his darts.
Therefore he resolved to venture and stand his
ground; for, thought he, had I no more in mine
eye than the saving of my life, it would be the best
way to stand.

So he went on, and Apollyon met him. Now
the monster was hideous to behold; he was clothed
with scales, like a fish (and they are his pride), he
had wings like a dragon, teet like a bear, and out
of his belly came fire and smoke, and his mouth
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 87

was as the mouth of a lion. When he was come
up to Christian, he beheld him with a disdainful
countenance, and thus began to question with him.

APOLLYON. Whence came you? and whither are
you bound?

CHRISTIAN. I am come from the City of Destruc-
tion, which is the place of all evil, and am going to
the City of Zion.

APOLLYON. By this I perceive that thou art one of
my subjects, for all that country is mine, and I am
the prince and god of it. How is it, then, that
thou hast run away from thy king? Were it not
that I hope thou mayest do me more service, I
would strike thee now, at one blow to the ground.

CHRISTIAN. I was born, indeed, in your dominions,
but your service was hard, and your wages such as
a man could not live on, for the wages of sin 7s
death; therefore, when I was come to years, I did
as other considerate persons do, look out, if, per-
haps, I might mend myself.

APOLLYON. There is no prince that will thus
lightly lose his subjects, neither will I as yet lose
thee; but since thou complainest of thy service and
wages, be content to go back; what our country
will afford, I promise to give thee.

CHRISTIAN. But I have let myself to another, even
to the King of princes; and how can I, with fair-
ness, go back with thee?

APOLLYON. Thou hast done in this, according to
the proverb, Changed a bad for a worse; but those
that have professed themselves his servants, after

6
88 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

a while give him the slip, and return again to me.
Do thou so too, and all shall be well.

CHRISTIAN. I have given him my faith, and sworn
my allegiance to him; how, then, can I go back
from this, and not be hanged as a traitor?

APOLLYON. Thou didst the same to me, and yet I
am willing to pass by all, if now thou wilt yet turn
again and go back.

CHRISTIAN. What I promised thee was in my
nonage; and, besides, I count the Prince under
whose banner now I stand is able to absolve me;
yea, and to pardon also what I did with thee; and
besides, O thou destroying Apollyon! to speak truth,
I like his service, his wages, his servants, his gov-
ernment, his company and country, better than
thine; and, therefore, leave off to persuade me
further; I am his servant and I will follow him.

APOLLYON. Thou hast already been unfaithful in
thy service to him; and how dost thou think to
receive wages of him?

Curistian. Wherein, O Apollyon! have I been
unfaithful to him?

APOLLYON. Thou didst faint at first setting out
when thou wast almost choked in the Gulf of De-
spond; thou didst attempt wrong ways to be rid of
thy burden, whereas thou shouldst have stayed till
thy Prince had taken it off; thou didst sinfully
sleep and lose thy choice thing; thou wast, also,
almost persuaded to go back, at the sight of the
lions; and when thou talkest of thy journey, and of
what thou hast heard and seen, thou art inwardly


CHRISTIAN GIVES THANKS.
90 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

desirous of vainglory in all that thou sayest or
doest.

CHRISTIAN. All this is true, and much more which
thou hast left out; but the Prince whom I serve
and honor is merciful, and ready to forgive; but,
besides, these infirmities possessed me in thy coun-
try, for there I sucked them in; and I have groaned
under them, been sorrry for them, and have ob-
tained pardon of my Prince.

Then Apollyon broke out into a grievous rage,
saying, [am an enemy to this Prince; I hate his
person, his laws, and people; I am come out on
purpose to withstand thee.

CHRISTIAN. Apollyon, beware what you do; for I
am in the king’s highway, the way of holiness;
therefore take heed to yourself.

Then Apollyon straddled quite over the whole
breadth of the way, and said, I am void of fear in
this matter: prepare thyself to die; for I swear by
my infernal den, that thou shalt go ne further;
here will I spill thy soul. And with that he threw
a flaming dart at his breast; but Christian had a
shield in his hand, with which he caught it, and so
prevented the danger of that.

Then did Christian draw, for he saw it was time
to bestir him: and Apollyon as fast made at him,
throwing darts as thick as hail; by the which, not-
withstanding all that Christian could do to avoid
it, Apollyon wounded him in his head, his hand,
and foot. This made Christian give a little back;
Apollyon, therefore, followed his work amain, and
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 91

Christian again took courage, and resisted as man-
fully as he could. This sore combat lasted for
above half a day, till Christian was quite spent; for
you must know that Christian, by reason of his
wounds, must needs grow weaker and weaker.

Then Apollyon began to gather up close to Chris-
tian, and wrestling with him, gave him a dreadful
fall; and with that Christian’s sword flew out of
his hand. Then said Apollyon, Iam sure of thee
now. And with that he had almost pressed him to
death, so that Christian began to despair of life:
but as God would have it, while Apollyon was
fetching of his last blow, thereby to make a full
end of this good man, Christian nimbly stretched
out his hand for his sword, and caught it, saying,
Rejoice not against me, O mine enemy: when I fall
I shall arise; and with that gave him a deadly
thrust, which made him give back, as one that had
received his mortal wound. Christian perceiving
that, made at him again, saying, Nay, in all these
things we are more than conquerors through him
that loved us. And with that Apollyon spread
forth his dragon’s wings, and sped him away, that
Christian for a season saw him no more.

In this combat no man can imagine, unless he
had seen and heard as I did, what yelling and hid-
eous roaring Apollyon made all the time of the fight
—he spake like a dragon; and, on the other side,
what sighs and groans burst from Christian’s heart.
I never saw him all the while give so much as one
pleasant look, till he perceived he had wounded
92 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

Apollyon with his two-edged sword; then, indeed,
he did smile, and look upward; but it was the dread-
fulest sight that ever I saw. So when the battle
was over, Christian said, I will here give thanks to
him that delivered me out of the mouth of the lion,
to him that did help me against Apollyon.

Then there came to him a hand, with some of
the leaves of the tree of life, the which Christian
took, and applied to the wounds that he had re-
ceived in the battle, and was healed immediately.
He also sat down in that place to eat bread, and to
drink of the bottle that was given him a little be-
fore; so, being refreshed, he addressed himself to
his journey, with his sword drawn in his hand; for
he said, I know not but some other enemy may be
at hand. But he met with no other affront trom
Apollyon quite through this valley.

Now, at the end of this valley was another, called
the Valley of the Shadow of Death, and Christian
must needs go through it, because the way to the
Celestial City lay through the midst of it. Now,
this valley is a very solitary place. The prophet
Jeremiah thus describes it: A wilderness, a land of
deserts and of pits, a land of drought, and of the
shadow of death, a land that no man (but a Chris-
tian) passed through, and where no man dwelt.

Now here Christian was worse put to it than in
his fight with Apollyon: as you shall see.

I saw then in my dream, ‘that when Christian
was got to the borders of the Shadow of Death,
there met him two men, children of them that


ONE OF THE IMPS HISSED IN HIS EAR.
94 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

brought up an evil report of the good land, making
haste to go back; to whom Christian spake as
follows:

CHRISTIAN. Whither are you going?

Men. Back! back! and we would have you to do
so too, if life or peace is prized by you.

CurIsTIAN. Why, what’s the matter?

Men. Matter! we were going that way as you
are going, and went as far as we durst; and indeed
we were almost past coming back; for had we gone
a little farther we had not been here to bring the
news to thee.

CHRISTIAN. But what have you met with?

Men. Why, we were almost in the Valley of the
Shadow of Death; but that, by good hap, we looked
before us, and saw the danger before we came
to it.

CHRISTIAN. But what have you seen?

Men. Seen! Why, the Valley itself, which is as
dark as pitch; we also saw there the hobgoblins,
satyrs, and dragons of the pit; we heard also in
that Valley a continual howling and yelling, as of
a people.under unutterable misery, who there sat
bound in affliction and irons; and over that Valley
hang the discouraging clouds of confusion. Death
also doth always spread his wings over it. Ina
word, it is dreadful, being utterly without order.

CHRISTIAN. I perceive not yet, by what you have
said, but that this is my way to the desired haven.

Men. Be it thy way; we will not choose it for
ours. So they parted, and Christian went on his
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 95

way, but still with his sword drawn in his hand,
for fear lest he should be assaulted.

J saw then in my dream so far as this valley
reached, there was on the right hand a very deep
ditch; that ditch is it into which the blind have
led the blind in all ages, and both have there miser-
ably perished. Again, behold, on the left hand,
there was a very dangerous quag, into which, if
even a good man falls, he can find no bottom for
his foot to stand on. Into that quag king David
once did fall, and had no doubt therein been smoth-
ered, had not HE that is able plucked him out.

The pathway was here also exceedingly narrow,
and therefore good Christian was the more put to
it; for when he sought, in the dark, to shun the
ditch on the one hand, he was ready to tip over
into the mire on the other; also when he sought
to escape the mire, without great carefulness he
would be ready to fall into the ditch. Thus he
went on, and I heard him here sigh bitterly; for,
besides the dangers mentioned above, the pathway
was here so dark, that ofttimes, when he lift up
his foot to set forward, he knew not where or upon
what he should set it next.

About the midst of this valley, I perceived the
mouth of hell to be, and it stood also hard by the
way-side. Now, thought Christian, what shall I
do? And ever and anon the flame and smoke
would come out in such abundance, with sparks
and hideous noises (things that cared not for Chris-
tian’s sword, as did Apollyon before), that he was
96 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

forced to put up his sword, and betake himself to
another weapon called All-prayer. So he cried in
my hearing, O Lord, I beseech thee, deliver my
‘soul! Thus he went on a great while, yet still the
flames would be reaching towards him. Also he
heard doleful voices, and rushings to and fro, so
that sometimes he thought he should be torn in
pieces, or trodden down like mire in the streets.
This frightful sight was seen and these dreadful
noises were heard by him for several miles together;
and, coming to a place where he thought he heard
a company of fiends coming forward to meet him,
he stopped, and began to muse what he had best to
do. Sometimes he had half a thought to go back;
then again he thought he might be half way
through the valley; he remembered also how he
had already vanquished many a danger, and that
the danger of going back might be much more than
for to go forward; so he resolved to goon. Yet
the fiends seemed to come nearer and nearer; but
when they were come even almost at him, he cried
out with a most vehement voice, I will walk in the
strength of the Lord God! so they gave back, and
came no further.

One thing I would not let slip; I took notice that
now poor Christian was so confounded, that he did
not know his own voice; and thus I perceived it.
Just when he was come over against the mouth of
the burning pit, one of the wicked ones got behind
him, and stepped up softly to him, and whisperingly
suggested many grievous blasphemies to him, which


FAITHFUL CAME TO HELP HIM.
98 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

he verily thought had proceeded from his own mind.
This put Christian more to it than anything that
he met with before, even to think that he should
now blaspheme him that he loved so much before;
yet if he could have helped it, he would not have
done it; but he had not the discretion either to stop
his ears, or to know from whence these blasphemies
came.

When Christian had travelled in this disconsolate
condition some considerable time, he thought he
heard the voice of a man, as going before him, say-
ing, Though I walk through the valley of the
shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for thou art
with me.

Then he was glad, and that for these reasons:
First, Because he gathered from thence, that some
who feared God were in this valley as well as him-
self. Secondly, For that he perceived God was
with them, though in that dark and dismal state;
and why not, thought he, with me? though, by
reason of the impediment that attends this place,
I cannot perceive it. Thirdly, For that he hoped,
could he overtake them, to have company by and
by. So he went on, and called to him that was be-
fore; but he knew not what to answer; for that he
also thought himself to be alone. And by and by
the day broke; then said Christian, He hath turned
the shadow of death into the morning.

In this light, therefore, he came to the end of the
valley. Now I saw in my dream, that at the end
of this valley lay blood, bones, ashes, and mangled
THE PILGRIN’S PROGRESS. 99

bodies of men, even of pilgrims that had gone this
way formerly; and while I was musing what should
be the reason, I espied a little before me a cave,
where two giants, Pope and Pagan, dwelt in old
time; by whose power and tyranny the men whose
bones, blood, ashes, etc., lay there, were cruelly put
todeath. But by this place Christian went without
much danger, whereat I somewhat wondered; but
Ihave learnt since, that Pagan has been dead many
a day; and as for the other, though he be yet alive,
he is, by reason of age, and also of the many shrewd
brushes that he met with in his younger days,
grown so crazy and stiff in his joints, that he can
now do little more than sit in his cave’s mouth
grinning at pilgrims as they go by, and biting his
nails because he cannot come at them.

So I saw that Christian went on his way; yet,
at the sight of the Old Man that sat in the mouth
of the cave, he could not tell what to think, espe-
cially because he spake to them, though he could
_ not go after him, saying, You will never mend till
more of you be burned. But he held his peace, and
so went by and caught no hurt.

As he went on his way, he came to a little ascent,
which was cast up on purpose that pilgrims might
see before them. Up there, therefore, Christian
went, and looking forward, he saw Faithful before
him, upon his journey. Then said Christian aloud,
Ho! ho! Soho! stay, and I will be your companion!
At that, Faithful looked behind him; to whom
Christian cried again, Stay, stay, till I come up to
100 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

you. But Faithful answered, No, I am upon my
life, and the avenger of blood is behind me.

At this, Christian was somewhat moved, and
putting to all his strength, he quickly got up with
Faithful, and did also overrun him; so the last was
first. Then did Christian vain-gloriously smile,
because he had gotten the start of his brother; but
not taking good heed to his feet, he suddenly
stumbled and fell, and could not rise again until
Faithful came up to help him.

Then I saw in my dream they went very lovingly
on together, and had sweet discourse of all things
that had happened to them in their pilgrimage;
and thus Christian began: My honored and well-
beloved brother, Faithful, I am glad that I have
overtaken you; and that God has so tempered our
spirits, that we can walk in so pleasant a path.

FAITHFUL. I had thought to have had your com-
pany quite far from our town; but you did get the
start of me, wherefore I was forced to come thus
much of the way alone.

CHRISTIAN. How long did you stay in the City of
Destruction, before you set out after me?

FaituHrun. Till I could stay no longer; for there
was great talk presently after you were gone out,
that our city would in a short time, with fire from
heaven, be burned down to the ground.

CuristiAN. What! did your neighbors talk so?

FairHruu. Yes, it was in everybody’s mouth.

CHRISTIAN. What! and did no more of them but
you come out to escape the danger?
THE PILGRIN’S PROGRESS. ToL

FAITHFUL. Though there was, as I said, a great
talk thereabout, yet I do not think they did firmly
believe it. For in the heat of the discourse, I heard
some of them deridingly speak of you and of your
desperate journey (for so they called this your pil-
grimage), but I did believe, and do still, that the
end of our city will be with fire and brimstone from
above; and therefore I have made my escape.

CurisTian. Did you hear no talk of Pliable? -

FalrHFuL. Yes, Christian, I heard that he fol-
lowed you till he came at the Slough of Despond,
where, as some said, he fell in; but he would not
be known to have so done; but I am sure he was
soundly bedabbled with that kind of dirt.

CHRISTIAN. And what said the neighbors to him?

FaiTHFuL. He hath, since his going back, been
held greatly in derision, and that among all sorts of
people; some do mock and despise him; and scarce
will any set him on work. He is now worse than
if he had never gone out of the city.

CHRISTIAN. But why should they beso set against
him, since they also despise the way that he forsook?

FaITHFuL. Oh, they say, hang him, he is a turn-
coat! he was not true to his profession. I think
God has stirred up even his enemies to hiss at him,
because he hath forsaken the way.

CHRISTIAN. Had you no talk with him before you
came out?

FairHruu. I met him once in the streets, but he
leered away on the other side, as one ashamed of
what he had done; so I spake not to him.
102 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

CursTian. Well, at my first setting out, I had
hopes of that man; but now I fear he will perish in
the overthrow of the city; for it is happened to him
according to the true proverb, The dog 7s turned to
his own vomit again; and the sow that was washed,
to her wallowing in the mire.

FAITHFUL. These are my fears of him too; but
who can hinder that which will be?

CurIsTIAN. Well, neighbor Faithful, let us leave
him, and talk of things that more immediately
concern ourselves. Tell me now what you have
met with in the way as you came; for I know you
have met with some things, or else it may be writ
for a wonder.

FAITHFUL. J escaped the Slough that I perceived
you fell into, and got up to the gate without that
danger. When I came to the foot of the hill called
Difficulty, I met with a very aged man, who asked
me what I was, and whither bound. I told him
that I am a pilgrim, going to the Celestial City.
He said, Thou lookest like an honest fellow; wilt
thou be content to dwell with me for the wages that
Ishall give thee? Then I asked him his name, and
where he dwelt. Hesaid his name was Adam the
First, and that he dwelt in the town of Deceit. I
asked him then what was his work, and what the
wages that he would give. He told me, that his
work was many delights; and his wages, that I
should be his heir at last. I further asked him |
what house he kept, and what other servants he
had. So he told me, that his house was maintained
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 103

with all the dainties in the world; and that his ser-
vants were those of his own begetting. Then I
asked if he had any children. He said that he had
but three daughters: the Lust of the Flesh, the
Lust of the Eyes, and the Pride of Life, and that I
should marry them all if I would. Then I asked
how long time he would have me live with him?
And he told me, As long as he lived himself. At
first, I found myself somewhat inclined to go with
the man, but looking in his forehead I saw there
written, Put off the old man with his deeds.

Curistran. And how then?

FaitHruu. Then it came into my mind, whatever
he said, and however he flattered, when he got me
home to his house he would sell me for a slave. So
I bid him cease to talk, for I would not come near
the door of his house. He reviled me, and told me
that he would send suchaone after me, that should
make my way bitter to my soul. So I turned to
go away from him; but just as I turned myself to
go thence, I felt him take hold of my flesh, and
give me such a deadly twitch back, that I thought
he had pulled part of meafter himself. This made
me cry, Oh, wretched man! So I went on my way
up the hill. Now when I had got about half-way
up, I looked behind, and saw one coming after me,
swift as the wind; so he overtook me just about
the place where the settle stands.

CHRISTIAN. Just there did I sit down to rest me;
but being overcome with sleep, I there lost this roll
out of my bosom.
104 THE PILGRIN’S PROGRESS.

FAITHFUL. But, good brother, hear me out. So
- soon as the man overtook me, he was but a word
and a blow, for down he knocked me, and laid me
for dead. But when I was a little come to myself
again, I asked him wherefore he served me so.
He said, because of my secret inclining to Adam
the First: and with that he struck me another
deadly blow on the breast, and beat me down back-
ward; so I lay at his foot as dead as before. So,
when I came to myself again, I cried him mercy;
but he said, I know not how to show mercy; and
with that knocked me down again. He had doubt-
less made an end of me, but that one came by, and
bid him cease.

CurisTian. Who was that that bid him cease?

FattHrut. I did not know Him at first, but as he
went by, I perceived the holes in His hands and in
His side; then I concluded that He was our Lord.
So I went up the hill.

CHRISTIAN. That man that overtook you was
Moses. He spareth none, neither knoweth he how
to show mercy to those that transgress his law.

Farruruu. I know it very well; it was not the
first time that he has met with me. It was he that
came to me when I dwelt securely at home, and
that told me he would burn my house over my head
if I stayed there.

CHRISTIAN. But did you not see the house that
stood there on the top of the hill, on the side of
which Moses met you?

FartHFuu. Yes, and the lions too, before I came


ere



A MAN WHOSE NAME IS TALKATIVE.
106 . THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

at it: but for the lions, I think they were asleep,
for it was about noon; and because I had so much
of the day before me, I passed by the porter, and
came down the hill.

CuRISTIAN. He told me, indeed, that he saw you
go by, but I wished you had called at the house,
for they would have showed you so many rarities,
that you would scarce have forgot them to the day
of your death. But pray tell me, Did you meet
nobody in the Valley of Humility?

FairHruL. Yes, I met with one Discontent who
would willingly have persuaded me to go back
again with him; his reason was for that the valley
was altogether without honor. He told me, more-
over, that there to go was the way to disobey
all my friends, as Pride, Arrogancy, Self-conceit,
Worldly-glory, with others, who, he knew, as he
said, would be very much offended, if I made such
a fool of myself as to wade through this valley.

CHRISTIAN. Met you with nothing else in that
valley?

Fairuruu. Yes, I met with Shame; but of all the
men that I met with in my pilgrimage, he, I think,
bears the wrong name. The others would be said
nay, after a little argument, and somewhat else;
but this bold-faced Shame would never have done.

CuRISTIAN. Why, what did he say to you?

FaiTHruLt. What! why, he objected against re-
ligion itself; he said it was a pitiful, low, sneaking
business for a man to mind religion; he said that
a tender conscience was an unmanly thing; and
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 107

that for a man to watch over his words and ways,
so as to tie up himself from that hectoring liber-
ty that the brave spirits of the times accustom
themselves unto, would make him the ridicule of
the times. He objected also, that but few of the
mighty, rich, or wise, were ever of my opinion;
nor any of them neither, before they were persuaded
to be fools, and to be of a voluntary fondness, to
venture the loss of all, for nobody knows what.
He, moreover, objected the base and low estate and
condition of those that were chiefly the pilgrims, of
the times in which they lived; also their ignorance
and want of understanding in all natural science.

CHRISTIAN. I am glad, my brother, that thou didst
withstand this villain so bravely.

Fairuruu. I think we must cry to Him for help
against Shame, who would have us to be valiant
for the truth upon the earth. ,

CHRISTIAN. You say true; but did you meet no-
body else in that valley?

FarrHruu. No, not I; for I had sunshine all the
rest of the way through that, and also through the
Valley of the Shadow of Death.

CHRISTIAN. It was well for you. I am sure it
fared far otherwise with me; I had for a long sea-
son, as soon almost as I entered into that valley, a
dreadful combat with that foul fiend Apollyon; yea,
I thought verily he would have killed me, especially
when he got me down and crushed me under him,
as if he would have crushed me to pieces; for as he
threw me, my sword flew out of my hand; nay, he
108 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

told me he was sure of me: but I cried to God, and
He heard me, and delivered me out of all my
troubles. Then I entered into the Valley of the
Shadow of Death, and had no light for almost half
the way through it. I thought I should have been
killed there over and over; but at last day broke,
and the sun rose, and I went through that wich
was behind with far more ease and quiet.

Moreover, I saw in my dream, that as they went
on, Faithful, as he chanced to look on one side, saw
aman whose name is Talkative walking at a dis-
tance beside them; for in this place there was room
enough for them all to walk. He was a tall man,
and something more comely at a distance than at
hand. To this man Faithful addressed himself in
this manner:

FAITHFUL. Friend, are you going to the heavenly
country?

TALKATIVE. I am going to the same place.

FAITHFUL. That is well; then I hope we may have
your good company.

TALKATIVE. I shall be glad to be your companion.

FAITHFUL. Come on, then, and let us go together,
and let us spend our time in discoursing of things
that are profitable.

TALKATIVE. To talk of things that are good,to me
is very acceptable, with you or with any other; and
Tam glad that I have met with those that incline to
so good a work; for, to speak the truth, there are
but few that care thus to spend their time as they
are in their travels, but choose much rather to be


VANITY FAIR,
110 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

speaking of things to no profit; and this hath been
a trouble to me.

FAITHFUL. That is indeed a thing to be lamented ;
for what things so worthy of the use of the tongue
and mouth of men on earth as are the things of
the God of heaven?

TALKATIVE. I like you wonderful well, for your
sayings are full of conviction; and I will add, what
thing is so pleasant, and what so profitable, as to
talk of the things of God? What things so pleas-
ant (that is, if man hath any delight in things that
are wonderful)? For instance, if a man doth de-
light to talk of the history or the mystery of things;
or if a man doth love to talk of miracles, wonders,
or signs, where shall he find things recorded so
delightful, and so sweetly penned, as in the Holy
Scripture?

Fairurun. Thatis true; but to be profited by such
things in our talk should be that which we design.

TALKATIVE. That is it that I said; for to talk of
such things is most profitable; for by so doing a
man may get knowledge of many things: as of the
vanity of earthly things, and the benefit of things
above. Thus, in general, but more particularly by
this, a man may learn the necessity of the new
birth, the insufficiency of our works, the need of
Christ’s righteousness, etc. Besides, by this a man
may learn, by talk, what it is to repent, to believe,
to pray, to suffer, or the like; by this also a man
may learn what are the great promises and consola-
tions of the gospel, to his own comfort. Further,
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. lil

by this a man may learn to refute false opinions,
to vindicate the truth, and also to instruct the
ignorant.

FAITHFUL. All this is true, and glad am I to hear
these things from you.

TALKATIVE. Alas! the want of this is the cause
why so few understand the need of faith, and the
necessity of a work of grace in their soul, in order
to eternal life; but ignorantly live in the works of
the law, by which a man can by no means obtain
the kingdom of heaven.

FaiTHFuL. By your leave, heavenly knowledge of
these is the gift of God; no man obtaineth them by
human industry, or only by the talk of them.

TALKATIVE. All this I know very well; for a man
can receive nothing, except it be given him from
heaven; all is of grace, not of works. I could give
you a hundred scriptures to confirm this.

FarrHruL. Well, then, what is that one thing that
we shall at this time found our discourse upon?

TaLKativeE. What you will. Iwill talk of things
heavenly, or things earthly; things moral, or things
‘evangelical; things sacred, or things profane;
things past, or things to come; things foreign, or
things at home; things more essential, or circum-
stantial; provided that all be done to our profit.

Now did Faithful begin to wonder; and stepping
to Christian (for he walked all this while by him-
self), he said to him (but softly), What a brave
companion have we got! Surely this man will make
a very excellent pilgrim.
112 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

At this Christian modestly smiled, and said, This
man, with whom you are so taken, will beguile,
with that tongue of his, twenty of them that know
him not.

FaiTHrut. Do you know him then?

CHRISTIAN. Know him! Yes, better than he
knows himself.

FaiTHFuu. Pray, what is he?

CHRISTIAN. His name is Talkative; he dwelleth in
our town. I wonder that you should be a stranger
to him, only I consider that our town is large.

FalTHFuL. Whose son is he? And whereabout
does he dwell?

CHRISTIAN. He is the son of one Say-well; he
dwelt in Prating Row; and is known of all that are
acquainted with him by the name of Talkative in
Prating Row; and notwithstanding his fine tongue,
he is but a sorry fellow.

FaiTHFuu. But I am ready to think you do but
jest, because you smiled.

CuRisTIaAn. God forbid that I should jest (al-
though I smiled) in this matter, or that I should
accuse any falsely! I will give you a further dis-
covery of him. This man is for any company, and
for any talk; religion hath no place in his heart,
or house, or conversation; all he hath lieth in his
tongue, and his religion is to make a noise there-
with.

‘FAITHFUL. Say you so! then am I in this man
greatly deceived.

CHRISTIAN. Deceived you may be sure of it 3 Te-


THE JURY AT VANITY FAIR,
114 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

member the proverb, They say and do not. But
the kingdom of God is not in word, but in power.
He talketh of prayer, of repentance, of faith, and
of the new birth; but he knows but only to talk of
them. I have been in his family, and have observed
him both at home and abroad; and I know what I
say of him is the truth. His house is as empty of
religion as the white of an egg is of savor.
Fairurunt. Well, my brother, Iam bound to be-
lieve you; not only because you say you know him,
but also because, like a Christian, you make your
reports of men. For I cannot think that you speak
these things of ill-will, but because it is as you say.
CurIsTIAN. Had I known him no more than you,
I might perhaps have thought of him, as, at the
first, you did; yea, had he received this report at
their hands only that are enemies to religion, I
should have thought it had been a slander—a lot
that often falls from bad men’s mouths upon good
men’s names and professions; but all these things,
yea, and a great many more as bad, of my own
knowledge, I can prove him guilty of. Besides,
good men are ashamed of him; they can neither
all him brother nor friend; naming of him among
them makes them blush, if they know him. '
FairHru. Well, I see that saying and doing are
two things, and hereafter I shall better observe this
distinction.
Thus they went on talking of what they had seen
by the way, and so made that way easy which
would otherwise, no doubt, have been tedious to
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 115

them; for now they went through a wilderness.
Now, when they were got almost quite out of this
wilderness, Faithful chanced to cast his eye back,
and espied one coming after them, and he knew
him. Oh! said Faithful to his brother, Who comes
yonder? Then Christian looked, and said, It is my
good friend Evangelist. Ay, and my good friend
too, said Faithful, for it was he that set me the
way to the gate. Now was Evangelist come up to
them, and thus saluted them: Peace be with you,
dearly beloved; and peace be to your helpers.

CHRISTIAN. Welcome, my good Evangelist; the
sight of thy countenance brings to my remembrance
thy ancient kindness and unwearied laboring for
my eternal good.

FaIrHFuL. And a thousand times welcome. Thy
company, O sweet Evangelist, how desirable it is
to us poor pilgrims!

EVANGELIST. How hath it fared with you, my
friends, since the time of our last parting? What
have you met with, and how have you behaved
yourselves?

Then Christian and Faithful told him of all things
that had happened to them in the way; and how,
and with what difficulty, they had arrived to that
place.

EVANGELIST. Right glad am I, not that you have
met with trials, but that you have been victors;
and for that you have, notwithstanding many
weaknesses, continued in the way to this very day.

I say, right glad am I of this thing, and that for
116 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

mine own sake and yours. I have sowed, and you
have reaped: and the day is coming when both he
that sowed and they that reaped shall rejoice to-
gether; that is, if you hold out: for in due season
ye shall reap, if ye faint not. The crown is before
you, and it is an incorruptible one; so run that you
may obtain it. Some there be that set out for this
crown, and, after they have gone far for it, another
comes in and takes it from them; hold fast, there-
fore, that you have; let no man take your crown.

Then I saw in my dream, that when they were .
got out of the wilderness, they presently saw a town
before them, and the name of that town is Vanity;
and at the town there is a fair kept, called Vanity
Fair; it is kept all the year long; it beareth the
name of Vanity Fair, because the town where it is
kept is lighter than vanity; and also because all
that is there sold, or that cometh thither, is vanity.
As is the saying of the wise, all that cometh 7s
vanity. ;

This fair is no new-erected business, but a thing
of ancient standing; I will show you the original of
it. Almost five thousand years agone, there were
pilgrims walking to the Celestial City, as these two
honest persons are; and Beelzebub, Apollyon, and
Legion, with their companions, perceiving by the
path that the pilgrims made that their way to the
city lay through this town of Vanity, they contrived
here to set up a fair wherein should be sold all sorts
of vanity, and that it should last all the year long;
therefore at this fair are all such merchandise


BURNING AT THE STAKE,
118 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

sold as houses, lands, trades, places, honors, prefer-
ments, titles, countries, kingdoms, lusts, pleasures,
and delights of all sorts; as wives, husbands, chil-
dren, masters, servants, lives, blood, bodies, souls,
silver, gold, pearls, precious stones, and what not.

And, moreover, at this fair there is at all times
to be seen juggling, cheats, games, plays, fools,
apes, knaves, and rogues, and that of every kind.
Here are to be seen, too, thefts, murders, false swear-
ers, and that of a blood-red color.

And as in other fairs of less moment, there are
several rows and streets, under their proper names,
where such and such wares are vended; so here
likewise you have the proper places, rows, streets
(viz., countries and kingdoms), where the wares of
this fair are soonest to be found. Here is the
Britain Row, the French Row, the Italian Row, the
Spanish Row, the German Row, where several sorts
of vanities are to be sold. But, as in other fairs,
some one commodity is as the chief of all the fair,
so the ware of Rome and her merchandise is greatly
promoted in this fair; only our English nation, with
some others, have taken a dislike thereat.

Now, as I said, the way to the Celestial City lies
just through this town where this lusty fair is kept;
and he that will go to the City, and yet not go
through this town, must needs go out of the world.
The Prince of princes himself, when here, went
through this town to his own country, and that
upon a fair day too; yea, and as I think, it was
Beelzebub, the chief lord of this fair, that invited
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 119

him to buy of his vanities; yea, would have made
him lord of the fair, would he but have done him
‘reverence as he went through the town. Yea, be-
cause he was such a person of honor, Beelzebub had
him from street to street, and showed him all the
kingdoms of the world in a little time, that he
might, if possible, allure the Blessed One to cheapen
and buy some of his vanities; but he had no mind
to the merchandise, and therefore left the town,
without laying out so much as one farthing upon
these vanities. This fair, therefore, is an ancient
thing, of long standing, and a very great fair.
Now these pilgrims, as I said, must needs go through
this fair. Well, so they did: but, behold, even as
they entered into the fair, all the people in the fair
were moved, and the town itself as it were in a
hubbub about them. :

One chanced mockingly to say unto them, What
will yebuy? . But they answered, We buy the truth.
At that there was an occasion taken to despise the
men the more; some mocking, some taunting, some
speaking reproachfully, and some calling upon oth-
ers tosmite them. At last things came to a hub-
bub and a great stir in the fair, insomuch that all
order was confounded. Now was word presently
brought to the great one of the fair, who quickly
came down and deputed some of his most trusty
friends to take these men into examination, about
whom the fair was almost overturned. So the men
were brought to examination; and they that sat
upon them, asked them whence they came, whither
120 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

they went, and what they did there, in such an un-
usual garb. The men told them that they were
pilgrims and strangers in the world, and that they
were going to their own country, which was the
heavenly Jerusalem; and that they had given no
occasion to the men of the town thus to abuse
them, and to let them in their journey, except it
was for that, when one asked them what they
would buy, they said they would buy the truth.
But they that were appointed to examine them did
not believe them to be any other than bedlams and
mad, or else such as came to put all things into
a confusion in the fair. Therefore they took them
and beat them, and besmeared them with dirt, and
put them into the cage, that they might be made a
spectacle to all the men of the fair.

There, therefore, they lay for some time, and
were made the objects of any man’s sport or malice
or revenge, the great one of the fair laughing still
at allthat befell them. But the men being patient,
and not rendering railing for railing, but contrari-
wise, blessing, and giving good words for bad, and
kindness for injuries done, some men in the fair
that were more observing, and less prejudiced than
the rest, began to check and blame the baser sort
for their continual abuses done by them to the men;
they, therefore, in angry manner, let fly at them
again, counting them as bad as the men in the cage,
and telling them that they seemed confederates and
should be made partakers of their misfortunes. The
others replied, that for aught they could see, the


HOPEFUL JOINS HIM.
122 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

men were quiet, and sober, and intended nobody
any harm; and that there were many that traded
in their fair that were more worthy to be put into
the cage, yea, and pillory too, than were the men
they had abused. Thus, after divers words had
passed on both sides, the men behaving themselves
all the while very wisely and soberly before them,
they fell to some blows among themselves; and did
harm one to another. Then were these two poor
men brought before their examiners again, and there
charged as being guilty of the late hubbub that had
been in the fair. So they beat them pitifully, and
hanged irons upon them, and led them in chains
up and down the fair, for an example and a terror
to others, lest any should speak in their behalf, or
join themselves unto them. But Christian and
Faithful behaved themselves yet more wisely, and
received the ignominy and shame that was cast
upon them with so much meekness and patience
that it won to their side, though but few in com-
parison of the rest, several of the men in the fair.
This put the other party yet into greater rage, inso-
much that they concluded the death of these two
men. Wherefore they threatened, that the cage
nor irons should serve their turn, but that they
should die, for the abuse they had done, and for
deluding the men of the fair.

Then were they remanded to the cage again,
until further order should be taken with them. So
they put them in, and made their feet fast in the
stocks.
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 123

Here, therefore, they called again to mind what
they had heard from their faithful friend Evangel-
ist, and were the more confirmed in their way and
sufferings by what he told them would happen to
them. They also now comforted each other, that
whose lot it was to suffer, even he should have the
best of it; therefore each man secretly wished that
he might have that preferment: but committing
themselves to the all-wise disposal of Him that ruleth
all things, with much content, they abode in the
condition in which they were until they should be
otherwise disposed of.

Then a convenient time being appointed, they
brought them forth to their trial, in order to their
condemnation. When the time was come, they
were brought before their enemies and arraigned.
The judge’s name was Lord Hate-good. Their in-
dictment was one and the same in substance, though
somewhat varying in form, the contents whereof
were this:—

That they were enemies to and disturbers of
their trade; that they had made commotions and
divisions in the town, and had won a party to their
own most dangerous opinions, in contempt of the
law of their prince.

Then Faithful began to answer that he had only
set himself against that which hath set itself against
him that is higher than the highest. And, said he,
as for disturbance, I make none, being myself a
man of peace; the parties that were won to us,
were won by beholding our truth and innocence,
124 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

and they are only turned from the worse to the
better. And as to the king you talk of, since he is
Beelzebub, the enemy of our Lord, I defy him and
all his angels.

Then proclamation was made, that they that had

aught to say for their lord the king against the
prisoner at the bar, should forthwith appear and
give in their evidence. So there came in three wit-
nesses, to wit, Envy, Superstition, and Pickthank.
They were then asked if they knew the prisoner at
the bar; and what they had to say for their lord the
king against him.
. Then stood forth Envy, and said to this effect:
My Lord, I have known this man a long time, and
will attest upon my oath that he is one of the vilest
men in our country. He neither regardeth prince
nor people, law nor custom; but doth all that he can
to possess all men with certain of his disloyal notions,
which he in the general calls principles of faith and
holiness. And, in particular, I heard him once
myself affirm that Christianity and the customs of
our town of Vanity could not be reconciled. By
which saying, my Lord, he doth at once not only
condemn all our laudable doings, but us in the
doing of them.

Then they called Superstition, and bid him look
upon the prisoner. They also asked what he could
say for their lord the king against him.

Superstition. My Lord, I have no great acquaint-
ance with this man, but I know that he is a very
pestilent fellow, from some discourse I had with


AS THEY CAME UP, HE MADE THEM A LOW BOW.
126 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

him in this town; for then, talking with him, I
heard him say that our religion was naught, and
such by which a man could by no means please God.

Then was Pickthank bid to say what he knew, in
behalf of their lord the king, against the prisoner
at the bar.

PickTHANK. My Lord, and you gentlemen all, this
fellow [have known of a long time, and have heard
him speak things that ought not to bespoke; for he
hath railed on our noble prince Beelzebub, and hath
spoken contemptibly of his honorable friends, and
all the rest of our nobility; and he hath said that
if all men were of his mind, if possible, there is
none of these noblemen should have any longer a
being in this town. Besides, he hath not been
afraid to rail on you, my Lord, who are now ap-
pointed to be his judge, calling you an ungodly
villain, with many other such like vilifying terms,
with which he hath bespattered most of the gentry
of our town.

When this Pickthank had told his tale, the Judge
directed his speech to the prisoner at the bar, say-
ing, Thou runagate, heretic, and traitor, hast thou
heard what these honest gentlemen have witnessed
against thee?

FaiTHFuL. May I speak a few words in my own
defence?

JUDGE. Sirrah! thou deservest to live no longer,
but to be slain immediately upon the place; yet,
that all men may see our gentleness towards thee,
let us hear what thou, vile runagate, hast to say.
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 127

FaITHFUL. 1. Isay, then, in answer to what Envy
hath spoken, I never said aught but this, That what
rule, or laws, or customs, or people, were flat
against the Word of God, are diametrically opposite
to Christianity. If I have said amiss in this, con-
vince me of my error, and I am ready hore before
you to make my recantation.

2. As to the second, to wit, Superstition, and his
charge against me, I said only this, That in the
worship of God there is required a Divine faith; but
there can be no Divine faith without a Divine rev-
elation of the will of God. Therefore, whatever is
thrust into the worship of God that is not agreeable
to Divine revelation, cannot be done but by a human
faith, which faith will not be profitable to eternal
life.

3. As to what Pickthank hath said, I say that
the prince of this town, with all the rabblement, his
attendants, by this gentleman named, are more fit
for a being in hell than in this town and country:
and so, the Lord have mercy upon me!

Then the Judge called to the jury, Gentlemen of
the jury, you see this man about whom so great an
uproar hath been made in this town. You have
also heard what these worthy gentlemen have wit-
nessed against him. Also you have heard his reply
and confession. It lieth now in your breasts to
hang him or save his life; but yet I think meet to
instruct you into our law.

There was an Act made in the days of Pharaoh
the Great, servant to our prince, that lest those of
128 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

a contrary religion should multiply and grow too
strong for him, their males should be thrown into
the river. There was also an Act made in the days
of Nebuchadnezzar the Great, another of his serv-
ants, that whosoever would not fall down and wor-
ship his golden image, should be thrown into a fiery
furnace. There was also an Act made in the days
of Darius, that whoso, for some time, called upon
any god but him, should be cast into the lions’ den.
Now the substance of these laws this rebel has
broken, not only in thought (which is not to be
borne), but also in word and deed; which must
therefore needs be intolerable.

For that of Pharaoh, his law was made upon a
supposition, to prevent mischief, no crime being yet
apparent; but here is a crime apparent. For the
second and third, you see he disputeth against our
religion; and for the treason he hath confessed, he
deserveth to die the death.

Then went the jury out, whose names were,
Blind-man, No-good, Malice, Love-lust, Live-loose,
Heady, High-mind, Enmity, Liar, Cruelty, Hate-
light, and Implacable; who every one gave in his
private verdict against him among themselves, and
afterward unanimously concluded to bring him in
guilty before the Judge. And first, among them-
selves, Blind-man, the foreman, said, I see clearly
that this man is a heretic. Then said No-good,
Away with such a fellow from the earth. Ay, said
Malice, for I hate the very looks of him. Then said
Love-lust, I could never endure him. ~ Nor I, said

4


THEY COULD NOT TELL WHAT TO MAKE THEREOF.
130 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

Live-loose, for he would always be condemning my
way. Hang him, hang him, said Heady. A sorry
scrub, said High-mind. My heart riseth against
him, said Enmity. He is a rogue, said Liar.
Hanging is too good for him, said Cruelty. Let us
despatch him out of the way, said Hate-light.
Then said Implacable, Might I have all the world
given me, I could not be reconciled to him; there-
fore ‘let us forthwith bring him in guilty of death.
And so they did; therefore he was presently
condemned to be had from the place where he
was, to the place from whence he came, and there
to ‘be put to the most cruel death that could be
invented. ,

They, ‘therefore, brought him out, to do with

him according to their law; and, first, they scourged
him, then they buffeted him, then they lanced his
flesh with knives; after that, they stoned him with
stones, then pricked him with their swords; and,
last of-all, they burned him to ashes at the stake.
Thus came Faithful to his end.
_ Now I saw that there stood behind the multitude
a chariot and a couple of horses, waiting for Faith-
ful, who (so soon as his adversaries had despatched
him) was taken up into it, and straightway was
carried up through the clouds, with sound of
trumpet, the nearest way to the celestial gate.

But as for Christian, he had some respite, and
was remanded back toprison. Sohe there remained
for a space; but He that overrules all things, having
the power of their rage in His own hand, so wrought
THE PILGRIM’S PORGRESS. 131

it about that Christian for that time escaped them,
and went his way.

Now I saw in my dream that Christian went not
forth alone, for there was one whose name was
Hopeful (being made so by the beholding of Chris-
tian and Faithful in their words and behavior, in
their sufferings at the fair), who joined himself unto
him, and, entering into a brotherly covenant, told
him that he would be his companion. Thus, one
died to bear testimony to the truth, and another
rises out of his ashes, to be a companion with Chris-
tian in his pilgrimage. This Hopeful also told
Christian that there were many more of the men in
the fair, that would take their time and follow after.

So I saw that quickly after they were got out of
the fair, they overtook one that was going before
them, whose name was By-ends: so they said to
him, What countryman, Sir? and how far go you
this way? He told them that he came from the
town of Fair-speech, and he was going to the Celes-
tial City, but told them not his name.

CHRISTIAN. From Fair-speech! Is there any good
that lives there?

By-Enps. Yes, I hope.

CHRISTIAN. Pray, Sir, what may I call you?

By-ENps. I am a stranger to you, and you to me:
if you be going this way, I shall be glad of your
company; if not, I must be content.

CHRISTIAN. This town of Fair-speech, I have heard
of; and, as I remember, they say, it is a wealthy
place.
182 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

By-Enps. Yes, I will assure you that it is; and I
have very many rich kindred there.

CHRISTIAN. Pray, who are your kindred there?

By-EnpDs. Almost the whole town. ;

CHRISTIAN. Are you a married man?

By-ENnpDs. Yes, and my wife was my Lady Feign-
ing’s daughter, therefore she came of a very honor-
able family, and is arrived to such a pitch of breed-
ing, that she knows how to carry it to all, even to
prince and peasant. It is true we somewhat differ
in religion from those of the stricter sort, yet but
in two small points: first, we never strive against
wind and tide; secondly, we are always most zeal-
ous when religion goes in his silver slippers; we
love much to walk with him in the street, if the sun
shines, and the people applaud him.

Then Christian stepped a little aside to his fellow,
Hopeful, saying, It runs in my mind that this is
one By-ends of Fair-speech; and if it be he, we have
as very a knave in our company as dwelleth in all
these parts. Then said Hopeful, Ask him; me-
thinks he should not be ashamed of his name. So
Christian came up with him again, and said, Sir,
you talk as if you knew something more than all
the world doth; and if I take not my mark amiss,

‘I deem I have half a guess of you: Is not your name
By-ends of Fair-speech?

By-gEnps. This is not my name, but indeed it is a
nickname that is given me by some that cannot abide
me: and I must be content to bear it as a reproach,
as other good men have borne theirs before me.


GIANT DESPAIR.
134 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

CHRISTIAN. But did you never give an occasion to
men to call you by this name?

By-ENnps. Never! The worst that ever I did to
give them an occasion to give me this name was,
that I had always the luck to jump in my judg-
ment with the present way of the times, whatever
it was, and my chance was to get thereby; but if
things are thus cast upon me, let me count them a
blessing; but let not the malicious load me there-
fore with reproach.

CurisTiaNn. I thought, indeed, that you were the
man that I heard of; and to tell you what I think,
I fear this name belongs to you more properly than
you are willing we should think it doth.

By-ENDs. Well, if you will thus imagine, I can-
not help it; you shall find me a fair company -keep-
er, if you will still admit me your associate.

Curistian. If you will go with us, you must go
against wind and tide; the which, I perceive, is
against your opinion; you must also own Religion
in his rags, as well as when in his silver slippers;
and stand by him, too, when bound in irons, as well
as when he walketh the streets with applause.

By-EnDs. You must not try to lord it over my
faith; leave me to my liberty, and let me go with
you.

CHRISTIAN. Not a step farther, unless you will do
in what I propound as we shall do.

By-ENDS. I shall never desert my old principles,
since they are harmless and profitable. If I may
not go with you, I must do as I did before you over-
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 135

took me, even go by myself, until some overtake
me that will be glad of my company.

Now I saw in my dream that Christian and
Hopeful forsook him, and kept their distance before
him; but one of them looking back, saw three men
following by By-ends, and behold, as they came up
with him, he made them a very low bow; and they
also gave him a compliment. The men’s names
were Hold-the-world, Money-love, and Save-all;
_ men that By-ends had formerly been acquainted
with; for in their minority they were school-fellows,
and were taught by one Gripe-man, a school-master
in Love-gain, which is a market town in the county
of Coveting, in the north. This schoolmaster
taught them the art of getting, either by violence,
flattery, lying, or by putting on a guise of religion;
and these four gentlemen had attained much of the
art of their master, so that they could each of them
have kept such a school themselves.

Well, when they had, as I said, thus saluted each
other, Money-love said to By-ends, Who are they
upon the road before us (for Christian and Hope-
ful were yet within view) ?

By-gnps. They are a couple of far countrymen,
that, after their mode, are going on pilgrimage.

MoNnEY-LOVE. Alas! Why did they not stay, that
we might have their good company? for they, and
we, and you, Sir, I hope, are all going on a pil-
grimage.

By-EnpDs. We are so, indeed; but the men before
us are so rigid, and love so much of their own
136 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

notions, and do also so lightly esteem the opinions
of others, that let a man be never so godly, yet if
he jumps not with them in all things, they thrust
him quite out of their company.

SAVE-ALL. That is bad, but we read of some that
are righteous overmuch; and such men’s rigidness
prevails with them to judge and condemn all but
themselves. But, I pray, what, and how many,
were the things wherein you differed?

By-Enps. Why, they, after their headstrong
manner, conclude that it is their duty to rush on
their journey all weathers; and I am for waiting
for wind and tide. They are for hazarding all for
God at aclap; and I am for taking all advantages
to secure my life and estate. They are for holding
their notions, though all other men are against
them; but I am for religion in what, and so far as
the times, and my safety, will bear it. They are
for Religion when in rags and contempt; but I am
for him when he walks in his golden slippers, in the
sunshine, and with applause.

HOLD-THE-WoORLD. Ay, and hold you thero still,
good By-ends; for, for my part, I can count him
but a fool that, having the liberty to keep what he
has, shall be so unwise as to lose it. Let us be
wise as serpents; it is best to make hay when the
sun shines; you see how the bee lieth still all winter,
and bestirs her only when she can have profit with
pleasure. God sends sometimes rain, and some-
times sunshine; if they be such fools to go through
the first, yet let us be content to take fair weather
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 17

along with us. For my part, I like that religion
best that will stand with the security of God’s good
blessings unto us: for who can imagine, that is
ruled by his reason, since God has bestowed upon
us the good things of this life, but that He would
have us keep them for His sake? Abraham and
Solomon grew rich in religion. And Job says that
a good man shall lay up goldas dust. But he must
not be such as the men before us, if they be as you
have described them.

SavE-ALL. I think that we are all agreed in this
matter, and therefore there needs no more words
about it.

Monry-Love. No, there needs no more words
about this matter, indeed; for he that believes
neither Scripture nor reason (and you see we have
both on our side), neither knows his own liberty
nor seeks his own safety.

Christian and Hopeful went on till they came at
a delicate plain called Ease, where they went with
much content; but that plain was but narrow, so
they were quickly got over it. Now at the farther
side of that plain was a hill called Lucre, and in
that hill a silver mine, which some of them that
had formerly gone that way, because of the rarity
of it, had turned aside to see; but going too near
the brink of the pit, the ground being deceitful
under them, broke, and they were slain; some also
had been maimed there, and could not, to their
dying day, be their own men again.

Then I saw in my dream, that a little off the
138 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

road, over against the silver mine, stood Demas
(gentleman-like) to call to passengers to come and
see; who said to Christian and his fellow, Ho! turn
aside hither, and I will show you a thing.

CurisTiAN. What thing so deserving as to turn
us out of the way to see it?

Demas. Here is a silver mine, and some digging
in it for treasure. If you will come, with a little
pains you may richly provide for yourselves.

Hopervut. Let us go see.

CurisTiAN. Not I, I have heard of this place be-
fore now; and how many have there been slain;
and besides that, treasure is a snare to those that
seek it; for it hindereth them in their pilgrimage.
Then Christian called to Demas, saying, Is not the
place dangerous? Hath it not hindered many in
their pilgrimage?

Demas. Not except to those that are careless.

CurisTIAN. Let us not stir a step, but still keep
on our way.

Hoperuu. I will warrant you, when By-ends
comes up, if he hath the same invitation as we, he
will turn in thither to see.

CurisTIAN. No doubt thereof, for his principle:
lead him that way, and a hundred to one but he
dies there.

Demas. But will you not come over and see?

CHRISTIAN. Demas, thou art an enemy to the right
ways of the Lord of this way, and hast been al-
ready condemned for thine own turning aside, by
one of His Majesty’s judges; and why seekest thou
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 139

to bring us into the like condemnation? Besides,
if we at all turn aside, our Lord the King will cer-
tainly hear thereof, and will there put us to shame,
where we would stand with boldness before Him.

Demas cried again that he also was one of their
fraternity ; and that if they would tarry a little, he
also himself would walk with them.

CurisTiAn. What is thy name? Is it not the
same by the which I have called thee?

Demas. Yes, my name is Demas; I am the son
of Abraham.

CHRISTIAN. I know you; Gehazi was your great-
grandfather, and Judas your father; and you have
trod in their steps. It is but a devilish prank that
thou usest; thy father was hanged for a traitor,
and thou deservest no better reward. Assure thy-
self, that when we come to the King, we will tell
Him of thy behavior. Thus they went their way.

By this time. By-ends and his companions were
come again within sight, and they, at the first beck,
went over to Demas. Now, whether they fell into
the pit by looking over the brink thereof, or whether
they went down to dig, or whether they were
smothered in the bottom by the damps that com-
monly arise, of these things I am not certain; but
this I observed, that they never were seen again
in the way.

Now I saw that, just on the other side of this
plain, the pilgrims came to a place where stood an
old monument, hard by the highway side, at the
sight of which they were both concerned, because
140 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

of the strangeness of the form thereof; for it
seemed to them as if it had been a woman trans-
formed into the shape of a pillar; here therefore
they stood looking, and looking upon it, but could
not for a time tell what they should make thereof.
At last Hopeful espied, written above the head
thereof, a writing in an unusual hand; but he, be-
ing no scholar, called to Christian (for he was
learned) to see if he could pick out the meaning; so
he came, and after a little laying of letters together,
he found the same to be this, Remember Lot’s wife.
So he read it to his fellow; after which they both
concluded that that was the pillar of salt into
which Lot’s wife was turned, for her looking back
with a covetous heart, when she was going from
Sodom for safety.

I saw, then, that they went on their way to a
pleasant river; which David the king called the
river of God, but John, the river of the water of
life. Now their way lay just upon the bank of the
river; here, therefore, Christian and his companion
walked with great delight; they drank also of the
water of the river, which was pleasant and enliven-
ing to their weary spirits: besides, on the banks of
this river, on either side, were green trees, that
bore all manner of fruit; and the leaves of the trees
were good for medicine; with the fruit of these
trees they werealso much delighted; and the leaves
they ate to prevent surfeits and other diseases that
are incident to those that heat their blood by travels.
On either side of the river was also a meadow, curi-


THEY CONTINUED IN THEIR DOLEFUL CONDITION,
142 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

ously beautified with lilies, and it was green all the
year long. In this‘meadow they lay down, and
slept; for here they might lie down safely. When
they awoke, they gathered again of the fruit of the
trees, and drank again of the water of the river,
and then lay down again to sleep. Thus they did
several days and nights. When they were disposed
to go on (for they were not, as yet, at their jour-
ney’s end) they ate and drank, and departed.

Now, I beheld in my dream, that they had not
journeyed far, but the river and the way for a time
parted; at which they were not a little sorry; yet
they durst not go out of the way. Now the way
from the river was rough, and their feet tender, by
reason of their travels; so the souls of the pil-
grims were much discouraged because of the way.
Wherefore, still as they went on, they wished for a
better way. Now, a little before them, there was
on the left hand of the road a meadow, and a stile
to go over into it; and that meadow is called By-
path Meadow. Thensaid Christian, If this meadow
lieth along by our wayside, let us go over into it.

Then he went to the stile to see, and behold, a
path lay along by the way, on the other side of the
fence. It is according to my wish, said Christian.
Here is the easiest going; come, good Hopeful, and
let us go over.

HoperuL. But how if this path should lead us out
of the way?

CHRISTIAN. That is not like. Look, doth -it not
go along by the wayside? So Hopeful, being per-
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 143

suaded by his fellow, went after him over the
stile. When they were gone over, and were got
into the path, they found it very easy for their
feet; and withal, they, looking before them, espied
aman walking as they did, and his name was Vain-
confidence; so they called after him, and asked him
whither that way led. He said, To the Celestial
Gate. Look, said Christian, did not I tell you so?
By this you may see we are right. So they fol-
lowed, and he went before them. But, behold, the
night came on, and it grew very dark; so that they
that were behind lost the sight of him that went
before.

He, therefore, that went before (Vain-confidence
by name), not seeing the way before him, fell into
a deep pit, which was on purpose there made, by
the Prince of those grounds, to catch vain-glorious
fools withal, and was dashed in pieces with his fall.

Now Christian and his fellow heard him fall. So
they called to know the matter, but there was none
to answer, only they heard a groaning. Then said
Hopeful, Where are we now? Then was his fellow
silent, as mistrusting that he had led him out of the
way; and now it began to rain, and thunder, and
lighten in a very dreadful manner; and the water
rose amain. Then Hopeful groaned in himself,
saying, Oh, that I had kept on my way!

Curistian. Who could have thought that this
path should have led us out of the way?

Hoprrut. I was afraid on it at the very first, and
therefore gave you that gentle caution. I would
144 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

have spoken plainer, but that you are older than I.
CuRIstian. Good brother, be not offended; I am
sorry I have brought thee out of the way, and that
I have put thee into such danger; pray, my brother,
forgive me; I did not do it of an evil intent.

HoperuL. Be comforted, my brother, for I forgive
thee; and I believe, too, that this shall be for our
good.

CHRISTIAN. I am glad I have with me a merciful
brother ;.but we must not stand thus: let us try to
go back again.

Hopervuu. But, good brother, let me go before.

CHRISTIAN. No, if you please, let me go first, that
if there be any danger I may be first therein, he-
cause by my means we are both gone out of the way.

Hoperuu. No, you shall not go first; for your
mind being troubled may lead you out of the way
again. Then, for their encouragement, they heard
the voice of one saying, Set thine. heart toward
the highway, even the way which thou went-
est; turn again. But by this time the waters were
greatly risen, by reason of which the way of going
back was very dangerous. (Then I thought that
it is easier going out of the way, when we are
in, than going in when we are out.) Yet they
ventured to go back, but it was dark, and the flood
was so high, that in their going back they had like
to have been drowned.

Neither could they, with all the skill they had,
get again to the stile that night. Wherefore, at
last, lighting under a little shelter, they sat down


IN THREATENING LANGUAGE THEY BID HIM STAND.
146 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

there until the day-break; but, being weary, they
fell asleep. Now there was, not far from the place
where they lay, a castle called Doubting Castle, the
owner whereof was Giant Despair; and it was in
his grounds they now were sleeping; wherefore he;
getting up in the morning early, and walking up
and down in his fields, caught Christian and Hope-
ful asleep in his grounds. Then, with a grim and
surly voice, he bid them awake; and asked them
wheuce they were, and what they did in his ground.
They told him they were pilgrims, and that they
had lost their way. Then said the Giant, You have
this night trespassed on me, by trampling in, and
lying on my grounds, and therefore you must go
along with me. So they were forced to go, because
he wasstronger than they. They also had but little
to say, for they knew themselves in a fault. The
Giant, therefore, drove them before him, and put
them into his castle, into a very dark dungeon,
nasty and stinking to the spirits of these two men.
Here, then, they lay from Wednesday morning till
Saturday night, without one bit of bread, or drop of
drink, or light, or any to ask how they did; they
were, therefore, here in evil case, and were far from
friends and acquaintance. Now in this place Chris-
tian had double sorrow, because it was through his
counsel that they were brought into this distress.
Now, Giant Despair had a wife, and her name
was Diffidence. So when he was gone to bed, he
told his wife what he had done; to wit, that he had
taken a couple of prisoners and cast them into his
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 147

dungeon, for trespassing on his grounds. Then he
asked her also what he had best to do to them. So
she asked him what they were, whence they came,
and whither they were bound; and he told her.
Then she counselled that he should beat them with-
out any mercy. So, when he arose, he getteth him
a crab-tree cudgel, and goes down into the dungeon
to them, and falls upon them, and beats them fear-
fully, in such sort that they were not able to help
themselves, or to turn them upon the floor. This
done, he leaves them, there to condole their misery,
and to mourn under their distress. So all that day
they spent the time in sighsand lamentations. The
next night, she, talking with her husband, and
understanding they were yet alive, did advise him
to counsel them to make away with themselves.
So when morning was come, he goes to them ina
surly manner as before, and perceiving them to be
very sore with the stripes that he had given them
the day before, he told them, that since they were
never likely to come out of that place, their only
way would be forthwith to make an end of them-
selves, either with knife, halter, or poison, for why,
said he, should you choose life, seeing it is attended
with so much bitterness? But they desired him to
let them go. With that he looked ugly upon them,
and, rushing to them, had doubtless made an end
of them himself, but that he fell into one of his fits
and lost for a time the use of his hands; wherefore
he left them as before, to consider what todo. Then
did the prisoners consult between themselves,
148 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

whether it was the best to take his counsel or no;
and thus they began to discourse :—

CHRISTIAN. Brother, what shall we do? The life
that we now live ismiserable. For my part I know
not whether is best, to live thus, or to die out of
hand. My soul chooseth strangling rather than
life, and the grave is more easy for me than this
dungeon. Shall we be ruled by the Giant?

HopeFrvu.. Indeed, our present condition is dread-
ful, and death would be far more welcome to me
than thus forever to abide; but yet, let us consider,
the Lord of the country to which we are going hath
said, Thou shalt do no murder; no, not to another
man’s person; much more, then, are we forbidden
to take his counsel to kill ourselves. Besides, he
that kills another can but commit murder upon his
body; but for one to kill himself is to kill body and
soul at once. And, moreover, my brother, thou
talkest of ease inthe grave; but hast thou forgotten
the hell, whither for certain the murderers go? For
no murderer hath eternal life, etc. And let us
consider, again, that all the law is not in the hand
of Giant Despair. Others, so far as I can under-
stand, have been taken by him, as well as we; and
yet have escaped out of his hand. Who knows but
that God that made the world may cause that Giant
Despair may die? or that, at some time or other,
he may forget to lock us in? or that he may, in a
short time, have another of his fits before us, and
may lose the use of his limbs? and if ever that
should come to pass again, for my part, I am re-
THE PILGRIMS PROGRESS. 149

solved to pluck up the heart of a man, and to try
my utmost to get from under his hand. I was a
fool that I did not try to do it before; but, however,
my brother, let us be patient and endure a while.
The time may come that may give up a happy re-
lease; but let us not be our own murderers. With
these words, Hopeful at present did moderate the
mind of his brother; so they continued together (in
the dark) that day, in their sad and doleful condition.

Well, toward evening, the Giant goes down into
the dungeon again, to see if his prisoners had taken
his counsel; but when he came there he found them
alive; and truly, alive was all; for now, what for
want of bread and water, and by reason of the
wounds they received when he beat them, they could
do little but breathe. But, I say, he found them
alive; at which he fell into a rage, and. told them
that, seeing they had disobeyed his counsel, it should
be worse with them than if they had never been born.

At this they trembled greatly, and I think that
Christian fell into a swoon; but, coming a little to
himself again, they renewed their discourse about
the Giant’s counsel; and whether yet they had best
to take it orno. Now Christian again seemed to
be for doing it, but Hopeful made his second reply
as followeth:

Hoperuu. My brother, said he, rememberest thou
not how valiant thou hast been heretofore? Apol-
lyon could not crush thee, nor could all that thou
didst hear, or see, or feel in the Valley of the
Shadow of Death. What hardship, terror, and
150 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

amazement hast thou already gone through! And
art thou now nothing but fear! Thou seest that I
am in the dungeon with thee, a far weaker man by
nature than thou art; also, this Giant has wounded
me as well as thee, and hath also cut off the bread
and water from my mouth; and with thee I mourn
without the light. But let us exercise a little more
patience: remember how thou playedst the man at
Vanity Fair, and wast neither afraid of the chain,
nor cage, nor yet of bloody death. Wherefore let
us (at least to avoid the shame, that becomes not a
Christian to be found in) bear up with patience as
well as we can.

Now, night being come again, and the Giant and
his wife being in bed, she asked him concerning the
prisoners, and if they had taken his counsel. To
which he replied, They are sturdy rogues, and choose
rather to bear all hardships, than to make away
with themselves. Then said she, Take them into
the castle-yard to-morrow, and show them the bones
and skulls of those that thou hast already despatched,
and make them believe, ere a week comes to an end,
thou also wilt tear them in pieces, as thou hast done
their fellows before them.

So when the morning was come, the Giant goes
to them again, and takes them into the castle-yard,
and shows them, as his wife had biddenhim. These,
said he, were pilgrims as you are, once, and they
trespassed in my grounds, as you have done; and
when I thought fit, I tore them in pieces, and so
within ten days, I will do you. Go, get you down
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 151

to your den again; and with that he beat them all
the way thither. They lay, therefore, all day on
Saturday in a lamentable case, as before. Now,
when night was come, and when Mrs. Diffidence
and her husband, the Giant, were got to bed, they
began to renew their discourse of their prisoners;
and withal the old Giant wondered, that he could
neither by his blows nor his counsel bring them to
an end. And with that his wife replied, I fear,
said she, that they live in hope that some will come
to relieve them, or that they have picklocks about
them, by the means of which they hope to escape.
And sayest thou so, my dear? said the Giant; I
will, therefore, search them in the morning.

Well, on Saturday, about midnight, they began
to pray, and continued in prayer till almost break
of day. Now, a little before it was.day, good
Christian, as one half amazed, brake out in this
passionate speech: What a fool, quoth he, am I,
thus to lie in a dungeon, when I may walk at
liberty! I have a key in my bosom, called Promise,
that will open any lock in Doubting Castle. That
is good news, said Hopeful, good brother; pluck it
out of thy bosom, and try.

Then Christian pulled it out of his bosom and be-
gan to try at the dungeon door, whose bolt (as he
turned the key) gave back, and the door flew open
with ease, and Christian and Hopeful both came
out. Then he went to the outward door that leads
into the castle-yard, and, with his key, opened that
door also. After, he went to the iron gate, for that
152 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

must be opened too; but that lock went hard, yet
the key did open it. Then they thrust open the
gate to make their escape with speed, but that gate,
as it opened, made such a creaking, that it waked
Giant Despair, who, hastily rising to pursue his
prisoners, felt his limbs to fail, for his fits took him
again, so that he could by no means go after them.
Then they went on, and came to the King’s high-
way, and so were safe.

Now, when they were gone over the stile, they
began to contrive with themselves what they should
do at that stile, to prevent those that should come
after from falling into the hands of Giant Despair.
So they consented to erect there a pillar, and to en-
grave upon the side thereof this sentence—Over this
stile isthe way to Doubting Castle, which is kept by
Giant Despair, who despiseth the King of the Celes-
tial Country, and seeks to destroy his holy Pilgrims.
Many, therefore, that followed after, read what
was written, and escaped the danger.

They went then till they came to the Delectable
Mountains, which mountains belong to the Lord of
that hill of which we have spoken before; so they.
went up to the mountains, to behold the gardens
and orchards, the vineyards and fountains of waters;
where also they drank and washed themselves, and
did freely eat of the vineyards. Now there were on
the tops of these mountains shepherds feeding their
flocks, and they stood by the highway side. The
pilgrims, therefore, went to them, and, leaning
upon their staves (as is common with weary pil-


ATHEIST
154 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

grims, when they stand to talk with any by the
way), they asked, Whose Delectable Mountains are
these? and whose be the sheep that feed upon
them ?

SHEPHERD. These mountains are Immanuel’s
Land, and they are within sight of His city; and
the sheep also are His, and he laid down His life for
them.

CHRISTIAN. Is this the way to the Celestial City?

SHEPHERD. You are just in your way.

CHRISTIAN. How far is it thither?

SHEPHERD. Too far for any but those that shall
get thither indeed.

CuRISTIAN. Is the way safe or dangerous?

SHEPHERD. Safe for those for whom it is to be
safe; but the transgressors shall fall therein.

CHRISTIAN. Is there, in this place, any relief for
pilgrims that are weary and faint in the way? .

SHEPHERD. The Lord of these mountains hath
given us a charge not to be forgetful to entertain
strangers; therefore the good of the place is before
you. i

I saw also in my dream, that when the Shepherds
perceived that they were wayfaring men, they also
put questions to them, to which they made answer
as in other places; as, Whence came you? and,
How got you into the way? and, By what means
have you so persevered therein? For but few of
them that begin to come hither do show their faces
on these mountains. But when the Shepherds heard
their answers, being pleased therewith, they looked
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 155

very lovingly upon them, and said, Welcome to the
Delectable Mountains!

The Shepherds, I say, whose names were Knowl-
edge, Experience, Watchful, and Sincere, took them
by the hand, and had them to their tents, and made
them partake of that which was ready at present.
They said, moreover, We would that ye should stay
here a while, to be acquainted with us; and yet
more to solace yourselves with the good of these
Delectable Mountains. They then told them, that
they were content to stay; so they went to their
rest that night, because it was very late.

Then I saw in my dream, that in the morning the
Shepherds called up Christian and Hopeful to walk
with them upon the mountains; so they went forth
with them, and walked a while, having a pleasant
prospect on every side. ;

Then I saw that they had them to the top of an-
other mountain, and the name of that is Caution,
and bid them look afar off; which, when they did,
they perceived, as they thought, several men walk-
ing up and down among the tombs that were there;
and they perceived that the men were blind, because
they stumbled sometimes upon the tombs, and be-
cause they could not get out from among them.
Then said Christian, What means this?

THE SHEPHERDS. Did you not see a little below
these mountains a stile, that led into a meadow, on
the left hand of this way? They answered, Yes.
Then said the Shepherds, From that stile there goes
a path that leads directly to Doubting Castle, which
156 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

is kept by Giant Despair, and these, pointing to
them among the tombs, came once on pilgrimage,
as you do now, even till they came to that same
stile; and because the right way was rough in that
place, they chose to go out of it into that meadow,
and there were taken by Giant Despair and cast into
Doubting Castle; where, after they had been a
while kept in the dungeon, he at last did put out
their eyes, and led them among those tombs, where
he has left them to wander to this very day, that
the saying of the wise man might be fulfilled, He
that wandereth out of the way of understanding,
shall remain in the congregation of thedead. Then
Christian and Hopeful looked upon one another,
with tears gushing out, but yet said nothing to the
Shepherds.

Then I saw in my dream, that the Shepherds had
them to another place, in a bottom, where was a
door in the side of a hill, and they opened the door
and bid them lookin. They looked in, therefore,
and saw that within it was very dark and smoky;
they also thought that they heard there a rumbling
noise as of fire, and a cry of some tormented, and
that they smelt the scent of brimstone. Then said
Christian, What means this? The Shepherds told
them, This is a by-way to hell, a way that hypocrites
go in at; namely, such as sell their birthright, with
Hsau; such as sell their master, with Judas; such
as blaspheme the gospel, with Alexander; and that
lie and dissemble, with Ananias and Sapphira his
wife. Then said Hopeful to the Shepherds, I per-
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 157

ceive that these had on them, even every one, a
show of pilgrimage, as we have now; had they not?

SHEPHERD. Yes, and held it a long time too.

Horrrun. How far might they go in pilgrimage
in their day, since they notwithstanding were thus
miserably cast away?

SHEPHERD. Some further, and some not so far, as
these mountains.

Then said the pilgrims one to another, We have
need to cry to the Strong for strength.

SHEPHERD. Ay, and you will have need to use it,
when you have if, too.

By this time the pilgrims had a desire to go for-
ward, and the Shepherds a desire they should; so
they walked together towards the end of the moun-
tains. Then said the Shepherds one to another, Let
us here show to the pilgrims the gates of the Celes-
tial City, if they have skill to look through our
perspective glass. The pilgrims accepted the mo-
tion; so they had them to the top of a high hill,
called Clear, and gave them their glass to look.

Then they essayed to look, but the remembrance
of that last thing that the Shepherds had shown
them made their hands shake; by means of which
impediment they could not look steadily through
the glass; yet they thought they saw something
like the gate, and also some of the glory of the
place. Then they went away.

When they were about to depart, one of the
Shepherds gave them a note of the way. Another
of them bid them beware of the Flatterer. The




158 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

third bid them take heed that they sleep not upon
the Enchanied Ground. And the fourth bid them
God-speed. So I awoke from my dream.

And I slept, and dreamed again, and saw the
same two pilgrims going down the mountains along
the highway towards the city. Now, a little below
these mountains, on the left hand, lieth the coun-
try of Conceit; from which country there comes
into the way in which the pilgrims walked, a little
crooked lane. Here, therefore, they met with a
very brisk lad, that came out of that country; and
his name was Ignorance. So Christian asked him
from what parts he came, and whither he was going.

IqanoRANCcE. Sir, I was born in the country that
lieth off there a little on the left hand, and I am
going to the Celestial City.

CHRISTIAN. But how do you think to get in at the
gate? for you may find some difficulty there.

Ianorance. As other good people do.

CHRISTIAN. But what have you to show at that
gate, that may cause that the gate should be opened
to you?

Ianorance. I know my Lord’s will, and I have
been a good liver; I pay every man his own; I
pray, fast, pay tithes, and give alms, and have left
my country for whither I am going.

CHRISTIAN. But thou camest not in at the wicket-
gate that is at the head of this way; thou camest
in hither through that same crooked lane, and
therefore, I fear, however thou mayest think of
thyself, when the reckoning day shall come, thou
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 159

wilt have laid to thy charge that thou arta thief and
a robber, instead of getting admittance into the city.

IGNORANCE. Gentlemen, ye be utter strangers to
me, I know you not; be content to follow the re-
ligion of your country, and I will follow the religion
of mine. I hope all will be well. And as for the
gate that you talk of, all the world knows that that
is a great way off of our country. I cannot think
that any man inall our parts doth somuch as know
the way to it, nor need they matter whether they
do or no, since we have, as you see, a fine, pleasant
green lane, that comes down from our country, the
next way into the way.

When Christian saw that the man was wise in
his own conceit, he said to Hopeful, whisperingly,
There is more hope of afool than of him. And said,
moreover, When he that is a fool walketh by the
way, his wisdom faileth him, and he saith to every
one that he isa fool. What, shall we talk further
with him, or outgo him at present, and so leave
him to think of what he hath heard already, and
then stop again for him afterwards, and see if by
degrees we can do any good to him?

HoprEFuL. It is not good, I think, to say all to him
at once; let us pass him by, if you will, and talk to
him anon, even as he is able to bear it.

So they both went on, and Ignorance he came
after. Now when they had passed him a little way,
they entered into a very dark lane, where they met
a man whom seven devils had bound with seven
strong cords, and were carrying of him back to the
160 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

door that they saw on the side of the hill. Now
good Christian began to tremble, and so did Hope-
ful his companion; yet as the devils led away the
man, Christian looked to see if he knew him; and
he thought it might be one Turn-away, that dwelt
in the town of Apostasy. But he did not perfectly
see his face, for he did hang his head like a thief
that is found. But being once past, Hopeful looked
after him, and espied on his back a paper with this
inscription, Wanton professor and apostate.

Then said Christian to his fellow, Now I call to
remembrance that which was told me of a thing
that happened to a good man hereabout. The
name of the man was Little-faith, but a good man,
and he dwelt in the town of Sincere. The thing
was this: At the entering in at this passage, there
comes down from Broad-way Gate, a lane called
Dead Man’s Lane; so called because of the murders
that are commonly done there; and this Little-faith
going on pilgrimage, as we do now, chanced to sit
down there, and slept. Now there happened, at
that time, to come down the lane, from Broad-way
Gate, three sturdy rogues, and their names were
Faint-heart, Mistrust, and Guilt (three brothers),
and they, espying Little-faith, where he was, came
galloping up with speed. Now the good man was
just awake from his sleep, and was getting up to
goon his journey. So they came up all to him,
and with threatening language bid him stand. At
this Little-faith looked as white as a clout, and had
neither power to fight or fly. Then said Faint-


ie ears

AND IGNORANCE,

FUL,

2S NES

CHRISTIAN, HOPE
162 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

heart, Deliver thy purse. But he making no haste
to do it (for he was loath tc lose his money), Mis-
trust ran up to him, and thrusting his hand into his
pocket, pulled out thence a bag of silver. Then he
cried out, Thieves! Thieves! With that Guilt, with
a great club that was in his hand, struck Little-
faith on the head, and with that blow felled him flat
to the ground, where he lay bleeding as one that
would bleed todeath. All this while the thieves
stood by.. But, at last, they hearing that some
were upon the road, and fearing lest it should be
one Great-grace, that dwells in the city of Good-
confidence, they betook themselves to. their heels,
and left this good man to shift for himself. Now,
after a while, Little-faith came to himself, and
getting up made shift to scramble on his way.
This was the story.

Hoperuu. But did they take from him all that
ever he had?

Curistian. No; the place where his jewels were
they never ransacked, so those he kept still. But
as I was told, the good man was much afflicted for
his loss, for the thieves got most of his spending-
money. That which they got not were jewels; also
he had a little odd money left, but scarce enough
to bring him to his journey’s end; nay, if I was not
misinformed, he was forced to beg as he went, to
keep himself alive; for his jewels he might not sell.
But beg, and do what he could, he went (as we
say) with many a hungry belly the most part of
the rest of the way.
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 163

Hopervu.. But isit not a wonder they got not from
him his certificate, by which he was to receive his
admittance at the Celestial Gate?

CHRISTIAN. It isa wonder; but they got not that,
though they missed it not through any good cun-
ning of his; for he, being dismayed with their com-
ing upon him, had neither power nor skill to hide
anything; so it was more by good Providence than
by his endeavor, that they missed of that good thing.

Hopervuu. But it must needs be a comfort to him,
that they got not his jewels from him.

CurisTian. It might have been great comfort to
him, had he used it as he should; but they that
told me the story said, that he made but little use
of it all the rest of the way, and that because of the
dismay that he had in the taking away his money;
indeed, he forgot it a great part of the rest of his
journey; and besides, when at any timeit came into
his mind, and he began to be comforted therewith,
then would fresh thoughts of his loss come again
and those thoughts would swallow up all.

So they went on, and Ignorance followed. They
went then till they came at a place where they saw
a way put itself into their way, and seemed withal
to lie as straight as the way which they should go:
and here they knew not which of the two to take,
for both seemed straight before them; therefore,
here they stood still to consider. And as they were
thinking about the way, behold a man, black of
flesh, but covered with a very light robe, came to
them, and asked them why they stood there. They
164 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

answered they were going to the Celestial City, but
knew not which of these ways to take. Follow
me, said the man. it is thither that I am going.
So they followed him in the way that but now came
into the road, which by degrees turned, and turned
them so from the city that they desired to go to,
that, in little time, their faces were turned away
from it; yet they followed him. But by and by,
before they were aware, he led them both within
the compass of a net, in which they were both so
entangled, that they knew not what to do; and with
that the white robe fell off the black man’s back.
Then they saw where they were. Wherefore, there
they lay crying for some time, for they could not
get themselves out.

CHRISTIAN. Now do I see myself in error. Did
not the Shepherds bid us beware of the flatterers?
As is the-saying of the wise man, so we have found
it this day: A man that flattereth his neighbor,
spreadeth a net for his feet.

Hoperuu. They also gave us a note of directions
about the way, for our more sure finding thereof;
but therein we have also forgotten to read, and have
not kept ourselves from the paths of the destroyer.
Here David was wiser than we; for, saith he, Con-
cerning the works of men, by the word of thy lips,
I have kept me from the paths of the destroyer.

Thus they lay bewailing themselves in the net.
At last they espied a Shining One coming towards
them with a whip of small cord in his hand. When
he was come to the place where they were, he asked


CHRISTIAN SAID, OH! I SEE HIM AGAIN.
166 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

them whence they came, and what they did there.
They told him that they were poor pilgrims going
to Zion, but were led out of their way by a black
man, clothed in white, who bid us, said they, fol-
low him, for he was going thither too. Then said
he with the whip, It is Flatterer, a false apostle,
that hath transformed himself into an angel of
light. So he rent the net, and let the men out.
Then said he to them, Follow me, that I may set
you in your way again. So he led them back to
the way which they had left to follow the Flatterer.
Then he asked them, saying, Where did you lie the
last night? They said, With the Shepherds, upon
the Delectable Mountains. He asked them then, if
they had not of those Shepherds a note of direction
for the way. They answered, Yes. But did you,
said he, when you were at a stand, pluck out and
read your note? They answered, No. He asked
them, Why? They said, they forgot. He asked,
moreover, if the Shepherds did not bid them beware
of the Flatterer. They answered, Yes, but we did
not imagine, said they, that this fine-spoken man
had been he.

Then I saw in my dream, that he commanded
them to lie down; which, when they did, he chas-
tised them sore, to teach them the good way wherein
they should walk; and as hechastised them he said,
As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten; be zeal-
ous, therefore, and repent. This done, he bid them
goon their way, and take good heed to the other
directions of the Shepherds. So they thanked him
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 167

for all his kindness, and went softly along the right
way.

Now, after a while, they perceived, afar off, one
coming alone, all along the highway to meet them.
Then said Christian, Yonder is a man with his back
towards Zion, and he is coming to meet us.

Hoperut. I see him; let us take heed to ourselves
now, lest he should prove a flatterer also. So he
drew nearer and nearer, and at last came up unto
them. His name was Atheist, and he asked them
whither they were going.

CurIstIAN. We are going to Mount Zion.

Then Atheist fell into a very great laughter.

Curistian. What is the meaning of your laughter?

Atueist. I laugh to see what ignorant persons you
are, to take upon you so tedious a journey, and you
are like to have nothing but your travel. for your
pains.

Curist1iaN. Why, man, do you think we shall not
be received?

ATHEIST. Received! There is no such place as
you dream of in all this world.

CHRISTIAN. But there is in the world to come.

Atueist. When I was at home in mine own coun-
try, I heard as you now affirm, and from that hear-
ing went out to see, and have been seeking this city
this twenty years: but find no more of it than I did
the first day I set out.

Curistian. We have both heard and believe that
there is such a place to be found.

Atueist. Had not I, when at home, believed, I
168 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

had not come thus far to seek; but finding none
(and yet I should, had there been such a place to be
found, for I have gone to seek it further than you),
I am going back again, and will seek to refresh
myself with the things that I then cast away, for
hopes of that which, I now see, is not.

Then said Christian to Hopeful, Is it true which
this man hath said?

Hopreruu. Take heed, he is one of the flatterers;
remember what it hath cost us once already for our
hearkening to such kinds of fellows. What! no
Mount Zion? Did we not see, from the Delectable
Mountains, the gate of the city? Also, are we not
now to walk by faith? Let us go on, said Hopeful,
lest the man with the whip overtake us again.
You should have taught me that lesson, which I
will round you in the ears withal: Cease, my son,
to hear the instruction that causeth to err from the
words of knowledge. I say, my brother, cease to
hear him, and let us believe to the saving of the soul.

CuRIsTIAN. My brother, I did not put the question
to thee for that I doubted of the truth of our belief
myself, but to prove thee, and to fetch from thee a
fruit of the honesty of thy heart. As for this man,
I know that he is blinded by the god of this world.
Let thee and I go on, knowing that we have belief
of the truth, and no lie is of the truth.

Hoperuu. Now do I rejoice in hope of the glory
of God. So they turned away from the man; and
he, laughing at them, went his way.

I saw then in my dream, that they went until
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 169

they came into a certain country whose air naturally
tended to make one drowsy, if he came a stranger
into it. And here Hopeful began to be very dull
and heavy of sleep; wherefore he said unto Chris-
tian, I do now begin to grow so drowsy that I can
scarcely hold up mine eyes; let us lie down here
and take one nap.

CHRISTIAN. By no means; lest sleeping, we never
awake more.

Hoprrut. Why, my brother? Sleep is sweet to
the laboring man; we may be refreshed if we take
a nap.

CHRISTIAN. Do you not remember that one of the
Shepherds bid us beware of the Enchanted Ground?
He meant by that, that we should beware of sleep-
ing; therefore let us not sleep, as do others, but
let us watch and be sober.

Hoperut. I acknowledge myself in a fault; and
had I been here alone, I had by sleeping run the
danger of death. I see it is true that the wise man
saith, Two are better than one. Hitherto hath thy
company been my mercy, and thou shalt have a
good reward for thy labor.

CHRISTIAN. Now, then, to prevent drowsiness in
this place, let us fall into good discourse.

Hoperun. With all my heart.

CHRISTIAN. Where shall we begin?

Hopgerut. Where God began with us. But do
you begin, if you please.

CHRISTIAN. I will ask you a question. How came
you to think at first of so doing as you do now?
170 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

Hoperut. Do you mean, how came I at first to
look after the good of my soul?

CHRISTIAN. Yes, that is my meaning.

HOPEFUL. - I continued a great while in the delight
of those things which were seen and sold at our fair;
things which, I believe now, would have, had I
continued in them still, drowned me in perdition
and destruction.

CurisTIAN. What things are they?

Hoperut. All the treasures and riches of the
world. Also I delighted much in rioting, revelling,
drinking, swearing, lying, uncleanness, Sabbath-
breaking, and what not, that tended to destroy the
soul. But I found at last, by hearing and consider-
ing of things that are divine, which indeed I heard
of you, as also of beloved Faithful, that was put to
death for his faith and good living in Vanity Fair,
that the end of these things is death. And that
for these things’ sake cometh the wrath of God upon
the children of disobedience.

Curistian. And did you presently fall under the
power of this conviction?

Hopervut. No, I was not willing presently to know
the evil of sin, nor the damnation that follows upon
the commission of it; but endeavored, when my
mind at first began to be shaken with the Word,
to shut mine eyes against the light thereof.

CHRISTIAN. But what was the cause of your carry-
ing of it thus to the first workings of God’s blessed
Spirit upon you?

Hoperuu. The causes were, 1. I was ignorant
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. Pel

that this was the work of God upon me. I never
thought that, by awakenings for sin, God at first
begins the conversion of a sinner. 2. Sin was yet
very sweet to my flesh, and I was loath to leave it.
3. I could not tell how to part with mine old com-
panions, their presence and actions were so desirable
unto me. 4. The hours in which-convictions were
upon me were such troublesome and such heart-
affrighting hours, that I could not bear, no not so
much as the remembrance of them upon my heart.

CHRISTIAN. Then, as it seems, sometimes you got
rid of your trouble.

HoprFruL. Yes, verily, but it would come into my
mind again, and then I should be as bad, nay,
worse, than I was before.

CHRISTIAN. And could you at any time, with ease,
get off the guilt of sin, when by any of these ways
it came upon you?

Hoperuu. No, not I, for then they got faster hold
of my conscience; and then if I did but think of
going back to sin (though my mind was turned
against it), it would be double torment to me.

CHRISTIAN. And how did you do then?

. Hoperu. I thought I must endeavor to mind my
life; for else, thought I, I am sure to be damned.

Curistian. And did you endeavor to mend?

Hoperuu. Yes; and fled from not only my sins,
but sinful company too; and betook me to religious
duties, as prayer, reading, weeping for sin, speak-
ing truth to my neighbors, etc. These things did
I, with many others, too much here to relate.


172 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

CurisTiaAn. And did you think yourself well then?

HoprEFu. Yes, for a while; but at the last, my
trouble came tumbling upon me again, and that
over the neck of all my reformations.

CHRISTIAN. How came that about, since you were
now reformed?

Hoperuu. There were several things brought it
upon me, especially such sayings as these: All our
righteousnesses are as filthy rags. By the works
of the law shall no flesh be justified. When ye
shall have done all those things, say, We are un-
profitable; with many more such like. From
whence I began to reason with myself thus: If ALL
my righteousnesses are filthy rags; if, by the deeds
of the law, NO man can be justified; and if, when
we have done ALL, we are yet unprofitable, then it
is but a folly to think of heaven by the law. I
further thought thus: If a man runs a hundred
pounds into the shopkeeper’s debt, and after that
shall pay for all that he shall fetch; yet, if this old
debt stands still in the book uncrossed, for that the
shopkeeper may sue him, and cast him into prison
till he shall pay the debt.

CuRIsTIAN. How did you apply this to yourself?

Horerun. Why, I thought thus with myself: I ~
have, by my sins, run a great way into God’s book,
and that my now reforming will not pay off that
score; therefore I should think still, under all my
present amendments, But how shall I be freed from
that damnation that I have brought myself in
danger of, by my former transgressions?
} bf , SX
\ Yi ~ if PS
fille iif il

pe
U




THUS THEY GOT OVER.
174 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

CuRIsTIAN. A very good application; but, pray,
go on.

Hoprrun. Another thing that hath troubled me,
even since my late amendments, is that if I look
narrowly into the best of what I do now, I still see
sin, new sin, mixing itself with the best of that I
do; so that now I am forced to conclude, that not-
withstanding my former fond conceits of myself
and duties, I have committed sin enough in one day
to send me to hell, though my former life had been
faultless.

CHRISTIAN. And what did you do then?

Hoprruu. Do! I could not tell what to do until I
brake my mind to Faithful, for he and I were well
acquainted. And he told me, that unless I could
obtain the righteousness of a man that never had
sinned, neither mine own, nor all the righteousness
of the world, could save me.

Curistian. And did you think he spake true?

Hoperuu. Had he told me so when I was pleased
and satisfied with mine own amendment, I had called
him fool for his pains; but now, since I see mine own ©
infirmity, and the sin that cleaves to my best per-
formance, I have been forced to be of his opinion.

CHRISTIAN. But did you think, when at first he
suggested it to you, that there was such a man to
be found, of whom it might justly be said that he
never committed sin?

HopeFrvt. I must confess the words at first sounded
strangely, but after a little more talk and company
with him [ had a full conviction about it.
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 175

CHRISTIAN. And did you ask him what man this
was, and how you must be justified by him?

Hoperuu. Yes, and he told me it was the Lord
Jesus, that dwelieth on the right hand of the Most
High. And thus, said he, you must be justified by
Him, even by trusting to what He hath done by
Himself, in the days of His flesh, and suffered when
He did hang on the tree. LTasked him further, how
that man’s righteousness could be of that efficacy
to justify another before God? And he told me He
was the mighty God, and did what He did, and died
the death also, not for Himself, but forme; to whom
His doings, and the worthiness of them, should be
imputed, if I believed on Him.

CHRISTIAN. And what did you then?

Hoperuu. I made my objections against my be-
lieving, for that 1 thought He was not willing to
save me.

Curistian. And what said Faithful to you then?

HopreFruL. He bid me go to Him andsee. ThenI
said it was presumption; but he said, No, for I was
invited tocome. Then he gave me a book of Jesus,
His inditing, to encourage me the more freely to
come; and he said, concerning that book, that
every jot and tittle thereof stood firmer than heaven
and earth. Then I asked him, What I must do
when I came; and he told me, I must entreat upon
my knees, with all my heart and soul, the Father
to reveal Him tome. Then I asked him further,
how I must make my supplication to Him? And
he said, Go, and thou shalt find Him upon a mercy-
176 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

seat, where He sits all the year long, to give pardon
and forgiveness to them that come. I told him
that I knew not what to say when I came. And
he bid me say to this effect: God be merciful to me
a sinner, and make me to know and believe in Jesus
Christ; for I see, that if His righteousness had not
been, or I have not faith in that righteousness, I
am utterly cast away. Lord, I have heard that
Thou art a merciful God, and hast ordained that
Thy Son Jesus Christ should be the Saviour of the”
world; and moreover, that Thou art willing to be-
stow Him upon such a poor sinner as I am (and I
am a sinner indeed); Lord, take therefore this op-
portunity, and magnify Thy grace in the salvation
of my soul, through Thy Son Jesus Christ. Amen.

Curist1an. And did you do as you were bidden?

Hoperuu. Yes; over, and over, and over. Q

Curistian. And did the Father reveal his Son to
you?

Hoprruu. Not at the first, nor second, nor third,
nor fourth, nor fifth; no, nor at the sixth time
neither.

Curistian. What did you do then?

Hoprrun. What! why I could not tell what to do.

CurisT1an. Had you not thoughts of leaving off
praying?

Hoprrerun. Yes; an hundred times twice told.

Curistian. And what was the reason you did not?

HopeFut. I believed that that was true which had
been told me, to wit, that without the righteousness
of this Christ all the world could not save me; and


ONE OF THE KING’S TRUMPETERS.
178 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

therefore, thought I with myself, if I leave off I die,
and I can but die at the throne of grace. And
withal, this came into my mind: Though it tarry,
wait for it; because it will surely come, it will not
tarry. So I continued praying until the Father
showed me His Son.

Curistian. And how was He revealed unto you?

Hoperut. I did not see Him with my bodily eyes,
but with the eyes of my understanding; and thus
it was: One day I was very sad, I think sadder
than at any one time in my life, and this sadness
was through a fresh sight of the greatness and
vileness of mysins. And as I was then looking for
nothing but hell, and the everlasting damnation of
my soul, suddenly, as I thought, I saw the Lord
Jesus Christ look down from heaven upon me, and
saying, Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou
shalt be saved. But I replied, Lord, I am a great,
avery great sinner. And He answered, My grace
is sufficient for thee. Then I said, But, Lord, what
is believing? And then I saw from that saying,
He that cometh to Me shall never hunger, and he
that believeth on Me shall never thirst, that believ-
ing and coming was all one; and that he that came,
that is, ran out in his heart and affections after
salvation by Christ, he indeed believed in Christ.
Then the water stood in mine eyes, and I asked
further: But, Lord, may such a great sinner as I
am be indeed accepted of Thee, and be saved by
Thee? AndI heard Him say, And him that cometh
to me, I will in no wise cast out. Then I said, But
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 179

how, Lord, must I consider of Thee in my coming
to Thee, that my faith may be placed aright upon
Thee? Then He said, Christ Jesus came into the
world tosave sinners. He is the end of the law for
righteousness to every one that believeth. He died
for our sins, and rose again for our justification.
He loved us, and washed us from our sins in His
own blood. He is mediator betwixt God and us.
He ever liveth to make intercession for us. From
all which I gathered, that I must look for right-
eousness in His person, and for satisfaction for my
sins by His blood; that what He did in obedience to
His Father’s law, and in submitting to the penalty
thereof, was not for Himself, but for him that
will accept it for his salvation, and be thankful.
And now was my heart full of joy, mine eyes
full of tears, and mine affections running over
with love to the noes people, and ways of Jesus
Christ.

CHRISTIAN. This was a revelation of Christ to
your soul indeed; but tell me what effect this had
upon your spirit.

Hoperut. It made me see that all the world, not-
withstanding all the righteousness thereof, is in a
state of condemnation. It made me see that God
the Father, though He be just, can justly justify
the coming sinner. It made me greatly ashamed
of the vileness of my former life, and confounded
me with thesense of mine own ignorance; for there
never came thought into my heart before now that
showed me so the beauty of Jesus Christ. It made
180 THE. PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

me love a holy life, and long to do something for
the honor and glory of the name of the Lord Jesus;
yea, I thought that had I now a thousand gallons
of blood in my body, I could spill it all for the sake
of the Lord Jesus.

IT saw then in my dream that Hopeful looked
back and saw Ignorance, whom they had left be-
hind, coming after. Look, said he to Christian,
how far yonder youngster loitereth behind.

Curistran. Ay, ay, I see him; he careth not for
our company. j

Hoperu.. But I trow it would not have hurt him,
had he kept pace with us hitherto.

CHRISTIAN. That is true; but, I warrant you, he
thinketh otherwise.

Hoperuu. That, I think, he doth; but, however,
let us tarry for him. So they did.

Then Christian said to him, Come away, man;
why do you stay so behind?

IGNORANCE. IJ take my pleasure in walking alone,
even more a great deal than in company, unless I
like it the better.

Then said Christian to Hopeful (but softly), Did
I not tell you he cared not for our company? But,
however, said he, come up, and let us talk away
the time in this solitary place. Then directing his
speech to Ignorance, he said, Come, how do you?
How stands it between God and your soul now?

IGNORANCE. I hope well; for I am always full of
good motions, that come into my mind, to comfort
me as I walk.
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 181

So I saw in my dream that they went on apace
before, and Ignorance he came hobbling after.
Then said Christian to his companion, It pities me
much for this poor man; it will certainly go ill with
him at last.

Hoprruu. Alas! there are abundance in our town
in his condition, whole families, yea, whole streets,
and that of pilgrims, too; and if there be so many
in our parts, how many, think you, must there be
in the place where he was born?

CHRISTIAN. Indeed, the Word saith, He hath
blinded their eyes, lest they should see, etc. But
now we are by ourselves, what do you think of such
men? Have they at no time, think you, convic-
tions of sin, and so consequently fears that their
state is dangerous?

Now I saw in my dream, that by this time the
pilgrims were got over the Enchanted Ground and
entering into the country of Beulah, whose air was
very sweet and pleasant; the way lying directly
through it, they solaced themselves there for a
season. Yea, here they heard continually the sing-
ing of birds, and saw every day the flowers appear
in the earth, and heard the voice of the turtle in the
land. In this country the sun shineth. night and
day; wherefore this was beyond the Valley of the
Shadow of Death, and also out of the reach of Giant
Despair, neither could they from this place so much
as see Doubting Castle. Here they were within
sight of the city they were going to, also here met
them some of the inhabitants thereof; for in this
182 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

land the Shining Ones commonly walked, because
it was upon the borders of heaven. In this land
also, the contract between the bride and the bride-
groom was renewed; yea, here, As the bridegroom
rejoiceth over the bride, so did their God rejoice
over them. Here they had no want of corn and
wine; for in this place they met with abundance of
what they had sought for in all their pilgrimage.
Here they heard voices from out of the city, loud
voices, saying, Say ye to the daughter of Zion, Be-
hold, thy salvation cometh! Behold, his reward is
with him! Here all the inhabitants of the country
called them, The holy people, The Redeemed of the
Lord, Sought out, etc.

Now, as they walked in this land, they had more
rejoicing than in parts more remote from the king-
dom to which they were bound; and, drawing near
to the city, they had yet a more perfect view thereof.
It was builded of pearls and precious stones, also
the street thereof was paved with gold; so that by
reason of the natural glory of the city, and the
reflection of the sunbeams upon it, Christian with
desire fell sick; Hopeful also had a fit or two of the
same disease. Wherefore, here they lay by it a
while, crying out, because of their pangs, If ye find
my beloved, tell him that I am sick of love.

But, being a little strengthened, and better able
to bear their sickness, they walked on their way,
and came yet nearer and nearer, where were or-
chards, vineyards, and gardens, and their gates
opened into the highway. Now, as they came up
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 183

to these places, behold the gardener stood in the
way, to whom the Pilgrims said, Whose goodly
vineyards and gardens are these? He answered,
They are the King’s, and are planted here for His
own delight, and also for the solace of pilgrims.
So the gardener had them into the vineyards, and
bid them refresh themselves with the dainties. He
also showed them there the King’s walks, and the
arbors where He delighted to be; and here they
tarried and slept.

Now I beheld in my dream, that they talked more
in their sleep at this time than ever they did in all
their journey; and being in a muse thereabout, the
gardener said even to me, Wherefore musest thou
at the matter? It is the nature of the fruit of
the grapes of these vineyards to go down so sweet-
ly as to cause the lips of them that are asleep to
speak.

So I saw that when they awoke, they addressed
themselves to go up to the city; but, as I said, the
reflection of the sun upon the city—for the city was
pure gold—was so extremely glorious, that they
could not, as yet, with open face behold it, but
through an instrument made for that purpose. So
I saw, that as they went on, there met them two _
men, in raiment that shone like gold; also their
faces shone as the light.

These men asked the Pilgrims whence they came;
and they told them. They also asked them where
they had. lodged, what difficulties and dangers, what
comforts and pleasures, they had met in the way;
184 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

-and they told them. Then said the men that met
them, You have but two difficulties more to meet
with, and then you are in the city.

Christian and his companion asked the men to go
along with them; so they told them they would.
But, said they, you must obtain it by your own
faith. So I saw in my dream that they went on
together, until they came in sight of the gate.

Now, I further saw, that betwixt them and the
gate was a river, but there was no bridge to go
over: the river was very deep. At the sight,
therefore, of this river, the pilgrims were much
stunned; but the men that went with them said,
You must go through, or you cannot come at the
gate.

The pilgrims then began to inquire if there was
no other way to the gate; to which they answered,
Yes; but there hath not any, save two, to wit,
Enoch and Elijah, been permitted to tread that
path, since the foundation of the world, nor shall,
until the last trumpet shall sound. The pilgrims
then, especially Christian, began to despond in their
minds, and looked this way and that, but no way
could be found by them, by which they might escape
the river. Then they asked the men if the waters
were all of a depth, They said, No; yet they could
not help them in that case; for, said they, you shall
find it deeper or shallower as you believe in the King
of the place.

They then addressed themselves to the water;
and entering, Christian began to sink, and crying
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 185

out to his good friend Hopeful, he said, I sink in
deep waters; the billows go over my head, all His
waves go over me! Selah.

Then said the other, Be of good cheer, my brother,
I feel the bottom, and itis good. Then said Chris-
tian, Ah! my friend, the sorrows of death have
compassed me about; I shall not see the land that
flows with milk and honey; and with that a great
darkness and horror fell upon Christian, so that he
could not see before him. Also here he in great
measure lost his senses, so that he could neither re-
member, nor orderly talk of any of those sweet re-
freshments that he had met with in the way of his
pilgrimage. But all the words that he spake till
tended to discover that he had horror of mind, and
heart fears that he should die in that river, and
never obtain entrance in at the gate. Here also,
as they that stood by perceived, he was much in the
troublesome thoughts of the sins that he had com-
mitted, both since and before he began to be a pil-
grim. It was also observed that he was troubled
with apparitions of hobgoblins and evil spirits, for
ever and anon he would intimate so much by words.
Hopeful, therefore, here had much ado to keep his
brother’s head above water; yea, sometimes he
would be quite gone down, and then, ere a while,
he would rise up again half dead. Hopeful also
would endeavor to comfort him, saying, Brother, I
see the gate, and men standing by to receive us;
but Christian would answer, It is you, it is you
they wait for; you have been Hopeful ever since I
186 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

knew you. And so have you, said he to Christian.
Ah, brother! said he, surely if I was right he would
now rise to help me; but for my sins he hath brought
me into the snare, and hath left me. Then said
Hopeful, My brother, you have quite forgot the text
where it is said of the wicked, There are no bands
in their death, but their strength is firm. They are
not in trouble as other men, neither are they plagued
like other men. These troubles and distresses that
you go through in these waters are no sign that
God hath forsaken you; but are sent to try you,
whether you will call to mind that which hereto-
fore you have received of His goodness, and live
upon Him in your distresses.

Then I saw in my dream that Christian was ina
muse a while. To whom also Hopeful added this
word, Be of good cheer. Jesus Christ maketh thee
whole; and with that Christian brake out with a
loud voice, Oh! I see him again, and He tells me,
When thou passest through the waters, I will be
with thee; and through the rivers, they shall not
overflow thee. Then they both took courage, and
the enemy was after that as still as a stone, until
they were gone over. Christian therefore presently
found ground to stand upon, and so it followed that
the rest of the river was but shallow. Thus they
got over. Now, upon the bank of the river, on the
other side, they saw the two shining men again,
who there waited for them; wherefore, being come
out of the river, they saluted them, saying, We are
ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for those
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 187

that shall be heirs of salvation. Thus they went
along towards the gate.

Now you must note that the city stood upon a
mighty hill, but the pilgrims went up that hill with
ease, because they had these two men to lead them
up by the arms; also, they had left their mortal
garments behind them in the river, for though they
went in with them, they came out without them.
They, therefore, went up here with much agility
and speed, though the foundation upon which the
city was framed was higher than the clouds. They
therefore went up through the regions of the air,
sweetly talking as they went, being comforted, be-
cause they safely got over the river, and had such
glorious companions to attend them.

The talk they had with the Shining Ones was
about the glory of the place; who told them that
the beauty and glory of it wasinexpressible. There,
said they, is the Mount Zion, the heavenly Jeru-
salem, the innumerable company of angels, and the
spirits of just men made perfect. You are going
now, said they, to the Paradise of God, wherein you
shall see the tree of life, and eat of the never-fading
fruits thereof; and when you come there, you shall
have white robes given you, and your walk and talk
shall be every day with the King, even all the days
of eternity. There you shall not see again such
things as you saw when you were in the lower
region upon the earth, to wit, sorrow, sickness, -
affliction, and death, for the former things are
passed away. You are now going to Abraham, to
*

188 THE PILGRIMN’S PROGRESS.

Isaac, and Jacob, and to the prophets—men that
God hath taken away from the evil to come, and
that are now resting upon their beds, each one
walking in hisrighteousness. The man then asked,
What must we do in the holy place? To whom it
was answered, You must there receive the comforts
of all your toil, and have joy for all your sorrow;
you must reap what you have sown, even the fruit
of all your prayers, and tears, and sufferings for
the King bythe way. In that place you must wear
crowns of gold, and enjoy the perpetual sight and
vision of the Holy One, for there you shall see Him
as Heis. There also you shall serve Him continually
with praise, with shouting, and thanksgiving, whom
you desired to serve in the world, though with much
difficulty, because of the infirmity of your flesh.
There your eyes shall be delighted with seeing, and
your ears with hearing the pleasant voice of the
Mighty One. There you shall enjoy your friends
again, that are gone. thither before you; and there
you shall with joy receive even every one that fol-
lows into the holy place after you. There also shall
you be clothed with glory and majesty, and put
into an equipage fit to ride out with the King of
Glory. When He shall come with sound of trumpet
in the clouds, as upon the wings of the wind, you
shall come with Him; and when He shall sit upon
the throne of judgment, you shall sit by Him; yea,
and when He shall pass sentence upon all the work-
ers of iniquity, let them be angels or men, you also
shall have a voice in that judgment, because they.
a
2
°
&
n
<
Oo
fq
Oo
Zz
<
4
oO
Z
oO


190 THE PILGRIM’ S PROGRESS.

were His and your enemies. Also, when He shall
again return to the city, you shall go too, with
sound of trumpet, and be ever with Him.

While they were drawing toward the gate, a
company of the heavenly host came to meet them;
to whom it was said, by the other two Shining
Ones, These are the men that have loved our Lord
when they were in the world, and that have left all
for His holy name; and He hath sent us to fetch
them, that they may go in and look their Redeemer
in the face with joy. Then the heavenly host gave
a great shout, saying, Blessed are they which are
called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb.
Then there came out several of the King’s trumpet-
ers, clothed in white and shining raiment, who, with
melodious noises, made even the heavens to echo
with their sound. These trumpeters saluted Chris-
tian and his fellow with ten thousand welcomes
from the world; and this they did with shouting,
and sound of trumpet. |

Then I saw in my dream that the Shining Men
bid them call at the gate; the which, when they
did, some looked from above over the gate, to wit,
Enoch, Moses, and Elijah, etc., to whom it was
said, These pilgrims are come from the City of De-
struction, for the love that they bear to the King of
this place; and then the pilgrims gave in -unto
them each man his certificate, which they had re-
ceived in the beginning; those, therefore, were car-
ried in to the King, who, when: He had read them,’
said, Where are the men? To whom it was an-
THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 191

swered, They are standing without the gate. The
King then commanded to open the gate, That the
righteous nation, said He, which keepeth the truth
may enter in.

Now J saw in my dream that these two men went
in at the gate: and lo, as they entered, they were
transfigured, and they had raiment put on that
shone like gold. There was also that met them
with harps and crowns, and gave them to them—
the harps to praise withal, and the crowns in token
of honor. Then I heard in my dream that all the
bells in the city rang again for joy, and that it was
said unto them, ENTER YE INTO THE JOY OF YOUR
Lorp. I also heard the men themselves, that they
sang with a loud voice, saying, BLESSING, AND
HONOR, AND GLORY, AND POWER, BE UNTO HIM
THAT SITTETH UPON THE THRONE, AND UNTO THE
LAMB, FOR EVER AND EVER.

Now, just as the gates were opened to let in the
men, I looked in after them, and, behold, the City
shone like the sun; the streets also were paved with
gold, and in them walked many men, with crowns
on their heads, palms in their hands, and golden
harps to sing praises withal.

There were also of them that had wings, and they
answered one another without intermission, saying,
Holy, holy, holy is the Lord. And after that they
shut up the gates; which, when I had seen, I
wished myself-among them.

Now while I was gazing upon all these things, I
turned my head to look back, and saw Ignorance
192 THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS.

come up to the river side; but he soon got over, and
that without half that difficulty which the other
two men met with. For it happened that there
was then in that place, one Vain-hope a ferryman,
that with his boat helped him over; so he, as the
other I saw, did ascend the hill, to come up to the
gate, only he came alone; neither did any man meet
him with the least encouragement. When he was
come upto the gate, he looked up to the writing
that was above, and then began to knock, suppos-
ing that entrance should have been quickly admin-
istered to him; but he was asked by the men that
looked over the top of the gate, Whence came you?
and what would you have? He answered, I have
eat and drank in the presence of the King, and He
has taught in our streets. Then they asked him
for his certificate, that they might go in and show
it to the King; so he fumbled in his bosom for one,
and found none. Then they said, Have you none?
But the man answered never a word. So they told .
the King, but he would not come down to see him,
but commanded the two Shining Ones that con-
ducted Christian and Hopeful to the City, to go out
and take Ignorance, and bind -him hand and foot,
and have him away. Then they took him up, and
carried him through the air, to the door that I saw
in the side of the hill, and put him in there. Then
I saw that there was a way to hell, even from the
gates of heaven, as well as from the City of De-
struction. So I awoke, and behold it was a dream!
END.


231 207Â¥0